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Sample records for 25th 50th 75th

  1. [50th anniversary of cisplatin].

    PubMed

    Rancoule, Chloé; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Vallard, Alexis; Ben Mrad, Majed; Rehailia, Amel; Magné, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    We have just celebrated the 50th anniversary of cisplatin cytotoxic potential discovery. It is time to take stock… and it seems mainly positive. This drug, that revolutionized the treatment of many cancer types, continues to be the most widely prescribed chemotherapy. Despite significant toxicities, resistance mechanisms associated with treatment failures, and unresolved questions about its mechanism of action, the use of this cytotoxic agent remains unwavering. The interest concerning this "old" invincible drug has not yet abated. Indeed many research axes are in the news. New platinum salts agents are tested, new cisplatin formulations are developed to target tumor cells more efficiently, and new combinations are established to increase the cytotoxic potency of cisplatin or overcome the resistance mechanisms.

  2. 25th anniversary. Population education.

    PubMed

    Tagle Ra

    1998-01-01

    The Population Education Program's (POPED) main areas of concern are family life and responsible parenthood; gender and development; population and reproductive health; and population, resources and environment, and sustainable development. POPED celebrated its 25th year of existence during October 6-8, 1997, at a National Convention in Davao City organized by the Department of Education, Culture, and Sports (DECS) and its governmental partner agencies, including the Philippine Population Commission (POPCOM), the Department of Health (DOH), and others. The event was held to update POPED stakeholders on current trends and developments in the program and to strengthen existing partnerships between government organizations and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). The convention also allowed the sharing of 25 years of experience, a chance to generate recommendations for improving the program, and the opportunity to seek greater commitment to POPED's cause from all concerned parties. Rapid population growth and its consequences, integrating family planning into all fields of study, core messages, and the future lifestyle of Filipino youths are discussed.

  3. 75th Ranger Regiment Nutrition Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-15

    75th Ranger Regiment Nutrition Program LTC Russ Kotwal CPT Nick Barringer Medical Director Dietician SFC Cesar Veliz SFC Justin...Siple Medical Training Culinary Advisor Warfighter Nutrition Conference USUHS, Bethesda, MD 15 JULY 2008 Report Documentation Page Form...DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 75th Ranger Regiment Nutrition Program 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  4. 50th JANNAF Propulsion Meeting. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggleston, Debra S. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This volume, the first of two volumes, is a collection of 29 unclassified/unlimited-distribution papers which were presented at the 50th Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) Propulsion Meeting, held 11-13 July 2001 at the Salt Lake City Marriott Hotel in Salt Lake City, Utah.

  5. Apollo 11 25th Anniversary logo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This Official NASA commemorative logo marks the 25th anniversary of the first lunar landing. The design incorporates an eagle, from the original Apoll 11 crew insignia, descending toward the lunar surface with an olive branch, symbolizing America's peaceful mission in space. Alternative Headquarters number is 93-HC-312 or 93-H-336.

  6. ESO 50th Anniversary Gala Dinner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirey, R.

    2012-12-01

    To formally mark the 50th anniversary of the signing of the ESO Convention, a gala dinner was held in the Munich Residenz. A brief report of the event is presented and the speeches are reproduced. The speakers were the President of the Council, Xavier Barcons; the German Minister for Education and Research, Prof. Dr Annette Schavan; the Bavarian State Minister for Science, Research and the Arts, Dr Wolfgang Heubisch; physics Nobel Laureate, Brian Schmidt; the current Director General, Tim de Zeeuw and the Chilean Minister of Foreign Affairs, Alfredo Moreno Charme.

  7. The 50th Annual Maize Genetics Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Cone, Karen

    2014-03-26

    The 50th Annual Maize Genetics Conference was held February 27 - March 2, 2008 at the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel in Washington, D.C. As the golden anniversary of the Conference and coinciding with the release of a draft of the maize genome sequence, this was a special meeting. To publicize this unique occasion, meeting organizers hosted a press conference, which was attended by members of the press representing science and non-science publications, and an evening reception at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, where the draft sequence was announced and awards were presented to Dr. Mary Clutter and Senator Kit Bond to thank them for their outstanding contributions to maize genetics and genomics research. As usual, the Conference provided an invigorating forum for exchange of recent research results in many areas of maize genetics, e.g., cytogenetics, development, molecular genetics, transposable element biology, biochemical genetics, and genomics. Results were shared via both oral and poster presentations. Invited talks were given by four distinguished geneticists: Vicki Chandler, University of Arizona; John Doebley, University of Wisconsin; Susan Wessler, University of Georgia; and Richard Wilson, Washington University. There were 46 short talks and 241 poster presentations. The Conference was attended by over 500 participants. This included a large number of first-time participants in the meeting and an increasingly visible presence by individuals from underrepresented groups. Although we do not have concrete counts, there seem to be more African American, African and Hispanic/Latino attendees coming to the meeting than in years past. In addition, this meeting attracted many participants from outside the U.S. Student participation continues to be hallmark of the spirit of free exchange and cooperation characteristic of the maize genetics community. With the generous support provided by DOE, USDA NSF, and corporate/private donors, organizers were

  8. 25th Texas Symposium on Relativistic Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Frank M.; van Eldik, Christopher; Hofmann, Werner

    The 25th Texas Symposium on Relativistic Astrophysics (TEXAS 2010) was held in Heidelberg, Germany, during December, 6-10, 2010. More than 350 astrophysicists attended a very interesting meeting, designed to exchange ideas and results, and to discuss future directions in Relativistic Astrophysics. A wide range of scientific results were discussed in about 100 oral and about 200 poster contributions during nine parallel afternoon sessions and one highlight evening session. Further information, including the full program, can be found on the conference webpage: http://www.mpi-hd.mpg.de/texas2010/. The papers published here in these proceedings represent the contributions accepted for the parallel sessions and the main poster session at TEXAS 2010.

  9. EDITORIAL: Inverse Problems' 25th year of publication Inverse Problems' 25th year of publication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    2009 is Inverse Problems' 25th year of publication. In this quarter-century, the journal has established itself as the premier publication venue for inverse problems research. It has matured from its beginnings as a niche journal serving the emerging field of inverse and ill-posed problems to a monthly publication in 2009 covering all aspects of a well-established, vibrant and still-expanding subject. Along with its core readership of pure and applied mathematicians and physicists, Inverse Problems has become widely known across a broad range of researchers in areas such as geophysics, optics, radar, acoustics, communication theory, signal processing and medical imaging, amongst others. The journal's appeal to the inverse problems community and those researchers from the varied fields that encounter such problems can be attributed to our commitment to publishing only the very best papers, and to offering unique services to the community. Besides our regular research papers, which average a remarkably short five months from submission to electronic publication, we regularly publish heavily cited topical review papers and topic-specific special sections, which first appeared in 2004. These highly-downloaded invited articles focus on the latest developments and hot topics in all areas of inverse problems. No other journal in the field offers these features. I am very pleased to take Inverse Problems into its 25th year as Editor-in-Chief. The journal has an impressive tradition of scholarship, established at its inception by the founder and first Editor-in-Chief, Professor Pierre Sabatier. Professor Sabatier envisioned the journal in 1985 as providing a medium for publication of exemplary research in our intrinsically interdisciplinary field. I am glad to say that the support of our authors, readers, referees, Editors-in-Chief, Editorial Boards and Advisory Panels over the years, has resulted in Inverse Problems becoming the top publication in this field, publishing

  10. Hubble 25th Anniversary: NASA Social at Goddard

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope celebrated its 25th anniversary on April 24, 2015. To mark the occasion, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland -- home of Hubble operations -- host...

  11. 25th anniversary of the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goreglyad, I.; Shonin, G.

    1985-01-01

    Interviews with retired Major General of Aviation L. Goreglyad and pilot-cosmonaut with the 25th anniversary of the establishment of the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center. Major-General Goreglyad, one of the Center's founders, tells of its development. Major General Shonin, one of the first cosmonauts to train there, tells of the tests and procedures leading to his acceptance as a trainee.

  12. The 50(th) Anniversary IMIA History of Medical Informatics Project.

    PubMed

    Kulikowski, Casimir A

    2014-02-01

    At the meeting of the IMIA Board in 2009 in Hiroshima, it approved an IMIA 50th Anniversary History Project to produce a historical volume and other materials to commemorate the anniversary of the foundation of the predecessor of IMIA-the IFIP-TC4 in 1967. A Taskforce was organized under the direction of Casimir Kulikowski, then the VP for Services of IMIA, and since that time it has met regularly to plan and implement the 50th Anniversary History of IMIA as an edited volume, and as material available online on a Media Presentation Database. The IMIA Taskforce is gathering IMIA-related archival materials, currently accessible through a prototype media repository at Rutgers University in order to help those contributing to the book or writing their own recollections and histories. The materials will support a chronicle of the development and evolution of IMIA, its contributors, its sponsored events and publications, educational and other professional activities. During 2013 Workshops were held at the Prague EFMI-STC meeting in April and at the MEDINFO 2013 Congress in Copenhagen in August.

  13. The ACS-NUCL Division 50th Anniversary: Introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hobart, David E.

    2016-01-10

    The ACS Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology was initiated in 1955 as a subdivision of the Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry. Probationary divisional status was lifted in 1965. The Division’s first symposium was held in Denver in 1964 and it is fitting that we kicked-off the 50th Anniversary in Denver in the spring of 2015. Listed as a small ACS Division with only about 1,000 members, NUCL’s impact over the past fifty years has been remarkable. National ACS meetings have had many symposia sponsored or cosponsored by NUCL that included Nobel Laureates, U.S. Senators, other high-ranking officials and many students as speakers. The range of subjects has been exceptional as are the various prestigious awards established by the Division. Of major impact has been the past 30 years of the NUCL Nuclear Chemistry Summer Schools to help fill the void of qualified nuclear scientists and technicians. In celebrating the 50th Anniversary we honor the past, celebrate the present and shape the future of the Division and nuclear science and technology. To celebrate this auspicious occasion a commemorative lapel pin has been designed for distribution to NUCL Division members.

  14. Bumper 8 team gathers for 50th anniversary celebration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A 50th Anniversary Ceremony was held today in honor of the first rocket launch, called Bumper 8, from Pad 3 at Cape Canaveral on July 24, 1950. Members of the original Bumper 8 team reconvene at the ceremony with a Bumper 8 model rocket. The model was later launched as part of the festivities. Other activities included presentation of a Bumper Award to the Honorable George Kirkpatrick, State Senator, District 5; remarks by Center Director Roy Bridges and Commander, 45th Space Wing, Brig. Gen. Donald Pettit; and a reception at Hangar C. Bumper consisted of a German V-2 missile acting as the booster and a U.S. Army WAC Corporal rocket as the second stage. Since 1950 there have been a total of 3,245 launches from Cape Canaveral.

  15. Bumper 8 model rocket launched at 50th anniversary celebration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A 50th Anniversary Ceremony was held today in honor of the first rocket launch, called Bumper 8, from Pad 3 at Cape Canaveral on July 24, 1950. Among the activities was the launch of a Bumper 8 model rocket (seen here), presentation of a Bumper Award to the Honorable George Kirkpatrick, State Senator, District 5; remarks by Center Director Roy Bridges and Commander, 45th Space Wing, Brig. Gen. Donald Pettit; and a reception at Hangar C. Bumper consisted of a German V-2 missile acting as the booster and a U.S. Army WAC Corporal rocket as the second stage. Since 1950 there have been a total of 3,245 launches from Cape Canaveral.

  16. Proceedings of the 25th intersociety energy conversion engineering conference

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, P.A.; Schertz, W.W.; Till, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the 25th Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference. Volume 5 is organized under the following headings: Photovoltaics I, Photovoltaics II, Geothermal power, Thermochemical conversion of biomass, Energy from waste and biomass, Solar thermal systems for environmental applications, Solar thermal low temperature systems and components, Solar thermal high temperature systems and components, Wind systems, Space power sterling technology Stirling cooler developments, Stirling solar terrestrial I, Stirling solar terrestrial II, Stirling engine generator sets, Stirling models and simulations, Stirling engine analysis, Stirling models and simulations, Stirling engine analysis, Stirling engine loss understanding, Novel engine concepts, Coal conversion and utilization, Power cycles, MHD water propulsion I, Underwater vehicle powerplants - performance, MHD underwater propulsion II, Nuclear power, Update of advanced nuclear power reactor concepts.

  17. AFTI/F-16 50th flight team photo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    An early (1983) photograph of the AFTI F-16 team, commemorating the aircraft's 50th flight. It shows the initial configuration and paint finish of the AFTI F-16, as well as the forward mounted canards and the spin chute. During the 1980s and 1990s, NASA and the U.S. Air Force participated in a joint program to integrate and demonstrate new avionics technologies to improve close air support capabilities in next-generation aircraft. The testbed aircraft, seen here in flight over the desert at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was called the Advanced Fighter Technology Integration (AFTI) F-16. The tests demonstrated technologies to improve navigation and the pilot's ability to find and destroy enemy ground targets day or night, including adverse weather. The aircraft--an F-16A Fighting Falcon (Serial #75-0750)--underwent numerous modifications. A relatively low-cost testbed, it evaluated the feasability of advanced, intergrated-sensor, avionics, and flight control technologies. During the first phase of the AFTI/F-16 program, which began in 1983, the aircraft demonstrated voice-actuated commands, helmet-mounted sights, flat turns, and selective fuselage pointing using forward-mounted canards and a triplex digital flight control computer system. The second phase of research, which began in the summer of 1991, demonstrated advanced technologies and capabilities to find and destroy ground targets day or night, and in adverse weather while using maneuverability and speed at low altitude. This phase was known as the close air support and battlefield air interdiction (CAS/BAI) phase. Finally, the aircraft was used to assess the Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System (Auto - GCAS), a joint project with the Swedish Government. For these tests, the pilot flew the aircraft directly toward the ground, simulating a total loss of control. The GCAS was designed to take command in such emergencies and bring the aircraft back to level flight. The AFTI F

  18. The Journal's 75th Anniversary: Diamond or Fullerene?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Jerry A.

    1998-01-01

    Diamonds are usually associated with a 75th anniversary, but is a different carbon allotrope, fullerene, a more fitting symbol for the Journal? A diamond aptly describes your Journal as long lasting and multifaceted. Month after month and decade after decade readers have found the best ideas in chemical education in its pages. Whether it's through a novel demonstration to use tomorrow, better explanations of chemical phenomena, or a provocative opinion that makes you wrestle with the way you will structure all of your teaching, every issue of your Journal is a gem that connects you with the chemical education community. Each month, this valued companion invites you to play an active role in enhancing the connections by contributing your own best ideas.

  19. 75 FR 33995 - Safety Zone; Michigan Orthopaedic Society 50th Anniversary Fireworks, Lake Huron, Mackinac Island...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Michigan Orthopaedic Society 50th... Society 50th Anniversary Fireworks display, June 19, 2010. This temporary safety zone is necessary to... vessels during the setup and launching of fireworks in conjunction with the Michigan Orthopaedic...

  20. 50th Yearbook of the National Reading Conference (Scottsdale, Arizona, December 2000)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, James V., Ed.; Schallert, Diane L., Ed.; Fairbanks, Colleen M., Ed.; Worthy, Jo, Ed.; Maloch, Beth, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    At the 2000 conference in Scottsdale, Arizona, the National Reading Conference celebrated its 50th anniversary, and with this issue, the editors offer to the readership the "50th Yearbook" of the conference. This Yearbook begins with a preface and presents profiles of two awardees, Lee Gunderson and Michael Pressley. Included in this…

  1. 25th PolyMAC Conference, June 13-15, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.F.

    1995-06-01

    This document contains abstracts of reports presented at the 25th Annual Polymeric, Materials, Adhesives and Composites Symposium. Reports covered aging, testing and performance, and encapsulating materials.

  2. 76 FR 67799 - Pricing for the American Eagle 25th Anniversary Silver Coin Set

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Pricing for the American Eagle 25th Anniversary Silver Coin Set AGENCY: United States... price of the American Eagle 25th Anniversary Silver Coin Set. The coin set will be offered for sale at...

  3. Proceedings of the 25th Himalaya-Karakoram-Tibet Workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leech, Mary L.; Klemperer, Simon L.; Mooney, Walter D.

    2010-01-01

    For a quarter of a century the Himalayan-Karakoram-Tibet (HKT) Workshop has provided scientists studying the India-Asia collision system a wonderful opportunity for workshop-style discussion with colleagues working in this region. In 2010, HKT returns to North America for the first time since 1996. The 25th international workshop is held from June 7 to10 at San Francisco State University, California. The international community was invited to contribute scientific papers to the workshop, on all aspects of geoscience research in the geographic area of the Tibetan Plateau and its bounding ranges and basins, from basic mapping to geochemical and isotopic analyses to large-scale geophysical imaging experiments. In recognition of the involvement of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists in a wide range of these activities, the USGS agreed to publish the extended abstracts of the numerous components of HKT-25 as an online Open-File Report, thereby ensuring the wide availability and distribution of these abstracts, particularly in the HKT countries from which many active workers are precluded by cost from attending international meetings. In addition to the workshop characterized by contributed presentations, participants were invited to attend a pre-meeting field trip from the Coast Ranges to the Sierra Nevada, to allow the international group to consider how the tectonic elements of the Pacific margin compare to those of the Himalayan belt. Following the workshop, the National Science Foundation (NSF) sponsored a workshop on the 'Future directions for NSF-sponsored geoscience research in the Himalaya/Tibet' intended to provide NSF Program Directors with a clear statement and vision of community goals for the future, including the scientific progress we can expect if NSF continues its support of projects in this geographic region, and to identify which key geoscience problems and processes are best addressed in the Himalaya and Tibet, what key datasets are needed, and

  4. Proceedings of the 25th Annual Stirling Physics Meeting 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McVey, Michael

    1999-09-01

    The 25th Annual Stirling Physics meeting took place on Thursday 20 May on a warm sunny day when the country setting of Stirling Campus could be seen at its best. A total of 225 participants from all sectors of physics education attended. There was an opportunity to view and discuss with exhibitors a wide range of state-of-the-art equipment and teaching materials both before and after the meeting. The theme of the meeting was `Maintaining Standards'. Gemmel Millar, Scottish Branch Secretary acting as Chairperson for the morning session and in anticipation of the first speaker, wondered if a new unit qualification, the `Planck' might be introduced. Half units would then be `Short Plancks' and how many Short Plancks must there be in a unit? Great stuff. Scottish Qualifications Authority Hugh McGill began with a brief history and description of the Scottish Qualifications Authority. Born on 1 April 1997 (a light frisson of amusement swept through the audience) it was a unification between SEB and SCOTVEC and has a range of responsibilities covering schools, further and higher education. It oversees Standard and Higher grades, HNC and HND and SVQs, and it has 500 full-time employees as well as some 13500 appointees who act as examiners, assessors and verifiers etc, without whom its remit could not be carried out. The committee structure of the Board was outlined, one each for national and higher national qualifications and a third for Scottish vocational qualifications. These will be served by a proposed 19 Advisory Groups. The Science Advisory Group will be the key body for advising SQA on strategic developments to ensure that qualifications meet the needs of both client groups and end users. A consultation paper `Added Value To Learning' was referred to, in which all qualifications available in Scotland are given parity of esteem on a rising 11-point scale. Mr McGill stated that standards would be best maintained by ensuring continuity in procedures developed over

  5. Learning by Doing: Teaching Multimedia Journalism through Coverage of the 50th Anniversary of "Freedom Summer"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pain, Paromita; Masullo Chen, Gina; Campbell, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    In-depth qualitative interviews with participants of a high school journalism workshop reveal that immersing students in coverage of a historically important news event enhances learning of multimedia journalism. Study explores how using a team-based approach to coverage of the 50th anniversary of "Freedom Summer," a key event in…

  6. Frontiers: Research highlights 1946-1996 [50th Anniversary Edition. Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    This special edition of 'Frontiers' commemorates Argonne National Laboratory's 50th anniversary of service to science and society. America's first national laboratory, Argonne has been in the forefront of U.S. scientific and technological research from its beginning. Past accomplishments, current research, and future plans are highlighted.

  7. Frontiers: Research Highlights 1946-1996 [50th Anniversary Edition. Argonne National Laboratory

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1996-01-01

    This special edition of 'Frontiers' commemorates Argonne National Laboratory's 50th anniversary of service to science and society. America's first national laboratory, Argonne has been in the forefront of U.S. scientific and technological research from its beginning. Past accomplishments, current research, and future plans are highlighted.

  8. The State of the World's Children, 1996 (50th Anniversary Issue).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Children's Fund, New York, NY.

    This special issue of "The State of the World's Children" marks the 50th anniversary year of UNICEF and its work on behalf of children. Chapter 1 examines how wars and civil conflicts are taking an enormous toll on children. The chapter outlines a proposed anti-war agenda as a vital step to prevent and alleviate the suffering of children…

  9. National Association for Research in Science Teaching. 50th Annual Meeting, Abstracts of Presented Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helgeson, Stanley L., Ed.

    This publication provides abstracts of papers presented at the 50th annual meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching held in Cincinnati, Ohio March 22-24, 1977. The entries represent a wide range of topics in the field of science education. Topics include instruction, teacher education, learning, enrollments, concept…

  10. Digest of Education Statistics 2014, 50th Edition. NCES 2016-006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Thomas D.; de Brey, Cristobal; Dillow, Sally A.

    2016-01-01

    The 2014 edition of the "Digest of Education Statistics" is the 50th in a series of publications initiated in 1962. The Digest has been issued annually except for combined editions for the years 1977-78, 1983-84, and 1985-86. Its primary purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of American…

  11. 75 FR 76611 - 50th Anniversary of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-09

    ... for wild and beautiful places. As we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the establishment of the Arctic... protect their indigenous traditions and way of life. Today, the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge remains... the continued conservation of these wild lands. Our Nation's great outdoors, whether our...

  12. Celebrating Human Rights: The 50th Anniversary of the U.N. Declaration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphey, Carol E.

    1998-01-01

    Responds to the 50th anniversary of the United Nations' Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) by arguing that elementary school is an appropriate place to begin teaching about human rights. Outlines the rights enumerated in the UDHR, provides related activities for primary and intermediate grades, and suggests related Web sites. (DSK)

  13. Golden Girl: Mary Lai Reflects as She Marks Her 50th Anniversary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwanowski, Jay

    1996-01-01

    The career and administrative style of Mary M. Lai, who celebrates her 50th year as chief financial officer at Long Island University (New York), are discussed. Her perspectives on change in higher education and in the institution during that time, the administrator's role, current challenges for financial officers, and the college environment as…

  14. Injury risk curves for the WorldSID 50th male dummy.

    PubMed

    Petitjean, Audrey; Trosseille, Xavier; Praxl, Norbert; Hynd, David; Irwin, Annette

    2012-10-01

    The development of the WorldSID 50th percentile male dummy was initiated in 1997 by the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO/TC22/SC12/WG5) with the objective of developing a more biofidelic side impact dummy and supporting the adoption of a harmonised dummy into regulations. The dummy is currently under evaluation at the Working Party on Passive Safety (GRSP) in order to be included in the pole side impact global technical regulation (GTR). Injury risk curves dedicated to this dummy and built on behalf of ISO/TC22/SC12/WG6 were proposed in order to assess the occupant safety performance (Petitjean et al. 2009). At that time, there was no recommendation yet on the injury criteria and no consensus on the most accurate statistical method to be used. Since 2009, ISO/TC22/SC12/WG6 reached a consensus on the definition of guidelines to build injury risk curves, including the use of the survival analysis, the distribution assessment and quality checks. These guidelines were applied to the WorldSID 50th results published in 2009 in order to be able to provide a final set of injury risk curves recommended by ISO/TC22/SC12/WG6. The paper presents the different steps of the guidelines as well as the recommended injury risk curves dedicated to the WorldSID 50th for lateral shoulder load, thoracic rib deflection, abdomen rib deflection and pubic force.

  15. American Association of Community Colleges 75th Annual Convention: Clinton Presidential Address. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community Colleges, Washington, DC.

    This 60 minute videotape is a live satellite presentation of the American Association of Community Colleges' 75th Annual Convention in 1995. Speeches by former Secretary of Labor, Robert Reich, and former Secretary of Education, Richard Riley, are followed by the presidential address to community colleges by former President Bill Clinton. He…

  16. Editorial: Special issue highlighting research presented at the 25th IWGO Conference, Chicago 2014

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A joint international conference was held among corn insect entomologists from 15 countries at the Allerton Hotel, Chicago, Illinois on April 13-17, 2014. It combined the 25th IWGO (International Working Group on Ostrinia and other maize pests) Conference with the 4th Diabrotica Genetics Conference,...

  17. Symposium commemorating the 25th anniversary of the discovery of mendelevium

    SciTech Connect

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1980-01-01

    The Symposium honoring the 25th Anniversary of the discovery of mendelevium was held at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory on March 28, 1980. The following three papers were presented: Chemical Properties of Mendelevium; Nuclear Properties of Mendelevium; and Radioactive Decay of Md Isotopes. Besides these papers there were introductory remarks, reminiscences, and concluding remarks.

  18. Mosquito vector biology and control in Latin America - A 25th Symposium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 25th Annual Latin American Symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 81st Annual Meeting in New Orleans, LA, in March 2015. The principal objective, for the previous 24 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector control spec...

  19. Research activities on Antarctic middle atmosphere by JARE 25th team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirasawa, T.; Eiwasaka, Y. AFTANAKA, M. agfujii, r.0 typ; Eiwasaka, Y. AFTANAKA, M. agfujii, r.0 typ

    1985-01-01

    The Antarctic Middle Atmosphere (AMA)-Japan research project was set about by the JARE (Japan Antarctic Research Expedition) 23rd team in 1982, and since then the JARE-24th and JARE-25th teams have been continuing reseach on the Antarctic Middle Atmosphere. Results gained by JARE-25th team members who are now working at Syowa Station (69.99 deg S, 39.35 deg E), Antarctica are presented. In their activities satellite measurements (Exos-C) and rocket soundings are used. Three rockets of the S310 type were launched at Syowa Station (Geomagnetic Latitude = 69.9 deg S) for the purpose of directly observing the electron density, ionospheric temperature, auroral patterns and luminosity in situ. Vertical profiles of electron density and auroral emission 4278A measured by three rockets are compared.

  20. Alumni of High School Internship Program Return for 25th Anniversary to Inspire Current Students | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Building 549 auditorium is often packed with high school interns eager to hear a scientific lecture. On April 22, however, the room swelled with interns spanning a wider age range. At the 25th Werner H. Kirsten Student Intern Program (WHK SIP) Anniversary Symposium, incoming, current, and former interns gathered to celebrate the program, which has provided biomedical research experience for local high school seniors.

  1. In the 25th year of bioethics publishing: new challenges of the post-truth era.

    PubMed

    Jesani, Amar

    2017-01-01

    As IJME enters its 25th year of publication, all of us closely associated with the journal look back on this journey with a degree of satisfaction. Not only has the only bioethics journal published from India survived for 24 years, it has also produced some extraordinary successes. As you read this issue, we will be celebrating the 12th year of the biennial National Bioethics Conferences - the sixth NBC will take place in Pune from January 13 to 15, 2017.

  2. Hubble’s 25th Anniversary: A Quarter-Century of Discovery and Inspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straughn, Amber; Jirdeh, Hussein

    2015-01-01

    April 24, 2015 marks the 25th anniversary of the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope. In its quarter-century in orbit, the Hubble Space Telescope has transformed the way we understand the Universe, helped us find our place among the stars, and paved the way to incredible advancements in science and technology. NASA and ESA, including STScI and partners, will use the 25th anniversary of Hubble's launch as a unique opportunity to communicate to the widest possible audience the significance of the past quarter-century of discovery with the Hubble Space Telescope and to highlight that Hubble will continue to produce groundbreaking science results. We will enhance public understanding of Hubble's many contributions to the scientific world, and will capitalize on Hubble's cultural popularity by emphasizing its' successor, the James Webb Space Telescope. This poster highlights many of the upcoming opportunities to join in the anniversary activities, both in-person and online. Find out more at hubble25th.org and follow #Hubble25 on social media.

  3. American Diabetes Association - 75th Scientific Sessions (June 5-9, 2015 - Boston, Massachusetts, USA).

    PubMed

    Glessner, M

    2015-06-01

    The 75th American Diabetes Association (ADA) Scientific Sessions, brought together experts in the diabetes research field to hear hundreds of oral presentations and thousands of poster presentations discussing novel research findings related to diabetes, obesity, fatty liver disease and related medical conditions. A significant number of presentations considered experimental and investigational therapeutic candidates that will potentially aid in the fight against diabetes, which continues to be on the increase worldwide.

  4. 50th Annual Scientific Meeting of the British Society for Haematology.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Angela E

    2010-08-01

    The 50th Annual Scientific Meeting of the British Society for Haematology was notable, not only for its golden anniversary, but also because it coincided with the eruption of the Icelandic volcano, Eyjafjallajökull, and the ensuing travel chaos. In total, 28 speakers from overseas were unable to reach Edinburgh, including a significant number of British speakers who were stranded. However, owing to the superb efforts of the conference organisers and Edinburgh International Conference Centre staff, teleconferencing equipment was installed and all speakers were contacted and able to give their talks on time. The program, consisting of simultaneous sessions and plenary lectures, covered not only recent advances in clinical and laboratory hematology, but also reflected on the contribution of British hematology to the international arena over the past 50 years.

  5. Philadelphia Chromosome Symposium: commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the discovery of the Ph chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, H. Sharat; Heistekamp, Nora C.; Hungerford, Alice; Morrissette, Jennifer J.D.; Nowell, Peter C.; Rowley, Janet D.; Testa, Joseph R.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the ‘Philadelphia Chromosome Symposium: Past, Present and Future’, held September 28, 2010, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the discovery of the Philadelphia chromosome. The symposium sessions included presentations by investigators who made seminal contributions concerning the discovery and molecular characterization of the Ph chromosome and others who developed a highly successful therapy based on the specific molecular alteration observed in chronic myelogenous leukemia. Additional presentations highlighted future opportunities for the design of molecularly targeted therapies for various types of cancer. Also included here are reminiscences connected with the discovery of the Ph chromosome by David Hungerford and Peter Nowell, the discovery that the abnormality arises from a chromosomal translocation, by Janet Rowley, and the cloning of the 9;22 translocation breakpoints by Nora Heisterkamp, John Groffen and colleagues. PMID:21536234

  6. Development of a simplified finite element model of the 50th percentile male occupant lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Doron; Moreno, Daniel P; Stitzel, Joel D; Gayzik, F Scott

    2014-01-01

    A simplified lower extremity model was developed using the geometry from the Global Human Body Models Consortium (GHBMC) 50th percentile male occupant model v4.1.1 (M50) as a base. This simplified model contains 31.4x103 elements and has structures that represent bone (assumed rigid) and soft tissue. This element total is substantially reduced compared to 117.7x103 elements in the original M50 lower extremity. The purpose of this simplified computational model is to output rapid kinematic and kinetic data when detailed structural response or injury prediction data is not required. The development process included evaluating the effects of element size, material properties, and contact definitions on total run time and response. Two simulations were performed to analyze this model; a 4.9 m/s knee bolster impact and a 6.9 m/s lateral knee impact using LS-DYNA R6.1.1. The 40 ms knee bolster impact and lateral knee impact tests required 5 and 7 minutes to run, respectively on 4 cores. The original detailed M50 lower extremity model required 94 and 112 minutes to run the same boundary conditions, on the same hardware, representing a reduction in run time of on average 94%. A quantitative comparison was made by comparing the peak force of the impacts between the two models. This simplified leg model will become a component in a simplified full body model of the seated, 50th percentile male occupant. The significantly reduced run time will be valuable for parametric studies with a full body finite element model.

  7. Predictions of the onset of mini ice age in the 25th solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajiv

    2016-07-01

    Predictions of the ir-regularty in the 11 year heartbeat of the sun due to asyncronous of the two layered dynamo effect would result in mini ice age as in the Maunder minimum.The onset of this event is expected in the begining of 25th solar cycle and would go to its maximum in the 26th solar cycle.The minimum temperature is expected in 2028 due to the fall of solar activity by 60 % termed as solar hibernation.The predictions are based on the observations obtained by the Royal Greenwich observatory since 1874. Keywords: Dynamo effect,munder minimum,Solar hybernation

  8. 50th anniversary of the discovery of ibuprofen: an interview with Dr Stewart Adams.

    PubMed

    Halford, Gayle M; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Watson, Steve P

    2012-01-01

    2011 marks the 50th anniversary of the discovery of ibuprofen. This article is a focus on the personal reflections and career of Dr Stewart Adams OBE, the scientist whose research lead to the discovery of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor. When Dr Adams discovered ibuprofen, he was working as a pharmacologist in the Research Department for the Boots Pure Drug Company Ltd. Dr Adams was assigned to work on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and chose in 1953 to search for a drug that would be effective in RA but would not be a corticosteroid. He was one of the first workers in this field that later became known as NSAIDs (Non-Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs). In 1961, Dr Adams with John Nicholson, the organic chemist, filed a patent for the compound 2-(4-isobutylphenyl) propionic acid, later to become one of the most successful NSAIDs in the modern world, ibuprofen. In this article, Dr Adams gives his modest insight into the early stages and initial observations which led to this world-wide success.

  9. 50th anniversary of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine--a historical overview.

    PubMed

    Körber, Friedrich; Plebani, Mario

    2013-01-01

    In the early 1960s, Joachim Brugsch, one of the founders of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM) (then Zeitschrift für Klinische Chemie), had the idea to found a journal in the upcoming field of clinical chemistry. He approached Ernst Schütte, who was associated with the De Gruyter publishing house through another journal, to participate, and Schütte thus became the second founder of this Journal. The aim was to create a vehicle allowing the experts to express their opinions and raise their voices more clearly than they could in a journal that publishes only original experimental papers, a laborious and difficult, but important endeavor, as the profession of clinical chemistry was still in the early stages of development at this time. The first issue of this Journal was published in early 1963, and today, we are proud to celebrate the 50th anniversary of CCLM. This review describes the development of this Journal in light of the political situation of the time when it was founded, the situation of the publisher Walter De Gruyter after the erection of the Berlin Wall, and the development of clinical chemistry, and later on, laboratory medicine as a well-acknowledged discipline and profession.

  10. Marshall Space Flight Center 1960-1985: 25th anniversary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The Marshall Space FLight Center marks its 25th aniversary with a record of notable achievements. These accomplishments are the essence of the Marshall Center's history. Behind the scenes of the space launches and missions, however, lies the story of challenges faced and problems solved. The highlights of that story are presented. The story is organized not as a straight chronology but as three parallel reviews of the major assignments: propulsion systems and launch vehicles, space science research and technology, and manned space systems. The general goals were to reach space, to know and understand the space environment, and to inhabit and utilize space for the benefit of mankind. Also included is a chronology of major events, presented as a fold-out chart for ready reference.

  11. [The Citizen Constitution and the 25th anniversary of the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS)].

    PubMed

    Paim, Jairnilson Silva

    2013-10-01

    This article, celebrating the 25th anniversary of Brazil's 1988 Constitution, aims to review the country's social policy development, discuss political projects, and analyze challenges for the sustainability of the Unified National Health System (SUS). Based on public policymaking studies, the article revisits the origins of liberal social policy, focused on social assistance, and analyzes the hegemony of U.S. policies targeting poverty and their repercussions for universal policies. After identifying the formulation of political projects in Brazil's democratic transition, it discusses their implications during the various Administrations since 1988, along with the difficulties faced by the National Health System. The article concludes that the political forces occupying government in the last two decades have failed to present a project for the country on the same level as those who drafted the Citizen Constitution.

  12. The Daylight Bolide of 1996 April 25th , over Mt. Bruce, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, G.; McBeath, A.

    On Thursday, 1996 April 25th (ANZAC Day in New Zealand) a bright daylight bolide with possible -22m end point, was seen from Newtown, Wellington, New Zealand at 02h20m12s. Its end-point altitude was calculated to be app. 15-20km over Mt. Bruce, some 80km NE of Wellington. A smoky train, initially 42deg long, was visible to the naked eye for 28 minutes afterwards. Sonics were heard by the New Zealand author, around 265s after the end point, suggesting a direct-line distance of 88km from the author's location. The impact point was probably several kilometers off Foxton Beach in the Tasman Sea. The bolide passed about 5deg above the first quarter Moon, and two photographs were secured, showing how the train began to drift, ultimately app. 17deg, to the south, before dissipating.

  13. Current German Laser and Quantum Optics Research Reviewed at the 50th Annual Meeting of the Physikalische Gesellschaft.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-23

    sessions) RESEARCH REVIEWED AT THE 50th ANNUAL . Optical chaos and photon statistics MEETINC OF THE PHYSIKALISCHE GESELL - * Industrial reports and...Ierl-). He recounted work with his col- am sure they were) then it emerges that ie.igue- In which they tested the posst- the most active subfield of

  14. Symposium--Perspectives on Motivation for Second Language Learning on the 50th Anniversary of Gardner & Lambert (1959)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacIntyre, Peter

    2010-01-01

    With the 50th anniversary of Robert C. Gardner and Wallace Lambert's seminal paper "Motivational variables in second language acquisition" (Gardner & Lambert 1959), we paused to reflect on the contributions the work has inspired and the state of the art in the study of motivation research.

  15. 3 CFR 8613 - Proclamation 8613 of December 6, 2010. 50th Anniversary of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Anniversary of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge 8613 Proclamation 8613 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8613 of December 6, 2010 Proc. 8613 50th Anniversary of the Arctic National Wildlife RefugeBy the... anniversary of the establishment of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, we remember......

  16. 75 FR 29658 - Safety Zone; America's Discount Tire 50th Anniversary, Fireworks Display, South Lake Tahoe, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-27

    ..., Fireworks Display, South Lake Tahoe, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The... support of America's Discount Tire 50th Anniversary Fireworks Display. This safety zone is established to... fireworks displays, the safety zone is necessary to provide for the safety of event participants,...

  17. Approximation of periodicity in sunspot formation of and prediction of the 25th cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshchina, E. M.; Sarychev, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    The empirical parameters of functions approximating solar activity cycles 8-23 are used. These parameters show the position of the cycle on the time axis (the start time) and its shape, which is characterized by the extension along the time axes and activity index. A statistical connections was found between two shape parameters of the cycle (the so-called Waldmeier effect) and between the extension of the cycle growth branch and the start time of the following cycle. A connection between the parameters of the given and future cycles has been obtained for a function approximating the "secular" variations in the cycle amplitude. The aforementioned empirical relationships can be stated in the form of three equations that contain the parameters of the current and future cycles. Solving this system, we obtain estimates for three parameters of the function approximating the next cycle. For the 25th cycle, it was found that the maximum of the smoothed Wolf number 116 is expected in March/April 2026; the duration of the activity growth branch is 4.16 years.

  18. Proceedings of the 25th Seismic Research Review -- Nuclear Explosion Monitoring: Building the Knowledge Base

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, Francesca C.; Mendius, E. Louise

    2003-09-23

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 25th Seismic Research Review -- Nuclear Explosion Monitoring: Building the Knowledge Base, held 23-25 September, 2003 in Tucson, Arizona. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  19. The 75th Anniversary of Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport: An Analysis of Status and Contributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardinal, Bradley J.; Thomas, Jerry R.

    2005-01-01

    In celebration of the 75th anniversary of The Research Quarterly/Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport (RQ/RQES) an analysis was conducted comparing RQ/RQES to numerous other journals in the field with regard to impact factors and citation rates. A series of analyses was conducted from the first publication of RQ/RQES in 1930 through this 75th…

  20. The 50th Anniversary of the First International Conference on Permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J.

    2013-12-01

    This year marks the 50th anniversary of the First International Conference on Permafrost (ICOP) that was held at Purdue University on 11-15 November 1963. The conference was a historic event in that it brought together for the first time the leading researchers and practitioners from North America and other countries that had diverse interests and activities in the study and applications of perennially frozen ground, cold regions engineering and related laboratory investigations. The 285 registered participants represented engineers, researchers, manufacturers and builders from the USA (231), Canada (42), the USSR (5), Sweden (3) and Argentina, Austria, Great Britain, Japan, Norway, Poland, Switzerland, and West Germany. The conference was organized by the Building Research Advisory Board of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council (NAS-NRC). The carefully edited volume, published in 1966 by the NAS, is considered to be the first multi-national, English-language collection of papers devoted entirely to permafrost topics. The 100 published papers followed closely the actual conference venue and panel discussions: soils and vegetation (9), massive ground ice (10), geomorphology (16), phase equilibrium and transition (8), thermal aspects (8), physico-mechanical properties (7), exploration and site selection (11), sanitary and hydraulic engineering (14), and earthwork and foundations (17). This 1963 Purdue conference essentially broke the 'ice' between East and West permafrost researchers and set the stage for the Second ICOP that was held in 1973 in Yakutsk, Siberia, and represented the first large international conference held in the restricted area of Siberia. All subsequent conferences maintained the interdisciplinary principles set forth at Purdue: two more in the United States (Fairbanks 1983, 2008), two in Canada (Edmonton 1978, Yellowknife 1998), and one in Trondheim, Norway (1988), Beijing, China (1993), and Zurich, Switzerland (2003

  1. NRAO Salutes Past, Looks to Future In 50th-Anniversary Science Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-06-01

    Radio telescopes now in operation or under construction will be indispensible to scientists wrestling with the big, unanswered questions of 21st-Century astrophysics. That was the conclusion of a wide-ranging scientific meeting held in Charlottesville, Virginia, June 18-21, to mark the 50th anniversary of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). 1957 Dedication Dedication of NRAO, 17 October 1957. Left to right: R.M. Emberson, L.V. Berkner, G.A. Nay, J.W. Findlay (seated in front of 140ft telescope model), N.L. Ashton, D.S. Heeschen, H. Hockenberry. CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on Image for Larger File ALMA Artist's conception of completed ALMA. CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/ESO Click on Image for Larger File (2.4 MB) Nearly 200 scientists from around the world heard presentations about the frontiers of astrophysics and how the challenges at those frontiers will be met. In specialties as disparate as seeking the nature of the mysterious Dark Energy that is speeding the Universe's expansion to unraveling the details of how stars and planets are formed, more than 70 presenters looked toward future research breakthroughs. "NRAO's telescopes have made landmark contributions to the vast explosion of astronomical knowledge of the past half- century, and we look eagerly to making even more important contributions in the coming decades," said Fred K.Y. Lo, NRAO's director. Over the four days of the meeting, discussions ranged from recollections of radio astronomy's pioneering days of vacuum-tube equipment and paper chart recorders to the design of telescopes that will produce amounts of data that will strain today's computers. Presenters pointed out that, in the coming decades, radio telescope observations will advance not only astronomy but also fields of basic physics such as gravitational radiation, particle physics, and the fundamental physical constants. "This meeting provided a great overview of where astrophysics stands today and where the challenges and opportunities of

  2. A golden anniversary: highlights of the 50th annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    McVie, Gordon; Nailor, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    The 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology showed a shift in the culture of cancer research, moving towards multidisciplinary, integrated, and patient-centric work. Hormone-sensitive cancers were particularly highlighted at this meeting, and impressive strides were made in the previously underserved areas of the lung and thyroid cancer. Interestingly, immunotherapy was one of the strongest themes to emerge. PMID:25075218

  3. Commemorating Toxicology at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences on the Occasion of Its 50th Anniversary

    PubMed Central

    Bucher, John R.; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: In 1978, the National Toxicology Program (NTP) was established and headquartered at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. On the occasion of the 50th Anniversary of the NIEHS, this article documents some of the historical and current NTP programs and scientific advances that have been made possible through this long-standing relationship. PMID:27801649

  4. 77 FR 76411 - Security Zone; 25th Annual North American International Auto Show, Detroit River, Detroit, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... [Docket No. USCG-2012-1077] RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zone; 25th Annual North American International Auto... docket USCG-2012-1077. To view documents mentioned in this preamble as being available in the docket, go...; Department of Homeland Security Delegation No. 0170.1. 0 2. Add Sec. 165.T09-1077 to read as follows:...

  5. The Prospects for Educational Planning. A Workshop Organised by IIEP on the Occasion of Its 25th Anniversary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caillods, Francoise, Ed.

    In late 1988, on the occasion of its 25th anniversary celebration, the International Institute for Educational Planning organized an international workshop to review the major problems faced by education today and to consider the future of educational planning worldwide. The workshop brought together researchers, planners, and specialists from all…

  6. Reflections on the 25th Anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court's Decision in Board of Education v. Rowley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yell, Mitchell L.; Katsiyannis, Antonis; Hazelkorn, Michael

    2007-01-01

    June 22, 2007, was the 25th anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Board of Education of the Hendrick Hudson Central School District v. Rowley (hereafter Rowley; 1982). In Rowley, the Supreme Court interpreted congressional intent in requiring that public schools provide a free appropriate public education (FAPE) to students with…

  7. PREFACE: 25th International Congress on Condition Monitoring and Diagnostic Engineering (COMADEM 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Andrew; Mishra, Rakesh; Gu, Fengshou; Rao, Raj B. K. N.

    2012-05-01

    The proactive multidisciplinary conceptual philosophy of Condition Monitoring and Diagnostic Engineering Management (COMADEM) was conceived and has been nurtured, developed and sustained since 1988. Since then, it is gratifying to note that the condition monitoring, diagnostic and prognostic community worldwide (representing industrialists, academics, research and development organizations, professional/private establishments and many hardware/software vending organizations) has warmly welcomed and supported this venture. As is evidenced, many have reaped (and are reaping) the benefits of COMADEM interdiscipline through continuous knowledge discovery, generation and dissemination. We are now proud to celebrate the 25th Annual Event (Silver Jubilee) in Huddersfield, the most beautiful part of the United Kingdom. The theme of this Congress is 'Sustained Prosperity through Proactive Monitoring, Diagnosis, Prognosis and Management'. This proceedings is enriched by contributions from many keynote experts representing many industry and academic establishments worldwide. Authors from more than 30 different countries have pooled their rich multidisciplinary up-to-date knowledge, in order to share their invaluable experience with the COMADEM community. In this proceedings, the readers will find more than 120 refereed papers encompassing a number of topical areas of interest relating to the theme of the congress. The proceedings of COMADEM 2012 will appear in the Open Access Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS), which is part of the IOP Conference Series. All papers published in the IOP Conference Series are fully citable and upon publication will be free to download. We would like to express our deep gratitude to all the keynote speakers, authors, referees, exhibitors, Technical Co-Sponsoring Organizations, Gold Sponsors, IOP Publishers, COMADEM 2012 organizing committee members, delegates and many others on whom the success of this prestigious event depends

  8. PREFACE: Part II of the Proceedings of the 25th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kes, Peter; Jochemsen, Reyer

    2009-03-01

    This Issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series forms Part II of the Proceedings of the 25th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics (LT25) held in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 6-13 August 2008. Part II contains the papers of short oral and poster presentations. In addition, it provides general information about the LT25 conference, such as a Report from the Organizers, an Activity Report to the IUPAP of the C5 Chairs, an overview of Committees, Sponsors and Exhibitors, and some Conference Statistics. Part I of the Proceedings of LT25 is a special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. It contains the majority of the special invited lectures, such as the London Prize Lectures, the IUPAP Young Scientist Award Lectures, the Plenary and Half Plenary and Public Lectures, and the Historical Lectures presented at the conference excursion to Leiden. The JPCM LT25 special issue is available for free for a period of one year from publication (Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter). To ensure the high publication standard mandated by Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter and Journal of Physics: Conference Series, every paper was reviewed by at least one referee before it was accepted for publication. The Editors are indebted to many colleagues for invaluable assistance in the preparation and with the reviewing of the 900 papers appearing in Parts I and II of these Proceedings. In particular, we like to thank Carlo Beenakker, Jeroen van den Brink, Hans Brom, Jos de Jongh, Horst Rogalla, and Fons de Waele. Guest Editors Peter Kes and Reijer Jochemsen Leiden University, The Netherlands Conference logo

  9. 50 Div in Normandy: A Critical Analysis of the British 50th (Northumbrian) Division on D-Day and in the Battle of Normandy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-14

    Breakout, Market Garden , and Disbandment ......................................................100 Other Assessments...Breakout, Market Garden , and Disbandment Following the breakout from Normandy, the 50th Division fought the retreating German army in a series of small...battles across France and into Belgium. After the failure of Operation Market Garden in mid-September, 1944, the 50th held a position in Holland

  10. An Examination of Growth in Vocabulary and Phonological Awareness in Early Childhood: An Individual Growth Model Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassano, Christina Marie

    2013-01-01

    The present study used individual growth modeling to examine the role of specific forms (i.e., receptive, expressive, and definitional vocabulary and grammatical skill) and levels of oral vocabulary skill (i.e., 25th, 50th, or 75th percentile) in phonological awareness growth during the preschool and kindergarten years. Sixty-one,…

  11. Echo-enabled harmonics up to the 75th order from precisely tailored electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemsing, E.; Dunning, M.; Garcia, B.; Hast, C.; Raubenheimer, T.; Stupakov, G.; Xiang, D.

    2016-08-01

    The production of coherent radiation at ever shorter wavelengths has been a long-standing challenge since the invention of lasers and the subsequent demonstration of frequency doubling. Modern X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) use relativistic electrons to produce intense X-ray pulses on few-femtosecond timescales. However, the shot noise that seeds the amplification produces pulses with a noisy spectrum and limited temporal coherence. To produce stable transform-limited pulses, a seeding scheme called echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) has been proposed, which harnesses the highly nonlinear phase mixing of the celebrated echo phenomenon to generate coherent harmonic density modulations in the electron beam with conventional lasers. Here, we report on a demonstration of EEHG up to the 75th harmonic, where 32 nm light is produced from a 2,400 nm laser. We also demonstrate that individual harmonic amplitudes are controlled by simple adjustment of the phase mixing. Results show the potential of laser-based manipulations to achieve precise control over the coherent spectrum in future X-ray FELs for new science.

  12. Echo-enabled harmonics up to the 75th order from precisely tailored electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hemsing, E.; Dunning, M.; Garcia, B.; Hast, C.; Raubenheimer, T.; Stupakov, G.; Xiang, D.

    2016-06-06

    The production of coherent radiation at ever shorter wavelengths has been a long-standing challenge since the invention of lasers1, 2 and the subsequent demonstration of frequency doubling3. Modern X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) use relativistic electrons to produce intense X-ray pulses on few-femtosecond timescales4, 5, 6. However, the shot noise that seeds the amplification produces pulses with a noisy spectrum and limited temporal coherence. To produce stable transform-limited pulses, a seeding scheme called echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) has been proposed7, 8, which harnesses the highly nonlinear phase mixing of the celebrated echo phenomenon9 to generate coherent harmonic density modulations in the electron beam with conventional lasers. Here, we report on a demonstration of EEHG up to the 75th harmonic, where 32 nm light is produced from a 2,400 nm laser. We also demonstrate that individual harmonic amplitudes are controlled by simple adjustment of the phase mixing. Results show the potential of laser-based manipulations to achieve precise control over the coherent spectrum in future X-ray FELs for new science10, 11.

  13. Earthquake Forecasts for Gorkha Immediately Following the 25th April, M=7.8 Mainshock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segkou, M.; Parsons, T.

    2015-12-01

    The M-7.8 Gorkha (Nepal) earthquake on the 25th April, 2015 has shaken the central Himalayan front and immediately raised concerns for the severity of future triggered earthquakes. Here, we implement standard and innovative forecast models to predict the spatio-temporal distribution of triggered events. Key challenges addressed are: 1) the limited information on early aftershocks, 2) the low-productivity aftershock sequence in the near-source area, 3) the off-fault (>250 km) triggered events exemplified by the M=5.4 Xegar event, 3 hrs after the mainshock. We apply short-term empirical/statistical ETAS and physical forecast models, the latter based on the combination of rate/state friction law and Coulomb stresses. Within the physics-based model implementation we seek to evaluate the uncertainty related with the rupture style of triggered events by considering: 1) the geometry of active structures, 2) optimally oriented for failure faults and 3) all-potential faults described by the total stress field. The latter is represented by the full stress tensor before and after the mainshock and our analysis suggests that the preseismic stress magnitudes are still sufficient to cause earthquakes even after modification by the mainshock. The above remark reveals that there are no "stress shadows" affecting the spatial distribution of near-field aftershocks. It is also noted that the method allows for an a-priori determination of the rupture plan of the M=7.3 event, within the limit of uncertainty (20˚). The results show that: (1) ETAS models underestimate the number of observed events, since they heavily base their good performance in small magnitude earthquakes, not available in the first few weeks after the mainshock, (2) far field triggered events are captured only by physics-based forecasts, and (3) the total stress method improves the predictability of larger magnitude events. We conclude that frontier regions benefit from the implementation of physics-based models

  14. The 50th Anniversary of the International Indian Ocean Expedition: An Update on Current Planning Efforts and Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, Raleigh; D'Adamo, Nick; Burkill, Peter; Urban, Ed; Bhikajee, Mitrasen

    2014-05-01

    The International Indian Ocean Expedition (IIOE) was one of the greatest international, interdisciplinary oceanographic research efforts of all time. Planning for the IIOE began in 1959 and the project officially continued through 1965, with forty-six research vessels participating under fourteen different flags. The IIOE motivated an unprecedented number of hydrographic surveys (and repeat surveys) over the course of the expedition covering the entire Indian Ocean basin. And it was an interdisciplinary endeavor that embraced physical oceanography, chemical oceanography, meteorology, marine biology, marine geology and geophysics. The end of 2015 will mark the 50th Anniversary of the completion of the IIOE. In the 50 years since the IIOE three fundamental changes have taken place in ocean science. The first is the deployment of a broad suite of oceanographic sensors on satellites that have dramatically improved the characterization of both physical and biological oceanographic variability. The second is the emergence of new components of the ocean observing system, most notably remote sensing and Argo floats. And the third is the development of ocean modeling in all its facets from short-term forecasting to seasonal prediction to climate projections. These advances have revolutionized our understanding of the global oceans, including the Indian Ocean. Compared to the IIOE era, we now have the capacity to provide a much more integrated picture of the Indian Ocean, especially if these new technologies can be combined with targeted and well-coordinated in situ measurements. In this presentation we report on current efforts to motivate an IIOE 50th Anniversary Celebration (IIOE-2). We envision this IIOE-2 as a 5-year expedition and effort beginning in 2015 and continuing through to 2020. An important objective of our planning efforts is assessing ongoing and planned research activities in the Indian Ocean in the 2015 to 2020 time frame, with the goal of embracing and

  15. REPORT FROM THE ORGANIZERS: The 25th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kes, Peter

    2009-03-01

    The 25th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics (LT25) was hosted by the Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratorium of the Leiden Institute of Physics and held in the RAI Convention Center in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 6-13 August 2008. It was the second time that the Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory had the privilege of organizing an LT conference. In 1958, at LT6, 50 years of liquid helium temperatures were commemorated; in 2008 we celebrated the 100th anniversary of the remarkable achievements of Heike Kamerlingh Onnes and his collaborators in Leiden. In 1958 there were 323 participants and 145 papers appeared in the proceedings; in 2008 these numbers had increased to 1390 participants and 900 papers, of which eventually 849 were accepted. This large participation required adequate conference and housing facilities. These could not be found in Leiden, but were conveniently available in Amsterdam. The triennial International Low Temperature Conferences are organized under the auspices of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) through Commission C5 on Low Temperature Physics. It is the most important global meeting that brings together the international scientific community in the broad field of Low Temperature Physics. Because the meeting is held only every third year the 11 plenary and 22 half plenary talks (of 45 or 30 min.) generally provide an overview of important new discoveries over the last few years, whereas the 161 short oral presentations (20 min.) are mainly focused on very recent developments. Since the field is broad, embracing a large section of condensed matter physics, the program is divided into five parallel program lines: A. Quantum Gases, Fluids and Solids B. Superconductivity C. Quantum Phase Transitions and Magnetism D. Electronic Quantum Transport in Condensed Matter E. Cryogenic Techniques and Applications This distinction was used both to group the 1625 accepted abstracts, and the short-oral and poster presentations; the

  16. 25th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference: summary of sessions EX/S, EX/W and ICC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, A.

    2015-10-01

    This paper provides a summary overview, based on papers presented at the 25th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference (FEC), in the area of magnetic confinement experiments related to stability (EX/S), wave-plasma interactions, current drive, heating, energetic particles (EX/W) and innovative confinement concepts (ICCs). A selection of results that represent progress made since the last FEC in a few important thematic areas that are relevant for the successful and safe operation of future fusion devices like ITER, is highlighted.

  17. Newly diagnosed hyperthyroidism in the 25th gestational week of pregnancy presenting with systolic arterial hypertension only.

    PubMed

    Zaveljcina, Janez; Legan, Mateja; Gaberšček, Simona

    2016-05-01

    We present a case of a 30-year-old woman diagnosed with arterial hypertension in the 25th week of pregnancy. Our search for secondary causes of arterial hypertension revealed hyperthyroid Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), which was treated with propilthiouracil. Three weeks after delivery, she was normotensive without medication. In the next four months, she developed hypothyroidism and treatment with L-thyroxine was started. In conclusion, in the second half of pregnancy, a hyperthyroid HT can occur - in spite of the well-known amelioration of autoimmune thyroid disorders in that period, and can be the only cause of arterial hypertension.

  18. Advanced optical correlation and digital methods for pattern matching—50th anniversary of Vander Lugt matched filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millán, María S.

    2012-10-01

    On the verge of the 50th anniversary of Vander Lugt’s formulation for pattern matching based on matched filtering and optical correlation, we acknowledge the very intense research activity developed in the field of correlation-based pattern recognition during this period of time. The paper reviews some domains that appeared as emerging fields in the last years of the 20th century and have been developed later on in the 21st century. Such is the case of three-dimensional (3D) object recognition, biometric pattern matching, optical security and hybrid optical-digital processors. 3D object recognition is a challenging case of multidimensional image recognition because of its implications in the recognition of real-world objects independent of their perspective. Biometric recognition is essentially pattern recognition for which the personal identification is based on the authentication of a specific physiological characteristic possessed by the subject (e.g. fingerprint, face, iris, retina, and multifactor combinations). Biometric recognition often appears combined with encryption-decryption processes to secure information. The optical implementations of correlation-based pattern recognition processes still rely on the 4f-correlator, the joint transform correlator, or some of their variants. But the many applications developed in the field have been pushing the systems for a continuous improvement of their architectures and algorithms, thus leading towards merged optical-digital solutions.

  19. Human Behavioral Pharmacology, Past, Present, and Future: Symposium Presented at the 50th Annual Meeting of the Behavioral Pharmacology Society

    PubMed Central

    Comer, Sandra D.; Bickel, Warren K.; Yi, Richard; de Wit, Harriet; Higgins, Stephen T.; Wenger, Galen R.; Johanson, Chris-Ellyn; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2010-01-01

    A symposium held at the 50th annual meeting of the Behavioral Pharmacology Society in May 2007 reviewed progress in the human behavioral pharmacology of drug abuse. Studies on drug self-administration in humans are reviewed that assessed reinforcing and subjective effects of drugs of abuse. The close parallels observed between studies in humans and laboratory animals using similar behavioral techniques have broadened our understanding of the complex nature of the pharmacological and behavioral factors controlling drug self-administration. The symposium also addressed the role that individual differences, such as gender, personality, and genotype play in determining the extent of self-administration of illicit drugs in human populations. Knowledge of how these factors influence human drug self-administration has helped validate similar differences observed in laboratory animals. In recognition that drug self-administration is but one of many choices available in the lives of humans, the symposium addressed the ways in which choice behavior can be studied in humans. These choice studies in human drug abusers have opened up new and exciting avenues of research in laboratory animals. Finally, the symposium reviewed behavioral pharmacology studies conducted in drug abuse treatment settings and the therapeutic benefits that have emerged from these studies. PMID:20664330

  20. World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP): the 50th anniversary in 2013--history, achievements, and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Eckert, J

    2013-08-01

    In 2013 the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP) can celebrate its 50th anniversary. At this occasion in this article selected historical data are updated, and the achievements and future perspectives of the WAAVP are discussed. Although the WAAVP is a small association with only a few hundred members, it has been able to develop remarkable activities. Between 1963 and 2011 the WAAVP has organized 23 international scientific congresses, and the 24th conference will take place in Perth, Western Australia, in 2013. These conferences have achieved a high degree of international recognition as indicated by relatively large numbers of participants (up to ~800). Furthermore, the WAAVP has promoted veterinary parasitology in various ways, such as publishing international guidelines (efficacy evaluation of antiparasitic drugs, parasitological methods, standardized nomenclature of animal parasitic diseases "SNOAPAD"), stimulating international discussions on teaching and continued education ("colleges of veterinary parasitology") and by supporting the high quality journal "Veterinary Parasitology" which is the official organ of the WAAVP. In retrospect, the development of the WAAVP can be classified as very successful. New challenges associated with global changes (growth of the world population, urbanization, climate change, new developments in animal and plant production, etc.) will require new efforts in research in various fields, including veterinary parasitology. Future activities of WAAVP may include inter alia: (a) support of international parasitological networks; (b) stimulation of coordinated research aimed at the solution of defined problems; (c) increasing the exposure of WAAVP to parasitology from hitherto neglected regions of the world; (d) strengthening of official links to international organizations (FAO, WHO, etc.); (e) continuation of guideline preparation; and (d) preparation and international distribution of high

  1. Educating Black Librarians. Papers from the 50th Anniversary Celebration of the School of Library and Information Sciences, North Carolina Central University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speller, Benjamin F., Jr., Ed.

    This document assembles 16 papers given at a 1989 symposium in honor of the 50th anniversary of the School of Library and Information Sciences at North Carolina Central University, Durham (NCCU). The papers examine the past, present, and future of the participation of African Americans in the field of library and information service. Titles…

  2. The Long Good-Bye: Why B. F. Skinner's "Verbal Behavior" Is Alive and Well on the 50th Anniversary of Its Publication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlinger, Henry D.

    2008-01-01

    The year 2007 marked the 50th anniversary of the publication of B. F. Skinner's "Verbal Behavior", a book that by Skinner's own account was his most important. The received view, however, is that a devastating review by a young linguist not only rendered Skinner's interpretation of language moot but was also a major factor in ending the hegemony…

  3. Proceedings of the Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) applications and Planning Meeting (25th) Held in Marina Del Rey, California on 29 November - 2 December 1993

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-02

    FINANCE COMMITTEE Dr. William J. Klepczynski Sheila C. Faulkner RECEPTIONISTS The receptionists at the 25th Annual PTTI meeting were: Ms. Kathe Hibbard...between the three annual Symposia : EF1T, FCS and PTTI. All three are very vital entreprises , but in a period of general shortage of resources, some

  4. Deeply Rooted, Branching Out, 1972-1997. Annual AEE International Conference Proceedings (25th, Asheville, North Carolina, November 23-26, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwell, Rick, Ed.; Comstedt, Timothea, Ed.; Roberts, Nina, Ed.

    This proceedings contains 36 papers presented at the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Experiential Education. Papers are: "The Woods and the Trees: Interpreting Experiential Education for Schools and a Greater Audience" (Joanna Allen, John Hutchinson); "Adventure Programming & Prevention of Adolescent Problem…

  5. Canadian Library Association 25th Annual Conference, Hamilton, Ontario, 20-25 June 1970. Proceedings. Theme: Into the Seventies -Challenge of Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Library Association, Ottawa (Ontario).

    The fifteen speeches presented at the 25th Annual Conference of the Canadian Library Association are: (1) Presidential Address, (2) Theme Day, (3) The Revolutionary 70's, Are We Ready, (4) The Prime Mover: The Role of the National Library, (5) What You Expect Out of Machines, (6) Twenty-Seven Million People: Four Million Square Miles: Where Shall…

  6. Visual Literacy in the Digital Age: Selected Readings from the Annual Conference of the International Visual Literacy Association (25th, Rochester, New York, October 13-17, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beauchamp, Darrel G.; And Others

    This document contains selected papers from the 25th annual conference of the International Visual Literacy Association (IVLA). Topics addressed in the papers include the following: visual literacy; graphic information in research and education; evaluation criteria for instructional media; understanding symbols in business presentations;…

  7. Teaching of Psychology: Ideas and Innovations. Proceedings of the Annual Conference (25th, Tarrytown, New York, March 25-26, 2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell-Carter, Marya, Ed.; Gonder, Jennifer, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Conference proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference on the Teaching of Psychology: Ideas and Innovations, sponsored by the Psychology Department of the State University of New York at Farmingdale. The conference theme for 2011 was: The Future of the Undergraduate Psychology Major: New Directions in an Evolving Educational Climate. The Conference…

  8. Children's Rights and School Psychology: An Introduction to the Multiple Journal Series Honoring the 25th Anniversary of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mcloughlin, Caven S.; Hart, Stuart N.

    2014-01-01

    This year, 2014, is the 25th anniversary of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child--the world's "positive ideology" and its clearest statement of commitments to and respect and aspirations for the dignity of the child. To commemorate this landmark, a program of articles by respected experts has been organized to advance…

  9. Proceedings of the Anniversary Meeting (25th, Toronto, December 28-29, 1972). Industrial Relations Research Association Series. Index of IRRA Publications 1966-1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somers, Gerald G., Ed.

    Papers presented at the 25th meeting of the Industrial Relations Research Association (IRAA) covered issues that are central to industrial relations in North America. Papers and discussions dealt with these major issues: (1) Prices and Income Policy: Comparative Aspects, (2) Dispute Settlement in the Public Sector, (3) Manpower Policies in Canada…

  10. Proceedings of the Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (25th, Utrecht, The Netherlands, July 12-17, 2001). Volumes 1-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja, Ed.

    This document contains the proceedings of the 25th annual Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME). It features plenary lectures, research forums, discussion groups, working sessions, short oral communications, and poster presentations. Papers in Volume 1 include: (1) "The P in PME: Progress and…

  11. Review of the 25th annual scientific meeting of the International Society for Biological Therapy of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Led by key opinion leaders in the field, the 25th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Biological Therapy of Cancer (iSBTc, recently renamed the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer, SITC) provided a scientific platform for ~500 attendees to exchange cutting-edge information on basic, clinical, and translational research in cancer immunology and immunotherapy. The meeting included keynote addresses on checkpoint blockade in cancer therapy and recent advances in therapeutic vaccination against cancer induced by Human Papilloma Virus 16. Participants from 29 countries interacted through oral presentations, panel discussions, and posters on topics that included dendritic cells and cancer, targeted therapeutics and immunotherapy, innate/adaptive immune interplay in cancer, clinical trial endpoints, vaccine combinations, countering negative regulation, immune cell trafficking to tumor microenvironment, and adoptive T cell transfer. In addition to the 50 oral presentations and >180 posters on these topics, a new SITC/iSBTc initiative to create evidence-based Cancer Immunotherapy Guidelines was announced. The SITC/iSBTc Biomarkers Taskforce announced the release of recommendations on immunotherapy biomarkers and a highly successful symposium on Immuno-Oncology Biomarkers that took place on the campus of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) immediately prior to the Annual Meeting. At the Annual Meeting, the NIH took the opportunity to publicly announce the award of the U01 grant that will fund the Cancer Immunotherapy Trials Network (CITN). In summary, the Annual Meeting gathered clinicians and scientists from academia, industry, and regulatory agencies from around the globe to interact and exchange important scientific advances related to tumor immunobiology and cancer immunotherapy. PMID:21569425

  12. Review of the 25th annual scientific meeting of the International Society for Biological Therapy of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Balwit, James M; Kalinski, Pawel; Sondak, Vernon K; Coulie, Pierre G; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Gajewski, Thomas F; Marincola, Francesco M

    2011-05-12

    Led by key opinion leaders in the field, the 25th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Biological Therapy of Cancer (iSBTc, recently renamed the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer, SITC) provided a scientific platform for ~500 attendees to exchange cutting-edge information on basic, clinical, and translational research in cancer immunology and immunotherapy. The meeting included keynote addresses on checkpoint blockade in cancer therapy and recent advances in therapeutic vaccination against cancer induced by Human Papilloma Virus 16. Participants from 29 countries interacted through oral presentations, panel discussions, and posters on topics that included dendritic cells and cancer, targeted therapeutics and immunotherapy, innate/adaptive immune interplay in cancer, clinical trial endpoints, vaccine combinations, countering negative regulation, immune cell trafficking to tumor microenvironment, and adoptive T cell transfer. In addition to the 50 oral presentations and >180 posters on these topics, a new SITC/iSBTc initiative to create evidence-based Cancer Immunotherapy Guidelines was announced. The SITC/iSBTc Biomarkers Taskforce announced the release of recommendations on immunotherapy biomarkers and a highly successful symposium on Immuno-Oncology Biomarkers that took place on the campus of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) immediately prior to the Annual Meeting. At the Annual Meeting, the NIH took the opportunity to publicly announce the award of the U01 grant that will fund the Cancer Immunotherapy Trials Network (CITN). In summary, the Annual Meeting gathered clinicians and scientists from academia, industry, and regulatory agencies from around the globe to interact and exchange important scientific advances related to tumor immunobiology and cancer immunotherapy.

  13. Effect of Anatomical Modeling on Space Radiation Dose Estimates: A Comparison of Doses for NASA Phantoms and 5th, 50th, and 95th Percentile UF Hybrid Phantoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, A.; VanBaalen, M.; Shavers, M.; Semones, E.; Dodge, C.; Bolch, W.

    2010-01-01

    The estimate of absorbed dose to individual organs of a space crewmember is affected by the geometry of the anatomical model of the astronaut used in the radiation transport calculation. For astronaut dosimetry, NASA currently uses the computerized anatomical male (CAM) and computerized anatomical female (CAF) stylized phantoms to represent astronauts in its operational radiation dose analyses. These phantoms are available in one size and in two body positions. In contrast, the UF Hybrid Adult Male and Female (UFHADM and UFHADF) phantoms have organ shapes based on actual CT data. The surfaces of these phantoms are defined by non-uniform rational B-spline surfaces, and are thus flexible in terms of body morphometry and extremity positioning. In this study, UFHADM and UFHADF are scaled to dimensions corresponding to 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile (PCTL) male and female astronauts. A ray-tracing program is written in Visual Basic 2008, which is then used to create areal density maps for dose points corresponding to various organs within the phantoms. The areal density maps, along with appropriate space radiation spectra, are input into the NASA program couplet HZETRN/BRYNTRN, and organ doses are calculated. The areal density maps selected tissues and organs of the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female phantoms are presented and compared. In addition, the organ doses for the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female phantoms are presented and compared to organ doses for CAM and CAF.

  14. MABAHISS/John Murray 50th Anniversary: Marine Science of the North West Indian Ocean and Adjacent Waters. Report of a Symposium on the Occasion of the 50th Anniversary of the MABAHISS/John Murray Expedition (1933/34) (Alexandria, Egypt, September 3-7, 1983). Unesco Reports in Marine Science, No. 31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Div. of Marine Sciences.

    An international symposium was convened to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the John Murray Expedition to the Indian Ocean on board the Egyptian research vessel Mabahiss (1933-1934). This report describes the symposium and provides abstracts and syntheses of the papers presented in the various marine scientific disciplines covering the areas of…

  15. 75th Anniversary Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmerij, Louis; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Includes "Editorial"; "Employment Problem and the International Economy" (Emmerij); "Declaration of Philadelphia" (Lee); "Pragmatism and Daring in International Labour Law" (Javillier); "Perspectives on the Future of Social Security" (von Maydell); and "Unions as Social Institutions in…

  16. Summary of the Workshop on Molten Salt Reactor Technologies Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the Startup of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Betzler, Benjamin R; Mays, Gary T

    2016-01-01

    A workshop on Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) technologies commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on October 15 16, 2015. The MSRE represented a pioneering experiment that demonstrated an advanced reactor technology: the molten salt eutectic-fueled reactor. A multinational group of more than 130 individuals representing a diverse set of stakeholders gathered to discuss the historical, current, and future technical challenges and paths to deployment of MSR technology. This paper provides a summary of the key messages from this workshop.

  17. World War II never ended in my house: interviews of 12 Office of Strategic Services veterans of wartime espionage on the 50th anniversary of WW II.

    PubMed

    Cavin, Susan

    2006-07-01

    The author conducted sociological interviews of 12 OSS spies (7 male, 5 female) who were operatives in France during World War II (WW II). The Office of Strategic Services (OSS) existed from 1941 to 1945 and was later renamed the CIA in 1947. This paper includes family studies of six close relatives of OSS vets and observation of 400 OSS veterans at the 50th anniversary of WW II. Three of the 12 OSS veterans who had been tortured by the Gestapo still suffered from PTSD-startle symptoms after 50 years; those three also suffered massive strokes in later life. The majority of OSS vets, regardless of gender, exhibited "war excitement" when talking about the war 50 years later. Most saw the war as the highpoint of their lives. War excitement needs more careful study within PTSD circles.

  18. Introduction to the special issue: 50th anniversary of APA Division 28: The past, present, and future of psychopharmacology and substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Stoops, William W; Sigmon, Stacey C; Evans, Suzette M

    2016-08-01

    This is an introduction to the special issue "50th Anniversary of APA Division 28: The Past, Present, and Future of Psychopharmacology and Substance Abuse." Taken together, the scholarly contributions included in this special issue serve as a testament to the important work conducted by our colleagues over the past five decades. Division 28 and its members have advanced and disseminated knowledge on the behavioral effects of drugs, informed efforts to prevent and treat substance abuse, and influenced education and policy issues more generally. As past and current leaders of the division, we are excited to celebrate 50 years of Division 28 and look forward to many more successful decades for our division and its members. (PsycINFO Database Record

  19. A report from the European Association for the Study of the Liver's 50th International Liver Congress (April 22-26 - Vienna, Austria).

    PubMed

    Rabasseda, X

    2015-04-01

    While Vienna's Prater park offers a varied selection of options, from theme parks to lush gardens and prairies to enjoy the sun, the nearby Messe Wien convention center was the focus of attention in April 2015 for all the scientists, researchers and clinicians interested in viral hepatitis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, hepatocellular carcinoma and a variety of other liver diseases. Treatments and potential new therapeutic strategies for these hepatopathies were discussed during the 50th International Liver Congress organized by the European Association for the Study of the Liver. Echoing epidemiological facts and a high social interest for hepatitis C virus infection, new findings with investigational and potential new therapies for the disease centered much of the attention at the conference. Nevertheless, new research was also reported related to potential improvements in how other liver diseases, particularly hepatitis B virus infection, hepatocellular carcinoma and a range of inflammatory and immune-mediated liver diseases, including rare hereditary diseases that should never be forgotten.

  20. Non-small cell lung cancer: Whole-lesion histogram analysis of the apparent diffusion coefficient for assessment of tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion and pleural invasion

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Naoko; Doai, Mariko; Usuda, Katsuo; Uramoto, Hidetaka

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Investigating the diagnostic accuracy of histogram analyses of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values for determining non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumor grades, lymphovascular invasion, and pleural invasion. Materials and methods We studied 60 surgically diagnosed NSCLC patients. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was performed in the axial plane using a navigator-triggered single-shot, echo-planar imaging sequence with prospective acquisition correction. The ADC maps were generated, and we placed a volume-of-interest on the tumor to construct the whole-lesion histogram. Using the histogram, we calculated the mean, 5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles of ADC, skewness, and kurtosis. Histogram parameters were correlated with tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion, and pleural invasion. We performed a receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis to assess the diagnostic performance of histogram parameters for distinguishing different pathologic features. Results The ADC mean, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles showed significant differences among the tumor grades. The ADC mean, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles were significant histogram parameters between high- and low-grade tumors. The ROC analysis between high- and low-grade tumors showed that the 95th percentile ADC achieved the highest area under curve (AUC) at 0.74. Lymphovascular invasion was associated with the ADC mean, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles, skewness, and kurtosis. Kurtosis achieved the highest AUC at 0.809. Pleural invasion was only associated with skewness, with the AUC of 0.648. Conclusions ADC histogram analyses on the basis of the entire tumor volume are able to stratify NSCLCs' tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion and pleural invasion. PMID:28207858

  1. EDITORIAL: 50th anniversary issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beddoe, Alun H.

    2006-07-01

    In July 1956, 50 years ago, the first issue of Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) was published. It was subtitled The Journal of the Hospital Physicists' Association and published in association with the Philosophical Magazine by Taylor and Francis. Subscriptions were £1 per part or £3 10s for an annual subscription. The Editor, Professor J E Roberts, prefaced the first issue with a cautious editorial noting: The appearance of a new journal is usually greeted with mixed feelings by scientific workers, a common response being that there are far too many journals already. Justification for a new publication is only possible if there is a clearly defined gap in the publishing facilities available to workers in a particular scientific field.... Professor Roberts ended by seeking support from the scientific community for the new venture. He certainly got it! From a tentative few hundred pages in four issues a year for the first few years, the journal is now issued twice monthly with nearly 8000 pages expected in volume 51. In this anniversary issue we have invited some 28 senior authors to submit papers on a range of subjects spanning the discipline. We decided that to be an author one had to be old, but age was not to be the only criterion! Indeed readers will recognize all names as major contributors to both the development of medical physics and the success of PMB. Authors were not asked to write formal topical reviews of the state-of-the-art of the sub-disciplines which make up medical physics, but rather to present short historical reviews, didactic in style, perhaps highlighting the role of PMB in the development of their fields. Nevertheless, other than a page limit (which many subsequently ignored!) no formal format was imposed on authors, so what follows is a range of contributions from the almost conversational, personal statement to the more formal and familiar scientific paper. Whatever the writing style we are confident that readers will gain some appreciation of the development of our wide-ranging discipline over the last half century. Some readers may feel that one or two subjects have not been represented, and for that I can only apologise. We did ask for contributions to several other topics (for example radiation metrology and optical techniques) but inevitably there were authors who for various reasons were unable to meet the deadline. Inevitably we will also have missed contributions from excellent potential authors (who satisfied the age criterion!). As Guest Editor I must bear the responsibility for those omissions. While page limits do not permit me to discuss the contributions to this issue individually I would like to mention the first contribution by Dr J E (Bob) Burns. Dr Burns was on the Editorial Board in the early sixties working with the second Editor, Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat. Both in his article and in personal communications Dr Burns has emphasized the important role of Professor Rotblat in the early years. I did write to Professor Rotblat seeking a contribution from him but, sadly, received a reply saying that he was not well enough to contribute `at present'; he died a few weeks later at the age of 96 years (please refer to www.pugwash.org for tributes from Mikhail Gorbachev, Kofi Annan and many others). Dr Burns wrote a short note to me shortly after his death including the following comment which is reproduced below: Although many people have contributed to the success of PMB over the last 50 years it was Rotblat's restless energy, power of persuasion and already existing fame (he was well known both scientifically and to the public at the time) that enabled him to rescue the journal from an early death. After discussions with colleagues around the UK, including Dr Burns, and with the Editorial Board, we all felt that it would be highly appropriate to dedicate this anniversary issue to the memory of Professor Rotblat. Institute of Physics Publishing (IOP) took over the publishing of PMB in 1972, firstly on behalf of the Hospital Physicists' Association and then on behalf of the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM). I wish to pay tribute to the staff at the IOP Publishing Office for the continuing excellent quality and short publication times for articles appearing in PMB. There can be no doubt that this contributes to the popularity with authors and readers alike. It almost goes without saying but I should also thank all the contributors, referees, Editorial Board members and International Advisory Board members who have, collectively, made PMB the success that it is. For historical interest I list below the 11 editors of PMB since its inception. Three of these editors have contributed papers to this issue. 1956-1961 Professor J E Roberts, Middlesex Hospital, London 1961-1972 Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat, St Bartholomew's Hospital, London 1973-1978 Professor H A B Simons, Royal Free Hospital, London 1979-1982 Mr J Clifton, University College Hospital, London 1983-1985 Professor R P Parker, University of Leeds, Leeds 1986-1987 Dr M J Day, Newcastle General Hospital, Newcastle 1988-1991 Professor S C Lillicrap, Royal United Hospital, Bath 1992-1995 Professor B L Diffey, Dryburn Hospital, Durham 1996-1999 Professor M O Leach, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London 2000-2005 Professor A H Beddoe, University Hospital, Birmingham 2006- Professor S Webb, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London Finally, apart from noting the usual caveat that the Guest Editor, Editor-in Chief, IOP and IPEM take no responsibility for opinions expressed by authors, I would like to conclude by wishing Professor Steve Webb and future editors every success. While I may not be around for the centenary issue in July 2056 I have every reason to believe that it will be a good one.

  2. 50th Anniversary: Freedom 7

    NASA Video Gallery

    On May 5, 1961, Alan Shepard was propelled into space aboard the Mercury capsule Freedom 7. His 15-minute suborbital flight was part of Project Mercury, the United States' first man-in-space progra...

  3. Increased Physical Activity and Fitness above the 50(th) Percentile Avoid the Threat of Older Adults Becoming Institutionalized: A Cross-sectional Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Catarina; Fernandes, Jorge; Raimundo, Armando; Biehl-Printes, Clarissa; Marmeleira, José; Tomas-Carus, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the impact of physical fitness and physical activity on the threat of older adults without cognitive impairment becoming institutionalized. This cross-sectional study involved 195 non-institutionalized (80.1 ± 4.4 years) and 186 institutionalized (83.8 ± 5.2years) participants. Cognitive impairment was assessed using Mini-Mental State Examination, measures of physical fitness were determined by the Senior Fitness Test, and physical activity was assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Multivariate binary logistic analysis selected four main determinants of institutionalization in both genders: The likelihood of becoming institutionalized increased by +18.6% for each additional year of age, whereas it decreased by -24.8% by each fewer kg/m(2) in body mass index (BMI), by -0.9% for each additional meter performed in the aerobic endurance test, and by -2.0% for each additional 100 metabolic equivalent of task (MET)-min/week of physical activity expenditure (p < 0.05). Values ≤50(th) percentile (age ≥81 years, BMI ≥26.7 kg/m(2), aerobic endurance ≤367.6 meters, and physical activity ≤693 MET-min/week) were computed using receiver operating characteristics analysis as cutoffs discriminating institutionalized from non-institutionalized older adults. The performance of physical activity, allied to an improvement in physical fitness (mainly BMI and aerobic endurance), may avoid the threat of institutionalization of older adults without cognitive impairment only if they are above the 50(th) percentile. The following parameters are highly recommended: Expending ≥693 MET-min/week on physical activity, having a BMI ≤26.7 kg/m(2), and being able to walk ≥367.6 meters in the aerobic endurance test, especially above the age of 80 years. The discovery of this trigger justifies the development of physical activity programs targeting the pointed cutoffs in old and very old adults.

  4. JANNAF 25th Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee, 37th Combustion Subcommittee and 1st Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee Joint Meeting. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, Ronald S.; Becker, Dorothy L.

    2000-01-01

    Volume I, the first of three volumes, is a compilation of 24 unclassified/unlimited-distribution technical papers presented at the Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) 25th Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee, 37th Combustion Subcommittee and 1st Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee (MSS) meeting held jointly with the 19th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee. The meeting was held 13-17 November 2000 at the Naval Postgraduate School and Hyatt Regency Hotel, Monterey, California. Topics covered include: a Keynote Address on Future Combat Systems, a review of the new JANNAF Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee, and technical papers on Hyper-X propulsion development and verification; GTX airbreathing launch vehicles; Hypersonic technology development, including program overviews, fuels for advanced propulsion, ramjet and scramjet research, hypersonic test medium effects; and RBCC engine design and performance, and PDE and UCAV advanced and combined cycle engine technologies.

  5. A portrait of the C4 photosynthetic family on the 50th anniversary of its discovery: species number, evolutionary lineages, and Hall of Fame.

    PubMed

    Sage, Rowan F

    2016-07-01

    Fifty years ago, the C4 photosynthetic pathway was first characterized. In the subsequent five decades, much has been learned about C4 plants, such that it is now possible to place nearly all C4 species into their respective evolutionary lineages. Sixty-one independent lineages of C4 photosynthesis are identified, with additional, ancillary C4 origins possible in 12 of these principal lineages. The lineages produced ~8100 C4 species (5044 grasses, 1322 sedges, and 1777 eudicots). Using midpoints of stem and crown node dates in their respective phylogenies, the oldest and most speciose C4 lineage is the grass lineage Chloridoideae, estimated to be near 30 million years old. Most C4 lineages are estimated to be younger than 15 million years. Older C4 lineages tend to be more speciose, while those younger than 7 million years have <43 species each. To further highlight C4 photosynthesis for a 50th anniversary snapshot, a Hall of Fame comprised of the 40 most significant C4 species is presented. Over the next 50 years, preservation of the Earth's C4 diversity is a concern, largely because of habitat loss due to elevated CO2 effects, invasive species, and expanded agricultural activities. Ironically, some members of the C4 Hall of Fame are leading threats to the natural C4 flora due to their association with human activities on landscapes where most C4 plants occur.

  6. A portrait of the C4 photosynthetic family on the 50th anniversary of its discovery: species number, evolutionary lineages, and Hall of Fame.

    PubMed

    Sage, Rowan F

    2017-01-01

    Fifty years ago, the C4 photosynthetic pathway was first characterized. In the subsequent five decades, much has been learned about C4 plants, such that it is now possible to place nearly all C4 species into their respective evolutionary lineages. Sixty-one independent lineages of C4 photosynthesis are identified, with additional, ancillary C4 origins possible in 12 of these principal lineages. The lineages produced ~8100 C4 species (5044 grasses, 1322 sedges, and 1777 eudicots). Using midpoints of stem and crown node dates in their respective phylogenies, the oldest and most speciose C4 lineage is the grass lineage Chloridoideae, estimated to be near 30 million years old. Most C4 lineages are estimated to be younger than 15 million years. Older C4 lineages tend to be more speciose, while those younger than 7 million years have <43 species each. To further highlight C4 photosynthesis for a 50th anniversary snapshot, a Hall of Fame comprised of the 40 most significant C4 species is presented. Over the next 50 years, preservation of the Earth's C4 diversity is a concern, largely because of habitat loss due to elevated CO2 effects, invasive species, and expanded agricultural activities. Ironically, some members of the C4 Hall of Fame are leading threats to the natural C4 flora due to their association with human activities on landscapes where most C4 plants occur.

  7. Rural Sociology: The Wisconsin Contribution, Current Status and Future Directions. Proceedings of the 50th Anniversary Symposium of the Department of Rural Sociology, University of Wisconsin (Madison, Wisconsin, May 8-9, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Coll. of Agricultural and Life Sciences.

    Papers presented at a symposium commemorating the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Department of Rural Sociology of the University of Wisconsin-Madison are collected in this volume. The first four papers--by Olaf Larson, Edward Moe, Daryl Hobbs, and Robert Gard--discuss the department's history, emphasizing the contributions of outstanding…

  8. 25th Birthday Cern- Amphi

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Cérémonie du 25ème anniversaire du Cern avec 2 orateurs: le Prof.Weisskopf parle de la signification et le rôle du Cern et le Prof.Casimir(?) fait un exposé sur les rélations entre la science pure et la science appliquée et la "big science" (science légère)

  9. Ceremony 25th birthday Cern

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Célébration du 25ème anniversaire du Cern (jour par jour) avec discours de L.Van Hove et J.B.Adams, des interludes musicals offerts par Mme Mey et ses collègues (au debut 1.mouvement du quatuor avec piano no 3 de L.van Beethoven) Les directeurs généraux procéderont à la remise du souvenir aux membres de personnel ayant 25 années de service dans l'organisation. Un témoignage de reconnaissance est auss fait à l'interprète Mme Zwerner

  10. 25th Birthday Cern- Restaurant

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Cérémonie du 25ème anniversaire du Cern avec plusieurs orateurs et la présence de nombreux autorités cantonales et communales genevoises et personnalités, directeurs généraux, ministres, chercheurs.... Le conseiller féderal et chef du département des affaires étrangères de la confédération Monsieur Pierre Aubert prend la parole pour célébrer à la fois les résultats très remarquables de la coopération internationale en matière scientifique, mais aussi la volonté politique des états européens de mettre en commun leurs ressources pour faire oeuvre d'avenir. Un grand hommage est aussi donné aux deux directeurs disparus, les prof.Bakker et Gregory.

  11. 25th Birthday Cern- Restaurant

    SciTech Connect

    2006-05-05

    Cérémonie du 25ème anniversaire du Cern avec plusieurs orateurs et la présence de nombreux autorités cantonales et communales genevoises et personnalités, directeurs généraux, ministres, chercheurs.... Le conseiller féderal et chef du département des affaires étrangères de la confédération Monsieur Pierre Aubert prend la parole pour célébrer à la fois les résultats très remarquables de la coopération internationale en matière scientifique, mais aussi la volonté politique des états européens de mettre en commun leurs ressources pour faire oeuvre d'avenir. Un grand hommage est aussi donné aux deux directeurs disparus, les prof.Bakker et Gregory.

  12. Standing adult human phantoms based on 10th, 50th and 90th mass and height percentiles of male and female Caucasian populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassola, V. F.; Milian, F. M.; Kramer, R.; de Oliveira Lira, C. A. B.; Khoury, H. J.

    2011-07-01

    Computational anthropomorphic human phantoms are useful tools developed for the calculation of absorbed or equivalent dose to radiosensitive organs and tissues of the human body. The problem is, however, that, strictly speaking, the results can be applied only to a person who has the same anatomy as the phantom, while for a person with different body mass and/or standing height the data could be wrong. In order to improve this situation for many areas in radiological protection, this study developed 18 anthropometric standing adult human phantoms, nine models per gender, as a function of the 10th, 50th and 90th mass and height percentiles of Caucasian populations. The anthropometric target parameters for body mass, standing height and other body measures were extracted from PeopleSize, a well-known software package used in the area of ergonomics. The phantoms were developed based on the assumption of a constant body-mass index for a given mass percentile and for different heights. For a given height, increase or decrease of body mass was considered to reflect mainly the change of subcutaneous adipose tissue mass, i.e. that organ masses were not changed. Organ mass scaling as a function of height was based on information extracted from autopsy data. The methods used here were compared with those used in other studies, anatomically as well as dosimetrically. For external exposure, the results show that equivalent dose decreases with increasing body mass for organs and tissues located below the subcutaneous adipose tissue layer, such as liver, colon, stomach, etc, while for organs located at the surface, such as breasts, testes and skin, the equivalent dose increases or remains constant with increasing body mass due to weak attenuation and more scatter radiation caused by the increasing adipose tissue mass. Changes of standing height have little influence on the equivalent dose to organs and tissues from external exposure. Specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) have also

  13. Meeting Report: International nephrology days - In honor of the 75(th) anniversary of acad. Momir Polenakovic and 50 years of scientific work, 26-27 September 2014.

    PubMed

    Spasovski, G

    2015-01-01

    The International Nephrology Days in honor of the 75(th) anniversary of Academician Momir Polenakovic and 50 years of his scientific work were held in the Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts (MASA) on 26 and 27 September 2014. Organizers of the meeting were the Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts and the Macedonian Society of Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation and Artificial Organs (MSNDTAO). The days were programmed with the VII Macedonian-Croatian Nephrology Meeting and the Continuing Medical Education (CME) Course on "Renal Replacement Therapy - when & how - update on the outcome and cost-efficacy" organized by the MSNDTAO in cooperation with the European Renal Association (ERA-EDTA). Prominent academicians, researchers and nephrologists from Europe and neighboring countries contributed with their lectures and discussion at this scientific event. On September 26, 2014 the opening talk was given by Acad. V. Kambovski, President of the MASA, about the Life and Work of Academician Momir Polenakovic. In honor of his anniversary and valuable scientific opus, during the meeting Acad. Momir Polenakovic was awarded with Certificate of the European Renal Association (ERA-EDTA) for his significant role in the development of nephrology in the Balkan region and couple of other diplomas and acknowledgement. Prof. Polenakovic is founder of the MSNDTAO and his lifetime honorary president.

  14. Mathematics Education in the South Pacific. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia Incorporated (25th, Auckland, New Zealand, July 7-10, 2002). Volume I [and] Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Bill, Ed.; Irwin, Kathryn C., Ed.; Pfannkuch, Maxine, Ed.; Thomas, Michael O. J., Ed.

    This document contains the proceedings of the 25th annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australia (MERGA) held at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. The focus of this meeting is mathematics education in the South Pacific. Presentations are centered around the topic of numeracy in primary or elementary school.…

  15. Graduate Education--Past--Present--Future. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council of Graduate Schools in the United States (25th, Anaheim, California, December 11-14, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalil, Edna M., Ed.

    This proceedings document contains papers presented at the 25th anniversary meeting of the Council of Graduate Schools in the United States (CGS); information on the CGS business meeting, notices of awards presentations, copies of the CGS constitution and bylaws, and a CGS membership list. Topics and presenters are as follows: "Current Issues…

  16. The Human Face of Technological Change. Theme Papers from the Silver Jubilee Conference of the Australian College of Education (25th, Australian Capital Territory, Canberra, May 5-9, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randell, Shirley, Ed.

    Papers presented at the 25th annual conference of the Australia College of Education addressed four major themes: The Brave New World of 1984; The Communications Revolution; Being Human in a Technological Age; and Implications of the Technological Society of Education. Papers in this volume include: (1) "The Challenge of Education in the…

  17. Informing Policy and Practice in Australia's Vocational Education and Training Sector: Reflections and Futures. Proceedings of the 25th Anniversary Forum of the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (Adelaide, South Australia, Australia, March 21, 2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtin, Penelope, Ed.; Loveder, Phil, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    To mark the occasion of its 25th anniversary, the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) brought together policy, industry and academic leaders to reflect on the role that research and statistics have played in the development of Australia's vocational education and training (VET) sector. This publication includes the original…

  18. An inflatable belt system in the rear seat occupant environment: investigating feasibility and benefit in frontal impact sled tests with a 50th percentile male ATD

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Jason L.; Lopez-Valdes, Francisco J.; Dennis, Nate; Kent, Richard W.; Tanji, Hiromasa; Higuchi, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    Frontal-impact airbag systems have the potential to provide a benefit to rear seat occupants by distributing restraining forces over the body in a manner not possible using belts alone. This study sought to investigate the effects of incorporating a belt-integrated airbag (“airbelt”) into a rear seat occupant restraint system. Frontal impact sled tests were performed with a Hybrid III 50th percentile male anthropomorphic test device (ATD) seated in the right-rear passenger position of a 2004 mid-sized sedan buck. Tests were performed at 48 km/h (20 g, 100 ms acceleration pulse) and 29 km/h (11 g, 100 ms). The restraints consisted of a 3-point belt system with a cylindrical airbag integrated into the upper portion of the shoulder belt. The airbag was tapered in shape, with a maximum diameter of 16 cm (at the shoulder) that decreased to 4 cm at the mid-chest. A 2.5 kN force-limiter was integrated into the shoulder-belt retractor, and a 2.3 kN pretensioner was present in the out-board anchor of the lap belt. Six ATD tests (three 48 km/h and three 29 km/h) were performed with the airbelt system. These were compared to previous frontal-impact, rear seat ATD tests with a standard (not-force-limited, not-pretensioned) 3-point belt system and a progressive force-limiting (peak 4.4 kN), pretensioning (FL+PT) 3-point belt system. In the 48 km/h tests, the airbelt resulted in significantly less (p<0.05, two-tailed Student’s t-test) posterior displacement of the sternum towards the spine (chest deflection) than both the standard and FL+PT belt systems (airbelt: average 13±1.1 mm standard deviation; standard belt: 33±2.3 mm; FL+PT belt: 23±2.6 mm). This was consistent with a significant reduction in the peak upper shoulder belt force (airbelt: 2.7±0.1 kN; standard belt: 8.7±0.3 kN; FL+PT belt: 4.4±0.1 kN), and was accompanied by a small increase in forward motion of the head (airbelt: 54±0.4 cm; standard belt: 45±1.3 cm; FL+PT belt: 47±1.1 cm) The airbelt system

  19. Blast Mitigation Sea Analysis - Evaluation of Lumbar Compression Data Trends in 5th Percentile Female Anthropomorphic Test Device Performance Compared to 50th Percentile Male Anthropomorphic Test Device in Drop Tower Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-21

    energy absorption properties and EA mechanisms to ensure all Soldiers, regardless of size and weight, are provided with equivalent protection...350 g for peak lumbar compression based on occupant size • All tests at 350 g had lumbar compression below the IARV threshold • Lumbar traces show...similar between the 5th female and 50th male ATD across almost all seat models • Seat C features initial loading rates for both occupant sizes that are

  20. Residential Radon Exposure and Incidence of Childhood Lymphoma in Texas, 1995-2011.

    PubMed

    Peckham, Erin C; Scheurer, Michael E; Danysh, Heather E; Lubega, Joseph; Langlois, Peter H; Lupo, Philip J

    2015-09-25

    There is warranted interest in assessing the association between residential radon exposure and the risk of childhood cancer. We sought to evaluate the association between residential radon exposure and the incidence of childhood lymphoma in Texas. The Texas Cancer Registry (n = 2147) provided case information for the period 1995-2011. Denominator data were obtained from the United States Census. Regional arithmetic mean radon concentrations were obtained from the Texas Indoor Radon Survey and linked to residence at diagnosis. Exposure was assessed categorically: ≤25th percentile (reference), >25th to ≤50th percentile, >50th to ≤75th percentile, and >75th percentile. Negative binomial regression generated adjusted incidence rate ratios (aIRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). We evaluated lymphoma overall and by subtype: Hodgkin (HL; n = 1248), Non-Hodgkin excluding Burkitt (non-BL NHL; n = 658), Burkitt (BL; n = 241), and Diffuse Large B-cell (DLBCL; n = 315). There was no evidence that residential radon exposure was positively associated with lymphoma overall, HL, or BL. Areas with radon concentrations >75th percentile had a marginal increase in DLBCL incidence (aIRR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.03-2.91). In one of the largest studies of residential radon exposure and the incidence of childhood lymphoma, we found little evidence to suggest a positive or negative association; an observation consistent with previous studies.

  1. Residential Radon Exposure and Incidence of Childhood Lymphoma in Texas, 1995–2011

    PubMed Central

    Peckham, Erin C.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Danysh, Heather E.; Lubega, Joseph; Langlois, Peter H.; Lupo, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    There is warranted interest in assessing the association between residential radon exposure and the risk of childhood cancer. We sought to evaluate the association between residential radon exposure and the incidence of childhood lymphoma in Texas. The Texas Cancer Registry (n = 2147) provided case information for the period 1995–2011. Denominator data were obtained from the United States Census. Regional arithmetic mean radon concentrations were obtained from the Texas Indoor Radon Survey and linked to residence at diagnosis. Exposure was assessed categorically: ≤25th percentile (reference), >25th to ≤50th percentile, >50th to ≤75th percentile, and >75th percentile. Negative binomial regression generated adjusted incidence rate ratios (aIRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). We evaluated lymphoma overall and by subtype: Hodgkin (HL; n = 1248), Non-Hodgkin excluding Burkitt (non-BL NHL; n = 658), Burkitt (BL; n = 241), and Diffuse Large B-cell (DLBCL; n = 315). There was no evidence that residential radon exposure was positively associated with lymphoma overall, HL, or BL. Areas with radon concentrations >75th percentile had a marginal increase in DLBCL incidence (aIRR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.03–2.91). In one of the largest studies of residential radon exposure and the incidence of childhood lymphoma, we found little evidence to suggest a positive or negative association; an observation consistent with previous studies. PMID:26404336

  2. Multidisciplinary approach for the study of an Egyptian coffin (late 22nd/early 25th dynasty): combining imaging and spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Bracci, S; Caruso, O; Galeotti, M; Iannaccone, R; Magrini, D; Picchi, D; Pinna, D; Porcinai, S

    2015-06-15

    This paper demonstrates that an educated methodology based on both non-invasive and micro invasive techniques in a two-step approach is a powerful tool to characterize the materials and stratigraphies of an Egyptian coffin, which was restored several times. This coffin, belonging to a certain Mesiset, is now located at the Museo Civico Archeologico of Bologna (inventory number MCABo EG 1963). Scholars attributed it to the late 22nd/early 25th dynasty by stylistic comparison. The first step of the diagnostic approach applied imaging techniques on the whole surface in order to select measurements spots and to unveil both original and restored areas. Images and close microscopic examination of the polychrome surface allowed selecting representative areas to be investigated in situ by portable spectroscopic techniques: X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), Fiber Optic Reflectance Spectroscopy (FORS) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). After the analysis of the results coming from the first step, very few selected samples were taken to clarify the stratigraphy of the polychrome layers. The first step, based on the combination of imaging and spectroscopic techniques in a totally non-invasive modality, is quite unique in the literature on Egyptian coffins and enabled us to reveal many differences in the ground layer's composition and to identify a remarkable number of pigments in the original and restored areas. This work offered also a chance to check the limitations of the non-invasive approach applied on a complex case, namely the right localization of different materials in the stratigraphy and the identification of binding media. Indeed, to dissolve any remaining doubts on superimposed layers belonging to different interventions, it was necessary to sample few micro-fragments in some selected areas and analyze them prepared as cross-sections. The original ground layer is made of calcite, while the restored areas show the presence of either a mixture of calcite

  3. Multidisciplinary approach for the study of an Egyptian coffin (late 22nd/early 25th dynasty): Combining imaging and spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracci, S.; Caruso, O.; Galeotti, M.; Iannaccone, R.; Magrini, D.; Picchi, D.; Pinna, D.; Porcinai, S.

    2015-06-01

    This paper demonstrates that an educated methodology based on both non-invasive and micro invasive techniques in a two-step approach is a powerful tool to characterize the materials and stratigraphies of an Egyptian coffin, which was restored several times. This coffin, belonging to a certain Mesiset, is now located at the Museo Civico Archeologico of Bologna (inventory number MCABo EG 1963). Scholars attributed it to the late 22nd/early 25th dynasty by stylistic comparison. The first step of the diagnostic approach applied imaging techniques on the whole surface in order to select measurements spots and to unveil both original and restored areas. Images and close microscopic examination of the polychrome surface allowed selecting representative areas to be investigated in situ by portable spectroscopic techniques: X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), Fiber Optic Reflectance Spectroscopy (FORS) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). After the analysis of the results coming from the first step, very few selected samples were taken to clarify the stratigraphy of the polychrome layers. The first step, based on the combination of imaging and spectroscopic techniques in a totally non-invasive modality, is quite unique in the literature on Egyptian coffins and enabled us to reveal many differences in the ground layer's composition and to identify a remarkable number of pigments in the original and restored areas. This work offered also a chance to check the limitations of the non-invasive approach applied on a complex case, namely the right localization of different materials in the stratigraphy and the identification of binding media. Indeed, to dissolve any remaining doubts on superimposed layers belonging to different interventions, it was necessary to sample few micro-fragments in some selected areas and analyze them prepared as cross-sections. The original ground layer is made of calcite, while the restored areas show the presence of either a mixture of calcite

  4. PREFACE: 11th Asia-Pacific Conference on Plasma Science and Technology (APCPST-11) and 25th Symposium on Plasma Science for Materials (SPSM-25)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Takayuki; Kaneko, Toshio; Sekine, Makoto; Tanaka, Yasunori

    2013-06-01

    The 11th Asia-Pacific Conference on Plasma Science and Technology (APCPST-11) was held in Kyoto, Japan on 2-5 October 2012 with the 25th Symposium on Plasma Science for Materials (SPSM-25). SPSM has been held annually since 1988 under the sponsorship of The 153rd Committee on Plasma Materials Science, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS). This symposium is one of the major activities of the Committee, which is organized by researchers in academia and industry for the purpose of advancing intersectional scientific information exchange and discussion of science and technology of plasma materials processing. APCPST and SPSM are jointly held biennially to survey the current status of low temperature and thermal plasma physics and chemistry for industrial applications. The whole area of plasma processing was covered from fundamentals to applications. Previous meetings were held in China, Japan, Korea, and Australia, attended by scientists from the Asia-Pacific and other countries. The joint conference was organized in plenary lectures, invited, contributed oral presentations and poster sessions. At this meeting, we had 386 participants from 10 countries and 398 presentations, including 26 invited presentations. This year, we arranged special topical sessions that covered green innovation, life innovation, and technical reports from industry. This conference seeks to bring the plasma community together and to create a forum for discussing the latest developments and issues, the challenges ahead in the field of plasma research and applications among engineers and scientists in Asia, the Pacific Rim, as well as Europe. This volume presents 44 papers that were selected via a strict peer-review process from full papers submitted for the proceedings of the conference. The topics range from the basic physics and chemistry of plasma processing to a broad variety of materials processing and environmental applications. This volume offers an overview of recent

  5. PREFACE: Proceedings of the 25th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics (LT25) (Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 6-13 August 2008) Proceedings of the 25th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics (LT25) (Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 6-13 August 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kes, Peter; Jochemsen, Reijer

    2009-04-01

    This issue forms part I of the Proceedings of the 25th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics (LT25) (Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 67-13 August 2008). The majority of the special invited lectures, such as the London prize lectures, the international union of pure and applied physics (IUPAP) young scientist award lectures, the plenary, half-plenary and public lectures, and the historical lectures presented at the LT25 conference, are included. The papers relating to the oral and poster presentations will appear in part II of the proceedings in a dedicated open access issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series (2009 J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 150). In addition to the organizer's report and a summary of the new developments in low temperature physics, which can also be found in this issue, part II provides useful information about LT25, such as an overview of committees, sponsors, exhibitors, and some conference statistics. To ensure the high publication standard mandated by Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter and Journal of Physics: Conference Series every paper was reviewed by at least one referee before it was accepted for publication. The editors are indebted to many colleagues for invaluable assistance in the preparation and review of 900 papers appearing in both parts I and II of these proceedings. In particular, we would like to thank Carlo Beenakker, Jeroen van den Brink, Hans Brom, Jos de Jongh, Horst Rogalla, Fons de Waele, and Jan Zaanen.

  6. 75th Anniversary of the Stiles-Crawford Effect(s): a celebratory special symposium, October 23, 2008; Rochester, New York.

    PubMed

    Enoch, Jay M; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2009-01-01

    There are rather few articles which, so-to-speak, serve to change the landscape in a scientific field. One of those was the discovery of the "directional sensitivity of the retina" by Walter Stanley Stiles and Brian Hewson Crawford (first reported in 1933). Subsequently, their findings were subdivided by Hansen into two logical components, "the Stiles-Crawford Effects of the First and Second Kinds, (SCE- 1 and SCE-2)." The former (SCE-1) dealt with aspects of their research which addressed alterations in perceived brightness of a visual stimulus; the second (SCE-2) was associated with the perceived hue and saturation of these visual stimuli. These discoveries arose out of a failed attempt by W.S. Stiles and B.H. Crawford to measure properly the areas of the entrance pupils of their experimental subjects as part of a research program which addressed problems of glare, e.g., disability glare, in illuminating engineering. Their research was conducted at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), which is located in Teddington, Middlesex, England. These two fine scientists properly deduced the reason for the failure of their experimental design, and they effectively described and defined a new feature of the visual system which was largely ascribed to the retina. In time, it was realized that this phenomenon was associated in large measure with the waveguide/fiber-optics properties of photoreceptors, and that this was a feature shared by virtually all vertebrate species. This paper is divided into two parts. In the first part, Enoch describes, as best he can, the culture and working conditions at NPL during 1959/60 when he served as a post-doctoral fellow with W.S. Stiles. And in the second part of this paper, the authors describe the findings of W.S. Stiles and B.H. Crawford at the time of their discovery. Today, we celebrate the 75th Anniversary of that research. The organizing committee for this program (alphabetically) is David Atchison, Jay M. Enoch, Vasudevan

  7. The effect of anatomical modeling on space radiation dose estimates: a comparison of doses for NASA phantoms and the 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile male and female astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadori, Amir A.; Van Baalen, Mary; Shavers, Mark R.; Dodge, Charles; Semones, Edward J.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2011-03-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) performs organ dosimetry and risk assessment for astronauts using model-normalized measurements of the radiation fields encountered in space. To determine the radiation fields in an organ or tissue of interest, particle transport calculations are performed using self-shielding distributions generated with the computer program CAMERA to represent the human body. CAMERA mathematically traces linear rays (or path lengths) through the computerized anatomical man (CAM) phantom, a computational stylized model developed in the early 1970s with organ and body profiles modeled using solid shapes and scaled to represent the body morphometry of the 1950 50th percentile (PCTL) Air Force male. With the increasing use of voxel phantoms in medical and health physics, a conversion from a mathematical-based to a voxel-based ray-tracing algorithm is warranted. In this study, the voxel-based ray tracer (VoBRaT) is introduced to ray trace voxel phantoms using a modified version of the algorithm first proposed by Siddon (1985 Med. Phys. 12 252-5). After validation, VoBRAT is used to evaluate variations in body self-shielding distributions for NASA phantoms and six University of Florida (UF) hybrid phantoms, scaled to represent the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female astronaut body morphometries, which have changed considerably since the inception of CAM. These body self-shielding distributions are used to generate organ dose equivalents and effective doses for five commonly evaluated space radiation environments. It is found that dosimetric differences among the phantoms are greatest for soft radiation spectra and light vehicular shielding.

  8. The effect of anatomical modeling on space radiation dose estimates: a comparison of doses for NASA phantoms and the 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile male and female astronauts.

    PubMed

    Bahadori, Amir A; Van Baalen, Mary; Shavers, Mark R; Dodge, Charles; Semones, Edward J; Bolch, Wesley E

    2011-03-21

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) performs organ dosimetry and risk assessment for astronauts using model-normalized measurements of the radiation fields encountered in space. To determine the radiation fields in an organ or tissue of interest, particle transport calculations are performed using self-shielding distributions generated with the computer program CAMERA to represent the human body. CAMERA mathematically traces linear rays (or path lengths) through the computerized anatomical man (CAM) phantom, a computational stylized model developed in the early 1970s with organ and body profiles modeled using solid shapes and scaled to represent the body morphometry of the 1950 50th percentile (PCTL) Air Force male. With the increasing use of voxel phantoms in medical and health physics, a conversion from a mathematical-based to a voxel-based ray-tracing algorithm is warranted. In this study, the voxel-based ray tracer (VoBRaT) is introduced to ray trace voxel phantoms using a modified version of the algorithm first proposed by Siddon (1985 Med. Phys. 12 252-5). After validation, VoBRAT is used to evaluate variations in body self-shielding distributions for NASA phantoms and six University of Florida (UF) hybrid phantoms, scaled to represent the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female astronaut body morphometries, which have changed considerably since the inception of CAM. These body self-shielding distributions are used to generate organ dose equivalents and effective doses for five commonly evaluated space radiation environments. It is found that dosimetric differences among the phantoms are greatest for soft radiation spectra and light vehicular shielding.

  9. Stream flow changes across North Carolina (USA) 1955-2012 with implications for environmental flow management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meitzen, Kimberly M.

    2016-01-01

    This study examines changes in stream flow conditions across North Carolina, relates these changes to geomorphological conditions of rivers, and makes recommendations for environmental flow guidelines to conserve and protect riverine ecosystems. Monthly stream flow percentile metrics (90th, 75th, 50th, 25th, and 10th percentiles) are compared over two time periods (1955-1980 and 1984-2012) for 63 gages distributed statewide. The results showed that stream flow changes vary spatially by flow magnitude, ecoregion, basin, and temporally by months. The greatest changes involve decreases to the 10th, 25th, 50th, and 75th percentiles and the least amount of change is associated with 90th percentile flows. The spring and summer months of February through August have the greatest flow reductions, while September, November, and December exhibit magnitude increases for the 75th and 90th percentile flows. The Blue Ridge has the least amount of change, whereas the Piedmont and Coastal Plain have the greatest change. The few gages that do not show significant magnitude decreases to the 10th percentile flow are below major dams on the Neuse, Cape Fear, and Roanoke rivers. These same dammed rivers exhibit increases to the 90th percentile flows. The Tar River Basin, which is free of dams, shows opposite effects, with significant decreases to the 10th percentile flows and minimal changes to the 75th and 90th percentile flows. This study elucidates the importance of establishing environmental flow criteria that apply statewide across North Carolina. Sustainable environmental flow criteria need to be established that conserve seasonal patterns of flows, sustain low flows (from increases and decreases), and protect headwater and tributary accumulation areas from over-abstraction.

  10. 50TH Project Air Force, 1946 - 1996.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    Baran’s work on the concept of "distributed communications"— now known as packet switching . Developed in the mid- 1960s in response to an Air Force...provided the natural com- 40 plement to the equally pathbreaking work under way at RAND on U.S. strategy for the nuclear era. They made possible...effects of arms control on nuclear power plants in California. Analysis for Negotiation Starting in the early 1960s with the Underground Test Ban

  11. AIP 50th anniversary: Physics vade mecum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, H. L.

    This compendium is intended to be of use to the wide spectrum of physicists associated with the AIP through its member societies. Twenty-two subjects broadly representative of physics as a whole are discussed. Each subeditor was charged to compile within 10 pages the most useful information, formulas, numerical data, definitions, and references most physicists would like to have at hand. The General Section is a compilation of the fundamental constants, the SI units and prefixes, conversion factors, magnitudes, basic mathematical and physics formulas, formulas useful in practical physics applications, and a list of physics data centers. The particular fields considered are: acoustics, astronomy and astrophysics, atomic collision properties, atomic spectroscopy, biological physics, cryogenics, crystallography, elementary particles, energy demand, energy supply, fluid dynamics, high polymer physics, medical physics, molecular spectroscopy and structure, nuclear physics, optics, plasma physics, rheology, solid state physics, surface physics, and thermophysics.

  12. 50th Anniversary of Acta stomatologica Croatica

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Acta stomatologica Croatisa (ASCRO) is scientific-professional magazine whose first issue was published back in 1966. Ever since the magazine publishers were the School of Dental Medicine of the University of Zagreb and the Croatian Dental Association of the Croatian Medical Association. Over the past fifty years two hundred regular editions were pubslihed along with three additions. The magazine has been internationally indexed and it was granted the DOI number. In this way by means of CrossCheck possible plagiarisms are being checked which aims at obtaining originality of the published results. Another peculiarity of ASCRO is bilingualism throughout the whole edition, international recognizability, open source and tradition based on sound foundations. PMID:27688420

  13. 50th anniversary of the laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolotti, M.

    2010-09-01

    On July, 7, 1960 a press conference at Huyghes announced that Maiman had assembled and put into operation the first laser. It was the very pulsed ruby laser that everybody knows today. The announcement came as a bomb. Nobody expected that in an unknown laboratory, new to the race to build a laser, this result could be obtained. It was such an unexpected result that many still today mantain that the true laser was discovered at Bell by Shawlow. This result was achieved through a long story which passed by the Townes maser and many tentative experiments and discussions both in the USA and Soviet Union. In this special issue we present a collection of papers which provide further information as to what happened after Einstein introduced the concept of stimulated emission. The first paper is a short paper by Townes on the development of the physics of microwaves following the creation of the maser. When the laser came on the stage one of its properties was the inherent coherence of the emitted light. Emil Wolf's contribution enlights the early days of coherence to which he so much contributed and the very timely first Rochester Conference which was held on June 27-29, 1960 a few days before the Times announcement of the Maiman achievement. Important contributions were given by Soviet Scientists and, Svetlana Lukishova's contributions helps us understand the work of Valentin Fabrikant which was mostly unknown to western scientists. At the end of his life, Maiman went to Vancouver in Canada and Andrew H. Rawicz gives his testimoniancy of his friendship there. Coherence and the statistical properties of laser light were much studied and we have two exceptional papers by Roy Pike and Jan Perina discussing these arguments. The issue also contains three more papers presenting some earlier achievements in the construction of multiquantumwell laser (M. L. Dotor, P. Huertas, P. A. Postigo, D. Golmayo and F. Briones), the first measurements on very short pulses (H. P. Weber and R. Dandliker) and spatial coherence (D. P. Barato and M. L. Calvo).

  14. [Changes in heart rate variability after myocardial infarction. Value of Poincareé's diagram].

    PubMed

    Copie, X; Le Heuzey, J Y; Iliou, M C; Pousset, F; Lavergne, T; Guize, L

    1995-11-01

    The variability of the heart rate is reduced after myocardial infarction. It then progressively increases, to return to near normal values after several months. However, these changes in heart rate variability occur at the same time as slowing of the heart rate which makes interpretation difficult. Poincaré's diagram is constructed from a Holter recording plotting each RR interval against the preceding RR interval. The authors have developed a geometric approach to this diagram to evaluate parasympathetic tone for a given heart rate. By measuring the dispersion in height of the Poincaré's diagram, the authors evaluate the shor-term variability for a given RR interval. Two 24 hr Holter recordings were performed in 52 patients at one and two weeks after a myocardial infarction. The dispersion in the height of the Poincaré's diagrams was measured at the 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 90th percentiles of the total dispersion. The authors have shown an increase in the short-term variability of the shortest RR intervals (1th, 25th and 50th percentiles) which is not observed in the longer RR intervals (75th and 90th percentiles). In conclusion, theres is an increase in the heart rate variability at the shortest RR intervals. This suggests that the recovery of parasympathic tone after myocardial infarction occurs mainly at the fastest heart rates.

  15. Metformin supplementation and life span in Fischer-344 rats.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daniel L; Elam, Calvin F; Mattison, Julie A; Lane, Mark A; Roth, George S; Ingram, Donald K; Allison, David B

    2010-05-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) has been known for more than 70 years to extend life span and delay disease in rodent models. Metformin administration in rodent disease models has been shown to delay cancer incidence and progression, reduce cardiovascular disease and extend life span. To more directly test the potential of metformin supplementation (300 mg/kg/day) as a CR mimetic, life-span studies were performed in Fischer-344 rats and compared with ad libitum feeding and CR (30%). The CR group had significantly reduced food intake and body weight throughout the study. Body weight was significantly reduced in the metformin group compared with control during the middle of the study, despite similar weekly food intake. Although CR significantly extended early life span (25th quantile), metformin supplementation did not significantly increase life span at any quantile (25th, 50th, 75th, or 90th), overall or maximum life span (p > .05) compared with control.

  16. Changes of the transverse diameter and volume and dosimetry before the 25th fraction during the course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Haihua; Hu Wei; Ding Weijun; Shan Guoping; Wang Wei; Yu Changhui; Wang Biyun; Shao Minghai; Wang Jianhua; Yang Weifang

    2012-07-01

    To quantify changes of the transverse diameter and volume and dosimetry, and to illustrate the inferiority of non-replanning during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. Fifty-three NPC patients who received IMRT in 33 fractions were enrolled in this prospective trial. Before the 25th fraction, a new simulation computed tomography (CT) scan was acquired for all patients. The dose-volume histograms of the phantom plan were compared with the initial plan. Significant reduction of the transverse diameter of the nasopharyngeal, the neck, and 2 parotid glands volume was observed on second CT compared with the first CT (mean reduction 7.48 {+-} 4.45 mm, 6.80 {+-} 15.14 mm, 5.70 {+-} 6.26 mL, and 5.04 {+-} 5.85 mL, respectively; p < 0.01). The maximum dose and V-40 of the spinal cord, mean dose, and V30 of the left and right parotid, and V-50 of the brain stem were increased significantly in the phantom plan compared with the initial plan (mean increase 4.75 {+-} 5.55 Gy, 7.18 {+-} 10.07%, 4.51 {+-} 8.55 Gy, 6.59 {+-} 17.82%, 5.33 {+-} 8.55 Gy, 11.68 {+-} 17.11% and 1.48 {+-} 3.67%, respectively; p < 0.01). On the basis of dose constraint criterion in the RTOG0225 protocol, the dose of the normal critical structures for 52.83% (28/53) of the phantom plans were out of limit compared with 1.89% (1/53) of the initial plans (p < 0.0001). Because of the significant change in anatomy and dose before the 25th fraction during IMRT, replanning should be necessary during IMRT with NPC.

  17. The influence of physique on dose conversion coefficients for idealised external photon exposures: a comparison of doses for Chinese male phantoms with 10th, 50th and 90th percentile anthropometric parameters.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wei; He, Hengda; Liu, Qian

    2017-03-22

    For evaluating radiation risk, the construction of anthropomorphic computational phantoms with a variety of physiques can help reduce the uncertainty that is due to anatomical variation. In our previous work, three deformable Chinese reference male phantoms with 10th, 50th and 90th percentile body mass indexes and body circumference physiques (DCRM-10, DCRM-50 and DCRM-90) were constructed to represent underweight, normal weight and overweight Chinese adult males, respectively. In the present study, the phantoms were updated by correcting the fat percentage to improve the precision of radiological dosimetry evaluations. The organ dose conversion coefficients for each phantom were calculated and compared for four idealized external photon exposures from 15 keV to 10 MeV, using the Monte Carlo method. The dosimetric results for the three deformable Chinese reference male phantom (DCRM) phantoms indicated that variations in physique can cause as much as a 20% difference in the organ dose conversion coefficients. When the photon energy was <50 keV, the discrepancy was greater. The irradiation geometry and organ position can also affect the difference in radiological dosimetry between individuals with different physiques. Hence, it is difficult to predict the conversion coefficients of the phantoms from the anthropometric parameters alone. Nevertheless, the complex organ conversion coefficients presented in this report will be helpful for evaluating the radiation risk for large groups of people with various physiques.

  18. The 25th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-two papers are documented regarding aeronautical and spacecraft hardware. Technological areas include actuators, latches, cryogenic mechanisms, vacuum tribology, bearings, robotics, ground support equipment for aerospace applications, and other mechanisms.

  19. Peer assistance reaches its 25th year.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Diana

    2009-08-01

    This column traces the history of the efforts of the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists to provide assistance to members struggling with addiction. The work of the Ad Hoc Committee on Chemical Dependency, the Peer Assistance Advisors, Anesthetists in Recovery, the Council on Public Interest in Anesthesia, and the Wellness Program are examined.

  20. Clinical association of baseline levels of conjugated dienes in low-density lipoprotein and nitric oxide with aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and their relationship with immunoglobulins and Th1-to-Th2 ratio

    PubMed Central

    Haddouche, Mustapha; Meziane, Warda; Hadjidj, Zeyneb; Mesli, Naima; Aribi, Mourad

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to highlight the clinical association of baseline levels of conjugated dienes in low-density lipoprotein (LDL-BCD) and nitric oxide (NO) with immunoglobulins (Igs) and T helper (Th)1/Th2 ratio in patients with newly diagnosed B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Patients and methods Thirty-two newly diagnosed patients with aggressive B-cell NHL and 25 age-, sex-, and body-mass-index-matched healthy controls were randomly selected for a cross-sectional case–control study conducted at the Hematology Department of Tlemcen Medical Centre University (northwest of Algeria). Results Circulating levels of LDL-BCD and NO and those of IgA and IgM were significantly higher in patients than in controls. The levels of Th1/Th2 ratio and plasma total antioxidant capacity were significantly lower in patients compared with controls, while malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels were significantly higher in patients. B-cell NHL was significantly associated with high levels of LDL-BCD from 25th to 75th percentile (25th percentile: relative risk [RR] =2.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.42–3.59, P=0.014; 50th percentile: RR =2.84, 95% CI 1.72–4.68, P<0.001; 75th percentile: RR =5.43, 95% CI 2.58–11.42, P<0.001). Similarly, the disease was significantly associated with high levels of NO production from 25th to 75th percentile (25th percentile: RR =2.07, 95% CI 1.25–3.44, P=0.024; 50th percentile: RR =2.78, 95% CI 1.63–4.72, P<0.001; 75th percentile: RR =4.68, 95% CI 2.21–9.91, P<0.001). Moreover, LDL-BCD levels were positively and significantly correlated with interferon (IFN)-γ, whereas NO levels were inversely and significantly correlated with IFN-γ and Th1/Th2 ratio. Conclusion LDL-BCD and NO production seem to be associated with aggressive B-cell NHL and alteration of Th1/Th2 ratio. Our results have to be examined using ex vivo mechanistic studies leading to further investigations of these parameters, with an interest in the

  1. Investigation of Coulomb stress changes in south Tibet (central Himalayas) due to the 25th April 2015 M W 7.8 Nepal earthquake using a Coulomb stress transfer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xu; Meng, Guojie

    2016-10-01

    After M W 7.8 Nepal earthquake occurred, the rearrangement of stresses in the crust commonly leads to subsequent damaging earthquakes. We present the calculations of the coseismic stress changes that resulted from the 25th April event using models of regional faults designed according to south Tibet-Nepal structure, and show that some indicative significant stress increases. We calculate static stress changes caused by the displacement of a fault on which dislocations happen and an earthquake occurs. A M W 7.3 earthquake broke on 12 May at a distance of 130 km SEE of the M W 7.8 earthquake, whose focus roughly located on high Coulomb stress change (CSC) site. Aftershocks (first 15 days after the mainshock) are associated with stress increase zone caused by the main rupture. We set receiver faults with specified strikes, dips, and rakes, on which the stresses imparted by the source fault are resolved. Four group normal faults to the north of the Nepal earthquake seismogenic fault were set as receiver faults and variant results followed. We provide a discussion on Coulomb stress transfer for the seismogenic fault, which is useful to identify potential future rupture zones.

  2. Report on the 5‘th scientific meeting of the “Verein zur Förderung des Wissenschaftlichen Nachwuchses in der Neurologie” (NEUROWIND e.V.) held in Motzen, Germany, Oct. 25th – Oct. 27th, 2013

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    From october 25th - 27th 2013, the 5th NEUROWIND e.V. meeting was held in Motzen, Brandenburg, Germany. This year more than 60 doctoral students and postdocs from over 25 different groups working in German university hospitals or research institutes attended the meeting to discuss their latest findings in the fields of neuroimmunology, neurodegeneration and neurovascular research. All participants appreciated the stimulating environment in Motzen, Brandenburg, and people took the opportunity for scientific exchange, discussion about ongoing projects and already started further collaborations. Like in the previous years, the symposium was regarded as a very well organized platform to support research of young investigators in Germany. According to the major aim of NEUROWIND e.V. to support younger researchers in Germany the 3rd NEUROWIND YOUNG SCIENTIST AWARD for experimental neurology was awarded to Ruth Stassart working in the group of Klaus Armin Nave and Wolfgang Brück (MPI Göttingen and Department of Neuropathology, Göttingen Germany). The successful work was published in Nature Neuroscience entitled “A role for Swann cell-derived neuregulin-1 in remyelination”. This outstanding paper deals with the function of Schwann cell neuregulin as an endogenous factor for myelin repair. The award is endowed with 20.000 Euro sponsored by Merck Serono GmbH, Darmstadt, Germany (unrestricted educational grant). This year’s keynote lecture was given by Albert Ludolph, Head of the Department of Neurology at the University Clinic of Ulm. Dr. Ludolph highlighted the particular role of individual scientists for the development of research concepts in Alzheimer´s disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). PMID:24330587

  3. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: On the 50th anniversary of the L F Vereshchagin Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS (Scientific outreach session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 23 April 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stishov, S. M.; Khvostantsev, L. G.; Slesarev, V. N.; Popova, S. V.; Brazhkin, V. V.; Dyuzheva, T. I.; Dzhavadov, L. N.; Gromnitskaya, E. L.; Stepanov, G. N.; Timofeev, Yu A.; Dizhur, E. M.; Venttsel, V. A.; Voronovskii, A. N.; Ryzhov, V. N.; Barabanov, A. F.; Magnitskaya, M. V.; Tareeva, E. E.

    2008-10-01

    A scientific outreach session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) was held on 23 April 2008 at the Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region. The session was devoted to the 50th anniversary of the Institute. The following reports were presented: (1) Stishov S M (Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) "The Institute for High Pressure Physics is now 50 (opening address)"; (2) Khvostantsev L G and Slesarev V N (Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) "Large-volume high-pressure devices for physical investigations"; (3) Popova S V, Brazhkin V V and Dyuzheva T I (Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) "Structural phase transitions in highly compressed substances and the synthesis of high-pressure phases"; (4) Dzhavadov L N, Gromnitskaya E L, Stepanov G N and Timofeev Yu A (Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) "Studies of the thermodynamic, elastic, superconducting, and magnetic properties of substances at high pressures"; (5) Dizhur E M, Venttsel V A and Voronovskii A N (Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region), "Quantum transport at high pressures"; (6) Ryzhov V N, Barabanov A F, Magnitskaya M V and Tareyeva E E (Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) "Theoretical studies of condensed matter"; (7) Bugakov V I, Antanovich A A, Konyaev Yu S and Slesarev V N (Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) "Designing new construction and superhard materials and related tools." An abridged version of reports 1 -6 is presented below. • The Institute for High Pressure Physics is now 50 (opening address), Stishov S M Physics-Uspekhi, 2008, Volume 51, Number 10, Pages 1055-1059 • Large-volume high-pressure devices for physical investigations, Khvostantsev L G and Slesarev V N Physics-Uspekhi, 2008, Volume 51, Number 10, Pages 1059

  4. Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics: a special issue in honour of Stuart Dowker's 75th birthday Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics: a special issue in honour of Stuart Dowker's 75th birthday

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowker, Fay; Elizalde, Emilio; Kirsten, Klaus

    2012-09-01

    extension that impacts particles never entering that region. What is the gravitational analogue for that situation? The analogue concerns the impact a localized curvature has, and the cone is an excellent example to shed light on that question. Related to the method of images, Stuart has done an enormous amount of work on the influence of topology and curvature on quantum field theory. An example is [17], where the vacuum stress-energy tensor for Clifford-Klein forms of the flat or spherical type were computed. Another strand we would like to mention is Stuart's interest in higher spin equations. In [18], Steven Weinberg wrote down a set of higher spin equations that took his fancy. They involved angular momentum theory, which has always pleased Stuart, and the description was an alternative to Roger Penrose's use of two-spinors. Investigating the inconsistencies that arose on coupling to gauge theories, Stuart extended the classic results in [19], from electromagnetism to gravity in accordance with his general philosophy; see, e.g., [20, 21, 22]. Lately, Stuart is best known for his many applications in the context of zeta function regularization and its applications to quantum field theory under external conditions and spectral theory. He can be considered the world expert on particular case calculations with a knowledge of the literature, old and recent, that is not seen very often and which originated in the many hours spent at different (mostly British) libraries. His attitude towards explicit computations is nicely summarized by himself: 'I have always been interested in exact solutions, even if unphysical, so long as they are pretty. They seem to be working mechanisms that fit together, complete in themselves, like a watch.' The following issue in honour of Stuart's 75th birthday contains contributions that touch upon the various topics he has worked on. References [1] de Broglie L 1928 La mécanique ondulatoire (Paris: Gauthier-Villars) [2] Castillejo L, Dalitz R H

  5. Characteristic ground motions of the 25th April 2015 Nepal earthquake (Mw 7.9) and its implications for the structural design codes for the border areas of India to Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Babita; Chingtham, Prasanta; Sharma, Varun; Kumar, Vikas; Mandal, H. S.; Mishra, O. P.

    2017-01-01

    The 25th April 2015 Nepal Earthquake was found associated with a series of aftershocks, and the mainshock rupture propagated predominantly towards SE direction where a major aftershock (Mw 7.3) rocked on 12th May 2015 to the east of the mainshock that enhanced the rate of occurrence of aftershocks in the affected region. We conducted a rigorous analysis of strong motion data to understand the characteristics of ground motion and their bearing on the structural design codes, responsible for the damage to the structures in the border area of India to Nepal. The effect of ground geology on the acceleration response spectra are also evaluated using main shock and its associated strong earthquakes. All the sites used in the present analysis are located on alluvium deposits showing a predominant period of 0.242 sec for horizontal components and at 0.193 sec for vertical components. Our results demonstrated that observed Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) has prominent distribution in the border cities of UP and Bihar. PGA ranges from 3 to 80 cm/sec2 in the study region for the epicentral distance varying from 120 km to 495 km with respect to the source zone (mainshock). The Peak Ground Velocity (PGV) varies from 1 to 16 cm/sec while the Peak Ground Displacement (PGD) lies in between 1 cm and 20 cm for the same area. Our study shows that variation of PGD, PGV, and PGA are controlled and dictated by the geo-morphological constraints, besides the nature and extent of structural heterogeneities of the sub-surface geological formation materials. The obtained normalised spectral amplifications are compared with the Bureau of Indian Standard code for construction of buildings which shows that the current Indian building design code is within the structural limits proposed for the seismic forces at all periods for alluvium sites, suggesting that the structural heterogeneity has the strong role contributing towards the intrinsic attenuation in the seismic wave propagating medium. Our

  6. PREFACE: SANS-YuMO User Meeting at the Start-up of Scientific Experiments on the IBR-2M Reactor: Devoted to the 75th anniversary of Yu M Ostanevich's birth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordely, Valentin; Kuklin, Alexander; Balasoiu, Maria

    2012-03-01

    The Second International Workshop 'SANS-YuMO User Meeting at the Start-up of Scientific Experiments on the IBR-2M Reactor', devoted to the 75th anniversary of the birth of Professor Yu M Ostanevich (1936-1992), an outstanding neutron physicist and the founder of small-angle neutron scattering (field, group, and instrument) at JINR FLNPh, was held on 27-30 May at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics. The first Workshop was held in October 2006. Research groups from different neutron centers, universities and research institutes across Europe presented more than 35 oral and poster presentations describing scientific and methodological results. Most of them were obtained with the help of the YuMO instrument before the IBR-2 shutdown in 2006. For the last four years the IBR-2 reactor has been shut down for refurbishment. At the end of 2010 the physical launch of the IBR-2M reactor was finally realized. Nowadays the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique is applied to a wide range of scientific problems in condensed matter, soft condensed matter, biology and nanotechnology, and despite the fact that there are currently over 30 SANS instruments in operation worldwide at both reactor and spallation sources, the demand for beam-time is considerably higher than the time available. It must be remembered, however, that as the first SANS machine on a steady-state reactor was constructed at the Institute Laue Langevin, Grenoble, the first SANS instrument on a 'white' neutron pulsed beam was accomplished at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research at the IBR-30 reactor, beamline N5. During the meeting Yu M Ostanevich's determinative and crucial contribution to the construction of spectrometers at the IBR-2 high-pulsed reactor was presented, as well as his contribution to the development of the time-of-flight (TOF) small-angle scattering technique, and a selection of other scientific areas. His leadership and outstanding scientific achievements in applications of the

  7. Optimal Skin-to-Stone Distance Is a Positive Predictor for Successful Outcomes in Upper Ureter Calculi following Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy: A Bayesian Model Averaging Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kang Su; Jung, Hae Do; Ham, Won Sik; Chung, Doo Yong; Kang, Yong Jin; Jang, Won Sik; Kwon, Jong Kyou; Choi, Young Deuk; Lee, Joo Yong

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether skin-to-stone distance (SSD), which remains controversial in patients with ureter stones, can be a predicting factor for one session success following extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) in patients with upper ureter stones. Patients and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 1,519 patients who underwent their first ESWL between January 2005 and December 2013. Among these patients, 492 had upper ureter stones that measured 4–20 mm and were eligible for our analyses. Maximal stone length, mean stone density (HU), and SSD were determined on pretreatment non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT). For subgroup analyses, patients were divided into four groups. Group 1 consisted of patients with SSD<25th percentile, group 2 consisted of patients with SSD in the 25th to 50th percentile, group 3 patients had SSD in the 50th to 75th percentile, and group 4 patients had SSD≥75th percentile. Results In analyses of group 2 patients versus others, there were no statistical differences in mean age, stone length and density. However, the one session success rate in group 2 was higher than other groups (77.9% vs. 67.0%; P = 0.032). The multivariate logistic regression model revealed that shorter stone length, lower stone density, and the group 2 SSD were positive predictors for successful outcomes in ESWL. Using the Bayesian model-averaging approach, longer stone length, lower stone density, and group 2 SSD can be also positive predictors for successful outcomes following ESWL. Conclusions Our data indicate that a group 2 SSD of approximately 10 cm is a positive predictor for success following ESWL. PMID:26659086

  8. 76 FR 11933 - 50th Anniversary of the Peace Corps

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... better lives for themselves and their communities. From the first group of volunteers to arrive in Ghana... present, for their many contributions to the cause of global peace and friendship. ] IN WITNESS WHEREOF,...

  9. Population, poverty alleviation issues considered at 50th commission session.

    PubMed

    1994-05-01

    ESCAP's (UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific) work program has focused on poverty alleviation through economic growth and social development. A paper was issued on this theme as a follow-up to the Bali Declaration on Population and Sustainable Development and as regional preparation for the International Conference on Population and Development. A meeting on April 5-13, 1994, in New Delhi stressed the new philosophy on development. The emphasis was on empowerment of individuals and growth of individuals' independence and self-sufficiency. ESCAP's programs have targeted women, disabled persons, human resource development, and population growth.

  10. A 50th anniversary guidebook for the desert project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Desert Project encompasses a 400 square mile areas studied by a team of soil scientists and geologists from 1957 to 1972. The project was staffed by personnel of the Soil Survey Investigations, U.S. Soil Conservation Service, and work was done in cooperation with the Agricultural Experiment Stat...

  11. 'Focus on Marshall' Marks Milestone With 50th Episode

    NASA Video Gallery

    Hard to believe, but it's been five years since the Marshall Space Flight Center began a video program called "Focus on Marshall." In those five years, co-hosts Bill Hubscher and Lori Meggs, have t...

  12. Appropriate Technology for Sustainable Living. 50th Yearbook, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wicklein, Robert C., Ed.

    These eleven papers focus on the need for technology education (TE) to address technological problem solving from a more holistic and appropriate level--less high tech, more thoughtful, and using available resources. "Philosophical Rationale for Appropriate Technology (AT)" (Robert C. Wicklein, Charles J. Kachmar) discusses concerns and…

  13. 50th Anniversary of Radiation Budget Measurements from Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raschke, Ehrhard, ,, Dr.; Kinne, Stefan, ,, Dr.

    2010-05-01

    The "space race" between the USA and the Soviet Union supported rapid developments of instruments to measure properties of the atmosphere from satellite platforms. The satellite Explorer 7 (launch on 13 October 1959) was the first to carry sensors which were sensitive to the fluxes of solar (shortwave) and terrestrial (longwave) radiation leaving the Earth to space. Improved versions of those sensors and more complicated radiometers were flown on various operational and experimental satellites of the Nimbus, ESSA, TIROS, COSMOS, and NOAA series. There results, although often inherent to strong sampling insufficiencies, provided already a general picture on the spatial distribution and seasonal variability of radiation budget components at the Top of the Atmosphere, which finally could be refined with the more recent and more accurate and complete data sets of the experiments ERBE, CERES and ScRaB. Numerical analyses of climate data complemented such measurements to obtain a complete picture on the radiation budget at various levels within the atmosphere and at ground. These data is now used to validate the performance of climate models.

  14. 76 FR 26923 - 50th Anniversary of the Freedom Rides

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-09

    ... struggling to implement the ideals of justice and equality set forth in our founding. The Freedom Rides..., organized by the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC... movement for equality and steer the course of our Nation. Because of their efforts, and the work of...

  15. The Classic Guide to Better Writing. 50th Anniversary Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flesch, Rudolf; Lass, A. H.

    This handbook, first published 50 years ago, is designed to teach individuals how to write more effectively. It offers step-by-step techniques and exercises to write simply, clearly, and correctly. New features in this edition of the handbook include contemporary examples, and guidelines for computer assisted research and writing and for…

  16. 50th Annual Fuze Conference. Session 1 and 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-11

    ESAD) AMRAAM (FMU-49/B) Legacy System JPF (FMU-152A/B) DSU-33 (Sensor) 1,2,3,4 1,2,3,4 1,2,3,4 1,2,3,4 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019...M439, M442 – 2.75 in. rocket • MK 420-BD Countermines/Demolitions/AT Munitions • APOBS Fuzing • M1134A3 for MICLIC • M147 TDFD • M87A1 Volcano Tank

  17. Automated Prediction of Early Blood Transfusion and Mortality in Trauma Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-24

    life-threatening injury or illness without available prehospital VSs. To avoid potential confusion with neurogenic shock, cervical spine injury patients...3 PPG features included the 25th percentile and 75th percentile of the PPG amplitude and the PPG amplitude interquartile range (25thY75th percentile...specificity of prediction are shown in Tables 1 to 3. Group 1 (prehospital HR only) AUROC for all post- admission time intervals ranged from 0.56 to

  18. PAX6: 25th anniversary and more to learn.

    PubMed

    Cvekl, Ales; Callaerts, Patrick

    2016-04-25

    The DNA-binding transcription factor PAX6 was cloned 25 years ago by multiple teams pursuing identification of human and mouse eye disease causing genes, cloning vertebrate homologues of pattern-forming regulatory genes identified in Drosophila, or abundant eye-specific transcripts. Since its discovery in 1991, genetic, cellular, molecular and evolutionary studies on Pax6 mushroomed in the mid 1990s leading to the transformative thinking regarding the genetic program orchestrating both early and late stages of eye morphogenesis as well as the origin and evolution of diverse visual systems. Since Pax6 is also expressed outside of the eye, namely in the central nervous system and pancreas, a number of important insights into the development and function of these organs have been amassed. In most recent years, genome-wide technologies utilizing massively parallel DNA sequencing have begun to provide unbiased insights into the regulatory hierarchies of specification, determination and differentiation of ocular cells and neurogenesis in general. This review is focused on major advancements in studies on mammalian eye development driven by studies of Pax6 genes in model organisms and future challenges to harness the technology-driven opportunities to reconstruct, step-by-step, the transition from naïve ectoderm, neuroepithelium and periocular mesenchyme/neural crest cells into the three-dimensional architecture of the eye.

  19. Earthquake Engineering Research Center: 25th anniversry edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-10-01

    The Earthquake Engineering Research Center exists to conduct research and develop technical information in all areas pertaining to earthquake engineering, including strong ground motion and ground failure, response of natural and manmade structures to earthquakes, design of structures to resist earthquakes, development of new systems for earthquake protection, and development of architectural and public policy aspects of earthquake engineering. The annual report for 1992-93 presents information on: Current Research Programs; Contracts and Grants; Public Service Program; National Information Service for Earthquake Engineering; Core Administration; Committees of the Earthquake Engineering Research Center; Research Participants - Faculty; and Research Participants - Students.

  20. Naval Training Device Center 25th Anniversary Commemorative Technical Journal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amico, G. Vincent; Regan, James J.

    Both the technical history of training devices and the issues which currently confront their design and use are discussed by a group of distinguished scientists and engineers. A blend of human factors and engineering paper reflects the twin thrusts that make up the educational tools that are training device systems. (Author)

  1. 25th ANNUAL NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON MANAGING ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The model results may help landscape ecologists produce indicators of surface water condition, such that unique combinations of these indicators can be used to infer the potential cause(s) and origin(s) of non-point pollution, which may lead to eutrophication in aquatic ecosystem...

  2. Proceedings of the 25th Project Integration Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, M.

    1985-01-01

    Topics addressed include: silicon sheet growth and characterization, silicon material, process development, high-efficiency cells, environmental isolation, engineering sciences, and reliability physics.

  3. 25th anniversary article: Ion exchange in colloidal nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shuchi; Kershaw, Stephen V; Rogach, Andrey L

    2013-12-23

    We review the progress in ion exchange in a variety of nanocrystal structures from the earliest accounts dating back over two decades ago to the present day. In recent years the number of groups using this method to form otherwise difficult or inaccessible nanoparticle shapes and morphologies has increased considerably and the field has experienced a resurgence of interest. Whilst most of the early work on cation exchange centered on II-VI materials, the methodology has been expanded to cover a far broader range of semiconductor nanocrystals including low toxicity I-III-VI materials and the much less facile III-V materials. The extent of exchange can be controlled leading to lightly doped nanoparticles, alloys, core-shells, segmented rods and dots-in-rods. Progress has been driven by a better understanding of the underlying principles of the exchange process - from thermodynamic factors (differences in cation solubilities); the interactions between ions and transfer agents (solvents, ligands, anions, co-dopants); ionic in-diffusion mechanisms and kinetics. More recent availability of very detailed electron microscopy coupled with image reconstruction techniques has been a valuable tool to investigate the resulting heterostructures and internal interfaces. We start by surveying the range of synthetic approaches most often used to carry out ion exchange, mainly focusing on cation replacement strategies, and then describe the rich variety of nanostructures these techniques can bring forth. We also describe some of the principles that are used to establish the relative ease of exchange and to systematically improve the process where the basic energetics are less favorable. To help further the understanding of the underlying fundamentals we have gathered together useful data from the literature on solubilities, cation and anion hardness, ligand and solvent Lewis acid or base strengths for a wide range of chemical species generally used. We offer a perspective on the outlook for the field in terms of the emerging applications and the ion exchange derived materials that will enable them.

  4. Proceedings, 25th international conference on ground control in mining

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, S.S.; Mark, C.; Finfinger, G.; Tadolini, S.; Wahab Khair, A.; Heasley, K.; Luo, Y.

    2006-07-01

    Topics covered include: computer and physical modelling; geology in ground control; geophysics in ground control; ground control; impoundments stability; longwall gateroad support design; longwall operations; longwall shields and standing supports; mine design; multiple-seam mining interactions; pillar and pillar extraction; roof bolting; roof bolting - resin; and subsidence. Most of the topics include a retrospective paper which summarises the progress of the subject field during the past 25 years.

  5. Transactions of the Conference of Army Mathematicians (25th).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    Army position, un- less so designated by other authorized documents. Sponsored by The Army Mthematics Stowing Committee on behalf of THE CHIEF OF...so designated by other authorized docui:ients. U. S. Army Research Office P. 0. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, North Carolina ot. K FOREWORD The...computer codes. The table presents the date of first publication of the users manuals, the authors name, and a short dis- crWipton of the code. The

  6. AFOSR Chemistry Program Review (25th) FY-80,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    John E. Jensen Dr. Michael Piliavin Dr. Siu-May Wong Gary P . Myer Dr. Hong S. Lim Dr. Leroy J. Miller 7. JUNIOR RESEARCH PERSONNEL: Camille I. VanAst...Induced Thermal Desorption," Lennard Wharton, J. P . Cowin, D. J. Auerbach and C. Becker, Surf. Sci., 78, 545 (1978). "Chemical Dynamics Investigated by...Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 1978). "UHF Application of Spring Loaded Teflon Seals," Daniel J. Auerbach , Charles A. Becker, James P . Cowin

  7. 25th Anniversary Article: Supramolecular Materials for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Boekhoven, Job

    2014-01-01

    In supramolecular materials, molecular building blocks are designed to interact with one another via non-covalent interactions in order to create function. This offers the opportunity to create structures similar to those found in living systems that combine order and dynamics through the reversibility of intermolecular bonds. For regenerative medicine there is a great need to develop materials that signal cells effectively, deliver or bind bioactive agents in vivo at controlled rates, have highly tunable mechanical properties, but at the same time, can biodegrade safely and rapidly after fulfilling their function. These requirements make supramolecular materials a great platform to develop regenerative therapies. This review illustrates the emerging science of these materials and their use in a number of applications for regenerative medicine. PMID:24496667

  8. A method to assess the influence of individual player performance distribution on match outcome in team sports.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Sam; Gupta, Ritu; McIntosh, Sam

    2016-10-01

    This study developed a method to determine whether the distribution of individual player performances can be modelled to explain match outcome in team sports, using Australian Rules football as an example. Player-recorded values (converted to a percentage of team total) in 11 commonly reported performance indicators were obtained for all regular season matches played during the 2014 Australian Football League season, with team totals also recorded. Multiple features relating to heuristically determined percentiles for each performance indicator were then extracted for each team and match, along with the outcome (win/loss). A generalised estimating equation model comprising eight key features was developed, explaining match outcome at a median accuracy of 63.9% under 10-fold cross-validation. Lower 75th, 90th and 95th percentile values for team goals and higher 25th and 50th percentile values for disposals were linked with winning. Lower 95th and higher 25th percentile values for Inside 50s and Marks, respectively, were also important contributors. These results provide evidence supporting team strategies which aim to obtain an even spread of goal scorers in Australian Rules football. The method developed in this investigation could be used to quantify the importance of individual contributions to overall team performance in team sports.

  9. Psychomotor development in Argentinean children aged 0-5 years.

    PubMed

    Lejarraga, Horacio; Pascucci, María Cecilia; Krupitzky, Sara; Kelmansky, Diana; Bianco, Ana; Martínez, Elena; Tibaldi, Fabián; Cameron, Noel

    2002-01-01

    In Argentina, there is no information on ages of attainment of developmental milestones and very few data about environmental factors that influence them. A national survey on the psychomotor development of children under 6 years of age was carried out with the help of 129 paediatricians. Logistic regression was applied to a final sample of 3573 healthy, normal children in order to estimate selected centiles (25th, 50th, 75th and 90th), together with their respective confidence intervals, of the ages of attainment of 78 developmental items belonging to the following areas: personal-social (18 items), fine motor (19), language (18) and gross motor (23). The 50th centile obtained for each of the 43 comparable items was compared with those obtained in previously standardised tests: DDST, Denver II, Bayley and Chilean scales. Neither significant nor systematic differences were found between our results and those described in the tests used for comparison. Multiple logistic regressions showed that social class, maternal education and sex (female) were associated with earlier attainment of some selected developmental items, achieved at ages later than 1 year. Selected items achieved before the first year of life were not affected by any of the independent environmental variables studied. The information is useful in helping paediatricians in their daily practice for surveillance of development, as baseline information for epidemiological studies on development in our country and for cross-cultural analysis.

  10. Biomechanics, exercise physiology, and the 75th anniversary of RQES.

    PubMed

    Hamill, Joseph; Haymes, Emily M

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the biomechanics and exercise physiology studies published in the Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport (RQES) over the past 75 years. Studies in biomechanics, a relatively new subdiscipline that evolved from kinesiology, first appeared in the journal about 40 years ago. Exercise physiology studies have been published in RQES throughout its history. Studies in both subdisciplines reflect areas of research that were of great interest at the time of their publication. Many of the leading scholars, past and present, in both biomechanics and exercise physiology were authors of papers in RQES.

  11. Biomechanics, Exercise Physiology, and the 75th Anniversary of RQES

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamill, Joseph; Haymes, Emily M.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the biomechanics and exercise physiology studies published in the Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport (RQES) over the past 75 years. Studies in biomechanics, a relatively new subdiscipline that evolved from kinesiology, first appeared in the journal about 40 years ago. Exercise physiology studies have…

  12. Commemorating the 75th Anniversary of the Blue Ridge Parkway.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Perriello, Thomas S.P. [D-VA-5

    2010-06-30

    09/23/2010 Received in the Senate and referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. Estimated water use and availability in the Pawtuxet and Quinebaug River basins, Rhode Island, 1995-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Nimiroski, Mark T.

    2007-01-01

    program, a computerized hydrograph-separation application, was used to analyze the data collected at two selected index stream-gaging stations to determine water availability on the basis of the 75th, 50th, and 25th percentiles of the total base flow; the base flow for the 7-day, 10-year low-flow scenario; and the base flow for the Aquatic Base Flow scenario for both stations. The index stream-gaging stations used in the analysis were the Branch River at Forestdale, Rhode Island (period of record 1957–1999) and the Nooseneck River at Nooseneck, Rhode Island (period of record 1964–1980). A regression equation was used to estimate unknown base-flow contributions from sand and gravel deposits at the two stations. The base-flow contributions from sand and gravel deposits and till deposits at the index stations were computed for June, July, August, and September within the periods of record, and divided by the area of each type of surficial deposit at each index station. These months were selected because they define a period when there is usually an increased demand for water and little to no precipitation. The base flows at the stream-gaging station Branch River at Forestdale, Rhode Island were lowest in August at the 75th, 50th, and 25th percentiles (29.67, 21.48, and 13.30 Mgal/d, respectively). The base flows at the stream-gaging station Nooseneck River at Nooseneck, Rhode Island were lowest in September at the 75th percentile (3.551 Mgal/d) and lowest in August at the 50th and 25th percentiles (2.554 and 1.811 Mgal/d). The base flows per unit area for the index stations were multiplied by the areas of sand and gravel and till in the studyarea subbasins to determine the amount of available water for each scenario. The water availability in the Pawtuxet River Basin at the 50th percentile ranged from 126.5 Mgal/d in August to 204.7 Mgal/d in June, and the total gross water availability for the 7-day, 10-year low-flow scenario at the 50th percentile ranged from 112

  14. A Prospective Study of Sedentary Behavior and Changes in the BMI Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Jonathan A.; Bottai, Matteo; Park, Yikyung; Marshall, Simon J.; Moore, Steven C.; Matthews, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to determine if baseline sedentary behavior was associated with changes in BMI over 9 years. Methods Participants were enrolled into the NIH-AARP Diet and Health study in 1995–1996 (median age 63) and BMI was reported at baseline and 9 years later (n=158,436). Sitting time (<3 [referent], 3–4, 5–6, 7–8 or ≥9 h/d), television viewing (None, <1, 1–2, 3–4, 5–6, 7–8, or ≥9 h/d) and the covariates (age, sex, race, education, smoking, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, caloric intake, and sleep duration) were reported at baseline. We used longitudinal quantile regression to model changes at the 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 90th BMI percentiles. Results More sitting at baseline was associated with additional increases in BMI over time and the association was stronger at the upper BMI percentiles (e.g. <3h/d [referent] vs. 5–6 h/d sitting additional increases: 50th percentile = 0.41 kg/m2, 95% CI: 0.34, 0.48 & 90th percentile = 0.85 kg/m2, 95% CI: 0.72, 0.98). Similar associations were observed between more television viewing at baseline and additional increases in BMI over time (e.g., no television [referent] vs. 3–4 h/d of television: 50th percentile= 1.96 kg/m2, 95% CI: 1.77, 2.15 & 90th percentile = 2.11 kg/m2, 95% CI: 1.49, 2.73). Conclusion Reducing sedentary behavior could help prevent an increase in BMI in adulthood, especially at the upper percentiles of the BMI distribution, and thereby reduce the prevalence of obesity. PMID:24781893

  15. An hour-specific nomogram for transcutaneous bilirubin values in term and late preterm Hispanic neonates.

    PubMed

    Engle, William D; Lai, Susanna; Ahmad, Naveed; Manning, M Denise; Jackson, Gregory L

    2009-06-01

    We sought to determine percentile values for hour-specific transcutaneous bilirubin (TcB) measurements in Hispanic neonates during the first 72 hours of age. Neonates with gestational age >or= 35 weeks and body weight >or= 2100 g were included. All neonates were screened with JM-103 TcB measurements at a minimum of every 24 hours by nursing personnel, and only TcB values obtained in Hispanic neonates with postnatal ages of 10 to 74 hours were analyzed. The 5th, 25th, 50th, 75th, and 95th percentile curves were determined. These data were compared with a previously published TcB nomogram predominantly composed of white, non-Hispanic neonates. A total of 3284 TcB values were measured in 2005 neonates. A nomogram was constructed for this exclusively Hispanic population, identifying the 5th, 25th, 50th, 75th, and 95th percentile curves. The 95th percentile values at 24, 48, and 72 hours were 7.6, 11.0, and 12.4 mg/dL, respectively. The comparison between our results and those of the previously published study indicated that small but consistent differences between the two study populations were apparent, with the Hispanic neonates having significantly higher TcB values at the majority of time points analyzed. These observations were made despite a higher proportion of neonates >or= 40 weeks' gestation ( p < 0.001) and a lower proportion exclusively breast-fed ( p < 0.001) in the Hispanic population versus those in the previous study. Although higher bilirubin levels for certain populations are well documented, such differences in Hispanic neonates have not been confirmed. A TcB nomogram for Hispanic neonates is presented as a tool that will aid the clinician in the management of jaundice for this population. Compared with the previous study, this report indicates that although differences were relatively small, significantly higher TcB values were observed in the Hispanic population.

  16. Relationships between atmospheric circulation indices and rainfall in Northern Algeria and comparison of observed and RCM-generated rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taibi, S.; Meddi, M.; Mahé, G.; Assani, A.

    2017-01-01

    This work aims, as a first step, to analyze rainfall variability in Northern Algeria, in particular extreme events, during the period from 1940 to 2010. Analysis of annual rainfall shows that stations in the northwest record a significant decrease in rainfall since the 1970s. Frequencies of rainy days for each percentile (5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, 95th, and 99th) and each rainfall interval class (1-5, 5-10, 10-20, 20-50, and ≥50 mm) do not show a significant change in the evolution of daily rainfall. The Tenes station is the only one to show a significant decrease in the frequency of rainy days up to the 75th percentile and for the 10-20-mm interval class. There is no significant change in the temporal evolution of extreme events in the 90th, 95th, and 99th percentiles. The relationships between rainfall variability and general atmospheric circulation indices for interannual and extreme event variability are moderately influenced by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation and Mediterranean Oscillation. Significant correlations are observed between the Southern Oscillation Index and annual rainfall in the northwestern part of the study area, which is likely linked with the decrease in rainfall in this region. Seasonal rainfall in Northern Algeria is affected by the Mediterranean Oscillation and North Atlantic Oscillation in the west. The ENSEMBLES regional climate models (RCMs) are assessed using the bias method to test their ability to reproduce rainfall variability at different time scales. The Centre National de Recherches Météorologiques (CNRM), Czech Hydrometeorological Institute (CHMI), Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich (ETHZ), and Forschungszentrum Geesthacht (GKSS) models yield the least biased results.

  17. A resolution recognizing and celebrating the 50th anniversary of the entry of Hawaii into the Union as the 50th State.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Inouye, Daniel K. [D-HI

    2009-07-28

    07/28/2009 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S210-8211; text: CR S8210; text of measure as introduced: CR S8203-8204) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. Regression equations to estimate seasonal flow duration, n-day high-flow frequency, and n-day low-flow frequency at sites in North Dakota using data through water year 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams-Sether, Tara; Gross, Tara A.

    2016-02-09

    Seasonal mean daily flow data from 119 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in North Dakota; the surrounding states of Montana, Minnesota, and South Dakota; and the Canadian provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan with 10 or more years of unregulated flow record were used to develop regression equations for flow duration, n-day high flow and n-day low flow using ordinary least-squares and Tobit regression techniques. Regression equations were developed for seasonal flow durations at the 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, and 90th percent exceedances; the 1-, 7-, and 30-day seasonal mean high flows for the 10-, 25-, and 50-year recurrence intervals; and the 1-, 7-, and 30-day seasonal mean low flows for the 2-, 5-, and 10-year recurrence intervals. Basin and climatic characteristics determined to be significant explanatory variables in one or more regression equations included drainage area, percentage of basin drainage area that drains to isolated lakes and ponds, ruggedness number, stream length, basin compactness ratio, minimum basin elevation, precipitation, slope ratio, stream slope, and soil permeability. The adjusted coefficient of determination for the n-day high-flow regression equations ranged from 55.87 to 94.53 percent. The Chi2 values for the duration regression equations ranged from 13.49 to 117.94, whereas the Chi2 values for the n-day low-flow regression equations ranged from 4.20 to 49.68.

  19. Growth curves for Turkish Girls with Turner Syndrome: Results of the Turkish Turner Syndrome Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Darendeliler, Feyza; Yeşilkaya, Ediz; Bereket, Abdullah; Baş, Firdevs; Bundak, Rüveyde; Sarı, Erkan; Küçükemre Aydın, Banu; Darcan, Şükran; Dündar, Bumin; Büyükinan, Muammer; Kara, Cengiz; Mazıcıoğlu, Mümtaz M.; Adal, Erdal; Akıncı, Ayşehan; Atabek, Mehmet Emre; Demirel, Fatma; Çelik, Nurullah; Özkan, Behzat; Özhan, Bayram; Orbak, Zerrin; Ersoy, Betül; Doğan, Murat; Ataş, Ali; Turan, Serap; Gökşen, Damla; Tarım, Ömer; Yüksel, Bilgin; Ercan, Oya; Hatun, Şükrü; Şimşek, Enver; Ökten, Ayşenur; Abacı, Ayhan; Döneray, Hakan; Özbek, Mehmet Nuri; Keskin, Mehmet; Önal, Hasan; Akyürek, Nesibe; Bulan, Kezban; Tepe, Derya; Emeksiz, Hamdi Cihan; Demir, Korcan; Kızılay, Deniz; Topaloğlu, Ali Kemal; Eren, Erdal; Özen, Samim; Demirbilek, Hüseyin; Abalı, Saygın; Akın, Leyla; Eklioğlu, Beray Selver; Kaba, Sultan; Anık, Ahmet; Baş, Serpil; Ünüvar, Tolga; Sağlam, Halil; Bolu, Semih; Özgen, Tolga; Doğan, Durmuş; Çakır, Esra Deniz; Şen, Yaşar; Andıran, Nesibe; Çizmecioğlu, Filiz; Evliyaoğlu, Olcay; Karagüzel, Gülay; Pirgon, Özgür; Çatlı, Gönül; Can, Hatice Dilek; Gürbüz, Fatih; Binay, Çiğdem; Baş, Veysel Nijat; Sağlam, Celal; Gül, Davut; Polat, Adem; Açıkel, Cengizhan; Cinaz, Peyami

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Children with Turner syndrome (TS) have a specific growth pattern that is quite different from that of healthy children. Many countries have population-specific growth charts for TS. Considering national and ethnic differences, we undertook this multicenter collaborative study to construct growth charts and reference values for height, weight and body mass index (BMI) from 3 years of age to adulthood for spontaneous growth of Turkish girls with TS. Methods: Cross-sectional height and weight data of 842 patients with TS, younger than 18 years of age and before starting any therapy, were evaluated. Results: The data were processed to calculate the 3rd, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th and 97th percentile values for defined ages and to construct growth curves for height-for-age, weight-for-age and BMI-for-age of girls with TS. The growth pattern of TS girls in this series resembled the growth pattern of TS girls in other reports, but there were differences in height between our series and the others. Conclusion: This study provides disease-specific growth charts for Turkish girls with TS. These disease-specific national growth charts will serve to improve the evaluation of growth and its management with growth-promoting therapeutic agents in TS patients. PMID:26831551

  20. Heavy metals in aquatic organisms of different trophic levels and their potential human health risk in Bohai Bay, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Lu, Xueqiang; Wang, Naili; Xin, Meinan; Geng, Shiwei; Jia, Jing; Meng, Qinghui

    2016-09-01

    Fourteen aquatic organism samples were collected from Bohai Bay, and concentrations of five heavy metals were measured to evaluate the pollution levels in aquatic organisms and the potential risk to human health. The concentrations of Zn and Cu were much higher than those of Cd, Cr, and Pb in all the organisms. In general, the heavy metal concentration levels were in the order phytoplankton < zooplankton < fish < shrimp < shellfish. Heavy metal concentrations in higher trophic-level aquatic organisms in Bohai Bay were compared to those in the organisms from other worldwide coastal waters. The concentration levels of most heavy metals were higher than the 75th percentile, except that Pb concentration was between the 25th and 50th percentiles. The calculated bioconcentration factors (BCF) of Cr, Cu, and Pb for phytoplankton were less than 100, indicating no accumulation in primary producers. The bioaccumulation factor (BAF) of Pb for zooplankton was the highest, indicating significant Pb accumulation in zooplankton. For higher trophic-level aquatic organisms, the order of BAF values was fish < shrimp < shellfish for most metals except for Pb. The human health risk assessment suggests that strict abatement measures of heavy metals must be taken to decrease the health risk caused by consuming aquatic products.

  1. Techniques for estimating selected streamflow characteristics of rural unregulated streams in Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koltun, G.F.; Whitehead, Matthew T.

    2002-01-01

    This report provides equations for estimating mean annual streamflow, mean monthly streamflows, harmonic mean streamflow, and streamflow quartiles (the 25th-, 50th-, and 75th-percentile streamflows) as a function of selected basin characteristics for rural, unregulated streams in Ohio. The equations were developed from streamflow statistics and basin-characteristics data for as many as 219 active or discontinued streamflow-gaging stations on rural, unregulated streams in Ohio with 10 or more years of homogenous daily streamflow record. Streamflow statistics and basin-characteristics data for the 219 stations are presented in this report. Simple equations (based on drainage area only) and best-fit equations (based on drainage area and at least two other basin characteristics) were developed by means of ordinary least-squares regression techniques. Application of the best-fit equations generally involves quantification of basin characteristics that require or are facilitated by use of a geographic information system. In contrast, the simple equations can be used with information that can be obtained without use of a geographic information system; however, the simple equations have larger prediction errors than the best-fit equations and exhibit geographic biases for most streamflow statistics. The best-fit equations should be used instead of the simple equations whenever possible.

  2. Multi-host model and threshold of intermediate host Oncomelania snail density for eliminating schistosomiasis transmission in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yi-Biao; Chen, Yue; Liang, Song; Song, Xiu-Xia; Chen, Geng-Xin; He, Zhong; Cai, Bin; Yihuo, Wu-Li; He, Zong-Gui; Jiang, Qing-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis remains a serious public health issue in many tropical countries, with more than 700 million people at risk of infection. In China, a national integrated control strategy, aiming at blocking its transmission, has been carried out throughout endemic areas since 2005. A longitudinal study was conducted to determine the effects of different intervention measures on the transmission dynamics of S. japonicum in three study areas and the data were analyzed using a multi-host model. The multi-host model was also used to estimate the threshold of Oncomelania snail density for interrupting schistosomiasis transmission based on the longitudinal data as well as data from the national surveillance system for schistosomiasis. The data showed a continuous decline in the risk of human infection and the multi-host model fit the data well. The 25th, 50th and 75th percentiles, and the mean of estimated thresholds of Oncomelania snail density below which the schistosomiasis transmission cannot be sustained were 0.006, 0.009, 0.028 and 0.020 snails/0.11 m2, respectively. The study results could help develop specific strategies of schistosomiasis control and elimination tailored to the local situation for each endemic area. PMID:27535177

  3. Extracellular water across the adult lifespan: reference values for adults.

    PubMed

    Silva, Analiza M; Wang, Jack; Pierson, Richard N; Wang, Zimian; Spivack, John; Allison, David B; Heymsfield, Steven B; Sardinha, Luis B; Heshka, Stanley

    2007-05-01

    Extracellular water (ECW) is a large and clinically important body compartment that varies widely in volume both in health and disease. Interpretation of ECW measurements in the clinical setting requires consideration of potential influencing factors such as age, race, sex and other variables that influence fluid status. An important gap in physiological research is a lack of normative ECW values against which to reference perturbations in fluid homeostasis. The current study's aim was to develop conditional quantile equations for ECW based on weight, height, age, sex and race using a large (n = 1538, 854 females and 684 males) healthy adult multi-ethnic (African American, Asian, European American, Hispanic) sample. ECW was derived from total body water and potassium measured by isotope dilution and whole-body 40K counting, respectively. Quantile regression methods were used to identify five percentile levels (10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th). Weight and height were significant variables at each quantile in both males and females; age made a significant contribution in the male but not the female sample. These regression equations provide ECW quantile reference values based on a large multi-ethnic adult population that should not only prove useful in clinical settings and physiological research, but serve as a model approach for developing body composition normative ranges.

  4. Creating normograms of dural sinuses in healthy persons using computer-assisted detection for analysis and comparison of cross-section dural sinuses in the brain.

    PubMed

    Anconina, Reut; Zur, Dinah; Kesler, Anat; Lublinsky, Svetlana; Toledano, Ronen; Novack, Victor; Benkobich, Elya; Novoa, Rosa; Novic, Evelyne Farkash; Shelef, Ilan

    2017-03-09

    Dural sinuses vary in size and shape in many pathological conditions with abnormal intracranial pressure. Size and shape normograms of dural brain sinuses are not available. The creation of such normograms may enable computer-assisted comparison to pathologic exams and facilitate diagnoses. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate normal magnetic resonance venography (MRV) studies in order to create normograms of dural sinuses using a computerized algorithm for vessel cross-sectional analysis. This was a retrospective analysis of MRV studies of 30 healthy persons. Data were analyzed using a specially developed Matlab algorithm for vessel cross-sectional analysis. The cross-sectional area and shape measurements were evaluated to create normograms. Mean cross-sectional size was 53.27±13.31 for the right transverse sinus (TS), 46.87+12.57 for the left TS (p=0.089) and 36.65+12.38 for the superior sagittal sinus. Normograms were created. The distribution of cross-sectional areas along the vessels showed distinct patterns and a parallel course for the median, 25th, 50th and 75th percentiles. In conclusion, using a novel computerized method for vessel cross-sectional analysis we were able to quantitatively characterize dural sinuses of healthy persons and create normograms.

  5. Comparison of Updated Weight and Height Percentiles with Previous References in 6-17-Year-Old Children in Kayseri, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Zararsız, Gökmen; Çiçek, Betül; Kondolot, Meda; Mazıcıoğlu, M. Mümtaz; Öztürk, Ahmet; Kurtoğlu, Selim

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare updated weight and height percentiles of 6-17-year-old children from all socio-economic levels in Kayseri with previous local references and other national/international data. Methods: The second study “Determination of Anthropometric Measurements of Turkish Children and Adolescents study (DAMTCA II)” was conducted in Kayseri, between October 2007 and April 2008. Weight and height measurements from 4321 (1926 boys, 2395 girls) school children aged between 6 to 17 years were included in this cross-sectional study. Using these data, weight and height percentile curves were produced with generalized additive models for location, scale and shape (GAMLSS) and compared with the most recent references. Results: Smoothed percentile curves including the 3rd, 5th, 10th, 15th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 85th, 90th, 95th, and 97th percentiles were obtained for boys and girls. These results were compared with DAMTCA I study and with two national (İstanbul and Ankara) and international data from Asia and from Europe. Conclusion: This study provides updated weight and height references for Turkish school children aged between 6 and 17 years residing in Kayseri. PMID:27507256

  6. Consistent seasonal snow cover depth and duration variability over the Western Himalayas (WH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dan; Juyal, Vikas; Sharma, Vikas

    2016-10-01

    Precipitation in solid form, i.e., snow, during winter season over the Western Himalayas (WH) leads to the build-up of seasonal snow cover. Seasonal snow cover build-up (snow cover depth and duration) largely depends on atmospheric variables such as temperature, precipitation, radiation, wind, etc. Integrated (combined) influence of atmospheric variables on seasonal snow cover gets reflected in terms of spatial and temporal variability in seasonal snow cover build-up pattern. Hence spatial and temporal variability of seasonal snow cover build-up can serve as a good indicator of climate change in high altitude mountainous regions like the WH. Consistent seasonal snow cover depth and duration, delay days and early melt days of consistent seasonal snow cover at 11 stations spread across different mountain ranges over the WH were analyzed. Mean, maximum and percentiles (25th, 50th, 75th, 90th and 95th) of consistent seasonal snow cover depth and duration show decline over the WH in the recent past 2-3 decades. Consistent seasonal snow cover is found to melt early and snow cover build-up pattern is found to show changes over the WH. Decline in consistent seasonal snow cover depth, duration and changing snow cover build-up pattern over the WH in recent decades indicate that WH has undergone considerable climate change and winter weather patterns are changing in the WH.

  7. Anthropometry of height, weight, arm, wrist, abdominal circumference and body mass index, for Bolivian adolescents 12 to 18 years: Bolivian adolescent percentile values from the MESA study.

    PubMed

    Baya Botti, A; Pérez-Cueto, F J A; Vasquez Monllor, P A; Kolsteren, P W

    2009-01-01

    Anthropometry is important as clinical tool for individual follow-up as well as for planning and health policy-making at population level. Recent references of Bolivian Adolescents are not available. The aim of this cross sectional study was to provide age and sex specific centile values and charts of Body Mass Index, height, weight, arm, wrist and abdominal circumference from Bolivian Adolescents. Data from the MEtabolic Syndrome in Adolescents (MESA) study was used. Thirty-two Bolivian clusters from urban and rural areas were selected randomly considering population proportions, 3445 school going adolescents, 12 to 18 y, 45% males; 55% females underwent anthropometric evaluation by trained personnel using standardized protocols for all interviews and examinations. Weight, height, wrist, arm and abdominal circumference data were collected. Body Mass Index was calculated. Smoothed age- and gender specific 3rd, 5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 85th, 90th, 95th and 97th Bolivian adolescent percentiles(BAP) and Charts(BAC) where derived using LMS regression. Percentile-based reference data for the antropometrics of for Bolivian Adolescents are presented for the first time.

  8. Age and Sex Specific Reference Intervals for Modifiable Risk Factors of Cardiovascular Diseases for Gujarati Asian Indians

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Sibasis; Shah, Komal H.; Konat, Ashwati R.; Sharma, Kamal H.; Tripathi, Payal

    2015-01-01

    Objective. We aimed to establish age and sex specific percentile reference data for cardiovascular risk factors such as lipids, sugar, blood pressure, and BMI in apparently healthy and disease-free Gujarati population. Methods. In this cross-sectional study, we enrolled 3265 apparently healthy and disease-free individuals of both genders residing in Gujarat state. Fasting samples of blood were used for biochemical estimations of lipids and sugar. The measurement of BMI and blood pressure was also done according to the standard guidelines. Age and gender specific 5th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles were obtained. Results. The mean values of lipids, sugar, blood pressure, and BMI were significantly (p < 0.001) higher in males as compared to female population. Age-wise distribution trends showed increase in the risk factors from the 2nd decade until the 5th to 6th decade in most of the cases, where loss of premenopausal protection in females was also observed. Specific trends according to gender and age were observed in percentile values of various parameters. Conclusion. The outcome of current study will contribute significantly to proposing clinically important reference values of various lipids, sugar, blood pressure, and BMI that could be used to screen the asymptomatic Gujarati Indian population with a propensity of developing dyslipidemia, diabetes, blood pressure, and obesity. PMID:26824054

  9. Psychometric Analysis of the JSPE Nursing Student Version R: Comparison of Senior BSN Students and Medical Students Attitudes toward Empathy in Patient Care.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Libba Reed; Shannon, David M

    2011-01-01

    Background. Empathic communication skills are critical to providing high-quality nursing care to holistically understand the patient's perspective. A survey research design was used to address the research questions discussed in this study. Data consisted of responses from nursing students attending accredited programs in the southeastern United Sates using the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy Nursing Student Version R (JSPE-R). Findings. Comparisons of the total scores from JSPE Versions S and R yielded similar means and standard deviations with 115 and 114.57, respectively, and standard deviations of 10 and 10.94, respectively. The results of a one-sample t-test failed to render statistical significance (t = -1.22, P = .224), indicating that the overall attitudes of nursing students and medical students are similar. The 25th, 50th, and 75th percentiles and overall instrument reliability were also comparable. Conclusions. This paper supports the emergence of alternative factor analysis structures as applied to nursing students through statistical progression from exploratory factor analysis to confirmatory structures. Implications for practice explore the utility of empathy instruments in nurse education, such as empathy progression through curriculum. As nursing educators, the utility of development of instruments to measure effectiveness of teaching strategies and pedagogy for empathy enhancement in practice is important.

  10. Impact of body mass on job quality.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Han, Euna

    2015-04-01

    The current study explores the association between body mass and job quality, a composite measurement of job characteristics, for adults. We use nationally representative data from the Korean Labor and Income Panel Study for the years 2005, 2007, and 2008 with 7282 person-year observations for men and 4611 for women. A Quality of Work Index (QWI) is calculated based on work content, job security, the possibilities for improvement, compensation, work conditions, and interpersonal relationships at work. The key independent variable is the body mass index (kg/m(2)) splined at 18.5, 25, and 30. For men, BMI is positively associated with the QWI only in the normal weight segment (+0.19 percentage points at the 10th, +0.28 at the 50th, +0.32 at the 75th, +0.34 at the 90th, and +0.48 at the 95th quantiles). A unit increase in the BMI for women is associated with a lower QWI at the lower quantiles in the normal weight segment (-0.28 at the 5th, -0.19 at the 10th, and -0.25 percentage points at the 25th quantiles) and at the upper quantiles in the overweight segment (-1.15 at the 90th and -1.66 percentage points at the 95th quantiles). The results imply a spill-over cost of overweight or obesity beyond its impact on health in terms of success in the labor market.

  11. Hydrologic data for the Larimer-Weld regional water-monitoring program, Colorado, 1975-82

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, S.R.; Steinheimer, J.T.

    1984-01-01

    The Larimer-Weld, Colorado, regional Monitoring Program was begun in 1976 to provide information on the quality and quantity of the surface-water resources in the area. Three stations on the big Thompson River and five stations on the Cache La Poudre River were selected for a data-collection network. Four previously established stations were added to complete the data-collection network: Horsetooth Reservoir, Joe Wright Creek above and below Joe Wright Reservoir, and Michigan River near Cameron Pass. Station description, location, and period of record are given for each station. A statistical summary of the water-quality data for each station is tabulated. Frequency of occurrence is given at the 95th, 75th, 50th, and 25th percentiles. Monthly water-quality data and daily average streamflow data are tabulated for each streamflow station for which this data was collected; Monthly contents data are presented for Horsetooth Reservoir. All data tabulated and summarized are from the period October 1, 1975, through September 30, 1982. (USGS)

  12. Disease-specific growth charts for Korean infants with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jieun; Isojima, Tsuyoshi; Chang, Mi Sun; Kwun, Young Hee; Huh, Rimm; Cho, Sung Yoon; Sohn, Young Bae; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Patients with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) present with short stature and obesity. The growth pattern of children with PWS is different from that of the healthy population. Therefore, it is not appropriate to use normal growth charts to evaluate the growth status of children with PWS. We aimed to develop disease-specific growth charts for height and weight for nongrowth hormone-treated Korean infants with PWS aged between 0 and 36 months and to use these growth charts for the evaluation and management of infants with PWS. We conducted a retrospective review of the medical records of 122 infants with genetically confirmed PWS. Data on the patients' height and weight measurements before they underwent growth hormone treatment were recorded. Disease-specific growth charts were generated and the 3rd, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 97th centiles were calculated using the LMS (refers to λ, μ, and σ, respectively) smoothing procedure for height and weight. The disease-specific growth charts for Korean infants with PWS can be used when examining infants with PWS and when evaluating their growth at later stages for comparison purposes. They are also useful for monitoring growth patterns, nutritional assessments, and recording responses to growth hormone treatment.

  13. Reference values in ovarian response to controlled ovarian stimulation throughout the reproductive period.

    PubMed

    La Marca, Antonio; Grisendi, Valentina; Spada, Elena; Argento, Cindy; Milani, Silvano; Plebani, Maddalena; Seracchioli, Renato; Volpe, Annibale

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The age-related decline in ovarian response to gonadotropins has been well known since the beginning of ovarian stimulation in IVF cycles and has been considered secondary to the age-related decline in ovarian reserve. The objective of this study was to establish reference values and to construct nomograms of ovarian response for any specific age to gonadotropins in IVF/ICSI cycles. We analyzed our database containing information on IVF cycles. According to inclusion and exclusion criteria, a total of 703 patients were selected. Among inclusion criteria, there were regular menstrual cycle, treatment with a long GnRH agonist protocol and starting follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) dose of at least 200 IU per day. To estimate the reference values of ovarian response, the CG-LMS method was used. A linear decline in the parameters of ovarian response with age was observed: the median number of oocytes decreases approximately by one every three years, and the median number of follicles >16 mm by one every eight years. The number of oocytes and growing follicles corresponding to the 5th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 95th centiles has been calculated. This study confirmed the well known negative relationship between ovarian response to FSH and female ageing and permitted the construction of nomograms of ovarian response.

  14. Age-specific reference values for serum FSH and estradiol levels throughout the reproductive period.

    PubMed

    Grisendi, Valentina; Spada, Elena; Argento, Cindy; Plebani, Maddalena; Milani, Silvano; Seracchioli, Renato; Volpe, Annibale; La Marca, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    High serum day 3 FSH levels are associated with poor ovarian reserve and reduced fertility, but the interpretation of FSH values according to age is still not univocal. The purpose of this study was to determine age-dependent reference values in women with regular menstrual cycles and FSH as a guide for specialists. The study was performed at the Department of Mother-Infant of a University-based tertiary care centre. One-hundred ninety-two healthy normal menstruating women were recruited for the study. All patients attended the department on menstrual cycle day 3 for a blood sample for FSH and estradiol determination. A linear relationship between FSH or estradiol serum levels and age was observed. The FSH level increased by 0.11 IU for every year of age (1 IU for every 9 years of age). The values of FSH and estradiol corresponding to the 5th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 95th centiles for any specific age have been calculated. Serum FSH levels need to be interpreted according to age-dependent reference values. Serum FSH levels on 95th centile for any age may represent a warning sign for reduced ovarian reserve.

  15. Forest-Water Feedbacks Under a Changing Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creed, I. F.; Hwang, T.

    2015-12-01

    Among the most valuable products produced by forests are the ecosystem services of safe and reliable water supplies. The provision of these ecosystem services on forested landscapes is inherently linked to forest condition. Climate change and associated hydrological intensification may affect forest water use (green water) and runoff generation (blue water) in the temperate forest biome of eastern North America. For the time period from the 1980s to present, a period with significant climate warming, we used a network of long-term catchment study sites nested within the temperate forest biome to explore forest-water feedbacks in response to climate change. Satellite remote sensing was used to track changes in forest phenology and forest productivity, and catchment meteorological and discharge records were used to track changes in the magnitude and timing of forest water yields. Forest responses to climate change varied along a latitudinal gradient. The magnitude of annual water yields declined at all study sites. The timing of peak discharge was measured by the center of mass (i.e., 50th percentile), and the narrowing or widening of discharge periods was measured by the coefficient of dispersion (i.e., 75th - 25th over 50th percentile) of water yield. For the vernal window, we observed subtle and systematic changes with a shift to later peaks in the center of mass of spring discharge and a widening of the spring discharge period (i.e., less peaked flows). For the autumnal window, we observed less subtle, non-systematic changes with a shift to later peaks above 45 degrees latitude but earlier peaks below 45 degrees latitude, and a narrowing of the fall discharge period (i.e., more peaked flows). The time shift and widening of vernal and autumnal windows are likely caused by asymmetric responses of forest water use (green water) and runoff generation (blue water) to climate warming. These disruptions in forest-water coupling are likely to have significant

  16. Water use and availability in the Woonasquatucket and Moshassuck River basins, north-central Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimiroski, Mark T.; Wild, Emily C.

    2005-01-01

    stream-gaging station to determine water availability based on the 75th, 50th, and 25th percentiles of the total base flow, the base flow minus the 7-day, 10-year flow criteria, and the base flow minus the Aquatic Base Flow criteria. The index station selected was the Branch River at Forestdale, which is close to the study area and has a similar percentage of sand and gravel area. Water availability was estimated on the basis of baseflow contributions from sand and gravel deposits and till deposits at the index station. Flows were computed for June, July, August, and September 1957–2000, and a percentage of the total flow was determined to come from either sand and gravel deposits, or till, by using a regression equation. The base-flow contributions were converted to a flow per unit area at the station for the till and for the sand and gravel deposits and then applied to the deposits in the study area basins. These values were used to estimate the gross yield of base flow, as well as to subtract the two low flows (7-day, 10-year flow, and Aquatic Base Flow criteria). The results from the Branch River stream-gaging station were lowest in August at the 75th, 50th, and 25th percentile for total flow with either flow criteria subtracted. The estimated August gross yield at the 50th percentile from the Woonasquatucket River Basin was 12.94 million gallons per day, and 5.91 million gallons per day from the Moshassuck River Basin.A ratio was calculated that is equal to total withdrawals divided by water availability. Water-availability flow scenarios at the 75th, 50th, and 25th percentiles for the basins, which are based on total water available from base-flow contributions from till and sand and gravel deposits in the basins, were assessed. The ratios were the highest in July for the 50th percentile estimated gross yield minus Aquatic Base Flow (ABF) flow criteria, where withdrawals are close to the available water. Ratios are not presented if the available water is less

  17. Lituya Bay Landslide Impact Generated Mega-Tsunami 50th Anniversary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Hermann M.; Mohammed, Fahad; Yoo, Jeseon

    2009-02-01

    On July 10, 1958, an earthquake Mw 8.3 along the Fairweather fault triggered a major subaerial landslide into Gilbert Inlet at the head of Lituya Bay on the southern coast of Alaska. The landslide impacted the water at high speed generating a giant tsunami and the highest wave runup in recorded history. The mega-tsunami runup to an elevation of 524 m caused total forest destruction and erosion down to bedrock on a spur ridge in direct prolongation of the slide axis. A cross section of Gilbert Inlet was rebuilt at 1:675 scale in a two-dimensional physical laboratory model based on the generalized Froude similarity. A pneumatic landslide tsunami generator was used to generate a high-speed granular slide with controlled impact characteristics. State-of-the-art laser measurement techniques such as particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser distance sensors (LDS) were applied to the decisive initial phase with landslide impact and wave generation as well as the runup on the headland. PIV provided instantaneous velocity vector fields in a large area of interest and gave insight into kinematics of wave generation and runup. The entire process of a high-speed granular landslide impact may be subdivided into two main stages: (a) Landslide impact and penetration with flow separation, cavity formation and wave generation, and (b) air cavity collapse with landslide run-out and debris detrainment causing massive phase mixing. Formation of a large air cavity — similar to an asteroid impact — in the back of the landslide is highlighted. A three-dimenional pneumatic landslide tsunami generator was designed, constructed and successfully deployed in the tsunami wave basin at OSU. The Lituya Bay landslide was reproduced in a three-dimensional physical model at 1:400 scale. The landslide surface velocities distribution was measured with PIV. The measured tsunami amplitude and runup heights serve as benchmark for analytical and numerical models.

  18. A resolution commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Wyden, Ron [D-OR

    2014-09-18

    09/18/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S5880; text as passed Senate: CR S5799-5800) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. Celebrating the 50th anniversary of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Eckardt, Marianne Horney

    2006-01-01

    On the occasion of its 50 anniversary, the members of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry can look back with pride and be aware that this professional society has been true to its original goal and passionate mission. Thanks for this momentous accomplishment goes to its founding fathers and mothers, who were clear in their purpose and whose wisdom is manifest in the Academy's constitution. In the 1930s, the orthodoxy of the American Psychoanalytic Association created a ferment of rebellion in most of its institutes, which led to secessions, sister institutes, and a greater open-mindedness in institutes residing in Chicago, Washington, New Orleans, and Detroit. The quest for a new national forum that would be open to an exchange of new ideas began in 1951 and culminated in the formation of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis in 1956. The spirit of the Academy is highlighted by relating the successful struggle of communication among its members in a dream workshop that existed for six years.

  20. 77 FR 63203 - 50th Anniversary of the Office of the United States Trade Representative

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ... Trade Representative By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation On October 11, 1962, President John F. Kennedy signed the Trade Expansion Act--a landmark piece of legislation that established a..., and build a business. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America,...

  1. 'Focus on Marshall' Features Marshall’s 50th Anniversary

    NASA Video Gallery

    On March 15, 1960, President Dwight Eisenhower issued an executive order designating NASA's first field center as the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center. On the November episode of “Focus on ...

  2. A new estradiol-dienogest oral contraceptive marks "The Pill's" 50th anniversary.

    PubMed

    Keder, Lisa M

    2011-01-01

    Oral contraceptive pills were first approved by the Food and Drug Administration 50 years ago. Discovery of the physiology of reproduction and demonstration of the ability to inhibit ovulation with ovarian extracts laid the early groundwork for the development of contraceptives. Later, characterization of the hormones controlling ovulation and synthesis of progestins allowed production of oral contraceptives. Modern estrogen and progestin pills have undergone significant changes since their initial introduction. New formulations have been developed, doses have been lowered, and extended use introduced. The Food and Drug Administration has recently approved a new oral contraceptive containing estradiol valerate and dienogest. This pill contains an orally active estradiol in combination with a progestin with strong endometrial activity. The decreasing estrogen dose combined with an increasing progestin dose decreases the risk of break through bleeding when compared to previous estradiol valerate formulations. The contraceptive efficacy and a tolerability of this new pill are similar to currently marketed low dose combined estrogen-progestin oral contraceptives.

  3. 3 CFR 8631 - Proclamation 8631 of February 28, 2011. 50th Anniversary of the Peace Corps

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... States of America A Proclamation In 1961, President John F. Kennedy signed an Executive Order... of President Kennedy’s most enduring legacies can be found in the over 200,000 current and returned... Kennedy’s noble vision lives on. In our increasingly interconnected world, the mission of the Peace...

  4. A resolution commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Combined Federal Campaign.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Akaka, Daniel K. [D-HI

    2011-10-18

    11/16/2011 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S7627; text as passed Senate: CR S7627) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. A resolution recognizing the Defense Intelligence Agency on its 50th Anniversary.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Feinstein, Dianne [D-CA

    2011-03-01

    05/12/2011 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (text: CR S2970) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. 50th Annual Technical Meeting of the Society of Engineering Science (SES)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-15

    Worcester Polytechnic Institute) Tough Composites Inspired by Mineralized Natural Materials: Computation, 3D printing and Testing Markus Buehler (MIT), Leon...ARO support from the start of the project to the date of this printing . List the papers, including journal references, in the following categories...University of Pennsylvania) Investigation of grain size effects and other stacking fault width dependencies using a DFT-informed 3D phase field dislocation

  7. The Thayer Conference: Comments on Fagan's Discussion of Its 50th Anniversary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakland, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This article comments on Thomas Fagan's historical account of the 1954 Thayer Conference and offers my personal views on its importance. Many improvements to the infrastructure of school psychology in addition to its growth, are attributable to the program of goals established at the conference, as well as the efforts of passionate and dedicated…

  8. "The upper limits of vegetation on Mauna Loa, Hawaii": a 50th-anniversary reassessment.

    PubMed

    Juvik, James O; Rodomsky, Brett T; Price, Jonathan P; Hansen, Eric W; Kueffer, Christoph

    2011-02-01

    In January 1958, a survey of alpine flora was conducted along a recently constructed access road across the upper volcanic slopes of Mauna Loa, Hawaii (2525-3397 m). Only five native Hawaiian species were encountered on sparsely vegetated historic and prehistoric lava flows adjacent to the roadway. A resurvey of roadside flora in 2008 yielded a more than fourfold increase to 22 species, including nine native species not previously recorded. Eight new alien species have now invaded this alpine environment, although exclusively limited to a few individuals in ruderal habitat along the roadway. Alternative explanations for species invasion and altitudinal change over the past 50 years are evaluated: (1) changes related to continuing primary succession on ameliorating (weathering) young lava substrates; (2) local climate change; and (3) road improvements and increased vehicular access which promote enhanced car-borne dispersal of alien species derived from the expanding pool of potential colonizers naturalized on the island in recent decades. Unlike alpine environments in temperate latitudes, the energy component (warming) in climate change on Mauna Loa does not appear to be the unequivocal driver of plant invasion and range extension. Warming may be offset by other climate change factors including rainfall and evapotranspiration.

  9. A resolution recognizing the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Antarctic Treaty.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Boxer, Barbara [D-CA

    2009-12-01

    12/01/2009 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S12089; text as passed Senate: CR S12089; text of measure as introduced: CR S12072) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  10. 76 FR 72821 - 50th Anniversary of the United States Agency for International Development

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... 1961, the men and women of USAID have worked on the front lines of poverty and conflict to support... against hunger, poverty, and disease. As USAID continues to shape a brighter future for generations...

  11. 77 FR 34894 - Safety Zone; Bostock 50th Anniversary Fireworks, Long Island Sound; Manursing Island, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ... Island Sound; Manursing Island, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking... Island Sound in the vicinity of Manursing Island, NY for a fireworks display. This temporary safety zone.... This rule is intended to restrict all vessels from a portion of Long Island Sound before, during,...

  12. Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA): The 50th Anniversary of Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Mitsunori

    2010-10-01

    Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is a hereditary spinocerebellar degeneration. Despite the establishment of this disease in 1982, it has been pointed out that DRPLA has an unexplained aspect concerning its clinicopathological features; that is, the discrepancy between the variety of clinical manifestations and the uniformity of the brain lesions. The discovery of a causative gene mutation (abnormal expansion of the CAG repeat in DRPLA gene) triggered the development of novel neuropathology in DRPLA, which has suggested that polyglutamine-related pathogenesis involves a wide range of central nervous system regions far beyond the systems previously reported to be affected. It is now likely that DRPLA has an aspect of neuronal storage disorder and has multiple system degeneration, the lesion distribution of which varies depending on the CAG repeat sizes in the causative gene.

  13. [Marine science in Revista de Biologia Tropical in its 50th anniversary].

    PubMed

    Cortés, Jorge; Nielsen, Vanessa

    2002-01-01

    The first paper published in the Revista de Biología Tropical (RBT) on anything related to marine science was in 1963. Since then the number of marine-related papers has increased to 637, which represents 27% of the total production of RBT (excluding the Supplements), and 33% since 1979. Most publications are Full Articles on Ecology (135 papers). The marine ecosystem of which there is more publications is the coral reefs (28); and fish is the most studied taxonomic group (165). Almost half of the Supplements are marine related (12). The RBT must continue its efforts to maintain itself as a leading marine science publication in Latin America.

  14. Commentary on "The 50th Anniversary of the Thayer Conference: Historical Perspectives and Accomplishments"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret

    2005-01-01

    Having reaped the benefits of the Thayer Conference in my school psychology career, it is a pleasure to provide a comment about Dr. Fagan's article. I began my career as a master's-level school psychologist in the state of Wisconsin just prior to the passage of 94-142, now called IDEA. I am now a trainer of school psychologists at the doctoral…

  15. The 50th Anniversary of the Thayer Conference: Historical Perspectives and Accomplishments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Thomas K.

    2005-01-01

    Information from several historical sources provides a clearer understanding of the Thayer Conference, including little-known background information. Changes in school psychology since the conference are described through comparisons of the field at the time of the conference and at present. Major recommendations and expectations emanating from…

  16. 77 FR 32873 - Commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of the Vietnam War

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ... home. In the reflection of The Wall, we see the military family members and veterans who carry a pain... more than 3 million servicemen and women who left their families to serve bravely, a world away from... veterans, their families, and all who have served the fullest respect and support of a grateful Nation....

  17. The Save-WEFM Case as Reported to the 50th Annual NAEB Convention, 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danna, Sammy R.

    The history of Chicago FM radio station WEFM and the activities of the Citizen's Committee to Save WEFM are chronicled. The focus is principally on the actions of the Citizen's Committee to prevent the conversion of the radio station from a classical music format to rock and roll offerings and to block the sale of the station by Zenith to GCC…

  18. A resolution commemorating the 50th anniversary of the publication of "To Kill a Mockingbird".

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Sessions, Jeff [R-AL

    2010-08-05

    08/05/2010 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S6981; text as passed Senate: CR S6981; text of measure as introduced: CR S6908) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. A resolution commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the Cape May-Lewes Ferry.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Coons, Christopher A. [D-DE

    2014-06-26

    06/26/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S4190; text as passed Senate: CR S4165) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  20. 3 CFR 8668 - Proclamation 8668 of May 3, 2011. 50th Anniversary of the Freedom Rides

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... equality set forth in our founding. The Freedom Rides, organized in the spring of 1961, were an interracial... segregation laws and practices. The Freedom Rides, organized by the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), the... young people have the power to generate a movement for equality and steer the course of our...

  1. 78 FR 53235 - 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ... the dream that our Nation would one day make real the promise of liberty, equality, and justice for... brought about civil rights understood that racial equality and fairness for workers are bound...

  2. Succeed or Else!: Reflections on the 50th Anniversary of the "Journal of Educational Administration"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, A. Ross

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify the key individuals, associations and significant events contributing to the establishment and first 50 years of successful publication of the "Journal of Educational Administration". Design/methodology/approach: This paper is historical in design. Information relevant to its 50 years of…

  3. A resolution celebrating the 50th anniversary of the 1962 Seattle World's Fair.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Cantwell, Maria [D-WA

    2012-04-19

    04/19/2012 Referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S2553-2554) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. The pathology of methylmercury poisoning (Minamata disease): The 50th Anniversary of Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Eto, Komyo; Marumoto, Masumi; Takeya, Motohiro

    2010-10-01

    Methylmercury (Me-Hg) poisoning (Minamata disease: MD) is one of the most severe types of disease caused by humans to humans in Japan. The disease is a special class of food-borne methylmercury intoxication in humans as typified by the outbreak that began in 1953 in Minamata and its vicinity in Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan. There are 450 autopsy cases in Kumamoto and 30 autopsy cases in Niigata Prefecture related to MD in Japan. Two hundred and one cases in Kumamoto and 22 cases in Niigata showed pathological changes of MD. This report provides a brief research history and overview of the pathological changes of MD, and also presents representative cases of adult, infantile and fetal forms of MD among the 450 MD-related autopsy cases in Kumamoto Prefecture.

  5. Vision research 1961-2011: retrospects and prospects on the 50th anniversary of vision research.

    PubMed

    Westheimer, Gerald

    2011-04-13

    Viewing the trajectory of the discipline through the first half-century of VISION RESEARCH it is of interest to sketch what it is was like to conduct vision research at the time of the founding of the journal and counterpoise that with the situation at present. The most notable change has been the increase in the number of researchers, in the volume of publication and in the incorporation of computers into the research enterprise at every level. A few topics that were cutting-edge at the earlier time turned out to have led into culs-de-sac, others have been forgotten because their solution opened up new territories, others yet have remained unanswered, challenging researchers now as they did 50years ago.

  6. 77 FR 51473 - Safety Zone; Bostock 50th Anniversary Fireworks, Long Island Sound; Manursing Island, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... Island Sound; Manursing Island, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on the navigable waters of Long Island Sound in the vicinity... all vessels from a portion of Long Island Sound before, during, and immediately after the...

  7. Commending and congratulating the California State University system on the occasion of its 50th anniversary.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Lofgren, Zoe [D-CA-16

    2010-02-25

    03/22/2010 Referred to the Subcommittee on Higher Education, Lifelong Learning, and Competitiveness. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. A resolution commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Federal Executive Boards.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Akaka, Daniel K. [D-HI

    2011-11-10

    11/10/2011 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S7391-7392; text as passed Senate: CR S7391-7392; text of measure as introduced: CR S7385) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. Down syndrome: comments and reflections on the 50th anniversary of Lejeune's discovery.

    PubMed

    Neri, Giovanni; Opitz, John M

    2009-12-01

    Over the past some 160 years, the study of Down syndrome (DS) went from early efforts of differentiating it from cretinism (Séguin) to its establishment as a specific nosologic category of mental deficiency (Down) and subsequent attempts to infer its cause. DS was known to be an overwhelmingly sporadic disorder, concordant in MZ and discordant in DZ twins and associated with increased maternal reproductive age (Penrose). Beginning in the 1920s and based in part on phenotype analysis and early cytogenetic insights in Drosophilia, several clinicians (Halbertsma, Waardenburg, Bleyer, Fanconi) and the geneticist C.B. Davenport postulated that DS might be due to a chromosome abnormality; only Davenport, with T.S. Painter, made an actual attempt to perform a clinical/cytological study (with inconclusive results). It was only with the application of the methods of Belling (colchicine, squash preparations) and of T.C. Hsu (hypotonic solution) to PHA-treated cell cultures in the mid-late 1950s, that it became possible to study, accurately, the human karyotype and its aberrations, allowing Lejeune et al. and Jacobs et al. in 1959 to discover the cause of DS. Nowadays, aided with powerful molecular methods, it has become possible to attain insights into the pathogenesis of DS based on the study of many duplications/deficiencies of HSA21 in humans and ingeniously constructed cytogenetic rearrangements of MMA16 in the mouse. These suggest a complex epigenetic interaction between genes on HSA21 and many (?most) other genes in the human genome, akin to an attempt at speciation as suggested early during the last century by Blakesly in his work on Datura. Many important ongoing efforts are underway in several countries to understand the developmental biology of DS, offering hope of ultimate amelioration for those averse to pregnancy termination.

  10. Recognizing the 50th anniversary of Title VI international education programs within the Department of Education.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Watson, Diane E. [D-CA-33

    2009-05-13

    07/20/2010 Received in the Senate and referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. Water use and availability in the West Narragansett Bay area, coastal Rhode Island, 1995-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimiroski, Mark T.; Wild, Emily C.

    2006-01-01

    , was used to determine water availability in the study area on the basis of low flows measured at a nearby index station, the Pawcatuck River at Wood River Junction, Rhode Island. Water availability was defined as the 75th, 50th, and 25th percentiles of the total base flow; the base flow minus the 7-day, 10-year flow; and the base flow minus the Aquatic Base Flow at the index station. The base-flow contributions per unit area of sand and gravel deposits and of till were computed for June, July, August, and September for the index station and multiplied by the areas of sand and gravel and till in the subbasins. The calculated base flows at the index station were lowest in August at the 75th, 50th, and 25th percentiles for total base flow and for two additional low-flow scenarios. Because water withdrawals and use are greater during June, July, August, and September than at other times of the year, water availability was compared to water withdrawals in the subbasins for these summer months. Ratios were calculated by dividing the summer withdrawals by the water availability at the 75th, 50th, and 25th percentiles, and these percentiles of the base flow minus the two low flows for each subbasin. The closer this ratio is to one, the closer the withdrawals are to the estimated water available. These ratios allow comparisons of the use of water to the available water from one subbasin to another. The ratios were highest in July for the 50th percentile of the estimated gross yield minus the Aquatic Base Flow. The ratios ranged from 0.01 in the Providence and Seekonk subbasin to 0.38 in the Hunt-Annaquatucket-Pettaquamscutt subbasin for the 50th percentile of the gross yield minus the 7Q10 for August. A long-term (1941–2000) water budget was calculated for the study area to assess the basin inflows and outflows. The water withdrawals and return flows used in the budget were from 1995 through 1999. Inflow was assumed to equal outflow. The total water budget was 146.29 million

  12. Characterization of selected biological, chemical, and physical conditions at fixed sites in the Upper Colorado River basin, Colorado, 1995-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deacon, Jeffrey R.; Mize, Scott V.; Spahr, Norman E.

    1999-01-01

    at mining land-use sites than at the background site and were less than the 50th percentile of those for sites from the three other NAWQA study units. Nutrient concentrations at urban and recreation sites in the Southern Rocky Mountain physiographic province generally were greater than concentrations at the background site and generally were between the 25th and 90th percentile of concentrations for sites from the three other NAWQA study units. Habitat conditions and fish communities at urban and recreation sites were slightly degraded compared to the background site. EPT richness and the percentage of EPT were lower at urban and recreation sites than at the background site and were between the 25th and 75th percentile of those for sites from the three other NAWQA study units. The percentage of Chironomidae, which may be indicative of pollutant-tolerant organisms, was higher at urban and recreation sites than at the background site. Mixed land-use sites in the Southern Rocky Mountains physiographic province had similar nutrient concentrations and similar cadmium and zinc streambed-sediment concentrations. Fish-community degradation index values were very different among the three mixed land-use sites in the Southern Rocky Mountains physiographic province. Larger percentages of omnivores and anomalies such as lesions and deformities at two mixed land-use sites resulted in higher degradation values of the fish community. Agriculture land-use sites had higher concentrations of nutrients and selenium than the background site in the Colorado Plateau physiographic province. Concentrations of p,p'-DDE in fish tissue at agriculture sites were higher than the 75th percentile of concentrations for sites from the three other NAWQA study units. Fish communities had degradation values near the 75th percentile for agriculture sites. The percentage of EPT was low at agriculture sites when compared to the background site. Two mixed land-use sites in the Colorado Plateau physiographi

  13. Estimated water use and availability in the lower Blackstone River basin, northern Rhode Island and south-central Massachusetts, 1995-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barolw, Lora K.

    2003-01-01

    flow, an estimated median rate of 50.5 Mgal/d of water was available for the basin during August, the lowest base-flow month. In addition, basin-wide water-availability estimates were calculated with and without streamflow criteria for each month of the low-flow period at the 75th, 50th, and 25th percentiles of base flow. These water availability estimates ranged from 42.3 to 181.7 Mgal/d in June; 20.2 to 96.7 Mgal/d in July; 20.2 to 85.4 Mgal/d in August, and 20.2 to 97.5 Mgal/d in September. Base flow was less than the Aquatic Base Flow (ABF), minimum flow considered adequate to protect aquatic fauna, from July through September at the 25th percentile and in August and September at the 50th percentile. A basin-stress ratio, which is equal to total withdrawals divided by water availability, was also calculated. The basin-stress ratio for August at the 50th percentile of base flow minus the 7Q10 was 0.68 for the study area. For individual subbasins, the ratio ranged from 0.13 in the Chepachet River subbasin to 0.95 in the Abbot Run subbasin. In addition, basin-stress ratios with and without streamflow criteria for all four months of the low-flow period were calculated at the 75th, 50th, and 25th percentiles of base flow. These values ranged from 0.19 to 0.83 in June, 0.36 to 1.50 in July, 0.40 to 1.14 in August, and 0.31 to 0.78 in September. Ratios could not be calculated by using the ABF at the 50th and 25th percentiles in August and September because the estimated base flow was less than the ABF. The depletion of the Blackstone River flows by Cumberland Water Department Manville well no. 1 in Rhode Island was estimated with the computer program STRMDEPL and specified daily pumping rates. STRMDEPL uses analytical solutions to calculate time-varying rates of streamflow depletion caused by pumping at wells. Results show that streamflow depletions were about 97 percent of average daily pumping rates for 1995 through 1999. Relative streamflow depletions for

  14. Distributions of median nutrient and chlorophyll concentrations across the Red River Basin, USA.

    PubMed

    Longing, D; Haggard, B E

    2010-01-01

    Acquisition and compilation of water-quality data for an 11-yr time period (1996-2006) from 589 stream and river stations were conducted to support nutrient criteria development for the multistate Red River Basin shared by Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Ten water-quality parameters were collected from six data sources (USGS, Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality, Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality, Oklahoma Conservation Commission, Oklahoma Water Resources Board, and Texas Commission on Environmental Quality), and an additional 13 parameters were acquired from at least one source. Median concentrations of water-quality parameters were calculated at each individual station and frequency distributions (minimum, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th percentiles, and maximum) of the median concentrations were calculated. Across the Red River Basin, median values for total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), and sestonic chlorophyll-a (chl-a) ranged from < 0.02 to 20.2 mg L(-1), < 0.01 to 6.66 mg L(-1), and 0.10 to 262 microg L(-1), respectively. Overall, the 25th percentiles of TN data specific to the Red River Basin were generally similar to the USEPA-recommended ecoregion nutrient criteria of 0.31 to 0.88 mg L(-1), whereas median TP and chl-a data specific to the Red River Basin showed 25th percentiles higher than the USEPA-recommended criteria (0.010-0.067 mg TP L(-1); 0.93-3.00 microg chl-a L(-1)). The unique location of the Red River Basin in the south-central United States places it near the boundaries of several aggregate ecoregions; therefore, the development of ecoregion nutrient criteria likely requires using data specific to the Red River Basin, as shown in these analyses. This study provided basin-specific frequency distribution of median concentrations of water-quality parameters as the first step to support states in developing nutrient criteria to protect designated uses in the multijurisdictional Red River Basin.

  15. Effectiveness of Intelligent Tutoring Systems: A Meta-Analytic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulik, James A.; Fletcher, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    This review describes a meta-analysis of findings from 50 controlled evaluations of intelligent computer tutoring systems. The median effect of intelligent tutoring in the 50 evaluations was to raise test scores 0.66 standard deviations over conventional levels, or from the 50th to the 75th percentile. However, the amount of improvement found in…

  16. Estimated water use and availability in the East Narragansett Bay study area, Rhode Island, 1995-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.

    2007-01-01

    the 75th, 50th, and 25th percentiles of the total base flow; the base flow for the 7-day, 10-year low-flow scenario; and the base flow for the Aquatic Base Flow scenario for both stations. Base flows in the study area were lowest in September for the 75th, 50th, and 25th percentiles. The safe yields determined for the surface-water reservoirs (14.10 Mgal/d) were added to the estimated available ground water (gross yield) in the Southeastern Narragansett and East Narragansett Islands regions to give the total available water. The water availability in the study area at the 50th percentile ranged from 33.18 Mgal/d in September to 94.62 Mgal/d in June, water availability for the 7-day, 10-year low-flow scenario at the 50th percentile ranged from 21.87 Mgal/d in September to 83.03 Mgal/d in June, and water availability for the Aquatic Base Flow scenario at the 50th percentile ranged from 14.10 Mgal/d in August and September to 65.48 Mgal/d in June. Because water withdrawals and use are greater during the summer than at other times of the year, water availability in June, July, August, and September was compared to water withdrawals in the three regions. For the study period, the withdrawals in July were higher than in the other summer months. For the 50th percentile, the ratios of water withdrawn to water available were close to one in August for the estimated basic and Aquatic Base Flow scenarios and in September for the estimated 7-day, 10-year low-flow scenario. For the 25th percentile, the ratios were close to one in August for the estimated basic and for the 7-day, 10-year low-flow scenario, and were close to one in July for the estimated Aquatic Base Flow scenario. A long-term water budget was calculated for the East Narragansett Bay study area to identify and assess inflows and outflows by region. The water withdrawals and return flows used in the budget were from 1995 through 1999. Total inflow and outflow were calculated separately for each region. Inflow was

  17. Trek across Maine 25th anniversary: a public health strategy to increase physical activity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Sarah Levin; Martin, Maurice; Perry, Tess; Harris, Jessica Maureen

    2013-09-01

    Could an annual event be an effective strategy to improve physical activity? Based on 25 years of data, we argue that it could be. Although there are eight recommended strategies to promote physical activity in the Community Guide, there is insufficient evidence for six others. Qualitative data collected from Trek Across Maine participants and other cause-specific events suggests that goal setting (i.e., individually adapted health behavior change) and family-based social support may be key factors in helping individuals become more physically active.

  18. Cryogenian Snowball Earth: a 25th anniversary assessment of models and data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, P. F.

    2014-12-01

    In 1989, Joe Kirschvink applied a nascent planetary climate theory—the self-reversing ice-albedo instability—to Neoproterozoic geology, citing paleomagnetic evidence that ancient Australian glaciers reached tidewater near the paleo-equator. He attributed the "snowball Earth" to a unique preponderance of low-latitude continents, and inferred that complex life including metazoa were spawned in the nutrient-rich glacial aftermath. There have been major advances in models and data since 1989, and gratifying convergences between them. In models, frozen oceans coexist with dynamic ice sheets, as demanded by geological data. Geochronological data show that snowball glaciations were prolonged and their terminations globally synchronous, as required by geochemical models for snowball deglaciation. In models, zonal average sources and sinks of water vapor are reversed in snowball atmospheres relative to climate states with ice lines (at low or high-latitude). Ice-covered oceans are well mixed, by true thermohaline meridional overturning and related jets, with implications for data linking iconic snowball iron-formations with silled basins. Triple oxygen isotope data from sulfate robustly supports model predictions of atmospheric CO2 required for snowball deglaciation, while promising results have been obtained from a variety of pH, weathering, productivity and redox sensitive proxies. The known first appearances of sponge biomarkers and metazoan embryos bracket the terminal Cryogenian snowball glaciation. Existing model-data conflicts are good targets for future research. Boron isotopes in syndeglacial cap dolomites consistently imply catastrophic ocean acidification upon deglaciation, while models suggest that the existence of cap dolomites implies that seawater acidified gradually and was buffered by the dissolution of carbonate, delivered by glaciers. Above all, the newly emerging Cryogenian chronology (highlighted in this session) presents new puzzles. Two low-latitude glaciations of grossly unequal longevity occurred in rapid succession. The Sturtian was 55-60 Myr long, followed a 109-yr glacial hiatus, and was distinguished by Fe2O3-rich sedimentary deposits; the Marinoan was 5-20 Myr long, followed a 107-yr glacial hiatus, and was distinguished by BaSO4-rich cap dolomite.

  19. Space Congress, 25th, Cocoa Beach, FL, Apr. 26-29, 1988, Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Papers are presented dealing with commercial aspects of space, space business, robotics, space station technologies, artificial intelligence applications in space, lunar and Mars exploration concepts, launch vehicles, and systems automation. Topics covered include ground processing of experiments conducted in space, the development of a commercial expendable launch vehicle industry, a small LEO satellite bus, epitaxial thin film growth in space, development of space enterprise, negotiating governmental contracts, robots in Shuttle hardware, telerobotic Space Station applications, simulation of an articulated transporter/manipulator system, welding the Space Station common module prototype, modeling the environment of the Man Tended Free Flyer, and Space Station rapid sample return. Ground operations support by AI, expert system prototype developments, Mars mission profile options and opportunities, launch vehicle operations analyses, space launch systems resiliency, model-based reasoning for knowledge-based software project management, technology advances for Space Shuttle processing, real-time fault management for large-scale systems, information systems for Shuttle processing, orbiter maneuvering vehicle support to the Space Station, and hydrogen-air-steam combustion regimes in large volumes are also discussed.

  20. C-PORT Overview for ECOS/ASTHO July 25th, 2016

    EPA Science Inventory

    C-PORT initially developed in response to Region 4 concerns with NEPA assessments in port expansionsExpansion of Panama Canal prompted East and Gulf Coast ports to propose modernizations/expansionsEPA R4 reviewed Charleston EIS, but letter specifically asked for screening-level a...

  1. 25th Anniversary Article: Ordered Polymer Structures for the Engineering of Photons and Phonons

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Koh, Cheong Yang; Singer, Jonathan P; Jeon, Seog-Jin; Maldovan, Martin; Stein, Ori; Thomas, Edwin L

    2014-01-01

    The engineering of optical and acoustic material functionalities via construction of ordered local and global architectures on various length scales commensurate with and well below the characteristic length scales of photons and phonons in the material is an indispensable and powerful means to develop novel materials. In the current mature status of photonics, polymers hold a pivotal role in various application areas such as light-emission, sensing, energy, and displays, with exclusive advantages despite their relatively low dielectric constants. Moreover, in the nascent field of phononics, polymers are expected to be a superior material platform due to the ability for readily fabricated complex polymer structures possessing a wide range of mechanical behaviors, complete phononic bandgaps, and resonant architectures. In this review, polymer-centric photonic and phononic crystals and metamaterials are highlighted, and basic concepts, fabrication techniques, selected functional polymers, applications, and emerging ideas are introduced. PMID:24338738

  2. The 25th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, Richard L. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Papers in the following categories are presented: recent developments in rubidium, cesium, and hydrogen-based frequency standards, and in cryogenic and trapped-ion technology; international and transnational applications of precise time and time interval (PTTI) technology with emphasis on satellite laser tracking networks, GLONASS timing, intercomparison of national time scales and international telecommunication; applications of PTTI technology to the telecommunications, power distribution, platform positioning, and geophysical survey industries; application of PTTI technology to evolving military communications and navigation systems; and dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of GPS, GLONASS, MILSTAR, LORAN, and synchronous communications satellites.

  3. 25th anniversary article: ordered polymer structures for the engineering of photons and phonons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Koh, Cheong Yang; Singer, Jonathan P; Jeon, Seog-Jin; Maldovan, Martin; Stein, Ori; Thomas, Edwin L

    2014-01-01

    The engineering of optical and acoustic material functionalities via construction of ordered local and global architectures on various length scales commensurate with and well below the characteristic length scales of photons and phonons in the material is an indispensable and powerful means to develop novel materials. In the current mature status of photonics, polymers hold a pivotal role in various application areas such as light-emission, sensing, energy, and displays, with exclusive advantages despite their relatively low dielectric constants. Moreover, in the nascent field of phononics, polymers are expected to be a superior material platform due to the ability for readily fabricated complex polymer structures possessing a wide range of mechanical behaviors, complete phononic bandgaps, and resonant architectures. In this review, polymer-centric photonic and phononic crystals and metamaterials are highlighted, and basic concepts, fabrication techniques, selected functional polymers, applications, and emerging ideas are introduced.

  4. 25th anniversary article: semiconductor nanowires--synthesis, characterization, and applications.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Neil P; Sun, Jianwei; Liu, Chong; Brittman, Sarah; Andrews, Sean C; Lim, Jongwoo; Gao, Hanwei; Yan, Ruoxue; Yang, Peidong

    2014-04-09

    Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have been studied extensively for over two decades for their novel electronic, photonic, thermal, electrochemical and mechanical properties. This comprehensive review article summarizes major advances in the synthesis, characterization, and application of these materials in the past decade. Developments in the understanding of the fundamental principles of "bottom-up" growth mechanisms are presented, with an emphasis on rational control of the morphology, stoichiometry, and crystal structure of the materials. This is followed by a discussion of the application of nanowires in i) electronic, ii) sensor, iii) photonic, iv) thermoelectric, v) photovoltaic, vi) photoelectrochemical, vii) battery, viii) mechanical, and ix) biological applications. Throughout the discussion, a detailed explanation of the unique properties associated with the one-dimensional nanowire geometry will be presented, and the benefits of these properties for the various applications will be highlighted. The review concludes with a brief perspective on future research directions, and remaining barriers which must be overcome for the successful commercial application of these technologies.

  5. Coseismic landsliding associated with the 2015 April 25th Gorkha earthquake, Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Marin; Zekkos, Dimitrios; West, A. Joshua; Gallen, Sean; Roback, Kevin; Chamlagain, Deepak; Athanasopoulos-Zekkos, Adda; Greenwood, William; Bateman, Julie; Partenio, Michael; Li, Gen; Cook, Kristen; Godt, Jonathan; Howat, Ian; Morin, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The characteristics of earthquake-triggered landslides have the potential to inform us about the ground motions during large earthquakes and the rock properties of the near surface environment. From the recent Mw7.8 2015 Gorkha earthquake in Nepal, we use satellite imagery to identify over 20,000 landslides that are associated with the main shock. While most landslides are located on steep hillslopes, we also present field measurements of alluvial terraces that have either failed or remained stable during the earthquake. We show how both hillslope and terrace failures can be used to better understand the earthquake. These local, site-specific surveys and analyses of alluvial terraces can be used to constrain co-seismic peak ground acceleration (PGA) and large landslide inventories can be used to gain insight into regional patterns of strong ground motion. Our regional landslide mapping reveals two principal patterns: (1) landslides are concentrated in the steep Greater Himalaya in the north, with conspicuously fewer landslides in the moderately-steep Lesser Himalaya in the south, and (2) within the Greater Himalaya, landslide density increases from west to east across the rupture area. We have compared our observed map of landslide occurrence to predictions from forward models using hillslope angles, average rock strength, and PGA estimated from ground motion prediction equations (GMPE). The higher concentration of landslides in the Greater Himalaya compared to the Lesser Himalaya can be predicted by the models and explained by the steeper topography of the Greater Himalaya. However, these forward models do not reproduce the east to west variation in observed landslide density, which is lower than model predictions near the epicenter, and greater than model predictions toward the eastern limit of the rupture. From limit equilibrium stability analysis of both failed and stable fluvial terraces, we constrain local PGA values in the eastern region of dense landsliding. We estimate higher PGA values than those predicted based on GMPE, which could in part explain the concentration of hillslope landsliding. An additional effect that may explain higher landslide density may be the concentration of high-frequency seismic energy, which is observed from high-rate GPS and teleseismic back-projections, since high-frequency spectra promote slope failure. Spatial variability in rock strength could also influence regional landslide distributions; this factor will be investigated with future shallow seismic and field observations. If the observed rupture characteristics of the Gorkha earthquake are typical of large earthquakes in the Himalaya, concentrated landsliding could locally deliver coarse sediment to river channels. Over the long term, spatially focused delivery of coarse sediment may lead to steepened river gradients and higher erosion rates that vary along strike of the Himalaya, provided that coseismic sediment production is mobilized and transported efficiently during the interseismic period. Ongoing work includes evaluating river sediment grain size. If a spatial correlation between coseismic landsliding, increased sediment grain size, and elevated erosion rates can be shown, it would demonstrate a new example of tectonic-erosion coupling based on the seismic cycle and fault behavior.

  6. Newspapers on Microfilm. Catalog and Price List 1971, 25th Anniversary Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1971

    Over 5500 current and backfile titles of American, foreign, and Black community newspapers that may be purchased on 35mm. roll microfilm are indexed in this catalog. Historical annotations are provided for selected American, Asian, and other foreign newspapers as well as for collections which focus on areas of special interest: early America, the…

  7. Development and External Debt: Friend or Foe? Academy for Educational Development 25th Anniversary Seminar Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hope, Nicholas C.

    Arguing that the benefits from borrowing abroad exceed the costs recently imposed on countries through debt-servicing difficulties, this paper defines debt as an engine of growth, forcing the borrower to produce goods efficiently, export them, and function competitively in the international market. Debt-servicing difficulties of developing nations…

  8. 25th anniversary article: A soft future: from robots and sensor skin to energy harvesters.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Siegfried; Bauer-Gogonea, Simona; Graz, Ingrid; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Keplinger, Christoph; Schwödiauer, Reinhard

    2014-01-08

    Scientists are exploring elastic and soft forms of robots, electronic skin and energy harvesters, dreaming to mimic nature and to enable novel applications in wide fields, from consumer and mobile appliances to biomedical systems, sports and healthcare. All conceivable classes of materials with a wide range of mechanical, physical and chemical properties are employed, from liquids and gels to organic and inorganic solids. Functionalities never seen before are achieved. In this review we discuss soft robots which allow actuation with several degrees of freedom. We show that different actuation mechanisms lead to similar actuators, capable of complex and smooth movements in 3d space. We introduce latest research examples in sensor skin development and discuss ultraflexible electronic circuits, light emitting diodes and solar cells as examples. Additional functionalities of sensor skin, such as visual sensors inspired by animal eyes, camouflage, self-cleaning and healing and on-skin energy storage and generation are briefly reviewed. Finally, we discuss a paradigm change in energy harvesting, away from hard energy generators to soft ones based on dielectric elastomers. Such systems are shown to work with high energy of conversion, making them potentially interesting for harvesting mechanical energy from human gait, winds and ocean waves.

  9. Attitudes and Opinions from the Nation's High Achieving Teens. 25th Annual Survey of High Achievers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Who's Who among American High School Students, Lake Forest, IL.

    This survey was conducted during the spring of 1994 for the purpose of determining the attitudes of student leaders in the nation's high schools. Eight thousand surveys were sent out to students, of which 3177 were returned. All students surveyed were members of the junior or senior class during the 1993-94 academic year. They were selected for…

  10. 25th Anniversary Article: Rational Design and Applications of Hydrogels in Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Annabi, Nasim; Tamayol, Ali; Uquillas, Jorge Alfredo; Akbari, Mohsen; Bertassoni, Luiz E.; Cha, Chaenyung; Camci-Unal, Gulden; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogels are hydrophilic polymer-based materials with high water content and physical characteristics that resemble the native extracellular matrix. Because of their remarkable properties, hydrogel systems are used for a wide range of biomedical applications, such as three-dimensional (3D) matrices for tissue engineering, drug-delivery vehicles, composite biomaterials, and as injectable fillers in minimally invasive surgeries. In addition, the rational design of hydrogels with controlled physical and biological properties can be used to modulate cellular functionality and tissue morphogenesis. Here, the development of advanced hydrogels with tunable physiochemical properties is highlighted, with particular emphasis on elastomeric, light-sensitive, composite, and shape-memory hydrogels. Emerging technologies developed over the past decade to control hydrogel architecture are also discussed and a number of potential applications and challenges in the utilization of hydrogels in regenerative medicine are reviewed. It is anticipated that the continued development of sophisticated hydrogels will result in clinical applications that will improve patient care and quality of life. PMID:24741694

  11. Proceedings of the 25th annual offshore technology conference. Volume 2 - Platform and marine system design

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This is volume 2 of a 4 volume set of conference proceedings dealing with offshore development of mineral resources. This particular conference centers around the design, construction, and installation of offshore platforms and underwater pipelines. It contains papers which discuss retrofitting of various types of platforms to meet current safety standards. It also discusses design criteria used to minimize wave motion in offshore platforms, moorings, and various types of support facilities. Papers also describe methods for welding joints in both platforms and pipelines. Many papers specifically address economic aspects of offshore development and the cost of complying with increasing safety regulations and standards. A few papers also deal directly with engineered safety systems as they apply to offshore platforms.

  12. 25th anniversary article: carbon nanotube- and graphene-based transparent conductive films for optoelectronic devices.

    PubMed

    Du, Jinhong; Pei, Songfeng; Ma, Laipeng; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2014-04-02

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)- and graphene (G)-based transparent conductive films (TCFs) are two promising alternatives for commonly-used indium tin oxide-based TCFs for future flexible optoelectronic devices. This review comprehensively summarizes recent progress in the fabrication, properties, modification, patterning, and integration of CNT- and G-TCFs into optoelectronic devices. Their potential applications and challenges in optoelectronic devices, such as organic photovoltaic cells, organic light emitting diodes and touch panels, are discussed in detail. More importantly, their key characteristics and advantages for use in these devices are compared. Despite many challenges, CNT- and G-TCFs have demonstrated great potential in various optoelectronic devices and have already been used for some products like touch panels of smartphones. This illustrates the significant opportunities for the industrial use of CNTs and graphene, and hence pushes nanoscience and nanotechnology one step towards practical applications.

  13. 25th anniversary article: materials for high-performance biodegradable semiconductor devices.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Suk-Won; Park, Gayoung; Cheng, Huanyu; Song, Jun-Kyul; Kang, Seung-Kyun; Yin, Lan; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G; Huang, Yonggang; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Rogers, John A

    2014-04-02

    We review recent progress in a class of silicon-based electronics that is capable of complete, controlled dissolution when immersed in water or bio-fluids. This type of technology, referred to in a broader sense as transient electronics, has potential applications in resorbable biomedical devices, eco-friendly electronics, environmental sensors, secure hardware systems and others. New results reported here include studies of the kinetics of hydrolysis of nanomembranes of single crystalline silicon in bio-fluids and aqueous solutions at various pH levels and temperatures. Evaluations of toxicity using live animal models and test coupons of transient electronic materials provide some evidence of their biocompatibility, thereby suggesting potential for use in bioresorbable electronic implants.

  14. 25th anniversary article: organic field-effect transistors: the path beyond amorphous silicon.

    PubMed

    Sirringhaus, Henning

    2014-03-05

    Over the past 25 years, organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) have witnessed impressive improvements in materials performance by 3-4 orders of magnitude, and many of the key materials discoveries have been published in Advanced Materials. This includes some of the most recent demonstrations of organic field-effect transistors with performance that clearly exceeds that of benchmark amorphous silicon-based devices. In this article, state-of-the-art in OFETs are reviewed in light of requirements for demanding future applications, in particular active-matrix addressing for flexible organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays. An overview is provided over both small molecule and conjugated polymer materials for which field-effect mobilities exceeding > 1 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) have been reported. Current understanding is also reviewed of their charge transport physics that allows reaching such unexpectedly high mobilities in these weakly van der Waals bonded and structurally comparatively disordered materials with a view towards understanding the potential for further improvement in performance in the future.

  15. 25th anniversary article: label-free electrical biodetection using carbon nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Kannan; Kern, Klaus

    2014-02-26

    Nanostructures are promising candidates for use as active materials for the detection of chemical and biological species, mainly due to the high surface-to-volume ratio and the unique physical properties arising at the nanoscale. Among the various nanostructures, materials comprised of sp(2) -carbon enjoy a unique position due to the possibility to readily prepare them in various dimensions ranging from 0D, through 1D to 2D. This review focuses on the use of 1D (carbon nanotubes) and 2D (graphene) carbon nanostructures for the detection of biologically relevant molecules. A key advantage is the possibility to perform the sensing operation without the use of any labels or complex reaction schemes. Along this spirit, various strategies reported for the label-free electrical detection of biomolecules using carbon nanostructures are discussed. With their promise for ultimate sensitivity and the capability to attain high selectivity through controlled chemical functionalization, carbon-based nanobiosensors are expected to open avenues to novel diagnostic tools as well as to obtain new fundamental insight into biomolecular interactions down to the single molecule level.

  16. 25th anniversary article: a decade of organic/polymeric photovoltaic research.

    PubMed

    Dou, Letian; You, Jingbi; Hong, Ziruo; Xu, Zheng; Li, Gang; Street, Robert A; Yang, Yang

    2013-12-10

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) technology has been developed and improved from a fancy concept with less than 1% power conversion efficiency (PCE) to over 10% PCE, particularly through the efforts in the last decade. The significant progress is the result of multidisciplinary research ranging from chemistry, material science, physics, and engineering. These efforts include the design and synthesis of novel compounds, understanding and controlling the film morphology, elucidating the device mechanisms, developing new device architectures, and improving large-scale manufacture. All of these achievements catalyzed the rapid growth of the OPV technology. This review article takes a retrospective look at the research and development of OPV, and focuses on recent advances of solution-processed materials and devices during the last decade, particular the polymer version of the materials and devices. The work in this field is exciting and OPV technology is a promising candidate for future thin film solar cells.

  17. 25th Anniversary Article: A Soft Future: From Robots and Sensor Skin to Energy Harvesters

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Siegfried; Bauer-Gogonea, Simona; Graz, Ingrid; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Keplinger, Christoph; Schwödiauer, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Scientists are exploring elastic and soft forms of robots, electronic skin and energy harvesters, dreaming to mimic nature and to enable novel applications in wide fields, from consumer and mobile appliances to biomedical systems, sports and healthcare. All conceivable classes of materials with a wide range of mechanical, physical and chemical properties are employed, from liquids and gels to organic and inorganic solids. Functionalities never seen before are achieved. In this review we discuss soft robots which allow actuation with several degrees of freedom. We show that different actuation mechanisms lead to similar actuators, capable of complex and smooth movements in 3d space. We introduce latest research examples in sensor skin development and discuss ultraflexible electronic circuits, light emitting diodes and solar cells as examples. Additional functionalities of sensor skin, such as visual sensors inspired by animal eyes, camouflage, self-cleaning and healing and on-skin energy storage and generation are briefly reviewed. Finally, we discuss a paradigm change in energy harvesting, away from hard energy generators to soft ones based on dielectric elastomers. Such systems are shown to work with high energy of conversion, making them potentially interesting for harvesting mechanical energy from human gait, winds and ocean waves. PMID:24307641

  18. 25th anniversary article: Rise to power--OPV-based solar parks.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Frederik C; Espinosa, Nieves; Hösel, Markus; Søndergaard, Roar R; Jørgensen, Mikkel

    2014-01-08

    A solar park based on polymer solar cells is described and analyzed with respect to performance, practicality, installation speed, and energy payback time. It is found that a high voltage installation where solar cells are all printed in series enables an installation rate in Watts installed per minute that far exceed any other PV technology in existence. The energy payback time for the practical installation of polymer solar cell foil on a wooden 250 square meter platform in its present form is 277 days when operated in Denmark and 180 days when operated in southern Spain. The installation and de-installation rate is above 100 m min⁻¹, which, with the present performance and web width, implies installation of >200 W min⁻¹. In comparison, this also exceeds the overall manufacturing speed of the polymer solar cell foil with a width of 305 mm which is currently 1 m min⁻¹ for complete encapsulated and tested foil. It is also significant that simultaneous installation and de-installation which enables efficient schemes for decommissioning and recycling is possible. It is highlighted where research efforts should most rationally be invested in order to make grid electricity from OPV a reality (and it is within reach).

  19. The Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory's 25th Anniversary Expedition to the South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. R.; Wiltshire, J. C.; Malahoff, A.

    2005-12-01

    The Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory (HURL) was established by NOAA at the University of Hawaii 25 years ago as part of its National Undersea Research Program. HURL's mission is to study deep water marine processes in the Pacific Ocean through a competitive proposal and review process. The dual Pisces IV and Pisces V 2000-meter manned submersibles, an RCV-150 1000-meter ROV, and multibeam equipped support ship R/V Ka'imikai-o-Kanaloa ( KoK) were largely acquired from the petroleum industry then adapted and upgraded to carry out cutting edge scientific expeditions. These studies range from active submarine volcanoes, delicate precious coral gardens, endangered marine mammal and fisheries management, to engineering surveys and deployment of observatory systems. HURL successfully completed a major 5-month expedition to the South Pacific during March-August 2005, working in the waters of New Zealand, Tonga, American Samoa, and the U.S. Line Islands covering a distance of nearly 14,500 nautical miles. This mission was significant in both the scientific merit and scope of operations, consisting of 8 different cruise legs at 21 study sites, with 12 chief and co-chief scientists, 58 total science team participants, and completing 61 out of 56 scheduled Pisces science dives, 17 ROV dives, 5 multibeam survey areas, 6 CTD rosette deployments, and 7 instrument mooring recoveries. The $3.5 million expedition was funded by an international partnership with New Zealand agencies (GNS & NIWA) and the University of Kiel in Germany along with the NOAA Office of Exploration and National Undersea Research Program. While most of the individual cruise legs focused on active submarine volcanoes of the Tonga-Kermadec Islands Arc and the Samoan hot spot chain with their hydrothermal systems and associated biological communities, others concentrated on marine protected areas including those of American Samoa and the remote atolls of the Line Islands of the Central Pacific. These studies included biological habitat mapping, climate change from dating of precious coral growth rings, ecological inventory assessments, and the marine archeology and impact from a grounded vessel. An overview of the latter portion of the voyage will be presented, along with the general capabilities of the HURL systems, and how they may be utilized by others employing the international collaborative model for extended missions to remote locations in the pursuit of deep submergence science.

  20. 25th anniversary article: CVD polymers: a new paradigm for surface modification and device fabrication.

    PubMed

    Coclite, Anna Maria; Howden, Rachel M; Borrelli, David C; Petruczok, Christy D; Yang, Rong; Yagüe, Jose Luis; Ugur, Asli; Chen, Nan; Lee, Sunghwan; Jo, Won Jun; Liu, Andong; Wang, Xiaoxue; Gleason, Karen K

    2013-10-11

    Well-adhered, conformal, thin (<100 nm) coatings can easily be obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for a variety of technological applications. Room temperature modification with functional polymers can be achieved on virtually any substrate: organic, inorganic, rigid, flexible, planar, three-dimensional, dense, or porous. In CVD polymerization, the monomer(s) are delivered to the surface through the vapor phase and then undergo simultaneous polymerization and thin film formation. By eliminating the need to dissolve macromolecules, CVD enables insoluble polymers to be coated and prevents solvent damage to the substrate. CVD film growth proceeds from the substrate up, allowing for interfacial engineering, real-time monitoring, and thickness control. Initiated-CVD shows successful results in terms of rationally designed micro- and nanoengineered materials to control molecular interactions at material surfaces. The success of oxidative-CVD is mainly demonstrated for the deposition of organic conducting and semiconducting polymers.

  1. A resolution honoring the Blackstone Valley Tourism Council on the celebration of its 25th anniversary.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Whitehouse, Sheldon [D-RI

    2010-03-24

    04/14/2010 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (text: CR S2326) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  2. United States Air Force Statistical Digest. Fiscal Year 1970. 25th Edition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1971-02-22

    TlC " ALTUSAFB • I" \\ SHAW AFB I ’......::!!’" ’" • LITTlE... Israel . F-5A •••••••• RF-5A •• ’.’ •• F-5A (FMS) Iran. F-5A (FMS) Morocco F-5A (FMS) Taiwan •• RF-5A (FMS) Norway F-5B •••••••• F-lllC (FMS)Australial T...2.088 .:lll as RF-4C. 445 36 - F-4D (FMS) Iran. 16 - - F-4E (MAP) 535 145 - F-4E - 18 - F-4E (FMS) Iran. - 32 - F-4E (FMS) Israel . - 44 - RF-4E

  3. A resolution recognizing the 25th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Lugar, Richard G. [R-IN

    2011-04-14

    05/09/2011 Resolution agreed to in Senate with an amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (text: CR S2799) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. 25th anniversary article: Bulk heterojunction solar cells: understanding the mechanism of operation.

    PubMed

    Heeger, Alan J

    2014-01-08

    The status of understanding of the operation of bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells is reviewed. Because the carrier photoexcitation recombination lengths are typically 10 nm in these disordered materials, the length scale for self-assembly must be of order 10-20 nm. Experiments have verified the existence of the BHJ nanostructure, but the morphology remains complex and a limiting factor. Three steps are required for generation of electrical power: i) absorption of photons from the sun; ii) photoinduced charge separation and the generation of mobile carriers; iii) collection of electrons and holes at opposite electrodes. The ultrafast charge transfer process arises from fundamental quantum uncertainty; mobile carriers are directly generated (electrons in the acceptor domains and holes in the donor domains) by the ultrafast charge transfer (≈70%) with ≈30% generated by exciton diffusion to a charge separating heterojunction. Sweep-out of the mobile carriers by the internal field prior to recombination is essential for high performance. Bimolecular recombination dominates in materials where the donor and acceptor phases are pure. Impurities degrade performance by introducing Shockly-Read-Hall decay. The review concludes with a summary of the problems to be solved to achieve the predicted power conversion efficiencies of >20% for a single cell.

  5. 25th anniversary article: Colloidal quantum dot materials and devices: a quarter-century of advances.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Young; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Zhitomirsky, David; Sargent, Edward H

    2013-09-25

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) optoelectronics offers a compelling combination of low-cost, large-area solution processing, and spectral tunability through the quantum size effect. Since early reports of size-tunable light emission from solution-synthesized CQDs over 25 years ago, tremendous progress has been made in synthesis and assembly, optical and electrical properties, materials processing, and optoelectronic applications of these materials. Here some of the major developments in this field are reviewed, touching on key milestones as well as future opportunities.

  6. 25th Space Simulation Conference. Environmental Testing: The Earth-Space Connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Topics covered include: Methods of Helium Injection and Removal for Heat Transfer Augmentation; The ESA Large Space Simulator Mechanical Ground Support Equipment for Spacecraft Testing; Temperature Stability and Control Requirements for Thermal Vacuum/Thermal Balance Testing of the Aquarius Radiometer; The Liquid Nitrogen System for Chamber A: A Change from Original Forced Flow Design to a Natural Flow (Thermo Siphon) System; Return to Mercury: A Comparison of Solar Simulation and Flight Data for the MESSENGER Spacecraft; Floating Pressure Conversion and Equipment Upgrades of Two 3.5kw, 20k, Helium Refrigerators; Affect of Air Leakage into a Thermal-Vacuum Chamber on Helium Refrigeration Heat Load; Special ISO Class 6 Cleanroom for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Project; A State-of-the-Art Contamination Effects Research and Test Facility Martian Dust Simulator; Cleanroom Design Practices and Their Influence on Particle Counts; Extra Terrestrial Environmental Chamber Design; Contamination Sources Effects Analysis (CSEA) - A Tool to Balance Cost/Schedule While Managing Facility Availability; SES and Acoustics at GSFC; HST Super Lightweight Interchangeable Carrier (SLIC) Static Test; Virtual Shaker Testing: Simulation Technology Improves Vibration Test Performance; Estimating Shock Spectra: Extensions beyond GEVS; Structural Dynamic Analysis of a Spacecraft Multi-DOF Shaker Table; Direct Field Acoustic Testing; Manufacture of Cryoshroud Surfaces for Space Simulation Chambers; The New LOTIS Test Facility; Thermal Vacuum Control Systems Options for Test Facilities; Extremely High Vacuum Chamber for Low Outgassing Processing at NASA Goddard; Precision Cleaning - Path to Premier; The New Anechoic Shielded Chambers Designed for Space and Commercial Applications at LIT; Extraction of Thermal Performance Values from Samples in the Lunar Dust Adhesion Bell Jar; Thermal (Silicon Diode) Data Acquisition System; Aquarius's Instrument Science Data System (ISDS) Automated to Acquire, Process, Trend Data and Produce Radiometric System Assessment Reports; Exhaustive Thresholds and Resistance Checkpoints; Reconfigurable HIL Testing of Earth Satellites; FPGA Control System for the Automated Test of MicroShutters; Ongoing Capabilities and Developments of Re-Entry Plasma Ground Tests at EADS-ASTRIUM; Operationally Responsive Space Standard Bus Battery Thermal Balance Testing and Heat Dissipation Analysis; Galileo - The Serial-Production AIT Challenge; The Space Systems Environmental Test Facility Database (SSETFD), Website Development Status; Simulated Reentry Heating by Torching; Micro-Vibration Measurements on Thermally Loaded Multi-Layer Insulation Samples in Vacuum; High Temperature Life Testing of 80Ni-20Cr Wire in a Simulated Mars Atmosphere for the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument Suit Gas Processing System (GPS) Carbon Dioxide Scrubber; The Planning and Implementation of Test Facility Improvements; and Development of a Silicon Carbide Molecular Beam Nozzle for Simulation Planetary Flybys and Low-Earth Orbit.

  7. BRENDA in 2015: exciting developments in its 25th year of existence

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Antje; Schomburg, Ida; Placzek, Sandra; Jeske, Lisa; Ulbrich, Marcus; Xiao, Mei; Sensen, Christoph W.; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    The BRENDA enzyme information system (http://www.brenda-enzymes.org/) has developed into an elaborate system of enzyme and enzyme-ligand information obtained from different sources, combined with flexible query systems and evaluation tools. The information is obtained by manual extraction from primary literature, text and data mining, data integration, and prediction algorithms. Approximately 300 million data include enzyme function and molecular data from more than 30 000 organisms. The manually derived core contains 3 million data from 77 000 enzymes annotated from 135 000 literature references. Each entry is connected to the literature reference and the source organism. They are complemented by information on occurrence, enzyme/disease relationships from text mining, sequences and 3D structures from other databases, and predicted enzyme location and genome annotation. Functional and structural data of more than 190 000 enzyme ligands are stored in BRENDA. New features improving the functionality and analysis tools were implemented. The human anatomy atlas CAVEman is linked to the BRENDA Tissue Ontology terms providing a connection between anatomical and functional enzyme data. Word Maps for enzymes obtained from PubMed abstracts highlight application and scientific relevance of enzymes. The EnzymeDetector genome annotation tool and the reaction database BKM-react including reactions from BRENDA, KEGG and MetaCyc were improved. The website was redesigned providing new query options. PMID:25378310

  8. KIDS COUNT Data Book, 2014: State Trends in Child Well-Being. 25th Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Each year since 1990, the Annie E. Casey Foundation has published the KIDS COUNT Data Book to track the well-being of children nationally and in every state. When the first Data Book was launched 25 years ago, the hope was that it would raise public awareness and build public commitment to invest in solutions to ensure that each and every child…

  9. 25th anniversary article: organic electronics marries photochromism: generation of multifunctional interfaces, materials, and devices.

    PubMed

    Orgiu, Emanuele; Samorì, Paolo

    2014-03-26

    Organic semiconductors have garnered significant interest as key components for flexible, low-cost, and large-area electronics. Hitherto, both materials and processing thereof seems to head towards a mature technology which shall ultimately meet expectations and efforts built up over the past years. However, by its own organic electronics cannot compete or complement the silicon-based electronics in integrating multiple functions in a small area unless novel solutions are brought into play. Photochromic molecules are small organic molecules able to undergo reversible photochemical isomerization between (at least) two (meta)stable states which exhibit markedly different properties. They can be embedded as additional component in organic-based materials ready to be exploited in devices such as OLEDs, OFETs, and OLETs. The structurally controlled incorporation of photochromic molecules can be done at various interfaces of a device, including the electrode/semiconductor or dielectric/semiconductor interface, or even as a binary mixture in the active layer, in order to impart a light responsive nature to the device. This can be accomplished by modulating via a light stimulus fundamental physico-chemical properties such as charge injection and transport in the device.

  10. 25th anniversary article: polymer-particle composites: phase stability and applications in electrochemical energy storage.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Samanvaya; Schaefer, Jennifer L; Yang, Zichao; Tu, Zhengyuan; Archer, Lynden A

    2014-01-15

    Polymer-particle composites are used in virtually every field of technology. When the particles approach nanometer dimensions, large interfacial regions are created. In favorable situations, the spatial distribution of these interfaces can be controlled to create new hybrid materials with physical and transport properties inaccessible in their constituents or poorly prepared mixtures. This review surveys progress in the last decade in understanding phase behavior, structure, and properties of nanoparticle-polymer composites. The review takes a decidedly polymers perspective and explores how physical and chemical approaches may be employed to create hybrids with controlled distribution of particles. Applications are studied in two contexts of contemporary interest: battery electrolytes and electrodes. In the former, the role of dispersed and aggregated particles on ion-transport is considered. In the latter, the polymer is employed in such small quantities that it has been historically given titles such as binder and carbon precursor that underscore its perceived secondary role. Considering the myriad functions the binder plays in an electrode, it is surprising that highly filled composites have not received more attention. Opportunities in this and related areas are highlighted where recent advances in synthesis and polymer science are inspiring new approaches, and where newcomers to the field could make important contributions.

  11. A Quarter Century of Turmoil: School Finance in California on the 25th Anniversary of "Serrano."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picus, Lawrence O.

    1997-01-01

    Explains problems with complex system of educational finance in California. Addresses issues such as diversity, per pupil expenditure, and equity at district and school level; problems with special education, pupil transportation, supplemental grants, and "mega-item;" and brief history of California's school financing--including Serrano…

  12. 25th RCOphth Congress, President's Session paper: 25 years of progress in medical retina

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, J M

    2014-01-01

    The quarter century since the foundation of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists has coincided with immense change in the subspecialty of medical retina, which has moved from being the province of a few dedicated enthusiasts to being an integral, core part of ophthalmology in every eye department. In age-related macular degeneration, there has been a move away from targeted, destructive laser therapy, dependent on fluorescein angiography to intravitreal injection therapy of anti-growth factor agents, largely guided by optical coherence tomography. As a result of these changes, ophthalmologists have witnessed a marked improvement in visual outcomes for their patients with wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), while at the same time developing and enacting entirely novel ways of delivering care. In the field of diabetic retinopathy, this period also saw advances in laser technology and a move away from highly destructive laser photocoagulation treatment to gentler retinal laser treatments. The introduction of intravitreal therapies, both steroids and anti-growth factor agents, has further advanced the treatment of diabetic macular oedema. This era has also seen in the United Kingdom the introduction of a coordinated national diabetic retinopathy screening programme, which offers an increasing hope that the burden of blindness from diabetic eye disease can be lessened. Exciting future advances in retinal imaging, genetics, and pharmacology will allow us to further improve outcomes for our patients and for ophthalmologists specialising in medical retina, the future looks very exciting but increasingly busy. PMID:24993325

  13. Oak Ridge Associated Universities 25th Annual Report for the year ending June 30, 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) is a private, nonprofit corporation sponsored by 41 colleges and universities in the South. The pioneer among corporate university management groups of its type in the United States, ORAU conducts programs of education, information, research, and human resources development under contract with the U.S.…

  14. Cartography and Connectomes Perspective article for Neuron 25th Anniversary Issue

    PubMed Central

    Van Essen, David C.

    2013-01-01

    The past 25 years have seen great progress in parcellating the cerebral cortex into a mosaic of many distinct areas in mice, monkeys, and humans. Quantitative studies of inter-areal connectivity have revealed unexpectedly many pathways and a wide range of connection strengths in mouse and macaque cortex. In humans, advances in analyzing ‘structural’ and ‘functional’ connectivity using powerful but indirect noninvasive neuroimaging methods are yielding intriguing insights about brain circuits, their variability across individuals, and their relationship to behavior. PMID:24183027

  15. National Center for Biotechnology Information Celebrates 25th Anniversary | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... NCBI is a national and international resource for molecular biology information. It creates public databases, conducts research in computational biology, develops software tools for analyzing genome data, and ... molecular processes affecting human health and disease. NLM Director ...

  16. Preliminary prediction of the 25-thTH solar cycle parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishkalo, M.

    2014-12-01

    Solar activity varies with a period of about 11 years. The solar activity variations cause changes in the interplanetary and near-Earth space. The whole space weather is mainly controlled by the solar activity. Changes in space weather affect the operation of space-borne and ground-based technological systems such as manned space flights, aero-navigation and space navigation, radars, high-frequency radio communication, GPS navigation, ground power lines. The solar activity variations influence living organisms and the climate on Earth. That is why it is important to know the level of solar activity in a solar cycle in advance. Current solar activity is near the maximum of solar cycle 24. Maximal monthly sunspot number was 102.8 in February 2014 and smoothed one was 75.4 in November 2013 (preliminary). Taking it into account and using correlation relations and regression equations from (Pishkalo, 2014: Solar Phys., vol. 289, 1815) we can estimate duration of solar cycle 24 and then predict parameters of solar cycle 25. Precursors in our calculations are the estimated duration of solar cycle 24 and sunspot number at the end of the cycle. We found that minimum and maximum of solar cycle 25 in monthly sunspot numbers will amount to 5 in April–June of 2020 and 105–110 in October–December of 2024, respectively. Solar cycle 25 will be stronger than the current cycle 24. No very deep drop in solar activity similar to Dalton or Maunder minimums was predicted.

  17. Unexpected earthquake of June 25th, 2015 in Madiun, East Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugraha, Andri Dian; Supendi, Pepen; Shiddiqi, Hasbi Ash; Widiyantoro, Sri

    2016-05-01

    An earthquake with magnitude 4.2 struck Madiun and its vicinity on June 25, 2015. According to Indonesian Meteorology, Climatology, and Geophysics Agency (BMKG), the earthquake occurred at 10:35:29 GMT+7 and was located in 7.73° S, 111.69 ° E, with a depth of 10 km. At least 57 houses suffered from light to medium damages. We reprocessed earthquake waveform data to obtain an accurate hypocenter location. We manually picked P- and S-waves arrival times from 12 seismic stations in the eastern part of Java. Earthquake location was determined by using Hypoellipse code that employs a single event determination method. Our inversion is able to resolve the fix-depth and shows that the earthquake occurred at 10:35:27.6 GMT+7 and was located in 7.6305° S, 111.7529 ° E with 14.81 km focus depth. Our location depicts a smaller travel time residual compared to that based on the BMKG result. Focal mechanism of the earthquake was determined by using HASH code. We used first arrival polarity of 9 seismic records with azimuthal gap less than 90°, and estimated take-off angles by using assumption of homogenous medium. Our focal mechanism solution shows a strike-slip mechanism with strike direction of 163o, which may be related to a strike-fault in Klangon, an area to the east of Madiun.

  18. GE Appliance Park Louisville, KY Plant Wide Assessment Final Report October 25th, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Chandon Rao; Richard Urschel

    2007-10-25

    Used a team of experts to analyze and model major systems at a large industrial appliance manufacturer. During the data gathering stage, the team specifically looked for baselining the efficiency of the systems as well as developing short term and longer term efficiency projects. Electrical distribution, Compressed air generation and thermal heat recovery for the production facility and front office heating and cooling optimization were all baselined during the study.

  19. 25th anniversary article: progress in chemistry and applications of functional indigos for organic electronics.

    PubMed

    Głowacki, Eric Daniel; Voss, Gundula; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar

    2013-12-17

    Indigo and its derivatives are dyes and pigments with a long and distinguished history in organic chemistry. Recently, applications of this 'old' structure as a functional organic building block for organic electronics applications have renewed interest in these molecules and their remarkable chemical and physical properties. Natural-origin indigos have been processed in fully bio-compatible field effect transistors, operating with ambipolar mobilities up to 0.5 cm(2) /Vs and air-stability. The synthetic derivative isoindigo has emerged as one of the most successful building-blocks for semiconducting polymers for plastic solar cells with efficiencies > 5%. Another isomer of indigo, epindolidione, has also been shown to be one of the best reported organic transistor materials in terms of mobility (∼2 cm(2) /Vs) and stability. This progress report aims to review very recent applications of indigoids in organic electronics, but especially to logically bridge together the hereto independent research directions on indigo, isoindigo, and other materials inspired by historical dye chemistry: a field which was the root of the development of modern chemistry in the first place.

  20. 25th anniversary article: hybrid nanostructures based on two-dimensional nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao; Tan, Chaoliang; Yin, Zongyou; Zhang, Hua

    2014-04-09

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), receive a lot of attention, because of their intriguing properties and wide applications in catalysis, energy-storage devices, electronics, optoelectronics, and so on. To further enhance the performance of their application, these 2D nanomaterials are hybridized with other functional nanostructures. In this review, the latest studies of 2D nanomaterial-based hybrid nanostructures are discussed, focusing on their preparation methods, properties, and applications.

  1. Normative Reference Values for Handgrip Strength in Colombian Schoolchildren: The FUPRECOL Study.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; Morales, Olimpo; Peña-Ibagon, Jhonatan C; Palacios-López, Adalberto; Prieto-Benavides, Daniel H; Vivas, Andrés; Correa-Bautista, Jorge E; Lobelo, Felipe; Alonso-Martínez, Alicia M; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2017-01-01

    Ramírez-Vélez, R, Morales, O, Peña-Ibagon, JC, Palacios-López, A, Prieto-Benavides, DH, Vivas, A, Correa-Bautista, JE, Lobelo, F, Alonso-Martínez, AM, and Izquierdo, M. Normative reference values for handgrip strength in Colombian schoolchildren: the FUPRECOL study. J Strength Cond Res 31(1): 217-226, 2017-The primary aim of this study was to generate normative handgrip (HG) strength data for 10 to 17.9 year olds. The secondary aim was to determine the relative proportion of Colombian children and adolescents that fall into established Health Benefit Zones (HBZ). This cross-sectional study enrolled 7,268 schoolchildren (boys n = 3,129 and girls n = 4,139, age 12.7 [2.4] years). Handgrip was measured using a hand dynamometer with an adjustable grip. Five HBZs (Needs Improvement, Fair, Good, Very Good, and Excellent) have been established that correspond to combined HG. Centile smoothed curves, percentile, and tables for the third, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 97th percentile were calculated using Cole's LMS method. Handgrip peaked in the sample at 22.2 (8.9) kg in boys and 18.5 (5.5) kg in girls. The increase in HG was greater for boys than for girls, but the peak HG was lower in girls than in boys. The HBZ data indicated that a higher overall percentage of boys than girls at each age group fell into the "Needs Improvement" zone, with differences particularly pronounced during adolescence. Our results provide, for the first time, sex- and age-specific HG reference standards for Colombian schoolchildren aged 9-17.9 years.

  2. Fog-Influenced Submicron Aerosol Number Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zikova, N.; Zdimal, V.

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the influence of fog on aerosol particle number size distributions (PNSD) in submicron range. Thus, five-year continuous time series of the SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer) data giving information on PNSD in five minute time step were compared with detailed meteorological records from the professional meteorological station Kosetice in the Czech Republic. The comparison included total number concentration and PNSD in size ranges between 10 and 800 nm. The meteorological records consist from the exact times of starts and ends of individual meteorological phenomena (with one minute precision). The records longer than 90 minutes were considered, and corresponding SMPS spectra were evaluated. Evaluation of total number distributions showed considerably lower concentration during fog periods compared to the period when no meteorological phenomenon was recorded. It was even lower than average concentration during presence of hydrometeors (not only fog, but rain, drizzle, snow etc. as well). Typical PNSD computed from all the data recorded in the five years is in Figure 1. Not only median and 1st and 3rd quartiles are depicted, but also 5th and 95th percentiles are plotted, to see the variability of the concentrations in individual size bins. The most prevailing feature is the accumulation mode, which seems to be least influenced by the fog presence. On the contrary, the smallest aerosol particles (diameter under 40 nm) are effectively removed, as well as the largest particles (diameter over 500 nm). Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the projects GAUK 62213 and SVV-2013-267308. Figure 1. 5th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 95th percentile of aerosol particle number size distributions recorded during fog events.

  3. Relationship of adiposity to the population distribution of plasma triglyceride concentrations in vigorously active men and women

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Paul T.

    2002-12-21

    Context and Objective: Vigorous exercise, alcohol and weight loss are all known to increase HDL-cholesterol, however, it is not known whether these interventions raise low HDL as effectively as has been demonstrated for normal HDL. Design: Physician-supplied medical data from 7,288 male and 2,359 female runners were divided into five strata according to their self-reported usual running distance, reported alcohol intake, body mass index (BMI) or waist circumference. Within each stratum, the 5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles for HDL-cholesterol were then determined. Bootstrap resampling of least-squares regression was applied to determine the cross-sectional relationships between these factors and each percentile of the HDL-cholesterol distribution. Results: In both sexes, the rise in HDL-cholesterol per unit of vigorous exercise or alcohol intake was at least twice as great at the 95th percentile as at the 5th percentile of the HDL-distribution. There was also a significant graded increase in the slopes relating exercise (km run) and alcohol intake to HDL between the 5th and the 95th percentile. Men's HDL-cholesterol decreased in association with fatness (BMI and waist circumference) more sharply at the 95th than at the 5th percentile of the HDL-distribution. Conclusions: Although exercise, alcohol and adiposity were all related to HDL-cholesterol, the elevation in HDL per km run or ounce of alcohol consumed, and reduction in HDL per kg of body weight (men only), was least when HDL was low and greatest when HDL was high. These cross-sectional relationships support the hypothesis that men and women who have low HDL-cholesterol will be less responsive to exercise and alcohol (and weight loss in men) as compared to those who have high HDL-cholesterol.

  4. A Streamflow Statistics (StreamStats) Web Application for Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koltun, G.F.; Kula, Stephanie P.; Puskas, Barry M.

    2006-01-01

    A StreamStats Web application was developed for Ohio that implements equations for estimating a variety of streamflow statistics including the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year peak streamflows, mean annual streamflow, mean monthly streamflows, harmonic mean streamflow, and 25th-, 50th-, and 75th-percentile streamflows. StreamStats is a Web-based geographic information system application designed to facilitate the estimation of streamflow statistics at ungaged locations on streams. StreamStats can also serve precomputed streamflow statistics determined from streamflow-gaging station data. The basic structure, use, and limitations of StreamStats are described in this report. To facilitate the level of automation required for Ohio's StreamStats application, the technique used by Koltun (2003)1 for computing main-channel slope was replaced with a new computationally robust technique. The new channel-slope characteristic, referred to as SL10-85, differed from the National Hydrography Data based channel slope values (SL) reported by Koltun (2003)1 by an average of -28.3 percent, with the median change being -13.2 percent. In spite of the differences, the two slope measures are strongly correlated. The change in channel slope values resulting from the change in computational method necessitated revision of the full-model equations for flood-peak discharges originally presented by Koltun (2003)1. Average standard errors of prediction for the revised full-model equations presented in this report increased by a small amount over those reported by Koltun (2003)1, with increases ranging from 0.7 to 0.9 percent. Mean percentage changes in the revised regression and weighted flood-frequency estimates relative to regression and weighted estimates reported by Koltun (2003)1 were small, ranging from -0.72 to -0.25 percent and -0.22 to 0.07 percent, respectively.

  5. Waist circumference percentiles among Turkish children under the age of 6 years.

    PubMed

    Hatipoglu, Nihal; Mazicioglu, M Mumtaz; Poyrazoglu, Serpil; Borlu, Arda; Horoz, Duygu; Kurtoglu, Selim

    2013-01-01

    Waist circumference, a proxy measure of abdominal obesity, is associated with cardio-metabolic risk factors in childhood and adolescence. Although there are numerous studies about waist circumference percentiles in children, only a few studies cover preschool children. The aim of this study was to develop age- and gender-specific waist circumference smoothed reference curves in Turkish preschool children to determine abdominal obesity prevalence and to compare them with reference curves obtained from different countries. The design of the study was cross-sectional. A total of 2,947 children (1,471 boys and 1,476 girls) aged 0-6 years were included in the study. The subjects were divided according to their gender. Waist circumference was measured by using a standardized procedure. The age- and gender-specific waist circumference reference curves were constructed and smoothed with LMS method. The reference values of waist circumference, including 3rd, 10th 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 97th percentiles, and standard deviations were given for preschool children. Waist circumference values increased with age, and there were differences between genders. The prevalence of abdominal obesity was calculated as 10.1 % for boys and 10.7 % for girls. Having compared our data with two other countries' data, we found that our waist circumference data were significantly lower. This is the first cross-sectional study for age- and gender-specific references of 0- to 6-year-old Turkish children. The gender- and age-specific waist circumference percentiles can be used to determine the risk of central obesity.

  6. Variability in early communicative development.

    PubMed

    Fenson, L; Dale, P S; Reznick, J S; Bates, E; Thal, D J; Pethick, S J

    1994-01-01

    Data from parent reports on 1,803 children--derived from a normative study of the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventories (CDIs)--are used to describe the typical course and the extent of variability in major features of communicative development between 8 and 30 months of age. The two instruments, one designed for 8-16-month-old infants, the other for 16-30-month-old toddlers, are both reliable and valid, confirming the value of parent reports that are based on contemporary behavior and a recognition format. Growth trends are described for children scoring at the 10th-, 25th-, 50th-, 75th-, and 90th-percentile levels on receptive and expressive vocabulary, actions and gestures, and a number of aspects of morphology and syntax. Extensive variability exists in the rate of lexical, gestural, and grammatical development. The wide variability across children in the time of onset and course of acquisition of these skills challenges the meaningfulness of the concept of the modal child. At the same time, moderate to high intercorrelations are found among the different skills both concurrently and predictively (across a 6-month period). Sex differences consistently favor females; however, these are very small, typically accounting for 1%-2% of the variance. The effects of SES and birth order are even smaller within this age range. The inventories offer objective criteria for defining typicality and exceptionality, and their cost effectiveness facilitates the aggregation of large data sets needed to address many issues of contemporary theoretical interest. The present data also offer unusually detailed information on the course of development of individual lexical, gestural, and grammatical items and features. Adaptations of the CDIs to other languages have opened new possibilities for cross-linguistic explorations of sequence, rate, and variability of communicative development.

  7. Technical note: Relationship between infrared thermography and heat production in young bulls.

    PubMed

    Gomes, R A; Busato, K C; Ladeira, M M; Johnson, K A; Galvão, M C; Rodrigues, A C; Lourençoni, D; Chizzotti, M L

    2016-03-01

    The traditional techniques to measure heat production (HP) are calorimetry (direct and indirect) and comparative slaughter. Both methods are expensive and require extensive amounts of time and infrastructure. Infrared thermography (IRT) could be a faster and less expensive alternative to estimate cattle HP. The objective of this project was to evaluate the use of the IRT technique as an indicator of HP in cattle. A total of 24 bulls (12 Nellore and 12 Black Angus) with initial BW of 380 ± 7 kg were used. Initially, 4 animals of each breed were harvested (baseline animals) and simple regressions were developed for each breed from these baseline animals to estimate the initial chemical composition of the remaining bulls. Eight animals of each breed were fed a silage/concentrate diet for ad libitum intake in individual stalls. On the 25th, 50th, and 75th experimental day, infrared thermal images (Fluke Ti 55ft; Fluke Corporation) were taken of each animal's face to access skin and ocular surface temperatures. A metabolism trial was conducted to estimate the ME intake (MEI). After 84 experimental days, the cattle were harvested and retained energy (RE) and HP were calculated. The data were analyzed using the MIXED and REG procedures of SAS adopting a significance level of 0.05. Angus cattle had a greater daily MEI, HP, and skin and eye temperatures than Nellore. We found significant correlations ( ≤ 0.005) between daily HP and maximum ( = 0.65) and average skin temperatures ( = 0.65) and maximum ( = 0.65) and average ocular surface ( = 0.69) temperatures recorded on d 50. Infrared thermography has potential to be used to evaluate HP in cattle.

  8. Reference Values for Body Composition and Anthropometric Measurements in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Diana A.; Dawson, John A.; Matias, Catarina N.; Rocha, Paulo M.; Minderico, Cláudia S.; Allison, David B.; Sardinha, Luís B.; Silva, Analiza M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the importance of body composition in athletes, reference sex- and sport-specific body composition data are lacking. We aim to develop reference values for body composition and anthropometric measurements in athletes. Methods Body weight and height were measured in 898 athletes (264 female, 634 male), anthropometric variables were assessed in 798 athletes (240 female and 558 male), and in 481 athletes (142 female and 339 male) with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). A total of 21 different sports were represented. Reference percentiles (5th, 25th, 50th, 75th, and 95th) were calculated for each measured value, stratified by sex and sport. Because sample sizes within a sport were often very low for some outcomes, the percentiles were estimated using a parametric, empirical Bayesian framework that allowed sharing information across sports. Results We derived sex- and sport-specific reference percentiles for the following DXA outcomes: total (whole body scan) and regional (subtotal, trunk, and appendicular) bone mineral content, bone mineral density, absolute and percentage fat mass, fat-free mass, and lean soft tissue. Additionally, we derived reference percentiles for height-normalized indexes by dividing fat mass, fat-free mass, and appendicular lean soft tissue by height squared. We also derived sex- and sport-specific reference percentiles for the following anthropometry outcomes: weight, height, body mass index, sum of skinfold thicknesses (7 skinfolds, appendicular skinfolds, trunk skinfolds, arm skinfolds, and leg skinfolds), circumferences (hip, arm, midthigh, calf, and abdominal circumferences), and muscle circumferences (arm, thigh, and calf muscle circumferences). Conclusions These reference percentiles will be a helpful tool for sports professionals, in both clinical and field settings, for body composition assessment in athletes. PMID:24830292

  9. Development of a quantitative food frequency questionnaire for Brazilian patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate the association between dietary components and development of chronic diabetic complications, the dietary evaluation should include a long period, months or years. The present manuscript aims to develop a quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and a portfolio with food photos to assess the usual intake pattern of Brazilian patients with type 2 diabetes to be used in future studies. Methods Dietary data using 3-day weighed diet records (WDR) from 188 outpatients with type 2 diabetes were used to construct the list of usually consumed foods. Foods were initially clustered into eight groups: “cereals, tubers, roots, and derivatives”; “vegetables and legumes”; “fruits”; “beans”; “meat and eggs”; “milk and dairy products”; “oils and fats”, and “sugars and sweets”. The frequency of food intake and the relative contribution of each food item to the total energy and nutrient intakes were calculated. Portion sizes were determined according to the 25th, 50th, 75th, and 95th percentiles of intake for each food item. Results A total of 62 food items were selected based on the 3-day WDR and another 27 foods or how they are prepared and nine beverages were included after the expert examination. Also, a portfolio with food photos of each included food item and portion sizes was made to assist the patients in identifying the consumed portion. Conclusions We developed a practical quantitative FFQ and portfolio with photos of 98 food items covering those most commonly consumed in the past 12 months, to assess the usual diet pattern of patients with type 2 diabetes in Southern Brazil. PMID:23938026

  10. Penetration of Vancomycin into Epithelial Lining Fluid in Healthy Volunteers▿

    PubMed Central

    Lodise, Thomas P.; Drusano, George L.; Butterfield, Jill M.; Scoville, Joshua; Gotfried, Mark; Rodvold, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    Although vancomycin is often regarded as an agent that concentrates poorly in the lower respiratory tract, as determined from concentrations in epithelial lining fluid (ELF), few data are available. This study sought to determine the profile of vancomycin exposure in the ELF relative to plasma. Population modeling and Monte Carlo simulation were employed to estimate the penetration of vancomycin into ELF. Plasma and ELF pharmacokinetic (PK) data were obtained from 10 healthy volunteers. Concentration-time profiles in plasma and ELF were simultaneously modeled using a three-compartment model with zero-order infusion and first-order elimination and transfer using the big nonparametric adaptive grid (BigNPAG) program. Monte Carlo simulation with 9,999 subjects was performed to calculate the ELF/plasma penetration ratios by estimating the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) in ELF (AUCELF) and plasma (AUCplasma) after a single simulated 1,000-mg dose. The mean (standard deviation) AUCELF/AUCplasma penetration ratio was 0.675 (0.677), and the 25th, 50th, and 75th percentile penetration ratios were 0.265, 0.474, and 0.842, respectively. Our results indicate that vancomycin penetrates ELF at approximately 50% of plasma levels. To properly judge the adequacy of current doses and schedules employed in practice, future studies are needed to delineate the PK/PD (pharmacodynamics) target for vancomycin in ELF. If the PK/PD target in ELF is found to be consistent with the currently proposed target of an AUC/MIC of ≥400, suboptimal probability of target attainment would be expected when vancomycin is utilized for pneumonias due to MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) with MICs in excess of 1 mg/liter. PMID:21911567

  11. A methodology to study multiple sclerosis (MS) based on distributions of standardized intensities in segmented tissue regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, T.; Udupa, J. K.; Odhner, D.; Mishra, S.; Wu, G.; Schwartz, E.; Ying, G.-S.; Iwanaga, T.; Desiderio, L.; Balcer, L.

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents (1) an improved hierarchical method for segmenting the component tissue regions in fast spin echo T2 and PD images of the brain of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients, and (2) a methodology to characterize the disease utilizing the distributions of standardized T2 and PD intensities in the segmented tissue regions. First, the background intensity inhomogeneities are corrected and the intensity scales are standardized for all acquired images. The segmentation method imposes a feedback-like procedure on our previously developed hierarchical brain tissue segmentation method. With gradually simplified patterns in images and stronger evidences, pathological objects are recognized and segmented in an interplay fashion. After the brain parenchymal (BP) mask is generated, an under-estimated gray matter mask (uGM) and an over-estimated white matter mask (oWM) are created. Pure WM (PWM) and lesion (LS) masks are extracted from the all-inclusive oWM mask. By feedback, accurate GM and WM masks are subsequently formed. Finally, partial volume regions of GM and WM as well as Dirty WM (DWM) masks are generated. Intensity histograms and their parameters (peak height, peak location, and 25th, 50th and 75th percentile values) are computed for both T2 and PD images within each tissue region. Tissue volumes are also estimated. Spearman correlation coefficient rank test is then utilized to assess if there exists a trend between clinical states and the image-based parameters. This image analysis method has been applied to a data set consisting of 60 patients with MS and 20 normal controls. LS related parameters and clinical Extended Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores demonstrate modest correlations. Almost every intensity-based parameter shows statistical difference between normal control and patient groups with a level better than 5%. These results can be utilized to monitor disease progression in MS.

  12. A resolution commemorating the 75th anniversary of Kristallnacht, or the Night of the Broken Glass.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Cardin, Benjamin L. [D-MD

    2013-11-12

    11/12/2013 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S7964; text as passed Senate: CR S7962) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. Prejudice and Educational Choice: 75th Anniversary of Pierce v. Society of Sisters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mizia, Robert Louis

    2000-01-01

    Recounts the landmark case of Pierce v. Society of Sisters. Reminds readers that parental choice of an appropriate education for their children is a constitutional right and liberty under law and must be sustained. Asserts that true choice will occur only when consensus on public funding issues of school choice (including private and Catholic…

  14. Organizational Culture and Leadership Practices in the 75th Ranger Regiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Rangers. Led by Colonel John S. Mosby, this unit was very successful in raiding Union supply trains behind enemy lines. During World War II, six Ranger...Battalions were formed for operations in the European and Pacific Theaters. The 1st Ranger Battalion was formed under Lieutenant Colonel William O...Darby, who later commanded all Ranger forces in the European Theater. Additionally, the 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional), more commonly known as

  15. A resolution commemorating the 75th Anniversary of Air Force Weather.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Johanns, Mike [R-NE

    2012-08-02

    08/02/2012 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S6012-6013; text as passed Senate: CR S6012; text of measure as introduced: CR S5992) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  16. A resolution congratulating the Soil Science Society of America on its 75th anniversary.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Moran, Jerry [R-KS

    2011-06-30

    06/30/2011 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S4304-4305; text as passed Senate: CR S4304-4305; text of measure as introduced: CR S4298) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  17. A concurrent resolution to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Blue Ridge Parkway.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Warner, Mark R. [D-VA

    2010-06-30

    06/30/2010 Referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. (text of measure as introduced: CR S5704) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. A concurrent resolution commemorating the 75th anniversary of the dedication of Shenandoah National Park.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Webb, Jim [D-VA

    2011-06-23

    06/23/2011 Referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. (text of measure as introduced: CR S4104) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. A resolution commemorating the 75th anniversary of the dedication of Shenandoah National Park.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Webb, Jim [D-VA

    2011-09-08

    09/08/2011 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR: S5465; text as passed Senate: CR S5465; text of measure as introduced: CR S5463) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  20. EDITORIAL: Special issue in honour of J E Allen's 75th birthday

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, R. N.

    2003-11-01

    This issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics is dedicated to Professor John Allen who has spent most of his professional life in the Department of Engineering Science, Oxford University, working on problems in gas discharges and plasma physics. His first degrees and doctorate were taken at Liverpool University in the 1950s where at the time there was an internationally renowned group led by Meek, Craggs and Edels. He then spent some time at Frascati in Italy on secondment from Harwell, helping to build up expertise there. He returned to England in the mid-1960s, first to Cambridge, but he soon migrated to Oxford to University College and the Department of Engineering Science to strengthen a team that already included von Engel, Motz and Woods with more recent reinforcement by Howatson and myself. Thus there was built up both a post-graduate MSc course and what amounted to a graduate school producing many scientists who have since distinguished themselves in all parts of the world. The prospects for success in the quest for fusion and the proximity of Culham Laboratory produced a heady mix. But the timescales lengthened and fashions changed. However, John moved with the times and he and his research students made notable contributions to the understanding of dusty plasmas and to radio-frequency plasmas used in the processing of microchips. The structure at Oxford was such that the recognition of a professorship came late in his career, but his international reputation was well established much earlier. Being freed of tutorial duties he has travelled much in recent years and has been Chairman of the International Conference on Phenomena in Ionized Gases (ICPIG) 1999-2001 and directly involved in the international effort to carry out dusty plasma experiments in space under micro-gravity conditions. For my part, having known John as a colleague over the past forty years, he has been a valuable point of reference when one needed someone to comment on new ideas, a challenging competitor when we were working on similar lines, and his research students provided me with the stimulation that comes from such interaction, be it informal or more formally in the course of D Phil vivas. Thus I have felt that there was a debt to be repaid by encouraging his students and other co-workers to contribute to this issue. More importantly, we honour someone whose contributions we know will stand the test of time.

  1. A resolution celebrating the 75th anniversary of the dedication of the Hoover Dam.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Reid, Harry [D-NV

    2010-09-28

    09/28/2010 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S7666-7669; text as passed Senate: CR S7667; text of measure as introduced: CR S7636-7637) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  2. Symposium for Alfred Wolf's 75th birthday at American Chemical Society meeting

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-02

    This report contains abstracts from the symposium presented by the Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society. Sessions covered the following topics: Therapeutic radionuclides--Making the right choice; Aspects of nuclear science; Nuclear structure with large gamma-ray detector arrays and their auxiliary devices; Thirty years of research in nuclear dynamics--From fission to the quark-gluon plasma; Chelated metal ions for diagnosis and therapy; Radiochemistry--Basic and applied; and Applications of small accelerators in science and industry.

  3. 75 FR 50843 - 75th Anniversary of the Social Security Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... most vulnerable citizens, giving elderly Americans income security and bringing us closer to President Roosevelt's vision of a Nation free from want or fear. As our country recovers from one of the greatest... years later, Social Security remains a safety net for seniors and a source of resilience for...

  4. Histogram Analysis of CT Perfusion of Hepatocellular Carcinoma for Predicting Response to Transarterial Radioembolization: Value of Tumor Heterogeneity Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Reiner, Caecilia S. Gordic, Sonja; Puippe, Gilbert; Morsbach, Fabian; Wurnig, Moritz; Schaefer, Niklaus; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Pfammatter, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2016-03-15

    PurposeTo evaluate in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), whether assessment of tumor heterogeneity by histogram analysis of computed tomography (CT) perfusion helps predicting response to transarterial radioembolization (TARE).Materials and MethodsSixteen patients (15 male; mean age 65 years; age range 47–80 years) with HCC underwent CT liver perfusion for treatment planning prior to TARE with Yttrium-90 microspheres. Arterial perfusion (AP) derived from CT perfusion was measured in the entire tumor volume, and heterogeneity was analyzed voxel-wise by histogram analysis. Response to TARE was evaluated on follow-up imaging (median follow-up, 129 days) based on modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST). Results of histogram analysis and mean AP values of the tumor were compared between responders and non-responders. Receiver operating characteristics were calculated to determine the parameters’ ability to discriminate responders from non-responders.ResultsAccording to mRECIST, 8 patients (50 %) were responders and 8 (50 %) non-responders. Comparing responders and non-responders, the 50th and 75th percentile of AP derived from histogram analysis was significantly different [AP 43.8/54.3 vs. 27.6/34.3 mL min{sup −1} 100 mL{sup −1}); p < 0.05], while the mean AP of HCCs (43.5 vs. 27.9 mL min{sup −1} 100 mL{sup −1}; p > 0.05) was not. Further heterogeneity parameters from histogram analysis (skewness, coefficient of variation, and 25th percentile) did not differ between responders and non-responders (p > 0.05). If the cut-off for the 75th percentile was set to an AP of 37.5 mL min{sup −1} 100 mL{sup −1}, therapy response could be predicted with a sensitivity of 88 % (7/8) and specificity of 75 % (6/8).ConclusionVoxel-wise histogram analysis of pretreatment CT perfusion indicating tumor heterogeneity of HCC improves the pretreatment prediction of response to TARE.

  5. Estimated water use and availability in the Pawcatuck Basin, southern Rhode Island and southeastern Connecticut, 1995-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Nimiroski, Mark T.

    2004-01-01

    In 1988, the Pawcatuck Basin (302.4 square miles) in southern Rhode Island (245.3 square miles) and southeastern Connecticut (57.12 square miles) was defined as a sole-source aquifer for 14 towns in southern Rhode Island and 4 towns in southeastern Connecticut. To determine water use and availability, the six subbasins in the Pawcatuck Basin were delineated on the basis of the surface- and ground-water system drainage areas. From 1995 through 1999, five major water suppliers in the basin withdrew an average of 6.768 million gallons per day from the aquifers. The estimated water withdrawals from minor water suppliers during the study period were 0.099 million gallons per day. Self-supplied domestic, industrial, commercial, and agricultural withdrawals from the basin averaged 4.386 million gallons per day. Water use in the basin averaged 7.401 million gallons per day. The average return flow in the basin was 7.855 million gallons per day, which included effluent from permitted facilities and self-disposed water users. The PART program, a computerized hydrographseparation application, was used for five selected index streamgaging stations to determine water availability on the basis of the 75th, 50th, and 25th percentiles of the total base flow, the base flow minus the 7-day, 10-year flow criteria, and the base flow minus the Aquatic Base Flow criteria at the index stations. The differences in the surface- and ground-water system drainage areas in the summer were applied to the water availability calculated at the index stations and subbasins. The base-flow contributions from sand and gravel deposits at the index stations were computed for June, July, August, and September, and applied to the percentage of surficial deposits at each index station. The base-flow contributions were converted to a per unit area at the station for the till, and for the sand and gravel deposits, and applied to the subbasins. The statistics used to estimate the gross yield of base flow, as

  6. Modeling the Cost-Effectiveness of the Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (IDSR) System: Meningitis in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Somda, Zana C.; Perry, Helen N.; Messonnier, Nancy R.; Djingarey, Mamadou H.; Ki, Salimata Ouedraogo; Meltzer, Martin I.

    2010-01-01

    Background Effective surveillance for infectious diseases is an essential component of public health. There are few studies estimating the cost-effectiveness of starting or improving disease surveillance. We present a cost-effectiveness analysis the Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (IDSR) strategy in Africa. Methodology/Principal Findings To assess the impact of the IDSR in Africa, we used pre- and post- IDSR meningococcal meningitis surveillance data from Burkina Faso (1996–2002 and 2003–2007). IDSR implementation was correlated with a median reduction of 2 weeks to peak of outbreaks (25th percentile 1 week; 75th percentile 4 weeks). IDSR was also correlated with a reduction of 43 meningitis cases per 100,000 (25th–40: 75th-129). Assuming the correlations between reductions in time to peak of outbreaks and cases are related, the cost-effectiveness of IDSR was $23 per case averted (25th-$30; 75th - cost saving), and $98 per meningitis-related death averted (25th-$140: 75th – cost saving). Conclusions/Significance We cannot absolutely claim that the measured differences were due to IDSR. We believe, however, that it is reasonable to claim that IDSR can improve the cost-effectiveness of public health surveillance. PMID:20927386

  7. 50th Anniversary of the World's First Extraterrestrial Sample Receiving Laboratory: The Apollo Program's Lunar Receiving Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, M. J.; Allton, J. H.; Zeigler, R. A.; McCubbin, F. M.

    2017-01-01

    The Apollo program's Lunar Receiving Laboratory (LRL), building 37 at NASA's Manned Spaceflight Center (MSC), now Johnson Space Center (JSC), in Houston, TX, was the world's first astronaut and extraterrestrial sample quarantine facility (Fig. 1). It was constructed by Warrior Construction Co. and Warrior-Natkin-National at a cost of $8.1M be-tween August 10, 1966 and June 26, 1967. In 1969, the LRL received and curated the first collection of extra-terrestrial samples returned to Earth; the rock and soil samples of the Apollo 11 mission. This year, the JSC Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office (here-after JSC curation) celebrates 50 years since the opening of the LRL and its legacy of laying the foundation for modern curation of extraterrestrial samples.

  8. Reflections on the 50th Anniversary of the Landmark Decision. Brown v. Board of Education. Info Brief. Number 37

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laitsch, Dan; Rodi, Katherine G.

    2004-01-01

    In the 50 years since "Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka" formally desegregated public schools, there has been enormous progress in the academic success of African Americans, particularly in high school completion, improved test scores, increased college enrollment, and attainment of advanced degrees, as well as full access to and…

  9. Landau ghost pole problem in quantum field theory: From 50th of last century to the present day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarov, Rauf G.; Mutallimov, Mutallim M.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present our results of the investigation of asymptotical behavior of amplitude at short distances in four-dimensional scalar field theory with ϕ4 interaction. To formulate of our calculating model - two-particle approximation of the mean-field expansion we have used an Rochev's iteration scheme of solution of the Schwinger-Dyson equations with the fermion bilocal source. We have considered the nonlinear integral equations in deep-inelastic region of momenta. As result we have a non-trivial behavior of amplitude at large momenta.

  10. Federal Aviation Administration Activites in the Agency’s 50th Year. An In-Depth Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    Warning Systems (GPWS), when equipment which met the criteria began pro- ducing an unacceptable number of false alarms during normal operations, making...29, 31, 33, and 35, having to do with certification procedures on projects and parts, airworthiness standards of normal , utility and acrobatic aircraft...was charged by the agency with having a history of dependence upon the drug, Ritalin , a type of amphetamine. Prior to his arrest for uttering forged

  11. The long journey to the discovery of PARK2: The 50th Anniversary of Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Yasuhiro

    2010-10-01

    Research into familial Parkinson's disease (PD) remained at a virtual standstill in Europe and the US for several decades until a re-challenge by Japanese neurologists regarding an autosomal recessive form of PD. In 1965, our research group at Nagoya University examined familial cases of early-onset parkinsonism characterized by autosomal recessive inheritance, diurnal fluctuation of symptoms (alleviation after sleep), foot dystonia, good response to medication, and benign course without dementia. An inborn error of metabolism in some dopamine-related pathway was suspected. The clinical study of four families with the disease, named as "early-onset parkinsonism with diurnal fluctuation (EPDF)", was published in Neurology in 1973. The pathological study of a case in 1993 revealed neuronal loss without Lewy bodies in the substantia nigra. Based on these clinical and pathological evidences, EPDF was defined as a distinct disease entity. Screening for the EPDF gene was started in 1994 in collaboration with Juntendo University. With the discovery of parkin gene in 1998, EPDF was designated as PARK2. Of our 16 families examined for gene analysis, 15 proved to be PARK2, and the remaining one, PARK6.

  12. Neuropathology of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (HAM/TSP): The 50th Anniversary of Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Izumo, Shuji

    2010-10-01

    A series of our neuropathological studies was reviewed in order to clarify pathogenesis of human T lymphotropic virus type 1(HTLV-1)-associated myelopathy (HAM)/tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP). The essential histopathologic finding was chronic inflammation in which inflammatory infiltrates of mononuclear cells and degeneration of myelin and axons were noted in the entire spinal cord. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated T-cell dominance, and the numbers of CD4+ cells and CD8+ cells were equally present in patients with shorter clinical courses. Apoptosis of helper/inducer T-cells were observed in these active inflammatory lesions. Horizontal distribution of inflammatory lesions was symmetric at all spinal levels and was accentuated at sites with slow blood flow in the middle to lower thoracic levels. HTLV-1 proviral DNA amounts were well correlated with the numbers of infiltrated CD4+ cells. In situ PCR of HTLV-1 proviral DNA and in situ hybridization of HTLV-1 Tax gene demonstrated the presence of HTLV-1-infected cells exclusively in the mononuclear infiltrates of perivascular areas. From these findings, it is suggested that T-cell mediated chronic inflammatory processes targeting the HTLV-1 infected T-cells is the primary pathogenic mechanism of HAM/TSP. Anatomically determined hemodynamic conditions may contribute to the localization of infected T-cells and the formation of main lesions in the middle to lower thoracic spinal cord.

  13. A resolution commemorating John Lewis on the 50th anniversary of his chairmanship of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Isakson, Johnny [R-GA

    2013-06-13

    06/19/2013 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  14. Requirements for Certification: For Elementary Schools, Secondary Schools, Junior Colleges. Teachers, Counselors, Librarians, Administrators. 50th Edition, 1985-86.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burks, Mary Paxton

    Certification requirements are set forth for teachers, counselors, librarians, administrators, and other school personnel in each of the states and the District of Columbia. It is suggested that students wishing more detailed information on their particular field, or on any subject not available in a digest such as this one, write to the State…

  15. 3 CFR 8829 - Proclamation 8829 of May 25, 2012. Commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of the Vietnam War

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... patriots home. In the reflection of The Wall, we see the military family members and veterans who carry a... tribute to the more than 3 million servicemen and women who left their families to serve bravely, a world... veterans, their families, and all who have served the fullest respect and support of a grateful Nation....

  16. Structures and Materials Panel. Summary Record of the Panel Meeting (50th) held at War Museum, Athens, Greece Spring-1980.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    DOREY Westland Helicopters RAE - Materials Dept Yeovil, Somerset - UK Farnborough, Hants - UK "Constant Amplitude and Flight-by-Flight Tests on CFRP...Yeovil, Somerset - UK "Service Experience with GRC Helicopter Blades (BO-10S)" by K- BRUNSCH, MBB GmbH/UD, MUnchen - Germany "Composite Components on...Westland Helicopters Ltd Panel Member, Sess.on Chairman Yeovil, Somerset BA20 2YB Composites Desmond LEWIS A/D Materials Research Coordination Panel

  17. Happy 50th, Smokey Bear! A Learning Kit about Forests and Fire Safety for Grades K-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Meryl

    In 1994, Smokey Bear turns 50! For a half century, Smokey has been helping children and adults protect forests and wildlands from careless fire. With this kit students can celebrate Smokey's message using a variety of activities that include dramatic play, stories, games, and things to make and do. Through these activities, students learn about…

  18. A resolution honoring the Minute Man National Historical Park on the occasion of its 50th anniversary.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Kerry, John F. [D-MA

    2009-09-21

    05/07/2010 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S3429-3431; text as passed Senate: CR S3430) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. A resolution commending South Charleston, West Virginia, for celebrating its 50th annual Armed Forces Day on May 16, 2009.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Byrd, Robert C. [D-WV

    2009-05-12

    05/14/2009 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (text: CR S5538) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  20. A resolution recognizing the 50th anniversary of the sinking of the U.S.S. Thresher (SSN 593).

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Shaheen, Jeanne [D-NH

    2013-04-09

    04/09/2013 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S2508; text as passed Senate: CR S2507) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  1. 3 CFR 8759 - Proclamation 8759 of November 21, 2011. 50th Anniversary of the United States Agency for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... those whose spirit of innovation has opened new frontiers in the global fight against hunger, poverty... developing world and the American people. Since President John F. Kennedy founded USAID in 1961, the men and women of USAID have worked on the front lines of poverty and conflict to support communities...

  2. 3 CFR 9004 - Proclamation 9004 of August 23, 2013. 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... on the victories of the Civil Rights Movement. In honor of every man, woman, and child who left... pool, to the proud base of the Washington Monument. They were men and women; young and old; black... a fierce dignity that stirred our Nation's conscience and paved the way for two major victories...

  3. 50th Annual Fuze Conference Sessions 3 and 4 Held in Norfolk, Virginia on May 9-11, 2006

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-11

    NOL-130 Lead-based components replaced Initiator Mix Composition Antimony TrisulfideAntimony Trisulfide Barium NitrateBarium Nitrate TetraceneTetracene...Cyanuric Triazide Lead Styphnate Lead Azide NOL-130GNOL-130 Transfer Charge Replacements Replacing the transfer charge will eliminate rest of the

  4. Dosimetric impacts of microgravity: an analysis of 5th, 50th and 95th percentile male and female astronauts.

    PubMed

    Bahadori, Amir A; Baalen, Mary Van; Shavers, Mark R; Semones, Edward J; Bolch, Wesley E

    2012-02-21

    Computational phantoms serve an important role in organ dosimetry and risk assessment performed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). A previous study investigated the impact on organ dose equivalents and effective doses from the use of the University of Florida hybrid adult male (UFHADM) and adult female (UFHADF) phantoms at differing height and weight percentiles versus those given by the two existing NASA phantoms, the computerized anatomical man (CAM) and female (CAF) (Bahadori et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 1671-94). In the present study, the UFHADM and UFHADF phantoms of different body sizes were further altered to incorporate the effects of microgravity. Body self-shielding distributions are generated using the voxel-based ray tracer (VoBRaT), and the results are combined with depth dose data from the NASA codes BRYNTRN and HZETRN to yield organ dose equivalents and their rates for a variety of space radiation environments. It is found that while organ dose equivalents are indeed altered by the physiological effects ofmicrogravity, the magnitude of the change in overall risk (indicated by the effective dose) is minimal for the spectra and simplified shielding configurations considered. The results also indicate, however, that UFHADMand UFHADF could be useful in designing dose reduction strategies through optimized positioning of an astronaut during encounters with solar particle events.

  5. The 50th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education: Continued Impacts on Minority Life Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricks, Irelene

    2004-01-01

    This article provides a brief history of affirmative action in the United States. The author describes the impact of the "Brown v. Board of Education" on minority life science education. She also discusses how The American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) Minorities Affairs Committee (MAC) can improve the minority science pipeline.…

  6. Happy 50th Birthday Smokey Bear! A Learning Kit about Forests and Fire Safety for Grades K-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Meryl

    For over 50 years, the primary goal of Smokey Bear has been to introduce the forest fire prevention message to young children. This learning kit provides the K-3 teacher with activities and resources to help students learn about Smokey Bear and fire safety, about forests as habitats, and about what they can do to protect forests. Students are…

  7. 77 FR 33094 - Safety Zone; International Bridge 50th Anniversary Celebration Fireworks, St. Mary's River, U.S...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ... Celebration Fireworks, St. Mary's River, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Locks, Sault Sainte Marie, MI AGENCY..., Sault Sainte Marie, MI; in the Federal Register (77 FR 21893). We received 1 public submission... Locks, Sault Sainte Marie, MI; in the Federal Register (76 FR 22064). We received 1 public...

  8. Detrimental effect of hypotonic cromolyn sodium.

    PubMed

    Chin, T W; Nussbaum, E

    1992-04-01

    In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study, inhalation of the commercially available nebulized form of cromolyn sodium resulted in a significant decrease in forced midexpiratory flow rate between the 25th and 75th percentile points, equivalent to that observed for distilled water, in children with chronic asthma. We conclude that inhalation of the current hypotonic concentration of cromolyn sodium may be detrimental.

  9. Contribution of dietary advanced glycation end products (AGE) to circulating AGE: role of dietary fat.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kathleen E; Prasad, Chandan; Vijayagopal, Parakat; Juma, Shanil; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Imrhan, Victorine

    2015-12-14

    The purpose of this pilot study was to determine whether macronutrient content (low-fat v. high-fat diet) influences an indicator of advanced glycation end products (AGE), N(ε) carboxymethyl-lysine (CML), in the context of a 1-d, high-AGE diet. The effect of the diets on inflammatory markers was also assessed. A total of nineteen overweight and obese adults (nine men and ten women) without known disease were recruited to participate in a crossover challenge of a high-fat, high-AGE (HFHA) and low-fat, high-AGE (LFHA) diet. In each phase patients had fasting blood drawn, followed by consumption of a high-fat or low-fat breakfast test meal, then three postprandial blood draws at 1, 2 and 3 h after consuming the test meal. After consuming high-AGE meals for the remainder of the day, participants returned the next day for a follow-up analysis. A different pattern in the 3-h post-meal CML and soluble receptor for AGE response to the two diets was observed (P=0·01 and 0·05, respectively). No change in serum CML was observed following consumption of a LFHA breakfast (535 (25th-75th percentile 451-790) to 495 (25th-75th percentile 391-682) ng/ml; P=0·36), whereas a rise in CML occurred after the HFHA breakfast (463 (25th-75th percentile 428-664) to 578 (25th-75th percentile 474-865) ng/ml; P=0·05). High sensitivity C-reactive protein and high molecular weight adiponectin were not affected by either diet. These findings suggest that dietary CML may not be as important in influencing serum CML as other dietary factors. In addition, acute exposure to dietary CML may not influence inflammation in adults without diabetes or kidney disease. This is contrary to previous findings.

  10. Quality Improvement Project to Improve Patient Satisfaction With Pain Management: Using Human-Centered Design.

    PubMed

    Trail-Mahan, Tracy; Heisler, Scott; Katica, Mary

    2016-01-01

    In this quality improvement project, our health system developed a comprehensive, patient-centered approach to improving inpatient pain management and assessed its impact on patient satisfaction across 21 medical centers. Using human-centered design principles, a bundle of 6 individual and team nursing practices was developed. Patient satisfaction with pain management, as measured by the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems pain composite score, increased from the 25th to just under the 75th national percentile.

  11. Exposure to polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners measured shortly after giving birth and subsequent risk of maternal breast cancer before age 50.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Barbara A; Terry, Mary Beth; Plumb, Marj; Cirillo, Piera M

    2012-11-01

    Discrete windows of susceptibility to toxicants have been identified for the breast, including in utero, puberty, pregnancy, and postpartum. We tested the hypothesis that polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) measured during the early postpartum predict increased risk of maternal breast cancer diagnosed before age 50. We analyzed archived early postpartum serum samples collected from 1959 to 1967, an average of 17 years before diagnosis (mean diagnosis age 43 years) for 16 PCB congeners in a nested case-control study in the Child Health and Development Studies cohort (N = 112 cases matched to controls on birth year). We used conditional logistic regression to adjust for lipids, race, year, lactation, and body mass. We observed strong breast cancer associations with three congeners. PCB 167 was associated with a lower risk (odds ratio (OR), 75th vs. 25th percentile = 0.2, 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) 0.1, 0.8) as was PCB 187 (OR, 75th vs. 25th percentile = 0.4, 95 % CI 0.1, 1.1). In contrast, PCB 203 was associated with a sixfold increased risk (OR, 75th vs. 25th percentile = 6.3, 95 % CI 1.9, 21.7). The net association of PCB exposure, estimated by a post-hoc score, was nearly a threefold increase in risk (OR, 75th vs. 25th percentile = 2.8, 95 % CI 1.1, 7.1) among women with a higher proportion of PCB 203 in relation to the sum of PCBs 167 and 187. Postpartum PCB exposure likely also represents pregnancy exposure, and may predict increased risk for early breast cancer depending on the mixture that represents internal dose. It remains unclear whether individual differences in exposure, response to exposure, or both explain risk patterns observed.

  12. Minutes of the Explosives Safety Seminar (25th) Held in Anaheim, California on 18-20 August 1992. Volume 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-20

    pollution; solid and hazardous waste management; research and development; noise, radon, and asbestos control and abatement; contingency planning and...Hygiene Agency, Technical Guide No. 164. 177 Figure 1 Radon 222 Decay Series B 214 - l- Po 19.7m 1.5x10 -s a 99. 96% 210 Pb 222 a 218 a 214 B /2149 Rn - Po...Rb Bi 3.8d 3.05m 26.8m B 1.32m 0.04% a 210 - Ti 19.7m 178 Figure 2 Thorium 220 Decay Series B 212 0- Po 60. 5m66.3%/ 6.m• 3.04x10\\ 208 220 a 216 a

  13. 25th anniversary article: Understanding the lithiation of silicon and other alloying anodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Matthew T; Lee, Seok Woo; Nix, William D; Cui, Yi

    2013-09-25

    Alloying anodes such as silicon are promising electrode materials for next-generation high energy density lithium-ion batteries because of their ability to reversibly incorporate a high concentration of Li atoms. However, alloying anodes usually exhibit a short cycle life due to the extreme volumetric and structural changes that occur during lithium insertion/extraction; these transformations cause mechanical fracture and exacerbate side reactions. To solve these problems, there has recently been significant attention devoted to creating silicon nanostructures that can accommodate the lithiation-induced strain and thus exhibit high Coulombic efficiency and long cycle life. In parallel, many experiments and simulations have been conducted in an effort to understand the details of volumetric expansion, fracture, mechanical stress evolution, and structural changes in silicon nanostructures. The fundamental materials knowledge gained from these studies has provided guidance for designing optimized Si electrode structures and has also shed light on the factors that control large-volume change solid-state reactions. In this paper, we review various fundamental studies that have been conducted to understand structural and volumetric changes, stress evolution, mechanical properties, and fracture behavior of nanostructured Si anodes for lithium-ion batteries and compare the reaction process of Si to other novel anode materials.

  14. Detection and Avoidance of Mines and Boobytraps in South Vietnam -- Training and Tactical Procedures of the 25th Infantry Division

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1968-03-01

    and here you have the safety pin . On the inside of the firing device you have the firing pin and firing pin spring. Now, let’s talk about the MLA1...This is the MLA1 firing device. The device itself is metal. On one end you have a safety pin and a trigger head. Right around the trigger head you...have a safety pin . Along with the devices you’ll get a three-pronged head that screws right into the top of the device. The M3 is a pull-release

  15. 25th Anniversary of Pollution Prevention Act Serves as Reminder That Everyone Can Take Steps for a Healthy Environment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    PHILADELPHIA (Sept. 21, 2015) Each year, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency celebrates Pollution Prevention Week - the third week in September - to highlight ways the agency is working with an array of organizations to prevent pollution right

  16. The Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation at 25: a pioneering success in safety, 25th anniversary provokes reflection, anticipation.

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, John H

    2012-04-01

    The Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation (APSF) was created in 1985. Its founders coined the term "patient safety" in its modern public usage and created the very first patient safety organization, igniting a movement that is now universal in all of health care. Driven by the vision "that no patient shall be harmed by anesthesia," the APSF has worked tirelessly for more than a quarter century to promote safety education and communication through its widely read Newsletter, its programs, and its presentations. The APSF's extensive research grant program has supported a great many projects leading to key safety improvements and, in particular, was central in the development of high-fidelity mannequin simulation as a research and teaching tool. With its pioneering collaboration, the APSF is unique in incorporating the talents and resources of anesthesia professionals of all types, safety scientists, pharmaceutical and equipment manufacturers, regulators, liability insurance companies, and also surgeons. Specific alerts, campaigns, discussions, and projects have targeted a host of safety issues and dangers over the years, starting with minimal intraoperative monitoring in 1986 and all the way up to beach-chair position cerebral perfusion pressure, operating room medication errors, and the extremely popular DVD on operating room fire safety in 2010; the list is long and expansive. The APSF has served as a model and inspiration for subsequent patient safety organizations and has been recognized nationally as having a dramatic positive impact on the safety of anesthesia care. Recognizing that the work is not over, that systems, organizations, and equipment still at times fail, that basic preventable human errors still do sometimes occur, and that "production pressure" in anesthesia practice threatens past safety gains, the APSF is firmly committed and continues to work hard both on established tenets and new patient safety principles.

  17. Highlights of the International Symposium on Plant Lipids, 18th ISPL 2008, Bordeaux July 20–25th, 2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant lipids are of considerable interest in economic sectors such as agriculture, food, health and the cosmetics industry. In addition, the sector of renewable energies is showing increasing interest in the field of plant lipids. Our society is highly dependent on raw fossil materials whose reserve...

  18. Biotechnology and the Third World: Panacea or Recipe for Social Disaster? Academy for Educational Development 25th Anniversary Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morehouse, Ward

    Asserting that developmental growth is easier to attain in developing countries than social change, this paper assesses the prospective impact of biotechnology on the developing nations. Biotechnology is defined as the integrated use of biochemistry, microbiology, and chemical engineering to achieve the industrial processes of fermentation, enzyme…

  19. 25th anniversary article: isoindigo-based polymers and small molecules for bulk heterojunction solar cells and field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ergang; Mammo, Wendimagegn; Andersson, Mats R

    2014-03-26

    Driven by the potential advantages and promising applications of organic solar cells, donor-acceptor (D-A) polymers have been intensively investigated in the past years. One of the strong electron-withdrawing groups that were widely used as acceptors for the construction of D-A polymers for applications in polymer solar cells and FETs is isoindigo. The isoindigo-based polymer solar cells have reached efficiencies up to ∼7% and hole mobilities as high as 3.62 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) have been realized by FETs based on isoindigo polymers. Over one hundred isoindigo-based small molecules and polymers have been developed in only three years. This review is an attempt to summarize the structures and properties of the isoindigo-based polymers and small molecules that have been reported in the literature since their inception in 2010. Focus has been given only to the syntheses and device performances of those polymers and small molecules that were designed for use in solar cells and FETs. Attempt has been made to deduce structure-property relationships that would guide the design of isoindigo-based materials. It is expected that this review will present useful guidelines for the design of efficient isoindigo-based materials for applications in solar cells and FETs.

  20. Education: Conformity--Liberation? Conference Report, International Schools Association 25th Annual Conference, July 22-30, 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinlein, Dvid A., Ed.

    The report contains 16 papers and additional summaries of workshops held at the 1976 Annual Conference of the International Schools Association in Somerset, New Jersey. The conference theme, Education: Conformity--Liberation, linked the experience of the American Revolution to international education and reviewed the growth of multicultural and…

  1. [Operation of acute dissecting aortic aneurysm in the 25th week of pregnancy using hypothermic extracorporeal circulation].

    PubMed

    Thaler, C J; Korell, M; Klinner, U; Reichart, B; Hepp, H

    1992-09-01

    We report on a 24 + 2 weeks pregnant woman with Marfan's syndrome, who acutely developed a dissecting aortic aneurysm with aortic valve insufficiency. Emergency surgery was performed by using hypothermic extracorporeal circulation, whilst the aortic valve and ascending aorta were replaced by a synthetic graft. Foetal heart rates, continuously monitored by using Doppler ultrasound, were shown to be closely correlated with perfusion pressures. By applying perfusion pressures of 90-100 mmHg, we were able to maintain foetal heart rates of approximately 100/min. During the first postoperative day, the CTG was normal for gestational age and no contractions were noted. During the second postoperative night, the patient prematurely delivered a dead 820 g infant (Apgar score 0/0/0/0). In view of this case report, opportunities and problems associated with an application of extracorporeal circulation during pregnancy are discussed.

  2. The Role of SoTL in the Academy: Upon the 25th Anniversary of Boyer's "Scholarship Reconsidered"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern, Beth; Mettetal, Gwendolyn; Dixson, Marcia D.; Morgan, Robin K.

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, we explore definitions and taxonomies of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) and present a model of the Dimensions of Activities Related to Teaching (DART) which provides a context for SoTL along two dimensions: public/private and systematic/informal. The four quadrants: practice of teaching, sharing about teaching,…

  3. 25th anniversary article: Artificial carbonate nanocrystals and layered structural nanocomposites inspired by nacre: synthesis, fabrication and applications.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hong-Bin; Ge, Jin; Mao, Li-Bo; Yan, You-Xian; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2014-01-08

    Rigid biological systems are increasingly becoming a source of inspiration for the fabrication of next generation advanced functional materials due to their diverse hierarchical structures and remarkable engineering properties. Among these rigid biomaterials, nacre, as the main constituent of the armor system of seashells, exhibiting a well-defined 'brick-and-mortar' architecture, excellent mechanical properties, and interesting iridescence, has become one of the most attractive models for novel artificial materials design. In this review, recent advances in nacre-inspired artificial carbonate nanocrystals and layered structural nanocomposites are presented. To clearly illustrate the inspiration of nacre, the basic principles relating to plate-like aragonite single-crystal growth and the contribution of hierarchical structure to outstanding properties in nacre are discussed. The inspiration of nacre for the synthesis of carbonate nanocrystals and the fabrication of layered structural nanocomposites is also discussed. Furthermore, the broad applications of these nacre inspired materials are emphasized. Finally, a brief summary of present nacre-inspired materials and challenges for the next generation of nacre-inspired materials is given.

  4. 25th anniversary article: The evolution of electronic skin (e-skin): a brief history, design considerations, and recent progress.

    PubMed

    Hammock, Mallory L; Chortos, Alex; Tee, Benjamin C-K; Tok, Jeffrey B-H; Bao, Zhenan

    2013-11-13

    Human skin is a remarkable organ. It consists of an integrated, stretchable network of sensors that relay information about tactile and thermal stimuli to the brain, allowing us to maneuver within our environment safely and effectively. Interest in large-area networks of electronic devices inspired by human skin is motivated by the promise of creating autonomous intelligent robots and biomimetic prosthetics, among other applications. The development of electronic networks comprised of flexible, stretchable, and robust devices that are compatible with large-area implementation and integrated with multiple functionalities is a testament to the progress in developing an electronic skin (e-skin) akin to human skin. E-skins are already capable of providing augmented performance over their organic counterpart, both in superior spatial resolution and thermal sensitivity. They could be further improved through the incorporation of additional functionalities (e.g., chemical and biological sensing) and desired properties (e.g., biodegradability and self-powering). Continued rapid progress in this area is promising for the development of a fully integrated e-skin in the near future.

  5. 25th Annual Report to Congress on the Implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 2003. Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This annual report focuses on three goals. First, the report is congruent with the "No Child Left Behind Act" (NCLB). This means that the annual report focuses on results and accountability throughout the text. The second goal is to make the report more useful to Congress, parents, each state, and other stakeholders. This report…

  6. 25th Annual Report to Congress on the Implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 2003. Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This annual report focuses on three goals. First, the report is congruent with the "No Child Left Behind Act" (NCLB). This means that the annual report focuses on results and accountability throughout the text. The second goal is to make the report more useful to Congress, parents, each state, and other stakeholders. This report…

  7. Minutes of the Explosives Safety Seminar (25th) Held in Anaheim, California on 18-20 August 1992. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-20

    volume propylene glycol * 25% by volume water * 25% by volume aqueous film -forming foam (AFFF) NSN No. 4210-01-056-8343 PROOF TESTS AT UTAH TEST AND...in processing, as well as improving the aqueous ammonia degradation rate, triacetin was used as a plasticizer. The amount of triacetin ranged from 15...exceeded. The bags in the baghouse did not appear to be properly coated and should be caked more thoroughly for further tests. The chloride being fed at

  8. Minutes of the Explosives Safety Seminar (25th) Held in Anaheim, California on 18-20 August 1992. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-20

    yon nor could pogitive testa with the Chemical tAent Letector Kit be obtained from soil samples taken at a depth of one foot. 2. The investigation...89 C. James Dahn and Bernadette N. Reyes Development of RF-Insensitive Electric Primers ................................. 103 John L. Bean...341, 11-373 Polcyn, Michael A. IV-511 LaHoud, Paul M. 111-415, IV-281 Reed, Jack W. 11-561 Langberg, Helge 11-99 Reyes , Bernadette N. 1-43, 111-89

  9. 25th anniversary article: organic photovoltaic modules and biopolymer supercapacitors for supply of renewable electricity: a perspective from Africa.

    PubMed

    Inganäs, Olle; Admassie, Shimelis

    2014-02-12

    The role of materials in civilization is well demonstrated over the centuries and millennia, as materials have come to serve as the classifier of stages of civilization. With the advent of materials science, this relation has become even more pronounced. The pivotal role of advanced materials in industrial economies has not yet been matched by the influence of advanced materials during the transition from agricultural to modern societies. The role of advanced materials in poverty eradication can be very large, in particular if new trajectories of social and economic development become possible. This is the topic of this essay, different in format from the traditional scientific review, as we try to encompass not only two infant technologies of solar energy conversion and storage by means of organic materials, but also the social conditions for introduction of the technologies. The development of organic-based photovoltaic energy conversion has been rapid, and promises to deliver new alternatives to well-established silicon photovoltaics. Our recent development of organic biopolymer composite electrodes opens avenues towards the use of renewable materials in the construction of wooden batteries or supercapacitors for charge storage. Combining these new elements may give different conditions for introduction of energy technology in areas now lacking electrical grids, but having sufficient solar energy inputs. These areas are found close to the equator, and include some of the poorest regions on earth.

  10. Proceedings of the Invitational Conference on Testing Problems (25th, New York, New York, October 31, 1964).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NJ.

    This conference focuses upon various aspects of testing within a society, and upon technical advances in measurement. Philip H. DuBois's paper deals with China, a society dominated by tests, from 1115 BC--1905 AD. Donald W. Fiske discusses the effect of testing on the individual in modern America in his paper, "The Subject Looks at…

  11. A resolution celebrating February 2, 2011, as the 25th anniversary of "National Women and Girls in Sports Day".

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Snowe, Olympia J. [R-ME

    2011-01-27

    02/02/2011 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (text: CR S492) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. Educational Linguistics as a Field: A View from Penn's Program on the Occasion of Its 25th Anniversary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornberger, Nancy H.

    2001-01-01

    Educational linguistics at the University of Pennsylvania's (Penn) Graduate School of Education traces its beginnings to 1976 and the deanship of Dell Hymes. This paper takes up various aspects of the practice of educational linguistics at Penn, discussing them in relation to issues that have been raised in the literature about the definition,…

  13. 25th anniversary article: exploring nanoscaled matter from speciation to phase diagrams: metal phosphide nanoparticles as a case of study.

    PubMed

    Carenco, Sophie; Portehault, David; Boissière, Cédric; Mézailles, Nicolas; Sanchez, Clément

    2014-01-22

    The notions of nanoscale "phase speciation" and "phase diagram" are defined and discussed in terms of kinetic and thermodynamic controls, based on the case of metal phosphide nanoparticles. After an overview of the most successful synthetic routes for these exotic nanomaterials, the cases of InP, Ni2 P, Ni12 P5 and Pdx Py are discussed in detail to highlight the relationship between composition, structure, and size at the nanoscale. The influence of morphology is discussed next by comparing the behavior of Cu3 P nanophases with those of Nix Py , FeP/Fe2 P, and CoP/Co2 P. Perspectives provide the reader with methodological guidelines for further investigation of nanoscale "phase diagrams", and their use for optimized synthesis of new functional nanomaterials.

  14. 25th anniversary article: Design of polymethine dyes for all-optical switching applications: guidance from theoretical and computational studies.

    PubMed

    Gieseking, Rebecca L; Mukhopadhyay, Sukrit; Risko, Chad; Marder, Seth R; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-08

    All-optical switching--controlling light with light--has the potential to meet the ever-increasing demand for data transmission bandwidth. The development of organic π-conjugated molecular materials with the requisite properties for all-optical switching applications has long proven to be a significant challenge. However, recent advances demonstrate that polymethine dyes have the potential to meet the necessary requirements. In this review, we explore the theoretical underpinnings that guide the design of π-conjugated materials for all-optical switching applications. We underline, from a computational chemistry standpoint, the relationships among chemical structure, electronic structure, and optical properties that make polymethines such promising materials.

  15. Language as Moral Action and the Ethical Dimensions of Teaching and Texts: Reflections on the 25th Year of Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pezzulich, Evelyn

    In the 1970s, women's literature had not yet arrived in the high school classroom, nor in graduate studies. Only some 20 years later was attention turned to women's literature through the publication of the "Norton Anthology of Literature by Women." Contemporary works by women writers that speak powerfully to the issue of women's…

  16. A resolution congratulating the National Institute of Nursing Research on the occasion of its 25th anniversary.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Inouye, Daniel K. [D-HI

    2010-09-23

    09/23/2010 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S7426-7427; text as passed Senate: CR S7427; text of measure as introduced: CR S7423-7424) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  17. Proceedings of the Annual Adult Education Research Conference (25th, Raleigh, North Carolina, April 5-7, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh. Dept. of Adult and Community Coll. Education.

    These proceedings contain 50 papers. Selected brief titles include: "A Comparative Analysis of Costs and Perceived Effectiveness of Postgraduate Continuing Education for Mississippi Pharmacists" (Bellande); "A Conceptual and Empirical Perspective on Adult Education Program Planning Theory" (Boshier); "Self-Directed Adult Learning" (Brookfield);…

  18. The living matter according to Ervin Bauer (1890-1938), (on the 75th anniversary of his tragic death) (History).

    PubMed

    Elek, Gábor; Müller, M

    2013-03-01

    Ervin Bauer is one of the first theoretical biologists distancing his ideas both from vitalism and mechanicism. He formulated the principle of permanent non-equilibrium of living systems (Bauer's principle) in terms of thermodynamics in 1920. Bauer's scientific path can be divided into three periods. In the early 1920s he proposed his principle as an axiom that cannot be derived from contemporary natural sciences. In the late 1920s he reformulated it in a way that it could be subjected to experimental testing. Summarizing his views in the 1930s in his book, Theoretical Biology, he tried to show that his axiom is indeed the fundamental principle of biology. This later view was anachronistic in spite of many striking insights of Bauer. The energetic formulation of Bauer's principle is, however, a realistic characterization of living organisms and it can be derived from the theory of open systems - in fact it contributed to the formulation of that theory. Bauer's principle can be incorporated into non-linear thermodynamics of irreversible processes.

  19. 3 CFR 8546 - Proclamation 8546 of August 13, 2010. 75th Anniversary of the Social Security Act

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... dependents. After a lifetime of contributions to our Nation and its economy, Americans have earned this support. The new health care law, the Affordable Care Act, helps sustain this commitment and improves...

  20. Laudatio for E. C. G. SUDARSHAN On his 75th Birth Day. Jaca, (HU), Spain, September 18, 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boya, L. J.

    2007-11-01

    The scientific career of E. C. G. Sudarshan is reported, with some biographical notes to frame the results. His research and teaching achievements span more than fifty years, and he has been Professor of Physics at the University of Texas at Austin since 1969, where he is still quite active and taking up students. Symmetry, in its multiple aspects, is perhaps the feature more persistent in his whole work; also the complex relations between classical and quantum realities permeates most of his mature- period papers.

  1. Estimated water use and availability in the South Coastal Drainage Basin, southern Rhode Island, 1995-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Nimiroski, Mark T.

    2005-01-01

    selected index stream-gaging station to determine water availability based on the 75th, 50th, and 25th percentiles of the total base flow, the base flow minus the 7-day, 10-year flow criteria, and the base flow minus the Aquatic Base Flow criteria at the index station. The base flow calculated at the selected index station was subdivided into two rates on the basis of the percent contributions from sandand-gravel and till deposits. There has been no long-term collection of surface-water data in this study area and therefore an index stream-gaging station in the Pawcatuck Basin was used for the South Coastal Drainage Basin. The Pawcatuck River at Wood River Junction was chosen as the index station for the South Coastal Drainage Basin because the station is representative of the basin on the basis of the percentage of sand and gravel deposits and the average extent of thickness of the sand and gravel deposits. The baseflow contributions from sand and gravel deposits at the index station were computed for June, July, August, and September, and applied to the percentage of surficial deposits at the index station. The base-flow contributions were converted to a per unit area at the station for the till, and for the sand and gravel deposits and applied to the South Coastal Drainage Basin to determine the water availability. The results from the index station, the Pawcatuck River at Wood River Junction streamgaging station, were lowest for the summer in September. To determine water availability in the South Coastal Drainage Basin, the per unit area of the estimated base flows from sand and gravel deposits and till deposits at the index station was applied to the subbasin areas, and the resultant flows were lowest in September. The base flow at the 75th percentile in the basin was 56.95 million gallons per day in June; 32.78 million gallons per day in July; 30.22 million gallons per day in August; and 23.94 million gallons per day in September. The base flow at the 50th

  2. Prenatal Exposure to Cadmium, Placental Permeability and Birth Outcomes in Coastal Populations of South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Röllin, Halina B.; Kootbodien, Tahira; Channa, Kalavati; Odland, Jon Ø.

    2015-01-01

    Background The impact of prenatal exposure to cadmium (Cd) on birth outcomes is an area of concern. This study aimed to assess an impact of prenatal Cd exposure on birth outcomes in distinct coastal populations of South Africa. Methods Cadmium was measured in maternal blood (CdB) (n = 641), cord blood and in maternal urine (n = 317). This investigation assessed the associations between CdB (non-transformed) and birth outcomes across the 25th, 50th, and 75th percentile for birth weight, birth length and head circumference, to test for a linear trend. Associations between natural log-transformed maternal CdB, size at birth and other factors were further evaluated using linear mixed-effects modelling with random intercepts. Results The average gestational age in the total sample was 38 weeks; 47% of neonates were female, average birth weight was 3065 g and 11% were of low birth weight (< 2500 g). The geometric mean (GM) of the maternal CdB level was 0.25 μg/L (n = 641; 95% CI, 0.23–0.27). The cord blood Cd level was 0.27 μg/L (n = 317; 95% CI, 0.26–0.29) and urine (creatinine-corrected) Cd level was 0.27 μg/L (n = 318; 95% CI, 0.24–0.29). The CdB cord:maternal ratio in the sub-cohort was 1, suggesting that the placenta offers no protective mechanism to the foetus. An inverse association was found between CdB and the lower birth weight percentile in female neonates only (β = - 0.13, p = 0.047). Mothers who reported eating vine vegetables daily had lower levels of CdB (β = - 0.55, p = 0.025). Maternal smoking was associated with an elevation in natural log-transformed CdB levels in both male and female cohorts. Discussion Significant inverse associations between prenatal Cd exposure and birth anthropometry were found in female neonates but not in male neonates, suggesting potential sex differences in the toxico-kinetics and toxico-dynamics of Cd. PMID:26544567

  3. National Performance Benchmarks for Modern Screening Digital Mammography: Update from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Constance D; Arao, Robert F; Sprague, Brian L; Lee, Janie M; Buist, Diana S M; Kerlikowske, Karla; Henderson, Louise M; Onega, Tracy; Tosteson, Anna N A; Rauscher, Garth H; Miglioretti, Diana L

    2016-12-05

    Purpose To establish performance benchmarks for modern screening digital mammography and assess performance trends over time in U.S. community practice. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant, institutional review board-approved study measured the performance of digital screening mammography interpreted by 359 radiologists across 95 facilities in six Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) registries. The study included 1 682 504 digital screening mammograms performed between 2007 and 2013 in 792 808 women. Performance measures were calculated according to the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System, 5th edition, and were compared with published benchmarks by the BCSC, the National Mammography Database, and performance recommendations by expert opinion. Benchmarks were derived from the distribution of performance metrics across radiologists and were presented as 50th (median), 10th, 25th, 75th, and 90th percentiles, with graphic presentations using smoothed curves. Results Mean screening performance measures were as follows: abnormal interpretation rate (AIR), 11.6 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.5, 11.6); cancers detected per 1000 screens, or cancer detection rate (CDR), 5.1 (95% CI: 5.0, 5.2); sensitivity, 86.9% (95% CI: 86.3%, 87.6%); specificity, 88.9% (95% CI: 88.8%, 88.9%); false-negative rate per 1000 screens, 0.8 (95% CI: 0.7, 0.8); positive predictive value (PPV) 1, 4.4% (95% CI: 4.3%, 4.5%); PPV2, 25.6% (95% CI: 25.1%, 26.1%); PPV3, 28.6% (95% CI: 28.0%, 29.3%); cancers stage 0 or 1, 76.9%; minimal cancers, 57.7%; and node-negative invasive cancers, 79.4%. Recommended CDRs were achieved by 92.1% of radiologists in community practice, and 97.1% achieved recommended ranges for sensitivity. Only 59.0% of radiologists achieved recommended AIRs, and only 63.0% achieved recommended levels of specificity. Conclusion The majority of radiologists in the BCSC surpass cancer detection recommendations for screening

  4. Gestational weight gain standards based on women enrolled in the Fetal Growth Longitudinal Study of the INTERGROWTH-21st Project: a prospective longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Deborah C; Pang, Ruyan; Ohuma, Eric O; Kac, Gilberto; Abrams, Barbara; Rasmussen, Kathleen; Barros, Fernando C; Hirst, Jane E; Lambert, Ann; Papageorghiou, Aris T; Stones, William; Jaffer, Yasmin A; Altman, Douglas G; Noble, J Alison; Giolito, Maria Rosa; Gravett, Michael G; Purwar, Manorama; Kennedy, Stephen H; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Villar, José

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe patterns in maternal gestational weight gain (GWG) in healthy pregnancies with good maternal and perinatal outcomes. Design Prospective longitudinal observational study. Setting Eight geographically diverse urban regions in Brazil, China, India, Italy, Kenya, Oman, United Kingdom, and United States, April 2009 to March 2014. Participants Healthy, well nourished, and educated women enrolled in the Fetal Growth Longitudinal Study component of the INTERGROWTH-21st Project, who had a body mass index (BMI) of 18.50-24.99 in the first trimester of pregnancy. Main outcome measures Maternal weight measured with standardised methods and identical equipment every five weeks (plus/minus one week) from the first antenatal visit (<14 weeks’ gestation) to delivery. After confirmation that data from the study sites could be pooled, a multilevel, linear regression analysis accounting for repeated measures, adjusted for gestational age, was applied to produce the GWG values. Results 13 108 pregnant women at <14 weeks’ gestation were screened, and 4607 met the eligibility criteria, provided consent, and were enrolled. The variance within sites (59.6%) was six times higher than the variance between sites (9.6%). The mean GWGs were 1.64 kg, 2.86 kg, 2.86 kg, 2.59 kg, and 2.56 kg for the gestational age windows 14-18+6 weeks, 19-23+6 weeks, 24-28+6 weeks, 29-33+6 weeks, and 34-40+0 weeks, respectively. Total mean weight gain at 40 weeks’ gestation was 13.7 (SD 4.5) kg for 3097 eligible women with a normal BMI in the first trimester. Of all the weight measurements, 71.7% (10 639/14 846) and 94.9% (14 085/14 846) fell within the expected 1 SD and 2 SD thresholds, respectively. Data were used to determine fitted 3rd, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 97th smoothed GWG centiles by exact week of gestation, with equations for the mean and standard deviation to calculate any desired centiles according to gestational age in exact weeks. Conclusions

  5. Update of Watershed Regressions for Pesticides (WARP) for Predicting Atrazine Concentration in Streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Wesley W.; Gilliom, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Regression models for predicting atrazine concentrations in streams were updated by incorporating refined annual atrazine-use estimates and by adding an explanatory variable representing annual precipitation characteristics. The updated Watershed Regressions for Pesticides (WARP) models enable improved predictions of specific pesticide-concentration statistics for unmonitored streams. for unmonitored streams. Separate WARP regression models were derived for selected percentiles (5th, 10th, 15th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 85th, 90th and 95th), annual mean, annual maximum, and annual maximum moving-average (21-, 60-, and 90-day durations) concentration statistics. Development of the regression models involved the same model-development data, model-validation data, and regression methods as those used in the original development of WARP. The original WARP models were based on atrazine-use estimates from either 1992 or 1997. This update of the WARP models incorporates annual atrazine-use estimates. In addition, annual precipitation data were evaluated as potential explanatory variables. as potential explanatory variables. The updated WARP models include the same five explanatory variables and transformations that were used in the original WARP models, including the new annual atrazine-use data. The models also include a sixth explanatory variable, total precipitation during May and June of the year of sampling. The updated WARP models account for as much as 82 percent of the variability in the concentration statistics among the 112 sites used for model development, whereas previous WARP models accounted for no more than 77 percent. Concentration statistics predicted by the 95th percentile, annual mean, annual maximum and annual maximum moving-average concentration models were within a factor of 10 of the observed concentration statistics for most of the model development and validation sites. Overall, performance of the models for the development and validation sites supports

  6. High lifetime and reproductive performance of sows on southern European Union commercial farms can be predicted by high numbers of pigs born alive in parity one.

    PubMed

    Iida, R; Piñeiro, C; Koketsu, Y

    2015-05-01

    Our objectives were 1) to compare reproductive performance across parity and lifetime performance in sow groups categorized by the number of pigs born alive (PBA) in parity 1 and 2) to examine the factors associated with more PBA in parity 1. We analyzed 476,816 parity records and 109,373 lifetime records of sows entered into 125 herds from 2008 to 2010. Sows were categorized into 4 groups based on the 10th, 50th, and 90th percentiles of PBA in parity 1 as follows: 7 pigs or fewer, 8 to 11 pigs, 12 to 14 pigs, and 15 pigs or more. Generalized linear models were applied to the data. For reproductive performance across parity, sows that had 15 or more PBA in parity 1 had 0.5 to 1.8 more PBA in any subsequent parity than the other 3 PBA groups ( P< 0.05). In addition, they had 2.8 to 5.4% higher farrowing rates in parities 1 through 3 than sows that had 7 or fewer PBA (P < 0.05). However, there were no differences between the sow PBA groups for weaning-to-first-mating interval in any parity (P ≥ 0.37). For lifetime performance, sows that had 15 or more PBA in parity 1 had 4.4 to 26.1 more lifetime PBA than sows that had 14 or fewer PBA (P < 0.05). Also, for sows that had 14 or fewer PBA in parity 1, those that were first mated at 229 d old (25th percentile) or earlier had 2.9 to 3.3 more lifetime PBA than those first mated at 278 d old (75th percentile) or later (P < 0.05). Factors associated with fewer PBA in parity 1 were summer mating and lower age of gilts at first mating (AFM; P < 0.05) but not reservice occurrences (P = 0.34). Additionally, there was a 2-way interaction between mated month groups and AFM for PBA in parity 1 (P < 0.05); PBA in parity 1 sows mated from July to December increased nonlinearly by 0.3 to 0.4 pigs when AFM increased from 200 to 310 d old (P < 0.05). However, the same rise in AFM had no significant effect on the PBA of sows mated between January and June (P ≥ 0.17). In conclusion, high PBA in parity 1 can be used to predict that a

  7. Statistical analysis and mapping of water levels in the Biscayne aquifer, water conservation areas, and Everglades National Park, Miami-Dade County, Florida, 2000–2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prinos, Scott T.; Dixon, Joann F.

    2016-02-25

    Maps were created by importing site coordinates, summary water-level statistics, and completeness of record statistics into a geographic information system, and by interpolating between water levels at monitoring sites in the canals and water levels along the coastline. Raster surfaces were created from these data by using the triangular irregular network interpolation method. The raster surfaces were contoured by using geographic information system software. These contours were imprecise in some areas because the software could not fully evaluate the hydrology given available information; therefore, contours were manually modified where necessary. The ability to evaluate differences in water levels between 1990–1999 and 2000–2009 is limited in some areas because most of the monitoring sites did not have 80 percent complete records for one or both of these periods. The quality of the analyses was limited by (1) deficiencies in spatial coverage; (2) the combination of pre- and post-construction water levels in areas where canals, levees, retention basins, detention basins, or water-control structures were installed or removed; (3) an inability to address the potential effects of the vertical hydraulic head gradient on water levels in wells of different depths; and (4) an inability to correct for the differences between daily water-level statistics. Contours are dashed in areas where the locations of contours have been approximated because of the uncertainty caused by these limitations. Although the ability of the maps to depict differences in water levels between 1990–1999 and 2000–2009 was limited by missing data, results indicate that near the coast water levels were generally higher in May during 2000–2009 than during 1990–1999; and that inland water levels were generally lower during 2000–2009 than during 1990–1999. Generally, the 25th, 50th, and 75th percentiles of water levels from all months were also higher near the coast and lower inland

  8. A review of stream nutrient criteria development in the United States.

    PubMed

    Evans-White, M A; Haggard, B E; Scott, J T

    2013-07-01

    Elevated nutrients and sediments are the main factors contributing to the poor biological condition measured in over 40% of US waters, highlighting the need for criteria that can aid management efforts to protect or restore the quality of US waters. A large amount of literature on nutrient criteria has been generated since the USEPA called for their development in 1998. Our objective was to examine this peer-reviewed literature to evaluate two main approaches for criteria development in lotic ecosystems: percentile rank and bivariate predictive statistical analyses. The 25th percentile approach has been examined broadly across USEPA-aggregate nutrient ecoregions, and we found that USEPA-suggested criteria for these aggregate ecoregions were often more conservative than criteria estimated using more current regionally focused data based on our compiled data set. Furthermore, 25th percentile estimates were often less than 75th percentile estimates based on reference sites, suggesting that 75th percentile estimates were not more conservative than 25th percentile estimates. Predictive approaches have focused on establishing linear and nonlinear relationships between water quality and algae, macroinvertebrate, and fish communities; attributing causation; and determining whether threshold points exist that can aid in nutrient criteria development. Most of the predictive approaches have occurred at the state or watershed level and may not be directly comparable to USEPA aggregate ecoregions. However, percentile method estimates often fell within the confidence interval of biological threshold criteria estimates, suggesting overlap and some consensus between the two main approaches.

  9. A resolution commemorating the 50th anniversary of the National Council for International Visitors, and designating February 16, 2011, as "Citizen Diplomacy Day".

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Specter, Arlen [D-PA

    2010-07-30

    09/14/2010 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (text: CR S7095) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  10. A resolution acknowledging and congratulating Miami Dade College on the occasion of its 50th anniversary of service to the students and residents of the State of Florida.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Nelson, Bill [D-FL

    2010-09-16

    09/16/2010 Referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S7178) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. Today's Families: Continuity, Change and Challenge. Keynote address on the Occasion of the 50th Anniversary of the Canadian Home Economics Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glossop, Robert

    Canadian families differ from one another to the degree that it is now customary for researchers, helping professionals, teachers, and others to declare their interest in families, not "the family." The proliferation of different family forms has led some, who disregard the fact that the traditional family has had a very brief history,…

  12. Effect of Strain Rates on the Compressive Response of Neck Rubber From Humanetics HIII 50th Percentile Male Dummy Under Different Loading Sequences

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    Sequences by Brett Sanborn, Paul Moy, Randy Mrozek, and Tusit Weerasooriya ARL-TR-6336 February 2013...Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) Paul Moy, Randy Mrozek, and Tusit Weerasooriya Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL...Different Loading Sequences 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 1120-1120-99 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Brett Sanborn, * Paul Moy

  13. A resolution commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Bay of Pigs operation and commending the members of Brigada de Asalto 2506 (Assault Brigade 2506).

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Rubio, Marco [R-FL

    2011-04-12

    04/12/2011 Referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations. (text of measure as introduced: CR S2398) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  14. The 50th anniversary of the discovery of trisomy 21: the past, present, and future of research and treatment of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mégarbané, André; Ravel, Aimé; Mircher, Clotilde; Sturtz, Franck; Grattau, Yann; Rethoré, Marie-Odile; Delabar, Jean-Maurice; Mobley, William C

    2009-09-01

    Trisomy 21 or Down syndrome is a chromosomal disorder resulting from the presence of all or part of an extra Chromosome 21. It is a common birth defect, the most frequent and most recognizable form of mental retardation, appearing in about 1 of every 700 newborns. Although the syndrome had been described thousands of years before, it was named after John Langdon Down who reported its clinical description in 1866. The suspected association of Down syndrome with a chromosomal abnormality was confirmed by Lejeune et al. in 1959. Fifty years after the discovery of the origin of Down syndrome, the term "mongolism" is still inappropriately used; persons with Down syndrome are still institutionalized. Health problems associated with that syndrome often receive no or little medical care, and many patients still die prematurely in infancy or early adulthood. Nevertheless, working against this negative reality, community-based associations have lobbied for medical care and research to support persons with Down syndrome. Different Trisomy 21 research groups have already identified candidate genes that are potentially involved in the formation of specific Down syndrome features. These advances in turn may help to develop targeted medical treatments for persons with Trisomy 21. A review on those achievements is discussed.

  15. 50th Anniversary Celebration: 46th Sagamore Army Materials Research Conference on Advances and Needs in Multi-Spectral Transparent Materials Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    superplasticity, and the highest hardness of any oxide ceramic. Unfortunately, the retention of nanosized grains during pressureless sintering is...Advances in Transparent Polycrystalline Oxide Windows ...............................38  5.4  Session IV: Multifunctional Transparent Materials...Polycrystalline Oxide Laser Gain Materials .......................46  5.7.2  Sintering of Polycrystalline Nd-YAG for Laser Hosts

  16. Comments on the Classic Henry and Rogers (1960) Paper on Its 50th Anniversary: Resolving the Issue of Simple versus Choice Reaction Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klapp, Stuart T.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of response complexity on simple RT, first reported by Henry and Rogers (H&R), is a robust phenomenon for complexity measured by the number of chunks in a multiple-chunk response. However, there are problems with the memory drum theory H&R used to account for this result, and no fully satisfactory alternative explanation has been…

  17. A resolution recognizing the 50th anniversary of the Congressional declaration of bourbon whiskey as a distinctive product of the United States.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. McConnell, Mitch [R-KY

    2014-05-15

    05/15/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S3049-3050; text as passed Senate: CR S3078) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. The Anniversary of the First Public Announcement of the Successful Test of Fission Proceedings (50th) Held in Washington, DC on 17 January 1989

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-17

    Fermi, Leo Szilard and others. A-1 these people had attempted to unravel the mystery of nuclear structure and the origin of the nuclear species...is Leo Szilard , the brilliant Hungarian-born physicist, who appeared in the world in 1898 and died in 1964. He was, of course, well-known to many in...The next major scientific figure to give warning that the nuclear age was imminent, for better or worse, was Leo Szilard ; who became interested in the

  19. Some results of the growth of semiconductor crystals in microgravity conditions (to the 50th anniversary of Yuri Gagarin's flight into space)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shul'pina, I. L.; Zakharov, B. G.; Parfen'ev, R. V.; Farbshtein, I. I.; Serebryakov, Yu. A.; Prokhorov, I. A.

    2012-07-01

    The history of the growth of semiconductor crystals aboard space vehicles and their subsequent investigation has been described shortly. It has been shown using Ge(Ga), GaSb(Si), and GaSb(Te) crystals as an example that the formation of segregation growth striations can be avoided during their recrystallization by the vertical Bridgman method in conditions of physical simulation of microgravity on the Earth, mainly due to the essential weakening of the thermal gravitation convection. By their structure and impurity distribution, they approach the crystals grown in space. The investigation of recrystallization of Te has made it possible to determine the role of the detachment effect characteristic of the microgravity conditions and the features of the microstructure of the samples that crystallize with a free surface. The analysis of the results obtained from experiments in space allows us to better understand the processes occurring during the crystallization of the melts and to improve the crystal growth in terrestrial conditions.

  20. Let's Make the Next Generation Tobacco-Free: Your Guide to the 50th Anniversary Surgeon General's Report on Smoking and ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... l Online As a result of tobacco industry marketing and other influences, more than 3,200 children ... adults smoke. 1990 R.J. Reynolds ends a marketing test targeting 26 % African Americans in response to ...

  1. [Lucja Frey (1889-1943) in the 50th anniversary of her tragic death and 70th anniversary of the auriculotemporal syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bennet, J D; Pietruski, J

    1993-01-01

    Lucja Frey was a Polish neurologist born and lived in Lwów, former east Polish town, and died during the war in Lwów's ghetto. In 1923 she described the auriculo-temporalis syndrome, at present well known all over the world. But personality and history of the extraordinary Polish scientist remains obscure. The aim of this paper is to present her silhouette. Because a great number of Polish scientists are also not known abroad, the authors tried to explain the causes of their absence in the world bibliography.

  2. The first autopsied case of diffuse Lewy body disease (DLBD): re-examination by recent immunostaining methods: The 50th Anniversary of Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Kenji; Manabe, Yuta

    2010-10-01

    Materials from our first autopsied case of diffuse Lewy body disease (DLBD), that was originally reported in 1976, were re-examined using recent immunohistochemical methods. Lewy pathology consisting of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites appeared much more marked with alpha-synuclein immunostaining than had been detected with classical stainings. This case and our other similar cases prompted us to propose the terms "Lewy body disease" in 1980 and "diffuse Lewy body disease" in 1984. We also reported in 1990 that DLBD was classified into two forms: a pure form and a common form. Based on these studies the term "dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB)" was proposed in 1996. Since 1980, we have insisted that DLB, Parkinson disease (PD), and PD with dementia (PDD) should be understood within the spectrum of Lewy body disease. This insistence has been recently accepted by the International Workshop and the International Working Group on DLB and PDD in 2005 and in 2006, respectively.

  3. Ubiquitin-positive tau-negative intraneuronal inclusions in dementia with motor neuron disease: The 50th Anniversary of Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Koichi

    2010-10-01

    We first reported ubiquitin-positive tau-negative intraneuronal inclusions in the hippocampal granular cell layer and entorhinal cortices in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We then found that those inclusions occur frequently in patients with presenile dementia and motor neuron disease. The ultrastructure of the inclusions consists mainly of granules with a few filaments. In 2006, TDP-43 was identified as a major component of the inclusions specific for frontotemporal lobar degeneration and ALS. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding ubiquitin-positive tau-negative intraneuronal inclusions.

  4. SHAPING the Future: Our Cause, 50 Million Strong. National Association of Kinesiology in Higher Education 50th Amy Morris Homans Commemorative Lecture 2016

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambdin, Dolly

    2016-01-01

    Amy Morris Homans was an amazing leader in the early development of physical education. She believed that every individual must be educated academically and physically. Earlier this year, SHAPE America committed to making her vision a reality with the goal of empowering ALL students with the skills, knowledge, habits, and determination to make…

  5. Symposium on the 50th anniversary of the discovery of deuterium: divisions of history of chemistry, geochemistry, nuclear and physical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Bigeleisen, J.

    1981-01-01

    In tribute to Harold Urey, the author cites Urey's accomplishments as a scientist and public servant and gives insight of the man. Some of his accomplishments in science are: discovered deuterium for which he received the Nobel prize in 1934; worked with Rittenberg and Greiff on the theory and calculation of the differences in the thermodynamic properties of isotopic compounds; with Thode, Hutchison and others, separated the isotopes of the light elements by chemical methods on a laboratory scale; during World War II headed the Substitute Alloy Materials Laboratories of Columbia University where his group developed industrial scale processes for the separation of /sup 2/H, /sup 10/B, and /sup 235/U; with his associates developed the /sup 18/O paleotemperature scale; made fundamental contributions to a widely accepted theory of the origin of the earth. (ATT)

  6. Proceedings of the Meeting of the Coastal Engineering Research Board (50th) Held in Virginia Beach, Virginia on 15-17 November 1988

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    hardfacing and soft defense, beach types) are also clearly needed if the same balanced design philosophy is to be useful to study total costs of all...levels for all shore protection alternatives ( hardfacing , rubble and soft systems) should be developed so that rational methods to estimate maintenance

  7. Vacation Study Abroad 2000/2001: 50th Anniversary Edition of IIE's Complete Guide to Summer and Short-Term Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Sara J., Ed.

    This guide provides descriptions of 2,239 summer and short-term study-abroad opportunities that range in length from one week to several months. Introductory material provides information on the Institute of International Education (IIE), IIE publications, how to use the guide, abbreviations, planning for study abroad, additional resources for…

  8. A resolution to observe the contributions of the American Chiropractic Association and to recognize the 50th anniversary of the founding of the organization.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Harkin, Tom [D-IA

    2013-03-07

    03/07/2013 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S1274; text as passed Senate: CR S1273) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. [Bioorganic chemistry: institutes, journals, publications, a short scientific metric analysis. On the 50th anniversary of the Institute of Natural Compound Chemistry, Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry].

    PubMed

    Spichenkova, N E; Vas'kovskiĭ, V E

    2009-01-01

    An attempt to illustrate the development of bioorganic chemistry in Russia and all over the world has been made. The development of a new field of science was accompanied by the emergence of specialized journals, organizations, departments and institutions for research in this field. A brief report about the four most important world journals on bioorganic chemistry is represented. The analysis of publications of world scientific institutions, having the word "bioorganic" in their title since 1972 to the middle of 2008, has been made with the help of information from Web Science. The publication distribution among countries, institutions, languages, journals, and the list of the most productive authors clearly demonstrate the leading role of the USSR and Russia and of the Institute of Natural Compound Chemistry, Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, in the creation and development of this field of science in the world. The publication distribution among the areas of knowledge displays a close connection between bioorganic chemistry and a number of the other fields of science, first of all, biochemistry and molecular biology, and also organic chemistry.

  10. A resolution commemorating the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Organization of African Unity (OAU) and commending its successor, the African Union.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Coons, Christopher A. [D-DE

    2013-06-10

    06/26/2013 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S5304-5305) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. Commemorating the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Organization of African Unity (OAU) and commending its successor, the African Union.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Bass, Karen [D-CA-37

    2013-05-23

    06/07/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights and International Organizations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. Nasu-Hakola disease: The first case reported by Nasu and review: The 50th Anniversary of Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Minoru; Sano, Kenji; Nakayama, Jun; Amano, Naoji

    2010-10-01

    Nasu-Hakola disease (NHD) was first reported separately by Nasu and Hakola around the same time in the 1970s. It is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterized by progressive dementia and repeated pathological fractures during adolescence. It has recently been demonstrated that NHD is caused by a mutation in the TREM2 or DAP12 gene. The present paper demonstrates the first patient reported by Nasu and reviews NHD. The patient was a man who died at the age 38 years. His family history was unremarkable. There was no abnormal developmental history. At the age of 26, the patient suffered a pathological fracture of the right tibia, and X-ray confirmed bone resorption in the right tibia. As for mental status, the patient tended to be euphoric. After that, bone resorption was also seen in other long bones. At the age of 33, the patient could not walk after suffering a right femoral neck fracture. He was apathetic and exhibited behavioral abnormalities. At the age of 38, he could not move or speak and subsequently died. General pathological examination showed yellow opaque gelatinous substances in the medullary cavities, matching translucent cystic lesions in the femur, tibia, and fibula on X-rays. Light microscopy showed numerous membranocystic changes in the substances. The brain weighed 1050 g. Symmetric systemic cerebral atrophy, in particular atrophy of the cerebral white matter in the occipital and temporal lobes, was confirmed. Histological examination showed white matter degeneration and diffuse sclerosis accompanied by astroglial proliferation. Severe demyelination was confirmed. Axonal degeneration and destruction were marked. In demyelinated areas, fat granule cells appeared, and lipid granule-positive cells aggregated around vessels. Cerebral cortical neurons were relatively maintained. In the brain, no membranocystic lesions could be recognized. In the DAP12 gene, the patient had a conversion of nucleotide at position 116 resulting in serine 38 to asparagine substitution.

  13. A resolution recognizing the 50th anniversary of the historic achievement of John Herschel Glenn, Jr., in becoming the first United States astronaut to orbit the Earth.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Brown, Sherrod [D-OH

    2012-02-15

    02/15/2012 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S690-692; text as passed Senate: CR S690-691; text of measure as introduced: CR S703-704) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  14. Bibliographical note on behavioral aspects: on the margin of the 50th anniversary of the Minnesota Starvation-Nutritional Rehabilitation experiment.

    PubMed

    Brozek, J

    1995-10-01

    The principal technical aim of this note is to bring together bibliographic information on the papers dealing with the behavioral aspects of the study and published both before and, in particular, after the appearance in print of the two-volume treatise on The Biology of Human Starvation by Keys, et al. in 1950, which provides a systematic, comprehensive account. The communications fall into three categories: methods, results, and overviews. The section on results is concerned primarily with the effects on personality.

  15. South Fork Shenandoah River habitat-flow modeling to determine ecological and recreational characteristics during low-flow periods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krstolic, Jennifer L.; Ramey, R. Clay

    2012-01-01

    The ecological habitat requirements of aquatic organisms and recreational streamflow requirements of the South Fork Shenandoah River were investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Central Shenandoah Valley Planning District Commission, the Northern Shenandoah Valley Regional Commission, and Virginia Commonwealth University. Physical habitat simulation modeling was conducted to examine flow as a major determinant of physical habitat availability and recreation suitability using field-collected hydraulic habitat variables such as water depth, water velocity, and substrate characteristics. Fish habitat-suitability criteria specific to the South Fork Shenandoah River were developed for sub-adult and adult smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu), juvenile and sub-adult redbreast sunfish (Lepomis auritus), spotfin or satinfin shiner (Cyprinella spp), margined madtom (Noturus insignis),and river chub (Nocomis micropogon). Historic streamflow statistics for the summer low-flow period during July, August, and September were used as benchmark low-flow conditions and compared to habitat simulation results and water-withdrawal scenarios based on 2005 withdrawal data. To examine habitat and recreation characteristics during droughts, daily fish habitat or recreation suitability values were simulated for 2002 and other selected drought years. Recreation suitability during droughts was extremely low, because the modeling demonstrated that suitable conditions occur when the streamflows are greater than the 50th percentile flow for July, August, and September. Habitat availability for fish is generally at a maximum when streamflows are between the 75th and 25th percentile flows for July, August, and September. Time-series results for drought years, such as 2002, showed that extreme low-flow conditions less than the 5th percentile of flow for July, August, and September corresponded to below-normal habitat availability for both game and nongame fish in the

  16. Nonylphenol in pregnant women and their matching fetuses: Placental transfer and potential risks of infants

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yu-Fang; Wang, Pei-Wei; Huang, Li-Wei; Yang, Winnie; Yu, Ching-Jung; Yang, Shang-Han; Chiu, Hsin-Hao; Chen, Mei-Lien

    2014-10-15

    As the predominant environmental biodegradation product of nonylphenol (NP) ethoxylates and with proven estrogenic effects, NP is formed during the alkylation process of phenols. The purposes of this study were (1) to examine maternal and prenatal exposure to NP in Taiwan, (2) to determine the level of placental protection against NP exposure as well as the level of NP in breast milk, and (3) to assess the potential risk for breastfed newborns exposed to NP through the milk. Thirty pairs of maternal and fetal blood samples, placenta, and breast milk during the 1st and the 3rd months of lactation were collected. External NP exposures of these specimens were then analyzed by using high-performance liquid chromatography coupling with fluorescence detection. Next, the socio-demographics, lifestyle, delivery method, dietary and work history were collected using a questionnaire. In addition, the daily intake of NP from consuming breast milk in the 1st and 3rd months for newborns was studied through deterministic and probabilistic risk assessment methods. The geometric means and geometric standard deviation of NP levels in maternal blood, fetal cord blood, placenta, and breast milk in the 1st and 3rd months were 14.6 (1.7) ng/ml, 18.8 (1.8) ng/ml, 19.8 (1.9) ng/g, 23.5 (3.2) ng/ml, and 57.3 (1.4) ng/ml, respectively. The probabilistic percentiles (50th, 75th, and 95th) of daily intake NP in breast milk were 4.33, 7.79, and 18.39 μg/kg-bw/day in the 1st month, respectively, and were 8.11, 10.78, 16.08 μg/kg-bw/day in the 3rd month, respectively. The probabilistic distributions (5th, 25th, and 50th) of risk for infants aged 1 month old were 0.27, 0.64, and 1.15, respectively, and that for infants aged 3 month old were 0.31, 0.46, and 0.62, respectively. Through repeated exposure from the dietary intake of expectant mothers, fetuses could encounter a high NP exposure level due to transplacental absorption, partitioning between the maternal and fetal compartments. Daily NP

  17. An analysis of potential water availability from the Charles Mill, Clendening, Piedmont, Pleasant Hill, Senecaville, and Wills Creek Lakes in the Muskingum River Watershed, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koltun, G.F.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to assess potential water availability from the Charles Mill, Clendening, Piedmont, Pleasant Hill, Senecaville, and Wills Creek Lakes, located within the Muskingum River Watershed, Ohio. The assessment was based on the criterion that water withdrawals should not appreciably affect maintenance of recreation-season pool levels in current use. To facilitate and simplify the assessment, it was assumed that historical lake operations were successful in maintaining seasonal pool levels, and that any discharges from lakes constituted either water that was discharged to prevent exceeding seasonal pool levels or discharges intended to meet minimum in-stream flow targets downstream from the lakes. It further was assumed that the volume of water discharged in excess of the minimum in-stream flow target is available for use without negatively impacting seasonal pool levels or downstream water uses and that all or part of it is subject to withdrawal. Historical daily outflow data for the lakes were used to determine the quantity of water that potentially could be withdrawn and the resulting quantity of water that would flow downstream (referred to as “flow-by”) on a daily basis as a function of all combinations of three hypothetical target minimum flow-by amounts (1, 2, and 3 times current minimum in-stream flow targets) and three pumping capacities (1, 2, and 3 million gallons per day). Using both U.S. Geological Survey streamgage data (where available) and lake-outflow data provided by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers resulted in analytical periods ranging from 51 calendar years for Charles Mill, Clendening, and Piedmont Lakes to 74 calendar years for Pleasant Hill, Senecaville, and Wills Creek Lakes. The observed outflow time series and the computed time series of daily flow-by amounts and potential withdrawals were analyzed to compute and report order statistics (95th, 75th, 50th, 25th, 10th, and 5th percentiles) and means for

  18. An analysis of potential water availability from the Atwood, Leesville, and Tappan Lakes in the Muskingum River Watershed, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koltun, G.F.

    2013-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to assess potential water availability from the Atwood, Leesville, and Tappan Lakes, located within the Muskingum River Watershed, Ohio. The assessment was based on the criterion that water withdrawals should not appreciably affect maintenance of recreation-season pool levels in current use. To facilitate and simplify the assessment, it was assumed that historical lake operations were successful in maintaining seasonal pool levels, and that any discharges from lakes constituted either water that was discharged to prevent exceeding seasonal pool levels or discharges intended to meet minimum in-stream flow targets downstream from the lakes. It further was assumed that the volume of water discharged in excess of the minimum in-stream flow target is available for use without negatively impacting seasonal pool levels or downstream water uses and that all or part of it is subject to withdrawal. Historical daily outflow data for the lakes were used to determine the quantity of water that potentially could be withdrawn and the resulting quantity of water that would flow downstream (referred to as “flow-by”) on a daily basis as a function of all combinations of three hypothetical target minimum flow-by amounts (1, 2, and 3 times current minimum in-stream flow targets) and three pumping capacities (1, 2, and 3 million gallons per day). Using both U.S. Geological Survey streamgage data and lake-outflow data provided by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers resulted in analytical periods ranging from 51 calendar years for the Atwood Lake to 73 calendar years for the Leesville and Tappan Lakes. The observed outflow time series and the computed time series of daily flow-by amounts and potential withdrawals were analyzed to compute and report order statistics (95th, 75th, 50th, 25th, 10th, and 5th percentiles) and means for the analytical period, in aggregate, and broken down by calendar month. In addition, surplus-water mass curve data

  19. Procalcitonin as a biomarker of bacterial infection in pediatric patients after congenital heart surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarti, Sujata B; Reformina, Diane A; Lee, Timothy M; Malhotra, Sunil P; Mosca, Ralph S; Bhatla, Puneet

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bacterial infection (BI) after congenital heart surgery (CHS) is associated with increased morbidity and is difficult to differentiate from systemic inflammatory response syndrome caused by cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Procalcitonin (PCT) has emerged as a reliable biomarker of BI in various populations. Aim: To determine the optimal PCT threshold to identify BI among children suspected of having infection following CPB. Setting and Design: Single-center retrospective observational study. Materials and Methods: Medical records of all the patients admitted between January 2013 and April 2015 were reviewed. Patients in the age range of 0-21 years of age who underwent CHS requiring CPB in whom PCT was drawn between postoperative days 0-8 due to suspicion of infection were included. Statistical Analysis: The Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used for nonparametric variables. The diagnostic performance of PCT was evaluated using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Results: Ninety-eight patients were included. The median age was 2 months (25th and 75th interquartile of 0.1-7.5 months). Eleven patients were included in the BI group. The median PCT for the BI group (3.42 ng/mL, 25th and 75th interquartile of 2.34-5.67) was significantly higher than the median PCT for the noninfected group (0.8 ng/mL, 25th and 75th interquartile 0.38-3.39), P = 0.028. The PCT level that yielded the best compromise between the sensitivity (81.8%) and specificity (66.7%) was 2 ng/mL with an area under the ROC curve of 0.742. Conclusion: A PCT less than 2 ng/mL makes BI unlikely in children suspected of infection after CHS. PMID:27212844

  20. Consumptive Water-Use Coefficients for the Great Lakes Basin and Climatically Similar Areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaffer, Kimberly H.; Runkle, Donna L.

    2007-01-01

    Consumptive water use is the portion of water withdrawn (for a particular use) that is evaporated, transpired, incorporated into products or crops, consumed by humans or livestock, or otherwise removed from the immediate water environment. This report, which is organized by water?use categories, includes consumptive?use coefficients for the Great Lakes Basin (including Canada) and for areas climatically similar to the Great Lakes Basin. This report also contains an annotated bibliography of consumptive water?use coefficients. Selected references are listed for consumptive?use data from elsewhere in the world. For the industrial water?use category, the median consumptive?use coefficients were 10 percent for the Great Lakes Basin, climatically similar areas, and the world; the 25th and 75th percentiles for these geographic areas were comparable within 6 percent. The combined domestic and public?supply consumptive?use statistics (median, 25th and 75th percentiles) were between 10 to 20 percent for the various geographic areas. Although summary statistics were similar for coefficients in the livestock and irrigation water?use categories for the Great Lakes Basin and climatically similar areas, statistic values for the world on a whole were substantially lower (15 to 28 percent lower). Commercial and thermoelectric power consumptive?use coefficient statistics (median, 25th, and 75th percentile) also were comparable for the Great Lakes Basin and climatically similar areas, within 2 percent. References for other countries were not found for commercial and thermoelectric power water?use categories. The summary statistics for the mining consumptive?use coefficients varied, likely because of differences in types of mining, processes, or equipment.

  1. Endogenous DNA Damage and Risk of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, M B; Sigurdson, A J; Jones, I M; Thomas, C B; Graubard, B I; Korde, L; Greene, M H; McGlynn, K A

    2008-01-18

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) are comprised of two histologic groups, seminomas and nonseminomas. We postulated that the possible divergent pathogeneses of these histologies may be partially explained by variable endogenous DNA damage. To assess our hypothesis, we conducted a case-case analysis of seminomas and nonseminomas using the alkaline comet assay to quantify single-strand DNA breaks and alkali-labile sites. The Familial Testicular Cancer study and the U.S. Radiologic Technologists cohort provided 112 TGCT cases (51 seminomas & 61 nonseminomas). A lymphoblastoid cell line was cultured for each patient and the alkaline comet assay was used to determine four parameters: tail DNA, tail length, comet distributed moment (CDM) and Olive tail moment (OTM). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated using logistic regression. Values for tail length, tail DNA, CDM and OTM were modeled as categorical variables using the 50th and 75th percentiles of the seminoma group. Tail DNA was significantly associated with nonseminoma compared to seminoma (OR{sub 50th percentile} = 3.31, 95%CI: 1.00, 10.98; OR{sub 75th percentile} = 3.71, 95%CI: 1.04, 13.20; p for trend=0.039). OTM exhibited similar, albeit statistically non-significant, risk estimates (OR{sub 50th percentile} = 2.27, 95%CI: 0.75, 6.87; OR{sub 75th percentile} = 2.40, 95%CI: 0.75, 7.71; p for trend=0.12) whereas tail length and CDM showed no association. In conclusion, the results for tail DNA and OTM indicate that endogenous DNA damage levels are higher in patients who develop nonseminoma compared with seminoma. This may partly explain the more aggressive biology and younger age-of-onset of this histologic subgroup compared with the relatively less aggressive, later-onset seminoma.

  2. [Effect of the synthetic cannabinoid dronabinol on central pain in patients with multiple sclerosis--secondary publication].

    PubMed

    Svendsen, Kristina Bacher; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Bach, Flemming W

    2005-06-20

    Cannabinoids reduce allodynia/hyperalgesia in animal pain models, but few clinical studies evaluated the analgesic action in humans. We aimed to evaluate the effect of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (dronabinol) on central pain in MS patients. Twenty-four MS patients participated in a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover trial. Dronabinol reduced the spontaneous pain intensity significantly compared with placebo (4.0 (2.3-6.0) vs. 5.0 (4.0-6.4), median (25th-75th percentiles), p = 0.02). Though dronabinol's analgesic effect is modest, its use should be evaluated considering the general difficulty in treating central pain.

  3. Decadal increase of organic compounds in winter and spring atmospheric aerosols in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, S.; Kawamura, K.; Kobayashi, M.; Tachibana, E.; Lee, M.; Jung, J.

    2014-12-01

    A rapid economic growth in China and other East Asian countries may have changed molecular level organic composition of atmospheric aerosols in East Asia. Molecular level composition is required to better evaluate the roles of organic aersols on climate, air quality and public health. Diacids and oxoacids account for a significant fraction of atmospheric organic matter and their secondary sources are more important than their primary sources. Atmospheric aerosol samples (n = 698) were collected during 2001-2008 at Gosan site in Jeju Island, South Korea. They were analyzed for saturated (C2-C10), unsaturated aliphatic (C4-C5), multifunctional (C3-C7) and aromatic (C8) diacids and oxoacids (C2-C9). According to monthly average concentration, oxalic acid (C2) is the most abundant followed by malonic acid (C3) and succinic acid (C4) in the homologous series of saturated diacids (C2-C10) whereas glyoxylic acid (ωC2) is most abundant in the homologous series of oxoacids (C2-C9). The monthly median, 25th percentile and 75th percentile concentrations of saturated and multifunctional diacids and oxoacids showed the highest in spring (March-May). In contrast, those concentrations for unsaturated aliphatic and aromatic diacids were observed the highest in winter (December-February). The monthly median and percentile (25th and 75th) concentrations of all diacids and oxoacids showed the second peak in the autumn (September-November) while those concentrations were recorded lowest in summer (June-August). A steady increment or decrement was not found in the monthly median and percentile (25th and 75th) concentrations of diacids and oxoacids in any month. However, the curve fitting of those concentrations over the study period shows an incremental trend for major diacids and oxoacids in winter and spring. For example, the monthly median, 25th percentile and 75th percentile concentrations of all major diacids and oxoacids increased up to 3 times from 2001 to 2008 in winter and

  4. Misclassification of iodine intake level from morning spot urine samples with high iodine excretion among Inuit and non-Inuit in Greenland.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Stig; Waagepetersen, Rasmus; Laurberg, Peter

    2015-05-14

    Iodine nutrition is commonly assessed from iodine excretion in urine. A 24 h urine sample is ideal, but it is cumbersome and inconvenient. Hence, spot urine samples with creatinine to adjust for differences in void volume are widely used. Still, the importance of ethnicity and the timing of spot urine samples need to be settled. We, thus, collected 104 early morning spot urine samples and 24 h urine samples from Inuit and non-Inuit living in Greenland. Diet was assessed by a FFQ. Demographic data were collected from the national registry and by questionnaires. Iodine was measured using the Sandell-Kolthoff reaction, creatinine using the Jaffe method and para-amino benzoic acid by the HPLC method for the estimation of completeness of urine sampling and compensation of incomplete urine samples to 24 h excretion. A population-based recruitment was done from the capital city, a major town and a settlement (n 36/48/20). Participants were seventy-eight Inuit and twenty-six non-Inuit. The median 24 h iodine excretion was 138 (25th-75th percentile 89-225) μg/97 (25th-75th percentile 72-124) μg in Inuit/non-Inuit (P= 0.030), and 153 (25th-75th percentile 97-251) μg/102 (25th-75th percentile 73-138) μg (P= 0.026) when including compensated iodine excretion. Iodine excretion in 24 h urine samples increased with a rising intake of traditional Inuit foods (P= 0.005). Iodine excretion was lower in morning spot urine samples than in 24 h urine samples (P< 0.001). This difference was associated with iodine intake levels (P< 0.001), and was statistically significant when the iodine excretion level was above 150 μg/24 h. In conclusion, the iodine intake level was underestimated from morning spot urine samples if iodine excretion was above the recommended level.

  5. The Battle for Leyte Gulf. October 1944. Strategical and Tactical Analysis. Volume V. Battle of Surigao Strait October 24th-25th

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1958-01-01

    Liloan Bay to obtain medical aid for\\ wounded man; and the Limasawa PT’s continued to patrol with PT 190 to the Westward of Li-aao- sawa Island and PT...DESDIV 21 Commander Ishii , Hisashi DD’s WAKABA (F), HATSUSH IMC, HATSUHARU CRIDIV 16 less KITAGAMIk Vice Admiral Sakonju, Naomasa CA AOBA** Captain

  6. Lunar and planetary science XXV; Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, 25th, Houston, TX, Mar. 14-18, 1994, Abstracts of Papers. Pts. 1, 2, & 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-01-01

    The present volume on lunar and planetary science discusses an experimental project regarding Martian fluvio-thermal erosion, radiative signals from the impact of Shoemaker-Levy on Jupiter, evidence for short SiC lifetimes in the ISM, and distributions of the preatmospheric sizes of Antarctic and non-Antarctic chondrites. Attention is given to the calculation of cosmic-ray exposure ages of meteorites, meteorites as differential detectors of events over a long time scale, a comparison of surface characteristics of steep-sided domes on Venus and terrestrial silicic domes, the surface and interior of Phobos, and the hypsometric distribution of impact craters on Venus. Topics addressed include impact craters as indicators of subsurface H2O on Mars, a quantitative assessment of an impact-generated ring vortex, ordinary chondrites in space and time, and a geologic map of Callisto. Also discussed are postshock cooling and annealing within L-Group ordinary chondrites, primitive material in lunar highland soils, refractory carbides in interstellar graphite, and a mineralogical instrument for planetary applications.

  7. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting, Aquatic Plant Control Research Program (25th) Held in Orlando, Florida on 26-30 November 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    semiaquat ’ griculture, including rice water body. (Bua-ngam an,. Mercado 1975). I US Army Engineer Waterways Experirneat Station, Vicksburg, MS. 148...afini, acontrol of water lettuce. Journal of weevil attacking Pistia stratiotes in South Aqu atic l en t uManageme nt 2 1 America: Biology and host...of watermilfoil from shallower adult weevils on watermilfoil growth. The water seemed atypici.1, as M. spicatum is re- experimental chambers consisted

  8. A resolution commending the 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division upon its completion of a deployment to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Begich, Mark [D-AK

    2012-05-14

    05/14/2012 Referred to the Committee on Armed Services. (text of measure as introduced: CR S3132-3133) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. Will Higher Education Be Ready for the Eighties? Proceedings of the SREB Legislative Work Conference (25th, July 28-30, 1976, Annapolis, Maryland).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1976

    Long-range demographic trends, enrollment patterns, and current decisions about program evaluation and collective bargaining all have a bearing on what higher education will do in the next decade. In answer to the question of whether or not higher education will be ready for the 1980's, topics discussed are: (1) demographic change and southern…

  10. Technology & Disability: Research, Design, Practice, and Policy. Proceedings of the RESNA International Conference (25th, Minneapolis, Minnesota, June 27-July 1, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Richard, Ed.

    These proceedings of the 2002 annual RESNA (Association for the Advancement of Rehabilitation Technology) conference include more than 200 presentations on all facets of assistive technology, including concurrent sessions, scientific platform sessions, interactive poster presentations, computer demonstrations, and the research symposium. The…

  11. Conference on Statistical Theory and Practice (25th) Held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on 29-31 May 1985.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    Toby Mitceiel, (Oak Ridge Nat. Lab.), Computer Construction of Super Saturated Screening Designs 3:30 Carl N. Morris, (Univ. of Texas, Austin), An...2906 MORRIS. CARL PENA. DANIEL UNIV.OF TEXAS UNrV.OF MADRID DEPT.OF MATHEMATICS DEPT.OF STATISTICS RLM 8.100/10.122 MADRID, SPAIN AUSTIN, TX 78703 512...CAMBRIDGE. MA 02138 617-495-O1600 PLANTINGA . PAMELA SANCHEZ, OLIVA UNIV.OF WISCONSIN UNIV.OF WISCONSIN DEPT.OF STATISTICS 217 N. PINCKNEY #2 1210 W

  12. 25th anniversary article: galvanic replacement: a simple and versatile route to hollow nanostructures with tunable and well-controlled properties.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiaohu; Wang, Yi; Ruditskiy, Aleksey; Xia, Younan

    2013-11-26

    This article provides a progress report on the use of galvanic replacement for generating complex hollow nanostructures with tunable and well-controlled properties. We begin with a brief account of the mechanistic understanding of galvanic replacement, specifically focused on its ability to engineer the properties of metal nanostructures in terms of size, composition, structure, shape, and morphology. We then discuss a number of important concepts involved in galvanic replacement, including the facet selectivity involved in the dissolution and deposition of metals, the impacts of alloying and dealloying on the structure and morphology of the final products, and methods for promoting or preventing a galvanic replacement reaction. We also illustrate how the capability of galvanic replacement can be enhanced to fabricate nanomaterials with complex structures and/or compositions by coupling with other processes such as co-reduction and the Kirkendall effect. Finally, we highlight the use of such novel metal nanostructures fabricated via galvanic replacement for applications ranging from catalysis to plasmonics and biomedical research, and conclude with remarks on prospective future directions.

  13. "25 Years of Educational Excellence." Special Issue Commemorating the 25th Anniversary of the Journal of the Pennsylvania Black Conference on Higher Education, Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redfern, Alicia King, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    The articles in this document are intended to be reflective of the theme "A Silver Celebration: 25 Years of Educational Excellence," and cover topics ranging from black college athletes to black real estate owners to the status of African Americans in Pennsylvania colleges and universities. They include: "The Social and Political…

  14. Proceedings of the Conference on the Design of Experiments in Army Research, Development, and Testing (25th) Held at Natick Massachusetts 17-19 October 1979

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    THE METHOD OF PAIREO COMPARISONS Dr. D. B. DeLury SAMPLING IN BIOLOGZCAL POPULATIONS Dr. W. J. Dixon MEDICAL HEALTH STATISTICS Dr. N. E. Golovin ...Philosophoical Society, written by our keynote speaker of today. Later, in the early 1940 ’s when I had been in uniform at the BRL during World War I1, we had...University in 1940 , in the first cohort of Wilks disciples. Between 1934 and 1940 he taught as a graduate assistant or instructor at Brown University

  15. Proceedings, joint conference of the 21st annual meeting of the American Society of Mining and Reclamation and 25th West Virginia Surface Mine Drainage Task Force symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhisel, R.I.

    2004-07-01

    Topics covered include: underground mine hydrology; valley fills; acid drainage technology initiative; reforestation/forestry; passive treatment of acid mine drainage; hydrology; selenium; acid mine drainage and remining; overburden/soils; forestry in West Virginia; revegetation and wildlife; mine soils; tailings; stream restoration; chemical treatment of acid mine drainage; watershed restoration; acidity; aquaculture; and stream characterisation. The poster papers and plenary session papers are also included.

  16. Promoting Educational Technology. Summary Report of the Annual Lake Okoboji Educational Media Leadership Conference (25th, Milford, Iowa, August 20-24, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Educational Communications and Technology, Washington, DC.

    This summary report of the annual conference includes statements of delegate concerns prepared for the planning committee, presentations by three resource delegates on the promotion of educational technology at different levels, and reports from seven study committees. Lucy Ainsley discussed promotion strategies at the district level, K-12; Wesley…

  17. Association of Small Computer Users in Education (ASCUE) Summer Conference. Proceedings (25th, North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, June 21-25, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Small Computer Users in Education, Greencastle, IN.

    Forty-three papers from a conference on microcomputers are presented under the following headings: Computing in the Curriculum, Information and Computer Science Information; Institutional and Administrative Computing, and Management, Services, and Training. Topics of the papers include the following: telecommunications projects that work in…

  18. Teaching Biochemistry at Lisbon University--Facing the Challenge of the Bologna Declaration in the 25th Anniversary of the Biochemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farinha, Carlos M.; Freire, Ana Ponces

    2007-01-01

    The biochemistry degree has been taught at Lisbon University for 25 years. Since its creation, the curriculum is characterized for being widely eclectic and multidisciplinary. The adoption of the concepts proposed in Europe by the Declaration of Bologna and incorporation of these ideas at Lisbon University is discussed here for the biochemistry…

  19. IEEE Conference on Software Engineering Education and Training (CSEE&T 2012) Proceedings (25th, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China, April 17-19, 2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IEEE Conference on Software Engineering Education and Training, Proceedings (MS), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Conference on Software Engineering Education and Training (CSEE&T) is the premier international peer-reviewed conference, sponsored by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. (IEEE) Computer Society, which addresses all major areas related to software engineering education, training, and professionalism. This year, as…

  20. Teacher Education Models in Geography: An International Comparison. Papers Prepared in Conjunction with the International Geographical Union Congress (25th, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsden, Wm., Ed.

    Thirteen essays discussing how teachers are trained to teach geography in various countries are presented. The papers are: "Teacher Education in Geography: The Comparative View" (W. E. Marsden); "The Training of Geography Teachers in the People's Republic of Bulgaria" (Paulina Vekilska and Dimitar Kantchev); "Note Sur la…

  1. Strategy for Peace 1984. The Stanley Foundation US Foreign Policy Conference Report (25th, Annapolis, Maryland, October 11-13, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley Foundation, Muscatine, IA.

    Proceedings are summarized of a conference in which 62 foreign policy professionals met to recommend strategies for peace in the areas of U.S.-Soviet competition in the Third World, space weapons and arms control, objectives of U.S. economic and security assistance, and the United States and UNESCO. Four sections focusing on each of these areas…

  2. Honoring the 25th anniversary of the enactment of the Drug Price Competition and Patent Term Restoration Act of 1984 (the Hatch-Waxman Act).

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Brown, Sherrod [D-OH

    2009-09-24

    09/24/2009 Referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S9853) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (25th).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 645 to 680

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1940-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  4. Nuclear Science Symposium, 25th, and Symposium on Nuclear Power Systems, 10th, Washington, D.C., October 18-20, 1978, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Detectors of various types are discussed, taking into account drift chambers, calorimetry, multiwire proportional chambers, signal processing, the use of semiconductors, and photo/optical applications. Circuits are considered along with instrumentation for space, nuclear medicine instrumentation, data acquisition and systems, environmental instrumentation, reactor instrumentation, and nuclear power systems. Attention is given to a new approach to high accuracy gaseous detectors, the current status of electron mobility and free-ion yield in high mobility liquids, a digital drift chamber digitizer system, the stability of oxides in high purity germanium, the quadrant photomultiplier, and the theory of imaging with a very limited number of projections.

  5. Promoting Excellence through Information and Technology. General Session Presentations of the Anniversary Forum of the Association for Institutional Research (25th, Portland, Oregon, April 28-May 1, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickey, Ann K., Ed.

    The evolving profession of institutional research as it exists in 1985, historical antecedents, and ideas about possible futures are presented in two addresses, a panel discussion, and an awards program from the Association for Institutional Research's annual forum. In "Promoting Excellence: Pursuing the Challenge of Quality," Burton R.…

  6. Gearing Up for Comparative Genomics: Analyses of the Fungal Class Dothideomycetes. Dothideomycetes Comparative Genomics Session: 25th Fungal Genetics Conference, Pacific Grove, CA, USA, March 2009

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Members of the Dothideomycetes, the largest and most important group of fungi, collectively infect almost every major monocot and dicot crop, whether for food, feed, fiber or fuel. In addition to plant pathogens, the class includes fungi with an unparalleled ecological, life history and metabolic di...

  7. Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) 25th Anniversary Recognition "A Model for Government Partnerships". LP DAAC "History and a Look Forward"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behnke, Jeanne; Doescher, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This presentation discusses 25 years of interactions between NASA and the USGS to manage a Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LPDAAC) for the purpose of providing users access to NASA's rich collection of Earth Science data. The presentation addresses challenges, efforts and metrics on the performance.

  8. Space industry: From experiments to industrial scales; Lectures Devoted to K.E. Tsiolkovsky's Ideas, 25th, Kaluga, Russia, Sept. 11-14, 1990, Transactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishin, S. D.; Leskov, L. V.; Ianik, B. F.; Miroshkin, A. A.

    Papers are presented on such topics as the development of a heavy autonomous module for the purpose of space manufacturing; calculation of microaccelerations on the Mir space station; a power transmission channel for space solar energy systems with radial field polarization on the antennas; and the proposal of a screen in interplanetary space for the prevention of the global warming of the earth. Consideration is also given to a mathematical model for the inflation of a spherical layer of a non-Newtonian fluid in conditions of weightlessness, the effect of space factors on the UV sensitivity of alkali-haloid crystal dosimetric materials onboard the Mir station, and bioengineering experiments on the electrophoretic fractionation of recombinant bacterial interferon alpha2 on the Foton space vehicles in 1988 and 1990. (For individual items see A93-18391 to A93-18405)

  9. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Western Regional Home Management-Family Economics Educators (25th, Scottsdale, Arizona, November 6-8, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Ruth E., Ed.

    These proceedings consist of 12 presentations, most of which are followed by responses or comments. The papers include: "Integrating Family Economics and Family Counseling" (Hogan; discussants Schnittgrund, Wilhelm); "A Test of the Deacon-Firebaugh Management Model" (Gage, Schmid); "Perceived Income Adequacy and Selected Financial Management…

  10. The multidrug transporter Pdr5 on the 25th anniversary of its discovery: an important model for the study of asymmetric ABC transporters

    PubMed Central

    Golin, John; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2016-01-01

    Asymmetric ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters make up a significant proportion of this important superfamily of integral membrane proteins. These proteins contain one canonical (catalytic) ATP-binding site and a second atypical site with little enzymatic capability. The baker’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Pdr5 multidrug transporter is the founding member of the Pdr subfamily of asymmetric ABC transporters, which exist only in fungi and slime moulds. Because these organisms are of considerable medical and agricultural significance, Pdr5 has been studied extensively, as has its medically important homologue Cdr1 from Candida albicans. Genetic and biochemical analyses of Pdr5 have contributed important observations that are likely to be applicable to mammalian asymmetric ABC multidrug transporter proteins, including the basis of transporter promiscuity, the function of the non-catalytic deviant ATP-binding site, the most complete description of an in vivo transmission interface, and the recent discovery that Pdr5 is a molecular diode (one-way gate). In the present review, we discuss the observations made with Pdr5 and compare them with findings from clinically important asymmetric ABC transporters, such as CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator), Cdr1 and Tap1/Tap2. PMID:25886173

  11. A >2-MJ, 1014-W laser system for DT fusion—NIF: a note in celebration of the 75th birthday of Prof. Theodore Haensch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzrichter, John F.; Manes, Kenneth R.

    2017-01-01

    In 1970, Dr. Theodore Haensch joined A.L. Schawlow's group in the physics department at Stanford, as a NATO postdoctoral researcher. Within a short time, he and his colleagues had invented a new, high-resolution, tunable laser system using expanded reflection gratings and an N2 laser for pumping the fluorescing dyes. This work resulted in a high-brightness, high-repetition-rate, narrow-band laser probe for conducting optical spectroscopy at extreme levels of precision. Dr. Haensch, and his many colleagues, particularly Prof. Arthur Schawlow and their students at Stanford, then proceeded to revolutionize optical spectroscopy and to train several generations of exceptional young scientists. At the same time, the Siegman, Harris, and Byer laboratories also at Stanford were making major contributions to the laser and quantum electronics fields. Several students from both groups joined the Livermore Laboratory. That early work, and that of others, encouraged teams at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to design and build a series of increasing complicated, high-power multi-beam laser systems to investigate the potential of laser fusion. The National Ignition Facility, recently completed, is enabling investigations of matter at very high temperatures, T > 1 million K and densities 100-1000× normal. In addition, researchers are creating 1015 DT fusion neutrons per fusion experiment and generating new knowledge about unusual and important conditions of matter.

  12. [Compromising conscientiously with reality but not with conscience. Reflections on the occasion of 75th anniversary of A. Stampar School of Public Health].

    PubMed

    Jaksić, Zelimir

    2002-09-01

    Changes in the activities and working conditions of the A. Stampar School of Public Health are reviewed following their anniversaries in the 25-year intervals. The differences have been described in understanding of major fields of work between: (1) social medicine (people's health) and public health; (2) health education following philosophy of Enlightenment and learning in the information era; (3) formal administrative organisation stressing implementation of given laws and entrepreneurial management in a society in transition; and (4) transfer of technology through international collaboration and under pressure of market oriented globalisation. Two basic points of view are identified: a social concern as opposite to technology-oriented productivity. It is concluded that a compromise of intentions and reality was always present looking for a balance between the described points of view. In relation to the present and future activities, the necessary compromise has to be conscientious, following the idea of preventive and social orientation applied to actual living problems of people and health care, namely people's health.

  13. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (75th, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, August 5-8, 1992). Part XI: Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Advertising section of the proceedings contains the following 16 papers: "Ethics of Advertising Practitioners: An Explanation Based on a Classical Theoretical Framework" (Cornelius B. Pratt and E. Lincoln James); "Sex Roles in Frightening Film Newspaper Advertisements: An Overview of the Past 50 Years" (Melissa M. Spirek);…

  14. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (75th, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, August 5-8, 1992). Part XIV: Newspapers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Newspapers section of the proceedings contains the following 11 papers: "News Items in the 'Shrinking Foreign Newshole': The Case of the New York Times" (Daniel Riffe and others); "Newspaper Coverage of Gays and Lesbians: Editors' Views of Its Longterm Effects" (Marilyn Greenwald and Joseph Bernt); "Effects of Staff…

  15. A beautiful stroke? A side note on the 75th anniversary of the spectacular death of the French organist and composer Louis Vierne (1870-1937).

    PubMed

    Foerch, Christian; Lemercier, Sophie; Hennerici, Michael G

    2012-01-01

    The great French organist and composer Louis Vierne (1870-1937) died while performing an organ recital at Notre Dame cathedral in Paris - right in front of the console. This historical article provides insights into the biography of a highly talented musician who was challenged by disability and diseases throughout his career. A special focus is placed on the circumstances of Vierne's remarkable death. Until now, both a primary cerebrovascular event and a 'heart attack' are discussed in reference books and encyclopedias as the immanent causes of death. From the perspective of a stroke neurologist, a reappraisal of Vierne's medical history and the events that happened during his last concert is presented.

  16. A concurrent resolution recognizing the 75th anniversary of the establishment of the East Bay Regional Park District in California, and for other purposes.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Boxer, Barbara [D-CA

    2009-11-05

    11/05/2009 Referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S11223) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  17. A resolution congratulating the men and women of the National Archives and Records Administration on the occasion of its 75th anniversary.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Carper, Thomas R. [D-DE

    2009-06-19

    06/19/2009 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S6855-6856; text as passed Senate: CR S6855-6856; text of measure as introduced: CR S6850) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. A resolution recognizing and commending the people of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park on the 75th anniversary of the establishment of the park.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Alexander, Lamar [R-TN

    2009-05-07

    06/02/2009 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S5980-5981; text as passed Senate: CR S5980-5981) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. Hypersonic Combined Cycle Propulsion Panel Symposium (75th) Held in Madrid, Spain on 28 May - 1 June 1990 (La Propulsion Hypersonique a Cycles Combines)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    TO INDIVIDUALLY AUTHORED SECTIONS OF PROCEEDING, ANNALS, 3’YMPOSIA, ETC. HOWEVER, THE COMPONENT SHOULD BE CONSIDERED WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF THE...connection with research and development problems in the aerospace field. The highest authority within AGARD is the National Delegates Board consisting of...work are reported to the member nations and the NATO Authorities through the AGARD series of publications of which this is one. Partic;pation in AGARD

  20. National College Physical Education Association for Men. Proceedings of Annual Meeting (75th, New Orleans, Louisiana, January 9-12, 1972).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, C. E., Ed.

    In addition to the presidential address and the general session address ("Does Sport and Physical Activity Have a Future in Education?"), the proceedings contain speeches on the following topics: (1) international relations, (2) intercollegiate athletics, (3) the history of sport, (4) teacher education, (5) basic instruction, (6) intramural…

  1. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (75th, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, August 5-8, 1992). More Miscellaneous Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The More Miscellaneous Studies section of the proceedings contains the following 34 papers: "The Louisville Courier-Journal's News Content after Purchase by Gannett" (Hansen and Coulson); "Reflection of Cultural Values in Advertising: A Comparative Analysis of Taiwan and U.S. Advertising" (Zandpour and Qian); "Sex,…

  2. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (75th, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, August 5-8, 1992). Part VII: Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Television section of the proceedings contains the following 10 papers: "Financial Commitment and Performance in Local Television News: Applying the Industrial Organizational Model" (Angela Powers); "The Relationship between Censorship and the Emotional and Critical Tone of Television News Coverage of the Persian Gulf War"…

  3. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (75th, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, August 5-8, 1992). Part XIII: Magazines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Magazine section of these proceedings contains the following six papers: "An Analysis of 'Magazine Type': Toward an Empirically Based Typology of Magazines and Non-Newspaper Periodicals" (Marcia R. Prior-Miller); "'Redbook': Changes in Attitude and Advice 1965-1990" (Jennifer Harbour); "A Quantitative Analysis of U.S.…

  4. Economic consequences incurred by living kidney donors: a Canadian multi-center prospective study.

    PubMed

    Klarenbach, S; Gill, J S; Knoll, G; Caulfield, T; Boudville, N; Prasad, G V R; Karpinski, M; Storsley, L; Treleaven, D; Arnold, J; Cuerden, M; Jacobs, P; Garg, A X

    2014-04-01

    Some living kidney donors incur economic consequences as a result of donation; however, these costs are poorly quantified. We developed a framework to comprehensively assess economic consequences from the donor perspective including out-of-pocket cost, lost wages and home productivity loss. We prospectively enrolled 100 living kidney donors from seven Canadian centers between 2004 and 2008 and collected and valued economic consequences ($CAD 2008) at 3 months and 1 year after donation. Almost all (96%) donors experienced economic consequences, with 94% reporting travel costs and 47% reporting lost pay. The average and median costs of lost pay were $2144 (SD 4167) and $0 (25th-75th percentile 0, 2794), respectively. For other expenses (travel, accommodation, medication and medical), mean and median costs were $1780 (SD 2504) and $821 (25th-75th percentile 242, 2271), respectively. From the donor perspective, mean cost was $3268 (SD 4704); one-third of donors incurred cost >$3000, and 15% >$8000. The majority of donors (83%) reported inability to perform usual household activities for an average duration of 33 days; 8% reported out-of-pocket costs for assistance with these activities. The economic impact of living kidney donation for some individuals is large. We advocate for programs to reimburse living donors for their legitimate costs.

  5. Can prescription of sip-feed supplements increase energy intake in hospitalised older people with medical problems?

    PubMed

    Roberts, Margaret; Potter, Jan; McColl, John; Reilly, John

    2003-08-01

    A blinded randomised controlled trial of prescribed oral sip-feed supplements compared with routine hospital practice was undertaken in acute admissions to a geriatric medicine department. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they were admitted from home, were not obese (BMI>75th percentile), had no swallowing difficulties and were not deemed to be in the terminal stage of illness. On admission they were stratified by nutritional status (BMI<5th, >5th to <25th, >25th to <75th percentile) and randomised. The intervention group received 120 ml oral sip-feed supplement prescribed three times per d in the medicine prescription chart (22.5 g protein, 2260 kJ (540 kcal) energy/d) distributed at medication rounds for the duration of hospital stay. The control group received routine hospital care. Outcomes were patient compliance with supplement, total energy intake and nursing staff views of the method. Patients were randomised to receive supplements (n 186 of total n 381). Half had full compliance and three-quarters at least moderate compliance. Total energy intake was significantly increased, on average, in the intervention group (P=0.001). The proportion of patients meeting estimated minimum energy requirements was significantly increased (P=0.023), but was still <50 % for the sample of patients in the intervention group. The present study suggests this method is acceptable to patients and staff and improves total energy intake. However, the amount prescribed did not ensure minimum energy requirements were met in all cases.

  6. Disease-specific Growth Charts of Marfan Syndrome Patients in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kwun, Younghee; Kim, Su Jin; Lee, Jieun; Isojima, Tsuyoshi; Choi, Doo-Seok; Kim, Duk-Kyung; Huh, June; Kang, I-Seok; Chang, MiSun; Cho, Sung Yoon; Sohn, Young Bae; Park, Sung Won; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2015-07-01

    Patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) presents with primary skeletal manifestations such as tall stature, chest wall abnormality, and scoliosis. These primary skeletal manifestations affect the growth pattern in MFS. Therefore, it is not appropriate to use normal growth charts to evaluate the growth status of MFS. We aimed to develop disease-specific growth charts for Korean MFS patients and to use these growth charts for understanding the growth patterns in MFS and managing of patients with MFS. Anthropometric data were available from 187 males and 152 females with MFS through a retrospective review of medical records. Disease-specific growth charts were generated and 3, 25, 50, 75, and 97 percentiles were calculated using the LMS (refers to λ, μ, and σ, respectively) smoothing procedure for height and weight. Comparisons between MFS patients and the general population were performed using a one-sample t-test. With regard to the height, the 50th percentile of MFS is above the normative 97th percentile in both genders. With regard to the weight, the 50 percentile of MFS is above the normative 75th percentile in male and between the normative 50th percentile and the 75th percentile in female. The disease-specific growth charts for Korean patients with MFS can be useful for monitoring growth patterns, planning the timing of growth-reductive therapy, predicting adult height and recording responses to growth-reductive therapy.

  7. Too old to have children? Lessons from natural fertility populations

    PubMed Central

    Eijkemans, Marinus J.C.; van Poppel, Frans; Habbema, Dik F.; Smith, Ken R.; Leridon, Henri; te Velde, Egbert R.

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Is it possible to construct an age curve denoting the ages above which women are biologically too old to reproduce? SUMMARY ANSWER We constructed a curve based on the distribution of female age at last birth in natural fertility populations reflecting the ages above which women have become biologically too old to have children. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY The median age at last birth (ALB) for females is ∼40–41 years of age across a range of natural fertility populations. This suggests that there is a fairly universal pattern of age-related fertility decline. However, little is known about the distribution of female ALB and in the present era of modern birth control, it is impossible to assess the age-specific distribution of ALB. Reliable information is lacking that could benefit couples who envisage delaying childbearing. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION This study is a review of high-quality historical data sets of natural fertility populations in which the distributions of female age at last birth were analysed. The studies selected used a retrospective cohort design where women were followed as they age through their reproductive years. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Using a common set of eligibility criteria, large data files of natural fertility populations were prepared such that the analysis could be performed in parallel across all populations. Data on the ALB and confounding variables are presented as box and whisker plots denoting the 5th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 95th percentile distribution of the age at last birth for each population. The analysis includes the estimation of Kaplan–Meier curves for age at last birth of each population. The hazard curve for ALB was obtained by plotting the smoothed hazard curve of each population and taking the lowest hazard within a time period of at least 5 years. This lowest hazard curve was then transformed into a cumulative distribution function representing the composite curve of the end of

  8. Low-flow characteristics and flow-duration statistics for selected USGS continuous-record streamgaging stations in North Carolina through 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weaver, J. Curtis

    2015-03-12

    of daily mean discharges for categorical periods. Flow-duration statistics based on the daily mean discharge records were compiled in this study for the 5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles. Flow-duration statistics were determined for each complete water year of record at a streamgage as well as the available period of record (or selected periods if flows were regulated) and selected seasonal, monthly, and calendar day periods. In addition to the streamflow statistics compiled for each of the water years, the number of days the daily mean discharge was at or below the 10th percentile was summed for each water year as well as the number of events during the water year when streamflow was consistently at or below the 10th percentile. All low-flow characteristics for the streamgages were added into the StreamStatsDB, which is a database accessible to users through the recently released USGS StreamStats application for North Carolina. The minimum, mean, maximum, and flow-duration statistics of daily mean discharges based on the available (or selected if regulated flows) period of record were updated in the North Carolina StreamStatsDB. However, for the selected seasonal, monthly, calendar day, and annual water year periods, tab-delimited American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) tables of the streamflow statistics are available online to users from a link provided in the StreamStats application. 1The annual period from October 1 through September 30, designated by the year in which the period ends. 2The annual period from April 1 through March 31, designated by the year in which the period begins.

  9. Trigeminal Electrophysiology: a 2 × 2 matrix model for differential diagnosis between temporomandibular disorders and orofacial pain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pain due to temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) often has the same clinical symptoms and signs as other types of orofacial pain (OP). The possible presence of serious neurological and/or systemic organic pathologies makes differential diagnosis difficult, especially in early disease stages. In the present study, we performed a qualitative and quantitative electrophysiological evaluation of the neuromuscular responses of the trigeminal nervous system. Using the jaw jerk reflex (JJ) and the motor evoked potentials of the trigeminal roots (bR-MEPs) tests, we investigated the functional and organic responses of healthy subjects (control group) and patients with TMD symptoms (TMD group). Method Thirty-three patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms and 36 control subjects underwent two electromyographic (EMG) tests: the jaw jerk reflex test and the motor evoked potentials of the trigeminal roots test using bilateral electrical transcranial stimulation. The mean, standard deviation, median, minimum, and maximum values were computed for the EMG absolute values. The ratio between the EMG values obtained on each side was always computed with the reference side as the numerator. For the TMD group, this side was identified as the painful side (pain side), while for the control group this was taken as the non-preferred masticatory side (non-preferred side). The 5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles were also calculated. Results Analysis of the ratios (expressed as percentages) between the values obtained on both sides revealed a high degree of symmetry in the bR-MEPs % in the control (0.93 ± 0.12%) and TMD (0.91 ± 0.22%) groups. This symmetry indicated organic integrity of the trigeminal root motor fibers and correct electrode arrangement. A degree of asymmetry of the jaw jerk's amplitude between sides (ipJJ%), when the mandible was kept in the intercuspal position, was found in the TMD group (0.24% ± 0.14%) with a statistically

  10. Case of congenital short small intestine: survival with use of long-term parenteral feeding.

    PubMed

    Dorney, S F; Byrne, W J; Ament, M E

    1986-03-01

    Isolated congenital short small intestine is a rare anomaly. Of six (one male, five females) previously reported cases, four died in infancy from intractable diarrhea. We report the case of 7-year-old boy with this syndrome in whom a 2-year period of parenteral feeding at home allowed normal weight gain, growth, and development while intestinal adaptation occurred. Parenteral feeding was discontinued at age 2 1/3 years, and for the past 5 years his weight has remained between the tenth and 25th percentiles and his stature between the 25th and 50th percentiles. His development has been normal and he functions at or above grade level at school. Coefficient of fat absorption has increased from 54% to 81%. Vitamin B12 absorption has improved but has not normalized. He remains lactose intolerant. We believe his survival, growth, and development would have been compromised if he had not received a prolonged period of parenteral feeding.

  11. Oxidative stress and nitric oxide are increased in obese children and correlate with cardiometabolic risk and renal function.

    PubMed

    Correia-Costa, Liane; Sousa, Teresa; Morato, Manuela; Cosme, Dina; Afonso, Joana; Areias, José C; Schaefer, Franz; Guerra, António; Afonso, Alberto C; Azevedo, Ana; Albino-Teixeira, António

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress and nitric oxide (NO) appear to represent important links between obesity and cardiovascular, metabolic and/or renal disease. We investigated whether oxidative stress and NO production/metabolism are increased in overweight and obese prepubertal children and correlate with cardiometabolic risk and renal function. We performed a cross-sectional evaluation of 313 children aged 8-9 years. Anthropometrics, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure, pulse wave velocity (PWV), insulin resistance (homoeostasis model assessment index (HOMA-IR)), inflammatory/metabolic biomarkers, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), plasma total antioxidant status (TAS), plasma and urinary isoprostanes (P-Isop, U-Isop), urinary hydrogen peroxide (U-H2O2), and plasma and urinary nitrates and nitrites (P-NOx, U-NOx) were compared among normal weight, overweight and obese groups, according to WHO BMI z-score reference. U-Isop were increased in the obese group, whereas U-NOx were increased in both overweight and obese children. U-Isop were positively correlated with U-H2O2, myeloperoxidase (MPO), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, HOMA-IR and TAG. TAS correlated negatively with U-Isop and MPO and positively with PWV. HOMA-IR and U-H2O2 were associated with higher U-Isop, independently of BMI and eGFR, and total cholesterol and U-H2O2 were associated with U-NOx, independently of BMI, eGFR values and P-NOx concentration. In overweight and obese children, eGFR decreased across P-NOx tertiles (median: 139·3 (25th, 75th percentile 128·0, 146·5), 128·0 (25th, 75th percentile 121·5, 140·4), 129·5 (25th, 75th percentile 119·4, 138·3), P for linear trend=0·003). We conclude that oxidant status and NO are increased in relation to fat accumulation and, even in young children, they translate into higher values of cardiometabolic risk markers and affect renal function.

  12. The effect of SonoPrep® on EMLA® cream application for pain relief prior to intravenous cannulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Kyun; Choi, Sae Won; Kwak, Young Ho

    2012-06-01

    The aim the study was to determine the effect of SonoPrep® on the delivery and analgesic effects of EMLA® cream prior to intravenous (iv) cannulation in a tertiary pediatric emergency department. Children aged between 5 and 10 years were enrolled. Patients were randomized to receive either sonophoresis with SonoPrep® or sham sonophoresis followed by application of EMLA® cream for 5 min prior to iv cannulation. The primary outcome measurement was the child's rating of pain immediately after iv placement, using a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS). Parents or guardians and blinded researchers were additionally asked to rate their perception of the child's pain using the 10-cm VAS and the Wong-Baker Face scale. A total of 42 patients completed the study (21 in the study group, 21 in the control group). The baseline characteristics between the groups were similar. The VAS pain score was significantly lower in children treated with sonophoresis compared with the sham sonophoresis (median (percentiles 25th-75th), 20.0 (10.0-22.5) vs. 60.0 (31.0-87.5); p < 0.001). The parent's perception of the child's pain was significantly lower in the study group vs. the control group by the VAS (median (percentiles 25th-75th), 10.0 (10.0-20.0) vs. 50.0 (15.0-80.0); p < 0.001) and Wong-Baker Face scale (median (percentiles 25th-75th), 2.0 (2.0-2.0) vs. 4.0 (2.5-4.5); p < 0.001). The researcher's evaluation of the child's discomfort was also significantly lower in the study group (2.0 (1.0-3.0) vs. 4.0 (2.5-4.5); p < 0.001). The application of sonophoresis using SonoPrep® followed by the 5-min application of EMLA® cream showed significant benefit in young children in terms of pain reduction and patient satisfaction.

  13. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans Growth and Biofilm Formation by Probiotics in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schwendicke, Falk; Korte, Franziska; Dörfer, Christof E; Kneist, Susanne; Fawzy El-Sayed, Karim; Paris, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    To exert anticaries effects, probiotics are described to inhibit growth and biofilm formation of cariogenic bacteria such as Streptococcus mutans (SM). We screened 8 probiotics and assessed how SM growth or biofilm formation inhibition affects cariogenicity of probiotic-SM mixed-species biofilms in vitro. Growth inhibition was assessed by cocultivating probiotics and 2 SM strains (ATCC 20532/25175) on agar. Probiotics were either precultured before SM cultivation (exclusion), or SM precultured prior to probiotic cultivation (displacement). Inhibition of SM culture growth was assessed visually. Inhibition of SM biofilm formation on bovine enamel was assessed using a continuous-flow short-term biofilm model, again in exclusion or displacement mode. The cariogenicity of mixed-species biofilms of SM with the most promising growth and biofilm formation inhibiting probiotic strains was assessed using an artificial mouth model, and enamel mineral loss (ΔZ) was measured microradiographically. We found limited differences in SM growth inhibition in exclusion versus displacement mode, and in inhibition of SM 20532 versus 25175. Results were therefore pooled. Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5 inhibited significantly more SM culture growth than most other probiotics. L. casei LC-11 inhibited SM biofilm formation similarly to other alternatives but showed the highest retention of probiotics in the biofilms (p < 0.05). Mineral loss from SM monospecies biofilms (ΔZ = 9,772, 25th/75th percentiles: 6,277/13,558 vol% × µm) was significantly lower than from mixed-species SM × LA-5 biofilms (ΔZ = 24,578, 25th/75th percentiles: 19,081/28,768 vol% × µm; p < 0.01) but significantly higher than from SM × LC-11 biofilms (ΔZ = 4,835, 25th/75th percentiles: 263/7,865 vol% × µm; p < 0.05). Probiotics inhibiting SM culture growth do not necessarily reduce the cariogenicity of SM-probiotic biofilms. Nevertheless, SM biofilm formation inhibition may be relevant in the reduction of

  14. Continuing Higher Education: In Retrospect and toward the Future. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting, Association for Continuing Higher Education (50th, Salt Lake City, Utah, October 30-November 2, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Jan, Ed.

    These proceedings contain addresses and summaries of presentations made in concurrent sessions at the annual meeting. The addresses are: Association for Continuing Higher Education (ACHE)--Then and Now: What Our Past Has To Tell Us about Our Future" (Nelcamp and others); "A Conversation with Alex Haley" (Haley); "Luncheon Address of…

  15. Celebration of the 50th anniversary of the foundation of the French society for connective tissue research. Its short history in the frame of the origin and development of this discipline.

    PubMed

    Borel, J P; Maquart, F X; Robert, A M; Labat-Robert, J; Robert, L

    2012-02-01

    The science of connective tissues has (at least) a double origin. Collagen, their major constituent was first studied in conjunction with the leather industry. Acid mucopolysaccharides (now glycosaminoglycans) were characterised by (bio)-chemists interested in glycoconjugates. They joined mainly hospital-based rheumatology departments. Later started the study of elastin with the discovery of elastases and of connective tissue-born (structural) glycoproteins. Besides rhumatologists and leather-chemists mainly pathologists became involved in this type of research, followed closely by ophthalmology research. The first important meetings of these diverse specialists were organised under the auspices of NATO, first in Saint-Andrew's in GB in 1964 and a few years later (1969) in Santa Margareta, Italy. With the discovery of fibronectin, a "structural glycoprotein", started the study of cell-matrix interactions, reinforced by the identification of cell-receptors mediating them and the "cross-talk" between cells and matrix constituents. The first initiative to organise societies for this rapidly growing discipline was that of Ward Pigman in New York in 1961, restricted however to glycol-conjugates. Next year, in 1962 was founded the first European Connective Tissue Society in Paris: the "Club français du tissu conjonctif", which played a crucial role in the establishment of schools, laboratories, national and international meetings in the major cities of France: Paris, Lyon, Reims, Caen,Toulouse. A second European society was born in Great Britain, and at a joint meeting with the French society at the Paris Pasteur Institute, was founded in 1967 by these societies the Federation of European Connective Tissue Societies (FECTS). Their meetings, organised every second year, drained a wide attendance from all over the world. An increasing number of young scientists joined since then this branch of biomedical discipline with several international journals devoted to connective tissue research, to matrix biology. The increasing number and quality of the young generation of scientists engaged in research related to the extracellular matrix or better Biomatrix and cell-matrix interactions is a further guarantee for the continued interest in this crucial field of science at the interface of basic and medically oriented research.

  16. CONFERENCE Proceedings of the computer Aided System Design and Simulation (50th) Held in Cesme/Ismir, Turkey on 22-25 May 1990 (Systeme de Conception Aide par Ordinateur et Simulation)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    que filtres limiteurs et autres non-lindarites, dynamique des capteurs et actuateurs, et logiciels cfibl6s sont progressivement quantifides. Dans les...comportement aecodynamique du rotor. (simulation avec mod~e de connaissance ) -Phase 3 : Prise en compte des capteurs et des actionneurs en simulation...AVECi CONTR .... DE....SS... ..M.DELE.... 5.3. Prise en comPte des capteurs et gctidoflfeyrs 5.3. 1. De la linetarit9 des actionneurs Dans le but de d

  17. A resolution celebrating the 50th anniversary of the signing of Public Law 87-788, an Act commonly known as the McIntire-Stennis Cooperative Forestry Act.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Cochran, Thad [R-MS

    2012-09-22

    09/22/2012 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR 9/21/2012 S6679-6684; text as passed Senate: CR 9/21/2012 S6680; text of measure as introduced: CR 9/21/2012 S6630) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. A resolution recognizing the 50th anniversary of the ratification of the Treaty of Mutual Security and Cooperation with Japan, and affirming support for the United States-Japan security alliance and relationship.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Webb, Jim [D-VA

    2010-06-23

    06/29/2010 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S5630; text as passed Senate: CR S5630) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. The chromosome 16q-linked autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (16q-ADCA): A newly identified degenerative ataxia in Japan showing peculiar morphological changes of the Purkinje cell: The 50th Anniversary of Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kinya; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2010-10-01

    The chromosome 16q22.1-linked autosomal-dominant cerebellar ataxia (16q-ADCA) is a form of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) common in Japan. It is clinically characterized by late-onset purely cerebellar ataxia. The neuropathologic hallmark of 16q-ADCA is degeneration of Purkinje cells accompanied by an eosinophilic structure which we named "halo-like amorphous materials". By immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy, the structure has been so far found to contain two components: the somatic sprouts from the Purkinje cells and presynaptic terminals of unknown origin. As far as we are aware, this peculiar morphological change of Purkinje cells has not been previously described. Further investigations may disclose unique pathological processes in SCA.

  20. A resolution honoring the educational and scientific significance of Dr. Jane Goodall on the 50th anniversary of the beginning of her work in what is today Gombe Stream National Park in Tanzania.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Udall, Tom [D-NM

    2010-07-14

    07/14/2010 Referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S5858) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  1. DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS. PROCEEDINGS, ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL BUSINESS OFFICIALS OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA, ANNUAL MEETING AND EDUCATIONAL EXHIBIT, (50TH SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA, OCTOBER 71-22, 1964).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LIEBESKIND, MORRIS

    PROBLEMS IN THE SCHEDULING AND COMPLETION OF SCHOOL BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS ARE DISCUSSED WITH REFERENCE TO THE CRITICAL PATH METHOD OF PROGRAMING. THE DISCUSSION GIVES A BROAD OVERVIEW OF THE METHOD WITH DETAILED SUGGESTIONS FOR SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS. SPECIFIC SUBJECT AREAS INCLUDE--(1) CPM, A NEW MANAGEMENT TOOL, (2) CPM…

  2. A resolution recognizing the artistic and cultural contributions of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater and the 50th Anniversary of the first performance of Alvin Ailey's masterwork, "Revelations".

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Gillibrand, Kirsten E. [D-NY

    2011-02-17

    02/17/2011 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S924-926; text as passed Senate: CR S924; text of measure as introduced: CR S917-918) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. FROM THE HISTORY OF PHYSICS: The extraordinarily beautiful physical principle of thermonuclear charge design (on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the test of RDS-37 — the first Soviet two-stage thermonuclear charge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, German A.

    2005-11-01

    On 22 November 1955, the Semipalatinsk test site saw the test of the first domestic two-stage thermonuclear RDS-37 charge. The charge operation was based on the principle of radiation implosion. The kernel of the principle consists in the radiation generated in a primary A-bomb explosion and confined by the radiation-opaque casing propagating throughout the interior casing volume and flowing around the secondary thermonuclear unit. The secondary unit experiences a strong compression under the irradiation, with a resulting nuclear and thermonuclear explosion. The RDS-37 explosion was the strongest of all those ever realized at the Semipalatinsk test site. It produced an indelible impression on the participants in the test. This document-based paper describes the genesis of the ideas underlying the RDS-37 design and reflects the critical moments in its development. The advent of RDS-37 was an outstanding accomplishment of the scientists and engineers of our country.

  4. Theodor Billroth's vision and Karl Ziegler's action: commemoration of the 40th day of death and the 50th anniversary of conferment of Nobel Prize for Chemistry of Karl Ziegler.

    PubMed

    Kapischke, Matthias; Pries, Alexandra

    2014-02-01

    Alloplastic materials are broadly used in modern surgery. Until the middle of the 20th century, metal materials and especially silver were used because of their antimicrobial properties. With the development of a new catalytic process for the production of high-density polyethylene and polypropylene materials, a new era of prosthesis was introduced. These polymers are integral part of our everyday operations surgery, especially in hernia repair. The famous surgeon Billroth mentioned to his pupil Czerny in 1878: "If we could artificially produce tissues of the density and toughness of fascia and tendon, the secret of the radical cure of hernia would be discovered". The polypropylene developed by Karl Ziegler gave the surgeon a material for daily practice, which in its properties (nearly) achieved Billroth's initial vision. In 1963 the Nobel Prize for Chemistry was awarded to Karl Ziegler and Giulio Natta in Stockholm. Furthermore, August 11, 2013 will be the 40th anniversary of Karl Ziegler's death. This manuscript honors both days.

  5. WITHDRAWN: Corrigendum to "World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP): The 50th anniversary in 2013-History, achievements, and future perspectives" [Vet. Parasitol. 195 (2013) 206-217].

    PubMed

    Eckert, J

    2014-01-15

    The Publisher regrets that this article is an accidental duplication of an article that has already been published, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetpar.2013.12.026. The duplicate article has therefore been withdrawn.

  6. Infant birth weight and third trimester maternal plasma markers of vascular integrity: the MIREC study

    PubMed Central

    Kumarathasan, Premkumari; Vincent, Renaud; Bielecki, Agnieszka; Blais, Erica; Blank, Katrin; Das, Dharani; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Cakmak, Sabit; Fisher, Mandy; Arbuckle, Tye; Fraser, William

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: There is paucity of information on mechanisms constituting adverse birth outcomes. We assessed here the relationship between vascular integrity and adverse birth effects. Methods and results: Third trimester maternal plasma (n = 144) from the Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals Study (MIREC) was analysed for vascular, inflammatory and oxidative stress markers by HPLC-fluorescence, protein array and EIA method. Analysis of the <25th and >75th percentile birth weight subgroups revealed markers associated with birth weight (ETs, MMP-9, VEGF, and 8-isoPGF-2α) and gestational age (ET-1, MMP-2, and VEGF). Conclusions: Mechanistic insights into adverse birth outcome pathways can be achieved by integrating information on multiple biomarkers, physiology using systems biology approach. PMID:26900787

  7. The Food Environment in an Urban Mexican American Community

    PubMed Central

    Lisabeth, Lynda D; Sánchez, Brisa N; Escobar, James; Hughes, Rebecca; Meurer, William J; Zuniga, Belinda; Garcia, Nelda; Brown, Devin L; Morgenstern, Lewis B

    2010-01-01

    The objective was to determine whether ethnic composition of neighborhoods is associated with number and type of food stores in an urban, Mexican American US community. Data were from a commercial food store data source and the US Census. Multivariate count models were used to test associations with adjustment for neighborhood demographics, income, and commercialization. Neighborhoods at the 75th percentile of percent Mexican American (76%) had nearly four times the number of convenience stores (RR=3.9, 95% CI: 2.2–7.0) compared with neighborhoods at the 25th percentile (36%). Percent Mexican American in the neighborhood was not associated with the availability of other food store types (supermarkets, grocery stores, specialty stores, convenience stores with gas stations) in the adjusted model. The impact of greater access to convenience stores on Mexican American residents' diets requires exploration. PMID:20167528

  8. Postpartum amenorrhoea and breast-feeding in a Danish sample.

    PubMed

    Vestermark, V; Høgdall, C K; Plenov, G; Birch, M

    1994-01-01

    The duration of postpartum amenorrhoea was studied in a Danish sample of 361 women. The median duration of amenorrhoea was 17 weeks. The 25th and 75th percentiles were 10 and 30 weeks, respectively. A significant correlation was found between the duration of postpartum amenorrhoea and of breast-feeding. However, lactation for more than 9 months did not extend the duration of amenorrhoea. Menstruation before weaning occurred in 57% of the women, and 43% terminated breast-feeding before the first menstruation. Four weeks after weaning menstruation had returned in 79% and by 8 weeks after in 93% of the mothers. At 6 months postpartum, frequency of breast-feeding, and of night-time feeding were determinants of amenorrhoea.

  9. Diagnostic reference level of computed tomography (CT) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Yasuhiro; Tsushima, Yoshito; Takei, Hiroyuki; Taketomi-Takahashi, Ayako; Otake, Hidenori; Endo, Keigo

    2012-08-01

    Optimisation of computed tomography (CT) parameters is important in avoiding excess radiation exposure. The aim of this study is to establish the diagnostic reference levels (DRL) of CT in Japan by using dose-length product (DLP). Datasheets were sent to all hospitals/clinics which had CT scanner(s) in Gunma prefecture. Data were obtained for all patients who underwent CT during a single month (June 2010), and the distributions of DLP were evaluated for eight anatomical regions and five patient age groups. The DRL was defined as the 25th and 75th percentiles of DLP. Datasheets were collected from 80 of 192 hospitals/clinics (26 090 patients). DLP for head CT of paediatric patients tended to be higher in Japan compared with DRLs of paediatric head CTs reported from the EU or Syria. Although this study was performed with limited samples, DLP for adult patients were at comparable levels for all anatomical regions.

  10. Early visual symptom patterns in inherited retinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Prokofyeva, Elena; Troeger, Eric; Wilke, Robert; Zrenner, Eberhart

    2011-01-01

    The present retrospective study compared initial visual symptom patterns in inherited retinal dystrophies (IRD) on the basis of records of 544 patients diagnosed with a wide variety of IRD at the Tuebingen University Eye Hospital from 2005 to 2008. Age at first onset of symptoms was noted, and the following clinical data were analyzed: visual acuity (VA), night vision disturbances, photophobia, onset of visual field defects, best corrected VA, and types of visual field defects. Median age at visual symptom onset was defined with 25th and 75th percentiles and compared in 15 IRD types. The main trends in VA changes in retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophies were identified. This study was the first to combine disease history and clinical data analysis in such a wide variety of IRD. It showed that patterns of initial symptoms in IRD can provide extra clues for early differential diagnosis and inclusion of IRD patients in clinical trials.

  11. Importance of location for describing typical and extreme wind speed behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, B. J.; Kohfeld, K. E.; Cooper, A. B.; Boenisch, G.

    2010-11-01

    Several recent studies have considered the potential impact of climate change on regional wind intensity. However, previous wind speed studies in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) present conflicting results for wind speed trends in relation to climate drivers. This study analyzes the percentiles (50th, 75th, and 95th) of the strongly positively skewed distributions for PNW maximum daily wind speeds from 92 meteorological stations, and reveals different behaviors for average and extreme wind speeds. Considerably stronger winds are found at coastal locations compared with sites further inland. Extreme wind speeds at these coastal locations appear to follow an eight to nine-year cyclic pattern, while mainland sites have a small, linear downward wind speed trend. This finding of a behavioral dependence on location helps reconcile previous, apparently contradictory results and has important global implications for wind research and infrastructure planning, such as wind energy feasibility studies and air quality management activities.

  12. Regionalization of precipitation characteristics in Iran's Lake Urmia basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazel, Nasim; Berndtsson, Ronny; Uvo, Cintia Bertacchi; Madani, Kaveh; Kløve, Bjørn

    2017-03-01

    Lake Urmia in northwest Iran, once one of the largest hypersaline lakes in the world, has shrunk by almost 90% in area and 80% in volume during the last four decades. To improve the understanding of regional differences in water availability throughout the region and to refine the existing information on precipitation variability, this study investigated the spatial pattern of precipitation for the Lake Urmia basin. Daily rainfall time series from 122 precipitation stations with different record lengths were used to extract 15 statistical descriptors comprising 25th percentile, 75th percentile, and coefficient of variation for annual and seasonal total precipitation. Principal component analysis in association with cluster analysis identified three main homogeneous precipitation groups in the lake basin. The first sub-region (group 1) includes stations located in the center and southeast; the second sub-region (group 2) covers mostly northern and northeastern part of the basin, and the third sub-region (group 3) covers the western and southern edges of the basin. Results of principal component (PC) and clustering analyses showed that seasonal precipitation variation is the most important feature controlling the spatial pattern of precipitation in the lake basin. The 25th and 75th percentiles of winter and autumn are the most important variables controlling the spatial pattern of the first rotated principal component explaining about 32% of the total variance. Summer and spring precipitation variations are the most important variables in the second and third rotated principal components, respectively. Seasonal variation in precipitation amount and seasonality are explained by topography and influenced by the lake and westerly winds that are related to the strength of the North Atlantic Oscillation. Despite using incomplete time series with different lengths, the identified sub-regions are physically meaningful.

  13. Evaluation of a novel method to assess corticosteroid responsiveness in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ghimlas, Fahad A; McIvor, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may benefit from oral steroid therapy. These steroid-responsive patients are diagnosed based on laboratory spirometry. We hypothesize that daily, home-based spirometry is a better tool. METHODS: Thirty patients with COPD underwent a single-blinded study, with a crossover design. They received 2 weeks of placebo followed by 2 weeks of prednisone therapy (40 mg/day). Laboratory spirometry was done at the beginning and end of the study and daily home-based spirometry was done twice a day. RESULTS: Analysis of variance model was used. The variability of the median day-to-day forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) was 72.5 mL (25th percentile of 40 mL and 75th percentile of 130 mL). The daily FEV1 variation was 70 mL (25th percentile of 50 mL and 75th percentile of 100 mL). The overall laboratory FEV1 variability was larger after the steroid course (P < 0.001), but not clinically significant. The variability was not significant postplacebo treatment compared with the baseline values. For home-based spirometry, steroid treatment was not significantly different. The majority (97%) completed more than 80% of the measurements. Ninety percent of the performed tests were considered acceptable. Only 53% of the tests were considered accurate. Overall both laboratory and home-based measurements did not show significant association between airway responsiveness and dyspnea or exercise capacity. CONCLUSION: Twice-daily home measurements of FEV1 might be better than the conventional approach to identify steroid responsive COPD patients. However, this finding was only statistically but not clinically significant. Therefore, we would not recommend this approach to identify COPD patients with steroid responsiveness. PMID:20981184

  14. The association of weather and mortality in Bangladesh from 1983–2009

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Nurul; Begum, Dilruba; Streatfield, Peter Kim

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The association of weather and mortality have not been widely studied in subtropical monsoon regions, particularly in Bangladesh. This study aims to assess the association of weather and mortality (measured with temperature and rainfall), adjusting for time trend and seasonal patterns in Abhoynagar, Bangladesh. Material and methods A sample vital registration system (SVRS) was set up in 1982 to facilitate operational research in family planning and maternal and child health. SVRS provided data on death counts and population from 1983–2009. The Bangladesh Meteorological Department provided data on daily temperature and rainfall for the same period. Time series Poisson regression with cubic spline functions was used, allowing for over-dispersion, including lagged weather parameters, and adjusting for time trends and seasonal patterns. Analysis was carried out using R statistical software. Results Both weekly mean temperature and rainfall showed strong seasonal patterns. After adjusting for seasonal pattern and time trend, weekly mean temperatures (lag 0) below the 25th percentile and between the 25th and 75th percentiles were associated with increased mortality risk, particularly in females and adults aged 20–59 years by 2.3–2.4% for every 1°C decrease. Temperature above the 75th percentile did not increase the risk. Every 1 mm increase in rainfall up to 14 mm of weekly average rainfall over lag 0–4 weeks was associated with decreased mortality risks. Rainfall above 14 mm was associated with increased mortality risk. Conclusion The relationships between temperature, rainfall and mortality reveal the importance of understanding the current factors contributing to adaptation and acclimatization, and how these can be enhanced to reduce negative impacts from weather. PMID:23195512

  15. Validity, reliability, and sensitivity-to-change properties of the psoriatic arthritis screening and evaluation questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Husni, M. Elaine; Holt, Elizabeth W.; Tyler, Stephanie; Qureshi, Abrar A.

    2010-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory arthritis associated with irreversible joint damage in a subset of individuals. There is a need to screen early for this condition to prevent damage. To meet this need, we have developed the psoriatic arthritis screening and evaluation (PASE) questionnaire. The 15-item PASE questionnaire was administered to 190 individuals with either psoriasis or PsA. The PASE questionnaire was readministered to a subset of individuals with PsA in order to assess test–retest reliability and sensitivity-to-change. Receiver operator curves were constructed to optimize sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of PsA. Of the 190 participating in the study, 19.5% (37/191) participants were diagnosed with PsA. PASE total scores ranged from 15 to 74 (possible range, 15–75). The PsA group had a median Total score of 51 (25th and 75th percentile 44 and 57), and non-PsA group had a median total score of 34 (25th and 75th percentile 21 and 49) (p < 0.001). A PASE total score of 44 was able to distinguish PsA from non-PsA participants with 76% sensitivity and 76% specificity. Furthermore, 13 of the 15 items demonstrated significant test–retest reliability as assessed by Pearson correlation coefficient (r ≥ 0.5). PASE was sensitive-to-change with therapy; PASE scores were significantly lower for PsA individuals after systemic therapy (p < 0.034). The PASE questionnaire is a valid and reliable tool to screen for active PsA among individuals with psoriasis. PASE scores may be used as a marker of therapeutic response. PMID:19603175

  16. Defining functioning categories in axial Spondyloarthritis: the role of the ASAS Health Index.

    PubMed

    Di Carlo, Marco; Lato, Valentina; Di Matteo, Andrea; Carotti, Marina; Salaffi, Fausto

    2017-01-06

    The Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society Health Index (ASAS HI) is an inclusive questionnaire, able to describe the total impairments and restrictions due to axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA). Considering the relationship between ASAS HI and the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS)-CRP, the aim of this study is to establish the ASAS HI cut-off values for functioning categories employing the ASDAS-CRP disease activity states in axSpA patients. ASAS HI and ASDAS-CPR were obtained from 140 consecutive axSpA patients, divided in the four ASDAS-CRP disease activity categories. High and very high disease activity were considered together. The ASAS HI cut-offs were obtained from the arithmetic mean, rounded off to the closest whole number, of the 75th percentile mean value of a lower rank and the 25th percentile mean value of the adjacent higher rank. This approach was applied in the transition from inactive disease and moderate disease activity, and in the transition from moderate disease activity and high/very high disease activity. Twenty-three patients were classified as having inactive disease, 36 were classified as having moderate disease activity, and 81 were in a high/very high disease activity state. Using the approach of the 75th-25th percentile mean values of adjacent disease activity states, the ASAS HI cut-offs resulted: ≤4 to dinstinguish a normal functioning, >4 and ≤8 to distinguish a moderate impairment of functioning, and >8 to distinguish a severe impairment of functioning. ASAS HI seems a reliable tool to define functioning categories in patients with axSpA.

  17. Long-term changes in plasma anti-Müllerian hormone concentration and the relationship with superovulatory response in Japanese Black cattle

    PubMed Central

    HIRAYAMA, Hiroki; NAITO, Akira; FUKUDA, Shigeo; FUJII, Takashi; ASADA, Masatsugu; INABA, Yasushi; TAKEDOMI, Toshiro; KAWAMATA, Masakazu; MORIYASU, Satoru; KAGEYAMA, Soichi

    2016-01-01

    The concentration of circulating anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) in cattle is a useful endocrine marker for ovarian response to superovulation. Although the AMH concentration undergoes little variation throughout the estrous cycle, its long-term changes remain incompletely understood. Here, we investigated the relationship between superovulation response and plasma AMH concentration in Japanese Black cattle and the long-term changes in plasma AMH concentration of embryo donor cows and heifers. The median, 25th percentile, and 75th percentile of AMH concentrations in 222 mature animals were 0.265, 0.118, and 0.488 ng/ml, respectively. The numbers of ova/embryos, fertilized embryos, and transferable embryos in a total of 295 superovulations were significantly different among the H (AMH ≥ 0.488 ng/ml), M (AMH 0.487–0.119 ng/ml), and L (AMH ≤ 0.118 ng/ml) groups. AMH concentrations during repeated superovulation in ten donor cows were significantly decreased after the third treatment. In heifers, the highest AMH concentration was observed in individuals during 2–13 months of age, with considerable individual variability. AMH concentrations of heifers at 10 or 11 months correlated with the number of ova/embryos during superovulation at 13–18 months (r = 0.641, P < 0.05). These results suggest that the 25th and 75th percentile values of AMH concentration would give a useful rough estimate of ovarian response; however, repeated superovulation may reduce the predictive accuracy of single measurements of AMH concentration. It would be possible to evaluate AMH concentration in heifers after approximately 11 months of age. PMID:27853050

  18. Proteomic Analysis of Early Mid-Trimester Amniotic Fluid Does Not Predict Spontaneous Preterm Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lenco, Juraj; Vajrychova, Marie; Link, Marek; Tambor, Vojtech; Liman, Victor; Bullarbo, Maria; Nilsson, Staffan; Tsiartas, Panagiotis; Cobo, Teresa; Kacerovsky, Marian; Jacobsson, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to identify early proteomic biomarkers of spontaneous preterm delivery (PTD) in mid-trimester amniotic fluid from asymptomatic women. Methods This is a case-cohort study. Amniotic fluid from mid-trimester genetic amniocentesis (14–19 weeks of gestation) was collected from 2008 to 2011. The analysis was conducted in 24 healthy women with subsequent spontaneous PTD (cases) and 40 randomly selected healthy women delivering at term (controls). An exploratory phase with proteomics analysis of pooled samples was followed by a verification phase with ELISA of individual case and control samples. Results The median (interquartile range (IQR: 25th; 75th percentiles) gestational age at delivery was 35+5 (33+6–36+6) weeks in women with spontaneous PTD and 40+0 (39+1–40+5) weeks in women who delivered at term. In the exploratory phase, the most pronounced differences were found in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, that were approximately two-fold higher in the pooled case samples than in the pooled control samples. However, we could not verify these differences with ELISA. The median (25th; 75th IQR) CRP level was 95.2 ng/mL (64.3; 163.5) in women with spontaneous PTD and 86.0 ng/mL (51.2; 145.8) in women delivering at term (p = 0.37; t-test). Conclusions Proteomic analysis with mass spectrometry of mid-trimester amniotic fluid suggests CRP as a potential marker of spontaneous preterm delivery, but this prognostic potential was not verified with ELISA. PMID:27214132

  19. Iodized Salt in Cambodia: Trends from 2008 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Laillou, Arnaud; Mam, Borath; Oeurn, Sam; Chea, Chantum

    2015-01-01

    Though the consequences of nutritional iodine deficiency have been known for a long time, in Cambodia its elimination has only become a priority in the last 18 years. The Royal Government of Cambodia initiated the National Sub-Committee for Control of Iodine Deficiency Disorders in 1996 to fight this problem. Using three different surveys providing information across all provinces, we examined the compliance of salt iodization in Cambodia over the last 6 years. Salt samples from the 24 provinces were collect at the household level in 2008 (n = 566) and 2011 (n = 1275) and at the market level in 2014 (n = 1862) and analysed through a wavelength spectrophotometer for iodine content. According to the samples collected, the median iodine content significantly dropped from 22 mg/kg (25th/75th percentile: 2/37 mg/kg) in 2011 to 0 mg/kg in 2014 (25th/75th percentile: 0/8.9 mg/kg) (p < 0.001). The proportion of non-iodized salt within our collected salt drastically increased from 22% in 2011 to 62% in 2014 (p < 0.001). Since the international organizations ceased to support the procurement of iodine, the prevalence of salt compliant with the Cambodian declined within our samples. To date, the current levels of iodine added to tested salt are unsatisfactory as 92% of those salts do not meet the government requirements (99.6% of the coarse salt and 82.4% of the fine salt). This inappropriate iodization could illustrate the lack of periodic monitoring and enforcement from government entities. Therefore, government quality inspection should be reinforced to reduce the quantity of salt not meeting the national requirement. PMID:26035245

  20. Age of onset influences on clinical and laboratory profile of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Rafael Hennemann; Hendler, Jordana Vaz; Piccoli, Giovana Fagundes; Gasparin, Andrese Aline; da Silva Chakr, Rafael Mendonça; Brenol, João Carlos Tavares; Monticielo, Odirlei André

    2017-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate differences in clinical and laboratory manifestations and medication use in the different ages of disease onset in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This cross-sectional study consisted of 598 SLE patients (550 female and 48 male), who attended the Rheumatology Clinic of the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre between 2003 and 2015. Demographic, clinical and laboratory data were collected. The patients were classified into three groups according to their ages at disease diagnosis. Mean age of diagnosis was 33.6 ± 14.3 years, and the median (25th-75th percentile) disease duration was 13 (7-20) years. Among the patients studied, 419 (70%) were adult-onset (aSLE), 90 (14.8%) were late-onset (lSLE) and 89 (14.8%) were childhood-onset (cSLE). The female to male ratio was higher in aSLE (18:1) compared to the other groups (p = 0.001). Arthritis was predominantly found in aSLE (78.5%) when compared with lSLE (57.7%) (p < 0.001). Nephritis was more common in cSLE (60.6%) than in lSLE (26.6%) (p < 0.001). Median (25th-75th percentile) of SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) was higher in the cSLE group [2 (0-5)] when compared to the lSLE group [0 (0-4)] (p = 0.045). Childhood-onset SLE showed a more severe disease due to the higher incidence of nephritis and needed a more aggressive treatment with immunosuppressive drugs.

  1. A resolution acknowledging the 25th anniversary of the nomination of Representative Geraldine A. Ferraro as the first woman selected by a major political party to run for the Office of the Vice President.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Gillibrand, Kirsten E. [D-NY

    2009-07-16

    07/16/2009 Referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S7653) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  2. Program and Abstracts of the National Meeting of the Society for Leukocyte Biology (25th) Held in Washington, DC on October 27-30, 1988. Journal of Leukocyte Biology. Volume 44, Number 4

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    RADIATION EXPOSURE: THERAPEUTIC APPROACH USING GLUCAN , A MACROPHAGE-ACTIVATOR, IN COMBINATION WITH GRANULOCYTE-COLONY STIMULATING FACTOR. M.L. Patchen...Emeryville, CA 94608. 5:00 PM 128. EFFECT OF TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR (TGF) TYPE BETA ON MURINE INFLAMMATORY MONONUCLEAR PHAGOCYTES: INCREASED FIBRONECTIN...20850. 5:15 PM 129. TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR BETA INDUCES LEUKOCYTE INFILTRATION AND INFLAMMATION IN THE SYNOVIAL JOINT. Janice B. Allen, Larry

  3. The Ecology, the Environment, and the Evolution of Technical Communication. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (25th, Lewes, Delaware, October 15-17, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication.

    This proceedings presents 40 papers delivered at the 1998 annual meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC). Papers in the proceedings are divided into sections on the Ecology of Technology; Environmental Shifts; and Evolving Perspectives. Representative papers in the proceedings include: "Mixing Oil…

  4. Proceedings of the Meeting of the Technical Documentation Division of the American Defense Preparedness Association (25th Annual) Held at Fort Monroe, Hampton, Virginia, 23-27 May 1983.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-27

    status of these projects. A-2 _____I Our annual meeting was held 25, 26, and 27 May at the Honalai Hotel in San Diego, California. September put the...PARAMETERS - The ILS/Technical Publications Workshop was conducted from 1315 to 1700 on May 24, 1983 in the Continental Room of the Chamberlin Hotel ...order for the excellent setting provided by both Fort Monroe and the Chamberlin Hotel . Also, the attendance and active participation of Jim Richardson

  5. How To Write Good Science Books for Children & Youths. Asian Cultural Center Training Course on Book Production in Asia and the Pacific (25th, Tokyo, Japan, October 30-November 16, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asian Cultural Centre for UNESCO, Tokyo (Japan).

    It is of critical importance in the Asia/Pacific region to produce quality science books which are attractive and interesting for children and youths and which can also stimulate their interest in science and provide them with accurate scientific knowledge in an easily understandable way. This publication is a report of a training course on book…

  6. NATCON Papers 1999 = Les Actes du CONAT. [Papers Presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Consultation on Career Development (NATCON) (25th, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, January 25-27, 1999)].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Consultation on Career Development (NATCON), Toronto (Ontario).

    This book contains the texts of a number of presentations from the 1999 NATCON conferences. These papers are: (1) "A Book of Surprises: Games, Stories, and Magic for Career Practitioners" (E. Sylvester); (2) "Academic and Career Choices for Lesbian and Gay Young Adults" (M. Schneider and J. McCurdy-Myers); (3)"Adolescent…

  7. A concurrent resolution congratulating the Navy and the current and former officers and crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise (CVN 65) on completion of the 25th and final deployment of the vessel.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Warner, Mark R. [D-VA

    2012-12-19

    12/19/2012 Referred to the Committee on Armed Services. (text of measure as introduced: CR S8206) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. Proceedings of the 27th International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education Conference Held Jointly with the 25th PME-NA Conference (Honolulu, Hawaii, July 13-18, 2003). Volume 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pateman, Neil A., Ed; Dougherty, Barbara J., Ed.; Zilliox, Joseph T., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This volume of the 27th International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education Conference includes the following research reports: (1) Improving Decimal Number Conception by Transfer from Fractions to Decimals (Irita Peled and Juhaina Awawdy Shahbari); (2) The Development of Student Teachers' Efficacy Beliefs in Mathematics during…

  9. Vision, Invention, Intervention: Celebrating Adult Education. Conference Proceedings. Papers from the Annual Conference of the Standing Conference on University Teaching and Research in the Education of Adults (25th, Winchester, England, United Kingdom, July 11-13, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Ian, Ed.

    The papers in these proceedings include a number of themes such as enduring and progressive social change, good practice and positive outcomes, and strategies of survival, resistance and subversion. They are: "Achievement, Personal Development, and Positive Outcomes" (Viv Anderson); "Raising Standards" (Paul Armstrong);…

  10. The Current Status of Fuel Cell Technologies for Portable Military Applications. Presentation to the 25th International Battery Seminar and Exhibit held 17-20 March 2008, Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-17

    release; distribution is unlimited. APPT-TR-08-02 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the...Information Operations and Reports , 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding...currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 17 MAR 2008 2. REPORT TYPE Final Presentation 3. DATES COVERED 17-03-2008 to 20-03-2008 4

  11. The Future Is Now: The Role of Institutional Research in Campus Transformation: Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research (25th, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, November 14-17, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    This proceedings document is comprised of the 17 papers, panel presentations, and work shares presented at a 1998 conference on institutional research. The papers are: (1) "Description of the UDAES Project: A Study of Undergraduate Academic Experiences" (Karen W. Bauer); (2) "Transforming Your Campus: Mixed Methodology in Institutional Research"…

  12. Conference Proceedings of Applications of Mesh Generation to Complex 3-D Configurations Held at the Specialists’ Meeting of the Fluid Dynamics Panel in Leon, Norway on 24th-25th May 1989

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    following expressions: 0 = (e) ’/ (6a) 1/2 1/2 OL ULI+ P u (6b) I/2 + t)/2( QL eR Ht = P/HtL+ I2 HR (6cl 1/ H 1/2 - 6 Q1 + OR where the total enthalpy...i. Flow data computed on type-2 meshes replaces those computed ol . all meshes lower down the hierarchy. Finally, type-3 meshes head the hierarchy. It...Cotii at I d iscr~ti-a’ioa d ’ut it oIblie aCcolttinua q ui coasisitea trouver une traasfor .aaioa x( () do u u t...it,- de rJfr,tc e ( espae , ( t,) at

  13. Proceedings of the 27th International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education Conference Held Jointly with the 25th PME-NA Conference (Honolulu, Hawaii, July 13-18, 2003). Volume 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pateman, Neil A., Ed; Dougherty, Barbara J., Ed.; Zilliox, Joseph T., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This volume of the 27th International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education Conference includes the following research reports: (1) The Affective Views of Primary School Children (Peter Grootenboer); (2) Theoretical Model of Analysis of Rate Problems in Algebra (Jose Guzman, Nadine Bednarz and Fernando Hitt); (3) Locating Fractions on…

  14. Proceedings of the 27th International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education Conference Held Jointly with the 25th PME-NA Conference (Honolulu, Hawaii, July 13-18, 2003). Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pateman, Neil A., Ed.; Dougherty, Barbara J., Ed.; Zilliox, Joseph T., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This volume of the 27th International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education Conference presents the following research reports: (1) Text Talk, Body Talk, Table Talk: A Design of Ratio and Proportion as Classroom Parallel Events (Dor Abrahamson); (2) Generalizing the Context and Generalising the Calculation (Janet Ainley); (3) Interview…

  15. Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Groupe Canadien d'Etude en Didactique des Mathematiques. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting (25th, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, May 25-29, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmt, Elaine, Ed.; Davis, Brent, Ed.

    This document contains the proceedings of the 2001 annual meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group (CMESG) held at the University of Alberta, May 25-39, 2000. The proceedings consist of two plenary lectures, four working groups, five topic sessions, new Ph.D. reports, an AD Hoc Session, and panel discussions. Papers include: (1)…

  16. Research in Science Education, 1994. Selected Refereed Papers from the Annual Conference of the Australasian Science Education Research Association (25th, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, July 10-13, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Paul L., Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This volume contains 41 papers, 10 abstracts/research notes, and an after-dinner speech "The Book of Genesis and the Chronicles of the People of ASERA (Australasian Science Education Research Association). Paper titles include: "Improving students' understanding of carbohydrate metabolism in first-year Biochemistry at tertiary…

  17. Proceedings of the 27th International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education Conference Held Jointly with the 25th PME-NA Conference (Honolulu, Hawaii, July 13-18, 2003). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pateman, Neil A., Ed; Dougherty, Barbara J., Ed.; Zilliox, Joseph T., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This volume of the 27th International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education Conference presents papers from: plenary panels; research forums; working sessions; discussion groups; short oral communications; and poster sessions from the meeting. Plenary lectures included: (1) Studying and Capturing the Complexity of Practice: The Case of…

  18. A Selection of Papers from NWAVE [New Ways of Analyzing Variation] (25th, Las Vegas, Nevada, October 1996). University of Pennsylvania Working Papers in Linguistics, Volume 4, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boberg, Charles, Ed.; Meyerhoff, Miriam, Ed.; Strassel, Stephanie, Ed.

    This issue includes the following articles: "Towards a Sociolinguistics of Style" (Alan Bell, Gary Johnson); "Engendering Identities: Pronoun Selection as an Indicator of Salient Intergroup Identities" (Miriam Meyerhoff); "A Majority Sound Change in a Minority Community" (Carmen Fought); "Addressing the Actuation…

  19. Symposium 'Methodology in Medical Education Research' organised by the Methodology in Medical Education Research Committee of the German Society of Medical Education May, 25th to 26th 2013 at Charité, Berlin.

    PubMed

    Schüttpelz-Brauns, Katrin; Kiessling, Claudia; Ahlers, Olaf; Hautz, Wolf E

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, the Methodology in Medical Education Research Committee ran a symposium on "Research in Medical Education" as part of its ongoing faculty development activities. The symposium aimed to introduce to participants educational research methods with a specific focus on research in medical education. Thirty-five participants were able to choose from workshops covering qualitative methods, quantitative methods and scientific writing throughout the one and a half days. The symposium's evaluation showed participant satisfaction with the format as well as suggestions for future improvement. Consequently, the committee will offer the symposium again in a modified form in proximity to the next annual Congress of the German Society of Medical Education.

  20. The effect of body mass index on perioperative thermoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Özer, Ayşe Belin; Yildiz Altun, Aysun; Erhan, Ömer Lütfi; Çatak, Tuba; Karatepe, Ümit; Demirel, İsmail; Çağlar Toprak, Gonca

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the effects of body mass index (BMI) on thermoregulation in obese patients scheduled to undergo laparoscopic abdominal surgery. Methods Sixty patients scheduled to undergo laparoscopic abdominal surgery with no pre-medication were included in the study. The patients were classified into 4 groups according to BMI <24.9, 25–39.9, 40–49.9, and >50. Anesthesia was provided with routine techniques. Tympanic and peripheral temperatures were recorded every 5 minutes starting with the induction of anesthesia. The mean skin temperature (MST), mean body temperature (MBT), vasoconstriction time, and vasoconstriction threshold that triggers core warming were calculated with the following formulas: MST = 0.3 (Tchest + Tarm) + 0.2 (Tthigh + Tcalf). MBT was calculated using the equation 0.64Tcore+0.36Tskin, and vasoconstriction was determined by calculating Tforearm−Tfinger. Results There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of age, gender, duration of operation, and room temperature. Compared to those with BMI <24.9, the tympanic temperature was significantly higher in those with BMI =25–39.9 in the 10th, 15th, 20th, and 50th minutes. In addition, BMI =40–49.9 in the 5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th, 30th, 40th, 45th, 50th, and 55th minutes and BMI >50 in the 5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th, 30th, 50th, and 55th minutes were less than those with BMI <24.9 (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in terms of MST and MBT. Vasoconstriction occurred later, and that vasoconstriction threshold was significantly higher in patients with higher BMIs. Conclusion Under anesthesia, the core temperature was protected more easily in obese patients as compared to nonobese patients. Therefore, obesity decreases the negative effects of anesthesia on thermoregulation. PMID:27920541