Science.gov

Sample records for 26s proteasome pathway

  1. Degradation of oxidized proteins by the proteasome: Distinguishing between the 20S, 26S, and immunoproteasome proteolytic pathways.

    PubMed

    Raynes, Rachel; Pomatto, Laura C D; Davies, Kelvin J A

    2016-08-01

    The proteasome is a ubiquitous and highly plastic multi-subunit protease with multi-catalytic activity that is conserved in all eukaryotes. The most widely known function of the proteasome is protein degradation through the 26S ubiquitin-proteasome system, responsible for the vast majority of protein degradation during homeostasis. However, the proteasome also plays an important role in adaptive immune responses and adaptation to oxidative stress. The unbound 20S proteasome, the core common to all proteasome conformations, is the main protease responsible for degrading oxidized proteins. During periods of acute stress, the 19S regulatory cap of the 26S proteasome disassociates from the proteolytic core, allowing for immediate ATP/ubiquitin-independent protein degradation by the 20S proteasome. Despite the abundance of unbound 20S proteasome compared to other proteasomal conformations, many publications fail to distinguish between the two proteolytic systems and often regard the 26S proteasome as the dominant protease. Further confounding the issue are the differential roles these two proteolytic systems have in adaptation and aging. In this review, we will summarize the increasing evidence that the 20S core proteasome constitutes the major conformation of the proteasome system and that it is far from a latent protease requiring activation by binding regulators. PMID:27155164

  2. Emodin potentiates the antiproliferative effect of interferon α/β by activation of JAK/STAT pathway signaling through inhibition of the 26S proteasome

    PubMed Central

    He, Yujiao; Huang, Junmei; Wang, Ping; Shen, Xiaofei; Li, Sheng; Yang, Lijuan; Liu, Wanli; Suksamrarn, Apichart; Zhang, Guolin; Wang, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a negative regulator of type I interferon (IFN-α/β) signaling. Inhibition of the 26S proteasome by small molecules may be a new strategy to enhance the efficacy of type I IFNs and reduce their side effects. Using cell-based screening assay for new 26S proteasome inhibitors, we found that emodin, a natural anthraquinone, was a potent inhibitor of the human 26S proteasome. Emodin preferably inhibited the caspase-like and chymotrypsin-like activities of the human 26S proteasome and increased the ubiquitination of endogenous proteins in cells. Computational modeling showed that emodin exhibited an orientation/conformation favorable to nucleophilic attack in the active pocket of the β1, β2, and β5 subunits of the 26S proteasome. Emodin increased phosphorylation of STAT1, decreased phosphorylation of STAT3 and increased endogenous gene expression stimulated by IFN-α. Emodin inhibited IFN-α-stimulated ubiquitination and degradation of type I interferon receptor 1 (IFNAR1). Emodin also sensitized the antiproliferative effect of IFN-α in HeLa cervical carcinoma cells and reduced tumor growth in Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma-bearing mice. These results suggest that emodin potentiates the antiproliferative effect of IFN-α by activation of JAK/STAT pathway signaling through inhibition of 26S proteasome-stimulated IFNAR1 degradation. Therefore, emodin warrants further investigation as a new means to enhance the efficacy of IFN-α/β. PMID:26683360

  3. Emodin potentiates the antiproliferative effect of interferon α/β by activation of JAK/STAT pathway signaling through inhibition of the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    He, Yujiao; Huang, Junmei; Wang, Ping; Shen, Xiaofei; Li, Sheng; Yang, Lijuan; Liu, Wanli; Suksamrarn, Apichart; Zhang, Guolin; Wang, Fei

    2016-01-26

    The 26S proteasome is a negative regulator of type I interferon (IFN-α/β) signaling. Inhibition of the 26S proteasome by small molecules may be a new strategy to enhance the efficacy of type I IFNs and reduce their side effects. Using cell-based screening assay for new 26S proteasome inhibitors, we found that emodin, a natural anthraquinone, was a potent inhibitor of the human 26S proteasome. Emodin preferably inhibited the caspase-like and chymotrypsin-like activities of the human 26S proteasome and increased the ubiquitination of endogenous proteins in cells. Computational modeling showed that emodin exhibited an orientation/conformation favorable to nucleophilic attack in the active pocket of the β1, β2, and β5 subunits of the 26S proteasome. Emodin increased phosphorylation of STAT1, decreased phosphorylation of STAT3 and increased endogenous gene expression stimulated by IFN-α. Emodin inhibited IFN-α-stimulated ubiquitination and degradation of type I interferon receptor 1 (IFNAR1). Emodin also sensitized the antiproliferative effect of IFN-α in HeLa cervical carcinoma cells and reduced tumor growth in Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma-bearing mice. These results suggest that emodin potentiates the antiproliferative effect of IFN-α by activation of JAK/STAT pathway signaling through inhibition of 26S proteasome-stimulated IFNAR1 degradation. Therefore, emodin warrants further investigation as a new means to enhance the efficacy of IFN-α/β. PMID:26683360

  4. Induction of 26S proteasome subunit PSMB5 by the bifunctional inducer 3-methylcholanthrene through the Nrf2-ARE, but not the AhR/Arnt-XRE, pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Mi-Kyoung . E-mail: mkwak@yumail.ac.kr; Kensler, Thomas W.

    2006-07-14

    The 26S proteasome is responsible for degradation of abnormal intracellular proteins, including oxidatively damaged proteins and may play a role as a component of a cellular antioxidative system. However, little is known about regulation of proteasome expression. In the present study, regulation of proteasome expression by the bifunctional enzyme inducer and a specific signaling pathway for this regulation were investigated in murine neuroblastoma cells. Expression of catalytic core subunits including PSMB5 and peptidase activities of the proteasome were elevated following incubation with 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC). Studies using reporter genes containing the murine Psmb5 promoter showed that transcriptional activity of this gene was enhanced by 3-MC. Overexpression of AhR/Arnt did not affect activation of the Pmsb5 promoter by 3-MC and deletion of the xenobiotic response elements (XREs) from this promoter exerted modest effects on inducibility in response to 3-MC. However, mutation of the proximal AREs of the Psmb5 promoter largely abrogated its inducibility by 3-MC. In addition, this promoter showed a blunted response toward 3-MC in the absence of nrf2; 3-MC incubation increased nuclear levels of Nrf2 only in wild-type cells. Collectively, these results indicate that expression of proteasome subunit PSMB5 is modulated by bifunctional enzyme inducers in a manner independent of the AhR/Arnt-XRE pathway but dependent upon the Nrf2-ARE pathway.

  5. The Arabidopsis F-Box Protein CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 Is Stabilized by SCFCOI1 and Degraded via the 26S Proteasome Pathway[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jianbin; Li, Haiou; Li, Shuhua; Yao, Ruifeng; Deng, Haiteng; Xie, Qi; Xie, Daoxin

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonate regulates critical aspects of plant development and defense. The F-box protein CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 (COI1) functions as a jasmonate receptor and forms Skp1/Cullin1/F-box protein COI1 (SCFCOI1) complexes with Arabidopsis thaliana Cullin1 and Arabidopsis Skp1-like1 (ASK1) to recruit its substrate jasmonate ZIM-domain proteins for ubiquitination and degradation. Here, we reveal a mechanism regulating COI1 protein levels in Arabidopsis. Genetic and biochemical analysis and in vitro degradation assays demonstrated that the COI1 protein was initially stabilized by interacting with ASK1 and further secured by assembly into SCFCOI1 complexes, suggesting a function for SCFCOI1 in the stabilization of COI1 in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, we show that dissociated COI1 is degraded through the 26S proteasome pathway, and we identified the 297th Lys residue as an active ubiquitination site in COI1. Our data suggest that the COI1 protein is strictly regulated by a dynamic balance of SCFCOI1-mediated stabilization and 26S proteasome–mediated degradation and thus maintained at a protein level essential for proper biological functions in Arabidopsis development and defense responses. PMID:23386265

  6. 26S Proteasome: Hunter and Prey in Auxin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangpei; Zhang, Liangran; Ding, Zhaojun

    2016-07-01

    Auxin binds to TRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESPONSE 1 and AUXIN SIGNALLING F-BOX proteins (TIR1/AFBs) and promotes the degradation of Aux/IAA transcriptional repressors. The proteasome regulator PROTEASOME REGULATOR1 (PTRE1) has now been shown to be required for auxin-mediated repression of 26S proteasome activity, thus providing new insights into the fine-tuning of the homoeostasis of Aux/IAA proteins and auxin signaling. PMID:27246455

  7. Structure-Driven Developments of 26S Proteasome Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Śledź, Paweł; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a 2.5-MDa complex, and it operates at the executive end of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. It is a proven target for therapeutic agents for the treatment of some cancers and autoimmune diseases, and moreover, it has potential as a target of antibacterial agents. Most inhibitors, including all molecules approved for clinical use, target the 20S proteolytic core complex; its structure was determined two decades ago. Hitherto, efforts to develop inhibitors targeting the 19S regulatory particle subunits have been less successful. This is, in part, because the molecular architecture of this subcomplex has been, until recently, poorly understood, and high-resolution structures have been available only for a few subunits. In this review, we describe, from a structural perspective, the development of inhibitory molecules that target both the 20S and 19S subunits of the proteasome. We highlight the recent progress achieved in structure-based drug-discovery approaches, and we discuss the prospects for further improvement. PMID:26738474

  8. Characterization of the 26S proteasome network in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihui; Delahunty, Claire; Fritz-Wolf, Karin; Rahlfs, Stefan; Helena Prieto, Judith; Yates, John R.; Becker, Katja

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the ubiquitin-proteasome system as a key regulator of protein quality control is an excellent drug target. We therefore aimed to analyze the 26S proteasome complex in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, which still threatens almost half of the world’s population. First, we established an affinity purification protocol allowing for the isolation of functional 26S proteasome complexes from the parasite. Subunit composition of the proteasome and component stoichiometry were studied and physiologic interacting partners were identified via in situ protein crosslinking. Furthermore, intrinsic ubiquitin receptors of the plasmodial proteasome were determined and their roles in proteasomal substrate recognition were analyzed. Notably, PfUSP14 was characterized as a proteasome-associated deubiquitinase resulting in the concept that targeting proteasomal deubiquitinating activity in P. falciparum may represent a promising antimalarial strategy. The data provide insights into a profound network orchestrated by the plasmodial proteasome and identified novel drug target candidates in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. PMID:26639022

  9. HSP70 Mediates Dissociation and Reassociation of the 26S Proteasome During Adaptation to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Grune, Tilman; Catalgol, Betül; Licht, Anke; Ermak, Gennady; Pickering, Andrew; Ngo, Jenny K.; Davies, Kelvin J. A.

    2011-01-01

    We report an entirely new role for the HSP70 chaperone in dissociating 26S proteasome complexes (into free 20S proteasomes and bound 19S regulators), preserving 19S regulators, and reconstituting 26S proteasomes in the first 1-3 hours following mild oxidative stress. These responses, coupled with direct 20S proteasome activation by poly-ADP ribose polymerase in the nucleus and by PA28αβ in the cytoplasm, instantly provides cells with increased capacity to degrade oxidatively damaged proteins and to survive the initial effects of stress exposure. Subsequent adaptive (hormetic) processes (3-24 hours following stress exposure), mediated by several signal transduction pathways and involving increased transcription/translation of 20S proteasomes, immunoproteasomes, and PA28αβ, abrogate the need for 26S proteasome dissociation. During this adaptive period, HSP70 releases its bound 19S regulators, 26S proteasomes are reconstituted, and ATP-stimulated proteolysis is restored. The 26S proteasome-dependent, and ATP-stimulated, turnover of ubiquitinylated proteins is essential for normal cell metabolism, and its restoration is required for successful stress-adaptation. PMID:21767633

  10. The murine cardiac 26S proteasome: an organelle awaiting exploration.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Aldrin V; Zong, Chenggong; Edmondson, Ricky D; Berhane, Beniam T; Wang, Guang-Wu; Le, Steven; Young, Glen; Zhang, Jun; Vondriska, Thomas M; Whitelegge, Julian P; Jones, Richard C; Joshua, Irving G; Thyparambil, Sheeno; Pantaleon, Dawn; Qiao, Joe; Loo, Joseph; Ping, Peipei

    2005-06-01

    Multiprotein complexes have been increasingly recognized as essential functional units for a variety of cellular processes, including the protein degradation system. Selective degradation of proteins in eukaryotes is primarily conducted by the ubiquitin proteasome system. The current knowledge base, pertaining to the proteasome complexes in mammalian cells, relies largely upon information gained in the yeast system, where the 26S proteasome is hypothesized to contain a 20S multiprotein core complex and one or two 19S regulatory complexes. To date, the molecular structure of the proteasome system, the proteomic composition of the entire 26S multiprotein complexes, and the specific designated function of individual components within this essential protein degradation system in the heart remain virtually unknown. A functional proteomic approach, employing multidimensional chromatography purification combined with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and protein chemistry, was utilized to explore the murine cardiac 26S proteasome system. This article presents an overview on the subject of protein degradation in mammalian cells. In addition, this review shares the limited information that has been garnered thus far pertaining to the molecular composition, function, and regulation of this important organelle in the cardiac cells. PMID:16093497

  11. The 26S Proteasome and Initiation of Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Durairaj, Geetha; Kaiser, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Transcription activation is the foremost step of gene expression and is modulated by various factors that act in synergy. Misregulation of this process and its associated factors has severe effects and hence requires strong regulatory control. In recent years, growing evidence has highlighted the 26S proteasome as an important contributor to the regulation of transcription initiation. Well known for its role in protein destruction, its contribution to protein synthesis was initially viewed with skepticism. However, studies over the past several years have established the proteasome as an important component of transcription initiation through proteolytic and non-proteolytic activities. In this review, we discuss findings made so far in understanding the connections between transcription initiation and the 26S proteasome complex. PMID:25211636

  12. D1 dopamine receptor stimulation impairs striatal proteasome activity in Parkinsonism through 26S proteasome disassembly.

    PubMed

    Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; Thiolat, Marie-Laure; Bido, Simone; Martinez, Audrey; Doudnikoff, Evelyne; Baufreton, Jérôme; Bourdenx, Mathieu; Bloch, Bertrand; Bezard, Erwan; Martin-Negrier, Marie-Laure

    2015-06-01

    Among the mechanisms underlying the development of L-dopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) in Parkinson's disease, complex alterations in dopamine signaling in D1 receptor (D1R)-expressing medium spiny striatal neurons have been unraveled such as, but not limited to, dysregulation of D1R expression, lateral diffusion, intraneuronal trafficking, subcellular localization and desensitization, leading to a pathological anchorage of D1R at the plasma membrane. Such anchorage is partly due to a decreased proteasomal activity that is specific of the L-dopa-exposed dopamine-depleted striatum, results from D1R activation and feeds-back the D1R exaggerated cell surface abundance. The precise mechanisms by which L-dopa affects striatal proteasome activity remained however unknown. We here show, in a series of in vitro ex vivo and in vivo models, that such rapid modulation of striatal proteasome activity intervenes through D1R-mediated disassembly of the 26S proteasome rather than change in transcription or translation of proteasome or proteasome subunits intraneuronal relocalization. PMID:25766677

  13. Molecular architecture of the 26S proteasome holocomplex determined by an integrative approach

    PubMed Central

    Lasker, Keren; Förster, Friedrich; Bohn, Stefan; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Villa, Elizabeth; Unverdorben, Pia; Beck, Florian; Aebersold, Ruedi; Sali, Andrej; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is at the executive end of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway for the controlled degradation of intracellular proteins. While the structure of its 20S core particle (CP) has been determined by X-ray crystallography, the structure of the 19S regulatory particle (RP), which recruits substrates, unfolds them, and translocates them to the CP for degradation, has remained elusive. Here, we describe the molecular architecture of the 26S holocomplex determined by an integrative approach based on data from cryoelectron microscopy, X-ray crystallography, residue-specific chemical cross-linking, and several proteomics techniques. The “lid” of the RP (consisting of Rpn3/5/6/7/8/9/11/12) is organized in a modular fashion. Rpn3/5/6/7/9/12 form a horseshoe-shaped heterohexamer, which connects to the CP and roofs the AAA-ATPase module, positioning the Rpn8/Rpn11 heterodimer close to its mouth. Rpn2 is rigid, supporting the lid, while Rpn1 is conformationally variable, positioned at the periphery of the ATPase ring. The ubiquitin receptors Rpn10 and Rpn13 are located in the distal part of the RP, indicating that they were recruited to the complex late in its evolution. The modular structure of the 26S proteasome provides insights into the sequence of events prior to the degradation of ubiquitylated substrates. PMID:22307589

  14. The life cycle of the 26S proteasome: from birth, through regulation and function, and onto its death

    PubMed Central

    Livneh, Ido; Cohen-Kaplan, Victoria; Cohen-Rosenzweig, Chen; Avni, Noa; Ciechanover, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a large, ∼2.5 MDa, multi-catalytic ATP-dependent protease complex that serves as the degrading arm of the ubiquitin system, which is the major pathway for regulated degradation of cytosolic, nuclear and membrane proteins in all eukaryotic organisms. PMID:27444871

  15. Near-atomic resolution structural model of the yeast 26S proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Florian; Unverdorben, Pia; Bohn, Stefan; Schweitzer, Andreas; Pfeifer, Günter; Sakata, Eri; Nickell, Stephan; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Villa, Elizabeth; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Förster, Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    The 26S proteasome operates at the executive end of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Here, we present a cryo-EM structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 26S proteasome at a resolution of 7.4 Å or 6.7 Å (Fourier-Shell Correlation of 0.5 or 0.3, respectively). We used this map in conjunction with molecular dynamics-based flexible fitting to build a near-atomic resolution model of the holocomplex. The quality of the map allowed us to assign α-helices, the predominant secondary structure element of the regulatory particle subunits, throughout the entire map. We were able to determine the architecture of the Rpn8/Rpn11 heterodimer, which had hitherto remained elusive. The MPN domain of Rpn11 is positioned directly above the AAA-ATPase N-ring suggesting that Rpn11 deubiquitylates substrates immediately following commitment and prior to their unfolding by the AAA-ATPase module. The MPN domain of Rpn11 dimerizes with that of Rpn8 and the C-termini of both subunits form long helices, which are integral parts of a coiled-coil module. Together with the C-terminal helices of the six PCI-domain subunits they form a very large coiled-coil bundle, which appears to serve as a flexible anchoring device for all the lid subunits. PMID:22927375

  16. [Structures and functions of the 26S proteasome Rpn10 family].

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Hiroyuki

    2002-09-01

    The ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway is thought to be one of the vital systems for cellular regulations, including control of the cell cycle, differentiation and apoptosis. In this pathway, poly-ubiquitinated proteins are selectively degraded by the 26S proteasome, a multisubunit proteolytic machinery. Recognition of the poly-ubiquitin chain by the 26S proteasome should be a key step leading to the selective degradation of target proteins, and the Rpn10 subunit of the 26S proteasome has been shown to preferentially bind the poly-ubiquitin chain in vitro. We previously reported that the mouse Rpn10 mRNA family is generated from a single gene by developmentally regulated, alternative splicing. To determine whether such alternative splicing mechanisms occur in organisms other than the mouse, we searched for Rpn10 isoforms in various species. Here we summarize the gene organization of the Rpn10 in lower species and provide evidence that the competence for generating all distinct forms of Rpn10 alternative splicing has expanded through evolution. Some of the Rpn10 family genes were found to be expressed in distinct developmental stages, suggesting that they have distinct functions during embryogenesis. For example, Rpn10c and Rpn10e were exclusively expressed at specific developmental stages and in specific tissues, while Rpn10a was expressed constitutively. Our experimental results indicate that the respective Rpn10 proteins possess distinct roles in the progression of development. Furthermore, some of the Rpn10 variants specifically interacted with important developmental regulators. PMID:12235853

  17. Deep classification of a large cryo-EM dataset defines the conformational landscape of the 26S proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Unverdorben, Pia; Beck, Florian; Śledź, Paweł; Schweitzer, Andreas; Pfeifer, Günter; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Förster, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a 2.5 MDa molecular machine that executes the degradation of substrates of the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. The molecular architecture of the 26S proteasome was recently established by cryo-EM approaches. For a detailed understanding of the sequence of events from the initial binding of polyubiquitylated substrates to the translocation into the proteolytic core complex, it is necessary to move beyond static structures and characterize the conformational landscape of the 26S proteasome. To this end we have subjected a large cryo-EM dataset acquired in the presence of ATP and ATP-γS to a deep classification procedure, which deconvolutes coexisting conformational states. Highly variable regions, such as the density assigned to the largest subunit, Rpn1, are now well resolved and rendered interpretable. Our analysis reveals the existence of three major conformations: in addition to the previously described ATP-hydrolyzing (ATPh) and ATP-γS conformations, an intermediate state has been found. Its AAA-ATPase module adopts essentially the same topology that is observed in the ATPh conformation, whereas the lid is more similar to the ATP-γS bound state. Based on the conformational ensemble of the 26S proteasome in solution, we propose a mechanistic model for substrate recognition, commitment, deubiquitylation, and translocation into the core particle. PMID:24706844

  18. Deep classification of a large cryo-EM dataset defines the conformational landscape of the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Unverdorben, Pia; Beck, Florian; Śledź, Paweł; Schweitzer, Andreas; Pfeifer, Günter; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Förster, Friedrich

    2014-04-15

    The 26S proteasome is a 2.5 MDa molecular machine that executes the degradation of substrates of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The molecular architecture of the 26S proteasome was recently established by cryo-EM approaches. For a detailed understanding of the sequence of events from the initial binding of polyubiquitylated substrates to the translocation into the proteolytic core complex, it is necessary to move beyond static structures and characterize the conformational landscape of the 26S proteasome. To this end we have subjected a large cryo-EM dataset acquired in the presence of ATP and ATP-γS to a deep classification procedure, which deconvolutes coexisting conformational states. Highly variable regions, such as the density assigned to the largest subunit, Rpn1, are now well resolved and rendered interpretable. Our analysis reveals the existence of three major conformations: in addition to the previously described ATP-hydrolyzing (ATPh) and ATP-γS conformations, an intermediate state has been found. Its AAA-ATPase module adopts essentially the same topology that is observed in the ATPh conformation, whereas the lid is more similar to the ATP-γS bound state. Based on the conformational ensemble of the 26S proteasome in solution, we propose a mechanistic model for substrate recognition, commitment, deubiquitylation, and translocation into the core particle. PMID:24706844

  19. Inherent Asymmetry in the 26S Proteasome Is Defined by the Ubiquitin Receptor RPN13*

    PubMed Central

    Berko, Dikla; Herkon, Ora; Braunstein, Ilana; Isakov, Elada; David, Yael; Ziv, Tamar; Navon, Ami; Stanhill, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    The 26S double-capped proteasome is assembled in a hierarchic event that is orchestrated by dedicated set of chaperons. To date, all stoichiometric subunits are considered to be present in equal ratios, thus providing symmetry to the double-capped complex. Here, we show that although the vast majority (if not all) of the double-capped 26S proteasomes, both 19S complexes, contain the ubiquitin receptor Rpn10/S5a, only one of these 19S particles contains the additional ubiquitin receptor Rpn13, thereby defining asymmetry in the 26S proteasome. These results were validated in yeast and mammals, utilizing biochemical and unbiased AQUA-MS methodologies. Thus, the double-capped 26S proteasomes are asymmetric in their polyubiquitin binding capacity. Our data point to a potential new role for ubiquitin receptors as directionality factors that may participate in the prevention of simultaneous substrates translocation into the 20S from both 19S caps. PMID:24429290

  20. Nucleotide excision repair and the 26S proteasome function together to promote trinucleotide repeat expansions.

    PubMed

    Concannon, Claire; Lahue, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion underpins a number of inheritable neurological human disorders. Multiple mechanisms are thought to contribute to the expansion process. The incorrect processing of the repeat tract by DNA repair proteins can drive this mutation process forward, as expansions are suppressed following ablation of certain repair factors in mouse models and cell models of disease. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is one repair pathway implicated in TNR instability, although most previous work focussed on TNR contractions, not expansions. Here we investigated the role of NER in modulating expansions of threshold-length (CTG·CAG) repeats in yeast. We show that both the global genome and transcription-coupled repair subpathways promote expansions of threshold-length TNRs. Furthermore, NER works with the 26S proteasome to drive expansions, based on analysis of double mutants defective in both pathways, and of Rad23, a protein involved in both NER and the shuttling of ubiquitinated proteins to the proteasome. This work provides the first evidence that both subpathways of NER can promote threshold-length TNR expansions and that NER interacts with the proteasome to drive expansions. PMID:24359926

  1. An atomic model AAA-ATPase/20S core particle sub-complex of the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Förster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Beck, Florian; Nickell, Stephan; Sali, Andrej; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2009-10-16

    The 26S proteasome is the most downstream element of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway of protein degradation. It is composed of the 20S core particle (CP) and the 19S regulatory particle (RP). The RP consists of 6 AAA-ATPases and at least 13 non-ATPase subunits. Based on a cryo-EM map of the 26S proteasome, structures of homologs, and physical protein-protein interactions we derive an atomic model of the AAA-ATPase-CP sub-complex. The ATPase order in our model (Rpt1/Rpt2/Rpt6/Rpt3/Rpt4/Rpt5) is in excellent agreement with the recently identified base-precursor complexes formed during the assembly of the RP. Furthermore, the atomic CP-AAA-ATPase model suggests that the assembly chaperone Nas6 facilitates CP-RP association by enhancing the shape complementarity between Rpt3 and its binding CP alpha subunits partners. PMID:19653995

  2. An atomic model AAA-ATPase/20S core particle sub-complex of the 26S proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Foerster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Beck, Florian; Nickell, Stephan; Sali, Andrej; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2009-10-16

    The 26S proteasome is the most downstream element of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway of protein degradation. It is composed of the 20S core particle (CP) and the 19S regulatory particle (RP). The RP consists of 6 AAA-ATPases and at least 13 non-ATPase subunits. Based on a cryo-EM map of the 26S proteasome, structures of homologs, and physical protein-protein interactions we derive an atomic model of the AAA-ATPase-CP sub-complex. The ATPase order in our model (Rpt1/Rpt2/Rpt6/Rpt3/Rpt4/Rpt5) is in excellent agreement with the recently identified base-precursor complexes formed during the assembly of the RP. Furthermore, the atomic CP-AAA-ATPase model suggests that the assembly chaperone Nas6 facilitates CP-RP association by enhancing the shape complementarity between Rpt3 and its binding CP alpha subunits partners.

  3. Ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and cellular responses to oxidative stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) is the primary cytosolic proteolytic machinery for the selective degradation of various forms of damaged proteins. Thus, the UPP is an important protein quality control mechanism. In the canonical UPP, both ubiquitin and the 26S proteasome are involved. Subs...

  4. The Lysine 48 and Lysine 63 Ubiquitin Conjugates Are Processed Differently by the 26 S Proteasome*

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Andrew D.; Zhang, Nan-Yan; Xu, Ping; Han, Ke-Jun; Noone, Seth; Peng, Junmin; Liu, Chang-Wei

    2009-01-01

    The role of Lys-63 ubiquitin chains in targeting proteins for proteasomal degradation is still obscure. We systematically compared proteasomal processing of Lys-63 ubiquitin chains with that of the canonical proteolytic signal, Lys-48 ubiquitin chains. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of ubiquitin chains in HeLa cells determines that the levels of Lys-63 ubiquitin chains are insensitive to short-time proteasome inhibition. Also, the Lys-48/Lys-63 ratio in the 26 S proteasome-bound fraction is 1.7-fold more than that in the cell lysates, likely because some cellular Lys-63 ubiquitin conjugates are sequestered by Lys-63 chain-specific binding proteins. In vitro, Lys-48 and Lys-63 ubiquitin chains bind the 26 S proteasome comparably, whereas Lys-63 chains are deubiquitinated 6-fold faster than Lys-48 chains. Also, Lys-63 tetraubiquitin-conjugated UbcH10 is rapidly deubiquitinated into the monoubiquitinated form, whereas Lys-48 tetraubiquitin targets UbcH10 for degradation. Furthermore, we found that both the ubiquitin aldehyde- and 1,10-phenanthroline-sensitive deubiquitinating activities of the 26 S proteasome contribute to Lys-48- and Lys-63-linkage deubiquitination, albeit the inhibitory extents are different. Together, our findings suggest that compared with Lys-48 chains, cellular Lys-63 chains have less proteasomal accessibility, and proteasome-bound Lys-63 chains are more rapidly deubiquitinated, which could cause inefficient degradation of Lys-63 conjugates. PMID:19858201

  5. Autoubiquitination of the 26S proteasome on Rpn13 regulates breakdown of ubiquitin conjugates.

    PubMed

    Besche, Henrike C; Sha, Zhe; Kukushkin, Nikolay V; Peth, Andreas; Hock, Eva-Maria; Kim, Woong; Gygi, Steven; Gutierrez, Juan A; Liao, Hua; Dick, Lawrence; Goldberg, Alfred L

    2014-05-16

    Degradation rates of most proteins in eukaryotic cells are determined by their rates of ubiquitination. However, possible regulation of the proteasome's capacity to degrade ubiquitinated proteins has received little attention, although proteasome inhibitors are widely used in research and cancer treatment. We show here that mammalian 26S proteasomes have five associated ubiquitin ligases and that multiple proteasome subunits are ubiquitinated in cells, especially the ubiquitin receptor subunit, Rpn13. When proteolysis is even partially inhibited in cells or purified 26S proteasomes with various inhibitors, Rpn13 becomes extensively and selectively poly-ubiquitinated by the proteasome-associated ubiquitin ligase, Ube3c/Hul5. This modification also occurs in cells during heat-shock or arsenite treatment, when poly-ubiquitinated proteins accumulate. Rpn13 ubiquitination strongly decreases the proteasome's ability to bind and degrade ubiquitin-conjugated proteins, but not its activity against peptide substrates. This autoinhibitory mechanism presumably evolved to prevent binding of ubiquitin conjugates to defective or stalled proteasomes, but this modification may also be useful as a biomarker indicating the presence of proteotoxic stress and reduced proteasomal capacity in cells or patients. PMID:24811749

  6. Structural characterization of the interaction of Ubp6 with the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Aufderheide, Antje; Beck, Florian; Stengel, Florian; Hartwig, Michaela; Schweitzer, Andreas; Pfeifer, Günter; Goldberg, Alfred L; Sakata, Eri; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Förster, Friedrich

    2015-07-14

    In eukaryotic cells, the 26S proteasome is responsible for the regulated degradation of intracellular proteins. Several cofactors interact transiently with this large macromolecular machine and modulate its function. The deubiquitylating enzyme ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase 6 [Ubp6; ubiquitin-specific protease (USP) 14 in mammals] is the most abundant proteasome-interacting protein and has multiple roles in regulating proteasome function. Here, we investigate the structural basis of the interaction between Ubp6 and the 26S proteasome in the presence and absence of the inhibitor ubiquitin aldehyde. To this end we have used single-particle electron cryomicroscopy in combination with cross-linking and mass spectrometry. Ubp6 binds to the regulatory particle non-ATPase (Rpn) 1 via its N-terminal ubiquitin-like domain, whereas its catalytic USP domain is positioned variably. Addition of ubiquitin aldehyde stabilizes the binding of the USP domain in a position where it bridges the proteasome subunits Rpn1 and the regulatory particle triple-A ATPase (Rpt) 1. The USP domain binds to Rpt1 in the immediate vicinity of the Ubp6 active site, which may effect its activation. The catalytic triad is positioned in proximity to the mouth of the ATPase module and to the deubiquitylating enzyme Rpn11, strongly implying their functional linkage. On the proteasome side, binding of Ubp6 favors conformational switching of the 26S proteasome into an intermediate-energy conformational state, in particular upon the addition of ubiquitin aldehyde. This modulation of the conformational space of the 26S proteasome by Ubp6 explains the effects of Ubp6 on the kinetics of proteasomal degradation. PMID:26130806

  7. Structural characterization of the interaction of Ubp6 with the 26S proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Aufderheide, Antje; Beck, Florian; Stengel, Florian; Hartwig, Michaela; Schweitzer, Andreas; Pfeifer, Günter; Goldberg, Alfred L.; Sakata, Eri; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Förster, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the 26S proteasome is responsible for the regulated degradation of intracellular proteins. Several cofactors interact transiently with this large macromolecular machine and modulate its function. The deubiquitylating enzyme ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase 6 [Ubp6; ubiquitin-specific protease (USP) 14 in mammals] is the most abundant proteasome-interacting protein and has multiple roles in regulating proteasome function. Here, we investigate the structural basis of the interaction between Ubp6 and the 26S proteasome in the presence and absence of the inhibitor ubiquitin aldehyde. To this end we have used single-particle electron cryomicroscopy in combination with cross-linking and mass spectrometry. Ubp6 binds to the regulatory particle non-ATPase (Rpn) 1 via its N-terminal ubiquitin-like domain, whereas its catalytic USP domain is positioned variably. Addition of ubiquitin aldehyde stabilizes the binding of the USP domain in a position where it bridges the proteasome subunits Rpn1 and the regulatory particle triple-A ATPase (Rpt) 1. The USP domain binds to Rpt1 in the immediate vicinity of the Ubp6 active site, which may effect its activation. The catalytic triad is positioned in proximity to the mouth of the ATPase module and to the deubiquitylating enzyme Rpn11, strongly implying their functional linkage. On the proteasome side, binding of Ubp6 favors conformational switching of the 26S proteasome into an intermediate-energy conformational state, in particular upon the addition of ubiquitin aldehyde. This modulation of the conformational space of the 26S proteasome by Ubp6 explains the effects of Ubp6 on the kinetics of proteasomal degradation. PMID:26130806

  8. DNA damage modulates interactions between microRNAs and the 26S proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Tsimokha, Anna S; Kulichkova, Valentina A.; Karpova, Elena V.; Zaykova, Julia J.; Aksenov, Nikolai D; Vasilishina, Anastasia A.; Kropotov, Andrei V.; Antonov, Alexey; Barlev, Nikolai A.

    2014-01-01

    26S proteasomes are known as major non-lysosomal cellular machines for coordinated and specific destruction of ubiquitinylated proteins. The proteolytic activities of proteasomes are controlled by various post-translational modifications in response to environmental cues, including DNA damage. Besides proteolysis, proteasomes also associate with RNA hydrolysis and splicing. Here, we extend the functional diversity of proteasomes by showing that they also dynamically associate with microRNAs (miRNAs) both in the nucleus and cytoplasm of cells. Moreover, DNA damage induced by an anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin, alters the repertoire of proteasome-associated miRNAs, enriching the population of miRNAs that target cell cycle checkpoint regulators and DNA repair proteins. Collectively, these data uncover yet another potential mode of action for proteasomes in the cell via their dynamic association with microRNAs. PMID:25004448

  9. Structure of an endogenous yeast 26S proteasome reveals two major conformational states

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Bai; Huang, Xiuliang; Wu, Jianping; Mei, Ziqing; Wang, Yiwei; Xue, Xiaobin; Yan, Chuangye; Wang, Jiawei; Finley, Daniel J.; Shi, Yigong; Wang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The eukaryotic proteasome mediates degradation of polyubiquitinated proteins. Here we report the single-particle cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of the endogenous 26S proteasome from Saccharomyces cerevisiae at 4.6- to 6.3-Å resolution. The fine features of the cryo-EM maps allow modeling of 18 subunits in the regulatory particle and 28 in the core particle. The proteasome exhibits two distinct conformational states, designated M1 and M2, which correspond to those reported previously for the proteasome purified in the presence of ATP-γS and ATP, respectively. These conformations also correspond to those of the proteasome in the presence and absence of exogenous substrate. Structure-guided biochemical analysis reveals enhanced deubiquitylating enzyme activity of Rpn11 upon assembly of the lid. Our structures serve as a molecular basis for mechanistic understanding of proteasome function. PMID:26929360

  10. Mouse homologue of yeast Prp19 interacts with mouse SUG1, the regulatory subunit of 26S proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Sihn, Choong-Ryoul; Cho, Si Young; Lee, Jeong Ho; Lee, Tae Ryong; Kim, Sang Hoon . E-mail: shkim@khu.ac.kr

    2007-04-27

    Yeast Prp19 has been shown to involve in pre-mRNA splicing and DNA repair as well as being an ubiquitin ligase. Mammalian homologue of yeast Prp19 also plays on similar functional activities in cells. In the present study, we isolated mouse SUG1 (mSUG1) as binding partner of mouse Prp19 (mPrp19) by the yeast two-hybrid system. We confirmed the interaction of mPrp9 with mSUG1 by GST pull-down assay and co-immunoprecipitation assay. The N-terminus of mPrp19 including U-box domain was associated with the C-terminus of mSUG1. Although, mSUG1 is a regulatory subunit of 26S proteasome, mPrp19 was not degraded in the proteasome-dependent pathway. Interestingly, GFP-mPrp19 fusion protein was co-localized with mSUG1 protein in cytoplasm as the formation of the speckle-like structures in the presence of a proteasome inhibitor MG132. In addition, the activity of proteasome was increased in cells transfected with mPrp19. Taken together, these results suggest that mPrp19 involves the regulation of protein turnover and may transport its substrates to 26S proteasome through mSUG1 protein.

  11. Structure of the human 26S proteasome at a resolution of 3.9 Å.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Andreas; Aufderheide, Antje; Rudack, Till; Beck, Florian; Pfeifer, Günter; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Sakata, Eri; Schulten, Klaus; Förster, Friedrich; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2016-07-12

    Protein degradation in eukaryotic cells is performed by the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System (UPS). The 26S proteasome holocomplex consists of a core particle (CP) that proteolytically degrades polyubiquitylated proteins, and a regulatory particle (RP) containing the AAA-ATPase module. This module controls access to the proteolytic chamber inside the CP and is surrounded by non-ATPase subunits (Rpns) that recognize substrates and deubiquitylate them before unfolding and degradation. The architecture of the 26S holocomplex is highly conserved between yeast and humans. The structure of the human 26S holocomplex described here reveals previously unidentified features of the AAA-ATPase heterohexamer. One subunit, Rpt6, has ADP bound, whereas the other five have ATP in their binding pockets. Rpt6 is structurally distinct from the other five Rpt subunits, most notably in its pore loop region. For Rpns, the map reveals two main, previously undetected, features: the C terminus of Rpn3 protrudes into the mouth of the ATPase ring; and Rpn1 and Rpn2, the largest proteasome subunits, are linked by an extended connection. The structural features of the 26S proteasome observed in this study are likely to be important for coordinating the proteasomal subunits during substrate processing. PMID:27342858

  12. Structure of the human 26S proteasome at a resolution of 3.9 Å

    PubMed Central

    Schweitzer, Andreas; Aufderheide, Antje; Rudack, Till; Beck, Florian; Pfeifer, Günter; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Sakata, Eri; Schulten, Klaus; Förster, Friedrich; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Protein degradation in eukaryotic cells is performed by the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System (UPS). The 26S proteasome holocomplex consists of a core particle (CP) that proteolytically degrades polyubiquitylated proteins, and a regulatory particle (RP) containing the AAA-ATPase module. This module controls access to the proteolytic chamber inside the CP and is surrounded by non-ATPase subunits (Rpns) that recognize substrates and deubiquitylate them before unfolding and degradation. The architecture of the 26S holocomplex is highly conserved between yeast and humans. The structure of the human 26S holocomplex described here reveals previously unidentified features of the AAA-ATPase heterohexamer. One subunit, Rpt6, has ADP bound, whereas the other five have ATP in their binding pockets. Rpt6 is structurally distinct from the other five Rpt subunits, most notably in its pore loop region. For Rpns, the map reveals two main, previously undetected, features: the C terminus of Rpn3 protrudes into the mouth of the ATPase ring; and Rpn1 and Rpn2, the largest proteasome subunits, are linked by an extended connection. The structural features of the 26S proteasome observed in this study are likely to be important for coordinating the proteasomal subunits during substrate processing. PMID:27342858

  13. Localization of the regulatory particle subunit Sem1 in the 26S proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, Stefan; Sakata, Eri; Beck, Florian; Pathare, Ganesh R.; Schnitger, Jérôme; Nágy, Istvan; Baumeister, Wolfgang Förster, Friedrich

    2013-05-31

    Highlights: •26S proteasome subunit Sem1 was mapped using cryo-EM and cross-linking data. •C-terminal helix of Sem1 located near winged helix motif of Rpn7. •N-terminal part of Sem1 tethers Rpn7, Rpn3 and lid helical bundle. •Sem1 binds differently to PCI-domains of proteasome subunit Rpn7 and TREX-2 subunit Thp1. -- Abstract: The ubiquitin–proteasome system is responsible for regulated protein degradation in the cell with the 26S proteasome acting as its executive arm. The molecular architecture of this 2.5 MDa complex has been established recently, with the notable exception of the small acidic subunit Sem1. Here, we localize the C-terminal helix of Sem1 binding to the PCI domain of the subunit Rpn7 using cryo-electron microscopy single particle reconstruction of proteasomes purified from yeast cells with sem1 deletion. The approximate position of the N-terminal region of Sem1 bridging the cleft between Rpn7 and Rpn3 was inferred based on site-specific cross-linking data of the 26S proteasome. Our structural studies indicate that Sem1 can assume different conformations in different contexts, which supports the idea that Sem1 functions as a molecular glue stabilizing the Rpn3/Rpn7 heterodimer.

  14. Indirect inhibition of 26S proteasome activity in a cellular model of Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Hipp, Mark S.; Patel, Chetan N.; Bersuker, Kirill; Riley, Brigit E.; Kaiser, Stephen E.; Shaler, Thomas A.; Brandeis, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Pathognomonic accumulation of ubiquitin (Ub) conjugates in human neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington’s disease, suggests that highly aggregated proteins interfere with 26S proteasome activity. In this paper, we examine possible mechanisms by which an N-terminal fragment of mutant huntingtin (htt; N-htt) inhibits 26S function. We show that ubiquitinated N-htt—whether aggregated or not—did not choke or clog the proteasome. Both Ub-dependent and Ub-independent proteasome reporters accumulated when the concentration of mutant N-htt exceeded a solubility threshold, indicating that stabilization of 26S substrates is not linked to impaired Ub conjugation. Above this solubility threshold, mutant N-htt was rapidly recruited to cytoplasmic inclusions that were initially devoid of Ub. Although synthetically polyubiquitinated N-htt competed with other Ub conjugates for access to the proteasome, the vast majority of mutant N-htt in cells was not Ub conjugated. Our data confirm that proteasomes are not directly impaired by aggregated N-terminal fragments of htt; instead, our data suggest that Ub accumulation is linked to impaired function of the cellular proteostasis network. PMID:22371559

  15. Ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and cellular responses to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Allen

    2011-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) is the primary cytosolic proteolytic machinery for the selective degradation of various forms of damaged proteins. Thus, the UPP is an important protein quality control mechanism. In the canonical UPP, both ubiquitin and the 26S proteasome are involved. Substrate proteins of the canonical UPP are first tagged by multiple ubiquitin molecules and then degraded by the 26S proteasome. However, in non-canonical UPP, proteins can be degraded by the 26S or the 20S proteasome without being ubiquitinated. It is clear that a proteasome is responsible for selective degradation of oxidized proteins, but the extent to which ubiquitination is involved in this process remains a subject of debate. While many publications suggest that the 20S proteasome degrades oxidized proteins independent of ubiquitin, there is also solid evidence indicating that ubiquitin and ubiquitination are involved in degradation of some forms of oxidized proteins. A fully functional UPP is required for cells to cope with oxidative stress and the activity of the UPP is also modulated by cellular redox status. Mild or transient oxidative stress up-regulates the ubiquitination system and proteasome activity in cells and tissues and transiently enhances intracellular proteolysis. Severe or sustained oxidative stress impairs the function of the UPP and decreases intracellular proteolysis. Both the ubiquitin conjugation enzymes and the proteasome can be inactivated by sustained oxidative stress, especially the 26S proteasome. Differential susceptibilities of the ubiquitin conjugation enzymes and the 26S proteasome to oxidative damage lead to an accumulation of ubiquitin conjugates in cells in response to mild oxidative stress. Thus, increased levels of ubiquitin conjugates in cells appear to be an indicator of mild oxidative stress. PMID:21530648

  16. Studies on the activation by ATP of the 26 S proteasome complex from rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Dahlmann, B; Kuehn, L; Reinauer, H

    1995-01-01

    The 26 S proteasome complex is thought to catalyse the breakdown of ubiquitinated proteins within eukaryotic cells. In addition it has been found that the complex also degrades short-lived proteins such as ornithine decarboxylase in a ubiquitin-independent manner. Both proteolytic processes are paralleled by the hydrolysis of ATP. Here we show that ATP also affects the hydrolytic activity towards fluorigenic peptide substrates by the 26 S proteasome complex from rat skeletal muscle tissue. Low concentrations of ATP (about 25 microM) optimally activate the so-called chymotryptic and tryptic activity by increasing the rate of peptide hydrolysis but not peptidylglutamylpeptide hydrolysis. Activation of the enzyme by ATP is transient but this effect can be enhanced and prolonged by including in the assay an ATP-regenerating system, indicating that ATP is hydrolysed by the 26 S proteasome complex. Although ATP cannot be substituted for by adenosine 5'-[beta,gamma-methylene]triphosphate or AMP, hydrolysis of the phosphoanhydride bond of ATP seems not to be necessary for the activation process of the proteasome complex, a conclusion drawn from the findings that ATP analogues such as adenosine 5'-[beta,gamma-imido]triphosphate, adenosine 5'-O-[gamma-thio]triphosphate, adenosine 5'-O-[beta-thio]-diphosphate and adenosine 5'-[alpha,beta-methylene]triphosphate give the same effect as ATP, and vanadate does not prevent ATP activation. These effects are independent of the presence of Mg2+. Thus, ATP and other nucleotides may act as allosteric activators of peptide-hydrolysing activities of the 26 S proteasome complex as has also been found with the lon protease from Escherichia coli. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7619056

  17. Autophagic Degradation of the 26S Proteasome Is Mediated by the Dual ATG8/Ubiquitin Receptor RPN10 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Richard S; Li, Faqiang; Gemperline, David C; Book, Adam J; Vierstra, Richard D

    2015-06-18

    Autophagic turnover of intracellular constituents is critical for cellular housekeeping, nutrient recycling, and various aspects of growth and development in eukaryotes. Here we show that autophagy impacts the other major degradative route involving the ubiquitin-proteasome system by eliminating 26S proteasomes, a process we termed proteaphagy. Using Arabidopsis proteasomes tagged with GFP, we observed their deposition into vacuoles via a route requiring components of the autophagy machinery. This transport can be initiated separately by nitrogen starvation and chemical or genetic inhibition of the proteasome, implying distinct induction mechanisms. Proteasome inhibition stimulates comprehensive ubiquitylation of the complex, with the ensuing proteaphagy requiring the proteasome subunit RPN10, which can simultaneously bind both ATG8 and ubiquitin. Collectively, we propose that Arabidopsis RPN10 acts as a selective autophagy receptor that targets inactive 26S proteasomes by concurrent interactions with ubiquitylated proteasome subunits/targets and lipidated ATG8 lining the enveloping autophagic membranes. PMID:26004230

  18. Atomic structure of the 26S proteasome lid reveals the mechanism of deubiquitinase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Dambacher, Corey M; Worden, Evan J; Herzik, Mark A; Martin, Andreas; Lander, Gabriel C

    2016-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is responsible for the selective, ATP-dependent degradation of polyubiquitinated cellular proteins. Removal of ubiquitin chains from targeted substrates at the proteasome is a prerequisite for substrate processing and is accomplished by Rpn11, a deubiquitinase within the ‘lid’ sub-complex. Prior to the lid’s incorporation into the proteasome, Rpn11 deubiquitinase activity is inhibited to prevent unwarranted deubiquitination of polyubiquitinated proteins. Here we present the atomic model of the isolated lid sub-complex, as determined by cryo-electron microscopy at 3.5 Å resolution, revealing how Rpn11 is inhibited through its interaction with a neighboring lid subunit, Rpn5. Through mutagenesis of specific residues, we describe the network of interactions that are required to stabilize this inhibited state. These results provide significant insight into the intricate mechanisms of proteasome assembly, outlining the substantial conformational rearrangements that occur during incorporation of the lid into the 26S holoenzyme, which ultimately activates the deubiquitinase for substrate degradation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13027.001 PMID:26744777

  19. The 26S proteasome in Schistosoma mansoni: bioinformatics analysis, developmental expression, and RNA interference (RNAi) studies.

    PubMed

    Nabhan, Joseph F; El-Shehabi, Fouad; Patocka, Nicholas; Ribeiro, Paula

    2007-11-01

    The 26S proteasome is a proteolytic complex responsible for the degradation of the vast majority of eukaryotic proteins. Regulated proteolysis by the proteasome is thought to influence cell cycle progression, transcriptional control, and other critical cellular processes. Here, we used a bioinformatics approach to identify the proteasomal constituents of the parasitic trematode Schistosoma mansoni. A detailed search of the S. mansoni genome database identified a total of 31 putative proteasomal subunits, including 17 subunits of the regulatory (19S) complex and 14 predicted catalytic (20S) subunits. A quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis of subunit expression levels revealed that the S. mansoni proteasome components are differentially expressed among cercaria, schistosomula, and adult worms. In particular, the data suggest that the proteasome may be downregulated during the early stages of schistosomula development and is subsequently upregulated as the parasite matures to the adult stage. To test for biological relevance, we developed a transfection-based RNA interference method to knockdown the expression of the proteasome subunit, SmRPN11/POH1. Transfection of in vitro transformed S. mansoni schistosomula with specific short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) diminished SmRPN11/POH1 expression nearly 80%, as determined by quantitative RT-PCR analysis, and also decreased parasite viability 78%, whereas no significant effect could be seen after treatment with the same amount of an irrelevant siRNA. These results indicate that the subunit SmRPN11/POH1 is an essential gene in schistosomes and further suggest an important role for the proteasome in parasite development and survival. PMID:17892869

  20. Regulation of Sperm Capacitation by the 26S Proteasome: An Emerging New Paradigm in Spermatology.

    PubMed

    Kerns, Karl; Morales, Patricio; Sutovsky, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) participates in many biological processes ranging from cell cycle and antigen processing to cellular defense and signaling. Work of the last decade has made it evident that the UPS is involved in many sperm-related processes leading up to and as part of fertilization. The current knowledge of UPS involvement and changes during sperm capacitation are reviewed together with a list of known proteasome-associated sperm proteins and a discussion of the relationships between these proteins and the proteasome. Proteasomal inhibitors such as MG-132 and epoxomicin significantly alter capacitation and prevent acrosome reaction. The 26S proteasome degrades AKAP3, an A-kinase anchoring protein, partially regulating the release of protein-kinase A (PKA), a vital component necessary for the steps leading up to capacitation. Further, changes occur in 20S core subunit localization and abundance throughout capacitation. Proteasome-interacting valosine-containing protein (VCP) undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation; however, its physiological roles in capacitation and fertilization remain unknown. The E1-type ubiquitin-activating enzyme (UBA1) inhibitor PYR-41 also alters acrosomal membrane remodeling during capacitation. Furthermore, after capacitation, the acrosomal proteasomes facilitate the degradation of zona pellucida glycoproteins leading up to fertilization. Methods to modulate the sperm proteasome activity during sperm storage and capacitation may translate to increased reproductive efficiency in livestock animals. Human male infertility diagnostics may benefit from incorporation of research outcomes built upon relationships between UPS and capacitation. Altogether, the studies reviewed here support the involvement of UPS in sperm capacitation and present opportunities for new discoveries. PMID:27053366

  1. Uncommon functional properties of the first piscine 26S proteasome from the Antarctic notothenioid Trematomus bernacchii

    PubMed Central

    Gogliettino, Marta; Balestrieri, Marco; Riccio, Alessia; Facchiano, Angelo; Fusco, Carmela; Palazzo, Vincenzo Cecere; Rossi, Mosè; Cocca, Ennio; Palmieri, Gianna

    2016-01-01

    Protein homoeostasis is a fundamental process allowing the preservation of functional proteins and it has a great impact on the life of the Antarctic organisms. However, the effect of low temperatures on protein turnover is poorly understood and the cold-adaptation of the degradation machinery remains an unresolved issue. As the 26S proteasome represents the main proteolytic system devoted to the controlled degradation of intracellular proteins, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the functions of this complex in the notothenioid Trematomus bernacchii, in order to better understand its role in the physiology of Antarctic fish. To this aim, we purified and characterized the 26S proteasome from T. bernacchii and isolated the cDNAs codifying seven of the 14 subunits belonging to the proteasome 20S core particle. Results provided evidences of the high resistance of the piscine 26S proteasome to oxidative agents and of its ‘uncommon’ ability to efficiently hydrolyse oxidized bovine serum albumin (BSA), suggesting that this enzymatic complex could play a key role in the antioxidant defense systems in fish inhabiting permanently cold marine environments. These unique properties were also reflected by the 3D model analysis, which revealed a higher structural stability of the piscine complex respect to the murine template. Finally, a comparative analysis, performed in a variety of tissues collected from T. bernacchii and the temperate fish Dicentrarchus labrax, showed a lower protein retention in the cold-adapted fish, possibly due to a better efficiency of its degradation machinery. PMID:26933238

  2. Phosphorylation of 20S proteasome alpha subunit C8 (alpha7) stabilizes the 26S proteasome and plays a role in the regulation of proteasome complexes by gamma-interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Suchira; Stratford, Fiona L L; Broadfoot, Kerry I; Mason, Grant G F; Rivett, A Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    In animal cells there are several regulatory complexes which interact with 20S proteasomes and give rise to functionally distinct proteasome complexes. gamma-Interferon upregulates three immuno beta catalytic subunits of the 20S proteasome and the PA28 regulator, and decreases the level of 26S proteasomes. It also decreases the level of phosphorylation of two proteasome alpha subunits, C8 (alpha7) and C9 (alpha3). In the present study we have investigated the role of phosphorylation of C8 by protein kinase CK2 in the formation and stability of 26S proteasomes. An epitope-tagged C8 subunit expressed in mammalian cells was efficiently incorporated into both 20S proteasomes and 26S proteasomes. Investigation of mutants of C8 at the two known CK2 phosphorylation sites demonstrated that these are the two phosphorylation sites of C8 in animal cells. Although phosphorylation of C8 was not absolutely essential for the formation of 26S proteasomes, it did have a substantial effect on their stability. Also, when cells were treated with gamma-interferon, there was a marked decrease in phosphorylation of C8, a decrease in the level of 26S proteasomes, and an increase in immunoproteasomes and PA28 complexes. These results suggest that the down-regulation of 26S proteasomes after gamma-interferon treatment results from the destabilization that occurs after dephosphorylation of the C8 subunit. PMID:14583091

  3. Characterization of peptidyl boronic acid inhibitors of mammalian 20 S and 26 S proteasomes and their inhibition of proteasomes in cultured cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, R C; Assinder, S J; Christie, G; Mason, G G; Markwell, R; Wadsworth, H; McLaughlin, M; King, R; Chabot-Fletcher, M C; Breton, J J; Allsop, D; Rivett, A J

    2000-01-01

    Proteasomes are large multisubunit proteinases which have several distinct catalytic sites. In this study a series of di- and tri-peptidyl boronic acids have been tested on the chymotrypsin-like activity of purified mammalian 20 S and 26 S proteasomes assayed with succinyl-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-amidomethylcoumarin (suc-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-AMC) as substrate. The inhibition of 20 S proteasomes is competitive but only slowly reversible. The K(i) values for the best inhibitors were in the range 10-100 nM with suc-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-AMC as substrate, but the compounds tested were much less effective on other proteasome activities measured with other substrates. Free boronic acid inhibitors exhibited equivalent potency to their pinacol esters. Both benzoyl (Bz)-Phe-boroLeu and benzyloxycarbonyl (Cbz)-Leu-Leu-boroLeu pinacol ester inhibited 20 S and 26 S proteasomes with non-ideal behaviour, differences in inhibition of the two forms of proteasomes becoming apparent at high inhibitor concentrations (above 3xK(i)). Both of these compounds were also potent inhibitors of 20 S and 26 S proteasomes in cultured cells. However, gel filtration of cell extracts prepared from cells treated with radiolabelled phenacetyl-Leu-Leu-boroLeu showed that only 20 S proteasomes were strongly labelled, demonstrating differences in the characteristics of inhibition of 20 S and 26 S proteasomes. The usefulness of peptidyl boronic acid inhibitors for investigations of proteasome-mediated protein degradation was confirmed by the observation that Bz-Phe-boroLeu and Cbz-Leu-Leu-boroLeu pinacol ester inhibited NFkappaB activation with IC(50) values comparable to their K(i) values for purified proteasomes. The latter result supports the view that the chymotrypsin-like activity of proteasomes assayed with suc-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-AMC is a critical one for protein degradation in cells. PMID:10677365

  4. Dietary apigenin potentiates the inhibitory effect of interferon-α on cancer cell viability through inhibition of 26S proteasome-mediated interferon receptor degradation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sheng; Yang, Li-juan; Wang, Ping; He, Yu-jiao; Huang, Jun-mei; Liu, Han-wei; Shen, Xiao-fei; Wang, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Background Type I interferons (IFN-α/β) have broad and potent immunoregulatory and antiproliferative activities. However, it is still known whether the dietary flavonoids exhibit their antiviral and anticancer properties by modulating the function of type I IFNs. Objective This study aimed at determining the role of apigenin, a dietary plant flavonoid abundant in common fruits and vegetables, on the type I IFN-mediated inhibition of cancer cell viability. Design Inhibitory effect of apigenin on human 26S proteasome, a known negative regulator of type I IFN signaling, was evaluated in vitro. Molecular docking was conducted to know the interaction between apigenin and subunits of 26S proteasome. Effects of apigenin on JAK/STAT pathway, 26S proteasome-mediated interferon receptor stability, and cancer cells viability were also investigated. Results Apigenin was identified to be a potent inhibitor of human 26S proteasome in a cell-based assay. Apigenin inhibited the chymotrypsin-like, caspase-like, and trypsin-like activities of the human 26S proteasome and increased the ubiquitination of endogenous proteins in cells. Results from computational modeling of the potential interactions of apigenin with the chymotrypsin site (β5 subunit), caspase site (β1 subunit), and trypsin site (β2 subunit) of the proteasome were consistent with the observed proteasome inhibitory activity. Apigenin enhanced the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins (STAT1 and STAT2) and promoted the endogenous IFN-α-regulated gene expression. Apigenin inhibited the IFN-α-stimulated ubiquitination and degradation of type I interferon receptor 1 (IFNAR1). Apigenin also sensitized the inhibitory effect of IFN-α on viability of cervical carcinoma HeLa cells. Conclusion These results suggest that apigenin potentiates the inhibitory effect of IFN-α on cancer cell viability by activating JAK/STAT signaling pathway through inhibition of 26S proteasome

  5. Downregulation of 26S proteasome catalytic activity promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    van Baarsel, Eric D.; Metz, Patrick J.; Fisch, Kathleen; Widjaja, Christella E.; Kim, Stephanie H.; Lopez, Justine; Chang, Aaron N.; Geurink, Paul P.; Florea, Bogdan I.; Overkleeft, Hermen S.; Ovaa, Huib; Bui, Jack D.; Yang, Jing; Chang, John T.

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) endows carcinoma cells with phenotypic plasticity that can facilitate the formation of cancer stem cells (CSCs) and contribute to the metastatic cascade. While there is substantial support for the role of EMT in driving cancer cell dissemination, less is known about the intracellular molecular mechanisms that govern formation of CSCs via EMT. Here we show that β2 and β5 proteasome subunit activity is downregulated during EMT in immortalized human mammary epithelial cells. Moreover, selective proteasome inhibition enabled mammary epithelial cells to acquire certain morphologic and functional characteristics reminiscent of cancer stem cells, including CD44 expression, self-renewal, and tumor formation. Transcriptomic analyses suggested that proteasome-inhibited cells share gene expression signatures with cells that have undergone EMT, in part, through modulation of the TGF-β signaling pathway. These findings suggest that selective downregulation of proteasome activity in mammary epithelial cells can initiate the EMT program and acquisition of a cancer stem cell-like phenotype. As proteasome inhibitors become increasingly used in cancer treatment, our findings highlight a potential risk of these therapeutic strategies and suggest a possible mechanism by which carcinoma cells may escape from proteasome inhibitor-based therapy. PMID:26930717

  6. The ATP costs and time required to degrade ubiquitinated proteins by the 26 S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Peth, Andreas; Nathan, James A; Goldberg, Alfred L

    2013-10-01

    The degradation of ubiquitinated proteins by 26 S proteasomes requires ATP hydrolysis. To investigate if the six proteasomal ATPases function independently or in a cyclic manner, as proposed recently, we used yeast mutants that prevent ATP binding to Rpt3, Rpt5, or Rpt6. Although proteasomes contain six ATPase subunits, each of these single mutations caused a 66% reduction in basal ATP hydrolysis, and each blocked completely the 2-3-fold stimulation of ATPase activity induced by ubiquitinated substrates. Therefore, the ATPase subunits must function in a ordered manner, in which each is required for the stimulation of ATPase activity by substrates. Although ATP is essential for multiple steps in proteasome function, when the rate of ATP hydrolysis was reduced incrementally, the degradation of Ub5-DHFR (where Ub is ubiquitin and DHFR is dihydrofolate reductase) decreased exactly in parallel. This direct proportionality implies that a specific number of ATPs is consumed in degrading a ubiquitinated protein. When the ubiquitinated DHFR was more tightly folded (upon addition of the ligand folate), the rate of ATP hydrolysis was unchanged, but the time to degrade a Ub5-DHFR molecule (∼13 s) and the energy expenditure (50-80 ATPs/Ub5-DHFR) both increased by 2-fold. With a mutation in the ATPase C terminus that reduced gate opening into the 20 S proteasome, the energy costs and time required for conjugate degradation also increased. Thus, different ubiquitin conjugates activate similarly the ATPase subunit cycle that drives proteolysis, but polypeptide structure determines the time required for degradation and thus the energy cost. PMID:23965995

  7. Proteomics of the 26S proteasome in Spodoptera frugiperda cells infected with the nucleopolyhedrovirus, AcMNPV.

    PubMed

    Lyupina, Yulia V; Zatsepina, Olga G; Serebryakova, Marina V; Erokhov, Pavel A; Abaturova, Svetlana B; Kravchuk, Oksana I; Orlova, Olga V; Beljelarskaya, Svetlana N; Lavrov, Andrey I; Sokolova, Olga S; Mikhailov, Victor S

    2016-06-01

    Baculoviruses are large DNA viruses that infect insect species such as Lepidoptera and are used in biotechnology for protein production and in agriculture as insecticides against crop pests. Baculoviruses require activity of host proteasomes for efficient reproduction, but how they control the cellular proteome and interact with the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) of infected cells remains unknown. In this report, we analyzed possible changes in the subunit composition of 26S proteasomes of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9), cells in the course of infection with the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). 26S proteasomes were purified from Sf9 cells by an immune affinity method and subjected to 2D gel electrophoresis followed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and Mascot search in bioinformatics databases. A total of 34 homologues of 26S proteasome subunits of eukaryotic species were identified including 14 subunits of the 20S core particle (7 α and 7 β subunits) and 20 subunits of the 19S regulatory particle (RP). The RP contained homologues of 11 of RPN-type and 6 of RPT-type subunits, 2 deubiquitinating enzymes (UCH-14/UBP6 and UCH-L5/UCH37), and thioredoxin. Similar 2D-gel maps of 26S proteasomes purified from uninfected and AcMNPV-infected cells at 48hpi confirmed the structural integrity of the 26S proteasome in insect cells during baculovirus infection. However, subtle changes in minor forms of some proteasome subunits were detected. A portion of the α5(zeta) cellular pool that presumably was not associated with the proteasome underwent partial proteolysis at a late stage in infection. PMID:26945516

  8. An assay for 26S proteasome activity based on fluorescence anisotropy measurements of dye-labeled protein substrates.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sucharita; Renn, Jonathan P; Yu, Houqing; Marko, John F; Matouschek, Andreas

    2016-09-15

    The 26S proteasome is the molecular machine at the center of the ubiquitin proteasome system and is responsible for adjusting the concentrations of many cellular proteins. It is a drug target in several human diseases, and assays for the characterization of modulators of its activity are valuable. The 26S proteasome consists of two components: a core particle, which contains the proteolytic sites, and regulatory caps, which contain substrate receptors and substrate processing enzymes, including six ATPases. Current high-throughput assays of proteasome activity use synthetic fluorogenic peptide substrates that report directly on the proteolytic activity of the proteasome, but not on the activities of the proteasome caps that are responsible for protein recognition and unfolding. Here, we describe a simple and robust assay for the activity of the entire 26S proteasome using fluorescence anisotropy to follow the degradation of fluorescently labeled protein substrates. We describe two implementations of the assay in a high-throughput format and show that it meets the expected requirement of ATP hydrolysis and the presence of a canonical degradation signal or degron in the target protein. PMID:27296635

  9. Tomato 26S Proteasome subunit RPT4a regulates ToLCNDV transcription and activates hypersensitive response in tomato.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Pranav Pankaj; Sharma, Namisha; Puranik, Swati; Chakraborty, Supriya; Prasad, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Involvement of 26S proteasomal subunits in plant pathogen-interactions, and the roles of each subunit in independently modulating the activity of many intra- and inter-cellular regulators controlling physiological and defense responses of a plant were well reported. In this regard, we aimed to functionally characterize a Solanum lycopersicum 26S proteasomal subunit RPT4a (SlRPT4) gene, which was differentially expressed after Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV) infection in tolerant cultivar H-88-78-1. Molecular analysis revealed that SlRPT4 protein has an active ATPase activity. SlRPT4 could specifically bind to the stem-loop structure of intergenic region (IR), present in both DNA-A and DNA-B molecule of the bipartite viral genome. Lack of secondary structure in replication-associated gene fragment prevented formation of DNA-protein complex suggesting that binding of SlRPT4 with DNA is secondary structure specific. Interestingly, binding of SlRPT4 to IR inhibited the function of RNA Pol-II and subsequently reduced the bi-directional transcription of ToLCNDV genome. Virus-induced gene silencing of SlRPT4 gene incited conversion of tolerant attributes of cultivar H-88-78-1 into susceptibility. Furthermore, transient overexpression of SlRPT4 resulted in activation of programmed cell death and antioxidant enzymes system. Overall, present study highlights non-proteolytic function of SlRPT4 and their participation in defense pathway against virus infection in tomato. PMID:27252084

  10. Tomato 26S Proteasome subunit RPT4a regulates ToLCNDV transcription and activates hypersensitive response in tomato

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Pranav Pankaj; Sharma, Namisha; Puranik, Swati; Chakraborty, Supriya; Prasad, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Involvement of 26S proteasomal subunits in plant pathogen-interactions, and the roles of each subunit in independently modulating the activity of many intra- and inter-cellular regulators controlling physiological and defense responses of a plant were well reported. In this regard, we aimed to functionally characterize a Solanum lycopersicum 26S proteasomal subunit RPT4a (SlRPT4) gene, which was differentially expressed after Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV) infection in tolerant cultivar H-88-78-1. Molecular analysis revealed that SlRPT4 protein has an active ATPase activity. SlRPT4 could specifically bind to the stem-loop structure of intergenic region (IR), present in both DNA-A and DNA-B molecule of the bipartite viral genome. Lack of secondary structure in replication-associated gene fragment prevented formation of DNA-protein complex suggesting that binding of SlRPT4 with DNA is secondary structure specific. Interestingly, binding of SlRPT4 to IR inhibited the function of RNA Pol-II and subsequently reduced the bi-directional transcription of ToLCNDV genome. Virus-induced gene silencing of SlRPT4 gene incited conversion of tolerant attributes of cultivar H-88-78-1 into susceptibility. Furthermore, transient overexpression of SlRPT4 resulted in activation of programmed cell death and antioxidant enzymes system. Overall, present study highlights non-proteolytic function of SlRPT4 and their participation in defense pathway against virus infection in tomato. PMID:27252084

  11. Numerous proteins with unique characteristics are degraded by the 26S proteasome following monoubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Braten, Ori; Livneh, Ido; Ziv, Tamar; Admon, Arie; Kehat, Izhak; Caspi, Lilac H; Gonen, Hedva; Bercovich, Beatrice; Godzik, Adam; Jahandideh, Samad; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Sommer, Thomas; Kwon, Yong Tae; Guharoy, Mainak; Tompa, Peter; Ciechanover, Aaron

    2016-08-01

    The "canonical" proteasomal degradation signal is a substrate-anchored polyubiquitin chain. However, a handful of proteins were shown to be targeted following monoubiquitination. In this study, we established-in both human and yeast cells-a systematic approach for the identification of monoubiquitination-dependent proteasomal substrates. The cellular wild-type polymerizable ubiquitin was replaced with ubiquitin that cannot form chains. Using proteomic analysis, we screened for substrates that are nevertheless degraded under these conditions compared with those that are stabilized, and therefore require polyubiquitination for their degradation. For randomly sampled representative substrates, we confirmed that their cellular stability is in agreement with our screening prediction. Importantly, the two groups display unique features: monoubiquitinated substrates are smaller than the polyubiquitinated ones, are enriched in specific pathways, and, in humans, are structurally less disordered. We suggest that monoubiquitination-dependent degradation is more widespread than assumed previously, and plays key roles in various cellular processes. PMID:27385826

  12. An evolutionarily conserved pathway controls proteasome homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Adrien; Bertolotti, Anne

    2016-08-11

    The proteasome is essential for the selective degradation of most cellular proteins, but how cells maintain adequate amounts of proteasome is unclear. Here we show that there is an evolutionarily conserved signalling pathway controlling proteasome homeostasis. Central to this pathway is TORC1, the inhibition of which induced all known yeast 19S regulatory particle assembly-chaperones (RACs), as well as proteasome subunits. Downstream of TORC1 inhibition, the yeast mitogen-activated protein kinase, Mpk1, acts to increase the supply of RACs and proteasome subunits under challenging conditions in order to maintain proteasomal degradation and cell viability. This adaptive pathway was evolutionarily conserved, with mTOR and ERK5 controlling the levels of the four mammalian RACs and proteasome abundance. Thus, the central growth and stress controllers, TORC1 and Mpk1/ERK5, endow cells with a rapid and vital adaptive response to adjust proteasome abundance in response to the rising needs of cells. Enhancing this pathway may be a useful therapeutic approach for diseases resulting from impaired proteasomal degradation. PMID:27462806

  13. CDNA cloning of p112, the largest regulatory subunit of the human 26s proteasome, and functional analysis of its yeast homologue, sen3p.

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, K; Kagawa, S; Shimizu, Y; Akioka, H; Tsurumi, C; Noda, C; Fujimuro, M; Yokosawa, H; Fujiwara, T; Takahashi, E; Ohba, M; Yamasaki, M; DeMartino, G N; Slaughter, C A; Toh-e, A; Tanaka, K

    1996-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a large multisubunit protease complex, the largest regulatory subunit of which is a component named p112. Molecular cloning of cDNA encoding human p112 revealed a polypeptide predicted to have 953 amino acid residues and a molecular mass of 105,865. The human p112 gene was mapped to the q37.1-q37.2 region of chromosome 2. Computer analysis showed that p112 has strong similarity to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sen3p, which has been listed in a gene bank as a factor affecting tRNA splicing endonuclease. The SEN3 also was identified in a synthetic lethal screen with the nin1-1 mutant, a temperature-sensitive mutant of NIN1. NIN1 encodes p31, another regulatory subunit of the 26S proteasome, which is necessary for activation of Cdc28p kinase. Disruption of the SEN3 did not affect cell viability, but led to temperature-sensitive growth. The human p112 cDNA suppressed the growth defect at high temperature in a SEN3 disruptant, indicating that p112 is a functional homologue of the yeast Sen3p. Maintenance of SEN3 disruptant cells at the restrictive temperature resulted in a variety of cellular dysfunctions, including defects in proteolysis mediated by the ubiquitin pathway, in the N-end rule system, in the stress response upon cadmium exposure, and in nuclear protein transportation. The functional abnormality induced by SEN3 disruption differs considerably from various phenotypes shown by the nin1-1 mutation, suggesting that these two regulatory subunits of the 26S proteasome play distinct roles in the various processes mediated by the 26S proteasome. Images PMID:8816993

  14. Role of 26S proteasome and HRD genes in the degradation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, an integral endoplasmic reticulum membrane protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, R Y; Gardner, R G; Rine, J

    1996-01-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-R), a key enzyme of sterol synthesis, is an integral membrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In both humans and yeast, HMG-R is degraded at or in the ER. The degradation of HMG-R is regulated as part of feedback control of the mevalonate pathway. Neither the mechanism of degradation nor the nature of the signals that couple the degradation of HMG-R to the mevalonate pathway is known. We have launched a genetic analysis of the degradation of HMG-R in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a selection for mutants that are deficient in the degradation of Hmg2p, an HMG-R isozyme. The underlying genes are called HRD (pronounced "herd"), for HMG-CoA reductase degradation. So far we have discovered mutants in three genes: HRD1, HRD2, and HRD3. The sequence of the HRD2 gene is homologous to the p97 activator of the 26S proteasome. This p97 protein, also called TRAP-2, has been proposed to be a component of the mature 26S proteasome. The hrd2-1 mutant had numerous pleiotropic phenotypes expected for cells with a compromised proteasome, and these phenotypes were complemented by the human TRAP-2/p97 coding region. In contrast, HRD1 and HRD3 genes encoded previously unknown proteins predicted to be membrane bound. The Hrd3p protein was homologous to the Caenorhabditis elegans sel-1 protein, a negative regulator of at least two different membrane proteins, and contained an HRD3 motif shared with several other proteins. Hrd1p had no full-length homologues, but contained an H2 ring finger motif. These data suggested a model of ER protein degradation in which the Hrd1p and Hrd3p proteins conspire to deliver HMG-R to the 26S proteasome. Moreover, our results lend in vivo support to the proposed role of the p97/TRAP-2/Hrd2p protein as a functionally important component of the 26S proteasome. Because the HRD genes were required for the degradation of both regulated and unregulated substrates of ER degradation, the HRD genes are the

  15. The 26S proteasome is a multifaceted target for anti-cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Grigoreva, Tatyana A; Tribulovich, Vyacheslav G; Garabadzhiu, Alexander V; Melino, Gerry; Barlev, Nickolai A

    2015-09-22

    Proteasomes play a critical role in the fate of proteins that are involved in major cellular processes, including signal transduction, gene expression, cell cycle, replication, differentiation, immune response, cellular response to stress, etc. In contrast to non-specific degradation by lysosomes, proteasomes are highly selective and destroy only the proteins that are covalently labelled with small proteins, called ubiquitins. Importantly, many diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases and cancers, are intimately connected to the activity of proteasomes making them an important pharmacological target. Currently, the vast majority of inhibitors are aimed at blunting the proteolytic activities of proteasomes. However, recent achievements in solving structures of proteasomes at very high resolution provided opportunities to design new classes of small molecules that target other physiologically-important enzymatic activities of proteasomes, including the de-ubiquitinating one. This review attempts to catalog the information available to date about novel classes of proteasome inhibitors that may have important pharmacological ramifications. PMID:26295307

  16. The 26S proteasome is a multifaceted target for anti-cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Grigoreva, Tatyana A; Tribulovich, Vyacheslav G.; Garabadzhiu, Alexander V.; Melino, Gerry; Barlev, Nickolai A.

    2015-01-01

    Proteasomes play a critical role in the fate of proteins that are involved in major cellular processes, including signal transduction, gene expression, cell cycle, replication, differentiation, immune response, cellular response to stress, etc. In contrast to non-specific degradation by lysosomes, proteasomes are highly selective and destroy only the proteins that are covalently labelled with small proteins, called ubiquitins. Importantly, many diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases and cancers, are intimately connected to the activity of proteasomes making them an important pharmacological target. Currently, the vast majority of inhibitors are aimed at blunting the proteolytic activities of proteasomes. However, recent achievements in solving structures of proteasomes at very high resolution provided opportunities to design new classes of small molecules that target other physiologically-important enzymatic activities of proteasomes, including the de-ubiquitinating one. This review attempts to catalog the information available to date about novel classes of proteasome inhibitors that may have important pharmacological ramifications. PMID:26295307

  17. Rice Stripe Tenuivirus Nonstructural Protein 3 Hijacks the 26S Proteasome of the Small Brown Planthopper via Direct Interaction with Regulatory Particle Non-ATPase Subunit 3

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi; Wu, Jianxiang; Fu, Shuai; Li, Chenyang; Zhu, Zeng-Rong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ubiquitin/26S proteasome system plays a vital role in regulating host defenses against pathogens. Previous studies have highlighted different roles for the ubiquitin/26S proteasome in defense during virus infection in both mammals and plants, but their role in the vectors that transmit those viruses is still unclear. In this study, we determined that the 26S proteasome is present in the small brown planthopper (SBPH) (Laodelphgax striatellus) and has components similar to those in plants and mammals. There was an increase in the accumulation of Rice stripe virus (RSV) in the transmitting vector SBPH after disrupting the 26S proteasome, indicating that the SBPH 26S proteasome plays a role in defense against RSV infection by regulating RSV accumulation. Yeast two-hybrid analysis determined that a subunit of the 26S proteasome, named RPN3, could interact with RSV NS3. Transient overexpression of RPN3 had no effect on the RNA silencing suppressor activity of RSV NS3. However, NS3 could inhibit the ability of SBPH rpn3 to complement an rpn3 mutation in yeast. Our findings also indicate that the direct interaction between RPN3 and NS3 was responsible for inhibiting the complementation ability of RPN3. In vivo, we found an accumulation of ubiquitinated protein in SBPH tissues where the RSV titer was high, and silencing of rpn3 resulted in malfunction of the SBPH proteasome-mediated proteolysis. Consequently, viruliferous SBPH in which RPN3 was repressed transmitted the virus more effectively as a result of higher accumulation of RSV. Our results suggest that the RSV NS3 protein is able to hijack the 26S proteasome in SBPH via a direct interaction with the RPN3 subunit to attenuate the host defense response. IMPORTANCE We show, for the first time, that the 26S proteasome components are present in the small brown planthopper and play a role in defense against its vectored plant virus (RSV). In turn, RSV encodes a protein that subverts the SBPH 26S proteasome

  18. N-Terminal Coiled-Coil Structure of ATPase Subunits of 26S Proteasome Is Crucial for Proteasome Function

    PubMed Central

    Inobe, Tomonao; Genmei, Reiko

    2015-01-01

    The proteasome is an essential proteolytic machine in eukaryotic cells, where it removes damaged proteins and regulates many cellular activities by degrading ubiquitinated proteins. Its heterohexameric AAA+ ATPase Rpt subunits play a central role in proteasome activity by the engagement of substrate unfolding and translocation for degradation; however, its detailed mechanism remains poorly understood. In contrast to AAA+ ATPase domains, their N-terminal regions of Rpt subunits substantially differ from each other. Here, to investigate the requirements and roles of the N-terminal regions of six Rpt subunits derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we performed systematic mutational analysis using conditional knockdown yeast strains for each Rpt subunit and bacterial heterologous expression system of the base subcomplex. We showed that the formation of the coiled-coil structure was the most important for the N-terminal region of Rpt subunits. The primary role of coiled-coil structure would be the maintenance of the ring structure with the defined order. However, the coiled-coil region would be also be involved in substrate recognition and an interaction between lid and base subcomplexes. PMID:26208326

  19. COP9 Signalosome- and 26S Proteasome-dependent Regulation of SCFTIR1 Accumulation in Arabidopsis*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Stuttmann, Johannes; Lechner, Esther; Guérois, Raphael; Parker, Jane E.; Nussaume, Laurent; Genschik, Pascal; Noël, Laurent D.

    2009-01-01

    Ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation of proteins are crucial for eukaryotic physiology and development. The largest class of E3 ubiquitin ligases is made up of the cullin-RING ligases (CRLs), which themselves are positively regulated through conjugation of the ubiquitin-like peptide RUB/NEDD8 to cullins. RUB modification is antagonized by the COP9 signalosome (CSN), an evolutionarily conserved eight-subunit complex that is essential in most eukaryotes and cleaves RUB from cullins. The CSN behaves genetically as an activator of CRLs, although it abolishes CRL activity in vitro. This apparent paradox was recently reconciled in different organisms, as the CSN was shown to prevent autocatalytic degradation of several CRL substrate adaptors. We tested for such a mechanism in the model plant Arabidopsis by measuring the impact of a newly identified viable csn2 mutant on the activity and stability of SCFTIR1, a receptor to the phytohormone auxin and probably the best characterized plant CRL. Our analysis reveals that not only the F-box protein TIR1 but also relevant cullins are destabilized in csn2 and other Arabidopsis csn mutants. These results provide an explanation for the auxin resistance of csn mutants. We further observed in vivo a post-translational modification of TIR1 dependent on the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 and provide evidence for proteasome-mediated degradation of TIR1, CUL1, and ASK1 (Arabidopsis SKP1 homolog). These results are consistent with CSN-dependent protection of Arabidopsis CRLs from autocatalytic degradation, as observed in other eukaryotes, and provide evidence for antagonist roles of the CSN and 26S proteasome in modulating accumulation of the plant CRL SCFTIR1. PMID:19147500

  20. Tau-driven 26S proteasome impairment and cognitive dysfunction can be prevented early in disease by activating cAMP-PKA signaling

    PubMed Central

    Myeku, Natura; Clelland, Catherine L; Emrani, Sheina; Kukushkin, Nikolay V; Yu, Wai Haung; Goldberg, Alfred L; Duff, Karen E

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) degrades misfolded proteins including those implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated the effects of tau accumulation on proteasome function in a mouse model of tauopathy and in a cross to a UPS reporter mouse (line Ub-G76V-GFP). Accumulation of insoluble tau was associated with a decrease in the peptidase activity of brain 26S proteasomes, higher levels of ubiquitinated proteins and undegraded Ub-G76V-GFP. 26S proteasomes from mice with tauopathy were physically associated with tau and were less active in hydrolyzing ubiquitinated proteins, small peptides and ATP. 26S proteasomes from normal mice incubated with recombinant oligomers or fibrils also showed lower hydrolyzing capacity in the same assays, implicating tau as a proteotoxin. Administration of an agent that activates cAMP–protein kinase A (PKA) signaling led to attenuation of proteasome dysfunction, probably through proteasome subunit phosphorylation. In vivo, this led to lower levels of aggregated tau and improvements in cognitive performance. PMID:26692334

  1. Glucocorticoids regulate mRNA levels for subunits of the 19 S regulatory complex of the 26 S proteasome in fast-twitch skeletal muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Combaret, Lydie; Taillandier, Daniel; Dardevet, Dominique; Béchet, Daniel; Rallière, Cécile; Claustre, Agnès; Grizard, Jean; Attaix, Didier

    2004-01-01

    Circulating levels of glucocorticoids are increased in many traumatic and muscle-wasting conditions that include insulin-dependent diabetes, acidosis, infection, and starvation. On the basis of indirect findings, it appeared that these catabolic hormones are required to stimulate Ub (ubiquitin)-proteasome-dependent proteolysis in skeletal muscles in such conditions. The present studies were performed to provide conclusive evidence for an activation of Ub-proteasome-dependent proteolysis after glucocorticoid treatment. In atrophying fast-twitch muscles from rats treated with dexamethasone for 6 days, compared with pair-fed controls, we found (i) increased MG132-inhibitable proteasome-dependent proteolysis, (ii) an enhanced rate of substrate ubiquitination, (iii) increased chymotrypsin-like proteasomal activity of the proteasome, and (iv) a co-ordinate increase in the mRNA expression of several ATPase (S4, S6, S7 and S8) and non-ATPase (S1, S5a and S14) subunits of the 19 S regulatory complex, which regulates the peptidase and the proteolytic activities of the 26 S proteasome. These studies provide conclusive evidence that glucocorticoids activate Ub-proteasome-dependent proteolysis and the first in vivo evidence for a hormonal regulation of the expression of subunits of the 19 S complex. The results suggest that adaptations in gene expression of regulatory subunits of the 19 S complex by glucocorticoids are crucial in the regulation of the 26 S muscle proteasome. PMID:14636157

  2. Inhibition of the 26S proteasome as a possible mechanism for toxicity of heavy metal species.

    PubMed

    Tomco, Dajena; Schmitt, Sara; Heeg, Mary Jane; Dou, Q Ping; Verani, Cláudio N

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we report on the synthesis of five metal complexes coordinated to the [NN'O] ligand HL(iodo) (2,4-diiodo-6-((pyridine-2-ylmethylamino)methyl)phenol), namely [Al(III)(L(iodo))2]ClO4 (1), [Cd(II)(L(iodo))Cl]·H2O (2), [Hg(II)(L(iodo))2]·4DMSO (3), [Pb(II)(L(iodo))NO3] (4), and [Sn(IV)(L(iodo))Cl3] (5). Species 1-5 are thoroughly characterized by spectroscopic and spectrometric methods, as well as by elemental analysis. X-ray crystallography results for complex 3 indicate the presence of Hg(II) ion hexacoordinated to two facially oriented [NN'O] ligands, whereas for complex 5 an Sn(IV) ion chelates to one deprotonated ligand and three chlorido coligands. The toxicity of species 1-5 is tested against transformed human prostate epithelial cells CRL2221 and we observe that the five complexes demonstrate high levels of cell growth inhibition in a dose-dependent manner. In order to evaluate the relationship between these species and the proteasome, we test 1-5 against purified 20S, CRL2221 cell extracts, and intact cells, followed by the measurement of the percent chymotrypsin-like activity inhibition levels. Results suggest a good correlation between the toxicity of [Hg(II)(L(iodo))2]·4DMSO (3) and proteasome inhibition. PMID:24452142

  3. The devil is in the details: comparison between COP9 signalosome (CSN) and the LID of the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Meister, Cindy; Gulko, Miriam Kolog; Köhler, Anna M; Braus, Gerhard H

    2016-02-01

    The COP9 signalosome (CSN) and the proteasomal LID are conserved macromolecular complexes composed of at least eight subunits with molecular weights of approximately 350 kDa. CSN and LID are part of the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway and cleave isopeptide linkages of lysine side chains on target proteins. CSN cleaves the isopeptide bond of ubiquitin-like protein Nedd8 from cullins, whereas the LID cleaves ubiquitin from target proteins sentenced for degradation. CSN and LID are structurally and functionally similar but the order of the assembly pathway seems to be different. The assembly differs in at least the last subunit joining the pre-assembled subcomplex. This review addresses the similarities and differences in structure, function and assembly of CSN and LID. PMID:26497135

  4. 26S Proteasome regulation of Ankrd1/CARP in adult rat ventricular myocytes and human microvascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Samaras, Susan E.; Chen, Billy; Koch, Stephen R.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Lim, Chee Chew; Davidson, Jeffrey M.

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 26S proteasome regulates Ankrd1 levels in cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ankrd1 protein degrades 60-fold faster in endothelial cells than cardiomyocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential degradation appears related to nuclear vs. sarcolemmal localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endothelial cell density shows uncoupling of Ankrd1 mRNA and protein levels. -- Abstract: Ankyrin repeat domain 1 protein (Ankrd1), also known as cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP), increases dramatically after tissue injury, and its overexpression improves aspects of wound healing. Reports that Ankrd1/CARP protein stability may affect cardiovascular organization, together with our findings that the protein is crucial to stability of the cardiomyocyte sarcomere and increased in wound healing, led us to compare the contribution of Ankrd1/CARP stability to its abundance. We found that the 26S proteasome is the dominant regulator of Ankrd1/CARP degradation, and that Ankrd1/CARP half-life is significantly longer in cardiomyocytes (h) than endothelial cells (min). In addition, higher endothelial cell density decreased the abundance of the protein without affecting steady state mRNA levels. Taken together, our data and that of others indicate that Ankrd1/CARP is highly regulated at multiple levels of its expression. The striking difference in protein half-life between a muscle and a non-muscle cell type suggests that post-translational proteolysis is correlated with the predominantly structural versus regulatory role of the protein in the two cell types.

  5. Autophagic Turnover of Inactive 26S Proteasomes in Yeast Is Directed by the Ubiquitin Receptor Cue5 and the Hsp42 Chaperone.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Richard S; McLoughlin, Fionn; Vierstra, Richard D

    2016-08-01

    The autophagic clearance of 26S proteasomes (proteaphagy) is an important homeostatic mechanism within the ubiquitin system that modulates proteolytic capacity and eliminates damaged particles. Here, we define two proteaphagy routes in yeast that respond to either nitrogen starvation or particle inactivation. Whereas the core autophagic machineries required for Atg8 lipidation and vesiculation are essential for both routes, the upstream Atg1 kinase participates only in starvation-induced proteaphagy. Following inactivation, 26S proteasomes become extensively modified with ubiquitin. Although prior studies with Arabidopsis implicated RPN10 in tethering ubiquitylated proteasomes to ATG8 lining the autophagic membranes, yeast proteaphagy employs the evolutionarily distinct receptor Cue5, which simultaneously binds ubiquitin and Atg8. Proteaphagy of inactivated proteasomes also requires the oligomeric Hsp42 chaperone, suggesting that ubiquitylated proteasomes are directed by Hsp42 to insoluble protein deposit (IPOD)-type structures before encapsulation. Together, Cue5 and Hsp42 provide a quality control checkpoint in yeast directed at recycling dysfunctional 26S proteasomes. PMID:27477278

  6. Plant ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and its role in gibberellin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Deng, Xing Wang

    2011-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in plants, like in other eukaryotes, targets numerous intracellular regulators and thus modulates almost every aspect of growth and development. The well-known and best-characterized outcome of ubiquitination is mediating target protein degradation via the 26S proteasome, which represents the major selective protein degradation pathway conserved among eukaryotes. In this review, we will discuss the molecular composition, regulation and function of plant UPS, with a major focus on how DELLA protein degradation acts as a key in gibberellin signal transduction and its implication in the regulation of plant growth. PMID:21788985

  7. Nin1p, a regulatory subunit of the 26S proteasome, is necessary for activation of Cdc28p kinase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Kominami, K; DeMartino, G N; Moomaw, C R; Slaughter, C A; Shimbara, N; Fujimuro, M; Yokosawa, H; Hisamatsu, H; Tanahashi, N; Shimizu, Y

    1995-01-01

    The nin1-1 mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cannot perform the G1/S and G2/M transitions at restrictive temperatures. At such temperatures, nin1-1 strains fail to activate histone H1 kinase after release from alpha factor-imposed G1 block and after release from hydroxyurea-imposed S block. The nin1-1 mutation shows synthetic lethality with certain cdc28 mutant alleles such as cdc28-IN. Two lines of evidence indicate that Nin1p is a component of the 26S proteasome complex: (i) Nin1p, as well as the known component of the 26S proteasome, shifted to the 26S proteasome peak in the glycerol density gradient after preincubation of crude extract with ATP-Mg2+, and (ii) nin1-1 cells accumulated polyubiquitinated proteins under restrictive conditions. These results suggest that activation of Cdc28p kinase requires proteolysis. We have cloned a human cDNA encoding a regulatory subunit of the 26S proteasome, p31, which was found to be a homolog of Nin1p. Images PMID:7621825

  8. The RPT2 subunit of the 26S proteasome directs complex assembly, histone dynamics, and gametophyte and sporophyte development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Hee; Minami, Atsushi; Marshall, Richard S; Book, Adam J; Farmer, Lisa M; Walker, Joseph M; Vierstra, Richard D

    2011-12-01

    The regulatory particle (RP) of the 26S proteasome contains a heterohexameric ring of AAA-ATPases (RPT1-6) that unfolds and inserts substrates into the core protease (CP) for degradation. Through genetic analysis of the Arabidopsis thaliana gene pair encoding RPT2, we show that this subunit plays a critical role in 26S proteasome assembly, histone dynamics, and plant development. rpt2a rpt2b double null mutants are blocked in both male and female gamete transmission, demonstrating that the subunit is essential. Whereas rpt2b mutants are phenotypically normal, rpt2a mutants display a range of defects, including impaired leaf, root, trichome, and pollen development, delayed flowering, stem fasciation, hypersensitivity to mitomycin C and amino acid analogs, hyposensitivity to the proteasome inhibitor MG132, and decreased 26S complex stability. The rpt2a phenotype can be rescued by both RPT2a and RPT2b, indicative of functional redundancy, but not by RPT2a mutants altered in ATP binding/hydrolysis or missing the C-terminal hydrophobic sequence that docks the RPT ring onto the CP. Many rpt2a phenotypes are shared with mutants lacking the chromatin assembly factor complex CAF1. Like caf1 mutants, plants missing RPT2a or reduced in other RP subunits contain less histones, thus implicating RPT2 specifically, and the 26S proteasome generally, in plant nucleosome assembly. PMID:22158466

  9. Functional study of hot pepper 26S proteasome subunit RPN7 induced by Tobacco mosaic virus from nuclear proteome analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Boo-Ja; Kwon, Sun Jae; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Park, Chang-Jin; Kim, Young-Jin; Park, Ohkmae K.; Paek, Kyung-Hee . E-mail: khpaek95@korea.ac.kr

    2006-12-15

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) was applied for the screening of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-induced hot pepper (Capsicum annuum cv. Bugang) nuclear proteins. From differentially expressed protein spots, we acquired the matched peptide mass fingerprint (PMF) data, analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS, from the non-redundant hot pepper EST protein FASTA database using the VEMS 2.0 software. Among six identified nuclear proteins, the hot pepper 26S proteasome subunit RPN7 (CaRPN7) was subjected to further study. The level of CaRPN7 mRNA was specifically increased during incompatible TMV-P{sub 0} interaction, but not during compatible TMV-P{sub 1.2} interaction. When CaRPN7::GFP fusion protein was targeted in onion cells, the nuclei had been broken into pieces. In the hot pepper leaves, cell death was exacerbated and genomic DNA laddering was induced by Agrobacterium-mediated transient overexpression of CaPRN7. Thus, this report presents that the TMV-induced CaRPN7 may be involved in programmed cell death (PCD) in the hot pepper plant.

  10. ARS5 is a component of the 26S proteasome complex, and negatively regulates thiol biosynthesis and arsenic tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sung, Dong-Yul; Kim, Tae-Houn; Komives, Elizabeth A; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Schroeder, Julian I

    2009-09-01

    A forward-genetic screen in Arabidopsis led to the isolation of several arsenic tolerance mutants. ars5 was the strongest arsenate- and arsenite-resistant mutant identified in this genetic screen. Here, we report the characterization and cloning of the ars5 mutant gene. ars5 is shown to exhibit an increased accumulation of arsenic and thiol compounds during arsenic stress. Rough mapping together with microarray-based expression mapping identified the ars5 mutation in the alpha subunit F (PAF1) of the 26S proteasome complex. Characterization of an independent paf1 T-DNA insertion allele and complementation by PAF1 confirmed that paf1 mutation is responsible for the enhanced thiol accumulation and arsenic tolerance phenotypes. Arsenic tolerance was not observed in a knock-out mutant of the highly homologous PAF2 gene. However, genetic complementation of ars5 by the overexpression of PAF2 suggests that the PAF2 protein is functionally equivalent to PAF1 when expressed at high levels. No detectible difference was observed in total ubiquitinylated protein profiles between ars5 and wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis, suggesting that the arsenic tolerance observed in ars5 is not derived from a general impairment in proteasome-mediated protein degradation. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that arsenic induces the enhanced transcriptional activation of several key genes that function in glutathione and phytochelatin biosynthesis in the WT, and this arsenic induction of gene expression is more dramatic in ars5. The enhanced transcriptional response to arsenic and the increased accumulation of thiol compounds in ars5, compared with WT, suggest the presence of a positive regulation pathway for thiol biosynthesis that is enhanced in the ars5 background. PMID:19453443

  11. ARS5 is a component of the 26S proteasome complex and negatively regulates thiol biosynthesis and arsenic tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Dong-Yul; Kim, Tae-Houn; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2010-01-01

    Summary A forward genetic screen in Arabidopsis led to the isolation of several arsenic tolerance mutants. ars5 is the strongest arsenate and arsenite resistant mutant identified in this genetic screen. Here, we report the characterization and cloning of the ars5 mutant gene. ars5 is shown to exhibit an increased accumulation of arsenic and thiol compounds during arsenic stress. Rough mapping together with microarray-based expression mapping identified the ars5 mutation in the alpha subunit F (PAF1) of the 26S proteasome complex. Characterization of an independent paf1 T-DNA insertion allele and complementation by PAF1 confirmed that paf1 mutation is responsible for the enhanced thiol accumulation and the arsenic tolerance phenotypes. Arsenic tolerance was not observed in a knockout mutant of the highly homologous PAF2 gene. However, genetic complementation of ars5 by over expression of PAF2 suggests that the PAF2 protein is functionally equivalent to PAF1 when expressed at high levels. No detectible difference was observed in total ubiquitinylated protein profiles between ars5 and wild type Arabidopsis, suggesting that the arsenic tolerance observed in ars5 is not derived from a general impairment in proteasome-mediated protein degradation. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that arsenic induces enhanced transcriptional activation of several key genes that function in glutathione and phytochelatin biosynthesis in wild type and this arsenic-induction of gene expression is more dramatic in ars5. The enhanced transcriptional response to arsenic and the increased accumulation of thiol compounds in ars5 compared to WT suggest the presence of a positive regulation pathway for thiol biosynthesis that is enhanced in the ars5 background. PMID:19453443

  12. Expression of the 26S proteasome subunit RPN10 is upregulated by salt stress in Dunaliella viridis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaobin; Meng, Xiangzong; Xu, Zhengkai; Song, Rentao

    2010-08-15

    Green algae of the genus Dunaliella can adapt to hypersaline environments and are considered model organisms for salinity tolerance. In an EST analysis in Dunaliella viridis under salt stress, we isolated a salt-inducible cDNA coding for the 26S proteasome subunit RPN10, designated DvRPN10. The DvRPN10 cDNA is 1472 bp and encodes a polypeptide of 377 amino acids. The DvRPN10 protein shares a high similarity to orthologs from other species. The function of DvRPN10 was confirmed by complementation of the yeast Deltarpn10 mutant. Q-PCR analysis of D. viridis cells grown in different salinities revealed that the transcript level of DvRPN10 increased in proportion to the external salinity within a range of 0.5-3 M NaCl, but decreased significantly at extremely high salinities (4-5 M NaCl). When a salinity shock of 1-3 M NaCl was applied to D. viridis cells, DvRPN10 mRNA levels remained steady during the first 36 h, and then gradually elevated to the level observed at 3 M NaCl. The gene structure of DvRPN10 was revealed by sequencing of a BAC clone containing this gene. Possible transcription factor binding sites related to stress tolerance were found in the promoter region of DvRPN10. The expression of DvRPN10 in response to the external salinity suggests that RPN10-mediated protein degradation plays a role in the salinity tolerance of D. viridis. PMID:20430475

  13. Gene Expression Analysis of the 26S Proteasome Subunit PSMB4 Reveals Significant Upregulation, Different Expression and Association with Proliferation in Human Pulmonary Neuroendocrine Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Mairinger, Fabian Dominik; Walter, Robert Fred Henry; Theegarten, Dirk; Hager, Thomas; Vollbrecht, Claudia; Christoph, Daniel Christian; Worm, Karl; Ting, Saskia; Werner, Robert; Stamatis, Georgios; Mairinger, Thomas; Baba, Hideo; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Schmid, Kurt Werner; Wohlschlaeger, Jeremias

    2014-01-01

    Background: Proteasomal subunit PSMB4 was suggested to be a survival gene in an animal model of hepatocellular carcinoma and in glioblastoma cell lines. In pulmonary adenocarcinoma, a high expression of these genes was found to be associated with poor differentiation and survival. This study investigates the gene expression levels of 26S proteasome subunits in human pulmonary neuroendocrine tumours including typical (TC) and atypical (AC) carcinoid tumours as well as small cell (SCLC) and large cell (LCNEC) neuroendocrine carcinomas. Material and methods: Gene expression levels of proteasomal subunits (PSMA1, PSMA5, PSMB4, PSMB5 and PSMD1) were investigated in 80 neuroendocrine pulmonary tumours (each 20 TC, AC, LCNLC and SCLC) and compared to controls. mRNA levels were determined by using TaqMan assays. Immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays (TMA) was performed to determine the expression of ki67, cleaved caspase 3 and PSMB4. Results: All proteasomal subunit gene expressions were significantly upregulated in TC, AC, SCLC and LCNEC compared to controls. PSMB4 mRNA is differently expressed between all neuroendocrine tumour subtypes demonstrating the highest expression and greatest range in LCNEC (p=0.043), and is significantly associated with proliferative activity (p=0.039). Conclusion: In line with other 26S proteasomal subunits PSMB4 is significantly increased, but differently expressed between pulmonary neuroendocrine tumours and is associated with the proliferative activity. Unlike in pulmonary adenocarcinomas, no association with biological behaviour was observed, suggesting that increased proteasomal subunit gene expression is a common and probably early event in the tumorigenesis of pulmonary neuroendocrine tumours regardless of their differentiation. PMID:25157275

  14. Structure of the 26S proteasome with ATP-γS bound provides insights into the mechanism of nucleotide-dependent substrate translocation

    PubMed Central

    Śledź, Paweł; Unverdorben, Pia; Beck, Florian; Pfeifer, Günter; Schweitzer, Andreas; Förster, Friedrich; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a 2.5-MDa, ATP-dependent multisubunit proteolytic complex that processively destroys proteins carrying a degradation signal. The proteasomal ATPase heterohexamer is a key module of the 19S regulatory particle; it unfolds substrates and translocates them into the 20S core particle where degradation takes place. We used cryoelectron microscopy single-particle analysis to obtain insights into the structural changes of 26S proteasome upon the binding and hydrolysis of ATP. The ATPase ring adopts at least two distinct helical staircase conformations dependent on the nucleotide state. The transition from the conformation observed in the presence of ATP to the predominant conformation in the presence of ATP-γS induces a sliding motion of the ATPase ring over the 20S core particle ring leading to an alignment of the translocation channels of the ATPase and the core particle gate, a conformational state likely to facilitate substrate translocation. Two types of intersubunit modules formed by the large ATPase domain of one ATPase subunit and the small ATPase domain of its neighbor exist. They resemble the contacts observed in the crystal structures of ClpX and proteasome-activating nucleotidase, respectively. The ClpX-like contacts are positioned consecutively and give rise to helical shape in the hexamer, whereas the proteasome-activating nucleotidase-like contact is required to close the ring. Conformational switching between these forms allows adopting different helical conformations in different nucleotide states. We postulate that ATP hydrolysis by the regulatory particle ATPase (Rpt) 5 subunit initiates a cascade of conformational changes, leading to pulling of the substrate, which is primarily executed by Rpt1, Rpt2, and Rpt6. PMID:23589842

  15. Ubiquitin/proteasome pathway impairment in neurodegeneration: therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qian; Figueiredo-Pereira, Maria E.

    2010-01-01

    The ubiquitin/proteasome pathway is the major proteolytic quality control system in cells. In this review we discuss the impact of a deregulation of this pathway on neuronal function and its causal relationship to the intracellular deposition of ubiquitin protein conjugates in pathological inclusion bodies in all the major chronic neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases as well as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We describe the intricate nature of the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway and discuss the paradox of protein aggregation, i.e. its potential toxic/protective effect in neurodegeneration. The relations between some of the dysfunctional components of the pathway and neurodegeneration are presented. We highlight possible ubiquitin/proteasome pathway-targeting therapeutic approaches, such as activating the proteasome, enhancing ubiquitination and promoting SUMOylation that might be important to slow/treat the progression of neurodegeneration. Finally, a model time line is presented for neurodegeneration starting at the initial injurious events up to protein aggregation and cell death, with potential time points for therapeutic intervention. PMID:20131003

  16. The Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway and Synaptic Plasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegde, Ashok N.

    2010-01-01

    Proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) has emerged as a new molecular mechanism that controls wide-ranging functions in the nervous system, including fine-tuning of synaptic connections during development and synaptic plasticity in the adult organism. In the UPP, attachment of a small protein, ubiquitin, tags the substrates for…

  17. Exploring the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Protein Degradation Pathway in Yeast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, Tamara J.; McWatters, Melissa K.; McQuade, Kristi L.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory investigating the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in yeast. In this exercise, the enzyme beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) is expressed in yeast under the control of a stress response promoter. Following exposure to heat stress to induce beta-gal expression, cycloheximide is added to halt…

  18. Colorectal Carcinogenesis, Radiation Quality, and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Kamal; Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Fornace, Albert J

    2016-01-01

    Adult colorectal epithelium undergoes continuous renewal and maintains homeostatic balance through regulated cellular proliferation, differentiation, and migration. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway involving the transcriptional co-activator β-catenin is important for colorectal development and normal epithelial maintenance, and deregulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. Colorectal carcinogenesis has been linked to radiation exposure, and radiation has been demonstrated to alter Wnt/β-catenin signaling, as well as the proteasomal pathway involved in the degradation of the signaling components and thus regulation of β-catenin. The current review discusses recent progresses in our understanding of colorectal carcinogenesis in relation to different types of radiation and roles that radiation quality plays in deregulating β-catenin and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) for colorectal cancer initiation and progression. PMID:26819641

  19. Biochemical and Physical Properties of the Methanococcus jannaschii 20S Proteasome and PAN, a Homolog of the ATPase (Rpt) Subunits of the Eucaryal 26S Proteasome†

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Heather L.; Ou, Mark S.; Aldrich, Henry C.; Maupin-Furlow, Julie

    2000-01-01

    The 20S proteasome is a self-compartmentalized protease which degrades unfolded polypeptides and has been purified from eucaryotes, gram-positive actinomycetes, and archaea. Energy-dependent complexes, such as the 19S cap of the eucaryal 26S proteasome, are assumed to be responsible for the recognition and/or unfolding of substrate proteins which are then translocated into the central chamber of the 20S proteasome and hydrolyzed to polypeptide products of 3 to 30 residues. All archaeal genomes which have been sequenced are predicted to encode proteins with up to ∼50% identity to the six ATPase subunits of the 19S cap. In this study, one of these archaeal homologs which has been named PAN for proteasome-activating nucleotidase was characterized from the hyperthermophile Methanococcus jannaschii. In addition, the M. jannaschii 20S proteasome was purified as a 700-kDa complex by in vitro assembly of the α and β subunits and has an unusually high rate of peptide and unfolded-polypeptide hydrolysis at 100°C. The 550-kDa PAN complex was required for CTP- or ATP-dependent degradation of β-casein by archaeal 20S proteasomes. A 500-kDa complex of PAN(Δ1–73), which has a deletion of residues 1 to 73 of the deduced protein and disrupts the predicted N-terminal coiled-coil, also facilitated this energy-dependent proteolysis. However, this deletion increased the types of nucleotides hydrolyzed to include not only ATP and CTP but also ITP, GTP, TTP, and UTP. The temperature optimum for nucleotide (ATP) hydrolysis was reduced from 80°C for the full-length protein to 65°C for PAN(Δ1–73). Both PAN protein complexes were stable in the absence of ATP and were inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide and p-chloromercuriphenyl-sulfonic acid. Kinetic analysis reveals that the PAN protein has a relatively high Vmax for ATP and CTP hydrolysis of 3.5 and 5.8 μmol of Pi per min per mg of protein as well as a relatively low affinity for CTP and ATP with Km values of 307 and 497

  20. Degradation of the encephalomyocarditis virus and hepatitis A virus 3C proteases by the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system in vivo.

    PubMed

    Schlax, Peter E; Zhang, Jin; Lewis, Elizabeth; Planchart, Antonio; Lawson, T Glen

    2007-04-10

    We have isolated stably transfected mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines that inducibly express either the mature encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) or hepatitis A virus (HAV) 3C protease and have used these cells to demonstrate that both proteins are subject to degradation in vivo by the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system. The detection of 3C protease expression in these cells requires inducing conditions and the presence of one of several proteasome inhibitors. Both 3C proteases are incorporated into conjugates with ubiquitin in vivo. HAV 3C protease expression has deleterious effects on cell viability, as determined by observation and counting of cells cultured in the absence or presence of inducing conditions. The EMCV 3C protease was found to be preferentially localized to the nucleus of induced cells, while the HAV 3C protease remains in the cytoplasm. The absence of polyubiquitinated EMCV 3C protease conjugates in nuclear fraction preparations suggests that localization to the nucleus can protect this protein from ubiquitination. PMID:17150238

  1. Degradation of the encephalomyocarditis virus and hepatitis A virus 3C proteases by the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Schlax, Peter E.; Zhang Jin; Lewis, Elizabeth; Planchart, Antonio; Lawson, T. Glen . E-mail: tlawson@bates.edu

    2007-04-10

    We have isolated stably transfected mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines that inducibly express either the mature encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) or hepatitis A virus (HAV) 3C protease and have used these cells to demonstrate that both proteins are subject to degradation in vivo by the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system. The detection of 3C protease expression in these cells requires inducing conditions and the presence of one of several proteasome inhibitors. Both 3C proteases are incorporated into conjugates with ubiquitin in vivo. HAV 3C protease expression has deleterious effects on cell viability, as determined by observation and counting of cells cultured in the absence or presence of inducing conditions. The EMCV 3C protease was found to be preferentially localized to the nucleus of induced cells, while the HAV 3C protease remains in the cytoplasm. The absence of polyubiquitinated EMCV 3C protease conjugates in nuclear fraction preparations suggests that localization to the nucleus can protect this protein from ubiquitination.

  2. Lipopolysaccharide Induces Degradation of Connexin43 in Rat Astrocytes via the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Proteolytic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chih-Kai; Jeng, Chung-Jiuan; Wang, Hwai-Shi; Wang, Shu-Huei; Wu, Jiahn-Chun

    2013-01-01

    The astrocytic syncytium plays a critical role in maintaining the homeostasis of the brain through the regulation of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC). Changes to GJIC in response to inflammatory stimuli in astrocytes may have serious effects on the brain. We have previously shown that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reduces connexin43 (Cx43) expression and GJIC in cultured rat astrocytes via a toll-like receptor 4-mediated signaling pathway. In the present study, treatment of astrocytes with LPS resulted in a significant increase in levels of the phosphorylated forms of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) -1, -2, and -3 for up to 18 h. An increase in nuclear transcription factor NF-κB levels was also observed after 8 h of LPS treatment and was sustained for up to 18 h. The LPS-induced decrease in Cx43 protein levels and inhibition of GJIC were blocked by the SAPK/JNK inhibitor SP600125, but not by the NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082. Following blockade of de novo protein synthesis by cycloheximide, LPS accelerated Cx43 degradation. Moreover, the LPS-induced downregulation of Cx43 was blocked following inhibition of 26S proteasome activity using the reversible proteasome inhibitor MG132 or the irreversible proteasome inhibitor lactacystin. Immunoprecipitation analyses revealed an increased association of Cx43 with both ubiquitin and E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 in astrocytes after LPS stimulation for 6 h and this effect was prevented by SP600125. Taken together, these results suggest that LPS stimulation leads to downregulation of Cx43 expression and GJIC in rat astrocytes by activation of SAPK/JNK and the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway. PMID:24236122

  3. Characterization and quantification of intact 26S proteasome proteins by real-time measurement of intrinsic fluorescence prior to top-down mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Russell, Jason D; Scalf, Mark; Book, Adam J; Ladror, Daniel T; Vierstra, Richard D; Smith, Lloyd M; Coon, Joshua J

    2013-01-01

    Quantification of gas-phase intact protein ions by mass spectrometry (MS) is impeded by highly-variable ionization, ion transmission, and ion detection efficiencies. Therefore, quantification of proteins using MS-associated techniques is almost exclusively done after proteolysis where peptides serve as proxies for estimating protein abundance. Advances in instrumentation, protein separations, and informatics have made large-scale sequencing of intact proteins using top-down proteomics accessible to the proteomics community; yet quantification of proteins using a top-down workflow has largely been unaddressed. Here we describe a label-free approach to determine the abundance of intact proteins separated by nanoflow liquid chromatography prior to MS analysis by using solution-phase measurements of ultraviolet light-induced intrinsic fluorescence (UV-IF). UV-IF is measured directly at the electrospray interface just prior to the capillary exit where proteins containing at least one tryptophan residue are readily detected. UV-IF quantification was demonstrated using commercially available protein standards and provided more accurate and precise protein quantification than MS ion current. We evaluated the parallel use of UV-IF and top-down tandem MS for quantification and identification of protein subunits and associated proteins from an affinity-purified 26S proteasome sample from Arabidopsis thaliana. We identified 26 unique proteins and quantified 13 tryptophan-containing species. Our analyses discovered previously unidentified N-terminal processing of the β6 (PBF1) and β7 (PBG1) subunit - such processing of PBG1 may generate a heretofore unknown additional protease active site upon cleavage. In addition, our approach permitted the unambiguous identification and quantification both isoforms of the proteasome-associated protein DSS1. PMID:23536786

  4. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway mediates the regulated degradation of mammalian 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase.

    PubMed

    Ravid, T; Doolman, R; Avner, R; Harats, D; Roitelman, J

    2000-11-17

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), the key regulatory enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, is rapidly degraded in mammalian cells supplemented with sterols or MVA. This accelerated turnover was blocked by N-acetyl-leucyl-leucyl-norleucinal (ALLN), MG-132, and lactacystin, and to a lesser extent by N-acetyl-leucyl-leucyl-methional (ALLM), indicating the involvement of the 26 S proteasome. Proteasome inhibition led to enhanced accumulation of high molecular weight polyubiquitin conjugates of HMGR and of HMGal, a chimera between the membrane domain of HMGR and beta-galactosidase. Importantly, increased amounts of polyubiquitinated HMGR and HMGal were observed upon treating cells with sterols or MVA. Cycloheximide inhibited the sterol-stimulated degradation of HMGR concomitantly with a marked reduction in polyubiquitination of the enzyme. Inhibition of squalene synthase with zaragozic acid blocked the MVA- but not sterol-stimulated ubiquitination and degradation of HMGR. Thus, similar to yeast, the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is involved in the metabolically regulated turnover of mammalian HMGR. Yet, the data indicate divergence between yeast and mammals and suggest distinct roles for sterol and nonsterol metabolic signals in the regulated ubiquitination and degradation of mammalian HMGR. PMID:10964918

  5. cAMP stimulates the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway in rat spinal cord neurons.

    PubMed

    Myeku, Natura; Wang, Hu; Figueiredo-Pereira, Maria E

    2012-10-11

    Proteasome impairment and accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins are implicated in neurodegeneration associated with different forms of spinal cord injury. We show herein that elevating cAMP in rat spinal cord neurons increases 26S proteasome activity in a protein kinase A-dependent manner. Treating spinal cord neurons with dibutyryl-cAMP (db-cAMP) also raised the levels of various components of the UPP including proteasome subunits Rpt6 and β5, polyubiquitin shuttling factor p62/sequestosome1, E3 ligase CHIP, AAA-ATPase p97 and the ubiquitin gene ubB. Finally, db-cAMP reduced the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, proteasome inhibition, and neurotoxicity triggered by the endogenous product of inflammation prostaglandin J2. We propose that optimizing the effects of cAMP/PKA-signaling on the UPP could offer an effective therapeutic approach to prevent UPP-related proteotoxicity in spinal cord neurons. PMID:22982149

  6. Regulated protein turnover: snapshots of the proteasome in action

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sucharita; Yu, Houqing; Mim, Carsten; Matouschek, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is the main ATP-dependent protein degradation pathway in the cytosol and nucleus of eukaryotic cells. At its centre is the 26S proteasome, which degrades regulatory proteins and mis-folded or damaged proteins. In a major breakthrough, several groups have determined high-resolution structures of the entire 26S proteasome particle in different nucleotide conditions and with and without substrate using cryo-electron microscopy combined with other techniques. These structures bring some surprising insights into the functional mechanism of the proteasome and will provide invaluable guidance for genetic and biochemical studies of this key regulatory system. PMID:24452470

  7. The ubiquitin proteasome system and efficacy of proteasome inhibitors in diseases.

    PubMed

    Chitra, Selvarajan; Nalini, Ganesan; Rajasekhar, Gopalakrishnan

    2012-06-01

    In eukaryotes the ubiquitin proteasome pathway plays an important role in cellular homeostasis and also it exerts a critical role in regulating a wide variety of cellular pathways, including cell growth and proliferation, apoptosis, DNA repair, transcription and immune response. Defects in these pathways have been implicated in a number of human pathologies. Inhibition of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway by proteasome inhibitors may be a rational therapeutic approach for various diseases, such as cancer and inflammatory diseases. Many of the critical cytokine and chemokine mediators of the progression of rheumatoid arthritis are regulated by nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). In peptidoglycan/polysaccharide-induced polyarthritis, proteasome inhibitors limit the overall inflammation, reduce NF-κB activation, decrease cellular adhesion molecule expression, inhibit nitric oxide synthase, attenuate circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 and reduce the arthritis index and swelling in the joints of the animals. Since proteasome inhibitors exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti proliferative effects, diseases characterized by both of these processes such as rheumatoid arthritis might also represent clinical opportunities for such drugs. The regulation of the proteasomal complex by proteasome inhibitors also has implications and potential benefits for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This review summarizes the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, the structure of 26S proteasomes and types of proteasome inhibitors, with their actions, and clinical applications of proteasome inhibitors in various diseases. PMID:22709487

  8. Targeting the ubiquitin proteasome pathway for the treatment of septic shock in patients

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Endotoxic shock is a serious systemic inflammatory response to an external biological stressor. The responsiveness of NF-κB is built upon rapid protein modification and degradation involving the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. Using transgenic mice, we have obtained in vivo evidence that interference with this pathway can alleviate the symptoms of toxic shock. We posit that administration of proteasome inhibitors may enhance the survival of patients with septic shock. PMID:19691815

  9. Targeting Tumor Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway with Polyphenols for Chemosensitization

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Min; Chan, Tak Hang; Dou, Q. Ping

    2012-01-01

    The development of tumor drug resistance is one of the biggest obstacles on the way to achieve a favorable outcome of chemotherapy. Among various strategies that have been explored to overcome drug resistance, the combination of current chemotherapy with plant polyphenols as a chemosensitizer has emerged as a promising one. Plant polyphenols are a group of phytochemicals characterized by the presence of more than one phenolic group. Mechanistic studies suggest that polyphenols have multiple intracellular targets, one of which is the proteasome complex. The proteasome is a proteolytic enzyme complex responsible for intracellular protein degradation and has been shown to play an important role in tumor growth and the development of drug resistance. Therefore, proteasome inhibition by plant polyphenols could be one of the mechanisms contributing to their chemosensitizing effect. Plant polyphenols that have been identified to possess proteasome-inhibitory activity include (−)-epigallocatechins-3-gallate (EGCG), genistein, luteolin, apigenin, chrysin, quercetin, curcumin and tannic acid. These polyphenols have exhibited an appreciable effect on overcoming resistance to various chemotherapeutic drugs as well as multidrug resistance in a broad spectrum of tumors ranging from carcinoma and sarcoma to hematological malignances. The in vitro and in vivo studies on polyphenols with proteasome-inhibitory activity have built a solid foundation to support the idea that they could serve as a chemosensitizer for the treatment of cancer. In-depth mechanistic studies and identification of optimal regimen are needed in order to eventually translate this laboratory concept into clinical trials to actually benefit current chemotherapy. PMID:22292765

  10. Ubiquitin-proteasome pathway function is required for lens cell proliferation and differentiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ubiquitin proteasome pathway is involved in the regulation of many cellular processes, such as cell cycle control, signal transduction, transcription, and removal of obsolete proteins. The objective of this work was to investigate roles for this proteolytic pathway in controlling the differentia...

  11. Thiostrepton interacts covalently with Rpt subunits of the 19S proteasome and proteasome substrates

    PubMed Central

    Sandu, Cristinel; Chandramouli, Nagaranjan; Glickman, Joseph Fraser; Molina, Henrik; Kuo, Chueh-Ling; Kukushkin, Nikolay; Goldberg, Alfred L; Steller, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report a novel mechanism of proteasome inhibition mediated by Thiostrepton (Thsp), which interacts covalently with Rpt subunits of the 19S proteasome and proteasome substrates. We identified Thsp in a cell-based high-throughput screen using a fluorescent reporter sensitive to degradation by the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. Thiostrepton behaves as a proteasome inhibitor in several paradigms, including cell-based reporters, detection of global ubiquitination status, and proteasome-mediated labile protein degradation. In vitro, Thsp does not block the chymotrypsin activity of the 26S proteasome. In a cell-based IκBα degradation assay, Thsp is a slow inhibitor and 4 hrs of treatment achieves the same effects as MG-132 at 30 min. We show that Thsp forms covalent adducts with proteins in human cells and demonstrate their nature by mass spectrometry. Furthermore, the ability of Thsp to interact covalently with the cysteine residues is essential for its proteasome inhibitory function. We further show that a Thsp modified peptide cannot be degraded by proteasomes in vitro. Importantly, we demonstrate that Thsp binds covalently to Rpt subunits of the 19S regulatory particle and forms bridges with a proteasome substrate. Taken together, our results uncover an important role of Thsp in 19S proteasome inhibition. PMID:26033448

  12. TRIB1 Is Regulated Post-Transcriptionally by Proteasomal and Non-Proteasomal Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Soubeyrand, Sébastien; Martinuk, Amy; Lau, Paulina; McPherson, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    The TRIB1 gene has been associated with multiple malignancies, plasma triglycerides and coronary artery disease (CAD). Despite the clinical significance of this pseudo-kinase, there is little information on the regulation of TRIB1. Previous studies reported TRIB1 mRNA to be unstable, hinting that TRIB1 might be subject to post-transcriptional regulation. This work explores TRIB1 regulation, focusing on its post-transcriptional aspects. In 3 distinct model systems (HEK293T, HeLa and arterial smooth muscle cells) TRIB1 was undetectable as assessed by western blot. Using recombinant TRIB1 as a proxy, we demonstrate TRIB1 to be highly unstable at the protein and RNA levels. By contrast, recombinant TRIB1 was stable in cellular extracts. Blocking proteasome function led to increased protein steady state levels but failed to rescue protein instability, demonstrating that the 2 processes are uncoupled. Unlike as shown for TRIB2, CUL1 and TRCPβ did not play a role in mediating TRIB1 instability although TRCPβ suppression increased TRIB1 expression. Lastly, we demonstrate that protein instability is independent of TRIB1 subcellular localization. Following the identification of TRIB1 nuclear localization signal, a cytosolic form was engineered. Despite being confined to the cytosol, TRIB1 remained unstable, suggesting that instability occurs at a stage that precedes its nuclear translocation and downstream nuclear function. These results uncover possible avenues of intervention to regulate TRIB1 function by identifying two distinct regulatory axes that control TRIB1 at the post-transcriptional level. PMID:27019349

  13. Impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in RPE alters the expression of inflammation related genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) plays an important role in regulating gene expression. Retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) are a major source of ocular inflammatory cytokines. In this work we determined the relationship between impairment of the UPP and expression of inflammation-related f...

  14. Proteasome Impairment Induces Recovery of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and an Alternative Pathway of Mitochondrial Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Shirozu, Ryohei; Yashiroda, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are vital and highly dynamic organelles that continuously fuse and divide to maintain mitochondrial quality. Mitochondrial dysfunction impairs cellular integrity and is known to be associated with various human diseases. However, the mechanism by which the quality of mitochondria is maintained remains largely unexplored. Here we show that impaired proteasome function recovers the growth of yeast cells lacking Fzo1, a pivotal protein for mitochondrial fusion. Decreased proteasome activity increased the mitochondrial oxidoreductase protein Mia40 and the ratio of the short isoform of mitochondrial intermembrane protein Mgm1 (s-Mgm1) to the long isoform (l-Mgm1). The increase in Mia40 restored mitochondrial membrane potential, while the increase in the s-Mgm1/l-Mgm1 ratio promoted mitochondrial fusion in an Fzo1-independent manner. Our findings demonstrate a new pathway for mitochondrial quality control that is induced by proteasome impairment. PMID:26552703

  15. Regulation of the retinoblastoma-E2F pathway by the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Satyaki; Henry, R William

    2015-10-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (RB) and its related family members p107 and p130 regulate cell proliferation through the transcriptional repression of genes involved in cellular G1 to S phase transition. However, RB proteins are functionally versatile, and numerous genetic and biochemical studies point to expansive roles in cellular growth control, pluripotency, and apoptotic response. For the vast majority of genes, RB family members target the E2F family of transcriptional activators as an integral component of its gene regulatory mechanism. These interactions are regulated via reversible phosphorylation by Cyclin/Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) complexes, a major molecular mechanism that regulates transcriptional output of RB/E2F target genes. Recent studies indicate an additional level of regulation involving the ubiquitin-proteasome system that renders pervasive control over each component of the RB pathway. Disruption of the genetic circuitry for proteasome-mediated targeting of the RB pathway has serious consequences on development and cellular transformation, and is associated with several forms of human cancer. In this review, we discuss the role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in proteolytic control of RB-E2F pathway components, and recent data that points to surprising non-proteolytic roles for the ubiquitin-proteasome system in novel transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. PMID:26319102

  16. Involvement of a eukaryotic-like ubiquitin-related modifier in the proteasome pathway of the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjum, Rana S.; Bray, Sian M.; Blackwood, John K.; Kilkenny, Mairi L.; Coelho, Matthew A.; Foster, Benjamin M.; Li, Shurong; Howard, Julie A.; Pellegrini, Luca; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Deery, Michael J.; Robinson, Nicholas P.

    2015-09-01

    In eukaryotes, the covalent attachment of ubiquitin chains directs substrates to the proteasome for degradation. Recently, ubiquitin-like modifications have also been described in the archaeal domain of life. It has subsequently been hypothesized that ubiquitin-like proteasomal degradation might also operate in these microbes, since all archaeal species utilize homologues of the eukaryotic proteasome. Here we perform a structural and biochemical analysis of a ubiquitin-like modification pathway in the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. We reveal that this modifier is homologous to the eukaryotic ubiquitin-related modifier Urm1, considered to be a close evolutionary relative of the progenitor of all ubiquitin-like proteins. Furthermore we demonstrate that urmylated substrates are recognized and processed by the archaeal proteasome, by virtue of a direct interaction with the modifier. Thus, the regulation of protein stability by Urm1 and the proteasome in archaea is likely representative of an ancient pathway from which eukaryotic ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis has evolved.

  17. What do we really know about the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in muscle atrophy?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagoe, R. T.; Goldberg, A. L.

    2001-01-01

    Studies of many different rodent models of muscle wasting have indicated that accelerated proteolysis via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is the principal cause of muscle atrophy induced by fasting, cancer cachexia, metabolic acidosis, denervation, disuse, diabetes, sepsis, burns, hyperthyroidism and excess glucocorticoids. However, our understanding about how muscle proteins are degraded, and how the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is activated in muscle under these conditions, is still very limited. The identities of the important ubiquitin-protein ligases in skeletal muscle, and the ways in which they recognize substrates are still largely unknown. Recent in-vitro studies have suggested that one set of ubquitination enzymes, E2(14K) and E3(alpha), which are responsible for the 'N-end rule' system of ubiquitination, plays an important role in muscle, especially in catabolic states. However, their functional significance in degrading different muscle proteins is still unclear. This review focuses on the many gaps in our understanding of the functioning of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in muscle atrophy, and highlights the strengths and limitations of the different experimental approaches used in such studies.

  18. The Proteasome Is a Molecular Target of Environmental Toxic Organotins

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Guoqing; Chen, Di; Zhai, Guangshu; Chen, Marina S.; Cui, Qiuzhi Cindy; Zhou, Qunfang; He, Bin; Dou, Q. Ping; Jiang, Guibin

    2009-01-01

    Background Because of the vital importance of the proteasome pathway, chemicals affecting proteasome activity could disrupt essential cellular processes. Although the toxicity of organotins to both invertebrates and vertebrates is well known, the essential cellular target of organotins has not been well identified. We hypothesize that the proteasome is a molecular target of environmental toxic organotins. Objectives Our goal was to test the above hypothesis by investigating whether organotins could inhibit the activity of purified and cellular proteasomes and, if so, the involved molecular mechanisms and downstream events. Results We found that some toxic organotins [e.g., triphenyltin (TPT)] can potently and preferentially inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of purified 20S proteasomes and human breast cancer cellular 26S proteasomes. Direct binding of tin atoms to cellular proteasomes is responsible for the observed irreversible inhibition. Inhibition of cellular proteasomes by TPT in several human cell lines results in the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and natural proteasome target proteins, accompanied by induction of cell death. Conclusions The proteasome is one of the molecular targets of environmental toxic organotins in human cells, and proteasome inhibition by organotins contributes to their cellular toxicity. PMID:19337512

  19. Limiting the power of p53 through the ubiquitin proteasome pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome pathway is critical in restraining the activities of the p53 tumor suppressor. Numerous E3 and E4 ligases regulate p53 levels. Additionally, deubquitinating enzymes that modify p53 directly or indirectly also impact p53 function. When alterations of these proteins result in increased p53 activity, cells arrest in the cell cycle, senesce, or apoptose. On the other hand, alterations that result in decreased p53 levels yield tumor-prone phenotypes. This review focuses on the physiological relevance of these important regulators of p53 and their therapeutic implications. PMID:25128494

  20. Cytosolic PINK1 promotes the targeting of ubiquitinated proteins to the aggresome-autophagy pathway during proteasomal stress.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ju; Li, Mengen; Qin, Siyue; Zhang, Ting; Jiang, Sicong; Hu, Yuan; Deng, Yongkang; Zhang, Chenliang; You, Dujuan; Li, Hongchang; Mu, Dezhi; Zhang, Zhuohua; Jiang, Changan

    2016-04-01

    During proteasomal stress, cells can alleviate the accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins by targeting them to perinuclear aggresomes for autophagic degradation, but the mechanism underlying the activation of this compensatory pathway remains unclear. Here we report that PINK1-s, a short form of Parkinson disease (PD)-related protein kinase PINK1 (PTEN induced putative kinase 1), is a major regulator of aggresome formation. PINK1-s is extremely unstable due to its recognition by the N-end rule pathway, and tends to accumulate in the cytosol during proteasomal stress. Overexpression of PINK1-s induces aggresome formation in cells with normal proteasomal activities, while loss of PINK1-s function leads to a significant decrease in the efficiency of aggresome formation induced by proteasomal inhibition. PINK1-s exerts its effect through phosphorylation of the ubiquitin-binding protein SQSTM1 (sequestosome 1) and increasing its ability to sequester polyubiquitinated proteins into aggresomes. These findings pinpoint PINK1-s as a sensor of proteasomal activities that transduces the proteasomal impairment signal to the aggresome formation machinery. PMID:27050454

  1. The Keap1-Nrf2-antioxidant response element pathway: a review of its regulation by melatonin and the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Vriend, Jerry; Reiter, Russel J

    2015-02-01

    Both melatonin and proteasome inhibitors upregulate antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GP), hemoxygenase 1 (HO-1), and NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1). Recent evidence suggests that the antioxidant action of both melatonin and proteasome inhibitors involves the Keap1-ARE (Keap1 antioxidant response element) pathway via the upregulation of Nrf2. Melatonin and proteasome inhibitors suppress the degradation of Nrf2 and also enhance its nuclear translocation. In the nucleus Nrf2, together with a cofactor, stimulates the transcription of antioxidant enzymes and detoxifying enzymes. The ligase (E3) complex (Keap1-Cul3-Rbx1) responsible for ubiquitinating Nrf2, prior to proteasomal degradation, also ubiquitinates IkB kinase and the antiapoptotic factor Bcl-2, and possibly additional proteins. In various systems, NF-κB, which is inhibited by IkBα, is downregulated by proteasome inhibitors as well as by melatonin. Similarly in leukemic cells, Bcl-2 is down-regulated by the proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, and also by melatonin. Thus melatonin administration modulates the activity of three separate substrates of the Keap1-Cul3-Rbx1 ubiquitin ligase. These facts could be accounted for by the hypothesis that melatonin interacts with the ubiquitin ligase complex or, more likely, by the hypothesis that melatonin acts as a proteasome inhibitor. A recent study documented that melatonin acts as a proteasome inhibitor in cancer cells as well as inhibiting chymotrypsin-like activity in cell-free systems of these cells. Further studies, however, are needed to clarify the interaction of melatonin and the ubiquitin-proteasome system as they relate to oxidative stress. PMID:25528518

  2. Fundamental reaction pathway and free energy profile for proteasome inhibition by syringolin A (SylA)

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Donghui; Tang, Mingsheng; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2015-01-01

    In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and first-principles quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical free energy (QM/MM-FE) calculations have been performed to uncover the fundamental reaction pathway of proteasome with a representative inhibitor syringolin A (SylA). The calculated results reveal that the reaction process consists of three steps. The first step is a proton transfer process, activating Thr1-Oγ directly by Thr1-Nz to form a zwitterionic intermediate. The next step is nucleophilic attack on the olefin carbon of SylA by the negatively charged Thr1-Oγ atom. The last step is a proton transfer from Thr1-Nz to another olefin carbon of SylA to complete the inhibition reaction process. The calculated free energy profile demonstrates that the second step should be the rate-determining step and has the highest free energy barrier of 24.6 kcal/mol, which is reasonably close to the activation free energy (∼22.4 – 23.0 kcal/mol) derived from available experimental kinetic data. In addition, our computational results indicate that no water molecule can assist the rate-determining step, since the second step is not involved a proton transfer process. The obtained mechanistic insights should be valuable for understanding the inhibition process of proteasome by SylA and structurally related inhibitors at molecular level, and thus provide a solid mechanistic base and valuable clues for future rational design of novel, more potent inhibitors of proteasome. PMID:26018983

  3. Disease-associated mutations of TDP-43 promote turnover of the protein through the proteasomal pathway.

    PubMed

    Araki, Wataru; Minegishi, Seiji; Motoki, Kazumi; Kume, Hideaki; Hohjoh, Hirohiko; Araki, Yumiko M; Tamaoka, Akira

    2014-12-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) is a major component of most ubiquitin-positive neuronal and glial inclusions of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). A number of missense mutations in the TARDBP gene have been identified in patients with familial and sporadic ALS, as well as familial FTLD with ALS. In the diseased states, TDP-43 proteins exhibit characteristic alterations, including truncation, abnormal phosphorylation, and altered subcellular distribution. However, the mechanisms by which TDP-43 mutations induce neurodegeneration remain unclear at present. In the current study, we analyzed protein turnover and subcellular distribution of wild-type TDP-43 and two disease-associated mutants (G298S and A382T) in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells stably expressing TDP-43 with a C-terminal tag. Cycloheximide chase experiments revealed more rapid turnover of TDP-43 mutant proteins than their wild-type counterpart. The decrease in the TDP-43 level after cycloheximide treatment was partially recovered upon co-treatment with the proteasome inhibitor, epoxomicin, but not the lysosomotropic agent, chloroquine, suggesting involvement of the proteasomal pathway in TDP-43 degradation. Analysis of the subcellular distribution of TDP-43 revealed predominant localization in the nuclear fraction, whereas the relative level in the cytoplasm remained unaltered in cells expressing either mutant protein, compared with wild-type protein. Our results suggest that higher turnover of disease-associated mutant TDP-43 proteins through the ubiquitin proteasome system is pathogenetically relevant and highlight the significance of proteolysis in the pathogenetic mechanism of TDP-43 proteinopathy. PMID:24477737

  4. The ubiquitin–proteasome pathway protects Chlamydomonas reinhardtii against selenite toxicity, but is impaired as reactive oxygen species accumulate

    PubMed Central

    Vallentine, Patrick; Hung, Chiu-Yueh; Xie, Jiahua; Van Hoewyk, Doug

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin–proteasome pathway (UPP) coordinates a myriad of physiological processes in higher plants, including abiotic stress responses, but it is less well characterized in algal species. In this study, the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was used to gain insights into the role of the UPP during moderate and severe selenite stress at three different time points. The data indicate that activity of the UPP in response to selenium (Se) stress was both time and dose dependent. Moderate selenite stress increased proteasome activity, protein ubiquitination and the proteasomal removal of malformed selenoproteins. However, severe Se stress caused by prolonged selenite treatment or high selenite concentration decreased proteasome activity, inhibited protein ubiquitination and prevented the proteasomal removal of selenoproteins. The UPP impairment during severe Se stress was associated with the observed accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including mitochondrial superoxide. Additionally, proteasomal inhibition decreased the concentration of chlorophyll in cultures challenged with Se. Therefore, although the UPP protects Chlamydomonas against Se stress, severe oxidative stress induced by selenite toxicity likely hinders the UPP's capacity to mediate a stress response. The possibility that stress tolerance in plants is dependent upon optimal UPP activity and maintenance is discussed. PMID:25301821

  5. Proteasome inhibitors induce peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor transactivation through RXR accumulation and a protein kinase C-dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, W.-C.; Wu, H.-M.; Chi, K.-H.; Chang, Y.-H.; Lin, W.-W. . E-mail: wwl@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2005-03-10

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), a member of nuclear hormone receptors, forms a heterodimeric DNA binding complex with retinoid X receptor (RXR) and serves as a transcriptional regulator of gene expression. In this study, using luciferase assay of a reporter gene containing PPAR response element (PPRE), we found PPRE transactivity was additively induced by PPAR{gamma} activator (15dPGJ{sub 2}) and RXR activator (9-cis retinoic acid, 9-cis RA). Proteasome inhibitors MG132 and MG262 also stimulate PPRE transactivity in a concentration-dependent manner, and this effect is synergistic to 15dPGJ{sub 2} and 9-cis RA. PKC activation by 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ingenol 3,20-dibenzoate (IDB) also led to an increased PPRE activation, and this action was additive to PPAR{gamma} activators and 9-cis RA, but not to proteasome inhibitors. Results indicate that the PPAR{gamma} enhancing effect of proteasome inhibitors was attributed to redox-sensitive PKC activation. Western blot analysis showed that the protein level of RXR{alpha}, but not PPAR{gamma}, RXR{beta}, or PKC isoforms, was accumulated in the presence of proteasome inhibitors. Taken together, we conclude that proteasome inhibitors can upregulate PPRE activity through RXR{alpha} accumulation and a PKC-dependent pathway. The former is due to inhibition of RXR{alpha} degradation through ubiquitin-dependent proteasome system, while the latter is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) production.

  6. The Role of the Ubiquitin Proteasome Pathway in Keratin Intermediate Filament Protein Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Rogel, Micah R.; Jaitovich, Ariel; Ridge, Karen M.

    2010-01-01

    Lung injury, whether caused by hypoxic or mechanical stresses, elicits a variety of responses at the cellular level. Alveolar epithelial cells respond and adapt to such injurious stimuli by reorganizing the cellular cytoskeleton, mainly accomplished through modification of the intermediate filament (IF) network. The structural and mechanical integrity in epithelial cells is maintained through this adaptive reorganization response. Keratin, the predominant IF expressed in epithelial cells, displays highly dynamic properties in response to injury, sometimes in the form of degradation of the keratin IF network. Post-translational modification, such as phosphorylation, targets keratin proteins for degradation in these circumstances. As with other structural and regulatory proteins, turnover of keratin is regulated by the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome pathway. The degradation process begins with activation of Ub by the Ub-activating enzyme (E1), followed by the exchange of Ub to the Ub-conjugating enzyme (E2). E2 shuttles the Ub molecule to the substrate-specific Ub ligase (E3), which then delivers the Ub to the substrate protein, thereby targeting it for degradation. In some cases of injury and IF-related disease, aggresomes form in epithelial cells. The mechanisms that regulate aggresome formation are currently unknown, although proteasome overload may play a role. Therefore, a more complete understanding of keratin degradation—causes, mechanisms, and consequences—will allow for a greater understanding of epithelial cell biology and lung pathology alike. PMID:20160151

  7. REGγ regulates ERα degradation via ubiquitin–proteasome pathway in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, Fan; Liang, Yan; Bi, Jiong; Chen, Li; Zhang, Fan; Cui, Youhong; Jiang, Jun

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • High expression of REGγ is correlated with ERα status and poor clinical features. • Cell growth, mobility and invasion are significantly impaired by REGγ knockdown. • REGγ indirectly regulates ERα protein expression. - Abstract: REGγ is a proteasome coactivator which regulates proteolytic activity in eukaryotic cells. Abundant lines of evidence have showed that REGγ is over expressed in a number of human carcinomas. However, its precise role in the pathogenesis of cancer is still unclear. In this study, by examining 200 human breast cancer specimens, we demonstrated that REGγ was highly expressed in breast cancers, and the expression of REGγ was positively correlated with breast cancer patient estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) status. Moreover, the expression of REGγ was found positively associated with poor clinical features and low survival rates in ERα positive breast cancer patients. Further cell culture studies using MCF7 and BT474 breast cancer cell lines showed that cell proliferation, motility, and invasion capacities were decreased significantly by REGγ knockdown. Lastly, we demonstrated that REGγ indirectly regulates the degradation of ERα protein via ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. In conclusion, our findings provide the evidence that REGγ expression was positively correlated with ERα status and poor clinical prognosis in ERα positive breast cancer patients. As well, we disclose a new connection between the two molecules that are both highly expressed in most breast cancer cases.

  8. Involvement of a eukaryotic-like ubiquitin-related modifier in the proteasome pathway of the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius

    PubMed Central

    Anjum, Rana S.; Bray, Sian M.; Blackwood, John K.; Kilkenny, Mairi L.; Coelho, Matthew A.; Foster, Benjamin M.; Li, Shurong; Howard, Julie A.; Pellegrini, Luca; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Deery, Michael J.; Robinson, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the covalent attachment of ubiquitin chains directs substrates to the proteasome for degradation. Recently, ubiquitin-like modifications have also been described in the archaeal domain of life. It has subsequently been hypothesized that ubiquitin-like proteasomal degradation might also operate in these microbes, since all archaeal species utilize homologues of the eukaryotic proteasome. Here we perform a structural and biochemical analysis of a ubiquitin-like modification pathway in the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. We reveal that this modifier is homologous to the eukaryotic ubiquitin-related modifier Urm1, considered to be a close evolutionary relative of the progenitor of all ubiquitin-like proteins. Furthermore we demonstrate that urmylated substrates are recognized and processed by the archaeal proteasome, by virtue of a direct interaction with the modifier. Thus, the regulation of protein stability by Urm1 and the proteasome in archaea is likely representative of an ancient pathway from which eukaryotic ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis has evolved. PMID:26348592

  9. Formation of distinct inclusion bodies by inhibition of ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosome pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Junho; Yang, Kyu-Hwan; Joe, Cheol O.; Kang, Seok-Seong

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} Distinct inclusion bodies are developed by inhibition of UPP and ALP. {yields} The inclusion bodies differ in morphology, localization and formation process. {yields} The inclusion bodies are distinguishable by the localization of TSC2. {yields} Inhibition of both UPP and ALP simultaneously induces those inclusion bodies. -- Abstract: Accumulation of misfolded proteins is caused by the impairment of protein quality control systems, such as ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) and autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP). In this study, the formation of inclusion bodies was examined after the blockade of UPP and/or ALP in A549 cells. UPP inhibition induced a single and large inclusion body localized in microtubule-organizing center. Interestingly, however, ALP inhibition generated dispersed small inclusion bodies in the cytoplasm. Tuberous sclerosis complex 2 was selectively accumulated in the inclusion bodies of UPP-inhibited cells, but not those of ALP-inhibited cells. Blockade of transcription and translation entirely inhibited the formation of inclusion body induced by UPP inhibition, but partially by ALP inhibition. Moreover, the simultaneous inhibition of two protein catabolic pathways independently developed two distinct inclusion bodies within a single cell. These findings clearly demonstrated that dysfunction of each catabolic pathway induced formation and accumulation of unique inclusion bodies on the basis of morphology, localization and formation process in A549 cells.

  10. Impairment of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway in RPE Alters the Expression of Inflammation Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenzhen; Qin, Tingyu; Zhou, Jilin; Taylor, Allen; Sparrow, Janet R.

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) plays an important role in regulating gene expression. Retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) are a major source of ocular inflammatory cytokines. In this work we determined the relationship between impairment of the UPP and expression of inflammation-related factors. The UPP could be impaired by oxidative stress or chemical inhibition. Impairment of the UPP in RPE increased the expression of several inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and IL-8. However, the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and complement factor H (CFH) and was reduced upon impairment of the UPP. These data suggest that impairment of the UPP in RPE may be one of the causes of retinal inflammation and abnormal functions of monocyte and the complement system during the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration. PMID:24664704

  11. Oxidative stress, NF-κB and the ubiquitin proteasomal pathway in the pathology of calpainopathy.

    PubMed

    Rajakumar, Dhanarajan; Alexander, Mathew; Oommen, Anna

    2013-10-01

    The neuromuscular disorder, calpainopathy (LGMD 2A), is a major muscular dystrophy classified under limb girdle muscular dystrophies. Genetic mutations of the enzyme calpain 3 cause LGMD 2A. Calpainopathy is phenotypically observed as progressive muscle wasting and weakness. Pathomechanisms of muscle wasting of calpainopathy remain poorly understood. Oxidative stress, NF-κB and the ubiquitin proteasomal pathway underlie the pathology of several muscle wasting conditions but their role in calpainopathic dystrophy is not known. Oxidative and nitrosative stress, the source of reactive oxygen species, NF-κB signaling and protein ubiquitinylation were studied in 15 calpainopathic and 8 healthy control human muscle biopsies. Oxidative stress and NF-κB/IKK β signaling were increased in calpainopathic muscle and may contribute to increased protein ubiquitinylation and muscle protein loss. Preventing oxidative stress or inhibition of NF-κB signaling could be considered for treatment of LGMD 2A. PMID:23846623

  12. Modulation of autophagy and ubiquitin-proteasome pathways during ultra-endurance running.

    PubMed

    Jamart, Cécile; Francaux, Marc; Millet, Guillaume Y; Deldicque, Louise; Frère, Delphine; Féasson, Léonard

    2012-05-01

    In this study, the coordinated activation of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP), autophagy-lysosomal pathway (ALP), and mitochondrial remodeling including mitophagy was assessed by measuring protein markers during ultra-endurance running exercise in human skeletal muscle. Eleven male, experienced ultra-endurance athletes ran for 24 h on a treadmill. Muscle biopsy samples were taken from the vastus lateralis muscle 2 h before starting and immediately after finishing exercise. Athletes ran 149.8 ± 16.3 km with an effective running time of 18 h 42 min ( ± 41 min). The phosphorylation state of Akt (-74 ± 5%; P < 0.001), FOXO3a (-49 ± 9%; P < 0.001), mTOR Ser2448 (-32 ± 14%; P = 0.028), and 4E-BP1 (-34 ± 7%; P < 0.001) was decreased, whereas AMPK phosphorylation state increased by 247 ± 170% (P = 0.042). Proteasome β2 subunit activity increased by 95 ± 44% (P = 0.028), whereas the activities associated with the β1 and β5 subunits remained unchanged. MuRF1 protein level increased by 55 ± 26% (P = 0.034), whereas MAFbx protein and ubiquitin-conjugated protein levels did not change. LC3bII increased by 554 ± 256% (P = 0.005), and the form of ATG12 conjugated to ATG5 increased by 36 ± 17% (P = 0.042). The mitochondrial fission marker phospho-DRP1 increased by 110 ± 47% (P = 0.003), whereas the fusion marker Mfn1 and the mitophagy markers Parkin and PINK1 remained unchanged. These results fit well with a coordinated regulation of ALP and UPP triggered by FOXO3 and AMPK during ultra-endurance exercise. PMID:22345427

  13. Phosphorylation-dependent targeting of cAMP response element binding protein to the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway in hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Cormac T.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Synnestvedt, Kristin; Colgan, Sean P.

    2000-01-01

    Hypoxia activates a number of gene products through degradation of the transcriptional coactivator cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Other transcriptional regulators (e.g., β-catenin and NF-κB) are controlled through phosphorylation-targeted proteasomal degradation, and thus, we hypothesized a similar degradative pathway for CREB. Differential display analysis of mRNA derived from hypoxic epithelia revealed a specific and time-dependent repression of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), a serine phosphatase important in CREB dephosphorylation. Subsequent studies identified a previously unappreciated proteasomal-targeting motif within the primary structure of CREB (DSVTDS), which functions as a substrate for PP1. Ambient hypoxia resulted in temporally sequential CREB serine phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and degradation (in vitro and in vivo). HIV-tat peptide-facilitated loading of intact epithelia with phosphopeptides corresponding to this proteasome targeting motif resulted in inhibition of CREB ubiquitination. Further studies revealed that PP1 inhibitors mimicked hypoxia-induced gene expression, whereas proteasome inhibitors reversed the hypoxic phenotype. Thus, hypoxia establishes conditions that target CREB to proteasomal degradation. These studies may provide unique insight into a general mechanism of transcriptional regulation by hypoxia. PMID:11035795

  14. Selective overproduction of the proteasome inhibitor salinosporamide A via precursor pathway regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, Anna; Eustáquio, Alessandra S.; Gulder, Tobias A. M.; Hafner, Mathias; Moore, Bradley S.

    2011-01-01

    The chlorinated natural product salinosporamide A is a potent 20S proteasome inhibitor currently in clinical trials as an anticancer agent. To deepen our understanding of salinosporamide biosynthesis, we investigated the function of a LuxR-type pathway-specific regulatory gene, salR2, and observed a selective effect on the production of salinosporamide A over its less active aliphatic analogs. SalR2 was shown to specifically activate genes involved in the biosynthesis of the halogenated precursor chloroethylmalonyl-CoA, which is a dedicated precursor of salinosporamide A. Specifically, SalR2 activates transcription of two divergent operons – one of which contains the unique S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent chlorinase encoding gene salL. By applying this knowledge towards rational engineering, we were able to selectively double salinosporamide A production. This study exemplifies the specialized regulation of a polyketide precursor pathway and its application to the selective overproduction of a specific natural product congener. PMID:22195555

  15. It's all about talking: two-way communication between proteasomal and lysosomal degradation pathways via ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Liebl, Martina P; Hoppe, Thorsten

    2016-08-01

    Selective degradation of proteins requires a fine-tuned coordination of the two major proteolytic pathways, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy. Substrate selection and proteolytic activity are defined by a plethora of regulatory cofactors influencing each other. Both proteolytic pathways are initiated by ubiquitylation to mark substrate proteins for degradation, although the size and/or topology of the modification are different. In this context E3 ubiquitin ligases, ensuring the covalent attachment of activated ubiquitin to the substrate, are of special importance. The regulation of E3 ligase activity, competition between different E3 ligases for binding E2 conjugation enzymes and substrates, as well as their interplay with deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) represent key events in the cross talk between the UPS and autophagy. The coordination between both degradation routes is further influenced by heat shock factors and ubiquitin-binding proteins (UBPs) such as p97, p62, or optineurin. Mutations in enzymes and ubiquitin-binding proteins or a general decline of both proteolytic systems during aging result in accumulation of damaged and aggregated proteins. Thus further mechanistic understanding of how UPS and autophagy communicate might allow therapeutic intervention especially against age-related diseases. PMID:27225656

  16. Production of Infectious Dengue Virus in Aedes aegypti Is Dependent on the Ubiquitin Proteasome Pathway.

    PubMed

    Choy, Milly M; Sessions, October M; Gubler, Duane J; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2015-11-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) relies on host factors to complete its life cycle in its mosquito host for subsequent transmission to humans. DENV first establishes infection in the midgut of Aedes aegypti and spreads to various mosquito organs for lifelong infection. Curiously, studies have shown that infectious DENV titers peak and decrease thereafter in the midgut despite relatively stable viral genome levels. However, the mechanisms that regulate this decoupling of infectious virion production from viral RNA replication have never been determined. We show here that the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) plays an important role in regulating infectious DENV production. Using RNA interference studies, we show in vivo that knockdown of selected UPP components reduced infectious virus production without altering viral RNA replication in the midgut. Furthermore, this decoupling effect could also be observed after RNAi knockdown in the head/thorax of the mosquito, which otherwise showed direct correlation between infectious DENV titer and viral RNA levels. The dependence on the UPP for successful DENV production is further reinforced by the observed up-regulation of key UPP molecules upon DENV infection that overcome the relatively low expression of these genes after a blood meal. Collectively, our findings indicate an important role for the UPP in regulating DENV production in the mosquito vector. PMID:26566123

  17. Activation of the Ubiquitin Proteasome Pathway by Silk Fibroin Modified Chitosan Nanoparticles in Hepatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming-Hui; Chung, Tze-Wen; Lu, Yi-Shan; Chen, Yi-Ling; Tsai, Wan-Chi; Jong, Shiang-Bin; Yuan, Shyng-Shiou; Liao, Pao-Chi; Lin, Po-Chiao; Tyan, Yu-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Silk fibroin (SF) is a protein with bulky hydrophobic domains and can be easily purified as sericin-free silk-based biomaterial. Silk fibroin modified chitosan nanoparticle (SF-CSNP), a biocompatible material, has been widely used as a potential drug delivery system. Our current investigation studied the bio-effects of the SF-CSNP uptake by liver cells. In this experiment, the characterizations of SF-CSNPs were measured by particle size analysis and protein assay. The average size of the SF-CSNP was 311.9 ± 10.7 nm, and the average zeta potential was +13.33 ± 0.3 mV. The SF coating on the SF-CSNP was 6.27 ± 0.17 μg/mL. Moreover, using proteomic approaches, several proteins involved in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway were identified by analysis of differential protein expressions of HepG2 cell uptake the SF-CSNP. Our experimental results have demonstrated that the SF-CSNP may be involved in liver cancer cell survival and proliferation. PMID:25588218

  18. Activation of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway by silk fibroin modified chitosan nanoparticles in hepatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming-Hui; Chung, Tze-Wen; Lu, Yi-Shan; Chen, Yi-Ling; Tsai, Wan-Chi; Jong, Shiang-Bin; Yuan, Shyng-Shiou; Liao, Pao-Chi; Lin, Po-Chiao; Tyan, Yu-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Silk fibroin (SF) is a protein with bulky hydrophobic domains and can be easily purified as sericin-free silk-based biomaterial. Silk fibroin modified chitosan nanoparticle (SF-CSNP), a biocompatible material, has been widely used as a potential drug delivery system. Our current investigation studied the bio-effects of the SF-CSNP uptake by liver cells. In this experiment, the characterizations of SF-CSNPs were measured by particle size analysis and protein assay. The average size of the SF-CSNP was 311.9 ± 10.7 nm, and the average zeta potential was +13.33 ± 0.3 mV. The SF coating on the SF-CSNP was 6.27 ± 0.17 μg/mL. Moreover, using proteomic approaches, several proteins involved in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway were identified by analysis of differential protein expressions of HepG2 cell uptake the SF-CSNP. Our experimental results have demonstrated that the SF-CSNP may be involved in liver cancer cell survival and proliferation. PMID:25588218

  19. An optimal ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in the nervous system: the role of deubiquitinating enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ristic, Gorica; Tsou, Wei-Ling; Todi, Sokol V.

    2014-01-01

    The Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway (UPP), which is critical for normal function in the nervous system and is implicated in various neurological diseases, requires the small modifier protein ubiquitin to accomplish its duty of selectively degrading short-lived, abnormal or misfolded proteins. Over the past decade, a large class of proteases collectively known as deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) has increasingly gained attention in all manners related to ubiquitin. By cleaving ubiquitin from another protein, DUBs ensure that the UPP functions properly. DUBs accomplish this task by processing newly translated ubiquitin so that it can be used for conjugation to substrate proteins, by regulating the “where, when, and why” of UPP substrate ubiquitination and subsequent degradation, and by recycling ubiquitin for re-use by the UPP. Because of the reliance of the UPP on DUB activities, it is not surprising that these proteases play important roles in the normal activities of the nervous system and in neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding the functions of DUBs in the nervous system. We focus on their role in the UPP, and make the argument that understanding the UPP from the perspective of DUBs can yield new insight into diseases that result from anomalous intra-cellular processes or inter-cellular networks. Lastly, we discuss the relevance of DUBs as therapeutic options for disorders of the nervous system. PMID:25191222

  20. Production of Infectious Dengue Virus in Aedes aegypti Is Dependent on the Ubiquitin Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Milly M.; Sessions, October M.; Gubler, Duane J.; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) relies on host factors to complete its life cycle in its mosquito host for subsequent transmission to humans. DENV first establishes infection in the midgut of Aedes aegypti and spreads to various mosquito organs for lifelong infection. Curiously, studies have shown that infectious DENV titers peak and decrease thereafter in the midgut despite relatively stable viral genome levels. However, the mechanisms that regulate this decoupling of infectious virion production from viral RNA replication have never been determined. We show here that the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) plays an important role in regulating infectious DENV production. Using RNA interference studies, we show in vivo that knockdown of selected UPP components reduced infectious virus production without altering viral RNA replication in the midgut. Furthermore, this decoupling effect could also be observed after RNAi knockdown in the head/thorax of the mosquito, which otherwise showed direct correlation between infectious DENV titer and viral RNA levels. The dependence on the UPP for successful DENV production is further reinforced by the observed up-regulation of key UPP molecules upon DENV infection that overcome the relatively low expression of these genes after a blood meal. Collectively, our findings indicate an important role for the UPP in regulating DENV production in the mosquito vector. PMID:26566123

  1. Bufalin derivative BF211 inhibits proteasome activity in human lung cancer cells in vitro by inhibiting β1 subunit expression and disrupting proteasome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peng; Feng, Li-xing; Zhang, Dong-mei; Liu, Miao; Liu, Wang; Mi, Tian; Wu, Wan-ying; Jiang, Bao-hong; Yang, Min; Hu, Li-hong; Guo, De-an; Liu, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Bufalin is one of the active components in the traditional Chinese medicine ChanSu that is used to treat arrhythmia, inflammation and cancer. BF211 is a bufalin derivative with stronger cytotoxic activity in cancer cells. The aim of this study was to identify the putative target proteins of BF211 and the signaling pathways in cancer cells. Methods: A549 human lung cancer cells were treated with BF211. A SILAC-based proteomic analysis was used to detect the protein expression profiles of BF211-treated A549 cells. Cellular proteasome activities were examined using fluorogenic peptide substrates, and the binding affinities of BF211 to recombinant proteasome subunit proteins were evaluated using the Biacore assay. The expression levels of proteasome subunits were determined using RT-PCR and Western blotting, and the levels of the integral 26S proteasome were evaluated using native PAGE analysis. Results: The proteomic analysis revealed that 1282 proteins were differentially expressed in BF211-treated A549 cells, and the putative target proteins of BF211 were associated with various cellular functions, including transcription, translation, mRNA splicing, ribosomal protein synthesis and proteasome function. In A549 cells, BF211 (5, 10, and 20 nmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited the enzymatic activities of proteasome. But BF211 displayed a moderate affinity in binding to proteasome β1 subunit and no binding affinity to the β2 and β5 subunits. Moreover, BF211 (0.1, 1, and 10 nmol/L) did not inhibit the proteasome activities in the cell lysates. BF211 (5, 10, and 20 nmol/L) significantly decreased the expression level of proteasome β1 subunit and the levels of integral 26S proteasome in A549 cells. Similarly, knockdown of the β1 subunit with siRNA in A549 cells significantly decreased integral 26S proteasome and proteasome activity. Conclusion: BF211 inhibits proteasome activity in A549 cells by decreasing β1 subunit expression and disrupting proteasome assembly

  2. Involvement of the Nrf2-proteasome pathway in the endoplasmic reticulum stress response in pancreatic β-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sanghwan; Hur, Eu-gene; Ryoo, In-geun; Jung, Kyeong-Ah; Kwak, Jiyeon; Kwak, Mi-Kyoung

    2012-11-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system plays a central role in protein quality control through endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) of unfolded and misfolded proteins. NF-E2‐related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that controls the expression of an array of phase II detoxification and antioxidant genes. Nrf2 signaling has additionally been shown to upregulate the expression of the proteasome catalytic subunits in several cell types. Here, we investigated the role of Nrf2 in tunicamycin-induced ER stress using a murine insulinoma β-cell line, βTC-6. shRNA-mediated silencing of Nrf2 expression in βTC-6 cells significantly increased tunicamycin-induced cytotoxicity, elevated the expression of the pro-apoptotic ER stress marker Chop10, and inhibited tunicamycin-inducible expression of the proteasomal catalytic subunits Psmb5 and Psmb6. The effects of 3H-1,2-dithiole-3-thione (D3T), a small molecule Nrf2 activator, on ER stress were also examined in βTC-6 cells. D3T pretreatment reduced tunicamycin cytotoxicity and attenuated the tunicamycin-inducible Chop10 and protein kinase RNA-activated‐like ER kinase (Perk). The protective effect of D3T was shown to be associated with increased ERAD. D3T increased the expression of Psmb5 and Psmb6 and elevated chymotrypsin-like peptidase activity; proteasome inhibitor treatment blocked D3T effects on tunicamycin cytotoxicity and ER stress marker changes. Similarly, silencing of Nrf2 abolished the protective effect of D3T against ER stress. These results indicate that the Nrf2 pathway contributes to the ER stress response in pancreatic β-cells by enhancing proteasome-mediated ERAD. -- Highlights: ► Nrf2 silencing in pancreatic β-cells enhanced tunicamycin-mediated ER stress. ► Expression of the proteasome was inducible by Nrf2 signaling. ► Nrf2 activator D3T protected β-cells from tunicamycin-mediated ER stress. ► Protective effect of D3T was associated with Nrf2-dependent proteasome

  3. Starvation Induces Proteasome Autophagy with Different Pathways for Core and Regulatory Particles*

    PubMed Central

    Waite, Kenrick A.; Mota-Peynado, Alina De-La; Vontz, Gabrielle; Roelofs, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome is responsible for the degradation of many cellular proteins. If and how this abundant and normally stable complex is degraded by cells is largely unknown. Here we show that in yeast, upon nitrogen starvation, proteasomes are targeted for vacuolar degradation through autophagy. Using GFP-tagged proteasome subunits, we observed that autophagy of a core particle (CP) subunit depends on the deubiquitinating enzyme Ubp3, although a regulatory particle (RP) subunit does not. Furthermore, upon blocking of autophagy, RP remained largely nuclear, although CP largely localized to the cytosol as well as granular structures within the cytosol. In all, our data reveal a regulated process for the removal of proteasomes upon nitrogen starvation. This process involves CP and RP dissociation, nuclear export, and independent vacuolar targeting of CP and RP. Thus, in addition to the well characterized transcriptional up-regulation of genes encoding proteasome subunits, cells are also capable of down-regulating cellular levels of proteasomes through proteaphagy. PMID:26670610

  4. The effects of anti-DNA topoisomerase II drugs, etoposide and ellipticine, are modified in root meristem cells of Allium cepa by MG132, an inhibitor of 26S proteasomes.

    PubMed

    Żabka, Aneta; Winnicki, Konrad; Polit, Justyna Teresa; Maszewski, Janusz

    2015-11-01

    DNA topoisomerase II (Topo II), a highly specialized nuclear enzyme, resolves various entanglement problems concerning DNA that arise during chromatin remodeling, transcription, S-phase replication, meiotic recombination, chromosome condensation and segregation during mitosis. The genotoxic effects of two Topo II inhibitors known as potent anti-cancer drugs, etoposide (ETO) and ellipticine (EPC), were assayed in root apical meristem cells of Allium cepa. Despite various types of molecular interactions between these drugs and DNA-Topo II complexes at the chromatin level, which have a profound negative impact on the genome integrity (production of double-strand breaks, chromosomal bridges and constrictions, lagging fragments of chromosomes and their uneven segregation to daughter cell nuclei), most of the elicited changes were apparently similar, regarding both their intensity and time characteristics. No essential changes between ETO- and EPC-treated onion roots were noticed in the frequency of G1-, S-, G2-and M-phase cells, nuclear morphology, chromosome structures, tubulin-microtubule systems, extended distribution of mitosis-specific phosphorylation sites of histone H3, and the induction of apoptosis-like programmed cell death (AL-PCD). However, the important difference between the effects induced by the ETO and EPC concerns their catalytic activities in the presence of MG132 (proteasome inhibitor engaged in Topo II-mediated formation of cleavage complexes) and relates to the time-variable changes in chromosomal aberrations and AL-PCD rates. This result implies that proteasome-dependent mechanisms may contribute to the course of physiological effects generated by DNA lesions under conditions that affect the ability of plant cells to resolve topological problems that associated with the nuclear metabolic activities. PMID:26233708

  5. Comparison of the SUMO1 and ubiquitin conjugation pathways during the inhibition of proteasome activity with evidence of SUMO1 recycling

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    To investigate potential interplay between the SUMO1 (small ubiquitin-related modifier-1) and ubiquitin pathways of post-translational protein modification, we examined aspects of their localization and conjugation status during proteasome inhibition. Our results indicate that these pathways converge upon the discrete sub-nuclear domains known as PML (promyelocytic leukaemia protein) NBs (nuclear bodies). Proteasome inhibition generated an increased number of PML bodies, without any obvious increase in size. Using a cell line that constitutively expresses an epitope-tagged version of SUMO1, which was incorporated into high-molecular-mass conjugates, we observed SUMO1 accumulating in clusters around a subset of the NBs. Nuclear ubiquitin was initially observed in numerous speckles and foci, which bore no relationship to PML NBs in the absence of proteasome inhibition. However, during proteasome inhibition, total ubiquitin-conjugated species increased in the cell, as judged by Western blotting. Concomitantly the number of nuclear ubiquitin clusters decreased, and were almost quantitatively associated with the PML NBs, co-localizing with the SUMO-conjugated pool. Proteasome inhibition depleted the pool of free SUMO1 in the cell. Reversal of proteasome inhibition in the presence or absence of protein synthesis demonstrated that free SUMO1 was regenerated from the conjugated pool. The results indicate that a significant fraction of the free SUMO1 pool could be accounted for by recycling from the conjugated pool and indeed it may be that, as for ubiquitin, SUMO1 needs to be removed from conjugated species prior to processing by the proteasome. Taken together with other recent reports on the proteasome and PML NBs, these results suggest that the PML NBs may play an important role in integrating these pathways. PMID:16117725

  6. Ubiquitin proteasome pathway-mediated degradation of proteins: effects due to site-specific substrate deamidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The accumulation, aggregation, and precipitation of proteins are etiologic for age-related diseases, particularly cataract, because the precipitates cloud the lens. Deamidation of crystallins is associated with protein precipitation, aging, and cataract. Among the roles of the ubiquitin proteasome p...

  7. Ubiquitin-Like Proteasome System Represents a Eukaryotic-Like Pathway for Targeted Proteolysis in Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xian; Liu, Rui; Sanchez, Iona; Silva-Sanchez, Cecilia; Hepowit, Nathaniel L.; Cao, Shiyun; Chen, Sixue

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The molecular mechanisms of targeted proteolysis in archaea are poorly understood, yet they may have deep evolutionary roots shared with the ubiquitin-proteasome system of eukaryotic cells. Here, we demonstrate in archaea that TBP2, a TATA-binding protein (TBP) modified by ubiquitin-like isopeptide bonds, is phosphorylated and targeted for degradation by proteasomes. Rapid turnover of TBP2 required the functions of UbaA (the E1/MoeB/ThiF homolog of archaea), AAA ATPases (Cdc48/p97 and Rpt types), a type 2 JAB1/MPN/MOV34 metalloenzyme (JAMM/MPN+) homolog (JAMM2), and 20S proteasomes. The ubiquitin-like protein modifier small archaeal modifier protein 2 (SAMP2) stimulated the degradation of TBP2, but SAMP2 itself was not degraded. Analysis of the TBP2 fractions that were not modified by ubiquitin-like linkages revealed that TBP2 had multiple N termini, including Met1-Ser2, Ser2, and Met1-Ser2(p) [where (p) represents phosphorylation]. The evidence suggested that the Met1-Ser2(p) form accumulated in cells that were unable to degrade TBP2. We propose a model in archaea in which the attachment of ubiquitin-like tags can target proteins for degradation by proteasomes and be controlled by N-terminal degrons. In support of a proteolytic mechanism that is energy dependent and recycles the ubiquitin-like protein tags, we find that a network of AAA ATPases and a JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease are required, in addition to 20S proteasomes, for controlled intracellular proteolysis. PMID:27190215

  8. Activation of the ATP-ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in skeletal muscle of cachectic rats bearing a hepatoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baracos, V. E.; DeVivo, C.; Hoyle, D. H.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Rats implanted with Yoshida ascites hepatoma (YAH) show a rapid and selective loss of muscle protein due mainly to a marked increase (63-95%) in the rate of protein degradation (compared with rates in muscles of pair-fed controls). To define which proteolytic pathways contribute to this increase, epitrochlearis muscles from YAH-bearing and control rats were incubated under conditions that modify different proteolytic systems. Overall proteolysis in either group of rats was not affected by removal of Ca2+ or by blocking the Ca(2+)-dependent proteolytic system. Inhibition of lysosomal function with methylamine reduced proteolysis (-12%) in muscles from YAH-bearing rats, but not in muscles of pair-fed rats. When ATP production was also inhibited, the remaining accelerated proteolysis in muscles of tumor-bearing rats fell to control levels. Muscles of YAH-bearing rats showed increased levels of ubiquitin-conjugated proteins and a 27-kDa proteasome subunit in Western blot analysis. Levels of mRNA encoding components of proteolytic systems were quantitated using Northern hybridization analysis. Although their total RNA content decreased 20-38%, pale muscles of YAH-bearing rats showed increased levels of ubiquitin mRNA (590-880%) and mRNA for multiple subunits of the proteasome (100-215%). Liver, kidney, heart, and brain showed no weight loss and no change in these mRNA species. Muscles of YAH-bearing rats also showed small increases (30-40%) in mRNA for cathepsins B and D, but not for calpain I or heat shock protein 70. Our findings suggest that accelerated muscle proteolysis and muscle wasting in tumor-bearing rats result primarily from activation of the ATP-dependent pathway involving ubiquitin and the proteasome.

  9. The role of hypercholesterolemic diet and vitamin E on Nrf2 pathway, endoplasmic reticulum stress and proteasome activity.

    PubMed

    Bozaykut, Perinur; Sozen, Erdi; Yazgan, Burak; Karademir, Betul; Kartal-Ozer, Nesrin

    2014-10-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is the major risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis and vitamin E is suggested to have a preventive role in this process (1), although the mechanism of action still remains unclear.The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) may in?uence atherosclerosis by affecting disease-relevant cellular processes such as apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation, or by affecting cellular stress responses and/or adaptive phenomena, such as ER stress, in?ammation, and redox homeostasis (2). NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that controls the expression of phase II detoxi?cation and antioxidant genes. Nrf2 signaling has additionally been shown to upregulate the expression of the proteasome catalytic subunits (3). In the present study, we investigated the role of Nrf2 pathway on oxidative and ER stress conditions induced by cholesterol diet and the effects of vitamin E on related signaling pathways in in vivo model of atherosclerosis. All experimental procedures were approved by the Marmara University Ethics Committee. Twenty-one male albino rabbits (23 months old) were assigned randomly to four groups fed for 8 weeks: (i) vitamin E deficient diet, (ii) vitamin E deficient diet containing 2% cholesterol, and (iii) vitamin E deficient diet containing 2% cholesterol with daily intramuscular injections of vitamin E (50mg/kg), (iv) vitamin E deficient diet with daily intramuscular injections of vitamin E (50mg/kg). In order to elucidate in vivo role of oxidative stress and ER stress in cardiovascular system of hypercholesterolemic rabbits, we investigated serum levels of cholesterol, MDA and vitamin E and Nrf2, GST-1, GRP78, GRP94, PERK, IRE1 protein levels and the proteasomal activity in aortic tissues will be discussed. PMID:26461313

  10. SIAH-1 interacts with alpha-tubulin and degrades the kinesin Kid by the proteasome pathway during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Germani, A; Bruzzoni-Giovanelli, H; Fellous, A; Gisselbrecht, S; Varin-Blank, N; Calvo, F

    2000-12-01

    SIAH-1, a human homologue of the Drosophila seven in absentia (Sina), has been implicated in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of different target proteins through its N-terminal RING finger domain. SIAH-1 is also induced during p53-mediated apoptosis. Furthermore, SIAH-1-transfected breast cancer cell line MCF-7 exhibits an altered mitotic process resulting in multinucleated giant cells. Now, using the two-hybrid system, we identified two new SIAH interacting proteins: Kid (kinesin like DNA binding protein) and alpha-tubulin. We demonstrate that SIAH is involved in the degradation of Kid via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Our results suggest that SIAH-1 but not its N-terminal deletion mutant, affects the mitosis by an enhanced reduction of kinesin levels. Our results imply, for the first time, SIAH-1 in regulating the degradation of proteins directly implicated in the mitotic process. PMID:11146551

  11. Low doses of single or combined agrichemicals induces α-synuclein aggregation in nigrostriatal system of mice through inhibition of proteasomal and autophagic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Su, Cen; Niu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Alpha synuclein (SNCA) genes and environmental factors are important risk factors of Parkinson’s disease (PD). The agrichemicals paraquat, maneb and chlorpyrifos selectively target dopaminergic neurons, leading to parkinsonism, through ill-defined mechanisms. We analyzed the ability of low dose paraquat, maneb and chlorpyrifos, separately or combined together, to induce synucleinopathy in wild type mice. Paraquat and maneb applied together did not increase α-Synuclein (α-Syn) levels. By contrast, paraquat and chlorpyrifos together resulted in robust accumulation of α-Syn in striata in mice. Therefore, co-treatment with chlorpyrifos enhanced the effects of paraquat. Paraquat, and its co-treatment with maneb or chlorpyrifos, inhibited all soluble proteasomal expression of 26S proteasome subunits. Both paraquat and chlorpyrifos treatments increased levels of the autophagy inhibitor, mammalian target of rapamycin, mTOR, suggesting impaired axonal autophagy, despite increases in certain autophagic proteins, such as beclin 1 and Atg 12. Autophagic flux was also impaired, as ratios of LC3 II to LC3 I were reduced in all the treated animals. These results suggest that a combination of paraquat and chlorpyrifos is much more toxic than paraquat alone or combined with maneb. These effects are likely via inhibitory effects of these toxins on proteasomes and autophagy, which lead to accumulation of α-Syn. Our study provides a novel insight into the mechanisms of action of these agrichemicals. PMID:26884967

  12. Graded Proteasome Dysfunction in Caenorhabditis elegans Activates an Adaptive Response Involving the Conserved SKN-1 and ELT-2 Transcription Factors and the Autophagy-Lysosome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chinchankar, Meghna N.; Ferguson, Annabel A.; Ghazi, Arjumand; Fisher, Alfred L.

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of cellular proteins in a biologically active and structurally stable state is a vital endeavor involving multiple cellular pathways. One such pathway is the ubiquitin-proteasome system that represents a major route for protein degradation, and reductions in this pathway usually have adverse effects on the health of cells and tissues. Here, we demonstrate that loss-of-function mutants of the Caenorhabditis elegans proteasome subunit, RPN-10, exhibit moderate proteasome dysfunction and unexpectedly develop both increased longevity and enhanced resistance to multiple threats to the proteome, including heat, oxidative stress, and the presence of aggregation prone proteins. The rpn-10 mutant animals survive through the activation of compensatory mechanisms regulated by the conserved SKN-1/Nrf2 and ELT-2/GATA transcription factors that mediate the increased expression of genes encoding proteasome subunits as well as those mediating oxidative- and heat-stress responses. Additionally, we find that the rpn-10 mutant also shows enhanced activity of the autophagy-lysosome pathway as evidenced by increased expression of the multiple autophagy genes including atg-16.2, lgg-1, and bec-1, and also by an increase in GFP::LGG-1 puncta. Consistent with a critical role for this pathway, the enhanced resistance of the rpn-10 mutant to aggregation prone proteins depends on autophagy genes atg-13, atg-16.2, and prmt-1. Furthermore, the rpn-10 mutant is particularly sensitive to the inhibition of lysosome activity via either RNAi or chemical means. We also find that the rpn-10 mutant shows a reduction in the numbers of intestinal lysosomes, and that the elt-2 gene also plays a novel and vital role in controlling the production of functional lysosomes by the intestine. Overall, these experiments suggest that moderate proteasome dysfunction could be leveraged to improve protein homeostasis and organismal health and longevity, and that the rpn-10 mutant provides a unique

  13. Graded Proteasome Dysfunction in Caenorhabditis elegans Activates an Adaptive Response Involving the Conserved SKN-1 and ELT-2 Transcription Factors and the Autophagy-Lysosome Pathway.

    PubMed

    Keith, Scott A; Maddux, Sarah K; Zhong, Yayu; Chinchankar, Meghna N; Ferguson, Annabel A; Ghazi, Arjumand; Fisher, Alfred L

    2016-02-01

    The maintenance of cellular proteins in a biologically active and structurally stable state is a vital endeavor involving multiple cellular pathways. One such pathway is the ubiquitin-proteasome system that represents a major route for protein degradation, and reductions in this pathway usually have adverse effects on the health of cells and tissues. Here, we demonstrate that loss-of-function mutants of the Caenorhabditis elegans proteasome subunit, RPN-10, exhibit moderate proteasome dysfunction and unexpectedly develop both increased longevity and enhanced resistance to multiple threats to the proteome, including heat, oxidative stress, and the presence of aggregation prone proteins. The rpn-10 mutant animals survive through the activation of compensatory mechanisms regulated by the conserved SKN-1/Nrf2 and ELT-2/GATA transcription factors that mediate the increased expression of genes encoding proteasome subunits as well as those mediating oxidative- and heat-stress responses. Additionally, we find that the rpn-10 mutant also shows enhanced activity of the autophagy-lysosome pathway as evidenced by increased expression of the multiple autophagy genes including atg-16.2, lgg-1, and bec-1, and also by an increase in GFP::LGG-1 puncta. Consistent with a critical role for this pathway, the enhanced resistance of the rpn-10 mutant to aggregation prone proteins depends on autophagy genes atg-13, atg-16.2, and prmt-1. Furthermore, the rpn-10 mutant is particularly sensitive to the inhibition of lysosome activity via either RNAi or chemical means. We also find that the rpn-10 mutant shows a reduction in the numbers of intestinal lysosomes, and that the elt-2 gene also plays a novel and vital role in controlling the production of functional lysosomes by the intestine. Overall, these experiments suggest that moderate proteasome dysfunction could be leveraged to improve protein homeostasis and organismal health and longevity, and that the rpn-10 mutant provides a unique

  14. PROTEASOME ACTIVITY DECLINES IN AGED MACROPHAGES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is involved in regulation of a variety of biologically important processes including antigen presentation by macrophages. Age-related decrease in proteasome activity has been reported in other tissues. However, the effect of aging on the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway ...

  15. Bacterial Proteasomes

    PubMed Central

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-01-01

    Interest in bacterial proteasomes was sparked by the discovery that proteasomal degradation is required for the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, one of the world's deadliest pathogens. Although bacterial proteasomes are structurally similar to their eukaryotic and archaeal homologs, there are key differences in their mechanisms of assembly, activation, and substrate targeting for degradation. In this article, we compare and contrast bacterial proteasomes with their archaeal and eukaryotic counterparts, and we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how bacterial proteasomes function to influence microbial physiology. PMID:26488274

  16. Flavones induce neutrophil apoptosis by down-regulation of Mcl-1 via a proteasomal-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Christopher D.; Allen, Keith C.; Dorward, David A.; Hoodless, Laura J.; Melrose, Lauren A.; Marwick, John A.; Tucker, Carl S.; Haslett, Christopher; Duffin, Rodger; Rossi, Adriano G.

    2013-01-01

    -1 via a proteasomal-dependent pathway. PMID:23195034

  17. The recognition of ubiquitinated proteins by the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Grice, Guinevere L; Nathan, James A

    2016-09-01

    The ability of ubiquitin to form up to eight different polyubiquitin chain linkages generates complexity within the ubiquitin proteasome system, and accounts for the diverse roles of ubiquitination within the cell. Understanding how each type of ubiquitin linkage is correctly interpreted by ubiquitin binding proteins provides important insights into the link between chain recognition and cellular fate. A major function of ubiquitination is to signal degradation of intracellular proteins by the 26S proteasome. Lysine-48 (K48) linked polyubiquitin chains are well established as the canonical signal for proteasomal degradation, but recent studies show a role for other ubiquitin linked chains in facilitating degradation by the 26S proteasome. Here, we review how different types of polyubiquitin linkage bind to ubiquitin receptors on the 26S proteasome, how they signal degradation and discuss the implications of ubiquitin chain linkage in regulating protein breakdown by the proteasome. PMID:27137187

  18. Proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Beverly A; Tomaszewski, Joseph E

    2015-07-01

    Proteasome inhibitors have a 20 year history in cancer therapy. The first proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib (Velcade, PS-341), a break-through multiple myeloma treatment, moved rapidly through development from bench in 1994 to first approval in 2003. Bortezomib is a reversible boronic acid inhibitor of the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome. Next generation proteasome inhibitors include carfilzomib and oprozomib which are irreversible epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors; and ixazomib and delanzomib which are reversible boronic acid proteasome inhibitors. Two proteasome inhibitors, bortezomib and carfilzomib are FDA approved drugs and ixazomib and oprozomib are in late stage clinical trials. All of the agents are potent cytotoxics. The disease focus for all the proteasome inhibitors is multiple myeloma. This focus arose from clinical observations made in bortezomib early clinical trials. Later preclinical studies confirmed that multiple myeloma cells were indeed more sensitive to proteasome inhibitors than other tumor cell types. The discovery and development of the proteasome inhibitor class of anticancer agents has progressed through a classic route of serendipity and scientific investigation. These agents are continuing to have a major impact in their treatment of hematologic malignancies and are beginning to be explored as potential treatment agent for non-cancer indications. PMID:25935605

  19. The ubiquitin-proteasome system regulates plant hormone signaling

    PubMed Central

    Santner, Aaron; Estelle, Mark

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Plants utilize the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) to modulate nearly every aspect of growth and development. Ubiquitin is covalently attached to target proteins through the action of three enzymes known as E1, E2, and E3. The ultimate outcome of this post-translational modification depends on the nature of the ubiquitin linkage and the extent of polyubiquitination. In most cases, ubiquitination results in degradation of the target protein in the 26S proteasome. During the last 10 years it has become clear that the UPS plays a prominent regulatory role in hormone biology. E3 ubiquitin ligases in particular actively participate in hormone perception, de-repression of hormone signaling pathways, degradation of hormone specific transcription factors, and regulation of hormone biosynthesis. It is certain that additional functions will be discovered as more of the nearly 1200 potential E3s in plants are elucidated. PMID:20409276

  20. Fundamental Reaction Pathway for Peptide Metabolism by Proteasome: Insights from First-principles Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Free Energy Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Donghui; Fang, Lei; Tang, Mingsheng; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2013-01-01

    Proteasome is the major component of the crucial nonlysosomal protein degradation pathway in the cells, but the detailed reaction pathway is unclear. In this study, first-principles quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical free energy calculations have been performed to explore, for the first time, possible reaction pathways for proteasomal proteolysis/hydrolysis of a representative peptide, succinyl-leucyl-leucyl-valyl-tyrosyl-7-amino-4-methylcoumarin (Suc-LLVY-AMC). The computational results reveal that the most favorable reaction pathway consists of six steps. The first is a water-assisted proton transfer within proteasome, activating Thr1-Oγ. The second is a nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon of a Tyr residue of substrate by the negatively charged Thr1-Oγ, followed by the dissociation of the amine AMC (third step). The fourth step is a nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon of the Tyr residue of substrate by a water molecule, accompanied by a proton transfer from the water molecule to Thr1-Nz. Then, Suc-LLVY is dissociated (fifth step), and Thr1 is regenerated via a direct proton transfer from Thr1-Nz to Thr1-Oγ. According to the calculated energetic results, the overall reaction energy barrier of the proteasomal hydrolysis is associated with the transition state (TS3b) for the third step involving a water-assisted proton transfer. The determined most favorable reaction pathway and the rate-determining step have provided a reasonable interpretation of the reported experimental observations concerning the substituent and isotopic effects on the kinetics. The calculated overall free energy barrier of 18.2 kcal/mol is close to the experimentally-derived activation free energy of ~18.3–19.4 kcal/mol, suggesting that the computational results are reasonable. PMID:24111489

  1. Coupling caspase cleavage and proteasomal degradation of proteins carrying PEST motif.

    PubMed

    Belizario, José E; Alves, Juliano; Garay-Malpartida, Miguel; Occhiucci, João Marcelo

    2008-06-01

    The degradation is critical to activation and deactivation of regulatory proteins involved in signaling pathways to cell growth, differentiation, stress responses and physiological cell death. Proteins carry domains and sequence motifs that function as prerequisite for their proteolysis by either individual proteases or the 26S multicomplex proteasomes. Two models for entry of substrates into the proteasomes have been considered. In one model, it is proposed that the ubiquitin chain attached to the protein serves as recognition element to drag them into the 19S regulatory particle, which promotes the unfolding required to its access into the 20S catalytic chamber. In second model, it is proposed that an unstructured tail located at amino or carboxyl terminus directly track proteins into the 26S/20S proteasomes. Caspases are cysteinyl aspartate proteases that control diverse signaling pathways, promoting the cleavage at one or two sites of hundreds of structural and regulatory protein substrates. Caspase cleavage sites are commonly found within PEST motifs, which are segments rich in proline (P), glutamic acid (D), aspartic acid (E) and serine (S) or threonine (T) residues. Considering that N- and C- terminal peptide carrying PEST motifs form disordered loops in the globular proteins after caspase cleavage, it is postulated here that these exposed termini serve as unstructured initiation site, coupling caspase cleavage and ubiquitin-proteasome dependent and independent degradation of short-lived proteins. This could explain the inherent susceptibility to proteolysis among proteins containing PEST motif. PMID:18537676

  2. Neuroinflammation and J2 prostaglandins: linking impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and mitochondria to neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo-Pereira, Maria E; Rockwell, Patricia; Schmidt-Glenewinkel, Thomas; Serrano, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The immune response of the CNS is a defense mechanism activated upon injury to initiate repair mechanisms while chronic over-activation of the CNS immune system (termed neuroinflammation) may exacerbate injury. The latter is implicated in a variety of neurological and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, HIV dementia, and prion diseases. Cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2), which are key enzymes in the conversion of arachidonic acid into bioactive prostanoids, play a central role in the inflammatory cascade. J2 prostaglandins are endogenous toxic products of cyclooxygenases, and because their levels are significantly increased upon brain injury, they are actively involved in neuronal dysfunction induced by pro-inflammatory stimuli. In this review, we highlight the mechanisms by which J2 prostaglandins (1) exert their actions, (2) potentially contribute to the transition from acute to chronic inflammation and to the spreading of neuropathology, (3) disturb the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and mitochondrial function, and (4) contribute to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, as well as stroke, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and demyelination in Krabbe disease. We conclude by discussing the therapeutic potential of targeting the J2 prostaglandin pathway to prevent/delay neurodegeneration associated with neuroinflammation. In this context, we suggest a shift from the traditional view that cyclooxygenases are the most appropriate targets to treat neuroinflammation, to the notion that J2 prostaglandin pathways and other neurotoxic prostaglandins downstream from cyclooxygenases, would offer significant benefits as more effective therapeutic targets to treat chronic neurodegenerative diseases, while minimizing adverse side effects. PMID:25628533

  3. Neuroinflammation and J2 prostaglandins: linking impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and mitochondria to neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo-Pereira, Maria E.; Rockwell, Patricia; Schmidt-Glenewinkel, Thomas; Serrano, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The immune response of the CNS is a defense mechanism activated upon injury to initiate repair mechanisms while chronic over-activation of the CNS immune system (termed neuroinflammation) may exacerbate injury. The latter is implicated in a variety of neurological and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, HIV dementia, and prion diseases. Cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2), which are key enzymes in the conversion of arachidonic acid into bioactive prostanoids, play a central role in the inflammatory cascade. J2 prostaglandins are endogenous toxic products of cyclooxygenases, and because their levels are significantly increased upon brain injury, they are actively involved in neuronal dysfunction induced by pro-inflammatory stimuli. In this review, we highlight the mechanisms by which J2 prostaglandins (1) exert their actions, (2) potentially contribute to the transition from acute to chronic inflammation and to the spreading of neuropathology, (3) disturb the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and mitochondrial function, and (4) contribute to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, as well as stroke, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and demyelination in Krabbe disease. We conclude by discussing the therapeutic potential of targeting the J2 prostaglandin pathway to prevent/delay neurodegeneration associated with neuroinflammation. In this context, we suggest a shift from the traditional view that cyclooxygenases are the most appropriate targets to treat neuroinflammation, to the notion that J2 prostaglandin pathways and other neurotoxic prostaglandins downstream from cyclooxygenases, would offer significant benefits as more effective therapeutic targets to treat chronic neurodegenerative diseases, while minimizing adverse side effects. PMID:25628533

  4. Inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway does not protect against ventilator-induced accelerated proteolysis or atrophy in the diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    Smuder, Ashley J.; Nelson, W. Bradley; Hudson, Matthew B.; Kavazis, Andreas N.; Powers, Scott K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a life-saving intervention in patients with acute respiratory failure. However, prolonged MV results in ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction (VIDD), a condition characterized by both diaphragm fiber atrophy and contractile dysfunction. Previous work has shown calpain, caspase-3 and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) are all activated in the diaphragm during prolonged MV. However, while it is established that both calpain and caspase-3 are important contributors to VIDD, the role that the UPP plays in VIDD remains unknown. These experiments tested the hypothesis that inhibition of the UPP will protect the diaphragm against VIDD. Methods We tested this prediction in an established animal model of MV using a highly specific UPP inhibitor, epoxomicin, to prevent MV-induced activation of the proteasome in the diaphragm (n = 8/group). Results Our results reveal that inhibition of the UPP did not prevent ventilator-induced diaphragm muscle fiber atrophy and contractile dysfunction during 12 hours of MV. Also, inhibition of the UPP does not impact MV-induced increases in calpain and caspase-3 activity in the diaphragm. Finally, administration of the proteasome inhibitor did not protect against the MV-induced increases in the expression of the E3 ligases, MuRF1 and atrogin-1/MaFbx. Conclusions Collectively, these results indicate that proteasome activation does not play a required role in VIDD during the first 12 hours of MV. PMID:24681580

  5. Direct cellular delivery of human proteasomes to delay tau aggregation.

    PubMed

    Han, Dong Hoon; Na, Hee-Kyung; Choi, Won Hoon; Lee, Jung Hoon; Kim, Yun Kyung; Won, Cheolhee; Lee, Seung-Han; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Kuret, Jeff; Min, Dal-Hee; Lee, Min Jae

    2014-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is the primary machinery that degrades ubiquitin (Ub)-conjugated proteins, including many proteotoxic proteins implicated in neurodegeneraton. It has been suggested that the elevation of proteasomal activity is tolerable to cells and may be beneficial to prevent the accumulation of protein aggregates. Here we show that purified proteasomes can be directly transported into cells through mesoporous silica nanoparticle-mediated endocytosis. Proteasomes that are loaded onto nanoparticles through non-covalent interactions between polyhistidine tags and nickel ions fully retain their proteolytic activity. Cells treated with exogenous proteasomes are more efficient in degrading overexpressed human tau than endogenous proteasomal substrates, resulting in decreased levels of tau aggregates. Moreover, exogenous proteasome delivery significantly promotes cell survival against proteotoxic stress caused by tau and reactive oxygen species. These data demonstrate that increasing cellular proteasome activity through the direct delivery of purified proteasomes may be an effective strategy for reducing cellular levels of proteotoxic proteins. PMID:25476420

  6. APC/CCdh1 Targets Brain-Specific Kinase 2 (BRSK2) for Degradation via the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Wang, Yingli; Luo, Ting; Gu, Xiuting; Chen, Fang; Yu, Long

    2012-01-01

    Studies of brain-specific kinase 2 (BRSK2), an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-related kinase, and its homologs suggest that they are multifunctional regulators of cell-cycle progression. BRSK2, which contains a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain, is polyubiquitinated in cells. However, the regulatory mechanisms and exact biological function of BRSK2 remain unclear. Herein, we show that BRSK2 co-localizes with the centrosomes during mitosis. We also demonstrate that BRSK2 protein levels fluctuate during the cell cycle, peaking during mitosis and declining in G1 phase. Furthermore, Cdh1, rather than Cdc20, promotes the degradation of BRSK2 in vivo. Consistent with this finding, knock-down of endogenous Cdh1 blocks BRSK2 degradation during the G1 phase. The conserved KEN box of BRSK2 is required for anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome-Cdh1 (APC/CCdh1)-dependent degradation. Additionally, overexpression of either BRSK2(WT) or BRSK2(ΔKEN) increases the percentage of cells in G2/M. Thus, our results provide the first evidence that BRSK2 regulates cell-cycle progression controlled by APC/CCdh1 through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. PMID:23029325

  7. The Stability of Ribosome Biogenesis Factor WBSCR22 Is Regulated by Interaction with TRMT112 via Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Õunap, Kadri; Leetsi, Lilian; Matsoo, Maarja; Kurg, Reet

    2015-01-01

    The human WBSCR22 protein is a 18S rRNA methyltransferase involved in pre-rRNA processing and ribosome 40S subunit biogenesis. Recent studies have shown that the protein function in ribosome synthesis is independent of its enzymatic activity. In this work, we have studied the WBSCR22 protein interaction partners by SILAC-coupled co-immunoprecipitation assay and identified TRMT112 as the interaction partner of WBSCR22. Knock-down of TRMT112 expression decreased the WBSCR22 protein level in mammalian cells, suggesting that the stability of WBSCR22 is regulated through the interaction with TRMT112. The localization of the TRMT112 protein is determined by WBSCR22, and the WBSCR22-TRMT112 complex is localized in the cell nucleus. We provide evidence that the interaction between WBSCR22/Bud23 and TRMT112/Trm112 is conserved between mammals and yeast, suggesting that the function of TRMT112 as a co-activator of methyltransferases is evolutionarily conserved. Finally, we show that the transiently expressed WBSCR22 protein is ubiquitinated and degraded through the proteasome pathway, revealing the tight control of the WBSCR22 protein level in the cells. PMID:26214185

  8. Analysis of the Protein Kinase A-Regulated Proteome of Cryptococcus neoformans Identifies a Role for the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway in Capsule Formation

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, J. M. H.; Caza, M.; Croll, D.; Stoynov, N.; Foster, L. J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The opportunistic fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes life-threatening meningitis in immunocompromised individuals. The expression of virulence factors, including capsule and melanin, is in part regulated by the cyclic-AMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) signal transduction pathway. In this study, we investigated the influence of PKA on the composition of the intracellular proteome to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the regulation that underpins virulence. Through quantitative proteomics, enrichment and bioinformatic analyses, and an interactome study, we uncovered a pattern of PKA regulation for proteins associated with translation, the proteasome, metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, and virulence-related functions. PKA regulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in C. neoformans showed a striking parallel with connections between PKA and protein degradation in chronic neurodegenerative disorders and other human diseases. Further investigation of proteasome function with the inhibitor bortezomib revealed an impact on capsule production as well as hypersusceptibility for strains with altered expression or activity of PKA. Parallel studies with tunicamycin also linked endoplasmic reticulum stress with capsule production and PKA. Taken together, the data suggest a model whereby expression of PKA regulatory and catalytic subunits and the activation of PKA influence proteostasis and the function of the endoplasmic reticulum to control the elaboration of the polysaccharide capsule. Overall, this study revealed both broad and conserved influences of the cAMP/PKA pathway on the proteome and identified proteostasis as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cryptococcosis. PMID:26758180

  9. PROTEASOME ACTIVITY DECLINES IN AGED MACROPHAGES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is involved in regulation of a variety of biologically important processes including antigen presentation by macrophages (Mf). Age-related decrease in proteasome activity has been reported in other tissues. However, the effect of aging on the ubiquitin-proteasome pat...

  10. [Proteasome inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Yagi, Hideo

    2014-06-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system plays an essential role in degradation of eukaryotic intracellular protein, including cell cycle regulation, cell growth and proliferation, and survival. Cancer cells generally have higher level of proteasome activity compared with normal cells, suggesting proteasome inhibition could be therapeutic target in oncology. Bortezomib, the first proteasome inhibitor introduced into the clinic, is approved for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Although it was approved as single agent in the relapsed setting, bortezomib is now predominantly used in combination with conventional and novel targeted agents because bortezomib has demonstrated additive and synergistic activity in preclinical studies. Recently, several second-generation proteasome inhibitors, such as carfilzomib and MLN9708, have been developed and entered into clinical trials. These agents were investigated in frontline MM in combination with lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone. These studies demonstrated positive efficacy and safety, and it is expected that they will be approved in near future. PMID:25016815

  11. Resistance Gene-Guided Genome Mining: Serial Promoter Exchanges in Aspergillus nidulans Reveal the Biosynthetic Pathway for Fellutamide B, a Proteasome Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Hsu-Hua; Ahuja, Manmeet; Chiang, Yi-Ming; Oakley, C Elizabeth; Moore, Shauna; Yoon, Olivia; Hajovsky, Heather; Bok, Jin-Woo; Keller, Nancy P; Wang, Clay C C; Oakley, Berl R

    2016-08-19

    Fungal genome projects are revealing thousands of cryptic secondary metabolism (SM) biosynthetic gene clusters that encode pathways that potentially produce valuable compounds. Heterologous expression systems should allow these clusters to be expressed and their products obtained, but approaches are needed to identify the most valuable target clusters. The inp cluster of Aspergillus nidulans contains a gene, inpE, that encodes a proteasome subunit, leading us to hypothesize that the inp cluster produces a proteasome inhibitor and inpE confers resistance to this compound. Previous efforts to express this cluster have failed, but by sequentially replacing the promoters of the genes of the cluster with a regulatable promotor, we have expressed them successfully. Expression reveals that the product of the inp cluster is the proteasome inhibitor fellutamide B, and our data allow us to propose a biosynthetic pathway for the compound. By deleting inpE and activating expression of the inp cluster, we demonstrate that inpE is required for resistance to internally produced fellutamide B. These data provide experimental validation for the hypothesis that some fungal SM clusters contain genes that encode resistant forms of the enzymes targeted by the compound produced by the cluster. PMID:27294372

  12. YSY01A, a Novel Proteasome Inhibitor, Induces Cell Cycle Arrest on G2 Phase in MCF-7 Cells via ERα and PI3K/Akt Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Bingjie; Huang, Wei; Yuan, Xia; Xu, Bo; Lou, Yaxin; Zhou, Quan; Ran, Fuxiang; Ge, Zemei; Li, Runtao; Cui, Jingrong

    2015-01-01

    Given that the proteasome is essential for multiple cellular processes by degrading diverse regulatory proteins, inhibition of the proteasome has emerged as an attractive target for anti-cancer therapy. YSY01A is a novel small molecule compound targeting the proteasome. The compound was found to suppress viability of MCF-7 cells and cause limited cell membrane damage as determined by sulforhodamine B assay (SRB) and CytoTox 96® non-radioactive cytotoxicity assay. High-content screening (HCS) further shows that YSY01A treatment induces cell cycle arrest on G2 phase within 24 hrs. Label-free quantitative proteomics (LFQP), which allows extensive comparison of cellular responses following YSY01A treatment, suggests that various regulatory proteins including cell cycle associated proteins and PI3K/Akt pathway may be affected. Furthermore, YSY01A increases p-CDC-2, p-FOXO3a, p53, p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 but decreases p-Akt, p-ERα as confirmed by Western blotting. Therefore, YSY01A represents a potential therapeutic for breast cancer MCF-7 by inducing G2 phase arrest via ERα and PI3K/Akt pathways. PMID:25767601

  13. Proteasome Activity Is Affected by Fluctuations in Insulin-Degrading Enzyme Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Sbardella, Diego; Tundo, Grazia Raffaella; Sciandra, Francesca; Bozzi, Manuela; Gioia, Magda; Ciaccio, Chiara; Tarantino, Umberto; Brancaccio, Andrea; Coletta, Massimo; Marini, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-Degrading-Enzyme (IDE) is a Zn2+-dependent peptidase highly conserved throughout evolution and ubiquitously distributed in mammalian tissues wherein it displays a prevalent cytosolic localization. We have recently demonstrated a novel Heat Shock Protein-like behaviour of IDE and its association with the 26S proteasome. In the present study, we examine the mechanistic and molecular features of IDE-26S proteasome interaction in a cell experimental model, extending the investigation also to the effect of IDE on the enzymatic activities of the 26S proteasome. Further, kinetic investigations indicate that the 26S proteasome activity undergoes a functional modulation by IDE through an extra-catalytic mechanism. The IDE-26S proteasome interaction was analyzed during the Heat Shock Response and we report novel findings on IDE intracellular distribution that might be of critical relevance for cell metabolism. PMID:26186340

  14. Cellular and computational studies of proteasome inhibition and apoptosis induction in human cancer cells by amino acid Schiff base–copper complexes

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Jian; Bi, Caifeng; Fan, Yuhua; Buac, Daniela; Nardon, Chiara; Daniel, Kenyon G.; Dou, Q. Ping

    2013-01-01

    Proliferation and apoptosis pathways are tightly regulated in a cell by the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) and alterations in the UPS may result in cellular transformation or other pathological conditions. Indeed, the proteasome is often found to be overactive in cancer cells. It has also been found that cancer cells are more sensitive to proteasome inhibition than normal cells, and therefore proteasome inhibitors are pursued as antitumor drugs. The use of the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib for treatment of multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma has proved this principle. Recent studies have suggested that copper complexes can inhibit proteasome activity and induce apoptosis in some human cancer cells. However, the involved molecular mechanism is unknown. In this study, we investigated the biological activities of four amino acid Schiff base–copper(II) complexes by using human breast (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7) and prostate (PC-3) cancer cells. The complexes C1 and C3, but not their counterparts C2 and C4, inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of purified 20S proteasome and human cancer cellular 26S proteasome, cause accumulation of proteasome target proteins Bax and IκB-α, and induce growth inhibition and apoptosis in concentration- and time-dependent manners. Docking analysis shows that C1, but not C2 has hydrophobic, pi–pi, pi–cation and hydrogen bond interactions with the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like pocket and could stably fit into the S3 region, leading to specific inhibition. Our study has identified the mechanism of action of these copper complexes on inhibiting tumor cell proteasome and suggested their great potential as novel anticancer agents. PMID:23142973

  15. Hypoxia and hypoxia mimetics decrease aquaporin 5 (AQP5) expression through both hypoxia inducible factor-1α and proteasome-mediated pathways.

    PubMed

    Kawedia, Jitesh D; Yang, Fan; Sartor, Maureen A; Gozal, David; Czyzyk-Krzeska, Maria; Menon, Anil G

    2013-01-01

    The alveolar epithelium plays a central role in gas exchange and fluid transport, and is therefore critical for normal lung function. Since the bulk of water flux across this epithelium depends on the membrane water channel Aquaporin 5 (AQP5), we asked whether hypoxia had any effect on AQP5 expression. We show that hypoxia causes a significant (70%) decrease in AQP5 expression in the lungs of mice exposed to hypoxia. Hypoxia and the hypoxia mimetic, cobalt, also caused similar decreases in AQP5 mRNA and protein expression in the mouse lung epithelial cell line MLE-12. The action of hypoxia and cobalt on AQP5 transcription was demonstrated by directly quantifying heternonuclear RNA by real-time PCR. Dominant negative mutants of Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF-1α) and HIF-1α siRNA blocked the action of cobalt, showing that HIF-1α is a key component in this mechanism. The proteasome inhibitors, lactacystin or proteasome inhibitor-III completely abolished the effect of hypoxia and cobalt both at the protein and mRNA level indicating that the proteasome pathway is probably involved not only for the stability of HIF-1α protein, but for the stability of unidentified transcription factors that regulate AQP5 transcription. These studies reveal a potentially important physiological mechanism linking hypoxic stress and membrane water channels. PMID:23469202

  16. LDL suppresses angiogenesis through disruption of the HIF pathway via NF-κB inhibition which is reversed by the proteasome inhibitor BSc2118

    PubMed Central

    Doeppner, Thorsten R.; Niu, Feng; Li, Qiaochuan; Yang, Yanping; Kuckelkorn, Ulrike; Hagemann, Nina; Li, Wei; Hermann, Dirk M.; Dai, Yun; Zhou, Wen; Jin, Fengyan

    2015-01-01

    Since disturbance of angiogenesis predisposes to ischemic injuries, attempts to promote angiogenesis have been made to improve clinical outcomes of patients with many ischemic disorders. While hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) stimulate vascular remodeling and angiogenesis, hyperlipidemia impairs angiogenesis in response to various pro-angiogenic factors. However, it remains uncertain how HIFs regulate angiogenesis under hyperlipidemia. Here, we report that exposure to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) suppressed in vitro angiogenesis of human brain microvascular endothelial cells. Whereas LDL exposure diminished expression of HIF-1α and HIF-2α induced by hypoxia, it inhibited DMOG- and TNFα-induced HIF-1α and HIF-2α expression in normoxia. Notably, in both hypoxia and normoxia, LDL markedly reduced expression of HIF-1β, a constitutively stable HIF subunit, an event associated with NF-κB inactivation. Moreover, knockdown of HIF-1β down-regulated HIF-1α and HIF-2α expression, in association with increased HIF-1α hydroxylation and 20S proteasome activity after LDL exposure. Significantly, the proteasome inhibitor BSc2118 prevented angiogenesis attenuation by LDL through restoring expression of HIFs. Together, these findings argue that HIF-1β might act as a novel cross-link between the HIF and NF-κB pathways in suppression of angiogenesis by LDL, while proteasome inhibitors might promote angiogenesis by reactivating this signaling cascade under hyperlipidemia. PMID:26388611

  17. In vivo pharmacodynamic imaging of proteasome inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kimbrel, Erin A; Davis, Tina N; Bradner, James E; Kung, Andrew L

    2009-01-01

    Inhibiting the proteolytic activity of the 26S proteasome has been shown to have selective apoptotic effects on cancer cells and to be clinically efficacious in certain malignancies. There is an unmet medical need for additional proteasome inhibitors, and their development will be facilitated by surrogate markers of proteasome function. Toward this end, ectopic fusion of the destruction domain from ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) to reporter proteins is often used for assessing proteasome function. For luciferase-based reporters, we hypothesized that the oxygen-dependent destruction domain (ODD) from hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1 alpha) may provide improved sensitivity over luciferase-ODC, owing to its extremely rapid turnover by the proteasome (HIF-1 alpha has a half-life of less than 5 minutes). In the current study, we show that ODD-luciferase affords a greater dynamic range and faster kinetics than luciferase-ODC in sensing proteasome inhibition in vitro. Importantly, ODD-luciferase also serves as an effective in vivo marker of proteasome function in xenograft tumor models, with inhibition being detected by noninvasive imaging within 3 hours of bortezomib administration. These data establish ODD-luciferase as a surrogate marker of proteasome function that can be used both in vitro and in vivo for the development of novel proteasome inhibitors. PMID:19723471

  18. Tert-butylhydroquinone lowers blood pressure in AngII-induced hypertension in mice via proteasome-PTEN-Akt-eNOS pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bing-Can; Long, Hui-Bao; Luo, Ke-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), as an antioxidant, has been widely used for many years to prevent oxidization of food products. The aim of this study was to investigate whether tBHQ activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) to prevent endothelial dysfunction and lower blood pressure. The role of Akt in tBHQ-induced eNOS phosphorylation was examined in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) or in mice. tBHQ treatment of HUVEC increased both Akt-Ser473 phosphorylation, accompanied with increased eNOS-Ser1177 phosphorylation and NO release. Mechanically, pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of Akt abolished tBHQ-enhanced NO release and eNOS phosphorylation in HUVEC. Gain-function of PTEN or inhibition of 26S proteasome abolished tBHQ-enhanced Akt phosphorylation in HUVEC. Ex vivo analysis indicated that tBHQ improved Ach-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation in LPC-treated mice aortic arteries, which were abolished by inhibition of Akt or eNOS. In animal study, administration of tBHQ significantly increased eNOS-Ser1177 phosphorylation and acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation, and lowered AngII-induced hypertension in wildtype mice, but not in mice deficient of Akt or eNOS. In conclusion, tBHQ via proteasome-dependent degradation of PTEN increases Akt phosphorylation, resulting in upregulation of eNOS-derived NO production and consequent improvement of endothelial function in vivo. In this way, tBHQ lowers blood pressure in hypertensive mice. PMID:27435826

  19. Tert-butylhydroquinone lowers blood pressure in AngII-induced hypertension in mice via proteasome-PTEN-Akt-eNOS pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bing-Can; Long, Hui-Bao; Luo, Ke-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), as an antioxidant, has been widely used for many years to prevent oxidization of food products. The aim of this study was to investigate whether tBHQ activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) to prevent endothelial dysfunction and lower blood pressure. The role of Akt in tBHQ-induced eNOS phosphorylation was examined in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) or in mice. tBHQ treatment of HUVEC increased both Akt-Ser473 phosphorylation, accompanied with increased eNOS-Ser1177 phosphorylation and NO release. Mechanically, pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of Akt abolished tBHQ-enhanced NO release and eNOS phosphorylation in HUVEC. Gain-function of PTEN or inhibition of 26S proteasome abolished tBHQ-enhanced Akt phosphorylation in HUVEC. Ex vivo analysis indicated that tBHQ improved Ach-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation in LPC-treated mice aortic arteries, which were abolished by inhibition of Akt or eNOS. In animal study, administration of tBHQ significantly increased eNOS-Ser1177 phosphorylation and acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation, and lowered AngII-induced hypertension in wildtype mice, but not in mice deficient of Akt or eNOS. In conclusion, tBHQ via proteasome-dependent degradation of PTEN increases Akt phosphorylation, resulting in upregulation of eNOS-derived NO production and consequent improvement of endothelial function in vivo. In this way, tBHQ lowers blood pressure in hypertensive mice. PMID:27435826

  20. Proteasomes remain intact, but show early focal alteration in their composition in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kabashi, Edor; Agar, Jeffrey N; Hong, Yu; Taylor, David M; Minotti, Sandra; Figlewicz, Denise A; Durham, Heather D

    2008-06-01

    In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis caused by mutations in Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1), altered solubility and aggregation of the mutant protein implicates failure of pathways for detecting and catabolizing misfolded proteins. Our previous studies demonstrated early reduction of proteasome-mediated proteolytic activity in lumbar spinal cord of SOD1(G93A) transgenic mice, tissue particularly vulnerable to disease. The purpose of this study was to identify any underlying abnormalities in proteasomal structure. In lumbar spinal cord of pre-symptomatic mice [postnatal day 45 (P45) and P75], normal levels of structural 20S alpha subunits were incorporated into 20S/26S proteasomes; however, proteasomal complexes separated by native gel electrophoresis showed decreased immunoreactivity with antibodies to beta3, a structural subunit of the 20S proteasome core, and beta5, the subunit with chymotrypsin-like activity. This occurred prior to increase in beta5i immunoproteasomal subunit. mRNA levels were maintained and no association of mutant SOD1 with proteasomes was identified, implicating post-transcriptional mechanisms. mRNAs also were maintained in laser captured motor neurons at a later stage of disease (P100) in which multiple 20S proteins are reduced relative to the surrounding neuropil. Increase in detergent-insoluble, ubiquitinated proteins at P75 provided further evidence of stress on mechanisms of protein quality control in multiple cell types prior to significant motor neuron death. PMID:18315558

  1. HUWE1 interacts with BRCA1 and promotes its degradation in the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway (Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, v. 444, isse 4)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaozhen; Lu, Guang; Li, Li; Yi, Juan; Yan, Kaowen; Wang, Yaqing; Zhu, Baili; Kuang, Jingyu; Lin, Ming; Zhang, Sha; Shao, Genze

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • The 2000–2634aa region of HUWE1 mediates the interaction with BRCA1 degron. • HUWE1 promotes the degradation of BRCA1 through the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. • HUWE1 expression is inversely correlated with BRCA1 in breast cancer cells. • RNAi inhibition of HUWE1 confers increased resistance of MCF-10F cells to IR and MMC. - Abstract: The cellular BRCA1 protein level is essential for its tumor suppression activity and is tightly regulated through multiple mechanisms including ubiquitn–proteasome system. E3 ligases are involved to promote BRCA1 for ubiquitination and degradation. Here, we identified HUWE1/Mule/ARF-BP1 as a novel BRCA1-interacting protein involved in the control of BRCA1 protein level. HUWE1 binds BRCA1 through its N-terminus degron domain. Depletion of HUWE1 by siRNA-mediated interference significantly increases BRCA1 protein levels and prolongs the half-life of BRCA1. Moreover, exogenous expression of HUWE1 promotes BRCA1 degradation through the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway, which could explain an inverse correlation between HUWE1 and BRCA1 levels in MCF10F, MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Consistent with a functional role for HUWE1 in regulating BRCA1-mediated cellular response to DNA damage, depletion of HUWE1 by siRNA confers increased resistance to ionizing radiation and mitomycin. These data indicate that HUWE1 is a critical negative regulator of BRCA1 and suggest a new molecular mechanism for breast cancer pathogenesis.

  2. HUWE1 interacts with BRCA1 and promotes its degradation in the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway (Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, v. 444 issue 3)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaozhen; Lu, Guang; Li, Li; Yi, Juan; Yan, Kaowen; Wang, Yaqing; Zhu, Baili; Kuang, Jingyu; Lin, Ming; Zhang, Sha; Shao, Genze

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • The 2000–2634 aa region of HUWE1 mediates the interaction with BRCA1 degron. • HUWE1 promotes the degradation of BRCA1 through the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. • HUWE1 expression is inversely correlated with BRCA1 in breast cancer cells. • RNAi inhibition of HUWE1 confers increased resistance of MCF-10F cells to IR and MMC. - Abstract: The cellular BRCA1 protein level is essential for its tumor suppression activity and is tightly regulated through multiple mechanisms including ubiquitn–proteasome system. E3 ligases are involved to promote BRCA1 for ubiquitination and degradation. Here, we identified HUWE1/Mule/ARF-BP1 as a novel BRCA1-interacting protein involved in the control of BRCA1 protein level. HUWE1binds BRCA1 through its N-terminus degron domain. Depletion of HUWE1 by siRNA-mediated interference significantly increases BRCA1 protein levels and prolongs the half-life of BRCA1. Moreover, exogenous expression of HUWE1 promotes BRCA1 degradation through the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway, which could explain an inverse correlation between HUWE1 and BRCA1 levels in MCF10F, MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Consistent with a functional role for HUWE1 in regulating BRCA1-mediated cellular response to DNA damage, depletion of HUWE1 by siRNA confers increased resistance to ionizing radiation and mitomycin. These data indicate that HUWE1 is a critical negative regulator of BRCA1 and suggest a new molecular mechanism for breast cancer pathogenesis.

  3. The co-chaperone carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) mediates alpha-synuclein degradation decisions between proteasomal and lysosomal pathways.

    PubMed

    Shin, Youngah; Klucken, Jochen; Patterson, Cam; Hyman, Bradley T; McLean, Pamela J

    2005-06-24

    Alpha-synuclein is a major component of Lewy bodies, the pathological hallmark of Parkinson disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and related disorders. Misfolding and aggregation of alpha-synuclein is thought to be a critical cofactor in the pathogenesis of certain neurodegenerative diseases. In the current study, we investigate the role of the carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) in alpha-synuclein aggregation. We demonstrate that CHIP is a component of Lewy bodies in the human brain, where it colocalizes with alpha-synuclein and Hsp70. In a cell culture model, endogenous CHIP colocalizes with alpha-synuclein and Hsp70 in intracellular inclusions, and overexpression of CHIP inhibits alpha-synuclein inclusion formation and reduces alpha-synuclein protein levels. We demonstrate that CHIP can mediate alpha-synuclein degradation by two discrete mechanisms that can be dissected using deletion mutants; the tetratricopeptide repeat domain is critical for proteasomal degradation, whereas the U-box domain is sufficient to direct alpha-synuclein toward the lysosomal degradation pathway. Furthermore, alpha-synuclein, synphilin-1, and Hsp70 all coimmunoprecipitate with CHIP, raising the possibility of a direct alpha-synuclein-CHIP interaction. The fact that the tetratricopeptide repeat domain is required for the effects of CHIP on alpha-synuclein inclusion morphology, number of inclusions, and proteasomal degradation as well as the direct interaction of CHIP with Hsp70 implicates a cooperation of CHIP and Hsp70 in these processes. Taken together, these data suggest that CHIP acts a molecular switch between proteasomal and lysosomal degradation pathways. PMID:15845543

  4. Jak-STAT3 pathway triggers DICER1 for proteasomal degradation by ubiquitin ligase complex of CUL4A(DCAF1) to promote colon cancer development.

    PubMed

    Ren, Weiguo; Shen, Shourong; Sun, Zhenqiang; Shu, Peng; Shen, Xiaohua; Bu, Chibin; Ai, Feiyan; Zhang, Xuemei; Tang, Anliu; Tian, Li; Li, Guiyuan; Li, Xiayu; Ma, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Chronic intestinal inflammation is closely associated with colon cancer development and STAT3 seems to take center stage in bridging chronic inflammation to colon cancer progress. Here, we discovered that DICER1 was significantly downregulated in response to IL-6 or LPS stimulation and identified a novel mechanism for DICER1 downregulation via proteasomal degradation by ubiquitin ligase complex of CUL4A(DCAF1) in colon cancer cells. Meanwhile, PI3K-AKT signaling pathway phosphorylated DICER1 and contributed to its proteasomal degradation. The regulation of DICER1 by CUL4A(DCAF1) affected cell growth and apoptosis which is controlled by IL-6 activated Jak-STAT3 pathway. Intervention of CUL4A(DCAF1) ubiquitin ligase complex led to fluctuation in expression levels of DICER1 and microRNAs, and thus affected tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. A panel of microRNAs that were downregulated by IL-6 stimulation was rescued by siRNA-CUL4A, and their predicated functions are involved in regulation of cell proliferation, apoptosis and motility. Furthermore, clinical specimen analysis revealed that decreased DICER1 expression was negatively correlated with STAT3 activation and cancer progression in human colon cancers. DICER1 and p-STAT3 expression levels correlated with 5-year overall survival of colon cancer patients. Consequently, this study proposes that inflammation-induced Jak-STAT3 signaling leads to colon cancer development through proteasomal degradation of DICER1 by ubiquitin ligase complex of CUL4A(DCAF1), which suggests a novel therapeutic opportunity for colon cancer. PMID:26965998

  5. The proteasome: a macromolecular assembly designed for controlled proteolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Zwickl, P; Voges, D; Baumeister, W

    1999-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the vast majority of proteins in the cytosol and nucleus are degraded via the proteasome-ubiquitin pathway. The 26S proteasome is a huge protein degradation machine of 2.5 MDa, built of approximately 35 different subunits. It contains a proteolytic core complex, the 20S proteasome and one or two 19S regulatory complexes which associate with the termini of the barrel-shaped 20S core. The 19S regulatory complex serves to recognize ubiquitylated target proteins and is implicated to have a role in their unfolding and translocation into the interior of the 20S complex where they are degraded into oligopeptides. While much progress has been made in recent years in elucidating the structure, assembly and enzymatic mechanism of the 20S complex, our knowledge of the functional organization of the 19S regulator is rather limited. Most of its subunits have been identified, but specific functions can be assigned to only a few of them. PMID:10582236

  6. Emerging mechanistic insights into AAA complexes regulating proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Förster, Friedrich; Schuller, Jan M; Unverdorben, Pia; Aufderheide, Antje

    2014-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is an integral element of the ubiquitin-proteasome system(UPS) and, as such, responsible for regulated degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells.It consists of the core particle, which catalyzes the proteolysis of substrates into small peptides, and the regulatory particle, which ensures specificity for a broad range of substrates.The heart of the regulatory particle is an AAA-ATPase unfoldase, which is surrounded by non-ATPase subunits enabling substrate recognition and processing. Cryo-EM-based studies revealed the molecular architecture of the 26S proteasome and its conformational rearrangements, providing insights into substrate recognition, commitment, deubiquitylation and unfolding. The cytosol proteasomal degradation of polyubiquitylated substrates is tuned by various associating cofactors, including deubiquitylating enzymes, ubiquitin ligases,shuttling ubiquitin receptors and the AAA-ATPase Cdc48/p97. Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors function upstream of the 26S proteasome, and their modular organization exhibits some striking analogies to the regulatory particle. In archaea PAN, the closest regulatory particle homolog and Cdc48 even have overlapping functions, underscoring their intricate relationship.Here, we review recent insights into the structure and dynamics of the 26S proteasome and its associated machinery, as well as our current structural knowledge on the Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors that function in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). PMID:25102382

  7. Emerging Mechanistic Insights into AAA Complexes Regulating Proteasomal Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Friedrich; Schuller, Jan M.; Unverdorben, Pia; Aufderheide, Antje

    2014-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is an integral element of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and, as such, responsible for regulated degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells. It consists of the core particle, which catalyzes the proteolysis of substrates into small peptides, and the regulatory particle, which ensures specificity for a broad range of substrates. The heart of the regulatory particle is an AAA-ATPase unfoldase, which is surrounded by non-ATPase subunits enabling substrate recognition and processing. Cryo-EM-based studies revealed the molecular architecture of the 26S proteasome and its conformational rearrangements, providing insights into substrate recognition, commitment, deubiquitylation and unfolding. The cytosol proteasomal degradation of polyubiquitylated substrates is tuned by various associating cofactors, including deubiquitylating enzymes, ubiquitin ligases, shuttling ubiquitin receptors and the AAA-ATPase Cdc48/p97. Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors function upstream of the 26S proteasome, and their modular organization exhibits some striking analogies to the regulatory particle. In archaea PAN, the closest regulatory particle homolog and Cdc48 even have overlapping functions, underscoring their intricate relationship. Here, we review recent insights into the structure and dynamics of the 26S proteasome and its associated machinery, as well as our current structural knowledge on the Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors that function in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). PMID:25102382

  8. Processing and MHC class II presentation of exogenous soluble antigen involving a proteasome-dependent cytosolic pathway in CD40-activated B cells.

    PubMed

    Becker, Hans Jiro; Kondo, Eisei; Shimabukuro-Vornhagen, Alexander; Theurich, Sebastian; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael S

    2016-08-01

    Activated B cells have the capacity to present antigen and induce immune responses as potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs). As in other APCs, antigen presentation by B cells involves antigen internalization, antigen processing, and peptide loading onto MHC molecules. However, while the mechanism of antigen processing has been studied extensively in other APCs, this pathway remains elusive in B cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the MHC class II processing pathway in CD40-activated B cells (CD40Bs), as a model for activated, antigen-presenting B cells. Using CMV pp65 as a model antigen, we evaluated processing and presentation of the CD4 + T-cell epitope 509-523 (K509) by human CD40Bs in ELISPOT assays. As expected, stimulation of specific CD4 + T-cell clones was attenuated after pretreatment of CD40Bs with inhibitors of classic class II pathway components. However, proteasome inhibitors such as epoxomicin limited antigen presentation as well. This suggests that the antigen is processed in a non-classical, cytosolic MHC class II pathway. Further experiments with truncated protein variants revealed involvement of the proteasome in processing of the N and C extensions of the epitope. Access to the cytosol was shown to be size dependent. Epoxomicin sensitivity exclusively in CD40B cells, but not in dendritic cells, suggests a novel processing mechanism unique to this APC. Our data suggest that B cells process antigen using a distinct, non-classical class II pathway. PMID:26561366

  9. High Fat Diet-Induced Skeletal Muscle Wasting Is Decreased by Mesenchymal Stem Cells Administration: Implications on Oxidative Stress, Ubiquitin Proteasome Pathway Activation, and Myonuclear Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Abrigo, Johanna; Rivera, Juan Carlos; Aravena, Javier; Cabrera, Daniel; Simon, Felipe; Ezquer, Fernando; Ezquer, Marcelo; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Obesity can lead to skeletal muscle atrophy, a pathological condition characterized by the loss of strength and muscle mass. A feature of muscle atrophy is a decrease of myofibrillar proteins as a result of ubiquitin proteasome pathway overactivation, as evidenced by increased expression of the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases atrogin-1 and MuRF-1. Additionally, other mechanisms are related to muscle wasting, including oxidative stress, myonuclear apoptosis, and autophagy. Stem cells are an emerging therapy in the treatment of chronic diseases such as high fat diet-induced obesity. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a population of self-renewable and undifferentiated cells present in the bone marrow and other mesenchymal tissues of adult individuals. The present study is the first to analyze the effects of systemic MSC administration on high fat diet-induced skeletal muscle atrophy in the tibialis anterior of mice. Treatment with MSCs reduced losses of muscle strength and mass, decreases of fiber diameter and myosin heavy chain protein levels, and fiber type transitions. Underlying these antiatrophic effects, MSC administration also decreased ubiquitin proteasome pathway activation, oxidative stress, and myonuclear apoptosis. These results are the first to indicate that systemically administered MSCs could prevent muscle wasting associated with high fat diet-induced obesity and diabetes. PMID:27579157

  10. Cisplatin triggers atrophy of skeletal C2C12 myotubes via impairment of Akt signalling pathway and subsequent increment activity of proteasome and autophagy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fanzani, Alessandro Zanola, Alessandra; Rovetta, Francesca; Rossi, Stefania; Aleo, Maria Francesca

    2011-02-01

    Cisplatin (cisPt) is an antineoplastic drug which causes an array of adverse effects on different organs and tissues, including skeletal muscle. In this work we show that cisPt behaves as a potent trigger to activate protein hypercatabolism in skeletal C2C12 myotubes. Within 24 h of 50 {mu}M cisPt administration, C2C12 myotubes displayed unchanged cell viability but showed a subset of hallmark signs typically recognized during atrophy, including severe reduction in body size, repression of Akt phosphorylation, transcriptional up-regulation of atrophy-related genes, such as atrogin-1, gabarap, beclin-1 and bnip-3, and loss of myogenic markers. As a consequence, proteasomal activity and formation of autophagosomes were remarkably increased in cisPt-treated myotubes, but forced stimulation of Akt pathway, as obtained through insulin administration or delivery of a constitutively activated Akt form, was sufficient to counter the cisPt-induced protein breakdown, leading to rescue of atrophic size. Overall, these results indicate that cisPt induces atrophy of C2C12 myotubes via activation of proteasome and autophagy systems, suggesting that the Akt pathway represents one sensitive target of cisPt molecular action in skeletal muscle.

  11. High Fat Diet-Induced Skeletal Muscle Wasting Is Decreased by Mesenchymal Stem Cells Administration: Implications on Oxidative Stress, Ubiquitin Proteasome Pathway Activation, and Myonuclear Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Aravena, Javier; Cabrera, Daniel; Simon, Felipe; Ezquer, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Obesity can lead to skeletal muscle atrophy, a pathological condition characterized by the loss of strength and muscle mass. A feature of muscle atrophy is a decrease of myofibrillar proteins as a result of ubiquitin proteasome pathway overactivation, as evidenced by increased expression of the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases atrogin-1 and MuRF-1. Additionally, other mechanisms are related to muscle wasting, including oxidative stress, myonuclear apoptosis, and autophagy. Stem cells are an emerging therapy in the treatment of chronic diseases such as high fat diet-induced obesity. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a population of self-renewable and undifferentiated cells present in the bone marrow and other mesenchymal tissues of adult individuals. The present study is the first to analyze the effects of systemic MSC administration on high fat diet-induced skeletal muscle atrophy in the tibialis anterior of mice. Treatment with MSCs reduced losses of muscle strength and mass, decreases of fiber diameter and myosin heavy chain protein levels, and fiber type transitions. Underlying these antiatrophic effects, MSC administration also decreased ubiquitin proteasome pathway activation, oxidative stress, and myonuclear apoptosis. These results are the first to indicate that systemically administered MSCs could prevent muscle wasting associated with high fat diet-induced obesity and diabetes. PMID:27579157

  12. Arabidopsis ABA-Activated Kinase MAPKKK18 is Regulated by Protein Phosphatase 2C ABI1 and the Ubiquitin–Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mitula, Filip; Tajdel, Malgorzata; Cieśla, Agata; Kasprowicz-Maluśki, Anna; Kulik, Anna; Babula-Skowrońska, Danuta; Michalak, Michal; Dobrowolska, Grazyna; Sadowski, Jan; Ludwików, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events play an important role in the transmission of the ABA signal. Although SnRK2 [sucrose non-fermenting1-related kinase2] protein kinases and group A protein phosphatase type 2C (PP2C)-type phosphatases constitute the core ABA pathway, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are also involved in plant response to ABA. However, little is known about the interplay between MAPKs and PP2Cs or SnRK2 in the regulation of ABA pathways. In this study, an effort was made to elucidate the role of MAP kinase kinase kinase18 (MKKK18) in relation to ABA signaling and response. The MKKK18 knockout lines showed more vigorous root growth, decreased abaxial stomatal index and increased stomatal aperture under normal growth conditions, compared with the control wild-type Columbia line. In addition to transcriptional regulation of the MKKK18 promoter by ABA, we demonstrated using in vitro and in vivo kinase assays that the kinase activity of MKKK18 was regulated by ABA. Analysis of the cellular localization of MKKK18 showed that the active kinase was targeted specifically to the nucleus. Notably, we identified abscisic acid insensitive 1 (ABI1) PP2C as a MKKK18-interacting protein, and demonstrated that ABI1 inhibited its activity. Using a cell-free degradation assay, we also established that MKKK18 was unstable and was degraded by the proteasome pathway. The rate of MKKK18 degradation was delayed in the ABI1 knockout line. Overall, we provide evidence that ABI1 regulates the activity and promotes proteasomal degradation of MKKK18. PMID:26443375

  13. Inhibition of PCSK9 Transcription by Berberine Involves Down-regulation of Hepatic HNF1α Protein Expression through the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Degradation Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Bin; Li, Hai; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Cao, Aiqin; Liu, Jingwen

    2015-01-01

    Our previous in vitro studies have identified hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α) as an obligated trans-activator for PCSK9 gene expression and demonstrated its functional involvement in the suppression of PCSK9 expression by berberine (BBR), a natural cholesterol-lowering compound. In this study, we investigated the mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of BBR on HNF1α-mediated PCSK9 transcription. Administration of BBR to hyperlipidemic mice and hamsters lowered circulating PCSK9 concentrations and hepatic PCSK9 mRNA levels without affecting the gene expression of HNF1α. However, hepatic HNF1α protein levels were markedly reduced in BBR-treated animals as compared with the control. Using HepG2 cells as a model system, we obtained evidence that BBR treatment let to accelerated degradation of HNF1α protein. By applying inhibitors to selectively block the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy-lysosomal pathway, we show that HNF1α protein content in HepG2 cells was not affected by bafilomycin A1 treatment, but it was dose-dependently increased by UPS inhibitors bortezomib and MG132. Bortezomib treatment elevated HNF1α and PCSK9 cellular levels with concomitant reductions of LDL receptor protein. Moreover, HNF1α protein displayed a multiubiquitination ladder pattern in cells treated with BBR or overexpressing ubiquitin. By expressing GFP-HNF1α fusion protein in cells, we observed that blocking UPS resulted in accumulation of GFP-HNF1α in cytoplasm. Importantly, we show that the BBR reducing effects on HNF1α protein and PCSK9 gene transcription can be eradicated by proteasome inhibitors. Altogether, our studies using BBR as a probe uncovered a new aspect of PCSK9 regulation by ubiquitin-induced proteasomal degradation of HNF1α. PMID:25540198

  14. Degradation of cAMP-Responsive Element–Binding Protein by the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway Contributes to Glucotoxicity in β-Cells and Human Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Costes, Safia; Vandewalle, Brigitte; Tourrel-Cuzin, Cécile; Broca, Christophe; Linck, Nathalie; Bertrand, Gyslaine; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Portha, Bernard; Pattou, François; Bockaert, Joel; Dalle, Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In type 2 diabetes, chronic hyperglycemia is detrimental to β-cells, causing apoptosis and impaired insulin secretion. The transcription factor cAMP-responsive element–binding protein (CREB) is crucial for β-cell survival and function. We investigated whether prolonged exposure of β-cells to high glucose affects the functional integrity of CREB. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS INS-1E cells and rat and human islets were used. Gene expression was analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Apoptosis was detected by cleaved caspase-3 emergence, DNA fragmentation, and electron microscopy. RESULTS Chronic exposure of INS-1E cells and rat and human islets to high glucose resulted in decreased CREB protein expression, phosphorylation, and transcriptional activity associated with apoptosis and impaired β-cell function. High-glucose treatment increased CREB polyubiquitination, while treatment of INS-1E cells with the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 prevented the decrease in CREB content. The emergence of apoptosis in INS-1E cells with decreased CREB protein expression knocked down by small interfering RNA suggested that loss of CREB protein content induced by high glucose contributes to β-cell apoptosis. Loading INS-1E cells or human islets with a cell-permeable peptide mimicking the proteasomal targeting sequence of CREB blocked CREB degradation and protected INS-1E cells and human islets from apoptosis induced by high glucose. The insulin secretion in response to glucose and the insulin content were preserved in human islets exposed to high glucose and loaded with the peptide. CONCLUSIONS These studies demonstrate that the CREB degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway contributes to β-cell dysfunction and death upon glucotoxicity and provide new insight into the cellular mechanisms of glucotoxicity. PMID:19223597

  15. Multiple Sclerosis Autoantigen Myelin Basic Protein Escapes Control by Ubiquitination during Proteasomal Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Belogurov, Alexey; Kudriaeva, Anna; Kuzina, Ekaterina; Smirnov, Ivan; Bobik, Tatyana; Ponomarenko, Natalia; Kravtsova-Ivantsiv, Yelena; Ciechanover, Aaron; Gabibov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of cellular proteins are degraded by the 26S proteasome after their ubiquitination. Here, we report that the major component of the myelin multilayered membrane sheath, myelin basic protein (MBP), is hydrolyzed by the 26S proteasome in a ubiquitin-independent manner both in vitro and in mammalian cells. As a proteasomal substrate, MBP reveals a distinct and physiologically relevant concentration range for ubiquitin-independent proteolysis. Enzymatic deimination prevents hydrolysis of MBP by the proteasome, suggesting that an abnormally basic charge contributes to its susceptibility toward proteasome-mediated degradation. To our knowledge, our data reveal the first case of a pathophysiologically important autoantigen as a ubiquitin-independent substrate of the 26S proteasome. PMID:24739384

  16. Identification of proteasome subunit beta type 6 (PSMB6) associated with deltamethrin resistance in mosquitoes by proteomic and bioassay analyses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Linchun; Ye, Yuting; Sun, Haibo; Yu, Jing; Zhang, Li; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Donghui; Ma, Lei; Shen, Bo; Zhu, Changliang

    2013-01-01

    Deltamethrin (DM) insecticides are currently being promoted worldwide for mosquito control, because of the high efficacy, low mammalian toxicity and less environmental impact. Widespread and improper use of insecticides induced resistance, which has become a major obstacle for the insect-borne disease management. Resistance development is a complex and dynamic process involving many genes. To better understand the possible molecular mechanisms involved in DM resistance, a proteomic approach was employed for screening of differentially expressed proteins in DM-susceptible and -resistant mosquito cells. Twenty-seven differentially expressed proteins were identified by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry (MS). Four members of the ubiquitin-proteasome system were significantly elevated in DM-resistant cells, suggesting that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway may play an important role in DM resistance. Proteasome subunit beta type 6 (PSMB6) is a member of 20S proteasomal subunit family, which forms the proteolytic core of 26S proteasome. We used pharmaceutical inhibitor and molecular approaches to study the contributions of PSMB6 in DM resistance: the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 and bortezomib were used to suppress the proteasomal activity and siRNA was designed to block the function of PSMB6. The results revealed that both MG-132 and bortezomib increased the susceptibility in DM-resistant cells and resistance larvae. Moreover, PSMB6 knockdown decreased cellular viability under DM treatment. Taken together, our study indicated that PSMB6 is associated with DM resistance in mosquitoes and that proteasome inhibitors such as MG-132 or bortezomib are suitable for use as a DM synergist for vector control. PMID:23762443

  17. A yeast Ubc9 mutant protein with temperature-sensitive in vivo function is subject to conditional proteolysis by a ubiquitin- and proteasome-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Betting, J; Seufert, W

    1996-10-18

    The UBC9 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is essential for cell viability and encodes a soluble protein of the nucleus that is metabolically stable. Products of mutant alleles selected to confer temperature-sensitive in vivo function were found to be extremely short-lived at the restrictive but long-lived at the permissive condition. An extragenic suppressor mutation was isolated which increased thermoresistance of a ubc9-1 strain. This suppressor turned out to stabilize the mutated gene product, indicating that the physiological activity of ubc9-1 protein is primarily controlled by conditional proteolysis. The labile ubc9-1 protein appears to be a substrate for ubiquitination, and its turnover was substantially reduced by expression of a ubiquitin derivative that interferes with formation of multi-ubiquitin chains. Stabilization resulted also from competitive inhibition of Ubc4-related ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes. Activity of the proteasome complex was crucial to rapid breakdown, whereas vacuolar proteases were dispensable. Thus, the heat-denatured ubc9-1 protein is targeted for proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and may serve as a useful tool to further define the process by which a misfolded polypeptide is recognized. PMID:8824207

  18. Clomiphene citrate down-regulates estrogen receptor-α through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in a human endometrial cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Amita, Mitsuyoshi; Takahashi, Toshifumi; Igarashi, Hideki; Nagase, Satoru

    2016-06-15

    We examined how clomiphene citrate (CC) reduces estrogen receptor-α (ERα) in a human endometrial cancer cell line. Ishikawa human endometrial cancer cells were treated with ERα ligands such as 17β-estradiol (E2), CC, and the pure antiestrogen, ICI 182,780 (ICI). Thereafter, the expression levels of ERα protein and mRNA were analyzed by western blot and real-time quantitative PCR, respectively, and those of ubiquitinated ERα were analyzed by immunoprecipitation of ERα followed by immunoblotting with an anti-ubiquitin antibody. The expression levels of ERα protein after treatment with E2, CC, and ICI were significantly decreased compared to pre-treatment levels without a corresponding decrease in ERα mRNA. These ligands significantly increased the levels of ubiquitinated ERα compared to vehicle treatment. Co-treatment with the proteasome inhibitor, MG132, abrogated the decrease in ERα levels caused by treatment with the ligands only. We demonstrated, for the first time, a CC-induced decrease in ERα mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in human endometrial cancer cells. PMID:27033325

  19. Aβ40 Reduces P-Glycoprotein at the Blood–Brain Barrier through the Ubiquitin–Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yu; Wolf, Andrea; LeVine, Harry; Miller, David S.; Bauer, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Failure to clear amyloid-β (Aβ) from the brain is in part responsible for Aβ brain accumulation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). A critical protein for clearing Aβ across the blood–brain barrier is the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in the luminal plasma membrane of the brain capillary endothelium. P-gp is reduced at the blood–brain barrier in AD, which has been shown to be associated with Aβ brain accumulation. However, the mechanism responsible for P-gp reduction in AD is not well understood. Here we focused on identifying critical mechanistic steps involved in reducing P-gp in AD. We exposed isolated rat brain capillaries to 100 nm Aβ40, Aβ40, aggregated Aβ40, and Aβ42. We observed that only Aβ40 triggered reduction of P-gp protein expression and transport activity levels; this occurred in a dose- and time-dependent manner. To identify the steps involved in Aβ-mediated P-gp reduction, we inhibited protein ubiquitination, protein trafficking, and the ubiquitin–proteasome system, and monitored P-gp protein expression, transport activity, and P-gp-ubiquitin levels. Thus, exposing brain capillaries to Aβ40 triggers ubiquitination, internalization, and proteasomal degradation of P-gp. These findings may provide potential therapeutic targets within the blood–brain barrier to limit P-gp degradation in AD and improve Aβ brain clearance. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The mechanism reducing blood–brain barrier P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in Alzheimer's disease is poorly understood. In the present study, we focused on defining this mechanism. We demonstrate that Aβ40 drives P-gp ubiquitination, internalization, and proteasome-dependent degradation, reducing P-gp protein expression and transport activity in isolated brain capillaries. These findings may provide potential therapeutic avenues within the blood–brain barrier to limit P-gp degradation in Alzheimer's disease and improve Aβ brain clearance. PMID:26865616

  20. Structural Biology of the Proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Kish-Trier, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome refers to a collection of complexes centered on the 20S proteasome core particle, a complex of 28 subunits that houses proteolytic sites in its hollow interior. Proteasomes are found in eukaryotes, archaea, and some eubacteria, and their activity is critical for many cellular pathways. Important advances include inhibitor binding studies and the structure of the immunoproteasome, whose specificity is altered by incorporation of inducible catalytic subunits. The inherent repression of the 20S CP is relieved by the ATP-independent activators, 11S and Blm10/PA200, whose structures reveal principles of proteasome mechanism. The structure of the ATP-dependent 19S regulatory particle, which mediates degradation of polyubiquitylated proteins, is being revealed by a combination of crystal or NMR structures of individual subunits and electron microscopy reconstruction of the intact complex. Other recent structural advances inform about mechanisms of assembly and the role of conformational changes in the functional cycle. PMID:23414347

  1. The Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus ORF34 Protein Binds to HIF-1α and Causes Its Degradation via the Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kousoulas, Konstantin G.

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent for Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and two other lymphoproliferative disorders, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD). Kaposi's sarcoma is a highly vascular tumor, and recently both hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and HIF-2α were detected in KS samples, indicating a role of HIFs in the KSHV life cycle. Previously, we showed that ORF34, a lytic gene of unassigned function, was activated by hypoxia and that ORF34 transcription was upregulated by both HIFs (M. Haque, D. A. Davis, V. Wang, I. Widmer, and R. Yarchoan, J Virol. 77:6761–6768, 2003). In the present study, we show that coexpression of ORF34 with HIF-1αm (degradation-resistant HIF-1α) caused substantial reduction in HIF-1α-dependent transcription, as evidenced by reporter assays. Two-way immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that ORF34 physically interacted with HIF-1αm in transient expression experiments. Deletion analysis revealed that three different ORF34 domains interacted with the amino-terminal domain of HIF-1α. Also, purified HIF-1α and ORF34 proteins interacted with each other. The observed transcriptional inhibition of HIF-1α-dependent promoters was attributed to degradation of HIF-1α after binding with ORF34, since the overall amount of wild-type HIF-1α but not the degradation-resistant one (HIF-1αm) was reduced in the presence of ORF34. Moreover, ORF34 caused degradation of HIF-1α in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of the ubiquitin-dependent pathway by the chemical proteasome inhibitor MG132 prevented HIF-1α degradation in the presence of ORF34. These results show that ORF34 binds to HIF-1α, leading to its degradation via the proteasome-dependent pathway. PMID:23221556

  2. Pristimerin Induces Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells by Down-regulating Bcl-2 through ROS-dependent Ubiquitin-proteasomal Degradation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong Bo; Gao, Xiaohua; Deeb, Dorrah; Arbab, Ali S; Gautam, Subhash C

    2014-01-01

    Pristimerin is a quinonemethide triterpenoid with the potential of a promising anticancer agent. Pristimerin (PM) has shown anticancer activity against a range of cancer cell lines, but its activity for prostate cancer has not been adequately investigated. In the present study we have examined the underlying mechanisms of the apoptotic response of the hormone-sensitive (LNCaP) and hormone-refractory (PC-3) prostate cancer cell lines to PM. Treatment with PM induced apoptosis in both cell lines as characterized by increased annexin V-binding and cleavage of PARP-1 and procaspases-3 and -9. It also induced mitochondrial depolarization, cytochrome c release from mitochondria and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Response to PM is regulated by Bcl-2 since it down-regulated Bcl-2 expression and overexpression of Bcl-2 rendered prostate cancer cells resistant to PM. ROS plays a role in down-regulation of Bcl-2, since treatment with PM in the presence of various ROS modulators, e.g., n-acetylcysteine (NAC), a general purpose antioxidant; diphenylene iodonium (DPI), a NADPH inhibitor; rotenone (ROT), a mitochondrial electron transport chain interrupter rotenone or MnTBAP, a O2 scavenger, attenuated the down-regulation of Bcl-2. Furthermore, ROS is also involved in the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of Bcl-2 as both of these events were blocked by O 2− scavenger MnTBAP. Thus, pristimerin induces apoptosis in prostate cancer cells predominately through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway by inhibiting antiapoptic Bcl-2 through a ROS-dependent ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation pathway. PMID:24877026

  3. The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF34 protein binds to HIF-1α and causes its degradation via the proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Haque, Muzammel; Kousoulas, Konstantin G

    2013-02-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent for Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and two other lymphoproliferative disorders, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD). Kaposi's sarcoma is a highly vascular tumor, and recently both hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and HIF-2α were detected in KS samples, indicating a role of HIFs in the KSHV life cycle. Previously, we showed that ORF34, a lytic gene of unassigned function, was activated by hypoxia and that ORF34 transcription was upregulated by both HIFs (M. Haque, D. A. Davis, V. Wang, I. Widmer, and R. Yarchoan, J Virol. 77:6761-6768, 2003). In the present study, we show that coexpression of ORF34 with HIF-1αm (degradation-resistant HIF-1α) caused substantial reduction in HIF-1α-dependent transcription, as evidenced by reporter assays. Two-way immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that ORF34 physically interacted with HIF-1αm in transient expression experiments. Deletion analysis revealed that three different ORF34 domains interacted with the amino-terminal domain of HIF-1α. Also, purified HIF-1α and ORF34 proteins interacted with each other. The observed transcriptional inhibition of HIF-1α-dependent promoters was attributed to degradation of HIF-1α after binding with ORF34, since the overall amount of wild-type HIF-1α but not the degradation-resistant one (HIF-1αm) was reduced in the presence of ORF34. Moreover, ORF34 caused degradation of HIF-1α in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of the ubiquitin-dependent pathway by the chemical proteasome inhibitor MG132 prevented HIF-1α degradation in the presence of ORF34. These results show that ORF34 binds to HIF-1α, leading to its degradation via the proteasome-dependent pathway. PMID:23221556

  4. Dss1 associating with the proteasome functions in selective nuclear mRNA export in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Mannen, Taro; Andoh, Tomoko; Tani, Tokio

    2008-01-25

    Dss1p is an evolutionarily conserved small protein that interacts with BRCA2, a tumor suppressor protein, in humans. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain lacking the dss1{sup +} gene ({delta}dss1) shows a temperature-sensitive growth defect and accumulation of bulk poly(A){sup +} RNA in the nucleus at a nonpermissive temperature. In situ hybridization using probes for several specific mRNAs, however, revealed that the analyzed mRNAs were exported normally to the cytoplasm in {delta}dss1, suggesting that Dss1p is required for export of some subsets of mRNAs. We identified the pad1{sup +} gene, which encodes a component of the 26S proteasome, as a suppressor for the ts{sup -} phenotype of {delta}dss1. Unexpectedly, overexpression of Pad1p could suppress neither the defect in nuclear mRNA export nor a defect in proteasome function. In addition, loss of proteasome functions does not cause defective nuclear mRNA export. Dss1p seems to be a multifunctional protein involved in nuclear export of specific sets of mRNAs and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in fission yeast.

  5. Arctigenin promotes degradation of inducible nitric oxide synthase through CHIP-associated proteasome pathway and suppresses its enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiangyang; Li, Guilan; Lü, Chaotian; Xu, Hui; Yin, Zhimin

    2012-10-01

    Arctigenin, a natural dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan compound, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. Previous works showed that arctigenin decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced iNOS at transcription level. However, whether arctigenin could regulate iNOS at the post-translational level is still unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that arctigenin promoted the degradation of iNOS which is expressed under LPS stimulation in murine macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells. Such degradation of iNOS protein is due to CHIP-associated ubiquitination and proteasome-dependency. Furthermore, arctigenin decreased iNOS phosphorylation through inhibiting ERK and Src activation, subsequently suppressed iNOS enzyme activity. In conclusion, our research displays a new finding that arctigenin can promote the ubiqitination and degradation of iNOS after LPS stimulation. iNOS activity regulated by arctigenin is likely to involve a multitude of crosstalking mechanisms. PMID:22770942

  6. Clinical and marketed proteasome inhibitors for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiankang; Wu, Peng; Hu, Yongzhou

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP), which influences essential cellular functions including cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, signal transduction, antigen processing and inflammatory responses, has been considered as one of the most important cellular protein degradation approaches. Proteasome functions as a gatekeeper, which controls the execution of protein degradation and plays a critical role in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The unfolding of the close connection between proteasome and cancer provides a potential strategy for cancer treatment by using proteasome inhibitors. Small molecular inhibitors of varied structures and potency against proteasome have been discovered in recent years, with bortezomib and carfilzomib having been successfully approved for clinical application while some other promising candidates are currently under clinical trials. Herein, we review the development history of drugs and candidates that target the 20S proteasome, structure-activity relationships (SARs) of various proteasome inhibitors, and related completed or ongoing clinical trials. PMID:23531219

  7. Cytoplasmic proteasomes are not indispensable for cell growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, Hikaru; Arai, Naoko; Tanaka, Keiji Saeki, Yasushi

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •We succeeded to control the proteasome localization by the anchor-away technique. •Nuclear proteasome-depleted cells showed a lethal phenotype. •Cytoplasmic proteasomes are not indispensable for cell growth in dividing cells. -- Abstract: The 26S proteasome is an essential protease complex responsible for the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins in eukaryotic cells. In rapidly proliferating yeast cells, proteasomes are mainly localized in the nucleus, but the biological significance of the proteasome localization is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the proteasome localization and the functions by the anchor-away technique, a ligand-dependent sequestration of a target protein into specific compartment(s). Anchoring of the proteasome to the plasma membrane or the ribosome resulted in conditional depletion of the nuclear proteasomes, whereas anchoring to histone resulted in the proteasome sequestration into the nucleus. We observed that the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins in all the proteasome-targeted cells, suggesting that both the nuclear and cytoplasmic proteasomes have proteolytic functions and that the ubiquitinated proteins are produced and degraded in each compartment. Consistent with previous studies, the nuclear proteasome-depleted cells exhibited a lethal phenotype. In contrast, the nuclear sequestration of the proteasome resulted only in a mild growth defect, suggesting that the cytoplasmic proteasomes are not basically indispensable for cell growth in rapidly growing yeast cells.

  8. Localization of the proteasomal ubiquitin receptors Rpn10 and Rpn13 by electron cryomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Eri; Bohn, Stefan; Mihalache, Oana; Kiss, Petra; Beck, Florian; Nagy, Istvan; Nickell, Stephan; Tanaka, Keiji; Saeki, Yasushi; Förster, Friedrich; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Two canonical subunits of the 26S proteasome, Rpn10 and Rpn13, function as ubiquitin (Ub) receptors. The mutual arrangement of these subunits—and all other non-ATPase subunits—in the regulatory particle is unknown. Using electron cryomicroscopy, we calculated difference maps between wild-type 26S proteasome from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and deletion mutants (rpn10Δ, rpn13Δ, and rpn10Δrpn13Δ). These maps allowed us to localize the two Ub receptors unambiguously. Rpn10 and Rpn13 mapped to the apical part of the 26S proteasome, above the N-terminal coiled coils of the AAA-ATPase heterodimers Rpt4/Rpt5 and Rpt1/Rpt2, respectively. On the basis of the mutual positions of Rpn10 and Rpn13, we propose a model for polyubiquitin binding to the 26S proteasome. PMID:22215586

  9. Autophagy and ubiquitin-proteasome system contribute to sperm mitophagy after mammalian fertilization.

    PubMed

    Song, Won-Hee; Yi, Young-Joo; Sutovsky, Miriam; Meyers, Stuart; Sutovsky, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Maternal inheritance of mitochondria and mtDNA is a universal principle in human and animal development, guided by selective ubiquitin-dependent degradation of the sperm-borne mitochondria after fertilization. However, it is not clear how the 26S proteasome, the ubiquitin-dependent protease that is only capable of degrading one protein molecule at a time, can dispose of a whole sperm mitochondrial sheath. We hypothesized that the canonical ubiquitin-like autophagy receptors [sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1), microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3), gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor-associated protein (GABARAP)] and the nontraditional mitophagy pathways involving ubiquitin-proteasome system and the ubiquitin-binding protein dislocase, valosin-containing protein (VCP), may act in concert during mammalian sperm mitophagy. We found that the SQSTM1, but not GABARAP or LC3, associated with sperm mitochondria after fertilization in pig and rhesus monkey zygotes. Three sperm mitochondrial proteins copurified with the recombinant, ubiquitin-associated domain of SQSTM1. The accumulation of GABARAP-containing protein aggregates was observed in the vicinity of sperm mitochondrial sheaths in the zygotes and increased in the embryos treated with proteasomal inhibitor MG132, in which intact sperm mitochondrial sheaths were observed. Pharmacological inhibition of VCP significantly delayed the process of sperm mitophagy and completely prevented it when combined with microinjection of autophagy-targeting antibodies specific to SQSTM1 and/or GABARAP. Sperm mitophagy in higher mammals thus relies on a combined action of SQSTM1-dependent autophagy and VCP-mediated dislocation and presentation of ubiquitinated sperm mitochondrial proteins to the 26S proteasome, explaining how the whole sperm mitochondria are degraded inside the fertilized mammalian oocytes by a protein recycling system involved in degradation of single protein molecules. PMID:27551072

  10. Structural disorder and its role in proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Aufderheide, Antje; Unverdorben, Pia; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Förster, Friedrich

    2015-09-14

    The ubiquitin proteasome system is responsible for the controlled degradation of a vast number of intracellular proteins. It targets misfolded or otherwise aberrant proteins as well as proteins no longer needed at a given point in time. The 26S proteasome is a large macromolecular machine comprising 33 distinct subunits as well as a number of transiently associating cofactors. Being essentially a non-specific protease, specificity is conferred by the ubiquitin system, which selects and marks substrates for degradation. Here, we review our current understanding of the structure and function of the 26S proteasome; in doing so we highlight the role of disordered protein regions. Disordered segments in substrates promote their degradation, whereas low complexity regions prevent their proteolysis. In the 26S proteasome itself a main role of disordered segments seems to be rendering the ubiquitin receptors mobile, possibly supporting recruitment of polyubiquitylated substrates. Thus, these structural features of substrates as well as of the 26S proteasome itself likely play important roles at different stages of the protein degradation process. PMID:26226424

  11. The NS1 protein of influenza A virus suppresses interferon-regulated activation of antigen-presentation and immune-proteasome pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tisoncik, Jennifer R.; Billharz, Rosalind; Burmakina, Svetlana; Belisle, Sarah E.; Proll, Sean C.; Korth, Marcus J.; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2011-01-01

    The NS1 protein of influenza virus counters host antiviral defences primarily by antagonizing the type I interferon (IFN) response. Both the N-terminal dsRNA-binding domain and the C-terminal effector domain are required for optimal suppression of host responses during infection. To better understand the regulatory role of the NS1 effector domain, we used an NS1-truncated mutant virus derived from human H1N1 influenza isolate A/Texas/36/91 (Tx/91) and assessed global transcriptional profiles from two independent human lung cell-culture models. Relative to the wild-type Tx/91-induced gene expression, the NS1 mutant virus induced enhanced expression of innate immune genes, specifically NF-κB signalling-pathway genes and IFN-α and -β target genes. We queried an experimentally derived IFN gene set to gauge the proportion of IFN-responsive genes that are suppressed specifically by NS1. We show that the C-terminally truncated NS1 mutant virus is less efficient at suppressing IFN-regulated gene expression associated with activation of antigen-presentation and immune-proteasome pathways. This is the first report integrating genomic analysis from two independent human culture systems, including primary lung cells, using genetically similar H1N1 influenza viruses that differ only in the length of the NS1 protein. PMID:21593271

  12. Exchange Factor TBL1 and Arginine Methyltransferase PRMT6 Cooperate in Protecting G Protein Pathway Suppressor 2 (GPS2) from Proteasomal Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiawen; Cardamone, M. Dafne; Johnson, Holly E.; Neault, Mathieu; Chan, Michelle; Floyd, Z. Elizabeth; Mallette, Frédérick A.; Perissi, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    G protein pathway suppressor 2 (GPS2) is a multifunctional protein involved in the regulation of a number of metabolic organs. First identified as part of the NCoR-SMRT corepressor complex, GPS2 is known to play an important role in the nucleus in the regulation of gene transcription and meiotic recombination. In addition, we recently reported a non-transcriptional role of GPS2 as an inhibitor of the proinflammatory TNFα pathway in the cytosol. Although this suggests that the control of GPS2 localization may be an important determinant of its molecular functions, a clear understanding of GPS2 differential targeting to specific cellular locations is still lacking. Here we show that a fine balance between protein stabilization and degradation tightly regulates GPS2 nuclear function. Our findings indicate that GPS2 is degraded upon polyubiquitination by the E3 ubiquitin ligase Siah2. Unexpectedly, interaction with the exchange factor TBL1 is required to protect GPS2 from degradation, with methylation of GPS2 by arginine methyltransferase PRMT6 regulating the interaction with TBL1 and inhibiting proteasome-dependent degradation. Overall, our findings indicate that regulation of GPS2 by posttranslational modifications provides an effective strategy for modulating its molecular function within the nuclear compartment. PMID:26070566

  13. Suppression of BRCA1 sensitizes cells to proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Y; Bouwman, P; Greco, D; Saarela, J; Yadav, B; Jonkers, J; Kuznetsov, S G

    2014-01-01

    BRCA1 is a multifunctional protein best known for its role in DNA repair and association with breast and ovarian cancers. To uncover novel biologically significant molecular functions of BRCA1, we tested a panel of 198 approved and experimental drugs to inhibit growth of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells depleted for BRCA1 by siRNA. 26S proteasome inhibitors bortezomib and carfilzomib emerged as a new class of selective BRCA1-targeting agents. The effect was confirmed in HeLa and U2OS cancer cell lines using two independent siRNAs, and in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells with inducible deletion of Brca1. Bortezomib treatment did not cause any increase in nuclear foci containing phosphorylated histone H2AX, and knockdown of BRCA2 did not entail sensitivity to bortezomib, suggesting that the DNA repair function of BRCA1 may not be directly involved. We found that a toxic effect of bortezomib on BRCA1-depleted cells is mostly due to deregulated cell cycle checkpoints mediated by RB1-E2F pathway and 53BP1. Similar to BRCA1, depletion of RB1 also conferred sensitivity to bortezomib, whereas suppression of E2F1 or 53BP1 together with BRCA1 reduced induction of apoptosis after bortezomib treatment. A gene expression microarray study identified additional genes activated by bortezomib treatment only in the context of inactivation of BRCA1 including a critical involvement of the ERN1-mediated unfolded protein response. Our data indicate that BRCA1 has a novel molecular function affecting cell cycle checkpoints in a manner dependent on the 26S proteasome activity. PMID:25522274

  14. Suppression of BRCA1 sensitizes cells to proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gu, Y; Bouwman, P; Greco, D; Saarela, J; Yadav, B; Jonkers, J; Kuznetsov, S G

    2014-01-01

    BRCA1 is a multifunctional protein best known for its role in DNA repair and association with breast and ovarian cancers. To uncover novel biologically significant molecular functions of BRCA1, we tested a panel of 198 approved and experimental drugs to inhibit growth of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells depleted for BRCA1 by siRNA. 26S proteasome inhibitors bortezomib and carfilzomib emerged as a new class of selective BRCA1-targeting agents. The effect was confirmed in HeLa and U2OS cancer cell lines using two independent siRNAs, and in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells with inducible deletion of Brca1. Bortezomib treatment did not cause any increase in nuclear foci containing phosphorylated histone H2AX, and knockdown of BRCA2 did not entail sensitivity to bortezomib, suggesting that the DNA repair function of BRCA1 may not be directly involved. We found that a toxic effect of bortezomib on BRCA1-depleted cells is mostly due to deregulated cell cycle checkpoints mediated by RB1-E2F pathway and 53BP1. Similar to BRCA1, depletion of RB1 also conferred sensitivity to bortezomib, whereas suppression of E2F1 or 53BP1 together with BRCA1 reduced induction of apoptosis after bortezomib treatment. A gene expression microarray study identified additional genes activated by bortezomib treatment only in the context of inactivation of BRCA1 including a critical involvement of the ERN1-mediated unfolded protein response. Our data indicate that BRCA1 has a novel molecular function affecting cell cycle checkpoints in a manner dependent on the 26S proteasome activity. PMID:25522274

  15. The Ubiquitin Ligase Hul5 Promotes Proteasomal Processivity▿

    PubMed Central

    Aviram, Sharon; Kornitzer, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a large cytoplasmic protease that degrades polyubiquitinated proteins to short peptides in a processive manner. The proteasome 19S regulatory subcomplex tethers the target protein via its polyubiquitin adduct and unfolds the target polypeptide, which is then threaded into the proteolytic site-containing 20S subcomplex. Hul5 is a 19S subcomplex-associated ubiquitin ligase that elongates ubiquitin chains on proteasome-bound substrates. We isolated hul5Δ as a mutation with which fusions of an unstable cyclin to stable reporter proteins accumulate as partially processed products. These products appear transiently in the wild type but are strongly stabilized in 19S ATPase mutants and in the hul5Δ mutant, supporting a role for the ATPase subunits in the unfolding of proteasome substrates before insertion into the catalytic cavity and suggesting a role for Hul5 in the processive degradation of proteins that are stalled on the proteasome. PMID:20008553

  16. TRIM13 (RFP2) downregulation decreases tumour cell growth in multiple myeloma through inhibition of NF Kappa B pathway and proteasome activity

    PubMed Central

    Gatt, Moshe E; Takada, Kohichi; Mani, Mala; Lerner, Mikael; Pick, Marjorie; Hideshima, Teru; Carrasco, Daniel E.; Protopopov, Alexei; Ivanova, Elena; Sangfelt, Olle; Grandér, Dan; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D.; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Carrasco, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable neoplasm caused by proliferation of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow (BM). MM is characterized frequently by a complete or partial deletion of chromosome 13q14, seen in more than 50% of patients at diagnosis. Within this deleted region the tripartite motif containing 13 (TRIM13, also termed RFP2) gene product has been proposed to be a tumour suppressor gene (TSG). Here, we show that low expression levels of TRIM13 in MM are associated with chromosome 13q deletion and poor clinical outcome. We present a functional analysis of TRIM13 using a loss-of-function approach, and demonstrate that TRIM13 downregulation decreases tumour cell survival as well as cell cycle progression and proliferation of MM cells. In addition, we provide evidence for the involvement of TRIM13 downregulation in inhibiting the NF kappa B pathway and the activity of the 20S proteasome. Although this data does not support a role of TRIM13 as a TSG, it substantiates important roles of TRIM13 in MM tumour survival and proliferation, underscoring its potential role as a novel target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23647456

  17. Multi-output Model with Box-Jenkins Operators of Quadratic Indices for Prediction of Malaria and Cancer Inhibitors Targeting Ubiquitin- Proteasome Pathway (UPP) Proteins.

    PubMed

    Casañola-Martin, Gerardo M; Le-Thi-Thu, Huong; Pérez-Giménez, Facundo; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Merino-Sanjuán, Matilde; Abad, Concepción; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) is the primary degradation system of short-lived regulatory proteins. Cellular processes such as the cell cycle, signal transduction, gene expression, DNA repair and apoptosis are regulated by this UPP and dysfunctions in this system have important implications in the development of cancer, neurodegenerative, cardiac and other human pathologies. UPP seems also to be very important in the function of eukaryote cells of the human parasites like Plasmodium falciparum, the causal agent of the neglected disease Malaria. Hence, the UPP could be considered as an attractive target for the development of compounds with Anti-Malarial or Anti-cancer properties. Recent online databases like ChEMBL contains a larger quantity of information in terms of pharmacological assay protocols and compounds tested as UPP inhibitors under many different conditions. This large amount of data give new openings for the computer-aided identification of UPP inhibitors, but the intrinsic data diversity is an obstacle for the development of successful classifiers. To solve this problem here we used the Bob-Jenkins moving average operators and the atom-based quadratic molecular indices calculated with the software TOMOCOMD-CARDD (TC) to develop a quantitative model for the prediction of the multiple outputs in this complex dataset. Our multi-target model can predict results for drugs against 22 molecular or cellular targets of different organisms with accuracies above 70% in both training and validation sets. PMID:26427384

  18. Identification of proteasome subunit beta type 2 associated with deltamethrin detoxification in Drosophila Kc cells by cDNA microarray analysis and bioassay analyses.

    PubMed

    Hu, Junli; Jiao, Dongxu; Xu, Qin; Ying, Xiaoli; Liu, Wei; Chi, Qingping; Ye, Yuting; Li, Xueyu; Cheng, Luogen

    2016-05-10

    Insecticide deltamethrin resistance has presented a difficult obstacle for pest control and the resistance development is complex and associated with many genes. To better understand the possible molecular mechanisms involved in DM stress, in this study, cDNA microarray analysis was employed. 448 differentially expressed genes with at least a 2-fold expression difference were identified in Drosophila cells after DM exposure. Moreover, some genes were confirmed with qPCR, which yielded results consistent with the microarray analysis. Three members of the ubiquitin-proteasome system were significantly elevated in DM-stressed cells, suggesting that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway may play an important role in DM detoxification. The proteasome beta2 subunit (Prosbeta2) is a member of 20S proteasome subunit family, which forms the proteolytic core of 26S proteasome. Whether Prosbeta2 participates in DM detoxification requires further study. RNAi and heterologous expression were conducted to investigate the contribution of Prosbeta2 in DM detoxification. The results revealed Prosbeta2 knockdown significantly reduce the level of DM detoxification in RNAi-treated cells after 48 h. Overexpression of Prosbeta2 increased cellular viability. These detoxification results represent the first evidence that Prosbeta2 plays a role in the detoxification of DM, which may provide new idea and target for studying the molecular mechanisms of insect resistance. PMID:26850132

  19. Evolution of Proteasome Regulators in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Fort, Philippe; Kajava, Andrey V.; Delsuc, Fredéric; Coux, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    All living organisms require protein degradation to terminate biological processes and remove damaged proteins. One such machine is the 20S proteasome, a specialized barrel-shaped and compartmentalized multicatalytic protease. The activity of the 20S proteasome generally requires the binding of regulators/proteasome activators (PAs), which control the entrance of substrates. These include the PA700 (19S complex), which assembles with the 20S and forms the 26S proteasome and allows the efficient degradation of proteins usually labeled by ubiquitin tags, PA200 and PA28, which are involved in proteolysis through ubiquitin-independent mechanisms and PI31, which was initially identified as a 20S inhibitor in vitro. Unlike 20S proteasome, shown to be present in all Eukaryotes and Archaea, the evolutionary history of PAs remained fragmentary. Here, we made a comprehensive survey and phylogenetic analyses of the four types of regulators in 17 clades covering most of the eukaryotic supergroups. We found remarkable conservation of each PA700 subunit in all eukaryotes, indicating that the current complex PA700 structure was already set up in the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA). Also present in LECA, PA200, PA28, and PI31 showed a more contrasted evolutionary picture, because many lineages have subsequently lost one or two of them. The paramount conservation of PA700 composition in all eukaryotes and the dynamic evolution of PA200, PA28, and PI31 are discussed in the light of current knowledge on their physiological roles. PMID:25943340

  20. Compromising the 19S proteasome complex protects cells from reduced flux through the proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Tsvetkov, Peter; Mendillo, Marc L; Zhao, Jinghui; Carette, Jan E; Merrill, Parker H; Cikes, Domagoj; Varadarajan, Malini; van Diemen, Ferdy R; Penninger, Josef M; Goldberg, Alfred L; Brummelkamp, Thijn R; Santagata, Sandro; Lindquist, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Proteasomes are central regulators of protein homeostasis in eukaryotes. Proteasome function is vulnerable to environmental insults, cellular protein imbalance and targeted pharmaceuticals. Yet, mechanisms that cells deploy to counteract inhibition of this central regulator are little understood. To find such mechanisms, we reduced flux through the proteasome to the point of toxicity with specific inhibitors and performed genome-wide screens for mutations that allowed cells to survive. Counter to expectation, reducing expression of individual subunits of the proteasome's 19S regulatory complex increased survival. Strong 19S reduction was cytotoxic but modest reduction protected cells from inhibitors. Protection was accompanied by an increased ratio of 20S to 26S proteasomes, preservation of protein degradation capacity and reduced proteotoxic stress. While compromise of 19S function can have a fitness cost under basal conditions, it provided a powerful survival advantage when proteasome function was impaired. This means of rebalancing proteostasis is conserved from yeast to humans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08467.001 PMID:26327695

  1. The role of the ubiquitination–proteasome pathway in breast cancer: Use of mouse models for analyzing ubiquitination processes

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Sabrina; Loda, Massimo

    2003-01-01

    Turnover of several regulatory proteins results from targeted destruction via ubiquitination and subsequent degradation through the proteosome. The timely and irreversible degradation of critical regulators is essential for normal cellular function. The precise biochemical mechanisms that are involved in protein turnover by ubiquitin-mediated degradation have been elucidated using in vitro assays and cell culture systems. However, pathways that lead to ubiquitination of critical regulatory proteins in vivo are more complex, and have both temporal and tissue-specific differences. In vivo models will allow identification of substrates and enzymes of the ubiquitin–proteosome pathway that play important roles in selected tissues and diseases. In addition, assessment of the therapeutic efficacy of drugs designed to inhibit or enhance protein turnover by ubiquitination requires in vivo models. In the present review we describe selected examples of transgenic and knockout models of proteins that are known either to be regulated by ubiquitin-mediated degradation or to have a catalytic function in this process, and to play an important role in breast cancer. We outline the functions of these proteins in vivo and focus on knowledge gained in the comparison of in vivo behavior predicted from cell-free in vitro data or from experiments conducted in cell culture systems. PMID:12559040

  2. Tripartite degrons confer diversity and specificity on regulated protein degradation in the ubiquitin-proteasome system

    PubMed Central

    Guharoy, Mainak; Bhowmick, Pallab; Sallam, Mohamed; Tompa, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Specific signals (degrons) regulate protein turnover mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here we systematically analyse known degrons and propose a tripartite model comprising the following: (1) a primary degron (peptide motif) that specifies substrate recognition by cognate E3 ubiquitin ligases, (2) secondary site(s) comprising a single or multiple neighbouring ubiquitinated lysine(s) and (3) a structurally disordered segment that initiates substrate unfolding at the 26S proteasome. Primary degron sequences are conserved among orthologues and occur in structurally disordered regions that undergo E3-induced folding-on-binding. Posttranslational modifications can switch primary degrons into E3-binding-competent states, thereby integrating degradation with signalling pathways. Degradation-linked lysines tend to be located within disordered segments that also initiate substrate degradation by effective proteasomal engagement. Many characterized mutations and alternative isoforms with abrogated degron components are implicated in disease. These effects result from increased protein stability and interactome rewiring. The distributed nature of degrons ensures regulation, specificity and combinatorial control of degradation. PMID:26732515

  3. Activity and regulation of the centrosome-associated proteasome.

    PubMed

    Fabunmi, R P; Wigley, W C; Thomas, P J; DeMartino, G N

    2000-01-01

    Regulated proteolysis is important for maintaining appropriate cellular levels of many proteins. The bulk of intracellular protein degradation is catalyzed by the proteasome. Recently, the centrosome was identified as a novel site for concentration of the proteasome and associated regulatory proteins (Wigley, W. C., Fabunmi, R. P., Lee, M. G., Marino, C. R., Muallem, S., DeMartino, G. N., and Thomas, P. J. (1999) J. Cell Biol. 145, 481-490). Here we provide evidence that centrosomes contain the active 26 S proteasome that degrades ubiquitinated-protein and proteasome-specific peptide substrates. Moreover, the centrosomes contain an ubiquitin isopeptidase activity. The proteolytic activity is ATP-dependent and is inhibited by proteasome inhibitors. Notably, treatment of cells with inhibitors of proteasome activity promotes redistribution of the proteasome and associated regulatory proteins to the centrosome independent of an intact microtubule system. These data provide biochemical evidence for active proteasomal complexes at the centrosome, highlighting a novel function for this organizing structure. PMID:10617632

  4. Nuclear import of an intact preassembled proteasome particle

    PubMed Central

    Savulescu, Anca F.; Shorer, Hagai; Kleifeld, Oded; Cohen, Ilana; Gruber, Rita; Glickman, Michael H.; Harel, Amnon

    2011-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a conserved 2.5 MDa protein degradation machine that localizes to different cellular compartments, including the nucleus. Little is known about the specific targeting mechanisms of proteasomes in eukaryotic cells. We used a cell-free nuclear reconstitution system to test for nuclear targeting and import of distinct proteasome species. Three types of stable, proteolytically active proteasomes particles were purified from Xenopus egg cytosol. Two of these, the 26S holoenzyme and the 20S core particle, were targeted to the nuclear periphery but did not reach the nucleoplasm. This targeting depends on the presence of mature nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) in the nuclear envelope. A third, novel form, designated here as 20S+, was actively imported through NPCs. The 20S+ proteasome particle resembles recently described structural intermediates from other systems. Nuclear import of this particle requires functional NPCs, but it is not directly regulated by the Ran GTPase cycle. The mere presence of the associated “+” factors is sufficient to reconstitute nuclear targeting and confer onto isolated 20S core particles the ability to be imported. Stable 20S+ particles found in unfertilized eggs may provide a means for quick mobilization of existing proteasome particles into newly formed nuclear compartments during early development. PMID:21289101

  5. A mechanistic insight into a proteasome-independent constitutive inhibitor kappaBalpha (IkappaBalpha) degradation and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation pathway in WEHI-231 B-cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shumway, Stuart D; Miyamoto, Shigeki

    2004-01-01

    Inducible activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB (nuclear factor kappaB) is classically mediated by proteasomal degradation of its associated inhibitors, IkappaBalpha (inhibitory kappaBalpha) and IkappaBbeta. However, certain B-lymphocytes maintain constitutively nuclear NF-kappaB activity (a p50-c-Rel heterodimer) which is resistant to inhibition by proteasome inhibitors. This activity in the WEHI-231 B-cell line is associated with continual and preferential degradation of IkappaBalpha, which is also unaffected by proteasome inhibitors. Pharmacological studies indicated that there was a correlation between inhibition of IkappaBalpha degradation and constitutive p50-c-Rel activity. Domain analysis of IkappaBalpha by deletion mutagenesis demonstrated that an N-terminal 36-amino-acid sequence of IkappaBalpha represented an instability determinant for constitutive degradation. Moreover, domain grafting studies indicated that this sequence was sufficient to cause IkappaBbeta, but not chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, to be rapidly degraded in WEHI-231 B-cells. However, this sequence was insufficient to target IkappaBbeta to the non-proteasome degradation pathway, suggesting that there was an additional cis-element(s) in IkappaBalpha that was required for complete targeting. Nevertheless, the NF-kappaB pool associated with IkappaBbeta now became constitutively active by virtue of IkappaBbeta instability in these cells. These findings further support the notion that IkappaB instability governs the maintenance of constitutive p50-c-Rel activity in certain B-cells via a unique degradation pathway. PMID:14763901

  6. Intracellular Dynamics of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome-System.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Maisha; Enenkel, Cordula

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system is the major degradation pathway for short-lived proteins in eukaryotic cells. Targets of the ubiquitin-proteasome-system are proteins regulating a broad range of cellular processes including cell cycle progression, gene expression, the quality control of proteostasis and the response to geno- and proteotoxic stress. Prior to degradation, the proteasomal substrate is marked with a poly-ubiquitin chain. The key protease of the ubiquitin system is the proteasome. In dividing cells, proteasomes exist as holo-enzymes composed of regulatory and core particles. The regulatory complex confers ubiquitin-recognition and ATP dependence on proteasomal protein degradation. The catalytic sites are located in the proteasome core particle. Proteasome holo-enzymes are predominantly nuclear suggesting a major requirement for proteasomal proteolysis in the nucleus. In cell cycle arrested mammalian or quiescent yeast cells, proteasomes deplete from the nucleus and accumulate in granules at the nuclear envelope (NE) / endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes. In prolonged quiescence, proteasome granules drop off the NE / ER membranes and migrate as stable organelles throughout the cytoplasm, as thoroughly investigated in yeast. When quiescence yeast cells are allowed to resume growth, proteasome granules clear and proteasomes are rapidly imported into the nucleus. Here, we summarize our knowledge about the enigmatic structure of proteasome storage granules and the trafficking of proteasomes and their substrates between the cyto- and nucleoplasm. Most of our current knowledge is based on studies in yeast. Their translation to mammalian cells promises to provide keen insight into protein degradation in non-dividing cells which comprise the majority of our body's cells. PMID:26339477

  7. Pupylation-dependent and -independent proteasomal degradation in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Imkamp, Frank; Ziemski, Michal; Weber-Ban, Eilika

    2015-08-01

    Bacteria make use of compartmentalizing protease complexes, similar in architecture but not homologous to the eukaryotic proteasome, for the selective and processive removal of proteins. Mycobacteria as members of the actinobacteria harbor proteasomes in addition to the canonical bacterial degradation complexes. Mycobacterial proteasomal degradation, although not essential during normal growth, becomes critical for survival under particular environmental conditions, like, for example, during persistence of the pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis in host macrophages or of environmental mycobacteria under starvation. Recruitment of protein substrates for proteasomal degradation is usually mediated by pupylation, the post-translational modification of lysine side chains with the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein Pup. This substrate recruitment strategy is functionally reminiscent of ubiquitination in eukaryotes, but is the result of convergent evolution, relying on chemically and structurally distinct enzymes. Pupylated substrates are recognized by the ATP-dependent proteasomal regulator Mpa that associates with the 20S proteasome core. A pupylation-independent proteasome degradation pathway has recently been discovered that is mediated by the ATP-independent bacterial proteasome activator Bpa (also referred to as PafE), and that appears to play a role under stress conditions. In this review, mechanistic principles of bacterial proteasomal degradation are discussed and compared with functionally related elements of the eukaryotic ubiquitin-proteasome system. Special attention is given to an understanding on the molecular level based on structural and biochemical analysis. Wherever available, discussion of in vivo studies is included to highlight the biological significance of this unusual bacterial degradation pathway. PMID:26352358

  8. Protein Abundance Changes and Ubiquitylation Targets Identified after Inhibition of the Proteasome with Syringolin A*

    PubMed Central

    Svozil, Julia; Hirsch-Hoffmann, Matthias; Dudler, Robert; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Baerenfaller, Katja

    2014-01-01

    As proteins are the main effectors inside cells, their levels need to be tightly regulated. This is partly achieved by specific protein degradation via the Ubiquitin-26S proteasome system (UPS). In plants, an exceptionally high number of proteins are involved in Ubiquitin-26S proteasome system-mediated protein degradation and it is known to regulate most, if not all, important cellular processes. Here, we investigated the response to the inhibition of the proteasome at the protein level treating leaves with the specific inhibitor Syringolin A (SylA) in a daytime specific manner and found 109 accumulated and 140 decreased proteins. The patterns of protein level changes indicate that the accumulating proteins cause proteotoxic stress that triggers various responses. Comparing protein level changes in SylA treated with those in a transgenic line over-expressing a mutated ubiquitin unable to form polyubiquitylated proteins produced little overlap pointing to different response pathways. To distinguish between direct and indirect targets of the UPS we also enriched and identified ubiquitylated proteins after inhibition of the proteasome, revealing a total of 1791 ubiquitylated proteins in leaves and roots and 1209 that were uniquely identified in our study. The comparison of the ubiquitylated proteins with those changing in abundance after SylA-mediated inhibition of the proteasome confirmed the complexity of the response and revealed that some proteins are regulated both at transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. For the ubiquitylated proteins that accumulate in the cytoplasm but are targeted to the plastid or the mitochondrion, we often found peptides in their target sequences, demonstrating that the UPS is involved in controlling organellar protein levels. Attempts to identify the sites of ubiquitylation revealed that the specific properties of this post-translational modification can lead to incorrect peptide spectrum assignments in complex peptide mixtures

  9. Proteasome Inhibitors: An Expanding Army Attacking a Unique Target

    PubMed Central

    Kisselev, Alexei F.; van der Linden, Wouter A.; Overkleeft, Herman S.

    2012-01-01

    Proteasomes are large, multisubunit proteolytic complexes presenting multiple targets for therapeutic intervention. The 26S proteasome consists of a 20S proteolytic core and one or two 19S regulatory particles. The 20S core contains three types of active sites. Many structurally diverse inhibitors of these active sites, both natural product and synthetic, have been discovered in the last two decades. One, bortezomib, is used clinically for treatment of multiple myeloma, mantle cell lymphoma, and acute allograft rejection. Five more recently developed proteasome inhibitors are in trials for treatment of myeloma and other cancers. Proteasome inhibitors also have activity in animal models of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, reperfusion injury, promote bone and hair growth, and can potentially be used as anti-infectives. In addition, inhibitors of ATPases and deubiquitinases of 19S regulatory particles have been discovered in the last decade. PMID:22284358

  10. Genetics of proteasome diseases.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Aldrin V

    2013-01-01

    The proteasome is a large, multiple subunit complex that is capable of degrading most intracellular proteins. Polymorphisms in proteasome subunits are associated with cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, neurological diseases, and cancer. One polymorphism in the proteasome gene PSMA6 (-8C/G) is associated with three different diseases: type 2 diabetes, myocardial infarction, and coronary artery disease. One type of proteasome, the immunoproteasome, which contains inducible catalytic subunits, is adapted to generate peptides for antigen presentation. It has recently been shown that mutations and polymorphisms in the immunoproteasome catalytic subunit PSMB8 are associated with several inflammatory and autoinflammatory diseases including Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome, CANDLE syndrome, and intestinal M. tuberculosis infection. This comprehensive review describes the disease-related polymorphisms in proteasome genes associated with human diseases and the physiological modulation of proteasome function by these polymorphisms. Given the large number of subunits and the central importance of the proteasome in human physiology as well as the fast pace of detection of proteasome polymorphisms associated with human diseases, it is likely that other polymorphisms in proteasome genes associated with diseases will be detected in the near future. While disease-associated polymorphisms are now readily discovered, the challenge will be to use this genetic information for clinical benefit. PMID:24490108

  11. Site-specific Proteasome Phosphorylation Controls Cell Proliferation and Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xing; Wang, Xiaorong; Wang, Zhiping; Banerjee, Sourav; Yang, Jing; Huang, Lan; Dixon, Jack E.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fundamental importance of proteasomal degradation in cells, little is known about whether and how the 26S proteasome itself is regulated in coordination with various physiological processes. Here we show that the proteasome is dynamically phosphorylated during cell cycle at Thr25 of the 19S subunit Rpt3. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing, RNA interference and biochemical studies demonstrate that blocking Rpt3-Thr25 phosphorylation markedly impairs proteasome activity and impedes cell proliferation. Through a kinome-wide screen, we have identified dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase 2 (DYRK2) as the primary kinase that phosphorylates Rpt3-Thr25, leading to enhanced substrate translocation and degradation. Importantly, loss of the single phosphorylation of Rpt3-Thr25 or knockout of DYRK2 significantly inhibits tumor formation by proteasome-addicted human breast cancer cells in mice. These findings define an important mechanism for proteasome regulation and demonstrate the biological significance of proteasome phosphorylation in regulating cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. PMID:26655835

  12. Analysis of Myelin Basic Protein Fragmentation by Proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Bacheva, A. V.; Belogurov, A. A.; Ponomarenko, N. A.; Govorun, V. M.; Serebryakova, M. V.; Gabibov, A. G.

    2009-01-01

    The proteasome is a high molecular protein complex whose purpose is specific protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. One of the proteasome functions is to produce peptides, which will then be presented on the outer cell membrane using main histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules of the first or second class. There are definite reasons to believe that proteasome directly takes part in the specific degradation of myelin basic protein (MBP), which make up to 30% of all proteins in the myelin sheath of neuronal axons. The details of the proteasomal degradation of MBP are still unclear. In this work, the features of specific MBP degradation by proteasome were studied. It was demonstrated that MBP (non-ubiquitinated) is a good substrate for 20S and for the 26S proteasome. This is the first work on detecting the sites of MBP proteolysis by proteasome from brains of SJL/J/J and Balb/C mice's lines. Substantial differences in the degradation pattern of this neuroantigen were found, which could indicate the better presentation MBP parts on MHC molecules in the case of mice predisposed to the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. PMID:22649589

  13. Arabidopsis PROTEASOME REGULATOR1 is required for auxin-mediated suppression of proteasome activity and regulates auxin signalling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bao-Jun; Han, Xin-Xin; Yin, Lin-Lin; Xing, Mei-Qing; Xu, Zhi-Hong; Xue, Hong-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The plant hormone auxin is perceived by the nuclear F-box protein TIR1 receptor family and regulates gene expression through degradation of Aux/IAA transcriptional repressors. Several studies have revealed the importance of the proteasome in auxin signalling, but details on how the proteolytic machinery is regulated and how this relates to degradation of Aux/IAA proteins remains unclear. Here we show that an Arabidopsis homologue of the proteasome inhibitor PI31, which we name PROTEASOME REGULATOR1 (PTRE1), is a positive regulator of the 26S proteasome. Loss-of-function ptre1 mutants are insensitive to auxin-mediated suppression of proteasome activity, show diminished auxin-induced degradation of Aux/IAA proteins and display auxin-related phenotypes. We found that auxin alters the subcellular localization of PTRE1, suggesting this may be part of the mechanism by which it reduces proteasome activity. Based on these results, we propose that auxin regulates proteasome activity via PTRE1 to fine-tune the homoeostasis of Aux/IAA repressor proteins thus modifying auxin activity. PMID:27109828

  14. Arabidopsis PROTEASOME REGULATOR1 is required for auxin-mediated suppression of proteasome activity and regulates auxin signalling

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bao-Jun; Han, Xin-Xin; Yin, Lin-Lin; Xing, Mei-Qing; Xu, Zhi-Hong; Xue, Hong-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The plant hormone auxin is perceived by the nuclear F-box protein TIR1 receptor family and regulates gene expression through degradation of Aux/IAA transcriptional repressors. Several studies have revealed the importance of the proteasome in auxin signalling, but details on how the proteolytic machinery is regulated and how this relates to degradation of Aux/IAA proteins remains unclear. Here we show that an Arabidopsis homologue of the proteasome inhibitor PI31, which we name PROTEASOME REGULATOR1 (PTRE1), is a positive regulator of the 26S proteasome. Loss-of-function ptre1 mutants are insensitive to auxin-mediated suppression of proteasome activity, show diminished auxin-induced degradation of Aux/IAA proteins and display auxin-related phenotypes. We found that auxin alters the subcellular localization of PTRE1, suggesting this may be part of the mechanism by which it reduces proteasome activity. Based on these results, we propose that auxin regulates proteasome activity via PTRE1 to fine-tune the homoeostasis of Aux/IAA repressor proteins thus modifying auxin activity. PMID:27109828

  15. Proteasomes and protein conjugation across domains of life

    PubMed Central

    Maupin-Furlow, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Like other energy-dependent proteases, proteasomes, which are found across the three domains of life, are self-compartmentalized and important in the early steps of proteolysis. Proteasomes degrade improperly synthesized, damaged or misfolded proteins and hydrolyse regulatory proteins that must be specifically removed or cleaved for cell signalling. In eukaryotes, proteins are typically targeted for proteasome-mediated destruction through polyubiquitylation, although ubiquitin-independent pathways also exist. Interestingly, actinobacteria and archaea also covalently attach small proteins (prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup) and small archaeal modifier proteins (Samps), respectively) to certain proteins, and this may serve to target the modified proteins for degradation by proteasomes. PMID:22183254

  16. 1.15 Å resolution structure of the proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 PDZ domain

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Chingakham R.; Lovell, Scott; Mehzabeen, Nurjahan; Chowdhury, Wasimul Q.; Geanes, Eric S.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Roelofs, Jeroen

    2014-03-25

    The proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 binds to the proteasome subunit Rpt5 using its PDZ domain. The structure of the Nas2 PDZ domain has been determined. The 26S proteasome is a 2.5 MDa protease dedicated to the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins in eukaryotes. The assembly of this complex containing 66 polypeptides is assisted by at least nine proteasome-specific chaperones. One of these, Nas2, binds to the proteasomal AAA-ATPase subunit Rpt5. The PDZ domain of Nas2 binds to the C-terminal tail of Rpt5; however, it does not require the C-terminus of Rpt5 for binding. Here, the 1.15 Å resolution structure of the PDZ domain of Nas2 is reported. This structure will provide a basis for further insights regarding the structure and function of Nas2 in proteasome assembly.

  17. Structural Basis for the Assembly and Gate Closure Mechanisms of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 20S Proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, D.; Li, H; Wang, T; Pan, H; Lin, G; Li, H

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) possesses a proteasome system analogous to the eukaryotic ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Mtb requires the proteasome to resist killing by the host immune system. The detailed assembly process and the gating mechanism of Mtb proteasome have remained unknown. Using cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography, we have obtained structures of three Mtb proteasome assembly intermediates, showing conformational changes during assembly, and explaining why the {beta}-subunit propeptide inhibits rather than promotes assembly. Although the eukaryotic proteasome core particles close their protein substrate entrance gates with different amino terminal peptides of the seven {alpha}-subunits, it has been unknown how a prokaryotic proteasome might close the gate at the symmetry axis with seven identical peptides. We found in the new Mtb proteasome crystal structure that the gate is tightly sealed by the seven identical peptides taking on three distinct conformations. Our work provides the structural bases for assembly and gating mechanisms of the Mtb proteasome.

  18. Structural basis for the assembly and gate closure mechanisms of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 20S proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, H.; Wang, T.; Pan, H.; Lin, G.

    2010-06-16

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) possesses a proteasome system analogous to the eukaryotic ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Mtb requires the proteasome to resist killing by the host immune system. The detailed assembly process and the gating mechanism of Mtb proteasome have remained unknown. Using cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography, we have obtained structures of three Mtb proteasome assembly intermediates, showing conformational changes during assembly, and explaining why the {beta}-subunit propeptide inhibits rather than promotes assembly. Although the eukaryotic proteasome core particles close their protein substrate entrance gates with different amino terminal peptides of the seven {alpha}-subunits, it has been unknown how a prokaryotic proteasome might close the gate at the symmetry axis with seven identical peptides. We found in the new Mtb proteasome crystal structure that the gate is tightly sealed by the seven identical peptides taking on three distinct conformations. Our work provides the structural bases for assembly and gating mechanisms of the Mtb proteasome.

  19. Hepatitis B Virus HBx Protein Interactions with the Ubiquitin Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    Minor, Marissa M.; Slagle, Betty L.

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes acute and chronic hepatitis, and the latter is a major risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HBV encodes a 17-kDa regulatory protein, HBx, which is required for virus replication. Although the precise contribution(s) of HBx to virus replication is unknown, many viruses target cellular pathways to create an environment favorable for virus replication. The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is a major conserved cellular pathway that controls several critical processes in the cell by regulating the levels of proteins involved in cell cycle, DNA repair, innate immunity, and other processes. We summarize here the interactions of HBx with components of the UPS, including the CUL4 adaptor DDB1, the cullin regulatory complex CSN, and the 26S proteasome. Understanding how these protein interactions benefit virus replication remains a challenge due to limited models in which to study HBV replication. However, studies from other viral systems that similarly target the UPS provide insight into possible strategies used by HBV. PMID:25421893

  20. Lack of muscle recovery after immobilization in old rats does not result from a defect in normalization of the ubiquitin–proteasome and the caspase-dependent apoptotic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Magne, Hugues; Savary-Auzeloux, Isabelle; Vazeille, Emilie; Claustre, Agnès; Attaix, Didier; Anne, Listrat; Véronique, Santé-Lhoutellier; Philippe, Gatellier; Dardevet, Dominique; Combaret, Lydie

    2011-01-01

    Immobilization periods increase with age because of decreased mobility and/or increased pathological episodes that require bed-rest. Sarcopaenia might be partially explained by an impaired recovery of skeletal muscle mass after a catabolic state due to an imbalance of muscle protein metabolism, apoptosis and cellular regeneration. Mechanisms involved in muscle recovery have been poorly investigated, and remain almost unknown in the elderly. This study aimed at studying the regulation of the capsase-dependent apoptotic and the ubiquitin–proteasome-dependent proteolytic pathways during immobilization and subsequent recovery during ageing. Old rats (22–24-months old) were subjected to unilateral hindlimb casting for 8 days (I8) and allowed to recover for 10 to 40 days (R10 to R40). Immobilized gastrocnemius muscles atrophied by 21%, and did not recover even at R40. Apoptotic index, amount of polyubiquitinated conjugates, proteasome chymotrypsin- and trypsin-like, apoptosome-linked caspase-9, -3, and -8 activities increased at I8. Conversely, the amount of the myogenic factor myf-5 decreased at I8. These changes paralleled the increase of intramuscular inflammation and oxidative stress. All these parameters normalized as soon as R10. The XIAP/Smac-DIABLO protein ratio decreased by half in immobilized muscles and remained low during recovery. Surprisingly, the non-immobilized leg also atrophied from R20, concomitantly with a decreased XIAP/Smac-DIABLO protein ratio. Altogether, this suggests that the impaired recovery following immobilization in ageing does not result from a lack of normalization of the caspase-dependent apoptotic and the ubiquitin–proteasome-dependent pathways, and also that immobilization could induce a general muscle loss and then contribute to the development of sarcopaenia in elderly. PMID:21115641

  1. The initiator caspase Dronc is subject of enhanced autophagy upon proteasome impairment in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lee, T V; Kamber Kaya, H E; Simin, R; Baehrecke, E H; Bergmann, A

    2016-09-01

    A major function of ubiquitylation is to deliver target proteins to the proteasome for degradation. In the apoptotic pathway in Drosophila, the inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (Diap1) regulates the activity of the initiator caspase Dronc (death regulator Nedd2-like caspase; caspase-9 ortholog) by ubiquitylation, supposedly targeting Dronc for degradation by the proteasome. Using a genetic approach, we show that Dronc protein fails to accumulate in epithelial cells with impaired proteasome function suggesting that it is not degraded by the proteasome, contrary to the expectation. Similarly, decreased autophagy, an alternative catabolic pathway, does not result in increased Dronc protein levels. However, combined impairment of the proteasome and autophagy triggers accumulation of Dronc protein levels suggesting that autophagy compensates for the loss of the proteasome with respect to Dronc turnover. Consistently, we show that loss of the proteasome enhances endogenous autophagy in epithelial cells. We propose that enhanced autophagy degrades Dronc if proteasome function is impaired. PMID:27104928

  2. Myostatin Activates the Ubiquitin-Proteasome and Autophagy-Lysosome Systems Contributing to Muscle Wasting in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong-Tao; Yang, Ya-Jun; Huang, Ren-Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Lin, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Our evidence demonstrated that CKD upregulated the expression of myostatin, TNF-α, and p-IkBa and downregulated the phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, and FoxO3a, which were also associated with protein degradation and muscle atrophy. The autophagosome formation and protein expression of autophagy-related genes were increased in muscle of CKD rats. The mRNA level and protein expression of MAFbx and MuRF-1 were also upregulated in CKD rats, as well as proteasome activity of 26S. Moreover, activation of myostatin elicited by TNF-α induces C2C12 myotube atrophy via upregulating the expression of autophagy-related genes, including MAFbx and MuRF1 and proteasome subunits. Inactivation of FoxO3a triggered by PI3K inhibitor LY294002 prevented the myostatin-induced increase of expression of MuRF1, MAFbx, and LC3-II protein in C2C12 myotubes. The findings were further consolidated by using siRNA interference and overexpression of myostatin. Additionally, expression of myostatin was activated by TNF-α via a NF-κB dependent pathway in C2C12 myotubes, while inhibition of NF-κB activity suppressed myostatin and improved myotube atrophy. Collectively, myostatin mediated CKD-induced muscle catabolism via coordinate activation of the autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome systems. PMID:26448817

  3. Disulfide Engineering to Map Subunit Interactions in the Proteasome and Other Macromolecular Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Hochstrasser, Mark; Funakoshi, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    Summary In studies of protein complexes for which high-resolution structural data are unavailable, it is often still possible to determine both nearest-neighbor relationships between subunits and atomic-resolution details of these interactions. The eukaryotic 26S proteasome, a ~2.5 MDa protein complex with at least 33 different subunits, is a prime example. Important information about quaternary organization and assembly of proteasomes has been gained using a combination of sequence alignments with related proteins of known tertiary structure, molecular modeling, and disulfide engineering to allow oxidative crosslinking between predicted polypeptide neighbors. Here we provide detailed protocols for engineered cysteine crosslinking of yeast proteasome subunits in whole cell extracts, in active 26S proteasome complexes first isolated by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and in subcomplexes that function as potential assembly intermediates. PMID:22350897

  4. CHIP promotes proteasomal degradation of familial ALS-linked mutant SOD1 by ubiquitinating Hsp/Hsc70.

    PubMed

    Urushitani, Makoto; Kurisu, Junko; Tateno, Minako; Hatakeyama, Shigetsugu; Nakayama, Kei-Ichi; Kato, Shinsuke; Takahashi, Ryosuke

    2004-07-01

    Over 100 mutants in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) are reported in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, the precise mechanism by which they are degraded through a ubiquitin-proteasomal pathway (UPP) remains unclear. Here, we report that heat-shock protein (Hsp) or heat-shock cognate (Hsc)70, and the carboxyl terminus of the Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP), are involved in proteasomal degradation of mutant SOD1. Only mutant SOD1 interacted with Hsp/Hsc70 in vivo, and in vitro experiments revealed that Hsp/Hsc70 preferentially interacted with apo-SOD1 or dithiothreitol (DTT)-treated holo-SOD1, compared with metallated or oxidized forms. CHIP, a binding partner of Hsp/Hsc70, interacted only with mutant SOD1 and promoted its degradation. Both Hsp70 and CHIP promoted polyubiquitination of mutant SOD1-associated molecules, but not of mutant SOD1, indicating that mutant SOD1 is not a substrate of CHIP. Moreover, mutant SOD1-associated Hsp/Hsc70, a known substrate of CHIP, was polyubiquitinated in vivo, and polyubiquitinated Hsc70 by CHIP interacted with the S5a subunit of the 26S proteasome in vitro. Furthermore, CHIP was predominantly expressed in spinal neurons, and ubiquitinated inclusions in the spinal motor neurons of hSOD1(G93A) transgenic mice were CHIP-immunoreactive. Taken together, we propose a novel pathway in which ubiquitinated Hsp/Hsc70 might deliver mutant SOD1 to, and facilitate its degradation, at the proteasome. PMID:15198682

  5. The proteasome assembly line

    PubMed Central

    Madura, Kiran

    2013-01-01

    The assembly of the proteasome — the cellular machine that eliminates unwanted proteins — is a carefully choreographed affair, involving a complex sequence of steps overseen by dedicated protein chaperones. PMID:19516331

  6. Trial Watch: Proteasomal inhibitors for anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Obrist, Florine; Manic, Gwenola; Kroemer, Guido; Vitale, Ilio; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The so-called “ubiquitin-proteasome system” (UPS) is a multicomponent molecular apparatus that catalyzes the covalent attachment of several copies of the small protein ubiquitin to other proteins that are generally (but not always) destined to proteasomal degradation. This enzymatic cascade is crucial for the maintenance of intracellular protein homeostasis (both in physiological conditions and in the course of adaptive stress responses), and regulates a wide array of signaling pathways. In line with this notion, defects in the UPS have been associated with aging as well as with several pathological conditions including cardiac, neurodegenerative, and neoplastic disorders. As transformed cells often experience a constant state of stress (as a result of the hyperactivation of oncogenic signaling pathways and/or adverse microenvironmental conditions), their survival and proliferation are highly dependent on the integrity of the UPS. This rationale has driven an intense wave of preclinical and clinical investigation culminating in 2003 with the approval of the proteasomal inhibitor bortezomib by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in multiple myeloma patients. Another proteasomal inhibitor, carfilzomib, is now licensed by international regulatory agencies for use in multiple myeloma patients, and the approved indications for bortezomib have been extended to mantle cell lymphoma. This said, the clinical activity of bortezomib and carfilzomib is often limited by off-target effects, innate/acquired resistance, and the absence of validated predictive biomarkers. Moreover, the antineoplastic activity of proteasome inhibitors against solid tumors is poor. In this Trial Watch we discuss the contribution of the UPS to oncogenesis and tumor progression and summarize the design and/or results of recent clinical studies evaluating the therapeutic profile of proteasome inhibitors in cancer patients. PMID:27308423

  7. Trial Watch: Proteasomal inhibitors for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Obrist, Florine; Manic, Gwenola; Kroemer, Guido; Vitale, Ilio; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The so-called "ubiquitin-proteasome system" (UPS) is a multicomponent molecular apparatus that catalyzes the covalent attachment of several copies of the small protein ubiquitin to other proteins that are generally (but not always) destined to proteasomal degradation. This enzymatic cascade is crucial for the maintenance of intracellular protein homeostasis (both in physiological conditions and in the course of adaptive stress responses), and regulates a wide array of signaling pathways. In line with this notion, defects in the UPS have been associated with aging as well as with several pathological conditions including cardiac, neurodegenerative, and neoplastic disorders. As transformed cells often experience a constant state of stress (as a result of the hyperactivation of oncogenic signaling pathways and/or adverse microenvironmental conditions), their survival and proliferation are highly dependent on the integrity of the UPS. This rationale has driven an intense wave of preclinical and clinical investigation culminating in 2003 with the approval of the proteasomal inhibitor bortezomib by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in multiple myeloma patients. Another proteasomal inhibitor, carfilzomib, is now licensed by international regulatory agencies for use in multiple myeloma patients, and the approved indications for bortezomib have been extended to mantle cell lymphoma. This said, the clinical activity of bortezomib and carfilzomib is often limited by off-target effects, innate/acquired resistance, and the absence of validated predictive biomarkers. Moreover, the antineoplastic activity of proteasome inhibitors against solid tumors is poor. In this Trial Watch we discuss the contribution of the UPS to oncogenesis and tumor progression and summarize the design and/or results of recent clinical studies evaluating the therapeutic profile of proteasome inhibitors in cancer patients. PMID:27308423

  8. Ni(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II) Diethyldithiocarbamate Complexes Show Various Activities Against the Proteasome in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cvek, Boris; Milacic, Vesna; Taraba, Jan; Dou, Q. Ping

    2008-01-01

    A series of three complexes with diethyldithiocarbamate ligand and three different metals (Ni, Cu, Zn) was prepared, confirmed by X-ray crystallography, and tested in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Zinc and copper complexes, but not nickel complex, were found to be more active against cellular 26S proteasome than against purified 20S proteasome core particle. One of the possible explanations is inhibition of JAMM domain in the 19S proteasome lid. PMID:18816109

  9. Lack of muscle recovery after immobilization in old rats does not result from a defect in normalization of the ubiquitin-proteasome and the caspase-dependent apoptotic pathways.

    PubMed

    Magne, Hugues; Savary-Auzeloux, Isabelle; Vazeille, Emilie; Claustre, Agnès; Attaix, Didier; Anne, Listrat; Véronique, Santé-Lhoutellier; Philippe, Gatellier; Dardevet, Dominique; Combaret, Lydie

    2011-02-01

    Immobilization periods increase with age because of decreased mobility and/or because of increased pathological episodes that require bed-rest. Then, sarcopaenia might be partially explained by an impaired recovery of skeletal muscle mass after a catabolic state due to an imbalance of muscle protein metabolism, apoptosis and cellular regeneration. Mechanisms involved during muscle recovery have been little studied and in elderly they remain almost unknown. We show, in rats, that a short immobilization period during ageing initiated muscle atrophy that was indeed not recovered after 40 days. Immobilization was associated with an activation of both the ubiquitin-proteasome and the mitochondria-associated apoptotic pathways and the inflammatory and redox processes, and a decrease of cellular regeneration. We show that the lack of muscle recovery during ageing is not due to a defect in proteolysis or apoptosis down-regulation. These observations lead us to hypothesize that muscle protein synthesis activation after immobilization was altered during ageing. PMID:21115641

  10. Light-Regulated Hypocotyl Elongation Involves Proteasome-Dependent Degradation of the Microtubule Regulatory Protein WDL3 in Arabidopsis[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaomin; Qin, Tao; Ma, Qianqian; Sun, Jingbo; Liu, Ziqiang; Yuan, Ming; Mao, Tonglin

    2013-01-01

    Light significantly inhibits hypocotyl cell elongation, and dark-grown seedlings exhibit elongated, etiolated hypocotyls. Microtubule regulatory proteins function as positive or negative regulators that mediate hypocotyl cell elongation by altering microtubule organization. However, it remains unclear how plants coordinate these regulators to promote hypocotyl growth in darkness and inhibit growth in the light. Here, we demonstrate that WAVE-DAMPENED 2–LIKE3 (WDL3), a microtubule regulatory protein of the WVD2/WDL family from Arabidopsis thaliana, functions in hypocotyl cell elongation and is regulated by a ubiquitin-26S proteasome–dependent pathway in response to light. WDL3 RNA interference Arabidopsis seedlings grown in the light had much longer hypocotyls than controls. Moreover, WDL3 overexpression resulted in overall shortening of hypocotyl cells and stabilization of cortical microtubules in the light. Cortical microtubule reorganization occurred slowly in cells from WDL3 RNA interference transgenic lines but was accelerated in cells from WDL3-overexpressing seedlings subjected to light treatment. More importantly, WDL3 protein was abundant in the light but was degraded through the 26S proteasome pathway in the dark. Overexpression of WDL3 inhibited etiolated hypocotyl growth in regulatory particle non-ATPase subunit-1a mutant (rpn1a-4) plants but not in wild-type seedlings. Therefore, a ubiquitin-26S proteasome–dependent mechanism regulates the levels of WDL3 in response to light to modulate hypocotyl cell elongation. PMID:23653471

  11. Mule Regulates the Intestinal Stem Cell Niche via the Wnt Pathway and Targets EphB3 for Proteasomal and Lysosomal Degradation.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Brauer, Carmen; Hao, Zhenyue; Elia, Andrew J; Fortin, Jérôme M; Nechanitzky, Robert; Brauer, Patrick M; Sheng, Yi; Mana, Miyeko D; Chio, Iok In Christine; Haight, Jillian; Pollett, Aaron; Cairns, Robert; Tworzyanski, Leanne; Inoue, Satoshi; Reardon, Colin; Marques, Ana; Silvester, Jennifer; Cox, Maureen A; Wakeham, Andrew; Yilmaz, Omer H; Sabatini, David M; van Es, Johan H; Clevers, Hans; Sato, Toshiro; Mak, Tak W

    2016-08-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase Mule is often overexpressed in human colorectal cancers, but its role in gut tumorigenesis is unknown. Here, we show in vivo that Mule controls murine intestinal stem and progenitor cell proliferation by modulating Wnt signaling via c-Myc. Mule also regulates protein levels of the receptor tyrosine kinase EphB3 by targeting it for proteasomal and lysosomal degradation. In the intestine, EphB/ephrinB interactions position cells along the crypt-villus axis and compartmentalize incipient colorectal tumors. Our study thus unveils an important new avenue by which Mule acts as an intestinal tumor suppressor by regulation of the intestinal stem cell niche. PMID:27184401

  12. Proteasome dysfunction induces muscle growth defects and protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, Yasuo; Tashiro, Yoshitaka; Suzuki, Naoki; Warita, Hitoshi; Kato, Masaaki; Tateyama, Maki; Ando, Risa; Izumi, Rumiko; Yamazaki, Maya; Abe, Manabu; Sakimura, Kenji; Ito, Hidefumi; Urushitani, Makoto; Nagatomi, Ryoichi; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Aoki, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ubiquitin–proteasome and autophagy–lysosome pathways are the two major routes of protein and organelle clearance. The role of the proteasome pathway in mammalian muscle has not been examined in vivo. In this study, we report that the muscle-specific deletion of a crucial proteasomal gene, Rpt3 (also known as Psmc4), resulted in profound muscle growth defects and a decrease in force production in mice. Specifically, developing muscles in conditional Rpt3-knockout animals showed dysregulated proteasomal activity. The autophagy pathway was upregulated, but the process of autophagosome formation was impaired. A microscopic analysis revealed the accumulation of basophilic inclusions and disorganization of the sarcomeres in young adult mice. Our results suggest that appropriate proteasomal activity is important for muscle growth and for maintaining myofiber integrity in collaboration with autophagy pathways. The deletion of a component of the proteasome complex contributed to myofiber degeneration and weakness in muscle disorders that are characterized by the accumulation of abnormal inclusions. PMID:25380823

  13. The proteasome stress regulon is controlled by a pair of NAC transcription factors in arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteotoxic stress is mitigated by a variety of mechanisms, including activation of the unfolded protein response and coordinated increases in protein chaperones and activities that direct proteolysis such as the 26S proteasome. Using RNA-seq analyses combined with either chemical inhibitors or mut...

  14. An adenosine triphosphate-independent proteasome activator contributes to the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Wang, Tong; Murphy, J. Patrick; Bai, Lin; Hu, Kuan; Merkx, Remco; Huang, Jessica; Chatterjee, Champak; Ovaa, Huib; Gygi, Steven P.; et al

    2015-03-23

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes a proteasome that is highly similar to eukaryotic proteasomes and is required to cause lethal infections in animals. The only pathway known to target proteins for proteasomal degradation in bacteria is pupylation, which is functionally analogous to eukaryotic ubiquitylation. However, evidence suggests that the M. tuberculosis proteasome contributes to pupylation-independent pathways as well. To identify new proteasome cofactors that might contribute to such pathways, we isolated proteins that bound to proteasomes overproduced in M. tuberculosis and found a previously uncharacterized protein, Rv3780, which formed rings and capped M. tuberculosis proteasome core particles. Rv3780 enhanced peptide and proteinmore » degradation by proteasomes in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-independent manner. We identified putative Rv3780-dependent proteasome substrates and found that Rv3780 promoted robust degradation of the heat shock protein repressor, HspR. Importantly, an M. tuberculosis Rv3780 mutant had a general growth defect, was sensitive to heat stress, and was attenuated for growth in mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP-independent proteasome activators are not confined to eukaryotes and can contribute to the virulence of one the world’s most devastating pathogens.« less

  15. An adenosine triphosphate-independent proteasome activator contributes to the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Wang, Tong; Murphy, J. Patrick; Bai, Lin; Hu, Kuan; Merkx, Remco; Huang, Jessica; Chatterjee, Champak; Ovaa, Huib; Gygi, Steven P.; Li, Huilin; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-03-23

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes a proteasome that is highly similar to eukaryotic proteasomes and is required to cause lethal infections in animals. The only pathway known to target proteins for proteasomal degradation in bacteria is pupylation, which is functionally analogous to eukaryotic ubiquitylation. However, evidence suggests that the M. tuberculosis proteasome contributes to pupylation-independent pathways as well. To identify new proteasome cofactors that might contribute to such pathways, we isolated proteins that bound to proteasomes overproduced in M. tuberculosis and found a previously uncharacterized protein, Rv3780, which formed rings and capped M. tuberculosis proteasome core particles. Rv3780 enhanced peptide and protein degradation by proteasomes in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-independent manner. We identified putative Rv3780-dependent proteasome substrates and found that Rv3780 promoted robust degradation of the heat shock protein repressor, HspR. Importantly, an M. tuberculosis Rv3780 mutant had a general growth defect, was sensitive to heat stress, and was attenuated for growth in mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP-independent proteasome activators are not confined to eukaryotes and can contribute to the virulence of one the world’s most devastating pathogens.

  16. Proteasome activation is a mechanism for pyrazolone small molecules displaying therapeutic potential in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Trippier, Paul C; Zhao, Kevin Tianmeng; Fox, Susan G; Schiefer, Isaac T; Benmohamed, Radhia; Moran, Jason; Kirsch, Donald R; Morimoto, Richard I; Silverman, Richard B

    2014-09-17

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disease. Pyrazolone containing small molecules have shown significant disease attenuating efficacy in cellular and murine models of ALS. Pyrazolone based affinity probes were synthesized to identify high affinity binding partners and ascertain a potential biological mode of action. Probes were confirmed to be neuroprotective in PC12-SOD1(G93A) cells. PC12-SOD1(G93A) cell lysates were used for protein pull-down, affinity purification, and subsequent proteomic analysis using LC-MS/MS. Proteomics identified the 26S proteasome regulatory subunit 4 (PSMC1), 26S proteasome regulatory subunit 6B (PSMC4), and T-complex protein 1 (TCP-1) as putative protein targets. Coincubation with appropriate competitors confirmed the authenticity of the proteomics results. Activation of the proteasome by pyrazolones was demonstrated in the absence of exogenous proteasome inhibitor and by restoration of cellular protein degradation of a fluorogenic proteasome substrate in PC12-SOD1(G93A) cells. Importantly, supplementary studies indicated that these molecules do not induce a heat shock response. We propose that pyrazolones represent a rare class of molecules that enhance proteasomal activation in the absence of a heat shock response and may have therapeutic potential in ALS. PMID:25001311

  17. Structural Insights on the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Proteasomal ATPase Mpa

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.; Li, H; Lin, G; Tang, C; Li, D; Nathan, C; Heran Darwin, K

    2009-01-01

    Proteasome-mediated protein turnover in all domains of life is an energy-dependent process that requires ATPase activity. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) was recently shown to possess a ubiquitin-like proteasome pathway that plays an essential role in Mtb resistance to killing by products of host macrophages. Here we report our structural and biochemical investigation of Mpa, the presumptive Mtb proteasomal ATPase. We demonstrate that Mpa binds to the Mtb proteasome in the presence of ATPS, providing the physical evidence that Mpa is the proteasomal ATPase. X-ray crystallographic determination of the conserved interdomain showed a five stranded double {beta} barrel structure containing a Greek key motif. Structure and mutational analysis indicate a major role of the interdomain for Mpa hexamerization. Our mutational and functional studies further suggest that the central channel in the Mpa hexamer is involved in protein substrate translocation and degradation. These studies provide insights into how a bacterial proteasomal ATPase interacts with and facilitates protein degradation by the proteasome.

  18. The Proteasome Inhibitor Bortezomib Enhances ATRA-Induced Differentiation of Neuroblastoma Cells via the JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Peihua; Lin, Meili; Li, Lin; Yang, Bo; He, Qiaojun

    2011-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extracranial solid tumor in childhood. Differentiated human NBs are associated with better outcome and lower stage; induction of differentiation is considered to be therapeutically advantageous. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) has been shown to induce the differentiation of neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib inhibits cell growth and angiogenesis in NBs. Here, we investigated the synergistic effect between bortezomib and ATRA in inducing NB cell differentiation in different NB cell lines. Bortezomib combined with ATRA had a significantly enhanced antiproliferative effect. This inhibition was characterized by a synergistic increase in neuronal differentiation. At the same time, the combination therapy showed little neuronal toxicity which was assessed in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells by the MTT assay, PI staining. The combination of bortezomib and ATRA triggered increased differentiation through the activation of proteins, including RARα, RARβ, RARγ, p-JNK and p21, compared with ATRA treatment alone. Using JNK inhibitor SP600125 to block JNK-dependent activity, the combination therapy-induced neuronal differentiation was partially attenuated. In addition, p21 shRNA had no effect on the combination therapy-induced neuronal differentiation. The in vivo antitumor activities were examined in human NB cell xenografts and GFP-labeled human NB cell xenografts. Treatment of human NB cell CHP126-bearing nude mice with ATRA plus bortezomib resulted in more significant tumor growth inhibition than mice treated with either drug alone. These findings provide the rationale for the development of a new therapeutic strategy for NB based on the pharmacological combination of ATRA and bortezomib. PMID:22087283

  19. Dopamine or biopterin deficiency potentiates phosphorylation at (40)Ser and ubiquitination of tyrosine hydroxylase to be degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Kawahata, Ichiro; Ohtaku, Shiori; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Ichinose, Hiroshi; Yamakuni, Tohru

    2015-09-11

    The protein amount of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), that is the rate-limiting enzyme for the biosynthesis of dopamine (DA), should be tightly regulated, whereas its degradation pathway is largely unknown. In this study, we analyzed how the TH protein is chemically modified and subsequently degraded under deficiencies of DA and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a cofactor for TH, by using pharmacological agents in PC12D cells and cultured mesencephalic neurons. When inhibition of DA- or BH4-synthesizing enzymes greatly reduced the DA contents in PC12D cells, a marked and persistent increase in phosphorylated TH at (40)Ser (p40-TH) was concomitantly observed. This phosphorylation was mediated by D2 dopamine auto-receptor and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Our immunoprecipitation experiments showed that the increase in the p40-TH level was accompanied with its poly-ubiquitination. Treatment of PC12D cells with cycloheximide showed that total-TH protein level was reduced by the DA- or BH4-depletion. Notably, this reduction in the total-TH protein level was sensitive not only to a 26S proteasomal inhibitor, MG-132, but also to a PKA inhibitor, H-89. These data demonstrated that DA deficiency should induce compensatory activation of TH via phosphorylation at (40)Ser through D2-autoreceptor and PKA-mediated pathways, which in turn give a rise to its degradation through an ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, resulting in a negative spiral of DA production when DA deficiency persists. PMID:26225746

  20. Proteasome Regulation of ULBP1 Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Butler, James E.; Moore, Mikel B.; Presnell, Steven R.; Chan, Huei-Wei; Chalupny, N. Jan; Lutz, Charles T.

    2009-01-01

    Killer lymphocytes recognize stress-activated NKG2D ligands on tumors. We examined NKG2D ligand expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells and other cell lines. HNSCC cells typically expressed MHC class I chain-related gene A (MICA), MICB, UL16-binding protein (ULBP)2, and ULBP3, but they were uniformly negative for cell surface ULBP1 and ULBP4. We then studied how cancer treatments affected NKG2D ligand expression. NKG2D ligand expression was not changed by most cancer-relevant treatments. However, bortezomib and other proteasome inhibitor drugs with distinct mechanisms of action dramatically and specifically up-regulated HNSCC ULBP1 mRNA and cell surface protein. Proteasome inhibition also increased RNA for ULBP1 and other NKG2D ligands in nontransformed human keratinocytes. Proteasome inhibitor drugs increased ULBP1 transcription by acting at a site in the 522-bp ULBP1 promoter. Although the DNA damage response pathways mediated by ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated) and ATR (ATM and Rad3-related) signaling had been reported to up-regulate NKG2D ligand expression, we found that ULBP1 up-regulation was not inhibited by caffeine and wortmannin, inhibitors of ATM/ATR signaling. ULBP1 expression in HNSCC cells was not increased by several ATM/ATR activating treatments, including bleomycin, cisplatin, aphidicolin, and hydroxyurea. Ionizing radiation caused ATM activation in HNSCC cells, but high-level ULBP1 expression was not induced by gamma radiation or UV radiation. Thus, ATM/ATR signaling was neither necessary nor sufficient for high-level ULBP1 expression in human HNSCC cell lines and could not account for the proteasome effect. The selective induction of ULBP1 expression by proteasome inhibitor drugs, along with variable NKG2D ligand expression by human tumor cells, indicates that NKG2D ligand genes are independently regulated. PMID:19414815

  1. Relationship between the proteasomal system and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Lilienbaum, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Two major pathways degrade most cellular proteins in eukaryotic cells: the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS), which usually degrades the majority of proteins, and autophagy, primarily responsible for the degradation of most long-lived or aggregated proteins and cellular organelles. Disruption of these processes can contribute to pathology of a variety of diseases. Further, both pathways are critical for the maintenance of several aspects of cellular homeostasis, but, until recently, were thought to be largely distinct. Recent advances in this field, however, now strongly suggest that their activities are carefully orchestrated through several interfacing elements that are presented and discussed in this review. PMID:23638318

  2. Ell3 stabilizes p53 following CDDP treatment via its effects on ubiquitin-dependent and -independent proteasomal degradation pathways in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Hee-Jin; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Shin, Kyung-Won; Lim, Kee-Hwan; Kim, Jin-Ock; Lee, Je-Yong; Kim, Jiewan; Park, Ji-Hoon; Yang, Kyung-Min; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Ko, Jeong-Jae; Park, Kyung-Soon

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 is unstable in quiescent cells and undergoes proteosomal degradation. Under conditions of cellular stress, p53 is rapidly stabilized by post-translational modification, thereby escaping degradation and translocating to the nucleus where it activates genes related to cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. Here, we report that the transcription elongation factor Ell3 sensitizes luminal type-cancer cell line, MCF7, which have wild-type p53, to the chemotherapeutic agent cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (CDDP) by stabilizing p53. Overexpression of Ell3 in MCF7 cells suppressed the MDM2-mediated ubiquitin-dependent degradation pathway. In addition, Ell3 promoted binding of p53 to NADH quinone oxidoreductase 1, which is linked to the ubiquitin-independent degradation of p53. We found that Ell3 activates interleukin-20 (IL20) expression, which is linked to the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. Chemical inhibition of ERK1/2 signaling or molecular suppression of IL20 revealed that the ERK1/2 signaling pathway and IL20 are the main causes of p53 stabilization in Ell3-overexpressing MCF7 cells. These findings suggest that the ERK1/2 pathway can be targeted in the rational development of therapies to induce chemosensitization of breast cancer cells. PMID:26540344

  3. Bladder cancer detection using a peptide substrate of the 20S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Gruba, Natalia; Wysocka, Magdalena; Brzezińska, Magdalena; Dębowski, Dawid; Sieńczyk, Marcin; Gorodkiewicz, Ewa; Guszcz, Tomasz; Czaplewski, Cezary; Rolka, Krzysztof; Lesner, Adam

    2016-08-01

    The 20S catalytic core of the human 26S proteasome can be secreted from cells, and high levels of extracellular 20S proteasome have been linked to many types of cancers and autoimmune diseases. Several diagnostic approaches have been developed that detect 20S proteasome activity in plasma, but these suffer from problems with efficiency and sensitivity. In this report, we describe the optimization and synthesis of an internally quenched fluorescent substrate of the 20S proteasome, and investigate its use as a potential diagnostic test in bladder cancer. This peptide, 2-aminobenzoic acid (ABZ)-Val-Val-Ser-Tyr-Ala-Met-Gly-Tyr(3-NO2 )-NH2 , is cleaved by the chymotrypsin 20S proteasome subunit and displays an excellent specificity constant value (9.7 × 10(5)  m(-1) ·s(-1) ) and a high kcat (8 s(-1) ). Using this peptide, we identified chymotrypsin-like proteasome activity in the majority of urine samples obtained from patients with bladder cancer, whereas the proteasome activity in urine samples from healthy volunteers was below the detection limit (0.5 pm). These findings were confirmed by an inhibitory study and immunochemistry methods. PMID:27326540

  4. Implications for proteasome nuclear localization revealed by the structure of the nuclear proteasome tether protein Cut8

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Kojiro; Tonthat, Nam K.; Glover, Tiffany; Xu, Weijun; Koonin, Eugene V.; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro; Schumacher, Maria A.

    2011-01-01

    Degradation of nuclear proteins by the 26S proteasome is essential for cell viability. In yeast, the nuclear envelope protein Cut8 mediates nuclear proteasomal sequestration by an uncharacterized mechanism. Here we describe structures of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Cut8, which shows that it contains a unique, modular fold composed of an extended N-terminal, lysine-rich segment that when ubiquitinated binds the proteasome, a dimer domain followed by a six-helix bundle connected to a flexible C tail. The Cut8 six-helix bundle shows structural similarity to 14-3-3 phosphoprotein-binding domains, and binding assays show that this domain is necessary and sufficient for liposome and cholesterol binding. Moreover, specific mutations in the 14-3-3 regions corresponding to putative cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus motifs abrogate cholesterol binding. In vivo studies confirmed that the 14-3-3 region is necessary for Cut8 membrane localization and that dimerization is critical for its function. Thus, the data reveal the Cut8 organization at the nuclear envelope. Reconstruction of Cut8 evolution suggests that it was present in the last common ancestor of extant eukaryotes and accordingly that nuclear proteasomal sequestration is an ancestral eukaryotic feature. The importance of Cut8 for cell viability and its absence in humans suggests it as a possible target for the development of specific chemotherapeutics against invasive fungal infections. PMID:21976488

  5. Ubiquitinated proteins activate the proteasomal ATPases by binding to Usp14 or Uch37 homologs.

    PubMed

    Peth, Andreas; Kukushkin, Nikolay; Bossé, Marc; Goldberg, Alfred L

    2013-03-15

    Degradation of ubiquitinated proteins by 26 S proteasomes requires ATP hydrolysis, but it is unclear how the proteasomal ATPases are regulated and how proteolysis, substrate deubiquitination, degradation, and ATP hydrolysis are coordinated. Polyubiquitinated proteins were shown to stimulate ATP hydrolysis by purified proteasomes, but only if the proteins contain a loosely folded domain. If they were not ubiquitinated, such proteins did not increase ATPase activity. However, they did so upon addition of ubiquitin aldehyde, which mimics the ubiquitin chain and binds to 26 S-associated deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs): in yeast to Ubp6, which is essential for the ATPase activation, and in mammalian 26 S to the Ubp6 homolog, Usp14, and Uch37. Occupancy of either DUB by a ubiquitin conjugate leads to ATPase stimulation, thereby coupling deubiquitination and ATP hydrolysis. Thus, ubiquitinated loosely folded proteins, after becoming bound to the 26 S, interact with Ubp6/Usp14 or Uch37 to activate ATP hydrolysis and enhance their own destruction. PMID:23341450

  6. The LeATL6-associated ubiquitin/proteasome system may contribute to fungal elicitor-activated defense response via the jasmonic acid-dependent signaling pathway in tomato.

    PubMed

    Hondo, Daisuke; Hase, Shu; Kanayama, Yoshinori; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki; Takenaka, Shigehito; Takahashi, Hideki

    2007-01-01

    The expression of LeATL6, an ortholog of Arabidopsis ATL6 that encodes a RING-H2 finger protein, was induced in tomato roots treated with a cell wall protein fraction (CWP) elicitor of the biocontrol agent Pythium oligandrum. The LeATL6 protein was expressed as a fusion protein with a maltose-binding protein (MBP) in Escherichia coli, and it catalyzed the transfer of ubiquitin to the MBP moiety on incubation with ubiquitin, the ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1, and the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2; this indicated that LeATL6 represents ubiquitin ligase E3. LeATL6 expression also was induced by elicitor treatment of jail-1 mutant tomato cells in which the jasmonic acid (JA)-mediated signaling pathway was impaired; however, JA-dependent expression of the basic PR-6 and TPI-1 genes that encode proteinase inhibitor II and I, respectively, was not induced in elicitor-treated jail-1 mutants. Furthermore, transient overexpression of LeATL6 under the control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter induced the basic PR6 and TPI-1 expression in wild tomato but not in the jail-1 mutant. In contrast, LeATL6 overexpression did not activate salicylic acid-responsive acidic PR-1 and PR-2 promoters in wild tomato. These results indicated that elicitor-responsive LeATL6 probably regulates JA-dependent basic PR6 and TPI-1 gene expression in tomato. The LeATL6-associated ubiquitin/proteasome system may contribute to elicitor-activated defense responses via a JA-dependent signaling pathway in plants. PMID:17249424

  7. Computational Approaches for the Discovery of Human Proteasome Inhibitors: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Romina A; Serra, Patrícia; Salvador, Jorge A R; Guedes, Rita C

    2016-01-01

    Proteasome emerged as an important target in recent pharmacological research due to its pivotal role in degrading proteins in the cytoplasm and nucleus of eukaryotic cells, regulating a wide variety of cellular pathways, including cell growth and proliferation, apoptosis, DNA repair, transcription, immune response, and signaling processes. The last two decades witnessed intensive efforts to discover 20S proteasome inhibitors with significant chemical diversity and efficacy. To date, the US FDA approved to market three proteasome inhibitors: bortezomib, carfilzomib, and ixazomib. However new, safer and more efficient drugs are still required. Computer-aided drug discovery has long being used in drug discovery campaigns targeting the human proteasome. The aim of this review is to illustrate selected in silico methods like homology modeling, molecular docking, pharmacophore modeling, virtual screening, and combined methods that have been used in proteasome inhibitors discovery. Applications of these methods to proteasome inhibitors discovery will also be presented and discussed to raise improvements in this particular field. PMID:27438821

  8. ATP-dependent incorporation of 20S protease into the 26S complex that degrades proteins conjugated to ubiquitin.

    PubMed Central

    Eytan, E; Ganoth, D; Armon, T; Hershko, A

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the ATP-dependent 26S protease complex that degrades proteins conjugated to ubiquitin is formed by the assembly of three factors in an ATP-requiring process. We now identify one of the factors as the 20S "multicatalytic" protease, a complex of low molecular weight subunits widely distributed in eukaryotic cells. Comparison of the subunit compositions of purified 20S and 26S complexes indicates that the former is an integral part of the latter. By the use of detergent treatment to activate latent protease activity, we show that the 20S protease becomes incorporated into the 26S complex in the ATP-dependent assembly process. It thus seems that the 20S protease is the "catalytic core" of the 26S complex of the ubiquitin proteolytic pathway. Images PMID:2554287

  9. Ciliopathy proteins regulate paracrine signaling by modulating proteasomal degradation of mediators

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yangfan P.; Tsai, I-Chun; Morleo, Manuela; Oh, Edwin C.; Leitch, Carmen C.; Massa, Filomena; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Parker, David S.; Finley, Daniel; Zaghloul, Norann A.; Franco, Brunella; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Cilia are critical mediators of paracrine signaling; however, it is unknown whether proteins that contribute to ciliopathies converge on multiple paracrine pathways through a common mechanism. Here, we show that loss of cilopathy-associated proteins Bardet-Biedl syndrome 4 (BBS4) or oral-facial-digital syndrome 1 (OFD1) results in the accumulation of signaling mediators normally targeted for proteasomal degradation. In WT cells, several BBS proteins and OFD1 interacted with proteasomal subunits, and loss of either BBS4 or OFD1 led to depletion of multiple subunits from the centrosomal proteasome. Furthermore, overexpression of proteasomal regulatory components or treatment with proteasomal activators sulforaphane (SFN) and mevalonolactone (MVA) ameliorated signaling defects in cells lacking BBS1, BBS4, and OFD1, in morphant zebrafish embryos, and in induced neurons from Ofd1-deficient mice. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that other proteasome-dependent pathways not known to be associated with ciliopathies are defective in the absence of ciliopathy proteins. We found that loss of BBS1, BBS4, or OFD1 led to decreased NF-κB activity and concomitant IκBβ accumulation and that these defects were ameliorated with SFN treatment. Taken together, our data indicate that basal body proteasomal regulation governs paracrine signaling pathways and suggest that augmenting proteasomal function might benefit ciliopathy patients. PMID:24691443

  10. Activation of Chymotrypsin-Like Activity of the Proteasome during Ischemia Induces Myocardial Dysfunction and Death.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Gina; Berrios, Daniela; Olmedo, Ivonne; Pezoa, Javier; Riquelme, Jaime A; Montecinos, Luis; Pedrozo, Zully; Donoso, Paulina

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of the ubiquitin-proteasome system improve hemodynamic parameters and decrease the infarct size after ischemia reperfusion. The molecular basis of this protection is not fully understood since most available data report inhibition of the 26 proteasome after ischemia reperfusion. The decrease in cellular ATP levels during ischemia leads to the dissociation of the 26S proteasome into the 19S regulatory complex and the 20S catalytic core, which results in protein degradation independently of ubiquitination. There is scarce information on the activity of the 20S proteasome during cardiac ischemia. Accordingly, the aim of this work was to determine the effects of 30 minutes of ischemia, or 30 min of ischemia followed by 60 minutes of reperfusion on the three main peptidase activities of the 20S proteasome in Langendorff perfused rat hearts. We found that 30 min of ischemia produced a significant increase in the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome, without changes in its caspase-like or trypsin-like activities. In contrast, all three activities were decreased upon reperfusion. Ixazomib, perfused before ischemia at a concentration that reduced the chymotrypsin-like activity to 50% of the control values, without affecting the other proteasomal activities, improved the hemodynamic parameters upon reperfusion and decreased the infarct size. Ixazomib also prevented the 50% reduction in RyR2 content observed after ischemia. The protection was lost, however, when simultaneous inhibition of chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activities of the proteasome was achieved at higher concentration of ixazomib. Our results suggest that selective inhibition of chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome during ischemia preserves key proteins for cardiomyocyte function and exerts a positive impact on cardiac performance after reperfusion. PMID:27529620

  11. Activation of Chymotrypsin-Like Activity of the Proteasome during Ischemia Induces Myocardial Dysfunction and Death

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Gina; Berrios, Daniela; Olmedo, Ivonne; Pezoa, Javier; Riquelme, Jaime A.; Montecinos, Luis; Pedrozo, Zully; Donoso, Paulina

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of the ubiquitin-proteasome system improve hemodynamic parameters and decrease the infarct size after ischemia reperfusion. The molecular basis of this protection is not fully understood since most available data report inhibition of the 26 proteasome after ischemia reperfusion. The decrease in cellular ATP levels during ischemia leads to the dissociation of the 26S proteasome into the 19S regulatory complex and the 20S catalytic core, which results in protein degradation independently of ubiquitination. There is scarce information on the activity of the 20S proteasome during cardiac ischemia. Accordingly, the aim of this work was to determine the effects of 30 minutes of ischemia, or 30 min of ischemia followed by 60 minutes of reperfusion on the three main peptidase activities of the 20S proteasome in Langendorff perfused rat hearts. We found that 30 min of ischemia produced a significant increase in the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome, without changes in its caspase-like or trypsin-like activities. In contrast, all three activities were decreased upon reperfusion. Ixazomib, perfused before ischemia at a concentration that reduced the chymotrypsin-like activity to 50% of the control values, without affecting the other proteasomal activities, improved the hemodynamic parameters upon reperfusion and decreased the infarct size. Ixazomib also prevented the 50% reduction in RyR2 content observed after ischemia. The protection was lost, however, when simultaneous inhibition of chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activities of the proteasome was achieved at higher concentration of ixazomib. Our results suggest that selective inhibition of chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome during ischemia preserves key proteins for cardiomyocyte function and exerts a positive impact on cardiac performance after reperfusion. PMID:27529620

  12. Oxidative Stress-Mediated Regulation of Proteasome Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Charity T.; Kaake, Robyn M.; Wang, Xiaorong; Huang, Lan

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in aging and many human diseases, notably neurodegenerative disorders and various cancers. The reactive oxygen species that are generated by aerobic metabolism and environmental stressors can chemically modify proteins and alter their biological functions. Cells possess protein repair pathways to rescue oxidized proteins and restore their functions. If these repair processes fail, oxidized proteins may become cytotoxic. Cell homeostasis and viability are therefore dependent on the removal of oxidatively damaged proteins. Numerous studies have demonstrated that the proteasome plays a pivotal role in the selective recognition and degradation of oxidized proteins. Despite extensive research, oxidative stress-triggered regulation of proteasome complexes remains poorly defined. Better understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying proteasome function in response to oxidative stress will provide a basis for developing new strategies aimed at improving cell viability and recovery as well as attenuating oxidation-induced cytotoxicity associated with aging and disease. Here we highlight recent advances in the understanding of proteasome structure and function during oxidative stress and describe how cells cope with oxidative stress through proteasome-dependent degradation pathways. PMID:21543789

  13. Quiescent fibroblasts are protected from proteasome inhibition–mediated toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Legesse-Miller, Aster; Raitman, Irene; Haley, Erin M.; Liao, Albert; Sun, Lova L.; Wang, David J.; Krishnan, Nithya; Lemons, Johanna M. S.; Suh, Eric J.; Johnson, Elizabeth L.; Lund, Benjamin A.; Coller, Hilary A.

    2012-01-01

    Proteasome inhibition is used as a treatment strategy for multiple types of cancers. Although proteasome inhibition can induce apoptotic cell death in actively proliferating cells, it is less effective in quiescent cells. In this study, we used primary human fibroblasts as a model system to explore the link between the proliferative state of a cell and proteasome inhibition–mediated cell death. We found that proliferating and quiescent fibroblasts have strikingly different responses to MG132, a proteasome inhibitor; proliferating cells rapidly apoptosed, whereas quiescent cells maintained viability. Moreover, MG132 treatment of proliferating fibroblasts led to increased superoxide anion levels, juxtanuclear accumulation of ubiquitin- and p62/SQSTM1-positive protein aggregates, and apoptotic cell death, whereas MG132-treated quiescent cells displayed fewer juxtanuclear protein aggregates, less apoptosis, and higher levels of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. In both cell states, reducing reactive oxygen species with N-acetylcysteine lessened protein aggregation and decreased apoptosis, suggesting that protein aggregation promotes apoptosis. In contrast, increasing cellular superoxide levels with 2-methoxyestradiol treatment or inhibition of autophagy/lysosomal pathways with bafilomycin A1 sensitized serum-starved quiescent cells to MG132-induced apoptosis. Thus, antioxidant defenses and the autophagy/lysosomal pathway protect serum-starved quiescent fibroblasts from proteasome inhibition–induced cytotoxicity. PMID:22875985

  14. Molecular sequelae of proteasome inhibition in human multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Mitsiades, Nicholas; Mitsiades, Constantine S.; Poulaki, Vassiliki; Chauhan, Dharminder; Fanourakis, Galinos; Gu, Xuesong; Bailey, Charles; Joseph, Marie; Libermann, Towia A.; Treon, Steven P.; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Richardson, Paul G.; Hideshima, Teru; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2002-01-01

    The proteasome inhibitor PS-341 inhibits IκB degradation, prevents NF-κB activation, and induces apoptosis in several types of cancer cells, including chemoresistant multiple myeloma (MM) cells. PS-341 has marked clinical activity even in the setting of relapsed refractory MM. However, PS-341-induced apoptotic cascade(s) are not yet fully defined. By using gene expression profiling, we characterized the molecular sequelae of PS-341 treatment in MM cells and further focused on molecular pathways responsible for the anticancer actions of this promising agent. The transcriptional profile of PS-341-treated cells involved down-regulation of growth/survival signaling pathways, and up-regulation of molecules implicated in proapoptotic cascades (which are both consistent with the proapoptotic effect of proteasome inhibition), as well as up-regulation of heat-shock proteins and ubiquitin/proteasome pathway members (which can correspond to stress responses against proteasome inhibition). Further studies on these pathways showed that PS-341 decreases the levels of several antiapoptotic proteins and triggers a dual apoptotic pathway of mitochondrial cytochrome c release and caspase-9 activation, as well as activation of Jun kinase and a Fas/caspase-8-dependent apoptotic pathway [which is inhibited by a dominant negative (decoy) Fas construct]. Stimulation with IGF-1, as well as overexpression of Bcl-2 or constitutively active Akt in MM cells also modestly attenuates PS-341-induced cell death, whereas inhibitors of the BH3 domain of Bcl-2 family members or the heat-shock protein 90 enhance tumor cell sensitivity to proteasome inhibition. These data provide both insight into the molecular mechanisms of antitumor activity of PS-341 and the rationale for future clinical trials of PS-341, in combination with conventional and novel therapies, to improve patient outcome in MM. PMID:12391322

  15. Ziram Causes Dopaminergic Cell Damage by Inhibiting E1 Ligase of the Proteasome*

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Arthur P.; Maidment, Nigel; Klintenberg, Rebecka; Casida, John E.; Li, Sharon; Fitzmaurice, Arthur G.; Fernagut, Pierre-Olivier; Mortazavi, Farzad; Chesselet, Marie-Francoise; Bronstein, Jeff M.

    2008-01-01

    The etiology of Parkinson disease (PD) is unclear but may involve environmental toxins such as pesticides leading to dysfunction of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Here, we measured the relative toxicity of ziram (a UPS inhibitor) and analogs to dopaminergic neurons and examined the mechanism of cell death. UPS (26 S) activity was measured in cell lines after exposure to ziram and related compounds. Dimethyl- and diethyldithiocarbamates including ziram were potent UPS inhibitors. Primary ventral mesencephalic cultures were exposed to ziram, and cell toxicity was assessed by staining for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and NeuN antigen. Ziram caused a preferential damage to TH+ neurons and elevated α-synuclein levels but did not increase aggregate formation. Mechanistically, ziram altered UPS function through interfering with the targeting of substrates by inhibiting ubiquitin E1 ligase. Sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate administered to mice for 2 weeks resulted in persistent motor deficits and a mild reduction in striatal TH staining but no nigral cell loss. These results demonstrate that ziram causes selective dopaminergic cell damage in vitro by inhibiting an important degradative pathway implicated in the etiology of PD. Chronic exposure to widely used dithiocarbamate fungicides may contribute to the development of PD, and elucidation of its mechanism would identify a new potential therapeutic target. PMID:18818210

  16. ACTIVATION OF PERK KINASE IN NEURAL CELLS BY PROTEASOME INHIBITOR TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Le; Ebenezer, Philip J; Dasuri, Kalavathi; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J.; Fernandez-Kim, Sun Ok; Liu, Ying; Keller, Jeffrey N.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition of the proteasome proteolytic pathway occurs as the result of normal aging, as well as in a variety of neurodegenerative conditions, and is believed to promote cellular toxicity in each of these conditions through diverse mechanisms. In the present study we examined whether proteasome inhibition alters the protein kinase (PKR)-like ER kinase (PERK). Our studies demonstrate that proteasome inhibitors induce the transient activation of PERK in both primary rat neurons as well as the N2a neural cell line. Experiments with siRNA to PERK demonstrated that the modulation of PERK was not significant involved in regulating toxicity, ubiquitinated protein levels, or ribosome perturbations in response to proteasome inhibitor treatment. Surprisingly, PERK was observed to be involved in the upregulation of p38 kinase following proteasome inhibitor treatment. Taken together, these data demonstrate the ability of proteasome inhibition to activate PERK and demonstrate evidence for novel cross talk between PERK and the activation of p38 kinase in neural cells following proteasome inhibition. Taken together, these data have implications for understanding the basis by which proteasome inhibition alters neural homeostasis, and the basis by which cell signaling cascades are regulated by proteasome inhibition. PMID:19860852

  17. Molecular Architecture and Assembly of the Eukaryotic Proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Tomko, Robert J.; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic ubiquitin-proteasome system is responsible for most cellular quality-control and regulatory protein degradation. Its substrates, which are usually modified by polymers of ubiquitin, are ultimately degraded by the 26S proteasome. This 2.6 MDa protein complex is separated into a barrel-shaped proteolytic 20S core particle (CP) of 28 subunits capped on one or both ends by a 19S regulatory particle (RP) comprising at least 19 subunits. The RP coordinates substrate recognition, removal of substrate polyubiquitin chains, and substrate unfolding and translocation into the CP for degradation. While many atomic structures of the CP have been determined, the RP has resisted high-resolution analysis. Recently, however, a combination of cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), biochemical analysis, and crystal structure determination of several RP subunits has yielded a near-atomic resolution view of much of the complex. Major new insights into chaperone-assisted proteasome assembly have also recently been made. Here we review these novel findings. PMID:23495936

  18. [Proteasome inhibitors in cancer therapy].

    PubMed

    Romaniuk, Wioletta; Ołdziej, Agnieszka Ewa; Zińczuk, Justyna; Kłoczko, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Proteasomes are multisubunit enzyme complexes. They contain three enzymatic active sites which are termed chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like. The elementary function of the proteasomes is degradation of damaged proteins. Proteasome inhibition leads to accumulation of damaged protein, which leads to caspase activation and cell death. This relationship is used in cancer therapy. Bortezomib is the first proteasome inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. Carfilzomib belongs to the second generation of drugs, which was approved by the US FDA in 2012. Currently in the study phase there are four new inhibitors: ixazomib (MLN9780/MLN2238), delanzomib (CEP-18770), oprozomib (ONX0912/PR-047) and marizomib (NPI-0052). PMID:27259216

  19. From Bortezomib to other Inhibitors of the Proteasome and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Buac, Daniela; Shen, Min; Schmitt, Sara; Kona, Fathima Rani; Deshmukh, Rahul; Zhang, Zhen; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Mitra, Bharati; Dou, Q. Ping

    2013-01-01

    The cancer drug discovery field has placed much emphasis on the identification of novel and cancer-specific molecular targets. A rich source of such targets for the design of novel anti-tumor agents is the ubiqutin-proteasome system (UP-S), a tightly regulated, highly specific pathway responsible for the vast majority of protein turnover within the cell. Because of its critical role in almost all cell processes that ensure normal cellular function, its inhibition at one point in time was deemed non-specific and therefore not worth further investigation as a molecular drug target. However, today the proteasome is one of the most promising anti-cancer drug targets of the century. The discovery that tumor cells are in fact more sensitive to proteasome inhibitors than normal cells indeed paved the way for the design of its inhibitors. Such efforts have led to bortezomib, the first FDA approved proteasome inhibitor now used as a frontline treatment for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM), relapsed/refractory MM and mantle cell lymphoma. Though successful in improving clinical outcomes for patients with hematological malignancies, relapse often occurs in those who initially responded to bortezomib. Therefore, the acquisition of bortezomib resistance is a major issue with its therapy. Furthermore, some neuro-toxicities have been associated with bortezomib treatment and its efficacy in solid tumors is lacking. These observations have encouraged researchers to pursue the next generation of proteasome inhibitors, which would ideally overcome bortezomib resistance, have reduced toxicities and a broader range of anti-cancer activity. This review summarizes the success and limitations of bortezomib, and describes recent advances in the field, including, and most notably, the most recent FDA approval of carfilzomib in July, 2012, a second generation proteasome inhibitor. Other proteasome inhibitors currently in clinical trials and those that are currently experimental grade

  20. Proteasome Assay in Cell Lysates

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) mediates the majority of the proteolysis seen in the cytoplasm and nucleus of mammalian cells. As such it plays an important role in the regulation of a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes including tumorigenesis, inflammation and cell death (Ciechanover, 2005; Kisselev and Goldberg, 2001). A number of recent studies have shown that proteasome activity is decreased in a variety of neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and stroke as well as during normal aging (Chung et al., 2001; Ciechanover and Brundin, 2003; Betarbet et al., 2005). This decrease in proteasome activity is thought to play a critical role in the accumulation of abnormal and oxidized proteins. Protein clearance by the UPS involves two sequential reactions. The first is the tagging of protein lysine residues with ubiquitin (Ub) and the second is the subsequent degradation of the tagged proteins by the proteasome. We herein describe an assay for the second of these two reactions (Valera et al., 2013). This assay uses fluorogenic substrates for each of the three activities of the proteasome: chymotrypsin-like activity, trypsin-like activity and caspase-like activity. Cleavage of the fluorophore from the substrate by the proteasome results in fluorescence that can be detected with a fluorescent plate reader.

  1. Proteasome Inhibitors in the Treatment of Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jatin J.; Orlowski, Robert Z.

    2016-01-01

    Targeting intracellular protein turnover by inhibiting the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway as a strategy for cancer therapy is a new addition to our chemotherapeutic armamentarium, and has seen its greatest successes against multiple myeloma. The first-in-class proteasome inhibitor bortezomib was initially approved for treatment of patients in the relapsed/refractory setting as a single agent, and was recently shown to induce even greater benefits as part of rationally-designed combinations that overcome chemoresistance. Modulation of proteasome function is also a rational approach to achieve chemosensitization to other anti-myeloma agents, and bortezomib has now been incorporated into the front-line setting. Bortezomib-based induction regimens are able to achieve higher overall response rates and response qualities than was the case with prior standards of care, and unlike these older approaches, maintain efficacy in patients with clinically- and molecularly-defined high-risk disease. Second-generation proteasome inhibitors with novel properties, such as NPI-0052 and carfilzomib, are entering the clinical arena, and showing evidence of anti-myeloma activity. In this spotlight review, we provide an overview of the current state of the art use of bortezomib and other proteasome inhibitors against multiple myeloma, and highlight areas for future study that will further optimize our ability to benefit patients with this disease. PMID:19741722

  2. Proteasome inhibition: a new anti-inflammatory strategy.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Peter J; Zollner, Thomas Matthias; Boehncke, Wolf-Henning

    2003-04-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway has a central role in the selective degradation of intracellular proteins. Among the key proteins modulated by the proteasome are those involved in the control of inflammatory processes, cell cycle regulation, and gene expression. Consequently proteasome inhibition is a potential treatment option for cancer and inflammatory conditions. Thus far, proof of principle has been obtained from studies in numerous animal models for a variety of human diseases including cancer, reperfusion injury, and inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, multiple sclerosis, and psoriasis. Two proteasome inhibitors, each representing a unique chemical class, are currently under clinical evaluation. Velcade (PS-341) is currently being evaluated in multiple phase II clinical trials for several solid tumor indications and has just entered a phase III trial for multiple myeloma. PS-519, representing another class of inhibitors, focuses on the inflammatory events following ischemia and reperfusion injury. Since proteasome inhibitors exhibit anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative effects, diseases characterized by both of these processes simultaneously, as is the case in rheumatoid arthritis or psoriasis, might also represent clinical opportunities for such drugs. PMID:12700891

  3. Proteasome Inhibition Suppresses Dengue Virus Egress in Antibody Dependent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Vivian V.; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Horrevorts, Sophie; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2015-01-01

    The mosquito-borne dengue virus (DENV) is a cause of significant global health burden, with an estimated 390 million infections occurring annually. However, no licensed vaccine or specific antiviral treatment for dengue is available. DENV interacts with host cell factors to complete its life cycle although this virus-host interplay remains to be fully elucidated. Many studies have identified the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) to be important for successful DENV production, but how the UPP contributes to DENV life cycle as host factors remains ill defined. We show here that proteasome inhibition decouples infectious virus production from viral RNA replication in antibody-dependent infection of THP-1 cells. Molecular and imaging analyses in β-lactone treated THP-1 cells suggest that proteasome function does not prevent virus assembly but rather DENV egress. Intriguingly, the licensed proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, is able to inhibit DENV titers at low nanomolar drug concentrations for different strains of all four serotypes of DENV in primary monocytes. Furthermore, bortezomib treatment of DENV-infected mice inhibited the spread of DENV in the spleen as well as the overall pathological changes. Our findings suggest that preventing DENV egress through proteasome inhibition could be a suitable therapeutic strategy against dengue. PMID:26565697

  4. Proteasome Inhibition Suppresses Dengue Virus Egress in Antibody Dependent Infection.

    PubMed

    Choy, Milly M; Zhang, Summer L; Costa, Vivian V; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Horrevorts, Sophie; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2015-11-01

    The mosquito-borne dengue virus (DENV) is a cause of significant global health burden, with an estimated 390 million infections occurring annually. However, no licensed vaccine or specific antiviral treatment for dengue is available. DENV interacts with host cell factors to complete its life cycle although this virus-host interplay remains to be fully elucidated. Many studies have identified the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) to be important for successful DENV production, but how the UPP contributes to DENV life cycle as host factors remains ill defined. We show here that proteasome inhibition decouples infectious virus production from viral RNA replication in antibody-dependent infection of THP-1 cells. Molecular and imaging analyses in β-lactone treated THP-1 cells suggest that proteasome function does not prevent virus assembly but rather DENV egress. Intriguingly, the licensed proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, is able to inhibit DENV titers at low nanomolar drug concentrations for different strains of all four serotypes of DENV in primary monocytes. Furthermore, bortezomib treatment of DENV-infected mice inhibited the spread of DENV in the spleen as well as the overall pathological changes. Our findings suggest that preventing DENV egress through proteasome inhibition could be a suitable therapeutic strategy against dengue. PMID:26565697

  5. New orally active proteasome inhibitors in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Allegra, Alessandro; Alonci, Andrea; Gerace, Demetrio; Russo, Sabina; Innao, Vanessa; Calabrò, Laura; Musolino, Caterina

    2014-01-01

    Bortezomib is the first proteasome inhibitor approved for the therapy of multiple myeloma (MM). Although Bortezomib has renovated the treatment of MM, a considerable proportion of subjects fail to respond to Bortezomib treatment and almost all patients relapse from this drug either alone or when used in combination therapies. However, the good clinical outcome of Bortezomib treatment in MM patients gave impulsion for the development of second generation proteasome inhibitors with the ambition of improving efficacy of proteasome inhibition, enhancing antitumor activity, and decreasing toxicity, as well as providing flexible dosing schedules and patient convenience. This review provides an overview of the role of oral proteasome inhibitors including Marizomib, Oprozomib, Delanzomib, chemical proteasome inhibitors, and cinnabaramides, in the therapy of MM, focusing on developments over the past five years. These emerging drugs with different mechanisms of action have exhibited promising antitumor activity in patients with relapsed/refractory MM, and they are creating chances to target multiple pathways, overcome resistance, and improve clinical outcomes, mainly for those subjects who are refractory to approved agents. Future steps in the clinical development of oral inhibitors include the optimization of the schedule and the definition of their antitumor activity in MM. PMID:24239172

  6. Biochemical analysis of proteasomes from mouse microglia: induction of immunoproteasomes by interferon-gamma and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Stohwasser, R; Giesebrecht, J; Kraft, R; Müller, E C; Häusler, K G; Kettenmann, H; Hanisch, U K; Kloetzel, P M

    2000-02-15

    The 20S proteasome is a multicatalytic threonine protease and serves to process peptides that are subsequently presented as antigenic epitopes by MHC class I molecules. In the brain, microglial cells are the major antigen presenting cells and they respond sensitive to pathologic events. We used cultured mouse microglia and a microglial cell line, the BV-2 line, as a model to study the correlation between microglial activation parameters and structural plasticity of the 20S/26S proteasome. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- or interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-stimulated microglia or BV-2 cells exhibit properties of activated microglia such as high levels of TNFalpha and IL-6 release. In response to IFN-gamma or LPS, three constitutive beta subunits (beta1/Delta, beta2/MC14, beta5/MB1) were replaced by the immunoproteasome subunits ibeta1/LMP2, ibeta2/MECL-1, and ibeta5/LMP7, indicating that activated microglia adapts its proteasomal subunit composition to the requirements of an optimized MHC class I epitope processing. Induction of immunoproteasomes in BV-2 cells was solely provoked by IFN-gamma, but not by LPS. Moreover, LPS (but not IFN-gamma) triggered the expression of a novel protein of approximately 50 kD as part of the proteasome activator PA700, that is the substrate-recognizing and unfolding unit of the 26S proteasome. These results indicate that both the 20S core protease as well as the proteasome activator PA700 are targets of modulatory subunit replacements or transient association of regulatory components in the course of microglial activation. PMID:10652445

  7. Profiling human protein degradome delineates cellular responses to proteasomal inhibition and reveals a feedback mechanism in regulating proteasome homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Tao, Yonghui; Yang, Meiqiang; Chen, Peng; Gao, Xiaobo; Zhang, Yanbo; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Zi; Hou, Jian; Zhang, Yan; Ruan, Kangcheng; Wang, Hongyan; Hu, Ronggui

    2014-10-01

    Global change in protein turnover (protein degradome) constitutes a central part of cellular responses to intrinsic or extrinsic stimuli. However, profiling protein degradome remains technically challenging. Recently, inhibition of the proteasome, e.g., by using bortezomib (BTZ), has emerged as a major chemotherapeutic strategy for treating multiple myeloma and other human malignancies, but systematic understanding of the mechanisms for BTZ drug action and tumor drug resistance is yet to be achieved. Here we developed and applied a dual-fluorescence-based Protein Turnover Assay (ProTA) to quantitatively profile global changes in human protein degradome upon BTZ-induced proteasomal inhibition. ProTA and subsequent network analyses delineate potential molecular basis for BTZ action and tumor drug resistance in BTZ chemotherapy. Finally, combined use of BTZ with drugs targeting the ProTA-identified key genes or pathways in BTZ action reduced BTZ resistance in multiple myeloma cells. Remarkably, BTZ stabilizes proteasome subunit PSMC1 and proteasome assembly factor PSMD10, suggesting a previously under-appreciated mechanism for regulating proteasome homeostasis. Therefore, ProTA is a novel tool for profiling human protein degradome to elucidate potential mechanisms of drug action and resistance, which might facilitate therapeutic development targeting proteostasis to treat human disorders. PMID:25223703

  8. The ubiquitin-proteasome system meets angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Nader

    2012-03-01

    A strict physiological balance between endogenous proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors controls endothelial cell functions, such that endothelial cell growth is normally restrained. However, in pathologic angiogenesis, a shift occurs in the balance of regulators, favoring endothelial growth. Much of the control of angiogenic events is instigated through hypoxia-induced VEGF expression. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays a central role in fine-tuning the functions of core proangiogenic proteins, including VEGF, VEGFR-2, angiogenic signaling proteins (e.g., the PLCγ1 and PI3 kinase/AKT pathways), and other non-VEGF angiogenic pathways. The emerging mechanisms by which ubiquitin modification of angiogenic proteins control angiogenesis involve both proteolytic and nonproteolytic functions. Here, I review recent advances that link the UPS to regulation of angiogenesis and highlight the potential therapeutic value of the UPS in angiogenesis-associated diseases. PMID:22357635

  9. Structure- and function-based design of Plasmodium-selective proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; O'Donoghue, Anthony J; van der Linden, Wouter A; Xie, Stanley C; Yoo, Euna; Foe, Ian T; Tilley, Leann; Craik, Charles S; da Fonseca, Paula C A; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-02-11

    The proteasome is a multi-component protease complex responsible for regulating key processes such as the cell cycle and antigen presentation. Compounds that target the proteasome are potentially valuable tools for the treatment of pathogens that depend on proteasome function for survival and replication. In particular, proteasome inhibitors have been shown to be toxic for the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum at all stages of its life cycle. Most compounds that have been tested against the parasite also inhibit the mammalian proteasome, resulting in toxicity that precludes their use as therapeutic agents. Therefore, better definition of the substrate specificity and structural properties of the Plasmodium proteasome could enable the development of compounds with sufficient selectivity to allow their use as anti-malarial agents. To accomplish this goal, here we use a substrate profiling method to uncover differences in the specificities of the human and P. falciparum proteasome. We design inhibitors based on amino-acid preferences specific to the parasite proteasome, and find that they preferentially inhibit the β2-subunit. We determine the structure of the P. falciparum 20S proteasome bound to the inhibitor using cryo-electron microscopy and single-particle analysis, to a resolution of 3.6 Å. These data reveal the unusually open P. falciparum β2 active site and provide valuable information about active-site architecture that can be used to further refine inhibitor design. Furthermore, consistent with the recent finding that the proteasome is important for stress pathways associated with resistance of artemisinin family anti-malarials, we observe growth inhibition synergism with low doses of this β2-selective inhibitor in artemisinin-sensitive and -resistant parasites. Finally, we demonstrate that a parasite-selective inhibitor could be used to attenuate parasite growth in vivo without appreciable toxicity to the host. Thus, the Plasmodium proteasome is a

  10. Structure and function based design of Plasmodium-selective proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; O'Donoghue, Anthony J.; van der Linden, Wouter A.; Xie, Stanley C.; Yoo, Euna; Foe, Ian T.; Tilley, Leann; Craik, Charles S.; da Fonseca, Paula C. A.; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome is a multi-component protease complex responsible for regulating key processes such as the cell cycle and antigen presentation1. Compounds that target the proteasome are potentially valuable tools for the treatment of pathogens that depend on proteasome function for survival and replication. In particular, proteasome inhibitors have been shown to be toxic for the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum at all stages of its life cycle2-5. Most compounds that have been tested against the parasite also inhibit the mammalian proteasome resulting in toxicity that precludes their use as therapeutic agents2,6. Therefore, better definition of the substrate specificity and structural properties of the Plasmodium proteasome could enable the development of compounds with sufficient selectivity to allow their use as anti-malarial agents. To accomplish this goal, we used a substrate profiling method to uncover differences in the specificities of the human and P. falciparum proteasome. We designed inhibitors based on amino acid preferences specific to the parasite proteasome, and found that they preferentially inhibit the β 2 subunit. We determined the structure of the P. falciparum 20S proteasome bound to the inhibitor using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and single particle analysis, to a resolution of 3.6 Å. These data reveal the unusually open P. falciparum β2 active site and provide valuable information regarding active site architecture that can be used to further refine inhibitor design. Furthermore, consistent with the recent finding that the proteasome is important for stress pathways associated with resistance of artemisinin (ART) family anti-malarials7,8, we observed growth inhibition synergism with low doses of this β 2 selective inhibitor in ART sensitive and resistant parasites. Finally, we demonstrated that a parasite selective inhibitor could be used to attenuate parasite growth in vivo without significant toxicity to the host. Thus, the

  11. Proteasome Inhibition Enhances the Induction and Impairs the Maintenance of Late-Phase Long-Term Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Chenghai; Upadhya, Sudarshan C.; Ding, Lan; Smith, Thuy K.; Hegde, Ashok N.

    2008-01-01

    Protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway plays important roles in synaptic plasticity, but the molecular mechanisms by which proteolysis regulates synaptic strength are not well understood. We investigated the role of the proteasome in hippocampal late-phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP), a model for enduring synaptic plasticity.…

  12. Binding-induced folding of prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein on the mycobacterium proteasomal ATPase targets substrates for degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.; Li, H.; Darwin, K. H.

    2010-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis uses a proteasome system that is analogous to the eukaryotic ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and is required for pathogenesis. However, the bacterial analog of ubiquitin, prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup), is an intrinsically disordered protein that bears little sequence or structural resemblance to the highly structured ubiquitin. Thus, it was unknown how pupylated proteins were recruited to the proteasome. Here, we show that the Mycobacterium proteasomal ATPase (Mpa) has three pairs of tentacle-like coiled coils that recognize Pup. Mpa bound unstructured Pup through hydrophobic interactions and a network of hydrogen bonds, leading to the formation of an {alpha}-helix in Pup. Our work describes a binding-induced folding recognition mechanism in the Pup-proteasome system that differs mechanistically from substrate recognition in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This key difference between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems could be exploited for the development of a small molecule-based treatment for tuberculosis.

  13. Binding-induced Folding of Prokaryotic Ubiquitin-like Protein on the Mycobacterium Proteasomal ATPase Targets Substrates for Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    T Wang; K Heran Darwin; H Li

    2011-12-31

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis uses a proteasome system that is analogous to the eukaryotic ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and is required for pathogenesis. However, the bacterial analog of ubiquitin, prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup), is an intrinsically disordered protein that bears little sequence or structural resemblance to the highly structured ubiquitin. Thus, it was unknown how pupylated proteins were recruited to the proteasome. Here, we show that the Mycobacterium proteasomal ATPase (Mpa) has three pairs of tentacle-like coiled coils that recognize Pup. Mpa bound unstructured Pup through hydrophobic interactions and a network of hydrogen bonds, leading to the formation of an {alpha}-helix in Pup. Our work describes a binding-induced folding recognition mechanism in the Pup-proteasome system that differs mechanistically from substrate recognition in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This key difference between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems could be exploited for the development of a small molecule-based treatment for tuberculosis.

  14. Structural Insights into Proteasome Activation by the 19S Regulatory Particle

    PubMed Central

    Ehlinger, Aaron; Walters, Kylie J.

    2013-01-01

    Since its discovery in the late 1970s, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) has become recognized as the major pathway for regulated cellular proteolysis. Processes ranging from cell cycle control, pathogen resistance, and protein quality control rely on selective protein degradation at the proteasome for homeostatic function. Perhaps as a consequence of the importance of this pathway, and the genesis of severe diseases upon its dysregulation, protein degradation by the UPS is highly controlled from the level of substrate recognition to proteolysis. Technological advances over the last decade have created an explosion of structural and mechanistic information that has underscored the complexity of the proteasome and its upstream regulatory factors. Significant insights have come from study of the 19S proteasome regulatory particle (RP) responsible for recognition and processing of ubiquitinated substrates destined for proteolysis. Established as a highly dynamic proteasome activator, a large number of both permanent and transient RP components with specialized functional roles are critical for proteasome function. In this review, we highlight recent mechanistic developments in the study of proteasome activation by the RP and how they provide context to our current understanding of the UPS. PMID:23672618

  15. Characterisation of 20S Proteasome in Tritrichomonas foetus and Its Role during the Cell Cycle and Transformation into Endoflagellar Form

    PubMed Central

    Pereira-Neves, Antonio; Gonzaga, Luiz; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F. S.; Benchimol, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    an accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and caused increase in the amount of endoplasmic reticulum membranes in the parasite. Taken together, our results suggest that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is required for cell cycle and EFF transformation in T. foetus. PMID:26047503

  16. Characterisation of 20S Proteasome in Tritrichomonas foetus and Its Role during the Cell Cycle and Transformation into Endoflagellar Form.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Neves, Antonio; Gonzaga, Luiz; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F S; Benchimol, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    an accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and caused increase in the amount of endoplasmic reticulum membranes in the parasite. Taken together, our results suggest that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is required for cell cycle and EFF transformation in T. foetus. PMID:26047503

  17. Proteasome inhibition improves fractionated radiation treatment against non-small cell lung cancer: an antioxidant connection.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Kristopher Ray; Daosukho, Chotiros; Zhao, Yunfeng; Meigooni, Ali; St Clair, William

    2005-10-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer frequently presents as a locally advanced disease. In this setting, radiation has a prominent role in cancer therapy. However, tumor adaptation to oxidative stress may lessen the efficacy of radiation therapy. Recent studies demonstrate that proteasome inhibitors increase the efficacy of radiation against a range of tumors. Although proteasome inhibition impacts on NF-kappaB translocation, the precise mechanism through which proteasome inhibitors induce tumor cell death and promote radiation efficacy remains unclear. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential of the proteasome inhibitor, MG-132, to improve the efficacy of radiation therapy and to determine whether its effect is linked to the suppression of the antioxidant enzyme, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Human NSCLC (A549) cells were utilized both in vivo and in vitro to evaluate proteasome inhibition on radiation response. In vivo, mice that received combined treatments of 2.5 microg/g body weight MG-132 and 30 Gy demonstrated a delay in tumor regrowth in comparison to the 30 Gy control group. In vitro, clonegenic survival assays confirmed a dose-dependent enhancement of radiation sensitivity in combination with MG-132 and a significant interaction between the two. The levels of IkappaB-alpha, a NF-kappaB target gene and also an inhibitor of NF-kappaB nuclear translocation, decreased in a time-dependent manner following administration of MG-132 confirming the inhibition of the 26S proteasome. The MnSOD protein level was increased consistent with lower levels of IkappaB-alpha, confirming a NF-kappaB-mediated effect. Cells treated with radiation demonstrated an induction of MnSOD; however, the administration of MG-132 suppressed this induction These results support the hypothesis that proteasome inhibitors such as MG-132 can increase the efficacy of radiation therapy, in part, by suppression of cytoprotective NF-kappaB-mediated MnSOD expression. PMID:16142322

  18. Altered Composition of Liver Proteasome Assemblies Contributes to Enhanced Proteasome Activity in the Exceptionally Long-Lived Naked Mole-Rat

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Karl A.; Edrey, Yael H.; Osmulski, Pawel; Gaczynska, Maria; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2012-01-01

    The longest-lived rodent, the naked mole-rat (Bathyergidae; Heterocephalus glaber), maintains robust health for at least 75% of its 32 year lifespan, suggesting that the decline in genomic integrity or protein homeostasis routinely observed during aging, is either attenuated or delayed in this extraordinarily long-lived species. The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) plays an integral role in protein homeostasis by degrading oxidatively-damaged and misfolded proteins. In this study, we examined proteasome activity in naked mole-rats and mice in whole liver lysates as well as three subcellular fractions to probe the mechanisms behind the apparently enhanced effectiveness of UPS. We found that when compared with mouse samples, naked mole-rats had significantly higher chymotrypsin-like (ChT-L) activity and a two-fold increase in trypsin-like (T-L) in both whole lysates as well as cytosolic fractions. Native gel electrophoresis of the whole tissue lysates showed that the 20S proteasome was more active in the longer-lived species and that 26S proteasome was both more active and more populous. Western blot analyses revealed that both 19S subunits and immunoproteasome catalytic subunits are present in greater amounts in the naked mole-rat suggesting that the observed higher specific activity may be due to the greater proportion of immunoproteasomes in livers of healthy young adults. It thus appears that proteasomes in this species are primed for the efficient removal of stress-damaged proteins. Further characterization of the naked mole-rat proteasome and its regulation could lead to important insights on how the cells in these animals handle increased stress and protein damage to maintain a longer health in their tissues and ultimately a longer life. PMID:22567116

  19. MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, induces apoptosis in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Na; Peng, Zhilan

    2013-03-01

    The balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis is critical for normal development and for the maintenance of homeostasis in adult organisms. Disruption of this balance has been implicated in a large number of disease processes, ranging from autoimmunity and neurodegenerative disorders to cancer. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, responsible for mediating the majority of intracellular proteolysis, plays a crucial role in the regulation of many normal cellular processes, including the cell cycle, differentiation and apoptosis. Apoptosis in cancer cells is closely connected with the activity of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The peptide-aldehyde proteasome inhibitor MG132 (carbobenzoxyl-L-leucyl-L-leucyl-L-leucine) induces the apoptosis of cells by a different intermediary pathway. Although the pathway of induction of apoptosis is different, it plays a crucial role in anti-tumor treatment. There are many cancer-related molecules in which the protein levels present in cells are regulated by a proteasomal pathway; for example, tumor inhibitors (P53, E2A, c-Myc, c-Jun, c-Fos), transcription factors (transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B, IκBα, HIFI, YYI, ICER), cell cycle proteins (cyclin A and B, P27, P21, IAP1/3), MG132 induces cell apoptosis through formation of reactive oxygen species or the upregulation and downregulation of these factors, which is ultimately dependent upon the activation of the caspase family of cysteine proteases. In this article we review the mechanism of the induction of apoptosis in order to provide information required for research. PMID:22897979

  20. Sperm proteasomes degrade sperm receptor on the egg zona pellucida during mammalian fertilization.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Shawn W; Manandhar, Gaurishankar; Yi, Young-Joo; Gupta, Satish K; Sutovsky, Miriam; Odhiambo, John F; Powell, Michael D; Miller, David J; Sutovsky, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the mechanism by which the fertilizing spermatozoon penetrates the mammalian vitelline membrane, the zona pellucida (ZP) remains one of the unexplained fundamental events of human/mammalian development. Evidence has been accumulating in support of the 26S proteasome as a candidate for echinoderm, ascidian and mammalian egg coat lysin. Monitoring ZP protein degradation by sperm during fertilization is nearly impossible because those few spermatozoa that penetrate the ZP leave behind a virtually untraceable residue of degraded proteins. We have overcome this hurdle by designing an experimentally consistent in vitro system in which live boar spermatozoa are co-incubated with ZP-proteins (ZPP) solubilized from porcine oocytes. Using this assay, mimicking sperm-egg interactions, we demonstrate that the sperm-borne proteasomes can degrade the sperm receptor protein ZPC. Upon coincubation with motile spermatozoa, the solubilized ZPP, which appear to be ubiquitinated, adhered to sperm acrosomal caps and induced acrosomal exocytosis/formation of the acrosomal shroud. The degradation of the sperm receptor protein ZPC was assessed by Western blotting band-densitometry and proteomics. A nearly identical pattern of sperm receptor degradation, evident already within the first 5 min of coincubation, was observed when the spermatozoa were replaced with the isolated, enzymatically active, sperm-derived proteasomes. ZPC degradation was blocked by proteasomal inhibitors and accelerated by ubiquitin-aldehyde(UBAL), a modified ubiquitin protein that stimulates proteasomal proteolysis. Such a degradation pattern of ZPC is consistent with in vitro fertilization studies, in which proteasomal inhibitors completely blocked fertilization, and UBAL increased fertilization and polyspermy rates. Preincubation of intact zona-enclosed ova with isolated active sperm proteasomes caused digestion, abrasions and loosening of the exposed zonae, and significantly reduced

  1. Disulfiram promotes the conversion of carcinogenic cadmium to a proteasome inhibitor with pro-apoptotic activity in human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Lihua; Yang Huanjie; Chen Di; Cui, Cindy; Ping Dou, Q.

    2008-06-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system is involved in various cellular processes, including transcription, apoptosis, and cell cycle. In vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies suggest the potential use of proteasome inhibitors as anticancer drugs. Cadmium (Cd) is a widespread environmental pollutant that has been classified as a human carcinogen. Recent study in our laboratory suggested that the clinically used anti-alcoholism drug disulfiram (DSF) could form a complex with tumor cellular copper, resulting in inhibition of the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity and induction of cancer cell apoptosis. In the current study, we report, for the first time, that DSF is able to convert the carcinogen Cd to a proteasome-inhibitor and cancer cell apoptosis inducer. Although the DSF-Cd complex inhibited the chymotrypsin-like activity of a purified 20S proteasome with an IC{sub 50} value of 32 {mu}mol/L, this complex was much more potent in inhibiting the chymotrypsin-like activity of prostate cancer cellular 26S proteasome. Inhibition of cellular proteasome activity by the DSF-Cd complex resulted in the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and the natural proteasome substrate p27, which was followed by activation of calpain and induction of apoptosis. Importantly, human breast cancer MCF10DCIS cells were much more sensitive to the DSF-Cd treatment than immortalized but non-tumorigenic human breast MCF-10A cells, demonstrating that the DSF-Cd complex could selectively induce proteasome inhibition and apoptosis in human tumor cells. Our work suggests the potential use of DSF for treatment of cells with accumulated levels of carcinogen Cd.

  2. Docking of the Proteasomal ATPases’ C-termini in the 20S Proteasomes alpha Ring Opens the Gate for Substrate Entry

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David M.; Chang, Shih-Chung; Park, Soyeon; Finley, Daniel; Cheng, Yifan; Goldberg, Alfred

    2007-01-01

    Summary The 20S proteasome functions in protein degradation in eukaryotes together with the 19S ATPases or in archaea with the homologous PAN ATPase complex. PAN and the 19S ATPases contain a conserved C-terminal hydrophobic-tyrosine-X motif (HbYX). We show that these residues are essential for PAN to associate with the 20S and open its gated-channel for substrate entry. Upon ATP binding, these C-terminal residues bind to pockets between the 20S’s α-subunits. Furthermore, seven-residue peptides from PAN’s C-terminus that contain the HbYX motif also bind to these sites and induce gate-opening in both archaeal and mammalian 20S proteasomes. Gate-opening could be induced by short C-terminal peptides from the 19S ATPase subunits, Rpt2 and Rpt5, but not by ones from PA28/26, which lack the HbYX motif and cause gate-opening by distinct mechanism. The C-terminal YX residues in the 19S ATPases were also shown to be critical for gating and stability of mammalian and yeast 26S proteasomes. Thus, the C-termini of the proteasomal ATPases function like a “key-in-a-lock” to induce gate-opening and allow substrate entry. PMID:17803938

  3. TOPORS, a Dual E3 Ubiquitin and Sumo1 Ligase, Interacts with 26 S Protease Regulatory Subunit 4, Encoded by the PSMC1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Czub, Barbara; Shah, Amna Z.; Alfano, Giovanna; Kruczek, Przemysław M.; Chakarova, Christina F.; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.

    2016-01-01

    The significance of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) for protein degradation has been highlighted in the context of neurodegenerative diseases, including retinal dystrophies. TOPORS, a dual E3 ubiquitin and SUMO1 ligase, forms a component of the UPS and selected substrates for its enzymatic activities, such as DJ-1/PARK7 and APOBEC2, are important for neuronal as well as retinal homeostasis, respectively. TOPORS is ubiquitously expressed, yet its mutations are only known to result in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We performed a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screen of a human retinal cDNA library in order to identify interacting protein partners of TOPORS from the retina, and thus begin delineating the putative disease mechanism(s) associated with the retina-specific phenotype resulting from mutations in TOPORS. The screen led to isolation of the 26 S protease regulatory subunit 4 (P26s4/ PSMC1), an ATPase indispensable for correct functioning of UPS-mediated proteostasis. The interaction between endogenous TOPORS and P26s4 proteins was validated by co-immuno-precipitation from mammalian cell extracts and further characterised by immunofluorescent co-localisation studies in cell lines and retinal sections. Findings from hTERT-RPE1 and 661W cells demonstrated that TOPORS and P26s4 co-localise at the centrosome in cultured cells. Immunofluorescent staining of mouse retinae revealed a strong P26s4 reactivity at the interface between retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) layer and the photoreceptors outer segments (OS). This finding leads us to speculate that P26s4, along with TOPORS, may have a role(s) in RPE phagocytosis, in addition to contributing to the overall photoreceptor and retinal homeostasis via the UPS. PMID:26872363

  4. Prolonged Proteasome Inhibition Cyclically Upregulates Oct3/4 and Nanog Gene Expression, but Reduces Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Colony Formation

    PubMed Central

    Floyd, Elizabeth Z.; Staszkiewicz, Jaroslaw; Power, Rachel A.; Kilroy, Gail; Kirk-Ballard, Heather; Barnes, Christian W.; Strickler, Karen L.; Rim, Jong S.; Harkins, Lettie L.; Gao, Ru; Kim, Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There is ample evidence that the ubiquitin–proteasome system is an important regulator of transcription and its activity is necessary for maintaining pluripotency and promoting cellular reprogramming. Moreover, proteasome activity contributes to maintaining the open chromatin structure found in pluripotent stem cells, acting as a transcriptional inhibitor at specific gene loci generally associated with differentiation. The current study was designed to understand further the role of proteasome inhibition in reprogramming and its ability to modulate endogenous expression of pluripotency-related genes and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) colony formation. Herein, we demonstrate that acute combinatorial treatment with the proteasome inhibitors MG101 or MG132 and the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) increases gene expression of the pluripotency marker Oct3/4, and that MG101 alone is as effective as VPA in the induction of Oct3/4 mRNA expression in fibroblasts. Prolonged proteasome inhibition cyclically upregulates gene expression of Oct3/4 and Nanog, but reduces colony formation in the presence of the iPSC induction cocktail. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the 26S proteasome is an essential modulator in the reprogramming process. Its inhibition enhances expression of pluripotency-related genes; however, efficient colony formation requires proteasome activity. Therefore, discovery of small molecules that increase proteasome activity might lead to more efficient cell reprogramming and generation of pluripotent cells. PMID:25826722

  5. Proteolysis, proteasomes and antigen presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, A. L.; Rock, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    Proteins presented to the immune system must first be cleaved to small peptides by intracellular proteinases. Proteasomes are proteolytic complexes that degrade cytosolic and nuclear proteins. These particles have been implicated in ATP-ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis and in the processing of intracellular antigens for cytolytic immune responses.

  6. Inhibition of Tumor Proteasome Activity by Gold Dithiocarbamato Complexes via both Redox-Dependent and –Independent Processes

    PubMed Central

    Milacic, Vesna; Ronconi, Luca; Fan, Yuhua; Bi, Caifeng; Fregona, Dolores; Dou, Q Ping

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported on a gold(III) complex, namely [AuBr2(DMDT)] (N,N-dimethyldithiocarbamate) showing potent in vitro and in vivo growth inhibitory activities toward human cancer cells and identifying the cellular proteasome as one of the major targets. However, the importance of the oxidation state of the gold center and the involved mechanism of action has yet to be established. Here we show that both gold(III)- and gold(I)-dithiocarbamato species, namely [AuBr2(ESDT)] (AUL12) and [Au(ESDT)]2 (AUL15), could inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of purified 20S proteasome and 26S proteasome in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, resulting in accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and proteasome target proteins, and induction of cell death, but at significantly different levels. Gold(I) and gold(III) compounds-mediated proteasome inhibition and cell death induction were completely reversed by the addition of a reducing agent, dithiothreitol or N-acetyl-l-cysteine, suggesting the involvement of redox processes. Furthermore, treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with gold(III) compound (AUL12), but not the gold(I) analogue (AUL15), resulted in the production of significant level of reactive oxygen species. Our study provides strong evidence that the cellular proteasome is an imporant target of both gold(I) and gold(III) dithiocarbamates, but distinct cellular mechanisms of action are responsible for their different overall effect. PMID:19911377

  7. Proteasome dysfunction triggers activation of SKN-1A/Nrf1 by the aspartic protease DDI-1.

    PubMed

    Lehrbach, Nicolas J; Ruvkun, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Proteasomes are essential for protein homeostasis in eukaryotes. To preserve cellular function, transcription of proteasome subunit genes is induced in response to proteasome dysfunction caused by pathogen attacks or proteasome inhibitor drugs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, this response requires SKN-1, a transcription factor related to mammalian Nrf1/2. Here, we use comprehensive genetic analyses to identify the pathway required for C. elegans to detect proteasome dysfunction and activate SKN-1. Genes required for SKN-1 activation encode regulators of ER traffic, a peptide N-glycanase, and DDI-1, a conserved aspartic protease. DDI-1 expression is induced by proteasome dysfunction, and we show that DDI-1 is required to cleave and activate an ER-associated isoform of SKN-1. Mammalian Nrf1 is also ER-associated and subject to proteolytic cleavage, suggesting a conserved mechanism of proteasome surveillance. Targeting mammalian DDI1 protease could mitigate effects of proteasome dysfunction in aging and protein aggregation disorders, or increase effectiveness of proteasome inhibitor cancer chemotherapies. PMID:27528192

  8. Proteasome dysfunction triggers activation of SKN-1A/Nrf1 by the aspartic protease DDI-1

    PubMed Central

    Lehrbach, Nicolas J; Ruvkun, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Proteasomes are essential for protein homeostasis in eukaryotes. To preserve cellular function, transcription of proteasome subunit genes is induced in response to proteasome dysfunction caused by pathogen attacks or proteasome inhibitor drugs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, this response requires SKN-1, a transcription factor related to mammalian Nrf1/2. Here, we use comprehensive genetic analyses to identify the pathway required for C. elegans to detect proteasome dysfunction and activate SKN-1. Genes required for SKN-1 activation encode regulators of ER traffic, a peptide N-glycanase, and DDI-1, a conserved aspartic protease. DDI-1 expression is induced by proteasome dysfunction, and we show that DDI-1 is required to cleave and activate an ER-associated isoform of SKN-1. Mammalian Nrf1 is also ER-associated and subject to proteolytic cleavage, suggesting a conserved mechanism of proteasome surveillance. Targeting mammalian DDI1 protease could mitigate effects of proteasome dysfunction in aging and protein aggregation disorders, or increase effectiveness of proteasome inhibitor cancer chemotherapies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17721.001 PMID:27528192

  9. Crystal structure of the proteasomal deubiquitylation module Rpn8-Rpn11

    PubMed Central

    Pathare, Ganesh Ramnath; Nagy, István; Śledź, Paweł; Anderson, Daniel J.; Zhou, Han-Jie; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Förster, Friedrich; Bracher, Andreas; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The ATP-dependent degradation of polyubiquitylated proteins by the 26S proteasome is essential for the maintenance of proteome stability and the regulation of a plethora of cellular processes. Degradation of substrates is preceded by the removal of polyubiquitin moieties through the isopeptidase activity of the subunit Rpn11. Here we describe three crystal structures of the heterodimer of the Mpr1–Pad1–N-terminal domains of Rpn8 and Rpn11, crystallized as a fusion protein in complex with a nanobody. This fusion protein exhibits modest deubiquitylation activity toward a model substrate. Full activation requires incorporation of Rpn11 into the 26S proteasome and is dependent on ATP hydrolysis, suggesting that substrate processing and polyubiquitin removal are coupled. Based on our structures, we propose that premature activation is prevented by the combined effects of low intrinsic ubiquitin affinity, an insertion segment acting as a physical barrier across the substrate access channel, and a conformationally unstable catalytic loop in Rpn11. The docking of the structure into the proteasome EM density revealed contacts of Rpn11 with ATPase subunits, which likely stabilize the active conformation and boost the affinity for the proximal ubiquitin moiety. The narrow space around the Rpn11 active site at the entrance to the ATPase ring pore is likely to prevent erroneous deubiquitylation of folded proteins. PMID:24516147

  10. Suppression of cytochrome P450 3A protein levels by proteasome inhibitors.

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C. ); Kocarek, Thomas A.; Shen, Shang; Bollinger, Nikki ); Dahn, Michael S.; Lee, Donna W.

    2003-06-01

    We have previously reported that CYP3A cross-links with polyubiquitinated proteins in microsomes from nicardipine-treated rats in a process that is distinct from classical polyubiquitination. To further examine the role of the proteasome in CYP3A degradation, we investigated the effects of proteasome inhibitors lactacystin, MG132, proteasome inhibitor 1, and hemin in primary cultures of rat and human hepatocytes. With the exception of hemin, these agents increased the total pool of ubiquitinated proteins in microsomes isolated from rat hepatocytes, indicating that lactacystin, MG132, and proteasome inhibitor 1 effectively inhibited the proteasome in these cells. All four agents caused a reduction in the amount of the major approximately 55-kDa CYP3A band, opposite to what would be expected if the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway degraded CYP3A. Only hemin treatment caused an increase in high molecular mass (HMM) CYP3A bands. Because hemin treatment did not alter levels of ubiquitin in CYP3 A immunoprecipitates, the HMM CYP3A bands formed in response to hemin treatment clearly were not due to proteasome inhibition. Rather, because hemin treatment also caused an increase in HMM CYP3A in the detergent-insoluble fraction of the 10,000g pellet, the HMM CYP3A seems to represent a large protein complex that is unlikely to primarily represent ubiquitination.

  11. Aggresome-like structure induced by isothiocyanates is novel proteasome-dependent degradation machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Mi, Lixin; Gan, Nanqin; Chung, Fung-Lung

    2009-10-16

    Unwanted or misfolded proteins are either refolded by chaperones or degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). When UPS is impaired, misfolded proteins form aggregates, which are transported along microtubules by motor protein dynein towards the juxta-nuclear microtubule-organizing center to form aggresome, a single cellular garbage disposal complex. Because aggresome formation results from proteasome failure, aggresome components are degraded through the autophagy/lysosome pathway. Here we report that small molecule isothiocyanates (ITCs) can induce formation of aggresome-like structure (ALS) through covalent modification of cytoplasmic {alpha}- and {beta}-tubulin. The formation of ALS is related to neither proteasome inhibition nor oxidative stress. ITC-induced ALS is a proteasome-dependent assembly for emergent removal of misfolded proteins, suggesting that the cell may have a previously unknown strategy to cope with misfolded proteins.

  12. Disulfiram promotes the conversion of carcinogenic cadmium to a proteasome inhibitor with pro-apoptotic activity in human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lihua; Yang, Huanjie; Chen, Di; Cui, Cindy; Dou, Q. Ping

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitinproteasome system is involved in various cellular processes, including transcription, apoptosis, and cell cycle. In vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies suggest the potential use of proteasome inhibitors as anticancer drugs. Cadmium (Cd) is a widespread environmental pollutant that has been classified as a human carcinogen. Recent study in our laboratory suggested that the clinically used anti-alcoholism drug disulfiram (DSF) could form a complex with tumor cellular copper, resulting in inhibition of the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity and induction of cancer cell apoptosis. In the current study, we report, for the first time, that DSF is able to convert the carcinogen Cd to a proteasome-inhibitor and cancer cell apoptosis inducer. Although the DSF–Cd complex inhibited the chymotrypsin-like activity of a purified 20S proteasome with an IC50 value of 32 μmol/L, this complex was much more potent in inhibiting the chymotrypsin-like activity of prostate cancer cellular 26S proteasome. Inhibition of cellular proteasome activity by the DSF–Cd complex resulted in the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and the natural proteasome substrate p27, which was followed by activation of calpain and induction of apoptosis. Importantly, human breast cancer MCF10DCIS cells were much more sensitive to the DSF–Cd treatment than immortalized but non-tumorigenic human breast MCF-10A cells, demonstrating that the DSF–Cd complex could selectively induce proteasome inhibition and apoptosis in human tumor cells. Our work suggests the potential use of DSF for treatment of cells with accumulated levels of carcinogen Cd. PMID:18304598

  13. ahg12 is a dominant proteasome mutant that affects multiple regulatory systems for germination of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shimpei; Hirayama, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system is fundamentally involved in myriad biological phenomena of eukaryotes. In plants, this regulated protein degradation system has a pivotal role in the cellular response mechanisms for both internal and external stimuli, such as plant hormones and environmental stresses. Information about substrate selection by the ubiquitination machinery has accumulated, but there is very little information about selectivity for substrates at the proteasome. Here, we report characterization of a novel abscisic acid (ABA)-hypersensitive mutant named ABA hypersensitive germination12 (ahg12) in Arabidopsis. The ahg12 mutant showed a unique pleiotropic phenotype, including hypersensitivity to ABA and ethylene, and hyposensitivity to light. Map-based cloning identified the ahg12 mutation to cause an amino acid conversion in the L23 loop of RPT5a, which is predicted to form the pore structure of the 19S RP complex of the proteasome. Transient expression assays demonstrated that some plant-specific signaling components accumulated at higher levels in the ahg12 mutant. These results suggest that the ahg12 mutation led to changes in the substrate preference of the 26S proteasome. The discovery of the ahg12 mutation thus will contribute to elucidate the characteristics of the regulated protein degradation system. PMID:27139926

  14. Proteasome targeting of proteins in Arabidopsis leaf mesophyll, epidermal and vascular tissues

    PubMed Central

    Svozil, Julia; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Baerenfaller, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Protein and transcript levels are partly decoupled as a function of translation efficiency and protein degradation. Selective protein degradation via the Ubiquitin-26S proteasome system (UPS) ensures protein homeostasis and facilitates adjustment of protein abundance during changing environmental conditions. Since individual leaf tissues have specialized functions, their protein composition is different and hence also protein level regulation is expected to differ. To understand UPS function in a tissue-specific context we developed a method termed Meselect to effectively and rapidly separate Arabidopsis thaliana leaf epidermal, vascular and mesophyll tissues. Epidermal and vascular tissue cells are separated mechanically, while mesophyll cells are obtained after rapid protoplasting. The high yield of proteins was sufficient for tissue-specific proteome analyses after inhibition of the proteasome with the specific inhibitor Syringolin A (SylA) and affinity enrichment of ubiquitylated proteins. SylA treatment of leaves resulted in the accumulation of 225 proteins and identification of 519 ubiquitylated proteins. Proteins that were exclusively identified in the three different tissue types are consistent with specific cellular functions. Mesophyll cell proteins were enriched for plastid membrane translocation complexes as targets of the UPS. Epidermis enzymes of the TCA cycle and cell wall biosynthesis specifically accumulated after proteasome inhibition, and in the vascular tissue several enzymes involved in glucosinolate biosynthesis were found to be ubiquitylated. Our results demonstrate that protein level changes and UPS protein targets are characteristic of the individual leaf tissues and that the proteasome is relevant for tissue-specific functions. PMID:26074939

  15. The poxvirus encoded ubiquitin ligase, p28, is regulated by proteasomal degradation and autoubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Mottet, Kelly; Bareiss, Bettina; Milne, Craig D; Barry, Michele

    2014-11-01

    Virus manipulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system has become increasingly apparent. Ubiquitin is a 76 amino acid protein that is post-translationally conjugated to target proteins, while poly-ubiquitination subsequently leads to degradation via the 26S proteasome. Target specificity is determined by a large family of ubiquitin ligases. Poxviruses encode p28, a highly conserved ubiquitin ligase expressed in a wide range of poxviruses (J. Virol. 79:597). Here we investigate the relationship between p28 and ubiquitination. Confocal microscopy indicated that orthologs of p28 co-localized with ubiquitin at the virus factory. Flow cytometry assays further demonstrated that p28 was regulated by proteasomal degradation. Moreover, when the ubiquitin ligase activity of p28 was disrupted by mutating the RING domain conjugated ubiquitin still localized to the viral factories, indicating that an unknown ubiquitin ligase(s) was responsible for regulating p28. Our observations indicate that p28 is a ubiquitin ligase that is regulated by ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. PMID:25240226

  16. ahg12 is a dominant proteasome mutant that affects multiple regulatory systems for germination of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shimpei; Hirayama, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system is fundamentally involved in myriad biological phenomena of eukaryotes. In plants, this regulated protein degradation system has a pivotal role in the cellular response mechanisms for both internal and external stimuli, such as plant hormones and environmental stresses. Information about substrate selection by the ubiquitination machinery has accumulated, but there is very little information about selectivity for substrates at the proteasome. Here, we report characterization of a novel abscisic acid (ABA)-hypersensitive mutant named ABA hypersensitive germination12 (ahg12) in Arabidopsis. The ahg12 mutant showed a unique pleiotropic phenotype, including hypersensitivity to ABA and ethylene, and hyposensitivity to light. Map-based cloning identified the ahg12 mutation to cause an amino acid conversion in the L23 loop of RPT5a, which is predicted to form the pore structure of the 19S RP complex of the proteasome. Transient expression assays demonstrated that some plant-specific signaling components accumulated at higher levels in the ahg12 mutant. These results suggest that the ahg12 mutation led to changes in the substrate preference of the 26S proteasome. The discovery of the ahg12 mutation thus will contribute to elucidate the characteristics of the regulated protein degradation system. PMID:27139926

  17. The proteasomal subunit Rpn6 is a molecular clamp holding the core and regulatory subcomplexes together

    PubMed Central

    Pathare, Ganesh Ramnath; Nagy, István; Bohn, Stefan; Unverdorben, Pia; Hubert, Agnes; Körner, Roman; Nickell, Stephan; Lasker, Keren; Sali, Andrej; Tamura, Tomohiro; Nishioka, Taiki; Förster, Friedrich; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Bracher, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Proteasomes execute the degradation of most cellular proteins. Although the 20S core particle (CP) has been studied in great detail, the structure of the 19S regulatory particle (RP), which prepares ubiquitylated substrates for degradation, has remained elusive. Here, we report the crystal structure of one of the RP subunits, Rpn6, and we describe its integration into the cryo-EM density map of the 26S holocomplex at 9.1 Å resolution. Rpn6 consists of an α-solenoid-like fold and a proteasome COP9/signalosome eIF3 (PCI) module in a right-handed suprahelical configuration. Highly conserved surface areas of Rpn6 interact with the conserved surfaces of the Pre8 (alpha2) and Rpt6 subunits from the alpha and ATPase rings, respectively. The structure suggests that Rpn6 has a pivotal role in stabilizing the otherwise weak interaction between the CP and the RP. PMID:22187461

  18. Modeling proteasome dynamics in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sneppen, Kim; Lizana, Ludvig; Jensen, Mogens H; Pigolotti, Simone; Otzen, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), there is evidence that alpha-synuclein (alphaSN) aggregation is coupled to dysfunctional or overburdened protein quality control systems, in particular the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here, we develop a simple dynamical model for the on-going conflict between alphaSN aggregation and the maintenance of a functional proteasome in the healthy cell, based on the premise that proteasomal activity can be titrated out by mature alphaSN fibrils and their protofilament precursors. In the presence of excess proteasomes the cell easily maintains homeostasis. However, when the ratio between the available proteasome and the alphaSN protofilaments is reduced below a threshold level, we predict a collapse of homeostasis and onset of oscillations in the proteasome concentration. Depleted proteasome opens for accumulation of oligomers. Our analysis suggests that the onset of PD is associated with a proteasome population that becomes occupied in periodic degradation of aggregates. This behavior is found to be the general state of a proteasome/chaperone system under pressure, and suggests new interpretations of other diseases where protein aggregation could stress elements of the protein quality control system. PMID:19411740

  19. Modeling proteasome dynamics in Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneppen, Kim; Lizana, Ludvig; Jensen, Mogens H.; Pigolotti, Simone; Otzen, Daniel

    2009-09-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), there is evidence that α-synuclein (αSN) aggregation is coupled to dysfunctional or overburdened protein quality control systems, in particular the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here, we develop a simple dynamical model for the on-going conflict between αSN aggregation and the maintenance of a functional proteasome in the healthy cell, based on the premise that proteasomal activity can be titrated out by mature αSN fibrils and their protofilament precursors. In the presence of excess proteasomes the cell easily maintains homeostasis. However, when the ratio between the available proteasome and the αSN protofilaments is reduced below a threshold level, we predict a collapse of homeostasis and onset of oscillations in the proteasome concentration. Depleted proteasome opens for accumulation of oligomers. Our analysis suggests that the onset of PD is associated with a proteasome population that becomes occupied in periodic degradation of aggregates. This behavior is found to be the general state of a proteasome/chaperone system under pressure, and suggests new interpretations of other diseases where protein aggregation could stress elements of the protein quality control system.

  20. Proteasome inhibitors exacerbate interleukin-8 production induced by protease-activated receptor 2 in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ghouzali, Ibtissem; Azhar, Saïda; Bôle-Feysot, Christine; Ducrotté, Philippe; Déchelotte, Pierre; Coëffier, Moïse

    2016-10-01

    Protease activated receptors (PARs) and the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) regulate inflammatory response in intestinal cells. We aimed to elucidate putative connections between PARs and UPS pathways in intestinal epithelial cells. Caco-2 cells were treated by agonist peptides of PARs and/or IL-1β and/or proteasome inhibitors, bortezomib or MG132. Inflammatory response was evaluated by measuring IL-8 production. Proteasome activities were also evaluated. We showed that PAR-1 and -2 activation increased release of IL-8 compared with vehicle and independently of IL-1β. In contrast, PAR-4 agonist peptide had no effect. Caspase-like and chymotrypsin-like proteasomal activities were increased by PAR-2 activation only in the presence of IL-1β. Interestingly, in polarized Caco-2 cells, the release of IL-8 was predominantly upregulated in the side where PAR-2 agonist peptide was added, apical or basalolateral. In contrast, proteasome activities were only affected when PAR-2 agonist peptide was added in the apical side. Proteasome inhibitors, bortezomib and MG132, enhanced IL-8 production in both sides, apical and basolateral. In conclusion, PAR-2 activation alone did not affect proteasome but needed inflammatory stimulus IL-1β to synergistically increase chymotrypsin-like activity in intestinal epithelial cells. However, proteasome inhibition led to exacerbate inflammatory response induced by PAR-2 activation. PMID:27455449

  1. Proteasome Modulates Positive and Negative Translational Regulators in Long-Term Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chenghai; Bach, Svitlana V.; Haynes, Kathryn A.

    2014-01-01

    Proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway appears to have a complex role in synaptic plasticity, but its various functions remain to be elucidated. Using late phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP) in the hippocampus of the mouse as a model for long-term synaptic plasticity, we previously showed that inhibition of the proteasome enhances induction but blocks maintenance of L-LTP. In this study, we investigated the possible mechanisms by which proteasome inhibition has opposite effects on L-LTP induction and maintenance. Our results show that inhibiting phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase or blocking the interaction between eukaryotic initiation factors 4E (eIF4E) and 4G (eIF4G) reduces the enhancement of L-LTP induction brought about by proteasome inhibition suggesting interplay between proteolysis and the signaling pathway mediated by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Also, proteasome inhibition leads to accumulation of translational activators in the mTOR pathway such as eIF4E and eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A) early during L-LTP causing increased induction. Furthermore, inhibition of the proteasome causes a buildup of translational repressors, such as polyadenylate-binding protein interacting protein 2 (Paip2) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 2 (4E-BP2), during late stages of L-LTP contributing to the blockade of L-LTP maintenance. Thus, the proteasome plays a critical role in regulating protein synthesis during L-LTP by tightly controlling translation. Our results provide novel mechanistic insights into the interplay between protein degradation and protein synthesis in long-term synaptic plasticity. PMID:24573276

  2. Dual targeting of the proteasome regulates survival and homing in Waldenström macroglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Roccaro, Aldo M.; Leleu, Xavier; Sacco, Antonio; Jia, Xiaoying; Melhem, Molly; Moreau, Anne-Sophie; Ngo, Hai T.; Runnels, Judith; Azab, Abdelkareem; Azab, Feda; Burwick, Nicholas; Farag, Mena; Treon, Steven P.; Palladino, Michael A.; Hideshima, Teru; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2008-01-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is an incurable low-grade B-cell lymphoma characterized by high protein turnover. We dissected the biologic role of the proteasome in WM using 2 proteasome inhibitors, NPI-0052 and bortezomib. We found that NPI-0052 inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in WM cells, and that the combination of NPI-0052 and bortezomib induced synergistic cytotoxicity in WM cells, leading to inhibition of nuclear translocation of p65NF-κB and synergistic induction of caspases-3, -8, and -9 and PARP cleavage. These 2 agents inhibited the canonical and noncanonical NF-κB pathways and acted synergistically through their differential effect on Akt activity and on chymotrypsin-like, caspaselike, and trypsinlike activities of the proteasome. We demonstrated that NPI-0052–induced cytotoxicity was completely abrogated in an Akt knockdown cell line, indicating that its major activity is mediated through the Akt pathway. Moreover, we demonstrated that NPI-0052 and bortezomib inhibited migration and adhesion in vitro and homing of WM cells in vivo, and overcame resistance induced by mesenchymal cells or by the addition of interleukin-6 in a coculture in vitro system. Theses studies enhance our understanding of the biologic role of the proteasome pathway in WM, and provide the preclinical basis for clinical trials of combinations of proteasome inhibitors in WM. PMID:18316628

  3. Pleiotropic defects caused by loss of the proteasome-interacting factors Rad23 and Rpn10 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Lambertson, D; Chen, L; Madura, K

    1999-01-01

    Rad23 is a member of a novel class of proteins that contain unprocessed ubiquitin-like (UbL) domains. We showed recently that a small fraction of Rad23 can form an interaction with the 26S proteasome. Similarly, a small fraction of Rpn10 is a component of the proteasome. Rpn10 can bind multiubiquitin chains in vitro, but genetic studies have not clarified its role in vivo. We report here that the loss of both Rad23 and Rpn10 results in pleiotropic defects that are not observed in either single mutant. rad23Delta rpn10Delta displays slow growth, cold sensitivity, and a pronounced G2/M phase delay, implicating overlapping roles for Rad23 and Rpn10. Although rad23Delta rpn10Delta displays similar sensitivity to DNA damage as a rad23Delta single mutant, deletion of RAD23 in rpn10Delta significantly increased sensitivity to canavanine, a phenotype associated with an rpn10Delta single mutant. A mutant Rad23 that is unable to bind the proteasome ((DeltaUbL)rad23) does not suppress the canavanine or cold-sensitive defects of rad23Delta rpn10Delta, demonstrating that Rad23/proteasome interaction is related to these effects. Finally, the accumulation of multiubiquitinated proteins and the stabilization of a specific proteolytic substrate in rad23Delta rpn10Delta suggest that proteasome function is altered. PMID:10471701

  4. Proteasome inhibitor MG-132 lowers gastric adenocarcinoma TMK1 cell proliferation via bone morphogenetic protein signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu; Yu Le; Cho, C.H.

    2008-06-27

    Proteasome inhibitor is a novel class of cancer therapeutics, of which the mechanism of action is not fully understood. It is reported that proteasome inhibitor enhances bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling in osteoblasts to stimulate bone formation. BMP signaling is also an important tumor-suppressing pathway in gastric carcinogenesis. We therefore sought to determine the anti-mitogenic effect of proteasome inhibition in relation to BMP signaling in gastric cancer cells. Results showed that proteasome inhibitor MG-132 significantly suppressed the proliferation and the colony-forming ability of gastric cancer TMK1 cells. In this connection, MG-132 activated BMP signaling, manifested as an increase in Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation and up-regulation of p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} mRNA and protein expression. Knockdown of BMP receptor II by RNA interference abolished Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation, p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} induction, and the inhibition of cell proliferation induced by MG-132. Further analysis revealed that MG-132 up-regulated the expression of BMP1 and BMP4 and suppressed the expression of Smad6. Knockdown of Smad6 also mimicked the effect of MG-132 on BMP signaling. Collectively, these findings suggest that inhibition of proteasome suppresses gastric cancer cell proliferation via activation of BMP signaling. This discovery may open up a novel therapeutic avenue to proteasome inhibitors for the management of gastric cancer.

  5. Induction of autophagy by proteasome inhibitor is associated with proliferative arrest in colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, William Ka Kei Wu Yachun; Yu Le; Li Zhijie; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu; Cho, C.H.

    2008-09-19

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and lysosome-dependent macroautophagy (autophagy) are two major intracellular pathways for protein degradation. Blockade of UPS by proteasome inhibitors has been shown to activate autophagy. Recent evidence also suggests that proteasome inhibitors may inhibit cancer growth. In this study, the effect of a proteasome inhibitor MG-132 on the proliferation and autophagy of cultured colon cancer cells (HT-29) was elucidated. Results showed that MG-132 inhibited HT-29 cell proliferation and induced G{sub 2}/M cell cycle arrest which was associated with the formation of LC3{sup +} autophagic vacuoles and the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles. MG-132 also increased the protein expression of LC3-I and -II in a time-dependent manner. In this connection, 3-methyladenine, a Class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor, significantly abolished the formation of LC3{sup +} autophagic vacuoles and the expression of LC3-II but not LC3-I induced by MG-132. Taken together, this study demonstrates that inhibition of proteasome in colon cancer cells lowers cell proliferation and activates autophagy. This discovery may shed a new light on the novel function of proteasome in the regulation of autophagy and proliferation in colon cancer cells.

  6. USP15 stabilizes the transcription factor Nrf1 in the nucleus, promoting the proteasome gene expression.

    PubMed

    Fukagai, Kousuke; Waku, Tsuyoshi; Chowdhury, A M Masudul Azad; Kubo, Kaori; Matsumoto, Mariko; Kato, Hiroki; Natsume, Tohru; Tsuruta, Fuminori; Chiba, Tomoki; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Akira

    2016-09-01

    The transcriptional factor Nrf1 (NF-E2-related factor 1) sustains protein homeostasis (proteostasis) by regulating the expression of proteasome genes. Under physiological conditions, the transcriptional activity of Nrf1 is repressed by its sequestration into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and furthermore by two independent ubiquitin-proteasome pathways, comprising Hrd1 and β-TrCP in the cytoplasm and nucleus, respectively. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying Nrf1 activation remain unclear. Here, we report that USP15 (Ubiquitin-Specific Protease 15) activates Nrf1 in the nucleus by stabilizing it through deubiquitination. We first identified USP15 as an Nrf1-associated factor through proteome analysis. USP15 physically interacts with Nrf1, and it markedly stabilizes Nrf1 by removing its ubiquitin moieties. USP15 activates the Nrf1-mediated expression of a proteasome gene luciferase reporter and endogenous proteasome activity. The siRNA-mediated knockdown of USP15 diminishes the Nrf1-induced proteasome gene expression in response to proteasome inhibition. These results uncover a new regulatory mechanism that USP15 activates Nrf1 against the β-TrCP inhibition to maintain proteostasis. PMID:27416755

  7. Unconventional secretion of misfolded proteins promotes adaptation to proteasome dysfunction in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Gu; Takahama, Shokichi; Zhang, Guofeng; Tomarev, Stanislav I; Ye, Yihong

    2016-07-01

    To safeguard proteomic integrity, cells rely on the proteasome to degrade aberrant polypeptides, but it is unclear how cells remove defective proteins that have escaped degradation owing to proteasome insufficiency or dysfunction. Here we report a pathway termed misfolding-associated protein secretion, which uses the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated deubiquitylase USP19 to preferentially export aberrant cytosolic proteins. Intriguingly, the catalytic domain of USP19 possesses an unprecedented chaperone activity, allowing recruitment of misfolded proteins to the ER surface for deubiquitylation. Deubiquitylated cargos are encapsulated into ER-associated late endosomes and secreted to the cell exterior. USP19-deficient cells cannot efficiently secrete unwanted proteins, and grow more slowly than wild-type cells following exposure to a proteasome inhibitor. Together, our findings delineate a protein quality control (PQC) pathway that, unlike degradation-based PQC mechanisms, promotes protein homeostasis by exporting misfolded proteins through an unconventional protein secretion process. PMID:27295555

  8. New proteasome inhibitors in myeloma.

    PubMed

    Lawasut, Panisinee; Chauhan, Dharminder; Laubach, Jacob; Hayes, Catriona; Fabre, Claire; Maglio, Michelle; Mitsiades, Constantine; Hideshima, Teru; Anderson, Kenneth C; Richardson, Paul G

    2012-12-01

    Proteasome inhibition has a validated role in cancer therapy since the successful introduction of bortezomib for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) and mantle cell lymphoma, leading to the development of second-generation proteasome inhibitors (PI) for MM patients in whom currently approved therapies have failed. Five PIs have reached clinical evaluation, with the goals of improving efficacy and limiting toxicity, including peripheral neuropathy (PN). Carfilzomib, an epoxyketone with specific chymothrypsin-like activity, acts as an irreversible inhibitor and was recently FDA approved for the response benefit seen in relapsed and refractory MM patients previously treated with bortezomib, thalidomide and lenalidomide. ONX-0912 is now under evaluation as an oral form with similar activity. The boronate peptides MLN9708 and CEP-18770 are orally bioactive bortezomib analogs with prolonged activity and greater tissue penetration. NPI-0052 (marizomib) is a unique, beta-lactone non-selective PI that has been shown to potently overcome bortezomib resistance in vitro. All of these second-generation PIs demonstrate encouraging anti-MM activity and appear to reduce the incidence of PN, with clinical trials ongoing. PMID:23065395

  9. Hyperglycemia Impairs Proteasome Function by Methylglyoxal

    PubMed Central

    Queisser, Markus A.; Yao, Dachun; Geisler, Sven; Hammes, Hans-Peter; Lochnit, Günter; Schleicher, Erwin D.; Brownlee, Michael; Preissner, Klaus T.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The ubiquitin-proteasome system is the main degradation machinery for intracellularly altered proteins. Hyperglycemia has been shown to increase intracellular levels of the reactive dicarbonyl methylglyoxal (MGO) in cells damaged by diabetes, resulting in modification of proteins and alterations of their function. In this study, the influence of MGO-derived advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation on the activity of the proteasome was investigated in vitro and in vivo. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS MGO-derived AGE modification of proteasome subunits was analyzed by mass spectrometry, immunoprecipitation, and Western blots. Proteasome activity was analyzed using proteasome-specific fluorogenic substrates. Experimental models included bovine retinal endothelial cells, diabetic Ins2Akita mice, glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) knockdown mice, and streptozotocin (STZ)-injected diabetic mice. RESULTS In vitro incubation with MGO caused adduct formation on several 20S proteasomal subunit proteins. In cultured endothelial cells, the expression level of the catalytic 20S proteasome subunit was not altered but proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity was significantly reduced. In contrast, levels of regulatory 19S proteasomal proteins were decreased. In diabetic Ins2Akita, STZ diabetic, and nondiabetic and diabetic G101 knockdown mice, chymotrypsin-like activity was also reduced and MGO modification of the 20S-β2 subunit was increased. CONCLUSIONS Hyperglycemia-induced formation of MGO covalently modifies the 20S proteasome, decreasing its activity in the diabetic kidney and reducing the polyubiquitin receptor 19S-S5a. The results indicate a new link between hyperglycemia and impairment of cell functions. PMID:20009088

  10. Is insulin signaling molecules misguided in diabetes for ubiquitin-proteasome mediated degradation?

    PubMed

    Balasubramanyam, Muthuswamy; Sampathkumar, Rangasamy; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2005-07-01

    Recent mining of the human and mouse genomes, use of yeast genetics, and detailed analyses of several biochemical pathways, have resulted in the identification of many new roles for ubiquitin-proteasome mediated degradation of proteins. In the context of last year's award of Noble Prize (Chemistry) work, the ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifications are increasingly recognized as key regulatory events in health and disease. Although the ATP-dependent ubiquitin-proteasome system has evolved as premier cellular proteolytic machinery, dysregulation of this system by several different mechanisms leads to inappropriate degradation of specific proteins and pathological consequences. While aberrations in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway have been implicated in certain malignancies and neurodegenerative disorders, recent studies indicate a role for this system in the pathogenesis of diabetes and its complications. Inappropriate degradation of insulin signaling molecules such as insulin receptor substrates (IRS-1 and IRS-2) has been demonstrated in experimental diabetes, mediated in part through the up-regulation of suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS). It appears that altered ubiquitin-proteasome system might be one of the molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance in many pathological situations. Drugs that modulate the SOCS action and/or proteasomal degradation of proteins could become novel agents for the treatment of insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes. PMID:16335791

  11. Rpn1 provides adjacent receptor sites for substrate binding and deubiquitination by the proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yuan; Chen, Xiang; Elsasser, Suzanne; Stocks, Bradley B.; Tian, Geng; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Shi, Yanhong; Zhang, Naixia; de Poot, Stefanie A. H.; Tuebing, Fabian; Sun, Shuangwu; Vannoy, Jacob; Tarasov, Sergey G.; Engen, John R.; Finley, Daniel; Walters, Kylie J.

    2016-01-01

    Structured Abstract INTRODUCTION The ubiquitin-proteasome system comprises hundreds of distinct pathways of degradation, which converge at the step of ubiquitin recognition by the proteasome. Five proteasomal ubiquitin receptors have been identified, two that are intrinsic to the proteasome (Rpn10 and Rpn13) and three reversibly associated proteasomal ubiquitin receptors (Rad23, Dsk2, and Ddi1). RATIONALE We found that the five known proteasomal ubiquitin receptors of yeast are collectively nonessential for ubiquitin recognition by the proteasome. We therefore screened for additional ubiquitin receptors in the proteasome and identified subunit Rpn1 as a candidate. We used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to characterize the structure of the binding site within Rpn1, which we term the T1 site. Mutational analysis of this site showed its functional importance within the context of intact proteasomes. T1 binds both ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like (UBL) proteins, in particular the substrate-delivering shuttle factor Rad23. A second site within the Rpn1 toroid, T2, recognizes the UBL domain of deubiquitinating enzyme Ubp6, as determined by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry analysis and validated by amino acid substitution and functional assays. The Rpn1 toroid thus serves a critical scaffolding role within the proteasome, helping to assemble multiple proteasome cofactors as well as substrates. RESULTS Our results indicate that proteasome subunit Rpn1 can recognize both ubiquitin and UBL domains of substrate shuttling factors that themselves bind ubiquitin and function as reversibly-associated proteasomal ubiquitin receptors. Recognition is mediated by the T1 site within the Rpn1 toroid, which supports proteasome function in vivo. We found that the capacity of T1 to recognize both ubiquitin and UBL proteins was shared with Rpn10 and Rpn13. The surprising multiplicity of ubiquitin-recognition domains within the proteasome may promote enhanced

  12. The therapeutic potential of microbial proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Momose, Isao; Kawada, Manabu

    2016-08-01

    The proteasome influences cellular homeostasis through the degradation of regulatory proteins, many of which are also involved in disease pathogenesis. In particular, numerous regulatory proteins associated with tumor growth, such as cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, tumor suppressors, and NF-κB inhibitors are degraded by the proteasome. Proteasome inhibitors can stabilize these regulatory proteins, resulting in the suppression of tumor development and the regulation of immune responses. Thus, proteasome inhibitors are promising candidate antitumor agents and immune-regulatory agents. Bortezomib is the first-in-class proteasome inhibitor approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma. Despite its high efficiency, however, a large proportion of patients do not attain sufficient clinical response due to toxicity and drug resistance. Therefore, the development of new proteasome inhibitors with improved pharmacological properties is needed. Natural products produced by microorganisms are a promising source of such compounds. This review provides an overview of proteasome inhibitors produced by microorganisms, with special focus on inhibitors isolated from actinomycetes. PMID:26589840

  13. Characterizing the Dynamics of Proteasome Complexes by Proteomics Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Kaake, Robyn M.; Kao, Athit; Yu, Clinton

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The proteasome is the degradation machine of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, which is critical in controlling many essential biological processes. Aberrant regulation of proteasome-dependent protein degradation can lead to various human diseases, and general proteasome inhibitors have shown efficacy for cancer treatments. Though clinically effective, current proteasome inhibitors have detrimental side effects and, thus, better therapeutic strategies targeting proteasomes are needed. Therefore, a comprehensive characterization of proteasome complexes will provide the molecular details that are essential for developing new and improved drugs. Recent Advances: New mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics approaches have been developed to study protein interaction networks and structural topologies of proteasome complexes. The results have helped define the dynamic proteomes of proteasome complexes, thus providing new insights into the mechanisms underlying proteasome function and regulation. Critical Issues: The proteasome exists as heterogeneous populations in tissues/cells, and its proteome is highly dynamic and complex. In addition, proteasome complexes are regulated by various mechanisms under different physiological conditions. Consequently, complete proteomic profiling of proteasome complexes remains a major challenge for the field. Future Directions: We expect that proteomic methodologies enabling full characterization of proteasome complexes will continue to evolve. Further advances in MS instrumentation and protein separation techniques will be needed to facilitate the detailed proteomic analysis of low-abundance components and subpopulations of proteasome complexes. The results will help us understand proteasome biology as well as provide new therapeutic targets for disease diagnostics and treatment. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2444–2456. PMID:24423446

  14. THE PROTEASOME IS A TARGET OF OXIDATIVE DAMAGE IN HUMAN RETINA PIGMENT EPITHELIAL CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: Dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) is associated with several age-related degenerative diseases. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of oxidative stress on the UPP in retina pigment epithelial cells. Methods: To mimic physiological oxidative stress...

  15. Proteasome-dependent regulation of signal transduction in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As in many other types of cells, retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells have an active ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP). However, the function of the UPP in RPE remains to be elucidated. The objective of this study is to determine the role of the UPP in controlling the levels and activities of tra...

  16. Substituted quinolines as noncovalent proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Tanner J; Lansdell, Theresa A; Dissanayake, Amila A; Azevedo, Lauren M; Claes, Jacob; Odom, Aaron L; Tepe, Jetze J

    2016-06-01

    Screening of a library of diverse heterocyclic scaffolds identified substituted quinolines as inhibitors of the human proteasome. The heterocyclic library was prepared via a novel titanium-catalyzed multicomponent coupling reaction, which rendered a diverse set of isoxazoles, pyrimidines, pyrroles, pyrazoles and quinolines. SAR of the parent lead compound indicated that hydrophobic residues on the benzo-moiety significantly improved potency. Lead compound 25 inhibits the chymotryptic-like proteolytic activity of the proteasome (IC50 5.4μM), representing a new class of nonpeptidic, noncovalent proteasome inhibitors. PMID:27112450

  17. An Archaeal Homolog of Proteasome Assembly Factor Functions as a Proteasome Activator

    PubMed Central

    Kumoi, Kentaro; Satoh, Tadashi; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Hiromoto, Takeshi; Mizushima, Tsunehiro; Kamiya, Yukiko; Noda, Masanori; Uchiyama, Susumu; Yagi, Hirokazu; Kato, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Assembly of the eukaryotic 20S proteasome is an ordered process involving several proteins operating as proteasome assembly factors including PAC1-PAC2 but archaeal 20S proteasome subunits can spontaneously assemble into an active cylindrical architecture. Recent bioinformatic analysis identified archaeal PAC1-PAC2 homologs PbaA and PbaB. However, it remains unclear whether such assembly factor-like proteins play an indispensable role in orchestration of proteasome subunits in archaea. We revealed that PbaB forms a homotetramer and exerts a dual function as an ATP-independent proteasome activator and a molecular chaperone through its tentacle-like C-terminal segments. Our findings provide insights into molecular evolution relationships between proteasome activators and assembly factors. PMID:23555947

  18. Overexpression of Dsk2/dUbqln results in severe developmental defects and lethality in Drosophila melanogaster that can be rescued by overexpression of the p54/Rpn10/S5a proteasomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Lipinszki, Zoltán; Pál, Margit; Nagy, Olga; Deák, Péter; Hunyadi-Gulyas, Eva; Udvardy, Andor

    2011-12-01

    Polyubiquitin receptors execute the targeting of polyubiquitylated proteins to the 26S proteasome. In vitro studies indicate that disturbance of the physiological balance among different receptor proteins impairs the proteasomal degradation of polyubiquitylated proteins. To study the physiological consequences of shifting the in vivo equilibrium between the p54/Rpn10 proteasomal and the Dsk2/dUbqln extraproteasomal polyubiquitin receptors, transgenic Drosophila lines were constructed in which the overexpression or RNA interference-mediated silencing of these receptors can be induced. Flies overexpressing Flag-p54 were viable and fertile, without any detectable morphological abnormalities, although detectable accumulation of polyubiquitylated proteins demonstrated a certain level of proteolytic disturbance. Flag-p54 was assembled into the 26S proteasome and could fully complement the lethal phenotype of a p54 null mutant Drosophila line. The overexpression of Dsk2 caused severe morphological abnormalities in the late pupal stages, leading to pharate adult lethality, accompanied by a huge accumulation of highly polyubiquitylated proteins. The lethal phenotype of Dsk2 overexpression could be rescued in a double transgenic line coexpressing Flag-Dsk2 and Flag-p54. Although the double transgenic line was viable and fertile, it did not restore the proteolytic defects; the accumulation of the highly polyubiquitylated proteins was even more severe in the double transgenic line. Significant differences were found in the Dsk2-26S proteasome interaction in Drosophila melanogaster as compared with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In yeast, Dsk2 can interact only with ΔRpn10 proteasomes and not with the wild-type one. In Drosophila, Dsk2 does not interact with Δp54 proteasomes, but the interaction can be fully restored by complementing the Δp54 deletion with Flag-p54. PMID:21973017

  19. Proteasome dysfunction inhibits surfactant protein gene expression in lung epithelial cells: mechanism of inhibition of SP-B gene expression.

    PubMed

    Das, Aparajita; Boggaram, Vijayakumar

    2007-01-01

    Surfactant proteins maintain lung function through their actions to reduce alveolar surface tension and control of innate immune responses in the lung. The ubiquitin proteasome pathway is responsible for the degradation of majority of intracellular proteins in eukaryotic cells, and proteasome dysfunction has been linked to the development of neurodegenerative, cardiac, and other diseases. Proteasome function is impaired in interstitial lung diseases associated with surfactant protein C (SP-C) mutation mapping to the BRICHOS domain located in the proSP-C protein. In this study we determined the effects of proteasome inhibition on surfactant protein expression in H441 and MLE-12 lung epithelial cells to understand the relationship between proteasome dysfunction and surfactant protein gene expression. Proteasome inhibitors lactacystin and MG132 reduced the levels of SP-A, SP-B, and SP-C mRNAs in a concentration-dependent manner in H441 and MLE-12 cells. In H441 cells, lactacystin and MG132 inhibition of SP-B mRNA was associated with similar decreases in SP-B protein, and the inhibition was due to inhibition of gene transcription. Proteasome inhibitors decreased thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1)/Nkx2.1 DNA binding activity, and the reduced TTF-1 DNA binding activity was due to reduced expression levels of TTF-1 protein. These data indicated that the ubiquitin proteasome pathway is essential for the maintenance of surfactant protein gene expression and that disruption of this pathway inhibits surfactant protein gene expression via reduced expression of TTF-1 protein. PMID:16905641

  20. Survival of mycobacteria depends on proteasome-mediated amino acid recycling under nutrient limitation

    PubMed Central

    Elharar, Yifat; Roth, Ziv; Hermelin, Inna; Moon, Alexandra; Peretz, Gabriella; Shenkerman, Yael; Vishkautzan, Marina; Khalaila, Isam; Gur, Eyal

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular protein degradation is an essential process in all life domains. While in all eukaryotes regulated protein degradation involves ubiquitin tagging and the 26S-proteasome, bacterial prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup) tagging and proteasomes are conserved only in species belonging to the phyla Actinobacteria and Nitrospira. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the Pup-proteasome system (PPS) is important for virulence, yet its physiological role in non-pathogenic species has remained an enigma. We now report, using Mycobacterium smegmatis as a model organism, that the PPS is essential for survival under starvation. Upon nitrogen limitation, PPS activity is induced, leading to accelerated tagging and degradation of many cytoplasmic proteins. We suggest a model in which the PPS functions to recycle amino acids under nitrogen starvation, thereby enabling the cell to maintain basal metabolic activities. We also find that the PPS auto-regulates its own activity via pupylation and degradation of its components in a manner that promotes the oscillatory expression of PPS components. As such, the destructive activity of the PPS is carefully balanced to maintain cellular functions during starvation. PMID:24986881

  1. Fine-Tuning of FACT by the Ubiquitin Proteasome System in Regulation of Transcriptional Elongation.

    PubMed

    Sen, Rwik; Ferdoush, Jannatul; Kaja, Amala; Bhaumik, Sukesh R

    2016-06-01

    FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription), an evolutionarily conserved histone chaperone involved in transcription and other DNA transactions, is upregulated in cancers, and its downregulation is associated with cellular death. However, it is not clearly understood how FACT is fine-tuned for normal cellular functions. Here, we show that the FACT subunit Spt16 is ubiquitylated by San1 (an E3 ubiquitin ligase) and degraded by the 26S proteasome. Enhanced abundance of Spt16 in the absence of San1 impairs transcriptional elongation. Likewise, decreased abundance of Spt16 also reduces transcription. Thus, an optimal level of Spt16 is required for efficient transcriptional elongation, which is maintained by San1 via ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation. Consistently, San1 associates with the coding sequences of active genes to regulate Spt16's abundance. Further, we found that enhanced abundance of Spt16 in the absence of San1 impairs chromatin reassembly at the coding sequence, similarly to the results seen following inactivation of Spt16. Efficient chromatin reassembly enhances the fidelity of transcriptional elongation. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time a fine-tuning of FACT by a ubiquitin proteasome system in promoting chromatin reassembly in the wake of elongating RNA polymerase II and transcriptional elongation, thus revealing novel regulatory mechanisms of gene expression. PMID:27044865

  2. Serendipity in discovery of proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Derek; Iqbal, Mohamed; Husten, Jean; Ator, Mark A; Chatterjee, Sankar

    2012-05-15

    Among its various catalytic activities, the 'chymotrypsin-like' activity of the proteasome, a large multicatalytic proteinase complex has emerged as the focus of drug discovery efforts in cancer therapy. Herein, a series of first generation (2S, 3R)-2-amino-3-hydroxybutyric acid derived proteasome inhibitors that were discovered serendipitously en route to original goal of generating a series of sterically constrained oxazoline derivatives has been reported. PMID:22503349

  3. Genomic organization and mapping of the mouse P26s4 ATPase gene: A member of the remarkably conserved AAA gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyle, J.; Fisher, E.M.C.

    1996-01-01

    The eukaryotic genome contains a large family of ATPases in which each member has at least one highly conserved domain of approximately 200 amino acids with an ATP binding motif (the {open_quotes}AAA{close_quotes} domain). AAA ATPases play diverse roles in the cell and are of considerable interest to researchers investigating a number of different phenomena, including control of the cell cycle. We have characterized the mouse P26s4 AAA ATPase gene that encodes a subunit of the 26S protease, a multimeric complex that is responsible for the ubiquitin- and ATP-dependent degradation of specific proteins. The normal functioning of eukaryotic cells depends on this pathway to remove regulatory proteins such as cyclins or signal transduction molecules from the intracellular environment, with the appropriate timing to allow normal cell division and development. We have isolated mouse P26s4 cDNAs and mapped the P26s4 gene to chromosome 12. We have analyzed the intron-exon structure of the P26s4 genomic locus and have determined that the gene contains at least 10 introns, the first of which separates the start methionine from the rest of the coding sequence. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Catabolism of endogenous and overexpressed APH1a and PEN2: evidence for artifactual involvement of the proteasome in the degradation of overexpressed proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dunys, Julie; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Wilk, Sherwin; St. George-Hyslop, Peter; Alves Da Costa, Cristine; Checler, Frédéric

    2005-01-01

    PS (presenilin)-dependent γ-secretase occurs as a high-molecular-mass complex composed of either PS1 or PS2 associated with Nct (nicastrin), PEN2 (presenilin enhancer 2 homologue) and APH1 (anterior pharynx defective 1 homologue). Numerous reports have documented the very complicated physical and functional cross-talk between these proteins that ultimately governs the biological activity of the γ-secretase, but very few studies examined the fate of the components of the complex. We show that, in both HEK-293 cells and the TSM1 neuronal cell line, the immunoreactivities of overexpressed myc-tagged-APH1a and -PEN2 were enhanced by the proteasome inhibitors ZIE and lactacystin, whereas a broad range of protease inhibitors had no effect. By contrast, proteasome inhibitors were totally unable to affect the cellular expression of endogenous APH1aL and PEN2 in HEK-293 cells, TSM1 and primary cultured cortical neurons. To explain this apparent discrepancy, we examined the degradation of myc-tagged-APH1a and -PEN2, in vitro, by cell extracts containing endogenous proteasome and by purified 20S proteasome. Strikingly, myc-tagged-APH1a and -PEN2 resist proteolysis by endogenous proteasome and purified 20S proteasome. We also show that endogenous PEN2 expression was drastically higher in wild-type than in PS- and Nct-deficient fibroblasts and was enhanced by proteasome inhibitors only in the two deficient cell systems. However, here again, purified 20S proteasome appeared unable to cleave endogenous PEN2 present in PS-deficient fibroblasts. The levels of endogenous APH1aL-like immunoreactivity were not modified by proteasome inhibitors and were unaffected by PS deficiency. Altogether, our results indicate that endogenous PEN2 and APH1aL do not undergo proteasomal degradation under physiological conditions in HEK-293 cells, TSM1 cells and fibroblasts and that the clearance of PEN2 in PS- and Nct-deficient fibroblasts is not mediated by 20S proteasome. Whether the 26S

  5. Inhibitors Selective for Mycobacterial Versus Human Proteasomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, G.; Li, D; Sorio de Carvalho, L; Deng, H; Tao, H; Vogt, G; Wu, K; Schneider, J; Chidawanyika, T; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Many anti-infectives inhibit the synthesis of bacterial proteins, but none selectively inhibits their degradation. Most anti-infectives kill replicating pathogens, but few preferentially kill pathogens that have been forced into a non-replicating state by conditions in the host. To explore these alternative approaches we sought selective inhibitors of the proteasome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Given that the proteasome structure is extensively conserved, it is not surprising that inhibitors of all chemical classes tested have blocked both eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteasomes, and no inhibitor has proved substantially more potent on proteasomes of pathogens than of their hosts. Here we show that certain oxathiazol-2-one compounds kill non-replicating M.?tuberculosis and act as selective suicide-substrate inhibitors of the M.?tuberculosis proteasome by cyclocarbonylating its active site threonine. Major conformational changes protect the inhibitor-enzyme intermediate from hydrolysis, allowing formation of an oxazolidin-2-one and preventing regeneration of active protease. Residues outside the active site whose hydrogen bonds stabilize the critical loop before and after it moves are extensively non-conserved. This may account for the ability of oxathiazol-2-one compounds to inhibit the mycobacterial proteasome potently and irreversibly while largely sparing the human homologue.

  6. Proteomic Analysis of MG132-Treated Germinating Pollen Reveals Expression Signatures Associated with Proteasome Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Candida; Bracale, Marcella; Crinelli, Rita; Marconi, Valerio; Campomenosi, Paola; Marsoni, Milena; Scoccianti, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Chemical inhibition of the proteasome has been previously found to effectively impair pollen germination and tube growth in vitro. However, the mediators of these effects at the molecular level are unknown. By performing 2DE proteomic analysis, 24 differentially expressed protein spots, representing 14 unique candidate proteins, were identified in the pollen of kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) germinated in the presence of the MG132 proteasome inhibitor. qPCR analysis revealed that 11 of these proteins are not up-regulated at the mRNA level, but are most likely stabilized by proteasome inhibition. These differentially expressed proteins are predicted to function in various pathways including energy and lipid metabolism, cell wall synthesis, protein synthesis/degradation and stress responses. In line with this evidence, the MG132-induced changes in the proteome were accompanied by an increase in ATP and ROS content and by an alteration in fatty acid composition. PMID:25265451

  7. Insights into the relationship between the proteasome and autophagy in human and yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Athané, Axel; Buisson, Anthony; Challier, Marion; Beaumatin, Florian; Manon, Stéphen; Bhatia-Kiššová, Ingrid; Camougrand, Nadine

    2015-07-01

    In eukaryotes, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy are two major intracellular protein degradation pathways. Several lines of evidence support the emerging concept of a coordinated and complementary relationship between these two processes, and a particularly interesting finding is that the inhibition of the proteasome induces autophagy. Yet, there is limited knowledge of the regulation of the UPS by autophagy. In this study, we show that the disruption of ATG5 and ATG32 genes in yeast cells under both nutrient-deficient conditions as well as stress that causes mitochondrial dysfunction leads to an activation of proteasome. The same scenario occurs after pharmacological inhibition of basal autophagy in cultured human cells. Our findings underline the view that the two processes are interconnected and tend to compensate, to some extent, for each other's functions. PMID:25882491

  8. Proteasome-mediated turnover of the transcriptional activator FIT is required for plant iron-deficiency responses.

    PubMed

    Sivitz, Alicia; Grinvalds, Claudia; Barberon, Marie; Curie, Catherine; Vert, Grégory

    2011-06-01

    Plants display a number of responses to low iron availability in order to increase iron uptake from the soil. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the ferric-chelate reductase FRO2 and the ferrous iron transporter IRT1 control iron entry from the soil into the root epidermis. To maintain iron homeostasis, the expression of FRO2 and IRT1 is tightly controlled by iron deficiency at the transcriptional level. The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor FIT represents the most upstream actor known in the iron-deficiency signaling pathway, and directly regulates the expression of the root iron uptake machinery genes FRO2 and IRT1. However, how FIT is controlled by iron and acts to activate transcription of its targets remains obscure. Here we show that FIT mRNA and endogenous FIT protein accumulate in Arabidopsis roots upon iron deficiency. However, using plants constitutively expressing FIT, we observed that FIT protein accumulation is reduced in iron-limited conditions. This post-transcriptional regulation of FIT is perfectly synchronized with the accumulation of endogenous FIT and IRT1 proteins, and therefore is part of the early responses to low iron. We demonstrated that such regulation affects FIT protein stability under iron deficiency as a result of 26S proteasome-dependent degradation. In addition, we showed that FIT post-translational regulation by iron is required for FRO2 and IRT1 gene expression. Taken together our results indicate that FIT transcriptional and post-translational regulations are integrated in plant roots to ensure that the positive regulator FIT accumulates as a short-lived protein following iron shortage, and to allow proper iron-deficiency responses. PMID:21426424

  9. Repression of protein translation and mTOR signaling by proteasome inhibitor in colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Volta, Viviana; Cho, Chi Hin; Wu, Ya Chun; Li, Hai Tao; Yu, Le; Li, Zhi Jie; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu

    2009-09-04

    Protein homeostasis relies on a balance between protein synthesis and protein degradation. The ubiquitin-proteasome system is a major catabolic pathway for protein degradation. In this respect, proteasome inhibition has been used therapeutically for the treatment of cancer. Whether inhibition of protein degradation by proteasome inhibitor can repress protein translation via a negative feedback mechanism, however, is unknown. In this study, proteasome inhibitor MG-132 lowered the proliferation of colon cancer cells HT-29 and SW1116. In this connection, MG-132 reduced the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) at Ser2448 and Ser2481 and the phosphorylation of its downstream targets 4E-BP1 and p70/p85 S6 kinases. Further analysis revealed that MG-132 inhibited protein translation as evidenced by the reductions of {sup 35}S-methionine incorporation and polysomes/80S ratio. Knockdown of raptor, a structural component of mTOR complex 1, mimicked the anti-proliferative effect of MG-132. To conclude, we demonstrate that the inhibition of protein degradation by proteasome inhibitor represses mTOR signaling and protein translation in colon cancer cells.

  10. Inhibition of Cellular Proteasome Activities Mediates HBX-Independent Hepatitis B Virus Replication In Vivo▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhensheng; Sun, Eun; Ou, Jing-hsiung James; Liang, T. Jake

    2010-01-01

    The X protein (HBX) of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is essential for HBV productive infection in vivo. Our previous study (Z. Hu, Z. Zhang, E. Doo, O. Coux, A. L. Goldberg, and T. J. Liang, J. Virol. 73:7231-7240, 1999) shows that interaction of HBX with the proteasome complex may underlie the pleiotropic functions of HBX. Previously, we demonstrated that HBX affects hepadnaviral replication through a proteasome-dependent pathway in cell culture models. In the present study, we studied the effect of the proteasome inhibitor MLN-273 in two HBV mouse models. We demonstrated that administration of MLN-273 to transgenic mice containing the replication-competent HBV genome with the defective HBX gene substantially enhanced HBV replication, while the compound had a minor effect on wild-type HBV transgenic mice. Similar results were obtained by using C57BL/6 mice infected with recombinant adenoviruses expressing the replicating HBV genome. Our data suggest that HBV replication is subjected to regulation by cellular proteasome and HBX functions through the inhibition of proteasome activities to enhance HBV replication in vivo. PMID:20592087

  11. Proteasome inhibition enhances the killing effect of BikDD gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ye; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Chang, Shih-Shin; Chang, Wei-Chao; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Hsu, Jennifer L; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-01-01

    BikDD, a phosphorylation-mimic mutant of pro-apoptotic protein Bik, elicits strong apoptosis in cancer cells when introduced via an expression platform termed VP16-GAL4-WPRE integrated systemic amplifier (VISA) under the control of a cancer-specific promoter both in vitro and in vivo. C-VISA-BikDD expression plasmid encapsulated in liposomes is currently in the process to initiate a phase I clinical trial for pancreatic cancer. In this study, we report a potential combination approach of BikDD with proteasome inhibitors on the basis of our findings that exogenously expressed BikDD protein undergoes proteasome-mediated degradation via both ubiquitin-dependent and -independent pathways. Inhibition of proteasome increases the protein stability of BikDD, enhancing the apoptotic effect of BikDD. Hence, high proteasome activity may be a mechanism by which intrinsic and acquired resistance occurs in BikDD gene therapy, and a combination therapy with current clinically approved proteasome inhibitor may overcome resistance. PMID:25901200

  12. Role of ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH)

    PubMed Central

    Cacciapuoti, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a key compensatory mechanism acting in response to pressure or volume overload, involving some alterations in signaling transduction pathways and transcription factors-regulation. These changes result in enhanced proteins’ synthesis leading to Left Ventricular Hypertrophy (LVH). It is known that the main function of Ubiquitin-Proteasome System (UPS) is to prevent accumulation of damaged, misfolded and mutant proteins by proteolysis. But emerging evidences suggest that UPS also attends to the cells’ growth, favoring proteins’ synthesis, subsequently evolving in LVH. The role of the proteasome in to favor cellular hypertrophy consists in upregulation of the catalytic proteasome subunit, with prevalence of proteins-synthesis on proteins degradation. It is also evident that UPS inhibition may prevent cells’ growth opposing to the hypertrophy. In fact in several experimental models, UPS inhibition demonstrated to be able to prevent or reverse cardiac hypertrophy induced by abdominal aortic banding (AAB). That can happen with several proteasome inhibitors acting by multifactorial mechanisms. These evidences induce to hypothesize that, in the future, in patients with the increased volume overload by systemic hypertension, some proteasome-inhibitors could be used to antagonize or prevent LVH without reducing peripheral high blood pressure levels too. PMID:24551479

  13. Structure of a Blm10 complex reveals common mechanisms for proteasome binding and gate opening

    PubMed Central

    Sadre-Bazzaz, Kianoush; Whitby, Frank G.; Robinson, Howard; Formosa, Tim; Hill, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The proteasome is an abundant protease that is critically important for numerous cellular pathways. Proteasomes are activated in vitro by three known classes of proteins/complexes, including Blm10/PA200. Here we report a 3.4Å resolution crystal structure of a proteasome-Blm10 complex, which reveals that Blm10 surrounds the proteasome entry pore in the 1.2 MDa complex to form a largely closed dome that is expected to restrict access of potential substrates. This architecture, and the observation that Blm10 induces a disordered proteasome gate structure, challenges the assumption that Blm10 functions as an activator of proteolysis in vivo. The Blm10 C-terminus binds in the same manner as seen for 11S activators and inferred for 19S/PAN activators, and indicates a unified model for gate opening. We also demonstrate that Blm10 acts to maintain mitochondrial function. Consistent with the structural data, the C-terminal residues of Blm10 are needed for this activity. PMID:20227375

  14. Molecular characterization of NbPAF encoding the alpha6 subunit of the 20S proteasome in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moonil; Yang, Kyoung-Sil; Kim, Yu-Kyung; Paek, Kyung-Hee; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2003-02-28

    The 26S proteasome involved in degradation of proteins covalently modified with polyubiquitin consists of the 20S proteasome and 19S regulatory complex. The NbPAF gene encoding the alpha6 subunit of the 20S proteasome was identified from Nicotiana benthamiana. NbPAF exhibits high sequence homology with the corresponding genes from Arabidopsis, human and yeast. The deduced amino acid sequence of NbPAF reveals that this protein contains the proteasome alpha-type subunits signature and nuclear localization signal at the N-terminus. The genomic Southern blot analysis suggests that the N. benthamiana genome contains one copy of NbPAF. The NbPAF mRNA was detected abundantly in flowers and weakly in roots and stems, but it was almost undetectable in mature leaves. In response to stresses, accumulation of the NbPAF mRNA was stimulated by methyl jasmonate, NaCl and salicylic acid, but not by abscisic acid and cold treatment in leaves. The NbPAF-GFP fusion protein was localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus. PMID:12661772

  15. GA signalling and cross-talk with other signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lor, Vai S; Olszewski, Neil E

    2015-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are phytohormones that regulate growth and development. DELLA proteins repress GA responses. GA binding to its receptor triggers a series of events that culminate in the destruction of DELLA proteins by the 26S proteasome, which removes the repression of GA signalling. DELLA proteins are transcription co-activators that induce the expression of genes which encode products that inhibit GA responses. In addition to repressing GA responses, DELLA proteins influence the activity of other signalling pathways and serve as a central hub from which other pathways influence GA signalling. In this role, DELLA proteins bind to and inhibit proteins, including transcription factors that act in the signalling pathways of other hormones and light. The binding of these proteins to DELLA proteins also inhibits DELLA activity. GA signalling is subject to homoeostatic regulation through GA-induced repression of GA biosynthesis gene expression, and increased production of the GA receptor and enzymes that catabolize bioactive GAs. This review also discusses the nature of mutant DELLA alleles that are used to produce high-yielding 'Green Revolution' cereal varieties, and highlights important gaps in our knowledge of GA signalling. PMID:26374886

  16. BMP-2-enhanced chondrogenesis involves p38 MAPK-mediated down-regulation of Wnt-7a pathway.

    PubMed

    Jin, Eun-Jung; Lee, Sun-Young; Choi, Young-Ae; Jung, Jae-Chang; Bang, Ok-Sun; Kang, Shin-Sung

    2006-12-31

    The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family has been implicated in control of cartilage development. Here, we demonstrate that BMP-2 promotes chondrogenesis by activating p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which in turn downregulates Wnt-7a/b-catenin signaling responsible for proteasomal degradation of Sox9. Exposure of mesenchymal cells to BMP-2 resulted in upregulation of Sox9 protein and a concomitant decrease in the level of b-catenin protein and Wnt-7a signaling. In agreement with this, the interaction of Sox9 with b-catenin was inhibited in the presence of BMP-2. Inhibition of the p38 MAPK pathway using a dominant negative mutant led to sustained Wnt-7a signaling and decreased Sox9 expression, with consequent inhibition of precartilage condensation and chondrogenic differentiation. Moreover, overexpression of b-catenin caused degradation of Sox9 via the ubiquitin/26S proteasome pathway. Our results collectively indicate that the increase in Sox9 protein resulting from downregulation of b-catenin/Wnt-7a signaling is mediated by p38 MAPK during BMP-2 induced chondrogenesis in chick wing bud mesenchymal cells. PMID:17202865

  17. Decreased Proteasomal Activity Causes Photoreceptor Degeneration in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Ryo; Noda, Kousuke; Tomaru, Utano; Kamoshita, Mamoru; Ozawa, Yoko; Notomi, Shoji; Hisatomi, Toshio; Noda, Mika; Kanda, Atsuhiro; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Kasahara, Masanori; Ishida, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To study the retinal degeneration caused by decreased proteasomal activity in β5t transgenic (β5t-Tg) mice, an animal model of senescence acceleration. Methods. β5t-Tg mice and age-matched littermate control (WT) mice were used. Proteasomal activities and protein level of poly-ubiquitinated protein in retinal extracts were quantified. Fundus images of β5t-Tg mice were taken and their features were assessed. For histologic evaluation, the thicknesses of inner nuclear layer (INL), outer nuclear layer (ONL), and photoreceptor outer segment (OS) were measured. For functional analysis, ERG was recorded under scotopic and photopic illumination conditions. Immunofluorescence (IF) staining and TUNEL were performed to investigate the mechanism of photoreceptor degeneration. Results. Chymotrypsin-like activity was partially suppressed in retinal tissues of β5t-Tg mice. Retinal degenerative changes with arterial attenuation were present in β5t-Tg, but not in WT mice. Inner nuclear layer thickness showed no significant change between β5t-Tg and WT mice at 1, 3, 6, and 9 months of age. By contrast, thicknesses of ONL and OS in β5t-Tg mice were significantly decreased at 3, 6, and 9 months compared with those in WT mice. Electroretinograms showed decrease of scotopic a-wave amplitude in β5t-Tg mice. The number of TUNEL-positive cells in ONL were significantly increased in β5t-Tg mice and colocalized with apoptosis-inducing factor, but not with cleaved caspase-3 and -9, indicating that the photoreceptor cell death was induced via a caspase-independent pathway. Conclusions. The current data showed that impaired proteasomal function causes photoreceptor degeneration. PMID:24994871

  18. Proteasome inhibitor associated thrombotic microangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Yui, Jennifer C; Van Keer, Jan; Weiss, Brendan M; Waxman, Adam J; Palmer, Matthew B; D'Agati, Vivette D; Kastritis, Efstathios; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Vij, Ravi; Bansal, Dhruv; Dingli, David; Nasr, Samih H; Leung, Nelson

    2016-09-01

    A variety of medications have been implicated in the causation of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Recently, a few case reports have emerged of TMA attributed to the proteasome inhibitors (PI) bortezomib and carfilzomib in patients with multiple myeloma. The aim of this case series was to better characterize the role of PI in the etiology of drug-induced TMA. We describe eleven patients from six medical centers from around the world who developed TMA while being treated with PI. The median time between medication initiation and diagnosis of TMA was 21 days (range 5 days to 17 months). Median laboratory values at diagnosis included hemoglobin-7.5 g dL(-1) , platelet count-20 × 10(9) /L, LDH-698 U L(-1) , creatinine-3.12 mg dL(-1) . No patient had any other cause of TMA, including ADAMTS13 inhibition, other malignancy or use of any other medication previously associated with TMA. Nine patients had resolution of TMA without evidence of hemolysis after withdrawal of PI. Two patients had stabilization of laboratory values but persistent evidence of hemolysis despite medication withdrawal. One patient had recurrence of TMA with rechallenge of PI. There is a strong level of evidence that PI can cause DITMA. In evaluating patients with suspected TMA, PI use should be recognized as a potential etiology, and these medications should be discontinued promptly if thought to be the cause of TMA. Am. J. Hematol. 91:E348-E352, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27286661

  19. Neuropeptide-inducible upregulation of proteasome activity precedes nuclear factor kappa B activation in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Upregulation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) activity and neuroendocrine differentiation are two mechanisms known to be involved in prostate cancer (PC) progression to castration resistance. We have observed that major components of these pathways, including NFκB, proteasome, neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and endothelin 1 (ET-1), exhibit an inverse and mirror image pattern in androgen-dependent (AD) and -independent (AI) states in vitro. Methods We have now investigated for evidence of a direct mechanistic connection between these pathways with the use of immunocytochemistry (ICC), western blot analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and proteasome activity assessment. Results Neuropeptide (NP) stimulation induced nuclear translocation of NFκB in a dose-dependent manner in AI cells, also evident as reduced total inhibitor κB (IκB) levels and increased DNA binding in EMSA. These effects were preceded by increased 20 S proteasome activity at lower doses and at earlier times and were at least partially reversed under conditions of NP deprivation induced by specific NP receptor inhibitors, as well as NFκB, IκB kinase (IKK) and proteasome inhibitors. AD cells showed no appreciable nuclear translocation upon NP stimulation, with less intense DNA binding signal on EMSA. Conclusions Our results support evidence for a direct mechanistic connection between the NPs and NFκB/proteasome signaling pathways, with a distinct NP-induced profile in the more aggressive AI cancer state. PMID:22715899

  20. Measuring activity in the ubiquitin-proteasome system: From large scale discoveries to single cells analysis

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Adam T.; Woss, Gregery S.; Park, Jessica H.; Waters, Marcey L.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is the primary pathway responsible for the recognition and degradation of misfolded, damaged, or tightly regulated proteins in addition to performing essential roles in DNA repair, cell cycle regulation, cell migration, and the immune response. While traditional biochemical techniques have proven useful in the identification of key proteins involved in this pathway, the implementation of novel reporters responsible for measuring enzymatic activity of the UPS have provided valuable insight into the effectiveness of therapeutics and role of the UPS in various human diseases such as multiple myeloma and Huntington’s disease. These reporters, usually consisting of a recognition sequences fused to an analytical handle, are designed to specifically evaluate enzymatic activity of certain members of the UPS including the proteasome, E3 ubiquitin ligases, and deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs). This review highlights the more commonly used reporters employed in a variety of scenarios ranging from high-throughput screening of novel inhibitors to single cell microscopy techniques measuring E3 ligase or proteasome activity. Finally, recent work is presented highlighting the development of novel degron-based substrate designed to overcome the limitations of current reporting techniques in measuring E3 ligase and proteasome activity in patient samples. PMID:23686610

  1. Therapeutic Potential of Proteasome Inhibition in Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Gazzerro, Elisabetta; Assereto, Stefania; Bonetto, Andrea; Sotgia, Federica; Scarfì, Sonia; Pistorio, Angela; Bonuccelli, Gloria; Cilli, Michele; Bruno, Claudio; Zara, Federico; Lisanti, Michael P.; Minetti, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and its milder allelic variant, Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), result from mutations of the dystrophin gene and lead to progressive muscle deterioration. Enhanced activation of proteasomal degradation underlies critical steps in the pathogenesis of the DMD/BMD dystrophic process. Previously, we demonstrated that treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 rescues the cell membrane localization of dystrophin and the dystrophin glycoprotein complex in mdx mice, a natural genetic mouse model of DMD. The current work aims to thoroughly define the therapeutic potential in dystrophinopathies of Velcade, a drug that selectively blocks the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Velcade is particularly intriguing since it has been approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma. Therefore, its side effects in humans have been explored. Velcade effects were analyzed through two independent methodological approaches. First, we administered the drug systemically in mdx mice over a 2-week period. In this system, Velcade restores the membrane expression of dystrophin and dystrophin glycoprotein complex members and improves the dystrophic phenotype. In a second approach, we treated with the compound explants from muscle biopsies of DMD or BMD patients. We show that the inhibition of the proteasome pathway up-regulates dystrophin, α-sarcoglycan, and β-dystroglycan protein levels in explants from BMD patients, whereas it increases the proteins of the dystrophin glycoprotein complex in DMD cases. PMID:20304949

  2. Proteasome Addiction Defined in Ewing Sarcoma Is Effectively Targeted by a Novel Class of 19S Proteasome Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Neerav; Somwar, Romel; Smith, Roger S; Ambati, Sri; Munoz, Stanley; Merchant, Melinda; D'Arcy, Padraig; Wang, Xin; Kobos, Rachel; Antczak, Christophe; Bhinder, Bhavneet; Shum, David; Radu, Constantin; Yang, Guangbin; Taylor, Barry S; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Weigelt, Britta; Khodos, Inna; de Stanchina, Elisa; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Linder, Stig; Djaballah, Hakim; Ladanyi, Marc

    2016-08-01

    Ewing sarcoma is a primitive round cell sarcoma with a peak incidence in adolescence that is driven by a chimeric oncogene created from the fusion of the EWSR1 gene with a member of the ETS family of genes. Patients with metastatic and recurrent disease have dismal outcomes and need better therapeutic options. We screened a library of 309,989 chemical compounds for growth inhibition of Ewing sarcoma cells to provide the basis for the development of novel therapies and to discover vulnerable pathways that might broaden our understanding of the pathobiology of this aggressive sarcoma. This screening campaign identified a class of benzyl-4-piperidone compounds that selectively inhibit the growth of Ewing sarcoma cell lines by inducing apoptosis. These agents disrupt 19S proteasome function through inhibition of the deubiquitinating enzymes USP14 and UCHL5. Functional genomic data from a genome-wide shRNA screen in Ewing sarcoma cells also identified the proteasome as a node of vulnerability in Ewing sarcoma cells, providing orthologous confirmation of the chemical screen findings. Furthermore, shRNA-mediated silencing of USP14 or UCHL5 in Ewing sarcoma cells produced significant growth inhibition. Finally, treatment of a xenograft mouse model of Ewing sarcoma with VLX1570, a benzyl-4-piperidone compound derivative currently in clinical trials for relapsed multiple myeloma, significantly inhibited in vivo tumor growth. Overall, our results offer a preclinical proof of concept for the use of 19S proteasome inhibitors as a novel therapeutic strategy for Ewing sarcoma. Cancer Res; 76(15); 4525-34. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27256563

  3. Denervation-Induced Activation of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System Reduces Skeletal Muscle Quantity Not Quality.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Cory W; Liu, Haiming M; Thompson, LaDora V

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the ubiquitin-proteasome system is activated in response to skeletal muscle wasting and functions to degrade contractile proteins. The loss of these proteins inevitably reduces skeletal muscle size (i.e., quantity). However, it is currently unknown whether activation of this pathway also affects function by impairing the muscle's intrinsic ability to produce force (i.e., quality). Therefore, the purpose of this study was twofold, (1) document how the ubiquitin-proteasome system responds to denervation and (2) identify the physiological consequences of these changes. To induce soleus muscle atrophy, C57BL6 mice underwent tibial nerve transection of the left hindlimb for 7 or 14 days (n = 6-8 per group). At these time points, content of several proteins within the ubiquitin-proteasome system were determined via Western blot, while ex vivo whole muscle contractility was specifically analyzed at day 14. Denervation temporarily increased several key proteins within the ubiquitin-proteasome system, including the E3 ligase MuRF1 and the proteasome subunits 19S, α7 and β5. These changes were accompanied by reductions in absolute peak force and power, which were offset when expressed relative to physiological cross-sectional area. Contrary to peak force, absolute and relative forces at submaximal stimulation frequencies were significantly greater following 14 days of denervation. Taken together, these data represent two keys findings. First, activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system is associated with reductions in skeletal muscle quantity rather than quality. Second, shortly after denervation, it appears the muscle remodels to compensate for the loss of neural activity via changes in Ca2+ handling. PMID:27513942

  4. Denervation-Induced Activation of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System Reduces Skeletal Muscle Quantity Not Quality

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiming M.; Thompson, LaDora V.

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the ubiquitin-proteasome system is activated in response to skeletal muscle wasting and functions to degrade contractile proteins. The loss of these proteins inevitably reduces skeletal muscle size (i.e., quantity). However, it is currently unknown whether activation of this pathway also affects function by impairing the muscle’s intrinsic ability to produce force (i.e., quality). Therefore, the purpose of this study was twofold, (1) document how the ubiquitin-proteasome system responds to denervation and (2) identify the physiological consequences of these changes. To induce soleus muscle atrophy, C57BL6 mice underwent tibial nerve transection of the left hindlimb for 7 or 14 days (n = 6–8 per group). At these time points, content of several proteins within the ubiquitin-proteasome system were determined via Western blot, while ex vivo whole muscle contractility was specifically analyzed at day 14. Denervation temporarily increased several key proteins within the ubiquitin-proteasome system, including the E3 ligase MuRF1 and the proteasome subunits 19S, α7 and β5. These changes were accompanied by reductions in absolute peak force and power, which were offset when expressed relative to physiological cross-sectional area. Contrary to peak force, absolute and relative forces at submaximal stimulation frequencies were significantly greater following 14 days of denervation. Taken together, these data represent two keys findings. First, activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system is associated with reductions in skeletal muscle quantity rather than quality. Second, shortly after denervation, it appears the muscle remodels to compensate for the loss of neural activity via changes in Ca2+ handling. PMID:27513942

  5. The ubiquitin proteasome system in Caenorhabditis elegans and its regulation☆

    PubMed Central

    Papaevgeniou, Nikoletta; Chondrogianni, Niki

    2014-01-01

    Protein degradation constitutes a major cellular function that is responsible for maintenance of the normal cellular physiology either through the degradation of normal proteins or through the elimination of damaged proteins. The Ubiquitin–Proteasome System (UPS)1 is one of the main proteolytic systems that orchestrate protein degradation. Given that up- and down- regulation of the UPS system has been shown to occur in various normal (such as ageing) and pathological (such as neurodegenerative diseases) processes, the exogenous modulation of the UPS function and activity holds promise of (a) developing new therapeutic interventions against various diseases and (b) establishing strategies to maintain cellular homeostasis. Since the proteasome genes are evolutionarily conserved, their role can be dissected in simple model organisms, such as the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. In this review, we survey findings on the redox regulation of the UPS in C. elegans showing that the nematode is an instrumental tool in the identification of major players in the UPS pathway. Moreover, we specifically discuss UPS-related genes that have been modulated in the nematode and in human cells and have resulted in similar effects thus further exhibiting the value of this model in the study of the UPS. PMID:24563851

  6. Characterization of a new series of non-covalent proteasome inhibitors with exquisite potency and selectivity for the 20S β5-subunit

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Christopher; Gigstad, Kenneth M.; Hales, Paul; Garcia, Khristofer; Jones, Matthew; Bruzzese, Frank J.; Barrett, Cynthia; Liu, Jane X.; Soucy, Teresa A.; Sappal, Darshan S.; Bump, Nancy; Olhava, Edward J.; Fleming, Paul; Dick, Lawrence R.; Tsu, Christopher; Sintchak, Michael D.; Blank, Jonathan L.

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian 26S proteasome is a 2500 kDa multi-catalytic complex involved in intracellular protein degradation. We describe the synthesis and properties of a novel series of non-covalent di-peptide inhibitors of the proteasome used on a capped tri-peptide that was first identified by high-throughput screening of a library of approx. 350000 compounds for inhibitors of the ubiquitin–proteasome system in cells. We show that these compounds are entirely selective for the β5 (chymotrypsin-like) site over the β1 (caspase-like) and β2 (trypsin-like) sites of the 20S core particle of the proteasome, and over a panel of less closely related proteases. Compound optimization, guided by X-ray crystallography of the liganded 20S core particle, confirmed their non-covalent binding mode and provided a structural basis for their enhanced in vitro and cellular potencies. We demonstrate that such compounds show low nanomolar IC50 values for the human 20S β5 site in vitro, and that pharmacological inhibition of this site in cells is sufficient to potently inhibit the degradation of a tetra-ubiquitin–luciferase reporter, activation of NFκB (nuclear factor κB) in response to TNF-α (tumour necrosis factor-α) and the proliferation of cancer cells. Finally, we identified capped di-peptides that show differential selectivity for the β5 site of the constitutively expressed proteasome and immunoproteasome in vitro and in B-cell lymphomas. Collectively, these studies describe the synthesis, activity and binding mode of a new series of non-covalent proteasome inhibitors with unprecedented potency and selectivity for the β5 site, and which can discriminate between the constitutive proteasome and immunoproteasome in vitro and in cells. PMID:20632995

  7. Characterization of a new series of non-covalent proteasome inhibitors with exquisite potency and selectivity for the 20S [beta]5-subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, Christopher; Gigstad, Kenneth M.; Hales, Paul; Garcia, Khristofer; Jones, Matthew; Bruzzese, Frank J.; Barrett, Cynthia; Liu, Jane X.; Soucy, Teresa A.; Sappal, Darshan S.; Bump, Nancy; Olhava, Edward J.; Fleming, Paul; Dick, Lawrence R.; Tsu, Christopher; Sintchak, Michael D.; Blank, Jonathan L.

    2012-04-30

    The mammalian 26S proteasome is a 2500 kDa multi-catalytic complex involved in intracellular protein degradation. We describe the synthesis and properties of a novel series of non-covalent di-peptide inhibitors of the proteasome used on a capped tri-peptide that was first identified by high-throughput screening of a library of approx. 350000 compounds for inhibitors of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in cells. We show that these compounds are entirely selective for the {beta}5 (chymotrypsin-like) site over the {beta}1 (caspase-like) and {beta}2 (trypsin-like) sites of the 20S core particle of the proteasome, and over a panel of less closely related proteases. Compound optimization, guided by X-ray crystallography of the liganded 20S core particle, confirmed their non-covalent binding mode and provided a structural basis for their enhanced in vitro and cellular potencies. We demonstrate that such compounds show low nanomolar IC{sub 50} values for the human 20S {beta}5 site in vitro, and that pharmacological inhibition of this site in cells is sufficient to potently inhibit the degradation of a tetra-ubiquitin-luciferase reporter, activation of NF{Kappa}B (nuclear factor {Kappa}B) in response to TNF-{alpha} (tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}) and the proliferation of cancer cells. Finally, we identified capped di-peptides that show differential selectivity for the {beta}5 site of the constitutively expressed proteasome and immunoproteasome in vitro and in B-cell lymphomas. Collectively, these studies describe the synthesis, activity and binding mode of a new series of non-covalent proteasome inhibitors with unprecedented potency and selectivity for the {beta}5 site, and which can discriminate between the constitutive proteasome and immunoproteasome in vitro and in cells.

  8. Oxathiazolones Selectively Inhibit the Human Immunoproteasome over the Constitutive Proteasome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Selective inhibitors for the human immunoproteasome LMP7 (β5i) subunit over the constitutive proteasome hold promise for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases and hematologic malignancies. Here we report that oxathiazolones inhibit the immunoproteasome β5i with up to 4700-fold selectivity over the constitutive proteasome, are cell permeable, and inhibit proteasomes inside cells. PMID:24900849

  9. Proteolytic Pathways Induced by Herbicides That Inhibit Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zulet, Amaia; Gil-Monreal, Miriam; Villamor, Joji Grace; Zabalza, Ana; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.; Royuela, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    Background The herbicides glyphosate (Gly) and imazamox (Imx) inhibit the biosynthesis of aromatic and branched-chain amino acids, respectively. Although these herbicides inhibit different pathways, they have been reported to show several common physiological effects in their modes of action, such as increasing free amino acid contents and decreasing soluble protein contents. To investigate proteolytic activities upon treatment with Gly and Imx, pea plants grown in hydroponic culture were treated with Imx or Gly, and the proteolytic profile of the roots was evaluated through fluorogenic kinetic assays and activity-based protein profiling. Results Several common changes in proteolytic activity were detected following Gly and Imx treatment. Both herbicides induced the ubiquitin-26 S proteasome system and papain-like cysteine proteases. In contrast, the activities of vacuolar processing enzymes, cysteine proteases and metacaspase 9 were reduced following treatment with both herbicides. Moreover, the activities of several putative serine protease were similarly increased or decreased following treatment with both herbicides. In contrast, an increase in YVADase activity was observed under Imx treatment versus a decrease under Gly treatment. Conclusion These results suggest that several proteolytic pathways are responsible for protein degradation upon herbicide treatment, although the specific role of each proteolytic activity remains to be determined. PMID:24040092

  10. Inducible expression of mutant alpha-synuclein decreases proteasome activity and increases sensitivity to mitochondria-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y; Engelender, S; Igarashi, S; Rao, R K; Wanner, T; Tanzi, R E; Sawa, A; L Dawson, V; Dawson, T M; Ross, C A

    2001-04-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Although mutations in alpha-synuclein have been identified in autosomal dominant PD, the mechanism by which dopaminergic neural cell death occurs remains unknown. Proteins encoded by two other genes in which mutations cause familial PD, parkin and UCH-L1, are involved in regulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, suggesting that dysregulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is involved in the mechanism by which these mutations cause PD. We established inducible PC12 cell lines in which wild-type or mutant alpha-synuclein can be de-repressed by removing doxycycline. Differentiated PC12 cell lines expressing mutant alpha-synuclein showed decreased activity of proteasomes without direct toxicity. Cells expressing mutant alpha-synuclein showed increased sensitivity to apoptotic cell death when treated with sub-toxic concentrations of an exogenous proteasome inhibitor. Apoptosis was accompanied by mitochondrial depolarization and elevation of caspase-3 and -9, and was blocked by cyclosporin A. These data suggest that expression of mutant alpha-synuclein results in sensitivity to impairment of proteasome activity, leading to mitochondrial abnormalities and neuronal cell death. PMID:11309365

  11. Proteasome machinery is instrumental in a common gain-of-function program of the p53 missense mutants in cancer.

    PubMed

    Walerych, Dawid; Lisek, Kamil; Sommaggio, Roberta; Piazza, Silvano; Ciani, Yari; Dalla, Emiliano; Rajkowska, Katarzyna; Gaweda-Walerych, Katarzyna; Ingallina, Eleonora; Tonelli, Claudia; Morelli, Marco J; Amato, Angela; Eterno, Vincenzo; Zambelli, Alberto; Rosato, Antonio; Amati, Bruno; Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Del Sal, Giannino

    2016-08-01

    In cancer, the tumour suppressor gene TP53 undergoes frequent missense mutations that endow mutant p53 proteins with oncogenic properties. Until now, a universal mutant p53 gain-of-function program has not been defined. By means of multi-omics: proteome, DNA interactome (chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing) and transcriptome (RNA sequencing/microarray) analyses, we identified the proteasome machinery as a common target of p53 missense mutants. The mutant p53-proteasome axis globally affects protein homeostasis, inhibiting multiple tumour-suppressive pathways, including the anti-oncogenic KSRP-microRNA pathway. In cancer cells, p53 missense mutants cooperate with Nrf2 (NFE2L2) to activate proteasome gene transcription, resulting in resistance to the proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib. Combining the mutant p53-inactivating agent APR-246 (PRIMA-1MET) with the proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib is effective in overcoming chemoresistance in triple-negative breast cancer cells, creating a therapeutic opportunity for treatment of solid tumours and metastasis with mutant p53. PMID:27347849

  12. High-Throughput siRNA Screening Applied to the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Esben G; Nielsen, Sofie V; Pietras, Elin J; Johansen, Jens V; Steinhauer, Cornelia; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system is the major pathway for intracellular protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. Due to the large number of genes dedicated to the ubiquitin-proteasome system, mapping degradation pathways for short lived proteins is a daunting task, in particular in mammalian cells that are not genetically tractable as, for instance, a yeast model system. Here, we describe a method relying on high-throughput cellular imaging of cells transfected with a targeted siRNA library to screen for components involved in degradation of a protein of interest. This method is a rapid and cost-effective tool which is also highly applicable for other studies on gene function. PMID:27613054

  13. The proteasome activator 11 S REG (PA28) and class I antigen presentation.

    PubMed Central

    Rechsteiner, M; Realini, C; Ustrell, V

    2000-01-01

    There are two immune responses in vertebrates: humoral immunity is mediated by circulating antibodies, whereas cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) confer cellular immunity. CTL lyse infected cells upon recognition of cell-surface MHC Class I molecules complexed with foreign peptides. The displayed peptides are produced in the cytosol by degradation of host proteins or proteins from intracellular pathogens that might be present. Proteasomes are cylindrical multisubunit proteases that generate many of the peptides eventually transferred to the cell surface for immune surveillance. In mammalian proteasomes, six active sites face a central chamber. As this chamber is sealed off from the enzyme's surface, there must be mechanisms to promote entry of substrates. Two protein complexes have been found to bind the ends of the proteasome and activate it. One of the activators is the 19 S regulatory complex of the 26 S proteasome; the other activator is '11 S REG' [Dubiel, Pratt, Ferrell and Rechsteiner (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 22369-22377] or 'PA28' [Ma, Slaughter and DeMartino (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 10515-10523]. During the past 7 years, our understanding of the structure of REG molecules has increased significantly, but much less is known about their biological functions. There are three REG subunits, namely alpha, beta and gamma. Recombinant REGalpha forms a ring-shaped heptamer of known crystal structure. 11 S REG is a heteroheptamer of alpha and beta subunits. REGgamma is also presumably a heptameric ring, and it is found in the nuclei of the nematode work Caenorhabditis elegans and higher organisms, where it may couple proteasomes to other nuclear components. REGalpha and REGbeta, which are abundant in vertebrate immune tissues, are located mostly in the cytoplasm. Synthesis of REG alpha and beta subunits is induced by interferon-gamma, and this has led to the prevalent hypothesis that REG alpha/beta hetero-oligomers play an important role in Class I antigen

  14. Proteasome as a Molecular Target of Microcystin-LR

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhu; Zhang, Li; Shi, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    Proteasome degrades proteins in eukaryotic cells. As such, the proteasome is crucial in cell cycle and function. This study proved that microcystin-LR (MC-LR), which is a toxic by-product of algal bloom, can target cellular proteasome and selectively inhibit proteasome trypsin-like (TL) activity. MC-LR at 1 nM can inhibit up to 54% of the purified 20S proteasome TL activity and 43% of the proteasome TL activity in the liver of the cyprinid rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus). Protein degradation was retarded in GFP-CL1-transfected PC-3 cells because MC-LR inhibited the proteasome TL activity. Docking studies indicated that MC-LR blocked the active site of the proteasome β2 subunit; thus, the proteasome TL activity was inhibited. In conclusion, MC-LR can target proteasome, selectively inhibit proteasome TL activity, and retard protein degradation. This study may be used as a reference of future research on the toxic mechanism of MC-LR. PMID:26090622

  15. Diaphragm Muscle Fiber Weakness and Ubiquitin–Proteasome Activation in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hooijman, Pleuni E.; Beishuizen, Albertus; Witt, Christian C.; de Waard, Monique C.; Girbes, Armand R. J.; Spoelstra-de Man, Angelique M. E.; Niessen, Hans W. M.; Manders, Emmy; van Hees, Hieronymus W. H.; van den Brom, Charissa E.; Silderhuis, Vera; Lawlor, Michael W.; Labeit, Siegfried; Stienen, Ger J. M.; Hartemink, Koen J.; Paul, Marinus A.; Heunks, Leo M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The clinical significance of diaphragm weakness in critically ill patients is evident: it prolongs ventilator dependency, and increases morbidity and duration of hospital stay. To date, the nature of diaphragm weakness and its underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms are poorly understood. Objectives: We hypothesized that diaphragm muscle fibers of mechanically ventilated critically ill patients display atrophy and contractile weakness, and that the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway is activated in the diaphragm. Methods: We obtained diaphragm muscle biopsies from 22 critically ill patients who received mechanical ventilation before surgery and compared these with biopsies obtained from patients during thoracic surgery for resection of a suspected early lung malignancy (control subjects). In a proof-of-concept study in a muscle-specific ring finger protein-1 (MuRF-1) knockout mouse model, we evaluated the role of the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway in the development of contractile weakness during mechanical ventilation. Measurements and Main Results: Both slow- and fast-twitch diaphragm muscle fibers of critically ill patients had approximately 25% smaller cross-sectional area, and had contractile force reduced by half or more. Markers of the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway were significantly up-regulated in the diaphragm of critically ill patients. Finally, MuRF-1 knockout mice were protected against the development of diaphragm contractile weakness during mechanical ventilation. Conclusions: These findings show that diaphragm muscle fibers of critically ill patients display atrophy and severe contractile weakness, and in the diaphragm of critically ill patients the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway is activated. This study provides rationale for the development of treatment strategies that target the contractility of diaphragm fibers to facilitate weaning. PMID:25760684

  16. Production of Proteasome Inhibitor Syringolin A by the Endophyte Rhizobium sp. Strain AP16

    PubMed Central

    Bigler, Laurent; Dudler, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Syringolin A, the product of a mixed nonribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthase encoded by the syl gene cluster, is a virulence factor secreted by certain Pseudomonas syringae strains. Together with the glidobactins produced by a number of beta- and gammaproteobacterial human and animal pathogens, it belongs to the syrbactins, a structurally novel class of proteasome inhibitors. In plants, proteasome inhibition by syringolin A-producing P. syringae strains leads to the suppression of host defense pathways requiring proteasome activity, such as the ones mediated by salicylic acid and jasmonic acid. Here we report the discovery of a syl-like gene cluster with some unusual features in the alphaproteobacterial endophyte Rhizobium sp. strain AP16 that encodes a putative syringolin A-like synthetase whose components share 55% to 65% sequence identity (72% to 79% similarity) at the amino acid level. As revealed by average nucleotide identity (ANI) calculations, this strain likely belongs to the same species as biocontrol strain R. rhizogenes K84 (formely known as Agrobacterium radiobacter K84), which, however, carries a nonfunctional deletion remnant of the syl-like gene cluster. Here we present a functional analysis of the syl-like gene cluster of Rhizobium sp. strain AP16 and demonstrate that this endophyte synthesizes syringolin A and some related minor variants, suggesting that proteasome inhibition by syrbactin production can be important not only for pathogens but also for endophytic bacteria in the interaction with their hosts. PMID:24727275

  17. Redox modulation of cellular metabolism through targeted degradation of signaling proteins by the proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-02-01

    Under conditions of oxidative stress, the 20S proteasome plays a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis through the selective degradation of oxidized and damaged proteins. This adaptive stress response is distinct from ubiquitin-dependent pathways in that oxidized proteins are recognized and degraded in an ATP-independent mechanism, which can involve the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Like the regulatory complexes 19S and 11S REG, Hsp90 tightly associates with the 20S proteasome to mediate the recognition of aberrant proteins for degradation. In the case of the calcium signaling protein calmodulin, proteasomal degradation results from the oxidation of a single surface exposed methionine (i.e., Met145); oxidation of the other eight methionines has a minimal effect on the recognition and degradation of calmodulin by the proteasome. Since cellular concentrations of calmodulin are limiting, the targeted degradation of this critical signaling protein under conditions of oxidative stress will result in the downregulation of cellular metabolism, serving as a feedback regulation to diminish the generation of reactive oxygen species. The targeted degradation of critical signaling proteins, such as calmodulin, can function as sensors of oxidative stress to downregulate global rates of metabolism and enhance cellular survival.

  18. Proteasome involvement in agonist-induced down-regulation of mu and delta opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, K; Bandari, P; Chinen, N; Howells, R D

    2001-04-13

    This study investigated the mechanism of agonist-induced opioid receptor down-regulation. Incubation of HEK 293 cells expressing FLAG-tagged delta and mu receptors with agonists caused a time-dependent decrease in opioid receptor levels assayed by immunoblotting. Pulse-chase experiments using [(35)S]methionine metabolic labeling indicated that the turnover rate of delta receptors was accelerated 5-fold following agonist stimulation. Inactivation of functional G(i) and G(o) proteins by pertussis toxin-attenuated down-regulation of the mu opioid receptor, while down-regulation of the delta opioid receptor was unaffected. Pretreatment of cells with inhibitors of lysosomal proteases, calpain, and caspases had little effect on mu and delta opioid receptor down-regulation. In marked contrast, pretreatment with proteasome inhibitors attenuated agonist-induced mu and delta receptor down-regulation. In addition, incubation of cells with proteasome inhibitors in the absence of agonists increased steady-state mu and delta opioid receptor levels. Immunoprecipitation of mu and delta opioid receptors followed by immunoblotting with ubiquitin antibodies suggested that preincubation with proteasome inhibitors promoted accumulation of polyubiquitinated receptors. These data provide evidence that the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway plays a role in agonist-induced down-regulation and basal turnover of opioid receptors. PMID:11152677

  19. Dynamic recruitment of active proteasomes into polyglutamine initiated inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Schipper-Krom, Sabine; Juenemann, Katrin; Jansen, Anne H; Wiemhoefer, Anne; van den Nieuwendijk, Rianne; Smith, Donna L; Hink, Mark A; Bates, Gillian P; Overkleeft, Hermen; Ovaa, Huib; Reits, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease are hallmarked by neuronal intracellular inclusion body formation. Whether proteasomes are irreversibly recruited into inclusion bodies in these protein misfolding disorders is a controversial subject. In addition, it has been proposed that the proteasomes may become clogged by the aggregated protein fragments, leading to impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here, we show by fluorescence pulse-chase experiments in living cells that proteasomes are dynamically and reversibly recruited into inclusion bodies. As these recruited proteasomes remain catalytically active and accessible to substrates, our results challenge the concept of proteasome sequestration and impairment in Huntington's disease, and support the reported absence of proteasome impairment in mouse models of Huntington's disease. PMID:24291262

  20. Role of ubiquitin-proteasome in protein quality control and signaling: implication in the pathogenesis of eye diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ubiquitin–proteasome pathway (UPP) plays important roles in many cellular functions, such as protein quality control, cell cycle control, and signal transduction. The selective degradation of aberrant proteins by the UPP is essential for the timely removal of potential cytotoxic damaged or other...

  1. New Difluoro Knoevenagel Condensates of Curcumin, Their Schiff Bases and Copper Complexes as Proteasome Inhibitors and Apoptosis Inducers in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Padhye, Subhash; Yang, Huanjie; Jamadar, Abeda; Cui, Qiuzhi Cindy; Chavan, Deepak; Dominiak, Kristin; McKinney, Jaclyn; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Dou, Q. Ping; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Emerging evidence clearly suggests the potential chemopreventive and anti-tumor activity of a well known “natural agent” curcumin. However, studies have shown that curcumin is not readily bioavailable, and thus the tissue bioavailability of curcumin is also poor except for gastrointestinal track. Because of the potential biological activity of curcumin, many studies have attempted for making a better analog of cucumin that is equally effective or better with increased bioavailability, which was the purpose of our current study. Methods We have designed and synthesized new difluoro Knoevenagel condensates of curcumin and Schiff bases along with their copper (II) complexes and evaluated their biological activities with respect to the inhibitory effects on purified rabbit 26S proteasome, and growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis in colon and pancreatic cancer cell lines. Results All copper complexes possess distorted square planar geometries with 1:1 metal to ligand stoichiometry with reversible copper redox couple. The difluoro compound CDF exhibited inhibitory effects on purified rabbit 20S proteasome or cellular 26S proteasome, and caused both growth inhibition of cancer cell lines and induced apoptotic cell death in our preliminary assessment. Conclusion Our results suggest that our newly synthesized classes of curcumin analogs could be useful as chemopreventive and/or therapeutic agents against cancers. PMID:19421843

  2. Bacterial Proteasome Activator Bpa (Rv3780) Is a Novel Ring-Shaped Interactor of the Mycobacterial Proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Delley, Cyrille L.; Laederach, Juerg; Ziemski, Michal; Bolten, Marcel; Boehringer, Daniel; Weber-Ban, Eilika

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of the proteasome in bacteria is limited to the phylum of actinobacteria, where it is maintained in parallel to the usual bacterial compartmentalizing proteases. The role it plays in these organisms is still not fully understood, but in the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) the proteasome supports persistence in the host. In complex with the ring-shaped ATPase Mpa (called ARC in other actinobacteria), the proteasome can degrade proteins that have been post-translationally modified with the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein Pup. Unlike for the eukaryotic proteasome core particle, no other bacterial proteasome interactors have been identified to date. Here we describe and characterize a novel bacterial proteasome activator of Mycobacterium tuberculosis we termed Bpa (Rv3780), using a combination of biochemical and biophysical methods. Bpa features a canonical C-terminal proteasome interaction motif referred to as the HbYX motif, and its orthologs are only found in those actinobacteria encoding the proteasomal subunits. Bpa can inhibit degradation of Pup-tagged substrates in vitro by competing with Mpa for association with the proteasome. Using negative-stain electron microscopy, we show that Bpa forms a ring-shaped homooligomer that can bind coaxially to the face of the proteasome cylinder. Interestingly, Bpa can stimulate the proteasomal degradation of the model substrate β-casein, which suggests it could play a role in the removal of non-native or damaged proteins. PMID:25469515

  3. The effect of peptidic and non-peptidic proteasome inhibitors on the biological properties of Acanthamoeba castellanii belonging to the T4 genotype.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Saleem, Sahreena; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2016-09-01

    The treatment of Acanthamoeba infections remains problematic, suggesting that new targets and/or chemotherapeutic agents are needed. Bioassay-guided screening of drugs that are clinically-approved for non-communicable diseases against opportunistic eukaryotic pathogens is a viable strategy. With known targets and mode of action, such drugs can advance to clinical trials at a faster pace. Recently Bortezomib (proteasome inhibitor) has been approved by FDA in the treatment of multiple myeloma. As proteasomal pathways are well known regulators of a variety of eukaryotic cellular functions, the overall aim of the present study was to study the effects of peptidic and non-peptidic proteasome inhibitors on the biology and pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba castellanii of the T4 genotype, in vitro. Zymographic assays revealed that inhibition of proteasome had detrimental effects on the extracellular proteolytic activities of A. castellanii. Proteasome inhibition affected A. castellanii growth (using amoebistatic assays), but not viability of A. castellanii. Importantly, proteasome inhibitors affected encystation as determined by trophozoite transformation into the cyst form, as well as excystation, as determined by cyst transformation into the trophozoite form. The ability of proteasome inhibitor to block Acanthamoeba differentiation is significant, as it presents a major challenge in the successful treatment of Acanthamoeba infection. As these drugs are used clinically against non-communicable diseases, the findings reported here have the potential to be tested in a clinical setting against amoebic infections. PMID:27327524

  4. The regulation of glucose on milk fat synthesis is mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lily; Jiang, Li; Ding, Xiang-dong; Liu, Jian-feng; Zhang, Qin

    2015-09-11

    Glucose as one of the nutrition factors plays a vital role in the regulation of milk fat synthesis. Ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is a vital proteolytic pathway in all eukaryotic cells through timely marking, recognizing and degrading the poly-ubiquitinated protein substrates. Previous studies indicated that UPS plays a considerable role in controlling the triglyceride (TG) synthesis. Therefore, the aim of this study is to confirm the link between high-glucose and UPS and its regulation mechanism on milk fat synthesis in BMEC (bovine mammary epithelial cells). We incubated BMEC with normal (17.5 mm/L) and high-glucose (25 mm/L) with and without proteasome inhibitor epoxomicin and found that, compared with the control (normal glucose and without proteasome inhibitor), both high-glucose concentration and proteasome inhibitor epoxomicin could increase the accumulation of TG and poly-ubiquitinated proteins, and reduce significantly three proteasome activities (chymotrypsin-like, caspase-like, and trypsin-like). In addition, high-glucose concentration combined with proteasome inhibitor further enhanced the increase of the poly-ubiquitinated protein level and the decrease of proteasome activities. Our results suggest that the regulation of high-glucose on milk fat synthesis is mediated by UPS in BMEC, and high-glucose exposure could lead to a hypersensitization of BMEC to UPS inhibition which in turn results in increased milk fat synthesis. PMID:26231798

  5. Melatonin, bone regulation and the ubiquitin-proteasome connection: A review.

    PubMed

    Vriend, Jerry; Reiter, Russel J

    2016-01-15

    Recently, investigators have shown that ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated protein degradation is critical in regulating the balance between bone formation and bone resorption. The major signal transduction pathways regulating bone formation are the RANK/NF-κB pathway and the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. These signal transduction pathways regulate the activity of mature osteoblasts and osteoclasts. In addition, the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is one of the major signaling pathways in the differentiation of osteoblasts. The ubiquitin ligases that are reported to be of major significance in regulating these pathways are the ubiquitin SCF(B-TrCP) ligase (which regulates activation of NF-κB via degradation of IkBα in osteoclasts, and regulates bone transcription factors via degradation of β-catenin), the Keap-Cul3-Rbx1 ligase (which regulates degradation of IkB kinase, Nrf2, and the antiapoptotic factor Bcl-2), and Smurf1. Also of significance in regulating osteoclastogenesis is the deubiquitinase, CYLD (cylindramatosis protein), which facilitates the separation of NF-κB from IkBα. The degradation of CYLD is also under the regulation of SCF(B-TrCP). Proteasome inhibitors influence the activity of mature osteoblasts and osteoclasts, but also modulate the differentiation of precursor cells into osteoblasts. Preclinical studies show that melatonin also influences bone metabolism by stimulating bone growth and inhibiting osteoclast activity. These actions of melatonin could be interpreted as being mediated by the ubiquitin ligases SCF(B-TrCP) and Keap-Cul3-Rbx, or as an inhibitory effect on proteasomes. Clinical trials of the use of melatonin in the treatment of bone disease, including multiple myeloma, using both continuous and intermittent modes of administration, are warranted. PMID:26706287

  6. Visualization of prosomes (MCP-proteasomes), intermediate filament and actin networks by "instantaneous fixation" preserving the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Arcangeletti, C; Sütterlin, R; Aebi, U; De Conto, F; Missorini, S; Chezzi, C; Scherrer, K

    1997-06-01

    A new "instantaneous" fixation/extraction procedure, yielding good preservation of intermediate filaments (IFs) and actin filaments when applied at 37 degrees C, has been explored to reexamine the relationships of the prosomes to the cytoskeleton. Prosomes are protein complexes of variable subunit composition, including occasionally a small RNA, which were originally observed as trans-acting factors in untranslated mRNPs. Constituting also the proteolytic core of the 26S proteasomes, they are also called "multicatalytic proteinase (MCP) complexes" or "20S-Proteasomes." In Triton X-100-extracted epithelial, fibroblastic, and muscle cells, prosome particles were found associated primarily with the IFs (Olink-Coux et al., 1994). Application of "instantaneous fixation" has now led to the new observation that a major fraction of prosome particles, composed of specific sets of subunits, is distributed in variable proportions between the IFs and the microfilament/ stress fiber system in PtK1 epithelial cells and human fibroblasts. Electron microscopy using gold-labeled antibodies confirms this dual localization on classical whole mounts and on cells exposed to instantaneous fixation. In contrast to the resistance of the prosome-IF association, a variable fraction of the prosome particles is released from the actin cytoskeleton by Triton X-100 when applied prior to fixation. Moreover, in vitro copolymerization of prosomes with G-actin made it possible to observe "ladder-like" filamentous structures in the electron microscope, in which the prosome particles, like the "rungs of a ladder," laterally crosslink two or more actin filaments in a regular pattern. These results demonstrate that prosomes are bound in the cell not only to IFs but also to the actin cytoskeleton and, furthermore, not only within large M(r) complexes (possibly mRNPs and/or 26S proteasomes), but also directly, as individual prosome particles. PMID:9216087

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Degradation of Pca1p, a Polytopic Protein, via Interaction with the Proteasome at the Membrane.

    PubMed

    Smith, Nathan; Adle, David J; Zhao, Miaoyun; Qin, Xiaojuan; Kim, Heejeong; Lee, Jaekwon

    2016-07-15

    Endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) plays a critical role in the destruction of terminally misfolded proteins at the secretory pathway. The system also regulates expression levels of several proteins such as Pca1p, a cadmium exporter in yeast. To gain better insight into the mechanisms underlying ERAD of Pca1p and other polytopic proteins by the proteasome in the cytosol, our study determined the roles for the molecular factors of ERAD in dislodging Pca1p from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Inactivation of the 20S proteasome leads to accumulation of ubiquitinated Pca1p in the ER membrane, suggesting a role for the proteasome in extraction of Pca1p from the ER. Pca1p formed a complex with the proteasome at the membrane in a Doa10p E3 ligase-dependent manner. Cdc48p is required for recruiting the proteasome to Pca1p. Although the Ufd2p E4 ubiquitin chain extension enzyme is involved in efficient degradation of Pca1p, Ufd2p-deficient cells did not affect the formation of a complex between Pca1p and the proteasome. Two other polytopic membrane proteins undergoing ERAD, Ste6*p and Hmg2p, also displayed the same outcomes observed for Pca1p. However, poly-ubiquitinated Cpy1*p, a luminal ERAD substrate, was detected in the cytosol independent of proteolytic activities of the proteasome. These results indicate that extraction and degradation of polytopic membrane proteins at the ER is a coupled event. This mechanism would relieve the cost of exposed hydrophobic domains in the cytosol during ERAD. PMID:27226596

  8. Identification of substrates of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Michael J; Arora, Pooja; Festa, Richard A; Butler-Wu, Susan M; Gokhale, Rajesh S; Darwin, K Heran

    2006-01-01

    The putative proteasome-associated proteins Mpa (Mycobaterium proteasomal ATPase) and PafA (proteasome accessory factor A) of the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) are essential for virulence and resistance to nitric oxide. However, a direct link between the proteasome protease and Mpa or PafA has never been demonstrated. Furthermore, protein degradation by bacterial proteasomes in vitro has not been accomplished, possibly due to the failure to find natural degradation substrates or other necessary proteasome co-factors. In this work, we identify the first bacterial proteasome substrates, malonyl Co-A acyl carrier protein transacylase and ketopantoate hydroxymethyltransferase, enzymes that are required for the biosynthesis of fatty acids and polyketides that are essential for the pathogenesis of Mtb. Maintenance of the physiological levels of these enzymes required Mpa and PafA in addition to proteasome protease activity. Mpa levels were also regulated in a proteasome-dependent manner. Finally, we found that a conserved tyrosine of Mpa was essential for function. Thus, these results suggest that Mpa, PafA, and the Mtb proteasome degrade bacterial proteins that are important for virulence in mice. PMID:17082771

  9. Subpopulations of proteasomes in rat liver nuclei, microsomes and cytosol.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, A; Rivett, A J; Thomson, S; Hendil, K B; Butcher, G W; Fuertes, G; Knecht, E

    1996-01-01

    Mammalian proteasomes are composed of 14-17 different types of subunits, some of which, including major-histocompatibility-complex-encoded subunits LMP2 and LMP7, are non-essential and present in variable amounts. We have investigated the distribution of total proteasomes and some individual subunits in rat liver by quantitative immunoblot analysis of purified subcellular fractions (nuclei, mitochondria, microsomes and cytosol). Proteasomes were mainly found in the cytosol but were also present in the purified nuclear and microsomal fractions. In the nuclei, proteasomes were soluble or loosely attached to the chromatin, since they could be easily extracted by treatment with nucleases or high concentrations of salt. In the microsomes, proteasomes were on the outside of the membranes. Further subfractionation of the microsomes showed that the proteasomes in this fraction were associated with the smooth endoplasmic reticulum and with the cis-Golgi but were practically absent from the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Using monospecific antibodies for some proteasomal subunits (C8, C9, LMP2 and Z), the composition of proteasomes in nuclei, microsomes and cytosol was investigated. Although there appear not to be differences in proteasome composition in the alpha subunits (C8 and C9) in the different locations, the relative amounts of some beta subunits varied. Subunit Z was enriched in nuclear proteasomes but low in microsome-associated proteasomes, whereas LMP2, which was relatively low in nuclei, showed a small enrichment in the microsomes. These differences in subunit composition of proteasomes probably reflect differences in the function of proteasomes in distinct cell compartments. PMID:8687380

  10. Acylpeptide Hydrolase Inhibition as Targeted Strategy to Induce Proteasomal Down-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Luini, Alberto; Ruvo, Menotti; Gogliettino, Marta; Langella, Emma; Saviano, Michele; Hegde, Ramanath N.; Sandomenico, Annamaria; Rossi, Mose

    2011-01-01

    Acylpeptide hydrolase (APEH), one of the four members of the prolyl oligopeptidase class, catalyses the removal of N-acylated amino acids from acetylated peptides and it has been postulated to play a key role in protein degradation machinery. Disruption of protein turnover has been established as an effective strategy to down-regulate the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and as a promising approach in anticancer therapy. Here, we illustrate a new pathway modulating UPS and proteasome activity through inhibition of APEH. To find novel molecules able to down-regulate APEH activity, we screened a set of synthetic peptides, reproducing the reactive-site loop of a known archaeal inhibitor of APEH (SsCEI), and the conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers. A 12-mer SsCEI peptide and the trans10-cis12 isomer of CLA, were identified as specific APEH inhibitors and their effects on cell-based assays were paralleled by a dose-dependent reduction of proteasome activity and the activation of the pro-apoptotic caspase cascade. Moreover, cell treatment with the individual compounds increased the cytoplasm levels of several classic hallmarks of proteasome inhibition, such as NFkappaB, p21, and misfolded or polyubiquitinylated proteins, and additive effects were observed in cells exposed to a combination of both inhibitors without any cytotoxicity. Remarkably, transfection of human bronchial epithelial cells with APEH siRNA, promoted a marked accumulation of a mutant of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), herein used as a model of misfolded protein typically degraded by UPS. Finally, molecular modeling studies, to gain insights into the APEH inhibition by the trans10-cis12 CLA isomer, were performed. Our study supports a previously unrecognized role of APEH as a negative effector of proteasome activity by an unknown mechanism and opens new perspectives for the development of strategies aimed at modulation of cancer progression. PMID:22016782

  11. Calpains and proteasomes mediate degradation of ryanodine receptors in a model of cardiac ischemic reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Pedrozo, Zully; Sánchez, Gina; Torrealba, Natalia; Valenzuela, Rodrigo; Fernández, Carolina; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Lavandero, Sergio; Donoso, Paulina

    2010-03-01

    Type-2 ryanodine receptors (RyR2)--the calcium release channels of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum--have a central role in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. In the heart, ischemia/reperfusion causes a rapid and significant decrease in RyR2 content but the mechanisms responsible for this effect are not fully understood. We have studied the involvement of three proteolytic systems--calpains, the proteasome and autophagy--on the degradation of RyR2 in rat neonatal cardiomyocyte cultures subjected to simulated ischemia/reperfusion (sI/R). We found that 8h of ischemia followed by 16h of reperfusion decreased RyR2 content by 50% without any changes in RyR2 mRNA. Specific inhibitors of calpains and the proteasome prevented the decrease of RyR2 caused by sI/R, implicating both pathways in its degradation. Proteasome inhibitors also prevented the degradation of calpastatin, the endogenous calpain inhibitor, hindering the activation of calpain induced by calpastatin degradation. Autophagy was activated during sI/R as evidenced by the increase in LC3-II and beclin-1, two proteins involved in autophagosome generation, and in the emergence of GFP-LC3 containing vacuoles in adenovirus GFP-LC3 transduced cardiomyocytes. Selective autophagy inhibition, however, induced even further RyR2 degradation, making unlikely the participation of autophagy in sI/R-induced RyR2 degradation. Our results suggest that calpain activation as a result of proteasome-induced degradation of calpastatin initiates RyR2 proteolysis, which is followed by proteasome-dependent degradation of the resulting RyR2 fragments. The decrease in RyR2 content during ischemia/reperfusion may be relevant to the decrease of heart contractility after ischemia. PMID:20026269

  12. Proteasome inhibition slightly improves cardiac function in mice with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Schlossarek, Saskia; Singh, Sonia R.; Geertz, Birgit; Schulz, Herbert; Reischmann, Silke; Hübner, Norbert; Carrier, Lucie

    2014-01-01

    A growing line of evidence indicates a dysfunctional ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in cardiac diseases. Anti-hypertrophic effects and improved cardiac function have been reported after treatment with proteasome inhibitors in experimental models of cardiac hypertrophy. Here we tested whether proteasome inhibition could also reverse the disease phenotype in a genetically-modified mouse model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), which carries a mutation in Mybpc3, encoding the myofilament protein cardiac myosin-binding protein C. At 7 weeks of age, homozygous mutant mice (KI) have 39% higher left ventricular mass-to-body-weight ratio and 29% lower fractional area shortening (FAS) than wild-type (WT) mice. Both groups were treated with epoxomicin (0.5 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 1 week via osmotic minipumps. Epoxomicin inhibited the chymotrypsin-like activity by ~50% in both groups. All parameters of cardiac hypertrophy (including the fetal gene program) were not affected by epoxomicin treatment in both groups. In contrast, FAS was 12% and 35% higher in epoxomicin-treated than vehicle-treated WT and KI mice, respectively. To identify which genes or pathways could be involved in this positive effect, we performed a transcriptome analysis in KI and WT neonatal cardiac myocytes, treated or not with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 (1 μM, 24 h). This revealed 103 genes (four-fold difference; 5% FDR) which are commonly regulated in both KI and WT cardiac myocytes. Thus, even in genetically-modified mice with manifest HCM, proteasome inhibition showed beneficial effects, at least with regard to cardiac function. Targeting the UPS in cardiac diseases remains therefore a therapeutic option. PMID:25566086

  13. Cytoplasmic Trafficking of Minute Virus of Mice: Low-pH Requirement, Routing to Late Endosomes, and Proteasome Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Ros, Carlos; Burckhardt, Christoph J.; Kempf, Christoph

    2002-01-01

    The cytoplasmic trafficking of the prototype strain of minute virus of mice (MVMp) was investigated by analyzing and quantifying the effect of drugs that reduce or abolish specific cellular functions on the accumulation of viral macromolecules. With this strategy, it was found that a low endosomal pH is required for the infection, since bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine, two pH-interfering drugs, were similarly active against MVMp. Disruption of the endosomal network by brefeldin A interfered with MVMp infection, indicating that viral particles are routed farther than the early endocytic compartment. Pulse experiments with endosome-interfering drugs showed that the bulk of MVMp particles remained in the endosomal compartment for several hours before its release to the cytosol. Drugs that block the activity of the proteasome by different mechanisms, such as MG132, lactacystin, and epoxomicin, all strongly blocked MVMp infection. Pulse experiments with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 indicated that MVMp interacts with cellular proteasomes after endosomal escape. The chymotrypsin-like but not the trypsin-like activity of the proteasome is required for the infection, since the chymotrypsin inhibitors N-tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone and aclarubicin were both effective in blocking MVMp infection. However, the trypsin inhibitor Nα-p-tosyl-l-lysine chloromethyl ketone had no effect. These results suggest that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway plays an essential role in the MVMp life cycle, probably assisting at the stages of capsid disassembly and/or nuclear translocation. PMID:12438589

  14. Cupriphilic compounds to aid in proteasome inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sreya; Sparks, Robert; Metcalf, Rainer; Brooks, Wesley; Daniel, Kenyon; Guida, Wayne C

    2016-08-01

    It has been found that tumor cells and tissues, compared to normal cells, have higher levels of copper and possibly other metal ions. This presents a potential vulnerability of tumor cells that can serve as a physiological difference between cancer cells and normal cells and allows design of compounds that selectively target tumor cells while sparing normal cells. Recently we have identified compounds that have potential to inhibit the proteasome in tumor cells and induce cell death by mobilizing endogenous tumor copper resulting in in cellulo activation of the compound. These compounds hence act as pro-drugs, becoming active drugs in tumor cells with high copper content but remaining essentially inactive in normal cells, thereby greatly reducing adverse effects in patients. Such use would be of significant benefit in early detection and treatment of cancers, in particular, aggressive cancers such as pancreatic cancer which is usually not detected until it has reached an advanced stage. Six compounds were identified following virtual screening of the NCI Diversity Set with our proteasome computer model followed by confirmation with a biochemical assay that showed significant inhibition of the proteasome by the compounds in the presence of copper ions. In a dose response assay, NSC 37408 (6,7-dihydroxy-1-benzofuran-3-one), our best compound, exhibited an IC50 of 3μM in the presence of 100nM copper. PMID:27311892

  15. Immunoaffinity purification of the functional 20S proteasome from human cells via transient overexpression of specific proteasome subunits.

    PubMed

    Livinskaya, Veronika A; Barlev, Nickolai A; Nikiforov, Andrey A

    2014-05-01

    The proteasome is a multi-subunit proteolytic complex that plays a central role in protein degradation in all eukaryotic cells. It regulates many vital cellular processes therefore its dysfunction can lead to various pathologies including cancer and neurodegeneration. Isolation of enzymatically active proteasomes is a key step to the successful study of the proteasome regulation and functions. Here we describe a simple and efficient protocol for immunoaffinity purification of the functional 20S proteasomes from human HEK 293T cells after transient overexpression of specific proteasome subunits tagged with 3xFLAG. To construct 3xFLAG-fusion proteins, DNA sequences encoding the 20S proteasome subunits PSMB5, PSMA5, and PSMA3 were cloned into mammalian expression vector pIRES-hrGFP-1a. The corresponding recombinant proteins PSMB5-3xFLAG, PSMA5-3xFLAG, or PSMA3-3xFLAG were transiently overexpressed in human HEK 293T cells and were shown to be partially incorporated into the intact proteasome complexes. 20S proteasomes were immunoprecipitated from HEK 293T cell extracts under mild conditions using antibodies against FLAG peptide. Isolation of highly purified 20S proteasomes were confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting using antibodies against different proteasome subunits. Affinity purified 20S proteasomes were shown to possess chymotrypsin- and trypsin-like peptidase activities confirming their functionality. This simple single-step affinity method of the 20S proteasome purification can be instrumental to subsequent functional studies of proteasomes in human cells. PMID:24583181

  16. Heat Shock Proteins Regulate Activation-induced Proteasomal Degradation of the Mature Phosphorylated Form of Protein Kinase C*

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Michelle A.; Balaburski, Gregor M.; Murphy, Maureen E.; Black, Adrian R.; Black, Jennifer D.

    2013-01-01

    Although alterations in stimulus-induced degradation of PKC have been implicated in disease, mechanistic understanding of this process remains limited. Evidence supports the existence of both proteasomal and lysosomal mechanisms of PKC processing. An established pathway involves rate-limiting priming site dephosphorylation of the activated enzyme and proteasomal clearance of the dephosphorylated protein. However, here we show that agonists promote down-regulation of endogenous PKCα with minimal accumulation of a nonphosphorylated species in multiple cell types. Furthermore, proteasome and lysosome inhibitors predominantly protect fully phosphorylated PKCα, pointing to this form as a substrate for degradation. Failure to detect substantive dephosphorylation of activated PKCα was not due to rephosphorylation because inhibition of Hsp70/Hsc70, which is required for re-priming, had only a minor effect on agonist-induced accumulation of nonphosphorylated protein. Thus, PKC degradation can occur in the absence of dephosphorylation. Further analysis revealed novel functions for Hsp70/Hsc70 and Hsp90 in the control of agonist-induced PKCα processing. These chaperones help to maintain phosphorylation of activated PKCα but have opposing effects on degradation of the phosphorylated protein; Hsp90 is protective, whereas Hsp70/Hsc70 activity is required for proteasomal processing of this species. Notably, down-regulation of nonphosphorylated PKCα shows little Hsp70/Hsc70 dependence, arguing that phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated species are differentially targeted for proteasomal degradation. Finally, lysosomal processing of activated PKCα is not regulated by phosphorylation or Hsps. Collectively, these data demonstrate that phosphorylated PKCα is a direct target for agonist-induced proteasomal degradation via an Hsp-regulated mechanism, and highlight the existence of a novel pathway of PKC desensitization in cells. PMID:23900841

  17. Combination Treatment with Sublethal Ionizing Radiation and the Proteasome Inhibitor, Bortezomib, Enhances Death-Receptor Mediated Apoptosis and Anti-Tumor Immune Attack

    PubMed Central

    Cacan, Ercan; Spring, Alexander M.; Kumari, Anita; Greer, Susanna F.; Garnett-Benson, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    Sub-lethal doses of radiation can modulate gene expression, making tumor cells more susceptible to T-cell-mediated immune attack. Proteasome inhibitors demonstrate broad anti-tumor activity in clinical and pre-clinical cancer models. Here, we use a combination treatment of proteasome inhibition and irradiation to further induce immunomodulation of tumor cells that could enhance tumor-specific immune responses. We investigate the effects of the 26S proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, alone or in combination with radiotherapy, on the expression of immunogenic genes in normal colon and colorectal cancer cell lines. We examined cells for changes in the expression of several death receptors (DR4, DR5 and Fas) commonly used by T cells for killing of target cells. Our results indicate that the combination treatment resulted in increased cell surface expression of death receptors by increasing their transcript levels. The combination treatment further increases the sensitivity of carcinoma cells to apoptosis through FAS and TRAIL receptors but does not change the sensitivity of normal non-malignant epithelial cells. Furthermore, the combination treatment significantly enhances tumor cell killing by tumor specific CD8+ T cells. This study suggests that combining radiotherapy and proteasome inhibition may simultaneously enhance tumor immunogenicity and the induction of antitumor immunity by enhancing tumor-specific T-cell activity. PMID:26703577

  18. Substrate Ubiquitination Controls the Unfolding Ability of the Proteasome.

    PubMed

    Reichard, Eden L; Chirico, Giavanna G; Dewey, William J; Nassif, Nicholas D; Bard, Katelyn E; Millas, Nickolas E; Kraut, Daniel A

    2016-08-26

    In eukaryotic cells, proteins are targeted to the proteasome for degradation by polyubiquitination. These proteins bind to ubiquitin receptors, are engaged and unfolded by proteasomal ATPases, and are processively degraded. The factors determining to what extent the proteasome can successfully unfold and degrade a substrate are still poorly understood. We find that the architecture of polyubiquitin chains attached to a substrate affects the ability of the proteasome to unfold and degrade the substrate, with K48- or mixed-linkage chains leading to greater processivity than K63-linked chains. Ubiquitin-independent targeting of substrates to the proteasome gave substantially lower processivity of degradation than ubiquitin-dependent targeting. Thus, even though ubiquitin chains are removed early in degradation, during substrate engagement, remarkably they dramatically affect the later unfolding of a protein domain. Our work supports a model in which a polyubiquitin chain associated with a substrate switches the proteasome into an activated state that persists throughout the degradation process. PMID:27405762

  19. LPS-Induced Formation of Immunoproteasomes: TNF-α and Nitric Oxide Production are Regulated by Altered Composition of Proteasome-Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Julia; Guan, Xiu Qin; Kisselev, Alexei F.; Papasian, Christopher J.; Qureshi, Asaf A.; Morrison, David C.; Van Way, Charles W.; Vogel, Stefanie N.

    2011-01-01

    Stimulation of mouse macrophages with LPS leads to tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) secretion and nitric oxide (NO) release at different times through independent signaling pathways. While the precise regulatory mechanisms responsible for these distinct phenotypic responses have not been fully delineated, results of our recent studies strongly implicate the cellular cytoplasmic ubiquitin–proteasome pathway as a key regulator of LPS-induced macrophage inflammatory responses. Our objective in this study was to define the relative contribution of specific proteasomal active-sites in induction of TNF-α and NO after LPS treatment of RAW 264.7 macrophages using selective inhibitors of these active sites. Our data provide evidence that LPS stimulation of mouse macrophages triggers a selective increase in the levels of gene and protein expression of the immunoproteasomes, resulting in a modulation of specific functional activities of the proteasome and a corresponding increase in NO production as compared to untreated controls. These findings suggest the LPS-dependent induction of immunoproteasome. In contrast, we also demonstrate that TNF-α expression is primarily dependent on both the chymotrypsin- and the trypsin-like activities of X, Y, Z subunits of the proteasome. Proteasome-associated post-acidic activity alone also contributes to LPS-induced expression of TNF-α. Taken together; our results indicate that LPS-induced TNF-α in macrophages is differentially regulated by each of the three proteasome activities. Since addition of proteasome inhibitors to mouse macrophages profoundly affects the degradation of proteins involved in signal transduction, we conclude that proteasome-specific degradation of several signaling proteins is likely involved in differential regulation of LPS-dependent secretion of proinflammatory mediators. PMID:21455682

  20. Partial Proteasome Inhibitors Induce Hair Follicle Growth by Stabilizing β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Yucel, Gozde; Van Arnam, John; Means, Paula Casey; Huntzicker, Erik; Altindag, Banu; Lara, Maria Fernanda; Yuan, Jenny; Kuo, Calvin; Oro, Anthony E.

    2014-01-01

    The activation of tissue stem cells from their quiescent state represents the initial step in the complex process of organ regeneration and tissue repair. While the identity and location of tissue stem cells are becoming known, how key regulators control the balance of activation and quiescence remains mysterious. The vertebrate hair is an ideal model system where hair cycling between growth and resting phases is precisely regulated by morphogen signaling pathways, but how these events are coordinated to promote orderly signaling in a spatial and temporal manner remains unclear. Here, we show that hair cycle timing depends on regulated stability of signaling substrates by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Topical application of partial proteasomal inhibitors (PaPIs) inhibits epidermal and dermal proteasome activity throughout the hair cycle. PaPIs prevent the destruction of the key anagen signal β-catenin, resulting in more rapid hair growth and dramati cally shortened telogen. We show that PaPIs induce excess β-catenin, act similarly to the GSK3β antagonist LiCl, and antagonize Dickopf-related protein-mediated inhibition of anagen. PaPIs thus represent a novel class of hair growth agents that act through transiently modifying the balance of stem cell activation and quiescence pathways. PMID:23963711

  1. Partial proteasome inhibitors induce hair follicle growth by stabilizing β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Yucel, Gozde; Van Arnam, John; Means, Paula Casey; Huntzicker, Erik; Altindag, Banu; Lara, Maria Fernanda; Yuan, Jenny; Kuo, Calvin; Oro, Anthony E

    2014-01-01

    The activation of tissue stem cells from their quiescent state represents the initial step in the complex process of organ regeneration and tissue repair. While the identity and location of tissue stem cells are becoming known, how key regulators control the balance of activation and quiescence remains mysterious. The vertebrate hair is an ideal model system where hair cycling between growth and resting phases is precisely regulated by morphogen signaling pathways, but how these events are coordinated to promote orderly signaling in a spatial and temporal manner remains unclear. Here, we show that hair cycle timing depends on regulated stability of signaling substrates by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Topical application of partial proteasomal inhibitors (PaPIs) inhibits epidermal and dermal proteasome activity throughout the hair cycle. PaPIs prevent the destruction of the key anagen signal β-catenin, resulting in more rapid hair growth and dramatically shortened telogen. We show that PaPIs induce excess β-catenin, act similarly to the GSK3β antagonist LiCl, and antagonize Dickopf-related protein-mediated inhibition of anagen. PaPIs thus represent a novel class of hair growth agents that act through transiently modifying the balance of stem cell activation and quiescence pathways. PMID:23963711

  2. Could inhibition of the proteasome cause mad cow disease?

    PubMed

    Hooper, Nigel M

    2003-04-01

    The proteasome is the cellular machinery responsible for the degradation of normal and misfolded proteins. Inhibitors of the proteasome are being evaluated as therapeutic agents and recent work suggests that such inhibition might promote the neurotoxic properties of the prion protein (the causative agent of mad cow disease) and its conformational conversion to the infectious form, thus raising the question as to whether proteasome inhibitors might facilitate the development of prion diseases. PMID:12679058

  3. [Cloning, expression and characterization of a gene encoding alpha2 subunit of the proteasome in Schistosoma japonicum].

    PubMed

    Hong, Yang; Han, Hongxiao; Peng, Jinbiao; Li, Ye; Shi, Yaojun; Fu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Jinming; Li, Xiangrui; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2010-04-01

    The 26S proteasome is a proteolytic complex responsible for the degradation of the vast majority of eukaryotic proteins. Regulated proteolysis by the proteasome is thought to influence cell cycle progression, transcriptional control, and other critical cellular processes. A novel Schistosoma japonicum gene (GenBank Accession No. AY813725) proteasome alpha2 subunit (SjPSMA2) was cloned. Sequence analysis revealed that the ORF of SjPSMA2 gene contains 708 nucleotides encoding 235 amino acids, and the molecular weight was estimated to be 25.84 kDa. Real-time PCR analysis showed that this gene expressed in 7 d, 13 d, 18 d, 23 d, 32 d and 42 d schistosoma. The mRNA level of SjPSMA2 was lower in 7 d and 23 d schistosomulum than that in other stages. The SjPSMA2 cDNA fragment was subcloned into an expression vector pET28a(+) and transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells. After induction with IPTCQ the 30 kDa fusion protein was produced as included bodies. Western-blotting revealed that the fusion protein could be recognized by the rabbit serum anti-Schistosoma japonicum adult worm antigen preparation, and the protein in native could be detected. After immunization of BALB/c mice with the fusion protein, the reduction rates of worm counts and liver egg counts were 12.33% and 35.23%. ELISA results revealed that the vaccinated group showed a significant increase in the level of IgG antibody. This study provided an important basis for investigating the regulation mechanism of the proteasome during the development of Schistosoma japonicum. PMID:20575440

  4. Tobacco RING E3 Ligase NtRFP1 Mediates Ubiquitination and Proteasomal Degradation of a Geminivirus-Encoded βC1.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qingtang; Hu, Tao; Bao, Min; Cao, Linge; Zhang, Huawei; Song, Fengmin; Xie, Qi; Zhou, Xueping

    2016-06-01

    The βC1 protein encoded by the Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus-associated betasatellite functions as a pathogenicity determinant. To better understand the molecular basis whereby βC1 functions in pathogenicity, a yeast two-hybrid screen of a tobacco cDNA library was carried out using βC1 as the bait. The screen revealed that βC1 interacts with a tobacco RING-finger protein designated NtRFP1, which was further confirmed by the bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation assays in Nicotiana benthamiana cells. Expression of NtRFP1 was induced by βC1, and in vitro ubiquitination assays showed that NtRFP1 is a functional E3 ubiquitin ligase that mediates βC1 ubiquitination. In addition, βC1 was shown to be ubiquitinated in vivo and degraded by the plant 26S proteasome. After viral infection, plants overexpressing NtRFP1 developed attenuated symptoms, whereas plants with silenced expression of NtRFP1 showed severe symptoms. Other lines of evidence showed that NtRFP1 attenuates βC1-induced symptoms through promoting its degradation by the 26S proteasome. Taken together, our results suggest that tobacco RING E3 ligase NtRFP1 attenuates disease symptoms by interacting with βC1 to mediate its ubiquitination and degradation via the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system. PMID:27018391

  5. BRK Targets Dok1 for Ubiquitin-Mediated Proteasomal Degradation to Promote Cell Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Miah, Sayem; Goel, Raghuveera Kumar; Dai, Chenlu; Kalra, Natasha; Beaton-Brown, Erika; Bagu, Edward T.; Bonham, Keith; Lukong, Kiven E.

    2014-01-01

    Breast tumor kinase (BRK), also known as protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6), is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase overexpressed in more that 60% of human breast carcinomas. The overexpression of BRK has been shown to sensitize mammary epithelial cells to mitogenic signaling and to promote cell proliferation and tumor formation. The molecular mechanisms of BRK have been unveiled by the identification and characterization of BRK target proteins. Downstream of tyrosine kinases 1 or Dok1 is a scaffolding protein and a substrate of several tyrosine kinases. Herein we show that BRK interacts with and phosphorylates Dok1 specifically on Y362. We demonstrate that this phosphorylation by BRK significantly downregulates Dok1 in a ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated mechanism. Together, these results suggest a novel mechanism of action of BRK in the promotion of tumor formation, which involves the targeting of tumor suppressor Dok1 for degradation through the ubiquitin proteasomal pathway. PMID:24523872

  6. The proteasome and the degradation of oxidized proteins: Part III—Redox regulation of the proteasomal system

    PubMed Central

    Höhn, Tobias Jung Annika; Grune, Tilman

    2014-01-01

    Here, we review shortly the current knowledge on the regulation of the proteasomal system during and after oxidative stress. After addressing the components of the proteasomal system and the degradation of oxidatively damaged proteins in part I and II of this series, we address here which changes in activity undergo the proteasome and the ubiquitin-proteasomal system itself under oxidative conditions. While several components of the proteasomal system undergo direct oxidative modification, a number of redox-regulated events are modulating the proteasomal activity in a way it can address the major tasks in an oxidative stress situation: the removal of oxidized proteins and the adaptation of the cellular metabolism to the stress situation. PMID:24563857

  7. Ubiquitin proteasome system research in gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jia-Ling; Huang, Chang-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is important for the degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells. It is involved in nearly every cellular process and plays an important role in maintaining body homeostasis. An increasing body of evidence has linked alterations in the UPS to gastrointestinal malignancies, including esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancers. Here, we summarize the current literature detailing the involvement of the UPS in gastrointestinal cancer, highlighting its role in tumor occurrence and development, providing information for therapeutic targets research and anti-gastrointestinal tumor drug design. PMID:26909134

  8. Proteasome activity or expression is not altered by activation of the heat shock transcription factor Hsf1 in cultured fibroblasts or myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Taylor, David M; Kabashi, Edor; Agar, Jeffrey N; Minotti, Sandra; Durham, Heather D

    2005-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) with chaperoning function work together with the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway to prevent the accumulation of misfolded, potentially toxic proteins, as well as to control catabolism of the bulk of cytoplasmic, cellular protein. There is evidence for the involvement of both systems in neurodegenerative disease, and a therapeutic target is the heat shock transcription factor, Hsf1, which mediates upregulation of Hsps in response to cellular stress. The mechanisms regulating expression of proteasomal proteins in mammalian cells are less well defined. To assess any direct effect of Hsf1 on expression of proteasomal subunits and activity in mammalian cells, a plasmid encoding a constitutively active form of Hsf1 (Hsf1act) was expressed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking Hsf1 and in cultured human myoblasts. Plasmid encoding an inactivatible form of Hsf1 (Hsf1inact) served as control. In cultures transfected with plasmid hsf1act, robust expression of the major stress-inducible Hsp, Hsp70, occurred but not in cultures transfected with hsf1inact. No significant changes in the level of expression of representative proteasomal proteins (structural [20Salpha], a nonpeptidase beta subunit [20Sbeta3], or 2 regulatory subunits [19S subunit 6b, 11 Salpha]) or in chymotrypsin-, trypsin-, and caspaselike activities of the proteasome were measured. Thus, stress-induced or pharmacological activation of Hsf1 in mammalian cells would upregulate Hsps but not directly affect expression or activity of proteasomes. PMID:16184768

  9. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-zinc(II) and -copper(II) complexes induce apoptosis in tumor cells by inhibiting the proteasomal activity

    SciTech Connect

    Milacic, Vesna; Chen Di; Giovagnini, Lorena; Diez, Alejandro; Fregona, Dolores; Dou, Q. Ping

    2008-08-15

    Zinc and copper are trace elements essential for proper folding, stabilization and catalytic activity of many metalloenzymes in living organisms. However, disturbed zinc and copper homeostasis is reported in many types of cancer. We have previously demonstrated that copper complexes induced proteasome inhibition and apoptosis in cultured human cancer cells. In the current study we hypothesized that zinc complexes could also inhibit the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity responsible for subsequent apoptosis induction. We first showed that zinc(II) chloride was able to inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of a purified 20S proteasome with an IC{sub 50} value of 13.8 {mu}M, which was less potent than copper(II) chloride (IC{sub 50} 5.3 {mu}M). We then compared the potencies of a pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PyDT)-zinc(II) complex and a PyDT-copper(II) complex to inhibit cellular proteasomal activity, suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis in various human breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Consistently, zinc complex was less potent than copper complex in inhibiting the proteasome and inducing apoptosis. Additionally, zinc and copper complexes appear to use somewhat different mechanisms to kill tumor cells. Zinc complexes were able to activate calpain-, but not caspase-3-dependent pathway, while copper complexes were able to induce activation of both proteases. Furthermore, the potencies of these PyDT-metal complexes depend on the nature of metals and also on the ratio of PyDT to the metal ion within the complex, which probably affects their stability and availability for interacting with and inhibiting the proteasome in tumor cells.

  10. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-zinc(II) and -copper(II) complexes induce apoptosis in tumor cells by inhibiting the proteasomal activity☆

    PubMed Central

    Milacic, Vesna; Chen, Di; Giovagnini, Lorena; Diez, Alejandro; Fregona, Dolores; Dou, Q. Ping

    2013-01-01

    Zinc and copper are trace elements essential for proper folding, stabilization and catalytic activity of many metalloenzymes in living organisms. However, disturbed zinc and copper homeostasis is reported in many types of cancer. We have previously demonstrated that copper complexes induced proteasome inhibition and apoptosis in cultured human cancer cells. In the current study we hypothesized that zinc complexes could also inhibit the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity responsible for subsequent apoptosis induction. We first showed that zinc(II) chloride was able to inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of a purified 20S proteasome with an IC50 value of 13.8 μM, which was less potent than copper(II) chloride (IC50 5.3 μM). We then compared the potencies of a pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PyDT)-zinc(II) complex and a PyDT-copper(II) complex to inhibit cellular proteasomal activity, suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis in various human breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Consistently, zinc complex was less potent than copper complex in inhibiting the proteasome and inducing apoptosis. Additionally, zinc and copper complexes appear to use somewhat different mechanisms to kill tumor cells. Zinc complexes were able to activate calpain-, but not caspase-3-dependent pathway, while copper complexes were able to induce activation of both proteases. Furthermore, the potencies of these PyDT-metal complexes depend on the nature of metals and also on the ratio of PyDT to the metal ion within the complex, which probably affects their stability and availability for interacting with and inhibiting the proteasome in tumor cells. PMID:18501397

  11. Impaired proteasome function in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kabashi, Edor; Agar, Jeffrey N; Strong, Michael J; Durham, Heather D

    2012-06-01

    Abstract The ubiquitin-proteasome system, important for maintaining protein quality control, is compromised in experimental models of familial ALS. The objective of this study was to determine if proteasome function is impaired in sporadic ALS. Proteasomal activities and subunit composition were evaluated in homogenates of spinal cord samples obtained at autopsy from sporadic ALS and non-neurological control cases, compared to cerebellum as a clinically spared tissue. The level of 20S α structural proteasome subunits was assessed in motor neurons by immunohistochemistry. Catalysis of peptide substrates of the three major proteasomal activities was substantially reduced in ALS thoracic spinal cord, but not in cerebellum, accompanied by alterations in the constitutive proteasome machinery. Chymotrypsin-like activity was decreased to 60% and 65% of control in ventral and dorsal spinal cord, respectively, concomitant with reduction in the β5 subunit with this catalytic activity. Caspase- and trypsin-like activities were reduced to a similar extent (46% - 68% of control). Proteasome levels, although generally maintained, appeared reduced specifically in motor neurons by immunolabelling. In conclusion, there are commonalities of findings in sporadic ALS patients and presymptomatic SOD1-G93A transgenic mice and these implicate inadequate proteasome function in the pathogenesis of both familial and sporadic ALS. PMID:22632443

  12. Cytosolic Hsp60 Can Modulate Proteasome Activity in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Kalderon, Bella; Kogan, Gleb; Bubis, Ettel; Pines, Ophry

    2015-01-01

    Hsp60, an essential oligomeric molecular mitochondrial chaperone, has been subject to rigorous basic and clinical research. With yeast as a model system, we provide evidence for the ability of cytosolic yHsp60 to inhibit the yeast proteasome. (i) Following biological turnover of murine Bax (a proteasome substrate), we show that co-expression of cytosolic yHsp60 stabilizes Bax, enhances its association with mitochondria, and enhances its killing capacity. (ii) Expression of yHsp60 in the yeast cytosol (yHsp60c) inhibits degradation of a cytosolic protein ΔMTS-Aco1 tagged with the degron SL17 (a ubiquitin-proteasome substrate). (iii) Conditions under which Hsp60 accumulates in the cytosol (elevated Hsp60c or growth at 37 °C) correlate with reduced 20 S peptidase activity in proteasomes purified from cell extracts. (iv) Elevated yHsp60 in the cytosol correlate with accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins. (v) According to 20 S proteasome pulldown experiments, Hsp60 is physically associated with proteasomes in extracts of cells expressing Hsp60c or grown at 37 °C. Even mutant Hsp60 proteins, lacking chaperone activity, were still capable of proteasome inhibition. The results support the hypothesis that localization of Hsp60 to the cytosol may modulate proteasome activity according to cell need. PMID:25525272

  13. Identification of Novel Proteasome Inhibitors from an Enaminone Library.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Megan L; Thomas, Kevin; Kennedy, Steven; Koduri, Naga D; Hussaini, R Syed; Sheaff, Robert J

    2015-09-01

    A library of structurally distinct enaminones was synthesized using sonication or Ru(II) catalysis to couple primary, secondary, and tertiary thioamides with α-halocarbonyls or α-diazocarbonyls. Screening the library for proteasome inhibition using a luciferase-based assay identified seven structurally diverse compounds. Two of these molecules targeted luciferase, while the remaining five exhibited varying potency and specificity for the trypsin-like, chymotrypsin-like, or caspase-like protease activities of the proteasome. Physiological relevance was confirmed by showing these molecules inhibited proteasomal degradation of the full-length protein substrate p21cip1 expressed in tissue culture cells. A cell viability analysis revealed that the proteasome inhibitors differentially affected cell survival. Results indicate a subset of enaminones and precursor molecules identified in this study are good candidates for further development into novel proteasome inhibitors with potential therapeutic value. PMID:25494709

  14. Proteasome modulators: essential chemical genetic tools for understanding human diseases.

    PubMed

    Wehenkel, Marie; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Kyung Bo

    2008-04-01

    Primarily used for medicinal purposes in the past, biologically active small molecules have been increasingly employed to explore complex biological processes in the era of "chemical genetics". Since the contributions of this small molecule approach to biology have been extensive, we limit the focus of our review to the use of small-molecule modulators in the exciting field of proteasomal biology, one that has benefited significantly from a chemical genetics approach. Specifically, as the contributions of general inhibitors of proteasomal activity to the fields of cell biology and clinical oncology have been extensively discussed in several excellent reviews, we instead outline recent progress towards the development of novel, specific classes of proteasome modulators for studies of proteasomal biology and the types of proteasome inhibitors emerging as important new treatment options for cancer therapeutics. PMID:18354780

  15. The genetic basis for the biosynthesis of the pharmaceutically important class of epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Schorn, Michelle; Zettler, Judith; Noel, Joseph P.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Moore, Bradley S.; Kaysser, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    The epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors are an established class of therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer. Their unique α′,β′-epoxyketone pharmacophore allows binding to the catalytic β-subunits of the proteasome with extraordinary specificity. Here we report the characterization of the first gene clusters for the biosynthesis of natural peptidyl-epoxyketones. The clusters for epoxomicin, the lead compound for the anti-cancer drug Kyprolis™, and for eponemycin were identified in the actinobacterial producer strains ATCC 53904 and Streptomyces hygroscopicus ATCC 53709, respectively, using a modified protocol for Ion Torrent PGM genome sequencing. Both gene clusters code for a hybrid non-ribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthase multifunctional enzyme complex and homologous redox enzymes. Epoxomicin and eponemycin were heterologously produced in Streptomyces albus J1046 via whole pathway expression. Moreover, we employed mass spectral molecular networking for a new comparative metabolomics approach in a heterologous system and discovered a number of putative epoxyketone derivatives. With this study we have definitively linked epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors and their biosynthesis genes for the first time in any organism, which will now allow for their detailed biochemical investigation. PMID:24168704

  16. Proteasome activator REGgamma enhances coxsackieviral infection by facilitating p53 degradation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guang; Wong, Jerry; Zhang, Jingchun; Mao, Ivy; Shravah, Jayant; Wu, Yan; Xiao, Allen; Li, Xiaotao; Luo, Honglin

    2010-11-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is a small RNA virus associated with diseases such as myocarditis, meningitis, and pancreatitis. We have previously demonstrated that proteasome inhibition reduces CVB3 replication and attenuates virus-induced myocarditis. However, the underlying mechanisms by which the ubiquitin/proteasome system regulates CVB replication remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of REGγ, a member of the 11S proteasome activator, in CVB3 replication. We showed that overexpression of REGγ promoted CVB3 replication but that knockdown of REGγ led to reduced CVB3 replication. We further demonstrated that REGγ-mediated p53 proteolysis contributes, as least in part, to the proviral function of REGγ. Although total protein levels of REGγ remained unaltered after CVB3 infection, virus infection induced a redistribution of REGγ from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, rendering an opportunity for a direct interaction of REGγ with viral proteins and/or host proteins (e.g., p53), which controls viral growth and thereby enhances viral infectivity. Further analyses suggested a potential modification of REGγ by SUMO following CVB3 infection, which was verified by both in vitro and in vivo sumoylation assays. Sumoylation of REGγ may play a role in its nuclear export during CVB3 infection. Taken together, our results present the first evidence that the host REGγ pathway is utilized and modified during CVB3 infection to promote efficient viral replication. PMID:20719955

  17. Regulation of c-Myc protein stability by proteasome activator REGγ.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Jiang, C; Pan, J; Wang, X; Jin, J; Zhao, L; Pan, W; Liao, G; Cai, X; Li, X; Xiao, J; Jiang, J; Wang, P

    2015-06-01

    c-Myc is a key transcriptional factor that has a prominent role in cell growth, differentiation and tumor development. Its protein levels are tightly controlled by ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and frequently deregulated in various cancers. Here, we report that the 11S proteasomal activator REGγ is a novel regulator of c-Myc abundance in cells. We showed that overexpression of wild-type REGγ, but not inactive mutants including N151Y and G250S, significantly promoted the degradation of c-Myc. Depletion of REGγ markedly increased the protein stability of c-Myc. REGγ interacts with the C-terminal region of c-Myc and regulates c-Myc protein turnover. Functionally, REGγ negatively regulates c-Myc-mediated cell proliferation. Interestingly, depletion of the Drosophila Reg homolog (dReg) in developing wings induced the upregulation of Drosophila Myc, which contributes to cell death. Collectively, these results suggest that REGγ proteasome has a conserved role in the regulation of Myc abundance in both mammalian cells and Drosophila. PMID:25412630

  18. mTORC1 signaling activates NRF1 to increase cellular proteasome levels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yinan; Manning, Brendan D

    2015-01-01

    Defects in the maintenance of protein homeostasis, or proteostasis, has emerged as an underlying feature of a variety of human pathologies, including aging-related diseases. Proteostasis is achieved through the coordinated action of cellular systems overseeing amino acid availability, mRNA translation, protein folding, secretion, and degradation. The regulation of these distinct systems must be integrated at various points to attain a proper balance. In a recent study, we found that the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway, well known to enhance the protein synthesis capacity of cells while concordantly inhibiting autophagy, promotes the production of more proteasomes. Activation of mTORC1 genetically, through loss of the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) tumor suppressors, or physiologically, through growth factors or feeding, stimulates a transcriptional program involving the sterol-regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1) and nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-related factor 1 (NRF1; also known as NFE2L1) transcription factors leading to an increase in cellular proteasome content. As discussed here, our findings suggest that this increase in proteasome levels facilitates both the maintenance of proteostasis and the recovery of amino acids in the face of an increased protein load consequent to mTORC1 activation. We also consider the physiological and pathological implications of this unexpected new downstream branch of mTORC1 signaling. PMID:26017155

  19. Ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation of keratin intermediate filaments in mechanically stimulated A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Jaitovich, Ariel; Mehta, Semil; Na, Ni; Ciechanover, Aaron; Goldman, Robert D; Ridge, Karen M

    2008-09-12

    We previously reported that shear stress induces phosphorylation and disassembly of keratin intermediate filaments (IFs). Shear stress also induces a time- and strain-dependent degradation of keratin IFs, and the current study examines the mechanisms involved in degradation of keratin proteins in human A549 cells exposed to 0-24 h of shear stress (7.5-30 dynes/cm(2)). Ubiquitin was found to be covalently associated with keratin proteins immunoprecipitated from shear-stressed cells, and pretreatment with the proteasomal inhibitor MG132 prevented the degradation of the keratin IF network. Importantly, phosphorylation of K8 Ser-73 is required for the shear stress-mediated ubiquitination, disassembly, and degradation of the keratin IF network. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that shear stress caused the thin array of keratin fibrils observed in control cells to be reorganized into a perinuclear aggregate, known as an aggresome, and that ubiquitin was also associated with this structure. Finally, the E2 enzymes, UbcH5b, -c, and Ubc3, but not E2-25K are required for the shear stress-mediated ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation of keratin proteins. These data suggest that shear stress promotes the disassembly and degradation of the keratin IF network via phosphorylation and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. PMID:18617517

  20. Targeting the 19S proteasomal subunit, Rpt4, for the treatment of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Boland, Karen; Flanagan, Lorna; McCawley, Niamh; Pabari, Ritesh; Kay, Elaine W; McNamara, Deborah A; Murray, Frank; Byrne, Annette T; Ramtoola, Zebunnissa; Concannon, Caoimhín G; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2016-06-01

    Deregulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway has been frequently observed in a number of malignancies. Using quantitative Western blotting of normal and matched tumour tissue, we here identified a significant increase in the 19S proteasome subunit Rpt4 in response to chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer patients with unfavourable outcome. We therefore explored the potential of Rpt4 reduction as a therapeutic strategy in colorectal cancer (CRC). Utilizing siRNA to down regulate Rpt4 expression, we show that silencing of Rpt4 reduced proteasomal activity and induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. Gene silencing of Rpt4 also inhibited cell proliferation, reduced clonogenic survival and induced apoptosis in HCT-116 colon cancer cells. We next developed a cell penetrating peptide-based nanoparticle delivery system to achieve in vivo gene silencing of Rpt4. Administration of Rpt4 siRNA nanoparticles reduced tumour growth and improved survival in a HCT-116 colon cancer xenograft tumour model in vivo. Collectively, our data suggest that inhibition of Rpt4 represents a novel strategy for the treatment of CRC. PMID:26997367

  1. Harnessing Proteasome Dynamics and Allostery in Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The proteasome is the essential protease that is responsible for regulated cleavage of the bulk of intracellular proteins. Its central role in cellular physiology has been exploited in therapies against aggressive cancers where proteasome-specific competitive inhibitors that block proteasome active centers are very effectively used. However, drugs regulating this essential protease are likely to have broader clinical usefulness. The non-catalytic sites of the proteasome emerge as an attractive alternative target in search of highly specific and diverse proteasome regulators. Recent Advances: Crystallographic models of the proteasome leave the false impression of fixed structures with minimal molecular dynamics lacking long-distance allosteric signaling. However, accumulating biochemical and structural observations strongly support the notion that the proteasome is regulated by precise allosteric interactions arising from protein dynamics, encouraging the active search for allosteric regulators. Here, we discuss properties of several promising compounds that affect substrate gating and processing in antechambers, and interactions of the catalytic core with regulatory proteins. Critical Issues: Given the structural complexity of proteasome assemblies, it is a painstaking process to better understand their allosteric regulation and molecular dynamics. Here, we discuss the challenges and achievements in this field. We place special emphasis on the role of atomic force microscopy imaging in probing the allostery and dynamics of the proteasome, and in dissecting the mechanisms involving small-molecule allosteric regulators. Future Directions: New small-molecule allosteric regulators may become a next generation of drugs targeting the proteasome, which is critical to the development of new therapies in cancers and other diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2286–2301. PMID:24410482

  2. A novel proteasome inhibitor suppresses tumor growth via targeting both 19S proteasome deubiquitinases and 20S proteolytic peptidases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ningning; Liu, Chunjiao; Li, Xiaofen; Liao, Siyan; Song, Wenbin; Yang, Changshan; Zhao, Chong; Huang, Hongbiao; Guan, Lixia; Zhang, Peiquan; Liu, Shouting; Hua, Xianliang; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Ping; Lan, Xiaoying; Yi, Songgang; Wang, Shunqing; Wang, Xuejun; Dou, Q. Ping; Liu, Jinbao

    2014-01-01

    The successful development of bortezomib-based therapy for treatment of multiple myeloma has established proteasome inhibition as an effective therapeutic strategy, and both 20S proteasome peptidases and 19S deubiquitinases (DUBs) are becoming attractive targets of cancer therapy. It has been reported that metal complexes, such as copper complexes, inhibit tumor proteasome. However, the involved mechanism of action has not been fully characterized. Here we report that (i) copper pyrithione (CuPT), an alternative to tributyltin for antifouling paint biocides, inhibits the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) via targeting both 19S proteasome-specific DUBs and 20S proteolytic peptidases with a mechanism distinct from that of the FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor bortezomib; (ii) CuPT potently inhibits proteasome-specific UCHL5 and USP14 activities; (iii) CuPT inhibits tumor growth in vivo and induces cytotoxicity in vitro and ex vivo. This study uncovers a novel class of dual inhibitors of DUBs and proteasome and suggests a potential clinical strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:24912524

  3. A novel proteasome inhibitor suppresses tumor growth via targeting both 19S proteasome deubiquitinases and 20S proteolytic peptidases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ningning; Liu, Chunjiao; Li, Xiaofen; Liao, Siyan; Song, Wenbin; Yang, Changshan; Zhao, Chong; Huang, Hongbiao; Guan, Lixia; Zhang, Peiquan; Liu, Shouting; Hua, Xianliang; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Ping; Lan, Xiaoying; Yi, Songgang; Wang, Shunqing; Wang, Xuejun; Dou, Q Ping; Liu, Jinbao

    2014-01-01

    The successful development of bortezomib-based therapy for treatment of multiple myeloma has established proteasome inhibition as an effective therapeutic strategy, and both 20S proteasome peptidases and 19S deubiquitinases (DUBs) are becoming attractive targets of cancer therapy. It has been reported that metal complexes, such as copper complexes, inhibit tumor proteasome. However, the involved mechanism of action has not been fully characterized. Here we report that (i) copper pyrithione (CuPT), an alternative to tributyltin for antifouling paint biocides, inhibits the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) via targeting both 19S proteasome-specific DUBs and 20S proteolytic peptidases with a mechanism distinct from that of the FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor bortezomib; (ii) CuPT potently inhibits proteasome-specific UCHL5 and USP14 activities; (iii) CuPT inhibits tumor growth in vivo and induces cytotoxicity in vitro and ex vivo. This study uncovers a novel class of dual inhibitors of DUBs and proteasome and suggests a potential clinical strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:24912524

  4. Increased hepatic receptor interacting protein kinase 3 expression due to impaired proteasomal functions contributes to alcohol-induced steatosis and liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaogui; Ni, Hong-Min; Dorko, Kenneth; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Nawabi, Atta; Komatsu, Masaaki; Huang, Heqing; Ding, Wen-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Chronic alcohol exposure increased hepatic receptor-interacting protein kinase (RIP) 3 expression and necroptosis in the liver but its mechanisms are unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that chronic alcohol feeding plus binge (Gao-binge) increased RIP3 but not RIP1 protein levels in mouse livers. RIP3 knockout mice had decreased serum alanine amino transferase activity and hepatic steatosis but had no effect on hepatic neutrophil infiltration compared with wild type mice after Gao-binge alcohol treatment. The hepatic mRNA levels of RIP3 did not change between Gao-binge and control mice, suggesting that alcohol-induced hepatic RIP3 proteins are regulated at the posttranslational level. We found that Gao-binge treatment decreased the levels of proteasome subunit alpha type-2 (PSMA2) and proteasome 26S subunit, ATPase 1 (PSMC1) and impaired hepatic proteasome function. Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of proteasome resulted in the accumulation of RIP3 in mouse livers. More importantly, human alcoholics had decreased expression of PSMA2 and PSMC1 but increased protein levels of RIP3 compared with healthy human livers. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of RIP1 decreased Gao-binge-induced hepatic inflammation, neutrophil infiltration and NF-κB subunit (p65) nuclear translocation but failed to protect against steatosis and liver injury induced by Gao-binge alcohol. In conclusion, results from this study suggest that impaired hepatic proteasome function by alcohol exposure may contribute to hepatic accumulation of RIP3 resulting in necroptosis and steatosis while RIP1 kinase activity is important for alcohol-induced inflammation. PMID:26769846

  5. Withaferin A inhibits the proteasome activity in mesothelioma in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huanjie; Wang, Ying; Cheryan, Vino T; Wu, Wenjuan; Cui, Cindy Qiuzhi; Polin, Lisa A; Pass, Harvey I; Dou, Q Ping; Rishi, Arun K; Wali, Anil

    2012-01-01

    The medicinal plant Withania somnifera has been used for over centuries in Indian Ayurvedic Medicine to treat a wide spectrum of disorders. Withaferin A (WA), a bioactive compound that is isolated from this plant, has anti-inflammatory, immuno-modulatory, anti-angiogenic, and anti-cancer properties. Here we investigated malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) suppressive effects of WA and the molecular mechanisms involved. WA inhibited growth of the murine as well as patient-derived MPM cells in part by decreasing the chymotryptic activity of the proteasome that resulted in increased levels of ubiquitinated proteins and pro-apoptotic proteasome target proteins (p21, Bax, IκBα). WA suppression of MPM growth also involved elevated apoptosis as evidenced by activation of pro-apoptotic p38 stress activated protein kinase (SAPK) and caspase-3, elevated levels of pro-apoptotic Bax protein and cleavage of poly-(ADP-ribose)-polymerase (PARP). Our studies including gene-array based analyses further revealed that WA suppressed a number of cell growth and metastasis-promoting genes including c-myc. WA treatments also stimulated expression of the cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory protein (CARP)-1/CCAR1, a novel transducer of cell growth signaling. Knock-down of CARP-1, on the other hand, interfered with MPM growth inhibitory effects of WA. Intra-peritoneal administration of 5 mg/kg WA daily inhibited growth of murine MPM cell-derived tumors in vivo in part by inhibiting proteasome activity and stimulating apoptosis. Together our in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that WA suppresses MPM growth by targeting multiple pathways that include blockage of proteasome activity and stimulation of apoptosis, and thus holds promise as an anti-MPM agent. PMID:22912669

  6. Proteasome Dysfunction Associated to Oxidative Stress and Proteotoxicity in Adipocytes Compromises Insulin Sensitivity in Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Ruiz, Alberto; Guzmán-Ruiz, Rocío; Moreno, Natalia R.; García-Rios, Antonio; Delgado-Casado, Nieves; Membrives, Antonio; Túnez, Isaac; El Bekay, Rajaa; Fernández-Real, José M.; Tovar, Sulay; Diéguez, Carlos; Tinahones, Francisco J.; Vázquez-Martínez, Rafael; López-Miranda, José

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Obesity is characterized by a low-grade systemic inflammatory state and adipose tissue (AT) dysfunction, which predispose individuals to the development of insulin resistance (IR) and metabolic disease. However, a subset of obese individuals, referred to as metabolically healthy obese (MHO) individuals, are protected from obesity-associated metabolic abnormalities. Here, we aim at identifying molecular factors and pathways in adipocytes that are responsible for the progression from the insulin-sensitive to the insulin-resistant, metabolically unhealthy obese (MUHO) phenotype. Results: Proteomic analysis of paired samples of adipocytes from subcutaneous (SC) and omental (OM) human AT revealed that both types of cells are altered in the MUHO state. Specifically, the glutathione redox cycle and other antioxidant defense systems as well as the protein-folding machinery were dysregulated and endoplasmic reticulum stress was increased in adipocytes from IR subjects. Moreover, proteasome activity was also compromised in adipocytes of MUHO individuals, which was associated with enhanced accumulation of oxidized and ubiquitinated proteins in these cells. Proteasome activity was also impaired in adipocytes of diet-induced obese mice and in 3T3-L1 adipocytes exposed to palmitate. In line with these data, proteasome inhibition significantly impaired insulin signaling in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Innovation: This study provides the first evidence of the occurrence of protein homeostasis deregulation in adipocytes in human obesity, which, together with oxidative damage, interferes with insulin signaling in these cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that proteasomal dysfunction and impaired proteostasis in adipocytes, resulting from protein oxidation and/or misfolding, constitute major pathogenic mechanisms in the development of IR in obesity. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 597–612. PMID:25714483

  7. HIV-1 Envelope Resistance to Proteasomal Cleavage: Implications for Vaccine Induced Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Steers, Nicholas J.; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; de Souza, Mark S.; Currier, Jeffrey R.; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Alving, Carl R.; Rao, Mangala

    2012-01-01

    Background Antigen processing involves many proteolytic enzymes such as proteasomes and cathepsins. The processed antigen is then presented on the cell surface bound to either MHC class I or class II molecules and induces/interacts with antigen-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T-cells, respectively. Preliminary immunological data from the RV144 phase III trial indicated that the immune responses were biased towards the Env antigen with a dominant CD4+ T-cell response. Methods In this study, we examined the susceptibility of HIV-1 Env-A244 gp120 protein, one of the protein boost subunits of the RV144 Phase III vaccine trial, to proteasomes and cathepsins and identified the generated peptide epitope repertoire by mass spectrometry. The peptide fragments were tested for cytokine production in CD4+ T-cell lines derived from RV144 volunteers. Results Env-A244 was resistant to proteasomes, thus diminishing the possibility of the generation of class I epitopes by the classical MHC class I pathway. However, Env-A244 was efficiently cleaved by cathepsins generating peptide arrays identified by mass spectrometry that contained both MHC class I and class II epitopes as reported in the Los Alamos database. Each of the cathepsins generated distinct degradation patterns containing regions of light and dense epitope clusters. The sequence DKKQKVHALF that is part of the V2 loop of gp120 produced by cathepsins induced a polyfunctional cytokine response including the generation of IFN-γ from CD4+ T-cell lines-derived from RV144 vaccinees. This sequence is significant since antibodies to the V1/V2-loop region correlated inversely with HIV-1 infection in the RV144 trial. Conclusions Based on our results, the susceptibility of Env-A244 to cathepsins and not to proteasomes suggests a possible mechanism for the generation of Env-specific CD4+T cell and antibody responses in the RV144 vaccinees. PMID:22880042

  8. Overview of proteasome inhibitor-based anti-cancer therapies: perspective on bortezomib and second generation proteasome inhibitors versus future generation inhibitors of ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Dou, Q Ping; Zonder, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Over the past ten years, proteasome inhibition has emerged as an effective therapeutic strategy for treating multiple myeloma (MM) and some lymphomas. In 2003, Bortezomib (BTZ) became the first proteasome inhibitor approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). BTZ-based therapies have become a staple for the treatment of MM at all stages of the disease. The survival rate of MM patients has improved significantly since clinical introduction of BTZ and other immunomodulatory drugs. However, BTZ has several limitations. Not all patients respond to BTZ based therapies and relapse occurs in many patients who initially responded. Solid tumors, in particular, are often resistant to BTZ. Furthermore, BTZ can induce dose-limiting peripheral neuropathy (PN). The second generation proteasome inhibitor Carfizomib (CFZ; U.S. FDA approved in August 2012) induces responses in a minority of MM patients relapsed from or refractory to BTZ. There is less PN compared to BTZ. Four other second-generation proteasome inhibitors (Ixazomib, Delanzomib, Oprozomib and Marizomib) with different pharmacologic properties and broader anticancer activities, have also shown some clinical activity in bortezomib-resistant cancers. While the mechanism of resistance to bortezomib in human cancers still remains to be fully understood, targeting the immunoproteasome, ubiquitin E3 ligases, the 19S proteasome and deubiquitinases in pre-clinical studies represents possible directions for future generation inhibitors of ubiquitin-proteasome system in the treatment of MM and other cancers. PMID:25092212

  9. Overview of Proteasome Inhibitor-Based Anti-cancer Therapies: Perspective on Bortezomib and Second Generation Proteasome Inhibitors versus Future Generation Inhibitors of Ubiquitin-Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Q. Ping; Zonder, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past ten years, proteasome inhibition has emerged as an effective therapeutic strategy for treating multiple myeloma (MM) and some lymphomas. In 2003, Bortezomib (BTZ) became the first proteasome inhibitor approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). BTZ-based therapies have become a staple for the treatment of MM at all stages of the disease. The survival rate of MM patients has improved significantly since clinical introduction of BTZ and other immunomodulatory drugs. However, BTZ has several limitations. Not all patients respond to BTZ-based therapies and relapse occurs in many patients who initially responded. Solid tumors, in particular, are often resistant to BTZ. Furthermore, BTZ can induce dose-limiting peripheral neuropathy (PN). The second generation proteasome inhibitor Carfizomib (CFZ; U.S. FDA approved in August 2012) induces responses in a minority of MM patients relapsed from or refractory to BTZ. There is less PN compared to BTZ. Four other second-generation proteasome inhibitors (Ixazomib, Delanzomib, Oprozomib and Marizomib) with different pharmacologic properties and broader anticancer activities, have also shown some clinical activity in bortezomib-resistant cancers. While the mechanism of resistance to bortezomib in human cancers still remains to be fully understood, targeting the immunoproteasome, ubiquitin E3 ligases, the 19S proteasome and deubiquitinases in pre-clinical studies represents possible directions for future generation inhibitors of ubiquitin-proteasome system in the treatment of MM and other cancers. PMID:25092212

  10. Phosphorylation of the C-terminal tail of proteasome subunit α7 is required for binding of the proteasome quality control factor Ecm29

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Prashant S.; Suppahia, Anjana; Capalla, Xavier; Ondracek, Alex; Roelofs, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome degrades many short-lived proteins that are labeled with an ubiquitin chain. The identification of phosphorylation sites on the proteasome subunits suggests that degradation of these substrates can also be regulated at the proteasome. In yeast and humans, the unstructured C-terminal region of α7 contains an acidic patch with serine residues that are phosphorylated. Although these were identified more than a decade ago, the molecular implications of α7 phosphorylation have remained unknown. Here, we showed that yeast Ecm29, a protein involved in proteasome quality control, requires the phosphorylated tail of α7 for its association with proteasomes. This is the first example of proteasome phosphorylation dependent binding of a proteasome regulatory factor. Ecm29 is known to inhibit proteasomes and is often found enriched on mutant proteasomes. We showed that the ability of Ecm29 to bind to mutant proteasomes requires the α7 tail binding site, besides a previously characterized Rpt5 binding site. The need for these two binding sites, which are on different proteasome subcomplexes, explains the specificity of Ecm29 for proteasome holoenzymes. We propose that alterations in the relative position of these two sites in different conformations of the proteasome provides Ecm29 the ability to preferentially bind specific proteasome conformations. PMID:27302526

  11. Metal-based 2,3-indolinedione derivatives as proteasome inhibitors and inducers of apoptosis in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengfei; Bi, Caifeng; Schmitt, Sara M; Li, Xin; Fan, Yuhua; Zhang, Nan; Dou, Q Ping

    2014-09-01

    Proliferation and apoptotic pathways are tightly regulated in cells by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Alterations in the UPS may result in cellular transformation or other pathological conditions. The proteasome is indeed often found to be overactive in cancer cells. It has been reported that 2,3-indolinedione (L), which exists in marine organisms, as well as in mammals, is a proteasome inhibitor. Studies have shown that metal-based complexes inhibit proteasome activity and induce apoptosis in certain human cancer cells. In the current study, we synthesized six novel metal-based complexes with derivatives of 2,3-indolinedione: [Cd (C15H11O3N2) (CH3COO)] (C1), [Cd (C15H11O2N2) (CH3COO)] (C2), [Co (C15H9O4N2) (CH3COO)] (C3), [Co (C15H11O2N2) (CH3COO)] (C4), [Zn (C19H14O3N3) (CH3COO)] (C5) and [Zn (C17H13O3N2) (CH3COO)] (C6). We sought to characterize and assess the proteasome inhibitory and anti-proliferative effects of these metal-based complexes in human breast (MDA-MB-231) and prostate (LNCaP and PC-3) cancer cells, in order to determine whether specific structures contribute to the inhibition of tumor proteasome activity and the induction of apoptosis. The results revealed that the complexes, C1, C3 and C5, but not their counterparts, C2, C4 and C6, inhibited the chymotrypsin-like activity of the human cancer cellular 26S proteasome; in addition, these complexes promoted the accumulation of the proteasome target protein, Bax, inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in a concentration- and time-dependent manner due to their unique structures. Our data suggest that the study of metal-based complexes, including aromatic ring structures with electron-attracting groups, may be an interesting research direction for the development of anticancer drugs. PMID:25017797

  12. Mutant glucocerebrosidase in Gaucher disease recruits Hsp27 to the Hsp90 chaperone complex for proteasomal degradation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunzhang; Wang, Herui; Zhu, Dongwang; Hong, Christopher S.; Dmitriev, Pauline; Zhang, Chao; Li, Yan; Ikejiri, Barbara; Brady, Roscoe O.; Zhuang, Zhengping

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease is caused by mutations of the GBA1 gene, which encodes the lysosomal anchored gluococerebrosidase (GCase). GBA1 mutations commonly result in protein misfolding, abnormal chaperone recognition, and premature degradation, but are less likely to affect catalytic activity. In the present study, we demonstrate that the Hsp90/HOP/Cdc37 complex recruits Hsp27 after recognition of GCase mutants with subsequent targeting of GCase mutant peptides to degradation mechanisms such as VCP and the 26S proteasome. Inhibition of Hsp27 not only increased the quantity of enzyme but also enhanced GCase activity in fibroblasts derived from patients with Gaucher disease. These findings provide insight into a possible therapeutic strategy for protein misfolding diseases by correcting chaperone binding and altering subsequent downstream patterns of protein degradation. PMID:25583479

  13. The degradation of p53 and its major E3 ligase Mdm2 is differentially dependent on the proteasomal ubiquitin receptor S5a

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, A; Dayal, S; Das, J; Robertson, P; Menendez, S; Saville, M K

    2014-01-01

    p53 and its major E3 ligase Mdm2 are both ubiquitinated and targeted to the proteasome for degradation. Despite the importance of this in regulating the p53 pathway, little is known about the mechanisms of proteasomal recognition of ubiquitinated p53 and Mdm2. In this study, we show that knockdown of the proteasomal ubiquitin receptor S5a/PSMD4/Rpn10 inhibits p53 protein degradation and results in the accumulation of ubiquitinated p53. Overexpression of a dominant-negative deletion of S5a lacking its ubiquitin-interacting motifs (UIM)s, but which can be incorporated into the proteasome, also causes the stabilization of p53. Furthermore, small-interferring RNA (siRNA) rescue experiments confirm that the UIMs of S5a are required for the maintenance of low p53 levels. These observations indicate that S5a participates in the recognition of ubiquitinated p53 by the proteasome. In contrast, targeting S5a has no effect on the rate of degradation of Mdm2, indicating that proteasomal recognition of Mdm2 can be mediated by an S5a-independent pathway. S5a knockdown results in an increase in the transcriptional activity of p53. The selective stabilization of p53 and not Mdm2 provides a mechanism for p53 activation. Depletion of S5a causes a p53-dependent decrease in cell proliferation, demonstrating that p53 can have a dominant role in the response to targeting S5a. This study provides evidence for alternative pathways of proteasomal recognition of p53 and Mdm2. Differences in recognition by the proteasome could provide a means to modulate the relative stability of p53 and Mdm2 in response to cellular signals. In addition, they could be exploited for p53-activating therapies. This work shows that the degradation of proteins by the proteasome can be selectively dependent on S5a in human cells, and that this selectivity can extend to an E3 ubiquitin ligase and its substrate. PMID:24121268

  14. Abnormally high expression of proteasomes in human leukemic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kumatori, A; Tanaka, K; Inamura, N; Sone, S; Ogura, T; Matsumoto, T; Tachikawa, T; Shin, S; Ichihara, A

    1990-01-01

    Proteasomes are eukaryotic ring-shaped or cylindrical particles with multicatalytic protease activities. To clarify the involvement of proteasomes in tumorigenesis of human blood cells, we compared their expression in human hematopoietic malignant tumor cells with that in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Immunohistochemical staining showed considerably increased concentrations of proteasomes in leukemic cells from the bone marrow of patients with various types of leukemia and the predominant localization of these proteasomes in the nuclei. Moreover, enzyme immunoassay and Northern blot analysis indicated that the concentrations of proteasomes and their mRNA levels were consistently much higher in a variety of malignant human hematopoietic cell lines than in resting peripheral lymphocytes and monocytes from healthy adults. Proteasome expression was also greatly increased in normal blood mononuclear cells during blastogenic transformation induced by phytohemagglutinin; their expression increased in parallel with induction of DNA synthesis and returned to the basal level with progress of the cell cycle. Thus, abnormally high expression of proteasomes may play an important role in transformation and proliferation of blood cells and in specific functions of hematopoietic tumor cells. Images PMID:2205851

  15. Proteasome activation as a novel anti-aging strategy.

    PubMed

    Gonos, Efstathios

    2014-10-01

    Aging and longevity are two multifactorial biological phenomena whose knowledge at molecular level is still limited. We have studied proteasome function in replicative senescence and cell survival (Mol Aspects Med 35, 1-71, 2014). We have observed reduced levels of proteasome content and activities in senescent cells due to the down-regulation of the catalytic subunits of the 20S complex (J Biol Chem 278, 28026-28037, 2003). In support, partial inhibition of proteasomes in young cells by specific inhibitors induces premature senescence which is p53 dependent (Aging Cell 7, 717-732, 2008). Stable over-expression of catalytic subunits or POMP resulted in enhanced proteasome assembly and activities and increased cell survival following treatments with various oxidants. Importantly, the developed "proteasome activated" human fibroblasts cell lines exhibit a delay of senescence by approximately 15% (J Biol Chem 280, 11840-11850, 2005; J Biol Chem 284, 30076-30086, 2009). Our current work proposes that proteasome activation is an evolutionary conserved mechanism, as it can delay aging in various in vivo systems. Moreover, additional findings indicate that the recorded proteasome activation by many inducers is Nrf2-dependent (J Biol Chem 285, 8171-8184, 2010). Finally, we have studied the proteolysis processes of various age-related proteins and we have identified that CHIP is a major p53 E3 ligase in senescent fibroblasts (Free Rad Biol Med 50, 157-165, 2011). PMID:26461417

  16. Deciphering preferential interactions within supramolecular protein complexes: the proteasome case

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, Bertrand; Lambour, Thomas; Garrigues, Luc; Amalric, François; Vigneron, Nathalie; Menneteau, Thomas; Stella, Alexandre; Monsarrat, Bernard; Van den Eynde, Benoît; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Bousquet-Dubouch, Marie-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, intracellular protein breakdown is mainly performed by the ubiquitin–proteasome system. Proteasomes are supramolecular protein complexes formed by the association of multiple sub-complexes and interacting proteins. Therefore, they exhibit a very high heterogeneity whose function is still not well understood. Here, using a newly developed method based on the combination of affinity purification and protein correlation profiling associated with high-resolution mass spectrometry, we comprehensively characterized proteasome heterogeneity and identified previously unknown preferential associations within proteasome sub-complexes. In particular, we showed for the first time that the two main proteasome subtypes, standard proteasome and immunoproteasome, interact with a different subset of important regulators. This trend was observed in very diverse human cell types and was confirmed by changing the relative proportions of both 20S proteasome forms using interferon-γ. The new method developed here constitutes an innovative and powerful strategy that could be broadly applied for unraveling the dynamic and heterogeneous nature of other biologically relevant supramolecular protein complexes. PMID:25561571

  17. The ubiquitin-proteasome system and its potential application in hepatocellular carcinoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Jie; Wu, Hao; Shen, Xi-Zhong

    2016-09-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is a complicated tightly controlled system in charge of degrading 80-90% of proteins, and is central to regulating cellular function and keeping protein homeostasis. Therefore, the components of UPS attract considerable attention as potential targets for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) therapy. The clinical success of bortezomib in multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma patients has set the precedent for therapeutically targeting this pathway. This review will provide an overview of the UPS in HCC and the current status of therapeutic strategies. PMID:26193663

  18. Activities of proteasome and m-calpain are essential for Chikungunya virus replication.

    PubMed

    Karpe, Yogesh A; Pingale, Kunal D; Kanade, Gayatri D

    2016-10-01

    Replication of many viruses is dependent on the ubiquitin proteasome system. The present study demonstrates that Chikungunya virus replication increases proteasome activity and induces unfolded protein response (UPR) in cultured cells. Further, it was seen that the virus replication was dependent on the activities of proteasomes and m-calpain. Proteasome inhibition induced accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins and earlier visualization of UPR. PMID:27206501

  19. It Is All about (U)biquitin: Role of Altered Ubiquitin-Proteasome System and UCHL1 in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tramutola, Antonella; Di Domenico, Fabio; Barone, Eugenio; Perluigi, Marzia; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2016-01-01

    Free radical-mediated damage to macromolecules and the resulting oxidative modification of different cellular components are a common feature of aging, and this process becomes much more pronounced in age-associated pathologies, including Alzheimer disease (AD). In particular, proteins are particularly sensitive to oxidative stress-induced damage and these irreversible modifications lead to the alteration of protein structure and function. In order to maintain cell homeostasis, these oxidized/damaged proteins have to be removed in order to prevent their toxic accumulation. It is generally accepted that the age-related accumulation of “aberrant” proteins results from both the increased occurrence of damage and the decreased efficiency of degradative systems. One of the most important cellular proteolytic systems responsible for the removal of oxidized proteins in the cytosol and in the nucleus is the proteasomal system. Several studies have demonstrated the impairment of the proteasome in AD thus suggesting a direct link between accumulation of oxidized/misfolded proteins and reduction of this clearance system. In this review we discuss the impairment of the proteasome system as a consequence of oxidative stress and how this contributes to AD neuropathology. Further, we focus the attention on the oxidative modifications of a key component of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, UCHL1, which lead to the impairment of its activity. PMID:26881020

  20. Sent to destroy: the ubiquitin proteasome system regulates cell signaling and protein quality control in cardiovascular development and disease.

    PubMed

    Willis, Monte S; Townley-Tilson, W H Davin; Kang, Eunice Y; Homeister, Jonathon W; Patterson, Cam

    2010-02-19

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) plays a crucial role in biological processes integral to the development of the cardiovascular system and cardiovascular diseases. The UPS prototypically recognizes specific protein substrates and places polyubiquitin chains on them for subsequent destruction by the proteasome. This system is in place to degrade not only misfolded and damaged proteins, but is essential also in regulating a host of cell signaling pathways involved in proliferation, adaptation to stress, regulation of cell size, and cell death. During the development of the cardiovascular system, the UPS regulates cell signaling by modifying transcription factors, receptors, and structural proteins. Later, in the event of cardiovascular diseases as diverse as atherosclerosis, cardiac hypertrophy, and ischemia/reperfusion injury, ubiquitin ligases and the proteasome are implicated in protecting and exacerbating clinical outcomes. However, when misfolded and damaged proteins are ubiquitinated by the UPS, their destruction by the proteasome is not always possible because of their aggregated confirmations. Recent studies have discovered how these ubiquitinated misfolded proteins can be destroyed by alternative "specific" mechanisms. The cytosolic receptors p62, NBR, and histone deacetylase 6 recognize aggregated ubiquitinated proteins and target them for autophagy in the process of "selective autophagy." Even the ubiquitination of multiple proteins within whole organelles that drive the more general macro-autophagy may be due, in part, to similar ubiquitin-driven mechanisms. In summary, the crosstalk between the UPS and autophagy highlight the pivotal and diverse roles the UPS plays in maintaining protein quality control and regulating cardiovascular development and disease. PMID:20167943

  1. Antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of proteasome inhibitors and their combination with histone deacetylase inhibitors on leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Ota; Provaznikova, Dana; Marinov, Iuri; Kuzelova, Katerina; Spicka, Ivan

    2009-03-01

    New chemotherapeutic agents are still required to further optimise treatment of leukemia patients. Proteasome inhibition by bortezomib, PR-171 (carfilzomib) and NPI-0052 (salinosporamide A) has been successfully used for the treatment of multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma and is considered also as novel treatment strategy in leukemia. Combination of proteasome inhibitors bortezomib and NPI-0052 induces synergistic anti-multiple myeloma activity both in vitro using multiple myeloma cells and in vivo in a human plasmacytoma xenograft mouse model. Cell death resulting from proteasome inhibition requires caspase activation and increased levels of reactive oxygen species. While bortezomib induces several caspases, NPI-0052 activates predominantly caspase-8-dependent pathway. We studied the effect of bortezomib (10 nM) on DNA synthesis and apoptosis in human acute myeloid cell lines KASUMI-1, ML-1, ML-2 and CTV-1 cells. Bortezomib was potent inhibitor of DNA synthesis in all four types of leukemia cells and induced apoptosis in KASUMI-1, ML-2 and CTV-1 cells but not in ML-1 cells. Other research groups showed that histone deacetylase inhibitors (valproic acid or benzamide derivative MS-275) in combination with NPI-0052 or PR-171 induced greater levels of acute leukemia cell death than in combination with bortezomib. Proteasome inhibition as monotherapy and its combination with many conventional therapies as novel treatment strategies in leukemia are promising. Malignant cells are more sensitive to this treatment than normal hematopoietic cells. PMID:19275578

  2. Development of novel proteasome inhibitors based on phthalazinone scaffold.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lingfei; Wang, Wei; Sun, Qi; Xu, Fengrong; Niu, Yan; Wang, Chao; Liang, Lei; Xu, Ping

    2016-06-15

    In this study we designed a series of proteasome inhibitors using pyridazinone as initial scaffold, and extended the structure with rational design by computer aided drug design (CADD). Two different synthetic routes were explored and the biological evaluation of the phthalazinone derivatives was investigated. Most importantly, electron positive triphenylphosphine group was first introduced in the structure of proteasome inhibitors and potent inhibition was achieved. As 6c was the most potent inhibitor of proteasome, we examined the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of 6c analogs. PMID:27158142

  3. A Single α Helix Drives Extensive Remodeling of the Proteasome Lid and Completion of Regulatory Particle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Tomko, Robert J.; Taylor, David W.; Chen, Zhuo A.; Wang, Hong-Wei; Rappsilber, Juri; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Summary Most short-lived eukaryotic proteins are degraded by the proteasome. A proteolytic core particle (CP) capped by regulatory particles (RPs) constitutes the 26S proteasome complex. RP biogenesis culminates with the joining of two large subcomplexes, the lid and base. In yeast and mammals, the lid appears to assemble completely before attaching to the base, but how this hierarchical assembly is enforced has remained unclear. Using biochemical reconstitutions, quantitative cross-linking/mass spectrometry, and electron microscopy, we resolve the mechanistic basis for the linkage between lid biogenesis and lid-base joining. Assimilation of the final lid subunit, Rpn12, triggers a large-scale conformational remodeling of the nascent lid that drives RP assembly, in part by relieving steric clash with the base. Surprisingly, this remodeling is triggered by a single Rpn12 α helix. Such assembly-coupled conformational switching is reminiscent of viral particle maturation and may represent a commonly used mechanism to enforce hierarchical assembly in multisubunit complexes. PMID:26451487

  4. Zinc ionophores pyrithione inhibits herpes simplex virus replication through interfering with proteasome function and NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Min; Chen, Yu; Chu, Ying; Song, Siwei; Yang, Na; Gao, Jie; Wu, Zhiwei

    2013-10-01

    Pyrithione (PT), known as a zinc ionophore, is effective against several pathogens from the Streptococcus and Staphylococcus genera. The antiviral activity of PT was also reported against a number of RNA viruses. In this paper, we showed that PT could effectively inhibit herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2). PT inhibited HSV late gene (Glycoprotein D, gD) expression and the production of viral progeny, and this action was dependent on Zn(2+). Further studies showed that PT suppressed the expression of HSV immediate early (IE) gene, the infected cell polypeptide 4 (ICP4), but had less effect on another regulatory IE protein, ICP0. It was found that PT treatment could interfere with cellular ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), leading to the inhibition of HSV-2-induced IκB-α degradation to inhibit NF-κB activation and enhanced promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) stability in nucleus. However, PT did not show direct inhibition of 26S proteasome activity. Instead, it induced Zn(2+) influx, which facilitated the dysregulation of UPS and the accumulation of intracellular ubiquitin-conjugates. UPS inhibition by PT caused disruption of IκB-α degradation and NF-κB activation thus leading to marked reduction of viral titer. PMID:23867132

  5. Conserved Sequence Preferences Contribute to Substrate Recognition by the Proteasome*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Houqing; Singh Gautam, Amit K.; Wilmington, Shameika R.; Wylie, Dennis; Martinez-Fonts, Kirby; Kago, Grace; Warburton, Marie; Chavali, Sreenivas; Inobe, Tomonao; Finkelstein, Ilya J.; Babu, M. Madan

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome has pronounced preferences for the amino acid sequence of its substrates at the site where it initiates degradation. Here, we report that modulating these sequences can tune the steady-state abundance of proteins over 2 orders of magnitude in cells. This is the same dynamic range as seen for inducing ubiquitination through a classic N-end rule degron. The stability and abundance of His3 constructs dictated by the initiation site affect survival of yeast cells and show that variation in proteasomal initiation can affect fitness. The proteasome's sequence preferences are linked directly to the affinity of the initiation sites to their receptor on the proteasome and are conserved between Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and human cells. These findings establish that the sequence composition of unstructured initiation sites influences protein abundance in vivo in an evolutionarily conserved manner and can affect phenotype and fitness. PMID:27226608

  6. Isoform-specific proteasomal degradation of Rbfox3 during chicken embryonic development

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kee K.; Adelstein, Robert S.; Kawamoto, Sachiyo

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Protein stability of Rbfox3 splice isoforms is differentially regulated. • Rbfox3-d31, an Rbfox3 isoform lacking the RRM, is highly susceptible to degradation. • The protein stability of Rbfox3-d31 is regulated by the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. • Rbfox3-d31 inhibits the nuclear localization of Rbfox2. • Rbfox3-d31 inhibits the splicing activity of Rbfox2. - Abstract: Rbfox3, a neuron-specific RNA-binding protein, plays an important role in neuronal differentiation during development. An isoform Rbfox3-d31, which excludes the 93-nucleotide cassette exon within the RNA recognition motif of chicken Rbfox3, has been previously identified. However, the cellular functions of Rbfox3-d31 remain largely unknown. Here we find that Rbfox3-d31 mRNA is highly expressed during the early developmental stages of the chicken embryo, while Rbfox3-d31 protein is barely detected during the same stage due to its rapid degradation mediated by the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. Importantly, this degradation is specific to the Rbfox3-d31 isoform and it does not occur with full-length Rbfox3. Furthermore, suppression of Rbfox3-d31 protein degradation with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 attenuates the splicing activity of another Rbfox family member Rbfox2 by altering the subcellular localization of Rbfox2. These results suggest that Rbfox3-d31 functions as a repressor for the splicing activity of the Rbfox family and its protein level is regulated in an isoform-specific manner in vivo.

  7. Rational Design of Proteasome Inhibitors as Antimalarial Drugs.

    PubMed

    Le Chapelain, Camille; Groll, Michael

    2016-05-23

    One life, two strategies: Crucial structural differences between the human and the Plasmodium falciparum proteasomes were recently identified. A combination of cryo-EM and functional characterization enabled the design of a selective antimalarial proteasome inhibitor that shows low toxicity in the host. When used with artemisinin, this ligand offers a new approach for the efficient treatment of malaria at all stages of the parasite lifecycle. PMID:27079849

  8. Cytokine induced changes in proteasome subunit composition are concentration dependent.

    PubMed

    Stohwasser, R; Kloetzel, P M

    1996-09-01

    In eukaryotes, 20S proteasome subunit composition is controlled by the cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). IFN-gamma induces the synthesis of the beta-subunits LMP2, LMP7 and MECL-1, which in consequence replace their constitutive subunit homologs delta, MB1 and MC14/Z in the 20S complex. By pulse labeling mouse RMA cells and immunoprecipitation of proteasome complexes with the antibody MP3, we have analysed the effect of different IFN-gamma concentrations on proteasomal subunit composition. Our experiments show that IFN-gamma concentrations as low as 5 U/ml induce subunit substitutions and that overall proteasomal subunit composition is dependent on the cytokine concentration used. An IFN-gamma concentration of 50 U/ml is sufficient for complete replacement of subunit delta by LMP2. In contrast, IFN-gamma treatment never induces a complete replacement of subunit MC14 by MECL-1. These subunits are present at an approximate 1:1 molar ratio, suggesting that both subunits coexist in the same 20S proteasome complex. Furthermore, different regulatory mechanisms have to be postulated for the synthesis and incorporation of the three IFN-gamma inducible proteasome subunits. Both IFN-gamma as well as IL-2 also seem to influence the modification state of the alpha subunit C8. Since the subunit composition is dependent on the cytokine concentration used and strongly influences the proteolytic properties of the 20S proteasome complex, our experiments represent a caveat for experiments in which IFN-gamma dependent proteasomal enzyme characteristics have been analysed without monitoring the subunit composition. PMID:9067255

  9. Dynamic Association of Proteasomal Machinery with the Centrosome

    PubMed Central

    Christian Wigley, W.; Fabunmi, Rosalind P.; Lee, Min Goo; Marino, Christopher R.; Muallem, Shmuel; DeMartino, George N.; Thomas, Philip J.

    1999-01-01

    Although the number of pathologies known to arise from the inappropriate folding of proteins continues to grow, mechanisms underlying the recognition and ultimate disposition of misfolded polypeptides remain obscure. For example, how and where such substrates are identified and processed is unknown. We report here the identification of a specific subcellular structure in which, under basal conditions, the 20S proteasome, the PA700 and PA28 (700- and 180-kD proteasome activator complexes, respectively), ubiquitin, Hsp70 and Hsp90 (70- and 90-kD heat shock protein, respectively) concentrate in HEK 293 and HeLa cells. The structure is perinuclear, surrounded by endoplasmic reticulum, adjacent to the Golgi, and colocalizes with γ-tubulin, an established centrosomal marker. Density gradient fractions containing purified centrosomes are enriched in proteasomal components and cell stress chaperones. The centrosome-associated structure enlarges in response to inhibition of proteasome activity and the level of misfolded proteins. For example, folding mutants of CFTR form large inclusions which arise from the centrosome upon inhibition of proteasome activity. At high levels of misfolded protein, the structure not only expands but also extensively recruits the cytosolic pools of ubiquitin, Hsp70, PA700, PA28, and the 20S proteasome. Thus, the centrosome may act as a scaffold, which concentrates and recruits the systems which act as censors and modulators of the balance between folding, aggregation, and degradation. PMID:10225950

  10. Dynamic association of proteasomal machinery with the centrosome.

    PubMed

    Wigley, W C; Fabunmi, R P; Lee, M G; Marino, C R; Muallem, S; DeMartino, G N; Thomas, P J

    1999-05-01

    Although the number of pathologies known to arise from the inappropriate folding of proteins continues to grow, mechanisms underlying the recognition and ultimate disposition of misfolded polypeptides remain obscure. For example, how and where such substrates are identified and processed is unknown. We report here the identification of a specific subcellular structure in which, under basal conditions, the 20S proteasome, the PA700 and PA28 (700- and 180-kD proteasome activator complexes, respectively), ubiquitin, Hsp70 and Hsp90 (70- and 90-kD heat shock protein, respectively) concentrate in HEK 293 and HeLa cells. The structure is perinuclear, surrounded by endoplasmic reticulum, adjacent to the Golgi, and colocalizes with gamma-tubulin, an established centrosomal marker. Density gradient fractions containing purified centrosomes are enriched in proteasomal components and cell stress chaperones. The centrosome-associated structure enlarges in response to inhibition of proteasome activity and the level of misfolded proteins. For example, folding mutants of CFTR form large inclusions which arise from the centrosome upon inhibition of proteasome activity. At high levels of misfolded protein, the structure not only expands but also extensively recruits the cytosolic pools of ubiquitin, Hsp70, PA700, PA28, and the 20S proteasome. Thus, the centrosome may act as a scaffold, which concentrates and recruits the systems which act as censors and modulators of the balance between folding, aggregation, and degradation. PMID:10225950

  11. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib induces testicular toxicity by upregulation of oxidative stress, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and deregulation of germ cell development in adult murine testis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Fu, Jianfang; Zhang, Shun; Zhao, Jie; Xie, Nianlin; Cai, Guoqing

    2015-06-01

    Understanding how chemotherapeutic agents mediate testicular toxicity is crucial in light of compelling evidence that male infertility, one of the severe late side effects of intensive cancer treatment, occurs more often than they are expected to. Previous study demonstrated that bortezomib (BTZ), a 26S proteasome inhibitor used to treat refractory multiple myeloma (MM), exerts deleterious impacts on spermatogenesis in pubertal mice via unknown mechanisms. Here, we showed that intermittent treatment with BTZ resulted in fertility impairment in adult mice, evidenced by testicular atrophy, desquamation of immature germ cells and reduced caudal sperm storage. These deleterious effects may originate from the elevated apoptosis in distinct germ cells during the acute phase and the subsequent disruption of Sertoli–germ cell anchoring junctions (AJs) during the late recovery. Mechanistically, balance between AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and Akt/ERK pathway appeared to be indispensable for AJ integrity during the late testicular recovery. Of particular interest, the upregulated testicular apoptosis and the following disturbance of Sertoli–germ cell interaction may both stem from the excessive oxidative stress elicited by BTZ exposure. We also provided the in vitro evidence that AMPK-dependent mechanisms counteract follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) proliferative effects in BTZ-exposed Sertoli cells. Collectively, BTZ appeared to efficiently prevent germ cells from normal development via multiple mechanisms in adult mice. Employment of antioxidants and/or AMPK inhibitor may represent an attractive strategy of fertility preservation in male MM patients exposed to conventional BTZ therapy and warrants further investigation. - Highlights: • Intermittent treatment with BTZ caused fertility impairment in adult mice. • BTZ treatment elicited apoptosis during early phase of testicular recovery. • Up-regulation of oxidative stress by BTZ treatment

  12. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib induces testicular toxicity by upregulation of oxidative stress, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and deregulation of germ cell development in adult murine testis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Fu, Jianfang; Zhang, Shun; Zhao, Jie; Xie, Nianlin; Cai, Guoqing

    2015-06-01

    Understanding how chemotherapeutic agents mediate testicular toxicity is crucial in light of compelling evidence that male infertility, one of the severe late side effects of intensive cancer treatment, occurs more often than they are expected to. Previous study demonstrated that bortezomib (BTZ), a 26S proteasome inhibitor used to treat refractory multiple myeloma (MM), exerts deleterious impacts on spermatogenesis in pubertal mice via unknown mechanisms. Here, we showed that intermittent treatment with BTZ resulted in fertility impairment in adult mice, evidenced by testicular atrophy, desquamation of immature germ cells and reduced caudal sperm storage. These deleterious effects may originate from the elevated apoptosis in distinct germ cells during the acute phase and the subsequent disruption of Sertoli-germ cell anchoring junctions (AJs) during the late recovery. Mechanistically, balance between AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and Akt/ERK pathway appeared to be indispensable for AJ integrity during the late testicular recovery. Of particular interest, the upregulated testicular apoptosis and the following disturbance of Sertoli-germ cell interaction may both stem from the excessive oxidative stress elicited by BTZ exposure. We also provided the in vitro evidence that AMPK-dependent mechanisms counteract follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) proliferative effects in BTZ-exposed Sertoli cells. Collectively, BTZ appeared to efficiently prevent germ cells from normal development via multiple mechanisms in adult mice. Employment of antioxidants and/or AMPK inhibitor may represent an attractive strategy of fertility preservation in male MM patients exposed to conventional BTZ therapy and warrants further investigation. PMID:25886977

  13. Ubiquitin–Proteasome-dependent Degradation of a Mitofusin, a Critical Regulator of Mitochondrial Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mickael M.J.; Leboucher, Guillaume P.; Livnat-Levanon, Nurit

    2008-01-01

    The mitochondrion is a dynamic membranous network whose morphology is conditioned by the equilibrium between ongoing fusion and fission of mitochondrial membranes. In the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transmembrane GTPase Fzo1p controls fusion of mitochondrial outer membranes. Deletion or overexpression of Fzo1p have both been shown to alter the mitochondrial fusion process indicating that maintenance of steady-state levels of Fzo1p are required for efficient mitochondrial fusion. Cellular levels of Fzo1p are regulated through degradation of Fzo1p by the F-box protein Mdm30p. How Mdm30p promotes degradation of Fzo1p is currently unknown. We have now determined that during vegetative growth Mdm30p mediates ubiquitylation of Fzo1p and that degradation of Fzo1p is an ubiquitin-proteasome–dependent process. In vivo, Mdm30p associates through its F-box motif with other core components of Skp1-Cullin-F-box (SCF) ubiquitin ligases. We show that the resulting SCFMdm30p ligase promotes ubiquitylation of Fzo1p at mitochondria and its subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome. These results provide the first demonstration that a cytosolic ubiquitin ligase targets a critical regulatory molecule at the mitochondrial outer membrane. This study provides a framework for developing an understanding of the function of Mdm30p-mediated Fzo1p degradation in the multistep process of mitochondrial fusion. PMID:18353967

  14. Plasmid Vectors for Proteomic Analyses in Giardia: Purification of Virulence Factors and Analysis of the Proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Stadelmann, Britta; Birkestedt, Sandra; Hellman, Ulf; Svärd, Staffan G.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, proteomics has come of age with the development of efficient tools for purification, identification, and characterization of gene products predicted by genome projects. The intestinal protozoan Giardia intestinalis can be transfected, but there is only a limited set of vectors available, and most of them are not user friendly. This work delineates the construction of a suite of cassette-based expression vectors for use in Giardia. Expression is provided by the strong constitutive ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OCT) promoter, and tagging is possible in both N- and C-terminal configurations. Taken together, the vectors are capable of providing protein localization and production of recombinant proteins, followed by efficient purification by a novel affinity tag combination, streptavidin binding peptide–glutathione S-transferase (SBP-GST). The option of removing the tags from purified proteins was provided by the inclusion of a PreScission protease site. The efficiency and feasibility of producing and purifying endogenous recombinant Giardia proteins with the developed vectors was demonstrated by the purification of active recombinant arginine deiminase (ADI) and OCT from stably transfected trophozoites. Moreover, we describe the tagging, purification by StrepTactin affinity chromatography, and compositional analysis by mass spectrometry of the G. intestinalis 26S proteasome by employing the Strep II-FLAG–tandem affinity purification (SF-TAP) tag. This is the first report of efficient production and purification of recombinant proteins in and from Giardia, which will allow the study of specific parasite proteins and protein complexes. PMID:22611020

  15. Prefoldin Promotes Proteasomal Degradation of Cytosolic Proteins with Missense Mutations by Maintaining Substrate Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Young, Barry P.; Loewen, Christopher J.; Mayor, Thibault

    2016-01-01

    Misfolded proteins challenge the ability of cells to maintain protein homeostasis and can accumulate into toxic protein aggregates. As a consequence, cells have adopted a number of protein quality control pathways to prevent protein aggregation, promote protein folding, and target terminally misfolded proteins for degradation. In this study, we employed a thermosensitive allele of the yeast Guk1 guanylate kinase as a model misfolded protein to investigate degradative protein quality control pathways. We performed a flow cytometry based screen to identify factors that promote proteasomal degradation of proteins misfolded as the result of missense mutations. In addition to the E3 ubiquitin ligase Ubr1, we identified the prefoldin chaperone subunit Gim3 as an important quality control factor. Whereas the absence of GIM3 did not impair proteasomal function or the ubiquitination of the model substrate, it led to the accumulation of the poorly soluble model substrate in cellular inclusions that was accompanied by delayed degradation. We found that Gim3 interacted with the Guk1 mutant allele and propose that prefoldin promotes the degradation of the unstable model substrate by maintaining the solubility of the misfolded protein. We also demonstrated that in addition to the Guk1 mutant, prefoldin can stabilize other misfolded cytosolic proteins containing missense mutations. PMID:27448207

  16. Prefoldin Promotes Proteasomal Degradation of Cytosolic Proteins with Missense Mutations by Maintaining Substrate Solubility.

    PubMed

    Comyn, Sophie A; Young, Barry P; Loewen, Christopher J; Mayor, Thibault

    2016-07-01

    Misfolded proteins challenge the ability of cells to maintain protein homeostasis and can accumulate into toxic protein aggregates. As a consequence, cells have adopted a number of protein quality control pathways to prevent protein aggregation, promote protein folding, and target terminally misfolded proteins for degradation. In this study, we employed a thermosensitive allele of the yeast Guk1 guanylate kinase as a model misfolded protein to investigate degradative protein quality control pathways. We performed a flow cytometry based screen to identify factors that promote proteasomal degradation of proteins misfolded as the result of missense mutations. In addition to the E3 ubiquitin ligase Ubr1, we identified the prefoldin chaperone subunit Gim3 as an important quality control factor. Whereas the absence of GIM3 did not impair proteasomal function or the ubiquitination of the model substrate, it led to the accumulation of the poorly soluble model substrate in cellular inclusions that was accompanied by delayed degradation. We found that Gim3 interacted with the Guk1 mutant allele and propose that prefoldin promotes the degradation of the unstable model substrate by maintaining the solubility of the misfolded protein. We also demonstrated that in addition to the Guk1 mutant, prefoldin can stabilize other misfolded cytosolic proteins containing missense mutations. PMID:27448207

  17. Phosphorylation of Kif26b promotes its polyubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation during kidney development.

    PubMed

    Terabayashi, Takeshi; Sakaguchi, Masaji; Shinmyozu, Kaori; Ohshima, Toshio; Johjima, Ai; Ogura, Teru; Miki, Hiroaki; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi

    2012-01-01

    Kif26b, a member of the kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs), is essential for kidney development. Kif26b expression is restricted to the metanephric mesenchyme, and its transcription is regulated by a zinc finger transcriptional regulator Sall1. However, the mechanism(s) by which Kif26b protein is regulated remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate phosphorylation and subsequent polyubiquitination of Kif26b in the developing kidney. We find that Kif26b interacts with an E3 ubiquitin ligase, neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated protein 4 (Nedd4) in developing kidney. Phosphorylation of Kif26b at Thr-1859 and Ser-1962 by the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) enhances the interaction of Kif26b with Nedd4. Nedd4 polyubiquitinates Kif26b and thereby promotes degradation of Kif26b via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Furthermore, Kif26b lacks ATPase activity but does associate with microtubules. Nocodazole treatment not only disrupts the localization of Kif26b to microtubules but also promotes phosphorylation and polyubiquitination of Kif26b. These results suggest that the function of Kif26b is microtubule-based and that Kif26b degradation in the metanephric mesenchyme via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway may be important for proper kidney development. PMID:22768111

  18. MiR-29b replacement inhibits proteasomes and disrupts aggresome+autophagosome formation to enhance the antimyeloma benefit of bortezomib.

    PubMed

    Jagannathan, S; Vad, N; Vallabhapurapu, S; Vallabhapurapu, S; Anderson, K C; Driscoll, J J

    2015-03-01

    Evading apoptosis is a cancer hallmark that remains a serious obstacle in current treatment approaches. Although proteasome inhibitors (PIs) have transformed management of multiple myeloma (MM), drug resistance emerges through induction of the aggresome+autophagy pathway as a compensatory protein clearance mechanism. Genome-wide profiling identified microRNAs (miRs) differentially expressed in bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells compared with drug-naive cells. The effect of individual miRs on proteasomal degradation of short-lived fluorescent reporter proteins was then determined in live cells. MiR-29b was significantly reduced in bortezomib-resistant cells as well as in cells resistant to second-generation PIs carfilzomib and ixazomib. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that miR-29b targeted PSME4 that encodes the proteasome activator PA200. Synthetically engineered miR-29b replacements impaired the growth of myeloma cells, patient tumor cells and xenotransplants. MiR-29b replacements also decreased PA200 association with proteasomes, reduced the proteasome's peptidase activity and inhibited ornithine decarboxylase turnover, a proteasome substrate degraded through ubiquitin-independent mechanisms. Immunofluorescence studies revealed that miR-29b replacements enhanced the bortezomib-induced accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins but did not reveal aggresome or autophagosome formation. Taken together, our study identifies miR-29b replacements as the first-in-class miR-based PIs that also disrupt the autophagy pathway and highlight their potential to synergistically enhance the antimyeloma effect of bortezomib. PMID:25234165

  19. MiR-29b replacement inhibits proteasomes and disrupts aggresome+autophagosome formation to enhance the antimyeloma benefit of bortezomib

    PubMed Central

    Jagannathan, S; Vad, N; Vallabhapurapu, S; Vallabhapurapu, S; Anderson, K C; Driscoll, J J

    2015-01-01

    Evading apoptosis is a cancer hallmark that remains a serious obstacle in current treatment approaches. Although proteasome inhibitors (PIs) have transformed management of multiple myeloma (MM), drug resistance emerges through induction of the aggresome+autophagy pathway as a compensatory protein clearance mechanism. Genome-wide profiling identified microRNAs (miRs) differentially expressed in bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells compared with drug-naive cells. The effect of individual miRs on proteasomal degradation of short-lived fluorescent reporter proteins was then determined in live cells. MiR-29b was significantly reduced in bortezomib-resistant cells as well as in cells resistant to second-generation PIs carfilzomib and ixazomib. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that miR-29b targeted PSME4 that encodes the proteasome activator PA200. Synthetically engineered miR-29b replacements impaired the growth of myeloma cells, patient tumor cells and xenotransplants. MiR-29b replacements also decreased PA200 association with proteasomes, reduced the proteasome's peptidase activity and inhibited ornithine decarboxylase turnover, a proteasome substrate degraded through ubiquitin-independent mechanisms. Immunofluorescence studies revealed that miR-29b replacements enhanced the bortezomib-induced accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins but did not reveal aggresome or autophagosome formation. Taken together, our study identifies miR-29b replacements as the first-in-class miR-based PIs that also disrupt the autophagy pathway and highlight their potential to synergistically enhance the antimyeloma effect of bortezomib. PMID:25234165

  20. Proteasome Failure Promotes Positioning of Lysosomes around the Aggresome via Local Block of Microtubule-Dependent Transport

    PubMed Central

    Zaarur, Nava; Meriin, Anatoli B.; Bejarano, Eloy; Xu, Xiaobin; Gabai, Vladimir L.; Cuervo, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Ubiquitinated proteins aggregate upon proteasome failure, and the aggregates are transported to the aggresome. In aggresomes, protein aggregates are actively degraded by the autophagy-lysosome pathway, but why targeting the aggresome promotes degradation of aggregated species is currently unknown. Here we report that the important factor in this process is clustering of lysosomes around the aggresome via a novel mechanism. Proteasome inhibition causes formation of a zone around the centrosome where microtubular transport of lysosomes is suppressed, resulting in their entrapment and accumulation. Microtubule-dependent transport of other organelles, including autophagosomes, mitochondria, and endosomes, is also blocked in this entrapment zone (E-zone), while movement of organelles at the cell periphery remains unaffected. Following the whole-genome small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen for proteins involved in aggresome formation, we defined the pathway that regulates formation of the E-zone, including the Stk11 protein kinase, the Usp9x deubiquitinating enzyme, and their substrate kinase MARK4. Therefore, upon proteasome failure, targeting of aggregated proteins of the aggresome is coordinated with lysosome positioning around this body to facilitate degradation of the abnormal species. PMID:24469403

  1. Regulation of dimethyl-fumarate toxicity by proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Booth, Laurence; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Tavallai, Seyedmehrad; Roberts, Jane L; Peery, Matthew; Poklepovic, Andrew; Dent, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The present studies examined the biology of the multiple sclerosis drug dimethyl-fumarate (DMF) or its in vivo breakdown product and active metabolite mono-methyl-fumarate (MMF), alone or in combination with proteasome inhibitors, in primary human glioblastoma (GBM) cells. MMF enhanced velcade and carfilzomib toxicity in multiple primary GBM isolates. Similar data were obtained in breast and colon cancer cells. MMF reduced the invasiveness of GBM cells, and enhanced the toxicity of ionizing radiation and temozolomide. MMF killed freshly isolated activated microglia which was associated with reduced IL-6, TGFβ and TNFα production. The combination of MMF and the multiple sclerosis drug Gilenya further reduced both GBM and activated microglia viability and cytokine production. Over-expression of c-FLIP-s or BCL(-)XL protected GBM cells from MMF and velcade toxicity. MMF and velcade increased plasma membrane localization of CD95, and knock down of CD95 or FADD blocked the drug interaction. The drug combination inactivated AKT, ERK1/2 and mTOR. Molecular inhibition of AKT/ERK/mTOR signaling enhanced drug combination toxicity whereas molecular activation of these pathways suppressed killing. MMF and velcade increased the levels of autophagosomes and autolysosomes and knock down of ATG5 or Beclin1 protected cells. Inhibition of the eIF2α/ATF4 arm or the IRE1α/XBP1 arm of the ER stress response enhanced drug combination lethality. This was associated with greater production of reactive oxygen species and quenching of ROS suppressed cell killing. PMID:25482938

  2. Elastase-like Activity Is Dominant to Chymotrypsin-like Activity in 20S Proteasome's β5 Catalytic Subunit.

    PubMed

    Bensinger, Dennis; Neumann, Theresa; Scholz, Christoph; Voss, Constantin; Knorr, Sabine; Kuckelkorn, Ulrike; Hamacher, Kay; Kloetzel, Peter-Michael; Schmidt, Boris

    2016-07-15

    The ubiquitin/proteasome system is the major protein degradation pathway in eukaryotes with several key catalytic cores. Targeting the β5 subunit with small-molecule inhibitors is an established therapeutic strategy for hematologic cancers. Herein, we report a mouse-trap-like conformational change that influences molecular recognition depending on the substitution pattern of a bound ligand. Variation of the size of P1 residues from the highly β5-selective proteasome inhibitor BSc2118 allows for discrimination between inhibitory strength and substrate conversion. We found that increasing molecular size strengthens inhibition, whereas decreasing P1 size accelerates substrate conversion. Evaluation of substrate hydrolysis after silencing of β5 activity reveals significant residual activity for large residues exclusively. Thus, classification of the β5 subunit as chymotrypsin-like and the use of the standard tyrosine-containing substrate should be reconsidered. PMID:27111844

  3. Paradoxical resistance of multiple myeloma to proteasome inhibitors by decreased levels of 19S proteasomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Alvear, Diego; Cho, Min Y; Wild, Thomas; Buchholz, Tonia J; Lerner, Alana G; Simakova, Olga; Hahn, Jamie; Korde, Neha; Landgren, Ola; Maric, Irina; Choudhary, Chunaram; Walter, Peter; Weissman, Jonathan S; Kampmann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Hallmarks of cancer, including rapid growth and aneuploidy, can result in non-oncogene addiction to the proteostasis network that can be exploited clinically. The defining example is the exquisite sensitivity of multiple myeloma (MM) to 20S proteasome inhibitors, such as carfilzomib. However, MM patients invariably acquire resistance to these drugs. Using a next-generation shRNA platform, we found that proteostasis factors, including chaperones and stress-response regulators, controlled the response to carfilzomib. Paradoxically, 19S proteasome regulator knockdown induced resistance to carfilzomib in MM and non-MM cells. 19S subunit knockdown did not affect the activity of the 20S subunits targeted by carfilzomib nor their inhibition by the drug, suggesting an alternative mechanism, such as the selective accumulation of protective factors. In MM patients, lower 19S levels predicted a diminished response to carfilzomib-based therapies. Together, our findings suggest that an understanding of network rewiring can inform development of new combination therapies to overcome drug resistance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08153.001 PMID:26327694

  4. The GST-BHMT assay reveals a distinct mechanism underlying proteasome inhibition-induced macroautophagy in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Yan-Ning; Xu, Zhen; Chen, Zhihua; Zhang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    By monitoring the fragmentation of a GST-BHMT (a protein fusion of glutathionine S-transferase N-terminal to betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase) reporter in lysosomes, the GST-BHMT assay has previously been established as an endpoint, cargo-based assay for starvation-induced autophagy that is largely nonselective. Here, we demonstrate that under nutrient-rich conditions, proteasome inhibition by either pharmaceutical or genetic manipulations induces similar autophagy-dependent GST-BHMT processing. However, mechanistically this proteasome inhibition-induced autophagy is different from that induced by starvation as it does not rely on regulation by MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin [serine/threonine kinase]) and PRKAA/AMPK (protein kinase, AMP-activated, α catalytic subunit), the upstream central sensors of cellular nutrition and energy status, but requires the presence of the cargo receptors SQSTM1/p62 (sequestosome 1) and NBR1 (neighbor of BRCA1 gene 1) that are normally involved in the selective autophagy pathway. Further, it depends on ER (endoplasmic reticulum) stress signaling, in particular ERN1/IRE1 (endoplasmic reticulum to nucleus signaling 1) and its main downstream effector MAPK8/JNK1 (mitogen-activated protein kinase 8), but not XBP1 (X-box binding protein 1), by regulating the phosphorylation-dependent disassociation of BCL2 (B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2) from BECN1 (Beclin 1, autophagy related). Moreover, the multimerization domain of GST-BHMT is required for its processing in response to proteasome inhibition, in contrast to its dispensable role in starvation-induced processing. Together, these findings support a model in which under nutrient-rich conditions, proteasome inactivation induces autophagy-dependent processing of the GST-BHMT reporter through a distinct mechanism that bears notable similarity with the yeast Cvt (cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting) pathway, and suggest the GST-BHMT reporter might be employed as a convenient assay to study

  5. The novel β2-selective proteasome inhibitor LU-102 synergizes with bortezomib and carfilzomib to overcome proteasome inhibitor resistance of myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Marianne; Bader, Juergen; Geurink, Paul P.; Weyburne, Emily S.; Mirabella, Anne C.; Silzle, Tobias; Shabaneh, Tamer B.; van der Linden, Wouter A.; de Bruin, Gerjan; Haile, Sarah R.; van Rooden, Eva; Appenzeller, Christina; Li, Nan; Kisselev, Alexei F.; Overkleeft, Herman; Driessen, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Proteasome inhibitor resistance is a challenge for myeloma therapy. Bortezomib targets the β5 and β1 activity, but not the β2 activity of the proteasome. Bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells down-regulate the activation status of the unfolded protein response, and up-regulate β2 proteasome activity. To improve proteasome inhibition in bortezomib-resistant myeloma and to achieve more efficient UPR activation, we have developed LU-102, a selective inhibitor of the β2 proteasome activity. LU-102 inhibited the β2 activity in intact myeloma cells at low micromolar concentrations without relevant co-inhibition of β1 and β5 proteasome subunits. In proteasome inhibitor-resistant myeloma cells, significantly more potent proteasome inhibition was achieved by bortezomib or carfilzomib in combination with LU-102, compared to bortezomib/carfilzomib alone, resulting in highly synergistic cytotoxic activity of the drug combination via endoplasmatic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis. Combining bortezomib/carfilzomib with LU-102 significantly prolonged proteasome inhibition and increased activation of the unfolded protein response and IRE1-a activity. IRE1-α has recently been shown to control myeloma cell differentiation and bortezomib sensitivity (Leung-Hagesteijn, Cancer Cell 24:3, 289-304). Thus, β2-selective proteasome inhibition by LU-102 in combination with bortezomib or carfilzomib results in synergistic proteasome inhibition, activation of the unfolded protein response, and cytotoxicity, and overcomes bortezomib/carfilzomib resistance in myeloma cells in vitro PMID:26069288

  6. The novel β2-selective proteasome inhibitor LU-102 synergizes with bortezomib and carfilzomib to overcome proteasome inhibitor resistance of myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Marianne; Bader, Juergen; Geurink, Paul P; Weyburne, Emily S; Mirabella, Anne C; Silzle, Tobias; Shabaneh, Tamer B; van der Linden, Wouter A; de Bruin, Gerjan; Haile, Sarah R; van Rooden, Eva; Appenzeller, Christina; Li, Nan; Kisselev, Alexei F; Overkleeft, Herman; Driessen, Christoph

    2015-10-01

    Proteasome inhibitor resistance is a challenge for myeloma therapy. Bortezomib targets the β5 and β1 activity, but not the β2 activity of the proteasome. Bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells down-regulate the activation status of the unfolded protein response, and up-regulate β2 proteasome activity. To improve proteasome inhibition in bortezomib-resistant myeloma and to achieve more efficient UPR activation, we have developed LU-102, a selective inhibitor of the β2 proteasome activity. LU-102 inhibited the β2 activity in intact myeloma cells at low micromolar concentrations without relevant co-inhibition of β1 and β5 proteasome subunits. In proteasome inhibitor-resistant myeloma cells, significantly more potent proteasome inhibition was achieved by bortezomib or carfilzomib in combination with LU-102, compared to bortezomib/carfilzomib alone, resulting in highly synergistic cytotoxic activity of the drug combination via endoplasmatic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis. Combining bortezomib/carfilzomib with LU-102 significantly prolonged proteasome inhibition and increased activation of the unfolded protein response and IRE1-a activity. IRE1-α has recently been shown to control myeloma cell differentiation and bortezomib sensitivity (Leung-Hagesteijn, Cancer Cell 24:3, 289-304). Thus, β2-selective proteasome inhibition by LU-102 in combination with bortezomib or carfilzomib results in synergistic proteasome inhibition, activation of the unfolded protein response, and cytotoxicity, and overcomes bortezomib/carfilzomib resistance in myeloma cells in vitro. PMID:26069288

  7. Cold Temperature Induces the Reprogramming of Proteolytic Pathways in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Isasa, Marta; Suñer, Clara; Díaz, Miguel; Puig-Sàrries, Pilar; Zuin, Alice; Bichman, Anne; Gygi, Steven P; Rebollo, Elena; Crosas, Bernat

    2016-01-22

    Despite much evidence of the involvement of the proteasome-ubiquitin signaling system in temperature stress response, the dynamics of the ubiquitylome during cold response has not yet been studied. Here, we have compared quantitative ubiquitylomes from a strain deficient in proteasome substrate recruitment and a reference strain during cold response. We have observed that a large group of proteins showing increased ubiquitylation in the proteasome mutant at low temperature is comprised by reverses suppressor of Ty-phenotype 5 (Rsp5)-regulated plasma membrane proteins. Analysis of internalization and degradation of plasma membrane proteins at low temperature showed that the proteasome becomes determinant for this process, whereas, at 30 °C, the proteasome is dispensable. Moreover, our observations indicate that proteasomes have increased capacity to interact with lysine 63-polyubiquitylated proteins during low temperature in vivo. These unanticipated observations indicate that, during cold response, there is a proteolytic cellular reprogramming in which the proteasome acquires a role in the endocytic-vacuolar pathway. PMID:26601941

  8. Transcriptional upregulation of BAG3 upon proteasome inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Huaqin Liu Haimei; Zhang Haiyan; Guan Yifu; Du Zhenxian

    2008-01-11

    Proteasome inhibitors exhibit antitumoral activity against malignancies of different histology. Emerging evidence indicates that antiapoptotic factors may also accumulate as a consequence of exposure to these drugs, thus it seems plausible that activation of survival signaling cascades might compromise their antitumoral effects. Bcl-2-associated athanogene (BAG) family proteins are characterized by their property of interaction with a variety of partners involved in modulating the proliferation/death balance, including heat shock proteins (HSP), Bcl-2, Raf-1. In this report, we demonstrated that BAG3 is a novel antiapoptotic molecule induced by proteasome inhibitors in various cancer cells at the transcriptional level. Moreover, we demonstrated that BAG3 knockdown by siRNA sensitized cancer cells to MG132-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our results suggest that BAG3 induction might represents as an unwanted molecular consequence of utilizing proteasome inhibitors to combat tumors.

  9. A novel proteasome inhibitor NPI-0052 as an anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, D; Hideshima, T; Anderson, K C

    2006-01-01

    Proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib/Velcade has emerged as an effective anticancer therapy for the treatment of relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma (MM), but prolonged treatment can be associated with toxicity and development of drug resistance. In this review, we discuss the recent discovery of a novel proteasome inhibitor, NPI-0052, that is distinct from Bortezomib in its chemical structure, mechanisms of action, and effects on proteasomal activities; most importantly, it overcomes resistance to conventional and Bortezomib therapies. In vivo studies using human MM xenografts shows that NPI-0052 is well tolerated, prolongs survival, and reduces tumour recurrence. These preclinical studies provided the basis for Phase-I clinical trial of NPI-0052 in relapsed/refractory MM patients. PMID:17047643

  10. Proteasome inhibitors - molecular basis and current perspectives in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Kubiczkova, Lenka; Pour, Ludek; Sedlarikova, Lenka; Hajek, Roman; Sevcikova, Sabina

    2014-06-01

    Inhibition of proteasome, a proteolytic complex responsible for the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins, has emerged as a powerful strategy for treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), a plasma cell malignancy. First-in-class agent, bortezomib, has demonstrated great positive therapeutic efficacy in MM, both in pre-clinical and in clinical studies. However, despite its high efficiency, a large proportion of patients do not achieve sufficient clinical response. Therefore, the development of a second-generation of proteasome inhibitors (PIs) with improved pharmacological properties was needed. Recently, several of these new agents have been introduced into clinics including carfilzomib, marizomib and ixazomib. Further, new orally administered second-generation PI oprozomib is being investigated. This review provides an overview of main mechanisms of action of PIs in MM, focusing on the ongoing development and progress of novel anti-proteasome therapeutics. PMID:24712303

  11. Complete subunit architecture of the proteasome regulatory particle

    PubMed Central

    Lander, Gabriel C.; Estrin, Eric; Matyskiela, Mary E.; Bashore, Charlene; Nogales, Eva; Martin, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The proteasome is the major ATP-dependent protease in eukaryotic cells, but limited structural information strongly restricts a mechanistic understanding of its activities. The proteasome regulatory particle, consisting of the lid and base subcomplexes, recognizes and processes poly-ubiquitinated substrates. We used electron microscopy and a newly-developed heterologous expression system for the lid to delineate the complete subunit architecture of the regulatory particle. Our studies reveal the spatial arrangement of ubiquitin receptors, deubiquitinating enzymes, and the protein unfolding machinery at subnanometer resolution, outlining the substrate’s path to degradation. Unexpectedly, the ATPase subunits within the base unfoldase are arranged in a spiral staircase, providing insight into potential mechanisms for substrate translocation through the central pore. Large conformational rearrangements of the lid upon holoenzyme formation suggest allosteric regulation of deubiquitination. We provide a structural basis for the ability of the proteasome to degrade a diverse set of substrates and thus regulate vital cellular processes. PMID:22237024

  12. The Regulatory Particle of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Glickman, Michael H.; Rubin, David M.; Fried, Victor A.; Finley, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    The proteasome is a multisubunit protease responsible for degrading proteins conjugated to ubiquitin. The 670-kDa core particle of the proteasome contains the proteolytic active sites, which face an interior chamber within the particle and are thus protected from the cytoplasm. The entry of substrates into this chamber is thought to be governed by the regulatory particle of the proteasome, which covers the presumed channels leading into the interior of the core particle. We have resolved native yeast proteasomes into two electrophoretic variants and have shown that these represent core particles capped with one or two regulatory particles. To determine the subunit composition of the regulatory particle, yeast proteasomes were purified and analyzed by gradient sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Resolution of the individual polypeptides revealed 17 distinct proteins, whose identities were determined by amino acid sequence analysis. Six of the subunits have sequence features of ATPases (Rpt1 to Rpt6). Affinity chromatography was used to purify regulatory particles from various strains, each of which expressed one of the ATPases tagged with hexahistidine. In all cases, multiple untagged ATPases copurified, indicating that the ATPases assembled together into a heteromeric complex. Of the remaining 11 subunits that we have identified (Rpn1 to Rpn3 and Rpn5 to Rpn12), 8 are encoded by previously described genes and 3 are encoded by genes not previously characterized for yeasts. One of the previously unidentified subunits exhibits limited sequence similarity with deubiquitinating enzymes. Overall, regulatory particles from yeasts and mammals are remarkably similar, suggesting that the specific mechanistic features of the proteasome have been closely conserved over the course of evolution. PMID:9584156

  13. The possible role of the ubiquitin proteasome system in the development of atherosclerosis in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Marfella, Raffaele; D' Amico, Michele; Di Filippo, Clara; Siniscalchi, Mario; Sasso, Ferdinando Carlo; Ferraraccio, Franca; Rossi, Francesco; Paolisso, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    and chronic hyperglycemia play a role in the atherosclerotic process and may require intervention 67. Moreover, it is important to recognize that these risk factors frequently "cluster" inindividual patients and possibly interact with each other, favouring the atherosclerosis progression toward plaque instability. Thus, a fundamental question is, "which is the common soil hypothesis that may unifying the burden of all these factors on atherosclerosis of diabetic patients? Because evidences suggest that insulin-resistance, diabetes and CHD share in common a deregulation of ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), the major pathway for nonlysosomal intracellular protein degradation in eucaryotic cells 89, in this review ubiquitin-proteasome deregulation is proposed as the common persistent pathogenic factor mediating the initial stage of the atherosclerosis as well as the progression to complicated plaque in diabetic patients. PMID:17971205

  14. Impaired methylation as a novel mechanism for proteasome suppression in liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Osna, Natalia A.; White, Ronda L.; Donohue, Terrence M.; Beard, Michael R.; Tuma, Dean J.; Kharbanda, Kusum K.

    2010-01-08

    The proteasome is a multi-catalytic protein degradation enzyme that is regulated by ethanol-induced oxidative stress; such suppression is attributed to CYP2E1-generated metabolites. However, under certain conditions, it appears that in addition to oxidative stress, other mechanisms are also involved in proteasome regulation. This study investigated whether impaired protein methylation that occurs during exposure of liver cells to ethanol, may contribute to suppression of proteasome activity. We measured the chymotrypsin-like proteasome activity in Huh7CYP cells, hepatocytes, liver cytosols and nuclear extracts or purified 20S proteasome under conditions that maintain or prevent protein methylation. Reduction of proteasome activity of hepatoma cell and hepatocytes by ethanol or tubercidin was prevented by simultaneous treatment with S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). Moreover, the tubercidin-induced decline in proteasome activity occurred in both nuclear and cytosolic fractions. In vitro exposure of cell cytosolic fractions or highly purified 20S proteasome to low SAM:S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) ratios in the buffer also suppressed proteasome function, indicating that one or more methyltransferase(s) may be associated with proteasomal subunits. Immunoblotting a purified 20S rabbit red cell proteasome preparation using methyl lysine-specific antibodies revealed a 25 kDa proteasome subunit that showed positive reactivity with anti-methyl lysine. This reactivity was modified when 20S proteasome was exposed to differential SAM:SAH ratios. We conclude that impaired methylation of proteasome subunits suppressed proteasome activity in liver cells indicating an additional, yet novel mechanism of proteasome activity regulation by ethanol.

  15. Multiplexed metagenome mining using short DNA sequence tags facilitates targeted discovery of epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Jeremy G.; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Smith, Alexandra G.; Ternei, Melinda A.; Calle, Paula Y.; Reddy, Boojala Vijay B.; Montiel, Daniel; Brady, Sean F.

    2015-01-01

    In molecular evolutionary analyses, short DNA sequences are used to infer phylogenetic relationships among species. Here we apply this principle to the study of bacterial biosynthesis, enabling the targeted isolation of previously unidentified natural products directly from complex metagenomes. Our approach uses short natural product sequence tags derived from conserved biosynthetic motifs to profile biosynthetic diversity in the environment and then guide the recovery of gene clusters from metagenomic libraries. The methodology is conceptually simple, requires only a small investment in sequencing, and is not computationally demanding. To demonstrate the power of this approach to natural product discovery we conducted a computational search for epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors within 185 globally distributed soil metagenomes. This led to the identification of 99 unique epoxyketone sequence tags, falling into 6 phylogenetically distinct clades. Complete gene clusters associated with nine unique tags were recovered from four saturating soil metagenomic libraries. Using heterologous expression methodologies, seven potent epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors (clarepoxcins A–E and landepoxcins A and B) were produced from these pathways, including compounds with different warhead structures and a naturally occurring halohydrin prodrug. This study provides a template for the targeted expansion of bacterially derived natural products using the global metagenome. PMID:25831524

  16. Chemical analysis of Greek pollen - Antioxidant, antimicrobial and proteasome activation properties

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pollen is a bee-product known for its medical properties from ancient times. In our days is increasingly used as health food supplement and especially as a tonic primarily with appeal to the elderly to ameliorate the effects of ageing. In order to evaluate the chemical composition and the biological activity of Greek pollen which has never been studied before, one sample with identified botanical origin from sixteen different common plant taxa of Greece has been evaluated. Results Three different extracts of the studied sample of Greek pollen, have been tested, in whether could induce proteasome activities in human fibroblasts. The water extract was found to induce a highly proteasome activity, showing interesting antioxidant properties. Due to this activity the aqueous extract was further subjected to chemical analysis and seven flavonoids have been isolated and identified by modern spectral means. From the methanolic extract, sugars, lipid acids, phenolic acids and their esters have been also identified, which mainly participate to the biosynthetic pathway of pollen phenolics. The total phenolics were estimated with the Folin-Ciocalteau reagent and the total antioxidant activity was determined by the DPPH method while the extracts and the isolated compounds were also tested for their antimicrobial activity by the dilution technique. Conclusions The Greek pollen is rich