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Sample records for 26s rdna gene

  1. Characterization of three different clusters of 18S-26S ribosomal DNA genes in the sea urchin P. lividus: Genetic and epigenetic regulation synchronous to 5S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, Daniele; Dimarco, Eufrosina; Caradonna, Fabio

    2016-04-15

    We previously reported the characterization 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clusters in the common sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and demonstrated the presence of DNA methylation-dependent silencing of embryo specific 5S rDNA cluster in adult tissue. In this work, we show genetic and epigenetic characterization of 18S-26S rDNA clusters in this specie. The results indicate the presence of three different 18S-26S rDNA clusters with different Non-Transcribed Spacer (NTS) regions that have different chromosomal localizations. Moreover, we show that the two largest clusters are hyper-methylated in the promoter-containing NTS regions in adult tissues, as in the 5S rDNA. These findings demonstrate an analogous epigenetic regulation in small and large rDNA clusters and support the logical synchronism in building ribosomes. In fact, all the ribosomal RNA genes must be synchronously and equally transcribed to perform their unique final product.

  2. Characterization of three different clusters of 18S-26S ribosomal DNA genes in the sea urchin P. lividus: Genetic and epigenetic regulation synchronous to 5S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, Daniele; Dimarco, Eufrosina; Caradonna, Fabio

    2016-04-15

    We previously reported the characterization 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clusters in the common sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and demonstrated the presence of DNA methylation-dependent silencing of embryo specific 5S rDNA cluster in adult tissue. In this work, we show genetic and epigenetic characterization of 18S-26S rDNA clusters in this specie. The results indicate the presence of three different 18S-26S rDNA clusters with different Non-Transcribed Spacer (NTS) regions that have different chromosomal localizations. Moreover, we show that the two largest clusters are hyper-methylated in the promoter-containing NTS regions in adult tissues, as in the 5S rDNA. These findings demonstrate an analogous epigenetic regulation in small and large rDNA clusters and support the logical synchronism in building ribosomes. In fact, all the ribosomal RNA genes must be synchronously and equally transcribed to perform their unique final product. PMID:26789074

  3. Phylogenetic relationships within Cornus (Cornaceae) based on 26S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Fan, C

    2001-06-01

    Phylogenetic relationships within the dogwood genus Cornus have been highly controversial due to the great morphological heterogeneity. Earlier phylogenetic analyses of Cornus using chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) data (including rbcL and matK sequences, as well as restriction sites) and morphological characters suggested incongruent relationships within the genus. The present study generated sequence data from the nuclear gene 26S rDNA for Cornus to test the phylogenetic hypotheses based on cpDNA and morphological data. The 26S rDNA sequence data obtained represent 16 species, 13 from Cornus and three from outgroups, having an aligned length of 3380 bp. Both parsimony and maximum likelihood analyses of these sequences were conducted. Trees resulting from these analyses suggest relationships among subgroups of Cornus consistent with those inferred from cpDNA data. That is, the dwarf dogwood (subg. Arctocrania) and the big-bracted dogwood (subg. Cynoxylon and subg. Syncarpea) clades are sisters, which are, in turn, sister to the cornelian cherries (subg. Cornus and subg. Afrocrania). This red-fruited clade is sister to the blue- or white-fruited dogwoods (subg. Mesomora, subg. Kraniopsis, and subg. Yinquania). Within the blue- or white-fruited clade, C. oblonga (subg. Yinquania) is sister to the remainder, and subg. Mesomora is sister to subg. Kraniopsis. These relationships were also suggested by the combined 26S rDNA and cpDNA data, but with higher bootstrap and Bremer support in the combined analysis. The 26S rDNA sequence data of Cornus consist of 12 expansion segments spanning 1034 bp. These expansion segments evolve approximately four times as fast as the conserved core regions. The study provides an example of phylogenetic utility of 26S rDNA sequences below the genus level. PMID:11410478

  4. Comparative physical mapping of the 18S-5.8S-26S rDNA in three sorghum species.

    PubMed

    Sang, Y; Liang, G H

    2000-10-01

    The physical locations of the 18S-5.8S-26S rDNA sequences were examined in three sorghum species by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using biotin-labeled heterologous 18S-5.8S-26S rDNA probe (pTa71). Each 18S-5.8S-26S rDNA locus occurred at two sites on the chromosomes in Sorghum bicolor (2n = 20) and S. versicolor (2n = 10), but at four sites on the chromosomes of S. halepense (2n = 40) and the tetraploid S. versicolor (2n = 20). Positions of the rDNA loci varied from the interstitial to terminal position among the four accessions of the three sorghum species. The rDNA data are useful for investigation of chromosome evolution and phylogeny. This study excluded S. versicolor as the possible progenitor of S. bicolor.

  5. Epidemiologic Study of Malassezia Yeasts in Acne Patients by Analysis of 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young Chan; Hahn, Hyung Jin; Kim, Ji Young; Ko, Jong Hyun; Choe, Yong Beom; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2011-01-01

    Background Although acne is a common follicular inflammatory dermatosis, studies of the relationship between Malassezia yeasts and acne have rarely been conducted. Objective We sought to identify Malassezia yeasts from acne patients and establish a relationship between specific types of species of Malassezia and acne. Methods Sixty acne patients were enrolled. Each strain obtained was identified as one of eleven species by 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP. We then compared these data with those of age- and sex-matched healthy subjects. Results Growth of Malassezia was evident in fewer patients with acne (50%) in comparison to controls (70.6%). M. restricta was dominant in patients with acne (23.9%), whereas M. globosa was most common (26.7%) in healthy controls. In the patients group, the rate was the highest (71.7%) in the twenties and, in terms of body site, the rate was the highest (60%) in the chest. In the control group, the rate was the highest (75.0%) in the thirties and in the forehead (85.0%). Conclusion The detection rate of Malassezia yeasts was conspicuously low in the acne patients group. Statistically significant differences were observed between the patient and the control groups in the twenties and thirties, and in terms of body site, in the forehead and chest. PMID:21909202

  6. Epidemiologic Study of Malassezia Yeasts in Patients with Malassezia Folliculitis by 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Jong Hyun; Choe, Yong Beom; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2011-01-01

    Background So far, studies on the inter-relationship between Malassezia and Malassezia folliculitis have been rather scarce. Objective We sought to analyze the differences in body sites, gender and age groups, and to determine whether there is a relationship between certain types of Malassezia species and Malassezia folliculitis. Methods Specimens were taken from the forehead, cheek and chest of 60 patients with Malassezia folliculitis and from the normal skin of 60 age- and gender-matched healthy controls by 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP. Results M. restricta was dominant in the patients with Malassezia folliculitis (20.6%), while M. globosa was the most common species (26.7%) in the controls. The rate of identification was the highest in the teens for the patient group, whereas it was the highest in the thirties for the control group. M. globosa was the most predominant species on the chest with 13 cases (21.7%), and M. restricta was the most commonly identified species, with 17 (28.3%) and 12 (20%) cases on the forehead and cheek, respectively, for the patient group. Conclusion Statistically significant differences were observed between the patient and control groups for the people in their teens and twenties, and in terms of the body site, on the forehead only. PMID:21747616

  7. Conserved Organisation of 45S rDNA Sites and rDNA Gene Copy Number among Major Clades of Early Land Plants.

    PubMed

    Rosato, Marcela; Kovařík, Aleš; Garilleti, Ricardo; Rosselló, Josep A

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoding ribosomal RNA (rDNA) are universal key constituents of eukaryotic genomes, and the nuclear genome harbours hundreds to several thousand copies of each species. Knowledge about the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number provides information for comparative studies of organismal and molecular evolution at various phylogenetic levels. With the exception of seed plants, the range of 45S rDNA locus (encoding 18S, 5.8S and 26S rRNA) and gene copy number variation within key evolutionary plant groups is largely unknown. This is especially true for the three earliest land plant lineages Marchantiophyta (liverworts), Bryophyta (mosses), and Anthocerotophyta (hornworts). In this work, we report the extent of rDNA variation in early land plants, assessing the number of 45S rDNA loci and gene copy number in 106 species and 25 species, respectively, of mosses, liverworts and hornworts. Unexpectedly, the results show a narrow range of ribosomal locus variation (one or two 45S rDNA loci) and gene copies not present in vascular plant lineages, where a wide spectrum is recorded. Mutation analysis of whole genomic reads showed higher (3-fold) intragenomic heterogeneity of Marchantia polymorpha (Marchantiophyta) rDNA compared to Physcomitrella patens (Bryophyta) and two angiosperms (Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tomentosifomis) suggesting the presence of rDNA pseudogenes in its genome. No association between phylogenetic position, taxonomic adscription and the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number was found. Our results suggest a likely evolutionary rDNA stasis during land colonisation and diversification across 480 myr of bryophyte evolution. We hypothesise that strong selection forces may be acting against ribosomal gene locus amplification. Despite showing a predominant haploid phase and infrequent meiosis, overall rDNA homogeneity is not severely compromised in bryophytes.

  8. Conserved Organisation of 45S rDNA Sites and rDNA Gene Copy Number among Major Clades of Early Land Plants

    PubMed Central

    Rosato, Marcela; Kovařík, Aleš; Garilleti, Ricardo; Rosselló, Josep A.

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoding ribosomal RNA (rDNA) are universal key constituents of eukaryotic genomes, and the nuclear genome harbours hundreds to several thousand copies of each species. Knowledge about the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number provides information for comparative studies of organismal and molecular evolution at various phylogenetic levels. With the exception of seed plants, the range of 45S rDNA locus (encoding 18S, 5.8S and 26S rRNA) and gene copy number variation within key evolutionary plant groups is largely unknown. This is especially true for the three earliest land plant lineages Marchantiophyta (liverworts), Bryophyta (mosses), and Anthocerotophyta (hornworts). In this work, we report the extent of rDNA variation in early land plants, assessing the number of 45S rDNA loci and gene copy number in 106 species and 25 species, respectively, of mosses, liverworts and hornworts. Unexpectedly, the results show a narrow range of ribosomal locus variation (one or two 45S rDNA loci) and gene copies not present in vascular plant lineages, where a wide spectrum is recorded. Mutation analysis of whole genomic reads showed higher (3-fold) intragenomic heterogeneity of Marchantia polymorpha (Marchantiophyta) rDNA compared to Physcomitrella patens (Bryophyta) and two angiosperms (Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tomentosifomis) suggesting the presence of rDNA pseudogenes in its genome. No association between phylogenetic position, taxonomic adscription and the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number was found. Our results suggest a likely evolutionary rDNA stasis during land colonisation and diversification across 480 myr of bryophyte evolution. We hypothesise that strong selection forces may be acting against ribosomal gene locus amplification. Despite showing a predominant haploid phase and infrequent meiosis, overall rDNA homogeneity is not severely compromised in bryophytes. PMID:27622766

  9. Conserved Organisation of 45S rDNA Sites and rDNA Gene Copy Number among Major Clades of Early Land Plants.

    PubMed

    Rosato, Marcela; Kovařík, Aleš; Garilleti, Ricardo; Rosselló, Josep A

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoding ribosomal RNA (rDNA) are universal key constituents of eukaryotic genomes, and the nuclear genome harbours hundreds to several thousand copies of each species. Knowledge about the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number provides information for comparative studies of organismal and molecular evolution at various phylogenetic levels. With the exception of seed plants, the range of 45S rDNA locus (encoding 18S, 5.8S and 26S rRNA) and gene copy number variation within key evolutionary plant groups is largely unknown. This is especially true for the three earliest land plant lineages Marchantiophyta (liverworts), Bryophyta (mosses), and Anthocerotophyta (hornworts). In this work, we report the extent of rDNA variation in early land plants, assessing the number of 45S rDNA loci and gene copy number in 106 species and 25 species, respectively, of mosses, liverworts and hornworts. Unexpectedly, the results show a narrow range of ribosomal locus variation (one or two 45S rDNA loci) and gene copies not present in vascular plant lineages, where a wide spectrum is recorded. Mutation analysis of whole genomic reads showed higher (3-fold) intragenomic heterogeneity of Marchantia polymorpha (Marchantiophyta) rDNA compared to Physcomitrella patens (Bryophyta) and two angiosperms (Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tomentosifomis) suggesting the presence of rDNA pseudogenes in its genome. No association between phylogenetic position, taxonomic adscription and the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number was found. Our results suggest a likely evolutionary rDNA stasis during land colonisation and diversification across 480 myr of bryophyte evolution. We hypothesise that strong selection forces may be acting against ribosomal gene locus amplification. Despite showing a predominant haploid phase and infrequent meiosis, overall rDNA homogeneity is not severely compromised in bryophytes. PMID:27622766

  10. Epidemiologic Study of Malassezia Yeasts in Seborrheic Dermatitis Patients by the Analysis of 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Byung Ho; Choe, Yong Beom; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2010-01-01

    Background This case-control study concerns a molecular biological method based on the data gathered from a group of Korean subjects to examine the distribution of Malassezia yeasts in seborrheic dermatitis (SD) patients. Cultures for Malassezia yeasts were taken from the foreheads, cheeks and chests of 60 patients with SD and in 60 healthy controls of equivalent age. Objective The purpose of this study is to identify the relationship between certain species of Malassezia and SD. This was done by analyzing the differences in the distribution of Malassezia species in terms of age and body parts of the host with healthy controls. Methods 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP, a fast and accurate molecular biological method, was used to overcome the limits of morphological and biochemical methods. Results The positive Malassezia culture rate was 51.7% in patients with SD, which was lower than that of healthy adults (63.9%). M. restricta was dominant in patients with SD (19.5%). Likewise, M. restricta was identified as a common species (20.5%) in healthy controls. In the ages 31~40, M. restricta was found to be the most common species (31.6%) among SD patients. Conclusion According to the results of the study, the most frequently isolated species was M. restricta (19.5%) in patients with SD. There was no statistically significant difference in the distribution of Malassezia species between the SD patients and healthy control groups. PMID:20548904

  11. Dancing together and separate again: gymnosperms exhibit frequent changes of fundamental 5S and 35S rRNA gene (rDNA) organisation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, S; Kovařík, A

    2013-07-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the 5S rRNA genes occur in tandem units and are arranged either separately (S-type arrangement) or linked to other repeated genes, in most cases to rDNA locus encoding 18S-5.8S-26S genes (L-type arrangement). Here we used Southern blot hybridisation, PCR and sequencing approaches to analyse genomic organisation of rRNA genes in all large gymnosperm groups, including Coniferales, Ginkgoales, Gnetales and Cycadales. The data are provided for 27 species (21 genera). The 5S units linked to the 35S rDNA units occur in some but not all Gnetales, Coniferales and in Ginkgo (∼30% of the species analysed), while the remaining exhibit separate organisation. The linked 5S rRNA genes may occur as single-copy insertions or as short tandems embedded in the 26S-18S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS). The 5S transcript may be encoded by the same (Ginkgo, Ephedra) or opposite (Podocarpus) DNA strand as the 18S-5.8S-26S genes. In addition, pseudogenised 5S copies were also found in some IGS types. Both L- and S-type units have been largely homogenised across the genomes. Phylogenetic relationships based on the comparison of 5S coding sequences suggest that the 5S genes independently inserted IGS at least three times in the course of gymnosperm evolution. Frequent transpositions and rearrangements of basic units indicate relatively relaxed selection pressures imposed on genomic organisation of 5S genes in plants.

  12. Repeated reunions and splits feature the highly dynamic evolution of 5S and 35S ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) in the Asteraceae family

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In flowering plants and animals the most common ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) organisation is that in which 35S (encoding 18S-5.8S-26S rRNA) and 5S genes are physically separated occupying different chromosomal loci. However, recent observations established that both genes have been unified to a single 35S-5S unit in the genus Artemisia (Asteraceae), a genomic arrangement typical of primitive eukaryotes such as yeast, among others. Here we aim to reveal the origin, distribution and mechanisms leading to the linked organisation of rDNA in the Asteraceae by analysing unit structure (PCR, Southern blot, sequencing), gene copy number (quantitative PCR) and chromosomal position (FISH) of 5S and 35S rRNA genes in ~200 species representing the family diversity and other closely related groups. Results Dominant linked rDNA genotype was found within three large groups in subfamily Asteroideae: tribe Anthemideae (93% of the studied cases), tribe Gnaphalieae (100%) and in the "Heliantheae alliance" (23%). The remaining five tribes of the Asteroideae displayed canonical non linked arrangement of rDNA, as did the other groups in the Asteraceae. Nevertheless, low copy linked genes were identified among several species that amplified unlinked units. The conserved position of functional 5S insertions downstream from the 26S gene suggests a unique, perhaps retrotransposon-mediated integration event at the base of subfamily Asteroideae. Further evolution likely involved divergence of 26S-5S intergenic spacers, amplification and homogenisation of units across the chromosomes and concomitant elimination of unlinked arrays. However, the opposite trend, from linked towards unlinked arrangement was also surmised in few species indicating possible reversibility of these processes. Conclusions Our results indicate that nearly 25% of Asteraceae species may have evolved unusual linked arrangement of rRNA genes. Thus, in plants, fundamental changes in intrinsic structure of rDNA units

  13. Cloning and sequencing of the rDNA gene family of the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Pang, C Y; Deng, T X; Tang, D S; Yang, C Y; Jiang, H; Yang, B Z; Liang, X W

    2012-01-01

    The rDNA genes coding for ribosomal RNA in animals are complicated repeat sequences with high GC content. We amplified water buffalo rDNA gene sequences with the long and accurate (LA) PCR method, using LA Taq DNA polymerase and GC buffer, based on bioinformatic analysis of related organisms. The rDNA genes were found to consist of 9016 nucleotides, including three rRNA genes and two internal transcribed spacers (ITS), which we named 18S rRNA, ITS1, 5.8S rRNA, ITS2 and 28S rRNA. We tested and optimized conditions for cloning these complicated rDNA sequences, including specific rules of primer design, improvements in the reaction system, and selection of the DNA polymerase.

  14. Dancing together and separate again: gymnosperms exhibit frequent changes of fundamental 5S and 35S rRNA gene (rDNA) organisation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, S; Kovařík, A

    2013-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the 5S rRNA genes occur in tandem units and are arranged either separately (S-type arrangement) or linked to other repeated genes, in most cases to rDNA locus encoding 18S–5.8S–26S genes (L-type arrangement). Here we used Southern blot hybridisation, PCR and sequencing approaches to analyse genomic organisation of rRNA genes in all large gymnosperm groups, including Coniferales, Ginkgoales, Gnetales and Cycadales. The data are provided for 27 species (21 genera). The 5S units linked to the 35S rDNA units occur in some but not all Gnetales, Coniferales and in Ginkgo (∼30% of the species analysed), while the remaining exhibit separate organisation. The linked 5S rRNA genes may occur as single-copy insertions or as short tandems embedded in the 26S–18S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS). The 5S transcript may be encoded by the same (Ginkgo, Ephedra) or opposite (Podocarpus) DNA strand as the 18S–5.8S–26S genes. In addition, pseudogenised 5S copies were also found in some IGS types. Both L- and S-type units have been largely homogenised across the genomes. Phylogenetic relationships based on the comparison of 5S coding sequences suggest that the 5S genes independently inserted IGS at least three times in the course of gymnosperm evolution. Frequent transpositions and rearrangements of basic units indicate relatively relaxed selection pressures imposed on genomic organisation of 5S genes in plants. PMID:23512008

  15. Molecular dissection of the rDNA array and of the 5S rDNA gene in Meloidogyne artiellia: phylogenetic and diagnostic implications.

    PubMed

    Veronico, Pasqua; De Luca, Francesca; De Giorgi, Carla

    2004-06-01

    The sequence of a 13.423 nucleotide genomic fragment has been determined for the plant parasitic nematode Meloidogyne artiellia. It contains an entire rDNA cluster, the bordering intergenic regions and portions of the flanking coding regions. The sequence analysis of the rDNA repeats suggests homogeneity in M. artiellia, thus providing a further indication of the usefulness of these genes for the diagnostic identification of this species. The comparison of the secondary structures of the internal transcribed spacer 2 region in several Meloidogyne species indicates that RNA folding predictions can be used as a tool of potential diagnostic relevance. The other ribosomal gene, 5S rDNA, has been demonstrated to be functional and located near the trans-spliced leader sequences, in the same arrangement found in the distantly related nematode Caenorhabditis elegans but never in other Meloidogyne thus providing species-specific markers for the identification of several Thylenchida parasitic nematodes. PMID:15135452

  16. Evolutionary dynamics of 5S rDNA location in acridid grasshoppers and its relationship with H3 histone gene and 45S rDNA location.

    PubMed

    Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo C; Cabrero, Josefa; López-León, María Dolores; Camacho, Juan Pedro M

    2011-07-01

    We analyze the chromosomal location of 5S rDNA clusters in 29 species of grasshoppers belonging to the family Acrididae. There was extensive variation among species for the number and location of 5S rDNA sites. Out of 148 sites detected, 75% were proximally located, 21.6% were interstitial, and only 3.4% were distal. The number of 5S rDNA sites per species varied from a single chromosome pair (in six species) to all chromosome pairs (in five species), with a range of intermediate situations. Thirteen chromosomes from eight species carried two 5S rDNA clusters. At intraspecific level, differences among populations were detected in Eyprepocnemis plorans, and some heteromorphisms have also been observed in some species. Double FISH for 5S rDNA and H3 histone gene DNA, performed on 17 of these 29 species, revealed that both markers are sometimes placed in a same chromosome but at different location, whereas they appeared to co-localize in five species (Calliptamus barbarus, Heteracris adpersa, Aiolopus strepens, Oedipoda charpentieri and O. coerulescens). Double fiber-FISH in A. strepens and O. coerulescens showed that the two DNAs are closely interspersed with variable relative amounts of both classes of DNA. Finally, no correlation was observed between the number of 5S and 45S rDNA clusters in 23 species where this information was available. These results are discussed in the light of possible mechanisms of spread that led to the extensive variation in the number of clusters observed for both rDNA types in acridid grasshoppers.

  17. Molecular organization of the 5S rDNA gene type II in elasmobranchs

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Sergio I.; Hleap, Jose S.; Cárdenas, Heiber; Blouin, Christian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The 5S rDNA gene is a non-coding RNA that can be found in 2 copies (type I and type II) in bony and cartilaginous fish. Previous studies have pointed out that type II gene is a paralog derived from type I. We analyzed the molecular organization of 5S rDNA type II in elasmobranchs. Although the structure of the 5S rDNA is supposed to be highly conserved, our results show that the secondary structure in this group possesses some variability and is different than the consensus secondary structure. One of these differences in Selachii is an internal loop at nucleotides 7 and 112. These mutations observed in the transcribed region suggest an independent origin of the gene among Batoids and Selachii. All promoters were highly conserved with the exception of BoxA, possibly due to its affinity to polymerase III. This latter enzyme recognizes a dT4 sequence as stop signal, however in Rajiformes this signal was doubled in length to dT8. This could be an adaptation toward a higher efficiency in the termination process. Our results suggest that there is no TATA box in elasmobranchs in the NTS region. We also provide some evidence suggesting that the complexity of the microsatellites present in the NTS region play an important role in the 5S rRNA gene since it is significantly correlated with the length of the NTS. PMID:26488198

  18. Molecular organization of the 5S rDNA gene type II in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Castro, Sergio I; Hleap, Jose S; Cárdenas, Heiber; Blouin, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The 5S rDNA gene is a non-coding RNA that can be found in 2 copies (type I and type II) in bony and cartilaginous fish. Previous studies have pointed out that type II gene is a paralog derived from type I. We analyzed the molecular organization of 5S rDNA type II in elasmobranchs. Although the structure of the 5S rDNA is supposed to be highly conserved, our results show that the secondary structure in this group possesses some variability and is different than the consensus secondary structure. One of these differences in Selachii is an internal loop at nucleotides 7 and 112. These mutations observed in the transcribed region suggest an independent origin of the gene among Batoids and Selachii. All promoters were highly conserved with the exception of BoxA, possibly due to its affinity to polymerase III. This latter enzyme recognizes a dT4 sequence as stop signal, however in Rajiformes this signal was doubled in length to dT8. This could be an adaptation toward a higher efficiency in the termination process. Our results suggest that there is no TATA box in elasmobranchs in the NTS region. We also provide some evidence suggesting that the complexity of the microsatellites present in the NTS region play an important role in the 5S rRNA gene since it is significantly correlated with the length of the NTS.

  19. Uptake of pathogenic intracellular bacteria into human and murine macrophages downregulates the eukaryotic 26S protease complex ATPase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Schwan, W R; Kopecko, D J

    1997-01-01

    A differential PCR technique detected the transcriptional downregulation of the mss1 (mammalian suppressor of svg1) gene in murine J774A.1 macrophages following uptake of Salmonella typhimurium. This downregulation was also noted after entry of virulent strains of Listeria monocytogenes and Shigella flexneri, two other facultative intracellular bacterial species. In contrast, uptake of nonpathogenic Escherichia coli HB101, an aroA mutant of S. typhimurium, an invasion plasmid antigen B (ipaB) mutant of S. flexneri, hemolysin (hly) and positive-regulatory factor (prfA) mutants of L. monocytogenes, or latex beads produced mss1 expression levels similar to that of uninfected macrophages. Transcriptional downregulation of mss1 was also shown to occur in S. typhimurium-infected human U937 cells, albeit to an extent less than that in murine J774A.1 cells. In addition to a lower abundance of mss1 transcripts, we also demonstrate for the first time that less MSS1 protein was detected in intracellular-bacterium-infected cells (beginning about 1 h after entry of the pathogenic intracellular bacteria) than in noninfected cells. Some strains with specific mutations in characterized genes, such as an ipaB mutant strain of S. flexneri and an hly mutant strain of L. monocytogenes, did not elicit this lower level of expression of MSS1 protein. The decrease in MSS1 within infected macrophages resulted in an accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, substrates for MSS1. Since MSS1 comprises the ATPase part of the 26S protease that degrades ubiquitinated proteins, we hypothesize that downregulation of the mss1 gene by intracellular bacterial entry may help subvert the host cell's normal defensive response to internalized bacteria, allowing the intracellular bacteria to survive. PMID:9353061

  20. Nonviral Gene Targeting at rDNA Locus of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Youjin; Liu, Xionghao; Long, Panpan; Xiao, Di; Cun, Jintao; Li, Zhuo; Xue, Jinfeng; Wu, Yong; Luo, Sha; Wu, Lingqian; Liang, Desheng

    2013-01-01

    Background. Genetic modification, such as the addition of exogenous genes to the MSC genome, is crucial to their use as cellular vehicles. Due to the risks associated with viral vectors such as insertional mutagenesis, the safer nonviral vectors have drawn a great deal of attention. Methods. VEGF, bFGF, vitamin C, and insulin-transferrin-selenium-X were supplemented in the MSC culture medium. The cells' proliferation and survival capacity was measured by MTT, determination of the cumulative number of cells, and a colony-forming efficiency assay. The plasmid pHr2-NL was constructed and nucleofected into MSCs. The recombinants were selected using G418 and characterized using PCR and Southern blotting. Results. BFGF is critical to MSC growth and it acted synergistically with vitamin C, VEGF, and ITS-X, causing the cells to expand significantly. The neomycin gene was targeted to the rDNA locus of human MSCs using a nonviral human ribosomal targeting vector. The recombinant MSCs retained multipotential differentiation capacity, typical levels of hMSC surface marker expression, and a normal karyotype, and none were tumorigenic in nude mice. Conclusions. Exogenous genes can be targeted to the rDNA locus of human MSCs while maintaining the characteristics of MSCs. This is the first nonviral gene targeting of hMSCs. PMID:23762822

  1. Species-genomic relationships among the tribasic diploid and polyploid Carthamus taxa based on physical mapping of active and inactive 18S-5.8S-26S and 5S ribosomal RNA gene families, and the two tandemly repeated DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Renuka; Tsujimoto, Hisashi; Tandon, Rajesh; Rao, Satyawada Rama; Raina, Soom Nath

    2013-05-25

    In the genus Carthamus (2n=20, 22, 24, 44, 64; x=10, 11, 12), most of the homologues within and between the chromosome complements are difficult to be identified. In the present work, we used fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) to determine the chromosome distribution of the two rRNA gene families, and the two isolated repeated DNA sequences in the 14 Carthamus taxa. The distinctive variability in the distribution, number and signal intensity of hybridisation sites for 18S-26S and 5S rDNA loci could generally distinguish the 14 Carthamus taxa. Active 18S-26S rDNA sites were generally associated with NOR loci on the nucleolar chromosomes. The two A genome taxa, C. glaucus ssp. anatolicus and C. boissieri with 2n=20, and the two botanical varieties of B genome C. tinctorius (2n=24) had diagnostic FISH patterns. The present results support the origin of C. tinctorius from C. palaestinus. FISH patterns of C. arborescens vis-à-vis the other taxa indicate a clear division of Carthamus taxa into two distinct lineages. Comparative distribution and intensity pattern of 18S-26S rDNA sites could distinguish each of the tetraploid and hexaploid taxa. The present results indicate that C. boissieri (2n=20) is one of the genome donors for C. lanatus and C. lanatus ssp. lanatus (2n=44), and C. lanatus is one of the progenitors for the hexaploid (2n=64) taxa. The association of pCtKpnI-2 repeated sequence with rRNA gene cluster (orphon) in 2-10 nucleolar and non-nucleolar chromosomes and the consistent occurrence of pCtKpnI-1 repeated sequence at the subtelomeric region in all the taxa analysed indicate some functional role of these sequences.

  2. More than 10% of yeast genes are related to genome stability and influence cellular senescence via rDNA maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Saka, Kimiko; Takahashi, Akihiro; Sasaki, Mariko; Kobayashi, Takehiko

    2016-01-01

    Genome instability triggers cellular senescence and is a common cause of cancer. The ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA), due to their repetitive structure, form a fragile site with frequent rearrangements. To identify eukaryotic factors that connect reduced genome stability to senescence we screened 4,876 strains of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion library for aberrant rDNA and found 708 genes that contribute to its upkeep. 28 mutants caused abnormalities in non-rDNA chromosomes and among them 12 mutants have abnormalities both in rDNA and in non-rDNA chromosomes. Many mutated genes have not previously been implicated with genome maintenance nor their homologues with tumorigenesis in mammals. The link between rDNA state and senescence was broken after deletion of factors related with DNA polymerase ϵ. These mutations also suppressed the short lifespan phenotype of a sir2 mutant, suggesting a model in which molecular events at the heart of the replication fork induce abnormal rDNA recombination and are responsible for the emergence of an aging signal. PMID:26912831

  3. Role of 26S proteasome and HRD genes in the degradation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, an integral endoplasmic reticulum membrane protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, R Y; Gardner, R G; Rine, J

    1996-01-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-R), a key enzyme of sterol synthesis, is an integral membrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In both humans and yeast, HMG-R is degraded at or in the ER. The degradation of HMG-R is regulated as part of feedback control of the mevalonate pathway. Neither the mechanism of degradation nor the nature of the signals that couple the degradation of HMG-R to the mevalonate pathway is known. We have launched a genetic analysis of the degradation of HMG-R in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a selection for mutants that are deficient in the degradation of Hmg2p, an HMG-R isozyme. The underlying genes are called HRD (pronounced "herd"), for HMG-CoA reductase degradation. So far we have discovered mutants in three genes: HRD1, HRD2, and HRD3. The sequence of the HRD2 gene is homologous to the p97 activator of the 26S proteasome. This p97 protein, also called TRAP-2, has been proposed to be a component of the mature 26S proteasome. The hrd2-1 mutant had numerous pleiotropic phenotypes expected for cells with a compromised proteasome, and these phenotypes were complemented by the human TRAP-2/p97 coding region. In contrast, HRD1 and HRD3 genes encoded previously unknown proteins predicted to be membrane bound. The Hrd3p protein was homologous to the Caenorhabditis elegans sel-1 protein, a negative regulator of at least two different membrane proteins, and contained an HRD3 motif shared with several other proteins. Hrd1p had no full-length homologues, but contained an H2 ring finger motif. These data suggested a model of ER protein degradation in which the Hrd1p and Hrd3p proteins conspire to deliver HMG-R to the 26S proteasome. Moreover, our results lend in vivo support to the proposed role of the p97/TRAP-2/Hrd2p protein as a functionally important component of the 26S proteasome. Because the HRD genes were required for the degradation of both regulated and unregulated substrates of ER degradation, the HRD genes are the

  4. The porcine gene TBP10 encodes a protein homologous to the human tat-binding protein/26S protease subunit family.

    PubMed

    Leeb, T; Rettenberger, G; Breech, J; Hameister, H; Brenig, B

    1996-03-01

    We have cloned a porcine gene, designated TBP1O, that belongs to the Tat-binding protein/26S protease subunit family. The genomic structure of the porcine TBP1O gene was analyzed after isolation of three overlapping genomic phage lambda clones. The TBP10 gene harbors 12 exons spanning 4.5 kb of chromosomal DNA. The TBP1O gene was assigned to Chromosome (Chr) 12 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on metaphase chromosomes. The chromosomal location was confirmed by PCR analysis of a porcine-rodent hybrid cell panel. The TBP1O protein is encoded by a 1221 nucleotide cDNA and has a molecular mass of 45.6 kDa. The predicted amino acid sequence has highest similarity to the human and bovine p45 subunit of the 26S protease and the human transcription factor TRIP1. Further similarities were detected to the slime mold protein DdTBP1O and the Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein SUG1. Like DdTBP1O and other members of the protein family, the porcine TBP1O harbors a leucine zipper motif in the N-terminal region and a domain characteristics of ATP-dependent proteases in the C-terminal region. PMID:8833236

  5. Targeting of the Human Coagulation Factor IX Gene at rDNA Locus of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junlin; Xue, Jinfeng; Hu, Youjin; Feng, Mai; Niu, Wenbin; Yang, Qiurui; Lei, Ming; Xia, Jiahui; Wu, Lingqian; Liang, Desheng

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic modification is a prerequisite to realizing the full potential of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in human genetic research and regenerative medicine. Unfortunately, the random integration methods that have been the primary techniques used keep creating problems, and the primary alternative method, gene targeting, has been effective in manipulating mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) but poorly in hESCs. Methodology/Principal Findings Human ribosomal DNA (rDNA) repeats are clustered on the short arm of acrocentric chromosomes. They consist of approximately 400 copies of the 45S pre-RNA (rRNA) gene per haploid. In the present study, we targeted a physiological gene, human coagulation factor IX, into the rDNA locus of hESCs via homologous recombination. The relative gene targeting efficiency (>50%) and homologous recombination frequency (>10−5) were more than 10-fold higher than those of loci targeted in previous reports. Meanwhile, the targeted clones retained both a normal karyotype and the main characteristics of ES cells. The transgene was found to be stably and ectopically expressed in targeted hESCs. Conclusion/Significance This is the first targeting of a human physiological gene at a defined locus on the hESC genome. Our findings indicate that the rDNA locus may serve as an ideal harbor for transgenes in hESCs. PMID:22615895

  6. Chromosomal localization of rDNA genes and genomic organization of 5S rDNA in Oreochromis mossambicus, O. urolepis hornorum and their hybrid.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hua Ping; Lu, Mai Xin; Gao, Feng Ying; Huang, Zhang Han; Yang, Li Ping; Gui, Jian Fang

    2010-08-01

    In this study, classical and molecular cytogenetic analyses were performed in tilapia fishes, Oreochromis mossambicus (XX/XY sex determination system), O. urolepis hornorum (WZ/ZZ sex determination system) and their hybrid by crossing O. mossambicus female x O. u. hornorum male. An identical karyotype ((2n = 44, NF (total number of chromosomal arms) = 50) was obtained from three examined tilapia samples. Genomic organization analysis of 5S rDNA revealed two different types of 5S rDNA sequences, 5S type I and 5S type II. Moreover, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 5S rDNA probes showed six positive fluorescence signals on six chromosomes of all the analysed metaphases from the three tilapia samples. Subsequently, 45S rDNA probes were also prepared, and six positive fluorescence signals were observed on three chromosome pairs in all analysed metaphases of the three tilapia samples. The correlation between 45 rDNA localization and nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) was confirmed by silver nitrate staining in tilapia fishes. Further, different chromosomal localizations of 5S rDNA and 45S rDNA were verified by two different colour FISH probes. Briefly, the current data provide an insights for hybridization projects and breeding improvement of tilapias.

  7. Evolutionary dynamics and preferential expression of homeologous 18S-5.8S-26S nuclear ribosomal genes in natural and artificial glycine allopolyploids.

    PubMed

    Joly, Simon; Rauscher, Jason T; Sherman-Broyles, Susan L; Brown, A H D; Doyle, Jeff J

    2004-07-01

    Polyploidy is an important evolutionary process in plants, but much remains to be learned about the evolution of gene expression in polyploids. Evolution and expression of the 18S-5.8S-26S ribosomal gene family was investigated at homeologous loci in the Glycine subgenus Glycine perennial soybean polyploid complex, which consists of several diploid genomes that have formed allopolyploids in various combinations, often recurrently. A semiquantitative PCR method targeting the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the 18S-5.8S-26S nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) was used to survey the ratio between homeologous repeats in polyploid genomes and to test for preferential expression of homeologous nrDNA loci. Most natural polyploids possess one predominant nrDNA homeolog in their genome. Analysis of F2 segregation in an artificial cross suggested that in some plants, most or all repeats at one homeologous locus have been lost, whereas in other plants two loci remain, but both have been homogenized by concerted evolution. In most natural allopolyploids harboring a relatively balanced ratio of homeologs, one homeolog was expressed preferentially, but in the majority of plants, low levels of transcription could be detected from the other homeolog. Individuals within some tetraploid taxa varied as to which homeolog was expressed preferentially. In some plants, the degree of preferential expression also varied among tissues. Preferential expression was absent in synthetic polyploids and in some artificial diploid hybrids, suggesting that nucleolar dominance is not necessarily a direct result of hybridization or polyploidization. The establishment of preferential expression in Glycine allopolyploids appears to be either stochastic within lineages or genotype specific. PMID:15084677

  8. An unusual Y chromosome of Drosophila simulans carrying amplified rDNA spacer without rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Lohe, A R; Roberts, P A

    1990-06-01

    The X and Y chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster each contain a cluster of several hundred ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA). A nontranscribed spacer region separates adjacent rRNA genes and contains tandem copies of 240 bp repeats that include the initiation site for RNA polymerase I transcription. We show here that Drosophila simulans, a sibling species of D. melanogaster, contains few, if any, rRNA genes on its Y chromosome but carries instead a large block (3,000 kb or 12,500 copies) of 240 bp nontranscribed spacer repeats. The repeats are located at the tip of the long arm of the simulans Y chromosome, in contrast to their location among rRNA genes on the short arm of the Y chromosome of D. melanogaster. The bobbed mutation in homozygous females of D. melanogaster shortens and thins the bristles, owing to a partial deletion of rRNA genes on the X chromosome. The bristles of bobbed/Y males are normal owing to the presence of a full complement of rRNA genes on the Y chromosome. Peculiarly, in bobbed/Y males of D. simulans the short bristle phenotype does not return to normal but is enhanced by the presence of the Y chromosome. We propose that the 12,500 nontranscribed spacer repeats on the Y chromosome are responsible for this biological effect by competition for a protein factor(s) essential for normal levels of rDNA transcription at the X-linked locus.

  9. Molecular phylogeny of the butterfly tribe Satyrini (Nymphalidae: Satyrinae) with emphasis on the utility of ribosomal mitochondrial genes 16s rDNA and nuclear 28s rDNA.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingsheng; Zhang, Yalin

    2015-07-09

    The tribe Satyrini is one of the most diverse groups of butterflies, but no robust phylogenetic hypothesis for this group has been achieved. Two rarely used 16s and 28s ribosomal and another seven protein-coding genes were used to reconstruct the phylogeny of the Satyrini, with further aim to evaluate the informativeness of the ribosomal genes. Our maximum parsimony (MP), maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian inference (BI) analyses consistently recovered three well-supported clades for the eleven sampled subtribes of Satyrini: clade I includes Eritina and Coenonymphina, being sister to the clade II + clade III; clade II contains Parargina, Mycalesina and Lethina, and the other six subtribes constitute clade III. The placements of the taxonomically unstable Davidina Oberthür and geographically restricted Paroeneis Moore in Satyrina are confirmed for the first time based on molecular evidence. The close relationships of Callerebia Butler, Loxerebia Watkins and Argestina Riley are well-supported. We suggest that Rhaphicera Butler belongs to Lethina. The partitioned Bremer support (PBS) values of MP analysis show that the 16s rDNA contributes well to the nodes representing all the taxa from subtribe to species levels, and the 28s rDNA is informative at the subtribe level. Furthermore, our ML analyses show that the ribosomal genes 16s rDNA and 28s rDNA are informative, because most node support values are lower in the ML tree after the removal of them than that in ML tree constructed based on the full nine-gene dataset. This indicates that some other ribosomal genes should be tentatively used through combining with traditionally used protein-coding genes in further analysis on phylogeny of Satyrini, providing that proper representatives are sampled.

  10. Evolutionary dynamics of the 5S rDNA gene family in the mussel Mytilus: mixed effects of birth-and-death and concerted evolution.

    PubMed

    Freire, Ruth; Arias, Alberto; Insua, Ana M; Méndez, Josefina; Eirín-López, José M

    2010-05-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the gene family encoding the 5S ribosomal RNA (5S rRNA) has been used (together with histones) to showcase the archetypal example of a gene family subject to concerted evolution. However, recent studies have revealed conspicuous features challenging the predictions of this model, including heterogeneity of repeat units, the presence of functional 5S gene variants as well as the existence of 5S rDNA divergent pseudogenes lacking traces of homogenization. In the present work, we have broadened the scope in the evolutionary study of ribosomal gene families by studying the 5S rRNA family in mussels, a model organism which stands out among other animals due to the heterogeneity it displays regarding sequence and organization. To this end, 48 previously unknown 5S rDNA units (coding and spacer regions) were sequenced in five mussel species, leading to the characterization of two new types of units (referred to here as small-beta 5S rDNA and gamma-5S rDNA) coexisting in the genome with alpha and beta rDNA units. The intense genetic dynamics of this family is further supported by the first description of an association between gamma-5S rDNA units and tRNA genes. Molecular evolutionary and phylogenetic analyses revealed an extensive lack of homology among spacer sequences belonging to different rDNA types, suggesting the presence of independent evolutionary pathways leading to their differentiation. Overall, our results suggest that the long-term evolution of the 5S rRNA gene family in mussels is most likely mediated by a mixed mechanism involving the generation of genetic diversity through birth-and-death, followed by a process of local homogenization resulting from concerted evolution in order to maintain the genetic identities of the different 5S units, probably after their transposition to independent chromosomal locations.

  11. Next generation sequencing analysis reveals a relationship between rDNA unit diversity and locus number in Nicotiana diploids

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tandemly arranged nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA), encoding 18S, 5.8S and 26S ribosomal RNA (rRNA), exhibit concerted evolution, a pattern thought to result from the homogenisation of rDNA arrays. However rDNA homogeneity at the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) level has not been detailed in organisms with more than a few hundred copies of the rDNA unit. Here we study rDNA complexity in species with arrays consisting of thousands of units. Methods We examined homogeneity of genic (18S) and non-coding internally transcribed spacer (ITS1) regions of rDNA using Roche 454 and/or Illumina platforms in four angiosperm species, Nicotiana sylvestris, N. tomentosiformis, N. otophora and N. kawakamii. We compared the data with Southern blot hybridisation revealing the structure of intergenic spacer (IGS) sequences and with the number and distribution of rDNA loci. Results and Conclusions In all four species the intragenomic homogeneity of the 18S gene was high; a single ribotype makes up over 90% of the genes. However greater variation was observed in the ITS1 region, particularly in species with two or more rDNA loci, where >55% of rDNA units were a single ribotype, with the second most abundant variant accounted for >18% of units. IGS heterogeneity was high in all species. The increased number of ribotypes in ITS1 compared with 18S sequences may reflect rounds of incomplete homogenisation with strong selection for functional genic regions and relaxed selection on ITS1 variants. The relationship between the number of ITS1 ribotypes and the number of rDNA loci leads us to propose that rDNA evolution and complexity is influenced by locus number and/or amplification of orphaned rDNA units at new chromosomal locations. PMID:23259460

  12. Cytogenetic Diversity and the Evolutionary Dynamics of rDNA Genes and Telomeric Sequences in the Ancistrus Genus (Loricariidae: Ancistrini).

    PubMed

    Favarato, Ramon Marin; Silva, Maelin da; Oliveira, Renildo Ribeiro de; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Feldberg, Eliana; Matoso, Daniele Aparecida

    2016-04-01

    The Ancistrus genus differs from other Ancistrini due to its wide karyotypic diversity, varied diploid numbers, differences in sex chromosomes, and large number of species, as well as its tendency to form small populations with low vagility. This study investigated the role of 5S and 18S rDNA and telomeric repetitive sequences in the evolution of the karyotypic macrostructure of seven species of the genus Ancistrus from the Central Amazon. The results indicate a strong correlation between the location of ribosomal sites and fragile sites in the genome, particularly of 5S rDNA sequences, which are associated, in some species, with telomeric sequences at the sites of chromosomal healing. Moreover, the occurrence of two lineages was observed with regard to the synteny of ribosomal genes. The species of the genus Ancistrus showed high chromosomal lability associated with breakpoints, which was characterized by the presence of repetitive DNA sequences and this process is suggested to be an evolutionary model for the rapid fixation of structural rearrangements. PMID:26829587

  13. Cytogenetic Diversity and the Evolutionary Dynamics of rDNA Genes and Telomeric Sequences in the Ancistrus Genus (Loricariidae: Ancistrini).

    PubMed

    Favarato, Ramon Marin; Silva, Maelin da; Oliveira, Renildo Ribeiro de; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Feldberg, Eliana; Matoso, Daniele Aparecida

    2016-04-01

    The Ancistrus genus differs from other Ancistrini due to its wide karyotypic diversity, varied diploid numbers, differences in sex chromosomes, and large number of species, as well as its tendency to form small populations with low vagility. This study investigated the role of 5S and 18S rDNA and telomeric repetitive sequences in the evolution of the karyotypic macrostructure of seven species of the genus Ancistrus from the Central Amazon. The results indicate a strong correlation between the location of ribosomal sites and fragile sites in the genome, particularly of 5S rDNA sequences, which are associated, in some species, with telomeric sequences at the sites of chromosomal healing. Moreover, the occurrence of two lineages was observed with regard to the synteny of ribosomal genes. The species of the genus Ancistrus showed high chromosomal lability associated with breakpoints, which was characterized by the presence of repetitive DNA sequences and this process is suggested to be an evolutionary model for the rapid fixation of structural rearrangements.

  14. Molecular characterization of dichloromethane-degrading Hyphomicrobium strains using 16S rDNA and DCM dehalogenase gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Nikolausz, Marcell; Kappelmeyer, Uwe; Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Ziller, Katja; Kästner, Matthias

    2005-09-01

    A phylogenetic analysis of 6 strains of dichloromethane (DCM) utilizing bacteria was performed. Based on the almost complete 16S rDNA sequence determination, all strains clustered together and showed high sequence similarity to Hyphomicrobium denitrificans, except for the strain MC8b, which is only moderately related to them and probably represents a distinct species. The 16S rDNA-based phylogenetic tree was compared to the one obtained from the DNA sequence data of the dcmA gene coding DCM dehalogenase, the key enzyme of DCM utilization. The topology of the two trees is in good agreement and may suggest an ancient origin of DCM dehalogenase, but also raises questions about the original role of the enzyme. PMID:16156115

  15. Repair of rDNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: RAD4-independent strand-specific nucleotide excision repair of RNA polymerase I transcribed genes.

    PubMed Central

    Verhage, R A; Van de Putte, P; Brouwer, J

    1996-01-01

    Removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from the individual strands of the rDNA locus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied. Yeast rDNA, that is transcribed by RNA polymerase I(RNA pol I), is repaired efficiently, slightly strand-specific and independently of RAD26, which has been implicated in transcription-coupled repair of the RNA pol II transcribed RPB2 gene. No repair of rDNA is observed in rad1,2,3 and 14 mutants, demonstrating that dimer removal from this highly repetitive DNA is accomplished by nucleotide excision repair (NER). In rad7 and rad16 mutants, which are specifically deficient in repair of non-transcribed DNA, there is a clear preferential repair of the transcribed strand of rDNA, indicating that strand-specific and therefore probably transcription-coupled repair of RNA pol I transcribed genes does exist in yeast. Unexpectedly, the transcribed but not the non-transcribed strand of rDNA can be repaired in rad4 mutants, which seem otherwise completely NER-deficient. PMID:8604332

  16. Physical mapping of 18S and 5S rDNA loci and histone H3 gene in grasshopper species of the subfamily Gomphocerinae (Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Silva-Neto, L C; Bernardino, A C S; Loreto, V; Moura, R C

    2015-01-01

    In this study, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis was used to determine and compare the numbers and chromosomal locations of two multigene families (rDNA and histone H3) in four Neotropical species of gomphocerine grasshoppers. FISH using the 18S rDNA probe identified a single site on the S9 chromosome of Amblytropidia sp and Cauratettix borelli, a single site on chromosome M6 of Compsacris pulcher, and two sites (chromosomes L1 and L2) in Orphulella punctata. By contrast, FISH with a 5S rDNA probe identified dispersion of this sequence in the genomes of the four species, with evidence of intraspecific variations. Amblytropidia sp had six to eight FISH signals on autosomal chromosomes, while C. pulcher exhibited a signal only on the M5 bivalent. The histone H3 gene was less variable and was restricted to a single pair in all species. The conservation of the numbers and locations of 18S rDNA and H3 genes in conjunction with data from the literature was useful for evaluating karyotype evolution in this subfamily. The variation in the number and sizes of 5S rDNA sites indicates a process of recent dispersion that might have been mediated by transposition. PMID:26634462

  17. Physical mapping of 18S and 5S rDNA loci and histone H3 gene in grasshopper species of the subfamily Gomphocerinae (Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Silva-Neto, L C; Bernardino, A C S; Loreto, V; Moura, R C

    2015-11-25

    In this study, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis was used to determine and compare the numbers and chromosomal locations of two multigene families (rDNA and histone H3) in four Neotropical species of gomphocerine grasshoppers. FISH using the 18S rDNA probe identified a single site on the S9 chromosome of Amblytropidia sp and Cauratettix borelli, a single site on chromosome M6 of Compsacris pulcher, and two sites (chromosomes L1 and L2) in Orphulella punctata. By contrast, FISH with a 5S rDNA probe identified dispersion of this sequence in the genomes of the four species, with evidence of intraspecific variations. Amblytropidia sp had six to eight FISH signals on autosomal chromosomes, while C. pulcher exhibited a signal only on the M5 bivalent. The histone H3 gene was less variable and was restricted to a single pair in all species. The conservation of the numbers and locations of 18S rDNA and H3 genes in conjunction with data from the literature was useful for evaluating karyotype evolution in this subfamily. The variation in the number and sizes of 5S rDNA sites indicates a process of recent dispersion that might have been mediated by transposition.

  18. Introduction of a novel 18S rDNA gene arrangement along with distinct ITS region in the saline water microalga Dunaliella

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Comparison of 18S rDNA gene sequences is a very promising method for identification and classification of living organisms. Molecular identification and discrimination of different Dunaliella species were carried out based on the size of 18S rDNA gene and, number and position of introns in the gene. Three types of 18S rDNA structure have already been reported: the gene with a size of ~1770 bp lacking any intron, with a size of ~2170 bp consisting one intron near 5' terminus, and with a size of ~2570 bp harbouring two introns near 5' and 3' termini. Hereby, we report a new 18S rDNA gene arrangement in terms of intron localization and nucleotide sequence in a Dunaliella isolated from Iranian salt lakes (ABRIINW-M1/2). PCR amplification with genus-specific primers resulted in production of a ~2170 bp DNA band, which is similar to that of D. salina 18S rDNA gene containing only one intron near 5' terminus. Whilst, sequence composition of the gene revealed the lack of any intron near 5' terminus in our isolate. Furthermore, another alteration was observed due to the presence of a 440 bp DNA fragment near 3' terminus. Accordingly, 18S rDNA gene of the isolate is clearly different from those of D. salina and any other Dunaliella species reported so far. Moreover, analysis of ITS region sequence showed the diversity of this region compared to the previously reported species. 18S rDNA and ITS sequences of our isolate were submitted with accesion numbers of EU678868 and EU927373 in NCBI database, respectively. The optimum growth rate of this isolate occured at the salinity level of 1 M NaCl. The maximum carotenoid content under stress condition of intense light (400 μmol photon m-2 s-1), high salinity (4 M NaCl) and deficiency of nitrate and phosphate nutritions reached to 240 ng/cell after 15 days. PMID:20377865

  19. Quantitative analysis of dinoflagellates and diatoms community via Miseq sequencing of actin gene and v9 region of 18S rDNA

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liliang; Sui, Zhenghong; Liu, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Miseq sequencing and data analysis for the actin gene and v9 region of 18S rDNA of 7 simulated samples consisting of different mixture of dinoflagellates and diatoms were carried out. Not all the species were detectable in all the 18S v9 samples, and sequence percent in all the v9 samples were not consistent with the corresponding cell percent which may suggest that 18S rDNA copy number in different cells of these species differed greatly which result in the large deviation of the amplification. And 18S rDNA amplification of the microalgae was prone to be contaminated by fungus. The amplification of actin gene all was from the dinoflagellates because of its targeted degenerate primers. All the actin sequences of dinoflagellates were detected in the act samples except act4, and sequence percentage of the dinoflagellates in the act samples was not completely consistent with the dinoflagellates percentage of cell samples, but with certain amplification deviations. Indexes of alpha diversity of actin gene sequencing may be better reflection of community structure, and beta diversity analysis could cluster the dinoflagellates samples with identical or similar composition together and was distinguishable with blooming simulating samples at the generic level. Hence, actin gene was more proper than rDNA as the molecular marker for the community analysis of the dinoflagellates. PMID:27721499

  20. Identification of goose (Anser anser) and mule duck (Anasplatyrhynchos x Cairina moschata) foie gras by multiplex polymerase chain reaction amplification of the 5S RDNA gene.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, M A; García, T; González, I; Asensio, L; Fernández, A; Lobo, E; Hernández, P E; Martín, R

    2001-06-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the nuclear 5S rDNA gene has been used for the identification of goose and mule duck foie gras. Two species-specific reverse primers were designed and used in a multiplex reaction, together with a forward universal primer, to amplify specific fragments of the 5S rDNA in each species. The different sizes of the species-specific amplicons, separated by agarose gel electrophoresis, allowed clear identification of goose and mule duck foie gras samples. This genetic marker can be useful for detecting fraudulent substitution of the duck liver for the more expensive goose liver.

  1. Genotypic Characterization of Bradyrhizobium Strains Nodulating Endemic Woody Legumes of the Canary Islands by PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis of Genes Encoding 16S rRNA (16S rDNA) and 16S-23S rDNA Intergenic Spacers, Repetitive Extragenic Palindromic PCR Genomic Fingerprinting, and Partial 16S rDNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Vinuesa, Pablo; Rademaker, Jan L. W.; de Bruijn, Frans J.; Werner, Dietrich

    1998-01-01

    We present a phylogenetic analysis of nine strains of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from nodules of tagasaste (Chamaecytisus proliferus) and other endemic woody legumes of the Canary Islands, Spain. These and several reference strains were characterized genotypically at different levels of taxonomic resolution by computer-assisted analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR-RFLPs), 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) RFLPs, and repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) genomic fingerprints with BOX, ERIC, and REP primers. Cluster analysis of 16S rDNA restriction patterns with four tetrameric endonucleases grouped the Canarian isolates with the two reference strains, Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110spc4 and Bradyrhizobium sp. strain (Centrosema) CIAT 3101, resolving three genotypes within these bradyrhizobia. In the analysis of IGS RFLPs with three enzymes, six groups were found, whereas rep-PCR fingerprinting revealed an even greater genotypic diversity, with only two of the Canarian strains having similar fingerprints. Furthermore, we show that IGS RFLPs and even very dissimilar rep-PCR fingerprints can be clustered into phylogenetically sound groupings by combining them with 16S rDNA RFLPs in computer-assisted cluster analysis of electrophoretic patterns. The DNA sequence analysis of a highly variable 264-bp segment of the 16S rRNA genes of these strains was found to be consistent with the fingerprint-based classification. Three different DNA sequences were obtained, one of which was not previously described, and all belonged to the B. japonicum/Rhodopseudomonas rDNA cluster. Nodulation assays revealed that none of the Canarian isolates nodulated Glycine max or Leucaena leucocephala, but all nodulated Acacia pendula, C. proliferus, Macroptilium atropurpureum, and Vigna unguiculata. PMID:9603820

  2. Astonishing 35S rDNA diversity in the gymnosperm species Cycas revoluta Thunb.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wencai; Ma, Lu; Becher, Hannes; Garcia, Sònia; Kovarikova, Alena; Leitch, Ilia J; Leitch, Andrew R; Kovarik, Ales

    2016-09-01

    In all eukaryotes, the highly repeated 35S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences encoding 18S-5.8S-26S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) typically show high levels of intragenomic uniformity due to homogenisation processes, leading to concerted evolution of 35S rDNA repeats. Here, we compared 35S rDNA divergence in several seed plants using next generation sequencing and a range of molecular and cytogenetic approaches. Most species showed similar 35S rDNA homogeneity indicating concerted evolution. However, Cycas revoluta exhibits an extraordinary diversity of rDNA repeats (nucleotide sequence divergence of different copies averaging 12 %), influencing both the coding and non-coding rDNA regions nearly equally. In contrast, its rRNA transcriptome was highly homogeneous suggesting that only a minority of genes (<20 %) encode functional rRNA. The most common SNPs were C > T substitutions located in symmetrical CG and CHG contexts which were also highly methylated. Both functional genes and pseudogenes appear to cluster on chromosomes. The extraordinary high levels of 35S rDNA diversity in C. revoluta, and probably other species of cycads, indicate that the frequency of repeat homogenisation has been much lower in this lineage, compared with all other land plant lineages studied. This has led to the accumulation of methylation-driven mutations and pseudogenisation. Potentially, the reduced homology between paralogs prevented their elimination by homologous recombination, resulting in long-term retention of rDNA pseudogenes in the genome.

  3. Astonishing 35S rDNA diversity in the gymnosperm species Cycas revoluta Thunb.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wencai; Ma, Lu; Becher, Hannes; Garcia, Sònia; Kovarikova, Alena; Leitch, Ilia J; Leitch, Andrew R; Kovarik, Ales

    2016-09-01

    In all eukaryotes, the highly repeated 35S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences encoding 18S-5.8S-26S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) typically show high levels of intragenomic uniformity due to homogenisation processes, leading to concerted evolution of 35S rDNA repeats. Here, we compared 35S rDNA divergence in several seed plants using next generation sequencing and a range of molecular and cytogenetic approaches. Most species showed similar 35S rDNA homogeneity indicating concerted evolution. However, Cycas revoluta exhibits an extraordinary diversity of rDNA repeats (nucleotide sequence divergence of different copies averaging 12 %), influencing both the coding and non-coding rDNA regions nearly equally. In contrast, its rRNA transcriptome was highly homogeneous suggesting that only a minority of genes (<20 %) encode functional rRNA. The most common SNPs were C > T substitutions located in symmetrical CG and CHG contexts which were also highly methylated. Both functional genes and pseudogenes appear to cluster on chromosomes. The extraordinary high levels of 35S rDNA diversity in C. revoluta, and probably other species of cycads, indicate that the frequency of repeat homogenisation has been much lower in this lineage, compared with all other land plant lineages studied. This has led to the accumulation of methylation-driven mutations and pseudogenisation. Potentially, the reduced homology between paralogs prevented their elimination by homologous recombination, resulting in long-term retention of rDNA pseudogenes in the genome. PMID:26637996

  4. Intraspecific Genetic Variation and Phylogenetic Analysis of Dirofilaria immitis Samples from Western China Using Complete ND1 and 16S rDNA Gene Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tianyu; Liang, Yinan; Zhong, Xiuqin; Wang, Ning; Hu, Dandan; Zhou, Xuan; Gu, Xiaobin; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2014-01-01

    Dirofilaria immitis (heartworm) is the causative agent of an important zoonotic disease that is spread by mosquitoes. In this study, molecular and phylogenetic characterization of D. immitis were performed based on complete ND1 and 16S rDNA gene sequences, which provided the foundation for more advanced molecular diagnosis, prevention, and control of heartworm diseases. The mutation rate and evolutionary divergence in adult heartworm samples from seven dogs in western China were analyzed to obtain information on genetic diversity and variability. Phylogenetic relationships were inferred using both maximum parsimony (MP) and Bayes methods based on the complete gene sequences. The results suggest that D. immitis formed an independent monophyletic group in which the 16S rDNA gene has mutated more rapidly than has ND1. PMID:24639299

  5. Morphology and 18S rDNA gene sequence of Blepharisma sinuosum Sawaya, 1940 (Ciliophora: Heterotrichea) from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Noemi Mendes; Dias, Roberto Júnio Pedroso; Senra, Marcus Vinicius Xavier; Soares, Carlos Augusto Gomes; da Silva Neto, Inácio Domingos

    2013-11-01

    The morphology and morphometric data of seven populations of Blepharisma sinuosum from southeastern Brazil were investigated. The description is based on live observations, protargol impregnation, and scanning electron microscopy. Blepharisma sinuosum measures 75-255μm in length and 25-93μm in width and has a spindle-shaped body, pink color, a single contractile vacuole located at the posterior end, 50 adoral membranelles, a conspicuous paroral, 17-35 somatic kineties, a moniliform macronucleus with 2-7 connected nodules, and 3-20 micronuclei. Morphological comparisons with similar species were performed and suggest that B. americanum is the junior synonym of B. sinuosum. The 18S rDNA gene sequence of B. sinuosum was obtained and compared with that of other Blepharisma species. The length and GC content of the obtained sequence is 1652bp and 47.03%, respectively, and has a very high structural similarity (99.9%) with the B. undulans sequence. The validity of the classification of Blepharisma species in morphonuclear subgenera is also discussed.

  6. Phylogenetic relationships of Brazilian isolates of Pythium insidiosum based on ITS rDNA and cytochrome oxidase II gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, M I; Botton, S A; Pereira, D I B; Robe, L J; Jesus, F P K; Mahl, C D; Costa, M M; Alves, S H; Santurio, J M

    2012-09-14

    Pythium insidiosum is an aquatic oomycete that is the causative agent of pythiosis. Advances in molecular methods have enabled increased accuracy in the diagnosis of pythiosis, and in studies of the phylogenetic relationships of this oomycete. To evaluate the phylogenetic relationships among isolates of P. insidiosum from different regions of Brazil, and also regarding to other American and Thai isolates, in this study a total of thirty isolates of P. insidiosum from different regions of Brazil was used and had their ITS1, 5.8S rRNA and ITS2 rDNA (ITS) region and the partial sequence of cytochrome oxidase II (COX II) gene sequenced and analyzed. The outgroup consisted of six isolates of other Pythium species and one of Lagenidium giganteum. Phylogenetic analyses of ITS and COX II genes were conducted, both individually and in combination, using four different methods: Maximum parsimony (MP); Neighbor-joining (NJ); Maximum likelihood (ML); and Bayesian analysis (BA). Our data supported P. insidiosum as monophyletic in relation to the other Pythium species, and COX II showed that P. insidiosum appears to be subdivided into three major polytomous groups, whose arrangement provides the Thai isolates as paraphyletic in relation to the Brazilian ones. The molecular analyses performed in this study suggest an evolutionary proximity among all American isolates, including the Brazilian and the Central and North America isolates, which were grouped together in a single entirely polytomous clade. The COX II network results presented signals of a recent expansion for the American isolates, probably originated from an Asian invasion source. Here, COX II showed higher levels bias, although it was the source of higher levels of phylogenetic information when compared to ITS. Nevertheless, the two markers chosen for this study proved to be entirely congruent, at least with respect to phylogenetic relationships between different isolates of P. insidiosum. PMID:22483240

  7. Expression of 5 S rRNA genes linked to 35 S rDNA in plants, their epigenetic modification and regulatory element divergence

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In plants, the 5 S rRNA genes usually occur as separate tandems (S-type arrangement) or, less commonly, linked to 35 S rDNA units (L-type). The activity of linked genes remains unknown so far. We studied the homogeneity and expression of 5 S genes in several species from family Asteraceae known to contain linked 35 S-5 S units. Additionally, their methylation status was determined using bisulfite sequencing. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was applied to reveal the sub-nuclear positions of rDNA arrays. Results We found that homogenization of L-type units went to completion in most (4/6) but not all species. Two species contained major L-type and minor S-type units (termed Ls-type). The linked genes dominate 5 S rDNA expression while the separate tandems do not seem to be expressed. Members of tribe Anthemideae evolved functional variants of the polymerase III promoter in which a residing C-box element differs from the canonical angiosperm motif by as much as 30%. On this basis, a more relaxed consensus sequence of a plant C-box: (5’-RGSWTGGGTG-3’) is proposed. The 5 S paralogs display heavy DNA methylation similarly as to their unlinked counterparts. FISH revealed the close association of 35 S-5 S arrays with nucleolar periphery indicating that transcription of 5 S genes may occur in this territory. Conclusions We show that the unusual linked arrangement of 5 S genes, occurring in several plant species, is fully compatible with their expression and functionality. This extraordinary 5 S gene dynamics is manifested at different levels, such as variation in intrachromosomal positions, unit structure, epigenetic modification and considerable divergence of regulatory motifs. PMID:22716941

  8. Reevaluation of the evolutionary position of opalinids based on 18S rDNA, and alpha- and beta-tubulin gene phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Akane; Ishida, Ken-ichiro; Endoh, Hiroshi

    2005-06-01

    Opalinids are enigmatic endosymbiotic protists principally found in the large intestine of anuran amphibians. They are multinucleates and uniformly covered with numerous flagella (or cilia). Their appearance is somewhat similar to that of ciliates, leading to opalinid's initial classification as ciliates, or later as protociliates. However, on the basis of their monomorphic nuclei, absence of a ciliate-like life cycle characterized by conjugation, and an interkinetal fission mode, opalinids were subsequently transferred in the zooflagellates. As several common ultrastructural characteristics shared with proteromonads were elucidated, in particular of the flagellar base, such as their double-stranded flagellar helix, an alliance with proteromonads was widely accepted. Thus, opalinids are currently favored to be placed in the class Opalinea, within the heterokont kingdom Chromista. However, the question of their classification has not been fully resolved, because of a lack of molecular information. Here, we report their phylogenetic position inferred from 18S rDNA, and alpha- and beta-tubulin gene sequences. The 18S rDNA tree gives the opalinids an ancestral position in heterokonts, together with proteromonads, as suggested by the morphological studies. In great contrast, alpha- and beta-tubulin gene analyses suggest an affiliation of opalinids to alveolates, not to heterokonts. However, the AU test implies that opalinids are not closely related with any of other three phyla in the alveolates, suggesting an occupation of an ancestral position within the alveolates. Based on the present molecular information, in particular rDNA phylogeny, and the ultrastructural character of the double helix common to heterokonts, we conclude that opalinids would have a common origin with heterokonts, although analyses based on two tubulin genes do not as yet completely deny a possible placement outside heterokonts. The ambiguity of the evolutionary position shown by the discrepancy

  9. Microbial rRNA: rDNA gene ratios may be unexpectedly low due to extracellular DNA preservation in soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We tested a method of estimating the activity of detectable individual bacterial and archaeal OTUs within a community by calculating ratios of absolute 16S rRNA to rDNA copy numbers. We investigated phylogenetically coherent patterns of activity among soil prokaryotes in non-growing soil communitie...

  10. Mutation of a Nopp140 gene dao-5 alters rDNA transcription and increases germ cell apoptosis in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Lee, C-C; Tsai, Y-T; Kao, C-W; Lee, L-W; Lai, H-J; Ma, T-H; Chang, Y-S; Yeh, N-H; Lo, S J

    2014-01-01

    Human diseases of impaired ribosome biogenesis resulting from disruption of rRNA biosynthesis or loss of ribosomal components are collectively described as 'ribosomopathies'. Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS), a representative human ribosomopathy with craniofacial abnormalities, is attributed to mutations in the tcof1 gene that has a homologous gene called nopp140. Previous studies demonstrated that the dao-5 (dauer and aged animal overexpression gene 5) of Caenorhabditis elegans is a member of nopp140 gene family and plays a role in nucleogenesis in the early embryo. Here, we established a C. elegans model for studying Nopp140-associated ribosomopathy. A null dao-5 mutant ok542 with a semi-infertile phenotype showed a delay in gonadogenesis, as well as a higher incidence of germline apoptosis. These phenotypes in dao-5(ok542) are likely resulted from inefficient rDNA transcription that was observed by run-on analyses and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays measuring the RNA Pol I occupancy on the rDNA promoter. ChIP assays further showed that the modifications of acetylated histone 4 (H4Ac) and dimethylation at the lysine 9 of histone 3 (H3K9me2) around the rDNA promoter were altered in dao-5 mutants compared with the N2 wild type. In addition, activated CEP-1 (a C. elegans p53 homolog) activity was also linked to the loss of DAO-5 in terms of the transcriptional upregulation of two CEP-1 downstream effectors, EGL-1 and CED-13. We propose that the dao-5 mutant of C. elegans can be a valuable model for studying human Nopp140-associated ribosomopathy at the cellular and molecular levels. PMID:24722283

  11. Contrasting Patterns of rDNA Homogenization within the Zygosaccharomyces rouxii Species Complex

    PubMed Central

    Chand Dakal, Tikam; Giudici, Paolo; Solieri, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Arrays of repetitive ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences are generally expected to evolve as a coherent family, where repeats within such a family are more similar to each other than to orthologs in related species. The continuous homogenization of repeats within individual genomes is a recombination process termed concerted evolution. Here, we investigated the extent and the direction of concerted evolution in 43 yeast strains of the Zygosaccharomyces rouxii species complex (Z. rouxii, Z. sapae, Z. mellis), by analyzing two portions of the 35S rDNA cistron, namely the D1/D2 domains at the 5’ end of the 26S rRNA gene and the segment including the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) 1 and 2 (ITS regions). We demonstrate that intra-genomic rDNA sequence variation is unusually frequent in this clade and that rDNA arrays in single genomes consist of an intermixing of Z. rouxii, Z. sapae and Z. mellis-like sequences, putatively evolved by reticulate evolutionary events that involved repeated hybridization between lineages. The levels and distribution of sequence polymorphisms vary across rDNA repeats in different individuals, reflecting four patterns of rDNA evolution: I) rDNA repeats that are homogeneous within a genome but are chimeras derived from two parental lineages via recombination: Z. rouxii in the ITS region and Z. sapae in the D1/D2 region; II) intra-genomic rDNA repeats that retain polymorphisms only in ITS regions; III) rDNA repeats that vary only in their D1/D2 domains; IV) heterogeneous rDNA arrays that have both polymorphic ITS and D1/D2 regions. We argue that an ongoing process of homogenization following allodiplodization or incomplete lineage sorting gave rise to divergent evolutionary trajectories in different strains, depending upon temporal, structural and functional constraints. We discuss the consequences of these findings for Zygosaccharomyces species delineation and, more in general, for yeast barcoding. PMID:27501051

  12. Employment of 16 S rDNA gene sequencing techniques to identify culturable environmental eubacteria in a tertiary referral hospital.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Smyth, C L; Buchanan, J A; Dolan, A; Rooney, P J; Millar, B C; Goldsmith, C E; Elborn, J S; Moore, J E

    2004-05-01

    Universal or 'broad-range' eubacterial polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed on 53 isolates from environmental water-associated sites in a haematology unit (N = 22) and the outer surfaces of cleaning lotion containers sited throughout a tertiary referral hospital (N = 31) 16 S rDNA PCR was performed using two sets of universal primers, including the novel reverse primer, XB4, to generate a composite amplicon of 1068 bp, which was sequenced to obtain each isolate's identity. Sequence analysis was able to identify 51 isolates. Most (75% from the haematology unit and 81% from cleaner containers) were Gram-positive. Nine different genera were identified from the haematology unit and 13 from the cleaning lotion containers. This study provides the first reports of Terrabacter spp. and Brachybacterium paraconglomeratum isolated from a hospital environment. As unusual and difficult-to-identify environmental organisms are unlikely to be clinically significant, and molecular identification is costly and labour-intensive, we recommend that molecular methods are only used as an adjunct to first-line phenotypic identification schemes where a definitive identification is required. Where molecular identification methods are justified, partial 16 S rDNA PCR and sequencing employing the novel universal primer XB4, is a valuable and reliable technique.

  13. Culturable bacteria present in the fluid of the hooded-pitcher plant Sarracenia minor based on 16S rDNA gene sequence data.

    PubMed

    Siragusa, Alex J; Swenson, Janice E; Casamatta, Dale A

    2007-08-01

    The culturable microbial community within the pitcher fluid of 93 Sarracenia minor carnivorous plants was examined over a 2-year study. Many aspects of the plant/bacterial/insect interaction within the pitcher fluid are minimally understood because the bacterial taxa present in these pitchers have not been identified. Thirteen isolates were characterized by 16S rDNA sequencing and subsequent phylogenetic analysis. The Proteobacteria were the most abundant taxa and included representatives from Serratia, Achromobacter, and Pantoea. The Actinobacteria Micrococcus was also abundant while Bacillus, Lactococcus, Chryseobacterium, and Rhodococcus were infrequently encountered. Several isolates conformed to species identifiers (>98% rDNA gene sequence similarity) including Serratia marcescens (isolates found in 27.5% of pitchers), Achromobacter xylosoxidans (37.6%), Micrococcus luteus (40.9%), Bacillus cereus (isolates found in 10.2%), Bacillus thuringiensis (5.4%), Lactococcus lactis (17.2%), and Rhodococcus equi (2.2%). Species-area curves suggest that sampling efforts were sufficient to recover a representative culturable bacterial community. The bacteria present represent a diverse community probably as a result of introduction by insect vectors, but the ecological significance remains under explored. PMID:17380356

  14. Culturable bacteria present in the fluid of the hooded-pitcher plant Sarracenia minor based on 16S rDNA gene sequence data.

    PubMed

    Siragusa, Alex J; Swenson, Janice E; Casamatta, Dale A

    2007-08-01

    The culturable microbial community within the pitcher fluid of 93 Sarracenia minor carnivorous plants was examined over a 2-year study. Many aspects of the plant/bacterial/insect interaction within the pitcher fluid are minimally understood because the bacterial taxa present in these pitchers have not been identified. Thirteen isolates were characterized by 16S rDNA sequencing and subsequent phylogenetic analysis. The Proteobacteria were the most abundant taxa and included representatives from Serratia, Achromobacter, and Pantoea. The Actinobacteria Micrococcus was also abundant while Bacillus, Lactococcus, Chryseobacterium, and Rhodococcus were infrequently encountered. Several isolates conformed to species identifiers (>98% rDNA gene sequence similarity) including Serratia marcescens (isolates found in 27.5% of pitchers), Achromobacter xylosoxidans (37.6%), Micrococcus luteus (40.9%), Bacillus cereus (isolates found in 10.2%), Bacillus thuringiensis (5.4%), Lactococcus lactis (17.2%), and Rhodococcus equi (2.2%). Species-area curves suggest that sampling efforts were sufficient to recover a representative culturable bacterial community. The bacteria present represent a diverse community probably as a result of introduction by insect vectors, but the ecological significance remains under explored.

  15. Haplotype Detection from Next-Generation Sequencing in High-Ploidy-Level Species: 45S rDNA Gene Copies in the Hexaploid Spartina maritima

    PubMed Central

    Boutte, Julien; Aliaga, Benoît; Lima, Oscar; Ferreira de Carvalho, Julie; Ainouche, Abdelkader; Macas, Jiri; Rousseau-Gueutin, Mathieu; Coriton, Olivier; Ainouche, Malika; Salmon, Armel

    2015-01-01

    Gene and whole-genome duplications are widespread in plant nuclear genomes, resulting in sequence heterogeneity. Identification of duplicated genes may be particularly challenging in highly redundant genomes, especially when there are no diploid parents as a reference. Here, we developed a pipeline to detect the different copies in the ribosomal RNA gene family in the hexaploid grass Spartina maritima from next-generation sequencing (Roche-454) reads. The heterogeneity of the different domains of the highly repeated 45S unit was explored by identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and assembling reads based on shared polymorphisms. SNPs were validated using comparisons with Illumina sequence data sets and by cloning and Sanger (re)sequencing. Using this approach, 29 validated polymorphisms and 11 validated haplotypes were reported (out of 34 and 20, respectively, that were initially predicted by our program). The rDNA domains of S. maritima have similar lengths as those found in other Poaceae, apart from the 5′-ETS, which is approximately two-times longer in S. maritima. Sequence homogeneity was encountered in coding regions and both internal transcribed spacers (ITS), whereas high intragenomic variability was detected in the intergenic spacer (IGS) and the external transcribed spacer (ETS). Molecular cytogenetic analysis by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed the presence of one pair of 45S rDNA signals on the chromosomes of S. maritima instead of three expected pairs for a hexaploid genome, indicating loss of duplicated homeologous loci through the diploidization process. The procedure developed here may be used at any ploidy level and using different sequencing technologies. PMID:26530424

  16. Slow molecular evolution in 18S rDNA, rbcL and nad5 genes of mosses compared with higher plants.

    PubMed

    Stenøien, H K

    2008-03-01

    The evolutionary potential of bryophytes (mosses, liverworts and hornworts) has been debated for decades. Fossil record and biogeographical distribution patterns suggest very slow morphological evolution and the retainment of several ancient traits since the split with vascular plants some 450 million years ago. Many have argued that bryophytes may evolve as rapidly as higher plants on the molecular level, but this hypothesis has not been tested so far. Here, it is shown that mosses have experienced significantly lower rates of molecular evolution than higher plants within 18S rDNA (nuclear), rbcL (chloroplast) and nad5 (mitochondrial) genes. Mosses are on an average evolving 2-3 times slower than ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms; and also green algae seem to be evolving faster than nonvascular plants. These results support the observation of a general correlation between morphological and molecular evolutionary rates in plants and also show that mosses are 'evolutionary sphinxes' regarding both morphological and molecular evolutionary potential.

  17. Detecting a complex of cryptic species within Neoechinorhynchus golvani (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae) inferred from ITSs and LSU rDNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Aquino, Andrés; Reyna-Fabián, Miriam E; Rosas-Valdez, Rogelio; Razo-Mendivil, Ulises; de León, Gerardo Pérez-Ponce; García-Varela, Martín

    2009-10-01

    Neoechinorhynchus golvani is an intestinal parasite of freshwater and brackish water fishes distributed in Mexico. The genetic variability of 40 samples representing 12 populations from north, south, and central Mexico, and 1 from Costa Rica, was estimated by sequencing 2 nuclear genes (ITS1, 5.8S, ITS2, and LSU rDNA, including the domain D2 + D3). The length of both genes ranged from 700 to 779 base pairs (bp) and from 813 to 821 bp, for ITSs and LSU, respectively. The genetic divergence among populations ranged from 19.5 to 35.3% with ITSs and from 9.28 to 19.58% with LSU. Maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony analyses were performed for each data set and also for 2 combined data sets (ITSs + LSU rDNA with and without outgroups), showing strong similarities among trees, with high bootstrap support in all cases. Genetic divergence, in combination with phylogenetic analyses, suggested that the acanthocephalan N. golvani represents a complex of cryptic species, which is composed of at least 3 lineages. The first lineage, corresponding with N. golvani, shows a wide distribution, including localities from northeastern Mexico, southwards through central and southeastern Mexico, and further down to Costa Rica. This lineage is associated with cichlid fishes in strictly freshwater environments. Lineages 2 and 3 are distributed in brackish water systems along the Gulf of Mexico and Pacific slopes, respectively; both are associated with eleotrid fishes, and apparently represent 2 cryptic species. The diversification of the eleotrid and cichlid lineages seems to be the result of independent host-switching events from the ancestral population.

  18. The 5S rDNA gene family in mollusks: characterization of transcriptional regulatory regions, prediction of secondary structures, and long-term evolution, with special attention to Mytilidae mussels.

    PubMed

    Vizoso, Miguel; Vierna, Joaquín; González-Tizón, Ana M; Martínez-Lage, Andrés

    2011-01-01

    Several reports on the characterization of 5S ribosomal DNA (5S rDNA) in various animal groups have been published to date, but there is a lack of studies analyzing this gene family in a much broader context. Here, we have studied 5S rDNA variation in several molluskan species, including bivalves, gastropods, and cephalopods. The degree of conservation of transcriptional regulatory regions was analyzed in these lineages, revealing a conserved TATA-like box in the upstream region. The evolution of the 120 bp coding region (5S) was also studied, suggesting the occurrence of paralogue groups in razor clams, clams, and cockles. In addition, 5S rDNA sequences from 11 species and 7 genus of Mytilidae Rafinesque, 1815 mussels were sampled and studied in detail. Four different 5S rDNA types, based on the nontranscribed spacer region were identified. The phylogenetic analyses performed within each type showed a between-species gene clustering pattern, suggesting ancestral polymorphism. Moreover, some putative pseudogenized 5S copies were also identified. Our report, together with previous studies that found high degree of intragenomic divergence in bivalve species, suggests that birth-and-death evolution may be the main force driving the evolution of 5S rDNA in these animals, even at the genus level.

  19. [Detection and analysis of Tetrahymena pyriformis 26S ribosomal DNA domain sequences, differing in degree of evolutionary conservation].

    PubMed

    Mukha, D V; Sidorenko, A P

    1995-01-01

    Domains of different evolutionary conservatism were defined in the 26S rDNA sequence of T. pyriformis. The fragment of studied DNA (1212 bp) showing high evolutionary conservatism was cloned. It was shown this fragment of DNA may be used to a probe for blot-hybridization analysis of the structure of rDNA from various taxa, protists to mammals. Superconservative and hypervariable domains were defined. The first are good for the primers for PCR analysis of rDNA from various taxa, the second--for species specific primers.

  20. Molecular systematics of the Amphisphaeriaceae based on cladistic analyses of partial LSU rDNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Jeewon, Rajesh; Liew, Edward C Y; Hyde, Kevin D

    2003-12-01

    The Amphisphaeriaceae is an important family of ascomycetes within the Xylariales. There has been, however, disagreement regarding the taxonomic placement of many genera within this family and whether it should be confined to ascomycetes producing Pestalotiopsis-like anamorphs. In this study, phylogenetic relationships among members of the Amphisphaeriaceae are investigated using partial sequences of the 28S rDNA. Molecular data provided further evidence to support the association of several coelomycetous genera with the ascomycetous Amphisphaeriaceae. Phylogenetic analyses also show that all ascomycetous genera possessing Pestalotiopsis-like anamorphs are monophyletic and confirm the anamorphic-teleomorphic connections of some. There is, however, insufficient evidence to support the restriction of Amphisphaeriaceae to genera, which produce Pestalotiopsis-like anamorphs, because the phylogenetic placement of Amphisphaeria umbrina is not fully resolved and its affinities with other members received low bootstrap support. The results also indicate that Iodosphaeria and Arecophila should be excluded from the Amphisphaeriaceae. The placement of Lanceispora in the Amphisphaeriaceae is doubtful. A broad concept of the family Amphisphaeriaceae is advocated until further data are available.

  1. A phylogeny of cycads (Cycadales) inferred from chloroplast matK gene, trnK intron, and nuclear rDNA ITS region.

    PubMed

    Chaw, Shu-Miaw; Walters, Terrence W; Chang, Chien-Chang; Hu, Shu-Hsuan; Chen, Shin-Hsiao

    2005-10-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among the three families and 12 living genera of cycads were reconstructed by distance and parsimony criteria using three markers: the chloroplast matK gene, the chloroplast trnK intron and the nuclear ITS/5.8S rDNA sequence. All datasets indicate that Cycadaceae (including only the genus Cycas) is remotely related to other cycads, in which Dioon was resolved as the basal-most clade, followed by Bowenia and a clade containing the remaining nine genera. Encephalartos and Lepidozamia are closer to each other than to Macrozamia. The African genus Stangeria is embedded within the New World subfamily Zamiodeae. Therefore, Bowenia is an unlikely sister to Stangeria, contrary to the view that they form the Stangeriaceae. The generic status of Dyerocycas and Chigua is unsupportable as they are paraphyletic with Cycas and the Zamia, respectively. Nonsense mutations in the matK gene and indels in the other two datasets lend evidence to reinforce the above conclusions. According to the phylogenies, the past geography of the genera of cycads and the evolution of character states are hypothesized and discussed. Within the suborder Zamiieae, Stangeria, and the tribe Zamieae evolved significantly faster than other genera. The matK gene and ITS/5.8S region contain more useful information than the trnK intron in addressing phylogeny. Redelimitations of Zamiaceae, Stangeriaceae, subfamily Encephalartoideae and subtribe Macrozamiineae are necessary.

  2. Structure characterization of the 26S proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho Min; Yu, Yadong; Cheng, Yifan

    2010-01-01

    In all eukaryotic cells, 26S proteasome plays an essential role in the process of ATP-dependent protein degradation. In this review, we focus on structure characterization of the 26S proteasome. Although the progress towards a high-resolution structure of the 26S proteasome has been slow, the recently solved structures of various proteasomal subcomplexes have greatly enhanced our understanding of this large machinery. In addition to having an ATP-dependent proteolytic function, the 26S proteasome is also involved in many non-proteolytic cellular activities, which are often mediated by subunits in its 19S regulatory complex. Thus, we include a detailed discussion of the structures of 19S subunits, including proteasomal ATPases, ubiquitin receptors, deubiquitinating enzymes and subunits that contain PCI domain. PMID:20800708

  3. Quantitative karyotyping of three diploid Brassica species by imaging methods and localization of 45s rDNA loci on the identified chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Fukui, K; Nakayama, S; Ohmido, N; Yoshiaki, H; Yamabe, M

    1998-03-01

    Chromosomes of the three diploid Brassica species, B. rapa (AA), B. nigra (BB) and B. oleracea (CC), were identified based on their morphological characteristics, especially on the condensation pattern appearing at the somatic pro-metaphase stage. The morphological features of the pro-metaphase chromosomes of the three Brassica spp. were quantified by imaging methods using chromosome image analyzing system II (CHIAS 2). As a result, quantitative chromosome maps or idiograms of the three diploid Brassica spp. were developed. The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method revealed the location of 45s rDNA (the 26s-5.8s-18s ribosomal RNA gene cluster) on the chromosomes involved. The number of 45s rDNA loci in the B. rapa, B. nigra and B. oleracea are five, three and two, respectively. The loci detected were systematically mapped on the idiograms of the three Brassica spp.

  4. Evolution of rDNA in Nicotiana Allopolyploids: A Potential Link between rDNA Homogenization and Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Kovarik, Ales; Dadejova, Martina; Lim, Yoong K.; Chase, Mark W.; Clarkson, James J.; Knapp, Sandra; Leitch, Andrew R.

    2008-01-01

    Background The evolution and biology of rDNA have interested biologists for many years, in part, because of two intriguing processes: (1) nucleolar dominance and (2) sequence homogenization. We review patterns of evolution in rDNA in the angiosperm genus Nicotiana to determine consequences of allopolyploidy on these processes. Scope Allopolyploid species of Nicotiana are ideal for studying rDNA evolution because phylogenetic reconstruction of DNA sequences has revealed patterns of species divergence and their parents. From these studies we also know that polyploids formed over widely different timeframes (thousands to millions of years), enabling comparative and temporal studies of rDNA structure, activity and chromosomal distribution. In addition studies on synthetic polyploids enable the consequences of de novo polyploidy on rDNA activity to be determined. Conclusions We propose that rDNA epigenetic expression patterns established even in F1 hybrids have a material influence on the likely patterns of divergence of rDNA. It is the active rDNA units that are vulnerable to homogenization, which probably acts to reduce mutational load across the active array. Those rDNA units that are epigenetically silenced may be less vulnerable to sequence homogenization. Selection cannot act on these silenced genes, and they are likely to accumulate mutations and eventually be eliminated from the genome. It is likely that whole silenced arrays will be deleted in polyploids of 1 million years of age and older. PMID:18310159

  5. Then and now: use of 16S rDNA gene sequencing for bacterial identification and discovery of novel bacteria in clinical microbiology laboratories.

    PubMed

    Woo, P C Y; Lau, S K P; Teng, J L L; Tse, H; Yuen, K-Y

    2008-10-01

    In the last decade, as a result of the widespread use of PCR and DNA sequencing, 16S rDNA sequencing has played a pivotal role in the accurate identification of bacterial isolates and the discovery of novel bacteria in clinical microbiology laboratories. For bacterial identification, 16S rDNA sequencing is particularly important in the case of bacteria with unusual phenotypic profiles, rare bacteria, slow-growing bacteria, uncultivable bacteria and culture-negative infections. Not only has it provided insights into aetiologies of infectious disease, but it also helps clinicians in choosing antibiotics and in determining the duration of treatment and infection control procedures. With the use of 16S rDNA sequencing, 215 novel bacterial species, 29 of which belong to novel genera, have been discovered from human specimens in the past 7 years of the 21st century (2001-2007). One hundred of the 215 novel species, 15 belonging to novel genera, have been found in four or more subjects. The largest number of novel species discovered were of the genera Mycobacterium (n = 12) and Nocardia (n = 6). The oral cavity/dental-related specimens (n = 19) and the gastrointestinal tract (n = 26) were the most important sites for discovery and/or reservoirs of novel species. Among the 100 novel species, Streptococcus sinensis, Laribacter hongkongensis, Clostridium hathewayi and Borrelia spielmanii have been most thoroughly characterized, with the reservoirs and routes of transmission documented, and S. sinensis, L. hongkongensis and C. hathewayi have been found globally. One of the greatest hurdles in putting 16S rDNA sequencing into routine use in clinical microbiology laboratories is automation of the technology. The only step that can be automated at the moment is input of the 16S rDNA sequence of the bacterial isolate for identification into one of the software packages that will generate the result of the identity of the isolate on the basis of its sequence database. However

  6. Morphology and small subunit rDNA gene sequence of Pseudoamphisiella quadrinucleata n. sp. (Ciliophora, Urostylida) from the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhuo; Lin, Xiaofeng; Long, Hongan; Miao, Miao; Liu, Hongbin; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Song, Weibo

    2008-01-01

    The urosylid genus Pseudoamphisiella was established by Song (1996) with hitherto only two known congeners. In the present work, the morphology and infraciliature of a new member, Pseudoamphisiella quadrinucleata n. sp., a form with conspicuous alveolar layer and four macronuclear nodules isolated from the coastal waters both near Hong Kong and near Guangzhou, South China were investigated using living observation and protargol silver impregnation methods. Pseudoamphisiella quadrinucleata differs from other two known forms mainly by the number of macronuclear nodules: constantly four vs. two in Pseudoamphisiella alveolata and 24-57 in Pseudoamphisiella lacazei. To support this, the sequence of the small subunit rDNA of P. quadrinucleata n. sp. showed 14 and 74 nucleotides in comparison with that of the two known congeners, respectively, which hence firmly supports the validity of the new species.

  7. Variation in rDNA locus number and position among legume species and detection of 2 linked rDNA loci in the model Medicago truncatula by FISH.

    PubMed

    Abirached-Darmency, Mona; Prado-Vivant, Emilce; Chelysheva, Liudmila; Pouthier, Thomas

    2005-06-01

    Within Fabaceae, legume species have a variable genome size, chromosome number, and ploidy level. The genome distribution of ribosomal genes, easily detectable by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), is a good tool for anchoring physical and genetic comparative maps. The organisation of 45S rDNA and 5S loci was analysed by FISH in the 4 closely related species: Pisum sativum, Medicago truncatula, Medicago sativa (2 diploid taxa), and Lathyrus sativus. The 2 types of rDNA arrays displayed interspecific variation in locus number and location, but little intraspecific variation was detected. In the model legume, M. truncatula, the presence of 2 adjacent 45S rDNA loci was demonstrated, and the location of the rDNA loci was independent of the general evolution of the genome DNA. The different parameters relative to clustering of the rDNA loci in specific chromosome regions and the possible basis of rDNA instability are discussed. PMID:16121252

  8. rDNA Copy Number Variants Are Frequent Passenger Mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Deletion Collections and de Novo Transformants

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Elizabeth X.; Wang, Xiaobin S.; Amemiya, Haley M.; Brewer, Bonita J.; Raghuraman, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus is known to exhibit greater instability relative to the rest of the genome. However, wild-type cells preferentially maintain a stable number of rDNA copies, suggesting underlying genetic control of the size of this locus. We performed a screen of a subset of the Yeast Knock-Out (YKO) single gene deletion collection to identify genetic regulators of this locus and to determine if rDNA copy number correlates with yeast replicative lifespan. While we found no correlation between replicative lifespan and rDNA size, we identified 64 candidate strains with significant rDNA copy number differences. However, in the process of validating candidate rDNA variants, we observed that independent isolates of our de novo gene deletion strains had unsolicited but significant changes in rDNA copy number. Moreover, we were not able to recapitulate rDNA phenotypes from the YKO yeast deletion collection. Instead, we found that the standard lithium acetate transformation protocol is a significant source of rDNA copy number variation, with lithium acetate exposure being the treatment causing variable rDNA copy number events after transformation. As the effects of variable rDNA copy number are being increasingly reported, our finding that rDNA is affected by lithium acetate exposure suggested that rDNA copy number variants may be influential passenger mutations in standard strain construction in S. cerevisiae. PMID:27449518

  9. Identification of airborne bacterial and fungal species in the clinical microbiology laboratory of a university teaching hospital employing ribosomal DNA (rDNA) PCR and gene sequencing techniques.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Yuriko; Walker, Jim; Loughrey, Anne; Millar, Cherie; Goldsmith, Colin; Rooney, Paul; Elborn, Stuart; Moore, John

    2009-06-01

    Universal or "broad-range" PCR-based ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was performed on a collection of 58 isolates (n = 30 bacteria + 28 fungi), originating from environmental air from several locations within a busy clinical microbiology laboratory, supporting a university teaching hospital. A total of 10 bacterial genera were identified including both Gram-positive and Gram-negative genera. Gram-positive organisms accounted for 27/30 (90%) of total bacterial species, consisting of seven genera and included (in descending order of frequency) Staphylococcus, Micrococcus, Corynebacterium, Paenibacillus, Arthrobacter, Janibacter and Rothia. Gram-negative organisms were less frequently isolated 3/30 (10%) and comprised three genera, including Moraxella, Psychrobacter and Haloanella. Eight fungal genera were identified among the 28 fungal organisms isolated, including (in descending order of frequency) Cladosporium, Penicillium, Aspergillus, Thanatephorus, Absidia, Eurotium, Paraphaeosphaeria and Tritirachium, with Cladosporium accounting for 10/28 (35.7%) of the total fungal isolates. In conclusion, this study identified the presence of 10 bacterial and eight fungal genera in the air within the laboratory sampled. Although this reflected diversity of the microorganisms present, none of these organisms have been described previously as having an inhalational route of laboratory-acquired infection. Therefore, we believe that the species of organisms identified and the concentration levels of these airborne contaminants determined, do not pose a significant health and safety threat for immunocompotent laboratory personnel and visitors. PMID:20183192

  10. PAGE analysis of the heteroduplexes formed between PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes: estimation of sequence similarity and rDNA complexity.

    PubMed

    Espejo, R T; Feijóo, C G; Romero, J; Vásquez, M

    1998-06-01

    Analysis of the 16S rRNA genes retrieved directly from different environments has proven to be a powerful tool that has greatly expanded our knowledge of microbial diversity and phylogeny. It is shown here that sequence similarity between 80 and 100% among 16S rDNAs can be estimated by the electrophoretic migration of their heteroduplexes. This was measured by hybridization and electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels of the product obtained after PCR amplification of almost the entire 16S rRNA gene from different bacterial species. These heteroduplexes were also observed after amplification of samples containing DNA from two or more bacterial species and a procedure was applied to identify reliably heteroduplexes among the amplification products. The electrophoretic migration of the heteroduplexes observed after PCR was used to detect the presence of 16S rDNAs with different sequences in DNA extracted from both a mixture of two bacterial species and samples containing a natural bacterial community.

  11. Molecular identification of Hysterothylacium aduncum specimens isolated from commercially important fish species of Eastern Mediterranean Sea using mtDNA cox1 and ITS rDNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Emre; Koyuncu, Cafer Erkin; Genc, Ercument

    2015-04-01

    The presence of a Raphidascarid parasitic nematode Hysterothylacium aduncum (Rudolphi, 1802) in two sparid fish (Sparus aurata and Diplodus vulgaris) and one soleid fish (Solea solea) was investigated in this study. A total of 868 individuals; 385 S. aurata, 437 D. vulgaris and 46 S. solea were collected from the Mersin Bay between February 2013 and January 2014 and examined. Variations in the prevalence, mean intensity, and mean abundance of the parasite were 14.55%, 2.05, and 0.30 for S. aurata, 4.12%, 2.44, and 0.10 for D. vulgaris, and 15.22%, 3.29, and 0.50 for S. sole respectively. Nucleotide sequences of 1398 base pair long fragment of 18S rRNA-ITS1-5.8S rRNA-ITS2-28S rRNA region and 641 base pair long fragment of mtDNA cytochrome c oxidase I (cox1) gene were used in molecular identification of isolated parasites at species level. All the parasite samples were identified as H. aduncum based on nucleotide sequence comparisons. Both ITS rDNA and mtDNA cox1 sequences revealed a genetic variation among H. aduncum specimens isolated from different fish species, while only mtDNA cox1 sequences were indicating a mean genetic distance of 0.010 among H. aduncum specimens of the same host species. PMID:25543079

  12. Structural analysis of the 26S proteasome by cryoelectron tomography.

    PubMed

    Nickell, Stephan; Mihalache, Oana; Beck, Florian; Hegerl, Reiner; Korinek, Andreas; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2007-02-01

    The 26S proteasome is the key enzyme of intracellular protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. It is a multisubunit complex of 2.5 MDa confining the proteolytic action to an inner compartment with tightly controlled access. Structural studies of this intriguing molecular machine have been hampered by its intrinsic instability and its dynamics. Here we have used an unconventional approach to obtain a three-dimensional structure of the holocomplex uncompromised by preparation-induced alterations and unbiased by any starting model. We have performed a tomographic reconstruction, followed by averaging over approx. 150 individual reconstructions, of Drosophila 26S proteasomes suspended in a thin layer of amorphous ice.

  13. 5S rDNA genome regions of Lens species.

    PubMed

    Fernández, M; Ruiz, M L; Linares, C; Fominaya, A; Pérez de la Vega, M

    2005-10-01

    The length variability of the nontranscribed spacer (NTS) of the 5S rDNA repeats was analyzed in species of the genus Lens by means of PCR amplification. The NTS ranged from approximately 227 to approximately 952 bp. The polymorphism detected was higher than previous NTS polymorphisms described in this genus. Three NTS length variants from Lens culinaris subsp. culinaris and 2 from Lens culinaris subsp. orientalis were sequenced. The culinaris NTS fragment lengths were 239, 371, and 838 bp, whereas the orientalis ones were 472 bp and 506 bp, respectively. As a result of sequence similarities, 2 families of sequences were distinguished, 1 including the sequences of 838 and 506 bp, and others with the sequences of 239, 371, and 472 bp. The 1st family was characterized by the presence of a repeated sequence designated A, whereas the 2nd family showed a single A sequence and other repeated sequences designated B, C, and D. The presence of an (AT)n microsatellite was also observed in the 2nd family of sequences. The fragments, which included the 239-bp and 838-bp NTS sequences, as well as the intergenic spacer (IGS) of the 18S-5.8S-26S ribosomal DNA also from L. culinaris subsp. culinaris, were used to localize the nucleolar organizer region (NOR) and the 5S rDNA loci in the chromosomes of several species of the genus Lens by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The selective hybridization of the 2 NTS probes allowed us to distinguish between different 5S rDNA chromosomal loci.

  14. [18S-25S rDNA variation in tissue culture of some Gentiana L. species].

    PubMed

    Mel'nyk, V M; Andrieiev, I O; Spiridonova, K V; Strashniuk, N M; Kunakh, V A

    2007-01-01

    18S-25S rDNA of intact plants and tissue cultures of G. acaulis, G. punctata and G. lutea have been investigated by using blot-hybridization. The decrease of rDNA amount was found in the callus cultures as compared with the plants. In contrast to other species, G. lutea showed intragenome heterogeneity of rRNA genes as well as qualitative rDNA changes in tissue culture, in particular appearance of altered repeats. The relationship between the peculiarities of rRNA gene structure and their rearrangements in in vitro culture was suggested.

  15. Phosphorylation of ATPase subunits of the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Mason, G G; Murray, R Z; Pappin, D; Rivett, A J

    1998-07-01

    The 26S proteasome complex plays a major role in the non-lysosomal degradation of intracellular proteins. Purified 26S proteasomes give a pattern of more than 40 spots on 2D-PAGE gels. The positions of subunits have been identified by mass spectrometry of tryptic peptides and by immunoblotting with subunit-specific antipeptide antibodies. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of proteasomes immunoprecipitated from [32P]phosphate-labelled human embryo lung L-132 cells revealed the presence of at least three major phosphorylated polypeptides among the regulatory subunits as well as the C8 and C9 components of the core 20S proteasome. Comparison with the positions of the regulatory polypeptides revealed a minor phosphorylated form to be S7 (MSS1). Antibodies against S4, S6 (TBP7) and S12 (MOV34) all cross-reacted at the position of major phosphorylated polypeptides suggesting that several of the ATPase subunits may be phosphorylated. The phosphorylation of S4 was confirmed by double immunoprecipitation experiments in which 26S proteasomes were immunoprecipitated as above and dissociated and then S4 was immunoprecipitated with subunit-specific antibodies. Antibodies against the non-ATPase subunit S10, which has been suggested by others to be phosphorylated, did not coincide with the position of a phosphorylated polypeptide. Some differences were observed in the 2D-PAGE pattern of proteasomes immunoprecipitated from cultured cells compared to purified rat liver 26S proteasomes suggesting possible differences in subunit compositions of 26S proteasomes.

  16. Silenced rRNA genes are activated and substitute for partially eliminated active homeologs in the recently formed allotetraploid, Tragopogon mirus (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Dobešová, E; Malinská, H; Matyášek, R; Leitch, A R; Soltis, D E; Soltis, P S; Kovařík, A

    2015-03-01

    To study the relationship between uniparental rDNA (encoding 18S, 5.8S and 26S ribosomal RNA) silencing (nucleolar dominance) and rRNA gene dosage, we studied a recently emerged (within the last 80 years) allotetraploid Tragopogon mirus (2n=24), formed from the diploid progenitors T. dubius (2n=12, D-genome donor) and T. porrifolius (2n=12, P-genome donor). Here, we used molecular, cytogenetic and genomic approaches to analyse rRNA gene activity in two sibling T. mirus plants (33A and 33B) with widely different rRNA gene dosages. Plant 33B had ~400 rRNA genes at the D-genome locus, which is typical for T. mirus, accounting for ~25% of total rDNA. We observed characteristic expression dominance of T. dubius-origin genes in all organs. Its sister plant 33A harboured a homozygous macrodeletion that reduced the number of T. dubius-origin genes to about 70 copies (~4% of total rDNA). It showed biparental rDNA expression in root, flower and callus, but not in leaf where D-genome rDNA dominance was maintained. There was upregulation of minor rDNA variants in some tissues. The RNA polymerase I promoters of reactivated T. porrifolius-origin rRNA genes showed reduced DNA methylation, mainly at symmetrical CG and CHG nucleotide motifs. We hypothesise that active, decondensed rDNA units are most likely to be deleted via recombination. The silenced homeologs could be used as a 'first reserve' to ameliorate mutational damage and contribute to evolutionary success of polyploids. Deletion and reactivation cycles may lead to bidirectional homogenisation of rRNA arrays in the long term. PMID:25537492

  17. Novel genetic diversity within Anopheles punctimacula s.l.: phylogenetic discrepancy between the Barcode cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene and the rDNA second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2).

    PubMed

    Loaiza, Jose R; Scott, Marilyn E; Bermingham, Eldredge; Sanjur, Oris I; Rovira, Jose R; Dutari, Larissa C; Linton, Yvonne-Marie; Bickersmith, Sara; Conn, Jan E

    2013-10-01

    Anopheles punctimacula s.l. is a regional malaria vector in parts of Central America, but its role in transmission is controversial due to its unresolved taxonomic status. Two cryptic species, An. malefactor and An. calderoni, have been previously confused with this taxon, and evidence for further genetic differentiation has been proposed. In the present study we collected and morphologically identified adult female mosquitoes of An. punctimacula s.l. from 10 localities across Panama and one in Costa Rica. DNA sequences from three molecular regions, the three prime end of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene (3' COI), the Barcode region in the five prime end of the COI (5' COI), and the rDNA second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) were used to test the hypothesis of new molecular lineages within An. punctimacula s.l. Phylogenetic analyses using the 3' COI depicted six highly supported molecular lineages (A-F), none of which was An. malefactor. In contrast, phylogenetic inference with the 5' COI demonstrated paraphyly. Tree topologies based on the combined COI regions and ITS2 sequence data supported the same six lineages as the 3' COI alone. As a whole this evidence suggests that An. punctimacula s.l. comprises two geographically isolated lineages, but it is not clear whether these are true species. The phylogenetic structure of the An. punctimacula cluster as well as that of other unknown lineages (C type I vs C type II; D vs E) appears to be driven by geographic partition, because members of these assemblages did not overlap spatially. We report An. malefactor for the first time in Costa Rica, but our data do not support the presence of An. calderoni in Panama. PMID:23806568

  18. Assembly, Structure and Function of the 26S proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Lynn; Paine, Simon; Sheppard, Paul W.; Mayer, R. John; Roelofs, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a large multi-protein complex involved in the regulated degradation of ubiquitinated proteins in the cell. The 26S proteasome has been shown to control an increasing number of essential biochemical mechanisms of the cellular lifecycle including DNA synthesis, repair, transcription, translation and cell signal transduction. Concurrently, it is increasingly seen that malfunction of the ubiquitin proteasome system contributes to the pathogenesis of disease. The recent identification of four molecular chaperones, in addition to five previously identified chaperones, have provided mechanistic insight into how this cellular megastructure is assembled in the cell. These data, together with new insights into the structure and function of the proteasome, provide a much better understanding of this complex protease. PMID:20427185

  19. 26S Proteasome: Hunter and Prey in Auxin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangpei; Zhang, Liangran; Ding, Zhaojun

    2016-07-01

    Auxin binds to TRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESPONSE 1 and AUXIN SIGNALLING F-BOX proteins (TIR1/AFBs) and promotes the degradation of Aux/IAA transcriptional repressors. The proteasome regulator PROTEASOME REGULATOR1 (PTRE1) has now been shown to be required for auxin-mediated repression of 26S proteasome activity, thus providing new insights into the fine-tuning of the homoeostasis of Aux/IAA proteins and auxin signaling. PMID:27246455

  20. DNA homologies of ribosomal RNA genes of Neurospora species

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, D.K.; Mimiko, R.; Dutta, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA genes (rDNAs) of Neurospora crassa contain DNA sequences which code for 17S, 5.8S, and 26S rRNAs, in addition to internal and external spacers. As has been reported for many eukaryotes, the DNA sequences which code for 17S, 5.8S, and 26S rRNAs in Neurospora species are probably conserved while the internal and external spacer regions are probably variable sequences. Extensive electron microscopic studies of 45S precursor rRNA of several cold and warm blooded animals confirm that spacer regions vary extensively from species to species. It was desirable to know whether such differences in rDNA sequences exist between Neurospora species. Any such difference should be detectable using standard procedures for DNA homology studies rDNA sequences were isolated from N. crassa mycelial cells using the procedure described previously. The purified rDNA was /sup 3/H-labeled (by nick translation) and reassociated with total DNA isolated from the heterothallic species N. crassa and from three homothalliospecies: N. dodgei, N. lineolata, and N. africana. In addition, /sup 32/P-labeled total DNA of N. crassa was reannealed with unlabeled bulk DNA from N. crassa, N. dodgei, and N. lineolata.

  1. DBC2 resistance is achieved by enhancing 26S proteasome-mediated protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Collado, Denise; Yoshihara, Takashi; Hamaguchi, Masaaki

    2007-08-31

    Tumor suppressor gene DBC2 stops growth of tumor cells through regulation of CCND1. Interference of CCND1 down-regulation prevented growth arrest caused by DBC2 [T. Yoshihara, D. Collado, M. Hamaguchi, Cyclin D1 down-regulation is essential for DBC2's tumor suppressor function, Biochemical and biophysical research communications 358 (2007) 1076-1079]. It was also noted that DBC2 resistant cells eventually arose after repeated induction of DBC2 with muristerone A treatment [M. Hamaguchi, J.L. Meth, C. Von Klitzing, W. Wei, D. Esposito, L. Rodgers, T. Walsh, P. Welcsh, M.C. King, M.H. Wigler, DBC2, a candidate for a tumor suppressor gene involved in breast cancer, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99 (2002) 13647-13652]. In order to elucidate the mechanism of resistance acquisition, we analyzed DBC2 sensitive and resistant cells derived from the same progenitor cells (T-47D). We discovered that DBC2 protein was abundantly expressed in the sensitive cells when DBC2 was induced. In contrast, it was undetectable by western blot analysis in the resistant cells. We confirmed that the inducible gene expression system was responsive in both cells by detecting induced GFP. Additionally, inhibition of 26S proteasome by MG132 revealed production of DBC2 protein in the resistant cells. These findings indicate that the resistant T-47D cells survive DBC2 induction by rapid destruction of DBC2 through 26S proteasome-mediated protein degradation.

  2. Convergence of the 26S proteasome and the REVOLUTA pathways in regulating inflorescence and floral meristem functions in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenzhen; Wang, Hua; Luo, Dexian; Zeng, Minhuan; Huang, Hai; Cui, Xiaofeng

    2011-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a large multisubunit proteolytic complex, regulating growth and development in eukaryotes by selective removal of short-lived regulatory proteins. Here, it is shown that the 26S proteasome and the transcription factor gene REVOLUTA (REV) act together in maintaining inflorescence and floral meristem (IM and FM) functions. The characterization of a newly identified Arabidopsis mutant, designated ae4 (asymmetric leaves1/2 enhancer4), which carries a mutation in the gene encoding the 26S proteasome subunit, RPN2a, is reported. ae4 and rev have minor defects in phyllotaxy structure and meristem initiation, respectively, whereas ae4 rev demonstrated strong developmental defects. Compared with the rev single mutant, an increased percentage of ae4 rev plants exhibited abnormal vegetative shoot apical and axillary meristems. After flowering, ae4 rev first gave rise to a few normal-looking flowers, and then flowers with reduced numbers of all types of floral organs. In late reproductive development, instead of flowers, the ae4 rev IM produced numerous filamentous structures, which contained cells seen only in the floral organs, and then carpelloid organs. In situ hybridization revealed that expression of the WUSCHEL and CLAVATA3 genes was severely down-regulated or absent in the late appearing ae4 rev primordia, but the genes were strongly expressed in top-layer cells of inflorescence tips. Double mutant plants combining rev with other 26S proteasome subunit mutants, rpn1a and rpn9a, resembled ae4 rev, suggesting that the 26S proteasome might act as a whole in regulating IM and FM functions.

  3. rDNA genetic imbalance and nucleolar chromatin restructuring is induced by distant hybridization between Raphanus sativus and Brassica alboglabra.

    PubMed

    Long, Hong; Chen, Chunli; Wang, Bing; Feng, Yanni

    2015-01-01

    The expression of rDNA in hybrids inherited from only one progenitor refers to nucleolar dominance. The molecular basis for choosing which genes to silence remains unclear. We report genetic imbalance induced by distant hybridization correlates with formation of rDNA genes (NORs) in the hybrids between Raphanus sativus L. and Brassica alboglabra Bailey. Moreover, increased CCGG methylation of rDNA in F1 hybrids is concomitant with Raphanus-derived rDNA gene silencing and rDNA transcriptional inactivity revealed by nucleolar configuration restriction. Newly formed rDNA gene locus occurred through chromosomal in F1 hybrids via chromosomal imbalance. NORs are gained de novo, lost, and/or transposed in the new genome. Inhibition of methyltransferases leads to changes in nucleolar architecture, implicating a key role of methylation in control of nucleolar dominance and vital nucleolar configuration transition. Our findings suggest that gene imbalance and methylation-related chromatin restructuring is important for rDNA gene silencing that may be crucial for synthesis of specific proteins. PMID:25723542

  4. rDNA genetic imbalance and nucleolar chromatin restructuring is induced by distant hybridization between Raphanus sativus and Brassica alboglabra.

    PubMed

    Long, Hong; Chen, Chunli; Wang, Bing; Feng, Yanni

    2015-01-01

    The expression of rDNA in hybrids inherited from only one progenitor refers to nucleolar dominance. The molecular basis for choosing which genes to silence remains unclear. We report genetic imbalance induced by distant hybridization correlates with formation of rDNA genes (NORs) in the hybrids between Raphanus sativus L. and Brassica alboglabra Bailey. Moreover, increased CCGG methylation of rDNA in F1 hybrids is concomitant with Raphanus-derived rDNA gene silencing and rDNA transcriptional inactivity revealed by nucleolar configuration restriction. Newly formed rDNA gene locus occurred through chromosomal in F1 hybrids via chromosomal imbalance. NORs are gained de novo, lost, and/or transposed in the new genome. Inhibition of methyltransferases leads to changes in nucleolar architecture, implicating a key role of methylation in control of nucleolar dominance and vital nucleolar configuration transition. Our findings suggest that gene imbalance and methylation-related chromatin restructuring is important for rDNA gene silencing that may be crucial for synthesis of specific proteins.

  5. Sequence arrangement of the rRNA genes of the dipteran Sarcophaga bullata.

    PubMed

    French, C K; Fouts, D L; Manning, J E

    1981-06-11

    Velocity sedimentation studies of RNA of Sarcophaga bullata show that the major rRNA species have sedimentation values of 26S and 18S. Analysis of the rRNA under denaturing conditions indicates that there is a hidden break centrally located in the 26S rRNA species. Saturation hybridization studies using total genomic DNA and rRNA show that 0.08% of the nuclear DNA is occupied by rRNA coding sequences and that the average repetition frequency of these coding sequences is approximately 144. The arrangement of the rRNA genes and their spacer sequences on long strands of purified rDNA was determined by the examination of the structure of rRNa:DNA hybrids in the electron microscope. Long DNA strands contain several gene sets (18S + 26S) with one repeat unit containing the following sequences in order given: (a) An 18S gene of length 2.12 kb, (b) an internal transcribed spacer of length 2.01 kb, which contains a short sequence that may code for a 5.8S rRNA, (c) A 26S gene of length 4.06 kb which, in 20% of the cases, contains an intron with an average length of 5.62 kb, and (d) an external spacer of average length of 9.23 kb.

  6. Characterization of the 26S proteasome network in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihui; Delahunty, Claire; Fritz-Wolf, Karin; Rahlfs, Stefan; Helena Prieto, Judith; Yates, John R.; Becker, Katja

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the ubiquitin-proteasome system as a key regulator of protein quality control is an excellent drug target. We therefore aimed to analyze the 26S proteasome complex in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, which still threatens almost half of the world’s population. First, we established an affinity purification protocol allowing for the isolation of functional 26S proteasome complexes from the parasite. Subunit composition of the proteasome and component stoichiometry were studied and physiologic interacting partners were identified via in situ protein crosslinking. Furthermore, intrinsic ubiquitin receptors of the plasmodial proteasome were determined and their roles in proteasomal substrate recognition were analyzed. Notably, PfUSP14 was characterized as a proteasome-associated deubiquitinase resulting in the concept that targeting proteasomal deubiquitinating activity in P. falciparum may represent a promising antimalarial strategy. The data provide insights into a profound network orchestrated by the plasmodial proteasome and identified novel drug target candidates in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. PMID:26639022

  7. Physical mapping of 5S rDNA in two species of Knifefishes: Gymnotus pantanal and Gymnotus paraguensis (Gymnotiformes).

    PubMed

    da Silva, M; Matoso, D A; Vicari, M R; de Almeida, M C; Margarido, V P; Artoni, R F

    2011-01-01

    Physical mapping of 5S rDNA in 2 species of knifefishes, Gymnotuspantanal and G. paraguensis (Gymnotiformes), was performed using fluorescence in situ hybridization with a 5S rDNA probe. The 5S rDNA PCR product from the genomes of both species was also sequenced and aligned to determine non-transcribed spacer sequences (NTS). Both species under study had different patterns of 5S rDNA gene cluster distribution. While in the karyotype of G. pantanal two 5S rDNA-bearing pairs were observed, the karyotype of G. paraguensis possessed as many as 19 such pairs. Such multiplication of 5S rDNA gene clusters might be caused by the involvement of transposable elements because the NTS of G. paraguensis was 400 bp long with high identity (90%) with a mobile transposable element called Tc1-like transposon, described from the cyprinid fish Labeo rohita.

  8. Unusual transcription termination of the ribosomal RNA genes in Ascaris lumbricoides.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, E; Neuhaus, H; Tobler, H; Müller, F

    1990-01-01

    We studied termination of transcription of the ribosomal RNA genes in Ascaris lumbricoides, the first representative in the phylum of nemathelminthes analysed so far. RNase protection experiments in vivo reveal that the 3' end of the precursor rRNA coincides with the end of mature 26S rRNA. Promoter-containing miniplasmids are able to direct unique 3' end formation in vitro at a site identical to that observed in vivo, whereas deletion of these sequences abolishes 3' end formation throughout the entire spacer. A nuclear run-on experiment in vitro confirms the drop of polymerase I concentration down-stream of this site. The termination site for polymerase I transcription of the rDNA operon in A. lumbricoides is therefore unique, and located at the very end of the 26S rRNA gene. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2390973

  9. Insights into the molecular architecture of the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Nickell, Stephan; Beck, Florian; Scheres, Sjors H W; Korinek, Andreas; Förster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Mihalache, Oana; Sun, Na; Nagy, István; Sali, Andrej; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Carazo, Jose-Maria; Mann, Matthias; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2009-07-21

    Cryo-electron microscopy in conjunction with advanced image analysis was used to analyze the structure of the 26S proteasome and to elucidate its variable features. We have been able to outline the boundaries of the ATPase module in the "base" part of the regulatory complex that can vary in its position and orientation relative to the 20S core particle. This variation is consistent with the "wobbling" model that was previously proposed to explain the role of the regulatory complex in opening the gate in the alpha-rings of the core particle. In addition, a variable mass near the mouth of the ATPase ring has been identified as Rpn10, a multiubiquitin receptor, by correlating the electron microscopy data with quantitative mass spectrometry.

  10. Insights into the molecular architecture of the 26S proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Nickell, Stephan; Beck, Florian; Scheres, Sjors H. W.; Korinek, Andreas; Förster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Mihalache, Oana; Sun, Na; Nagy, István; Sali, Andrej; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Carazo, Jose-Maria; Mann, Matthias; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy in conjunction with advanced image analysis was used to analyze the structure of the 26S proteasome and to elucidate its variable features. We have been able to outline the boundaries of the ATPase module in the “base” part of the regulatory complex that can vary in its position and orientation relative to the 20S core particle. This variation is consistent with the “wobbling” model that was previously proposed to explain the role of the regulatory complex in opening the gate in the α-rings of the core particle. In addition, a variable mass near the mouth of the ATPase ring has been identified as Rpn10, a multiubiquitin receptor, by correlating the electron microscopy data with quantitative mass spectrometry. PMID:19581588

  11. Toward an integrated structural model of the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Förster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Nickell, Stephan; Sali, Andrej; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2010-08-01

    The 26S proteasome is the end point of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and degrades ubiquitylated substrates. It is composed of the 20S core particle (CP), where degradation occurs, and the 19S regulatory particle (RP), which ensures substrate specificity of degradation. Whereas the CP is resolved to atomic resolution, the architecture of the RP is largely unknown. We provide a comprehensive analysis of the current structural knowledge on the RP, including structures of the RP subunits, physical protein-protein interactions, and cryoelectron microscopy data. These data allowed us to compute an atomic model for the CP-AAA-ATPase subcomplex. In addition to this atomic model, further subunits can be mapped approximately, which lets us hypothesize on the substrate path during its degradation.

  12. Toward an Integrated Structural Model of the 26S Proteasome*

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Nickell, Stephan; Sali, Andrej; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is the end point of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and degrades ubiquitylated substrates. It is composed of the 20S core particle (CP), where degradation occurs, and the 19S regulatory particle (RP), which ensures substrate specificity of degradation. Whereas the CP is resolved to atomic resolution, the architecture of the RP is largely unknown. We provide a comprehensive analysis of the current structural knowledge on the RP, including structures of the RP subunits, physical protein-protein interactions, and cryoelectron microscopy data. These data allowed us to compute an atomic model for the CP-AAA-ATPase subcomplex. In addition to this atomic model, further subunits can be mapped approximately, which lets us hypothesize on the substrate path during its degradation. PMID:20467039

  13. Dss1 Is a 26S Proteasome Ubiquitin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Paraskevopoulos, Konstantinos; Kriegenburg, Franziska; Tatham, Michael H.; Rösner, Heike I.; Medina, Bethan; Larsen, Ida B.; Brandstrup, Rikke; Hardwick, Kevin G.; Hay, Ronald T.; Kragelund, Birthe B.; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Gordon, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Summary The ubiquitin-proteasome system is the major pathway for protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. Proteins to be degraded are conjugated to ubiquitin chains that act as recognition signals for the 26S proteasome. The proteasome subunits Rpn10 and Rpn13 are known to bind ubiquitin, but genetic and biochemical data suggest the existence of at least one other substrate receptor. Here, we show that the phylogenetically conserved proteasome subunit Dss1 (Sem1) binds ubiquitin chains linked by K63 and K48. Atomic resolution data show that Dss1 is disordered and binds ubiquitin by binding sites characterized by acidic and hydrophobic residues. The complementary binding region in ubiquitin is composed of a hydrophobic patch formed by I13, I44, and L69 flanked by two basic regions. Mutations in the ubiquitin-binding site of Dss1 cause growth defects and accumulation of ubiquitylated proteins. PMID:25306921

  14. Viruses and the 26S proteasome: hacking into destruction.

    PubMed

    Banks, Lawrence; Pim, David; Thomas, Miranda

    2003-08-01

    The discovery that the human papillomavirus E6 oncoprotein could direct the ubiquitination and degradation of the p53 tumour suppressor at the 26S proteasome was the beginning of a new view on virus-host interactions. A decade later, a plethora of viral proteins have been shown to direct host-cell proteins for proteolytic degradation. These activities are required for various aspects of the virus life-cycle from entry, through replication and enhanced cell survival, to viral release. As with oncogenes and cell-cycle control, the study of apparently simple viruses has provided a wealth of information on the function of a whole class of cellular proteins whose function is arguably as important as that of the kinases: the ubiquitin-protein ligases.

  15. Differential gene expression in neurospora crassa cell types: amplification of rRNA genes. Progress report, July 1979-30 June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    The significant results obtained during 1979 to 1980 of the current research program are as follows: (1) the differential rRNA gene amplification in germinated conidia of N.crassa was confirmed. N.crassa rDNAs showed differences in degrees of homology with isolated DNAs from other Neurospora species which could be due to heterogeneity in internal spacers. Studies with N.crassa rDNA clones were initiated to study their heterogeneities. The organization of the Institutional Biohazard Committee (IBC) for Recombinant DNA research was completed and necessary certifications for the laboratory and the workers were obtained in accordance with the P/sub 2/EK/sub 1/ containment regulation of N.I.H. Known 17S and 26S N.crassa rDNA probes are being used to detect differences, if any, in restriction cleavage sites in rDNAs of different cell types and developmental mutants of N.crassa. DNAs from these N.crassa cells are restricted with EcoR/sub 1/ and Hind III and cleaved fragments separated by gel electrophoresis are transferred into nitrocellulose papers. Experiments are underway now to see if there are any changes in cleavage sites by annealing with /sup 32/P or /sup 3/H-17S or 26S rDNA probes followed by autoradiography.

  16. Evolution in the block: common elements of 5S rDNA organization and evolutionary patterns in distant fish genera.

    PubMed

    Campo, Daniel; García-Vázquez, Eva

    2012-01-01

    The 5S rDNA is organized in the genome as tandemly repeated copies of a structural unit composed of a coding sequence plus a nontranscribed spacer (NTS). The coding region is highly conserved in the evolution, whereas the NTS vary in both length and sequence. It has been proposed that 5S rRNA genes are members of a gene family that have arisen through concerted evolution. In this study, we describe the molecular organization and evolution of the 5S rDNA in the genera Lepidorhombus and Scophthalmus (Scophthalmidae) and compared it with already known 5S rDNA of the very different genera Merluccius (Merluccidae) and Salmo (Salmoninae), to identify common structural elements or patterns for understanding 5S rDNA evolution in fish. High intra- and interspecific diversity within the 5S rDNA family in all the genera can be explained by a combination of duplications, deletions, and transposition events. Sequence blocks with high similarity in all the 5S rDNA members across species were identified for the four studied genera, with evidences of intense gene conversion within noncoding regions. We propose a model to explain the evolution of the 5S rDNA, in which the evolutionary units are blocks of nucleotides rather than the entire sequences or single nucleotides. This model implies a "two-speed" evolution: slow within blocks (homogenized by recombination) and fast within the gene family (diversified by duplications and deletions).

  17. Chromosome mapping of 18S rDNA and 5S rDNA by dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization in the half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis).

    PubMed

    Jiang, L; Jiang, J; Liu, J; Yuan, J; Chen, Y; Zhang, Q; Wang, X

    2014-12-18

    Half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis) is an important aquaculture flatfish in China. Cytogenetic analysis has revealed that its sex determination system is female heterogametic (ZZ/ZW). The W chromosome is morphologically larger and has been considered evolutionarily younger than any other chromosome in the set. However, the genetic origin and evolution process of this neo-chromosome remains unclear. In this study, 2 tandem arrays of rRNA genes were chosen to address this question. Both the major rDNA (18S rDNA) and the minor rDNA (5S rDNA) were located on the C. semilaevis chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Six 18S rDNA signals were observed on the centromeric regions of 3 pairs of autosomes in both males and females. In females, there was an additional 18S rDNA signal mapping to the telomeric region of the W chromosome long arm. With respect to the 5S rDNA, 12 signals were mapped to the centromeric regions of six pairs of autosomes. Two-color FISH further confirmed that the two pairs of the 5S rDNA signals were correspondingly located at the same positions of the same autosomes as those of the 18S rDNA signals. These results allowed us to speculate about the evolution process of the W chromosome. Chromosome fusions and repetitive sequence accumulations might have occurred in C. semilaevis. The synteny and non-synteny of C. semilaevis 18S rDNA and 5S rDNA might imply the original and evolutionary characteristics of this species. These findings will facilitate studies on karyotype evolution of the order Pleuronectiformes.

  18. The 5S rDNA in two Abracris grasshoppers (Ommatolampidinae: Acrididae): molecular and chromosomal organization.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Danilo; Palacios-Gimenez, Octavio Manuel; Martí, Dardo Andrea; Mariguela, Tatiane Casagrande; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti

    2016-08-01

    The 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences are subject of dynamic evolution at chromosomal and molecular levels, evolving through concerted and/or birth-and-death fashion. Among grasshoppers, the chromosomal location for this sequence was established for some species, but little molecular information was obtained to infer evolutionary patterns. Here, we integrated data from chromosomal and nucleotide sequence analysis for 5S rDNA in two Abracris species aiming to identify evolutionary dynamics. For both species, two arrays were identified, a larger sequence (named type-I) that consisted of the entire 5S rDNA gene plus NTS (non-transcribed spacer) and a smaller (named type-II) with truncated 5S rDNA gene plus short NTS that was considered a pseudogene. For type-I sequences, the gene corresponding region contained the internal control region and poly-T motif and the NTS presented partial transposable elements. Between the species, nucleotide differences for type-I were noticed, while type-II was identical, suggesting pseudogenization in a common ancestor. At chromosomal point to view, the type-II was placed in one bivalent, while type-I occurred in multiple copies in distinct chromosomes. In Abracris, the evolution of 5S rDNA was apparently influenced by the chromosomal distribution of clusters (single or multiple location), resulting in a mixed mechanism integrating concerted and birth-and-death evolution depending on the unit. PMID:27106499

  19. The 5S rDNA in two Abracris grasshoppers (Ommatolampidinae: Acrididae): molecular and chromosomal organization.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Danilo; Palacios-Gimenez, Octavio Manuel; Martí, Dardo Andrea; Mariguela, Tatiane Casagrande; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti

    2016-08-01

    The 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences are subject of dynamic evolution at chromosomal and molecular levels, evolving through concerted and/or birth-and-death fashion. Among grasshoppers, the chromosomal location for this sequence was established for some species, but little molecular information was obtained to infer evolutionary patterns. Here, we integrated data from chromosomal and nucleotide sequence analysis for 5S rDNA in two Abracris species aiming to identify evolutionary dynamics. For both species, two arrays were identified, a larger sequence (named type-I) that consisted of the entire 5S rDNA gene plus NTS (non-transcribed spacer) and a smaller (named type-II) with truncated 5S rDNA gene plus short NTS that was considered a pseudogene. For type-I sequences, the gene corresponding region contained the internal control region and poly-T motif and the NTS presented partial transposable elements. Between the species, nucleotide differences for type-I were noticed, while type-II was identical, suggesting pseudogenization in a common ancestor. At chromosomal point to view, the type-II was placed in one bivalent, while type-I occurred in multiple copies in distinct chromosomes. In Abracris, the evolution of 5S rDNA was apparently influenced by the chromosomal distribution of clusters (single or multiple location), resulting in a mixed mechanism integrating concerted and birth-and-death evolution depending on the unit.

  20. Bacterial flora as indicated by PCR-temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) of 16S rDNA gene fragments from isolated guts of phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae).

    PubMed

    Guernaoui, S; Garcia, D; Gazanion, E; Ouhdouch, Y; Boumezzough, A; Pesson, B; Fontenille, D; Sereno, D

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we tested the capacity of Temperature Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (TGGE)-based fingerprinting of 16S rDNA PCR fragments to assess bacterial composition in a single isolated sand fly gut. Bacterial content was studied in different life stages of a laboratory-reared colony of Phlebotomus duboscqi and in a wild-caught Phlebotomus papatasi population. Our study demonstrates that a major reorganization in the gut bacterial community occurs during metamorphosis of sand flies. Chloroflexi spp. was dominant in the guts of pre-imaginal stages, although Microbacterium spp. and another as yet unidentified bacteria were detected in the gut of the adult specimen. Interestingly, Microbacterium spp. was also found in all the adult guts of both species. We demonstrate that the analysis of bacterial diversity in an individualized sand fly gut is possible with fingerprinting of 16S rDNA. The use of such methodology, in conjunction with other culture-based methods, will be of great help in investigating the behavior of the Leishmania-bacterial community in an ecological context.

  1. An atomic structure of the human 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiuliang; Luan, Bai; Wu, Jianping; Shi, Yigong

    2016-09-01

    We report the cryo-EM structure of the human 26S proteasome at an average resolution of 3.5 Å, allowing atomic modeling of 28 subunits in the core particle (CP) and 18 subunits in the regulatory particle (RP). The C-terminal residues of Rpt3 and Rpt5 subunits in the RP can be seen inserted into surface pockets formed between adjacent α subunits in the CP. Each of the six Rpt subunits contains a bound nucleotide, and the central gate of the CP α-ring is closed despite RP association. The six pore 1 loops in the Rpt ring are arranged similarly to a spiral staircase along the axial channel of substrate transport, which is constricted by the pore 2 loops. We also determined the cryo-EM structure of the human proteasome bound to the deubiquitinating enzyme USP14 at 4.35-Å resolution. Together, our structures provide a framework for mechanistic understanding of eukaryotic proteasome function.

  2. BEND3 represses rDNA transcription by stabilizing a NoRC component via USP21 deubiquitinase.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abid; Giri, Sumanprava; Wang, Yating; Chakraborty, Arindam; Ghosh, Archit K; Anantharaman, Aparna; Aggarwal, Vasudha; Sathyan, Kizhakke M; Ha, Taekjip; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V; Prasanth, Supriya G

    2015-07-01

    Ribosome biogenesis dictates the translational capacity of cells. Several mechanisms establish and maintain transcriptional output from eukaryotic ribosomal DNA (rDNA) loci. rDNA silencing is one such mechanism that ensures the inactivity and hence the maintenance of a silenced state of a subset of rRNA gene copies. Whereas oncogenic agents stimulate rRNA gene transcription, tumor suppressors decrease rRNA gene transcription. We demonstrate in mammalian cells that BANP, E5R, and Nac1 (BEN) domain 3 (BEND3), a quadruple BEN domain-containing protein, localizes in nucleoli and binds to ribosomal RNA gene promoters to help repress rRNA genes. Loss of BEND3 increases histone H3K4 trimethylation and, correspondingly, decreases rDNA promoter DNA methylation, consistent with a role for BEND3 in rDNA silencing. BEND3 associates with the nucleolar-remodeling complex (NoRC), and SUMOylated BEND3 stabilizes NoRC component TTF-1-interacting protein 5 via association with ubiquitin specific protease 21 (USP21) debiquitinase. Our results provide mechanistic insights into how the novel rDNA transcription repressor BEND3 acts together with NoRC to actively coordinate the establishment of rDNA silencing.

  3. BEND3 represses rDNA transcription by stabilizing a NoRC component via USP21 deubiquitinase

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Abid; Giri, Sumanprava; Wang, Yating; Chakraborty, Arindam; Ghosh, Archit K.; Anantharaman, Aparna; Aggarwal, Vasudha; Sathyan, Kizhakke M.; Ha, Taekjip; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V.; Prasanth, Supriya G.

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis dictates the translational capacity of cells. Several mechanisms establish and maintain transcriptional output from eukaryotic ribosomal DNA (rDNA) loci. rDNA silencing is one such mechanism that ensures the inactivity and hence the maintenance of a silenced state of a subset of rRNA gene copies. Whereas oncogenic agents stimulate rRNA gene transcription, tumor suppressors decrease rRNA gene transcription. We demonstrate in mammalian cells that BANP, E5R, and Nac1 (BEN) domain 3 (BEND3), a quadruple BEN domain-containing protein, localizes in nucleoli and binds to ribosomal RNA gene promoters to help repress rRNA genes. Loss of BEND3 increases histone H3K4 trimethylation and, correspondingly, decreases rDNA promoter DNA methylation, consistent with a role for BEND3 in rDNA silencing. BEND3 associates with the nucleolar-remodeling complex (NoRC), and SUMOylated BEND3 stabilizes NoRC component TTF-1–interacting protein 5 via association with ubiquitin specific protease 21 (USP21) debiquitinase. Our results provide mechanistic insights into how the novel rDNA transcription repressor BEND3 acts together with NoRC to actively coordinate the establishment of rDNA silencing. PMID:26100909

  4. BEND3 represses rDNA transcription by stabilizing a NoRC component via USP21 deubiquitinase.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abid; Giri, Sumanprava; Wang, Yating; Chakraborty, Arindam; Ghosh, Archit K; Anantharaman, Aparna; Aggarwal, Vasudha; Sathyan, Kizhakke M; Ha, Taekjip; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V; Prasanth, Supriya G

    2015-07-01

    Ribosome biogenesis dictates the translational capacity of cells. Several mechanisms establish and maintain transcriptional output from eukaryotic ribosomal DNA (rDNA) loci. rDNA silencing is one such mechanism that ensures the inactivity and hence the maintenance of a silenced state of a subset of rRNA gene copies. Whereas oncogenic agents stimulate rRNA gene transcription, tumor suppressors decrease rRNA gene transcription. We demonstrate in mammalian cells that BANP, E5R, and Nac1 (BEN) domain 3 (BEND3), a quadruple BEN domain-containing protein, localizes in nucleoli and binds to ribosomal RNA gene promoters to help repress rRNA genes. Loss of BEND3 increases histone H3K4 trimethylation and, correspondingly, decreases rDNA promoter DNA methylation, consistent with a role for BEND3 in rDNA silencing. BEND3 associates with the nucleolar-remodeling complex (NoRC), and SUMOylated BEND3 stabilizes NoRC component TTF-1-interacting protein 5 via association with ubiquitin specific protease 21 (USP21) debiquitinase. Our results provide mechanistic insights into how the novel rDNA transcription repressor BEND3 acts together with NoRC to actively coordinate the establishment of rDNA silencing. PMID:26100909

  5. Overexpression of Ribosomal RNA in the Development of Human Cervical Cancer Is Associated with rDNA Promoter Hypomethylation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong; Wang, Yapei; Lv, Qiongying; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Qing; Gao, Fei; Hou, Haoli; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Wei; Li, Lijia

    2016-01-01

    The ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene encodes rRNA for protein synthesis. Aberrant expression of the rRNA gene has been generally observed in tumor cells and levels of its promoter methylation as an epigenetic regulator affect rRNA gene transcription. The possible relationship between expression and promoter methylation of rDNA has not been examined in human clinical cervical cancer. Here we investigate rRNA gene expression by quantitative real time PCR, and promoter methylation levels by HpaII/MspI digestion and sodium bisulfite sequencing in the development of human cervical cancer. We find that indeed rRNA levels are elevated in most of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) specimens as compared with non-cancer tissues. The rDNA promoter region in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) tissues reveals significant hypomethylation at cytosines in the context of CpG dinucleotides, accompanied with rDNA chromatin decondensation. Furthermore treatment of HeLa cells with the methylation inhibitor drug 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine (DAC) demonstrates the negative correlation between the expression of 45S rDNA and the methylation level in the rDNA promoter region. These data suggest that a decrease in rDNA promoter methylation levels can result in an increase of rRNA synthesis in the development of human cervical cancer. PMID:27695092

  6. Satellite DNA derived from 5S rDNA in Physalaemus cuvieri (Anura, Leiuperidae).

    PubMed

    Vittorazzi, S E; Lourenço, L B; Del-Grande, M L; Recco-Pimentel, S M

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we describe for the first time a family of 190-bp satellite DNA related to 5S rDNA in anurans and the existence of 2 forms of 5S rDNA, type I (201 bp) and type II (690 bp). The sequences were obtained from genomic DNA of Physalaemus cuvieri from Palmeiras, State of Bahia, Brazil. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence revealed that the satellite DNA obtained by digestion with EcoRI, called PcP190EcoRI, is 70% similar to the coding region of type I 5S rDNA and 66% similar to the coding region of type II 5S rDNA. Membrane hybridization and PCR amplification of the sequence showed that PcP190EcoRI is tandemly repeated. The satellite DNA as well as type I and type II 5S rDNA were localized in P. cuvieri chromosomes by fluorescent in situ hybridization. The PcP190EcoRI sequence was found in the centromeres of chromosomes 1-5 and in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 3. Type I 5S rDNA was detected in chromosome 3, coincident with the site of PcP190EcoRI. Type II 5S rDNA was located interstitially in the long arm of chromosome 5. None of these sequences co-localized with nucleolar organizer regions. Our data suggests that this satellite DNA originates from the 5S ribosomal multigene family, probably by gene duplication, nucleotide divergence and sequence dispersion in the genome.

  7. Similar patterns of rDNA evolution in synthetic and recently formed natural populations of Tragopogon (Asteraceae) allotetraploids

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Tragopogon mirus and T. miscellus are allotetraploids (2n = 24) that formed repeatedly during the past 80 years in eastern Washington and adjacent Idaho (USA) following the introduction of the diploids T. dubius, T. porrifolius, and T. pratensis (2n = 12) from Europe. In most natural populations of T. mirus and T. miscellus, there are far fewer 35S rRNA genes (rDNA) of T. dubius than there are of the other diploid parent (T. porrifolius or T. pratensis). We studied the inheritance of parental rDNA loci in allotetraploids resynthesized from diploid accessions. We investigate the dynamics and directionality of these rDNA losses, as well as the contribution of gene copy number variation in the parental diploids to rDNA variation in the derived tetraploids. Results Using Southern blot hybridization and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), we analyzed copy numbers and distribution of these highly reiterated genes in seven lines of synthetic T. mirus (110 individuals) and four lines of synthetic T. miscellus (71 individuals). Variation among diploid parents accounted for most of the observed gene imbalances detected in F1 hybrids but cannot explain frequent deviations from repeat additivity seen in the allotetraploid lines. Polyploid lineages involving the same diploid parents differed in rDNA genotype, indicating that conditions immediately following genome doubling are crucial for rDNA changes. About 19% of the resynthesized allotetraploid individuals had equal rDNA contributions from the diploid parents, 74% were skewed towards either T. porrifolius or T. pratensis-type units, and only 7% had more rDNA copies of T. dubius-origin compared to the other two parents. Similar genotype frequencies were observed among natural populations. Despite directional reduction of units, the additivity of 35S rDNA locus number is maintained in 82% of the synthetic lines and in all natural allotetraploids. Conclusions Uniparental reductions of homeologous rRNA gene

  8. rDNA amplification in previtellogenic and vitellogenic oocytes of symphylans (Arthropoda, Myriapoda).

    PubMed

    Jabłońska, A; Szklarzewicz, T; Jankowska, W; Kukiełka, M; Biliński, S M

    2002-01-01

    Tube-shaped ovaries of symphylans house numerous developing oocytes that are accompanied by somatic follicular cells. Oocyte nuclei (germinal vesicles) are relatively large and ovoid. During early previtellogenesis they contain compact spherical bodies and lampbrush chromosomes immersed in a translucent karyoplasm. Fluorescent labeling with DAPI and propidium iodide has revealed the presence of both DNA and RNA in the spherical bodies. As previtellogenesis advances, small RNA- and AgNOR-positive nucleoli bud off from these bodies. Full-grown nucleoli consist of coarse-granular material and comprise electron-transparent vacuoles. Our results suggest that in symphylan germinal vesicles amplification of rDNA genes takes place, and that the spherical bodies represent accumulations of extrachromosomal rDNA (rDNA bodies) after commencement of transcriptional activity.

  9. Shifts in rDNA levels act as a genome buffer promoting chromosome homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Deregowska, Anna; Adamczyk, Jagoda; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Gurgul, Artur; Skoneczny, Marek; Skoneczna, Adrianna; Szmatola, Tomasz; Jasielczuk, Igor; Magda, Michal; Rawska, Ewa; Pabian, Sylwia; Panek, Anita; Kaplan, Jakub; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    The nucleolus is considered to be a stress sensor and rDNA-based regulation of cellular senescence and longevity has been proposed. However, the role of rDNA in the maintenance of genome integrity has not been investigated in detail. Using genomically diverse industrial yeasts as a model and array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), we show that chromosome level may be balanced during passages and as a response to alcohol stress that may be associated with changes in rDNA pools. Generation- and ethanol-mediated changes in genes responsible for protein and DNA/RNA metabolism were revealed using next-generation sequencing. Links between redox homeostasis, DNA stability, and telomere and nucleolus states were also established. These results suggest that yeast genome is dynamic and chromosome homeostasis may be controlled by rDNA. PMID:26566866

  10. Nucleolar association and transcriptional inhibition through 5S rDNA in mammals.

    PubMed

    Fedoriw, Andrew M; Starmer, Joshua; Yee, Della; Magnuson, Terry

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the spatial positioning of genes within the mammalian nucleus have been associated with transcriptional differences and thus have been hypothesized as a mode of regulation. In particular, the localization of genes to the nuclear and nucleolar peripheries is associated with transcriptional repression. However, the mechanistic basis, including the pertinent cis- elements, for such associations remains largely unknown. Here, we provide evidence that demonstrates a 119 bp 5S rDNA can influence nucleolar association in mammals. We found that integration of transgenes with 5S rDNA significantly increases the association of the host region with the nucleolus, and their degree of association correlates strongly with repression of a linked reporter gene. We further show that this mechanism may be functional in endogenous contexts: pseudogenes derived from 5S rDNA show biased conservation of their internal transcription factor binding sites and, in some cases, are frequently associated with the nucleolus. These results demonstrate that 5S rDNA sequence can significantly contribute to the positioning of a locus and suggest a novel, endogenous mechanism for nuclear organization in mammals.

  11. Variability of the 5S and 45S rDNA Sites in Passiflora L. Species with Distinct Base Chromosome Numbers

    PubMed Central

    DE MELO, NATONIEL FRANKLIN; GUERRA, MARCELO

    2003-01-01

    Cytologically, the species of Passiflora with known chromosome number can be divided into four groups: (1) 2n = 12, 24, 36; (2) 2n = 24; (3) 2n = 18, 72; and (4) 2n = 20. The base chromosome number proposed for the genus is x = 6, with x = 9, x = 10 and x = 12 being considered secondary base numbers. In the present study, variability of 5S and 45S rDNA sites was investigated in 20 species of these four groups to check the reliability of this hypothesis. In the group with x = 6, five diploid species (2n = 12) exhibit two 5S rDNA sites and two (P. capsularis, P. morifolia and P. rubra) or four (P. misera 2x and P. tricuspis) 45S rDNA sites. The hexaploid cytotype of P. misera had 12 45S rDNA sites and six 5S rDNA. A tetraploid species, P. suberosa, had ten 45S rDNA sites and four 5S rDNA sites, both in the same chromosomes as the 45S rDNA sites. In the group with x = 9, P. actinia, P. amethystina, P. edmundoi, P. elegans, P. galbana, P. glandulosa and P. mucronata displayed six 45S rDNA sites, whereas P. alata, P. cincinnata, P. edulis f. flavicarpa, P. edulis var. roxo and P. laurifolia had four sites. In this group, all species were diploid (2n = 18) and had only two 5S rDNA sites. Passiflora foetida, the only species with 2n = 20, had six 45S rDNA sites and four 5S rDNA sites. The species with x = 12 (2n = 24), P. haematostigma and P. pentagona, showed four 45S rDNA sites and two 5S rDNA. In general, the number and location of 5S and 45S rDNA sites were consistent with the hypothesis of x = 6 as the probable ancestral genome for the genus, while the groups of species with x = 9, x = 10 and x = 12 were considered to be of tetraploid origin with descending dysploidy and gene silencing of some redundant gene sites, mainly those of 5S rDNA. PMID:12876193

  12. Variability of the 5S and 45S rDNA sites in Passiflora L. species with distinct base chromosome numbers.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Natoniel Franklin; Guerra, Marcelo

    2003-08-01

    Cytologically, the species of Passiflora with known chromosome number can be divided into four groups: (1) 2n = 12, 24, 36; (2) 2n = 24; (3) 2n = 18, 72; and (4) 2n = 20. The base chromosome number proposed for the genus is x = 6, with x = 9, x = 10 and x = 12 being considered secondary base numbers. In the present study, variability of 5S and 45S rDNA sites was investigated in 20 species of these four groups to check the reliability of this hypothesis. In the group with x = 6, five diploid species (2n = 12) exhibit two 5S rDNA sites and two (P. capsularis, P. morifolia and P. rubra) or four (P. misera 2x and P. tricuspis) 45S rDNA sites. The hexaploid cytotype of P. misera had 12 45S rDNA sites and six 5S rDNA. A tetraploid species, P. suberosa, had ten 45S rDNA sites and four 5S rDNA sites, both in the same chromosomes as the 45S rDNA sites. In the group with x = 9, P. actinia, P. amethystina, P. edmundoi, P. elegans, P. galbana, P. glandulosa and P. mucronata displayed six 45S rDNA sites, whereas P. alata, P. cincinnata, P. edulis f. flavicarpa, P. edulis var. roxo and P. laurifolia had four sites. In this group, all species were diploid (2n = 18) and had only two 5S rDNA sites. Passiflora foetida, the only species with 2n = 20, had six 45S rDNA sites and four 5S rDNA sites. The species with x = 12 (2n = 24), P. haematostigma and P. pentagona, showed four 45S rDNA sites and two 5S rDNA. In general, the number and location of 5S and 45S rDNA sites were consistent with the hypothesis of x = 6 as the probable ancestral genome for the genus, while the groups of species with x = 9, x = 10 and x = 12 were considered to be of tetraploid origin with descending dysploidy and gene silencing of some redundant gene sites, mainly those of 5S rDNA. PMID:12876193

  13. Evolutionary Dynamics of rDNA Clusters in Chromosomes of Five Clam Species Belonging to the Family Veneridae (Mollusca, Bivalvia)

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-García, Concepción; Hurtado, Ninoska S.; Morán, Paloma; Pasantes, Juan J.

    2014-01-01

    The chromosomal changes accompanying bivalve evolution are an area about which few reports have been published. To improve our understanding on chromosome evolution in Veneridae, ribosomal RNA gene clusters were mapped by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to chromosomes of five species of venerid clams (Venerupis corrugata, Ruditapes philippinarum, Ruditapes decussatus, Dosinia exoleta, and Venus verrucosa). The results were anchored to the most comprehensive molecular phylogenetic tree currently available for Veneridae. While a single major rDNA cluster was found in each of the five species, the number of 5S rDNA clusters showed high interspecies variation. Major rDNA was either subterminal to the short arms or intercalary to the long arms of metacentric or submetacentric chromosomes, whereas minor rDNA signals showed higher variability. Major and minor rDNAs map to different chromosome pairs in all species, but in R. decussatus one of the minor rDNA gene clusters and the major rDNA cluster were located in the same position on a single chromosome pair. This interspersion of both sequences was confirmed by fiber FISH. Telomeric signals appeared at both ends of every chromosome in all species. FISH mapping data are discussed in relation to the molecular phylogenetic trees currently available for Veneridae. PMID:24967400

  14. Contrasting patterns of the 5S and 45S rDNA evolutions in the Byblis liniflora complex (Byblidaceae).

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Kenji; Imamura, Kaori; Nagano, Katsuya; Hoshi, Yoshikazu

    2011-03-01

    To clarify the evolutionary dynamics of ribosomal RNA genes (rDNAs) in the Byblis liniflora complex (Byblidaceae), we investigated the 5S and 45S rDNA genes through (1) chromosomal physical mapping by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and (2) phylogenetic analyses using the nontranscribed spacer of 5S rDNA (5S-NTS) and the internal transcribed spacer of 45S rDNA (ITS). In addition, we performed phylogenetic analyses based on rbcL and trnK intron. The complex was divided into 2 clades: B. aquatica-B. filifolia and B. guehoi-B. liniflora-B. rorida. Although members of the complex had conservative symmetric karyotypes, they were clearly differentiated on chromosomal rDNA distribution patterns. The sequence data indicated that ITS was almost homogeneous in all taxa in which two or four 45S rDNA arrays were frequently found at distal regions of chromosomes in the somatic karyotype. ITS homogenization could have been prompted by relatively distal 45S rDNA positions. In contrast, 2-12 5S rDNA arrays were mapped onto proximal/interstitial regions of chromosomes, and some paralogous 5S-NTS were found in the genomes harboring 4 or more arrays. 5S-NTS sequence type-specific FISH analysis showed sequence heterogeneity within and between some 5S rDNA arrays. Interlocus homogenization may have been hampered by their proximal location on chromosomes. Chromosomal location may have affected the contrasting evolutionary dynamics of rDNAs in the B. liniflora complex.

  15. Aberrant DNA Methylation of rDNA and PRIMA1 in Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Teschler, Stefanie; Gotthardt, Julia; Dammann, Gerhard; Dammann, Reinhard H.

    2016-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a serious psychic disease with a high risk for suicide. DNA methylation is a hallmark for aberrant epigenetic regulation and could be involved in the etiology of BPD. Previously, it has been reported that increased DNA methylation of neuropsychiatric genes is found in the blood of patients with BPD compared to healthy controls. Here, we analyzed DNA methylation patterns of the ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA promoter region and 5′-external transcribed spacer/5′ETS) and the promoter of the proline rich membrane anchor 1 gene (PRIMA1) in peripheral blood samples of 24 female patients (mean age (33 ± 11) years) diagnosed with DSM-IV BPD and in 11 female controls (mean age (32 ± 7) years). A significant aberrant methylation of rDNA and PRIMA1 was revealed for BPD patients using pyrosequencing. For the promoter of PRIMA1, the average methylation of six CpG sites was 1.6-fold higher in BPD patients compared to controls. In contrast, the methylation levels of the rDNA promoter region and the 5′ETS were significantly lower (0.9-fold) in patients with BPD compared to controls. Thus, for nine CpGs located in the rDNA promoter region and for four CpGs at the 5′ETS decreased methylation was found in peripheral blood of patients compared to controls. Our results suggest that aberrant methylation of rDNA and PRIMA1 is associated with the pathogenesis of BPD. PMID:26742039

  16. Aberrant DNA Methylation of rDNA and PRIMA1 in Borderline Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Teschler, Stefanie; Gotthardt, Julia; Dammann, Gerhard; Dammann, Reinhard H

    2016-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a serious psychic disease with a high risk for suicide. DNA methylation is a hallmark for aberrant epigenetic regulation and could be involved in the etiology of BPD. Previously, it has been reported that increased DNA methylation of neuropsychiatric genes is found in the blood of patients with BPD compared to healthy controls. Here, we analyzed DNA methylation patterns of the ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA promoter region and 5'-external transcribed spacer/5'ETS) and the promoter of the proline rich membrane anchor 1 gene (PRIMA1) in peripheral blood samples of 24 female patients (mean age (33 ± 11) years) diagnosed with DSM-IV BPD and in 11 female controls (mean age (32 ± 7) years). A significant aberrant methylation of rDNA and PRIMA1 was revealed for BPD patients using pyrosequencing. For the promoter of PRIMA1, the average methylation of six CpG sites was 1.6-fold higher in BPD patients compared to controls. In contrast, the methylation levels of the rDNA promoter region and the 5'ETS were significantly lower (0.9-fold) in patients with BPD compared to controls. Thus, for nine CpGs located in the rDNA promoter region and for four CpGs at the 5'ETS decreased methylation was found in peripheral blood of patients compared to controls. Our results suggest that aberrant methylation of rDNA and PRIMA1 is associated with the pathogenesis of BPD. PMID:26742039

  17. Basic leucine zipper protein Cnc-C is a substrate and transcriptional regulator of the Drosophila 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Grimberg, Kristian Björk; Beskow, Anne; Lundin, Daniel; Davis, Monica M; Young, Patrick

    2011-02-01

    While the 26S proteasome is a key proteolytic complex, little is known about how proteasome levels are maintained in higher eukaryotic cells. Here we describe an RNA interference (RNAi) screen of Drosophila melanogaster that was used to identify transcription factors that may play a role in maintaining levels of the 26S proteasome. We used an RNAi library against 993 Drosophila transcription factor genes to identify genes whose suppression in Schneider 2 cells stabilized a ubiquitin-green fluorescent protein reporter protein. This screen identified Cnc (cap 'n' collar [CNC]; basic region leucine zipper) as a candidate transcriptional regulator of proteasome component expression. In fact, 20S proteasome activity was reduced in cells depleted of cnc. Immunoblot assays against proteasome components revealed a general decline in both 19S regulatory complex and 20S proteasome subunits after RNAi depletion of this transcription factor. Transcript-specific silencing revealed that the longest of the seven transcripts for the cnc gene, cnc-C, was needed for proteasome and p97 ATPase production. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR confirmed the role of Cnc-C in activation of transcription of genes encoding proteasome components. Expression of a V5-His-tagged form of Cnc-C revealed that the transcription factor is itself a proteasome substrate that is stabilized when the proteasome is inhibited. We propose that this single cnc gene in Drosophila resembles the ancestral gene family of mammalian nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-related transcription factors, which are essential in regulating oxidative stress and proteolysis.

  18. Basic Leucine Zipper Protein Cnc-C Is a Substrate and Transcriptional Regulator of the Drosophila 26S Proteasome▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Grimberg, Kristian Björk; Beskow, Anne; Lundin, Daniel; Davis, Monica M.; Young, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    While the 26S proteasome is a key proteolytic complex, little is known about how proteasome levels are maintained in higher eukaryotic cells. Here we describe an RNA interference (RNAi) screen of Drosophila melanogaster that was used to identify transcription factors that may play a role in maintaining levels of the 26S proteasome. We used an RNAi library against 993 Drosophila transcription factor genes to identify genes whose suppression in Schneider 2 cells stabilized a ubiquitin-green fluorescent protein reporter protein. This screen identified Cnc (cap 'n’ collar [CNC]; basic region leucine zipper) as a candidate transcriptional regulator of proteasome component expression. In fact, 20S proteasome activity was reduced in cells depleted of cnc. Immunoblot assays against proteasome components revealed a general decline in both 19S regulatory complex and 20S proteasome subunits after RNAi depletion of this transcription factor. Transcript-specific silencing revealed that the longest of the seven transcripts for the cnc gene, cnc-C, was needed for proteasome and p97 ATPase production. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR confirmed the role of Cnc-C in activation of transcription of genes encoding proteasome components. Expression of a V5-His-tagged form of Cnc-C revealed that the transcription factor is itself a proteasome substrate that is stabilized when the proteasome is inhibited. We propose that this single cnc gene in Drosophila resembles the ancestral gene family of mammalian nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-related transcription factors, which are essential in regulating oxidative stress and proteolysis. PMID:21149573

  19. Inherent Asymmetry in the 26S Proteasome Is Defined by the Ubiquitin Receptor RPN13*

    PubMed Central

    Berko, Dikla; Herkon, Ora; Braunstein, Ilana; Isakov, Elada; David, Yael; Ziv, Tamar; Navon, Ami; Stanhill, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    The 26S double-capped proteasome is assembled in a hierarchic event that is orchestrated by dedicated set of chaperons. To date, all stoichiometric subunits are considered to be present in equal ratios, thus providing symmetry to the double-capped complex. Here, we show that although the vast majority (if not all) of the double-capped 26S proteasomes, both 19S complexes, contain the ubiquitin receptor Rpn10/S5a, only one of these 19S particles contains the additional ubiquitin receptor Rpn13, thereby defining asymmetry in the 26S proteasome. These results were validated in yeast and mammals, utilizing biochemical and unbiased AQUA-MS methodologies. Thus, the double-capped 26S proteasomes are asymmetric in their polyubiquitin binding capacity. Our data point to a potential new role for ubiquitin receptors as directionality factors that may participate in the prevention of simultaneous substrates translocation into the 20S from both 19S caps. PMID:24429290

  20. Deletion of the Tetrahymena thermophila rDNA replication fork barrier region disrupts macronuclear rDNA excision and creates a fragile site in the micronuclear genome.

    PubMed

    Yakisich, J S; Kapler, G M

    2006-01-01

    During macronuclear development the Tetrahymena thermophila ribosomal RNA gene is excised from micronuclear chromosome 1 by site-specific cleavage at chromosome breakage sequence (Cbs) elements, rearranged into a 'palindromic' 21 kb minichromosome and extensively amplified. Gene amplification initiates from origins in the 5' non-transcribed spacer, and forks moving toward the center of the palindrome arrest at a developmentally regulated replication fork barrier (RFB). The RFB is inactive during vegetative cell divisions, suggesting a role in the formation or amplification of macronuclear rDNA. Using micronuclear (germline) transformation, we show that the RFB region facilitates Cbs-mediated excision. Deletion of the RFB inhibits chromosome breakage in a sub-population of developing macronuclei and promotes alternative processing by a Cbs-independent mechanism. Remarkably, the RFB region prevents spontaneous breakage of chromosome 1 in the diploid micronucleus. Strains heterozygous for DeltaRFB and wild-type rDNA lose the DeltaRFB allele and distal left arm of chromosome 1 during vegetative propagation. The wild-type chromosome is subsequently fragmented near the rDNA locus, and both homologs are progressively eroded, suggesting that broken micronuclear chromosomes are not 'healed' by telomerase. Deletion of this 363 bp segment effectively creates a fragile site in the micronuclear genome, providing the first evidence for a non-telomere cis-acting determinant that functions to maintain the structural integrity of a mitotic eukaryotic chromosome.

  1. Chromosomal localization of 18S and 5S rDNA using FISH in the genus Tor (Pisces, Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Singh, Mamta; Kumar, Ravindra; Nagpure, N S; Kushwaha, B; Gond, Indramani; Lakra, W S

    2009-12-01

    Dual color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed to study the simultaneous chromosomal localization of 18S and 5S ribosomal genes in the genus Tor for the first time. The 18S and 5S rDNAs in four Tor species were amplified, sequenced and mapped on the metaphase chromosomes. The number and distribution of 18S and 5S rDNA clusters were examined on metaphase chromosome spreads using FISH. The specimens of T. chelynoides, T. putitora and T. progeneius showed six bright fluorescent signals of 18S rDNA and T. tor exhibited ten such signals. The 5S rDNA signals were present only on one pair of chromosomes in all the four Tor species. Ag-NORs were observed on two pairs of chromosomes in T. chelynoides, T. putitora, T. progeneius and four pairs in T. tor. Comparison of the observed 18S rDNA FISH signals and Ag-NORs strongly suggested a possible inactivation of NORs localized at the telomeres of a subtelocentric and telocentric chromosome pairs in all four species. The 5S rDNA contained an identical 120 bp long coding region and 81 bp long highly divergent non-transcribed spacers in all species examined. 18S and 5S rDNA sequencing and chromosomal localization can be a useful genetic marker in species identification as well as phylogenetic and evolutionary studies.

  2. Preferential PCR amplification of parasitic protistan small subunit rDNA from metazoan tissues.

    PubMed

    Bower, Susan M; Carnegie, Ryan B; Goh, Benjamin; Jones, Simon R; Lowe, Geoffrey J; Mak, Michelle W

    2004-01-01

    A "universal non-metazoan" polymerase chain reaction (UNonMet-PCR) that selectively amplifies a segment of nonmetazoan Small Subunit (SSU) rDNA gene was validated. The primers used were: 18S-EUK581-F (5'-GTGCCAGCAGCCGCG-3') and 18S-EUK1134-R (5'-TTTAAGTTTCAGCCTTGCG-3') with specificity provided by the 19-base reverse primer. Its target site is highly conserved across the Archaea, Bacteria, and eukaryotes (including fungi), but not most Metazoa (except Porifera, Ctenophora, and Myxozoa) which have mismatches at bases 14 and 19 resulting in poor or failed amplification. During validation, UNonMet-PCR amplified SSU rDNA gene fragments from all assayed protists (n = 16 from 7 higher taxa, including two species of marine phytoplankton) and Fungi (n = 3) but amplified very poorly or not at all most assayed Metazoa (n = 13 from 8 higher taxa). When a nonmetazoan parasite was present in a metazoan host, the parasite DNA was preferentially amplified. For example, DNA from the parasite Trypanosoma danilewskyi was preferentially amplified in mixtures containing up to 1,000 x more goldfish Carassius auratus (host) DNA. Also, the weak amplification of uninfected host (Chionoecetes tanneri) SSU rDNA did not occur in the presence of a natural infection with a parasite (Hematodinium sp.). Only Hematodinium sp. SSU rDNA was amplified in samples from infected C. tanneri. This UNonMet-PCR is a powerful tool for amplifying SSU rDNA from non-metazoan pathogens or symbionts that have not been isolated from metazoan hosts.

  3. Cyst-theca relationship of the arctic dinoflagellate cyst Islandinium minutum (Dinophyceae) and phylogenetic position based on SSU rDNA and LSU rDNA.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Éric; Rochon, André; Lovejoy, Connie

    2013-10-01

    Round brown spiny cysts constitute a morphological group common in high latitude dinoflagellate cyst assemblages. The dinoflagellate cyst Islandinium minutum (Harland et Reid) Head, Harland et Matthiessen is the main paleoecological indicator of seasonal sea-ice cover in the Arctic. Despite the importance of this cyst in paleoceanographical studies, its biological affinity has so far been unknown. The biological affinity of the species I. minutum and its phylogenetic position based on the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (SSU rDNA) and the large subunit ribosomal RNA gene (LSU rDNA) were established from cyst incubation experiments in controlled conditions, optical and scanning electron microscopy, and single-cell PCR. The thecal motile cell obtained was undescribed. Although the motile cell was similar to Archaeperidinium minutum (Kofoid) Jörgensen, the motile cell of I. minutum lacked a transitional plate in the cingular series, which is present in Archaeperidinium spp. Islandinium minutum and Archaeperidinium spp. were paraphyletic in all phylogenetic analyses. Furthermore, Protoperidinium tricingulatum, which also lacks a transitional plate, was closely related to I. minutum and transfered to the genus Islandinium. Based on available data, it is clear that Islandinium is distinct from Archaeperidinium. Therefore, we considered Islandinium Head, Harland et Matthiessen as a non-fossil genus and emend its description, as well as the species I. minutum. This is the first description of a cyst-theca relationship and the first study that reports molecular data based on SSU rDNA and LSU rDNA on a species assigned to the genus Islandinium.

  4. Extrachromosomal amplification of rDNA in oocytes of Hemerobius spp. (Insecta, Neuroptera).

    PubMed

    Kubrakiewicz, J; Biliński, S M

    1995-05-01

    In previtellogenic oocytes of the neuropteran, Hemerobius spp., two distinct, DNA-positive intranuclear structures have been observed. Chromosomes of meiotic prophase assemble in the center of the oocyte nucleus forming a highly polymorphic karyosphere, which persists in this position until the very late stages of vitellogenesis. The extrachromosomal DNA body, containing amplified ribosomal genes, undergoes fragmentation and dispersion in the nucleoplasm. At the onset of previtellogenic growth, transcription of extra rDNA starts, which is accompanied by the appearance of dense, granular material (multiple nucleoli). Arising nucleoli gradually fill the nucleoplasm. At the electron microscopic (EM) level two electron dense structural forms of the granular material have been described. Together with general histological and ultrastructural analysis the amplification of rDNA genes in Hemerobius spp. oocytes has been demonstrated by means of the spreading technique, which has shown that extra rDNA is organized in rings containing various numbers of active ribosomal genes. The transcription activity of amplified genes is manifested in the form of typical "Christmas tree" structures.

  5. Clinorotation influences rDNA and NopA100 localization in nucleoli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, M. A.; González-Camacho, F.; Rodríguez-Vilariño, V.; Kordyum, E. L.; Medina, F. J.

    The nucleolus is the transcription site of rRNA genes as well as the site of processing and initial packaging of their transcripts. The plant nucleolin homologue NopA100 is involved in the regulation of r-chromatin condensation/expansion and rDNA transcription as well as in rRNA processing. We have investigated with immunogold electron microscopy the location of nucleolar DNA and NopA100 in cress root meristematic cells grown under slow horizontal clinorotation, reproducing an important feature of microgravity, namely the absence of an orienting action of a gravity vector, compared to control conditions. We demonstrate redistribution of both rDNA and NopA100 in nucleolar subcomponents induced by clinorotation. Ribosomal DNA concentrated predominantly in fibrillar centers in the form of condensed r-chromatin inclusions and internal non condensed fibrils, redistributing from the dense fibrillar component and the transition zone between fibrillar centers and the dense fibrillar component, recognized as the loci of rDNA transcription. The content of NopA100 was much higher in the inner space of fibrillar centers and reduced in the dense fibrillar component as compared to the control. Based on these data, an effect of slow horizontal clinorotation in lowering the level of rDNA transcription as well as rRNA processing is suggested.

  6. Evolutionary pattern of rDNA following polyploidy in Leymus (Triticeae: Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Fan, Xing; Liu, Jing; Sha, Li-Na; Sun, Gen-Lou; Hu, Zhi-Qin; Zeng, Jian; Kang, Hou-Yang; Zhang, Hai-Qin; Wang, Yi; Wang, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Li; Ding, Chun-Bang; Yang, Rui-Wu; Zheng, You-Liang; Zhou, Yong-Hong

    2014-08-01

    Ribosomal ITS polymorphism and its ancestral genome origin of polyploid Leymus were examined to infer the evolutionary outcome of rDNA gene following allopolyploid speciation and to elucidate the geographic pattern of ITS variation. The results demonstrated that different polyploids have experienced varying fates, including maintenance or homogenization of divergent arrays, occurrence of chimeric repeats and potential pseudogenes. Our data suggested that (1) the Ns, P/F, and St genomic types in Leymus were originated from Psathyrostachys, Agropyron/Eremopyrum, and Pseudoroegneria, respectively; (2) the occurrence of a higher proportion of Leymus species with predominant uniparental rDNA type might associate with the segmental allopolyploid origin, nucleolar dominance of alloploids, and rapid radiation of Leymus; (3) maintenance of multiple parental ITS types in allopolyploid might result from long generation times associated to vegetative multiplication, number and chromosomal location of ribosomal loci and/or recurrent hybridization; (4) the rDNA genealogical structure of Leymus species might associate with the geographic origins; and (5) ITS sequence clade shared by Leymus species from Central Asia, North America, and Nordic might be an outcome of ancestral ITS homogenization. Our results shed new light on understanding evolutionary outcomes of rDNA following allopolyploid speciation and geographic isolation. PMID:24780748

  7. Tomato 26S Proteasome subunit RPT4a regulates ToLCNDV transcription and activates hypersensitive response in tomato.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Pranav Pankaj; Sharma, Namisha; Puranik, Swati; Chakraborty, Supriya; Prasad, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Involvement of 26S proteasomal subunits in plant pathogen-interactions, and the roles of each subunit in independently modulating the activity of many intra- and inter-cellular regulators controlling physiological and defense responses of a plant were well reported. In this regard, we aimed to functionally characterize a Solanum lycopersicum 26S proteasomal subunit RPT4a (SlRPT4) gene, which was differentially expressed after Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV) infection in tolerant cultivar H-88-78-1. Molecular analysis revealed that SlRPT4 protein has an active ATPase activity. SlRPT4 could specifically bind to the stem-loop structure of intergenic region (IR), present in both DNA-A and DNA-B molecule of the bipartite viral genome. Lack of secondary structure in replication-associated gene fragment prevented formation of DNA-protein complex suggesting that binding of SlRPT4 with DNA is secondary structure specific. Interestingly, binding of SlRPT4 to IR inhibited the function of RNA Pol-II and subsequently reduced the bi-directional transcription of ToLCNDV genome. Virus-induced gene silencing of SlRPT4 gene incited conversion of tolerant attributes of cultivar H-88-78-1 into susceptibility. Furthermore, transient overexpression of SlRPT4 resulted in activation of programmed cell death and antioxidant enzymes system. Overall, present study highlights non-proteolytic function of SlRPT4 and their participation in defense pathway against virus infection in tomato. PMID:27252084

  8. Tomato 26S Proteasome subunit RPT4a regulates ToLCNDV transcription and activates hypersensitive response in tomato

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Pranav Pankaj; Sharma, Namisha; Puranik, Swati; Chakraborty, Supriya; Prasad, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Involvement of 26S proteasomal subunits in plant pathogen-interactions, and the roles of each subunit in independently modulating the activity of many intra- and inter-cellular regulators controlling physiological and defense responses of a plant were well reported. In this regard, we aimed to functionally characterize a Solanum lycopersicum 26S proteasomal subunit RPT4a (SlRPT4) gene, which was differentially expressed after Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV) infection in tolerant cultivar H-88-78-1. Molecular analysis revealed that SlRPT4 protein has an active ATPase activity. SlRPT4 could specifically bind to the stem-loop structure of intergenic region (IR), present in both DNA-A and DNA-B molecule of the bipartite viral genome. Lack of secondary structure in replication-associated gene fragment prevented formation of DNA-protein complex suggesting that binding of SlRPT4 with DNA is secondary structure specific. Interestingly, binding of SlRPT4 to IR inhibited the function of RNA Pol-II and subsequently reduced the bi-directional transcription of ToLCNDV genome. Virus-induced gene silencing of SlRPT4 gene incited conversion of tolerant attributes of cultivar H-88-78-1 into susceptibility. Furthermore, transient overexpression of SlRPT4 resulted in activation of programmed cell death and antioxidant enzymes system. Overall, present study highlights non-proteolytic function of SlRPT4 and their participation in defense pathway against virus infection in tomato. PMID:27252084

  9. Characterization of the rDNA unit and sequence analysis of the small subunit rRNA and 5.8S rRNA genes from Tritrichomonas foetus.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, D; Dame, J B; Gutell, R R; Yowell, C A

    1992-05-01

    The ribosomal RNA gene unit of the protozoan parasite Tritrichomonas foetus has been cloned and analyzed. Southern blot analysis of the genomic DNA showed that the ribosomal RNA gene unit is organized as a tandem head to tail repeat with a unit length of 6 kb. By Northern analysis a primary transcript of 5.8 kb was detected. Copy number analysis showed the presence of 12 copies of the ribosomal RNA gene unit. The lengths of the small subunit ribosomal RNA and 5.8S ribosomal RNA are 1571 bp and 159 bp, respectively, as determined by sequence analysis. The T. foetus small subunit ribosomal RNA sequence is one of the shortest eukaryotic small subunit rRNA sequences, similar in length to those from 2 other amitochondrial protists. Although shorter than the majority of the eukaryotic small subunit ribosomal RNAs, this sequence maintains the primary and secondary structure common to all eukaryotic small subunit ribosomal RNA structures, while truncating sequences found within the eukaryotic variable regions. The length of the large subunit ribosomal RNA was measured at 2.5 kb.

  10. The RPT2 Subunit of the 26S Proteasome Directs Complex Assembly, Histone Dynamics, and Gametophyte and Sporophyte Development in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang-Hee; Minami, Atsushi; Marshall, Richard S.; Book, Adam J.; Farmer, Lisa M.; Walker, Joseph M.; Vierstra, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    The regulatory particle (RP) of the 26S proteasome contains a heterohexameric ring of AAA-ATPases (RPT1-6) that unfolds and inserts substrates into the core protease (CP) for degradation. Through genetic analysis of the Arabidopsis thaliana gene pair encoding RPT2, we show that this subunit plays a critical role in 26S proteasome assembly, histone dynamics, and plant development. rpt2a rpt2b double null mutants are blocked in both male and female gamete transmission, demonstrating that the subunit is essential. Whereas rpt2b mutants are phenotypically normal, rpt2a mutants display a range of defects, including impaired leaf, root, trichome, and pollen development, delayed flowering, stem fasciation, hypersensitivity to mitomycin C and amino acid analogs, hyposensitivity to the proteasome inhibitor MG132, and decreased 26S complex stability. The rpt2a phenotype can be rescued by both RPT2a and RPT2b, indicative of functional redundancy, but not by RPT2a mutants altered in ATP binding/hydrolysis or missing the C-terminal hydrophobic sequence that docks the RPT ring onto the CP. Many rpt2a phenotypes are shared with mutants lacking the chromatin assembly factor complex CAF1. Like caf1 mutants, plants missing RPT2a or reduced in other RP subunits contain less histones, thus implicating RPT2 specifically, and the 26S proteasome generally, in plant nucleosome assembly. PMID:22158466

  11. The RPT2 subunit of the 26S proteasome directs complex assembly, histone dynamics, and gametophyte and sporophyte development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Hee; Minami, Atsushi; Marshall, Richard S; Book, Adam J; Farmer, Lisa M; Walker, Joseph M; Vierstra, Richard D

    2011-12-01

    The regulatory particle (RP) of the 26S proteasome contains a heterohexameric ring of AAA-ATPases (RPT1-6) that unfolds and inserts substrates into the core protease (CP) for degradation. Through genetic analysis of the Arabidopsis thaliana gene pair encoding RPT2, we show that this subunit plays a critical role in 26S proteasome assembly, histone dynamics, and plant development. rpt2a rpt2b double null mutants are blocked in both male and female gamete transmission, demonstrating that the subunit is essential. Whereas rpt2b mutants are phenotypically normal, rpt2a mutants display a range of defects, including impaired leaf, root, trichome, and pollen development, delayed flowering, stem fasciation, hypersensitivity to mitomycin C and amino acid analogs, hyposensitivity to the proteasome inhibitor MG132, and decreased 26S complex stability. The rpt2a phenotype can be rescued by both RPT2a and RPT2b, indicative of functional redundancy, but not by RPT2a mutants altered in ATP binding/hydrolysis or missing the C-terminal hydrophobic sequence that docks the RPT ring onto the CP. Many rpt2a phenotypes are shared with mutants lacking the chromatin assembly factor complex CAF1. Like caf1 mutants, plants missing RPT2a or reduced in other RP subunits contain less histones, thus implicating RPT2 specifically, and the 26S proteasome generally, in plant nucleosome assembly.

  12. PiZ Mouse Liver Accumulates Polyubiquitin Conjugates That Associate with Catalytically Active 26S Proteasomes

    PubMed Central

    Haddock, Christopher J.; Blomenkamp, Keith; Gautam, Madhav; James, Jared; Mielcarska, Joanna; Gogol, Edward; Teckman, Jeffrey; Skowyra, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of aggregation-prone human alpha 1 antitrypsin mutant Z (AT-Z) protein in PiZ mouse liver stimulates features of liver injury typical of human alpha 1 antitrypsin type ZZ deficiency, an autosomal recessive genetic disorder. Ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis by the 26S proteasome counteracts AT-Z accumulation and plays other roles that, when inhibited, could exacerbate the injury. However, it is unknown how the conditions of AT-Z mediated liver injury affect the 26S proteasome. To address this question, we developed a rapid extraction strategy that preserves polyubiquitin conjugates in the presence of catalytically active 26S proteasomes and allows their separation from deposits of insoluble AT-Z. Compared to WT, PiZ extracts had about 4-fold more polyubiquitin conjugates with no apparent change in the levels of the 26S and 20S proteasomes, and unassembled subunits. The polyubiquitin conjugates had similar affinities to ubiquitin-binding domain of Psmd4 and co-purified with similar amounts of catalytically active 26S complexes. These data show that polyubiquitin conjugates were accumulating despite normal recruitment to catalytically active 26S proteasomes that were available in excess, and suggest that a defect at the 26S proteasome other than compromised binding to polyubiquitin chain or peptidase activity played a role in the accumulation. In support of this idea, PiZ extracts were characterized by high molecular weight, reduction-sensitive forms of selected subunits, including ATPase subunits that unfold substrates and regulate access to proteolytic core. Older WT mice acquired similar alterations, implying that they result from common aspects of oxidative stress. The changes were most pronounced on unassembled subunits, but some subunits were altered even in the 26S proteasomes co-purified with polyubiquitin conjugates. Thus, AT-Z protein aggregates indirectly impair degradation of polyubiquitinated proteins at the level of the 26S proteasome

  13. PiZ mouse liver accumulates polyubiquitin conjugates that associate with catalytically active 26S proteasomes.

    PubMed

    Haddock, Christopher J; Blomenkamp, Keith; Gautam, Madhav; James, Jared; Mielcarska, Joanna; Gogol, Edward; Teckman, Jeffrey; Skowyra, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of aggregation-prone human alpha 1 antitrypsin mutant Z (AT-Z) protein in PiZ mouse liver stimulates features of liver injury typical of human alpha 1 antitrypsin type ZZ deficiency, an autosomal recessive genetic disorder. Ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis by the 26S proteasome counteracts AT-Z accumulation and plays other roles that, when inhibited, could exacerbate the injury. However, it is unknown how the conditions of AT-Z mediated liver injury affect the 26S proteasome. To address this question, we developed a rapid extraction strategy that preserves polyubiquitin conjugates in the presence of catalytically active 26S proteasomes and allows their separation from deposits of insoluble AT-Z. Compared to WT, PiZ extracts had about 4-fold more polyubiquitin conjugates with no apparent change in the levels of the 26S and 20S proteasomes, and unassembled subunits. The polyubiquitin conjugates had similar affinities to ubiquitin-binding domain of Psmd4 and co-purified with similar amounts of catalytically active 26S complexes. These data show that polyubiquitin conjugates were accumulating despite normal recruitment to catalytically active 26S proteasomes that were available in excess, and suggest that a defect at the 26S proteasome other than compromised binding to polyubiquitin chain or peptidase activity played a role in the accumulation. In support of this idea, PiZ extracts were characterized by high molecular weight, reduction-sensitive forms of selected subunits, including ATPase subunits that unfold substrates and regulate access to proteolytic core. Older WT mice acquired similar alterations, implying that they result from common aspects of oxidative stress. The changes were most pronounced on unassembled subunits, but some subunits were altered even in the 26S proteasomes co-purified with polyubiquitin conjugates. Thus, AT-Z protein aggregates indirectly impair degradation of polyubiquitinated proteins at the level of the 26S proteasome

  14. How well do ITS rDNA sequences differentiate species of true morels (Morchella)?

    PubMed

    Du, Xi-Hui; Zhao, Qi; Yang, Zhu L; Hansen, Karen; Taskin, Hatira; Büyükalaca, Saadet; Dewsbury, Damon; Moncalvo, Jean-Marc; Douhan, Greg W; Robert, Vincent A R G; Crous, Pedro W; Rehner, Stephen A; Rooney, Alejandro P; Sink, Stacy; O'Donnell, Kerry

    2012-01-01

    Arguably more mycophiles hunt true morels (Morchella) during their brief fruiting season each spring in the northern hemisphere than any other wild edible fungus. Concerns about overharvesting by individual collectors and commercial enterprises make it essential that science-based management practices and conservation policies are developed to ensure the sustainability of commercial harvests and to protect and preserve morel species diversity. Therefore, the primary objectives of the present study were to: (i) investigate the utility of the ITS rDNA locus for identifying Morchella species, using phylogenetic species previously inferred from multilocus DNA sequence data as a reference; and (ii) clarify insufficiently identified sequences and determine whether the named sequences in GenBank were identified correctly. To this end, we generated 553 Morchella ITS rDNA sequences and downloaded 312 additional ones generated by other researchers from GenBank using emerencia and analyzed them phylogenetically. Three major findings emerged: (i) ITS rDNA sequences were useful in identifying 48/62 (77.4%) of the known phylospecies; however, they failed to identify 12 of the 22 species within the species-rich Elata Subclade and two closely related species in the Esculenta Clade; (ii) at least 66% of the named Morchella sequences in GenBank are misidentified; and (iii) ITS rDNA sequences of up to six putatively novel Morchella species were represented in GenBank. Recognizing the need for a dedicated Web-accessible reference database to facilitate the rapid identification of known and novel species, we constructed Morchella MLST (http://www.cbs.knaw.nl/morchella/), which can be queried with ITS rDNA sequences and those of the four other genes used in our prior multilocus molecular systematic studies of this charismatic genus.

  15. Utility of internally transcribed spacer region of rDNA (ITS) and β-tubulin gene sequences to infer genetic diversity and migration patterns of Colletotrichum truncatum infecting Capsicum spp.

    PubMed

    Rampersad, Kandyce; Ramdial, Hema; Rampersad, Sephra N

    2016-01-01

    Anthracnose is among the most economically important diseases affecting pepper (Capsicum spp.) production in the tropics and subtropics. Of the three species of Colletotrichum implicated as causal agents of pepper anthracnose, C. truncatum is considered to be the most destructive in agro-ecosystems worldwide. However, the genetic variation and the migration potential of C. truncatum infecting pepper are not known. Five populations were selected for study and a two-locus (internally transcribed spacer region, ITS1-5.8S-ITS2, and β-tubulin, β-TUB) sequence data set was generated and used in the analyses. Sequences of the ITS region were less informative than β -tubulin gene sequences based on comparisons of DNA polymorphism indices. Trinidad had the highest genetic diversity and also had the largest effective population size in pairwise comparisons with the other populations. The Trinidad population also demonstrated significant genetic differentiation from the other populations. AMOVA and STRUCTURE analyses both suggested significant genetic variation within populations more so than among populations. A consensus Maximum Likelihood tree based on β-TUB gene sequences revealed very little intraspecific diversity for all isolates except for Trinidad. Two clades consisting solely of Trinidad isolates may have diverged earlier than the other isolates. There was also evidence of directional migration among the five populations. These findings may have a direct impact on the development of integrated disease management strategies to control C. truncatum infection in pepper. PMID:26843942

  16. Identification of a newly isolated erythritol-producing yeast and cloning of its erythrose [corrected] reductase genes.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huihui; Han, Ye; Liu, Yuanyuan; Jia, Wei; Zhou, Zhijiang

    2012-11-01

    A new erythritol-producing yeast (strain BH010) was isolated in this study. Analysis of the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rDNA sequence, the ITS/5.8S rDNA sequence [corrected] and the 18S rDNA sequence allowed the taxonomic position of strain BH010 to be discussed, [corrected] and it was identified and named Moniliella sp. BH010. Physiological characteristics were described. Scanning electron micrography clearly indicated that the cells were cylindrical to elliptical with an average size of 5 × 10 μm when growing in liquid medium [corrected] and that pseudohyphae and blastoconidia were observed when cultivated in agar plates. The erythrose [corrected] reductase genes were cloned, sequenced, and analyzed. BLAST analysis and multiple sequence alignment demonstrated that erythrose [corrected] reductase genes of Moniliella sp. BH010 shared very high homology with that of Trichosporonoides megachiliensis SNG-42 except for the presence of introns. The deduced amino acid sequences showed high homology to the aldo-keto reductase superfamily.

  17. Species-specific identification of Dekkera/Brettanomyces yeasts by fluorescently labeled DNA probes targeting the 26S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Röder, Christoph; König, Helmut; Fröhlich, Jürgen

    2007-09-01

    Sequencing of the complete 26S rRNA genes of all Dekkera/Brettanomyces species colonizing different beverages revealed the potential for a specific primer and probe design to support diagnostic PCR approaches and FISH. By analysis of the complete 26S rRNA genes of all five currently known Dekkera/Brettanomyces species (Dekkera bruxellensis, D. anomala, Brettanomyces custersianus, B. nanus and B. naardenensis), several regions with high nucleotide sequence variability yet distinct from the D1/D2 domains were identified. FISH species-specific probes targeting the 26S rRNA gene's most variable regions were designed. Accessibility of probe targets for hybridization was facilitated by the construction of partially complementary 'side'-labeled probes, based on secondary structure models of the rRNA sequences. The specificity and routine applicability of the FISH-based method for yeast identification were tested by analyzing different wine isolates. Investigation of the prevalence of Dekkera/Brettanomyces yeasts in the German viticultural regions Wonnegau, Nierstein and Bingen (Rhinehesse, Rhineland-Palatinate) resulted in the isolation of 37 D. bruxellensis strains from 291 wine samples. PMID:17596183

  18. Short communication: Evaluation of the microbiota of kefir samples using metagenetic analysis targeting the 16S and 26S ribosomal DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Korsak, N; Taminiau, B; Leclercq, M; Nezer, C; Crevecoeur, S; Ferauche, C; Detry, E; Delcenserie, V; Daube, G

    2015-06-01

    Milk kefir is produced by fermenting milk in the presence of kefir grains. This beverage has several benefits for human health. The aim of this experiment was to analyze 5 kefir grains (and their products) using a targeted metagenetic approach. Of the 5 kefir grains analyzed, 1 was purchased in a supermarket, 2 were provided by the Ministry of Agriculture (Namur, Belgium), and 2 were provided by individuals. The metagenetic approach targeted the V1-V3 fragment of the 16S ribosomal (r)DNA for the grains and the resulting beverages at 2 levels of grain incorporation (5 and 10%) to identify the bacterial species population. In contrast, the 26S rDNA pyrosequencing was performed only on kefir grains with the aim of assessing the yeast populations. In parallel, pH measurements were performed on the kefir obtained from the kefir grains using 2 incorporation rates. Regarding the bacterial population, 16S pyrosequencing revealed the presence of 20 main bacterial species, with a dominance of the following: Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens, Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris, Gluconobacter frateurii, Lactobacillus kefiri, Acetobacter orientalis, and Acetobacter lovaniensis. An important difference was noticed between the kefir samples: kefir grain purchased from a supermarket (sample E) harbored a much higher proportion of several operational taxonomic units of Lactococcus lactis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides. This sample of grain was macroscopically different from the others in terms of size, apparent cohesion of the grains, structure, and texture, probably associated with a lower level of Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens. The kefir (at an incorporation rate of 5%) produced from this sample of grain was characterized by a lower pH value (4.5) than the others. The other 4 samples of kefir (5%) had pH values above 5. Comparing the kefir grain and the kefir, an increase in the population of Gluconobacter in grain sample B was observed. This was also the case for Acetobacter orientalis

  19. When fathers are instant losers: homogenization of rDNA loci in recently formed Cardamine × schulzii trigenomic allopolyploid.

    PubMed

    Zozomová-Lihová, Judita; Mandáková, Terezie; Kovaříková, Alena; Mühlhausen, Andreas; Mummenhoff, Klaus; Lysak, Martin A; Kovařík, Aleš

    2014-09-01

    Recently formed allopolyploids represent an excellent system to study the impacts of hybridization and genomic duplication on genome structure and evolution. Here we explored the 35SrRNA genes (rDNA) in the Cardamine × schulzii allohexaploid that was formed by two subsequent hybridization events within the past c. 150 yr. The rDNA loci were analyzed by cloning, next generation sequencing (NGS), RT-PCR and FISH methods. The primary C. × insueta triploid hybrid derived from C. rivularis (♀) and C. amara (♂) had gene ratios highly skewed towards maternal sequences. Similarly, C. × schulzii, originating from the secondary hybridization event involving C. × insueta (♀) and C. pratensis (♂), showed a reduction in paternal rDNA homeologs despite an excess of chromosomes inherited from C. pratensis. We also identified novel rDNA loci in C. × schulzii, suggesting that lost loci might be slowly reinstalled by translocation (but not recombination) of genes from partner genomes. Prevalent clonal propagation of allopolyploids, C. × insueta and C. × schulzii, indicates that concerted evolution of rDNA may occur in the absence of extensive meiotic cycles. Adoption of NGS in rDNA variant analysis is highly informative for deciphering the evolutionary histories of allopolyploid species with ongoing homogenization processes. PMID:24916080

  20. Chromosomal localization of 18S rDNA and telomere sequence in the aye-aye, Daubentonia madagascariensis.

    PubMed

    Rakotoarisoa, G; Hirai, Y; Go, Y; Kawamoto, Y; Shima, T; Koyama, N; Randrianjafy, A; Mora, R; Hirai, H

    2000-10-01

    Chromosomal localization of 18S rDNA and telomere sequence was attempted on the chromosomes of the aye-aye (2n = 30) using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and primed in situ labeling (PRINS), respectively. The rDNA was localized at the tip or whole of the short arm of acrocentric chromosomes 13 and 14 in all spreads observed. However, post-FISH silver-nitrate (Ag) staining showed that transcriptional activity of the rRNA genes was variable, particularly in chromosome 14, which was most frequently negative in one homologue carrying the smaller copy number of rDNA. This observation supports, at the molecular cytogenetic level, previous data concerning the relationship between the copy number of rDNA and its trancriptional activity. On the other hand, telomere sequence was localized only at the telomeric region of all chromosomes, the so-called telomere-only pattern, a characteristic similar to that of the greater bushbaby. These data may provide information on the chromosomal evolution of the lemur, because locations of rDNA and telomere sequences frequently offer important clues in reconstruction of karyotype differentiation. PMID:11245223

  1. Fragile Sites of 'Valencia' Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis) Chromosomes Are Related with Active 45s rDNA.

    PubMed

    Lan, Hong; Chen, Chun-Li; Miao, Yin; Yu, Chang-Xiu; Guo, Wen-Wu; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiu-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Citrus sinensis chromosomes present a morphological differentiation of bands after staining by the fluorochromes CMA and DAPI, but there is still little information on its chromosomal characteristics. In this study, the chromosomes in 'Valencia' C. sinensis were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using telomere DNA and the 45S rDNA gene as probes combining CMA/DAPI staining, which showed that there were two fragile sites in sweet orange chromosomes co-localizing at distended 45S rDNA regions, one proximally locating on B-type chromosome and the other subterminally locating on D-type chromosome. While the chromosomal CMA banding and 45S rDNA FISH mapping in the doubled haploid line of 'Valencia' C. sinensis indicated six 45S rDNA regions, four were identified as fragile sites as doubled comparing its parental line, which confirmed the cytological heterozygosity and chromosomal heteromorphisms in sweet orange. Furthermore, Ag-NOR identified two distended 45S rDNA regions to be active nucleolar organizing regions (NORs) in diploid 'Valencia' C. sinensis. The occurrence of quadrivalent in meiosis of pollen mother cells (PMCs) in 'Valencia' sweet orange further confirmed it was a chromosomal reciprocal translocation line. We speculated this chromosome translocation was probably related to fragile sites. Our data provide insights into the chromosomal characteristics of the fragile sites in 'Valencia' sweet orange and are expected to facilitate the further investigation of the possible functions of fragile sites. PMID:26977938

  2. Fragile Sites of 'Valencia' Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis) Chromosomes Are Related with Active 45s rDNA.

    PubMed

    Lan, Hong; Chen, Chun-Li; Miao, Yin; Yu, Chang-Xiu; Guo, Wen-Wu; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiu-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Citrus sinensis chromosomes present a morphological differentiation of bands after staining by the fluorochromes CMA and DAPI, but there is still little information on its chromosomal characteristics. In this study, the chromosomes in 'Valencia' C. sinensis were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using telomere DNA and the 45S rDNA gene as probes combining CMA/DAPI staining, which showed that there were two fragile sites in sweet orange chromosomes co-localizing at distended 45S rDNA regions, one proximally locating on B-type chromosome and the other subterminally locating on D-type chromosome. While the chromosomal CMA banding and 45S rDNA FISH mapping in the doubled haploid line of 'Valencia' C. sinensis indicated six 45S rDNA regions, four were identified as fragile sites as doubled comparing its parental line, which confirmed the cytological heterozygosity and chromosomal heteromorphisms in sweet orange. Furthermore, Ag-NOR identified two distended 45S rDNA regions to be active nucleolar organizing regions (NORs) in diploid 'Valencia' C. sinensis. The occurrence of quadrivalent in meiosis of pollen mother cells (PMCs) in 'Valencia' sweet orange further confirmed it was a chromosomal reciprocal translocation line. We speculated this chromosome translocation was probably related to fragile sites. Our data provide insights into the chromosomal characteristics of the fragile sites in 'Valencia' sweet orange and are expected to facilitate the further investigation of the possible functions of fragile sites.

  3. Interpopulation hybridization generates meiotically stable rDNA epigenetic variants in allotetraploid Tragopogon mirus.

    PubMed

    Matyášek, Roman; Dobešová, Eva; Húska, Dalibor; Ježková, Ivana; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E; Kovařík, Aleš

    2016-02-01

    Uniparental silencing of 35S rRNA genes (rDNA), known as nucleolar dominance (ND), is common in interspecific hybrids. Allotetraploid Tragopogon mirus composed of Tragopogon dubius (d) and Tragopogon porrifolius (p) genomes shows highly variable ND. To examine the molecular basis of such variation, we studied the genetic and epigenetic features of rDNA homeologs in several lines derived from recently and independently formed natural populations. Inbred lines derived from T. mirus with a dominant d-rDNA homeolog transmitted this expression pattern over generations, which may explain why it is prevalent among natural populations. In contrast, lines derived from the p-rDNA dominant progenitor were meiotically unstable, frequently switching to co-dominance. Interpopulation crosses between progenitors displaying reciprocal ND resulted in d-rDNA dominance, indicating immediate suppression of p-homeologs in F1 hybrids. Original p-rDNA dominance was not restored in later generations, even in those segregants that inherited the corresponding parental rDNA genotype, thus indicating the generation of additional p-rDNA and d-rDNA epigenetic variants. Despite preserved intergenic spacer (IGS) structure, they showed altered cytosine methylation and chromatin condensation patterns, and a correlation between expression, hypomethylation of RNA Pol I promoters and chromatin decondensation was apparent. Reversion of such epigenetic variants occurred rarely, resulting in co-dominance maintained in individuals with distinct genotypes. Generally, interpopulation crosses may generate epialleles that are not present in natural populations, underlying epigenetic dynamics in young allopolyploids. We hypothesize that highly expressed variants with distinct IGS features may induce heritable epigenetic reprogramming of the partner rDNA arrays, harmonizing the expression of thousands of genes in allopolyploids. PMID:26711705

  4. Purification and characterization of 26S proteasomes from human and mouse spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Tipler, C P; Hutchon, S P; Hendil, K; Tanaka, K; Fishel, S; Mayer, R J

    1997-12-01

    We purified by fractionation on 10-40% glycerol gradients, 26S proteasomes from normal human spermatozoa. These proteasomes, which participate in the ATP-dependent degradation of ubiquitinated proteins, share a similar sedimentation coefficient to those purified from other human tissues. Fluorogenic peptide assays reveal they have chymotrypsin, trypsin and peptidyl-glutamyl-like peptide hydrolysing activities; the chymotrypsin activity is ablated by the specific 26S proteasome inhibitor MG132. Confirmation that these large proteases are 26S proteasomes is provided by detection of the 20S proteasome subunits HC2, XAPC7, RN3 and Z and regulatory ATPases MSS1, TBP1, SUG1 and SUG2 by Western analyses with monoclonal antisera. These antigens are found only in the gradient fractions enriched in proteolytic activities. We have also shown that, although mature spermatozoa from mice have considerably reduced amounts of a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2) and ubiquitin-protein conjugates in comparison with less mature germ cells, they retain relatively high values of 26S proteasome activity. This suggests that proteasomes may have further roles to play in normal sperm physiology.

  5. Structure of the human 26S proteasome at a resolution of 3.9 Å

    PubMed Central

    Schweitzer, Andreas; Aufderheide, Antje; Rudack, Till; Beck, Florian; Pfeifer, Günter; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Sakata, Eri; Schulten, Klaus; Förster, Friedrich; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Protein degradation in eukaryotic cells is performed by the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System (UPS). The 26S proteasome holocomplex consists of a core particle (CP) that proteolytically degrades polyubiquitylated proteins, and a regulatory particle (RP) containing the AAA-ATPase module. This module controls access to the proteolytic chamber inside the CP and is surrounded by non-ATPase subunits (Rpns) that recognize substrates and deubiquitylate them before unfolding and degradation. The architecture of the 26S holocomplex is highly conserved between yeast and humans. The structure of the human 26S holocomplex described here reveals previously unidentified features of the AAA-ATPase heterohexamer. One subunit, Rpt6, has ADP bound, whereas the other five have ATP in their binding pockets. Rpt6 is structurally distinct from the other five Rpt subunits, most notably in its pore loop region. For Rpns, the map reveals two main, previously undetected, features: the C terminus of Rpn3 protrudes into the mouth of the ATPase ring; and Rpn1 and Rpn2, the largest proteasome subunits, are linked by an extended connection. The structural features of the 26S proteasome observed in this study are likely to be important for coordinating the proteasomal subunits during substrate processing. PMID:27342858

  6. CDNA cloning of p112, the largest regulatory subunit of the human 26s proteasome, and functional analysis of its yeast homologue, sen3p.

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, K; Kagawa, S; Shimizu, Y; Akioka, H; Tsurumi, C; Noda, C; Fujimuro, M; Yokosawa, H; Fujiwara, T; Takahashi, E; Ohba, M; Yamasaki, M; DeMartino, G N; Slaughter, C A; Toh-e, A; Tanaka, K

    1996-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a large multisubunit protease complex, the largest regulatory subunit of which is a component named p112. Molecular cloning of cDNA encoding human p112 revealed a polypeptide predicted to have 953 amino acid residues and a molecular mass of 105,865. The human p112 gene was mapped to the q37.1-q37.2 region of chromosome 2. Computer analysis showed that p112 has strong similarity to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sen3p, which has been listed in a gene bank as a factor affecting tRNA splicing endonuclease. The SEN3 also was identified in a synthetic lethal screen with the nin1-1 mutant, a temperature-sensitive mutant of NIN1. NIN1 encodes p31, another regulatory subunit of the 26S proteasome, which is necessary for activation of Cdc28p kinase. Disruption of the SEN3 did not affect cell viability, but led to temperature-sensitive growth. The human p112 cDNA suppressed the growth defect at high temperature in a SEN3 disruptant, indicating that p112 is a functional homologue of the yeast Sen3p. Maintenance of SEN3 disruptant cells at the restrictive temperature resulted in a variety of cellular dysfunctions, including defects in proteolysis mediated by the ubiquitin pathway, in the N-end rule system, in the stress response upon cadmium exposure, and in nuclear protein transportation. The functional abnormality induced by SEN3 disruption differs considerably from various phenotypes shown by the nin1-1 mutation, suggesting that these two regulatory subunits of the 26S proteasome play distinct roles in the various processes mediated by the 26S proteasome. Images PMID:8816993

  7. Physical mapping of the 5S and 18S rDNA in ten species of Hypostomus Lacépède 1803 (Siluriformes: Loricariidae): evolutionary tendencies in the genus.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Vanessa; Venere, Paulo César; Thums Konerat, Jocicléia; Zawadzki, Cláudio Henrique; Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo; Margarido, Vladimir Pavan

    2014-01-01

    Hypostomus is a diverse group with unclear aspects regarding its biology, including the mechanisms that led to chromosome diversification within the group. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 5S and 18S rDNA probes was performed on ten Hypostomini species. Hypostomus faveolus, H. cochliodon, H. albopunctatus, H. aff. paulinus, and H. topavae had only one chromosome pair with 18S rDNA sites, while H. ancistroides, H. commersoni, H. hermanni, H. regani, and H. strigaticeps had multiple 18S rDNA sites. Regarding the 5S rDNA genes, H. ancistroides, H. regani, H. albopunctatus, H. aff. paulinus, and H. topavae had 5S rDNA sites on only one chromosome pair and H. faveolus, H. cochliodon, H. commersoni, H. hermanni, and H. strigaticeps had multiple 5S rDNA sites. Most species had 18S rDNA sites in the telomeric region of the chromosomes. All species but H. cochliodon had 5S rDNA in the centromeric/pericentromeric region of one metacentric pair. Obtained results are discussed based on existent phylogenies for the genus, with comments on possible dispersion mechanisms to justify the variability of the rDNA sites in Hypostomus.

  8. Physical Mapping of the 5S and 18S rDNA in Ten Species of Hypostomus Lacépède 1803 (Siluriformes: Loricariidae): Evolutionary Tendencies in the Genus

    PubMed Central

    César Venere, Paulo; Thums Konerat, Jocicléia; Henrique Zawadzki, Cláudio; Ricardo Vicari, Marcelo; Margarido, Vladimir Pavan

    2014-01-01

    Hypostomus is a diverse group with unclear aspects regarding its biology, including the mechanisms that led to chromosome diversification within the group. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 5S and 18S rDNA probes was performed on ten Hypostomini species. Hypostomus faveolus, H. cochliodon, H. albopunctatus, H. aff. paulinus, and H. topavae had only one chromosome pair with 18S rDNA sites, while H. ancistroides, H. commersoni, H. hermanni, H. regani, and H. strigaticeps had multiple 18S rDNA sites. Regarding the 5S rDNA genes, H. ancistroides, H. regani, H. albopunctatus, H. aff. paulinus, and H. topavae had 5S rDNA sites on only one chromosome pair and H. faveolus, H. cochliodon, H. commersoni, H. hermanni, and H. strigaticeps had multiple 5S rDNA sites. Most species had 18S rDNA sites in the telomeric region of the chromosomes. All species but H. cochliodon had 5S rDNA in the centromeric/pericentromeric region of one metacentric pair. Obtained results are discussed based on existent phylogenies for the genus, with comments on possible dispersion mechanisms to justify the variability of the rDNA sites in Hypostomus. PMID:25405240

  9. Phylogenetic Analysis of Geographically Diverse Radopholus similis via rDNA Sequence Reveals a Monomorphic Motif

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, D. T.; Thomas, W. K.; Frisse, L. M.; Sarah, J. L.; Stanton, J. M.; Speijer, P. R.; Marin, D. H.; Opperman, C. H.

    2000-01-01

    The nucleic acid sequences of rDNA ITS1 and the rDNA D2/D3 expansion segment were compared for 57 burrowing nematode isolates collected from Australia, Cameroon, Central America, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Florida, Guadeloupe, Hawaii, Nigeria, Honduras, Indonesia, Ivory Coast, Puerto Rico, South Africa, and Uganda. Of the 57 isolates, 55 were morphologically similar to Radopholus similis and seven were citrus-parasitic. The nucleic acid sequences for PCR-amplified ITS1 and for the D2/D3 expansion segment of the 28S rDNA gene were each identical for all putative R. similis. Sequence divergence for both the ITS1 and the D2/D3 was concordant with morphological differences that distinguish R. similis from other burrowing nematode species. This result substantiates previous observations that the R. similis genome is highly conserved across geographic regions. Autapomorphies that would delimit phylogenetic lineages of non-citrus-parasitic R. similis from those that parasitize citrus were not observed. The data presented herein support the concept that R. similis is comprised of two pathotypes-one that parasitizes citrus and one that does not. PMID:19270959

  10. Evolutionary relationships among Magnetospirillum strains inferred from phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, J G; Kawaguchi, R; Sakaguchi, T; Thornhill, R H; Matsunaga, T

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the evolutionary relationships between two facultatively anaerobic Magnetospirillum strains (AMB-1 and MGT-1) and fastidious, obligately microaerophilic species, such as Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum, using a molecular phylogenetic approach. Genomic DNA from strains MGT-1 and AMB-1 was used as a template for amplification of the genes coding for 16S rRNA (16S rDNA) by the polymerase chain reaction. Amplified DNA fragments were sequenced (1,424 bp) and compared with sequences for M. magnetotacticum MS-1 and Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1. Phylogenetic analysis of the aligned 16S rDNA sequences indicated that the two new magnetic spirilla, AMB-1 and MGT-1, lie within the alpha subdivision (alpha-1) of the eubacterial group Proteobacteria and are closely related to Rhodospirillum fulvum and to several endosymbiotic bacteria. Strains AMB-1, MGT-1, and MS-1 formed a cluster, termed group I, in which they were more closely related to each other than to group II, which contained M. gryphiswaldense MSR-1. Group I strains were also physiologically distinct from strain MSR-1. Sequence alignment studies allowed elucidation of genus-specific regions of the 16S rDNA, and oligonucleotide primers complementary to two of these regions were used to develop a specific polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of magnetic spirilla in natural samples. Images PMID:7691800

  11. Phylogeny of the Eustigmatophyceae Based upon 18S rDNA, with Emphasis on Nannochloropsis.

    PubMed

    Andersen, R A; Brett, R W; Potter, D; Sexton, J P

    1998-02-01

    Complete 18S rDNA sequences were determined for 25 strains representing five genera of the Eustigmatophyceae, including re-examination of three strains with previously published sequences. Parsimony analysis of these and 44 published sequences for other heterokont chromophytes (unalignable sites removed) revealed that the Eustigmatophyceae were a monophyletic group. Analysis of eustigmatophyte taxa only (complete gene analyzed) supported the current familial classification scheme. Twenty one strains of Nannochloropsis were also examined using light microscopy. Gross morphology of cells was variable and overlapped among the strains; cell size was consistent within strains but sometimes varied considerably among strains of a species. The 18S rDNA of N. gaditana, N. oculata and N. salina was re-sequenced for strains used in previous publications and one or more nucleotide differences were found. Nucleotide sequences for Nannochloropsis species varied by up to 32 nucleotides. Identical sequences were found for six strains of N. salina, five strains of N. gadifana, four strains of N. granulata, and two strains of N. oculata, respectively. Four strains could not be assigned to described species and may represent two new species. The unique 18S rDNA sequences for each sibling species of Nannochloropsis demonstrates the presence of considerable genetic diversity despite the extremely simple morphology in this genus. PMID:23196114

  12. Dietary apigenin potentiates the inhibitory effect of interferon-α on cancer cell viability through inhibition of 26S proteasome-mediated interferon receptor degradation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sheng; Yang, Li-juan; Wang, Ping; He, Yu-jiao; Huang, Jun-mei; Liu, Han-wei; Shen, Xiao-fei; Wang, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Background Type I interferons (IFN-α/β) have broad and potent immunoregulatory and antiproliferative activities. However, it is still known whether the dietary flavonoids exhibit their antiviral and anticancer properties by modulating the function of type I IFNs. Objective This study aimed at determining the role of apigenin, a dietary plant flavonoid abundant in common fruits and vegetables, on the type I IFN-mediated inhibition of cancer cell viability. Design Inhibitory effect of apigenin on human 26S proteasome, a known negative regulator of type I IFN signaling, was evaluated in vitro. Molecular docking was conducted to know the interaction between apigenin and subunits of 26S proteasome. Effects of apigenin on JAK/STAT pathway, 26S proteasome-mediated interferon receptor stability, and cancer cells viability were also investigated. Results Apigenin was identified to be a potent inhibitor of human 26S proteasome in a cell-based assay. Apigenin inhibited the chymotrypsin-like, caspase-like, and trypsin-like activities of the human 26S proteasome and increased the ubiquitination of endogenous proteins in cells. Results from computational modeling of the potential interactions of apigenin with the chymotrypsin site (β5 subunit), caspase site (β1 subunit), and trypsin site (β2 subunit) of the proteasome were consistent with the observed proteasome inhibitory activity. Apigenin enhanced the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins (STAT1 and STAT2) and promoted the endogenous IFN-α-regulated gene expression. Apigenin inhibited the IFN-α-stimulated ubiquitination and degradation of type I interferon receptor 1 (IFNAR1). Apigenin also sensitized the inhibitory effect of IFN-α on viability of cervical carcinoma HeLa cells. Conclusion These results suggest that apigenin potentiates the inhibitory effect of IFN-α on cancer cell viability by activating JAK/STAT signaling pathway through inhibition of 26S proteasome

  13. Characterization and Sequence Variation in the rDNA Region of Six Nematode Species of the Genus Longidorus (Nematoda)

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, F.; Reyes, A.; Grunder, J.; Kunz, P.; Agostinelli, A.; De Giorgi, C.; Lamberti, F.

    2004-01-01

    Total DNA was isolated from individual nematodes of the species Longidorus helveticus, L. macrosoma, L. arthensis, L. profundorum, L. elongatus, and L. raskii collected in Switzerland. The ITS region and D1-D2 expansion segments of the 26S rDNA were amplified and cloned. The sequences obtained were aligned in order to investigate sequence diversity and to infer the phylogenetic relationships among the six Longidorus species. D1-D2 sequences were more conserved than the ITS sequences that varied widely in primary structure and length, and no consensus was observed. Phylogenetic analyses using the neighbor-joining, maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood methods were performed with three different sequence data sets: ITS1-ITS2, 5.8S-D1-D2, and combining ITS1-ITS2+5.8S-D1-D2 sequences. All multiple alignments yielded similar basic trees supporting the existence of the six species established using morphological characters. These sequence data also provided evidence that the different regions of the rDNA are characterized by different evolution rates and by different factors associated with the generation of extreme size variation. PMID:19262800

  14. Chromosomal location of 18S and 5S rDNA sites in Triportheus fish species (Characiformes, Characidae)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The location of 18S and 5S rDNA sites was determined in eight species and populations of the fish genus Triportheus by using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The males and females of all species had 2n = 52 chromosomes and a ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system. A single 18S rDNA site that was roughly equivalent to an Ag-NOR was detected on the short arms of a submetacentric pair in nearly all species, and up to two additional sites were also observed in some species. In addition, another 18S rDNA cluster was identified in a distal region on the long arms of the W chromosome; this finding corroborated previous evidence that this cluster would be a shared feature amongst Triportheus species. In T. angulatus, a heterozygotic paracentric inversion involving the short arms of one homolog of a metacentric pair was associated with NORs. The 5S rDNA sites were located on the short arms of a single submetacentric chromosomal pair, close to the centromeres, except in T. auritus, which had up to ten 5S rDNA sites. The 18S and 5S rDNA sites were co-localized and adjacent on the short arms of a chromosomal pair in two populations of T. nematurus. Although all Triportheus species have a similar karyotypic macrostructure, the results of this work show that in some species ribosomal genes may serve as species-specific markers when used in conjunction with other putatively synapomorphic features. PMID:21637644

  15. The pleiotropic role of the 26S proteasome subunit RPN10 in Arabidopsis growth and development supports a substrate-specific function in abscisic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Smalle, Jan; Kurepa, Jasmina; Yang, Peizhen; Emborg, Thomas J; Babiychuk, Elena; Kushnir, Sergei; Vierstra, Richard D

    2003-04-01

    The 26S proteasome is an essential protease complex responsible for removing most short-lived intracellular proteins, especially those modified with polyubiquitin chains. We show here that an Arabidopsis mutant expressing an altered RPN10 subunit exhibited a pleiotropic phenotype consistent with specific changes in 26S proteasome function. rpn10-1 plants displayed reduced seed germination, growth rate, stamen number, genetic transmission through the male gamete, and hormone-induced cell division, which can be explained partially by a constitutive downregulation of the key cell cycle gene CDKA;1. rpn10-1 also was more sensitive to abscisic acid (ABA), salt, and sucrose stress and to DNA-damaging agents and had decreased sensitivity to cytokinin and auxin. Most of the phenotypes can be explained by a hypersensitivity to ABA, which is reflected at the molecular level by the selective stabilization of the short-lived ABA-signaling protein ABI5. Collectively, these results indicate that RPN10 affects a number of regulatory processes in Arabidopsis likely by directing specific proteins to the 26S proteasome for degradation. A particularly important role may be in regulating the responses to signals promulgated by ABA.

  16. Cytogenetic analysis in Polypterus ornatipinnis (Actinopterygii, Cladistia, Polypteridae) and 5S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Morescalchi, Maria Alessandra; Stingo, Vincenzo; Capriglione, Teresa

    2011-03-01

    Polypteridae is a family of archaic freshwater African fish that constitute an interesting subject for the study of the karyological evolution in vertebrates, on account of their primitive morphological characters and peculiar relationships with lower Osteichthyans. In this paper, a cytogenetic analysis on twenty specimens of both sexes of Polypterus ornatipinnis the ornate "bichir", coming from the Congo River basin, was performed by using both classical and molecular techniques. The karyotypic formula (2n=36; FN=72) was composed of 26 M+10 SM. The Alu I banding, performed to characterize heterochromatin in this species, was mainly centromeric. Both the chromosome location of the ribosomal 5S and 18S rRNA genes were examined by using Ag-NOR, classical C-banding, CMA(3) staining and FISH. CMA(3) marked all centromerical regions and showed the presence of two GC rich regions on the p arm of the chromosome pair n°1 and on the q arm of the pair n°14. Staining with Ag-NOR marked the only telomeric region of the chromosome n°1 p arm. After PCR, the 5S rDNA in this species was cloned, sequenced and analyzed. In the 665bp 5S rDNA sequence of P.ornatipinnis, a conserved 120bp gene region for the 5S rDNA was identified, followed by a non-transcribed variable spacer (NTS) which included simple repeats, microsatellites and a fragment of a non-LTR retrotransposon R-TEX. FISH with 5S rDNA marked the subtelomeric region of the q arm of the chromosome pair n°14, previously marked by CMA(3). FISH with 18S rDNA marked the telomeric region of the p arm of the pair n°1, previously marked both by Ag-NOR and CMA(3). The (GATA)(7) repeats marked the telomeric regions of all chromosome pairs, with the exclusion of the n°1, n°3 and n°14; hybridization with telomeric probes (TTAGGG)(n) showed signals at the end of all chromosomes. Karyotype evolution in Polypterus genus was finally discussed, including the new data obtained.

  17. Cytogenetic analysis in Polypterus ornatipinnis (Actinopterygii, Cladistia, Polypteridae) and 5S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Morescalchi, Maria Alessandra; Stingo, Vincenzo; Capriglione, Teresa

    2011-03-01

    Polypteridae is a family of archaic freshwater African fish that constitute an interesting subject for the study of the karyological evolution in vertebrates, on account of their primitive morphological characters and peculiar relationships with lower Osteichthyans. In this paper, a cytogenetic analysis on twenty specimens of both sexes of Polypterus ornatipinnis the ornate "bichir", coming from the Congo River basin, was performed by using both classical and molecular techniques. The karyotypic formula (2n=36; FN=72) was composed of 26 M+10 SM. The Alu I banding, performed to characterize heterochromatin in this species, was mainly centromeric. Both the chromosome location of the ribosomal 5S and 18S rRNA genes were examined by using Ag-NOR, classical C-banding, CMA(3) staining and FISH. CMA(3) marked all centromerical regions and showed the presence of two GC rich regions on the p arm of the chromosome pair n°1 and on the q arm of the pair n°14. Staining with Ag-NOR marked the only telomeric region of the chromosome n°1 p arm. After PCR, the 5S rDNA in this species was cloned, sequenced and analyzed. In the 665bp 5S rDNA sequence of P.ornatipinnis, a conserved 120bp gene region for the 5S rDNA was identified, followed by a non-transcribed variable spacer (NTS) which included simple repeats, microsatellites and a fragment of a non-LTR retrotransposon R-TEX. FISH with 5S rDNA marked the subtelomeric region of the q arm of the chromosome pair n°14, previously marked by CMA(3). FISH with 18S rDNA marked the telomeric region of the p arm of the pair n°1, previously marked both by Ag-NOR and CMA(3). The (GATA)(7) repeats marked the telomeric regions of all chromosome pairs, with the exclusion of the n°1, n°3 and n°14; hybridization with telomeric probes (TTAGGG)(n) showed signals at the end of all chromosomes. Karyotype evolution in Polypterus genus was finally discussed, including the new data obtained. PMID:21429462

  18. Structure of the 26S proteasome from Schizosaccharomyces pombe at subnanometer resolution

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Stefan; Beck, Florian; Sakata, Eri; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Beck, Martin; Aebersold, Ruedi; Förster, Friedrich; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Nickell, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    The structure of the 26S proteasome from Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been determined to a resolution of 9.1 Å by cryoelectron microscopy and single particle analysis. In addition, chemical cross-linking in conjunction with mass spectrometry has been used to identify numerous residue pairs in close proximity to each other, providing an array of spatial restraints. Taken together these data clarify the topology of the AAA-ATPase module in the 19S regulatory particle and its spatial relationship to the α-ring of the 20S core particle. Image classification and variance analysis reveal a belt of high “activity” surrounding the AAA-ATPase module which is tentatively assigned to the reversible association of proteasome interacting proteins and the conformational heterogeneity among the particles. An integrated model is presented which sheds light on the early steps of protein degradation by the 26S complex. PMID:21098295

  19. Automated cryoelectron microscopy of "single particles" applied to the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Nickell, Stephan; Beck, Florian; Korinek, Andreas; Mihalache, Oana; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Plitzko, Jürgen M

    2007-06-19

    The 26S proteasome is a large molecular machine with a central role in intracellular protein degradation in eukaryotes. The 2.5 MDa complex, which is built from two copies each of more than 30 different subunits, is labile and prone to dissociation into subcomplexes. Hence it is difficult if not impossible, to obtain structurally homogeneous preparations and, as a consequence, it is very cumbersome to obtain large numbers of images of the holocomplex. In this communication, we describe an automated procedure for the acquisition of large data sets of cryoelectron micrographs. The application of this procedure to the 26S proteasome from Drosophila has allowed us to determine the three-dimensional structure of the complex to a resolution of 2.9 nm and the prospects for further improvements are good.

  20. Structure of the 26S proteasome from Schizosaccharomyces pombe at subnanometer resolution.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Stefan; Beck, Florian; Sakata, Eri; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Beck, Martin; Aebersold, Ruedi; Förster, Friedrich; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Nickell, Stephan

    2010-12-01

    The structure of the 26S proteasome from Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been determined to a resolution of 9.1 Å by cryoelectron microscopy and single particle analysis. In addition, chemical cross-linking in conjunction with mass spectrometry has been used to identify numerous residue pairs in close proximity to each other, providing an array of spatial restraints. Taken together these data clarify the topology of the AAA-ATPase module in the 19S regulatory particle and its spatial relationship to the α-ring of the 20S core particle. Image classification and variance analysis reveal a belt of high "activity" surrounding the AAA-ATPase module which is tentatively assigned to the reversible association of proteasome interacting proteins and the conformational heterogeneity among the particles. An integrated model is presented which sheds light on the early steps of protein degradation by the 26S complex.

  1. Chromosomal characteristics and distribution of rDNA sequences in the brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis (Mitchill, 1814).

    PubMed

    Śliwińska-Jewsiewicka, A; Kuciński, M; Kirtiklis, L; Dobosz, S; Ocalewicz, K; Jankun, Malgorzata

    2015-08-01

    Brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis (Mitchill, 1814) chromosomes have been analyzed using conventional and molecular cytogenetic techniques enabling characteristics and chromosomal location of heterochromatin, nucleolus organizer regions (NORs), ribosomal RNA-encoding genes and telomeric DNA sequences. The C-banding and chromosome digestion with the restriction endonucleases demonstrated distribution and heterogeneity of the heterochromatin in the brook trout genome. DNA sequences of the ribosomal RNA genes, namely the nucleolus-forming 28S (major) and non-nucleolus-forming 5S (minor) rDNAs, were physically mapped using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and primed in situ labelling. The minor rDNA locus was located on the subtelo-acrocentric chromosome pair No. 9, whereas the major rDNA loci were dispersed on 14 chromosome pairs, showing a considerable inter-individual variation in the number and location. The major and minor rDNA loci were located at different chromosomes. Multichromosomal location (3-6 sites) of the NORs was demonstrated by silver nitrate (AgNO3) impregnation. All Ag-positive i.e. active NORs corresponded to the GC-rich blocks of heterochromatin. FISH with telomeric probe showed the presence of the interstitial telomeric site (ITS) adjacent to the NOR/28S rDNA site on the chromosome 11. This ITS was presumably remnant of the chromosome rearrangement(s) leading to the genomic redistribution of the rDNA sequences. Comparative analysis of the cytogenetic data among several related salmonid species confirmed huge variation in the number and the chromosomal location of rRNA gene clusters in the Salvelinus genome.

  2. Phylogeny of gregarines (Apicomplexa) as inferred from small-subunit rDNA and beta-tubulin.

    PubMed

    Leander, Brian S; Clopton, Richard E; Keeling, Patrick J

    2003-01-01

    Gregarines are thought to be deep-branching apicomplexans. Accordingly, a robust inference of gregarine phylogeny is crucial to any interpretation of apicomplexan evolution, but molecular sequences from gregarines are restricted to a small number of small-subunit (SSU) rDNA sequences from derived taxa. This work examines the usefulness of SSU rDNA and beta-tubulin sequences for inferring gregarine phylogeny. SSU rRNA genes from Lecudina (Mingazzini) sp., Monocystis agilis Stein, Leidyana migrator Clopton and Gregarina polymorpha Dufour, as well as the beta-tubulin gene from Leidyana migrator, were sequenced. The results of phylogenetic analyses of alveolate taxa using both genes were consistent with an early origin of gregarines and the putative 'sister' relationship between gregarines and Cryptosporidium, but neither phylogeny was strongly supported. In addition, two SSU rDNA sequences from unidentified marine eukaryotes were found to branch among the gregarines: one was a sequence derived from the haemolymph parasite of the giant clam, Tridacna crocea, and the other was a sequence misattributed to the foraminiferan Ammonium beccarii. In all of our analyses, the SSU rDNA sequence from Colpodella sp. clustered weakly with the apicomplexans, which is consistent with ultrastructural data. Altogether, the exact position of gregarines with respect to Cryptosporidium and other apicomplexans remains to be confirmed, but the congruence of SSU rDNA and beta-tubulin trees with one another and with morphological data does suggest that further sampling of molecular data will eventually put gregarine diversity into a phylogenetic context.

  3. Characterization of the Brain 26S Proteasome and its Interacting Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Hwan-Ching; Besche, Henrike; Goldberg, Alfred L.; Schuman, Erin M.

    2010-01-01

    Proteasome-mediated proteolysis is important for synaptic plasticity, neuronal development, protein quality control, and many other processes in neurons. To define proteasome composition in brain, we affinity purified 26S proteasomes from cytosolic and synaptic compartments of the rat cortex. Using tandem mass spectrometry, we identified the standard 26S subunits and a set of 28 proteasome-interacting proteins that associated substoichiometrically and may serve as regulators or cofactors. This set differed from those in other tissues and we also found several proteins that associated only with either the cytosolic or the synaptic proteasome. The latter included the ubiquitin-binding factor TAX1BP1 and synaptic vesicle protein SNAP-25. Native gel electrophoresis revealed a higher proportion of doubly-capped 26S proteasome (19S-20S-19S) in the cortex than in the liver or kidney. To investigate the interplay between proteasome regulation and synaptic plasticity, we exposed cultured neurons to glutamate receptor agonist NMDA. Within 4 h, this agent caused a prolonged decrease in the activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system as shown by disassembly of 26S proteasomes, decrease in ubiquitin-protein conjugates, and dissociation of the ubiquitin ligases UBE3A (E6-AP) and HUWE1 from the proteasome. Surprisingly, the regulatory 19S particles were rapidly degraded by proteasomal, not lysosomal degradation, and the dissociated E3 enzymes also degraded. Thus the content of proteasomes and their set of associated proteins can be altered by neuronal activity, in a manner likely to influence synaptic plasticity and learning. PMID:20717473

  4. Molecular architecture of the 26S proteasome holocomplex determined by an integrative approach

    PubMed Central

    Lasker, Keren; Förster, Friedrich; Bohn, Stefan; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Villa, Elizabeth; Unverdorben, Pia; Beck, Florian; Aebersold, Ruedi; Sali, Andrej; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is at the executive end of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway for the controlled degradation of intracellular proteins. While the structure of its 20S core particle (CP) has been determined by X-ray crystallography, the structure of the 19S regulatory particle (RP), which recruits substrates, unfolds them, and translocates them to the CP for degradation, has remained elusive. Here, we describe the molecular architecture of the 26S holocomplex determined by an integrative approach based on data from cryoelectron microscopy, X-ray crystallography, residue-specific chemical cross-linking, and several proteomics techniques. The “lid” of the RP (consisting of Rpn3/5/6/7/8/9/11/12) is organized in a modular fashion. Rpn3/5/6/7/9/12 form a horseshoe-shaped heterohexamer, which connects to the CP and roofs the AAA-ATPase module, positioning the Rpn8/Rpn11 heterodimer close to its mouth. Rpn2 is rigid, supporting the lid, while Rpn1 is conformationally variable, positioned at the periphery of the ATPase ring. The ubiquitin receptors Rpn10 and Rpn13 are located in the distal part of the RP, indicating that they were recruited to the complex late in its evolution. The modular structure of the 26S proteasome provides insights into the sequence of events prior to the degradation of ubiquitylated substrates. PMID:22307589

  5. Localization of the regulatory particle subunit Sem1 in the 26S proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, Stefan; Sakata, Eri; Beck, Florian; Pathare, Ganesh R.; Schnitger, Jérôme; Nágy, Istvan; Baumeister, Wolfgang Förster, Friedrich

    2013-05-31

    Highlights: •26S proteasome subunit Sem1 was mapped using cryo-EM and cross-linking data. •C-terminal helix of Sem1 located near winged helix motif of Rpn7. •N-terminal part of Sem1 tethers Rpn7, Rpn3 and lid helical bundle. •Sem1 binds differently to PCI-domains of proteasome subunit Rpn7 and TREX-2 subunit Thp1. -- Abstract: The ubiquitin–proteasome system is responsible for regulated protein degradation in the cell with the 26S proteasome acting as its executive arm. The molecular architecture of this 2.5 MDa complex has been established recently, with the notable exception of the small acidic subunit Sem1. Here, we localize the C-terminal helix of Sem1 binding to the PCI domain of the subunit Rpn7 using cryo-electron microscopy single particle reconstruction of proteasomes purified from yeast cells with sem1 deletion. The approximate position of the N-terminal region of Sem1 bridging the cleft between Rpn7 and Rpn3 was inferred based on site-specific cross-linking data of the 26S proteasome. Our structural studies indicate that Sem1 can assume different conformations in different contexts, which supports the idea that Sem1 functions as a molecular glue stabilizing the Rpn3/Rpn7 heterodimer.

  6. Uncommon functional properties of the first piscine 26S proteasome from the Antarctic notothenioid Trematomus bernacchii.

    PubMed

    Gogliettino, Marta; Balestrieri, Marco; Riccio, Alessia; Facchiano, Angelo; Fusco, Carmela; Palazzo, Vincenzo Cecere; Rossi, Mosè; Cocca, Ennio; Palmieri, Gianna

    2016-01-01

    Protein homoeostasis is a fundamental process allowing the preservation of functional proteins and it has a great impact on the life of the Antarctic organisms. However, the effect of low temperatures on protein turnover is poorly understood and the cold-adaptation of the degradation machinery remains an unresolved issue. As the 26S proteasome represents the main proteolytic system devoted to the controlled degradation of intracellular proteins, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the functions of this complex in the notothenioid Trematomus bernacchii, in order to better understand its role in the physiology of Antarctic fish. To this aim, we purified and characterized the 26S proteasome from T. bernacchii and isolated the cDNAs codifying seven of the 14 subunits belonging to the proteasome 20S core particle. Results provided evidences of the high resistance of the piscine 26S proteasome to oxidative agents and of its 'uncommon' ability to efficiently hydrolyse oxidized bovine serum albumin (BSA), suggesting that this enzymatic complex could play a key role in the antioxidant defense systems in fish inhabiting permanently cold marine environments. These unique properties were also reflected by the 3D model analysis, which revealed a higher structural stability of the piscine complex respect to the murine template. Finally, a comparative analysis, performed in a variety of tissues collected from T. bernacchii and the temperate fish Dicentrarchus labrax, showed a lower protein retention in the cold-adapted fish, possibly due to a better efficiency of its degradation machinery.

  7. Altered epidermal lipid processing and calcium distribution in the KID syndrome mouse model Cx26S17F

    PubMed Central

    Bosen, Felicitas; Celli, Anna; Crumrine, Debra; vom Dorp, Katharina; Ebel, Philipp; Jastrow, Holger; Dörmann, Peter; Winterhager, Elke; Mauro, Theodora; Willecke, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The keratitis–ichthyosis–deafness (KID) syndrome is caused by mutations in the gap junctional channel protein connexin 26 (Cx26), among them the mutation Cx26S17F. Heterozygous Cx26S17F mice resemble the human KID syndrome, i.e. exhibiting epidermal hyperplasia and hearing impairments. Newborn Cx26S17F mice show a defective epidermal water barrier as well as altered epidermal lipid secretion and location. Linoleoyl ω-esterified ceramides are strongly decreased on the skin surface of Cx26S17F mice. Moreover, the epidermal calcium gradient is altered in the mutant mice. These alterations may be caused by an abnormal Cx26S17F channel function that leads to a defective epidermal water barrier, which in turn may trigger the hyperproliferation seen in the KID syndrome. PMID:26070424

  8. Abridged 5S rDNA units in sea beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima).

    PubMed

    Turner, Daniel J; Brown, Terence A

    2005-04-01

    Amplification by polymerase chain reaction of the 5S rDNA repeat units of Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima resulted in a 350-bp product corresponding to the full-length 5S unit, but also revealed 4 abridged unit classes, each with a deletion that removed most of the spacer and 12-76 bp of the coding sequence. Each abridged type lacks at least 1 of the conserved elements involved in transcription of the 5S gene, and so appear to be nonfunctional. Network analysis revealed that the abridged units are evolving in the same manner as the full-length versions.

  9. The phylogenetic position of the pelobiont Mastigamoeba balamuthi based on sequences of rDNA and translation elongation factors EF-1alpha and EF-2.

    PubMed

    Arisue, Nobuko; Hashimot, Tetsuo; Lee, Jennifer A; Moore, Dorothy V; Gordon, Paul; Sensen, Christoph W; Gaasterland, Terry; Hasegawa, Masami; Müller, Miklós

    2002-01-01

    The taxonomic position and phylogenetic relationships of the Pelobionta, an amitochondriate amoeboflagellate group, are not yet completely settled. To provide more information, we obtained sequences for the large subunit rDNA gene, the gene for translation elongation factor 1alpha, and for a large part of the gene encoding translation elongation factor 2 from a representative of this group, Mastigamoeba balamuthi (formerly Phreatamoeba balamuthi). The gene for the large subunit rDNA was unusually large compared to those of other protists, a phenomenon that had previously been observed for the gene encoding the small subunit rDNA. Phylogenetic reconstruction using a maximum likelihood method was performed with these sequences, as well as the gene encoding the small subunit rDNA. When evaluated individually, the M. balamuthi genes for the small and large subunit rDNAs and elongation factor 1alpha had a most recent common ancestor with either the Mycetozoa (slime molds) or with Entamoeba histolytica. A clade formed by M. balamuthi, E. histolytica, and Mycetozoa was not rejected statistically for any of the sequences. A combined maximum likelihood analysis using 3,935 positions from all molecules suggested that these three taxonomic units form a robust clade. We were unable to resolve the closest group to this clade using the combined analysis. These findings support the notion, which had previously been proposed primarily on cytological evidence, that both M. balamuthi and E. histolytica are closely related to the Mycetozoa and that these three together represent a major eukaryotic lineage.

  10. Complete structure of nuclear rDNA of the obligate plant parasite Plasmodiophora brassicae: intraspecific polymorphisms in the exon and group I intron of the large subunit rDNA.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Rieko; Kawahara, Ai; Murakami, Hiroharu; Tanaka, Shuhei; Ezawa, Tatsuhiro

    2011-07-01

    Plasmodiophora brassicae is a soil-borne obligate intracellular parasite in the phylum Cercozoa of the Rhizaria that causes clubroot disease of crucifer crops. To control the disease, understanding the distribution and infection routes of the pathogen is essential, and thus development of reliable molecular markers to discriminate geographic populations is required. In this study, the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) repeat unit of P. brassicae was determined, with particular emphasis on the structure of large subunit (LSU) rDNA, in which polymorphic regions were expected to be present. The complete rDNA complex was 9513bp long, which included the small subunit, 5.8S and LSU rDNAs as well as the internal transcribed spacer and intergenic spacer regions. Among eight field populations collected from throughout Honshu Island, Japan, a 1.1 kbp region of the LSU rDNA, including the divergent 8 domain, exhibited intraspecific polymorphisms that reflected geographic isolation of the populations. Two new group I introns were found in this region in six out of the eight populations, and the sequences also reflected their geographic isolation. The polymorphic region found in this study may have potential for the development of molecular markers for discrimination of field populations/isolates of this organism.

  11. Complete structure of nuclear rDNA of the obligate plant parasite Plasmodiophora brassicae: intraspecific polymorphisms in the exon and group I intron of the large subunit rDNA.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Rieko; Kawahara, Ai; Murakami, Hiroharu; Tanaka, Shuhei; Ezawa, Tatsuhiro

    2011-07-01

    Plasmodiophora brassicae is a soil-borne obligate intracellular parasite in the phylum Cercozoa of the Rhizaria that causes clubroot disease of crucifer crops. To control the disease, understanding the distribution and infection routes of the pathogen is essential, and thus development of reliable molecular markers to discriminate geographic populations is required. In this study, the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) repeat unit of P. brassicae was determined, with particular emphasis on the structure of large subunit (LSU) rDNA, in which polymorphic regions were expected to be present. The complete rDNA complex was 9513bp long, which included the small subunit, 5.8S and LSU rDNAs as well as the internal transcribed spacer and intergenic spacer regions. Among eight field populations collected from throughout Honshu Island, Japan, a 1.1 kbp region of the LSU rDNA, including the divergent 8 domain, exhibited intraspecific polymorphisms that reflected geographic isolation of the populations. Two new group I introns were found in this region in six out of the eight populations, and the sequences also reflected their geographic isolation. The polymorphic region found in this study may have potential for the development of molecular markers for discrimination of field populations/isolates of this organism. PMID:21497131

  12. When molecules support morphology: Phylogenetic reconstruction of the family Onuphidae (Eunicida, Annelida) based on 16S rDNA and 18S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Budaeva, Nataliya; Schepetov, Dmitry; Zanol, Joana; Neretina, Tatiana; Willassen, Endre

    2016-01-01

    Onuphid polychaetes are tubicolous marine worms commonly reported worldwide from intertidal areas to hadal depths. They often dominate in benthic communities and have economic importance in aquaculture and recreational fishing. Here we report the phylogeny of the family Onuphidae based on the combined analyses of nuclear (18S rDNA) and mitochondrial (16S rDNA) genes. Results of Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood analyses supported the monophyly of Onuphidae and its traditional subdivision into two monophyletic subfamilies: Onuphinae and Hyalinoeciinae. Ten of 22 recognized genera were monophyletic with strong node support; four more genera included in this study were either monotypic or represented by a single species. None of the genera appeared para- or polyphyletic and this indicates a strong congruence between the traditional morphology-based systematics of the family and the newly obtained molecular-based phylogenetic reconstructions. Intergeneric relationships within Hyalinoeciinae were not resolved. Two strongly supported monophyletic groups of genera were recovered within Onuphinae: ((Onuphis, Aponuphis), Diopatra, Paradiopatra) and (Hirsutonuphis, (Paxtonia, (Kinbergonuphis, Mooreonuphis))). A previously accepted hypothesis on the subdivision of Onuphinae into the Onuphis group of genera and the Diopatra group of genera was largely rejected.

  13. Polymorphism and recombination for rDNA in the putatively asexual microsporidian Nosema ceranae, a pathogen of honeybees.

    PubMed

    Sagastume, Soledad; del Aguila, Carmen; Martín-Hernández, Raquel; Higes, Mariano; Henriques-Gil, Nuno

    2011-01-01

    Nosema ceranae is currently one of the major pathogens of honeybees, related to the worldwide colony losses phenomenon. The genotyping of strains based on ribosomal DNA (rDNA) can be misleading if the repeated units are not identical. The analysis of cloned rDNA fragments containing the intergenic spacer (IGS) and part of the rDNA small-subunit (SSU) gene, from N. ceranae isolates from different European and Central Asia populations, revealed a high diversity of sequences. The variability involved single-nucleotide polymorphisms and insertion/deletions, resulting in 79 different haplotypes. Two sequences from the same isolate could be as different as any pair of sequences from different samples; in contrast, identical haplotypes were also found in very different geographical origins. Consequently, haplotypes cannot be organized in a consistent phylogenetic tree, clearly indicating that rDNA is not a reliable marker for the differentiation of N. ceranae strains. The results indicate that recombination between different sequences may produce new variants, which is quite surprising in microsporidia, usually considered to have an asexual mode of reproduction. The diversity of sequences and their geographical distribution indicate that haplotypes of different lineages may occasionally be present in a same cell and undergo homologue recombination, therefore suggesting a sexual haplo-diploid cycle.

  14. Radiolaria Divided into Polycystina and Spasmaria in Combined 18S and 28S rDNA Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Dolven, Jane K.; Ose, Randi F.; Klaveness, Dag; Kristensen, Tom; Bjørklund, Kjell R.; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran

    2011-01-01

    Radiolarians are marine planktonic protists that belong to the eukaryote supergroup Rhizaria together with Foraminifera and Cercozoa. Radiolaria has traditionally been divided into four main groups based on morphological characters; i.e. Polycystina, Acantharia, Nassellaria and Phaeodaria. But recent 18S rDNA phylogenies have shown that Phaeodaria belongs within Cerocozoa, and that the previously heliozoan group Taxopodida should be included in Radiolaria. 18S rDNA phylogenies have not yet resolved the sister relationship between the main Radiolaria groups, but nevertheless suggests that Spumellaria, and thereby also Polycystina, are polyphyletic. Very few sequences other than 18S rDNA have so far been generated from radiolarian cells, mostly due to the fact that Radiolaria has been impossible to cultivate and single cell PCR has been hampered by low success rate. Here we have therefore investigated the mutual evolutionary relationship of the main radiolarian groups by using the novel approach of combining single cell whole genome amplification with targeted PCR amplification of the 18S and 28S rDNA genes. Combined 18S and 28S phylogeny of sequences obtained from single cells shows that Radiolaria is divided into two main lineages: Polycystina (Spumellaria+Nassellaria) and Spasmaria (Acantharia+Taxopodida). Further we show with high support that Foraminifera groups within Radiolaria supporting the Retaria hypothesis. PMID:21853146

  15. Radiolaria divided into Polycystina and Spasmaria in combined 18S and 28S rDNA phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Krabberød, Anders K; Bråte, Jon; Dolven, Jane K; Ose, Randi F; Klaveness, Dag; Kristensen, Tom; Bjørklund, Kjell R; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran

    2011-01-01

    Radiolarians are marine planktonic protists that belong to the eukaryote supergroup Rhizaria together with Foraminifera and Cercozoa. Radiolaria has traditionally been divided into four main groups based on morphological characters; i.e. Polycystina, Acantharia, Nassellaria and Phaeodaria. But recent 18S rDNA phylogenies have shown that Phaeodaria belongs within Cerocozoa, and that the previously heliozoan group Taxopodida should be included in Radiolaria. 18S rDNA phylogenies have not yet resolved the sister relationship between the main Radiolaria groups, but nevertheless suggests that Spumellaria, and thereby also Polycystina, are polyphyletic. Very few sequences other than 18S rDNA have so far been generated from radiolarian cells, mostly due to the fact that Radiolaria has been impossible to cultivate and single cell PCR has been hampered by low success rate. Here we have therefore investigated the mutual evolutionary relationship of the main radiolarian groups by using the novel approach of combining single cell whole genome amplification with targeted PCR amplification of the 18S and 28S rDNA genes. Combined 18S and 28S phylogeny of sequences obtained from single cells shows that Radiolaria is divided into two main lineages: Polycystina (Spumellaria+Nassellaria) and Spasmaria (Acantharia+Taxopodida). Further we show with high support that Foraminifera groups within Radiolaria supporting the Retaria hypothesis.

  16. The 26S Proteasome Complex: An Attractive Target for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Frankland-Searby, Sarah; Bhaumik, Sukesh R.

    2011-01-01

    The 26S proteasome complex engages in an ATP-dependent proteolytic degradation of a variety of oncoproteins, transcription factors, cell cycle specific cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, ornithine decarboxylase, and other key regulatory cellular proteins. Thus, the proteasome regulates either directly or indirectly many important cellular processes. Altered regulation of these cellular events is linked to the development of cancer. Therefore, the proteasome has become an attractive target for the treatment of numerous cancers. Several proteasome inhibitors that target the proteolytic active sites of the 26S proteasome complex have been developed and tested for anti-tumor activities. These proteasome inhibitors have displayed impressive anti-tumor functions by inducing apoptosis in different tumor types. Further, the proteasome inhibitors have been shown to induce cell cycle arrest, and inhibit angiogenesis, cell-cell adhesion, cell migration, immune and inflammatory responses, and DNA repair response. A number of proteasome inhibitors are now in clinical trials to treat multiple myeloma and solid tumors. Many other proteasome inhibitors with different efficiencies are being developed and tested for anti-tumor activities. Several proteasome inhibitors currently in clinical trials have shown significantly improved anti-tumor activities when combined with other drugs such as histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, Akt (protein kinase B) inhibitors, DNA damaging agents, Hsp90 (heat shock protein 90) inhibitors, and lenalidomide. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib is now in the clinic to treat multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. Here, we discuss the 26S proteasome complex in carcinogenesis and different proteasome inhibitors with their potential therapeutic applications in treatment of numerous cancers. PMID:22037302

  17. Uncommon functional properties of the first piscine 26S proteasome from the Antarctic notothenioid Trematomus bernacchii

    PubMed Central

    Gogliettino, Marta; Balestrieri, Marco; Riccio, Alessia; Facchiano, Angelo; Fusco, Carmela; Palazzo, Vincenzo Cecere; Rossi, Mosè; Cocca, Ennio; Palmieri, Gianna

    2016-01-01

    Protein homoeostasis is a fundamental process allowing the preservation of functional proteins and it has a great impact on the life of the Antarctic organisms. However, the effect of low temperatures on protein turnover is poorly understood and the cold-adaptation of the degradation machinery remains an unresolved issue. As the 26S proteasome represents the main proteolytic system devoted to the controlled degradation of intracellular proteins, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the functions of this complex in the notothenioid Trematomus bernacchii, in order to better understand its role in the physiology of Antarctic fish. To this aim, we purified and characterized the 26S proteasome from T. bernacchii and isolated the cDNAs codifying seven of the 14 subunits belonging to the proteasome 20S core particle. Results provided evidences of the high resistance of the piscine 26S proteasome to oxidative agents and of its ‘uncommon’ ability to efficiently hydrolyse oxidized bovine serum albumin (BSA), suggesting that this enzymatic complex could play a key role in the antioxidant defense systems in fish inhabiting permanently cold marine environments. These unique properties were also reflected by the 3D model analysis, which revealed a higher structural stability of the piscine complex respect to the murine template. Finally, a comparative analysis, performed in a variety of tissues collected from T. bernacchii and the temperate fish Dicentrarchus labrax, showed a lower protein retention in the cold-adapted fish, possibly due to a better efficiency of its degradation machinery. PMID:26933238

  18. Inhibition of Interjacent Ribonucleic Acid (26S) Synthesis in Cells Infected by Sindbis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Scheele, Christina M.; Pfefferkorn, E. R.

    1969-01-01

    The interrelationship of viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) and protein synthesis in cells infected by Sindbis virus was investigated. When cultures were treated with puromycin early in the course of infection, the synthesis of interjacent RNA (26S) was preferentially inhibited. A similar result was obtained by shifting cells infected by one temperature-sensitive mutant defective in RNA synthesis from the permissive (29 C) to the nonpermissive (41.5 C) temperature. Under both conditions, the viral RNA produced appeared to be fully active biologically. Once underway, the synthesis of viral RNA in wild-type Sindbis infections did not require concomitant protein synthesis. PMID:5817400

  19. Divergent histories of rDNA group I introns in the lichen family Physciaceae.

    PubMed

    Simon, Dawn; Moline, Jessica; Helms, Gert; Friedl, Thomas; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2005-04-01

    The wide but sporadic distribution of group I introns in protists, plants, and fungi, as well as in eubacteria, likely resulted from extensive lateral transfer followed by differential loss. The extent of horizontal transfer of group I introns can potentially be determined by examining closely related species or genera. We used a phylogenetic approach with a large data set (including 62 novel large subunit [LSU] rRNA group I introns) to study intron movement within the monophyletic lichen family Physciaceae. Our results show five cases of horizontal transfer into homologous sites between species but do not support transposition into ectopic sites. This is in contrast to previous work with Physciaceae small subunit (SSU) rDNA group I introns where strong support was found for multiple ectopic transpositions. This difference in the apparent number of ectopic intron movements between SSU and LSU rDNA genes may in part be explained by a larger number of positions in the SSU rRNA, which can support the insertion and/or retention of group I introns. In contrast, we suggest that the LSU rRNA may have fewer acceptable positions and therefore intron spread is limited in this gene.

  20. Near-atomic resolution structural model of the yeast 26S proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Florian; Unverdorben, Pia; Bohn, Stefan; Schweitzer, Andreas; Pfeifer, Günter; Sakata, Eri; Nickell, Stephan; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Villa, Elizabeth; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Förster, Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    The 26S proteasome operates at the executive end of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Here, we present a cryo-EM structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 26S proteasome at a resolution of 7.4 Å or 6.7 Å (Fourier-Shell Correlation of 0.5 or 0.3, respectively). We used this map in conjunction with molecular dynamics-based flexible fitting to build a near-atomic resolution model of the holocomplex. The quality of the map allowed us to assign α-helices, the predominant secondary structure element of the regulatory particle subunits, throughout the entire map. We were able to determine the architecture of the Rpn8/Rpn11 heterodimer, which had hitherto remained elusive. The MPN domain of Rpn11 is positioned directly above the AAA-ATPase N-ring suggesting that Rpn11 deubiquitylates substrates immediately following commitment and prior to their unfolding by the AAA-ATPase module. The MPN domain of Rpn11 dimerizes with that of Rpn8 and the C-termini of both subunits form long helices, which are integral parts of a coiled-coil module. Together with the C-terminal helices of the six PCI-domain subunits they form a very large coiled-coil bundle, which appears to serve as a flexible anchoring device for all the lid subunits. PMID:22927375

  1. Near-atomic resolution structural model of the yeast 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Beck, Florian; Unverdorben, Pia; Bohn, Stefan; Schweitzer, Andreas; Pfeifer, Günter; Sakata, Eri; Nickell, Stephan; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Villa, Elizabeth; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Förster, Friedrich

    2012-09-11

    The 26S proteasome operates at the executive end of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Here, we present a cryo-EM structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 26S proteasome at a resolution of 7.4 Å or 6.7 Å (Fourier-Shell Correlation of 0.5 or 0.3, respectively). We used this map in conjunction with molecular dynamics-based flexible fitting to build a near-atomic resolution model of the holocomplex. The quality of the map allowed us to assign α-helices, the predominant secondary structure element of the regulatory particle subunits, throughout the entire map. We were able to determine the architecture of the Rpn8/Rpn11 heterodimer, which had hitherto remained elusive. The MPN domain of Rpn11 is positioned directly above the AAA-ATPase N-ring suggesting that Rpn11 deubiquitylates substrates immediately following commitment and prior to their unfolding by the AAA-ATPase module. The MPN domain of Rpn11 dimerizes with that of Rpn8 and the C-termini of both subunits form long helices, which are integral parts of a coiled-coil module. Together with the C-terminal helices of the six PCI-domain subunits they form a very large coiled-coil bundle, which appears to serve as a flexible anchoring device for all the lid subunits.

  2. Atomic structure of the 26S proteasome lid reveals the mechanism of deubiquitinase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Dambacher, Corey M; Worden, Evan J; Herzik, Mark A; Martin, Andreas; Lander, Gabriel C

    2016-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is responsible for the selective, ATP-dependent degradation of polyubiquitinated cellular proteins. Removal of ubiquitin chains from targeted substrates at the proteasome is a prerequisite for substrate processing and is accomplished by Rpn11, a deubiquitinase within the ‘lid’ sub-complex. Prior to the lid’s incorporation into the proteasome, Rpn11 deubiquitinase activity is inhibited to prevent unwarranted deubiquitination of polyubiquitinated proteins. Here we present the atomic model of the isolated lid sub-complex, as determined by cryo-electron microscopy at 3.5 Å resolution, revealing how Rpn11 is inhibited through its interaction with a neighboring lid subunit, Rpn5. Through mutagenesis of specific residues, we describe the network of interactions that are required to stabilize this inhibited state. These results provide significant insight into the intricate mechanisms of proteasome assembly, outlining the substantial conformational rearrangements that occur during incorporation of the lid into the 26S holoenzyme, which ultimately activates the deubiquitinase for substrate degradation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13027.001 PMID:26744777

  3. Phylogenetic analyses of four species of Ulva and Monostroma grevillei using ITS, rbc L and 18S rDNA sequence data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhongheng; Shen, Songdong; Chen, Weizhou; Li, Huihui

    2013-01-01

    Chlorophyta species are common in the southern and northern coastal areas of China. In recent years, frequent green tide incidents in Chinese coastal waters have raised concerns and attracted the attention of scientists. In this paper, we sequenced the 18S rDNA genes, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions and the rbc L genes in seven organisms and obtained 536-566 bp long ITS sequences, 1 377-1 407 bp long rbc L sequences and 1 718-1 761 bp long partial 18S rDNA sequences. The GC base pair content was highest in the ITS regions and lowest in the rbc L genes. The sequencing results showed that the three Ulva prolifera (or U. pertusa) gene sequences from Qingdao and Nan'ao Island were identical. The ITS, 18S rDNA and rbc L genes in U. prolifera and U. pertusa from different sea areas in China were unchanged by geographic distance. U. flexuosa had the least evolutionary distance from U. californica in both the ITS regions (0.009) and the 18S rDNA (0.002). These data verified that Ulva and Enteromorpha are not separate genera.

  4. Fragile Sites of ‘Valencia’ Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis) Chromosomes Are Related with Active 45s rDNA

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Hong; Chen, Chun-Li; Miao, Yin; Yu, Chang-Xiu; Guo, Wen-Wu; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiu-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Citrus sinensis chromosomes present a morphological differentiation of bands after staining by the fluorochromes CMA and DAPI, but there is still little information on its chromosomal characteristics. In this study, the chromosomes in ‘Valencia’ C. sinensis were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using telomere DNA and the 45S rDNA gene as probes combining CMA/DAPI staining, which showed that there were two fragile sites in sweet orange chromosomes co-localizing at distended 45S rDNA regions, one proximally locating on B-type chromosome and the other subterminally locating on D-type chromosome. While the chromosomal CMA banding and 45S rDNA FISH mapping in the doubled haploid line of ‘Valencia’ C. sinensis indicated six 45S rDNA regions, four were identified as fragile sites as doubled comparing its parental line, which confirmed the cytological heterozygosity and chromosomal heteromorphisms in sweet orange. Furthermore, Ag-NOR identified two distended 45S rDNA regions to be active nucleolar organizing regions (NORs) in diploid ‘Valencia’ C. sinensis. The occurrence of quadrivalent in meiosis of pollen mother cells (PMCs) in ‘Valencia’ sweet orange further confirmed it was a chromosomal reciprocal translocation line. We speculated this chromosome translocation was probably related to fragile sites. Our data provide insights into the chromosomal characteristics of the fragile sites in ‘Valencia’ sweet orange and are expected to facilitate the further investigation of the possible functions of fragile sites. PMID:26977938

  5. ATP-dependent incorporation of 20S protease into the 26S complex that degrades proteins conjugated to ubiquitin.

    PubMed Central

    Eytan, E; Ganoth, D; Armon, T; Hershko, A

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the ATP-dependent 26S protease complex that degrades proteins conjugated to ubiquitin is formed by the assembly of three factors in an ATP-requiring process. We now identify one of the factors as the 20S "multicatalytic" protease, a complex of low molecular weight subunits widely distributed in eukaryotic cells. Comparison of the subunit compositions of purified 20S and 26S complexes indicates that the former is an integral part of the latter. By the use of detergent treatment to activate latent protease activity, we show that the 20S protease becomes incorporated into the 26S complex in the ATP-dependent assembly process. It thus seems that the 20S protease is the "catalytic core" of the 26S complex of the ubiquitin proteolytic pathway. Images PMID:2554287

  6. S6 Kinase is essential for MYC-dependent rDNA transcription in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Naomi C; Tchoubrieva, Elissaveta B; Chahal, Arjun; Woods, Simone; Lee, Amanda; Lin, Jane I; Parsons, Linda; Jastrzebski, Katarzyna; Poortinga, Gretchen; Hannan, Katherine M; Pearson, Richard B; Hannan, Ross D; Quinn, Leonie M

    2015-10-01

    Increased rates of ribosome biogenesis and biomass accumulation are fundamental properties of rapidly growing and dividing malignant cells. The MYC oncoprotein drives growth predominantly via its ability to upregulate the ribosome biogenesis program, in particular stimulating the activity of the RNA Polymerase I (Pol I) machinery to increase ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription. Although MYC function is known to be highly dependent on the cellular signalling context, the pathways interacting with MYC to regulate transcription of ribosomal genes (rDNA) in vivo in response to growth factor status, nutrient availability and cellular stress are only beginning to be understood. To determine factors critical to MYC-dependent stimulation of rDNA transcription in vivo, we performed a transient expression screen for known oncogenic signalling pathways in Drosophila. Strikingly, from the broad range of pathways tested, we found that ribosomal protein S6 Kinase (S6K) activity, downstream of the TOR pathway, was the only factor rate-limiting for the rapid induction of rDNA transcription due to transiently increased MYC. Further, we demonstrated that one of the mechanism(s) by which MYC and S6K cooperate is through coordinate activation of the essential Pol I transcription initiation factor TIF-1A (RRN 3). As Pol I targeted therapy is now in phase 1 clinical trials in patients with haematological malignancies, including those driven by MYC, these data suggest that therapies dually targeting Pol I transcription and S6K activity may be effective in treating MYC-driven tumours.

  7. S6 Kinase is essential for MYC-dependent rDNA transcription in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Naomi C; Tchoubrieva, Elissaveta B; Chahal, Arjun; Woods, Simone; Lee, Amanda; Lin, Jane I; Parsons, Linda; Jastrzebski, Katarzyna; Poortinga, Gretchen; Hannan, Katherine M; Pearson, Richard B; Hannan, Ross D; Quinn, Leonie M

    2015-10-01

    Increased rates of ribosome biogenesis and biomass accumulation are fundamental properties of rapidly growing and dividing malignant cells. The MYC oncoprotein drives growth predominantly via its ability to upregulate the ribosome biogenesis program, in particular stimulating the activity of the RNA Polymerase I (Pol I) machinery to increase ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription. Although MYC function is known to be highly dependent on the cellular signalling context, the pathways interacting with MYC to regulate transcription of ribosomal genes (rDNA) in vivo in response to growth factor status, nutrient availability and cellular stress are only beginning to be understood. To determine factors critical to MYC-dependent stimulation of rDNA transcription in vivo, we performed a transient expression screen for known oncogenic signalling pathways in Drosophila. Strikingly, from the broad range of pathways tested, we found that ribosomal protein S6 Kinase (S6K) activity, downstream of the TOR pathway, was the only factor rate-limiting for the rapid induction of rDNA transcription due to transiently increased MYC. Further, we demonstrated that one of the mechanism(s) by which MYC and S6K cooperate is through coordinate activation of the essential Pol I transcription initiation factor TIF-1A (RRN 3). As Pol I targeted therapy is now in phase 1 clinical trials in patients with haematological malignancies, including those driven by MYC, these data suggest that therapies dually targeting Pol I transcription and S6K activity may be effective in treating MYC-driven tumours. PMID:26215099

  8. Measuring rDNA diversity in eukaryotic microbial systems: how intragenomic variation, pseudogenes, and PCR artifacts confound biodiversity estimates.

    PubMed

    Thornhill, Daniel J; Lajeunesse, Todd C; Santos, Scott R

    2007-12-01

    Molecular approaches have revolutionized our ability to study the ecology and evolution of micro-organisms. Among the most widely used genetic markers for these studies are genes and spacers of the rDNA operon. However, the presence of intragenomic rDNA variation, especially among eukaryotes, can potentially confound estimates of microbial diversity. To test this hypothesis, bacterially cloned PCR products of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region from clonal isolates of Symbiodinium, a large genus of dinoflagellates that live in symbiosis with many marine protists and invertebrate metazoa, were sequenced and analysed. We found widely differing levels of intragenomic sequence variation and divergence in representatives of Symbiodinium clades A to E, with only a small number of variants attributed to Taq polymerase/bacterial cloning error or PCR chimeras. Analyses of 5.8S-rDNA and ITS2 secondary structure revealed that some variants possessed base substitutions and/or indels that destabilized the folded form of these molecules; given the vital nature of secondary structure to the function of these molecules, these likely represent pseudogenes. When similar controls were applied to bacterially cloned ITS sequences from a recent survey of Symbiodinium diversity in Hawaiian Porites spp., most variants (approximately 87.5%) possessed unstable secondary structures, had unprecedented mutations, and/or were PCR chimeras. Thus, data obtained from sequencing of bacterially cloned rDNA genes can substantially exaggerate the level of eukaryotic microbial diversity inferred from natural samples if appropriate controls are not applied. These considerations must be taken into account when interpreting sequence data generated by bacterial cloning of multicopy genes such as rDNA.

  9. Comparative resistance of the 20S and 26S proteasome to oxidative stress.

    PubMed Central

    Reinheckel, T; Sitte, N; Ullrich, O; Kuckelkorn, U; Davies, K J; Grune, T

    1998-01-01

    Oxidatively modified ferritin is selectively recognized and degraded by the 20S proteasome. Concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) higher than 10 micromol/mg of protein are able to prevent proteolytic degradation. Exposure of the protease to high amounts of oxidants (H2O2, peroxynitrite and hypochlorite) inhibits the enzymic activity of the 20S proteasome towards the fluorogenic peptide succinyl-leucine-leucine-valine-tyrosine-methylcoumarylamide (Suc-LLVY-MCA), as well as the proteolytic degradation of normal and oxidant-treated ferritin. Fifty per cent inhibition of the degradation of the protein substrates was achieved using 40 micromol of H2O2/mg of proteasome. No change in the composition of the enzyme was revealed by electrophoretic analysis up to concentrations of 120 micromol of H2O2/mg of proteasome. In further experiments, it was found that the 26S proteasome, the ATP- and ubiquitin-dependent form of the proteasomal system, is much more susceptible to oxidative stress. Whereas degradation of the fluorogenic peptide, Suc-LLVY-MCA, by the 20S proteasome was inhibited by 50% with 12 micromol of H2O2/mg, 3 micromol of H2O2/mg was enough to inhibit ATP-stimulated degradation by the 26S proteasome by 50%. This loss in activity could be followed by the loss of band intensity in the non-denaturing gel. Therefore we concluded that the 20S proteasome was more resistant to oxidative stress than the ATP- and ubiquitin-dependent 26S proteasome. Furthermore, we investigated the activity of both proteases in K562 cells after H2O2 treatment. Lysates from K562 cells are able to degrade oxidized ferritin at a higher rate than non-oxidized ferritin, in an ATP-independent manner. This effect could be followed even after treatment of the cells with H2O2 up to a concentration of 2mM. The lactacystin-sensitive ATP-stimulated degradation of the fluorogenic peptide Suc-LLVY-MCA declined, after treatment of the cells with 1mM H2O2, to the same level as that obtained without

  10. DNA damage modulates interactions between microRNAs and the 26S proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Tsimokha, Anna S; Kulichkova, Valentina A.; Karpova, Elena V.; Zaykova, Julia J.; Aksenov, Nikolai D; Vasilishina, Anastasia A.; Kropotov, Andrei V.; Antonov, Alexey; Barlev, Nikolai A.

    2014-01-01

    26S proteasomes are known as major non-lysosomal cellular machines for coordinated and specific destruction of ubiquitinylated proteins. The proteolytic activities of proteasomes are controlled by various post-translational modifications in response to environmental cues, including DNA damage. Besides proteolysis, proteasomes also associate with RNA hydrolysis and splicing. Here, we extend the functional diversity of proteasomes by showing that they also dynamically associate with microRNAs (miRNAs) both in the nucleus and cytoplasm of cells. Moreover, DNA damage induced by an anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin, alters the repertoire of proteasome-associated miRNAs, enriching the population of miRNAs that target cell cycle checkpoint regulators and DNA repair proteins. Collectively, these data uncover yet another potential mode of action for proteasomes in the cell via their dynamic association with microRNAs. PMID:25004448

  11. Enhanced rate of degradation of basic proteins by 26S immunoproteasomes.

    PubMed

    Raule, Mary; Cerruti, Fulvia; Cascio, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    Immunoproteasomes are alternative forms of proteasomes specialized in the generation of MHC class I antigenic peptides and important for efficient cytokine production. We have identified a new biochemical property of 26S immunoproteasomes, namely the ability to hydrolyze basic proteins at greatly increased rates compared to constitutive proteasomes. This enhanced degradative capacity is specific for basic polypeptides, since substrates with a lower content in lysine and arginine residues are hydrolyzed at comparable rates by constitutive and immunoproteasomes. Crucially, selective inhibition of the immunoproteasome tryptic subunit β2i strongly reduces degradation of basic proteins. Therefore, our data demonstrate the rate limiting function of the proteasomal trypsin-like activity in controlling turnover rates of basic protein substrates and suggest new biological roles for immunoproteasomes in maintaining cellular homeostasis by rapidly removing a potentially harmful excess of free histones that can build up under different pathophysiological conditions.

  12. Authentication of Curcuma species (Zingiberaceae) based on nuclear 18S rDNA and plastid trnK sequences.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Sasaki, Yohei; Fushimi, Hirotoshi; Komatsu, Katsuko

    2010-07-01

    Curcuma drugs have been used discriminatingly for invigorating blood circulation, promoting digestion, and as a cholagogic in China. However, there is confusion about the drug's botanical origins and clinical uses because of morphological similarity of Curcuma plants and drugs. Comparative sequencing of the 18S rRNA gene in nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and trnK gene in chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) was carried out in order to examine interspecies phylogeny and to identify ultimately Curcuma species. A total of a hundred of accessions of eighteen species were analyzed. This resulted in an aligned matrix of 1810 bp for 18S rDNA and 2 800 bp for trnK. 18S rDNA sequence divergence within the ingroup ranged from 0-0.05%, trnK ranged from 0-0.19%. One base transversion-substituted site (from cytosine to thymine) was observed from the upstream of 18S rDNA at nucleotide position 234 in C. kwangsiensis and Japanese population of C. zedoaria which have separated genetic distance to other Curcuma taxa. Two noncoding regions embedded in trnK intron showed higher variability, including nucleotide substitutions, repeat insertion and deletions. Based on consensus of relationship, eighteen major lineages within Curcuma are recognized at the species level. The results suggest that Curcuma is monophyletic with 100% bootstrap support and sister to the genera Hedychium and Zingiber. The trnK sequences showed considerable variations between Curcuma species and thus were revealed as a promising candidate for barcoding of Curcuma species, which provide valuable characters for inferring relationship within species but are insufficient to resolve relationships among closely related taxa.

  13. Breaks in the 45S rDNA Lead to Recombination-Mediated Loss of Repeats.

    PubMed

    Warmerdam, Daniël O; van den Berg, Jeroen; Medema, René H

    2016-03-22

    rDNA repeats constitute the most heavily transcribed region in the human genome. Tumors frequently display elevated levels of recombination in rDNA, indicating that the repeats are a liability to the genomic integrity of a cell. However, little is known about how cells deal with DNA double-stranded breaks in rDNA. Using selective endonucleases, we show that human cells are highly sensitive to breaks in 45S but not the 5S rDNA repeats. We find that homologous recombination inhibits repair of breaks in 45S rDNA, and this results in repeat loss. We identify the structural maintenance of chromosomes protein 5 (SMC5) as contributing to recombination-mediated repair of rDNA breaks. Together, our data demonstrate that SMC5-mediated recombination can lead to error-prone repair of 45S rDNA repeats, resulting in their loss and thereby reducing cellular viability.

  14. Phylogenetic relationships among diploid Aegilops species inferred from 5S rDNA units.

    PubMed

    Baum, B R; Edwards, T; Johnson, D A

    2009-10-01

    Relationships among the currently recognized 11 diploid species within the genus Aegilops have been investigated. Sequence similarity analysis, based upon 363 sequenced 5S rDNA clones from 44 accessions plus 15 sequences retrieved from GenBank, depicted two unit classes labeled the long AE1 and short AE1. Several different analytical methods were applied to infer relationships within haplomes, between haplomes and among the species, including maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood analyses of consensus sequences, "total evidence" phylogeny analysis and "matrix representation with parsimony" analysis. None were able to depict suites of markers or unit classes that could discern among the seven haplomes as is observed among established haplomes in other genera within the tribe Triticeae; however, most species could be separated when displayed on gene trees. These results suggest that the haplomes currently recognized are so refined that they may be relegated as sub-haplomes or haplome variants. Amblyopyrum shares the same 5S rDNA unit classes with the diploid Aegilops species suggesting that it belongs within the latter. Comparisons of the Aegilops sequences with those of Triticum showed that the long AE1 unit class of Ae. tauschii shared the clade with the equivalent long D1 unit class, i.e., the putative D haplome donor, but the short AE1 unit class did not. The long AE1 unit class but not the short, of Ae. speltoides and Ae. searsii both share the clade with the previously identified long {S1 and long G1 unit classes meaning that both Aegilops species can be equally considered putative B haplome donors to tetraploid Triticum species. The semiconserved nature of the nontranscribed spacer in Aegilops and in Triticeae in general is discussed in view that it may have originated by processes of incomplete gene conversion or biased gene conversion or birth-and-death evolution.

  15. [An intriguing model for 5S rDNA sequences dispersion in the genome of freshwater stingray Potamotrygon motoro (Chondrichthyes: Potamotrygonidae)].

    PubMed

    Cruz, V P; Oliveira, C; Foresti, F

    2015-01-01

    5S rDNA genes of the stingray Potamotrygon motoro were PCR replicated, purified, cloned and sequenced. Two distinct classes of segments of different sizes were obtained. The smallest, with 342 bp units, was classified as class I, and the largest, with 1900 bp units, was designated as class II. Alignment with the consensus sequences for both classes showed changes in a few bases in the 5S rDNA genes. TATA-like sequences were detected in the nontranscribed spacer (NTS) regions of class I and a microsatellite (GCT) 10 sequence was detected in the NTS region of class II. The results obtained can help to understand the molecular organization of ribosomal genes and the mechanism of gene dispersion.

  16. [An intriguing model for 5S rDNA sequences dispersion in the genome of freshwater stingray Potamotrygon motoro (Chondrichthyes: Potamotrygonidae)].

    PubMed

    Cruz, V P; Oliveira, C; Foresti, F

    2015-01-01

    5S rDNA genes of the stingray Potamotrygon motoro were PCR replicated, purified, cloned and sequenced. Two distinct classes of segments of different sizes were obtained. The smallest, with 342 bp units, was classified as class I, and the largest, with 1900 bp units, was designated as class II. Alignment with the consensus sequences for both classes showed changes in a few bases in the 5S rDNA genes. TATA-like sequences were detected in the nontranscribed spacer (NTS) regions of class I and a microsatellite (GCT) 10 sequence was detected in the NTS region of class II. The results obtained can help to understand the molecular organization of ribosomal genes and the mechanism of gene dispersion. PMID:26107907

  17. Differential gene expression in Neurospora crassa cell types: heterogeneity and amplification of rRNA genes. Progress report, July 1980-June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.K.

    1981-01-01

    The significant results obtained during 1980-1981 year of the current research program are as follows: I. Studies on heterogeneity of multiple copies of rDNAs from N. crassa cell types are being continued, such as: (1) Autoradiographs of Southern transfers of EcoR/sub 1/ restricted fragments of nuclear DNA from conidia, germinated conidia (sprouts) and mycelia of N. crassa were compared after hybridization with /sup 32/P-rDNA probe. The nuclear DNA of two hours sprout and of 16 hours mycelia gave similar hybridization patterns with EcoR/sub 1/ digest, but no such hybridization pattern was evident in conidial DNA digest; (2) Procedure for concentration of rDNAs from Neurospora species and cell types was standardized; restriction analysis of purified rDNAs is being done; (3) 35S total rDNA clone, 17S rDNA clone and 26S rDNA subclone are being used to see gross differences in the precursor rRNAs of different cell types; (4) Comparison of DNA:DNA homologies of rRNA genes with different Neurospora species. II. Post-mitochondrial DNAs of N. crassa are found to be rDNA-like and were further characterized by electron microscopic studies and are found to be approximately twice the size of SV-40 DNAs. These N. crassa post-mitochondrial DNAs hybridized with /sup 32/P-labeled N. crassa nuclear DNAs. III. Previous studies on differential RNase sensitive DNA polymerase activity in N. Crassa cell types and on evolution of sexual morphogenesis in the genus Neurospora are completed and published. RNase sensitive DNA polymerase activity is found to be in the post-mitochondrial fraction. Heterothallism in the genus Neurospora is evolved from homothallism.

  18. Secondray structure and sequence of ITS2-rDNA of the Egyptian malaria vector Anopheles pharoensis (Theobald).

    PubMed

    Wassim, Nahla M

    2014-04-01

    Out of the twelve Anophelines present in Egypt, only five species known to be malaria vectors. Anopheles (An.) pharoensis proved to be the important vector all over Egypt, especially in the Delta. Anopheles sergenti proved to be the primary vector in the Oases of the Western Desert, An. multicolor in Faiyoum, An. stephensi in the Red Sea Coast, and An. superpictus in Sinai. Genomic DNA was isolated from single adult mosquito of An. pharoensis (Sahel Sudanese form), PCR was performed to amplify ITS2 region of rDNA using specific primers for 5.8S and 28S rDNA genes. The amplicons were purified, directly sequenced and aligned to the sequence of the same region of An. gambiae, using clustalw2. The length of ITS2-rDNA of An. pharoensis was 411bp. The GC content of the ITS2 reported 53% is consistent with spacer base composition in Anopheles species. The similarity between the two species was 52% and genetic distance was 0.46.Variable simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are found at low frequency. The secondary structure of rDNA-ITS2was predicted by MFOLD and was -192; 60 to-195.32 kilocalories/mole.

  19. Secondray structure and sequence of ITS2-rDNA of the Egyptian malaria vector Anopheles pharoensis (Theobald).

    PubMed

    Wassim, Nahla M

    2014-04-01

    Out of the twelve Anophelines present in Egypt, only five species known to be malaria vectors. Anopheles (An.) pharoensis proved to be the important vector all over Egypt, especially in the Delta. Anopheles sergenti proved to be the primary vector in the Oases of the Western Desert, An. multicolor in Faiyoum, An. stephensi in the Red Sea Coast, and An. superpictus in Sinai. Genomic DNA was isolated from single adult mosquito of An. pharoensis (Sahel Sudanese form), PCR was performed to amplify ITS2 region of rDNA using specific primers for 5.8S and 28S rDNA genes. The amplicons were purified, directly sequenced and aligned to the sequence of the same region of An. gambiae, using clustalw2. The length of ITS2-rDNA of An. pharoensis was 411bp. The GC content of the ITS2 reported 53% is consistent with spacer base composition in Anopheles species. The similarity between the two species was 52% and genetic distance was 0.46.Variable simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are found at low frequency. The secondary structure of rDNA-ITS2was predicted by MFOLD and was -192; 60 to-195.32 kilocalories/mole. PMID:24961025

  20. 18S rDNA dataset profiling microeukaryotic populations within Chicago area nearshore waters.

    PubMed

    Searle, Daniel; Sible, Emily; Cooper, Alexandria; Putonti, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    Despite their critical role in the aquatic food web and nutrient cycling, microeukaryotes within freshwater environments are under-studied. Herein we present the first high-throughput molecular survey of microeukaryotes within Lake Michigan. Every two weeks from May 13 to August 5, 2014, we collected surface water samples from the nearshore waters of four Chicago area beaches: Gillson Park, Montrose Beach, 57th Street Beach, and Calumet Beach. Four biological replicates were collected for each sampling date and location, resulting in 112 samples. Eighty-nine of these samples were surveyed through targeted sequencing of the V7 and V8 regions of the 18S rDNA gene. Both technical and biological replicates were sequenced and are included in this dataset. Raw sequence data is available via NCBI's SRA database (BioProject PRJNA294919). PMID:26904716

  1. 18S rDNA dataset profiling microeukaryotic populations within Chicago area nearshore waters.

    PubMed

    Searle, Daniel; Sible, Emily; Cooper, Alexandria; Putonti, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    Despite their critical role in the aquatic food web and nutrient cycling, microeukaryotes within freshwater environments are under-studied. Herein we present the first high-throughput molecular survey of microeukaryotes within Lake Michigan. Every two weeks from May 13 to August 5, 2014, we collected surface water samples from the nearshore waters of four Chicago area beaches: Gillson Park, Montrose Beach, 57th Street Beach, and Calumet Beach. Four biological replicates were collected for each sampling date and location, resulting in 112 samples. Eighty-nine of these samples were surveyed through targeted sequencing of the V7 and V8 regions of the 18S rDNA gene. Both technical and biological replicates were sequenced and are included in this dataset. Raw sequence data is available via NCBI's SRA database (BioProject PRJNA294919).

  2. [Comparative analysis of rDNA distribution in metaphase chromosomes of Cucurbitaceae species].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan-Hao; Yang, Fei; Cheng, You-Lin; Ma, Lu; Wang, Jian-Bo; Li, Li-Jia

    2007-05-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and double FISH experiments were carried out to ascertain the chromosomal distribution patterns of the 45S and 5S ribosomal DNAs in the three species of Cucurbitaceae. Five pairs of 45S rDNA loci and two pairs of 5S rDNA signals were detected on chromosomes of Cucurbita moschata Duch. Luffa cylindrical Roem. contained five pairs of 45S rDNA loci and one pair of 5S rDNA loci. In Benincasa hispida Cogn., two pairs of 45S rDNA sites and one pair of 5S rDNA site were detected. In this species, 5S rDNA and one pair of the 45S loci were collocated closely in chromosome 7S. 45S rDNA chromosomal distribution patterns were highly conserved among the three species, althoufh their number varied markedly. The 5S rDNA sites on chromosomes among the three species were highly polymorphic. We further discussed differentially evolutionary processes of 45S and 5S rDNA in plant genomes.

  3. Contrasting patterns of evolution of 45S and 5S rDNA families uncover new aspects in the genome constitution of the agronomically important grass Thinopyrum intermedium (Triticeae).

    PubMed

    Mahelka, Václav; Kopecky, David; Baum, Bernard R

    2013-09-01

    We employed sequencing of clones and in situ hybridization (genomic and fluorescent in situ hybridization [GISH and rDNA-FISH]) to characterize both the sequence variation and genomic organization of 45S (herein ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region) and 5S (5S gene + nontranscribed spacer) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) families in the allohexaploid grass Thinopyrum intermedium. Both rDNA families are organized within several rDNA loci within all three subgenomes of the allohexaploid species. Both families have undergone different patterns of evolution. The 45S rDNA family has evolved in a concerted manner: internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences residing within the arrays of two subgenomes out of three got homogenized toward one major ribotype, whereas the third subgenome contained a minor proportion of distinct unhomogenized copies. Homogenization mechanisms such as unequal crossover and/or gene conversion were coupled with the loss of certain 45S rDNA loci. Unlike in the 45S family, the data suggest that neither interlocus homogenization among homeologous chromosomes nor locus loss occurred in 5S rDNA. Consistently with other Triticeae, the 5S rDNA family in intermediate wheatgrass comprised two distinct array types-the long- and short-spacer unit classes. Within the long and short units, we distinguished five and three different types, respectively, likely representing homeologous unit classes donated by putative parental species. Although the major ITS ribotype corresponds in our phylogenetic analysis to the E-genome species, the minor ribotype corresponds to Dasypyrum. 5S sequences suggested the contributions from Pseudoroegneria, Dasypyrum, and Aegilops. The contribution from Aegilops to the intermediate wheatgrass' genome is a new finding with implications in wheat improvement. We discuss rDNA evolution and potential origin of intermediate wheatgrass.

  4. Contrasting patterns of evolution of 45S and 5S rDNA families uncover new aspects in the genome constitution of the agronomically important grass Thinopyrum intermedium (Triticeae).

    PubMed

    Mahelka, Václav; Kopecky, David; Baum, Bernard R

    2013-09-01

    We employed sequencing of clones and in situ hybridization (genomic and fluorescent in situ hybridization [GISH and rDNA-FISH]) to characterize both the sequence variation and genomic organization of 45S (herein ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region) and 5S (5S gene + nontranscribed spacer) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) families in the allohexaploid grass Thinopyrum intermedium. Both rDNA families are organized within several rDNA loci within all three subgenomes of the allohexaploid species. Both families have undergone different patterns of evolution. The 45S rDNA family has evolved in a concerted manner: internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences residing within the arrays of two subgenomes out of three got homogenized toward one major ribotype, whereas the third subgenome contained a minor proportion of distinct unhomogenized copies. Homogenization mechanisms such as unequal crossover and/or gene conversion were coupled with the loss of certain 45S rDNA loci. Unlike in the 45S family, the data suggest that neither interlocus homogenization among homeologous chromosomes nor locus loss occurred in 5S rDNA. Consistently with other Triticeae, the 5S rDNA family in intermediate wheatgrass comprised two distinct array types-the long- and short-spacer unit classes. Within the long and short units, we distinguished five and three different types, respectively, likely representing homeologous unit classes donated by putative parental species. Although the major ITS ribotype corresponds in our phylogenetic analysis to the E-genome species, the minor ribotype corresponds to Dasypyrum. 5S sequences suggested the contributions from Pseudoroegneria, Dasypyrum, and Aegilops. The contribution from Aegilops to the intermediate wheatgrass' genome is a new finding with implications in wheat improvement. We discuss rDNA evolution and potential origin of intermediate wheatgrass. PMID:23741054

  5. Altered gravity influences rDNA and NopA100 localization in nucleoli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, M. A.; Kordyum, E. L.

    Fundamental discovery of gravisensitivity of cells no specified to gravity perception focused increasing attention on an elucidation of the mechanisms involved in altered gravity effects at the cellular and subcellular levels. The nucleolus is the transcription site of rRNA genes as well as the site of processing and initial packaging of their transcripts with ribosomal and nonribosomal proteins. The mechanisms inducing the changes in the subcomponents of the nucleolus that is morphologically defined yet highly dynamic structure are still unknown in detail. To understand the functional organization of the nucleolus as in the control as under altered gravity conditions it is essential to determine both the precise location of rDNA and the proteins playing the key role in rRNA processing. Lepidium sativum seeds were germinated in 1% agar medium on the slow horizontal clinostat (2 rpm) and in the stationary conditions. We investigated the root meristematic cells dissected from the seedlings grown in darkness for two days. The investigations were carried out with anti-DNA and anti-NopA100 antibodies labeling as well as with TdT procedure, and immunogold electron microscopy. In the stationary growth conditions, the anti-DNA antibody as well TdT procedure were capable of detecting fibrillar centers (FCs) and the dense fibrillar component (DFC) in the nucleolus. In FCs, gold particles were revealed on the condensed chromatin inclusions, internal fibrils of decondensed rDNA and the transition zone FC-DFC. Quantitatively, FCs appeared 1,5 times more densely labeled than DFC. NopA100 was localized in FCs and in DFC. In FCs, the most of protein was revealed in the transition zone FC-DFC. After a quantitative study, FCs and the transition zone FC-DFC appeared to contain NopA100 1,7 times more than DFC. Under the conditions of altered gravity, quantitative data clearly showed a redistribution of nucleolar DNA and NopA100 between FCs and DFC in comparison with the control. In

  6. Transformation of tetrahymena thermophila with hypermethylated rRNA genes

    SciTech Connect

    Karrer, K.M.; Yao, M.C.

    1988-04-01

    The extrachromosomal rRNA genes (rDNA) of Tetrahymena thermophila contain 0.4% N/sup 6/-methyladenine. C3 strain rDNA was isolated, hypermethylated in vitro, and microinjected into B strain host cells. Clonal cell lines were established, and transformants were selected on the basis of resistance to paromomycin, conferred by the injected rDNA. The effects of methylation by three enzymes which methylate the sequence 5'-NAT-3'', the dam, EcoRI, and ClaI methylases, were tested. Hypermethylation of the injected rDNA had no effect on transformation efficiency relative to mock-methylated controls. The injected C3 strain rDNA efficiently replaced host rDNA as the major constituent of the population of rDNA molecules. Hypermethylation of the injected DNA was not maintained through 20 to 25 cell generations.

  7. The life cycle of the 26S proteasome: from birth, through regulation and function, and onto its death

    PubMed Central

    Livneh, Ido; Cohen-Kaplan, Victoria; Cohen-Rosenzweig, Chen; Avni, Noa; Ciechanover, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a large, ∼2.5 MDa, multi-catalytic ATP-dependent protease complex that serves as the degrading arm of the ubiquitin system, which is the major pathway for regulated degradation of cytosolic, nuclear and membrane proteins in all eukaryotic organisms. PMID:27444871

  8. Molecular characterization and phylogeny of whipworm nematodes inferred from DNA sequences of cox1 mtDNA and 18S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Callejón, Rocío; Nadler, Steven; De Rojas, Manuel; Zurita, Antonio; Petrášová, Jana; Cutillas, Cristina

    2013-11-01

    A molecular phylogenetic hypothesis is presented for the genus Trichuris based on sequence data from the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 (cox1) and ribosomal 18S genes. The taxa consisted of different described species and several host-associated isolates (undescribed taxa) of Trichuris collected from hosts from Spain. Sequence data from mitochondrial cox1 (partial gene) and nuclear 18S near-complete gene were analyzed by maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods, as separate and combined datasets, to evaluate phylogenetic relationships among taxa. Phylogenetic results based on 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) were robust for relationships among species; cox1 sequences delimited species and revealed phylogeographic variation, but most relationships among Trichuris species were poorly resolved by mitochondrial sequences. The phylogenetic hypotheses for both genes strongly supported monophyly of Trichuris, and distinct genetic lineages corresponding to described species or nematodes associated with certain hosts were recognized based on cox1 sequences. Phylogenetic reconstructions based on concatenated sequences of the two loci, cox1 (mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)) and 18S rDNA, were congruent with the overall topology inferred from 18S and previously published results based on internal transcribed spacer sequences. Our results demonstrate that the 18S rDNA and cox1 mtDNA genes provide resolution at different levels, but together resolve relationships among geographic populations and species in the genus Trichuris.

  9. Organization of ribosomal genes in Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The macronuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of the ciliated protozoan Paramecium tetraurelia (stock 51) was analyzed by digestion with restriction endonucleases. The fragments which contained ribosomal RNA (rRNA) coding sequences and spacer sequences were identified. The spacer sequences exhibited some heterogeneity in size. The genes coding for 5.8S RNA, but not for 5S RNA, are linked to the 17S and 25S rRNA genes. Complementary RNA, synthesized from rDNA of stock 51, was hybridized with restriction digests of whole cell DNA from six other allopatric stocks of this species. The restriction patterns of the rDNA from these seven stocks were, in general, very similar, and the sizes of the coding sequences were identical in all seven stocks. Only the restriction pattern of rDNA from stock 127 differed significantly from that of stock 51. The rDNA from stock 127 was isolated and characterized, and with the exception of the restriction pattern of its spacer, it resembled the rDNA from stock 51. It is concluded that the rDNA repeat in Paramecium, including the spacer, has, in general, been conserved during the course of evolution. It is suggested that in some species, even in the absence of genetic exchange among geographically separated populations, selection pressure may act to conserve spacers of tandemly repeated rDNA. The conservation may be related to the number of rDNA copies in the germinal nucleus. PMID:6244317

  10. Proteomics of the 26S proteasome in Spodoptera frugiperda cells infected with the nucleopolyhedrovirus, AcMNPV.

    PubMed

    Lyupina, Yulia V; Zatsepina, Olga G; Serebryakova, Marina V; Erokhov, Pavel A; Abaturova, Svetlana B; Kravchuk, Oksana I; Orlova, Olga V; Beljelarskaya, Svetlana N; Lavrov, Andrey I; Sokolova, Olga S; Mikhailov, Victor S

    2016-06-01

    Baculoviruses are large DNA viruses that infect insect species such as Lepidoptera and are used in biotechnology for protein production and in agriculture as insecticides against crop pests. Baculoviruses require activity of host proteasomes for efficient reproduction, but how they control the cellular proteome and interact with the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) of infected cells remains unknown. In this report, we analyzed possible changes in the subunit composition of 26S proteasomes of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9), cells in the course of infection with the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). 26S proteasomes were purified from Sf9 cells by an immune affinity method and subjected to 2D gel electrophoresis followed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and Mascot search in bioinformatics databases. A total of 34 homologues of 26S proteasome subunits of eukaryotic species were identified including 14 subunits of the 20S core particle (7 α and 7 β subunits) and 20 subunits of the 19S regulatory particle (RP). The RP contained homologues of 11 of RPN-type and 6 of RPT-type subunits, 2 deubiquitinating enzymes (UCH-14/UBP6 and UCH-L5/UCH37), and thioredoxin. Similar 2D-gel maps of 26S proteasomes purified from uninfected and AcMNPV-infected cells at 48hpi confirmed the structural integrity of the 26S proteasome in insect cells during baculovirus infection. However, subtle changes in minor forms of some proteasome subunits were detected. A portion of the α5(zeta) cellular pool that presumably was not associated with the proteasome underwent partial proteolysis at a late stage in infection.

  11. PCR amplification of 16S rDNA from lyophilized cell cultures facilitates studies in molecular systematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisotzkey, J. D.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr; Fox, G. E.

    1990-01-01

    The sequence of the major portion of a Bacillus cycloheptanicus strain SCH(T) 16S rRNA gene is reported. This sequence suggests that B. cycloheptanicus is genetically quite distinct from traditional Bacillus strains (e.g., B. subtilis) and may be properly regarded as belonging to a different genus. The sequence was determined from DNA that was produced by direct amplification of ribosomal DNA from a lyophilized cell pellet with straightforward polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedures. By obviating the need to revive cell cultures from the lyophile pellet, this approach facilitates rapid 16S rDNA sequencing and thereby advances studies in molecular systematics.

  12. The linked units of 5S rDNA and U1 snDNA of razor shells (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Pharidae)

    PubMed Central

    Vierna, J; Jensen, K T; Martínez-Lage, A; González-Tizón, A M

    2011-01-01

    The linkage between 5S ribosomal DNA and other multigene families has been detected in many eukaryote lineages, but whether it provides any selective advantage remains unclear. In this work, we report the occurrence of linked units of 5S ribosomal DNA (5S rDNA) and U1 small nuclear DNA (U1 snDNA) in 10 razor shell species (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Pharidae) from four different genera. We obtained several clones containing partial or complete repeats of both multigene families in which both types of genes displayed the same orientation. We provide a comprehensive collection of razor shell 5S rDNA clones, both with linked and nonlinked organisation, and the first bivalve U1 snDNA sequences. We predicted the secondary structures and characterised the upstream and downstream conserved elements, including a region at −25 nucleotides from both 5S rDNA and U1 snDNA transcription start sites. The analysis of 5S rDNA showed that some nontranscribed spacers (NTSs) are more closely related to NTSs from other species (and genera) than to NTSs from the species they were retrieved from, suggesting birth-and-death evolution and ancestral polymorphism. Nucleotide conservation within the functional regions suggests the involvement of purifying selection, unequal crossing-overs and gene conversions. Taking into account this and other studies, we discuss the possible mechanisms by which both multigene families could have become linked in the Pharidae lineage. The reason why 5S rDNA is often found linked to other multigene families seems to be the result of stochastic processes within genomes in which its high copy number is determinant. PMID:21364693

  13. The linked units of 5S rDNA and U1 snDNA of razor shells (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Pharidae).

    PubMed

    Vierna, J; Jensen, K T; Martínez-Lage, A; González-Tizón, A M

    2011-08-01

    The linkage between 5S ribosomal DNA and other multigene families has been detected in many eukaryote lineages, but whether it provides any selective advantage remains unclear. In this work, we report the occurrence of linked units of 5S ribosomal DNA (5S rDNA) and U1 small nuclear DNA (U1 snDNA) in 10 razor shell species (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Pharidae) from four different genera. We obtained several clones containing partial or complete repeats of both multigene families in which both types of genes displayed the same orientation. We provide a comprehensive collection of razor shell 5S rDNA clones, both with linked and nonlinked organisation, and the first bivalve U1 snDNA sequences. We predicted the secondary structures and characterised the upstream and downstream conserved elements, including a region at -25 nucleotides from both 5S rDNA and U1 snDNA transcription start sites. The analysis of 5S rDNA showed that some nontranscribed spacers (NTSs) are more closely related to NTSs from other species (and genera) than to NTSs from the species they were retrieved from, suggesting birth-and-death evolution and ancestral polymorphism. Nucleotide conservation within the functional regions suggests the involvement of purifying selection, unequal crossing-overs and gene conversions. Taking into account this and other studies, we discuss the possible mechanisms by which both multigene families could have become linked in the Pharidae lineage. The reason why 5S rDNA is often found linked to other multigene families seems to be the result of stochastic processes within genomes in which its high copy number is determinant.

  14. The linked units of 5S rDNA and U1 snDNA of razor shells (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Pharidae).

    PubMed

    Vierna, J; Jensen, K T; Martínez-Lage, A; González-Tizón, A M

    2011-08-01

    The linkage between 5S ribosomal DNA and other multigene families has been detected in many eukaryote lineages, but whether it provides any selective advantage remains unclear. In this work, we report the occurrence of linked units of 5S ribosomal DNA (5S rDNA) and U1 small nuclear DNA (U1 snDNA) in 10 razor shell species (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Pharidae) from four different genera. We obtained several clones containing partial or complete repeats of both multigene families in which both types of genes displayed the same orientation. We provide a comprehensive collection of razor shell 5S rDNA clones, both with linked and nonlinked organisation, and the first bivalve U1 snDNA sequences. We predicted the secondary structures and characterised the upstream and downstream conserved elements, including a region at -25 nucleotides from both 5S rDNA and U1 snDNA transcription start sites. The analysis of 5S rDNA showed that some nontranscribed spacers (NTSs) are more closely related to NTSs from other species (and genera) than to NTSs from the species they were retrieved from, suggesting birth-and-death evolution and ancestral polymorphism. Nucleotide conservation within the functional regions suggests the involvement of purifying selection, unequal crossing-overs and gene conversions. Taking into account this and other studies, we discuss the possible mechanisms by which both multigene families could have become linked in the Pharidae lineage. The reason why 5S rDNA is often found linked to other multigene families seems to be the result of stochastic processes within genomes in which its high copy number is determinant. PMID:21364693

  15. Male meiosis, heterochromatin characterization and chromosomal location of rDNA in Microtomus lunifer (Berg, 1900) (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Hammacerinae)

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, María Georgina; Bressa, María José; Papeschi, Alba Graciela

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In the present work, we analysed the male meiosis, the content and distribution of heterochromatin and the number and location of nucleolus organizing regions in Microtomus lunifer (Berg, 1900) by means of standard technique, C- and fluorescent bandings, and fluorescent in situ hybridization with an 18S rDNA probe. This species is the second one cytogenetically analysed within the Hammacerinae. Its male diploid chromosome number is 31 (2n=28+X1X2Y), including a minute pair of m-chromosomes. The diploid autosomal number and the presence of m-chromosomes are similar to those reported in Microtomus conspicillaris (Drury, 1782) (2n=28+XY). However, Microtomus lunifer has a multiple sex chromosome system X1X2Y (male) that could have originated by fragmentation of the ancestral X chromosome. Taking into account that Microtomus conspicillaris and Microtomus lunifer are the only two species within Reduviidae that possess m-chromosomes, the presence of this pair could be a synapomorphy for the species of this genus. C- and fluorescent bandings showed that the amount of heterochromatin in Microtomus lunifer was small, and only a small CMA3 bright band was observed in the largest autosomal pair at one terminal region. FISH with the 18S rDNA probe demonstrated that ribosomal genes were terminally placed on the largest autosomal pair. Our present results led us to propose that the location of rDNA genes could be associated with variants of the sex chromosome systems in relation with a kind of the sex chromosome systems within this family. Furthermore, the terminal location of NOR in the largest autosomal pair allowed us to use it as a chromosome marker and, thus, to infer that the kinetic activity of both ends is not a random process, and there is an inversion of this activity. PMID:24260616

  16. Links between nucleolar activity, rDNA stability, aneuploidy and chronological aging in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lewinska, Anna; Miedziak, Beata; Kulak, Klaudia; Molon, Mateusz; Wnuk, Maciej

    2014-06-01

    The nucleolus is speculated to be a regulator of cellular senescence in numerous biological systems (Guarente, Genes Dev 11(19):2449-2455, 1997; Johnson et al., Curr Opin Cell Biol 10(3):332-338, 1998). In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alterations in nucleolar architecture, the redistribution of nucleolar protein and the accumulation of extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA circles (ERCs) during replicative aging have been reported. However, little is known regarding rDNA stability and changes in nucleolar activity during chronological aging (CA), which is another yeast aging model used. In the present study, the impact of aberrant cell cycle checkpoint control (knock-out of BUB1, BUB2, MAD1 and TEL1 genes in haploid and diploid hemizygous states) on CA-mediated changes in the nucleolus was studied. Nucleolus fragmentation, changes in the nucleolus size and the nucleolus/nucleus ratio, ERC accumulation, expression pattern changes and the relocation of protein involved in transcriptional silencing during CA were revealed. All strains examined were affected by oxidative stress, aneuploidy (numerical rather than structural aberrations) and DNA damage. However, the bub1 cells were the most prone to aneuploidy events, which may contribute to observed decrease in chronological lifespan. We postulate that chronological aging may be affected by redox imbalance-mediated chromosome XII instability leading to both rDNA instability and whole chromosome aneuploidy. CA-mediated nucleolus fragmentation may be a consequence of nucleolus enlargement and/or Nop2p upregulation. Moreover, the rDNA content of chronologically aging cells may be a factor determining the subsequent replicative lifespan. Taken together, we demonstrated that the nucleolus state is also affected during CA in yeast.

  17. Cytogenetic analysis and chromosomal characteristics of the polymorphic 18S rDNA of Haliotis discus hannai from Fujian, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haishan; Luo, Xuan; You, Weiwei; Dong, Yunwei; Ke, Caihuan

    2015-01-01

    We report on novel chromosomal characteristics of Haliotis discus hannai from a breeding population at Fujian, China. The karyotypes of H. discus hannai we obtained from an abalone farm include a common type 2n = 36 = 10M + 8SM (82%) and two rare types 2n = 36 = 11M + 7SM (14%) and 2n = 36 = 10M + 7SM + 1ST (4%). The results of silver staining showed that the NORs of H. discus hannai were usually located terminally on the long arms of chromosome pairs 14 and 17, NORs were also sometimes located terminally on the short arms of other chromosomes, either metacentric or submetacentric pairs. The number of Ag-nucleoli ranged from 2 to 8, and the mean number was 3.61 ± 0.93. Among the scored interphase cells, 41% had 3 detectable nucleoli and 37% had 4 nucleoli. The 18S rDNA FISH result is the first report of the location of 18S rDNA genes in H. discus hannai. The 18S rDNA locations were highly polymorphic in this species. Copies of the gene were observed in the terminal of long or/and short arms of submetacentric or/and metacentric chromosomes. Using FISH with probe for vertebrate-like telomeric sequences (CCCTAA)3 displayed positive green FITC signals at telomere regions of all analyzed chromosome types. We found about 7% of chromosomes had breaks in prophase. A special form of nucleolus not previously described from H. discus hannai was observed in some interphase cells. It consists of many small silver-stained nucleoli gathered together to form a larger nucleolus and may correspond to prenucleolar bodies. PMID:25699679

  18. Cytogenetic analysis and chromosomal characteristics of the polymorphic 18S rDNA of Haliotis discus hannai from Fujian, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haishan; Luo, Xuan; You, Weiwei; Dong, Yunwei; Ke, Caihuan

    2015-01-01

    We report on novel chromosomal characteristics of Haliotis discus hannai from a breeding population at Fujian, China. The karyotypes of H. discus hannai we obtained from an abalone farm include a common type 2n = 36 = 10M + 8SM (82%) and two rare types 2n = 36 = 11M + 7SM (14%) and 2n = 36 = 10M + 7SM + 1ST (4%). The results of silver staining showed that the NORs of H. discus hannai were usually located terminally on the long arms of chromosome pairs 14 and 17, NORs were also sometimes located terminally on the short arms of other chromosomes, either metacentric or submetacentric pairs. The number of Ag-nucleoli ranged from 2 to 8, and the mean number was 3.61 ± 0.93. Among the scored interphase cells, 41% had 3 detectable nucleoli and 37% had 4 nucleoli. The 18S rDNA FISH result is the first report of the location of 18S rDNA genes in H. discus hannai. The 18S rDNA locations were highly polymorphic in this species. Copies of the gene were observed in the terminal of long or/and short arms of submetacentric or/and metacentric chromosomes. Using FISH with probe for vertebrate-like telomeric sequences (CCCTAA)3 displayed positive green FITC signals at telomere regions of all analyzed chromosome types. We found about 7% of chromosomes had breaks in prophase. A special form of nucleolus not previously described from H. discus hannai was observed in some interphase cells. It consists of many small silver-stained nucleoli gathered together to form a larger nucleolus and may correspond to prenucleolar bodies.

  19. An atomic model AAA-ATPase/20S core particle sub-complex of the 26S proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Beck, Florian; Nickell, Stephan; Sali, Andrej; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is the most downstream element of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway of protein degradation. It is composed of the 20S core particle (CP) and the 19S regulatory particle (RP). The RP consists of 6 AAA-ATPases and at least 13 non-ATPase subunits. Based on a cryo-EM map of the 26S proteasome, structures of homologs, and physical protein-protein interactions we derive an atomic model of the AAA-ATPase-CP sub-complex. The ATPase order in our model (Rpt1/Rpt2/Rpt6/Rpt3/Rpt4/Rpt5) is in excellent agreement with the recently identified base-precursor complexes formed during the assembly of the RP. Furthermore, the atomic CP-AAA-ATPase model suggests that the assembly chaperone Nas6 facilitates CP-RP association by enhancing the shape complementarity between Rpt3 and its binding CP alpha subunits partners. PMID:19653995

  20. An atomic model AAA-ATPase/20S core particle sub-complex of the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Förster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Beck, Florian; Nickell, Stephan; Sali, Andrej; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2009-10-16

    The 26S proteasome is the most downstream element of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway of protein degradation. It is composed of the 20S core particle (CP) and the 19S regulatory particle (RP). The RP consists of 6 AAA-ATPases and at least 13 non-ATPase subunits. Based on a cryo-EM map of the 26S proteasome, structures of homologs, and physical protein-protein interactions we derive an atomic model of the AAA-ATPase-CP sub-complex. The ATPase order in our model (Rpt1/Rpt2/Rpt6/Rpt3/Rpt4/Rpt5) is in excellent agreement with the recently identified base-precursor complexes formed during the assembly of the RP. Furthermore, the atomic CP-AAA-ATPase model suggests that the assembly chaperone Nas6 facilitates CP-RP association by enhancing the shape complementarity between Rpt3 and its binding CP alpha subunits partners.

  1. An atomic model AAA-ATPase/20S core particle sub-complex of the 26S proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Foerster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Beck, Florian; Nickell, Stephan; Sali, Andrej; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2009-10-16

    The 26S proteasome is the most downstream element of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway of protein degradation. It is composed of the 20S core particle (CP) and the 19S regulatory particle (RP). The RP consists of 6 AAA-ATPases and at least 13 non-ATPase subunits. Based on a cryo-EM map of the 26S proteasome, structures of homologs, and physical protein-protein interactions we derive an atomic model of the AAA-ATPase-CP sub-complex. The ATPase order in our model (Rpt1/Rpt2/Rpt6/Rpt3/Rpt4/Rpt5) is in excellent agreement with the recently identified base-precursor complexes formed during the assembly of the RP. Furthermore, the atomic CP-AAA-ATPase model suggests that the assembly chaperone Nas6 facilitates CP-RP association by enhancing the shape complementarity between Rpt3 and its binding CP alpha subunits partners.

  2. Degradation of oxidized proteins by the proteasome: Distinguishing between the 20S, 26S, and immunoproteasome proteolytic pathways.

    PubMed

    Raynes, Rachel; Pomatto, Laura C D; Davies, Kelvin J A

    2016-08-01

    The proteasome is a ubiquitous and highly plastic multi-subunit protease with multi-catalytic activity that is conserved in all eukaryotes. The most widely known function of the proteasome is protein degradation through the 26S ubiquitin-proteasome system, responsible for the vast majority of protein degradation during homeostasis. However, the proteasome also plays an important role in adaptive immune responses and adaptation to oxidative stress. The unbound 20S proteasome, the core common to all proteasome conformations, is the main protease responsible for degrading oxidized proteins. During periods of acute stress, the 19S regulatory cap of the 26S proteasome disassociates from the proteolytic core, allowing for immediate ATP/ubiquitin-independent protein degradation by the 20S proteasome. Despite the abundance of unbound 20S proteasome compared to other proteasomal conformations, many publications fail to distinguish between the two proteolytic systems and often regard the 26S proteasome as the dominant protease. Further confounding the issue are the differential roles these two proteolytic systems have in adaptation and aging. In this review, we will summarize the increasing evidence that the 20S core proteasome constitutes the major conformation of the proteasome system and that it is far from a latent protease requiring activation by binding regulators.

  3. Comparison of ITS and 18S rDNA for estimating fungal diversity using PCR-DGGE.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Yu, Yaoyao; Cai, Zhang; Bartlam, Mark; Wang, Yingying

    2015-09-01

    Both the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and 18S rRNA genes are broadly applied in molecular fingerprinting studies of fungi. However, the differences in those two ribosomal RNA regions are still largely unknown. In the current study, three sets of most suitable subunit ribosomes in ITS and 18S rRNA were compared using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) under the optimum experimental conditions. Ten samples from both aquatic and soil environments were tested. The results revealed that the ITS region produced range-weighted richness in the range 36-361, which was significantly higher than that produced by 18S rDNA. There was a similar tendency in terms of the Shannon-Weaver diversity index and community dynamics in both water and soil samples. Samples from water and soil were better separated using ITS than 18S rDNA in principal component analysis of DGGE bands. Our study suggests that the ITS region is more precise and has more potential than 18S rRNA genes in fungal community analysis.

  4. ARS5 is a component of the 26S proteasome complex and negatively regulates thiol biosynthesis and arsenic tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Dong-Yul; Kim, Tae-Houn; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2010-01-01

    Summary A forward genetic screen in Arabidopsis led to the isolation of several arsenic tolerance mutants. ars5 is the strongest arsenate and arsenite resistant mutant identified in this genetic screen. Here, we report the characterization and cloning of the ars5 mutant gene. ars5 is shown to exhibit an increased accumulation of arsenic and thiol compounds during arsenic stress. Rough mapping together with microarray-based expression mapping identified the ars5 mutation in the alpha subunit F (PAF1) of the 26S proteasome complex. Characterization of an independent paf1 T-DNA insertion allele and complementation by PAF1 confirmed that paf1 mutation is responsible for the enhanced thiol accumulation and the arsenic tolerance phenotypes. Arsenic tolerance was not observed in a knockout mutant of the highly homologous PAF2 gene. However, genetic complementation of ars5 by over expression of PAF2 suggests that the PAF2 protein is functionally equivalent to PAF1 when expressed at high levels. No detectible difference was observed in total ubiquitinylated protein profiles between ars5 and wild type Arabidopsis, suggesting that the arsenic tolerance observed in ars5 is not derived from a general impairment in proteasome-mediated protein degradation. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that arsenic induces enhanced transcriptional activation of several key genes that function in glutathione and phytochelatin biosynthesis in wild type and this arsenic-induction of gene expression is more dramatic in ars5. The enhanced transcriptional response to arsenic and the increased accumulation of thiol compounds in ars5 compared to WT suggest the presence of a positive regulation pathway for thiol biosynthesis that is enhanced in the ars5 background. PMID:19453443

  5. Growth and developmental functions of a human immunodeficiency virus Tat-binding protein/26S protease subunit homolog from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed Central

    Cao, J G; Firtel, R A

    1995-01-01

    We have characterized a newly identified gene from Dictyostelium discoideum, DdTBP alpha, that encodes a member of the family of eukaryotic proteins. These proteins contain a conserved ATPase domain, include subunits of the 26S protease subunit, and are homologous to the mammalian human immunodeficiency virus Tat-binding protein TBP1. While information indicates that some family members are involved in the regulation of transcription in mammalian and yeast cells during growth, these proteins are also involved in other cellular functions, and nothing is known about their possible function in multicellular development. The Dictyostelium DdTBP alpha gene is developmentally regulated, with its expression at the highest levels occurring during growth and early development. The gene is present in two copies in the genome. Disruption of one copy by homologous recombination leads to aberrant morphogenesis, which lasts from the formation of the first finger until the onset of culmination. The gene appears to be essential for growth since we were unable to obtain a complete null phenotype and since expression of an inducible antisense construct in the partial null background resulted in cell death. Expression of the antisense construct during development accentuated the partial null phenotype and also resulted in very abnormal fruiting bodies. Overexpression of DdTBP alpha from its own promoter leads to very large multinucleated vegetative cells when the cells are grown in suspension culture. When the cells are plated onto petri dishes in growth medium, they rapidly split into multiple cells containing one to two nuclei, in a manner similar to that of wild-type cells. Overexpressing cells are significantly delayed in forming a multicellular aggregate, but development proceeds normally once the first finger stage is reached. The results indicate that DdTBP alpha plays an important role in regulating both growth and morphogenesis in D. discoideum. PMID:7862164

  6. Analysis of Mammalian rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacers

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Annette W.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacers, ITS1 and ITS2, are widely used for eukaryote phylogenetic studies from the ordinal level to the species level, and there is even a database for ITS2 sequences. However, ITS regions have been ignored in mammalian phylogenetic studies, and only a few rodent and ape sequences are represented in GenBank. The reasons for this dearth, and the remedies, are described here. We have recovered these sequences, mostly >1 kb in length, for 36 mammalian species. Sequence alignment and transcript folding comparisons reveal the rRNA transcript secondary structure. Mammalian ITS regions, though quite long, still fold into the recognizable secondary structure of other eukaryotes. The ITS2 in particular bears the four standard helix loops, and loops II and III have the hallmark characters universal to eukaryotes. Both sequence and insertions/deletions of transcript secondary structure helices observed here support the four superorder taxonomy of Placentalia. On the family level, major unique indels, neatly excising entire helices, will be useful when additional species are represented, resulting in significant further understanding of the details of mammalian evolutionary history. Furthermore, the identification of a highly conserved element of ITS1 common to warm-blooded vertebrates may aid in deciphering the complex mechanism of RNA transcript processing. This is the last major group of terrestrial vertebrates for which rRNA ITS secondary structure has been resolved. PMID:24260162

  7. (Cryptic) sex in the microsporidian Nosema granulosis--evidence from parasite rDNA and host mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Krebes, Lukas; Zeidler, Lisza; Frankowski, Jens; Bastrop, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Microsporidia are single-celled, intracellular eukaryotes that parasitise a wide range of animals. The Nosema/Vairimorpha group includes some putative asexual species, and asexuality is proposed to have originated multiple times from sexual ancestors. Here, we studied the variation in the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of 14 isolates of the presumed apomictic and vertically transmitted Nosema granulosis to evaluate its sexual status. The analysed DNA fragment contained a part of the small-subunit ribosomal gene (SSU) and the entire intergenic spacer (IGS). The mitochondrial cox1 gene of the host Gammarus duebeni (Crustacea) was analysed to temporally calibrate the system and to test the expectation of cophylogeny of host and parasite genealogies. Genetic variability of the SSU gene was very low within and between the isolates. In contrast, intraisolate (within a single host) variability of the IGS felt in two categories, because 12 isolates possess a very high IGS genetic diversity and two isolates were almost invariable in the IGS. This difference suggests variable models of rDNA evolution involving birth-and-death and unexpectedly concerted evolution. An alternative explanation could be a likewise unattended mixed infection of host individuals by more than one parasite strain. Despite considerable genetic divergence between associated host mitochondrial haplotypes, some N. granulosis 'IGS populations' seem not to belong to different gene pools; the relevant tests failed to show significant differences between populations. A set of recombinant IGS sequences made our data incompatible with the model of a solely maternally inherited, asexual species. In line with recent reports, our study supports the hypothesis that some assumed apomictic Microsporidia did not entirely abstain from the evolutionary advantages of sex. In addition, the presented data indicate that horizontal transmission may occur occasionally. This transmission mode could be a survival strategy of N

  8. High dynamics of rDNA cluster location in kissing bug holocentric chromosomes (Triatominae, Heteroptera).

    PubMed

    Panzera, Y; Pita, S; Ferreiro, M J; Ferrandis, I; Lages, C; Pérez, R; Silva, A E; Guerra, M; Panzera, F

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we determine by fluorescent in situ hybridization the variability in the chromosomal location of 45S rDNA clusters in 38 species belonging to 7 genera of the Triatominae subfamily, using a triatomine-specific 18S rDNA probe. Our results show a striking variability at the inter- and intraspecific level, never reported so far in holocentric chromosomes, revealing the extraordinary genomic dynamics that occurred during the evolution in this group of insects. Our results also demonstrate that the chromosomal position of rDNA clusters is an important marker to disclose chromosomal differentiation in species karyotypically homogenous in their chromosome number.

  9. Targeting of the human F8 at the multicopy rDNA locus in Hemophilia A patient-derived iPSCs using TALENickases.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jialun; Wu, Yong; Li, Zhuo; Hu, Zhiqing; Wang, Xiaolin; Hu, Xuyun; Wang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xionghao; Zhou, Miaojin; Liu, Bo; Wang, Yanchi; Feng, Mai; Liang, Desheng

    2016-03-25

    Hemophilia A (HA) is a monogenic disease due to lack of the clotting factor VIII (FVIII). This deficiency may lead to spontaneous joint hemorrhages or life-threatening bleeding but there is no cure for HA until very recently. In this study, we derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients with severe HA and used transcription activator-like effector nickases (TALENickases) to target the factor VIII gene (F8) at the multicopy ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus in HA-iPSCs, aiming to rescue the shortage of FVIII protein. The results revealed that more than one copy of the exogenous F8 could be integrated into the rDNA locus. Importantly, we detected exogenous F8 mRNA and FVIII protein in targeted HA-iPSCs. After they were differentiated into endothelial cells (ECs), the exogenous FVIII protein was still detectable. Thus, it is showed that the multicopy rDNA locus could be utilized as an effective target site in patient-derived iPSCs for gene therapy. This strategy provides a novel iPSCs-based therapeutic option for HA and other monogenic diseases.

  10. Phylogeny of coral-inhabiting barnacles (Cirripedia; Thoracica; Pyrgomatidae) based on 12S, 16S and 18S rDNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Simon-Blecher, N; Huchon, D; Achituv, Y

    2007-09-01

    The traditional phylogeny of the coral-inhabiting barnacles, the Pyrgomatidae, is based on morphological characteristics, mainly of the hard parts. It has been difficult to establish the phylogenetic relationships among Pyrgomatidae because of the apparent convergence of morphological characteristics, and due to the use of non-cladistic systematics, which emphasize ancestor-descendant relationships rather than sister-clade relationships. We used partial sequences of two mithochondrial genes, 12S rDNA and 16S rDNA, and a nuclear gene, 18S rDNA, to infer the molecular phylogeny of the pyrgomatids. Our phylogenetic results allowed us to reject previous classifications of Pyrgomatidae based on morphological characteristics. Our results also suggested the possibility of paraphyly of the Pyrgomatidae. The hydrocoral barnacle Wanella is not found on the same clade as the other pyrgomatids, but rather, with the free-living balanids. The basal position of Megatrema and Ceratoconcha is supported. The archeaobalanid Armatobalanus is grouped with Cantellius at the base of the Indo-Pacific pyrgomatines. Fusion of the shell plate and modification of the opercular valves are homoplasious features that occurred more than three times on different clades. The monophyly of the "Savignium" group, comprising four nominal genera, is also not supported, and the different taxa are placed on different clades.

  11. The establishment of species-specific primers for the molecular identification of ten stored-product psocids based on ITS2 rDNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zi-Hua; Cui, Bing-Yi; Li, Zhi-Hong; Jiang, Fan; Yang, Qian-Qian; Kučerová, Zuzana; Stejskal, Václav; Opit, George; Cao, Yang; Li, Fu-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Psocids are important stored product pests found worldwide that can be spread through grain trade. Most stored-product psocids, including eggs, nymphs, and adults, are very small (~1 mm) and difficult to identify morphologically. Here, we collected 10 economically important stored-product Liposcelis spp. psocids (L. bostrychophila, L. entomophila, L. decolor, L. paeta, L. brunnea, L. corrodens, L. mendax, L. rufa, L. pearmani, and L. tricolor) from 35 geographical locations in 5 countries (China, Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, and the United States). The ITS2 rDNA gene was extracted and sequenced. The interspecific genetic distance of the stored-product psocids was significantly higher than the intraspecific genetic distance according to the barcoding gap analysis. Ten pairs of species-specific primers based on the ITS2 rDNA were developed for psocid identification. The sensitivity estimation indicated that the species-specific primers could correctly amplify the target ITS2 gene and successfully identify psocids at 1.0 ng/mL. Additionally, these species-specific primers could quantify specificity and identify 10 stored-product psocids; this approach could also be used to accurately identify other stored-product psocids. This work provides a practical approach for the precise examination of 10 stored-product psocid species and also contributes to the development of an identification method using ITS2 rDNA. PMID:26880378

  12. Hot spots of DNA double-strand breaks and genomic contacts of human rDNA units are involved in epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Tchurikov, Nickolai A; Fedoseeva, Daria M; Sosin, Dmitri V; Snezhkina, Anastasia V; Melnikova, Nataliya V; Kudryavtseva, Anna V; Kravatsky, Yuri V; Kretova, Olga V

    2015-08-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are involved in many cellular mechanisms, including replication, transcription, and genome rearrangements. The recent observation that hot spots of DSBs in human chromosomes delimit DNA domains that possess coordinately expressed genes suggests a strong relationship between the organization of transcription patterns and hot spots of DSBs. In this study, we performed mapping of hot spots of DSBs in a human 43-kb ribosomal DNA (rDNA) repeated unit. We observed that rDNA units corresponded to the most fragile sites in human chromosomes and that these units possessed at least nine specific regions containing clusters of extremely frequently occurring DSBs, which were located exclusively in non-coding intergenic spacer (IGS) regions. The hot spots of DSBs corresponded to only a specific subset of DNase-hypersensitive sites, and coincided with CTCF, PARP1, and HNRNPA2B1 binding sites, and H3K4me3 marks. Our rDNA-4C data indicate that the regions of IGS containing the hot spots of DSBs often form contacts with specific regions in different chromosomes, including the pericentromeric regions, as well as regions that are characterized by H3K27ac and H3K4me3 marks, CTCF binding sites, ChIA-PET and RIP signals, and high levels of DSBs. The data suggest a strong link between chromosome breakage and several different mechanisms of epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

  13. Hot spots of DNA double-strand breaks and genomic contacts of human rDNA units are involved in epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Tchurikov, Nickolai A.; Fedoseeva, Daria M.; Sosin, Dmitri V.; Snezhkina, Anastasia V.; Melnikova, Nataliya V.; Kudryavtseva, Anna V.; Kravatsky, Yuri V.; Kretova, Olga V.

    2015-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are involved in many cellular mechanisms, including replication, transcription, and genome rearrangements. The recent observation that hot spots of DSBs in human chromosomes delimit DNA domains that possess coordinately expressed genes suggests a strong relationship between the organization of transcription patterns and hot spots of DSBs. In this study, we performed mapping of hot spots of DSBs in a human 43-kb ribosomal DNA (rDNA) repeated unit. We observed that rDNA units corresponded to the most fragile sites in human chromosomes and that these units possessed at least nine specific regions containing clusters of extremely frequently occurring DSBs, which were located exclusively in non-coding intergenic spacer (IGS) regions. The hot spots of DSBs corresponded to only a specific subset of DNase-hypersensitive sites, and coincided with CTCF, PARP1, and HNRNPA2B1 binding sites, and H3K4me3 marks. Our rDNA-4C data indicate that the regions of IGS containing the hot spots of DSBs often form contacts with specific regions in different chromosomes, including the pericentromeric regions, as well as regions that are characterized by H3K27ac and H3K4me3 marks, CTCF binding sites, ChIA-PET and RIP signals, and high levels of DSBs. The data suggest a strong link between chromosome breakage and several different mechanisms of epigenetic regulation of gene expression. PMID:25280477

  14. Distribution of Mosquitoes in the South East of Argentina and First Report on the Analysis Based on 18S rDNA and COI Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Nieto, Leonardo M.; Maciá, Arnaldo; Parisi, Gustavo; Farina, Juan L.; Vidal-Domínguez, María E.; Perotti, M. Alejandra; Berón, Corina M.

    2013-01-01

    Although Mar del Plata is the most important city on the Atlantic coast of Argentina, mosquitoes inhabiting such area are almost uncharacterized. To increase our knowledge in their distribution, we sampled specimens of natural populations. After the morphological identification based on taxonomic keys, sequences of DNA from small ribosomal subunit (18S rDNA) and cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) genes were obtained from native species and the phylogenetic analysis of these sequences were done. Fourteen species from the genera Uranotaenia, Culex, Ochlerotatus and Psorophora were found and identified. Our 18S rDNA and COI-based analysis indicates the relationships among groups at the supra-species level in concordance with mosquito taxonomy. The introduction and spread of vectors and diseases carried by them are not known in Mar del Plata, but some of the species found in this study were reported as pathogen vectors. PMID:24098700

  15. [Investigation of bacterial diversity in the biological desulfurization reactor for treating high salinity wastewater by the 16S rDNA cloning method].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Guo; Liang, Cun-Zhen; Yang, Jin-Sheng; Wang, Gui-Ping; Liu, Miao-Miao

    2013-02-01

    The bacterial diversity in the biological desulfurization reactor operated continuously for 1 year was studied by the 16S rDNA cloning and sequencing method. Forty clones were randomly selected and their partial 16S rDNA genes (ca. 1,400 bp) were sequenced and blasted. The results indicated that there were dominant bacterias in the biological desulfurization reactor, where 33 clones belonged to 3 different published phyla, while 1 clone belonged to unknown phylum. The dominant bacterial community in the system was Proteobacteria, which accounted for 85.3%. The bacterial community succession was as follows: the gamma-Proteobacteria(55.9%), beta-Proteobacteria(17.6%), Actinobacteridae (8.8%), delta-Proteobacteria (5.9%) , alpha-Proteobacteria(5.9%), and Sphingobacteria (2.9%). Halothiobacillus sp. ST15 and Thiobacillus sp. UAM-I were the major desulfurization strains.

  16. Assessing diversity of the female urine microbiota by high throughput sequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Urine within the urinary tract is commonly regarded as "sterile" in cultivation terms. Here, we present a comprehensive in-depth study of bacterial 16S rDNA sequences associated with urine from healthy females by means of culture-independent high-throughput sequencing techniques. Results Sequencing of the V1V2 and V6 regions of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene using the 454 GS FLX system was performed to characterize the possible bacterial composition in 8 culture-negative (<100,000 CFU/ml) healthy female urine specimens. Sequences were compared to 16S rRNA databases and showed significant diversity, with the predominant genera detected being Lactobacillus, Prevotella and Gardnerella. The bacterial profiles in the female urine samples studied were complex; considerable variation between individuals was observed and a common microbial signature was not evident. Notably, a significant amount of sequences belonging to bacteria with a known pathogenic potential was observed. The number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) for individual samples varied substantially and was in the range of 20 - 500. Conclusions Normal female urine displays a noticeable and variable bacterial 16S rDNA sequence richness, which includes fastidious and anaerobic bacteria previously shown to be associated with female urogenital pathology. PMID:22047020

  17. Wide occurrence of SSU rDNA intragenomic polymorphism in foraminifera and its implications for molecular species identification.

    PubMed

    Weber, Alexandra Anh-Thu; Pawlowski, Jan

    2014-09-01

    Ribosomal DNA is commonly used as a marker for protist phylogeny and taxonomy because of its ubiquity and its expected species specificity thanks to the mechanism of concerted evolution. However, numerous studies reported the occurrence of intragenomic (intra-individual) polymorphism in various protists and particularly in Foraminifera. To infer to what extent the SSU rDNA intragenomic variability occurs in Foraminifera, we studied 16 foraminiferal species belonging to single-chambered monothalamids and multi-chambered Globothalamea, with one to six individuals per species. We performed single-cell DNA extractions and PCRs of a 600bp fragment of SSU rDNA, and sequenced 9 to 23 clones per individual for a total of 818 sequences. We found intragenomic variability in almost all species, even after excluding singleton mutations. Intra-individual sequence divergence ranged from 0 to 5.15% and was higher than 1% in 11 species. Variability was usually located at the end of stem-loop structures and included compensatory single nucleotide polymorphisms and expansion segments polymorphisms. However, the polymorphisms did not change the secondary structure of the rRNA. Our results suggest a non-concerted evolution of rRNA genes in Foraminifera. The origin of this variability and its implications for species identification in environmental DNA studies are discussed.

  18. Detection of rDNA ITS polymorphism in Rhizoctonia solani AG 2-1 isolates.

    PubMed

    Pannecoucque, Joke; Höfte, Monica

    2009-01-01

    The sequence variability of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer regions ITS1 and ITS2, including the 5.8S gene, was investigated for Rhizoctonia solani isolates of anastomosis group (AG) 2-1. During PCR RFLP analysis of eight isolates, the restriction patterns of four isolates showed an excess of bands after restriction with the enzymes AvaII and/or HincII, which suggested the presence of more than one ITS region. By cloning the ITS region of six isolates sequence heterogeneity was detected in the isolates that showed an excess of bands in the PCR RFLP analysis; up to nine different ITS regions were identified within one isolate. The same level of diversity was found within the same isolate as among isolates. In the phylogenetic tree based on the rDNA ITS sequences of several AG 2-1 isolates, sequences derived from the same isolate did not form distinct clusters, questioning the relevance of further subdivision of heterogeneous AG 2-1 isolates based on the ITS region.

  19. Structural Determinants Involved in the Regulation of CXCL14/BRAK Expression by the 26S Proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Francis C.; Thorpe, Jeffery A.; Harder, Adam; Volkman, Brian F.; Schwarze, Steven R.

    2006-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL14/BRAK participates in immune surveillance by recruiting dendritic cells. CXCL14 gene expression is altered in a number of cancers, but protein expression levels have not been investigated. Here we report that CXCL14 protein can be expressed in primary epithelial cells, however in several immortalized and cancer cell lines this protein is targeted for polyubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation. We determined the NMR structure of CXCL14 to identify motifs controlling its expression. CXCL14 adopts the canonical chemokine tertiary fold but contains a unique five amino acid insertion (41VSRYR45) relative to other CXC chemokines. Deletion or substitution of key residues within this insertion prevented proteasomal degradation. Furthermore, we defined a 15 amino acid fragment of CXCL14 that is sufficient to induce proteasomal degradation. This study elucidates a post-translational mechanism for the loss of CXCL14 in cancer and a novel mode of chemokine regulation. PMID:16987528

  20. The 26S proteasome is a multifaceted target for anti-cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Grigoreva, Tatyana A; Tribulovich, Vyacheslav G.; Garabadzhiu, Alexander V.; Melino, Gerry; Barlev, Nickolai A.

    2015-01-01

    Proteasomes play a critical role in the fate of proteins that are involved in major cellular processes, including signal transduction, gene expression, cell cycle, replication, differentiation, immune response, cellular response to stress, etc. In contrast to non-specific degradation by lysosomes, proteasomes are highly selective and destroy only the proteins that are covalently labelled with small proteins, called ubiquitins. Importantly, many diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases and cancers, are intimately connected to the activity of proteasomes making them an important pharmacological target. Currently, the vast majority of inhibitors are aimed at blunting the proteolytic activities of proteasomes. However, recent achievements in solving structures of proteasomes at very high resolution provided opportunities to design new classes of small molecules that target other physiologically-important enzymatic activities of proteasomes, including the de-ubiquitinating one. This review attempts to catalog the information available to date about novel classes of proteasome inhibitors that may have important pharmacological ramifications. PMID:26295307

  1. Detection and characterization of fungal infections of Ammophila arenaria (marram grass) roots by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of specifically amplified 18s rDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kowalchuk, G A; Gerards, S; Woldendorp, J W

    1997-01-01

    Marram grass (Ammophila arenaria L.), a sand-stabilizing plant species in coastal dune areas, is affected by a specific pathosystem thought to include both plant-pathogenic fungi and nematodes. To study the fungal component of this pathosystem, we developed a method for the cultivation-independent detection and characterization of fungi infecting plant roots based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of specifically amplified DNA fragments coding for 18S rRNA (rDNA). A nested PCR strategy was employed to amplify a 569-bp region of the 18S rRNA gene, with the addition of a 36-bp GC clamp, from fungal isolates, from roots of test plants infected in the laboratory, and from field samples of marram grass roots from both healthy and degenerating stands from coastal dunes in The Netherlands. PCR products from fungal isolates were subjected to DGGE to examine the variation seen both between different fungal taxa and within a single species. DGGE of the 18S rDNA fragments could resolve species differences from fungi used in this study yet was unable to discriminate between strains of a single species. The 18S rRNA genes from 20 isolates of fungal species previously recovered from A. arenaria roots were cloned and partially sequenced to aid in the interpretation of DGGE data. DGGE patterns recovered from laboratory plants showed that this technique could reliably identify known plant-infecting fungi. Amplification products from field A. arenaria roots also were analyzed by DGGE, and the major bands were excised, reamplified, sequenced, and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Some recovered 18S rDNA sequences allowed for phylogenetic placement to the genus level, whereas other sequences were not closely related to known fungal 18S rDNA sequences. The molecular data presented here reveal fungal diversity not detected in previous culture-based surveys. PMID:9327549

  2. Phenotypic assortment in Tetrahymena thermophila: assortment kinetics of antibiotic-resistance markers, tsA, death, and the highly amplified rDNA locus.

    PubMed

    Merriam, E V; Bruns, P J

    1988-10-01

    Phenotypic assortment in Tetrahymena thermophila results from random distribution of alleles during amitotic division of the macronucleus. The rate of assortment is dependent on input ratio and the number of assorting units. The assortment of the antibiotic resistance markers Chx, Mpr and gal was determined and is consistent for each with the model of 45 assorting chromosomes. The gene tsA (previously ts-1) shows normal assortment, in contrast to previous reports. A mutation in the highly amplified ribosomal locus (rdnA2) assorts as if present at only 45 copies. Death of clones occurred at a rate consistent with assortment for a single gene.

  3. Chromosomal localization and characterization of rDNA loci in the Brassica A and C genomes.

    PubMed

    Snowdon, R J; Köhler, W; Köhler, A

    1997-08-01

    Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we located ribosomal DNA loci on prometaphase chromosomes of the diploid species Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea and their amphidiploid Brassica napus. Based on comparisons of chromosome morphology and hybridization patterns, we characterized the individual B. napus rDNA loci according to their presumed origins in the Brassica A and C genomes. As reported in other studies, the sum of rDNA loci observed on B. rapa (AA genome) and B. oleracea (CC genome) chromosomes was one greater than the total number of loci seen in their amphidiploid B. napus (AACC). Evidence is presented that this reduction in B. napus rDNA locus number results from the loss of the smallest A genome rDNA site in the amphidiploid.

  4. Phylogenetic study on Shiraia bambusicola by rDNA sequence analyses.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tian-Fan; Jia, Xiao-Ming; Ma, Xiao-Hang; Lin, Hai-Ping; Zhao, Yu-Hua

    2004-01-01

    In this study, 18S rDNA and ITS-5.8S rDNA regions of four Shiraia bambusicola isolates collected from different species of bamboos were amplified by PCR with universal primer pairs NS1/NS8 and ITS5/ITS4, respectively, and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted on three selected datasets of rDNA sequences. Maximum parsimony, distance and maximum likelihood criteria were used to infer trees. Morphological characteristics were also observed. The positioning of Shiraia in the order Pleosporales was well supported by bootstrap, which agreed with the placement by Amano (1980) according to their morphology. We did not find significant inter-hostal differences among these four isolates from different species of bamboos. From the results of analyses and comparison of their rDNA sequences, we conclude that Shiraia should be classified into Pleosporales as Amano (1980) proposed and suggest that it might be positioned in the family Phaeosphaeriaceae.

  5. ATP-DEPENDENT STEPS IN THE BINDING OF UBIQUITIN CONJUGATES TO THE 26S PROTEASOME THAT COMMIT TO DEGRADATION

    PubMed Central

    Peth, Andreas; Uchiki, Tomoaki; Goldberg, Alfred L.

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells target proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome by attaching a ubiquitin chain. Using a rapid assay, we analyzed the initial binding of ubiquitinated proteins to purified 26S particles as an isolated process at 4°C. Subunits Rpn10 and Rpn13 contribute equally to the high affinity binding of ubiquitin chains, but in their absence ubiquitin conjugates bind to another site with 4-fold lower affinity. Conjugate binding is stimulated 2-4 fold by binding of ATP or the nonhydrolyzable analog, ATPγS (but not ADP) to the 19S ATPases. Following this initial, reversible association, ubiquitin conjugates at 37°C become more tightly bound through a step that requires ATP hydrolysis and a loosely folded domain on the protein, but appears independent of ubiquitin. Unfolded or loosely folded polypeptides can inhibit this tighter binding. This commitment step precedes substrate deubiquitination and allows for selection of ubiquitinated proteins capable of being unfolded and efficiently degraded. PMID:21095592

  6. Mouse homologue of yeast Prp19 interacts with mouse SUG1, the regulatory subunit of 26S proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Sihn, Choong-Ryoul; Cho, Si Young; Lee, Jeong Ho; Lee, Tae Ryong; Kim, Sang Hoon . E-mail: shkim@khu.ac.kr

    2007-04-27

    Yeast Prp19 has been shown to involve in pre-mRNA splicing and DNA repair as well as being an ubiquitin ligase. Mammalian homologue of yeast Prp19 also plays on similar functional activities in cells. In the present study, we isolated mouse SUG1 (mSUG1) as binding partner of mouse Prp19 (mPrp19) by the yeast two-hybrid system. We confirmed the interaction of mPrp9 with mSUG1 by GST pull-down assay and co-immunoprecipitation assay. The N-terminus of mPrp19 including U-box domain was associated with the C-terminus of mSUG1. Although, mSUG1 is a regulatory subunit of 26S proteasome, mPrp19 was not degraded in the proteasome-dependent pathway. Interestingly, GFP-mPrp19 fusion protein was co-localized with mSUG1 protein in cytoplasm as the formation of the speckle-like structures in the presence of a proteasome inhibitor MG132. In addition, the activity of proteasome was increased in cells transfected with mPrp19. Taken together, these results suggest that mPrp19 involves the regulation of protein turnover and may transport its substrates to 26S proteasome through mSUG1 protein.

  7. Hyperfine structure of the 4{f}^{8}5{d}^{2}6s configuration in the Tb atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furmann, B.; Stefanska, D.; Krzykowski, A.

    2016-01-01

    Within this work new experimental results concerning the hyperfine structure (hfs) in the terbium atom are presented. Hfs constants A and B for eight levels belonging to the even-parity configuration 4{f}85{d}26s were determined, based on the results of measurements performed using the laser-induced fluorescence method in a hollow cathode discharge at 18 spectral lines. The configuration 4{f}85{d}26s in the terbium atom was hitherto very scarcely investigated; for seven of the levels examined within this work results concerning the hfs were obtained for the first time. As a by-product, hfs constants for 12 odd-parity levels, involved as upper levels in the transitions investigated, were also determined. A preliminary attempt at a semi-empirical analysis of Tb I hfs on a multi-configuration basis, based on the results of this work, yielded a value of the one-electron {a}6s10 parameter as well as the respective radial integral {< {r}-3> }6s10, which can be compared with the values along the lanthanide elements series reported in the literature. More conclusive results can certainly be obtained once the experimental database for Tb I becomes more extensive.

  8. Downregulation of 26S proteasome catalytic activity promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    van Baarsel, Eric D.; Metz, Patrick J.; Fisch, Kathleen; Widjaja, Christella E.; Kim, Stephanie H.; Lopez, Justine; Chang, Aaron N.; Geurink, Paul P.; Florea, Bogdan I.; Overkleeft, Hermen S.; Ovaa, Huib; Bui, Jack D.; Yang, Jing; Chang, John T.

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) endows carcinoma cells with phenotypic plasticity that can facilitate the formation of cancer stem cells (CSCs) and contribute to the metastatic cascade. While there is substantial support for the role of EMT in driving cancer cell dissemination, less is known about the intracellular molecular mechanisms that govern formation of CSCs via EMT. Here we show that β2 and β5 proteasome subunit activity is downregulated during EMT in immortalized human mammary epithelial cells. Moreover, selective proteasome inhibition enabled mammary epithelial cells to acquire certain morphologic and functional characteristics reminiscent of cancer stem cells, including CD44 expression, self-renewal, and tumor formation. Transcriptomic analyses suggested that proteasome-inhibited cells share gene expression signatures with cells that have undergone EMT, in part, through modulation of the TGF-β signaling pathway. These findings suggest that selective downregulation of proteasome activity in mammary epithelial cells can initiate the EMT program and acquisition of a cancer stem cell-like phenotype. As proteasome inhibitors become increasingly used in cancer treatment, our findings highlight a potential risk of these therapeutic strategies and suggest a possible mechanism by which carcinoma cells may escape from proteasome inhibitor-based therapy. PMID:26930717

  9. Contrasting evolution of a satellite DNA and its ancestral IGS rDNA in Phaseolus (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Almeida, Cícero; Fonsêca, Artur; dos Santos, Karla Galvão Bezerra; Mosiolek, Magdalena; Pedrosa-Harand, Andrea

    2012-09-01

    CC4 is a satellite DNA from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) that is similar to its intergenic spacer (IGS) rDNA. CC4 was originally hypothesized to be an old, fast evolving satellite family that has invaded common bean rDNA. To test this hypothesis and contribute to the understanding of IGS-like satellite DNA evolution, we have investigated its distribution in the genus Phaseolus and related species. CC4 was cloned and used as probe for Southern blot and FISH experiments. CC4 was observed as an independent satellite in common bean, forming two to three major and a few minor pericentromeric clusters. In Phaseolus coccineus, CC4 was present in four major clusters, also not co-localized with the 45S rDNA sites. Remarkably, in the less related species of the genus, signals were detected co-localized with the 45S rDNA sites, but co-localization was not observed in the species where CC4 is present as an independent satellite. No signal was detected in species from related genera. Altogether, the data suggest that CC4 has originated from the IGS rDNA in the P. vulgaris-P. coccineus lineage and has evolved slower than the IGS rDNA from this lineage.

  10. Contrasting evolution of a satellite DNA and its ancestral IGS rDNA in Phaseolus (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Almeida, Cícero; Fonsêca, Artur; dos Santos, Karla Galvão Bezerra; Mosiolek, Magdalena; Pedrosa-Harand, Andrea

    2012-09-01

    CC4 is a satellite DNA from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) that is similar to its intergenic spacer (IGS) rDNA. CC4 was originally hypothesized to be an old, fast evolving satellite family that has invaded common bean rDNA. To test this hypothesis and contribute to the understanding of IGS-like satellite DNA evolution, we have investigated its distribution in the genus Phaseolus and related species. CC4 was cloned and used as probe for Southern blot and FISH experiments. CC4 was observed as an independent satellite in common bean, forming two to three major and a few minor pericentromeric clusters. In Phaseolus coccineus, CC4 was present in four major clusters, also not co-localized with the 45S rDNA sites. Remarkably, in the less related species of the genus, signals were detected co-localized with the 45S rDNA sites, but co-localization was not observed in the species where CC4 is present as an independent satellite. No signal was detected in species from related genera. Altogether, the data suggest that CC4 has originated from the IGS rDNA in the P. vulgaris-P. coccineus lineage and has evolved slower than the IGS rDNA from this lineage. PMID:23050694

  11. [Analysis of DNA homology and 16S rDNA sequence of rhizobia, a new phenotypic subgroup, isolated from Xizang Autonomous Region of China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Su-ying; Yang, Xiao-li; Li, Hai-feng; Liu, Jie

    2006-02-01

    Based on the studies of numerical taxonomy, the seven rhizobial strains isolated from the root nodules of leguminous plants Trigonella spp. and Astragalus spp. growing in the Xizang Autonomous Region of China constituted a new phenotypic subgroup, where wide phenotypic and genotypic diversity among legume crops had been reported due to complex terrain and various climate. The new phenotypic subgroup were further identified to clarify its taxonomic position by DNA homology analysis and 16S rDNA gene sequencing. The mol% G + C ratio of the DNA among members of the new subgroup ranged from 59.5 to 63.3 mol% as determined by T (m) assay. The levels of DNA relatedness, determined by using the DNA liquid hybridization method, among the members of the new subgroup were between 74.3% and 92.3%, while level of DNA relatedness between the central strains XZ2-3 of the new subgroup and the type strains of known species of Rhizobium was less than 47.4%. These results indicated that the new phenotypic subgroup is a DNA homological group different from described species of Rhizobium. Therefore, this new phenotypic subgroup was supposed to be a new species in the genus of Rhizobium since the strains in the same species generally exhibit levels of DNA homology ranging from 70 to 100%. A systematic identification method-16S rDNA gene sequence comparison was carried out to determine the phylogenetic relationships of the new subgroup with the described species of Rhizobium. The GenBank accession number for the 16S rDNA sequence of the central strain XZ2-3 of the new subgroup is DQ099745. The full-length 16S rDNA gene sequence were sequenced by chain terminator techniques and analyzed with PHYLIP. The phylogenetic trees were constructed by using the programs DRAWTREE. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that new subgroup occupy a independent sub-branch in phylogenetic tree. The sequence similarities between the center strain XZ2-3 and the closest relatives, strain R. leguminosarum USDA

  12. Soil clone library analyses to evaluate specificity and selectivity of PCR primers targeting fungal 18S rDNA for denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE).

    PubMed

    Takada Hoshino, Yuko; Morimoto, Sho

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the fungal specificity and detection bias of four fungal 18S rRNA gene (18S rDNA) primer sets for denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). We constructed and compared clone libraries amplified from upland and paddy field soils with each primer set (1, NS1/GCFung; 2, FF390/FR1-GC; 3, NS1/FR1-GC; and 4, NS1/EF3 for the first PCR and NS1/FR1-GC for the second PCR). Primer set 4 (for nested PCR) showed the highest specificity for fungi but biased specific sequences. Sets 1, 2, and 3 (for single PCR) amplified non-fungal eukaryotic sequences (from 7 to 16% for upland soil and from 20 to 31% for paddy field soil) and produced libraries with similar distributions of fungal 18S rDNA sequences at both the phylum and the class level. Set 2 tended to amplify more diverse fungal sequences, maintaining higher specificity for fungi. In addition, clone analyses revealed differences among primer sets in the frequency of chimeras. In upland field soil, the libraries amplified with primer sets 3 and 4, which targeted long fragments, contained many chimeric 18S rDNA sequences (18% and 48%, respectively), while the libraries obtained with sets 1 and 2, which targeted short fragments, contained fewer chimeras (5% and 10%, respectively).

  13. Cytological characterization of sunflower by in situ hybridization using homologous rDNA sequences and a BAC clone containing highly represented repetitive retrotransposon-like sequences.

    PubMed

    Talia, P; Greizerstein, E; Quijano, C Díaz; Peluffo, L; Fernández, L; Fernández, P; Hopp, H E; Paniego, N; Heinz, R A; Poggio, L

    2010-03-01

    In the present work we report new tools for the characterization of the complete chromosome complement of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone containing repetitive sequences with similarity to retrotransposons and a homologous rDNA sequence isolated from the sunflower genome as probes for FISH. The rDNA signal was found in 3 pairs of chromosomes, coinciding with the location of satellites. The BAC clone containing highly represented retroelements hybridized with all the chromosome complement in FISH, and used together with the rDNA probe allowed the discrimination of all chromosome pairs of sunflower. Their distinctive distribution pattern suggests that these probes could be useful for karyotype characterization and for chromosome identification. The karyotype could be subdivided into 3 clear-cut groups of 12 metacentric pairs, 1 submetacentric pair, and 4 subtelocentric pairs, thus resolving previously described karyotype controversies. The use of BAC clones containing single sequences of specific markers and (or) genes associated with important agricultural traits represents an important tool for future locus-specific identification and physical mapping.

  14. Chromosomal localization of 5S rDNA in Chinese shrimp ( Fenneropenaeus chinensis): a chromosome-specific marker for chromosome identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Pin; Zhang, Xiaojun; Li, Fuhua; Zhao, Cui; Zhang, Chengsong; Xiang, Jianhai

    2010-03-01

    Chinese shrimp ( Fenneropenaeus chinensis) is an economically important aquaculture species in China. However, cytogenetic and genomic data is limited in the organism partly because the chromosomes are difficult to isolate and analyze. In this study, fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) was used to identify the chromosomes of F. chinensis. The 5S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) of F. chinensis was isolated, cloned and then used as a hybridization probe. The results show that the 5S rDNA was located on one pair of homologous chromosomes in F. chinensis. In addition, triploid shrimp were used to evaluate the feasibility of chromosome identification using FISH and to validate the method. It was confirmed that 5S rDNA can be used as a chromosome-specific probe for chromosome identification in F. chinensis. The successful application of FISH in F. chinensis shows that chromosome-specific probes can be developed and this finding will facilitate further research on the chromosomes of penaeid shrimps.

  15. Surface water-borne multidrug and heavy metal-resistant Staphylococcus isolates characterized by 16S rDNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Fadime; Orman, Nazlı; Serim, Gamze; Kochan, Ceren; Ergene, Aysun; Icgen, Bulent

    2013-12-01

    Four Staphylococcus isolates having both multidrug- and multimetal-resistant ability were isolated from surface water. Further identification of the isolates was obtained through biochemical tests and 16S rDNA gene sequencing. One methicillin-resistant and two methicillin-sensitive isolates were determined as Staphylococcus aureus. The other isolate was identified as Staphylococcus warneri. The antibiotic and heavy metal resistance profiles of the Staphylococcus isolates were determined by using 26 antibiotics and 17 heavy metals. S. aureus isolates displayed resistance to most of the β-lactam antibiotics tested. All Staphylococcus isolates were resistant to heavy metals including silver, lithium, and barium. Due to a possible health risk of these pathogenic bacteria, a need exists for an accurate assessment of their acquired resistance to multiple drugs and metals.

  16. Non-Random Distribution of 5S rDNA Sites and Its Association with 45S rDNA in Plant Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Roa, Fernando; Guerra, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    5S and 45S rDNA sites are the best mapped chromosome regions in eukaryotic chromosomes. In this work, a database was built gathering information about the position and number of 5S rDNA sites in 784 plant species, aiming to identify patterns of distribution along the chromosomes and its correlation with the position of 45S rDNA sites. Data revealed that in most karyotypes (54.5%, including polyploids) two 5S rDNA sites (a single pair) are present, with 58.7% of all sites occurring in the short arm, mainly in the proximal region. In karyotypes of angiosperms with only 1 pair of sites (single sites) they are mostly found in the proximal region (52.0%), whereas in karyotypes with multiple sites the location varies according to the average chromosome size. Karyotypes with multiple sites and small chromosomes (<3 µm) often display proximal sites, while medium-sized (between 3 and 6 µm) and large chromosomes (>6 µm) more commonly show terminal or interstitial sites. In species with holokinetic chromosomes, the modal value of sites per karyotype was also 2, but they were found mainly in a terminal position. Adjacent 5S and 45S rDNA sites were often found in the short arm, reflecting the preferential distribution of both sites in this arm. The high frequency of genera with at least 1 species with adjacent 5S and 45S sites reveals that this association appeared several times during angiosperm evolution, but it has been maintained only rarely as the dominant array in plant genera.

  17. In β-actin knockouts, epigenetic reprogramming and rDNA transcription inactivation lead to growth and proliferation defects.

    PubMed

    Almuzzaini, Bader; Sarshad, Aishe A; Rahmanto, Aldwin S; Hansson, Magnus L; Von Euler, Anne; Sangfelt, Olle; Visa, Neus; Farrants, Ann-Kristin Östlund; Percipalle, Piergiorgio

    2016-08-01

    Actin and nuclear myosin 1 (NM1) are regulators of transcription and chromatin organization. Using a genome-wide approach, we report here that β-actin binds intergenic and genic regions across the mammalian genome, associated with both protein-coding and rRNA genes. Within the rDNA, the distribution of β-actin correlated with NM1 and the other subunits of the B-WICH complex, WSTF and SNF2h. In β-actin(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), we found that rRNA synthesis levels decreased concomitantly with drops in RNA polymerase I (Pol I) and NM1 occupancies across the rRNA gene. Reintroduction of wild-type β-actin, in contrast to mutated forms with polymerization defects, efficiently rescued rRNA synthesis underscoring the direct role for a polymerization-competent form of β-actin in Pol I transcription. The rRNA synthesis defects in the β-actin(-/-) MEFs are a consequence of epigenetic reprogramming with up-regulation of the repressive mark H3K4me1 (monomethylation of lys4 on histone H3) and enhanced chromatin compaction at promoter-proximal enhancer (T0 sequence), which disturb binding of the transcription factor TTF1. We propose a novel genome-wide mechanism where the polymerase-associated β-actin synergizes with NM1 to coordinate permissive chromatin with Pol I transcription, cell growth, and proliferation.-Almuzzaini, B., Sarshad, A. A. , Rahmanto, A. S., Hansson, M. L., Von Euler, A., Sangfelt, O., Visa, N., Farrants, A.-K. Ö., Percipalle, P. In β-actin knockouts, epigenetic reprogramming and rDNA transcription inactivation lead to growth and proliferation defects.

  18. Ca2O3Fe2.6S2: an antiferromagnetic Mott insulator at proximity to bad metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Han; Wu, Xiaozhi; Li, Dandan; Jin, Shifeng; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Tao; Lin, Zhiping; Shen, Shijie; Yuan, Duanduan; Chen, Xiaolong

    2016-04-01

    We report here the first layered iron oxychalcogenide Ca2O3Fe2.6S2 that contains both planar [Ca2FeO2]2+ and [Fe2OS2]2- layers with the shortest Fe-Fe bond length. This compound is a narrow band gap (~0.073 eV) Mott insulator. The observed antiferromagnetic (AFM) transition at 77 K is due to the ordered Fe vacancies, which can be suppressed by partial substitution of Se for S. We show that the vacancy-free phase Ca2O3Fe3S2 may become a metal with moderate electron correlation comparable to the parent compound LaOFeAs of corresponding superconductors. Our results imply that iron oxychalcogenide can be converted from an AFM Mott insulator into a bad metal like iron pnictides through Fe-Fe bond length shrinking.

  19. 26S Proteasome regulation of Ankrd1/CARP in adult rat ventricular myocytes and human microvascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Samaras, Susan E.; Chen, Billy; Koch, Stephen R.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Lim, Chee Chew; Davidson, Jeffrey M.

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 26S proteasome regulates Ankrd1 levels in cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ankrd1 protein degrades 60-fold faster in endothelial cells than cardiomyocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential degradation appears related to nuclear vs. sarcolemmal localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endothelial cell density shows uncoupling of Ankrd1 mRNA and protein levels. -- Abstract: Ankyrin repeat domain 1 protein (Ankrd1), also known as cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP), increases dramatically after tissue injury, and its overexpression improves aspects of wound healing. Reports that Ankrd1/CARP protein stability may affect cardiovascular organization, together with our findings that the protein is crucial to stability of the cardiomyocyte sarcomere and increased in wound healing, led us to compare the contribution of Ankrd1/CARP stability to its abundance. We found that the 26S proteasome is the dominant regulator of Ankrd1/CARP degradation, and that Ankrd1/CARP half-life is significantly longer in cardiomyocytes (h) than endothelial cells (min). In addition, higher endothelial cell density decreased the abundance of the protein without affecting steady state mRNA levels. Taken together, our data and that of others indicate that Ankrd1/CARP is highly regulated at multiple levels of its expression. The striking difference in protein half-life between a muscle and a non-muscle cell type suggests that post-translational proteolysis is correlated with the predominantly structural versus regulatory role of the protein in the two cell types.

  20. Patterns of rDNA and telomeric sequences diversification: contribution to repetitive DNA organization in Phyllostomidae bats.

    PubMed

    Calixto, Merilane da Silva; de Andrade, Izaquiel Santos; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti; Santos, Neide; Martins, Cesar; Loreto, Vilma; de Souza, Maria José

    2014-02-01

    Chromosomal organization and the evolution of genome architecture can be investigated by physical mapping of the genes for 45S and 5S ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs) and by the analysis of telomeric sequences. We studied 12 species of bats belonging to four subfamilies of the family Phyllostomidae in order to correlate patterns of distribution of heterochromatin and the multigene families for rDNA. The number of clusters for 45S gene ranged from one to three pairs, with exclusively location in autosomes, except for Carollia perspicillata that had in X chromosome. The 5S gene all the species studied had only one site located on an autosomal pair. In no species the 45S and 5S genes collocated. The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probe for telomeric sequences revealed fluorescence on all telomeres in all species, except in Carollia perspicillata. Non-telomeric sites in the pericentromeric region of the chromosomes were observed in most species, ranged from one to 12 pairs. Most interstitial telomeric sequences were coincident with heterochromatic regions. The results obtained in the present work indicate that different evolutionary mechanisms are acting in Phyllostomidae genome architecture, as well as the occurrence of Robertsonian fusion during the chromosomal evolution of bats without a loss of telomeric sequences. These data contribute to understanding the organization of multigene families and telomeric sequences on bat genome as well as the chromosomal evolutionary history of Phyllostomidae bats.

  1. Unequal exchanges and the coevolution of X and Y rDNA arrays in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Coen, E S; Dover, G A

    1983-07-01

    We have examined the molecular basis of the response of individuals of D. melanogaster to artificial selection for high and low abdominal bristles. By monitoring the fate of particular rDNA spacer length variants associated with individually isolated X and Y chromosomes, we show that flies from the low bristle number selection lines have undergone an unequal exchange between the X and Y rDNA arrays. Such exchanges result in translocations between X and Y chromosomes, visualised as X.Y compound chromosomes at mitosis. Transfer of few copies of a length variant between X and Y indicates a clustering of variants. Flies that have reverted back to wild-type seemingly have undergone a second unequal exchange, giving rise to a compound X.Y chromosome containing Y rDNA of normal amounts. Unequal exchanges between X and Y rDNA arrays could contribute to the observed coevolution of rDNA sequences on these chromosomes. The biological significance of this outcome is discussed.

  2. Heterothallic species of neurospora are distinguishable by restriction analysis of their nuclear rDNA sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, C.; Dutta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    Restriction analysis of rDNAs was used to distinguish nuclear rDNA's of three different reference strains of heterothallic species of the genus Neurospora: N. crassa 74A (FGSC number987), N. intermedia P420 (FGSC number2316), and N. sitophila 10B (FGSC number580). Two approaches were adopted: (1) Nuclear DNA's of these three Neurospora species were treated with various restriction enzymes. Against the streaks of nuclear DNAs on the 0.7% agarose gels background bands were visible. These background bands are visible because rDNA sequences of Neurospora species exist in multiple copies within the nuclear DNA's. (2) The second approach was comparison of auto-radiographs of hybrid molecules of Southern blot transfers of restricted nuclear DNAs and /sup 32/P-labelled nick translated rDNA's (referred to as rDNA probe) isolated from N. crassa slime mutant (FGSC number1118), rDNA cloned into pBR322. A summary of restricted fragment sizes as seen in the gels and in autoradiographs of Southern blots of the respective gels is presented.

  3. Analysis of the unexplored features of rrs (16S rDNA) of the Genus Clostridium

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bacterial taxonomy and phylogeny based on rrs (16S rDNA) sequencing is being vigorously pursued. In fact, it has been stated that novel biological findings are driven by comparison and integration of massive data sets. In spite of a large reservoir of rrs sequencing data of 1,237,963 entries, this analysis invariably needs supplementation with other genes. The need is to divide the genetic variability within a taxa or genus at their rrs phylogenetic boundaries and to discover those fundamental features, which will enable the bacteria to naturally fall within them. Within the large bacterial community, Clostridium represents a large genus of around 110 species of significant biotechnological and medical importance. Certain Clostridium strains produce some of the deadliest toxins, which cause heavy economic losses. We have targeted this genus because of its high genetic diversity, which does not allow accurate typing with the available molecular methods. Results Seven hundred sixty five rrs sequences (> 1200 nucleotides, nts) belonging to 110 Clostridium species were analyzed. On the basis of 404 rrs sequences belonging to 15 Clostridium species, we have developed species specific: (i) phylogenetic framework, (ii) signatures (30 nts) and (iii) in silico restriction enzyme (14 Type II REs) digestion patterns. These tools allowed: (i) species level identification of 95 Clostridium sp. which are presently classified up to genus level, (ii) identification of 84 novel Clostridium spp. and (iii) potential reduction in the number of Clostridium species represented by small populations. Conclusions This integrated approach is quite sensitive and can be easily extended as a molecular tool for diagnostic and taxonomic identification of any microbe of importance to food industries and health services. Since rapid and correct identification allows quicker diagnosis and consequently treatment as well, it is likely to lead to reduction in economic losses and mortality

  4. Paenibacillus larvae 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions: DNA fingerprinting and characterization.

    PubMed

    Dingman, Douglas W

    2012-07-01

    Paenibacillus larvae is the causative agent of American foulbrood in honey bee (Apis mellifera) larvae. PCR amplification of the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, and agarose gel electrophoresis of the amplified DNA, was performed using genomic DNA collected from 134 P. larvae strains isolated in Connecticut, six Northern Regional Research Laboratory stock strains, four strains isolated in Argentina, and one strain isolated in Chile. Following electrophoresis of amplified DNA, all isolates exhibited a common migratory profile (i.e., ITS-PCR fingerprint pattern) of six DNA bands. This profile represented a unique ITS-PCR DNA fingerprint that was useful as a fast, simple, and accurate procedure for identification of P. larvae. Digestion of ITS-PCR amplified DNA, using mung bean nuclease prior to electrophoresis, characterized only three of the six electrophoresis bands as homoduplex DNA and indicating three true ITS regions. These three ITS regions, DNA migratory band sizes of 915, 1010, and 1474 bp, signify a minimum of three types of rrn operons within P. larvae. DNA sequence analysis of ITS region DNA, using P. larvae NRRL B-3553, identified the 3' terminal nucleotides of the 16S rRNA gene, 5' terminal nucleotides of the 23S rRNA gene, and the complete DNA sequences of the 5S rRNA, tRNA(ala), and tRNA(ile) genes. Gene organization within the three rrn operon types was 16S-23S, 16S-tRNA(ala)-23S, and l6S-5S-tRNA(ile)-tRNA(ala)-23S and these operons were named rrnA, rrnF, and rrnG, respectively. The 23S rRNA gene was shown by I-CeuI digestion and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of genomic DNA to be present as seven copies. This was suggestive of seven rrn operon copies within the P. larvae genome. Investigation of the 16S-23S rDNA regions of this bacterium has aided the development of a diagnostic procedure and has helped genomic mapping investigations via characterization of the ITS regions.

  5. Phylogeny and genetic diversity of Bridgeoporus nobilissimus inferred using mitochondrial and nuclear rDNA sequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Redberg, G.L.; Hibbett, D.S.; Ammirati, J.F.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    The genetic diversity and phylogeny of Bridgeoporus nobilissimus have been analyzed. DNA was extracted from spores collected from individual fruiting bodies representing six geographically distinct populations in Oregon and Washington. Spore samples collected contained low levels of bacteria, yeast and a filamentous fungal species. Using taxon-specific PCR primers, it was possible to discriminate among rDNA from bacteria, yeast, a filamentous associate and B. nobilissimus. Nuclear rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region sequences of B. nobilissimus were compared among individuals representing six populations and were found to have less than 2% variation. These sequences also were used to design dual and nested PCR primers for B. nobilissimus-specific amplification. Mitochondrial small-subunit rDNA sequences were used in a phylogenetic analysis that placed B. nobilissimus in the hymenochaetoid clade, where it was associated with Oxyporus and Schizopora.

  6. Differentiation of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and A. thiooxidans strains based on 16S-23S rDNA spacer polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Bergamo, Rogério F; Novo, Maria Teresa M; Veríssimo, Ricardo V; Paulino, Luciana C; Stoppe, Nancy C; Sato, Maria Inês Z; Manfio, Gilson P; Prado, Paulo Inácio; Garcia, Oswaldo; Ottoboni, Laura M M

    2004-09-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and sequence analyses of the PCR-amplified 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (ITS) were used for differentiating Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans strains from other related acidithiobacilli, including A. ferrooxidans and A. caldus. RFLP fingerprints obtained with AluI, DdeI, HaeIII, HinfI and MspI enabled the differentiation of all Acidithiobacillus reference strains into species groups. The A. thiooxidans strains investigated (metal mine isolates) yielded identical RFLP patterns to the A. thiooxidans type strain (ATCC 19377(T)), except for strain DAMS, which had a distinct pattern for all enzymes tested. Fourteen A. ferrooxidans mine strains were assigned to 3 RFLP groups, the majority of which were grouped with A. ferrooxidans ATCC 23270(T). The spacer region of one representative strain from each of the RFLP groups obtained was subjected to sequence analysis, in addition to eleven additional A. thiooxidans strains isolated from sediment and water samples, and A. caldus DSM 8584(T). The tRNA(IIe) and tRNA(Ala) genes, present in all strains analyzed, showed high sequence similarity. Phylogenetic analysis of the ITS sequences differentiated all three Acidithiobacillus species. Inter- and infraspecific genetic variations detected were mainly due to the size and sequence polymorphism of the ITS3 region. Mantel tests showed no significant correlation between ITS sequence similarity and the geographical origin of strains. The results showed that the 16S-23S rDNA spacer region is a useful target for the development of molecular-based methods aimed at the detection, rapid differentiation and identification of acidithiobacilli.

  7. Morphology and 18S rDNA of Henneguya gurlei (Myxosporea) from Ameiurus nebulosus (Siluriformes) in North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iwanowicz, L.R.; Iwanowicz, D.D.; Pote, L.M.; Blazer, V.S.; Schill, W.B.

    2008-01-01

    Henneguya gurlei was isolated from Ameiurus nebulosus captured in North Carolina and redescribed using critical morphological features and 18S small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rDNA) gene sequence. Plasmodia are white, spherical, or subspherical, occur in clusters, measure up to 1.8 mm in length, and are located on the dorsal, pectoral, and anal fins. Histologically, plasmodia are located in the dermis and subdermally, and the larger cysts disrupt the melanocyte pigment layer. The spore body is lanceolate, 18.2 ?? 0.3 ??m (range 15.7-20.3) in length, and 5.4 ?? 0.1 ??m (range 3.8-6.1) in width in valvular view. The caudal appendages are 41.1 ?? 1.1 ??m (range 34.0-49.7) in length. Polar capsules are pyriform and of unequal size. The longer polar capsule measures 6.2 ?? 0.1 ??m (range 5.48-7.06), while the shorter is 5.7 ?? 0.1 ??m (range 4.8-6.4) in length. Polar capsule width is 1.2 ?? 0.03 ??m (range 1.0-1.54). The total length of the spore is 60.9 ?? 1.2 ??m (range 48.7-68.5). Morphologically, this species is similar to other species of Henneguya that are known to infect ictalurids. Based on SSU rDNA sequences, this species is most closely related to H. exilis and H. ictaluri, which infect Ictalurus punctatus. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2008.

  8. The evolution pattern of rDNA ITS in Avena and phylogenetic relationship of the Avena species (Poaceae: Aveneae).

    PubMed

    Peng, Yuan-Ying; Baum, Bernard R; Ren, Chang-Zhong; Jiang, Qian-Tao; Chen, Guo-Yue; Zheng, You-Liang; Wei, Yu-Ming

    2010-10-01

    Ribosomal ITS sequences are commonly used for phylogenetic reconstruction because they are included in rDNA repeats, and these repeats often undergo rapid concerted evolution within and between arrays. Therefore, the rDNA ITS copies appear to be virtually identical and can sometimes be treated as a single gene. In this paper we examined ITS polymorphism within and among 13 diploid (A and C genomes), seven tetraploid (AB, AC and CC genomes) and four hexaploid (ACD genome) to infer the extent and direction of concerted evolution, and to reveal the phylogenetic and genome relationship among species of Avena. A total of 170 clones of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 fragment were sequenced to carry out haplotype and phylogenetic analysis. In addition, 111 Avena ITS sequences retrieved from GenBank were combined with 170 clones to construct a phylogeny and a network. We demonstrate the major divergence between the A and C genomes whereas the distinction among the A and B/D genomes was generally not possible. High affinity among the A(d) genome species A. damascena and the ACD genome species A. fatua was found, whereas the rest of the ACD genome hexaploids and the AACC tetraploids were highly affiliated with the A(l) genome diploid A. longiglumis. One of the AACC species A. murphyi showed the closest relationship with most of the hexaploid species. Both C(v) and C(p) genome species have been proposed as paternal donors of the C-genome carrying polyploids. Incomplete concerted evolution is responsible for the observed differences among different clones of a single Avena individual. The elimination of C-genome rRNA sequences and the resulting evolutionary inference of hexaploid species are discussed.

  9. Molecular characterization and physical mapping of two classes of 5S rDNA in the genomes of Gymnotus sylvius and G. inaequilabiatus (Gymnotiformes, Gymnotidae).

    PubMed

    Scacchetti, P C; Alves, J C P; Utsunomia, R; Claro, F L; de Almeida Toledo, L F; Oliveira, C; Foresti, F

    2012-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the 5S rRNA multigene family and their distribution across the karyotypes in 2 species of Gymnotiformes, genus Gymnotus (G. sylvius and G. inaequilabiatus) were investigated by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The results showed the existence of 2 distinct classes of 5S rDNA sequences in both species: class I and class II. A high conservative pattern of the codifying region of the 5S rRNA gene was identified, contrasting with significant alterations detected in the nontranscribed spacer (NTS). The presence of TATA-like sequences along the NTS of both species was an expected occurrence, since such sequences have been associated with the regulation of the gene expression. FISH using 5S rDNA class I and class II probes revealed that both gene classes were collocated in the same chromosome pair in the genome of G. sylvius, while in that of G. inaequilabiatus, class II appeared more disperse than class I.

  10. Thinking beside the box: Should we care about the non-coding strand of the 16S rRNA gene?

    PubMed

    Garcia-Mazcorro, Jose F; Barcenas-Walls, Jose R

    2016-08-01

    The 16S rRNA gene (16S rDNA) codes for RNA that plays a fundamental role during translation in the ribosome and is used extensively as a marker gene to establish relationships among bacteria. However, the complementary non-coding 16S rDNA (nc16S rDNA) has been ignored. An idea emerged in the course of analyzing bacterial 16S rDNA sequences in search for nucleotide composition and substitution patterns: Does the nc16S rDNA code? If so, what does it code for? More importantly: Does 16S rDNA evolution reflect its own evolution or the evolution of its counterpart nc16S rDNA? The objective of this minireview is to discuss these thoughts. nc strands often encode small RNAs (sRNAs), ancient components of gene regulation. nc16S rDNA sequences from different bacterial groups were used to search for possible matches in the Bacterial Small Regulatory RNA Database. Intriguingly, the sequence of one published sRNA obtained from Legionella pneumophila (GenBank: AE0173541) showed high non-random similarity with nc16S rDNA corresponding in part to the V5 region especially from Legionella and relatives. While the target(s) of this sRNA is unclear at the moment, its mere existence might open up a new chapter in the use of the 16S rDNA to study relationships among bacteria. PMID:27412167

  11. Thinking beside the box: Should we care about the non-coding strand of the 16S rRNA gene?

    PubMed

    Garcia-Mazcorro, Jose F; Barcenas-Walls, Jose R

    2016-08-01

    The 16S rRNA gene (16S rDNA) codes for RNA that plays a fundamental role during translation in the ribosome and is used extensively as a marker gene to establish relationships among bacteria. However, the complementary non-coding 16S rDNA (nc16S rDNA) has been ignored. An idea emerged in the course of analyzing bacterial 16S rDNA sequences in search for nucleotide composition and substitution patterns: Does the nc16S rDNA code? If so, what does it code for? More importantly: Does 16S rDNA evolution reflect its own evolution or the evolution of its counterpart nc16S rDNA? The objective of this minireview is to discuss these thoughts. nc strands often encode small RNAs (sRNAs), ancient components of gene regulation. nc16S rDNA sequences from different bacterial groups were used to search for possible matches in the Bacterial Small Regulatory RNA Database. Intriguingly, the sequence of one published sRNA obtained from Legionella pneumophila (GenBank: AE0173541) showed high non-random similarity with nc16S rDNA corresponding in part to the V5 region especially from Legionella and relatives. While the target(s) of this sRNA is unclear at the moment, its mere existence might open up a new chapter in the use of the 16S rDNA to study relationships among bacteria.

  12. Functional study of hot pepper 26S proteasome subunit RPN7 induced by Tobacco mosaic virus from nuclear proteome analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Boo-Ja; Kwon, Sun Jae; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Park, Chang-Jin; Kim, Young-Jin; Park, Ohkmae K.; Paek, Kyung-Hee . E-mail: khpaek95@korea.ac.kr

    2006-12-15

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) was applied for the screening of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-induced hot pepper (Capsicum annuum cv. Bugang) nuclear proteins. From differentially expressed protein spots, we acquired the matched peptide mass fingerprint (PMF) data, analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS, from the non-redundant hot pepper EST protein FASTA database using the VEMS 2.0 software. Among six identified nuclear proteins, the hot pepper 26S proteasome subunit RPN7 (CaRPN7) was subjected to further study. The level of CaRPN7 mRNA was specifically increased during incompatible TMV-P{sub 0} interaction, but not during compatible TMV-P{sub 1.2} interaction. When CaRPN7::GFP fusion protein was targeted in onion cells, the nuclei had been broken into pieces. In the hot pepper leaves, cell death was exacerbated and genomic DNA laddering was induced by Agrobacterium-mediated transient overexpression of CaPRN7. Thus, this report presents that the TMV-induced CaRPN7 may be involved in programmed cell death (PCD) in the hot pepper plant.

  13. Salt stress-induced disassembly of Arabidopsis cortical microtubule arrays involves 26S proteasome-dependent degradation of SPIRAL1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Songhu; Kurepa, Jasmina; Hashimoto, Takashi; Smalle, Jan A

    2011-09-01

    The dynamic instability of cortical microtubules (MTs) (i.e., their ability to rapidly alternate between phases of growth and shrinkage) plays an essential role in plant growth and development. In addition, recent studies have revealed a pivotal role for dynamic instability in the response to salt stress conditions. The salt stress response includes a rapid depolymerization of MTs followed by the formation of a new MT network that is believed to be better suited for surviving high salinity. Although this initial depolymerization response is essential for the adaptation to salt stress, the underlying molecular mechanism has remained largely unknown. Here, we show that the MT-associated protein SPIRAL1 (SPR1) plays a key role in salt stress-induced MT disassembly. SPR1, a microtubule stabilizing protein, is degraded by the 26S proteasome, and its degradation rate is accelerated in response to high salinity. We show that accelerated SPR1 degradation is required for a fast MT disassembly response to salt stress and for salt stress tolerance.

  14. Complete Sequence Construction of the Highly Repetitive Ribosomal RNA Gene Repeats in Eukaryotes Using Whole Genome Sequence Data.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Saumya; Ganley, Austen R D

    2016-01-01

    The ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) encode the major rRNA species of the ribosome, and thus are essential across life. These genes are highly repetitive in most eukaryotes, forming blocks of tandem repeats that form the core of nucleoli. The primary role of the rDNA in encoding rRNA has been long understood, but more recently the rDNA has been implicated in a number of other important biological phenomena, including genome stability, cell cycle, and epigenetic silencing. Noncoding elements, primarily located in the intergenic spacer region, appear to mediate many of these phenomena. Although sequence information is available for the genomes of many organisms, in almost all cases rDNA repeat sequences are lacking, primarily due to problems in assembling these intriguing regions during whole genome assemblies. Here, we present a method to obtain complete rDNA repeat unit sequences from whole genome assemblies. Limitations of next generation sequencing (NGS) data make them unsuitable for assembling complete rDNA unit sequences; therefore, the method we present relies on the use of Sanger whole genome sequence data. Our method makes use of the Arachne assembler, which can assemble highly repetitive regions such as the rDNA in a memory-efficient way. We provide a detailed step-by-step protocol for generating rDNA sequences from whole genome Sanger sequence data using Arachne, for refining complete rDNA unit sequences, and for validating the sequences obtained. In principle, our method will work for any species where the rDNA is organized into tandem repeats. This will help researchers working on species without a complete rDNA sequence, those working on evolutionary aspects of the rDNA, and those interested in conducting phylogenetic footprinting studies with the rDNA. PMID:27576718

  15. Comet-FISH with rDNA probes for the analysis of mutagen-induced DNA damage in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Kwasniewska, Jolanta; Grabowska, Marta; Kwasniewski, Miroslaw; Kolano, Bozena

    2012-06-01

    We used comet-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in the model plant species Crepis capillaris following exposure of seedlings to maleic hydrazide (MH). FISH with 5S and 25S rDNA probes was applied to comets obtained under alkaline conditions to establish whether these DNA regions were preferentially involved in comet tail formation. MH treatment induced significant fragmentation of nuclear DNA and of rDNA loci. A 24-h post-treatment recovery period allowed a partial reversibility of MH-induced damage on nuclear and rDNA regions. Analyses of FISH signals demonstrated that rDNA sequences were always involved in tail formation and that 5S rDNA was more frequently present in the tail than 25S rDNA, regardless of treatment. The involvement of 25S rDNA in nucleolus formation and differences in chromatin structure between the two loci may explain the different susceptibility of the 25S and 5S rDNA regions to migrate into the tail. This work is the first report on the application of FISH to comet preparations from plants to analyze the distribution and repair of DNA damage within specific genomic regions after mutagenic treatment. Moreover, our work suggests that comet-FISH in plants may be a useful tool for environmental monitoring assessment. PMID:22556029

  16. Analysis of 5S rDNA organization and variation in polyploid hybrids from crosses of different fish subfamilies.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qinbo; He, Weiguo; Liu, Shaojun; Wang, Jing; Xiao, Jun; Liu, Yun

    2010-07-15

    In this article, sequence analysis of the coding region (5S) and adjacent nontranscribed spacer (NTS) were conducted in red crucian carp (RCC), blunt snout bream (BSB), and their polyploid offspring. Three monomeric 5S rDNA classes (designated class I: 203 bp; class II: 340 bp; and class III: 477 bp) of RCC were characterized by distinct NTS types (designated NTS-I, II, and III for the 83, 220, and 357 bp monomers, respectively). In BSB, only one monomeric 5S rDNA was observed (designated class IV: 188 bp), which was characterized by one NTS type (designated NTS-IV: 68 bp). In the polyploid offspring, the tetraploid (4nRB) hybrids partially inherited 5S rDNA classes from their female parent (RCC); however, they also possessed a unique 5S rDNA sequence (designated class I-L: 203 bp) with a novel NTS sequence (designated NTS-I-L: 83 bp). The characteristic paternal 5S rDNA sequences (class IV) were not observed. The 5S rDNA of triploid (3nRB) hybrids was completely inherited from the parental species, and generally preserved the parental 5S rDNA structural organization. These results first revealed the influence of polyploidy on the organization and evolution of the multigene family of 5S rDNA of fish, and are also useful in clarifying aspects of vertebrate genome evolution.

  17. A Natural Polymorphism in rDNA Replication Origins Links Origin Activation with Calorie Restriction and Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Elizabeth X.; Foss, Eric J.; Tsuchiyama, Scott; Alvino, Gina M.; Kruglyak, Leonid; Kaeberlein, Matt; Raghuraman, M. K.; Brewer, Bonita J.; Kennedy, Brian K.; Bedalov, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Aging and longevity are complex traits influenced by genetic and environmental factors. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that control replicative lifespan, we employed an outbred Saccharomyces cerevisiae model, generated by crossing a vineyard and a laboratory strain. The predominant QTL mapped to the rDNA, with the vineyard rDNA conferring a lifespan increase of 41%. The lifespan extension was independent of Sir2 and Fob1, but depended on a polymorphism in the rDNA origin of replication from the vineyard strain that reduced origin activation relative to the laboratory origin. Strains carrying vineyard rDNA origins have increased capacity for replication initiation at weak plasmid and genomic origins, suggesting that inability to complete genome replication presents a major impediment to replicative lifespan. Calorie restriction, a conserved mediator of lifespan extension that is also independent of Sir2 and Fob1, reduces rDNA origin firing in both laboratory and vineyard rDNA. Our results are consistent with the possibility that calorie restriction, similarly to the vineyard rDNA polymorphism, modulates replicative lifespan through control of rDNA origin activation, which in turn affects genome replication dynamics. PMID:23505383

  18. Relationships between rDNA, Nop1 and Sir complex in biotechnologically relevant distillery yeasts.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Potocki, Leszek; Kuna, Ewelina; Kaplan, Jakub; Pabian, Sylwia; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-09-01

    Distillery yeasts are poorly characterized physiological group among the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex. As industrial yeasts are under constant environmental stress during fermentation processes and the nucleolus is a stress sensor, in the present study, nucleolus-related parameters were evaluated in 22 commercially available distillery yeast strains. Distillery yeasts were found to be a heterogeneous group with a variable content and length of rDNA and degree of nucleolus fragmentation. The levels of rDNA were negatively correlated with Nop1 (r = -0.59, p = 0.0038). Moreover, the protein levels of Sir transcriptional silencing complex and longevity regulators, namely Sir1, Sir2, Sir3 and Fob1, were studied and negative correlations between Sir2 and Nop1 (r = -0.45, p = 0.0332), and between Sir2 and Fob1 (r = -0.49, p = 0.0211) were revealed. In general, S. paradoxus group of distillery yeasts with higher rDNA pools and Sir2 level than S. bayanus group was found to be more tolerant to fermentation-associated stress stimuli, namely mild cold/heat stresses and KCl treatment. We postulate that rDNA state may be considered as a novel factor that may modulate a biotechnological process. PMID:27329282

  19. Relationships between rDNA, Nop1 and Sir complex in biotechnologically relevant distillery yeasts.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Potocki, Leszek; Kuna, Ewelina; Kaplan, Jakub; Pabian, Sylwia; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-09-01

    Distillery yeasts are poorly characterized physiological group among the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex. As industrial yeasts are under constant environmental stress during fermentation processes and the nucleolus is a stress sensor, in the present study, nucleolus-related parameters were evaluated in 22 commercially available distillery yeast strains. Distillery yeasts were found to be a heterogeneous group with a variable content and length of rDNA and degree of nucleolus fragmentation. The levels of rDNA were negatively correlated with Nop1 (r = -0.59, p = 0.0038). Moreover, the protein levels of Sir transcriptional silencing complex and longevity regulators, namely Sir1, Sir2, Sir3 and Fob1, were studied and negative correlations between Sir2 and Nop1 (r = -0.45, p = 0.0332), and between Sir2 and Fob1 (r = -0.49, p = 0.0211) were revealed. In general, S. paradoxus group of distillery yeasts with higher rDNA pools and Sir2 level than S. bayanus group was found to be more tolerant to fermentation-associated stress stimuli, namely mild cold/heat stresses and KCl treatment. We postulate that rDNA state may be considered as a novel factor that may modulate a biotechnological process.

  20. Top2 and Sgs1-Top3 Act Redundantly to Ensure rDNA Replication Termination

    PubMed Central

    Fredsøe, Jacob; Nielsen, Ida; Pedersen, Jakob Madsen; Bentsen, Iben Bach; Lisby, Michael; Bjergbaek, Lotte; Andersen, Anni H

    2015-01-01

    Faithful DNA replication with correct termination is essential for genome stability and transmission of genetic information. Here we have investigated the potential roles of Topoisomerase II (Top2) and the RecQ helicase Sgs1 during late stages of replication. We find that cells lacking Top2 and Sgs1 (or Top3) display two different characteristics during late S/G2 phase, checkpoint activation and accumulation of asymmetric X-structures, which are both independent of homologous recombination. Our data demonstrate that checkpoint activation is caused by a DNA structure formed at the strongest rDNA replication fork barrier (RFB) during replication termination, and consistently, checkpoint activation is dependent on the RFB binding protein, Fob1. In contrast, asymmetric X-structures are formed independent of Fob1 at less strong rDNA replication fork barriers. However, both checkpoint activation and formation of asymmetric X-structures are sensitive to conditions, which facilitate fork merging and progression of replication forks through replication fork barriers. Our data are consistent with a redundant role of Top2 and Sgs1 together with Top3 (Sgs1-Top3) in replication fork merging at rDNA barriers. At RFB either Top2 or Sgs1-Top3 is essential to prevent formation of a checkpoint activating DNA structure during termination, but at less strong rDNA barriers absence of the enzymes merely delays replication fork merging, causing an accumulation of asymmetric termination structures, which are solved over time. PMID:26630413

  1. Distribution of 45S rDNA sites in chromosomes of plants: Structural and evolutionary implications

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background 45S rDNA sites are the most widely documented chromosomal regions in eukaryotes. The analysis of the distribution of these sites along the chromosome in several genera has suggested some bias in their distribution. In order to evaluate if these loci are in fact non-randomly distributed and what is the influence of some chromosomal and karyotypic features on the distribution of these sites, a database was built with the position and number of 45S rDNA sites obtained by FISH together with other karyotypic data from 846 plant species. Results In angiosperms the most frequent numbers of sites per diploid karyotype were two and four, suggesting that in spite of the wide dispersion capacity of these sequences the number of rDNA sites tends to be restricted. The sites showed a preferential distribution on the short arms, mainly in the terminal regions. Curiously, these sites were frequently found on the short arms of acrocentric chromosomes where they usually occupy the whole arm. The trend to occupy the terminal region is especially evident in holokinetic chromosomes, where all of them were terminally located. In polyploids there is a trend towards reduction in the number of sites per monoploid complement. In gymnosperms, however, the distribution of rDNA sites varied strongly among the sampled families. Conclusions The location of 45S rDNA sites do not vary randomly, occurring preferentially on the short arm and in the terminal region of chromosomes in angiosperms. The meaning of this preferential location is not known, but some hypotheses are considered and the observed trends are discussed. PMID:23181612

  2. Phylogeographic structure of cotton pest Adelphocoris suturalis (Hemiptera: Miridae): strong subdivision in China inferred from mtDNA and rDNA ITS markers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lijuan; Li, Hu; Li, Shujuan; Zhang, Aibing; Kou, Fei; Xun, Huaizhu; Wang, Pei; Wang, Ying; Song, Fan; Cui, Jianxin; Cui, Jinjie; Gouge, Dawn H.; Cai, Wanzhi

    2015-01-01

    Phylogeographic patterns of some extant plant and vertebrate species have been well studied; however, they are poorly understood in the majority of insects. The study documents analysis of mitochondrial (COI, CYTB and ND5) and nuclear (5.8S rDNA, ITS2 and 28S rDNA) data from 419 individuals of Adelphocoris suturalis, which is one of the main cotton pests found in the 31 locations in China and Japan involved in the study. Results show that the species is highly differentiated between populations from central China and peripheral China regions. Analysis of molecular variance showed a high level of geographical differentiation at different hierarchical levels. Isolation-by-distance test showed no significant correlation between genetic distance and geographical distance among A. suturalis populations, which suggested gene flow is not restricted by distance. In seven peripheral populations, the high levels of genetic differentiation and the small Nem values implied that geographic barriers were more likely restrict gene flow. Neutrality tests and the Bayesian skyline plot suggested population expansion likely happened during the cooling transition between Last Interglacial and Last Glacial Maximum. All lines of evidence suggest that physical barriers, Pleistocene climatic oscillations and geographical heterogeneity have affected the population structure and distribution of this insect in China. PMID:26388034

  3. Phylogeographic structure of cotton pest Adelphocoris suturalis (Hemiptera: Miridae): strong subdivision in China inferred from mtDNA and rDNA ITS markers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijuan; Li, Hu; Li, Shujuan; Zhang, Aibing; Kou, Fei; Xun, Huaizhu; Wang, Pei; Wang, Ying; Song, Fan; Cui, Jianxin; Cui, Jinjie; Gouge, Dawn H; Cai, Wanzhi

    2015-01-01

    Phylogeographic patterns of some extant plant and vertebrate species have been well studied; however, they are poorly understood in the majority of insects. The study documents analysis of mitochondrial (COI, CYTB and ND5) and nuclear (5.8S rDNA, ITS2 and 28S rDNA) data from 419 individuals of Adelphocoris suturalis, which is one of the main cotton pests found in the 31 locations in China and Japan involved in the study. Results show that the species is highly differentiated between populations from central China and peripheral China regions. Analysis of molecular variance showed a high level of geographical differentiation at different hierarchical levels. Isolation-by-distance test showed no significant correlation between genetic distance and geographical distance among A. suturalis populations, which suggested gene flow is not restricted by distance. In seven peripheral populations, the high levels of genetic differentiation and the small Nem values implied that geographic barriers were more likely restrict gene flow. Neutrality tests and the Bayesian skyline plot suggested population expansion likely happened during the cooling transition between Last Interglacial and Last Glacial Maximum. All lines of evidence suggest that physical barriers, Pleistocene climatic oscillations and geographical heterogeneity have affected the population structure and distribution of this insect in China. PMID:26388034

  4. Nuclear and nucleomorph SSU rDNA phylogeny in the Cryptophyta and the evolution of cryptophyte diversity.

    PubMed

    Hoef-Emden, Kerstin; Marin, Birger; Melkonian, Michael

    2002-08-01

    The plastid-bearing members of the Cryptophyta contain two functional eukaryotic genomes of different phylogenetic origin, residing in the nucleus and in the nucleomorph, respectively. These widespread and diverse protists thus offer a unique opportunity to study the coevolution of two different eukaryotic genomes within one group of organisms. In this study, the SSU rRNA genes of both genomes were PCR-amplified with specific primers and phylogenetic analyses were performed on different data sets using different evolutionary models. The results show that the composition of the principal clades obtained from the phylogenetic analyses of both genes was largely congruent, but striking differences in evolutionary rates were observed. These affected the topologies of the nuclear and nucleomorph phylogenies differently, resulting in long-branch attraction artifacts when simple evolutionary models were applied. Deletion of long-branch taxa stabilized the internal branching order in both phylogenies and resulted in a completely resolved topology in the nucleomorph phylogeny. A comparison of the tree topologies derived from SSU rDNA sequences with characters previously used in cryptophyte systematics revealed that the biliprotein type was congruent, but the type of inner periplast component incongruent, with the molecular trees. The latter is indicative of a hidden cellular dimorphism (cells with two periplast types present in a single clonal strain) of presumably widespread occurrence throughout cryptophyte diversity, which, in consequence, has far-reaching implications for cryptophyte systematics as it is practiced today.

  5. Chromosomal Mapping of Repetitive DNA Sequences in Five Species of Astyanax (Characiformes, Characidae) Reveals Independent Location of U1 and U2 snRNA Sites and Association of U1 snRNA and 5S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Silva, Duilio M Z A; Utsunomia, Ricardo; Pansonato-Alves, José C; Oliveira, Cláudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    Astyanax is a genus of Characidae fishes currently composed of 155 valid species. Previous cytogenetic studies revealed high chromosomal diversification among them, and several studies have been performed using traditional cytogenetic techniques to investigate karyotypes and chromosomal locations of 18S and 5S rDNA genes. However, only a few studies are currently available about other repetitive sequences. Here, the chromosomal location of small nuclear RNA genes, identified as U1 and U2 snRNA clusters, was established and compared to the distribution of 5S rDNA and histone clusters in 5 Astyanax species (A. paranae, A. fasciatus, A. bockmanni, A. altiparanae, and A. jordani) using FISH. The cytogenetic mapping of U1 and U2 snRNA demonstrated a conserved pattern in the number of sites per genome independent of the location in Astyanax species. The location of the U1 snRNA gene was frequently associated with 5S rDNA sequences, indicating a possible interaction between the distinct repetitive DNA families. Finally, comparisons involving the location of U1 and U2 snRNA clusters in the chromosomes of Astyanax species revealed a very diverse pattern, suggesting that many rearrangements have occurred during the diversification process of this group. PMID:26329975

  6. Chromosomal Mapping of Repetitive DNA Sequences in Five Species of Astyanax (Characiformes, Characidae) Reveals Independent Location of U1 and U2 snRNA Sites and Association of U1 snRNA and 5S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Silva, Duilio M Z A; Utsunomia, Ricardo; Pansonato-Alves, José C; Oliveira, Cláudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    Astyanax is a genus of Characidae fishes currently composed of 155 valid species. Previous cytogenetic studies revealed high chromosomal diversification among them, and several studies have been performed using traditional cytogenetic techniques to investigate karyotypes and chromosomal locations of 18S and 5S rDNA genes. However, only a few studies are currently available about other repetitive sequences. Here, the chromosomal location of small nuclear RNA genes, identified as U1 and U2 snRNA clusters, was established and compared to the distribution of 5S rDNA and histone clusters in 5 Astyanax species (A. paranae, A. fasciatus, A. bockmanni, A. altiparanae, and A. jordani) using FISH. The cytogenetic mapping of U1 and U2 snRNA demonstrated a conserved pattern in the number of sites per genome independent of the location in Astyanax species. The location of the U1 snRNA gene was frequently associated with 5S rDNA sequences, indicating a possible interaction between the distinct repetitive DNA families. Finally, comparisons involving the location of U1 and U2 snRNA clusters in the chromosomes of Astyanax species revealed a very diverse pattern, suggesting that many rearrangements have occurred during the diversification process of this group.

  7. Molecular interaction of the proteasome (multicatalytic proteinase). Evidence that the proteasome is not a constituent of the '26 S' multienzyme complex.

    PubMed Central

    Seelig, A; Kloetzel, P M; Kuehn, L; Dahlmann, B

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of recent reports that suggested that proteasomes, via an ATP-dependent process, become integral components of a '26 S' complex possessing 3-carboxypropionyl-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr 4-methylcoumarin-7-ylamide-hydrolysing activity, we have investigated the molecular interaction of proteasomes in ATP-stabilized fraction II (proteins absorbed on DEAE-matrix and eluted with 0.5 M-KCl) of rabbit reticulocytes and mouse liver. Analysis of the various extracts by (NH4)2SO4 fractionation, velocity-gradient centrifugation, non-denaturing PAGE and SDS/PAGE and immunoblotting with proteasome-specific antisera failed to identify the proteasome as part of a higher-molecular-mass '26 S' multienzyme complex. In all instances proteasomes are identified in their 'free' 650 kDa '20 S' form. In addition to the proteasome and independent of the presence of MgATP, we isolated a high-molecular-mass proteinase whose electrophoretic migration behaviour and sedimentation rate correspond to that of the previously described '26 S' proteinase. This '26 S' proteinase possesses a strong 3-carboxypropionyl-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr 4-methylcoumarin-7-ylamide-hydrolysing activity and is composed of several non-identical polypeptides in the molecular-mass range 20-150 kDa. Despite its similarity to proteasomal enzyme activity, protein analysis and immunoblotting experiments demonstrate that neither the intact proteasome nor subunits thereof are components of the '26 S' proteinase complex. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1741750

  8. Effects of altered gravity on a distribution of rDNA and nucleolar proteins and the expression of nucleolar proteins in plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, Margaryta; Kordyum, Elizabeth; Medina, Francisco Javier

    The nucleolus is an inner nuclear organelle originated from the activity of hundreds of rRNA genes, typically spanning several megabases. It morphologically reflects the functional events leading to ribosome biogenesis, from the transcription of rDNA through the processing of nascent pre-rRNA to the assembly of pre-ribosomes. A typical nucleolus consists of three major elements, namely fibrillar centers (FCs), the dense fibrillar component (DFC), and granular component (GC). The rate of ribosome biosynthesis and the subnucleolar structure are reliable monitors of the general level of cell metabolism and, consequently, of the rate of cellular growth, being influenced with many external factors, among which altered gravity could be included. Thus, we can hypothesize that the structural organization of the nucleolar subcomponents and the level, distribution and quantitative/qualitative characteristics of the nucleolar proteins would be changed under conditions of altered gravity. To confirm our hypothesis, we applied parallel procedures, such as cytochemistry, immunofluorescence, confocal laser microscopy, immunogold electron microscopy, monoand bi-dimensional electrophoresis and immunoblotting in root meristematic cells from two-day cress seedlings grown under slow horizontal clinorotation (2 rpm) and in stationary control. The complex model of the ultrastructural organization and functions of the nucleolus was created based on the location of rDNA and the nucleolar proteins fibrillarin, NhL90 and NhL68, these latter being cress nucleolin homologues. The principal stages of ribosome biogenesis, namely ribosomal gene activation, rDNA transcription and pre-rRNA processing were reflected in this model. Compared to the pattern shown in control ground gravity conditions, we found firstly a redistribution of both rDNA and nucleolar proteins in nucleolar subcomponents, induced by clinorotation. Under the conditions of altered gravity, nucleolar DNA concentrated

  9. Sequence and structure of the extrachromosomal palindrome encoding the ribosomal RNA genes in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Sucgang, Richard; Chen, Guokai; Liu, Wen; Lindsay, Ryan; Lu, Jing; Muzny, Donna; Shaulsky, Gad; Loomis, William; Gibbs, Richard; Kuspa, Adam

    2003-05-01

    Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) are encoded by multicopy families of identical genes. In Dictyostelium and other protists, the rDNA is carried on extrachromosomal palindromic elements that comprise up to 20% of the nuclear DNA. We present the sequence of the 88 kb Dictyostelium rDNA element, noting that the rRNA genes are likely to be the only transcribed regions. By interrogating a library of ordered YAC clones, we provide evidence for a chromosomal copy of the rDNA on chromosome 4. This locus may provide master copies for the stable transmission of the extrachromosomal elements. The extrachromosomal elements were also found to form chromosome-sized clusters of DNA within nuclei of nocodazole-treated cells arrested in mitosis. These clusters resemble true chromosomes and may allow the efficient segregation of the rDNA during mitosis. These rDNA clusters may also explain the cytological observations of a seventh chromosome in this organism.

  10. Assessment of helminth biodiversity in wild rats using 18S rDNA based metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryusei; Hino, Akina; Tsai, Isheng J; Palomares-Rius, Juan Emilio; Yoshida, Ayako; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Kikuchi, Taisei

    2014-01-01

    Parasite diversity has important implications in several research fields including ecology, evolutionary biology and epidemiology. Wide-ranging analysis has been restricted because of the difficult, highly specialised and time-consuming processes involved in parasite identification. In this study, we assessed parasite diversity in wild rats using 18S rDNA-based metagenomics. 18S rDNA PCR products were sequenced using an Illumina MiSeq sequencer and the analysis of the sequences using the QIIME software successfully classified them into several parasite groups. The comparison of the results with those obtained using standard methods including microscopic observation of helminth parasites in the rat intestines and PCR amplification/sequencing of 18S rDNA from isolated single worms suggests that this new technique is reliable and useful to investigate parasite diversity.

  11. Evaluation of amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) for the identification of Mycoplasma species

    PubMed Central

    Stakenborg, Tim; Vicca, Jo; Butaye, Patrick; Maes, Dominiek; De Baere, Thierry; Verhelst, Rita; Peeters, Johan; de Kruif, Aart; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Vaneechoutte, Mario

    2005-01-01

    Background Mycoplasmas are present worldwide in a large number of animal hosts. Due to their small genome and parasitic lifestyle, Mycoplasma spp. require complex isolation media. Nevertheless, already over 100 different species have been identified and characterized and their number increases as more hosts are sampled. We studied the applicability of amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) for the identification of all 116 acknowledged Mycoplasma species and subspecies. Methods Based upon available 16S rDNA sequences, we calculated and compared theoretical ARDRA profiles. To check the validity of these theoretically calculated profiles, we performed ARDRA on 60 strains of 27 different species and subspecies of the genus Mycoplasma. Results In silico digestion with the restriction endonuclease AluI (AG^CT) was found to be most discriminative and generated from 3 to 13 fragments depending on the Mycoplasma species. Although 73 Mycoplasma species could be differentiated using AluI, other species gave undistinguishable patterns. For these, an additional restriction digestion, typically with BfaI (C^TAG) or HpyF10VI (GCNNNNN^NNGC), was needed for a final identification. All in vitro obtained restriction profiles were in accordance with the calculated fragments based on only one 16S rDNA sequence, except for two isolates of M. columbinum and two isolates of the M. mycoides cluster, for which correct ARDRA profiles were only obtained if the sequences of both rrn operons were taken into account. Conclusion Theoretically, restriction digestion of the amplified rDNA was found to enable differentiation of all described Mycoplasma species and this could be confirmed by application of ARDRA on a total of 27 species and subspecies. PMID:15955250

  12. Genetic diversity of Histoplasma capsulatum strains isolated from Argentina based on nucleotide sequence variations in the internal transcribed spacer regions of rDNA.

    PubMed

    Landaburu, Fernanda; Cuestas, María Luján; Rubio, Andrea; Elías, Nahuel Alejandro; Daneri, Gabriela Lopez; Veciño, Cecilia; Iovannitti, Cristina A; Mujica, María Teresa

    2014-05-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rDNA genes of 49 Histoplasma capsulatum (48 from clinical samples and one from soil) isolates were examined. Nucleotide sequence heterogeneity within this region was useful for phylogenetic classification of H. capsulatum and species identification. Thus, in 45 of 49 isolates we observed higher percentages of identity in the nucleotide sequences of ITS regions when the isolates studied herein were compared with those reported in our country in the South America B clade. Phylogenetic analyses of rDNA sequences corresponding to the 537 bp of the ITS region obtained from H. capsulatum isolates assigned South America type B clade (45 isolates), North America type 1 and Asia clade (2 isolates each one). H. capsulatum strains isolated from soil and from patients living in Argentina (45 of 49) clustered together with the H. capsulatum isolates of the South America B clade. The high level of genetic similarity among our isolates suggests that almost one genetic population is present in the microenvironment. Isolates described as H. capsulatum var. capsulatum or var. farciminosum (2 isolates) did not form a monophyletic group and were found in the Asia clade. Subsequent studies are needed to properly identify these isolates.

  13. Genetic diversity of Histoplasma capsulatum strains isolated from Argentina based on nucleotide sequence variations in the internal transcribed spacer regions of rDNA.

    PubMed

    Landaburu, Fernanda; Cuestas, María Luján; Rubio, Andrea; Elías, Nahuel Alejandro; Daneri, Gabriela Lopez; Veciño, Cecilia; Iovannitti, Cristina A; Mujica, María Teresa

    2014-05-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rDNA genes of 49 Histoplasma capsulatum (48 from clinical samples and one from soil) isolates were examined. Nucleotide sequence heterogeneity within this region was useful for phylogenetic classification of H. capsulatum and species identification. Thus, in 45 of 49 isolates we observed higher percentages of identity in the nucleotide sequences of ITS regions when the isolates studied herein were compared with those reported in our country in the South America B clade. Phylogenetic analyses of rDNA sequences corresponding to the 537 bp of the ITS region obtained from H. capsulatum isolates assigned South America type B clade (45 isolates), North America type 1 and Asia clade (2 isolates each one). H. capsulatum strains isolated from soil and from patients living in Argentina (45 of 49) clustered together with the H. capsulatum isolates of the South America B clade. The high level of genetic similarity among our isolates suggests that almost one genetic population is present in the microenvironment. Isolates described as H. capsulatum var. capsulatum or var. farciminosum (2 isolates) did not form a monophyletic group and were found in the Asia clade. Subsequent studies are needed to properly identify these isolates. PMID:24299459

  14. Formal Revision of the Alexandrium tamarense Species Complex (Dinophyceae) Taxonomy: The Introduction of Five Species with Emphasis on Molecular-based (rDNA) Classification

    PubMed Central

    John, Uwe; Litaker, R. Wayne; Montresor, Marina; Murray, Shauna; Brosnahan, Michael L.; Anderson, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    The Alexandrium tamarense species complex is one of the most studied marine dinoflagellate groups due to its ecological, toxicological and economic importance. Several members of this complex produce saxitoxin and its congeners – potent neurotoxins that cause paralytic shellfish poisoning. Isolates from this complex are assigned to A. tamarense, A. fundyense, or A. catenella based on two main morphological characters: the ability to form chains and the presence/absence of a ventral pore between Plates 1′ and 4′. However, studies have shown that these characters are not consistent and/or distinctive. Further, phylogenies based on multiple regions in the rDNA operon indicate that the sequences from morphologically indistinguishable isolates partition into five clades. These clades were initially named based on their presumed geographic distribution, but recently were renamed as Groups I–V following the discovery of sympatry among some groups. In this study we present data on morphology, ITS/5.8S genetic distances, ITS2 compensatory base changes, mating incompatibilities, toxicity, the sxtA toxin synthesis gene, and rDNA phylogenies. All results were consistent with each group representing a distinct cryptic species. Accordingly, the groups were assigned species names as follows: Group I, A. fundyense; Group II, A. mediterraneum; Group III, A. tamarense; Group IV, A. pacificum; Group V, A. australiense. PMID:25460230

  15. Phylogeny of hard- and soft-tick taxa (Acari: Ixodida) based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Black, W C; Piesman, J

    1994-01-01

    Ticks are parasitiform mites that are obligate hematophagous ectoparasites of amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. A phylogeny for tick families, subfamilies, and genera has been described based on morphological characters, life histories, and host associations. To test the existing phylogeny, we sequenced approximately 460 bp from the 3' end of the mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) in 36 hard- and soft-tick species; a mesostigmatid mite, Dermanyssus gallinae, was used as an outgroup. Phylogenies derived using distance, maximum-parsimony, or maximum-likelihood methods were congruent. The existing phylogeny was largely supported with four exceptions. In hard ticks (Ixodidae), members of Haemaphysalinae were monophyletic with the primitive Amblyomminae and members of Hyalomminae grouped within the Rhipicephalinae. In soft ticks (Argasidae), the derived phylogeny failed to support a monophyletic relationship among members of Ornithodorinae and supported placement of Argasinae as basal to the Ixodidae, suggesting that hard ticks may have originated from an Argas-like ancestor. Because most Argas species are obligate bird octoparasites, this result supports earlier suggestions that hard ticks did not evolve until the late Cretaceous. PMID:7937832

  16. Polymorphism of Paramecium pentaurelia (Ciliophora, Oligohymenophorea) strains revealed by rDNA and mtDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Przyboś, Ewa; Tarcz, Sebastian; Greczek-Stachura, Magdalena; Surmacz, Marta

    2011-05-01

    Paramecium pentaurelia is one of 15 known sibling species of the Paramecium aurelia complex. It is recognized as a species showing no intra-specific differentiation on the basis of molecular fingerprint analyses, whereas the majority of other species are polymorphic. This study aimed at assessing genetic polymorphism within P. pentaurelia including new strains recently found in Poland (originating from two water bodies, different years, seasons, and clones of one strain) as well as strains collected from distant habitats (USA, Europe, Asia), and strains representing other species of the complex. We compared two DNA fragments: partial sequences (349 bp) of the LSU rDNA and partial sequences (618 bp) of cytochrome B gene. A correlation between the geographical origin of the strains and the genetic characteristics of their genotypes was not observed. Different genotypes were found in Kraków in two types of water bodies (Opatkowice-natural pond; Jordan's Park-artificial pond). Haplotype diversity within a single water body was not recorded. Likewise, seasonal haplotype differences between the strains within the artificial water body, as well as differences between clones originating from one strain, were not detected. The clustering of some strains belonging to different species was observed in the phylogenies.

  17. Identification of cephalopod species from the North and Baltic Seas using morphology, COI and 18S rDNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, Katharina; Knebelsberger, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    We morphologically analyzed 79 cephalopod specimens from the North and Baltic Seas belonging to 13 separate species. Another 29 specimens showed morphological features of either Alloteuthis mediaor Alloteuthis subulata or were found to be in between. Reliable identification features to distinguish between A. media and A. subulata are currently not available. The analysis of the DNA barcoding region of the COI gene revealed intraspecific distances (uncorrected p) ranging from 0 to 2.13 % (average 0.1 %) and interspecific distances between 3.31 and 22 % (average 15.52 %). All species formed monophyletic clusters in a neighbor-joining analysis and were supported by bootstrap values of ≥99 %. All COI haplotypes belonging to the 29 Alloteuthis specimens were grouped in one cluster. Neither COI nor 18S rDNA sequences helped to distinguish between the different Alloteuthis morphotypes. For species identification purposes, we recommend the use of COI, as it showed higher bootstrap support of species clusters and less amplification and sequencing failure compared to 18S. Our data strongly support the assumption that the genus Alloteuthis is only represented by a single species, at least in the North Sea. It remained unclear whether this species is A. subulata or A. media. All COI sequences including important metadata were uploaded to the Barcode of Life Data Systems and can be used as reference library for the molecular identification of more than 50 % of the cephalopod fauna known from the North and Baltic Seas.

  18. Taiwanese Trichogramma of Asian Corn Borer: Morphology, ITS-2 rDNA Characterization, and Natural Wolbachia Infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Hsin; Hoffmann, Ary A; Thomson, Linda J

    2016-01-01

    Egg parasitoids of the genus Trichogramma are natural enemies of many lepidopteran borers in agricultural areas around the world. It is important to identify the correct species and ideally focus on endemic Trichogramma for pest control in particular crops. In this study, Trichogramma wasps were collected from parasitized eggs of Asian corn borer in Southwestern Taiwan. Three Trichogramma species, Trichogramma ostriniae Pang and Chen, Trichogramma chilonis Ishii, and T. sp. y, were identified based on morphology and the nucleotide sequence of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS-2) region of rDNA. Although T. ostriniae and T. sp. y appear to be morphologically similar, ITS-2 identity between these two taxa is only 89%. Surprisingly, a commercially released Trichogramma colony thought to be T. chilonis possessed 99% identity (ITS-2) with the field T. sp. y individuals. This suggests past contamination leading to subsitution of the laboratory-reared T. chilonis colony by T. sp. y. Natural populations of all three Trichogramma species were found to be infected by a single Wolbachia strain which was identified using a wsp gene sequence. PMID:26896674

  19. The phylogeny of native and exotic scallops cultured in China based on 16S rDNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baozhong; Dong, Bo; Xiang, Jianhai; Wang, Zaizhao

    2007-01-01

    Scallops of the Family Pectinidae are a valuable resource in marine industry of the world. Understanding the phylogeny of the family is important for the development of the industry. In this study, partial 16S mitochondrial rDNA genes were obtained from 8 scallop species that are commonly cultured indigenous and transplanted species in China. Phylogenetic relationships of Pectinidae were analyzed based on the 8 sequences and other 5 published ones in GenBank, representing 9 genera of the family. The molecular phylogeny trees were constructed using 3 methods with software PHYLIP. The results showe that total 13 species of scallops clustered in 4 clades. Pecten maximus joins P. jacobaeus then Amusium pleuronectes in cluster, indicating close relationship of genus Amusium with Pecten in evolution. P. yessoensis is close to Chlamys farreri and C. islandica. No enough material was available to single out genus Patinopecten as an independent monophyletic subfamily. The position of Adamussium colbecki indicates that it is far from genus Pecten but near to genus Chlamys in evolution.

  20. Tyrosine Nitration of PA700 Activates the 26S Proteasome to Induce Endothelial Dysfunction in Mice With Angiotensin II–Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian; Wang, Shuangxi; Wu, Yong; Song, Ping; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2010-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system has been implicated in oxidative stress–induced endothelial dysfunction in cardiovascular diseases. However, the mechanism by which oxidative stress alters the ubiquitin-proteasome system is poorly defined. The present study was conducted to determine whether oxidative modifications of PA700, a 26S proteasome regulatory subunit, contributes to angiotensin II (Ang II)–induced endothelial dysfunction. Exposure of human umbilical vein endothelial cells to low concentrations of Ang II, but not vehicle, for 6 hours significantly decreased the levels of tetrahydro-L-biopterin (BH4), an essential cofactor of endothelial NO synthase, which was accompanied by a decrease in GTP cyclohydrolase I, the rate-limiting enzyme for de novo BH4 synthesis. In addition, Ang II increased both tyrosine nitration of PA700 and the 26S proteasome activity, which were paralleled by increased coimmunoprecipitation of PA700 and the 20S proteasome. Genetic inhibition of NAD(P)H oxidase or administration of uric acid (a peroxynitrite scavenger) or NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (nonselective NO synthase inhibitor) significantly attenuated Ang II–induced PA700 nitration, 26S proteasome activation, and reduction of GTP cyclohydrolase I and BH4. Finally, Ang II infusion in mice decreased the levels of both BH4 and GTP cyclohydrolase I and impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation in isolated aortas, and all of these effects were prevented by the administration of MG132, a potent inhibitor for 26S proteasome. We conclude that Ang II increases tyrosine nitration of PA700 resulting in accelerated GTP cyclohydrolase I degradation, BH4 deficiency, and consequent endothelial dysfunction in hypertension. PMID:19597039

  1. Differential roles of the COOH termini of AAA subunits of PA700 (19 S regulator) in asymmetric assembly and activation of the 26 S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Gillette, Thomas G; Kumar, Brajesh; Thompson, David; Slaughter, Clive A; DeMartino, George N

    2008-11-14

    The 26 S proteasome is an energy-dependent protease that degrades proteins modified with polyubiquitin chains. It is assembled from two multi-protein subcomplexes: a protease (20 S proteasome) and an ATPase regulatory complex (PA700 or 19 S regulatory particle) that contains six different AAA family subunits (Rpt1 to -6). Here we show that binding of PA700 to the 20 S proteasome is mediated by the COOH termini of two (Rpt2 and Rpt5) of the six Rpt subunits that constitute the interaction surface between the subcomplexes. COOH-terminal peptides of either Rpt2 or Rpt5 bind to the 20 S proteasome and activate hydrolysis of short peptide substrates. Simultaneous binding of both COOH-terminal peptides had additive effects on peptide substrate hydrolysis, suggesting that they bind to distinct sites on the proteasome. In contrast, only the Rpt5 peptide activated hydrolysis of protein substrates. Nevertheless, the COOH-terminal peptide of Rpt2 greatly enhanced this effect, suggesting that proteasome activation is a multistate process. Rpt2 and Rpt5 COOH-terminal peptides cross-linked to different but specific subunits of the 20 S proteasome. These results reveal critical roles of COOH termini of Rpt subunits of PA700 in the assembly and activation of eukaryotic 26 S proteasome. Moreover, they support a model in which Rpt subunits bind to dedicated sites on the proteasome and play specific, nonequivalent roles in the asymmetric assembly and activation of the 26 S proteasome.

  2. Molecular Organization of the 25S–18S rDNA IGS of Fagus sylvatica and Quercus suber: A Comparative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Inácio, Vera; Rocheta, Margarida; Morais-Cecílio, Leonor

    2014-01-01

    The 35S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) units, repeated in tandem at one or more chromosomal loci, are separated by an intergenic spacer (IGS) containing functional elements involved in the regulation of transcription of downstream rRNA genes. In the present work, we have compared the IGS molecular organizations in two divergent species of Fagaceae, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus suber, aiming to comprehend the evolution of the IGS sequences within the family. Self- and cross-hybridization FISH was done on representative species of the Fagaceae. The IGS length variability and the methylation level of 18 and 25S rRNA genes were assessed in representatives of three genera of this family: Fagus, Quercus and Castanea. The intergenic spacers in Beech and Cork Oak showed similar overall organizations comprising putative functional elements needed for rRNA gene activity and containing a non-transcribed spacer (NTS), a promoter region, and a 5′-external transcribed spacer. In the NTS: the sub-repeats structure in Beech is more organized than in Cork Oak, sharing some short motifs which results in the lowest sequence similarity of the entire IGS; the AT-rich region differed in both spacers by a GC-rich block inserted in Cork Oak. The 5′-ETS is the region with the higher similarity, having nonetheless different lengths. FISH with the NTS-5′-ETS revealed fainter signals in cross-hybridization in agreement with the divergence between genera. The diversity of IGS lengths revealed variants from ∼2 kb in Fagus, and Quercus up to 5.3 kb in Castanea, and a lack of correlation between the number of variants and the number of rDNA loci in several species. Methylation of 25S Bam HI site was confirmed in all species and detected for the first time in the 18S of Q. suber and Q. faginea. These results provide important clues for the evolutionary trends of the rDNA 25S-18S IGS in the Fagaceae family. PMID:24893289

  3. Molecular organization of the 25S-18S rDNA IGS of Fagus sylvatica and Quercus suber: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Inácio, Vera; Rocheta, Margarida; Morais-Cecílio, Leonor

    2014-01-01

    The 35S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) units, repeated in tandem at one or more chromosomal loci, are separated by an intergenic spacer (IGS) containing functional elements involved in the regulation of transcription of downstream rRNA genes. In the present work, we have compared the IGS molecular organizations in two divergent species of Fagaceae, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus suber, aiming to comprehend the evolution of the IGS sequences within the family. Self- and cross-hybridization FISH was done on representative species of the Fagaceae. The IGS length variability and the methylation level of 18 and 25S rRNA genes were assessed in representatives of three genera of this family: Fagus, Quercus and Castanea. The intergenic spacers in Beech and Cork Oak showed similar overall organizations comprising putative functional elements needed for rRNA gene activity and containing a non-transcribed spacer (NTS), a promoter region, and a 5'-external transcribed spacer. In the NTS: the sub-repeats structure in Beech is more organized than in Cork Oak, sharing some short motifs which results in the lowest sequence similarity of the entire IGS; the AT-rich region differed in both spacers by a GC-rich block inserted in Cork Oak. The 5'-ETS is the region with the higher similarity, having nonetheless different lengths. FISH with the NTS-5'-ETS revealed fainter signals in cross-hybridization in agreement with the divergence between genera. The diversity of IGS lengths revealed variants from ∼ 2 kb in Fagus, and Quercus up to 5.3 kb in Castanea, and a lack of correlation between the number of variants and the number of rDNA loci in several species. Methylation of 25S Bam HI site was confirmed in all species and detected for the first time in the 18S of Q. suber and Q. faginea. These results provide important clues for the evolutionary trends of the rDNA 25S-18S IGS in the Fagaceae family.

  4. Molecular analysis of complete ssu to lsu rdna sequence in the harmful dinoflagellate alexandrium tamarense (korean isolate, HY970328M)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ki, Jang-Seu; Han, Myung-Soo

    2005-09-01

    New PCR primers (N=18) were designed for the isolation of complete SSU to LSU rDNA sequences from the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense. Standard PCR, employing each primer set selected for amplifications of less than 1.5 kb, successfully amplified the expected rDNA regions of A. tamarense (Korean isolate, HY970328M). Complete SSU, LSU rDNAs and ITS sequences, including 5.8S rDNA, were recorded at 1,800 bp, 520 bp and 3,393 bp, respectively. The LSU rDNA sequence was the first report in Alexandrium genus. No intron was found in the LSU rRNA coding region. Twelve D-domains within the LSU rDNA were put together into 1,879 bp (44.4% G+C), and cores into 1514 bp (42.8% G+C). The core sequence was significantly different (0.0867 of genetic distance, 91% sequence similarity) in comparison with Prorocentrum micans (GenBank access. no. X16108). The D2 region was the longest in length (300 bp) and highly variable among the 12 D-domains. In a phylogenetic analysis using complete LSU rDNA sequences of a variety of phytoplankton, A tamarense was clearly separated with high resolution against other species. The result suggests that the sequence may resolve the taxonomic ambiguities of Alexandrium genus, particularly of the tamarensis complex.

  5. Sequence variation of the rDNA ITS regions within and between anastomosis groups in Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Kuninaga, S; Natsuaki, T; Takeuchi, T; Yokosawa, R

    1997-09-01

    Sequence analysis of the rDNA region containing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions and the 5.8s rDNA coding sequence was used to evaluate the genetic diversity of 45 isolates within and between anastomosis groups (AGs) in Rhizoctonia solani. The 5.8s rDNA sequence was completely conserved across all the AGs examined, whereas the ITS rDNA sequence was found to be highly variable among isolates. The sequence homology in the ITS regions was above 96% for isolates of the same subgroup, 66-100% for isolates of different subgroups within an AG, and 55-96% for isolates of different AGs. In neighbor-joining trees based on distances derived from ITS-5.8s rDNA sequences, subgroups IA, IB and IC within AG-1 and subgroups HG-I and HG-II within AG-4 were placed on statistically significant branches as assessed by bootstrap analysis. These results suggest that sequence analysis of ITS rDNA regions of R. solani may be a valuable tool for identifying AG subgroups of biological significance.

  6. Phylogeny of the eelpout genus Lycodes (Pisces, Zoarcidae) as inferred from mitochondrial cytochrome b and 12S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Møller, Peter R; Gravlund, Peter

    2003-03-01

    The bottom-dwelling and species-rich eelpout genus Lycodes Reinhardt has a great potential for the study of Arctic marine speciation. Subdivision of the genus has been based on single or few morphological characters (e.g., lateral line configuration) with contradicting results and phylogenetic approaches have not been attended. Here we present the first phylogenetic analysis of the genus employing DNA sequences of the mitochondrial genes cytochrome b and 12S rDNA (714 bp). The analysis with the two genes combined resulted in two equally parsimonious trees. In both cladograms most of the previously suggested subgroups are para- or polyphyletic, except for the so-called short-tailed Lycodes spp., with a short tail, a single mediolateral lateral line configuration and a shallow or filled otolith sulcus. The group of long-tailed Lycodes spp., with ventral or ventro-medio-lateral types of lateral line configuration and a deep otolith sulcus, appears to be paraphyletic, since Pacific and Atlantic species in this group are not each other's closest relatives. Thus, the short-tailed species are placed in a derived clade, indicating a secondary shortening of the tail, and a "slope to shore" type of evolution. This is not in accordance with earlier assumptions of the more elongate, deeper living species being the more derived. The basal position of long-tailed Pacific species supports earlier theories of Pacific origin of the genus/family. Small genetic differences between Arctic/Atlantic species indicate a rather recent radiation in these areas after the opening of the Bering Strait 3.0-3.5 million years ago. PMID:12644398

  7. Ultrastructure and 18S rDNA phylogeny of Apoikia lindahlii comb. nov. (Chrysophyceae) and its epibiontic protists, Filos agilis gen. et sp. nov. (Bicosoecida) and Nanos amicus gen. et sp. nov. (Bicosoecida).

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunsoo; Yubuki, Naoji; Leander, Brian S; Graham, Linda E

    2010-04-01

    Three heterotrophic stramenopiles--Apoikia lindahlii comb. nov. (Chrysophyceae), Filos agilis gen. et sp. nov. (Bicosoecida), and Nanos amicus gen. et sp. nov. (Bicosoecida)--were isolated from acidic peat bogs. The biflagellate A. lindahlii forms loose irregular colonies from which swimming cells may detach, and produces extensive mucilaginous material containing bacterial cells. Phylogenetic analyses of small subunit rDNA sequences demonstrated that A. lindahlii branches within the Chrysophyceae. While A. lindahlii is an obligate heterotroph, ultrastructural observations revealed a leukoplast in the perinuclear region. The pico-sized uniflagellates F. agilis and N. amicus were isolated from separate lakes and within the mucilage of A. lindahlii, suggesting their close associations in natural habitats. In SSU rDNA phylogenies, F. agilis and N. amicus were closely related to the bicosoecids Adriamonas, Siluania, Paramonas, and Nerada. While Filos, Nanos, and Siluania are similar in light microscopic features, their SSU rDNA gene sequences differed significantly (>8% differences) and were not monophyletic. Both F. agilis and N. amicus have a cytostome/cytopharynx particle ingestion apparatus. Bacterial cells and material similar to the mucilage of A. lindahlii occurred within the food vacuole of F. agilis and N. amicus. The nature of association between A. lindahlii and its epibiontic bicosoecids is discussed.

  8. Extremely high copy numbers and polymorphisms of the rDNA operon estimated from single cell analysis of oligotrich and peritrich ciliates.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jun; Dong, Jun; Liu, Xihan; Massana, Ramon

    2013-05-01

    The copy number and sequence variation of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) operon are of functional significance in evolution and ecology of organisms. However, the relationship between copy number and sequence variation of rDNA in protists has been rarely studied. Here we quantified rDNA copy numbers of oligotrich and peritrich ciliate species using single-cell quantitative PCR. We also examined the rDNA sequence variation by using single-cell PCR, cloning, and sequencing of multiple clones. We found that the rDNA copy numbers per cell were extremely high and different among even congeners, with the highest record of about 310,000. There was substantial intraindividual haplotype diversity and nucleotide diversity for the rDNA markers, with sequence differences primarily characterized by single nucleotide polymorphisms. Haplotype and nucleotide diversity was positively correlated to the rDNA copy number. Our findings provide evidence that: (1) ciliates generally have much higher rDNA copy numbers than other protists and fungi, which could lead to overestimation of the relative abundance of ciliates in environmental samples when rDNA sequence-based methodologies are used; and that (2) the rDNA might not always evolve in a strictly concerted manner in ciliates, which may raise problems in rDNA-based inference of species richness and phylogeny.

  9. Phylogenetic relationships among higher Nemertean (Nemertea) Taxa inferred from 18S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, P; Turbeville, J M; Lindh, S

    2001-09-01

    We estimated the phylogenetic relationships of 15 nemertean (phylum Nemertea) species from the four subclasses Hoplo-, Hetero-, Palaeo-, and Bdellonemertea with 18S rDNA sequence data. Three outgroup taxa were used for rooting: Annelida, Platyhelminthes, and Mollusca. Parsimony and maximum-likelihood analyses supported the monophyletic status of the Heteronemertea and a taxon consisting of hoplonemerteans and Bdellonemertea, while indicating that Palaeonemertea is paraphyletic. The monophyletic status of the two nemertean classes Anopla and Enopla is not supported by the data. The unambiguous clades are well supported, as assessed by a randomization test (bootstrapping) and branch support values.

  10. Relationship between organization and function of ribosomal genes in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Karpen, G.H.

    1987-01-01

    In most eukaryotic organisms, the genes that encode the 18S and 28S ribosomal RNAs (rDNA genes) are tandemly repeated, and are located in constitutive heterochromatin and/or centromeric or telomeric regions. P-element mediated transformation was used to investigate the relationship between rDNA organization and function in Drosophila melanogaster. Tritiated-uridine incorporation under heat shock conditions and in situ hybridization to rRNA were used to demonstrate that a single rDNA gene inserted into euchromatin can be transcribed at a high rate, in polytene nuclei. P-element-mediated transformation of a single Drosophila rDNA gene was also utilized to investigate the ability of ribosomal DNA to organize a nucleolus. Cytological approaches demonstrated that structures resembling the endogenous nucleoli were preferentially associated with four different sites of rDNA insertion, in polytene nuclei. These mini-nucleoli also contained components specific to the nucleolus, as shown by in situ hybridization to rRNA and indirect immunofluorescence with an antibody that binds to Drosophila nucleoli. The transformed genes were able to partially rescue mutant phenotypes due to a deficiency of rDNA, indicating that the mini-nucleoli were functional.

  11. Characterization of the microbial community in different types of Daqu samples as revealed by 16S rRNA and 26S rRNA gene clone libraries.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao-Wei; Yan, Zheng; Nout, M J Robert; Boekhout, Teun; Han, Bei-Zhong; Zwietering, Marcel H; Smid, Eddy J

    2015-01-01

    Daqu is a fermentative saccharification agent that is used to initiate fermentation in the production of Chinese liquor and vinegar. Different types of Daqu can be distinguished based on the maximum fermentation temperature, location of production, and raw materials used. We aimed to characterize and distinguish the different types of Daqu using a culture-independent cloning method. The lowest microbial diversity was found in Daqu produced at high-temperature. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to compare the bacterial composition of Daqu from different regions (i.e., northern Daqu and southern Daqu). Staphylococcus gallinarum and Staphylococcus saprophyticus were found in southern Daqu, and were absent in northern Daqu. The fungi Saccharomycopsis fibuligera and Lichtheimia ramosa dominated in low/medium-temperature Daqu, whereas Thermomyces lanuginosus occurred in high-temperature Daqu. Our study identified potential biomarkers for the different types of Daqu, which can be useful for quality control and technology development of liquor or vinegar production. PMID:25395233

  12. Effects of 16S rDNA sampling on estimates of the number of endosymbiont lineages in sucking lice

    PubMed Central

    Burleigh, J. Gordon; Light, Jessica E.; Reed, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic trees can reveal the origins of endosymbiotic lineages of bacteria and detect patterns of co-evolution with their hosts. Although taxon sampling can greatly affect phylogenetic and co-evolutionary inference, most hypotheses of endosymbiont relationships are based on few available bacterial sequences. Here we examined how different sampling strategies of Gammaproteobacteria sequences affect estimates of the number of endosymbiont lineages in parasitic sucking lice (Insecta: Phthirapatera: Anoplura). We estimated the number of louse endosymbiont lineages using both newly obtained and previously sequenced 16S rDNA bacterial sequences and more than 42,000 16S rDNA sequences from other Gammaproteobacteria. We also performed parametric and nonparametric bootstrapping experiments to examine the effects of phylogenetic error and uncertainty on these estimates. Sampling of 16S rDNA sequences affects the estimates of endosymbiont diversity in sucking lice until we reach a threshold of genetic diversity, the size of which depends on the sampling strategy. Sampling by maximizing the diversity of 16S rDNA sequences is more efficient than randomly sampling available 16S rDNA sequences. Although simulation results validate estimates of multiple endosymbiont lineages in sucking lice, the bootstrap results suggest that the precise number of endosymbiont origins is still uncertain. PMID:27547523

  13. Effects of 16S rDNA sampling on estimates of the number of endosymbiont lineages in sucking lice.

    PubMed

    Allen, Julie M; Burleigh, J Gordon; Light, Jessica E; Reed, David L

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic trees can reveal the origins of endosymbiotic lineages of bacteria and detect patterns of co-evolution with their hosts. Although taxon sampling can greatly affect phylogenetic and co-evolutionary inference, most hypotheses of endosymbiont relationships are based on few available bacterial sequences. Here we examined how different sampling strategies of Gammaproteobacteria sequences affect estimates of the number of endosymbiont lineages in parasitic sucking lice (Insecta: Phthirapatera: Anoplura). We estimated the number of louse endosymbiont lineages using both newly obtained and previously sequenced 16S rDNA bacterial sequences and more than 42,000 16S rDNA sequences from other Gammaproteobacteria. We also performed parametric and nonparametric bootstrapping experiments to examine the effects of phylogenetic error and uncertainty on these estimates. Sampling of 16S rDNA sequences affects the estimates of endosymbiont diversity in sucking lice until we reach a threshold of genetic diversity, the size of which depends on the sampling strategy. Sampling by maximizing the diversity of 16S rDNA sequences is more efficient than randomly sampling available 16S rDNA sequences. Although simulation results validate estimates of multiple endosymbiont lineages in sucking lice, the bootstrap results suggest that the precise number of endosymbiont origins is still uncertain. PMID:27547523

  14. Distribution of 18S rDNA sites and absence of the canonical TTAGG insect telomeric repeat in parasitoid Hymenoptera.

    PubMed

    Gokhman, Vladimir E; Anokhin, Boris A; Kuznetsova, Valentina G

    2014-08-01

    Karyotypes of six species belonging to three main clades of parasitoid Hymenoptera, the superfamilies Ichneumonoidea (Ichneumonidae: Ichneumon amphibolus), Cynipoidea (Cynipidae: Diplolepis rosae) and Chalcidoidea (Eurytomidae: Eurytoma robusta, Eu. serratulae and Eu. compressa, and Torymidae: Torymus bedeguaris) were studied using FISH with 18S rDNA and telomeric (TTAGG)n probes. Haploid karyotypes of D. rosae, Eu. robusta and Eu. serratulae carried the only 18S rDNA hybridization signal, whereas those of I. amphibolus and Eu. compressa carried three and two rDNA clusters respectively. In addition, three rDNA sites were visualized in the aneuploid female of T. bedeguaris. The number of rDNA clusters in parasitoid Hymenoptera generally correlates to the chromosome number. Apart from the overwhelming majority of the studied species of aculeate Hymenoptera, no hybridization signals were obtained from FISH with the telomeric (TTAGG)n probe in the examined parasitoid species. These data suggest absence of the canonical (TTAGG)n insect telomeric motif in the Ichneumonoidea, Cynipoidea and Chalcidoidea, and perhaps in parasitoid Hymenoptera in general.

  15. Protein purification in multicompartment electrolyzers for crystal growth of r-DNA products in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Casale, Elena; Carter, Daniel; Snyder, Robert S.; Wenisch, Elisabeth; Faupel, Michel

    1990-01-01

    Recombinant-DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) (r-DNA) proteins, produced in large quantities for human consumption, are now available in sufficient amounts for crystal growth. Crystallographic analysis is the only method now available for defining the atomic arrangements within complex biological molecules and decoding, e.g., the structure of the active site. Growing protein crystals in microgravity has become an important aspect of biology in space, since crystals that are large enough and of sufficient quality to permit complete structure determinations are usually obtained. However even small amounts of impurities in a protein preparation are anathema for the growth of a regular crystal lattice. A multicompartment electrolyzer with isoelectric, immobiline membranes, able to purify large quantities of r-DNA proteins is described. The electrolyzer consists of a stack of flow cells, delimited by membranes of very precise isoelectric point (pI, consisting of polyacrylamide supported by glass fiber filters containing Immobiline buffers and titrants to uniquely define a pI value) and very high buffering power, able to titrate all proteins tangent or crossing such membranes. By properly selecting the pI values of two membranes delimiting a flow chamber, a single protein can be kept isoelectric in a single flow chamber and thus, be purified to homogeneity (by the most stringent criterion, charge homogeneity).

  16. cAMP-induced phosphorylation of 26S proteasomes on Rpn6/PSMD11 enhances their activity and the degradation of misfolded proteins.

    PubMed

    Lokireddy, Sudarsanareddy; Kukushkin, Nikolay Vadimovich; Goldberg, Alfred Lewis

    2015-12-29

    Although rates of protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPS) are determined by their rates of ubiquitination, we show here that the proteasome's capacity to degrade ubiquitinated proteins is also tightly regulated. We studied the effects of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) on proteolysis by the UPS in several mammalian cell lines. Various agents that raise intracellular cAMP and activate PKA (activators of adenylate cyclase or inhibitors of phosphodiesterase 4) promoted degradation of short-lived (but not long-lived) cell proteins generally, model UPS substrates having different degrons, and aggregation-prone proteins associated with major neurodegenerative diseases, including mutant FUS (Fused in sarcoma), SOD1 (superoxide dismutase 1), TDP43 (TAR DNA-binding protein 43), and tau. 26S proteasomes purified from these treated cells or from control cells and treated with PKA degraded ubiquitinated proteins, small peptides, and ATP more rapidly than controls, but not when treated with protein phosphatase. Raising cAMP levels also increased amounts of doubly capped 26S proteasomes. Activated PKA phosphorylates the 19S subunit, Rpn6/PSMD11 (regulatory particle non-ATPase 6/proteasome subunit D11) at Ser14. Overexpression of a phosphomimetic Rpn6 mutant activated proteasomes similarly, whereas a nonphosphorylatable mutant decreased activity. Thus, proteasome function and protein degradation are regulated by cAMP through PKA and Rpn6, and activation of proteasomes by this mechanism may be useful in treating proteotoxic diseases.

  17. Early-life nutrition modulates the epigenetic state of specific rDNA genetic variants in mice.

    PubMed

    Holland, Michelle L; Lowe, Robert; Caton, Paul W; Gemma, Carolina; Carbajosa, Guillermo; Danson, Amy F; Carpenter, Asha A M; Loche, Elena; Ozanne, Susan E; Rakyan, Vardhman K

    2016-07-29

    A suboptimal early-life environment, due to poor nutrition or stress during pregnancy, can influence lifelong phenotypes in the progeny. Epigenetic factors are thought to be key mediators of these effects. We show that protein restriction in mice from conception until weaning induces a linear correlation between growth restriction and DNA methylation at ribosomal DNA (rDNA). This epigenetic response remains into adulthood and is restricted to rDNA copies associated with a specific genetic variant within the promoter. Related effects are also found in models of maternal high-fat or obesogenic diets. Our work identifies environmentally induced epigenetic dynamics that are dependent on underlying genetic variation and establishes rDNA as a genomic target of nutritional insults.

  18. Early-life nutrition modulates the epigenetic state of specific rDNA genetic variants in mice.

    PubMed

    Holland, Michelle L; Lowe, Robert; Caton, Paul W; Gemma, Carolina; Carbajosa, Guillermo; Danson, Amy F; Carpenter, Asha A M; Loche, Elena; Ozanne, Susan E; Rakyan, Vardhman K

    2016-07-29

    A suboptimal early-life environment, due to poor nutrition or stress during pregnancy, can influence lifelong phenotypes in the progeny. Epigenetic factors are thought to be key mediators of these effects. We show that protein restriction in mice from conception until weaning induces a linear correlation between growth restriction and DNA methylation at ribosomal DNA (rDNA). This epigenetic response remains into adulthood and is restricted to rDNA copies associated with a specific genetic variant within the promoter. Related effects are also found in models of maternal high-fat or obesogenic diets. Our work identifies environmentally induced epigenetic dynamics that are dependent on underlying genetic variation and establishes rDNA as a genomic target of nutritional insults. PMID:27386920

  19. 16S rDNA analysis of archaea indicates dominance of Methanobacterium and high abundance of Methanomassiliicoccaceae in rumen of Nili-Ravi buffalo.

    PubMed

    Paul, S S; Deb, S M; Dey, A; Somvanshi, S P S; Singh, D; Rathore, R; Stiverson, J

    2015-10-01

    The molecular diversity of rumen methanogens was investigated using 16S rDNA gene library prepared from the rumen contents of Nili-Ravi buffaloes. Microbial genomic DNA was isolated from four adult male fistulated buffaloes and PCR conditions were set up using specific primers. Amplified product was cloned into a suitable vector, and the inserts of positive clones were sequenced. A total of 142 clones were examined, and the analysis revealed 46 species level (0.01 distance) operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Twenty six OTUs comprising 89 clones (63% of the total clones) were taxonomically assigned to Methanobacterium genus and the majority of them had highest percent identity with Methanobacterium flexile among cultured methanogens. Five OTUs comprising 27 clones (19% of total clones) were taxonomically assigned to Methanomicrobium genus and these clones showed highest sequence identity with Methanomicrobium mobile. Only two OTUs comprising 6 clones (4% of total clones) were assigned to Methanobrevibacter genus. A total of 17 clones belonging to 10 species level OTUs showed highest percent identity (ranging from 85 to 95%) with Methanomassilicoccus luminyensis and were taxonomically classified as Methanomassiliicocaceae. Out of the 142 rDNA clones, 112 clones, which constitute 79% of the total clones representing 42 OTUs, had less than 98.5% sequence identity with any of the cultured strains of methanogens and represent novel species of methanogens. This study has revealed the largest assortment of hydrogenotrophic methanogen phylotypes ever identified from the rumen of Nili-Ravi buffaloes. The study indicates that Methanobacterium is the most dominant methanogen in the rumen of Nili-Ravi buffalo. This is also the first report on the presence of methanogens phylogenetically close to M. luminyensis, an H2 dependent methylotrophic methanogen, in the rumen of buffaloes at such a high level of abundance. PMID:26103451

  20. 16S rDNA analysis of archaea indicates dominance of Methanobacterium and high abundance of Methanomassiliicoccaceae in rumen of Nili-Ravi buffalo.

    PubMed

    Paul, S S; Deb, S M; Dey, A; Somvanshi, S P S; Singh, D; Rathore, R; Stiverson, J

    2015-10-01

    The molecular diversity of rumen methanogens was investigated using 16S rDNA gene library prepared from the rumen contents of Nili-Ravi buffaloes. Microbial genomic DNA was isolated from four adult male fistulated buffaloes and PCR conditions were set up using specific primers. Amplified product was cloned into a suitable vector, and the inserts of positive clones were sequenced. A total of 142 clones were examined, and the analysis revealed 46 species level (0.01 distance) operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Twenty six OTUs comprising 89 clones (63% of the total clones) were taxonomically assigned to Methanobacterium genus and the majority of them had highest percent identity with Methanobacterium flexile among cultured methanogens. Five OTUs comprising 27 clones (19% of total clones) were taxonomically assigned to Methanomicrobium genus and these clones showed highest sequence identity with Methanomicrobium mobile. Only two OTUs comprising 6 clones (4% of total clones) were assigned to Methanobrevibacter genus. A total of 17 clones belonging to 10 species level OTUs showed highest percent identity (ranging from 85 to 95%) with Methanomassilicoccus luminyensis and were taxonomically classified as Methanomassiliicocaceae. Out of the 142 rDNA clones, 112 clones, which constitute 79% of the total clones representing 42 OTUs, had less than 98.5% sequence identity with any of the cultured strains of methanogens and represent novel species of methanogens. This study has revealed the largest assortment of hydrogenotrophic methanogen phylotypes ever identified from the rumen of Nili-Ravi buffaloes. The study indicates that Methanobacterium is the most dominant methanogen in the rumen of Nili-Ravi buffalo. This is also the first report on the presence of methanogens phylogenetically close to M. luminyensis, an H2 dependent methylotrophic methanogen, in the rumen of buffaloes at such a high level of abundance.

  1. Sequence-Based Identification of Mycobacterium Species Using the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA Bacterial Identification System

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jean Baldus; Leonard, Debra G. B.; Pan, Xai; Musser, James M.; Berman, Richard E.; Nachamkin, Irving

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA Bacterial Sequencing Kit (PE Applied Biosystems), a 500-bp sequence-based identification system, for its ability to identify clinical Mycobacterium isolates. The organism identity was determined by comparing the 16S rDNA sequence to the MicroSeq database, which consists primarily of type strain sequences. A total of 113 isolates (18 different species), previously recovered and identified by routine methods from two clinical laboratories, were analyzed by the MicroSeq method. Isolates with discordant results were analyzed by hsp65 gene sequence analysis and in some cases repeat phenotypic identification, AccuProbe rRNA hybridization (Gen-Probe, Inc., San Diego, Calif.), or high-performance liquid chromatography of mycolic acids. For 93 (82%) isolates, the MicroSeq identity was concordant with the previously reported identity. For 18 (16%) isolates, the original identification was discordant with the MicroSeq identification. Of the 18 discrepant isolates, 7 (six unique sequences) were originally misidentified by phenotypic analysis or the AccuProbe assay but were correctly identified by the MicroSeq assay. Of the 18 discrepant isolates, 11 (seven unique sequences) were unusual species that were difficult to identify by phenotypic methods and, in all but one case, by molecular methods. The remaining two isolates (2%) failed definitive phenotypic identification, but the MicroSeq assay was able to definitively identify one of these isolates. The MicroSeq identification system is an accurate and rapid method for the identification of Mycobacterium spp. PMID:10618095

  2. Adaptation of a membrane bioreactor to 1,2-dichloroethane revealed by 16S rDNA pyrosequencing and dhlA qPCR.

    PubMed

    Munro, Jacob E; Liew, Elissa F; Coleman, Nicholas V

    2013-01-01

    A pilot-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) was tested for bioremediation of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA) in groundwater. Pyrosequencing of 16S rDNA was used to study changes in the microbiology of the MBR over 137 days, including a 67 day initial adaptation phase of increasing DCA concentration. The bacterial community in the MBR was distinct from those in soil and groundwater at the same site, and was dominated by alpha- and beta- proteobacteria, including Rhodobacter, Methylibium, Rhodopseudomonas, Methyloversatilis, Caldilinea, Thiobacillus, Azoarcus, Hyphomicrobium, and Leptothrix. Biodegradation of DCA in the MBR began after 26 days, and was sustained for the remainder of the experiment. A quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for the dehalogenase gene dhlA was developed to monitor DCA-degrading bacteria in the MBR, and a positive correlation was seen between dhlA gene abundance and the cumulative amount of DCA that had entered the MBR. Genera previously associated with aerobic DCA biodegradation (Xanthobacter, Ancylobacter, Azoarcus) were present in the MBR, and the abundance of Azoarcus correlated well with dhlA gene abundance. This study shows that MBRs can be an effective method for removal of DCA from groundwater, and that the dhlA qPCR is a rapid and sensitive method for detection of DCA-degrading bacteria. PMID:24175727

  3. The first comprehensive molecular phylogeny of Bryozoa (Ectoprocta) based on combined analyses of nuclear and mitochondrial genes.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Judith; Obst, Matthias; Sundberg, Per

    2009-07-01

    Bryozoa is one of the most puzzling phyla in the animal kingdom and little is known about their evolutionary history. Its phylogenetic position among the Metazoa remains unsettled, as well as its intra-phylum relationships. Here, we present the first comprehensive molecular phylogeny of Bryozoa based on the mitochondrial gene COI and two nuclear genes 18S rDNA and 28S rDNA including 32 species from 23 families. We show that the monophyletic status is supported for the phylum as well as for previously defined bryozoan classes. The 28S rDNA supports a close relationship of Phylactolaemata and Stenolaemata, while partial COI and 18S rDNA show the freshwater Phylactolaemata as basal bryozoans. The Gymnolaemata have generally been divided into soft-bodied forms (Ctenostomata) and hard-bodied species (Cheilostomata). In our analyses all three genes conflict with this assumption and show hard body forms having evolved within Gymnolaemata several times.

  4. Molecular Taxonomy of Ganoderma cupreum from Southern India Inferred from ITS rDNA Sequences Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Ganoderma is a cosmopolitan wood-rot basidiomycete that has been extensively studied for its pathogencity and medicinal properties. Identification of Ganoderma based on macro-microscopic features led to large number of synonyms which resulted in 250 taxonomic names. A Ganoderma species collected from Courtallam, Tamil Nadu was identified as G. cupreum. Phylogenetic analysis inferred from internal transcribed spacer rDNA region resolved the Indian isolate MYC1 as Ganoderma cupreum which clustered with Australian and Asian "cupreum" clade with 85% bootstrap support BS and shared 99% and 98% nucleotide similarity with Malaysian and Australian 'cupreum' respectively. This study represents the first molecular evidence of G. cupreum from Asian origin. PMID:24493948

  5. Single-step co-integration of multiple expressible heterologous genes into the ribosomal DNA of the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Klabunde, J; Diesel, A; Waschk, D; Gellissen, G; Hollenberg, C P; Suckow, M

    2002-05-01

    We have investigated the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha as a host for the co-integration and expression of multiple heterologous genes using an rDNA integration approach. The ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of H. polymorpha was found to consist of a single rDNA cluster of about 50-60 repeats of an 8-kb unit located on chromosome II. A 2.4-kb segment of H. polymorpha rDNA encompassing parts of the 25S, the complete 5S and the non-transcribed spacer region between 25S and 18S rDNA was isolated and inserted into conventional integrative H. polymorpha plasmids harboring the Saccharomyces- cerevisiae-derived URA3 gene for selection. These rDNA plasmids integrated homologously into the rDNA repeats of a H. polymorpha (odc1) host as several independent clusters. Anticipating that this mode of multiple-cluster integration could be used for the simultaneous integration of several distinct rDNA plasmids, the host strain was co-transformed with a mixture of up to three different plasmids, all bearing the same URA3 selection marker. Transformations indeed resulted in mitotically stable strains harboring one, two, or all three plasmids integrated into the rDNA. The overall copy number of the plasmids integrated did not exceed the number of rDNA repeats present in the untransformed host strain, irrespective of the number of different plasmids involved. Strains harboring different plasmids co-expressed the introduced genes, resulting in functional proteins. Thus, this approach provides a new and attractive tool for the rapid generation of recombinant strains that simultaneously co-produce several proteins in desired stoichiometric ratios. PMID:12021801

  6. ASSESSMENT OF FECAL POLLUTION SOURCES IN PLUM CREEK WATERSHED USING BACTEROIDETES 16S RDNA-BASED ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, 16S rDNA Bacteroidetes-targeted PCR assays were developed to discriminate between ruminant and human fecal pollution. These assays are rapid and relatively inexpensive but have been used in a limited number of studies. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy o...

  7. ASSESSMENT OF FECAL POLLUTION SOURCES IN PLUM CREEK WATERSHED USING PCR AND PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSES OF BACTEROIDETES 16S RDNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional methods for assessing fecal pollution in environmental systems, such as monitoring for fecal coliforms are not capable of discriminating between different sources fecal pollution. Recently, 16S rDNA Bacteroidetes-targeted PCR assays were developed to discriminate betw...

  8. Bacterial diversity in the rumen of Indian Surti buffalo (Bubalus bubalis), assessed by 16S rDNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Pandya, P R; Singh, K M; Parnerkar, S; Tripathi, A K; Mehta, H H; Rank, D N; Kothari, R K; Joshi, C G

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial communities in buffalo rumen were characterized using a culture-independent approach for a pooled sample of rumen fluid from 3 adult Surti buffaloes. Buffalo rumen is likely to include species of various bacterial phyla, so 16S rDNA sequences were amplified and cloned from the sample. A total of 191 clones were sequenced and similarities to known 16S rDNA sequences were examined. About 62.82% sequences (120 clones) had >90% similarity to the 16S rDNA database sequences. Furthermore, about 34.03% of the sequences (65 clones) were 85-89% similar to 16S rDNA database sequences. For the remaining 3.14%; the similarity was lower than 85% Phylogenetic analyses were also used to infer the makeup of bacterial communities in the rumen of Surti buffalo. As a result, we distinguished 42 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on unique 16S r DNA sequences: 19 OTUs affiliated to an unidentified group (45.23% of total OTUs), 11 OTUs of the phylum Firmicutes, also known as the low G+C group (26.19%), 7 OTUs of the Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides phylum (16.66%), 4 OTUs of Spirochaetes (9.52%), and 1 OTU of Actinobacteria (2.38%). These include 10 single-clone OTUs, so Good's coverage (94.76%) of 16S rRNA libraries indicated that sequences identified in the libraries represent the majority of bacterial diversity present in rumen. PMID:20720314

  9. Methanogen diversity in the rumen of Indian Surti buffalo (Bubalus bubalis), assessed by 16S rDNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, K M; Tripathi, A K; Pandya, P R; Parnerkar, S; Rank, D N; Kothari, R K; Joshi, C G

    2012-06-01

    The methanogenic communities in buffalo rumen were characterized using a culture-independent approach of a pooled sample of rumen fluid from three adult Surti buffaloes. Buffalo rumen is likely to include species of various methanogens, so 16S rDNA sequences were amplified and cloned from the sample. A total of 171 clones were sequenced to examine 16S rDNA sequence similarity. About 52.63% sequences (90 clones) had ≥ 90% similarity, whereas, 46.78% of the sequences (81 clones) were 75-89% similar to 16S rDNA database sequences, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses were also used to infer the makeup of methanogenic communities in the rumen of Surti buffalo. As a result, we distinguished 23 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on unique 16S rDNA sequences: 12 OTUs (52.17%) affiliated to Methanomicrobiales order, 10 OTUs (43.47%) of the order Methanobacteriales and one OTU (4.34%) of Methanosarcina barkeri like clone, respectively. In addition, the population of Methanomicrobiales and Methabacteriales orders were also observed, accounting 4% and 2.17% of total archea. This study has revealed the largest assortment of hydrogenotrophic methanogens phylotypes ever identified from rumen of Surti buffaloes. PMID:21507441

  10. Macrolide Resistance in Treponema pallidum Correlates With 23S rDNA Mutations in Recently Isolated Clinical Strains

    PubMed Central

    Molini, Barbara J.; Tantalo, Lauren C.; Sahi, Sharon K.; Rodriguez, Veronica I.; Brandt, Stephanie L.; Fernandez, Mark C.; Godornes, Charmie B.; Marra, Christina M.; Lukehart, Sheila A.

    2016-01-01

    Background High rates of 23S rDNA mutations implicated in macrolide resistance have been identified in Treponema pallidum samples from syphilis patients in many countries. Nonetheless, some clinicians have been reluctant to abandon azithromycin as a treatment for syphilis, citing the lack of a causal association between these mutations and clinical evidence of drug resistance. Although azithromycin resistance has been demonstrated in vivo for the historical Street 14 strain, no recent T. pallidum isolates have been tested. We used the well-established rabbit model of syphilis to determine the in vivo efficacy of azithromycin against 23S rDNA mutant strains collected in 2004 to 2005 from patients with syphilis in Seattle, Wash. Methods Groups of 9 rabbits were each infected with a strain containing 23S rDNA mutation A2058G (strains UW074B, UW189B, UW391B) or A2059G (strains UW228B, UW254B, and UW330B), or with 1 wild type strain (Chicago, Bal 3, and Mexico A). After documentation of infection, 3 animals per strain were treated with azithromycin, 3 were treated with benzathine penicillin G, and 3 served as untreated control groups. Treatment efficacy was documented by darkfield microscopic evidence of T. pallidum, serological response, and rabbit infectivity test. Results Azithromycin uniformly failed to cure rabbits infected with strains harboring either 23S rDNA mutation, although benzathine penicillin G was effective. Infections caused by wild type strains were successfully treated by either azithromycin or benzathine penicillin G. Conclusions A macrolide resistant phenotype was demonstrated for all strains harboring a 23S rDNA mutation, demonstrating that either A2058G or A2059G mutation confers in vivo drug resistance. PMID:27513385

  11. Development of a real-time PCR method for the detection of fossil 16S rDNA fragments of phototrophic sulfur bacteria in the sediments of Lake Cadagno.

    PubMed

    Ravasi, D F; Peduzzi, S; Guidi, V; Peduzzi, R; Wirth, S B; Gilli, A; Tonolla, M

    2012-05-01

    Lake Cadagno is a crenogenic meromictic lake situated in the southern range of the Swiss Alps characterized by a compact chemocline that has been the object of many ecological studies. The population dynamics of phototrophic sulfur bacteria in the chemocline has been monitored since 1994 with molecular methods such as 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. To reconstruct paleo-microbial community dynamics, we developed a quantitative real-time PCR methodology for specific detection of 16S rRNA gene sequences of purple and green sulfur bacteria populations from sediment samples. We detected fossil 16S rDNA of nine populations of phototrophic sulfur bacteria down to 9-m sediment depth, corresponding to about 9500 years of the lake's biogeological history. These results provide the first evidence for the presence of 16S rDNA of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria in Holocene sediments of an alpine meromictic lake and indicate that the water column stratification and the bacterial plume were already present in Lake Cadagno thousands of years ago. The finding of Chlorobium clathratiforme remains in all the samples analyzed shows that this population, identified in the water column only in 2001, was already a part of the lake's biota in the past.

  12. Molecular organization and phylogenetic analysis of 5S rDNA in crustaceans of the genus Pollicipes reveal birth-and-death evolution and strong purifying selection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The 5S ribosomal DNA (5S rDNA) is organized in tandem arrays with repeat units that consist of a transcribing region (5S) and a variable nontranscribed spacer (NTS), in higher eukaryotes. Until recently the 5S rDNA was thought to be subject to concerted evolution, however, in several taxa, sequence divergence levels between the 5S and the NTS were found higher than expected under this model. So, many studies have shown that birth-and-death processes and selection can drive the evolution of 5S rDNA. In analyses of 5S rDNA evolution is found several 5S rDNA types in the genome, with low levels of nucleotide variation in the 5S and a spacer region highly divergent. Molecular organization and nucleotide sequence of the 5S ribosomal DNA multigene family (5S rDNA) were investigated in three Pollicipes species in an evolutionary context. Results The nucleotide sequence variation revealed that several 5S rDNA variants occur in Pollicipes genomes. They are clustered in up to seven different types based on differences in their nontranscribed spacers (NTS). Five different units of 5S rDNA were characterized in P. pollicipes and two different units in P. elegans and P. polymerus. Analysis of these sequences showed that identical types were shared among species and that two pseudogenes were present. We predicted the secondary structure and characterized the upstream and downstream conserved elements. Phylogenetic analysis showed an among-species clustering pattern of 5S rDNA types. Conclusions These results suggest that the evolution of Pollicipes 5S rDNA is driven by birth-and-death processes with strong purifying selection. PMID:22004418

  13. Rapid identification of bovine mastitis pathogens by high-resolution melt analysis of 16S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Ajitkumar, Praseeda; Barkema, Herman W; De Buck, Jeroen

    2012-03-23

    Accurate identification of mastitis pathogens is often compromised when using conventional culture-based methods. Here, we report a novel, rapid assay tested for speciation of bacterial mastitis pathogens using high-resolution melt analysis (HRMA) of 16S rDNA sequences. Real-time PCR amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragment, spanning the variable region V5 and V6 was performed with a resulting amplicon of 290bp. First, a library was generated of melt curves of 9 common pathogens that are implicated in bovine mastitis. Six of the isolates, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus agalactiae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus uberis, Staphylococcus aureus and Mycoplasma bovis, were type strains while the other 3, Arcanobacterium pyogenes, Corynebacterium bovis and Streptococcus dysgalactiae, were bovine mastitis field isolates. Four of the type strains, E. coli, S. agalactiae, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus, were found to be of human origin, while the other 3 type strains were isolated from bovine infections. Secondly, the melt curves and corresponding amplicon sequences of A. pyogenes, E. coli, S. agalactiae, S. dysgalactiae, K. pneumoniae, S. uberis and S. aureus were compared with 10 bovine mastitis field isolates of each pathogen. Based on the distinct differences in melt curves and sequences between human and bovine isolates of E. coli and K. pneumoniae, it was deemed necessary to select a set of bovine strains for these pathogens to be used as reference strains in the HRMA. Next, the HRMA was validated by three interpreters analyzing the differential clustering pattern of melt curves of 60 bacterial cultures obtained from mastitis milk samples. The three test interpreters were blinded to the culture and sequencing results of the isolates. Overall accuracy of the validation assay was 95% as there was difficulty in identifying the streptococci due to heterogeneity observed in the PCR amplicons of S. uberis. The present study revealed that broad-range real-time PCR with

  14. Nuclear rDNA pseudogenes in Chagas disease vectors: evolutionary implications of a new 5.8S+ITS-2 paralogous sequence marker in triatomines of North, Central and northern South America.

    PubMed

    Bargues, M Dolores; Zuriaga, M Angeles; Mas-Coma, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    A pseudogene, paralogous to rDNA 5.8S and ITS-2, is described in Meccus dimidiata dimidiata, M. d. capitata, M. d. maculippenis, M. d. hegneri, M. sp. aff. dimidiata, M. p. phyllosoma, M. p. longipennis, M. p. pallidipennis, M. p. picturata, M. p. mazzottii, Triatoma mexicana, Triatoma nitida and Triatoma sanguisuga, covering North America, Central America and northern South America. Such a nuclear rDNA pseudogene is very rare. In the 5.8S gene, criteria for pseudogene identification included length variability, lower GC content, mutations regarding the functional uniform sequence, and relatively high base substitutions in evolutionary conserved sites. At ITS-2 level, criteria were the shorter sequence and large proportion of insertions and deletions (indels). Pseudogenic 5.8S and ITS-2 secondary structures were different from the functional foldings, different one another, showing less negative values for minimum free energy (mfe) and centroid predictions, and lower fit between mfe, partition function, and centroid structures. A complete characterization indicated a processed pseudogenic unit of the ghost type, escaping from rDNA concerted evolution and with functionality subject to constraints instead of evolving free by neutral drift. Despite a high indel number, low mutation number and an evolutionary rate similar to the functional ITS-2, that pseudogene distinguishes different taxa and furnishes coherent phylogenetic topologies with resolution similar to the functional ITS-2. The discovery of a pseudogene in many phylogenetically related species is unique in animals and allowed for an estimation of its palaeobiogeographical origin based on molecular clock data, inheritance pathways, evolutionary rate and pattern, and geographical spread. Additional to the technical risk to be considered henceforth, this relict pseudogene, designated as "ps(5.8S+ITS-2)", proves to be a valuable marker for specimen classification, phylogenetic analyses, and systematic

  15. The conservation of number and location of 18S sites indicates the relative stability of rDNA in species of Pentatomomorpha (Heteroptera).

    PubMed

    Bardella, Vanessa Bellini; Fernandes, Thiago; Vanzela, André Luís Laforga

    2013-07-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with rDNA probes has been used for comparative cytogenetics studies in different groups of organisms. Although heteropterans are a large suborder within Hemiptera, studies using rDNA are limited to the infraorder Cimicomorpha, in which rDNA sites are present in the autosomes or sex chromosomes. We isolated and sequenced a conserved 18S rDNA region of Antiteuchus tripterus (Pentatomidae) and used it as a probe against chromosomes of 25 species belonging to five different families of Pentatomomorpha. The clone pAt05, with a length of 736 bp, exhibited a conserved stretch of 590 bp. FISH analysis with the probe pAt05 always demonstrated hybridization signals in sub-terminal positions, except for Euschistus heros. Apparently, there is a tendency for 18S rDNA sites to locate in autosomes, except for Leptoglossus gonagra and Euryophthalmus rufipennis, which showed signals in the m- and sex chromosomes, respectively. Although FISH has produced evidence that rearrangements are involved in rDNA repositioning, whether in different autosomes or between sex and m-chromosomes, we have no conclusive evidence of what were the pathways of these rearrangements based on the evolutionary history of the species studied here. Nevertheless, the diversity in the number of species analyzed here showed a tendency of 18S rDNA to remain among the autosomes.

  16. Characterization of viable bacteria from Siberian permafrost by 16S rDNA sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, T.; Reeves, R. H.; Gilichinsky, D. A.; Friedmann, E. I.

    1997-01-01

    Viable bacteria were found in permafrost core samples from the Kolyma-Indigirka lowland of northeast Siberia. The samples were obtained at different depths; the deepest was about 3 million years old. The average temperature of the permafrost is -10 degrees C. Twenty-nine bacterial isolates were characterized by 16S rDNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, cell morphology, Gram staining, endospore formation, and growth at 30 degrees C. The majority of the bacterial isolates were rod shaped and grew well at 30 degrees C; but two of them did not grow at or above 28 degrees C, and had optimum growth temperatures around 20 degrees C. Thirty percent of the isolates could form endospores. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the isolates fell into four categories: high-GC Gram-positive bacteria, beta-proteobacteria, gamma-proteobacteria, and low-GC Gram-positive bacteria. Most high-GC Gram-positive bacteria and beta-proteobacteria, and all gamma-proteobacteria, came from samples with an estimated age of 1.8-3.0 million years (Olyor suite). Most low-GC Gram-positive bacteria came from samples with an estimated age of 5,000-8,000 years (Alas suite).

  17. Molecular Analysis of Methanogen Richness in Landfill and Marshland Targeting 16S rDNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Shailendra; Kundu, Sharbadeb; Ghosh, Sankar K; Maitra, S S

    2015-01-01

    Methanogens, a key contributor in global carbon cycling, methane emission, and alternative energy production, generate methane gas via anaerobic digestion of organic matter. The methane emission potential depends upon methanogenic diversity and activity. Since they are anaerobes and difficult to isolate and culture, their diversity present in the landfill sites of Delhi and marshlands of Southern Assam, India, was analyzed using molecular techniques like 16S rDNA sequencing, DGGE, and qPCR. The sequencing results indicated the presence of methanogens belonging to the seventh order and also the order Methanomicrobiales in the Ghazipur and Bhalsawa landfill sites of Delhi. Sequences, related to the phyla Crenarchaeota (thermophilic) and Thaumarchaeota (mesophilic), were detected from marshland sites of Southern Assam, India. Jaccard analysis of DGGE gel using Gel2K showed three main clusters depending on the number and similarity of band patterns. The copy number analysis of hydrogenotrophic methanogens using qPCR indicates higher abundance in landfill sites of Delhi as compared to the marshlands of Southern Assam. The knowledge about "methanogenic archaea composition" and "abundance" in the contrasting ecosystems like "landfill" and "marshland" may reorient our understanding of the Archaea inhabitants. This study could shed light on the relationship between methane-dynamics and the global warming process. PMID:26568700

  18. New parachlamydial 16S rDNA phylotypes detected in human clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Daniele; Venditti, Danielle; Valassina, Marcello

    2002-11-01

    Chlamydiales are important intracellular bacterial pathogens, causing a wide variety of diseases in vertebrates, including humans. Besides the well-known species in the family Chlamydiaceae, new chlamydial organisms have recently been discovered, forming three new families: Parachlamydiaceae, Simkaniaceae and Waddliaceae. Parachlamydia acanthamoebae and Simkania negevensis are currently investigated as emerging human respiratory pathogens. Additional chlamydial lineages have been discovered by 16S rDNA-based molecular studies, and their implication in human infections is poorly known. By using a pan-chlamydia 16S rDNA PCR, we have searched for the presence of chlamydiae in 228 clinical samples that all previously had been shown to be PCR-negative for Chlamydophila pneumoniae: 170 respiratory samples, 45 atheromatic plaques and 13 peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples. Nine respiratory samples tested positive. Sequence analysis has allowed us to assign four sequences to Chlamydophila psittaci, three sequences to Chlamydophila felis, and two sequences to two novel phylotypes belonging to the Parachlamydiaceae. These latter sequences showed similarity values of more than 93% with each other and with the P. acanthamoebae sequence, thus belonging to novel, unrecognized species. In conclusion, this report showed that a variety of non-C. pneumoniae chlamydial respiratory infection is present in humans, and that new parachlamydiae distinct from P. acanthamoebae may be detected in human clinical samples. Future studies will be of interest in order to estimate the diversity of these novel chlamydiae in both clinical and environmental samples, as well as their possible clinical implication in human and animal infections.

  19. Molecular Analysis of Methanogen Richness in Landfill and Marshland Targeting 16S rDNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Shailendra; Kundu, Sharbadeb; Ghosh, Sankar K; Maitra, S S

    2015-01-01

    Methanogens, a key contributor in global carbon cycling, methane emission, and alternative energy production, generate methane gas via anaerobic digestion of organic matter. The methane emission potential depends upon methanogenic diversity and activity. Since they are anaerobes and difficult to isolate and culture, their diversity present in the landfill sites of Delhi and marshlands of Southern Assam, India, was analyzed using molecular techniques like 16S rDNA sequencing, DGGE, and qPCR. The sequencing results indicated the presence of methanogens belonging to the seventh order and also the order Methanomicrobiales in the Ghazipur and Bhalsawa landfill sites of Delhi. Sequences, related to the phyla Crenarchaeota (thermophilic) and Thaumarchaeota (mesophilic), were detected from marshland sites of Southern Assam, India. Jaccard analysis of DGGE gel using Gel2K showed three main clusters depending on the number and similarity of band patterns. The copy number analysis of hydrogenotrophic methanogens using qPCR indicates higher abundance in landfill sites of Delhi as compared to the marshlands of Southern Assam. The knowledge about "methanogenic archaea composition" and "abundance" in the contrasting ecosystems like "landfill" and "marshland" may reorient our understanding of the Archaea inhabitants. This study could shed light on the relationship between methane-dynamics and the global warming process.

  20. Molecular Analysis of Methanogen Richness in Landfill and Marshland Targeting 16S rDNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Shailendra; Kundu, Sharbadeb; Ghosh, Sankar K.; Maitra, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Methanogens, a key contributor in global carbon cycling, methane emission, and alternative energy production, generate methane gas via anaerobic digestion of organic matter. The methane emission potential depends upon methanogenic diversity and activity. Since they are anaerobes and difficult to isolate and culture, their diversity present in the landfill sites of Delhi and marshlands of Southern Assam, India, was analyzed using molecular techniques like 16S rDNA sequencing, DGGE, and qPCR. The sequencing results indicated the presence of methanogens belonging to the seventh order and also the order Methanomicrobiales in the Ghazipur and Bhalsawa landfill sites of Delhi. Sequences, related to the phyla Crenarchaeota (thermophilic) and Thaumarchaeota (mesophilic), were detected from marshland sites of Southern Assam, India. Jaccard analysis of DGGE gel using Gel2K showed three main clusters depending on the number and similarity of band patterns. The copy number analysis of hydrogenotrophic methanogens using qPCR indicates higher abundance in landfill sites of Delhi as compared to the marshlands of Southern Assam. The knowledge about “methanogenic archaea composition” and “abundance” in the contrasting ecosystems like “landfill” and “marshland” may reorient our understanding of the Archaea inhabitants. This study could shed light on the relationship between methane-dynamics and the global warming process. PMID:26568700

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of Leymus (Poaceae: Triticeae) inferred from nuclear rDNA ITS sequences.

    PubMed

    Sha, Li-Na; Yang, Rui-Wu; Fan, Xing; Wang, Xiao-Li; Zhou, Yong-Hong

    2008-10-01

    To investigate the phylogenetic relationships of polyploid Leymus (Poaceae: Triticeae), sequences of the nuclear rDNA internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) were analyzed for 34 Leymus accessions representing 25 species, together with three Psathyrostachys species (Ns genome), two Pseudoroegneria (St genome) species, Lophopyrum elongatum (E(e) genome), and Thinopyrum bessarabicum (E(b) genome). The phylogenetic analyses (maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference) supported two major clades, one including 21 Leymus species and three Psathyrostachys species, the other with nine Leymus species and four diploid species. The ITS RNA secondary structure of the Leymus species was compared with that of their putative diploid donor. It is suggested that (1) the species from the same areas or neighboring geographic regions are closely related to each other; (2) L. coreanus, L. duthiei, L. duthiei var. longearistatus, and L. komarovii are closely related to other Leymus species, and it is reasonable to transfer these species from the genus Hystrix to Leymus; (3) the ITS sequences of Leymus are evolutionarily distinct; (4) the different Leymus species and different distribution of a species derived their Ns genome from different Psathyrostachys species; and (5) there is a close relationship among Leymus, Pseudoroegneria, Lophopyrum, and Thinopyrum, but it is difficult to presume that the St, E(e), and E(b) genome may be the Xm genome donor of the Leymus species.

  2. BBX21, an Arabidopsis B-box protein, directly activates HY5 and is targeted by COP1 for 26S proteasome-mediated degradation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongqing; Jiang, Yan; Li, Jigang; Lin, Fang; Holm, Magnus; Deng, Xing Wang

    2016-07-01

    BBX21 (also known as SALT TOLERANCE HOMOLOG 2), a B-box (BBX)-containing protein, has been previously identified as a positive regulator of light signaling; however, the precise role of BBX21 in regulating seedling photomorphogenesis remains largely unclear. In this study, we report that CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1) interacts with BBX21 in vivo and is able to ubiquitinate BBX21 in vitro. Thus, BBX21 is targeted for 26S proteasome-mediated degradation in dark-grown Arabidopsis seedlings in a COP1-dependent manner. Moreover, we show that BBX21 binds to the T/G-box in the ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5) promoter and directly activates HY5 expression in the light. Transgenic seedlings overexpressing BBX21 exhibit dramatically shortened hypocotyls in the light, and this phenotype is dependent on a functional HY5. Taken together, our data suggest a molecular base underlying BBX21-mediated seedling photomorphogenesis, indicating that BBX21 is a pivotal component involved in the COP1-HY5 regulatory hub. PMID:27325768

  3. Degradation of the encephalomyocarditis virus and hepatitis A virus 3C proteases by the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Schlax, Peter E.; Zhang Jin; Lewis, Elizabeth; Planchart, Antonio; Lawson, T. Glen . E-mail: tlawson@bates.edu

    2007-04-10

    We have isolated stably transfected mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines that inducibly express either the mature encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) or hepatitis A virus (HAV) 3C protease and have used these cells to demonstrate that both proteins are subject to degradation in vivo by the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system. The detection of 3C protease expression in these cells requires inducing conditions and the presence of one of several proteasome inhibitors. Both 3C proteases are incorporated into conjugates with ubiquitin in vivo. HAV 3C protease expression has deleterious effects on cell viability, as determined by observation and counting of cells cultured in the absence or presence of inducing conditions. The EMCV 3C protease was found to be preferentially localized to the nucleus of induced cells, while the HAV 3C protease remains in the cytoplasm. The absence of polyubiquitinated EMCV 3C protease conjugates in nuclear fraction preparations suggests that localization to the nucleus can protect this protein from ubiquitination.

  4. Degradation of the encephalomyocarditis virus and hepatitis A virus 3C proteases by the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system in vivo.

    PubMed

    Schlax, Peter E; Zhang, Jin; Lewis, Elizabeth; Planchart, Antonio; Lawson, T Glen

    2007-04-10

    We have isolated stably transfected mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines that inducibly express either the mature encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) or hepatitis A virus (HAV) 3C protease and have used these cells to demonstrate that both proteins are subject to degradation in vivo by the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system. The detection of 3C protease expression in these cells requires inducing conditions and the presence of one of several proteasome inhibitors. Both 3C proteases are incorporated into conjugates with ubiquitin in vivo. HAV 3C protease expression has deleterious effects on cell viability, as determined by observation and counting of cells cultured in the absence or presence of inducing conditions. The EMCV 3C protease was found to be preferentially localized to the nucleus of induced cells, while the HAV 3C protease remains in the cytoplasm. The absence of polyubiquitinated EMCV 3C protease conjugates in nuclear fraction preparations suggests that localization to the nucleus can protect this protein from ubiquitination. PMID:17150238

  5. Variability of 18rDNA loci in four lace bug species (Hemiptera, Tingidae) with the same chromosome number

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Natalia V.; Golub, Viktor B.; Kuznetsova, Valentina G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Male karyotypes of Elasmotropis testacea (Herrich-Schaeffer, 1835), Tingis cardui (Linnaeus, 1758), Tingis crispata (Herrich-Schaeffer, 1838), and Agramma femorale Thomson, 1871 (Heteroptera, Cimicomorpha, Tingidae) were analyzed using conventional chromosome staining and FISH with 18S rDNA and (TTAGG)n telomeric probes. The FISH technique was applied for the first time in the Tingidae. In spite of the fact that all species showed the same chromosome number (2n = 12 + XY), they have significant differences in the number and position of rDNA loci. FISH with the classical insect (TTAGG)n probe produced no signals on chromosomes suggesting telomeres in lace bugs to be of some other molecular composition. Tingidae share absence of the (TTAGG)n telomeric sequence with all so far studied taxa of the advanced true bug infraorders Cimicomorpha and Pentatomomorpha. PMID:26753071

  6. Chromosome analysis and rDNA FISH in the stag beetle Dorcus parallelipipedus L. (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea: Lucanidae).

    PubMed

    Colomba, M S; Vitturi, R; Zunino, M

    2000-01-01

    In the present work the chromosome complement (2n = 18; 8AA + XY) of the stag beetle Dorcus parallelipipedus L. (Scarabaeoidea: Lucanidae) is analyzed using conventional Giemsa staining, banding techniques and ribosomal fluorescent in situ hybridization (rDNA FISH). rDNA FISH remains the unique tool for providing a clear-cut identification of Nucleolar Organizer Regions (NORs) when conventional banding methods such as silver- and CMA3-staining proved to be inadequate. The dull, homogeneous CMA3 fluorescence of all chromosomes indicates the absence of markedly GC rich compartmentalized regions in D. parallelipipedus genome. Silver impregnation inadequacy in detecting NOR regions is to be sought in the unusual extensive silver stainability of heterochromatic material which, on the contrary of what stated for vertebrates, seems to be a common feature in Scarabaeoidea species. PMID:11433969

  7. Molecular characterization of Stictodora tridactyla (Trematoda: Heterophyidae) from Kuwait Bay using rDNA ITS and mtCO1.

    PubMed

    Al-Kandari, Wafa Y; Alnaqeeb, Majed A; Isaac, Asha M; Al-Bustan, Suzanne A

    2015-11-01

    Stictodora tridactyla is an intestinal fluke in the family Heterophyidae that parasitizes shorebirds and mammals, including humans. Its metacercarial cyst stage was reported in the Arabian killifish, Aphanius dispar, at Kuwait Bay. In the present study, Cerithidea cingulata was found to serve as the first intermediate host of S. tridactyla. In order to establish the snail-fish link in the life cycle of S. tridactyla, complete sequences of ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer region 1 and 2 (rDNA ITS1 and ITS2) and partial sequence of cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 were obtained for metacercarial cysts isolated from the fish A. dispar and rediae isolated from the snail C. cingulata. Sequence alignment demonstrated that these larval stages belong to the same heterophyid species, S. tridactyla. Phylogenetic analysis based on rDNA ITS1, ITS2, and mtCO1 confirmed the position of S. tridactyla within the Heterophyidae and found it to cluster with Haplorchis spp. The present study represents the first molecular study correlating the larval stages of S. tridactyla using rDNA ITS1, ITS2, and mtCO1 and examining the phylogenetic relationships of S. tridactyla with different heterophyid species. PMID:26268569

  8. Histone H3 N-terminal acetylation sites especially K14 are important for rDNA silencing and aging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Heng-hao; Su, Trent; Xue, Yong

    2016-02-24

    Histone variants and histone modifications are essential components in the establishment and maintenance of the repressed status of heterochromatin. Among these histone variants and modifications, acetylation at histone H4K16 is uniquely important for the maintenance of silencing at telomere and mating type loci but not at the ribosomal DNA locus. Here we show that mutations at H3 N-terminal acetylation site K14 specifically disrupt rDNA silencing. However, the mutant ion at H3K14R doesn't affect the recruitment of Pol II repressor RENT (regulator of nucleolar silencing and telophase exit) complex at the rDNA region. Instead, the CAF-1(chromatin assembly factor I) subunit Cac2 level decreased in the H3K14R mutant. Further experiments revealed that the single mutation at H3K14 and multi-site mutations at H3 N-terminus including K14 also delayed replication-depend nucleosome assembly and advanced replicative life span. In conclusion, our data suggest that histone H3 N-terminal acetylation sites especially at K14 are important for rDNA silencing and aging.

  9. Histone H3 N-terminal acetylation sites especially K14 are important for rDNA silencing and aging

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Heng-hao; Su, Trent; Xue, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Histone variants and histone modifications are essential components in the establishment and maintenance of the repressed status of heterochromatin. Among these histone variants and modifications, acetylation at histone H4K16 is uniquely important for the maintenance of silencing at telomere and mating type loci but not at the ribosomal DNA locus. Here we show that mutations at H3 N-terminal acetylation site K14 specifically disrupt rDNA silencing. However, the mutant ion at H3K14R doesn’t affect the recruitment of Pol II repressor RENT (regulator of nucleolar silencing and telophase exit) complex at the rDNA region. Instead, the CAF-1(chromatin assembly factor I) subunit Cac2 level decreased in the H3K14R mutant. Further experiments revealed that the single mutation at H3K14 and multi-site mutations at H3 N-terminus including K14 also delayed replication-depend nucleosome assembly and advanced replicative life span. In conclusion, our data suggest that histone H3 N-terminal acetylation sites especially at K14 are important for rDNA silencing and aging. PMID:26906758

  10. Karyotype characterization and evolution in South American species of Lathyrus (Notolathyrus, Leguminosae) evidenced by heterochromatin and rDNA mapping.

    PubMed

    Chalup, Laura; Samoluk, Sergio Sebastián; Neffa, Viviana Solís; Seijo, Guillermo

    2015-11-01

    Notolathyrus is a section of South American endemic species of the genus Lathyrus. The origin, phylogenetic relationship and delimitation of some species are still controversial. The present study provides an exhaustive analysis of the karyotypes of approximately half (10) of the species recognized for section Notolathyrus and four outgroups (sections Lathyrus and Orobus) by cytogenetic mapping of heterochromatic bands and 45S and 5S rDNA loci. The bulk of the parameters analyzed here generated markers to identify most of the chromosomes in the complements of the analyzed species. Chromosome banding showed interspecific variation in the amount and distribution of heterochromatin, and together with the distribution of rDNA loci, allowed the characterization of all the species studied here. Additionally, some of the chromosome parameters described (st chromosomes and the 45S rDNA loci) constitute the first diagnostic characters for the Notolathyrus section. Evolutionary, chromosome data revealed that the South American species are a homogeneous group supporting the monophyly of the section. Variation in the amount of heterochromatin was not directly related to the variation in DNA content of the Notolathyrus species. However, the correlation observed between the amount of heterochromatin and some geographical and bioclimatic variables suggest that the variation in the heterochromatic fraction should have an adaptive value.

  11. Genealogical relationships of southern Ontario polyploid unisexual salamanders (genus Ambystoma) inferred from intergenomic exchanges and major rDNA cytotypes.

    PubMed

    Bi, Ke; Bogart, James P; Fu, Jinzhong

    2008-01-01

    North American unisexual salamanders in the genus Ambystoma are common around the Great Lakes region of North America. They contain an almost identical mitochondrial genome across their distribution that is unlike that of any of the four species whose genomes may be included in their nuclei. Thus, sequence-based phylogenies of unisexual populations are confusing. We used chromosomal intergenomic exchanges and major rDNA cytotypes as combined cytogenetic markers to tentatively construct a genealogy of unisexual Ambystoma in southern Ontario. We employed GISH and sequential/simultaneous GISH/FISH-rDNA to reveal intergenomic exchanges and rDNA cytotypes in unisexual A. laterale--2 jeffersonianum (LJJ) triploids and their tetraploid derivative A. laterale--3 jeffersonianum (LJJJ). We identified 10 different patterns of intergenomic exchanges from 18 isolated populations and used them as primary cytogenetic markers. Major rDNA cytotypes served as independent and supplementary markers. Our results suggest that current LJJ and LJJJ populations in southern Ontario are likely derived from a few unisexual individuals. Intergenomic exchanges are common phenomena and widely distributed in the salamanders of the A. laterale--A. jeffersonianum unisexual complex. Integration of GISH and FISH can exhibit multiple unrelated chromosomal markers on the same chromosome spread and demonstrate lineage relationships in unisexual populations. Similar methods may be applied for studying the molecular cytogenetics of other unisexuals to improve our understanding of their genealogical relationships and historical dispersal. PMID:18175200

  12. Primary and secondary structure analyses of the rDNA group-I introns of the Zygnematales (Charophyta).

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, D; Damberger, S; Surek, B; Melkonian, M

    1996-02-01

    The Zygnematales (Charophyta) contain a group-I intron (subgroupIC1) within their nuclear-encoded small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) coding region. This intron, which is inserted after position 1506 (relative to the SSU rDNA of Escherichia coli), is proposed to have been vertically inherited since the origin of the Zygnematales approximately 350-400 million years ago. Primary and secondary structure analyses were carried out to model group-I intron evolution in the Zygnematales. Secondary structure analyses support genetic data regarding sequence conservation within regions known to be functionally important for in vitro self-splicing of group-I introns. Comparisons of zygnematalean group-I intron secondary structures also provided some new insights into sequences that may have important roles in in vivo RNA splicing. Sequence analyses showed that sequence divergence rates and the nucleotide compositions of introns and coding regions within any one taxon varied widely, suggesting that the "1506" group-I introns and rDNA coding regions in the Zygnematales evolve independently.

  13. Immediate unidirectional epigenetic reprogramming of NORs occurs independently of rDNA rearrangements in synthetic and natural forms of a polyploid species Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Książczyk, Tomasz; Kovarik, Ales; Eber, Frédérique; Huteau, Virginie; Khaitova, Lucie; Tesarikova, Zuzana; Coriton, Olivier; Chèvre, Anne-Marie

    2011-12-01

    The dynamics of genome modification that occurred from the initial hybridization event to the stabilization of allopolyploid species remains largely unexplored. Here, we studied inheritance and expression of rDNA loci in the initial generations of Brassica napus allotetraploids (2n = 38, AACC) resynthesized from Brassica oleracea (2n = 18, CC) and B. rapa (2n = 20, AA) and compared the patterns to natural forms. Starting already from F1 generation, there was a strong uniparental silencing of B. oleracea genes. The epigenetic reprogramming was accompanied with immediate condensation of C-genome nucleolar organizer region (NOR) and progressive transgeneration hypermethylation of polymerase I promoters, mainly at CG sites. No such changes were observed in the A-genome NORs. Locus loss and gains affecting mainly non-NOR loci after the first allotetraploid meiosis did not influence established functional status of NORs. Collectively, epigenetic and genetic modifications in synthetic lines resemble events that accompanied formation of natural allopolyploid species.

  14. Structure and comparative analysis of the rDNA intergenic spacer of Brassica rapa. Implications for the function and evolution of the Cruciferae spacer.

    PubMed

    Da Rocha, P S; Bertrand, H

    1995-04-15

    The sequence of the intergenic spacer (IGS) of the Brassica rapa rDNA was determined and compared with those of other Cruciferae species. In the 3012-bp IGS, two segments of mostly unique sequence flank a 1.5-kb region consisting of two tandem arrays of repeats. A putative transcription initiation site (TIS) was identified by sequence comparison, 395 bp downstream from the repeat region. The intercalating segment displays unusual sequence patterns, and modelling of its topology predicts intrinsically bent DNA, with two elements of bending centered at positions -118 and -288 relative to the TIS. Comparative analysis of spacers from Cruciferae, revealed a common organization and high sequence similarity in their 5' and, particularly, 3' regions, whereas the repeat region upstream of TIS diverges rapidly. The conservation of structural elements, including the bent DNA upstream from the TIS, is discussed in light of their possible involvement in the IGS functions and structure of spacers in common ancestors. Examination of the Cruciferae spacers shows that, in addition to unequal crossover and gene conversion, insertional mutagenesis and replication slippage are molecular mechanisms significantly contributing to their evolution.

  15. Recognition of a common rDNA target site in archaea and eukarya by analogous LAGLIDADG and His-Cys box homing endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Norimichi; Nomura, Yayoi; Sussman, Django; Klein, Daniel; Stoddard, Barry L

    2008-12-01

    The presence of a homing endonuclease gene (HEG) within a microbial intron or intein empowers the entire element with the ability to invade genomic targets. The persistence of a homing endonuclease lineage depends in part on conservation of its DNA target site. One such rDNA sequence has been invaded both in archaea and in eukarya, by LAGLIDADG and His-Cys box homing endonucleases, respectively. The bases encoded by this target include a universally conserved ribosomal structure, termed helix 69 (H69) in the large ribosomal subunit. This region forms the 'B2a' intersubunit bridge to the small ribosomal subunit, contacts bound tRNA in the A- and P-sites, and acts as a trigger for ribosome disassembly through its interactions with ribosome recycling factor. We have determined the DNA-bound structure and specificity profile of an archaeal LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease (I-Vdi141I) that recognizes this target site, and compared its specificity with the analogous eukaryal His-Cys box endonuclease I-PpoI. These homodimeric endonuclease scaffolds have arrived at similar specificity profiles across their common biological target and analogous solutions to the problem of accommodating conserved asymmetries within the DNA sequence, but with differences at individual base pairs that are fine-tuned to the sequence conservation of archaeal versus eukaryal ribosomes. PMID:18984620

  16. Morphology and SSU rDNA sequence analysis of two hypotrichous ciliates (Protozoa, Ciliophora, Hypotrichia) including the new species Metaurostylopsis parastruederkypkeae n. sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Borong; Wang, Chundi; Huang, Jie; Shi, Yuhong; Chen, Xiangrui

    2016-10-01

    The morphology and phylogeny of two hypotrichous ciliates, Metaurostylopsis parastruederkypkeae n. sp. and Neourostylopsis flavicana (Wang et al., 2011) Chen et al., 2013 were investigated based on morphology, infraciliature and the small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA gene (rRNA) sequence. The new species, M. parastruederkypkeae n. sp. was identified according to its characteristics: body shape ellipsoidal, size about (165-200) × (45-60) μm in vivo, cell color reddish; two types of cortical granules including wheat grain-like and yellow-greenish larger ones along the marginal cirri rows and dorsal kineties and dot-like and reddish smaller ones, grouped around marginal cirri on ventral side and arranged in short lines on dorsal side; 26-41 adoral membranelles; three frontal and one parabuccal, five to seven frontoterminal, one buccal, and three to six transverse cirri; seven to thirteen midventral pairs; five to nine unpaired ventral cirri, five to seven left and three to five right marginal rows; and three complete dorsal kineties. Phylogenetic analysis based on SSU rDNA sequences showed that both Metaurostylopsis and Neourostylopsis are monophyletic. As the internal relationship between and within both genera are not clear, further studies on the species in these two genera are necessary. The key characteristics of all known twelve Metaurostylopsis-Apourostylopsis-Neourostylopsis species complex were updated.

  17. Morphology and SSU rDNA sequence analysis of two hypotrichous ciliates (Protozoa, Ciliophora, Hypotrichia) including the new species Metaurostylopsis parastruederkypkeae n. sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Borong; Wang, Chundi; Huang, Jie; Shi, Yuhong; Chen, Xiangrui

    2016-05-01

    The morphology and phylogeny of two hypotrichous ciliates, Metaurostylopsis parastruederkypkeae n. sp. and Neourostylopsis flavicana (Wang et al., 2011) Chen et al., 2013 were investigated based on morphology, infraciliature and the small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA gene (rRNA) sequence. The new species, M. parastruederkypkeae n. sp. was identified according to its characteristics: body shape ellipsoidal, size about (165-200) × (45-60) μm in vivo, cell color reddish; two types of cortical granules including wheat grain-like and yellow-greenish larger ones along the marginal cirri rows and dorsal kineties and dot-like and reddish smaller ones, grouped around marginal cirri on ventral side and arranged in short lines on dorsal side; 26-41 adoral membranelles; three frontal and one parabuccal, five to seven frontoterminal, one buccal, and three to six transverse cirri; seven to thirteen midventral pairs; five to nine unpaired ventral cirri, five to seven left and three to five right marginal rows; and three complete dorsal kineties. Phylogenetic analysis based on SSU rDNA sequences showed that both Metaurostylopsis and Neourostylopsis are monophyletic. As the internal relationship between and within both genera are not clear, further studies on the species in these two genera are necessary. The key characteristics of all known twelve Metaurostylopsis-Apourostylopsis-Neourostylopsis species complex were updated.

  18. Evaluation of direct 16S rDNA sequencing as a metagenomics-based approach to screening bacteria in bottled water.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Trine; Skånseng, Beate; Hoorfar, Jeffrey; Löfström, Charlotta

    2013-09-01

    Deliberate or accidental contamination of food, feed, and water supplies poses a threat to human health worldwide. A rapid and sensitive detection technique that could replace the current labor-intensive and time-consuming culture-based methods is highly desirable. In addition to species-specific assays, such as PCR, there is a need for generic methods to screen for unknown pathogenic microorganisms in samples. This work presents a metagenomics-based direct-sequencing approach for detecting unknown microorganisms, using Bacillus cereus (as a model organism for B. anthracis) in bottled water as an example. Total DNA extraction and 16S rDNA gene sequencing were used in combination with principle component analysis and multicurve resolution to study detection level and possibility for identification. Results showed a detection level of 10(5) to 10(6) CFU/L. Using this method, it was possible to separate 2 B. cereus strains by the principal component plot, despite the close sequence resemblance. A linear correlation between the artificial contamination level and the relative amount of the Bacillus artificial contaminant in the metagenome was observed, and a relative amount value above 0.5 confirmed the presence of Bacillus. The analysis also revealed that background flora in the bottled water varied between the different water types that were included in the study. This method has the potential to be adapted to other biological matrices and bacterial pathogens for fast screening of unknown bacterial threats in outbreak situations.

  19. Evaluation of direct 16S rDNA sequencing as a metagenomics-based approach to screening bacteria in bottled water.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Trine; Skånseng, Beate; Hoorfar, Jeffrey; Löfström, Charlotta

    2013-09-01

    Deliberate or accidental contamination of food, feed, and water supplies poses a threat to human health worldwide. A rapid and sensitive detection technique that could replace the current labor-intensive and time-consuming culture-based methods is highly desirable. In addition to species-specific assays, such as PCR, there is a need for generic methods to screen for unknown pathogenic microorganisms in samples. This work presents a metagenomics-based direct-sequencing approach for detecting unknown microorganisms, using Bacillus cereus (as a model organism for B. anthracis) in bottled water as an example. Total DNA extraction and 16S rDNA gene sequencing were used in combination with principle component analysis and multicurve resolution to study detection level and possibility for identification. Results showed a detection level of 10(5) to 10(6) CFU/L. Using this method, it was possible to separate 2 B. cereus strains by the principal component plot, despite the close sequence resemblance. A linear correlation between the artificial contamination level and the relative amount of the Bacillus artificial contaminant in the metagenome was observed, and a relative amount value above 0.5 confirmed the presence of Bacillus. The analysis also revealed that background flora in the bottled water varied between the different water types that were included in the study. This method has the potential to be adapted to other biological matrices and bacterial pathogens for fast screening of unknown bacterial threats in outbreak situations. PMID:23971801

  20. SSU rDNA Divergence in Planktonic Foraminifera: Molecular Taxonomy and Biogeographic Implications

    PubMed Central

    André, Aurore; Quillévéré, Frédéric; Morard, Raphaël; Ujiié, Yurika; Escarguel, Gilles; de Vargas, Colomban; de Garidel-Thoron, Thibault; Douady, Christophe J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of planktonic foraminifera in paleoceanography requires taxonomic consistency and precise assessment of the species biogeography. Yet, ribosomal small subunit (SSUr) DNA analyses have revealed that most of the modern morpho-species of planktonic foraminifera are composed of a complex of several distinct genetic types that may correspond to cryptic or pseudo-cryptic species. These genetic types are usually delimitated using partial sequences located at the 3′end of the SSUrDNA, but typically based on empirical delimitation. Here, we first use patristic genetic distances calculated within and among genetic types of the most common morpho-species to show that intra-type and inter-type genetic distances within morpho-species may significantly overlap, suggesting that genetic types have been sometimes inconsistently defined. We further apply two quantitative and independent methods, ABGD (Automatic Barcode Gap Detection) and GMYC (General Mixed Yule Coalescent) to a dataset of published and newly obtained partial SSU rDNA for a more objective assessment of the species status of these genetic types. Results of these complementary approaches are highly congruent and lead to a molecular taxonomy that ranks 49 genetic types of planktonic foraminifera as genuine (pseudo)cryptic species. Our results advocate for a standardized sequencing procedure allowing homogenous delimitations of (pseudo)cryptic species. On the ground of this revised taxonomic framework, we finally provide an integrative taxonomy synthesizing geographic, ecological and morphological differentiations that can occur among the genuine (pseudo)cryptic species. Due to molecular, environmental or morphological data scarcities, many aspects of our proposed integrative taxonomy are not yet fully resolved. On the other hand, our study opens up the potential for a correct interpretation of environmental sequence datasets. PMID:25119900

  1. 18S rDNA Sequences from Microeukaryotes Reveal Oil Indicators in Mangrove Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Henrique F.; Cury, Juliano C.; Carmo, Flavia L.; Rosado, Alexandre S.; Peixoto, Raquel S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Microeukaryotes are an effective indicator of the presence of environmental contaminants. However, the characterisation of these organisms by conventional tools is often inefficient, and recent molecular studies have revealed a great diversity of microeukaryotes. The full extent of this diversity is unknown, and therefore, the distribution, ecological role and responses to anthropogenic effects of microeukaryotes are rather obscure. The majority of oil from oceanic oil spills (e.g., the May 2010 accident in the Gulf of Mexico) converges on coastal ecosystems such as mangroves, which are threatened with worldwide disappearance, highlighting the need for efficient tools to indicate the presence of oil in these environments. However, no studies have used molecular methods to assess the effects of oil contamination in mangrove sediment on microeukaryotes as a group. Methodology/Principal Findings We evaluated the population dynamics and the prevailing 18S rDNA phylotypes of microeukaryotes in mangrove sediment microcosms with and without oil contamination, using PCR/DGGE and clone libraries. We found that microeukaryotes are useful for monitoring oil contamination in mangroves. Our clone library analysis revealed a decrease in both diversity and species richness after contamination. The phylogenetic group that showed the greatest sensitivity to oil was the Nematoda. After contamination, a large increase in the abundance of the groups Bacillariophyta (diatoms) and Biosoecida was detected. The oil-contaminated samples were almost entirely dominated by organisms related to Bacillariophyta sp. and Cafeteria minima, which indicates that these groups are possible targets for biomonitoring oil in mangroves. The DGGE fingerprints also indicated shifts in microeukaryote profiles; specific band sequencing indicated the appearance of Bacillariophyta sp. only in contaminated samples and Nematoda only in non-contaminated sediment. Conclusions/Significance We believe that

  2. Investigating bacterial populations in styrene-degrading biofilters by 16S rDNA tag pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Portune, Kevin J; Pérez, M Carmen; Álvarez-Hornos, F Javier; Gabaldón, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are essential components in the elimination of pollutants within biofilters, yet still little is known regarding the complex relationships between microbial community structure and biodegradation function within these engineered ecosystems. To further explore this relationship, 16S rDNA tag pyrosequencing was applied to samples taken at four time points from a styrene-degrading biofilter undergoing variable operating conditions. Changes in microbial structure were observed between different stages of biofilter operation, and the level of styrene concentration was revealed to be a critical factor affecting these changes. Bacterial genera Azoarcus and Pseudomonas were among the dominant classified genera in the biofilter. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and correlation analysis revealed that the genera Brevundimonas, Hydrogenophaga, and Achromobacter may play important roles in styrene degradation under increasing styrene concentrations. No significant correlations (P > 0.05) could be detected between biofilter operational/functional parameters and biodiversity measurements, although biological heterogeneity within biofilms and/or technical variability within pyrosequencing may have considerably affected these results. Percentages of selected bacterial taxonomic groups detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were compared to results from pyrosequencing in order to assess the effectiveness and limitations of each method for identifying each microbial taxon. Comparison of results revealed discrepancies between the two methods in the detected percentages of numerous taxonomic groups. Biases and technical limitations of both FISH and pyrosequencing, such as the binding of FISH probes to non-target microbial groups and lack of classification of sequences for defined taxonomic groups from pyrosequencing, may partially explain some differences between the two methods.

  3. The unique N-terminal insert in the ribosomal protein, phosphoprotein P0, of Tetrahymena thermophila: Bioinformatic evidence for an interaction with 26S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Giovanni J; King, Roberta S; Martin, Lenore M; Hufnagel, Linda A

    2015-06-01

    Phosphoprotein P0 (P0) is part of the stalk complex of the eukaryotic large ribosomal subunit necessary for recruiting elongation factors. While the P0 sequence is highly conserved, our group noted a 15-16 residue insert exclusive to the P0s of ciliated protists, including Tetrahymena thermophila. We hypothesized that this insert may have a function unique in ciliated protists, such as stalk regulation via phosphorylation of the insert. Almost no mention of this insert exists in the literature, and although the T. thermophila ribosome has been crystallized, there is limited structural data for Tetrahymena's P0 (TtP0) and its insert. To investigate the structure and function of the TtP0 insert, we performed in silico analyses. The TtP0 sequence was scanned with phosphorylation site prediction tools to detect the likelihood of phosphorylation in the insert. TtP0's sequence was also used to produce a homology model of the N-terminal domain of TtP0, including the insert. When the insert was modeled in the context of the 26S rRNA, it associated with a region identified as expansion segment 7B (ES7B), suggesting a potential functional interaction between ES7B and the insert in T. thermophila. We were not able to obtain sufficient data to determine whether a similar relationship exists in other ciliated protists. This study lays the groundwork for future experimental studies to verify the presence of TtP0 insert/ES7 interactions in Tetrahymena, and to explore their functional significance during protein synthesis.

  4. Karyotype divergence and spreading of 5S rDNA sequences between genomes of two species: darter and emerald gobies ( Ctenogobius , Gobiidae).

    PubMed

    Lima-Filho, P A; Bertollo, L A C; Cioffi, M B; Costa, G W W F; Molina, W F

    2014-01-01

    Karyotype analyses of the cryptobenthic marine species Ctenogobius boleosoma and C. smaragdus were performed by means of classical and molecular cytogenetics, including physical mapping of the multigene 18S and 5S rDNA families. C. boleosoma has 2n = 44 chromosomes (2 submetacentrics + 42 acrocentrics; FN = 46) with a single chromosome pair each carrying 18S and 5S ribosomal sites; whereas C. smaragdus has 2n = 48 chromosomes (2 submetacentrics + 46 acrocentrics; FN = 50), also with a single pair bearing 18S rDNA, but an extensive increase in the number of GC-rich 5S rDNA sites in 21 chromosome pairs. The highly divergent karyotypes among Ctenogobius species contrast with observations in several other marine fish groups, demonstrating an accelerated rate of chromosomal evolution mediated by both chromosomal rearrangements and the extensive dispersion of 5S rDNA sequences in the genome. PMID:24643007

  5. Karyotype divergence and spreading of 5S rDNA sequences between genomes of two species: darter and emerald gobies ( Ctenogobius , Gobiidae).

    PubMed

    Lima-Filho, P A; Bertollo, L A C; Cioffi, M B; Costa, G W W F; Molina, W F

    2014-01-01

    Karyotype analyses of the cryptobenthic marine species Ctenogobius boleosoma and C. smaragdus were performed by means of classical and molecular cytogenetics, including physical mapping of the multigene 18S and 5S rDNA families. C. boleosoma has 2n = 44 chromosomes (2 submetacentrics + 42 acrocentrics; FN = 46) with a single chromosome pair each carrying 18S and 5S ribosomal sites; whereas C. smaragdus has 2n = 48 chromosomes (2 submetacentrics + 46 acrocentrics; FN = 50), also with a single pair bearing 18S rDNA, but an extensive increase in the number of GC-rich 5S rDNA sites in 21 chromosome pairs. The highly divergent karyotypes among Ctenogobius species contrast with observations in several other marine fish groups, demonstrating an accelerated rate of chromosomal evolution mediated by both chromosomal rearrangements and the extensive dispersion of 5S rDNA sequences in the genome.

  6. Purification of Drosophila ribosomal proteins. Isolation of proteins S8, S13, S14, S16, S19, S20/L24, S22/L26, S24, S25/S27, S26, S29, L4, L10/L11, L12, L13, L16, L18, L19, L27, 1, 7/8, 9, and 11.

    PubMed

    Chooi, W Y

    1980-07-22

    The proteins of Drosophila melanogaster embryonic ribosomes were separated into seven groups (A80 through G80) by stepwise elution from carboxymethylcellulose with lithium chloride at pH 6.5 by procedures previously described [Chooi, W. Y., Sabatini, L. M., MacKlin, M. D., & Fraser, W. (1980) Biochemistry 19, 1425-1433]. Three relatively acidic proteins, S14, S25/S27, and 7/8, have now been isolated from group A80 by ion-exchange chromatog raphy on carboxymethylcellulose eluted with a linear gradient of lithium chloride at pH 4.2. Fractions containing the relatively basic proteins (groups B80 through G80) were furher combined into a total of 24 "pools". The criterion for combination was the migration patterns in one-dimensional polyacrylamide gels containing sodium dodecyl sulfate (NaDodS04) of every fifth fraction from the carboxymethylcellulose column. Each pool contained between 1 and 12 major proteins. Proteins S8, S13, S16, S19, S20/L24, S22/L26, S24, S26, S29, L4, L10/L11, L12, L13, L16, L18, L19, L27, 1, 9, and 11 have now been isolated from selected pools by gel filtration through Sephadix G-100. The amount of each protein recovered from a starting amount of 1.8 g of total 80S proteins varied form 0.2 to 10.8 mg. Five proteins had no detectable contamination, and in each of the others the impurities were no greater than 9%. The amino acid composition of the individual purified proteins was determined. The molecular weights of the proteins were estimated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in NaDodSO4.

  7. Organization and variation analysis of 5S rDNA in different ploidy-level hybrids of red crucian carp × topmouth culter.

    PubMed

    He, Weiguo; Qin, Qinbo; Liu, Shaojun; Li, Tangluo; Wang, Jing; Xiao, Jun; Xie, Lihua; Zhang, Chun; Liu, Yun

    2012-01-01

    Through distant crossing, diploid, triploid and tetraploid hybrids of red crucian carp (Carassius auratus red var., RCC♀, Cyprininae, 2n = 100) × topmouth culter (Erythroculter ilishaeformis Bleeker, TC♂, Cultrinae, 2n = 48) were successfully produced. Diploid hybrids possessed 74 chromosomes with one set from RCC and one set from TC; triploid hybrids harbored 124 chromosomes with two sets from RCC and one set from TC; tetraploid hybrids had 148 chromosomes with two sets from RCC and two sets from TC. The 5S rDNA of the three different ploidy-level hybrids and their parents were sequenced and analyzed. There were three monomeric 5S rDNA classes (designated class I: 203 bp; class II: 340 bp; and class III: 477 bp) in RCC and two monomeric 5S rDNA classes (designated class IV: 188 bp, and class V: 286 bp) in TC. In the hybrid offspring, diploid hybrids inherited three 5S rDNA classes from their female parent (RCC) and only class IV from their male parent (TC). Triploid hybrids inherited class II and class III from their female parent (RCC) and class IV from their male parent (TC). Tetraploid hybrids gained class II and class III from their female parent (RCC), and generated a new 5S rDNA sequence (designated class I-N). The specific paternal 5S rDNA sequence of class V was not found in the hybrid offspring. Sequence analysis of 5S rDNA revealed the influence of hybridization and polyploidization on the organization and variation of 5S rDNA in fish. This is the first report on the coexistence in vertebrates of viable diploid, triploid and tetraploid hybrids produced by crossing parents with different chromosome numbers, and these new hybrids are novel specimens for studying the genomic variation in the first generation of interspecific hybrids, which has significance for evolution and fish genetics.

  8. Phylogeny of giant clams (Cardiidae: Tridacninae) based on partial mitochondrial 16S rDNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Schneider, J A; Foighil, D O

    1999-10-01

    We have performed the first DNA molecular phylogenetic analysis of giant clams. An approximately 462-nucleotide fragment of the mitochondrial large ribosomal subunit (16S) was sequenced for all eight species of giant clams and two species of an outgroup taxon, the edible cockle Cerastoderma. The data were analyzed using a maximum parsimony approach and a single most parsimonious tree was found. The resulting phylogenetic hypothesis indicates that the genera Hippopus and Tridacna are monophyletic sister taxa. Tridacna (Chametrachea) is the sister taxon to (T. tevoroa (T. derasa + T. gigas)), with these latter three taxa all being placed in a single subgenus, Tridacna (Tridacna). The number of recognized giant clam species has increased by one-third over the last two decades with the discovery of two rare new species having restricted geographic ranges: H. porcellanus (Palau and the Sulu Archipelago) and T. tevoroa (Tonga and Fiji). These two species lack a known fossil record but exhibit greater genetic distances from sister taxa than do extant giant clam species pairs which are recognizable in Neogene strata, e.g., T. gigas/T. derasa and T. maxima/T. squamosa. We propose that the two new species represent ancient relict lineages of Miocene origin.

  9. The multiubiquitin-chain-binding protein Mcb1 is a component of the 26S proteasome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and plays a nonessential, substrate-specific role in protein turnover.

    PubMed

    van Nocker, S; Sadis, S; Rubin, D M; Glickman, M; Fu, H; Coux, O; Wefes, I; Finley, D; Vierstra, R D

    1996-11-01

    The 26S proteasome is an essential proteolytic complex that is responsible for degrading proteins conjugated with ubiquitin. It has been proposed that the recognition of substrates by the 26S proteasome is mediated by a multiubiquitin-chain-binding protein that has previously been characterized in both plants and animals. In this study, we identified a Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of this protein, designated Mcb1. Mcb1 copurified with the 26S proteasome in both conventional and nickel chelate chromatography. In addition, a significant fraction of Mcb1 in cell extracts was present in a low-molecular-mass form free of the 26S complex. Recombinant Mcb1 protein bound multiubiquitin chains in vitro and, like its plant and animal counterparts, exhibited a binding preference for longer chains. Surprisingly, (delta)mcb1 deletion mutants were viable, grew at near-wild-type rates, degraded the bulk of short-lived proteins normally, and were not sensitive to UV radiation or heat stress. These data indicate that Mcb1 is not an essential component of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in S.cerevisiae. However, the (delta)mcb1 mutant exhibited a modest sensitivity to amino acid analogs and had increased steady-state levels of ubiquitin-protein conjugates. Whereas the N-end rule substrate, Arg-beta-galactosidase, was degraded at the wild-type rate in the (delta)mcb1 strain, the ubiquitin fusion degradation pathway substrate, ubiquitin-Pro-beta-galactosidase, was markedly stabilized. Collectively, these data suggest that Mcb1 is not the sole factor involved in ubiquitin recognition by the 26S proteasome and that Mcb1 may interact with only a subset of ubiquitinated substrates.

  10. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of the Appenine endemic cyprinid fish Squalius lucumonis and three other Italian leuciscines using chromosome banding and FISH with rDNA probes.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Anna Rita; Milana, Valentina; Hett, Anne Kathrin; Tancioni, Lorenzo

    2012-12-01

    Karyotype and other chromosomal characteristics of the Appenine endemic cyprinid fish, Toscana stream chub Squalius lucumonis, were analysed using conventional banding and FISH with 45S and 5S rDNA probes. The diploid chromosome number (2n = 50) and karyotype characteristics including pericentromeric heterochromatic blocks and GC-rich CMA(3)-positive sites corresponding to both positive Ag-NORs and 45S rDNA loci on the short arms of a single medium-sized submetacentric chromosome pair were consistent with those found in most European leuciscine cyprinids. On other hand, 5S rDNA FISH in the Toscana stream chub and three other Italian leuciscines, S. squalus, Rutilus rubilio and Telestes muticellus, revealed a species-specific hybridization pattern, i.e. signals on four (S. lucumonis), three (S. squalus and R. rubilio) and two (T. muticellus) chromosome pairs. Whereas all the species shared the 5S rDNA loci on the largest subtelocentric chromosome pair, a "leuciscine" cytotaxonomic marker, S. lucumonis showed both classes of rDNA loci tandem aligned on the short arms of chromosome pair No. 12. The present findings suggest that the observed high variability of 5S rDNA loci provides a powerful tool for investigation of karyotype differentiation in karyologically conservative leuciscine fishes.

  11. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of the Appenine endemic cyprinid fish Squalius lucumonis and three other Italian leuciscines using chromosome banding and FISH with rDNA probes.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Anna Rita; Milana, Valentina; Hett, Anne Kathrin; Tancioni, Lorenzo

    2012-12-01

    Karyotype and other chromosomal characteristics of the Appenine endemic cyprinid fish, Toscana stream chub Squalius lucumonis, were analysed using conventional banding and FISH with 45S and 5S rDNA probes. The diploid chromosome number (2n = 50) and karyotype characteristics including pericentromeric heterochromatic blocks and GC-rich CMA(3)-positive sites corresponding to both positive Ag-NORs and 45S rDNA loci on the short arms of a single medium-sized submetacentric chromosome pair were consistent with those found in most European leuciscine cyprinids. On other hand, 5S rDNA FISH in the Toscana stream chub and three other Italian leuciscines, S. squalus, Rutilus rubilio and Telestes muticellus, revealed a species-specific hybridization pattern, i.e. signals on four (S. lucumonis), three (S. squalus and R. rubilio) and two (T. muticellus) chromosome pairs. Whereas all the species shared the 5S rDNA loci on the largest subtelocentric chromosome pair, a "leuciscine" cytotaxonomic marker, S. lucumonis showed both classes of rDNA loci tandem aligned on the short arms of chromosome pair No. 12. The present findings suggest that the observed high variability of 5S rDNA loci provides a powerful tool for investigation of karyotype differentiation in karyologically conservative leuciscine fishes. PMID:23238894

  12. Diversity and Recombination of Dispersed Ribosomal DNA and Protein Coding Genes in Microsporidia

    PubMed Central

    Ironside, Joseph Edward

    2013-01-01

    Microsporidian strains are usually classified on the basis of their ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences. Although rDNA occurs as multiple copies, in most non-microsporidian species copies within a genome occur as tandem arrays and are homogenised by concerted evolution. In contrast, microsporidian rDNA units are dispersed throughout the genome in some species, and on this basis are predicted to undergo reduced concerted evolution. Furthermore many microsporidian species appear to be asexual and should therefore exhibit reduced genetic diversity due to a lack of recombination. Here, DNA sequences are compared between microsporidia with different life cycles in order to determine the effects of concerted evolution and sexual reproduction upon the diversity of rDNA and protein coding genes. Comparisons of cloned rDNA sequences between microsporidia of the genus Nosema with different life cycles provide evidence of intragenomic variability coupled with strong purifying selection. This suggests a birth and death process of evolution. However, some concerted evolution is suggested by clustering of rDNA sequences within species. Variability of protein-coding sequences indicates that considerable intergenomic variation also occurs between microsporidian cells within a single host. Patterns of variation in microsporidian DNA sequences indicate that additional diversity is generated by intragenomic and/or intergenomic recombination between sequence variants. The discovery of intragenomic variability coupled with strong purifying selection in microsporidian rRNA sequences supports the hypothesis that concerted evolution is reduced when copies of a gene are dispersed rather than repeated tandemly. The presence of intragenomic variability also renders the use of rDNA sequences for barcoding microsporidia questionable. Evidence of recombination in the single-copy genes of putatively asexual microsporidia suggests that these species may undergo cryptic sexual reproduction, a

  13. rDNA ITS sequences among morphotypes of Keratell cochlearis, Keratell quadrata and Brachionus forficula (Rotifera).

    PubMed

    Ge, Y L; Xi, Y L; Ma, J; Xu, D D

    2012-03-22

    Morphological variation in rotifers is affected by environmental conditions, making it hard to identify some rotifer taxa. We examined the rDNA ITS sequences of 10 unspined (KCU1-KCU10) and 17 spined (KCS1-KCS17) Keratell cochlearis clones, 26 two-spined (KQT1-KQT26), 18 single-spined (KQS1-KQS18) and 9 unspined (KQU1-KQU9) K. quadrata clones, and 17 long-spined (BL1-BL17) and 11 short-spined (BS1-BS11) Brachionus forficula clones collected from Lake Tingtang in Wuhu city, China. Molecular phylogenetic trees were constructed by neighbor-joining, maximum-likelihood, maximum parsimony, and Bayesian inference methods using B. calyciflorus as an outgroup. The K. cochlearis clones included 20 haplotypes, the K. quadrata clones included 37 haplotypes, and the B. forficula clones included 25 haplotypes. Different morphotypes of each rotifer species had shared haplotypes. Sequence divergences were 0.1-8.9% among different K. cochlearis haplotypes, and 8.1-8.9% between KCHAP1 (KCU1 and KCU10), KCU3, KCU4 and KCU6, and the other haplotypes. Sequence divergences were 0.1-14.5% among different K. quadrata haplotypes, and 11.9-14.5% between KQS17 and the other haplotypes. Sequence divergences were 0.1-11.7% among different B. forficula haplotypes, 11.0-11.7% between BL15 and the other haplotypes, 9.3-10.1% between BS3 and the other haplotypes, and 11.7% between BL15 and BS3. The four phylogenetic trees all supported that KCHAP1, KCU3, KCU4, KCU6 and the other 16 haplotypes among the 20 K. cochlearis haplotypes, KQS17 and the other 36 haplotypes among the 37 K. quadrata haplotypes, and BL15, BS3 and the other 23 haplotypes among the 25 B. forficula haplotypes all belonged to their own isolated clades. The morphological variation of the three rotifer species was attributed mainly to phenotypic plasticity.

  14. Microbial community dynamics in manure composts based on 16S and 18S rDNA T-RFLP profiles.

    PubMed

    Tiquia, S M

    2005-10-01

    Compost processing is assumed to be related to the microbial communities present. However, methods that will evaluate these relationships are not well understood. In this study, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis was used to evaluate the diversity of PCR-amplified bacterial 16S and fungal 18S rDNA communities from manure composts at different stages of composting (initial [day 0], thermophilic [day 24], and mature [day 104]). Results showed that the bacterial and fungal community profiles changed over the composting process, with bacterial communities showing a higher diversity compared with the fungal communities. During the thermophilic stage (day 24), the diversity of the bacterial communities increased, while the fungal communities decreased. As the compost reached maturity (day 104), a reverse pattern was observed between the diversity of bacterial and fungal communities. That is, the 18S rDNA T-RFLP-based diversity indices increased, while the 16S rDNA T-RFLP-based diversity decreased. Differences in temperature profiles at different stages of composting impacted the chemical properties and the diversity of the microbial communities. The day 104 compost (mature) had lower water, organic matter and C contents and higher C and OM loss compared with the day 0 (initial) and day 24 (thermophilic) composts, which affected the diversity of the microbial communities. The results presented here demonstrated that distinctive community patterns from manure composts could be rapidly generated using T-RFLP analysis. The succession of peaks in combination of increasing and decreasing peak heights at different stage of composting indicates the high potential of T-RFLP technique to monitor the dynamics of microbial communities, and their variation qualitatively and quantitatively.

  15. 16S and 23S plastid rDNA phylogenies of Prototheca species and their auxanographic phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Aren; Brubaker, Shane; Somanchi, Aravind; Yu, Esther; Rudenko, George; Reyes, Nina; Espina, Karen; Grossman, Arthur; Franklin, Scott

    2014-08-01

    Because algae have become more accepted as sources of human nutrition, phylogenetic analysis can help resolve the taxonomy of taxa that have not been well studied. This can help establish algal evolutionary relationships. Here, we compare Auxenochlorella protothecoides and 23 strains of Prototheca based on their complete 16S and partial 23S plastid rDNA sequences along with nutrient utilization (auxanographic) profiles. These data demonstrate that some of the species groupings are not in agreement with the molecular phylogenetic analyses and that auxanographic profiles are poor predictors of phylogenetic relationships. PMID:25937672

  16. 16S and 23S plastid rDNA phylogenies of Prototheca species and their auxanographic phenotypes1

    PubMed Central

    Ewing, Aren; Brubaker, Shane; Somanchi, Aravind; Yu, Esther; Rudenko, George; Reyes, Nina; Espina, Karen; Grossman, Arthur; Franklin, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Because algae have become more accepted as sources of human nutrition, phylogenetic analysis can help resolve the taxonomy of taxa that have not been well studied. This can help establish algal evolutionary relationships. Here, we compare Auxenochlorella protothecoides and 23 strains of Prototheca based on their complete 16S and partial 23S plastid rDNA sequences along with nutrient utilization (auxanographic) profiles. These data demonstrate that some of the species groupings are not in agreement with the molecular phylogenetic analyses and that auxanographic profiles are poor predictors of phylogenetic relationships. PMID:25937672

  17. Identification of the Bacterial Community of Maple Sap by Using Amplified Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) Restriction Analysis and rDNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lagacé, L.; Pitre, M.; Jacques, M.; Roy, D.

    2004-01-01

    The bacterial community of maple sap was characterized by analysis of samples obtained at the taphole of maple trees for the 2001 and 2002 seasons. Among the 190 bacterial isolates, 32 groups were formed according to the similarity of the banding patterns obtained by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). A subset of representative isolates for each ARDRA group was identified by 16S rRNA gene fragment sequencing. Results showed a wide variety of organisms, with 22 different genera encountered. Pseudomonas and Ralstonia, of the γ- and β-Proteobacteria, respectively, were the most frequently encountered genera. Gram-positive bacteria were also observed, and Staphylococcus, Plantibacter, and Bacillus were the most highly represented genera. The sampling period corresponding to 50% of the cumulative sap flow percentage presented the greatest bacterial diversity according to its Shannon diversity index value (1.1). γ-Proteobacteria were found to be dominant almost from the beginning of the season to the end. These results are providing interesting insights on maple sap microflora that will be useful for further investigation related to microbial contamination and quality of maple products and also for guiding new strategies on taphole contamination control. PMID:15066796

  18. Repair in ribosomal RNA genes is deficient in xeroderma pigmentosum group C and in Cockayne's syndrome cells.

    PubMed

    Christians, F C; Hanawalt, P C

    1994-04-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated transcription-coupled DNA repair in mammalian genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II but not in ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA), which are transcribed by RNA polymerase I. The removal of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) from rDNA in repair-proficient human cells has been shown to be slow but detectable and apparently not coupled to transcription. We studied the induction and removal of CPD from rDNA in cultured cells from two repair-deficient human disorders. Primary xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XP-C) cells, whether proliferating or nondividing, removed no CPD from either rDNA strand in 24 h post-UV, a result which supports earlier conclusions that XP-C cells lack the general, transcription-independent pathway of nucleotide excision repair. We also observed lower than normal repair of rDNA in Cockayne's syndrome (CS) cells from complementation groups A and B. In agreement with previous findings, the repair of both strands of the RNA polymerase II-transcribed dihydrofolate reductase gene was also deficient relative to that of normal cells. This strongly suggests that the defect in CS cells is not limited to a deficiency in a transcription-repair coupling factor. Rather, the defect may interfere with the ability of repair proteins to gain access to all expressed genes. PMID:7512688

  19. Basonuclin Regulates a Subset of Ribosomal RNA Genes in HaCaT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shengliang; Wang, Junwen; Tseng, Hung

    2007-01-01

    Basonuclin (Bnc1), a cell-type-specific ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene regulator, is expressed mainly in keratinocytes of stratified epithelium and gametogenic cells of testis and ovary. Previously, basonuclin was shown in vitro to interact with rRNA gene (rDNA) promoter at three highly conserved sites. Basonuclin's high affinity binding site overlaps with the binding site of a dedicated and ubiquitous Pol I transcription regulator, UBF, suggesting that their binding might interfere with each other if they bind to the same promoter. Knocking-down basonuclin in mouse oocytes eliminated approximately one quarter of RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcription foci, without affecting the BrU incorporation of the remaining ones, suggesting that basonuclin might regulate a subset of rDNA. Here we show, via chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), that basonuclin is associated with rDNA promoters in HaCaT cells, a spontaneously established human keratinocyte line. Immunoprecipitation data suggest that basonuclin is in a complex that also contains the subunits of Pol I (RPA194, RPA116), but not UBF. Knocking-down basonuclin in HaCaT cells partially impairs the association of RPA194 to rDNA promoter, but not that of UBF. Basonuclin-deficiency also reduces the amount of 47S pre-rRNA, but this effect can be seen only after cell-proliferation related rRNA synthesis has subsided at a higher cell density. DNA sequence of basonuclin-bound rDNA promoters shows single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that differ from those associated with UBF-bound promoters, suggesting that basonuclin and UBF interact with different subsets of promoters. In conclusion, our results demonstrate basonuclin's functional association with rDNA promoters and its interaction with Pol I in vivo. Our data also suggest that basonuclin-Pol I complex transcribes a subset of rDNA. PMID:17878937

  20. Chromosomal Locations of 5S and 45S rDNA in Gossypium Genus and Its Phylogenetic Implications Revealed by FISH.

    PubMed

    Gan, Yimei; Liu, Fang; Chen, Dan; Wu, Qiong; Qin, Qin; Wang, Chunying; Li, Shaohui; Zhang, Xiangdi; Wang, Yuhong; Wang, Kunbo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the locations of 5S and 45S rDNA in Gossypium diploid A, B, D, E, F, G genomes and tetraploid genome (AD) using multi-probe fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for evolution analysis in Gossypium genus. The rDNA numbers and sizes, and synteny relationships between 5S and 45S were revealed using 5S and 45S as double-probe for all species, and the rDNA-bearing chromosomes were identified for A, D and AD genomes with one more probe that is single-chromosome-specific BAC clone from G. hirsutum (A1D1). Two to four 45S and one 5S loci were found in diploid-species except two 5S loci in G. incanum (E4), the same as that in tetraploid species. The 45S on the 7th and 9th chromosomes and the 5S on the 9th chromosomes seemed to be conserved in A, D and AD genomes. In the species of B, E, F and G genomes, the rDNA numbers, sizes, and synteny relationships were first reported in this paper. The rDNA pattern agrees with previously reported phylogenetic history with some disagreements. Combined with the whole-genome sequencing data from G. raimondii (D5) and the conserved cotton karyotype, it is suggested that the expansion, decrease and transposition of rDNA other than chromosome rearrangements might occur during the Gossypium evolution.

  1. Molecular phylogenetics at the Felsenstein zone: approaching the Strepsiptera problem using 5.8S and 28S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Hwang, U W; Kim, W; Tautz, D; Friedrich, M

    1998-06-01

    Recent efforts to reconstruct the phylogenetic position of the insect order Strepsiptera have elicited a major controversy in molecular phylogenetics. We sequenced the 5.8S rDNA and major parts of the 28S rDNA 5' region of the strepsipteran species Stylops melittae. Their evolutionary dynamics were analyzed together with previously published insect rDNA sequences to identify tree estimation bias risks and to explore additional sources of phylogenetic information. Several major secondary structure changes were found as being autapomorphic for the Diptera, the Strepsiptera, or the Archaeognatha. Besides elevated substitution rates a significant AT bias was present in dipteran and strepsipteran 28S rDNA which, however, was restricted to stem sites in the Diptera while also affecting single-stranded sites in the Strepsiptera. When dipteran taxa were excluded from tree estimation all methods consistently supported the placement of Strepsiptera to within the Holometabola. When dipteran taxa were included maximum likelihood continued to favor a sister-group relationship of Strepsiptera with Mecoptera while remaining methods strongly supported a sister-group relationship with Diptera. Parametric bootstrap analysis revealed maximum likelihood as a consistent estimator if rate heterogeneity across sites was taken into account. Though the position of Strepsiptera within Holometabola remains elusive, we conclude that the evolution of dipteran and strepsipteran rDNA involved similar yet independent changes of substitution parameters. PMID:9667995

  2. Phylogenetic Relationships Among Xiphinema and Xiphidorus Nematode Species from Brazil Inferred from 18S rDNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Claudio M G; Hübschen, Judith; Brown, Derek J F; Ferraz, Luiz C C B; Wright, Frank; Neilson, Roy

    2004-06-01

    Maximum likelihood trees produced from 18S rDNA sequences separated 14 Xiphinema and five Xiphidorus nematode species from Brazil into distinct groups that concurred with their current morphological taxonomic status. Species belonging to the X. americanum group (X. brevicolle, X. diffusum, X. oxycaudatum, and X. peruvianum) formed a single group that was clearly separated from the other Xiphinema species. As with previous taxonomic studies that noted only minor morphological differences between putative X. americanum group species, separation of these species based upon 18S rDNA sequences was inconclusive. Thus it is probable that instead of comprising distinct species, the X. americanum group may in fact represent numerous morphotypes with large inter- and intra- population morphological variability that may be environmentally driven. Within the cluster representing non X. americanum group species, there was little statistical support to clearly separate species. However, three subgroups, comprising (i) the X. setariae/vulgare complex, (ii) X. ifacolum and X. paritaliae, and (iii) X. brasiliense and X. ensiculiferum were well resolved.

  3. Phylogenetic Relationships Among Xiphinema and Xiphidorus Nematode Species from Brazil Inferred from 18S rDNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Claudio M. G.; Hübschen, Judith; Brown, Derek J. F.; Ferraz, Luiz C. C. B.; Wright, Frank; Neilson, Roy

    2004-01-01

    Maximum likelihood trees produced from 18S rDNA sequences separated 14 Xiphinema and five Xiphidorus nematode species from Brazil into distinct groups that concurred with their current morphological taxonomic status. Species belonging to the X. americanum group (X. brevicolle, X. diffusum, X. oxycaudatum, and X. peruvianum) formed a single group that was clearly separated from the other Xiphinema species. As with previous taxonomic studies that noted only minor morphological differences between putative X. americanum group species, separation of these species based upon 18S rDNA sequences was inconclusive. Thus it is probable that instead of comprising distinct species, the X. americanum group may in fact represent numerous morphotypes with large inter- and intra- population morphological variability that may be environmentally driven. Within the cluster representing non X. americanum group species, there was little statistical support to clearly separate species. However, three subgroups, comprising (i) the X. setariae/vulgare complex, (ii) X. ifacolum and X. paritaliae, and (iii) X. brasiliense and X. ensiculiferum were well resolved. PMID:19262801

  4. Rapid identification and classification of bacteria by 16S rDNA restriction fragment melting curve analyses (RFMCA).

    PubMed

    Rudi, Knut; Kleiberg, Gro H; Heiberg, Ragnhild; Rosnes, Jan T

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate restriction fragment melting curve analyses (RFMCA) as a novel approach for rapid classification of bacteria during food production. RFMCA was evaluated for bacteria isolated from sous vide food products, and raw materials used for sous vide production. We identified four major bacterial groups in the material analysed (cluster I-Streptococcus, cluster II-Carnobacterium/Bacillus, cluster III-Staphylococcus and cluster IV-Actinomycetales). The accuracy of RFMCA was evaluated by comparison with 16S rDNA sequencing. The strains satisfying the RFMCA quality filtering criteria (73%, n=57), with both 16S rDNA sequence information and RFMCA data (n=45) gave identical group assignments with the two methods. RFMCA enabled rapid and accurate classification of bacteria that is database compatible. Potential application of RFMCA in the food or pharmaceutical industry will include development of classification models for the bacteria expected in a given product, and then to build an RFMCA database as a part of the product quality control. PMID:17367680

  5. Phylogeny and rates of molecular evolution of planktonic foraminifera: SSU rDNA sequences compared to the fossil record.

    PubMed

    de Vargas, C; Zaninetti, L; Hilbrecht, H; Pawlowski, J

    1997-09-01

    Planktonic foraminifera are marine protists, whose calcareous shells form oceanic sediments and are widely used for stratigraphic and paleoenvironmental analyses. The fossil record of planktonic foraminifera is compared here to their molecular phylogeny inferred from ribosomal DNA sequences. Eighteen partial SSU rDNA sequences from species representing all modern planktonic families (Globigerinidae, Hastigerinidae, Globorotaliidae, Candeinidae) were obtained and compared to seven sequences representing the major groups of benthic foraminifera. The phylogenetic analyses indicate a polyphyletic origin for the planktonic foraminifera. The Candeinidae, the Globorotaliidae, and the clade Globigerinidae + Hastigerinidae seem to have originated independently, at different epochs in the evolution of foraminifera. Inference of their relationships, however, is limited by substitution rates of heterogeneity. Rates of SSU rDNA evolution vary from 4.0 x 10(-9) substitutions/site/year in the Globigerinidae to less than 1.0 x 10(-9) substitutions/site/year in the Globorotaliidae. These variations may be related to different levels of adaptation to the planktonic mode of life. A clock-like evolution is observed among the Globigerinidae, for which molecular and paleontological data are congruent. Phylogeny of the Globorotaliidae is clearly biased by rapid rates of substitution in two species (G. truncatulinoides and G. menardii). Our study reveals differences in absolute rates of evolution at all taxonomic levels in planktonic foraminifera and demonstrates their effect on phylogenetic reconstructions.

  6. Comparison of the ITS1 and ITS2 rDNA in Emeria callospermophili (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Sciurid Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Motriuk-Smith, Dagmara; Seville, R Scott; Quealy, Leah; Oliver, Clinton E.

    2011-01-01

    The taxonomy of the coccidia has historically been morphologically based. The purpose of this study was to establish if conspecificity of isolates of Eimeria callospermophili from 4 ground-dwelling squirrel hosts (Rodentia: Sciuridae) is supported by comparison of rDNA sequence data and to examine how this species relates to eimerian species from other sciurid hosts. Eimeria callospermophili was isolated from 4 wild caught hosts, i.e., Urocitellus elegans, Cynomys leucurus, Marmota flaviventris, and Cynomys ludovicianus. The ITS1 and ITS2 genomic rDNA sequences were PCR generated, sequenced, and analyzed. The highest intraspecific pairwise distance values of 6.0% in ITS1 and 7.1% in ITS2 were observed in C. leucurus. Interspecific pairwise distance values greater than 5% do not support E. callospermophili conspecificity. Generated E. callospermophili sequences were compared to Eimeria lancasterensis from Sciuris niger and Sciurus niger cinereus, and Eimeria ontarioensis from S. niger. A single well-supported clade was formed by E. callospermophili amplicons in Neighbor Joining and Maximum Parsimony analyses. However, within the clade there was little evidence of host or geographic structuring of the species. PMID:21506777

  7. Identification of Hortaea werneckii Isolated from mangrove plant Aegiceras comiculatum based on morphology and rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Xing, Xiao-Ke; Zhang, Li-Chun; Xing, Yong-Mei; Guo, Shun-Xing

    2012-12-01

    Hortaea werneckii is a black yeast-like ascomycetous fungi associated with the human superficial infection tinea nigra, which commonly occurs in tropical and subtropical countries. Now, this fungus has been found in the halophilic environment all over the world and recognized as a new model organism in exploring the mechanisms of salt tolerance in eukaryotes. During a survey of endophytic fungi of mangrove forest at South China Sea, two isolates of H. werneckii were recovered from medicinal plant of Aegiceras comiculatum. The isolates were identified by morphological characters and phylogenetic analyses (e.g., ITS rDNA, LSU rDNA and translation elongation factor EF1α). Some physiological tests such as thermotolerance, acid tolerance (pH) and NaCl tolerance as well as pathogenicity test in vitro for the strains of Hortaea were performed. It is the first report that H. werneckii was isolated from medicinal plant of A. comiculatum in south sea of China as the endophytic fungi.

  8. TURKEY FECAL MICROBIAL COMMUNITY STRUCTURE AND ECOLOGICAL FUNCTIONS REVEALED BY 16S RDNA AND METAGENOME SEQUENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Turkey feces are an important source of fecal waste in the United States. With the exception of isolated studies on bacterial pathogens, little is known about the type of bacteria inhabiting the turkey gut. In order to understand the microbial diversity and functional genes assoc...

  9. Primers to block the amplification of symbiotic apostome ciliate 18S rRNA gene in a PCR-based copepod diet study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Guangxing

    2014-05-01

    Pelagic copepods play an important role in the marine food web. However, a full understanding of the ecological status of this zooplankton group depends on the careful study of their natural diets. In previous PCR-based copepod diet studies, we found many apostome ciliates that live symbiotically under the exoskeleton of the copepods, and their sequences were often over-represented in the 18S rRNA gene (18S rDNA) libraries. As a first step to address this issue, we designed three apostome ciliate 18S rDNA blocking primers, and tested their blocking efficiency against apostome ciliate 18s rDNA under various PCR conditions. Using a semi-quantitative PCR method, we optimized the conditions to efficiently amplify the 18S rDNA of the prey while simultaneously excluding the symbiotic apostome ciliates. This technique will facilitate PCR-based diet studies of copepods and other zooplankton in their natural environments.

  10. Twenty years of physical mapping of major ribosomal RNA genes across the teleosts: A review of research.

    PubMed

    Gornung, E

    2013-01-01

    Molecular cytogenetic data on the number and position of 45S ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA; located in nucleolus organizing regions, NORs) detected by FISH in 330 species of 77 families and 22 orders of bony fishes (Teleostei) and, additionally, 11 species of basal ray-finned fishes are compiled and analyzed. The portion of species with single rDNA sites in the sample amounts to 72%. The percentage of species with multiple NORs decreases with increasing numbers of rDNA loci per genome, i.e. scarcely 3% of species carry 4 or more rDNA-bearing chromosome pairs. 43% of all rDNA sites analyzed occur terminally on the short arms of chromosomes or constitute them. In general, terminal rDNA sites account for 87% of all examined cases. Interspecific variation in the location of single rDNA sites among related taxa, polymorphisms of multiple NORs in some groups of teleosts and analytical outcomes on the subject are reviewed.

  11. Karyotype Diversification and Evolution in Diploid and Polyploid South American Hypochaeris (Asteraceae) Inferred from rDNA Localization and Genetic Fingerprint Data

    PubMed Central

    Weiss-Schneeweiss, Hanna; Tremetsberger, Karin; Schneeweiss, Gerald M.; Parker, John S.; Stuessy, Tod F.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Changes in chromosome structure and number play an important role in plant evolution. A system well-suited to studying different modes of chromosome evolution is the genus Hypochaeris (Asteraceae) with its centre of species' diversity in South America. All South American species uniformly have a chromosome base number of x = 4 combined with variation in rDNA number and distribution, and a high frequency of polyploidy. The aim of this paper is to assess directions and mechanisms of karyotype evolution in South American species by interpreting both newly obtained and previous data concerning rDNA localization in a phylogenetic context. Methods Eleven Hypochaeris species from 18 populations were studied using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 35S and 5S rDNA probes. A phylogenetic framework was established from neighbour-net analysis of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprint data. Key Results A single 5S rDNA locus is invariably found on the short arm of chromosome 2. Using 35S rDNA loci, based on number (one or two) and localization (interstitial on the long arm of chromosome 2, but sometimes lacking, and terminal or interstitial on the short arm of chromosome 3, only very rarely lacking), seven karyotype groups can be distinguished; five of these include polyploids. Karyotype groups with more than one species do not form monophyletic groups. Conclusions Early evolution of Hypochaeris in South America was characterized by considerable karyotype differentiation resulting from independent derivations from an ancestral karyotype. There was marked diversification with respect to the position and evolution of the 35S rDNA locus on chromosome 3, probably involving inversions and/or transpositions, and on chromosome 2 (rarely 3) concerning inactivation and loss. Among these different karyotype assemblages, the apargioides group and its derivatives constitute by far the majority of species. PMID:18285356

  12. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of the crucian carp, Carassius carassius (Linnaeus, 1758) (Teleostei, Cyprinidae), using chromosome staining and fluorescence in situ hybridisation with rDNA probes

    PubMed Central

    Spoz, Aneta; Boron, Alicja; Porycka, Katarzyna; Karolewska, Monika; Ito, Daisuke; Abe, Syuiti; Kirtiklis, Lech; Juchno, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The crucian carp Carassius carassius (Linnaeus, 1758) is a species with restricted and decreasing distribution in Europe. Six males and six females of the species from the Baltic Sea basin in Poland were examined to show sequentially CMA3/AgNO3 staining pattern, DAPI staining, and, for the first time in literature, molecular cytogenetic analysis using double-colour fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with 28S and 5S rDNA probes. The karyotype consisted of 20 m, 36 sm and 44 sta chromosomes, NF=156. The AgNO3 stained NORs were most frequently located terminally in the short arms of two sm and two sta elements, and CMA3-positive sites were also observed suggesting abundant GC-rich repetitive DNA in the regions. Other CMA3-positive sites in the short arms of six to ten sm and sta chromosomes were detected. The results based on 28S rDNA FISH confirmed the location of rDNA sites. DAPI-negative staining of NORs suggested the scarcity of AT-rich DNA in the regions. FISH with 5S rDNA probe revealed 8–14 loci (ten and 12 in respectively 49 and 29% of metaphases). They were located in two sm and eight to ten sta chromosomes and six of them were larger than others. Simultaneously, mapping of the two rDNA families on the chromosomes of C. carassius revealed that both 28S and 5S rDNA probes were located in different chromosomes. Molecular cytogenetic data of C. carassius presented here for the first time give an important insight into the structure of chromosomes of this polyploid and declining species and may be useful in its systematics. PMID:25349674

  13. Distribution and 16S rDNA sequences of Argas monachus (Acari: Argasidae), a soft tick parasite of Myiopsitta monachus (Aves: Psittacidae).

    PubMed

    Mastropaolo, Mariano; Turienzo, Paola; Di Iorio, Osvaldo; Nava, Santiago; Venzal, José M; Guglielmone, Alberto A; Mangold, Atilio J

    2011-11-01

    Specimens of Argas monachus Keirans et al. were collected from Myiopsitta monachus nests in 42 localities in Argentina and Paraguay from 2006 to 2010. A list of localities where this tick has been found is presented. 16S rDNA sequences of specimens of A. monachus from different localities were compared to confirm whether they belong to the same specific taxon. Argas monachus is present in the phytogeographic provinces of Chaco, Espinal, and Monte, but not in the Pampa (all from de Chaco Domain) where the host is well distributed. No differences were found among 16S rDNA sequences of geographically distant specimens.

  14. Characterization of Bacterial Communities in Selected Smokeless Tobacco Products Using 16S rDNA Analysis.

    PubMed

    Tyx, Robert E; Stanfill, Stephen B; Keong, Lisa M; Rivera, Angel J; Satten, Glen A; Watson, Clifford H

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial communities present in smokeless tobacco (ST) products have not previously reported. In this study, we used Next Generation Sequencing to study the bacteria present in U.S.-made dry snuff, moist snuff and Sudanese toombak. Sample diversity and taxonomic abundances were investigated in these products. A total of 33 bacterial families from four phyla, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, were identified. U.S.-produced dry snuff products contained a diverse distribution of all four phyla. Moist snuff products were dominated by Firmicutes. Toombak samples contained mainly Actinobacteria and Firmicutes (Aerococcaceae, Enterococcaceae, and Staphylococcaceae). The program PICRUSt (Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States) was used to impute the prevalence of genes encoding selected bacterial toxins, antibiotic resistance genes and other pro-inflammatory molecules. PICRUSt also predicted the presence of specific nitrate reductase genes, whose products can contribute to the formation of carcinogenic nitrosamines. Characterization of microbial community abundances and their associated genomes gives us an indication of the presence or absence of pathways of interest and can be used as a foundation for further investigation into the unique microbiological and chemical environments of smokeless tobacco products.

  15. Characterization of Bacterial Communities in Selected Smokeless Tobacco Products Using 16S rDNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tyx, Robert E.; Stanfill, Stephen B.; Keong, Lisa M.; Rivera, Angel J.; Satten, Glen A.; Watson, Clifford H.

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial communities present in smokeless tobacco (ST) products have not previously reported. In this study, we used Next Generation Sequencing to study the bacteria present in U.S.-made dry snuff, moist snuff and Sudanese toombak. Sample diversity and taxonomic abundances were investigated in these products. A total of 33 bacterial families from four phyla, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, were identified. U.S.-produced dry snuff products contained a diverse distribution of all four phyla. Moist snuff products were dominated by Firmicutes. Toombak samples contained mainly Actinobacteria and Firmicutes (Aerococcaceae, Enterococcaceae, and Staphylococcaceae). The program PICRUSt (Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States) was used to impute the prevalence of genes encoding selected bacterial toxins, antibiotic resistance genes and other pro-inflammatory molecules. PICRUSt also predicted the presence of specific nitrate reductase genes, whose products can contribute to the formation of carcinogenic nitrosamines. Characterization of microbial community abundances and their associated genomes gives us an indication of the presence or absence of pathways of interest and can be used as a foundation for further investigation into the unique microbiological and chemical environments of smokeless tobacco products. PMID:26784944

  16. DNA sequence heterogeneity in the three copies of the long 16S-23S rDNA spacer of Enterococcus faecalis isolates.

    PubMed

    Gürtler, V; Rao, Y; Pearson, S R; Bates, S M; Mayall, B C

    1999-07-01

    The possibility of intragenic heterogeneity between copies of the long intergenic (16S-23S rDNA) spacer region (LISR) was investigated by specific amplification of this region from 21 Enterococcus faecalis isolates. Three copies of the LISR (rrnA, B and C) were demonstrated by hybridization of the LISR to genomic DNA cleaved with I-Ceul and SmaI. When the LISR amplicon was digested with Tsp509I, two known nucleotide substitutions were detected, one 4 nt upstream from the 5' end of the tRNA(ala) gene (allele rrnB has the Tsp509I site and rrnA and C do not) and the other 22 nt downstream from the 3' end of the tRNA(ala) gene (rrnC has the Tsp509I site). Sequence differences at these sites were detected at the allelic level (alleles rrnA, B and C) and different combinations of these alleles were designated Tsp Types. Using densitometry to analyse bands from electrophoresis gels, the intra-isolate ratios of the separate alleles (rrnA:rrnB:rrnC) were determined in each Tsp Type: I (0:3:0), II (1:2:0), III (2:0:1), IV (3:0:0), V (2:1:0) and VI (1:1:1). Sequence variation between the three copies of the LISR was confirmed by the detection of at least five other intra-isolate nucleotide substitutions using heteroduplex analysis by conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE) that were not detected by Tsp509I cleavage. Perpendicular denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was capable of resolving homoduplexes; six to seven out of a possible nine curves were obtained in some isolates. In the isolate where seven curves were obtained one or more further nucleotide substitutions, not detected by Tsp509I cleavage or CSGE, were detected. On the basis of LISR sequence heterogeneity, isolates were categorized into homogeneous (only one allele sequence present) and heterogeneous (two or three allele sequences present). The transition between homogeneous and heterogeneous LISRs may be useful in studying evolutionary mechanisms between E. faecalis isolates.

  17. FISH-mapping of the 5S rDNA locus in chili peppers (Capsicum-Solanaceae).

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Patricia M; Debat, Humberto J; Scaldaferro, Marisel A; Martí, Dardo A; Grabiele, Mauro

    2016-03-01

    We present here the physical mapping of the 5S rDNA locus in six wild and five cultivated taxa of Capsicum by means of a genus-specific FISH probe. In all taxa, a single 5S locus per haploid genome that persistently mapped onto the short arm of a unique metacentric chromosome pair at intercalar position, was found. 5S FISH signals of almost the same size and brightness intensity were observed in all the analyzed taxa. This is the first cytological characterization of the 5S in wild taxa of Capsicum by using a genus-derived probe, and the most exhaustive and comprehensive in the chili peppers up to now. The information provided here will aid the cytomolecular characterization of pepper germplasm to evaluate variability and can be instrumental to integrate physical, genetic and genomic maps already generated in the genus. PMID:26959315

  18. Loop mediated isothermal amplification of 5.8S rDNA for specific detection of Tritrichomonas foetus.

    PubMed

    Oyhenart, Jorge; Martínez, Florencia; Ramírez, Rosana; Fort, Marcelo; Breccia, Javier D

    2013-03-31

    Tritrichomonas foetus is the causative agent of bovine trichomonosis, a sexually transmitted disease leading to infertility and abortion. A test based on loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) targeting the 5.8S rDNA subunit was designed for the specific identification of T. foetus. The LAMP assay was validated using 28 T. foetus and 35 non-T. foetus trichomonads strains. It did not exhibit cross-reaction with closely related parasites commonly found in smegma cultures like Tetratrichomonas spp. and Pentatrichomonas hominis. Bovine smegma did not show interferences for the detection of the parasite and, the sensitivity of the method (4×10(3) CFU/mL, approximately 10 cells/reaction) was slightly higher than that found for PCR amplification with TFR3 and TFR4 primers. The LAMP approach has potential applications for diagnosis and control of T. foetus and, practical use for low skill operators in rural areas.

  19. Sequence analysis of the rDNA internal transcribed spacer 2 of five species of South American human malaria mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Fritz, G N

    1998-03-01

    The rDNA internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) was sequenced for 5 species of mosquitoes that may be important vectors of human malaria in certain regions of South America and are difficult to distinguish by morphology: Anopheles evansae, An. nuneztovari, An. rangeli, An. strodei and An. trinkae. ITS2 sequences from samples collected in Ecuador, Bolivia, Venezuela and Brazil were aligned and compared in order to determine the usefulness of this spacer for the elaboration of species specific primers and DNA probes. The ITS2 was found to be different in size (ranging from 333 to 397 bp) and sequence between all pairs of species. Highly variable regions were found primarily at the 3' end of the spacer and were interspersed with relatively conserved sites. Instraspecific sequence variation was limited to a single transversion between specimens of An. rangeli from distant geographic locations suggesting concerted evolution and homogenization of the ITS2. PMID:10520449

  20. Three Group-I introns in 18S rDNA of Endosymbiotic Algae of Paramecium bursaria from Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshina, Ryo; Kamako, Shin-ichiro; Imamura, Nobutaka

    2004-08-01

    In the nuclear encoded small subunit ribosomal DNA (18S rDNA) of symbiotic alga of Paramecium bursaria (F36 collected in Japan) possesses three intron-like insertions (Hoshina et al., unpubl. data, 2003). The present study confirmed these exact lengths and insertion sites by reverse transcription-PCR. Two of them were inserted at Escherichia coli 16S rRNA genic position 943 and 1512 that are frequent intron insertion positions, but another insertion position (nearly 1370) was the first finding. Their secondary structures suggested they belong to Group-I intron; one belongs to subgroup IE, others belong to subgroup IC1. Similarity search indicated these introns are ancestral ones.

  1. Description of the male, redescription of the female and 16S rDNA sequence of Ixodes aulacodi (Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Chiţimia-Dobler, Lidia; D'Amico, Gianluca; Yao, Patrick Kouassi; Kalmár, Zsuzsa; Gherman, Călin Mircea; Mihalca, Andrei Daniel; Estrada-Peña, Agustin

    2016-04-01

    Ixodes (Afrixodes) aulacodiArthur, 1956 is a poorly known species that has been recorded predominantly in the wet countries of western and central Africa, mainly associated to the greater cane rat Thryonomys swinderianus (Temmink). We herein redescribe the female, describe the male (ascribed to the species from specimens found in copula) and provide the 16S rDNA sequence. We also provide complete illustrations of the adults based on specimens found on greater cane rats in Ivory Coast. Ixodes aulacodi is included in the group of species of the subgenus Afrixodes that have horseshoe shaped anal groove, and which lack auriculae and cornua. The female is easily separated when compared with other species because of a unique combination of characters: All the coxae have internal spurs, coxa II has two external spurs, syncoxae are absent, and trochanters I-III have one spur each. The male has a notched hypostome and lacks syncoxae, auriculae and cornua. PMID:26803353

  2. Stalled RNAP-II molecules bound to non-coding rDNA spacers are required for normal nucleolus architecture.

    PubMed

    Freire-Picos, M A; Landeira-Ameijeiras, V; Mayán, María D

    2013-07-01

    The correct distribution of nuclear domains is critical for the maintenance of normal cellular processes such as transcription and replication, which are regulated depending on their location and surroundings. The most well-characterized nuclear domain, the nucleolus, is essential for cell survival and metabolism. Alterations in nucleolar structure affect nuclear dynamics; however, how the nucleolus and the rest of the nuclear domains are interconnected is largely unknown. In this report, we demonstrate that RNAP-II is vital for the maintenance of the typical crescent-shaped structure of the nucleolar rDNA repeats and rRNA transcription. When stalled RNAP-II molecules are not bound to the chromatin, the nucleolus loses its typical crescent-shaped structure. However, the RNAP-II interaction with Seh1p, or cryptic transcription by RNAP-II, is not critical for morphological changes.

  3. Short communication: Genetic variants of Sarcocystis cruzi in infected Malaysian cattle based on 18S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yit Han; Fong, Mun Yik; Subramaniam, Vellayan; Shahari, Shahhaziq; Lau, Yee Ling

    2015-12-01

    Sarcocystis species are pathogenic parasites that infect a wide range of animals, including cattle. A high prevalence of cattle sarcocystosis has been reported worldwide, but its status is unknown in Malaysia. This study focused on utilizing 18S rDNA to identify Sarcocystis species in Malaysian cattle and to determine their genetic variants. In this study, only Sarcocystis cruzi was detected in Malaysian cattle. The intra-species S. cruzi phylogenetic tree analysis and principal coordinate analysis (PCoA), respectively displayed two minor groups among the parasite isolates. This finding was supported by high Wright FST value (FST=0.647). The definitive hosts (dogs) may play a fundamental role in the development of S. cruzi genetic variants. Additionally, the existence of microheterogeneity within the S. cruzi merozoites and/or distinct genetic variants arisen from independent merozoites in mature sarcocysts, possibly contributed to the existence of intra-species variations within the population. PMID:26679818

  4. FISH-mapping of the 5S rDNA locus in chili peppers (Capsicum-Solanaceae).

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Patricia M; Debat, Humberto J; Scaldaferro, Marisel A; Martí, Dardo A; Grabiele, Mauro

    2016-03-01

    We present here the physical mapping of the 5S rDNA locus in six wild and five cultivated taxa of Capsicum by means of a genus-specific FISH probe. In all taxa, a single 5S locus per haploid genome that persistently mapped onto the short arm of a unique metacentric chromosome pair at intercalar position, was found. 5S FISH signals of almost the same size and brightness intensity were observed in all the analyzed taxa. This is the first cytological characterization of the 5S in wild taxa of Capsicum by using a genus-derived probe, and the most exhaustive and comprehensive in the chili peppers up to now. The information provided here will aid the cytomolecular characterization of pepper germplasm to evaluate variability and can be instrumental to integrate physical, genetic and genomic maps already generated in the genus.

  5. Short communication: Genetic variants of Sarcocystis cruzi in infected Malaysian cattle based on 18S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yit Han; Fong, Mun Yik; Subramaniam, Vellayan; Shahari, Shahhaziq; Lau, Yee Ling

    2015-12-01

    Sarcocystis species are pathogenic parasites that infect a wide range of animals, including cattle. A high prevalence of cattle sarcocystosis has been reported worldwide, but its status is unknown in Malaysia. This study focused on utilizing 18S rDNA to identify Sarcocystis species in Malaysian cattle and to determine their genetic variants. In this study, only Sarcocystis cruzi was detected in Malaysian cattle. The intra-species S. cruzi phylogenetic tree analysis and principal coordinate analysis (PCoA), respectively displayed two minor groups among the parasite isolates. This finding was supported by high Wright FST value (FST=0.647). The definitive hosts (dogs) may play a fundamental role in the development of S. cruzi genetic variants. Additionally, the existence of microheterogeneity within the S. cruzi merozoites and/or distinct genetic variants arisen from independent merozoites in mature sarcocysts, possibly contributed to the existence of intra-species variations within the population.

  6. GC-biased gene conversion impacts ribosomal DNA evolution in vertebrates, angiosperms, and other eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Juan S; Glémin, Sylvain; Galtier, Nicolas

    2011-09-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) is one of the most conserved genes in eukaryotes. The multiples copies of rDNA in the genome evolve in a concerted manner, through unequal crossing over and/or gene conversion, two mechanisms related to homologous recombination. Recombination increases local GC content in several organisms through a process known as GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC). gBGC has been well characterized in mammals, birds, and grasses, but its phylogenetic distribution across the tree of life is poorly understood. Here, we test the hypothesis that recombination affects the evolution of base composition in 18S rDNA and examine the reliability of this thoroughly studied molecule as a marker of gBGC in eukaryotes. Phylogenetic analyses of 18S rDNA in vertebrates and angiosperms reveal significant heterogeneity in the evolution of base composition across both groups. Mammals, birds, and grasses experience increases in the GC content of the 18S rDNA, consistent with previous genome-wide analyses. In addition, we observe increased GC contents in Ostariophysi ray-finned fishes and commelinid monocots (i.e., the clade including grasses), suggesting that the genomes of these two groups have been affected by gBGC. Polymorphism analyses in rDNA confirm that gBGC, not mutation bias, is the most plausible explanation for these patterns. We also find that helix and loop sites of the secondary structure of ribosomal RNA do not evolve at the same pace: loops evolve faster than helices, whereas helices are GC richer than loops. We extend analyses to major lineages of eukaryotes and suggest that gBGC might have also affected base composition in Giardia (Diplomonadina), nudibranch gastropods (Mollusca), and Asterozoa (Echinodermata). PMID:21444650

  7. Multicopy integration and expression of heterologous genes in the oleaginous yeast, Lipomyces starkeyi.

    PubMed

    Oguro, Yoshifumi; Yamazaki, Harutake; Shida, Yosuke; Ogasawara, Wataru; Takagi, Masamichi; Takaku, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The oleaginous yeast, Lipomyces starkeyi, is an excellent lipid producer with great industrial potential. However, methods for molecular breeding have not been established for L. starkeyi. We describe the development of a system for targeted rDNA integration of multiple copies of a gene into L. starkeyi genome by spheroplast-polyethylene glycol transformation.

  8. Search for Basonuclin Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junwen; Zhang, Shengliang; Schultz, Richard M.; Tseng, Hung

    2006-01-01

    Basonuclin (Bnc 1) is a transcription factor that has an unusual ability to interact with promoters of both RNA polymerases I and II. The action of basonuclin is mediated through three pairs of evolutionarily conserved zinc fingers, which produce three DNase I footprints on the promoters of rDNA and the basonuclin gene. Using these DNase footprints, we built a computational model for the basonuclin DNA-binding module, which was used to identify in silico potential RNA polymerase II target genes in the human and mouse promoter databases. The target genes of basonuclin show that it regulates the expression of proteins involved in chromatin structure, transcription/DNA-binding, ion-channels, adhesion/cell-cell junction, signal transduction and intracellular transport. Our results suggest that basonuclin, like MYC, may coordinate transcriptional activities among the three RNA polymerases. But basonuclin regulates a distinctive set of pathways, which differ from that regulated by MYC. PMID:16919236

  9. Fluorescent oligonucleotide rDNA probes that specifically bind to a common nanoflagellate, Paraphysomonas vestita.

    PubMed

    Rice, J; O'Connor, C D; Sleigh, M A; Burkill, P H; Giles, I G; Zubkov, M V

    1997-05-01

    Nanoflagellates are ecologically important, but morphological identification requires techniques which are not practicable for use in quantitative studies of populations; alternative methods of accurate recognition of nanoflagellate species in mixed populations are therefore desirable. Fluorescent oligonucleotide probes which hybridize with unique sequences of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA have been exploited as 'phylogenetic stains' in the identification of bacteria. In this paper we describe the preparation and application of probes which specifically hybridize with a common nanoflagellate species, Paraphysomonas vestita. The sequence of nucleotides in the SSU rRNA gene of this flagellate was determined and compared with those of related species to select unique P. vestita sequences 18-21 nucleotides in length. Five sequences in different parts of the SSU rRNA gene were used to design 5'-fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes. Published sequences were used to make probes that hybridized with all eukaryotes (EUK) or any cellular organism (UNI), and probes were designed not to hybridize with rRNA (CON). Optimum conditions for hybridization were determined. In all cases, UNI probes hybridized with the cells, but CON probes were only bound to a limited extent. All five probes targeted to P. vestita proved to be species-specific; they hybridized well with this species, but not with three other species of the same genus, nor with three more distantly related flagellate species, nor with a ciliate, nor with bacteria. These probes provide a means of quantitatively measuring the proportion of P. vestita cells in samples of mixed protists.

  10. Intervening sequences in ribosomal RNA genes and bobbed phenotype in Drosophila hydei.

    PubMed

    Franz, G; Kunz, W

    1981-08-13

    The "bobbed' (bb) mutation in Drosophila is represented phenotypically by shortened and abnormally thin scutellar bristles and by delayed development. There is a direct correlation between bristle size and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis, and the bb mutation was at first explained as a deficiency of rRNA genes (rDNA). However, the bb phenotype can occur in Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila hydei with high rDNA content, while phenotypically wild-type flies are known with few rRNA genes, suggesting that what matters is not the number of rRNA genes but their transcriptional activity. In D. melanogaster, it has recently emerged that rRNA genes interrupted by an intervening sequence are not transcribed. We now report that in D. hydei, the length of the scutellar bristle is directly proportional to the number of rRNA genes without this intervening sequence.

  11. Randomly detected genetically modified (GM) maize (Zea mays L.) near a transport route revealed a fragile 45S rDNA phenotype.

    PubMed

    Waminal, Nomar Espinosa; Ryu, Ki Hyun; Choi, Sun-Hee; Kim, Hyun Hee

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring of genetically modified (GM) crops has been emphasized to prevent their potential effects on the environment and human health. Monitoring of the inadvertent dispersal of transgenic maize in several fields and transport routes in Korea was carried out by qualitative multiplex PCR, and molecular analyses were conducted to identify the events of the collected GM maize. Cytogenetic investigations through fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of the GM maize were performed to check for possible changes in the 45S rDNA cluster because this cluster was reported to be sensitive to replication and transcription stress. Three GM maize kernels were collected from a transport route near Incheon port, Korea, and each was found to contain NK603, stacked MON863 x NK603, and stacked NK603 x MON810 inserts, respectively. Cytogenetic analysis of the GM maize containing the stacked NK603 x MON810 insert revealed two normal compact 5S rDNA signals, but the 45S rDNA showed a fragile phenotype, demonstrating a "beads-on-a-string" fragmentation pattern, which seems to be a consequence of genetic modification. Implications of the 45S rDNA cluster fragility in GM maize are also discussed.

  12. The spatial and temporal distribution of microalgae in the South China Sea: evidence from GIS-based analysis of 18S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, LüYan; Huang, QiaoJuan; Wu, ShuHui; Lin, Duan; Chen, JiaHui; Chen, YueQin

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the spatial and temporal variation of microalgae in the South China Sea and to demonstrate the environmental factors controlling the diversity of microalgae by GIS (geographic information system)-based analysis of 18S rDNA sequences. Six 18S rDNA libraries were constructed from environmental samples collected at different sites in the study area, and more than 600 18S rDNA sequences were determined. The rDNA sequence data were then analyzed by DIVA-GIS software to display the spatial and temporal variation of phytoplankton's composition. It was shown that the autotrophic eukaryotic plankton dominated over the heterotrophic cells in most of our clone libraries, and the dominating phytoplankton was Dinophyceae except for Bacillariophyta at the Xiamen harbor. The percentages of these two groups were controlled by water temperature and salinity. Our results also revealed that the species composition of Chlorophyta showed a close relationship with latitude, changing from Prasinophyceae at the high latitude to Trebouxiophyceae at the low latitude. Several newly classified picoplankton lineages were first uncovered in the South China Sea, including the pico-sized green alga Ostreococcus sp. and Picochlorum eukaryotum, and picobiliphytes, which was just discovered in 2007 with unknown affinities to other eukaryotes. Their spatial and temporal variation were also analyzed and discussed.

  13. Variation in copy number of the 28S rDNA of Aspergillus fumigatus measured by droplet digital PCR and analog quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Alanio, Alexandre; Sturny-Leclère, Aude; Benabou, Marion; Guigue, Nicolas; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    Droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) after DNA digestion yielded a 28S rDNA copy number of 61 to 86 copies/genome when testing 10 unrelated Aspergillus fumigatus isolates, higher than with quantitative PCR. Unfortunately, ddPCR after DNA digestion did not improve the sensitivity of our PCR assay when testing serum patients with invasive aspergillosis. PMID:27316653

  14. Bacterial diversity in water samples from uranium wastes as demonstrated by 16S rDNA and ribosomal intergenic spacer amplification retrievals.

    PubMed

    Radeva, Galina; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja

    2005-11-01

    Bacterial diversity was assessed in water samples collected from several uranium mining wastes in Ger many and in the United States by using 16S rDNA and ribosomal intergenic spacer amplification retrievals. The results obtained using the 16S rDNA retrieval showed that the samples collected from the uranium mill tailings of Schlema/Alberoda, Germany, were predominated by Nitrospina-like bacteria, whereas those from the mill tailings of Shiprock, New Mexico, USA, were predominated by gamma-Pseudomonas and Frauteria spp. Additional smaller populations of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group and alpha- and delta-Proteobacteria were identified in the Shiprock samples as well. Proteobacteria and Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides were also found in the third uranium mill tailings studied, Gittersee/Coschütz, Germany, but the groups of the predominant clones were rather small. Most of the clones of the Gittersee/Coschütz samples represented individual sequences, which indicates a high level of bacterial diversity. The samples from the fourth uranium waste studied, Steinsee Deponie B1, Germany, were predominantly occupied by Acinetobacter spp. The ribosomal intergenic spacer amplification retrieval provided results complementary to those obtained by the 16S rDNA analyses. For instance, in the Shiprock samples, an additional predominant bacterial group was identified and affiliated with Nitrosomonas sp., whereas in the Gittersee/Coschütz samples, anammox populations were identified that were not retrieved by the applied 16S rDNA approach.

  15. Randomly Detected Genetically Modified (GM) Maize (Zea mays L.) near a Transport Route Revealed a Fragile 45S rDNA Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Waminal, Nomar Espinosa; Ryu, Ki Hyun; Choi, Sun-Hee; Kim, Hyun Hee

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring of genetically modified (GM) crops has been emphasized to prevent their potential effects on the environment and human health. Monitoring of the inadvertent dispersal of transgenic maize in several fields and transport routes in Korea was carried out by qualitative multiplex PCR, and molecular analyses were conducted to identify the events of the collected GM maize. Cytogenetic investigations through fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of the GM maize were performed to check for possible changes in the 45S rDNA cluster because this cluster was reported to be sensitive to replication and transcription stress. Three GM maize kernels were collected from a transport route near Incheon port, Korea, and each was found to contain NK603, stacked MON863 x NK603, and stacked NK603 x MON810 inserts, respectively. Cytogenetic analysis of the GM maize containing the stacked NK603 x MON810 insert revealed two normal compact 5S rDNA signals, but the 45S rDNA showed a fragile phenotype, demonstrating a “beads-on-a-string” fragmentation pattern, which seems to be a consequence of genetic modification. Implications of the 45S rDNA cluster fragility in GM maize are also discussed. PMID:24040165

  16. Chromosomal localization of 45S rDNA, sex-specific C values, and heterochromatin distribution in Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Biplab Kumar; Yamamoto, Masashi; Jha, Sumita

    2016-01-01

    Coccinia grandis is a widely distributed dioecious cucurbit in India, with heteromorphic sex chromosomes and X-Y sex determination mode. The present study aids in the cytogenetic characterization of four native populations of this plant employing distribution patterns of 45S rDNA on chromosomes and guanine-cytosine (GC)-rich heterochromatin in the genome coupled with flow cytometric determination of genome sizes. Existence of four nucleolar chromosomes could be confirmed by the presence of four telomeric 45S rDNA signals in both male and female plants. All four 45S rDNA sites are rich in heterochromatin evident from the co-localization of telomeric chromomycin A (CMA)(+ve) signals. The size of 45S rDNA signal was found to differ between the homologues of one nucleolar chromosome pair. The distribution of heterochromatin is found to differ among the male and female populations. The average GC-rich heterochromatin content of male and female populations is 23.27 and 29.86 %, respectively. Moreover, the male plants have a genome size of 0.92 pg/2C while the female plants have a size of 0.73 pg/2C, reflecting a huge genomic divergence between the genders. The great variation in genome size is owing to the presence of Y chromosome in the male populations, playing a multifaceted role in sexual divergence in C. grandis. PMID:25795278

  17. The phylogeny of the genus Yersinia based on 16S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, A; Goebel, B M; Liesack, W; Griffiths, M; Stackebrandt, E

    1993-12-01

    The inter- and intrageneric relationships of the genus Yersinia were investigated by sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. A stretch of approximately 1450 nucleotides was sequenced from representatives of ten of the eleven validly described species. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that yersinae form a coherent cluster within the gamma subgroup of Proteobacteria. The intrageneric relationship was characterized by five sublines with Y. enterocolitica, Y. rohdei, and Y. ruckeri forming separate sublines each represented by a single species. A separate subline was formed by Y. pestis, Y pseudotuberculosis and Y. kristensenii, while Y. mollaretii, Y. intermedia, Y. bercovieri, Y. aldovae, and Y. kristensenii formed a fifth subline. The phylogenetic distinctness of the yersiniae sublines is compared to published phenotypic properties and results of DNA-DNA similarity studies.

  18. The limits of nuclear encoded SSU rDNA for resolving the diatom phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Theriot, Edward C.; Cannone, Jamie J.; Gutell, Robin R.; Alverson, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    A recent reclassification of diatoms based on phylogenies recovered using the nuclear-encoded SSU rRNA gene contains three major classes, Coscinodiscophyceae, Mediophyceae and the Bacillariophyceae (the CMB hypothesis). We evaluated this with a sequence alignment of 1336 protist and heterokont algae SSU rRNAs, which includes 673 diatoms. Sequences were aligned to maintain structural elements conserved within this dataset. Parsimony analysis rejected the CMB hypothesis, albeit weakly. Morphological data are also incongruent with this recent CMB hypothesis of three diatom clades. We also reanalyzed a recently published dataset which purports to support the CMB hypothesis. Our reanalysis found that the original analysis had not converged on the true bipartition posterior probability distribution, and rejected the CMB hypothesis. Thus we conclude that a reclassification of the evolutionary relationships of the diatoms according to the CMB hypothesis is premature. PMID:20224747

  19. Developmental regulation of DNA replication: replication fork barriers and programmed gene amplification in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Macalpine, D M; Kapler, G M

    1997-10-01

    The palindromic Tetrahymena ribosomal DNA (rDNA) minichromosome is amplified 10,000-fold during development. Subsequent vegetative replication is cell cycle regulated. rDNA replication differs fundamentally in cycling vegetative and nondividing amplifying cells. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we show for the first time that replication origins that direct gene amplification also function in normal dividing cells. Two classes of amplification intermediates were identified. The first class is indistinguishable from vegetative rDNA, initiating in just one of the two 5' nontranscribed spacer (NTS) copies in the rDNA palindrome at either of two closely spaced origins. Thus, these origins are active throughout the life cycle and their regulation changes at different developmental stages. The second, novel class of amplification intermediates is generated by multiple initiation events. Intermediates with mass greater than fully replicated DNA were observed, suggesting that onionskin replication occurs at this stage. Unlike amplified rDNA in Xenopus laevis, the novel Tetrahymena species are not produced by random initiation; replication also initiates in the 5' NTS. Surprisingly, a replication fork barrier which is activated only in these amplifying molecules blocks the progression of forks near the center of the palindrome. Whereas barriers have been previously described, this is the first instance in which programmed regulation of replication fork progression has been demonstrated in a eukaryote.

  20. Phylogenetic relationships of the enigmatic angiosperm family Podostemaceae inferred from 18S rDNA and rbcL sequence data.

    PubMed

    Soltis, D E; Mort, M E; Soltis, P S; Hibsch-Jetter, C; Zimmer, E A; Morgan, D

    1999-03-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of some angiosperm families have remained enigmatic despite broad phylogenetic analyses of rbcL sequences. One example is the aquatic family Podostemaceae, the relationships of which have long been controversial because of major morphological modifications associated with their aquatic habit. Podostemaceae have variously been associated with Piperaceae, Nepenthaceae, Polygonaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Scrophulariaceae, Rosaceae, Crassulaceae, and Saxifragaceae. Two recent analyses of rbcL sequences suggest a possible sister-group relationship of Podostemaceae to Crassulaceae (Saxifragales). However, the branch leading to Podostemaceae was long, and use of different outgroups resulted in alternative placements. We explored the phylogenetic relationships of Podostemaceae using 18S rDNA sequences and a combined rbcL + 18S rDNA matrix representing over 250 angiosperms. In analyses based on 18S rDNA data, Podostemaceae are not characterized by a long branch; the family consistently appears as part of a Malpighiales clade that also includes Malpighiaceae, Turneraceae, Passifloraceae, Salicaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Violaceae, Linaceae, Chrysobalanaceae, Trigoniaceae, Humiriaceae, and Ochnaceae. Phylogenetic analyses based on a combined 18S rDNA + rbcL data set (223 ingroup taxa) with basal angiosperms as the outgroup also suggest that Podostemaceae are part of a Malpighiales clade. These searches swapped to completion, and the shortest trees showed enhanced resolution and increased internal support compared to those based on 18S rDNA or rbcL alone. However, when Gnetales are used as the outgroup, Podostemaceae appear with members of the nitrogen fixing clade (e.g., Elaeagnaceae, Ulmaceae, Rhamnaceae, Cannabaceae, Moraceae, and Urticaceae). None of the relationships suggested here for Podostemaceae receives strong bootstrap support. Our analyses indicate that Podostemaceae are not closely allied with Crassulaceae or with other members of the

  1. Replication fork arrest and rDNA silencing are two independent and separable functions of the replication terminator protein Fob1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bairwa, Narendra K; Zzaman, Shamsu; Mohanty, Bidyut K; Bastia, Deepak

    2010-04-23

    The replication terminator protein Fob1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is multifunctional, and it not only promotes polar replication fork arrest at the tandem Ter sites located in the intergenic spacer region of rDNA but also loads the NAD-dependent histone deacetylase Sir2 at Ter sites via a protein complex called RENT (regulator of nucleolar silencing and telophase exit). Sir2 is a component of the RENT complex, and its loading not only silences intrachromatid recombination in rDNA but also RNA polymerase II-catalyzed transcription. Here, we present three lines of evidence showing that the two aforementioned activities of Fob1 are independent of each other as well as functionally separable. First, a Fob1 ortholog of Saccharomyces bayanus expressed in a fob1Delta strain of S. cerevisiae restored polar fork arrest at Ter but not rDNA silencing. Second, a mutant form (I407T) of S. cerevisiae Fob1 retained normal fork arresting activity but was partially defective in rDNA silencing. We further show that the silencing defect of S. bayanus Fob1 and the Iota407Tau mutant of S. cerevisiae Fob1 were caused by the failure of the proteins to interact with two members of the S. cerevisiae RENT complex, namely S. cerevisiae Sir2 and S. cerevisiae Net1. Third, deletions of the intra-S phase checkpoint proteins Tof1 and Csm3 abolished fork arrest by Fob1 at Ter without causing loss of silencing. Taken together, the data support the conclusion that unlike some other functions of Fob1, rDNA silencing at Ter is independent of fork arrest.

  2. Chromatin tethering effects of hNopp140 are involved in the spatial organization of nucleolus and the rRNA gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yi-Tzang; Lin, Chen-I; Chen, Hung-Kai; Lee, Kuo-Ming; Hsu, Chia-Yi; Yang, Shun-Jen

    2008-01-01

    The short arms of five human acrocentric chromosomes contain ribosomal gene (rDNA) clusters where numerous mini-nucleoli arise at the exit of mitosis. These small nucleoli tend to coalesce into one or a few large nucleoli during interphase by unknown mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that the N- and C-terminal domains of a nucleolar protein, hNopp140, bound respectively to α-satellite arrays and rDNA clusters of acrocentric chromosomes for nucleolar formation. The central acidic-and-basic repeated domain of hNopp140, possessing a weak self-self interacting ability, was indispensable for hNopp140 to build up a nucleolar round-shaped structure. The N- or the C-terminally truncated hNopp140 caused nucleolar segregation and was able to alter locations of the rDNA transcription, as mediated by detaching the rDNA repeats from the acrocentric α-satellite arrays. Interestingly, an hNopp140 mutant, made by joining the N- and C-terminal domains but excluding the entire central repeated region, induced nucleolar disruption and global chromatin condensation. Furthermore, RNAi knockdown of hNopp140 resulted in dispersion of the rDNA and acrocentric α-satellite sequences away from nucleolus that was accompanied by rDNA transcriptional silence. Our findings indicate that hNopp140, a scaffold protein, is involved in the nucleolar assembly, fusion, and maintenance. PMID:18253863

  3. Two group I ribozymes with different functions in a nuclear rDNA intron.

    PubMed Central

    Decatur, W A; Einvik, C; Johansen, S; Vogt, V M

    1995-01-01

    DiSSU1, a mobile intron in the nuclear rRNA gene of Didymium iridis, was previously reported to contain two independent catalytic RNA elements. We have found that both catalytic elements, renamed GIR1 and GIR2, are group I ribozymes, but with differing functionality. GIR2 carries out the several reactions associated with self-splicing. GIR1 carries out a hydrolysis reaction at an internal processing site (IPS-1). These conclusions are based on the catalytic properties of RNAs transcribed in vitro. Mutation of the P7 pairing segment of GIR2 abrogated self-splicing, while mutation of P7 in GIR1 abrogated hydrolysis at the IPS-1. Much of the P2 stem and all of the associated loop could be deleted without effect on self-splicing. These results are accounted for by a secondary structure model, in which a long P2 pairing segment brings the 5' splice site to the GIR2 catalytic core. GIR1 is the smallest natural group I ribozyme yet reported and is the first example of a group I ribozyme whose presumptive biological function is hydrolysis. We hypothesize that GIR1-mediated cleavage of the excised intron RNA functions in the generation and expression of the mRNA for the intron-encoded endonuclease I-DirI. Images PMID:7556099

  4. Regulation of rDNA transcription in response to growth factors, nutrients and energy.

    PubMed

    Kusnadi, Eric P; Hannan, Katherine M; Hicks, Rodney J; Hannan, Ross D; Pearson, Richard B; Kang, Jian

    2015-02-01

    Exquisite control of ribosome biogenesis is fundamental for the maintenance of cellular growth and proliferation. Importantly, synthesis of ribosomal RNA by RNA polymerase I is a key regulatory step in ribosome biogenesis and a major biosynthetic and energy consuming process. Consequently, ribosomal RNA gene transcription is tightly coupled to the availability of growth factors, nutrients and energy. Thus cells have developed an intricate sensing network to monitor the cellular environment and modulate ribosomal DNA transcription accordingly. Critical controllers in these sensing networks, which mediate growth factor activation of ribosomal DNA transcription, include the PI3K/AKT/mTORC1, RAS/RAF/ERK pathways and MYC transcription factor. mTORC1 also responds to amino acids and energy status, making it a key hub linking all three stimuli to the regulation of ribosomal DNA transcription, although this is achieved via overlapping and distinct mechanisms. This review outlines the current knowledge of how cells respond to environmental cues to control ribosomal RNA synthesis. We also highlight the critical points within this network that are providing new therapeutic opportunities for treating cancers through modulation of RNA polymerase I activity and potential novel imaging strategies.

  5. Oceanic 18S rDNA sequences from picoplankton reveal unsuspected eukaryotic diversity.

    PubMed

    Moon-van der Staay, S Y; De Wachter, R; Vaulot, D

    2001-02-01

    Picoplankton--cells with a diameter of less than 3 microm--are the dominant contributors to both primary production and biomass in open oceanic regions. However, compared with the prokaryotes, the eukaryotic component of picoplankton is still poorly known. Recent discoveries of new eukaryotic algal taxa based on picoplankton cultures suggest the existence of many undiscovered taxa. Conventional approaches based on phenotypic criteria have limitations in depicting picoplankton composition due to their tiny size and lack of distinctive taxonomic characters. Here we analyse, using an approach that has been very successful for prokaryotes but has so far seldom been applied to eukaryotes, 35 full sequences of the small-subunit (18S) ribosomal RNA gene derived from a picoplanktonic assemblage collected at a depth of 75 m in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, and show that there is a high diversity of picoeukaryotes. Most of the sequences were previously unknown but could still be assigned to important marine phyla including prasinophytes, haptophytes, dinoflagellates, stramenopiles, choanoflagellates and acantharians. We also found a novel lineage, closely related to dinoflagellates and not previously described.

  6. Oceanic 18S rDNA sequences from picoplankton reveal unsuspected eukaryotic diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon-van der Staay, Seung Yeo; De WachterRDanielVaulot, RupertDe WachterR.Daniel

    2001-02-01

    Picoplankton-cells with a diameter of less than 3µm-are the dominant contributors to both primary production and biomass in open oceanic regions. However, compared with the prokaryotes, the eukaryotic component of picoplankton is still poorly known. Recent discoveries of new eukaryotic algal taxa based on picoplankton cultures suggest the existence of many undiscovered taxa. Conventional approaches based on phenotypic criteria have limitations in depicting picoplankton composition due to their tiny size and lack of distinctive taxonomic characters. Here we analyse, using an approach that has been very successful for prokaryotes but has so far seldom been applied to eukaryotes, 35 full sequences of the small-subunit (18S) ribosomal RNA gene derived from a picoplanktonic assemblage collected at a depth of 75m in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, and show that there is a high diversity of picoeukaryotes. Most of the sequences were previously unknown but could still be assigned to important marine phyla including prasinophytes, haptophytes, dinoflagellates, stramenopiles, choanoflagellates and acantharians. We also found a novel lineage, closely related to dinoflagellates and not previously described.

  7. Modular structural elements in the replication origin region of Tetrahymena rDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Du, C; Sanzgiri, R P; Shaiu, W L; Choi, J K; Hou, Z; Benbow, R M; Dobbs, D L

    1995-01-01

    Computer analyses of the DNA replication origin region in the amplified rRNA genes of Tetrahymena thermophila identified a potential initiation zone in the 5'NTS [Dobbs, Shaiu and Benbow (1994), Nucleic Acids Res. 22, 2479-2489]. This region consists of a putative DNA unwinding element (DUE) aligned with predicted bent DNA segments, nuclear matrix or scaffold associated region (MAR/SAR) consensus sequences, and other common modular sequence elements previously shown to be clustered in eukaryotic chromosomal origin regions. In this study, two mung bean nuclease-hypersensitive sites in super-coiled plasmid DNA were localized within the major DUE-like element predicted by thermodynamic analyses. Three restriction fragments of the 5'NTS region predicted to contain bent DNA segments exhibited anomalous migration characteristic of bent DNA during electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gels. Restriction fragments containing the 5'NTS region bound Tetrahymena nuclear matrices in an in vitro binding assay, consistent with an association of the replication origin region with the nuclear matrix in vivo. The direct demonstration in a protozoan origin region of elements previously identified in Drosophila, chick and mammalian origin regions suggests that clusters of modular structural elements may be a conserved feature of eukaryotic chromosomal origins of replication. Images PMID:7784181

  8. Higher-level phylogeny of Foraminifera inferred from the RNA polymerase II (RPB1) gene.

    PubMed

    Longet, David; Pawlowski, Jan

    2007-08-01

    Macroevolutionary relations among main lineages of Foraminifera have traditionally been inferred from the small subunit ribosomal genes (SSU rDNA). However, important discrepancies in the rates of SSU rDNA evolution between major lineages led to difficulties in accurate interpretation of SSU-based phylogenetic reconstructions. Recently, actin and beta-tubulin sequences have been used as alternative markers of foraminiferal phylogeny and their analyses globally confirm results obtained with SSU rDNA. In order to test new protein markers, we sequenced a fragment of the largest subunit of the RNA polymerase II (RPB1), a nuclear encoded single copy gene, for 8 foraminiferal species representing major orders of Foraminifera. Analyses of our data robustly confirm previous SSU rDNA and actin phylogenies and show (i) the paraphyly and ancestral position of monothalamid Foraminifera; (ii) the independent origin of miliolids; (iii) the monophyly of rotaliids, including buliminids and globigerinids; and (iv) the polyphyly of planktonic families Globigerinidae and Candeinidae. Additionally, the RPB1 phylogeny suggests Allogromiidae as the most ancestral foraminiferal lineage. In the light of our study, RPB1 appears as a valuable phylogenetic marker, particularly useful for groups of protists showing extreme variations of evolutionary rates in ribosomal genes.

  9. Characterisation of the microbial diversity in a pig manure storage pit using small subunit rDNA sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Snell-Castro, Raúl; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Delgenès, Jean-Philippe; Dabert, Patrick

    2005-04-01

    The microbial community structure of pig manure slurry (PMS) was determined with comparative analysis of 202 bacterial, 44 archaeal and 33 eukaryotic small subunit (SSU) rDNA partial sequences. Based on a criterion of 97% of sequence similarity, the phylogenetic analyses revealed a total of 108, eight and five phylotypes for the Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya lineages, respectively. Only 36% of the bacterial phylotypes were closely related (>or=97% similarity) to any previously known sequence in databases. The bacterial groups most often represented in terms of phylotype and clone abundance were the Eubacterium (22% of total sequences), the Clostridium (15% of sequences), the Bacillus-Lactobacillus-Streptococcus subdivision (20% of sequences), theMycoplasma and relatives (10% of sequences) and the Flexibacter-Cytophaga-Bacteroides (20% of sequences). The global microbial community structure and phylotype diversity show a close relationship to the pig gastrointestinal tract ecosystem whereas phylotypes from the Acholeplasma-Anaeroplasma and the Clostridium purinolyticum groups appear to be better represented in manure. Archaeal diversity was dominated by three phylotypes clustering with a group of uncultured microorganisms of unknown activity and only distantly related to the Thermoplasmales and relatives. Other Archaea were methanogenic H2/CO2 utilisers. No known acetoclastic Archaea methanogen was found. Eukaryotic diversity was represented by a pluricellular nematode, two Alveolata, a Blastocystis and an Entamoebidae. Manure slurry physico-chemical characteristics were analysed. Possible inhibitory effects of acetate, sulphide and ammonia concentrations on the microbial anaerobic ecosystem are discussed. PMID:16329909

  10. Preliminary phylogeny of Encarsia Förster (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) based on morphology and 28S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Babcock, C S; Heraty, J M; De Barro, P J; Driver, F; Schmidt, S

    2001-02-01

    Species of Encarsia Förster (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae, Coccophaginae) are economically important for the biological control of whitefly and armored scale pests (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae, Diaspididae). Whereas some regional keys for identification of Encarsia species are now available, few studies have addressed relationships within this diverse and cosmopolitan genus because of unreliable morphological data. Nuclear sequences of the D2 expansion region of 28S rDNA were determined from 67 strains of 24 species representing 10 species groups of Encarsia, 2 strains of Encarsiella noyesi Hayat, and 1 strain of Coccophagoides fuscipennis Girault. Analysis of molecular data alone and combined with morphological data resolves many nodes not resolved by morphology alone and offer insights into which morphological characters are useful for supporting group relationships. All analyses that include molecular data reveal Encarsia to be paraphyletic with respect to Encarsiella. If monophyly of Encarsia is constrained, the relationships are the same but with a different root within Encarsia, and these trees are presented as an alternate hypothesis. The luteola and strenua species groups are shown by both morphological and molecular data to be monophyletic, whereas the inaron group, the E. nigricephala + luteola group, and the E. quericola + strenua group are supported only by molecular data. The aurantii and parvella species groups are not supported in any of the analyses. The utility of morphological characters for defining species group relationships is discussed.

  11. 16S rDNA PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis in determining proportions of coexisting Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains.

    PubMed

    Ihalin, Riikka; Asikainen, Sirkka

    2006-06-01

    Certain serotypes of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans seem to prefer coexistence in vivo. The 16S rDNA PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was tested for its capability to distinguish coexisting A. actinomycetemcomitans strains of different serotypes or genetic lineages and to determine their proportions in vitro. The migration pattern of the PCR amplicon from serotype c differed from those of the other serotypes. Contrary to the strains of serotypes c, d, and e, strains of serotypes a, b, and f consistently demonstrated intra-serotype migration patterns similar to each other. Since the migration patterns differed between serotype c and b strains a strain of each was used to determine their proportional representation in a strain mixture. The strains were distinguishable from each other above the 5% PCR-DGGE detection level (12.5 ng DNA/1.5 x 10(6) cells). DGGE provides a promising tool for in vitro studies on the coexistence of different genetic lineages of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  12. Specific PCR for Myxobolus arcticus SSU rDNA in juvenile sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka from British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Mahony, Amelia; Fraser, Sarah; Groman, David B; Jones, Simon R M

    2015-06-29

    A PCR for the specific detection of the salmon brain parasite Myxobolus arcticus (Pugachev and Khokhlov, 1979) was developed using primers designed to amplify a 1363 base pair fragment of the small subunit rDNA. The assay did not amplify DNA from 5 other Myxobolus species or from 7 other myxozoan species belonging to 5 other genera. For juvenile sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka (Walbaum) collected from Chilko Lake, British Columbia (BC), Canada, in 2011, the prevalence by PCR was 96%, in contrast to 71% by histological examination of brain tissue. In 2010, the histological prevalence was 52.5%. Sequence identity between M. arcticus from Chilko Lake and other sites in BC ranged from 99.7 to 99.8% and was 99.6% for a Japanese sequence. In contrast, an M. arcticus sequence from Norway shared 95.3% identity with the Chilko Lake sequence, suggesting misidentification of the parasite. Chilko Lake sockeye salmon were previously reported free of infection with M. arcticus, and more research is required to understand the processes involved in the local and global dispersion of this parasite. PMID:26119303

  13. Detection of novel organisms associated with salpingitis, by use of 16S rDNA polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Hebb, Jennifer K; Cohen, Craig R; Astete, Sabina G; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Totten, Patricia A

    2004-12-15

    Although Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are established causes of salpingitis, the majority of cases have no known etiology. We used broad-range 16S rDNA polymerase chain reaction to identify novel, possibly uncultivable, bacteria associated with salpingitis and identified bacterial 16S sequences in Fallopian-tube specimens from 11 (24%) of 45 consecutive women with laparoscopically confirmed acute salpingitis (the case patients) and from 0 of 44 women seeking tubal ligations (the control subjects) at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya. Bacterial phylotypes most closely related to Leptotrichia spp. were detected as the sole phylotypes in 1, and mixed with other bacterial phylotypes in 2, specimens. Novel bacterial phylotypes and those associated with bacterial vaginosis, including Atopobium vaginae, were identified in 3 specimens. N. gonorrhoeae and Streptococcus pyogenes were identified in 2 and 1 specimens, respectively. The finding of novel phylotypes associated with salpingitis has important implications for the etiology, pathogenesis, and treatment of this important reproductive-tract disease syndrome. PMID:15551209

  14. Robertsonian polymorphism in the marine gastropod, Nucella lapillus: advances in karyology using rDNA loci and NORs.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, P L; Patton, S J; Critcher, R; Dixon, D R

    1996-03-01

    Previous studies of the Robertsonian polymorphism in the Atlantic dog-whelk, Nucella lapillus (2n = 26-36), have been limited by the inability to identify unequivocally individual chromosomes in the karyotype. This species, as with many other marine invertebrates, has proven largely refractory to the standard (mammalian) chromosome-banding techniques. In this study, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a rDNA probe was applied to the metaphase chromosomes of the 2n = 26 and 2n = 36 forms of N. lapillus. The results were compared with silver-staining of the nucleolar organizer regions (NORs). The FISH technique was shown to be more sensitive and less intrinsically prone to variation than the silver-staining method. An additional NOR/rDNA locus was observed in the 2n = 36 form which, to date, has not been seen in any 2n = 26 population. The 2n = 36 karyotype is described for a south-west UK population that differs from that reported previously in the literature. After fission, Robertsonian metacentrics are shown to correspond to at least one subtelocentric product. PMID:8601340

  15. Secondary structure analysis of ITS2 in the rDNA of three Indian paramphistomid species found in local livestock.

    PubMed

    Shylla, Jollin A; Ghatani, Sudeep; Chatterjee, Anupam; Tandon, Veena

    2011-04-01

    Of paramphistomid trematodes, three species viz., Homalogaster paloniae, Calicophoron calicophorum and Orthocoelium streptocoelium are commonly prevalent in bovine hosts in Northeast India. The aim of the present study was to genetically characterise these species using rDNA second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) so as to supplement the morphological criteria substantiated by molecular findings. The annotated ITS2 region from H. paloniae, C. calicophorum and O. streptocoelium were found to be 289 bp, 288 bp and 288 bp long, respectively. On comparison, the Indian isolates of the three species were observed to have a maximum identity of 99% with each of their respective counterparts from Japan. The secondary structure models were inferred using minimum free energy modelling algorithms. The paramphistomes displayed the typical four helix ITS2 secondary structure and differed from each other due to minor nucleotide differences. The consensus ITS2 secondary structure model revealed the presence of conservative motifs GACGAGGGUG and GCGGUAGAGUC in helix III. Monophyly is well supported for a clade consisting of the Japanese and Indian paramphistomes with significant bootstrap values.

  16. Phylogeny of Populus (Salicaceae) based on nucleotide sequences of chloroplast TRNT-TRNF region and nuclear rDNA.

    PubMed

    Hamzeh, Mona; Dayanandan, Selvadurai

    2004-09-01

    The species of the genus Populus, collectively known as poplars, are widely distributed over the northern hemisphere and well known for their ecological, economical, and evolutionary importance. The extensive interspecific hybridization and high morphological diversity in this group pose difficulties in identifying taxonomic units for comparative evolutionary studies and systematics. To understand the evolutionary relationships among poplars and to provide a framework for biosystematic classification, we reconstructed a phylogeny of the genus Populus based on nucleotide sequences of three noncoding regions of the chloroplast DNA (intron of trnL and intergenic regions of trnT-trnL and trnL-trnF) and ITS1 and ITS2 of the nuclear rDNA. The resulting phylogenetic trees showed polyphyletic relationships among species in the sections Tacamahaca and Aigeiros. Based on chloroplast DNA sequence data, P. nigra had a close affinity to species of section Populus, whereas nuclear DNA sequence data suggested a close relationship between P. nigra and species of the section Aigeiros, suggesting a possible hybrid origin for P. nigra. Similarly, the chloroplast DNA sequences of P. tristis and P. szechuanica were similar to that of the species of section Aigeiros, while the nuclear sequences revealed a close affinity to species of the section Tacamahaca, suggesting a hybrid origin for these two Asiatic balsam poplars. The incongruence between phylogenetic trees based on nuclear- and chloroplast-DNA sequence data suggests a reticulate evolution in the genus Populus.

  17. Employing 454 amplicon pyrosequencing to reveal intragenomic divergence in the internal transcribed spacer rDNA region in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Daniel L; Carlsen, Tor; Henrik Nilsson, R; Davey, Marie; Schumacher, Trond; Kauserud, Håvard

    2013-01-01

    The rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has been accepted as a DNA barcoding marker for fungi and is widely used in phylogenetic studies; however, intragenomic ITS variability has been observed in a broad range of taxa, including prokaryotes, plants, animals, and fungi, and this variability has the potential to inflate species richness estimates in molecular investigations of environmental samples. In this study 454 amplicon pyrosequencing of the ITS1 region was applied to 99 phylogenetically diverse axenic single-spore cultures of fungi (Dikarya: Ascomycota and Basidiomycota) to investigate levels of intragenomic variation. Three species (one Basidiomycota and two Ascomycota), in addition to a positive control species known to contain ITS paralogs, displayed levels of molecular variation indicative of intragenomic variation; taxon inflation due to presumed intragenomic variation was ≈9%. Intragenomic variability in the ITS region appears to be widespread but relatively rare in fungi (≈3–5% of species investigated in this study), suggesting this problem may have minor impacts on species richness estimates relative to PCR and/or pyrosequencing errors. Our results indicate that 454 amplicon pyrosequencing represents a powerful tool for investigating levels of ITS intragenomic variability across taxa, which may be valuable for better understanding the fundamental mechanisms underlying concerted evolution of repetitive DNA regions. PMID:23789083

  18. [Variability of nuclear 18S-25S rDNA of Gentiana lutea L. in nature and in tissue culture in vitro].

    PubMed

    Mel'nyk, V M; Spiridonova, K V; Andrieiev, I O; Strashniuk, N M; Kunakh, V A

    2004-01-01

    18S-25S rDNA sequence in genomes of G. lutea plants from different natural populations and from tissue culture has been studied with blot-hybridization method. It was shown that ribosomal repeats are represented by the variants which differ for their size and for the presence of additional HindIII restriction site. Genome of individual plant usually possesses several variants of DNA repeats. Interpopulation variability according to their quantitative ratio and to the presence of some of them has been shown. Modifications of the range of rDNA repeats not exceeding intraspecific variability were observed in callus tissues in comparison with the plants of initial population. Non-randomness of genome modifications in the course of cell adaptation to in vitro conditions makes it possible to some extent to forecast these modifications in tissue culture.

  19. Molecular confirmation of the genomic constitution of Douglasdeweya (Triticeae: Poaceae): demonstration of the utility of the 5S rDNA sequence as a tool for haplome identification.

    PubMed

    Baum, Bernard R; Johnson, Douglas A

    2008-06-01

    A new genus Douglasdeweya containing the two species, Douglasdeweya deweyi and D. wangii was published in 2005 by Yen et al. based upon the results of cytogenetical and morphological findings. The genome constitution of Douglasdeweya-PPStSt-allowed its segregation from the genus Pseudoroegneria which contains the StSt or StStStSt genomes. Our previous work had demonstrated the utility of using 5S rDNA units, especially the non-transcribed spacer sequence variation, for the resolution of genomes (haplomes) previously established by cytology. Here, we show that sequence analysis of the 5S DNA units from these species strongly supports the proposed species relationships of Yen et al. (Can J Bot 83:413-419, 2005), i.e., the PP genome from Agropyron and the StSt genome from Pseudoroegneria. Analysis of the 5S rDNA units constitutes a powerful tool for genomic research especially in the Triticeae. PMID:18421479

  20. Characterization of bacterial diversity in pulque, a traditional Mexican alcoholic fermented beverage, as determined by 16S rDNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Escalante, Adelfo; Rodríguez, María Elena; Martínez, Alfredo; López-Munguía, Agustín; Bolívar, Francisco; Gosset, Guillermo

    2004-06-15

    The bacterial diversity in pulque, a traditional Mexican alcoholic fermented beverage, was studied in 16S rDNA clone libraries from three pulque samples. Sequenced clones identified as Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus strain ASF360, L. kefir, L. acetotolerans, L. hilgardii, L. plantarum, Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides, Microbacterium arborescens, Flavobacterium johnsoniae, Acetobacter pomorium, Gluconobacter oxydans, and Hafnia alvei, were detected for the first time in pulque. Identity of 16S rDNA sequenced clones showed that bacterial diversity present among pulque samples is dominated by Lactobacillus species (80.97%). Seventy-eight clones exhibited less than 95% of relatedness to NCBI database sequences, which may indicate the presence of new species in pulque samples.

  1. Molecular approaches to differentiate three species of Nematodirus in sheep and goats from China based on internal transcribed spacer rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhao, G H; Jia, Y Q; Bian, Q Q; Nisbet, A J; Cheng, W Y; Liu, Y; Fang, Y Q; Ma, X T; Yu, S K

    2015-05-01

    Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rDNA sequences of three Nematodirus species from naturally infected goats or sheep in two endemic provinces of China were analysed to establish an effective molecular approach to differentiate Nematodirus species in small ruminants. The respective intra-specific genetic variations in ITS1 and ITS2 rDNA regions were 0.3-1.8% and 0-0.4% in N. spathiger, 0-6.5% and 0-5.4% in N. helvetianus, and 0-4.4% and 0-6.1% in N. oiratianus from China. The respective intra-specific variations of ITS1 and ITS2 were 1.8-4.4% and 1.6-6.1% between N. oiratianus isolates from China and Iran, 5.7-7.1% and 6.3-8.3% between N. helvetianus samples from China and America. For N. spathiger, compared with samples from China, sequence differences in ITS1 rDNA were 0.3-2.4% in isolates from America, 0.3-2.9% in New Zealand and 2.1-2.4% in Australia. Genetic variations in ITS2 rDNA of N. spathiger were 0-0.4% between samples from China and America, and 0-0.8% between samples from China and New Zealand. Using mutation sites, polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and specific PCR techniques were developed to differentiate these three Nematodirus species. The specific PCR assay allowed the accurate identification of N. oiratianus from other common nematodes with a sensitivity of 0.69 pg and further examination of Nematodirus samples demonstrated the reliability of these two molecular methods.

  2. In situ chromosomal localization of rDNA sites in "Safed Musli" Chlorophytum ker-gawl and their physical measurement by fiber FISH.

    PubMed

    Lavania, U C; Basu, S; Srivastava, S; Mukai, Y; Lavania, S

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) technique has been applied on somatic chromosomes and extended DNA fibers in the medicinally important species of Chlorophytum to elucidate physical localization and measurement of the rDNA sites using two rRNA multigene families homologous to 45S and 5S rDNA. The two species of Chlorophytum, namely C. borivillianum and C. comosum, both with 2n = 28, reveal diversity for copy number and localization of rDNA sites. C. borivillianum is comprised of five 45S-rDNA sites:one each in the secondary constriction region of chromosomes 7, 8, 9; one in the subtelomeric region of the short arm of chromosome 2 and the telomeric region of the short arm of chromosome 12; and one 5S-rDNA site in the subtelomeric region of the long arm of chromosome 1. In C. comosum, there are three 45S-rDNA sites (one each in the short arm of chromosomes 12, 13, and 14) and two 5S-rDNA sites (in the secondary constriction regions of chromosomes 2 and 13). Fiber FISH analysis conducted on extended DNA fibers revealed variation in the size of continuous tandem strings for the two r-DNA families. Taking the standard value of native B DNA equivalent to 3.27 kb for 1 mum, it was estimated that the physical size of continuous DNA strings is of the order of approximately 90 kb, 180 kb, and 300 kb for 45S-rDNA and of the order of 60 kb, 150 kb for 5S-rDNA in C. comosum, grossly in correspondence to their respective physical sizes at metaphase.

  3. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  4. Chromosomal organization of the 18S and 5S rRNAs and histone H3 genes in Scarabaeinae coleopterans: insights into the evolutionary dynamics of multigene families and heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Scarabaeinae beetles show a high level of macro-chromosomal variability, although the karyotypic organization of heterochromatin and multigene families (rDNAs and histone genes) is poorly understood in this group. To better understand the chromosomal organization and evolution in this group, we analyzed the karyotypes, heterochromatin distribution and chromosomal locations of the rRNAs and histone H3 genes in beetles belonging to eight tribes from the Scarabaeinae subfamily (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae). Results The number of 18S rRNA gene (a member of the 45S rDNA unit) sites varied from one to 16 and were located on the autosomes, sex chromosomes or both, although two clusters were most common. Comparison of the 45S rDNA cluster number and the diploid numbers revealed a low correlation value. However, a comparison between the number of 45S rDNA sites per genome and the quantity of heterochromatin revealed (i) species presenting heterochromatin restricted to the centromeric/pericentromeric region that contained few rDNA sites and (ii) species with a high quantity of heterochromatin and a higher number of rDNA sites. In contrast to the high variability for heterochromatin and 45S rDNA cluster, the presence of two clusters (one bivalent cluster) co-located on autosomal chromosomes with the 5S rRNA and histone H3 genes was highly conserved. Conclusions Our results indicate that the variability of the 45S rDNA chromosomal clusters is not associated with macro-chromosomal rearrangements but are instead related to the spread of heterochromatin. The data obtained also indicate that both heterochromatin and the 45S rDNA loci could be constrained by similar evolutionary forces regulating spreading in the distinct Scarabaeinae subfamily lineages. For the 5S rRNA and the histone H3 genes, a similar chromosomal organization could be attributed to their association/co-localization in the Scarabaeinae karyotypes. These data provide evidence that different evolutionary

  5. Systematic design of 18S rRNA gene primers for determining eukaryotic diversity in microbial consortia.

    PubMed

    Hugerth, Luisa W; Muller, Emilie E L; Hu, Yue O O; Lebrun, Laura A M; Roume, Hugo; Lundin, Daniel; Wilmes, Paul; Andersson, Anders F

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing of ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) amplicons has opened up the door to large-scale comparative studies of microbial community structures. The short reads currently produced by massively parallel sequencing technologies make the choice of sequencing region crucial for accurate phylogenetic assignments. While for 16S rDNA, relevant regions have been well described, no truly systematic design of 18S rDNA primers aimed at resolving eukaryotic diversity has yet been reported. Here we used 31,862 18S rDNA sequences to design a set of broad-taxonomic range degenerate PCR primers. We simulated the phylogenetic information that each candidate primer pair would retrieve using paired- or single-end reads of various lengths, representing different sequencing technologies. Primer pairs targeting the V4 region performed best, allowing discrimination with paired-end reads as short as 150 bp (with 75% accuracy at genus level). The conditions for PCR amplification were optimised for one of these primer pairs and this was used to amplify 18S rDNA sequences from isolates as well as from a range of environmental samples which were then Illumina sequenced and analysed, revealing good concordance between expected and observed results. In summary, the reported primer sets will allow minimally biased assessment of eukaryotic diversity in different microbial ecosystems.

  6. Karyotype diversity of four species of the incertae sedis group (Characidae) from different hydrographic basins: analysis of AgNORs, CMA3 and 18S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Mendes, M M; da Rosa, R; Giuliano-Caetano, L; Dias, A L

    2011-01-01

    A large number of genera in the tropical fish family Characidae are incertae sedis. Cytogenetic analysis was made of four of these species: Astyanax eigenmanniorum, Deuterodon stigmaturus, Hyphessobrycon luetkenii, and H. anisitsi, collected from various hydrographic basins: hydrographic system from Laguna dos Patos/RS, Tramandaí basin/RS and Tibagi River basin/PR. The first two species were collected in their type locality in the State of Rio Grande do Sul. The 2n = 48 karyotype was observed only in A. eigenmanniorum, while the other species had 2n = 50 chromosomes, with different karyotypic formulas. There was weak heterochromatin staining in the pericentromeric region of A. eigenmanniorum, D. stigmaturus and H. luetkenni chromosomes. In H. anisitsi, heterochromatin appeared to be more abundant and distributed in the pericentromeric and terminal regions of the chromosomes; three pairs showed more evident heterochromatic blocks. There were multiple Ag-NORs in all populations, visualized by FISH with an 18S rDNA probe. While D. stigmaturus and H. luetkenii had conserved AgNOR, CMA3 and 18S rDNA sites, the other two species showed intra- and interindividual variation at these sites. The karyotype variability was high, as is common in this group of fish. Different species arising from isolated hydrographic basins maintain an elevated level of karyotype differentiation, mainly with respect to chromosome structure, heterochromatin distribution and rDNA localization. This is the first report with cytogenetic data for D. stigmaturus and H. luetkenii. PMID:22179995

  7. Reconstructing the Phylogeny of Capsosiphon fulvescens (Ulotrichales, Chlorophyta) from Korea Based on rbcL and 18S rDNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Sang-Mi; Yang, Seung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Capsosiphon fulvescens is a filamentous green algae in the class Ulvophyceae. It has been consumed as food with unique flavor and soft texture to treat stomach disorders and hangovers, and its economic value justifies studying its nutritional and potential therapeutic effects. In contrast to these applications, only a few taxonomic studies have been conducted on C. fulvescens. In particular, classification and phylogenetic relationships of the C. fulvescens below the order level are controversial. To determine its phylogenetic position in the class, we used rbcL and 18S rDNA sequences as molecular markers to construct phylogenetic trees. The amplified rbcL and 18S rDNA sequences from 4 C. fulvescens isolates (Jindo, Jangheung, Wando, and Koheung, Korea) were used for phylogenetic analysis by employing three different phylogenetic methods: neighbor joining (NJ), maximum parsimony (MP), and maximum likelihood (ML). The rbcL phylogenetic tree showed that all taxa in the order Ulvales were clustered as a monophyletic group and resolved the phylogenetic position of C. fulvescens in the order Ulotrichales. The significance of our study is that the 18S rDNA phylogenetic tree shows the detailed taxonomic position of C. fulvescens. In our result, C. fulvescens is inferred as a member of Ulotrichaceae, along with Urospora and Acrosiphonia. PMID:27190985

  8. Performance of 16s rDNA Primer Pairs in the Study of Rhizosphere and Endosphere Bacterial Microbiomes in Metabarcoding Studies

    PubMed Central

    Beckers, Bram; Op De Beeck, Michiel; Thijs, Sofie; Truyens, Sascha; Weyens, Nele; Boerjan, Wout; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have revolutionized the methods for studying microbial ecology by enabling high-resolution community profiling. However, the use of these technologies in unraveling the plant microbiome remains challenging. Many bacterial 16S rDNA primer pairs also exhibit high affinity for non-target DNA such as plastid (mostly chloroplast) DNA and mitochondrial DNA. Therefore, we experimentally tested a series of commonly used primers for the analysis of plant-associated bacterial communities using 454 pyrosequencing. We evaluated the performance of all selected primer pairs in the study of the bacterial microbiomes present in the rhizosphere soil, root, stem and leaf endosphere of field-grown poplar trees (Populus tremula × Populus alba) based on (a) co-amplification of non-target DNA, (b) low amplification efficiency for pure chloroplast DNA (real-time PCR), (c) high retrieval of bacterial 16S rDNA, (d) high operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness and Inverse Simpson diversity and (e) taxonomic assignment of reads. Results indicate that experimental evaluation of primers provide valuable information that could contribute in the selection of suitable primer pairs for 16S rDNA metabarcoding studies in plant-microbiota research. Furthermore, we show that primer pair 799F-1391R outperforms all other primer pairs in our study in the elimination of non-target DNA and retrieval of bacterial OTUs. PMID:27242686

  9. Molecular Systematic of Three Species of Oithona (Copepoda, Cyclopoida) from the Atlantic Ocean: Comparative Analysis Using 28S rDNA

    PubMed Central

    Cepeda, Georgina D.; Blanco-Bercial, Leocadio; Bucklin, Ann; Berón, Corina M.; Viñas, María D.

    2012-01-01

    Species of Oithona (Copepoda, Cyclopoida) are highly abundant, ecologically important, and widely distributed throughout the world oceans. Although there are valid and detailed descriptions of the species, routine species identifications remain challenging due to their small size, subtle morphological diagnostic traits, and the description of geographic forms or varieties. This study examined three species of Oithona (O. similis, O. atlantica and O. nana) occurring in the Argentine sector of the South Atlantic Ocean based on DNA sequence variation of a 575 base-pair region of 28S rDNA, with comparative analysis of these species from other North and South Atlantic regions. DNA sequence variation clearly resolved and discriminated the species, and revealed low levels of intraspecific variation among North and South Atlantic populations of each species. The 28S rDNA region was thus shown to provide an accurate and reliable means of identifying the species throughout the sampled domain. Analysis of 28S rDNA variation for additional species collected throughout the global ocean will be useful to accurately characterize biogeographical distributions of the species and to examine phylogenetic relationships among them. PMID:22558245

  10. B chromosomes in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans are present in all body parts analyzed and show extensive variation for rDNA copy number.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Estévez, Mercedes; Cabrero, Josefa; Camacho, Juan Pedro M; López-León, María Dolores

    2014-01-01

    B chromosomes in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans are considered to be mitotically stable, because all meiotic (primary spermatocytes and oocytes) or mitotic (embryos, ovarioles, and gastric caecum) cells analyzed within the same individual show the same B chromosome number. Nothing is known, however, about body parts with somatic tissues with no mitotic activity in adult individuals, constituting the immense majority of their body. Therefore, we investigated whether B chromosomes are present in 8 non-mitotically active somatic body parts from both sexes in addition to ovarioles and testes by PCR analysis of 2 B-specific molecular markers. We also elucidated the number of B chromosomes that an individual carried through quantifying the B-located rDNA copy number by qPCR. Our results indicated the amplification of both B-specific markers in all analyzed body parts. However, we found high variation between males for the estimated number of rDNA units in the B chromosomes. These results demonstrate the presence of B chromosomes in all body parts from the same individual and suggest a high variation in the rDNA content of the B chromosomes carried by different individuals from the same population, presumably due to unequal crossovers during meiosis.

  11. Molecular systematic of three species of Oithona (Copepoda, Cyclopoida) from the Atlantic Ocean: comparative analysis using 28S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Cepeda, Georgina D; Blanco-Bercial, Leocadio; Bucklin, Ann; Berón, Corina M; Viñas, María D

    2012-01-01

    Species of Oithona (Copepoda, Cyclopoida) are highly abundant, ecologically important, and widely distributed throughout the world oceans. Although there are valid and detailed descriptions of the species, routine species identifications remain challenging due to their small size, subtle morphological diagnostic traits, and the description of geographic forms or varieties. This study examined three species of Oithona (O. similis, O. atlantica and O. nana) occurring in the Argentine sector of the South Atlantic Ocean based on DNA sequence variation of a 575 base-pair region of 28S rDNA, with comparative analysis of these species from other North and South Atlantic regions. DNA sequence variation clearly resolved and discriminated the species, and revealed low levels of intraspecific variation among North and South Atlantic populations of each species. The 28S rDNA region was thus shown to provide an accurate and reliable means of identifying the species throughout the sampled domain. Analysis of 28S rDNA variation for additional species collected throughout the global ocean will be useful to accurately characterize biogeographical distributions of the species and to examine phylogenetic relationships among them. PMID:22558245

  12. A comparative cytogenetic study of Drosophila parasitoids (Hymenoptera, Figitidae) using DNA-binding fluorochromes and FISH with 45S rDNA probe.

    PubMed

    Gokhman, Vladimir E; Bolsheva, Nadezhda L; Govind, Shubha; Muravenko, Olga V

    2016-06-01

    Karyotypes of Leptopilina boulardi (Barbotin, Carton et Keiner-Pillault, 1979) (n = 9), L. heterotoma (Thomson, 1862) (n = 10), L. victoriae Nordlander, 1980 (n = 10) and Ganaspis xanthopoda (Ashmead, 1896) (n = 9) (Hymenoptera, Figitidae) were studied using DNA-binding ligands with different base specificity [propidium iodide (PI), chromomycin A3 (CMA3) and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)], and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a 45S rDNA probe. Fluorochrome staining was similar between the different fluorochromes, except for a single CMA3- and PI-positive and DAPI-negative band per haploid karyotype of each species. FISH with 45S rDNA probe detected a single rDNA site in place of the bright CMA3-positive band, thus identifying the nucleolus organizing region (NOR). Chromosomal locations of NORs were similar for both L. heterotoma and L. victoriae, but strongly differed in L. boulardi as well as in G. xanthopoda. Phylogenetic aspects of NOR localization in all studied species are briefly discussed.

  13. A comparative cytogenetic study of Drosophila parasitoids (Hymenoptera, Figitidae) using DNA-binding fluorochromes and FISH with 45S rDNA probe.

    PubMed

    Gokhman, Vladimir E; Bolsheva, Nadezhda L; Govind, Shubha; Muravenko, Olga V

    2016-06-01

    Karyotypes of Leptopilina boulardi (Barbotin, Carton et Keiner-Pillault, 1979) (n = 9), L. heterotoma (Thomson, 1862) (n = 10), L. victoriae Nordlander, 1980 (n = 10) and Ganaspis xanthopoda (Ashmead, 1896) (n = 9) (Hymenoptera, Figitidae) were studied using DNA-binding ligands with different base specificity [propidium iodide (PI), chromomycin A3 (CMA3) and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)], and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a 45S rDNA probe. Fluorochrome staining was similar between the different fluorochromes, except for a single CMA3- and PI-positive and DAPI-negative band per haploid karyotype of each species. FISH with 45S rDNA probe detected a single rDNA site in place of the bright CMA3-positive band, thus identifying the nucleolus organizing region (NOR). Chromosomal locations of NORs were similar for both L. heterotoma and L. victoriae, but strongly differed in L. boulardi as well as in G. xanthopoda. Phylogenetic aspects of NOR localization in all studied species are briefly discussed. PMID:27150102

  14. Performance of 16s rDNA Primer Pairs in the Study of Rhizosphere and Endosphere Bacterial Microbiomes in Metabarcoding Studies.

    PubMed

    Beckers, Bram; Op De Beeck, Michiel; Thijs, Sofie; Truyens, Sascha; Weyens, Nele; Boerjan, Wout; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have revolutionized the methods for studying microbial ecology by enabling high-resolution community profiling. However, the use of these technologies in unraveling the plant microbiome remains challenging. Many bacterial 16S rDNA primer pairs also exhibit high affinity for non-target DNA such as plastid (mostly chloroplast) DNA and mitochondrial DNA. Therefore, we experimentally tested a series of commonly used primers for the analysis of plant-associated bacterial communities using 454 pyrosequencing. We evaluated the performance of all selected primer pairs in the study of the bacterial microbiomes present in the rhizosphere soil, root, stem and leaf endosphere of field-grown poplar trees (Populus tremula × Populus alba) based on (a) co-amplification of non-target DNA, (b) low amplification efficiency for pure chloroplast DNA (real-time PCR), (c) high retrieval of bacterial 16S rDNA, (d) high operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness and Inverse Simpson diversity and (e) taxonomic assignment of reads. Results indicate that experimental evaluation of primers provide valuable information that could contribute in the selection of suitable primer pairs for 16S rDNA metabarcoding studies in plant-microbiota research. Furthermore, we show that primer pair 799F-1391R outperforms all other primer pairs in our study in the elimination of non-target DNA and retrieval of bacterial OTUs. PMID:27242686

  15. Comparison of two approaches for the classification of 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Chatellier, Sonia; Mugnier, Nathalie; Allard, Françoise; Bonnaud, Bertrand; Collin, Valérie; van Belkum, Alex; Veyrieras, Jean-Baptiste; Emler, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    The use of 16S rRNA gene sequences for microbial identification in clinical microbiology is accepted widely, and requires databases and algorithms. We compared a new research database containing curated 16S rRNA gene sequences in combination with the lca (lowest common ancestor) algorithm (RDB-LCA) to a commercially available 16S rDNA Centroid approach. We used 1025 bacterial isolates characterized by biochemistry, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight MS and 16S rDNA sequencing. Nearly 80 % of isolates were identified unambiguously at the species level by both classification platforms used. The remaining isolates were mostly identified correctly at the genus level due to the limited resolution of 16S rDNA sequencing. Discrepancies between both 16S rDNA platforms were due to differences in database content and the algorithm used, and could amount to up to 10.5 %. Up to 1.4 % of the analyses were found to be inconclusive. It is important to realize that despite the overall good performance of the pipelines for analysis, some inconclusive results remain that require additional in-depth analysis performed using supplementary methods.

  16. Chromosomal mapping of repetitive DNAs in Gobionellus oceanicus and G. stomatus (Gobiidae; Perciformes): A shared XX/XY system and an unusual distribution of 5S rDNA sites on the Y chromosome.

    PubMed

    Lima-Filho, Paulo A; Amorim, Karlla D J; Cioffi, Marcelo B; Bertollo, Luiz A C; Molina, Wagner F

    2014-01-01

    With nearly 2,000 species, Gobiidae is the most specious family of the vertebrates. This high level of speciation is accompanied by conspicuous karyotypic modifications, where the role of repetitive sequences remains largely unknown. This study analyzed the karyotype of 2 species of the genus Gobionellus and mapped 18S and 5S ribosomal RNA genes and (CA)15 microsatellite sequences onto their chromosomes. G. oceanicus (2n = 56; ♂ 12 metacentrics (m) + 4 submetacentrics (sm) + 1 subtelocentric (st) + 39 acrocentrics (a); ♀ 12m + 4sm + 2st + 38a) and G. stomatus (2n = 56; ♂ 20m + 14sm + 1st + 21a; ♀ 20m + 14sm + 2st + 20a) possess the highest diploid chromosome number among the Gobiidae and have different karyotypes. Both species share an XX/XY sex chromosome system with a large subtelocentric X and a small acrocentric Y chromosome which is rich in (CA)15 sequences and bears 5S rRNA sites. Although coding and noncoding repetitive DNA sequences may be involved in the genesis or differentiation of the sex chromosomes, the exclusive presence of 5S rDNA sites on the Y, but not on the X chromosome of both species, represents a novelty in fishes. In summary, the karyotypic differences, as well as new data on the sex chromosome systems in these 2 Gobiidae species, confirm the high chromosomal dynamism observed in this family.

  17. Who are the active players of the Iberian Margin deep biosphere? Microbial diversity of borehole U1385 through analysis of 16S rDNA and rRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, J. A.; Orsi, W.; Edgcomb, V. P.; Biddle, J.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial community structure and activity in marine deep subsurface environments across the globe have been assayed using various molecular biology tools including 16S rDNA sequencing, microarrays, FISH/CARD-FISH, and metagenomics. Many studies involving these techniques are DNA-based. This limits study of microbial function in these environments as DNA does not degrade as quickly as RNA and may lead to misinterpreting relic microbial genes as important for present-day activity. In this study, the diversity of bacteria and archaea from sediments of the Iberian Margin IODP borehole U1385 was analyzed from bulk extracted DNA and RNA at seven different depths ranging from 10 to 123 meters below seafloor (mbsf). Presented data suggests that the picture of microbial diversity obtained from DNA is markedly different from that seen through analysis of RNA. IODP borehole U1385 offers a great comparison to ODP Site 1229, a well characterized borehole on the Peru Margin. Similar sediment depositional history and geochemistry will allow exploration of what represents a 'typical' continental margin sediment microbial community or if microbial endemism is established despite similar conditions. This study represents the first molecular exploration of sediment microbial communities from the Iberian Margin IODP Site U1385.

  18. Phylogeny of tremellomycetous yeasts and related dimorphic and filamentous basidiomycetes reconstructed from multiple gene sequence analyses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X.-Z.; Wang, Q.-M.; Theelen, B.; Groenewald, M.; Bai, F.-Y.; Boekhout, T.

    2015-01-01

    The Tremellomycetes (Basidiomycota) contains a large number of unicellular and dimorphic fungi with stable free-living unicellular states in their life cycles. These fungi have been conventionally classified as basidiomycetous yeasts based on physiological and biochemical characteristics. Many currently recognised genera of these yeasts are mainly defined based on phenotypical characters and are highly polyphyletic. Here we reconstructed the phylogeny of the majority of described anamorphic and teleomorphic tremellomycetous yeasts using Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood, and neighbour-joining analyses based on the sequences of seven genes, including three rRNA genes, namely the small subunit of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA), D1/D2 domains of the large subunit rDNA, and the internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS 1 and 2) of rDNA including 5.8S rDNA; and four protein-coding genes, namely the two subunits of the RNA polymerase II (RPB1 and RPB2), the translation elongation factor 1-α (TEF1) and the mitochondrial gene cytochrome b (CYTB). With the consideration of morphological, physiological and chemotaxonomic characters and the congruence of phylogenies inferred from analyses using different algorithms based on different data sets consisting of the combined seven genes, the three rRNA genes, and the individual protein-coding genes, five major lineages corresponding to the orders Cystofilobasidiales, Filobasidiales, Holtermanniales, Tremellales, and Trichosporonales were resolved. A total of 45 strongly supported monophyletic clades with multiple species and 23 single species clades were recognised. This phylogenetic framework will be the basis for the proposal of an updated taxonomic system of tremellomycetous yeasts that will be compatible with the current taxonomic system of filamentous basidiomycetes accommodating the ‘one fungus, one name’ principle. PMID:26955196

  19. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis can rapidly display the bacterial diversity contained in 16S rDNA clone libraries.

    PubMed

    Burr, M D; Clark, S J; Spear, C R; Camper, A K

    2006-05-01

    Two different strategies for molecular analysis of bacterial diversity, 16S rDNA cloning and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), were combined into a single protocol that took advantage of the best attributes of each: the ability of cloning to package DNA sequence information and the ability of DGGE to display a community profile. In this combined protocol, polymerase chain reaction products from environmental DNA were cloned, and then DGGE was used to screen the clone libraries. Both individual clones and pools of randomly selected clones were analyzed by DGGE, and these migration patterns were compared to the conventional DGGE profile produced directly from environmental DNA. For two simple bacterial communities (biofilm from a humics-fed laboratory reactor and planktonic bacteria filtered from an urban freshwater pond), pools of 35-50 clones produced DGGE profiles that contained most of the bands visible in the conventional DGGE profiles, indicating that the clone pools were adequate for identifying the dominant genotypes. However, DGGE profiles of two different pools of 50 clones from a lawn soil clone library were distinctly different from each other and from the conventional DGGE profile, indicating that this small number of clones poorly represented the bacterial diversity in soil. Individual clones with the same apparent DGGE mobility as prominent bands in the humics reactor community profiles were sequenced from the clone plasmid DNA rather than from bands excised from the gel. Because a longer fragment was cloned (approximately 1500 bp) than was actually analyzed in DGGE (approximately 350 bp), far more sequence information was available using this approach that could have been recovered from an excised gel band. This clone/DGGE protocol permitted rapid analysis of the microbial diversity in the two moderately complex systems, but was limited in its ability to represent the diversity in the soil microbial community. Nonetheless, clone/DGGE is

  20. High penetrance of a pan-canina type rDNA family in intersection Rosa hybrids suggests strong selection of bivalent chromosomes in the section Caninae.

    PubMed

    Crhak Khaitova, Lucie; Werlemark, Gun; Kovarikova, Alena; Nybom, Hilde; Kovarik, Ales

    2014-01-01

    All dogroses (Rosa sect. Caninae) are characterized by the peculiar canina meiosis in which genetic material is unevenly distributed between female and male gametes. The pan-canina rDNA family (termed beta) appears to be conserved in all dogroses analyzed so far. Here, we have studied rDNAs in experimental hybrids obtained from open pollination of F1 plants derived from 2 independent intersectional crosses between the pentaploid dogrose species (2n = 5x = 35) Rosa rubiginosa as female parent (producing 4x egg cells due to the unique asymmetrical canina meiosis) and the tetraploid (2n = 4x = 28) garden rose R. hybrida 'André Brichet' as male parent (producing 2x pollen after normal meiosis). We analyzed the structure of rDNA units by molecular methods [CAPS and extensive sequencing of internal transcribed spacers (ITS)] and determined the number of loci on chromosomes by FISH. FISH showed that R. rubiginosa and 'André Brichet' harbored 5 and 4 highly heteromorphic rDNA loci, respectively. In the second generation of hybrid lines, we observed a reduced number of loci (4 and 5 instead of the expected 6). In R. rubiginosa and 'André Brichet', 2-3 major ITS types were found which is consistent with a weak homogenization pressure maintaining high diversity of ITS types in this genus. In contrast to expectation (the null hypothesis of Mendelian inheritance of ITS families), we observed reduced ITS diversity in some individuals of the second generation which might derive from self-fertilization or from a backcross to R. rubiginosa. In these individuals, the pan-canina beta family appeared to be markedly enriched, while the paternal families were lost or diminished in copies. Although the mechanism of biased meiotic transmission of certain rDNA types is currently unknown, we speculate that the bivalent-forming chromosomes carrying the beta rDNA family exhibit extraordinary pairing efficiency and/or are subjected to strong selection in Caninae polyploids. PMID:24685720

  1. 18S rDNA analysis of alkenone-producing haptophyte(s) preserved in surface sediments of Lake Toyoni, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McColl, J. L.; Couto, J.; Bendle, J. A.; Henderson, A. C.; Seki, O.; Phoenix, V. R.; Toney, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Alkenones (long chain ketones) are readily preserved in sedimentary archives and have the potential to provide quantitative reconstructions of past water temperature. Alkenones are produced by a limited number of haptophyte algae in the marine and also some lacustrine systems. However, lakes are heterogeneous: an individual lake will have a unique combination of ecological conditions, haptophyte species and seasonal alkenone production that contributes to the sedimentary record. Haptophyte algae species have different sensitivities to temperature; therefore identifying the alkenone producer(s) prior to down-core temperature reconstructions is critical before selecting the most appropriate temperature calibration. We present a study from Lake Toyoni, a freshwater lake in Hokkaido, Japan that has alkenones preserved in surface sediments. The aim of this study is to identify the alkenone producer(s) within the lake using 18S rDNA analyses. Preserved rDNA of planktonic phototrophic algae was extracted from surface sediments of Lake Toyoni and phylogenetic analyses of the rDNA sequences suggest alkenones are produced by a single haptophyte within the class Prymnesiophyceae (order Isochrysidales). The Lake Toyoni alkenone-producer shares a distinct phylotype with a haptophyte reported from water filter samples collected in Lake BrayaSø, Greenland (D'Andrea et al., 2006). Similarity between the 18S rDNA sequences from Lake Toyoni and Lake BrayaSø provides a basis for applying (and updating) the Greenland lake temperature calibration. Applying this temperature calibration (T°C = 40.8 [UK37] + 31.8, R2=0.96; n=34) to the surface sediment alkenone unsaturation index from Lake Toyoni gives an estimated lake surface temperature (LST) of 8°C. This is in line with observed LST at Lake Toyoni, which ranges between 7 - 22°C (Apr 2011 to Nov 2011). The occurrence and identification of a single alkenone producer in Lake Toyoni means problems posed by a mixture of haptophytes in

  2. Dinoflagellate Phylogeny as Inferred from Heat Shock Protein 90 and Ribosomal Gene Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Hoppenrath, Mona; Leander, Brian S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Interrelationships among dinoflagellates in molecular phylogenies are largely unresolved, especially in the deepest branches. Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences provide phylogenetic signals only at the tips of the dinoflagellate tree. Two reasons for the poor resolution of deep dinoflagellate relationships using rDNA sequences are (1) most sites are relatively conserved and (2) there are different evolutionary rates among sites in different lineages. Therefore, alternative molecular markers are required to address the deeper phylogenetic relationships among dinoflagellates. Preliminary evidence indicates that the heat shock protein 90 gene (Hsp90) will provide an informative marker, mainly because this gene is relatively long and appears to have relatively uniform rates of evolution in different lineages. Methodology/Principal Findings We more than doubled the previous dataset of Hsp90 sequences from dinoflagellates by generating additional sequences from 17 different species, representing seven different orders. In order to concatenate the Hsp90 data with rDNA sequences, we supplemented the Hsp90 sequences with three new SSU rDNA sequences and five new LSU rDNA sequences. The new Hsp90 sequences were generated, in part, from four additional heterotrophic dinoflagellates and the type species for six different genera. Molecular phylogenetic analyses resulted in a paraphyletic assemblage near the base of the dinoflagellate tree consisting of only athecate species. However, Noctiluca was never part of this assemblage and branched in a position that was nested within other lineages of dinokaryotes. The phylogenetic trees inferred from Hsp90 sequences were consistent with trees inferred from rDNA sequences in that the backbone of the dinoflagellate clade was largely unresolved. Conclusions/Significance The sequence conservation in both Hsp90 and rDNA sequences and the poor resolution of the deepest nodes suggests that dinoflagellates reflect an explosive

  3. PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis for Identification of Bacteroides spp. and Characterization of Nitroimidazole Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, Simon L. J.; Brazier, Jon S.; Talbot, Paul R.; Duerden, Brian I.

    2000-01-01

    Bacteroides spp. are opportunist pathogens that cause blood and soft tissue infections and are often resistant to antimicrobial agents. We have developed a combined PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) technique to characterize the 16S rRNA gene for identification purposes and the nitroimidazole resistance (nim) gene for detection of resistance to the major antimicrobial agent used to treat Bacteroides infections: metronidazole (MTZ). PCR-RFLP analysis of 16S ribosomal (rDNA) with HpaII and TaqI produced profiles that enabled discrimination of type strains and identification of 70 test strains to the species level. The 16S rDNA PCR-RFLP identification results agreed with routine phenotypic testing for 62 of the strains. The discrepancies between phenotypic and PCR-RFLP methods for eight strains were resolved by 16S rDNA sequencing in three cases, but five strains remain unidentified. The presence of nim genes was indicated by PCR in 25 of 28 strains that exhibited reduced sensitivity to MTZ. PCR-RFLP of the nim gene products identified the four reported genes (nimA, -B, -C, and -D) and indicated the presence of a previously unreported nim gene in 5 strains. This novel nim gene exhibited 75% DNA sequence similarity with nimB. These rapid, accurate, and inexpensive methods should enable improved identification of Bacteroides spp. and the detection of MTZ resistance determinants. PMID:10970359

  4. Ribosomal RNA genes of Trypanosoma brucei. Cloning of a rRNA gene containing a mobile element.

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, G; Turner, M J; Cordingley, J S

    1982-01-01

    An ordered restriction map of the ribosomal RNA genes of Trypanosoma brucei brucei is presented. Bgl II fragments of T.b.brucei genomic DNA were cloned into pAT 153, and the clones containing rDNA identified. Restriction maps were established and the sense strands identified. One clone was shown by heteroduplex mapping to contain a 1.1 kb inserted sequence which was demonstrated to be widely distributed throughout the genomes of members of the subgenus Trypanozoon. However, in two other subgenera of Trypanosoma, Nannomonas and Schizotrypanum, the sequence is far less abundant. Analysis of the genomic DNA from two serodemes of T.b.brucei showed that the sequence was present in the rRNA of only one of them, implying that the sequence is a mobile element and that its appearance in rDNA is a comparitively recent occurrence. Images PMID:6294613

  5. Molecular organization of 5S rDNAs in Rajidae (Chondrichthyes): Structural features and evolution of piscine 5S rRNA genes and nontranscribed intergenic spacers.

    PubMed

    Pasolini, Paola; Costagliola, Domenico; Rocco, Lucia; Tinti, Fausto

    2006-05-01

    The genomic and gene organisation of 5S rDNA clusters have been extensively characterized in bony fish and eukaryotes, providing general issues for understanding the molecular evolution of this multigene DNA family. By contrast, the 5S rDNA features have been rarely investigated in cartilaginous fish (only three species). Here, we provide evidence for a dual 5S rDNA gene system in the Rajidae by sequence analysis of the coding region (5S) and adjacent nontranscribed spacer (NTS) in five Mediterranean species of rays (Rajidae), and in a large number of piscine taxa including lampreys and bony fish. As documented in several bony fish, two functional 5S rDNA types were found here also in the rajid genome: a short one (I) and a long one (II), distinguished by distinct 5S and NTS sequences. That the ancestral piscine genome had these two 5S rDNA loci might be argued from the occurrence of homologous dual gene systems that exist in several fish taxa and from 5S phylogenetic relationships. An extensive analysis of NTS-II sequences of Rajidae and Dasyatidae revealed the occurrence of large simple sequence repeat (SSR) regions that are formed by microsatellite arrays. The localization and organization of SSR within the NTS-II are conserved in Rajiformes since the Upper Cretaceous. The direct correlation between the SSRs extension and the NTS length indicated that they might play a role in the maintenance of the larger 5S rDNA clusters in rays. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that NTS-II is a valuable systematic tool limited to distantly related taxa of Rajiformes. PMID:16612546

  6. A tandem array of 5S ribosomal RNA genes in Pythium irregulare.

    PubMed

    Belkhiri, A; Intengan, H; Klassen, G R

    1997-02-28

    The 5S ribosomal RNA genes of the oomycete Pythium irregulare exist in tandem arrays unlinked to the rDNA repeat unit. A clone with a 9.2-kb insert containing an array of 5S genes was identified in a lambda genomic library and was characterized by restriction mapping and partial sequencing. The array consisted of 9 apparently identical 5S genes and their spacers in tandem, followed by a diverged 5S-like sequence that is likely to be a pseudogene. This gene arrangement, although almost universal in plants and animals, is rare in fungi and protists.

  7. Utility of combining morphological characters, nuclear and mitochondrial genes: An attempt to resolve the conflicts of species identification for ciliated protists.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Yi, Zhenzhen; Gentekaki, Eleni; Zhan, Aibin; Al-Farraj, Saleh A; Song, Weibo

    2016-01-01

    Ciliates comprise a highly diverse protozoan lineage inhabiting all biotopes and playing crucial roles in regulating microbial food webs. Nevertheless, subtle morphological differences and tiny sizes hinder proper species identification for many ciliates. Here, we use the species-rich taxon Frontonia and employ both nuclear and mitochondrial loci. We attempt to assess the level of genetic diversity and evaluate the potential of each marker in delineating species of Frontonia. Morphological features and ecological characteristics are also integrated into genetic results, in an attempt to resolve conflicts of species identification based on morphological and molecular methods. Our studies reveal: (1) the mitochondrial cox1 gene, nuclear ITS1 and ITS2 as well as the hypervariable D2 region of LSU rDNA are promising candidates for species delineation; (2) the cox1 gene provides the best resolution for analyses below the species level; (3) the V2 and V4 hypervariable regions of SSU rDNA, and D1 of LSU rDNA as well as the 5.8S rDNA gene do not show distinct barcoding gap due to overlap between intra- and inter-specific genetic divergences; (4) morphological character-based analysis shows promise for delimitation of Frontonia species; and (5) all gene markers and character-based analyses demonstrate that the genus Frontonia consists of three groups and monophyly of the genus Frontonia is questionable.

  8. The 16S rDNA Phylogenetic Composition of Bacteria Implicated in Sulfur Redox Cycles and Associated Sulfur Isotope Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicknell, B. T.; Batts, J. E.; Krouse, H. R.

    2006-12-01

    The reduction of sulfate ion to sulfide species by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) is accompanied by sulfur isotope fractionation, measured in terms of changes in the δ^{34}S values for sulfate and sulfide ions relative to a defined standard. In open environments, the S-isotope compositions of sulfate and sulfide can be affected by loss from the system of sulfide species as gaseous H2S, insoluble metal sulfides such as FeS2, organic complexes or by re-oxidation. The S-isotope fractionation accompanying bacterial sulfate reduction in nature is often much larger than the maxima obtained in chemical and bacterial sulfate reduction experiments in the laboratory. One mechanism postulated for the large natural S-isotope selectivity depends on repetitive reduction-oxidation cycles. In turn, this would require a level of tolerance to oxygen by SRB in the sedimentary environment, contrary to laboratory experience with SRB strains. Bird Lake (The Coorong, South Australia) is a small calcareous, evaporative lake, where average Δ^{34}S (δ^{34}Ssulfate - δ^{34}Ssulfide) values for groundwater at 16 of the 27 sites sampled periodically since 1974, vary from 15.0 ‰ to 62.3 ‰ within the range -1.8 ‰ to 70.6 ‰. Wide fluctuations in δ34Ssulfide values at individual sites are the significant factor affecting the variability of Δ^{34}S values. Values for δ18Osulfate are elevated over that of the sulfate source to an unusual extent, reflecting re-oxidation of sulfur species and O- isotope exchange between some of these species and water. One aspect of investigations at Bird Lake was the evaluation of bacterial populations in subsurface sediments and their role in sulfur cycling. To achieve this, microcosms were established with subsurface sediment and incubated under a nitrogen atmosphere, for up to 119 days. These were sampled at various times to determine sulfur species concentrations and sulfur isotope fractionation and to generate 16S rDNA clone libraries. Results

  9. Nuclear rDNA ITS-2 sequences reveal polyphyly of Panstrongylus species (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae), vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Marcilla, A; Bargues, M D; Abad-Franch, F; Panzera, F; Carcavallo, R U; Noireau, F; Galvão, C; Jurberg, J; Miles, M A; Dujardin, J P; Mas-Coma, S

    2002-05-01

    Panstrongylus species are widely distributed throughout the Americas, where they act as vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, agent of Chagas disease. Their intraspecific relationships, taxonomic position and phylogeny in relation to other Triatomini were explored using ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS-2) sequence polymorphisms and maximum parsimony, distance and maximum likelihood analyses of 10 populations representing six species of the genus (P. megistus, P. geniculatus, P. rufotuberculatus, P. lignarius, P. herreri and P. chinai). At the subspecific level, P. megistus appeared more homogeneous than P. rufotuberculatus and P. geniculatus (both with broader distribution). Several dinucleotide microsatellites were detected in the sequences of given species. Many of these microsatellites (GC, TA, GT and AT) showed different number of repeats in different populations and thus, may be very useful for population differentiation and dynamics analyses in future studies. The sequences of P. lignarius (considered sylvatic) and P. herreri (a major disease vector in Peru) were identical, suggesting that these species should be synonymised. Intrageneric analysis showed a clear separation of P. rufotuberculatus, with closest relationships between P. geniculatus and P. chinai, and P. megistus occupying a separate branch. Genetic distances between Panstrongylus species (0.11585-0.22131) were higher than those between Panstrongylus and other Triatomini (16 species from central and North America and South America) (0.08617-0.11039). The distance between P. megistus and P. lignarius/herreri (0.22131) was the largest so far recorded in the tribe. The pronounced differences in length and nucleotide composition suggest a relatively old divergence of Panstrongylus species. P. rufotuberculatus was closer to Mesoamerican Triatoma, Meccus and Dipetalogaster species than to other Panstrongylus. All Panstrongylus clustered with the Mesoamerican clade; P. rufotuberculatus

  10. Polymorphism and evolution of ribosomal DNA in tea (Camellia sinensis, Theaceae).

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Xu, Ying; Yonezawa, Takahiro; Li, Lijia; Hasegawa, Masami; Lu, Fan; Chen, Jiakuan; Zhang, Wenju

    2015-08-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) repeats often exhibit a high level of within-species homogeneity, but intra-individual polymorphism of rDNA has been found in Camellia species. In order to reveal the evolutionary pattern of rDNA repeats in tea [Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze], we identified the 45S rDNA loci, estimated their copy number, and cloned partial regions of them from different PCR products and from digested genomic DNA. The results show that there are 3 loci (6 sites) containing 45S rDNA in the tea genome; they are located at the ends of the short arms of 6 chromosomes and consist of a maximum of ∼6500 repeat units. On one hand, 164 sequences of the 26S rDNA cloned from PCR products contained 147 haplotypes, consisting of 62% pseudogenes, 24% putative functional genes, and 14% PCR-mediated recombinants, suggesting that the 45S rDNA of tea maintains an extremely high level of polymorphism and divergence; on the other hand, rDNA fragments cloned directly from genomic DNA exhibited a very high level of homogeneity: only one of 33 rDNA fragments was from a pseudogene. These results demonstrate that although over 60% of the 26S rDNA sequences identified in PCR products belong to pseudogenes, most 45S rDNA repeats are functional genes and have undergone concerted evolution. In this study, strong PCR bias and PCR-mediated recombination greatly increased the apparent proportion of pseudogenes in PCR products. Phylogenetic analysis and genetic divergence values for 26S rDNA sequences obtained in this study show that many pseudogenes have originated independently from functional genes at different times, and despite thus escaping from concerted evolution, they have failed to be eliminated from the tea genome over a long period, some of them having even produced addition copies by rapid expansion. Importantly, our study suggests that in order to determine the true pattern of evolution of rDNA it is necessary to combine data from more than one method rather than relying only

  11. "Cryptic" group-I introns in the nuclear SSU-rRNA gene of Verticillium dahliae.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Ioannis A; Dimopoulou, Chrysoula D; Typas, Milton A

    2014-08-01

    Group-I introns are widespread--though irregularly distributed--in eukaryotic organisms, and they have been extensively used for discrimination and phylogenetic analyses. Within the Verticillium genus, which comprises important phytopathogenic fungi, a group-I intron was previously identified in the SSU-rRNA (18S) gene of only V. longisporum. In this work, we aimed at elucidating the SSU-located intron distribution in V. dahliae and other Verticillium species, and the assessment of heterogeneity regarding intron content among rDNA repeats of fungal strains. Using conserved PCR primers for the amplification of the SSU gene, a structurally similar novel intron (sub-group IC1) was detected in only a few V. dahliae isolates. However, when intron-specific primers were used for the screening of a diverse collection of Verticillium isolates that originally failed to produce intron-containing SSU amplicons, most were found to contain one or both intron types, at variable rDNA repeat numbers. This marked heterogeneity was confirmed with qRT-PCR by testing rDNA copy numbers (varying from 39 to 70 copies per haploid genome) and intron copy ratios in selected isolates. Our results demonstrate that (a) IC1 group-I introns are not specific to V. longisporum within the Verticillium genus, (b) V. dahliae isolates of vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs) 4A and 6, which bear the novel intron at most of their rDNA repeats, are closely related, and (c) there is considerable intra-genomic heterogeneity for the presence or absence of introns among the ribosomal repeats. These findings underline that distributions of introns in the highly heterogeneous repetitive rDNA complex should always be verified with sensitive methods to avoid misleading conclusions for the phylogeny of fungi and other organisms.