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Sample records for 26s proteasome-dependent regulation

  1. SUMO regulates proteasome-dependent degradation of FLASH/Casp8AP2

    PubMed Central

    Vennemann, Astrid; Hofmann, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    FLASH/Casp8AP2 is a huge multifunctional protein involved in multiple cellular processes, reaching from death receptor signaling to regulation of histone gene transcription and histone mRNA processing. Previous work has shown that FLASH localizes to Cajal bodies and promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies. However, the function of its nuclear body association remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that murine FLASH is covalently modified by SUMO at Lys residue 1792. Interestingly, ectopic expression of SUMO results in proteasome-dependent degradation of FLASH. A point mutant of FLASH with a mutated SUMO acceptor lysine residue, FLASHK1792R, is resistant to SUMO-induced degradation. Finally, we show that arsenic trioxide, a drug known to potentiate SUMO modification and degradation of PML, triggers recruitment of FLASH to PML bodies and concomitant loss of FLASH protein. Our data suggest that SUMO targets FLASH for proteasome-dependent degradation, which is associated with recruitment of FLASH to PML bodies. PMID:23673342

  2. SUMO regulates proteasome-dependent degradation of FLASH/Casp8AP2.

    PubMed

    Vennemann, Astrid; Hofmann, Thomas G

    2013-06-15

    FLASH/Casp8AP2 is a huge multifunctional protein involved in multiple cellular processes, reaching from death receptor signaling to regulation of histone gene transcription and histone mRNA processing. Previous work has shown that FLASH localizes to Cajal bodies and promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies. However, the function of its nuclear body association remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that murine FLASH is covalently modified by SUMO at Lys residue 1792. Interestingly, ectopic expression of SUMO results in proteasome-dependent degradation of FLASH. A point mutant of FLASH with a mutated SUMO acceptor lysine residue, FLASH(K1792R), is resistant to SUMO-induced degradation. Finally, we show that arsenic trioxide, a drug known to potentiate SUMO modification and degradation of PML, triggers recruitment of FLASH to PML bodies and concomitant loss of FLASH protein. Our data suggest that SUMO targets FLASH for proteasome-dependent degradation, which is associated with recruitment of FLASH to PML bodies.

  3. Proteasome-dependent degradation of replisome components regulates faithful DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Roseaulin, Laura C; Noguchi, Chiaki; Noguchi, Eishi

    2013-08-15

    The replication machinery, or the replisome, collides with a variety of obstacles during the normal process of DNA replication. In addition to damaged template DNA, numerous chromosome regions are considered to be difficult to replicate owing to the presence of DNA secondary structures and DNA-binding proteins. Under these conditions, the replication fork stalls, generating replication stress. Stalled forks are prone to collapse, posing serious threats to genomic integrity. It is generally thought that the replication checkpoint functions to stabilize the replisome and replication fork structure upon replication stress. This is important in order to allow DNA replication to resume once the problem is solved. However, our recent studies demonstrated that some replisome components undergo proteasome-dependent degradation during DNA replication in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Our investigation has revealed the involvement of the SCF(Pof3) (Skp1-Cullin/Cdc53-F-box) ubiquitin ligase in replisome regulation. We also demonstrated that forced accumulation of the replisome components leads to abnormal DNA replication upon replication stress. Here we review these findings and present additional data indicating the importance of replisome degradation for DNA replication. Our studies suggest that cells activate an alternative pathway to degrade replisome components in order to preserve genomic integrity.

  4. Ubiquitin–Proteasome-Dependent Regulation of Bidirectional Communication between Plastids and the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Hirosawa, Yoshihiro; Ito-Inaba, Yasuko; Inaba, Takehito

    2017-01-01

    Plastids are DNA-containing organelles and can have unique differentiation states depending on age, tissue, and environment. Plastid biogenesis is optimized by bidirectional communication between plastids and the nucleus. Import of nuclear-encoded proteins into plastids serves as anterograde signals and vice versa, plastids themselves send retrograde signals to the nucleus, thereby controlling de novo synthesis of nuclear-encoded plastid proteins. Recently, it has become increasingly evident that the ubiquitin–proteasome system regulates both the import of anterograde plastid proteins and retrograde signaling from plastids to the nucleus. Targets of ubiquitin–proteasome regulation include unimported chloroplast precursor proteins in the cytosol, protein translocation machinery at the chloroplast surface, and transcription factors in the nucleus. This review will focus on the mechanism through which the ubiquitin–proteasome system optimizes plastid biogenesis and plant development through the regulation of nuclear–plastid interactions. PMID:28360917

  5. HIV-2 and SIVmac accessory virulence factor Vpx down-regulates SAMHD1 enzyme catalysis prior to proteasome-dependent degradation.

    PubMed

    DeLucia, Maria; Mehrens, Jennifer; Wu, Ying; Ahn, Jinwoo

    2013-06-28

    SAMHD1, a dGTP-regulated deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) triphosphohydrolase, down-regulates dNTP pools in terminally differentiated and quiescent cells, thereby inhibiting HIV-1 infection at the reverse transcription step. HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) counteract this restriction via a virion-associated virulence accessory factor, Vpx (Vpr in some SIVs), which loads SAMHD1 onto CRL4-DCAF1 E3 ubiquitin ligase for polyubiquitination, programming it for proteasome-dependent degradation. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms of SAMHD1 recruitment to the E3 ligase have not been defined. Further, whether divergent, orthologous Vpx proteins, encoded by distinct HIV/SIV strains, bind SAMHD1 in a similar manner, at a molecular level, is not known. We applied surface plasmon resonance analysis to assess the requirements for and kinetics of binding between various primate SAMHD1 proteins and Vpx proteins from SIV or HIV-2 strains. Our data indicate that Vpx proteins, bound to DCAF1, interface with the C terminus of primate SAMHD1 proteins with nanomolar affinity, manifested by rapid association and slow dissociation. Further, we provide evidence that Vpx binding to SAMHD1 inhibits its catalytic activity and induces disassembly of a dGTP-dependent oligomer. Our studies reveal a previously unrecognized biochemical mechanism of Vpx-mediated SAMHD1 inhibition: direct down-modulation of its catalytic activity, mediated by the same binding event that leads to SAMHD1 recruitment to the E3 ubiquitin ligase for proteasome-dependent degradation.

  6. The tyrosine kinase Syk regulates the survival of chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells through PKCdelta and proteasome-dependent regulation of Mcl-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Baudot, A D; Jeandel, P Y; Mouska, X; Maurer, U; Tartare-Deckert, S; Raynaud, S D; Cassuto, J P; Ticchioni, M; Deckert, M

    2009-09-17

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) is characterized by accumulation of mature monoclonal CD5+ B cells. The disease results mainly from a failure of cells to undergo apoptosis, a process largely influenced by the existence of constitutively activated components of B-cell receptor signaling and the deregulated expression of anti-apoptotic molecules. Recent evidence pointing to a critical role of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) in ligand-independent BCR signaling prompted us to examine its role in primary B-CLL cell survival. We demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of constitutive Syk activity and silencing by siRNA led to a dramatic decrease of cell viability in CLL samples (n=44), regardless of clinical and biological status and induced typical apoptotic cell death with mitochondrial failure followed by caspase 3-dependent cell death. We also provide functional and biochemical evidence that Syk regulated B-CLL cell survival through a novel pathway involving PKCdelta and a proteasome-dependent regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1. Together, our observations are consistent with a model wherein PKCdelta downstream of Syk stabilizes Mcl-1 through inhibitory phosphorylation of GSK3 by Akt. We conclude that Syk constitutes a key regulator of B-CLL cell survival, emphasizing the clinical utility of Syk inhibition in hematopoietic malignancies.

  7. Ubiquitin-Proteasome Dependent Regulation of the GOLDEN2-LIKE 1 Transcription Factor in Response to Plastid Signals1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tokumaru, Mitsuaki; Adachi, Fumi; Toda, Makoto; Yazu, Fumiko; Hirosawa, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) GOLDEN2-LIKE (GLK) transcription factors promote chloroplast biogenesis by regulating the expression of photosynthesis-related genes. Arabidopsis GLK1 is also known to participate in retrograde signaling from chloroplasts to the nucleus. To elucidate the mechanism by which GLK1 is regulated in response to plastid signals, we biochemically characterized Arabidopsis GLK1 protein. Expression analysis of GLK1 protein indicated that GLK1 accumulates in aerial tissues. Both tissue-specific and Suc-dependent accumulation of GLK1 were regulated primarily at the transcriptional level. In contrast, norflurazon- or lincomycin-treated gun1-101 mutant expressing normal levels of GLK1 mRNA failed to accumulate GLK1 protein, suggesting that plastid signals directly regulate the accumulation of GLK1 protein in a GUN1-independent manner. Treatment of the glk1glk2 mutant expressing functional GFP-GLK1 with a proteasome inhibitor, MG-132, induced the accumulation of polyubiquitinated GFP-GLK1. Furthermore, the level of endogenous GLK1 in plants with damaged plastids was partially restored when those plants were treated with MG-132. Collectively, these data indicate that the ubiquitin-proteasome system participates in the degradation of Arabidopsis GLK1 in response to plastid signals. PMID:27821720

  8. Flavones induce neutrophil apoptosis by down-regulation of Mcl-1 via a proteasomal-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Christopher D; Allen, Keith C; Dorward, David A; Hoodless, Laura J; Melrose, Lauren A; Marwick, John A; Tucker, Carl S; Haslett, Christopher; Duffin, Rodger; Rossi, Adriano G

    2013-03-01

    Neutrophil apoptosis and subsequent nonphlogistic clearance by surrounding phagocytes are key to the successful resolution of neutrophilic inflammation, with dysregulated apoptosis reported in multiple human inflammatory diseases. Enhancing neutrophil apoptosis has proresolution and anti-inflammatory effects in preclinical models of inflammation. Here we investigate the ability of the flavones apigenin, luteolin, and wogonin to induce neutrophil apoptosis in vitro and resolve neutrophilic inflammation in vivo. Human neutrophil apoptosis was assessed morphologically and by flow cytometry following incubation with apigenin, luteolin, and wogonin. All three flavones induced time- and concentration-dependent neutrophil apoptosis (apigenin, EC=12.2 μM; luteolin, EC=14.6 μM; and wogonin, EC=28.9 μM). Induction of apoptosis was caspase dependent, as it was blocked by the broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor Q-VD-OPh and was associated with both caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation. Flavone-induced apoptosis was preceded by down-regulation of the prosurvival protein Mcl-1, with proteasomal inhibition preventing flavone-induced Mcl-1 down-regulation and apoptosis. The flavones abrogated the survival effects of mediators that prolong neutrophil life span, including lipoteichoic acid, peptidoglycan, dexamethasone, and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, by driving apoptosis. Furthermore, wogonin enhanced resolution of established neutrophilic inflammation in a zebrafish model of sterile tissue injury. Wogonin-induced resolution was dependent on apoptosis in vivo as it was blocked by caspase inhibition. Our data show that the flavones induce neutrophil apoptosis and have potential as neutrophil apoptosis-inducing anti-inflammatory, proresolution agents.

  9. Nuclear Export Signal of Androgen Receptor (NESAR) Regulation of Androgen Receptor Level in Human Prostate Cell Lines via Ubiquitination and Proteasome-Dependent Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yanqing; Wang, Dan; Dar, Javid A.; Singh, Prabhpreet; Graham, Lara; Liu, Weijun; Ai, Junkui; Xin, Zhongcheng

    2012-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a key role in prostate development and carcinogenesis. Increased expression and/or stability of AR is associated with sensitization of prostate cancer cells to low levels of androgens, leading to castration resistance. Hence, understanding the mechanisms regulating AR protein stability is clinically relevant and may lead to new approaches to prevent and/or treat prostate cancer. Using fluorescence microscopy, Western blot, and pulse chase assay, we showed that nuclear export signal (NES)AR, a nuclear export signal in the ligand binding domain (LBD) of AR, can significantly enhance the degradation of fusion protein constructs in PC3 prostate cancer cells. The half-life of GFP-NESAR was less than 3 h, which was 10 times shorter than that of green fluorescent protein (GFP) control. Further analysis showed that NESAR can signal for polyubiquitination and that degradation of NESAR-containing fusion proteins can be blocked by proteasome inhibitor MG132. Ubiquitination of GFP-AR or GFP-LBD was suppressed in the presence of dihydrotestosterone, which is known to suppress NESAR while inducing nuclear localization signal 2 in AR or LBD, suggesting that the export activity of NESAR is required for NESAR-mediated polyubiquitination. Treatment with MG132 also induced aggresome formation of NESAR-containing fusion proteins in perinuclear regions of the transfected PC3 cells, indicating a role for NESAR in inducing unfolded protein responses. The above observations suggest that NESAR plays a key role in AR ubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation in prostate cancer cells. PMID:23041672

  10. Light-Regulated Hypocotyl Elongation Involves Proteasome-Dependent Degradation of the Microtubule Regulatory Protein WDL3 in Arabidopsis[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaomin; Qin, Tao; Ma, Qianqian; Sun, Jingbo; Liu, Ziqiang; Yuan, Ming; Mao, Tonglin

    2013-01-01

    Light significantly inhibits hypocotyl cell elongation, and dark-grown seedlings exhibit elongated, etiolated hypocotyls. Microtubule regulatory proteins function as positive or negative regulators that mediate hypocotyl cell elongation by altering microtubule organization. However, it remains unclear how plants coordinate these regulators to promote hypocotyl growth in darkness and inhibit growth in the light. Here, we demonstrate that WAVE-DAMPENED 2–LIKE3 (WDL3), a microtubule regulatory protein of the WVD2/WDL family from Arabidopsis thaliana, functions in hypocotyl cell elongation and is regulated by a ubiquitin-26S proteasome–dependent pathway in response to light. WDL3 RNA interference Arabidopsis seedlings grown in the light had much longer hypocotyls than controls. Moreover, WDL3 overexpression resulted in overall shortening of hypocotyl cells and stabilization of cortical microtubules in the light. Cortical microtubule reorganization occurred slowly in cells from WDL3 RNA interference transgenic lines but was accelerated in cells from WDL3-overexpressing seedlings subjected to light treatment. More importantly, WDL3 protein was abundant in the light but was degraded through the 26S proteasome pathway in the dark. Overexpression of WDL3 inhibited etiolated hypocotyl growth in regulatory particle non-ATPase subunit-1a mutant (rpn1a-4) plants but not in wild-type seedlings. Therefore, a ubiquitin-26S proteasome–dependent mechanism regulates the levels of WDL3 in response to light to modulate hypocotyl cell elongation. PMID:23653471

  11. Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) Positively Regulates 26S Proteasome Activity.

    PubMed

    Im, Eunju; Yoon, Jong Bok; Lee, Han-Woong; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2017-08-01

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is the catalytic subunit of telomerase, an RNA-dependent DNA polymerase that elongates telomeric DNA. hTERT displays several extra-telomeric functions that are independent of its telomere-regulatory function, including tumor progression, and neuronal cell death regulation. In this study, we evaluated these additional hTERT non-telomeric functions. We determined that hTERT interacts with several 19S and 20S proteasome subunits. The 19S regulatory particle and 20S core particle are part of 26S proteasome complex, which plays a central role in ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. In addition, hTERT positively regulated 26S proteasome activity independent of its enzymatic activity. Moreover, hTERT enhanced subunit interactions, which may underlie hTERT's ability of hTERT to stimulate the 26S proteasome. Furthermore, hTERT displayed cytoprotective effect against ER stress via the activation of 26S proteasome in acute myeloid leukemia cells. Our data suggest that hTERT acts as a novel chaperone to promote 26S proteasome assembly and maintenance. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 2083-2093, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Oxidative challenge enhances REGγ-proteasome-dependent protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Shuang; Zuo, Qiuhong; Wu, Lin; Ji, Lei; Zhai, Wanli; Xiao, Jianru; Chen, Jiwu; Li, Xiaotao

    2015-05-01

    Elimination of oxidized proteins is important to cells as accumulation of damaged proteins causes cellular dysfunction, disease, and aging. Abundant evidence shows that the 20S proteasome is largely responsible for degradation of oxidative proteins in both ubiquitin-dependent and ubiquitin-independent pathways. However, the role of the REGγ-proteasome in degrading oxidative proteins remains unclear. Here, we focus on two of the well-known REGγ-proteasome substrates, p21(Waf1/Cip1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein, to analyze the impact of oxidative stress on REGγ-proteasome functions. We demonstrate that REGγ-proteasome is essential for oxidative stress-induced rapid degradation of p21 and HCV proteins. Silencing REGγ abrogated this response in multiple cell lines. Furthermore, pretreatment with proteasome inhibitor MG132 completely blunted oxidant-induced p21 degradation, indicating a proteasome-dependent action. Cellular oxidation promoted REGγ-proteasome-dependent trypsin-like activity by enhancing the interaction between REGγ and 20S proteasome. Antioxidant could counteract oxidation-induced protein degradation, indicating that REGγ-proteasome activity may be regulated by redox state. This study provides further insights into the actions of a unique proteasome pathway in response to an oxidative stress environment, implying a novel molecular basis for REGγ-proteasome functions in antioxidation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Regulation of the 26S proteasome by adenovirus E1A

    PubMed Central

    Turnell, Andrew S.; Grand, Roger J.A.; Gorbea, Carlos; Zhang, Xian; Wang, Wenlan; Mymryk, Joe S.; Gallimore, Phillip H.

    2000-01-01

    We have identified the N-terminus of adenovirus early region 1A (AdE1A) as a region that can regulate the 26S proteasome. Specifically, in vitro and in vivo co-precipitation studies have revealed that the 19S regulatory components of the proteasome, Sug1 (S8) and S4, bind through amino acids (aa) 4–25 of Ad5 E1A. In vivo expression of wild-type (wt) AdE1A, in contrast to the N-terminal AdE1A mutant that does not bind the proteasome, reduces ATPase activity associated with anti-S4 immunoprecipitates relative to mock-infected cells. This reduction in ATPase activity correlates positively with the ability of wt AdE1A, but not the N-terminal deletion mutant, to significantly reduce the ability of HPV16 E6 to target p53 for ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation. AdE1A/proteasomal complexes are present in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus, suggesting that AdE1A interferes with both nuclear and cytoplasmic proteasomal degradation. We have also demonstrated that wt AdE1A and the N-terminal AdE1A deletion mutant are substrates for proteasomal-mediated degradation. AdE1A degradation is not, however, mediated through ubiquitylation, but is regulated through phosphorylation of residues within a C-terminal PEST region (aa 224–238). PMID:10970867

  14. The life cycle of the 26S proteasome: from birth, through regulation and function, and onto its death

    PubMed Central

    Livneh, Ido; Cohen-Kaplan, Victoria; Cohen-Rosenzweig, Chen; Avni, Noa; Ciechanover, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a large, ∼2.5 MDa, multi-catalytic ATP-dependent protease complex that serves as the degrading arm of the ubiquitin system, which is the major pathway for regulated degradation of cytosolic, nuclear and membrane proteins in all eukaryotic organisms. PMID:27444871

  15. ATP Binding by Proteasomal ATPases Regulates Cellular Assembly and Substrate-induced Functions of the 26 S Proteasome*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Chan; Li, Xiaohua; Thompson, David; DeMartino, George N.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the role of ATP binding by six different ATPase subunits (Rpt1–6) in the cellular assembly and molecular functions of mammalian 26 S proteasome. Four Rpt subunits (Rpt1–4) with ATP binding mutations were incompetent for cellular assembly into 26 S proteasome. In contrast, analogous mutants of Rpt5 and Rpt6 were incorporated normally into 26 S proteasomes in both intact cells and an in vitro assembly assay. Surprisingly, purified 26 S proteasomes containing either mutant Rpt5 or Rpt6 had normal basal ATPase activity and substrate gate opening for hydrolysis of short peptides. However, these mutant 26 S proteasomes were severely defective for ATP-dependent in vitro degradation of ubiquitylated and non-ubiquitylated proteins and did not display substrate-stimulated ATPase and peptidase activities characteristic of normal proteasomes. These results reveal differential roles of ATP binding by various Rpt subunits in proteasome assembly and function. They also indicate that substrate-stimulated ATPase activity and gating depend on the concerted action of a full complement of Rpt subunits competent for ATP binding and that this regulation is essential for normal proteolysis. Thus, protein substrates appear to promote their own degradation by stimulating proteasome functions involved in proteolysis. PMID:23212908

  16. Convergence of the 26S proteasome and the REVOLUTA pathways in regulating inflorescence and floral meristem functions in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenzhen; Wang, Hua; Luo, Dexian; Zeng, Minhuan; Huang, Hai; Cui, Xiaofeng

    2011-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a large multisubunit proteolytic complex, regulating growth and development in eukaryotes by selective removal of short-lived regulatory proteins. Here, it is shown that the 26S proteasome and the transcription factor gene REVOLUTA (REV) act together in maintaining inflorescence and floral meristem (IM and FM) functions. The characterization of a newly identified Arabidopsis mutant, designated ae4 (asymmetric leaves1/2 enhancer4), which carries a mutation in the gene encoding the 26S proteasome subunit, RPN2a, is reported. ae4 and rev have minor defects in phyllotaxy structure and meristem initiation, respectively, whereas ae4 rev demonstrated strong developmental defects. Compared with the rev single mutant, an increased percentage of ae4 rev plants exhibited abnormal vegetative shoot apical and axillary meristems. After flowering, ae4 rev first gave rise to a few normal-looking flowers, and then flowers with reduced numbers of all types of floral organs. In late reproductive development, instead of flowers, the ae4 rev IM produced numerous filamentous structures, which contained cells seen only in the floral organs, and then carpelloid organs. In situ hybridization revealed that expression of the WUSCHEL and CLAVATA3 genes was severely down-regulated or absent in the late appearing ae4 rev primordia, but the genes were strongly expressed in top-layer cells of inflorescence tips. Double mutant plants combining rev with other 26S proteasome subunit mutants, rpn1a and rpn9a, resembled ae4 rev, suggesting that the 26S proteasome might act as a whole in regulating IM and FM functions.

  17. Parkin mediates proteasome-dependent protein degradation and rupture of the outer mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Saori R; Kishi, Chieko; Ishihara, Naotada; Mizushima, Noboru

    2011-06-03

    Upon mitochondrial depolarization, Parkin, a Parkinson disease-related E3 ubiquitin ligase, translocates from the cytosol to mitochondria and promotes their degradation by mitophagy, a selective type of autophagy. Here, we report that in addition to mitophagy, Parkin mediates proteasome-dependent degradation of outer membrane proteins such as Tom20, Tom40, Tom70, and Omp25 of depolarized mitochondria. By contrast, degradation of the inner membrane and matrix proteins largely depends on mitophagy. Furthermore, Parkin induces rupture of the outer membrane of depolarized mitochondria, which also depends on proteasomal activity. Upon induction of mitochondrial depolarization, proteasomes are recruited to mitochondria in the perinuclear region. Neither proteasome-dependent degradation of outer membrane proteins nor outer membrane rupture is required for mitophagy. These results suggest that Parkin regulates degradation of outer and inner mitochondrial membrane proteins differently through proteasome- and mitophagy-dependent pathways.

  18. 26S Proteasome regulation of Ankrd1/CARP in adult rat ventricular myocytes and human microvascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Samaras, Susan E.; Chen, Billy; Koch, Stephen R.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Lim, Chee Chew; Davidson, Jeffrey M.

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 26S proteasome regulates Ankrd1 levels in cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ankrd1 protein degrades 60-fold faster in endothelial cells than cardiomyocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential degradation appears related to nuclear vs. sarcolemmal localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endothelial cell density shows uncoupling of Ankrd1 mRNA and protein levels. -- Abstract: Ankyrin repeat domain 1 protein (Ankrd1), also known as cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP), increases dramatically after tissue injury, and its overexpression improves aspects of wound healing. Reports that Ankrd1/CARP protein stability may affect cardiovascular organization, together with our findings that the protein is crucial to stability of the cardiomyocyte sarcomere and increased in wound healing, led us to compare the contribution of Ankrd1/CARP stability to its abundance. We found that the 26S proteasome is the dominant regulator of Ankrd1/CARP degradation, and that Ankrd1/CARP half-life is significantly longer in cardiomyocytes (h) than endothelial cells (min). In addition, higher endothelial cell density decreased the abundance of the protein without affecting steady state mRNA levels. Taken together, our data and that of others indicate that Ankrd1/CARP is highly regulated at multiple levels of its expression. The striking difference in protein half-life between a muscle and a non-muscle cell type suggests that post-translational proteolysis is correlated with the predominantly structural versus regulatory role of the protein in the two cell types.

  19. Basic Leucine Zipper Protein Cnc-C Is a Substrate and Transcriptional Regulator of the Drosophila 26S Proteasome▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Grimberg, Kristian Björk; Beskow, Anne; Lundin, Daniel; Davis, Monica M.; Young, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    While the 26S proteasome is a key proteolytic complex, little is known about how proteasome levels are maintained in higher eukaryotic cells. Here we describe an RNA interference (RNAi) screen of Drosophila melanogaster that was used to identify transcription factors that may play a role in maintaining levels of the 26S proteasome. We used an RNAi library against 993 Drosophila transcription factor genes to identify genes whose suppression in Schneider 2 cells stabilized a ubiquitin-green fluorescent protein reporter protein. This screen identified Cnc (cap 'n’ collar [CNC]; basic region leucine zipper) as a candidate transcriptional regulator of proteasome component expression. In fact, 20S proteasome activity was reduced in cells depleted of cnc. Immunoblot assays against proteasome components revealed a general decline in both 19S regulatory complex and 20S proteasome subunits after RNAi depletion of this transcription factor. Transcript-specific silencing revealed that the longest of the seven transcripts for the cnc gene, cnc-C, was needed for proteasome and p97 ATPase production. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR confirmed the role of Cnc-C in activation of transcription of genes encoding proteasome components. Expression of a V5-His-tagged form of Cnc-C revealed that the transcription factor is itself a proteasome substrate that is stabilized when the proteasome is inhibited. We propose that this single cnc gene in Drosophila resembles the ancestral gene family of mammalian nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-related transcription factors, which are essential in regulating oxidative stress and proteolysis. PMID:21149573

  20. Basic leucine zipper protein Cnc-C is a substrate and transcriptional regulator of the Drosophila 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Grimberg, Kristian Björk; Beskow, Anne; Lundin, Daniel; Davis, Monica M; Young, Patrick

    2011-02-01

    While the 26S proteasome is a key proteolytic complex, little is known about how proteasome levels are maintained in higher eukaryotic cells. Here we describe an RNA interference (RNAi) screen of Drosophila melanogaster that was used to identify transcription factors that may play a role in maintaining levels of the 26S proteasome. We used an RNAi library against 993 Drosophila transcription factor genes to identify genes whose suppression in Schneider 2 cells stabilized a ubiquitin-green fluorescent protein reporter protein. This screen identified Cnc (cap 'n' collar [CNC]; basic region leucine zipper) as a candidate transcriptional regulator of proteasome component expression. In fact, 20S proteasome activity was reduced in cells depleted of cnc. Immunoblot assays against proteasome components revealed a general decline in both 19S regulatory complex and 20S proteasome subunits after RNAi depletion of this transcription factor. Transcript-specific silencing revealed that the longest of the seven transcripts for the cnc gene, cnc-C, was needed for proteasome and p97 ATPase production. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR confirmed the role of Cnc-C in activation of transcription of genes encoding proteasome components. Expression of a V5-His-tagged form of Cnc-C revealed that the transcription factor is itself a proteasome substrate that is stabilized when the proteasome is inhibited. We propose that this single cnc gene in Drosophila resembles the ancestral gene family of mammalian nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-related transcription factors, which are essential in regulating oxidative stress and proteolysis.

  1. RNF20 promotes the polyubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation of AP-2α protein.

    PubMed

    Ren, Peng; Sheng, Zhifeng; Wang, Yijun; Yi, Xin; Zhou, Qiuzhi; Zhou, Jianlin; Xiang, Shuanglin; Hu, Xiang; Zhang, Jian

    2014-02-01

    Transcription factor activator protein 2α (AP-2α) is a negative regulator of adipogenesis by repressing the transcription of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBPα) gene. During adipogenesis, AP-2α is degraded, leading to transcriptional up-regulation of C/EBPα. However, the mechanism for AP-2α degradation is not clear. Here, using immunoprecipitation assay and mass spectrometry, we identified ring finger protein 20 (RNF20) as an AP-2α-interacting protein in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. RNF20 has been proved to be an E3 ubiquitin ligase for both histone H2B and tumor suppressor ErbB3-binding protein 1 (Ebp1). In this study, we demonstrated that RNF20 co-localized and interacted with AP-2α, and promoted its polyubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation. Over-expression of RNF20 inhibited the activity of AP-2α and rescued the C/EBPα expression which was inhibited by AP-2α. These results suggested that RNF20 may play roles in adipocyte differentiation by stimulating ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent degradation of AP-2α.

  2. Tomato 26S Proteasome subunit RPT4a regulates ToLCNDV transcription and activates hypersensitive response in tomato

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Pranav Pankaj; Sharma, Namisha; Puranik, Swati; Chakraborty, Supriya; Prasad, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Involvement of 26S proteasomal subunits in plant pathogen-interactions, and the roles of each subunit in independently modulating the activity of many intra- and inter-cellular regulators controlling physiological and defense responses of a plant were well reported. In this regard, we aimed to functionally characterize a Solanum lycopersicum 26S proteasomal subunit RPT4a (SlRPT4) gene, which was differentially expressed after Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV) infection in tolerant cultivar H-88-78-1. Molecular analysis revealed that SlRPT4 protein has an active ATPase activity. SlRPT4 could specifically bind to the stem-loop structure of intergenic region (IR), present in both DNA-A and DNA-B molecule of the bipartite viral genome. Lack of secondary structure in replication-associated gene fragment prevented formation of DNA-protein complex suggesting that binding of SlRPT4 with DNA is secondary structure specific. Interestingly, binding of SlRPT4 to IR inhibited the function of RNA Pol-II and subsequently reduced the bi-directional transcription of ToLCNDV genome. Virus-induced gene silencing of SlRPT4 gene incited conversion of tolerant attributes of cultivar H-88-78-1 into susceptibility. Furthermore, transient overexpression of SlRPT4 resulted in activation of programmed cell death and antioxidant enzymes system. Overall, present study highlights non-proteolytic function of SlRPT4 and their participation in defense pathway against virus infection in tomato. PMID:27252084

  3. Hypo-osmotic shock induces nuclear export and proteasome-dependent decrease of UBL5

    SciTech Connect

    Hatanaka, Ken; Ikegami, Koji; Takagi, Hiroshi; Setou, Mitsutoshi . E-mail: setou@nips.ac.jp

    2006-11-24

    The osmolarity of body fluid is strictly controlled through the action of diuretic hormones, which are secreted in the hypothalamus. In the mammalian brain, ubiquitin-like 5 (UBL5) is expressed in oxytocin- and vasopressin-positive neurons in the hypothalamus, and these neurons play a role in regulating osmolarity. We examined the dynamics of UBL5 levels in response to hyper- or hypo-osmotic conditions. Hypo-osmotic conditions led to significantly reduced levels of UBL5 both in brain slices from the hypothalamus and in NIH-3T3 cells. This decrease in UBL5 was transcription-independent and proteasome-dependent. Time-course immunocytochemical studies using exogenous UBL5 revealed that the protein was exported from the nucleus under hypo-osmotic conditions and decreased in a proteasome-dependent manner. This report is the first to describe changes in the intracellular and subcellular localization of UBL5 in response to hypo-osmotic conditions. Our results imply osmoregulation of UBL5.

  4. Lysine 269 is essential for cyclin D1 ubiquitylation by the SCFFbx4/αB-crystallin ligase and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation

    PubMed Central

    O., Barbash; E., Egan; L.L., Pontano; J., Kosak; Diehl, J. Alan

    2009-01-01

    Protein ubiquitylation is a complex enzymatic process that results in the covalent attachment of ubiquitin, via Gly-76 of ubiquitin, to an ε-NH2-group of an internal lysine residue in a given substrate. While E3 ligases frequently utilize lysines adjacent to the degron within the substrate, many substrates can be targeted to the proteasome via polyubiquitylation of any lysine. We have assessed the role of lysine residues proximal to the cyclin D1 phosphodegron for ubiquitylation by the SCFFbx4/αB-crystallin ubiquitin ligase and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation of cyclin D1. The work described herein reveals a requisite role for Lys-269 (K269) for the rapid, poly-ubiquitin mediated degradation of cyclin D1. Mutation of lysine 269, which is proximal to the phosphodegron sequence surrounding Thr-286 in cyclin D1, not only stabilizes cyclin D1, but also triggers cyclin D1 accumulation within the nucleus thereby promoting cell transformation. In addition, D1-K269R is resistant to genotoxic stress induced degradation, similar to non-phosphorylatable D1-T286A, supporting the critical role for the post-translational regulation of cyclin D1 in the response to DNA damaging agents. Strikingly, while mutation of lysine 269 to arginine inhibits cyclin D1 degradation, it does not inhibit cyclin D1 ubiquitylation in vivo demonstrating that ubiquitylation of a specific lysine can influence substrate targeting to the 26S proteasome. PMID:19767775

  5. Mouse homologue of yeast Prp19 interacts with mouse SUG1, the regulatory subunit of 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Sihn, Choong-Ryoul; Cho, Si Young; Lee, Jeong Ho; Lee, Tae Ryong; Kim, Sang Hoon

    2007-04-27

    Yeast Prp19 has been shown to involve in pre-mRNA splicing and DNA repair as well as being an ubiquitin ligase. Mammalian homologue of yeast Prp19 also plays on similar functional activities in cells. In the present study, we isolated mouse SUG1 (mSUG1) as binding partner of mouse Prp19 (mPrp19) by the yeast two-hybrid system. We confirmed the interaction of mPrp9 with mSUG1 by GST pull-down assay and co-immunoprecipitation assay. The N-terminus of mPrp19 including U-box domain was associated with the C-terminus of mSUG1. Although, mSUG1 is a regulatory subunit of 26S proteasome, mPrp19 was not degraded in the proteasome-dependent pathway. Interestingly, GFP-mPrp19 fusion protein was co-localized with mSUG1 protein in cytoplasm as the formation of the speckle-like structures in the presence of a proteasome inhibitor MG132. In addition, the activity of proteasome was increased in cells transfected with mPrp19. Taken together, these results suggest that mPrp19 involves the regulation of protein turnover and may transport its substrates to 26S proteasome through mSUG1 protein.

  6. Mouse homologue of yeast Prp19 interacts with mouse SUG1, the regulatory subunit of 26S proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Sihn, Choong-Ryoul; Cho, Si Young; Lee, Jeong Ho; Lee, Tae Ryong; Kim, Sang Hoon . E-mail: shkim@khu.ac.kr

    2007-04-27

    Yeast Prp19 has been shown to involve in pre-mRNA splicing and DNA repair as well as being an ubiquitin ligase. Mammalian homologue of yeast Prp19 also plays on similar functional activities in cells. In the present study, we isolated mouse SUG1 (mSUG1) as binding partner of mouse Prp19 (mPrp19) by the yeast two-hybrid system. We confirmed the interaction of mPrp9 with mSUG1 by GST pull-down assay and co-immunoprecipitation assay. The N-terminus of mPrp19 including U-box domain was associated with the C-terminus of mSUG1. Although, mSUG1 is a regulatory subunit of 26S proteasome, mPrp19 was not degraded in the proteasome-dependent pathway. Interestingly, GFP-mPrp19 fusion protein was co-localized with mSUG1 protein in cytoplasm as the formation of the speckle-like structures in the presence of a proteasome inhibitor MG132. In addition, the activity of proteasome was increased in cells transfected with mPrp19. Taken together, these results suggest that mPrp19 involves the regulation of protein turnover and may transport its substrates to 26S proteasome through mSUG1 protein.

  7. Degrasyn activates proteasomal-dependent degradation of c-Myc.

    PubMed

    Bartholomeusz, Geoffrey; Talpaz, Moshe; Bornmann, William; Kong, Ling-Yuan; Donato, Nicholas J

    2007-04-15

    c-Myc is a highly unstable transcription factor whose deregulation and increased expression are associated with cancer. Degrasyn, a small synthetic molecule, induces rapid degradation of c-Myc protein in MM-1 multiple myeloma and other tumor cell lines. Destruction of c-Myc by degrasyn requires the presence of a region of c-Myc between amino acid residues 316 and 378 that has not previously been associated with c-Myc stability. Degrasyn-induced degradation of c-Myc depends on proteasomes but is independent of the degron regions previously shown to be important for ubiquitin-mediated targeting and proteasomal destruction of the protein. Degrasyn-dependent c-Myc proteolysis is not mediated by any previously identified c-Myc regulatory mechanism, does not require new protein synthesis, and does not depend on the nuclear localization of c-Myc. Degrasyn reduced c-Myc levels in A375 melanoma cells and in A375 tumors in nude mice, and this activity correlated with tumor growth inhibition. Together, these results suggest that degrasyn reduces the stability of c-Myc in vitro and in vivo through a unique signaling process that uses c-Myc domains not previously associated with c-Myc regulation.

  8. ARS5 is a component of the 26S proteasome complex, and negatively regulates thiol biosynthesis and arsenic tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sung, Dong-Yul; Kim, Tae-Houn; Komives, Elizabeth A; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Schroeder, Julian I

    2009-09-01

    A forward-genetic screen in Arabidopsis led to the isolation of several arsenic tolerance mutants. ars5 was the strongest arsenate- and arsenite-resistant mutant identified in this genetic screen. Here, we report the characterization and cloning of the ars5 mutant gene. ars5 is shown to exhibit an increased accumulation of arsenic and thiol compounds during arsenic stress. Rough mapping together with microarray-based expression mapping identified the ars5 mutation in the alpha subunit F (PAF1) of the 26S proteasome complex. Characterization of an independent paf1 T-DNA insertion allele and complementation by PAF1 confirmed that paf1 mutation is responsible for the enhanced thiol accumulation and arsenic tolerance phenotypes. Arsenic tolerance was not observed in a knock-out mutant of the highly homologous PAF2 gene. However, genetic complementation of ars5 by the overexpression of PAF2 suggests that the PAF2 protein is functionally equivalent to PAF1 when expressed at high levels. No detectible difference was observed in total ubiquitinylated protein profiles between ars5 and wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis, suggesting that the arsenic tolerance observed in ars5 is not derived from a general impairment in proteasome-mediated protein degradation. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that arsenic induces the enhanced transcriptional activation of several key genes that function in glutathione and phytochelatin biosynthesis in the WT, and this arsenic induction of gene expression is more dramatic in ars5. The enhanced transcriptional response to arsenic and the increased accumulation of thiol compounds in ars5, compared with WT, suggest the presence of a positive regulation pathway for thiol biosynthesis that is enhanced in the ars5 background.

  9. ARS5 is a component of the 26S proteasome complex and negatively regulates thiol biosynthesis and arsenic tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Dong-Yul; Kim, Tae-Houn; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2010-01-01

    Summary A forward genetic screen in Arabidopsis led to the isolation of several arsenic tolerance mutants. ars5 is the strongest arsenate and arsenite resistant mutant identified in this genetic screen. Here, we report the characterization and cloning of the ars5 mutant gene. ars5 is shown to exhibit an increased accumulation of arsenic and thiol compounds during arsenic stress. Rough mapping together with microarray-based expression mapping identified the ars5 mutation in the alpha subunit F (PAF1) of the 26S proteasome complex. Characterization of an independent paf1 T-DNA insertion allele and complementation by PAF1 confirmed that paf1 mutation is responsible for the enhanced thiol accumulation and the arsenic tolerance phenotypes. Arsenic tolerance was not observed in a knockout mutant of the highly homologous PAF2 gene. However, genetic complementation of ars5 by over expression of PAF2 suggests that the PAF2 protein is functionally equivalent to PAF1 when expressed at high levels. No detectible difference was observed in total ubiquitinylated protein profiles between ars5 and wild type Arabidopsis, suggesting that the arsenic tolerance observed in ars5 is not derived from a general impairment in proteasome-mediated protein degradation. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that arsenic induces enhanced transcriptional activation of several key genes that function in glutathione and phytochelatin biosynthesis in wild type and this arsenic-induction of gene expression is more dramatic in ars5. The enhanced transcriptional response to arsenic and the increased accumulation of thiol compounds in ars5 compared to WT suggest the presence of a positive regulation pathway for thiol biosynthesis that is enhanced in the ars5 background. PMID:19453443

  10. Aggresome-like structure induced by isothiocyanates is novel proteasome-dependent degradation machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Mi, Lixin; Gan, Nanqin; Chung, Fung-Lung

    2009-10-16

    Unwanted or misfolded proteins are either refolded by chaperones or degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). When UPS is impaired, misfolded proteins form aggregates, which are transported along microtubules by motor protein dynein towards the juxta-nuclear microtubule-organizing center to form aggresome, a single cellular garbage disposal complex. Because aggresome formation results from proteasome failure, aggresome components are degraded through the autophagy/lysosome pathway. Here we report that small molecule isothiocyanates (ITCs) can induce formation of aggresome-like structure (ALS) through covalent modification of cytoplasmic {alpha}- and {beta}-tubulin. The formation of ALS is related to neither proteasome inhibition nor oxidative stress. ITC-induced ALS is a proteasome-dependent assembly for emergent removal of misfolded proteins, suggesting that the cell may have a previously unknown strategy to cope with misfolded proteins.

  11. Protein Kinase Cδ Stimulates Proteasome-Dependent Degradation of C/EBPα during Apoptosis Induction of Leukemic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Meng; Duan, Xu-Fang; Zhao, Xu-Yun; Zhang, Bo; Lu, Ying; Liu, Wei; Cheng, Jin-Ke; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2009-01-01

    Background The precise regulation and maintenance of balance between cell proliferation, differentiation and death in metazoan are critical for tissue homeostasis. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) has been implicated as a key regulator of differentiation and proliferation in various cell types. Here we investigated the potential dynamic change and role of C/EBPα protein during apoptosis induction. Methodology/Principal Findings Upon onset of apoptosis induced by various kinds of inducers such as NSC606985, etoposide and others, C/EBPα expression presented a profound down-regulation in leukemic cell lines and primary cells via induction of protein degradation and inhibition of transcription, as assessed respectively by cycloheximide inhibition test, real-time quantitative RT-PCR and luciferase reporter assay. Applying chemical inhibition, forced expression of dominant negative mutant and catalytic fragment (CF) of protein kinase Cdelta (PKCδ), which was proteolytically activated during apoptosis induction tested, we showed that the active PKCδ protein contributed to the increased degradation of C/EBPα protein. Three specific proteasome inhibitors antagonized C/EBPα degradation during apoptosis induction. More importantly, ectopic expression of PKCδ-CF stimulated the ubiquitination of C/EBPα protein, while the chemical inhibition of PKCδ action significantly inhibited the enhanced ubiquitination of C/EBPα protein under NSC606985 treatment. Additionally, silencing of C/EBPα expression by small interfering RNAs enhanced, while inducible expression of C/EBPα inhibited NSC606985/etoposide-induced apoptosis in leukemic cells. Conclusions/Significance These observations indicate that the activation of PKCδ upon apoptosis results in the increased proteasome-dependent degradation of C/EBPα, which partially contributes to PKCδ-mediated apoptosis. PMID:19662097

  12. Silibinin Inhibits Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-Driven Cell Proliferation via Downregulation of N-Glycosylation in Human Tenon's Fibroblasts in a Proteasome-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Hao; Chen, Ching-Long; Lu, Da-Wen; Liang, Chang-Min; Tai, Ming-Cheng; Chen, Jiann-Torng

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of silibinin on cell proliferation in platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-treated human Tenon's fibroblasts (HTFs). The effect of silibinin on cell proliferation in PDGF-treated HTFs was determined by examining the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and performing WST-1 assays. Cell cycle progression was evaluated using flow cytometry. The related cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) were also analyzed using western blot. A modified rat trabeculectomy model was established to evaluate the effect of silibinin on cell proliferation in vivo. Western blot analysis was carried out to determine the effect of silibinin on the expression of PDGF receptor and on the downstream signaling pathways regulated by PDGF receptor. PDGF elevated the expression of PCNA in HTFs, and this elevation was inhibited by silibinin. The inhibitory effect of silibinin on cell proliferation was also confirmed via WST-1 assay. PDGF-stimulated cell cycle in HTFs was delayed by silibinin, and the related cyclin D1 and CDK4 were also suppressed by silibinin. In the rat model of trabeculectomy, silibinin reduced the expression of PCNA at the site of blebs in vivo. The effects of silibinin on PDGF-stimulated HTFs were mediated via the downregulation of PDGF receptor-regulated signaling pathways, such as ERKs and STATs, which may be partially caused by the downregulation of N-glycosylation of PDGF receptor beta (PDGFRβ). The effect of silibinin on modulation of N-glycosylation of PDGFRβ was mediated in a proteasome-dependent manner. Silibinin inhibited cell proliferation and delayed cell cycle progression in PDGF-treated HTFs in vitro. PDGF also modulated the process of N-glycosylation of the PDGFRβ in a proteasome-dependent manner. Our findings suggest that silibinin has potential therapeutic applications in glaucoma filtering surgery. PMID:28030611

  13. Autoregulation of the 26S proteasome by in situ ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Andrew D.; MacFadden, Andrea; Wu, Zhiping; Peng, Junmin; Liu, Chang-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The 26S proteasome degrades ubiquitinated proteins, and proteasomal degradation controls various cellular events. Here we report that the human 26S proteasome is ubiquitinated, by which the ubiquitin receptors Adrm1 and S5a, the ATPase subunit Rpt5, and the deubiquitinating enzyme Uch37 are ubiquitinated in situ by proteasome-associating ubiquitination enzymes. Ubiquitination of these subunits significantly impairs the 26S proteasome's ability to bind, deubiquitinate, and degrade ubiquitinated proteins. Moreover, ubiquitination of the 26S proteasome can be antagonized by proteasome-residing deubiquitinating enzymes, by the binding of polyubiquitin chains, and by certain cellular stress, indicating that proteasome ubiquitination is dynamic and regulated in cells. We propose that in situ ubiquitination of the 26S proteasome regulates its activity, which could function to adjust proteasomal activity in response to the alteration of cellular ubiquitination levels. PMID:24743594

  14. Redox-Regulated Pathway of Tyrosine Phosphorylation Underlies NF-κB Induction by an Atypical Pathway Independent of the 26S Proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Sarah; Ponnappan, Subramaniam; Ponnappan, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Alternative redox stimuli such as pervanadate or hypoxia/reoxygenation, induce transcription factor NF-κB by phospho-tyrosine-dependent and proteasome-independent mechanisms. While considerable attention has been paid to the absence of proteasomal regulation of tyrosine phosphorylated IκBα, there is a paucity of information regarding proteasomal regulation of signaling events distinct from tyrosine phosphorylation of IκBα. To delineate roles for the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in the phospho-tyrosine dependent mechanism of NF-κB induction, we employed the proteasome inhibitor, Aclacinomycin, and the phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, pervanadate (PV). Results from these studies demonstrate that phospho-IκBα (Tyr-42) is not subject to proteasomal degradation in a murine stromal epithelial cell line, confirming results previously reported. Correspondingly, proteasome inhibition had no discernable effect on the key signaling intermediaries, Src and ERK1/2, involved in the phospho-tyrosine mechanisms regulating PV-mediated activation of NF-κB. Consistent with previous reports, a significant redox imbalance leading to the activation of tyrosine kinases, as occurs with pervanadate, is required for the induction of NF-κB. Strikingly, our studies demonstrate that proteasome inhibition can potentiate oxidative stress associated with PV-stimulation without impacting kinase activation, however, other cellular implications for this increase in intracellular oxidation remain to be fully delineated. PMID:25671697

  15. Characterization of three different clusters of 18S-26S ribosomal DNA genes in the sea urchin P. lividus: Genetic and epigenetic regulation synchronous to 5S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, Daniele; Dimarco, Eufrosina; Caradonna, Fabio

    2016-04-15

    We previously reported the characterization 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clusters in the common sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and demonstrated the presence of DNA methylation-dependent silencing of embryo specific 5S rDNA cluster in adult tissue. In this work, we show genetic and epigenetic characterization of 18S-26S rDNA clusters in this specie. The results indicate the presence of three different 18S-26S rDNA clusters with different Non-Transcribed Spacer (NTS) regions that have different chromosomal localizations. Moreover, we show that the two largest clusters are hyper-methylated in the promoter-containing NTS regions in adult tissues, as in the 5S rDNA. These findings demonstrate an analogous epigenetic regulation in small and large rDNA clusters and support the logical synchronism in building ribosomes. In fact, all the ribosomal RNA genes must be synchronously and equally transcribed to perform their unique final product. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Proteasome-Dependent Degradation of Daxx by the Viral E1B-55K Protein in Human Adenovirus-Infected Cells ▿

    PubMed Central

    Schreiner, Sabrina; Wimmer, Peter; Sirma, Hüseyin; Everett, Roger D.; Blanchette, Paola; Groitl, Peter; Dobner, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The death-associated protein Daxx found in PML (promyelocytic leukemia protein) nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) is involved in transcriptional regulation and cellular intrinsic antiviral resistence against incoming viruses. We found that knockdown of Daxx in a nontransformed human hepatocyte cell line using RNA interference (RNAi) techniques results in significantly increased adenoviral (Ad) replication, including enhanced viral mRNA synthesis and viral protein expression. This Daxx restriction imposed upon adenovirus growth is counteracted by early protein E1B-55K (early region 1B 55-kDa protein), a multifunctional regulator of cell-cycle-independent Ad5 replication. The viral protein binds to Daxx and induces its degradation through a proteasome-dependent pathway. We show that this process is independent of Ad E4orf6 (early region 4 open reading frame 6), known to promote the proteasomal degradation of cellular p53, Mre11, DNA ligase IV, and integrin α3 in combination with E1B-55K. These results illustrate the importance of the PML-NB-associated factor Daxx in virus growth restriction and suggest that E1B-55K antagonizes innate antiviral activities of Daxx and PML-NBs to stimulate viral replication at a posttranslational level. PMID:20484509

  17. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists induce proteasome-dependent degradation of cyclin D1 and estrogen receptor alpha in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chunhua; Burghardt, Robert; Smith, Roger; Wormke, Mark; Stewart, Jessica; Safe, Stephen

    2003-03-01

    Treatment of MCF-7 cells with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonists ciglitazone or 15-deoxy-Delta 12,14-prostaglandin J2 resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent decrease of cyclin D1 and estrogen receptor (ER) alpha proteins, and this was accompanied by decreased cell proliferation and G(1)-G(0)-->S-phase progression. Down-regulation of cyclin D1 and ER alpha by PPARgamma agonists was inhibited in cells cotreated with the proteasome inhibitors MG132 and PSII, but not in cells cotreated with the protease inhibitors calpain II and calpeptin. Moreover, after treatment of MCF-7 cells with 15-deoxy-Delta 12,14-prostaglandin J2 and immunoprecipitation with cyclin D1 or ER alpha antibodies, there was enhanced formation of ubiquitinated cyclin D1 and ER alpha bands. Thus, PPARgamma-induced inhibition of breast cancer cell growth is due, in part, to proteasome-dependent degradation of cyclin D1 (and ER alpha), and this pathway may be important for other cancer cell lines.

  18. Reversible phosphorylation of the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xing; Huang, Xiuliang; Chen, Mark J

    2017-04-01

    The 26S proteasome at the center of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is essential for virtually all cellular processes of eukaryotes. A common misconception about the proteasome is that, once made, it remains as a static and uniform complex with spontaneous and constitutive activity for protein degradation. Recent discoveries have provided compelling evidence to support the exact opposite insomuch as the 26S proteasome undergoes dynamic and reversible phosphorylation under a variety of physiopathological conditions. In this review, we summarize the history and current understanding of proteasome phosphorylation, and advocate the idea of targeting proteasome kinases/phosphatases as a new strategy for clinical interventions of several human diseases.

  19. Ubiquitin-proteasome dependent degradation of GABAAα1 in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the neurobiological basis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is not fully understood, recent studies have indicated the potential role of GABAA receptors in the pathophysiology of ASD. GABAA receptors play a crucial role in various neurodevelopmental processes and adult neuroplasticity. However, the mechanism(s) of regulation of GABAA receptors in ASD remains poorly understood. Methods Postmortem middle frontal gyrus tissues (13 ASD and 13 control subjects) were used. In vitro studies were performed in primary cortical neurons at days in vitro (DIV) 14. The protein levels were examined by western blotting. Immunofluorescence studies were employed for cellular localization. The gene expression was determined by RT-PCR array and qRT-PCR. Results A significant decrease in GABAAα1 protein, but not mRNA levels was found in the middle frontal gyrus of ASD subjects indicating a post-translational regulation of GABAA receptors in ASD. At the cellular level, treatment with proteasomal inhibitor, MG132, or lactacystin significantly increased GABAAα1 protein levels and Lys48-linked polyubiquitination of GABAAα1, but reduced proteasome activity in mouse primary cortical neurons (DIV 14 from E16 embryos). Moreover, treatment with betulinic acid, a proteasome activator significantly decreased GABAAα1 protein levels in cortical neurons indicating the role of polyubiquitination of GABAAα1 proteins with their subsequent proteasomal degradation in cortical neurons. Ubiquitination specific RT-PCR array followed by western blot analysis revealed a significant increase in SYVN1, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) E3 ubiquitin ligase in the middle frontal gyrus of ASD subjects. In addition, the inhibition of proteasomal activity by MG132 increased the expression of GABAAα1 in the ER. The siRNA knockdown of SYVN1 significantly increased GABAAα1 protein levels in cortical neurons. Moreover, reduced association between SYVN1 and GABAAα1

  20. Ikaros is degraded by proteasome-dependent mechanism in the early phase of apoptosis induction

    SciTech Connect

    He, Li-Cai; Xu, Han-Zhang; Gu, Zhi-Min; Liu, Chuan-Xu; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Yue-Fei; Wen, Dong-Hua; Wu, Ying-Li

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Chemotherapeutic drugs or UV treatment reduces Ikaros prior to caspase-3 activation. {yields} Etoposide treatment does not alter the mRNA but shortens the half-life of Ikaros. {yields} MG132 or epoxomicin but not calpeptin inhibits etoposide-induced Ikaros degradation. {yields} Overexpression of Ikaros accelerates etoposide-induced apoptosis in NB4 cells. -- Abstract: Ikaros is an important transcription factor involved in the development and differentiation of hematopoietic cells. In this work, we found that chemotherapeutic drugs or ultraviolet radiation (UV) treatment could reduce the expression of full-length Ikaros (IK1) protein in less than 3 h in leukemic NB4, Kasumi-1 and Jurkat cells, prior to the activation of caspase-3. Etoposide treatment could not alter the mRNA level of IK1 but it could shorten the half-life of IK1. Co-treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 or epoxomicin but not calpain inhibitor calpeptin inhibited etoposide-induced Ikaros downregulation. Overexpression of IK1 could accelerate etoposide-induced apoptosis in NB4 cells, as evidenced by the increase of Annexin V positive cells and the more early activation of caspase 3. To our knowledge, this is the first report to show that upon chemotherapy drugs or UV treatment, IK1 could be degraded via the proteasome system in the early phase of apoptosis induction. These data might shed new insight on the role of IK1 in apoptosis and the post-translational regulation of IK1.

  1. Characterization of the 26S proteasome network in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihui; Delahunty, Claire; Fritz-Wolf, Karin; Rahlfs, Stefan; Helena Prieto, Judith; Yates, John R; Becker, Katja

    2015-12-07

    In eukaryotic cells, the ubiquitin-proteasome system as a key regulator of protein quality control is an excellent drug target. We therefore aimed to analyze the 26S proteasome complex in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, which still threatens almost half of the world's population. First, we established an affinity purification protocol allowing for the isolation of functional 26S proteasome complexes from the parasite. Subunit composition of the proteasome and component stoichiometry were studied and physiologic interacting partners were identified via in situ protein crosslinking. Furthermore, intrinsic ubiquitin receptors of the plasmodial proteasome were determined and their roles in proteasomal substrate recognition were analyzed. Notably, PfUSP14 was characterized as a proteasome-associated deubiquitinase resulting in the concept that targeting proteasomal deubiquitinating activity in P. falciparum may represent a promising antimalarial strategy. The data provide insights into a profound network orchestrated by the plasmodial proteasome and identified novel drug target candidates in the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  2. Conformational switching of the 26S proteasome enables substrate degradation.

    PubMed

    Matyskiela, Mary E; Lander, Gabriel C; Martin, Andreas

    2013-07-01

    The 26S proteasome is the major eukaryotic ATP-dependent protease, responsible for regulating the proteome through degradation of ubiquitin-tagged substrates. Its regulatory particle, containing the heterohexameric AAA+ ATPase motor and the essential deubiquitinase Rpn11, recognizes substrates, removes their ubiquitin chains and translocates them into the associated peptidase after unfolding, but detailed mechanisms remain unknown. Here we present the 26S proteasome structure from Saccharomyces cerevisiae during substrate degradation, showing that the regulatory particle switches from a preengaged to a translocation-competent conformation. This conformation is characterized by a rearranged ATPase ring with uniform subunit interfaces, a widened central channel coaxially aligned with the peptidase and a spiral orientation of pore loops that suggests a rapid progression of ATP-hydrolysis events around the ring. Notably, Rpn11 moves from an occluded position to directly above the central pore, thus facilitating substrate deubiquitination concomitant with translocation.

  3. The Logic of the 26S Proteasome.

    PubMed

    Collins, Galen Andrew; Goldberg, Alfred L

    2017-05-18

    The ubiquitin proteasome pathway is responsible for most of the protein degradation in mammalian cells. Rates of degradation by this pathway have generally been assumed to be determined by rates of ubiquitylation. However, recent studies indicate that proteasome function is also tightly regulated and determines whether a ubiquitylated protein is destroyed or deubiquitylated and survives longer. This article reviews recent advances in our understanding of the proteasome's multistep ATP-dependent mechanism, its biochemical and structural features that ensure efficient proteolysis and ubiquitin recycling while preventing nonselective proteolysis, and the regulation of proteasome activity by interacting proteins and subunit modifications, especially phosphorylation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Rice ROOT ARCHITECTURE ASSOCIATED1 Binds the Proteasome Subunit RPT4 and Is Degraded in a D-Box and Proteasome-Dependent Manner1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ye; Cao, Hong; Jiang, Jiafu; Xu, Yunyuan; Du, Jizhou; Wang, Xin; Yuan, Ming; Wang, Zhiyong; Xu, Zhihong; Chong, Kang

    2008-01-01

    Root growth is mainly determined by cell division and subsequent elongation in the root apical area. Components regulating cell division in root meristematic cells are largely unknown. Previous studies have identified rice (Oryza sativa) ROOT ARCHITECTURE ASSOCIATED1 (OsRAA1) as a regulator in root development. Yet, the function of OsRAA1 at the cellular and molecular levels is unclear. Here, we show that OsRAA1-overexpressed transgenic rice showed reduced primary root growth, increased numbers of cells in metaphase, and reduced numbers of cells in anaphase, which suggests that OsRAA1 is responsible for limiting root growth by inhibiting the onset of anaphase. The expression of OsRAA1 in fission yeast also induced metaphase arrest, which is consistent with the fact that OsRAA1 functions through a conserved mechanism of cell cycle regulation. Moreover, a colocalization assay has shown that OsRAA1 is expressed predominantly at spindles during cell division. Yeast two-hybrid and pull-down assays, as well as a bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay, all have revealed that OsRAA1 interacts with a rice homolog of REGULATORY PARTICLE TRIPLE-A ATPASE4, a component that is involved in the ubiquitin pathway. Treating transgenic rice with specific inhibitors of the 26S proteasome blocked the degradation of OsRAA1 and increased the number of cells in metaphase. Mutation of a putative ubiquitination-targeting D-box (RGSLDLISL) in OsRAA1 interrupted the destruction of OsRAA1 in transgenic yeast. These results suggest that ubiquitination and proteasomic proteolysis are involved in OsRAA1 degradation, which is essential for the onset of anaphase, and that OsRAA1 may modulate root development mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway as a novel regulatory factor of the cell cycle. PMID:18701670

  5. The F-box Protein FBXO25 Promotes the Proteasome-dependent Degradation of ELK-1 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Felipe R.; Manfiolli, Adriana O.; Soares, Cláudia S.; Baqui, Munira M. A.; Koide, Tie; Gomes, Marcelo D.

    2013-01-01

    FBXO25 is one of the 69 known human F-box proteins that serve as specificity factors for a family of ubiquitin ligases composed of SKP1, Rbx1, Cullin1, and F-box protein (SCF1) that are involved in targeting proteins for degradation across the ubiquitin proteasome system. However, the substrates of most SCF E3 ligases remain unknown. Here, we applied an in chip ubiquitination screen using a human protein microarray to uncover putative substrates for the FBXO25 protein. Among several novel putative targets identified, the c-fos protooncogene regulator ELK-1 was characterized as the first endogenous substrate for SCF1(FBXO25) E3 ligase. FBXO25 interacted with and mediated the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of ELK-1 in HEK293T cells. In addition, FBXO25 overexpression suppressed induction of two ELK-1 target genes, c-fos and egr-1, in response to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Together, our findings show that FBXO25 mediates ELK-1 degradation through the ubiquitin proteasome system and thereby plays a role in regulating the activation of ELK-1 pathway in response to mitogens. PMID:23940030

  6. The F-box protein FBXO25 promotes the proteasome-dependent degradation of ELK-1 protein.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Felipe R; Manfiolli, Adriana O; Soares, Cláudia S; Baqui, Munira M A; Koide, Tie; Gomes, Marcelo D

    2013-09-27

    FBXO25 is one of the 69 known human F-box proteins that serve as specificity factors for a family of ubiquitin ligases composed of SKP1, Rbx1, Cullin1, and F-box protein (SCF1) that are involved in targeting proteins for degradation across the ubiquitin proteasome system. However, the substrates of most SCF E3 ligases remain unknown. Here, we applied an in chip ubiquitination screen using a human protein microarray to uncover putative substrates for the FBXO25 protein. Among several novel putative targets identified, the c-fos protooncogene regulator ELK-1 was characterized as the first endogenous substrate for SCF1(FBXO25) E3 ligase. FBXO25 interacted with and mediated the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of ELK-1 in HEK293T cells. In addition, FBXO25 overexpression suppressed induction of two ELK-1 target genes, c-fos and egr-1, in response to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Together, our findings show that FBXO25 mediates ELK-1 degradation through the ubiquitin proteasome system and thereby plays a role in regulating the activation of ELK-1 pathway in response to mitogens.

  7. Increased proteasome-dependent degradation of estrogen receptor-alpha by TGF-beta1 in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Petrel, Trevor A; Brueggemeier, Robert W

    2003-01-01

    Normal mammary epithelial cells are rapidly induced to G(1) arrest by the widely expressed cytokine, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta1). Studies in established breast cancer cell lines that express the estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) have demonstrated loss of this responsiveness. This inverse correlation suggests interpathway signaling important to cell growth and regulation. The adenocarcinoma breast cell line BT474, which was not growth arrested by TGF-beta1, was used as a model of estrogen-inducible growth to explore interpathway crosstalk. Although BT474 cells were not growth-arrested by TGF-beta1 as determined by flow cytometry analysis and 5'-bromo-3'-deoxyuridine incorporation into DNA, estrogen receptor protein levels were attenuated by 100 pM TGF-beta1 after 6 h. This decrease in ERalpha reached 50% of untreated control levels by 24 h of treatment and was further supported by a 50% decrease in estrogen-inducible DNA synthesis. Inspection of ERalpha transcripts suggested that this decrease was primarily the result of altered ERalpha protein stability or availability. Use of the proteasome inhibitor, MG132, abolished all effects on ERalpha by TGF-beta1. Collectively, this data supports a role for TGF-beta1 in regulating the growth of otherwise insensitive breast cancer cells through modulation of ERalpha stability. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Increased Proteasome-Dependent Degradation of Estrogen Receptor-Alpha by TGF-β1 in Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Petrel, Trevor A.; Brueggemeier, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    Normal mammary epithelial cells are rapidly induced to G1 arrest by the widely expressed cytokine, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1). Studies in established breast cancer cell lines that express the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) have demonstrated loss of this responsiveness. This inverse correlation suggests interpathway signaling important to cell growth and regulation. The adenocarcinoma breast cell line BT474, which was not growth arrested by TGF-β1, was used as a model of estrogen-inducible growth to explore interpathway crosstalk. Although BT474 cells were not growth-arrested by TGF-β1 as determined by flow cytometry analysis and 5′-bromo-3′-deoxyuridine incorporation into DNA, estrogen receptor protein levels were attenuated by 100 pM TGF-β1 after 6 h. This decrease in ERα reached 50% of untreated control levels by 24 h of treatment and was further supported by a 50% decrease in estrogen-inducible DNA synthesis. Inspection of ERα transcripts suggested that this decrease was primarily the result of altered ERα protein stability or availability. Use of the proteasome inhibitor, MG132, abolished all effects on ERα by TGF-β1. Collectively, this data supports a role for TGF-β1 in regulating the growth of otherwise insensitive breast cancer cells through modulation of ERα stability. PMID:12461787

  9. PiZ Mouse Liver Accumulates Polyubiquitin Conjugates That Associate with Catalytically Active 26S Proteasomes

    PubMed Central

    Haddock, Christopher J.; Blomenkamp, Keith; Gautam, Madhav; James, Jared; Mielcarska, Joanna; Gogol, Edward; Teckman, Jeffrey; Skowyra, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of aggregation-prone human alpha 1 antitrypsin mutant Z (AT-Z) protein in PiZ mouse liver stimulates features of liver injury typical of human alpha 1 antitrypsin type ZZ deficiency, an autosomal recessive genetic disorder. Ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis by the 26S proteasome counteracts AT-Z accumulation and plays other roles that, when inhibited, could exacerbate the injury. However, it is unknown how the conditions of AT-Z mediated liver injury affect the 26S proteasome. To address this question, we developed a rapid extraction strategy that preserves polyubiquitin conjugates in the presence of catalytically active 26S proteasomes and allows their separation from deposits of insoluble AT-Z. Compared to WT, PiZ extracts had about 4-fold more polyubiquitin conjugates with no apparent change in the levels of the 26S and 20S proteasomes, and unassembled subunits. The polyubiquitin conjugates had similar affinities to ubiquitin-binding domain of Psmd4 and co-purified with similar amounts of catalytically active 26S complexes. These data show that polyubiquitin conjugates were accumulating despite normal recruitment to catalytically active 26S proteasomes that were available in excess, and suggest that a defect at the 26S proteasome other than compromised binding to polyubiquitin chain or peptidase activity played a role in the accumulation. In support of this idea, PiZ extracts were characterized by high molecular weight, reduction-sensitive forms of selected subunits, including ATPase subunits that unfold substrates and regulate access to proteolytic core. Older WT mice acquired similar alterations, implying that they result from common aspects of oxidative stress. The changes were most pronounced on unassembled subunits, but some subunits were altered even in the 26S proteasomes co-purified with polyubiquitin conjugates. Thus, AT-Z protein aggregates indirectly impair degradation of polyubiquitinated proteins at the level of the 26S proteasome

  10. Retinoic acid induces proteasome-dependent degradation of retinoic acid receptor α (RARα) and oncogenic RARα fusion proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun; Gianni, Maurizio; Kopf, Eliezer; Honoré, Nicole; Chelbi-Alix, Mounira; Koken, Marcel; Quignon, Frédérique; Rochette-Egly, Cécile; de Thé, Hugues

    1999-01-01

    Analyzing the pathways by which retinoic acid (RA) induces promyelocytic leukemia/retinoic acid receptor α (PML/RARα) catabolism in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), we found that, in addition to caspase-mediated PML/RARα cleavage, RA triggers degradation of both PML/RARα and RARα. Similarly, in non-APL cells, RA directly targeted RARα and RARα fusions to the proteasome degradation pathway. Activation of either RARα or RXRα by specific agonists induced degradation of both proteins. Conversely, a mutation in RARα that abolishes heterodimer formation and DNA binding, blocked both RARα and RXRα degradation. Mutations in the RARα DNA-binding domain or AF-2 transcriptional activation region also impaired RARα catabolism. Hence, our results link transcriptional activation to receptor catabolism and suggest that transcriptional up-regulation of nuclear receptors by their ligands may be a feedback mechanism allowing sustained target-gene activation. PMID:10611294

  11. Identification of proteins that interact with mammalian peptide:N-glycanase and implicate this hydrolase in the proteasome-dependent pathway for protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hangil; Suzuki, Tadashi; Lennarz, William J.

    2001-01-01

    Peptide:N-glycanase (PNGase) cleaves oligosaccharide chains from glycopeptides and glycoproteins. Recently the deduced amino acid sequence of a cytoplasmic PNGase has been identified in various eukaryotes ranging from yeast to mammals, suggesting that deglycosylation may play a central role in some catabolic process. Several lines of evidence indicate that the cytoplasmic enzyme is involved in the quality control system for newly synthesized glycoproteins. Two-hybrid library screening by using mouse PNGase as the target yielded several PNGase-interacting proteins that previously had been implicated in proteasome-dependent protein degradation: mHR23B, ubiquitin, a regulatory subunit of the 19S proteasome, as well as a protein containing an ubiquitin regulatory motif (UBX) and an ubiquitin-associated motif (UBA). These findings by using the two-hybrid system were further confirmed either by in vitro binding assays or size fractionation assays. These results suggest that PNGase may be required for efficient proteasome-mediated degradation of misfolded glycoproteins in mammalian cells. PMID:11562482

  12. Rapid Degradation of Auxin/Indoleacetic Acid Proteins Requires Conserved Amino Acids of Domain II and Is Proteasome Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Jason A.; Zenser, Nathan; Leyser, Ottoline; Callis, Judy

    2001-01-01

    Auxin rapidly induces auxin/indoleacetic acid (Aux/IAA) transcription. The proteins encoded are short-lived nucleus-localized transcriptional regulators that share four conserved domains. In a transient assay measuring protein accumulation, an Aux/IAA 13–amino acid domain II consensus sequence was sufficient to target firefly luciferase (LUC) for low protein accumulation equivalent to that observed previously for full-length PSIAA6. Single amino acid substitutions in these 13 amino acids, corresponding to known auxin response mutants, resulted in a sixfold to 20-fold increase in protein accumulation. Naturally occurring variant amino acids had no effect. Residues identified as essential by single alanine substitutions were not sufficient when all flanking amino acids were alanine, indicating the importance of flanking regions. Using direct protein degradation measurements in transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings, full-length IAA1, PSIAA6, and the N-terminal 73 PSIAA6 amino acids targeted LUC for rapid degradation with 8-min half-lives. The C-terminal 109 amino acids did not affect LUC half-life. Smaller regions containing domain II also targeted LUC for rapid degradation, but the rates were not equivalent to those of the full-length protein. A single domain II substitution in the context of full-length PSIAA6 increased half-life 30-fold. Proteasome inhibitors affected Aux/IAA::LUC fusion protein accumulation, demonstrating the involvement of the proteasome. PMID:11595806

  13. Structural analysis of the 26S proteasome by cryoelectron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Nickell, Stephan; Mihalache, Oana; Beck, Florian; Hegerl, Reiner; Korinek, Andreas; Baumeister, Wolfgang . E-mail: baumeist@biochem.mpg.de

    2007-02-02

    The 26S proteasome is the key enzyme of intracellular protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. It is a multisubunit complex of 2.5 MDa confining the proteolytic action to an inner compartment with tightly controlled access. Structural studies of this intriguing molecular machine have been hampered by its intrinsic instability and its dynamics. Here we have used an unconventional approach to obtain a three-dimensional structure of the holocomplex uncompromised by preparation-induced alterations and unbiased by any starting model. We have performed a tomographic reconstruction, followed by averaging over approx. 150 individual reconstructions, of Drosophila 26S proteasomes suspended in a thin layer of amorphous ice.

  14. [Structures and functions of the 26S proteasome Rpn10 family].

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Hiroyuki

    2002-09-01

    The ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway is thought to be one of the vital systems for cellular regulations, including control of the cell cycle, differentiation and apoptosis. In this pathway, poly-ubiquitinated proteins are selectively degraded by the 26S proteasome, a multisubunit proteolytic machinery. Recognition of the poly-ubiquitin chain by the 26S proteasome should be a key step leading to the selective degradation of target proteins, and the Rpn10 subunit of the 26S proteasome has been shown to preferentially bind the poly-ubiquitin chain in vitro. We previously reported that the mouse Rpn10 mRNA family is generated from a single gene by developmentally regulated, alternative splicing. To determine whether such alternative splicing mechanisms occur in organisms other than the mouse, we searched for Rpn10 isoforms in various species. Here we summarize the gene organization of the Rpn10 in lower species and provide evidence that the competence for generating all distinct forms of Rpn10 alternative splicing has expanded through evolution. Some of the Rpn10 family genes were found to be expressed in distinct developmental stages, suggesting that they have distinct functions during embryogenesis. For example, Rpn10c and Rpn10e were exclusively expressed at specific developmental stages and in specific tissues, while Rpn10a was expressed constitutively. Our experimental results indicate that the respective Rpn10 proteins possess distinct roles in the progression of development. Furthermore, some of the Rpn10 variants specifically interacted with important developmental regulators.

  15. The Regulatory Complex of Drosophila melanogaster 26s Proteasomes

    PubMed Central

    Hölzl, Harald; Kapelari, Barbara; Kellermann, Josef; Seemüller, Erika; Sümegi, Máté; Udvardy, Andor; Medalia, Ohad; Sperling, Joseph; Müller, Shirley A.; Engel, Andreas; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2000-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster embryos are a source for homogeneous and stable 26S proteasomes suitable for structural studies. For biochemical characterization, purified 26S proteasomes were resolved by two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and subunits composing the regulatory complex (RC) were identified by amino acid sequencing and immunoblotting, before corresponding cDNAs were sequenced. 17 subunits from Drosophila RCs were found to have homologues in the yeast and human RCs. An additional subunit, p37A, not yet described in RCs of other organisms, is a member of the ubiquitin COOH-terminal hydrolase family (UCH). Analysis of EM images of 26S proteasomes-UCH-inhibitor complexes allowed for the first time to localize one of the RC's specific functions, deubiquitylating activity. The masses of 26S proteasomes with either one or two attached RCs were determined by scanning transmission EM (STEM), yielding a mass of 894 kD for a single RC. This value is in good agreement with the summed masses of the 18 identified RC subunits (932 kD), indicating that the number of subunits is complete. PMID:10893261

  16. Structural insights into the functional cycle of the ATPase module of the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Wehmer, Marc; Rudack, Till; Beck, Florian; Aufderheide, Antje; Pfeifer, Günter; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Förster, Friedrich; Schulten, Klaus; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Sakata, Eri

    2017-02-07

    In eukaryotic cells, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is responsible for the regulated degradation of intracellular proteins. The 26S holocomplex comprises the core particle (CP), where proteolysis takes place, and one or two regulatory particles (RPs). The base of the RP is formed by a heterohexameric AAA(+) ATPase module, which unfolds and translocates substrates into the CP. Applying single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and image classification to samples in the presence of different nucleotides and nucleotide analogs, we were able to observe four distinct conformational states (s1 to s4). The resolution of the four conformers allowed for the construction of atomic models of the AAA(+) ATPase module as it progresses through the functional cycle. In a hitherto unobserved state (s4), the gate controlling access to the CP is open. The structures described in this study allow us to put forward a model for the 26S functional cycle driven by ATP hydrolysis.

  17. Aging perturbs 26S proteasome assembly in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Vernace, Vita A.; Arnaud, Lisette; Schmidt-Glenewinkel, Thomas; Figueiredo-Pereira, Maria E.

    2012-01-01

    Aging is associated with loss of quality control in protein turnover. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is critical to this quality control process as it degrades mutated and damaged proteins. We identified a unique aging-dependent mechanism that contributes to proteasome dysfunction in Drosophila melanogaster. Our studies are the first to show that the major proteasome form in old (43–47 days old) female and male flies is the weakly active 20S core particle, while in younger (1–32 days old) flies highly active 26S proteasomes are preponderant. Old (43–47 days) flies of both genders also exhibit a decline (~50%) in ATP levels, which is relevant to 26S proteasomes, as their assembly is ATP-dependent. The steep declines in 26S proteasome and ATP levels were observed at an age (43–47 days) when the flies exhibited a marked drop in locomotor performance, attesting that these are “old age” events. Remarkably, treatment with a proteasome inhibitor increases ubiquitinated protein levels and shortens the life span of old but not young flies. In conclusion, our data reveal a previously unknown mechanism that perturbs proteasome activity in “old-age” female and male Drosophila most likely depriving them of the ability to effectively cope with proteotoxic damages caused by environmental and/or genetic factors. PMID:17413001

  18. The Cdc48-Vms1 complex maintains 26S proteasome architecture.

    PubMed

    Tran, Joseph R; Brodsky, Jeffrey L

    2014-03-15

    The 26S proteasome is responsible for most regulated protein turnover and for the degradation of aberrant proteins in eukaryotes. The assembly of this ~2.5 MDa multicatalytic protease requires several dedicated chaperones and, once assembled, substrate selectivity is mediated by ubiquitin conjugation. After modification with ubiquitin, substrates are escorted to the proteasome by myriad factors, including Cdc48 (cell-division cycle 48). Cdc48 also associates with numerous cofactors, but, to date, it is unclear whether each cofactor facilitates proteasome delivery. We discovered that yeast lacking a conserved Cdc48 cofactor, Vms1 [VCP (valosin-containing protein)/Cdc48-associated mitochondrial stress-responsive], accumulate proteasome-targeted ubiquitinated proteins. Vms1 mutant cells also contain elevated levels of unassembled 20S proteasome core particles and select 19S cap subunits. In addition, we found that the ability of Vms1 to support 26S proteasome assembly requires Cdc48 interaction, and that the loss of Vms1 reduced 26S proteasome levels and cell viability after prolonged culture in the stationary phase. The results of the present study highlight an unexpected link between the Cdc48-Vms1 complex and the preservation of proteasome architecture, and indicate how perturbed proteasome assembly affects the turnover of ubiquitinated proteins and maintains viability in aging cells.

  19. The Cdc48–Vms1 complex maintains 26S proteasome architecture

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Joseph R.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is responsible for most regulated protein turnover and for the degradation of aberrant proteins in eukaryotes. The assembly of this ~2.5 MDa multicatalytic protease requires several dedicated chaperones and, once assembled, substrate selectivity is mediated by ubiquitin conjugation. After modification with ubiquitin, substrates are escorted to the proteasome by myriad factors, including Cdc48 (cell-division cycle 48). Cdc48 also associates with numerous cofactors, but, to date, it is unclear whether each cofactor facilitates proteasome delivery. We discovered that yeast lacking a conserved Cdc48 cofactor, Vms1 [VCP (valosin-containing protein)/Cdc48-associated mitochondrial stress-responsive], accumulate proteasome-targeted ubiquitinated proteins. Vms1 mutant cells also contain elevated levels of unassembled 20S proteasome core particles and select 19S cap subunits. In addition, we found that the ability of Vms1 to support 26S proteasome assembly requires Cdc48 interaction, and that the loss of Vms1 reduced 26S proteasome levels and cell viability after prolonged culture in the stationary phase. The results of the present study highlight an unexpected link between the Cdc48–Vms1 complex and the preservation of proteasome architecture, and indicate how perturbed proteasome assembly affects the turnover of ubiquitinated proteins and maintains viability in aging cells. PMID:24351022

  20. Localization of the regulatory particle subunit Sem1 in the 26S proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, Stefan; Sakata, Eri; Beck, Florian; Pathare, Ganesh R.; Schnitger, Jérôme; Nágy, Istvan; Baumeister, Wolfgang Förster, Friedrich

    2013-05-31

    Highlights: •26S proteasome subunit Sem1 was mapped using cryo-EM and cross-linking data. •C-terminal helix of Sem1 located near winged helix motif of Rpn7. •N-terminal part of Sem1 tethers Rpn7, Rpn3 and lid helical bundle. •Sem1 binds differently to PCI-domains of proteasome subunit Rpn7 and TREX-2 subunit Thp1. -- Abstract: The ubiquitin–proteasome system is responsible for regulated protein degradation in the cell with the 26S proteasome acting as its executive arm. The molecular architecture of this 2.5 MDa complex has been established recently, with the notable exception of the small acidic subunit Sem1. Here, we localize the C-terminal helix of Sem1 binding to the PCI domain of the subunit Rpn7 using cryo-electron microscopy single particle reconstruction of proteasomes purified from yeast cells with sem1 deletion. The approximate position of the N-terminal region of Sem1 bridging the cleft between Rpn7 and Rpn3 was inferred based on site-specific cross-linking data of the 26S proteasome. Our structural studies indicate that Sem1 can assume different conformations in different contexts, which supports the idea that Sem1 functions as a molecular glue stabilizing the Rpn3/Rpn7 heterodimer.

  1. The 26S Proteasome Complex: An Attractive Target for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Frankland-Searby, Sarah; Bhaumik, Sukesh R.

    2011-01-01

    The 26S proteasome complex engages in an ATP-dependent proteolytic degradation of a variety of oncoproteins, transcription factors, cell cycle specific cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, ornithine decarboxylase, and other key regulatory cellular proteins. Thus, the proteasome regulates either directly or indirectly many important cellular processes. Altered regulation of these cellular events is linked to the development of cancer. Therefore, the proteasome has become an attractive target for the treatment of numerous cancers. Several proteasome inhibitors that target the proteolytic active sites of the 26S proteasome complex have been developed and tested for anti-tumor activities. These proteasome inhibitors have displayed impressive anti-tumor functions by inducing apoptosis in different tumor types. Further, the proteasome inhibitors have been shown to induce cell cycle arrest, and inhibit angiogenesis, cell-cell adhesion, cell migration, immune and inflammatory responses, and DNA repair response. A number of proteasome inhibitors are now in clinical trials to treat multiple myeloma and solid tumors. Many other proteasome inhibitors with different efficiencies are being developed and tested for anti-tumor activities. Several proteasome inhibitors currently in clinical trials have shown significantly improved anti-tumor activities when combined with other drugs such as histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, Akt (protein kinase B) inhibitors, DNA damaging agents, Hsp90 (heat shock protein 90) inhibitors, and lenalidomide. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib is now in the clinic to treat multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. Here, we discuss the 26S proteasome complex in carcinogenesis and different proteasome inhibitors with their potential therapeutic applications in treatment of numerous cancers. PMID:22037302

  2. Insights into the molecular architecture of the 26S proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Nickell, Stephan; Beck, Florian; Scheres, Sjors H. W.; Korinek, Andreas; Förster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Mihalache, Oana; Sun, Na; Nagy, István; Sali, Andrej; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Carazo, Jose-Maria; Mann, Matthias; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy in conjunction with advanced image analysis was used to analyze the structure of the 26S proteasome and to elucidate its variable features. We have been able to outline the boundaries of the ATPase module in the “base” part of the regulatory complex that can vary in its position and orientation relative to the 20S core particle. This variation is consistent with the “wobbling” model that was previously proposed to explain the role of the regulatory complex in opening the gate in the α-rings of the core particle. In addition, a variable mass near the mouth of the ATPase ring has been identified as Rpn10, a multiubiquitin receptor, by correlating the electron microscopy data with quantitative mass spectrometry. PMID:19581588

  3. Toward an Integrated Structural Model of the 26S Proteasome*

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Nickell, Stephan; Sali, Andrej; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is the end point of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and degrades ubiquitylated substrates. It is composed of the 20S core particle (CP), where degradation occurs, and the 19S regulatory particle (RP), which ensures substrate specificity of degradation. Whereas the CP is resolved to atomic resolution, the architecture of the RP is largely unknown. We provide a comprehensive analysis of the current structural knowledge on the RP, including structures of the RP subunits, physical protein-protein interactions, and cryoelectron microscopy data. These data allowed us to compute an atomic model for the CP-AAA-ATPase subcomplex. In addition to this atomic model, further subunits can be mapped approximately, which lets us hypothesize on the substrate path during its degradation. PMID:20467039

  4. Viruses and the 26S proteasome: hacking into destruction.

    PubMed

    Banks, Lawrence; Pim, David; Thomas, Miranda

    2003-08-01

    The discovery that the human papillomavirus E6 oncoprotein could direct the ubiquitination and degradation of the p53 tumour suppressor at the 26S proteasome was the beginning of a new view on virus-host interactions. A decade later, a plethora of viral proteins have been shown to direct host-cell proteins for proteolytic degradation. These activities are required for various aspects of the virus life-cycle from entry, through replication and enhanced cell survival, to viral release. As with oncogenes and cell-cycle control, the study of apparently simple viruses has provided a wealth of information on the function of a whole class of cellular proteins whose function is arguably as important as that of the kinases: the ubiquitin-protein ligases.

  5. Over-expression of tobacco UBC1 encoding a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme increases cadmium tolerance by activating the 20S/26S proteasome and by decreasing Cd accumulation and oxidative stress in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Bahmani, Ramin; Kim, DongGwan; Lee, Byoung Doo; Hwang, Seongbin

    2017-07-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub)-conjugating enzyme (UBC, E2) receives Ub from Ub-activating enzyme (E1) and transfers it to target proteins, thereby playing a key role in Ub/26S proteasome-dependent proteolysis. UBC has been reported to be involved in tolerating abiotic stress in plants, including drought, salt, osmotic and water stresses. To isolate the genes involved in Cd tolerance, we transformed WT (wild-type) yeast Y800 with a tobacco cDNA expression library and isolated a tobacco cDNA, NtUBC1 (Ub-conjugating enzyme), that enhances cadmium tolerance. When NtUBC1 was over-expressed in tobacco, cadmium tolerance was enhanced, but the Cd level was decreased. Interestingly, 20S proteasome activity was increased and ubiquitinated protein levels were diminished in response to cadmium in NtUBC1 tobacco. By contrast, proteasome activity was decreased and ubiquitinated protein levels were slightly enhanced by Cd treatment in control tobacco, which is sensitive to Cd. Moreover, the oxidative stress level was induced to a lesser extent by Cd in NtUBC1 tobacco compared with control plants, which is ascribed to the higher activity of antioxidant enzymes in NtUBC1 tobacco. In addition, NtUBC1 tobacco displayed a reduced accumulation of Cd compared with the control, likely due to the higher expression of CAX3 (Ca(2+)/H(+) exchanger) and the lower expression of IRT1 (iron-responsive transporter 1) and HMA-A and -B (heavy metal ATPase). In contrast, atubc1 and atubc1atubc2 Arabidopsis exhibited lower Cd tolerance and proteasome activity than WT. In conclusion, NtUBC1 expression promotes cadmium tolerance likely by removing cadmium-damaged proteins via Ub/26S proteasome-dependent proteolysis or the Ub-independent 20S proteasome and by diminishing oxidative stress through the activation of antioxidant enzymes and decreasing Cd accumulation due to higher CAX3 and lower IRT1 and HMA-A/B expression in response to 50 µM Cd challenge for 3 weeks.

  6. The exocyst subunit Sec3 is regulated by a protein quality control pathway.

    PubMed

    Kampmeyer, Caroline; Karakostova, Antonina; Schenstrøm, Signe M; Abildgaard, Amanda B; Lauridsen, Anne-Marie; Jourdain, Isabelle; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2017-09-15

    Exocytosis involves fusion of secretory vesicles with the plasma membrane, thereby delivering membrane proteins to the cell surface and releasing material into the extracellular space. The tethering of the secretory vesicles before membrane fusion is mediated by the exocyst, an essential phylogenetically conserved octameric protein complex. Exocyst biogenesis is regulated by several processes, but the mechanisms by which the exocyst is degraded are unknown. Here, to unravel the components of the exocyst degradation pathway, we screened for extragenic suppressors of a temperature-sensitive fission yeast strain mutated in the exocyst subunit Sec3 (sec3-913). One of the suppressing DNAs encoded a truncated dominant-negative variant of the 26S proteasome subunit, Rpt2, indicating that exocyst degradation is controlled by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The temperature-dependent growth defect of the sec3-913 strain was gene dosage-dependent and suppressed by blocking the proteasome, Hsp70-type molecular chaperones, the Pib1 E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase, and the deubiquitylating enzyme Ubp3. Moreover, defects in cell septation, exocytosis, and endocytosis in sec3 mutant strains were similarly alleviated by mutation of components in this pathway. We also found that, particularly under stress conditions, wild-type Sec3 degradation is regulated by Pib1 and the 26S proteasome. In conclusion, our results suggest that a cytosolic protein quality control pathway monitors folding and proteasome-dependent turnover of an exocyst subunit and, thereby, controls exocytosis in fission yeast. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Emodin potentiates the antiproliferative effect of interferon α/β by activation of JAK/STAT pathway signaling through inhibition of the 26S proteasome

    PubMed Central

    He, Yujiao; Huang, Junmei; Wang, Ping; Shen, Xiaofei; Li, Sheng; Yang, Lijuan; Liu, Wanli; Suksamrarn, Apichart; Zhang, Guolin; Wang, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a negative regulator of type I interferon (IFN-α/β) signaling. Inhibition of the 26S proteasome by small molecules may be a new strategy to enhance the efficacy of type I IFNs and reduce their side effects. Using cell-based screening assay for new 26S proteasome inhibitors, we found that emodin, a natural anthraquinone, was a potent inhibitor of the human 26S proteasome. Emodin preferably inhibited the caspase-like and chymotrypsin-like activities of the human 26S proteasome and increased the ubiquitination of endogenous proteins in cells. Computational modeling showed that emodin exhibited an orientation/conformation favorable to nucleophilic attack in the active pocket of the β1, β2, and β5 subunits of the 26S proteasome. Emodin increased phosphorylation of STAT1, decreased phosphorylation of STAT3 and increased endogenous gene expression stimulated by IFN-α. Emodin inhibited IFN-α-stimulated ubiquitination and degradation of type I interferon receptor 1 (IFNAR1). Emodin also sensitized the antiproliferative effect of IFN-α in HeLa cervical carcinoma cells and reduced tumor growth in Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma-bearing mice. These results suggest that emodin potentiates the antiproliferative effect of IFN-α by activation of JAK/STAT pathway signaling through inhibition of 26S proteasome-stimulated IFNAR1 degradation. Therefore, emodin warrants further investigation as a new means to enhance the efficacy of IFN-α/β. PMID:26683360

  8. Structural insights into the functional cycle of the ATPase module of the 26S proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Wehmer, Marc; Rudack, Till; Beck, Florian; Aufderheide, Antje; Pfeifer, Günter; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Förster, Friedrich; Schulten, Klaus; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Sakata, Eri

    2017-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) is responsible for the regulated degradation of intracellular proteins. The 26S holocomplex comprises the core particle (CP), where proteolysis takes place, and one or two regulatory particles (RPs). The base of the RP is formed by a heterohexameric AAA+ ATPase module, which unfolds and translocates substrates into the CP. Applying single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and image classification to samples in the presence of different nucleotides and nucleotide analogs, we were able to observe four distinct conformational states (s1 to s4). The resolution of the four conformers allowed for the construction of atomic models of the AAA+ ATPase module as it progresses through the functional cycle. In a hitherto unobserved state (s4), the gate controlling access to the CP is open. The structures described in this study allow us to put forward a model for the 26S functional cycle driven by ATP hydrolysis. PMID:28115689

  9. Differential expression of 26S proteasome subunits and functional activity during neonatal development.

    PubMed

    Claud, Erika C; McDonald, Julie A K; He, Shu-Mei; Yu, Yueyue; Duong, Lily; Sun, Jun; Petrof, Elaine O

    2014-08-29

    Proteasomes regulate many essential cellular processes by degrading intracellular proteins. While aging is known to be associated with dysfunction of the proteasome, there are few reports detailing activity and function of proteasomes in the early stages of life. To elucidate the function and development of mammalian proteasomes, 26S proteasomes were affinity-purified from rat intestine, spleen and liver. The developmental expression of core, regulatory and immunoproteasome subunits was analyzed by immunoblotting and reverse-transcriptase PCR of mRNA subunits, and proteasome catalytic function was determined by fluorogenic enzymatic assays. The expression of core (β2, β5, α7 and β1) and regulatory (Rpt5) subunits was found to be present at low levels at birth and increased over time particularly at weaning. In contrast, while gradual developmental progression of proteasome structure was also seen with the immunoproteasome subunits (β1i, β5i, and β2i), these were not present at birth. Our studies demonstrate a developmental pattern to 26S proteasome activity and subunit expression, with low levels of core proteasome components and absence of immunoproteasomes at birth followed by increases at later developmental stages. This correlates with findings from other studies of a developmental hyporesponsiveness of the adaptive immune system to allow establishment of microbial colonization immediately after birth.

  10. KIAA0368-deficiency affects disassembly of 26S proteasome under oxidative stress condition.

    PubMed

    Haratake, Kousuke; Sato, Akitsugu; Tsuruta, Fuminori; Chiba, Tomoki

    2016-06-01

    Many cellular stresses cause damages of intracellular proteins, which are eventually degraded by the ubiquitin and proteasome system. The proteasome is a multicatalytic protease complex composed of 20S core particle and the proteasome activators that regulate the proteasome activity. Extracellular mutants 29 (Ecm29) is a 200 kDa protein encoded by KIAA0368 gene, associates with the proteasome, but its role is largely unknown. Here, we generated KIAA0368-deficient mice and investigated the function of Ecm29 in stress response. KIAA0368-deficient mice showed normal peptidase activity and proteasome formation at normal condition. Under stressed condition, 26S proteasome dissociates in wild-type cells, but not in KIAA0368(-/-) cells. This response was correlated with efficient degradation of damaged proteins and resistance to oxidative stress of KIAA0368(-/-) cells. Thus, Ecm29 is involved in the dissociation process of 26S proteasome, providing clue to analyse the mechanism of proteasomal degradation under various stress condition. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  11. DNA damage modulates interactions between microRNAs and the 26S proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Tsimokha, Anna S; Kulichkova, Valentina A.; Karpova, Elena V.; Zaykova, Julia J.; Aksenov, Nikolai D; Vasilishina, Anastasia A.; Kropotov, Andrei V.; Antonov, Alexey; Barlev, Nikolai A.

    2014-01-01

    26S proteasomes are known as major non-lysosomal cellular machines for coordinated and specific destruction of ubiquitinylated proteins. The proteolytic activities of proteasomes are controlled by various post-translational modifications in response to environmental cues, including DNA damage. Besides proteolysis, proteasomes also associate with RNA hydrolysis and splicing. Here, we extend the functional diversity of proteasomes by showing that they also dynamically associate with microRNAs (miRNAs) both in the nucleus and cytoplasm of cells. Moreover, DNA damage induced by an anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin, alters the repertoire of proteasome-associated miRNAs, enriching the population of miRNAs that target cell cycle checkpoint regulators and DNA repair proteins. Collectively, these data uncover yet another potential mode of action for proteasomes in the cell via their dynamic association with microRNAs. PMID:25004448

  12. The N termini of Brassica and tung omega-3 fatty acid desaturases mediate proteasome-dependent protein degradation in plant cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The regulation of fatty acid desaturase activity in plants is important for determining the polyunsaturated fatty acid content of cellular membranes, which is often rapidly adjusted in plant cells in response to temperature change. Recent studies have demonstrated that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)...

  13. Rice Stripe Tenuivirus Nonstructural Protein 3 Hijacks the 26S Proteasome of the Small Brown Planthopper via Direct Interaction with Regulatory Particle Non-ATPase Subunit 3

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi; Wu, Jianxiang; Fu, Shuai; Li, Chenyang; Zhu, Zeng-Rong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ubiquitin/26S proteasome system plays a vital role in regulating host defenses against pathogens. Previous studies have highlighted different roles for the ubiquitin/26S proteasome in defense during virus infection in both mammals and plants, but their role in the vectors that transmit those viruses is still unclear. In this study, we determined that the 26S proteasome is present in the small brown planthopper (SBPH) (Laodelphgax striatellus) and has components similar to those in plants and mammals. There was an increase in the accumulation of Rice stripe virus (RSV) in the transmitting vector SBPH after disrupting the 26S proteasome, indicating that the SBPH 26S proteasome plays a role in defense against RSV infection by regulating RSV accumulation. Yeast two-hybrid analysis determined that a subunit of the 26S proteasome, named RPN3, could interact with RSV NS3. Transient overexpression of RPN3 had no effect on the RNA silencing suppressor activity of RSV NS3. However, NS3 could inhibit the ability of SBPH rpn3 to complement an rpn3 mutation in yeast. Our findings also indicate that the direct interaction between RPN3 and NS3 was responsible for inhibiting the complementation ability of RPN3. In vivo, we found an accumulation of ubiquitinated protein in SBPH tissues where the RSV titer was high, and silencing of rpn3 resulted in malfunction of the SBPH proteasome-mediated proteolysis. Consequently, viruliferous SBPH in which RPN3 was repressed transmitted the virus more effectively as a result of higher accumulation of RSV. Our results suggest that the RSV NS3 protein is able to hijack the 26S proteasome in SBPH via a direct interaction with the RPN3 subunit to attenuate the host defense response. IMPORTANCE We show, for the first time, that the 26S proteasome components are present in the small brown planthopper and play a role in defense against its vectored plant virus (RSV). In turn, RSV encodes a protein that subverts the SBPH 26S proteasome

  14. Arabidopsis MBP1 gene encodes a conserved ubiquitin recognition component of the 26S proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Nocker, S. Van; Deveraux, Q.; Rechsteiner, M.

    1996-01-23

    Multiubiquitin chain attachment is a key step leading to the selective degradation of abnormal polypeptides and many important regulatory proteins by the eukaryotic 26S proteasome. However, the mechanism by which the 26S complex recognizes this posttranslational modification is unknown. Using synthetic multiubiquitin chains to probe an expression library for interacting proteins, we have isolated an Arabidopsis cDNA, designated MBP1, that encodes a 41-kDa acidic protein exhibiting high affinity for chains, especially those containing four or more ubiquitins. Based on similar physical and immunological properties, multiubiquitin binding affinities, and peptide sequence, MBP1 is homologous to subunit 5a of the human 26S proteasome. Structurally related proteins also exist in yeast, Caenorhabditis, and other plant species. Given their binding properties, association with the 26S proteasome, and widespread distribution, MBP1, S5a, and related proteins likely function as essential ubiquitin recognition components of the 26S proteasome. 35 refs., 3 figs.

  15. How degrading: Cyp26s in hindbrain development

    PubMed Central

    White, Richard J.; Schilling, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The vitamin A derivative retinoic acid performs many functions in vertebrate development and is thought to act as a diffusible morphogen that patterns the anterior-posterior axis of the hindbrain. Recent work in several systems has led to insights into how the spatial distribution of retinoic acid is regulated. These have shown local control of synthesis and degradation, and computational models suggest that degradation by the Cyp26 enzymes plays a critical role in the formation of a morphogen gradient as well as its ability to compensate for fluctuations in RA levels. PMID:18816852

  16. Both PHYTOCHROME RAPIDLY REGULATED1 (PAR1) and PAR2 Promote Seedling Photomorphogenesis in Multiple Light Signaling Pathways1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Peng; Song, Meifang; Yang, Qinghua; Su, Liang; Hou, Pei; Guo, Lin; Zheng, Xu; Xi, Yulin; Meng, Fanhua; Xiao, Yang; Yang, Li; Yang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings undergo photomorphogenesis in the light and etiolation in the dark. Light-activated photoreceptors transduce the light signals through a series of photomorphogenesis promoting or repressing factors to modulate many developmental processes in plants, such as photomorphogenesis and shade avoidance. CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1) is a conserved RING finger E3 ubiquitin ligase, which mediates degradation of several photomorphogenesis promoting factors, including ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5) and LONG HYPOCOTYL IN FAR-RED1 (HFR1), through a 26S proteasome-dependent pathway. PHYTOCHROME RAPIDLY REGULATED1 (PAR1) was first detected as an early repressed gene in both phytochrome A (phyA)-mediated far-red and phyB-mediated red signaling pathways, and subsequent studies showed that both PAR1 and PAR2 are negative factors of shade avoidance in Arabidopsis. However, the role of PAR1 and PAR2 in seedling deetiolation, and their relationships with other photomorphogenesis promoting and repressing factors are largely unknown. Here, we confirmed that both PAR1 and PAR2 redundantly enhance seedling deetiolation in multiple photoreceptor signaling pathways. Their transcript abundances are repressed by phyA, phyB, and cryptochrome1 under far-red, red, and blue light conditions, respectively. Both PAR1 and PAR2 act downstream of COP1, and COP1 mediates the degradation of PAR1 and PAR2 through the 26S proteasome pathway. Both PAR1 and PAR2 act in a separate pathway from HY5 and HFR1 under different light conditions, except for sharing in the same pathway with HFR1 under far-red light. Together, our results substantiate that PAR1 and PAR2 are positive factors functioning in multiple photoreceptor signaling pathways during seedling deetiolation. PMID:24335334

  17. The emerging roles of the ubiquitination/deubiquitination system in tumor radioresistance regarding DNA damage responses, cell cycle regulation, hypoxic responses, and antioxidant properties: Insight into the development of novel radiosensitizing strategies.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yoko; Koyasu, Sho; Kobayashi, Minoru; Harada, Hiroshi

    2017-10-01

    Radiation therapy is one of the first-line treatments for many cancers, with no less than half of cancer patients receiving it in the US. Despite the development of innovative and high-precision radiation therapy strategies, many patients still experience local tumor recurrence after the treatment, at least in part, due to the existence of radioresistant cells in malignant tumor tissues. Among the various biological processes known to induce radioresistance, a post-translational protein modification, ubiquitination, has received marked attention in recent years. Ubiquitination, in which highly conserved ubiquitin polypeptides are covalently attached to their target proteins, has long been recognized as a system to tag unnecessary proteins for 26S proteasome-dependent proteolysis. However, accumulating lines of evidence recently revealed that it acts as a signal molecule in diverse biological processes as well, and its functional disorder was found to cause not only tumor development and various diseases but also tumor radioresistance. The present review summarizes the latest knowledge about how the cancer-related disorder of the ubiquitination systems induces the radioresistance of cancer cells by influencing intrinsic pathways, each of which potentially affects the radioresistance/radiosensitivity of cells, such as DNA damage responses, cell cycle regulation, hypoxic responses, and antioxidant properties. In addition, this review aims to provide insights into how we can exploit the disorders in order to develop novel radiosensitizing strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Attenuation of glucocorticoid signaling through targeted degradation of p300 via the 26S proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiao; Su, Anna; Chen, Jihong; Lefebvre, Yvonne A; Haché, Robert J G

    2002-12-01

    The effects of acetylation on gene expression are complex, with changes in chromatin accessibility intermingled with direct effects on transcriptional regulators. For the nuclear receptors, both positive and negative effects of acetylation on specific gene transcription have been observed. We report that p300 and steroid receptor coactivator 1 interact transiently with the glucocorticoid receptor and that the acetyltransferase activity of p300 makes an important contribution to glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transcription. Treatment of cells with the deacetylase inhibitor, sodium butyrate, inhibited steroid-induced transcription and altered the transient association of glucocorticoid receptor with p300 and steroid receptor coactivator 1. Additionally, sustained sodium butyrate treatment induced the degradation of p300 through the 26S proteasome pathway. Treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 restored both the level of p300 protein and the transcriptional response to steroid over 20 h of treatment. These results reveal new levels for the regulatory control of gene expression by acetylation and suggest feedback control on p300 activity.

  19. Formation of an intricate helical bundle dictates the assembly of the 26S proteasome lid.

    PubMed

    Estrin, Eric; Lopez-Blanco, José Ramón; Chacón, Pablo; Martin, Andreas

    2013-09-03

    The 26S proteasome is the major ATP-dependent protease in eukaryotes and thus involved in regulating a diverse array of vital cellular processes. Three subcomplexes form this massive degradation machine: the lid, the base, and the core. While assembly of base and core has been well-studied, the detailed molecular mechanisms involved in formation of the nine-subunit lid remain largely unknown. Here, we reveal that helices found at the C terminus of each lid subunit form a helical bundle that directs the ordered self-assembly of the lid subcomplex. Furthermore, we use an integrative modeling approach to gain critical insights into the bundle topology and provide an important structural framework for our biochemical data. We show that the helical bundle serves as a hub through which the last-added subunit Rpn12 monitors proper lid assembly before incorporation into the proteasome. Finally, we predict that the assembly of the COP9 signalosome depends on a similar helical bundle.

  20. Inherent asymmetry in the 26S proteasome is defined by the ubiquitin receptor RPN13.

    PubMed

    Berko, Dikla; Herkon, Ora; Braunstein, Ilana; Isakov, Elada; David, Yael; Ziv, Tamar; Navon, Ami; Stanhill, Ariel

    2014-02-28

    The 26S double-capped proteasome is assembled in a hierarchic event that is orchestrated by dedicated set of chaperons. To date, all stoichiometric subunits are considered to be present in equal ratios, thus providing symmetry to the double-capped complex. Here, we show that although the vast majority (if not all) of the double-capped 26S proteasomes, both 19S complexes, contain the ubiquitin receptor Rpn10/S5a, only one of these 19S particles contains the additional ubiquitin receptor Rpn13, thereby defining asymmetry in the 26S proteasome. These results were validated in yeast and mammals, utilizing biochemical and unbiased AQUA-MS methodologies. Thus, the double-capped 26S proteasomes are asymmetric in their polyubiquitin binding capacity. Our data point to a potential new role for ubiquitin receptors as directionality factors that may participate in the prevention of simultaneous substrates translocation into the 20S from both 19S caps.

  1. Sodium butyrate down-regulation of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guan-Min; He, Yu-Wen; Fang, Rui; Zhang, Ge; Zeng, Jun; Yi, Yan-Mei; Zhang, Shu; Bu, Xian-Zhang; Cai, Shao-Hui; Du, Jun

    2010-11-01

    The clinical outcomes of most immunotherapeutic strategies have been less effective than anticipated partially because of the tumor immune tolerance induced by many immune tolerance factors, which originate from the tumor and tumor microenvironment. Indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-inducible enzyme and is one of main immune tolerance factors during tumor development. Sodium butyrate (NaB) has received much attention as a potential chemopreventive agent for cancer treatment due to its protective action against intracellular events including IFN-γ-mediated signaling transduction. Therefore, the question remains whether IDO is a target of the anti-tumor action of NaB. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that NaB down-regulated IDO via both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. NaB repressed the activity of STAT1 to inhibit STAT1-driven transcriptional activity of IDO. These mechanisms included inhibiting STAT1 701 tyrosine phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, and repression of STAT1 binding to γ-activated sites (GAS). Moreover, immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting assays showed that treatment of cells with NaB caused dramatic ubiquitination of total intracellular proteins, including IDO. Blocking 26S proteasome activity by addition of its specific inhibitor, bortezomib, reversed the ubiquitination and down-regulation of IDO. These results suggest that NaB-induced STAT1 activity inhibition and ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent proteolysis are involved in the down-regulation of IDO. The discoveries in this study represent a new mechanism in the anti-tumor action of NaB and may have implications for development of clinical cancer immunotherapy.

  2. Biological significance of co- and post-translational modifications of the yeast 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Hisashi; Kimura, Yayoi; Kimura, Ayuko

    2016-02-16

    In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), co- and post-translational modifications of the 26S proteasome, a large protein complex, were comprehensively detected by proteomic techniques, and their functions were investigated. The presence, number, site, and state of co- and post-translational modifications of the 26S proteasome differ considerably among yeast, human, and mouse. The roles of phosphorylation, N(α)-acetylation, N(α)-myristoylation, N(α)-methylation, and N-terminal truncation in the yeast 26S proteasome were investigated. Although there is only one modification site for either N(α)-acetylation, N(α)-myristoylation, or N(α)-methylation, these modifications play an important role in the functions of the yeast proteasome. In contrast, there are many phosphorylation sites in the yeast 26S proteasome. However, the phosphorylation patterns might be a few, suggesting that tiny modifications exert considerable effects on the function of the proteasome. Protein co- and post-translational modifications produce different protein species which often have different functions. The yeast 26S proteasome, a large protein complex, consisting of many subunits has a number of co- and post-translational modification sites. This review describes the effects of the modifications on the function of the protein complex. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein species. Guest Editors: Peter Jungblut, Hartmut Schlüter and Bernd Thiede. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. INT6 May Influence Breast Cancer Formation by Regulating the 26S Proteasome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    have shown that int6kd cells display mitotic abnormalities in that they become multinucleated and contain abnormal spindles (see also Figure 1A-D). In...Int6∆C, but not wild type Int6, will lead to formation of larger acini (Figure 3B), suggesting that mInt6, like Int6∆C, might cause abnormal cell...functions in Int6-reduced HeLa cells and found evidence of abnormal mitosis due to the presence of tri-polar spindles (as reported in 2004). 4. I

  4. INT6 May Influence Breast Cancer Formation by Regulating the 26S Proteasome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    critically reading the manuscript. We also thank Nick Rhind, Chris Norbury, Roger Tsien , and Colin Gordon for kindly providing materials that are...Yarbrough, C. A., Tsien , R. Y., and Remington, S. J. (2006) Biochemistry 45(32), 9639-9647 20. Bähler, J., Wu, J. Q., Longtine, M. S., Shah, N. G

  5. Precise assembly and regulation of 26S proteasome and correlation between proteasome dysfunction and neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Im, Eunju; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) often involve the formation of abnormal and toxic protein aggregates, which are thought to be the primary factor in ND occurrence and progression. Aged neurons exhibit marked increases in aggregated protein levels, which can lead to increased cell death in specific brain regions. As no specific drugs/therapies for treating the symptoms or/and progression of NDs are available, obtaining a complete understanding of the mechanism underlying the formation of protein aggregates is needed for designing a novel and efficient removal strategy. Intracellular proteolysis generally involves either the lysosomal or ubiquitin-proteasome system. In this review, we focus on the structure and assembly of the proteasome, proteasome-mediated protein degradation, and the multiple dynamic regulatory mechanisms governing proteasome activity. We also discuss the plausibility of the correlation between changes in proteasome activity and the occurrence of NDs. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(9): 459-473] PMID:27312603

  6. Precise assembly and regulation of 26S proteasome and correlation between proteasome dysfunction and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Im, Eunju; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2016-09-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) often involve the formation of abnormal and toxic protein aggregates, which are thought to be the primary factor in ND occurrence and progression. Aged neurons exhibit marked increases in aggregated protein levels, which can lead to increased cell death in specific brain regions. As no specific drugs/therapies for treating the symptoms or/and progression of NDs are available, obtaining a complete understanding of the mechanism underlying the formation of protein aggregates is needed for designing a novel and efficient removal strategy. Intracellular proteolysis generally involves either the lysosomal or ubiquitin-proteasome system. In this review, we focus on the structure and assembly of the proteasome, proteasome-mediated protein degradation, and the multiple dynamic regulatory mechanisms governing proteasome activity. We also discuss the plausibility of the correlation between changes in proteasome activity and the occurrence of NDs. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(9): 459-473].

  7. Regulation of the Response to Radiotherapy and Hyperthermia in Prostate Cancer by the 26s Proteasome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    in the inner membrane space of the mitochondria and released into the cytoplasm upon mitochondrial damage. By a not fully understood mechanism, AIF...apoptotic member of this family, Bik, which accumulated in a ubiquitinylated form in the mitochondria (Marshansky et al., 2001). Involvement of the Bcl-2... Biogenesis of eukaryotic 20S pro- 33. M. Petersson, J. Charo, F Salazar-Onfray, G. Noffz, M. Mohaupt, Z. teasomes: the complex maturation pathway of a

  8. Methamphetamine oxidatively damages parkin and decreases the activity of 26S proteasome in vivo.

    PubMed

    Moszczynska, Anna; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2011-03-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is toxic to dopaminergic (DAergic) terminals in animals and humans. An early event in METH neurotoxicity is an oxidative stress followed by damage to proteins and lipids. The removal of damaged proteins is accomplished by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and the impairment of this system can cause neurodegeneration. Whether dysfunction of the UPS contributes to METH toxicity to DAergic terminals has not been determined. The present investigation examined the effects of METH on functions of parkin and proteasome in rat striatal synaptosomes. METH rapidly modified parkin via conjugation with 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) to decrease parkin levels and decreased the activity of the 26S proteasome while simultaneously increasing chymotrypsin-like activity and 20S proteasome levels. Prior injections of vitamin E diminished METH-induced changes to parkin and the 26S proteasome as well as long-term decreases in DA and its metabolites' concentrations in striatal tissue. These results suggest that METH causes lipid peroxidation-mediated damage to parkin and the 26S proteasome. As the changes in parkin and 26S occur before the sustained deficits in DAergic markers, an early loss of UPS function may be important in mediating the long-term degeneration of striatal DAergic terminals via toxic accumulation of parkin substrates and damaged proteins. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  9. Purification and characterization of 26S proteasomes from human and mouse spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Tipler, C P; Hutchon, S P; Hendil, K; Tanaka, K; Fishel, S; Mayer, R J

    1997-12-01

    We purified by fractionation on 10-40% glycerol gradients, 26S proteasomes from normal human spermatozoa. These proteasomes, which participate in the ATP-dependent degradation of ubiquitinated proteins, share a similar sedimentation coefficient to those purified from other human tissues. Fluorogenic peptide assays reveal they have chymotrypsin, trypsin and peptidyl-glutamyl-like peptide hydrolysing activities; the chymotrypsin activity is ablated by the specific 26S proteasome inhibitor MG132. Confirmation that these large proteases are 26S proteasomes is provided by detection of the 20S proteasome subunits HC2, XAPC7, RN3 and Z and regulatory ATPases MSS1, TBP1, SUG1 and SUG2 by Western analyses with monoclonal antisera. These antigens are found only in the gradient fractions enriched in proteolytic activities. We have also shown that, although mature spermatozoa from mice have considerably reduced amounts of a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2) and ubiquitin-protein conjugates in comparison with less mature germ cells, they retain relatively high values of 26S proteasome activity. This suggests that proteasomes may have further roles to play in normal sperm physiology.

  10. Lysine 63-linked polyubiquitin chain may serve as a targeting signal for the 26S proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Saeki, Yasushi; Kudo, Tai; Sone, Takayuki; Kikuchi, Yoshiko; Yokosawa, Hideyoshi; Toh-e, Akio; Tanaka, Keiji

    2009-01-01

    Recruitment of substrates to the 26S proteasome usually requires covalent attachment of the Lys48-linked polyubiquitin chain. In contrast, modifications with the Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chain and/or monomeric ubiquitin are generally thought to function in proteasome-independent cellular processes. Nevertheless, the ubiquitin chain-type specificity for the proteasomal targeting is still poorly understood, especially in vivo. Using mass spectrometry, we found that Rsp5, a ubiquitin-ligase in budding yeast, catalyzes the formation of Lys63-linked ubiquitin chains in vitro. Interestingly, the 26S proteasome degraded well the Lys63-linked ubiquitinated substrate in vitro. To examine whether Lys63-linked ubiquitination serves in degradation in vivo, we investigated the ubiquitination of Mga2-p120, a substrate of Rsp5. The polyubiquitinated p120 contained relatively high levels of Lys63-linkages, and the Lys63-linked chains were sufficient for the proteasome-binding and subsequent p120-processing. In addition, Lys63-linked chains as well as Lys48-linked chains were detected in the 26S proteasome-bound polyubiquitinated proteins. These results raise the possibility that Lys63-linked ubiquitin chain also serves as a targeting signal for the 26S proteaseome in vivo. PMID:19153599

  11. Methamphetamine oxidatively damages parkin and decreases the activity of 26S proteasome in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Moszczynska, Anna; Yamamoto, Bryan K.

    2010-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is toxic to dopaminergic (DAergic) terminals in animals and humans. An early event in METH neurotoxicity is oxidative stress followed by damage to proteins and lipids. The removal of damaged proteins is accomplished by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and the impairment of this system can cause neurodegeneration. Whether dysfunction of the UPS contributes to METH toxicity to DAergic terminals has not been determined. The present investigation examined the effects of METH on functions of parkin and proteasome in rat striatal synaptosomes. METH rapidly modified parkin via conjugation with 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) to decrease parkin levels and decreased the activity of the 26S proteasome while simultaneously increasing chymotrypsin-like activity and 20S proteasome levels. Prior injections of vitamin E diminished METH-induced changes to parkin and the 26S proteasome as well as long-term decreases in DA and its metabolites’ concentrations in striatal tissue. These results suggest that METH causes lipid peroxidation-mediated damage to parkin and the 26S proteasome. As the changes in parkin and 26S occur before the sustained deficits in DAergic markers, an early loss of UPS function may be important in mediating the long-term degeneration of striatal DAergic terminals via toxic accumulation of parkin substrates and damaged proteins. PMID:21166679

  12. Quantitative live-cell imaging reveals spatio-temporal dynamics and cytoplasmic assembly of the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Pack, Chan-Gi; Yukii, Haruka; Toh-e, Akio; Kudo, Tai; Tsuchiya, Hikaru; Kaiho, Ai; Sakata, Eri; Murata, Shigeo; Yokosawa, Hideyoshi; Sako, Yasushi; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Tanaka, Keiji; Saeki, Yasushi

    2014-03-06

    The 26S proteasome is a 2.5-MDa multisubunit protease complex that degrades polyubiquitylated proteins. Although its functions and structure have been extensively characterized, little is known about its dynamics in living cells. Here, we investigate the absolute concentration, spatio-temporal dynamics and complex formation of the proteasome in living cells using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. We find that the 26S proteasome complex is highly mobile, and that almost all proteasome subunits throughout the cell are stably incorporated into 26S proteasomes. The interaction between 19S and 20S particles is stable even in an importin-α mutant, suggesting that the 26S proteasome is assembled in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, a genetically stabilized 26S proteasome mutant is able to enter the nucleus. These results suggest that the 26S proteasome completes its assembly process in the cytoplasm and translocates into the nucleus through the nuclear pore complex as a holoenzyme.

  13. Dietary apigenin potentiates the inhibitory effect of interferon-α on cancer cell viability through inhibition of 26S proteasome-mediated interferon receptor degradation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sheng; Yang, Li-juan; Wang, Ping; He, Yu-jiao; Huang, Jun-mei; Liu, Han-wei; Shen, Xiao-fei; Wang, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Background Type I interferons (IFN-α/β) have broad and potent immunoregulatory and antiproliferative activities. However, it is still known whether the dietary flavonoids exhibit their antiviral and anticancer properties by modulating the function of type I IFNs. Objective This study aimed at determining the role of apigenin, a dietary plant flavonoid abundant in common fruits and vegetables, on the type I IFN-mediated inhibition of cancer cell viability. Design Inhibitory effect of apigenin on human 26S proteasome, a known negative regulator of type I IFN signaling, was evaluated in vitro. Molecular docking was conducted to know the interaction between apigenin and subunits of 26S proteasome. Effects of apigenin on JAK/STAT pathway, 26S proteasome-mediated interferon receptor stability, and cancer cells viability were also investigated. Results Apigenin was identified to be a potent inhibitor of human 26S proteasome in a cell-based assay. Apigenin inhibited the chymotrypsin-like, caspase-like, and trypsin-like activities of the human 26S proteasome and increased the ubiquitination of endogenous proteins in cells. Results from computational modeling of the potential interactions of apigenin with the chymotrypsin site (β5 subunit), caspase site (β1 subunit), and trypsin site (β2 subunit) of the proteasome were consistent with the observed proteasome inhibitory activity. Apigenin enhanced the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins (STAT1 and STAT2) and promoted the endogenous IFN-α-regulated gene expression. Apigenin inhibited the IFN-α-stimulated ubiquitination and degradation of type I interferon receptor 1 (IFNAR1). Apigenin also sensitized the inhibitory effect of IFN-α on viability of cervical carcinoma HeLa cells. Conclusion These results suggest that apigenin potentiates the inhibitory effect of IFN-α on cancer cell viability by activating JAK/STAT signaling pathway through inhibition of 26S proteasome

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of nematodes of the genus Pratylenchus using nuclear 26S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Al-Banna, L; Williamson, V; Gardner, S L

    1997-02-01

    We used nucleotide sequences of the large subunit ribosomal genes (26S rDNA) to examine evolutionary relationships among species of the genus Pratylenchus (Order: Tylenchida, Family: Pratylenchidae), commonly known as root-lesion nematodes. Ten species of Pratylenchus were studied including, P. penetrans, P. crenatus, P. minyus, P. vulnus, P. thornei, P. musicola, P. coffeae, P. hexincisus, P. scribneri, and P. brachyurus. The species Hirschmanniella belli, Meloidogyne javanica, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora, Nacobbus aberrans, Radopholus similis, and Xiphinema index were used as outgroups. Based on parsimony analyses of approximately 307 aligned nucleotides of the D3 expansion region of the 26S rDNA, it is clear that species of Pratylenchus are a paraphyletic assemblage. The outgroup taxon H. belli shares a common ancestor with the clade that includes P. vulnus and P. crenatus while N. aberrans and R. similis share a common ancestor with 5 other species included in this study.

  15. Recent advances in the structural biology of the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Wehmer, Marc; Sakata, Eri

    2016-10-01

    There is growing appreciation for the fundamental role of structural dynamics in the function of macromolecules. In particular, the 26S proteasome, responsible for selective protein degradation in an ATP dependent manner, exhibits dynamic conformational changes that enable substrate processing. Recent cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) work has revealed the conformational dynamics of the 26S proteasome and established the function of the different conformational states. Technological advances such as direct electron detectors and image processing algorithms allowed resolving the structure of the proteasome at atomic resolution. Here we will review those studies and discuss their contribution to our understanding of proteasome function. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular architecture of the 26S proteasome holocomplex determined by an integrative approach.

    PubMed

    Lasker, Keren; Förster, Friedrich; Bohn, Stefan; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Villa, Elizabeth; Unverdorben, Pia; Beck, Florian; Aebersold, Ruedi; Sali, Andrej; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2012-01-31

    The 26S proteasome is at the executive end of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway for the controlled degradation of intracellular proteins. While the structure of its 20S core particle (CP) has been determined by X-ray crystallography, the structure of the 19S regulatory particle (RP), which recruits substrates, unfolds them, and translocates them to the CP for degradation, has remained elusive. Here, we describe the molecular architecture of the 26S holocomplex determined by an integrative approach based on data from cryoelectron microscopy, X-ray crystallography, residue-specific chemical cross-linking, and several proteomics techniques. The "lid" of the RP (consisting of Rpn3/5/6/7/8/9/11/12) is organized in a modular fashion. Rpn3/5/6/7/9/12 form a horseshoe-shaped heterohexamer, which connects to the CP and roofs the AAA-ATPase module, positioning the Rpn8/Rpn11 heterodimer close to its mouth. Rpn2 is rigid, supporting the lid, while Rpn1 is conformationally variable, positioned at the periphery of the ATPase ring. The ubiquitin receptors Rpn10 and Rpn13 are located in the distal part of the RP, indicating that they were recruited to the complex late in its evolution. The modular structure of the 26S proteasome provides insights into the sequence of events prior to the degradation of ubiquitylated substrates.

  17. The Lysine 48 and Lysine 63 Ubiquitin Conjugates Are Processed Differently by the 26 S Proteasome*

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Andrew D.; Zhang, Nan-Yan; Xu, Ping; Han, Ke-Jun; Noone, Seth; Peng, Junmin; Liu, Chang-Wei

    2009-01-01

    The role of Lys-63 ubiquitin chains in targeting proteins for proteasomal degradation is still obscure. We systematically compared proteasomal processing of Lys-63 ubiquitin chains with that of the canonical proteolytic signal, Lys-48 ubiquitin chains. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of ubiquitin chains in HeLa cells determines that the levels of Lys-63 ubiquitin chains are insensitive to short-time proteasome inhibition. Also, the Lys-48/Lys-63 ratio in the 26 S proteasome-bound fraction is 1.7-fold more than that in the cell lysates, likely because some cellular Lys-63 ubiquitin conjugates are sequestered by Lys-63 chain-specific binding proteins. In vitro, Lys-48 and Lys-63 ubiquitin chains bind the 26 S proteasome comparably, whereas Lys-63 chains are deubiquitinated 6-fold faster than Lys-48 chains. Also, Lys-63 tetraubiquitin-conjugated UbcH10 is rapidly deubiquitinated into the monoubiquitinated form, whereas Lys-48 tetraubiquitin targets UbcH10 for degradation. Furthermore, we found that both the ubiquitin aldehyde- and 1,10-phenanthroline-sensitive deubiquitinating activities of the 26 S proteasome contribute to Lys-48- and Lys-63-linkage deubiquitination, albeit the inhibitory extents are different. Together, our findings suggest that compared with Lys-48 chains, cellular Lys-63 chains have less proteasomal accessibility, and proteasome-bound Lys-63 chains are more rapidly deubiquitinated, which could cause inefficient degradation of Lys-63 conjugates. PMID:19858201

  18. Evidence for an Independent 26-s Microseismic Source near the Vanuatu Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiangfang; Ni, Sidao

    2014-09-01

    The 26 s peak in the ambient seismic noise spectrum is persistently excited and observed at stations globally. Using noise cross-correlation functions (NCFs), the location suggests that the source could be situated in the Gulf of Guinea and Fiji Basin. However, the Fiji Basin was proposed to be the mirror site (near antipode) of the Gulf of Guinea source instead of an independent source, assuming that the surface waves more efficiently propagate along the major-arc paths of oceanic movements. To investigate the propagation of the Rayleigh waves along continental and oceanic paths, we analyzed the surface wave data recorded from an earthquake near the Gulf of Guinea and found that Rayleigh waves travel along continental minor-arc paths more efficiently than along oceanic major-arc paths. We then located the source in the western Pacific Ocean from group velocities measured with earthquake data by using the travel time misfit in NCFs after calibration and concluded that the source is in the Vanuatu Islands. Moreover, the temporal variation of the 26 s microseismic peak observed in the western Pacific seismic stations is very different from that in stations near the Gulf of Guinea, which suggests that they are excited by independent sources. Therefore, the Vanuatu source should be an independent microseismic source. As it is close to volcanoes in the Vanuatu islands, the Pacific 26 s microseismic source might be excited by magmatic processes, which are also responsible for very-long-period volcanic tremors.

  19. The Pleiotropic Role of the 26S Proteasome Subunit RPN10 in Arabidopsis Growth and Development Supports a Substrate-Specific Function in Abscisic Acid Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Smalle, Jan; Kurepa, Jasmina; Yang, Peizhen; Emborg, Thomas J.; Babiychuk, Elena; Kushnir, Sergei; Vierstra, Richard D.

    2003-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is an essential protease complex responsible for removing most short-lived intracellular proteins, especially those modified with polyubiquitin chains. We show here that an Arabidopsis mutant expressing an altered RPN10 subunit exhibited a pleiotropic phenotype consistent with specific changes in 26S proteasome function. rpn10-1 plants displayed reduced seed germination, growth rate, stamen number, genetic transmission through the male gamete, and hormone-induced cell division, which can be explained partially by a constitutive downregulation of the key cell cycle gene CDKA;1. rpn10-1 also was more sensitive to abscisic acid (ABA), salt, and sucrose stress and to DNA-damaging agents and had decreased sensitivity to cytokinin and auxin. Most of the phenotypes can be explained by a hypersensitivity to ABA, which is reflected at the molecular level by the selective stabilization of the short-lived ABA-signaling protein ABI5. Collectively, these results indicate that RPN10 affects a number of regulatory processes in Arabidopsis likely by directing specific proteins to the 26S proteasome for degradation. A particularly important role may be in regulating the responses to signals promulgated by ABA. PMID:12671091

  20. The pleiotropic role of the 26S proteasome subunit RPN10 in Arabidopsis growth and development supports a substrate-specific function in abscisic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Smalle, Jan; Kurepa, Jasmina; Yang, Peizhen; Emborg, Thomas J; Babiychuk, Elena; Kushnir, Sergei; Vierstra, Richard D

    2003-04-01

    The 26S proteasome is an essential protease complex responsible for removing most short-lived intracellular proteins, especially those modified with polyubiquitin chains. We show here that an Arabidopsis mutant expressing an altered RPN10 subunit exhibited a pleiotropic phenotype consistent with specific changes in 26S proteasome function. rpn10-1 plants displayed reduced seed germination, growth rate, stamen number, genetic transmission through the male gamete, and hormone-induced cell division, which can be explained partially by a constitutive downregulation of the key cell cycle gene CDKA;1. rpn10-1 also was more sensitive to abscisic acid (ABA), salt, and sucrose stress and to DNA-damaging agents and had decreased sensitivity to cytokinin and auxin. Most of the phenotypes can be explained by a hypersensitivity to ABA, which is reflected at the molecular level by the selective stabilization of the short-lived ABA-signaling protein ABI5. Collectively, these results indicate that RPN10 affects a number of regulatory processes in Arabidopsis likely by directing specific proteins to the 26S proteasome for degradation. A particularly important role may be in regulating the responses to signals promulgated by ABA.

  1. Altered epidermal lipid processing and calcium distribution in the KID syndrome mouse model Cx26S17F.

    PubMed

    Bosen, Felicitas; Celli, Anna; Crumrine, Debra; vom Dorp, Katharina; Ebel, Philipp; Jastrow, Holger; Dörmann, Peter; Winterhager, Elke; Mauro, Theodora; Willecke, Klaus

    2015-07-08

    The keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome is caused by mutations in the gap junctional channel protein connexin 26 (Cx26), among them the mutation Cx26S17F. Heterozygous Cx26S17F mice resemble the human KID syndrome, i.e. exhibiting epidermal hyperplasia and hearing impairments. Newborn Cx26S17F mice show a defective epidermal water barrier as well as altered epidermal lipid secretion and location. Linoleoyl ω-esterified ceramides are strongly decreased on the skin surface of Cx26S17F mice. Moreover, the epidermal calcium gradient is altered in the mutant mice. These alterations may be caused by an abnormal Cx26S17F channel function that leads to a defective epidermal water barrier, which in turn may trigger the hyperproliferation seen in the KID syndrome.

  2. Altered epidermal lipid processing and calcium distribution in the KID syndrome mouse model Cx26S17F

    PubMed Central

    Bosen, Felicitas; Celli, Anna; Crumrine, Debra; vom Dorp, Katharina; Ebel, Philipp; Jastrow, Holger; Dörmann, Peter; Winterhager, Elke; Mauro, Theodora; Willecke, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The keratitis–ichthyosis–deafness (KID) syndrome is caused by mutations in the gap junctional channel protein connexin 26 (Cx26), among them the mutation Cx26S17F. Heterozygous Cx26S17F mice resemble the human KID syndrome, i.e. exhibiting epidermal hyperplasia and hearing impairments. Newborn Cx26S17F mice show a defective epidermal water barrier as well as altered epidermal lipid secretion and location. Linoleoyl ω-esterified ceramides are strongly decreased on the skin surface of Cx26S17F mice. Moreover, the epidermal calcium gradient is altered in the mutant mice. These alterations may be caused by an abnormal Cx26S17F channel function that leads to a defective epidermal water barrier, which in turn may trigger the hyperproliferation seen in the KID syndrome. PMID:26070424

  3. The RhoGAP SPIN6 Associates with SPL11 and OsRac1 and Negatively Regulates Programmed Cell Death and Innate Immunity in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinling; Park, Chan Ho; He, Feng; Nagano, Minoru; Wang, Mo; Bellizzi, Maria; Zhang, Kai; Zeng, Xiaoshan; Liu, Wende; Ning, Yuese; Kawano, Yoji; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system in plants plays important roles in plant-microbe interactions and in immune responses to pathogens. We previously demonstrated that the rice U-box E3 ligase SPL11 and its Arabidopsis ortholog PUB13 negatively regulate programmed cell death (PCD) and defense response. However, the components involved in the SPL11/PUB13-mediated PCD and immune signaling pathway remain unknown. In this study, we report that SPL11-interacting Protein 6 (SPIN6) is a Rho GTPase-activating protein (RhoGAP) that interacts with SPL11 in vitro and in vivo. SPL11 ubiquitinates SPIN6 in vitro and degrades SPIN6 in vivo via the 26S proteasome-dependent pathway. Both RNAi silencing in transgenic rice and knockout of Spin6 in a T-DNA insertion mutant lead to PCD and increased resistance to the rice blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae and the bacterial blight pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. The levels of reactive oxygen species and defense-related gene expression are significantly elevated in both the Spin6 RNAi and mutant plants. Strikingly, SPIN6 interacts with the small GTPase OsRac1, catalyze the GTP-bound OsRac1 into the GDP-bound state in vitro and has GAP activity towards OsRac1 in rice cells. Together, our results demonstrate that the RhoGAP SPIN6 acts as a linkage between a U-box E3 ligase-mediated ubiquitination pathway and a small GTPase-associated defensome system for plant immunity. PMID:25658451

  4. Uncommon functional properties of the first piscine 26S proteasome from the Antarctic notothenioid Trematomus bernacchii

    PubMed Central

    Gogliettino, Marta; Balestrieri, Marco; Riccio, Alessia; Facchiano, Angelo; Fusco, Carmela; Palazzo, Vincenzo Cecere; Rossi, Mosè; Cocca, Ennio; Palmieri, Gianna

    2016-01-01

    Protein homoeostasis is a fundamental process allowing the preservation of functional proteins and it has a great impact on the life of the Antarctic organisms. However, the effect of low temperatures on protein turnover is poorly understood and the cold-adaptation of the degradation machinery remains an unresolved issue. As the 26S proteasome represents the main proteolytic system devoted to the controlled degradation of intracellular proteins, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the functions of this complex in the notothenioid Trematomus bernacchii, in order to better understand its role in the physiology of Antarctic fish. To this aim, we purified and characterized the 26S proteasome from T. bernacchii and isolated the cDNAs codifying seven of the 14 subunits belonging to the proteasome 20S core particle. Results provided evidences of the high resistance of the piscine 26S proteasome to oxidative agents and of its ‘uncommon’ ability to efficiently hydrolyse oxidized bovine serum albumin (BSA), suggesting that this enzymatic complex could play a key role in the antioxidant defense systems in fish inhabiting permanently cold marine environments. These unique properties were also reflected by the 3D model analysis, which revealed a higher structural stability of the piscine complex respect to the murine template. Finally, a comparative analysis, performed in a variety of tissues collected from T. bernacchii and the temperate fish Dicentrarchus labrax, showed a lower protein retention in the cold-adapted fish, possibly due to a better efficiency of its degradation machinery. PMID:26933238

  5. Uncommon functional properties of the first piscine 26S proteasome from the Antarctic notothenioid Trematomus bernacchii.

    PubMed

    Gogliettino, Marta; Balestrieri, Marco; Riccio, Alessia; Facchiano, Angelo; Fusco, Carmela; Palazzo, Vincenzo Cecere; Rossi, Mosè; Cocca, Ennio; Palmieri, Gianna

    2016-01-01

    Protein homoeostasis is a fundamental process allowing the preservation of functional proteins and it has a great impact on the life of the Antarctic organisms. However, the effect of low temperatures on protein turnover is poorly understood and the cold-adaptation of the degradation machinery remains an unresolved issue. As the 26S proteasome represents the main proteolytic system devoted to the controlled degradation of intracellular proteins, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the functions of this complex in the notothenioid Trematomus bernacchii, in order to better understand its role in the physiology of Antarctic fish. To this aim, we purified and characterized the 26S proteasome from T. bernacchii and isolated the cDNAs codifying seven of the 14 subunits belonging to the proteasome 20S core particle. Results provided evidences of the high resistance of the piscine 26S proteasome to oxidative agents and of its 'uncommon' ability to efficiently hydrolyse oxidized bovine serum albumin (BSA), suggesting that this enzymatic complex could play a key role in the antioxidant defense systems in fish inhabiting permanently cold marine environments. These unique properties were also reflected by the 3D model analysis, which revealed a higher structural stability of the piscine complex respect to the murine template. Finally, a comparative analysis, performed in a variety of tissues collected from T. bernacchii and the temperate fish Dicentrarchus labrax, showed a lower protein retention in the cold-adapted fish, possibly due to a better efficiency of its degradation machinery. © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. Molecular coevolution among cryptically simple expansion segments of eukaryotic 26S/28S rRNAs.

    PubMed

    Hancock, J M; Dover, G A

    1988-07-01

    The set of "expansion segments" of any eukaryotic 26S/28S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene is responsible for the bulk of the difference in length between the prokaryotic 23S rRNA gene and the eukaryotic 26S/28S rRNA gene. The expansion segments are also responsible for interspecific fluctuations in length during eukaryotic evolution. They show a consistent bias in base composition in any species; for example, they are AT rich in Drosophila melanogaster and GC rich in vertebrate species. Dot-matrix comparisons of sets of expansion segments reveal high similarities between members of a set within any 28S rRNA gene of a species, in contrast to the little or spurious similarity that exists between sets of expansion segments from distantly related species. Similarities among members of a set of expansion segments within any 28S rRNA gene cannot be accounted for by their base-compositional bias alone. In contrast, no significant similarity exists within a set of "core" segments (regions between expansion segments) of any 28S rRNA gene, although core segments are conserved between species. The set of expansion segments of a 26S/28S gene is coevolving as a unit in each species, at the same time as the family of 28S rRNA genes, as a whole, is undergoing continual homogenization, making all sets of expansion segments from all ribosomal DNA (rDNA) arrays in a species similar in sequence. Analysis of DNA simplicity of 26S/28S rRNA genes shows a direct correlation between significantly high relative simplicity factors (RSFs) and sequence similarity among a set of expansion segments. A similar correlation exists between RSF values, overall rDNA lengths, and the lengths of individual expansion segments. Such correlations suggest that most length fluctuations reflect the gain and loss of simple sequence motifs by slippage-like mechanisms. We discuss the molecular coevolution of expansion segments, which takes place against a background of slippage-like and unequal crossing

  7. Karyotypes, heterochromatin, and physical mapping of 18S-26S rDNA in Cactaceae.

    PubMed

    Las Peñas, M L; Urdampilleta, J D; Bernardello, G; Forni-Martins, E R

    2009-01-01

    Karyotype analyses in members of the four Cactaceae subfamilies were performed. Numbers and karyotype formula obtained were: Pereskioideae = Pereskiaaculeata(2n = 22; 10 m + 1 sm), Maihuenioideae = Maihuenia patagonica (2n = 22, 9 m + 2 sm; 2n = 44, 18 m + 4 sm), Opuntioideae = Cumulopuntia recurvata(2n = 44; 20 m + 2 sm), Cactoideae = Acanthocalycium spiniflorum (2n = 22; 10 m + 1 sm),Echinopsis tubiflora (2n = 22; 10 m + 1 sm), Trichocereus candicans (2n = 22, 22 m). Chromosomes were small, the average chromosome length was 2.3 mum. Diploid species and the tetraploid C. recurvata had one terminal satellite, whereas the remaining tetraploid species showed four satellited chromosomes. Karyotypes were symmetrical. No CMA(-)/DAPI(+) bands were detected, but CMA(+)/DAPI(-) bands associated with NOR were always found. Pericentromeric heterochromatin was found in C. recurvata, A. spiniflorum, and the tetraploid cytotype of M. patagonica. The locations of the 18S-26S rDNA sites in all species coincided with CMA(+)/DAPI(-) bands; the same occurred with the sizes and numbers of signals for each species. This technique was applied for the first time in metaphase chromosomes in cacti. NOR-bearing pair no.1 may be homeologous in all species examined. In Cactaceae, the 18S-26S loci seem to be highly conserved.

  8. Atomic structure of the 26S proteasome lid reveals the mechanism of deubiquitinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Dambacher, Corey M; Worden, Evan J; Herzik, Mark A; Martin, Andreas; Lander, Gabriel C

    2016-01-08

    The 26S proteasome is responsible for the selective, ATP-dependent degradation of polyubiquitinated cellular proteins. Removal of ubiquitin chains from targeted substrates at the proteasome is a prerequisite for substrate processing and is accomplished by Rpn11, a deubiquitinase within the 'lid' sub-complex. Prior to the lid's incorporation into the proteasome, Rpn11 deubiquitinase activity is inhibited to prevent unwarranted deubiquitination of polyubiquitinated proteins. Here we present the atomic model of the isolated lid sub-complex, as determined by cryo-electron microscopy at 3.5 Å resolution, revealing how Rpn11 is inhibited through its interaction with a neighboring lid subunit, Rpn5. Through mutagenesis of specific residues, we describe the network of interactions that are required to stabilize this inhibited state. These results provide significant insight into the intricate mechanisms of proteasome assembly, outlining the substantial conformational rearrangements that occur during incorporation of the lid into the 26S holoenzyme, which ultimately activates the deubiquitinase for substrate degradation.

  9. Calcium-dependent protein kinase CPK28 targets the methionine adenosyltransferases for degradation by the 26S proteasome and affects ethylene biosynthesis and lignin deposition in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yu; Ye, Nenghui; Zhu, Fuyuan; Li, Haoxuan; Wang, Juan; Jiang, Liwen; Zhang, Jianhua

    2017-04-01

    S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) is synthesized by methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT), and plays an essential role in ethylene biosynthesis and other methylation reactions. Despite increasing knowledge of MAT regulation at transcriptional levels, how MAT is post-translationally regulated remains unknown in plant cells. Phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification for regulating the activity of enzymes, protein function and signaling transduction. Using molecular and biochemical approaches, we have identified the phosphorylation of MAT proteins by calcium-dependent protein kinase (CPK28). Phenotypically, both MAT2-overexpressing transgenic plants and cpk28 mutants display short hypocotyls and ectopic lignifications. Their shortened hypocotyl phenotypes are caused by ethylene overproduction and rescued by ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor aminoethoxyvinylglycine treatment. Genetic evidence reveals that MAT2 mutation restores the phenotype of ectopic lignification in CPK28-deficient plants. We find that total MAT proteins and AdoMet are increased in cpk28 mutants, but decreased in CPK28-overexpressing seedlings. We also find that MATs in OE::CPK28 are degraded through the 26S proteasome pathway. Our work suggests that CPK28 targets MATs (MAT1, MAT2 and MAT3) for degradation by the 26S proteasome pathway, and thus affects ethylene biosynthesis and lignin deposition in Arabidopsis. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Copper modulates the degradation of copper chaperone for Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase by the 26 S proteosome.

    PubMed

    Bertinato, Jesse; L'Abbé, Mary R

    2003-09-12

    Copper chaperones are copper-binding proteins that directly insert copper into specific targets, preventing the accumulation of free copper ions that can be toxic to the cell. Despite considerable advances in the understanding of copper transfer from copper chaperones to their target, to date, there is no information regarding how the activity of these proteins is regulated in higher eukaryotes. The insertion of copper into the antioxidant enzyme Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) depends on the copper chaperone for SOD1 (CCS). We have recently reported that CCS protein is increased in tissues of rats fed copper-deficient diets suggesting that copper may regulate CCS expression. Here we show that whereas copper deficiency increased CCS protein in rats, mRNA level was unaffected. Rodent and human cell lines cultured in the presence of the specific copper chelator 2,3,2-tetraamine displayed a dose-dependent increase in CCS protein that could be reversed with the addition of copper but not iron or zinc to the cells. Switching cells from copper-deficient to copper-rich medium promoted the rapid degradation of CCS, which could be blocked by the proteosome inhibitors MG132 and lactacystin but not a cysteine protease inhibitor or inhibitors of the lysosomal degradation pathway. In addition, CCS degradation was slower in copper-deficient cells than in cells cultured in copper-rich medium. Together, these data show that copper regulates CCS expression by modulating its degradation by the 26 S proteosome and suggest a novel role for CCS in prioritizing the utilization of copper when it is scarce.

  11. ATP-dependent incorporation of 20S protease into the 26S complex that degrades proteins conjugated to ubiquitin.

    PubMed Central

    Eytan, E; Ganoth, D; Armon, T; Hershko, A

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the ATP-dependent 26S protease complex that degrades proteins conjugated to ubiquitin is formed by the assembly of three factors in an ATP-requiring process. We now identify one of the factors as the 20S "multicatalytic" protease, a complex of low molecular weight subunits widely distributed in eukaryotic cells. Comparison of the subunit compositions of purified 20S and 26S complexes indicates that the former is an integral part of the latter. By the use of detergent treatment to activate latent protease activity, we show that the 20S protease becomes incorporated into the 26S complex in the ATP-dependent assembly process. It thus seems that the 20S protease is the "catalytic core" of the 26S complex of the ubiquitin proteolytic pathway. Images PMID:2554287

  12. Structure of an endogenous yeast 26S proteasome reveals two major conformational states

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Bai; Huang, Xiuliang; Wu, Jianping; Mei, Ziqing; Wang, Yiwei; Xue, Xiaobin; Yan, Chuangye; Wang, Jiawei; Finley, Daniel J.; Shi, Yigong; Wang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The eukaryotic proteasome mediates degradation of polyubiquitinated proteins. Here we report the single-particle cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of the endogenous 26S proteasome from Saccharomyces cerevisiae at 4.6- to 6.3-Å resolution. The fine features of the cryo-EM maps allow modeling of 18 subunits in the regulatory particle and 28 in the core particle. The proteasome exhibits two distinct conformational states, designated M1 and M2, which correspond to those reported previously for the proteasome purified in the presence of ATP-γS and ATP, respectively. These conformations also correspond to those of the proteasome in the presence and absence of exogenous substrate. Structure-guided biochemical analysis reveals enhanced deubiquitylating enzyme activity of Rpn11 upon assembly of the lid. Our structures serve as a molecular basis for mechanistic understanding of proteasome function. PMID:26929360

  13. Structure of an endogenous yeast 26S proteasome reveals two major conformational states.

    PubMed

    Luan, Bai; Huang, Xiuliang; Wu, Jianping; Mei, Ziqing; Wang, Yiwei; Xue, Xiaobin; Yan, Chuangye; Wang, Jiawei; Finley, Daniel J; Shi, Yigong; Wang, Feng

    2016-03-08

    The eukaryotic proteasome mediates degradation of polyubiquitinated proteins. Here we report the single-particle cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of the endogenous 26S proteasome from Saccharomyces cerevisiae at 4.6- to 6.3-Å resolution. The fine features of the cryo-EM maps allow modeling of 18 subunits in the regulatory particle and 28 in the core particle. The proteasome exhibits two distinct conformational states, designated M1 and M2, which correspond to those reported previously for the proteasome purified in the presence of ATP-γS and ATP, respectively. These conformations also correspond to those of the proteasome in the presence and absence of exogenous substrate. Structure-guided biochemical analysis reveals enhanced deubiquitylating enzyme activity of Rpn11 upon assembly of the lid. Our structures serve as a molecular basis for mechanistic understanding of proteasome function.

  14. Membrane-bound transcription factors: regulated release by RIP or RUP.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, T; Rape, M; Jentsch, S

    2001-06-01

    Regulated nuclear transport of transcription factors from cytoplasmic pools is a major route by which eukaryotes control gene expression. Exquisite examples are transcription factors that are kept in a dormant state in the cytosol by membrane anchors; such proteins are released from membranes by proteolytic cleavage, which enables these transcription factors to enter the nucleus. Cleavage can be mediated either by regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) catalysed by specific membrane-bound proteases or by regulated ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent processing (RUP). In both cases processing can be controlled by cues that originate at or in the vicinity of the membrane.

  15. The RPN1 Subunit of the 26S Proteasome in Arabidopsis Is Essential for Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Brukhin, Vladimir; Gheyselinck, Jacqueline; Gagliardini, Valeria; Genschik, Pascal; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2005-01-01

    The 26S proteasome plays a central role in the degradation of regulatory proteins involved in a variety of developmental processes. It consists of two multisubunit protein complexes: the proteolytic core protease and the regulatory particle (RP). The function of most RP subunits is poorly understood. Here, we describe mutants in the Arabidopsis thaliana RPN1 subunit, which is encoded by two paralogous genes, RPN1a and RPN1b. Disruption of RPN1a caused embryo lethality, while RPN1b mutants showed no obvious abnormal phenotype. Embryos homozygous for rpn1a arrested at the globular stage with defects in the formation of the embryonic root, the protoderm, and procambium. Cyclin B1 protein was not degraded in these embryos, consistent with cell division defects. Double mutant plants (rpn1a/RPN1a rpn1b/rpn1b) produced embryos with a phenotype indistinguishable from that of the rpn1a single mutant. Thus, despite their largely overlapping expression patterns in flowers and developing seeds, the two isoforms do not share redundant functions during gametogenesis and embryogenesis. However, complementation of the rpn1a mutation with the coding region of RPN1b expressed under the control of the RPN1a promoter indicates that the two RPN1 isoforms are functionally equivalent. Overall, our data indicate that RPN1 activity is essential during embryogenesis, where it might participate in the destruction of a specific set of protein substrates. PMID:16169895

  16. D1 dopamine receptor stimulation impairs striatal proteasome activity in Parkinsonism through 26S proteasome disassembly.

    PubMed

    Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; Thiolat, Marie-Laure; Bido, Simone; Martinez, Audrey; Doudnikoff, Evelyne; Baufreton, Jérôme; Bourdenx, Mathieu; Bloch, Bertrand; Bezard, Erwan; Martin-Negrier, Marie-Laure

    2015-06-01

    Among the mechanisms underlying the development of L-dopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) in Parkinson's disease, complex alterations in dopamine signaling in D1 receptor (D1R)-expressing medium spiny striatal neurons have been unraveled such as, but not limited to, dysregulation of D1R expression, lateral diffusion, intraneuronal trafficking, subcellular localization and desensitization, leading to a pathological anchorage of D1R at the plasma membrane. Such anchorage is partly due to a decreased proteasomal activity that is specific of the L-dopa-exposed dopamine-depleted striatum, results from D1R activation and feeds-back the D1R exaggerated cell surface abundance. The precise mechanisms by which L-dopa affects striatal proteasome activity remained however unknown. We here show, in a series of in vitro ex vivo and in vivo models, that such rapid modulation of striatal proteasome activity intervenes through D1R-mediated disassembly of the 26S proteasome rather than change in transcription or translation of proteasome or proteasome subunits intraneuronal relocalization.

  17. Poly-Ub-Substrate-Degradative Activity of 26S Proteasome Is Not Impaired in the Aging Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Giannini, Carolin; Kloß, Alexander; Gohlke, Sabrina; Mishto, Michele; Nicholson, Thomas P.; Sheppard, Paul W.; Kloetzel, Peter-Michael; Dahlmann, Burkhardt

    2013-01-01

    Proteostasis is critical for the maintenance of life. In neuronal cells an imbalance between protein synthesis and degradation is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases during aging. Partly, this seems to be due to a decrease in the activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, wherein the 20S/26S proteasome complexes catalyse the proteolytic step. We have characterised 20S and 26S proteasomes from cerebrum, cerebellum and hippocampus of 3 weeks old (young) and 24 month old (aged) rats. Our data reveal that the absolute amount of the proteasome is not dfferent between both age groups. Within the majority of standard proteasomes in brain the minute amounts of immuno-subunits are slightly increased in aged rat brain. While this goes along with a decrease in the activities of 20S and 26S proteasomes to hydrolyse synthetic fluorogenic tripeptide substrates from young to aged rats, the capacity of 26S proteasomes for degradation of poly-Ub-model substrates and its activation by poly-Ub-substrates is not impaired or even slightly increased in brain of aged rats. We conclude that these alterations in proteasome properties are important for maintaining proteostasis in the brain during an uncomplicated aging process. PMID:23667697

  18. Structural insights into the COP9 signalosome and its common architecture with the 26S proteasome lid and eIF3.

    PubMed

    Enchev, Radoslav I; Schreiber, Anne; Beuron, Fabienne; Morris, Edward P

    2010-03-14

    The evolutionary conserved COP9 signalosome (CSN), a large multisubunit complex, plays a central role in regulating ubiquitination and cell signaling. Here we report recombinant insect cell expression and two-step purification of human CSN and demonstrate its functional assembly. We further obtain a three-dimensional structure of both native and recombinant CSN using electron microscopy and single particle analysis. Antibody labeling of CSN5 and segmentation of the structure suggest a likely subunit distribution and the architecture of its helical repeat subunits is revealed. We compare the structure of CSN with its homologous complexes, the 26S proteasome lid and eIF3, and propose a conserved architecture implying similar assembly pathways and/or conserved substrate interaction modes.

  19. Proteomics of the 26S proteasome in Spodoptera frugiperda cells infected with the nucleopolyhedrovirus, AcMNPV.

    PubMed

    Lyupina, Yulia V; Zatsepina, Olga G; Serebryakova, Marina V; Erokhov, Pavel A; Abaturova, Svetlana B; Kravchuk, Oksana I; Orlova, Olga V; Beljelarskaya, Svetlana N; Lavrov, Andrey I; Sokolova, Olga S; Mikhailov, Victor S

    2016-06-01

    Baculoviruses are large DNA viruses that infect insect species such as Lepidoptera and are used in biotechnology for protein production and in agriculture as insecticides against crop pests. Baculoviruses require activity of host proteasomes for efficient reproduction, but how they control the cellular proteome and interact with the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) of infected cells remains unknown. In this report, we analyzed possible changes in the subunit composition of 26S proteasomes of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9), cells in the course of infection with the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). 26S proteasomes were purified from Sf9 cells by an immune affinity method and subjected to 2D gel electrophoresis followed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and Mascot search in bioinformatics databases. A total of 34 homologues of 26S proteasome subunits of eukaryotic species were identified including 14 subunits of the 20S core particle (7 α and 7 β subunits) and 20 subunits of the 19S regulatory particle (RP). The RP contained homologues of 11 of RPN-type and 6 of RPT-type subunits, 2 deubiquitinating enzymes (UCH-14/UBP6 and UCH-L5/UCH37), and thioredoxin. Similar 2D-gel maps of 26S proteasomes purified from uninfected and AcMNPV-infected cells at 48hpi confirmed the structural integrity of the 26S proteasome in insect cells during baculovirus infection. However, subtle changes in minor forms of some proteasome subunits were detected. A portion of the α5(zeta) cellular pool that presumably was not associated with the proteasome underwent partial proteolysis at a late stage in infection.

  20. An atomic model AAA-ATPase/20S core particle sub-complex of the 26S proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Beck, Florian; Nickell, Stephan; Sali, Andrej; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is the most downstream element of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway of protein degradation. It is composed of the 20S core particle (CP) and the 19S regulatory particle (RP). The RP consists of 6 AAA-ATPases and at least 13 non-ATPase subunits. Based on a cryo-EM map of the 26S proteasome, structures of homologs, and physical protein-protein interactions we derive an atomic model of the AAA-ATPase-CP sub-complex. The ATPase order in our model (Rpt1/Rpt2/Rpt6/Rpt3/Rpt4/Rpt5) is in excellent agreement with the recently identified base-precursor complexes formed during the assembly of the RP. Furthermore, the atomic CP-AAA-ATPase model suggests that the assembly chaperone Nas6 facilitates CP-RP association by enhancing the shape complementarity between Rpt3 and its binding CP alpha subunits partners. PMID:19653995

  1. An atomic model AAA-ATPase/20S core particle sub-complex of the 26S proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Foerster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Beck, Florian; Nickell, Stephan; Sali, Andrej; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2009-10-16

    The 26S proteasome is the most downstream element of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway of protein degradation. It is composed of the 20S core particle (CP) and the 19S regulatory particle (RP). The RP consists of 6 AAA-ATPases and at least 13 non-ATPase subunits. Based on a cryo-EM map of the 26S proteasome, structures of homologs, and physical protein-protein interactions we derive an atomic model of the AAA-ATPase-CP sub-complex. The ATPase order in our model (Rpt1/Rpt2/Rpt6/Rpt3/Rpt4/Rpt5) is in excellent agreement with the recently identified base-precursor complexes formed during the assembly of the RP. Furthermore, the atomic CP-AAA-ATPase model suggests that the assembly chaperone Nas6 facilitates CP-RP association by enhancing the shape complementarity between Rpt3 and its binding CP alpha subunits partners.

  2. The connexin26 S17F mouse mutant represents a model for the human hereditary keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Melanie; Auth, Tanja; Gehrt, Anna; Bosen, Felicitas; Körber, Inken; Strenzke, Nicola; Moser, Tobias; Willecke, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the GJB2 gene coding for connexin26 (Cx26) can cause a variety of deafness and hereditary hyperproliferative skin disorders in humans. In this study, we investigated the Cx26S17F mutation in mice, which had been identified to cause the keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome in humans. The KID syndrome is characterized by keratitis and chronic progressive corneal neovascularization, skin hyperplasia, sensorineural hearing loss and increased carcinogenic potential. We have generated a conditional mouse mutant, in which the floxed wild-type Cx26-coding DNA can be deleted and the Cx26S17F mutation is expressed under control of the endogenous Cx26 promoter. Homozygous mutants are not viable, whereas the surviving heterozygous mice show hyperplasia of tail and foot epidermis, wounded tails and annular tail restrictions, and are smaller than their wild-type littermates. Analyses of auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) indicate an ∼35 dB increased hearing threshold in these mice, which is likely due to the reduction of the endocochlear potential by 20-40%. Our results indicate that the Cx26S17F protein, which does not form functional gap junction channels or hemichannels, alters epidermal proliferation and differentiation in the heterozygous state. In the inner ear, reduced intercellular coupling by heteromeric channels composed of Cx26S17F and Cx30 could contribute to hearing impairment in heterozygous mice, while remaining wild-type Cx26 may be sufficient to stabilize Cx30 and partially maintain cochlear homeostasis. The phenotype of heterozygous mice resembles many of the symptoms of the human KID syndrome. Thus, these mice represent an appropriate model to further investigate the disease mechanism.

  3. Induction of 26S proteasome subunit PSMB5 by the bifunctional inducer 3-methylcholanthrene through the Nrf2-ARE, but not the AhR/Arnt-XRE, pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Mi-Kyoung . E-mail: mkwak@yumail.ac.kr; Kensler, Thomas W.

    2006-07-14

    The 26S proteasome is responsible for degradation of abnormal intracellular proteins, including oxidatively damaged proteins and may play a role as a component of a cellular antioxidative system. However, little is known about regulation of proteasome expression. In the present study, regulation of proteasome expression by the bifunctional enzyme inducer and a specific signaling pathway for this regulation were investigated in murine neuroblastoma cells. Expression of catalytic core subunits including PSMB5 and peptidase activities of the proteasome were elevated following incubation with 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC). Studies using reporter genes containing the murine Psmb5 promoter showed that transcriptional activity of this gene was enhanced by 3-MC. Overexpression of AhR/Arnt did not affect activation of the Pmsb5 promoter by 3-MC and deletion of the xenobiotic response elements (XREs) from this promoter exerted modest effects on inducibility in response to 3-MC. However, mutation of the proximal AREs of the Psmb5 promoter largely abrogated its inducibility by 3-MC. In addition, this promoter showed a blunted response toward 3-MC in the absence of nrf2; 3-MC incubation increased nuclear levels of Nrf2 only in wild-type cells. Collectively, these results indicate that expression of proteasome subunit PSMB5 is modulated by bifunctional enzyme inducers in a manner independent of the AhR/Arnt-XRE pathway but dependent upon the Nrf2-ARE pathway.

  4. Origin and inheritance of group I introns in 26S rRNA genes of Gaeumannomyces graminis.

    PubMed

    Tan, M K

    1997-06-01

    Studies of the distribution of the three group I introns (intron A, intron T, and intron AT) in the 26S rDNA of Gaeumannomyces graminis had suggested that they were transferred to a common ancestor of G. graminis var. avenae and var. tritici after it had branched off from var. graminis. Intron AT and intron A exhibited vertical inheritance and coevolved in concert with their hosts. Intron loss could occur after its acquisition. Loss of any one of the three introns could occur in var. tritici whereas only loss of intron T had been found in the majority of var. avenae isolates. The existence of isolates of var. tritici and var. avenae with three introns suggested that intron loss could be reversed by intron acquisition and that the whole process is a dynamic one. This process of intron acquisition and intron loss reached different equilibrium points for different varieties and subgroups, which explained the irregular distribution of these introns in G. graminis. Each of the three group I introns was more closely related to other intron sequences that share the same insertion point in the 26S rDNA than to each other. These introns in distantly related organisms appeared to have a common ancestry. This system had provided a good model for studies on both the lateral transfer and common ancestry of group I introns in the 26S rRNA genes.

  5. Compensatory role of the Nrf2-ARE pathway against paraquat toxicity: Relevance of 26S proteasome activity.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Yasuhiko; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Matsushima, Sayaka; Yamamoto, Takamori; Takada-Takatori, Yuki; Akaike, Akinori; Kume, Toshiaki

    2015-11-01

    Oxidative stress and the ubiquitin-proteasome system play a key role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease. Although the herbicide paraquat is an environmental factor that is involved in the etiology of Parkinson disease, the role of 26S proteasome in paraquat toxicity remains to be determined. Using PC12 cells overexpressing a fluorescent protein fused to the proteasome degradation signal, we report here that paraquat yielded an inhibitory effect on 26S proteasome activity without an obvious decline in 20S proteasome activity. Relative low concentrations of proteasome inhibitors caused the accumulation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which is targeted to the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and activated the antioxidant response element (ARE)-dependent transcription. Paraquat also upregulated the protein level of Nrf2 without increased expression of Nrf2 mRNA, and activated the Nrf2-ARE pathway. Consequently, paraquat induced expression of Nrf2-dependent ARE-driven genes, such as γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, catalase, and hemeoxygenase-1. Knockdown of Nrf2 or inhibition of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase and catalase exacerbated paraquat-induced toxicity, whereas suppression of hemeoxygenase-1 did not. These data indicate that the compensatory activation of the Nrf2-ARE pathway via inhibition of 26S proteasome serves as part of a cellular defense mechanism to protect against paraquat toxicity.

  6. Cocaine and ethanol target 26S proteasome activity and gene expression in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Caputi, Francesca Felicia; Carboni, Lucia; Mazza, Daria; Candeletti, Sanzio; Romualdi, Patrizia

    2016-04-01

    Ethanol and cocaine are widely abused drugs triggering long-lasting changes in neuronal circuits and synaptic transmission through the regulation of enzyme activity and gene expression. Compelling evidence indicates that the ubiquitin-proteasome system plays a role in the molecular changes induced by addictive substances, impacting on several mechanisms implicated in abuse. The goal of these studies was to evaluate the effects of cocaine or ethanol on proteasome activity in neuroblastoma cells. Moreover, the gene expression of specific subunits was assessed. Chymotrypsin-like activity was measured after 2 h, 24 h, and 48 h exposure to 5 μM cocaine or 40 mM ethanol. Proteasome subunit transcripts were evaluated by qPCR at the same time-points. Treatments modified proteasome function in opposite directions, since cocaine increased and ethanol reduced chymotrypsin-like activity. Interestingly, we observed gene expression alterations induced by these drugs. In the core particle, the β1 and α5 subunits were mainly up-regulated by cocaine, whereas α6 transcripts were mostly decreased. β2 and β5 did not change. Similarly, ethanol exposure generally increased β1 and α5 mRNAs. Moreover, the β2 subunit was significantly up-regulated by ethanol only. The β5 and α6 subunits were not altered. In the regulatory particle, Rpt3 was increased by cocaine exposure, whereas it was reduced by ethanol. No significant Rpn9 alterations were observed. These findings support the notion that addictive substances regulate proteasome function, contributing to the dysregulations related to drug abuse since the availability of adequate subunit amounts is necessary for proper complex assembly and function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Stress-responsive mitogen-activated protein kinases interact with the EAR motif of a poplar zinc finger protein and mediate its degradation through the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Louis-Philippe; Benchabane, Meriem; Nicole, Marie-Claude; Major, Ian T; Morency, Marie-Josée; Pelletier, Gervais; Beaudoin, Nathalie; Sheen, Jen; Séguin, Armand

    2011-11-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) contribute to the establishment of plant disease resistance by regulating downstream signaling components, including transcription factors. In this study, we identified MAPK-interacting proteins, and among the newly discovered candidates was a Cys-2/His-2-type zinc finger protein named PtiZFP1. This putative transcription factor belongs to a family of transcriptional repressors that rely on an ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif for their repression activity. Amino acids located within this repression motif were also found to be essential for MAPK binding. Close examination of the primary protein sequence revealed a functional bipartite MAPK docking site that partially overlaps with the EAR motif. Transient expression assays in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) protoplasts suggest that MAPKs promote PtiZFP1 degradation through the 26S proteasome. Since features of the MAPK docking site are conserved among other EAR repressors, our study suggests a novel mode of defense mechanism regulation involving stress-responsive MAPKs and EAR repressors.

  8. Yeast Deubiquitinase Ubp3 Interacts with the 26 S Proteasome to Facilitate Rad4 Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Peng; Smerdon, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) function in a variety of cellular processes by removing ubiquitin moieties from substrates, but their role in DNA repair has not been elucidated. Yeast Rad4-Rad23 heterodimer is responsible for recognizing DNA damage in nucleotide excision repair (NER). Rad4 binds to UV damage directly while Rad23 stabilizes Rad4 from proteasomal degradation. Here, we show that disruption of yeast deubiquitinase UBP3 leads to enhanced UV resistance, increased repair of UV damage and Rad4 levels in rad23Δ cells, and elevated Rad4 stability. A catalytically inactive Ubp3 (Ubp3-C469A), however, is unable to affect NER or Rad4. Consistent with its role in down-regulating Rad4, Ubp3 physically interacts with Rad4 and the proteasome, both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that Ubp3 associates with the proteasome to facilitate Rad4 degradation and thus suppresses NER. PMID:20876584

  9. Sequence arrangement of the 16S and 26S rRNA genes in the pathogenic haemoflagellate Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed Central

    Leon, W; Fouts, D L; Manning, J

    1978-01-01

    Kinetic and chemical analysis show that the haploid genome of Leishmania donovani has between 4.6 and 6.5 X 10(7) Kb pairs of DNA. Cot analysis shows that the genome contains 12% rapidly reassociating DNA, U3% middle repetitive DNA with an average reiteration frequency of 77 and 62% single copy DNA. Saturation hybridization experiments show that 0.82% of the nuclear DNA is occupied by rRNA coding sequences. The average repetition frequency of these sequences is determined to be 166. Sedimentation velocity studies indicate the two major rRNA species have sedimentation values of 26S and 16S, respectively. The arrangement of the rRNA genes and their spacer sequences on long strands of purified rDNA has been determined by the examination of the structure of rRNA:DNA hybrids prepared for electron microscopy by the gene 32-ethidium bromide technique. Long DNA strands are observed to contain several gene sets (16S + 26S). One repeat unit contains the following sequences in the order given: (a) A 16S gene of length 2.12 Kb, (b) An internal transcribed spacer (Spl) of length 1.23 Kb, which contains a short sequence that may code for a 5.8S rRNA, (C) 26S gene with a length of 4.31 Kb which contains an internal gap region of length 0.581 Ib, (d) An external spacer of average length 5.85 Kb. Images PMID:634795

  10. Autophagic degradation of the 26S proteasome is mediated by the dual ATG8/ubiquitin receptor RPN10 in Arabidopsis

    DOE PAGES

    Marshall, Richard S.; Li, Faqiang; Gemperline, David C.; ...

    2015-05-21

    Autophagic turnover of intracellular constituents is critical for cellular housekeeping, nutrient recycling, and various aspects of growth and development in eukaryotes. In this paper, we show that autophagy impacts the other major degradative route involving the ubiquitin-proteasome system by eliminating 26S proteasomes, a process we termed proteaphagy. Using Arabidopsis proteasomes tagged with GFP, we observed their deposition into vacuoles via a route requiring components of the autophagy machinery. This transport can be initiated separately by nitrogen starvation and chemical or genetic inhibition of the proteasome, implying distinct induction mechanisms. Proteasome inhibition stimulates comprehensive ubiquitylation of the complex, with the ensuingmore » proteaphagy requiring the proteasome subunit RPN10, which can simultaneously bind both ATG8 and ubiquitin. Finally and collectively, we propose that Arabidopsis RPN10 acts as a selective autophagy receptor that targets inactive 26S proteasomes by concurrent interactions with ubiquitylated proteasome subunits/targets and lipidated ATG8 lining the enveloping autophagic membranes.« less

  11. Molecular phylogenetic study of the Ranunculaceae: utility of the nuclear 26S ribosomal DNA in inferring intrafamilial relationships.

    PubMed

    Ro, K E; Keener, C S; McPheron, B A

    1997-10-01

    There are only a small number of molecular markers currently proven to be useful for phylogenetic inference within the flowering plants. We demonstrate that the 5' end of the 26S ribosomal DNA (ca. 1100 bp) is of great value for investigating generic to subfamilial relationships. We analyzed DNA sequences from 31 species of the Ranunculaceae and four species of the Berberidaceae to test phylogenetic relationships within the Ranunculaceae. The inferred phylogeny strongly supports the concept that the Thalictrum chromosome group is not monophyletic, but consists of three independent lineages: (1) Hydrastis, (2) Xanthorhiza and Coptis, and (3) Thalictrum, Aquilegia, and Enemion. Based on comparison with conventional taxonomic characters, we propose a hypothesis that the third group also includes the rest of the Thalictrum chromosome taxa that have a base chromosome number of seven. For the Ranunculus chromosome group, our study suggests several relationships that have not been recognized by conventional systematics. The inferred 26S rDNA topology is compared with results from two previously published molecular data sets: DNA sequences from rbcL, atpB, and 18S rDNA genes and restriction fragment length polymorphism data from chloroplast DNA. The three topologies are highly congruent and agree with karyological characters, but not with fruit type, both of which have often been used for the higher classification of the Ra- nunculaceae.

  12. Evidence that the Arabidopsis Ubiquitin C-terminal Hydrolases 1 and 2 associate with the 26S proteasome and the TREX-2 complex.

    PubMed

    Tian, Gang; Lu, Qing; Kohalmi, Susanne E; Rothstein, Steven J; Cui, Yuhai

    2012-11-01

    The 26S proteasome interacts with a number of different proteins, while the TREX-2 complex is an important component of the mRNA export machinery. In animals and yeast, members of the Ubiquitin C-terminal Hydrolase 37 (UCH37) family are found to associate with the 26S proteasome, but this has not been demonstrated in plants. The Arabidopsis UCH1 and UCH2 are orthologous to UCH37. Here, we show that UCH1 and UCH2 interact with the 26S proteasome lid subunits. In addition, the two UCHs also interact with TREX-2 components. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis UCHs may serve as a link between the 26S proteasome lid complex and the TREX-2 complex.

  13. The ubiquitin-interacting motifs of S5a as a unique upstream inhibitor of the 26S proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Elangovan, Muthukumar; Shin, Dong Yeon; Yoo, Yung Joon

    2009-10-30

    It has been demonstrated that ubiquitin-conjugated proteins were accumulated by ectopically-expressed S5a as well as the ubiquitin-interacting motifs of S5a (S5a-UIMs). In this study, we further found that free S5a-UIMs stabilized only a subset of proteasomal substrates including p53, c-Fos, c-Jun, and p27 but not {beta}-catenin, p15, and ornithine decarboxylase. Both S5a-UIMs and epoxomicin inhibited the proliferation of A549 lung cancer cells but arrest at the different stages of cell cycle. Together, our results suggest a potential role of S5a-UIMs as an upstream proteasomal inhibitor by blocking the subset of substrates from delivery to the 26S proteasome.

  14. Amino acid, peptide, and protein hydroperoxides and their decomposition products modify the activity of the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Gracanin, Michelle; Lam, Magdalena A; Morgan, Philip E; Rodgers, Kenneth J; Hawkins, Clare L; Davies, Michael J

    2011-01-15

    Proteins are major biological targets for oxidative damage within cells because of their high abundance and rapid rates of reaction with radicals and singlet oxygen. These reactions generate high yields of hydroperoxides. The turnover of both native and modified/damaged proteins is critical for maintaining cell homeostasis, with this occurring via the proteasomal and endosomal-lysosomal systems; the former is of particular importance for intracellular proteins. In this study we have examined whether oxidation products generated on amino acids, peptides, and proteins modulate 26S proteasome activity. We show that oxidation products, and particularly protein hydroperoxides, are efficient inhibitors of the 26S proteasome tryptic and chymotryptic activities, with this depending, at least in part, on the presence of hydroperoxide groups. Removal of these species by reduction significantly reduces proteasome inhibition. This loss of activity is accompanied by a loss of thiol residues, but an absence of radical formation, consistent with molecular, rather than radical, reactions being responsible for proteasome inhibition. Aldehydes also seem to play a role in the inhibition of chymotryptic activity, with this prevented by treatment with NaBH(4), which reduces these groups. Inhibition occurred at hydroperoxide concentrations of ≥1μM for oxidized amino acids and peptides and ≥10μM for oxidized proteins, compared with ca. 100μM for H(2)O(2), indicating that H(2)O(2) is a much less effective inhibitor. These data indicate that the formation of oxidized proteins within cells may modulate cell function by interfering with the turnover of native proteins and the clearance of modified materials. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Zinc mesoporphyrin induces rapid and marked degradation of the transcription factor Bach1 and up-regulates HO-1.

    PubMed

    Hou, Weihong; Shan, Ying; Zheng, Jianyu; Lambrecht, Richard W; Donohue, Susan E; Bonkovsky, Herbert L

    2008-03-01

    Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is the first and rate-controlling enzyme in heme degradation. Bach1 is a mammalian transcriptional repressor of HO-1. To understand how zinc mesoporphyrin (ZnMP) induces the expression of HO-1, we investigated the effects of ZnMP on Bach1 mRNA and protein levels in human hepatoma Huh-7 cells by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blots. We found that ZnMP markedly up-regulated HO-1 mRNA and protein levels, and rapidly and significantly decreased Bach1 protein levels by increasing degradation of Bach1 protein [half life (t(1/2)) from 19 h to 45 min], whereas ZnMP did not influence Bach1 mRNA levels. The proteasome inhibitors, epoxomicin and MG132, significantly inhibited degradation of Bach1 by ZnMP in a dose-dependent fashion, indicating that the degradation of Bach1 by ZnMP is proteasome-dependent. Purified Bach1 C-terminal fragment bound heme, but there was no evidence for binding of ZnMP to the heme-binding region of Bach1. In conclusion, ZnMP produces profound post-transcriptional down-regulation of Bach1 protein levels and transcriptional up-regulation of HO-1. Our results indicate that ZnMP up-regulates HO-1 gene expression by markedly increasing Bach1 protein degradation in a proteasome-dependent manner.

  16. Cobalt chloride-induced estrogen receptor alpha down-regulation involves hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jungyoon; Kim, Dukkyung; Lee, SeungKi; Lee, YoungJoo

    2005-05-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) is down-regulated under hypoxia via a proteasome-dependent pathway. We studied the mechanism of ERalpha degradation under hypoxic mimetic conditions. Cobalt chloride-induced ERalpha down-regulation was dependent on the expression of newly synthesized protein(s), one possibility of which was hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha). To examine the role of HIF-1alpha expression in ERalpha down-regulation under hypoxic-mimetic conditions, we used a constitutively active form of HIF-1alpha, HIF-1alpha/herpes simplex viral protein 16 (VP16), constructed by replacing the transactivation domain of HIF-1alpha with that of VP16. Western blot analysis revealed that HIF-1alpha/VP16 down-regulated ERalpha in a dose-dependent manner via a proteasome-dependent pathway. The kinase pathway inhibitors PD98059, U0126, wortmannin, and SB203580 did not affect the down-regulation. A mammalian two-hybrid screen and immunoprecipitation assays indicated that ERalpha interacted with HIF-1alpha physically. These results suggest that ERalpha down-regulation under hypoxia involves protein-protein interactions between the ERalpha and HIF-1alpha.

  17. Genomic organization and mapping of the mouse P26s4 ATPase gene: A member of the remarkably conserved AAA gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyle, J.; Fisher, E.M.C.

    1996-01-01

    The eukaryotic genome contains a large family of ATPases in which each member has at least one highly conserved domain of approximately 200 amino acids with an ATP binding motif (the {open_quotes}AAA{close_quotes} domain). AAA ATPases play diverse roles in the cell and are of considerable interest to researchers investigating a number of different phenomena, including control of the cell cycle. We have characterized the mouse P26s4 AAA ATPase gene that encodes a subunit of the 26S protease, a multimeric complex that is responsible for the ubiquitin- and ATP-dependent degradation of specific proteins. The normal functioning of eukaryotic cells depends on this pathway to remove regulatory proteins such as cyclins or signal transduction molecules from the intracellular environment, with the appropriate timing to allow normal cell division and development. We have isolated mouse P26s4 cDNAs and mapped the P26s4 gene to chromosome 12. We have analyzed the intron-exon structure of the P26s4 genomic locus and have determined that the gene contains at least 10 introns, the first of which separates the start methionine from the rest of the coding sequence. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  18. An AAA Motor-Driven Mechanical Switch in Rpn11 Controls Deubiquitination at the 26S Proteasome.

    PubMed

    Worden, Evan J; Dong, Ken C; Martin, Andreas

    2017-09-07

    Poly-ubiquitin chains direct protein substrates to the 26S proteasome, where they are removed by the deubiquitinase Rpn11 during ATP-dependent substrate degradation. Rapid deubiquitination is required for efficient degradation but must be restricted to committed substrates that are engaged with the ATPase motor to prevent premature ubiquitin chain removal and substrate escape. Here we reveal the ubiquitin-bound structure of Rpn11 from S. cerevisiae and the mechanisms for mechanochemical coupling of substrate degradation and deubiquitination. Ubiquitin binding induces a conformational switch of Rpn11's Insert-1 loop from an inactive closed state to an active β hairpin. This switch is rate-limiting for deubiquitination and strongly accelerated by mechanical substrate translocation into the AAA+ motor. Deubiquitination by Rpn11 and ubiquitin unfolding by the ATPases are in direct competition. The AAA+ motor-driven acceleration of Rpn11 is therefore important to ensure that poly-ubiquitin chains are removed only from committed substrates and fast enough to prevent their co-degradation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Functional study of hot pepper 26S proteasome subunit RPN7 induced by Tobacco mosaic virus from nuclear proteome analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Boo-Ja; Kwon, Sun Jae; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Park, Chang-Jin; Kim, Young-Jin; Park, Ohkmae K.; Paek, Kyung-Hee . E-mail: khpaek95@korea.ac.kr

    2006-12-15

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) was applied for the screening of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-induced hot pepper (Capsicum annuum cv. Bugang) nuclear proteins. From differentially expressed protein spots, we acquired the matched peptide mass fingerprint (PMF) data, analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS, from the non-redundant hot pepper EST protein FASTA database using the VEMS 2.0 software. Among six identified nuclear proteins, the hot pepper 26S proteasome subunit RPN7 (CaRPN7) was subjected to further study. The level of CaRPN7 mRNA was specifically increased during incompatible TMV-P{sub 0} interaction, but not during compatible TMV-P{sub 1.2} interaction. When CaRPN7::GFP fusion protein was targeted in onion cells, the nuclei had been broken into pieces. In the hot pepper leaves, cell death was exacerbated and genomic DNA laddering was induced by Agrobacterium-mediated transient overexpression of CaPRN7. Thus, this report presents that the TMV-induced CaRPN7 may be involved in programmed cell death (PCD) in the hot pepper plant.

  20. Functional study of hot pepper 26S proteasome subunit RPN7 induced by Tobacco mosaic virus from nuclear proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Boo-Ja; Kwon, Sun Jae; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Park, Chang-Jin; Kim, Young-Jin; Park, Ohkmae K; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2006-12-15

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) was applied for the screening of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-induced hot pepper (Capsicum annuum cv. Bugang) nuclear proteins. From differentially expressed protein spots, we acquired the matched peptide mass fingerprint (PMF) data, analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS, from the non-redundant hot pepper EST protein FASTA database using the VEMS 2.0 software. Among six identified nuclear proteins, the hot pepper 26S proteasome subunit RPN7 (CaRPN7) was subjected to further study. The level of CaRPN7 mRNA was specifically increased during incompatible TMV-P(0) interaction, but not during compatible TMV-P(1.2) interaction. When CaRPN7::GFP fusion protein was targeted in onion cells, the nuclei had been broken into pieces. In the hot pepper leaves, cell death was exacerbated and genomic DNA laddering was induced by Agrobacterium-mediated transient overexpression of CaPRN7. Thus, this report presents that the TMV-induced CaRPN7 may be involved in programmed cell death (PCD) in the hot pepper plant.

  1. Epidemiologic Study of Malassezia Yeasts in Acne Patients by Analysis of 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young Chan; Hahn, Hyung Jin; Kim, Ji Young; Ko, Jong Hyun; Choe, Yong Beom; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2011-01-01

    Background Although acne is a common follicular inflammatory dermatosis, studies of the relationship between Malassezia yeasts and acne have rarely been conducted. Objective We sought to identify Malassezia yeasts from acne patients and establish a relationship between specific types of species of Malassezia and acne. Methods Sixty acne patients were enrolled. Each strain obtained was identified as one of eleven species by 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP. We then compared these data with those of age- and sex-matched healthy subjects. Results Growth of Malassezia was evident in fewer patients with acne (50%) in comparison to controls (70.6%). M. restricta was dominant in patients with acne (23.9%), whereas M. globosa was most common (26.7%) in healthy controls. In the patients group, the rate was the highest (71.7%) in the twenties and, in terms of body site, the rate was the highest (60%) in the chest. In the control group, the rate was the highest (75.0%) in the thirties and in the forehead (85.0%). Conclusion The detection rate of Malassezia yeasts was conspicuously low in the acne patients group. Statistically significant differences were observed between the patient and the control groups in the twenties and thirties, and in terms of body site, in the forehead and chest. PMID:21909202

  2. Epidemiologic Study of Malassezia Yeasts in Patients with Malassezia Folliculitis by 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Jong Hyun; Choe, Yong Beom; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2011-01-01

    Background So far, studies on the inter-relationship between Malassezia and Malassezia folliculitis have been rather scarce. Objective We sought to analyze the differences in body sites, gender and age groups, and to determine whether there is a relationship between certain types of Malassezia species and Malassezia folliculitis. Methods Specimens were taken from the forehead, cheek and chest of 60 patients with Malassezia folliculitis and from the normal skin of 60 age- and gender-matched healthy controls by 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP. Results M. restricta was dominant in the patients with Malassezia folliculitis (20.6%), while M. globosa was the most common species (26.7%) in the controls. The rate of identification was the highest in the teens for the patient group, whereas it was the highest in the thirties for the control group. M. globosa was the most predominant species on the chest with 13 cases (21.7%), and M. restricta was the most commonly identified species, with 17 (28.3%) and 12 (20%) cases on the forehead and cheek, respectively, for the patient group. Conclusion Statistically significant differences were observed between the patient and control groups for the people in their teens and twenties, and in terms of the body site, on the forehead only. PMID:21747616

  3. Siah1/SIP regulates p27(kip1) stability and cell migration under metabolic stress.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Yoshito; Fukushima, Toru; Okemoto, Kazuo; Tanaka, Keiichiro; Bowtell, David D L; Ronai, Ze'ev; Reed, John C; Matsuzawa, Shu-ichi

    2011-08-01

    p27(kip1) has been implicated in cell cycle regulation, functioning as an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase activity. In addition, p27 was also shown to affect cell migration, with accumulation of cytoplasmic p27 associated with tumor invasiveness. However, the mechanism underlying p27 regulation as a cytoplasmic protein is poorly understood. Here we show that glucose starvation induces proteasome-dependent degradation of cytoplasmic p27, accompanied by a decrease in cell motility. We also show that the glucose limitation-induced p27 degradation is regulated through an ubiquitin E3 ligase complex involving Siah1 and SIP/CacyBP. SIP (-/-) embryonic fibroblasts have increased levels of cytosolic p27 and exhibit increased cell motility compared to wild-type cells. These observations suggest that the Siah1/SIP E3 ligase complex regulates cell motility through degradation of p27.

  4. TOPORS, a Dual E3 Ubiquitin and Sumo1 Ligase, Interacts with 26 S Protease Regulatory Subunit 4, Encoded by the PSMC1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Czub, Barbara; Shah, Amna Z; Alfano, Giovanna; Kruczek, Przemysław M; Chakarova, Christina F; Bhattacharya, Shomi S

    2016-01-01

    The significance of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) for protein degradation has been highlighted in the context of neurodegenerative diseases, including retinal dystrophies. TOPORS, a dual E3 ubiquitin and SUMO1 ligase, forms a component of the UPS and selected substrates for its enzymatic activities, such as DJ-1/PARK7 and APOBEC2, are important for neuronal as well as retinal homeostasis, respectively. TOPORS is ubiquitously expressed, yet its mutations are only known to result in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We performed a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screen of a human retinal cDNA library in order to identify interacting protein partners of TOPORS from the retina, and thus begin delineating the putative disease mechanism(s) associated with the retina-specific phenotype resulting from mutations in TOPORS. The screen led to isolation of the 26 S protease regulatory subunit 4 (P26s4/ PSMC1), an ATPase indispensable for correct functioning of UPS-mediated proteostasis. The interaction between endogenous TOPORS and P26s4 proteins was validated by co-immuno-precipitation from mammalian cell extracts and further characterised by immunofluorescent co-localisation studies in cell lines and retinal sections. Findings from hTERT-RPE1 and 661W cells demonstrated that TOPORS and P26s4 co-localise at the centrosome in cultured cells. Immunofluorescent staining of mouse retinae revealed a strong P26s4 reactivity at the interface between retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) layer and the photoreceptors outer segments (OS). This finding leads us to speculate that P26s4, along with TOPORS, may have a role(s) in RPE phagocytosis, in addition to contributing to the overall photoreceptor and retinal homeostasis via the UPS.

  5. TOPORS, a Dual E3 Ubiquitin and Sumo1 Ligase, Interacts with 26 S Protease Regulatory Subunit 4, Encoded by the PSMC1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Czub, Barbara; Shah, Amna Z.; Alfano, Giovanna; Kruczek, Przemysław M.; Chakarova, Christina F.; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.

    2016-01-01

    The significance of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) for protein degradation has been highlighted in the context of neurodegenerative diseases, including retinal dystrophies. TOPORS, a dual E3 ubiquitin and SUMO1 ligase, forms a component of the UPS and selected substrates for its enzymatic activities, such as DJ-1/PARK7 and APOBEC2, are important for neuronal as well as retinal homeostasis, respectively. TOPORS is ubiquitously expressed, yet its mutations are only known to result in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We performed a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screen of a human retinal cDNA library in order to identify interacting protein partners of TOPORS from the retina, and thus begin delineating the putative disease mechanism(s) associated with the retina-specific phenotype resulting from mutations in TOPORS. The screen led to isolation of the 26 S protease regulatory subunit 4 (P26s4/ PSMC1), an ATPase indispensable for correct functioning of UPS-mediated proteostasis. The interaction between endogenous TOPORS and P26s4 proteins was validated by co-immuno-precipitation from mammalian cell extracts and further characterised by immunofluorescent co-localisation studies in cell lines and retinal sections. Findings from hTERT-RPE1 and 661W cells demonstrated that TOPORS and P26s4 co-localise at the centrosome in cultured cells. Immunofluorescent staining of mouse retinae revealed a strong P26s4 reactivity at the interface between retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) layer and the photoreceptors outer segments (OS). This finding leads us to speculate that P26s4, along with TOPORS, may have a role(s) in RPE phagocytosis, in addition to contributing to the overall photoreceptor and retinal homeostasis via the UPS. PMID:26872363

  6. GCN5L1 modulates cross-talk between mitochondria and cell signaling to regulate FoxO1 stability and gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingdi; Scott, Iain; Zhu, Lu; Wu, Kaiyuan; Han, Kim; Chen, Yong; Gucek, Marjan; Sack, Michael N

    2017-09-12

    The mitochondrial enriched GCN5-like 1 (GCN5L1) protein has been shown to modulate mitochondrial protein acetylation, mitochondrial content and mitochondrial retrograde signaling. Here we show that hepatic GCN5L1 ablation reduces fasting glucose levels and blunts hepatic gluconeogenesis without affecting systemic glucose tolerance. PEPCK and G6Pase transcript levels are downregulated in hepatocytes from GCN5L1 liver specific knockout mice and their upstream regulator, FoxO1 protein levels are decreased via proteasome-dependent degradation and via reactive oxygen species mediated ERK-1/2 phosphorylation. ERK inhibition restores FoxO1, gluconeogenic enzyme expression and glucose production. Reconstitution of mitochondrial-targeted GCN5L1 blunts mitochondrial ROS, ERK activation and increases FoxO1, gluconeogenic enzyme expression and hepatocyte glucose production. We suggest that mitochondrial GCN5L1 modulates post-translational control of FoxO1, regulates gluconeogenesis and controls metabolic pathways via mitochondrial ROS mediated ERK activation. Exploring mechanisms underpinning GCN5L1 mediated ROS signaling may expand our understanding of the role of mitochondria in gluconeogenesis control.Hepatic gluconeogenesis is tightly regulated at transcriptional level and is essential for survival during prolonged fasting. Here Wang et al. show that the mitochondrial enriched GCN5-like 1 protein controls hepatic glucose production by regulating FoxO1 protein levels via proteasome-dependent degradation and, in turn, gluconeogenic gene expression.

  7. Regulated proteolysis in light signaling.

    PubMed

    Hoecker, Ute

    2005-10-01

    Photoreceptors regulate many aspects of development throughout the life cycle of a plant. Recent advances have demonstrated the importance of ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis in the control of development by light. Both some of the photoreceptors themselves and, in particular, transcription factors that are involved in transducing the light signal are subject to regulated ubiquitination and subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome.

  8. A pilot study to investigate the role of the 26S proteasome in radiotherapy resistance and loco-regional recurrence following breast conserving therapy for early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Elfadl, Dalia; Hodgkinson, Victoria C; Long, Ervine D; Scaife, Lucy; Drew, Philip J; Lind, Michael J; Cawkwell, Lynn

    2011-08-01

    Breast conserving therapy is a currently accepted method for managing patients with early stage breast cancer. However, approximately 7% of patients may develop loco-regional tumour recurrence within 5 years. We previously reported that expression of the 26S proteasome may be associated with radio-resistance. Here we aimed to analyse the 26S proteasome in a pilot series of early breast cancers and correlate the findings with loco-regional recurrence. Fourteen patients with early breast cancer who developed loco-regional recurrence within 4 years of completing breast conserving therapy were selected according to strict criteria and compared with those from 14 patients who were disease-free at 10 years. Decreased expression of the 26S proteasome was significantly associated with radio-resistance, manifested as the development of a loco-regional recurrence within 4 years of breast conserving therapy (p = 0.018). This small pilot study provides further suggestion that the 26S proteasome may be associated with response to radiotherapy.

  9. Genotyping of a miso and soy sauce fermentation yeast, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, based on sequence analysis of the partial 26S ribosomal RNA gene and two internal transcribed spacers.

    PubMed

    Suezawa, Yasuhiko; Suzuki, Motofumi; Mori, Haruhiko

    2008-09-01

    We analyzed sequences of the D1D2 domain of the 26S ribosomal RNA gene (26S rDNA sequence), the internal transcribed spacer 1, the 5.8S ribosomal RNA gene, and the internal transcribed spacer 2 (the ITS sequence) from 46 strains of miso and soy sauce fermentation yeast, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and a closely related species, Z. mellis, for typing. Based on the 26S rDNA sequence analysis, the Z. rouxii strains were of two types, and the extent of sequence divergence between them was 2.6%. Based on the ITS sequence analysis, they were divided into seven types (I-VII). Between the type strain (type I) and type VI, in particular, a 12% difference was detected. The occurrence of these nine genotypes with a divergence of more than 1% in these two sequences suggests that Z. rouxii is a species complex including novel species and hybrids. Z. mellis strains were of two types (type alpha and type beta) based on the ITS sequence. Z. rouxii could clearly be distinguished from Z. mellis by 26S rDNA and ITS sequence analyses, but not by the 16% NaCl tolerance, when used as the sole key characteristic for differentiation between the two species.

  10. Gankyrin is an ankyrin-repeat oncoprotein that interacts with CDK4 kinase and the S6 ATPase of the 26 S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Simon; Apcher, Sebastien; Mee, Maureen; Higashitsuji, Hiroaki; Baker, Rohan; Uhle, Stefan; Dubiel, Wolfgang; Fujita, Jun; Mayer, R John

    2002-03-29

    A yeast two-hybrid screen with the human S6 (TBP7, RPT3) ATPase of the 26 S proteasome has identified gankyrin, a liver oncoprotein, as an interacting protein. Gankyrin interacts with both free and regulatory complex-associated S6 ATPase and is not stably associated with the 26 S particle. Deletional mutagenesis shows that the C-terminal 78 amino acids of the S6 ATPase are necessary and sufficient to mediate the interaction with gankyrin. Deletion of an orthologous gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggests that it is dispensable for cell growth and viability. Overexpression and precipitation of tagged gankyrin from cultured cells detects a complex containing co-transfected tagged S6 ATPase (or endogenous S6) and endogenous cyclin D-dependent kinase CDK4. The proteasomal ATPases are part of the AAA (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) family, members of which are molecular chaperones; gankyrin complexes may therefore influence CDK4 function during oncogenesis.

  11. 26S and PA28-20S Proteasome Activity in Cytosolic Extracts from Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Hernebring, Malin

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome is a complex multisubunit protease that plays a major role in the degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells. Proteasome function is one of the key players regulating the proteome and it is vital for many cellular processes. The method described here makes it possible to assay the proteolytic capacities of proteasome complexes separately in crude cytosolic extracts from ES cells. The method is based on hydrolysis of a fluorogenic peptide substrate in lysates prepared under conditions that favor the interactions of the 20S proteasomal catalytical core with either the 19S or the PA28αβ proteasome regulator.

  12. Identification of clinically important ascomycetous yeasts based on nucleotide divergence in the 5' end of the large-subunit (26S) ribosomal DNA gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kurtzman, C P; Robnett, C J

    1997-01-01

    Clinically important species of Candida and related organisms were compared for extent of nucleotide divergence in the 5' end of the large-subunit (26S) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene. This rDNA region is sufficiently variable to allow reliable separation of all known clinically significant yeast species. Of the 204 described species examined, 21 appeared to be synonyms of previously described organisms. Phylogenetic relationships among the species are presented. PMID:9114410

  13. Tau-driven 26S proteasome impairment and cognitive dysfunction can be prevented early in disease by activating cAMP-PKA signaling.

    PubMed

    Myeku, Natura; Clelland, Catherine L; Emrani, Sheina; Kukushkin, Nikolay V; Yu, Wai Haung; Goldberg, Alfred L; Duff, Karen E

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) degrades misfolded proteins including those implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated the effects of tau accumulation on proteasome function in a mouse model of tauopathy and in a cross to a UPS reporter mouse (line Ub-G76V-GFP). Accumulation of insoluble tau was associated with a decrease in the peptidase activity of brain 26S proteasomes, higher levels of ubiquitinated proteins and undegraded Ub-G76V-GFP. 26S proteasomes from mice with tauopathy were physically associated with tau and were less active in hydrolyzing ubiquitinated proteins, small peptides and ATP. 26S proteasomes from normal mice incubated with recombinant oligomers or fibrils also showed lower hydrolyzing capacity in the same assays, implicating tau as a proteotoxin. Administration of an agent that activates cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling led to attenuation of proteasome dysfunction, probably through proteasome subunit phosphorylation. In vivo, this led to lower levels of aggregated tau and improvements in cognitive performance.

  14. Species-specific identification of Dekkera/Brettanomyces yeasts by fluorescently labeled DNA probes targeting the 26S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Röder, Christoph; König, Helmut; Fröhlich, Jürgen

    2007-09-01

    Sequencing of the complete 26S rRNA genes of all Dekkera/Brettanomyces species colonizing different beverages revealed the potential for a specific primer and probe design to support diagnostic PCR approaches and FISH. By analysis of the complete 26S rRNA genes of all five currently known Dekkera/Brettanomyces species (Dekkera bruxellensis, D. anomala, Brettanomyces custersianus, B. nanus and B. naardenensis), several regions with high nucleotide sequence variability yet distinct from the D1/D2 domains were identified. FISH species-specific probes targeting the 26S rRNA gene's most variable regions were designed. Accessibility of probe targets for hybridization was facilitated by the construction of partially complementary 'side'-labeled probes, based on secondary structure models of the rRNA sequences. The specificity and routine applicability of the FISH-based method for yeast identification were tested by analyzing different wine isolates. Investigation of the prevalence of Dekkera/Brettanomyces yeasts in the German viticultural regions Wonnegau, Nierstein and Bingen (Rhinehesse, Rhineland-Palatinate) resulted in the isolation of 37 D. bruxellensis strains from 291 wine samples.

  15. Inhibition of the 26S proteasome by peptide mimics of the coiled-coil region of its ATPase subunits.

    PubMed

    Inobe, Tomonao; Genmei, Reiko

    Regulation of proteasomal degradation is an indispensable tool for biomedical studies. Thus, there is demand for novel proteasome inhibitors. Proteasomal degradation requires formation of coiled-coil structure by the N-terminal region of ATPase subunits of the proteasome cap. Here we show that peptides that mimic the N-terminal coiled-coil region of ATPase subunits interfere with proteasome function. These results suggest that coiled-coil peptides represent promising new proteasome inhibitors and that N-terminal coiled-coil regions of ATPase subunits are targets for proteasome inhibition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Microenvironmental hypoxia regulates FLT3 expression and biology in AML.

    PubMed

    Sironi, Silvia; Wagner, Michaela; Kuett, Alexander; Drolle, Heidrun; Polzer, Harald; Spiekermann, Karsten; Rieger, Christina; Fiegl, Michael

    2015-11-30

    Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) is a receptor tyrosine kinase constitutively expressed by acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) blasts. In addition, 25% of AML patients harbour a FLT3-ITD mutation, associated with inferior outcome due to increased relapse rate. Relapse might be propagated by interactions between AML blasts and the bone marrow microenvironment. Besides cellular elements of the microenvironment (e.g. mesenchymal stromal cells), bone marrow hypoxia has emerged as an additional crucial component. Hence, effects of hypoxia on FLT3 expression and biology could provide novel insight into AML biology. Here we show that 25% of AML patients down-regulate FLT3 expression on blasts in response to in vitro hypoxia (1% O2), which was independent of its mutational state. While virtually no AML cell lines regulate FLT3 in response to hypoxia, the down-regulation could be observed in Ba/F3 cells stably transfected with different FLT3 mutants. Hypoxia-mediated down-regulation was specific for FLT3, reversible and proteasome-dependent; with FLT3 half-life being significantly shorter at hypoxia. Also, PI-3K inhibition could partially abrogate down-regulation of FLT3. Hypoxia-mediated down-regulation of FLT3 conferred resistance against cytarabine in vitro. In conclusion, FLT3 expression in AML is dependent on the oxygen partial pressure, but response to hypoxia differs.

  17. Determination of fruit origin by using 26S rDNA fingerprinting of yeast communities by PCR-DGGE: preliminary application to Physalis fruits from Egypt.

    PubMed

    El Sheikha, Aly Farag; Condur, Ana; Métayer, Isabelle; Nguyen, Doan Duy Le; Loiseau, Gérard; Montet, Didier

    2009-10-01

    The determination of geographical origin is a demand of the traceability system of import-export food products. One hypothesis for tracing the source of a product is by global analysis of the microbial communities of the food and statistical linkage of this analysis to the geographical origin of the food. For this purpose, a molecular technique employing 26S rDNA profiles generated by PCR-DGGE was used to detect the variation in yeast community structures of three species of Physalis fruit (Physalis ixocarpa Brat, Physalis pubescens L, Physalis pruinosa L) from four Egyptian regions (Qalyoubia, Minufiya, Beheira and Alexandria Governments). When the 26S rDNA profiles were analysed by multivariate analysis, distinct microbial communities were detected. The band profiles of Physalis yeasts from different Governments were specific for each location and could be used as a bar code to discriminate the origin of the fruits. This method is a new traceability tool which provides fruit products with a unique biological bar code and makes it possible to trace back the fruits to their original location.

  18. Sulforaphane Induced Apoptosis via Promotion of Mitochondrial Fusion and ERK1/2-Mediated 26S Proteasome Degradation of Novel Pro-survival Bim and Upregulation of Bax in Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yang; Zhou, Yan; Wu, Sai; Hu, Yabin; Lin, Kai; Wang, Yalin; Zheng, Zhongnan; Wu, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory showed that sulforaphane (SFN) induced apoptosis by sustained activation of extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). However, the underlying mechanisms associated with SFN-induced apoptosis and downstream cascades which are modulated by ERK1/2 were not elucidated. Herein we demonstrated for the first time that alteration of mitochondrial dynamics contributed to SFN-induced apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Reports showed that protein Bim not only induced apoptosis but also promoted proliferation under certain circumstances. We found that Bim was related to cell growth in NSCLC cells. Pro-survival Bim downregulation was shown to induce apoptosis in response to SFN. Further, Using the ERK1/2 inhibitor, PD98059, we found that SFN upregulated Bax and downregulated Bim through the ERK1/2-dependent signaling pathway. Furthermore, SFN activated ERK1/2 to increase 26S proteasome activity to degrade Bim, while the proteasome inhibitor MG132 reversed this effect. Therefore, SFN phosphorylated ERK1/2 and activated the proteasome system leading to the degradation of Bim, which contributed to apoptosis in NSCLC cells. These findings provided a novel insight into SFN-related therapeutics in cancer treatment.

  19. The Investigation on the Distribution of Malassezia Yeasts on the Normal Korean Skin by 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Soo-Jung; Lim, Sang-Hee; Ko, Jong-Hyun; Oh, Byung-Ho; Kim, Sang-Min; Song, Young-Chan; Yim, Seon-Mi; Lee, Yang-Won; Choe, Yong-Beom

    2009-01-01

    Background Malassezia yeasts are normal flora of the skin that are discovered in 75~98% of health subjects, but since its association with various skin disorders have been known, many studies have been conducted in the distribution of the yeasts. Objective To isolate, identify, and classify Malassezia yeasts from the normal human skin of Koreans by using the rapid and accurate molecular biology method (26S rDNA PCR-RFLP) which overcome the limits of morphological and biochemical methods, and to gather a basic database that will show its relation to various skin diseases. Methods Malassezia yeasts were cultured from clinically healthy human skin using scrub-wash technique at five sites (forehead, cheek, chest, upper arm, and thigh) and swabbing technique at scalp in 160 participants comprised of 80 males and 80 females aged from 0 to 80. Identification of obtained strains were placed into the one of the 11 species by 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP. Results An overall positive culture rate was 62.4% (599/960). As shown in the experiment groups by their age, the positive culture rate was the highest (74.2%) in the age 21~30 and 31~40 (89/120). In the experiment groups by different body areas, the scalp showed the highest positive culture rate of 90% (144/160). On analysis of 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP, M. globosa was the most predominant species in the age 0~10 (32.8%), 11~20 (28.9%), 21~30 (32.3%). M. restricta was identified as predominant species in the age 41~50 (27.9%), 61~70 (31.5%) and 71~80 (24.0%). In the age 31~40 years, M. sympodialis was found to be the most common species (24.6%). According to body site, M. restricta was more frequently recovered in the scalp (56.8%), forehead (39.8%) and cheek (24.0%) and while M. globosa was more frequently recovered in the chest (36.8%). Higher positive culture rates of Malassezia yeasts were shown in male subjects than female counterparts in all body areas except scalp (p<0.05). Especially in this study, M. dermatis, newly isolated

  20. Transcriptional Regulation by CHIP/LDB Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Bronstein, Revital; Levkovitz, Liron; Yosef, Nir; Yanku, Michaela; Ruppin, Eytan; Sharan, Roded; Westphal, Heiner; Oliver, Brian; Segal, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    It is increasingly clear that transcription factors play versatile roles in turning genes “on” or “off” depending on cellular context via the various transcription complexes they form. This poses a major challenge in unraveling combinatorial transcription complex codes. Here we use the powerful genetics of Drosophila combined with microarray and bioinformatics analyses to tackle this challenge. The nuclear adaptor CHIP/LDB is a major developmental regulator capable of forming tissue-specific transcription complexes with various types of transcription factors and cofactors, making it a valuable model to study the intricacies of gene regulation. To date only few CHIP/LDB complexes target genes have been identified, and possible tissue-dependent crosstalk between these complexes has not been rigorously explored. SSDP proteins protect CHIP/LDB complexes from proteasome dependent degradation and are rate-limiting cofactors for these complexes. By using mutations in SSDP, we identified 189 down-stream targets of CHIP/LDB and show that these genes are enriched for the binding sites of APTEROUS (AP) and PANNIER (PNR), two well studied transcription factors associated with CHIP/LDB complexes. We performed extensive genetic screens and identified target genes that genetically interact with components of CHIP/LDB complexes in directing the development of the wings (28 genes) and thoracic bristles (23 genes). Moreover, by in vivo RNAi silencing we uncovered novel roles for two of the target genes, xbp1 and Gs-alpha, in early development of these structures. Taken together, our results suggest that loss of SSDP disrupts the normal balance between the CHIP-AP and the CHIP-PNR transcription complexes, resulting in down-regulation of CHIP-AP target genes and the concomitant up-regulation of CHIP-PNR target genes. Understanding the combinatorial nature of transcription complexes as presented here is crucial to the study of transcription regulation of gene batteries required

  1. Short communication: Evaluation of the microbiota of kefir samples using metagenetic analysis targeting the 16S and 26S ribosomal DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Korsak, N; Taminiau, B; Leclercq, M; Nezer, C; Crevecoeur, S; Ferauche, C; Detry, E; Delcenserie, V; Daube, G

    2015-06-01

    Milk kefir is produced by fermenting milk in the presence of kefir grains. This beverage has several benefits for human health. The aim of this experiment was to analyze 5 kefir grains (and their products) using a targeted metagenetic approach. Of the 5 kefir grains analyzed, 1 was purchased in a supermarket, 2 were provided by the Ministry of Agriculture (Namur, Belgium), and 2 were provided by individuals. The metagenetic approach targeted the V1-V3 fragment of the 16S ribosomal (r)DNA for the grains and the resulting beverages at 2 levels of grain incorporation (5 and 10%) to identify the bacterial species population. In contrast, the 26S rDNA pyrosequencing was performed only on kefir grains with the aim of assessing the yeast populations. In parallel, pH measurements were performed on the kefir obtained from the kefir grains using 2 incorporation rates. Regarding the bacterial population, 16S pyrosequencing revealed the presence of 20 main bacterial species, with a dominance of the following: Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens, Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris, Gluconobacter frateurii, Lactobacillus kefiri, Acetobacter orientalis, and Acetobacter lovaniensis. An important difference was noticed between the kefir samples: kefir grain purchased from a supermarket (sample E) harbored a much higher proportion of several operational taxonomic units of Lactococcus lactis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides. This sample of grain was macroscopically different from the others in terms of size, apparent cohesion of the grains, structure, and texture, probably associated with a lower level of Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens. The kefir (at an incorporation rate of 5%) produced from this sample of grain was characterized by a lower pH value (4.5) than the others. The other 4 samples of kefir (5%) had pH values above 5. Comparing the kefir grain and the kefir, an increase in the population of Gluconobacter in grain sample B was observed. This was also the case for Acetobacter orientalis

  2. Degradation of the encephalomyocarditis virus and hepatitis A virus 3C proteases by the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Schlax, Peter E.; Zhang Jin; Lewis, Elizabeth; Planchart, Antonio; Lawson, T. Glen . E-mail: tlawson@bates.edu

    2007-04-10

    We have isolated stably transfected mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines that inducibly express either the mature encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) or hepatitis A virus (HAV) 3C protease and have used these cells to demonstrate that both proteins are subject to degradation in vivo by the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system. The detection of 3C protease expression in these cells requires inducing conditions and the presence of one of several proteasome inhibitors. Both 3C proteases are incorporated into conjugates with ubiquitin in vivo. HAV 3C protease expression has deleterious effects on cell viability, as determined by observation and counting of cells cultured in the absence or presence of inducing conditions. The EMCV 3C protease was found to be preferentially localized to the nucleus of induced cells, while the HAV 3C protease remains in the cytoplasm. The absence of polyubiquitinated EMCV 3C protease conjugates in nuclear fraction preparations suggests that localization to the nucleus can protect this protein from ubiquitination.

  3. Physical mapping of 5S and 18S-5.8S-26S RNA gene families in polyploid series of Cenchrus ciliaris Linnaeus, 1771 (Poaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Kharrat-Souissi, Amina; Siljak-Yakovlev, Sonja; Pustahija, Fatima; Chaieb, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The Buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris L., Poaceae) is one of the most important pasturage grasses due to its high productivity and good forage qualities. This species possess a high adaptability to bioclimatic constraints of arid zones and may be used for the restoration of degraded arid ecosystems. Tunisian populations present three ploidy levels (4x, 5x and 6x) with a basic chromosome number x=9. This study reported for the first time the distribution of the ribosomal genes (rRNA) for pentaploid and hexaploid cytotypes of Cenchrus ciliaris. Molecular cytogenetic study using double fluorescence in situ hybridization has shown that the two rDNA families, 5S and 18S-5.8S-26S (18S), displayed intraspecific variation in number of loci among different ploidy levels. Each ploidy level was characterized by specific number of both 5S and 18S rDNA loci (two loci in tetraploid, five in pentaploid and six in hexaploid level). For three studied cytotypes (4x, 5x and 6x) all 5S rDNA loci were localized on the subcentromeric region of chromosomes, while 18S loci were situated on the telomeric region of short chromosome arms. Data of the FISH experiments show proportional increase of ribosomal loci number during polyploidization processes. PMID:24260668

  4. Epidemiologic Study of Malassezia Yeasts in Seborrheic Dermatitis Patients by the Analysis of 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Byung Ho; Choe, Yong Beom; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2010-01-01

    Background This case-control study concerns a molecular biological method based on the data gathered from a group of Korean subjects to examine the distribution of Malassezia yeasts in seborrheic dermatitis (SD) patients. Cultures for Malassezia yeasts were taken from the foreheads, cheeks and chests of 60 patients with SD and in 60 healthy controls of equivalent age. Objective The purpose of this study is to identify the relationship between certain species of Malassezia and SD. This was done by analyzing the differences in the distribution of Malassezia species in terms of age and body parts of the host with healthy controls. Methods 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP, a fast and accurate molecular biological method, was used to overcome the limits of morphological and biochemical methods. Results The positive Malassezia culture rate was 51.7% in patients with SD, which was lower than that of healthy adults (63.9%). M. restricta was dominant in patients with SD (19.5%). Likewise, M. restricta was identified as a common species (20.5%) in healthy controls. In the ages 31~40, M. restricta was found to be the most common species (31.6%) among SD patients. Conclusion According to the results of the study, the most frequently isolated species was M. restricta (19.5%) in patients with SD. There was no statistically significant difference in the distribution of Malassezia species between the SD patients and healthy control groups. PMID:20548904

  5. PUB22 and PUB23 U-BOX E3 ligases directly ubiquitinate RPN6, a 26S proteasome lid subunit, for subsequent degradation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seok Keun; Bae, Hansol; Ryu, Moon Young; Wook Yang, Seong; Kim, Woo TaeK

    2015-09-04

    Drought stress strongly affects plant growth and development, directly connected with crop yields, accordingly. However, related to the function of U-BOX E3 ligases, the underlying molecular mechanisms of desiccation stress response in plants are still largely unknown. Here we report that PUB22 and PUB23, two U-box E3 ligase homologs, tether ubiquitins to 19S proteasome regulatory particle (RP) subunit RPN6, leading to its degradation. RPN6 was identified as an interacting substrate of PUB22 by yeast two-hybrid screening, and in vitro pull-down assay confirmed that RPN6 interacts not only with PUB22, but also with PUB23. Both PUB22 and PUB23 were able to conjugate ubiquitins on RPN6 in vitro. Furthermore, RPN6 showed a shorter protein half-life in PUB22 overexpressing plants than in wild-type, besides RPN6 was significantly stabilized in pub22pub23 double knockout plants. Taken together, these results solidify a notion that PUB22 and PUB23 can alter the activity of 26S proteasome in response to drought stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Degradation Signals for Ubiquitin-Proteasome Dependent Cytosolic Protein Quality Control (CytoQC) in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Matthew J; Spear, Eric D; Yu, Allen T; Lee, Evan J; Shahzad, Saba; Michaelis, Susan

    2016-07-07

    Cellular protein quality control (PQC) systems selectively target misfolded or otherwise aberrant proteins for degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). How cells discern abnormal from normal proteins remains incompletely understood, but involves in part the recognition between ubiquitin E3 ligases and degradation signals (degrons) that are exposed in misfolded proteins. PQC is compartmentalized in the cell, and a great deal has been learned in recent years about ER-associated degradation (ERAD) and nuclear quality control. In contrast, a comprehensive view of cytosolic quality control (CytoQC) has yet to emerge, and will benefit from the development of a well-defined set of model substrates. In this study, we generated an isogenic "degron library" in Saccharomyces cerevisiae consisting of short sequences appended to the C-terminus of a reporter protein, Ura3 About half of these degron-containing proteins are substrates of the integral membrane E3 ligase Doa10, which also plays a pivotal role in ERAD and some nuclear protein degradation. Notably, some of our degron fusion proteins exhibit dependence on the E3 ligase Ltn1/Rkr1 for degradation, apparently by a mechanism distinct from its known role in ribosomal quality control of translationally paused proteins. Ubr1 and San1, E3 ligases involved in the recognition of some misfolded CytoQC substrates, are largely dispensable for the degradation of our degron-containing proteins. Interestingly, the Hsp70/Hsp40 chaperone/cochaperones Ssa1,2 and Ydj1, are required for the degradation of all constructs tested. Taken together, the comprehensive degron library presented here provides an important resource of isogenic substrates for testing candidate PQC components and identifying new ones. Copyright © 2016 Maurer et al.

  7. Role of Proteasome-Dependent Protein Degradation in Long-Term Operant Memory in "Aplysia"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Lisa C.; Gardner, Jacob S.; Gandour, Catherine E.; Krishnan, Harini C.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the in vivo role of protein degradation during intermediate (ITM) and long-term memory (LTM) in "Aplysia" using an operant learning paradigm. The proteasome inhibitor MG-132 inhibited the induction and molecular consolidation of LTM with no effect on ITM. Remarkably, maintenance of steady-state protein levels through…

  8. Degradation Signals for Ubiquitin-Proteasome Dependent Cytosolic Protein Quality Control (CytoQC) in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Matthew J.; Spear, Eric D.; Yu, Allen T.; Lee, Evan J.; Shahzad, Saba; Michaelis, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Cellular protein quality control (PQC) systems selectively target misfolded or otherwise aberrant proteins for degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). How cells discern abnormal from normal proteins remains incompletely understood, but involves in part the recognition between ubiquitin E3 ligases and degradation signals (degrons) that are exposed in misfolded proteins. PQC is compartmentalized in the cell, and a great deal has been learned in recent years about ER-associated degradation (ERAD) and nuclear quality control. In contrast, a comprehensive view of cytosolic quality control (CytoQC) has yet to emerge, and will benefit from the development of a well-defined set of model substrates. In this study, we generated an isogenic “degron library” in Saccharomyces cerevisiae consisting of short sequences appended to the C-terminus of a reporter protein, Ura3. About half of these degron-containing proteins are substrates of the integral membrane E3 ligase Doa10, which also plays a pivotal role in ERAD and some nuclear protein degradation. Notably, some of our degron fusion proteins exhibit dependence on the E3 ligase Ltn1/Rkr1 for degradation, apparently by a mechanism distinct from its known role in ribosomal quality control of translationally paused proteins. Ubr1 and San1, E3 ligases involved in the recognition of some misfolded CytoQC substrates, are largely dispensable for the degradation of our degron-containing proteins. Interestingly, the Hsp70/Hsp40 chaperone/cochaperones Ssa1,2 and Ydj1, are required for the degradation of all constructs tested. Taken together, the comprehensive degron library presented here provides an important resource of isogenic substrates for testing candidate PQC components and identifying new ones. PMID:27172186

  9. Role of Proteasome-Dependent Protein Degradation in Long-Term Operant Memory in "Aplysia"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Lisa C.; Gardner, Jacob S.; Gandour, Catherine E.; Krishnan, Harini C.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the in vivo role of protein degradation during intermediate (ITM) and long-term memory (LTM) in "Aplysia" using an operant learning paradigm. The proteasome inhibitor MG-132 inhibited the induction and molecular consolidation of LTM with no effect on ITM. Remarkably, maintenance of steady-state protein levels through…

  10. Characterization and Quantification of Intact 26S Proteasome Proteins by Real-Time Measurement of Intrinsic Fluorescence Prior to Top-down Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Jason D.; Scalf, Mark; Book, Adam J.; Ladror, Daniel T.; Vierstra, Richard D.; Smith, Lloyd M.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    Quantification of gas-phase intact protein ions by mass spectrometry (MS) is impeded by highly-variable ionization, ion transmission, and ion detection efficiencies. Therefore, quantification of proteins using MS-associated techniques is almost exclusively done after proteolysis where peptides serve as proxies for estimating protein abundance. Advances in instrumentation, protein separations, and informatics have made large-scale sequencing of intact proteins using top-down proteomics accessible to the proteomics community; yet quantification of proteins using a top-down workflow has largely been unaddressed. Here we describe a label-free approach to determine the abundance of intact proteins separated by nanoflow liquid chromatography prior to MS analysis by using solution-phase measurements of ultraviolet light-induced intrinsic fluorescence (UV-IF). UV-IF is measured directly at the electrospray interface just prior to the capillary exit where proteins containing at least one tryptophan residue are readily detected. UV-IF quantification was demonstrated using commercially available protein standards and provided more accurate and precise protein quantification than MS ion current. We evaluated the parallel use of UV-IF and top-down tandem MS for quantification and identification of protein subunits and associated proteins from an affinity-purified 26S proteasome sample from Arabidopsis thaliana. We identified 26 unique proteins and quantified 13 tryptophan-containing species. Our analyses discovered previously unidentified N-terminal processing of the β6 (PBF1) and β7 (PBG1) subunit - such processing of PBG1 may generate a heretofore unknown additional protease active site upon cleavage. In addition, our approach permitted the unambiguous identification and quantification both isoforms of the proteasome-associated protein DSS1. PMID:23536786

  11. The effects of anti-DNA topoisomerase II drugs, etoposide and ellipticine, are modified in root meristem cells of Allium cepa by MG132, an inhibitor of 26S proteasomes.

    PubMed

    Żabka, Aneta; Winnicki, Konrad; Polit, Justyna Teresa; Maszewski, Janusz

    2015-11-01

    DNA topoisomerase II (Topo II), a highly specialized nuclear enzyme, resolves various entanglement problems concerning DNA that arise during chromatin remodeling, transcription, S-phase replication, meiotic recombination, chromosome condensation and segregation during mitosis. The genotoxic effects of two Topo II inhibitors known as potent anti-cancer drugs, etoposide (ETO) and ellipticine (EPC), were assayed in root apical meristem cells of Allium cepa. Despite various types of molecular interactions between these drugs and DNA-Topo II complexes at the chromatin level, which have a profound negative impact on the genome integrity (production of double-strand breaks, chromosomal bridges and constrictions, lagging fragments of chromosomes and their uneven segregation to daughter cell nuclei), most of the elicited changes were apparently similar, regarding both their intensity and time characteristics. No essential changes between ETO- and EPC-treated onion roots were noticed in the frequency of G1-, S-, G2-and M-phase cells, nuclear morphology, chromosome structures, tubulin-microtubule systems, extended distribution of mitosis-specific phosphorylation sites of histone H3, and the induction of apoptosis-like programmed cell death (AL-PCD). However, the important difference between the effects induced by the ETO and EPC concerns their catalytic activities in the presence of MG132 (proteasome inhibitor engaged in Topo II-mediated formation of cleavage complexes) and relates to the time-variable changes in chromosomal aberrations and AL-PCD rates. This result implies that proteasome-dependent mechanisms may contribute to the course of physiological effects generated by DNA lesions under conditions that affect the ability of plant cells to resolve topological problems that associated with the nuclear metabolic activities.

  12. Combination of quercetin and tannic acid in inhibiting 26S proteasome affects S5a and 20S expression, and accumulation of ubiquitin resulted in apoptosis in cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tsui-Ling; Wang, Chi-Hsien

    2013-04-01

    To look for oral proteasome inhibitors, daily injested food is the best source for cancer chemoprevention. A combination of active components from vegetables, coffee, tea, and fruit could be more efficient to inhibit 26S proteasome activities for preventing cancer diseases. Tannic acid and quercetin have been shown to strongly inhibit 26S proteasome activity, but the molecular target involved remains unknown. Overlay assay, peptide assay, Western blot, and 2-D gels were used to assess the combination of quercetin and tannic acid as a potential inhibitor. Here, we demonstrated that the combination of quercetin and tannic acid (1) synergistically suppresses chymotrypsin-, caspase-, and trypsin-like proteolytic activities, (2) are tightly binding substrates, (3) do not perturb the proteasome structure, (4) inhibit the 26S proteasome affected by ubiquitin, ATP, or β-casein, and (5) inhibit β-casein degradation by the 26S proteasome in vitro. Finally, the inhibition of the proteasome by a combination of quercetin plus tannic acid in Hep-2 cells resulted in the induction of S5a at low dose, accumulation of ubiquitin, and the cleavage of pro-caspase-3, followed by the induction of apoptotic cell death. Evaluating the combination of quercetin and tannic acid as an oral drug to prevent cancer may provide a pharmacological rationale to pursue preclinical trials of this combination.

  13. MMSET is dynamically regulated during cell-cycle progression and promotes normal DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Debra L.; Zhang, Haoxing; Ham, Hyoungjun; Pei, Huadong; Lee, SeungBaek; Kim, JungJin; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Lou, Zhenkun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The timely and precise duplication of cellular DNA is essential for maintaining genome integrity and is thus tightly-regulated. During mitosis and G1, the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) binds to future replication origins, coordinating with multiple factors to load the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex onto future replication origins as part of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC). The pre-RC machinery, in turn, remains inactive until the subsequent S phase when it is required for replication fork formation, thereby initiating DNA replication. Multiple myeloma SET domain-containing protein (MMSET, a.k.a. WHSC1, NSD2) is a histone methyltransferase that is frequently overexpressed in aggressive cancers and is essential for normal human development. Several studies have suggested a role for MMSET in cell-cycle regulation; however, whether MMSET is itself regulated during cell-cycle progression has not been examined. In this study, we report that MMSET is degraded during S phase in a cullin-ring ligase 4-Cdt2 (CRL4Cdt2) and proteasome-dependent manner. Notably, we also report defects in DNA replication and a decreased association of pre-RC factors with chromatin in MMSET-depleted cells. Taken together, our results suggest a dynamic regulation of MMSET levels throughout the cell cycle, and further characterize the role of MMSET in DNA replication and cell-cycle progression. PMID:26771714

  14. MMSET is dynamically regulated during cell-cycle progression and promotes normal DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Evans, Debra L; Zhang, Haoxing; Ham, Hyoungjun; Pei, Huadong; Lee, SeungBaek; Kim, JungJin; Billadeau, Daniel D; Lou, Zhenkun

    2016-01-01

    The timely and precise duplication of cellular DNA is essential for maintaining genome integrity and is thus tightly-regulated. During mitosis and G1, the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) binds to future replication origins, coordinating with multiple factors to load the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex onto future replication origins as part of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC). The pre-RC machinery, in turn, remains inactive until the subsequent S phase when it is required for replication fork formation, thereby initiating DNA replication. Multiple myeloma SET domain-containing protein (MMSET, a.k.a. WHSC1, NSD2) is a histone methyltransferase that is frequently overexpressed in aggressive cancers and is essential for normal human development. Several studies have suggested a role for MMSET in cell-cycle regulation; however, whether MMSET is itself regulated during cell-cycle progression has not been examined. In this study, we report that MMSET is degraded during S phase in a cullin-ring ligase 4-Cdt2 (CRL4(Cdt2)) and proteasome-dependent manner. Notably, we also report defects in DNA replication and a decreased association of pre-RC factors with chromatin in MMSET-depleted cells. Taken together, our results suggest a dynamic regulation of MMSET levels throughout the cell cycle, and further characterize the role of MMSET in DNA replication and cell-cycle progression.

  15. CHIP mediates down-regulation of nucleobindin-1 in preosteoblast cell line models.

    PubMed

    Xue, Fuying; Wu, Yanping; Zhao, Xinghui; Zhao, Taoran; Meng, Ying; Zhao, Zhanzhong; Guo, Junwei; Chen, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Nucleobindin-1 (NUCB1), also known as Calnuc, is a highly conserved, multifunctional protein widely expressed in tissues and cells. It contains two EF-hand motifs which have been shown to play a crucial role in binding Ca(2+) ions. In this study, we applied comparative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to characterize differentially expressed proteins in HA-CHIP over-expressed and endogenous CHIP depleted MC3T3-E1 stable cell lines, identifying NUCB1 as a novel CHIP/Stub1 targeted protein. NUCB1 interacts with and is down-regulated by CHIP by both proteasomal dependent and independent pathways, suggesting that CHIP-mediated down-regulation of nucleobindin-1 might play a role in osteoblast differentiation. The chaperone protein Hsp70 was found to be important for CHIP and NUCB1 interaction as well as CHIP-mediated NUCB1 down-regulation. Our findings provide new insights into understanding the stability regulation of NUCB1. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The E3 ubiquitin ligase WWP1 regulates {Delta}Np63-dependent transcription through Lys63 linkages

    SciTech Connect

    Peschiaroli, Angelo; Scialpi, Flavia; Bernassola, Francesca; Sherbini, El Said El; Melino, Gerry

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} WWP1 ubiquitylates {Delta}Np63 through conjugation of Lys63-linked poly-ubiquitin chains. {yields} WWP1 does not control {Delta}Np63 protein stability. {yields} WWP1 regulates {Delta}Np63-dependent transcription. -- Abstract: The transcription factor p63, a member of the p53 family, plays a crucial role in epithelial development and tumorigenesis through the regulation of epithelial progenitor cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Similarly to p53, p63 activity is regulated by post-translational modifications, including ubiquitylation. Here, we report that the WWP1 E3 ubiquitin ligase binds specifically to {Delta}Np63 isoform but it does not trigger {Delta}Np63 proteasome-dependent degradation. Accordingly, we found that WWP1-dependent ubiquitylation of {Delta}Np63 occurs through the formation of Lys63-linked poly-ubiquitin chains. Importantly, we found that WWP1 is able to increase {Delta}Np63-dependent transcription and depletion of WWP1 in human primary keratinocytes induces cell cycle arrest. All together these results indicate that WWP1 regulates {Delta}Np63 transcriptional activity, acting thus as a potential regulator of the proliferation and survival of epithelial-derived cells.

  17. Polo-like kinase 1 regulates the stability of the mitotic centromere-associated kinesin in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Sanhaji, Mourad; Ritter, Andreas; Belsham, Hannah R; Friel, Claire T; Roth, Susanne; Louwen, Frank; Yuan, Juping

    2014-05-30

    Proper bi-orientation of chromosomes is critical for the accurate segregation of chromosomes in mitosis. A key regulator of this process is MCAK, the mitotic centromere-associated kinesin. During mitosis the activity and localization of MCAK are regulated by mitotic key kinases including Plk1 and Aurora B. We show here that S621 in the MCAK's C-terminal domain is the major phosphorylation site for Plk1. This phosphorylation regulates MCAK's stability and facilitates its recognition by the ubiquitin/proteasome dependent APC/C(Cdc20) pathway leading to its D-box dependent degradation in mitosis. While phosphorylation of S621 does not directly affect its microtubule depolymerising activity, loss of Plk1 phosphorylation on S621 indirectly enhances its depolymerization activity in vivo by stabilizing MCAK, leading to an increased level of protein. Interfering with phosphorylation at S621 causes spindle formation defects and chromosome misalignments. Therefore, this study suggests a new mechanism by which Plk1 regulates MCAK: by regulating its degradation and hence controlling its turnover in mitosis.

  18. Agonist-induced Down-regulation of Endogenous Protein Kinase C α through an Endolysosomal Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Michelle A.; Pundt, Krista E.; Paluch, Benjamin E.; Black, Adrian R.; Black, Jennifer D.

    2013-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes undergo down-regulation upon sustained stimulation. Previous studies have pointed to the existence of both proteasome-dependent and -independent pathways of PKCα processing. Here we demonstrate that these down-regulation pathways are engaged in different subcellular compartments; proteasomal degradation occurs mainly at the plasma membrane, whereas non-proteasomal processing occurs in the perinuclear region. Using cholesterol depletion, pharmacological inhibitors, RNA interference, and dominant-negative mutants, we define the mechanisms involved in perinuclear accumulation of PKCα and identify the non-proteasomal mechanism mediating its degradation. We show that intracellular accumulation of PKCα involves at least two clathrin-independent, cholesterol/lipid raft-mediated pathways that do not require ubiquitination of the protein; one is dynamin-dependent and likely involves caveolae, whereas the other is dynamin- and small GTPase-independent. Internalized PKCα traffics through endosomes and is delivered to the lysosome for degradation. Supportive evidence includes (a) detection of the enzyme in EEA1-positive early endosomes, Rab7-positive late endosomes/multivesicular bodies, and LAMP1-positive lysosomes and (b) inhibition of its down-regulation by lysosome-disrupting agents and leupeptin. Only limited dephosphorylation of PKCα occurs during trafficking, with fully mature enzyme being the main target for lysosomal degradation. These studies define a novel and widespread mechanism of desensitization of PKCα signaling that involves endocytic trafficking and lysosome-mediated degradation of the mature, fully phosphorylated protein. PMID:23508961

  19. TRPC3 positively regulates reactive oxygen species driving maladaptive cardiac remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, Naoyuki; Numaga-Tomita, Takuro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kuroda, Takuya; Nishimura, Akiyuki; Miyano, Kei; Yasuda, Satoshi; Kuwahara, Koichiro; Sato, Yoji; Ide, Tomomi; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Sumimoto, Hideki; Mori, Yasuo; Nishida, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2) function as key mediators of mechanotransduction during both physiological adaptation to mechanical load and maladaptive remodeling of the heart. This is despite low levels of cardiac Nox2 expression. The mechanism underlying the transition from adaptation to maladaptation remains obscure, however. We demonstrate that transient receptor potential canonical 3 (TRPC3), a Ca2+-permeable channel, acts as a positive regulator of ROS (PRROS) in cardiomyocytes, and specifically regulates pressure overload-induced maladaptive cardiac remodeling in mice. TRPC3 physically interacts with Nox2 at specific C-terminal sites, thereby protecting Nox2 from proteasome-dependent degradation and amplifying Ca2+-dependent Nox2 activation through TRPC3-mediated background Ca2+ entry. Nox2 also stabilizes TRPC3 proteins to enhance TRPC3 channel activity. Expression of TRPC3 C-terminal polypeptide abolished TRPC3-regulated ROS production by disrupting TRPC3-Nox2 interaction, without affecting TRPC3-mediated Ca2+ influx. The novel TRPC3 function as a PRROS provides a mechanistic explanation for how diastolic Ca2+ influx specifically encodes signals to induce ROS-mediated maladaptive remodeling and offers new therapeutic possibilities. PMID:27833156

  20. Yeast counterparts of subunits S5a and p58 (S3) of the human 26S proteasome are encoded by two multicopy suppressors of nin1-1.

    PubMed Central

    Kominami, K; Okura, N; Kawamura, M; DeMartino, G N; Slaughter, C A; Shimbara, N; Chung, C H; Fujimuro, M; Yokosawa, H; Shimizu, Y; Tanahashi, N; Tanaka, K; Toh-e, A

    1997-01-01

    Nin1p, a component of the 26S proteasome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is required for activation of Cdc28p kinase at the G1-S-phase and G2-M boundaries. By exploiting the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the nin1-1 mutant, we have screened for genes encoding proteins with related functions to Nin1p and have cloned and characterized two new multicopy suppressors, SUN1 and SUN2, of the nin1-1 mutation. SUN1 can suppress a null nin1 mutation, whereas SUN2, an essential gene, does not. Sun1p is a 268-amino acid protein which shows strong similarity to MBP1 of Arabidopsis thaliana, a homologue of the S5a subunit of the human 26S proteasome. Sun1p binds ubiquitin-lysozyme conjugates as do S5a and MBP1. Sun2p (523 amino acids) was found to be homologous to the p58 subunit of the human 26S proteasome. cDNA encoding the p58 component was cloned. Furthermore, expression of a derivative of p58 from which the N-terminal 150 amino acids had been removed restored the function of a null allele of SUN2. During glycerol density gradient centrifugation, both Sun1p and Sun2p comigrated with the known proteasome components. These results, as well as other structural and functional studies, indicate that both Sun1p and Sun2p are components of the regulatory module of the yeast 26S proteasome. Images PMID:9017604

  1. Studies on the 3'-terminal sequences of the large ribosomal ribonucleic acid of different eukaryotes and those associated with "hidden" breaks in heart-dissociable insects 26S ribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Shine, J; Hunt, J A; Dalgarno, L

    1974-09-01

    The 3'-terminal sequences associated with the large rRNA complex from a range of eukaryotes were determined after pancreatic or T(1)-ribonuclease digestion of RNA terminally labelled with [(3)H]isoniazid. In all higher eukaryotes examined except Drosophila melanogaster, the 3'-terminal sequences Y-G-U(OH) and G-C-U(OH) were demonstrated for the large RNA component(s) and for 6S RNA respectively. The 3'-terminal sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 26S RNA was Y-G-U(OH) and that of 6S RNA Y-A-U-U-U(OH). Three 3'-terminal sequences were found in equimolar amounts in the heat-dissociable 26S rRNA characteristic of insect ribosomes. These were Y-G-U-G-U(OH), Y-C-G-U(OH) and G-C-U(OH) for cultured Antheraea eucalypti cells, Y-G-U(OH), Y-G-U(OH) and G-C-U(OH) for Galleria mellonella larvae and Y-C-G-A(OH), Y-G-U-A(OH) and G-Y-U-G(OH) for Drosophila melanogaster flies. Thus the introduction of the central scission in insect 26S rRNA results in the generation of a unique 3'-terminus and does not arise from random cleavage of the polynucleotide chain.

  2. The E3 ubiquitin ligase WWP1 regulates ΔNp63-dependent transcription through Lys63 linkages.

    PubMed

    Peschiaroli, Angelo; Scialpi, Flavia; Bernassola, Francesca; El Sherbini, El Said; Melino, Gerry

    2010-11-12

    The transcription factor p63, a member of the p53 family, plays a crucial role in epithelial development and tumorigenesis through the regulation of epithelial progenitor cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Similarly to p53, p63 activity is regulated by post-translational modifications, including ubiquitylation. Here, we report that the WWP1 E3 ubiquitin ligase binds specifically to ΔNp63 isoform but it does not trigger ΔNp63 proteasome-dependent degradation. Accordingly, we found that WWP1-dependent ubiquitylation of ΔNp63 occurs through the formation of Lys63-linked poly-ubiquitin chains. Importantly, we found that WWP1 is able to increase ΔNp63-dependent transcription and depletion of WWP1 in human primary keratinocytes induces cell cycle arrest. All together these results indicate that WWP1 regulates ΔNp63 transcriptional activity, acting thus as a potential regulator of the proliferation and survival of epithelial-derived cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A CUL-2 ubiquitin ligase containing three FEM proteins degrades TRA-1 to regulate C. elegans sex determination.

    PubMed

    Starostina, Natalia G; Lim, Jae-min; Schvarzstein, Mara; Wells, Lance; Spence, Andrew M; Kipreos, Edward T

    2007-07-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, the Gli-family transcription factor TRA-1 is the terminal effector of the sex-determination pathway. TRA-1 activity inhibits male development and allows female fates. Genetic studies have indicated that TRA-1 is negatively regulated by the fem-1, fem-2, and fem-3 genes. However, the mechanism of this regulation has not been understood. Here, we present data that TRA-1 is regulated by degradation mediated by a CUL-2-based ubiquitin ligase complex that contains FEM-1 as the substrate-recognition subunit, and FEM-2 and FEM-3 as cofactors. CUL-2 physically associates with both FEM-1 and TRA-1 in vivo, and cul-2 mutant males share feminization phenotypes with fem mutants. CUL-2 and the FEM proteins negatively regulate TRA-1 protein levels in C. elegans. When expressed in human cells, the FEM proteins interact with human CUL2 and induce the proteasome-dependent degradation of TRA-1. This work demonstrates that the terminal step in C. elegans sex determination is controlled by ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis.

  4. A CUL-2 ubiquitin ligase containing three FEM proteins degrades TRA-1 to regulate C. elegans sex determination

    PubMed Central

    Starostina, Natalia G.; Lim, Jae-min; Schvarzstein, Mara; Wells, Lance; Spence, Andrew M.; Kipreos, Edward T.

    2007-01-01

    Summary In Caenorhabditis elegans, the Gli-family transcription factor TRA-1 is the terminal effector of the sex determination pathway. TRA-1 activity inhibits male development and allows female fates. Genetic studies have indicated that TRA-1 is negatively regulated by the fem-1, fem-2, and fem-3 genes. However, the mechanism of this regulation has not been understood. Here, we present data that TRA-1 is regulated by degradation mediated by a CUL-2-based ubiquitin ligase complex that contains FEM-1 as the substrate-recognition subunit, and FEM-2 and FEM-3 as cofactors. CUL-2 physically associates with both FEM-1 and TRA-1 in vivo, and cul-2 mutant males share feminization phenotypes with fem mutants. CUL-2 and the FEM proteins negatively regulate TRA-1 protein levels in C. elegans. When expressed in human cells, the FEM proteins interact with human CUL2 and induce the proteasome-dependent degradation of TRA-1. This work demonstrates that the terminal step in C. elegans sex determination is controlled by ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. PMID:17609115

  5. Phosphorylation of the alternative mRNA splicing factor 45 (SPF45) by Clk1 regulates its splice site utilization, cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuying; Conaway, LaShardai; Rutherford Bethard, Jennifer; Al-Ayoubi, Adnan M; Thompson Bradley, Amber; Zheng, Hui; Weed, Scott A; Eblen, Scott T

    2013-05-01

    Alternative mRNA splicing is a mechanism to regulate protein isoform expression and is regulated by alternative splicing factors. The alternative splicing factor 45 (SPF45) is overexpressed in cancer, although few biological effects of SPF45 are known, and few splicing targets have been identified. We previously showed that Extracellular Regulated Kinase 2 (ERK2) phosphorylation of SPF45 regulates cell proliferation and adhesion to fibronectin. In this work, we show that Cdc2-like kinase 1 (Clk1) phosphorylates SPF45 on eight serine residues. Clk1 expression enhanced, whereas Clk1 inhibition reduced, SPF45-induced exon 6 exclusion from Fas mRNA. Mutational analysis of the Clk1 phosphorylation sites on SPF45 showed both positive and negative regulation of splicing, with a net effect of inhibiting SPF45-induced exon 6 exclusion, correlating with reduced Fas mRNA binding. However, Clk1 enhanced SPF45 protein expression, but not mRNA expression, whereas inhibition of Clk1 increased SPF45 degradation through a proteasome-dependent pathway. Overexpression of SPF45 or a phospho-mimetic mutant, but not a phospho-inhibitory mutant, stimulated ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion, correlating with increased fibronectin expression, ERK activation and enhanced splicing and phosphorylation of full-length cortactin. Our results demonstrate for the first time that SPF45 overexpression enhances cell migration and invasion, dependent on biochemical regulation by Clk1.

  6. Activity-Dependent Regulation of Dendritic Complexity by Semaphorin 3A through Farp1

    PubMed Central

    Cheadle, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic arbors are complex neuronal structures that receive and process synaptic inputs. One mechanism regulating dendrite differentiation is Semaphorin/Plexin signaling, specifically through binding of soluble Sema3A to Neuropilin/PlexinA coreceptors. Here we show that the protein Farp1 [FERM, RhoGEF (ARHGEF), and pleckstrin domain protein 1], a Rac1 activator previously identified as a synaptogenic signaling protein, contributes to establishing dendrite tip number and total dendritic branch length in maturing rat neurons and is sufficient to promote dendrite complexity. Aiming to define its upstream partners, our results support that Farp1 interacts with the Neuropilin-1/PlexinA1 complex and colocalizes with PlexinA1 along dendritic shafts. Functionally, Farp1 is required by Sema3A to promote dendritic arborization of hippocampal neurons, and Sema3A regulates dendritic F-actin distribution via Farp1. Unexpectedly, Sema3A also requires neuronal activity to promote dendritic complexity, presumably because silencing neurons leads to a proteasome-dependent reduction of PlexinA1 in dendrites. These results provide new insights into how activity and soluble cues cooperate to refine dendritic morphology through intracellular signaling pathways. PMID:24899721

  7. UbcH7 regulates 53BP1 stability and DSB repair.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiangzi; Zhang, Lei; Chung, Jinsil; Mayca Pozo, Franklin; Tran, Amanda; Seachrist, Darcie D; Jacobberger, James W; Keri, Ruth A; Gilmore, Hannah; Zhang, Youwei

    2014-12-09

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is not only key to genome stability but is also an important anticancer target. Through an shRNA library-based screening, we identified ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme H7 (UbcH7, also known as Ube2L3), a ubiquitin E2 enzyme, as a critical player in DSB repair. UbcH7 regulates both the steady-state and replicative stress-induced ubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation of the tumor suppressor p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1). Phosphorylation of 53BP1 at the N terminus is involved in the replicative stress-induced 53BP1 degradation. Depletion of UbcH7 stabilizes 53BP1, leading to inhibition of DSB end resection. Therefore, UbcH7-depleted cells display increased nonhomologous end-joining and reduced homologous recombination for DSB repair. Accordingly, UbcH7-depleted cells are sensitive to DNA damage likely because they mainly used the error-prone nonhomologous end-joining pathway to repair DSBs. Our studies reveal a novel layer of regulation of the DSB repair choice and propose an innovative approach to enhance the effect of radiotherapy or chemotherapy through stabilizing 53BP1.

  8. Heat shock protein 70 regulates Tcl1 expression in leukemia and lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Gaudio, Eugenio; Paduano, Francesco; Ngankeu, Apollinaire; Lovat, Francesca; Fabbri, Muller; Sun, Hui-Lung; Gasparini, Pierluigi; Efanov, Alexey; Peng, Yong; Zanesi, Nicola; Shuaib, Mohammed A; Rassenti, Laura Z; Kipps, Thomas J; Li, Chenglong; Aqeilan, Rami I; Lesinski, Gregory B; Trapasso, Francesco; Croce, Carlo M

    2013-01-10

    T-cell leukemia/lymphoma 1 (TCL1) is an oncogene overexpressed in T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia and in B-cell malignancies including B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphomas. To date, only a limited number of Tcl1-interacting proteins that regulate its oncogenic function have been identified. Prior studies used a proteomic approach to identify a novel interaction between Tcl1 with Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated. The association of Tcl1 and Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated leads to activation of the NF-κB pathway. Here, we demonstrate that Tcl1 also interacts with heat shock protein (Hsp) 70. The Tcl1-Hsp70 complex was validated by coimmunoprecipitation experiments. In addition, we report that Hsp70, a protein that plays a critical role in the folding and maturation of several oncogenic proteins, associates with Tcl1 protein and stabilizes its expression. The inhibition of the ATPase activity of Hsp70 results in ubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation of Tcl1. The inhibition of Hsp70 significantly reduced the growth of lymphoma xenografts in vivo and down-regulated the expression of Tcl1 protein. Our findings reveal a functional interaction between Tcl1 and Hsp70 and identify Tcl1 as a novel Hsp70 client protein. These findings suggest that inhibition of Hsp70 may represent an alternative effective therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphomas via its ability to inhibit the oncogenic functions of Tcl1.

  9. Heat shock protein 70 regulates Tcl1 expression in leukemia and lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Gaudio, Eugenio; Paduano, Francesco; Ngankeu, Apollinaire; Lovat, Francesca; Fabbri, Muller; Sun, Hui-Lung; Gasparini, Pierluigi; Efanov, Alexey; Peng, Yong; Zanesi, Nicola; Shuaib, Mohammed A.; Rassenti, Laura Z.; Kipps, Thomas J.; Li, Chenglong; Aqeilan, Rami I.; Lesinski, Gregory B.; Trapasso, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    T-cell leukemia/lymphoma 1 (TCL1) is an oncogene overexpressed in T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia and in B-cell malignancies including B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphomas. To date, only a limited number of Tcl1-interacting proteins that regulate its oncogenic function have been identified. Prior studies used a proteomic approach to identify a novel interaction between Tcl1 with Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated. The association of Tcl1 and Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated leads to activation of the NF-κB pathway. Here, we demonstrate that Tcl1 also interacts with heat shock protein (Hsp) 70. The Tcl1-Hsp70 complex was validated by coimmunoprecipitation experiments. In addition, we report that Hsp70, a protein that plays a critical role in the folding and maturation of several oncogenic proteins, associates with Tcl1 protein and stabilizes its expression. The inhibition of the ATPase activity of Hsp70 results in ubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation of Tcl1. The inhibition of Hsp70 significantly reduced the growth of lymphoma xenografts in vivo and down-regulated the expression of Tcl1 protein. Our findings reveal a functional interaction between Tcl1 and Hsp70 and identify Tcl1 as a novel Hsp70 client protein. These findings suggest that inhibition of Hsp70 may represent an alternative effective therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphomas via its ability to inhibit the oncogenic functions of Tcl1. PMID:23160471

  10. Dp71 is regulated by phosphorylation and ubiquitin-proteasome system in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji; Itoh, Kyoko

    2017-10-21

    The Dystrophin (Dp) gene is responsible for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), which is characterized by progressive muscular degeneration and variable degrees of cognitive impairment. Although Dp71 is the most abundant among the Dp isoforms in the brain, the regulatory mechanisms of the related expression levels have not been elucidated. In this study, we found that the constitutive expression levels of Dp71 in PC12 cells were sensitive to proteasomal inhibition. The ectopic expression of FLAG-tagged ubiquitin revealed that Dp71 was ubiquitinated intracellularly. Interestingly, proteasomal inhibition was accompanied by a posttranslational accumulation of modified Dp71, which was restored by protein phosphatase treatment in vitro, indicating that phosphorylation is responsible for the modification and affects the proteasome-dependent degradation of Dp71. Proteasomal activity-sensitive phosphorylated Dp71 is closely associated with syntrophin, a well-known binding partner of Dp71, and syntrophin is also regulated by proteasomal activity in a similar way to Dp71, suggesting that the posttranslational regulatory machinery for Dp71 level is coupled with Dp71-syntrophin molecular complex. Taken together, our results indicated that the expression levels of Dp71 are posttranslationally regulated by the phosphorylation-ubiquitin-proteasomal pathway, which may indicate the presence of regulatory mechanisms underlying the proteostasis of both Dp and its molecular complex, which may lead to better therapeutic approaches for the treatment of Dp-related diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Urban renewal in the nucleus: is protein turnover by proteasomes absolutely required for nuclear receptor-regulated transcription?

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Zafar; O'Malley, Bert W

    2004-03-01

    The importance of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway in higher eukaryotes has been well established in cell cycle regulation, signal transduction, and cell differentiation, but has only recently been linked to nuclear hormone receptor-regulated gene transcription. Characterization of a number of ubiquitin proteasome pathway enzymes as coactivators and observations that several nuclear receptors are ubiquitinated and degraded in the course of their nuclear activities provide evidence that ubiquitin proteasome-mediated protein degradation plays an integral role in eukaryotic transcription. In addition to receptors, studies have revealed that coactivators are ubiquitinated and degraded via the proteasome. The notion that the ubiquitin proteasome pathway is involved in gene transcription is further strengthened by the fact that ubiquitin proteasome pathway enzymes are recruited to the promoters of target genes and that proteasome-dependent degradation of nuclear receptors is required for efficient transcriptional activity. These findings suggest that protein degradation is coupled with nuclear receptor coactivation activity. It is possible that the ubiquitin proteasome pathway modulates transcription by promoting remodeling and turnover of the nuclear receptor-transcription complex. In this review, we discus the possible role of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway in nuclear hormone receptor-regulated gene transcription.

  12. N-Myristoylation of the Rpt2 subunit of the yeast 26S proteasome is implicated in the subcellular compartment-specific protein quality control system.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Ayuko; Kurata, Yoichi; Nakabayashi, Jun; Kagawa, Hiroyuki; Hirano, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitination is the posttranslational modification of a protein by covalent attachment of ubiquitin. Controlled proteolysis via the ubiquitin-proteasome system (\\UPS) alleviates cellular stress by clearing misfolded proteins. In budding yeast, UPS within the nucleus degrades the nuclear proteins as well as proteins imported from the cytoplasm. While the predominantly nuclear localization of the yeast proteasome is maintained by the importin-mediated transport, N-myristoylation of the proteasome subunit Rpt2 was indicated to cause dynamic nucleo-cytoplasmic localization of proteasomes. Here, we quantitatively analyzed the ubiquitinated peptides using anti-K-ε-GG antibody in yeast cell lines with or without a mutation in the N-myristoylation site of Rpt2 and detected upregulated ubiquitination of proteins with nucleo-cytoplasmic localizations in the mutant strains. Moreover, both the protein and ubiquitinated peptide levels of two Hsp70 family chaperones involved in the nuclear import of misfolded proteins, Ssa and Sse1, were elevated in the mutant strains, whereas levels of an Hsp70 family chaperone involved in the nuclear export, Ssb, were reduced. Taken together, our results indicate that N-myristoylation of Rpt2 is involved in controlled proteolysis via regulation of the nucleo-cytoplasmic localization of the yeast proteasome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the non-ATPase subunit Nas6 in complex with the ATPase subunit Rpt3 of the 26S proteasome from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Umehara, Takashi; Tanaka, Akiko; Horikoshi, Masami; Padmanabhan, Balasundaram; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2007-03-01

    The complex of the non-ATPase subunit Nas6 with the C-terminal domain of the ATPase subunit Rpt3 of the 26S proteasome from S. cerevisiae was co-expressed in E. coli and purified to homogeneity. The crystals obtained from the protein complex diffracted to a resolution of 2.2 Å. The non-ATPase subunit Nas6, which is the human orthologue of gankyrin, was co-expressed with the C-terminal domain of the ATPase subunit Rpt3 of the yeast 26S proteasome in Escherichia coli, purified to near-homogeneity and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The protein crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.38, b = 100.22, c = 72.20 Å, β = 94.70° and with three Nas6–Rpt3C molecules per asymmetric unit. The crystal diffracted to beyond 2.2 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation.

  14. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray data collection of the N-terminal domain of the 26S proteasome regulatory subunit p27 and its complex with the ATPase domain of Rpt5 from Mus musculus.

    PubMed

    Diao, Wentao; Yang, Xue; Zhou, Hao

    2014-05-01

    The protein 26S proteasome regulatory subunit p27 is one of the four chaperones that help in the assembly of the 19S regulatory particle (RP) of the 26S proteasome. In the present work, the N-terminus of p27 (residues 1-128) from Mus musculus was cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized alone and in complex with the C-terminal ATPase domain of Rpt5 (residues 173-442). The crystals of p27((1-128)) diffracted to 1.7 Å resolution and belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 26.79, b = 30.39, c = 145.06 Å. Resolution-dependent Matthews coefficient probability analysis suggested the presence of only one molecule per asymmetric unit, with 40.5% solvent content and a VM value of 2.02 Å(3) Da(-1). The crystal of the p27((1-128))-Rpt5((173-442)) complex diffracted to 4 Å resolution and belonged to space group P222, with unit-cell parameters a = 75.93, b = 76.08, c = 336.85 Å. The presence of four heterodimers in the asymmetric unit with 53.2% solvent content and a VM value of 2.63 Å(3) Da(-1) or five heterodimers in the asymmetric unit with 41.5% solvent content and a VM value of 2.10 Å(3) Da(-1) is assumed.

  15. Heat Shock Protein 90 Modulates Lipid Homeostasis by Regulating the Stability and Function of Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) and SREBP Cleavage-activating Protein.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yen-Chou; Hashidume, Tsutomu; Shibata, Takahiro; Uchida, Koji; Shimizu, Makoto; Inoue, Jun; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2017-02-17

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are the key transcription factors that modulate lipid biosynthesis. SREBPs are synthesized as endoplasmic reticulum-bound precursors that require proteolytic activation in the Golgi apparatus. The stability and maturation of precursor SREBPs depend on their binding to SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP), which escorts the SCAP-SREBP complex to the Golgi apparatus. In this study, we identified heat shock protein (HSP) 90 as a novel SREBP regulator that binds to and stabilizes SCAP-SREBP. In HepG2 cells, HSP90 inhibition led to proteasome-dependent degradation of SCAP-SREBP, which resulted in the down-regulation of SREBP target genes and the reduction in intracellular triglyceride and cholesterol levels. We also demonstrated in vivo that HSP90 inhibition decreased SCAP-SREBP protein, down-regulated SREBP target genes, and reduced lipids levels in mouse livers. We propose that HSP90 plays an indispensable role in SREBP regulation by stabilizing the SCAP-SREBP complex, facilitating the activation of SREBP to maintain lipids homeostasis. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Mixed Lineage Leukemia 5 (MLL5) Protein Stability Is Cooperatively Regulated by O-GlcNac Transferase (OGT) and Ubiquitin Specific Protease 7 (USP7)

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaodan; Jiang, Wei; Zhou, Peipei; Liu, Lulu; Wan, Xiaoling; Yuan, Xiujie; Wang, Xizi; Chen, Miao; Chen, Jun; Yang, Jing; Kong, Chao; Li, Bin; Peng, Chao; Wong, Catherine C. L.; Hou, Fajian; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Mixed lineage leukemia 5 (MLL5) protein is a trithorax family histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferase that regulates diverse biological processes, including cell cycle progression, hematopoiesis and cancer. The mechanisms by which MLL5 protein stability is regulated have remained unclear to date. Here, we showed that MLL5 protein stability is cooperatively regulated by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and ubiquitin-specific protease 7 (USP7). Depletion of OGT in cells led to a decrease in the MLL5 protein level through ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent proteolytic degradation, whereas ectopic expression of OGT protein suppressed MLL5 ubiquitylation. We further identified deubiquitinase USP7 as a novel MLL5-associated protein using mass spectrometry. USP7 stabilized the MLL5 protein through direct binding and deubiquitylation. Loss of USP7 induced degradation of MLL5 protein. Conversely, overexpression of USP7, but not a catalytically inactive USP7 mutant, led to decreased ubiquitylation and increased MLL5 stability. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-immunostaining assays revealed that MLL5, OGT and USP7 interact with each other to form a stable ternary complex that is predominantly located in the nucleus. In addition, upregulation of MLL5 expression was correlated with increased expression of OGT and USP7 in human primary cervical adenocarcinomas. Our results collectively reveal a novel molecular mechanism underlying regulation of MLL5 protein stability and provide new insights into the functional interplay among O-GlcNAc transferase, deubiquitinase and histone methyltransferase. PMID:26678539

  17. Mixed Lineage Leukemia 5 (MLL5) Protein Stability Is Cooperatively Regulated by O-GlcNac Transferase (OGT) and Ubiquitin Specific Protease 7 (USP7).

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaodan; Jiang, Wei; Zhou, Peipei; Liu, Lulu; Wan, Xiaoling; Yuan, Xiujie; Wang, Xizi; Chen, Miao; Chen, Jun; Yang, Jing; Kong, Chao; Li, Bin; Peng, Chao; Wong, Catherine C L; Hou, Fajian; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Mixed lineage leukemia 5 (MLL5) protein is a trithorax family histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferase that regulates diverse biological processes, including cell cycle progression, hematopoiesis and cancer. The mechanisms by which MLL5 protein stability is regulated have remained unclear to date. Here, we showed that MLL5 protein stability is cooperatively regulated by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and ubiquitin-specific protease 7 (USP7). Depletion of OGT in cells led to a decrease in the MLL5 protein level through ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent proteolytic degradation, whereas ectopic expression of OGT protein suppressed MLL5 ubiquitylation. We further identified deubiquitinase USP7 as a novel MLL5-associated protein using mass spectrometry. USP7 stabilized the MLL5 protein through direct binding and deubiquitylation. Loss of USP7 induced degradation of MLL5 protein. Conversely, overexpression of USP7, but not a catalytically inactive USP7 mutant, led to decreased ubiquitylation and increased MLL5 stability. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-immunostaining assays revealed that MLL5, OGT and USP7 interact with each other to form a stable ternary complex that is predominantly located in the nucleus. In addition, upregulation of MLL5 expression was correlated with increased expression of OGT and USP7 in human primary cervical adenocarcinomas. Our results collectively reveal a novel molecular mechanism underlying regulation of MLL5 protein stability and provide new insights into the functional interplay among O-GlcNAc transferase, deubiquitinase and histone methyltransferase.

  18. The Evolutionarily Conserved C-terminal Domains in the Mammalian Retinoblastoma Tumor Suppressor Family Serve as Dual Regulators of Protein Stability and Transcriptional Potency*

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Satyaki; Lingnurkar, Raj; Carey, Timothy S.; Pomaville, Monica; Kar, Parimal; Feig, Michael; Wilson, Catherine A.; Knott, Jason G.; Arnosti, David N.; Henry, R. William

    2015-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor and related family of proteins play critical roles in development through their regulation of genes involved in cell fate. Multiple regulatory pathways impact RB function, including the ubiquitin-proteasome system with deregulated RB destruction frequently associated with pathogenesis. With the current study we explored the mechanisms connecting proteasome-mediated turnover of the RB family to the regulation of repressor activity. We find that steady state levels of all RB family members, RB, p107, and p130, were diminished during embryonic stem cell differentiation concomitant with their target gene acquisition. Proteasome-dependent turnover of the RB family is mediated by distinct and autonomously acting instability elements (IE) located in their C-terminal regulatory domains in a process that is sensitive to cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK4) perturbation. The IE regions include motifs that contribute to E2F-DP transcription factor interaction, and consistently, p107 and p130 repressor potency was reduced by IE deletion. The juxtaposition of degron sequences and E2F interaction motifs appears to be a conserved feature across the RB family, suggesting the potential for repressor ubiquitination and specific target gene regulation. These findings establish a mechanistic link between regulation of RB family repressor potency and the ubiquitin-proteasome system. PMID:25903125

  19. Regulation of 2-oxoglutarate (alpha-ketoglutarate) dehydrogenase stability by the RING finger ubiquitin ligase Siah.

    PubMed

    Habelhah, Hasem; Laine, Aaron; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Gershwin, M Eric; Bowtell, David D L; Ronai, Ze'ev

    2004-12-17

    The 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGHDC) (also known as the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the mitochondrial Krebs cycle. Here we report that the RING finger ubiquitin-protein isopeptide ligase Siah2 binds to and targets OGDHC-E2 for ubiquitination-dependent degradation. OGDHC-E2 expression and activity are elevated in Siah2(-/-) cells compared with Siah2(+)(/)(+) cells. Deletion of the mitochondrial targeting sequence of OGDHC-E2 results in its cytoplasmic localization and rapid proteasome-dependent degradation in Siah2(+)(/)(+) but not in Siah2(-/-) cells. Significantly, because of its overexpression or disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, the release of OGDHC-E2 from mitochondria to the cytoplasm also results in its concomitant degradation. The role of the Siah family of ligases in the regulation of OGDHC-E2 stability is expected to take place under pathological conditions in which the levels of OGDHC-E2 are altered.

  20. Ciliopathy proteins regulate paracrine signaling by modulating proteasomal degradation of mediators.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangfan P; Tsai, I-Chun; Morleo, Manuela; Oh, Edwin C; Leitch, Carmen C; Massa, Filomena; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Parker, David S; Finley, Daniel; Zaghloul, Norann A; Franco, Brunella; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2014-05-01

    Cilia are critical mediators of paracrine signaling; however, it is unknown whether proteins that contribute to ciliopathies converge on multiple paracrine pathways through a common mechanism. Here, we show that loss of cilopathy-associated proteins Bardet-Biedl syndrome 4 (BBS4) or oral-facial-digital syndrome 1 (OFD1) results in the accumulation of signaling mediators normally targeted for proteasomal degradation. In WT cells, several BBS proteins and OFD1 interacted with proteasomal subunits, and loss of either BBS4 or OFD1 led to depletion of multiple subunits from the centrosomal proteasome. Furthermore, overexpression of proteasomal regulatory components or treatment with proteasomal activators sulforaphane (SFN) and mevalonolactone (MVA) ameliorated signaling defects in cells lacking BBS1, BBS4, and OFD1, in morphant zebrafish embryos, and in induced neurons from Ofd1-deficient mice. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that other proteasome-dependent pathways not known to be associated with ciliopathies are defective in the absence of ciliopathy proteins. We found that loss of BBS1, BBS4, or OFD1 led to decreased NF-κB activity and concomitant IκBβ accumulation and that these defects were ameliorated with SFN treatment. Taken together, our data indicate that basal body proteasomal regulation governs paracrine signaling pathways and suggest that augmenting proteasomal function might benefit ciliopathy patients.

  1. Sirt1 physically interacts with Tip60 and negatively regulates Tip60-mediated acetylation of H2AX

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagata, Kazutsune; Kitabayashi, Issay

    2009-12-25

    Sirt1 appear to be NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase that deacetylates histones and several non-histone proteins. In this study, we identified Sirt1 as a physical interaction partner of Tip60, which is a mammalian MYST-type histone acetyl-transferase that specifically acetylates histones H2A and H4. Although Tip60 also acetylates DNA damage-specific histone H2A variant H2AX in response to DNA damage, which is a process required for appropriate DNA damage response, overexpression of Sirt1 represses Tip60-mediated acetylation of H2AX. Furthermore, Sirt1 depletion by RNAi causes excessive acetylation of H2AX, and enhances accumulation of {gamma}-ray irradiation-induced MDC1, BRCA1, and Rad51 foci in nuclei. These findings suggest that Sirt1 functions as negative regulator of Tip60-mediated acetylation of H2AX. Moreover, Sirt1 deacetylates an acetylated Tip60 in response to DNA damage and stimulates proteasome-dependent Tip60 degradation in vivo, suggesting that Sirt1 negatively regulates the protein level of Tip60 in vivo. Sirt1 may thus repress excessive activation of the DNA damage response and Rad51-homologous recombination repair by suppressing the function of Tip60.

  2. Ubiquitin-specific peptidase 20 regulates Rad17 stability, checkpoint kinase 1 phosphorylation and DNA repair by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Ilanchezhian; Abbas, Mohammad; Ayoub, Farhan; Mirabal, Susan; Bsaili, Manal; Caulder, Erin K; Weinstock, David M; Tomkinson, Alan E; Hromas, Robert; Shaheen, Monte

    2014-08-15

    Rad17 is a subunit of the Rad9-Hus1-Rad1 clamp loader complex, which is required for Chk1 activation after DNA damage. Rad17 has been shown to be regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. We have identified a deubiquitylase, USP20 that is required for Rad17 protein stability in the steady-state and post DNA damage. We demonstrate that USP20 and Rad17 interact, and that this interaction is enhanced by UV exposure. We show that USP20 regulation of Rad17 is at the protein level in a proteasome-dependent manner. USP20 depletion results in poor activation of Chk1 protein by phosphorylation, consistent with Rad17 role in ATR-mediated phosphorylation of Chk1. Similar to other DNA repair proteins, USP20 is phosphorylated post DNA damage, and its depletion sensitizes cancer cells to damaging agents that form blocks ahead of the replication forks. Similar to Chk1 and Rad17, which enhance recombinational repair of collapsed replication forks, we demonstrate that USP20 depletion impairs DNA double strand break repair by homologous recombination. Together, our data establish a new function of USP20 in genome maintenance and DNA repair.

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of tamoxifen derivatives with a long alkyl side chain as selective estrogen receptor down-regulators.

    PubMed

    Shoda, Takuji; Kato, Masashi; Harada, Rintaro; Fujisato, Takuma; Okuhira, Keiichiro; Demizu, Yosuke; Inoue, Hideshi; Naito, Mikihiko; Kurihara, Masaaki

    2015-07-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERs) play a major role in the growth of human breast cancer cells. An antagonist that acts as not only an inhibitor of ligand binding but also an inducer of the down-regulation of ER would be useful for the treatment for ER-positive breast cancer. We previously reported the design and synthesis of a selective estrogen receptor down-regulator (SERD), (E/Z)-4-(1-{4-[2-(dodecylamino)ethoxy]phenyl}-2-phenylbut-1-en-1-yl)phenol (C12), which is a tamoxifen derivative having a long alkyl chain on the amine moiety. This compound induced degradation of ERα via a proteasome-dependent pathway and showed an antagonistic effect in MCF-7 cells. With the aim of increasing the potency of SERDs, we designed and synthesized various tamoxifen derivatives that have various lengths and terminal groups of the long alkyl side chain. During the course of our investigation, C10F having a 10-fluorodecyl group on the amine moiety of 4-OHT was shown to be the most potent compound among the tamoxifen derivatives. Moreover, computational docking analysis suggested that the long alkyl chain interacted with the hydrophobic region on the surface of the ER, which is a binding site of helix 12 and coactivator. These results provide useful information to develop promising candidates as SERDs.

  4. CARMA3 Is a Host Factor Regulating the Balance of Inflammatory and Antiviral Responses against Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Changying; Zhou, Zhicheng; Quan, Yanping; Zhang, Shilei; Wang, Tingting; Zhao, Xueqiang; Morrison, Clayton; Heise, Mark T; He, Wenqian; Miller, Matthew S; Lin, Xin

    2016-03-15

    Host response to RNA virus infection is sensed by RNA sensors such as RIG-I, which induces MAVS-mediated NF-κB and IRF3 activation to promote inflammatory and antiviral responses, respectively. Here, we have found that CARMA3, a scaffold protein previously shown to mediate NF-κB activation induced by GPCR and EGFR, positively regulates MAVS-induced NF-κB activation. However, our data suggest that CARMA3 sequesters MAVS from forming high-molecular-weight aggregates, thereby suppressing TBK1/IRF3 activation. Interestingly, following NF-κB activation upon virus infection, CARMA3 is targeted for proteasome-dependent degradation, which releases MAVS to activate IRF3. When challenged with vesicular stomatitis virus or influenza A virus, CARMA3-deficient mice showed reduced disease symptoms compared to those of wild-type mice as a result of less inflammation and a stronger ability to clear infected virus. Altogether, our results reveal the role of CARMA3 in regulating the balance of host antiviral and pro-inflammatory responses against RNA virus infection.

  5. Post-translational regulation of the cleaved fragment of Par-4 in ovarian and endometrial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Brasseur, Kevin; Fabi, François; Adam, Pascal; Parent, Sophie; Lessard, Laurent; Asselin, Eric

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported the caspase3-dependent cleavage of Par-4 resulting in the accumulation of a 25kDa cleaved-Par-4 (cl-Par-4) fragment and we investigated in the present study the mechanisms regulating this fragment using cl-Par-4-expressing stable clones derived from ovarian and endometrial cancer cell lines. Cl-Par-4 protein was weakly express in all stable clones despite constitutive expression. However, upon cisplatin treatment, cl-Par-4 levels increased up to 50-fold relative to baseline conditions. Treatment of stable clones with proteasome and translation inhibitors revealed that cisplatin exposure might in fact protect cl-Par-4 from proteasome-dependent degradation. PI3K and MAPK pathways were also implicated as evidenced by an increase of cl-Par-4 in the presence of PI3K inhibitors and a decrease using MAPK inhibitors. Finally using bioinformatics resources, we found diverse datasets showing similar results to those we observed with the proteasome and cl-Par-4 further supporting our data. These new findings add to the complex mechanisms regulating Par-4 expression and activity, and justify further studies addressing the biological significance of this phenomenon in gynaecological cancer cells. PMID:27175591

  6. USP17- and SCFβTrCP-Regulated Degradation of DEC1 Controls the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jihoon; D'Annibale, Sara; Magliozzi, Roberto; Low, Teck Yew; Jansen, Petra; Shaltiel, Indra A.; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J. R.; Medema, Rene H.

    2014-01-01

    In response to genotoxic stress, DNA damage checkpoints maintain the integrity of the genome by delaying cell cycle progression to allow for DNA repair. Here we show that the degradation of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor DEC1, a critical regulator of cell fate and circadian rhythms, controls the DNA damage response. During unperturbed cell cycles, DEC1 is a highly unstable protein that is targeted for proteasome-dependent degradation by the SCFβTrCP ubiquitin ligase in cooperation with CK1. Upon DNA damage, DEC1 is rapidly induced in an ATM/ATR-dependent manner. DEC1 induction results from protein stabilization via a mechanism that requires the USP17 ubiquitin protease. USP17 binds and deubiquitylates DEC1, markedly extending its half-life. Subsequently, during checkpoint recovery, DEC1 proteolysis is reestablished through βTrCP-dependent ubiquitylation. Expression of a degradation-resistant DEC1 mutant prevents checkpoint recovery by inhibiting the downregulation of p53. These results indicate that the regulated degradation of DEC1 is a key factor controlling the DNA damage response. PMID:25202122

  7. Emerging Mechanistic Insights into AAA Complexes Regulating Proteasomal Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Friedrich; Schuller, Jan M.; Unverdorben, Pia; Aufderheide, Antje

    2014-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is an integral element of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and, as such, responsible for regulated degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells. It consists of the core particle, which catalyzes the proteolysis of substrates into small peptides, and the regulatory particle, which ensures specificity for a broad range of substrates. The heart of the regulatory particle is an AAA-ATPase unfoldase, which is surrounded by non-ATPase subunits enabling substrate recognition and processing. Cryo-EM-based studies revealed the molecular architecture of the 26S proteasome and its conformational rearrangements, providing insights into substrate recognition, commitment, deubiquitylation and unfolding. The cytosol proteasomal degradation of polyubiquitylated substrates is tuned by various associating cofactors, including deubiquitylating enzymes, ubiquitin ligases, shuttling ubiquitin receptors and the AAA-ATPase Cdc48/p97. Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors function upstream of the 26S proteasome, and their modular organization exhibits some striking analogies to the regulatory particle. In archaea PAN, the closest regulatory particle homolog and Cdc48 even have overlapping functions, underscoring their intricate relationship. Here, we review recent insights into the structure and dynamics of the 26S proteasome and its associated machinery, as well as our current structural knowledge on the Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors that function in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). PMID:25102382

  8. Emerging mechanistic insights into AAA complexes regulating proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Förster, Friedrich; Schuller, Jan M; Unverdorben, Pia; Aufderheide, Antje

    2014-08-06

    The 26S proteasome is an integral element of the ubiquitin-proteasome system(UPS) and, as such, responsible for regulated degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells.It consists of the core particle, which catalyzes the proteolysis of substrates into small peptides, and the regulatory particle, which ensures specificity for a broad range of substrates.The heart of the regulatory particle is an AAA-ATPase unfoldase, which is surrounded by non-ATPase subunits enabling substrate recognition and processing. Cryo-EM-based studies revealed the molecular architecture of the 26S proteasome and its conformational rearrangements, providing insights into substrate recognition, commitment, deubiquitylation and unfolding. The cytosol proteasomal degradation of polyubiquitylated substrates is tuned by various associating cofactors, including deubiquitylating enzymes, ubiquitin ligases,shuttling ubiquitin receptors and the AAA-ATPase Cdc48/p97. Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors function upstream of the 26S proteasome, and their modular organization exhibits some striking analogies to the regulatory particle. In archaea PAN, the closest regulatory particle homolog and Cdc48 even have overlapping functions, underscoring their intricate relationship.Here, we review recent insights into the structure and dynamics of the 26S proteasome and its associated machinery, as well as our current structural knowledge on the Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors that function in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS).

  9. TRIM30α Is a Negative-Feedback Regulator of the Intracellular DNA and DNA Virus-Triggered Response by Targeting STING.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanming; Lian, Qiaoshi; Yang, Bo; Yan, Shanshan; Zhou, Haiyan; He, Lan; Lin, Guomei; Lian, Zhexiong; Jiang, Zhengfan; Sun, Bing

    2015-06-01

    Uncontrolled immune responses to intracellular DNA have been shown to induce autoimmune diseases. Homeostasis regulation of immune responses to cytosolic DNA is critical for limiting the risk of autoimmunity and survival of the host. Here, we report that the E3 ubiquitin ligase tripartite motif protein 30α (TRIM30α) was induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection in dendritic cells (DCs). Knockdown or genetic ablation of TRIM30α augmented the type I IFNs and interleukin-6 response to intracellular DNA and DNA viruses. Trim30α-deficient mice were more resistant to infection by DNA viruses. Biochemical analyses showed that TRIM30α interacted with the stimulator of interferon genes (STING), which is a critical regulator of the DNA-sensing response. Overexpression of TRIM30α promoted the degradation of STING via K48-linked ubiquitination at Lys275 through a proteasome-dependent pathway. These findings indicate that E3 ligase TRIM30α is an important negative-feedback regulator of innate immune responses to DNA viruses by targeting STING.

  10. TRIM30α Is a Negative-Feedback Regulator of the Intracellular DNA and DNA Virus-Triggered Response by Targeting STING

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Yan, Shanshan; Zhou, Haiyan; He, Lan; Lin, Guomei; Lian, Zhexiong; Jiang, Zhengfan; Sun, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled immune responses to intracellular DNA have been shown to induce autoimmune diseases. Homeostasis regulation of immune responses to cytosolic DNA is critical for limiting the risk of autoimmunity and survival of the host. Here, we report that the E3 ubiquitin ligase tripartite motif protein 30α (TRIM30α) was induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection in dendritic cells (DCs). Knockdown or genetic ablation of TRIM30α augmented the type I IFNs and interleukin-6 response to intracellular DNA and DNA viruses. Trim30α-deficient mice were more resistant to infection by DNA viruses. Biochemical analyses showed that TRIM30α interacted with the stimulator of interferon genes (STING), which is a critical regulator of the DNA-sensing response. Overexpression of TRIM30α promoted the degradation of STING via K48-linked ubiquitination at Lys275 through a proteasome-dependent pathway. These findings indicate that E3 ligase TRIM30α is an important negative-feedback regulator of innate immune responses to DNA viruses by targeting STING. PMID:26114947

  11. Protein Kinase C-{delta} mediates down-regulation of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K protein: involvement in apoptosis induction

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Feng-Hou; Wu, Ying-Li; Zhao, Meng; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2009-11-15

    We reported previously that NSC606985, a camptothecin analogue, induces apoptosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells through proteolytic activation of protein kinase C delta ({Delta}PKC-{delta}). By subcellular proteome analysis, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) was identified as being significantly down-regulated in NSC606985-treated leukemic NB4 cells. HnRNP K, a docking protein for DNA, RNA, and transcriptional or translational molecules, is implicated in a host of processes involving the regulation of gene expression. However, the molecular mechanisms of hnRNP K reduction and its roles during apoptosis are still not understood. In the present study, we found that, following the appearance of the {Delta}PKC-{delta}, hnRNP K protein was significantly down-regulated in NSC606985, doxorubicin, arsenic trioxide and ultraviolet-induced apoptosis. We further provided evidence that {Delta}PKC-{delta} mediated the down-regulation of hnRNP K protein during apoptosis: PKC-{delta} inhibitor could rescue the reduction of hnRNP K; hnRNP K failed to be decreased in PKC-{delta}-deficient apoptotic KG1a cells; conditional induction of {Delta}PKC-{delta} in U937T cells directly down-regulated hnRNP K protein. Moreover, the proteasome inhibitor also inhibited the down-regulation of hnRNP K protein by apoptosis inducer and the conditional expression of {Delta}PKC-{delta}. More intriguingly, the suppression of hnRNP K with siRNA transfection significantly induced apoptosis. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that proteolytically activated PKC-{delta} down-regulates hnRNP K protein in a proteasome-dependent manner, which plays an important role in apoptosis induction.

  12. Nutrient-induced FNIP degradation by SCFβ-TRCP regulates FLCN complex localization and promotes renal cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Katsuyuki; Fukushima, Hidefumi; Shimizu, Kouhei; Yamada, Aya; Hidaka, Masumi; Hasumi, Hisashi; Ikebe, Tetsuro; Fukumoto, Satoshi; Okabe, Koji; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-07

    Folliculin-interacting protein 1 and 2 (FNIP1 and FNIP2) play critical roles in preventing renal malignancy through their association with the tumor suppressor FLCN. Mutations in FLCN are associated with Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome, a rare disorder with increased risk of renal cancer. Recent studies indicated that FNIP1/FNIP2 double knockout mice display enlarged polycystic kidneys and renal carcinoma, which phenocopies FLCN knockout mice, suggesting that these two proteins function together to suppress renal cancer. However, the molecular mechanism functionally linking FNIP1/FNIP2 and FLCN remains largely elusive. Here, we demonstrated that FNIP2 protein is unstable and subjected to proteasome-dependent degradation via β-TRCP and Casein Kinase 1 (CK1)-directed ubiquitination in a nutrition-dependent manner. Degradation of FNIP2 leads to lysosomal dissociation of FLCN and subsequent lysosomal association of mTOR, which in turn promotes the proliferation of renal cancer cells. These results indicate that SCFβ-TRCP negatively regulates the FLCN complex by promoting FNIP degradation and provide molecular insight into the pathogenesis of BHD-associated renal cancer.

  13. The Hippo/YAP pathway interacts with EGFR signaling and HPV oncoproteins to regulate cervical cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    He, Chunbo; Mao, Dagan; Hua, Guohua; Lv, Xiangmin; Chen, Xingcheng; Angeletti, Peter C; Dong, Jixin; Remmenga, Steven W; Rodabaugh, Kerry J; Zhou, Jin; Lambert, Paul F; Yang, Peixin; Davis, John S; Wang, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway controls organ size and tumorigenesis through a kinase cascade that inactivates Yes-associated protein (YAP). Here, we show that YAP plays a central role in controlling the progression of cervical cancer. Our results suggest that YAP expression is associated with a poor prognosis for cervical cancer. TGF-α and amphiregulin (AREG), via EGFR, inhibit the Hippo signaling pathway and activate YAP to induce cervical cancer cell proliferation and migration. Activated YAP allows for up-regulation of TGF-α, AREG, and EGFR, forming a positive signaling loop to drive cervical cancer cell proliferation. HPV E6 protein, a major etiological molecule of cervical cancer, maintains high YAP protein levels in cervical cancer cells by preventing proteasome-dependent YAP degradation to drive cervical cancer cell proliferation. Results from human cervical cancer genomic databases and an accepted transgenic mouse model strongly support the clinical relevance of the discovered feed-forward signaling loop. Our study indicates that combined targeting of the Hippo and the ERBB signaling pathways represents a novel therapeutic strategy for prevention and treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:26417066

  14. Regulated Intramembrane Proteolysis and Degradation of Murine Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule mEpCAM

    PubMed Central

    Hachmeister, Matthias; Bobowski, Karolina D.; Hogl, Sebastian; Dislich, Bastian; Fukumori, Akio; Eggert, Carola; Mack, Brigitte; Kremling, Heidi; Sarrach, Sannia; Coscia, Fabian; Zimmermann, Wolfgang; Steiner, Harald; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F.; Gires, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial cell adhesion molecule EpCAM is a transmembrane glycoprotein, which is highly and frequently expressed in carcinomas and (cancer-)stem cells, and which plays an important role in the regulation of stem cell pluripotency. We show here that murine EpCAM (mEpCAM) is subject to regulated intramembrane proteolysis in various cells including embryonic stem cells and teratocarcinomas. As shown with ectopically expressed EpCAM variants, cleavages occur at α-, β-, γ-, and ε-sites to generate soluble ectodomains, soluble Aβ-like-, and intracellular fragments termed mEpEX, mEp-β, and mEpICD, respectively. Proteolytic sites in the extracellular part of mEpCAM were mapped using mass spectrometry and represent cleavages at the α- and β-sites by metalloproteases and the b-secretase BACE1, respectively. Resulting C-terminal fragments (CTF) are further processed to soluble Aβ-like fragments mEp-β and cytoplasmic mEpICD variants by the g-secretase complex. Noteworthy, cytoplasmic mEpICD fragments were subject to efficient degradation in a proteasome-dependent manner. In addition the γ-secretase complex dependent cleavage of EpCAM CTF liberates different EpICDs with different stabilities towards proteasomal degradation. Generation of CTF and EpICD fragments and the degradation of hEpICD via the proteasome were similarly demonstrated for the human EpCAM ortholog. Additional EpCAM orthologs have been unequivocally identified in silico in 52 species. Sequence comparisons across species disclosed highest homology of BACE1 cleavage sites and in presenilin-dependent γ-cleavage sites, whereas strongest heterogeneity was observed in metalloprotease cleavage sites. In summary, EpCAM is a highly conserved protein present in fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, marsupials, and placental mammals, and is subject to shedding, γ-secretase-dependent regulated intramembrane proteolysis, and proteasome-mediated degradation. PMID:24009667

  15. MKRN2 is a novel ubiquitin E3 ligase for the p65 subunit of NF-κB and negatively regulates inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Chanyoung; Ito, Yuma; Ichikawa, Shota; Tokunaga, Makio; Sakata-Sogawa, Kumiko; Tanaka, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Activation of NF-κB transcription factor is strictly regulated to prevent excessive inflammatory responses leading to immunopathology. However, it still remains unclear how NF-κB activation is negatively controlled. The PDZ-LIM domain-containing protein PDLIM2 is a nuclear ubiquitin E3 ligase targeting the p65 subunit of NF-κB for degradation, thus terminating NF-κB-mediated inflammation. Using yeast two-hybrid screening, we sought to isolate PDLIM2-interacting proteins that are critical for suppressing NF-κB signaling. Here we identified MKRN2, a RING finger domain-containing protein that belongs to the makorin ring finger protein gene family, as a novel p65 ubiquitin E3 ligase. MKRN2 bound to p65 and promoted the polyubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation of p65 through the MKRN2 RING finger domain, thereby suppressing p65-mediated NF-κB transactivation. Notably, MKRN2 and PDLIM2 synergistically promote polyubiquitination and degradation of p65. Consistently, MKRN2 knockdown in dendritic cells resulted in larger amounts of nuclear p65 and augmented production of proinflammatory cytokines in responses to innate stimuli. These results delineate a novel role of MKRN2 in negatively regulating NF-κB-mediated inflammatory responses, cooperatively with PDLIM2. PMID:28378844

  16. Mitochondrial E3 ubiquitin ligase MARCH5 controls mitochondrial fission and cell sensitivity to stress-induced apoptosis through regulation of MiD49 protein

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shan; Cherok, Edward; Das, Shweta; Li, Sunan; Roelofs, Brian A.; Ge, Shealinna X.; Polster, Brian M.; Boyman, Liron; Lederer, W. Jonathan; Wang, Chunxin; Karbowski, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin- and proteasome-dependent outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM)-associated degradation (OMMAD) is critical for mitochondrial and cellular homeostasis. However, the scope and molecular mechanisms of the OMMAD pathways are still not well understood. We report that the OMM-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase MARCH5 controls dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1)-dependent mitochondrial fission and cell sensitivity to stress-induced apoptosis. MARCH5 knockout selectively inhibited ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of MiD49, a mitochondrial receptor of Drp1, and consequently led to mitochondrial fragmentation. Mitochondrial fragmentation in MARCH5−/− cells was not associated with inhibition of mitochondrial fusion or bioenergetic defects, supporting the possibility that MARCH5 is a negative regulator of mitochondrial fission. Both MARCH5 re-expression and MiD49 knockout in MARCH5−/− cells reversed mitochondrial fragmentation and reduced sensitivity to stress-induced apoptosis. These findings and data showing MARCH5-dependent degradation of MiD49 upon stress support the possibility that MARCH5 regulation of MiD49 is a novel mechanism controlling mitochondrial fission and, consequently, the cellular response to stress. PMID:26564796

  17. Mitochondrial E3 ubiquitin ligase MARCH5 controls mitochondrial fission and cell sensitivity to stress-induced apoptosis through regulation of MiD49 protein.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shan; Cherok, Edward; Das, Shweta; Li, Sunan; Roelofs, Brian A; Ge, Shealinna X; Polster, Brian M; Boyman, Liron; Lederer, W Jonathan; Wang, Chunxin; Karbowski, Mariusz

    2016-01-15

    Ubiquitin- and proteasome-dependent outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM)-associated degradation (OMMAD) is critical for mitochondrial and cellular homeostasis. However, the scope and molecular mechanisms of the OMMAD pathways are still not well understood. We report that the OMM-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase MARCH5 controls dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1)-dependent mitochondrial fission and cell sensitivity to stress-induced apoptosis. MARCH5 knockout selectively inhibited ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of MiD49, a mitochondrial receptor of Drp1, and consequently led to mitochondrial fragmentation. Mitochondrial fragmentation in MARCH5(-/-) cells was not associated with inhibition of mitochondrial fusion or bioenergetic defects, supporting the possibility that MARCH5 is a negative regulator of mitochondrial fission. Both MARCH5 re-expression and MiD49 knockout in MARCH5(-/-) cells reversed mitochondrial fragmentation and reduced sensitivity to stress-induced apoptosis. These findings and data showing MARCH5-dependent degradation of MiD49 upon stress support the possibility that MARCH5 regulation of MiD49 is a novel mechanism controlling mitochondrial fission and, consequently, the cellular response to stress.

  18. Two waves of proteasome-dependent protein degradation in the hippocampus are required for recognition memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Luciana S; Dornelles, Arethuza S; Petry, Fernanda S; Falavigna, Lucio; Dargél, Vinicius A; Köbe, Luiza M; Aguzzoli, Cristiano; Roesler, Rafael; Schröder, Nadja

    2015-04-01

    Healthy neuronal function and synaptic modification require a concert of synthesis and degradation of proteins. Increasing evidence indicates that protein turnover mediated by proteasome activity is involved in long-term synaptic plasticity and memory. However, its role in different phases of memory remains debated, and previous studies have not examined the possible requirement of protein degradation in recognition memory. Here, we show that the proteasome inhibitor, lactacystin (LAC), infused into the CA1 area of the hippocampus at two specific time points during consolidation, impairs 24-retention of memory for object recognition in rats. Administration of LAC after retrieval did not affect retention. These findings provide the first evidence for a requirement of proteasome activity in recognition memory, indicate that protein degradation in the hippocampus is necessary during selective time windows of memory consolidation, and further our understanding of the role of protein turnover in memory formation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Proteasome-dependent cyst formation and stage-specific ubiquitin mRNA accumulation in Entamoeba invadens.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, J; Bai, G; Frevert, U; Corey, E J; Eichinger, D

    1999-09-01

    Proteases play an important role in the pathogenic mechanisms and differentiation events of protozoan parasites; the proteasome/ubiquitin system is essential for maintaining the differentiation state of many cell types. A single input of the specific inhibitor of proteasomes, lactacystin, prevented encystation of the protozoan parasite Entameoba invadens, whereas a cysteine protease inhibitor, E64, only delayed encystation. The ameba target of lactacystin was purified and it displayed the features typical of eukaryotic 20S proteasome complexes. In addition, transcripts encoding ubiquitin were detectable in trophozoites stage cells, disappeared immediately following transfer of amoebae to encystation induction medium, and reappeared at the same time during encystation as other encystation-specific transcripts. These results demonstrate that proteasome function is required during the conversion of the disease-causing trophozoite into the infectious cyst stage of Entamoeba parasites, and that ubiquitin transcript levels undergo an unusual decrease during the early stages of this differentiation process.

  20. Proteasomal-dependent aggregate reversal and absence of cell death in a conditional mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Martín-Aparicio, E; Yamamoto, A; Hernández, F; Hen, R; Avila, J; Lucas, J J

    2001-11-15

    Neuronal intranuclear inclusions are a histopathological hallmark of Huntington's disease. Nevertheless, the precise mechanism by which they are formed and their relevance to neuronal cell death and/or dysfunction remains unclear. We recently generated a conditional mouse model of Huntington's disease (HD94) in which silencing expression of mutated huntingtin led to the disappearance of intranuclear aggregates and amelioration of the behavioral phenotype. Here, we analyze primary striatal neuronal cultures from HD94 mice to explore the dynamics of aggregate formation and reversal, the possible mechanisms involved, and the correlation between aggregates and neuronal death. In parallel, we examine symptomatic adult HD94 mice in similar studies and explored the relationship between aggregate clearance and behavioral reversal. We report that, in culture, aggregate formation and reversal were rapid processes, such that 2 d of transgene expression led to aggregate formation, and 5 d of transgene suppression led to aggregate disappearance. In mice, full reversal of aggregates and intranuclear mutant huntingtin was more rapid than reported previously and preceded the motor recovery by several weeks. Furthermore, the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin inhibited the aggregate clearance observed in culture, thus indicating that aggregate formation is a balance between the rate of huntingtin synthesis and its degradation by the proteasome. Finally, neither expression of the mutant huntingtin nor aggregates compromised the viability of HD94 cultures. This correlated with the lack of cell death in symptomatic HD94 mice, thus demonstrating that neuronal dysfunction, and not cell loss, triggered by mutant huntingtin underlies symptomatology.

  1. RNF185 Is a Novel E3 Ligase of Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Degradation (ERAD) That Targets Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR)*

    PubMed Central

    El Khouri, Elma; Le Pavec, Gwenaëlle; Toledano, Michel B.; Delaunay-Moisan, Agnès

    2013-01-01

    In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), misfolded or improperly assembled proteins are exported to the cytoplasm and degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway through a process called ER-associated degradation (ERAD). ER-associated E3 ligases, which coordinate substrate recognition, export, and proteasome targeting, are key components of ERAD. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is one ERAD substrate targeted to co-translational degradation by the E3 ligase RNF5/RMA1. RNF185 is a RING domain-containing polypeptide homologous to RNF5. We show that RNF185 controls the stability of CFTR and of the CFTRΔF508 mutant in a RING- and proteasome-dependent manner but does not control that of other classical ERAD model substrates. Reciprocally, its silencing stabilizes CFTR proteins. Turnover analyses indicate that, as RNF5, RNF185 targets CFTR to co-translational degradation. Importantly, however, simultaneous depletion of RNF5 and RNF185 profoundly blocks CFTRΔF508 degradation not only during translation but also after synthesis is complete. Our data thus identify RNF185 and RNF5 as a novel E3 ligase module that is central to the control of CFTR degradation. PMID:24019521

  2. Reactivation of L1 retrotransposon by benzo(a)pyrene involves complex genetic and epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Teneng, Ivo; Montoya-Durango, Diego E; Quertermous, James L; Lacy, Mary E; Ramos, Kenneth S

    2011-03-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), is an environmental pollutant present in tobacco smoke and a byproduct of fossil fuel combustion which likely contributes to the tumorigenic processes in human cancers including lung and esophageal. Long Interspersed Nuclear Element-1 (LINE-1) or L1 is a mobile element within the mammalian genome that propagates via a "copy-and-paste" mechanism using reverse transcriptase and RNA intermediates. L1 is strongly expressed during early embryogenesis and then silenced as cells initiate differentiation programming. Although the complex transcriptional control mechanisms of L1 are not well understood, L1 reactivation has been described in several human cancers and following exposure of mouse or human cells to BaP. In this study we investigated the molecular mechanisms and epigenetic events that regulate L1 reactivation following BaP exposure. We show that challenge of HeLa cells with BaP induces early enrichment of the transcriptionally-active chromatin markers histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 4 (H3K4Me3) and histone H3 acetylated at lysine 9 (H3K9Ac), and reduces association of DNA methyltransferase-1 (DNMT1) with the L1 promoter. These changes are followed by proteasome-dependent decreases in cellular DNMT1 expression and sustained reduction of cytosine methylation within the L1 promoter CpG island. Pharmacological inhibition of the proteasome signaling pathway with the inhibitor MG132 blocks degradation of DNMT1 and alters BaP-mediated histone epigenetic modifications. We conclude that genetic reactivation of L1 by BaP involves an ordered cascade of epigenetic events that begin with nucleosomal histone modifications and is completed with alterations in DNMT1 recruitment to the L1 promoter and reduced DNA methylation of CpG islands.

  3. Caveolin-1 controls mitochondrial function through regulation of m-AAA mitochondrial protease

    PubMed Central

    Volonte, Daniela; Liu, Zhongmin; Shiva, Sruti; Galbiati, Ferruccio

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial proteases ensure mitochondrial integrity and function after oxidative stress by providing mitochondrial protein quality control. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate this basic biological function in eukaryotic cells remain largely unknown. Caveolin-1 is a scaffolding protein involved in signal transduction. We find that AFG3L2, a m-AAA type of mitochondrial protease, is a novel caveolin-1-interacting protein in vitro. We show that oxidative stress promotes the translocation of both caveolin-1 and AFG3L2 to mitochondria, enhances the interaction of caveolin-1 with AFG3L2 in mitochondria and stimulates mitochondrial protease activity in wild-type fibroblasts. Localization of AFG3L2 to mitochondria after oxidative stress is inhibited in fibroblasts lacking caveolin-1, which results in impaired mitochondrial protein quality control, an oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis switch and reduced ATP production. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that a lack of caveolin-1 does not alter either mitochondrial number or morphology but leads to the cytoplasmic and proteasome-dependent degradation of complexes I, III, IV and V upon oxidant stimulation. Restoration of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes in caveolin-1 null fibroblasts reverts the enhanced glycolysis observed in these cells. Expression of a mutant form of AFG3L2, which has reduced affinity for caveolin-1, fails to localize to mitochondria and promotes degradation of complex IV after oxidative stress. Thus, caveolin-1 maintains mitochondrial integrity and function when cells are challenged with free radicals by promoting the mitochondrial localization of m-AAA protease and its quality control functions. PMID:27705926

  4. Reactivation of L1 retrotransposon by benzo(a)pyrene involves complex genetic and epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Quertermous, James L; Lacy, Mary E

    2011-01-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), is an environmental pollutant present in tobacco smoke and a byproduct of fossil fuel combustion that likely contributes to the tumorigenic processes in human cancers including lung and esophageal. Long Interspersed Nuclear Element-1 (LINE-1) or L1 is a mobile element within the mammalian genome that propagates via a “copy-and-paste” mechanism using reverse transcriptase and RNA intermediates. L1 is strongly expressed during early embryogenesis and then silenced as cells initiate differentiation programming. Although the complex transcriptional control mechanisms of L1 are not well understood, L1 reactivation has been described in several human cancers and following exposure of mouse or human cells to BaP. In this study we investigated the molecular mechanisms and epigenetic events that regulate L1 reactivation following BaP exposure. We show that challenge of HeLa cells with BaP induces early enrichment of the transcriptionally-active chromatin markers histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 4 (H3K4Me3) and histone H3 acetylated at lysine 9 (H3K9Ac), and reduces association of DNA methyltransferase-1 (DNMT1) with the L1 promoter. These changes are followed by proteasome-dependent decreases in cellular DNMT1 expression and sustained reduction of cytosine methylation within the L1 promoter CpG island. Pharmacological inhibition of the proteasome signaling pathway with the inhibitor MG132 blocks degradation of DNMT1 and alters BaP-mediated histone epigenetic modifications. We conclude that genetic reactivation of L1 by BaP involves an ordered cascade of epigenetic events that begin with nucleosomal histone modifications and is completed with alterations in DNMT1 recruitment to the L1 promoter and reduced DNA methylation of CpG islands. PMID:21150308

  5. CHIP has a protective role against oxidative stress-induced cell death through specific regulation of Endonuclease G

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J S; Seo, T W; Yi, J H; Shin, K S; Yoo, S J

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in carcinogenesis, aging, and neurodegenerative diseases. The E3 ligase C terminus of Hsc-70 interacting protein (CHIP) has a protective role against various stresses by targeting damaged proteins for proteasomal degradation, and thus maintains protein quality control. However, the detailed mechanism by which CHIP protects cells from oxidative stress has not been demonstrated. Here, we show that depletion of CHIP led to elevated Endonuclease G (EndoG) levels and enhanced cell death upon oxidative stress. In contrast, CHIP overexpression reduced EndoG levels, and resulted in reduced or no oxidative stress-induced cell death in cancer cells and primary rat cortical neurons. Under normal conditions Hsp70 mediated the interaction between EndoG and CHIP, downregulating EndoG levels in a Hsp70/proteasome-dependent manner. However, under oxidative stress Hsp70 no longer interacted with EndoG, and the stabilized EndoG translocated to the nucleus and degraded chromosomal DNA. Our data suggest that regulation of the level of EndoG by CHIP in normal conditions may determine the sensitivity to cell death upon oxidative stress. Indeed, injection of H2O2 into the rat brain markedly increased cell death in aged mice compared with young mice, which correlated with elevated levels of EndoG and concurrent downregulation of CHIP in aged mice. Taken together, our findings demonstrate a novel protective mechanism of CHIP against oxidative stress through regulation of EndoG, and provide an opportunity to modulate oxidative stress-induced cell death in cancer and aging. PMID:23764847

  6. Adenovirus Regulates Sumoylation of Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 Components through a Paralog-Specific Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Sook-Young

    2012-01-01

    The Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex plays a key role in the DNA damage response, presenting challenges for DNA viruses and retroviruses. To inactivate this complex, adenovirus (Ad) makes use of the E1B-55K and E4-open reading frame 6 (ORF6) proteins for ubiquitin (Ub)-mediated, proteasome-dependent degradation of MRN and the E4-ORF3 protein for relocalization and sequestration of MRN within infected-cell nuclei. Here, we report that Mre11 is modified by the Ub-related modifier SUMO-2 and Nbs1 is modified by both SUMO-1 and SUMO-2. We found that Mre11 and Nbs1 are sumoylated during Ad5 infection and that the E4-ORF3 protein is necessary and sufficient to induce SUMO conjugation. Relocalization of Mre11 and Nbs1 into E4-ORF3 nuclear tracks is required for this modification to occur. E4-ORF3-mediated SUMO-1 conjugation to Nbs1 and SUMO-2 conjugation to Mre11 and Nbs1 are transient during wild-type Ad type 5 (Ad5) infection. In contrast, SUMO-1 conjugation to Nbs1 is stable in cells infected with E1B-55K or E4-ORF6 mutant viruses, suggesting that Ad regulates paralog-specific desumoylation of Nbs1. Inhibition of viral DNA replication blocks deconjugation of SUMO-2 from Mre11 and Nbs1, indicating that a late-phase process is involved in Mre11 and Nbs1 desumoylation. Our results provide direct evidence of Mre11 and Nbs1 sumoylation induced by the Ad5 E4-ORF3 protein and an important example showing that modification of a single substrate by both SUMO-1 and SUMO-2 is regulated through distinct mechanisms. Our findings suggest how E4-ORF3-mediated relocalization of the MRN complex influences the cellular DNA damage response. PMID:22740413

  7. Q6, a novel hypoxia-targeted drug, regulates hypoxia-inducible factor signaling via an autophagy-dependent mechanism in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Wen; Cai, Tian-Yu; Zhu, Hong; Cao, Ji; Su, Yi; Hu, Yong-Zhou; He, Qiao-Jun; Yang, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia underlies treatment failure and yields more aggressive and metastatic cancer phenotypes. Although therapeutically targeting these hypoxic environments has been proposed for many years, to date no approaches have shown the therapeutic value to gain regulatory approval. Here, we demonstrated that a novel hypoxia-activated prodrug, Q6, exhibits potent antiproliferative efficacy under hypoxic conditions and induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in 2 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines, with no obvious toxicity being detected in 2 normal liver cell lines. Treatment with Q6 markedly downregulated HIF1A [hypoxia inducible factor 1, α subunit (basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor)] expression and transcription of the downstream target gene, VEGFA (vascular endothelial growth factor A). This dual hypoxia-targeted modulation mechanism leads to high potency in suppressing tumor growth and vascularization in 2 in vivo models. Intriguingly, it is the autophagy-dependent degradation pathway that plays a crucial role in Q6-induced attenuation of HIF1A expression, rather than the proteasome-dependent pathway, which is normally regarded as the predominant mechanism underlying posttranslational regulation of HIF1A. Inhibition of autophagy, either by short interfering RNA (siRNA) or by chemical inhibitors, blocked Q6-induced HIF1A degradation. Autophagic degradation of HIF1A was further confirmed by the observation that HIF1A coimmunoprecipitated with the ubiquitin-binding adaptor protein, SQSTM1, which is degraded through autophagy. Additionally, silencing of SQSTM1 inhibited Q6-induced HIF1A degradation. These findings suggest that the novel hypoxia-targeted agent, Q6, has potential clinical value in the therapy of HCC. Furthermore, the identification of autophagy as a crucial regulator of HIF1A provides new insights into hypoxia-related treatments.

  8. beta-Arrestins facilitate ubiquitin-dependent degradation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) and attenuate H2O2-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengping; Hao, Jiaying; Zhao, Zhihui; Ben, Peiling; Fang, Fang; Shi, Lijun; Gao, Yanhong; Liu, Junhong; Wen, Chuanjun; Luo, Lan; Yin, Zhimin

    2009-07-01

    beta-Arrestins are ubiquitously expressed proteins that play important roles in receptor desensitization, endocytosis, proteosomal degradation, apoptosis and signaling. It has been reported that beta-Arrestin2 acts as a scaffold by directly interacting with the JNK3 isoform and recruiting MKK4 and the apoptosis-signaling kinase-1 (ASK1). Here, we report a novel function of beta-Arrestins in regulating H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis. Our study demonstrates that beta-Arrestins physically associate with C-terminal domain of ASK1, and moreover, both over-expression and RNA interference (RNAi) experiments indicate that beta-Arrestins down-regulate ASK1 protein. In detail, beta-Arrestin-induced reduction of ASK1 protein is due to ubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation of ASK1 in response to association of beta-Arrestins and ASK1. Upon H(2)O(2) stimulation, the protein binding between beta-Arrestins and ASK1 increases and ASK1 degradation is expedited. In consequence, beta-Arrestins prevent ASK1-JNK signaling and as a result attenuate H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis. Structurally, C-terminal domain of ASK1 is essential for beta-Arrestins and ASK1 association. We also found that CHIP is required for beta-Arrestins-induced ASK1 degradation, which suggested that beta-Arrestins function as a scaffold of ASK1 and CHIP, leading to CHIP-mediated ASK1 degradation. All these findings indicate that beta-Arrestins play a negative regulatory role in H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis signaling through associating with ASK1 and CHIP and facilitating ASK1 degradation, which provides a new insight for analyzing the effects of beta-Arrestins on protecting cells from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis.

  9. VOLTAGE REGULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Von Eschen, R.L.; Scheele, P.F.

    1962-04-24

    A transistorized voltage regulator which provides very close voitage regulation up to about 180 deg F is described. A diode in the positive line provides a constant voltage drop from the input to a regulating transistor emitter. An amplifier is coupled to the positive line through a resistor and is connected between a difference circuit and the regulating transistor base which is negative due to the difference in voltage drop across thc diode and the resistor so that a change in the regulator output causes the amplifier to increase or decrease the base voltage and current and incrcase or decrease the transistor impedance to return the regulator output to normal. (AEC)

  10. Arabidopsis ETO1 specifically interacts with and negatively regulates type 2 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Hitoshi; Nagata, Masayasu; Saito, Koji; Wang, Kevin LC; Ecker, Joseph R

    2005-01-01

    Background In Arabidopsis, ETO1 (ETHYLENE-OVERPRODUCER1) is a negative regulator of ethylene evolution by interacting with AtACS5, an isoform of the rate-limiting enzyme, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases (ACC synthase or ACS), in ethylene biosynthetic pathway. ETO1 directly inhibits the enzymatic activity of AtACS5. In addition, a specific interaction between ETO1 and AtCUL3, a constituent of a new type of E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, suggests the molecular mechanism in promoting AtACS5 degradation by the proteasome-dependent pathway. Because orthologous sequences to ETO1 are found in many plant species including tomato, we transformed tomato with Arabidopsis ETO1 to evaluate its ability to suppress ethylene production in tomato fruits. Results Transgenic tomato lines that overexpress Arabidopsis ETO1 (ETO1-OE) did not show a significant delay of fruit ripening. So, we performed yeast two-hybrid assays to investigate potential heterologous interaction between ETO1 and three isozymes of ACC synthases from tomato. In the yeast two-hybrid system, ETO1 interacts with LE-ACS3 as well as AtACS5 but not with LE-ACS2 or LE-ACS4, two major isozymes whose gene expression is induced markedly in ripening fruits. According to the classification of ACC synthases, which is based on the C-terminal amino acid sequences, both LE-ACS3 and AtACS5 are categorized as type 2 isozymes and possess a consensus C-terminal sequence. In contrast, LE-ACS2 and LE-ACS4 are type 1 and type 3 isozymes, respectively, both of which do not possess this specific C-terminal sequence. Yeast two-hybrid analysis using chimeric constructs between LE-ACS2 and LE-ACS3 revealed that the type-2-ACS-specific C-terminal tail is required for interaction with ETO1. When treated with auxin to induce LE-ACS3, seedlings of ETO1-OE produced less ethylene than the wild type, despite comparable expression of the LE-ACS3 gene in the wild type. Conclusion These results suggest that ETO1 family proteins

  11. Molecular and cellular roles of PI31 (PSMF1) protein in regulation of proteasome function.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohua; Thompson, David; Kumar, Brajesh; DeMartino, George N

    2014-06-20

    We investigated molecular features and cellular roles of PI31 (PSMF1) on regulation of proteasome function. PI31 has a C-terminal HbYX (where Hb is a hydrophobic amino acid, Y is tyrosine, and X is any amino acid) motif characteristic of several proteasome activators. Peptides corresponding to the PI31 C terminus also bind to and activate the 20 S proteasome in an HbYX-dependent manner, but intact PI31protein inhibits in vitro 20 S activity. Binding to and inhibition of the proteasome by PI31 are conferred by the HbYX-containing proline-rich C-terminal domain but do not require HbYX residues. Thus, multiple regions of PI31 bind independently to the proteasome and collectively determine effects on activity. PI31 blocks the ATP-dependent in vitro assembly of 26 S proteasome from 20 S proteasome and PA700 subcomplexes but has no effect on in vitro activity of the intact 26 S proteasome. To determine the physiologic significance of these in vitro effects, we assessed multiple aspects of cellular proteasome content and function after altering PI31 levels. We detected no change in overall cellular proteasome content or function when PI31 levels were either increased by moderate ectopic overexpression or decreased by RNA interference (RNAi). We also failed to identify a role of PI31 ADP-ribosylation as a mechanism for regulation of overall 26 S proteasome content and function, as recently proposed. Thus, despite its in vitro effects on various proteasome activities and its structural relationship to established proteasome regulators, cellular roles and mechanisms of PI31 in regulation of proteasome function remain unclear and require future definition. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Molecular and Cellular Roles of PI31 (PSMF1) Protein in Regulation of Proteasome Function*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohua; Thompson, David; Kumar, Brajesh; DeMartino, George N.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated molecular features and cellular roles of PI31 (PSMF1) on regulation of proteasome function. PI31 has a C-terminal HbYX (where Hb is a hydrophobic amino acid, Y is tyrosine, and X is any amino acid) motif characteristic of several proteasome activators. Peptides corresponding to the PI31 C terminus also bind to and activate the 20 S proteasome in an HbYX-dependent manner, but intact PI31protein inhibits in vitro 20 S activity. Binding to and inhibition of the proteasome by PI31 are conferred by the HbYX-containing proline-rich C-terminal domain but do not require HbYX residues. Thus, multiple regions of PI31 bind independently to the proteasome and collectively determine effects on activity. PI31 blocks the ATP-dependent in vitro assembly of 26 S proteasome from 20 S proteasome and PA700 subcomplexes but has no effect on in vitro activity of the intact 26 S proteasome. To determine the physiologic significance of these in vitro effects, we assessed multiple aspects of cellular proteasome content and function after altering PI31 levels. We detected no change in overall cellular proteasome content or function when PI31 levels were either increased by moderate ectopic overexpression or decreased by RNA interference (RNAi). We also failed to identify a role of PI31 ADP-ribosylation as a mechanism for regulation of overall 26 S proteasome content and function, as recently proposed. Thus, despite its in vitro effects on various proteasome activities and its structural relationship to established proteasome regulators, cellular roles and mechanisms of PI31 in regulation of proteasome function remain unclear and require future definition. PMID:24770418

  13. Beta-amyloid oligomers induce early loss of presynaptic proteins in primary neurons by caspase-dependent and proteasome-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jang, Bong Geum; In, Sua; Choi, Boyoung; Kim, Min-Ju

    2014-11-12

    Beta-amyloid is a major pathogenic molecule for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and can be aggregated into a soluble oligomer, which is a toxic intermediate, before amyloid fibril formation. Beta-amyloid oligomers are associated closely with early synaptic loss in AD. However, it is still unknown which synaptic proteins are involved in the synaptotoxicity, and a direct comparison among the synaptic proteins should also be addressed. Here, we investigated changes in the expression of several presynaptic and postsynaptic proteins in primary neurons after treatment with a low-molecular weight and a high-molecular weight beta-amyloid oligomer. Both oligomers induced early neuronal dysfunction after 4 h and significantly reduced presynaptic protein (synaptophysin, syntaxin, synapsin, and synaptotagmin) expression. However, the expression of postsynaptic proteins (PSD95, NMDAR2A/B, and GluR2/3), except NMDAR1 was not reduced, and some protein expression levels were increased. Glutamate treatment, which is correlated with postsynaptic activation, showed more postsynaptic-specific protein loss compared with beta-amyloid oligomer treatment. Finally, the caspase inhibitor zVAD and the proteasomal inhibitor MG132 attenuated presynaptic protein loss. Thus, our data showed changes in synaptic proteins by beta-amyloid oligomers, which provides an understanding of early synaptotoxicity and suggests new approaches for AD treatment.

  14. Processing and MHC class II presentation of exogenous soluble antigen involving a proteasome-dependent cytosolic pathway in CD40-activated B cells.

    PubMed

    Becker, Hans Jiro; Kondo, Eisei; Shimabukuro-Vornhagen, Alexander; Theurich, Sebastian; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael S

    2016-08-01

    Activated B cells have the capacity to present antigen and induce immune responses as potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs). As in other APCs, antigen presentation by B cells involves antigen internalization, antigen processing, and peptide loading onto MHC molecules. However, while the mechanism of antigen processing has been studied extensively in other APCs, this pathway remains elusive in B cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the MHC class II processing pathway in CD40-activated B cells (CD40Bs), as a model for activated, antigen-presenting B cells. Using CMV pp65 as a model antigen, we evaluated processing and presentation of the CD4 + T-cell epitope 509-523 (K509) by human CD40Bs in ELISPOT assays. As expected, stimulation of specific CD4 + T-cell clones was attenuated after pretreatment of CD40Bs with inhibitors of classic class II pathway components. However, proteasome inhibitors such as epoxomicin limited antigen presentation as well. This suggests that the antigen is processed in a non-classical, cytosolic MHC class II pathway. Further experiments with truncated protein variants revealed involvement of the proteasome in processing of the N and C extensions of the epitope. Access to the cytosol was shown to be size dependent. Epoxomicin sensitivity exclusively in CD40B cells, but not in dendritic cells, suggests a novel processing mechanism unique to this APC. Our data suggest that B cells process antigen using a distinct, non-classical class II pathway.

  15. Refining the minimal sequence required for ERK1/2-dependent poly-ubiquitination and proteasome-dependent turnover of BIM.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Ceri M; Johnson, Mark; Cook, Simon J

    2010-05-01

    The pro-apoptotic protein BIM(EL) is phosphorylated by ERK1/2 and this targets the protein for poly-ubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome as a survival mechanism. To define in greater detail the sequence determinants required for BIM(EL) turnover we have compared various BIM splice variants and truncation mutants. Of the naturally occurring splice variants BIMbeta1, which lacks the C-terminal hydrophobic domain, the BH3 domain and is cytosolic, exhibited the fastest turnover rate. Indeed, neither the C-terminus, the BH3 domain nor the DLC1 binding region was required for poly-ubiquitination and turnover of BIM. However, we demonstrate that a region consisting of the ERK1/2 docking domain, ERK1/2 phosphorylation sites and either of the two potential ubiquitin-acceptor lysine residues is sufficient to allow poly-ubiquitination and turnover of BIM. In the process we demonstrate that the C-terminal hydrophobic domain, previously suggested to be important in membrane localisation, is as important as the BH3 domain for BIM to induce cell death; similarly, the pro-death BH3-domain can also confer correct mitochondrial localisation in the absence of the C-terminus. These results refine the minimal sequence for ERK1/2-driven degradation and further define the functional importance of key regions within BIM(EL), highlighting the complexity of this pro-apoptotic protein.

  16. Rapid turnover of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3

    PubMed Central

    Azzu, Vian; Mookerjee, Shona A.; Brand, Martin D.

    2013-01-01

    UCP3 (uncoupling protein 3) and its homologues UCP2 and UCP1 are regulators of mitochondrial function. UCP2 is known to have a short half-life of approx. 1 h, owing to its rapid degradation by the cytosolic 26S proteasome, whereas UCP1 is turned over much more slowly by mitochondrial autophagy. In the present study we investigate whether UCP3 also has a short half-life, and whether the proteasome is involved inUCP3 degradation. UCP3 half-life was examined in the mouse C2C12 myoblast cell line by inhibiting protein synthesis with cycloheximide and monitoring UCP3 protein levels by immunoblot analysis. We show that UCP3 has a short half-life of 0.5–4 h. Rapid degradation was prevented by a cocktail of proteasome inhibitors, supporting a proteasomal mechanism for turnover. In addition, this phenotype is recapitulated in vitro: UCP3 was degraded in mitochondria isolated from rat skeletal muscle or brown adipose tissue with a half-life of 0.5–4 h, but only in the presence of a purified 26S proteasomal fraction. This in vitro proteolysis was also sensitive to proteasome inhibition. This phenotype is in direct contrast with the related proteins UCP1 and the adenine nucleotide translocase, which have long half-lives. Therefore UCP3 is turned over rapidly in multiple cell types in a proteasome-dependent manner. PMID:19954423

  17. Evolution of Proteasome Regulators in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Fort, Philippe; Kajava, Andrey V.; Delsuc, Fredéric; Coux, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    All living organisms require protein degradation to terminate biological processes and remove damaged proteins. One such machine is the 20S proteasome, a specialized barrel-shaped and compartmentalized multicatalytic protease. The activity of the 20S proteasome generally requires the binding of regulators/proteasome activators (PAs), which control the entrance of substrates. These include the PA700 (19S complex), which assembles with the 20S and forms the 26S proteasome and allows the efficient degradation of proteins usually labeled by ubiquitin tags, PA200 and PA28, which are involved in proteolysis through ubiquitin-independent mechanisms and PI31, which was initially identified as a 20S inhibitor in vitro. Unlike 20S proteasome, shown to be present in all Eukaryotes and Archaea, the evolutionary history of PAs remained fragmentary. Here, we made a comprehensive survey and phylogenetic analyses of the four types of regulators in 17 clades covering most of the eukaryotic supergroups. We found remarkable conservation of each PA700 subunit in all eukaryotes, indicating that the current complex PA700 structure was already set up in the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA). Also present in LECA, PA200, PA28, and PI31 showed a more contrasted evolutionary picture, because many lineages have subsequently lost one or two of them. The paramount conservation of PA700 composition in all eukaryotes and the dynamic evolution of PA200, PA28, and PI31 are discussed in the light of current knowledge on their physiological roles. PMID:25943340

  18. Evolution of proteasome regulators in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Fort, Philippe; Kajava, Andrey V; Delsuc, Fredéric; Coux, Olivier

    2015-05-04

    All living organisms require protein degradation to terminate biological processes and remove damaged proteins. One such machine is the 20S proteasome, a specialized barrel-shaped and compartmentalized multicatalytic protease. The activity of the 20S proteasome generally requires the binding of regulators/proteasome activators (PAs), which control the entrance of substrates. These include the PA700 (19S complex), which assembles with the 20S and forms the 26S proteasome and allows the efficient degradation of proteins usually labeled by ubiquitin tags, PA200 and PA28, which are involved in proteolysis through ubiquitin-independent mechanisms and PI31, which was initially identified as a 20S inhibitor in vitro. Unlike 20S proteasome, shown to be present in all Eukaryotes and Archaea, the evolutionary history of PAs remained fragmentary. Here, we made a comprehensive survey and phylogenetic analyses of the four types of regulators in 17 clades covering most of the eukaryotic supergroups. We found remarkable conservation of each PA700 subunit in all eukaryotes, indicating that the current complex PA700 structure was already set up in the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA). Also present in LECA, PA200, PA28, and PI31 showed a more contrasted evolutionary picture, because many lineages have subsequently lost one or two of them. The paramount conservation of PA700 composition in all eukaryotes and the dynamic evolution of PA200, PA28, and PI31 are discussed in the light of current knowledge on their physiological roles.

  19. CK2 phosphorylation of SAG at Thr10 regulates SAG stability, but not its E3 ligase activity.

    PubMed

    He, Hongbin; Tan, Mingjia; Pamarthy, Deepika; Wang, Guixia; Ahmed, Khalil; Sun, Yi

    2007-01-01

    Sensitive to Apoptosis Gene (SAG), a RING component of SCF E3 ubiquitin ligase, was shown to be phosphorylated by protein kinase CK2 at the Thr10 residue. It is, however, unknown whether this phosphorylation is stress-responsive or whether the phosphorylation changes its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. To address these, we made a specific antibody against the phosphor-SAG(Thr10). Transient transfection experiment showed that SAG was phosphorylated at Thr10 which can be significantly inhibited by TBB, a relatively specific inhibitor of protein kinase CK2. To determine whether this SAG phosphorylation is stress-responsive, we defined a chemical-hypoxia condition in which SAG and CK2 were both induced. Under this condition, we failed to detect SAG phosphorylation at Thr10, which was readily detected, however, in the presence of MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, suggesting that the phosphorylated SAG has undergone a rapid degradation. To further define this, we made two SAG mutants, SAG-T10A which abolishes the SAG phosphorylation and SAG-T10E, which mimics the constitutive SAG phosphorylation. The half-life study revealed that indeed, SAG-T10E has a much shorter protein half-life (2 h), as compared to wild-type SAG (10 h). Again, rapid degradation of SAG-T10E in cells can be blocked by MG132. Thus, it appears that CK2-induced SAG phosphorylation at Thr10 regulates its stability through a proteasome-dependent pathway. Immunocytochemistry study showed that SAG as well as its phosphorylation mutants, was mainly localized in nucleus and lightly in cytoplasm. Hypoxia condition did not change their sub-cellular localization. Finally, an in vitro ubiqutination assay showed that SAG mutation at Thr10 did not change its E3 ligase activity when complexed with cullin-1. These studies suggested that CK2 might regulate SAG-SCF E3 ligase activity through modulating SAG's stability, rather than its enzymatic activity directly.

  20. NORM regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.

    1997-02-01

    The author reviews the question of regulation for naturally occuring radioactive material (NORM), and the factors that have made this a more prominent concern today. Past practices have been very relaxed, and have often involved very poor records, the involvment of contractors, and the disposition of contaminated equipment back into commercial service. The rationale behind the establishment of regulations is to provide worker protection, to exempt low risk materials, to aid in scrap recycling, to provide direction for remediation and to examine disposal options. The author reviews existing regulations at federal and state levels, impending legislation, and touches on the issue of site remediation and potential liabilities affecting the release of sites contaminated by NORM.

  1. Heat shock protein 90 is involved in the regulation of HMGA2-driven growth and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Chun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    High Mobility Group AT-hook 2 (HMGA2) is a nonhistone chromatin-binding protein which acts as a transcriptional regulating factor involved in gene transcription. In particular, overexpression of HMGA2 has been demonstrated to associate with neoplastic transformation and tumor progression in Colorectal Cancer (CRC). Thus, HMGA2 is a potential therapeutic target in cancer therapy. Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90) is a chaperone protein required for the stability and function for a number of proteins that promote the growth, mobility, and survival of cancer cells. Moreover, it has shown strong positive connections were observed between Hsp90 inhibitors and CRC, which indicated their potential for use in CRC treatment by using combination of data mining and experimental designs. However, little is known about the effect of Hsp90 inhibition on HMGA2 protein expression in CRC. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that Hsp90 may regulate HMGA2 expression and investigated the relationship between Hsp90 and HMGA2 signaling. The use of the second-generation Hsp90 inhibitor, NVP-AUY922, considerably knocked down HMGA2 expression, and the effects of Hsp90 and HMGA2 knockdown were similar. In addition, Hsp90 knockdown abrogates colocalization of Hsp90 and HMGA2 in CRC cells. Moreover, the suppression of HMGA2 protein expression in response to NVP-AUY922 treatment resulted in ubiquitination and subsequent proteasome-dependant degradation of HMGA2. Furthermore, RNAi-mediated silencing of HMGA2 reduced the survival of CRC cells and increased the sensitivity of these cells to chemotherapy. Finally, we found that the NVP-AUY922-dependent mitigation of HMGA2 signaling occurred also through indirect reactivation of the tumor suppressor microRNA (miRNA), let-7a, or the inhibition of ERK-regulated HMGA2 involved in regulating the growth of CRC cells. Collectively, our studies identify the crucial role for the Hsp90-HMGA2 interaction in maintaining CRC cell survival and migration. These

  2. Light involved regulation of BZR1 stability andphosphorylation statusto coordinate plant growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian-Feng; Huang, Li-Chun; Wei, Ke; Yu, Jia-Wen; Zhang, Chang-Quan; Liu, Qiao-Quan

    2017-04-10

    Light and Brassinosteroid (BR) are master environmental stimulus and endogenous cue for plant growth and development, respectively. Great progress has been made in elucidating the molecular mechanisms on the crosstalk between light and BR. However, little is known about how BZR1, the pivotal integration node, is regulated by light and dark. Here, we demonstrated that an intact BR signaling pathway is essential for dark-induced hypocotyl elongation. Consequent expression assay showed that light-dark switch affected BZR1 phosphorylation and accumulation. Moreover, blocking the 26S proteasome pathway promoted the accumulation of both phosphorylated and dephosphorylated BZR1 proteins. Restriction of new protein biosynthesis had multiple effects on BZR1 phosphorylation status and stability, relying on the availability of light and the 26S proteasome pathways. Furthermore, sugar treatment strikingly enhanced the accumulation of total BZR1 under either light or dark conditions, likely by repressing transcript abundance of MAX2 , a gene encoding an E3 ligase for BZR1. Finally, light regulated phosphorylation change of BZR1 requires the existence of endogenous BR as well as functional BIN2 and PP2A. Taken together, our results depicted a light-involved complex regulation network of BZR1 stability and phosphorylation status.

  3. The p38-interacting Protein (p38IP) Regulates G2/M Progression by Promoting α-Tubulin Acetylation via Inhibiting Ubiquitination-induced Degradation of the Acetyltransferase GCN5*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Xu-Dong; Li, Yue-Fang; Han, Jiahuai; Li, Yingqiu

    2013-01-01

    p38-interacting protein (p38IP) is a component of the GCN5 histone acetyltransferase-containing coactivator complex (GCN5-SAGA complex). It remains unclear whether p38IP or GCN5-SAGA is involved in cell cycle regulation. Using RNA interference to knock down p38IP, we observed that cells were arrested at the G2/M phase, exhibiting accumulation of cyclins, shrunken spindles, and hypoacetylation of α-tubulin. Further analysis revealed that knockdown of p38IP led to proteasome-dependent degradation of GCN5. GCN5 associated with and acetylated α-tubulin, and recovering GCN5 protein levels in p38IP knockdown cells by ectopic expression of GCN5 efficiently reversed α-tubulin hypoacetylation and G2/M arrest. During the G2/M transition, the association of α-tubulin with GCN5 increased, and the acetylation of α-tubulin reached a peak. Biochemical analyses demonstrated that the interaction between p38IP and GCN5 depended on the p38IP N terminus (1–381 amino acids) and GCN5 histone acetyltransferase domain and bromodomain. The p38IP N terminus could effectively reverse p38IP depletion-induced GCN5 degradation, thus recovering α-tubulin acetylation and G2/M progression. p38IP-mediated suppression of GCN5 ubiquitination most likely occurs via nuclear sequestration of GCN5. Our data indicate that the GCN5-SAGA complex is required for G2/M progression, mainly because p38IP promotes the acetylation of α-tubulin by preventing the degradation of GCN5, in turn facilitating the formation of the mitotic spindle. PMID:24220028

  4. The ubiquitin-proteasome system regulates plant hormone signaling

    PubMed Central

    Santner, Aaron; Estelle, Mark

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Plants utilize the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) to modulate nearly every aspect of growth and development. Ubiquitin is covalently attached to target proteins through the action of three enzymes known as E1, E2, and E3. The ultimate outcome of this post-translational modification depends on the nature of the ubiquitin linkage and the extent of polyubiquitination. In most cases, ubiquitination results in degradation of the target protein in the 26S proteasome. During the last 10 years it has become clear that the UPS plays a prominent regulatory role in hormone biology. E3 ubiquitin ligases in particular actively participate in hormone perception, de-repression of hormone signaling pathways, degradation of hormone specific transcription factors, and regulation of hormone biosynthesis. It is certain that additional functions will be discovered as more of the nearly 1200 potential E3s in plants are elucidated. PMID:20409276

  5. How the ubiquitin proteasome system regulates the regulators of transcription.

    PubMed

    Ee, Gary; Lehming, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system plays an important role in transcription. Monoubiquitination of activators is believed to aid their function, while the 26S proteasomal degradation of repressors is believed to restrict their function. What remains controversial is the question of whether the degradation of activators aids or restricts their function.

  6. Temperature regulation.

    PubMed

    Cabanac, M

    1975-01-01

    The general way of looking at short-term temperature regulation has not fundamentaly changed since 1968. Some points nevertheless have been developed and deserve special attention: 1. The influence of water on the skin surface inhibits sweat secretion (55, 106). This fact may be the explanation of sweating fatigue and of discordant conclusions regarding the functioning of the regulator, particularly during exercise in man. 2. Since a large number of studies have shown that appropriate behaviors occur in response to all the stimuli that activate autonomic responses, behavior itself should be considered as an integral part of the thermoregulatory system (1, 2, 16, 18, 19, 21, 23, 25, 31, 32, 34-36, 48, 88, 89, 98, 99, 122, 126, 127, 137). 3. The description of the peripheral input for the control of sweating with regard to mean skin temperature (104) and time dependence (159) has been improved. Among internal temperature sensors those of the spinal cord have been extensively studies (25, 27, 32, 36, 42, 59-63, 71-75, 82, 83, 86, 113-115, 121, 150, 158) and demonstrated to have a sensitivity equal to that of the hypothalamic sensors (73, 75). 4. New hypotheses have been proposed describing the overall mechanism responsible for a constant temperature in the core (58, 96, 97, 135). These stimulating theories have been discussed briefly herein. Mechanisms for the defense against heat and against cold can be dissociated completely from one another. In the same way the control of autonomic responses can be dissociated from the control of behavioral responses. This suggests that temperature regulation is brought about by multiple independent feedback loops. The overall system is well described, in the author's opinion, by the theory of the adjustable set point with proportional control (47).

  7. Regulated Pollutant

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the Title V air operating permit regulations. This document is part of the Title V Policy and Guidance Database available at www2.epa.gov/title-v-operating-permits/title-v-operating-permit-policy-and-guidance-document-index. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  8. Regulated Pollutant

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  9. PSD Regulations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  10. Roles of UV-damaged DNA binding protein 1 (DDB1) in epigenetically modifying multiple traits of agronomic importance in tomato.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Jikai; Huang, Shengxiong; Shi, Wei; Miao, Min; Tang, Dan Feng; Niu, Xiangli; Xiao, Fangming; Liu, Yongsheng

    2012-12-01

    Epigenetic regulation participates broadly in many fundamentally cellular and physiological processes. In this study, we found that DDB1, a protein originally identified as a factor involved in DNA repairing, plays important roles in regulating organ size, growth habit and photosynthesis in tomato via an epigenetic manner. We generated transgenic tomato plants overexpressing an alternatively spliced DDB1 transcript (DDB1(F) , prevalently present in tomato tissues) and found the primary transformants displayed small-fruited "cherry tomato" in companion with strikingly enhanced shoot branching and biomass, dark-green leaves with elevated chlorophyll accumulation, and increased soluble solids in fruits. Significantly, these phenotypic alterations did not segregate with the DDB1(F) transgene in subsequent generations, suggesting that the effect of DDB1(F) on multiple agronomic traits is implemented via an epigenetic manner and is inheritable over generations. We speculate that DDB1, as a core subunit in the recently identified CUL4-based E3 ligase complex, mediates the 26S proteasome-dependent degradation of a large number of proteins, some of which might be required for perpetuating epigenetic marks on chromatins.

  11. Proteasome, but Not Autophagy, Disruption Results in Severe Eye and Wing Dysmorphia: A Subunit- and Regulator-Dependent Process in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Pantazi, Asimina D.; Mpakou, Vassiliki E.; Zervas, Christos G.; Papassideri, Issidora S.; Stravopodis, Dimitrios J.

    2013-01-01

    Proteasome-dependent and autophagy-mediated degradation of eukaryotic cellular proteins represent the two major proteostatic mechanisms that are critically implicated in a number of signaling pathways and cellular processes. Deregulation of functions engaged in protein elimination frequently leads to development of morbid states and diseases. In this context, and through the utilization of GAL4/UAS genetic tool, we herein examined the in vivo contribution of proteasome and autophagy systems in Drosophila eye and wing morphogenesis. By exploiting the ability of GAL4-ninaE. GMR and P{GawB}BxMS1096 genetic drivers to be strongly and preferentially expressed in the eye and wing discs, respectively, we proved that proteasomal integrity and ubiquitination proficiency essentially control fly’s eye and wing development. Indeed, subunit- and regulator-specific patterns of severe organ dysmorphia were obtained after the RNAi-induced downregulation of critical proteasome components (Rpn1, Rpn2, α5, β5 and β6) or distinct protein-ubiquitin conjugators (UbcD6, but not UbcD1 and UbcD4). Proteasome deficient eyes presented with either rough phenotypes or strongly dysmorphic shapes, while transgenic mutant wings were severely folded and carried blistered structures together with loss of vein differentiation. Moreover, transgenic fly eyes overexpressing the UBP2-yeast deubiquitinase enzyme were characterized by an eyeless-like phenotype. Therefore, the proteasome/ubiquitin proteolytic activities are undoubtedly required for the normal course of eye and wing development. In contrast, the RNAi-mediated downregulation of critical Atg (1, 4, 7, 9 and 18) autophagic proteins revealed their non-essential, or redundant, functional roles in Drosophila eye and wing formation under physiological growth conditions, since their reduced expression levels could only marginally disturb wing’s, but not eye’s, morphogenetic organization and architecture. However, Atg9 proved indispensable

  12. Importance of the regulation of nuclear receptor degradation.

    PubMed

    Dennis, A P; Haq, R U; Nawaz, Z

    2001-08-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) represent a superfamily of structurally related ligand-activated transcription factors, which regulate diverse biological activities like growth, development, and homeostasis. Recently, it has been demonstrated that certain members of the NHR superfamily are degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in a ligand-dependent manner. Though the signal for the down-regulation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is not yet known, phosphorylation at specific amino acid residues or coactivator binding to receptors could lead to their degradation by the 26S proteasome. Activation and degradation seems to be an engineered cyclic mechanism, which provides tight control over diverse cellular processes. The degradation process involves extensive loss of proteins and requires expenditure of cellular ATP. That seems to be inevitable for a more important aim, that is efficient and appropriate regulation of transcription. Down-regulation of receptors would lead to an attenuated transcriptional response because the number of receptor molecules available to activate transcription would decrease over time. One of the obvious reasons for down-regulating NHRs thus seems to be to prevent the cell from overstimulation by the hormones or other activating signals. Nuclear receptor turnover may also reset the transcriptional apparatus in preparation for a subsequent response. Since inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome degradation pathway disturbs the transcriptional activitity of some of the nuclear receptors such as estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptors, it is also possible that the degradation of NHRs may enable recycling of components of receptor-cofactor complexes and general transcriptional machinary. Understanding the mechanism of nuclear hormone receptor degradation and its relation to transcription may lead to novel insights of therapuetic intervention.

  13. Decoding ubiquitin sorting signals for clathrin-dependent endocytosis by CLASPs.

    PubMed

    Traub, Linton M; Lukacs, Gergely L

    2007-02-15

    Cargo selectivity is a hallmark of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. A wide range of structurally unrelated internalization signals specify the preferential clustering of transmembrane cargo into clathrin coats forming on the plasma membrane. Intriguingly, the classical endocytic adaptor AP-2 appears to recognize only a subset of these endocytic sorting signals. New data now reveal the molecular basis for recognition of other internalization signals, including post-translationally appended ubiquitin, by clathrin-coat-associated sorting proteins (CLASPs). Curiously, structurally related ubiquitin-recognition modules are shared by select CLASPs and the 26S proteasome, and recent work indicates that both display similar requirements for ubiquitin binding. During endocytosis, these modules engage oligoubiquitylated cargo in the form of polyubiquitin chains and/or multiple single ubiquitin molecules appended to different acceptor lysines. Functional separation between clathrin-mediated endocytosis and proteasome-dependent proteolysis is probably ensured by temporally regulated, local assembly of ubiquitin-tagged membrane cargo at sorting stations on the cell surface, shielding ubiquitin sorting signals from the proteasome. Thus, an expanded repertoire of CLASPs couples the process of clathrin-coat assembly with high-fidelity incorporation of assorted, cargo-specific sorting signals.

  14. RelA/p65 Regulation of IκBβ

    PubMed Central

    Hertlein, Erin; Wang, Jingxin; Ladner, Katherine J.; Bakkar, Nadine; Guttridge, Denis C.

    2005-01-01

    IκB inhibitor proteins are the primary regulators of NF-κB. In contrast to the defined regulatory interplay between NF-κB and IκBα, much less is known regarding the regulation of IκBβ by NF-κB. Here, we describe in detail the regulation of IκBβ by RelA/p65. Using p65−/− fibroblasts, we show that IκBβ is profoundly reduced in these cells, but not in other NF-κB subunit knockouts. This regulation prevails during embryonic and postnatal development in a tissue-specific manner. Significantly, in both p65−/− cells and tissues, IκBα is also reduced, but not nearly to the same extent as IκBβ, thus highlighting the degree to which IκBβ is dependent on p65. This dependence is based on the ability of p65 to stabilize IκBβ protein from the 26S proteasome, a process mediated in large part through the p65 carboxyl terminus. Furthermore, IκBβ was found to exist in both a basally phosphorylated and a hyperphosphorylated form. While the hyperphosphorylated form is less abundant, it is also more stable and less dependent on p65 and its carboxyl domain. Finally, we show that in p65−/− fibroblasts, expression of a proteolysis-resistant form of IκBβ, but not IκBα, causes a severe growth defect associated with apoptosis. Based on these findings, we propose that tight control of IκBβ protein by p65 is necessary for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. PMID:15923614

  15. RelA/p65 regulation of IkappaBbeta.

    PubMed

    Hertlein, Erin; Wang, Jingxin; Ladner, Katherine J; Bakkar, Nadine; Guttridge, Denis C

    2005-06-01

    IkappaB inhibitor proteins are the primary regulators of NF-kappaB. In contrast to the defined regulatory interplay between NF-kappaB and IkappaBalpha, much less is known regarding the regulation of IkappaBbeta by NF-kappaB. Here, we describe in detail the regulation of IkappaBbeta by RelA/p65. Using p65(-/-) fibroblasts, we show that IkappaBbeta is profoundly reduced in these cells, but not in other NF-kappaB subunit knockouts. This regulation prevails during embryonic and postnatal development in a tissue-specific manner. Significantly, in both p65(-/-) cells and tissues, IkappaBalpha is also reduced, but not nearly to the same extent as IkappaBbeta, thus highlighting the degree to which IkappaBbeta is dependent on p65. This dependence is based on the ability of p65 to stabilize IkappaBbeta protein from the 26S proteasome, a process mediated in large part through the p65 carboxyl terminus. Furthermore, IkappaBbeta was found to exist in both a basally phosphorylated and a hyperphosphorylated form. While the hyperphosphorylated form is less abundant, it is also more stable and less dependent on p65 and its carboxyl domain. Finally, we show that in p65(-/-) fibroblasts, expression of a proteolysis-resistant form of IkappaBbeta, but not IkappaBalpha, causes a severe growth defect associated with apoptosis. Based on these findings, we propose that tight control of IkappaBbeta protein by p65 is necessary for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis.

  16. The Arabidopsis U-box E3 Ubiquitin ligase PUB30 Negatively Regulates Salt Tolerance by Facilitating BRI1 KINASE INHIBITOR 1 (BKI1) Degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Jinfeng; Li, Long; Gao, Yanan; Zhao, Linlin; Patil, Suyash Bhimgonda; Fang, Jingjing; Zhang, Wenhui; Yang, Yuhong; Li, Ming; Li, Xueyong

    2017-09-02

    The Arabidopsis U-box E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligases play an important role in the ubiquitin/26S proteasome-mediated protein degradation pathway. Recently PUB30 has been reported to participate in the salt stress response during seed germination stage in ABA-independent manner, but the molecular mechanism remains to be elucidated. Here we displayed that the pub30 mutant was more tolerant to salt stress during seed germination, whereas the mutant of its closest homologue PUB31 showed mild sensitivity to salt stress. PUB30 exhibited E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in vitro. PUB30 specifically interacted with BRI1 KINASE INHIBITOR 1 (BKI1), a regulator playing dual roles in brassinosteroids (BRs) signaling, in vitro and in vivo. We found that BKI1 protein was ubiquitinated and degraded by the 26S proteasome. The degradation of BKI1 was slowed down in the pub30-1 mutant compared with that in the wild-type. The bki1 mutant was sensitive to salt whereas the transgenic plants overexpressing BKI1 showed salt tolerant phenotype. All these results indicate that PUB30 negatively regulates salt tolerance probably through regulating the degradation of BKI1 and BRs signaling in Arabidopsis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Multimedia regulated chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.C.; Huffman, G.L.; Mao, Y.L.

    1999-10-01

    This article examines those chemicals that are listed in either environmental laws or regulations. Its objective is to help readers determine which laws regulate what types of chemicals and which types of chemicals are regulated by what laws. It is multimedia in scope, describing the various chemicals that are regulated in the different media (i.e., air, water, or land).

  18. The anaphase-promoting complex: a key factor in the regulation of cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Castro, Anna; Bernis, Cyril; Vigneron, Suzanne; Labbé, Jean-Claude; Lorca, Thierry

    2005-01-13

    Events controlling cell division are governed by the degradation of different regulatory proteins by the ubiquitin-dependent pathway. In this pathway, the attachment of a polyubiquitin chain to a substrate by an ubiquitin-ligase targets this substrate for degradation by the 26S proteasome. Two different ubiquitin ligases play an important role in the cell cycle: the SCF (Skp1/Cullin/F-box) and the anaphase-promoting complex (APC). In this review, we describe the present knowledge about the APC. We pay particular attention to the latest results concerning APC structure, APC regulation and substrate recognition, and we discuss the implication of these findings in the understanding the APC function.

  19. Carbon and nitrogen metabolism regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takeo; Maekawa, Shugo; Yasuda, Shigetaka; Yamaguchi, Junji

    2011-10-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is a unique protein degradation mechanism conserved in the eukaryotic cell. In addition to the control of protein quality, UPS regulates diverse cellular signal transduction via the fine-tuning of target protein degradation. Protein ubiquitylation and subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome are involved in almost all aspects of plant growth and development and response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Recent studies reveal that the UPS plays an essential role in adaptation to carbon and nitrogen availability in plants. Here we highlight ubiquitin ligase ATL31 and the homologue ATL6 target 14-3-3 proteins for ubiquitylation to be degraded, which control signaling for carbon and nitrogen metabolisms and C/N balance response. We also give an overview of the UPS function involved in carbon and nitrogen metabolisms.

  20. Combinatorial Gene Regulation Using Auto-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hermsen, Rutger; Ursem, Bas; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2010-01-01

    As many as 59% of the transcription factors in Escherichia coli regulate the transcription rate of their own genes. This suggests that auto-regulation has one or more important functions. Here, one possible function is studied. Often the transcription rate of an auto-regulator is also controlled by additional transcription factors. In these cases, the way the expression of the auto-regulator responds to changes in the concentrations of the “input” regulators (the response function) is obviously affected by the auto-regulation. We suggest that, conversely, auto-regulation may be used to optimize this response function. To test this hypothesis, we use an evolutionary algorithm and a chemical–physical model of transcription regulation to design model cis-regulatory constructs with predefined response functions. In these simulations, auto-regulation can evolve if this provides a functional benefit. When selecting for a series of elementary response functions—Boolean logic gates and linear responses—the cis-regulatory regions resulting from the simulations indeed often exploit auto-regulation. Surprisingly, the resulting constructs use auto-activation rather than auto-repression. Several design principles show up repeatedly in the simulation results. They demonstrate how auto-activation can be used to generate sharp, switch-like activation and repression circuits and how linearly decreasing response functions can be obtained. Auto-repression, on the other hand, resulted only when a high response speed or a suppression of intrinsic noise was also selected for. The results suggest that, while auto-repression may primarily be valuable to improve the dynamical properties of regulatory circuits, auto-activation is likely to evolve even when selection acts on the shape of response function only. PMID:20548950

  1. Structural basis of antizyme-mediated regulation of polyamine homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsiang-Yi; Chen, Shin-Fu; Hsieh, Ju-Yi; Chou, Fang; Wang, Yu-Hsuan; Lin, Wan-Ting; Lee, Pei-Ying; Yu, Yu-Jen; Lin, Li-Ying; Lin, Te-Sheng; Lin, Chieh-Liang; Liu, Guang-Yaw; Tzeng, Shiou-Ru; Hung, Hui-Chih; Chan, Nei-Li

    2015-01-01

    Polyamines are organic polycations essential for cell growth and differentiation; their aberrant accumulation is often associated with diseases, including many types of cancer. To maintain polyamine homeostasis, the catalytic activity and protein abundance of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the committed enzyme for polyamine biosynthesis, are reciprocally controlled by the regulatory proteins antizyme isoform 1 (Az1) and antizyme inhibitor (AzIN). Az1 suppresses polyamine production by inhibiting the assembly of the functional ODC homodimer and, most uniquely, by targeting ODC for ubiquitin-independent proteolytic destruction by the 26S proteasome. In contrast, AzIN positively regulates polyamine levels by competing with ODC for Az1 binding. The structural basis of the Az1-mediated regulation of polyamine homeostasis has remained elusive. Here we report crystal structures of human Az1 complexed with either ODC or AzIN. Structural analysis revealed that Az1 sterically blocks ODC homodimerization. Moreover, Az1 binding triggers ODC degradation by inducing the exposure of a cryptic proteasome-interacting surface of ODC, which illustrates how a substrate protein may be primed upon association with Az1 for ubiquitin-independent proteasome recognition. Dynamic and functional analyses further indicated that the Az1-induced binding and degradation of ODC by proteasome can be decoupled, with the intrinsically disordered C-terminal tail fragment of ODC being required only for degradation but not binding. Finally, the AzIN–Az1 structure suggests how AzIN may effectively compete with ODC for Az1 to restore polyamine production. Taken together, our findings offer structural insights into the Az-mediated regulation of polyamine homeostasis and proteasomal degradation. PMID:26305948

  2. Proteasome-mediated turnover of the transcriptional activator FIT is required for plant iron-deficiency responses.

    PubMed

    Sivitz, Alicia; Grinvalds, Claudia; Barberon, Marie; Curie, Catherine; Vert, Grégory

    2011-06-01

    Plants display a number of responses to low iron availability in order to increase iron uptake from the soil. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the ferric-chelate reductase FRO2 and the ferrous iron transporter IRT1 control iron entry from the soil into the root epidermis. To maintain iron homeostasis, the expression of FRO2 and IRT1 is tightly controlled by iron deficiency at the transcriptional level. The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor FIT represents the most upstream actor known in the iron-deficiency signaling pathway, and directly regulates the expression of the root iron uptake machinery genes FRO2 and IRT1. However, how FIT is controlled by iron and acts to activate transcription of its targets remains obscure. Here we show that FIT mRNA and endogenous FIT protein accumulate in Arabidopsis roots upon iron deficiency. However, using plants constitutively expressing FIT, we observed that FIT protein accumulation is reduced in iron-limited conditions. This post-transcriptional regulation of FIT is perfectly synchronized with the accumulation of endogenous FIT and IRT1 proteins, and therefore is part of the early responses to low iron. We demonstrated that such regulation affects FIT protein stability under iron deficiency as a result of 26S proteasome-dependent degradation. In addition, we showed that FIT post-translational regulation by iron is required for FRO2 and IRT1 gene expression. Taken together our results indicate that FIT transcriptional and post-translational regulations are integrated in plant roots to ensure that the positive regulator FIT accumulates as a short-lived protein following iron shortage, and to allow proper iron-deficiency responses.

  3. New insights into the role of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in the regulation of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cui-Hua; Goldberg, Alfred L; Qiu, Xiao-Bo

    2007-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) is the major system responsible for degradation of intracellular proteins in eukaryotes. By controlling the levels of key proteins, it regulates almost all of the cellular activities, including cell cycle progression, DNA replication and repair, transcription, protein quality control, immune response, and apoptosis. UPP is composed of the ubiquitination system that marks proteins for degradation and the proteasome which degrades the ubiquitinated proteins. The 26S proteasome is a 2400 kDa complex consisting of more than 40 subunits. Following ubiquitination catalyzed by the ubiquitin activating enzyme (El), a ubiquitin-carrier protein (E2), and one of the cell's many ubiquitin-protein ligases (E3s), the protein substrates are targeted to the proteasome for degradation into small peptides. E3s regulate the degradation of protein substrates indirectly by determining both the specificity and timing of substrate ubiquitination, whereas the deubiquitinating enzymes can inhibit this process by releasing ubiquitin from substrates. In this review, we attempt to highlight the recent progress in research on UPP and its role in the regulation of apoptosis by focusing on several of its important components, including the ubiqutin ligase Nrdp 1, which regulates ErbB/EGFR family of receptor tyrosine kinases, the ubiquitin-carrier protein BRUCE/Apollon (an Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein), and the novel proteasome subunit hRpnl3 (a binding site for the deubiquitinating enzyme, UCH37).

  4. WRKY42 Modulates Phosphate Homeostasis through Regulating Phosphate Translocation and Acquisition in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Su, Tong; Xu, Qian; Zhang, Fei-Cui; Chen, Yun; Li, Li-Qin; Wu, Wei-Hua; Chen, Yi-Fang

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) WRKY transcription factor family has more than 70 members, and some of them have been reported to play important roles in plant response to biotic and abiotic stresses. This study shows that WRKY42 regulated phosphate homeostasis in Arabidopsis. The WRKY42-overexpressing lines, similar to the phosphate1 (pho1) mutant, were more sensitive to low-inorganic phosphate (Pi) stress and had lower shoot Pi content compared with wild-type plants. The PHO1 expression was repressed in WRKY42-overexpressing lines and enhanced in the wrky42 wrky6 double mutant. The WRKY42 protein bound to the PHO1 promoter under Pi-sufficient condition, and this binding was abrogated during Pi starvation. These data indicate that WRKY42 modulated Pi translocation by regulating PHO1 expression. Furthermore, overexpression of WRKY42 increased root Pi content and Pi uptake, whereas the wrky42 mutant had lower root Pi content and Pi uptake rate compared with wild-type plants. Under Pi-sufficient condition, WRKY42 positively regulated PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER1;1 (PHT1;1) expression by binding to the PHT1;1 promoter, and this binding was abolished by low-Pi stress. During Pi starvation, the WRKY42 protein was degraded through the 26S proteasome pathway. Our results showed that AtWRKY42 modulated Pi homeostasis by regulating the expression of PHO1 and PHT1;1 to adapt to environmental changes in Pi availability. PMID:25733771

  5. Load regulating expansion fixture

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, L.M.; Strum, M.J.

    1998-12-15

    A free standing self contained device for bonding ultra thin metallic films, such as 0.001 inch beryllium foils is disclosed. The device will regulate to a predetermined load for solid state bonding when heated to a bonding temperature. The device includes a load regulating feature, whereby the expansion stresses generated for bonding are regulated and self adjusting. The load regulator comprises a pair of friction isolators with a plurality of annealed copper members located therebetween. The device, with the load regulator, will adjust to and maintain a stress level needed to successfully and economically complete a leak tight bond without damaging thin foils or other delicate components. 1 fig.

  6. Load regulating expansion fixture

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Lawrence M.; Strum, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    A free standing self contained device for bonding ultra thin metallic films, such as 0.001 inch beryllium foils. The device will regulate to a predetermined load for solid state bonding when heated to a bonding temperature. The device includes a load regulating feature, whereby the expansion stresses generated for bonding are regulated and self adjusting. The load regulator comprises a pair of friction isolators with a plurality of annealed copper members located therebetween. The device, with the load regulator, will adjust to and maintain a stress level needed to successfully and economically complete a leak tight bond without damaging thin foils or other delicate components.

  7. Emotion Regulation in Parenthood

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Helena J.V.; Wallace, Norah S.; Laurent, Heidemarie K.; Mayes, Linda C.

    2015-01-01

    Emotion regulation, defined as the capacity to influence one’s experience and expression of emotion, is a complex skill now recognized to evolve throughout the lifetime. Here we examine the role of emotion regulation in parenthood, and propose that regulatory function during this period is distinct from the emotion regulation skills acquired and implemented during other periods of life. In this review, we consider the unique demands of caring for a child and recognize that parents have to maintain a regulated state as well as facilitate regulation in their child, especially early in development. We examine neurobiological, hormonal and behavioral shifts during the transition to parenthood that may facilitate parental regulation in response to infant cues. Furthermore, we consider how parents shape emotion regulation in their child, and the clinical implications of regulatory functioning within the parent-child relationship. PMID:26085709

  8. Blue light induces degradation of the negative regulator phytochrome interacting factor 1 to promote photomorphogenic development of Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Castillon, Alicia; Shen, Hui; Huq, Enamul

    2009-05-01

    Phytochrome interacting factors (PIFs) are nuclear basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors that negatively regulate photomorphogenesis both in the dark and in the light in Arabidopsis. The phytochrome (phy) family of photoreceptors induces the rapid phosphorylation and degradation of PIFs in response to both red and far-red light conditions to promote photomorphogenesis. Although phys have been shown to function under blue light conditions, the roles of PIFs under blue light have not been investigated in detail. Here we show that PIF1 negatively regulates photomorphogenesis at the seedling stage under blue light conditions. pif1 seedlings displayed more open cotyledons and slightly reduced hypocotyl length compared to wild type under diurnal (12 hr light/12 hr dark) blue light conditions. Double-mutant analyses demonstrated that pif1phyA, pif1phyB, pif1cry1, and pif1cry2 have enhanced cotyledon opening compared to the single photoreceptor mutants under diurnal blue light conditions. Blue light induced the rapid phosphorylation, polyubiquitination, and degradation of PIF1 through the ubi/26S proteasomal pathway. PIF1 interacted with phyA and phyB in a blue light-dependent manner, and the interactions with phys are necessary for the blue light-induced degradation of PIF1. phyA played a dominant role under pulses of blue light, while phyA, phyB, and phyD induced the degradation of PIF1 in an additive manner under prolonged continuous blue light conditions. Interestingly, the absence of cry1 and cry2 enhanced the degradation of PIF1 under blue light conditions. Taken together, these data suggest that PIF1 functions as a negative regulator of photomorphogenesis under blue light conditions and that blue light-activated phys induce the degradation of PIF1 through the ubi/26S proteasomal pathway to promote photomorphogenesis.

  9. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, J.C.; Dilgard, L.W.

    1995-10-10

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure is disclosed. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes. 10 figs.

  10. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, John C.; Dilgard, Lemoyne W.

    1995-01-01

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes.

  11. TOWARD MORE EFFECTIVE REGULATION

    SciTech Connect

    J. GRAF

    2000-06-01

    This paper proposes a model relationship between the operator engaged in a hazardous activity, the regulator of that activity, and the general public. The roles and responsibilities of each entity are described in a way that allows effective communication flow. The role of the regulator is developed using the steam boiler as an example of a hazard subject to regulation; however, the model applies to any regulated activity. In this model the safety analyst has the extremely important role of communicating sometimes difficult technical information to the regulator in a way that the regulator can provide credible assurance to the general public as to the adequacy of the control of the hazardous activity. The conclusion asserts that acceptance of the model, understanding of the roles and responsibilities and definition of who communicates what information to whom will mitigate frustration on the part of each of the three entities.

  12. Novel regulators of spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fok, Kin Lam; Chen, Hao; Ruan, Ye Chun; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2014-05-01

    Spermatogenesis is a multistep process that supports the production of millions of sperm daily. Understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate spermatogenesis has been a major focus for decades. Yet, the regulators involved in different cellular processes of spermatogenesis remain largely unknown. Human diseases that result in defective spermatogenesis have provided hints on the molecular mechanisms regulating this process. In this review, we have summarized recent findings on the function and signaling mechanisms of several genes that are known to be associated with disease or pathological processes, including CFTR, CD147, YWK-II and CT genes, and discuss their potential roles in regulating different processes of spermatogenesis.

  13. Regulation of the endothelial cell cycle by the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Fasanaro, Pasquale; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Martelli, Fabio

    2010-01-15

    Degradation of poly-ubiquitinated proteins by the 26S-proteasome complex represents a crucial quantitative control mechanism. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays a pivotal role in the complex molecular network regulating the progression both between and within each cell-cycle phase. Two major complexes are involved: the SKP1-CUL1-F-box-protein complex (SCF) and the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). Notwithstanding structural similarities, SCF and APC/C display different cellular functions and mechanisms of action. SCF modulates all cell-cycle stages and plays a prominent role at G1/S transition mainly through three regulatory subunits: Skp2, Fbw7, and beta-TRCP. APC/C, regulated by Cdc20 or Cdh1 subunits, has a crucial role in mitosis. In this review, we will describe how the endothelial cell cycle is regulated by the UPS. We will illustrate the principal SCF- and APC/C-dependent molecular mechanisms that modulate cell growth, allowing a unidirectional cell-cycle progression. Then, we will focus our attention on UPS modulation by oxidative stress, a pathogenic stimulus that causes endothelial dysfunction and is involved in numerous cardiovascular diseases.

  14. Federal, State, and Local regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.M.; Brandenburg, B.L. )

    1991-08-01

    This article is a review of federal, state, and local regulations pertinent treatment of leachate from hazardous materials landfills in California. The topics covered include under federal regulations: pretreatment, whole-effluent toxicity, hazardous waste regulation; under state regulations: hazardous waste regulations, air toxics, environmental quality act; under local regulations: local limits, toxicity-regional water quality board, air emissions and district code.

  15. Child Care Center Regulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska State Dept. of Health and Human Services, Lincoln.

    This guide enumerates regulations for anyone caring for four or more children, from families other than their own, for compensation and on a regular basis, in the state of Nebraska. The purpose of the regulations is to protect and promote the health and safety of children in child care facilities. The first section of the guide lists specific…

  16. The Right to Regulate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vittek, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    An introduction to the historical and constitutional framework of industry regulation by local and Federal Governments is presented. Problems of the confiscation of private property without due process, government control and the rights and duties of the regulated industry are discussed.

  17. Plant Growth Regulators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickell, Louis G.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the effect of "plant growth regulators" on plants, such as controlling the flowering, fruit development, plant size, and increasing crop yields. Provides a list of plant growth regulators which includes their chemical, common, and trade names, as well as their different use(s). (GA)

  18. Plant Growth Regulators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickell, Louis G.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the effect of "plant growth regulators" on plants, such as controlling the flowering, fruit development, plant size, and increasing crop yields. Provides a list of plant growth regulators which includes their chemical, common, and trade names, as well as their different use(s). (GA)

  19. Vascular plant one-zinc-finger protein 1/2 transcription factors regulate abiotic and biotic stress responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Yusuke; Nakahira, Yoichi; Sumida, Hiroki; Takebayashi, Kosuke; Nagasawa, Yumiko; Yamasaki, Kanako; Akiyama, Masako; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Fujiwara, Sumire; Shiina, Takashi; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Kubo, Yasuyuki; Sato, Masa H

    2013-03-01

    Plants adapt to abiotic and biotic stresses by activating abscisic acid-mediated (ABA) abiotic stress-responsive and salicylic acid-(SA) or jasmonic acid-mediated (JA) biotic stress-responsive pathways, respectively. Although the abiotic stress-responsive pathway interacts antagonistically with the biotic stress-responsive pathways, the mechanisms that regulate these pathways remain largely unknown. In this study, we provide insight into the function of vascular plant one-zinc-finger proteins (VOZs) that modulate various stress responses in Arabidopsis. The expression of many stress-responsive genes was changed in the voz1voz2 double mutant under normal growth conditions. Consistent with altered stress-responsive gene expression, freezing- and drought-stress tolerances were increased in the voz1voz2 double mutant. In contrast, resistance to a fungal pathogen, Colletotrichum higginsianum, and to a bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae, was severely impaired. Thus, impairing VOZ function simultaneously conferred increased abiotic tolerance and biotic stress susceptibility. In a chilling stress condition, both the VOZ1 and VOZ2 mRNA expression levels and the VOZ2 protein level gradually decreased. VOZ2 degradation during cold exposure was completely inhibited by the addition of the 26S proteasome inhibitor, MG132, a finding that suggested that VOZ2 degradation is dependent on the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system. In voz1voz2, ABA-inducible transcription factor CBF4 expression was enhanced significantly even under normal growth conditions, despite an unchanged endogenous ABA content. A finding that suggested that VOZs negatively affect CBF4 expression in an ABA-independent manner. These results suggest that VOZs function as both negative and positive regulators of the abiotic and biotic stress-responsive pathways, and control Arabidopsis adaptation to various stress conditions. © 2012 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Serine 421 regulates mutant huntingtin toxicity and clearance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kratter, Ian H.; Zahed, Hengameh; Lau, Alice; Daub, Aaron C.; Weiberth, Kurt F.; Gu, Xiaofeng; Humbert, Sandrine; Yang, X. William; Osmand, Alex; Steffan, Joan S.; Masliah, Eliezer

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a progressive, adult-onset neurodegenerative disease caused by a polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion in the N-terminal region of the protein huntingtin (HTT). There are no cures or disease-modifying therapies for HD. HTT has a highly conserved Akt phosphorylation site at serine 421, and prior work in HD models found that phosphorylation at S421 (S421-P) diminishes the toxicity of mutant HTT (mHTT) fragments in neuronal cultures. However, whether S421-P affects the toxicity of mHTT in vivo remains unknown. In this work, we used murine models to investigate the role of S421-P in HTT-induced neurodegeneration. Specifically, we mutated the human mHTT gene within a BAC to express either an aspartic acid or an alanine at position 421, mimicking tonic phosphorylation (mHTT-S421D mice) or preventing phosphorylation (mHTT-S421A mice), respectively. Mimicking HTT phosphorylation strongly ameliorated mHTT-induced behavioral dysfunction and striatal neurodegeneration, whereas neuronal dysfunction persisted when S421 phosphorylation was blocked. We found that S421 phosphorylation mitigates neurodegeneration by increasing proteasome-dependent turnover of mHTT and reducing the presence of a toxic mHTT conformer. These data indicate that S421 is a potent modifier of mHTT toxicity and offer in vivo validation for S421 as a therapeutic target in HD. PMID:27525439

  1. The Blue Light-Dependent Polyubiquitination and Degradation of Arabidopsis Cryptochrome2 Requires Multiple E3 Ubiquitin Ligases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Wang, Qin; Liu, Bin; Wang, Wei; Wang, Xu; Park, Joon; Yang, Zhenming; Du, Xinglin; Bian, Mingdi; Lin, Chentao

    2016-10-01

    Cryptochromes are blue light receptors regulated by light-dependent ubiquitination and degradation in both plant and animal lineages. The Arabidopsis genome encodes two cryptochromes, CRY1 and CRY2, of which CRY2 undergoes blue light-dependent ubiquitination and 26S proteasome-dependent degradation. The molecular mechanism regulating blue light-dependent proteolysis of CRY2 is still not fully understood. We found that the F-box proteins ZEITLUPE (ZTL) and Lov Kelch Protein2 (LKP2), which mediate blue light suppression of degradation of the CRY2 signaling partner CIB1, are not required for the blue light-dependent CRY2 degradation. We further showed that the previously reported function of the COP1-SPA1 protein complex in blue light-dependent CRY2 degradation is more likely to be attributable to its cullin 4 (CUL4)-based E3 ubiquitin ligase activity than its activity as the cryptochrome signaling partner. However, the blue light-dependent CRY2 degradation is only partially impaired in the cul4 mutant, the cop1-5 null mutant and the spa1234 quadruple mutant, suggesting a possible involvement of additional E3 ubiquitin ligases in the regulation of CRY2. Consistent with this hypothesis, we demonstrated that the blue light-dependent CRY2 degradation is significantly impaired in the temperature-sensitive cul1 mutant allele (axr6-3), especially under the non-permissive temperature. Based on these and other results presented, we propose that photoexcited CRY2 undergoes Lys48-linked polyubiquitination catalyzed by the CUL4- and CUL1-based E3 ubiquitin ligases.

  2. Bioethics regulations in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Aydin, E

    1999-10-01

    Although modern technical and scientific developments in medicine are followed closely in Turkey, it cannot be claimed that the same is true in the field of bioethics. Yet, more and more attention is now being paid to bioethics and ethics training in health sciences. In addition, there are also legal regulations in bioethics, some of which are not so new. The objective of these regulations is to provide technical and administrative control. Ethical concerns are rather few. What attracts our attention most in these regulations is the presence of the idea of "consent".

  3. HIGH PRESSURE GAS REGULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Ramage, R.W.

    1962-05-01

    A gas regulator operating on the piston and feedback principle is described. The device is particularly suitable for the delicate regulation of high pressure, i.e., 10,000 psi and above, gas sources, as well as being perfectly adaptable for use on gas supplies as low as 50 psi. The piston is adjustably connected to a needle valve and the movement of the piston regulates the flow of gas from the needle valve. The gas output is obtained from the needle valve. Output pressure is sampled by a piston feedback means which, in turn, regulates the movement of the main piston. When the output is other than the desired value, the feedback system initiates movement of the main piston to allow the output pressure to be corrected or to remain constant. (AEC)

  4. Metabolite turns master regulator

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Silhavy, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of catabolite repression enables microorganisms to use their favourite carbon source first. New work reveals α-ketoacids as key effectors of this process, with their levels regulating gene expression. PMID:23925111

  5. Arabidopsis CRY2 and ZTL mediate blue-light regulation of the transcription factor CIB1 by distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongtao; Wang, Qin; Liu, Yawen; Zhao, Xiaoying; Imaizumi, Takato; Somers, David E; Tobin, Elaine M; Lin, Chentao

    2013-10-22

    Plants possess multiple photoreceptors to mediate light regulation of growth and development, but it is not well understood how different photoreceptors coordinate their actions to jointly regulate developmental responses, such as flowering time. In Arabidopsis, the photoexcited cryptochrome 2 interacts with the transcription factor CRYPTOCHROME-INTERACTING basic helix-loop-helix 1 (CIB1) to activate transcription and floral initiation. We show that the CIB1 protein expression is regulated by blue light; CIB1 is highly expressed in plants exposed to blue light, but levels of the CIB1 protein decreases in the absence of blue light. We demonstrate that CIB1 is degraded by the 26S proteasome and that blue light suppresses CIB1 degradation. Surprisingly, although cryptochrome 2 physically interacts with CIB1 in response to blue light, it is not the photoreceptor mediating blue-light suppression of CIB1 degradation. Instead, two of the three light-oxygen-voltage (LOV)-domain photoreceptors, ZEITLUPE and LOV KELCH PROTEIN 2, but not FLAVIN-BINDING KELCH REPEAT 1, are required for the function and blue-light suppression of degradation of CIB1. These results support the hypothesis that the evolutionarily unrelated blue-light receptors, cryptochrome and LOV-domain F-box proteins, mediate blue-light regulation of the same transcription factor by distinct mechanisms.

  6. Arabidopsis CRY2 and ZTL mediate blue-light regulation of the transcription factor CIB1 by distinct mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongtao; Wang, Qin; Liu, Yawen; Zhao, Xiaoying; Imaizumi, Takato; Somers, David E.; Tobin, Elaine M.; Lin, Chentao

    2013-01-01

    Plants possess multiple photoreceptors to mediate light regulation of growth and development, but it is not well understood how different photoreceptors coordinate their actions to jointly regulate developmental responses, such as flowering time. In Arabidopsis, the photoexcited cryptochrome 2 interacts with the transcription factor CRYPTOCHROME-INTERACTING basic helix–loop–helix 1 (CIB1) to activate transcription and floral initiation. We show that the CIB1 protein expression is regulated by blue light; CIB1 is highly expressed in plants exposed to blue light, but levels of the CIB1 protein decreases in the absence of blue light. We demonstrate that CIB1 is degraded by the 26S proteasome and that blue light suppresses CIB1 degradation. Surprisingly, although cryptochrome 2 physically interacts with CIB1 in response to blue light, it is not the photoreceptor mediating blue-light suppression of CIB1 degradation. Instead, two of the three light–oxygen–voltage (LOV)-domain photoreceptors, ZEITLUPE and LOV KELCH PROTEIN 2, but not FLAVIN-BINDING KELCH REPEAT 1, are required for the function and blue-light suppression of degradation of CIB1. These results support the hypothesis that the evolutionarily unrelated blue-light receptors, cryptochrome and LOV-domain F-box proteins, mediate blue-light regulation of the same transcription factor by distinct mechanisms. PMID:24101505

  7. Output-Based Regulations: A Handbook for Air Regulators

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This handbook assists air regulators in developing emission regulations that recognize the pollution prevention benefits of CHP, and to assist CHP project owners in understanding and complying with output-based environmental regulations.

  8. In regulation we trust.

    PubMed

    Wiig, Siri; Tharaldsen, Jorunn Elise

    2012-01-01

    The role of trust has been argued to play an increasingly important role in modern, complex, and ambivalent risk societies. Trust within organizational research is anticipated to have a general strategic impact on aspects such as organizational performance, communication and knowledge exchange, and learning from accidents. Trust is also an important aspect related to regulation of risk. Diverse regulatory regimes, their contexts and risks influence regulators use of trust and distrust in regulatory practice. The aim of this paper is to discuss the relationship between risk regulation and trust across diverse risk regulation regimes. By drawing from studies of risk regulation, risk perception, and trust the purpose is to discuss how regulation and trust are linked and used in practice to control risk across system levels in socio-technical systems in high risk industries. This paper provides new knowledge on 1) how functional and dysfunctional trust and distrust are grounded in the empirical realities of high risk industries, 2) how different perspectives on trust and distrust act together and bring new knowledge on how society control risk.

  9. Epigenetic regulation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lyko, F; Beisel, C; Marhold, J; Paro, R

    2006-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of gene transcription relies on molecular marks like DNA methylation or histone modifications. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of epigenetic regulation in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. In the past, DNA methylation research has primarily utilized mammalian model systems. However, several recent landmark discoveries have been made in other organisms. For example, the interaction between DNA methylation and histone methylation was first described in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. Another example is provided by the interaction between epigenetic modifications and the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery that was first reported in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Another organism with great experimental power is the fruit fly Drosophila. Epigenetic regulation by chromatin has been extensively analyzed in the fly and several of the key components have been discovered in this organism. In this chapter, we will focus on three aspects that represent the complexity of epigenetic gene regulation. (1) We will discuss the available data about the DNA methylation system, (2) we will illuminate the interaction between DNA methylation and chromatin regulation, and (3) we will provide an overview over the Polycomb system of epigenetic chromatin modifiers that has proved to be an important paradigm for a chromatin system regulating epigenetic programming.

  10. HY5, a positive regulator of light signaling, negatively controls the unfolded protein response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Nawkar, Ganesh M; Kang, Chang Ho; Maibam, Punyakishore; Park, Joung Hun; Jung, Young Jun; Chae, Ho Byoung; Chi, Yong Hun; Jung, In Jung; Kim, Woe Yeon; Yun, Dae-Jin; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2017-02-21

    Light influences essentially all aspects of plant growth and development. Integration of light signaling with different stress response results in improvement of plant survival rates in ever changing environmental conditions. Diverse environmental stresses affect the protein-folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), thus evoking ER stress in plants. Consequently, the unfolded protein response (UPR), in which a set of molecular chaperones is expressed, is initiated in the ER to alleviate this stress. Although its underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown, light is believed to be required for the ER stress response. In this study, we demonstrate that increasing light intensity elevates the ER stress sensitivity of plants. Moreover, mutation of the ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5), a key component of light signaling, leads to tolerance to ER stress. This enhanced tolerance of hy5 plants can be attributed to higher expression of UPR genes. HY5 negatively regulates the UPR by competing with basic leucine zipper 28 (bZIP28) to bind to the G-box-like element present in the ER stress response element (ERSE). Furthermore, we found that HY5 undergoes 26S proteasome-mediated degradation under ER stress conditions. Conclusively, we propose a molecular mechanism of crosstalk between the UPR and light signaling, mediated by HY5, which positively mediates light signaling, but negatively regulates UPR gene expression.

  11. Tripartite degrons confer diversity and specificity on regulated protein degradation in the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Guharoy, Mainak; Bhowmick, Pallab; Sallam, Mohamed; Tompa, Peter

    2016-01-06

    Specific signals (degrons) regulate protein turnover mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here we systematically analyse known degrons and propose a tripartite model comprising the following: (1) a primary degron (peptide motif) that specifies substrate recognition by cognate E3 ubiquitin ligases, (2) secondary site(s) comprising a single or multiple neighbouring ubiquitinated lysine(s) and (3) a structurally disordered segment that initiates substrate unfolding at the 26S proteasome. Primary degron sequences are conserved among orthologues and occur in structurally disordered regions that undergo E3-induced folding-on-binding. Posttranslational modifications can switch primary degrons into E3-binding-competent states, thereby integrating degradation with signalling pathways. Degradation-linked lysines tend to be located within disordered segments that also initiate substrate degradation by effective proteasomal engagement. Many characterized mutations and alternative isoforms with abrogated degron components are implicated in disease. These effects result from increased protein stability and interactome rewiring. The distributed nature of degrons ensures regulation, specificity and combinatorial control of degradation.

  12. Structural insight into the mutual recognition and regulation between Suppressor of Fused and Gli/Ci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Fu, Lin; Qi, Xiaolong; Zhang, Zhenyi; Xia, Yuanxin; Jia, Jianhang; Jiang, Jin; Zhao, Yun; Wu, Geng

    2013-11-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signalling regulates embryonic development and adult tissue homoeostasis. Mutations of its pathway components including Suppressor of Fused (Sufu) and Gli/Ci predispose to cancers and congenital anomalies. The Sufu-Gli protein complex occupies a central position in the vertebrate Hh signalling pathway, especially in mammals. Here structures of full-length human and Drosophila Sufu, the human Sufu-Gli complex, along with normal mode analysis and FRET measurement results, reveal that Sufu alternates between ‘open’ and ‘closed’ conformations. The ‘closed’ form of Sufu is stabilized by Gli binding and inhibited by Hh treatment, whereas the ‘open’ state of Sufu is promoted by Gli-dissociation and Hh signalling. Mutations of critical interface residues disrupt the Sufu-Gli complex and prevent Sufu from repressing Gli-mediated transcription, tethering Gli in the cytoplasm and protecting Gli from the 26S proteasome-mediated degradation. Our study thus provides mechanistic insight into the mutual recognition and regulation between Sufu and Gli/Ci.

  13. HY5, a positive regulator of light signaling, negatively controls the unfolded protein response in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Nawkar, Ganesh M.; Kang, Chang Ho; Maibam, Punyakishore; Park, Joung Hun; Jung, Young Jun; Chae, Ho Byoung; Chi, Yong Hun; Jung, In Jung; Kim, Woe Yeon; Yun, Dae-Jin; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2017-01-01

    Light influences essentially all aspects of plant growth and development. Integration of light signaling with different stress response results in improvement of plant survival rates in ever changing environmental conditions. Diverse environmental stresses affect the protein-folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), thus evoking ER stress in plants. Consequently, the unfolded protein response (UPR), in which a set of molecular chaperones is expressed, is initiated in the ER to alleviate this stress. Although its underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown, light is believed to be required for the ER stress response. In this study, we demonstrate that increasing light intensity elevates the ER stress sensitivity of plants. Moreover, mutation of the ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5), a key component of light signaling, leads to tolerance to ER stress. This enhanced tolerance of hy5 plants can be attributed to higher expression of UPR genes. HY5 negatively regulates the UPR by competing with basic leucine zipper 28 (bZIP28) to bind to the G-box–like element present in the ER stress response element (ERSE). Furthermore, we found that HY5 undergoes 26S proteasome-mediated degradation under ER stress conditions. Conclusively, we propose a molecular mechanism of crosstalk between the UPR and light signaling, mediated by HY5, which positively mediates light signaling, but negatively regulates UPR gene expression. PMID:28167764

  14. The Arabidopsis CROWDED NUCLEI genes regulate seed germination by modulating degradation of ABI5 protein.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenming; Guan, Chunmei; Feng, Jian; Liang, Yan; Zhan, Ni; Zuo, Jianru; Ren, Bo

    2016-07-01

    In Arabidopsis, the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a vital role in inhibiting seed germination and in post-germination seedling establishment. In the ABA signaling pathway, ABI5, a basic Leu zipper transcription factor, has important functions in the regulation of seed germination. ABI5 protein localizes in nuclear bodies, along with AFP, COP1, and SIZ1, and was degraded through the 26S proteasome pathway. However, the mechanisms of ABI5 nuclear body formation and ABI5 protein degradation remain obscure. In this study, we found that the Arabidopsis CROWDED NUCLEI (CRWN) proteins, predicted nuclear matrix proteins essential for maintenance of nuclear morphology, also participate in ABA-controlled seed germination by regulating the degradation of ABI5 protein. During seed germination, the crwn mutants are hypersensitive to ABA and have higher levels of ABI5 protein compared to wild type. Genetic analysis suggested that CRWNs act upstream of ABI5. The observation that CRWN3 colocalizes with ABI5 in nuclear bodies indicates that CRWNs might participate in ABI5 protein degradation in nuclear bodies. Moreover, we revealed that the extreme C-terminal of CRWN3 protein is necessary for its function in the response to ABA in germination. Our results suggested important roles of CRWNs in ABI5 nuclear body organization and ABI5 protein degradation during seed germination.

  15. Tripartite degrons confer diversity and specificity on regulated protein degradation in the ubiquitin-proteasome system

    PubMed Central

    Guharoy, Mainak; Bhowmick, Pallab; Sallam, Mohamed; Tompa, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Specific signals (degrons) regulate protein turnover mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here we systematically analyse known degrons and propose a tripartite model comprising the following: (1) a primary degron (peptide motif) that specifies substrate recognition by cognate E3 ubiquitin ligases, (2) secondary site(s) comprising a single or multiple neighbouring ubiquitinated lysine(s) and (3) a structurally disordered segment that initiates substrate unfolding at the 26S proteasome. Primary degron sequences are conserved among orthologues and occur in structurally disordered regions that undergo E3-induced folding-on-binding. Posttranslational modifications can switch primary degrons into E3-binding-competent states, thereby integrating degradation with signalling pathways. Degradation-linked lysines tend to be located within disordered segments that also initiate substrate degradation by effective proteasomal engagement. Many characterized mutations and alternative isoforms with abrogated degron components are implicated in disease. These effects result from increased protein stability and interactome rewiring. The distributed nature of degrons ensures regulation, specificity and combinatorial control of degradation. PMID:26732515

  16. Worldwide regulations for mycotoxins.

    PubMed

    van Egmond, Hans P

    2002-01-01

    Since the discovery of the aflatoxins in the 1960s, regulations have been established in many countries to protect the consumer from the harmful effects of mycotoxins that may contaminate foodstuffs. Various factors play a role in the decision-making process of setting limits for mycotoxins. These include scientific factors such as the availability of toxicological data, survey data, knowledge about the distribution of mycotoxins in commodities, and analytical methodology. Economical and political factors such as commercial interests and sufficiency of food supply have their impact as well. International enquiry's on existing mycotoxin legislation in foodstuffs and animal feedstuffs have been carried out several times in the 1980s and 1990s and details about tolerances, legal basis, responsible authorities, official protocols of analysis and sampling have been published. Recently a comprehensive update on worldwide regulations was published as FAO Food and Nutrition Paper 64. It appeared that at least 77 countries now have specific regulations for mycotoxins, 13 countries are known to have no specific regulations, whereas no data are available for about 50 countries, many of them in Africa. Over the years, a large diversity in tolerance levels for mycotoxins has remained. Some free trade zones (EU, MERCOSUR) are in the process of harmonizing the limits and regulations for mycotoxins in their respective member states, but it is not likely that worldwide harmonized limits for mycotoxins will soon be within reach.

  17. Appetite regulation: an overview.

    PubMed

    Dhillo, Waljit S

    2007-05-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem associated with morbidity and mortality and continues to increase worldwide. This review focuses on the regions of the brain that are important in appetite regulation and the circulating factors implicated in the control of food intake. The hypothalamus is critical in the regulation of food intake containing neural circuits, which produce a number of peptides that influence food intake. The arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus produces both orexigenic peptides (agouti-related protein and neuropeptide Y) and anorectic peptides (alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and cocaine- and amphetamine-related transcript). The lateral hypothalamus produces the orexigenic peptides (melanin-concentrating hormone and orexins). Other hypothalamic factors recently implicated in appetite regulation include the endocannabinoids, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, nesfatin-1, AMP-activated protein kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin protein, and protein tyrosine phosphatase. Circulating factors that affect food intake mediate their effects by signaling to the hypothalamus and/or brainstem. A number of circulating factors are produced by peripheral organs, for example, leptin by adipose tissue, insulin and pancreatic polypeptide by the pancreas, gut hormones (e.g., ghrelin, obestatin, glucagon-like peptide-1, oxyntomodulin, peptide YY), and triiodothyronine by the thyroid gland. Circulating carbohydrates, lipids, and amino acids also affect appetite regulation. Knowledge regarding appetite regulation has vastly expanded in recent years providing targets for antiobesity drug design.

  18. Mechanisms Regulating Protein Localization.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Nicholas C; Doetsch, Paul W; Corbett, Anita H

    2015-10-01

    Cellular functions are dictated by protein content and activity. There are numerous strategies to regulate proteins varying from modulating gene expression to post-translational modifications. One commonly used mode of regulation in eukaryotes is targeted localization. By specifically redirecting the localization of a pool of existing protein, cells can achieve rapid changes in local protein function. Eukaryotic cells have evolved elegant targeting pathways to direct proteins to the appropriate cellular location or locations. Here, we provide a general overview of these localization pathways, with a focus on nuclear and mitochondrial transport, and present a survey of the evolutionarily conserved regulatory strategies identified thus far. We end with a description of several specific examples of proteins that exploit localization as an important mode of regulation.

  19. Regulating the unregistered.

    PubMed

    Freckelton, Ian

    2008-12-01

    A high proportion of health services is provided by complementary health practitioners who are not subject to formal regulation via a statutory registration scheme. The risk is that such practitioners are not subject to effective forms of professional accountability in relation to services which have the potential to be seriously counter-therapeutic for their clients if they breach fundamental norms of propriety generally accepted within their professions and expected by their clients. Consideration has been given in both South Australia and Victoria to increasing the oversight over complementary health professionals. New South Wales and New Zealand have gone further, bringing such practitioners within the rubric of regulation. The operation of these schemes is reviewed and it is argued that there is a need to ensure that all health practitioners are subject to effective regulation in relation to their adherence to fundamental ethical obligations.

  20. Mechanisms regulating melanogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Videira, Inês Ferreira dos Santos; Moura, Daniel Filipe Lima; Magina, Sofia

    2013-01-01

    Skin pigmentation is an important human phenotypic trait whose regulation, in spite of recent advances, has not yet been fully understood. The pigment melanin is produced in melanosomes by melanocytes in a complex process called melanogenesis. The melanocyte interacts with endocrine, immune, inflammatory and central nervous systems, and its activity is also regulated by extrinsic factors such as ultraviolet radiation and drugs. We have carried out a review of the current understanding of intrinsic and extrinsic factors regulating skin pigmentation, the melanogenesis stages and related gene defects. We focused on melanocyte-keratinocyte interaction, activation of melanocortin type 1 receptor (MC1-R) by peptides (melanocyte-stimulating hormone and adrenocorticotropic hormone) resulting from proopiomelanocortin (POMC) cleavage, and mechanisms of ultraviolet-induced skin pigmentation. The identification and comprehension of the melanogenesis mechanism facilitate the understanding of the pathogenesis of pigmentation disorders and the development of potential therapeutic options. PMID:23539007

  1. The Impact of Regulating Social Science Research with Biomedical Regulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durosinmi, Brenda Braxton

    2011-01-01

    The Impact of Regulating Social Science Research with Biomedical Regulations Since 1974 Federal regulations have governed the use of human subjects in biomedical and social science research. The regulations are known as the Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects, and often referred to as the "Common Rule" because 18 Federal…

  2. The Impact of Regulating Social Science Research with Biomedical Regulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durosinmi, Brenda Braxton

    2011-01-01

    The Impact of Regulating Social Science Research with Biomedical Regulations Since 1974 Federal regulations have governed the use of human subjects in biomedical and social science research. The regulations are known as the Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects, and often referred to as the "Common Rule" because 18 Federal…

  3. Other-Regulation in Collaborative Groups: Implications for Regulation Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogat, Toni Kempler; Adams-Wiggins, Karlyn R.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examines variation in other-regulation, conceptualized as efforts by one student to regulate their group's work. This study extends research which has conceptualized other-regulation as temporarily guiding others' conceptual understanding and skill development by broadening the spectrum of other-regulation to include…

  4. Other-Regulation in Collaborative Groups: Implications for Regulation Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogat, Toni Kempler; Adams-Wiggins, Karlyn R.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examines variation in other-regulation, conceptualized as efforts by one student to regulate their group's work. This study extends research which has conceptualized other-regulation as temporarily guiding others' conceptual understanding and skill development by broadening the spectrum of other-regulation to include…

  5. Environmentally regulated aerospace coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Virginia L.

    1995-01-01

    Aerospace coatings represent a complex technology which must meet stringent performance requirements in the protection of aerospace vehicles. Topcoats and primers are used, primarily, to protect the structural elements of the air vehicle from exposure to and subsequent degradation by environmental elements. There are also many coatings which perform special functions, i.e., chafing resistance, rain erosion resistance, radiation and electric effects, fuel tank coatings, maskants, wire and fastener coatings. The scheduled promulgation of federal environmental regulations for aerospace manufacture and rework materials and processes will regulate the emissions of photochemically reactive precursors to smog and air toxics. Aerospace organizations will be required to identify, qualify and implement less polluting materials. The elimination of ozone depleting chemicals (ODC's) and implementation of pollution prevention requirements are added constraints which must be addressed concurrently. The broad categories of operations affected are the manufacture, operation, maintenance, and repair of military, commercial, general aviation, and space vehicles. The federal aerospace regulations were developed around the precept that technology had to be available to support the reduction of organic and air toxic emissions, i.e., the regulations cannot be technology forcing. In many cases, the regulations which are currently in effect in the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD), located in Southern California, were used as the baseline for the federal regulations. This paper addresses strategies used by Southern California aerospace organizations to cope with these regulatory impacts on aerospace productions programs. All of these regulatory changes are scheduled for implementation in 1993 and 1994, with varying compliance dates established.

  6. Regulation of Energy Balance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, George A.

    1985-01-01

    Explains relationships between energy intake and expenditure focusing on the cellular, chemical and neural mechanisms involved in regulation of energy balance. Information is referenced specifically to conditions of obesity. (Physicians may earn continuing education credit by completing an appended test). (ML)

  7. Federal Regulation of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Martin

    Fresh light might be shed on problems of federal education policy by treating them not only as problems of intergovernmental relations but of government regulation of enterprise, given that they involve the attempts of a central government to influence the conduct of enterprises that it does not own nor directly operate. Using well-established…

  8. Adaptation with transcriptional regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenjia; Ma, Wenzhe; Xiong, Liyang; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Chao

    2017-02-01

    Biochemical adaptation is one of the basic functions that are widely implemented in biological systems for a variety of purposes such as signal sensing, stress response and homeostasis. The adaptation time scales span from milliseconds to days, involving different regulatory machineries in different processes. The adaptive networks with enzymatic regulation (ERNs) have been investigated in detail. But it remains unclear if and how other forms of regulation will impact the network topology and other features of the function. Here, we systematically studied three-node transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs), with three different types of gene regulation logics. We found that the topologies of adaptive gene regulatory networks can still be grouped into two general classes: negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed-forward loop (IFFL), but with some distinct topological features comparing to the enzymatic networks. Specifically, an auto-activation loop on the buffer node is necessary for the NFBL class. For IFFL class, the control node can be either a proportional node or an inversely-proportional node. Furthermore, the tunability of adaptive behavior differs between TRNs and ERNs. Our findings highlight the role of regulation forms in network topology, implementation and dynamics.

  9. Adaptation with transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wenjia; Ma, Wenzhe; Xiong, Liyang; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Biochemical adaptation is one of the basic functions that are widely implemented in biological systems for a variety of purposes such as signal sensing, stress response and homeostasis. The adaptation time scales span from milliseconds to days, involving different regulatory machineries in different processes. The adaptive networks with enzymatic regulation (ERNs) have been investigated in detail. But it remains unclear if and how other forms of regulation will impact the network topology and other features of the function. Here, we systematically studied three-node transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs), with three different types of gene regulation logics. We found that the topologies of adaptive gene regulatory networks can still be grouped into two general classes: negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed-forward loop (IFFL), but with some distinct topological features comparing to the enzymatic networks. Specifically, an auto-activation loop on the buffer node is necessary for the NFBL class. For IFFL class, the control node can be either a proportional node or an inversely-proportional node. Furthermore, the tunability of adaptive behavior differs between TRNs and ERNs. Our findings highlight the role of regulation forms in network topology, implementation and dynamics. PMID:28233824

  10. Regulating the New Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, Stephen; Goodship, Jo; Holloway, David

    2003-01-01

    This article arises out of a research project that sought to assess the development of regulation within the public sector. It examines the forms and impact of the regulatory systems that now operate within the public sector focusing on the further education sector. The research project developed out of an awareness that the increase in various…

  11. Metabolic regulation of yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiechter, A.

    1982-12-01

    Metabolic regulation which is based on endogeneous and exogeneous process variables which may act constantly or time dependently on the living cell is discussed. The observed phenomena of the regulation are the result of physical, chemical, and biological parameters. These parameters are identified. Ethanol is accumulated as an intermediate product and the synthesis of biomass is reduced. This regulatory effect of glucose is used for the aerobic production of ethanol. Very high production rates are thereby obtained. Understanding of the regulation mechanism of the glucose effect has improved. In addition to catabolite repression, several other mechanisms of enzyme regulation have been described, that are mostly governed by exogeneous factors. Glucose also affects the control of respiration in a third class of yeasts which are unable to make use of ethanol as a substrate for growth. This is due to the lack of any anaplerotic activity. As a consequence, diauxic growth behavior is reduced to a one-stage growth with a drastically reduced cell yield. The pulse chemostat technique, a systematic approach for medium design is developed and medium supplements that are essential for metabolic control are identified.

  12. Regulation and Markets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Margaret; Wells, Julie

    2007-01-01

    There has been much critical comment in recent years about the tensions between the regulation imposed on public universities and the flexibility needed to compete effectively in international and national markets for students and funding. In the partisan world of politics each side points the finger at the other as the author of "too…

  13. Neuroendocrine regulation of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Padro, Caroline J.; Sanders, Virginia M.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between the sympathetic nervous system and the immune system has been documented over the last several decades. In this review, the neuroanatomical, cellular, and molecular evidence for neuroimmune regulation in the maintenance of immune homeostasis will be discussed, as well as the potential impact of neuroimmune dysregulation in health and disease. PMID:24486056

  14. Regulating the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Byron

    2007-01-01

    The Internet's breakthrough to primetime usage beginning in the mid-1990s evolved in an era of openness. Unfettered access seemed key to Internet development. An important foundation for the 1996 Telecommunications Act was the theory that the telecom industry would work best if it were free of government regulation, a guiding principle that has…

  15. REGULATIONS AND SYLLABUSES, 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Associated Examining Board, Aldershot, Hampshire (England).

    EXAMINATIONS USED IN AWARDING EDUCATIONAL CERTIFICATES TO STUDENTS IN ENGLISH SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN 1968 ARE DESCRIBED IN THIS MANUAL. IT IS WRITTEN PRIMARILY FOR HEADS OF COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS AND DESCRIBES IN DETAIL THE PROCEDURES AND REGULATIONS FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF EXAMINATIONS IN ALL SUBJECT AREAS. EXAMINATIONS MAY BE TAKEN AT THE ORDINARY…

  16. REGULATIONS AND SYLLABUSES 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JOHNSON, ARTHUR L.; AND OTHERS

    DESCRIBED IN THIS MANUAL ARE EXAMINATIONS USED IN 1966 IN AWARDING EDUCATIONAL CERTIFICATES TO STUDENTS IN ENGLISH SECONDARY SCHOOLS AND ESTABLISHMENTS FOR FURTHER EDUCATION. IT IS WRITTEN PRIMARILY FOR HEADS OF COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS AND DESCRIBES IN DETAIL THE PROCEDURES AND REGULATIONS FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF EXAMINATIONS IN ALL SUBJECT AREAS.…

  17. REGULATIONS AND SYLLABUSES 1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Associated Examining Board, Aldershot, Hampshire (England).

    DESCRIBED IN THIS MANUAL ARE EXAMINATIONS USED IN 1967 IN AWARDING EDUCATIONAL CERTIFICATES TO STUDENTS IN ENGLISH SECONDARY SCHOOLS AND ESTABLISHMENTS FOR FURTHER EDUCATION. IT IS WRITTEN PRIMARILY FOR HEADS OF COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS AND DESCRIBES IN DETAIL THE PROCEDURES AND REGULATIONS FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF EXAMINATIONS IN ALL SUBJECT AREAS.…

  18. Regulation of serum phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Lederer, Eleanor

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of serum phosphate, an acknowledged risk factor for chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular mortality, is poorly understood. The discovery of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) as a key regulator of renal phosphate handling and activation of vitamin D has revolutionized our comprehension of phosphate homeostasis. Through as yet undetermined mechanisms, circulating and dietary phosphate appear to have a direct effect on FGF23 release by bone cells that, in turn, causes renal phosphate excretion and decreases intestinal phosphate absorption through a decrease in vitamin D production. Thus, the two major phosphaturic hormones, PTH and FGF23, have opposing effects on vitamin D production, placing vitamin D at the nexus of phosphate homeostasis. While our understanding of phosphate homeostasis has advanced, the factors determining regulation of serum phosphate level remain enigmatic. Diet, time of day, season, gender, age and genetics have all been identified as significant contributors to serum phosphate level. The effects of these factors on serum phosphate have major implications for what is understood as ‘normal’ and for studies of phosphate homeostasis and metabolism. Moreover, other hormonal mediators such as dopamine, insulin-like growth factor, and angiotensin II also affect renal handling of phosphate. How the major hormone effects on phosphate handling are regulated and how the effect of these other factors are integrated to yield the measurable serum phosphate are only now beginning to be studied. PMID:24973411

  19. Lightweight Regulated Power Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Power-supply circuit regulates output voltage by adjusting frequency of chopper circuit according to variations. Currently installed in battery charger for electric wheelchair, circuit is well suited to other uses in which light weight is important - for example, in portable computers, radios, and test instruments.

  20. Regulation of Energy Balance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, George A.

    1985-01-01

    Explains relationships between energy intake and expenditure focusing on the cellular, chemical and neural mechanisms involved in regulation of energy balance. Information is referenced specifically to conditions of obesity. (Physicians may earn continuing education credit by completing an appended test). (ML)

  1. Nondissipative optimum charge regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, R.; Vitebsky, J. N.

    1970-01-01

    Optimum charge regulator provides constant level charge/discharge control of storage batteries. Basic power transfer and control is performed by solar panel coupled to battery through power switching circuit. Optimum controller senses battery current and modifies duty cycle of switching circuit to maximize current available to battery.

  2. Regulating the New Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, Stephen; Goodship, Jo; Holloway, David

    2003-01-01

    This article arises out of a research project that sought to assess the development of regulation within the public sector. It examines the forms and impact of the regulatory systems that now operate within the public sector focusing on the further education sector. The research project developed out of an awareness that the increase in various…

  3. Regulated Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Breger, Ludivine; Wettergren, Erika Elgstrand; Quintino, Luis; Lundberg, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy represents a promising approach for the treatment of monogenic and multifactorial neurological disorders. It can be used to replace a missing gene and mutated gene or downregulate a causal gene. Despite the versatility of gene therapy, one of the main limitations lies in the irreversibility of the process: once delivered to target cells, the gene of interest is constitutively expressed and cannot be removed. Therefore, efficient, safe and long-term gene modification requires a system allowing fine control of transgene expression.Different systems have been developed over the past decades to regulate transgene expression after in vivo delivery, either at transcriptional or post-translational levels. The purpose of this chapter is to give an overview on current regulatory system used in the context of gene therapy for neurological disorders. Systems using external regulation of transgenes using antibiotics are commonly used to control either gene expression using tetracycline-controlled transcription or protein levels using destabilizing domain technology. Alternatively, specific promoters of genes that are regulated by disease mechanisms, increasing expression as the disease progresses or decreasing expression as disease regresses, are also examined. Overall, this chapter discusses advantages and drawbacks of current molecular methods for regulated gene therapy in the central nervous system.

  4. Adaptation with transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenjia; Ma, Wenzhe; Xiong, Liyang; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Chao

    2017-02-24

    Biochemical adaptation is one of the basic functions that are widely implemented in biological systems for a variety of purposes such as signal sensing, stress response and homeostasis. The adaptation time scales span from milliseconds to days, involving different regulatory machineries in different processes. The adaptive networks with enzymatic regulation (ERNs) have been investigated in detail. But it remains unclear if and how other forms of regulation will impact the network topology and other features of the function. Here, we systematically studied three-node transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs), with three different types of gene regulation logics. We found that the topologies of adaptive gene regulatory networks can still be grouped into two general classes: negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed-forward loop (IFFL), but with some distinct topological features comparing to the enzymatic networks. Specifically, an auto-activation loop on the buffer node is necessary for the NFBL class. For IFFL class, the control node can be either a proportional node or an inversely-proportional node. Furthermore, the tunability of adaptive behavior differs between TRNs and ERNs. Our findings highlight the role of regulation forms in network topology, implementation and dynamics.

  5. Federal Gasoline Regulations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Air Act requires EPA to regulate fuels and fuel additives for use in mobile sources if such fuel, fuel additive or any emission products causes or contributes to air or water pollution that may endanger the public health or welfare.

  6. Photovoltaic power regulation system

    SciTech Connect

    Jaster, D.R.

    1986-02-18

    This patent describes a multi-solar module direct current battery charging arrangement consisting of: a group of solar cells; a reverse current blocking diode; a first relay having an energizing winding; and a set of contacts; the diode, the energizing winding and the solar module connected across the battery; a second relay having a second set of contacts; the first relay contacts operate upon a predetermined current flow through the first relay winding to close the first relay and contacts to operate the second relay. A voltage regulator has a set of contacts. The regulator contacts operate upon the battery reaching a predetermined state of charge as indicated by the voltage level; solar cells and a third relay having a set of contacts; the second relay make contacts, the voltage regulator make contacts, the third relay and the second group of solar cells connected in series; the third relay operated upon the second relay operating indicating the solar cells are functioning, and the voltage regulator operating its associated contacts indicating the batteries require further charging to operate the third relay; and the third relay operated to close the associated contacts to connect the second plurality of solar cells across the battery.

  7. Arabidopsis Kelch Repeat F-Box Proteins Regulate Phenylpropanoid Biosynthesis via Controlling the Turnover of Phenylalanine Ammonia-Lyase[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuebin; Gou, Mingyue; Liu, Chang-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) catalyzes the first rate-limiting step in the phenylpropanoid pathway, which controls carbon flux to a variety of bioactive small-molecule aromatic compounds, and to lignin, the structural component of the cell wall. PAL is regulated at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Our knowledge about the transcriptional regulation of PAL is relatively comprehensive, but our knowledge of the molecular basis of the posttranslational regulation of PAL remains limited. Here, we demonstrate that the Arabidopsis thaliana Kelch repeat F-box (KFB) proteins KFB01, KFB20, and KFB50 physically interact with four PAL isozymes and mediate their proteolytic turnover via the ubiquitination-26S proteasome pathway. The KFB genes are differentially expressed in Arabidopsis tissues and respond to developmental and environmental cues. Up- or downregulation of their expression reciprocally affects the stability of the PAL enzymes, consequently altering the levels of phenylpropanoids. These data suggest that the KFB-mediated protein ubiquitination and degradation regulates the proteolysis of PALs, thus posttranslationally regulating phenylpropanoid metabolism. Characterizing the KFB-mediated proteolysis of PAL enzymes may inform future strategies for manipulating the synthesis of bioactive phenolics. PMID:24363316

  8. Air Weapon System Configuration Statement: SM-26S/T Machete

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    do not constitute, nor are to be misconstrued as, a proposal for the sale of SME . Flyaway cost data is for budgetary and market study purposes only...replaced by a HUD repeater. IFR certified, the cockpit is designed for Generation III night vision compliance and Helmet Mounted Cuing Systems/Integrated

  9. Air Weapon System Configuration Statement: SM-26S/T Machete

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    marketing research purposes only and do not constitute, nor are to be misconstrued as, a proposal for the sale of SME . Flyaway cost data is for budgetary...exception of the HUD being replaced by a HUD repeater. IFR certified, the cockpit is designed for Generation III night vision compliance and Helmet

  10. The 26S proteasome is a multifaceted target for anti-cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Grigoreva, Tatyana A; Tribulovich, Vyacheslav G; Garabadzhiu, Alexander V; Melino, Gerry; Barlev, Nickolai A

    2015-09-22

    Proteasomes play a critical role in the fate of proteins that are involved in major cellular processes, including signal transduction, gene expression, cell cycle, replication, differentiation, immune response, cellular response to stress, etc. In contrast to non-specific degradation by lysosomes, proteasomes are highly selective and destroy only the proteins that are covalently labelled with small proteins, called ubiquitins. Importantly, many diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases and cancers, are intimately connected to the activity of proteasomes making them an important pharmacological target. Currently, the vast majority of inhibitors are aimed at blunting the proteolytic activities of proteasomes. However, recent achievements in solving structures of proteasomes at very high resolution provided opportunities to design new classes of small molecules that target other physiologically-important enzymatic activities of proteasomes, including the de-ubiquitinating one. This review attempts to catalog the information available to date about novel classes of proteasome inhibitors that may have important pharmacological ramifications.

  11. Numerous proteins with unique characteristics are degraded by the 26S proteasome following monoubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Braten, Ori; Livneh, Ido; Ziv, Tamar; Admon, Arie; Kehat, Izhak; Caspi, Lilac H.; Gonen, Hedva; Bercovich, Beatrice; Godzik, Adam; Jahandideh, Samad; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Sommer, Thomas; Kwon, Yong Tae; Guharoy, Mainak; Tompa, Peter; Ciechanover, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    The “canonical” proteasomal degradation signal is a substrate-anchored polyubiquitin chain. However, a handful of proteins were shown to be targeted following monoubiquitination. In this study, we established—in both human and yeast cells—a systematic approach for the identification of monoubiquitination-dependent proteasomal substrates. The cellular wild-type polymerizable ubiquitin was replaced with ubiquitin that cannot form chains. Using proteomic analysis, we screened for substrates that are nevertheless degraded under these conditions compared with those that are stabilized, and therefore require polyubiquitination for their degradation. For randomly sampled representative substrates, we confirmed that their cellular stability is in agreement with our screening prediction. Importantly, the two groups display unique features: monoubiquitinated substrates are smaller than the polyubiquitinated ones, are enriched in specific pathways, and, in humans, are structurally less disordered. We suggest that monoubiquitination-dependent degradation is more widespread than assumed previously, and plays key roles in various cellular processes. PMID:27385826

  12. The role of ubiquitin and the 26S proteasome in plant abiotic stress signaling

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Sophia L.

    2014-01-01

    Ubiquitin is a small, highly conserved, ubiquitously expressed eukaryotic protein with immensely important and diverse regulatory functions. A well-studied function of ubiquitin is its role in selective proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). The UPS has emerged as an integral player in plant response and adaptation to environmental stresses such as drought, salinity, cold and nutrient deprivation. The UPS has also been shown to influence the production and signal transduction of stress-related hormones such as abscisic acid. Understanding UPS function has centered mainly on defining the role of E3 ubiquitin ligases, which are the substrate-recruiting component of the ubiquitination pathway. The recent identification of stress signaling/regulatory proteins that are the subject of ubiquitin-dependent degradation has increased our knowledge of how the UPS facilitates responses to adverse environmental conditions. A brief overview is provided on role of the UPS in modulating protein stability during abiotic stress signaling. E3 ubiquitin ligases for which stress-related substrate proteins have been identified are discussed. PMID:24795732

  13. Noncovalent inhibitors of human 20S and 26S proteasome based on trypsin inhibitor SFTI-1.

    PubMed

    Dębowski, Dawid; Cichorek, Mirosława; Lubos, Marta; Wójcik, Sławomir; Łęgowska, Anna; Rolka, Krzysztof

    2016-09-01

    Sunflower trypsin inhibitor (SFTI-1) is recognized as an attractive scaffold to designed potent inhibitors of various proteases. We have recently found that its analogues inhibit noncovalently both human and yeast 20S proteasomes. Here, a set of novel and more potent in vitro inhibitors is presented. The inhibitory potency of the peptides was assessed with human 20S proteasome in the presence or absence of sodium dodecyl sulfate and with human 26 proteasome. Their antiproliferative action against tumor (human melanoma cells A375) and normal cells (46 BR.1N human fibroblasts and HaCaT keratinocytes) was determined. The selected fluoresceine-labeled inhibitors were able to internalize into A375 cells and were sometimes present as foci in the cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 685-696, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The 26S proteasome is a multifaceted target for anti-cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Grigoreva, Tatyana A; Tribulovich, Vyacheslav G.; Garabadzhiu, Alexander V.; Melino, Gerry; Barlev, Nickolai A.

    2015-01-01

    Proteasomes play a critical role in the fate of proteins that are involved in major cellular processes, including signal transduction, gene expression, cell cycle, replication, differentiation, immune response, cellular response to stress, etc. In contrast to non-specific degradation by lysosomes, proteasomes are highly selective and destroy only the proteins that are covalently labelled with small proteins, called ubiquitins. Importantly, many diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases and cancers, are intimately connected to the activity of proteasomes making them an important pharmacological target. Currently, the vast majority of inhibitors are aimed at blunting the proteolytic activities of proteasomes. However, recent achievements in solving structures of proteasomes at very high resolution provided opportunities to design new classes of small molecules that target other physiologically-important enzymatic activities of proteasomes, including the de-ubiquitinating one. This review attempts to catalog the information available to date about novel classes of proteasome inhibitors that may have important pharmacological ramifications. PMID:26295307

  15. ELECTRON EMISSION REGULATING MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Brenholdt, I.R.

    1957-11-19

    >An electronic regulating system is described for controlling the electron emission of a cathode, for example, the cathode in a mass spectrometer. The system incorporates a transformer having a first secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding load by grid controlled vacuum tubes. A portion of the electron current emitted by the cathode is passed through a network which develops a feedback signal. The system arrangement is completed by using the feedback signal to control the vacuum tubes in the second secondary winding through a regulator tube. When a change in cathode emission occurs, the feedback signal acts to correct this change by adjusting the load on the transformer.

  16. A regulated magnetron pulser

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, C.R.

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes and analysis of a 4.5-kV, 500-mA, regulated current pulser used to drive a Hitachi ZM130 magnetron in a particle-accelerator injector. In this application, precise beam from the injector. A high-voltage triode vacuum tube with active feedback is used to control the magnetron current. Current regulation and accuracy is better than 1%. The pulse width may be varied from as little as 5 {mu}m to cw by varying the width of a gate pulse. The current level can be programmed between 10 and 500 mA. Design of the pulser including circuit simulations, power calculations, and high-voltage issues are discussed.

  17. Regulation of Meiotic Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory p. Copenhaver

    2011-11-09

    Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system

  18. Risk and regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Joan P.

    1994-12-01

    Regulation of the health care industry and development of drugs, biologics and devices has developed, in part, to ensure public safety. There are numerous forces that promote regulatory efforts and those that work against formal regulatory measures. This presentation provides an overview of the following: What is risk? What is risk assessment? What drives regulatory activity to ensure public safety? What are the issue areas surrounding cost benefit analysis? How is technology helpful in assessing and managing risks? How does health care reform drive new technologies which, in turn, must be assessed for risk and cost/benefit? A force field analysis model of factors contributing to regulatory activities and those that work against the promulgation of regulations is offered.

  19. CNS regulation of appetite.

    PubMed

    Harrold, Joanne A; Dovey, Terry M; Blundell, John E; Halford, Jason C G

    2012-07-01

    This article reviews the regulation of appetite from a biopsychological perspective. It considers psychological experiences and peripheral nutritional systems (both episodic and tonic) and addresses their relationship with the CNS networks that process and integrate their input. Whilst such regulatory aspects of obesity focus on homeostatic control mechanisms, in the modern environment hedonic aspects of appetite are also critical. Enhanced knowledge of the complexity of appetite regulation and the mechanisms that sustain obesity indicate the challenge presented by management of the obesity epidemic. Nonetheless, effective control of appetite expression remains a critical therapeutic target for weight management. Currently, strategies which utilise a combination of agents to target both homeostatic and hedonic control mechanisms represent the most promising approaches. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Central Control of Food Intake'.

  20. Redox regulated peroxisome homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Shuo; Liu, Yu; Ma, Changle

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous organelles present in nearly all eukaryotic cells. Conserved functions of peroxisomes encompass beta-oxidation of fatty acids and scavenging of reactive oxygen species generated from diverse peroxisomal metabolic pathways. Peroxisome content, number, and size can change quickly in response to environmental and/or developmental cues. To achieve efficient peroxisome homeostasis, peroxisome biogenesis and degradation must be orchestrated. We review the current knowledge on redox regulated peroxisome biogenesis and degradation with an emphasis on yeasts and plants. PMID:25545794

  1. Information Security Program Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    Over the High Seas," January 13, 1981 (rr) DoD Directive 5210.41, "Security Criteria and Standards for Pro - tecting Nuclear Weapons," September 12...relevant to operations of nongovernment personnel entrusted with classified information shall be made applicable thereto by con - tracts or other legally...Regulation applies to protection of classified information pro -cessed, stored or used in, or communicated, displayed or dissemi- nated by an automatic

  2. Regulation of biomedical products.

    PubMed

    Gillett, Grant; Saville-Cook, Donald

    2010-05-01

    Two recent decisions, one from Australia and one from Canada, should cause us to examine the ethical issues surrounding the regulation of biomedical products. The protection of vulnerable consumers from variable quality and poorly prepared drugs with uncertain parameters of safety and efficacy is a priority for any community and should not have to be weighed against possible costs based on restrictions of trade. However, the possibility of an environment in which the multinational biomedical industry edges out any other players in the treatment of various illnesses has its own dangers. Not least is the apparent collusion between regulators and industry that ramps up the costs and intensity of licensing and risk management so that only an industry-type budget can sustain the costs of compliance. This has the untoward effect of delivering contemporary health care into the hands of those who make immense fortunes out of it. An approach to regulation that tempers bureaucratic mechanisms with a dose of common sense and realistic evidence-based risk assessment could go a long way in avoiding the Scylla and Charybdis awaiting the clinical world in these troubled waters.

  3. [Sleep: regulation and phenomenology].

    PubMed

    Vecchierini, M-F

    2013-12-01

    This article describes the two-process model of sleep regulation. The 24-hour sleep-wake cycle is regulated by a homeostatic process and an endogenous, 2 oscillators, circadian process, under the influence of external synchronisers. These two processes are partially independent but influence each other, as shown in the two-sleep-process auto-regulation model. A reciprocal inhibition model of two interconnected neuronal groups, "SP on" and "SP off", explains the regular recurrence of paradoxical sleep. Sleep studies have primarily depended on observation of the subject and have determined the optimal conditions for sleep (position, external conditions, sleep duration and need) and have studied the consequences of sleep deprivation or modifications of sleep schedules. Then, electrophysiological recordings permitted the classification of sleep stages according to the observed EEG patterns. The course of a night's sleep is reported on a "hypnogram". The adult subject falls asleep in non-REM sleep (N1), then sleep deepens progressively to stages N2 and N3 with the appearance of spindles and slow waves (N2). Slow waves become more numerous in stage N3. Every 90minutes REM sleep recurs, with muscle atonia and rapid eye movements. These adult sleep patterns develop progressively during the 2 first years of life as total sleep duration decreases, with the reduction of diurnal sleep and of REM sleep. Around 2 to 4 months, spindles and K complexes appear on the EEG, with the differentiation of light and deep sleep with, however, a predominance of slow wave sleep.

  4. Cytokines in sleep regulation.

    PubMed

    Krueger, J M; Takahashi, S; Kapás, L; Bredow, S; Roky, R; Fang, J; Floyd, R; Renegar, K B; Guha-Thakurta, N; Novitsky, S

    1995-01-01

    The central thesis of this essay is that the cytokine network in brain is a key element in the humoral regulation of sleep responses to infection and in the physiological regulation of sleep. We hypothesize that many cytokines, their cellular receptors, soluble receptors, and endogenous antagonists are involved in physiological sleep regulation. The expressions of some cytokines are greatly amplified by microbial challenge. This excess cytokine production during infection induces sleep responses. The excessive sleep and wakefulness that occur at different times during the course of the infectious process results from dynamic changes in various cytokines that occur during the host's response to infectious challenge. Removal of any one somnogenic cytokine inhibits normal sleep, alters the cytokine network by changing the cytokine mix, but does not completely disrupt sleep due to the redundant nature of the cytokine network. The cytokine network operates in a paracrine/autocrine fashion and is responsive to neuronal use. Finally, cytokines elicit their somnogenic actions via endocrine and neurotransmitter systems as well as having direct effects neurons and glia. Evidence in support of these postulates is reviewed in this essay.

  5. Improving CS regulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Nesse, R.J.; Scheer, R.M.; Marasco, A.L.; Furey, R.

    1980-10-01

    President Carter issued Executive Order 12044 (3/28/78) that required all Federal agencies to distinguish between significant and insignificant regulations, and to determine whether a regulation will result in major impacts. This study gathered information on the impact of the order and the guidelines on the Office of Conservation and Solar Energy (CS) regulatory practices, investigated problems encountered by the CS staff when implementing the order and guidelines, and recommended solutions to resolve these problems. Major tasks accomplished and discussed are: (1) legislation, Executive Orders, and DOE Memoranda concerning Federal administrative procedures relevant to the development and analysis of regulations within CS reviewed; (2) relevant DOE Orders and Memoranda analyzed and key DOE and CS staff interviewed in order to accurately describe the current CS regulatory process; (3) DOE staff from the Office of the General Counsel, the Office of Policy and Evaluation, the Office of the Environment, and the Office of the Secretary interviewed to explore issues and problems encountered with current CS regulatory practices; (4) the regulatory processes at five other Federal agencies reviewed in order to see how other agencies have approached the regulatory process, dealt with specific regulatory problems, and responded to the Executive Order; and (5) based on the results of the preceding four tasks, recommendations for potential solutions to the CS regulatory problems developed. (MCW)

  6. Restructuring nuclear regulations.

    PubMed

    Mossman, Kenneth L

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear regulations are a subset of social regulations (laws to control activities that may negatively impact the environment, health, and safety) that concern control of ionizing radiation from radiation-producing equipment and from radioactive materials. The impressive safety record among nuclear technologies is due, in no small part, to the work of radiation safety professionals and to a protection system that has kept pace with the rapid technologic advancements in electric power generation, engineering, and medicine. The price of success, however, has led to a regulatory organization and philosophy characterized by complexity, confusion, public fear, and increasing economic costs. Over the past 20 years, regulatory costs in the nuclear sector have increased more than 250% in constant 1995 U.S. dollars. Costs of regulatory compliance can be reduced sharply, particularly when health and environmental benefits of risk reduction are questionable. Three key regulatory areas should be closely examined and modified to improve regulatory effectiveness and efficiency: a) radiation protection should be changed from a risk-based to dose-based system; b) the U.S. government should adopt the modern metric system (International System of Units), and radiation quantities and units should be simplified to facilitate international communication and public understanding; and c) a single, independent office is needed to coordinate nuclear regulations established by U.S. federal agencies and departments.

  7. Ensembl regulation resources

    PubMed Central

    Zerbino, Daniel R.; Johnson, Nathan; Juetteman, Thomas; Sheppard, Dan; Wilder, Steven P.; Lavidas, Ilias; Nuhn, Michael; Perry, Emily; Raffaillac-Desfosses, Quentin; Sobral, Daniel; Keefe, Damian; Gräf, Stefan; Ahmed, Ikhlak; Kinsella, Rhoda; Pritchard, Bethan; Brent, Simon; Amode, Ridwan; Parker, Anne; Trevanion, Steven; Birney, Ewan; Dunham, Ian; Flicek, Paul

    2016-01-01

    New experimental techniques in epigenomics allow researchers to assay a diversity of highly dynamic features such as histone marks, DNA modifications or chromatin structure. The study of their fluctuations should provide insights into gene expression regulation, cell differentiation and disease. The Ensembl project collects and maintains the Ensembl regulation data resources on epigenetic marks, transcription factor binding and DNA methylation for human and mouse, as well as microarray probe mappings and annotations for a variety of chordate genomes. From this data, we produce a functional annotation of the regulatory elements along the human and mouse genomes with plans to expand to other species as data becomes available. Starting from well-studied cell lines, we will progressively expand our library of measurements to a greater variety of samples. Ensembl’s regulation resources provide a central and easy-to-query repository for reference epigenomes. As with all Ensembl data, it is freely available at http://www.ensembl.org, from the Perl and REST APIs and from the public Ensembl MySQL database server at ensembldb.ensembl.org. Database URL: http://www.ensembl.org PMID:26888907

  8. Flow compensating pressure regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baehr, E. F. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for regulating pressure of treatment fluid during ophthalmic procedures is described. Flow sensing and pressure regulating diaphragms are used to modulate a flow control valve. The pressure regulating diaphragm is connected to the flow control valve to urge the valve to an open position due to pressure being applied to the diaphragm by bias means such as a spring. The flow sensing diaphragm is mechanically connected to the flow control valve and urges it to an opened position because of the differential pressure on the diaphragm generated by a flow of incoming treatment fluid through an orifice in the diaphragm. A bypass connection with a variable restriction is connected in parallel relationship to the orifice to provide for adjusting the sensitivity of the flow sensing diaphragm. A multiple lever linkage system is utilized between the center of the second diaphragm and the flow control valve to multiply the force applied to the valve by the other diaphragm and reverse the direction of the force.

  9. Whither tobacco product regulation?

    PubMed

    McNeill, Ann; Hammond, David; Gartner, Coral

    2012-03-01

    Despite decades of industry innovation and regulatory efforts, the harmfulness of conventional cigarettes has not changed. There are several pitfalls in this area, including the long time lag before health impacts of product regulatory changes become apparent, the danger of consumers deriving false reassurance of lesser harm in the interim period, the lack of relevant expertise and the lack of an internationally agreed and evidence-based strategic approach. Articles 9 and 10 of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control provide the potential for such a global strategy, and knowledge and research has increased significantly over recent years. However, there are huge opportunity costs in implementing product disclosure and regulatory strategies: most national regulators have very limited human and financial resources, which should be focused on other evidence-based tobacco control interventions. We believe therefore that it is now time to abandon the notion of safe or safer cigarettes while moving consumers towards cleaner nicotine products as soon as possible. In parallel to this, we recommend a number of other strategies be implemented including: reducing the appeal of all tobacco products, forbidding new tobacco products or brand variants being marketed without evidence of reduced harm, appeal or addictiveness, and developing a tobacco industry resourced, but industry independent, Framework Convention on Tobacco Control global repository to assist national regulators in understanding and regulating the products on their markets.

  10. FDA 101: Regulating Biological Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates FDA 101: Regulating Biological Products Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... and highly important field. back to top What biological products does FDA regulate? The Center for Biologics ...

  11. REGULATION OF VASCULOGENESIS AND ANGIOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regulation of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis.
    B.D. Abbott
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA
    Vasculogenesis and angiogenesis are regulated by a complex, interactive family of receptors and lig...

  12. Using Science for Environmental Regulation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scientists have helped apply environmental aquatic toxicology to develop regulations for EPA over many years. This presentation will highlight some historical changes in the aquatic environment and how EPA has used them to develop regulations for the Clean Water Act.

  13. White paper on occupational regulation.

    PubMed

    Rops, Mickie S

    2004-12-01

    There are many ways that occupations are regulated, with the degree of regulation usually depending on the amount of harm to the public that lack of regulation could bring. Strict regulations, such as mandatory licensure, are established through state law and maintained by a state board. Less strict regulations, such as voluntary credentialing, may be requirements by employers or third-party payers. This white paper reviews the possible approaches ASET could take toward regulation of the practice of electroneurodiagnostic technology: maintain position of neutrality, advocate for no statutory regulation of END, advocate for statutory regulation of END, or advocate for voluntary credentialing. The routes taken by other allied health fields are outlined, with exploration of the advantages and disadvantages of each option, as well as what would be required of ASET in terms of time and other resources to achieve each option. The appendix is a summary of entry requirements of several healthcare professions.

  14. REGULATION OF VASCULOGENESIS AND ANGIOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regulation of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis.
    B.D. Abbott
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA
    Vasculogenesis and angiogenesis are regulated by a complex, interactive family of receptors and lig...

  15. Proteomics of regulated secretory organelles.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Yannick; Schvartz, Domitille; Couté, Yohann; Sanchez, Jean-Charles

    2009-01-01

    Regulated secretory organelles are important subcellular structures of living cells that allow the release in the extracellular space of crucial compounds, such as hormones and neurotransmitters. Therefore, the regulation of biogenesis, trafficking, and exocytosis of regulated secretory organelles has been intensively studied during the last 30 years. However, due to the large number of different regulated secretory organelles, only a few of them have been specifically characterized. New insights into regulated secretory organelles open crucial perspectives for a better comprehension of the mechanisms that govern cell secretion. The combination of subcellular fractionation, protein separation, and mass spectrometry is also possible to study regulated secretory organelles at the proteome level. In this review, we present different strategies used to isolate regulated secretory organelles, separate their protein content, and identify the proteins by mass spectrometry. The biological significance of regulated secretory organelles-proteomic analysis is discussed as well. Copyright 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Using Science for Environmental Regulation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scientists have helped apply environmental aquatic toxicology to develop regulations for EPA over many years. This presentation will highlight some historical changes in the aquatic environment and how EPA has used them to develop regulations for the Clean Water Act.

  17. S-Adenosylmethionine Regulates Dual-Specificity Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase Expression in Mouse and Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tomasi, Maria Lauda; Ramani, Komal; Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Rodríguez, Manuel S.; Li, Tony W. H.; Ko, Kwangsuk; Yang, Heping; Bardag-Gorce, Fawzia; Iglesias-Ara, Ainhoa; Feo, Francesco; Pascale, Maria Rosa; Mato, José M.; Lu, Shelly C.

    2010-01-01

    Increased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity correlates with a more malignant hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) phenotype. There is a reciprocal regulation between p44/42 MAPK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase [ERK]1/2) and the dual-specificity MAPK phosphatase MKP-1/DUSP1. ERK phosphorylates DUSP1, facilitating its proteasomal degradation, whereas DUSP1 inhibits ERK activity. Methionine adenosyltransferase 1a (Mat1a) knockout (KO) mice express hepatic S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) deficiency and increased ERK activity and develop HCC. The aim of this study was to examine whether DUSP1 expression is regulated by SAM and if so, elucidate the molecular mechanisms. Studies were conducted using Mat1a KO mice livers, cultured mouse and human hepatocytes, and 20S and 26S proteasomes. DUSP1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels were reduced markedly in livers of Mat1a KO mice and in cultured mouse and human hepatocytes with protein falling to lower levels than mRNA. SAM treatment protected against the fall in DUSP1 mRNA and protein levels in mouse and human hepatocytes. SAM increased DUSP1 transcription, p53 binding to DUSP1 promoter, and stability of its mRNA and protein. Proteasomal chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activities were increased in Mat1a KO livers and cultured hepatocytes, which was blocked by SAM treatment. SAM inhibited chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activities by 40% and 70%, respectively, in 20S proteasomes and caused rapid degradation of some of the 26S proteasomal subunits, which was blocked by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. SAM treatment in Mat1a KO mice for 7 days raised SAM, DUSP1, mRNA and protein levels and lowered proteosomal and ERK activities. Conclusion DUSP1 mRNA and protein levels are lower in Mat1a KO livers and fall rapidly in cultured hepatocytes. SAM treatment increases DUSP1 expression through multiple mechanisms, and this may suppress ERK activity and malignant degeneration. PMID:20196119

  18. OsFTIP1-Mediated Regulation of Florigen Transport in Rice Is Negatively Regulated by the Ubiquitin-Like Domain Kinase OsUbDKγ4.

    PubMed

    Song, Shiyong; Chen, Ying; Liu, Lu; Wang, Yanwen; Bao, Shengjie; Zhou, Xuan; Teo, Zhi Wei Norman; Mao, Chuanzao; Gan, Yinbo; Yu, Hao

    2017-03-01

    Flowering time is a critical agronomic trait that determines successful seed production and adaptation of crop plants. Photoperiodic control of this process in flowering plants is mediated by the long-distance mobile signal called florigen partly encoded by FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) in Arabidopsis thaliana and its orthologs in other plant species. Despite the progress in understanding FT transport in the dicot model Arabidopsis, the mechanisms of florigen transport in monocots, which provide most of the biomass in agriculture, are unknown. Here, we show that rice FT-INTERACTING PROTEIN1 (OsFTIP1), a member of the family of multiple C2 domain and transmembrane region proteins (MCTPs) and the closest ortholog of Arabidopsis FTIP1, is required for export of RICE FLOWERING LOCUS T 1 (RFT1) from companion cells to sieve elements. This affects RFT1 movement to the shoot apical meristem and its regulation of rice flowering time under long days. We further reveal that a ubiquitin-like domain kinase γ4, OsUbDKγ4, interacts with OsFTIP1 and modulates its degradation in leaves through the 26S proteasome, which in turn affects RFT1 transport to the shoot apical meristem. Thus, dynamic modulation of OsFTIP1 abundance in leaves by a negative regulator OsUbDKγ4 is integral to the role of OsFTIP1 in mediating RFT1 transport in rice and provides key evidence for a conserved role of FTIP1-like MCTPs in mediating florigen transport in flowering plants. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  19. Feeding regulation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Pool, Allan-Hermann; Scott, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Neuromodulators play a key role in adjusting animal behavior based on environmental cues and internal needs. Here, we review the regulation of Drosophila feeding behavior to illustrate how neuromodulators achieve behavioral plasticity. Recent studies have made rapid progress in determining molecular and cellular mechanisms that translate the metabolic needs of the fly into changes in neuroendocrine and neuromodulatory states. These neuromodulators in turn promote or inhibit discrete feeding behavioral subprograms. This review highlights the links between physiological needs, neuromodulatory states, and feeding decisions. PMID:24937262

  20. Gastrointestinal hormones regulating appetite

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhri, Owais; Small, Caroline; Bloom, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The role of gastrointestinal hormones in the regulation of appetite is reviewed. The gastrointestinal tract is the largest endocrine organ in the body. Gut hormones function to optimize the process of digestion and absorption of nutrients by the gut. In this capacity, their local effects on gastrointestinal motility and secretion have been well characterized. By altering the rate at which nutrients are delivered to compartments of the alimentary canal, the control of food intake arguably constitutes another point at which intervention may promote efficient digestion and nutrient uptake. In recent decades, gut hormones have come to occupy a central place in the complex neuroendocrine interactions that underlie the regulation of energy balance. Many gut peptides have been shown to influence energy intake. The most well studied in this regard are cholecystokinin (CCK), pancreatic polypeptide, peptide YY, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin and ghrelin. With the exception of ghrelin, these hormones act to increase satiety and decrease food intake. The mechanisms by which gut hormones modify feeding are the subject of ongoing investigation. Local effects such as the inhibition of gastric emptying might contribute to the decrease in energy intake. Activation of mechanoreceptors as a result of gastric distension may inhibit further food intake via neural reflex arcs. Circulating gut hormones have also been shown to act directly on neurons in hypothalamic and brainstem centres of appetite control. The median eminence and area postrema are characterized by a deficiency of the blood–brain barrier. Some investigators argue that this renders neighbouring structures, such as the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and the nucleus of the tractus solitarius in the brainstem, susceptible to influence by circulating factors. Extensive reciprocal connections exist between these areas and the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and other energy-regulating centres of the

  1. [Regulation of terpene metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes accomplishments over the past year on understanding of terpene synthesis in mint plants and sage. Specifically reported are the fractionation of 4-S-limonene synthetase, the enzyme responsible for the first committed step to monoterpene synthesis, along with isolation of the corresponding RNA and DNA cloning of its gene; the localization of the enzyme within the oil glands, regulation of transcription and translation of the synthetase, the pathway to camphor biosynthesis,a nd studies on the early stages and branch points of the isoprenoid pathway.

  2. Epigenetic Regulation in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Pikaard, Craig S.; Mittelsten Scheid, Ortrun

    2014-01-01

    The study of epigenetics in plants has a long and rich history, from initial descriptions of non-Mendelian gene behaviors to seminal discoveries of chromatin-modifying proteins and RNAs that mediate gene silencing in most eukaryotes, including humans. Genetic screens in the model plant Arabidopsis have been particularly rewarding, identifying more than 130 epigenetic regulators thus far. The diversity of epigenetic pathways in plants is remarkable, presumably contributing to the phenotypic plasticity of plant postembryonic development and the ability to survive and reproduce in unpredictable environments. PMID:25452385

  3. Self-regulating valve

    DOEpatents

    Humphreys, D.A.

    1982-07-20

    A variable, self-regulating valve having a hydraulic loss coefficient proportional to a positive exponential power of the flow rate. The device includes two objects in a flow channel and structure which assures that the distance between the two objects is an increasing function of the flow rate. The range of spacing between the objects is such that the hydraulic resistance of the valve is an increasing function of the distance between the two objects so that the desired hydraulic loss coefficient as a function of flow rate is obtained without variation in the flow area.

  4. Variable orifice flow regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christianson, Rollin C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A flow regulator for high-pressure fluids at elevated temperatures includes a body having a flow passage extending between inlet and outlet openings. First and second orifice members are arranged in the flow passage so at least one of the orifice members can be moved transversely in relation to the flow passage between one operating position where the two orifice openings are aligned for establishing a maximum flow rate of fluids flowing through the flow passage and at least one other operating position in which the two openings are moderately misaligned with one another for establishing a predetermined reduced flow rate of fluids flowing through the flow passage.

  5. Applicability of PSD Regulations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  6. Control of mammalian circadian rhythm by CKIepsilon-regulated proteasome-mediated PER2 degradation.

    PubMed

    Eide, Erik J; Woolf, Margaret F; Kang, Heeseog; Woolf, Peter; Hurst, William; Camacho, Fernando; Vielhaber, Erica L; Giovanni, Andrew; Virshup, David M

    2005-04-01

    The mammalian circadian regulatory proteins PER1 and PER2 undergo a daily cycle of accumulation followed by phosphorylation and degradation. Although phosphorylation-regulated proteolysis of these inhibitors is postulated to be essential for the function of the clock, inhibition of this process has not yet been shown to alter mammalian circadian rhythm. We have developed a cell-based model of PER2 degradation. Murine PER2 (mPER2) hyperphosphorylation induced by the cell-permeable protein phosphatase inhibitor calyculin A is rapidly followed by ubiquitination and degradation by the 26S proteasome. Proteasome-mediated degradation is critically important in the circadian clock, as proteasome inhibitors cause a significant lengthening of the circadian period in Rat-1 cells. CKIepsilon (casein kinase Iepsilon) has been postulated to prime PER2 for degradation. Supporting this idea, CKIepsilon inhibition also causes a significant lengthening of circadian period in synchronized Rat-1 cells. CKIepsilon inhibition also slows the degradation of PER2 in cells. CKIepsilon-mediated phosphorylation of PER2 recruits the ubiquitin ligase adapter protein beta-TrCP to a specific site, and dominant negative beta-TrCP blocks phosphorylation-dependent degradation of mPER2. These results provide a biochemical mechanism and functional relevance for the observed phosphorylation-degradation cycle of mammalian PER2. Cell culture-based biochemical assays combined with measurement of cell-based rhythm complement genetic studies to elucidate basic mechanisms controlling the mammalian clock.

  7. Instructional Principles for Self Regulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ley, Kathryn; Young, Dawn B.

    This study analyzed the growing body of research on self regulation and the distinctive self regulation differences between higher and lower achieving adult learners to identify instructional principles to infuse compensatory support for weak self regulation. The following four principles are proposed: (1) prepare--the instruction should encourage…

  8. Regulation of skeletal muscle plasticity by glycogen synthase kinase-3β: a potential target for the treatment of muscle wasting.

    PubMed

    Verhees, Koen J P; Pansters, Nicholas A M; Schols, Annemie M W J; Langen, Ramon C J

    2013-01-01

    Muscle wasting is a prevalent and disabling condition in chronic disease and cancer and has been associated with increased mortality and impaired efficacy of surgical and medical interventions. Pharmacological therapies to combat muscle wasting are currently limited but considered as an important unmet medical need. Muscle wasting has been attributed to increased muscle proteolysis, and in particular ubiquitin 26S-proteasome system (UPS)-dependent protein breakdown. However, rates of muscle protein synthesis are also subject to extensive (patho) physiological regulation, and the balance between synthesis and degradation ultimately determines net muscle protein turnover. As multinucleated muscle fibers accommodate threshold changes in muscle protein content by the accretion and loss of muscle nuclei, myonuclear turnover may additionally determine muscle mass. Current insights in the mechanisms dictating muscle mass plasticity not only reveal intricate interactions and crosstalk between these processes, but imply the existence of signaling molecules that act as molecular switchboards, which coordinate and integrate cellular responses upon conditions that evoke changes in muscle mass. These "master regulators" of skeletal muscle mass plasticity are preferred targets for pharmacological modulation of skeletal muscle wasting. In this review Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) is highlighted as a master regulator of muscle mass plasticity since, in addition to its role in UPS-mediated muscle protein degradation, it also controls protein synthesis, and influences myonuclear accretion and cell death. Moreover, the regulation of GSK-3β activity as well as currently available pharmacological inhibitors are described and discussed in the context of multimodal treatment strategies aimed at the inhibition of GSK-3β, and optimal exploitation of its potential role as a central regulator of skeletal muscle mass plasticity for the treatment of muscle wasting.

  9. Environmental regulations on chlorofluorocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, J.S.; Wells, J.B. )

    1989-05-01

    In August 1988, the US Environmental Protection Agency issued final regulations that implement the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer. The regulations require a 50% reduction in consumption of fully halogenated chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) within 10 years and a freeze on consumption of halons within 4 years. The Montreal Protocol provisions were designed in September 1987 based on the results of a 2-year international series of scientific, technical, and economic workshops. As would be expected, scientific investigations continued during this period. While these investigations suggested that significant global depletion had already occurred, these preliminary findings were not taken into account during negotiations or rulemaking. In March 1988, however, the international Ozone Trends Panel confirmed the findings. Depletion greater than that projected under the Montreal Protocol has already occurred. An early reassessment of the Protocol provisions appears to be inevitable. Restrictions on CFCs will affect the refrigeration and air-conditioning industries. Emerging alternatives to CFCs include newly developed refrigerants, innovative designs, and engineering controls. Key issues in evaluating these alternatives include energy efficiency, capital costs, service to consumers, and compatibility with existing designs.

  10. Effective doses, guidelines & regulations.

    PubMed

    Burch, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    A number of countries have developed regulations or guidelines for cyanotoxins and cyanobacteria in drinking water, and in some cases in water used for recreational activity and agriculture. The main focus internationally has been upon microcystin toxins, produced predominantly by Microcystis aeruginosa. This is because microcystins are widely regarded as the most significant potential source of human injury from cyanobacteria on a world-wide scale. Many international guidelines have taken their lead from the World Health Organization's (WHO) provisional guideline of 1 microg L(-1) for microcystin-LR in drinking-water released in 1998 (WHO 2004). The WHO guideline value is stated as being 'provisional', because it covers only microcystin-LR, for reasons that the toxicology is limited and new data for toxicity of cyanobacterial toxins are being generated. The derivation of this guideline is based upon data that there is reported human injury related to consumption of drinking water containing cyanobacteria, or from limited work with experimental animals. It was also recognised that at present the human evidence for microcystin tumor promotion is inadequate and animal evidence is limited. As a result the guideline is based upon the model of deriving a Tolerable Daily intake (TDI) from an animal study No Observed Adverse Effects Level (NOAEL), with the application of appropriate safety or uncertainty factors. The resultant WHO guideline by definition is the concentration of a toxin that does not result in any significant risk to health of the consumer over a lifetime of consumption. Following the release of this WHO provisional guideline many countries have either adopted it directly (e.g., Czech Republic, France, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Brazil and Spain), or have adopted the same animal studies, TDI and derivation convention to arrive at slight variants based upon local requirements (e.g., Australia, Canada). Brazil currently has the most

  11. [Regulation of terpene metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1991-01-01

    During the last grant period, we have completed studies on the key pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism in sage and peppermint, and have, by several lines of evidence, deciphered the rate-limiting step of each pathway. We have at least partially purified and characterized the relevant enzymes of each pathway. We have made a strong case, based on analytical, in vivo, and in vitro studies, that terpene accumulation depends upon the balance between biosynthesis and catabolism, and provided supporting evidence that these processes are developmentally-regulated and very closely associated with senescence of the oil glands. Oil gland ontogeny has been characterized at the ultrastructural level. We have exploited foliar-applied bioregulators to delay gland senescence, and have developed tissue explant and cell culture systems to study several elusive aspects of catabolism. We have isolated pure gland cell clusters and localized monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism within these structures, and have used these preparations as starting materials for the purification to homogeneity of target regulatory'' enzymes. We have thus developed the necessary background knowledge, based on a firm understanding of enzymology, as well as the necessary experimental tools for studying the regulation of monoterpene metabolism at the molecular level. Furthermore, we are now in a position to extend our systematic approach to other terpenoid classes (C[sub 15]-C[sub 30]) produced by oil glands.

  12. Regulations and Procedures Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Lydia J.

    2011-07-25

    The purpose of the Regulations and Procedures Manual (RPM) is to provide LBNL personnel with a reference to University and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL or Laboratory) policies and regulations by outlining normal practices and answering most policy questions that arise in the day-to-day operations of Laboratory organizations. Much of the information in this manual has been condensed from detail provided in LBNL procedure manuals, Department of Energy (DOE) directives, and Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231. This manual is not intended, however, to replace any of those documents. RPM sections on personnel apply only to employees who are not represented by unions. Personnel policies pertaining to employees represented by unions may be found in their labor agreements. Questions concerning policy interpretation should be directed to the LBNL organization responsible for the particular policy. A link to the Managers Responsible for RPM Sections is available on the RPM home page. If it is not clear which organization is responsible for a policy, please contact Requirements Manager Lydia Young or the RPM Editor.

  13. Regulations and Procedures Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Lydia

    2010-09-30

    The purpose of the Regulations and Procedures Manual (RPM) is to provide Laboratory personnel with a reference to University and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory policies and regulations by outlining the normal practices and answering most policy questions that arise in the day-to-day operations of Laboratory departments. Much of the information in this manual has been condensed from detail provided in Laboratory procedure manuals, Department of Energy (DOE) directives, and Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231. This manual is not intended, however, to replace any of those documents. The sections on personnel apply only to employees who are not represented by unions. Personnel policies pertaining to employees represented by unions may be found in their labor agreements. Questions concerning policy interpretation should be directed to the department responsible for the particular policy. A link to the Managers Responsible for RPM Sections is available on the RPM home page. If it is not clear which department should be called, please contact the Associate Laboratory Director of Operations.

  14. Histamine regulates memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Passani, Maria Beatrice; Benetti, Fernando; Blandina, Patrizio; Furini, Cristiane R G; de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2017-08-23

    Recent findings have reasserted the role of histamine in the regulation of memory consolidation first proposed in 1986 in an inhibitory avoidance task in rats. They indicate that histamine is indeed a major regulator of memory consolidation in various tasks, through H2 receptors in the dorsal hippocampus and through H3 receptors in the basolateral amygdala, depending on the task. In the object recognition task, the memory enhancing effect is mediated by the three receptors (H1, H2, H3) in the dorsal hippocampus. In social recognition, the consolidation effect is mediated by H2 receptors in both amygdala and dorsal hippocampus. Data have suggested, in addition, influences on retrieval; this has been best studied in the dorsal hippocampus in step-down inhibitory avoidance task. Depending on the recent history of the conditioned stimulus (i.e., whether it has been recently reinforced or not), histamine acts on hippocampal H1 receptors, facilitating retrieval, or on H2 receptors, inhibiting it. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Translational regulation in nutrigenomics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Botao; Qian, Shu-Bing

    2011-11-01

    The emergence of genome-wide analysis to interrogate cellular DNA, RNA, and protein content has revolutionized the study of the control network that mediates cellular homeostasis. Nutrigenomics addresses the effect of nutrients on gene expression, which provides a basis for understanding the biological activity of dietary components. Translation of mRNAs represents the last step of genetic flow and primarily defines the proteome. Translational regulation is thus critical for gene expression, in particular, under nutrient excess or deficiency. Until recently, it was unclear how the global effects of translational control are influenced by nutrient signaling. An emerging concept of translational reprogramming addresses how to maintain the expression of specific proteins during pathophysiological conditions by translation of selective mRNAs. Here we describe recent advances in our understanding of translational control, nutrient signaling, and their dysregulation in aging and cancer. The mechanistic understanding of translational regulation in response to different nutrient conditions may help identify potential dietary and therapeutic targets to improve human health.

  16. Rapamycin regulates biochemical metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Tucci, Paola; Porta, Giovanni; Agostini, Massimiliano; Antonov, Alexey; Garabadgiu, Alexander Vasilievich; Melino, Gerry; Willis, Anne E

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is a master regulator of protein synthesis that couples nutrient sensing to cell growth, and deregulation of this pathway is associated with tumorigenesis. p53, and its less investigated family member p73, have been shown to interact closely with mTOR pathways through the transcriptional regulation of different target genes. To investigate the metabolic changes that occur upon inhibition of the mTOR pathway and the role of p73 in this response primary mouse embryonic fibroblast from control and TAp73−/− were treated with the macrocyclic lactone rapamycin. Extensive gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) analysis were used to obtain a rapamycin-dependent global metabolome profile from control or TAp73−/− cells. In total 289 metabolites involved in selective pathways were identified; 39 biochemical metabolites were found to be significantly altered, many of which are known to be associated with the cellular stress response. PMID:23839040

  17. Trust-based environmental regulation.

    PubMed

    Lange, Bettina; Gouldson, Andy

    2010-10-15

    Within this paper, we examine the contribution that trust-based relationships can make to achieving better-and particularly more effective, efficient and equitable-environmental regulation. While levels of trust in regulators, regulatory processes and outcomes are often discussed, the influence of trust on different actors and on different measures of regulatory performance is poorly understood. Within this paper, we define trust-based environmental regulation as a specific regulatory style that involves openness and cooperation in interaction between regulated, regulators and third-party stakeholders in order to achieve environmental protection objectives. We then discuss the pros and cons of trust relationships between regulators, regulated businesses and citizens for achieving behavioural change towards greater environmental protection. To illustrate the significance of these issues, we then examine three forms of contractual regulatory style where trust relationships are critically important: responsive regulation, self-regulation and environmental agreements. Based on this analysis, we highlight the importance of trust-based relationships, and we argue that one of the greatest contributions of trust-based environmental regulation is to challenge how we think about regulation. Trust is often understood as enabling existing regulatory relationships or in the case of self-regulation as a complement to regulation. However, we argue that the real potential of trust is to open up new ways for participants in regulatory regimes to engage in collective action, to go beyond a perception of regulation as driven by the competing interests of individual actors, and thus, to open up new channels of influence for behavioural change towards greater environmental protection. Our analysis therefore has great relevance for future research and for on-going debates on the future of regulation. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Bidirectional Pressure-Regulator System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth; Miller, John R.

    2008-01-01

    A bidirectional pressure-regulator system has been devised for use in a regenerative fuel cell system. The bidirectional pressure-regulator acts as a back-pressure regulator as gas flows through the bidirectional pressure-regulator in one direction. Later, the flow of gas goes through the regulator in the opposite direction and the bidirectional pressure-regulator operates as a pressure- reducing pressure regulator. In the regenerative fuel cell system, there are two such bidirectional regulators, one for the hydrogen gas and another for the oxygen gas. The flow of gases goes from the regenerative fuel cell system to the gas storage tanks when energy is being stored, and reverses direction, flowing from the storage tanks to the regenerative fuel cell system when the stored energy is being withdrawn from the regenerative fuel cell system. Having a single bidirectional regulator replaces two unidirectional regulators, plumbing, and multiple valves needed to reverse the flow direction. The term "bidirectional" refers to both the bidirectional nature of the gas flows and capability of each pressure regulator to control the pressure on either its upstream or downstream side, regardless of the direction of flow.

  19. Dwarf and short grain 1, encoding a putative U-box protein regulates cell division and elongation in rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Xing, Yadi; Lou, Qijin; Feng, Ping; Liu, Song; Zhu, Meidan; Yin, Wuzhong; Fang, Shunran; Lin, Yan; Zhang, Tianquan; Sang, Xianchun; He, Guanghua

    2017-02-01

    Plant hormones coordinate a plant's responses to environmental stimuli and the endogenous developmental programs for cell division and elongation. Brassinosteroids are among the most important of these hormones in plant development. Recently, the ubiquitin-26S-proteasome system was identified to play a key role in hormone biology. In this study, we analyzed the function of a rice (Oryza sativa) gene, DSG1, which encodes a U-box E3 ubiquitin ligase. In the dsg1 mutant (an allelic mutant of tud1), the lengths of the roots, internodes, panicles, and seeds were shorter than that in the wild-type, which was due to defects in cell division and elongation. In addition, the leaves of the dsg1 mutant were wider and curled. The DSG1 protein is nuclear- and cytoplasm-localized and does not show tissue specificity in terms of its expression, which occurs in roots, culms, leaves, sheaths, and spikelets. The dsg1 mutant is less sensitive to brassinosteroid treatment than the wild-type, and DSG1 expression is negatively regulated by brassinosteroids, ethylene, auxin, and salicylic acid. These results demonstrate that DSG1 positively regulates cell division and elongation and may be involved in multiple hormone pathways.

  20. Pubertal development and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Ana Paula; Kaiser, Ursula B

    2016-01-01

    Puberty marks the end of childhood and is a period when individuals undergo physiological and psychological changes to achieve sexual maturation and fertility. The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis controls puberty and reproduction and is tightly regulated by a complex network of excitatory and inhibitory factors. This axis is active in the embryonic and early postnatal stages of life and is subsequently restrained during childhood, and its reactivation culminates in puberty initiation. The mechanisms underlying this reactivation are not completely known. The age of puberty onset varies between individuals and the timing of puberty initiation is associated with several health outcomes in adult life. In this Series paper, we discuss pubertal markers, epidemiological trends of puberty initiation over time, and the mechanisms whereby genetic, metabolic, and other factors control secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone to determine initiation of puberty. PMID:26852256

  1. Regulation of Terpene Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Rodney Croteau

    2004-03-14

    OAK-B135 Research over the last four years has progressed fairly closely along the lines initially proposed, with progress-driven expansion of Objectives 1, 2 and 3. Recent advances have developed from three research thrusts: 1. Random sequencing of an enriched peppermint oil gland cDNA library has given access to a large number of potential pathway and regulatory genes for test of function; 2. The availability of new DNA probes and antibodies has permitted investigation of developmental regulation and organization of terpenoid metabolism; and 3. The development of a transformation system for peppermint by colleagues at Purdue University has allowed direct transgenic testing of gene function and added a biotechnological component to the project. The current status of each of the original research objectives is outlined below.

  2. Regulation of Transcript Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Belogurov, Georgiy A.; Artsimovitch, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria lack subcellular compartments and harbor a single RNA polymerase that synthesizes both structural and protein-coding RNAs, which are cotranscriptionally processed by distinct pathways. Nascent rRNAs fold into elaborate secondary structures and associate with ribosomal proteins, whereas nascent mRNAs are translated by ribosomes. During elongation, nucleic acid signals and regulatory proteins modulate concurrent RNA-processing events, instruct RNA polymerase where to pause and terminate transcription, or act as roadblocks to the moving enzyme. Communications among complexes that carry out transcription, translation, repair, and other cellular processes ensure timely execution of the gene expression program and survival under conditions of stress. This network is maintained by auxiliary proteins that act as bridges between RNA polymerase, ribosome, and repair enzymes, blurring boundaries between separate information-processing steps and making assignments of unique regulatory functions meaningless. Understanding the regulation of transcript elongation thus requires genome-wide approaches, which confirm known and reveal new regulatory connections. PMID:26132790

  3. Factors regulating microglia activation

    PubMed Central

    Kierdorf, Katrin; Prinz, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Microglia are resident macrophages of the central nervous system (CNS) that display high functional similarities to other tissue macrophages. However, it is especially important to create and maintain an intact tissue homeostasis to support the neuronal cells, which are very sensitive even to minor changes in their environment. The transition from the “resting” but surveying microglial phenotype to an activated stage is tightly regulated by several intrinsic (e.g., Runx-1, Irf8, and Pu.1) and extrinsic factors (e.g., CD200, CX3CR1, and TREM2). Under physiological conditions, minor changes of those factors are sufficient to cause fatal dysregulation of microglial cell homeostasis and result in severe CNS pathologies. In this review, we discuss recent achievements that gave new insights into mechanisms that ensure microglia quiescence. PMID:23630462

  4. Regulation of cholesterol homeostasis.

    PubMed

    van der Wulp, Mariëtte Y M; Verkade, Henkjan J; Groen, Albert K

    2013-04-10

    Hypercholesterolemia is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It is caused by a disturbed balance between cholesterol secretion into the blood versus uptake. The pathways involved are regulated via a complex interplay of enzymes, transport proteins, transcription factors and non-coding RNA's. The last two decades insight into underlying mechanisms has increased vastly but there are still a lot of unknowns, particularly regarding intracellular cholesterol transport. After decades of concentration on the liver, in recent years the intestine has come into focus as an important control point in cholesterol homeostasis. This review will discuss current knowledge of cholesterol physiology, with emphasis on cholesterol absorption, cholesterol synthesis and fecal excretion, and new (possible) therapeutic options for hypercholesterolemia.

  5. Transcription Regulation in Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Gehring, Alexandra M.; Walker, Julie E.

    2016-01-01

    The known diversity of metabolic strategies and physiological adaptations of archaeal species to extreme environments is extraordinary. Accurate and responsive mechanisms to ensure that gene expression patterns match the needs of the cell necessitate regulatory strategies that control the activities and output of the archaeal transcription apparatus. Archaea are reliant on a single RNA polymerase for all transcription, and many of the known regulatory mechanisms employed for archaeal transcription mimic strategies also employed for eukaryotic and bacterial species. Novel mechanisms of transcription regulation have become apparent by increasingly sophisticated in vivo and in vitro investigations of archaeal species. This review emphasizes recent progress in understanding archaeal transcription regulatory mechanisms and highlights insights gained from studies of the influence of archaeal chromatin on transcription. PMID:27137495

  6. Magnetostrictive Pressure Regulating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James A. (Inventor); Pickens, Herman L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A magnetostrictive pressure regulating system includes a magnetostrictive valve that incorporates a magnetostrictive actuator with at least one current-carrying coil disposed thereabout. A pressure force sensor, in fluid communication with the fluid exiting the valve, includes (i) a magnetostrictive material, (ii) a magnetic field generator in proximity to the magnetostrictive material for inducing a magnetic field in and surrounding the magnetostrictive material wherein lines of magnetic flux passing through the magnetostrictive material are defined, and (iii) a sensor positioned adjacent to the magnetostrictive material and in the magnetic field for measuring changes in at least one of flux angle and flux density when the magnetostrictive material experiences an applied force that is aligned with the lines of magnetic flux. The pressure of the fluid exiting the valve causes the applied force. A controller coupled to the sensor and to the current-carrying coil adjusts a current supplied to the current-carrying coil based on the changes so-measured.

  7. Redox regulation: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Karl-Josef; Scheibe, Renate

    2004-01-01

    The redox-state is a critical determinate of cell function, and any major imbalances can cause severe damage or death. The cellular redox status therefore needs to be sensed and modulated before such imbalances occur. Various redox-active components are involved in these processes, including thioredoxins, glutaredoxins and other thiol/disulphide-containing proteins. The cellular reactions for cytoprotection and for signalling are integrated with physiological redox-reactions in photosynthesis, assimilation and respiration. They also determine the developmental fate of the cell and finally decide on proliferation or cell death. An international workshop on redox regulation, organized by the research initiative FOR 387 of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, was held in Bielefeld, Germany in 2002. A selection of articles originating from the meeting is printed in this issue of Physiologia Plantarum.

  8. Immune Regulation of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Disis, Mary L.

    2010-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immune system cells play a major role in regulating the growth of cancer. Although it is commonly thought that an immune response localized to the tumor will inhibit cancer growth, it is clear that some types of inflammation induced in a tumor may also lead to cancer proliferation, invasion, and dissemination. Recent evidence suggests, however, that some patients with cancer can mount an antitumor immune response that has the potential to control or eliminate cancer. Indeed, a so-called “immune response” signature has been described in malignancy that is associated with improved outcomes in several tumor types. Moreover, the presence of specific subsets of T cells, which have the capability to penetrate tumor stroma and infiltrate deep into the parenchyma, identifies patients with an improved prognosis. Immune-based therapies have the potential to modulate the tumor microenvironment by eliciting immune system cells that will initiate acute inflammation that leads to tissue destruction. PMID:20516428

  9. Pubertal development and regulation.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Ana Paula; Kaiser, Ursula B

    2016-03-01

    Puberty marks the end of childhood and is a period when individuals undergo physiological and psychological changes to achieve sexual maturation and fertility. The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis controls puberty and reproduction and is tightly regulated by a complex network of excitatory and inhibitory factors. This axis is active in the embryonic and early postnatal stages of life and is subsequently restrained during childhood, and its reactivation culminates in puberty initiation. The mechanisms underlying this reactivation are not completely known. The age of puberty onset varies between individuals and the timing of puberty initiation is associated with several health outcomes in adult life. In this Series paper, we discuss pubertal markers, epidemiological trends of puberty initiation over time, and the mechanisms whereby genetic, metabolic, and other factors control secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone to determine initiation of puberty.

  10. Endocannabinoids in cerebrovascular regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ruisanchez, Éva; Leszl-Ishiguro, Miriam; Sándor, Péter; Pacher, Pál

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral blood flow is tightly regulated by myogenic, endothelial, metabolic, and neural mechanisms under physiological conditions, and a large body of recent evidence indicates that inflammatory pathways have a major influence on the cerebral blood perfusion in certain central nervous system disorders, like hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, and vascular dementia. All major cell types involved in cerebrovascular control pathways (i.e., smooth muscle, endothelium, neurons, astrocytes, pericytes, microglia, and leukocytes) are capable of synthesizing endocannabinoids and/or express some or several of their target proteins [i.e., the cannabinoid 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2) receptors and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 ion channel]. Therefore, the endocannabinoid system may importantly modulate the regulation of cerebral circulation under physiological and pathophysiological conditions in a very complex manner. Experimental data accumulated since the late 1990s indicate that the direct effect of cannabinoids on cerebral vessels is vasodilation mediated, at least in part, by CB1 receptors. Cannabinoid-induced cerebrovascular relaxation involves both a direct inhibition of smooth muscle contractility and a release of vasodilator mediator(s) from the endothelium. However, under stress conditions (e.g., in conscious restrained animals or during hypoxia and hypercapnia), cannabinoid receptor activation was shown to induce a reduction of the cerebral blood flow, probably via inhibition of the electrical and/or metabolic activity of neurons. Finally, in certain cerebrovascular pathologies (e.g., subarachnoid hemorrhage, as well as traumatic and ischemic brain injury), activation of CB2 (and probably yet unidentified non-CB1/non-CB2) receptors appear to improve the blood perfusion of the brain via attenuating vascular inflammation. PMID:26825517

  11. [Regulation of terpene metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1989-11-09

    Terpenoid oils, resins, and waxes from plants are important renewable resources. The objective of this project is to understand the regulation of terpenoid metabolism using the monoterpenes (C[sub 10]) as a model. The pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism have been established, and the relevant enzymes characterized. Developmental studies relating enzyme levels to terpene accumulation within the oil gland sites of synthesis, and work with bioregulators, indicate that monoterpene production is controlled by terpene cyclases, the enzymes catalyzing the first step of the monoterpene pathway. As the leaf oil glands mature, cyclase levels decline and monoterpene biosynthesis ceases. Yield then decreases as the monoterpenes undergo catabolism by a process involving conversion to a glycoside and transport from the leaf glands to the root. At this site, the terpenoid is oxidatively degraded to acetate that is recycled into other lipid metabolites. During the transition from terpene biosynthesis to catabolism, the oil glands undergo dramatic ultrastructural modification. Degradation of the producing cells results in mixing of previously compartmentized monoterpenes with the catabolic enzymes, ultimately leading to yield decline. This regulatory model is being applied to the formation of other terpenoid classes (C[sub 15] C[sub 20], C[sub 30], C[sub 40]) within the oil glands. Preliminary investigations on the formation of sesquiterpenes (C[sub 15]) suggest that the corresponding cyclases may play a lesser role in determining yield of these products, but that compartmentation effects are important. From these studies, a comprehensive scheme for the regulation of terpene metabolism is being constructed. Results from this project wail have important consequences for the yield and composition of terpenoid natural products that can be made available for industrial exploitation.

  12. Endocannabinoids in cerebrovascular regulation.

    PubMed

    Benyó, Zoltán; Ruisanchez, Éva; Leszl-Ishiguro, Miriam; Sándor, Péter; Pacher, Pál

    2016-04-01

    The cerebral blood flow is tightly regulated by myogenic, endothelial, metabolic, and neural mechanisms under physiological conditions, and a large body of recent evidence indicates that inflammatory pathways have a major influence on the cerebral blood perfusion in certain central nervous system disorders, like hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, and vascular dementia. All major cell types involved in cerebrovascular control pathways (i.e., smooth muscle, endothelium, neurons, astrocytes, pericytes, microglia, and leukocytes) are capable of synthesizing endocannabinoids and/or express some or several of their target proteins [i.e., the cannabinoid 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2) receptors and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 ion channel]. Therefore, the endocannabinoid system may importantly modulate the regulation of cerebral circulation under physiological and pathophysiological conditions in a very complex manner. Experimental data accumulated since the late 1990s indicate that the direct effect of cannabinoids on cerebral vessels is vasodilation mediated, at least in part, by CB1 receptors. Cannabinoid-induced cerebrovascular relaxation involves both a direct inhibition of smooth muscle contractility and a release of vasodilator mediator(s) from the endothelium. However, under stress conditions (e.g., in conscious restrained animals or during hypoxia and hypercapnia), cannabinoid receptor activation was shown to induce a reduction of the cerebral blood flow, probably via inhibition of the electrical and/or metabolic activity of neurons. Finally, in certain cerebrovascular pathologies (e.g., subarachnoid hemorrhage, as well as traumatic and ischemic brain injury), activation of CB2 (and probably yet unidentified non-CB1/non-CB2) receptors appear to improve the blood perfusion of the brain via attenuating vascular inflammation.

  13. TFEB regulates lysosomal proteostasis.

    PubMed

    Song, Wensi; Wang, Fan; Savini, Marzia; Ake, Ashley; di Ronza, Alberto; Sardiello, Marco; Segatori, Laura

    2013-05-15

    Loss-of-function diseases are often caused by destabilizing mutations that lead to protein misfolding and degradation. Modulating the innate protein homeostasis (proteostasis) capacity may lead to rescue of native folding of the mutated variants, thereby ameliorating the disease phenotype. In lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs), a number of highly prevalent alleles have missense mutations that do not impair the enzyme's catalytic activity but destabilize its native structure, resulting in the degradation of the misfolded protein. Enhancing the cellular folding capacity enables rescuing the native, biologically functional structure of these unstable mutated enzymes. However, proteostasis modulators specific for the lysosomal system are currently unknown. Here, we investigate the role of the transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis and function, in modulating lysosomal proteostasis in LSDs. We show that TFEB activation results in enhanced folding, trafficking and lysosomal activity of a severely destabilized glucocerebrosidase (GC) variant associated with the development of Gaucher disease (GD), the most common LSD. TFEB specifically induces the expression of GC and of key genes involved in folding and lysosomal trafficking, thereby enhancing both the pool of mutated enzyme and its processing through the secretory pathway. TFEB activation also rescues the activity of a β-hexosaminidase mutant associated with the development of another LSD, Tay-Sachs disease, thus suggesting general applicability of TFEB-mediated proteostasis modulation to rescue destabilizing mutations in LSDs. In summary, our findings identify TFEB as a specific regulator of lysosomal proteostasis and suggest that TFEB may be used as a therapeutic target to rescue enzyme homeostasis in LSDs.

  14. Branded prescription drug fee. Final regulations, temporary regulations, and removal of temporary regulations.

    PubMed

    2014-07-28

    This document contains final regulations that provide guidance on the annual fee imposed on covered entities engaged in the business of manufacturing or importing branded prescription drugs. This fee was enacted by section 9008 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by section 1404 of the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010. This document also withdraws the Branded Prescription Drug Fee temporary regulations and contains new temporary regulations regarding the definition of controlled group that apply beginning on January 1, 2015. The final regulations and the new temporary regulations affect persons engaged in the business of manufacturing or importing certain branded prescription drugs. The text of the temporary regulations in this document also serves as the text of proposed regulations set forth in a notice of proposed rulemaking (REG-123286-14) on this subject in the Proposed Rules section in this issue of the Federal Register.

  15. Regulating the regulators: serine/arginine-rich proteins under scrutiny.

    PubMed

    Risso, Guillermo; Pelisch, Federico; Quaglino, Ana; Pozzi, Berta; Srebrow, Anabella

    2012-10-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are among the most studied splicing regulators. They constitute a family of evolutionarily conserved proteins that, apart from their initially identified and deeply studied role in splicing regulation, have been implicated in genome stability, chromatin binding, transcription elongation, mRNA stability, mRNA export and mRNA translation. Remarkably, this list of SR protein activities seems far from complete, as unexpected functions keep being unraveled. An intriguing aspect that awaits further investigation is how the multiple tasks of SR proteins are concertedly regulated within mammalian cells. In this article, we first discuss recent findings regarding the regulation of SR protein expression, activity and accessibility. We dive into recent studies describing SR protein auto-regulatory feedback loops involving different molecular mechanisms such asunproductive splicing, microRNA-mediated regulation and translational repression. In addition, we take into account another step of regulation of SR proteins, presenting new findings about a variety of post-translational modifications by proteomics approaches and how some of these modifications can regulate SR protein sub-cellular localization or stability. Towards the end, we focus in two recently revealed functions of SR proteins beyond mRNA biogenesis and metabolism, the regulation of micro-RNA processing and the regulation of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) conjugation. Copyright © 2012 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. ELECTRICAL REGULATING APPARATUS INCLUDING AN IONIC CURRENT REGULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Brackney, H.W.

    1958-08-12

    An apparatus is described for regulating the operation of an electromagmetic charged particle separator lt consists of an electrical circuit for innproving the regulation of the accelerating voltage of a calutron when the ionic current regulator control means is disconnected. The novel circuit arrangement connects the input of the ionic current regulator to a voltage divider. in association with a second voltage regulatora to furnish an accelerating voltage output which remains constant at a mean value instead of zero as has been the practice.

  17. Shame regulation in personality pathology.

    PubMed

    Schoenleber, Michelle; Berenbaum, Howard

    2012-05-01

    Drawing on extant work on shame and emotion regulation, this article proposes that three broad forms of maladaptive shame regulation strategies are fundamental in much of personality pathology: Prevention (e.g., dependence, fantasy), used preemptively, lessens potential for shame; Escape (e.g., social withdrawal, misdirection) reduces current or imminent shame; Aggression, used after shame begins, refocuses shame into anger directed at the self (e.g., physical self-harm) or others (e.g., verbal aggression). This article focuses on the contributions of shame regulation to the development and maintenance of personality pathology, highlighting how various maladaptive shame regulation strategies may lead to personality pathology symptoms, associated features, and dimensions. Consideration is also given to the possible shame-related constructs necessitating emotion regulation (e.g., shame aversion and proneness) and the points in the emotion process when regulation can occur.

  18. Transcriptional regulation during Drosophila spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Cindy; Tarayrah, Lama; Chen, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila spermatogenesis has become a paradigmatic system for the study of mechanisms that regulate adult stem cell maintenance, proliferation and differentiation. The dramatic cellular differentiation process from germline stem cell (GSC) to mature sperm is accompanied by dynamic changes in gene expression, which are regulated at transcriptional, post-transcriptional (including translational) and post-translational levels. Post-transcriptional regulation has been proposed as a unique feature of germ cells. However, recent studies have provided new insights into transcriptional regulation during Drosophila spermatogenesis. Both signaling pathways and epigenetic mechanisms act to orchestrate the transcriptional regulation of distinct genes at different germ cell differentiation stages. Many of the regulatory pathways that control male gamete differentiation in Drosophila are conserved in mammals. Therefore, studies using Drosophila spermatogenesis will provide insight into the molecular mechanisms that regulate mammalian germ cell differentiation pathways. PMID:23087835

  19. Sustainable regulation of construction.

    PubMed

    2000-11-01

    The seminar examined the role building codes and regulations can have in promoting a more sustainable approach to construction, particularly through their application to non-industrial building materials. A range of building materials such as straw, bamboo, rammed earth, adobe, and cob (a mixture of clay and chopped straw) were described and illustrated by slides to show their building potential. The current codes have a prime concern to protect the health and safety of people from the built environment. They have been developed almost exclusively for mainstream industrial materials and methods of construction, which makes them difficult to use with alternative, indigenous, or non-industrial building materials, even though those materials may be considered more sustainable. The argument was put forward that with only one-third of the world population living in modern industrial buildings today, it is not sustainable to re-house the remaining rapidly expanding population in high technology dwellings. Many of the low technology building materials and methods now used by the majority of people in the world need only incremental improvement to be equal or superior to many of their industrial replacements. Since these can be more sustainable methods of building, there needs to be an acceptance of the use of alternative materials, particularly in the developing parts of the world, where they are being rejected for less sustainable industrial methods. However, many codes make it difficult to use non-industrial materials; indeed, many of the industrial materials would not meet the demands that must be now met if they were now being introduced as new materials. Consequently, there is a need to develop codes to facilitate the use of a wider range of materials than in current use, and research is needed to assist this development. Sustainable regulation should take into account the full range of real impacts that materials and systems have in areas such as resource use and

  20. New EU regulations in endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Wächter, M; Diekjobst, T

    1995-09-01

    As a result of European unification, new regulations valid within the territory of the European Union (EU) have been negotiated and published. As in other medical fields, the Medical Device Directive (MDD) is the most important new regulation and also effects endoscopy. In a transition period until June 1998, the MDD will be transposed into national law by the member states of the EU. Compliance with the MDD and other European regulations is indicated by the CE mark affixed to the product.

  1. Expression, regulation and activity of a B2-type cyclin in mitotic and endoreduplicating maize endosperm

    PubMed Central

    Sabelli, Paolo A.; Dante, Ricardo A.; Nguyen, Hong N.; Gordon-Kamm, William J.; Larkins, Brian A.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases, the master regulators of the eukaryotic cell cycle, are complexes comprised of a catalytic serine/threonine protein kinase and an essential regulatory cyclin. The maize genome encodes over 50 cyclins grouped in different types, but they have been little investigated. We characterized a type B2 cyclin (CYCB2;2) during maize endosperm development, which comprises a cell proliferation phase based on the standard mitotic cell cycle, followed by an endoreduplication phase in which DNA replication is reiterated in the absence of mitosis or cytokinesis. CYCB2;2 RNA was present throughout the period of endosperm development studied, but its level declined as the endosperm transitioned from a mitotic to an endoreduplication cell cycle. However, the level of CYCB2;2 protein remained relatively constant during both stages of endosperm development. CYCB2;2 was recalcitrant to degradation by the 26S proteasome in endoreduplicating endosperm extracts, which could explain its sustained accumulation during endosperm development. In addition, although CYCB2;2 was generally localized to the nucleus of endosperm cells, a lower molecular weight form of the protein accumulated specifically in the cytosol of endoreduplicating endosperm cells. In dividing cells, CYCB2;2 appeared to be localized to the phragmoplast and may be involved in cytokinesis and cell wall formation. Kinase activity was associated with CYCB2;2 in mitotic endosperm, but was absent or greatly reduced in immature ear and endoreduplicating endosperm. CYCB2;2-associated kinase phosphorylated maize E2F1 and the “pocket” domains of RBR1 and RBR3. CYCB2;2 interacted with both maize CDKA;1 and CDKA;3 in insect cells. These results suggest CYCB2;2 functions primarily during the mitotic cell cycle, and they are discussed in the context of the roles of cyclins, CDKs and proteasome activity in the regulation of the cell cycle during endosperm development. PMID:25368625

  2. Insights into the regulation of the human COP9 signalosome catalytic subunit, CSN5/Jab1

    PubMed Central

    Echalier, Aude; Pan, Yunbao; Birol, Melissa; Tavernier, Nicolas; Pintard, Lionel; Hoh, François; Ebel, Christine; Galophe, Nathalie; Claret, François X.; Dumas, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The COP9 (Constitutive photomorphogenesis 9) signalosome (CSN), a large multiprotein complex that resembles the 19S lid of the 26S proteasome, plays a central role in the regulation of the E3-cullin RING ubiquitin ligases (CRLs). The catalytic activity of the CSN complex, carried by subunit 5 (CSN5/Jab1), resides in the deneddylation of the CRLs that is the hydrolysis of the cullin-neural precursor cell expressed developmentally downregulated gene 8 (Nedd8)isopeptide bond. Whereas CSN-dependent CSN5 displays isopeptidase activity, it is intrinsically inactive in other physiologically relevant forms. Here we analyze the crystal structure of CSN5 in its catalytically inactive form to illuminate the molecular basis for its activation state. We show that CSN5 presents a catalytic domain that brings essential elements to understand its activity control. Although the CSN5 active site is catalytically competent and compatible with di-isopeptide binding, the Ins-1 segment obstructs access to its substrate-binding site, and structural rearrangements are necessary for the Nedd8-binding pocket formation. Detailed study of CSN5 by molecular dynamics unveils signs of flexibility and plasticity of the Ins-1 segment. These analyses led to the identification of a molecular trigger implicated in the active/inactive switch that is sufficient to impose on CSN5 an active isopeptidase state. We show that a single mutation in the Ins-1 segment restores biologically relevant deneddylase activity. This study presents detailed insights into CSN5 regulation. Additionally, a dynamic monomer-dimer equilibrium exists both in vitro and in vivo and may be functionally relevant. PMID:23288897

  3. Power-MOSFET Voltage Regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W. N.; Gray, O. E.

    1982-01-01

    Ninety-six parallel MOSFET devices with two-stage feedback circuit form a high-current dc voltage regulator that also acts as fully-on solid-state switch when fuel-cell out-put falls below regulated voltage. Ripple voltage is less than 20 mV, transient recovery time is less than 50 ms. Parallel MOSFET's act as high-current dc regulator and switch. Regulator can be used wherever large direct currents must be controlled. Can be applied to inverters, industrial furnaces photovoltaic solar generators, dc motors, and electric autos.

  4. Metabolic regulation via enzyme filamentation

    PubMed Central

    Aughey, Gabriel N.; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Determining the mechanisms of enzymatic regulation is central to the study of cellular metabolism. Regulation of enzyme activity via polymerization-mediated strategies has been shown to be widespread, and plays a vital role in mediating cellular homeostasis. In this review, we begin with an overview of the filamentation of CTP synthase, which forms filamentous structures termed cytoophidia. We then highlight other important examples of the phenomenon. Moreover, we discuss recent data relating to the regulation of enzyme activity by compartmentalization into cytoophidia. Finally, we hypothesize potential roles for enzyme filament formation in the regulation of metabolism, development and disease. PMID:27098510

  5. Regulation of the G1 phase of the cell cycle by periodic stabilization and degradation of the p25rum1 CDK inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Benito, J; Martín-Castellanos, C; Moreno, S

    1998-01-01

    In fission yeast, the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p25(rum1) is a key regulator of progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle. We show here that p25(rum1) protein levels are sharply periodic. p25(rum1) begins to accumulate at anaphase, persists in G1 and is destroyed during S phase. p25(rum1 )is stabilized and polyubiquitinated in a mutant defective in the 26S proteasome, suggesting that its degradation normally occurs through the ubiquitin-dependent 26S proteasome pathway. Phosphorylation of p25(rum1 )by cdc2-cyclin complexes at residues T58 and T62 is important to target the protein for degradation. Mutation of one or both of these residues to alanine causes stabilization of p25(rum1) and induces a cell cycle delay in G1 and polyploidization due to occasional re-initiation of DNA replication before mitosis. The CDK-cyclin complex cdc2-cig1, which is insensitive to p25(rum1 )inhibition, seems to be the main kinase that phosphorylates p25(rum1). Phosphorylation of p25(rum1) in S phase and G2 serves as the trigger for p25(rum1) proteolysis. Thus, periodic accumulation and degradation of the CDK inhibitor p25(rum1 )in G1 plays a role in setting a threshold of cyclin levels important in determining the length of the pre-Start G1 phase and in ensuring the correct order of cell cycle events. PMID:9430640

  6. Load regulating latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleberry, W. T. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A load regulating mechanical latch is described that has a pivotally mounted latch element having a hook-shaped end with a strike roller-engaging laterally open hook for engaging a stationary strike roller. The latch element or hook is pivotally mounted in a clevis end of an elongated latch stem that is adapted for axial movement through an opening in a support plate or bracket mounted to a structural member. A coil spring is disposed over and around the extending latch stem and the lower end of the coil spring engages the support bracket. A thrust washer is removably attached to the other end of the latch stem and engages the other end of the coil spring and compresses the coil spring thereby preloading the spring and the latch element carried by the latch stem. The hook-shaped latch element has a limited degree of axial travel for loading caused by structural distortion which may change the relative positions of the latch element hook and the strike roller. Means are also provided to permit limited tilt of the latch element due to loading of the hook.

  7. NCAM regulates cell motility.

    PubMed

    Prag, Søren; Lepekhin, Eugene A; Kolkova, Kateryna; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Kawa, Anna; Walmod, Peter S; Belman, Vadym; Gallagher, Helen C; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth; Pedersen, Nina

    2002-01-15

    Cell migration is required during development of the nervous system. The regulatory mechanisms for this process, however, are poorly elucidated. We show here that expression of or exposure to the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) strongly affected the motile behaviour of glioma cells independently of homophilic NCAM interactions. Expression of the transmembrane 140 kDa isoform of NCAM (NCAM-140) caused a significant reduction in cellular motility, probably through interference with factors regulating cellular attachment, as NCAM-140-expressing cells exhibited a decreased attachment to a fibronectin substratum compared with NCAM-negative cells. Ectopic expression of the cytoplasmic part of NCAM-140 also inhibited cell motility, presumably via the non-receptor tyrosine kinase p59(fyn) with which NCAM-140 interacts. Furthermore, we showed that the extracellular part of NCAM acted as a paracrine inhibitor of NCAM-negative cell locomotion through a heterophilic interaction with a cell-surface receptor. As we showed that the two N-terminal immunoglobulin modules of NCAM, which are known to bind to heparin, were responsible for this inhibition, we presume that this receptor is a heparan sulfate proteoglycan. A model for the inhibitory effect of NCAM is proposed, which involves competition between NCAM and extracellular components for the binding to membrane-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycan.

  8. Regulation of sphingomyelin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bienias, Kamil; Fiedorowicz, Anna; Sadowska, Anna; Prokopiuk, Sławomir; Car, Halina

    2016-06-01

    Sphingolipids (SFs) represent a large class of lipids playing diverse functions in a vast number of physiological and pathological processes. Sphingomyelin (SM) is the most abundant SF in the cell, with ubiquitous distribution within mammalian tissues, and particularly high levels in the Central Nervous System (CNS). SM is an essential element of plasma membrane (PM) and its levels are crucial for the cell function. SM content in a cell is strictly regulated by the enzymes of SM metabolic pathways, which activities create a balance between SM synthesis and degradation. The de novo synthesis via SM synthases (SMSs) in the last step of the multi-stage process is the most important pathway of SM formation in a cell. The SM hydrolysis by sphingomyelinases (SMases) increases the concentration of ceramide (Cer), a bioactive molecule, which is involved in cellular proliferation, growth and apoptosis. By controlling the levels of SM and Cer, SMSs and SMases maintain cellular homeostasis. Enzymes of SM cycle exhibit unique properties and diverse tissue distribution. Disturbances in their activities were observed in many CNS pathologies. This review characterizes the physiological roles of SM and enzymes controlling SM levels as well as their involvement in selected pathologies of the Central Nervous System, such as ischemia/hypoxia, Alzheimer disease (AD), Parkinson disease (PD), depression, schizophrenia and Niemann Pick disease (NPD). Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  9. Phosphorylation regulates mycobacterial proteasome.

    PubMed

    Anandan, Tripti; Han, Jaeil; Baun, Heather; Nyayapathy, Seeta; Brown, Jacob T; Dial, Rebekah L; Moltalvo, Juan A; Kim, Min-Seon; Yang, Seung Hwan; Ronning, Donald R; Husson, Robert N; Suh, Joowon; Kang, Choong-Min

    2014-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis possesses a proteasome system that is required for the microbe to resist elimination by the host immune system. Despite the importance of the proteasome in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, the molecular mechanisms by which proteasome activity is controlled remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the α-subunit (PrcA) of the M. tuberculosis proteasome is phosphorylated by the PknB kinase at three threonine residues (T84, T202, and T178) in a sequential manner. Furthermore, the proteasome with phosphorylated PrcA enhances the degradation of Ino1, a known proteasomal substrate, suggesting that PknB regulates the proteolytic activity of the proteasome. Previous studies showed that depletion of the proteasome and the proteasome-associated proteins decreases resistance to reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNIs) but increases resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Here we show that PknA phosphorylation of unprocessed proteasome β-subunit (pre-PrcB) and α-subunit reduces the assembly of the proteasome complex and thereby enhances the mycobacterial resistance to H2O2 and that H2O2 stress diminishes the formation of the proteasome complex in a PknA-dependent manner. These findings indicate that phosphorylation of the M. tuberculosis proteasome not only modulates proteolytic activity of the proteasome, but also affects the proteasome complex formation contributing to the survival of M. tuberculosis under oxidative stress conditions.

  10. Epigenetic regulation in obesity.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Elaine M; Gibney, Eileen R

    2013-07-01

    Research suggests that 65% of variation in obesity is genetic. However, much of the known genetic associations have little known function and their effect size small, thus the gene-environment interaction, including epigenetic influences on gene expression, is suggested to be an important factor in the susceptibilty to obesity. This review will explore the potential of epigenetic markers to influence expression of genes associated with obesity. Epigenetic changes in utero are known to have direct implications on the phenotype of the offspring. More recently work has focused on how such epigenetic changes continue to regulate risk of obesity from infancy through to adulthood. Work has shown that, for example, hypomethylation of the MC4 gene causes an increase in expression, and has a direct impact on appetite and intake, and thus influences risk of obesity. Similar influences are also seen in other aspects of obesity including inflammation and adiposity. Maternal diet during foetal development has many epigenetic implications, which affect the offspring's risk factors for obesity during childhood and adulthood, and even in subsequent generations. Genes associated with risk of obesity, are susceptible to epigenetic mutations, which have subsequent effects on disease mechanisms, such as appetite and impaired glucose and insulin tolerance.

  11. Mechanisms regulating glioma invasion.

    PubMed

    Paw, Ivy; Carpenter, Richard C; Watabe, Kounosuke; Debinski, Waldemar; Lo, Hui-Wen

    2015-06-28

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive, deadliest, and most common brain malignancy in adults. Despite the advances made in surgical techniques, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the median survival for GBM patients has remained at a mere 14 months. GBM poses several unique challenges to currently available treatments for the disease. For example, GBM cells have the propensity to aggressively infiltrate/invade into the normal brain tissues and along the vascular tracks, which prevents complete resection of all malignant cells and limits the effect of localized radiotherapy while sparing normal tissue. Although anti-angiogenic treatment exerts anti-edematic effect in GBM, unfortunately, tumors progress with acquired increased invasiveness. Therefore, it is an important task to gain a deeper understanding of the intrinsic and post-treatment invasive phenotypes of GBM in hopes that the gained knowledge would lead to novel GBM treatments that are more effective and less toxic. This review will give an overview of some of the signaling pathways that have been shown to positively and negatively regulate GBM invasion, including, the PI3K/Akt, Wnt, sonic hedgehog-GLI1, and microRNAs. The review will also discuss several approaches to cancer therapies potentially altering GBM invasiveness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Visibility: science and regulation.

    PubMed

    Watson, John G

    2002-06-01

    The 1999 Regional Haze Rule provides a context for this review of visibility, the science that describes it, and the use of that science in regulatory guidance. The scientific basis for the 1999 regulation is adequate. The deciview metric that tracks progress is an imperfect but objective measure of what people see near the prevailing visual range. The definition of natural visibility conditions is adequate for current planning, but it will need to be refined as visibility improves. Emissions from other countries will set achievable levels above those produced by natural sources. Some natural events, notably dust storms and wildfires, are episodic and cannot be represented by annual average background values or emission estimates. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission reductions correspond with lower sulfate (SO4(2-)) concentrations and visibility improvements in the regions where these have occurred. Non-road emissions have been growing more rapidly than emissions from other sources, which have remained stable or decreased since 1970. Simpler models representing transport, limiting precursor pollutants, and gas-to-particle equilibrium should be used to understand where and when emission reductions will be effective, rather than large complex models that have insufficient input and validation measurements. Examples of model-based source attribution show large differences among estimates from various modeling systems and with ambient measurements.

  13. [Ghrelin: beyond hunger regulation].

    PubMed

    Milke García, Maria del Pilar

    2005-01-01

    Man ingests food to mitigate hunger (mediated by physiological and biochemical signals), satisfy appetite (subjective sensation) and because of psychosocial reasons. Satiation biomarkers (stop feeding) are gastric distention and hormones (CCK, GLP-1) and satiety biomarkers (induce feeding) are food-induced thermogenesis, body temperature, glycaemia and also hormones (insulin, leptin and ghrelin). Oxidative metabolism/body composition, tryptophan/serotonin and proinflammatory cytokines are also implicated on hunger physiology. At the present time, ghrelin is the only known circulating orexigenic with potential on hunger/body weight regulation. It is a neuropeptide (endogenous ligand for the GH secretagogue) recently isolated from the oxyntic mucosa and synthesized mainly in the stomach. Its blood concentration depends on diet, hyperglucemia and adiposity/leptin. It is secreted 1-2 hours preprandially and its concentration decreases drastically during the postprandium. Ghrelin acts on the lateral hypothalamus and theoretically inhibits proinflammatory cytokine secretion and antagonizes leptin. Ghrelin physiologically increases food intake and stimulates adipogenesis, gastrointestinal motility and gastric acid secretion, and has other hormonal and cardiovascular functions. Ghrelin blood concentration is reduced in massive obesity, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, polycystic ovary syndrome, acromegaly, hypogonadism, ageing, short bowel syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis; and increased in primary or secondary anorexia, starvation, chronic liver disease and celiac disease. Cerebral and peritoneal ghrelin administration (rats) and systemic administration (rats and healthy volunteers, cancer patients or patients on peritoneal dialysis) promotes food consumption and increases adiposity, of utmost importance in the treatment of patients with anorexia.

  14. Post-translational regulation enables robust p53 regulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The tumor suppressor protein p53 plays important roles in DNA damage repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Due to its critical functions, the level of p53 is tightly regulated by a negative feedback mechanism to increase its tolerance towards fluctuations and disturbances. Interestingly, the p53 level is controlled by post-translational regulation rather than transcriptional regulation in this feedback mechanism. Results We analyzed the dynamics of this feedback to understand whether post-translational regulation provides any advantages over transcriptional regulation in regard to disturbance rejection. When a disturbance happens, even though negative feedback reduces the steady-state error, it can cause a system to become less stable and transiently overshoots, which may erroneously trigger downstream reactions. Therefore, the system needs to balance the trade-off between steady-state and transient errors. Feedback control and adaptive estimation theories revealed that post-translational regulation achieves a better trade-off than transcriptional regulation, contributing to a more steady level of p53 under the influence of noise and disturbances. Furthermore, post-translational regulation enables cells to respond more promptly to stress conditions with consistent amplitude. However, for better disturbance rejection, the p53- Mdm2 negative feedback has to pay a price of higher stochastic noise. Conclusions Our analyses suggest that the p53-Mdm2 feedback favors regulatory mechanisms that provide the optimal trade-offs for dynamic control. PMID:23992617

  15. 75 FR 68217 - Acquisition Regulation: Agency Supplementary Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... Acquisition Regulation (DEAR) on DOE Management and Operating Contracts to make changes to conform to the... does not alter substantive rights or obligations under current law. DATES: Effective Date: December 6... Regulations, Part 970--DOE Management and Operating Contracts to conform it to the FAR. None of today's...

  16. ABD1 is an Arabidopsis DCAF substrate receptor for CUL4-DDB1-based E3 ligases that acts as a negative regulator of abscisic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kyoung-In; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Nezames, Cynthia D; Zhong, Shangwei; Song, Eunyoung; Byun, Myung-Ok; Deng, Xing Wang

    2014-02-01

    Members of the DDB1-CUL4-associated factors (DCAFs) family directly bind to DAMAGED DNA BINDING PROTEIN1 (DDB1) and function as the substrate receptors in CULLIN4-based E3 (CUL4) ubiquitin ligases, which regulate the selective ubiquitination of proteins. Here, we describe a DCAF protein, ABD1 (for ABA-hypersensitive DCAF1), that negatively regulates abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana. ABD1 interacts with DDB1 in vitro and in vivo, indicating that it likely functions as a CUL4 E3 ligase substrate receptor. ABD1 expression is induced by ABA, and mutations in ABD1 result in ABA- and NaCl-hypersensitive phenotypes. Loss of ABD1 leads to hyperinduction of ABA-responsive genes and higher accumulation of the ABA-responsive transcription factor ABA INSENSITIVE5 (ABI5), hypersensitivity to ABA during seed germination and seedling growth, enhanced stomatal closure, reduced water loss, and, ultimately, increased drought tolerance. ABD1 directly interacts with ABI5 in yeast two-hybrid assays and associates with ABI5 in vivo by coimmunoprecipitation, and the interaction was found in the nucleus by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Furthermore, loss of ABD1 results in a retardation of ABI5 degradation by the 26S proteasome. Taken together, these data suggest that the DCAF-CUL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase assembled with ABD1 is a negative regulator of ABA responses by directly binding to and affecting the stability of ABI5 in the nucleus.

  17. 78 FR 31551 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Commerce Patent Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Commerce Patent Regulations AGENCIES: Department of Defense (DOD... approved information collection requirement concerning Department of Commerce patent regulations. A notice... Collection 9000- 0095, Commerce Patent Regulations, by any of the following methods: Regulations.gov :...

  18. Glucocorticoid Regulation of Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Geraghty, Anna C; Kaufer, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    It is well accepted that stress, measured by increased glucocorticoid secretion, leads to profound reproductive dysfunction. In times of stress, glucocorticoids activate many parts of the fight or flight response, mobilizing energy and enhancing survival, while inhibiting metabolic processes that are not necessary for survival in the moment. This includes reproduction, an energetically costly procedure that is very finely regulated. In the short term, this is meant to be beneficial, so that the organism does not waste precious energy needed for survival. However, long-term inhibition can lead to persistent reproductive dysfunction, even if no longer stressed. This response is mediated by the increased levels of circulating glucocorticoids, which orchestrate complex inhibition of the entire reproductive axis. Stress and glucocorticoids exhibits both central and peripheral inhibition of the reproductive hormonal axis. While this has long been recognized as an issue, understanding the complex signaling mechanism behind this inhibition remains somewhat of a mystery. What makes this especially difficult is attempting to differentiate the many parts of both of these hormonal axes, and new neuropeptide discoveries in the last decade in the reproductive field have added even more complexity to an already complicated system. Glucocorticoids (GCs) and other hormones within the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis (as well as contributors in the sympathetic system) can modulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis at all levels-GCs can inhibit release of GnRH from the hypothalamus, inhibit gonadotropin synthesis and release in the pituitary, and inhibit testosterone synthesis and release from the gonads, while also influencing gametogenesis and sexual behavior. This chapter is not an exhaustive review of all the known literature, however is aimed at giving a brief look at both the central and peripheral effects of glucocorticoids on the reproductive function.

  19. The Universities and Federal Regulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, John C.

    The impact of increasing federal regulation on American universities is discussed based on an informal survey of senior academic and administrative officials in 13 public and private universities. As government regulation is becoming more intensive and compliance more resource- and time-consuming, government is perceived as having little…

  20. Teachers' Regulation of the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, William K., Jr.

    The nature of teachers' control in classrooms is explored in order: to understand the tension created when noneducators superimpose their rules on the regime of teachers at work and to learn something of a general nature about the antagonism between regulators and those they regulate. Teachers' regulatory powers are based on coercion, exchange, or…

  1. Frequency-controlled voltage regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1980-01-01

    Converting input ac to higher frequency reduce size and weight and makes possible unique kind of regulation. Since conversion frequency is above range of human hearing, supply generated on audible noise. It also exploits highfrequency conversion features to regulate its output voltage in novel way. Circuit is inherently short-circuit proof.

  2. Gravity and body mass regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, L. E.; Horwitz, B. A.; Fuller, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of altered gravity on body mass, food intake, energy expenditure, and body composition are examined. Metabolic adjustments are reviewed in maintenance of energy balance, neural regulation, and humoral regulation are discussed. Experiments with rats indicate that genetically obese rats respond differently to hypergravity than lean rats.

  3. Team Regulation, Regulation of Social Activities or Co-Regulation: Different Labels for Effective Regulation of Learning in CSCL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saab, Nadira

    2012-01-01

    Computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) is an approach to learning in which learners can actively and collaboratively construct knowledge by means of interaction and joint problem solving. Regulation of learning is especially important in the domain of CSCL. Next to the regulation of task performance, the interaction between learners who…

  4. Deceptive Business Practices: Federal Regulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohrer, Daniel Morgan

    Federal regulations to prevent deceptive advertising seek to balance the advertiser's freedom of speech with protection of the consumer. This paper discusses what the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has done to regulate advertising and evaluates the adequacy of its controls. The commission uses cease-and-desist orders, affirmative disclosure,…

  5. Regulating Pornography: A Public Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Margaret E.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examines attitudes toward sex and pornography by means of a telephone survey of Dane County, Wisconsin, adults. Describes survey questions about sexual attitudes, perceived effects of pornography, and pornography regulation. Concludes that adults who feel more strongly that pornography has negative effects are more opposed to its regulation. (SG)

  6. NIPF Landowner's view of regulation.

    Treesearch

    Rebecca L. Johnson; Ralph J. Alig; Eric Moore; Robert J. Moulton

    1997-01-01

    As awareness and concern regarding the environmental consequences of forest practices have increased, new or amended forest regulations have been placed on nonindustrial private forestlands (NIPF) in the Pacific Northwest (Salazar and Cubbage 1990; Quigley 1992). Debates over whether forest practice regulations are providing public benefits or preventing public harm...

  7. Team Regulation, Regulation of Social Activities or Co-Regulation: Different Labels for Effective Regulation of Learning in CSCL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saab, Nadira

    2012-01-01

    Computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) is an approach to learning in which learners can actively and collaboratively construct knowledge by means of interaction and joint problem solving. Regulation of learning is especially important in the domain of CSCL. Next to the regulation of task performance, the interaction between learners who…

  8. Design for pressure regulating components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichmann, H.

    1973-01-01

    The design development for Pressure Regulating Components included a regulator component trade-off study with analog computer performance verification to arrive at a final optimized regulator configuration for the Space Storable Propulsion Module, under development for a Jupiter Orbiter mission. This application requires the pressure regulator to be capable of long-term fluorine exposure. In addition, individual but basically identical (for purposes of commonality) units are required for separate oxidizer and fuel pressurization. The need for dual units requires improvement in the regulation accuracy over present designs. An advanced regulator concept was prepared featuring redundant bellows, all metallic/ceramic construction, friction-free guidance of moving parts, gas damping, and the elimination of coil springs normally used for reference forces. The activities included testing of actual size seat/poppet components to determine actual discharge coefficients and flow forces. The resulting data was inserted into the computer model of the regulator. Computer simulation of the propulsion module performance over two mission profiles indicated satisfactory minimization of propellant residual requirements imposed by regulator performance uncertainties.

  9. Affect and Self-Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malmivuori, Marja-Liisa

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents affect as an essential aspect of students' self-reflection and self-regulation. The introduced concepts of self-system and self-system process stress the importance of self-appraisals of personal competence and agency in affective responses and self-regulation in problem solving. Students are viewed as agents who constantly…

  10. The Universities and Federal Regulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, John C.

    The impact of increasing federal regulation on American universities is discussed based on an informal survey of senior academic and administrative officials in 13 public and private universities. As government regulation is becoming more intensive and compliance more resource- and time-consuming, government is perceived as having little…

  11. Strategic automation of emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Inge Schweiger; Keil, Andreas; McCulloch, Kathleen C; Rockstroh, Brigitte; Gollwitzer, Peter M

    2009-01-01

    As implementation intentions are a powerful self-regulation tool for thought and action (meta-analysis by P. M. Gollwitzer & P. Sheeran, 2006), the present studies were conducted to address their effectiveness in regulating emotional reactivity. Disgust- (Study 1) and fear- (Study 2) eliciting stimuli were viewed under 3 different self-regulation instructions: the goal intention to not get disgusted or frightened, respectively, this goal intention furnished with an implementation intention (i.e., an if-then plan), and a no-self-regulation control group. Only implementation-intention participants succeeded in reducing their disgust and fear reactions as compared to goal-intention and control participants. In Study 3, electrocortical correlates (using dense-array electroencephalography) revealed differential early visual activity in response to spider slides in ignore implementation-intention participants, as reflected in a smaller P1. Theoretical and applied implications of the present findings for emotion regulation via implementation intentions are discussed.

  12. Regulation of GMOs in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yinliang

    2008-12-01

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are created by biotechnology to serve people with much benefit while may impose risks to ecological environment and human health and therefore need careful regulation. During the past two decades, GMOs have been well developed in China and so has their corresponding regulation. This paper reviews and comments the multiple aspects of mainly the agricultural GMOs, including their safety assessment, control measures, trade activities, import, labels, and GM food, which have been prescribed by the corresponding laws, regulations and administrative measures. It is held that till present a framework for regulation of agricultural GMOs and GM food has been established basically in China, while a more comprehensive system for regulation of all kinds of GMOs and all kinds of related activities is still needed at present and in the future.

  13. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  14. Regulating chemicals: law, science, and the unbearable burdens of regulation.

    PubMed

    Silbergeld, Ellen K; Mandrioli, Daniele; Cranor, Carl F

    2015-03-18

    The challenges of regulating industrial chemicals remain unresolved in the United States. The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) of 1976 was the first legislation to extend coverage to the regulation of industrial chemicals, both existing and newly registered. However, decisions related to both law and science that were made in passing this law inevitably rendered it ineffectual. Attempts to fix these shortcomings have not been successful. In light of the European Union's passage of innovative principles and requirements for chemical regulation, it is no longer possible to deny the opportunity and need for reform in US law and practice.

  15. Cysteine-based regulation of the CUL3 adaptor protein Keap1

    SciTech Connect

    Sekhar, Konjeti R.; Rachakonda, Girish; Freeman, Michael L.

    2010-04-01

    Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) is a master transcription factor containing a powerful acidic transcriptional activation domain. Nrf2-dependent gene expression impacts cancer chemoprevention strategies, inflammatory responses, and progression of neurodegenerative diseases. Under basal conditions, association of Nrf2 with the CUL3 adaptor protein Keap1 results in the rapid Nrf2 ubiquitylation and proteasome-dependent degradation. Inhibition of Keap1 function blocks ubiquitylation of Nrf2, allowing newly synthesized Nrf2 to translocate into the nucleus, bind to ARE sites and direct target gene expression. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments coupled with proteomic analysis support a model in which Keap1 contains at least 2 distinct cysteine motifs. The first is located at Cys 151 in the BTB domain. The second is located in the intervening domain and centers around Cys 273 and 288. Adduction or oxidation at Cys151 has been shown to produce a conformational change in Keap1 that results in dissociation of Keap1 from CUL3, thereby inhibiting Nrf2 ubiquitylation. Thus, adduction captures specific chemical information and translates it into biochemical information via changes in structural conformation.

  16. Precipitated silica as flow regulator.

    PubMed

    Müller, Anne-Kathrin; Ruppel, Joanna; Drexel, Claus-Peter; Zimmermann, Ingfried

    2008-08-07

    Flow regulators are added to solid pharmaceutical formulations to improve the flow properties of the powder mixtures. The primary particles of the flow regulators exist in the form of huge agglomerates which are broken down into smaller aggregates during the blending process. These smaller aggregates adsorb at the surface of the solid's grains and thus diminish attractive Van-der-Waals-forces by increasing the roughness of the host's surface. In most cases amorphous silica is used as flow additive but material properties like particle size or bond strength influence the desagglomeration tendency of the agglomerates and thus the flow regulating potency of each silica. For some silica types we will show that the differences in their flow regulating potency are due to the rate and extent by which they are able to cover the surface of the host particles. Binary powder mixtures consisting of a pharmaceutical excipient and an added flow regulator were blended in a Turbula mixer for a defined period of time. As pharmaceutical excipient corn starch was used. The flow regulators were represented by a selection of amorphous silicon dioxide types like a commercial fumed silica and various types of SIPERNAT precipitated silica provided by Evonik-Degussa GmbH, Hanau, Germany. Flowability parameters of the mixtures were characterized by means of a tensile strength tester. The reduction of tensile strength with the blending time can be correlated with an increase in fragmentation of the flow regulator.

  17. Mental fatigue impairs emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Grillon, Christian; Quispe-Escudero, David; Mathur, Ambika; Ernst, Monique

    2015-06-01

    Because healthy physical and mental functioning depends on the ability to regulate emotions, it is important to identify moderators of such regulations. Whether mental fatigue, subsequent to the depletion of cognitive resources, impairs explicit emotion regulation to negative stimuli is currently unknown. This study explored this possibility. In a within-subject design over 2 separate sessions, healthy individuals performed easy (control session) or difficult (depletion session) cognitive tasks. Subsequently, they were presented with neutral and negative pictures, with instructions to either maintain or regulate (i.e., reduce) the emotions evoked by the pictures. Emotional reactivity was probed with the startle reflex. The negative pictures evoked a similar aversive state in the control and depletion sessions as measured by startle potentiation. However, subjects were able to down-regulate their aversive state only in the control session, not in the depletion session. These results indicate that mental fatigue following performance of cognitive tasks impairs emotion regulation without affecting emotional reactivity. These findings suggest that mental fatigue needs to be incorporated into models of emotion regulation.

  18. 7 CFR 301.89-5 - Movement of regulated articles from regulated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Movement of regulated articles from regulated areas... § 301.89-5 Movement of regulated articles from regulated areas. (a) Any regulated article may be moved... is met: (i) The regulated article was moved into the regulated area from an area that is not...

  19. Wolf population regulation revisited: again

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McRoberts, Ronald E.; Mech, L. David

    2014-01-01

    The long-accepted conclusion that wolf density is regulated by nutrition was recently challenged, and the conclusion was reached that, at greater levels of prey biomass, social factors such as intraspecific strife and territoriality tend to regulate wolf density. We reanalyzed the data used in that study for 2 reasons: 1) we disputed the use of 2 data points, and 2) because of recognized heteroscedasticity, we used weighted-regression analysis instead of the unweighted regressions used in the original study. We concluded that the data do not support the hypothesis that wolf densities are regulated by social factors.

  20. Emotional regulation strategies and negotiation.

    PubMed

    Yurtsever, Gülçimen

    2004-12-01

    This study examined the relationship between profit achievement and emotional regulation strategies, using Kelley's Negotiation Game to measure profit achievement. The game involves bargaining for the prices of three products. Emotional Regulation Strategies were measured by The Emotional Regulation Questionnaire. Scores were obtained from 104 lower level managers of a bank in Turkey. Their average age was 32.0 yr. (SD=3.7), (39 women and 65 men). A correlation of .65 (p<.01) was obtained between scores on profit achievement with scores on Cognitive Reappraisal strategy and -.50 (p<.01) with scores on Suppression strategy.

  1. The regulation of ascorbate biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bulley, Sean; Laing, William

    2016-10-01

    We review the regulation of ascorbate (vitamin C) biosynthesis, focusing on the l-galactose pathway. We discuss the regulation of ascorbate biosynthesis at the level of gene transcription (both repression and enhancement) and translation (feedback inhibition of translation by ascorbate concentration) and discuss the eight proteins that have been demonstrated to date to affect ascorbate concentration in plant tissues. GDP-galactose phosphorylase (GGP) and GDP-mannose epimerase are critical steps that regulate ascorbate biosynthesis. These and other biosynthetic genes are controlled at the transcriptional level, while GGP is also controlled at the translational level. Ascorbate feedback on enzyme activity has not been observed unequivocally.

  2. Voltage Regulators for Photovoltaic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, R.

    1986-01-01

    Two simple circuits developed to provide voltage regulation for highvoltage (i.e., is greater than 75 volts) and low-voltage (i.e., is less than 36 volts) photovoltaic/battery power systems. Use of these circuits results in voltage regulator small, low-cost, and reliable, with very low power dissipation. Simple oscillator circuit controls photovoltaic-array current to regulate system voltage and control battery charging. Circuit senses battery (and system) voltage and adjusts array current to keep battery voltage from exceeding maximum voltage.

  3. Regulating the 20S Proteasome Ubiquitin-Independent Degradation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Nissan, Gili; Sharon, Michal

    2014-01-01

    For many years, the ubiquitin-26S proteasome degradation pathway was considered the primary route for proteasomal degradation. However, it is now becoming clear that proteins can also be targeted for degradation by the core 20S proteasome itself. Degradation by the 20S proteasome does not require ubiquitin tagging or the presence of the 19S regulatory particle; rather, it relies on the inherent structural disorder of the protein being degraded. Thus, proteins that contain unstructured regions due to oxidation, mutation, or aging, as well as naturally, intrinsically unfolded proteins, are susceptible to 20S degradation. Unlike the extensive knowledge acquired over the years concerning degradation by the 26S proteasome, relatively little is known about the means by which 20S-mediated proteolysis is controlled. Here, we describe our current understanding of the regulatory mechanisms that coordinate 20S proteasome-mediated degradation, and highlight the gaps in knowledge that remain to be bridged. PMID:25250704

  4. Flow-compensating pressure regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baehr, E. F.

    1979-01-01

    Pressure regulator developed for use with cataract-surgery instrument controls intraocular pressure during substantial variations in flow rate of infusion fluid. Device may be applicable to variety of eye-surgery instruments.

  5. APPARATUS FOR REGULATING HIGH VOLTAGE

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, K.G.

    1951-03-20

    This patent describes a high-voltage regulator of the r-f type wherein the modulation of the r-f voltage is accomplished at a high level, resulting in good stabilization over a large range of load conditions.

  6. How is Pet Coke Regulated?

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    No emission standards apply specifically to the storage and handling of petroleum coke, but National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for particulate matter (PM10) do apply, so states have regulations as part of their Air State Implementation Plan.

  7. State Regulation of Private Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lines, Patricia M.

    1982-01-01

    Examines state laws and the actions of various courts on home instruction and unauthorized educational programs. Suggests reforming the regulation of private education through legislative action that requires periodic testing as an alternative to compulsory school attendance. (Author/MLF)

  8. State Regulation of Private Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lines, Patricia M.

    1982-01-01

    Examines state laws and the actions of various courts on home instruction and unauthorized educational programs. Suggests reforming the regulation of private education through legislative action that requires periodic testing as an alternative to compulsory school attendance. (Author/MLF)

  9. Targeting epigenetic regulations in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Bo; Li, Wenyuan; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Rongfu

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of gene expression is a dynamic and reversible process with DNA methylation, histone modifications, and chromatin remodeling. Recently, groundbreaking studies have demonstrated the importance of DNA and chromatin regulatory proteins from different aspects, including stem cell, development, and tumor genesis. Abnormal epigenetic regulation is frequently associated with diseases and drugs targeting DNA methylation and histone acetylation have been approved for cancer therapy. Although the network of epigenetic regulation is more complex than people expect, new potential druggable chromatin-associated proteins are being discovered and tested for clinical application. Here we review the key proteins that mediate epigenetic regulations through DNA methylation, the acetylation and methylation of histones, and the reader proteins that bind to modified histones. We also discuss cancer associations and recent progress of pharmacological development of these proteins. PMID:26508480

  10. Regulation of TAZ in cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Lei, Qun-Ying

    2016-08-01

    TAZ, a transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif, is encoded by WWTR1 gene (WW domain containing transcription regulator 1). TAZ is tightly regulated in the hippo pathway-dependent and -independent manner in response to a wide range of extracellular and intrinsic signals, including cell density, cell polarity, F-actin related mechanical stress, ligands of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), cellular energy status, hypoxia and osmotic stress. Besides its role in normal tissue development, TAZ plays critical roles in cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, migration, invasion, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and stemness in multiple human cancers. We discuss here the regulators and regulation of TAZ. We also highlight the tumorigenic roles of TAZ and its potential therapeutic impact in human cancers.

  11. Gastrointestinal regulation of food intake

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, David E.; Overduin, Joost

    2007-01-01

    Despite substantial fluctuations in daily food intake, animals maintain a remarkably stable body weight, because overall caloric ingestion and expenditure are exquisitely matched over long periods of time, through the process of energy homeostasis. The brain receives hormonal, neural, and metabolic signals pertaining to body-energy status and, in response to these inputs, coordinates adaptive alterations of energy intake and expenditure. To regulate food consumption, the brain must modulate appetite, and the core of appetite regulation lies in the gut-brain axis. This Review summarizes current knowledge regarding the neuroendocrine regulation of food intake by the gastrointestinal system, focusing on gastric distention, intestinal and pancreatic satiation peptides, and the orexigenic gastric hormone ghrelin. We highlight mechanisms governing nutrient sensing and peptide secretion by enteroendocrine cells, including novel taste-like pathways. The increasingly nuanced understanding of the mechanisms mediating gut-peptide regulation and action provides promising targets for new strategies to combat obesity and diabetes. PMID:17200702

  12. Chloroplast signaling: retrograde regulation revelations.

    PubMed

    Beale, Samuel I

    2011-05-24

    Developing chloroplasts are able to communicate their status to the nucleus and regulate expression of genes whose products are needed for photosynthesis. Heme is revealed to be a signaling molecule for this retrograde communication.

  13. 77 FR 13155 - Waste Regulation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Waste Regulation AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permit modification request... Martin personnel will be assuming responsibility for waste management activities. Those activities are...

  14. 7 CFR 987.48 - Container regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container regulation. 987.48 Section 987.48... IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Container Regulation § 987.48 Container regulation. Whenever the Committee deems it advisable to establish a container regulation for any variety...

  15. 75 FR 24394 - Somalia Sanctions Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... Other Laws and Regulations Sec. 551.101 Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. Subpart B... Laws and Regulations Sec. 551.101 Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. This part is... or issued pursuant to any other provision of law or regulation authorizes any transaction...

  16. Self Regulating Fiber Fuel Cell

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-16

    energy numbers are 2.3X and 5.7X the theoretical values for lithium thionyl chloride respectively (1100 Whr/liter and 590 Whr/kg), which has the...REPORT Self Regulating Fiber Fuel Cell 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Advances in lithium primary battery technology, which serves as the...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - 16-Aug-2010 Self Regulating Fiber Fuel Cell Report Title ABSTRACT Advances in lithium primary battery technology

  17. Epigenetic regulation of persistent pain

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Guang; Ren, Ke; Dubner, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Persistent or chronic pain is tightly associated with various environmental changes and linked to abnormal gene expression within cells processing nociceptive signaling. Epigenetic regulation governs gene expression in response to environmental cues. Recent animal model and clinical studies indicate that epigenetic regulation plays an important role in the development/maintenance of persistent pain and, possibly the transition of acute pain to chronic pain, thus shedding light in a direction for development of new therapeutics for persistent pain. PMID:24948399

  18. 14-3-3 Regulates 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Synthase Protein Turnover in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Gyeong Mee; Kieber, Joseph J.

    2013-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins are a family of conserved phospho-specific binding proteins involved in diverse physiological processes. Plants have large 14-3-3 gene families, and many binding partners have been identified, though relatively few functions have been defined. Here, we demonstrate that 14-3-3 proteins interact with multiple 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (ACS) isoforms in Arabidopsis thaliana. ACS catalyzes the generally rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of the phytohormone ethylene. This interaction increases the stability of the ACS proteins. 14-3-3s also interact with the ETHYLENE-OVERPRODUCER1 (ETO1)/ETO1-LIKE (EOLs), a group of three functionally redundant proteins that are components of a CULLIN-3 E3 ubiquitin ligase that target a subset of the ACS proteins for rapid degradation by the 26S proteasome. In contrast with ACS, the interaction with 14-3-3 destabilizes the ETO1/EOLs. The level of the ETO1/EOLs in vivo plays a role in mediating ACS protein turnover, with increased levels leading to a decrease in ACS protein levels. These studies demonstrate that regulation of ethylene biosynthesis occurs by a mechanism in which 14-3-3 proteins act through a direct interaction and stabilization of ACS and through decreasing the abundance of the ubiquitin ligases that target a subset of ACS proteins for degradation. PMID:23512855

  19. Quantitative and Functional Phosphoproteomic Analysis Reveals that Ethylene Regulates Water Transport via the C-Terminal Phosphorylation of Aquaporin PIP2;1 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Qing, Dongjin; Yang, Zhu; Li, Mingzhe; Wong, Wai Shing; Guo, Guangyu; Liu, Shichang; Guo, Hongwei; Li, Ning

    2016-01-04

    Ethylene participates in the regulation of numerous cellular events and biological processes, including water loss, during leaf and flower petal wilting. The diverse ethylene responses may be regulated via dynamic interplays between protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation and ubiquitin/26S proteasome-mediated protein degradation and protease cleavage. To address how ethylene alters protein phosphorylation through multi-furcated signaling pathways, we performed a (15)N stable isotope labelling-based, differential, and quantitative phosphoproteomics study on air- and ethylene-treated ethylene-insensitive Arabidopsis double loss-of-function mutant ein3-1/eil1-1. Among 535 non-redundant phosphopeptides identified, two and four phosphopeptides were up- and downregulated by ethylene, respectively. Ethylene-regulated phosphorylation of aquaporin PIP2;1 is positively correlated with the water flux rate and water loss in leaf. Genetic studies in combination with quantitative proteomics, immunoblot analysis, protoplast swelling/shrinking experiments, and leaf water loss assays on the transgenic plants expressing both the wild-type and S280A/S283A-mutated PIP2;1 in the both Col-0 and ein3eil1 genetic backgrounds suggest that ethylene increases water transport rate in Arabidopsis cells by enhancing S280/S283 phosphorylation at the C terminus of PIP2;1. Unknown kinase and/or phosphatase activities may participate in the initial up-regulation independent of the cellular functions of EIN3/EIL1. This finding contributes to our understanding of ethylene-regulated leaf wilting that is commonly observed during post-harvest storage of plant organs.

  20. Chromatin regulators: weaving epigenetic nets.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Muñoz, Inmaculada

    2010-10-01

    In multicellular organisms differentiated cells must maintain their cellular memory, which will be faithfully inherited and maintained by their progeny. In addition, these specialized cells are exposed to specific environmental and cell-intrinsic signals and will have to appropriately respond to them. Some of these stimuli lead to changes in a subset of genes or to a genome-wide reprogramming of the cells that will remain after stimuli removal and, in some instances, will be inherited by the daughter cells. The molecular substrate that integrates cellular memory and plasticity is the chromatin, a complex of DNA and histones unique to eukaryotes. The nucleosome is the fundamental unit of the chromatin and nucleosomal organization defines different chromatin conformations. Chromatin regulators affect chromatin conformation and accessibility by covalently modifying the DNA or the histones, substituting histone variants, remodeling the nucleosome position or modulating chromatin looping and folding. These regulators frequently act in multiprotein complexes and highly specific interplays among chromatin marks and different chromatin regulators allow a remarkable array of possibilities. Therefore, chromatin regulator nets act to propagate the conformation of different chromatin regions through DNA replication and mitosis, and to remodel the chromatin fiber to regulate the accessibility of the DNA to transcription factors and to the transcription and repair machineries. Here, the state-of-the-art of the best-known chromatin regulators is reviewed.

  1. YCRD: Yeast Combinatorial Regulation Database

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei-Sheng; Hsieh, Yen-Chen; Lai, Fu-Jou

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the precise transcriptional control of gene expression is typically achieved through combinatorial regulation using cooperative transcription factors (TFs). Therefore, a database which provides regulatory associations between cooperative TFs and their target genes is helpful for biologists to study the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Because there is no such kind of databases in the public domain, this prompts us to construct a database, called Yeast Combinatorial Regulation Database (YCRD), which deposits 434,197 regulatory associations between 2535 cooperative TF pairs and 6243 genes. The comprehensive collection of more than 2500 cooperative TF pairs was retrieved from 17 existing algorithms in the literature. The target genes of a cooperative TF pair (e.g. TF1-TF2) are defined as the common target genes of TF1 and TF2, where a TF’s experimentally validated target genes were downloaded from YEASTRACT database. In YCRD, users can (i) search the target genes of a cooperative TF pair of interest, (ii) search the cooperative TF pairs which regulate a gene of interest and (iii) identify important cooperative TF pairs which regulate a given set of genes. We believe that YCRD will be a valuable resource for yeast biologists to study combinatorial regulation of gene expression. YCRD is available at http://cosbi.ee.ncku.edu.tw/YCRD/ or http://cosbi2.ee.ncku.edu.tw/YCRD/. PMID:27392072

  2. Emotion regulation and sport performance.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Christopher R D

    2014-08-01

    This study used a single-blind, within-participant, counterbalanced, repeated-measures design to examine the relationship between emotional self-regulation and sport performance. Twenty competitive athletes completed four laboratory-based conditions; familiarization, control, emotion suppression, and nonsuppression. In each condition participants completed a 10-km cycling time trial requiring self-regulation. In the experimental conditions participants watched an upsetting video before performing the cycle task. When participants suppressed their emotional reactions to the video (suppression condition) they completed the cycling task slower, generated lower mean power outputs, and reached a lower maximum heart rate and perceived greater physical exertion than when they were given no self-regulation instructions during the video (nonsuppression condition) and received no video treatment (control condition). The findings suggest that emotional self-regulation resource impairment affects perceived exertion, pacing and sport performance and extends previous research examining the regulation of persistence on physical tasks. The results are discussed in line with relevant psychophysiological theories of self-regulation and fatigue and pertinent potential implications for practice regarding performance and well-being are suggested.

  3. Precision Adjustable Liquid Regulator (ALR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinhold, R.; Parker, M.

    2004-10-01

    A passive mechanical regulator has been developed for the control of fuel or oxidizer flow to a 450N class bipropellant engine for use on commercial and interplanetary spacecraft. There are several potential benefits to the propulsion system, depending on mission requirements and spacecraft design. This system design enables more precise control of main engine mixture ratio and inlet pressure, and simplifies the pressurization system by transferring the function of main engine flow rate control from the pressurization/propellant tank assemblies, to a single component, the ALR. This design can also reduce the thermal control requirements on the propellant tanks, avoid costly Qualification testing of biprop engines for missions with more stringent requirements, and reduce the overall propulsion system mass and power usage. In order to realize these benefits, the ALR must meet stringent design requirements. The main advantage of this regulator over other units available in the market is that it can regulate about its nominal set point to within +/-0.85%, and change its regulation set point in flight +/-4% about that nominal point. The set point change is handled actively via a stepper motor driven actuator, which converts rotary into linear motion to affect the spring preload acting on the regulator. Once adjusted to a particular set point, the actuator remains in its final position unpowered, and the regulator passively maintains outlet pressure. The very precise outlet regulation pressure is possible due to new technology developed by Moog, Inc. which reduces typical regulator mechanical hysteresis to near zero. The ALR requirements specified an outlet pressure set point range from 225 to 255 psi, and equivalent water flow rates required were in the 0.17 lb/sec range. The regulation output pressure is maintained at +/-2 psi about the set point from a P (delta or differential pressure) of 20 to over 100 psid. Maximum upstream system pressure was specified at 320 psi

  4. Regulation Development for Drinking Water Contaminants

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To explain what process and information underlies regulations including how the Safe Drinking Water Act applies to regulation development i.e. how does the drinking water law translate into regulations.

  5. Post regulation circuit with energy storage

    DOEpatents

    Ball, Don G.; Birx, Daniel L.; Cook, Edward G.

    1992-01-01

    A charge regulation circuit provides regulation of an unregulated voltage supply and provides energy storage. The charge regulation circuit according to the present invention provides energy storage without unnecessary dissipation of energy through a resistor as in prior art approaches.

  6. 77 FR 43082 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Information Collection; Commerce Patent Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... Regulation; Information Collection; Commerce Patent Regulations AGENCIES: Department of Defense (DOD... approved information collection requirement concerning Department of Commerce patent regulations. Public...: Submit comments identified by Information Collection 9000- 0095, Commerce Patent Regulations, by any of...

  7. Thyroid Hormone Regulation of Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mullur, Rashmi; Liu, Yan-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is required for normal development as well as regulating metabolism in the adult. The thyroid hormone receptor (TR) isoforms, α and β, are differentially expressed in tissues and have distinct roles in TH signaling. Local activation of thyroxine (T4), to the active form, triiodothyronine (T3), by 5′-deiodinase type 2 (D2) is a key mechanism of TH regulation of metabolism. D2 is expressed in the hypothalamus, white fat, brown adipose tissue (BAT), and skeletal muscle and is required for adaptive thermogenesis. The thyroid gland is regulated by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). In addition to TRH/TSH regulation by TH feedback, there is central modulation by nutritional signals, such as leptin, as well as peptides regulating appetite. The nutrient status of the cell provides feedback on TH signaling pathways through epigentic modification of histones. Integration of TH signaling with the adrenergic nervous system occurs peripherally, in liver, white fat, and BAT, but also centrally, in the hypothalamus. TR regulates cholesterol and carbohydrate metabolism through direct actions on gene expression as well as cross-talk with other nuclear receptors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), liver X receptor (LXR), and bile acid signaling pathways. TH modulates hepatic insulin sensitivity, especially important for the suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis. The role of TH in regulating metabolic pathways has led to several new therapeutic targets for metabolic disorders. Understanding the mechanisms and interactions of the various TH signaling pathways in metabolism will improve our likelihood of identifying effective and selective targets. PMID:24692351

  8. To Regulate or Not to Regulate? Views on Electronic Cigarette Regulations and Beliefs about the Reasons for and against Regulation.

    PubMed

    Sanders-Jackson, Ashley; Tan, Andy S L; Bigman, Cabral A; Mello, Susan; Niederdeppe, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Policies designed to restrict marketing, access to, and public use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are increasingly under debate in various jurisdictions in the US. Little is known about public perceptions of these policies and factors that predict their support or opposition. Using a sample of US adults from Amazon Mechanical Turk in May 2015, this paper identifies beliefs about the benefits and costs of regulating e-cigarettes and identifies which of these beliefs predict support for e-cigarette restricting policies. A higher proportion of respondents agreed with 8 different reasons to regulate e-cigarettes (48.5% to 83.3% agreement) versus 7 reasons not to regulate e-cigarettes (11.5% to 18.9%). The majority of participants agreed with 7 out of 8 reasons for regulation. When all reasons to regulate or not were included in a final multivariable model, beliefs about protecting people from secondhand vapor and protecting youth from trying e-cigarettes significantly predicted stronger support for e-cigarette restricting policies, whereas concern about government intrusion into individual choices was associated with reduced support. This research identifies key beliefs that may underlie public support or opposition to policies designed to regulate the marketing and use of e-cigarettes. Advocates on both sides of the issue may find this research valuable in developing strategic campaigns related to the issue. Specific beliefs of potential benefits and costs of e-cigarette regulation (protecting youth, preventing exposure to secondhand vapor, and government intrusion into individual choices) may be effectively deployed by policy makers or health advocates in communicating with the public.

  9. To Regulate or Not to Regulate? Views on Electronic Cigarette Regulations and Beliefs about the Reasons for and against Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sanders-Jackson, Ashley; Tan, Andy S. L.; Bigman, Cabral A.; Mello, Susan; Niederdeppe, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Background Policies designed to restrict marketing, access to, and public use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are increasingly under debate in various jurisdictions in the US. Little is known about public perceptions of these policies and factors that predict their support or opposition. Methods Using a sample of US adults from Amazon Mechanical Turk in May 2015, this paper identifies beliefs about the benefits and costs of regulating e-cigarettes and identifies which of these beliefs predict support for e-cigarette restricting policies. Results A higher proportion of respondents agreed with 8 different reasons to regulate e-cigarettes (48.5% to 83.3% agreement) versus 7 reasons not to regulate e-cigarettes (11.5% to 18.9%). The majority of participants agreed with 7 out of 8 reasons for regulation. When all reasons to regulate or not were included in a final multivariable model, beliefs about protecting people from secondhand vapor and protecting youth from trying e-cigarettes significantly predicted stronger support for e-cigarette restricting policies, whereas concern about government intrusion into individual choices was associated with reduced support. Discussion This research identifies key beliefs that may underlie public support or opposition to policies designed to regulate the marketing and use of e-cigarettes. Advocates on both sides of the issue may find this research valuable in developing strategic campaigns related to the issue. Implications Specific beliefs of potential benefits and costs of e-cigarette regulation (protecting youth, preventing exposure to secondhand vapor, and government intrusion into individual choices) may be effectively deployed by policy makers or health advocates in communicating with the public. PMID:27517716

  10. Differential Regulation of the Autophagy and Proteasome Pathways in Skeletal Muscles in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Stana, Flavia; Vujovic, Marija; Mayaki, Dominique; Leduc-Gaudet, Jean-Philippe; Leblanc, Philippe; Huck, Laurent; Hussain, Sabah N A

    2017-09-01

    Skeletal muscle fiber atrophy develops in response to severe sepsis, but it is unclear as to how the proteolytic pathways that are involved in its development are differentially regulated. We investigated the link between sepsis-induced fiber atrophy and activation of the proteasome and autophagy pathways and whether the degree of activation is more severe and sustained in limb muscles than it is in the diaphragm. Randomized controlled experiment. Animal research laboratory. Adult male C57/BL6 mice. Two groups of animals were studied. The sepsis group was subjected to a cecal ligation and perforation technique, whereas the control (sham) group was subjected to abdominal surgery without cecal ligation and perforation. Measurements for both groups were performed 24, 48, and 96 hours after the surgical procedure. Atrophy was quantified in the diaphragm and tibialis anterior by measuring fiber diameter. Autophagy was evaluated using electron microscopic detection of autophagosomes and by measuring LC3B protein lipidation and autophagy-related protein expressions. Proteasomal degradation was quantified by measuring chymotrypsin-like activity of the 26S proteasome and messenger RNA expressions of muscle-specific E3 ligases. Sepsis triggered transient fiber atrophy in the diaphragm that lasted for 24 hours and prolonged atrophy in the tibialis anterior that persisted for 96 hours. The autophagy and proteasome pathways were activated in both muscles at varying intensities over the time course of sepsis. Activation was more pronounced in the tibialis anterior than in the diaphragm. Sepsis inhibited the V-Akt thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 and complex 1 of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathways and stimulated the AMP-activated protein kinase pathway in both muscles. Sepsis triggers more severe and sustained muscle fiber atrophy in limb muscles when compared with respiratory muscle. This response is associated with enhanced proteasomal and autophagic proteolytic pathway

  11. 50 CFR 402.04 - Counterpart regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS SUBCHAPTER A INTERAGENCY COOPERATION-ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT OF 1973, AS AMENDED General § 402.04 Counterpart regulations. The...

  12. 50 CFR 402.04 - Counterpart regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS SUBCHAPTER A INTERAGENCY COOPERATION-ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT OF 1973, AS AMENDED General § 402.04 Counterpart regulations. The...

  13. 50 CFR 402.04 - Counterpart regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS SUBCHAPTER A INTERAGENCY COOPERATION-ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT OF 1973, AS AMENDED General § 402.04 Counterpart regulations. The...

  14. 50 CFR 402.04 - Counterpart regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS SUBCHAPTER A INTERAGENCY COOPERATION-ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT OF 1973, AS AMENDED General § 402.04 Counterpart regulations. The...

  15. 50 CFR 402.04 - Counterpart regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS SUBCHAPTER A INTERAGENCY COOPERATION-ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT OF 1973, AS AMENDED General § 402.04 Counterpart regulations. The...

  16. Progress toward risk informed regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, K.C.

    1997-01-01

    For the last several years, the NRC, with encouragement from the industry, has been moving in the direction of risk informed regulation. This is consistent with the regulatory principle of efficiency, formally adopted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 1991, which requires that regulatory activities be consistent with the degree of risk reduction they achieve. Probabilistic risk analysis has become the tool of choice for selecting the best of several alternatives. Closely related to risk informed regulation is the development of performance based rules. Such rules focus on the end result to be achieved. They do not specify the process, but instead establish the goals to be reached and how the achievement of those goals is to be judged. The inspection and enforcement activity is based on whether or not the goals have been met. The author goes on to offer comments on the history of the development of this process and its probable development in the future. He also addresses some issues which must be resolved or at least acknowledged. The success of risk informed regulation ultimately depends on having sufficiently reliable data to allow quantification of regulatory alternatives in terms of relative risk. Perhaps the area of human reliability and organizational performance has the greatest potential for improvement in reactor safety. The ability to model human performance is significantly less developed that the ability to model mechanical or electrical systems. The move toward risk informed, performance based regulation provides an unusual, perhaps unique, opportunity to establish a more rational, more effective basis for regulation.

  17. How Europe regulates its genes

    SciTech Connect

    Balter, M.

    1991-06-07

    As Europe moves toward unification in 1992, more than two dozen regulations and directives that will affect biotech are working their way through the complex European legislative system. The result could mean tough scrutiny for genetically engineered products. One reason is that the European Community (EC) has chosen to examine genetically engineered products as a special category - an approach the FDA has rejected. Another is that the EC is considering enacting regulations that would mandate consideration of the socioeconomic effects of biotech products in addition to their safety. In addition, some - particularly in industry - fear a nightmare of overlapping and contradictory regulations. It's too soon to tell how well the European system will work, or how stifling the regulations might be. In all likelihood the regulations emerging in Europe won't be demonstrably superior - or inferior - to the American ones, just different, with different strengths and weaknesses. But since many US biotech companies are looking to the huge market that a unified Europe represents, the specifics of those strengths and weaknesses will ultimately be of more than passing interest.

  18. Circadian regulation of lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gooley, Joshua J

    2016-11-01

    The circadian system temporally coordinates daily rhythms in feeding behaviour and energy metabolism. The objective of the present paper is to review the mechanisms that underlie circadian regulation of lipid metabolic pathways. Circadian rhythms in behaviour and physiology are generated by master clock neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The SCN and its efferent targets in the hypothalamus integrate light and feeding signals to entrain behavioural rhythms as well as clock cells located in peripheral tissues, including the liver, adipose tissue and muscle. Circadian rhythms in gene expression are regulated at the cellular level by a molecular clock comprising a core set of clock genes/proteins. In peripheral tissues, hundreds of genes involved in lipid biosynthesis and fatty acid oxidation are rhythmically activated and repressed by clock proteins, hence providing a direct mechanism for circadian regulation of lipids. Disruption of clock gene function results in abnormal metabolic phenotypes and impaired lipid absorption, demonstrating that the circadian system is essential for normal energy metabolism. The composition and timing of meals influence diurnal regulation of metabolic pathways, with food intake during the usual rest phase associated with dysregulation of lipid metabolism. Recent studies using metabolomics and lipidomics platforms have shown that hundreds of lipid species are circadian-regulated in human plasma, including but not limited to fatty acids, TAG, glycerophospholipids, sterol lipids and sphingolipids. In future work, these lipid profiling approaches can be used to understand better the interaction between diet, mealtimes and circadian rhythms on lipid metabolism and risk for obesity and metabolic diseases.

  19. Cosmetic Regulations: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Suhag, Jyoti; Dureja, Harish

    2015-01-01

    The regulatory framework, compliance requirement, efficacy, safety, and marketing of cosmetic products are considered the most important factors for growth of the cosmetic industry. There are different regulatory bodies across the globe that have their own insights for regulation; moreover, governments such as the United States, European Union, and Japan follow a stringent regulatory framework, whereas cosmetics are not so much strictly regulated in countries such as India, Brazil, and China. The alignment of a regulatory framework will play a significant role in the removal of barriers to trade, growth of market at an international level, innovation in the development and presentation of new products, and most importantly safety and efficacy of the marketed products. The present contribution gives insight into the important cosmetic regulations in areas of premarket approval, ingredient control, and labeling and warnings, with a special focus on the cosmetic regulatory environments in the United States, European Union, Japan, and India. Most importantly, the authors highlight the dark side of cosmetics associated with allergic reactions and even skin cancer. The importance of cosmetic regulations has been highlighted by dint of which the society can be healthier, accomplished by more stringent and harmonized regulations.

  20. Redox regulation of intercellular transport.

    PubMed

    Benitez-Alfonso, Yoselin; Jackson, David; Maule, Andy

    2011-01-01

    Plant cells communicate with each other via plasmodesmata (PDs) in order to orchestrate specific responses to environmental and developmental cues. At the same time, environmental signals regulate this communication by promoting changes in PD structure that modify symplastic permeability and, in extreme cases, isolate damaged cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key messengers in plant responses to a range of biotic and abiotic stresses. They are also generated during normal metabolism, and mediate signaling pathways that modulate plant growth and developmental transitions. Recent research has suggested the participation of ROS in the regulation of PD transport. The study of several developmental and stress-induced processes revealed a co-regulation of ROS and callose (a cell wall polymer that regulates molecular flux through PDs). The identification of Arabidopsis mutants simultaneously affected in cell redox homeostasis and PD transport, and the histological detection of hydrogen peroxide and peroxidases in the PDs of the tomato vascular cambium provide new information in support of this novel regulatory mechanism. Here, we describe the evidence that supports a role for ROS in the regulation of callose deposition and/or in the formation of secondary PD, and discuss the potential importance of this mechanism during plant growth or defense against environmental stresses.

  1. Neuronal regulation of tendon homoeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of tendon homoeostasis, including adaptation to loading, is still not fully understood. Accumulating data, however, demonstrates that in addition to afferent (sensory) functions, the nervous system, via efferent pathways which are associated with through specific neuronal mediators plays an active role in regulating pain, inflammation and tendon homeostasis. This neuronal regulation of intact-, healing- and tendinopathic tendons has been shown to be mediated by three major groups of molecules including opioid, autonomic and excitatory glutamatergic neuroregulators. In intact healthy tendons the neuromediators are found in the surrounding structures: paratenon, endotenon and epitenon, whereas the proper tendon itself is practically devoid of neurovascular supply. This neuroanatomy reflects that normal tendon homoeostasis is regulated from the tendon surroundings. After injury and during tendon repair, however, there is extensive nerve ingrowth into the tendon proper, followed by a time-dependent emergence of sensory, autonomic and glutamatergic mediators, which amplify and fine-tune inflammation and regulate tendon regeneration. In tendinopathic condition, excessive and protracted presence of sensory and glutamatergic neuromediators has been identified, suggesting involvement in inflammatory, nociceptive and hypertrophic (degenerative) tissue responses. Under experimental and clinical conditions of impaired (e.g. diabetes) as well as excessive (e.g. tendinopathy) neuromediator release, dysfunctional tendon homoeostasis develops resulting in chronic pain and gradual degeneration. Thus there is a prospect that in the future pharmacotherapy and tissue engineering approaches targeting neuronal mediators and their receptors may prove to be effective therapies for painful, degenerative and traumatic tendon disorders. PMID:23718724

  2. 7 CFR 301.89-5 - Movement of regulated articles from regulated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Movement of regulated articles from regulated areas. 301.89-5 Section 301.89-5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL... § 301.89-5 Movement of regulated articles from regulated areas. (a) Any regulated article may be moved...

  3. ISOs: The new antitrust regulators?

    SciTech Connect

    Raskin, D.B.

    1998-04-01

    Fear of seller market power in emerging electricity markets has led regulators to sanction use of independent system operators as private market police. A more restrained approach is likely to yield better results without the chilling effects of private regulation. This new industry regulatory paradigm has received little critical attention to date. This is unfortunate because ISO antitrust regulation raises serious legal and policy concerns. The California and New England Power Pool (NEPOOL) plans are quite intrusive. They require the ISO to make difficult distinctions between acceptable and unacceptable market behavior. They create considerable risk that desirable competitive behavior will be chilled and that market participants will incur significant explicit and implicit costs to meet regulatory requirements.

  4. Upstream regulation of mycotoxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Alkhayyat, Fahad; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Mycotoxins are natural contaminants of food and feed products, posing a substantial health risk to humans and animals throughout the world. A plethora of filamentous fungi has been identified as mycotoxin producers and most of these fungal species belong to the genera Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Penicillium. A number of studies have been conducted to better understand the molecular mechanisms of biosynthesis of key mycotoxins and the regulatory cascades controlling toxigenesis. In many cases, the mycotoxin biosynthetic genes are clustered and regulated by one or more pathway-specific transcription factor(s). In addition, as biosynthesis of many secondary metabolites is coordinated with fungal growth and development, there are a number of upstream regulators affecting biosynthesis of mycotoxins in fungi. This review presents a concise summary of the regulation of mycotoxin biosynthesis, focusing on the roles of the upstream regulatory elements governing biosynthesis of aflatoxin and sterigmatocystin in Aspergillus.

  5. Regulation of cellular chromatin state

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rakesh K; Dhawan, Jyotsna

    2010-01-01

    The identity and functionality of eukaryotic cells is defined not just by their genomic sequence which remains constant between cell types, but by their gene expression profiles governed by epigenetic mechanisms. Epigenetic controls maintain and change the chromatin state throughout development, as exemplified by the setting up of cellular memory for the regulation and maintenance of homeotic genes in proliferating progenitors during embryonic development. Higher order chromatin structure in reversibly arrested adult stem cells also involves epigenetic regulation and in this review we highlight common trends governing chromatin states, focusing on quiescence and differentiation during myogenesis. Together, these diverse developmental modules reveal the dynamic nature of chromatin regulation providing fresh insights into the role of epigenetic mechanisms in potentiating development and differentiation. PMID:20592864

  6. Regulation of DNA replication licensing.

    PubMed

    Niida, Hiroyuki; Kitagawa, Masatoshi

    2012-12-01

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA replication is tightly regulated to occur only once per cell cycle. DNA licensing is a mechanism to guarantee this aim; that is, licensing of replication initiation is permitted during late M phase to G1 phase. The license is canceled by the start of DNA replication. Once DNA replication begins, the license is never given until the next late M phase. The licensing corresponds to the process of assembling components of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC) on the replication origin DNA. This pre-RC is the target of several different regulation systems to prevent rereplication of DNA during a single cell cycle. In this review, the regulation mechanisms mainly in mammals to control assembling components of the pre-RC will be discussed.

  7. Developmental regulators in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee-Soo; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2016-03-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus is the most prevalent airborne fungal pathogen causing severe and usually fatal invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. This fungus produces a large number of small hydrophobic asexual spores called conidia as the primary means of reproduction, cell survival, propagation, and infectivity. The initiation, progression, and completion of asexual development (conidiation) is controlled by various regulators that govern expression of thousands of genes associated with formation of the asexual developmental structure conidiophore, and biogenesis of conidia. In this review, we summarize key regulators that directly or indirectly govern conidiation in this important pathogenic fungus. Better understanding these developmental regulators may provide insights into the improvement in controlling both beneficial and detrimental aspects of various Aspergillus species.

  8. PTEN regulates cilia through Dishevelled

    PubMed Central

    Shnitsar, Iryna; Bashkurov, Mikhail; Masson, Glenn R.; Ogunjimi, Abiodun A.; Mosessian, Sherly; Cabeza, Eduardo Aguiar; Hirsch, Calley L.; Trcka, Daniel; Gish, Gerald; Jiao, Jing; Wu, Hong; Winklbauer, Rudolf; Williams, Roger L.; Pelletier, Laurence; Wrana, Jeffrey L.; Barrios-Rodiles, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are hair-like cellular protrusions important in many aspects of eukaryotic biology. For instance, motile cilia enable fluid movement over epithelial surfaces, while primary (sensory) cilia play roles in cellular signalling. The molecular events underlying cilia dynamics, and particularly their disassembly, are not well understood. Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) is an extensively studied tumour suppressor, thought to primarily act by antagonizing PI3-kinase signalling. Here we demonstrate that PTEN plays an important role in multicilia formation and cilia disassembly by controlling the phosphorylation of Dishevelled (DVL), another ciliogenesis regulator. DVL is a central component of WNT signalling that plays a role during convergent extension movements, which we show here are also regulated by PTEN. Our studies identify a novel protein substrate for PTEN that couples PTEN to regulation of cilia dynamics and WNT signalling, thus advancing our understanding of potential underlying molecular etiologies of PTEN-related pathologies. PMID:26399523

  9. NETs and cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    Robson, Michael I; Le Thanh, Phu; Schirmer, Eric C

    2014-01-01

    There are many ways that the nuclear envelope can influence the cell cycle. In addition to roles of lamins in regulating the master cell cycle regulator pRb and nuclear envelope breakdown in mitosis, many other nuclear envelope proteins influence the cell cycle through regulatory or structural functions. Of particular note among these are the nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) that appear to influence cell cycle regulation through multiple separate mechanisms. Some NETs and other nuclear envelope proteins accumulate on the mitotic spindle, suggesting functional or structural roles in the cell cycle. In interphase exogenous overexpression of some NETs promotes an increase in G1 populations, while others promote an increase in G2/M populations, sometimes associated with the induction of senescence. Intriguingly, most of the NETs linked to the cell cycle are highly restricted in their tissue expression; thus, their misregulation in cancer could contribute to the many tissue-specific types of cancer.

  10. Planned and proposed pipeline regulations

    SciTech Connect

    De Leon, C. )

    1992-04-01

    The Research and Special Programs Administration administers the Natural Gas Pipeline Safety Act of 1968 (NGPSA) and the Hazardous Liquid Pipeline Safety Act of 1979 (HLPSA). The RSPA issues and enforces design, construction, operation and maintenance regulations for natural gas pipelines and hazardous liquid pipelines. This paper discusses a number of proposed and pending safety regulations and legislative initiatives currently being considered by the RSPA and the US Congress. Some new regulations have been enacted. The next few years will see a great deal of regulatory activity regarding natural gas and hazardous liquid pipelines, much of it resulting from legislative requirements. The office of Pipeline Safety is currently conducting a study to streamline its operations. This study is analyzing the office's business, social and technical operations with the goal of improving overall efficiency, effectiveness, productivity and job satisfaction to meet the challenges of the future.

  11. Chloroplast retrograde signal regulates flowering

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Peiqiang; Guo, Hailong; Chi, Wei; Chai, Xin; Sun, Xuwu; Xu, Xiumei; Ma, Jinfang; Rochaix, Jean-David; Leister, Dario; Wang, Haiyang; Lu, Congming; Zhang, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Light is a major environmental factor regulating flowering time, thus ensuring reproductive success of higher plants. In contrast to our detailed understanding of light quality and photoperiod mechanisms involved, the molecular basis underlying high light-promoted flowering remains elusive. Here we show that, in Arabidopsis, a chloroplast-derived signal is critical for high light-regulated flowering mediated by the FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). We also demonstrate that PTM, a PHD transcription factor involved in chloroplast retrograde signaling, perceives such a signal and mediates transcriptional repression of FLC through recruitment of FVE, a component of the histone deacetylase complex. Thus, our data suggest that chloroplasts function as essential sensors of high light to regulate flowering and adaptive responses by triggering nuclear transcriptional changes at the chromatin level. PMID:27601637

  12. Positively regulated bacterial expression systems

    PubMed Central

    Brautaset, Trygve; Lale, Rahmi; Valla, Svein

    2009-01-01

    Summary Regulated promoters are useful tools for many aspects related to recombinant gene expression in bacteria, including for high‐level expression of heterologous proteins and for expression at physiological levels in metabolic engineering applications. In general, it is common to express the genes of interest from an inducible promoter controlled either by a positive regulator or by a repressor protein. In this review, we discuss established and potentially useful positively regulated bacterial promoter systems, with a particular emphasis on those that are controlled by the AraC‐XylS family of transcriptional activators. The systems function in a wide range of microorganisms, including enterobacteria, soil bacteria, lactic bacteria and streptomycetes. The available systems that have been applied to express heterologous genes are regulated either by sugars (l‐arabinose, l‐rhamnose, xylose and sucrose), substituted benzenes, cyclohexanone‐related compounds, ε‐caprolactam, propionate, thiostrepton, alkanes or peptides. It is of applied interest that some of the inducers require the presence of transport systems, some are more prone than others to become metabolized by the host and some have been applied mainly in one or a limited number of species. Based on bioinformatics analyses, the AraC‐XylS family of regulators contains a large number of different members (currently over 300), but only a small fraction of these, the XylS/Pm, AraC/PBAD, RhaR‐RhaS/rhaBAD, NitR/PnitA and ChnR/Pb regulator/promoter systems, have so far been explored for biotechnological applications. PMID:21261879

  13. Medical device regulation for manufacturers.

    PubMed

    McAllister, P; Jeswiet, J

    2003-01-01

    Manufacturers of medical devices are held to a higher standard than manufacturers of many other products due to the potential severity of the consequences of introducing inferior or unsafe products to the market-place. In Canada, the medical device industry is regulated by Health Canada under the Medical Device Regulations of the Food and Drug Act. The Medical Device Regulations define requirements of medical device design, development and manufacture to ensure that products reaching the public are safe and effective. Health Canada also requires that medical device manufacturers maintain distribution records to ensure that devices can be traced to the source and consumers can be contacted successfully in the event that a device is recalled. Medical devices exported from Canada must be compliant with the regulations of the country of import. The Canadian Medical Device Regulations were based on the Medical Device Directives of the European Union thus facilitating approval of Canadian devices for the European market. The United States Food and Drug Administration has separate and distinct requirements for safety and quality of medical devices. While effort has been made to facilitate approval and trade of Canadian medical devices in the United States and the European Union, obtaining approval from multiple regulatory bodies can result in increased device development time and cost. The Global Harmonization Task Force is an organization composed of members from Japanese, Australian, European, Canadian and American medical device regulatory bodies. This organization was formed with the objective of harmonizing medical device regulations in an effort to facilitate international trade and standardize the quality of medical devices available to all countries. This paper discusses the requirements that must be met by manufacturers when designing and manufacturing medical devices.

  14. Calcium regulation of muscle contraction.

    PubMed Central

    Szent-Györgyi, A G

    1975-01-01

    Calcium triggers contraction by reaction with regulatory proteins that in the absence of calcium prevent interaction of actin and myosin. Two different regulatory systems are found in different muscles. In actin-linked regulation troponin and tropomyosin regulate actin by blocking sites on actin required for complex formation with myosin; in myosin-linked regulation sites on myosin are blocked in the absence of calcium. The major features of actin control are as follows: there is a requirement for tropomyosin and for a troponin complex having three different subunits with different functions; the actin displays a cooperative behavior; and a movement of tropomyosin occurs controlled by the calcium binding on troponin. Myosin regulation is controlled by a regulatory subunit that can be dissociated in scallop myosin reversibly by removing divalent cations with EDTA. Myosin control can function with pure actin in the absence of tropomyosin. Calcium binding and regulation of molluscan myosins depend on the presence of regulatory light chains. It is proposed that the light chains function by sterically blocking myosin sites in the absence of calcium, and that the "off" state of myosin requires cooperation between the two myosin heads. Both myosin control and actin control are widely distributed in different organisms. Many invertebrates have muscles with both types of regulation. Actin control is absent in the muscles of molluscs and in several minor phyla that lack troponin. Myosin control is not found in striated vertebrate muscles and in the fast muscles of crustacean decapods, although regulatory light chains are present. While in vivo myosin control may not be excluded from vertebrate striated muscles, myosin control may be absent as a result of mutations of the myosin heavy chain. PMID:806311

  15. 75 FR 32719 - Acquisition Regulation: Agency Supplementary Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ... current law. DATES: Written comments on the proposed rulemaking must be received on or before close of... Federal law or regulation; (3) provides a clear legal standard for affected conduct while promoting... completed the required review and determined that, to the extent permitted by law, this rule meets the...

  16. 76 FR 63191 - Sudanese Sanctions Regulations; Iranian Transactions Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ... specified food items, as well as exports to certain persons, requiring a greater level of scrutiny are.... Certain specified food items, as well as exports to certain persons, requiring a greater level of scrutiny... Transactions Regulations by issuing general licenses that authorize the exportation or reexportation of food...

  17. Autoimmune regulator, Aire, is a novel regulator of chondrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Si, Yuan; Inoue, Kazuki; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Kanno, Jun; Imai, Yuuki

    2013-08-09

    Chondrocyte differentiation is controlled by various regulators, such as Sox9 and Runx2, but the process is complex. To further understand the precise underlying molecular mechanisms of chondrocyte differentiation, we aimed to identify a novel regulatory factor of chondrocyte differentiation using gene expression profiles of micromass-cultured chondrocytes at different differentiation stages. From the results of microarray analysis, the autoimmune regulator, Aire, was identified as a novel regulator. Aire stable knockdown cells, and primary cultured chondrocytes obtained from Aire(-/-) mice, showed reduced mRNA expression levels of chondrocyte-related genes. Over-expression of Aire induced the early stages of chondrocyte differentiation by facilitating expression of Bmp2. A ChIP assay revealed that Aire was recruited on an Airebinding site (T box) in the Bmp2 promoter region in the early stages of chondrocyte differentiation and histone methylation was modified. These results suggest that Aire can facilitate early chondrocyte differentiation by expression of Bmp2 through altering the histone modification status of the promoter region of Bmp2. Taken together, Aire might play a role as an active regulator of chondrocyte differentiation, which leads to new insights into the regulatory mechanisms of chondrocyte differentiation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Lrp, a global regulator, regulates the virulence of Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yu-Chi; Hung, Feng-Ru; Weng, Chao-Hui; Li, Wei-Ting; Chuang, Tzu-Hung; Liu, Tsung-Lin; Lin, Ching-Yuan; Lo, Chien-Jung; Chen, Chun-Liang; Chen, Jen-Wei; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Hor, Lien-I

    2017-08-11

    An attenuated mutant (designated NY303) of Vibrio vulnificus, which causes serious wound infection and septicemia in humans, was isolated fortuitously from a clinical strain YJ016. This mutant was defective in cytotoxicity, migration on soft agar and virulence in the mouse. The purpose of this study was to map the mutation in this attenuated mutant and further explore how the gene thus identified is involved in virulence. The whole genome sequence of mutant NY303 determined by next-generation sequencing was compared with that of strain YJ016 to map the mutations. By isolating and characterizing the specific gene-knockout mutants, the gene associated with the phenotype of mutant NY303 was identified. This gene encodes a global regulator, Lrp. A mutant, YH01, deficient in Lrp was isolated and examined in vitro, in vivo and ex vivo to find the affected virulence mechanisms. The target genes of Lrp were further identified by comparing the transcriptomes, which were determined by RNA-seq, of strain YJ016 and mutant YH01. The promoters bound by Lrp were identified by genome footprinting-sequencing, and those related with virulence were further examined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. A mutation in lrp was shown to be associated with the reduced cytotoxicity, chemotaxis and virulence of mutant NY303. Mutant YH01 exhibited a phenotype resembling that of mutant NY303, and was defective in colonization in the mouse and growth in mouse serum, but not the antiphagocytosis ability. 596 and 95 genes were down- and up-regulated, respectively, in mutant YH01. Many of the genes involved in secretion of the MARTX cytotoxin, chemotaxis and iron-acquisition were down-regulated in mutant YH01. The lrp gene, which was shown to be negatively autoregulated, and 7 down-regulated virulence-associated genes were bound by Lrp in their promoters. A 14-bp consensus sequence, mkCrTTkwAyTsTG, putatively recognized by Lrp was identified in the promoters of these genes. Lrp is a global

  19. Regulations against the human nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizondo-Garza, Fernando J.

    2004-05-01

    The discussion around the concept of the addiction to noise has evidenced the importance of noise for the human being and explains why in some cases the regulations fail to control the noise in cities. In this presentation the different uses, consciously or unconsciously, of the noise will be analyzed, uses that go from habits to maybe addictions. Also discussed are the implications of establishing regulations against the human nature as well as the importance of education to manage the noise and design acoustically instead of trying to ban the noise in some social circumstances.

  20. The dyadic regulation of affect.

    PubMed

    Fosha, D

    2001-02-01

    Accelerated Experiential-Dynamic Psychotherapy integrates experiential, relational, and psychodynamic elements. Deep authentic affective experience and its regulation through coordinated emotional interchanges between patient and therapist are viewed as key transformational agents. When maintaining attachment with caregivers necessitates excluding particular affects, a patient's capacity to regulate emotion becomes compromised. Being in an emotionally alive therapeutic relationship enables patients to better tolerate and communicate affective states; doing so, in turn, fosters security, openness, and intimacy in their other relationships. A clinical vignette will illustrate how using the therapist's affect, and focusing on the patient's experience of it, contributes to the repair of affect regulatory difficulties.