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Sample records for 27-day solar rotation

  1. Chemistry climate model simulations of the effect of the 27 day solar rotational cycle on ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubin, A.; Langematz, U.; Brühl, C.

    2011-08-01

    The results from two simulations with the coupled chemistry climate model (CCM) ECHAM5/MESSy (EMAC-FUB) are analyzed for the effect of solar variability at the 27 day rotational time scale on ozone. One simulation is forced with constant spectral irradiances at the top of the atmosphere and the other one with daily varying irradiances using data of 1 year for solar maximum conditions. Consistent changes are applied to the photolysis scheme of the model. The model results show the main features of observed correlations between ozone and solar irradiance variability with a maximum positive correlation in the upper stratosphere and an anticorrelation in the mesosphere. The relative sensitivity of upper stratospheric ozone to changes in the solar ultraviolet flux is estimated to be 0.3 to 0.4% per 1% change in 205 nm flux. During periods of strong 27 day variability, a similar upper stratospheric ozone sensitivity is derived. However, when the daily solar irradiance variability is weak and dominated by the 13.5 day period, the ozone sensitivity is reduced in the subtropics. The modeled temperature response is consistent with the ozone signal. When averaged over one rotational cycle, the ozone and temperature response to a neglect of the 27 day cycle is weak and statistically insignificant in the stratosphere but of nonnegligible magnitude and statistically significant in the equatorial mesosphere. Our results suggest that ignoring daily solar flux variations on the 27 day time scale in transient CCM simulations does not lead to a significant degradation of the time mean ozone response in the stratosphere, while in the tropical mesosphere, significant errors of up to 3% may occur. This result does not exclude potential additional effects of 27 day solar cycle variability on stratospheric dynamics in winter which were, however, not the subject of this study.

  2. Variability of mesospheric water vapor above Bern in relation to the 27-day solar rotation cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lainer, Martin; Hocke, Klemens; Kämpfer, Niklaus

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the solar-terrestrial response of mesospheric water vapor from a mid-latitudinal observation site at the 27-day solar rotation cycle time scale. Eight years of water vapor profile measurements above Bern (46.88°N/7.46°E) by the microwave radiometer MIAWARA are used to study prominent oscillation features. The spectral data analyses shows enhanced oscillations in the 27-day period band above 0.1hPa during the rising sunspot activity of solar cycle 24. Aura MLS observations of H2O support these results by showing a similar behavior. The relationship between mesospheric H2O and the solar Lyman-α flux (FLyα) is studied by comparing the similarity of their temporal oscillations. The H2O oscillation is negatively correlated to FLyα oscillation with a correlation coefficient of up to -0.3 to -0.4, and the phase lag is 6-10 days on 0.04hPa. The confidence level of the correlation is ≥ 99%. Additionally we compute wavelet power spectra, cross-wavelet transform and wavelet coherence (WTC). The latter shows significant (two σ level) correlations occurring intermittently in the 27 and 13-day band with variable phase lock behavior. Large FLyα oscillations appeared after the solar superstorm in July 2012 and the H2O oscillations show a well pronounced anti-correlation. The competition between advective transport and photo-dissociation loss of mesospheric H2O may explain the sometimes variable phase relationship of mesospheric H2O and FLyα oscillations. Generally, the WTC analysis indicates that solar variability causes observable photochemical and dynamical processes in the mid-latitude mesosphere.

  3. Variability of mesospheric water vapor above Bern in relation to the 27-day solar rotation cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lainer, Martin; Hocke, Klemens; Kämpfer, Niklaus

    2016-06-01

    Many studies investigated solar-terrestrial responses (thermal state, O3, OH, H2O) with emphasis on the tropical upper atmosphere. In this paper the focus is switched to water vapor in the mesosphere at a mid-latitudinal location. Eight years of water vapor profile measurements above Bern (46.88 ° N / 7.46 ° E) are investigated to study oscillations with the focus on periods between 10 and 50 days. Different spectral analyses revealed prominent features in the 27-day oscillation band, which are enhanced in the upper mesosphere (above 0.1 hPa, ∼ 64 km) during the rising sunspot activity of solar cycle 24. Local as well as zonal mean Aura MLS observations support these results by showing a similar behavior. The relationship between mesospheric water and the solar Lyman-α flux is studied by comparing the similarity of their temporal oscillations. The H2O oscillation is negatively correlated to solar Lyman-α oscillation with a correlation coefficient of up to - 0.3 to - 0.4, and the phase lag is 6-10 days at 0.04 hPa. The confidence level of the correlation is ≥ 99 %. This finding supports the assumption that the 27-day oscillation in Lyman-α causes a periodical photodissociation loss in mesospheric water. Wavelet power spectra, cross-wavelet transform and wavelet coherence analysis (WTC) complete our study. More periods of high common wavelet power of H2O and solar Lyman-α are present when amplitudes of the Lyman-α flux increase. Since this is not a measure of physical correlation a more detailed view on WTC is necessary, where significant (two sigma level) correlations occur intermittently in the 27 and 13-day band with variable phase lock behavior. Large Lyman-α oscillations appeared after the solar superstorm in July 2012 and the H2O oscillations show a well pronounced anti-correlation. The competition between advective transport and photodissociation loss of mesospheric water vapor may explain the sometimes variable phase relationship of mesospheric H2

  4. The 27 day solar rotational effect on mesospheric nighttime OH and O3 observations induced by geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fytterer, T.; Santee, M. L.; Sinnhuber, M.; Wang, S.

    2015-09-01

    Observations performed by the Earth Observing System Microwave Limb Sounder instrument on board the Aura satellite from 2004 to 2009 (2004 to 2014) were used to investigate the 27 day solar rotational cycle in mesospheric OH (O3) and the physical connection to geomagnetic activity. Data analysis was focused on nighttime measurements at geomagnetic latitudes connected to the outer radiation belts (55°N/S-75°N/S). The applied superposed epoch analysis reveals a distinct 27 day solar rotational signal in OH and O3 during winter in both hemispheres at altitudes >70 km. The OH response is positive and in-phase with the respective geomagnetic activity signal, lasting for 1-2 days. In contrast, the O3 feedback is negative, delayed by 1 day, and is present up to 4 days afterward. Largest OH (O3) peaks are found at ~75 km, exceeding the 95% significance level and the measurement noise of <2% (<0.5%), while reaching variations of +14% (-7%) with respect to their corresponding background. OH at 75 km is observed to respond to particle precipitation only after a certain threshold of geomagnetic activity is exceeded, depending on the respective OH background. The relation between OH and O3 at 75 km in both hemispheres is found to be nonlinear. In particular, OH has a strong impact on O3 for relatively weak geomagnetic disturbances and accompanying small absolute OH variations (<0.04 ppb). In contrast, catalytic O3 depletion is seen to slow down for stronger geomagnetic variations and OH anomalies (0.04-0.13 ppb), revealing small variations around -0.11 ppm.

  5. Modeling of the middle atmosphere response to 27-day solar irradiance variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhodolov, Timofei; Rozanov, Eugene; Ball, William T.; Peter, Thomas; Schmutz, Werner

    2017-01-01

    The solar rotational variability (27-day) signal in the Earth's middle atmosphere has been studied for several decades, as it was believed to help in the understanding of the Sun's influence on climate at longer timescales. However, all previous studies have found that this signal is very uncertain, likely due to the influence of the internal variability of the atmosphere. Here, we applied an ensemble modeling approach in order to decrease internal random variations in the modeled time series. Using a chemistry-climate model (CCM), SOCOLv3, we performed two 30-member 3-year long (2003-2005) ensemble runs: with and without a rotational component in input irradiance fluxes. We also performed similar simulations with a 1-D model, in order to demonstrate the system behavior in the absence of any dynamical feedbacks and internal perturbations. For the first time we show a clear connection between the solar rotation and the stratospheric tropical temperature time-series. We show tropical temperature and ozone signal phase lag patterns that are in agreement with those from a 1-D model. Pronounced correlation and signal phase lag patterns allow us to properly estimate ozone and temperature sensitivities to irradiance changes. While ozone sensitivity is found to be in agreement with recent sensitivities reported for the 11-year cycle, temperature sensitivity appears to be at the lowest boundary of previously reported values. Analysis of temperature reanalysis data, separate ensemble members, and modeling results without a rotational component reveals that the atmosphere can produce random internal variations with periods close to 27 days even without solar rotational forcing. These variations are likely related to tropospheric wave-forcing and complicate the extraction of the solar rotational signal from observational time-series of temperature and, to a lesser extent, of ozone. Possible ways of further improving solar rotational signal extraction are discussed.

  6. 3-d modeling of the middle and upper atmosphere response to the 27-day solar variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruzdev, A.; Schmidt, H.; Brasseur, G.

    We present results of an analysis of the effect of the 27-day solar variation on composition and temperature of the stratosphere mesosphere and lower thermosphere calculated with the 3-dimensional chemistry climate model HAMMONIA The spectral amplitudes of the 27-day solar cycle within the wavelength range from Lyman-a to the short infrared which are input parameters at the upper boundary of the model were calculated from data of UARS SOLSTICE measurements A combination of high resolution spectral and cross-spectral analyses allows determining 27-day variations in the Earth atmosphere which are related to the 27-day solar forcing These methods give also estimates of the amplitude and hence sensitivity and phase of the response While the calculated thermal and chemical responses are very distinct and permanent in the upper atmosphere the responses in the stratosphere and mesosphere are intermittent in time and affected as well by interannual variability It is due to interference of the inherent atmospheric variability and the variability forced by the 27-day solar cycle which sophisticates the response to the 27-day solar forcing in large parts of the model stratosphere and mesosphere In the extratropical latitudes the responses are seasonally dependent Altitude-latitude distributions of sensitivities and phases of the responses to the 27-day solar forcing are analyzed in detail for temperature and chemical species important for ozone chemistry The sensitivity and phase of the ozone response in the tropical stratosphere and lower mesosphere are in satisfactory

  7. Mesospheric ozone changes associated with 27-day solar ultraviolet flux variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, A. C.; Smith, H. J. P.

    1986-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet flux changes associated with the 27-day solar rotational period cause corresponding variations in mesospheric ozone near the maximum of the 11-year sunspot cycle. This statement is based on a correlation and spectral analysis of ozone mixing ratios, deduced from Solar Mesospheric explorer satellite-based measurements of 1.27-micron O2 airglow emission and solar flux observations made from the same spacecraft in 1982. With the Lyman-alpha flux taken as an indicator of solar ultraviolet variability, spectral analysis shows a primary period of 27.1 days with a secondary period of 13.5 days. The 27.1-day period is observed in the ozone mixing ratio data together with other periods, including 13.5 days. Both a classical statistical analysis and a time series treatment show that, for 244 days, there is a correlation between ozone and solar flux near 50 km and between 65 and 70 km. Calculations predict a positive correlation over the entire mesosphere if there is no change in temperature accompanying the solar flux. Lack of correlation is temperature induced.

  8. Solar or meteorological control of lower ionospheric fluctuations (2-15 and 27 days) in middle latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pancheva, D.; Lastovicka, Jan

    1989-01-01

    Several types of short and long term effects of solar activity on the lower ionosphere are related to solar flares, the sector structure of the interplanetary magnetic field and some periodicities in sunspots or solar radio flux. The most evident periodicities of the Sun are the 11 year cycle of its activity and the differential rotation period near 27 days (25 to 30 days). Here, the following questions are discussed: which periods between 2 and 15 days and near 27 days occur in ionospheric absorption during the interval July 1980 to July 1985 and are these periods related to similar periods in solar Ly-alpha flux, geomagnetic activity, or neutral wind near 95 km observed in Collm (GDR). Day-time absorption data obtained by the A3 method was used for the following radio-paths: (164 kHz), (1539 kHz), (6090 kHz). With the use of these data the electron density variations in the lower ionosphere can be analyzed. An attempt was made to clarify the nature of the observed fluctuations in absorption.

  9. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of the Rigidity Spectrum of the 27-Day Variation of the Galactic Cosmic Ray Intensity in Different Epochs of Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, A.; Alania, M. V.

    2013-04-01

    We consider the recent, very exceptional, 11-year cycle (2003 - 2009) of solar activity and confirm that the relative amplitude in rigidity spectrum, δD( R)/ D( R), which can be approximated by a power law in rigidity R, of the first three harmonics of the 27-day variation of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity is hard in the maximum and soft in the minimum epochs of solar activity, as was found by neutron monitor data for the period of 1965 - 2002. This property is seen not only in separate minimum and maximum epochs but in individual intervals of a solar Carrington rotation as well: There exist many individual intervals of solar rotation when the expected rigidity spectrum of the 27-day variation of the GCR intensity indeed is hard in the maximum epoch of solar activity and is soft in the minimum epoch. We then construct a three-dimensional model of the 27-day variation of the GCR intensity based on Parker's transport equation, by implementing in situ measurements of the changes in heliographic longitude of the solar wind velocity and interplanetary magnetic field for different epochs of solar activity.

  10. The response of middle atmospheric ozone to solar UV irradiance variations with a period of 27 days

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, LI; Brasseur, Guy; London, Julius

    1994-01-01

    A one-dimensional photochemical-dynamical-radiative time-dependent model was used to study the response of middle atmospheric temperature and ozone to solar UV irradiance variations with the period of 27 days. The model solar UV O(x), HO(x), NO(x), and CIO(x)families and modeled solar UV variations. The amplitude of the primary temperature response to the solar UV variation is plus 0.4 K at 85-90 km with a phase lag of about 6 days. A secondary maximum response of plus 0.3 K at 45-50 km appears with a phase lag of 1 day. There is a maximum positive ozone response to the 27-day solar UV oscillation of 2.5 percent at 80-90 km with a phase lag of about 10 days after the solar irradiance maximum. At 70 km the ozone response is about 1.2 percent and is out of phase with the solar variation. In the upper stratosphere (40-50 km) the relative ozone variation is small, about 0.2 percent to 0.3 percent, and there is a negative phase of about 4 days between the ozone and solar oscillations. These oscillations are in phase in the middle stratosphere (35-40 km) where there is again a maximum relative response of about 0.6 percent. The reasons for these ozone amplitude and phase variations are discussed.

  11. The 27-day versus 13.5-day variations in the solar Lyman-alpha radiation and the radio wave absorption in the lower ionosphere over Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delamorena, B. A.; Lastovicka, Jan; Rapoport, Z. TS.; Alberca, L.

    1989-01-01

    In order to clarify the question of solar periods in absorption, the pattern was studied of the solar Lyman-alpha radiation (the principal ionizing agent of the lower ionosphere) and of the radio wave absorption at five widely spaced places in Europe. When the solar Lyman-alpha flux variability is very well developed, then it dominates in the lower ionospheric variability. The most pronounced Lyman-alpha variation on time scale day-month is the solar rotation variation (about 27 days). When the Lyman-alpha variability is developed rather poorly, as it is typical for periods dominated by the 13.5 day variability, then the lower ionospheric variability appears to be dominated by variations of meteorological origin. The conclusions hold for all five widely spaced placed in Europe.

  12. Global Characteristics of the Correlation and Time Lag Between Solar and Ionospheric Parameters in the 27-day Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Choon-Ki; Han, Shin-Chan; Dieter,Bilitza; Ki-Weon,Seo

    2012-01-01

    The 27-day variations of topside ionosphere are investigated using the in-situ electron density measurements from the CHAMP planar Langmuir probe and GRACE K-band ranging system. As the two satellite systems orbit at the altitudes of approx. 370 km and approx. 480 km, respectively, the satellite data sets are greatly valuable for examining the electron density variations in the vicinity of F2-peak. In a 27-day period, the electron density measurements from the satellites are in good agreements with the solar flux, except during the solar minimum period. The time delays are mostly 1-2 day and represent the hemispherical asymmetry. The globally-estimated spatial patterns of the correlation between solar flux and in-situ satellite measurements show poor correlations in the (magnetic) equatorial region, which are not found from the ground measurements of vertically-integrated electron content. We suggest that the most plausible cause for the poor correlation is the vertical movement of ionization due to atmospheric dynamic processes that is not controlled by the solar extreme ultraviolet radiation.

  13. Solar rotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziembowski, W.

    Sunspot observations made by Johannes Hevelius in 1642 - 1644 are the first ones providing significant information about the solar differential rotation. In modern astronomy the determination of the rotation rate is done in a routine way by measuring positions of various structures on the solar surface as well as by studying the Doppler shifts of spectral lines. In recent years a progress in helioseismology enabled determination of the rotation rate in the layers inaccessible for direct observations. There are still uncertainties concerning, especially, the temporal variations of the rotation rate and its behaviour in the radiative interior. We are far from understanding the observations. Theoretical works have not yet resulted in a satisfactory model for the angular momentum transport in the convective zone.

  14. Observation of 27 day solar cycles in the production and mesospheric descent of EPP-produced NO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickx, K.; Megner, L.; Gumbel, J.; Siskind, D. E.; Orsolini, Y. J.; Tyssøy, H. Nesse; Hervig, M.

    2015-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is produced by energetic particle precipitation (EPP) in the mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT) region, and during the polar winter, NO can descend to stratospheric altitudes where it destroys ozone. In this paper, we study the general scenario, as opposed to a case study, of NO production in the thermosphere due to energetic particles in the auroral region. We first investigate the relationship between NO production and two geomagnetic indices. The analysis indicates that the auroral electrojet index is a more suitable proxy for EPP-produced NO than the typically used midlatitude Ap index. In order to study the production and downward transport of NO from the lower thermosphere to the mesosphere, we perform superposed epoch analyses on NO observations made by the Solar Occultation For Ice Experiment instrument on board the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere satellite. The epoch analysis clearly shows the impact of the 27 day solar cycle on NO production. The effect is observed down to an altitude range of about 50 km to 65 km, depending on the hemisphere and the occurrence of stratospheric warmings. Initially, a rapid downward transport is noted during the first 10 days after EPP onset to an altitude of about 80-85 km, which is then followed by a slower downward transport of approximately 1-1.2 km/d to lower mesospheric altitudes in the order of 30 days.

  15. 27-day solar forcing of mesospheric temperature, water vapor and polar mesospheric clouds from the AIM SOFIE and CIPS satellite experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Gary; Thurairajah, Brentha; von Savigny, Christian; Hervig, Mark; Snow, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Solar cycle variations of ultraviolet radiation have been implicated in the 11-year and 27-day variations of Polar Mesospheric Cloud (PMC) properties. Both of these variations have been attributed to variable solar ultraviolet heating and photolysis, but no definitive studies of the mechanisms are available. The solar forcing issue is critical toward answering the broader question of whether PMC's have undergone long-term changes, and if so, what is the nature of the responsible long-term climate forcings? One of the principal goals of the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere satellite mission was to answer the question: "How does changing solar irradiance affect PMCs and the environment in which they form?" We describe an eight-year data set from the AIM Solar Occultation for Ice Experiment (SOFIE) and the AIM Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) experiment. Together, these instruments provide high-precision measurements of high-latitude summertime temperature (T), water vapor (H2O), and PMC ice properties for the period 2007-present. The complete temporal coverage of the summertime polar cap region for both the primary atmospheric forcings of PMC (T and H2O), together with a continually updated time series of Lyman-alpha solar irradiance, allows an in-depth study of the causes and effects of 27-day PMC variability. The small responses of these variables, relative to larger day-to-day changes from gravity waves, tides, inter-hemispheric coupling, etc. require a careful statistical analysis to isolate the solar influence. We present results for the 27-day responses of T, H2O and PMC for a total of 15 PMC seasons, (30 days before summer solstice to 60 days afterward, for both hemispheres). We find that the amplitudes and phase relationships are not consistent with the expected mechanisms of solar UV heating and photolysis - instead we postulate a primarily dynamical response, in which a periodic vertical wind heats/cools the upper mesosphere, and modulates PMC

  16. Altitude dependent sensitivity of equatorial atomic oxygen in the MLT region to the quasi-11-year and quasi-27-day solar cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lednyts'kyy, Olexandr; Von Savigny, Christian

    2016-07-01

    We retrieved atomic oxygen concentration ([O]) profiles with help of volume emission rate (VER) profiles calculated from the measured by SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) emissions of green line nightglow in the MLT (Mesosphere/Lower Thermosphere) region. We quantified the sensitivity of equatorial [O] to the 11-year and 27-day solar cycle forcing represented by such proxy indicators of solar activity as MgII index and Lyman-α with help of the wavelet, cross-correlation, superposed epoch, regression and harmonical analysis methods. We applied ordinary least squares bisector fitting on MgII index and F10.7 radio flux, which is measured in solar flux units (sfu), to convert the [O] sensitivity values in sfu and finally in percent changes. The same procedure was performed in the case of Lyman-α. Our results of the sensitivity analysis correspond well to the 11-year solar cycle response of O volume mixing ratios found in simulations performed with the WACCM3 (Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model, v. 3) and the HAMMONIA (3D Hamburg Model of the Neutral and Ionized Atmosphere) model. We identified an 11-year solar cycle variation, quasi-biennial and annual/semi-annual oscillations as well as signatures of the 27-day cycle of solar activity as presented in the MLT O layer. The most remarkable result is that the found sensitivities agree within their uncertainties and do not depend on averaging method (annual, monthly and daily) of the [O] time series. We report on 11-year and 27-day solar cycle signatures in dependence on altitude intervals used to average the [O] time series.

  17. Solar-induced 27-day variations of mesospheric temperature and water vapor from the AIM SOFIE experiment: Drivers of polar mesospheric cloud variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Gary E.; Thurairajah, Brentha; Hervig, Mark E.; von Savigny, Christian; Snow, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs) are known to be influenced by changes in water vapor and temperature in the cold summertime mesopause. Solar variability of these constituents has been held responsible for 11-year and 27-day variability of PMC activity, although the detailed mechanisms are not yet understood. It is also known that the solar influence on PMC variability is a minor contributor to the overall day-to-day variability, which is dominated by effects of gravity waves, planetary waves, and inter-hemispheric coupling. To address this issue, we have analyzed 15 seasons of data taken from the Solar Occultation for Ice Experiment (SOFIE) on the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite. The SOFIE data contain precise measurements of water vapor, temperature and ice water content (among other quantities). These high-latitude measurements are made during the PMC season at the terminator, and therefore directly relate to the simultaneous measurements of mesospheric ice. Using a composite data set of Lyman-α irradiance, we correlated the time variation of the atmospheric variables with the 27-day variability of solar ultraviolet irradiance. We used a combination of time-lagged linear regression and Superposed Epoch Analysis to extract the solar contribution as sensitivity values (response/forcing) vs. height. We compare these results to previously published results, and show that the temperature sensitivity is somewhat higher, whereas the water sensitivity is nearly the same as published values. The time lags are shorter than that expected from direct solar heating and photodissociation, suggesting that the responses are due to 27-day variations of vertical winds. An analytic solution for temperature changes forced by solar irradiance variations suggests that if the response is due purely to Lyman-α heating and Newtonian cooling, the response should vary throughout the summertime season and depend primarily upon the height-dependent column density of

  18. Solar Rotational Modulations of Spectral Irradiance and Correlations with the Variability of Total Solar Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jae N.; Cahalan, Robert F.; Wu, Dong L.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: We characterize the solar rotational modulations of spectral solar irradiance (SSI) and compare them with the corresponding changes of total solar irradiance (TSI). Solar rotational modulations of TSI and SSI at wavelengths between 120 and 1600 nm are identified over one hundred Carrington rotational cycles during 2003-2013. Methods: The SORCE (Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment) and TIMED (Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics)/SEE (Solar EUV Experiment) measured and SATIRE-S modeled solar irradiances are analyzed using the EEMD (Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition) method to determine the phase and amplitude of 27-day solar rotational variation in TSI and SSI. Results: The mode decomposition clearly identifies 27-day solar rotational variations in SSI between 120 and 1600 nm, and there is a robust wavelength dependence in the phase of the rotational mode relative to that of TSI. The rotational modes of visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) are in phase with the mode of TSI, but the phase of the rotational mode of ultraviolet (UV) exhibits differences from that of TSI. While it is questionable that the VIS to NIR portion of the solar spectrum has yet been observed with sufficient accuracy and precision to determine the 11-year solar cycle variations, the temporal variations over one hundred cycles of 27-day solar rotation, independent of the two solar cycles in which they are embedded, show distinct solar rotational modulations at each wavelength.

  19. Solar rotational modulations of spectral irradiance and correlations with the variability of total solar irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae N.; Cahalan, Robert F.; Wu, Dong L.

    2016-09-01

    Aims: We characterize the solar rotational modulations of spectral solar irradiance (SSI) and compare them with the corresponding changes of total solar irradiance (TSI). Solar rotational modulations of TSI and SSI at wavelengths between 120 and 1600 nm are identified over one hundred Carrington rotational cycles during 2003-2013. Methods: The SORCE (Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment) and TIMED (Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics)/SEE (Solar EUV Experiment) measured and SATIRE-S modeled solar irradiances are analyzed using the EEMD (Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition) method to determine the phase and amplitude of 27-day solar rotational variation in TSI and SSI. Results: The mode decomposition clearly identifies 27-day solar rotational variations in SSI between 120 and 1600 nm, and there is a robust wavelength dependence in the phase of the rotational mode relative to that of TSI. The rotational modes of visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) are in phase with the mode of TSI, but the phase of the rotational mode of ultraviolet (UV) exhibits differences from that of TSI. While it is questionable that the VIS to NIR portion of the solar spectrum has yet been observed with sufficient accuracy and precision to determine the 11-year solar cycle variations, the temporal variations over one hundred cycles of 27-day solar rotation, independent of the two solar cycles in which they are embedded, show distinct solar rotational modulations at each wavelength.

  20. Atmospheric planetary waves induced by solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krivolutsky, A. A.

    1989-01-01

    It is known that there are variations in the atmospheric processes with a period close to that of the rotation of the Sun (27 days). The variations are discovered in tropospheric processes, rainfalls, geopotential and in stratosphere. The main theoretical problem is the identification of the physical process by which these heterogeneous solar and meteorological phenomena are connected. Ivanovsky and Krivolutsky proposed that the periodic heating of the ozone layer by the short wave radiation would be the reason of excitation the 27-day oscillations. It was also assumed that excitement takes place in condition of resonance with an excited mode corresponding to the conditions present in the stratospheric circulations. The possibility is discussed of the resonant excitation and presentation is made of the data analysis results which support this idea.

  1. Solar Rotational Periodicities and the Semiannual Variation in the Solar Wind, Radiation Belt, and Aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, Barbara A.; Richardson, Ian G.; Evans, David S.; Rich, Frederick J.; Wilson, Gordon R.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of a number of solar wind, radiation belt, auroral and geomagnetic parameters is examined during the recent extended solar minimum and previous solar cycles, covering the period from January 1972 to July 2010. This period includes most of the solar minimum between Cycles 23 and 24, which was more extended than recent solar minima, with historically low values of most of these parameters in 2009. Solar rotational periodicities from S to 27 days were found from daily averages over 81 days for the parameters. There were very strong 9-day periodicities in many variables in 2005 -2008, triggered by recurring corotating high-speed streams (HSS). All rotational amplitudes were relatively large in the descending and early minimum phases of the solar cycle, when HSS are the predominant solar wind structures. There were minima in the amplitudes of all solar rotational periodicities near the end of each solar minimum, as well as at the start of the reversal of the solar magnetic field polarity at solar maximum (approx.1980, approx.1990, and approx. 2001) when the occurrence frequency of HSS is relatively low. Semiannual equinoctial periodicities, which were relatively strong in the 1995-1997 solar minimum, were found to be primarily the result of the changing amplitudes of the 13.5- and 27-day periodicities, where 13.5-day amplitudes were better correlated with heliospheric daily observations and 27-day amplitudes correlated better with Earth-based daily observations. The equinoctial rotational amplitudes of the Earth-based parameters were probably enhanced by a combination of the Russell-McPherron effect and a reduction in the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling efficiency during solstices. The rotational amplitudes were cross-correlated with each other, where the 27 -day amplitudes showed some of the weakest cross-correlations. The rotational amplitudes of the > 2 MeV radiation belt electron number fluxes were progressively weaker from 27- to 5-day periods

  2. Correlation of the 27-day variation of cosmic rays to the interplanetary magnetic field strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbah, I.

    2001-08-01

    ). The amplitude of the 27-day variation has been calculated for each detector for every solar rotation during the time interval 1965 to 1995 (Sabbah, 2001). The 13-solar rotationrunning averages ofthe amplitude of the three detectors are displayed in the top panels (a & b) of Fig.1. We also used hourly averages values of IMF and plasma (OMNI data base form NSSDC) collected by variety of spacecraft near 1 AU during the same period in order to study their effect upon the 27-day cosmic ray variation. The 27-day averages of each solar rotation have been calculated for: field magnitude B, its components in the geocentric solar ecliptic coordinates (Bx, By, Bz), solar wind speed V and the product VB (Sabbah, 2000). These data cover three solar cycles (20, 21, 22). In panel (f), we plot the smoothed NCS tilt angle R. We see from the top panels (a & b) of Fig. 1 that the amplitude of the 27-day variation of cosmic ray exhibits an 11-year sunspot cycle variation, with minima occurring near sunspot minimum represented with dotted vertical lines at 1976 and 1986 and maxima occurring near sunspot maximum denoted with dashed vertical lines at 1968, 1979 and 1989. The values of the IMF magnitude B shown in (b), the product VB shown in (e) and the NCS tilt angle R, shown in (f), display separate solar cycle variation during cycles 21 and 22. Their values track the variation in the 27-day cosmic ray amplitude. The values of B and VB are enhanced right after solar activity maximum in 1979 and

  3. The fluctuations of 27-day periodicities of the total ozone content at middle latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokourov, Victor D.; Vergasova, Galina V.; Kazimirovsky, Edward S.

    2004-12-01

    The time variations of daily values of the Total Ozone Content (TOC) during 1978-1992 at stations Irkutsk, Collm, Madrid and Saskatoon were investigated. These stations are located in the middle latitudes but have essentially different longitudes. The TOMS-database (satellite Nimbus-7) was used. The multi-correlation periodogramanalysis with sliding step 1 month was applied. The fluctuations with the periods lying in rater wide band including 27-day variations (21-39) days were revealed. Amplitudes of these fluctuations have a well-defined annual course with a maximum in the winter and a minimum in the summer. The variations of amplitudes of 27-day fluctuations contain an annual wave and quasibiennial oscillations with periods 20-28 months. At Saskatoon and Irkutsk, during years close to maxima of solar activity (1980 and 1990) the amplitudes of 27-day TOC fluctuations are the greatest. The significant correlation between amplitudes of fluctuations at considered middle-latitude stations practically without of phase lag is found out. Correlation functions are quasiperiodical with maxima of correlation coefficients each two years. It is possible to explain the results by joint influence of 27-day variations of solar activity connected with rotation of the sun and planetary atmospheric waves activity. The regular 27-day TOC fluctuations can be considered as climatic parameters of TOC variability in the Earth"s atmosphere.

  4. Doppler observations of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric equatorial rotation rate using the Doppler effect mode at the Sanford Solar Observatory are presented. These observations show no variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about one percent. The average rotation rate is indistinguishable from that of sunspots and large scale magnetic field structures.

  5. Doppler observations of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, P. H.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric equatorial rotation rate using the Doppler effect are made at the Stanford Solar Observatory. These observations show no variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about 1%. The average rotation rate is indistinguishable from that of sunspots and large-scale magnetic field structures.

  6. Solar rotation effects on the thermospheres of Mars and Earth.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Jeffrey M; Bruinsma, Sean; Lemoine, Frank G

    2006-06-02

    The responses of Earth's and Mars' thermospheres to the quasi-periodic (27-day) variation of solar flux due to solar rotation were measured contemporaneously, revealing that this response is twice as large for Earth as for Mars. Per typical 20-unit change in 10.7-centimeter radio flux (used as a proxy for extreme ultraviolet flux) reaching each planet, we found temperature changes of 42.0 +/- 8.0 kelvin and 19.2 +/- 3.6 kelvin for Earth and Mars, respectively. Existing data for Venus indicate values of 3.6 +/- 0.6 kelvin. Our observational result constrains comparative planetary thermosphere simulations and may help resolve existing uncertainties in thermal balance processes, particularly CO2 cooling.

  7. Ionospheric ion temperature forecasting in multiples of 27 days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, Jan J.; Schunk, Robert W.; Nicolls, Michael J.

    2014-03-01

    The ionospheric variability found at auroral locations is usually assumed to be unpredictable. The magnetosphere, which drives this ionospheric variability via storms and substorms, is at best only qualitatively describable. In this study we demonstrate that over a 3 year period, ionospheric variability observed from Poker Flat, Alaska, has, in fact, a high degree of long-term predictability. The observations used in this study are (a) the solar wind high speed stream velocity measured by the NASA Advanced Composition Explorer satellite, used to define the corotating interaction region (CIR), and (b) the ion temperature at 300 km altitude measured by the National Science Foundation Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar over Poker Flat, Alaska. After determining a seasonal and diurnal climatology for the ion temperature, we show that the residual ion temperature heating events occur synchronously with CIR-geospace interactions. Furthermore, we demonstrate examples of ion temperature forecasting at 27, 54, and 81 days. A rudimentary operational forecasting scenario is described for forecasting recurrence 27 days ahead for the CIR-generated geomagnetic storms. These forecasts apply specifically to satellite tracking operations (thermospheric drag) and emergency HF-radio communications (ionospheric modifications) in the polar regions. The forecast is based on present-day solar and solar wind observations that can be used to uniquely identify the coronal hole and its CIR. From this CIR epoch, a 27 day forecast is then made.

  8. Solar rotation results at Mount Wilson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R.; Adkins, J. M.; Boyden, J. E.; Cragg, T. A.; Gregory, T. S.; Labonte, B. J.; Padilla, S. P.; Webster, L.

    1983-01-01

    Solar rotation results from Doppler velocity measurements made at Mount Wilson over a period of more than 14 years are presented based on a single reduction procedure. The observations were made with the wavelength 5250.2 A line of Fe I, and wavelength shifts of the line were simultaneously recorded. Data from 188 rotations are presented. Measurements of scattered light along with its effect on the measured rotation rate are given.

  9. The solar UV related changes in total ozone from a solar rotation to a solar cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.

    1991-05-01

    The Nimbus-7 TOMS version 6 data, corrected for the instrument degradation, are analyzed to delineate the solar UV related changes in total ozone (TOZ) against background signals of dynamical origin. It is shown that the solar UV related change in TOZ over a solar cycle is about 1.5 percent that may be attributed to about 6 percent change in the solar UV flux near 200 nm. This estimate is also consistent with the solar UV related changes in TOZ over a time scale of a solar rotation. In the solar rotation case, ozone lags the solar UV by 3-4 days and its sensitivity to solar UV change is a factor of 203 less than for the solar cycle case. Both these effects are attributed to chemical time constants in the lower stratosphere that are comparable to the period of a solar rotation.

  10. The solar UV related changes in total ozone from a solar rotation to a solar cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, S.

    1991-01-01

    The Nimbus-7 TOMS version 6 data, corrected for the instrument degradation, are analyzed to delineate the solar UV related changes in total ozone (TOZ) against background signals of dynamical origin. It is shown that the solar UV related change in TOZ over a solar cycle is about 1.5 percent that may be attributed to about 6 percent change in the solar UV flux near 200 nm. This estimate is also consistent with the solar UV related changes in TOZ over a time scale of a solar rotation. In the solar rotation case, ozone lags the solar UV by 3-4 days and its sensitivity to solar UV change is a factor of 2-3 less than for the solar cycle case. Both these effects are attributed to chemical time constants in the lower stratosphere that are comparable to the period of a solar rotation.

  11. Evidence for the existence of nonradial solar oscillations: Solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caudell, T. P.; Hill, H. A.

    1980-01-01

    The coherent properties of six oscillations over a two week period in which seven days of equatorial diameter measurements were analyzed, are confirmed by the addition of an extra day of data. The two large 1 (the principal order number in the spherical harmonic expansion of the eigenfunction) g-mode oscillations may be candidates for the slowly rotating mode locked structures. For the four low frequency p-modes, periodic nature is observed in the daily power levels, varying with periods of several days. This is attributed to beating between rotationally split m states for a given 1 value. Nonradial modes are a major contribution to the observed solar oscillations. The nonradial character of the observed modes allows the depth dependence of the internal solar rotation to be investigated.

  12. Fine Structure of Solar Acoustic Oscillations Due to Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goode, P. R.; Dziembowski, W.

    1984-01-01

    The nature of the fine structure of high order, low degree five minute period solar oscillations following from various postulated forms of spherical rotation is predicted. The first and second order effects of rotation are included.

  13. On the Cause of Solar Differential Rotations in the Solar Interior and Near the Solar Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, L.

    2012-12-01

    A theoretical model is proposed to explain the cause of solar differential rotations observed in the solar interior and near the solar surface. We propose that the latitudinal differential rotation in the solar convection zone is a manifestation of an easterly wind in the mid latitude. The speed of the easterly wind is controlled by the magnitude of the poleward temperature gradient in the lower part of the solar convection zone. The poleward temperature gradient depends on the orientation and strength of the magnetic fields at different latitudes in the solar convection zone. The north-south asymmetry in the wind speed can lead to north-south asymmetry in the evolution of the solar cycle. The easterly wind is known to be unstable for a west-to-east rotating star or planet. Based on the observed differential rotations in the solar convection zone, we can estimate the easterly wind speed at about 60-degree latitude and determine the azimuthal wave number of the unstable wave modes along the zonal flow. The lowest azimuthal wave number is about m=7~8. This result is consistent with the average width of the elephant-trunk coronal hole shown in the solar X-ray images. The nonlinear evolution of the unstable easterly wind can lead to transpolar migration of coronal holes and can change the poloidal magnetic field in a very efficient way. In the study of radial differential rotation near the solar surface, we propose that the radial differential rotation depends on the radial temperature gradient. The radial temperature gradient depends on the magnetic field structure above the solar surface. The non-uniform magnetic field distribution above the solar surface can lead to non-uniform radial convections and formation of magnetic flux rope at different spatial scales. The possible cause of continuous formation and eruption of prominences near an active region will also be discussed.

  14. INTERNAL-CYCLE VARIATION OF SOLAR DIFFERENTIAL ROTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K. J.; Xie, J. L.; Shi, X. J.

    2013-06-01

    The latitudinal distributions of the yearly mean rotation rates measured by Suzuki in 1998 and 2012 and Pulkkinen and Tuominen in 1998 are utilized to investigate internal-cycle variation of solar differential rotation. The rotation rate at the solar equator seems to have decreased since cycle 10 onward. The coefficient B of solar differential rotation, which represents the latitudinal gradient of rotation, is found to be smaller in the several years after the minimum of a solar cycle than in the several years after the maximum time of the cycle, and it peaks several years after the maximum time of the solar cycle. The internal-cycle variation of the solar rotation rates looks similar in profile to that of the coefficient B. A new explanation is proposed to address such a solar-cycle-related variation of the solar rotation rates. Weak magnetic fields may more effectively reflect differentiation at low latitudes with high rotation rates than at high latitudes with low rotation rates, and strong magnetic fields may more effectively repress differentiation at relatively low latitudes than at high latitudes. The internal-cycle variation is inferred as the result of both the latitudinal migration of the surface torsional pattern and the repression of strong magnetic activity in differentiation.

  15. Solar rotating magnetic dipole?. [around axis perpendicular to rotation axis of the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonucci, E.

    1974-01-01

    A magnetic dipole rotating around an axis perpendicular to the rotation axis of the sun can account for the characteristics of the surface large-scale solar magnetic fields through the solar cycle. The polarity patterns of the interplanetary magnetic field, predictable from this model, agree with the observed interplanetary magnetic sector structure.

  16. Solar rotation measurements at Mount Wilson. II - Systematic instrumental effects and the absolute rotation rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labonte, B. J.; Howard, R.

    1981-01-01

    Possible sources of systematic error in solar Doppler rotational velocities are examined. Scattered light is shown to affect the Mount Wilson solar rotation results, but this effect is not enough to bring the spectroscopic results in coincidence with the sunspot rotation. Interference fringes at the spectrograph focus at Mount Wilson have in two intervals affected the rotation results. It has been possible to correlate this error with temperature and thus correct for it. A misalignment between the entrance and exit slits is a possible source of error, but for the Mount Wilson slit configuration, the amplitude of this effect is negligibly small. Rapid scanning of the solar image also produces no measurable effect.

  17. Hale cycle and long-term trend in variation of galactic cosmic rays related to solar rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, A.; Mursula, K.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensities around solar minimum times are modulated by magnetic drifts that depend on the overall solar polarity. GCR intensities reach a higher but more narrow peak during negative minima than during positive minima. However, despite these higher intensities, the variation of GCRs over timescales of solar rotation is smaller during negative minima than during positive minima. Aims: We study the variation of GCR intensity over the 27-day synodic solar rotation and over the 14-day half-rotation, in particular the long-term trend and cyclic pattern of this variation, and propose a unifying explanation for the observations. Methods: We used two high-latitude neutron monitors, Oulu and Apatity, which are most sensitive to the low-energy part of the GCR spectrum and thereby more strongly affected by the changes in the conditions of the local heliosphere. We calculated the yearly mean amplitudes of the GCR intensity variation during the full solar rotation (A27) and half-rotation (A14) in 1964-2016. Results: We verify that the A27 and A14 amplitudes exhibit a clear 22-yr Hale cycle during solar minima at both stations, with larger amplitudes in positive minima. We find that the mean amplitude of the Hale cycle is about 30-45% of the mean amplitude for A14, while is only about 15-30% for A27. We also find that all amplitudes depict a declining long-term trend, which we suggest is due to the weakening of solar polar magnetic fields during the last four solar cycles and the ensuing latitudinal widening of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) region. An exceptionally wide HCS region during the last solar minimum, when A14 reached its all-time minimum, is demonstrated by Ulysses probe observations. Conclusions: Our results emphasize the effect of polarity-dependent drift and the properties of the HCS in modulating the variation of GCR intensity during solar rotation in solar minimum times. The second rotation harmonic yields a larger Hale

  18. Asteroid rotation control via a tethered solar sail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Youtao; Wu, Jingyun

    2016-12-01

    The rotation of asteroids causes difficulties in the exploration of asteroids or prevention of asteroids impact on the Earth. We propose to use a solar sail to control, i.e., slow down or stop the rotational motion of an asteroid. First, the dynamic model of a tethered solar sail in the rotating gravitational field of an asteroid is presented. An optimal control method is employed to determine the control law of the tethered solar sail. The optimal control problem is converted into a nonlinear programming problem with the Gauss pseudospectral method. Simulation results show that this method can effectively slow down or even stop the rotation of an asteroid. A solar sail of 105 m2 can stop the rotation of the asteroid Apophis in 1000 days.

  19. Differential rotation in solar-like stars from global simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, G.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.; Mansour, N. N. E-mail: sasha@sun.stanford.edu E-mail: nagi.n.mansour@nasa.gov

    2013-12-20

    To explore the physics of large-scale flows in solar-like stars, we perform three-dimensional anelastic simulations of rotating convection for global models with stratification resembling the solar interior. The numerical method is based on an implicit large-eddy simulation approach designed to capture effects from non-resolved small scales. We obtain two regimes of differential rotation, with equatorial zonal flows accelerated either in the direction of rotation (solar-like) or in the opposite direction (anti-solar). While the models with the solar-like differential rotation tend to produce multiple cells of meridional circulation, the models with anti-solar differential rotation result in only one or two meridional cells. Our simulations indicate that the rotation and large-scale flow patterns critically depend on the ratio between buoyancy and Coriolis forces. By including a sub-adiabatic layer at the bottom of the domain, corresponding to the stratification of a radiative zone, we reproduce a layer of strong radial shear similar to the solar tachocline. Similarly, enhanced super-adiabaticity at the top results in a near-surface shear layer located mainly at lower latitudes. The models reveal a latitudinal entropy gradient localized at the base of the convection zone and in the stable region, which, however, does not propagate across the convection zone. In consequence, baroclinicity effects remain small, and the rotation isocontours align in cylinders along the rotation axis. Our results confirm the alignment of large convective cells along the rotation axis in the deep convection zone and suggest that such 'banana-cell' pattern can be hidden beneath the supergranulation layer.

  20. Rotation of solid bodies in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peale, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of elastic distortion, nonprincipal axis rotation, precessing orbits, and internal dissipation on the rotation of a solid solar system body, which is in the gravitational field of an exterior body, are relatively easily analyzed by a Hamiltonian theory developed here. Examples of applications include the Chandler wobble, wobble of the moon, spin-orbit coupling, generalized Cassini laws, and tidal evolution.

  1. MODELING OF DIFFERENTIAL ROTATION IN RAPIDLY ROTATING SOLAR-TYPE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Hotta, H.; Yokoyama, T.

    2011-10-10

    We investigate differential rotation in rapidly rotating solar-type stars by means of an axisymmetric mean field model that was previously applied to the Sun. This allows us to calculate the latitudinal entropy gradient with a reasonable physical basis. Our conclusions are as follows. (1) Differential rotation approaches the Taylor-Proudman state when stellar rotation is faster than solar rotation. (2) Entropy gradient generated by the attached subadiabatic layer beneath the convection zone becomes relatively small with a large stellar angular velocity. (3) Turbulent viscosity and turbulent angular momentum transport determine the spatial difference of angular velocity {Delta}{Omega}. (4) The results of our mean field model can explain observations of stellar differential rotation.

  2. About the Solar Activity Rotation Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouradian, Zadig

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evidence, from a statistical point of view, the different periods of solar activity. The well known period is that of 150-160 days, but many others were detected between 9 and 4750 days (length of solar cycle). We tabulated 49 articles revealing 231 periods. In order to explain them, different hypotheses were suggested.

  3. Coronal Rotation at Solar Minimum from UV Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancuso, S.

    2008-01-01

    UVCS/SOHO observations have been analyzed to reconstruct intensity time series of the O VI 1032 A and H 11216 A spectral lines at different coronal heliolatitudes from 1.5 to 3.0 solar radii from Sun center. Evidence was found for coronal differential rotation that differs significantly from that of the photospheric plasma. The study of the latitudinal variation shows that the UV corona decelerates toward the photospheric rates from the equator up to the poleward boundary 2 of the midlatitude streamers, reaching a peak of 28.16+/-0.20 days around +30 from the equator at 1.5 solar radii, while a less evident peak is observed in the northern hemisphere. This result suggests a real north-south rotational asymmetry as a consequence of different activity and weak coupling between the magnetic fields of the two hemispheres. The study of the radial rotation profiles shows that the corona is rotating almost rigidly with height.

  4. 27-day cycles in human mortality: Traute and Bernhard Düll

    PubMed Central

    Halberg, F.; Düll-Pfaff, N.; Gumarova, L.; Zenchenko, T. A.; Schwartzkopff, O.; Freytag, E. M.; Freytag, J.; Cornelissen, G.

    2013-01-01

    This tribute to her parents by one co-author (NDP) is the fruit of a more than a decade-long search by the senior author (FH) for the details of the lives of Bernhard and Gertraud (“Traute”) Düll. These pioneers studied how space/terrestrial weather may differentially influence human mortality from various causes, the 27-day mortality pattern being different whether death was from cardiac or respiratory disease, or from suicide. FH is the translator of personal information about her parents provided by NDP in German. Figuratively, he also attempts to “translate” the Dülls’ contribution in the context of the literature that had appeared before their work and after their deaths. Although the Dülls published in a then leading journal, among others (and FH had re-analyzed some of their work in a medical journal), they were unknown to academies or libraries (where FH had inquired about them). The Dülls thoroughly assembled death certificates to offer the most powerful evidence for an effect of solar activity reflected in human mortality, as did others before them. They went several steps further than their predecessors, however. They were the first to show possibly differential effects of space and/or Earth weather with respect to suicide and other deaths associated with the nervous and sensory systems vs. death from cardiac or respiratory disease as well as overall death by differences in the phase of a common 27-day cycle characterizing these mortality patterns. Furthermore, Bernhard Düll developed tests of human visual and auditory reaction time to study effects of weather and solar activity, publishing a book (his professorial dissertation) on the topic. His unpublished finding of an increased incidence of airplane crashes in association with higher solar activity was validated after his death, among others, by Tatiana Zenchenko and A. M. Merzlyi. PMID:24224144

  5. 27-day cycles in human mortality: Traute and Bernhard Düll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halberg, F.; Düll-Pfaff, N.; Gumarova, L.; Zenchenko, T. A.; Schwartzkopff, O.; Freytag, E. M.; Freytag, J.; Cornelissen, G.

    2013-04-01

    This tribute to her parents by one co-author (NDP) is the fruit of a more than a decade-long search by the senior author (FH) for the details of the lives of Bernhard and Gertraud (''Traute'') Düll. These pioneers studied how space/terrestrial weather may differentially influence human mortality from various causes, the 27-day mortality pattern being different whether death was from cardiac or respiratory disease, or from suicide. FH is the translator of personal information about her parents provided by NDP in German. Figuratively, he also attempts to ''translate'' the Dülls' contribution in the context of the literature that had appeared before their work and after their deaths. Although the Dülls published in a then leading journal, among others (and FH had re-analyzed some of their work in a medical journal), they were unknown to academies or libraries (where FH had inquired about them). The Dülls thoroughly assembled death certificates to offer the most powerful evidence for an effect of solar activity reflected in human mortality, as did others before them. They went several steps further than their predecessors, however. They were the first to show possibly differential effects of space and/or Earth weather with respect to suicide and other deaths associated with the nervous and sensory systems vs. death from cardiac or respiratory disease as well as overall death by differences in the phase of a common 27-day cycle characterizing these mortality patterns. Furthermore, Bernhard Düll developed tests of human visual and auditory reaction time to study effects of weather and solar activity, publishing a book (his professorial dissertation) on the topic. His unpublished finding of an increased incidence of airplane crashes in association with higher solar activity was validated after his death, among others, by Tatiana Zenchenko and A. M. Merzlyi.

  6. Variations in the Solar Coronal Rotation with Altitude - Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Hitaishi; Trivedi, Rupal; Sharma, Som Kumar; Vats, Hari Om

    2017-04-01

    Here we report an in-depth reanalysis of an article by Vats et al. ( Astrophys. J. 548, L87, 2001) that was based on measurements of differential rotation with altitude as a function of observing frequencies (as lower and higher frequencies indicate higher and lower heights, respectively) in the solar corona. The radial differential rotation of the solar corona is estimated from daily measurements of the disc-integrated solar radio flux at 11 frequencies: 275, 405, 670, 810, 925, 1080, 1215, 1350, 1620, 1755, and 2800 MHz. We use the same data as were used in Vats et al. (2001), but instead of the twelfth maxima of autocorrelograms used there, we use the first secondary maximum to derive the synodic rotation period. We estimate synodic rotation by Gaussian fit of the first secondary maximum. Vats et al. (2001) reported that the sidereal rotation period increases with increasing frequency. The variation found by them was from 23.6 to 24.15 days in this frequency range, with a difference of only 0.55 days. The present study finds that the sidereal rotation period increases with decreasing frequency. The variation range is from 24.4 to 22.5 days, and the difference is about three times larger (1.9 days). However, both studies give a similar rotation period at 925 MHz. In Vats et al. (2001) the Pearson's factor with trend line was 0.86, whereas present analysis obtained a {˜} 0.97 Pearson's factor with the trend line. Our study shows that the solar corona rotates more slowly at higher altitudes, which contradicts the findings reported in Vats et al. (2001).

  7. On Differential Rotation and Overshooting in Solar-like Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Allan Sacha; Strugarek, Antoine; Varela, Jacobo; Matt, Sean P.; Augustson, Kyle C.; Emeriau, Constance; DoCao, Olivier Long; Brown, Benjamin; Toomre, Juri

    2017-02-01

    We seek to characterize how the change of global rotation rate influences the overall dynamics and large-scale flows arising in the convective envelopes of stars covering stellar spectral types from early G to late K. We do so through numerical simulations with the ASH code, where we consider stellar convective envelopes coupled to a radiative interior with various global properties. As solar-like stars spin down over the course of their main sequence evolution, such a change must have a direct impact on their dynamics and rotation state. We indeed find that three main states of rotation may exist for a given star: anti-solar-like (fast poles, slow equator), solar-like (fast equator, slow poles), or a cylindrical rotation profile. Under increasingly strict rotational constraints, the last profile can further evolve into a Jupiter-like profile, with alternating prograde and retrograde zonal jets. We have further assessed how far the convection and meridional flows overshoot into the radiative zone and investigated the morphology of the established tachocline. Using simple mixing length arguments, we are able to construct a scaling of the fluid Rossby number {R}{of}=\\tilde{ω }/2{{{Ω }}}* ∼ \\tilde{v}/2{{{Ω }}}* {R}* , which we calibrate based on our 3D ASH simulations. We can use this scaling to map the behavior of differential rotation versus the global parameters of stellar mass and rotation rate. Finally, we isolate a region on this map (R of ≳ 1.5–2) where we posit that stars with an anti-solar differential rotation may exist in order to encourage observers to hunt for such targets.

  8. Twists and rotations of solar magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piddington, J. H.

    1981-04-01

    A detailed review is given of evidence for the emergence of solar magnetic fields as helically twisted flux ropes, made up of hundreds of thousands of individually twisted flux fibers and reaching concentrations greater than 4000 gauss. The initial pitch angle of the twists is estimated as less than 10 deg in the submerged flux ropes and 1 deg in the fibers, with large-factor increases during (and following) emergence. The upward transmission of magnetic stresses and motions from submerged flux rope sections are major factors in solar physics, with the helical twists accounting for the creation of sunspots and for their stability, fine structure, and mode of decay. They are basic features of solar atmospheric structures, from the largest flare events and prominences to arch filaments and the smallest network components.

  9. Rotation of solar magnetic fields for the current solar cycle 24

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, X. J.; Xie, J. L.

    2014-11-01

    The rotation of solar magnetic fields for the current solar cycle 24 is investigated through a cross-correlation analysis of the Carrington synoptic maps of solar photospheric magnetic fields during Carrington rotation numbers 2076-2146 (2008 October to 2014 January). The sidereal rotation rates of positive and negative magnetic fields at some latitudes are shown, and it can be found that the positive (negative) fields generally rotate faster than the negative (positive) fields in the southern (northern) hemisphere at low latitudes. The mean rotation profiles of total, positive, and negative magnetic fields between ±60° latitudes in the time interval are also obtained. It should be noted that both of the mean rotation profiles of the positive and negative magnetic fields, as well as the mean rotation profile of the total magnetic field, exhibit a quasi-rigid rotation at latitudes above about 55°. The mean rotation rates of the positive (negative) polarity reach their maximum values at about 9°(6)° latitude in the southern (northern) hemisphere. The mean rotation profile of the total magnetic field displays an obvious north-south asymmetry, where the rotation seems to be more differential in the northern hemisphere. The latitude variation in the rotation rate differences between positive and negative magnetic fields is further studied, and it is found that magnetic fields with the same polarity as the leading sunspots at a given hemisphere rotate faster than those with the opposite polarity, except for the zones around 52° latitude of the southern hemisphere and around 35° latitude of the northern hemisphere. The implication of these results is discussed. It is clear that the obtained results can provide some observational constraints on the theoretical research of the mechanisms of differential rotation and solar cycle.

  10. Combined Solar system and rotation curve constraints on MOND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hees, Aurélien; Famaey, Benoit; Angus, Garry W.; Gentile, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    The Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) paradigm generically predicts that the external gravitational field in which a system is embedded can produce effects on its internal dynamics. In this communication, we first show that this external field effect (EFE) can significantly improve some galactic rotation curves fits by decreasing the predicted velocities of the external part of the rotation curves. In modified gravity versions of MOND, this EFE also appears in the Solar system and leads to a very good way to constrain the transition function of the theory. A combined analysis of the galactic rotation curves and Solar system constraints (provided by the Cassini spacecraft) rules out several classes of popular MOND transition functions, but leaves others viable. Moreover, we show that Laser Interferometer Space Antenna Pathfinder will not be able to improve the current constraints on these still viable transition functions.

  11. On the rotation rate in the solar convection zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schou, Jepser; Brown, Timothy M.

    1994-01-01

    Recently Gough et al. (1993) have argued that the rotation rate in parts of the solar convection zone may be constant on cylinders as predicted by models of the convection zone, contrary to the inferences generally made from helioseismology. Here we consider models similar to those suggested by Gough et al. and show that they are either inconsistent with observations made by Fourier Tachometer or require unphysical rotation rates in other parts of the Sun. These observations use a more detailed model of the effects of the solar rotation on the observed frequencies than that used in reducing previous observations. We also show the results of an inversion of the Fourier Tachometer observations and compare it with an inversion of data similar to that used previously. The result of this inversion generally confirms the conclusions from previous inversions.

  12. ON THE VARIATION OF SOLAR RADIUS IN ROTATION CYCLES

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Z. N.; Kong, D. F.; Xiang, N. B.; Feng, W.

    2015-01-10

    The Date Compensated Discrete Fourier Transform and CLEANest algorithm are used to study the temporal variations of the solar radius observed at Rio de Janeiro Observatory from 1998 March 2 to 2009 November 6. The CLEANest spectra show several significant periodicities around 400, 312, 93.5, 86.2, 79.4, 70.9, 53.2, and 26.3 days. Then, combining the data on the daily solar radius measured at Calern Observatory and Rio de Janeiro Observatory and the corresponding daily sunspot areas, we study the short-term periodicity of the solar radius and the role of magnetic field in the variation of the solar radius. The rotation period of the daily solar radius is determined to be statistically significant. Moreover, its temporal evolution is anti-phase with that of sunspot activity, and it is found anti-phase with solar activity. Generally, the stronger solar activity is, the more obvious is the anti-phase relation of radius with solar activity. This indicates that strong magnetic fields have a greater inhibitive effect than weak magnetic fields on the variation of the radius.

  13. SOLAR ROTATION RATE DURING THE CYCLE 24 MINIMUM IN ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Antia, H. M.; Basu, Sarbani E-mail: sarbani.basu@yale.ed

    2010-09-01

    The minimum of solar cycle 24 is significantly different from most other minima in terms of its duration as well as its abnormally low levels of activity. Using available helioseismic data that cover epochs from the minimum of cycle 23 to now, we study the differences in the nature of the solar rotation between the minima of cycles 23 and 24. We find that there are significant differences between the rotation rates during the two minima. There are differences in the zonal-flow pattern too. We find that the band of fast rotating region close to the equator bifurcated around 2005 and recombined by 2008. This behavior is different from that during the cycle 23 minimum. By autocorrelating the zonal-flow pattern with a time shift, we find that in terms of solar dynamics, solar cycle 23 lasted for a period of 11.7 years, consistent with the result of Howe et al. (2009). The autocorrelation coefficient also confirms that the zonal-flow pattern penetrates through the convection zone.

  14. The Rotation of the Solar Photospheric Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J. C.; Gao, P. X.

    2016-12-01

    The rotational characteristics of the solar photospheric magnetic field at four flux ranges are investigated together with the total flux of active regions (MFar) and quiet regions (MFqr). The first four ranges (MF1-4) are (1.5-2.9) × 1018, (2.9-32.0) × 1018, (3.20-4.27) × 1019, and (4.27-38.01) × 1019, respectively (the unit is Mx per element). Daily values of the flux data are extracted from magnetograms of the Michelson Doppler Imager on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. Lomb-Scargle periodograms show that only MF2, MF4, MFqr, and MFar exhibit rotational periods. The periods of the first three types of flux are very similar, i.e., 26.20, 26.23, and 26.24 days, respectively, while that of MFar is longer, 26.66 days. This indicates that active regions rotate more slowly than quiet regions on average, and strong magnetic fields tend to repress the surface rotation. Sinusoidal function fittings and cross-correlation analyses reveal that MFar leads MF2 and MF4 by 5 and 1 days, respectively. This is speculated to be related with the decaying of active regions. MF2 and MFar are negatively correlated, while both MF4 and MFqr are positively correlated with MFar. At the timescale of the solar activity cycle, MFar leads (negatively) MF2 by around one year (350 days), and leads MF4 by about 3 rotation periods (82 days). The relation between MF2 and MFar may be explained by the possibility that the former mainly comes from a higher latitude, or emerges from the subsurface shear layer. We conjecture that MF4 may partly come from the magnetic flux of active regions; this verifies previous results that were obtained with indirect solar magnetic indices.

  15. Modelling the rotational evolution of solar-like stars: the rotational coupling time-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spada, F.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Lanza, A. F.; Messina, S.; Collier Cameron, A.

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the rotational evolution of solar-like stars with a focus on the internal angular momentum transport processes. The double-zone model, in which the star's radiative core and convective envelope are assumed to rotate as solid bodies, is used to test simple relationships between the core-envelope coupling time-scale, τc, and rotational properties, like the envelope angular velocity or the differential rotation at the core-envelope interface. The trial relationships are tested by fitting the model parameters to available observations via a Markov chain Monte Carlo method. The synthetic distributions are tested for compatibility with their observational counterparts by means of the standard Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test. A power-law dependence of τc on the inner differential rotation leads to a more satisfactory agreement with observations than a two-valued prescription for τc, which would imply a dichotomy between the initially slow (Prot≳ 3 d) and fast (Prot≲ 3 d) rotators. However, we find it impossible to reconcile the high fraction of fast rotators in α Per with the rotation period distributions in stellar systems at earlier and later evolutionary stages. This could be explained by local environmental effects (e.g. early removal of circumstellar discs due to ultraviolet radiation and winds from nearby high-mass stars) or by observational biases. The low KS probability that the synthetic and observed distributions are not incompatible, found in some cases, may be due to oversimplified assumptions of the double-zone model, but the large relative uncertainties in the age determination of very young clusters and associations are expected to play a relevant role. Other possible limitations and uncertainties are discussed.

  16. DYNAMO EFFECTS NEAR THE TRANSITION FROM SOLAR TO ANTI-SOLAR DIFFERENTIAL ROTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Simitev, Radostin D.; Kosovichev, Alexander G.; Busse, Friedrich H.

    2015-09-01

    Numerical MHD simulations play an increasingly important role for understanding the mechanisms of stellar magnetism. We present simulations of convection and dynamos in density-stratified rotating spherical fluid shells. We employ a new 3D simulation code for obtaining the solution of a physically consistent anelastic model of the process with a minimum number of parameters. The reported dynamo simulations extend into a “buoyancy-dominated” regime where the buoyancy forcing is dominant while the Coriolis force is no longer balanced by pressure gradients, and strong anti-solar differential rotation develops as a result. We find that the self-generated magnetic fields, despite being relatively weak, are able to reverse the direction of differential rotation from anti-solar to solar-like. We also find that convection flows in this regime are significantly stronger in the polar regions than in the equatorial region, leading to non-oscillatory dipole-dominated dynamo solutions, and to a concentration of magnetic field in the polar regions. We observe that convection has a different morphology in the inner and the outer part of the convection zone simultaneously such that organized geostrophic convection columns are hidden below a near-surface layer of well-mixed highly chaotic convection. While we focus our attention on the buoyancy-dominated regime, we also demonstrate that conical differential rotation profiles and persistent regular dynamo oscillations can be obtained in the parameter space of the rotation-dominated regime even within this minimal model.

  17. ROTATION PERIODS AND AGES OF SOLAR ANALOGS AND SOLAR TWINS REVEALED BY THE KEPLER MISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Do Nascimento Jr, J.-D.; Meibom, S.; García, R. A.; Salabert, D.; Ceillier, T.; Anthony, F.; Da Costa, J. S.; Castro, M.; Barnes, S. A.

    2014-08-01

    A new sample of solar analogs and twin candidates has been constructed and studied, paying particular attention to their light curves from NASA's Kepler mission. This Letter aims to assess their evolutionary status, derive their rotation and ages, and identify those which are solar analogs or solar twin candidates. We separate out the subgiants that compose a large fraction of the asteroseismic sample, and which show an increase in the average rotation period as the stars ascend the subgiant branch. The rotation periods of the dwarfs, ranging from 6 to 30 days and averaging 19 days, allow us to assess their individual evolutionary states on the main sequence and to derive their ages using gyrochronology. These ages are found to be in agreement with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.79 with independent asteroseismic ages, where available. As a result of this investigation, we are able to identify 34 stars as solar analogs and 22 of them as solar twin candidates.

  18. A solar eruption driven by rapid sunspot rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan, Guiping; Chen, Yao; Du, Guohui; Wang, Shuo; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin; Zhang, Hongqi; Su, Jiangtao; Xu, Haiqing; Li, Gang; Li, Xing

    2014-04-01

    We present the observation of a major solar eruption that is associated with fast sunspot rotation. The event includes a sigmoidal filament eruption, a coronal mass ejection, and a GOES X2.1 flare from NOAA active region 11283. The filament and some overlying arcades were partially rooted in a sunspot. The sunspot rotated at ∼10° hr{sup –1} during a period of 6 hr prior to the eruption. In this period, the filament was found to rise gradually along with the sunspot rotation. Based on the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager observation, for an area along the polarity inversion line underneath the filament, we found gradual pre-eruption decreases of both the mean strength of the photospheric horizontal field (B{sub h} ) and the mean inclination angle between the vector magnetic field and the local radial (or vertical) direction. These observations are consistent with the pre-eruption gradual rising of the filament-associated magnetic structure. In addition, according to the nonlinear force-free field reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field, a pre-eruption magnetic flux rope structure is found to be in alignment with the filament, and a considerable amount of magnetic energy was transported to the corona during the period of sunspot rotation. Our study provides evidence that in this event sunspot rotation plays an important role in twisting, energizing, and destabilizing the coronal filament-flux rope system, and led to the eruption. We also propose that the pre-event evolution of B{sub h} may be used to discern the driving mechanism of eruptions.

  19. The Comparison of Spectroscopic Measurements of the Solar Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jejčič, S.; Čadež, A.

    We studied the velocity field on the surface of the Sun measured by the Doppler shift of Fraunhofer Sodium lines Na-D_{2} at 5891.583 Å, Na-D_{1} at 5897.557 Å and Nickel line Ni I at 5894.505 Å. All the spectroscopic measurements were done at Ljubljana observatory on September 9, 10, 13 and 14 1999 using double monochromator DFS-12. The calibration was done through five telluric water lines in the vicinity of Sodium lines. With respect to telluric water lines Fraunhofer lines were analysed and through their Doppler velocity we determined the velocity field on the surface of the Sun. The data were fitted to the rotation model to determine the average solar angular (sidereal) coefficients, the average gravitational redshift velocity and the average parameters of the systematic limb shift for each line separately. Solar rotation coefficients determined by our measurements are compared with those of Howard and Harvey, Snodgrass and Ulrich, and Wittmann.

  20. Determination of the Rotation Periods of Solar Active Longitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plyusnina, L. A.

    2010-02-01

    There are two types of active longitudes (ALs) in terms of the distribution of sunspot areas: long-lived and intra-cyclic ALs. The rotation period of the long-lived ALs has been determined by a new method in this paper. The method is based on the property of ALs to be maintained over several cycles of solar activity. The daily values of sunspot areas for 1878 - 2005 are analyzed. It is shown that the AL positions remain almost constant over a period of about ten cycles, from cycle 13 to cycle 22. The rotation period was found to be 27.965 days during this period. The dispersion in AL positions is about 26° from cycle to cycle, which is half of the dispersion observed in the Carrington system. The ALs in the growth phase of the activity cycle are more stable and pronounced. The excess in solar activity in the ALs over adjacent longitudinal intervals is about 12 - 14%. It is shown that only one long-lived AL can be observed at one time on the Sun, as a rule.

  1. Rotational periods of solar-mass young stars in Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marilli, E.; Frasca, A.; Covino, E.; Alcalá, J. M.; Catalano, S.; Fernández, M.; Arellano Ferro, A.; Rubio-Herrera, E.; Spezzi, L.

    2007-03-01

    Context: The evolution of the angular momentum in young low-mass stars is still a debated issue. The stars presented here were discovered as X-ray sources in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) of the Orion complex and subsequently optically identified thanks to both low and high resolution spectroscopy. Aims: The determination of the rotational periods in young low-mass stars of different age is fundamental for the understanding of the angular momentum evolution. Methods: We performed a photometric monitoring program on a sample of 40 solar-mass young stars in the Orion star-forming region, almost all previously identified as weak T Tauri stars (WTTS) candidates. Photometric B and V data were collected from 1999 to 2006 at Catania Astrophysical Observatory (OAC). Data were also acquired in December 1998 at Calar Alto Observatory (CA) and in 1999, 2000, and 2003 at San Pedro Martir (SPM). From the observed rotational modulation, induced by starspots, we derived the rotation periods, using both the Lomb-Scargle periodogram and the CLEAN deconvolution algorithms. Results: In total, we were able to determine the rotation periods for 39 stars, spanning from about 0.5 to 13 days, showing a rather flat distribution with a peak around 1-2 days. Though some of these stars were found to be spectroscopic binaries, only the systems with shorter orbital periods and circular orbits turned out to be synchronized. In the other cases, the rotational period is shorter than the period of pseudo-synchronization at periastron. Conclusions: .The new data provide further evidence for the spin up of solar-mass stars predicted by models of angular momentum evolution of pre-main sequence (PMS) stars. Based on observations collected at the Catania Astrophysical Observatory (Italy), at the Estación de Observación de Calar Alto (Spain), and San Pedro Martir Observatory (México). Appendix A is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. Solar-cycle variation of the rotational shear near the solar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barekat, A.; Schou, J.; Gizon, L.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Helioseismology has revealed that the angular velocity of the Sun increases with depth in the outermost 35 Mm of the Sun. Recently, we have shown that the logarithmic radial gradient (dlnΩ/dlnr) in the upper 10 Mm is close to -1 from the equator to 60° latitude. Aims: We aim to measure the temporal variation of the rotational shear over solar cycle 23 and the rising phase of cycle 24 (1996-2015). Methods: We used f mode frequency splitting data spanning 1996 to 2011 from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) and 2010 to 2015 from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI). In a first for such studies, the f mode frequency splitting data were obtained from 360-day time series. We used the same method as in our previous work for measuring dlnΩ/dlnr from the equator to 80° latitude in the outer 13 Mm of the Sun. Then, we calculated the variation of the gradient at annual cadence relative to the average over 1996 to 2015. Results: We found the rotational shear at low latitudes (0° to 30°) to vary in-phase with the solar activity, varying by ~± 10% over the period 1996 to 2015. At high latitudes (60° to 80°), we found rotational shear to vary in anti-phase with the solar activity. By comparing the radial gradient obtained from the splittings of the 360-day and the corresponding 72-day time series of HMI and MDI data, we suggest that the splittings obtained from the 72-day HMI time series suffer from systematic errors. Conclusions: We provide a quantitative measurement of the temporal variation of the outer part of the near surface shear layer which may provide useful constraints on dynamo models and differential rotation theory.

  3. Solar cycle signal in Earth rotation: nonstationary behavior.

    PubMed

    Currie, R G

    1981-01-23

    Following the discovery of the 11-year solar cycle signal in earth rotation, linear techniques were employed to investigate the amplitude and phase of the difference between ephemeris time and universal time (DeltaT) as a function of time. The amplitude is nonstationary. This difference was related to Delta(LOD), the difference between the length of day and its nominal value. The 11-year term in Delta(LOD) was 0.8 millisecond at the close of the 18th century and decreased below noise level from 1840 to 1860. From 1875 to 1925, Delta(LOD) was about 0.16 millisecond, and it decreased to about 0.08 millisecond by the 1950's. Except for anomalous behavior from 1797 to 1838, DeltaT lags sunspot numbers by 3.0 +/- 0.4 years. Since DeltaT lags Delta(LOD) by 2.7 years, the result is that Delta(LOD) is approximately in phase with sunspot numbers.

  4. Temporal Variation of the Rotation of the Solar Mean Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, J. L.; Shi, X. J.; Xu, J. C.

    2017-04-01

    Based on continuous wavelet transformation analysis, the daily solar mean magnetic field (SMMF) from 1975 May 16 to 2014 July 31 is analyzed to reveal its rotational behavior. Both the recurrent plot in Bartels form and the continuous wavelet transformation analysis show the existence of rotational modulation in the variation of the daily SMMF. The dependence of the rotational cycle lengths on solar cycle phase is also studied, which indicates that the yearly mean rotational cycle lengths generally seem to be longer during the rising phase of solar cycles and shorter during the declining phase. The mean rotational cycle length for the rising phase of all of the solar cycles in the considered time is 28.28 ± 0.67 days, while for the declining phase it is 27.32 ± 0.64 days. The difference of the mean rotational cycle lengths between the rising phase and the declining phase is 0.96 days. The periodicity analysis, through the use of an auto-correlation function, indicates that the rotational cycle lengths have a significant period of about 10.1 years. Furthermore, the cross-correlation analysis indicates that there exists a phase difference between the rotational cycle lengths and solar activity.

  5. Diagnostics of the solar corona from comparison between Faraday rotation measurements and magnetohydrodynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Le Chat, G.; Cohen, O.; Kasper, J. C.; Spangler, S. R.

    2014-07-10

    Polarized natural radio sources passing behind the Sun experience Faraday rotation as a consequence of the electron density and magnetic field strength in coronal plasma. Since Faraday rotation is proportional to the product of the density and the component of the magnetic field along the line of sight of the observer, a model is required to interpret the observations and infer coronal structures. Faraday rotation observations have been compared with relatively ad hoc models of the corona. Here for the first time we compare these observations with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the solar corona driven by measurements of the photospheric magnetic field. We use observations made with the NRAO Very Large Array of 34 polarized radio sources occulted by the solar corona between 5 and 14 solar radii. The measurements were made during 1997 May, and 2005 March and April. We compare the observed Faraday rotation values with values extracted from MHD steady-state simulations of the solar corona. We find that (1) using a synoptic map of the solar magnetic field just one Carrington rotation off produces poorer agreements, meaning that the outer corona changes in the course of one month, even in solar minimum; (2) global MHD models of the solar corona driven by photospheric magnetic field measurements are generally able to reproduce Faraday rotation observations; and (3) some sources show significant disagreement between the model and the observations, which appears to be a function of the proximity of the line of sight to the large-scale heliospheric current sheet.

  6. Diagnostics of the Solar corona from Comparison Between Faraday Rotation Measurements and MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LE CHAT, G.; Kasper, J. C.; Cohen, O.; Spangler, S.

    2013-05-01

    Faraday rotation observations of natural radio sources allow remote diagnostics of the density and magnetic field of the solar corona. We use linear polarization observations made with the NRAO Very Large Array at frequencies of 1465 and 1665 MHz of 33 polarized radio sources occulted by the solar corona within 5 to 14 solar radii. The measurements were made during May 1997 (Mancuso and Spangler, 2000), March 2005 and april 2005 (Ingleby et al., 2005), corresponding to Carrington rotation number 1922, 1923, 2027 and 2028. We compare the observed Faraday rotation values with values extracted from MHD steady-state simulations of the solar corona using the BATS-R-US model. The simulations are driven by magnetogram data taken at the same time as the observed data. We present the agreement between the model and the Faraday rotation measurements, and we discuss the contraints imposed on models of the quiet corona and CMEs by these observations.

  7. THE ROTATION PROFILE OF SOLAR MAGNETIC FIELDS BETWEEN {+-}60 Degree-Sign LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, X. J.; Xie, J. L.

    2013-08-10

    Through a cross-correlation analysis of the Carrington synoptic maps of solar photospheric magnetic fields from Carrington Rotation Nos. 1625 to 2129 (from 1975 February to 2012 October), the sidereal rotation rates of solar magnetic fields between {+-}60 Degree-Sign latitudes are investigated. It seems that the temporal variation of rotation rates should be related to the solar cycle phase. The rotation profile of magnetic fields is obtained: the sidereal rotation rates decrease from the equator to mid-latitude and reach their minimum values of about 13.16 deg day{sup -1} (13.17 deg day{sup -1}) at 53 Degree-Sign (54 Degree-Sign ) latitude in the northern (southern) hemisphere, then increase toward higher latitudes. This rotation profile is different from the differential rotation law obtained by Snodgrass from a cross-correlation analysis of daily magnetograms, in which the rotation rates show a steep decrease from the equator to the poles. However, it is much closer to the quasi-rigid rotation law derived by Stenflo from an auto-correlation analysis of daily magnetograms. Some possible interpretations are discussed for the resulting rotation profile.

  8. A search for evidence of solar rotation in Super-Kamiokande solar neutrino dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Shantanu; Liu, Dawei W.

    2016-09-01

    We apply the generalized Lomb-Scargle (LS) periodogram, proposed by Zechmeister and Kurster, to the solar neutrino data from Super-Kamiokande (Super-K) using data from its first five years. For each peak in the LS periodogram, we evaluate the statistical significance in two different ways. The first method involves calculating the False Alarm Probability (FAP) using non-parametric bootstrap resampling, and the second method is by calculating the difference in Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) between the null hypothesis, viz. the data contains only noise, compared to the hypothesis that the data contains a peak at a given frequency. Using these methods, we scan the frequency range between 7-14 cycles per year to look for any peaks caused by solar rotation, since this is the proposed explanation for the statistically significant peaks found by Sturrock and collaborators in the Super-K dataset. From our analysis, we do confirm that similar to Sturrock et al, the maximum peak occurs at a frequency of 9.42/year, corresponding to a period of 38.75 days. The FAP for this peak is about 1.5% and the difference in BIC (between pure white noise and this peak) is about 4.8. We note that the significance depends on the frequency band used to search for peaks and hence it is important to use a search band appropriate for solar rotation. However, The significance of this peak based on the value of BIC is marginal and more data is needed to confirm if the peak persists and is real.

  9. Rotation, activity, and stellar obliquities in a large uniform sample of Kepler solar analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzasi, Derek; Lezcano, Andy; Preston, Heather L.

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we undertook a deep photometric examination of a narrowly-defined sample of solar analogs in the Kepler field, with the goals of producing a uniform and statistically meaningful sample of such stars, comparing the properties of planet hosts to those of the general stellar population, and examining the behavior of rotation and photometric activity among stars with similar overall physical parameters. We successfully derived photometric activity indicators and rotation periods for 95 planet hosts (Kepler objects of interest [KOIs]) and 954 solar analogs without detected planets; 573 of these rotation periods are reported here for the first time. Rotation periods average roughly 20 d, but the distribution has a wide dispersion, with a tail extending to P > 35 d which appears to be inconsistent with published gyrochronological relations. We observed a weak rotation-activity relation for stars with rotation periods less than about 12 d; for slower rotators, the relation is dominated by scatter. However, we are able to state that the solar activity level derived from Virgo data is consistent with the majority of stars with similar rotation periods in our sample. Finally, our KOI sample is consistently approximately 0.3 dex more variable than our non-KOIs; we ascribe the difference to a selection effect due to low orbital obliquity in the planet-hosting stars and derive a mean obliquity for our sample of χ = 6+5°-6, similar to that seen in the solar system.

  10. Differential rotation in main-sequence solar-like stars: Qualitative inference from asteroseismic data

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Mikkel N.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Miesch, Mark S.

    2014-08-01

    Understanding differential rotation of Sun-like stars is of great importance for insight into the angular momentum transport in these stars. One means of gaining such information is that of asteroseismology. By a forward modeling approach we analyze in a qualitative manner the impact of different differential rotation profiles on the splittings of p-mode oscillation frequencies. The optimum modes for inference on differential rotation are identified along with the best value of the stellar inclination angle. We find that in general it is not likely that asteroseismology can be used to make an unambiguous distinction between a rotation profile such as a conical Sun-like profile and a cylindrical profile. In addition, it seems unlikely that asteroseismology of Sun-like stars will result in inferences on the radial profile of the differential rotation, such as can be done for red giants. At best, one could possibly obtain the sign of the radial differential rotation gradient. Measurements of the extent of the latitudinal differential from frequency splitting are, however, more promising. One very interesting aspect that could likely be tested from frequency splittings is whether the differential rotation is solar-like or anti-solar-like in nature, in the sense that a solar-like profile has an equator rotating faster than the poles.

  11. The Emergence of Solar Supergranulation as a Natural Consequence of Rotationally Constrained Interior Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Featherstone, Nicholas A.; Hindman, Bradley W.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate how rotationally constrained, deep convection might give rise to supergranulation, the largest distinct spatial scale of convection observed in the solar photosphere. While supergranulation is only weakly influenced by rotation, larger spatial scales of convection sample the deep convection zone and are presumably rotationally influenced. We present numerical results from a series of nonlinear, 3D simulations of rotating convection and examine the velocity power distribution realized under a range of Rossby numbers. When rotation is present, the convective power distribution possesses a pronounced peak, at characteristic wavenumber {{\\ell }}{peak}, whose value increases as the Rossby number is decreased. This distribution of power contrasts with that realized in non-rotating convection, where power increases monotonically from high to low wavenumbers. We find that spatial scales smaller than {{\\ell }}{peak} behave in analogy to non-rotating convection. Spatial scales larger than {{\\ell }}{peak} are rotationally constrained and possess substantially reduced power relative to the non-rotating system. We argue that the supergranular scale emerges due to a suppression of power on spatial scales larger than {\\ell }≈ 100 owing to the presence of deep, rotationally constrained convection. Supergranulation thus represents the largest non-rotationally constrained mode of solar convection. We conclude that the characteristic spatial scale of supergranulation bounds that of the deep convective motions from above, making supergranulation an indirect measure of the deep-seated dynamics at work in the solar dynamo. Using the spatial scale of supergranulation in conjunction with our numerical results, we estimate an upper bound of 10 m s-1 for the Sun’s bulk rms convective velocity.

  12. Rotating models of young solar-type stars. Exploring braking laws and angular momentum transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amard, L.; Palacios, A.; Charbonnel, C.; Gallet, F.; Bouvier, J.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Understanding the angular momentum evolution of stars is one of the greatest challenges of modern stellar physics. Aims: We study the predicted rotational evolution of solar-type stars from the pre-main sequence to the solar age with 1D rotating evolutionary models including physical ingredients. Methods: We computed rotating evolution models of solar-type stars including an external stellar wind torque and internal transport of angular momentum following the method of Maeder and Zahn with the code STAREVOL. We explored different formalisms and prescriptions available from the literature. We tested the predictions of the models against recent rotational period data from extensive photometric surveys, lithium abundances of solar-mass stars in young clusters, and the helioseismic rotation profile of the Sun. Results: We find a best-matching combination of prescriptions for both internal transport and surface extraction of angular momentum. This combination provides a very good fit to the observed evolution of rotational periods for solar-type stars from early evolution to the age of the Sun. Additionally, we show that fast rotators experience a stronger coupling between their radiative region and the convective envelope. Regardless of the set of prescriptions, however, we cannot simultaneously reproduce surface angular velocity and the internal profile of the Sun or the evolution of lithium abundance. Conclusions: We confirm the idea that additional transport mechanisms must occur in solar-type stars until they reach the age of the Sun. Whether these processes are the same as those needed to explain recent asteroseismic data in more advanced evolutionary phases is still an open question.

  13. Determination of rotation periods in solar-like stars with irregular sampling: the Gaia case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Distefano, E.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Lanza, A. F.; Messina, S.; Korn, A. J.; Eriksson, K.; Cuypers, J.

    2012-04-01

    We present a study on the determination of rotation periods (P) of solar-like stars from the photometric irregular time sampling of the European Space Agency Gaia mission, currently scheduled for launch in 2013, taking into account its dependence on ecliptic coordinates. We examine the case of solar twins as well as thousands of synthetic time series of solar-like stars rotating faster than the Sun. In the case of solar twins, we assume that the Gaia unfiltered photometric passband G will mimic the variability of the total solar irradiance as measured by the Variability of solar IRradiance and Gravity Oscillations (VIRGO) experiment. For stars rotating faster than the Sun, light curves are simulated using synthetic spectra for the quiet atmosphere, the spots and the faculae combined by applying semi-empirical relationships relating the level of photospheric magnetic activity to the stellar rotation and the Gaia instrumental response. The capabilities of the Deeming, Lomb-Scargle and phase dispersion minimization methods in recovering the correct rotation periods are tested and compared. The false alarm probability is computed using Monte Carlo simulations and compared with analytical formulae. The Gaia scanning law makes the rate of correct detection of rotation periods strongly dependent on the ecliptic latitude (β). We find that for P≃ 1 d, the rate of correct detection increases with β from 20-30 per cent at β≃ 0 to a peak of 70 per cent at β= 45°; then it abruptly falls below 10 per cent at β > 45°. For P > 5 d, the rate of correct detection is quite low and for solar twins is only 5 per cent on average.

  14. The Solar Surface Differential Rotation from Disk-Integrated Chromospheric Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, Robert A.; Keil, Steven L.

    1995-06-01

    Disk-integrated solar chromospheric Ca ii K-line (3933.68 Å) fluxes have been measured almost daily at Sacramento Peak Observatory since 1977. Using observing windows selected to mimic seasonal windows for chromospheric measurements of lower Main-Sequence stars such as those observed by Mount Wilson Observatory's HK Project, we have measured the solar rotation from the modulation of the Ca ii K-line flux. We track the change of rotation period from the decline of cycle 21 through the maximum of cycle 22. This variation in rotation period is shown to behave as expected from the migration of active regions in latitude according to Maunder's ‘butterfly diagram’, including an abrupt change in rotation period at the transition from cycle 21 to cycle 22. These results indicate the successful detection of solar surface differential rotation from disk-integrated observations. We argue that the success of our study compared to previous investigations of the solar surface differential rotation from disk-integrated fluxes lies primarily with the choice of the length of the time-series window. Our selection of 200 days is shorter than in previous studies whose windows are typically on the order of one year. The 200-day window is long enough to permit an accurate determination of the rotation period, yet short enough to avoid complications arising from active region evolution. Thus, measurements of the variation of rotation period in lower Main-Sequence stars, especially those that appear to be correlated with long-term changes in chromospheric activity (i.e., cycles), are probably evidence for stellar surface differential rotation.

  15. Observation of a reversal of rotation in a sunspot during a solar flare

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Yi; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Hong, Junchao; Li, Haidong; Yang, Bo; Xu, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    The abrupt motion of the photospheric flux during a solar flare is thought to be a back reaction caused by the coronal field reconfiguration. However, the type of motion pattern and the physical mechanism responsible for the back reaction has been uncertain. Here we show that the direction of a sunspot's rotation is reversed during an X1.6 flare using observations from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. A magnetic field extrapolation model shows that the corresponding coronal magnetic field shrinks with increasing magnetic twist density. This suggests that the abrupt reversal of rotation in the sunspot may be driven by a Lorentz torque that is produced by the gradient of twist density from the solar corona to the solar interior. These results support the view that the abrupt reversal in the rotation of the sunspot is a dynamic process responding to shrinkage of the coronal magnetic field during the flare. PMID:27958266

  16. Observation of a reversal of rotation in a sunspot during a solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Yi; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Hong, Junchao; Li, Haidong; Yang, Bo; Xu, Zhe

    2016-12-01

    The abrupt motion of the photospheric flux during a solar flare is thought to be a back reaction caused by the coronal field reconfiguration. However, the type of motion pattern and the physical mechanism responsible for the back reaction has been uncertain. Here we show that the direction of a sunspot's rotation is reversed during an X1.6 flare using observations from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. A magnetic field extrapolation model shows that the corresponding coronal magnetic field shrinks with increasing magnetic twist density. This suggests that the abrupt reversal of rotation in the sunspot may be driven by a Lorentz torque that is produced by the gradient of twist density from the solar corona to the solar interior. These results support the view that the abrupt reversal in the rotation of the sunspot is a dynamic process responding to shrinkage of the coronal magnetic field during the flare.

  17. Observation of a reversal of rotation in a sunspot during a solar flare.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yi; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Hong, Junchao; Li, Haidong; Yang, Bo; Xu, Zhe

    2016-12-13

    The abrupt motion of the photospheric flux during a solar flare is thought to be a back reaction caused by the coronal field reconfiguration. However, the type of motion pattern and the physical mechanism responsible for the back reaction has been uncertain. Here we show that the direction of a sunspot's rotation is reversed during an X1.6 flare using observations from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. A magnetic field extrapolation model shows that the corresponding coronal magnetic field shrinks with increasing magnetic twist density. This suggests that the abrupt reversal of rotation in the sunspot may be driven by a Lorentz torque that is produced by the gradient of twist density from the solar corona to the solar interior. These results support the view that the abrupt reversal in the rotation of the sunspot is a dynamic process responding to shrinkage of the coronal magnetic field during the flare.

  18. A new determination of the solar rotation rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Wang, Y.-M.; Nash, A. G.

    1992-01-01

    We use 'stackplot' displays to compare observations of the photospheric magnetic field during sunspot cycle 21 with simulations based on the flux-transport model. Adopting nominal rates of diffusion, differential rotation, and meridional flow, we obtain slanted patterns similar to those of the observed field, even when the sources of flux are assigned random longitudes in the model. At low latitudes, the slopes of the nearly vertical patterns of simulated field are sensitive to the rotation rate used in the calculation, and insensitive to the rates of diffusion and flow during much of the sunspot cycle. Good agreement between the observed and simulated patterns requires a synodic equatorial rotation period of 26.75 +/- 0.05 days.

  19. The Effects of Differential Rotation on the Magnetic Structure of the Solar Corona: MHD Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lionello, Roberto; Riley, Pete; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran

    2004-01-01

    Coronal holes are magnetically open regions from which the solar wind streams. Magnetic reconnection has been invoked to reconcile the apparently rigid rotation of coronal holes with the differential rotation of magnetic flux in the photosphere. This mechanism might also be relevant to the formation of the slow solar wind, the properties of which seem to indicate an origin from the opening of closed magnetic field lines. We have developed a global MHD model to study the effect of differential rotation on the coronal magnetic field. Starting from a magnetic flux distribution similar to that of Wang et al., which consists of a bipolar magnetic region added to a background dipole field, we applied differential rotation over a period of 5 solar rotations. The evolution of the magnetic field and of the boundaries of coronal holes are in substantial agreement with the findings of Wang et al.. We identified examples of interchange reconnection and other changes of topology of the magnetic field. Possible consequences for the origin of the slow solar wind are also discussed.

  20. Study on the relationship between the residual 27 day quasiperiodicity and ionospheric Q disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhou; Wang, Jing-Song; Deng, Xiaohua; Deng, Yue; Huang, Chun-Ming; Li, Hai Meng; Wu, Zhi Xu

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the relationship between the residual 27 day quasiperiodicity (QP) and Q disturbances is studied using three methods. Two Q disturbances identified by the monthly median method (MMM) and the commonly used 27 day running median centered method (RMC) show significant diurnal variation but are seen quiet in the same period when the spectral whitening method (SWM) is used. Further analysis indicates that diurnally varying Q disturbance events tend to appear in the extreme value position (EVP) of QP, which are the Q disturbance events related to QP. And their percentages are 81.8% for RMC and 95.6% for MMM but 0% for SWM. By studying the power spectrum, it suggests that the QP is the significant frequency component in the frequency domain of RfoF2-RMC and RfoF2-MMM (RfoF2 denotes to the relative deviation of foF2). However, there are no obvious periodic components in RfoF2-SWM. Finally, to further verify whether the QP can contribute to common Q disturbance events, band-pass filtering is used to extract the QP at different stations. The occurrence percentages of Q disturbances in the EVP of QP thus obtained with MMM and RMC are higher than with SWM for 90% of the stations. In addition, the average occurrence percentage based on RMC (37.5%) is also significantly higher than the percentage of EVP (23.2%). These findings suggest that the limitations of traditional methods lead to a significant QP in their results and that this residual QP may cause artificial Q disturbances.

  1. A MODEL OF MAGNETIC BRAKING OF SOLAR ROTATION THAT SATISFIES OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS

    SciTech Connect

    Denissenkov, Pavel A.

    2010-08-10

    The model of magnetic braking of solar rotation considered by Charbonneau and MacGregor has been modified so that it is able to reproduce for the first time the rotational evolution of both the fastest and slowest rotators among solar-type stars in open clusters of different ages, without coming into conflict with other observational constraints, such as the time evolution of the atmospheric Li abundance in solar twins and the thinness of the solar tachocline. This new model assumes that rotation-driven turbulent diffusion, which is thought to amplify the viscosity and magnetic diffusivity in stellar radiative zones, is strongly anisotropic with the horizontal components of the transport coefficients strongly dominating over those in the vertical direction. Also taken into account is the poloidal field decay that helps to confine the width of the tachocline at the solar age. The model's properties are investigated by numerically solving the azimuthal components of the coupled momentum and magnetic induction equations in two dimensions using a finite element method.

  2. Solar Differential Rotation in Calcium II K Line Spectra Supported with Spectroheliogram Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behm, Tyler; Keil, S. L.

    2013-07-01

    Two recent papers report on measuring differential rotation in data that views the Sun as a star. Unlike using tracers at different latitudes to measure the differential rotation, disk-integrated light averages over many latitudes and can only work if the features both exist at a dominate latitude that changes with the solar cycle and they persist long enough to affect the measured rotation rate. Bertello, Pevtsov, and Pietarila (2012, ApJ 761, pg 11) use disk-integrated Ca II K-line data from the SOLIS/ISS instrument to show that a change in rotation rate is clearly visible at the beginning of the current solar cycle in the disk-integrated K-line. Scargle, Keil, and Worden (2013, ApJ in press, arXiv:1303.6303) use the Sacramento Peak K-line series to look at the last current and previous three cycles with fairly strong evidence that the differential rotation is visible in cycle 22, but much harder to see in cycles 21 and 23. In order to understand the differences in the three cycles we report on solar differential rotation measurements in both the Sacramento Peak disk-integrated, Ca II K spectral time series (1977-2012) and full-disk, Ca II K spectroheliogram time series (1977-2002) observed at the Evans Solar Facility. The former data set is the same as used by Scargle et al (2013) and averages about 2-3 measurements per week. For the disk-integrated spectra, we use two interpolation schemes to fill in missing days (regression and singular value decomposition with proxy data sets) and use two methods (power spectra and autocorrelation) to find the rotation rates. We find a clear signature of solar differential rotation for solar cycle 21 and 22 and a partial signature for cycle 23. We test this result by measuring differential rotation using the Ca II K spectroheliograms using phase analysis between longitudinal bands. We have also explored the image features that lead to changes in the disk-integrated spectrum's signal-to-noise. The data analyzed in this

  3. Solar-stellar connection : A solar analogous behaviour by an active ultra fast rotator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sairam, Lalitha; Schmitt, Juergen; Pal Singh, Kulinder

    2015-08-01

    AB Dor is an ultra-fast rotating (Prot ~ 0.51 d) active young K dwarf with an age of ~40-50 Myr. Located as a foreground star towards large magellanic cloud (LMC), AB Dor has the advantage of being observed at all times by most of the X-ray satellites making it a favourite calibration target. AB Dor has been repeatedly observed for calibration by reflection grating spectrometer (RGS) on board XMM- Newton over last decade. This gives an ideal opportunity to perform a detailed analysis of the coronal emission, and to compare the flare characteristics with the Sun, since the Sun is usually considered as a prototype of low mass stars. Flares are frequent in low mass active stars across the electromagnetic spectrum similar to the Sun. We will for the first time, present an analysis of 30 intense X-ray flares observed from AB Dor. These flares detected in XMM-Newton data show a rapid rise (500-3000 s) and a slow decay (1000-6000 s). The derived X-ray luminosity during the flares ranges between 30.20 ≤ log(Lx) ≤ 30.83 erg/s; the flare peak temperature lies between 30-80 MK and the emission measures for these flares are in the range of 52.3 ≤ log(EM) ≤ 53.5 cm^-3. Our studies suggest that the scaling law between the flare peak emission measure and the flare peak temperature for all the flares observed on AB Dor is very similar to the relationship followed by solar flares, despite the fact that the AB Dor flare emission is ~250 times higher than the solar flare emission. We also carried out a homogenous study of flare frequencies, energetics and its occurrence in AB Dor. The frequency distribution of flare energies is a crucial diagnostic to calculate the overall energy residing in a flare. Our results of this study indicate that the large flare (33 ≤ log(E) ≤ 34 erg) may not contribute to the heating of the corona. We will show the presence of a possible long-term cycle in AB Dor both from a photospheric and coronal point of view, similar to the 11-year

  4. What we know about the sun's internal rotation from solar oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goode, Philip R.; Dziembowski, W. A.; Korzennik, S. G.; Rhodes, E. J., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, a uniform approach of inversion was used to determine the internal rotation rate of the sun from each of the six available sets of solar oscillation data, which included the data of Duvall et al. (1986), Rhodes et al. (1987, 1990), Tomczyk (1988), Brown and Morrow (1987), and Libbrecht (1989). The technique chosen for inverting the solar oscillation data was the discretized least-squares technique. The results indicate that the rotation rate of the sun in the equatorial plane declines going inward between the surface and 0.6 of the radius and that the polar rate increases going inward (i.e., the surfacelike differential rotation decreases with depth).

  5. Solar Cycle Fine Structure and Surface Rotation from Ca II K-Line Time Series Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeff; Keil, Steve; Worden, Pete

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of three and a half decades of data from the NSO/AFRL/Sac Peak K-line monitoring program yields evidence for four components to the variation: (a) the solar cycle, with considerable fine structure and a quasi-periodicity of 122.4 days; (b) a stochastic process, faster than (a) and largely independent of it, (c) a quasi-periodic signal due to rotational modulation, and of course (d) observational errors (shown to be quite small). Correlation and power spectrum analyses elucidate periodic and aperiodic variation of these chromospheric parameters. Time-frequency analysis is especially useful for extracting information about differential rotation, and in particular elucidates the connection between its behavior and fine structure of the solar cycle on approximately one-year time scales. These results further suggest that similar analyses will be useful at detecting and characterizing differential rotation in stars from stellar light-curves such as those being produced at NASA's Kepler observatory.

  6. SUN-LIKE MAGNETIC CYCLES IN THE RAPIDLY ROTATING YOUNG SOLAR ANALOG HD 30495

    SciTech Connect

    Egeland, Ricky; Metcalfe, Travis S.; Hall, Jeffrey C.; Henry, Gregory W.

    2015-10-10

    A growing body of evidence suggests that multiple dynamo mechanisms can drive magnetic variability on different timescales, not only in the Sun but also in other stars. Many solar activity proxies exhibit a quasi-biennial (∼2 year) variation, which is superimposed upon the dominant 11 year cycle. A well-characterized stellar sample suggests at least two different relationships between rotation period and cycle period, with some stars exhibiting long and short cycles simultaneously. Within this sample, the solar cycle periods are typical of a more rapidly rotating star, implying that the Sun might be in a transitional state or that it has an unusual evolutionary history. In this work, we present new and archival observations of dual magnetic cycles in the young solar analog HD 30495, a ∼1 Gyr old G1.5 V star with a rotation period near 11 days. This star falls squarely on the relationships established by the broader stellar sample, with short-period variations at ∼1.7 years and a long cycle of ∼12 years. We measure three individual long-period cycles and find durations ranging from 9.6 to 15.5 years. We find the short-term variability to be intermittent, but present throughout the majority of the time series, though its occurrence and amplitude are uncorrelated with the longer cycle. These essentially solar-like variations occur in a Sun-like star with more rapid rotation, though surface differential rotation measurements leave open the possibility of a solar equivalence.

  7. Sun-like Magnetic Cycles in the Rapidly-rotating Young Solar Analog HD 30495

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Metcalfe, Travis S.; Hall, Jeffrey C.; Henry, Gregory W.

    2015-10-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that multiple dynamo mechanisms can drive magnetic variability on different timescales, not only in the Sun but also in other stars. Many solar activity proxies exhibit a quasi-biennial (∼2 year) variation, which is superimposed upon the dominant 11 year cycle. A well-characterized stellar sample suggests at least two different relationships between rotation period and cycle period, with some stars exhibiting long and short cycles simultaneously. Within this sample, the solar cycle periods are typical of a more rapidly rotating star, implying that the Sun might be in a transitional state or that it has an unusual evolutionary history. In this work, we present new and archival observations of dual magnetic cycles in the young solar analog HD 30495, a ∼1 Gyr old G1.5 V star with a rotation period near 11 days. This star falls squarely on the relationships established by the broader stellar sample, with short-period variations at ∼1.7 years and a long cycle of ∼12 years. We measure three individual long-period cycles and find durations ranging from 9.6 to 15.5 years. We find the short-term variability to be intermittent, but present throughout the majority of the time series, though its occurrence and amplitude are uncorrelated with the longer cycle. These essentially solar-like variations occur in a Sun-like star with more rapid rotation, though surface differential rotation measurements leave open the possibility of a solar equivalence.

  8. ROTATION RATE DIFFERENCES OF POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE SOLAR MAGNETIC FIELDS BETWEEN ±60° LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, X. J.; Xie, J. L.

    2015-04-15

    Based on a cross-correlation analysis of the Carrington synoptic maps of solar photospheric magnetic fields from Carrington Rotations Nos. 1625 to 2135 (from 1975 February to 2013 March), the sidereal rotation rates of the positive and negative magnetic fields in the latitude range of ±60° are obtained, and the rotation rate differences between them are investigated. The time–latitude distribution of the rate differences is shown, which looks like a butterfly diagram at the low and middle latitudes. For comparison, the time–latitude distribution of the longitudinally averaged photospheric magnetic fields is shown. We conclude that the magnetic fields having the same polarity as the leading sunspots at a given hemisphere rotate faster than those exhibiting the opposite polarity at low and middle latitudes. However, at higher latitudes, the magnetic fields having the same polarity as the leading sunspots at a given hemisphere do not always rotate faster than those with the opposite polarity. Furthermore, the relationship between the rotation rate differences and solar magnetic fields is studied through a correlation analysis. Our result shows that the correlation coefficients between them reach maximum values at 13° (14°) latitude in the northern (southern) hemisphere, and change sign at 28° latitude in both hemispheres, then reach their minimum values at 58° (53°) latitude in the northern (southern) hemisphere.

  9. A tracking polarimeter for measuring solar and ionospheric Faraday rotation of signals from deep space probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlson, J. E.; Levy, G. S.; Stelzried, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    A tracking polarimeter implemented on the 64-m NASA/JPL paraboloid antenna at Goldstone, Calif., is described. Its performance is analyzed and compared with measurements. The system was developed to measure Faraday rotation in the solar corona of the telemetry carrier from the Pioneer VI spacecraft as it was occulted by the sun. It also measures rotation in the earth's ionosphere and is an accurate method of determining spacecraft orientation. The new feature of this system is its use of a pair of quarter-wave plates to allow the synthesis of a rotating feed system, while requiring the rotation of only a single section of waveguide. Since the polarization sensing is done at RF and the receiver operates essentially as a null detector, the system's accuracy is superior to other polarization tracking schemes. In addition, the antenna size and maser preamplifier provide unsurpassed sensitivity. The associated instrumentation used in the Pioneer VI experiment is also described.

  10. Stability of Rotating Magnetized Jets in the Solar Atmosphere. I. Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz V.; Zhelyazkov, Ivan; Ofman, Leon

    2015-11-01

    Observations show various jets in the solar atmosphere with significant rotational motions, which may undergo instabilities leading to heat ambient plasma. We study the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) of twisted and rotating jets caused by the velocity jumps near the jet surface. We derive a dispersion equation with appropriate boundary conditions for total pressure (including centrifugal force of tube rotation), which governs the dynamics of incompressible jets. Then, we obtain analytical instability criteria of KHI in various cases, which were verified by numerical solutions to the dispersion equation. We find that twisted and rotating jets are unstable to KHI when the kinetic energy of rotation is more than the magnetic energy of the twist. Our analysis shows that the azimuthal magnetic field of 1-5 G can stabilize observed rotations in spicule/macrospicules and X-ray/extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) jets. On the other hand, nontwisted jets are always unstable to KHI. In this case, the instability growth time is several seconds for spicule/macrospicules and a few minutes (or less) for EUV/X-ray jets. We also find that standing kink and torsional Alfvén waves are always unstable near the antinodes, owing to the jump of azimuthal velocity at the surface, while the propagating waves are generally stable. Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) vortices may lead to enhanced turbulence development and heating of surrounding plasma therefore, rotating jets may provide energy for chromospheric and coronal heating.

  11. STABILITY OF ROTATING MAGNETIZED JETS IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE. I. KELVIN–HELMHOLTZ INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz V.; Zhelyazkov, Ivan; Ofman, Leon

    2015-11-10

    Observations show various jets in the solar atmosphere with significant rotational motions, which may undergo instabilities leading to heat ambient plasma. We study the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability (KHI) of twisted and rotating jets caused by the velocity jumps near the jet surface. We derive a dispersion equation with appropriate boundary conditions for total pressure (including centrifugal force of tube rotation), which governs the dynamics of incompressible jets. Then, we obtain analytical instability criteria of KHI in various cases, which were verified by numerical solutions to the dispersion equation. We find that twisted and rotating jets are unstable to KHI when the kinetic energy of rotation is more than the magnetic energy of the twist. Our analysis shows that the azimuthal magnetic field of 1–5 G can stabilize observed rotations in spicule/macrospicules and X-ray/extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) jets. On the other hand, nontwisted jets are always unstable to KHI. In this case, the instability growth time is several seconds for spicule/macrospicules and a few minutes (or less) for EUV/X-ray jets. We also find that standing kink and torsional Alfvén waves are always unstable near the antinodes, owing to the jump of azimuthal velocity at the surface, while the propagating waves are generally stable. Kelvin–Helmholtz (KH) vortices may lead to enhanced turbulence development and heating of surrounding plasma; therefore, rotating jets may provide energy for chromospheric and coronal heating.

  12. TIME-DEPENDENT NONEXTENSIVITY ARISING FROM THE ROTATIONAL EVOLUTION OF SOLAR-TYPE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, J. R. P.; Nepomuceno, M. M. F.; Soares, B. B.; De Freitas, D. B.

    2013-11-01

    Nonextensive formalism is a generalization of the Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics. In this formalism, the entropic index q is a quantity characterizing the degree of nonextensivity and is interpreted as a parameter of long-memory or long-range interactions between the components of the system. Since its proposition in 1988, this formalism has been applied to investigate a wide variety of natural phenomena. In stellar astrophysics, a theoretical distribution function based on nonextensive formalism (q distributions) has been successfully applied to reproduce the distribution of stellar radial and rotational velocity data. In this paper, we investigate the time variation of the entropic index q obtained from the distribution of rotation, Vsin i, for a sample of 254 rotational data for solar-type stars from 11 open clusters aged between 35.5 Myr and 2.6 Gyr. As a result, we have found an anti-correlation between the entropic index q and the age of clusters, and that the distribution of rotation Vsin i for these stars becomes extensive for an age greater than about 170 Myr. Assuming that the parameter q is associated with long-memory effects, we suggest that the memory of the initial angular momentum of solar-type stars can be scaled by the entropic index q. We also propose a physical link between the parameter q and the magnetic braking of stellar rotation.

  13. Observational requirements for measurements of solar rotation inward to the base of the convection zone. [measuring the solar power spectra in the photosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, E. J., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of the rate of rotation at various depths in the solar interior and of temporal changes in the rotation are discussed. A technique to measure the absolute rate of the Sun's rotation (in meters per second) below its visible surface over the outer 3% of its radius using ground based equipment is described. The theory of the technique, developed to the base of the solar convection zone is analyzed. It is stressed that such deeper rotational measurements, extending from 3% inward to 25 to 30% of the Sun's radius can only be obtained from a spaceborne instrument which is not subject to the normal Earth based day-night observing cycle.

  14. EVIDENCE FOR ROTATIONAL MOTIONS IN THE FEET OF A QUIESCENT SOLAR PROMINENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Orozco Suarez, D.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2012-12-20

    We present observational evidence of apparent plasma rotational motions in the feet of a solar prominence. Our study is based on spectroscopic observations taken in the He I 1083.0 nm multiplet with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter attached to the German Vacuum Tower Telescope. We recorded a time sequence of spectra with 34 s cadence placing the slit of the spectrograph almost parallel to the solar limb and crossing two feet of an intermediate size, quiescent hedgerow prominence. The data show opposite Doppler shifts, {+-}6 km s{sup -1}, at the edges of the prominence feet. We argue that these shifts may be interpreted as prominence plasma rotating counterclockwise around the vertical axis to the solar surface as viewed from above. The evolution of the prominence seen in EUV images taken with the Solar Dynamics Observatory provided us with clues to interpret the results as swirling motions. Moreover, time-distance images taken far from the central wavelength show plasma structures moving parallel to the solar limb with velocities of about 10-15 km s{sup -1}. Finally, the shapes of the observed intensity profiles suggest the presence of, at least, two components at some locations at the edges of the prominence feet. One of them is typically Doppler shifted (up to {approx}20 km s{sup -1}) with respect to the other, thus suggesting the existence of supersonic counter-streaming flows along the line of sight.

  15. A dynamo model of magnetic activity in solar-like stars with different rotational velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Choudhuri, Arnab Rai; Kitchatinov, Leonid L.

    2014-08-10

    We attempt to provide a quantitative theoretical explanation for the observations that Ca II H/K emission and X-ray emission from solar-like stars increase with decreasing Rossby number (i.e., with faster rotation). Assuming that these emissions are caused by magnetic cycles similar to the sunspot cycle, we construct flux transport dynamo models of 1 M{sub ☉} stars rotating with different rotation periods. We first compute the differential rotation and the meridional circulation inside these stars from a mean-field hydrodynamics model. Then these are substituted in our dynamo code to produce periodic solutions. We find that the dimensionless amplitude f{sub m} of the toroidal flux through the star increases with decreasing rotation period. The observational data can be matched if we assume the emissions to go as the power 3-4 of f{sub m}. Assuming that the Babcock-Leighton mechanism saturates with increasing rotation, we can provide an explanation for the observed saturation of emission at low Rossby numbers. The main failure of our model is that it predicts an increase of the magnetic cycle period with increasing rotation rate, which is the opposite of what is found observationally. Much of our calculations are based on the assumption that the magnetic buoyancy makes the magnetic flux tubes rise radially from the bottom of the convection zone. Taking into account the fact that the Coriolis force diverts the magnetic flux tubes to rise parallel to the rotation axis in rapidly rotating stars, the results do not change qualitatively.

  16. SOLAR CYCLE VARIABILITY AND SURFACE DIFFERENTIAL ROTATION FROM Ca II K-LINE TIME SERIES DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.; Worden, Simon P.; Keil, Stephen L.

    2013-07-01

    Analysis of over 36 yr of time series data from the NSO/AFRL/Sac Peak K-line monitoring program elucidates 5 components of the variation of the 7 measured chromospheric parameters: (a) the solar cycle (period {approx} 11 yr), (b) quasi-periodic variations (periods {approx} 100 days), (c) a broadband stochastic process (wide range of periods), (d) rotational modulation, and (e) random observational errors, independent of (a)-(d). Correlation and power spectrum analyses elucidate periodic and aperiodic variation of these parameters. Time-frequency analysis illuminates periodic and quasi-periodic signals, details of frequency modulation due to differential rotation, and in particular elucidates the rather complex harmonic structure (a) and (b) at timescales in the range {approx}0.1-10 yr. These results using only full-disk data suggest that similar analyses will be useful for detecting and characterizing differential rotation in stars from stellar light curves such as those being produced by NASA's Kepler observatory. Component (c) consists of variations over a range of timescales, in the manner of a 1/f random process with a power-law slope index that varies in a systematic way. A time-dependent Wilson-Bappu effect appears to be present in the solar cycle variations (a), but not in the more rapid variations of the stochastic process (c). Component (d) characterizes differential rotation of the active regions. Component (e) is of course not characteristic of solar variability, but the fact that the observational errors are quite small greatly facilitates the analysis of the other components. The data analyzed in this paper can be found at the National Solar Observatory Web site http://nsosp.nso.edu/cak{sub m}on/, or by file transfer protocol at ftp://ftp.nso.edu/idl/cak.parameters.

  17. High dispersion spectroscopy of solar-type superflare stars. II. Stellar rotation, starspots, and chromospheric activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notsu, Yuta; Honda, Satoshi; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Shota; Shibayama, Takuya; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-06-01

    We conducted high dispersion spectroscopic observations of 50 superflare stars with Subaru/HDS. These 50 stars were selected from the solar-type superflare stars that we had discovered from the Kepler data. More than half (34 stars) of these 50 target superflare stars show no evidence of binarity, and we estimated stellar parameters of these 34 stars in our previous study (Notsu et al. 2015, PASJ, 67, 32). According to our previous studies using Kepler data, superflare stars show quasi-periodic brightness variations whose amplitude (0.1%-10%) is much larger than that of the solar brightness variations (0.01%-0.1%) caused by the existence of sunspots on the rotating solar surface. In this study, we investigated whether these quasi-periodic brightness variations of superflare stars are explained by the rotation of a star with fairly large starspots, by using stellar parameters derived in Paper I. First, we confirmed that the value of the projected rotational velocity, v sin i, is consistent with the rotational velocity estimated from the period of the brightness variation. Next, we measured the intensity of Ca II infrared triplet lines and Hα line, good indicators of the stellar chromospheric activity, and compared them with other stellar properties. The intensity of Ca II infrared triplet lines indicates that the mean magnetic field strength () of the target superflare stars can be higher than that of the Sun. A correlation between the amplitude of the brightness variation and the intensity of Ca II triplet line was found. All the targets expected to have large starspots because of their large amplitude of the brightness variation show high chromospheric activities compared to the Sun. These results support the idea that the brightness variation of superflare stars is due to the rotation with large starspots.

  18. Solar p-mode oscillations as a tracer of radial differential rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deubner, F.-L.; Ulrich, R. K.; Rhodes, E. J., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Photoelectric observations of solar p-modes obtained with improved wavenumber and frequency resolution are presented. The observations are compared with model calculations of the p-modes, and the degree of spatial and temporal coherence of the observed wave pattern is investigated. It is found that the p-mode oscillations pervade the visible surface of the sun with a high degree of coherence in space and time, so that the whole complex pattern of standing waves with its nodes and antinodes can be regarded as a fixed pattern corotating with the solar surface layers. The p-modes are introduced as a tracer of solar rotational flow velocities. The equatorial differential rotation is estimated as a function of effective depth on the basis of the theoretical contribution functions for the p-modes recently derived by Ulrich et al. (1978). The results strongly indicate that the angular speed of rotation is not uniform even in the relatively shallow layer extending about 20,000 km below the photosphere.

  19. The evolution of rotating stars. 1: Method and exploratory calculations for a 7 solar mass star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endal, A. S.; Sofia, S.

    1976-01-01

    A method was developed which allows us to study the evolution of rotating stars beyond the main sequence stage. Four different cases of redistribution of angular momentum in an evolving star are considered. Evolutionary sequences for a 7 solar mass star, rotating according to these different cases, were computed from the ZAMS to the double shell source stage. Each sequence was begun with a (typical) equatorial velocity of 210 km/sec. On the main sequence, the effects of rotation are of minor importance. As the core contracts during later stages, important effects arise in all physically plausible cases. The outer regions of the cores approach critical velocities and develop unstable angular velocity distributions. The effects of these instabilities should significantly alter the subsequent evolution.

  20. Manifestation of solar and geodynamic activity in the dynamics of the Earth's rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshkov, V. L.; Miller, N. O.; Vorotkov, M. V.

    2012-12-01

    The relationships between different manifestations of solar and geomagnetic activity and the structural peculiarities of the dynamics of the pole wobble and irregularities in the Earth's rotation are studied using singular spectrum analysis. There are two close major peaks and several lower ones in the same frequency range (1.1-1.3 years) in the Chandler wobble (CW) spectrum. Components in the geomagnetic activity were distinguished in the same frequency band (by the Dst and Ap indices). Six- to seven-year oscillations in the Earth's rotation rate with a complex dynamics of amplitude variations are shown in variations in geomagnetic activity. It is revealed that secular (decade) variations in the Earth's rotation rate on average repeat global variations in the secular trend of the Earth's geomagnetic field with a delay of eight years during the whole observation period.

  1. Uncertainties for two-dimensional models of solar rotation from helioseismic eigenfrequency splitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genovese, Christopher R.; Stark, Philip B.; Thompson, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    Observed solar p-mode frequency splittings can be used to estimate angular velocity as a function of position in the solar interior. Formal uncertainties of such estimates depend on the method of estimation (e.g., least-squares), the distribution of errors in the observations, and the parameterization imposed on the angular velocity. We obtain lower bounds on the uncertainties that do not depend on the method of estimation; the bounds depend on an assumed parameterization, but the fact that they are lower bounds for the 'true' uncertainty does not. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals for estimates of the angular velocity from 1986 Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) data, based on a 3659 element tensor-product cubic-spline parameterization, are everywhere wider than 120 nHz, and exceed 60,000 nHz near the core. When compared with estimates of the solar rotation, these bounds reveal that useful inferences based on pointwise estimates of the angular velocity using 1986 BBSO splitting data are not feasible over most of the Sun's volume. The discouraging size of the uncertainties is due principally to the fact that helioseismic measurements are insensitive to changes in the angular velocity at individual points, so estimates of point values based on splittings are extremely uncertain. Functionals that measure distributed 'smooth' properties are, in general, better constrained than estimates of the rotation at a point. For example, the uncertainties in estimated differences of average rotation between adjacent blocks of about 0.001 solar volumes across the base of the convective zone are much smaller, and one of several estimated differences we compute appears significant at the 95% level.

  2. The Solar Twin Planet Search. IV. The Sun as a typical rotator and evidence for a new rotational braking law for Sun-like stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Leonardo A.; Meléndez, Jorge; do Nascimento, José-Dias; Bedell, Megan; Ramírez, Iván; Bean, Jacob L.; Asplund, Martin; Spina, Lorenzo; Dreizler, Stefan; Alves-Brito, Alan; Casagrande, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Context. It is still unclear how common the Sun is when compared to other similar stars in regards to some of its physical properties, such as rotation. Considering that gyrochronology relations are widely used today to estimate ages of stars in the main sequence, and that the Sun is used to calibrate it, it is crucial to assess whether these procedures are acceptable. Aims: We analyze the rotational velocities, limited by the unknown rotation axis inclination angle, of an unprecedented large sample of solar twins to study the rotational evolution of Sun-like stars, and assess whether the Sun is a typical rotator. Methods: We used high-resolution (R = 115 000) spectra obtained with the HARPS spectrograph and the 3.6 m telescope at La Silla Observatory. The projected rotational velocities for 81 solar twins were estimated by line profile fitting with synthetic spectra. Macroturbulence velocities were inferred from a prescription that accurately reflects their dependence with effective temperature and luminosity of the stars. Results: Our sample of solar twins include some spectroscopic binaries with enhanced rotational velocities, and we do not find any nonspectroscopic binaries with unusually high rotation velocities. We verified that the Sun does not have a peculiar rotation, but the solar twins exhibit rotational velocities that depart from the Skumanich relation. Conclusions: The Sun is a regular rotator when compared to solar twins with a similar age. Additionally, we obtain a rotational braking law that better describes the stars in our sample (v ∝ t-0.6) in contrast to previous, often-used scalings. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere under ESO programs 188.C-0265, 183.D-0729, 292.C-5004, 077.C-0364, 072.C-0488, 092.C-0721, 093.C-0409, 183.C-0972, 192.C-0852, 091.C-0936, 089.C-0732, 091.C-0034, 076.C-0155, 185.D-0056, 074.C-0364, 075.C-0332, 089.C-0415, 60.A-9036, 075.C-0202, 192

  3. Faraday rotation fluctutation spectra observed during solar occultation of the Helios spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreev, V.; Efimov, A. I.; Samoznaev, L.; Bird, M. K.

    1995-01-01

    Faraday rotation (FR) measurements using linearly polarized radio signals from the two Helios spacecraft were carried out during the period from 1975 to 1984. This paper presents the results of a spectral analysis of the Helios S-band FR fluctuations observed at heliocentric distances from 2.6 to 15 solar radii during the superior conjunctions 1975-1983. The mean intensity of the FR fluctuations does not exceed the noise level for solar offsets greater than ca. 15 solar radii. The rms FR fluctuation amplitude increases rapidly as the radio ray path approaches the Sun, varying according to a power law (exponent: 2.85 +/- 0.15) at solar distances 4-12 solar radii. At distances inside 4 solar radii the increase is even steeper (exponent: 5.6 +/- 0.2). The equivalent two-dimensional FR fluctuation spectrum is well modeled by a single power-law over the frequency range from 5 to 50 mHz. For heliocentric distances larger than 4 solar radii the spectral index varies between 1.1 and 1.6 with a mean value of 1.4 +/- 0.2, corresponding to a 3-D spectral index p = 2.4. FR fluctuations thus display a somwhat lower spectral index compared with phase and amplitude fluctuations. Surprisingly high values of the spectral index were found for measurements inside 4 solar radii (p = 2.9 +/- 0.2). This may arise from the increasingly dominant effect of the magnetic field on radio wave propagation at small solar offsets. Finally, a quasiperiodic component, believed to be associated with Alfven waves, was discovered in some (but not all!) fluctuation spectra observed simultaneously at two ground stations. Characteristic periods and bulk velocities of this component were 240 +/- 30 sec and 300 +/- 60 km/s, respectively.

  4. Thermal bifurcation in the upper solar photosphere inferred from heterodyne spectroscopy of OH rotational lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deming, D.; Hillman, J. J.; Kostiuk, T.; Mumma, M. J.; Zipoy, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    Low noise high spectral resolution observations of two pure rotation transitions of OH from the solar photosphere were obtained. The observations were obtained using the technique of optically null-balanced infrared heterodyne spectroscopy, and consist of center-to-limb line profiles of a v=1 and a v=0 transition near 12 microns. These lines should be formed in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), and are diagnostics of the thermal structure of the upper photosphere. The v=0 R22 (24.5)e line strengthens at the solar limb, in contradiction to the predictions of current one dimensional photospheric models. Data for this line support a two dimensional model in which horizontal thermal fluctuations of order + or - 800K occur in the region Tau (sub 5000) approximately .001 to .01. This thermal bifurcation may be maintained by the presence of magnetic flux tubes, and may be related to the solar limb extensions observed in the 30 to 200 micron region.

  5. Relationship Between Sunspot Rotation and a Major Solar Eruption on 12 July 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Ying D.; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Cheng, Xin; Hu, Huidong; Yang, Zhongwei

    2016-04-01

    We present an analysis of Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observations of an X1.4 class flare on 12 July 2012 (SOL2012-07-12T15:37L082C105), which was associated with a pronounced sunspot rotation in the associated active region. Based on the magnetograms taken with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on the SDO, we measured the rotational speed of the sunspot. We also used a technique, called the differential affine velocity estimator for vector magnetograms (DAVE4VM), to determine the horizontal velocities and the magnetic helicity flux transport. The helicity flux rate due to shearing motion changed sign after the onset of the eruption. A high correlation between the sunspot rotation speed and the change in the total accumulated helicity was found. We also calculated the net fluxes of the respective magnetic polarities and the net vertical currents. The net current in the region of interest showed a synchronous change with the sunspot rotation rate. The magnetic configurations of the sigmoid filament in the active region and the associated possible interaction between different structures were further investigated by means of a nonlinear force-free field extrapolation. We identified a possible magnetic reconnection region from the three-dimensional magnetic fields and its association with EUV structures. These results suggest that the major eruption of this active region was connected with the sunspot rotation.

  6. The transverse and rotational motions of magnetohydrodynamic kink waves in the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Goossens, M.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Soler, R.; Terradas, J.; Verth, G.

    2014-06-10

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink waves have now been observed to be ubiquitous throughout the solar atmosphere. With modern instruments, they have now been detected in the chromosphere, interface region, and corona. The key purpose of this paper is to show that kink waves do not only involve purely transverse motions of solar magnetic flux tubes, but the velocity field is a spatially and temporally varying sum of both transverse and rotational motion. Taking this fact into account is particularly important for the accurate interpretation of varying Doppler velocity profiles across oscillating structures such as spicules. It has now been shown that, as well as bulk transverse motions, spicules have omnipresent rotational motions. Here we emphasize that caution should be used before interpreting the particular MHD wave mode/s responsible for these rotational motions. The rotational motions are not necessarily signatures of the classic axisymmetric torsional Alfvén wave alone, because kink motion itself can also contribute substantially to varying Doppler velocity profiles observed across these structures. In this paper, the displacement field of the kink wave is demonstrated to be a sum of its transverse and rotational components, both for a flux tube with a discontinuous density profile at its boundary, and one with a more realistic density continuum between the internal and external plasma. Furthermore, the Doppler velocity profile of the kink wave is forward modeled to demonstrate that, depending on the line of sight, it can either be quite distinct or very similar to that expected from a torsional Alfvén wave.

  7. A Comparison of Solar Cycle Variations in the Equatorial Rotation Rates of the Sun's Subsurface, Surface, Corona, and Sunspot Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaraiah, J.

    2013-10-01

    Using the Solar Optical Observing Network (SOON) sunspot-group data for the period 1985 - 2010, the variations in the annual mean equatorial-rotation rates of the sunspot groups are determined and compared with the known variations in the solar equatorial-rotation rates determined from the following data: i) the plasma rotation rates at 0.94R⊙,0.95R⊙,…,1.0R⊙ measured by the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) during the period 1995 - 2010, ii) the data on the soft-X-ray corona determined from Yohkoh/SXT full-disk images for the years 1992 - 2001, iii) the data on small bright coronal structures (SBCS) that were traced in Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/EIT images during the period 1998 - 2006, and iv) the Mount Wilson Doppler-velocity measurements during the period 1986 - 2007. A large portion (up to ≈ 30∘ latitude) of the mean differential-rotation profile of the sunspot groups lies between those of the internal differential-rotation rates at 0.94R⊙ and 0.98R⊙. The variation in the yearly mean equatorial-rotation rate of the sunspot groups seems to be lagging behind that of the equatorial-rotation rate determined from the GONG measurements by one to two years. The amplitude of the GONG measurements is very small. The solar-cycle variation in the equatorial-rotation rate of the solar corona closely matches that determined from the sunspot-group data. The variation in the equatorial-rotation rate determined from the Mount Wilson Doppler-velocity data closely resembles the corresponding variation in the equatorial-rotation rate determined from the sunspot-group data that included the values of the abnormal angular motions (> |3∘| day-1) of the sunspot groups. Implications of these results are pointed out.

  8. Anti-solar differential rotation on the active sub-giant HU Virginis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunyan, G.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Künstler, A.; Carroll, T. A.; Weber, M.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Measuring surface differential rotation (DR) on different types of stars is important when characterizing the underlying stellar dynamo. It has been suggested that anti-solar DR laws can occur when strong meridional flows exist. Aims: We aim to investigate the differential surface rotation on the primary star of the RS CVn binary, HU Vir, by tracking its starspot distribution as a function of time. We also aim to recompute and update the values for several system parameters of the triple system HU Vir (close and wide orbits). Methods: Time-series high-resolution spectroscopy for four continuous months was obtained with the 1.2-m robotic STELLA telescope. Nine consecutive Doppler images were reconstructed from these data, using our line-profile inversion code iMap. An image cross-correlation method was applied to derive the surface differential-rotation law for HU Vir. New orbital elements for the close and the wide orbits were computed using our new STELLA radial velocities (RVs) combined with the RV data available in the literature. Photometric observations were performed with the Amadeus Automatic Photoelectric Telescope (APT), providing contemporaneous Johnson-Cousins V and I data for approximately 20 yrs. This data was used to determine the stellar rotation period and the active longitudes. Results: We confirm anti-solar DR with a surface shear parameter α of -0.029 ± 0.005 and -0.026 ± 0.009, using single-term and double-term differential rotation laws, respectively. These values are in good agreement with previously claimed results. The best fit is achieved assuming a solar-like double-term law with a lap time of ≈400 d. Our orbital solutions result in a period of 10.387678 ± 0.000003 days for the close orbit and 2726 ± 7 d (≈7.5 yr) for the wide orbit. A Lomb-Scarge (L-S) periodogram of the pre-whitened V-band data reveals a strong single peak providing a rotation period of 10.391 ± 0.008 d, well synchronized to the short orbit. Based on

  9. Comparison of Historical Satellite-Based Estimates of Solar Radiation Resources with Recent Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Measurements: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D. R.

    2009-03-01

    The availability of rotating shadow band radiometer measurement data at several new stations provides an opportunity to compare historical satellite-based estimates of solar resources with measurements. We compare mean monthly daily total (MMDT) solar radiation data from eight years of NSRDB and 22 years of NASA hourly global horizontal and direct beam solar estimates with measured data from three stations, collected after the end of the available resource estimates.

  10. A simulation of convective dynamo in the solar convective envelope: Maintenance of the solar-like differential rotation and emerging flux

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Yuhong; Fang, Fang

    2014-07-01

    We report the results of a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of a convective dynamo in a model solar convective envelope driven by the solar radiative diffusive heat flux. The convective dynamo produces a large-scale mean magnetic field that exhibits irregular cyclic behavior with oscillation time scales ranging from about 5 to 15 yr and undergoes irregular polarity reversals. The mean axisymmetric toroidal magnetic field is of opposite signs in the two hemispheres and is concentrated at the bottom of the convection zone. The presence of the magnetic fields is found to play an important role in the self-consistent maintenance of a solar-like differential rotation in the convective dynamo model. Without the magnetic fields, the convective flows drive a differential rotation with a faster rotating polar region. In the midst of magneto-convection, we found the emergence of strong super-equipartition flux bundles at the surface, exhibiting properties that are similar to emerging solar active regions.

  11. THE HELIOCENTRIC DISTANCE WHERE THE DEFLECTIONS AND ROTATIONS OF SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS OCCUR

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, C.; Opher, M.

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the trajectory of a coronal mass ejection (CME), including any deflection from a radial path, and the orientation of its magnetic field is essential for space weather predictions. Kay et al. developed a model, Forecasting a CME’s Altered Trajectory (ForeCAT), of CME deflections and rotation due to magnetic forces, not including the effects of reconnection. ForeCAT is able to reproduce the deflection of observed CMEs. The deflecting CMEs tend to show a rapid increase of their angular momentum close to the Sun, followed by little to no increase at farther distances. Here we quantify the distance at which the CME deflection is “determined,” which we define as the distance after which the background solar wind has negligible influence on the total deflection. We consider a wide range in CME masses and radial speeds and determine that the deflection and rotation of these CMEs can be well-described by assuming they propagate with constant angular momentum beyond 10 R{sub ⊙}. The assumption of constant angular momentum beyond 10 R{sub ⊙} yields underestimates of the total deflection at 1 AU of only 1%–5% and underestimates of the rotation of 10%. Since the deflection from magnetic forces is determined by 10 R{sub ⊙}, non-magnetic forces must be responsible for any observed interplanetary deflections or rotations where the CME has increasing angular momentum.

  12. Spectral analysis of auroral geomagnetic activity during various solar cycles between 1960 and 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotzé, Pieter Benjamin

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we use wavelets and Lomb-Scargle spectral analysis techniques to investigate the changing pattern of the different harmonics of the 27-day solar rotation period of the AE (auroral electrojet) index during various phases of different solar cycles between 1960 and 2014. Previous investigations have revealed that the solar minimum of cycles 23-24 exhibited strong 13.5- and 9.0-day recurrence in geomagnetic data in comparison to the usual dominant 27.0-day synodic solar rotation period. Daily mean AE indices are utilized to show how several harmonics of the 27-day recurrent period change during every solar cycle subject to a 95 % confidence rule by performing a wavelet analysis of each individual year's AE indices. Results show that particularly during the solar minimum of 23-24 during 2008 the 27-day period is no longer detectable above the 95 % confidence level. During this interval geomagnetic activity is now dominated by the second (13.5-day) and third (9.0-day) harmonics. A Pearson correlation analysis between AE and various spherical harmonic coefficients describing the solar magnetic field during each Carrington rotation period confirms that the solar dynamo has been dominated by an unusual combination of sectorial harmonic structure during 23-24, which can be responsible for the observed anomalously low solar activity. These findings clearly show that, during the unusual low-activity interval of 2008, auroral geomagnetic activity was predominantly driven by high-speed solar wind streams originating from multiple low-latitude coronal holes distributed at regular solar longitude intervals.

  13. Temperature and Abundance Variations of an Active Region in Three Solar Rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Y.; Fludra, A.; Raymond, J. C.

    2002-12-01

    Active region 9718 (AR 9718) appeared at the east limb on November 26, 2001 which was newly formed when it was at the backside of the Sun. It survives through three solar rotations -- AR 9755 and AR 9798 for subsequent rotations. AR 9798 decayed to no visible sunspot before it reached the west limb. SOHO/UVCS observed this region four times, as part of SOHO JOP 151, when it was at the limbs (AR 9718 at the west limb, AR 9755 at both the east and west limbs, and AR 9798 at the west limb). SOHO/CDS made observations when AR 9718 and AR 9755 were at the west limb. We investigate the temperature and abundance variations of this active region during its lifetime, and look for possible correlations between these physical parameters and its magnetic characteristics.

  14. Tidal friction and generalized Cassini's laws in the solar system. [for planetary spin axis rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    The tidal drift toward a generalized Cassini state of rotation of the spin axis of a planet or satellite in a precessing orbit is described. Generalized Cassini's laws are applied to several solar system objects and the location of their spin axes estimated. Of those considered only the moon definitely occupies state 2 with the spin axis near to the normal of the invariable plane. Most objects appear to occupy state 1 with the spin axis near to the orbit normal. Iapetus could occupy either state depending on its oblateness. In addition, the resonant rotation of Mercury is found to have little effect on the tidal drift of its spin axis toward state 1.

  15. Measurements of Solar Differential Rotation and Meridional Circulation from Tracking of Photospheric Magnetic Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Derek A.

    2017-02-01

    Long-lived rotational and meridional flows are important ingredients of the solar cycle. Magnetic field images have typically been used to measure these flows on the solar surface by cross-correlating thin longitudinal strips or square patches across sufficiently long time gaps. Here, I use 1 month of SDO/HMI line-of-sight magnetic field observations, combined with the Southwest Automatic Magnetic Identification Suite magnetic feature-tracking code to measure the motion of individual features in these magnetograms. By controlling for perturbations due to short-lived flows and due to false motions from feature interactions, I effectively isolate the long-lived flows traced by the magnetic features. This allows me to produce high-resolution (2° bins) differential rotation measurements with well-characterized variances and covariances of the fit parameters. I find a sidereal rotational profile of (14.296 ± 0.006) + (‑1.847 ± 0.056)sin2 b + (‑2.615 ± 0.093) sin4 b, with units of deg day‑1, and a large covariance σ BC 2 = ‑4.87 × 10‑3(deg day‑1)2. I also produce measurements of the much weaker meridional flow that are broadly consistent with previous results. These measurements exhibit a peak flow of 16.7 ± 0.6 m s‑1 at latitude b = 45° but are insufficiently characterized at higher latitudes to ascertain whether the chosen functional form 2\\cos b\\sin b is appropriate. This work demonstrates that measuring the motions of individual features in photospheric magnetograms can produce high-precision results in relatively short time spans, and suggests that high-resolution non-longitudinally averaged photospheric velocity residual measurements could be produced to compare with coronal results and to provide other diagnostics of the solar dynamo.

  16. Differential rotation and turbulent convection: A new Reynolds stress model and comparison with solar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Minotti, F. O.; Schilling, O.

    1994-01-01

    In most hydrodynamic cases, the existence of a turbulent flow superimposed on a mean flow is caused by a shear instability in the latter. Boussinesq suggested the first model for the turbulent Reynolds stresses bar-(u(sub i)u(sub j)) in which the mean shear S(sub ij) is the cause (or source) of turbulence represented by the stress bar-(u(sub i)u(sub j)). In the case of solar differential rotation, exactly the reverse physical process occurs: turbulence (which must pre-exist) generates a mean flow which manifests itself in the form of differential rotation. Thus, the Boussinesq model is wholly inadequate because in the solar case, cause and effect are reversed. Since the Boussinesq model is inadequate, one needs an alternative model for the Reynolds stresses. We present a new dynamical model for the Reynolds stresses, convective fluxes, turbulent kinetic energy, and temperature fluctuations. The complete model requires the solution of 11 differential equations. We then introduce a set of simplifying assumptions which reduce the full dynamical model to a set of algebraic Reynolds stress models. We explicitly solve one of these models that entails only one differential equation. The overall agreement with the data is obtained with a model that is neither phenomenological nor one that requires a full numerical simulation, since it is algebraic in nature. The new model can play an important role in understanding the complex physics underlying the interplay between solar differential rotation and convection, as many physical processes can naturally be incorporated into the model.

  17. Royal Society, Discussion on Rotation in the Solar System, London, England, March 8, 9, 1984, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hide, R.

    1984-11-01

    The classical mechanics of rotation (R) in the present solar system and during its evolution is examined in theoretical studies and reviews of observational data. Topics discussed include R in the early solar system, R/magnetic-field interactions, the R of the sun, long-term changes in the R of the earth, tidal friction in the earth-moon system, the R of the atmospheres of the earth and planets, R and internal structures of the major planets and their inner satellites, the R of the Uranian system, the R of Hyperion, asteroid R rates, R of cometary nuclei, and the R of the earth inner core. Graphs, diagrams, tables, and photographs are provided.

  18. Solar system constraints on planetary Coriolis-type effects induced by rotation of distant masses

    SciTech Connect

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2010-08-01

    We phenomenologically put local constraints on the rotation of distant masses by using the planets of the solar system. First, we analytically compute the orbital secular precessions induced on the motion of a test particle about a massive primary by a Coriolis-like force, treated as a small perturbation, in the case of a constant angular velocity vector Ψ directed along a generic direction in space. The semimajor axis a and the eccentricity e of the test particle do not secularly change, contrary to the inclination I, the longitude of the ascending node Ω, the longitude of the pericenter varpi and the mean anomaly M. Then, we compare our prediction for (dot varpi) with the corrections Δdot varpi to the usual perihelion precessions of the inner planets recently estimated by fitting long data sets with different versions of the EPM ephemerides. We obtain as preliminary upper bounds |Ψ{sub z}| ≤ 0.0006−0.013 arcsec cty{sup −1}, |Ψ{sub x}| ≤ 0.1−2.7 arcsec cty{sup −1}, |Ψ{sub y}| ≤ 0.3−2.3 arcsec cty{sup −1}. Interpreted in terms of models of space-time involving cosmic rotation, our results are able to yield constraints on cosmological parameters like the cosmological constant Λ and the Hubble parameter H{sub 0} not too far from their values determined with cosmological observations and, in some cases, several orders of magnitude better than the constraints usually obtained so far from space-time models not involving rotation. In the case of the rotation of the solar system throughout the Galaxy, occurring clockwise about the North Galactic Pole, our results for Ψ{sub z} are in disagreement with the expected value of it at more than 3−σ level. Modeling the Oort cloud as an Einstein-Thirring slowly rotating massive shell inducing Coriolis-type forces inside yields unphysical results for its putative rotation.

  19. The effects of the Reimers η on the solar rotational period when our Sun evolves to the RGB tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jianpo; Lin, Ling; Bai, Chunyan; Liu, Jinzhong

    2017-01-01

    Our Sun will expand enormously and lose substantial mass via a stellar wind during the red giant branch (RGB) phase; the rotational period will be prolonged by several orders of magnitude. It is difficult to predict how much mass the Sun will lose before it reaches the RGB tip. Therefore, the solar rotational period at the RGB tip is also quite indeterminate. In this work, the Sun is considered as a two-component system comprised of a core and a convective envelope, each being allowed to rotate freely. The angular momentum transfer from the inner planets to the solar envelope is taken into consideration. Using Eggleton's stellar evolution code, we study how the solar rotational period at the RGB tip depends on the value of Reimers η chosen. The solar envelope's rotational period at the RGB tip varies from 1 792 to 736 934 years, as the Reimers η is changed from 0.00 to 0.75. Recent observations show that the average Reimers η of Sun-like stars is 0.477. Adopting this average value of the Reimers η, the solar envelope's rotational period at the RGB tip will be 24 868 years. We also show how the envelope's rotational evolves with age and luminosity. Other Sun-like stars, with different planetary configurations, may prematurely eject mass and lead to planetary nebulae, if they engulf a brown-dwarf companion at the RGB tip. Swallowing a planet with 13 Jupiter masses and a 3-day orbit, a Sun-like star can become a rapidly rotating giant star.

  20. The power spectrum of the solar wind speed for periods greater than 10 days

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenimore, E. E.; Asbridge, J. R.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Gosling, J. T.

    1978-01-01

    The use of the more than 11 years of solar wind speed data obtained by Vela 2-6 and Imp 6-8 to study the power spectrum of speed variations in the range near the solar rotational frequency is discussed. The broad bands of power near periods of 27 days (corresponding to the rotational period of the sun), 13.5 days, and higher harmonics are characterized, and it is suggested that the described individual peaks in both the solar wind and the geomagnetic spectra are probably not due to differential rotation. The alternate explanation is that the multipeak nature of the power spectra are explained by a wave packet concept in which recurring highspeed streams are described as a series of pulses (separated by a constant period) that last for a varying number of solar rotations.

  1. Maternal smoking during pregnancy and newborn neurobehavior: A pilot study of effects at 10–27 days

    PubMed Central

    Stroud, Laura R.; Paster, Rachel L.; Papandonatos, George D.; Niaura, Raymond; Salisbury, Amy L.; Battle, Cynthia; Lagasse, Linda L.; Lester, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine effects of maternal smoking during pregnancy on newborn neurobehavior at 10–27 days. Study design Participants were 56 healthy infants (28 smoking-exposed, 28 unexposed) matched on maternal social class, age, and alcohol use. Maternal smoking during pregnancy was determined by maternal interview and maternal saliva cotinine. Postnatal smoke exposure was quantified by infant saliva cotinine. Infant neurobehavior was assessed through the NICU Network Neurobehavioral Scale. Results Smoking-exposed infants showed greater need for handling and worse self-regulation (p <.05) and trended toward greater excitability and arousal (p <.10) relative to matched, unexposed infants (all moderate effect sizes). In contrast to prior studies of days 0–5, no effects of smoking-exposure on signs of stress/abstinence or muscle tone emerged. In stratified, adjusted analyses, only effects on need for handling remained significant (p<.05, large effect size). Conclusions Effects of maternal smoking during pregnancy at 10–27 days are subtle and consistent with increased need for external intervention and poorer self-regulation. Along with parenting deficits, these effects may represent early precursors for long-term adverse outcomes from maternal smoking during pregnancy. That signs of abstinence shown in prior studies of 0–5 day-old newborns did not emerge in older newborns provides further evidence for the possibility of a withdrawal process in exposed infants. PMID:18990408

  2. A dissipative model of solar system and stability of stationary rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilke, V. G.

    2009-04-01

    In classical model of Solar system the planets are represented by the material points cooperating under the law of universal gravitation. This model remains fair if planet to consider as absolutely rigid spheres with spherical distribution of density. The gravitational potential of such body coincides with potential of a material point, and rotation of each sphere concerning his centre of mass occurs to constant angular velocity. The motion of the centers of mass of spherical planets identically to motion in the appropriate problem of points. Let's notice, that forms of planets of Solar system are close to spherical as dominant forces at formation of planets are gravitational forces to which forces of molecular interaction in substance of a planet counteract. The model of the isolated Solar system submitted in a not indignant condition by homogeneous viscoelastic spheres is considered. Under action of own rotation and tidal gravitational forces the spherical planet changes the shape: there is "flattening" of a planet in a direction of a vector of its angular velocity and formation of tidal bulgs on the lines connecting the centre of a planet with the centers of other planets. From a variational principle of Hamilton the full system of the equations describing movements of the centers of mass of planets, rotations of systems of coordinates, by integrated image connected with planets, and deformations of planets be relative these of systems of coordinates has been obtained. It is supposed, that tidal gravitational, centrifugal and elastic forces result in small change of the spherical form of a planet. In system there are small parameters - inversely proportional of the Young modules of materials of the planets, providing small deformations of planets at influence on them of the centrifugal forces produced by own rotation of planets, and the small tidal deformations arising under influence of gradients of gravitational forces. The method of division of movements

  3. Origin of Axial Spin and Orbital Rotation of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, A.; Criss, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    We explain the nearly circular, co-planar orbits and mostly upright axial spins of the planets with a radical, new accretion model. These common and fundamental rotational characteristics record conditions of origin. The Figure below shows that current planetary spin (triangles) and orbital (circles) rotational energies (R.E.) of each planet nearly equal and linearly depend on its gravitational self-potential of formation (Ug). We derive a formula for dissipation of the Sun's spin via photons carrying off angular momentum (radiative braking): for constant luminosity, the primordal Sun (square) lies at the apex of the planetary trends. Total planetary R.E. (grey diamond) lies on the 1:1 line if Jupiter, lost 97% of its spin, like the Earth (open triangle, calculated for a 4 hr primordal day). Hence, the Sun and planets formed contemporaneously and accretion provided little heat. Data on satellite systems provides corroboration. Accretion converted Ug of the 3-dimensional pre-solar nebula to R.E., because (1) the negative sign of Ug forbids conversion exclusively to heat, (2) planetary nebulae are too rarified to produce heat until solid bodies are essentially formed, and (3) configurational energy and PV terms are small compared to Ug. We derive the conversion (-ΔUg~=ΔR.E) from ideal gas behavior, appropriate for low nebula density. From -ΔUg~=ΔR.E, the time-dependent virial theorem, conservation of angular momemtum, and measured masses and other characteristics, we derive a quantitative model which (1) deduces mechanisms, (2) quantifies the time-dependence in converting a 3-d cloud to the present 2-d Solar System, and (3) calculates the evolution of dust and gas densities. Rocky kernels assembled first and rapidly from pre-solar dust in a nebula with nearly uniform density via almost vertical collapse of dust, but not gas, to a disk, verified by stability criteria. Gas giants formed at great distance where rocky kernels out-competes the pull of the central, co

  4. Model for correcting global solar irradiance measured with rotating shadowband radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Hongyan; Chong, Wei; Sha, Yizhuo; Lv, Wenhua

    2012-04-01

    Global horizontal irradiance (GHI) measured with rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR) is not accurate enough due to thermal sensitivity and nonuniform spectral response of the photovoltaic detector equipped inside. The purpose of this work is to develop a multiple regressive model to correct the errors posed by the temperature and spectrum. The ratio of the reference global horizontal irradiance (RGHI) to the RSR measured GHI is defined as correction factor, based on which, the model is built via device temperature, air mass, and solar zenith angle. Evaluated from various statistical tests such as coefficient of correlation R2, mean bias deviation, root mean square deviation, t-statistic, skewness, and kurtosis, results show that the corrected RSR GHI can be comparable with the high-quality RGHI, which indicates the validity of the model.

  5. First identification of pure rotation lines of NH in the infrared solar spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, M.; Farmer, C. B.; Norton, R. H.; Sauval, A. J.; Grevesse, N.

    1991-01-01

    Pure rotation lines of NH of the v = 0 level and v = 1 level are detected in high-resolution solar spectra obtained from the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experimental observations. It is pointed out that the identification of the lines is favored by the typical appearance of the triplet lines of nearly equal intensities. The observed equivalent widths of these triplet lines are compared with predicted intensities, and it is observed that these widths are systematically larger than the predicted values. It is noted that because these very faint lines are observed in a region where the signal is very low, a systematic error in the measurements of the equivalent widths cannot be ruled out; therefore, the disagreement between the observed and predicted intensities is not considered to be real.

  6. Nearly-uniform internal rotation of solar-like main sequence stars revealed by asteroseismology and spectroscopic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benomar, Othman Michel; Takata, Masao; Shibahashi, Hiromoto; Ceillier, Tugdual; Garcia, Rafael

    2015-08-01

    Stellar pulsations, which can be trapped acoustic waves (p modes), internal gravity waves (g modes) or a mixture of two, have frequencies that depend on the properties of the stellar interior, such as the internal rotation.Helioseismology extensively exploited these pulsations and, by the means of seismic inversion, has revealed a nearly uniform rotation profile, with variations that do not exceed 30% in the radial direction (e.g. Thompson et al. 2003). To conciliate models with observations, an efficient mechanism of transport of angular momentum from the core to the envelope is required.The necessity of an efficient angular momentum transport was also revealed on two main-sequence stars showing p modes and g modes (Kurtz et al. 2014, Saio et al. 2015) and on several evolved stars solar-like showing mixed modes (Deheuvels et al. 2012, 2014).However, the number of stars with a measured internal rotation structure is still limited. For low-mass main-sequence stars showing solar-like oscillations, the measure of the internal rotation profile is limited because only the low degree p modes can be observed by unresolved photometry.Yet, by comparing the average surface rotation with the average of the internal rotation, it is possible to evaluate the degree of differential rotation between deep layers and the surface. The surface rotation can be derived by spectroscopic vsin(i) or by the periodic luminosity variation due to surface spots, while the average internal rotation is determined by asteroseismology, using the so-called rotational splitting.We performed this comparison on 22 solar-like stars of the main sequence. We show that the rotation at the surface and in the interior are generally close to each other. For 10 stars, the difference is clearly too small to be explained by simple evolutionary models that assume local conservation of angular momentum. Furthermore, by adopting a simple two-zone model, we show that 20 out of the 22 stars have a rotation rate in

  7. Helioseismic Observations of the Structure and Dynamics of a Rotating Sunspot Beneath the Solar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Junwei; Kosovichev, Alexander G.

    2003-01-01

    Time-distance helioseismology is applied to study the subphotospheric structures and dynamics of an unusually fast-rotating sunspot observed by the Michelson Doppler Imager on bead SOH0 in 2000 August. The subsurface sound speed structures and velocity fields are obtained for the sunspot region at different depths from 0 to 12 Mm. By comparing the subsurface sound speed variations with the surface magnetic field, we find evidence for structural twists beneath the visible surface of this active region, which may indicate that magnetic twists often seen at the photosphere also exist beneath the photosphere. We also report on the observation of subsurface horizontal vortical flows that extend to a depth of 5 Mm around this rotating sunspot and present evidence that opposite vortical flows may exist below 9 Mm. It is suggested that the vortical flows around this active region may build up a significant amount of magnetic helicity and energy to power solar eruptions. Monte Carlo simulation has been performed to estimate the error propagation, and in addition the sunspot umbra is masked to test the reliability of our inversion results. On the basis of the three-dimensional velocity fields obtained from the time-distance helioseismology inversions, we estimate the subsurface kinetic helicity at different depths for the first time and conclude that it is comparable to the current helicity estimated from vector magnetograms.

  8. SCIAMACHY observations of OH*(3-1) rotational temperature and OH* emission height variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Savigny, C.; McDade, I. C.; Eichmann, K.; Burrows, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    SCIAMACHY, the Scanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY on ESA's Envisat provided night-time limb measurements of the terrestrial airglow between fall 2002 and spring 2012 over a wide spectral range (220 - 2380 nm). These measurements are employed to retrieve OH(3-1) rotational temperatures and vertical emission rate profiles of several different Meinel bands. This contribution will focus on three different topics related to the OH airglow. First, a solar-driven 27-day signature in OH(3-1) rotational temperatures was identified using cross-correlation and superposed epoch analysis methods. This signature was found to be highly significant. Interestingly, the sensitivity of the mesopause temperatures to the 27-day solar forcing agrees within uncertainties with the sensitivity in terms of the 11-year solar cycle, suggesting similar forcing mechanims. The sensitivity in terms of the 27-day cycle is consistent with recent model simulations, but is significantly larger than previously published experimental results. Second, SCIAMACHY observations and model simulations are used to investigate, whether the Meinel emissions originating from different vibrational levels peak at the same altitude. We find systematic differences in emission peak altitudes between different Meinel bands - emissions from higher vibrational levels peak at higher altitudes - and good qualitative and quantitative agreement between measurements and model results. Third, the variability of the OH(3-1) emission altitude is investigated. A pronounced semi-annual variation with an amplitude of about 1 km is found at low latitudes. Annually averaged emission altitudes do not vary by more than about 300 m between 2003 and 2011, i.e. they show no evidence of an obvious 11-year solar cycle signature or a long-term trend. This provides important information for the interpretation of ground-based OH rotational temperature measurements.

  9. ROTATING MOTIONS AND MODELING OF THE ERUPTING SOLAR POLAR-CROWN PROMINENCE ON 2010 DECEMBER 6

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Yingna; Van Ballegooijen, Adriaan

    2013-02-10

    A large polar-crown prominence composed of different segments spanning nearly the entire solar disk erupted on 2010 December 6. Prior to the eruption, the filament in the active region part split into two layers: a lower layer and an elevated layer. The eruption occurs in several episodes. Around 14:12 UT, the lower layer of the active region filament breaks apart: One part ejects toward the west, while the other part ejects toward the east, which leads to the explosive eruption of the eastern quiescent filament. During the early rise phase, part of the quiescent filament sheet displays strong rolling motion (observed by STEREO-B) in the clockwise direction (viewed from east to west) around the filament axis. This rolling motion appears to start from the border of the active region, then propagates toward the east. The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) observes another type of rotating motion: In some other parts of the erupting quiescent prominence, the vertical threads turn horizontal, then turn upside down. The elevated active region filament does not erupt until 18:00 UT, when the erupting quiescent filament has already reached a very large height. We develop two simplified three-dimensional models that qualitatively reproduce the observed rolling and rotating motions. The prominence in the models is assumed to consist of a collection of discrete blobs that are tied to particular field lines of a helical flux rope. The observed rolling motion is reproduced by continuous twist injection into the flux rope in Model 1 from the active region side. Asymmetric reconnection induced by the asymmetric distribution of the magnetic fields on the two sides of the filament may cause the observed rolling motion. The rotating motion of the prominence threads observed by AIA is consistent with the removal of the field line dips in Model 2 from the top down during the eruption.

  10. Faraday Rotation Fluctuations of MESSENGER radio signals through the Corona during the 2009 Solar Minimum.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wexler, David; Vierinen, Juha; Coster, Anthea; Jensen, Elizabeth A.

    2015-04-01

    Faraday rotation (FR) techniques have been used to probe variations of coronal plasma velocity, density and magnetic field. The plane of polarization for an electromagnetic wave rotates in proportion to the integrated product of parallel magnetic field components and electron density along the radio signal line-of-sight as directed towards the receiving antenna. Fluctuations in FR through the corona thus represent the evolution of these line-integrated plasma parameters, providing a unique measurement of regional corona physics. The MESSENGER spacecraft radio 8 GHz radio beacon, transmitting through the corona at offsets 1.6 to 1.9 solar radii and near-equatorial heliolatitude, was recorded on the Green Bank radio telescope during the solar minimum of 2009. Here we reanalyze at higher temporal resolution the data previously published (Jensen et al 2013, Solar Physics 285:83-95). Combinations of coherent and incoherent integration were used to estimate Stokes parameters, from which the FR phase differences were obtained for serial one-second frames. Results were concatenated and corrected for phase wrap-around to produce a continuous FR phase curve. The general FR phase curve was broad and sweeping, with greatest spectral power observed in periods of hours. Also, finer wave-like fluctuations were noted with periods on the order of 100's of seconds. With the lowest-frequency components removed by detrending techniques, spectral analysis revealed a power spectrum of form P=kνα with spectral index α = -2.25 over frequencies ν = 2-20 milliHertz (mHz), and a flat noise spectrum at higher frequencies. Imposed upon the general power spectrum were trends of enhanced spectral power around 3.5 and 6 mHz, corresponding to approximately 5- and 3-minute period waves. Temporal evolution plots demonstrated that the increased power in these spectral bands appeared intermittently and irregularly. Our results reinforce the findings of prior coronal FR studies, and now extend the

  11. Three-dimensional Spherical Simulations of Solar Convection. I. Differential Rotation and Pattern Evolution Achieved with Laminar and Turbulent States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miesch, Mark S.; Elliott, Julian R.; Toomre, Juri; Clune, Tom L.; Glatzmaier, Gary A.; Gilman, Peter A.

    2000-03-01

    Rotationally constrained convection possesses velocity correlations that transport momentum and drive mean flows such as differential rotation. The nature of this transport can be very complex in turbulent flow regimes, where large-scale, coherent vorticity structures and mean flows can be established by smaller scale turbulence through inverse cascades. The dynamics of the highly turbulent solar convection zone therefore may be quite different than in early global-scale numerical models, which were limited by computational resources to nearly laminar flows. Recent progress in high-performance computing technology and ongoing helioseismic investigations of the dynamics of the solar interior have motivated us to develop more sophisticated numerical models of global-scale solar convection. Here we report three-dimensional simulations of compressible, penetrative convection in rotating spherical shells in both laminar and turbulent parameter regimes. The convective structure in the laminar case is dominated by ``banana cells,'' but the turbulent case is much more complex, with an intricate, rapidly evolving downflow network in the upper convection zone and an intermittent, plume-dominated structure in the lower convection zone and overshoot region. Convective patterns generally propagate prograde at low latitudes and retrograde at high latitudes relative to the local rotation. The differential rotation profiles show some similarity with helioseismic determinations of the solar rotation but still exhibit significantly more cylindrical alignment. Strong, intermittent, vortical downflow lanes and plumes play an important dynamical role in turbulent flow regimes and are responsible for significant differences relative to laminar flows with regard to momentum and energy transport and to the structure of the overshoot region at the base of the convection zone.

  12. The evolution of rotating stars. I - Method and exploratory calculations for a 7-solar-mass star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endal, A. S.; Sofia, S.

    1976-01-01

    A method is developed which allows the evolution of rotating stars to be studied well beyond the main-sequence stage. Four different cases of redistribution of angular momentum in an evolving star are considered. Evolutionary sequences for a 7-solar-mass star, rotating according to these different cases, were computed from the zero-age main-sequence to the double-shell-source stage. Each sequence was begun with a (typical) equatorial rotational velocity of 210 km/s. On the main sequence, the effects of rotation are of minor importance. However, as the core contracts during later stages, important effects arise in all physically plausible cases. The outer regions of the cores approach critical velocities and develop unstable angular-velocity distributions. The effects of these instabilities should significantly alter the subsequent evolution.

  13. Dependence of the cosmic ray intensity upon solar coronal hole area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbah, I.; Kudela, K.; Al Jasaar, H. K.; Rybansky, M.

    2003-04-01

    We examine the dependence of the cosmic ray intensity (CRI) observed with neutron monitor located at Climax and Huancayo/Haleakala upon the solar coronal hole area (CHA) during the time interval 1953-2001. The cross-correlation function between the 27-day averages of the two parameters displays solar cycle as well as magnetic cycle. The CRI is well correlated to the CHA (r=0.89-0.93). The CHA leads the CRI by 5-6 solar rotations. The CHA is inversely correlated to product of the solar wind speed and the interplanetary magnetic field strength (VB). It is inversely correlated to the geomagnetic activity as well. The CHA leads both: the product VB and geomagnetic activity by 5 and 9 solar rotations respectively.

  14. Periodicity of the Solar Full-disk Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, N. B.; Qu, Z. N.; Zhai, Q.

    2014-07-01

    A full-disk solar magnetogram has been measured each day since 1970 January 19, and the daily Magnetic Plage Strength Index (MPSI) and the daily Mount Wilson Sunspot Index (MWSI) were calculated for each magnetogram at the Mount Wilson Observatory. The MPSI and MWSI are used to investigate the periodicity of the solar full-disk magnetic activity through autocorrelation analyses. Just two periods, the solar cycle and the rotation cycle, are determined in both the MPSI (the solar full-disk weak magnetic field activity) and MWSI (the solar full-disk strong magnetic field activity) with no annual signal found. The solar cycle for MPSI (10.83 yr) is found to be obviously longer than that for MWSI (9.77 yr). The rotation cycle is determined to be 26.8 ± 0.63 sidereal days for MPSI and 27.4 ± 2.4 sidereal days for MWSI. The rotation cycle length for MPSI is found to fluctuate around 27 days within a very small amplitude, but for MWSI it obviously temporally varies with a rather large amplitude. The rotation cycle for MWSI seems longer near solar minimum than at solar maximum. Cross-correlation analyses of daily MPSI and MWSI are carried out, and it is inferred that the MPSI components partly come from relatively early MWSI measurements.

  15. Periodicity of the solar full-disk magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, N. B.; Qu, Z. N.; Zhai, Q.

    2014-07-01

    A full-disk solar magnetogram has been measured each day since 1970 January 19, and the daily Magnetic Plage Strength Index (MPSI) and the daily Mount Wilson Sunspot Index (MWSI) were calculated for each magnetogram at the Mount Wilson Observatory. The MPSI and MWSI are used to investigate the periodicity of the solar full-disk magnetic activity through autocorrelation analyses. Just two periods, the solar cycle and the rotation cycle, are determined in both the MPSI (the solar full-disk weak magnetic field activity) and MWSI (the solar full-disk strong magnetic field activity) with no annual signal found. The solar cycle for MPSI (10.83 yr) is found to be obviously longer than that for MWSI (9.77 yr). The rotation cycle is determined to be 26.8 ± 0.63 sidereal days for MPSI and 27.4 ± 2.4 sidereal days for MWSI. The rotation cycle length for MPSI is found to fluctuate around 27 days within a very small amplitude, but for MWSI it obviously temporally varies with a rather large amplitude. The rotation cycle for MWSI seems longer near solar minimum than at solar maximum. Cross-correlation analyses of daily MPSI and MWSI are carried out, and it is inferred that the MPSI components partly come from relatively early MWSI measurements.

  16. From Solar to Stellar Corona: The Role of Wind, Rotation, and Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Réville, Victor; Brun, Allan Sacha; Strugarek, Antoine; Matt, Sean P.; Bouvier, Jérôme; Folsom, Colin P.; Petit, Pascal

    2015-12-01

    Observations of surface magnetic fields are now within reach for many stellar types thanks to the development of Zeeman-Doppler Imaging. These observations are extremely useful for constraining rotational evolution models of stars, as well as for characterizing the generation of the magnetic field. We recently demonstrated that the impact of coronal magnetic field topology on the rotational braking of a star can be parameterized with a scalar parameter: the open magnetic flux. However, without running costly numerical simulations of the stellar wind, reconstructing the coronal structure of the large-scale magnetic field is not trivial. An alternative—broadly used in solar physics—is to extrapolate the surface magnetic field assuming a potential field in the corona, to describe the opening of the field lines by the magnetized wind. This technique relies on the definition of a so-called source surface radius, which is often fixed to the canonical value of 2.5{R}⊙ . However this value likely varies from star to star. To resolve this issue, we use our extended set of 2.5D wind simulations published in 2015 to provide a criterion for the opening of field lines as well as a simple tool to assess the source surface radius and the open magnetic flux. This allows us to derive the magnetic torque applied to the star by the wind from any spectropolarimetric observation. We conclude by discussing some estimations of spin-down timescales made using our technique and compare them to observational requirements.

  17. Structure and Rotation of the Solar Interior: Initial Results from the MDI Medium-L Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosovichev, A. G.; Schou, J.; Scherrer, P. H.; Bogart, R. S.; Bush, R. I.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Aloise, J.; Bacon, L.; Burnette, A.; DeForest, C.; Giles, P. M.; Leibrand, K.; Nigam, R.; Rubin, M.; Scott, K.; Williams, S. D.; Basu, Sarbani; Christensen-Dalsgaard J.; Daeppen W.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The medium-l program of the Michelson Doppler Imager instrument on board SOHO provides continuous observations of oscillation modes of angular degree, l, from 0 to approximately 300. The data for the program are partly processed on board because only about 3% of MDI observations can be transmitted continuously to the ground. The on-board data processing, the main component of which is Gaussian-weighted binning, has been optimized to reduce the negative influence of spatial aliasing of the high-degree oscillation modes. The data processing is completed in a data analysis pipeline at the SOI Stanford Support Center to determine the mean multiplet frequencies and splitting coefficients. The initial results show that the noise in the medium-l oscillation power spectrum is substantially lower than in ground-based measurements. This enables us to detect lower amplitude modes and, thus, to extend the range of measured mode frequencies. This is important for inferring the Sun's internal structure and rotation. The MDI observations also reveal the asymmetry of oscillation spectral lines. The line asymmetries agree with the theory of mode excitation by acoustic sources localized in the upper convective boundary layer. The sound-speed profile inferred from the mean frequencies gives evidence for a sharp variation at the edge of the energy-generating core. The results also confirm the previous finding by the GONG (Gough et al., 1996) that, in a thin layer just beneath the convection zone, helium appears to be less abundant than predicted by theory. Inverting the multiplet frequency splittings from MDI, we detect significant rotational shear in this thin layer. This layer is likely to be the place where the solar dynamo operates. In order to understand how the Sun works, it is extremely important to observe the evolution of this transition layer throughout the 11-year activity cycle.

  18. An evolutionary computation based algorithm for calculating solar differential rotation by automatic tracking of coronal bright points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahamatnia, Ehsan; Dorotovič, Ivan; Fonseca, Jose M.; Ribeiro, Rita A.

    2016-03-01

    Developing specialized software tools is essential to support studies of solar activity evolution. With new space missions such as Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), solar images are being produced in unprecedented volumes. To capitalize on that huge data availability, the scientific community needs a new generation of software tools for automatic and efficient data processing. In this paper a prototype of a modular framework for solar feature detection, characterization, and tracking is presented. To develop an efficient system capable of automatic solar feature tracking and measuring, a hybrid approach combining specialized image processing, evolutionary optimization, and soft computing algorithms is being followed. The specialized hybrid algorithm for tracking solar features allows automatic feature tracking while gathering characterization details about the tracked features. The hybrid algorithm takes advantages of the snake model, a specialized image processing algorithm widely used in applications such as boundary delineation, image segmentation, and object tracking. Further, it exploits the flexibility and efficiency of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), a stochastic population based optimization algorithm. PSO has been used successfully in a wide range of applications including combinatorial optimization, control, clustering, robotics, scheduling, and image processing and video analysis applications. The proposed tool, denoted PSO-Snake model, was already successfully tested in other works for tracking sunspots and coronal bright points. In this work, we discuss the application of the PSO-Snake algorithm for calculating the sidereal rotational angular velocity of the solar corona. To validate the results we compare them with published manual results performed by an expert.

  19. A 2000 Solar Mass Rotating Molecular Disk Around NGC 6334A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraemer, Kathleen E.; Jackson, James M.; Paglione, A. D.; Bolatto, Alberto D.

    1997-01-01

    We present millimeter and centimeter wave spectroscopic observations of the H II region NGC 6334A. We have mapped the source in several transitions of CO, CS, and NH3. The molecular emission shows a distinct flattened structure in the east-west direction. This structure is probably a thick molecular disk or torus (2.2 x 0.9 pc) responsible for the bipolarity of the near-infrared (NIR) and radio continuum emission which extends in two "lobes" to the north and south of the shell-like H II region. The molecular disk is rotating from west to east (omega approximately equals 2.4 km/s.pc) about an axis approximately parallel to the radio and NIR emission lobes. By assuming virial equilibrium, we find that the molecular disk contains approximately 2000 solar mass. Single-component gas excitation model calculations show that the molecular gas in the disk is warmer and denser (T(sub k) approximately equals 60 K, n approximately equals 3000/cc) than the gas to the north and south (T(sub k) approximately equals 50 K, n approximately equals 400/cc). High resolution (approximately 5 sec) NH3 (3, 3) images of NGC 6334A reveal several small (approximately 0.1 pc) clumps, one of which lies southwest of the radio continuum shell, and is spatially coincident with a near-infrared source, IRS 20. A second NH3 clump is coincident with an H2O maser and the center of a molecular outflow. The dense gas tracers, CS J = 5 approaches 4 and 7 approaches 6, peak near IRS 20 and the H2O maser, not at NGC 6334A. IRS 20 has a substantial far-infrared (FIR) luminosity L(sub FIR) approximately 10(exp 5) solar luminosity, which indicates the presence of an O 7.5 star but has no detected radio continuum (F(sub 6 cm) < 0.02 Jy). The combination of dense gas, a large FIR luminosity and a lack of radio continuum can best be explained if IRS 20 is a protostar. A third clump of NH3 emission lies to the west of IRS 20 but is not associated with any other molecular or continuum features. The star formation

  20. Simultaneously photocatalytic treatment of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) using rotating reactor under solar irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngji; Joo, Hyunku; Her, Namguk; Yoon, Yeomin; Sohn, Jinsik; Kim, Sungpyo; Yoon, Jaekyung

    2015-05-15

    In this study, simultaneous treatments, reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and oxidation of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), such as bisphenol A (BPA), 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) and 17β-estradiol (E2), were investigated with a rotating photocatalytic reactor including TiO₂ nanotubes formed on titanium mesh substrates under solar UV irradiation. In the laboratory tests with a rotating type I reactor, synergy effects of the simultaneous photocatalytic reduction and oxidation of inorganic (Cr(VI)) and organic (BPA) pollutants were achieved. Particularly, the concurrent photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) and oxidation of BPA was higher under acidic conditions. The enhanced reaction efficiency of both pollutants was attributed to a stronger charge interaction between TiO₂ nanotubes (positive charge) and the anionic form of Cr(VI) (negative charge), which are prevented recombination (electron-hole pair) by the hole scavenging effect of BPA. In the extended outdoor tests with a rotating type II reactor under solar irradiation, the experiment was extended to examine the simultaneous reduction of Cr(VI) in the presence of additional EDCs, such as EE2 and E2 as well as BPA. The findings showed that synergic effect of both photocatalytic reduction and oxidation was confirmed with single-component (Cr(VI) only), two-components (Cr(VI)/BPA, Cr(VI)/EE2, and Cr(VI)/E2), and four-components (Cr(VI)/BPA/EE2/E2) under various solar irradiation conditions.

  1. 22-year cycle of differential rotation of the solar corona and the rule by Gnevyshev-Ohl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badalyan, O. G.; Obridko, V. N.

    2017-01-01

    The time variation of the parameters of differential rotation of the solar corona is considered based on data on the coronal green-line brightness. Separate analysis is performed for even and odd cycles. It is shown that the equatorial rotation rate of the corona increases in the epochs of minimum between the even and odd cycles and reaches its minimum values between the odd and even cycles. Besides, it is found that the differential rotation gradient in absolute value increases in the even cycles. Both these factors may act to increase the amplitude of the odd cycle compared to the preceding even one. Perhaps this is what explains the effect of Gnevyshev-Ohl.

  2. Measurement of the solar diurnal anisotropy of the cosmic-ray albedo neutron flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ifedili, S. O.

    1982-03-01

    The solar diurnal anisotropy of the cosmic-ray albedo neutron flux has been measured by a neutron detector on board the OGO-6 satellite. On the average the diurnal amplitudes and phases of the cosmic ray albedo neutron flux (less than or equal to 10 MeV) were respectively 0.18 + or - 0.02% and 15 + or - 1 hr LT, though there were substantial fluctuations of a few days' duration which did not depend on the solar sector structure polarity and a 27-day periodicity in the diurnal amplitudes which was associated with the sun's rotation.

  3. Evaluation of N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide (NBBS) Neurotoxicity in Sprague-Dawley Male Rats Following 27-day Oral Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Rider, CV; Janardhan, KS; Rao, D; Morrison, JP; McPherson, CA; Harry, GJ

    2012-01-01

    N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide (NBBS) is widely used as a plasticizer in polyacetals, polyamides, and polycarbonates and has been found in ground water and effluent from wastewater treatment sites. The compound is lipophilic and distributes rapidly to the brain but also clears rapidly and shows little evidence of accumulation. Limited studies in the literature report neurotoxicity of NBBS in rabbits and rats. Adult Sprague-Dawley male rats (Harlan) received corn oil vehicle or NBBS (100, 200, or 400 mg/kg/d) via oral gavage (5 ml/kg bwt) daily/5 days/week for 27 days. Deaths were observed in the 400 mg/kg/d dose group in the first 5 days and dosing was decreased to 300 mg/kg/d. No alterations were observed in gait, locomotor activity, and rearing behavior. No histological lesions were observed in the testis, seminal vesicles, coagulating gland, epididymis, and prostate. In the liver, minimal centrilobular hypertrophy was evident in all rats of the high dose group. Contrary to previous reports, there was no evidence of peripheral nerve lesions or gliosis in the hippocampus or cerebellum. mRNA levels for glial fibrillary acidic acid protein, interferon gamma, CXCR-3, intracellular adhesion molecule-1, and CD11b were not altered in the hippocampus while Iba-1 levels were decreased. These data do not support previous reports of neurotoxicity for NBBS within a 4-week exposure regimen; however, neuropathological injury occurring over an extended period of exposure cannot be ruled out and given the potential for human exposure requires further examination. PMID:22824510

  4. Mg 280-nm doublet as a monitor of changes in solar ultraviolet irradiance

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, D.F.; Schlesinger, B.M.

    1986-07-20

    Five years of 160- to 400-nm solar flux measurements by the Solar Backscattered Ultraviolet experiment on Nimbus 7 have been analyzed. The flux in the center of strong lines and at shorter wavelengths varies with periods that correspond to modulation by the rotation of active regions. The modulation is greater at the centers of strong lines and at shorter wavelengths, corresponding to radiation that originates at higher levels in the solar atmosphere. The ratio of the irradiance in the core of the Mg 280-nm line to the irradiance at neighboring wavelengths is used as an index of solar variation. A scaling factor is derived by comparing rotational modulation at other wavelengths with the rotational modulation of the index. The scaled Mg II 280-nm strength successfully represents both rotational and long-term variations across the Al absorption edge near 210 nm. This ratio can therefore provide an empirical representation of long-term ultraviolet solar variability. Scaling factors are derived and changes estimated at several ultraviolet wavelengths. At 204 nm, in the wavelength region that drives atmospheric photochemistry, the solar irradiance drops about 4% from its average level for 1979-1980 to late 1983. The total estimated range of variation of the 27-day averaged (one rotation) 204-nm irradiance is 6%, over the 5 years of measurements. A least squares fit shows that over the 5 years, 27-day averages of 10.7-cm radio flux and of the Mg II index follow a linear relation. The radio flux can therefore be used to estimate changes in the solar ultraviolet for times before the launch of Nimbus 7.

  5. s-process production in rotating massive stars at solar and low metallicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frischknecht, Urs; Hirschi, Raphael; Pignatari, Marco; Maeder, André; Meynet, George; Chiappini, Cristina; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl; Rauscher, Thomas; Georgy, Cyril; Ekström, Sylvia

    2016-02-01

    Rotation was shown to have a strong impact on the structure and light element nucleosynthesis in massive stars. In particular, models including rotation can reproduce the primary nitrogen observed in halo extremely metal poor (EMP) stars. Additional exploratory models showed that rotation may enhance s-process production at low metallicity. Here we present a large grid of massive star models including rotation and a full s-process network to study the impact of rotation on the weak s-process. We explore the possibility of producing significant amounts of elements beyond the strontium peak, which is where the weak s-process usually stops. We used the Geneva stellar evolution code coupled to an enlarged reaction network with 737 nuclear species up to bismuth to calculate 15-40 M⊙ models at four metallicities (Z = 0.014, 10-3, 10-5 and 10-7) from the main sequence up to the end of oxygen burning. We confirm that rotation-induced mixing between the convective H-shell and He-core enables an important production of primary 14N and 22Ne and s-process at low metallicity. At low metallicity, even though the production is still limited by the initial number of iron seeds, rotation enhances the s-process production, even for isotopes heavier than strontium, by increasing the neutron-to-seed ratio. The increase in this ratio is a direct consequence of the primary production of 22Ne. Despite nuclear uncertainties affecting the s-process production and stellar uncertainties affecting the rotation-induced mixing, our results show a robust production of s-process at low metallicity when rotation is taken into account. Considering models with a distribution of initial rotation rates enables us to reproduce the observed large range of the [Sr/Ba] ratios in (carbon-enhanced and normal) EMP stars.

  6. Steps towards a high precision solar rotation profile: Results from SDO/AIA coronal bright point data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudar, D.; Skokić, I.; Brajša, R.; Saar, S. H.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Coronal bright points (CBP) are ubiquitous small brightenings in the solar corona associated with small magnetic bipoles. Aims: We derive the solar differential rotation profile by tracing the motions of CBPs detected by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We also investigate problems related to the detection of CBPs resulting from instrument and detection algorithm limitations. Methods: To determine the positions and identification of CBPs we used a segmentation algorithm. A linear fit of their central meridian distance and latitude vs time was used to derive velocities. Results: We obtained 906 velocity measurements in a time interval of only 2 days. The differential rotation profile can be expressed as ωrot = (14.47° ± 0.10° + (0.6° ± 1.0°) sin2(b) = (-4.7° ± 1.7°) sin4(b)) d-1. Our result is in agreement with other work and it comes with reasonable errors in spite of the very short time interval used. This was made possible by the higher sensitivity and resolution of the AIA instrument compared to similar equipment as well as high cadence. The segmentation algorithm also played a crucial role by detecting so many CBPs, which reduced the errors to a reasonable level. Conclusions: Data and methods presented in this paper show a great potential for obtaining very accurate velocity profiles, both for rotation and meridional motion and, consequently, Reynolds stresses. The amount of CBP data that could be obtained from this instrument should also provide a great opportunity to study changes of velocity patterns with a temporal resolution of only a few months. Other possibilities are studies of evolution of CBPs and proper motions of magnetic elements on the Sun.

  7. Analysis of Solar Spectral Irradiance Measurements from the SBUV/2-Series and the SSBUV Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebula, Richard P.; DeLand, Matthew T.; Hilsenrath, Ernest

    1997-01-01

    The NOAA-9 SBEV/2 instrument has made the first regular measurements ot solar UV activity over a complete solar cycle, beginning in March 1985 and continuing as of this writing. The NOAA-9 solar irradiance data set includes the minimum between Cycles 21-22 and the current minimum at the end of Cycle 22. Although overall solar activity is low during these periods, 27-day rotational modulation is frequently present. The episode of 13-day periodicity observed during September 1994 - March 1995 shows that phenomena previously associated with high levels of solar activity can occur at any point in the solar cycle. The 205 nm irradiance and Mg II index measured by NOAA-9 showed very similar behavior during the Cycle 21-22 minimum in 1985-1986, when 27-day periodicity dominated short-term solar variations, but behaved differently in 1994-1995 during the episode of 13-day periodicity. We plan further investigations into the physical causes of this result, since it affects the extent to which the Mg II index is an accurate proxy for 205 nm irradiance variations during such episodes. The NOAA-9 Mg II data are available.

  8. Multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis of ionospheric total electron content data during solar minimum and maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekhar, E.; Prabhudesai, Sanjana S.; Seemala, Gopi K.; Shenvi, Nayana

    2016-11-01

    The spatio-temporal variations in ionospheric vertical total electron content (TEC) data, which often reflect their scale invariant properties, can well be studied with multifractal analysis. We discuss the multifractal behaviour of TEC recorded at a total of 27 stations confined to a narrow longitude band (35°W-80°W) spanning from equator to high-latitude regions (30°S to 80°N) (geographic coordinates) during solar minimum (2008) and solar maximum (2014), using multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA). MFDFA provides an understanding of the multifractal scaling behaviour of a signal using the multifractal singularity spectra and the generalised Hurst exponents as diagnostic tools. The objectives of this study are to (i) understand the latitudinal dependence of the multifractal behaviour of TEC, (ii) compare the multifractal behaviour of TEC corresponding to the well-known 27-day variation (solar rotation period) and its harmonics and the 1-day (solar diurnal) periodicities, during 2008 and 2014 and (iii) understand the lunar tidal influence on TEC. Results indicate that except for the 1-day period, the TEC at all other periods shows a higher degree of multifractality during solar maximum compared to solar minimum. Further, irrespective of the solar activity, the degree of mutifractality in general decreases with increase in period for all latitude zones for periods of 27-day and its harmonics. However, the 1-day period exhibits monofractal behaviour regardless of the solar activity. The influence of semi-lunar tidal effects (having a periodicity of about 14.5 days) as a function of latitude is clearly seen in the 13.5-day periodicity (i.e., the 2nd harmonic of 27-day variation) of TEC. It manifests in the form of decreasing differences in the widths of the multifractal singularity spectra corresponding to the years 2008 and 2014, with increase in latitude. Results are discussed in the light of these observations.

  9. A search for evidence of the evolution of rotational discontinuities in the solar wind from nonlinear Alfven waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, M.; Buti, B.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented of a study designed to confirm the suspected relation between Alfven solitons (steepened Afven waves) and rotational discontinuities (RDs) in the solar wind. The ISEE 3 data were used to search for the predicted correlations between the beta value of plasma, the sense of polarization of the discontinuity, and changes of the magnetic field strength and plasma density across the discontinuity. No statistically significant evidence was found for the evolution of RDs from Alfven solitons. A possibility is suggested that the observations made could have been far from the regions in which the RDs were formed.

  10. EUV flux variations with solar rotation observed during 1974-1976 from AE satellites C, D, and E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinteregger, H. E.; Bedo, D. E.; Manson, J. E.; Skillman, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    Solar EUV fluxes in the spectral range from 140 to 1850 A have been observed by spectrophotometers on the satellites AE-C, D, and E. Variations over the long period of one or two years cannot be verified quantitatively, as the observed small variations are of the same magnitude as possible variations of instrumental sensitivities and estimated uncertainties of absolute values from the rocket experiment which established the calibration of the AE-C instrument. Fortunately, no similar difficulty exists for the interpretation of observed EUV variations within smaller time periods up to that of a full solar rotation. Results from AE-C observations for many different wavelength groups for the year 1974 are shown by some detail and compared with some recent observations made by the AE-D and AE-E instruments.

  11. Solar-terrestrial influences on weather and climate; Proceedings of the Symposium, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, August 24-28, 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormac, B. M. (Editor); Seliga, T. A.

    1979-01-01

    The book contains most of the invited papers and contributions presented at the symposium/workshop on solar-terrestrial influences on weather and climate. Four main issues dominate the activities of the symposium: whether solar variability relationships to weather and climate is a fundamental scientific question to which answers may have important implications for long-term weather and climate prediction; the sun-weather relationships; other potential solar influences on weather including the 11-year sunspot cycle, the 27-day solar rotation, and special solar events such as flares and coronal holes; and the development of practical use of solar variability as a tool for weather and climatic forecasting, other than through empirical approaches. Attention is given to correlation topics; solar influences on global circulation and climate models; lower and upper atmospheric coupling, including electricity; planetary motions and other indirect factors; experimental approaches to sun-weather relationships; and the role of minor atmospheric constituents.

  12. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Cedar City, Utah (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-07-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  13. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Milford, Utah (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-07-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  14. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Los Angeles, California (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

    2010-04-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  15. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Kalaeloa Oahu, Hawaii (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-03-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  16. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); La Ola Lanai, Hawaii (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2009-07-22

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  17. Solar Spectral Irradiance Changes During Cycle 24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchenko, Sergey; Deland, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    We use solar spectra obtained by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board the Aura satellite to detect and follow long-term (years) and short-term (weeks) changes in the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the 265-500 nm spectral range. During solar Cycle 24, in the relatively line-free regions the SSI changed by approximately 0.6% +/- 0.2% around 265 nm. These changes gradually diminish to 0.15% +/- 0.20% at 500 nm. All strong spectral lines and blends, with the notable exception of the upper Balmer lines, vary in unison with the solar "continuum." Besides the lines with strong chromospheric components, the most involved species include Fe I blends and all prominent CH, NH, and CN spectral bands. Following the general trend seen in the solar "continuum," the variability of spectral lines also decreases toward longer wavelengths. The long-term solar cycle SSI changes are closely, to within the quoted 0.1%-0.2% uncertainties, matched by the appropriately adjusted short-term SSI variations derived from the 27 day rotational modulation cycles. This further strengthens and broadens the prevailing notion about the general scalability of the UV SSI variability to the emissivity changes in the Mg II 280 nm doublet on timescales from weeks to years. We also detect subtle deviations from this general rule: the prominent spectral lines and blends at lambda approximately or greater than 350 nm show slightly more pronounced 27 day SSI changes when compared to the long-term (years) trends. We merge the solar data from Cycle 21 with the current Cycle 24 OMI and GOME-2 observations and provide normalized SSI variations for the 170-795 nm spectral region.

  18. Short- and mid-term oscillations of solar, geomagnetic activity and cosmic-ray intensity during the last two solar magnetic cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Y. P.; Badruddin

    2017-04-01

    Short-and mid-term oscillations of the solar activity (sunspot number and 10.7 cm solar flux), geomagnetic activity (Ap index) and cosmic-ray intensity (neutron monitor count rate) are analysed during the past two solar-magnetic cycles (1968-1989 and 1989-2014). We have implemented the wavelet analysis on the daily time resolution data of sunspot number (SSN), 10.7 cm solar flux, geomagnetic Ap index and Oulu neutron monitor count rate. Results suggest that few quasi and intermittent oscillations are observed with remarkable power density in addition to fundamental periods, like 27 day (synodic period), 154 day (Rieger period), semi-annual, annual, 1.3 year, and 1.7 year. We have consistently observed first (27 day), second (13.5 day) and third (9.0 day) solar-rotation harmonics in the geomagnetic Ap-index during both the magnetic cycles. Rieger period is more pronounced in SSN and solar flux during 1980-82 and 1990-92. Semi-annual variation of Ap-index is consistently observed during both the magnetic cycles. The annual and 1.85 year variation are also observed in all the considered parameters with good signatures in CRI.

  19. Space observations of the variability of solar irradiance in the near and far ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. F.

    1972-01-01

    Satellite observations of the ultraviolet solar irradiance in selected wavelength bands between 1200 and 3000 a were made continuously by photometers consisting of broad-band sensors operated on Numbus 3 and 4 which were launched in April 1969 and 1970. In addition, spectrophotometer measurements of the solar irradiance were made with a dispersive instrument at 12 selected wavelengths from 2550 to 3400 a with a 10 a bandpass on Nimbus 4. Variations of the solar irradiance associated with the solar rotational period were observed since the launch of Nimbus 3. These variations are apparently associated with two source regions separated by about 180 deg in solar longitude. The change in irradiance with solar rotation was found to increase with decreasing wavelengths. Different types of the observed variations in uv solar irradiance can be classified in accordance with characteristics times, e.g. in the order of increasing periods as follows: (1)flare associated enhancements (2) 27-day variations due to solar rotation; (3) a possible biennial effect; and (4) long term variations associated with the 11-year solar cycle.

  20. Observations of Oppositely Directed Umbral Wavefronts Rotating in Sunspots Obtained from the New Solar Telescope of BBSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J. T.; Ji, K. F.; Cao, W.; Banerjee, D.; Priya, T. G.; Zhao, J. S.; Bai, X. Y.; Chen, J.; Zhang, M.; Ji, H. S.

    2016-02-01

    We study the umbral waves as observed by chromospheric imaging observations of two sunspots with the New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. We find that the wavefronts (WFs) rotate clockwise and form a one-armed spiral structure in the first sunspot, whereas two- and three-armed structures arise in the second sunspot where the WFs rotate anticlockwise and clockwise alternately. All the spiral arms display propagation outwards and become running penumbral waves once they cross the umbral boundaries, suggesting that the umbral and penumbral waves propagate along the same inclined field lines. We propose that the one-armed spiral structure may be produced by the WF reflections at the chromospheric umbral light bridge, and the multi-armed spirals may be related to the twist of the magnetic field in the umbra. Additionally, the time lag of the umbral oscillations in between the data of He i 10830 Å and {{H}}α -0.4 Å is ∼17 s, and it is ∼60 s for that in between the data of 304 Å and {{H}}α -0.4 Å. This indicates that these disturbances are slow magnetoacoustic waves in nature, and that they propagate upward along the inclined lines with fast radial expansions causing horizontal velocities of the running waves.

  1. A general circulation model study of the effects of faster rotation rate, enhanced CO2 concentration, and reduced solar forcing: Implications for the faint young sun paradox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Gregory S.

    1993-01-01

    Solar energy at the top of the atmosphere (solar constant), rotation rate, and carbon dioxide (CO2) may have varied significantly over Earth's history, especially during the earliest times. The sensitivity of a general circulation model to faster rotation, enhanced CO2 concentration, and reduced solar constant is presented. The control simulation of this study has a solar constant reduced by 10% the present amount, zero land fraction using a swamp ocean surface, CO2 concentrations of 330 ppmv, present-day rotation rate, and is integrated under mean diurnal and seasonal solar forcing. Four sensitivity test are performed under zero land fraction and reduced solar constant conditions by varying the earth's rotation rate atmospheric CO2 concentration and solar constant. The global mean sea surface temperatures (SSTs) compared to the control simulation: were 6.6 K to 12 K higher than the control's global mean temperature of 264.7 K. Sea ice is confined to higher latitudes in each experiment compared to the control, with ice-free areas equatorward of the subtropics. The warm SSTs are associated with a 20% reduction in clouds for the rotation rate experiments and higher CO2 concentrations in the other experiments. These results are in contrast to previous studies that have used energy balance and radiative convective models. Previous studies required a much larger atmospheric CO2 increase to prevent an ice-covered Earth. The results of the study, suggest that because of its possible feedback with clouds, the general circulation of the atmosphere should be taken into account in understanding the climate of early Earth. While higher CO2 concentrations are likely in view of the results, very large atmospheric CO2 concentrations may not be necessary to counterbalance the lower solar constant that existed early in Earth's history.

  2. Coronal Radio Occultation Experiments with the Helios Solar Probes: Correlation/Spectral Analysis of Faraday Rotation Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, A. I.; Lukanina, L. A.; Rogashkova, A. I.; Samoznaev, L. N.; Chashei, I. V.; Bird, M. K.; Pätzold, M.

    2015-09-01

    The coronal Faraday rotation (FR) experiments using the linearly polarized signals of the Helios-1 and Helios-2 interplanetary probes remain a unique investigation of the magnetic field of the solar corona and its aperiodic and quasi-periodic variations. The unexpectedly long lifetime of these spacecraft (1974 - 1986) enabled studies from very deep solar-activity minimum (1975 - 1976) into the strong activity maximum (1979). Important experimental data were also obtained for the rising (1977 - 1978) and declining (1980 - 1984) branches of the solar-activity cycle. Previous publications have presented results of the initial experimental data only for coronal-sounding experiments performed during individual solar-conjunction opportunities. This report is a more detailed analysis of the Helios FR measurements for the entire period 1975 - 1984. Radial profiles of the FR fluctuation (FRF) intensity recorded during the deepest solar-activity minimum in 1975 - 1976 are shown to differ distinctly from those during the strong solar-activity maximum in 1979. In particular, the decrease of the FRF intensity with solar-offset distance is substantially steeper in 1979 than in 1975/1976. In all cases, however, the FR data reveal quasi-periodic wave-like fluctuations in addition to the random background with a power-law spectrum. The dominant period of these fluctuations, recorded during 35 % of the total measurement time, is found to be close to five minutes. Large-scale FR variations at considerably longer periods (1.1 - 2.7 hours) were observed during 20 % of the measurement time. Knowing the intrinsic motion of the radio ray path from spacecraft to Earth and making a reasonable assumption about the solar-wind velocity, FRF observations at widely spaced ground stations have been used to estimate the velocity of coronal Alfvén waves. The velocity values range between 290 and 550 km s-1 at heliocentric distances between 3.5 and 4.5 R⊙ and are marginally lower (150 - 450 km s

  3. Rotation-Activity-Age Relations For Solar-Type And Cooler Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basri, Gibor

    2016-08-01

    The fact that stellar rotation and chromospheric emission are correlated with age was explicitly noted by Wilson (1963) and reinforced by Kraft (1967). Wilson knew that Ca II emission was correlated with surface magnetic field in the Sun. Skumanich (1972) suggested a simple functional for the age-activity relation, and suggested that magnetic braking was the likely reason for the decline in activity. A theory for the rotation-activity connection was elucidated by Noyes et al. (1984), who invoked the Rossby number as important to the stellar dynamo. This calibrated the relation by convection zone depth and turnover time, although it was noted early and recently confirmed that it is not clear whether Rossby number is empirically superior to the rotation period itself in producing a clear rotation-activity relation. In fact, turnover times are hard to properly define, and the Rossby number is itself calibrated to tighten the relations. The number of stars in samples used to study this has increased dramatically, as have the diagnostics available to assess magnetic activity. It remains clear is that there is a strong relationship between magnetic activity and stellar rotation, and that magnetic braking forces both activity and rotation to decrease with age. These relations are also subject to modification as a function of stellar mass. There has recently been a great increase in the number of measured stellar rotation periods, and in the calibration of these relations using star clusters (whose ages can be independently assessed). I will summarize some of the ongoing progress on this topic.

  4. The cool component and the dichotomy, lateral expansion, and axial rotation of solar X-ray jets

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.; Robe, Dominic

    2013-06-01

    We present results from a study of 54 polar X-ray jets that were observed in coronal X-ray movies from the X-ray Telescope on Hinode and had simultaneous coverage in movies of the cooler transition region (T ∼ 10{sup 5} K) taken in the He II 304 Å band of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on Solar Dynamics Observatory. These dual observations verify the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of polar X-ray jets previously found primarily from XRT movies alone. In accord with models of blowout jets and standard jets, the AIA 304 Å movies show a cool (T ∼ 10{sup 5} K) component in nearly all blowout X-ray jets and in a small minority of standard X-ray jets, obvious lateral expansion in blowout X-ray jets but none in standard X-ray jets, and obvious axial rotation in both blowout X-ray jets and standard X-ray jets. In our sample, the number of turns of axial rotation in the cool-component standard X-ray jets is typical of that in the blowout X-ray jets, suggesting that the closed bipolar magnetic field in the jet base has substantial twist not only in all blowout X-ray jets but also in many standard X-ray jets. We point out that our results for the dichotomy, lateral expansion, and axial rotation of X-ray jets add credence to published speculation that type-II spicules are miniature analogs of X-ray jets, are generated by granule-size emerging bipoles, and thereby carry enough energy to power the corona and solar wind.

  5. A SOLAR TORNADO OBSERVED BY AIA/SDO: ROTATIONAL FLOW AND EVOLUTION OF MAGNETIC HELICITY IN A PROMINENCE AND CAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xing; Morgan, Huw; Leonard, Drew; Jeska, Lauren

    2012-06-20

    During 2011 September 24, as observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument of the Solar Dynamic Observatory and ground-based H{alpha} telescopes, a prominence and associated cavity appeared above the southwest limb. On 2011 September 25 8:00 UT, material flows upward from the prominence core along a narrow loop-like structure, accompanied by a rise ({>=}50,000 km) of the prominence core and the loop. As the loop fades by 10:00, small blobs and streaks of varying brightness rotate around the top part of the prominence and cavity, mimicking a cyclone. The most intense and coherent rotation lasts for over three hours, with emission in both hot ({approx}1 MK) and cold (hydrogen and helium) lines. We suggest that the cyclonic appearance and overall evolution of the structure can be interpreted in terms of the expansion of helical structures into the cavity, and the movement of plasma along helical structures which appears as a rotation when viewed along the helix axis. The coordinated movement of material between prominence and cavity suggests that they are structurally linked. Complexity is great due to the combined effect of these actions and the line-of-sight integration through the structure which contains tangled fields.

  6. Effect of solar activity on the repetitiveness of some meteorological phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorović, Nedeljko; Vujović, Dragana

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we research the relationship between solar activity and the weather on Earth. This research is based on the assumption that every ejection of magnetic field energy and particles from the Sun (also known as Solar wind) has direct effects on the Earth's weather. The impact of coronal holes and active regions on cold air advection (cold fronts, precipitation, and temperature decrease on the surface and higher layers) in the Belgrade region (Serbia) was analyzed. Some active regions and coronal holes appear to be in a geo-effective position nearly every 27 days, which is the duration of a solar rotation. A similar period of repetitiveness (27-29 days) of the passage of the cold front, and maximum and minimum temperatures measured at surface and at levels of 850 and 500 hPa were detected. We found that 10-12 days after Solar wind velocity starts significantly increasing, we could expect the passage of a cold front. After eight days, the maximum temperatures in the Belgrade region are measured, and it was found that their minimum values appear after 12-16 days. The maximum amount of precipitation occurs 14 days after Solar wind is observed. A recurring period of nearly 27 days of different phases of development for hurricanes Katrina, Rita and Wilma was found. This analysis confirmed that the intervals of time between two occurrences of some particular meteorological parameter correlate well with Solar wind and A index.

  7. Limitation of Ground-based Estimates of Solar Irradiance Due to Atmospheric Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Guoyong; Cahalan, Robert F.; Holben, Brent N.

    2003-01-01

    The uncertainty in ground-based estimates of solar irradiance is quantitatively related to the temporal variability of the atmosphere's optical thickness. The upper and lower bounds of the accuracy of estimates using the Langley Plot technique are proportional to the standard deviation of aerosol optical thickness (approx. +/- 13 sigma(delta tau)). The estimates of spectral solar irradiance (SSI) in two Cimel sun photometer channels from the Mauna Loa site of AERONET are compared with satellite observations from SOLSTICE (Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment) on UARS (Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite) for almost two years of data. The true solar variations related to the 27-day solar rotation cycle observed from SOLSTICE are about 0.15% at the two sun photometer channels. The variability in ground-based estimates is statistically one order of magnitude larger. Even though about 30% of these estimates from all Level 2.0 Cimel data fall within the 0.4 to approx. 0.5% variation level, ground-based estimates are not able to capture the 27-day solar variation observed from SOLSTICE.

  8. Sunspot Rotation as a Driver of Major Solar Eruptions in the NOAA Active Region 12158

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemareddy, P.; Cheng, X.; Ravindra, B.

    2016-09-01

    We studied the development conditions of sigmoid structure under the influence of the magnetic non-potential characteristics of a rotating sunspot in the active region (AR) 12158. Vector magnetic field measurements from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager and coronal EUV observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly reveal that the erupting inverse-S sigmoid had roots at the location of the rotating sunspot. The sunspot rotates at a rate of 0°-5° h-1 with increasing trend in the first half followed by a decrease. The time evolution of many non-potential parameters had a good correspondence with the sunspot rotation. The evolution of the AR magnetic structure is approximated by a time series of force-free equilibria. The non-linear force-free field magnetic structure around the sunspot manifests the observed sigmoid structure. Field lines from the sunspot periphery constitute the body of the sigmoid and those from the interior overlie the sigmoid, similar to a flux rope structure. While the sunspot was rotating, two major coronal mass ejection eruptions occurred in the AR. During the first (second) event, the coronal current concentrations were enhanced (degraded), consistent with the photospheric net vertical current; however, magnetic energy was released during both cases. The analysis results suggest that the magnetic connections of the sigmoid are driven by the slow motion of sunspot rotation, which transforms to a highly twisted flux rope structure in a dynamical scenario. Exceeding the critical twist in the flux rope probably leads to the loss of equilibrium, thus triggering the onset of the two eruptions.

  9. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Southwest Solar Research Park (Formerly SolarCAT) Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Phoenix, Arizona (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-09-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  10. Spectroscopic parameters for solar-type stars with moderate-to-high rotation. New parameters for ten planet hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsantaki, M.; Sousa, S. G.; Santos, N. C.; Montalto, M.; Delgado-Mena, E.; Mortier, A.; Adibekyan, V.; Israelian, G.

    2014-10-01

    Context. Planetary studies demand precise and accurate stellar parameters as input for inferring the planetary properties. Different methods often provide different results that could lead to biases in the planetary parameters. Aims: In this work, we present a refinement of the spectral synthesis technique designed to treat fast rotating stars better. This method is used to derive precise stellar parameters, namely effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and rotational velocity. The procedure is tested for FGK stars with low and moderate-to-high rotation rates. Methods: The spectroscopic analysis is based on the spectral synthesis package Spectroscopy Made Easy (SME), which assumes Kurucz model atmospheres in LTE. The line list where the synthesis is conducted is comprised of iron lines, and the atomic data are derived after solar calibration. Results: The comparison of our stellar parameters shows good agreement with literature values, both for slowly and for fast rotating stars. In addition, our results are on the same scale as the parameters derived from the iron ionization and excitation method presented in our previous works. We present new atmospheric parameters for 10 transiting planet hosts as an update to the SWEET-Cat catalog. We also re-analyze their transit light curves to derive new updated planetary properties. Based on observations collected at the La Silla Observatory, ESO (Chile) with the FEROS spectrograph at the 2.2 m telescope (ESO runs ID 089.C-0444(A), 088.C-0892(A)) and with the HARPS spectrograph at the 3.6 m telescope (ESO runs ID 072.C-0488(E), 079.C-0127(A)); at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP, CNRS/OAMP), France, with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the 1.93 m telescope and at the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées (CNRS), France, with the NARVAL spectrograph at the 2 m Bernard Lyot Telescope (Run ID L131N11).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. SOLAR MAGNETIZED TORNADOES: ROTATIONAL MOTION IN A TORNADO-LIKE PROMINENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Yang; Veronig, Astrid; Temmer, Manuela; Vanninathan, Kamalam; Gömöry, Peter; Wang, Tongjiang; Gan, Weiqun; Li, YouPing

    2014-04-10

    Su et al. proposed a new explanation for filament formation and eruption, where filament barbs are rotating magnetic structures driven by underlying vortices on the surface. Such structures have been noticed as tornado-like prominences when they appear above the limb. They may play a key role as the source of plasma and twist in filaments. However, no observations have successfully distinguished rotational motion of the magnetic structures in tornado-like prominences from other motions such as oscillation and counter-streaming plasma flows. Here we report evidence of rotational motions in a tornado-like prominence. The spectroscopic observations in two coronal lines were obtained from a specifically designed Hinode/EIS observing program. The data revealed the existence of both cold and million-degree-hot plasma in the prominence leg, supporting the so-called prominence-corona transition region. The opposite velocities at the two sides of the prominence and their persistent time evolution, together with the periodic motions evident in SDO/AIA dark structures, indicate a rotational motion of both cold and hot plasma with a speed of ∼5 km s{sup –1}.

  12. Vibration measurements of the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope mount, Coudé rotator, and enclosure assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, William R.; McBride, Daniel R.

    2016-08-01

    The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) will be the largest solar telescope in the world, with a 4-meter off-axis primary mirror and 16 meter rotating Coudé laboratory within the telescope pier. The off-axis design requires a mount similar to an 8-meter on-axis telescope. Both the telescope mount and the Coudé laboratory utilize a roller bearing technology in place of the more commonly used hydrostatic bearings. The telescope enclosure utilizes a crawler mechanism for the altitude axis. As these mechanisms have not previously been used in a telescope, understanding the vibration characteristics and the potential impact on the telescope image is important. This paper presents the methodology used to perform jitter measurements of the enclosure and the mount bearings and servo system in a high-noise environment utilizing seismic accelerometers and high dynamic-range data acquisition equipment, along with digital signal processing (DSP) techniques. Data acquisition and signal processing were implemented in MATLAB. In the factory acceptance testing of the telescope mount, multiple accelerometers were strategically located to capture the six axes-of-motion of the primary and secondary mirror dummies. The optical sensitivity analysis was used to map these mirror mount displacements and rotations into units of image motion on the focal plane. Similarly, tests were done with the Coudé rotator, treating the entire rotating instrument lab as a rigid body. Testing was performed by recording accelerometer data while the telescope control system performed tracking operations typical of various observing scenarios. The analysis of the accelerometer data utilized noise-averaging fast Fourier transform (FFT) routines, spectrograms, and periodograms. To achieve adequate dynamic range at frequencies as low as 3Hz, the use of special filters and advanced windowing functions were necessary. Numerous identical automated tests were compared to identify and select the data sets

  13. Solar rotation measurements at Mount Wilson. I - Analysis and instrumental effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R.; Boyden, J. E.; Labonte, B. J.

    1980-01-01

    We examine the background velocity fields of the sun as observed at Mount Wilson. The method of velocity reduction of the full-disk Mount Wilson data is outlined. We describe a number of tests that have been carried out in order to find an instrumental origin for short-term rotation variations and a large-scale background line-shift - the ears. No instrumental cause can be found for this ear effect, although such a cause cannot yet be ruled out.

  14. Precise spectroscopic parameters for solar-type stars with moderate-to-high rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsantaki, M.; Sousa, S.; Santos, N. C.; Montalto, M.

    2014-07-01

    One of the primary objectives of Gaia is to survey billions stars and build the most precise 3D map of the Milky Way. Automated techniques of spectral analysis are needed to perform a rapid and homogeneous processing of the data to provide precise and accurate stellar parameters, such as for the GAIA-ESO survey. In this context, our recent work is based on the spectral synthesis technique to derive parameters for both slowly and fast rotating stars (Tsantaki et al. 2014). The spectroscopic analysis was performed using the package Spectroscopy Made Easy (SME; Valenti & Piskunov 1996) and a specific methodology to deal with fast rotators (υsini up to 50 km/s). The spectral regions, including the atomic data of all the lines in our analysis are available online in SME readable format http://mariatsantaki.weebly.com;. A comparison between the parameters derived with our methodology and with the iron ionization and excitation method (e.g. Sousa et al. 2008; Tsantaki et al. 2013) shows that both results are on the same scale. Additionally, for fast rotating stars, our results are in good agreement with literature values when comparing to other methods. We are now able to provide parameters for a very wide group of stars: from giants to dwarfs and from slowly to fast rotating stars. Except for galactic studies, stellar parameters are important for the planetary characterization. We provided updated stellar and planetary properties for ten systems. The stellar parameters were compiled in the SWEET-Catalogue (https://www.astro.up.pt/resources/sweet-cat/).

  15. The Solar Rotation in the Period 1853 - 1870 from the Sunspot Catalogues of Carrington, Peters, and de la Rue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, R.; Vaquero, J. M.

    2015-08-01

    R.C. Carrington, C.H.F. Peters, and W. de la Rue observed the sunspots in the second half of the nineteenth century, determining their heliographic positions between 1853 and 1870, before the solar program of the Royal Greenwich Observatory was established. The large tables of sunspot positions included in the catalogues published by these observers have recently been converted into a machine-readable format. The present work analyses these data by calculating the sunspot group velocities for each observer. The results are then fitted with a differential-rotation law to compare the data of the three observers with each other and with the results published by others. Finally, we study the possible relationship between the sunspot-group areas as determined by de la Rue and the corresponding sunspot-group velocities.

  16. The 27 day solar rotational effect on mesospheric nighttime OH and O3 observations induced by geomagnetic activity.

    PubMed

    Fytterer, T; Santee, M L; Sinnhuber, M; Wang, S

    2015-09-01

    Observations performed by the Earth Observing System Microwave Limb Sounder instrument on board the Aura satellite from 2004 to 2009 (2004 to 2014) were used to investigate the 27 day solar rotational cycle in mesospheric OH (O3) and the physical connection to geomagnetic activity. Data analysis was focused on nighttime measurements at geomagnetic latitudes connected to the outer radiation belts (55°N/S-75°N/S). The applied superposed epoch analysis reveals a distinct 27 day solar rotational signal in OH and O3 during winter in both hemispheres at altitudes >70 km. The OH response is positive and in-phase with the respective geomagnetic activity signal, lasting for 1-2 days. In contrast, the O3 feedback is negative, delayed by 1 day, and is present up to 4 days afterward. Largest OH (O3) peaks are found at ~75 km, exceeding the 95% significance level and the measurement noise of <2% (<0.5%), while reaching variations of +14% (-7%) with respect to their corresponding background. OH at 75 km is observed to respond to particle precipitation only after a certain threshold of geomagnetic activity is exceeded, depending on the respective OH background. The relation between OH and O3 at 75 km in both hemispheres is found to be nonlinear. In particular, OH has a strong impact on O3 for relatively weak geomagnetic disturbances and accompanying small absolute OH variations (<0.04 ppb). In contrast, catalytic O3 depletion is seen to slow down for stronger geomagnetic variations and OH anomalies (0.04-0.13 ppb), revealing small variations around -0.11 ppm.

  17. Gravity, Rotation, Ages, and Magnetism of Solar-like Stars and Red Giants observed by Kepler and K2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Savita

    Scientific Objectives: Asteroseismology has proved to be a very powerful tool thanks to the high-precision data obtained by the space missions such as Kepler and CoRoT. Solar-like oscillations have been detected and reported for around 15,600 red giants and 540 main-sequence stars observed by the nominal Kepler mission. Hence, these stars have their surface gravities, masses, and radii obtained with seismology. However, according to the latest Kepler star properties catalog (Mathur et al., in prep.) more than 24,000 red giants, 127,000 FGK dwarfs, and 10,000 subgiants were targeted. K2 has been observing 90,000 red giants and dwarfs. Moreover, the continuous photometric data of 4 yrs (resp. 3 mo) collected by Kepler (resp. K2) contain the signature of other phenomena such as convection, rotation, and magnetism, which are very important to understand stellar evolution and can also be used to obtain precise fundamental stellar parameters even when pulsations are not detected. We propose to perform the largest homogeneous analysis to date of seismic oscillations, convection, and rotation/magnetic activity across the full range of stellar spectral types and evolutionary states present in the K2 and Kepler missions. We will use the longest publicly available time series to derive the most accurate surface gravities, rotation periods, evolutionary states, and magnetic activity levels to characterize rotation-age-magnetic activity relationships and oscillations-magnetism interaction. Relevance: The determination of the gravity, mass, radius, and age of planet host stars allow us to better characterize the planetary systems. By studying the stellar surface rotation periods, we can better understand the angular momentum transport involved during the stellar evolution and have more accurate rotation-age relationships. Finally, the study of the magnetic activity of a large number of stars will allow us to put the Sun in a broader context. This work will also have an impact on

  18. Solar rotation measurements at Mount Wilson. III - Meridional flow and limbshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labonte, B. J.; Howard, R.

    1982-01-01

    It is shown that the use of a two-parameter limbshift and a meridional flow velocity fits solar velocity data better than the standard analysis defined by Howard et al. (1980). The data used are the coarse residual velocity arrays, with 34 equal intervals in both sine latitude and sine longitude. There are a total of 2899 full-disk observations between January 1, 1967, and December 12, 1980. The original velocity fields are reconstructed by adding into the residual arrays the large-scale patterns that were measured and removed on a daily basis by a standard reduction. Tests of this reconstituded data set show that no significant errors are introduced in the analysis of large-scale velocity fields. The results of the analysis presented here imply that the study of solar velocity pattern at the level of a few m/s requires that magnetic regions be treated separately from nonmagnetic regions.

  19. Solar rotation measurements at Mount Wilson. V - Reanalysis of 21 years of data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, Roger K.; Boyden, John E.; Webster, Larry; Padilla, Steven P.; Snodgrass, Herschel B.

    1988-01-01

    The procedure for reducing the data acquired during the Mt. Wilson Observatory synoptic program is described, and a program for acquiring as many scans per day as possible of the solar magnetic and velocity fields is discussed. A fitting formula which removes the background velocity field from each scan has been derived. It is suggested that the difference between the limb shift along the north-south axis and the east-west axis may be due to the meridional circulation.

  20. Three-component model of the variability of the solar ultraviolet flux: 145--200 nM

    SciTech Connect

    Lean, J.L; White, O.R.; Livingston, W.C.; Heath, D.F.; Donnelly, R.F.; Skumanich, A.

    1982-12-01

    A three-component model has been developed to examine the variation with solar activity of the far ultraviolet irradiance between 145 and 200 nm. This model is based on spatially resolved observations of the Call K chromosphere and includes the contributions to the full disk flux from both plage and active network emission. The 27-day modulation of the ultraviolet flux is explained by the evolution and rotation of the plage regions on the solar disc. Over the longer time scale of the eleven-year cycle it is essential that changes in the active network arising from the decay of plage regions also be solar flux is it possible to simultaneously reproduce the 27-day variability observed by the solar backscatter ultraviolet experiment on the Nimbus 7 satellite and the changes from the minimum to the maximum of the solar activity cycle observed by the rocket experiments of the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics and by the extreme ultraviolet spectrometer on the Atmospheric Explorer E satellite. It is shown that the AE-E experiment measured a smaller solar cycle variability for the ultraviolet irradiances than is predicted by the model calculations because of the spatially restricted field of view of this instrument.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Differential rotation in solar-like stars (Distefano+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Distefano, E.; Lanzafame., A. C.; Lanza, A. F.; Messina, S.; Spada, F.

    2016-04-01

    The average rotation period, the parameters ωmin ωmax, ΔΩphot and alphaphot are reported for 111 late-type stars belonging to loose young stellar associations. For each target, the main physical parameters are also reported. The Spectral types, the photometric data and the distances are taken by previous works. The masses, the effective temperatures and the convective turn-over time-scales have been inferred by comparing absolute magnitudes with different sets of theoretical isochrones. (4 data files).

  2. Revisiting a possible relationship between solar activity and Earth rotation variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarca del Rio, R.; Gambis, D.

    2011-10-01

    A variety of studies have searched to establish a possible relationship between the solar activity and earth variations (Danjon, 1958-1962; Challinor, 1971; Currie, 1980, Gambis, 1990). We are revisiting previous studies (Bourget et al, 1992, Abarca del Rio et al, 2003, Marris et al, 2004) concerning the possible relationship between solar activity variability and length of day (LOD) variations at decadal time scales. Assuming that changes in AAM for the entire atmosphere are accompanied by equal, but opposite, changes in the angular momentum of the earth it is possible to infer changes in LOD from global AAM time series, through the relation : delta (LOD) (ms) = 1.68 10^29 delta(AAM) (kgm2/s) (Rosen and Salstein, 1983), where δ(LOD) is given in milliseconds. Given the close relationship at seasonal to interannual time's scales between LOD and the Atmospheric Angular Momentum (AAM) (see Abarca del Rio et al., 2003) it is possible to infer from century long atmospheric simulations what may have been the variability in the associated LOD variability throughout the last century. In the absence of a homogeneous century long LOD time series, we take advantage of the recent atmospheric reanalyzes extending since 1871 (Compo, Whitaker and Sardeshmukh, 2006). The atmospheric data (winds) of these reanalyzes allow computing AAM up to the top of the atmosphere; though here only troposphere data (up to 100 hPa) was taken into account.

  3. Sun-Relative Pointing for Dual-Axis Solar Trackers Employing Azimuth and Elevation Rotations

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Daniel; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2014-12-30

    Dual axis trackers employing azimuth and elevation rotations are common in the field of photovoltaic (PV) energy generation. Accurate sun-tracking algorithms are widely available. However, a steering algorithm has not been available to accurately point the tracker away from the sun such that a vector projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face falls along a desired path relative to the tracker face. We have developed an algorithm which produces the appropriate azimuth and elevation angles for a dual axis tracker when given the sun position, desired angle of incidence, and the desired projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face. Development of this algorithm was inspired by the need to accurately steer a tracker to desired sun-relative positions in order to better characterize the electro-optical properties of PV and CPV modules.

  4. The structure of the solar wind in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Christina On-Yee

    2010-12-01

    This dissertation is devoted to expanding our understanding of the solar wind structure in the inner heliosphere and variations therein with solar activity. Using spacecraft observations and numerical models, the origins of the large-scale structures and long-term trends of the solar wind are explored in order to gain insights on how our Sun determines the space environments of the terrestrial planets. I use long term measurements of the solar wind density, velocity, interplanetary magnetic field, and particles, together with models based on solar magnetic field data, to generate time series of these properties that span one solar rotation27 days). From these time series, I assemble and obtain the synoptic overviews of the solar wind properties. The resulting synoptic overviews show that the solar wind around Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars is a complex co-rotating structure with recurring features and occasional transients. During quiet solar conditions, the heliospheric current sheet, which separates the positive interplanetary magnetic field from the negative, usually has a remarkably steady two- or four-sector structure that persists for many solar rotations. Within the sector boundaries are the slow and fast speed solar wind streams that originate from the open coronal magnetic field sources that map to the ecliptic. At the sector boundaries, compressed high-density and the related high-dynamic pressure ridges form where streams from different coronal source regions interact. High fluxes of energetic particles also occur at the boundaries, and are seen most prominently during the quiet solar period. The existence of these recurring features depends on how long-lived are their source regions. In the last decade, 3D numerical solar wind models have become more widely available. They provide important scientific tools for obtaining a more global view of the inner heliosphere and of the relationships between conditions at Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars. When

  5. ROTATING SOLAR JETS IN SIMULATIONS OF FLUX EMERGENCE WITH THERMAL CONDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Fang; Fan, Yuhong; McIntosh, Scott W.

    2014-07-01

    We study the formation of coronal jets through numerical simulation of the emergence of a twisted magnetic flux rope into a pre-existing open magnetic field. Reconnection inside the emerging flux rope in addition to that between the emerging and pre-existing fields give rise to the violent eruption studied. The simulated event closely resembles the coronal jets ubiquitously observed by the X-Ray Telescope on board Hinode and demonstrates that heated plasma is driven into the extended atmosphere above. Thermal conduction implemented in the model allows us to qualitatively compare simulated and observed emission from such events. We find that untwisting field lines after the reconnection drive spinning outflows of plasma in the jet column. The Poynting flux in the simulated jet is dominated by the untwisting motions of the magnetic fields loaded with high-density plasma. The simulated jet is comprised of ''spires'' of untwisting field that are loaded with a mixture of cold and hot plasma and exhibit rotational motion of order 20 km s{sup –1} and match contemporary observations.

  6. SUPERFLARES ON SOLAR-TYPE STARS OBSERVED WITH KEPLER II. PHOTOMETRIC VARIABILITY OF SUPERFLARE-GENERATING STARS: A SIGNATURE OF STELLAR ROTATION AND STARSPOTS

    SciTech Connect

    Notsu, Yuta; Shibayama, Takuya; Notsu, Shota; Nagao, Takashi; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Honda, Satoshi; Ishii, Takako T.; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2013-07-10

    We performed simple spot-model calculations for quasi-periodic brightness variations of solar-type stars showing superflares using Kepler photometric data. Most of the superflare stars show quasi-periodic brightness modulations with a typical period of one to a few tens of days. Our results indicate that these brightness variations can be explained by the rotation of a star with fairly large starspots. Using the results of the period analysis, we investigated the relation between the energy and frequency of superflares and the rotation period. Stars with relatively slower rotation rates can still produce flares that are as energetic as those of more rapidly rotating stars although the average flare frequency is lower for more slowly rotating stars. We found that the energy of superflares is related to the total coverage of the starspot. The correlation between the spot coverage and the flare energy in superflares is similar to that in solar flares. These results suggest that the energy of superflares can be explained by the magnetic energy stored around the starspots.

  7. Measuring rotation periods of solar-like stars using TIGRE. A study of periodic CaII H+K S-index variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hempelmann, A.; Mittag, M.; Gonzalez-Perez, J. N.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Schröder, K. P.; Rauw, G.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The rotation period of a star is a key parameter both for the stellar dynamo that generates magnetic fields as well as for stellar differential rotation. Aims: We present the results from the first year of monitoring a sample of solar-like stars by the TIGRE facility in Guanajuato (Mexico), which will study rotation in solar analogs. Methods: TIGRE is an automatically operating 1.2 m telescope equipped with an Échelle spectrograph with a spectral resolution of 20 000, which covers a spectral range of between 3800 and 8800 Å. A main task is the monitoring the stellar activity of cool stars, mainly in the emission cores of the CaII H and K lines. We observed a number of stars with a sampling between 1-3 days over one year. Results: A total number of 95 stars were observed between August 1 2013 and July 31 2014, the total number of spectra taken for this program was appoximately 2700. For almost a third of the sample stars the number of observations was rather low (less than 20), mainly because of bad weather. Fifty-four stars show a periodic signal but often with low significance. Only 24 stars exhibit a significant period. We interpret these signals as stellar rotation. For about half of them the rotation periods were already previously known, in which case our period measurements are usually in good agreement with the literature values. Besides the periodic signals, trends are frequently observed in the time series. Conclusions: TIGRE is obviously able to detect stellar rotation periods in the CaII H+K emission cores when the time series contains a sufficient number of data points. However, this is frequently not achievable during the wet summer season in Guanajuato. Hence, future estimates of rotation periods will concentrate on stars that are observable during the winter season from October until April.

  8. Solar spectral irradiance variation and its impact on earth's atmosphere as observed by SCIAMACHY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, M.; Pagaran, J.; Burrows, J. P.; Dikty, S.; von Savigny, C.; DeLand, M. T.; Floyd, L. E.; Harder, J. W.; Langematz, U.

    2011-12-01

    SCIAMACHY is a UV/vis/NIR spectrometer aboard ENVISAT which provides routine observations of ozone and other trace gases in the earth's atmosphere since 2002. Ozone profile data are provided from limb, lunar, and solar occultation observations, while the nadir viewing geometry allows measurements of total ozone columns. For normalizing observed backscattered earth radiances for trace gas retrievals, daily measurements of solar irradiance at moderately high spectral resolution (<1.5 nm) from 230 nm to 2400 nm, with some gaps in the NIR, are made. From the solar observations a Mg II index can be derived that in combination with other satellite data becomes a useful solar UV activity proxy indicator during the satellite era (since 1978). Using solar proxies for faculae brightening and sunspot darkening fitted to SCIAMACHY irradiance time-series a SCIA proxy model has been derived that allows us to describe solar cycle irradiance changes covering several decades. This talk will present highlights from SCIAMACHY solar observations, comparisons with other satellite data, and presents results on solar influence on ozone, i. e. 27 day solar rotation signal in the upper stratosphere and solar cycle effects on polar ozone losses.

  9. Estimating the Global Solar Magnetic Field Distribution Using ADAPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arge, C. N.; Henney, C. J.; Toussaint, W. A.; Godinez, H. C.; Hickmann, K. S.

    2014-12-01

    Estimation of the global solar photospheric magnetic field distribution is currently difficult, since only approximately half of the solar surface is magnetically observed at any given time. With the solar rotational period relative to Earth at approximately 27 days, these global maps include observed data that are more than 13 days old. Data assimilation between old and new observations can result in spatial polarity discontinuities that result in significant monopole signals. To help minimize these large discontinuities and to specify the global state of the photospheric magnetic flux distribution as accurately as possible, we have developed the ADAPT (Air Force Data Assimilative Photospheric flux Transport) model, which is comprised of a photospheric magnetic flux transport model that makes use of data assimilation methods. The ADAPT transport model evolves the solar magnetic flux for an ensemble of realizations using different model parameter values, e.g., for rotational, meridional, and super-granular diffusive transport processes. In this presentation, the ADAPT model and the data assimilative methods used within it will be reviewed. Coronal, solar wind, F10.7, and EUV model predictions based on ADAPT global photospheric magnetic field maps as input will be discussed.

  10. Solar variability for periods of days to months

    SciTech Connect

    Froehlich, C.

    1984-01-01

    The time series of total solar-irradiance determinations from ACRIM on the solar maximum mission satellite of 270 days and from the ERB experiment on NIMBUS 7 of 1445 days are analyzed for periods greater than a few days. Comparison of the spectra of both with the spectrum of projected sunspot area over the corresponding time periods show high coherence for periods of 7 to about 25 days and for periods longer than about 30 to 35 days. In the vicinity and at the 27-day rotational period of the sun, however, the coherence between sunspot area and irradiance is small, although both spectra show significant power at and around this period. This means that there is a signal in the irradiance which cannot be due to the sunspot area and the assumption of a straight-forward sunspot blocking seems to be over simplified. This irradiance signal at 27 days has an amplitude of about + or - 0.012 per cent and is an enhancement. 9 references.

  11. THE EMERGENCE OF A TWISTED FLUX TUBE INTO THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE: SUNSPOT ROTATIONS AND THE FORMATION OF A CORONAL FLUX ROPE

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Y.

    2009-06-01

    We present a three-dimensional simulation of the dynamic emergence of a twisted magnetic flux tube from the top layer of the solar convection zone into the solar atmosphere and corona. It is found that after a brief initial stage of flux emergence during which the two polarities of the bipolar region become separated and the tubes intersecting the photosphere become vertical, significant rotational motion sets in within each polarity. The rotational motions of the two polarities are found to twist up the inner field lines of the emerged fields such that they change their orientation into an inverse configuration (i.e., pointing from the negative polarity to the positive polarity over the neutral line). As a result, a flux rope with sigmoid-shaped, dipped core fields forms in the corona, and the center of the flux rope rises in the corona with increasing velocity as the twisting of the flux rope footpoints continues. The rotational motion in the two polarities is a result of propagation of nonlinear torsional Alfven waves along the flux tube, which transports significant twist from the tube's interior portion toward its expanded coronal portion. This is a basic process whereby twisted flux ropes are developed in the corona with increasing twist and magnetic energy, leading up to solar eruptions.

  12. One common structural peculiarity of the Solar system bodies including the star, planets, satellites and resulting from their globes rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, , G. G.

    2008-09-01

    be less dense diminishing its angular momentum. A crosscutting wave rippling producing chains of square craters here is also clearly visible. Sun presents a special case because its equatorial region rotates faster than the higher latitudes. It could be attributed to an important loss of angular momentum by this region during formation of planets (significant transfer of momentum to the planetary system) and its compensation according to the Le Chatelier rule by the faster rotation. But, in turn, this faster rotation causes an intensive destruction of this region in tendency to keep " status quo". The photosphere is "perforated" by darker colder spots deep up to 300 (maybe more?) km - famous solar spots long to 200000 km and smaller pores (Fig. 7). In the chromosphere there is a remarkable loss of "heavy" Ca ion from this region (compare with the loss of methane from the equatorial region of Saturn). Under more close inspection of other planetary bodies this uniform separation of tropical and extra-tropical zones should be discovered.

  13. Internal rotation of the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Dziembowski, W. A.; Goode, P. R.; Gough, D. O.; Harvey, J. W.; Leibacher, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The frequency difference between prograde and retrograde sectoral solar oscillations is analyzed to determine the rotation rate of the solar interior, assuming no latitudinal dependence. Much of the solar interior rotates slightly less rapidly than the surface, while the innermost part apparently rotates more rapidly. The resulting solar gravitational quadrupole moment is J2 = (1.7 + or - 0.4) x 10 to the -7th and provides a negligible contribution to current planetary tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity.

  14. THREE-DIMENSIONAL FEATURES OF THE OUTER HELIOSPHERE DUE TO COUPLING BETWEEN THE INTERSTELLAR AND INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELDS. III. THE EFFECTS OF SOLAR ROTATION AND ACTIVITY CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Borovikov, Sergey N.; Zank, Gary P.; Ogino, Tatsuki E-mail: snb0003@uah.edu E-mail: ogino@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2009-05-10

    We investigate the effects of the 11 year solar cycle and 25 day rotation period of the Sun on the interaction of the solar wind (SW) with the local interstellar medium (LISM). Our models take into account the partially ionized character of the LISM and include momentum and energy transfer between the ionized and neutral components. We assume that the interstellar magnetic field vector belongs to the hydrogen deflection plane as discovered in the SOHO SWAN experiment. This plane is inclined at an angle of about 60 deg. toward the ecliptic plane of the Sun, as suggested in recent publications relating the local interstellar cloud properties to the radio emission observed by Voyager 1. It is assumed that the latitudinal extent of the boundary between the slow and fast SW regions, as well as the angle between the Sun's rotation and magnetic-dipole axes, are periodic functions of time, while the polarity of the interstellar magnetic field changes sign every 11 years at the solar maximum. The global variation of the SW-LISM interaction pattern, the excursions of the termination shock and the heliopause, and parameter distributions in certain directions are investigated. The analysis of the behavior of the wavy heliospheric current sheet in the supersonic SW region shows the importance of neutral atoms on its dynamics.

  15. Martian upper atmosphere response to solar EUV flux and soft X-ray flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sonal; Stewart, Ian; Schneider, Nicholas M.; Deighan, Justin; Stiepen, Arnaud; Evans, J. Scott; Stevens, Michael H.; Chaffin, Michael S.; Crismani, Matteo; McClintock, William; Montmessin, Franck; Thiemann, E. M.; Eparvier, Frank; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Jacosky, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    Planetary upper atmosphere energetics is mainly governed by absorption of solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. Understanding the response of planetary upper atmosphere to the daily, long and short term variation in solar flux is very important to quantify energy budget of upper atmosphere. We report a comprehensive study of Mars dayglow observations made by the IUVS instrument aboard the MAVEN spacecraft, focusing on upper atmospheric response to solar EUV flux. Our analysis shows both short and long term effect of solar EUV flux on Martian thermospheric temperature. We find a significant drop (> 100 K) in thermospheric temperature between Ls = 218° and Ls = 140°, attributed primarily to the decrease in solar activity and increase in heliocentric distance. IUVS has observed response of Martian thermosphere to the 27-day solar flux variation due to solar rotation.We also report effect of two solar flare events (19 Oct. 2014 and 24 March 2015) on Martian dayglow observations. IUVS observed about ~25% increase in observed brightness of major ultraviolet dayglow emissions below 120 km, where most of the high energy photons (< 10 nm) deposit their energy. The results presented in this talk will help us better understand the role of EUV flux in total heat budget of Martian thermosphere.

  16. Pre-supernova Evolution of Rotating Solar Metallicity Stars in the Mass Range 13-120 M ⊙ and their Explosive Yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chieffi, Alessandro; Limongi, Marco

    2013-02-01

    We present the first set of a new generation of models of massive stars with a solar composition extending between 13 and 120 M ⊙, computed with and without the effects of rotation. We included two instabilities induced by rotation: the meridional circulation and the shear instability. We implemented two alternative schemes to treat the transport of the angular momentum: the advection-diffusion formalism and the simpler purely diffusive one. The full evolution from the pre-main sequence up to the pre-supernova stage is followed in detail with a very extended nuclear network. The explosive yields are provided for a variety of possible mass cuts and are available at the Web site http://www.iasf-roma.inaf.it/orfeo/public_html. We find that both the He and the CO core masses are larger than those of their non-rotating counterparts. Also the C abundance left by the He burning is lower than in the non-rotating case, especially for stars with an initial mass of 13-25 M ⊙, and this affects the final mass-radius relation, basically the final binding energy, at the pre-supernova stage. The elemental yields produced by a generation of stars rotating initially at 300 km s-1 do not change substantially with respect to those produced by a generation of non-rotating massive stars, the main differences being a slight overproduction of the weak s-component and a larger production of F. Since rotation also affects the mass-loss rate, either directly or indirectly, we find substantial differences in the lifetimes as O-type and Wolf-Rayet subtypes between the rotating and non-rotating models. The maximum mass exploding as Type IIP supernova ranges between 15 and 20 M ⊙ in both sets of models (this value depends basically on the larger mass-loss rates in the red supergiant phase due to the inclusion of the dust-driven wind). This limiting value is in remarkably good agreement with current estimates.

  17. Stratospheric and mesospheric pressure-temperature profiles from rotational analysis of CO2 lines in atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy/ATLAS 1 infrared solar occultation spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiller, G. P.; Gunson, M. R.; Lowes, L. L.; Abrams, M. C.; Raper, O. F.; Farmer, C. B.; Zander, R.; Rinsland, C. P.

    1995-01-01

    A simple, classical, and expedient method for the retrieval of atmospheric pressure-temperature profiles has been applied to the high-resolution infrared solar absorption spectra obtained with the atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument. The basis for this method is a rotational analysis of retrieved apparent abundances from CO2 rovibrational absorption lines, employing existing constituent concentration retrieval software used in the analysis of data returned by ATMOS. Pressure-temperature profiles derived from spectra acquired during the ATLAS 1 space shuttle mission of March-April 1992 are quantitatively evaluated and compared with climatological and meteorological data as a means of assessing the validity of this approach.

  18. Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Escalante Tri-State - Prewitt, New Mexico (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2012-11-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  19. Solar Wind Helium Abundance as a Function of Speed and Heliographic Latitude: Variation through a Solar Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasper, J. C.; Stenens, M. L.; Stevens, M. L.; Lazarus, A. J.; Steinberg, J. T.; Ogilvie, Keith W.

    2006-01-01

    We present a study of the variation of the relative abundance of helium to hydrogen in the solar wind as a function of solar wind speed and heliographic latitude over the previous solar cycle. The average values of A(sub He), the ratio of helium to hydrogen number densities, are calculated in 25 speed intervals over 27-day Carrington rotations using Faraday Cup observations from the Wind spacecraft between 1995 and 2005. The higher speed and time resolution of this study compared to an earlier work with the Wind observations has led to the discovery of three new aspects of A(sub He), modulation during solar minimum from mid-1995 to mid-1997. First, we find that for solar wind speeds between 350 and 415 km/s, A(sub He), varies with a clear six-month periodicity, with a minimum value at the heliographic equatorial plane and a typical gradient of 0.01 per degree in latitude. For the slow wind this is a 30% effect. We suggest that the latitudinal gradient may be due to an additional dependence of coronal proton flux on coronal field strength or the stability of coronal loops. Second, once the gradient is subtracted, we find that A(sub He), is a remarkably linear function of solar wind speed. Finally, we identify a vanishing speed, at which A(sub He), is zero, is 259 km/s and note that this speed corresponds to the minimum solar wind speed observed at one AU. The vanishing speed may be related to previous theoretical work in which enhancements of coronal helium lead to stagnation of the escaping proton flux. During solar maximum the A(sub He), dependences on speed and latitude disappear, and we interpret this as evidence of two source regions for slow solar wind in the ecliptic plane, one being the solar minimum streamer belt and the other likely being active regions.

  20. Observations of turkey eggs stored up to 27 days and incubated for 8 days: embryo developmental stage and weight differences and the differentiation of fertilized from unfertilized germinal discs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For logistical reasons, egg storage prior to incubation is a growing practice in the commercial turkey industry. In the following study, 5 groups of eggs each from inseminated and virgin hens were stored for progressively increasing periods of time (5 days or less to 21-27 days) and incubated. At ...

  1. The International Space Station (ISS) Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ): Materials & Processes (M&P) Lessons Learned for a Large, Rotating Spacecraft Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) utilizes two large rotating mechanisms, the solar alpha rotary joints (SARJs), as part of the solar arrays' alignment system for more efficient power generation. Each SARJ is a 10.3m circumference, nitrided 15-5PH steel race ring of triangular cross-section, with 12 sets of trundle bearing assemblies transferring load across the rolling joint. The SARJ mechanism rotates continuously and slowly - once every orbit, or every 90 minutes. In 2007, the starboard SARJ suffered a lubrication failure, resulting in severe damage (spalling) to one of the race ring surfaces. Extensive effort was conducted to prevent the port SARJ from suffering the same failure, and fortunately that effort was ultimately successful in also recovering the functionality of the starboard SARJ. The M&P engineering function was key in determining the cause of failure and the means for mechanism recovery. From a M&P lessons-learned perspective, observations are made concerning the original SARJ design parameters (boundary conditions), the perceived need for nitriding the race ring, the test conditions employed during qualification, the environmental controls used for the hardware preflight, and the lubrication robustness necessary for complex kinematic mechanisms expecting high-reliability and long-life.

  2. Changes in the earth's rate of rotation between A.D. 1672 and 1806 as deduced from solar eclipse timings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, F. R.; Lieske, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    Solar eclipse timings measured between A.D. 1672 and 1806 are analyzed to study the variation of Delta T (= ET - UT) over this interval. These solar eclipse observations confirm the results of Brouwer (1952), Martin (1969), and Stephenson and Morrison (1969) which were obtained from the analysis of occultations in this period. It is believed that Goldstein's (1985) analysis inadequately represents the changes in Delta T.

  3. The Solar Rotation in the 1930s from the Sunspot and Flocculi Catalogs of the Ebro Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paula, V.; Curto, J. J.; Casas, R.

    2016-10-01

    The tables of sunspot and flocculi heliographic positions included in the catalogs published by the Ebro Observatory in the 1930s have recently been recovered and converted into digital format by using optical character recognition (OCR) technology. We here analyzed these data by computing the angular velocity of several sunspot and flocculi groups. A difference was found in the rotational velocity for sunspots and flocculi groups at high latitudes, and we also detected an asymmetry between the northern and southern hemispheres, which is especially marked for the flocculi groups. The results were then fitted with a differential-rotation law [ω=a+b sin2 B] to compare the data obtained with the results published by other authors. A dependence on the latitude that is consistent with former studies was found. Finally, we studied the possible relationship between the sunspot/flocculi group areas and their corresponding angular velocity. There are strong indications that the rotational velocity of a sunspot/flocculi group is reduced (in relation to the differential rotation law) when its maximum area is larger.

  4. Grids of stellar models with rotation. I. Models from 0.8 to 120 M⊙ at solar metallicity (Z = 0.014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekström, S.; Georgy, C.; Eggenberger, P.; Meynet, G.; Mowlavi, N.; Wyttenbach, A.; Granada, A.; Decressin, T.; Hirschi, R.; Frischknecht, U.; Charbonnel, C.; Maeder, A.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Many topical astrophysical research areas, such as the properties of planet host stars, the nature of the progenitors of different types of supernovae and gamma ray bursts, and the evolution of galaxies, require complete and homogeneous sets of stellar models at different metallicities in order to be studied during the whole of cosmic history. We present here a first set of models for solar metallicity, where the effects of rotation are accounted for in a homogeneous way. Methods: We computed a grid of 48 different stellar evolutionary tracks, both rotating and non-rotating, at Z = 0.014, spanning a wide mass range from 0.8 to 120 M⊙. For each of the stellar masses considered, electronic tables provide data for 400 stages along the evolutionary track and at each stage, a set of 43 physical data are given. These grids thus provide an extensive and detailed data basis for comparisons with the observations. The rotating models start on the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) with a rotation rate υini/υcrit = 0.4. The evolution is computed until the end of the central carbon-burning phase, the early asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase, or the core helium-flash for, respectively, the massive, intermediate, and both low and very low mass stars. The initial abundances are those deduced by Asplund and collaborators, which best fit the observed abundances of massive stars in the solar neighbourhood. We update both the opacities and nuclear reaction rates, and introduce new prescriptions for the mass-loss rates as stars approach the Eddington and/or the critical velocity. We account for both atomic diffusion and magnetic braking in our low-mass star models. Results: The present rotating models provide a good description of the average evolution of non-interacting stars. In particular, they reproduce the observed main-sequence width, the positions of the red giant and supergiant stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram, the observed surface compositions and

  5. Rotational Periods and Starspot Activity of Young Solar-Type Dwarfs in the Open Cluster IC 4665

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allain, S.; Bouvier, J.; Prosser, C.; Marschall, L. A.; Laaksonen, B. D.

    1995-01-01

    We present the results of a V-band photometric monitoring survey of 15 late-type dwarfs in the young open cluster IC 4665. Low-amplitude periodic light variations are found for 8 stars and ascribed to the modulation by starspots that cover typically a few percent of the stellar disk. Periods range from 0.6 to 3.7 d, translating to equatorial velocities between 13 and 93 km/s. That no period longer than 4 d was detected suggests a relative paucity of extremely slow rotators (V(sub eq) much less than 10 km/s) among late-type dwarfs in IC 4665. The fractional number of slow rotators in IC 4665 is similar to that of Alpha Per cluster, suggesting that IC 4665 is close in age to Alpha Per (approx. 50 Myr).

  6. Solar Extreme Ultraviolet and X-ray Irradiance Measurements for Thermosphere and Ionosphere Studies (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, T. N.; Caspi, A.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Eparvier, F. G.; Jones, A. R.; Sojka, J. J.; Solomon, S. C.; Viereck, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    The solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV: 10-120 nm) and soft X-ray (SXR: 0.1-10 nm) radiation is critical energy input for Earth's upper atmosphere above 80 km as a driver for photochemistry, ionosphere creation, temperature structure, and dynamics. Understanding the solar EUV and X-ray variations and their influences on Earth's atmosphere are important for myriad of space weather applications. The solar EUV and SXR spectral irradiances are currently being measured by NASA's Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere, Energetics, and Dynamics (TIMED) Solar EUV Experiment (SEE), NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) EUV Variability Experiment (EVE), and NOAA's GOES X-Ray Sensor (XRS) and EUV Sensor (EUVS). The solar irradiance varies on all time scales, ranging from seconds to hours from solar flare events, to days from 27-day solar rotation, and to years and longer from 11-year solar cycle. The amount of variation is strongly wavelength dependent with smaller ~50% solar cycle variations seen in the EUV for transition region emissions and larger factor of 10 and more variations seen in the SXR for coronal emissions. These solar irradiance observations are expected to be continued and to overlap with NASA's future Global-scale Observations of the Limb and Disk (GOLD) and Ionospheric Connection (ICON) missions that focus on the study of the thermosphere and ionosphere. These current measurements are only broad band in the SXR, but there are plans to have new spectral SXR measurements from CubeSat missions that may also overlap with the GOLD and ICON missions.

  7. Topside Ionospheric Response to Solar EUV Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, P. C.; Hawkins, J.

    2015-12-01

    We present an analysis of 23 years of thermal plasma measurements in the topside ionosphere from several DMSP spacecraft at ~800 km. The solar cycle variations of the daily averaged densities, temperatures, and H+/O+ ratios show a strong relationship to the solar EUV as described by the E10.7 solar EUV proxy with cross-correlation coefficients (CCCs) with the density greater than 0.85. The H+/O+ varies dramatically from solar maximum when it is O+ dominated to solar minimum when it is H+ dominated. These ionospheric parameters also vary strongly with season, particularly at latitudes well away from the equator where the solar zenith angle (SZA) varies greatly with season. There are strong 27-day solar rotation periodicities in the density, associated with the periodicities in the solar EUV as measured by the TIMED SEE and SDO EVE instruments, with CCCs at times greater than 0.9 at selected wavelengths. Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis captures over 95% of the variation in the density over the 23 years in the first two principle components. The first principle component (PC1) is clearly associated with the solar EUV showing a 0.91 CCC with the E10.7 proxy while the PC1 EOFs remain relatively constant with latitude indicating that the solar EUV effects are relatively independent of latitude. The second principle component (PC2) is clearly associated with the SZA variation, showing strong correlations with the SZA and the concomitant density variations at latitudes away from the equator and with the PC2 EOFs having magnitudes near zero at the equator and maximum at high latitude. The magnitude of the variation of the response of the topside ionosphere to solar EUV variability is shown to be closely related to the composition. This is interpreted as the result of the effect of composition on the scale height in the topside ionosphere and the "pivot effect" in which the variation in density near the F2 peak is expected to be amplified by a factor of e at an

  8. The International Space Station (ISS) Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ): Materials & Processes (M&P) Lessons Learned for a Large, Spacecraft Rotating Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    2016-01-01

    The ISS utilizes two large rotating mechanisms, the SARJ, as part of the solar arrays alignment system for more efficient power generation. The SARJ is a 10.3m circumference, nitrided 15-5PH steel race ring of triangular cross-section, with 12 sets of trundle bearing assemblies transferring load across the rolling joint. The SARJ mechanism rotates continuously and slowly - once every orbit, or every 90 minutes. In 2008, the starboard SARJ suffered a lubrication failure, resulting in severe damage (spalling) of one of the race ring surfaces. Extensive effort was conducted to prevent the port SARJ from suffering the same failure, and fortunately was ultimately successful in recovering the functionality of the starboard SARJ. The M&P function was key in determining the cause of failure and the means for mechanism recovery. From a M&P lessons-learned perspective, observations are made concerning the original SARJ design parameters (boundary conditions), the perceived need for nitriding the race ring, the test conditions employed during qualification, the environmental controls used for the hardware preflight, and the lubrication robustness necessary for complex kinematic mechanisms expecting high-reliability and long-life.

  9. Identification of the V3 vibration-rotation band of CF4 in balloon-borne infrared solar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Murcray, D. G.; Murcray, F. J.; Cook, G. R.; Van Allen, J. W.; Bonomo, F. S.; Blatherwick, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Infrared solar spectra in the 850 to 1350/cm region, at 0.02/cm resolution, were obtained during a balloon flight made on 27 October 1978 from Alamogordo, New Mexico. Analysis of the 1275-1290/cm region indicates that the atmospheric absorption lines of CH4, N2O, H2O, HNO3 and CO2 near 1283/cm are super-imposed on a broader absorption feature which we interpret as due to the V3 band of CF4. Fine structure of CF4 is also identified. Preliminary estimates from the sunset spectra show approximately 75 pptv CF4 near 25 km.

  10. Chromospheric activity and rotation of FGK stars in the solar vicinity. An estimation of the radial velocity jitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Arnáiz, R.; Maldonado, J.; Montes, D.; Eiroa, C.; Montesinos, B.

    2010-09-01

    Context. Chromospheric activity produces both photometric and spectroscopic variations that can be mistaken as planets. Large spots crossing the stellar disc can produce planet-like periodic variations in the light curve of a star. These spots clearly affect the spectral line profiles, and their perturbations alter the line centroids creating a radial velocity jitter that might “contaminate” the variations induced by a planet. Precise chromospheric activity measurements are needed to estimate the activity-induced noise that should be expected for a given star. Aims: We obtain precise chromospheric activity measurements and projected rotational velocities for nearby (d ≤ 25 pc) cool (spectral types F to K) stars, to estimate their expected activity-related jitter. As a complementary objective, we attempt to obtain relationships between fluxes in different activity indicator lines, that permit a transformation of traditional activity indicators, i.e., Ca ii H & K lines, to others that hold noteworthy advantages. Methods: We used high resolution (~50 000) echelle optical spectra. Standard data reduction was performed using the IRAF echelle package. To determine the chromospheric emission of the stars in the sample, we used the spectral subtraction technique. We measured the equivalent widths of the chromospheric emission lines in the subtracted spectrum and transformed them into fluxes by applying empirical equivalent width and flux relationships. Rotational velocities were determined using the cross-correlation technique. To infer activity-related radial velocity (RV) jitter, we used empirical relationships between this jitter and the R'_HK index. Results: We measured chromospheric activity, as given by different indicators throughout the optical spectra, and projected rotational velocities for 371 nearby cool stars. We have built empirical relationships among the most important chromospheric emission lines. Finally, we used the measured chromospheric activity

  11. The Response of the Magnetosphere and Ionosphere to Solar Wind Variability for 2002-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackett, A. M.; Lu, G.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the Sun's processes and how they affect the Earth allows us to better understand climate change, main sequence stars, and aids in the understanding and prediction of space weather, which is becoming increasingly more important as our dependence on satellite communication and electric power grids grows. This work examines magnetospheric and ionospheric response to solar wind drivers during various phases of solar cycles 23 and 24 (years 2002 - 2010). To date, no studies on Sun-Earth coupling during this period have considered both ionospheric and magnetospheric response to various solar drivers. In this study, several satellite data sets were used to examine solar parameters, relativistic and energetic electrons, nitric oxide (NO) infrared radiation and Auroral power (Ap). Yearly time series, correlations, and trends in periodicities were examined for the entire period, and active years (2002 and 2003) and inactive years (2008 and 2009) were contrasted in attempts to develop an understanding of the underlying physical processes and relationships among solar, magnetospheric, and ionospheric parameters. Relativistic and energetic particles had the highest correlation with solar wind speed in general, especially during the extended solar minimum when high speed streams were present (2008). Periodicity analysis showed the dominance of the 27-day solar rotational period for the declining phase of cycle 23, and more prominent 7, 9 and 12.5-day periodicities for the solar minimum. These findings support previous work, and combine two areas of research to reveal a more complete view of Sun-Earth dynamics during this time period.; Correlation coefficients for magnetospheric and ionospheric parameter pairs (Auroral Power (Ap), NO Power, energetic electrons (POES), and relativistic electrons (GOES)), and solar parameters Vsw, VBz, IEF, and two coupling functions -dφ/dt, and ɛ were calculated. Shown here are the highest correlations among these parameters for

  12. SUSIM Measurements of UV Variations During the Decline of Solar Cycle 22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floyd, L. E.; Crane, P. C.; Herring, L. C.; Prinz, D. K.; Brueckner, G. E.

    1997-05-01

    The Solar Ultraviolet Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SUSIM) aboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) has measured the solar spectral irradiance for wavelengths 1150-4100 { Angstroms} on every available day from October 11, 1991 to the present. The record of spectral irradiances obtained during this period clearly shows the decline associated with the last half of solar cycle 22. Superimposed on this solar cycle variation is a 27-day solar rotation modulation which, for the most part, maintains coherence across the wavelength spectrum and with SUSIM's own Mg II core-to-wing ratio index. However, for wavelengths between the Si I edge at 1682 { Angstroms} and the Mg I edge at 2513 { Angstroms} and for some time periods, 13.5-day variations dominate. SUSIM observations began when solar activity was near maximum and now extend through minimum. Generally, the measured peak-to-peak variations are larger for shorter wavelengths and for emission or absorption lines. The wavelength dependence of the UV variability apparently corresponds to the solar atmospheric emission heights given by radiative transfer models. The largest measured variation, that for H I Ly-alpha , exceeds a factor of two. The variation in the continuum just shortward of the Al I edge at 2076 { Angstroms} is about 10%; just longward, about 5%. This latter variation continues up to the Mg I edge and then declines to approximately zero measured variation at about 3000 { Angstroms} and above. Based on common proxies of solar UV variation, such as the Mg II core-to-wing ratio and He I 10830 { Angstroms} equivalent width, SUSIM irradiance measurements have ranged over more than 85% of the entire solar cycle 22 variation. Through the separate use of each index as a UV proxy, we extend the SUSIM measurements to estimate the wavelength-dependent peak-to-peak UV variability over the whole of solar cycle 22. SUSIM is supported under NASA-Defense Purchase Request S14798D.

  13. Chromospheric activity and rotation of FGK stars in the solar neighbourhood: characterizing possible exoplanetary system host stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Arnáiz, Raquel M.

    2011-06-01

    This dissertation has investigated the chromospheric activity and rotation of nearby cool stars, which can potentially host exoplanetary systems. 1. High-resolution echelle spectra have been obtained for 565 nearby (d ≤ 25 pc) cool (spectral types F to M) stars. The observations were taken using high resolution echelle optical spectrographs. The observations were designed to ensure a spectral coverage including all the optical magnetic activity indicator lines: from the Ca II H & K lines to the Ca II IRT, including all the Balmer lines Hα, Hβ, Hγ, Hδ, and H?. This fact has ensured a simultaneous analysis of the magnetic activity using different diagnostics. The spectral coverage of the spectra has also permitted a precise analysis of the stellar properties as well as rotational and radial velocities. 2. The suitability of the stars as targets in exoplanetary search surveys has been analysed using the results obtained in the spectroscopic survey. Using the measured chromospheric activity in the optical spectrum, activity-induced RV jitter has been calculated for the active stars in the sample. Although the intrinsic variability of stellar activity makes it impossible to directly subtract the computed values from the RV signal, it provides an estimation of the activity-related noise. Therefore, this values can be used to set the minimum detectable mass for a planet orbiting the star or to determine the minimal amplitude variation that could indicate the existence of a planet. The compilation of the activity, rotation and predicted activity-induced RV jitter build up into a catalogue that determines the suitability of the stars as targets in exoplanet search surveys. 3. The relationship between pairs of excess surface flux in different activity diagnostics has been analysed using the results from the spectroscopic survey. The results show a clear correlation between the activity measured in different optical indicators. This fact confirms previous findings and

  14. Ionospheric electron temperature at solar maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brace, L. H.; Theis, R. F.; Hoegy, W. R.

    1987-01-01

    Langmuir-probe measurements made at solar maximum from the DE-2 satellite in 1981 and 1982 are used to examine the latitudinal variation of electron temperature at altitudes between 300 and 400 km and its response to 27-day variations of solar EUV. A comparison of these data with models based on solar-minimum measurements from the AE-C suggests that the daytime electron temperature does not change very much during the solar cycle except at low latitudes where a particularly large 27-day variation occurs. It is found that the daytime electron temperature near the F2 peak is more responsive to short-term variations in F10.7 than to any longer-term changes that may occur between solar minimum and maximum.

  15. Response of middle atmosphere to short-term solar ultraviolet variations: 2. Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Brasseur, G.; De Rudder, A.; Keating, G.M.; Pitts, M.C.

    1987-01-20

    Ozone and temperature responses to solar variability, based on satellite data, have been reported in a companion paper (Keating et. al., this issue). The present is intended to present a theoretical interpretation of this analysis with the purpose of better understanding the chemical behavior of the stratosphere and the coupling between temperature and ozone concentration, when a periodic forcing is applied to the solar ultraviolet (UV) flux. The response of the temperature and of the trace species concentrations, including ozone, to short-term variations in the solar UV irradiance is calculated by a one-dimensional chemical-radiative time-dependent model. The applied solar variability is assumed to be sinusoidal with a period of 27 days (in accordance with the rotation period of the sun) of 13.5 days (when two active regions are on opposite sides of the sun). The amplitude varies with wavelength, which is consistent with observations made by the Nimbus 7 solar backscattered ultraviolet (SBUV) experiment. The maximum ozone sensitivity in the stratosphere appears to be located near 3 mbar. The calculated amplitude and phase of the ozone response are significantly modified when the feedback between ozone and temperature is taken into account. The ozone/temperature coupling tends to modify the ozone phase lag such that, in the upper stratosphere and in the mesosphere, the ozone peak occurs a few days before the UV peak.

  16. A search for five month solar induced periodicity in the stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S. )

    1989-07-01

    Recent studies of solar UV spectra and various indices of solar activity indicate a strong period at about 5 months. In the 10.7 cm solar radio flux (F10.7), a conventional index for the solar EUV and UV variabilities, the spectral power of the 5 month period is comparable to the well known 27 day solar period. However, in the solar UV flux at 205 nm, directly measured from the Nimbus-7 SBUV spectrometer, the (spectral) power of the 5 month period is about half that of the 27 day period. This paper examines the possible impact of the 5 month solar period on ozone and temperature at various pressure levels in the stratosphere and discusses the implications of differences in solar forcing at the 27 day and 5 month periods. It is shown that ozone, both in the lower and upper stratosphere, has a measurable response to solar UV forcing 27 days. Such a solar response is not observed at 5 month period because of a relatively weaker 5 month solar UV component in the solar signal and a strong interference from dynamical signals associated with planetary wave activity.

  17. Short-term temporal variations of NIMBUS-7 measurements of the solar uv spectral irradiance. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, R.E.; Stevens, D.E.; Barrett, J.; Pfendt, K.

    1987-06-01

    NIMBUS-7 measurements of the solar spectral irradiance in the 160-400 nm range during November 7, 1978 - October 29, 1984, were analyzed to determine the characteristics of their short-term variations (days and weeks to a couple of months). The persistence of solar-rotational variations is shown to be uniformly high for the UV wavelengths important for inducing stratospheric photochemical reactions and for heating the stratosphere, which contrasts greatly with the low and nonuniform persistence for coronal EUV wavelengths and the standard ground-based measures of solar variability, the Ottawa 10.7-cm flux (F10) and sunspot number (R). Periodicity in the 13 - 14 day range is the second strongest short-term variation (27 - 28 day solar rotational variations are the strongest short-term periodicity). The ratios of power in the 13-day periodicity to that in the 27-day periodicity is fairly constant for photospheric UV fluxes throughout the 170 - 260 nm wavelength range, the main exception being the chromospheric Si II lines in the 180 - 182 nm range.

  18. Variability of the Lyman alpha flux with solar activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lean, J.L.; Skumanich, A.

    1983-07-01

    A three-component model of the solar chromosphere, developed from ground based observations of the Ca II K chromospheric emission, is used to calculate the variability of the Lyman alpha flux between 1969 and 1980. The Lyman alpha flux at solar minimum is required in the model and is taken as 2.32 x 10/sup 11/ photons/cm/sup 2//s. This value occurred during 1975 as well as in 1976 near the commencement of solar cycle 21. The model predicts that the Lyman alpha flux increases to as much as 5 x 10/sup 11/ photons/cm/sup 2//s at the maximum of the solar cycle. The ratio of the average fluxes for December 1979 (cycle maximum) and July 1976 (cycle minimum) is 1.9. During solar maximum the 27-day solar rotation is shown to cause the Lyman alpha flux to vary by as much as 40% or as little as 5%. The model also shows that the Lyman alpha flux varies over intermediate time periods of 2 to 3 years, as well as over the 11-year sunspot cycle. We conclude that, unlike the sunspot number and the 10.7-cm radio flux, the Lyman alpha flux had a variability that was approximately the same during each of the past three cycles. Lyman alpha fluxes calculated by the model are consistent with measurements of the Lyman alpha flux made by 11 of a total of 14 rocket experiments conducted during the period 1969--1980. The model explains satisfactorily the absolute magnitude, long-term trends, and the cycle variability seen in the Lyman alpha irradiances by the OSO 5 satellite experiment. The 27-day variability observed by the AE-E satellite experiment is well reproduced. However, the magntidue of the AE-E 1 Lyman alpha irradiances are higher than the model calculations by between 40% and 80%. We suggest that the assumed calibration of the AE-E irradiances is in error.

  19. Search for Persistent Quasi-Periodicities in the Solar and Interplanetary Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, J. K.; Cadavid, A. C.; Ruzmaikin, A.

    2007-12-01

    Previous analysis of the radial component of the interplanetary magnetic field from 1962 - 1998 has revealed a dominant frequency of 27.03 days to 0.02 day accuracy (Neugebauer, et al., 2000). We have repeated and extended this analysis with OMNI data from 1963 - 2007 obtained from the Coordinated Heliospheric Observations (COHO) database. Over this longer data string we find that the 27.03 day Lomb-Scargle periodogram peak is reduced while two side peaks near 26.8 days and 27.6 days become almost as strong. In the interval 1999-2007 there are two dominant periods near 26.5 days and 27.2 days. As a solar counterpart to the above analysis we have searched for persistent rotation periods near 27 days of global patterns of photospheric magnetic fields derived from Wilcox Solar Observatory synoptic Carrington rotation maps. Techniques applied include, principal components analysis, independent component analysis, singular spectrum analysis, wavelet spectral analysis, and complex demodulation. We find a variety of quasi- periodicities between 26 and 29 days that remain coherent for 1 - 2 years. In the southern solar hemisphere the strongest periodicity is at 28.2 days, while in the northern hemisphere it is around 26.5 days. Neugebauer, M., Smith, Smith, E.J., Ruzmaikin, A., Feynman, J., Vaughan, A.H. 2000, J. Geophys. Res., 106, A5, 8363.

  20. Venus' rotation and atmospheric tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingersoll, A. P.; Dobrovolskis, A. R.

    1978-01-01

    On the basis of a presented theory, it is suggested that Venus' current rotation is a stable balance between atmospheric and solar body tides. The theory is concerned with Venus' atmospheric tides, driven by solar heating, and how these tides could serve as a third torque to balance the effects of solar body torque and to maintain a stable equilibrium resonance with regard to the earth's gravitational effects. In the absence of the atmospheric tidal torque, or some other torque, it would be expected that Venus would be despun until synchronous rotation (one side always facing the sun) is attained, rather than retain the retrograde rotation period of 243 days.

  1. The solar wind effect on cosmic rays and solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujimoto, K.; Kojima, H.; Murakami, K.

    1985-01-01

    The relation of cosmic ray intensity to solar wind velocity is investigated, using neutron monitor data from Kiel and Deep River. The analysis shows that the regression coefficient of the average intensity for a time interval to the corresponding average velocity is negative and that the absolute effect increases monotonously with the interval of averaging, tau, that is, from -0.5% per 100km/s for tau = 1 day to -1.1% per 100km/s for tau = 27 days. For tau 27 days the coefficient becomes almost constant independently of the value of tau. The analysis also shows that this tau-dependence of the regression coefficiently is varying with the solar activity.

  2. Periodic and quiescent solar activity effects in the low ionosphere, using SAVNET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoni, F. C. P.; Raulin, J.-P.; Gavilan, H. R.; Kaufmann, P.; Raymundo, T. E.

    2010-10-01

    Important results have been acquired using the measurements of VLF amplitude and phase signals from the South America VLF Network (SAVNET) stations. This network is an international project coordinated by CRAAM, Brazil in cooperation with Peru and Argentina. It started operating in April 2006, and now counts on eight stations (Atibaia, Palmas, Santa Maria and Estaça~o Antártica Comandante Ferraz in Brazil; Piura, Punta-Lobos and Ica, in Peru; CASLEO, in Argentina). Researches, through the last decades, have demonstrated the versatility of the VLF technique for many scientific and technological purposes. In this work, we summarize some recent results using SAVNET data base. We have obtained daily maximum diurnal amplitude time series that exhibited behavior patterns in different time scales: 1) 1ong term variations indicating the solar activity level control of the low ionosphere; 2) characteristic periods of alternated slow and fast variations, the former being related to solar illumination conditions, and the latter that have been associated with the winter anomaly at high latitudes; 3) 27-days period related to the solar rotation and consequently associated to the solar Lyman-α radiation flux variations, reinforcing earlier theories about the importance of this spectral line for the D-region formation. Finally, we conclude presenting preliminary results of simulation using LWPC, which showed very good agreement at times of observed modal amplitude minima for a given VLF propagation path.

  3. Using the 11-year Solar Cycle to Predict the Heliosheath Environment at Voyager 1 and 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, A.; Opher, M.; Provornikova, E.; Richardson, J. D.; Toth, G.

    2015-12-01

    As Voyager 2 moves further into the heliosheath, the region of subsonic solar wind plasma in between the termination shock and the heliopause, it has observed an increase of the magnetic field strength to large values, all while maintaining magnetic flux conservation. Dr. Burlaga will present these observations in the 2015 AGU Fall meeting (abstract ID: 59200). The increase in magnetic field strength could be a signature of Voyager 2 approaching the heliopause or, possibly, due to solar cycle effects. In this work we investigate the role the 11-year solar cycle variations as well as magnetic dissipation effects have on the heliosheath environments observed at Voyager 1 and 2 using a global 3D magnetohydrodynamic model of the heliosphere. We use time and latitude-dependent solar wind velocity and density inferred from SOHO/SWAN and IPS data and solar cycle variations of the magnetic field derived from 27-day averages of the field magnitude average of the magnetic field at 1 AU from the OMNI database as presented in Michael et al. (2015). Since the model has already accurately matched the flows and magnetic field strength at Voyager 2 until 93 AU, we extend the boundary conditions to model the heliosheath up until Voyager 2 reaches the heliopause. This work will help clarify if the magnetic field observed at Voyager 2 should increase or decrease due to the solar cycle. We describe the solar magnetic field both as a dipole, with the magnetic and rotational axes aligned, and as a monopole, with magnetic field aligned with the interstellar medium to reduce numerical reconnection within the heliosheath, due to the removal of the heliospheric surrent sheet, and at the solar wind - interstellar medium interface. A comparison of the models allows for a crude estimation of the role that magnetic dissipation plays in the system and whether it allows for a better understanding of the Voyager 2 location in the heliosheath.

  4. Radiance And Irradiance Of The Solar HeII 304 Emission Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullin, D. R.; Floyd, L. E.; Auchère, F.

    2013-12-01

    For over 17 years, EIT and the later EUVI instruments aboard SoHO and STEREO, respectively, have provided a time series of radiant images in the HeII 30.4 nm transition region and three coronal emission lines (FeIX/X, FeXII, and FeXV). While the EIT measurements were gathered from positions approximately on the Earth-Sun axis, EUVI images have been gathered at angles ranging to more than ×90 degrees in solar longitude relative the Earth-Sun axis. Using a Differential Emission Measure (DEM) model, these measurements provide a basis for estimates of the spectral irradiance for the solar spectrum of wavelengths between 15 and 50 nm at any position in the heliosphere. In particular, we generate the He 30.4 spectral irradiance in all directions in the heliosphere and examine its time series in selected directions. Such spectra are utilized for two distinct purposes. First, the photoionization rate of neutral He at each position is calculated. Neutral He is of interest because it traverses the heliopause relatively undisturbed and therefore provides a measure of isotopic parameters beyond the heliosphere. Second, we use these generate a time series of estimates of the solar spectral luminosity in the HeII 30.4 nm emission line extending from the recent past solar cycle 23 minimum into the current weak solar cycle 24 enabling an estimate of its variation over the solar cycle. Because this 30.4~nm spectral luminosity is the sum of such radiation in all directions, its time series is devoid of the 27-day solar rotation periodicity present in indices typically used to represent solar activity.

  5. NIMBUS-7 SBUV (Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet) observations of solar UV spectral irradiance variations caused by solar rotation and active-region evolution for the period November 7, 1978 - November 1, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. F.; Repoff, T. P.; Donnelly, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of temporal variations of the solar UV spectral irradiance over several days to a few weeks in the 160-400 nm wavelength range are presented. Larger 28-day variations and a second episode of 13-day variations occurred during the second year of measurements. The thirteen day periodicity is not a harmonic of the 28-day periodicity. The 13-day periodicity dominates certain episodes of solar activity while others are dominated by 28-day periods accompanied by a week 14-day harmonic. Techniques for removing noise and long-term trends are described. Time series analysis results are presented for the Si II lines near 182 nm, the Al I continuum in the 190 nm to 205 nm range, the Mg I continuum in the 210 nm to 250 nm range, the MgII H & K lines at 280 nm, the Mg I line at 285 nm, and the Ca II K & H lines at 393 and 397 nm.

  6. Rotating Vesta

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronomers combined 146 exposures taken by NASA's Hubble SpaceTelescope to make this 73-frame movie of the asteroid Vesta's rotation.Vesta completes a rotation every 5.34 hours.› Asteroid and...

  7. MHD Modeling of Differential Rotation in Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran; Riley, Pete

    2004-01-01

    The photosphere and the magnetic flux therein undergo differential rotation. Coronal holes appear to rotate almost rigidly. Magnetic reconnection has been invoked to reconcile these phenomena. Mechanism relevant to the formation of the slow solar wind. We have used our MHD model in spherical coordinates to study the effect of differential rotation on coronal holes. We have imposed a magnetic flux distribution similar to and applied differential rotation for the equivalent of 5 solar rotations.

  8. Enhancing the output current of a CdTe solar cell via a CN-free hydrocarbon luminescent down-shifting fluorophore with intramolecular energy transfer and restricted internal rotation characteristics.

    PubMed

    Li, Yilin; Olsen, Joseph; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2015-04-01

    A CN-free hydrocarbon fluorophore (Perylene-TPE) was synthesized as a new luminescent down-shifting (LDS) material. Its photophysical properties in both the solution state and the solid state were studied. The unity fluorescence quantum yield of Perylene-TPE observed in its solid state is considered to be from the characteristics of intramolecular energy transfer (IET) and restricted internal rotation (RIR). This is supported by the results from theoretical calculations and spectroscopic measurements. For the photovoltaic application of Perylene-TPE, a theoretical modeling study suggests that using the LDS film of Perylene-TPE may increase the output short circuit current density (Jsc) of a CdTe solar cell by 2.95%, enhance the spectral response of a CdTe solar cell at 400 nm by 41%, and shift the incident solar photon distribution from short-wavelength (<500 nm) to long-wavelength (>500 nm). Experimentally, placing a LDS film of Perylene-TPE on a CdTe solar cell can enhance its output Jsc by as high as 3.30 ± 0.31%, which is comparable to the current commercially available LDS material – Y083 (3.28% ± 0.37%).

  9. Corotating solar wind structures and recurrent trains of enhanced diurnal variation in galactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Yeeram, T.; Ruffolo, D.; Sáiz, A.; Kamyan, N.; Nutaro, T. E-mail: david.ruf@mahidol.ac.th E-mail: p_chang24@hotmail.com

    2014-04-01

    Data from the Princess Sirindhorn Neutron Monitor at Doi Inthanon, Thailand, with a vertical cutoff rigidity of 16.8 GV, were utilized to determine the diurnal anisotropy (DA) of Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) near Earth during solar minimum conditions between 2007 November and 2010 November. We identified trains of enhanced DA over several days, which often recur after a solar rotation period (∼27 days). By investigating solar coronal holes as identified from synoptic maps and solar wind parameters, we found that the intensity and anisotropy of cosmic rays are associated with the high-speed streams (HSSs) in the solar wind, which are in turn related to the structure and evolution of coronal holes. An enhanced DA was observed after the onset of some, but not all, HSSs. During time periods of recurrent trains, the DA was often enhanced or suppressed according to the sign of the interplanetary magnetic field B, which suggests a contribution from a mechanism involving a southward gradient in the GCR density, n, and a gradient anisotropy along B × ∇n. In one non-recurrent and one recurrent sequence, an HSS from an equatorial coronal hole was merged with that from a trailing mid-latitude extension of a polar coronal hole, and the slanted HSS structure in space with suppressed GCR density can account for the southward GCR gradient. We conclude that the gradient anisotropy is a source of temporary changes in the GCR DA under solar minimum conditions, and that the latitudinal GCR gradient can sometimes be explained by the coronal hole morphology.

  10. A comparative study of solar facula during cycle 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, P.; Choudhary, D. P.; Moon, Y. J.

    2015-12-01

    The solar activity minimum between the end of cycle 23 and beginning of cycle 24 was the longest and deepest since the modern satellite era of 20th century. In this paper, we have investigated statistical properties of solar facula and sunspot area (and their ratio) covering entire solar cycle 23 and the ascending phase of cycle 24. The facular area has been considered from the K-line composite at the San Fernando Observatory and is a direct measurement of the strength of solar cycle activity. It is found that solar facular area decreased during minimum phase of cycle 23/24 compared to maximum phase and also during rising phase of cycle 24. However, the ratio of facula to sunspot area increased during minimum epoch of cycle 23. Power spectrum analysis shows that along with other periods, the solar rotational periods 22 -31 days and Rieger type periods are both prominent during maxima, minima of cycle 23 and ascending branch of cycle 24. During the decline phase of cycle 23, the period ~ 27 days is more prominent whereas ~ 14 days and ~ 31 days periods are dominant during activity maxima. During maximum phase of cycle 23 and 24, there was no phase lag between sunspot and facular area, but a phase lag ~ 3 months has been detected during activity minima of cycle 23. These results indicate that the distribution of active regions during the activity maximum years is quite different from that in the minimum years. We shall present discussion of our results in this paper.

  11. Rotational testing.

    PubMed

    Furman, J M

    2016-01-01

    The natural stimulus for the semicircular canals is rotation of the head, which also might stimulate the otolith organs. Vestibular stimulation usually induces eye movements via the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). The orientation of the subject with respect to the axis of rotation and the orientation of the axis of rotation with respect to gravity together determine which labyrinthine receptors are stimulated for particular motion trajectories. Rotational testing usually includes the measurement of eye movements via a video system but might use a subject's perception of motion. The most common types of rotational testing are whole-body computer-controlled sinusoidal or trapezoidal stimuli during earth-vertical axis rotation (EVAR), which stimulates primarily the horizontal semicircular canals bilaterally. Recently, manual impulsive rotations, known as head impulse testing (HIT), have been developed to assess individual horizontal semicircular canals. Most types of rotational stimuli are not used routinely in the clinical setting but may be used in selected research environments. This chapter will discuss clinically relevant rotational stimuli and several types of rotational testing that are used primarily in research settings.

  12. Improving solar wind persistence forecasts: Removing transient space weather events, and using observations away from the Sun-Earth line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohutova, Petra; Bocquet, François-Xavier; Henley, Edmund M.; Owens, Matthew J.

    2016-10-01

    This study demonstrates two significant ways of improving persistence forecasts of the solar wind, which exploit the relatively unchanging nature of the ambient solar wind to provide 27 day forecasts, when using data from the Lagrangian L1 point. Such forecasts are useful as a prediction tool for the ambient wind, and for benchmarking of solar wind models. We show that solar wind persistence forecasts can be improved by removing transient solar wind features such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Using CME indicators to automatically identify CME-contaminated periods in ACE data from 1998 to 2011, and replacing these with solar wind from a previous synodic rotation, persistence forecasts improve (relative to a baseline): skill scores for Bz, a crucial parameter for determining solar wind geoeffectiveness, improve by 7.7 percentage points when using a proton temperature-based indicator with good operational potential. We also show that persistence forecasts can be improved by using measurements away from L1, to reduce the requirement on coronal stability for an entire synodic period, at the cost of reduced lead time. Using STEREO-B data from 2007 to 2013 to create such a reduced lead time persistence forecast, we show that Bz skill scores improve by 17.1 percentage points relative to ACE. Finally, we report on implications for persistence forecasts from any future missions to the L5 Lagrangian point and on the successful operational implementation (in spring 2015) of the normal (ACE-based) and reduced lead time (STEREO-based) persistence forecasts in the Met Office's Space Weather Operations Centre, as well as plans for future improvements.

  13. On periodicity of solar wind phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, V. K.; Joshi, G. C.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the rate of occurrence of solar wind phenomena observed between 1972-1984 using power spectrum analysis. The data have been taken from the high speed solar wind (HSSW) streams catalogue published by Mavromichalaki et al. (1988). The power spectrum analysis of HSSW events indicate that HSSW stream events have a periodicity of 9 days. This periodicity of HSSW events is 1/3 of the 27 days period of coronal holes which are the major source of solar wind events. In our opinion the 9 days period may be the energy build up time to produce the HSSW stream events.

  14. The Rapidly Rotating Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures at a continuum of scales, from large to small. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. In the present work, imaging techniques of time-distance helioseismology applied to observational data reveal no long-range order in the convective motion. We conservatively bound the associated velocity magnitudes, as a function of depth and the spherical-harmonic degree l to be 20-100 times weaker than prevailing estimates within the wavenumber band l < 60. The observationally constrained kinetic energy is approximately a thousandth of the theoretical prediction, suggesting the prevalence of an intrinsically different paradigm of turbulence. A fundamental question arises: what mechanism of turbulence transports the heat ux of a solar luminosity outwards? The Sun is seemingly a much faster rotator than previously thought, with advection dominated by Coriolis forces at scales l < 60.

  15. Rotating Wavepackets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Any free-particle wavepacket solution of Schrodinger's equation can be converted by differentiations to wavepackets rotating about the original direction of motion. The angular momentum component along the motion associated with this rotation is an integral multiple of [h-bar]. It is an "intrinsic" angular momentum: independent of origin and…

  16. Observations of corotating solar wind structures at radio sounding by signals of the Rosetta and Mars Express spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, A. I.; Lukanina, L. A.; Samoznaev, L. N.; Chashei, I. V.; Bird, M. K.; Pätzold, M.

    2016-05-01

    In the implementation of the space projects Rosetta and Mars Express, a large-scale series of experiments has been carried out on radio sounding circumsolar plasma by decimeter ( S-band) and centimeter ( X-band) signals of the Rosetta comet probe (from October 3 to October 31, 2010) and the Mars Express satellite of Mars (from December 25, 2010 to March 27, 2011). It was found that in the phase of ingress the spacecraft behind the Sun, the intensity of the frequency fluctuations increases in accordance with a power function whose argument is the solar offset distance of radio ray path, and when the spacecraft is removed from the Sun (the egress phase), frequency fluctuations are reduced. Periodic strong increases in the fluctuation level, exceeding by a factor of 3-12 the background values of this value determined by the regular radial dependences, are imposed on the regular dependences. It was found that increasing the fluctuations of radio waves alternates with the periodicity m × T or n × T, where m = 1/2, n = 1, and T is the synodic period of the Sun's rotation ( T ≈ 27 days). It was shown that the corotating structures associated with the interaction regions of different speed fluxes are formed in the area of solar wind acceleration and at distances of 6-20 solar radii already have a quasi-stationary character.

  17. Plant Maintenance/Training Manual, (RADL Item 2-37): Section 1. Rotating apparatus. 10-MWe solar-thermal central-receiver pilot plant. Solar-facilities design integration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    The rotating apparatus include the turbine-generator, pumps, fans, air compressor, blowers and centrifuges. This equipment is listed, and in addition, the pumps and the blowers are described, with specifications and performance data given. (LEW)

  18. Supergranulation rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schou, Jesper; Beck, John G.

    2001-01-01

    Simple convection models estimate the depth of supergranulation at approximately 15,000 km which suggests that supergranules should rotate at the rate of the plasma in the outer 2% of the Sun by radius. Previous measurements (Snodgrass & Ulrich, 1990; Beck & Schou, 2000) found that supergranules rotate significantly faster than this, with a size-dependent rotation rate. We expand on previous work and show that the torsional oscillation signal seen in the supergranules tracks that obtained for normal modes. We also find that the amplitudes and lifetimes of the supergranulation are size dependent.

  19. Changes in subcellular morphologies, defense enzyme and genetic characteristics in earth-grown tomato seedlings propagated from six year Mir-flown seeds and 27 day recovery satellite-flown seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jinying; Liu, Min; Xue, Huai; Pan, Yi; Han, Xinyun; Kan, Sheng; Nechitailo, Galina S.

    Subcellular, changes of enzymes activities and genetic characteristics were compared between Earth-grown plants from the original tomato seeds, 6-year long-term flown in the Mir and 27- day short-term flown in the satellite. In some Mir-flown plants, the lamellae's structure of some chloroplasts became curved and loose, and some mitochondrial outer membranes were broken. In some satellite-flown plants, the number of mitochondria increased, the lamellae's structure of some chloroplasts became curved and loose, and some mitochondrial cristae disappeared. The number of starch grains per chloroplast in Mir-flown plants and satellite-flown plants increased significantly compared with the ground control. The number of chloroplasts per leaf cell in Mir-flown plants and satellite-flown plants decreased significantly compared with the ground control. The activities of three defense enzymes SOD, POD and CAT in the satellite -flown plants increased significantly as compared with those of the ground controls and the Mir-flown plants, but the content of MDA decreased significantly. Coefficients of variation of the activities of SOD, POD, CAT and the content of MDA in the satellite -flown plants were lest, and those in the Mir-flown plants were maximum. Among the 90 pair of SSR primers used for the genome DNA PCR analyses, the total number of SSR bands in the Mir-flown plants was the same 90 bands as in the control. Different DNA band types were generated from 7 pairs of SSR primers with a 7.78% polymorphism between the control and the 15 Mir-flown plants. Of 8 polymorphic bands, the SSR fragment size in 4 bands was larger and 4 smaller in the Mir-flown plants than that in the control. Different DNA band types were generated from 5 pairs of SSR primers with a 5.56% polymorphism between the control and one satellite-flown plant. The total number of SSR bands in one satellite-flown plant was 95 bands, of which 90 bands were the same with the ground control and 5 bands were

  20. EFFECTS OF ROTATIONALLY INDUCED MIXING IN COMPACT BINARY SYSTEMS WITH LOW-MASS SECONDARIES AND IN SINGLE SOLAR-TYPE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Chatzopoulos, E.; Robinson, Edward L.; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2012-08-20

    Many population synthesis and stellar evolution studies have addressed the evolution of close binary systems in which the primary is a compact remnant and the secondary is filling its Roche lobe, thus triggering mass transfer. Although tidal locking is expected in such systems, most studies have neglected the rotationally induced mixing that may occur. Here we study the possible effects of mixing in mass-losing stars for a range of secondary star masses and metallicities. We find that tidal locking can induce rotational mixing prior to contact and thus affect the evolution of the secondary star if the effects of the Spruit-Tayler dynamo are included both for angular momentum and chemical transport. Once contact is made, the effect of mass transfer tends to be more rapid than the evolutionary timescale, so the effects of mixing are no longer directly important, but the mass-transfer strips matter to inner layers that may have been affected by the mixing. These effects are enhanced for secondaries of 1-1.2 M{sub Sun} and for lower metallicities. We discuss the possible implications for the paucity of carbon in the secondaries of the cataclysmic variable SS Cyg and the black hole candidate XTE J1118+480 and for the progenitor evolution of Type Ia supernovae. We also address the issue of the origin of blue straggler stars in globular and open clusters. We find that for models that include rotation consistent with that observed for some blue straggler stars, evolution is chemically homogeneous. This leads to tracks in the H-R diagram that are brighter and bluer than the non-rotating main-sequence turn-off point. Rotational mixing could thus be one of the factors that contribute to the formation of blue stragglers.

  1. Rotational Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockett, Keith

    1988-01-01

    Demonstrates several objects rolling down a slope to explain the energy transition among potential energy, translational kinetic energy, and rotational kinetic energy. Contains a problem from Galileo's rolling ball experiment. (YP)

  2. High-resolution Calculation of the Solar Global Convection with the Reduced Speed of Sound Technique. II. Near Surface Shear Layer with the Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotta, H.; Rempel, M.; Yokoyama, T.

    2015-01-01

    We present a high-resolution, highly stratified numerical simulation of rotating thermal convection in a spherical shell. Our aim is to study in detail the processes that can maintain a near surface shear layer (NSSL) as inferred from helioseismology. Using the reduced speed of sound technique, we can extend our global convection simulation to 0.99 R ⊙ and include, near the top of our domain, small-scale convection with short timescales that is only weakly influenced by rotation. We find the formation of an NSSL preferentially in high latitudes in the depth range of r = 0.95-0.975 R ⊙. The maintenance mechanisms are summarized as follows. Convection under the weak influence of rotation leads to Reynolds stresses that transport angular momentum radially inward in all latitudes. This leads to the formation of a strong poleward-directed meridional flow and an NSSL, which is balanced in the meridional plane by forces resulting from the < v\\prime r v\\prime _θ > correlation of turbulent velocities. The origin of the required correlations depends to some degree on latitude. In high latitudes, a positive correlation < v\\prime _rv\\prime _θ > is induced in the NSSL by the poleward meridional flow whose amplitude increases with the radius, while a negative correlation is generated by the Coriolis force in bulk of the convection zone. In low latitudes, a positive correlation < v\\prime _rv\\prime _θ > results from rotationally aligned convection cells ("banana cells"). The force caused by these Reynolds stresses is in balance with the Coriolis force in the NSSL.

  3. HIGH-RESOLUTION CALCULATION OF THE SOLAR GLOBAL CONVECTION WITH THE REDUCED SPEED OF SOUND TECHNIQUE. II. NEAR SURFACE SHEAR LAYER WITH THE ROTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hotta, H.; Rempel, M.; Yokoyama, T.

    2015-01-01

    We present a high-resolution, highly stratified numerical simulation of rotating thermal convection in a spherical shell. Our aim is to study in detail the processes that can maintain a near surface shear layer (NSSL) as inferred from helioseismology. Using the reduced speed of sound technique, we can extend our global convection simulation to 0.99 R {sub ☉} and include, near the top of our domain, small-scale convection with short timescales that is only weakly influenced by rotation. We find the formation of an NSSL preferentially in high latitudes in the depth range of r = 0.95-0.975 R {sub ☉}. The maintenance mechanisms are summarized as follows. Convection under the weak influence of rotation leads to Reynolds stresses that transport angular momentum radially inward in all latitudes. This leads to the formation of a strong poleward-directed meridional flow and an NSSL, which is balanced in the meridional plane by forces resulting from the 〈v{sub r}{sup ′}v{sub θ}{sup ′}〉 correlation of turbulent velocities. The origin of the required correlations depends to some degree on latitude. In high latitudes, a positive correlation 〈v{sub r}{sup ′}v{sub θ}{sup ′}〉 is induced in the NSSL by the poleward meridional flow whose amplitude increases with the radius, while a negative correlation is generated by the Coriolis force in bulk of the convection zone. In low latitudes, a positive correlation 〈v{sub r}{sup ′}v{sub θ}{sup ′}〉 results from rotationally aligned convection cells ({sup b}anana cells{sup )}. The force caused by these Reynolds stresses is in balance with the Coriolis force in the NSSL.

  4. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  5. High-resolution calculations of the solar global convection with the reduced speed of sound technique. I. The structure of the convection and the magnetic field without the rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Hotta, H.; Yokoyama, T.; Rempel, M.

    2014-05-01

    We carry out non-rotating high-resolution calculations of the solar global convection, which resolve convective scales of less than 10 Mm. To cope with the low Mach number conditions in the lower convection zone, we use the reduced speed of sound technique (RSST), which is simple to implement and requires only local communication in the parallel computation. In addition, the RSST allows us to expand the computational domain upward to about 0.99 R {sub ☉}, as it can also handle compressible flows. Using this approach, we study the solar convection zone on the global scale, including small-scale near-surface convection. In particular, we investigate the influence of the top boundary condition on the convective structure throughout the convection zone as well as on small-scale dynamo action. Our main conclusions are as follows. (1) The small-scale downflows generated in the near-surface layer penetrate into deeper layers to some extent and excite small-scale turbulence in the region >0.9 R {sub ☉}, where R {sub ☉} is the solar radius. (2) In the deeper convection zone (<0.9 R {sub ☉}), the convection is not influenced by the location of the upper boundary. (3) Using a large eddy simulation approach, we can achieve small-scale dynamo action and maintain a field of about 0.15B {sub eq}-0.25B {sub eq} throughout the convection zone, where B {sub eq} is the equipartition magnetic field to the kinetic energy. (4) The overall dynamo efficiency varies significantly in the convection zone as a consequence of the downward directed Poynting flux and the depth variation of the intrinsic convective scales.

  6. Rotational modulation and flares on RS Canum Venaticorum and BY Draconis-type stars. XV - Observations of Proxima Centauri and solar calibration data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisch, B. M.; Butler, C. J.; Foing, B.; Rodono, M.; Giampapa, M. S.

    1990-01-01

    Results are reported from simultaneous Exosat and IUE observations of flaring in Proxima Cen on March 2, 1985. The data are presented in extensive tables and sample spectra and discussed in detail. The peak emission of the soft-X-ray flare is found to be about 3 x 10 to the 27th erg/sec, with energy about 3 x 10 to the 30th erg and an associated increase in Mg II flux to 17,000-67,000 erg/sq cm sec, or about an order of magnitude lower than the solar value. The presence of flare- and microflare-related processes heating the corona is inferred.

  7. Solar System Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Carl D.; Dermott, Stanley F.

    2000-02-01

    Preface; 1. Structure of the solar system; 2. The two-body problem; 3. The restricted three-body problem; 4. Tides, rotation and shape; 5. Spin-orbit coupling; 6. The disturbing function; 7. Secular perturbations; 8. Resonant perturbations; 9. Chaos and long-term evolution; 10. Planetary rings; Appendix A. Solar system data; Appendix B. Expansion of the disturbing function; Index.

  8. Differential rotation in rapidly rotating F-stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiners, A.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2003-12-01

    We obtained high quality spectra of 135 stars of spectral types F and later and derived ``overall'' broadening functions in selected wavelength regions utilizing a Least Squares Deconvolution (LSD) procedure. Precision values of the projected rotational velocity v \\sini were derived from the first zero of the Fourier transformed profiles and the shapes of the profiles were analyzed for effects of differential rotation. The broadening profiles of 70 stars rotating faster than v \\sini = 45 km s-1 show no indications of multiplicity nor of spottedness. In those profiles we used the ratio of the first two zeros of the Fourier transform q_2/q_1 to search for deviations from rigid rotation. In the vast majority the profiles were found to be consistent with rigid rotation. Five stars were found to have flat profiles probably due to cool polar caps, in three stars cuspy profiles were found. Two out of those three cases may be due to extremely rapid rotation seen pole on, only in one case (v \\sini = 52 km s-1) is solar-like differential rotation the most plausible explanation for the observed profile. These results indicate that the strength of differential rotation diminishes in stars rotating as rapidly as v \\sini >~ 50 km s-1. Table A.1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.125.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/412/813 Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, 69.D-0015(B).

  9. Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopresto, James C.; Mathews, John; Manross, Kevin

    1995-12-01

    Calcium K plage, H alpha plage and sunspot area have been monitored daily on the INTERNET since November of 1992. The plage and sunspot area have been measured by image processing. The purpose of the project is to investigate the degree of correlation between plage area and solar irradiance. The plage variation shows the expected variation produced by solar rotation and the longer secular changes produced by the solar cycle. The H alpha and sunspot plage area reached a minimum in about late 1994 or early 1995. This is in agreement with the K2 spectral index obtained daily from Sacramento Peak Observatory. The Calcium K plage area minimum seems delayed with respect to the others mentioned above. The minimum of the K line plage area is projected to come within the last few months of 1995.

  10. Observed solar UV irradiance variations of importance to middle atmosphere energetics and photochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, Julius

    1994-01-01

    Absorption of solar UV irradiance in the spectral interval 120-420 nm is chiefly responsible for radiative heating and photodissociation of important atmospheric constituents (e.g., O2, O3, H2O, NO2, etc.) in the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere. Thus, the absolute value and time perturbations of the UV irradiance could significantly affect the energetics, photochemistry, and subsequent dynamics of these regions. Analysis of preliminary data from the SOLSTICE (UARS) observations for a period of 244 days (3 Oct 1991-2 Jun 1992) is discussed in this paper. The data provide mean daily values of the spectral distribution of the observed irradiances at 1-nm resolution and their solar rotation and semirotation variations. The average amplitudes of the 27-day irradiance oscillations for the 244-day data period were 5.7% at Lyman-alpha (121 nm), 1% at 200 nm, 0.5% at 210 nm, and generally less than 0.2% at wavelengths longer than 280 nm. The average amplitudes of 13.5-day oscillations were, by and large, about half of these values. Solar irradiance variations at 10.7 cm are highly correlated with those at Ly-alpha and other chromospheric emission lines (r = 0.7 to 0.8) and only moderately correlated with irradiances at wavelengths of 180-208 nm (r = 0.5). The correlation decreases as the source region of the irradiance gets closer to the base of the photosphere. At the 2-nm interval 279-281 nm, however, which contains the cores of the Mg II h and k lines, the correlation is again approximately 0.8.

  11. #4 Simulated Solar Sphere from Data - Interpolated

    NASA Video Gallery

    Rotating solar sphere made from a combination of imagery from the two STEREO spacecraft, together with simultaneous data from the Solar Dynamic Observatory.This movie is made from data taken on Jan...

  12. Solar Coronal Cells as Seen by STEREO

    NASA Video Gallery

    The changes of a coronal cell region as solar rotation carries it across the solar disk as seen with NASA's STEREO-B spacecraft. The camera is fixed on the region (panning with it) and shows the pl...

  13. Solar and lunar effects in the MLT region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Savigny, Christian; DeLand, Matthew; Thomas, Gary; Thurairajah, Brentha; Teiser, Georg; Lednyts'kyy, Olexandr

    2016-07-01

    The Earth's mesosphere / lower thermosphere region (MLT) is subject to variability driven by a variety of different processes from above and below. In terms of solar 27-day effects as well as lunar tidal effects, statistically significant signatures have been identified in many MLT parameters, including temperature, ozone, atomic oxygen, OH emission rate and altitude, as well as noctilucent (or polar mesospheric) clouds. While the identification of these signatures is often straightforward - if the time series are sufficiently long - the underlying physico-chemical mechanisms driving the signatures are often only poorly understood and involve both photochemical and dynamical effects. The main purpose of this contribution is to summarize recent advances in the scientific understanding of lunar tidal and solar 27-day effects in the MLT region with a focus on satellite remote sensing observations. For some parameters the sensitivities to solar forcing at the 27-day time scale agree within uncertainties with the sensitivities at the 11-year time scale, suggesting similar driving mechanisms. We will present hypotheses for driving mechanisms - where applicable - and highlight gaps in the scientific understanding.

  14. A Comparison of FOF2 Baselines for Use in Studying the Effects of Solar Ultraviolet Irradiance on the F2 Region of the Ionosphere.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    radio wave U)’ traveling at the speed of light, the apparent height of reflection can be calculated. These ionograms are used to deduce electron...including interplanetary mag- netic field sector boundaries, solar wind , and solar 27 day variability in ionizing irradiance. The only one that showed...hourly variations in foF2 presumed to be caused by solar irradiance. 2. Values for foF2 are taken directly from ionograms . The ionogram measurements

  15. Rotating Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues currently being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  16. Magnetic damping of rotation. [in satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opik, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    Based on Wilson's (1977) article on the magnetic effects on space vehicles and other celestial bodies, the magnetic damping of rotation is considered. The inadequacy of the interstellar magnetic field in overcoming solar wind shielding and thus influencing the rotation of bodies is described. The ionospheric shielding of the interstellar field is discussed along with the permeability and magnetic damping by the solar or stellar wind. Star formation and angular momentum is discussed and attention is given to the magnetic damping of unshielded small bodies. Calculations of the rate for damping through random particle impact are made. Theories concerning the rotation of asteroids and the origin of meteorites are reviewed. The shielding process of ionospheric plasmas is outlined and the damping effect of the geomagnetic field on the rotation of artificial satellites is evaluated.

  17. An analytical theory of planetary rotation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, A. W.

    1977-01-01

    An approximate analytical theory is derived for the rate of rotation acquired by a planet as it grows from the solar nebula. This theory was motivated by a numerical study by Giuli, and yields fair agreement with his results. The periods of planetary rotation obtained are proportional to planetesimal encounter velocity, and appear to suggest lower values of this velocity than are commonly assumed to have existed during planetary formation.

  18. The Corona of the Young Solar Analog EK Draconis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gudel, M.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Benz, A. O.; Elias, N. M., II

    1995-01-01

    First coronal microwave and new soft X-ray observations of the very active, near-Zero-Age Main-Sequence (ZAMS) dGOe star EK Dra = HD 129333 show that this analog of the young Sun is more luminous in both emissions than most single M-dwarf flare stars. Variations in the 8.4 GHz flux include modulation with the optically determined rotation period of 2.7 days. This result points to a non-uniform filling of the corona with energetic electrons due to an incomplete coverage of the surface with active regions and a source volume that is not concentric with the star. The radio luminosity varying between log L(sub R) = 13.6 and 14.6 (L(sub R) in erg/s/Hz) shows evidence for unpolarized gyrosynchrotron flares, while strongly polarized flares were absent during the observations. This star is the first young, truly solar-like main sequence G star discovered in microwaves. Having just arrived on the main sequence, it conclusively proves that young, solar-like G stars can maintain very high levels of radio emission after their T Tau phase. The X-ray observations were obtained from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS). The average X-ray luminosity amounts to log L(sub x) = 29.9 (L(sub x) in erg/s). A Raymond-Smith type plasma model fit yields two plasma components at temperatures of 1.9 and 10 MK, with volume emission measures of 1.2 and 2.5 x 10 (exp 52)/cu cm, respectively. The X-ray light curve is significantly variable, with the photon count rate from the cooler plasma being strongly modulated by the rotation period; the emission from the hotter plasma is only weakly variable. Modeling of the source distribution in the stellar corona yields electron densities of the order of 4 x 10(exp 10)/cu cm or higher for the cool plasma component. It indicates that a considerable portion of EK Dra's high X-ray luminosity is due to high-density plasma rather than large emission volume. Parameters for an X-ray flare indicate an electron density of 1.75 x 10(exp 11)/cu cm and a source height of

  19. Exploring Venus by Solar Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2001-01-01

    A solar-powered airplane is proposed to explore the atmospheric environment of Venus. Venus has several advantages for a solar airplane. At the top of the cloud level, the solar intensity is comparable to or greater than terrestrial solar intensities. The Earthlike atmospheric pressure means that the power required for flight is lower for Venus than that of Mars, and the slow rotation of Venus allows an airplane to be designed for continuous sunlight, with no energy storage needed for night-time flight. These factors mean that Venus is perhaps the easiest planet in the solar system for flight of a long-duration solar airplane.

  20. Imaging Grating SpectroPhotometer (I-GRASP) for Solar Soft X-Ray Spectra and Images from a Cube Sat Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didkovsky, Leonid V.; Wieman, Seth; Woods, Thomas N.; Jones, Andrew; Chao, Weilun

    2016-05-01

    We describe the Soft X-ray Imaging Grating SpectroPhotometer (I-GRASP), a novel spectrophotometer with four times narrower transmission grating period (about 50 nm) compared to the MIT-designed 200 nm gratings successfully used for the SOHO/SEM, the SDO/EVE/ESP, and the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM) onboard the EVE sounding rocket suite of instruments. The new grating is based on technology developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and provides four to five time greater diffraction dispersion than the 200 nm period gratings. Such new technology will provide detection of both 0.1 nm - resolved solar spectra in about 1.0 to 7.0 nm spectral range and a soft X-ray pin-hole solar image from the I-GRASP instrument that is appropriately sized for a CubeSat platform. The solar observations of this soft X-ray range do not currently have spectral resolution, so I-GRASP concurrent spectral and imaging X-ray observations will be important for:Improvements in modeling of coronal dynamics and heating by comparing measured and modeled spectra through identifying changes in abundances from different active regions- Resolving some differences in certain iron spectral line intensity ratios observed with SAM, identifying key emission lines, and comparing to those modeled with the CHIANTI atomic database- Studying SXR spectral variability for different solar activity periods including solar flares and the 27-day solar rotation- Studying of the Earth’s ionosphere, thermosphere and mesosphere responses using as input the detailed soft X-ray spectra from I-GRASP- Improving solar soft X-ray reference spectra for accurate calculations of absolute solar irradiance from the SDO/EVE/ESP, SDO/EVE/SAM, TIMED/SEE/XPS, and SORCE/XPS channels that have broadband measurements of the 1-7 nm band- Providing validation for the soft X-Ray observations from the MinXSS CubeSat X123 spectrometer (0.04 to 2.5 nm) with the I-GRASP spectral observations from 1.0 to 7.0 nm- Comparing I

  1. Solar collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, S. I.

    1984-08-01

    Solar dishes, photovoltaics, passive solar building and solar hot water systems, Trombe walls, hot air panels, hybrid solar heating systems, solar grain dryers, solar greenhouses, solar hot water worhshops, and solar workshops are discussed. These solar technologies are applied to residential situations.

  2. Solar Wind Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic fields originate as coronal fields that are converted into space by the supersonic, infinitely conducting, solar wind. On average, the sun's rotation causes the field to wind up and form an Archimedes Spiral. However, the field direction changes almost continuously on a variety of scales and the irregular nature of these changes is often interpreted as evidence that the solar wind flow is turbulent.

  3. Solar skylight

    DOEpatents

    Adamson, James C.

    1984-01-01

    A reflective shutter rotates within a skylight housing in such a fashion as to control solar energy thereby providing a combination of heating, lighting, and ventilation. The skylight housing has three faces: a glazed southern face, a glazed northern face, and an open downwardly oriented face to the interior of the structure. Counter-weighted pivot arms support the shutter at either end causing the center of rotation to pass through the center of gravity. The shutter has three basic positions: In the first position, during the winter day, the shutter closes off the northern face, allowing solar energy to enter directly into the supporting structure providing heat gain and daylighting. In the second position, during the winter night, the shutter closes off the open face to the interior, providing insulation between the structure and the skylight housing. In the third position, during the non-heating season, the shutter closes off the southern face blocking unwanted heat gain but allowing diffuse northern light to penetrate for daylighting. In this last position, a means is provided for ventilating by natural convection. The apparatus can be operated either manually or by motor.

  4. Rotational properties of the Maria asteroid family

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M.-J.; Byun, Y.-I.; Choi, Y.-J.; Moon, H.-K.; Hinse, T. C.; Park, J.-H.; Brosch, N.; Kaplan, M.; Kaynar, S.; Uysal, Ö.; Eker, Z.; Güzel, E.; Behrend, R.; Yoon, J.-N.; Mottola, S.; Hellmich, S.

    2014-03-01

    The Maria family is regarded as an old-type (∼3 ± 1 Gyr) asteroid family that has experienced substantial collisional and dynamical evolution in the main belt. It is located near the 3:1 Jupiter mean-motion resonance area that supplies near-Earth asteroids to the inner solar system. We carried out observations of Maria family asteroids during 134 nights from 2008 July to 2013 May and derived synodic rotational periods for 51 objects, including newly obtained periods of 34 asteroids. We found that there is a significant excess of fast and slow rotators in the observed rotation rate distribution. The one-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test confirms that the spin rate distribution is not consistent with a Maxwellian at a 92% confidence level. From correlations among rotational periods, amplitudes of light curves, and sizes, we conclude that the rotational properties of Maria family asteroids have been changed considerably by non-gravitational forces such as the YORP effect. Using a light-curve inversion method, we successfully determined the pole orientations for 13 Maria members and found an excess of prograde versus retrograde spins with a ratio (N{sub p} /N{sub r} ) of 3. This implies that the retrograde rotators could have been ejected by the 3:1 resonance into the inner solar system since the formation of the Maria family. We estimate that approximately 37-75 Maria family asteroids larger than 1 km have entered near-Earth space every 100 Myr.

  5. Rotational Properties of the Maria Asteroid Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M.-J.; Choi, Y.-J.; Moon, H.-K.; Byun, Y.-I.; Brosch, N.; Kaplan, M.; Kaynar, S.; Uysal, Ö.; Güzel, E.; Behrend, R.; Yoon, J.-N.; Mottola, S.; Hellmich, S.; Hinse, T. C.; Eker, Z.; Park, J.-H.

    2014-03-01

    The Maria family is regarded as an old-type (~3 ± 1 Gyr) asteroid family that has experienced substantial collisional and dynamical evolution in the main belt. It is located near the 3:1 Jupiter mean-motion resonance area that supplies near-Earth asteroids to the inner solar system. We carried out observations of Maria family asteroids during 134 nights from 2008 July to 2013 May and derived synodic rotational periods for 51 objects, including newly obtained periods of 34 asteroids. We found that there is a significant excess of fast and slow rotators in the observed rotation rate distribution. The one-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test confirms that the spin rate distribution is not consistent with a Maxwellian at a 92% confidence level. From correlations among rotational periods, amplitudes of light curves, and sizes, we conclude that the rotational properties of Maria family asteroids have been changed considerably by non-gravitational forces such as the YORP effect. Using a light-curve inversion method, we successfully determined the pole orientations for 13 Maria members and found an excess of prograde versus retrograde spins with a ratio (Np /Nr ) of 3. This implies that the retrograde rotators could have been ejected by the 3:1 resonance into the inner solar system since the formation of the Maria family. We estimate that approximately 37-75 Maria family asteroids larger than 1 km have entered near-Earth space every 100 Myr.

  6. Time variations of solar UV irradiance as measured by the SOLSTICE (UARS) instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, Julius; Rottman, Gary J.; Woods, Thomas N.; Wu, Fie

    1993-01-01

    An analysis is presented of solar ultraviolet irradiance measurements made by the SOLSTICE spectrometers on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). Reported observations cover the wavelength interval 119-420 nm, and the analysis discussed here is for the time period 26 Nov 1991 to 31 Dec 1992, during which time solar activity decreased in intensity. At the time of peak activity, the average 27-day variation had a relative amplitude of about 8 percent at Ly-alpha, tailing off to about 0.6 percent at 260 nm. It is shown that over the spectral interval 119-260 nm, the relative 27-day harmonic was about a factor of two larger during the strongly disturbed as compared with the moderately disturbed period.

  7. Venus: Interaction with Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C.; Luhmann, J.; Murdin, P.

    2002-07-01

    The solar wind interaction with VENUS provides the archetypal interaction of a flowing magnetized PLASMA with a PLANETARY IONOSPHERE. Mars interacts with the solar wind in much the same way as does Venus, while the rotating plasma in the Saturnian magnetosphere is believed to interact similarly with its moon, Titan (see SATURN: MAGNETOSPHERE INTERACTION WITH TITAN). The interaction of the Jovian ...

  8. The solar dynamo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    1994-01-01

    The solar dynamo is the process by which the Sun's magnetic field is generated through the interaction of the field with convection and rotation. In this, it is kin to planetary dynamos and other stellar dynamos. Although the precise mechanism by which the Sun generates its field remains poorly understood in spite of decades of theoretical and observational work, recent advances suggest that solutions to this solar dynamo problem may be forthcoming. The two basic processes involved in dynamo activity are demonstrated and the Sun's activity effects are presented in this document, along with a historical perspective regarding solar dynamos and the efforts to understand and measure them.

  9. Solar Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Oscillations were first detected in the solar photosphere in 1962 by Leighton and students. In 1970 it was calculated that these oscillations, with a period near five minutes, were the manifestations of acoustic waves trapped in the interior. The subsequent measurements of the frequencies of global oscillation modes from the spatio-temporal power spectrum of the waves made possible the refinement of solar interior models. Over the years, increased understanding of the nuclear reaction rates, the opacity, the equation of state, convection, and gravitational settling have resulted. Mass flows shift the frequencies of modes leading to very accurate measurements of the interior rotation as a function of radius and latitude. In recent years, analogues of terrestrial seismology have led to a tomography of the interior, including measurements of global north-south flows and flow and wave speed measurements below features such as sunspots. The future of helioseismology seems bright with the approval of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, to be launched in 2008.

  10. Anomalously Weak Solar Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures on a spectrum of scales. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations, though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. Here, we analyze observations of the wavefield in the solar photosphere using techniques of time-distance helioseismology to image flows in the solar interior. We downsample and synthesize 900 billion wavefield observations to produce 3 billion cross-correlations, which we average and fit, measuring 5 million wave travel times. Using these travel times, we deduce the underlying flow systems and study their statistics to bound convective velocity magnitudes in the solar interior, as a function of depth and spherical- harmonic degree l..Within the wavenumber band l < 60, convective velocities are 20-100 times weaker than current theoretical estimates. This constraint suggests the prevalence of a different paradigm of turbulence from that predicted by existing models, prompting the question: what mechanism transports the heat flux of a solar luminosity outwards? Advection is dominated by Coriolis forces for wavenumbers l < 60, with Rossby numbers smaller than approximately 10(exp -2) at r/R-solar = 0.96, suggesting that the Sun may be a much faster rotator than previously thought, and that large-scale convection may be quasi-geostrophic. The fact that isorotation contours in the Sun are not coaligned with the axis of rotation suggests the presence of a latitudinal entropy gradient.

  11. Activity and Rotation of Kepler-17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valio, Adriana; Estrela, Raissa; Netto, Yuri; Bravo, J. P.; de Medeiros, J. R.

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic activity on stars manifests itself in the form of dark spots on the stellar surface, which cause modulations of a few percent in the light curve of the star as it rotates. When a planet eclipses its host star, it might cross in front of one of these spots, creating a “bump” in the transit light curve. By modeling these spot signatures, it is possible to determine the physical properties of the spots such as size, temperature, and location. In turn, monitoring of the spots’ longitude provides estimates of the stellar rotation and differential rotation. This technique was applied to the star Kepler-17, a solar–type star orbited by a hot Jupiter. The model yields the following spot characteristics: average radius of 49 ± 10 Mm, temperatures of 5100 ± 300 K, and surface area coverage of 6 ± 4%. The rotation period at the transit latitude, -5^\\circ , occulted by the planet was found to be 11.92 ± 0.05 day, slightly smaller than the out-of-transit average period of 12.4 ± 0.1 day. Adopting a solar-like differential rotation, we estimated the differential rotation of Kepler-17 to be {{Δ }}{{Ω }}=0.041+/- 0.005 rd day‑1, which is close to the solar value of 0.050 rd day‑1, and a relative differential rotation of {{Δ }}{{Ω }}/{{Ω }}=8.0+/- 0.9 % . Because Kepler-17 is much more active than our Sun, it appears that, for this star, larger rotation rate is more effective in the generation of magnetic fields than shear.

  12. The rotation of the Sun's core.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterno, L.; Sofia, S.; di Mauro, M. P.

    1996-10-01

    The rotation of the Sun's core, below 0.3Rsun_, is inferred from two independent new results. The first is based on the recent oblateness measurements carried out by the Solar Disk Sextant (SDS) instrument outside the Earth's atmosphere, and the second on the very accurate measurements of rotational splittings of the lowest degree acoustic modes, carried out in the framework of the helioseismic network IRIS. By using the theory of slowly rotating stars applied to a solar standard model, we deduce a set of rotational laws for the innermost layers, which are consistent with both the measured oblateness value and the results of the inversion of helioseismic data. The SDS and IRIS results indicate that the Sun's central regions rotate at a rate in between 1.5 and 2 times the surface equatorial angular velocity. As a result of our analysis, we deduce a quadrupole moment J_2_=2.22x10^-7^, which implies an advance of Mercury's perihelion of 42.98arcsec/c, in agreement with the theory of General Relativity and the measurements of Mercury's orbit by means of planetary radar ranging. However, very recent results obtained by the helioseismic network BISON indicate that core rotation is even slower than the polar surface rotation and therefore imply a completely different scenario than that proposed here. If we assume the intermediate solution of rigid body rotation, an alternate source of the oblateness may be attributed to a magnetic field of the order of 10^5^Gauss in the interior of the Sun.

  13. Solar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Robert; Noyes, Robert; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Canfield, Richard C.; Chupp, Edward L.; Deming, Drake; Doschek, George A.; Dulk, George A.; Foukal, Peter V.; Gilliland, Ronald L.

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of modern solar physics. Topics covered include the solar interior, the solar surface, the solar atmosphere, the Large Earth-based Solar Telescope (LEST), the Orbiting Solar Laboratory, the High Energy Solar Physics mission, the Space Exploration Initiative, solar-terrestrial physics, and adaptive optics. Policy and related programmatic recommendations are given for university research and education, facilitating solar research, and integrated support for solar research.

  14. ROTATION RATES OF CORONAL HOLES AND THEIR PROBABLE ANCHORING DEPTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Hiremath, K. M.; Hegde, M.

    2013-02-15

    From 2001-2008, we use full-disk, SOHO/EIT 195 A calibrated images to determine latitudinal and day-to-day variations of the rotation rates of coronal holes (CHs). We estimate the weighted average of heliographic coordinates such as latitude and longitude from the central meridian on the observed solar disk. For different latitude zones between 40 Degree-Sign north and 40 Degree-Sign south, we compute rotation rates and find that, irrespective of their area, the number of days observed on the solar disk, and their latitudes, CHs rotate rigidly. Combined for all the latitude zones, we also find that CHs rotate rigidly during their evolution history. In addition, for all latitude zones, CHs follow a rigid body rotation law during their first appearance. Interestingly, the average first rotation rate ({approx}438 nHz) of CHs, computed from their first appearance on the solar disk, matches the rotation rate of the solar interior only below the tachocline.

  15. Time-variations in Solar Mean Magnetic Field from 1975-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YIN, Z.; Chen, J.; Han, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Solar variation has a profound impact on not only the space but also the earth climate related to human being. Solar magnetic evolutions are the fundamental fields for solar activity and space weather. Large-scale manifestations of solar magnetism can be described by a mean magnetic field. The solar mean magnetic field (SMMF) is the average field as observed over the entire visible disk. Large-scale solar magnetic fields have been measured at Wilcox Solar Observatory since 1975 till now; their daily observations are described and analyzed by using continuous wavelet transforms. The time-variable characteristics of short-term periods of SMMF are well demonstrated. Except the obvious the 11 years solar cycle, our results show that the SMMF has also the periods of about 1-2 year, 80-200 days, 27 days, 13.5 days, etc. The different periods appear in both the maximum and minimum years of each activity cycle and the characteristic of time variations of these periods are investigated and discussed. Revisited spectral-time analysis of variations in SMMF demonstrates the intermittent structures of short-term periodicities. Some of our results support the conclusion that ~13.5-day periodicity is significant during solar minimum phase, although the time intervals we selected are slightly different from the choice by Ye et al. in 2012. For instance, from the integrated statistic of global wavelet spectrum, we can see the peak of ~27-day is weaker than the ~13.5-day during the solar minimum. But if we look into the spectral-time areas of the local wavelet spectrum, the ~13.5-day periodicity is actually not always the prominent during the whole solar minimum phase. Even more, this period becomes the obvious variation of SMMF in the solar maximum of 1980-1981.5, in the declining portions of solar cycle of 1983-1984 and 2005-2007, in the rising portion of 1998-1999. Similarly, the ~27-day periodicity is not always leading variation of SMMF during the whole solar maximum phase

  16. Flare differentially rotates sunspot on Sun's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Hudson, Hugh S.; Gary, Dale E.; Wang, Jiasheng; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin

    2016-10-01

    Sunspots are concentrations of magnetic field visible on the solar surface (photosphere). It was considered implausible that solar flares, as resulted from magnetic reconnection in the tenuous corona, would cause a direct perturbation of the dense photosphere involving bulk motion. Here we report the sudden flare-induced rotation of a sunspot using the unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope, supplemented by magnetic data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. It is clearly observed that the rotation is non-uniform over the sunspot: as the flare ribbon sweeps across, its different portions accelerate (up to ~50° h-1) at different times corresponding to peaks of flare hard X-ray emission. The rotation may be driven by the surface Lorentz-force change due to the back reaction of coronal magnetic restructuring and is accompanied by a downward Poynting flux. These results have direct consequences for our understanding of energy and momentum transportation in the flare-related phenomena.

  17. Flare differentially rotates sunspot on Sun's surface.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Hudson, Hugh S; Gary, Dale E; Wang, Jiasheng; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin

    2016-10-10

    Sunspots are concentrations of magnetic field visible on the solar surface (photosphere). It was considered implausible that solar flares, as resulted from magnetic reconnection in the tenuous corona, would cause a direct perturbation of the dense photosphere involving bulk motion. Here we report the sudden flare-induced rotation of a sunspot using the unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope, supplemented by magnetic data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. It is clearly observed that the rotation is non-uniform over the sunspot: as the flare ribbon sweeps across, its different portions accelerate (up to ∼50° h(-1)) at different times corresponding to peaks of flare hard X-ray emission. The rotation may be driven by the surface Lorentz-force change due to the back reaction of coronal magnetic restructuring and is accompanied by a downward Poynting flux. These results have direct consequences for our understanding of energy and momentum transportation in the flare-related phenomena.

  18. Flare differentially rotates sunspot on Sun's surface

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Hudson, Hugh S.; Gary, Dale E.; Wang, Jiasheng; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    Sunspots are concentrations of magnetic field visible on the solar surface (photosphere). It was considered implausible that solar flares, as resulted from magnetic reconnection in the tenuous corona, would cause a direct perturbation of the dense photosphere involving bulk motion. Here we report the sudden flare-induced rotation of a sunspot using the unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope, supplemented by magnetic data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. It is clearly observed that the rotation is non-uniform over the sunspot: as the flare ribbon sweeps across, its different portions accelerate (up to ∼50° h−1) at different times corresponding to peaks of flare hard X-ray emission. The rotation may be driven by the surface Lorentz-force change due to the back reaction of coronal magnetic restructuring and is accompanied by a downward Poynting flux. These results have direct consequences for our understanding of energy and momentum transportation in the flare-related phenomena. PMID:27721463

  19. Multifractal analysis of vertical total electron content (VTEC) at equatorial region and low latitude, during low solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolzan, M. J. A.; Tardelli, A.; Pillat, V. G.; Fagundes, P. R.; Rosa, R. R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses the multifractal aspects of the GPS data (measured during a period of low solar activity) obtained from two Brazilian stations: Belém (01.3° S, 48.3° W) and São José dos Campos (SJC) (23.2° S, 45.9° W). The results show that the respective geographic sites show important scaling differences as well as similarities when their multifractal signatures for vertical total electron content (VTEC) are compared. The f(α) spectra have a narrow shape for great scales, which indicates the predominance of deterministic phenomena, such as solar rotation (27 days) over intermittent phenomena. Furthermore, the f(α) spectra for both sites have a strong multifractality degree at small scales. This strong multifractality degree observed at small scales (1 to 12 h) at both sites is because the ionosphere over Brazil is a non-equilibrium system. The differences found were that Belém presented a stronger multifractality at small scales (1 h to 12 h) compared with SJC, particularly in 2006. The reason for this behaviour may be associated with the location of Belém, near the geomagnetic equator, where at this location the actions of X-rays, ultraviolet, and another wavelength from the Sun are more direct, strong, and constant throughout the whole year. Although the SJC site is near ionospheric equatorial anomaly (IEA) peaks, this interpretation could explain the higher values found for the intermittent parameter μ for Belém compared with SJC. Belém also showed the presence of one or two flattening regions for f(α) spectra at the same scales mentioned before. These differences and similarities also were interpreted in terms of the IEA content, where this phenomenon is an important source of intermittence due the presence of the VTEC peaks at ±20° geomagnetic latitudes.

  20. Shear rotation numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doeff, E.; Misiurewicz, M.

    1997-11-01

    This paper presents results on rotation numbers for orientation-preserving torus homeomorphisms homotopic to a Dehn twist. Rotation numbers and the rotation set for such homeomorphisms have been defined and initially investigated by the first author in a previous paper. Here we prove that each rotation number 0951-7715/10/6/017/img5 in the interior of the rotation set is realized by some compact invariant set, and that there is an ergodic measure on that set with mean rotation number 0951-7715/10/6/017/img5. It is also proved that the function which assigns its rotation set to such a homeomorphism is continuous. Finally, a counterexample is presented that shows that rational extremal points of the shear rotation set do not necessarily correspond to any periodic orbits.

  1. Power Harvesting from Rotation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicone, Carmen; Feng, Z. C.

    2008-01-01

    We show the impossibility of harvesting power from rotational motions by devices attached to the rotating object. The presentation is suitable for students who have studied Lagrangian mechanics. (Contains 2 figures.)

  2. Rotator cuff exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... to these tendons may result in: Rotator cuff tendinitis, which is irritation and swelling of these tendons ... Brien MJ, Leggin BG, Williams GR. Rotator cuff tendinopathies and tears: surgery and therapy. In: Skirven TM, ...

  3. Differential Rotation via Tracking of Coronal Bright Points.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAteer, James; Boucheron, Laura E.; Osorno, Marcy

    2016-05-01

    The accurate computation of solar differential rotation is important both as a constraint for, and evidence towards, support of models of the solar dynamo. As such, the use of Xray and Extreme Ultraviolet bright points to elucidate differential rotation has been studied in recent years. In this work, we propose the automated detection and tracking of coronal bright points (CBPs) in a large set of SDO data for re-evaluation of solar differential rotation and comparison to other results. The big data aspects, and high cadence, of SDO data mitigate a few issues common to detection and tracking of objects in image sequences and allow us to focus on the use of CBPs to determine differential rotation. The high cadence of the data allows to disambiguate individual CBPs between subsequent images by allowing for significant spatial overlap, i.e., by the fact that the CBPs will rotate a short distance relative to their size. The significant spatial overlap minimizes the effects of incorrectly detected CBPs by reducing the occurrence of outlier values of differential rotation. The big data aspects of the data allows to be more conservative in our detection of CBPs (i.e., to err on the side of missing CBPs rather than detecting extraneous CBPs) while still maintaining statistically larger populations over which to study characteristics. The ability to compute solar differential rotation through the automated detection and tracking of a large population of CBPs will allow for further analyses such as the N-S asymmetry of differential rotation, variation of differential rotation over the solar cycle, and a detailed study of the magnetic flux underlying the CBPs.

  4. Shaft-Rotation Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, Richard L.

    1990-01-01

    Signal-processing subsystem generates signal indicative of rotation of shaft from output of accelerometer mounted on housing of bearing supporting shaft. Output of subsystem binary signal at frequency of rotation of shaft. Part of assembly of electronic equipment measuring vibrations in rotating machinery. Accelerometer mounted in such way sensitive to vibrations of shaft perpendicular to axis. Output of accelerometer includes noise and components of vibration at frequencies higher than rotational frequency of shaft.

  5. Rotations with Rodrigues' Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, E.

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears…

  6. Galaxy cluster's rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manolopoulou, M.; Plionis, M.

    2017-03-01

    We study the possible rotation of cluster galaxies, developing, testing, and applying a novel algorithm which identifies rotation, if such does exist, as well as its rotational centre, its axis orientation, rotational velocity amplitude, and, finally, the clockwise or counterclockwise direction of rotation on the plane of the sky. To validate our algorithms we construct realistic Monte Carlo mock rotating clusters and confirm that our method provides robust indications of rotation. We then apply our methodology on a sample of Abell clusters with z ≲ 0.1 with member galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR10 spectroscopic data base. After excluding a number of substructured clusters, which could provide erroneous indications of rotation, and taking into account the expected fraction of misidentified coherent substructure velocities for rotation, provided by our Monte Carlo simulation analysis, we find that ∼23 per cent of our clusters are rotating under a set of strict criteria. Loosening the strictness of the criteria, on the expense of introducing spurious rotation indications, we find this fraction increasing to ∼28 per cent. We correlate our rotation indicators with the cluster dynamical state, provided either by their Bautz-Morgan type or by their X-ray isophotal shape and find for those clusters showing rotation within 1.5 h^{-1}_{70} Mpc that the significance of their rotation is related to the dynamically younger phases of cluster formation but after the initial anisotropic accretion and merging has been completed. Finally, finding rotational modes in galaxy clusters could lead to the necessity of correcting the dynamical cluster mass calculations.

  7. SEAL FOR ROTATING SHAFT

    DOEpatents

    Coffman, R.T.

    1957-12-10

    A seal is described for a rotatable shaft that must highly effective when the shaft is not rotating but may be less effective while the shaft is rotating. Weights distributed about a sealing disk secured to the shaft press the sealing disk against a tubular section into which the shiilt extends, and whem the shaft rotates, the centrifugal forces on the weights relieve the pressurc of the sealing disk against the tubular section. This action has the very desirible result of minimizing the wear of the rotating disk due to contact with the tubular section, while affording maximum sealing action when it is needed.

  8. Visualizing molecular unidirectional rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kang; Song, Qiying; Gong, Xiaochun; Ji, Qinying; Pan, Haifeng; Ding, Jingxin; Zeng, Heping; Wu, Jian

    2015-07-01

    We directly visualize the spatiotemporal evolution of a unidirectional rotating molecular rotational wave packet. Excited by two time-delayed polarization-skewed ultrashort laser pulses, the cigar- or disk-shaped rotational wave packet is impulsively kicked to unidirectionally rotate as a quantum rotor which afterwards disperses and exhibits field-free revivals. The rich dynamics can be coherently controlled by varying the timing or polarization of the excitation laser pulses. The numerical simulations very well reproduce the experimental observations and intuitively revivify the thoroughgoing evolution of the molecular rotational wave packet of unidirectional spin.

  9. Anomalously weak solar convection.

    PubMed

    Hanasoge, Shravan M; Duvall, Thomas L; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R

    2012-07-24

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures on a spectrum of scales. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations, though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. Here, we analyze observations of the wavefield in the solar photosphere using techniques of time-distance helioseismology to image flows in the solar interior. We downsample and synthesize 900 billion wavefield observations to produce 3 billion cross-correlations, which we average and fit, measuring 5 million wave travel times. Using these travel times, we deduce the underlying flow systems and study their statistics to bound convective velocity magnitudes in the solar interior, as a function of depth and spherical-harmonic degree ℓ. Within the wavenumber band ℓ < 60, convective velocities are 20-100 times weaker than current theoretical estimates. This constraint suggests the prevalence of a different paradigm of turbulence from that predicted by existing models, prompting the question: what mechanism transports the heat flux of a solar luminosity outwards? Advection is dominated by Coriolis forces for wavenumbers ℓ < 60, with Rossby numbers smaller than approximately 10(-2) at r/R([symbol: see text]) = 0.96, suggesting that the Sun may be a much faster rotator than previously thought, and that large-scale convection may be quasi-geostrophic. The fact that isorotation contours in the Sun are not coaligned with the axis of rotation suggests the presence of a latitudinal entropy gradient.

  10. Rotational bursting of interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paddack, S. J.; Rhee, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    Solar radiation pressure is discussed as a cause of rotational bursting, and of eventual elimination of asymmetric dust particles from the solar system, by a windmill effect. The predicted life span with this process for metallic particles with radii of 0.00001 to 0.01 cm ranges from 10 to 10,000 years. The effects of magnetic spin damping were considered. This depletion mechanism works faster than the traditional Poynting-Robertson effect by approximately one order of magnitude for metallic particles and about two orders of magnitude for nonmetallic particles.

  11. Rotation of a Moonless Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Barnes, Jason W.; Chambers, John E.

    2013-01-01

    We numerically explore the obliquity (axial tilt) variations of a hypothetical moonless Earth. Previous work has shown that the Earth's Moon stabilizes Earth's obliquity such that it remains within a narrow range, between 22.1 deg and 24.5 deg. Without lunar influence, a frequency-map analysis by Laskar et al. showed that the obliquity could vary between 0 deg. and 85 deg. This has left an impression in the astrobiology community that a large moon is necessary to maintain a habitable climate on an Earth-like planet. Using a modified version of the orbital integrator mercury, we calculate the obliquity evolution for moonless Earths with various initial conditions for up to 4 Gyr. We find that while obliquity varies significantly more than that of the actual Earth over 100,000 year timescales, the obliquity remains within a constrained range, typically 20-25 deg. in extent, for timescales of hundreds of millions of years. None of our Solar System integrations in which planetary orbits behave in a typical manner show obliquity accessing more than 65% of the full range allowed by frequency-map analysis. The obliquities of moonless Earths that rotate in the retrograde direction are more stable than those of pro-grade rotators. The total obliquity range explored for moonless Earths with rotation periods shorter than 12 h is much less than that for slower-rotating moonless Earths. A large moon thus does not seem to be needed to stabilize the obliquity of an Earth-like planet on timescales relevant to the development of advanced life.

  12. Predictors of human rotation.

    PubMed

    Stochl, Jan; Croudace, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Why some humans prefer to rotate clockwise rather than anticlockwise is not well understood. This study aims to identify the predictors of the preferred rotation direction in humans. The variables hypothesised to influence rotation preference include handedness, footedness, sex, brain hemisphere lateralisation, and the Coriolis effect (which results from geospatial location on the Earth). An online questionnaire allowed us to analyse data from 1526 respondents in 97 countries. Factor analysis showed that the direction of rotation should be studied separately for local and global movements. Handedness, footedness, and the item hypothesised to measure brain hemisphere lateralisation are predictors of rotation direction for both global and local movements. Sex is a predictor of the direction of global rotation movements but not local ones, and both sexes tend to rotate clockwise. Geospatial location does not predict the preferred direction of rotation. Our study confirms previous findings concerning the influence of handedness, footedness, and sex on human rotation; our study also provides new insight into the underlying structure of human rotation movements and excludes the Coriolis effect as a predictor of rotation.

  13. The solar cycle variation of ozone in the stratosphere inferred from Nimbus 7 and NOAA 11 satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, S.; Mcpeters, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    The combined Nimbus 7 solar backscattered ultraviolet (SBUV) and NOAA 11 SBUV/2 ozone data, covering a period of more than a solar cycle (about 15 years), are used to study the UV response of ozone in the stratosphere. The study shows that about 2% change in total column ozone and about 5-7% change in ozone mixing ratio in the upper stratosphere (0.7 to 2 hPa) may be attributed to the change in the solar UV flux over a solar cycle. In the upper stratosphere, where photochemical processes are expected to play a major role, the measured solar cycle variation of ozone is significantly larger than inferred either from the photochemical models or from the ozone response to the 27-day solar UV modulation. For example, the observed solar cycle related change in ozone mixing ratio at 2 hPa is about 1% for 1% change in the solar UV flux near 200 nm. The inferred change in ozone from either the photochemical models or from the 27-day ozone-UV response is about a factor of 2-3 lower than this value.

  14. The solar cycle variation of ozone in the stratosphere inferred from Nimbus 7 and NOAA 11 satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.; Mcpeters, R.D.

    1994-10-01

    The combined Nimbus 7 solar backscattered ultraviolet (SBUV) and NOAA 11 SBUV/2 ozone data, covering a period of more than a solar cycle (about 15 years), are used to study the UV response of ozone in the stratosphere. The study shows that about 2% change in total column ozone and about 5-7% change in ozone mixing ratio in the upper stratosphere (0.7 to 2 hPa) may be attributed to the change in the solar UV flux over a solar cycle. In the upper stratosphere, where photochemical processes are expected to play a major role, the measured solar cycle variation of ozone is significantly larger than inferred either from the photochemical models or from the ozone response to the 27-day solar UV modulation. For example, the observed solar cycle related change in ozone mixing ratio at 2 hPa is about 1% for 1% change in the solar UV flux near 200 nm. The inferred change in ozone from either the photochemical models or from the 27-day ozone-UV response is about a factor of 2-3 lower than this value.

  15. Core rotational dynamics and geological events

    PubMed

    Greff-Lefftz; Legros

    1999-11-26

    A study of Earth's fluid core oscillations induced by lunar-solar tidal forces, together with tidal secular deceleration of Earth's axial rotation, shows that the rotational eigenfrequency of the fluid core and some solar tidal waves were in resonance around 3.0 x 10(9), 1.8 x 10(9), and 3 x 10(8) years ago. The associated viscomagnetic frictional power at the core boundaries may be converted into heat and would destabilize the D" thermal layer, leading to the generation of deep-mantle plumes, and would also increase the temperature at the fluid core boundaries, perturbing the core dynamo process. Such phenomena could account for large-scale episodes of continental crust formation, the generation of flood basalts, and abrupt changes in geomagnetic reversal frequency.

  16. Differential rotation in rapidly rotating early-type stars. I. Motivations for combined spectroscopic and interferometric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorec, J.; Frémat, Y.; Domiciano de Souza, A.; Delaa, O.; Stee, P.; Mourard, D.; Cidale, L.; Martayan, C.; Georgy, C.; Ekström, S.

    2011-02-01

    Context. Since the external regions of the envelopes of rapidly rotating early-type stars are unstable to convection, a coupling may exist between the convection and the internal rotation. Aims: We explore what can be learned from spectroscopic and interferometric observations about the properties of the rotation law in the external layers of these objects. Methods: Using simple relations between the entropy and specific rotational quantities, some of which are found to be efficient at accounting for the solar differential rotation in the convective region, we derived analytical solutions that represent possible differential rotations in the envelope of early-type stars. A surface latitudinal differential rotation may not only be an external imprint of the inner rotation, but induces changes in the stellar geometry, the gravitational darkening, the aspect of spectral line profiles, and the emitted spectral energy distribution. Results: By studying the equation of the surface of stars with non-conservative rotation laws, we conclude that objects undergo geometrical deformations that are a function of the latitudinal differential rotation able to be scrutinized both spectroscopically and by interferometry. The combination of Fourier analysis of spectral lines with model atmospheres provides independent estimates of the surface latitudinal differential rotation and the inclination angle. Models of stars at different evolutionary stages rotating with internal conservative rotation laws were calculated to show that the Roche approximation can be safely used to account for the gravitational potential. The surface temperature gradient in rapid rotators induce an acceleration to the surface angular velocity. Although a non-zero differential rotation parameter may indicate that the rotation is neither rigid nor shellular underneath the stellar surface, still further information, perhaps non-radial pulsations, is needed to determine its characteristics as a function of depth

  17. Mounts For Selective Rotation And Translation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Blade-in-groove bearings stacked to obtain necessary degrees of freedom. Mounting system allows panels to be tilted, rotated, and translated selectively. Developed for large solar reflectors or antennas composed of hexagonal panels about 6 ft. wide and 6 in. thick. With system, each panel tilted around two axes to focus antenna. At same time, each panel translates along these axes to accommodate thermal expansion and contraction without affecting focus.

  18. Cylindrical rotating triboelectric nanogenerator.

    PubMed

    Bai, Peng; Zhu, Guang; Liu, Ying; Chen, Jun; Jing, Qingshen; Yang, Weiqing; Ma, Jusheng; Zhang, Gong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-07-23

    We demonstrate a cylindrical rotating triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) based on sliding electrification for harvesting mechanical energy from rotational motion. The rotating TENG is based on a core-shell structure that is made of distinctly different triboelectric materials with alternative strip structures on the surface. The charge transfer is strengthened with the formation of polymer nanoparticles on surfaces. During coaxial rotation, a contact-induced electrification and the relative sliding between the contact surfaces of the core and the shell result in an "in-plane" lateral polarization, which drives the flow of electrons in the external load. A power density of 36.9 W/m(2) (short-circuit current of 90 μA and open-circuit voltage of 410 V) has been achieved by a rotating TENG with 8 strip units at a linear rotational velocity of 1.33 m/s (a rotation rate of 1000 r/min). The output can be further enhanced by integrating more strip units and/or applying larger linear rotational velocity. This rotating TENG can be used as a direct power source to drive small electronics, such as LED bulbs. This study proves the possibility to harvest mechanical energy by TENGs from rotational motion, demonstrating its potential for harvesting the flow energy of air or water for applications such as self-powered environmental sensors and wildlife tracking devices.

  19. The Solar Dynamo Zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Soon, Willie H.; Baliunas, Sallie L.; Hall, Jeffrey C.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Henry, Gregory W.

    2016-05-01

    We present composite time series of Ca II H & K line core emission indices of up to 50 years in length for a set of 27 solar-analog stars (spectral types G0-G5; within ~10% of the solar mass) and the Sun. These unique data are available thanks to the long-term dedicated efforts of the Mount Wilson Observatory HK project, the Lowell Observatory Solar-Stellar Spectrograph, and the National Solar Observatory/Air Force Research Laboratory/Sacremento Peak K-line monitoring program. The Ca II H & K emission originates in the lower chromosphere and is strongly correlated with the presence of magnetic plage regions in the Sun. These synoptic observations allow us to trace the patterns long-term magnetic variability and explore dynamo behavior over a wide range of rotation regimes and stellar evolution timescales.

  20. Solar Probe Plus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, Adam

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Solar Probe Plus mission is planned to be launched in 2018 to study the upper solar corona with both.in-situ and remote sensing instrumentation. The mission will utilize 6 Venus gravity assist maneuver to gradually lower its perihelion to 9.5 Rs below the expected Alfven pOint to study the sub-alfvenic solar wind that is still at least partially co-rotates with the Sun. The detailed science objectives of this mission will be discussed. SPP will have a strong synergy with The ESA/NASA Solar orbiter mission to be launched a year ahead. Both missions will focus on the inner heliosphere and will have complimentary instrumentations. Strategies to exploit this synergy will be also presented.

  1. Coronal hole differential rotation rate observed with SWICS/Ulysses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurbuchen, Th.; Bochsler, P.; von Steiger, R.

    1996-07-01

    We discuss the latitude variation of the coronal hole differential rotation investigating persistent structures in high speed streams as observed from SWICS Ulysses during its first passage of the southern polar hole in 1993-1994. We find a slower rotation rate near the ecliptic than what is inferred from averaged photospheric features, e.g. from sunspots. At intermediate latitudes we find a rate similar to the equatorial rotation rate indicating a quasi-rigid rotation of the polar coronal hole. At latitudes >65° no persistent structures to determine the polar rotation have been observed. For the passage of the southern heliosphere in 1993/94 we find a latitudinal dependence of the sidereal rotation rate of the coronal hole which can be approximated by ωSW=[13.13+1.94 sin2(Θ)]°/day, where Θ denotes the solar latitude.

  2. Turbulent Convection under the Influence of Rotation: Sustaining a Strong Differential Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Allan Sacha; Toomre, Juri

    2002-05-01

    The intense turbulence present in the solar convection zone is a major challenge to both theory and simulation as one tries to understand the origins of the striking differential rotation profile with radius and latitude that has been revealed by helioseismology. The differential rotation must be an essential element in the operation of the solar magnetic dynamo and its cycles of activity, yet there are many aspects of the interplay between convection, rotation, and magnetic fields that are still unclear. We have here carried out a series of three-dimensional numerical simulations of turbulent convection within deep spherical shells using our anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code on massively parallel supercomputers. These studies of the global dynamics of the solar convection zone concentrate on how the differential rotation and meridional circulation are established. We have addressed two issues raised by previous simulations with ASH. First, can solutions be obtained that possess the apparent solar property that the angular velocity Ω continues to decrease significantly with latitude as the pole is approached? Prior simulations had most of their rotational slowing with latitude confined to the interval from the equator to about 45°. Second, can a strong latitudinal angular velocity contrast ΔΩ be sustained as the convection becomes increasingly more complex and turbulent? There was a tendency for ΔΩ to diminish in some of the turbulent solutions that also required the emerging energy flux to be invariant with latitude. In responding to these questions, five cases of increasingly turbulent convection coupled with rotation have been studied along two paths in parameter space. We have achieved in one case the slow pole behavior comparable to that deduced from helioseismology and have retained in our more turbulent simulations a consistently strong ΔΩ. We have analyzed the transport of angular momentum in establishing such differential rotation and

  3. Diamagnetic pumping in a rotating convection zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchatinov, L. L.; Nepomnyashchikh, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Solar dynamo models require some mechanism for magnetic field concentration near the base of the convection zone in order to generate super-kilogauss toroidal fields with sufficiently large (∼ 1024 Mx) magnetic flux. We consider the downward diamagnetic pumping near the base of the convection zone as a possible concentration mechanism and derive the pumping velocities with allowance for the effect of rotation. Transport velocities for poloidal and toroidal fields differ in rotating fluid. The toroidal field is transported downward along the radius only but the pumping velocity for the poloidal field has an equatorward meridional component also. Previous results for cases of slow and rapid rotation are reproduced and the diamagnetic pumping expressions adapted for use in dynamo models are presented.

  4. Solar physics: Weather of the magnetic Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathis, Stéphane

    2017-04-01

    The Sun is a magnetically active rotating star. Simultaneous observations with the STEREO and SDO space missions reveal solar analogues of planetary Rossby waves that will help forecast space weather.

  5. Influence of projection effects on the observed differential rotation rate in the UV corona.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Salvatore; Giordano, Silvio

    2013-05-01

    Following previous investigations by Giordano and Mancuso [1] and Mancuso and Giordano [2,3] on the differential rotation of the solar corona as obtained through the analysis of the intensity time series of the O VI 1032 Å spectral line observed by the UVCS/SOHO telescope during solar cycle 23, we analysed the possible influence of projection effects of extended coronal structures on the observed differential rotation rate in the ultraviolet corona. Through a simple geometrical model, we found that, especially at higher latitudes, the differential rotation may be less rigid than observed, since features at higher latitudes could be actually linked to much lower coronal structures due to projection effects. At solar maximum, the latitudinal rigidity of the UV corona, with respect to the differential rotating photosphere, has thus to be considered as an upper limit of the possible rigidity. At solar minimum and near the equatorial region throughout the solar cycle, projection effects are negligible.

  6. Rotating cooloing flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kley, Wilhelm; Mathews, William G.

    1995-01-01

    We describe the evolution of the hot interstellar medium in a large, slowly rotating elliptical galaxy. Although the rotation assumed is a small fraction of the circular velocity, in accordance with recent observations, it is sufficient to have a profound influence on the X-ray emission and cooling geometry of the interstellar gas. The hot gas cools into a disk that extends out to approximately 10 kpc. The cool, dusty disks observed in the majority of elliptical galaxies may arise naturally from internal cooling rather than from mergers with gas-rich companions. As a result of angular momentum conservation in the cooling flow, the soft X-ray isophotes are quite noticeably flatter than those of the stellar image. The gas temperature is higer along the rotation axis. The rotational velocity of the gas several kiloparcsecs above the central disk far exceeds the local stellar rotation and approaches the local circular velocity as it flows toward the galactic core. The detailed appearance of the X-ray image and velocity field of the X-ray gas provide information about the global rotational properties of giant ellipticals at radii too distant for optical observations. The overall pattern of rotation in these galaxies retains information about the origin of ellipticals, particularly of their merging history. In ellipticals having radio jets, if the jets are aligned with the rotation axis of the inner cooling flow, rotation within the jet could be sustained by the rotating environment. Since most large ellipticals have modest rotation, the X-ray observations at low spatial resolution, when interpreted with spherical theoretical models, give the impression that hot gas undergoes localized cooling to very low temperatures many kiloparcsecs from the galactic core. We suggest that such apparent cooling can result in a natural way as gas cools onto a rotating disk.

  7. On the fast magnetic rotator regime of stellar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, C. P.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We study the acceleration of the stellar winds of rapidly rotating low mass stars and the transition between the slow magnetic rotator and fast magnetic rotator regimes. We aim to understand the properties of stellar winds in the fast magnetic rotator regime and the effects of magneto-centrifugal forces on wind speeds and mass loss rates. Methods: We extend a solar wind model to 1D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the winds of rotating stars. We test two assumptions for how to scale the wind temperature to other stars and assume the mass loss rate scales as dot{M_star ∝ R_star2 Ω_star1.33 M_star-3.36}, in the unsaturated regime, as estimated from observed rotational evolution. Results: For 1.0 M⊙ stars, the winds can be accelerated to several thousand km s-1, and the effects of magneto-centrifugal forces are much weaker for lower mass stars. We find that the different assumptions for how to scale the wind temperature to other stars lead to significantly different mass loss rates for the rapid rotators. If we assume a constant temperature, the mass loss rates of solar mass stars do not saturate at rapid rotation, which we show to be inconsistent with observed rotational evolution. If we assume the wind temperatures scale positively with rotation, the mass loss rates are only influenced significantly at rotation rates above 75 Ω⊙. We suggest that models with increasing wind speed for more rapid rotators are preferable to those that assume a constant wind speed. If this conclusion is confirmed by more sophisticated wind modelling. it might provide an interesting observational constraint on the properties of stellar winds. All of the codes and output data used in this paper can be downloaded from http://https://zenodo.org/record/160052#.V_y6drWkVC1 or obtained by contacting the author.

  8. ROTATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS DURING ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, B. J.; Li, Y.; Luhmann, J. G.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R. E-mail: yanli@ssl.berkeley.edu E-mail: spiro.k.antiochos@nasa.gov

    2009-06-01

    Understanding the connection between coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and their interplanetary counterparts (ICMEs) is one of the most important problems in solar-terrestrial physics. We calculate the rotation of erupting field structures predicted by numerical simulations of CME initiation via the magnetic breakout model. In this model, the initial potential magnetic field has a multipolar topology and the system is driven by imposing a shear flow at the photospheric boundary. Our results yield insight on how to connect solar observations of the orientation of the filament or polarity inversion line (PIL) in the CME source region, the orientation of the CME axis as inferred from coronagraph images, and the ICME flux rope orientation obtained from in situ measurements. We present the results of two numerical simulations that differ only in the direction of the applied shearing motions (i.e., the handedness of the sheared-arcade systems and their resulting CME fields). In both simulations, eruptive flare reconnection occurs underneath the rapidly expanding sheared fields transforming the ejecta fields into three-dimensional flux rope structures. As the erupting flux ropes propagate through the low corona (from 2 to 4 R{sub sun}) the right-handed breakout flux rope rotates clockwise and the left-handed breakout flux rope rotates counterclockwise, in agreement with recent observations of the rotation of erupting filaments. We find that by 3.5 R {sub sun} the average rotation angle between the flux rope axes and the active region PIL is approximately 50 deg. We discuss the implications of these results for predicting, from the observed chirality of the pre-eruption filament and/or other properties of the CME source region, the direction and amount of rotation that magnetic flux rope structures will experience during eruption. We also discuss the implications of our results for CME initiation models.

  9. Rotational properties of the Maria asteroid family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M.; Choi, Y.; Moon, H.; Byun, Y.; Brosch, N.; Kaplan, M.; Kaynar, S.; Uysal, O.; Guzel, E.; Behrend, R.; Yoon, J.; Mottola, S.; Hellmich, S.; Hinse, T.; Eker, Z.; Park, J.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: The Maria family is regarded as an old-type (˜3 ± 1 Gyr) [1] asteroid family which has experienced substantial collisional and dynamical evolution in the main belt. It is located near the 3:1 Jupiter mean-motion resonance area that supplies near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) to the inner Solar System. Observations: We carried out observations of Maria family asteroids in 134 nights from July 2008 to May 2013 using 0.5-m to 2-m class telescopes at seven observatories in the northern hemisphere, and derived synodic rotational periods for 51 objects, including new periods for 34 asteroids [2]. Results: We found that there is a significant excess of fast and slow rotators in the observed rotation-rate distribution. From the correlations among rotational periods, the amplitudes of lightcurves, and the sizes, we conclude that the rotational properties of the Maria family asteroids have been changed considerably by non-gravitational forces such as the YORP effect. Using the lightcurve inversion method [3,4], we successfully determined pole orientations for 13 Maria members, and found an excess of prograde spins over retrograde spins with a ratio (N_p/N_r) of 3. This implies that the retrograde rotators could have been ejected by the 3:1 resonance into the inner Solar System since the formation of the Maria family. We estimate that approximately 37 to 75 Maria family asteroids larger than 1 km have entered the near-Earth space as per 100 Myr [2].

  10. The rotation-activity relation in M dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Elisabeth R.; Irwin, Jonathan; Charbonneau, David; Berlind, Perry L.; Calkins, Michael L.; Mink, Jessica D.

    2017-01-01

    Main sequence stars with masses below approximately 0.35 solar masses are fully-convective, and are expected to have a different type of magnetic dynamo than solar-type stars. Observationally, the dynamo mechanism can be probed through the relationship between rotation and magnetic activity, and the evolution of these properties. Though M dwarfs are the most common type of star in the galaxy, a lack of observational constraints at ages beyond 1 Gyr has hampered studies of the rotation-activity relation. To address this, we have made new measurements of rotation and magnetic activity in nearby, field-age M dwarfs. Combining our 386 rotation period measurements and 247 new optical spectra with data from the literature, we are able to probe the rotation-activity in M dwarfs with masses from 0.1 to 0.6 solar masses. We observe a threshold in the mass--period plane that separates active and inactive M dwarfs. The threshold coincides with the fast-period edge of the slowly rotating population, at approximately the rotation period at which an era of rapid rotational evolution appears to cease. We confirm that the activity of rapidly rotating M dwarfs maintains a saturated value. We have measured rotation periods as long as 140 days, allowing us to probe the unsaturated regime in detail. Our data show a clear power-law decay in relative H-alpha luminosity as a function Rossby number. We discuss implications for the magnetic dynamo mechanism.We acknowledge funding from the National Science Foundation, the David and Lucile Packard Foundation Fellowship for Science and Engineering, and the John Templeton Foundation. E.R.N. acknowledges support from the NSF through a Graduate Research Fellowship and an Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship.

  11. Magnetic energy flow in the solar wind.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modisette, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the effect of rotation (tangential flow) of the solar wind on the conclusions of Whang (1971) suggesting an increase in the solar wind velocity due to the conversion of magnetic energy to kinetic energy. It is shown that the effect of the rotation of the sun on the magnetic energy flow results in most of the magnetic energy being transported by magnetic shear stress near the sun.

  12. Solar terrestrial relationships related to thunderstorms and BUV dark current and ozone data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Solar terrestrial interactions as they affect Nimbus 4 BUV dark current and possibly affect thunderstorm occurrence are investigated. A solar wind index is calculated for 1970 to 1971. Dark current enhancements appear to be associated in some way with solar proton events and the solar wind index, but additional investigations by GSFC are required before conclusions can be drawn. Superposed epoch analysis of an index of North American thunderstorm occurrence reveals a discernible increase in the index magnitude on days 1 and 2 following solar proton events. There appears to be little or no 27 day recurrence tendency in thunderstorm occurrence frequency and no association with vorticity area index on a day to day basis.

  13. Solar Tracking Error Analysis of Fresnel Reflector

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiantao; Yan, Junjie; Pei, Jie; Liu, Guanjie

    2014-01-01

    Depending on the rotational structure of Fresnel reflector, the rotation angle of the mirror was deduced under the eccentric condition. By analyzing the influence of the sun tracking rotation angle error caused by main factors, the change rule and extent of the influence were revealed. It is concluded that the tracking errors caused by the difference between the rotation axis and true north meridian, at noon, were maximum under certain conditions and reduced at morning and afternoon gradually. The tracking error caused by other deviations such as rotating eccentric, latitude, and solar altitude was positive at morning, negative at afternoon, and zero at a certain moment of noon. PMID:24895664

  14. Differential Rotation and Angular Momentum Transport Caused by Thermal Convection in a Rotating Spherical Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takehiro, S.; Sasaki, Y.; Hayashi, Y.-Y.; Yamada, M.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate generation mechanisms of differential rotation and angular momentum transport caused by Boussinesq thermal convection in a rotating spherical shell based on weakly nonlinear numerical calculations for various values of the Prandtl and Ekman numbers under a setup similar to the solar convection layer. When the Prandtl number is of order unity or less and the rotation rate of the system is small (the Ekman number is larger than O(10-2)), the structure of thermal convection is not governed by the Taylor-Proudman theorem; banana-type convection cells emerge which follow the spherical shell boundaries rather than the rotation axis. Due to the Coriolis effect, the velocity field associated with those types of convection cells accompanies the Reynolds stress which transports angular momentum from high-latitudes to the equatorial region horizontally, and equatorial prograde flows are produced. The surface and internal distributions of differential rotation realized in this regime are quite similar to those observed in the Sun with helioseismology. These results may suggest that we should apply larger values of the eddy diffusivities than those believed so far when we use a low resolution numerical model for thermal convection in the solar interior.

  15. The Solar-Stellar Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunker, Hannah

    2015-08-01

    The influence of rotation on stellar magnetism, and the importance of the shear layer between a radiative core and the convective envelope for the generation of magnetic fields are key to understanding solar-like dynamos. Despite having an abundance of observational constraints, the answer to the solar dynamo problem remains tantalisingly out of reach. With the advent of space-based instrumentation for asteroseismology including Kepler, CoRoT, and in the future PLATO, we can exploit the sheer number of observations, and complementary techniques to constrain the rotation of Sun-like stars.

  16. Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Király, Péter

    Energetic particles recorded in the Earth environment and in interplanetary space have a multitude of origins, i.e. acceleration and propagation histories. At early days practically all sufficiently energetic particles were considered to have come either from solar flares or from interstellar space. Later on, co-rotating interplanetary shocks, the termination shock of the supersonic solar wind, planetary bow shocks and magnetospheres, and also coronal mass ejections (CME) were recognized as energetic particle sources. It was also recognized that less energetic (suprathermal) particles of solar origin and pick-up ions have also a vital role in giving rise to energetic particles in interplanetary disturbances. The meaning of the term "solar energetic particles" (SEP) is now somewhat vague, but essentially it refers to particles produced in disturbances fairly directly related to solar processes. Variation of intensity fluctuations with energy and with the phase of the solar cycle will be discussed. Particular attention will be given to extremes of time variation, i.e. to very quiet periods and to large events. While quiet-time fluxes are expected to shed light on some basic coronal processes, large events dominate the fluctuation characteristics of cumulated fluence, and the change of that fluctuation with energy and with the phase of the solar cycle may also provide important clues. Mainly ISEE-3 and long-term IMP-8 data will be invoked. Energetic and suprathermal particles that may never escape into interplanetary space may play an important part in heating the corona of the sun.

  17. Solar Wind and Global Electron Hemispheric Power in Solar Minimum Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emery, B. A.; Richardson, I. G.; Evans, D. S.; Rich, F. J.; Wilson, G.

    2008-12-01

    We assess the periodicities of the hourly and daily solar wind velocity (Vsw) and average global electron auroral hemispheric power (Hpeg) with Lomb-Scargle (L-S) and Fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs) using three Carrington Rotations (CRs) to a year or more of data in two different solar minimum periods. The first Whole Sun Month (WSM) interval (96223-96252) was during the last solar minimum where the solar magnetic field relaxed into a dipole. A strong 'semiannual' periodicity in Vsw maximizing in equinoxes was found, which enhanced the equinoctial maxima found in Hpeg (and Kp) due to the preferred solar wind and magnetospheric reconnection during equinoxes. In the present solar minimum, the solar magnetic field has considerable quadrupole components during the Whole Heliospheric Interval (WHI, 08080-08107). Hpeg exhibits solar rotational periodicities similar to those for Vsw using both L-S and FFT analyses, where the 9- day periodicity is particularly strong in the present solar minimum period. The 9-day periodicity in the WHI CR was caused by three periods of slow-speed solar wind from near the ecliptic plane as seen in the sign of IMF Bx. Periodicities are examined in Vsw since 1972, and in Hpeg since 1978 to assess solar cycle variations. Periodicities longer than 100 days are not as strong or as well correlated between Vsw and Hpeg compared to the shorter solar rotational periodicities.

  18. Diamagnetism of rotating plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Young, W. C.; Hassam, A. B.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Ellis, R. F.; Teodorescu, C.

    2011-11-15

    Diamagnetism and magnetic measurements of a supersonically rotating plasma in a shaped magnetic field demonstrate confinement of plasma pressure along the magnetic field resulting from centrifugal force. The Grad-Shafranov equation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic force balance, including supersonic rotation, is solved to confirm that the predicted angular velocity is in agreement with spectroscopic measurements of the Doppler shifts.

  19. Wideband rotating junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochernyaev, V. N.

    1993-06-01

    Rotating junctions of coaxial-waveguide and waveguide type with a traveling wave coefficient exceeding 0.8 in a wide frequency range are considered. The design of these junctions is based on a method of the theory of electrodynamic circuits. Numerical results are obtained for rotating junctions of partially filled rectangular waveguide type and their particular cases.

  20. The Weighted Oblimin Rotation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano

    2000-01-01

    Demonstrates that the weighting procedure proposed by E. Cureton and S. Mulaik (1975) can be applied to the Direct Oblimin approach of D. Clarkson and R. Jennrich (1988) to provide good results. The rotation method obtained is called Weighted Oblimin. Compared this method to other rotation methods with favorable results. (SLD)

  1. SMAP Faraday Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, David

    2016-01-01

    Faraday rotation is a change in the polarization as signal propagates through the ionosphere. At L-band it is necessary to correct for this change and measurements are made on the spacecraft of the rotation angle. These figures show that there is good agreement between the SMAP measurements (blue) and predictions based on models (red).

  2. Rotatable shear plate interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Duffus, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotatable shear plate interferometer comprises a transparent shear plate mounted obliquely in a tubular supporting member at 45.degree. with respect to its horizontal center axis. This tubular supporting member is supported rotatably around its center axis and a collimated laser beam is made incident on the shear plate along this center axis such that defocus in different directions can be easily measured.

  3. Dynamical evolution of comet nucleus rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeres, D. J.; Sidorenko, V. V.; Neishtadt, A. I.; Vasiliev, A. A.

    2002-09-01

    The rotational dynamics of outgassing cometary nuclei are investigated analytically. We develop a general theory for the evolution of a comet nucleus' rotation state using averaging theory and assuming that the outgassing torques are a function of solar insolation and heliocentric distance. The resulting solutions are a function of the nucleus inertia ellipsoid, its outgassing properties, its heliocentric orbit, and the assumed distribution of active regions on its surface. We find that the long-term evolution of the comet nucleus rotation is a strong function of the distribution of active regions over its surface. In particular, we find that nuclei with nearly axisymmetric inertia ellipsoids and a uniformly active surface will tend towards a rotation state that has a nutation angle of ~ 55 degrees and its angular momentum perpendicular to the sun-perihelion direction. If such a comet nucleus has only one isolated active region, it will tend towards a zero nutation angle with its approximate symmetry axis and rotational angular momentum aligned parallel to the sun-perihelion direction. In the general case for an inertia ellipsoid that is not close to being axisymmetric we find a much richer set of possible steady-state solutions that are stable, ranging from rotation about the maximum moment of the inertia axis, to SAM and LAM non-principal axis rotation states. The resulting stable rotation states are a strong function of outgassing activity distribution, which we show using a simplified model of the comet Halley nucleus. Also, we demonstrate that comet Borrely observations are consistent with a stable rotation state. Our results can be used to discriminate between competing theories of comet outgassing based on a nucelus' rotation state. They also allow for a range of plausible a priori constraints to be placed on a comet's rotation state to aid in the interpretation of its outgassing structure. This work was supported by the NASA JURRISS program under Grant NAG5

  4. Equations for Solar Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Merlaud, Alexis; De Mazière, Martine; Hermans, Christian; Cornet, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Direct sunlight absorption by trace gases can be used to quantify them and investigate atmospheric chemistry. In such experiments, the main optical apparatus is often a grating or a Fourier transform spectrometer. A solar tracker based on motorized rotating mirrors is commonly used to direct the light along the spectrometer axis, correcting for the apparent rotation of the Sun. Calculating the Sun azimuth and altitude for a given time and location can be achieved with high accuracy but different sources of angular offsets appear in practice when positioning the mirrors. A feedback on the motors, using a light position sensor close to the spectrometer, is almost always needed. This paper aims to gather the main geometrical formulas necessary for the use of a widely used kind of solar tracker, based on two 45° mirrors in altazimuthal set-up with a light sensor on the spectrometer, and to illustrate them with a tracker developed by our group for atmospheric research. PMID:22666019

  5. Solar tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, P. R.; Scott, D. R. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A solar tracker for a solar collector is described in detail. The collector is angularly oriented by a motor wherein the outputs of two side-by-side photodetectors are discriminated as to three ranges: a first corresponding to a low light or darkness condition; a second corresponding to light intensity lying in an intermediate range; and a third corresponding to light above an intermediate range, direct sunlight. The first output drives the motor to a selected maximum easterly angular position; the second enables the motor to be driven westerly at the Earth rotational rate; and the third output, the separate outputs of the two photodetectors, differentially controls the direction of rotation of the motor to effect actual tracking of the Sun.

  6. Equations for solar tracking.

    PubMed

    Merlaud, Alexis; De Mazière, Martine; Hermans, Christian; Cornet, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Direct sunlight absorption by trace gases can be used to quantify them and investigate atmospheric chemistry. In such experiments, the main optical apparatus is often a grating or a Fourier transform spectrometer. A solar tracker based on motorized rotating mirrors is commonly used to direct the light along the spectrometer axis, correcting for the apparent rotation of the Sun. Calculating the Sun azimuth and altitude for a given time and location can be achieved with high accuracy but different sources of angular offsets appear in practice when positioning the mirrors. A feedback on the motors, using a light position sensor close to the spectrometer, is almost always needed. This paper aims to gather the main geometrical formulas necessary for the use of a widely used kind of solar tracker, based on two 45° mirrors in altazimuthal set-up with a light sensor on the spectrometer, and to illustrate them with a tracker developed by our group for atmospheric research.

  7. Solar tracking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, P. R.; Scott, D. R.

    1981-04-01

    A solar tracker for a solar collector is described in detail. The collector is angularly oriented by a motor wherein the outputs of two side-by-side photodetectors are discriminated as to three ranges: a first corresponding to a low light or darkness condition; a second corresponding to light intensity lying in an intermediate range; and a third corresponding to light above an intermediate range, direct sunlight. The first output drives the motor to a selected maximum easterly angular position; the second enables the motor to be driven westerly at the Earth rotational rate; and the third output, the separate outputs of the two photodetectors, differentially controls the direction of rotation of the motor to effect actual tracking of the Sun.

  8. Rotation sensor switch

    DOEpatents

    Sevec, John B.

    1978-01-01

    A protective device to provide a warning if a piece of rotating machinery slows or stops comprises a pair of hinged weights disposed to rotate on a rotating shaft of the equipment. When the equipment is rotating, the weights remain in a plane essentially perpendicular to the shaft and constitute part of an electrical circuit that is open. When the shaft slows or stops, the weights are attracted to a pair of concentric electrically conducting disks disposed in a plane perpendicular to the shaft and parallel to the plane of the weights when rotating. A disk magnet attracts the weights to the electrically conducting plates and maintains the electrical contact at the plates to complete an electrical circuit that can then provide an alarm signal.

  9. Mixing in the solar tachocline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Allan Sacha

    We conduct numerical simulations of updated solar models including a physical treatment of the tachocline (Spiegel & Zahn 1992), the rotational transition layer localized at the base of the solar convection zone. We first describe what is the current understanding of this thin shear layer. We then show that we improve substantially the agreement between the models and the observed Sun by taking into account the macroscopic mixing occurring within this region.

  10. Molded polymer solar water heater

    DOEpatents

    Bourne, Richard C.; Lee, Brian E.

    2004-11-09

    A solar water heater has a rotationally-molded water box and a glazing subassembly disposed over the water box that enhances solar gain and provides an insulating air space between the outside environment and the water box. When used with a pressurized water system, an internal heat exchanger is integrally molded within the water box. Mounting and connection hardware is included to provide a rapid and secure method of installation.

  11. On shear-induced turbulence in rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathis, S.; Palacios, A.; Zahn, J.-P.

    2004-10-01

    We review various prescriptions which have been proposed for the turbulent transport of matter and angular momentum in differentially rotating stellar radiation zones. A new prescription is presented for the horizontal transport associated with the anisotropic shear turbulence which is produced by the differential rotation in latitude; this ``β-viscosity'' is drawn from torque measurements in the classical Couette-Taylor experiment (Richard & Zahn \\cite{Richard99}, A&A, 347, 734). Its implementation in a stellar evolution code leads to enhanced mixing, as illustrated by models of a rotating main-sequence star of 1.5 solar mass.

  12. Time-series Doppler images and surface differential rotation of the effectively single, rapidly rotating K-giant KU Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kővári, Zs.; Künstler, A.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Carroll, T. A.; Weber, M.; Kriskovics, L.; Oláh, K.; Vida, K.; Granzer, T.

    2016-11-01

    Context. According to most stellar dynamo theories, differential rotation (DR) plays a crucial role in the generation of toroidal magnetic fields. Numerical models predict surface differential rotation to be anti-solar for rapidly rotating giant stars, i.e. their surface angular velocity could increase with stellar latitude. However, surface differential rotation has been derived only for a handful of individual giant stars to date. Aims: The spotted surface of the K-giant KU Pegasi is investigated in order to detect its time evolution and to quantify the surface differential rotation. Methods: We present 11 Doppler images from spectroscopic data collected with the robotic telescope STELLA between 2006 and 2011. All maps are obtained with the surface reconstruction code iMap. Differential rotation is extracted from these images by detecting systematic (latitude-dependent) spot displacements. We apply a cross-correlation technique to find the best differential rotation law. Results: The surface of KU Peg shows cool spots at all latitudes and one persistent warm spot at high latitude. A small cool polar spot exists for most but not all of the epochs. Re-identification of spots in at least two consecutive maps is mostly possible only at middle and high latitudes and thus restricts the differential-rotation determination mainly to these latitudes. Our cross-correlation analysis reveals solar-like differential rotation with a surface shear of α = + 0.040 ± 0.006, i.e., approximately five times weaker than on the Sun. We also derive a more accurate and consistent set of stellar parameters for KU Peg including a small Li abundance of ten times less than solar. Based on data obtained with the STELLA robotic observatory in Tenerife, an AIP facility jointly operated by AIP and IAC.

  13. Rotatable seal assembly. [Patent application; rotating targets

    DOEpatents

    Logan, C.M.; Garibaldi, J.L.

    1980-11-12

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

  14. Rotating reactor studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Glyn O.

    1991-01-01

    Undesired gravitational effects such as convection or sedimentation in a fluid can sometimes be avoided or decreased by the use of a closed chamber uniformly rotated about a horizontal axis. In a previous study, the spiral orbits of a heavy or buoyant particle in a uniformly rotating fluid were determined. The particles move in circles, and spiral in or out under the combined effects of the centrifugal force and centrifugal buoyancy. A optimization problem for the rotation rate of a cylindrical reactor rotated about its axis and containing distributed particles was formulated and solved. Related studies in several areas are addressed. A computer program based on the analysis was upgraded by correcting some minor errors, adding a sophisticated screen-and-printer graphics capability and other output options, and by improving the automation. The design, performance, and analysis of a series of experiments with monodisperse polystyrene latex microspheres in water were supported to test the theory and its limitations. The theory was amply confirmed at high rotation rates. However, at low rotation rates (1 rpm or less) the assumption of uniform solid-body rotation of the fluid became invalid, and there were increasingly strong secondary motions driven by variations in the mean fluid density due to variations in the particle concentration. In these tests the increase in the mean fluid density due to the particles was of order 0.015 percent. To a first approximation, these flows are driven by the buoyancy in a thin crescent-shaped depleted layer on the descending side of the rotating reactor. This buoyancy distribution is balanced by viscosity near the walls, and by the Coriolis force in the interior. A full analysis is beyond the scope of this study. Secondary flows are likely to be stronger for buoyant particles, which spiral in towards the neutral point near the rotation axis under the influence of their centrifugal buoyancy. This is because the depleted layer is

  15. Chaotic rotation of Hyperion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binzel, R. P.; Green, J. R.; Opal, C. B.

    1986-01-01

    Thomas et al. (1984) analyzed 14 Voyager 2 images of Saturn's satellite Hyperion and interpreted them to be consistent with a coherent (nonchaotic) rotation period of 13.1 days. This interpretation was criticized by Peale and Wisdom (1984), who argued that the low sampling frequency of Voyager data does not allow chaotic or nonchaotic rotation to be distinguished. New observations obtained with a higher sampling frequency are reported here which conclusively show that the 13.1 day period found by Thomas et al. was not due to coherent rotation.

  16. Method for Design Rotation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    desirability of a rotation as a function of the set of planar angles. Criteria for the symmetry of the design (such as the same set of factor levels for...P is -1. Hence there is no theoretical problem in obtaining rotations of a design; there are only the practical questions Why rotate a design? And...star points, which can be represented in a shorthand notation by the permutations of (±1,0, "’" , 0), and (c) factorial points, which are a two- level

  17. Rotational polarities of sudden impulses in the magnetotail lobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawano, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Kokubun, S.; Lepping, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    A sudden impulse (SI) is a sudden change in the magnetic field strength which is caused by a change in the solar wind pressure and is observed throughout the magnetosphere. In this report we have examined the rotations of the magnetic field vectors at times of SIs in the magnetotail lobe, by using IMP 6, 7, and 8 magnetometer data. The following properties have been found: (1) at the time of SI the arrowhead of the magnetic vector tends to rotate in one plane; (2) the plane of rotation tends to include the unperturbed magnetic field vector; (3) the plane of rotation tends to be aligned with the radial direction from the magnetotail axis; and (4) the magnetic vectors have a particular rotational polarity: when the plane of rotation is viewed so that the Sun is to the right of the viewed plane and the magnetotail axis is to the bottom, the arrowhead of the vector tends to rotate counterclockwise in this plane. These magnetic vector properties are consistent with those expected when part of an increase in solar wind lateral pressure squeezes the magnetotail axisymmetrically while moving tailward.

  18. Rotating mobile launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    Apparatus holds remotely piloted arm that accelerates until launching speed is reached. Then vehicle and counterweight at other end of arm are released simultaneously to avoid structural damage from unbalanced rotating forces.

  19. The Rotating Mirror.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses theory of the rotating mirror, its use in measuring the velocity of the electrical signal in wires, and the velocity of light. Concludes with a description of the manometric flame apparatus developed for analyzing sound waves. (SK)

  20. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... cuff are common. They include tendinitis, bursitis, and injuries such as tears. Rotator cuff tendons can become ... cuff depends on age, health, how severe the injury is, and how long you've had the ...

  1. Rotator cuff problems

    MedlinePlus

    Miller RH III, Azar FM, Throckmorton TW. Shoulder and elbow injuries. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. ... Krishnan SG. Rotator cuff and impingement lesions. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic ...

  2. Rotator cuff repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... presentations/100229.htm Rotator cuff repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  3. Solar-Geophysical Data Number 542, October 1989. Part 2 (comprehensive reports). Data for April 1989 and miscellaneous

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, H.E.

    1989-10-01

    Contents: detailed index for 1989; data for April 1989 -- solar flares, solar radio bursts at fixed frequencies, interplanetary solar particles and plasma, solar x-ray radiation from GOES satellite, mass ejections from the sun, active prominences and filaments; miscellaneous data -- Meudon Carte synoptique carrington rotations 1811-1812, solar ultraviolet radiation Nimbus 7 November 1978-October 1984.

  4. Rotator cuff injuries.

    PubMed

    Crusher, R H

    2000-07-01

    Different types of rotator cuff injuries frequently present to Accident and Emergency departments and minor injury units but can be difficult to differentiate clinically. This brief case study describes the examination and diagnosis of related shoulder injuries, specifically rotator cuff tears/disruption and calcifying supraspinatus tendinitis. The relevant anatomy and current therapies for these injuries is also discussed to enable the emergency nurse practitioner to have a greater understanding of the theory surrounding their diagnosis and treatments.

  5. Rotational rate sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Steven L.

    2002-01-01

    A rate sensor for angular/rotational acceleration includes a housing defining a fluid cavity essentially completely filled with an electrolyte fluid. Within the housing, such as a toroid, ions in the fluid are swept during movement from an excitation electrode toward one of two output electrodes to provide a signal for directional rotation. One or more ground electrodes within the housing serve to neutralize ions, thus preventing any effect at the other output electrode.

  6. Rotational spectrum of phenylglycinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simão, Alcides; Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2014-11-01

    Solid samples of phenylglycinol were vaporized by laser ablation and investigated through rotational spectroscopy in a supersonic expansion using two different techniques: chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy and narrow band molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. One conformer, bearing an O-H···N and an N-H···π intramolecular hydrogen bonds, could be successfully identified by comparison of the experimental rotational and 14N nuclear quadruple coupling constants with those predicted theoretically.

  7. Rotating arc spark plug

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

    2003-05-27

    A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

  8. Instability in Rotating Machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings contain 45 papers on a wide range of subjects including flow generated instabilities in fluid flow machines, cracked shaft detection, case histories of instability phenomena in compressors, turbines, and pumps, vibration control in turbomachinery (including antiswirl techniques), and the simulation and estimation of destabilizing forces in rotating machines. The symposium was held to serve as an update on the understanding and control of rotating machinery instability problems.

  9. Electromagnetic rotational actuation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Alexander Lee

    2010-08-01

    There are many applications that need a meso-scale rotational actuator. These applications have been left by the wayside because of the lack of actuation at this scale. Sandia National Laboratories has many unique fabrication technologies that could be used to create an electromagnetic actuator at this scale. There are also many designs to be explored. In this internship exploration of the designs and fabrications technologies to find an inexpensive design that can be used for prototyping the electromagnetic rotational actuator.

  10. SOLAR MAGNETIZED 'TORNADOES': RELATION TO FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Su Yang; Veronig, Astrid; Temmer, Manuela; Wang Tongjiang; Gan Weiqun

    2012-09-10

    Solar magnetized 'tornadoes', a phenomenon discovered in the solar atmosphere, appear as tornado-like structures in the corona but are rooted in the photosphere. Like other solar phenomena, solar tornadoes are a feature of magnetized plasma and therefore differ distinctly from terrestrial tornadoes. Here we report the first analysis of solar 'tornadoes' (two papers which focused on different aspects of solar tornadoes were published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters and Nature, respectively, during the revision of this Letter). A detailed case study of two events indicates that they are rotating vertical magnetic structures probably driven by underlying vortex flows in the photosphere. They usually exist as a group and are related to filaments/prominences, another important solar phenomenon whose formation and eruption are still mysteries. Solar tornadoes may play a distinct role in the supply of mass and twists to filaments. These findings could lead to a new explanation of filament formation and eruption.

  11. Rotational Spectrum of Sarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, A. R. Hight; Suenram, R. D.; Samuels, Alan; Jensen, James; Ellzy, Michael W.; Lochner, J. Michael; Zeroka, Daniel

    2001-05-01

    As part of an effort to examine the possibility of using molecular-beam Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy to unambiguously detect and monitor chemical warfare agents, we report the first observation and assignment of the rotational spectrum of the nerve agent Sarin (GB) (Methylphosphonofluoridic acid 1-methyl-ethyl ester, CAS #107-44-8) at frequencies between 10 and 22 GHz. Only one of the two low-energy conformers of this organophosphorus compound (C4H10FO2P) was observed in the rotationally cold (Trot<2 K) molecular beam. The experimental asymmetric-rotor ground-state rotational constants of this conformer are A=2874.0710(9) MHz, B=1168.5776(4) MHz, C=1056.3363(4) MHz (Type A standard uncertainties are given, i.e., 1σ), as obtained from a least-squares analysis of 74 a-, b-, and c-type rotational transitions. Several of the transitions are split into doublets due to the internal rotation of the methyl group attached to the phosphorus. The three-fold-symmetry barrier to internal rotation estimated from these splittings is 677.0(4) cm-1. Ab initio electronic structure calculations using Hartree-Fock, density functional, and Moller-Plesset perturbation theories have also been made. The structure of the lowest-energy conformer determined from a structural optimization at the MP2/6-311G** level of theory is consistent with our experimental findings.

  12. Anomalously weak solar convection

    PubMed Central

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures on a spectrum of scales. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations, though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. Here, we analyze observations of the wavefield in the solar photosphere using techniques of time-distance helioseismology to image flows in the solar interior. We downsample and synthesize 900 billion wavefield observations to produce 3 billion cross-correlations, which we average and fit, measuring 5 million wave travel times. Using these travel times, we deduce the underlying flow systems and study their statistics to bound convective velocity magnitudes in the solar interior, as a function of depth and spherical-harmonic degree ℓ. Within the wavenumber band ℓ < 60, convective velocities are 20–100 times weaker than current theoretical estimates. This constraint suggests the prevalence of a different paradigm of turbulence from that predicted by existing models, prompting the question: what mechanism transports the heat flux of a solar luminosity outwards? Advection is dominated by Coriolis forces for wavenumbers ℓ < 60, with Rossby numbers smaller than approximately 10-2 at r/R⊙ = 0.96, suggesting that the Sun may be a much faster rotator than previously thought, and that large-scale convection may be quasi-geostrophic. The fact that isorotation contours in the Sun are not coaligned with the axis of rotation suggests the presence of a latitudinal entropy gradient. PMID:22665774

  13. Magnetospheres in the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Mcnutt, R.L.

    1984-11-01

    Intrinsic and induced magnetospheres of planets, moons, and comets in the solar system are described. Magnetospheric electric fields, the plasmasphere, rotational effects, and corotation and convection dominated intrinsic magnetospheres are considered. Supersonic and subsonic interactions in induced magnetospheres are discussed. (ESA)

  14. A measurement of the shape of the solar disk: The solar quadrupole moment, the solar octopole moment, and the advance of perihelion of the planet mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Lydon, T.J.; Sofia, S.

    1996-01-01

    The Solar Disk Sextant experiment has measured the solar angular diameter for a variety of solar latitudes. Combined with solar surface angular rotation data, the solar quadrupole moment {ital J}{sub 2} and the solar octopole moment {ital J}{sub 4} have been derived first by assuming constant internal angular rotation on cylinders and then by assuming constant internal angular rotation on cones. We have derived values of 1.8{times}10{sup {minus}7} for {ital J}{sub 2} and 9.8{times}10{sup {minus}7} for {ital J}{sub 4}. We conclude with a discussion of errors and address the prediction of general relativity for the rate of advance of perihelion of the planet Mercury. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  15. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    DOEpatents

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  16. The Role of Rotation in the Evolution of Massive Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lanz, Thierry M.

    2003-01-01

    Recent evolutionary models of massive stars predict important effects of rotation including: increasing the rate of mass loss; lowering the effective gravity; altering the evolutionary track on the Hertzsprung-Russel Diagram (HRD); extending the main-sequence phase (both on the HR diagram and in time); and mixing of CNO-processed elements up to the stellar surface. Observations suggest that rotation is a more important factor at lower metallicities because of higher initial rotational velocities and weaker winds. This makes the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), a low-metallicity galaxy (Z=0.2 solar Z), an excellent environment for discerning the role of rotation in massive stars. We report on a FUSE+STIS+optical spectral analysis of 17 O-type stars in the SMC, where we found an enormous range in N abundances. Three stars in the sample have the same (low) CN abundances as the nebular material out of which they formed, namely C=0.085 solar C and N=0.034 solar N. However, more than half show N approx. solar N, an enrichment factor of 30X! Such unexpectedly high levels of N have ramifications for the evolution of massive stars including precursors to supernovae. They also raise questions about the sources of nitrogen in the early universe. This study was supported in part by grants from NASA's ADP, HST GO-7437, and FUSE B134.

  17. The Role of Rotation in the Evolution of Massive Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lanz, Thierry M.

    2002-01-01

    Recent evolutionary models of massive stars predict important effects of rotation including: increasing the rate of mass-loss; lowering the effective gravity; altering the evolutionary track on the HRD; extending the main-sequence phase (both on the HR diagram and in time); and mixing of CNO-processed elements up to the stellar surface. Observations suggest that rotation is a more important factor at lower metallicities because of higher initial rotational velocities and weaker winds. This makes the SMC, a low-metallicity galaxy (Z= 0.2 solar Z), an excellent environment for discerning the role of rotation in massive stars. We report on a FUSE + STIS + optical spectral analysis of 17 O-type stars in the SMC, where we found an enormous range in N abundances. Three stars in the sample have the same (low) CN abundances as the nebular material out of which they formed, namely C = 0.085 solar C and N = 0.034 solar N. However, more than half show N approx. solar N, an enrichment factor of 30X! Such unexpectedly high levels of N have ramifications for the evolution of massive stars including precursors to supernovae. They also raise questions about the sources of nitrogen in the early universe.

  18. Dynamical evolution of comet nucleus rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeres, D. J.; Sidorenko, V. V.; Neishtadt, A. I.; Vasiliev, A. A.

    2001-11-01

    The rotational dynamics of outgassing cometary nuclei are investigated analytically using dynamical systems theory. We develop a general theory for the averaged evolution of a comet nucleus rotation state assuming that the nucleus is a spheroid (either prolate or oblate) and that the outgassing torques are a function of solar insolation and heliocentric distance. The resulting solutions are a function of the comet outgassing properties, its heliocentric orbit, and the assumed distribution of active regions on its surface. We find that the long-term evolution of the comet nucleus rotation is a strong function of the distribution of active regions over its surface. Specifically, we find that a comet nucleus with a uniformly active surface will tend towards a rotation state with a nutation angle of ~ 55 degrees and an angular momentum perpendicular to the sun-perihelion direction. Conversely, a comet nucleus with an isolated active region will tend towards a zero nutation angle with its symmetry axis and angular momentum aligned parallel to the sun-perihelion direction. For active surface regions between these extremes we find 4 qualitatively different dynamical outcomes. In all cases, the theory predicts that the comet nucleus angular momentum will have a secular increase, a phenomenon that could contribute to nucleus splitting of active comets. These results can be used to discriminate between competing theories of comet outgassing based on a nucelus' rotation state. They also allow for a range of plausible a priori constraints to be placed on a comet's rotation state to aid in the interpretation of its outgassing structure. This work was supported by the NASA JURRISS program under Grant NAG5-8715. AIN, AAV and VVS acknowledge support from Russian Foundation for Basic research via Grants 00-01-00538 and 00-01-0174 respectively. DJS acknowledges support from the PG&G program via Grant NAG5-9017.

  19. Activity and Rotation in the young cluster h Per

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argiroffi, Costanza; Caramazza, Marilena; Micela, Giusi; Moraux, Estelle; Bouvier, Jerome

    2013-07-01

    We study the stellar rotation-activity relation in the crucial age at which stars reach the fastest rotation. To this aim we have analyzed data of the young cluster h Per, very rich and compact, located at 2300 pc, that at an age of 13 Myr should be mainly composed of stars that have ended their contraction phase and that have not lost significant angular momentum viamagnetic breaking. To constrain the activity level of h Per members we have analyzed a deep Chandra/ACIS-I observation. Rotational periods of h Per members have been derived by Moraux et al. (2013) in the framework of the MONITOR project (Aigrain et al. 2007; Irwin et al. 2007). In the Chandra observation we have detected 1010 X-ray sources located in the central field of h Persei. Assuming a distance of 2300 pc their X-ray luminosity ranges between 2x10^29 and 6x10^31 erg/s. Among the 1010 x-ray sources ~600 have as optical counterpart candidate members of the cluster with masses ranging down to 0.3 solar mass, and ˜150 have also measured rotational period. For this sample of ˜150 h Per members we have compared X-ray luminosity and rotational periods for different mass ranges. We have found that solar type stars (~1.3 solar mass) show evidence of supersaturation for short periods. This phenomenon is unobserved for lower mass stars.

  20. Mercury's resonant rotation from secular orbital elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Alexander; Oberst, Jürgen; Hussmann, Hauke

    2015-11-01

    We used recently produced Solar System ephemerides, which incorporate 2 years of ranging observations to the MESSENGER spacecraft, to extract the secular orbital elements for Mercury and associated uncertainties. As Mercury is in a stable 3:2 spin-orbit resonance, these values constitute an important reference for the planet's measured rotational parameters, which in turn strongly bear on physical interpretation of Mercury's interior structure. In particular, we derive a mean orbital period of (87.96934962 ± 0.00000037) days and (assuming a perfect resonance) a spin rate of (6.138506839± 0.000000028)°/day. The difference between this rotation rate and the currently adopted rotation rate (Archinal et al. in Celest Mech Dyn Astron 109(2):101-135, 2011. doi:10.1007/s10569-010-9320-4), corresponds to a longitudinal displacement of approx. 67 m per year at the equator. Moreover, we present a basic approach for the calculation of the orientation of the instantaneous Laplace and Cassini planes of Mercury. The analysis allows us to assess the uncertainties in physical parameters of the planet, when derived from observations of Mercury's rotation.

  1. Problems of interior structure, the solar dynamo and the role of SCADM in providing interior diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, N. O.

    1980-01-01

    What is already known about the structure of the Sun, the motion of its convective zone, and the solar cycle is reviewed. Topics discussed include solar variability, solar 'seismology', velocity patterns, magnetic fields, and the dynamo theory. Observations are needed to determine global properties (solar luminosity and radius), oscillations (p and g models), velocities (variation of rotation with time and depth), and magnetic fields.

  2. Study of solar variability impact on nitrogen dioxide: 2004-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, Daniel-Eduard; Voiculescu, Mirela; Merlaud, Alexis; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) locally plays an important role in the radiation budget by absorbing solar radiation at ultraviolet (UV) and visible wavelengths. The influence of solar variability on the inter-annual variability and trends in nitrogen dioxide is evaluated for a period of 10 years (2004-2013) using monthly mean tropospheric NO2 measurements of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) version 2.0. Possible signatures of solar variability on nitrogen dioxide time series of NO2 over several cities were analyzed using various statistical methods. Various solar proxies were selected, in order to separate between possible links to solar irradiance and to solar wind. Several locations with different levels of pollution, located in different places of the world (Athens, Jungfraujoch, Lauder, Lisbon, Moscow, and Uccle), were selected. Observations show a clear 27 day period of the NO2 tropospheric Vertical Column Density (VCD) or total Slant Column Density (SCD). NO2 content decreases with increasing activity above polluted areas (e.g. Athens, Moscow) while for unpolluted areas there is no evident correlation (e.g. Lauder, Jungfraujoch). Possible effects of solar wind on NO2 content are observed as well, but the relationship is less clear, since polluted areas seem to respond differently to solar wind variations. The mechanism by which NO2 content can be affected by solar variations relate mainly to ozone production but other paths by which solar energy may be transferred to the lower atmosphere are investigated.

  3. Solar Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, William W.

    Presented is the utilization of solar radiation as an energy resource principally for the production of electricity. Included are discussions of solar thermal conversion, photovoltic conversion, wind energy, and energy from ocean temperature differences. Future solar energy plans, the role of solar energy in plant and fossil fuel production, and…

  4. Rotation Angle for the Optimum Tracking of One-Axis Trackers

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, W. F.; Dobos, A. P.

    2013-07-01

    An equation for the rotation angle for optimum tracking of one-axis trackers is derived along with equations giving the relationships between the rotation angle and the surface tilt and azimuth angles. These equations are useful for improved modeling of the solar radiation available to a collector with tracking constraints and for determining the appropriate motor revolutions for optimum tracking.

  5. Dynamics of formation of the resonance rotations of natural celestial bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Khentov, A.A.

    1982-07-01

    The rule for formation of the observed commensurabilities of the 1:1 and 3:2 types between the rotational and orbitial motions of certain bodies of the Solar System in the course of evolution is validated. An interpretation of the rotation of Venus is proposed.

  6. A wavelet based approach to Solar-Terrestrial Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsavrias, Ch.; Hillaris, A.; Preka-Papadema, P.

    2016-05-01

    Transient and recurrent solar activity drive geomagnetic disturbances; these are quantified (amongst others) by DST , AE indices time-series. Transient disturbances are related to the Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) while recurrent disturbances are related to corotating interaction regions (CIR). We study the relationship of the geomagnetic disturbances to the solar wind drivers within solar cycle 23 where the drivers are represented by ICMEs and CIRs occurrence rate and compared to the DST and AE as follows: terms with common periodicity in both the geomagnetic disturbances and the solar drivers are, firstly, detected using continuous wavelet transform (CWT). Then, common power and phase coherence of these periodic terms are calculated from the cross-wavelet spectra (XWT) and wavelet-coherence (WTC) respectively. In time-scales of ≈27 days our results indicate an anti-correlation of the effects of ICMEs and CIRs on the geomagnetic disturbances. The former modulates the DST and AE time series during the cycle maximum the latter during periods of reduced solar activity. The phase relationship of these modulation is highly non-linear. Only the annual frequency component of the ICMEs is phase-locked with DST and AE. In time-scales of ≈1.3-1.7 years the CIR seem to be the dominant driver for both geomagnetic indices throughout the whole solar cycle 23.

  7. Solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, D.

    1981-01-01

    The book opens with a review of the patterns of energy use and resources in the United States, and an exploration of the potential of solar energy to supply some of this energy in the future. This is followed by background material on solar geometry, solar intensities, flat plate collectors, and economics. Detailed attention is then given to a variety of solar units and systems, including domestic hot water systems, space heating systems, solar-assisted heat pumps, intermediate temperature collectors, space heating/cooling systems, concentrating collectors for high temperatures, storage systems, and solar total energy systems. Finally, rights to solar access are discussed.

  8. Solar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The solar collectors shown are elements of domestic solar hot water systems produced by Solar One Ltd., Virginia Beach, Virginia. Design of these systems benefited from technical expertise provided Solar One by NASA's Langley Research Center. The company obtained a NASA technical support package describing the d e sign and operation of solar heating equipment in NASA's Tech House, a demonstration project in which aerospace and commercial building technology are combined in an energy- efficient home. Solar One received further assistance through personal contact with Langley solar experts. The company reports that the technical information provided by NASA influenced Solar One's panel design, its selection of a long-life panel coating which increases solar collection efficiency, and the method adopted for protecting solar collectors from freezing conditions.

  9. Hubble the Rotation of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    These three NASA Hubble Space Telescope images of the planet Uranus reveal the motion of a pair of bright clouds in the planet's southern hemisphere, and a high altitude haze that forms a 'cap' above the planet's south pole.

    Hubble's new view was obtained on August 14, 1994, when Uranus was 1.7 billion miles (2.8 billion kilometers) from Earth. These atmospheric details were only previously seen by the Voyager 2 spacecraft, which flew by Uranus in 1986. Since then, detailed observations of Uranus's atmospheric features have not been possible because the planet is at the resolution limit of ground-based telescopes.

    Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 observed Uranus through a filter that is sensitive to light reflected by a pair of high altitude clouds. This makes a high altitude haze over Uranus' south polar region clearly visible, along with a pair of high altitude clouds or plume-type features that are 2500 and 1800 miles (4300 and 3100 kilometers) across, respectively. This sequence of images shows how the clouds (labeled A and B) rotate with the planet during the three hours that elapsed between the first two observations (left and center picture) and the five hours that elapsed between the second pair of observations (center and right picture). Some cloud motion might be due to high altitude winds on the planet. (Observations are indicated in Universal Time.)

    By tracking the motion of high-altitude clouds, the new Hubble observations will allow astronomers to make new measurements of Uranus' rotation period. Based on the previous Voyager observations, Uranus spins on its axis at a faster rate than Earth does, completing one rotation every 7 hours, 14 minutes.

    One of the four gas giant planets of our solar system, Uranus is largely featureless. Unlike Earth, Uranus' south pole points toward the Sun during part of the planet's 84-year orbit. Thanks to its high resolution and ability to make observations over many years, Hubble can follow seasonal

  10. The rotation of the Sun: Observations at Stanford. [using the Doppler effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, J. M.; Wilcox, J. M.; Svalgaard, L.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric rotation rate using the Doppler effect made at the Stanford Solar Observatory since May 1976 are analyzed. Results show that these observations show no daily or long period variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about one percent. The average rotation rate is the same as that of the sunspot and the large-scale magnetic field structures.

  11. STRUCTURE OF UNIFORMLY ROTATING STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Deupree, Robert G.

    2011-07-10

    Zero-age main-sequence models of uniformly rotating stars have been computed for 10 masses between 1.625 and 8 M{sub sun} and for 21 rotation rates from zero to nearly critical rotation. The surface shape is used to distinguish rotation rather than the surface equatorial velocity or the rotation rate. Using the surface shape is close, but not quite equivalent, to using the ratio of the rotation rate to the critical rotation rate. Using constant shape as the rotation variable means that it and the mass are separable, something that is not true for either the rotation rate or surface equatorial velocity. Thus, a number of properties, including the ratio of the effective temperature anywhere on the surface to the equatorial temperature, are nearly independent of the mass of the model, as long as the rotation rate changes in such a way as to keep the surface shape constant.

  12. IO Rotation Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    During its 1979 flyby, Voyager 2 observed Io only from a distance. However, the volcanic activity discovered by Voyager 1 months earlier was readily visible. This sequence of nine color images was collected using the Blue, Green and Orange filters from about 1.2 million kilometers. A 2.5 hour period is covered during which Io rotates 7 degrees.

    Rotating into view over the limb of Io are the plumes of the volcanoes Amirani (top) and Maui (lower). These plumes are very distinct against the black sky because they are being illuminated from behind. Notice that as Io rotates, the proportion of Io which is sunlit decreases greatly. This changing phase angle is because Io is moving between the spacecraft and the Sun.

    This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1985.

  13. Rotating Aperture System

    DOEpatents

    Rusnak, Brian; Hall, James M.; Shen, Stewart; Wood, Richard L.

    2005-01-18

    A rotating aperture system includes a low-pressure vacuum pumping stage with apertures for passage of a deuterium beam. A stator assembly includes holes for passage of the beam. The rotor assembly includes a shaft connected to a deuterium gas cell or a crossflow venturi that has a single aperture on each side that together align with holes every rotation. The rotating apertures are synchronized with the firing of the deuterium beam such that the beam fires through a clear aperture and passes into the Xe gas beam stop. Portions of the rotor are lapped into the stator to improve the sealing surfaces, to prevent rapid escape of the deuterium gas from the gas cell.

  14. Chiral rotational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Robert P.; Götte, Jörg B.; Barnett, Stephen M.

    2016-09-01

    We introduce chiral rotational spectroscopy, a technique that enables the determination of the orientated optical activity pseudotensor components BX X, BY Y, and BZ Z of chiral molecules, in a manner that reveals the enantiomeric constitution of a sample and provides an incisive signal even for a racemate. Chiral rotational spectroscopy could find particular use in the analysis of molecules that are chiral solely by virtue of their isotopic constitution and molecules with multiple chiral centers. A basic design for a chiral rotational spectrometer together with a model of its functionality is given. Our proposed technique offers the more familiar polarizability components αX X, αY Y, and αZ Z as by-products, which could see it find use even for achiral molecules.

  15. Lattice QCD in rotating frames.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Arata; Hirono, Yuji

    2013-08-23

    We formulate lattice QCD in rotating frames to study the physics of QCD matter under rotation. We construct the lattice QCD action with the rotational metric and apply it to the Monte Carlo simulation. As the first application, we calculate the angular momenta of gluons and quarks in the rotating QCD vacuum. This new framework is useful to analyze various rotation-related phenomena in QCD.

  16. Rotating bubble membrane radiator

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Brent J.; Coomes, Edmund P.

    1988-12-06

    A heat radiator useful for expelling waste heat from a power generating system aboard a space vehicle is disclosed. Liquid to be cooled is passed to the interior of a rotating bubble membrane radiator, where it is sprayed into the interior of the bubble. Liquid impacting upon the interior surface of the bubble is cooled and the heat radiated from the outer surface of the membrane. Cooled liquid is collected by the action of centrifical force about the equator of the rotating membrane and returned to the power system. Details regarding a complete space power system employing the radiator are given.

  17. Rotating flexible drag mill

    DOEpatents

    Pepper, W.B.

    1984-05-09

    A rotating parachute for decelerating objects travelling through atmosphere at subsonic or supersonic deployment speeds includes a circular canopy having a plurality of circumferentially arranged flexible panels projecting radially from a solid central disk. A slot extends radially between adjacent panels to the outer periphery of the canopy. Upon deployment, the solid disk diverts air radially to rapidly inflate the panels into a position of maximum diameter. Air impinging on the panels adjacent the panel slots rotates the parachute during its descent. Centrifugal force flattens the canopy into a constant maximum diameter during terminal descent for maximum drag and deceleration.

  18. Geometry of solar coronal rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, B. P.; Martsenyuk, O. V.; Platov, Yu. V.; Den, O. E.

    2016-02-01

    Coronal helmet streamers are the most prominent large-scale elements of the solar corona observed in white light during total solar eclipses. The base of the streamer is an arcade of loops located above a global polarity inversion line. At an altitude of 1-2 solar radii above the limb, the apices of the arches sharpen, forming cusp structures, above which narrow coronal rays are observed. Lyot coronagraphs, especially those on-board spacecrafts flying beyond the Earth's atmosphere, enable us to observe the corona continuously and at large distances. At distances of several solar radii, the streamers take the form of fairly narrow spokes that diverge radially from the Sun. This radial direction displays a continuous expansion of the corona into the surrounding space, and the formation of the solar wind. However, the solar magnetic field and solar rotation complicate the situation. The rotation curves radial streams into spiral ones, similar to water streams flowing from rotating tubes. The influence of the magnetic field is more complex and multifarious. A thorough study of coronal ray geometries shows that rays are frequently not radial and not straight. Coronal streamers frequently display a curvature whose direction in the meridional plane depends on the phase of the solar cycle. It is evident that this curvature is related to the geometry of the global solar magnetic field, which depends on the cycle phase. Equatorward deviations of coronal streamers at solar minima and poleward deviations at solar maxima can be interpreted as the effects of changes in the general topology of the global solar magnetic field. There are sporadic temporal changes in the coronal rays shape caused by remote coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagating through the corona. This is also a manifestation of the influence of the magnetic field on plasma flows. The motion of a large-scale flux rope associated with a CME away from the Sun creates changes in the structure of surrounding field

  19. Rotating Stars Can Help Planets Become Habitable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    What characteristics must a terrestrial planet exhibit to have the potential to host life? Orbiting within the habitable zone of its host star is certainly a good start, but theres another important aspect: the planet has to have the right atmosphere. A recent study has determined how host stars can help their planets to lose initial, enormous gaseous envelopes and become more Earth-like.Collecting An EnvelopeWhen a terrestrial planet forms inside a gaseous protoplanetary disk, it can accumulate a significant envelope of hydrogen gas causing the planet to bear more similarity to a mini-Neptune than to Earth. Before the planet can become habitable, it must shed this enormous, primordial hydrogen envelope, so that an appropriate secondary atmosphere can form.So what determines whether a planet can get rid of its protoatmosphere? The dominant process for shedding a hydrogen atmosphere is thermal mass loss: as the planets upper atmosphere is heated by X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from the host star, the envelope evaporates.A Critical DependenceIn a recent study led by Colin Johnstone (University of Vienna), a team of scientists has developed models of this evaporation process for hydrogen planetary atmospheres. In particular, Johnstone and collaborators examine how the host stars initial rotation rate which strongly impacts the stars level of XUV activity affects the degree to which the planets hydrogen atmosphere is evaporated, and the rate at which the evaporation occurs.The authors findings can be illustrated with the example of an Earth-mass planet located in the habitable zone of a solar-mass star. In this case, the authors find four interesting regimes (shown in the plot to the right):Evolution of the hydrogen protoatmosphere of an Earth-mass planet in the habitable zone of a solar-mass star. The four lettered cases describe different initial atmospheric masses. The three curves for each case describe the stellar rotation rate: slow (red

  20. Effect of rotation on a rotating hot-wire sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, C.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to discern the effects of centrifugal and Coriolis forces on a rotating hot-wire. The probe was calibrated in a wind tunnel as well as in a rotating mode. The effect of rotation was found to be negligibly small. A small change in cold resistance (1.5%) was observed in the rotating wire. The rotation seems to have a negligible effect on the fluid mechanics, heat transfer and material characteristics of the wire. This is a significant conclusion in view of the potential application of the hot-wire probe in a rotating passage (such as turbomachinery).

  1. A New Picture for the Internal Rotation of the Sun.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, Cherilynn Ann

    This thesis describes a helioseismic quest to determine the angular velocity inside the Sun as a function of depth and latitude. I analyze rotational frequency splittings extracted from 15 days of full-disk observations of the solar acoustic oscillations (1 = 15-99) obtained with the Fourier Tachometer (a Doppler analyzing instrument design by Tim Brown). I have compared the observed frequency splittings to those generated by several different physically -motivated models for the solar internal angular velocity. I also introduce convenient preliminary analysis techniques, which require no formal computations and which guide the choices of rotation models. My analysis suggests that the differential rotation in latitude observed at the solar surface pervades the convection zone and perhaps even deeper layers. Thus, the convection zone appears to contain little or no radial gradient of angular velocity. The analysis further indicates that the angular velocity of the outer portion of the radiative interior is constant, or nearly so, at a value that is intermediate between the relatively fast equatorial rate and the slower polar rate of the surface profile. This new picture of the Sun's internal rotation implies that a significant radial gradient exists only in a transitional layer between the convection zone and the radiative interior. The sign of the gradient in this layer reverses at a latitude of about 30 degrees, where the angular velocity of the "surface" profile at the base of the convection zone matches that of the interior: angular velocity decreases inward at latitudes below 30 degrees and increases inward at higher latitudes. This model has intriguing implications for the solar dynamo, for the current distribution and transport of angular momentum, and for the rotational and evolutionary history of the Sun. Frequency splittings from a novel reduction of higher degree oscillations (1 ~ 140-400), which potentially contain more detailed information on the

  2. Compact rotating cup anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellman, J. B.

    1968-01-01

    Compact, collapsible rotating cup anemometer is used in remote locations where portability and durability are factors in the choice of equipment. This lightweight instrument has a low wind-velocity threshold, is capable of withstanding large mechanical shocks while in its stowed configuration, and has fast response to wind fluctuations.

  3. Rotationally Actuated Prosthetic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell G., Jr.; Carden, James R.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand attached to end of remaining part of forearm and to upper arm just above elbow. Pincerlike fingers pushed apart to degree depending on rotation of forearm. Simpler in design, simpler to operate, weighs less, and takes up less space.

  4. Rotating Science Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogg, Loretta A.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a science classroom program with centralized materials, and assistance and workshops for teachers. Classroom materials on one of five topics rotate every six weeks among five schools. Teachers plan specific units to match the arrival of the materials in their schools. (Author/DS)

  5. Rotational Dynamics with Tracker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eadkhong, T.; Rajsadorn, R.; Jannual, P.; Danworaphong, S.

    2012-01-01

    We propose the use of Tracker, freeware for video analysis, to analyse the moment of inertia ("I") of a cylindrical plate. Three experiments are performed to validate the proposed method. The first experiment is dedicated to find the linear coefficient of rotational friction ("b") for our system. By omitting the effect of such friction, we derive…

  6. Concepts in crop rotations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop rotations have been a part of civilization since the Middle Ages. With colonization of what would become the United States came new crops of tobacco, cotton, and corn, the first two of which would play significant roles in both the economic beginnings and social fabric of the new country, how ...

  7. Anisotropy in rotating drums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povall, Timothy; McBride, Andrew; Govender, Indresan

    2015-11-01

    An anisotropic relationship between the stress and the strain rate has been observed in two-dimensional simulations of rotating drums. The objective of this work is to investigate the structure of the constitutive relation using three-dimensional discrete-element-method simulations of a rotating drum containing identical rigid spheres for a range of rotational speeds. Anisotropy is quantified from the alignment of the stress and strain rate tensors, with the strain rate computed using a least-squares fit. It is shown that in certain regions there is a strong anisotropic relationship, regardless of the speed of rotation. The effective friction coefficient is examined in order to determine the phase space in which the μ (I) rheology is valid. Lastly, a depth-averaged approach through the flowing layer is employed to determine the relationship between the velocity tangential to the equilibrium surface and the height of the flowing layer. A power-law relationship that approaches linear at high speeds is observed. Supported by NRF/DST Scarce Skills (South Africa).

  8. Rotating Saddle Paul Trap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueckner, Wolfgang; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a demonstration in which a ball is placed in an unstable position on a saddle shape. The ball becomes stable when it is rotated above some threshold angular velocity. The demonstration is a mechanical analog of confining a particle in a "Paul Trap". (DDR)

  9. Rotatable stem and lock

    DOEpatents

    Deveney, Joseph E.; Sanderson, Stephen N.

    1984-01-01

    A valve stem and lock include a housing surrounding a valve stem, a solenoid affixed to an interior wall of the housing, an armature affixed to the valve stem and a locking device for coupling the armature to the housing body. When the solenoid is energized, the solenoid moves away from the housing body, permitting rotation of the valve stem.

  10. Rotatable stem and lock

    DOEpatents

    Deveney, J.E.; Sanderson, S.N.

    1981-10-27

    A valve stem and lock is disclosed which includes a housing surrounding a valve stem, a solenoid affixed to an interior wall of the housing, an armature affixed to the valve stem and a locking device for coupling the armature to the housing body. When the solenoid is energized, the solenoid moves away from the housing body, permitting rotation of the valve stem.

  11. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  12. NEA rotations and binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravec, Petr; Harris, A. W.; Warner, B. D.

    2007-05-01

    Of nearly 3900 near-Earth asteroids known in June 2006, 325 have got estimated rotation periods. NEAs with sizes down to 10 meters have been sampled. Observed spin distribution shows a major changing point around D=200 m. Larger NEAs show a barrier against spin rates >11 d-1 (period P~2.2 h) that shifts to slower rates with increasing equatorial elongation. The spin barrier is interpreted as a critical spin rate for bodies held together by self-gravitation only, suggesting that NEAs larger than 200 m are mostly strenghtless bodies (i.e., with zero tensile strength), so called `rubble piles'. The barrier disappears at D<200 m where most objects rotate too fast to be held together by self-gravitation only, so a non-zero cohesion is implied in the smaller NEAs. The distribution of NEA spin rates in the `rubble pile' range (D>0.2 km) is non-Maxwellian, suggesting that other mechanisms than just collisions worked there. There is a pile up in front of the barrier (P of 2-3 h). It may be related to a spin up mechanism crowding asteroids to the barrier. An excess of slow rotators is seen at P>30 h. The spin-down mechanism has no clear lower limit on spin rate; periods as long as tens of days occur. Most NEAs appear to be in basic spin states with rotation around the principal axis. Excited rotations are present among and actually dominate in slow rotators with damping timescales >4.5 byr. A few tumblers observed among fast rotating coherent objects consistently appear to be more rigid or younger than the larger, rubble-pile tumblers. An abundant population of binary systems among NEAs has been found. The fraction of binaries among NEAs larger than 0.3 km has been estimated to be 15 +/-4%. Primaries of the binary systems concentrate at fast spin rates (periods 2-3 h) and low amplitudes, i.e., they lie just below the spin barrier. The total angular momentum content in the binary systems suggests that they formed at the critical spin rate, and that little or no angular

  13. Superflares on solar-type stars.

    PubMed

    Maehara, Hiroyuki; Shibayama, Takuya; Notsu, Shota; Notsu, Yuta; Nagao, Takashi; Kusaba, Satoshi; Honda, Satoshi; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2012-05-16

    Solar flares are caused by the sudden release of magnetic energy stored near sunspots. They release 10(29) to 10(32) ergs of energy on a timescale of hours. Similar flares have been observed on many stars, with larger 'superflares' seen on a variety of stars, some of which are rapidly rotating and some of which are of ordinary solar type. The small number of superflares observed on solar-type stars has hitherto precluded a detailed study of them. Here we report observations of 365 superflares, including some from slowly rotating solar-type stars, from about 83,000 stars observed over 120 days. Quasi-periodic brightness modulations observed in the solar-type stars suggest that they have much larger starspots than does the Sun. The maximum energy of the flare is not correlated with the stellar rotation period, but the data suggest that superflares occur more frequently on rapidly rotating stars. It has been proposed that hot Jupiters may be important in the generation of superflares on solar-type stars, but none have been discovered around the stars that we have studied, indicating that hot Jupiters associated with superflares are rare.

  14. Depth and latitude dependence of the solar internal angular velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, E.J. Jr.; Cacciani, A.; Korzennik, S.; Tomczyk, S.; Ulrich, R.K.; Woodard, M.F. JPL, Pasadena, CA Roma I Universita California Univ., Los Angeles )

    1990-03-01

    One of the design goals for the dedicated helioseismology observing state located at Mount Wilson Observatory was the measurement of the internal solar rotation using solar p-mode oscillations. In this paper, the first p-mode splittings obtained from Mount Wilson are reported and compared with those from several previously published studies. It is demonstrated that the present splittings agree quite well with composite frequency splittings obtained from the comparisons. The splittings suggest that the angular velocity in the solar equatorial plane is a function of depth below the photosphere. The latitudinal differential rotation pattern visible at the surface appears to persist at least throughout the solar convection zone. 43 refs.

  15. Depth and latitude dependence of the solar internal angular velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Edward J., Jr.; Cacciani, Alessandro; Korzennik, Sylvain; Tomczyk, Steven; Ulrich, Roger K.; Woodard, Martin F.

    1990-01-01

    One of the design goals for the dedicated helioseismology observing state located at Mount Wilson Observatory was the measurement of the internal solar rotation using solar p-mode oscillations. In this paper, the first p-mode splittings obtained from Mount Wilson are reported and compared with those from several previously published studies. It is demonstrated that the present splittings agree quite well with composite frequency splittings obtained from the comparisons. The splittings suggest that the angular velocity in the solar equatorial plane is a function of depth below the photosphere. The latitudinal differential rotation pattern visible at the surface appears to persist at least throughout the solar convection zone.

  16. The First Measurement of Seasonal Trends in the Equatorial Ionospheric Anomaly Trough at the CHUK GNSS Site During the Solar Maximum in 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jong-Kyun; Yoo, Sung-Moon; Lee, Wookyoung

    2016-12-01

    The equatorial region of the Earth's ionosphere exhibits large temporal variations in electron density that have significant implications on satellite signal transmissions. In this paper, the first observation results of the variations in the trough of the equatorial ionospheric anomaly at the permanent Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) site in Chuuk (Geographic: 7.5° N, 151.9° E; Geomagnetic: 0.4° N) are presented. It was found that the daytime Global Positioning System (GPS) total electron content (TEC) values vary according to the 27 day period of solar rotation , and that these trends show sharp contrast with those of summer. The amplitudes of the semi-annual anomaly were 12.4 TECU (33 %) on 19th of March and 8.8 TECU (23 %) on 25th of October respectively, with a yearly averaged value of 38.0 TECU. The equinoctial asymmetry at the March equinox was higher than that at the October equinox rather than the November equinox. Daily mean TEC values were higher in December than in June, which could be interpreted as annual or winter anomalies. The nighttime GPS TEC enhancements during 20:00-24:00 LT also exhibited the semi-annual variation. The pre-midnight TEC enhancement could be explained with the slow loss process of electron density that is largely produced during the daytime of equinox. However, the significant peaks around 22:00-23:00 LT at the spring equinox require other mechanisms other than the slow loss process of the electron density.

  17. Solar Collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Solar Energy's solar panels are collectors for a solar energy system which provides heating for a drive-in bank in Akron, OH. Collectors were designed and manufactured by Solar Energy Products, a firm established by three former NASA employees. Company President, Frank Rom, an example of a personnel-type technology transfer, was a Research Director at Lewis Research Center, which conducts extensive solar heating and cooling research, including development and testing of high-efficiency flat-plate collectors. Rom acquired solar energy expertise which helped the company develop two types of collectors, one for use in domestic/commercial heating systems and the other for drying grain.

  18. The evolution of rotating stars. III - Predicted surface rotation velocities for stars which conserve total angular momentum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endal, A. S.; Sofia, S.

    1979-01-01

    Predicted surface rotation velocities for Population I stars at 10, 7, 5, 3, and 1.5 solar masses are presented. The surface velocities were computed for angular momentum with no radial redistribution, complete redistribution, and partial redistribution as predicted by consideration of circulation currents in rotating stars. Near the main sequence, rotational effects can reduce the moment of inertia of a star, so nonrotating models underestimate the expected velocities for evolving stars. On the red giant branch, angular momentum redistribution reduces the surface velocity by a factor of 2 or more, relative to the velocity expected for no radial redistribution. This removes the discrepancy between predicted and observed rotation rates for the K giants and makes it unlikely that these stars lose significant amounts of angular momentum by stellar winds. Calculations indicate that improved observations of the red giants in the Hyades cluster can be used to determine how angular momentum is redistributed by convection

  19. Wave-driven Rotation in Supersonically Rotating Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-15

    Supersonic rotation in mirrors may be produced by radio frequency waves. The waves produce coupled diffusion in ion kinetic and potential energy. A population inversion along the diffusion path then produces rotation. Waves may be designed to exploit a natural kinetic energy source or may provide the rotation energy on their own. Centrifugal traps for fusion and isotope separation may benefit from this wave-driven rotation.

  20. K2 & Solar System Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack

    2015-01-01

    All of the fields that K2 observes are near the ecliptic plane in order to minimize the spin-up of the spacecraft in response to the effects of solar irradiation. The fields observed by K2 are thus rich in Solar System objects including planets, asteroids and trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs). K2 has already performed observations of Neptune and its large moon Triton, 68 Trojan and Hilda asteroids, 5 TNOs (including Pluto) and Comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Springs). About 10,000 main-belt asteroids that fell into the pixel masks of stars have been serendipitously observed. Observations of small bodies are especially useful for determining rotation periods. Uranus will be observed in a future campaign (C8), as will many more small Solar System bodies. The status of various K2 Solar System studies will be reviewed and placed within the context of our current knowledge of the objects being observed.

  1. Wind and solar powered turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, I. D.; Koh, J. L.; Holmes, M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A power generating station having a generator driven by solar heat assisted ambient wind is described. A first plurality of radially extendng air passages direct ambient wind to a radial flow wind turbine disposed in a centrally located opening in a substantially disc-shaped structure. A solar radiation collecting surface having black bodies is disposed above the fist plurality of air passages and in communication with a second plurality of radial air passages. A cover plate enclosing the second plurality of radial air passages is transparent so as to permit solar radiation to effectively reach the black bodies. The second plurality of air passages direct ambient wind and thermal updrafts generated by the black bodies to an axial flow turbine. The rotating shaft of the turbines drive the generator. The solar and wind drien power generating system operates in electrical cogeneration mode with a fuel powered prime mover.

  2. Solar flare predictions and warnings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, K. P., III; Mayfield, E. B.

    1973-01-01

    The real-time solar monitoring information supplied to support SPARCS-equipped rocket launches, the routine collection and analysis of 3.3-mm solar radio maps, short-term flare forecasts based on these maps, longer-term forecasts based on the recurrence of active regions, and results of the synoptic study of solar active regions at 3.3-mm wavelength are presented. Forecasted flares in the 24-hour forecasts were 81% accurate, and those in the 28-day forecasts were 97% accurate. Synoptic radio maps at 3.3-mm wavelength are presented for twenty-three solar rotations in 1967 and 1968, as well as synoptic flare charts for the same period.

  3. Optimized dynamic rotation with wedges.

    PubMed

    Rosen, I I; Morrill, S M; Lane, R G

    1992-01-01

    Dynamic rotation is a computer-controlled therapy technique utilizing an automated multileaf collimator in which the radiation beam shape changes dynamically as the treatment machine rotates about the patient so that at each instant the beam shape matches the projected shape of the target volume. In simple dynamic rotation, the dose rate remains constant during rotation. For optimized dynamic rotation, the dose rate is varied as a function of gantry angle. Optimum dose rate at each gantry angle is computed by linear programming. Wedges can be included in the optimized dynamic rotation therapy by using additional rotations. Simple and optimized dynamic rotation treatment plans, with and without wedges, for a pancreatic tumor have been compared using optimization cost function values, normal tissue complication probabilities, and positive difference statistic values. For planning purposes, a continuous rotation is approximated by static beams at a number of gantry angles equally spaced about the patient. In theory, the quality of optimized treatment planning solutions should improve as the number of static beams increases. The addition of wedges should further improve dose distributions. For the case studied, no significant improvements were seen for more than 36 beam angles. Open and wedged optimized dynamic rotations were better than simple dynamic rotation, but wedged optimized dynamic rotation showed no definitive improvement over open beam optimized dynamic rotation.

  4. Activity-rotation relations for lower main-sequence stars

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson-Hockey, A.K.

    1987-01-01

    It has been known for some time that stellar rotation and activity are related, both for chromospheric activity (e.g., Noyes et al. 1984) and coronal activity (e.g., Pallavicini et al. 1981; Maggio et al. 1987). Younger, more rapidly rotating stars of a given spectral type generally show higher levels of activity than do older, more slowly rotating stars. On the Sun, activity is distinctly related to magnetic fields. This leads to the suggestion that activity, at least in solar-type stars, is traceable to a magnetic dynamo which results from the interaction of rotation and differential rotation with convection. The more efficient the coriolis forces are at introducing helicity into convective motions, the more the magnetic field will be amplified and the more activity we may expect to see. The precise nature of the relationship between magnetic fields, rotation, and activity remains to be well-defined. This thesis examines the relationship between activity (both chromospheric and coronal) and rotation in order to better define and express such a relation (or relations).

  5. Spin-Stabilized Microsatellites with Solar Concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timmerman, Paul; Shields, Virgil

    2008-01-01

    A document proposes the development of spin-stabilized microsatellites powered by solar photovoltaic cells aided by solar concentrators. Each such satellite would have a cylindrical or other axisymmetric main body with solar cells mounted in a circumferential belt-like array on its exterior surface. The solar concentrator would be a halo-like outrigger cylindrical Fresnel lens array that would be deployed from and would surround the main body, connected to the main body via spokes or similar structural members. The spacecraft would be oriented with its axis of symmetry perpendicular to the line of sight to the Sun and would be set into rotation about this axis. In effect, the solar cells and concentrator would be oriented and rotated in a "rotisserie" mode, making it possible to take advantage of the concentration of solar light while preventing localized overheating of the solar cells. In addition, the mechanical stabilization inherently afforded by the rotation could be exploited as a means of passive attitude control or, at least, of reducing the requirement for active attitude control.

  6. Angular Momentum Evolution of Young Solar-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amard, Louis; Palacios, Ana; Charbonnel, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    We present stellar evolution models of young solar-type stars including self consistent treatment of rotational mixing and extraction of angular momentum (AM) by magnetized wind including the most up-to-date physic of AM transport.

  7. Solar physics: When the tail wags the dog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulanier, Guillaume

    2016-11-01

    Solar eruptions are triggered by magnetic stress building up in the corona due to the motion of the Sun's dense surface. New observations reveal that these eruptions can, in turn, induce the rotational motion of sunspots.

  8. Solar collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cassidy, V.M.

    1981-11-01

    Practical applications of solar energy in commercial, industrial and institutional buildings are considered. Two main types of solar collectors are described: flat plate collectors and concentrating collectors. Efficiency of air and hydronic collectors among the flat plate types are compared. Also several concentrators are described, including their sun tracking mechanisms. Descriptions of some recent solar installations are presented and a list representing the cross section of solar collector manufacturers is furnished.

  9. Solar Flare Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmahl, Edward J.; Kundu, Mukul R.

    1998-01-01

    We have continued our previous efforts in studies of fourier imaging methods applied to hard X-ray flares. We have performed physical and theoretical analysis of rotating collimator grids submitted to GSFC(Goddard Space Flight Center) for the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI). We have produced simulation algorithms which are currently being used to test imaging software and hardware for HESSI. We have developed Maximum-Entropy, Maximum-Likelihood, and "CLEAN" methods for reconstructing HESSI images from count-rate profiles. This work is expected to continue through the launch of HESSI in July, 2000. Section 1 shows a poster presentation "Image Reconstruction from HESSI Photon Lists" at the Solar Physics Division Meeting, June 1998; Section 2 shows the text and viewgraphs prepared for "Imaging Simulations" at HESSI's Preliminary Design Review on July 30, 1998.

  10. 3D Reconstruction of a Rotating Erupting Prominence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. T.; Kliem, B.; Torok, T.

    2011-01-01

    A bright prominence associated with a coronal mass ejection (CME) was seen erupting from the Sun on 9 April 2008. This prominence was tracked by both the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) EUVI and COR1 telescopes, and was seen to rotate about the line of sight as it erupted; therefore, the event has been nicknamed the "Cartwheel CME." The threads of the prominence in the core of the CME quite clearly indicate the structure of a weakly to moderately twisted flux rope throughout the field of view, up to heliocentric heights of 4 solar radii. Although the STEREO separation was 48 deg, it was possible to match some sharp features in the later part of the eruption as seen in the 304 Angstrom line in EUVI and in the H alpha-sensitive bandpass of COR1 by both STEREO Ahead and Behind. These features could then be traced out in three dimensional space, and reprojected into a view in which the eruption is directed towards the observer. The reconstructed view shows that the alignment of the prominence to the vertical axis rotates as it rises up to a leading-edge height of approximately equals 2.5 solar radii, and then remains approximately constant. The alignment at 2.5 solar radii differs by about 115 deg. from the original filament orientation inferred from H alpha and EUV data, and the height profile of the rotation, obtained here for the first time, shows that two thirds of the total rotation is reached within approximately equals 0.5 solar radii above the photosphere. These features are well reproduced by numerical simulations of an unstable moderately twisted flux rope embedded in external flux with a relatively strong shear field component.

  11. 3D Reconstruction of a Rotating Erupting Prominence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. T.; Kliem, B.; Toeroek, T.

    2011-01-01

    A bright prominence associated with a coronal mass ejection (CME) was seen erupting from the Sun on 9 April 2008. This prominence was tracked by both the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) EUVI and COR1 telescopes, and was seen to rotate about the line of sight a it erupted; therefore, the event has been nicknamed the "Cartwheel CME." The threads of the prominence in the core of the CME quite clearly indicate the structure of a weakly to moderately twisted flux rope throughout the field of view, up to heliocentric heights of 4 solar radii. Although the STEREO separation was 48 deg, it was possible to match some sharp features in the later part of the eruption as seen in the 304 A line in EUVI and in the H-alpha-sensitive bandpass of COR I by both STEREO Ahead and Behind. These features could then be traced out in three-dimensional space, and reprojected into a view in which the eruption is directed toward the observer. The reconstructed view shows that the alignment of the prominence to the vertical axis rotates as it rises up to a leading-edge height of approximately equal to 2.5 solar radii, and then remains approximately constant. The alignment at 2.5 solar radii differs by about 115 deg from the original filament orientation inferred from H-alpha and EUV data, and the height profile of the rotation, obtained here for the first time, shows that two thirds of the total rotation are reached within approximately equal to 0.5 solar radii above the photosphere. These features are well reproduced by numerical simulations of an unstable moderately twisted flux rope embedded in external flux with a relatively strong shear field component.

  12. A Translational Polarization Rotator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.; Wollack, Edward J.; Pisano, Giampaolo; Ackiss, Sheridan; U-Yen, Kongpop; Ng, Ming wah

    2012-01-01

    We explore a free-space polarization modulator in which a variable phase introduction between right- and left-handed circular polarization components is used to rotate the linear polarization of the outgoing beam relative to that of the incoming beam. In this device, the polarization states are separated by a circular polarizer that consists of a quarter-wave plate in combination with a wire grid. A movable mirror is positioned behind and parallel to the circular polarizer. As the polarizer-mirror distance is separated, an incident liear polarization will be rotated through an angle that is proportional to the introduced phase delay. We demonstrate a prototype device that modulates Stokes Q and U over a 20% bandwidth.

  13. A call for rotators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountain, Gregory

    “Needed: highly motivated geoscientists willing to slow the pace of their research for 1-2 years while managing federal government support of their discipline. Assured: change of perspective; no change in pay. Contact your National Science Foundation Program Director for details.—No, this isn't an NSF job announcement; this is an open letter to members of the Earth science community from a recently “retired” NSF rotator concerned by the small number of researchers interested in a Washington tour. I learned firsthand the extent to which an individual in this position is entrusted with decision-making powers, and as a result, I believe that each of us in the research community should feel responsible for ensuring that highly qualified people serve as rotators.

  14. Rotatable seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Logan, Clinton M.; Garibaldi, Jack L.

    1982-01-01

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

  15. Rotational spectrum of tryptophan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, M. Eugenia; Cabezas, Carlos; Mata, Santiago; Alonso, Josè L.

    2014-05-01

    The rotational spectrum of the natural amino acid tryptophan has been observed for the first time using a combination of laser ablation, molecular beams, and Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Independent analysis of the rotational spectra of individual conformers has conducted to a definitive identification of two different conformers of tryptophan, with one of the observed conformers never reported before. The analysis of the 14N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants is of particular significance since it allows discrimination between structures, thus providing structural information on the orientation of the amino group. Both observed conformers are stabilized by an O-H...N hydrogen bond in the side chain and a N-H...π interaction forming a chain that reinforce the strength of hydrogen bonds through cooperative effects.

  16. Rotational spectrum of tryptophan

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz, M. Eugenia Cabezas, Carlos Mata, Santiago Alonso, Josè L.

    2014-05-28

    The rotational spectrum of the natural amino acid tryptophan has been observed for the first time using a combination of laser ablation, molecular beams, and Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Independent analysis of the rotational spectra of individual conformers has conducted to a definitive identification of two different conformers of tryptophan, with one of the observed conformers never reported before. The analysis of the {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants is of particular significance since it allows discrimination between structures, thus providing structural information on the orientation of the amino group. Both observed conformers are stabilized by an O–H···N hydrogen bond in the side chain and a N–H···π interaction forming a chain that reinforce the strength of hydrogen bonds through cooperative effects.

  17. New picture for the internal rotation of the sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, Cherilynn Ann

    For the last decade, solar acoustic oscillations have been used to probe the physical properties of the solar interior. The endeavor is called helioseismology and is based on the fact that shifts in the frequency of an oscillation mode, as observed at the surface, contain information about the physical environment in those regions of the interior where the oscillation has energy. A helioseismic quest is described to determine the angular velocity inside the Sun as a function of depth and latitude. Rotational frequency splittings extracted from 15 days of full-disk observations of the solar acoustic oscillations (l=15-99) obtained with the Fourier Tachometer (a Doppler analyzing instrument designed by Tim Brown) were analyzed. The observed frequency splittings are compared to those generated by several different physically-motivated models for the solar internal angular velocity.

  18. Solar Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A medical refrigeration and a water pump both powered by solar cells that convert sunlight directly into electricity are among the line of solar powered equipment manufactured by IUS (Independent Utility Systems) for use in areas where conventional power is not available. IUS benefited from NASA technology incorporated in the solar panel design and from assistance provided by Kerr Industrial Applications Center.

  19. Solar reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, D. C.

    1981-02-17

    A solar reflector having a flexible triangular reflective sheet or membrane for receiving and reflecting solar energy therefrom. The reflector is characterized by the triangular reflective sheet which is placed under tension thereby defining a smooth planar surface eliminating surface deflection which heretofore has reduced the efficiency of reflectors or heliostats used in combination for receiving and transmitting solar energy to an absorber tower.

  20. Buying Solar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Joe

    Presented are guidelines for buying solar systems for the individual consumer. This is intended to help the consumer reduce many of the risks associated with the purchase of solar systems, particularly the risks of fraud and deception. Engineering terms associated with solar technology are presented and described to enable the consumer to discuss…

  1. Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pate, Brooks

    2014-06-01

    The past decade has seen several major technology advances in electronics operating at microwave frequencies making it possible to develop a new generation of spectrometers for molecular rotational spectroscopy. High-speed digital electronics, both arbitrary waveform generators and digitizers, continue on a Moore's Law-like development cycle that started around 1993 with device bandwidth doubling about every 36 months. These enabling technologies were the key to designing chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectrometers which offer significant sensitivity enhancements for broadband spectrum acquisition in molecular rotational spectroscopy. A special feature of the chirped-pulse spectrometer design is that it is easily implemented at low frequency (below 8 GHz) where Balle-Flygare type spectrometers with Fabry-Perot cavity designs become technologically challenging due to the mirror size requirements. The capabilities of CP-FTMW spectrometers for studies of molecular structure will be illustrated by the collaborative research effort we have been a part of to determine the structures of water clusters - a project which has identified clusters up to the pentadecamer. A second technology trend that impacts molecular rotational spectroscopy is the development of high power, solid state sources in the mm-wave/THz regions. Results from the field of mm-wave chirped-pulse Fourier transform spectroscopy will be described with an emphasis on new problems in chemical dynamics and analytical chemistry that these methods can tackle. The third (and potentially most important) technological trend is the reduction of microwave components to chip level using monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC) - a technology driven by an enormous mass market in communications. Some recent advances in rotational spectrometer designs that incorporate low-cost components will be highlighted. The challenge to the high-resolution spectroscopy community - as posed by Frank De

  2. On rotational conical flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrari, Carlo

    1952-01-01

    Some general properties of isoenergetic rotational conical fields are determined. For such fields, provided the physical parameters of the fluid flow are known on a conical reference surface, it being understood that they satisfy certain imposed conditions, it is shown how to construct the hodographs in the various meridional semiplanes, as the envelope of either the tangents to the hodographs or of the osculatory circles.

  3. Rotating housing turbine

    DOEpatents

    Allouche, Erez; Jaganathan, Arun P.

    2016-10-11

    The invention is a new turbine structure having a housing that rotates. The housing has a sidewall, and turbine blades are attached to a sidewall portion. The turbine may be completely open in the center, allowing space for solids and debris to be directed out of the turbine without jamming the spinning blades/sidewall. The turbine may be placed in a generator for generation of electrical current.

  4. Rotating Connection for Electrical Cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manges, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    Cable reel provides electrical connections between fixed structure and rotating one. Reel carries power and signal lines while allowing rotating structure to turn up to 360 degrees with respect to fixed structure. Reel replaces sliprings. Can be used to electrically connect arm of robot with body. Reel releases cable to rotating part as it turns and takes up cable as rotating part comes back to its starting position, without tangling, twisting, or kinking.

  5. Rotating black hole hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Ruth; Kubizňák, David; Wills, Danielle

    2013-06-01

    A Kerr black hole sporting cosmic string hair is studied in the context of the abelian Higgs model vortex. It is shown that such a system displays much richer phenomenology than its static Schwarzschild or Reissner-Nordstrom cousins, for example, the rotation generates a near horizon `electric' field. In the case of an extremal rotating black hole, two phases of the Higgs hair are possible: large black holes exhibit standard hair, with the vortex piercing the event horizon. Small black holes on the other hand, exhibit a flux-expelled solution, with the gauge and scalar field remaining identically in their false vacuum state on the event horizon. This solution however is extremely sensitive to confirm numerically, and we conjecture that it is unstable due to a supperradiant mechanism similar to the Kerr-adS instability. Finally, we compute the gravitational back reaction of the vortex, which turns out to be far more nuanced than a simple conical deficit. While the string produces a conical effect, it is conical with respect to a local co-rotating frame, not with respect to the static frame at infinity.

  6. Bioreactor rotating wall vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells.

  7. Snakes and spin rotators

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    1990-06-18

    The generalized snake configuration offers advantages of either shorter total snake length and smaller orbit displacement in the compact configuration or the multi-functions in the split configuration. We found that the compact configuration can save about 10% of the total length of a snake. On other hand, the spilt snake configuration can be used both as a snake and as a spin rotator for the helicity state. Using the orbit compensation dipoles, the spilt snake configuration can be located at any distance on both sides of the interaction point of a collider provided that there is no net dipole rotation between two halves of the snake. The generalized configuration is then applied to the partial snake excitation. Simple formula have been obtained to understand the behavior of the partial snake. Similar principle can also be applied to the spin rotators. We also estimate the possible snake imperfections are due to various construction errors of the dipole magnets. Accuracy of field error of better than 10{sup {minus}4} will be significant. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  8. OH "Rotational" Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slanger, T. G.; Matsiev, D.

    2015-12-01

    It is customary to determine temperatures in the mesosphere and MLT by using Boltzmann plots based on the distributions of the lowest rotational levels in the bands of the OH Meinel system, assuming that populations in these levels are in LTE with the kinetic temperature. The higher rotational levels are clearly not in LTE, and using sky spectra from the large telescopes (Keck, VLT) has now shown that this assumption is invalid even for low rotational levels [Cosby and Slanger, 2007; Noll et al. 2014]. The apparent temperatures derived from such Boltzmann plots show an upward trend with increasing OH vibrational level, from v = 2 to v = 9, with reproducible structure such that there is always a peak at v = 8. Over this range of vibrational levels, the "temperature" increase with increasing altitude is on the order of 15-20 K. At the same time, the modeled kinetic temperature is decreasing, as the OH layer lies below the mesopause, and rocket/satellite measurements indicate that the highest levels have the highest altitude. Since this technique of kinetic temperature assessment has been in use for many years, it is important to realize that the procedure is flawed, most likely due to the details of the relaxation processes of OH(v).

  9. Simulations of Solar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    Formation of a coronal jet from twisted field lines that have reconnected with the ambient field. The colors show the radial velocity of the plasma. [Adapted from Szente et al. 2017]How do jets emitted from the Suns surface contribute to its corona and to the solar wind? In a recent study, a team of scientists performed complex three-dimensional simulations of coronal jets to answer these questions.Small ExplosionsCoronal jets are relatively small eruptions from the Suns surface, with heights of roughly 100 to 10,000 km, speeds of 10 to 1,000 km/s, and lifetimes of a few minutes to around ten hours. These jets are constantly present theyre emitted even from the quiet Sun, when activity is otherwise low and weve observed them with a fleet of Sun-watching space telescopes spanning the visible, extreme ultraviolet (EUV), and X-ray wavelength bands.A comparison of simulated observations based on the authors model (left panels) to actual EUV and X-ray observations of jets (right panels). [Szente et al. 2017]Due to their ubiquity, we speculate that these jets might contribute to heating the global solar corona (which is significantly hotter than the surface below it, a curiosity known as the coronal heating problem). We can also wonder what role these jets might play in driving the overall solar wind.Launching a JetLed by Judit Szente (University of Michigan), a team of scientists has explored the impact of coronal jets on the global corona and solar wind with a series of numerical simulations. Szente and collaborators used three-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that provide realistic treatment of the solar atmosphere, the solar wind acceleration, and the complexities of heat transfer throughout the corona.In the authors simulations, a jet is initiated as a magnetic dipole rotates at the solar surface, winding up field lines. Magnetic reconnection between the twisted lines and the background field then launches the jet from the dense and hot solar

  10. Solar shutter arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Fulkerson, P.L.

    1988-02-02

    In a structure having a roof with a skylight including a glass panel which transmits solar energy, a shutter arrangement supported on the roof is described comprising an insulative flat one-piece solid shutter in the form of a panel selectively and linearly slidable on tracks which conceal the side edges thereof from a position blocking transmittal of solar energy through the glass panel of the skylight into an area within the structure to a position permitting transmittal of solar energy through the glass panel of the skylight into the area within the structure. The skylight presents a space between the glass panel and the selectively and linearly slidable insulative flat one-piece solid shutter, where the latter serves as the selective inner wall of the space contiguous with the area within the structure and the glass panel serves as the fixed outer wall of the space, where temperature responsive means is disposed within the space and in direct engagement with the inner surface of the glass panel, where the temperature responsive means is a black thermocouple operating a motor in a driving relationship with the insulative flat one-piece solid shutter. The insulative flat one-piece solid shutter is supported by a cable secured to a rotatable shaft controlled by the motor, where bi-directional movement of the rotatable shaft achieves raising and lowering of the insulative flat one-piece solid shutter to each of the solar energy blocking and transmittal positions, and where the insulative flat one-piece solid shutter includes a reflective surface facing the skylight and a decorative surface facing the area within the structure.

  11. Periodogram analysis of sunspot numbers and the relation with solar activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hady, Ahmed A.

    1995-01-01

    The time series of average monthly sunspot numbers during 1900-1992 is studied by using power spectral analysis. This prediction method is used to study the sunspot periodicities relations between its, and with the other periodicities by solar activities. There are periodicities (between few days and 5 years) overwhelm on the mean solar cycle. ( 11 year cycle). These periodicities have the same relation with variations of solar constant and solar radiation reaching the Earth's atmosphere in the last solar cycle. These periods are related to the solar magnetic activity and to the modulation of solar features due to solar rotation.

  12. The Solar Dynamo Zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Soon, Willie; Baliunas, Sallie; Hall, Jeffrey C.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Henry, Gregory W.

    2016-07-01

    We present composite time series of Ca II H & K line core emission indices of up to 50 years in length for a set of 27 solar-analog stars (spectral types G0-G5; within 10% of the solar mass) and the Sun. These unique data are available thanks to the long-term dedicated efforts of the Mount Wilson Observatory HK project, the Lowell Observatory Solar-Stellar Spectrograph, and the National Solar Observatory/Air Force Research Laboratory/Sacramento Peak K-line monitoring program. The Ca II H & K emission originates in the lower chromosphere and is strongly correlated with the presence of magnetic plage regions in the Sun. These synoptic observations allow us to trace the patterns long-term magnetic variability and explore dynamo behavior over a wide range of rotation regimes and stellar evolution timescales.In this poster, the Ca HK observations are expressed using the Mount Wilson S-index. Each time series is accompanied by a Lomb-Scargle periodogram, fundemental stellar parameters derived from the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey, and statistics derived from the time series including the median S-index value and seasonal and long-term amplitudes. Statistically significant periodogram peaks are ranked according to a new cycle quality metric. We find that clear, simple, Sun-like cycles are the minority in this sample.

  13. The Solar Dynamo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    1998-01-01

    The solar dynamo is the process by which the Sun's magnetic field is generated through the interaction of the field with convection and rotation. In this, it is kin to planetary dynamos and other stellar dynamos. Although the precise mechanism by which the Sun generates its field remains poorly understood despite decades of theoretical and observational work, recent advances suggest that solutions to this solar dynamo problem may be forthcoming. Two basic processes are involved in dynamo activity. When the fluid stresses dominate the magnetic stresses (high plasma beta = 8(pi)rho/B(sup 2)), shear flows can stretch magnetic field lines in the direction of the shear (the "alpha effect") and helical flows can lift and twist field lines into orthogonal planes (the "alpha effect"). These two processes can be active anywhere in the solar convection zone but with different results depending upon their relative strengths and signs. Little is known about how and where these processes occur. Other processes, such as magnetic diffusion and the effects of the fine scale structure of the solar magnetic field, pose additional problems.

  14. Rotating plug bearing and seal

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1977-01-01

    A bearing and seal structure for nuclear reactors utilizing rotating plugs above the nuclear reactor vessel. The structure permits lubrication of bearings and seals of the rotating plugs without risk of the lubricant draining into the reactor vessel below. The structure permits lubrication by utilizing a rotating outer race bearing.

  15. The rotation of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Thomas A.

    1991-01-01

    Earth rotation studies are reviewed for the 1987-1990 time period. It is noted that the emphasis in these studies has shifted from improvements in the observational techniques to interpreting and gaining greater understanding of the variations of the earth rotations. There have been progressive improvements in the accuracy and the temporal resolution of earth rotation measurements.

  16. On the Product of Rotations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trenkler, G.; Trenkler, D.

    2008-01-01

    Using the elementary tools of matrix theory, we show that the product of two rotations in the three-dimensional Euclidean space is a rotation again. For this purpose, three types of rotation matrices are identified which are of simple structure. One of them is the identity matrix, and each of the other two types can be uniquely characterized by…

  17. Earth's Variable Rotation from 750BC to present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Leslie Valentine; Hohenkerk, Catherine; Stephenson, F. Richard

    2015-08-01

    Ancient Babylonian clay tablets buried for centuries beneath the sands of the desert are part of an extensive historical archive that contains vital information about the Earth's rotation from 750BC to the present. These historical observations of solar and lunar eclipses and occultations of stars are re-analysed to determine the error of the Earth's rotational clock, usually designated by ΔT. The diagrams display the individual results for ΔT, together with the best-fitting curve through these data.

  18. Differentially Rotating White Dwarfs I: Regimes of Internal Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pranab; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2017-01-01

    Most viable models of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) require the thermonuclear explosion of a carbon/oxygen white dwarf that has evolved in a binary system. Rotation could be an important aspect of any model for SNe Ia, whether single or double degenerate, with the white dwarf mass at, below, or above the Chandrasekhar limit. Differential rotation is specifically invoked in attempts to account for the apparent excess mass in the super-Chandrasekhar events. Some earlier work has suggested that only uniform rotation is consistent with the expected mechanisms of angular momentum transport in white dwarfs, while others have found pronounced differential rotation. We show that if the baroclinic instability is active in degenerate matter and the effects of magnetic fields are neglected, both nearly uniform rotation and strongly differential rotation are possible. We classify rotation regimes in terms of the Richardson number, Ri. At small values of Ri ≤slant 0.1, we find both the low-viscosity Zahn regime with a nonmonotonic angular velocity profile and a new differential rotation regime for which the viscosity is high and scales linearly with the shear, σ. Employment of Kelvin–Helmholtz viscosity alone yields differential rotation. Large values of Ri ≫ 1 produce a regime of nearly uniform rotation for which the baroclinic viscosity is of intermediate value and scales as {σ }3. We discuss the gap in understanding of the behavior at intermediate values of Ri and how observations may constrain the rotation regimes attained by nature.

  19. Rotation of low-mass stars - A new probe of stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinsonneault, M. H.; Kawaler, Steven D.; Demarque, P.

    1990-01-01

    Models of stars of various masses and rotational parameters were developed and compared with observations of stars in open clusters of various ages in order to analyze the evolution of rotating stars from the early premain sequence to an age of 1.7 x 10 to the 9th yrs. It is shown that, for stars older than 10 to the 8th yrs and less massive than 1.1 solar mass, the surface rotation rates depend most strongly on the properties of the angular momentum loss. The trends of the currently available observations suggest that the rotation periods are a good indicator of the field-star ages.

  20. Helioseismology with Solar Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löptien, Björn; Birch, Aaron C.; Gizon, Laurent; Schou, Jesper; Appourchaux, Thierry; Blanco Rodríguez, Julián; Cally, Paul S.; Dominguez-Tagle, Carlos; Gandorfer, Achim; Hill, Frank; Hirzberger, Johann; Scherrer, Philip H.; Solanki, Sami K.

    2015-12-01

    The Solar Orbiter mission, to be launched in July 2017, will carry a suite of remote sensing and in-situ instruments, including the Polarimetric and Helioseismic Imager (PHI). PHI will deliver high-cadence images of the Sun in intensity and Doppler velocity suitable for carrying out novel helioseismic studies. The orbit of the Solar Orbiter spacecraft will reach a solar latitude of up to 21∘ (up to 34∘ by the end of the extended mission) and thus will enable the first local helioseismology studies of the polar regions. Here we consider an array of science objectives to be addressed by helioseismology within the baseline telemetry allocation (51 Gbit per orbit, current baseline) and within the science observing windows (baseline 3×10 days per orbit). A particularly important objective is the measurement of large-scale flows at high latitudes (rotation and meridional flow), which are largely unknown but play an important role in flux transport dynamos. For both helioseismology and feature tracking methods convection is a source of noise in the measurement of longitudinally averaged large-scale flows, which decreases as T -1/2 where T is the total duration of the observations. Therefore, the detection of small amplitude signals (e.g., meridional circulation, flows in the deep solar interior) requires long observation times. As an example, one hundred days of observations at lower spatial resolution would provide a noise level of about three m/s on the meridional flow at 80∘ latitude. Longer time-series are also needed to study temporal variations with the solar cycle. The full range of Earth-Sun-spacecraft angles provided by the orbit will enable helioseismology from two vantage points by combining PHI with another instrument: stereoscopic helioseismology will allow the study of the deep solar interior and a better understanding of the physics of solar oscillations in both quiet Sun and sunspots. We have used a model of the PHI instrument to study its

  1. Solar flair.

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, John S

    2003-01-01

    Design innovations and government-sponsored financial incentives are making solar energy increasingly attractive to homeowners and institutional customers such as school districts. In particular, the passive solar design concept of daylighting is gaining favor among educators due to evidence of improved performance by students working in daylit classrooms. Electricity-generating photovoltaic systems are also becoming more popular, especially in states such as California that have high electric rates and frequent power shortages. To help spread the word about solar power, the U.S. Department of Energy staged its first-ever Solar Decathlon in October 2002. This event featured solar-savvy homes designed by 14 college teams. PMID:12573926

  2. Solar Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The instrument pictured is an inexpensive solar meter which is finding wide acceptance among architects, engineers and others engaged in construction of solar energy facilities. It detects the amount of solar energy available at a building site, information necessary to design the most efficient type of solar system for a particular location. Incorporating technology developed by NASA's Lewis Research Center, the device is based upon the solar cell, which provides power for spacecraft by converting the sun's energy to electricity. The meter is produced by Dodge Products, Inc., Houston, Texas, a company formed to bring the technology to the commercial marketplace.

  3. Solar flair.

    PubMed

    Manuel, John S

    2003-02-01

    Design innovations and government-sponsored financial incentives are making solar energy increasingly attractive to homeowners and institutional customers such as school districts. In particular, the passive solar design concept of daylighting is gaining favor among educators due to evidence of improved performance by students working in daylit classrooms. Electricity-generating photovoltaic systems are also becoming more popular, especially in states such as California that have high electric rates and frequent power shortages. To help spread the word about solar power, the U.S. Department of Energy staged its first-ever Solar Decathlon in October 2002. This event featured solar-savvy homes designed by 14 college teams.

  4. Earth rotation derived from occultation records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sôma, Mitsuru; Tanikawa, Kiyotaka

    2016-04-01

    We determined the values of the Earth's rotation parameter, ΔT = T T - UT, around AD 500 after confirming that the value of the tidal acceleration, dot{n}, of the lunar motion remained unchanged during the period between ancient times and the present. For determining of ΔT, we used contemporaneous occultations of planets by the Moon. In general, occultation records are not useful. However, there are some records that give us a stringent condition for the range of ΔT. Records of the lunar occultations in AD 503 and AD 513 are such examples. In order to assure the usefulness of this occultation data, we used contemporaneous annular and total solar eclipses, which have not been used in the preceding work. This is the first work in which the lunar occultation data have been used as primary data to determine the value of ΔT together with auxiliary contemporaneous annular and total solar eclipses. Our ΔT value is less than a smoothed value (Stephenson 1997) by at least 450 s. The result is consistent with our earlier results obtained from solar eclipses.

  5. Solar Energy: Solar System Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on solar system economics is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies.…

  6. Solar Sailing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les

    2009-01-01

    Solar sailing is a topic of growing technical and popular interest. Solar sail propulsion will make space exploration more affordable and offer access to destinations within (and beyond) the solar system that are currently beyond our technical reach. The lecture will describe solar sails, how they work, and what they will be used for in the exploration of space. It will include a discussion of current plans for solar sails and how advanced technology, such as nanotechnology, might enhance their performance. Much has been accomplished recently to make solar sail technology very close to becoming an engineering reality and it will soon be used by the world s space agencies in the exploration of the solar system and beyond. The first part of the lecture will summarize state-of-the-art space propulsion systems and technologies. Though these other technologies are the key to any deep space exploration by humans, robots, or both, solar-sail propulsion will make space exploration more affordable and offer access to distant and difficult destinations. The second part of the lecture will describe the fundamentals of space solar sail propulsion and will describe the near-, mid- and far-term missions that might use solar sails as a propulsion system. The third part of the lecture will describe solar sail technology and the construction of current and future sailcraft, including the work of both government and private space organizations.

  7. Solar mechanics thermal response capabilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranich, Dean D.

    2009-07-01

    In many applications, the thermal response of structures exposed to solar heat loads is of interest. Solar mechanics governing equations were developed and integrated with the Calore thermal response code via user subroutines to provide this computational simulation capability. Solar heat loads are estimated based on the latitude and day of the year. Vector algebra is used to determine the solar loading on each face of a finite element model based on its orientation relative to the sun as the earth rotates. Atmospheric attenuation is accounted for as the optical path length varies from sunrise to sunset. Both direct and diffuse components of solar flux are calculated. In addition, shadowing of structures by other structures can be accounted for. User subroutines were also developed to provide convective and radiative boundary conditions for the diurnal variations in air temperature and effective sky temperature. These temperature boundary conditions are based on available local weather data and depend on latitude and day of the year, consistent with the solar mechanics formulation. These user subroutines, coupled with the Calore three-dimensional thermal response code, provide a complete package for addressing complex thermal problems involving solar heating. The governing equations are documented in sufficient detail to facilitate implementation into other heat transfer codes. Suggestions for improvements to the approach are offered.

  8. Rotating Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scase, M. M.; Baldwin, K. A.; Hill, R. J. A.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of rotation upon the classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability is investigated. We consider a two-layer system with an axis of rotation that is perpendicular to the interface between the layers. In general, we find that a wave mode's growth rate may be reduced by rotation. We further show that in some cases, unstable axisymmetric wave modes may be stabilized by rotating the system above a critical rotation rate associated with the mode's wavelength, the Atwood number, and the flow's aspect ratio.

  9. Activity-rotation relations for lower main sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson-Hockey, Andrea Kay

    It was known for some time that stellar rotation and activity are related, both for chromospheric activity and control activity. Younger, more rapidly rotating stars of a given spectral type generally show higher levels of activity than do older, more slowly rotating stars. On the Sun acitivity is distinctly related to magnetic fields. This leads to the suggestion that activity, at least in solar-type stars, is traceable to a magnetic dynamo which results from the interaction of rotation and differential rotation with convection. The more efficient the coriolis forces are at introducing helicity into convective motions, the more the magnetic field will be amplified and the more activity that is expected. The precise nature of the relationship between magnetic fields, rotation, and activity remains to be well-defined. It is the purpose to examine the relationship between activity and rotation in order to better define and express such a relation (or relations). To meet this goal, a comprehensive sample of stars was collected from the published literature having two or more of the following: chromospheric Ca II, H, and K emission indices; coronal soft X-ray illumination; rotation rates; and where possible, ages. It is seen that the use of normalized activity units and Rossby number generally improves the correlation between activity and rotation. The use of the convective turnover time further permits a possible explanation for the distribution of stars in an activity-color diagram. A large and homogeneous data set permits better definition of previously examined functional dependencies such as the time decay of activity and the relationship between chromospheric and coronal activity indicators.

  10. What have we learned about the solar interior from solar oscillations?

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    After a brief review of the discovery and properties of solar oscillations, I summarize the significant advances in our knowledge of the Sun`s interior structure achieved by using solar oscillation frequency data. I discuss the surprising solar interior rotation profile; the precise determination of the convection zone depth; the convection zone helium abundance; evidence for diffusive settling of helium during the Sun`s 4.5 billion year lifetime; and the Sun`s central structure and implications for the solar neutrino problem.

  11. Solar-Geophysical Data Number 548, April 1990. Part 1 (prompt reports). Data for March, February 1990, and late data

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, H.E.

    1990-04-01

    Contents: detailed index for 1989-1990; data for March 1990--solar-terrestrial environment, IUWDS alert periods (advance and worldwide), solar activity indices, solar flares, solar radio emission, stanford mean solar magnetic field; data for February 1990--solar active regions, sudden ionospheric disturbances, solar radio spectral observations, cosmic ray measurements by neutron monitor, geomagnetic indices; late data--solar radio emission February 1990, cosmic rays climax and huancayo January 1990, inferred interplanetary magnetic field 1989, printer's error November-December 1989 data--reprint of halftone images of kitt peak solar magnetic field synoptic charts rotations 1822-1823.

  12. Orienting and Applying Flux to Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feder, H.; Frasch, W.

    1982-01-01

    Solar cells are oriented and fluxed automatically at first work station along solar-array assembly line. In under 2 seconds rotary drive rotates cell into proper position for applying solder flux to bus pad on collector side. When contact bus pad is in correct position, capstan drive is disengaged, and vacuum holddown beneath cell is turned on. Flux system lowers and applies preset amount of solder flux to bus pad. Two interconnect tabs are soldered to fluxed areas.

  13. Solar energy system with wind vane

    DOEpatents

    Grip, Robert E

    2015-11-03

    A solar energy system including a pedestal defining a longitudinal axis, a frame that is supported by the pedestal and that is rotateable relative to the pedestal about the longitudinal axis, the frame including at least one solar device, and a wind vane operatively connected to the frame to urge the frame relative to the pedestal about the longitudinal axis in response to wind acting on the wind vane.

  14. Observational and theoretical investigations in solar seismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noyes, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    This is the final report on a project to develop a theoretical basis for interpreting solar oscillation data in terms of the interior dynamics and structure of the Sun. The topics covered include the following: (1) studies of the helioseismic signatures of differential rotation and convection in the solar interior; (2) wave generation by turbulent convection; and (3) the study of antipodal sunspot imaging of an active region tomography.

  15. Regimes of Internal Rotation in Differentially Rotating White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, J. Craig; Ghosh, Pranab

    2017-01-01

    Most viable models of Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) require the thermonuclear explosion of a carbon/oxygen white dwarf that has evolved in a binary system. Rotation could be an important aspect of any model for SN Ia, whether single or double degenerate, with the white dwarf mass at, below, or above the Chandrasekhar limit. Differential rotation is specifically invoked in attempts to account for the apparent excess mass in the super--Chandrasekhar events. Some earlier work has suggested that only uniform rotation is consistent with the expected mechanisms of angular momentum transport in white dwarfs, while others have found pronounced differential rotation. We show that if the baroclinic instability is active in degenerate matter and the effects of magnetic fields are neglected, both nearly-uniform and strongly-differential rotation are possible. We classify rotation regimes in terms of the Richardson number, Ri. At small values of Ri < 0.1, we find both the low-viscosity Zahn regime with a non-monotonic angular velocity profile and a new differential rotation regime for which the viscosity is high and scales linearly with the shear, σ. Employment of Kelvin-Helmholtz viscosity alone yields differential rotation. Large values of Ri >> 1 produce a regime of nearly-uniform rotation for which the baroclinic viscosity is of intermediate value and scales as σ3. We discuss the gap in understanding of the behavior at intermediate values of Ri and how observations may constrain the rotation regimes attained by nature.

  16. Physical characterization of fast rotator NEOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikwaya Eluo, Jean-Baptiste; Hergenrother, Carl W.

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the physical characteristics of fast rotator NEOs (sub-km sizes with H > 22) is important for two reasons: to establish properties that can constraint models of their potential hazard, and to learn about the origin and the evolution of the solar system. Technically it is difficult to cover different ranges of wavelengths using one telescope with one instrument. Setting up a network of telescopes with different instruments observing simultaneously the same object will efficiently contribute to the characterization of NEOs.ART (Arizona Robotic Telescope) is a University of Arizona initiative whose goal is to use local 2-m size telescopes to provide near real-time observations of Target of Opportunity objects covering the visible and the near- infrared wavelengths. We plan to use three telescopes of the ART project to observe fast rotator NEOs: 1) VATT (Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope) at Mount Graham (longitude: -109.8719, latitude: 32.7016, elevation: 10469 feet) with VATT-4K optical imager for photometry to estimate colors, lightcurves to get the rotation rate, and estimate the phase angle function of NEOs, 2) Bok 2.3 m at Kitt Peak (longitude: -111.6004, latitude: 31.9629, elevation: 6795 feet) with BCSpec (Boller & Chivens Spectrograph) for visible spectroscopy, and 3) Kuiper 1.5-m at Mount Bigelow (longitude: -110.7345, latitude: 32.4165, elevation: 8235 feet) with a near-infrared instrument.We report here the preliminary results of several NEOs whose rotation rate, color, and type have been estimated using photometry with images recorded with VATT-4K. 2009 SQ104 has a rotation rate of 6.85+/- 0.03 h, 2014 AY28 has a rotation rate of 0.91 +/- 0.02 h, 2014 EC of 0.54 +/-0.04 h, 2014 FA44 of 3.45 +/- 0.05 h, 2014 KS40 of 1.11 +/- 0.06 h, 2011 PT of 0.17 +/- 0.05 h, 2014 SC324 of 0.36 +/- 0.43 h, 2014 WF201 of 1.00 +/- 0.03 h. Of these objects, 2014 HM2, 2014 FA, 2014 SB145, 2011 PT fall among X-type asteroids; 2014 KS, 2014 WF are likely to be

  17. ROTATING PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Boyer, K.; Hammel, J.E.; Longmire, C.L.; Nagle, D.E.; Ribe, F.L.; Tuck, J.L.

    1961-10-24

    ABS>A method and device are described for obtaining fusion reactions. The basic concept is that of using crossed electric and magnetic fields to induce a plasma rotation in which the ionized particles follow a circumferential drift orbit on wldch a cyclotron mode of motion is superimposed, the net result being a cycloidal motion about the axis of symmetry. The discharge tube has a radial electric field and a longitudinal magnetic field. Mirror machine geometry is utilized. The device avoids reliance on the pinch effect and its associated instability problems. (AEC)

  18. Rotational isomerism of vinylmethyltelluride

    SciTech Connect

    Keiko, V.V.; Sinegovskaya, L.M.; Gusarova, N.K.; Tatarinova, A.A.; Kalinina, N.A.; Trofimov, B.A.

    1987-08-10

    In the IR spectrum of solutions of vinylmethyltelluride in n-heptane the doublet form of the valence oscillation band of the double bond is due to rotational isomerism. By analyzing the temperature dependence of the doublet shape, the low-frequency component of the doublet was identified as the s-cis-rotamer. The differences in the enthalpies (4.6 +/- 0.2 kJ/mole) and entropies (-11.1 +/- 0.3 e.u.) of the vinylmethyltelluride rotamers have been calculated and it has been shown that the p,..pi..-conjugation in its molecule is weaker by a factor of 2 than in vinylmethylsulfide.

  19. Solar wind influence on Jupiter's aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyalay, Szilard; Vogt, Marissa F.; Withers, Paul; Bunce, Emma J.

    2016-10-01

    Jupiter's main auroral emission is driven by a system of corotation enforcement currents that arises to speed up outflowing Iogenic plasma and is not due to the magnetosphere-solar wind interaction like at Earth. The solar wind is generally expected to have only a small influence on Jupiter's magnetosphere and aurora compared to the influence of rotational stresses due to the planet's rapid rotation. However, there is considerable observational evidence that the solar wind does affect the magnetopause standoff distance, auroral radio emissions, and the position and brightness of the UV auroral emissions. Using the Michigan Solar Wind Model (mSWiM) to predict the solar wind conditions upstream of Jupiter we have identified intervals of high and low solar wind dynamic pressure in the Galileo dataset, and use this information to quantify how a magnetospheric compression affects the magnetospheric field configuration. We have developed separate spatial fits to the compressed and nominal magnetic field data, accounting for variations with radial distance and local time. These two fits can be used to update the flux equivalence mapping model of Vogt et al. (2011), which links auroral features to source regions in the middle and outer magnetosphere. The updated version accounts for changing solar wind conditions and provides a way to quantify the expected solar wind-induced variability in the ionospheric mapping of the main auroral emission, satellite footprints, and other auroral features. Our results are highly relevant to interpretation of the new auroral observations from the Juno mission.

  20. Catastrophic rotational braking among Sun-like stars. A model of the Sun's rotation evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondoin, P.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Observations of young open clusters show a bimodal distribution of stellar rotation. In those clusters, Sun-like stars group into two main populations of fast and slow rotators. Beyond an age of approximately 600 Myr, the two populations converge towards a single sequence of slow rotators. Aims: The present study addresses the origin of this bimodal distribution and the cause of its observed evolution. Methods: New prescriptions of mass-loss rate and Alfven radius dependences on Rossby number suggested by observations are implemented in a phenomenological model of angular-momentum loss and redistribution. The obtained model is used to calculate the time evolution of a rotation-period distribution of solar-mass stars similar to that observed in the 5 Myr-old NGC 2362 open cluster. The simulated distributions at subsequent ages are compared with those of h Per, the Pleiades, M 50, M 35, and M 37. Results: The model is able to reproduce the appearance and disappearance of a bimodal rotation-period distribution in open clusters providing that a brief episode of large-angular-momentum loss is included in the early evolution of Sun-like stars. Conclusions: I argue that a transitory episode of large-angular-momentum loss occurs on Sun-like stars with Rossby numbers between 0.13 and 0.3. This phenomenon of enhanced magnetic braking by stellar wind would be mainly driven by a rapid increase of mass loss at a critical rotation rate. This scenario accounts for the bimodal distribution of stellar rotation in open clusters with ages between 20-30 Myr and approximately 600 Myr. The mass-loss rate increase could account for a significant fraction of the X-ray luminosity decay of Sun-like stars in the 0.13-0.3 Rossby number range where a transition from the saturated to the non-saturated regime of X-ray emission is observed. Observed correlations between Li abundance and rotation sequences in the Pleiades and M 34 clusters support this scenario.

  1. Venus and Earth , false twins: really different rotational properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottereau, L.

    2010-12-01

    Although Venus and the Earth are the most similar planets in the Solar system, the rotation of these two planets has quite different characteristics. Of the very slow retrograde rotation of Venus, due to a balance between atmospheric and solid body tidal torques, emerge many differences on the evolution of the rotational state of Venus with respect to the Earth one. A complete study of the rotation of Venus on short time scale is presented and compared to the results obtained for the Earth. Applying the theoretical models of Kinoshita (1972, 1977) already used for the Earth, the polhody and the nutation of the figure axis of a rigid Venus is determined. Then evaluating the deformations produced by the zonal part of the tidal potential on the principal moment of inertia, the periodic variations of the speed of rotation of Venus is presented. At last the differences between the results obtained for Venus and for the Earth are explained. Preliminary results on the effect of the atmosphere and the interior of the planet on its rotation state will also be discussed.

  2. Rotating drum filter

    DOEpatents

    Anson, Donald

    1990-01-01

    A perforated drum (10) rotates in a coaxial cylindrical housing (18) having three circumferential ports (19,22,23), and an axial outlet (24) at one end. The axis (11) is horizontal. A fibrous filter medium (20) is fed through a port (19) on or near the top of the housing (81) by a distributing mechanism (36) which lays a uniform mat (26) of the desired thickness onto the rotating drum (10). This mat (26) is carried by the drum (10) to a second port (23) through which dirty fluid (13) enters. The fluid (13) passes through the filter (26) and the cleaned stream (16) exits through the open end (15) of the drum (10) and the axial port (24) in the housing (18). The dirty filter material (20) is carried on to a third port (22) near the bottom of the housing (18) and drops into a receiver (31) from which it is continuously removed, cleaned (30), and returned (32) to the charging port (36) at the top. To support the filter mat, the perforated cylinder may carry a series of tines (40), shaped blades (41), or pockets, so that the mat (26) will not fall from the drum (10) prematurely. To minimize risk of mat failure, the fluid inlet port (23) may be located above the horizontal centerline (11).

  3. Optical rotation sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotge, J. R.; Simmons, B. J.; Kroncke, G. T.; Stech, D. J.

    1986-05-01

    Research efforts were concentrated on passive ring laser rotation sensor technology. Initial efforts were performed on supportive projects, e.g., laser stabilization, followed by a 0.62 sq m passive resonant ring laser gyro (PRRLG), leading to the development of a 60 sq m system mounted on the pneumatically supported isolation test platform (Iso-Pad) at FJSRL. Numerous sub-system tasks and a feasibility 0.62 sq m PRRLG were completed, supporting projections of very high resolution performance by a large 60 sq m PRRLG. The expected performance of the large PRRLG, on the order of 10 to the minus 10th power ERU (earth rate units), would provide an accurate error model applicable to Air Force operational ring laser gyros, a new source of geophysical data, e.g., earth wobble and variations in earth rotation, a proven design concept applicable to Air Force sensor needs as reference to MX instruments tests, and relativity experiments. This report documents the many accomplishments leading to, and the status of the large PRRLG at the date of the PRRLG stop order, November 1985.

  4. Digital rotation measurement unit

    DOEpatents

    Sanderson, S.N.

    1983-09-30

    A digital rotation indicator is disclosed for monitoring the position of a valve member having a movable actuator. The indicator utilizes mercury switches adapted to move in cooperation with the actuator. Each of the switches produces an output as it changes state when the actuator moves. A direction detection circuit is connected to the switches to produce a first digital signal indicative of the direction of rotation of the actuator. A count pulse generating circuit is also connected to the switches to produce a second digital pulse signal having count pulses corresponding to a change of state of any of the mercury switches. A reset pulse generating circuit is provided to generate a reset pulse each time a count pulse is generated. An up/down counter is connected to receive the first digital pulse signal and the second digital pulse signal and to count the pulses of the second digital pulse signal either up or down depending upon the instantaneous digital value of the first digital signal whereby a running count indicative of the movement of the actuator is maintained.

  5. Rotating Wheel Wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombard, Jean-Eloi; Xu, Hui; Moxey, Dave; Sherwin, Spencer

    2016-11-01

    For open wheel race-cars, such as Formula One, or IndyCar, the wheels are responsible for 40 % of the total drag. For road cars, drag associated to the wheels and under-carriage can represent 20 - 60 % of total drag at highway cruise speeds. Experimental observations have reported two, three or more pairs of counter rotating vortices, the relative strength of which still remains an open question. The near wake of an unsteady rotating wheel. The numerical investigation by means of direct numerical simulation at ReD =400-1000 is presented here to further the understanding of bifurcations the flow undergoes as the Reynolds number is increased. Direct numerical simulation is performed using Nektar++, the results of which are compared to those of Pirozzoli et al. (2012). Both proper orthogonal decomposition and dynamic mode decomposition, as well as spectral analysis are leveraged to gain unprecedented insight into the bifurcations and subsequent topological differences of the wake as the Reynolds number is increased.

  6. Sample rotating turntable kit for infrared spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Eckels, Joel Del; Klunder, Gregory L.

    2008-03-04

    An infrared spectrometer sample rotating turntable kit has a rotatable sample cup containing the sample. The infrared spectrometer has an infrared spectrometer probe for analyzing the sample and the rotatable sample cup is adapted to receive the infrared spectrometer probe. A reflectance standard is located in the rotatable sample cup. A sleeve is positioned proximate the sample cup and adapted to receive the probe. A rotator rotates the rotatable sample cup. A battery is connected to the rotator.

  7. Cosmic ray particles behavior during last solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockenbach, Marlos; Dal Lago, Alisson; Munakata, Kazuoki; Kato, Chihiro; Kuwabara, Takao; Bieber, John; Schuch, Nelson; Duldig, Marc; Humble, John; Jassar, Hala Al; Sharma, Madan; Sabbah, Ismail

    2013-04-01

    The work presents the Heliosphere characterization during the minimum solar activity. It is possible to identify phenomena caused by the Corrotating Interaction Regions - CIRs, during this solar activity phase. CIRs can be visualized in satellite data for each 27 days, approximately, and it is frequently accompanied by the Earth crossing through the Heliospheric Current Sheath - HCS. These crossing occur in a period of time lower than a day, and it is possible to study the behavior of cosmic rays particles in two different regions with opposite magnetic field polarities. The last solar minimum was special because their long duration and it was the first that the Global Muon Detector Network - GMDN operated in its full capacity. This cosmic ray detectors network is composed by muon scintillators installed in Nagoya - Japan, Hobart - Australia, São Martinho da Serra - Brazil and Kuwait City - Kuwait. Analyzing the GMDN data together with data from SOHO and/or ACE satellites it is possible to study the behavior of the cosmic ray particles and presents a Heliosphere characterization during the minimum solar activity, giving a better understanding of the cosmic ray particles modulation.

  8. Seismology and geodesy of the sun: Solar geodesy.

    PubMed

    Dicke, R H

    1981-03-01

    Measurements of the elliptical figure of the sun made in 1966 are analyzed on an hourly basis. This analysis yields an improved measure of the previously found solar distortion, rotating rigidly with a sidereal period of 12.38+/-0.10 days. It also yields a set of residùals used to search for signals due to low-frequency solar oscillations.

  9. Bifurcations of rotating waves in rotating spherical shell convection.

    PubMed

    Feudel, F; Tuckerman, L S; Gellert, M; Seehafer, N

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics and bifurcations of convective waves in rotating and buoyancy-driven spherical Rayleigh-Bénard convection are investigated numerically. The solution branches that arise as rotating waves (RWs) are traced by means of path-following methods, by varying the Rayleigh number as a control parameter for different rotation rates. The dependence of the azimuthal drift frequency of the RWs on the Ekman and Rayleigh numbers is determined and discussed. The influence of the rotation rate on the generation and stability of secondary branches is demonstrated. Multistability is typical in the parameter range considered.

  10. Visualizing rotations and composition of rotations with the Rodrigues vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdenebro, Angel G.

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show that the mathematical treatment of three-dimensional rotations can be simplified, and its geometrical understanding improved, using the Rodrigues vector representation. We present a novel geometrical interpretation of the Rodrigues vector. Based on this interpretation and simple geometrical considerations, we derive the Euler-Rodrigues formula, Cayley’s rotation formula and the composition law for finite rotations. The level of this discussion should be suitable for undergraduate physics or engineering courses where rotations are discussed.

  11. Solar spectral irradiance variability in cycle 24: observations and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, Sergey V.; DeLand, Matthew T.; Lean, Judith L.

    2016-12-01

    Utilizing the excellent stability of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), we characterize both short-term (solar rotation) and long-term (solar cycle) changes of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) between 265 and 500 nm during the ongoing cycle 24. We supplement the OMI data with concurrent observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) and Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) instruments and find fair-to-excellent, depending on wavelength, agreement among the observations, and predictions of the Naval Research Laboratory Solar Spectral Irradiance (NRLSSI2) and Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction for the Satellite era (SATIRE-S) models.

  12. Solar Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Oriel Corporation's simulators have a high pressure xenon lamp whose reflected light is processed by an optical system to produce a uniform solar beam. Because of many different types of applications, the simulators must be adjustable to replicate many different areas of the solar radiation spectrum. Simulators are laboratory tools for such purposes as testing and calibrating solar cells, or other solar energy systems, testing dyes, paints and pigments, pharmaceuticals and cosmetic preparations, plant and animal studies, food and agriculture studies and oceanographic research.

  13. Solar Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    The areas of emphasis are: (1) develop theoretical models of the transient release of magnetic energy in the solar atmosphere, e.g., in solar flares, eruptive prominences, coronal mass ejections, etc.; (2) investigate the role of the Sun's magnetic field in the structuring of solar corona by the development of three-dimensional numerical models that describe the field configuration at various heights in the solar atmosphere by extrapolating the field at the photospheric level; (3) develop numerical models to investigate the physical parameters obtained by the ULYSSES mission; (4) develop numerical and theoretical models to investigate solar activity effects on the solar wind characteristics for the establishment of the solar-interplanetary transmission line; and (5) develop new instruments to measure solar magnetic fields and other features in the photosphere, chromosphere transition region and corona. We focused our investigation on the fundamental physical processes in solar atmosphere which directly effect our Planet Earth. The overall goal is to establish the physical process for the Sun-Earth connections.

  14. A study of cosmic ray flux based on the noise in raw CCD data from solar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Z.-N.; Qin, G.

    2016-11-01

    Raw solar images from CCDs are often contaminated with single-pixel noise which is thought to be made by cosmic ray hits. The cosmic ray-affected pixels are usually outstanding when compared with the perimeter zone. In this work, we use a method based on the median filtering algorithm to identify and count the cosmic ray traces from SOHO/EIT solar images to estimate the cosmic ray (CR) flux. With such cosmic ray flux, we study the transient variations associated with the violent solar activities, such as the solar proton events (SPEs), which show good similarity with the observations of GOES 11 P6 channel with an energy interval 80-165 MeV. Further, using SPE list observed by SOHO/ERNE proton channels with more narrow energy intervals, it is found that CRs in the energy range 118-140 MeV affect the SOHO/EIT images the most. In addition, by using a robust automatic despiking method, we get the background of the cosmic ray flux from solar images, which is considered to be the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) flux. The GCR flux from solar images shows an 11 year period due to the solar modulation, similar to the SOHO/ERNE GCR flux and Newark neutron monitor count rates. Furthermore, GCRs from solar images have a 27 day period and show good anticorrelation with the changes of solar wind velocity.

  15. Stellar differential rotation and coronal time-scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibb, G. P. S.; Jardine, M. M.; Mackay, D. H.

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the time-scales of evolution of stellar coronae in response to surface differential rotation and diffusion. To quantify this, we study both the formation time and lifetime of a magnetic flux rope in a decaying bipolar active region. We apply a magnetic flux transport model to prescribe the evolution of the stellar photospheric field, and use this to drive the evolution of the coronal magnetic field via a magnetofrictional technique. Increasing the differential rotation (i.e. decreasing the equator-pole lap time) decreases the flux rope formation time. We find that the formation time is dependent upon the lap time and the surface diffusion time-scale through the relation τ_Form ∝ √{τ_Lapτ_Diff}. In contrast, the lifetimes of flux ropes are proportional to the lap time (τLife∝τLap). With this, flux ropes on stars with a differential rotation of more than eight times the solar value have a lifetime of less than 2 d. As a consequence, we propose that features such as solar-like quiescent prominences may not be easily observable on such stars, as the lifetimes of the flux ropes which host the cool plasma are very short. We conclude that such high differential rotation stars may have very dynamical coronae.

  16. Solar ultraviolet radiation induced variations in the stratosphere and mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.

    1987-01-01

    The detectability and interpretation of short-term solar UV induced responses of middle atmospheric ozone, temperature, and dynamics are reviewed. The detectability of solar UV induced perturbations in the middle atmosphere is studied in terms of seasonal and endogenic dynamical variations. The interpretation of low-latitude ozone and possible temperature responses on the solar rotation time scale is examined. The use of these data to constrain or test photochemical model predictions is discussed.

  17. Rotational scanning atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ulčinas, A; Vaitekonis, Š

    2017-03-10

    A non-raster scanning technique for atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging which combines rotational and translational motion is presented. The use of rotational motion for the fast scan axis allows us to significantly increase the scanning speed while imaging a large area (diameter > 30 μm). An image reconstruction algorithm and the factors influencing the resolution of the technique are discussed. The experimental results show the potential of the rotational scanning technique for high-throughput large area AFM investigation.

  18. Torque Simulator for Rotating Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, W. T.

    1982-01-01

    New torque brake simulates varying levels of friction in bearings of rotating body. Rolling-tail torque brake uses magnetic force to produce friction between rotating part and stationary part. Simulator electronics produce positive or negative feedback signal, depending on direction of rotation. New system allows for first time in-depth study of effects of tail-fin spin rates on pitch-, yaw-, and roll-control characteristics.

  19. Rotational scanning atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulčinas, A.; Vaitekonis, Š.

    2017-03-01

    A non-raster scanning technique for atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging which combines rotational and translational motion is presented. The use of rotational motion for the fast scan axis allows us to significantly increase the scanning speed while imaging a large area (diameter > 30 μm). An image reconstruction algorithm and the factors influencing the resolution of the technique are discussed. The experimental results show the potential of the rotational scanning technique for high-throughput large area AFM investigation.

  20. Rotating Detonation Engine Operation (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    MdotH2 = mass flow of hydrogen MdotAir = mass flow of air PCB = Piezoelectric Pressure Sensor PDE = Pulsed Detonation Engine RDE = Rotating ...and unsteady thrust output of PDEs . One of the new designs was the Rotating Detonation Engine (RDE). An RDE operates by exhausting an initial...AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2012-0003 ROTATING DETONATION ENGINE OPERATION (PREPRINT) James A. Suchocki and Sheng-Tao John Yu The Ohio State

  1. Uniformly Rotating Single Substance Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Charles Michael Leo

    This dissertation explicitly and in detail solves the extended rotator problem in the uncharged relativistic classical cases of most physical interest. It shows that no plausible relativistic solutions exist in the literature of the extended rotator and that the point rotator solutions sometimes ballyhooed are not to be taken seriously. Explicit energy speedratio functions, angular momentum speedratio functions, Hamiltonian, Lagrangian, and other important characteristic functions of the state of uniform rotation of the extended body are detailed. This dissertation does not retreat to an 'analysis' of just the point rotator --which so many others have done and done incorrectly, or at best misleadingly, by hiding implausible assumptions in manifestly covariant formats. Assumptions in the model are not hidden but are brought out and analyzed as to their relevance for highlighting the core of the uniform rotation physics. Neither does the author hide any ignorance of the internal holding field for the rotator. Formulae for the characteristic Minimum Holding Field are explicitly given and their relativistic relevance is shown. The demonstration that such fields can be ignored in the energy and angular momentum expressions is completely detailed. The explicit Stress-Energy Tensor for the entire closed rotator system is given with all that entails as to the inescapability of the results from out of that mathematics. The generality of the finiteness of the extreme relativistic rotational limit is detailed and explained with its stark essential contrast to the infinite limit in the case of extreme relativistic translation of a body. The rotator is shown to possess a rich mathematical structure. Many elegant interconnection formulae are found as well as new Hamiltonian formulae --sometimes of considerable complexity. Exact rotator formulae as well as graphs, tables, and even interesting approximations are provided. New nonlinear differential equations are discovered and

  2. Stellar Rubella: Starspots on F, G and K Stars of Different Ages and Rotation Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, E. F.; Dewarf, L. E.; Messina, S.; McCook, G. P.

    1995-05-01

    We present high precision photoelectric photometry of a sample of bright, single F, G, and K- type main-sequence and subgiant stars. Several of the stars are members of clusters or moving groups and thus have well determined ages. The majority of the stars are main-sequence to subgiant G-types stars that range in age from 70 Myr to 10 Gyr with directly measured rotation periods from 2.7 days up to 40-50 days. The observations have been carried out with Automatic Photometric Telescopes (APTs) located on Mt Hopkins, Arizona beginning in 1988; standard UBVRI \\ or uvby \\ filters were used. As expected, the youngest, fastest rotating stars in the sample typically have the largest, rotationally modulated starspot light variations. Some of the stars show relatively rapid changes in their light curves that are explained by differential rotation of the starspot groups. In addition, some of the stars that have been observed over several years show long-term, seasonal trends in their mean brightness levels that most likely arise from starspot cycles. The starspot properties (areal coverage, distribution, and temperature) are determined from the modelling of the multiwavelength light curves. For certain stars, comparisons of these photospheric starspots properties to their corresponding chromospheric, transition region, and coronal activity indicators obtained in the UV, EUV \\ and X-ray are presented and discussed. Analogies are also made to the magnetic properties of the Sun. This research is supported by NSF AST 86-16362, NASA NAG5-2160, and NAG5-2494.

  3. The rotation of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goody, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    A historical review of the use of three independent techniques for measuring the rotational rate is presented. The approaches examined are: (1) using theoretical interior models together with observations of the oblateness and the gravitational moment; (2) studying periodic fluctuations in the brightness; and (3) spectrographically measuring the Doppler shifts (line tilts). Measurements of line tilts obtained using the Kitt Peak National Observation 4 meter telescope with a Cassegrain echelle to high obtain high spectral dispersion and large image are discussed and compared with results obtained by Muench and Hipplelein (1980) and by Hayes and Belton (1977). The possibility of using speckel imaging techniques to detect the motion of features across the disc in the 6091 methane band, and with more suitable image intensifiers, in the 7261 band is considered.

  4. PLT rotating pumped limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.A.; Budny, R.V.; Corso, V.; Boychuck, J.; Grisham, L.; Heifetz, D.; Hosea, J.; Luyber, S.; Loprest, P.; Manos, D.

    1984-07-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face and the ability to rotate during tokamak discharges has been installed in a PLT pump duct. These features have been selected to handle the unique particle removal and heat load requirements of ICRF heating and lower-hybrid current-drive experiments. The limiter has been conditioned and commissioned in an ion-beam test stand by irradiation with 1 MW power, 200 ms duration beams of 40 keV hydrogen ions. Operation in PLT during ohmic discharges has proven the ability of the limiter to reduce localized heating caused by energetic electron bombardment and to remove about 2% of the ions lost to the PLT walls and limiters.

  5. Asteroid Ida Rotation Sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This montage of 14 images (the time order is right to left, bottom to top) shows Ida as it appeared in the field of view of Galileo's camera on August 28, 1993. Asteroid Ida rotates once every 4 hours, 39 minutes and clockwise when viewed from above the north pole; these images cover about one Ida 'day.' This sequence has been used to create a 3-D model that shows Ida to be almost croissant shaped. The earliest view (lower right) was taken from a range of 240,000 kilometers (150,000 miles), 5.4 hours before closest approach. The asteroid Ida draws its name from mythology, in which the Greek god Zeus was raised by the nymph Ida.

  6. Rotating Gravity Gradiometer Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forward, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The application of a Rotating Gravity Gradiometer (RGG) system on board a Lunar Polar Orbiter (LPO) for the measurement of the Lunar gravity field was investigated. A data collection simulation study shows that a gradiometer will give significantly better gravity data than a doppler tracking system for the altitudes under consideration for the LOP, that the present demonstrated sensitivity of the RGG is adequate for measurement of the Lunar gravity gradient field, and that a single RGG instrument will provide almost as much data for geophysical interpretation as an orthogonal three axis RGG system. An engineering study of the RGG sensor/LPO spacecraft interface characteristics shows that the RGG systems under consideration are compatible with the present models of the LPO spacecraft.

  7. Rotating gravity gradiometer study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forward, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Two rotating gravity gradiometer (RGG) sensors, along with all the external electronics needed to operate them, and the fixtures and special test equipment needed to fill and align the bearings, were assembled in a laboratory, and inspected. The thermal noise threshold of the RGG can be lowered by replacing a damping resistor in the first stage electronics by an active artificial resistor that generates less random voltage noise per unit bandwidth than the Johnson noise from the resistor it replaces. The artificial resistor circuit consists of an operational amplifier, three resistors, and a small DC to DC floating power supply. These are small enough to be retrofitted to the present circuit boards inside the RGG rotor in place of the 3 Megohm resistor. Using the artificial resistor, the thermal noise of the RGG-2 sensor can be lowered from 0.3 Eotvos to 0.15 Eotvos for a 10 sec integration time.

  8. Solar Powered Flight on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony; Landis, Geoff (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    Solar powered flight within the Venus environment from the surface to the upper atmosphere was evaluated. The objective was to see if a station-keeping mission was possible within this environment based on a solar power generating system. Due to the slow rotation rate of Venus it would be possible to remain within the day light side of the planet for extended periods of time. However the high wind speeds and thick cloud cover make a station-keeping solar powered mission challenging. The environment of Venus was modeled as a function of altitude from the surface. This modeling included density, temperature, solar attenuation and wind speed. Using this environmental model flight with both airships and aircraft was considered to evaluate whether a station-keeping mission is feasible. The solar power system and flight characteristics of both types of vehicles was modeled and power balance was set up to determine if the power available from the solar array was sufficient to provide enough thrust to maintain station over a fixed ground location.

  9. Offset truss hex solar concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, John E. (Inventor); Sturgis, James D. (Inventor); Erikson, Raymond J. (Inventor); Waligroski, Gregg A. (Inventor); Scott, Michael A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A solar energy concentrator system comprises an offset reflector structure made up of a plurality of solar energy reflector panel sections interconnected with one another to form a piecewise approximation of a portion of a (parabolic) surface of revolution rotated about a prescribed focal axis. Each panel section is comprised of a plurality of reflector facets whose reflective surfaces effectively focus reflected light to preselected surface portions of the interior sidewall of a cylindrically shaped solar energy receiver. The longitudinal axis of the receiver is tilted at an acute angle with respect to the optical axis such that the distribution of focussed solar energy over the interior surface of the solar engine is optimized for dynamic solar energy conversion. Each reflector panel section comprises a flat, hexagonally shaped truss support framework and a plurality of beam members interconnecting diametrically opposed corners of the hexagonal framework recessed within which a plurality of (spherically) contoured reflector facets is disposed. The depth of the framework and the beam members is greater than the thickness of a reflector facet such that a reflector facet may be tilted (for controlling the effective focus of its reflected light through the receiver aperture) without protruding from the panel section.

  10. Recent developments for realistic solar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serenelli, Aldo M.

    2014-05-01

    The "solar abundance problem" has triggered a renewed interest in revising the concept of SSM from different perspectives: 1) constituent microphysics: equation of state, nuclear rates, radiative opacities; 2) constituent macrophysics: the physical processes impact the evolution of the Sun and its present-day structure, e.g. dynamical processes induced by rotation, presence of magnetic fields; 3) challenge the hypothesis that the young Sun was chemically homogeneous: the possible interaction of the young Sun with its protoplanetary disk. Here, I briefly review and then present a (personal) view on recent advances and developments on solar modeling, part of them carried out as attempts to solve the solar abundance problem.

  11. The sun and heliosphere at solar maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.; Marsden, R. G.; Balogh, A.; Gloeckler, G.; Geiss, J.; McComas, D. J.; McKibben, R. B.; MacDowall, R. J.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Krupp, N.; Krueger, H.; Landgraf, M.

    2003-01-01

    Recent Ulysses observations from the Sun's equator to the poles reveal fundamental properties of the three-dimensional heliosphere at the maximum in solar activity. The heliospheric magnetic field originates from a magnetic dipole oriented nearly perpendicular to, instead of nearly parallel to, the Sun'rotation axis. Magnetic fields, solar wind, and energetic charged particles from low-latitude sources reach all latitudes, including the polar caps. The very fast high-latitude wind and polar coronal holes disappear and reappear together. Solar wind speed continues to be inversely correlated with coronal temperature. The cosmic ray flux is reduced symmetrically at all latitudes.

  12. Rotation Curves of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnajs, Agris J.

    One can obtain a fairly good understanding of the relation between axially symmetric mass distributions and the rotation curves they produce without resorting to calculations. However it does require a break with tradition. The first step consists of replacing quantities such as surface density, volume density, and circular velocity with the mass in a ring, mass in a spherical shell, and the square of the circular velocity, or more precisely with 2 pi G r mu(r), 4 pi G r^2 rho(r), and Vc^2 (r). These three quantities all have the same dimensions, and are related to each other by scale-free linear operators. The second step consists of introducing ln(r) as the coordinate. On the log scale the scale-free operators becomes the more familiar convolution operations. Convolutions are easily handled by Fourier techniques and a surface density can be converted into a rotation curve or volume density in a small fraction of a second. A simple plot of 2 pi G r mu(r) as a function of ln(r) reveals the relative contributions of different radii to Vc^2(r). Such a plot also constitutes a sanity test for the fitting of various laws to photometric data. There are numerous examples in the literature of excellent fits to the tails that lack data or are poor fits around the maximum of 2 pi G r mu(r). I will discuss some exact relations between the above three quantities as well as some empirical observations such as the near equality of the maxima of 2 pi G r mu(r) and Vc^2 (r) curves for flat mass distributions.

  13. Plasma rotation induced by RF

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, V. S.; Chiu, S. C.; Lin-Liu, Y. R. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698; Omelchenko, Y. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698

    1999-09-20

    Plasma rotation has many beneficial effects on tokamak operation including stabilization of MHD and microturbulence to improve the beta limit and confinement. Contrary to present-day tokamaks, neutral beams may not be effective in driving rotation in fusion reactors; hence the investigation of radiofrequency (RF) induced plasma rotation is of great interest and potential importance. This paper reviews the experimental results of RF induced rotation and possible physical mechanisms, suggested by theories, to explain the observations. This subject is only in the infancy of its research and many challenging issues remained to be understood and resolved. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  14. Solar and stellar coronal plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1989-01-01

    Progress in observational, theoretical, and radio studies of coronal plasmas is summarized. Specifically work completed in the area of solar and stellar magnetic fields, related photospheric phenomena and the relationships between magnetism, rotation, coronal and chromospheric emission in solar-like stars is described. Also outlined are theoretical studies carried out in the following areas, among others: (1) neutral beams as the dominant energy transport mechanism in two ribbon-flares; (2) magneto hydrodynamic and circuit models for filament eruptions; and (3) studies of radio emission mechanisms in transient events. Finally, radio observations designed for coronal activity studies of the sun and of solar-type coronae are described. A bibliography of publications and talks is provided along with reprints of selected articles.

  15. The Solar/Stellar Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Allan Sacha

    2015-08-01

    The Sun is the archetype of magnetic star. Its proximity and the wealth of very high accuracy observations that this has allowed us to gather over many decades have greatly helped us understanding how solar-like stars (e.g with a convective envelope) redistribute angular momentum and generate a cyclic magnetic field. However most models have been so fine tuned that when they are straightforwardly extended to other solar-like stars and are compared with the ever growing stellar magnetism and differential rotation observations the agreement is not as good as one could hope. In this review I will discuss based on theoretical considerations and multi-D MHD stellar models what can be considered as robust properties of solar-like star dynamics and magnetism and what is still speculative.

  16. Solar wind and its interaction with the magnetosphere - Measured parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenn, R.

    The sun and the solar wind are considered in terms of the 'ballerina' model first proposed by Alfven (1977), taking into account high speed streams, the slow solar wind, stream-stream interactions, the relation of streams and magnetic structure, and transients caused by solar activity. The main features of the solar wind behavior are illustrated with the aid of data, covering one complete solar rotation in 1974/1975, which were obtained with instruments aboard the Helios-1 solar probe. It is pointed out that the solar wind acts like a huge buffer pushing onto the earth's magnetosphere with a highly variable pressure. Of the energy in the highly variable solar wind reservoir only a tiny fraction is absorbed by the magnetosphere in an obviously very nonstationary way.

  17. Image Rotation Does Not Rotate Smooth Eye Movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey B.; Stone, Leland S. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Subjects viewing a drifting noise pattern make reflexive smooth eye movements in the direction of motion, which follow rapid changes in movement direction. These responses are unaffected by rotations of the pattern, suggesting that there is no coupling between visually sensed rotation and the direction of ocular following.

  18. Modeling rigid magnetically rotated microswimmers: Rotation axes, bistability, and controllability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkati, Farshad; Fu, Henry Chien

    2014-12-01

    Magnetically actuated microswimmers have recently attracted attention due to many possible biomedical applications. In this study we investigate the dynamics of rigid magnetically rotated microswimmers with permanent magnetic dipoles. Our approach uses a boundary element method to calculate a mobility matrix, accurate for arbitrary geometries, which is then used to identify the steady periodically rotating orbits in a co-rotating body-fixed frame. We evaluate the stability of each of these orbits. We map the magnetoviscous behavior as a function of dimensionless Mason number and as a function of the angle that the magnetic field makes with its rotation axis. We describe the wobbling motion of these swimmers by investigating how the rotation axis changes as a function of experimental parameters. We show that for a given magnetic field strength and rotation frequency, swimmers can have more than one stable periodic orbit with different rotation axes. Finally, we demonstrate that one can improve the controllability of these types of microswimmers by adjusting the relative angle between the magnetic field and its axis of rotation.

  19. Solar Eclipse

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... a solar eclipse where an observer on Earth can watch the Moon's shadow obscure more than 90% the Sun's disk, the Multiangle Imaging ... total solar eclipse of November 23, 2003. The path of the Moon's umbral shadow began in the Indian Ocean in the far Southern Hemisphere, ...

  20. Solar Eclipse

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ...   View Larger Image On June 10, 2002 the Moon obscured the central portion of the solar disk in a phenomenon known as an ... in which 99.6 percent of the solar disk was shadowed by the Moon, was situated in the central Pacific Ocean. Since there are no populated ...