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Sample records for 27-day solar rotation

  1. Chemistry climate model simulations of the effect of the 27 day solar rotational cycle on ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubin, A.; Langematz, U.; Brühl, C.

    2011-08-01

    The results from two simulations with the coupled chemistry climate model (CCM) ECHAM5/MESSy (EMAC-FUB) are analyzed for the effect of solar variability at the 27 day rotational time scale on ozone. One simulation is forced with constant spectral irradiances at the top of the atmosphere and the other one with daily varying irradiances using data of 1 year for solar maximum conditions. Consistent changes are applied to the photolysis scheme of the model. The model results show the main features of observed correlations between ozone and solar irradiance variability with a maximum positive correlation in the upper stratosphere and an anticorrelation in the mesosphere. The relative sensitivity of upper stratospheric ozone to changes in the solar ultraviolet flux is estimated to be 0.3 to 0.4% per 1% change in 205 nm flux. During periods of strong 27 day variability, a similar upper stratospheric ozone sensitivity is derived. However, when the daily solar irradiance variability is weak and dominated by the 13.5 day period, the ozone sensitivity is reduced in the subtropics. The modeled temperature response is consistent with the ozone signal. When averaged over one rotational cycle, the ozone and temperature response to a neglect of the 27 day cycle is weak and statistically insignificant in the stratosphere but of nonnegligible magnitude and statistically significant in the equatorial mesosphere. Our results suggest that ignoring daily solar flux variations on the 27 day time scale in transient CCM simulations does not lead to a significant degradation of the time mean ozone response in the stratosphere, while in the tropical mesosphere, significant errors of up to 3% may occur. This result does not exclude potential additional effects of 27 day solar cycle variability on stratospheric dynamics in winter which were, however, not the subject of this study.

  2. Variability of mesospheric water vapor above Bern in relation to the 27-day solar rotation cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lainer, Martin; Hocke, Klemens; Kämpfer, Niklaus

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the solar-terrestrial response of mesospheric water vapor from a mid-latitudinal observation site at the 27-day solar rotation cycle time scale. Eight years of water vapor profile measurements above Bern (46.88°N/7.46°E) by the microwave radiometer MIAWARA are used to study prominent oscillation features. The spectral data analyses shows enhanced oscillations in the 27-day period band above 0.1hPa during the rising sunspot activity of solar cycle 24. Aura MLS observations of H2O support these results by showing a similar behavior. The relationship between mesospheric H2O and the solar Lyman-α flux (FLyα) is studied by comparing the similarity of their temporal oscillations. The H2O oscillation is negatively correlated to FLyα oscillation with a correlation coefficient of up to ‑0.3 to ‑0.4, and the phase lag is 6-10 days on 0.04hPa. The confidence level of the correlation is ≥ 99%. Additionally we compute wavelet power spectra, cross-wavelet transform and wavelet coherence (WTC). The latter shows significant (two σ level) correlations occurring intermittently in the 27 and 13-day band with variable phase lock behavior. Large FLyα oscillations appeared after the solar superstorm in July 2012 and the H2O oscillations show a well pronounced anti-correlation. The competition between advective transport and photo-dissociation loss of mesospheric H2O may explain the sometimes variable phase relationship of mesospheric H2O and FLyα oscillations. Generally, the WTC analysis indicates that solar variability causes observable photochemical and dynamical processes in the mid-latitude mesosphere.

  3. Variability of mesospheric water vapor above Bern in relation to the 27-day solar rotation cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lainer, Martin; Hocke, Klemens; Kämpfer, Niklaus

    2016-06-01

    Many studies investigated solar-terrestrial responses (thermal state, O3, OH, H2O) with emphasis on the tropical upper atmosphere. In this paper the focus is switched to water vapor in the mesosphere at a mid-latitudinal location. Eight years of water vapor profile measurements above Bern (46.88 ° N / 7.46 ° E) are investigated to study oscillations with the focus on periods between 10 and 50 days. Different spectral analyses revealed prominent features in the 27-day oscillation band, which are enhanced in the upper mesosphere (above 0.1 hPa, ∼ 64 km) during the rising sunspot activity of solar cycle 24. Local as well as zonal mean Aura MLS observations support these results by showing a similar behavior. The relationship between mesospheric water and the solar Lyman-α flux is studied by comparing the similarity of their temporal oscillations. The H2O oscillation is negatively correlated to solar Lyman-α oscillation with a correlation coefficient of up to - 0.3 to - 0.4, and the phase lag is 6-10 days at 0.04 hPa. The confidence level of the correlation is ≥ 99 %. This finding supports the assumption that the 27-day oscillation in Lyman-α causes a periodical photodissociation loss in mesospheric water. Wavelet power spectra, cross-wavelet transform and wavelet coherence analysis (WTC) complete our study. More periods of high common wavelet power of H2O and solar Lyman-α are present when amplitudes of the Lyman-α flux increase. Since this is not a measure of physical correlation a more detailed view on WTC is necessary, where significant (two sigma level) correlations occur intermittently in the 27 and 13-day band with variable phase lock behavior. Large Lyman-α oscillations appeared after the solar superstorm in July 2012 and the H2O oscillations show a well pronounced anti-correlation. The competition between advective transport and photodissociation loss of mesospheric water vapor may explain the sometimes variable phase relationship of mesospheric H2

  4. The 27 day solar rotational effect on mesospheric nighttime OH and O3 observations induced by geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fytterer, T.; Santee, M. L.; Sinnhuber, M.; Wang, S.

    2015-09-01

    Observations performed by the Earth Observing System Microwave Limb Sounder instrument on board the Aura satellite from 2004 to 2009 (2004 to 2014) were used to investigate the 27 day solar rotational cycle in mesospheric OH (O3) and the physical connection to geomagnetic activity. Data analysis was focused on nighttime measurements at geomagnetic latitudes connected to the outer radiation belts (55°N/S-75°N/S). The applied superposed epoch analysis reveals a distinct 27 day solar rotational signal in OH and O3 during winter in both hemispheres at altitudes >70 km. The OH response is positive and in-phase with the respective geomagnetic activity signal, lasting for 1-2 days. In contrast, the O3 feedback is negative, delayed by 1 day, and is present up to 4 days afterward. Largest OH (O3) peaks are found at ~75 km, exceeding the 95% significance level and the measurement noise of <2% (<0.5%), while reaching variations of +14% (-7%) with respect to their corresponding background. OH at 75 km is observed to respond to particle precipitation only after a certain threshold of geomagnetic activity is exceeded, depending on the respective OH background. The relation between OH and O3 at 75 km in both hemispheres is found to be nonlinear. In particular, OH has a strong impact on O3 for relatively weak geomagnetic disturbances and accompanying small absolute OH variations (<0.04 ppb). In contrast, catalytic O3 depletion is seen to slow down for stronger geomagnetic variations and OH anomalies (0.04-0.13 ppb), revealing small variations around -0.11 ppm.

  5. The 27-day rotational variations in total solar irradiance observations: From SORCE/TIM, ACRIMSAT/ACRIM III, and SOHO/VIRGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae N.; Cahalan, Robert F.; Wu, Dong L.

    2015-09-01

    During the last decade, observations from SORCE (Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment)/TIM (Total Irradiance Monitor), ACRIMSAT (Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor Satellite)/ACRIM III, and SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory)/VIRGO (Variability of IRradiance and Gravity Oscillations Sun PhotoMeter) provided Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) measurements with unprecedented accuracy and stability to determine the amount of solar irradiance reaching the top of the atmosphere and how solar irradiance varies on different time scales. These three independent measurements are analyzed using the EEMD (Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition) method to characterize the phase and amplitude of the 27-day solar rotational variation in TSI. The mode decomposition clearly identifies a 27-day solar rotational signature on TSI measurements. The rotational variations of TSI from the three independent observations are generally consistent with each other, despite different mean TSI values. During the declining phase of solar cycle 23, the amplitude of TSI 27-day variations is as high as 0.8 W/m2 (~0.05%), while during the rising phase of solar cycle 24, the amplitude is up to 0.4 W/m2 (~0.04%). During the minimum phase (2008-2009), the amplitude of the rotational mode is only ~0.1 W/m2. The correlation of this rotational mode between TIM and ACRIM III is ~0.92 and the slope of the local peak values is ~0.98. The correlation between TIM and VIRGO is ~0.96 and the slope of the local peak values is ~0.98, very similar to the slope with ACRIM III.

  6. Signature of the 27-day solar rotation cycle in mesospheric OH and H2O observed by the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, A. V.; Rozanov, E.; Shapiro, A. I.; Wang, S.; Egorova, T.; Schmutz, W.; Peter, Th.

    2011-10-01

    The mesospheric hydroxyl radical (OH) is mainly produced by the water vapor (H2O) photolysis and could be considered as a proxy for the influence of the solar irradiance variability on the mesosphere. We analyze the tropical mean response of the mesospheric OH and H2O data as observed by the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) to 27-day solar variability. The analysis is performed for two time periods corresponding to the different phases of the 11-yr cycle: from December 2004 to December 2005 ("solar maximum" period with a pronounced 27-day solar cycle) and from November 2008 to November 2009 ("solar minimum" period with a vague 27-day solar cycle). We demonstrate, for the first time, that in the mesosphere the daily time series of OH concentrations correlate well with the solar irradiance (correlation coefficients up to 0.79) at zero time-lag. At the same time H2O anticorrelates (correlation coefficients up to -0.74) with the solar irradiance at non-zero time-lag. We found that the response of OH and H2O to the 27-day variability of the solar irradiance is strong for the solar maximum and negligible for the solar minimum conditions. It allows us to suggest that the 27-day cycle in the solar irradiance and in OH and H2O are physically connected.

  7. Signature of the 27-day solar rotation cycle in mesospheric OH and H2O observed by the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, A. V.; Rozanov, E.; Shapiro, A. I.; Wang, S.; Egorova, T.; Schmutz, W.; Peter, Th.

    2012-04-01

    The mesospheric hydroxyl radical (OH) is mainly produced by the water vapor (H2O) photolysis and could be considered as a proxy for the influence of the solar irradiance variability on the mesosphere. We analyze the tropical mean response of the mesospheric OH and H2O data as observed by the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) to 27-day solar variability. The analysis is performed for two time periods corresponding to the different phases of the 11-yr cycle: from December 2004 to December 2005 (the period of "high activity" with a pronounced 27-day solar cycle) and from August 2008 to August 2009 ("solar minimum" period with a vague 27-day solar cycle). We demonstrate, for the first time, that in the mesosphere the daily time series of OH concentrations correlate well with the solar irradiance (correlation coefficients up to 0.79) at zero time-lag. At the same time H2O anticorrelates (correlation coefficients up to -0.74) with the solar irradiance at non-zero time-lag. We found that the response of OH and H2O to the 27-day variability of the solar irradiance is strong for the period of the high solar activity and negligible for the solar minimum conditions. It allows us to suggest that the 27-day cycle in the solar irradiance and in OH and H2O are physically connected.

  8. Model analysis of 27-day solar-induced variability of chemical dynamics in the equatorial upper and middle atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanchilina, Anastasia G.; Marsh, Dan; Calvo, Natalia

    2010-05-01

    The effect of solar variability on the atmosphere remains poorly understood. This study explored the impact of 27-day rotation of sunspots on the equatorial upper and middle atmospheric photochemistry from Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model 3 (WACCM3) output. WACCM3 was driven with observed solar and greenhouse gas forcing for a period during the last solar maximum which included 1999, 2000, and 2001. Fourier and wavelet analysis were applied to determine the magnitude and phase responses to the solar-induced forcing on ozone (O3), temperature, hydrogen species (OH,HO2,H), molecular oxygen (O(3P)), water vapor (H2O), and shortwave heating. Wavelet analysis demonstrated that the response of these atmospheric constituents to the 27-day forcing is largely intermittent and depends on the magnitude of solar forcing. Fourier and phase analysis demonstrated that the largest responses of ozone occurred around 80 and 40 km. The former is attributed to increased production of odd hydrogen (HOX) from photolysis of water vapor at Lyman-α, while the latter is attributed to increased O3 production in the stratopause from increased UV. The analysis also demonstrated that the largest responses of temperature occurred around 70 km and 40 km. They are attributed to increased UV at those altitudes. The amplitude of these responses compared well with data from models and observations. Phase difference, on the other hand, did not. Internal modes of variability close to 27 days and the realistic forcing mechanisms used to drive the model may contribute to this.

  9. Solar or meteorological control of lower ionospheric fluctuations (2-15 and 27 days) in middle latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pancheva, D.; Lastovicka, Jan

    1989-01-01

    Several types of short and long term effects of solar activity on the lower ionosphere are related to solar flares, the sector structure of the interplanetary magnetic field and some periodicities in sunspots or solar radio flux. The most evident periodicities of the Sun are the 11 year cycle of its activity and the differential rotation period near 27 days (25 to 30 days). Here, the following questions are discussed: which periods between 2 and 15 days and near 27 days occur in ionospheric absorption during the interval July 1980 to July 1985 and are these periods related to similar periods in solar Ly-alpha flux, geomagnetic activity, or neutral wind near 95 km observed in Collm (GDR). Day-time absorption data obtained by the A3 method was used for the following radio-paths: (164 kHz), (1539 kHz), (6090 kHz). With the use of these data the electron density variations in the lower ionosphere can be analyzed. An attempt was made to clarify the nature of the observed fluctuations in absorption.

  10. Modeling Research of the 27-day Forecast of 10.7 cm Solar Radio Flux (I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Si-Qing; Zhong, Qiu-Zhen; Wen, Jing; Dou, Xian-Kang

    2010-07-01

    Adopting the autoregressive method for time-series modeling, we have made a study on the medium-term forecast of solar 10.7 cm radio flux (F10.7). The result of forecast experiments and the error analysis indicate that when the solar activity is at a rather low level and the 27-day periodicity of F10.7 is apparent, the autoregressive forecast method has a high accuracy and relatively ideal effectiveness, but when a large active region appears or disappears on the solar dusk, the forecast effectiveness is not ideal. This means that the autoregressive method for the time-series modeling can reflect well the 27-day periodicity of F10.7, and that it has certain applicability for building a mediumterm forecast model of F10.7. By comparing the forecast results in the period from 21th September 2005 to 7th June 2007, it is demonstrated that the accuracy of the autoregressive forecast method is equivalent to that of the forecast made by the American Air Force.

  11. First evidence of middle atmospheric HO2 response to 27 day solar cycles from satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuhui; Zhang, Qiong; Millán, Luis; Li, King-Fai; Yung, Yuk L.; Sander, Stanley P.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Santee, Michelle L.

    2015-11-01

    HO2 and OH, also known as HOx, play an important role in controlling middle atmospheric O3. Due to their photochemical production and short chemical lifetimes, HOx are expected to respond rapidly to solar irradiance changes, resulting in O3 variability. While OH solar cycle signals have been investigated, HO2 studies have been limited by the lack of reliable observations. Here we present the first evidence of HO2 variability during solar 27 day cycles by investigating the recently developed HO2 data from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). We focus on 2012-2015, when solar variability is strong near the peak of Solar Cycle 24. The features of HO2 variability, with the strongest signals at 0.01-0.068 hPa, correlate well with those of solar Lyman α. When continuous MLS OH observations are not available, the new HO2 data could be a promising alternative for investigating HOx variability and the corresponding impacts on O3 and the climate.

  12. Cosmic ray variations with the period close to 27 days and their connection with solar activity longitudinal distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Tyasto, M. I.; Vernova, E. S.

    1985-01-01

    The amplitude and phase changes of the 27 day cosmic ray variation from 1958 to 1975 are studied. The comparison between cosmic ray intensity characteristics and longitudinal distribution of solar activity ones for different stages of the solar cycle are made.

  13. Estimating 11-year solar UV variations using 27-day response as a guide to isolate trends in total column ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keating, G. M.; Brasseur, G. P.; Chiou, L. S.; Hsu, N. C.

    1994-01-01

    The total column ozone response to 11-year solar ultraviolet (UV) variations is estimated here from the observed response to 27-day solar variations adjusted for the theoretical difference between the 27-day response and 11-year response. The estimate is tested by comparing two data sets where long-term drifts have been removed, the Nimbus 7 TOMS Version 6 total column ozone and the 280 nm core-to-wing ratio (a proxy for solar UV variations). The 365-day running means of data area-weighted between 40 deg N to 40 deg S latitude give a 1.9% ozone variation related to the 11-year solar cycle compared with the estimate of 1.8%. Estimates of linear trends were reduced by a factor of 2 by including solar effects. The standard deviation from the empirical model was reduced from 1.0 to 0.6 Dobson Units, by including the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), but the QBO did not significantly alter trend estimates. Both the ozone responses to 27-day and 11-year solar variations were considerably stronger than predicted by a 2-D theoretical model.

  14. The 27-day versus 13.5-day variations in the solar Lyman-alpha radiation and the radio wave absorption in the lower ionosphere over Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delamorena, B. A.; Lastovicka, Jan; Rapoport, Z. TS.; Alberca, L.

    1989-01-01

    In order to clarify the question of solar periods in absorption, the pattern was studied of the solar Lyman-alpha radiation (the principal ionizing agent of the lower ionosphere) and of the radio wave absorption at five widely spaced places in Europe. When the solar Lyman-alpha flux variability is very well developed, then it dominates in the lower ionospheric variability. The most pronounced Lyman-alpha variation on time scale day-month is the solar rotation variation (about 27 days). When the Lyman-alpha variability is developed rather poorly, as it is typical for periods dominated by the 13.5 day variability, then the lower ionospheric variability appears to be dominated by variations of meteorological origin. The conclusions hold for all five widely spaced placed in Europe.

  15. Global Characteristics of the Correlation and Time Lag Between Solar and Ionospheric Parameters in the 27-day Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Choon-Ki; Han, Shin-Chan; Dieter,Bilitza; Ki-Weon,Seo

    2012-01-01

    The 27-day variations of topside ionosphere are investigated using the in-situ electron density measurements from the CHAMP planar Langmuir probe and GRACE K-band ranging system. As the two satellite systems orbit at the altitudes of approx. 370 km and approx. 480 km, respectively, the satellite data sets are greatly valuable for examining the electron density variations in the vicinity of F2-peak. In a 27-day period, the electron density measurements from the satellites are in good agreements with the solar flux, except during the solar minimum period. The time delays are mostly 1-2 day and represent the hemispherical asymmetry. The globally-estimated spatial patterns of the correlation between solar flux and in-situ satellite measurements show poor correlations in the (magnetic) equatorial region, which are not found from the ground measurements of vertically-integrated electron content. We suggest that the most plausible cause for the poor correlation is the vertical movement of ionization due to atmospheric dynamic processes that is not controlled by the solar extreme ultraviolet radiation.

  16. Solar rotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziembowski, W.

    Sunspot observations made by Johannes Hevelius in 1642 - 1644 are the first ones providing significant information about the solar differential rotation. In modern astronomy the determination of the rotation rate is done in a routine way by measuring positions of various structures on the solar surface as well as by studying the Doppler shifts of spectral lines. In recent years a progress in helioseismology enabled determination of the rotation rate in the layers inaccessible for direct observations. There are still uncertainties concerning, especially, the temporal variations of the rotation rate and its behaviour in the radiative interior. We are far from understanding the observations. Theoretical works have not yet resulted in a satisfactory model for the angular momentum transport in the convective zone.

  17. Periodicity of about 27 days in the cosmic-ray intensity and KP data during the solar cycle no. 18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovera, G.; Filisetti, O.; Mussino, V.; Tedde, P. G.

    1981-07-01

    A periodicity analysis is presented of the 27-day quasi-periodic variations in cosmic ray intensity and associated Kp index during solar cycle 18 (1944-1953) and compared with those performed for cycles 19 and 20. Daily mean cosmic ray data was obtained with shielded ionization chambers at Huancayo, Peru and Cheltenham, MD, and together with daily sums of the Kp index, analyzed according to the periodicity method of Vercelli, which traces the time history and dynamics of a quasi-periodic variable showing amplitude, period and phase variations. Detailed diagrams are presented of the behavior of the single-oscillation amplitudes for the three cycles, and the generally low correspondence between the cosmic ray and Kp index variations is noted. The temporal variation of the annual amplitude means confirms the discrepancy between the cosmic ray amplitudes and the sunspot Wolf numbers discovered by Venkatesan (1958). Correlation coefficients among the experimental data from different locations are also calculated which show a high degree of correlation among cosmic ray intensities and a low negative correlation between Kp and cosmic ray data.

  18. 27-day solar forcing of mesospheric temperature, water vapor and polar mesospheric clouds from the AIM SOFIE and CIPS satellite experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Gary; Thurairajah, Brentha; von Savigny, Christian; Hervig, Mark; Snow, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Solar cycle variations of ultraviolet radiation have been implicated in the 11-year and 27-day variations of Polar Mesospheric Cloud (PMC) properties. Both of these variations have been attributed to variable solar ultraviolet heating and photolysis, but no definitive studies of the mechanisms are available. The solar forcing issue is critical toward answering the broader question of whether PMC's have undergone long-term changes, and if so, what is the nature of the responsible long-term climate forcings? One of the principal goals of the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere satellite mission was to answer the question: "How does changing solar irradiance affect PMCs and the environment in which they form?" We describe an eight-year data set from the AIM Solar Occultation for Ice Experiment (SOFIE) and the AIM Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) experiment. Together, these instruments provide high-precision measurements of high-latitude summertime temperature (T), water vapor (H2O), and PMC ice properties for the period 2007-present. The complete temporal coverage of the summertime polar cap region for both the primary atmospheric forcings of PMC (T and H2O), together with a continually updated time series of Lyman-alpha solar irradiance, allows an in-depth study of the causes and effects of 27-day PMC variability. The small responses of these variables, relative to larger day-to-day changes from gravity waves, tides, inter-hemispheric coupling, etc. require a careful statistical analysis to isolate the solar influence. We present results for the 27-day responses of T, H2O and PMC for a total of 15 PMC seasons, (30 days before summer solstice to 60 days afterward, for both hemispheres). We find that the amplitudes and phase relationships are not consistent with the expected mechanisms of solar UV heating and photolysis - instead we postulate a primarily dynamical response, in which a periodic vertical wind heats/cools the upper mesosphere, and modulates PMC

  19. Altitude dependent sensitivity of equatorial atomic oxygen in the MLT region to the quasi-11-year and quasi-27-day solar cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lednyts'kyy, Olexandr; Von Savigny, Christian

    2016-07-01

    We retrieved atomic oxygen concentration ([O]) profiles with help of volume emission rate (VER) profiles calculated from the measured by SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) emissions of green line nightglow in the MLT (Mesosphere/Lower Thermosphere) region. We quantified the sensitivity of equatorial [O] to the 11-year and 27-day solar cycle forcing represented by such proxy indicators of solar activity as MgII index and Lyman-α with help of the wavelet, cross-correlation, superposed epoch, regression and harmonical analysis methods. We applied ordinary least squares bisector fitting on MgII index and F10.7 radio flux, which is measured in solar flux units (sfu), to convert the [O] sensitivity values in sfu and finally in percent changes. The same procedure was performed in the case of Lyman-α. Our results of the sensitivity analysis correspond well to the 11-year solar cycle response of O volume mixing ratios found in simulations performed with the WACCM3 (Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model, v. 3) and the HAMMONIA (3D Hamburg Model of the Neutral and Ionized Atmosphere) model. We identified an 11-year solar cycle variation, quasi-biennial and annual/semi-annual oscillations as well as signatures of the 27-day cycle of solar activity as presented in the MLT O layer. The most remarkable result is that the found sensitivities agree within their uncertainties and do not depend on averaging method (annual, monthly and daily) of the [O] time series. We report on 11-year and 27-day solar cycle signatures in dependence on altitude intervals used to average the [O] time series.

  20. Solar-induced 27-day variations of mesospheric temperature and water vapor from the AIM SOFIE experiment: Drivers of polar mesospheric cloud variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Gary E.; Thurairajah, Brentha; Hervig, Mark E.; von Savigny, Christian; Snow, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs) are known to be influenced by changes in water vapor and temperature in the cold summertime mesopause. Solar variability of these constituents has been held responsible for 11-year and 27-day variability of PMC activity, although the detailed mechanisms are not yet understood. It is also known that the solar influence on PMC variability is a minor contributor to the overall day-to-day variability, which is dominated by effects of gravity waves, planetary waves, and inter-hemispheric coupling. To address this issue, we have analyzed 15 seasons of data taken from the Solar Occultation for Ice Experiment (SOFIE) on the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite. The SOFIE data contain precise measurements of water vapor, temperature and ice water content (among other quantities). These high-latitude measurements are made during the PMC season at the terminator, and therefore directly relate to the simultaneous measurements of mesospheric ice. Using a composite data set of Lyman-α irradiance, we correlated the time variation of the atmospheric variables with the 27-day variability of solar ultraviolet irradiance. We used a combination of time-lagged linear regression and Superposed Epoch Analysis to extract the solar contribution as sensitivity values (response/forcing) vs. height. We compare these results to previously published results, and show that the temperature sensitivity is somewhat higher, whereas the water sensitivity is nearly the same as published values. The time lags are shorter than that expected from direct solar heating and photodissociation, suggesting that the responses are due to 27-day variations of vertical winds. An analytic solution for temperature changes forced by solar irradiance variations suggests that if the response is due purely to Lyman-α heating and Newtonian cooling, the response should vary throughout the summertime season and depend primarily upon the height-dependent column density of

  1. Corotating interaction regions and the 27 day variation of galactic cosmic rays intensity at 1 AU during the cycle 23/24 solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X.; Florinski, V.

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the formation and evolution of corotating interaction regions (CIRs) in the solar wind and their effects on galactic cosmic rays (GCR) during the recent solar cycle 23/24 solar minimum. The output from a three-dimensional MHD model serves as background for kinetic time-dependent simulations of GCR transport based on the Parker equation. The results show that the CIR forward/reverse shock pairs or compression/rarefaction regions play important roles in the transport of GCR particles and directly control the observed 27 day periodic intensity variations. We find that stream interfaces (SIs) in CIRs and the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) are both closely associated with the GCR depression onset, in agreement with the observations at 1 AU. The HCS is more important when its tilt angle becomes small during the declining phase of the solar minimum, while the passages of SIs control the onset of GCR depressions for larger HCS tilt angles. The mechanism of GCR intensity variation near 1 AU can be explained through an interplay between the effects of particle drift and diffusion. The simulated plasma background and GCR intensity are compared with the observations from spacecraft and a neutron monitor on the ground, to find good qualitative agreement. Evidently, CIRs had a substantial modulational effect on GCR during the recent solar minimum.

  2. Atmospheric planetary waves induced by solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krivolutsky, A. A.

    1989-01-01

    It is known that there are variations in the atmospheric processes with a period close to that of the rotation of the Sun (27 days). The variations are discovered in tropospheric processes, rainfalls, geopotential and in stratosphere. The main theoretical problem is the identification of the physical process by which these heterogeneous solar and meteorological phenomena are connected. Ivanovsky and Krivolutsky proposed that the periodic heating of the ozone layer by the short wave radiation would be the reason of excitation the 27-day oscillations. It was also assumed that excitement takes place in condition of resonance with an excited mode corresponding to the conditions present in the stratospheric circulations. The possibility is discussed of the resonant excitation and presentation is made of the data analysis results which support this idea.

  3. Solar Rotational Periodicities and the Semiannual Variation in the Solar Wind, Radiation Belt, and Aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, Barbara A.; Richardson, Ian G.; Evans, David S.; Rich, Frederick J.; Wilson, Gordon R.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of a number of solar wind, radiation belt, auroral and geomagnetic parameters is examined during the recent extended solar minimum and previous solar cycles, covering the period from January 1972 to July 2010. This period includes most of the solar minimum between Cycles 23 and 24, which was more extended than recent solar minima, with historically low values of most of these parameters in 2009. Solar rotational periodicities from S to 27 days were found from daily averages over 81 days for the parameters. There were very strong 9-day periodicities in many variables in 2005 -2008, triggered by recurring corotating high-speed streams (HSS). All rotational amplitudes were relatively large in the descending and early minimum phases of the solar cycle, when HSS are the predominant solar wind structures. There were minima in the amplitudes of all solar rotational periodicities near the end of each solar minimum, as well as at the start of the reversal of the solar magnetic field polarity at solar maximum (approx.1980, approx.1990, and approx. 2001) when the occurrence frequency of HSS is relatively low. Semiannual equinoctial periodicities, which were relatively strong in the 1995-1997 solar minimum, were found to be primarily the result of the changing amplitudes of the 13.5- and 27-day periodicities, where 13.5-day amplitudes were better correlated with heliospheric daily observations and 27-day amplitudes correlated better with Earth-based daily observations. The equinoctial rotational amplitudes of the Earth-based parameters were probably enhanced by a combination of the Russell-McPherron effect and a reduction in the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling efficiency during solstices. The rotational amplitudes were cross-correlated with each other, where the 27 -day amplitudes showed some of the weakest cross-correlations. The rotational amplitudes of the > 2 MeV radiation belt electron number fluxes were progressively weaker from 27- to 5-day periods

  4. Correlation of the 27-day variation of cosmic rays to the interplanetary magnetic field strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbah, I.

    2001-08-01

    ). The amplitude of the 27-day variation has been calculated for each detector for every solar rotation during the time interval 1965 to 1995 (Sabbah, 2001). The 13-solar rotationrunning averages ofthe amplitude of the three detectors are displayed in the top panels (a & b) of Fig.1. We also used hourly averages values of IMF and plasma (OMNI data base form NSSDC) collected by variety of spacecraft near 1 AU during the same period in order to study their effect upon the 27-day cosmic ray variation. The 27-day averages of each solar rotation have been calculated for: field magnitude B, its components in the geocentric solar ecliptic coordinates (Bx, By, Bz), solar wind speed V and the product VB (Sabbah, 2000). These data cover three solar cycles (20, 21, 22). In panel (f), we plot the smoothed NCS tilt angle R. We see from the top panels (a & b) of Fig. 1 that the amplitude of the 27-day variation of cosmic ray exhibits an 11-year sunspot cycle variation, with minima occurring near sunspot minimum represented with dotted vertical lines at 1976 and 1986 and maxima occurring near sunspot maximum denoted with dashed vertical lines at 1968, 1979 and 1989. The values of the IMF magnitude B shown in (b), the product VB shown in (e) and the NCS tilt angle R, shown in (f), display separate solar cycle variation during cycles 21 and 22. Their values track the variation in the 27-day cosmic ray amplitude. The values of B and VB are enhanced right after solar activity maximum in 1979 and

  5. On forced and free atmospheric oscillations near the 27-day periodicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanz, Ansgar; Hocke, Klemens; Kämpfer, Niklaus

    2016-06-01

    The Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model was used to investigate the influences of solar fluctuations on zonal wind oscillations. Two simulations were conducted with short-term solar forcing (<35 days) on and off. We found that a 27-day wave is an inherent feature of the atmosphere when the short-term solar forcing is inactive. This internal 27-day oscillation comes along with other periods of the extra-long period wave band (20-40 days) and cannot be linked to the Sun's rotation period. When the short-term solar variability is part of the forcing, including the solar 27-day periodicity, it affects a wide range of the spectrum of zonal wind. At mid-latitudes, a 10-day wave emerges by the short-term solar forcing, which suggests that indirect and nonlinear interactions are involved. Solar short-term variability seems to generate atmospheric perturbations that interact with modes of the internal wave spectrum or the background mean flow. A robust and clear solar interpretation of these wind oscillations is challenging. However, dynamical responses to short-term solar variability exist and need further investigation.

  6. Solar Internal Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schou, J.; SOE Internal Rotation Team

    With the flood of high quality helioseismic data from the instruments on the SOHO spacecraft (MDI/VIRGO/GOLF) and ground based instruments (eg. GONG and LOWL) we have been able to get increasingly detailed information on the rotation and other large scale flows in the solar interior. In this talk I will discuss some of the highlights of what we have learned so far and what we may expect to learn in the near future. Among the recent advances have been tighter constraints on the tachocline at the bottom of the convection zone, detection of details in the surface rotation rate similar to the torsional oscillations found in the surface Doppler shift and helioseismic evidence for meridional flows. The MDI project is supported by NASA contract NAG5-3077 at Stanford University.

  7. Doppler observations of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, P. H.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric equatorial rotation rate using the Doppler effect are made at the Stanford Solar Observatory. These observations show no variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about 1%. The average rotation rate is indistinguishable from that of sunspots and large-scale magnetic field structures.

  8. Doppler observations of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric equatorial rotation rate using the Doppler effect mode at the Sanford Solar Observatory are presented. These observations show no variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about one percent. The average rotation rate is indistinguishable from that of sunspots and large scale magnetic field structures.

  9. Wavelet Analysis of Stratospheric SCIAMACHY Ozone - The Quest for the 27-day Cycle!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikty, S.; Weber, M.; Sonkaew, T.; Rozanov, A.; von Savigny, C.; Burrows, J. P.

    2009-04-01

    The high-frequency influence of solar radiation has already been investigated by Hood (1986) in the 80s of last century during solar maximum 21 (1979-1981). It was done with the help of SBUV (Solar Backscattered UltraViolet) ozone measurements onboard Nimbus 7. Further investigations followed. Hood and Zhou (1998), Ruzmaikin et al. (2007) and Gruzdev et al. (2008) are only a few studies to mention from the following years, whereas the last study was based upon the output of a three-dimensional Chemistry-Climate-Model (CCM) and the other studies on satellite measurements. Besides different means of the descriptive statistics and their associated investigation of the statistical significance use of the within the last two decades in popularity grown wavelet analysis has been made. The advantage to standard techniques is a higher temporal resolution with a combined adjustment between the time and frequency resolution depending on the choice of wavelet and its order. Within a given time series the connection between ozone and solar radiation is sometimes not well-defined and should be able to be investigated in more detail. On the one side ozone profiles from SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) limb measurements retrieved with the knowledge about ozone absorption in the Hartley, Huggins and Chapuis bands are used in this study. On the other side we apply the wavelet analysis to the SCIAGOME Mg II index (Skupin et al., 2005) which serves as solar proxy. The modulation of the Mg II index goes along with the rotation of the sun (27-day cycle). Note: 27 days in not the only period for the solar rotational cycle. Depending on the solar latitude at which active regions and sunspots are located on the sun the periods vary from 25 days to 30 days. The differential rotation of the sun lets regions with an intensified radiative output appear and disappear within the field of view of the earth. It is simply convenient to call it the

  10. Ionospheric ion temperature forecasting in multiples of 27 days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, Jan J.; Schunk, Robert W.; Nicolls, Michael J.

    2014-03-01

    The ionospheric variability found at auroral locations is usually assumed to be unpredictable. The magnetosphere, which drives this ionospheric variability via storms and substorms, is at best only qualitatively describable. In this study we demonstrate that over a 3 year period, ionospheric variability observed from Poker Flat, Alaska, has, in fact, a high degree of long-term predictability. The observations used in this study are (a) the solar wind high speed stream velocity measured by the NASA Advanced Composition Explorer satellite, used to define the corotating interaction region (CIR), and (b) the ion temperature at 300 km altitude measured by the National Science Foundation Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar over Poker Flat, Alaska. After determining a seasonal and diurnal climatology for the ion temperature, we show that the residual ion temperature heating events occur synchronously with CIR-geospace interactions. Furthermore, we demonstrate examples of ion temperature forecasting at 27, 54, and 81 days. A rudimentary operational forecasting scenario is described for forecasting recurrence 27 days ahead for the CIR-generated geomagnetic storms. These forecasts apply specifically to satellite tracking operations (thermospheric drag) and emergency HF-radio communications (ionospheric modifications) in the polar regions. The forecast is based on present-day solar and solar wind observations that can be used to uniquely identify the coronal hole and its CIR. From this CIR epoch, a 27 day forecast is then made.

  11. Temporal variation of hemispheric solar rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jing-Lan; Shi, Xiang-Jun; Xu, Jing-Chen

    2012-02-01

    The daily sunspot numbers of the whole disk as well as the northern and southern hemispheres from 1945 January 1 to 2010 December 31 are used to investigate the temporal variation of rotational cycle length through the continuous wavelet transformation analysis method. Auto-correlation function analysis of daily hemispheric sunspot numbers shows that the southern hemisphere rotates faster than the northern hemisphere. The results obtained from the wavelet transformation analysis are that no direct relationship exists between the variation trend of the rotational cycle length and the solar activity in the two hemispheres and that the rotational cycle length of both hemispheres has no significant period appearing at 11yr, but has a significant period of about 7.6 yr. Analysis concerning the solar cycle dependence of the rotational cycle length shows that acceleration seems to appear before the minimum time of solar activity in the whole disk and the northern hemisphere, respectively. Furthermore, the cross-correlation study indicates that the rotational cycle length of the two hemispheres has different phases, and that the rotational cycle length of the whole disk as well as the northern and southern hemispheres, also has phase shifts with corresponding solar activity. In addition, the temporal variation of the north-south (N-S) asymmetry of the rotational cycle length is also studied. This displays the same variation trend as the N-S asymmetry of solar activity in a solar cycle, as well as in the considered time interval, and has two significant periods of 7.7 and 17.5 yr. Moreover, the rotational cycle length and the N-S asymmetry of solar activity are highly correlated. It is inferred that the northern hemisphere should rotate faster at the beginning of solar cycle 24.

  12. Development of a numerical scheme to predict geomagnetic storms after intense solar events and geomagnetic activity 27 days in advance. Final report, 6 Aug 86-16 Nov 90

    SciTech Connect

    Akasofu, S.I.; Lee, L.H.

    1991-02-01

    The modern geomagnetic storm prediction scheme should be based on a numerical simulation method, rather than on a statistical result. Furthermore, the scheme should be able to predict the geomagnetic storm indices, such as the Dst and AE indices, as a function of time. By recognizing that geomagnetic storms are powered by the solar wind-magnetosphere generator and that its power is given in terms of the solar wind speed, the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) magnitude and polar angle, the authors have made a major advance in predicting both flare-induced storms and recurrent storms. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the prediction scheme can be calibrated using the interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observation, when the solar disturbance advances about half-way to the earth. It is shown, however, that we are still far from a reliable prediction scheme. The prediction of the IMF polar angle requires future advance in understanding characteristics of magnetic clouds.

  13. The solar differential rotation: a historical view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paternò, Lucio

    2010-07-01

    This brief historical review covers the period preceding the advent of helioseismology, when the author actively worked in the field of solar differential rotation and knowledge of the Sun’s dynamics was limited to the observations of surface phenomena, while the interpretation of the internal rotation was demanded solely to theoretical conjectures based on fluid dynamic of convective, rotating fluids. After a survey of the observations, based on both sunspot motions and spectroscopy, which led to the laws of differential rotation, the various attempts to interpret observations on theoretical grounds and to infer the internal dynamics are discussed, also within the dynamo requirements of the velocity field. We point out that the many efforts for a correct description of the Sun’s internal dynamics failed in the light of the helioseismic results. Finally, the recent theoretical efforts, essentially based on powerful computer simulations, for modeling the solar internal dynamic with the aim of reproducing the helioseismic results are outlined.

  14. Generating AC With Rotating Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, David T.

    1993-01-01

    Rotating solar photovoltaic cells or batteries connected to suitable mechanical and/or electronic commutators produce nearly sinusoidal alternating current. Eliminates need for inverter circuitry and its attendant power-consumption and heat-dissipation problems, but imposes need for low-power-consumption rotary mechanism. Intended for use aboard spacecraft, also useful in special terrestrial situations where solar electric power must be transmitted over powerlines from one remote location to another.

  15. Solar Rotational Effects on the Mars Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talaat, E. R.; Paxton, L.; Zhu, X.; Yee, J.; Smith, D. C.

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, using opportune periods during the five years of MGS radio occultation observations of the Martian ionosphere, we examine the short-term variability in the ionospheric profile peak densities and peak heights. During solar maximum, strong solar rotational signatures were observed. On Mars, the morphology of the ionosphere is thought to be controlled by photochemical processes (coupled with the neutral atmosphere). In this paper, we will present the observed magnitude of the variabilities the phasing with solar forcing, and quantify the source mechanisms with a 1-D ionospheric model.

  16. 27-day variation of the GCR intensity based on corrected and uncorrected for geomagnetic disturbances data of neutron monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alania, M. V.; Modzelewska, R.; Wawrzynczak, A.; Sdobnov, V. E.; Kravtsova, M. V.

    2015-08-01

    We study 27-day variations of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity for 2005-2008 period of the solar cycle #23. We use neutron monitors (NMs) data corrected and uncorrected for geomagnetic disturbances. Besides the limited time intervals when the 27-day variations are clearly established, always exist some feeble 27-day variations in the GCR intensity related to the constantly present weak heliolongitudinal asymmetry in the heliosphere. We calculate the amplitudes of the 27-day variation of the GCR intensity based on the NMs data corrected and uncorrected for geomagnetic disturbances. We show that these amplitudes do not differ for NMs with cut-off rigidities smaller than 4-5 GV comparing with NMs of higher cut-off rigidities. Rigidity spectrum of the 27-day variation of the GCR intensity found in the uncorrected data is soft while it is hard in the case of the corrected data. For both cases exists definite tendency of softening the temporal changes of the 27-day variation's rigidity spectrum in period of 2005 to 2008 approaching the minimum of solar activity. We believe that a study of the 27-day variation of the GCR intensity based on the data uncorrected for geomagnetic disturbances should be carried out by NMs with cut-off rigidities smaller than 4-5 GV.

  17. On rotational forces in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, J. V.; Isenberg, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    Solar rotational forces affecting the flow of minor ions in the solar wind are considered as corotating with the sun. Cold, noninteracting charged particles in the magnetic and gravitational fields of the sun rotate with the angular velocity of the sun, and calculations of lowest bulk order velocities show that differences in particle velocities decrease with increasing distance from the sun. A centrifugal potential in the corotating frame implies that ion motion is independent of protons, with velocities determined by the potential, which monotonically decreases without limit. The potential dominates the initial kinetic energy of the particles, and the equality of velocities within the potential is not due to interactions between particles as claimed by Mackenzie et al. (1979).

  18. Solar irradiance observed from PVO and inferred solar rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Charles L.; Hoegy, Walter R.

    1990-08-01

    Solar irradiance in the extreme ultraviolet flux (EUV) has been monitored for 11 years by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO). Since the experiment moves around the Sun with the orbital rate of Venus rather than that of Earth, the measurement gives us a second viewing location from which to begin unravelling which irradiance variations are intrinsic to the Sun, and which are merely rotational modulations whose periods depend on the motion of the observer. Researchers confirm an earlier detection, made with only 8.6 years of data, that the EUV irradiance is modulated by rotation rates of two families of global oscillation modes. One family is assumed to be r-modes occupying the convective envelope and sharing its rotation, while the other family (g-modes) lies in the radiative interior which as a slower rotation. Measured power in r-modes of low angular harmonic number indicates that the Sun's envelope rotated about 0.7 percent faster near the last solar maximum (1979 thru 1982) than it did during the next rise to maximum (1986 to 1989). No change was seen in the g-mode family of lines, as would be expected from the much greater rotational inertia of the radiative interior.

  19. Influence of Short-Term Solar UV Variability on the Determination of Solar Cycle Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebula, Richard P.; DeLand, Matthew T.

    1997-01-01

    Smoothing solar UV data on rotational timescale (approx. 27 days) improves identification of solar minimum. Smoothing intervals which are not multiples of rotational period (e.g. 35 days) can leave measurable residual signal. No evidence found for periodic behavior on intermediate (50-250 days) time scales during Cycle 22, based on data from three solar UV instruments.

  20. Faraday Rotation Observations of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, S.; Spangler, S. R.

    1998-05-01

    Faraday rotation measures the path integral of the product of electron density and line of sight component of the magnetic field from the observer to a source of linearly polarized radio emission. For our observations, the line of sight passes through the solar corona. These observations were made with the NRAO Very Large Array at frequencies of 1465 and 1635 MHz. Observations at two frequencies can confirm the lambda (2) dependence of position angle rotation characteristic of Faraday rotation. We observed the extended radio source 0036+030 (4C+03.01) on March 28, 1997, when the source was 8.6 Rsun from the center of the Sun. Nearly continuous observations were made over an 11 hour period. Our observations measure an average rotation measure (RM) of about +7 radians/m(2) attributable to the corona. The RM showed slow variations during the observing session, with a total change of about 3 radians/m(2) . This variation is attributed to large scale gradients and static plasma structures in the corona, and is the same for two source components separated by 30 arcseconds (22000 km). We have also detected RM variations on time scales of 15 minutes to one hour, which may be coronal Alfven waves. We measure an rms variation of 0.57 radians/m(2) for such fluctuations, which is comparable to previous reports.

  1. Internal-cycle Variation of Solar Differential Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K. J.; Xie, J. L.; Shi, X. J.

    2013-06-01

    The latitudinal distributions of the yearly mean rotation rates measured by Suzuki in 1998 and 2012 and Pulkkinen & Tuominen in 1998 are utilized to investigate internal-cycle variation of solar differential rotation. The rotation rate at the solar equator seems to have decreased since cycle 10 onward. The coefficient B of solar differential rotation, which represents the latitudinal gradient of rotation, is found to be smaller in the several years after the minimum of a solar cycle than in the several years after the maximum time of the cycle, and it peaks several years after the maximum time of the solar cycle. The internal-cycle variation of the solar rotation rates looks similar in profile to that of the coefficient B. A new explanation is proposed to address such a solar-cycle-related variation of the solar rotation rates. Weak magnetic fields may more effectively reflect differentiation at low latitudes with high rotation rates than at high latitudes with low rotation rates, and strong magnetic fields may more effectively repress differentiation at relatively low latitudes than at high latitudes. The internal-cycle variation is inferred as the result of both the latitudinal migration of the surface torsional pattern and the repression of strong magnetic activity in differentiation.

  2. INTERNAL-CYCLE VARIATION OF SOLAR DIFFERENTIAL ROTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K. J.; Xie, J. L.; Shi, X. J.

    2013-06-01

    The latitudinal distributions of the yearly mean rotation rates measured by Suzuki in 1998 and 2012 and Pulkkinen and Tuominen in 1998 are utilized to investigate internal-cycle variation of solar differential rotation. The rotation rate at the solar equator seems to have decreased since cycle 10 onward. The coefficient B of solar differential rotation, which represents the latitudinal gradient of rotation, is found to be smaller in the several years after the minimum of a solar cycle than in the several years after the maximum time of the cycle, and it peaks several years after the maximum time of the solar cycle. The internal-cycle variation of the solar rotation rates looks similar in profile to that of the coefficient B. A new explanation is proposed to address such a solar-cycle-related variation of the solar rotation rates. Weak magnetic fields may more effectively reflect differentiation at low latitudes with high rotation rates than at high latitudes with low rotation rates, and strong magnetic fields may more effectively repress differentiation at relatively low latitudes than at high latitudes. The internal-cycle variation is inferred as the result of both the latitudinal migration of the surface torsional pattern and the repression of strong magnetic activity in differentiation.

  3. SOLAR ROTATION EFFECTS ON THE HELIOSHEATH FLOW NEAR SOLAR MINIMA

    SciTech Connect

    Borovikov, Sergey N.; Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Ebert, Robert W.

    2012-05-01

    The interaction between fast and slow solar wind (SW) due to the Sun's rotation creates corotating interaction regions (CIRs), which further interact with each other creating complex plasma structures at large heliospheric distances. We investigate the global influence of CIRs on the SW flow in the inner heliosheath between the heliospheric termination shock (TS) and the heliopause. The stream interaction model takes into account the major global effects due to slow-fast stream interaction near solar minima. The fast and slow wind parameters are derived from the Ulysses observations. We investigate the penetration of corotating structures through the TS and their further propagation through the heliosheath. It is shown that the heliosheath flow structure may experience substantial modifications, including local decreases in the radial velocity component observed by Voyager 1.

  4. Insights from the rotational braking of solar twins: is the Sun a regular rotator?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dos Santos, Leonardo Augusto; Melendez, Jorge

    2016-06-01

    Although the Sun is widely used as a reference star in astrophysics, it is still unclear how regular it is when compared to other similar stars in regards to some of its physical properties, such as its rotation. We analyze the rotational velocities (limited by the unknown rotation axis inclination angle) of an unprecedented sample of solar twins in order to study how common the Sun is in its rotation. We use high-resolution (R = 115000) spectra obtained with the HARPS spectrograph and ESO’s 3.6 m telescope at La Silla Observatory. The projected rotational velocities for 71 solar twins are estimated through line profile fitting using synthetic spectra. We take into account the macroturbulence velocities in a separate analysis, for they are known to be difficult to disentangle from rotation. Our sample of solar twins include some spectroscopic binaries with enhanced rotational velocities, and we do not find any non-spectroscopic binaries with unusually high rotation velocities. The Sun does not have a peculiar rotation, but the solar twins exhibit rotational velocities that depart from the tried and tested Skumanich’s law. We conclude that the Sun is a regular rotator when compared to solar twins with a similar age, and obtain a rotational braking law that better describes the stars in our sample when compared to previous, often-used scalings.

  5. Solar rotating magnetic dipole?. [around axis perpendicular to rotation axis of the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonucci, E.

    1974-01-01

    A magnetic dipole rotating around an axis perpendicular to the rotation axis of the sun can account for the characteristics of the surface large-scale solar magnetic fields through the solar cycle. The polarity patterns of the interplanetary magnetic field, predictable from this model, agree with the observed interplanetary magnetic sector structure.

  6. Large-scale velocity fields. [of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Robert F.; Kichatinov, L. L.; Bogart, Richard S.; Ribes, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    The present evaluation of recent observational results bearing on the nature and characteristics of solar rotation gives attention to the status of current understanding on such large-scale velocity-field-associated phenomena as solar supergranulation, mesogranulation, and giant-scale convection. Also noted are theoretical suggestions reconciling theory and observations of giant-scale solar convection. The photosphere's global meridional circulation is suggested by solar rotation models requiring pole-to-equator flows of a few m/sec, as well as by the observed migration of magnetic activity over the solar cycle. The solar rotation exhibits a latitude and cycle dependence which can be understood in terms of a time-dependent convective toroidal roll pattern.

  7. Anomalous solar rotation in the early 17th century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eddy, J. A.; Gilman, P. A.; Trotter, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    The character of solar rotation has been examined for two periods in the early 17th century for which detailed sunspot drawings are available: A.D. 1625 through 1626 and 1642 through 1644. The first period occurred 20 years before the start of the Maunder sunspot minimum, 1645 through 1715; the second occurred just at its commencement. Solar rotation in the earlier period was much like that of today. In the later period, the equatorial velocity of the sun was faster by 3 to 5 percent and the differential rotation was enhanced by a factor of 3. The equatorial acceleration with declining solar activity is in the same sense as that found in recent Doppler data. It seems likely that the change in rotation of the solar surface between 1625 and 1645 was associated with the onset of the Maunder Minimum.

  8. Differential rotation in solar-like stars from global simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, G.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.; Mansour, N. N. E-mail: sasha@sun.stanford.edu E-mail: nagi.n.mansour@nasa.gov

    2013-12-20

    To explore the physics of large-scale flows in solar-like stars, we perform three-dimensional anelastic simulations of rotating convection for global models with stratification resembling the solar interior. The numerical method is based on an implicit large-eddy simulation approach designed to capture effects from non-resolved small scales. We obtain two regimes of differential rotation, with equatorial zonal flows accelerated either in the direction of rotation (solar-like) or in the opposite direction (anti-solar). While the models with the solar-like differential rotation tend to produce multiple cells of meridional circulation, the models with anti-solar differential rotation result in only one or two meridional cells. Our simulations indicate that the rotation and large-scale flow patterns critically depend on the ratio between buoyancy and Coriolis forces. By including a sub-adiabatic layer at the bottom of the domain, corresponding to the stratification of a radiative zone, we reproduce a layer of strong radial shear similar to the solar tachocline. Similarly, enhanced super-adiabaticity at the top results in a near-surface shear layer located mainly at lower latitudes. The models reveal a latitudinal entropy gradient localized at the base of the convection zone and in the stable region, which, however, does not propagate across the convection zone. In consequence, baroclinicity effects remain small, and the rotation isocontours align in cylinders along the rotation axis. Our results confirm the alignment of large convective cells along the rotation axis in the deep convection zone and suggest that such 'banana-cell' pattern can be hidden beneath the supergranulation layer.

  9. Differential Rotation in Solar-like Stars from Global Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, G.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Mansour, N. N.

    2013-12-01

    To explore the physics of large-scale flows in solar-like stars, we perform three-dimensional anelastic simulations of rotating convection for global models with stratification resembling the solar interior. The numerical method is based on an implicit large-eddy simulation approach designed to capture effects from non-resolved small scales. We obtain two regimes of differential rotation, with equatorial zonal flows accelerated either in the direction of rotation (solar-like) or in the opposite direction (anti-solar). While the models with the solar-like differential rotation tend to produce multiple cells of meridional circulation, the models with anti-solar differential rotation result in only one or two meridional cells. Our simulations indicate that the rotation and large-scale flow patterns critically depend on the ratio between buoyancy and Coriolis forces. By including a sub-adiabatic layer at the bottom of the domain, corresponding to the stratification of a radiative zone, we reproduce a layer of strong radial shear similar to the solar tachocline. Similarly, enhanced super-adiabaticity at the top results in a near-surface shear layer located mainly at lower latitudes. The models reveal a latitudinal entropy gradient localized at the base of the convection zone and in the stable region, which, however, does not propagate across the convection zone. In consequence, baroclinicity effects remain small, and the rotation isocontours align in cylinders along the rotation axis. Our results confirm the alignment of large convective cells along the rotation axis in the deep convection zone and suggest that such "banana-cell" pattern can be hidden beneath the supergranulation layer.

  10. MODELING OF DIFFERENTIAL ROTATION IN RAPIDLY ROTATING SOLAR-TYPE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Hotta, H.; Yokoyama, T.

    2011-10-10

    We investigate differential rotation in rapidly rotating solar-type stars by means of an axisymmetric mean field model that was previously applied to the Sun. This allows us to calculate the latitudinal entropy gradient with a reasonable physical basis. Our conclusions are as follows. (1) Differential rotation approaches the Taylor-Proudman state when stellar rotation is faster than solar rotation. (2) Entropy gradient generated by the attached subadiabatic layer beneath the convection zone becomes relatively small with a large stellar angular velocity. (3) Turbulent viscosity and turbulent angular momentum transport determine the spatial difference of angular velocity {Delta}{Omega}. (4) The results of our mean field model can explain observations of stellar differential rotation.

  11. 27-day cycles in human mortality: Traute and Bernhard Düll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halberg, F.; Düll-Pfaff, N.; Gumarova, L.; Zenchenko, T. A.; Schwartzkopff, O.; Freytag, E. M.; Freytag, J.; Cornelissen, G.

    2013-04-01

    This tribute to her parents by one co-author (NDP) is the fruit of a more than a decade-long search by the senior author (FH) for the details of the lives of Bernhard and Gertraud (''Traute'') Düll. These pioneers studied how space/terrestrial weather may differentially influence human mortality from various causes, the 27-day mortality pattern being different whether death was from cardiac or respiratory disease, or from suicide. FH is the translator of personal information about her parents provided by NDP in German. Figuratively, he also attempts to ''translate'' the Dülls' contribution in the context of the literature that had appeared before their work and after their deaths. Although the Dülls published in a then leading journal, among others (and FH had re-analyzed some of their work in a medical journal), they were unknown to academies or libraries (where FH had inquired about them). The Dülls thoroughly assembled death certificates to offer the most powerful evidence for an effect of solar activity reflected in human mortality, as did others before them. They went several steps further than their predecessors, however. They were the first to show possibly differential effects of space and/or Earth weather with respect to suicide and other deaths associated with the nervous and sensory systems vs. death from cardiac or respiratory disease as well as overall death by differences in the phase of a common 27-day cycle characterizing these mortality patterns. Furthermore, Bernhard Düll developed tests of human visual and auditory reaction time to study effects of weather and solar activity, publishing a book (his professorial dissertation) on the topic. His unpublished finding of an increased incidence of airplane crashes in association with higher solar activity was validated after his death, among others, by Tatiana Zenchenko and A. M. Merzlyi.

  12. 27-day cycles in human mortality: Traute and Bernhard Düll

    PubMed Central

    Halberg, F.; Düll-Pfaff, N.; Gumarova, L.; Zenchenko, T. A.; Schwartzkopff, O.; Freytag, E. M.; Freytag, J.; Cornelissen, G.

    2013-01-01

    This tribute to her parents by one co-author (NDP) is the fruit of a more than a decade-long search by the senior author (FH) for the details of the lives of Bernhard and Gertraud (“Traute”) Düll. These pioneers studied how space/terrestrial weather may differentially influence human mortality from various causes, the 27-day mortality pattern being different whether death was from cardiac or respiratory disease, or from suicide. FH is the translator of personal information about her parents provided by NDP in German. Figuratively, he also attempts to “translate” the Dülls’ contribution in the context of the literature that had appeared before their work and after their deaths. Although the Dülls published in a then leading journal, among others (and FH had re-analyzed some of their work in a medical journal), they were unknown to academies or libraries (where FH had inquired about them). The Dülls thoroughly assembled death certificates to offer the most powerful evidence for an effect of solar activity reflected in human mortality, as did others before them. They went several steps further than their predecessors, however. They were the first to show possibly differential effects of space and/or Earth weather with respect to suicide and other deaths associated with the nervous and sensory systems vs. death from cardiac or respiratory disease as well as overall death by differences in the phase of a common 27-day cycle characterizing these mortality patterns. Furthermore, Bernhard Düll developed tests of human visual and auditory reaction time to study effects of weather and solar activity, publishing a book (his professorial dissertation) on the topic. His unpublished finding of an increased incidence of airplane crashes in association with higher solar activity was validated after his death, among others, by Tatiana Zenchenko and A. M. Merzlyi. PMID:24224144

  13. 27-day cycles in human mortality: Traute and Bernhard Düll.

    PubMed

    Halberg, F; Düll-Pfaff, N; Gumarova, L; Zenchenko, T A; Schwartzkopff, O; Freytag, E M; Freytag, J; Cornelissen, G

    2013-01-01

    This tribute to her parents by one co-author (NDP) is the fruit of a more than a decade-long search by the senior author (FH) for the details of the lives of Bernhard and Gertraud ("Traute") Düll. These pioneers studied how space/terrestrial weather may differentially influence human mortality from various causes, the 27-day mortality pattern being different whether death was from cardiac or respiratory disease, or from suicide. FH is the translator of personal information about her parents provided by NDP in German. Figuratively, he also attempts to "translate" the Dülls' contribution in the context of the literature that had appeared before their work and after their deaths. Although the Dülls published in a then leading journal, among others (and FH had re-analyzed some of their work in a medical journal), they were unknown to academies or libraries (where FH had inquired about them). The Dülls thoroughly assembled death certificates to offer the most powerful evidence for an effect of solar activity reflected in human mortality, as did others before them. They went several steps further than their predecessors, however. They were the first to show possibly differential effects of space and/or Earth weather with respect to suicide and other deaths associated with the nervous and sensory systems vs. death from cardiac or respiratory disease as well as overall death by differences in the phase of a common 27-day cycle characterizing these mortality patterns. Furthermore, Bernhard Düll developed tests of human visual and auditory reaction time to study effects of weather and solar activity, publishing a book (his professorial dissertation) on the topic. His unpublished finding of an increased incidence of airplane crashes in association with higher solar activity was validated after his death, among others, by Tatiana Zenchenko and A. M. Merzlyi. PMID:24224144

  14. Rotational Variability in Ultraviolet Solar Spectral Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, M. A.; Richard, E. C.; Harder, J. W.; Thuillier, G. O.

    2011-12-01

    There are currently many observations and models of the Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) in the ultraviolet (UV). The models and the observations are often in agreement, but sometimes have significant differences. Using the decline of solar cycle 23 and the rise of solar cycle 24 as a test case, we will investigate the systematic differences between the short term SSI variation observed by satellite instruments and the predictions of proxy models.

  15. Coronal Rotation at Solar Minimum from UV Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancuso, S.

    2008-01-01

    UVCS/SOHO observations have been analyzed to reconstruct intensity time series of the O VI 1032 A and H 11216 A spectral lines at different coronal heliolatitudes from 1.5 to 3.0 solar radii from Sun center. Evidence was found for coronal differential rotation that differs significantly from that of the photospheric plasma. The study of the latitudinal variation shows that the UV corona decelerates toward the photospheric rates from the equator up to the poleward boundary 2 of the midlatitude streamers, reaching a peak of 28.16+/-0.20 days around +30 from the equator at 1.5 solar radii, while a less evident peak is observed in the northern hemisphere. This result suggests a real north-south rotational asymmetry as a consequence of different activity and weak coupling between the magnetic fields of the two hemispheres. The study of the radial rotation profiles shows that the corona is rotating almost rigidly with height.

  16. Rotation of solar magnetic fields for the current solar cycle 24

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, X. J.; Xie, J. L.

    2014-11-01

    The rotation of solar magnetic fields for the current solar cycle 24 is investigated through a cross-correlation analysis of the Carrington synoptic maps of solar photospheric magnetic fields during Carrington rotation numbers 2076-2146 (2008 October to 2014 January). The sidereal rotation rates of positive and negative magnetic fields at some latitudes are shown, and it can be found that the positive (negative) fields generally rotate faster than the negative (positive) fields in the southern (northern) hemisphere at low latitudes. The mean rotation profiles of total, positive, and negative magnetic fields between ±60° latitudes in the time interval are also obtained. It should be noted that both of the mean rotation profiles of the positive and negative magnetic fields, as well as the mean rotation profile of the total magnetic field, exhibit a quasi-rigid rotation at latitudes above about 55°. The mean rotation rates of the positive (negative) polarity reach their maximum values at about 9°(6)° latitude in the southern (northern) hemisphere. The mean rotation profile of the total magnetic field displays an obvious north-south asymmetry, where the rotation seems to be more differential in the northern hemisphere. The latitude variation in the rotation rate differences between positive and negative magnetic fields is further studied, and it is found that magnetic fields with the same polarity as the leading sunspots at a given hemisphere rotate faster than those with the opposite polarity, except for the zones around 52° latitude of the southern hemisphere and around 35° latitude of the northern hemisphere. The implication of these results is discussed. It is clear that the obtained results can provide some observational constraints on the theoretical research of the mechanisms of differential rotation and solar cycle.

  17. Faraday Rotation Probing of the Solar Corona in 1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, S.; Spangler, S. R.

    1999-05-01

    Faraday rotation observations of polarized radiation from natural radio sources yield a unique diagnostic of the coronal magnetic field and electron density at heliocentric distances not reached by spacecraft. Dual frequency polarization measurements yield the rotation measure, which is proportional to int n_e vec {B} * ds, where n_e is the electron density, vec {B} is the magnetic field, and the integral is along the line of sight. We made linear polarization observations with the NRAO Very Large Array of several polarized radio sources occulted by the solar corona. The observations were made at frequencies of 1465 and 1665 MHz on four days in May, 1997. The observations cover a full solar rotation and sample solar elongations ranging from about 5 to 14 solar radii. The magnitudes of the rotation measures observed range from 11 to less than 1 radians/m(2) . We attribute the relatively low values for the rotation measures to the magnetohydrodynamic state of the corona at the time of the observations. The coronal magnetic field was quasi-dipolar with the lines of sight to the sources generally not crossing sector boundaries. The highest plasma density was at the streamer belt at low latitudes, which was missed by many of the lines of sight. The largest rotation measure was observed for the source 3C79 on May 11, 1997, and corresponds to a case in which the line of sight passed through the streamer belt at small solar elongation. This research was supported by grant ATM96-16721 from the National Science Foundation.

  18. Combined Solar system and rotation curve constraints on MOND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hees, Aurélien; Famaey, Benoit; Angus, Garry W.; Gentile, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    The Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) paradigm generically predicts that the external gravitational field in which a system is embedded can produce effects on its internal dynamics. In this communication, we first show that this external field effect (EFE) can significantly improve some galactic rotation curves fits by decreasing the predicted velocities of the external part of the rotation curves. In modified gravity versions of MOND, this EFE also appears in the Solar system and leads to a very good way to constrain the transition function of the theory. A combined analysis of the galactic rotation curves and Solar system constraints (provided by the Cassini spacecraft) rules out several classes of popular MOND transition functions, but leaves others viable. Moreover, we show that Laser Interferometer Space Antenna Pathfinder will not be able to improve the current constraints on these still viable transition functions.

  19. Rotation Periods and Ages of Solar Analogs and Solar Twins Revealed by the Kepler Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Nascimento, J.-D., Jr.; García, R. A.; Mathur, S.; Anthony, F.; Barnes, S. A.; Meibom, S.; da Costa, J. S.; Castro, M.; Salabert, D.; Ceillier, T.

    2014-08-01

    A new sample of solar analogs and twin candidates has been constructed and studied, paying particular attention to their light curves from NASA's Kepler mission. This Letter aims to assess their evolutionary status, derive their rotation and ages, and identify those which are solar analogs or solar twin candidates. We separate out the subgiants that compose a large fraction of the asteroseismic sample, and which show an increase in the average rotation period as the stars ascend the subgiant branch. The rotation periods of the dwarfs, ranging from 6 to 30 days and averaging 19 days, allow us to assess their individual evolutionary states on the main sequence and to derive their ages using gyrochronology. These ages are found to be in agreement with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.79 with independent asteroseismic ages, where available. As a result of this investigation, we are able to identify 34 stars as solar analogs and 22 of them as solar twin candidates.

  20. SOLAR ROTATION RATE DURING THE CYCLE 24 MINIMUM IN ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Antia, H. M.; Basu, Sarbani E-mail: sarbani.basu@yale.ed

    2010-09-01

    The minimum of solar cycle 24 is significantly different from most other minima in terms of its duration as well as its abnormally low levels of activity. Using available helioseismic data that cover epochs from the minimum of cycle 23 to now, we study the differences in the nature of the solar rotation between the minima of cycles 23 and 24. We find that there are significant differences between the rotation rates during the two minima. There are differences in the zonal-flow pattern too. We find that the band of fast rotating region close to the equator bifurcated around 2005 and recombined by 2008. This behavior is different from that during the cycle 23 minimum. By autocorrelating the zonal-flow pattern with a time shift, we find that in terms of solar dynamics, solar cycle 23 lasted for a period of 11.7 years, consistent with the result of Howe et al. (2009). The autocorrelation coefficient also confirms that the zonal-flow pattern penetrates through the convection zone.

  1. On the Variation of Solar Radius in Rotation Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Z. N.; Kong, D. F.; Xiang, N. B.; Feng, W.

    2015-01-01

    The Date Compensated Discrete Fourier Transform and CLEANest algorithm are used to study the temporal variations of the solar radius observed at Rio de Janeiro Observatory from 1998 March 2 to 2009 November 6. The CLEANest spectra show several significant periodicities around 400, 312, 93.5, 86.2, 79.4, 70.9, 53.2, and 26.3 days. Then, combining the data on the daily solar radius measured at Calern Observatory and Rio de Janeiro Observatory and the corresponding daily sunspot areas, we study the short-term periodicity of the solar radius and the role of magnetic field in the variation of the solar radius. The rotation period of the daily solar radius is determined to be statistically significant. Moreover, its temporal evolution is anti-phase with that of sunspot activity, and it is found anti-phase with solar activity. Generally, the stronger solar activity is, the more obvious is the anti-phase relation of radius with solar activity. This indicates that strong magnetic fields have a greater inhibitive effect than weak magnetic fields on the variation of the radius.

  2. ON THE VARIATION OF SOLAR RADIUS IN ROTATION CYCLES

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Z. N.; Kong, D. F.; Xiang, N. B.; Feng, W.

    2015-01-10

    The Date Compensated Discrete Fourier Transform and CLEANest algorithm are used to study the temporal variations of the solar radius observed at Rio de Janeiro Observatory from 1998 March 2 to 2009 November 6. The CLEANest spectra show several significant periodicities around 400, 312, 93.5, 86.2, 79.4, 70.9, 53.2, and 26.3 days. Then, combining the data on the daily solar radius measured at Calern Observatory and Rio de Janeiro Observatory and the corresponding daily sunspot areas, we study the short-term periodicity of the solar radius and the role of magnetic field in the variation of the solar radius. The rotation period of the daily solar radius is determined to be statistically significant. Moreover, its temporal evolution is anti-phase with that of sunspot activity, and it is found anti-phase with solar activity. Generally, the stronger solar activity is, the more obvious is the anti-phase relation of radius with solar activity. This indicates that strong magnetic fields have a greater inhibitive effect than weak magnetic fields on the variation of the radius.

  3. The Solar Rotation Rate Profile from 1915 to 1985

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertello, L.; Ulrich, R. K.; Boyden, J. E.; Javaraiah, J.

    2008-12-01

    The Mount Wilson solar photographic archive digitization project makes available to the scientific community in digital form a selection of the solar images in the archives of the Carnegie Observatories. This archive contains over 150,000 images of the Sun which were acquired over a time span in excess of 100 years. The images include broad-band images called White Light Directs, ionized CaK line spectroheliograms and Hydrogen Balmer alpha spectroheliograms. This project will digitize essentially all of the CaK and broad-band direct images out of the archive with 12 bits of significant precision and up to 3000 by 3000 spatial pixels. This project has already completed the digitization of essentially all of the CaK and about 50% of the broad-band direct images out of the archive with 12 bits of significant precision and up to 3000 by 3000 spatial pixels. Solar images have been extracted and identified with original logbook parameters of observation time and scan format, and they are available from the project web site at www.astro.ucla.edu/~ulrich/MW_SPADP. The rate of solar rotation over the whole solar surface can be determined as a function of time using the day-to day motions of features on these CaK images. We present here preliminary results for the period 1915 to 1975. The pattern of rotation rate is determined by cross-correlating observations taken on successive days for 11 separate latitude zones spanning the solar disk between +/- 50 degrees in latitude. We found that the average rotation rate of the Sun during the 20th century was higher during periods of minimum activity than it was during periods of maximum activity. The difference in the rotation rate at the equator can be estimated at about 0.01 microrad/s. We also found that the orthogonalized rotation coefficients calculated from the northern and southern hemispheres separately show an asymmetry between the two hemispheres, with the northern hemisphere rotating slightly faster than the southern

  4. A rotating solar magnetic "dipole' observed from 1926 to 1968.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, J. M.; Gonzalez, W.

    1971-01-01

    A recurring pattern with a period of 26 7/8 days observed in the polar geomagnetic field during the interval from 1926 to 1941 appears to persist in the interplanetary magnetic field polarity observed with spacecraft during the interval from 1963 to 1968. This observation suggests the existence of a rotating solar magnetic ?dipole' with a period of 26 7/8 plus or minus 0.003 days.

  5. Magnetic Field Rotations at Kinetic Scales in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Christopher; Matteini, Lorenzo; Burgess, David; Horbury, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    The distribution of spatial angle changes in the solar wind magnetic field is usually attributed to a mixture of turbulence and other structures. Recent results have suggested that in the MHD inertial range this distribution may be scale invariant, generated by the turbulence, and consist mainly of field rotations. Here, we examine the distribution of magnetic field rotations in the smaller scale kinetic range (from ion to electron scales), where the turbulence is thought to be dissipated, using combined fluxgate/search-coil magnetometer data from Cluster. The degree of self-similarity is measured and the spatial distribution of the fluctuations at different scales is compared. At ion scales, the energy in angle rotations larger than α drops exponentially with α with e-folding ~10°, and at electron scales with e-folding

  6. Differential Rotation and Dynamics of the Solar Interior

    PubMed

    Thompson; Toomre; Anderson; Antia; Berthomieu; Burtonclay; Chitre; Christensen-Dalsgaard; Corbard; DeRosa; Genovese; Gough; Haber; Harvey; Hill; Howe; Korzennik; Kosovichev; Leibacher; Pijpers; Provost; Rhodes; Schou; Sekii; Stark; Wilson

    1996-05-31

    Splitting of the sun's global oscillation frequencies by large-scale flows can be used to investigate how rotation varies with radius and latitude within the solar interior. The nearly uninterrupted observations by the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) yield oscillation power spectra with high duty cycles and high signal-to-noise ratios. Frequency splittings derived from GONG observations confirm that the variation of rotation rate with latitude seen at the surface carries through much of the convection zone, at the base of which is an adjustment layer leading to latitudinally independent rotation at greater depths. A distinctive shear layer just below the surface is discernible at low to mid-latitudes. PMID:8662459

  7. Discrepant responses of the global electron content to the solar cycle and solar rotation variations of EUV irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yiding; Liu, Libo; Le, Huijun; Zhang, Hui

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the responses of the ionosphere to the solar cycle and solar rotation variations of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance are comparatively investigated using daily mean global electron content (GEC) and 0.1-50 nm EUV daily flux. GEC is well correlated with EUV on both the solar cycle and solar rotation timescales; however, the responses of GEC to the solar cycle and solar rotation variations of EUV are significantly different in terms of the following two aspects: (1) There is a significant time lag between the solar rotation variations of GEC and EUV; the lag is dominated by a 1-day lag and generally presents a decrease trend with solar activity decreasing. For the solar cycle variations of GEC and EUV, however, there are no evident time lags. (2) The GEC versus EUV slopes are different for the solar cycle and solar rotation variations of GEC and EUV; the solar cycle GEC versus EUV slope is higher than the solar rotation GEC versus EUV slope, and this difference occurs in different seasons and latitudinal bands. The results present an aspect of the difference between ionospheric climatology and weather.

  8. Measurements of Faraday Rotation through the Solar Corona at 4.6 Solar Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Fischer, P. D.; Buffo, J. J.; Spangler, S. R.

    2013-07-01

    Identifying and understanding (1) the coronal heating mechanism and (2) the acceleration mechanism for the high-speed solar wind are two of the most important modern problems in solar physics. Many competing models of the high-speed solar wind depend on the solar magnetic field inside heliocentric distances of 5 solar radii. We report on sensitive VLA full-polarization observations made in August, 2011, at 5.0 and 6.1 GHz (each with a bandwidth of 128 MHz) of the radio galaxy 3C228 through the solar corona at heliocentric distances of 4.6 - 5.0 solar radii. Observations at 5.0 GHz (C-band frequencies) permit measurements deeper in the corona than previous VLA observations at 1.4 and 1.7 GHz. These Faraday rotation observations provide unique information on the plasma density and magnetic field strength in this region of the corona. The measured Faraday rotation on this day was lower than our a priori expectations, but we have successfully modeled the measurement in terms of observed properties of the corona on the day of observation. Further, 3C228 provides two lines of sight (separated by 46”) that allow measurement of differential Faraday rotation. These data may provide constraints on the magnitude of coronal currents and, thus, on the role Joule heating plays in the corona. Fluctuations in the observed rotation measure may also place constraints on wave-turbulence models by constraining the magnitude of coronal Alfvén waves.

  9. ROTATION PERIODS AND AGES OF SOLAR ANALOGS AND SOLAR TWINS REVEALED BY THE KEPLER MISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Do Nascimento Jr, J.-D.; Meibom, S.; García, R. A.; Salabert, D.; Ceillier, T.; Anthony, F.; Da Costa, J. S.; Castro, M.; Barnes, S. A.

    2014-08-01

    A new sample of solar analogs and twin candidates has been constructed and studied, paying particular attention to their light curves from NASA's Kepler mission. This Letter aims to assess their evolutionary status, derive their rotation and ages, and identify those which are solar analogs or solar twin candidates. We separate out the subgiants that compose a large fraction of the asteroseismic sample, and which show an increase in the average rotation period as the stars ascend the subgiant branch. The rotation periods of the dwarfs, ranging from 6 to 30 days and averaging 19 days, allow us to assess their individual evolutionary states on the main sequence and to derive their ages using gyrochronology. These ages are found to be in agreement with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.79 with independent asteroseismic ages, where available. As a result of this investigation, we are able to identify 34 stars as solar analogs and 22 of them as solar twin candidates.

  10. A solar eruption driven by rapid sunspot rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan, Guiping; Chen, Yao; Du, Guohui; Wang, Shuo; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin; Zhang, Hongqi; Su, Jiangtao; Xu, Haiqing; Li, Gang; Li, Xing

    2014-04-01

    We present the observation of a major solar eruption that is associated with fast sunspot rotation. The event includes a sigmoidal filament eruption, a coronal mass ejection, and a GOES X2.1 flare from NOAA active region 11283. The filament and some overlying arcades were partially rooted in a sunspot. The sunspot rotated at ∼10° hr{sup –1} during a period of 6 hr prior to the eruption. In this period, the filament was found to rise gradually along with the sunspot rotation. Based on the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager observation, for an area along the polarity inversion line underneath the filament, we found gradual pre-eruption decreases of both the mean strength of the photospheric horizontal field (B{sub h} ) and the mean inclination angle between the vector magnetic field and the local radial (or vertical) direction. These observations are consistent with the pre-eruption gradual rising of the filament-associated magnetic structure. In addition, according to the nonlinear force-free field reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field, a pre-eruption magnetic flux rope structure is found to be in alignment with the filament, and a considerable amount of magnetic energy was transported to the corona during the period of sunspot rotation. Our study provides evidence that in this event sunspot rotation plays an important role in twisting, energizing, and destabilizing the coronal filament-flux rope system, and led to the eruption. We also propose that the pre-event evolution of B{sub h} may be used to discern the driving mechanism of eruptions.

  11. Stratospheric effects of solar ultraviolet variations on the solar rotation time scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.

    1989-01-01

    A summary is presented of some current work on measurement and interpretation of stratospheric ozone and temperature responses to observed short term solar ultraviolet variations. Although some studies have yielded provisional evidence for a nearly in-phase ozone-solar cycle relationship, they extend at most over only one or two 11 year cycles so the statistical significance of the correlations is not large. Similarly, the relatively short lengths of individual satellite data sets combined with the problem of estimating the effect of changes in instrument sensitivity (drift) during the observing period have complicated attempts to infer long term or solar cycle ozone trends. The solar rotation and active region development time scale provides an alternate time scale for which detailed studies of middle atmospheric ozone and temperature responses to solar ultraviolet variability are currently possible using available satellite data sets. At tropical latitudes where planetary wave amplitudes are relatively small, clear correlative evidence for the existence of middle atmospheric ozone and temperature responses to short term solar ultraviolet variations has been obtained in recent years. These measurements will ultimately allow improved empirical and theoretical calculations of longer term solar induced ozone and temperature variations at low and middle latitudes.

  12. Full solar rotations observed by the SOLAR payload on the ISS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Since March 2008, an optical package measuring the sun spectral irradiance operates in space from the ESA COLUMBUS module of the International Space Station. Three instruments compose this package: a total solar irradiance instrument SOVIM, a UV-visible-infrared spectrometer: SOLSPEC and a far UV instrument: SOL-ACES. SOVIM stopped operations due to an electrical problem six months after launch but the two other instruments are still operating and ESA plans on supporting them until 2017. However, the life of the ISS has now been officially extended to 2020 and if the instruments stay in the current condition, a further extension would be possible. Due to the specificities of the ISS and mechanical limitation of the SOLAR moving platform, continuous operations are not possible and are made in intervals guaranteeing both solar visibility and minimum of contamination. This excludes arrivals of vehicles at the ISS and manoeuvres using chemical propulsion. In December 2012 and June 2013, NASA and the ISS partners approved a specific attitude, called the "SOLAR Attitude", allowing the bridging of two solar viewing opportunities and thus providing quasi-continuous observations during a full solar rotation. This process was repeated in December 2013 but the instruments had to be shut down after 25 days due to a temporary power reduction in the ISS. Normal operations are planned to resume in 2014 and would allow again the space agencies to approve new solar attitudes at the solstices. The completed operations and results already reviewed by the science teams will be presented with a special emphasis on the abnormal minimum of cycle 23. The continuation of these bridging operations and their meaning for space climate studies will also be discussed.

  13. Solar cycle signal in Earth rotation: nonstationary behavior.

    PubMed

    Currie, R G

    1981-01-23

    Following the discovery of the 11-year solar cycle signal in earth rotation, linear techniques were employed to investigate the amplitude and phase of the difference between ephemeris time and universal time (DeltaT) as a function of time. The amplitude is nonstationary. This difference was related to Delta(LOD), the difference between the length of day and its nominal value. The 11-year term in Delta(LOD) was 0.8 millisecond at the close of the 18th century and decreased below noise level from 1840 to 1860. From 1875 to 1925, Delta(LOD) was about 0.16 millisecond, and it decreased to about 0.08 millisecond by the 1950's. Except for anomalous behavior from 1797 to 1838, DeltaT lags sunspot numbers by 3.0 +/- 0.4 years. Since DeltaT lags Delta(LOD) by 2.7 years, the result is that Delta(LOD) is approximately in phase with sunspot numbers. PMID:17748272

  14. Diagnostics of the solar corona from comparison between Faraday rotation measurements and magnetohydrodynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Le Chat, G.; Cohen, O.; Kasper, J. C.; Spangler, S. R.

    2014-07-10

    Polarized natural radio sources passing behind the Sun experience Faraday rotation as a consequence of the electron density and magnetic field strength in coronal plasma. Since Faraday rotation is proportional to the product of the density and the component of the magnetic field along the line of sight of the observer, a model is required to interpret the observations and infer coronal structures. Faraday rotation observations have been compared with relatively ad hoc models of the corona. Here for the first time we compare these observations with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the solar corona driven by measurements of the photospheric magnetic field. We use observations made with the NRAO Very Large Array of 34 polarized radio sources occulted by the solar corona between 5 and 14 solar radii. The measurements were made during 1997 May, and 2005 March and April. We compare the observed Faraday rotation values with values extracted from MHD steady-state simulations of the solar corona. We find that (1) using a synoptic map of the solar magnetic field just one Carrington rotation off produces poorer agreements, meaning that the outer corona changes in the course of one month, even in solar minimum; (2) global MHD models of the solar corona driven by photospheric magnetic field measurements are generally able to reproduce Faraday rotation observations; and (3) some sources show significant disagreement between the model and the observations, which appears to be a function of the proximity of the line of sight to the large-scale heliospheric current sheet.

  15. THE ROTATION PROFILE OF SOLAR MAGNETIC FIELDS BETWEEN {+-}60 Degree-Sign LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, X. J.; Xie, J. L.

    2013-08-10

    Through a cross-correlation analysis of the Carrington synoptic maps of solar photospheric magnetic fields from Carrington Rotation Nos. 1625 to 2129 (from 1975 February to 2012 October), the sidereal rotation rates of solar magnetic fields between {+-}60 Degree-Sign latitudes are investigated. It seems that the temporal variation of rotation rates should be related to the solar cycle phase. The rotation profile of magnetic fields is obtained: the sidereal rotation rates decrease from the equator to mid-latitude and reach their minimum values of about 13.16 deg day{sup -1} (13.17 deg day{sup -1}) at 53 Degree-Sign (54 Degree-Sign ) latitude in the northern (southern) hemisphere, then increase toward higher latitudes. This rotation profile is different from the differential rotation law obtained by Snodgrass from a cross-correlation analysis of daily magnetograms, in which the rotation rates show a steep decrease from the equator to the poles. However, it is much closer to the quasi-rigid rotation law derived by Stenflo from an auto-correlation analysis of daily magnetograms. Some possible interpretations are discussed for the resulting rotation profile.

  16. Solar Rotation Measurements at Mount Wilson over the Period 1990--1995

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Roger K.; Bertello, Luca

    1996-07-01

    One of the most fundamental properties of the Sun is its rate of rotation. Kinetic energy of large-scale circulation might interact with rotation and cause the surface rate to vary throughout the solar cycle. The solar wind carries off angular momentum from the Sun, and the coupling between the outer and inner parts of the heliosphere might produce effects that are evident in the photosphere and chromosphere. The quadrapole moment of Sun's gravitational potential depends on the rotation rate. The interaction between rotation, convection, and solar magnetic fields forms the solar dynamo which governs the solar cycle of activity. Although the rate of solar rotation has been measured for decades, several key questions remain: What is the rotation rate, and what is the uncertainty in this value? Does the rotation rate depend on the solar cycle? Can the gradient of rotation rate as a function of distance from the solar center be detected within the solar atmosphere? The synoptic program of solar observations carried out at the 150 foot tower of the Mount Wilson Observatory has long been a source of measurements which address these questions. Improvements in the facilities of this program over the past decade have led to a reduction in the errors of measurement which now permit a new examination of these questions. Key improvements were: 12/81---installation of a fiber-optic image reformattor to select the spectral sampling of the absorption lines; 2/86---multiple daily observations were begun; 12/87---the Cr II line at lambda 5237.3 was added to the regular program of observation; 9/90---the grating mount and alignment system were replaced; 7/91---the polarization analysis optics were placed in a new alignment box and index matching fluid was introduced around the KDP variable retarder; 11/95---antireflection optics were installed for the KDP end windows to reduce interference fringes. Each of these changes resulted in a noticeable reduction in the rms error in the

  17. A search for evidence of solar rotation in Super-Kamiokande solar neutrino dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Shantanu; Liu, Dawei W.

    2016-09-01

    We apply the generalized Lomb-Scargle (LS) periodogram, proposed by Zechmeister and Kurster, to the solar neutrino data from Super-Kamiokande (Super-K) using data from its first five years. For each peak in the LS periodogram, we evaluate the statistical significance in two different ways. The first method involves calculating the False Alarm Probability (FAP) using non-parametric bootstrap resampling, and the second method is by calculating the difference in Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) between the null hypothesis, viz. the data contains only noise, compared to the hypothesis that the data contains a peak at a given frequency. Using these methods, we scan the frequency range between 7-14 cycles per year to look for any peaks caused by solar rotation, since this is the proposed explanation for the statistically significant peaks found by Sturrock and collaborators in the Super-K dataset. From our analysis, we do confirm that similar to Sturrock et al, the maximum peak occurs at a frequency of 9.42/year, corresponding to a period of 38.75 days. The FAP for this peak is about 1.5% and the difference in BIC (between pure white noise and this peak) is about 4.8. We note that the significance depends on the frequency band used to search for peaks and hence it is important to use a search band appropriate for solar rotation. However, The significance of this peak based on the value of BIC is marginal and more data is needed to confirm if the peak persists and is real.

  18. Effects of rotational mixing on the asteroseismic properties of solar-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggenberger, P.; Meynet, G.; Maeder, A.; Miglio, A.; Montalban, J.; Carrier, F.; Mathis, S.; Charbonnel, C.; Talon, S.

    2010-09-01

    Context. Observations of solar-like oscillations obtained either from the ground or from space stimulated the study of the effects of various physical processes on the modelling of solar-type stars. Aims: The influence of rotational mixing on the evolution and asteroseismic properties of solar-type stars is studied. Methods: Global and asteroseismic properties of models of solar-type stars computed with and without a comprehensive treatment of shellular rotation are compared. The effects of internal magnetic fields are also discussed in the framework of the Tayler-Spruit dynamo. Results: Rotational mixing changes the global properties of a solar-type star with a significant increase of the effective temperature resulting in a shift of the evolutionary track to the blue part of the HR diagram. These differences observed in the HR diagram are related to changes of the chemical composition, because rotational mixing counteracts the effects of atomic diffusion leading to larger helium surface abundances for rotating models than for non-rotating ones. Higher values of the large frequency separation are then found for rotating models than for non-rotating ones at the same evolutionary stage, because the increase of the effective temperature leads to a smaller radius and hence to an increase of the stellar mean density. In addition to changing the global properties of solar-type stars, rotational mixing also has a considerable impact on the structure and chemical composition of the central stellar layers by bringing fresh hydrogen fuel to the central stellar core, thereby enhancing the main-sequence lifetime. The increase of the central hydrogen abundance together with the change of the chemical profiles in the central layers result in a significant increase of the values of the small frequency separations and of the ratio of the small to large separations for models including shellular rotation. This increase is clearly seen for models with the same age sharing the same

  19. Differential rotation in main-sequence solar-like stars: Qualitative inference from asteroseismic data

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Mikkel N.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Miesch, Mark S.

    2014-08-01

    Understanding differential rotation of Sun-like stars is of great importance for insight into the angular momentum transport in these stars. One means of gaining such information is that of asteroseismology. By a forward modeling approach we analyze in a qualitative manner the impact of different differential rotation profiles on the splittings of p-mode oscillation frequencies. The optimum modes for inference on differential rotation are identified along with the best value of the stellar inclination angle. We find that in general it is not likely that asteroseismology can be used to make an unambiguous distinction between a rotation profile such as a conical Sun-like profile and a cylindrical profile. In addition, it seems unlikely that asteroseismology of Sun-like stars will result in inferences on the radial profile of the differential rotation, such as can be done for red giants. At best, one could possibly obtain the sign of the radial differential rotation gradient. Measurements of the extent of the latitudinal differential from frequency splitting are, however, more promising. One very interesting aspect that could likely be tested from frequency splittings is whether the differential rotation is solar-like or anti-solar-like in nature, in the sense that a solar-like profile has an equator rotating faster than the poles.

  20. SEISMIC AND DYNAMICAL SOLAR MODELS. I. THE IMPACT OF THE SOLAR ROTATION HISTORY ON NEUTRINOS AND SEISMIC INDICATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Turck-Chieze, S.; Palacios, A.; Nghiem, P. A. P.

    2010-06-01

    Solar activity and helioseismology show the limitation of the standard solar model and call for the inclusion of dynamical processes in both convective and radiative zones. In this paper, we concentrate on the radiative zone. We first recall the sensitivity of boron neutrinos to the microscopic physics included in solar standard and seismic models. We confront the neutrino predictions of the seismic model with all the detected neutrino fluxes. Then, we compute new models of the Sun including a detailed transport of angular momentum and chemicals due to internal rotation that includes meridional circulation and shear-induced turbulence. We use two stellar evolution codes: CESAM and STAREVOL to estimate the different terms. We follow three temporal evolutions of the internal rotation which differ by their initial conditions: very slow, moderate, and fast rotation, with magnetic braking at the arrival on the main sequence for the last two. We find that the meridional velocities in the present solar radiative zone are extremely small in comparison with those of the convective zone (smaller than 10{sup -6} cm s{sup -1} instead of m s{sup -1}). All models lead to a radial differential rotation profile in the radiative zone but with a significantly different contrast. We compare these profiles to the presumed solar internal rotation and show that if meridional circulation and shear turbulence were the only mechanisms transporting angular momentum within the Sun, a rather slow rotation in the young Sun is favored. We confirm the small influence of the transport by rotation on the sound speed profile but its potential impact on the chemicals in the transition region between radiation and convective zones. These models are physically more representative of the real Sun than the standard or seismic solar models but a high initial rotation, as has been considered previously, increases the disagreement with neutrinos and the sound speed in the radiative zone. This present work

  1. Rotating models of young solar-type stars. Exploring braking laws and angular momentum transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amard, L.; Palacios, A.; Charbonnel, C.; Gallet, F.; Bouvier, J.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Understanding the angular momentum evolution of stars is one of the greatest challenges of modern stellar physics. Aims: We study the predicted rotational evolution of solar-type stars from the pre-main sequence to the solar age with 1D rotating evolutionary models including physical ingredients. Methods: We computed rotating evolution models of solar-type stars including an external stellar wind torque and internal transport of angular momentum following the method of Maeder and Zahn with the code STAREVOL. We explored different formalisms and prescriptions available from the literature. We tested the predictions of the models against recent rotational period data from extensive photometric surveys, lithium abundances of solar-mass stars in young clusters, and the helioseismic rotation profile of the Sun. Results: We find a best-matching combination of prescriptions for both internal transport and surface extraction of angular momentum. This combination provides a very good fit to the observed evolution of rotational periods for solar-type stars from early evolution to the age of the Sun. Additionally, we show that fast rotators experience a stronger coupling between their radiative region and the convective envelope. Regardless of the set of prescriptions, however, we cannot simultaneously reproduce surface angular velocity and the internal profile of the Sun or the evolution of lithium abundance. Conclusions: We confirm the idea that additional transport mechanisms must occur in solar-type stars until they reach the age of the Sun. Whether these processes are the same as those needed to explain recent asteroseismic data in more advanced evolutionary phases is still an open question.

  2. Linear astrophysical dynamos in rotating spheres Differential rotation, anisotropic turbulent magnetic diffusivity, and solar-stellar cycle magnetic parity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, H.; Wang, Z.; Wu, F.

    1984-05-01

    Differential rotation dependence of the selection mechanism for magnetic parity of solar and stellar cycles is studied by assuming various differential rotation profiles in the dynamo equation. The parity selection depends on propagation direction of oscillating magnetic fields in the form of dynamo waves which propagate along isorotation surfaces. When there is any radial gradient in the differential rotation, dynamo waves propagate either equatorward or poleward. In the former case, field systems of the two hemispheres approach each other and collide at the equator. Then, odd parity is selected. In the latter case, field systems of the two hemispheres recede from each other and do not collide at the equator, and even parity is selected. Thus the equatorial migration of wings of the butterfly diagram of the solar cycle and its odd parity are intrinsically related. In the case of purely latitudinal differential rotation, dynamo waves propagate purely radially and growth rates of odd and even modes are nearly the same even when dynamo strength is weak when the parity selection mechanism should work most efficiently. In this case, anisotropy of turbulent diffusivity is a decisive factor to separate odd and even modes. Unlike in the case of radial-gradient-dominated differential rotation in which any difference between diffusivities for poloidal and toroidal fields enhances the parity selection without changing the parity, the parity selection in the case of latitudinal-gradient-dominated differential rotation depends on the difference of diffusivities for poloidal and toroidal fields. When diffusivity for poloidal fields is larger than that for toroidal fields, odd parity is selected; and when diffusivity for toroidal fields is larger, even parity is selected. This suggests that diffusivity for poloidal fields is larger than that for toroidal fields in the solar convection zone where magnetic parity is odd and where radial gradient influence on the parity selection

  3. The Solar Surface Differential Rotation from Disk-Integrated Chromospheric Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, Robert A.; Keil, Steven L.

    1995-06-01

    Disk-integrated solar chromospheric Ca ii K-line (3933.68 Å) fluxes have been measured almost daily at Sacramento Peak Observatory since 1977. Using observing windows selected to mimic seasonal windows for chromospheric measurements of lower Main-Sequence stars such as those observed by Mount Wilson Observatory's HK Project, we have measured the solar rotation from the modulation of the Ca ii K-line flux. We track the change of rotation period from the decline of cycle 21 through the maximum of cycle 22. This variation in rotation period is shown to behave as expected from the migration of active regions in latitude according to Maunder's ‘butterfly diagram’, including an abrupt change in rotation period at the transition from cycle 21 to cycle 22. These results indicate the successful detection of solar surface differential rotation from disk-integrated observations. We argue that the success of our study compared to previous investigations of the solar surface differential rotation from disk-integrated fluxes lies primarily with the choice of the length of the time-series window. Our selection of 200 days is shorter than in previous studies whose windows are typically on the order of one year. The 200-day window is long enough to permit an accurate determination of the rotation period, yet short enough to avoid complications arising from active region evolution. Thus, measurements of the variation of rotation period in lower Main-Sequence stars, especially those that appear to be correlated with long-term changes in chromospheric activity (i.e., cycles), are probably evidence for stellar surface differential rotation.

  4. Rotational shear near the solar surface as a probe for subphotospheric magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchatinov, L. L.

    2016-05-01

    Helioseismology revealed an increase in the rotation rate with depth just beneath the solar surface. The relative magnitude of the radial shear is almost constant with latitude. This rotational state can be interpreted as a consequence of two conditions characteristic of the near-surface convection: the smallness of convective turnover time in comparison with the rotation period and absence of a horizontal preferred direction of convection anisotropy. The latter condition is violated in the presence of a magnetic field. This raises the question of whether the subphotospheric fields can be probed with measurements of near-surface rotational shear. The shear is shown to be weakly sensitive to magnetic fields but can serve as a probe for sufficiently strong fields of the order of one kilogauss. It is suggested that the radial differential rotation in extended convective envelopes of red giants is of the same origin as the near-surface rotational shear of the Sun.

  5. SOLAR ROTATION: A Laboratory Exercise from Project CLEA and the GONG Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschall, L. A.; Sudol, J. J.; Snyder, G. A.

    2002-12-01

    Digital images from the GONG Project provide a nearly continuous record of sunspots that are ideal for determining the rate of rotation of the Sun. A new laboratory exercise from Project CLEA provides students with the capability to access an archive of 368 images of the Sun obtained at GONG solar telescopes between January 1, 2002 and April 30, 2002, during a period near solar maximum when large numbers of spots were daily visible on the sun. The resolution of each image is about 2.5 arcsec per pixel (or about 0.25 degree in longitude and latitude at the center of the solar disk). Because these images have such exquisite spatial and temporal resolution, they are the best images to date from which students can determine the solar rotation rate. CLEA software for this exercise allows students to select images by date and time, to overlay a coordinate grid on the image, and to record the latitudes and longitudes of sunspots. This data can be tabulated and analyzed with the software to determine solar rotation rates. The expected precision in the solar rotation rates is +/- 3 hours. Students will also have the ability to combine their chosen images into a digital movie showing the solar rotation. The exercise includes a student workbook and a technical manual, as well as a CD-rom of the data and the software. This exercise was produced with funding from the National Science Foundation and Gettysburg College and with the support of the GONG Project at the National Solar Observatory.

  6. Solar wind velocity distribution on the heliospheric current sheet during Carrington rotations 1787-1795

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, B.; Prabhakaran Nayar, S. R.

    1995-08-01

    The solar wind velocity distribution in the heliosphere is best represented using a v-map, where velocity contours are plotted in heliographic latitude-longitude coordinates. It has already been established that low-speed regions of the solar wind on the source surface correspond to the maximum bright regions of the K-corona and the neutral line of the coronal magnetic field. In this analysis, v-maps on the source surface for Carrington rotations (CRs) 1787-1795, during 1987, have been prepared using the interplanetary scintillation measurements at Research Institute of Atmospherics (RIA), Nagoya Univ., Japan. These v-maps were then used to study the time evolution of the low-speed (leq450 km s-1) belt of the solar wind and to deduce the distribution of solar wind velocity on the heliospheric current sheet. The low-speed belt of the solar wind on the source surface was found to change from one CR to the next, implying a time evolution. Instead of a slow and systematic evolution, the pattern of distribution of solar wind changed dramatically at one particular solar rotation (CR 1792) and the distributions for the succeeding rotations were similar to this pattern. The low-speed region, in most cases, was found to be close to the solar equator and almost parallel to it. However, during some solar rotations, they were found to be organised in certain longitudes, leaving regions with longitudinal width greater than 30° free of low-speed solar wind, i.e. these regions were occupied by solar wind with velocities greater than 450 km s-1. It is also noted from this study that the low-speed belt, in general, followed the neutral line of the coronal magnetic field, except in certain cases. The solar wind velocity on the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) varied in the range 300-585 km s-1 during the period of study, and the pattern of velocity distribution varied from rotation to rotation.

  7. Modelling rotational and cyclical spectral solar irradiance variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, Yvonne

    Solar irradiance changes are highly wavelength dependent: solar-cycle variations in the UV can be on the order of tens of percent, while changes in the visible are typically only of the order of one or two permille. With the launch of a number of instruments to measure spectral solar irradiance, we are now for a first time in a good position to explore the changing solar irradiance over a large range of wavelengths and to test our irradiance models as well as some of their underlying assumptions. I will introduce some of the current modelling approaches and present model-data comparisons, using the SATIRE irradiance model and SORCE/SIM measurements as an example. I will conclude by highlighting a number of outstanding questions regarding the modelling of spectral irradiance and current approaches to address these.

  8. The Effects of Differential Rotation on the Magnetic Structure of the Solar Corona: MHD Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lionello, Roberto; Riley, Pete; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran

    2004-01-01

    Coronal holes are magnetically open regions from which the solar wind streams. Magnetic reconnection has been invoked to reconcile the apparently rigid rotation of coronal holes with the differential rotation of magnetic flux in the photosphere. This mechanism might also be relevant to the formation of the slow solar wind, the properties of which seem to indicate an origin from the opening of closed magnetic field lines. We have developed a global MHD model to study the effect of differential rotation on the coronal magnetic field. Starting from a magnetic flux distribution similar to that of Wang et al., which consists of a bipolar magnetic region added to a background dipole field, we applied differential rotation over a period of 5 solar rotations. The evolution of the magnetic field and of the boundaries of coronal holes are in substantial agreement with the findings of Wang et al.. We identified examples of interchange reconnection and other changes of topology of the magnetic field. Possible consequences for the origin of the slow solar wind are also discussed.

  9. Effects of solar radiation pressure torque on the rotational motion of an artificial satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanardi, Maria Cecilia F. P. S.; Vilhenademoraes, Rodolpho

    1992-01-01

    The motion of an artificial satellite about its center of mass is studied considering torques due to the gravity gradient and direct solar radiation pressure. A model for direct solar radiation torque is derived for a circular cylindrical satellite. An analytical solution is obtained by the method of variation of the parameters. This solution shows that the angular variables have secular variation but that the modulus of the rotational angular momentum, the projection of rotational angular momentum on the z axis of the moment of inertia and inertial axis z, suffer only periodic variations. Considering a hypothetical artificial satellite, a numerical application is demonstrated.

  10. Near-transyear in solar magnetism

    PubMed Central

    Cornélissen, G.; Otsuka, K.; Halberg, F.

    2008-01-01

    Daily data on solar magnetism, available from May 1975 to April 2002, were analyzed by linear–nonlinear rhythmometry, with particular focus on the near-transyear, slightly longer than the calendar year. The time structure of solar magnetism is compared to that of solar activity, gauged by Wolf numbers. An about 27-day component corresponding to the solar rotation period, is common to both variables but differs in harmonic content. About 10-year component characterizes solar activity but not solar magnetism. A near-transyear with a period of about 1.05 years is detected in solar magnetism. In solar activity, a near-transyear is also found but its period of about 1.10 years is longer than that characterizing solar magnetism, and it may be paired with an about 0.9-year component to correspond to an about 10-year modulation in amplitude or phase of an about-yearly component. PMID:16275508

  11. Viking radio science data analysis and synthesis. [rotation of Mars, solar system dynamics, and gravitational laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, I. I.

    1984-01-01

    The rotational motion of Mars and its geophysical ramifications were investigated. Solar system dynamics and the laws of gravitation were also studied. The planetary ephemeris program, which was the central element in data analysis for this project, is described in brief. Viking Lander data were used in the investigation.

  12. Solar-stellar connection : A solar analogous behaviour by an active ultra fast rotator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sairam, Lalitha; Schmitt, Juergen; Pal Singh, Kulinder

    2015-08-01

    AB Dor is an ultra-fast rotating (Prot ~ 0.51 d) active young K dwarf with an age of ~40-50 Myr. Located as a foreground star towards large magellanic cloud (LMC), AB Dor has the advantage of being observed at all times by most of the X-ray satellites making it a favourite calibration target. AB Dor has been repeatedly observed for calibration by reflection grating spectrometer (RGS) on board XMM- Newton over last decade. This gives an ideal opportunity to perform a detailed analysis of the coronal emission, and to compare the flare characteristics with the Sun, since the Sun is usually considered as a prototype of low mass stars. Flares are frequent in low mass active stars across the electromagnetic spectrum similar to the Sun. We will for the first time, present an analysis of 30 intense X-ray flares observed from AB Dor. These flares detected in XMM-Newton data show a rapid rise (500-3000 s) and a slow decay (1000-6000 s). The derived X-ray luminosity during the flares ranges between 30.20 ≤ log(Lx) ≤ 30.83 erg/s; the flare peak temperature lies between 30-80 MK and the emission measures for these flares are in the range of 52.3 ≤ log(EM) ≤ 53.5 cm^-3. Our studies suggest that the scaling law between the flare peak emission measure and the flare peak temperature for all the flares observed on AB Dor is very similar to the relationship followed by solar flares, despite the fact that the AB Dor flare emission is ~250 times higher than the solar flare emission. We also carried out a homogenous study of flare frequencies, energetics and its occurrence in AB Dor. The frequency distribution of flare energies is a crucial diagnostic to calculate the overall energy residing in a flare. Our results of this study indicate that the large flare (33 ≤ log(E) ≤ 34 erg) may not contribute to the heating of the corona. We will show the presence of a possible long-term cycle in AB Dor both from a photospheric and coronal point of view, similar to the 11-year

  13. Solar Cycle Fine Structure and Surface Rotation from Ca II K-Line Time Series Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeff; Keil, Steve; Worden, Pete

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of three and a half decades of data from the NSO/AFRL/Sac Peak K-line monitoring program yields evidence for four components to the variation: (a) the solar cycle, with considerable fine structure and a quasi-periodicity of 122.4 days; (b) a stochastic process, faster than (a) and largely independent of it, (c) a quasi-periodic signal due to rotational modulation, and of course (d) observational errors (shown to be quite small). Correlation and power spectrum analyses elucidate periodic and aperiodic variation of these chromospheric parameters. Time-frequency analysis is especially useful for extracting information about differential rotation, and in particular elucidates the connection between its behavior and fine structure of the solar cycle on approximately one-year time scales. These results further suggest that similar analyses will be useful at detecting and characterizing differential rotation in stars from stellar light-curves such as those being produced at NASA's Kepler observatory.

  14. What we know about the sun's internal rotation from solar oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goode, Philip R.; Dziembowski, W. A.; Korzennik, S. G.; Rhodes, E. J., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, a uniform approach of inversion was used to determine the internal rotation rate of the sun from each of the six available sets of solar oscillation data, which included the data of Duvall et al. (1986), Rhodes et al. (1987, 1990), Tomczyk (1988), Brown and Morrow (1987), and Libbrecht (1989). The technique chosen for inverting the solar oscillation data was the discretized least-squares technique. The results indicate that the rotation rate of the sun in the equatorial plane declines going inward between the surface and 0.6 of the radius and that the polar rate increases going inward (i.e., the surfacelike differential rotation decreases with depth).

  15. Rotationally Asymmetric Magnetic Holes in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, M. A.; Wheeler, H. R., IV

    2015-12-01

    Most magnetic holes that have been observed in the solar wind are not "linear." That is, the direction of the background magnetic field changes direction across the magnetic depression. We present the results of a search of the Ulysses database for these types of magnetic structures, and a comparison is made with previous searches for magnetic holes. The magnetic structures are analyzed to determine their soliton content (see doi:10.1002/2014JA020770). In addition, we numerically integrate these profiles using the derivative nonlinear Schrödinger (DNLS) equation to investigate their stability and soliton nature.

  16. The Rotation and Galactic Kinematics of Mid M Dwarfs in the Solar Neighborhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Elisabeth R.; Irwin, Jonathan; Charbonneau, David; Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Dittmann, Jason A.; West, Andrew A.

    2016-04-01

    Rotation is a directly observable stellar property, and it drives magnetic field generation and activity through a magnetic dynamo. Main-sequence stars with masses below approximately 0.35 {M}ȯ (mid-to-late M dwarfs) are fully convective, and are expected to have a different type of dynamo mechanism than solar-type stars. Measurements of their rotation rates provide insight into these mechanisms, but few rotation periods are available for these stars at field ages. Using photometry from the MEarth Project, we measure rotation periods for 387 nearby, mid-to-late M dwarfs in the northern hemisphere, finding periods from 0.1 to 140 days. The typical rotator has stable, sinusoidal photometric modulations at a semi-amplitude of 0.5%–1%. We find no period–amplitude relation for stars below 0.25 {M}ȯ and an anticorrelation between period and amplitude for higher-mass M dwarfs. We highlight the existence of older, slowly rotating stars without Hα emission that nevertheless have strong photometric variability. We use parallaxes, proper motions, radial velocities, photometry, and near-infrared metallicity estimates to further characterize the population of rotators. The Galactic kinematics of our sample is consistent with the local population of G and K dwarfs, and rotators have metallicities characteristic of the solar neighborhood. We use the W space velocities and established age–velocity relations to estimate that stars with P < 10 days have ages of on average <2 Gyr, and that those with P > 70 days have ages of about 5 Gyr. The period distribution is dependent on mass: as the mass decreases, the slowest rotators at a given mass have longer periods, and the fastest rotators have shorter periods. We find a lack of stars with intermediate rotation periods, and the gap between the fast and slow rotators is larger for lower masses. Our data are consistent with a scenario in which these stars maintain rapid rotation for several gigayears, then spin down quickly

  17. A tracking polarimeter for measuring solar and ionospheric Faraday rotation of signals from deep space probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlson, J. E.; Levy, G. S.; Stelzried, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    A tracking polarimeter implemented on the 64-m NASA/JPL paraboloid antenna at Goldstone, Calif., is described. Its performance is analyzed and compared with measurements. The system was developed to measure Faraday rotation in the solar corona of the telemetry carrier from the Pioneer VI spacecraft as it was occulted by the sun. It also measures rotation in the earth's ionosphere and is an accurate method of determining spacecraft orientation. The new feature of this system is its use of a pair of quarter-wave plates to allow the synthesis of a rotating feed system, while requiring the rotation of only a single section of waveguide. Since the polarization sensing is done at RF and the receiver operates essentially as a null detector, the system's accuracy is superior to other polarization tracking schemes. In addition, the antenna size and maser preamplifier provide unsurpassed sensitivity. The associated instrumentation used in the Pioneer VI experiment is also described.

  18. Rotation and activity among solar-type stars of the Ursa Major Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderblom, David R.; Mayor, Michel

    1993-01-01

    We examine rotation and chromospheric activity among G and K dwarfs recently shown to be members of the Ursa Major Group (UMaG). Rotation periods for UMaG stars are smaller than for stars of the same colors in the Hyades, and by an amount corresponding to the Skumanich relation. Most UMaG stars have about the same level of Ca II and K emission, implying that they also have nearly uniform intrinsic rotation rates. That means that the diversity of rotation rates and levels of activity seen among solar-type stars in the Alpha Persei and Pleiades clusters has largely converged by the age of UMaG (0.3 Gyr).

  19. Long-term variations of the coronal rotation and solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K. J.; Shi, X. J.; Feng, W.; Xie, J. L.; Gao, P. X.; Zhan, L. S.; Liang, H. F.

    2012-07-01

    Recently, Chandra and Vats have obtained the yearly period length of the solar coronal rotation cycle by analysing the daily adjusted solar radio flux at the 10.7-cm wavelength for the years 1947-2009. In this paper, we use the time series (series I) of the yearly period length to investigate the long-term variation of the rotation of radio emission corona, and we find a weak decreasing trend in the time series. We use the empirical mode decomposition to decompose both the yearly mean value (series II) of the solar radio flux at the 10.7-cm wavelength and series I into different periodical components. There is a secular trend for each of the two series, and we find a negative correlation in the two trends. The decomposed 11-yr-cycle components of the two series show different and complicated periods and there is a phase relation between them. We investigate the cycle-related variation of the coronal rotation length, and we find that there is no Schwable cycle of statistical significance for the long-term variation of the rotation cycle length.

  20. TIME-DEPENDENT NONEXTENSIVITY ARISING FROM THE ROTATIONAL EVOLUTION OF SOLAR-TYPE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, J. R. P.; Nepomuceno, M. M. F.; Soares, B. B.; De Freitas, D. B.

    2013-11-01

    Nonextensive formalism is a generalization of the Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics. In this formalism, the entropic index q is a quantity characterizing the degree of nonextensivity and is interpreted as a parameter of long-memory or long-range interactions between the components of the system. Since its proposition in 1988, this formalism has been applied to investigate a wide variety of natural phenomena. In stellar astrophysics, a theoretical distribution function based on nonextensive formalism (q distributions) has been successfully applied to reproduce the distribution of stellar radial and rotational velocity data. In this paper, we investigate the time variation of the entropic index q obtained from the distribution of rotation, Vsin i, for a sample of 254 rotational data for solar-type stars from 11 open clusters aged between 35.5 Myr and 2.6 Gyr. As a result, we have found an anti-correlation between the entropic index q and the age of clusters, and that the distribution of rotation Vsin i for these stars becomes extensive for an age greater than about 170 Myr. Assuming that the parameter q is associated with long-memory effects, we suggest that the memory of the initial angular momentum of solar-type stars can be scaled by the entropic index q. We also propose a physical link between the parameter q and the magnetic braking of stellar rotation.

  1. Alpha-Effect and Turbulent Pumping In The Rapid Rotation Regime - Implications For Solar Dynamo Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käpylä, P. J.; Korpi, M. J.; Ossendrijver, M.; Stix, M.; Tuominen, I.

    2006-08-01

    We use local 3D convection calculations to compute the alpha-effect and turbulent pumping of mean magnetic fields in the rapid rotation regime corresponding to the deep layers of the solar convection zone. We find that in this regime the alpha-effect responsible for generating the poloidal field out of the toroidal one peaks at around latitude 30 degrees, in contrast to the slow rotation case and the often adopted prescription in mean-field models of the solar dynamo, where the maximum values are found at the poles. Furthermore, the turbulent pumping of mean fields is predominantly down- and equatorward. We find that the downward pumping is decreased near the equator for rapid rotation and can be upward for the toroidal field component. In order to investigate the implications of the obtained local results for the problems in mean-field dynamo theory arising from the helioseismically determined solar rotation profile, namely the poleward migration of activity belts at low latitudes and the activity being concentrated at too high latitudes, we introduce the alpha-effect and turbulent pumping as they were found in the local calculations into a kinematic mean-field model of the solar dynamo. We also investigate the effect of a one-cell counter-clockwise meridional flow pattern on the dynamo solutions. We find that using the alpha-effect and turbulent pumping adapted from the results of the local calculations, the migration of the activity belts is equatorward also at low latitudes. When the meridional flow is added, the activity belts are shifted further closer to the equator, and a poleward migration belt appears at high latitudes. With all the effects included, the activity still appears at too high latitudes (5...60 degrees). Other remaining problems include the somewhat too short cycle periods for the solar-like dipole solutions.

  2. Rotation and magnetism of solar-like stars: from scaling laws to spot-dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Allan Sacha

    2014-08-01

    The Sun is the archetype of magnetic star and its proximity coupled with very high accuracy observations has helped us understanding how solar-like stars (e.g with a convective envelope) redistribute angular momentum and generate a cyclic magnetic field. However most solar models have been so fine tuned that when they are applied to other solar-like stars the agreement with observations is not good enough. I will thus discuss, based on theoretical considerations and multi-D MHD stellar models, what can be considered as robust properties of solar-like star dynamics and magnetism and what is still speculative. I will derive scaling laws for differential rotation and magnetic energy as a function of stellar parameters, discuss recent results of stellar dynamo models and define the new concept of spot-dynamo, e.g. global dynamo that develops self-consistent magnetic buoyant structures that emerge at the surface.

  3. On diurnal variations of the solar rotation rate as derived from sunspot tracings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, A.; Woehl, H.; Schroeter, E. H.

    1981-06-01

    The heliographic positions of more than 100 sunspots were accurately measured several times a day from 1974 until 1979 by means of the computer-controlled tracking method described by Schroeter and Woehl (1975). A striking degree of constancy of the solar rotation rate (about 0.15% or 3 m/s) is found, when east-west proper motion components of each individual stable sunspot is considered. However, large differences of the rotation rate are observed (up to 7% or 130 m/s) when comparing different sunspots. We found no significant correlation of these fluctuations with characteristics of the sunspots (age, evolution, etc.).

  4. A dynamo model of magnetic activity in solar-like stars with different rotational velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Choudhuri, Arnab Rai; Kitchatinov, Leonid L.

    2014-08-10

    We attempt to provide a quantitative theoretical explanation for the observations that Ca II H/K emission and X-ray emission from solar-like stars increase with decreasing Rossby number (i.e., with faster rotation). Assuming that these emissions are caused by magnetic cycles similar to the sunspot cycle, we construct flux transport dynamo models of 1 M{sub ☉} stars rotating with different rotation periods. We first compute the differential rotation and the meridional circulation inside these stars from a mean-field hydrodynamics model. Then these are substituted in our dynamo code to produce periodic solutions. We find that the dimensionless amplitude f{sub m} of the toroidal flux through the star increases with decreasing rotation period. The observational data can be matched if we assume the emissions to go as the power 3-4 of f{sub m}. Assuming that the Babcock-Leighton mechanism saturates with increasing rotation, we can provide an explanation for the observed saturation of emission at low Rossby numbers. The main failure of our model is that it predicts an increase of the magnetic cycle period with increasing rotation rate, which is the opposite of what is found observationally. Much of our calculations are based on the assumption that the magnetic buoyancy makes the magnetic flux tubes rise radially from the bottom of the convection zone. Taking into account the fact that the Coriolis force diverts the magnetic flux tubes to rise parallel to the rotation axis in rapidly rotating stars, the results do not change qualitatively.

  5. EVIDENCE FOR ROTATIONAL MOTIONS IN THE FEET OF A QUIESCENT SOLAR PROMINENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Orozco Suarez, D.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2012-12-20

    We present observational evidence of apparent plasma rotational motions in the feet of a solar prominence. Our study is based on spectroscopic observations taken in the He I 1083.0 nm multiplet with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter attached to the German Vacuum Tower Telescope. We recorded a time sequence of spectra with 34 s cadence placing the slit of the spectrograph almost parallel to the solar limb and crossing two feet of an intermediate size, quiescent hedgerow prominence. The data show opposite Doppler shifts, {+-}6 km s{sup -1}, at the edges of the prominence feet. We argue that these shifts may be interpreted as prominence plasma rotating counterclockwise around the vertical axis to the solar surface as viewed from above. The evolution of the prominence seen in EUV images taken with the Solar Dynamics Observatory provided us with clues to interpret the results as swirling motions. Moreover, time-distance images taken far from the central wavelength show plasma structures moving parallel to the solar limb with velocities of about 10-15 km s{sup -1}. Finally, the shapes of the observed intensity profiles suggest the presence of, at least, two components at some locations at the edges of the prominence feet. One of them is typically Doppler shifted (up to {approx}20 km s{sup -1}) with respect to the other, thus suggesting the existence of supersonic counter-streaming flows along the line of sight.

  6. Solar rotation during the Maunder Minimum. [evaluation of historical records from A.D. 1645-1715

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eddy, J. A.; Gilman, P. A.; Trotter, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Solar surface rotation has been measured from sunspot drawings made in A.D. 1642-1644, probable differences from present-day rates are found. The 17th-century sunspots rotated faster near the equator by 3 or 4%, and the differential rotation between zero and + or - 20 deg latitude was enhanced by about a factor 3. These differences are consistent features in both spots and groups of spots and in both hemispheres. It is assumed that this apparent change in surface rotation was related to the ensuing dearth of solar activity (the Maunder Minimum) which persisted until about 1715.

  7. Dependence of Stellar Magnetic Activity Cycles on Rotational Period in a Nonlinear Solar-type Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipin, V. V.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2016-06-01

    We study the turbulent generation of large-scale magnetic fields using nonlinear dynamo models for solar-type stars in the range of rotational periods from 14 to 30 days. Our models take into account nonlinear effects of dynamical quenching of magnetic helicity, and escape of magnetic field from the dynamo region due to magnetic buoyancy. The results show that the observed correlation between the period of rotation and the duration of activity cycles can be explained in the framework of a distributed dynamo model with a dynamical magnetic feedback acting on the turbulent generation from either magnetic buoyancy or magnetic helicity. We discuss implications of our findings for the understanding of dynamo processes operating in solar-like stars.

  8. Long-term Fluctuations in The Earth's Rotation And Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banjevic, Boris

    2006-08-01

    The tidal friction is not the only cause to influence the earth's rotation in long term. There is a correlation between solar activity and long term variations of the Earth's rotation. Possible cause is an interaction between solar wind and magnetosphere of the earth. This would produce the angular deceleration of earth's rotation. Long-term fluctuation in the length of the day (LOD) with semi-amplitude of ca. 4 ms and a period of ca. 1480 years may exist. One cause is probably electromagnetic core-mantle coupling. Ice-rafting event during Holocene is found with cyclity of 1470 years. There is also possible connection between solar activity identified in delta ^14C records of 1450 year periodicity and cyclity of the Earth's rotation. Global-sea level changes associated with climatic variations may produce significant effect on long timescales. The non-tidal acceleration may be connected with the rate of change in Earth's oblateness, attributed to viscous rebound of the Earth from the decrease in load in the polar caps following last deglaciation. The average of Earth's dynamic oblateness (J2 dot) for the past 4000 years is larger than the present J2 (dot) from satellite laser ranging, - 2.8x10^-11/yr. Current increase of LOD is on the average by 1.8+/-0.1 milliseconds per century (ms/ cy). According to early Chinese and Babylonian eclipses from 2000-700 BC we obtain an average of LOD 1.67+/-0.05 ms/cy (1820 AD), which is lower than current value. This is very important for evaluating ancient eclipses before 700 BC. We have used singular spectrum analysis, Catterpilar method, to find periodicities from time series of LOD. We have also founded highly correlated relationship between the periods of low solar activity and LOD at centennial time scales. Our calculation before 700 BC implies sudden change of rotation between 850-750 BC. Major increases of ^14C in the atmosphere at ca. 750 BC (Homer minimum) and ca. 1650 AD (Maunder minimum) are caused by the reduction of

  9. Magnetic activity of six young solar analogues II. Surface Differential Rotation from long-term photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, S.; Guinan, E. F.

    2003-10-01

    The present paper is the second of a series dedicated to the study of the magnetic activity in a selected sample of young solar analogues. The sample includes five single G0-G5V stars with ages between =~ 130 Myr and 700 Myr: EK Dra, pi 1 UMa, HN Peg, k1 Cet and BE Cet. In this study we also include the Pleiades-age ( =~ 130 Myr) K0V star DX Leo. Our analysis is based on high precision photometric observations carried out as part of The Sun in Time project, aimed at a multiwavelength study of stars with solar-like global properties, but with different ages and thus at different stages of evolution. In the first paper of this series we presented the photometric observations and determined the existence of starspot cycles and their correlation with the global stellar properties. In the present paper we investigate the surface differential rotation (SDR). The periodogram analysis of the photometric data time series has allowed us to determine the rotational periods and to derive the following results: i) all the selected stars show variations of the rotational period. Such variations are definitely periodic and in phase with the starspot cycle for BE Cet and DX Leo. They are likely periodic and in phase also for pi 1 UMa, EK Dra and HN Peg, but still need confirmation. By analogy with the solar butterfly diagram, the rotational period variations are interpretable in terms of surface differential rotation, that is, they are attributable to the existence of active latitude belts migrating during the activity cycle on a differentially rotating star; ii) BE Cet, pi 1 UMa and EK Dra show a solar-like pattern of SDR, that is the rotational period steadily decreases along the activity cycle, jumping back to higher values at the beginning of the next cycle; on the contrary, DX Leo, k1 Cet and HN Peg show an antisolar pattern; iii) the amplitude of the rotational period variations shows a power law dependence on the rotational period similar to that found in previous studies

  10. SOLAR CYCLE VARIABILITY AND SURFACE DIFFERENTIAL ROTATION FROM Ca II K-LINE TIME SERIES DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.; Worden, Simon P.; Keil, Stephen L.

    2013-07-01

    Analysis of over 36 yr of time series data from the NSO/AFRL/Sac Peak K-line monitoring program elucidates 5 components of the variation of the 7 measured chromospheric parameters: (a) the solar cycle (period {approx} 11 yr), (b) quasi-periodic variations (periods {approx} 100 days), (c) a broadband stochastic process (wide range of periods), (d) rotational modulation, and (e) random observational errors, independent of (a)-(d). Correlation and power spectrum analyses elucidate periodic and aperiodic variation of these parameters. Time-frequency analysis illuminates periodic and quasi-periodic signals, details of frequency modulation due to differential rotation, and in particular elucidates the rather complex harmonic structure (a) and (b) at timescales in the range {approx}0.1-10 yr. These results using only full-disk data suggest that similar analyses will be useful for detecting and characterizing differential rotation in stars from stellar light curves such as those being produced by NASA's Kepler observatory. Component (c) consists of variations over a range of timescales, in the manner of a 1/f random process with a power-law slope index that varies in a systematic way. A time-dependent Wilson-Bappu effect appears to be present in the solar cycle variations (a), but not in the more rapid variations of the stochastic process (c). Component (d) characterizes differential rotation of the active regions. Component (e) is of course not characteristic of solar variability, but the fact that the observational errors are quite small greatly facilitates the analysis of the other components. The data analyzed in this paper can be found at the National Solar Observatory Web site http://nsosp.nso.edu/cak{sub m}on/, or by file transfer protocol at ftp://ftp.nso.edu/idl/cak.parameters.

  11. Solar Cycle Variability and Surface Differential Rotation from Ca II K-line Time Series Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.; Keil, Stephen L.; Worden, Simon P.

    2013-07-01

    Analysis of over 36 yr of time series data from the NSO/AFRL/Sac Peak K-line monitoring program elucidates 5 components of the variation of the 7 measured chromospheric parameters: (a) the solar cycle (period ~ 11 yr), (b) quasi-periodic variations (periods ~ 100 days), (c) a broadband stochastic process (wide range of periods), (d) rotational modulation, and (e) random observational errors, independent of (a)-(d). Correlation and power spectrum analyses elucidate periodic and aperiodic variation of these parameters. Time-frequency analysis illuminates periodic and quasi-periodic signals, details of frequency modulation due to differential rotation, and in particular elucidates the rather complex harmonic structure (a) and (b) at timescales in the range ~0.1-10 yr. These results using only full-disk data suggest that similar analyses will be useful for detecting and characterizing differential rotation in stars from stellar light curves such as those being produced by NASA's Kepler observatory. Component (c) consists of variations over a range of timescales, in the manner of a 1/f random process with a power-law slope index that varies in a systematic way. A time-dependent Wilson-Bappu effect appears to be present in the solar cycle variations (a), but not in the more rapid variations of the stochastic process (c). Component (d) characterizes differential rotation of the active regions. Component (e) is of course not characteristic of solar variability, but the fact that the observational errors are quite small greatly facilitates the analysis of the other components. The data analyzed in this paper can be found at the National Solar Observatory Web site http://nsosp.nso.edu/cak_mon/, or by file transfer protocol at ftp://ftp.nso.edu/idl/cak.parameters.

  12. The evolution of rotating stars. 1: Method and exploratory calculations for a 7 solar mass star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endal, A. S.; Sofia, S.

    1976-01-01

    A method was developed which allows us to study the evolution of rotating stars beyond the main sequence stage. Four different cases of redistribution of angular momentum in an evolving star are considered. Evolutionary sequences for a 7 solar mass star, rotating according to these different cases, were computed from the ZAMS to the double shell source stage. Each sequence was begun with a (typical) equatorial velocity of 210 km/sec. On the main sequence, the effects of rotation are of minor importance. As the core contracts during later stages, important effects arise in all physically plausible cases. The outer regions of the cores approach critical velocities and develop unstable angular velocity distributions. The effects of these instabilities should significantly alter the subsequent evolution.

  13. Turbulent Convection in Young Solar-like Stars: Influence of rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballot, J.; Brun, A. S.; Turck-Chièze, S.

    2004-12-01

    The study of the relationship between X-ray emission and rotation in young stars (Feigelson et al. 2003) and observations of magnetic-field topology of such stars with Zeeman-Doppler Imaging (Donati et al. 2003) indicate that the dynamo processes differ from those operating in main sequence stars. In this context, 3-D numerical simulations have been started. The first step is to study the purely hydrodynamic case. We have simulated the convective shell of a young sun (10 Myr) with the Anelastic Spherical Harmonic (ASH) code. We have studied the angular momentum transfer, the meridional circulation and the differential rotation in this shell. We have also studied the effects of different rotation rates (1, 2 and 5 solar rate).

  14. Solar p-mode oscillations as a tracer of radial differential rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deubner, F.-L.; Ulrich, R. K.; Rhodes, E. J., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Photoelectric observations of solar p-modes obtained with improved wavenumber and frequency resolution are presented. The observations are compared with model calculations of the p-modes, and the degree of spatial and temporal coherence of the observed wave pattern is investigated. It is found that the p-mode oscillations pervade the visible surface of the sun with a high degree of coherence in space and time, so that the whole complex pattern of standing waves with its nodes and antinodes can be regarded as a fixed pattern corotating with the solar surface layers. The p-modes are introduced as a tracer of solar rotational flow velocities. The equatorial differential rotation is estimated as a function of effective depth on the basis of the theoretical contribution functions for the p-modes recently derived by Ulrich et al. (1978). The results strongly indicate that the angular speed of rotation is not uniform even in the relatively shallow layer extending about 20,000 km below the photosphere.

  15. The Solar Twin Planet Search. IV. The Sun as a typical rotator and evidence for a new rotational braking law for Sun-like stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Leonardo A.; Meléndez, Jorge; do Nascimento, José-Dias; Bedell, Megan; Ramírez, Iván; Bean, Jacob L.; Asplund, Martin; Spina, Lorenzo; Dreizler, Stefan; Alves-Brito, Alan; Casagrande, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Context. It is still unclear how common the Sun is when compared to other similar stars in regards to some of its physical properties, such as rotation. Considering that gyrochronology relations are widely used today to estimate ages of stars in the main sequence, and that the Sun is used to calibrate it, it is crucial to assess whether these procedures are acceptable. Aims: We analyze the rotational velocities, limited by the unknown rotation axis inclination angle, of an unprecedented large sample of solar twins to study the rotational evolution of Sun-like stars, and assess whether the Sun is a typical rotator. Methods: We used high-resolution (R = 115 000) spectra obtained with the HARPS spectrograph and the 3.6 m telescope at La Silla Observatory. The projected rotational velocities for 81 solar twins were estimated by line profile fitting with synthetic spectra. Macroturbulence velocities were inferred from a prescription that accurately reflects their dependence with effective temperature and luminosity of the stars. Results: Our sample of solar twins include some spectroscopic binaries with enhanced rotational velocities, and we do not find any nonspectroscopic binaries with unusually high rotation velocities. We verified that the Sun does not have a peculiar rotation, but the solar twins exhibit rotational velocities that depart from the Skumanich relation. Conclusions: The Sun is a regular rotator when compared to solar twins with a similar age. Additionally, we obtain a rotational braking law that better describes the stars in our sample (v ∝ t-0.6) in contrast to previous, often-used scalings. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere under ESO programs 188.C-0265, 183.D-0729, 292.C-5004, 077.C-0364, 072.C-0488, 092.C-0721, 093.C-0409, 183.C-0972, 192.C-0852, 091.C-0936, 089.C-0732, 091.C-0034, 076.C-0155, 185.D-0056, 074.C-0364, 075.C-0332, 089.C-0415, 60.A-9036, 075.C-0202, 192

  16. Uncertainties for two-dimensional models of solar rotation from helioseismic eigenfrequency splitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genovese, Christopher R.; Stark, Philip B.; Thompson, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    Observed solar p-mode frequency splittings can be used to estimate angular velocity as a function of position in the solar interior. Formal uncertainties of such estimates depend on the method of estimation (e.g., least-squares), the distribution of errors in the observations, and the parameterization imposed on the angular velocity. We obtain lower bounds on the uncertainties that do not depend on the method of estimation; the bounds depend on an assumed parameterization, but the fact that they are lower bounds for the 'true' uncertainty does not. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals for estimates of the angular velocity from 1986 Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) data, based on a 3659 element tensor-product cubic-spline parameterization, are everywhere wider than 120 nHz, and exceed 60,000 nHz near the core. When compared with estimates of the solar rotation, these bounds reveal that useful inferences based on pointwise estimates of the angular velocity using 1986 BBSO splitting data are not feasible over most of the Sun's volume. The discouraging size of the uncertainties is due principally to the fact that helioseismic measurements are insensitive to changes in the angular velocity at individual points, so estimates of point values based on splittings are extremely uncertain. Functionals that measure distributed 'smooth' properties are, in general, better constrained than estimates of the rotation at a point. For example, the uncertainties in estimated differences of average rotation between adjacent blocks of about 0.001 solar volumes across the base of the convective zone are much smaller, and one of several estimated differences we compute appears significant at the 95% level.

  17. Solar system constraints on planetary Coriolis-type effects induced by rotation of distant masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2010-08-01

    We phenomenologically put local constraints on the rotation of distant masses by using the planets of the solar system. First, we analytically compute the orbital secular precessions induced on the motion of a test particle about a massive primary by a Coriolis-like force, treated as a small perturbation, in the case of a constant angular velocity vector Ψ directed along a generic direction in space. The semimajor axis a and the eccentricity e of the test particle do not secularly change, contrary to the inclination I, the longitude of the ascending node Ω, the longitude of the pericenter varpi and the mean anomaly Script M. Then, we compare our prediction for langledot varpirangle with the corrections Δdot varpi to the usual perihelion precessions of the inner planets recently estimated by fitting long data sets with different versions of the EPM ephemerides. We obtain as preliminary upper bounds |Ψz| <= 0.0006-0.013 arcsec cty-1, |Ψx| <= 0.1-2.7 arcsec cty-1, |Ψy| <= 0.3-2.3 arcsec cty-1. Interpreted in terms of models of space-time involving cosmic rotation, our results are able to yield constraints on cosmological parameters like the cosmological constant Λ and the Hubble parameter H0 not too far from their values determined with cosmological observations and, in some cases, several orders of magnitude better than the constraints usually obtained so far from space-time models not involving rotation. In the case of the rotation of the solar system throughout the Galaxy, occurring clockwise about the North Galactic Pole, our results for Ψz are in disagreement with the expected value of it at more than 3-σ level. Modeling the Oort cloud as an Einstein-Thirring slowly rotating massive shell inducing Coriolis-type forces inside yields unphysical results for its putative rotation.

  18. Solar-induced oscillations in the stratosphere - A myth or reality?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, S.

    1985-01-01

    Chandra (1984) has provided an assessment of the solar cycle ozone relationship based on seven years of Nimbus 4 BUV (backscattered ultraviolet) data. It was found that the globally averaged ozone in the upper stratosphere, when corrected for the changes in instrument sensitivity, decreased from 1970 to 1976 by 3-4 percent. This decrease is in accordance with the current estimates of solar UV variability over a solar cycle. The present investigation has the objective to determine if measured changes in ozone and temperature in the upper stratosphere on a time scale of a solar rotation are of solar origin, i.e., directly induced by changes in solar irradiance. The conducted study is based on the first two years (1970-1972) of ozone and temperature data obtained from the Nimbus 4 BUV and the Selective Chopper Radiometer (SCR) experiments. Attention is given to the response of the stratosphere to changes in solar activity associated with the 27-day solar rotation.

  19. Height of Tracers and the Correction of the Measured Solar Synodic Rotation Rate: Demonstration of the Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vršnak, B.; Rošd, A.; Božić, H.; Brajša, R.; Ruždjak, V.; Schroll, A.; Wöhl, H.

    1999-04-01

    Two large stable solar filaments were used as test tracers to determine the apparent synodic rotation rate as a function of the central meridian distance for several filaments' segments at different heights. An analytic fitting procedure was applied to determine simultaneously the real synodic rotation rate and the height of the traced filament segments. The determined heights were compared with the values obtained from the widths of filament contours on the solar disk and with the values obtained by direct measurements at the solar limb. Furthermore, the obtained rotation rates and heights of the filaments' segments close to the filaments' pivot points were compared with the values obtained using two successive central meridian passages. Finally, sources and scales of errors were investigated and possible implications on the previous studies of the solar differential rotation were considered.

  20. Faraday rotation fluctutation spectra observed during solar occultation of the Helios spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreev, V.; Efimov, A. I.; Samoznaev, L.; Bird, M. K.

    1995-01-01

    Faraday rotation (FR) measurements using linearly polarized radio signals from the two Helios spacecraft were carried out during the period from 1975 to 1984. This paper presents the results of a spectral analysis of the Helios S-band FR fluctuations observed at heliocentric distances from 2.6 to 15 solar radii during the superior conjunctions 1975-1983. The mean intensity of the FR fluctuations does not exceed the noise level for solar offsets greater than ca. 15 solar radii. The rms FR fluctuation amplitude increases rapidly as the radio ray path approaches the Sun, varying according to a power law (exponent: 2.85 +/- 0.15) at solar distances 4-12 solar radii. At distances inside 4 solar radii the increase is even steeper (exponent: 5.6 +/- 0.2). The equivalent two-dimensional FR fluctuation spectrum is well modeled by a single power-law over the frequency range from 5 to 50 mHz. For heliocentric distances larger than 4 solar radii the spectral index varies between 1.1 and 1.6 with a mean value of 1.4 +/- 0.2, corresponding to a 3-D spectral index p = 2.4. FR fluctuations thus display a somwhat lower spectral index compared with phase and amplitude fluctuations. Surprisingly high values of the spectral index were found for measurements inside 4 solar radii (p = 2.9 +/- 0.2). This may arise from the increasingly dominant effect of the magnetic field on radio wave propagation at small solar offsets. Finally, a quasiperiodic component, believed to be associated with Alfven waves, was discovered in some (but not all!) fluctuation spectra observed simultaneously at two ground stations. Characteristic periods and bulk velocities of this component were 240 +/- 30 sec and 300 +/- 60 km/s, respectively.

  1. The response of the MLS mesospheric daytime hydroxyl radical and water vapor to the short-term solar irradiance variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, A. V.; Rozanov, E.; Shapiro, A.; Wang, S.; Egorova, T. A.; Schmutz, W. K.; Peter, T.

    2011-12-01

    Solar radiation, which is the main energy source in the terrestrial atmosphere, is highly variable on different time-scales. The variations of the SSI may have substantial impact on chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere. The mesospheric hydroxyl radical (OH), which is the main ozone destructor, is produced due to the photolysis of the water vapor (H2O) by highly variable short wave solar radiation. Chemistry-climate models suggest strong response of the mesospheric OH and H2O caused by the solar irradiance variability. However the response was not yet defined with observed data. We analyzed the response of the tropical mean OH and H2O data observed by Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) to the solar irradiance variations during rotational cycle. We performed the analysis for the two time periods. The data from December 2004 to December 2005 were used to estimate the OH and H2O responses to the solar irradiance variability in high solar activity conditions (when the 27-day rotational cycle is well pronounced). The response for the solar minimum conditions (when the 27-day rotational cycle is vague) was considered using the data from November 2008 to November 2009. We found, for the first time, that during the period of the high solar activity the daily time series of the mesospheric OH correlate well with the solar irradiance at zero time-lag and the correlation coefficient reaches 0.79 at 76-82 km. The H2O for the same period anticorrelates with the solar irradiance at about 6-7 days time-lag with the correlation coefficient up to -0.7. At the same time the OH and H2O responses are negligible for the solar minimum period. This confirms that the 27-day solar cycles in OH, H2O and solar irradiance are physically connected.

  2. ON INTERMITTENT TURBULENCE HEATING OF THE SOLAR WIND: DIFFERENCES BETWEEN TANGENTIAL AND ROTATIONAL DISCONTINUITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xin; Tu Chuanyi; He Jiansen; Wang Linghua; Marsch, Eckart

    2013-08-01

    The intermittent structures in solar wind turbulence, studied by using measurements from the WIND spacecraft, are identified as being mostly rotational discontinuities (RDs) and rarely tangential discontinuities (TDs) based on the technique described by Smith. Only TD-associated current sheets (TCSs) are found to be accompanied with strong local heating of the solar wind plasma. Statistical results show that the TCSs have a distinct tendency to be associated with local enhancements of the proton temperature, density, and plasma beta, and a local decrease of magnetic field magnitude. Conversely, for RDs, our statistical results do not reveal convincing heating effects. These results confirm the notion that dissipation of solar wind turbulence can take place in intermittent or locally isolated small-scale regions which correspond to TCSs. The possibility of heating associated with RDs is discussed.

  3. On Intermittent Turbulence Heating of the Solar Wind: Differences between Tangential and Rotational Discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Tu, Chuanyi; He, Jiansen; Marsch, Eckart; Wang, Linghua

    2013-08-01

    The intermittent structures in solar wind turbulence, studied by using measurements from the WIND spacecraft, are identified as being mostly rotational discontinuities (RDs) and rarely tangential discontinuities (TDs) based on the technique described by Smith. Only TD-associated current sheets (TCSs) are found to be accompanied with strong local heating of the solar wind plasma. Statistical results show that the TCSs have a distinct tendency to be associated with local enhancements of the proton temperature, density, and plasma beta, and a local decrease of magnetic field magnitude. Conversely, for RDs, our statistical results do not reveal convincing heating effects. These results confirm the notion that dissipation of solar wind turbulence can take place in intermittent or locally isolated small-scale regions which correspond to TCSs. The possibility of heating associated with RDs is discussed.

  4. Discriminating solar and antisolar differential rotation in high-precision light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhold, Timo; Arlt, Rainer

    2015-04-01

    Context. Surface differential rotation (DR) is one major ingredient of the magnetic field generation process in the Sun and likely in other stars. The term solar-like differential rotation describes the observation that solar equatorial regions rotate faster than polar ones. The opposite effect of polar regions rotating faster than equatorial ones (termed as antisolar DR) has only been observed in a few stars, although there is evidence from theoretical dynamo models. Aims: We present a new method of detecting the sign of DR (i.e., solar-like or antisolar DR) by analyzing long-term high-precision light curves with the Lomb-Scargle periodogram. Methods: We compute the Lomb-Scargle periodogram and identify a set of significant periods Pk, which we associate with active regions located at different latitudes on the stellar surface. If detectable, the first harmonics (P_k') of these periods were identified to compute their peak-height-ratios rk:= h(P'k)/h(Pk) . Spots rotating at lower latitudes generate less sine-shaped light curves, which requires additional power in the harmonics, and results in larger ratios rk. Comparing different ratios rk and the associated periods Pk yields information about the spot latitudes, and reveals the sign of DR. Results: We tested our method on different sets of synthetic light curves all exhibiting solar-like DR. The number of cases where our method detects antisolar DR is the false-positive rate of our method. Depending on the set of light curves, the noise level, the required minimum peak separation, and the presence or absence of spot evolution, our method fails to detect the correct sign in at most 20%. We applied our method to 50 Kepler G stars and found 21-34 stars with solar-like DR and 5-10 stars with antisolar DR, depending on the minimum peak separation. Conclusions: The method is able to determine the sign of DR in a statistical way with a low false-positive rate. Applying our method to real data might suggest that - within

  5. Relationship Between Sunspot Rotation and a Major Solar Eruption on 12 July 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Ying D.; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Cheng, Xin; Hu, Huidong; Yang, Zhongwei

    2016-04-01

    We present an analysis of Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observations of an X1.4 class flare on 12 July 2012 (SOL2012-07-12T15:37L082C105), which was associated with a pronounced sunspot rotation in the associated active region. Based on the magnetograms taken with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on the SDO, we measured the rotational speed of the sunspot. We also used a technique, called the differential affine velocity estimator for vector magnetograms (DAVE4VM), to determine the horizontal velocities and the magnetic helicity flux transport. The helicity flux rate due to shearing motion changed sign after the onset of the eruption. A high correlation between the sunspot rotation speed and the change in the total accumulated helicity was found. We also calculated the net fluxes of the respective magnetic polarities and the net vertical currents. The net current in the region of interest showed a synchronous change with the sunspot rotation rate. The magnetic configurations of the sigmoid filament in the active region and the associated possible interaction between different structures were further investigated by means of a nonlinear force-free field extrapolation. We identified a possible magnetic reconnection region from the three-dimensional magnetic fields and its association with EUV structures. These results suggest that the major eruption of this active region was connected with the sunspot rotation.

  6. The transverse and rotational motions of magnetohydrodynamic kink waves in the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Goossens, M.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Soler, R.; Terradas, J.; Verth, G.

    2014-06-10

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink waves have now been observed to be ubiquitous throughout the solar atmosphere. With modern instruments, they have now been detected in the chromosphere, interface region, and corona. The key purpose of this paper is to show that kink waves do not only involve purely transverse motions of solar magnetic flux tubes, but the velocity field is a spatially and temporally varying sum of both transverse and rotational motion. Taking this fact into account is particularly important for the accurate interpretation of varying Doppler velocity profiles across oscillating structures such as spicules. It has now been shown that, as well as bulk transverse motions, spicules have omnipresent rotational motions. Here we emphasize that caution should be used before interpreting the particular MHD wave mode/s responsible for these rotational motions. The rotational motions are not necessarily signatures of the classic axisymmetric torsional Alfvén wave alone, because kink motion itself can also contribute substantially to varying Doppler velocity profiles observed across these structures. In this paper, the displacement field of the kink wave is demonstrated to be a sum of its transverse and rotational components, both for a flux tube with a discontinuous density profile at its boundary, and one with a more realistic density continuum between the internal and external plasma. Furthermore, the Doppler velocity profile of the kink wave is forward modeled to demonstrate that, depending on the line of sight, it can either be quite distinct or very similar to that expected from a torsional Alfvén wave.

  7. Anti-solar differential rotation on the active sub-giant HU Virginis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunyan, G.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Künstler, A.; Carroll, T. A.; Weber, M.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Measuring surface differential rotation (DR) on different types of stars is important when characterizing the underlying stellar dynamo. It has been suggested that anti-solar DR laws can occur when strong meridional flows exist. Aims: We aim to investigate the differential surface rotation on the primary star of the RS CVn binary, HU Vir, by tracking its starspot distribution as a function of time. We also aim to recompute and update the values for several system parameters of the triple system HU Vir (close and wide orbits). Methods: Time-series high-resolution spectroscopy for four continuous months was obtained with the 1.2-m robotic STELLA telescope. Nine consecutive Doppler images were reconstructed from these data, using our line-profile inversion code iMap. An image cross-correlation method was applied to derive the surface differential-rotation law for HU Vir. New orbital elements for the close and the wide orbits were computed using our new STELLA radial velocities (RVs) combined with the RV data available in the literature. Photometric observations were performed with the Amadeus Automatic Photoelectric Telescope (APT), providing contemporaneous Johnson-Cousins V and I data for approximately 20 yrs. This data was used to determine the stellar rotation period and the active longitudes. Results: We confirm anti-solar DR with a surface shear parameter α of -0.029 ± 0.005 and -0.026 ± 0.009, using single-term and double-term differential rotation laws, respectively. These values are in good agreement with previously claimed results. The best fit is achieved assuming a solar-like double-term law with a lap time of ≈400 d. Our orbital solutions result in a period of 10.387678 ± 0.000003 days for the close orbit and 2726 ± 7 d (≈7.5 yr) for the wide orbit. A Lomb-Scarge (L-S) periodogram of the pre-whitened V-band data reveals a strong single peak providing a rotation period of 10.391 ± 0.008 d, well synchronized to the short orbit. Based on

  8. The power spectrum of the solar wind speed for periods greater than 10 days

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenimore, E. E.; Asbridge, J. R.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Gosling, J. T.

    1978-01-01

    The use of the more than 11 years of solar wind speed data obtained by Vela 2-6 and Imp 6-8 to study the power spectrum of speed variations in the range near the solar rotational frequency is discussed. The broad bands of power near periods of 27 days (corresponding to the rotational period of the sun), 13.5 days, and higher harmonics are characterized, and it is suggested that the described individual peaks in both the solar wind and the geomagnetic spectra are probably not due to differential rotation. The alternate explanation is that the multipeak nature of the power spectra are explained by a wave packet concept in which recurring highspeed streams are described as a series of pulses (separated by a constant period) that last for a varying number of solar rotations.

  9. Comparison of Historical Satellite-Based Estimates of Solar Radiation Resources with Recent Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Measurements: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D. R.

    2009-03-01

    The availability of rotating shadow band radiometer measurement data at several new stations provides an opportunity to compare historical satellite-based estimates of solar resources with measurements. We compare mean monthly daily total (MMDT) solar radiation data from eight years of NSRDB and 22 years of NASA hourly global horizontal and direct beam solar estimates with measured data from three stations, collected after the end of the available resource estimates.

  10. ON THE ROLE OF ROTATING SUNSPOTS IN THE ACTIVITY OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGION NOAA 11158

    SciTech Connect

    Vemareddy, P.; Ambastha, A.; Maurya, R. A. E-mail: ambastha@prl.res.in

    2012-12-10

    We study the role of rotating sunspots in relation to the evolution of various physical parameters characterizing the non-potentiality of the active region (AR) NOAA 11158 and its eruptive events using the magnetic field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and multi-wavelength observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. From the evolutionary study of HMI intensity and AIA channels, it is observed that the AR consists of two major rotating sunspots, one connected to a flare-prone region and another with coronal mass ejection (CME). The constructed space-time intensity maps reveal that the sunspots exhibited peak rotation rates coinciding with the occurrence of major eruptive events. Further, temporal profiles of twist parameters, namely, average shear angle, {alpha}{sub av}, {alpha}{sub best}, derived from HMI vector magnetograms, and the rate of helicity injection, obtained from the horizontal flux motions of HMI line-of-sight magnetograms, correspond well with the rotational profile of the sunspot in the CME-prone region, giving predominant evidence of rotational motion causing magnetic non-potentiality. Moreover, the mean value of free energy from the virial theorem calculated at the photospheric level shows a clear step-down decrease at the onset time of the flares revealing unambiguous evidence of energy release intermittently that is stored by flux emergence and/or motions in pre-flare phases. Additionally, distribution of helicity injection is homogeneous in the CME-prone region while in the flare-prone region it is not and often changes sign. This study provides a clear picture that both proper and rotational motions of the observed fluxes played significant roles in enhancing the magnetic non-potentiality of the AR by injecting helicity, twisting the magnetic fields and thereby increasing the free energy, leading to favorable conditions for the observed transient activity.

  11. A simulation of convective dynamo in the solar convective envelope: Maintenance of the solar-like differential rotation and emerging flux

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Yuhong; Fang, Fang

    2014-07-01

    We report the results of a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of a convective dynamo in a model solar convective envelope driven by the solar radiative diffusive heat flux. The convective dynamo produces a large-scale mean magnetic field that exhibits irregular cyclic behavior with oscillation time scales ranging from about 5 to 15 yr and undergoes irregular polarity reversals. The mean axisymmetric toroidal magnetic field is of opposite signs in the two hemispheres and is concentrated at the bottom of the convection zone. The presence of the magnetic fields is found to play an important role in the self-consistent maintenance of a solar-like differential rotation in the convective dynamo model. Without the magnetic fields, the convective flows drive a differential rotation with a faster rotating polar region. In the midst of magneto-convection, we found the emergence of strong super-equipartition flux bundles at the surface, exhibiting properties that are similar to emerging solar active regions.

  12. Measuring the Solar Magnetic Field with STEREO A Radio Transmissions: Faraday Rotation Observations using the 100m Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobelski, A.; Jensen, E.; Wexler, D.; Heiles, C.; Kepley, A.; Kuiper, T.; Bisi, M.

    2016-04-01

    The STEREO mission spacecraft recently passed through superior conjunction, providing an opportunity to probe the solar corona using radio transmissions. Strong magnetic field and dense plasma environment induce Faraday rotation of the linearly polarized fraction of the spacecraft radio carrier signal. Variations in the Faraday rotation signify changes in magnetic field components and plasma parameters, and thus can be used to gain understanding processes of the quiescent sun as well as active outbursts including coronal mass ejections. Our 2015 observing campaign resulted in a series of measurements over several months with the 100m Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to investigate the coronal Faraday rotation at various radial distances. These observations reveal notable fluctuations in the Faraday rotation of the signal in the deep corona, and should yield unique insights into coronal magnetohydrodynamics down to a 1.5 solar radius line-of-sight solar elongation.

  13. A torsional oscillation in the rotation of the solar magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snodgrass, Herschel B.

    1991-12-01

    The pattern rotation rate for the sun's magnetic field, determined by cross-correlating Mount Wilson full disk 5250.2 (Fe I) magnetograms spaced a full solar rotation apart, closely parallels at all latitudes the photospheric plasma rotation profile determined from the Doppler shifts of the same spectral line. When an 11-yr running mean is subtracted, a torsional oscillation is revealed, in the form of an equatorward-migrating pattern of fast and slow zones. Although the magnetic rotation torsional pattern is similar enough to its much-studied Doppler counterpart to provide confirmation, there are significant differences between the two - the magnetic pattern is strongest (about 20 m/s) at high latitudes, weakens at sunspot latitudes where the Doppler pattern is strongest, and is offset at all latitudes by about 10 deg toward the equator, so that its slow zones approximately coincide with the maximal shear zones of the Doppler pattern. These zones appear to be fore-runners to the wings of the magnetic flux (sunspot) butterflies of the activity cycle.

  14. Differential rotation and turbulent convection: A new Reynolds stress model and comparison with solar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Minotti, F. O.; Schilling, O.

    1994-01-01

    In most hydrodynamic cases, the existence of a turbulent flow superimposed on a mean flow is caused by a shear instability in the latter. Boussinesq suggested the first model for the turbulent Reynolds stresses bar-(u(sub i)u(sub j)) in which the mean shear S(sub ij) is the cause (or source) of turbulence represented by the stress bar-(u(sub i)u(sub j)). In the case of solar differential rotation, exactly the reverse physical process occurs: turbulence (which must pre-exist) generates a mean flow which manifests itself in the form of differential rotation. Thus, the Boussinesq model is wholly inadequate because in the solar case, cause and effect are reversed. Since the Boussinesq model is inadequate, one needs an alternative model for the Reynolds stresses. We present a new dynamical model for the Reynolds stresses, convective fluxes, turbulent kinetic energy, and temperature fluctuations. The complete model requires the solution of 11 differential equations. We then introduce a set of simplifying assumptions which reduce the full dynamical model to a set of algebraic Reynolds stress models. We explicitly solve one of these models that entails only one differential equation. The overall agreement with the data is obtained with a model that is neither phenomenological nor one that requires a full numerical simulation, since it is algebraic in nature. The new model can play an important role in understanding the complex physics underlying the interplay between solar differential rotation and convection, as many physical processes can naturally be incorporated into the model.

  15. Sunspot activity, solar wind, Earth's rotation and climate on a decadal time-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mörner, N.-A.

    2003-04-01

    The Spörer, Maunder and Dalton Minima correlate reasonably well with observed periods of cold climate in the years 1440-1460, 1687-1703 and 1808-182. Therefore, a causal connection has been proposed. From the mode of changes in ocean surface circulation in the North Atlantic, two facts are established; viz. (1) that the recorded cold periods in western Europe, primarily, are driven by changes in ocean circulation (interchange of angular momentum between the solid Earth and the hydrosphere), and (2) that all the three periods of cooling represent periods when Earth’s rotation experienced a speeding-up (increased rate of rotation and decreased LOD). Sunspot activity and LOD express a good correlation when plotted against each other. This suggests (or indicates) that variations in the Solar Wind strength affect the Earth’s rate of rotation, which in its turn affects the oceanic and atmospheric circulation. The oceans being the Earth’s greatest store of heat has a vital impact on the redistribution of heat via changes in the ocean surface circulation. The Gulf Stream and the Kurishio Current, both bringing hot equatorial water to middle and high latitudes, have a central role in redistribution of heat and oceanic water masses (controlling the interchange of angular momentum). Similarly, the Humboldt Current play a central role in bringing cold low-latitude water up along the South American coast in ENSO and super-ENSO variability. In conclusion, there seems to be a strong causal chain-relation between sunspot activity, solar wind strength, Earth’s rate of rotation, oceanic surface circulation and regional climatic changes on a decadal time-scale.

  16. Solar system constraints on planetary Coriolis-type effects induced by rotation of distant masses

    SciTech Connect

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2010-08-01

    We phenomenologically put local constraints on the rotation of distant masses by using the planets of the solar system. First, we analytically compute the orbital secular precessions induced on the motion of a test particle about a massive primary by a Coriolis-like force, treated as a small perturbation, in the case of a constant angular velocity vector Ψ directed along a generic direction in space. The semimajor axis a and the eccentricity e of the test particle do not secularly change, contrary to the inclination I, the longitude of the ascending node Ω, the longitude of the pericenter varpi and the mean anomaly M. Then, we compare our prediction for (dot varpi) with the corrections Δdot varpi to the usual perihelion precessions of the inner planets recently estimated by fitting long data sets with different versions of the EPM ephemerides. We obtain as preliminary upper bounds |Ψ{sub z}| ≤ 0.0006−0.013 arcsec cty{sup −1}, |Ψ{sub x}| ≤ 0.1−2.7 arcsec cty{sup −1}, |Ψ{sub y}| ≤ 0.3−2.3 arcsec cty{sup −1}. Interpreted in terms of models of space-time involving cosmic rotation, our results are able to yield constraints on cosmological parameters like the cosmological constant Λ and the Hubble parameter H{sub 0} not too far from their values determined with cosmological observations and, in some cases, several orders of magnitude better than the constraints usually obtained so far from space-time models not involving rotation. In the case of the rotation of the solar system throughout the Galaxy, occurring clockwise about the North Galactic Pole, our results for Ψ{sub z} are in disagreement with the expected value of it at more than 3−σ level. Modeling the Oort cloud as an Einstein-Thirring slowly rotating massive shell inducing Coriolis-type forces inside yields unphysical results for its putative rotation.

  17. ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROSCOPY OF RAPIDLY ROTATING SOLAR-MASS STARS: EMISSION-LINE REDSHIFTS AS A TEST OF THE SOLAR-STELLAR CONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Bushinsky, Rachel; Ayres, Tom; France, Kevin

    2012-07-20

    We compare high-resolution ultraviolet spectra of the Sun and thirteen solar-mass main-sequence stars with different rotational periods that serve as proxies for their different ages and magnetic field structures. In this, the second paper in the series, we study the dependence of ultraviolet emission-line centroid velocities on stellar rotation period, as rotation rates decrease from that of the Pleiades star HII314 (P{sub rot} = 1.47 days) to {alpha} Cen A (P{sub rot} = 28 days). Our stellar sample of F9 V to G5 V stars consists of six stars observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and eight stars observed with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on HST. We find a systematic trend of increasing redshift with more rapid rotation (decreasing rotation period) that is similar to the increase in line redshift between quiet and plage regions on the Sun. The fastest-rotating solar-mass star in our study, HII314, shows significantly enhanced redshifts at all temperatures above log T = 4.6, including the corona, which is very different from the redshift pattern observed in the more slowly rotating stars. This difference in the redshift pattern suggests that a qualitative change in the magnetic-heating process occurs near P{sub rot} = 2 days. We propose that HII314 is an example of a solar-mass star with a magnetic heating rate too large for the physical processes responsible for the redshift pattern to operate in the same way as for the more slowly rotating stars. HII314 may therefore lie above the high activity end of the set of solar-like phenomena that is often called the 'solar-stellar connection'.

  18. Predictions of the solar wind speed by the probability distribution function model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussy-Virat, C. D.; Ridley, A. J.

    2014-06-01

    The near-Earth space environment is strongly driven by the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field. This study presents a model for predicting the solar wind speed up to 5 days in advance. Probability distribution functions (PDFs) were created that relate the current solar wind speed and slope to the future solar wind speed, as well as the solar wind speed to the solar wind speed one solar rotation in the future. It was found that a major limitation of this type of technique is that the solar wind periodicity is close to 27 days but can be from about 22 to 32 days. Further, the optimum lag between two solar rotations can change from day to day, making a prediction of the future solar wind speed based solely on the solar wind speed approximately 27 days ago quite difficult. It was found that using a linear combination of the solar wind speed one solar rotation ago and a prediction of the solar wind speed based on the current speed and slope is optimal. The linear weights change as a function of the prediction horizon, with shorter prediction times putting more weight on the prediction based on the current solar wind speed and the longer prediction times based on an even spread between the two. For all prediction horizons from 8 h up to 120 h, the PDF Model is shown to be better than using the current solar wind speed (i.e., persistence), and better than the Wang-Sheeley-Arge Model for prediction horizons of 24 h.

  19. SME Observations of Solar Ultraviolet Irradiance, October 1981 to April 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottman, G. J.

    2011-12-01

    The primary science objective of the Solar Mesosphere Explorer was to establish the natural relation between solar ultraviolet irradiance and atmospheric ozone. To this end the SME instruments measured both solar spectral irradiance and altitude profiles of ozone from 50 km to 90 km. The Chapman reaction controlling atmospheric ozone production requires solar radiation in the O2 Schumann-Runge and Herzberg bands between 140 nm and 240 nm, and the commensurate ozone destruction involves longer wavelengths in the O3 Hartley band between 230nm and 290nm. The SME solar irradiance spectrometer made daily observations of these relevant spectral bands and extended further down to 115 nm to include Lyman-α. This talk reviews the original SME data and the reported solar variations at both intermediate time scales (especially 27-day variations related to solar rotation) and over the 11-year solar cycle. Recent reprocessing the SME solar data are providing small but important improvements to the data set.

  20. Fourth order expansions of the luni-solar gravity perturbations along rotating axes for trajectory optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kéchichian, Jean A.

    2011-09-01

    A fourth order extension of the analytic form of the accelerations due to the luni-solar gravity perturbations along rotating axes is presented. These derivations are carried out in order to increase the accuracy of the dynamic modeling of perturbed optimal low-thrust transfers between general elliptic orbits, and enhance the fidelity of trajectory optimization software used in simulations and mission analyses. A set of rotating axes attached to the thrusting spacecraft is used such that both the thrust and perturbation accelerations due to Earth's geopotential and the luni-solar gravity are mathematically resolved along these axes prior to numerical integration of the actual trajectory. This Gaussian form of the state as well as the adjoint differential equations form a set of equations that are readily integrated and an iterative process is used to achieve convergence to a desired transfer. This analysis further reveals that further extensions to higher orders, say to the fifth order and beyond, are not needed to extract even more accuracy in the solutions because the minimum-time transfer solutions become fully stabilized in the sense that they do not exhibit any differences beyond a fraction of a second, or at most a few seconds even in the more extreme cases of very large orbits with apogee heights around 100,000 km with strong lunar influence.

  1. Joint Instability of Differential Rotation and Toroidal Magnetic Fields below the Solar Convection Zone, II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, P. A.; Fox, P.

    1997-05-01

    At the 1996 AAS/SPD meeting in Madison we reported first results for the joint instability of differential rotation and toroidal magnetic fields to 2D disturbances (see also Gilman and Fox, Paper I, July 20 1997 issue of ApJ). This analysis was for the toroidal field profile B=a*sin(LAT)cos(LAT). This paper reports results for the profile B=(a*sin(LAT)+b*(sin(LAT))(3) ))cos(LAT), which, with b<-a<0, allows for a node in the toroidal field at latitude arcsin (-a/b). This generalization is of interest because we should expect such a node to appear and migrate equatorward as the sun proceeds from one sunspot cycle to the next. As with the simpler profile, instability occurs for virtually all differential rotation amplitudes, and all toroidal field amplitudes and shapes, and remains confined to disturbances with longitudinal wave number m=1. For a, b>0, the instability is enhanced for the same a compared to the b=0 case, particularly in high latitudes. For 0>b>-a (so no node is present) the instability is similar to the b=0 case but with diminished growth rates, due to the reduction of toroidal fields at high latitudes. At b=-a, the symmetric mode of instability vanishes, but the antisymmetric mode remains. For b<-a<0, both symmetric and antisymmetric modes are unstable, but with disturbances confined largely to the domain poleward of the node, unless the toroidal field energy greatly exceeds the kinetic energy of differential rotation. Unstable disturbances spread and migrate toward the equator as the field strength is increased and as the node is moved equatorward. Thus, the instability may still contribute to the existence of the solar butterfly diagram, and to other solar dynamo presses.

  2. An Investigation of the Sources of Earth-directed Solar Wind during Carrington Rotation 2053

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazakerley, A. N.; Harra, L. K.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we analyze multiple sources of solar wind through a full Carrington Rotation (CR 2053) by analyzing the solar data through spectroscopic observations of the plasma upflow regions and the in situ data of the wind itself. Following earlier authors, we link solar and in situ observations by a combination of ballistic backmapping and potential-field source-surface modeling. We find three sources of fast solar wind that are low-latitude coronal holes. The coronal holes do not produce a steady fast wind, but rather a wind with rapid fluctuations. The coronal spectroscopic data from Hinode’s Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer show a mixture of upflow and downflow regions highlighting the complexity of the coronal hole, with the upflows being dominant. There is a mix of open and multi-scale closed magnetic fields in this region whose (interchange) reconnections are consistent with the up- and downflows they generate being viewed through an optically thin corona, and with the strahl directions and freeze-in temperatures found in in situ data. At the boundary of slow and fast wind streams there are three short periods of enhanced-velocity solar wind, which we term intermediate based on their in situ characteristics. These are related to active regions that are located beside coronal holes. The active regions have different magnetic configurations, from bipolar through tripolar to quadrupolar, and we discuss the mechanisms to produce this intermediate wind, and the important role that the open field of coronal holes adjacent to closed-field active regions plays in the process.

  3. CORONAL FARADAY ROTATION FLUCTUATIONS AND A WAVE/TURBULENCE-DRIVEN MODEL OF THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Hollweg, Joseph V.; Cranmer, Steven R.; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. E-mail: scranmer@cfa.harvard.ed

    2010-10-20

    Some recent models for coronal heating and the origin of the solar wind postulate that the source of energy and momentum consists of Alfven waves of solar origin dissipating via MHD turbulence. We use one of these models to predict the level of Faraday rotation fluctuations (FRFs) that should be imposed on radio signals passing through the corona. This model has the virtue of specifying the correlation length of the turbulence, knowledge of which is essential for calculating the FRFs; previous comparisons of observed FRFs with models suffered from the fact that the correlation length had to be guessed. We compare the predictions with measurements of FRFs obtained by the Helios radio experiment during occultations in 1975 through 1977, close to solar minimum. We show that only a small fraction of the FRFs are produced by density fluctuations; the bulk of the FRFs must be produced by coronal magnetic field fluctuations. The observed FRFs have periods of hours, suggesting that they are related to Alfven waves which are observed in situ by spacecraft throughout the solar wind; other evidence also suggests that the FRFs are due to coronal Alfven waves. We choose a model field line in an equatorial streamer which has background electron concentrations that match those inferred from the Helios occultation data. The predicted FRFs are found to agree very well with the Helios data. If the FRFs are in fact produced by Alfven waves with the assumed correlation length, our analysis leads us to conclude that wave-turbulence models should continue to be pursued with vigor. But since we cannot prove that the FRFs are produced by Alfven waves, we state the more conservative conclusion, still subject to the correctness of the assumed correlation length, that the corona contains long-period magnetic fluctuations with sufficient energy to heat the corona and drive the solar wind.

  4. GONG Observations of Solar Surface Flows

    PubMed

    Hathaway; Gilman; Harvey; Hill; Howard; Jones; Kasher; Leibacher; Pintar; Simon

    1996-05-31

    Doppler velocity observations obtained by the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) instruments directly measure the nearly steady flows in the solar photosphere. The sun's differential rotation is accurately determined from single observations. The rotation profile with respect to latitude agrees well with previous measures, but it also shows a slight north-south asymmetry. Rotation profiles averaged over 27-day rotations of the sun reveal the torsional oscillation signal-weak, jetlike features, with amplitudes of 5 meters per second, that are associated with the sunspot latitude activity belts. A meridional circulation with a poleward flow of about 20 meters per second is also evident. Several characteristics of the surface flows suggest the presence of large convection cells. PMID:8662460

  5. A dissipative model of solar system and stability of stationary rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilke, V. G.

    2009-04-01

    In classical model of Solar system the planets are represented by the material points cooperating under the law of universal gravitation. This model remains fair if planet to consider as absolutely rigid spheres with spherical distribution of density. The gravitational potential of such body coincides with potential of a material point, and rotation of each sphere concerning his centre of mass occurs to constant angular velocity. The motion of the centers of mass of spherical planets identically to motion in the appropriate problem of points. Let's notice, that forms of planets of Solar system are close to spherical as dominant forces at formation of planets are gravitational forces to which forces of molecular interaction in substance of a planet counteract. The model of the isolated Solar system submitted in a not indignant condition by homogeneous viscoelastic spheres is considered. Under action of own rotation and tidal gravitational forces the spherical planet changes the shape: there is "flattening" of a planet in a direction of a vector of its angular velocity and formation of tidal bulgs on the lines connecting the centre of a planet with the centers of other planets. From a variational principle of Hamilton the full system of the equations describing movements of the centers of mass of planets, rotations of systems of coordinates, by integrated image connected with planets, and deformations of planets be relative these of systems of coordinates has been obtained. It is supposed, that tidal gravitational, centrifugal and elastic forces result in small change of the spherical form of a planet. In system there are small parameters - inversely proportional of the Young modules of materials of the planets, providing small deformations of planets at influence on them of the centrifugal forces produced by own rotation of planets, and the small tidal deformations arising under influence of gradients of gravitational forces. The method of division of movements

  6. Rotational periodicities in sunspot relative numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balthasar, H.

    2007-08-01

    Context: The search for active longitudes on the Sun has a long history, and many controversial results have been published. Recently the question became more important when active longitudes were found on other stars. Aims: The aim of this paper is to investigate an integral measure of solar activity available for a long time interval and which allows enough frequency resolution for the investigation of active longitudes. Such a measure is given by the daily sunspot relative numbers. Methods: A search for periodicities is performed with a classical Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), with a wavelet analysis and with the tool of superimposed epochs. Results: The FFT yields a hump of power peaks near the synodic rotation period of 27 days, but only a very weak and insignificant enhancement around 13.5 days, indicating that the mean rotational variation of the sunspot numbers typically has one maximum and one minimum (overlaid by minor fluctuations). The wavelet analysis shows that spectral power for single periods varies for certain time intervals. A systematic drift during the solar activity cycle is not detected. Similar results are obtained from the superimposed epochs. Periodic “flip-flops” with time scales of a few years as for some stars are not found for the Sun in this investigation. Conclusions: Sunspots are not distributed equally over the longitudes; there is a more active and a less active hemisphere. The rotation period derived from the pattern varies over long time scales. The results found in this work are not in favor of an explanation of the variations due to a differential rotation law. The rotation of the sunspot distribution pattern might reflect the internal rotation of the Sun, but it better fits the range of highest rotation rates in the upper convection zone than the rotation near the tachocline. Figure [see full text] is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. Origin of Axial Spin and Orbital Rotation of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, A.; Criss, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    We explain the nearly circular, co-planar orbits and mostly upright axial spins of the planets with a radical, new accretion model. These common and fundamental rotational characteristics record conditions of origin. The Figure below shows that current planetary spin (triangles) and orbital (circles) rotational energies (R.E.) of each planet nearly equal and linearly depend on its gravitational self-potential of formation (Ug). We derive a formula for dissipation of the Sun's spin via photons carrying off angular momentum (radiative braking): for constant luminosity, the primordal Sun (square) lies at the apex of the planetary trends. Total planetary R.E. (grey diamond) lies on the 1:1 line if Jupiter, lost 97% of its spin, like the Earth (open triangle, calculated for a 4 hr primordal day). Hence, the Sun and planets formed contemporaneously and accretion provided little heat. Data on satellite systems provides corroboration. Accretion converted Ug of the 3-dimensional pre-solar nebula to R.E., because (1) the negative sign of Ug forbids conversion exclusively to heat, (2) planetary nebulae are too rarified to produce heat until solid bodies are essentially formed, and (3) configurational energy and PV terms are small compared to Ug. We derive the conversion (-ΔUg~=ΔR.E) from ideal gas behavior, appropriate for low nebula density. From -ΔUg~=ΔR.E, the time-dependent virial theorem, conservation of angular momemtum, and measured masses and other characteristics, we derive a quantitative model which (1) deduces mechanisms, (2) quantifies the time-dependence in converting a 3-d cloud to the present 2-d Solar System, and (3) calculates the evolution of dust and gas densities. Rocky kernels assembled first and rapidly from pre-solar dust in a nebula with nearly uniform density via almost vertical collapse of dust, but not gas, to a disk, verified by stability criteria. Gas giants formed at great distance where rocky kernels out-competes the pull of the central, co

  8. First identification of pure rotation lines of NH in the infrared solar spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, M.; Farmer, C. B.; Norton, R. H.; Sauval, A. J.; Grevesse, N.

    1991-01-01

    Pure rotation lines of NH of the v = 0 level and v = 1 level are detected in high-resolution solar spectra obtained from the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experimental observations. It is pointed out that the identification of the lines is favored by the typical appearance of the triplet lines of nearly equal intensities. The observed equivalent widths of these triplet lines are compared with predicted intensities, and it is observed that these widths are systematically larger than the predicted values. It is noted that because these very faint lines are observed in a region where the signal is very low, a systematic error in the measurements of the equivalent widths cannot be ruled out; therefore, the disagreement between the observed and predicted intensities is not considered to be real.

  9. Differential rotation in a solar-driven quasi-axisymmetric circulation. [of planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.; Chan, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    The concept of a quasi-axisymmetric circulation is used to explore the global scale dynamics of planetary atmospheres. A numerical circulation model applicable to Jupiter is presented, and an analytical study is performed elucidating the conditions leading to differential rotation in an atmosphere which is convectively unstable. A linear system forced by solar differential heating is considered, with nonlinear effects arising from advection being represented in the form of eddy diffusion. An empirical, latitudinal spectrum of the observed zonal wind field on Jupiter is discussed. Numerical solutions are presented which reveal banded wind fields with alternating and equatorial zonal jets and a multicellular Ferrel-Thomson meridional circulation consistent with the observed cloud striations on Jupiter. The vertical derivatives are parameterized to construct a simplified one-layer model.

  10. Photospheric subrotations, differential rotation and zonal wind bands - A reverse pirouette

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.; Mayr, H. G.; Levine, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    It is noted that on the sun the core is assumed to be rotating with a period of about 12 days while the overlying 'mantle' convection zone has a solid body component of about 27 days. It is proposed that this phenomenon could simply be understood as a 'reverse pirouette'. It is noted that while previously proposed models provide solutions of valid equations and computer analyses, they lack a simple physical picture to explain the phenomenon. In the model proposed here, the solar oblateness is conventionally providing added heat input at the poles. The result is the large scale transport of material toward the equator, causing subrotation. The model is thus seen as facilitating an understanding of the formation of a slowly rotating convection zone above the more rapidly rotating core. The latitudinal photospheric differential rotation is interpreted as a 'second order' effect associated with the horizontal transport of momentum.

  11. Helioseismic Observations of the Structure and Dynamics of a Rotating Sunspot Beneath the Solar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Junwei; Kosovichev, Alexander G.

    2003-01-01

    Time-distance helioseismology is applied to study the subphotospheric structures and dynamics of an unusually fast-rotating sunspot observed by the Michelson Doppler Imager on bead SOH0 in 2000 August. The subsurface sound speed structures and velocity fields are obtained for the sunspot region at different depths from 0 to 12 Mm. By comparing the subsurface sound speed variations with the surface magnetic field, we find evidence for structural twists beneath the visible surface of this active region, which may indicate that magnetic twists often seen at the photosphere also exist beneath the photosphere. We also report on the observation of subsurface horizontal vortical flows that extend to a depth of 5 Mm around this rotating sunspot and present evidence that opposite vortical flows may exist below 9 Mm. It is suggested that the vortical flows around this active region may build up a significant amount of magnetic helicity and energy to power solar eruptions. Monte Carlo simulation has been performed to estimate the error propagation, and in addition the sunspot umbra is masked to test the reliability of our inversion results. On the basis of the three-dimensional velocity fields obtained from the time-distance helioseismology inversions, we estimate the subsurface kinetic helicity at different depths for the first time and conclude that it is comparable to the current helicity estimated from vector magnetograms.

  12. ROTATING MOTIONS AND MODELING OF THE ERUPTING SOLAR POLAR-CROWN PROMINENCE ON 2010 DECEMBER 6

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Yingna; Van Ballegooijen, Adriaan

    2013-02-10

    A large polar-crown prominence composed of different segments spanning nearly the entire solar disk erupted on 2010 December 6. Prior to the eruption, the filament in the active region part split into two layers: a lower layer and an elevated layer. The eruption occurs in several episodes. Around 14:12 UT, the lower layer of the active region filament breaks apart: One part ejects toward the west, while the other part ejects toward the east, which leads to the explosive eruption of the eastern quiescent filament. During the early rise phase, part of the quiescent filament sheet displays strong rolling motion (observed by STEREO-B) in the clockwise direction (viewed from east to west) around the filament axis. This rolling motion appears to start from the border of the active region, then propagates toward the east. The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) observes another type of rotating motion: In some other parts of the erupting quiescent prominence, the vertical threads turn horizontal, then turn upside down. The elevated active region filament does not erupt until 18:00 UT, when the erupting quiescent filament has already reached a very large height. We develop two simplified three-dimensional models that qualitatively reproduce the observed rolling and rotating motions. The prominence in the models is assumed to consist of a collection of discrete blobs that are tied to particular field lines of a helical flux rope. The observed rolling motion is reproduced by continuous twist injection into the flux rope in Model 1 from the active region side. Asymmetric reconnection induced by the asymmetric distribution of the magnetic fields on the two sides of the filament may cause the observed rolling motion. The rotating motion of the prominence threads observed by AIA is consistent with the removal of the field line dips in Model 2 from the top down during the eruption.

  13. Spectral irradiance variations: comparison between observations and the SATIRE model on solar rotation time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, Y. C.; Krivova, N. A.; Solanki, S. K.; Harder, J. W.; Kopp, G.

    2008-07-01

    Aims: We test the reliability of the observed and calculated spectral irradiance variations between 200 and 1600 nm over a time span of three solar rotations in 2004. Methods: We compare our model calculations to spectral irradiance observations taken with SORCE/SIM, SoHO/VIRGO, and UARS/SUSIM. The calculations assume LTE and are based on the SATIRE (Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction) model. We analyse the variability as a function of wavelength and present time series in a number of selected wavelength regions covering the UV to the NIR. We also show the facular and spot contributions to the total calculated variability. Results: In most wavelength regions, the variability agrees well between all sets of observations and the model calculations. The model does particularly well between 400 and 1300 nm, but fails below 220 nm, as well as for some of the strong NUV lines. Our calculations clearly show the shift from faculae-dominated variability in the NUV to spot-dominated variability above approximately 400 nm. We also discuss some of the remaining problems, such as the low sensitivity of SUSIM and SORCE for wavelengths between approximately 310 and 350 nm, where currently the model calculations still provide the best estimates of solar variability.

  14. Determination of parameters of rotational motion of the Monitor-E spacecraft from the telemetry data on solar batteries' current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, A. A.; Sazonov, V. V.

    2009-10-01

    The Monitor-E spacecraft executed uncontrolled flight due to emergency situation, no telemetry information on parameters of the spacecraft’s attitude motion being available. So, the problem arose to determine the spacecraft’s rotational motion from the accessible indirect information—the electric current provided by solar batteries. In this paper the integrated statistical technique is described, that allows one to solve this problem. The values of current, obtained over the time interval some tens of minutes long, have been processed simultaneously by the least squares method using the integration of the equations of spacecraft’s rotational motion. As a result of processing, the initial conditions of motion were estimated, and the spacecraft’s moments of inertia were updated, as well as the angles, specifying solar batteries position in the spacecraft-fixed coordinate system. The results of processing of 12 data sets are presented, which allowed us to reconstruct the actual rotational motion of the spacecraft.

  15. Faraday Rotation Fluctuations of MESSENGER radio signals through the Corona during the 2009 Solar Minimum.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wexler, David; Vierinen, Juha; Coster, Anthea; Jensen, Elizabeth A.

    2015-04-01

    Faraday rotation (FR) techniques have been used to probe variations of coronal plasma velocity, density and magnetic field. The plane of polarization for an electromagnetic wave rotates in proportion to the integrated product of parallel magnetic field components and electron density along the radio signal line-of-sight as directed towards the receiving antenna. Fluctuations in FR through the corona thus represent the evolution of these line-integrated plasma parameters, providing a unique measurement of regional corona physics. The MESSENGER spacecraft radio 8 GHz radio beacon, transmitting through the corona at offsets 1.6 to 1.9 solar radii and near-equatorial heliolatitude, was recorded on the Green Bank radio telescope during the solar minimum of 2009. Here we reanalyze at higher temporal resolution the data previously published (Jensen et al 2013, Solar Physics 285:83-95). Combinations of coherent and incoherent integration were used to estimate Stokes parameters, from which the FR phase differences were obtained for serial one-second frames. Results were concatenated and corrected for phase wrap-around to produce a continuous FR phase curve. The general FR phase curve was broad and sweeping, with greatest spectral power observed in periods of hours. Also, finer wave-like fluctuations were noted with periods on the order of 100's of seconds. With the lowest-frequency components removed by detrending techniques, spectral analysis revealed a power spectrum of form P=kνα with spectral index α = -2.25 over frequencies ν = 2-20 milliHertz (mHz), and a flat noise spectrum at higher frequencies. Imposed upon the general power spectrum were trends of enhanced spectral power around 3.5 and 6 mHz, corresponding to approximately 5- and 3-minute period waves. Temporal evolution plots demonstrated that the increased power in these spectral bands appeared intermittently and irregularly. Our results reinforce the findings of prior coronal FR studies, and now extend the

  16. Periodicity of the solar full-disk magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, N. B.; Qu, Z. N.; Zhai, Q.

    2014-07-01

    A full-disk solar magnetogram has been measured each day since 1970 January 19, and the daily Magnetic Plage Strength Index (MPSI) and the daily Mount Wilson Sunspot Index (MWSI) were calculated for each magnetogram at the Mount Wilson Observatory. The MPSI and MWSI are used to investigate the periodicity of the solar full-disk magnetic activity through autocorrelation analyses. Just two periods, the solar cycle and the rotation cycle, are determined in both the MPSI (the solar full-disk weak magnetic field activity) and MWSI (the solar full-disk strong magnetic field activity) with no annual signal found. The solar cycle for MPSI (10.83 yr) is found to be obviously longer than that for MWSI (9.77 yr). The rotation cycle is determined to be 26.8 ± 0.63 sidereal days for MPSI and 27.4 ± 2.4 sidereal days for MWSI. The rotation cycle length for MPSI is found to fluctuate around 27 days within a very small amplitude, but for MWSI it obviously temporally varies with a rather large amplitude. The rotation cycle for MWSI seems longer near solar minimum than at solar maximum. Cross-correlation analyses of daily MPSI and MWSI are carried out, and it is inferred that the MPSI components partly come from relatively early MWSI measurements.

  17. Periodicity of the Solar Full-disk Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, N. B.; Qu, Z. N.; Zhai, Q.

    2014-07-01

    A full-disk solar magnetogram has been measured each day since 1970 January 19, and the daily Magnetic Plage Strength Index (MPSI) and the daily Mount Wilson Sunspot Index (MWSI) were calculated for each magnetogram at the Mount Wilson Observatory. The MPSI and MWSI are used to investigate the periodicity of the solar full-disk magnetic activity through autocorrelation analyses. Just two periods, the solar cycle and the rotation cycle, are determined in both the MPSI (the solar full-disk weak magnetic field activity) and MWSI (the solar full-disk strong magnetic field activity) with no annual signal found. The solar cycle for MPSI (10.83 yr) is found to be obviously longer than that for MWSI (9.77 yr). The rotation cycle is determined to be 26.8 ± 0.63 sidereal days for MPSI and 27.4 ± 2.4 sidereal days for MWSI. The rotation cycle length for MPSI is found to fluctuate around 27 days within a very small amplitude, but for MWSI it obviously temporally varies with a rather large amplitude. The rotation cycle for MWSI seems longer near solar minimum than at solar maximum. Cross-correlation analyses of daily MPSI and MWSI are carried out, and it is inferred that the MPSI components partly come from relatively early MWSI measurements.

  18. Behavior of Li abundances in solar-analog stars. II. Evidence of the connection with rotation and stellar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Y.; Honda, S.; Kawanomoto, S.; Ando, H.; Sakurai, T.

    2010-06-01

    Context. We previously attempted to ascertain why the Li i 6708 line-strengths of Sun-like stars differ so significantly despite the superficial similarities of stellar parameters. We carried out a comprehensive analysis of 118 solar analogs and reported that a close connection exists between the Li abundance (ALi) and the line-broadening width (vr+m; mainly contributed by rotational effect), which led us to conclude that stellar rotation may be the primary control of the surface Li content. Aims: To examine our claim in more detail, we study whether the degree of stellar activity exhibits a similar correlation with the Li abundance, which is expected because of the widely believed close connection between rotation and activity. Methods: We measured the residual flux at the line center of the strong Ca ii 8542 line, r0(8542), known to be a useful index of stellar activity, for all sample stars using newly acquired spectra in this near-IR region. The projected rotational velocity (ve sin i) was estimated by subtracting the macroturbulence contribution from vr+m that we had already established. Results: A remarkable (positive) correlation was found in the ALi versus (vs.) r0(8542) diagram as well as in both the r0(8542) vs. ve sin i and ALi vs. ve sin i diagrams, as had been expected. With the confirmation of rotation-dependent stellar activity, this clearly shows that the surface Li abundances of these solar analogs progressively decrease as the rotation rate decreases. Conclusions: Given this observational evidence, we conclude that the depletion of surface Li in solar-type stars, probably caused by effective envelope mixing, operates more efficiently as stellar rotation decelerates. It may be promising to attribute the low-Li tendency of planet-host G dwarfs to their different nature in the stellar angular momentum. Based on observations carried out at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory (Okayama, Japan).

  19. The evolution of rotating stars. I - Method and exploratory calculations for a 7-solar-mass star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endal, A. S.; Sofia, S.

    1976-01-01

    A method is developed which allows the evolution of rotating stars to be studied well beyond the main-sequence stage. Four different cases of redistribution of angular momentum in an evolving star are considered. Evolutionary sequences for a 7-solar-mass star, rotating according to these different cases, were computed from the zero-age main-sequence to the double-shell-source stage. Each sequence was begun with a (typical) equatorial rotational velocity of 210 km/s. On the main sequence, the effects of rotation are of minor importance. However, as the core contracts during later stages, important effects arise in all physically plausible cases. The outer regions of the cores approach critical velocities and develop unstable angular-velocity distributions. The effects of these instabilities should significantly alter the subsequent evolution.

  20. Evaluation of N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide (NBBS) Neurotoxicity in Sprague-Dawley Male Rats Following 27-day Oral Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Rider, CV; Janardhan, KS; Rao, D; Morrison, JP; McPherson, CA; Harry, GJ

    2012-01-01

    N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide (NBBS) is widely used as a plasticizer in polyacetals, polyamides, and polycarbonates and has been found in ground water and effluent from wastewater treatment sites. The compound is lipophilic and distributes rapidly to the brain but also clears rapidly and shows little evidence of accumulation. Limited studies in the literature report neurotoxicity of NBBS in rabbits and rats. Adult Sprague-Dawley male rats (Harlan) received corn oil vehicle or NBBS (100, 200, or 400 mg/kg/d) via oral gavage (5 ml/kg bwt) daily/5 days/week for 27 days. Deaths were observed in the 400 mg/kg/d dose group in the first 5 days and dosing was decreased to 300 mg/kg/d. No alterations were observed in gait, locomotor activity, and rearing behavior. No histological lesions were observed in the testis, seminal vesicles, coagulating gland, epididymis, and prostate. In the liver, minimal centrilobular hypertrophy was evident in all rats of the high dose group. Contrary to previous reports, there was no evidence of peripheral nerve lesions or gliosis in the hippocampus or cerebellum. mRNA levels for glial fibrillary acidic acid protein, interferon gamma, CXCR-3, intracellular adhesion molecule-1, and CD11b were not altered in the hippocampus while Iba-1 levels were decreased. These data do not support previous reports of neurotoxicity for NBBS within a 4-week exposure regimen; however, neuropathological injury occurring over an extended period of exposure cannot be ruled out and given the potential for human exposure requires further examination. PMID:22824510

  1. Structure and Rotation of the Solar Interior: Initial Results from the MDI Medium-L Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosovichev, A. G.; Schou, J.; Scherrer, P. H.; Bogart, R. S.; Bush, R. I.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Aloise, J.; Bacon, L.; Burnette, A.; DeForest, C.; Giles, P. M.; Leibrand, K.; Nigam, R.; Rubin, M.; Scott, K.; Williams, S. D.; Basu, Sarbani; Christensen-Dalsgaard J.; Daeppen W.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The medium-l program of the Michelson Doppler Imager instrument on board SOHO provides continuous observations of oscillation modes of angular degree, l, from 0 to approximately 300. The data for the program are partly processed on board because only about 3% of MDI observations can be transmitted continuously to the ground. The on-board data processing, the main component of which is Gaussian-weighted binning, has been optimized to reduce the negative influence of spatial aliasing of the high-degree oscillation modes. The data processing is completed in a data analysis pipeline at the SOI Stanford Support Center to determine the mean multiplet frequencies and splitting coefficients. The initial results show that the noise in the medium-l oscillation power spectrum is substantially lower than in ground-based measurements. This enables us to detect lower amplitude modes and, thus, to extend the range of measured mode frequencies. This is important for inferring the Sun's internal structure and rotation. The MDI observations also reveal the asymmetry of oscillation spectral lines. The line asymmetries agree with the theory of mode excitation by acoustic sources localized in the upper convective boundary layer. The sound-speed profile inferred from the mean frequencies gives evidence for a sharp variation at the edge of the energy-generating core. The results also confirm the previous finding by the GONG (Gough et al., 1996) that, in a thin layer just beneath the convection zone, helium appears to be less abundant than predicted by theory. Inverting the multiplet frequency splittings from MDI, we detect significant rotational shear in this thin layer. This layer is likely to be the place where the solar dynamo operates. In order to understand how the Sun works, it is extremely important to observe the evolution of this transition layer throughout the 11-year activity cycle.

  2. From Solar to Stellar Corona: The Role of Wind, Rotation, and Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Réville, Victor; Brun, Allan Sacha; Strugarek, Antoine; Matt, Sean P.; Bouvier, Jérôme; Folsom, Colin P.; Petit, Pascal

    2015-12-01

    Observations of surface magnetic fields are now within reach for many stellar types thanks to the development of Zeeman-Doppler Imaging. These observations are extremely useful for constraining rotational evolution models of stars, as well as for characterizing the generation of the magnetic field. We recently demonstrated that the impact of coronal magnetic field topology on the rotational braking of a star can be parameterized with a scalar parameter: the open magnetic flux. However, without running costly numerical simulations of the stellar wind, reconstructing the coronal structure of the large-scale magnetic field is not trivial. An alternative—broadly used in solar physics—is to extrapolate the surface magnetic field assuming a potential field in the corona, to describe the opening of the field lines by the magnetized wind. This technique relies on the definition of a so-called source surface radius, which is often fixed to the canonical value of 2.5{R}⊙ . However this value likely varies from star to star. To resolve this issue, we use our extended set of 2.5D wind simulations published in 2015 to provide a criterion for the opening of field lines as well as a simple tool to assess the source surface radius and the open magnetic flux. This allows us to derive the magnetic torque applied to the star by the wind from any spectropolarimetric observation. We conclude by discussing some estimations of spin-down timescales made using our technique and compare them to observational requirements.

  3. Surface velocity network with anti-solar differential rotation on the active K-giant σ Geminorum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovári, Zs.; Bartus, J.; Švanda, M.; Vida, K.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Oláh, K.; Forgács-Dajka, E.

    2007-12-01

    We demonstrate the power of the local correlation tracking technique on stellar data for the first time. We recover the spot migration pattern of the long-period RS CVn-type binary σ Gem from a set of six Doppler images from 3.6 consecutive rotation cycles. The resulting surface flow map suggests a weak anti-solar differential rotation with {α≈-0.0022±0.0016}, and a coherent poleward spot migration with an average velocity of 220±10 m s-1. This result agrees with our recent findings from another study and could also be confirmed theoretically.

  4. A 2000 Solar Mass Rotating Molecular Disk Around NGC 6334A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraemer, Kathleen E.; Jackson, James M.; Paglione, A. D.; Bolatto, Alberto D.

    1997-01-01

    We present millimeter and centimeter wave spectroscopic observations of the H II region NGC 6334A. We have mapped the source in several transitions of CO, CS, and NH3. The molecular emission shows a distinct flattened structure in the east-west direction. This structure is probably a thick molecular disk or torus (2.2 x 0.9 pc) responsible for the bipolarity of the near-infrared (NIR) and radio continuum emission which extends in two "lobes" to the north and south of the shell-like H II region. The molecular disk is rotating from west to east (omega approximately equals 2.4 km/s.pc) about an axis approximately parallel to the radio and NIR emission lobes. By assuming virial equilibrium, we find that the molecular disk contains approximately 2000 solar mass. Single-component gas excitation model calculations show that the molecular gas in the disk is warmer and denser (T(sub k) approximately equals 60 K, n approximately equals 3000/cc) than the gas to the north and south (T(sub k) approximately equals 50 K, n approximately equals 400/cc). High resolution (approximately 5 sec) NH3 (3, 3) images of NGC 6334A reveal several small (approximately 0.1 pc) clumps, one of which lies southwest of the radio continuum shell, and is spatially coincident with a near-infrared source, IRS 20. A second NH3 clump is coincident with an H2O maser and the center of a molecular outflow. The dense gas tracers, CS J = 5 approaches 4 and 7 approaches 6, peak near IRS 20 and the H2O maser, not at NGC 6334A. IRS 20 has a substantial far-infrared (FIR) luminosity L(sub FIR) approximately 10(exp 5) solar luminosity, which indicates the presence of an O 7.5 star but has no detected radio continuum (F(sub 6 cm) < 0.02 Jy). The combination of dense gas, a large FIR luminosity and a lack of radio continuum can best be explained if IRS 20 is a protostar. A third clump of NH3 emission lies to the west of IRS 20 but is not associated with any other molecular or continuum features. The star formation

  5. An evolutionary computation based algorithm for calculating solar differential rotation by automatic tracking of coronal bright points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahamatnia, Ehsan; Dorotovič, Ivan; Fonseca, Jose M.; Ribeiro, Rita A.

    2016-03-01

    Developing specialized software tools is essential to support studies of solar activity evolution. With new space missions such as Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), solar images are being produced in unprecedented volumes. To capitalize on that huge data availability, the scientific community needs a new generation of software tools for automatic and efficient data processing. In this paper a prototype of a modular framework for solar feature detection, characterization, and tracking is presented. To develop an efficient system capable of automatic solar feature tracking and measuring, a hybrid approach combining specialized image processing, evolutionary optimization, and soft computing algorithms is being followed. The specialized hybrid algorithm for tracking solar features allows automatic feature tracking while gathering characterization details about the tracked features. The hybrid algorithm takes advantages of the snake model, a specialized image processing algorithm widely used in applications such as boundary delineation, image segmentation, and object tracking. Further, it exploits the flexibility and efficiency of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), a stochastic population based optimization algorithm. PSO has been used successfully in a wide range of applications including combinatorial optimization, control, clustering, robotics, scheduling, and image processing and video analysis applications. The proposed tool, denoted PSO-Snake model, was already successfully tested in other works for tracking sunspots and coronal bright points. In this work, we discuss the application of the PSO-Snake algorithm for calculating the sidereal rotational angular velocity of the solar corona. To validate the results we compare them with published manual results performed by an expert.

  6. Dependence of magnetic cycle parameters on period of rotation in non-linear solar-type dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipin, V. V.

    2015-08-01

    Parameters of magnetic activity on the solar-type stars depend on the properties of the dynamo processes operating in stellar convection zones. We apply non-linear mean-field axisymmetric α2Ω dynamo models to calculate of the magnetic cycle parameters, such as the dynamo cycle period, the total magnetic flux and the Poynting magnetic energy flux on the surface of solar analogues with the rotation periods from 15 to 30 d. The models take into account the principal non-linear mechanisms of the large-scale dynamo, such as the magnetic helicity conservation, magnetic buoyancy and effects of magnetic forces on the angular momentum balance inside the convection zones. Also, we consider two types of the dynamo models. The distributed (D-type) models employ the standard α-effect distributed on the whole convection zone. The `boundary' (B-type) models employ the non-local α-effect, which is confined to the boundaries of the convection zone. Both the D- and B-type models show that the dynamo-generated magnetic flux increases with the increase of the stellar rotation rate. It is found that for the considered range of the rotational periods the magnetic helicity conservation is the most significant effect for the non-linear quenching of the dynamo. This quenching is more efficient in the B-type than in the D-type dynamo models. The D-type dynamo reproduces the observed dependence of the cycle period on the rotation rate for the Sun analogues. For the solar analogue rotating with a period of 15 d, we find non-linear dynamo regimes with multiply cycles.

  7. Simultaneously photocatalytic treatment of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) using rotating reactor under solar irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngji; Joo, Hyunku; Her, Namguk; Yoon, Yeomin; Sohn, Jinsik; Kim, Sungpyo; Yoon, Jaekyung

    2015-05-15

    In this study, simultaneous treatments, reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and oxidation of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), such as bisphenol A (BPA), 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) and 17β-estradiol (E2), were investigated with a rotating photocatalytic reactor including TiO₂ nanotubes formed on titanium mesh substrates under solar UV irradiation. In the laboratory tests with a rotating type I reactor, synergy effects of the simultaneous photocatalytic reduction and oxidation of inorganic (Cr(VI)) and organic (BPA) pollutants were achieved. Particularly, the concurrent photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) and oxidation of BPA was higher under acidic conditions. The enhanced reaction efficiency of both pollutants was attributed to a stronger charge interaction between TiO₂ nanotubes (positive charge) and the anionic form of Cr(VI) (negative charge), which are prevented recombination (electron-hole pair) by the hole scavenging effect of BPA. In the extended outdoor tests with a rotating type II reactor under solar irradiation, the experiment was extended to examine the simultaneous reduction of Cr(VI) in the presence of additional EDCs, such as EE2 and E2 as well as BPA. The findings showed that synergic effect of both photocatalytic reduction and oxidation was confirmed with single-component (Cr(VI) only), two-components (Cr(VI)/BPA, Cr(VI)/EE2, and Cr(VI)/E2), and four-components (Cr(VI)/BPA/EE2/E2) under various solar irradiation conditions. PMID:25698573

  8. Eddy viscosity and flow properties of the solar wind: Co-rotating interaction regions, coronal-mass-ejection sheaths, and solar-wind/magnetosphere coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Borovsky, Joseph E.

    2006-05-15

    The coefficient of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) eddy viscosity of the turbulent solar wind is calculated to be {nu}{sub eddy}{approx_equal}1.3x10{sup 17} cm{sup 2}/s: this coefficient is appropriate for velocity shears with scale thicknesses larger than the {approx}10{sup 6} km correlation length of the solar-wind turbulence. The coefficient of MHD eddy viscosity is calculated again accounting for the action of smaller-scale turbulent eddies on smaller scale velocity shears in the solar wind. This eddy viscosity is quantitatively tested with spacecraft observations of shear flows in co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs) and in coronal-mass-ejection (CME) sheaths and ejecta. It is found that the large-scale ({approx}10{sup 7} km) shear of the CIR fractures into intense narrow ({approx}10{sup 5} km) slip zones between slabs of differently magnetized plasma. Similarly, it is found that the large-scale shear of CME sheaths also fracture into intense narrow slip zones between parcels of differently magnetized plasma. Using the solar-wind eddy-viscosity coefficient to calculate vorticity-diffusion time scales and comparing those time scales with the {approx}100-h age of the solar-wind plasma at 1 AU, it is found that the slip zones are much narrower than eddy-viscosity theory says they should be. Thus, our concept of MHD eddy viscosity fails testing. For the freestream turbulence effect in solar-wind magnetosphere coupling, the eddy-viscous force of the solar wind on the Earth's magnetosphere is rederived accounting for the action of turbulent eddies smaller than the correlation length, along with other corrections. The improved derivation of the solar-wind driver function for the turbulence effect fails to yield higher correlation coefficients between measurements of the solar-wind driver and measurements of the response of the Earth's magnetosphere.

  9. The Features of Change of the Drag Perturbations of Artificial Satellite Orbits during Extreme Developments of Solar Activity in years 2003-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshkin, N.; Korniychuk, L.; Korobeynikova, E.; Ryabov, M.; Sukhov, K.

    2006-12-01

    In this paper the movement of the artificial satellites of the Earth on low orbits is analyzed which are subject to resistance of a rarefied atmosphere. Temperature and density of terrestrial atmosphere at height of 200-800 km vary over wide range under influence of external conditions. The changes of solar activity are compared to variations of satellite braking (atmospheric drag). In spite of the fact that unequivocal dependence of the atmosphere density behavior from the considered physical factors of solar activity is not present, the attempt is done to find the characteristic periods in these processes. Some periods of fluctuation of an atmosphere density are revealed which can be harmonics of the basic period close to 27 days. Fluctuations of density with the period about 27 days have two close components, which reason is not quite clear. Probably, they are caused by rotation of the Sun and lunar tidal wave in the Earth's atmosphere.

  10. A Statistical Analysis of 50 Years of Daily Solar Wind Velocity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LI, K. J.; ZHANNG, J.; FENG, W.

    2016-05-01

    Daily mean value of solar wind velocity measured by various spacecraft near the Earth’s orbit from 1963 November 27 to 2013 December 31 given by OMNIWeb is utilized to investigate its characteristics through statistical analyses. The percent probability distribution of solar wind velocity can be described well by the Γ distribution function with the most probable velocity to be 373 {km} {{{s}}}-1. It is found that solar wind could be statistically classified into three groups: (1) the low-velocity wind, v\\lt 450 {km} {{{s}}}-1, which positively responds to, and in the cycle phase lags, the solar activity cycle; (2) the high-velocity wind, 450≤slant v\\lt 725 {km} {{{s}}}-1, which negatively responds to, and in the cycle phase leads, the solar activity cycle, but in a short timescale (one-rotation-period) lags the solar activity cycle; and (3) the extreme-high-velocity wind, v≥slant 725 {km} {{{s}}}-1, which positively responds to, and in cycle phase leads, the solar activity cycle. A period of about 27 days is determined for solar wind in the first two groups, so that solar wind in the groups is modulated by the solar rotation and related with solar long-life magnetic structures. Solar wind of extreme high velocity appears mainly at the descending phases of the solar cycles.

  11. A three-dimensional model of co-rotating streams in the solar wind. 2: Hydrodynamic streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, V. J.

    1979-01-01

    Theoretical aspects of corotating solar wind dynamics on a global scale are explored by means of numerical simulations executed with a nonlinear, inviscid, adiabatic, single-fluid, three-dimensional (3-D) hydrodynamic formulation. A simple, hypothetical 3-D stream structure is defined on a source surface located at 35 solar radius and carefully documents its evolution to 1 AU under the influence of solar rotation. By manipulating the structure of this prototype configuration at the source surface, it is possible to elucidate the factors most strongly affecting stream evolution: (1) the intrinsic correlations among density, temperature, and velocity existing near the source; (2) the amplitude of the stream; (3) the longitudinal breadth of the stream; (4) the latitudinal breadth of the stream; and (5) the heliographic latitude of the centroid of the stream.

  12. Analysis of Solar Spectral Irradiance Measurements from the SBUV/2-Series and the SSBUV Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebula, Richard P.; DeLand, Matthew T.; Hilsenrath, Ernest

    1997-01-01

    The NOAA-9 SBEV/2 instrument has made the first regular measurements ot solar UV activity over a complete solar cycle, beginning in March 1985 and continuing as of this writing. The NOAA-9 solar irradiance data set includes the minimum between Cycles 21-22 and the current minimum at the end of Cycle 22. Although overall solar activity is low during these periods, 27-day rotational modulation is frequently present. The episode of 13-day periodicity observed during September 1994 - March 1995 shows that phenomena previously associated with high levels of solar activity can occur at any point in the solar cycle. The 205 nm irradiance and Mg II index measured by NOAA-9 showed very similar behavior during the Cycle 21-22 minimum in 1985-1986, when 27-day periodicity dominated short-term solar variations, but behaved differently in 1994-1995 during the episode of 13-day periodicity. We plan further investigations into the physical causes of this result, since it affects the extent to which the Mg II index is an accurate proxy for 205 nm irradiance variations during such episodes. The NOAA-9 Mg II data are available.

  13. Solar-terrestrial influences on weather and climate; Proceedings of the Symposium, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, August 24-28, 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormac, B. M. (Editor); Seliga, T. A.

    1979-01-01

    The book contains most of the invited papers and contributions presented at the symposium/workshop on solar-terrestrial influences on weather and climate. Four main issues dominate the activities of the symposium: whether solar variability relationships to weather and climate is a fundamental scientific question to which answers may have important implications for long-term weather and climate prediction; the sun-weather relationships; other potential solar influences on weather including the 11-year sunspot cycle, the 27-day solar rotation, and special solar events such as flares and coronal holes; and the development of practical use of solar variability as a tool for weather and climatic forecasting, other than through empirical approaches. Attention is given to correlation topics; solar influences on global circulation and climate models; lower and upper atmospheric coupling, including electricity; planetary motions and other indirect factors; experimental approaches to sun-weather relationships; and the role of minor atmospheric constituents.

  14. Space-based Observations of the Solar Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Thomas N.

    2015-08-01

    Solar photon radiation is the dominant energy input to the Earth system, and this energy determines the temperature, structure, and dynamics of the atmosphere, warms the Earth surface, and sustains life. Observations of true solar variability became possible only after attaining access to space, so the observational record of the solar irradiance for sun-climate studies extends back only about 40 years. The total solar irradiance (TSI) and solar spectral irradiance (SSI) observations will be presented along with the discussion of the solar variability during the past four decades. The solar radiation varies on all time scales ranging from minutes to hours for solar eruptive events (flares), days to months for active region evolution and solar rotation (~27 days), and years to decades over the solar activity cycle (~11 years). The amount of solar variability is highly dependent on wavelength and ranges from orders of magnitude for the X-ray to 10-60% for part of the ultraviolet to only 0.1% for the visible and infrared. The accuracy and precision of the solar irradiance measurements have steadily improved with each new generation of instrumentation and with new laboratory (pre-flight) calibration facilities.

  15. Analysis of Solar Wind Plasma Properties of Co-Rotating Interaction Regions at Mars with MSL/RAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohf, H.; Kohler, J.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Ehresmann, B.; Guo, J.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Hassler, D.; Reitz, G.; Posner, A.; Heber, B.; Appel, J. K.; Matthiae, D.; Brinza, D. E.; Weigle, E.; Böttcher, S. I.; Burmeister, S.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Boehm, E.; Rafkin, S. C.; Kahanpää, H.; Martín-Torres, J.; Zorzano, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    The measurements of the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) onboard Mars Science Laboratory's rover Curiosity have given us the very first opportunity to evaluate the radiation environment on the surface of Mars, which consists mostly of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and secondary particles created in the Martian Atmosphere. The solar wind can have an influence on the modulation of the GCR, e.g. when the fast solar wind (~ 750 km/s) interacts with the slow solar wind (~ 400 km/s) at so-called Stream Interaction Regions (SIRs) resulting in an enhancement of the local magnetic field which could affect the shielding of GCRs. SIRs often occur periodically as Co-rotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) which may-be observed at Mars as a decrease in the radiation data measured by MSL/RAD. Considering the difference of the Earth-Mars orbit, we correlate these in-situ radiation data at Mars with the solar wind properties measured by spacecrafts at 1 AU, with the aim to eventually determine the solar wind properties at Mars based on MSL/RAD measurements.

  16. Simulating the Outer Radiation Belt During the Rising Phase of Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Glocer, Alex; Zheng, Qiuhua; Chen, Sheng-Hsien; Kanekal, Shri; Nagai, Tsungunobu; Albert, Jay

    2011-01-01

    After prolonged period of solar minimum, there has been an increase in solar activity and its terrestrial consequences. We are in the midst of the rising phase of solar cycle 24, which began in January 2008. During the initial portion of the cycle, moderate geomagnetic storms occurred follow the 27 day solar rotation. Most of the storms were accompanied by increases in electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt. These enhancements were often preceded with rapid dropout at high L shells. We seek to understand the similarities and differences in radiation belt behavior during the active times observed during the of this solar cycle. This study includes extensive data and simulations our Radiation Belt Environment Model. We identify the processes, transport and wave-particle interactions, that are responsible for the flux dropout and the enhancement and recovery.

  17. Solar Spectral Irradiance Changes during Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, S. V.; DeLand, M. T.

    2014-07-01

    We use solar spectra obtained by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board the Aura satellite to detect and follow long-term (years) and short-term (weeks) changes in the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the 265-500 nm spectral range. During solar Cycle 24, in the relatively line-free regions the SSI changed by ~0.6% ± 0.2% around 265 nm. These changes gradually diminish to 0.15% ± 0.20% at 500 nm. All strong spectral lines and blends, with the notable exception of the upper Balmer lines, vary in unison with the solar "continuum." Besides the lines with strong chromospheric components, the most involved species include Fe I blends and all prominent CH, NH, and CN spectral bands. Following the general trend seen in the solar "continuum," the variability of spectral lines also decreases toward longer wavelengths. The long-term solar cycle SSI changes are closely, to within the quoted 0.1%-0.2% uncertainties, matched by the appropriately adjusted short-term SSI variations derived from the 27 day rotational modulation cycles. This further strengthens and broadens the prevailing notion about the general scalability of the UV SSI variability to the emissivity changes in the Mg II 280 nm doublet on timescales from weeks to years. We also detect subtle deviations from this general rule: the prominent spectral lines and blends at λ >~ 350 nm show slightly more pronounced 27 day SSI changes when compared to the long-term (years) trends. We merge the solar data from Cycle 21 with the current Cycle 24 OMI and GOME-2 observations and provide normalized SSI variations for the 170-795 nm spectral region.

  18. Solar Spectral Irradiance Changes During Cycle 24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchenko, Sergey; Deland, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    We use solar spectra obtained by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board the Aura satellite to detect and follow long-term (years) and short-term (weeks) changes in the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the 265-500 nm spectral range. During solar Cycle 24, in the relatively line-free regions the SSI changed by approximately 0.6% +/- 0.2% around 265 nm. These changes gradually diminish to 0.15% +/- 0.20% at 500 nm. All strong spectral lines and blends, with the notable exception of the upper Balmer lines, vary in unison with the solar "continuum." Besides the lines with strong chromospheric components, the most involved species include Fe I blends and all prominent CH, NH, and CN spectral bands. Following the general trend seen in the solar "continuum," the variability of spectral lines also decreases toward longer wavelengths. The long-term solar cycle SSI changes are closely, to within the quoted 0.1%-0.2% uncertainties, matched by the appropriately adjusted short-term SSI variations derived from the 27 day rotational modulation cycles. This further strengthens and broadens the prevailing notion about the general scalability of the UV SSI variability to the emissivity changes in the Mg II 280 nm doublet on timescales from weeks to years. We also detect subtle deviations from this general rule: the prominent spectral lines and blends at lambda approximately or greater than 350 nm show slightly more pronounced 27 day SSI changes when compared to the long-term (years) trends. We merge the solar data from Cycle 21 with the current Cycle 24 OMI and GOME-2 observations and provide normalized SSI variations for the 170-795 nm spectral region.

  19. Sensitivity of tropical stratospheric ozone to rotational UV variations estimated from UARS and Aura MLS observations during the declining phases of solar cycles 22 and 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossay, Sébastien; Bekki, Slimane; Marchand, Marion; Poulain, Virginie; Toumi, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    The correlation between tropical stratospheric ozone and UV radiation on solar rotational time scales is investigated using daily satellite ozone observations and reconstructed solar spectra. We consider two 3-year periods falling within the descending phases of two 11-year solar cycles 22 (1991-1994) and 23 (2004-2007). The UV rotational cycle is highly irregular and even disappears for half a year during cycle 23. For the 1991-1994 period, ozone and 205 nm UV flux are found to be correlated between about 10 and 1 hPa with a maximum of 0.29 at ~5 hPa; ozone sensitivity (percentage change in ozone for 1% change in UV) peaks at ~0.4. Correlation during cycle 23 is weaker with a peak ozone sensitivity of 0.2. The correlation is found to vary widely, not only with altitude, but also from one year to the next with a rotational signal in ozone appearing almost intermittent. Unexpectedly, the correlation is not found to bear any relation with the solar rotational forcing. For instance, solar rotational fluctuations are by far the strongest during 1991-1992 whereas the correlation peaks at the end of 1993, a rotationally quiescent period. When calculated over sliding intervals of 1-year, the sensitivity is found to vary very strongly within both 3-year periods; it is almost negligible over the entire vertical profile during some 1-year intervals or reaches close to 1 around 2-5 mb for other intervals. Other sources of variability, presumably of dynamical origin, operate on the rotational spectral range and determine to a large extent the estimated solar rotational signal. Even considering 3 years of observations (corresponding to about 40 solar cycles), the extraction of the rotational solar signal does not appear to be robust during declining phases of 11-year solar cycles. As observational studies cover at best three 11-year solar cycles, it must be challenging to produce a reliable estimation of the 11-year solar cycle signal in stratospheric ozone, especially in the

  20. Understanding Solar Cycle Ultraviolet Variations from SME and Subsequent Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, T. N.; Rottman, G. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) measured the solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiance from 1981 to 1989, and those observations are the foundation for a series of solar UV measurements continued through today. The solar UV radiation between 115 nm and 300 nm is a critical energy input for studying Earth's atmosphere, such as for ozone photochemistry, thus understanding the solar UV variations was an important part of the SME mission and continues to be important for Earth science studies today. After SME, there were additional solar UV irradiance measurements from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), the Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere, Energetics, and Dynamics (TIMED) spacecraft, and the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE). These four sets of observations that span 1981 to the present day enable the evaluation of the solar UV variations over multiple solar cycles. While solar rotation 27-day variability is very similar from the different instruments, there are some differences in the solar cycle 11-year variations, partly due to observations made during different solar cycles and perhaps also due to uncorrected instrumental effects. The composite time series of the SME and other irradiance measurements provide an important climate record of the solar UV irradiance, for understanding solar cycle variations, and for studying solar forcing in Earth's atmosphere.

  1. Rotation of the Large-Scale Solar Magnetic Fields in the Equatorial Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latushko, S.

    1996-07-01

    A study is made of the rotation of large-scale magnetic fields using the synoptic maps from the Kitt Peak National Observatory for the time interval 1976 1985. The auto-correlation method and the mass-centers method of magnetic structures was applied to infer mean differential rotation profiles and rotation profiles separately for each magnetic field polarity. It has been found that in both hemispheres the leading polarity rotates faster than the following polarity at all latitudes by about 0.04° day-1. The maximum rotation rate of the leading polarity is reached at about 6° latitude. In the mean profile for both polarities, this brings about two angular velocity maxima at 6° latitudes in both hemispheres. Such a profile appears as to have a ‘dimple’ on the equator.

  2. Dynamic Evolution of Active Region Flux Tubes in the Turbulent Convective Envelope of a Young Sun: Solar-like Fast Rotators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Maria A.; Brown, B. P.; Fan, Y.

    2012-05-01

    Our Sun rotated much more rapidly when it was younger, as is suggested by observations of rapidly rotating solar-like stars and the influence of the solar wind, which removes angular momentum from the Sun. By studying how flux emergence may have occurred on the young Sun, we are likely to learn more about the nature of the solar dynamo early in the Sun's history, as well as other solar-like stars. To investigate this, we embed a toroidal flux tube near the base of the convection zone of a rotating spherical shell of turbulent convection performed for solar-like stars that rotate 3, 5, and 10 times the current solar rate. Our objective is to understand how the convective flows of these fast rotators can influence the emergent properties of flux tubes which would rise to create active regions, or starspots, of a variety of magnetic flux strengths, magnetic fields, and initial latitudes. Flux tube properties we will discuss include rise times, latitude of emergence, and tilt angles of the emerging flux tube limbs with respect to the east-west direction. Also of interest is identifying the regimes where dynamics of the flux tube are convection dominated or magnetic buoyancy dominated, as well as attempting to identify active longitudes.

  3. s-process production in rotating massive stars at solar and low metallicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frischknecht, Urs; Hirschi, Raphael; Pignatari, Marco; Maeder, André; Meynet, George; Chiappini, Cristina; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl; Rauscher, Thomas; Georgy, Cyril; Ekström, Sylvia

    2016-02-01

    Rotation was shown to have a strong impact on the structure and light element nucleosynthesis in massive stars. In particular, models including rotation can reproduce the primary nitrogen observed in halo extremely metal poor (EMP) stars. Additional exploratory models showed that rotation may enhance s-process production at low metallicity. Here we present a large grid of massive star models including rotation and a full s-process network to study the impact of rotation on the weak s-process. We explore the possibility of producing significant amounts of elements beyond the strontium peak, which is where the weak s-process usually stops. We used the Geneva stellar evolution code coupled to an enlarged reaction network with 737 nuclear species up to bismuth to calculate 15-40 M⊙ models at four metallicities (Z = 0.014, 10-3, 10-5 and 10-7) from the main sequence up to the end of oxygen burning. We confirm that rotation-induced mixing between the convective H-shell and He-core enables an important production of primary 14N and 22Ne and s-process at low metallicity. At low metallicity, even though the production is still limited by the initial number of iron seeds, rotation enhances the s-process production, even for isotopes heavier than strontium, by increasing the neutron-to-seed ratio. The increase in this ratio is a direct consequence of the primary production of 22Ne. Despite nuclear uncertainties affecting the s-process production and stellar uncertainties affecting the rotation-induced mixing, our results show a robust production of s-process at low metallicity when rotation is taken into account. Considering models with a distribution of initial rotation rates enables us to reproduce the observed large range of the [Sr/Ba] ratios in (carbon-enhanced and normal) EMP stars.

  4. Space observations of the variability of solar irradiance in the near and far ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. F.

    1972-01-01

    Satellite observations of the ultraviolet solar irradiance in selected wavelength bands between 1200 and 3000 a were made continuously by photometers consisting of broad-band sensors operated on Numbus 3 and 4 which were launched in April 1969 and 1970. In addition, spectrophotometer measurements of the solar irradiance were made with a dispersive instrument at 12 selected wavelengths from 2550 to 3400 a with a 10 a bandpass on Nimbus 4. Variations of the solar irradiance associated with the solar rotational period were observed since the launch of Nimbus 3. These variations are apparently associated with two source regions separated by about 180 deg in solar longitude. The change in irradiance with solar rotation was found to increase with decreasing wavelengths. Different types of the observed variations in uv solar irradiance can be classified in accordance with characteristics times, e.g. in the order of increasing periods as follows: (1)flare associated enhancements (2) 27-day variations due to solar rotation; (3) a possible biennial effect; and (4) long term variations associated with the 11-year solar cycle.

  5. Effect of solar activity on the repetitiveness of some meteorological phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorović, Nedeljko; Vujović, Dragana

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we research the relationship between solar activity and the weather on Earth. This research is based on the assumption that every ejection of magnetic field energy and particles from the Sun (also known as Solar wind) has direct effects on the Earth's weather. The impact of coronal holes and active regions on cold air advection (cold fronts, precipitation, and temperature decrease on the surface and higher layers) in the Belgrade region (Serbia) was analyzed. Some active regions and coronal holes appear to be in a geo-effective position nearly every 27 days, which is the duration of a solar rotation. A similar period of repetitiveness (27-29 days) of the passage of the cold front, and maximum and minimum temperatures measured at surface and at levels of 850 and 500 hPa were detected. We found that 10-12 days after Solar wind velocity starts significantly increasing, we could expect the passage of a cold front. After eight days, the maximum temperatures in the Belgrade region are measured, and it was found that their minimum values appear after 12-16 days. The maximum amount of precipitation occurs 14 days after Solar wind is observed. A recurring period of nearly 27 days of different phases of development for hurricanes Katrina, Rita and Wilma was found. This analysis confirmed that the intervals of time between two occurrences of some particular meteorological parameter correlate well with Solar wind and A index.

  6. Limitation of Ground-based Estimates of Solar Irradiance Due to Atmospheric Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Guoyong; Cahalan, Robert F.; Holben, Brent N.

    2003-01-01

    The uncertainty in ground-based estimates of solar irradiance is quantitatively related to the temporal variability of the atmosphere's optical thickness. The upper and lower bounds of the accuracy of estimates using the Langley Plot technique are proportional to the standard deviation of aerosol optical thickness (approx. +/- 13 sigma(delta tau)). The estimates of spectral solar irradiance (SSI) in two Cimel sun photometer channels from the Mauna Loa site of AERONET are compared with satellite observations from SOLSTICE (Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment) on UARS (Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite) for almost two years of data. The true solar variations related to the 27-day solar rotation cycle observed from SOLSTICE are about 0.15% at the two sun photometer channels. The variability in ground-based estimates is statistically one order of magnitude larger. Even though about 30% of these estimates from all Level 2.0 Cimel data fall within the 0.4 to approx. 0.5% variation level, ground-based estimates are not able to capture the 27-day solar variation observed from SOLSTICE.

  7. A search for evidence of the evolution of rotational discontinuities in the solar wind from nonlinear Alfven waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, M.; Buti, B.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented of a study designed to confirm the suspected relation between Alfven solitons (steepened Afven waves) and rotational discontinuities (RDs) in the solar wind. The ISEE 3 data were used to search for the predicted correlations between the beta value of plasma, the sense of polarization of the discontinuity, and changes of the magnetic field strength and plasma density across the discontinuity. No statistically significant evidence was found for the evolution of RDs from Alfven solitons. A possibility is suggested that the observations made could have been far from the regions in which the RDs were formed.

  8. Analytic expansions of luni-solar gravity perturbations along rotating axes for trajectory optimization: Part 1: The dynamic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kéchichian, Jean A.

    2011-06-01

    An analytic form of the accelerations due to the luni-solar perturbations resolved along the rotating Euler-Hill frame is devised by using the expansion method. The addition of higher order terms to the main gravity gradient term linear in the spacecraft radial distance, carried out to the third order, provides a very high level of accuracy in accounting for the gravity perturbations experienced by a vehicle in orbit due to the sun and the moon. The nodal precession as well as the perigee advance of the lunar orbit is taken into account analytically by using the analytic lunar theory of de Pontécoulant. The analytic description of the apparent solar orbit and the motion of the moon remove the need to call an epherneris generator at each integration step during the numerical integration of the spacecraft trajectory, leading to the self-contained software for rapid and efficient optimal trajectory generation through iterations. Equinoctial elements are used to describe the spacecraft state and the luni-solar accelerations are given in terms of the apparent solar and lunar longitudes as well as Eulerian angles of the spacecraft orbit with respect to the inertial ecliptic system. The analysis is useful in optimal low-thrust orbit transfers complementing previous analyses carried out by this author, in which thrust and Earth zonal perturbations such as J2, J3 and J4 in terms of the nonsingular equinoctial elements are included.

  9. Analysis and synthesis of coronal and interplanetary energetic particle, plasma, and magnetic field observations over three solar rotations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelof, E. C.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1973-01-01

    In a previous paper (Krimigis et al., 1971), simultaneous observations in 1967 of solar particle events at low (less than 1 MeV) energies were presented. In the present paper, the full complement of simultaneous plasma, magnetic field, and energetic particle data is combined, and a complete analysis is made of all the events discussed in the original paper. The essential concept of 'collimated convection' is introduced, whereby the bulk velocity along the field lines of low-energy solar particles is independent of solar local plasma velocity, and the particles are strongly collimated along the field line with no transverse velocity component other than that of the field line itself. Collimated convection effects are shown to exist in small-scale convection and large-scale evolution of particle fluxes; the particle fluxes are, in turn, used to delineate the small-scale and large-scale evolution of the interplanetary magnetic field. Use of collimated convection is made in demonstrating a technique whereby energetic particle intensity profiles in the interplanetary medium can be related to equatorial high coronal magnetic field structures, by using the instantaneous solar wind velocity. This technique is applied in mapping particle intensities from Mariner 5 onto H alpha synoptic charts of chromospheric magnetic field structures for Carrington rotations 1523 to 1525.

  10. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); La Ola Lanai, Hawaii (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2009-07-22

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  11. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Kalaeloa Oahu, Hawaii (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-03-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  12. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Los Angeles, California (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

    2010-04-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  13. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Cedar City, Utah (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-07-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  14. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Milford, Utah (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-07-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  15. Solar dynamo signatures in the new type quasi-periodicity of the galactic cosmic rays intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Agnieszka; Alania, Michael

    Studying the temporal changes of the 27-days variation of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) intensity we detected a new type of cycle with length of 3 to 4 solar rotations, which we called 3 to 4 Carrington rotations period (3-4 CRP) recurrence. We assume that the general cause of this phenomenon may be related to the similar cycle in the topological structure of the solar magnetic field lines created owing to the existence of the asymmetry of turbulent solar dynamo and solar differential rotation, transforming the Sun’s poloidal magnetic field to the toroidal, and vice versa (alphaa-omegaw effect). Mutual transmission of the poloidal and toroidal magnetic fields should have partially turbulent character due to corresponding rearrangement of various cyclical modes in different time scales. One can assume that, according to features as are demonstrated by timelines of the amplitudes of the 27- days variations of various parameters: the GCR intensity, solar wind speed, solar wind plasma temperature, the strength B and components of the interplanetary magnetic field, solar radio flux f10.7, coronal green line intensity and sunspot number, during 3-4 CRP, beside pure induction process a certain role should be played by a diffusion of magnetic lines. It is especially dealing with upper layer of the tachocline - transition region of the Sun between the radiative interior and the differentially rotating outer convective zone. We believe that any kind of periodicities in the range more than 3 days in different parameters of solar wind, solar activity and the GCR intensity can be potentially explained by aalpha-omegaw transformation process taking into account ‘macro-discrete’ character of the differential rotation of the Sun. We introduce a notion ‘macro- discrete’ character of the differential rotation to underline that from the equator to the pole region of the Sun there should exist distinguished periods of rotation, in spite changes of periodicities of

  16. Coronal holes, solar wind streams, and geomagnetic activity during the new sunspot cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Harvey, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents results obtained for 1976-1977 using daily He I 10830 A spectroheliograms and photospheric magnetograms. It was found that as the magnetic field patterns changed, the solar atmosphere evolved from a structure with a few large long-lived low-latitude coronal holes to one with numerous small short-lived high-latitude holes. High-latitude holes recurred with a synodic rotation period of 28-29 days instead of the 27-day period already known to be characteristic of low-latitude holes. A Bartels display of the occurrence of holes, wind speed, and geomagnetic activity is considered.

  17. Photoelectrons as a tool to evaluate spectral and temporal variations of solar EUV and XUV irradiance models over solar rotation and solar cycle time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, W. K.; Woods, T. N.; Fontenla, J. M.; Richards, P. G.; Tobiska, W.; Solomon, S. C.; Warren, H. P.

    2010-12-01

    Solar radiation below 50 nm produces a substantial portion of the F region ionization and most of the E region ionization that drives chemical reactions in the thermosphere. Because of a lack of high temporal and spectral resolution Solar EUV and XUV observations, particularly below 27 nm, various solar irradiance models have been developed. We have developed a technique to use observations of escaping photoelectron fluxes from the FAST satellite and two different photoelectron production codes driven by model solar irradiance values to systematically examine differences between observed and calculated escaping photoelectron fluxes. We have compared modeled and observed photoelectron fluxes from the start of TIMED/SEE data availability (2002) to the end of FAST photoelectron observations (2009). Solar irradiance inputs included TIMED/SEE data, which is derived from a model below 27 nm, and the FISM Version 1, the SRPM predictive model based on solar observation, HEUVAC, S2000, and NRL, solar irradiance models. We used the GLOW and FLIP photoelectron production codes. We find that model photoelectron spectra generated using the HEUVAC solar irradiance model have the best overall agreement with observations. Photoelectron spectra generated with the the TIMED/SEE based FISM model best agree with the observations on solar cycle time scales. Below ~27 nm all but the HEUVAC solar irradiance model produces photoelectron fluxes that are systematically below observations. We also noted systematic differences in the photoelectron energy spectra below 25 eV produced by the GLOW and FLIP photoelectron production codes for all solar irradiance inputs.

  18. Observations of Oppositely Directed Umbral Wavefronts Rotating in Sunspots Obtained from the New Solar Telescope of BBSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J. T.; Ji, K. F.; Cao, W.; Banerjee, D.; Priya, T. G.; Zhao, J. S.; Bai, X. Y.; Chen, J.; Zhang, M.; Ji, H. S.

    2016-02-01

    We study the umbral waves as observed by chromospheric imaging observations of two sunspots with the New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. We find that the wavefronts (WFs) rotate clockwise and form a one-armed spiral structure in the first sunspot, whereas two- and three-armed structures arise in the second sunspot where the WFs rotate anticlockwise and clockwise alternately. All the spiral arms display propagation outwards and become running penumbral waves once they cross the umbral boundaries, suggesting that the umbral and penumbral waves propagate along the same inclined field lines. We propose that the one-armed spiral structure may be produced by the WF reflections at the chromospheric umbral light bridge, and the multi-armed spirals may be related to the twist of the magnetic field in the umbra. Additionally, the time lag of the umbral oscillations in between the data of He i 10830 Å and {{H}}α -0.4 Å is ∼17 s, and it is ∼60 s for that in between the data of 304 Å and {{H}}α -0.4 Å. This indicates that these disturbances are slow magnetoacoustic waves in nature, and that they propagate upward along the inclined lines with fast radial expansions causing horizontal velocities of the running waves.

  19. Detection of Solar Rotational Variability in the Large Yield RAdiometer (LYRA) 190 - 222 nm Spectral Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, A. V.; Shapiro, A. I.; Dominique, M.; Dammasch, I. E.; Wehrli, C.; Rozanov, E.; Schmutz, W.

    2013-08-01

    We analyze the variability of the spectral solar irradiance during the period from 7 January 2010 until 20 January 2010 as measured by the Herzberg channel (190 - 222 nm) of the Large Yield RAdiometer (LYRA) onboard PROBA2. In this period of time, observations by the LYRA nominal unit experienced degradation and the signal produced by the Herzberg channel frequently jumped from one level to another. Both factors significantly complicate the analysis. We present the algorithm that allowed us to extract the solar variability from the LYRA data and compare the results with SORCE/SOLSTICE measurements and with modeling based on the Code for the Solar Irradiance (COSI).

  20. Solar Irradiance: Observations, Proxies, and Models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lean, J.

    2013-12-01

    Solar irradiance has been measured from space for more than thirty years. Variations in total (spectrally integrated) solar irradiance associated with the Sun's 11-year activity cycle and 27-day rotation are now well characterized. But the magnitude, and even the sign, of spectral irradiance changes at near ultraviolet, visible and near infrared wavelengths, remain uncertain on time scales longer than a few months. Drifts in the calibration of the instruments that measure solar irradiance and incomplete understanding of the causes of irradiance variations preclude specification of multi-decadal solar irradiance variations with any confidence, including whether, or not, irradiance levels were lower during the 2008-2009 anomalously low solar activity minimum than in prior minima. The ultimate cause of solar irradiance variations is the Sun's changing activity, driven by a sub-surface dynamo that generates magnetic features called sunspots and faculae, which respectively deplete and enhance the net radiative output. Solar activity also alters parameters that have been measured from the ground for longer periods and with greater stability than the solar irradiance datasets. The longest and most stable such record is the Sun's irradiance at 10.7 cm in the radio spectrum, which is used frequently as a proxy indicator of solar irradiance variability. Models have been developed that relate the solar irradiance changes - both total and spectral - evident in extant databases to proxies chosen to best represent the sunspot darkening and facular brightening influences. The proxy models are then used to reconstruct solar irradiance variations at all wavelengths on multi-decadal time scales, for input to climate and atmospheric model simulations that seek to quantity the Sun's contribution to Earth's changing environment. This talk provides an overview of solar total and spectral irradiance observations and their relevant proxies, describes the formulation and construction of

  1. A general circulation model study of the effects of faster rotation rate, enhanced CO2 concentration, and reduced solar forcing: Implications for the faint young sun paradox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Gregory S.

    1993-01-01

    Solar energy at the top of the atmosphere (solar constant), rotation rate, and carbon dioxide (CO2) may have varied significantly over Earth's history, especially during the earliest times. The sensitivity of a general circulation model to faster rotation, enhanced CO2 concentration, and reduced solar constant is presented. The control simulation of this study has a solar constant reduced by 10% the present amount, zero land fraction using a swamp ocean surface, CO2 concentrations of 330 ppmv, present-day rotation rate, and is integrated under mean diurnal and seasonal solar forcing. Four sensitivity test are performed under zero land fraction and reduced solar constant conditions by varying the earth's rotation rate atmospheric CO2 concentration and solar constant. The global mean sea surface temperatures (SSTs) compared to the control simulation: were 6.6 K to 12 K higher than the control's global mean temperature of 264.7 K. Sea ice is confined to higher latitudes in each experiment compared to the control, with ice-free areas equatorward of the subtropics. The warm SSTs are associated with a 20% reduction in clouds for the rotation rate experiments and higher CO2 concentrations in the other experiments. These results are in contrast to previous studies that have used energy balance and radiative convective models. Previous studies required a much larger atmospheric CO2 increase to prevent an ice-covered Earth. The results of the study, suggest that because of its possible feedback with clouds, the general circulation of the atmosphere should be taken into account in understanding the climate of early Earth. While higher CO2 concentrations are likely in view of the results, very large atmospheric CO2 concentrations may not be necessary to counterbalance the lower solar constant that existed early in Earth's history.

  2. Coronal Radio Occultation Experiments with the Helios Solar Probes: Correlation/Spectral Analysis of Faraday Rotation Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, A. I.; Lukanina, L. A.; Rogashkova, A. I.; Samoznaev, L. N.; Chashei, I. V.; Bird, M. K.; Pätzold, M.

    2015-09-01

    The coronal Faraday rotation (FR) experiments using the linearly polarized signals of the Helios-1 and Helios-2 interplanetary probes remain a unique investigation of the magnetic field of the solar corona and its aperiodic and quasi-periodic variations. The unexpectedly long lifetime of these spacecraft (1974 - 1986) enabled studies from very deep solar-activity minimum (1975 - 1976) into the strong activity maximum (1979). Important experimental data were also obtained for the rising (1977 - 1978) and declining (1980 - 1984) branches of the solar-activity cycle. Previous publications have presented results of the initial experimental data only for coronal-sounding experiments performed during individual solar-conjunction opportunities. This report is a more detailed analysis of the Helios FR measurements for the entire period 1975 - 1984. Radial profiles of the FR fluctuation (FRF) intensity recorded during the deepest solar-activity minimum in 1975 - 1976 are shown to differ distinctly from those during the strong solar-activity maximum in 1979. In particular, the decrease of the FRF intensity with solar-offset distance is substantially steeper in 1979 than in 1975/1976. In all cases, however, the FR data reveal quasi-periodic wave-like fluctuations in addition to the random background with a power-law spectrum. The dominant period of these fluctuations, recorded during 35 % of the total measurement time, is found to be close to five minutes. Large-scale FR variations at considerably longer periods (1.1 - 2.7 hours) were observed during 20 % of the measurement time. Knowing the intrinsic motion of the radio ray path from spacecraft to Earth and making a reasonable assumption about the solar-wind velocity, FRF observations at widely spaced ground stations have been used to estimate the velocity of coronal Alfvén waves. The velocity values range between 290 and 550 km s-1 at heliocentric distances between 3.5 and 4.5 R⊙ and are marginally lower (150 - 450 km s

  3. A SOLAR TORNADO OBSERVED BY AIA/SDO: ROTATIONAL FLOW AND EVOLUTION OF MAGNETIC HELICITY IN A PROMINENCE AND CAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xing; Morgan, Huw; Leonard, Drew; Jeska, Lauren

    2012-06-20

    During 2011 September 24, as observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument of the Solar Dynamic Observatory and ground-based H{alpha} telescopes, a prominence and associated cavity appeared above the southwest limb. On 2011 September 25 8:00 UT, material flows upward from the prominence core along a narrow loop-like structure, accompanied by a rise ({>=}50,000 km) of the prominence core and the loop. As the loop fades by 10:00, small blobs and streaks of varying brightness rotate around the top part of the prominence and cavity, mimicking a cyclone. The most intense and coherent rotation lasts for over three hours, with emission in both hot ({approx}1 MK) and cold (hydrogen and helium) lines. We suggest that the cyclonic appearance and overall evolution of the structure can be interpreted in terms of the expansion of helical structures into the cavity, and the movement of plasma along helical structures which appears as a rotation when viewed along the helix axis. The coordinated movement of material between prominence and cavity suggests that they are structurally linked. Complexity is great due to the combined effect of these actions and the line-of-sight integration through the structure which contains tangled fields.

  4. The cool component and the dichotomy, lateral expansion, and axial rotation of solar X-ray jets

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.; Robe, Dominic

    2013-06-01

    We present results from a study of 54 polar X-ray jets that were observed in coronal X-ray movies from the X-ray Telescope on Hinode and had simultaneous coverage in movies of the cooler transition region (T ∼ 10{sup 5} K) taken in the He II 304 Å band of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on Solar Dynamics Observatory. These dual observations verify the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of polar X-ray jets previously found primarily from XRT movies alone. In accord with models of blowout jets and standard jets, the AIA 304 Å movies show a cool (T ∼ 10{sup 5} K) component in nearly all blowout X-ray jets and in a small minority of standard X-ray jets, obvious lateral expansion in blowout X-ray jets but none in standard X-ray jets, and obvious axial rotation in both blowout X-ray jets and standard X-ray jets. In our sample, the number of turns of axial rotation in the cool-component standard X-ray jets is typical of that in the blowout X-ray jets, suggesting that the closed bipolar magnetic field in the jet base has substantial twist not only in all blowout X-ray jets but also in many standard X-ray jets. We point out that our results for the dichotomy, lateral expansion, and axial rotation of X-ray jets add credence to published speculation that type-II spicules are miniature analogs of X-ray jets, are generated by granule-size emerging bipoles, and thereby carry enough energy to power the corona and solar wind.

  5. Spectroscopic parameters for solar-type stars with moderate-to-high rotation. New parameters for ten planet hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsantaki, M.; Sousa, S. G.; Santos, N. C.; Montalto, M.; Delgado-Mena, E.; Mortier, A.; Adibekyan, V.; Israelian, G.

    2014-10-01

    Context. Planetary studies demand precise and accurate stellar parameters as input for inferring the planetary properties. Different methods often provide different results that could lead to biases in the planetary parameters. Aims: In this work, we present a refinement of the spectral synthesis technique designed to treat fast rotating stars better. This method is used to derive precise stellar parameters, namely effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and rotational velocity. The procedure is tested for FGK stars with low and moderate-to-high rotation rates. Methods: The spectroscopic analysis is based on the spectral synthesis package Spectroscopy Made Easy (SME), which assumes Kurucz model atmospheres in LTE. The line list where the synthesis is conducted is comprised of iron lines, and the atomic data are derived after solar calibration. Results: The comparison of our stellar parameters shows good agreement with literature values, both for slowly and for fast rotating stars. In addition, our results are on the same scale as the parameters derived from the iron ionization and excitation method presented in our previous works. We present new atmospheric parameters for 10 transiting planet hosts as an update to the SWEET-Cat catalog. We also re-analyze their transit light curves to derive new updated planetary properties. Based on observations collected at the La Silla Observatory, ESO (Chile) with the FEROS spectrograph at the 2.2 m telescope (ESO runs ID 089.C-0444(A), 088.C-0892(A)) and with the HARPS spectrograph at the 3.6 m telescope (ESO runs ID 072.C-0488(E), 079.C-0127(A)); at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP, CNRS/OAMP), France, with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the 1.93 m telescope and at the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées (CNRS), France, with the NARVAL spectrograph at the 2 m Bernard Lyot Telescope (Run ID L131N11).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  6. Solar Magnetized Tornadoes: Rotational Motion in a Tornado-like Prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yang; Gömöry, Peter; Veronig, Astrid; Temmer, Manuela; Wang, Tongjiang; Vanninathan, Kamalam; Gan, Weiqun; Li, YouPing

    2014-04-01

    Su et al. proposed a new explanation for filament formation and eruption, where filament barbs are rotating magnetic structures driven by underlying vortices on the surface. Such structures have been noticed as tornado-like prominences when they appear above the limb. They may play a key role as the source of plasma and twist in filaments. However, no observations have successfully distinguished rotational motion of the magnetic structures in tornado-like prominences from other motions such as oscillation and counter-streaming plasma flows. Here we report evidence of rotational motions in a tornado-like prominence. The spectroscopic observations in two coronal lines were obtained from a specifically designed Hinode/EIS observing program. The data revealed the existence of both cold and million-degree-hot plasma in the prominence leg, supporting the so-called prominence-corona transition region. The opposite velocities at the two sides of the prominence and their persistent time evolution, together with the periodic motions evident in SDO/AIA dark structures, indicate a rotational motion of both cold and hot plasma with a speed of ~5 km s-1.

  7. SOLAR MAGNETIZED TORNADOES: ROTATIONAL MOTION IN A TORNADO-LIKE PROMINENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Yang; Veronig, Astrid; Temmer, Manuela; Vanninathan, Kamalam; Gömöry, Peter; Wang, Tongjiang; Gan, Weiqun; Li, YouPing

    2014-04-10

    Su et al. proposed a new explanation for filament formation and eruption, where filament barbs are rotating magnetic structures driven by underlying vortices on the surface. Such structures have been noticed as tornado-like prominences when they appear above the limb. They may play a key role as the source of plasma and twist in filaments. However, no observations have successfully distinguished rotational motion of the magnetic structures in tornado-like prominences from other motions such as oscillation and counter-streaming plasma flows. Here we report evidence of rotational motions in a tornado-like prominence. The spectroscopic observations in two coronal lines were obtained from a specifically designed Hinode/EIS observing program. The data revealed the existence of both cold and million-degree-hot plasma in the prominence leg, supporting the so-called prominence-corona transition region. The opposite velocities at the two sides of the prominence and their persistent time evolution, together with the periodic motions evident in SDO/AIA dark structures, indicate a rotational motion of both cold and hot plasma with a speed of ∼5 km s{sup –1}.

  8. Validation of the 3D AMR SIP-CESE Solar Wind Model for Four Carrington Rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xueshang; Yang, Liping; Xiang, Changqing; Jiang, Caowei; Ma, Xiaopeng; Wu, S. T.; Zhong, DingKun; Zhou, Yufen

    2012-07-01

    We carry out the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) implementation of our solar-interplanetary space-time conservation element and solution element (CESE) magnetohydrodynamic model (SIP-CESE MHD model) using a six-component grid system (Feng, Zhou, and Wu, Astrophys. J. 655, 1110, 2007; Feng et al., Astrophys. J. 723, 300, 2010). By transforming the governing MHD equations from the physical space ( x, y, z) to the computational space ( ξ, η, ζ) while retaining the form of conservation (Jiang et al., Solar Phys. 267, 463, 2010), the SIP-AMR-CESE MHD model is implemented in the reference coordinates with the aid of the parallel AMR package PARAMESH available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/paramesh/. Meanwhile, the volumetric heating source terms derived from the topology of the magnetic-field expansion factor and the minimum angular separation (at the photosphere) between an open-field foot point and its nearest coronal-hole boundary are also included. We show the preliminary results of applying the SIP-AMR-CESE MHD model for simulating the solar-wind background of different solar-activity phases by comparison with SOHO observations and other spacecraft data from OMNI. Our numerical results show overall good agreements in the solar corona and in interplanetary space with these multiple-spacecraft observations.

  9. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Southwest Solar Research Park (Formerly SolarCAT) Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Phoenix, Arizona (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-09-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  10. Two Rotational Discontinuities in Collision: An Alternate Interpretation to the Suggestion of Widespread "Magnetic Reconnection" in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Karamibadi, H. Y.; Vu, H. X.; Montag, P. K.

    2008-12-01

    With a general non-dissipative model of two interacting rotational discontinuities (RDs) with opposing phase velocities along B we have reproduced the recently reported suite of signatures interpreted as those of collisionless magnetic reconnection in the solar wind. This model has been derived analytically and also reinforced with novel hybrid simulations of the interaction. Nearly a complete degeneracy is thus illustrated between the experimental evidence used to support the solar wind reconnection interpretation and the highly probable passing of two RDs through one another in the solar wind plasma that is often modeled as a "sea" of Alfvenic turbulence. The recovered morphology includes (i) the characteristic Walen signature with opposing signs, (ii) the Hall signatures, (iii) the ion phase space beams, (iv) the inferred "reconnection" rate from the non-zero tangential electric field and (v) counter-streaming jets. There is already evidence in the solar wind from B-V correlations that Alfvenic power is propagating in both directions relative to the radial and hence magnetic field direction. From this fact it is clear that the likelihood of the reconnection interpretation of the oppositely signed B-V correlations goes like the product of two probabilities P(a)P(b): P(a) for the inference that the shears are opposing RD layers and P(b) that assesses the probability that an unmeasured electron current scale layer enabling collisionless reconnection is attached to the observed MHD patterns. The present paper explains the observation only assuming that P(a) is a high likely in the Alfven turbulence already documented in the interplanetary medium. None of the presented evidence is compelling that P(b) is appreciable. Thus, by Occam's razor the two RD interaction (without attending reconnection) interpretation is the more likely interpretation of the space data, pending further differentiation of these two possibilities.

  11. Sensitivity of tropical stratospheric and mesospheric ozone to short-term solar variability: observations vs chemistry climate model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    bossay, sébastien; marchand, marion; bekki, slimane; thuillier, gérard; hauchecorne, alain; lefèvre, franck; Onishi, tatsuo

    2014-05-01

    The response of stratospheric and mesospheric ozone in the tropics to short-term solar ultraviolet variations (i.e. 27-day solar rotational cycle) over the descending phases of two consecutive solar cycles (solar cycles 22 and 23) is investigated using daily ozone measurements (MLS on UARS and AURA, GOMOS on ENVISAT), reconstructed solar spectra variations and stratospheric chemistry-climate model calculations. Daily solar spectra are taken from the NRL-SSI solar reconstruction model. The chemistry-climate model is forced at the top by the reconstructed solar spectra, and at the surface by analyzed sea-surface temperatures and sea-ice. The solar variable for regression analysis is the UV flux at 205nm, within an atmospheric window region that is crucial for the ozone photochemistry. The same spectral analysis (cross-correlation, wavelet and fourier transform, coherence,…) is carried out on all the observations and model simulations, and for both periods. In the stratosphere, statistically significant correlation is found between around 1 and 10 hPa with a peak at about 4 hPa (~36 km) for both periods. However the ozone sensitivity to solar variations (defined as the percentage change in ozone for 1% change in solar 205nm flux) is two times weaker during the solar cycle 23 (0.2) than during the solar cycle 22 (0.4%/%). Moreover, wavelet transforms show that the magnitude and occurrence of the solar signal in ozone data is highly variable temporally and vanishes during several solar rotations. This intermittence is much more pronounced during the solar cycle 23 than during the solar cycle 22. The chemistry-climate model calculations are able to reproduce most of the features of the solar signal in tropical stratospheric ozone including the differences between the solar cycle 22 and 23. In the mesosphere, the analysis of the GOMOS data reveals a clear 27-day solar signal in ozone. The results have implications for the impact of solar variability on ozone and

  12. Precise spectroscopic parameters for solar-type stars with moderate-to-high rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsantaki, M.; Sousa, S.; Santos, N. C.; Montalto, M.

    2014-07-01

    One of the primary objectives of Gaia is to survey billions stars and build the most precise 3D map of the Milky Way. Automated techniques of spectral analysis are needed to perform a rapid and homogeneous processing of the data to provide precise and accurate stellar parameters, such as for the GAIA-ESO survey. In this context, our recent work is based on the spectral synthesis technique to derive parameters for both slowly and fast rotating stars (Tsantaki et al. 2014). The spectroscopic analysis was performed using the package Spectroscopy Made Easy (SME; Valenti & Piskunov 1996) and a specific methodology to deal with fast rotators (υsini up to 50 km/s). The spectral regions, including the atomic data of all the lines in our analysis are available online in SME readable format http://mariatsantaki.weebly.com;. A comparison between the parameters derived with our methodology and with the iron ionization and excitation method (e.g. Sousa et al. 2008; Tsantaki et al. 2013) shows that both results are on the same scale. Additionally, for fast rotating stars, our results are in good agreement with literature values when comparing to other methods. We are now able to provide parameters for a very wide group of stars: from giants to dwarfs and from slowly to fast rotating stars. Except for galactic studies, stellar parameters are important for the planetary characterization. We provided updated stellar and planetary properties for ten systems. The stellar parameters were compiled in the SWEET-Catalogue (https://www.astro.up.pt/resources/sweet-cat/).

  13. Rotational modulation of the chromospheric activity in the young solar-type star, X-1 Orionis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesgaard, A. M.; Simon, T.

    1982-01-01

    The IUE satellite was used to observe one of the youngest G stars (GO V) for which Duncan (1981) derives an age of 6 x 10 to the 8th power years from the Li abundance. Rotational modulation was looked for in the emission flux in the chromospheric and transition region lines of this star. Variations in the Ca 11 K-lines profile were studied with the CHF telescope at Mauna Kea. Results show that the same modulation of the emission flux of Ca 11 due to stellar rotation is present in the transition region feature of C IV and probably of He II. For other UV lines the modulation is not apparent, due to a more complex surface distribution of the active areas or supergranulation network, or a shorter lifetime of the conditions which give rise to these features, or to the uncertainities in the measured line strengths. The Mg II emission flux is constant to within + or - 3.4% implying a rather uniform distribution of Mg II emission areas. The Ca II emission not only shows a measurable variation in intensity but also variations in detailed line profile shape when observed at high resolution.

  14. Angular Distribution of Solar Wind Magnetic Field Vector at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, F.; Li, G.; Zhao, L.; Zhang, Y.; Khabarova, O.; Miao, B.; le Roux, J.

    2015-03-01

    We study the angular distribution of the solar wind magnetic field vector at 1 AU and its solar cycle dependence using ACE observations. A total of twelve 27.27 day (the duration of a solar rotation) intervals during the solar maximum, the solar minimum, as well as the ascending and descending phases of solar cycle 23 are examined. For all selected intervals, we obtain the angular distribution function {{f}τ }(α ), where α is the angle between the instantaneous solar wind magnetic field vector and the average background magnetic field vector, and τ is the period length for the averaging. Our results show that in all periods {{f}τ }(α ) has two populations, one at small angles and one at large angles. We suggest that the second population is due to the presence of current sheets in the solar wind. The solar-cycle dependence of {{f}τ }(α ) and a τ-scaling property of the second population of {{f}τ }(α ) are discussed. The τ scaling shows a clear dependence on the solar wind type. The implication of {{f}τ }(α ) for particle acceleration at interplanetary shocks driven by coronal mass ejections, such as those in solar energetic particle events, is also discussed.

  15. Sun-Relative Pointing for Dual-Axis Solar Trackers Employing Azimuth and Elevation Rotations

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Daniel; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2014-12-30

    Dual axis trackers employing azimuth and elevation rotations are common in the field of photovoltaic (PV) energy generation. Accurate sun-tracking algorithms are widely available. However, a steering algorithm has not been available to accurately point the tracker away from the sun such that a vector projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face falls along a desired path relative to the tracker face. We have developed an algorithm which produces the appropriate azimuth and elevation angles for a dual axis tracker when given the sun position, desired angle of incidence, and the desired projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face. Development of this algorithm was inspired by the need to accurately steer a tracker to desired sun-relative positions in order to better characterize the electro-optical properties of PV and CPV modules.

  16. Sun-Relative Pointing for Dual-Axis Solar Trackers Employing Azimuth and Elevation Rotations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Riley, Daniel; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2014-12-30

    Dual axis trackers employing azimuth and elevation rotations are common in the field of photovoltaic (PV) energy generation. Accurate sun-tracking algorithms are widely available. However, a steering algorithm has not been available to accurately point the tracker away from the sun such that a vector projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face falls along a desired path relative to the tracker face. We have developed an algorithm which produces the appropriate azimuth and elevation angles for a dual axis tracker when given the sun position, desired angle of incidence, and the desired projection of the sun beam ontomore » the tracker face. Development of this algorithm was inspired by the need to accurately steer a tracker to desired sun-relative positions in order to better characterize the electro-optical properties of PV and CPV modules.« less

  17. Revisiting a possible relationship between solar activity and Earth rotation variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarca del Rio, R.; Gambis, D.

    2011-10-01

    A variety of studies have searched to establish a possible relationship between the solar activity and earth variations (Danjon, 1958-1962; Challinor, 1971; Currie, 1980, Gambis, 1990). We are revisiting previous studies (Bourget et al, 1992, Abarca del Rio et al, 2003, Marris et al, 2004) concerning the possible relationship between solar activity variability and length of day (LOD) variations at decadal time scales. Assuming that changes in AAM for the entire atmosphere are accompanied by equal, but opposite, changes in the angular momentum of the earth it is possible to infer changes in LOD from global AAM time series, through the relation : delta (LOD) (ms) = 1.68 10^29 delta(AAM) (kgm2/s) (Rosen and Salstein, 1983), where δ(LOD) is given in milliseconds. Given the close relationship at seasonal to interannual time's scales between LOD and the Atmospheric Angular Momentum (AAM) (see Abarca del Rio et al., 2003) it is possible to infer from century long atmospheric simulations what may have been the variability in the associated LOD variability throughout the last century. In the absence of a homogeneous century long LOD time series, we take advantage of the recent atmospheric reanalyzes extending since 1871 (Compo, Whitaker and Sardeshmukh, 2006). The atmospheric data (winds) of these reanalyzes allow computing AAM up to the top of the atmosphere; though here only troposphere data (up to 100 hPa) was taken into account.

  18. The structure of the solar wind in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Christina On-Yee

    2010-12-01

    This dissertation is devoted to expanding our understanding of the solar wind structure in the inner heliosphere and variations therein with solar activity. Using spacecraft observations and numerical models, the origins of the large-scale structures and long-term trends of the solar wind are explored in order to gain insights on how our Sun determines the space environments of the terrestrial planets. I use long term measurements of the solar wind density, velocity, interplanetary magnetic field, and particles, together with models based on solar magnetic field data, to generate time series of these properties that span one solar rotation27 days). From these time series, I assemble and obtain the synoptic overviews of the solar wind properties. The resulting synoptic overviews show that the solar wind around Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars is a complex co-rotating structure with recurring features and occasional transients. During quiet solar conditions, the heliospheric current sheet, which separates the positive interplanetary magnetic field from the negative, usually has a remarkably steady two- or four-sector structure that persists for many solar rotations. Within the sector boundaries are the slow and fast speed solar wind streams that originate from the open coronal magnetic field sources that map to the ecliptic. At the sector boundaries, compressed high-density and the related high-dynamic pressure ridges form where streams from different coronal source regions interact. High fluxes of energetic particles also occur at the boundaries, and are seen most prominently during the quiet solar period. The existence of these recurring features depends on how long-lived are their source regions. In the last decade, 3D numerical solar wind models have become more widely available. They provide important scientific tools for obtaining a more global view of the inner heliosphere and of the relationships between conditions at Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars. When

  19. A solar dynamo surface wave at the interface between convection and nonuniform rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1993-05-01

    A simple dynamo surface wave is presented to illustrate the basic principles of a dynamo operating in the thin layer of shear and suppressed eddy diffusion beneath the cyclonic convection in the convection zone of the sun. It is shown that the restriction of the shear delta(Omega)/delta(r) to a region below the convective zone provides the basic mode with a greatly reduced turbulent diffusion coefficient in the region of strong azimuthal field. The dynamo takes on the character of a surface wave tied to the lower surface z = 0 of the convective zone. There is a substantial body of evidence suggesting a fibril state for the principal flux bundles beneath the surface of the sun, with fundamental implications for the solar dynamo.

  20. ROTATING SOLAR JETS IN SIMULATIONS OF FLUX EMERGENCE WITH THERMAL CONDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Fang; Fan, Yuhong; McIntosh, Scott W.

    2014-07-01

    We study the formation of coronal jets through numerical simulation of the emergence of a twisted magnetic flux rope into a pre-existing open magnetic field. Reconnection inside the emerging flux rope in addition to that between the emerging and pre-existing fields give rise to the violent eruption studied. The simulated event closely resembles the coronal jets ubiquitously observed by the X-Ray Telescope on board Hinode and demonstrates that heated plasma is driven into the extended atmosphere above. Thermal conduction implemented in the model allows us to qualitatively compare simulated and observed emission from such events. We find that untwisting field lines after the reconnection drive spinning outflows of plasma in the jet column. The Poynting flux in the simulated jet is dominated by the untwisting motions of the magnetic fields loaded with high-density plasma. The simulated jet is comprised of ''spires'' of untwisting field that are loaded with a mixture of cold and hot plasma and exhibit rotational motion of order 20 km s{sup –1} and match contemporary observations.

  1. SUPERFLARES ON SOLAR-TYPE STARS OBSERVED WITH KEPLER II. PHOTOMETRIC VARIABILITY OF SUPERFLARE-GENERATING STARS: A SIGNATURE OF STELLAR ROTATION AND STARSPOTS

    SciTech Connect

    Notsu, Yuta; Shibayama, Takuya; Notsu, Shota; Nagao, Takashi; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Honda, Satoshi; Ishii, Takako T.; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2013-07-10

    We performed simple spot-model calculations for quasi-periodic brightness variations of solar-type stars showing superflares using Kepler photometric data. Most of the superflare stars show quasi-periodic brightness modulations with a typical period of one to a few tens of days. Our results indicate that these brightness variations can be explained by the rotation of a star with fairly large starspots. Using the results of the period analysis, we investigated the relation between the energy and frequency of superflares and the rotation period. Stars with relatively slower rotation rates can still produce flares that are as energetic as those of more rapidly rotating stars although the average flare frequency is lower for more slowly rotating stars. We found that the energy of superflares is related to the total coverage of the starspot. The correlation between the spot coverage and the flare energy in superflares is similar to that in solar flares. These results suggest that the energy of superflares can be explained by the magnetic energy stored around the starspots.

  2. Forced periodic motions by solar radiation pressure around uniformly rotating asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Xiaosheng; Scheeres, Daniel J.; Hou, Xiyun

    2016-06-01

    Since asteroids generally have relatively weak gravity fields, solar radiation pressure (SRP) is a major perturbation for orbits in their vicinity, which under certain circumstances can be even larger than the third-body gravitational perturbations. In this work, by adopting a triaxial ellipsoid model for the asteroid and taking into account of SRP, the forced periodic motions caused by SRP around equilibrium points are studied in the body-fixed frame of the asteroid. For forced periodic motions around saddle equilibrium points, we find that the SRP does not alter their stability yet does change the morphology of the associated invariant manifolds. For forced periodic motions around center equilibrium points, different types of orbits are identified. Their stability changes with different parameters, i.e., the asteroid's shape and spin period, the latitude of the Sun, and the magnitude of SRP. Evolution of these forced periodic motions is described in detail and some interesting phenomena are found. Stability results found for our ideal model with the Sun at a fixed distance and latitude are shown to predict stability regions in a realistic model with the Sun on inclined and elliptic orbits. Though our work is based on the simplified triaxial ellipsoid model, similar computation method and conclusions should also be applicable to real asteroids.

  3. Measuring rotation periods of solar-like stars using TIGRE. A study of periodic CaII H+K S-index variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hempelmann, A.; Mittag, M.; Gonzalez-Perez, J. N.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Schröder, K. P.; Rauw, G.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The rotation period of a star is a key parameter both for the stellar dynamo that generates magnetic fields as well as for stellar differential rotation. Aims: We present the results from the first year of monitoring a sample of solar-like stars by the TIGRE facility in Guanajuato (Mexico), which will study rotation in solar analogs. Methods: TIGRE is an automatically operating 1.2 m telescope equipped with an Échelle spectrograph with a spectral resolution of 20 000, which covers a spectral range of between 3800 and 8800 Å. A main task is the monitoring the stellar activity of cool stars, mainly in the emission cores of the CaII H and K lines. We observed a number of stars with a sampling between 1-3 days over one year. Results: A total number of 95 stars were observed between August 1 2013 and July 31 2014, the total number of spectra taken for this program was appoximately 2700. For almost a third of the sample stars the number of observations was rather low (less than 20), mainly because of bad weather. Fifty-four stars show a periodic signal but often with low significance. Only 24 stars exhibit a significant period. We interpret these signals as stellar rotation. For about half of them the rotation periods were already previously known, in which case our period measurements are usually in good agreement with the literature values. Besides the periodic signals, trends are frequently observed in the time series. Conclusions: TIGRE is obviously able to detect stellar rotation periods in the CaII H+K emission cores when the time series contains a sufficient number of data points. However, this is frequently not achievable during the wet summer season in Guanajuato. Hence, future estimates of rotation periods will concentrate on stars that are observable during the winter season from October until April.

  4. Topside ionospheric response to solar EUV variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Phillip C.; Hawkins, Jessica M.

    2016-02-01

    We present an analysis of 23 years of thermal plasma measurements in the topside ionosphere from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft. The H+/O+ ratio and density vary dramatically with the solar cycle; cross-correlation coefficients between E10.7 and the daily averaged densities are greater than 0.85. The ionospheric parameters also vary dramatically with season, particularly at latitudes away from the equator where the solar zenith angle varies greatly with season. There are also 27 day solar rotation periodicities in the density, associated with periodicities in the directly measured solar EUV flux. Empirical orthogonal function analysis captures over 95% of the variation in the density in the first two principal components. The first principal component (PC1) is clearly associated with the solar EUV while the second principal component (PC2) is clearly associated with the solar zenith angle variation. The magnitude of the variation of the response of the topside ionosphere to solar EUV variability is shown to be closely related to the ionospheric composition. This is interpreted as the result of the effect of composition on the scale height in the topside ionosphere and the "pivot effect" in which the variation in density near the F2 peak is amplified by a factor of e at an altitude a scale height above the F2 peak. When the topside ionosphere is H+ dominated during solar minimum, DMSP may be much less than a scale height above the F2 peak while during solar maximum, when it is O+ dominated, DMSP may be several scale heights above the F2 peak.

  5. One common structural peculiarity of the Solar system bodies including the star, planets, satellites and resulting from their globes rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, , G. G.

    2008-09-01

    be less dense diminishing its angular momentum. A crosscutting wave rippling producing chains of square craters here is also clearly visible. Sun presents a special case because its equatorial region rotates faster than the higher latitudes. It could be attributed to an important loss of angular momentum by this region during formation of planets (significant transfer of momentum to the planetary system) and its compensation according to the Le Chatelier rule by the faster rotation. But, in turn, this faster rotation causes an intensive destruction of this region in tendency to keep " status quo". The photosphere is "perforated" by darker colder spots deep up to 300 (maybe more?) km - famous solar spots long to 200000 km and smaller pores (Fig. 7). In the chromosphere there is a remarkable loss of "heavy" Ca ion from this region (compare with the loss of methane from the equatorial region of Saturn). Under more close inspection of other planetary bodies this uniform separation of tropical and extra-tropical zones should be discovered.

  6. A Different View of Solar Cycle Spectral Variations: Total Energy during Isolated Solar Outburst Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, T. N.

    2014-12-01

    The solar spectral irradiance (SSI) varies on all time scales, and these variations are highly dependent on wavelength. The daily and 27-day solar rotation variations are best understood from many different satellite observations over the past five decades. There has also been much progress in understanding the longer term 11-year solar activity cycle variations. However, instrument degradation corrections are not as accurate as sometimes needed for long-term studies, thus there can be challenges in understanding the solar cycle variations at some wavelengths. In particular, the Harder et al. (GRL, 36, L07801, 2009) results for the near ultraviolet (NUV), visible, and near infrared (NIR) have indicated more NUV variation and some out-of-phase variation for some visible and NIR wavelengths. These variations have been challenged as they are inconsistent with some prior measurements and with some SSI models. A different approach to study the solar cycle variations, but without the need for long-term instrument degradation corrections, is to examine the total energy during isolated solar outburst periods. A solar active region typically appears suddenly and then takes about seven months to decay and disperse back into the quiet Sun network. The isolated outburst period refers to when only one major active region dominates the irradiance variation. The solar outburst energy, which includes all phases of active region evolution, could be considered to be the primary cause for solar cycle variations. Using TIMED, SDO, and SORCE extreme ultraviolet and far ultraviolet observations, the outburst energy (7 months) spectral variation is found to be very similar to their multi-year (solar cycle) variation. The same approach is applied for studying the NUV-Visible-NIR variations from SORCE, and these new results provide a different, and perhaps more accurate, indicator of SSI variation.

  7. Internal rotation of the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Dziembowski, W. A.; Goode, P. R.; Gough, D. O.; Harvey, J. W.; Leibacher, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The frequency difference between prograde and retrograde sectoral solar oscillations is analyzed to determine the rotation rate of the solar interior, assuming no latitudinal dependence. Much of the solar interior rotates slightly less rapidly than the surface, while the innermost part apparently rotates more rapidly. The resulting solar gravitational quadrupole moment is J2 = (1.7 + or - 0.4) x 10 to the -7th and provides a negligible contribution to current planetary tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity.

  8. ON A TRANSITION FROM SOLAR-LIKE CORONAE TO ROTATION-DOMINATED JOVIAN-LIKE MAGNETOSPHERES IN ULTRACOOL MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Schrijver, Carolus J.

    2009-07-10

    For main-sequence stars beyond spectral type M5, the characteristics of magnetic activity common to warmer solar-like stars change into the brown-dwarf domain: the surface magnetic field becomes more dipolar and the evolution of the field patterns slows, the photospheric plasma is increasingly neutral and decoupled from the magnetic field, chromospheric and coronal emissions weaken markedly, and the efficiency of rotational braking rapidly decreases. Yet, radio emission persists, and has been argued to be dominated by electron-cyclotron maser emission instead of the gyrosynchrotron emission from warmer stars. These properties may signal a transition in the stellar extended atmosphere. Stars warmer than about M5 have a solar-like corona and wind-sustained heliosphere in which the atmospheric activity is powered by convective motions that move the magnetic field. Stars cooler than early-L, in contrast, may have a Jovian-like rotation-dominated magnetosphere powered by the star's rotation in a scaled-up analog of the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. A dimensional scaling relationship for rotation-dominated magnetospheres by Fan et al. is consistent with this hypothesis.

  9. Observations of turkey eggs stored up to 27 days and incubated for 8 days: embryo developmental stage and weight differences and the differentiation of fertilized from unfertilized germinal discs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For logistical reasons, egg storage prior to incubation is a growing practice in the commercial turkey industry. In the following study, 5 groups of eggs each from inseminated and virgin hens were stored for progressively increasing periods of time (5 days or less to 21-27 days) and incubated. At ...

  10. The dynamics of large-scale meridional flows in the solar interior, and their role in establishing the observed rotational balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaud, P.

    2009-12-01

    The rotation profile of the solar interior, as observed by helioseismology, exhibits a sharp transition at the base of the convection zone. Above the radiative-convective interface, strong differential rotation is observed while the radiative zone itself is in near-uniform rotation. To date, the only self-consistent published model of the dynamics of the transition region, the solar tachocline, is the one proposed by Gough & McIntyre (1998). In this model, large-scale meridional flows are "gyroscopically pumped" by the differential rotation in the convection zone, down-well into the radiative zone where they encounter a large-scale primordial magnetic field. The magnetic field is thereby confined by the down-welling flows within the radiative zone only, and imposes the observed differential rotation. In this talk, I review a series of new results inspired by this original idea, each of which provides insight into a different aspect of the problem. The new picture which emerges from these related explorations clarifies many outstanding issues, and provides guidance for future investigations. These results begin with a study of the angular-momentum balance of the radiative interior (Garaud & Guervilly 2009), assuming the presence of a confined magnetic field and neglecting the role of meridional flows (a model which is identical to the one originally proposed by Ruediger & Kitchatinov, 1997). We show analytically that this model systematically fails to explain the observed value of the rotation rate of the radiative zone. This implies that, within the Gough & McIntyre model framework, the dynamics of the convection zone flows in the tachocline are crucial not only for field confinement but also for angular-momentum transport. We then present an exhaustive study of a toy model for gyroscopic pumping of large-scale meridional flows by the solar convection zone (Garaud & Acevedo-Arreguin 2009), which 1. illustrates the phenomenon pedagogically 2. quantifies the

  11. Solar FLAG hare and hounds: on the extraction of rotational p-mode splittings from seismic, Sun-as-a-star data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin, W. J.; Appourchaux, T.; Baudin, F.; Boumier, P.; Elsworth, Y.; Fletcher, S. T.; Fossat, E.; García, R. A.; Isaak, G. R.; Jiménez, A.; Jiménez-Reyes, S. J.; Lazrek, M.; Leibacher, J. W.; Lochard, J.; New, R.; Pallé, P.; Régulo, C.; Salabert, D.; Seghouani, N.; Toutain, T.; Wachter, R.

    2006-06-01

    We report on results from the first solar Fitting at Low-Angular degree Group (solar FLAG) hare-and-hounds exercise. The group is concerned with the development of methods for extracting the parameters of low-l solar p-mode data (`peak bagging'), collected by Sun-as-a-star observations. Accurate and precise estimation of the fundamental parameters of the p modes is a vital pre-requisite of all subsequent studies. Nine members of the FLAG (the `hounds') fitted an artificial 3456-d data set. The data set was made by the `hare' (WJC) to simulate full-disc Doppler velocity observations of the Sun. The rotational frequency splittings of the l = 1, 2 and 3 modes were the first parameter estimates chosen for scrutiny. Significant differences were uncovered at l = 2 and 3 between the fitted splittings of the hounds. Evidence is presented that suggests this unwanted bias had its origins in several effects. The most important came from the different way in which the hounds modelled the visibility ratio of the different rotationally split components. Our results suggest that accurate modelling of the ratios is vital to avoid the introduction of significant bias in the estimated splittings. This is of importance not only for studies of the Sun, but also of the solar analogues that will be targets for asteroseismic campaigns. Solar FLAG URL: http://bison.ph.bham.ac.uk/~wjc/Research/FLAG.html E-mail: wjc@bison.ph.bham.ac.uk ‡ George Isaak passed away in 2005 June 5, prior to the completion of this work. He is greatly missed by us all.

  12. THREE-DIMENSIONAL FEATURES OF THE OUTER HELIOSPHERE DUE TO COUPLING BETWEEN THE INTERSTELLAR AND INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELDS. III. THE EFFECTS OF SOLAR ROTATION AND ACTIVITY CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Borovikov, Sergey N.; Zank, Gary P.; Ogino, Tatsuki E-mail: snb0003@uah.edu E-mail: ogino@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2009-05-10

    We investigate the effects of the 11 year solar cycle and 25 day rotation period of the Sun on the interaction of the solar wind (SW) with the local interstellar medium (LISM). Our models take into account the partially ionized character of the LISM and include momentum and energy transfer between the ionized and neutral components. We assume that the interstellar magnetic field vector belongs to the hydrogen deflection plane as discovered in the SOHO SWAN experiment. This plane is inclined at an angle of about 60 deg. toward the ecliptic plane of the Sun, as suggested in recent publications relating the local interstellar cloud properties to the radio emission observed by Voyager 1. It is assumed that the latitudinal extent of the boundary between the slow and fast SW regions, as well as the angle between the Sun's rotation and magnetic-dipole axes, are periodic functions of time, while the polarity of the interstellar magnetic field changes sign every 11 years at the solar maximum. The global variation of the SW-LISM interaction pattern, the excursions of the termination shock and the heliopause, and parameter distributions in certain directions are investigated. The analysis of the behavior of the wavy heliospheric current sheet in the supersonic SW region shows the importance of neutral atoms on its dynamics.

  13. PRE-SUPERNOVA EVOLUTION OF ROTATING SOLAR METALLICITY STARS IN THE MASS RANGE 13-120 M {sub Sun} AND THEIR EXPLOSIVE YIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Chieffi, Alessandro; Limongi, Marco E-mail: marco.limongi@oa-roma.inaf.it

    2013-02-10

    We present the first set of a new generation of models of massive stars with a solar composition extending between 13 and 120 M {sub Sun }, computed with and without the effects of rotation. We included two instabilities induced by rotation: the meridional circulation and the shear instability. We implemented two alternative schemes to treat the transport of the angular momentum: the advection-diffusion formalism and the simpler purely diffusive one. The full evolution from the pre-main sequence up to the pre-supernova stage is followed in detail with a very extended nuclear network. The explosive yields are provided for a variety of possible mass cuts and are available at the Web site http://www.iasf-roma.inaf.it/orfeo/public{sub h}tml. We find that both the He and the CO core masses are larger than those of their non-rotating counterparts. Also the C abundance left by the He burning is lower than in the non-rotating case, especially for stars with an initial mass of 13-25 M {sub Sun }, and this affects the final mass-radius relation, basically the final binding energy, at the pre-supernova stage. The elemental yields produced by a generation of stars rotating initially at 300 km s{sup -1} do not change substantially with respect to those produced by a generation of non-rotating massive stars, the main differences being a slight overproduction of the weak s-component and a larger production of F. Since rotation also affects the mass-loss rate, either directly or indirectly, we find substantial differences in the lifetimes as O-type and Wolf-Rayet subtypes between the rotating and non-rotating models. The maximum mass exploding as Type IIP supernova ranges between 15 and 20 M {sub Sun} in both sets of models (this value depends basically on the larger mass-loss rates in the red supergiant phase due to the inclusion of the dust-driven wind). This limiting value is in remarkably good agreement with current estimates.

  14. Pre-supernova Evolution of Rotating Solar Metallicity Stars in the Mass Range 13-120 M ⊙ and their Explosive Yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chieffi, Alessandro; Limongi, Marco

    2013-02-01

    We present the first set of a new generation of models of massive stars with a solar composition extending between 13 and 120 M ⊙, computed with and without the effects of rotation. We included two instabilities induced by rotation: the meridional circulation and the shear instability. We implemented two alternative schemes to treat the transport of the angular momentum: the advection-diffusion formalism and the simpler purely diffusive one. The full evolution from the pre-main sequence up to the pre-supernova stage is followed in detail with a very extended nuclear network. The explosive yields are provided for a variety of possible mass cuts and are available at the Web site http://www.iasf-roma.inaf.it/orfeo/public_html. We find that both the He and the CO core masses are larger than those of their non-rotating counterparts. Also the C abundance left by the He burning is lower than in the non-rotating case, especially for stars with an initial mass of 13-25 M ⊙, and this affects the final mass-radius relation, basically the final binding energy, at the pre-supernova stage. The elemental yields produced by a generation of stars rotating initially at 300 km s-1 do not change substantially with respect to those produced by a generation of non-rotating massive stars, the main differences being a slight overproduction of the weak s-component and a larger production of F. Since rotation also affects the mass-loss rate, either directly or indirectly, we find substantial differences in the lifetimes as O-type and Wolf-Rayet subtypes between the rotating and non-rotating models. The maximum mass exploding as Type IIP supernova ranges between 15 and 20 M ⊙ in both sets of models (this value depends basically on the larger mass-loss rates in the red supergiant phase due to the inclusion of the dust-driven wind). This limiting value is in remarkably good agreement with current estimates.

  15. Stratospheric and mesospheric pressure-temperature profiles from rotational analysis of CO2 lines in atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy/ATLAS 1 infrared solar occultation spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiller, G. P.; Gunson, M. R.; Lowes, L. L.; Abrams, M. C.; Raper, O. F.; Farmer, C. B.; Zander, R.; Rinsland, C. P.

    1995-01-01

    A simple, classical, and expedient method for the retrieval of atmospheric pressure-temperature profiles has been applied to the high-resolution infrared solar absorption spectra obtained with the atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument. The basis for this method is a rotational analysis of retrieved apparent abundances from CO2 rovibrational absorption lines, employing existing constituent concentration retrieval software used in the analysis of data returned by ATMOS. Pressure-temperature profiles derived from spectra acquired during the ATLAS 1 space shuttle mission of March-April 1992 are quantitatively evaluated and compared with climatological and meteorological data as a means of assessing the validity of this approach.

  16. Stratospheric and mesospheric pressure-temperature profiles from rotational analysis of CO2 lines in atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy/ATLAS 1 infrared solar occultation spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Stiller, G.P.; Gunson, M.R.; Lowes, L.L.; Abrams, M.C.; Raper, O.F.; Farmer, C.B.; Zander, R.; Rinsland, C.P. |||

    1995-02-01

    A simple, classical, and expedient method for the retrieval of atmospheric pressure-temperature profiles has been applied to the high-resolution infrared solar absorption spectra obtained with the atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument. The basis for this method is a rotational analysis of retrieved apparent abundances from CO2 rovibrational absorption lines, employing existing constituent concentration retrieval software used in the analysis of data returned by ATMOS. Pressure-temperature profiles derived from spectra acquired during the ATLAS 1 space shuttle mission of March-April 1992 are quantitatively evaluated and compared with climatological and meteorological data as a means of assessing the validity of this approach.

  17. On the determination of heliographic positions and rotation velocities of sunspots. III - Effects caused by wrong solar image radii and their corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balthasar, H.; Lustig, G.; Woehl, H.

    1984-03-01

    The effect of incorrect solar-image radius on the determination of the rotation velocity of sunspots is analyzed by comparing data collected at Sonnenobservatorium Kanzelhoehe with those from Locarno and Greenwich (for May and September, 1982, and for 27 stable recurrent sunspots during 1950-1976, respectively). While the Locarno data are insufficient to draw quantitative conclusions, the Kanzelhoehe/Greenwich comparison reveals a time-independent discrepancy of 0.004 deg/day, corresponding to a velocity difference of less than 1 m/s, from the 'true' values determined from successive passages through the central meridian.

  18. Solar Wind Helium Abundance as a Function of Speed and Heliographic Latitude: Variation through a Solar Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasper, J. C.; Stenens, M. L.; Stevens, M. L.; Lazarus, A. J.; Steinberg, J. T.; Ogilvie, Keith W.

    2006-01-01

    We present a study of the variation of the relative abundance of helium to hydrogen in the solar wind as a function of solar wind speed and heliographic latitude over the previous solar cycle. The average values of A(sub He), the ratio of helium to hydrogen number densities, are calculated in 25 speed intervals over 27-day Carrington rotations using Faraday Cup observations from the Wind spacecraft between 1995 and 2005. The higher speed and time resolution of this study compared to an earlier work with the Wind observations has led to the discovery of three new aspects of A(sub He), modulation during solar minimum from mid-1995 to mid-1997. First, we find that for solar wind speeds between 350 and 415 km/s, A(sub He), varies with a clear six-month periodicity, with a minimum value at the heliographic equatorial plane and a typical gradient of 0.01 per degree in latitude. For the slow wind this is a 30% effect. We suggest that the latitudinal gradient may be due to an additional dependence of coronal proton flux on coronal field strength or the stability of coronal loops. Second, once the gradient is subtracted, we find that A(sub He), is a remarkably linear function of solar wind speed. Finally, we identify a vanishing speed, at which A(sub He), is zero, is 259 km/s and note that this speed corresponds to the minimum solar wind speed observed at one AU. The vanishing speed may be related to previous theoretical work in which enhancements of coronal helium lead to stagnation of the escaping proton flux. During solar maximum the A(sub He), dependences on speed and latitude disappear, and we interpret this as evidence of two source regions for slow solar wind in the ecliptic plane, one being the solar minimum streamer belt and the other likely being active regions.

  19. Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Escalante Tri-State - Prewitt, New Mexico (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2012-11-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  20. The International Space Station (ISS) Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ): Materials & Processes (M&P) Lessons Learned for a Large, Rotating Spacecraft Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) utilizes two large rotating mechanisms, the solar alpha rotary joints (SARJs), as part of the solar arrays' alignment system for more efficient power generation. Each SARJ is a 10.3m circumference, nitrided 15-5PH steel race ring of triangular cross-section, with 12 sets of trundle bearing assemblies transferring load across the rolling joint. The SARJ mechanism rotates continuously and slowly - once every orbit, or every 90 minutes. In 2007, the starboard SARJ suffered a lubrication failure, resulting in severe damage (spalling) to one of the race ring surfaces. Extensive effort was conducted to prevent the port SARJ from suffering the same failure, and fortunately that effort was ultimately successful in also recovering the functionality of the starboard SARJ. The M&P engineering function was key in determining the cause of failure and the means for mechanism recovery. From a M&P lessons-learned perspective, observations are made concerning the original SARJ design parameters (boundary conditions), the perceived need for nitriding the race ring, the test conditions employed during qualification, the environmental controls used for the hardware preflight, and the lubrication robustness necessary for complex kinematic mechanisms expecting high-reliability and long-life.

  1. Changes in the earth's rate of rotation between A.D. 1672 and 1806 as deduced from solar eclipse timings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, F. R.; Lieske, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    Solar eclipse timings measured between A.D. 1672 and 1806 are analyzed to study the variation of Delta T (= ET - UT) over this interval. These solar eclipse observations confirm the results of Brouwer (1952), Martin (1969), and Stephenson and Morrison (1969) which were obtained from the analysis of occultations in this period. It is believed that Goldstein's (1985) analysis inadequately represents the changes in Delta T.

  2. The Solar Rotation in the 1930s from the Sunspot and Flocculi Catalogs of the Ebro Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paula, V.; Curto, J. J.; Casas, R.

    2016-09-01

    The tables of sunspot and flocculi heliographic positions included in the catalogs published by the Ebro Observatory in the 1930s have recently been recovered and converted into digital format by using optical character recognition (OCR) technology. We here analyzed these data by computing the angular velocity of several sunspot and flocculi groups. A difference was found in the rotational velocity for sunspots and flocculi groups at high latitudes, and we also detected an asymmetry between the northern and southern hemispheres, which is especially marked for the flocculi groups. The results were then fitted with a differential-rotation law [ ω=a+b sin2 B] to compare the data obtained with the results published by other authors. A dependence on the latitude that is consistent with former studies was found. Finally, we studied the possible relationship between the sunspot/flocculi group areas and their corresponding angular velocity. There are strong indications that the rotational velocity of a sunspot/flocculi group is reduced (in relation to the differential rotation law) when its maximum area is larger.

  3. Deceleration of Alpha Particles in the Solar Wind by Instabilities and the Rotational Force: Implications for Heating, Azimuthal Flow, and the Parker Spiral Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verscharen, Daniel; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Bourouaine, Sofiane; Hollweg, Joseph V.

    2015-06-01

    Protons and alpha particles in the fast solar wind are only weakly collisional and exhibit a number of non-equilibrium features, including relative drifts between particle species. Two non-collisional mechanisms have been proposed for limiting differential flow between alpha particles and protons: plasma instabilities and the rotational force. Both mechanisms decelerate the alpha particles. In this paper, we derive an analytic expression for the rate {Q}{flow} at which energy is released by alpha-particle deceleration, accounting for azimuthal flow and conservation of total momentum. We show that instabilities control the deceleration of alpha particles at r\\lt {r}{crit}, and the rotational force controls the deceleration of alpha particles at r\\gt {r}{crit}, where {r}{crit}≃ 2.5 {AU} in the fast solar wind in the ecliptic plane. We find that {Q}{flow} is positive at r\\lt {r}{crit} and {Q}{flow}=0 at r≥slant {r}{crit}, consistent with the previous finding that the rotational force does not lead to a release of energy. We compare the value of {Q}{flow} at r\\lt {r}{crit} with empirical heating rates for protons and alpha particles, denoted {Q}p and {Q}α , deduced from in situ measurements of fast-wind streams from the Helios and Ulysses spacecraft. We find that {Q}{flow} exceeds {Q}α at r\\lt 1 {AU}, and that {Q}{flow}/{Q}p decreases with increasing distance from the Sun from a value of about one at r = 0.29–0.42 AU to about 1/4 at 1 AU. We conclude that the continuous energy input from alpha-particle deceleration at r\\lt {r}{crit} makes an important contribution to the heating of the fast solar wind. We also discuss the implications of the alpha-particle drift for the azimuthal flow velocities of the ions and for the Parker spiral magnetic field.

  4. Modeled soft X-ray solar irradiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent

    1994-01-01

    Solar soft X-rays have historically been inaccurately modeled in both relative variations and absolute magnitudes by empirical solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance models. This is a result of the use of a limited number of rocket data sets which were primarily associated with the calibration of the AE-E satellite EUV data set. In this work, the EUV91 solar EUV irradiance model has been upgraded to improve the accuracy of the 3.0 to 5.0 nm relative irradiance variations. The absolute magnitude estimate of the flux in this wavelength range has also been revised upwards. The upgrade was accomplished by first digitizing the SOLRAD 11 satellite 4.4 to 6.0 nm measured energy flux data set, then extracting and extrapolating a derived 3.0 to 5.0 nm photon flux from these data, and finally by performing a correlation between these derived data and the daily and 81-day mean 10.7 cm radio flux emission using a multiple linear regression technique. A correlation coefficient of greater than 0.9 was obtained between the dependent and independent data sets. The derived and modeled 3.0 to 5.0 nm flux varies by more than an order of magnitude over a solar cycle, ranging from a flux below 1 x 10(exp 8) to a flux greater than 1 x 10(exp 9) photons per sq cm per sec. Solar rotational (27-day) variations in the flux magnitude are a factor of 2. The derived and modeled irradiance absolute values are an order of magnitude greater than previous values from rocket data sets related to the calibration of the AE-E satellite.

  5. Rotational Periods and Starspot Activity of Young Solar-Type Dwarfs in the Open Cluster IC 4665

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allain, S.; Bouvier, J.; Prosser, C.; Marschall, L. A.; Laaksonen, B. D.

    1995-01-01

    We present the results of a V-band photometric monitoring survey of 15 late-type dwarfs in the young open cluster IC 4665. Low-amplitude periodic light variations are found for 8 stars and ascribed to the modulation by starspots that cover typically a few percent of the stellar disk. Periods range from 0.6 to 3.7 d, translating to equatorial velocities between 13 and 93 km/s. That no period longer than 4 d was detected suggests a relative paucity of extremely slow rotators (V(sub eq) much less than 10 km/s) among late-type dwarfs in IC 4665. The fractional number of slow rotators in IC 4665 is similar to that of Alpha Per cluster, suggesting that IC 4665 is close in age to Alpha Per (approx. 50 Myr).

  6. EXPLOSIVE NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN THE NEUTRINO-DRIVEN ASPHERICAL SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION OF A NON-ROTATING 15 M{sub sun} STAR WITH SOLAR METALLICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Shin-ichiro; Kotake, Kei; Hashimoto, Masa-aki; Ono, Masaomi; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2011-09-01

    We investigate explosive nucleosynthesis in a non-rotating 15 M{sub sun} star with solar metallicity that explodes by a neutrino-heating supernova (SN) mechanism aided by both standing accretion shock instability (SASI) and convection. To trigger explosions in our two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we approximate the neutrino transport with a simple light-bulb scheme and systematically change the neutrino fluxes emitted from the protoneutron star. By a post-processing calculation, we evaluate abundances and masses of the SN ejecta for nuclei with a mass number {<=}70, employing a large nuclear reaction network. Aspherical abundance distributions, which are observed in nearby core-collapse SN remnants, are obtained for the non-rotating spherically symmetric progenitor, due to the growth of a low-mode SASI. The abundance pattern of the SN ejecta is similar to that of the solar system for models whose masses range between (0.4-0.5) M{sub sun} of the ejecta from the inner region ({<=}10, 000 km) of the precollapse core. For the models, the explosion energies and the {sup 56}Ni masses are {approx_equal} 10{sup 51}erg and (0.05-0.06) M{sub sun}, respectively; their estimated baryonic masses of the neutron star are comparable to the ones observed in neutron-star binaries. These findings may have little uncertainty because most of the ejecta is composed of matter that is heated via the shock wave and has relatively definite abundances. The abundance ratios for Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe observed in the Cygnus loop are reproduced well with the SN ejecta from an inner region of the 15 M{sub sun} progenitor.

  7. Rotation Periods for Cool Stars in the 4 Gyr old Open Cluster M67, The Solar–Stellar Connection, and the Applicability of Gyrochronology to at least Solar Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Sydney A.; Weingrill, Joerg; Fritzewski, Dario; Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Platais, Imants

    2016-05-01

    We report rotation periods for 20 cool (FGK) main sequence member stars of the 4 Gyr-old open cluster M67 (=NGC 2682), obtained by analyzing data from Campaign 5 of the K2 mission with the Kepler Space Telescope. The rotation periods delineate a sequence in the color–period diagram (CPD) of increasing period with redder color. This sequence represents a cross-section at the cluster age of the surface P = P(t, M), suggested in prior work to extend to at least solar age. The current Sun is located marginally (approximately 1σ) above M67 in the CPD, as its relative age leads us to expect, and lies on the P = P(t, M) surface to within measurement precision. We therefore conclude that the solar rotation rate is normal as compared with cluster stars, a fact that strengthens the solar–stellar connection. The agreement between the M67 rotation period measurements and prior predictions further implies that rotation periods, especially when coupled with appropriate supporting work such as spectroscopy, can provide reliable ages via gyrochronology for other similar FGK dwarfs from the early main sequence to solar age and likely until the main sequence turnoff. The M67 rotators have a rotational age of 4.2 Gyr with a standard deviation of 0.7 Gyr, implying that similar field stars can be age-dated to precisions of ∼17%. The rotational age of the M67 cluster as a whole is therefore 4.2 Gyr, but with a lower (averaged) uncertainty of 0.2 Gyr.

  8. The International Space Station (ISS) Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ): Materials & Processes (M&P) Lessons Learned for a Large, Spacecraft Rotating Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    2016-01-01

    The ISS utilizes two large rotating mechanisms, the SARJ, as part of the solar arrays alignment system for more efficient power generation. The SARJ is a 10.3m circumference, nitrided 15-5PH steel race ring of triangular cross-section, with 12 sets of trundle bearing assemblies transferring load across the rolling joint. The SARJ mechanism rotates continuously and slowly - once every orbit, or every 90 minutes. In 2008, the starboard SARJ suffered a lubrication failure, resulting in severe damage (spalling) of one of the race ring surfaces. Extensive effort was conducted to prevent the port SARJ from suffering the same failure, and fortunately was ultimately successful in recovering the functionality of the starboard SARJ. The M&P function was key in determining the cause of failure and the means for mechanism recovery. From a M&P lessons-learned perspective, observations are made concerning the original SARJ design parameters (boundary conditions), the perceived need for nitriding the race ring, the test conditions employed during qualification, the environmental controls used for the hardware preflight, and the lubrication robustness necessary for complex kinematic mechanisms expecting high-reliability and long-life.

  9. Solar wind interaction with small bodies. 2: What can Galileo's detection of magnetic rotations tell us about Gaspra and Ida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kivelson, M. G.; Wang, Z.; Joy, S.; Khurana, K. K.; Polanskey, C.; Southwood, D. J.; Walker, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    As the Galileo spacecraft passed the asteroids Gaspra in 1990 and Ida in 1993, the magnetometer recorded changes in the solar wind magnetic field that we associate with the presence of the nearby body. This paper focuses on the types of interactions that can produce perturbations in the solar wind. We have suggested that the interaction at Gaspra is consistent with expectations of flow diversion by a magnetic dipole moment and an associated 'magnetosphere' whose scale size is much larger than the diameter of the solid body. The conditions for the Ida flyby leave more room for ambiguity. The observations could plausibly be related to either interaction with a magnetized body or with a conducting body. We will report on details of the observations that may enable us to distinguish between the different types of interaction and to provide quantitative estimates of the physical properties of the asteroids themselves.

  10. Variability of the Lyman alpha flux with solar activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lean, J.L.; Skumanich, A.

    1983-07-01

    A three-component model of the solar chromosphere, developed from ground based observations of the Ca II K chromospheric emission, is used to calculate the variability of the Lyman alpha flux between 1969 and 1980. The Lyman alpha flux at solar minimum is required in the model and is taken as 2.32 x 10/sup 11/ photons/cm/sup 2//s. This value occurred during 1975 as well as in 1976 near the commencement of solar cycle 21. The model predicts that the Lyman alpha flux increases to as much as 5 x 10/sup 11/ photons/cm/sup 2//s at the maximum of the solar cycle. The ratio of the average fluxes for December 1979 (cycle maximum) and July 1976 (cycle minimum) is 1.9. During solar maximum the 27-day solar rotation is shown to cause the Lyman alpha flux to vary by as much as 40% or as little as 5%. The model also shows that the Lyman alpha flux varies over intermediate time periods of 2 to 3 years, as well as over the 11-year sunspot cycle. We conclude that, unlike the sunspot number and the 10.7-cm radio flux, the Lyman alpha flux had a variability that was approximately the same during each of the past three cycles. Lyman alpha fluxes calculated by the model are consistent with measurements of the Lyman alpha flux made by 11 of a total of 14 rocket experiments conducted during the period 1969--1980. The model explains satisfactorily the absolute magnitude, long-term trends, and the cycle variability seen in the Lyman alpha irradiances by the OSO 5 satellite experiment. The 27-day variability observed by the AE-E satellite experiment is well reproduced. However, the magntidue of the AE-E 1 Lyman alpha irradiances are higher than the model calculations by between 40% and 80%. We suggest that the assumed calibration of the AE-E irradiances is in error.

  11. Identification of the V3 vibration-rotation band of CF4 in balloon-borne infrared solar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Murcray, D. G.; Murcray, F. J.; Cook, G. R.; Van Allen, J. W.; Bonomo, F. S.; Blatherwick, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Infrared solar spectra in the 850 to 1350/cm region, at 0.02/cm resolution, were obtained during a balloon flight made on 27 October 1978 from Alamogordo, New Mexico. Analysis of the 1275-1290/cm region indicates that the atmospheric absorption lines of CH4, N2O, H2O, HNO3 and CO2 near 1283/cm are super-imposed on a broader absorption feature which we interpret as due to the V3 band of CF4. Fine structure of CF4 is also identified. Preliminary estimates from the sunset spectra show approximately 75 pptv CF4 near 25 km.

  12. Chromospheric activity and rotation of FGK stars in the solar vicinity. An estimation of the radial velocity jitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Arnáiz, R.; Maldonado, J.; Montes, D.; Eiroa, C.; Montesinos, B.

    2010-09-01

    Context. Chromospheric activity produces both photometric and spectroscopic variations that can be mistaken as planets. Large spots crossing the stellar disc can produce planet-like periodic variations in the light curve of a star. These spots clearly affect the spectral line profiles, and their perturbations alter the line centroids creating a radial velocity jitter that might “contaminate” the variations induced by a planet. Precise chromospheric activity measurements are needed to estimate the activity-induced noise that should be expected for a given star. Aims: We obtain precise chromospheric activity measurements and projected rotational velocities for nearby (d ≤ 25 pc) cool (spectral types F to K) stars, to estimate their expected activity-related jitter. As a complementary objective, we attempt to obtain relationships between fluxes in different activity indicator lines, that permit a transformation of traditional activity indicators, i.e., Ca ii H & K lines, to others that hold noteworthy advantages. Methods: We used high resolution (~50 000) echelle optical spectra. Standard data reduction was performed using the IRAF echelle package. To determine the chromospheric emission of the stars in the sample, we used the spectral subtraction technique. We measured the equivalent widths of the chromospheric emission lines in the subtracted spectrum and transformed them into fluxes by applying empirical equivalent width and flux relationships. Rotational velocities were determined using the cross-correlation technique. To infer activity-related radial velocity (RV) jitter, we used empirical relationships between this jitter and the R'_HK index. Results: We measured chromospheric activity, as given by different indicators throughout the optical spectra, and projected rotational velocities for 371 nearby cool stars. We have built empirical relationships among the most important chromospheric emission lines. Finally, we used the measured chromospheric activity

  13. Temporal variations of solar EUV, UV, and 10,830-A radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnelly, R. F.; Hinteregger, H. E.; Heath, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    The temporal characteristics of the full-disk chromospheric EUV fluxes agree well with those of the ground-based measurements of the chromospheric He I absorption line at 10,830 A and differ systematically from those of the coronal EUV and 10.7-cm flux. The ratio of the flux increase during the rise of solar cycle 21 to that during solar rotation variations is uniformly high for the chromospheric EUV and corroborating 10,830-A fluxes, highest for the transition region and 'cool' coronal EUV fluxes (T less than 2 x 10 to the 6th K), and lowest for the 'hot' coronal EUV and 10.7-cm flux. The rise and decay rates of episodes of major activity progress from those for the hot coronal EUV lines and the 10.7-cm flux to slower values for the chromospheric H Lyman alpha line, 10,830-A line, and photospheric 2050-A UV flux. It is suggested that active region remnants contribute significantly to the solar cycle increase and during the decay of episodes of major activity. The ratio of power in 13-day periodicity to that for 27 days in high (1/3) for the photospheric UV flux, medium (1/6) for the chromospheric EUV and 10,830-A fluxes, and small to negligible for the hot coronal EUV fluxes. These ratios are used to estimate the dependence of active region emission on the solar central meridian distance for chromospheric and coronal EUV flux.

  14. Periodic and quiescent solar activity effects in the low ionosphere, using SAVNET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoni, F. C. P.; Raulin, J.-P.; Gavilan, H. R.; Kaufmann, P.; Raymundo, T. E.

    2010-10-01

    Important results have been acquired using the measurements of VLF amplitude and phase signals from the South America VLF Network (SAVNET) stations. This network is an international project coordinated by CRAAM, Brazil in cooperation with Peru and Argentina. It started operating in April 2006, and now counts on eight stations (Atibaia, Palmas, Santa Maria and Estaça~o Antártica Comandante Ferraz in Brazil; Piura, Punta-Lobos and Ica, in Peru; CASLEO, in Argentina). Researches, through the last decades, have demonstrated the versatility of the VLF technique for many scientific and technological purposes. In this work, we summarize some recent results using SAVNET data base. We have obtained daily maximum diurnal amplitude time series that exhibited behavior patterns in different time scales: 1) 1ong term variations indicating the solar activity level control of the low ionosphere; 2) characteristic periods of alternated slow and fast variations, the former being related to solar illumination conditions, and the latter that have been associated with the winter anomaly at high latitudes; 3) 27-days period related to the solar rotation and consequently associated to the solar Lyman-α radiation flux variations, reinforcing earlier theories about the importance of this spectral line for the D-region formation. Finally, we conclude presenting preliminary results of simulation using LWPC, which showed very good agreement at times of observed modal amplitude minima for a given VLF propagation path.

  15. The effect of solar flares, coronal mass ejections, and co-rotating interaction regions on the Venusian 557.7 nm oxygen green line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Candace L.; Chanover, Nancy; Slanger, Tom; Molaverdikhani, Karan; Peter, Kerstin; Häusler, Bernd; Tellmann, Silvia; Pätzold, Martin; Witasse, Olivier; Blelly, Pierre-Louis; Collinson, Glyn

    2015-11-01

    The Venusian 557.7nm OI (1S - 1D) (oxygen green line) nightglow emission is known to be highly temporally variable. The reason for this variability is unknown. We propose that the emission is due to electron precipitation from intense solar storms. For my dissertation, I observed the Venusian green line after solar flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and co-rotating interaction regions from December 2010 to April 2015 using the high resolution Astrophysical Research Consortium Echelle Spectrograph on the Apache Point Observatory 3.5-m telescope. Combining these observation with all other published observations, we find that the strongest detections occur after CME impacts and we conclude electron precipitation is required to produce green line emission. We do not detect emission from the 630.0nm OI (1D - 3P) oxygen red line for any observation.In an effort to determine the emitting altitude, thereby constraining the possible emission processes responsible for green line emission, and quantify the electron energy and flux entering the Venusian nightside, we conducted analyses of space-based observations of the Venusian nightglow and ionosphere collected by the Venus Express (VEX) spacecraft. We were unable to detect the green line but confirmed that electron energy and flux increases after CME impacts.In order to determine the effect of storm condition electron precipitation on the Venusian green line, we modeled the Venusian ionosphere using the TRANSCAR model (a 1-D magnetohydrodynamic ionospheric model that simulates auroral emission from electron precipitation) by applying observed electron energies and fluxes. We found that electron energy plays a primary role in producing increased green line emission in the Venusian ionosphere.Based on observation and modeling results, we conclude that the Venusian green line is an auroral-type emission that occurs after solar storms with the largest intensities observed after CMEs. Post-CME electron fluxes and energies

  16. Solar flux and its variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. V. P.; Gottlieb, D. M.

    1975-01-01

    Data are presented on the solar irradiance as derived from a number of sources. An attempt was made to bring these data onto a uniform scale. Summation of fluxes at all wavelengths yields a figure of 1357.826 for the solar constant. Estimates are made of the solar flux variations due to flares, active regions (slowly varying component), 27-day period, and the 11-yr cycle. Solar activity does not produce a significant variation in the value of the solar constant. Variations in the X-ray and EUV portions of the solar flux may be several orders of magnitude during solar activity, especially at times of major flares. It is established that these short wavelength flux enhancements cause significant changes in the terrestrial ionosphere.

  17. Using the 11-year Solar Cycle to Predict the Heliosheath Environment at Voyager 1 and 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, A.; Opher, M.; Provornikova, E.; Richardson, J. D.; Toth, G.

    2015-12-01

    As Voyager 2 moves further into the heliosheath, the region of subsonic solar wind plasma in between the termination shock and the heliopause, it has observed an increase of the magnetic field strength to large values, all while maintaining magnetic flux conservation. Dr. Burlaga will present these observations in the 2015 AGU Fall meeting (abstract ID: 59200). The increase in magnetic field strength could be a signature of Voyager 2 approaching the heliopause or, possibly, due to solar cycle effects. In this work we investigate the role the 11-year solar cycle variations as well as magnetic dissipation effects have on the heliosheath environments observed at Voyager 1 and 2 using a global 3D magnetohydrodynamic model of the heliosphere. We use time and latitude-dependent solar wind velocity and density inferred from SOHO/SWAN and IPS data and solar cycle variations of the magnetic field derived from 27-day averages of the field magnitude average of the magnetic field at 1 AU from the OMNI database as presented in Michael et al. (2015). Since the model has already accurately matched the flows and magnetic field strength at Voyager 2 until 93 AU, we extend the boundary conditions to model the heliosheath up until Voyager 2 reaches the heliopause. This work will help clarify if the magnetic field observed at Voyager 2 should increase or decrease due to the solar cycle. We describe the solar magnetic field both as a dipole, with the magnetic and rotational axes aligned, and as a monopole, with magnetic field aligned with the interstellar medium to reduce numerical reconnection within the heliosheath, due to the removal of the heliospheric surrent sheet, and at the solar wind - interstellar medium interface. A comparison of the models allows for a crude estimation of the role that magnetic dissipation plays in the system and whether it allows for a better understanding of the Voyager 2 location in the heliosheath.

  18. Effects of Solar Activity Variation on the Low Latitude Topside Nighttime Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, K. W.; Kim, H.; Park, J.; Park, S.; Lee, J.; Lee, E.

    2006-05-01

    We investigate the effects of solar activity variation on the topside nighttime ionosphere of the low latitude region using the DMSP F15 data taken at 840 km altitude as well as the KOMPSAT-1 data taken at 685 km altitude. The change of the ionospheric parameters shows a good correlation with F 10.7 variations, in accordance with 27-day solar rotations. The correlation is especially good when a time delay of 1 to 2 days is incorporated and when the F 10.7 variation is large. Vertical drift velocities and the oxygen ion fractions, observed by DMSP F15, are also seen to have good correlations with F 10.7 with similar time delays. We suspect the delayed correlation of the ionospheric response is closely related to the neutral density changes affected by the solar activity as it has been reported that changes in the solar soft X-rays and the neutral density are well correlated with a delay of approximately 1.5 days. We also compare the ionospheric response for the solar maximum period with that of the declining phase using the data for the period 2000 through 2004 during which average F 10.7 varied from over 200 to around 100. The density does not seem to saturate at high F 10.7 values even during the solar maximum phase, in contrast to the daytime ionospheric response reported previously. The density during the low solar activity cycle is observed to be lower than that of the high solar activity for the same F 10.7 values, implying the long term dependence of the ionosphere in addition to the prompt response of 1 to 2 days.

  19. Rotational moulding.

    PubMed

    Crawford, R J; Kearns, M P

    2003-10-01

    Rotational moulding promises designers attractive economics and a low-pressure process. The benefits of rotational moulding are compared here with other manufacturing methods such as injection and blow moulding. PMID:14603714

  20. Rotating Vesta

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronomers combined 146 exposures taken by NASA's Hubble SpaceTelescope to make this 73-frame movie of the asteroid Vesta's rotation.Vesta completes a rotation every 5.34 hours.› Asteroid and...

  1. NIMBUS-7 SBUV (Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet) observations of solar UV spectral irradiance variations caused by solar rotation and active-region evolution for the period November 7, 1978 - November 1, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. F.; Repoff, T. P.; Donnelly, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of temporal variations of the solar UV spectral irradiance over several days to a few weeks in the 160-400 nm wavelength range are presented. Larger 28-day variations and a second episode of 13-day variations occurred during the second year of measurements. The thirteen day periodicity is not a harmonic of the 28-day periodicity. The 13-day periodicity dominates certain episodes of solar activity while others are dominated by 28-day periods accompanied by a week 14-day harmonic. Techniques for removing noise and long-term trends are described. Time series analysis results are presented for the Si II lines near 182 nm, the Al I continuum in the 190 nm to 205 nm range, the Mg I continuum in the 210 nm to 250 nm range, the MgII H & K lines at 280 nm, the Mg I line at 285 nm, and the Ca II K & H lines at 393 and 397 nm.

  2. Composite Mg II solar activity index for solar cycles 21 and 22

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deland, Matthew T.; Cebula, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    On the basis of version 1.0 of the composite MG II solar activity index data set, it is shown that the change in the 27-day running average of the Mg II index from solar maximum to solar minimum is about 8 percent for solar cycle 21 and about 9 percent for solar cycle 22 through January 1992. Scaling factors based on the short-term variations in the Mg II index and solar irradiance data sets are developed for each instrument to estimate solar variability at mid-UV and near-UV wavelengths. A set of composite scale factors are derived for use with the present composite MG index. Near 205 cm, where solar irradiance variations are important for stratospheric chemistry, the estimated change in irradiance during solar cycle 22 is about 10 +/- 1 percent using the composite Mg II index (version 1.0) and scale factors.

  3. Corotating solar wind structures and recurrent trains of enhanced diurnal variation in galactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Yeeram, T.; Ruffolo, D.; Sáiz, A.; Kamyan, N.; Nutaro, T. E-mail: david.ruf@mahidol.ac.th E-mail: p_chang24@hotmail.com

    2014-04-01

    Data from the Princess Sirindhorn Neutron Monitor at Doi Inthanon, Thailand, with a vertical cutoff rigidity of 16.8 GV, were utilized to determine the diurnal anisotropy (DA) of Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) near Earth during solar minimum conditions between 2007 November and 2010 November. We identified trains of enhanced DA over several days, which often recur after a solar rotation period (∼27 days). By investigating solar coronal holes as identified from synoptic maps and solar wind parameters, we found that the intensity and anisotropy of cosmic rays are associated with the high-speed streams (HSSs) in the solar wind, which are in turn related to the structure and evolution of coronal holes. An enhanced DA was observed after the onset of some, but not all, HSSs. During time periods of recurrent trains, the DA was often enhanced or suppressed according to the sign of the interplanetary magnetic field B, which suggests a contribution from a mechanism involving a southward gradient in the GCR density, n, and a gradient anisotropy along B × ∇n. In one non-recurrent and one recurrent sequence, an HSS from an equatorial coronal hole was merged with that from a trailing mid-latitude extension of a polar coronal hole, and the slanted HSS structure in space with suppressed GCR density can account for the southward GCR gradient. We conclude that the gradient anisotropy is a source of temporary changes in the GCR DA under solar minimum conditions, and that the latitudinal GCR gradient can sometimes be explained by the coronal hole morphology.

  4. A comparative study of solar facula during cycle 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, P.; Choudhary, D. P.; Moon, Y. J.

    2015-12-01

    The solar activity minimum between the end of cycle 23 and beginning of cycle 24 was the longest and deepest since the modern satellite era of 20th century. In this paper, we have investigated statistical properties of solar facula and sunspot area (and their ratio) covering entire solar cycle 23 and the ascending phase of cycle 24. The facular area has been considered from the K-line composite at the San Fernando Observatory and is a direct measurement of the strength of solar cycle activity. It is found that solar facular area decreased during minimum phase of cycle 23/24 compared to maximum phase and also during rising phase of cycle 24. However, the ratio of facula to sunspot area increased during minimum epoch of cycle 23. Power spectrum analysis shows that along with other periods, the solar rotational periods 22 -31 days and Rieger type periods are both prominent during maxima, minima of cycle 23 and ascending branch of cycle 24. During the decline phase of cycle 23, the period ~ 27 days is more prominent whereas ~ 14 days and ~ 31 days periods are dominant during activity maxima. During maximum phase of cycle 23 and 24, there was no phase lag between sunspot and facular area, but a phase lag ~ 3 months has been detected during activity minima of cycle 23. These results indicate that the distribution of active regions during the activity maximum years is quite different from that in the minimum years. We shall present discussion of our results in this paper.

  5. On periodicity of solar wind phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, V. K.; Joshi, G. C.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the rate of occurrence of solar wind phenomena observed between 1972-1984 using power spectrum analysis. The data have been taken from the high speed solar wind (HSSW) streams catalogue published by Mavromichalaki et al. (1988). The power spectrum analysis of HSSW events indicate that HSSW stream events have a periodicity of 9 days. This periodicity of HSSW events is 1/3 of the 27 days period of coronal holes which are the major source of solar wind events. In our opinion the 9 days period may be the energy build up time to produce the HSSW stream events.

  6. Observations of corotating solar wind structures at radio sounding by signals of the Rosetta and Mars Express spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, A. I.; Lukanina, L. A.; Samoznaev, L. N.; Chashei, I. V.; Bird, M. K.; Pätzold, M.

    2016-05-01

    In the implementation of the space projects Rosetta and Mars Express, a large-scale series of experiments has been carried out on radio sounding circumsolar plasma by decimeter ( S-band) and centimeter ( X-band) signals of the Rosetta comet probe (from October 3 to October 31, 2010) and the Mars Express satellite of Mars (from December 25, 2010 to March 27, 2011). It was found that in the phase of ingress the spacecraft behind the Sun, the intensity of the frequency fluctuations increases in accordance with a power function whose argument is the solar offset distance of radio ray path, and when the spacecraft is removed from the Sun (the egress phase), frequency fluctuations are reduced. Periodic strong increases in the fluctuation level, exceeding by a factor of 3-12 the background values of this value determined by the regular radial dependences, are imposed on the regular dependences. It was found that increasing the fluctuations of radio waves alternates with the periodicity m × T or n × T, where m = 1/2, n = 1, and T is the synodic period of the Sun's rotation ( T ≈ 27 days). It was shown that the corotating structures associated with the interaction regions of different speed fluxes are formed in the area of solar wind acceleration and at distances of 6-20 solar radii already have a quasi-stationary character.

  7. Enhancing the output current of a CdTe solar cell via a CN-free hydrocarbon luminescent down-shifting fluorophore with intramolecular energy transfer and restricted internal rotation characteristics.

    PubMed

    Li, Yilin; Olsen, Joseph; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2015-04-01

    A CN-free hydrocarbon fluorophore (Perylene-TPE) was synthesized as a new luminescent down-shifting (LDS) material. Its photophysical properties in both the solution state and the solid state were studied. The unity fluorescence quantum yield of Perylene-TPE observed in its solid state is considered to be from the characteristics of intramolecular energy transfer (IET) and restricted internal rotation (RIR). This is supported by the results from theoretical calculations and spectroscopic measurements. For the photovoltaic application of Perylene-TPE, a theoretical modeling study suggests that using the LDS film of Perylene-TPE may increase the output short circuit current density (Jsc) of a CdTe solar cell by 2.95%, enhance the spectral response of a CdTe solar cell at 400 nm by 41%, and shift the incident solar photon distribution from short-wavelength (<500 nm) to long-wavelength (>500 nm). Experimentally, placing a LDS film of Perylene-TPE on a CdTe solar cell can enhance its output Jsc by as high as 3.30 ± 0.31%, which is comparable to the current commercially available LDS material – Y083 (3.28% ± 0.37%). PMID:25679960

  8. [Effects of rotation and fallowing on the microbial communities and enzyme activities in a solar greenhouse soil under continuous cucumber cropping].

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-juan; Wu, Huan-tao; Wei, Min; Wang, Xiu-feng; Shi, Qing-hua

    2009-12-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of rotation and fallowing on the microbial communities and enzyme activities in a greenhouse soil continuously cropped with cucumber and on the growth and yield of followed cucumber. Comparing with continuous cropping, rotation improved the components of soil microbial communities, which was manifested in the increase of bacteria and actinomycetes and the decrease of fungi. Rotation and fallowing enhanced the activities of soil invertase, urease, catalase, and polyphenol oxidase significantly. The quantities of soil bacteria and actinomycetes and the activity of soil invertase increased at the fruiting stage of cucumber plants, being the maximum at harvest stage, but decreased thereafter. In contrast, the quantity of soil fungi had a linear increase, and the activities of soil urease, catalase, and polyphenol oxidase decreased gradually during fruit development. Welsh onion and waxy maize promoted the growth and fruiting of the followed cucumber plants significantly, being the optimal rotation crops for cucumber. PMID:20353066

  9. Rotating Wavepackets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Any free-particle wavepacket solution of Schrodinger's equation can be converted by differentiations to wavepackets rotating about the original direction of motion. The angular momentum component along the motion associated with this rotation is an integral multiple of [h-bar]. It is an "intrinsic" angular momentum: independent of origin and…

  10. Coronal holes, solar wind streams, and recurrent geomagnetic disturbances - 1973-1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Harvey, J. W.; Feldman, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    Observations of coronal holes, solar-wind streams, and geomagnetic disturbances during 1973-1976 are compared in a 27-day pictorial format which shows their long-term evolution. The results leave little doubt that coronal holes are related to the high-speed streams and their associated recurrent geomagnetic disturbances. In particular, these observations strongly support the hypothesis that coronal holes are the solar origin of the high-speed streams observed in the solar wind near the ecliptic plane.

  11. The Rapidly Rotating Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures at a continuum of scales, from large to small. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. In the present work, imaging techniques of time-distance helioseismology applied to observational data reveal no long-range order in the convective motion. We conservatively bound the associated velocity magnitudes, as a function of depth and the spherical-harmonic degree l to be 20-100 times weaker than prevailing estimates within the wavenumber band l < 60. The observationally constrained kinetic energy is approximately a thousandth of the theoretical prediction, suggesting the prevalence of an intrinsically different paradigm of turbulence. A fundamental question arises: what mechanism of turbulence transports the heat ux of a solar luminosity outwards? The Sun is seemingly a much faster rotator than previously thought, with advection dominated by Coriolis forces at scales l < 60.

  12. Three dimensional solar anisotropy of galactic cosmic rays near the recent solar minimum 23/24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modzelewska, R.; Alania, M. V.

    2015-08-01

    Three dimensional (3D) galactic cosmic ray (GCR) anisotropy has been studied for 2006-2012. The GCR anisotropy, both in the ecliptic plane and in polar direction, were obtained based on the neutron monitors (NMs) and Nagoya muon telescopes (MT) data. We analyze two dimensional (2D) GCR anisotropy in the ecliptic plane and north-south anisotropy normal to the ecliptic plane. We reveal quasi-periodicities - the annual and 27-days waves in the GCR anisotropy in 2006-2012. We investigate the relationship of the 27-day variation of the GCR anisotropy in the ecliptic plane and in the polar direction with the parameters of solar activity and solar wind.

  13. Supergranulation rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schou, Jesper; Beck, John G.

    2001-01-01

    Simple convection models estimate the depth of supergranulation at approximately 15,000 km which suggests that supergranules should rotate at the rate of the plasma in the outer 2% of the Sun by radius. Previous measurements (Snodgrass & Ulrich, 1990; Beck & Schou, 2000) found that supergranules rotate significantly faster than this, with a size-dependent rotation rate. We expand on previous work and show that the torsional oscillation signal seen in the supergranules tracks that obtained for normal modes. We also find that the amplitudes and lifetimes of the supergranulation are size dependent.

  14. Rotational aerophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, N. H.; Tarnopolsky, A. Z.; Lai, J. C. S.

    2002-03-01

    Free rotational aerophones such as the bullroarer, which consists of a wooden slat whirled around on the end of a string, and which emits a loud pulsating roar, have been used in many ancient and traditional societies for ceremonial purposes. This article presents an experimental and theoretical investigation of this instrument. The aerodynamics of rotational behavior is elucidated, and relates slat rotation frequency to slat width and velocity through the air. Analysis shows that sound production is due to generation of an oscillating-rotating dipole across the slat, the role of the vortices shed by the slat being relatively minor. Apparent discrepancies between the behavior of a bullroarer slat and a slat mounted on an axle in a wind tunnel are shown to be due to viscous friction in the bearings of the wind-tunnel experiment.

  15. SOLAR MODELS WITH REVISED ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, S. L.; Li, T. D.; Yang, W. M.; Li, L. H.

    2011-04-20

    We present new solar models in which we use the latest low abundances and further include the effects of rotation, magnetic fields, and extra-mixing processes. We assume that the extra-element mixing can be treated as a diffusion process, with the diffusion coefficient depending mainly on the solar internal configuration of rotation and magnetic fields. We find that such models can well reproduce the observed solar rotation profile in the radiative region. Furthermore, the proposed models can match the seismic constraints better than the standard solar models, also when these include the latest abundances, but neglect the effects of rotation and magnetic fields.

  16. Solar concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, J.S.

    1982-06-08

    A solar concentrator having an open framework formed as a geodesic dome. A rotatable support axle extends substantially diametrically across the dome and has the opposite ends thereof supported on the framework. The support axle defines a first rotational axis which is oriented to extend substantially parallel with the earth's north-south axis. A support post is hingedly mounted on the support shaft substantially at the midpoint thereof for permitting angular displacement of the support post relative to the support shaft about a second rotational axis which is perpendicular to the first axis. A dishshaped reflector assembly is positioned within the interior of the framework and fixedly secured to the support post. First and second drives effect angular displacement of the reflector assembly about the first and second axes, respectively, to permit tracking of the solar position.

  17. High-resolution Calculation of the Solar Global Convection with the Reduced Speed of Sound Technique. II. Near Surface Shear Layer with the Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotta, H.; Rempel, M.; Yokoyama, T.

    2015-01-01

    We present a high-resolution, highly stratified numerical simulation of rotating thermal convection in a spherical shell. Our aim is to study in detail the processes that can maintain a near surface shear layer (NSSL) as inferred from helioseismology. Using the reduced speed of sound technique, we can extend our global convection simulation to 0.99 R ⊙ and include, near the top of our domain, small-scale convection with short timescales that is only weakly influenced by rotation. We find the formation of an NSSL preferentially in high latitudes in the depth range of r = 0.95-0.975 R ⊙. The maintenance mechanisms are summarized as follows. Convection under the weak influence of rotation leads to Reynolds stresses that transport angular momentum radially inward in all latitudes. This leads to the formation of a strong poleward-directed meridional flow and an NSSL, which is balanced in the meridional plane by forces resulting from the < v\\prime r v\\prime _θ > correlation of turbulent velocities. The origin of the required correlations depends to some degree on latitude. In high latitudes, a positive correlation < v\\prime _rv\\prime _θ > is induced in the NSSL by the poleward meridional flow whose amplitude increases with the radius, while a negative correlation is generated by the Coriolis force in bulk of the convection zone. In low latitudes, a positive correlation < v\\prime _rv\\prime _θ > results from rotationally aligned convection cells ("banana cells"). The force caused by these Reynolds stresses is in balance with the Coriolis force in the NSSL.

  18. HIGH-RESOLUTION CALCULATION OF THE SOLAR GLOBAL CONVECTION WITH THE REDUCED SPEED OF SOUND TECHNIQUE. II. NEAR SURFACE SHEAR LAYER WITH THE ROTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hotta, H.; Rempel, M.; Yokoyama, T.

    2015-01-01

    We present a high-resolution, highly stratified numerical simulation of rotating thermal convection in a spherical shell. Our aim is to study in detail the processes that can maintain a near surface shear layer (NSSL) as inferred from helioseismology. Using the reduced speed of sound technique, we can extend our global convection simulation to 0.99 R {sub ☉} and include, near the top of our domain, small-scale convection with short timescales that is only weakly influenced by rotation. We find the formation of an NSSL preferentially in high latitudes in the depth range of r = 0.95-0.975 R {sub ☉}. The maintenance mechanisms are summarized as follows. Convection under the weak influence of rotation leads to Reynolds stresses that transport angular momentum radially inward in all latitudes. This leads to the formation of a strong poleward-directed meridional flow and an NSSL, which is balanced in the meridional plane by forces resulting from the 〈v{sub r}{sup ′}v{sub θ}{sup ′}〉 correlation of turbulent velocities. The origin of the required correlations depends to some degree on latitude. In high latitudes, a positive correlation 〈v{sub r}{sup ′}v{sub θ}{sup ′}〉 is induced in the NSSL by the poleward meridional flow whose amplitude increases with the radius, while a negative correlation is generated by the Coriolis force in bulk of the convection zone. In low latitudes, a positive correlation 〈v{sub r}{sup ′}v{sub θ}{sup ′}〉 results from rotationally aligned convection cells ({sup b}anana cells{sup )}. The force caused by these Reynolds stresses is in balance with the Coriolis force in the NSSL.

  19. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  20. Rotation Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In aircraft turbine engine research, certain investigations require extremely precise measurement of the position of a rotating part, such as the rotor, a disc-like part of the engine's compressor which revolves around a shaft at extremely high speeds. For example, in studies of airflow velocity within a compressor, researchers need to know-for data correlation the instantaneous position of a given spot on the rotor each time a velocity measurement is made. Earlier methods of measuring rotor shaft angle required a physical connection to the shaft, which limited the velocity of the rotating object.

  1. Analysis of the Earth's variable rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. F.

    1984-01-01

    The objective was to analyze the Earth's rotation, and to compare the observations with the atmospheric and seismic excitation functions. The variation in the Earth's rotation can be separated into the length-of-day (LOD) variation and the polar motion. Possible driving mechanisms include: atmospheric/oceanic circulations, seismic activities, solar-lunar tides, mantle convection, core-mantle coupling, and solar activities. The major problem of concern was the identification of these dynamical processes as primary driving mechanisms for the various features in the variation of the Earth's rotation.

  2. IMP 8 GME Particle Observations Over Three Solar Cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Ian; Cane, Hilary; Von Rosenvinge, Tycho; McGuire, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The Goddard Medium Energy experiment on the IMP 8 spacecraft has made nearly continuous observations of the near-Earth energetic particle environment from its launch in October, 1973 until near present. We summarize several aspects of these observations, including solar energetic particle events, CIR-associated events, and cosmic ray modulations. In particular, we note that, as expected fiom the pattern of smaller recurrent (27 day) cosmic ray modulations seen in the mid 1980's A less than 0 solar minimum compared to the previous and following (A greater than 0) minima, recurrent modulations are again reduced in the current solar minimum.

  3. High-resolution calculations of the solar global convection with the reduced speed of sound technique. I. The structure of the convection and the magnetic field without the rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Hotta, H.; Yokoyama, T.; Rempel, M.

    2014-05-01

    We carry out non-rotating high-resolution calculations of the solar global convection, which resolve convective scales of less than 10 Mm. To cope with the low Mach number conditions in the lower convection zone, we use the reduced speed of sound technique (RSST), which is simple to implement and requires only local communication in the parallel computation. In addition, the RSST allows us to expand the computational domain upward to about 0.99 R {sub ☉}, as it can also handle compressible flows. Using this approach, we study the solar convection zone on the global scale, including small-scale near-surface convection. In particular, we investigate the influence of the top boundary condition on the convective structure throughout the convection zone as well as on small-scale dynamo action. Our main conclusions are as follows. (1) The small-scale downflows generated in the near-surface layer penetrate into deeper layers to some extent and excite small-scale turbulence in the region >0.9 R {sub ☉}, where R {sub ☉} is the solar radius. (2) In the deeper convection zone (<0.9 R {sub ☉}), the convection is not influenced by the location of the upper boundary. (3) Using a large eddy simulation approach, we can achieve small-scale dynamo action and maintain a field of about 0.15B {sub eq}-0.25B {sub eq} throughout the convection zone, where B {sub eq} is the equipartition magnetic field to the kinetic energy. (4) The overall dynamo efficiency varies significantly in the convection zone as a consequence of the downward directed Poynting flux and the depth variation of the intrinsic convective scales.

  4. Rotational modulation and flares on RS Canum Venaticorum and BY Draconis-type stars. XV - Observations of Proxima Centauri and solar calibration data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisch, B. M.; Butler, C. J.; Foing, B.; Rodono, M.; Giampapa, M. S.

    1990-01-01

    Results are reported from simultaneous Exosat and IUE observations of flaring in Proxima Cen on March 2, 1985. The data are presented in extensive tables and sample spectra and discussed in detail. The peak emission of the soft-X-ray flare is found to be about 3 x 10 to the 27th erg/sec, with energy about 3 x 10 to the 30th erg and an associated increase in Mg II flux to 17,000-67,000 erg/sq cm sec, or about an order of magnitude lower than the solar value. The presence of flare- and microflare-related processes heating the corona is inferred.

  5. Solar and lunar effects in the MLT region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Savigny, Christian; DeLand, Matthew; Thomas, Gary; Thurairajah, Brentha; Teiser, Georg; Lednyts'kyy, Olexandr

    2016-07-01

    The Earth's mesosphere / lower thermosphere region (MLT) is subject to variability driven by a variety of different processes from above and below. In terms of solar 27-day effects as well as lunar tidal effects, statistically significant signatures have been identified in many MLT parameters, including temperature, ozone, atomic oxygen, OH emission rate and altitude, as well as noctilucent (or polar mesospheric) clouds. While the identification of these signatures is often straightforward - if the time series are sufficiently long - the underlying physico-chemical mechanisms driving the signatures are often only poorly understood and involve both photochemical and dynamical effects. The main purpose of this contribution is to summarize recent advances in the scientific understanding of lunar tidal and solar 27-day effects in the MLT region with a focus on satellite remote sensing observations. For some parameters the sensitivities to solar forcing at the 27-day time scale agree within uncertainties with the sensitivities at the 11-year time scale, suggesting similar driving mechanisms. We will present hypotheses for driving mechanisms - where applicable - and highlight gaps in the scientific understanding.

  6. Rotation period of comet Donati

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, F. L.

    1978-01-01

    Consideration is given to the rotation period of comet Donati (1858 VI) whose haloes were approximate parabolic envelopes having foci near the apparent nucleus and vertices toward the sun forward from the tail axis. The regularity and sharpness of the halves suggest that they represent the repetitive ejection of material from an active area which is exposed to solar radiation as the cometary nucleus rotates. Bobrovnikov's results (1954) are used to evaluate the linear expansion velocity of such haloes. This calculation is applied to the comet and a linear correction is used to assess the results.

  7. Libration in the earth's rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. F.; Liu, H. S.; Dong, D. N.; Herring, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    External luni-solar torque exerted on the difference (B-A) of the earth's two equatorial principal moments of inertia gives rise to two types of librational motions in the earth's rotation: the semidiurnal libration in spin and the prograde diurnal libration in polar motion. Formulas for the librations considering a realistic earth model and their tidal decompositions are derived and evaluated. The spin libration has a maximum peal-to-peak amplitude of 0.90 milliarcseconds, that of the polar libration is 0.06 milliarcseconds. Implications concerning their detectability and role in the tidal variation of earth rotation are discussed.

  8. Space station rotational equations of motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rheinfurth, M. H.; Carroll, S. N.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic equations of motion are developed which describe the rotational motion for a large space structure having rotating appendages. The presence of the appendages produce torque coupling terms which are dependent on the inertia properties of the appendages and the rotational rates for both the space structure and the appendages. These equations were formulated to incorporate into the Space Station Attitude Control and Stabilization Test Bed to accurately describe the influence rotating solar arrays and thermal radiators have on the dynamic behavior of the Space Station.

  9. Observed solar UV irradiance variations of importance to middle atmosphere energetics and photochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, Julius

    1994-01-01

    Absorption of solar UV irradiance in the spectral interval 120-420 nm is chiefly responsible for radiative heating and photodissociation of important atmospheric constituents (e.g., O2, O3, H2O, NO2, etc.) in the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere. Thus, the absolute value and time perturbations of the UV irradiance could significantly affect the energetics, photochemistry, and subsequent dynamics of these regions. Analysis of preliminary data from the SOLSTICE (UARS) observations for a period of 244 days (3 Oct 1991-2 Jun 1992) is discussed in this paper. The data provide mean daily values of the spectral distribution of the observed irradiances at 1-nm resolution and their solar rotation and semirotation variations. The average amplitudes of the 27-day irradiance oscillations for the 244-day data period were 5.7% at Lyman-alpha (121 nm), 1% at 200 nm, 0.5% at 210 nm, and generally less than 0.2% at wavelengths longer than 280 nm. The average amplitudes of 13.5-day oscillations were, by and large, about half of these values. Solar irradiance variations at 10.7 cm are highly correlated with those at Ly-alpha and other chromospheric emission lines (r = 0.7 to 0.8) and only moderately correlated with irradiances at wavelengths of 180-208 nm (r = 0.5). The correlation decreases as the source region of the irradiance gets closer to the base of the photosphere. At the 2-nm interval 279-281 nm, however, which contains the cores of the Mg II h and k lines, the correlation is again approximately 0.8.

  10. The Mid-term Forecast Method of Solar Radiation Index {F}_{10.7}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. B.; Xiong, J. N.; Zhao, C. Y.

    2014-07-01

    In the low earth orbit satellite's orbit computation, the solar radiation index F_{10.7} is an important parameter, which is usually used to describe the solar activity's effect on the thermosphere density and the orbit perturbation. So the accuracy of index F_{10.7} will affect the precision of orbit prediction. In this paper, based on the characteristics of the solar 27-day short-term activity, we bring up a forecast method of F_{10.7} which can use the historical indices of the past 135 days to predict the solar radiation indices in the next 54 days. That is to say, the method is able to forecast the variations of solar radiation for about two rotation-cycles in the future. In this paper, we compare this method with those widely-used methods. The detail results are as follows: (1) This paper's method is observably better than the traditional triangle function method; (2) In the short-term forecast (7 days) , this paper's method is little better than the method developed by Space Weather Prediction Center in America, since the root mean square could be reduced by about 19% when using this paper's method; (3) In the mid-termforecast (2 7 days), the accuracy of this paper's method is almost equal to the 54-order self-regression method which is used widely in our country. However, fewer parameters and observation data are needed in this paper's method, leading to the more convenient application in orbit computation. Moreover, on the 54th day the correlation coefficient between the prediction and actual index is still greater than 0.92, implying that the method can keep stable in mid-term forecast. All in all, the advantage of this paper's method is that it could use fewer historical indices to predict the mid-term solar radiation independent of extra solar real-time observation, and it is very helpful to the orbit short- and mid-term predictions in some space flight missions.

  11. Rotating Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues currently being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  12. The Short-term Relationship of Ionospheric Electron Density With Solar Irradiance and Geomagnetic Activity in Daily Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Sun, Q.; Eastes, R.; Bailey, S.; Reinisch, B.; Valladares, C.; Woods, T.

    2006-12-01

    The short-term relationship (~ 27-day and less) between equatorial ionospheric electron density, solar irradiance and geomagnetic activity in daily observations has been studied. Hourly averages of the Total Electron Content (TEC) and foF2 are used as measures of electron content at local times of 700-800 LT, 1200- 1300 LT and 1700-1800 LT from 1998 to 1999. Hourly measurements of Dst and daily measurements (6-19 nm) of the solar soft X-ray irradiances from the SNOE satellite provide the geomagnetic activity and solar irradiance information. These data are decomposed into components at ~3-day, ~9-day and ~27-day scales using a 3-band wavelet. This 3-band wavelet allows better isolation of the 27 day variations than the 2-band wavelets available in commercial software packages. At each scale, correlations of ionospheric electron content with solar irradiance and Dst are calculated. The ionosphere has the highest correlation with solar irradiance at the~27-day scales, where the correlation with TEC is 0.8. At ~3-day and ~9-day scales, the ionosphere has a more significant correlation with geomagnetic activity than with solar irradiance. At ~3-day scales, TEC has a correlation of 0.4 with Dst. With both solar irradiances and Dst, and at all three time scales, TEC has higher correlations than foF2. The correlations also change with local time. The correlations with TEC increase from morning to afternoon, when either using solar irradiances or Dst, while the correlations with foF2 do not change significantly or even decrease from morning to afternoon.

  13. Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopresto, James C.; Mathews, John; Manross, Kevin

    1995-12-01

    Calcium K plage, H alpha plage and sunspot area have been monitored daily on the INTERNET since November of 1992. The plage and sunspot area have been measured by image processing. The purpose of the project is to investigate the degree of correlation between plage area and solar irradiance. The plage variation shows the expected variation produced by solar rotation and the longer secular changes produced by the solar cycle. The H alpha and sunspot plage area reached a minimum in about late 1994 or early 1995. This is in agreement with the K2 spectral index obtained daily from Sacramento Peak Observatory. The Calcium K plage area minimum seems delayed with respect to the others mentioned above. The minimum of the K line plage area is projected to come within the last few months of 1995.

  14. Evolution Character Analysis of Total Solar Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, N. B.

    2013-05-01

    The significant periods of total solar irradiance are 35 days and 26 days in solar cycle 23 and 24, respectively. It is inferred that the solar quasi-rotation periods are 35 days and 26 days in solar cycle 23 and 24, respectively. The value of total solar irradiance in solar cycle 24 minimum should be close to the value of Maunder minimum. On short time scales, sunspots should be the main reason to cause variations of total solar irradiance on the scale of one solar rotation cycle to several months, but not the unique one, and the variations of total solar irradiance are notrelated with the Mg II index on the scale of a few days to one solar rotation cycle.

  15. Stellar Surface Differential Rotation from Dynamo Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, H.; Elstner, D.

    2006-08-01

    We have previously published dynamo models that can reproduce the flip-flop phenomenon. In this phenomenon the main part of the stellar activity changes longitude by 180 degrees. Here we use these dynamo models for studying the stellar surface differential rotation. We use standard cross-correlation methods to study the changes in the magnetic pressure maps obtained from the dynamo calculations. As these maps can be treated the same way as the temperature maps, e.g., ones obtained with the Doppler imaging, we can use the same techniques as for real observations to analyse the maps produced by the dynamo calculations. Our investigation reveals that the input rotation used in the dynamo calculations is not always obtained with the analysis. In some cases even the sign of the surface differential rotation changes from the solar type input surface rotation to anti-solar surface rotation obtained from the analysis. This means that the spot motion is not determined by the differential rotation, but mainly by the underlying magnetic field structure. There is also some indication that in some cases the strength of the surface differential rotation varies with the activity cycle. These results could have important implications for observational studies of the stellar surface differential rotation.

  16. The Corona of the Young Solar Analog EK Draconis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gudel, M.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Benz, A. O.; Elias, N. M., II

    1995-01-01

    First coronal microwave and new soft X-ray observations of the very active, near-Zero-Age Main-Sequence (ZAMS) dGOe star EK Dra = HD 129333 show that this analog of the young Sun is more luminous in both emissions than most single M-dwarf flare stars. Variations in the 8.4 GHz flux include modulation with the optically determined rotation period of 2.7 days. This result points to a non-uniform filling of the corona with energetic electrons due to an incomplete coverage of the surface with active regions and a source volume that is not concentric with the star. The radio luminosity varying between log L(sub R) = 13.6 and 14.6 (L(sub R) in erg/s/Hz) shows evidence for unpolarized gyrosynchrotron flares, while strongly polarized flares were absent during the observations. This star is the first young, truly solar-like main sequence G star discovered in microwaves. Having just arrived on the main sequence, it conclusively proves that young, solar-like G stars can maintain very high levels of radio emission after their T Tau phase. The X-ray observations were obtained from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS). The average X-ray luminosity amounts to log L(sub x) = 29.9 (L(sub x) in erg/s). A Raymond-Smith type plasma model fit yields two plasma components at temperatures of 1.9 and 10 MK, with volume emission measures of 1.2 and 2.5 x 10 (exp 52)/cu cm, respectively. The X-ray light curve is significantly variable, with the photon count rate from the cooler plasma being strongly modulated by the rotation period; the emission from the hotter plasma is only weakly variable. Modeling of the source distribution in the stellar corona yields electron densities of the order of 4 x 10(exp 10)/cu cm or higher for the cool plasma component. It indicates that a considerable portion of EK Dra's high X-ray luminosity is due to high-density plasma rather than large emission volume. Parameters for an X-ray flare indicate an electron density of 1.75 x 10(exp 11)/cu cm and a source height of

  17. #4 Simulated Solar Sphere from Data - Interpolated

    NASA Video Gallery

    Rotating solar sphere made from a combination of imagery from the two STEREO spacecraft, together with simultaneous data from the Solar Dynamic Observatory.This movie is made from data taken on Jan...

  18. Solar Coronal Cells as Seen by STEREO

    NASA Video Gallery

    The changes of a coronal cell region as solar rotation carries it across the solar disk as seen with NASA's STEREO-B spacecraft. The camera is fixed on the region (panning with it) and shows the pl...

  19. Rotational evolution of slow-rotator sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzafame, A. C.; Spada, F.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The observed relationship between mass, age and rotation in open clusters shows the progressive development of a slow-rotator sequence among stars possessing a radiative interior and a convective envelope during their pre-main sequence and main-sequence evolution. After 0.6 Gyr, most cluster members of this type have settled on this sequence. Aims: The observed clustering on this sequence suggests that it corresponds to some equilibrium or asymptotic condition that still lacks a complete theoretical interpretation, and which is crucial to our understanding of the stellar angular momentum evolution. Methods: We couple a rotational evolution model, which takes internal differential rotation into account, with classical and new proposals for the wind braking law, and fit models to the data using a Monte Carlo Markov chain (MCMC) method tailored to the problem at hand. We explore to what extent these models are able to reproduce the mass and time dependence of the stellar rotational evolution on the slow-rotator sequence. Results: The description of the evolution of the slow-rotator sequence requires taking the transfer of angular momentum from the radiative core to the convective envelope into account. We find that, in the mass range 0.85-1.10 M⊙, the core-envelope coupling timescale for stars in the slow-rotator sequence scales as M-7.28. Quasi-solid body rotation is achieved only after 1-2 Gyr, depending on stellar mass, which implies that observing small deviations from the Skumanich law (P ∝ √{t}) would require period data of older open clusters than is available to date. The observed evolution in the 0.1-2.5 Gyr age range and in the 0.85-1.10 M⊙ mass range is best reproduced by assuming an empirical mass dependence of the wind angular momentum loss proportional to the convective turnover timescale and to the stellar moment of inertia. Period isochrones based on our MCMC fit provide a tool for inferring stellar ages of solar-like main

  20. Imaging Grating SpectroPhotometer (I-GRASP) for Solar Soft X-Ray Spectra and Images from a Cube Sat Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didkovsky, Leonid V.; Wieman, Seth; Woods, Thomas N.; Jones, Andrew; Chao, Weilun

    2016-05-01

    We describe the Soft X-ray Imaging Grating SpectroPhotometer (I-GRASP), a novel spectrophotometer with four times narrower transmission grating period (about 50 nm) compared to the MIT-designed 200 nm gratings successfully used for the SOHO/SEM, the SDO/EVE/ESP, and the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM) onboard the EVE sounding rocket suite of instruments. The new grating is based on technology developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and provides four to five time greater diffraction dispersion than the 200 nm period gratings. Such new technology will provide detection of both 0.1 nm – resolved solar spectra in about 1.0 to 7.0 nm spectral range and a soft X-ray pin-hole solar image from the I-GRASP instrument that is appropriately sized for a CubeSat platform. The solar observations of this soft X-ray range do not currently have spectral resolution, so I-GRASP concurrent spectral and imaging X-ray observations will be important for:Improvements in modeling of coronal dynamics and heating by comparing measured and modeled spectra through identifying changes in abundances from different active regions- Resolving some differences in certain iron spectral line intensity ratios observed with SAM, identifying key emission lines, and comparing to those modeled with the CHIANTI atomic database- Studying SXR spectral variability for different solar activity periods including solar flares and the 27-day solar rotation- Studying of the Earth’s ionosphere, thermosphere and mesosphere responses using as input the detailed soft X-ray spectra from I-GRASP- Improving solar soft X-ray reference spectra for accurate calculations of absolute solar irradiance from the SDO/EVE/ESP, SDO/EVE/SAM, TIMED/SEE/XPS, and SORCE/XPS channels that have broadband measurements of the 1-7 nm band- Providing validation for the soft X-Ray observations from the MinXSS CubeSat X123 spectrometer (0.04 to 2.5 nm) with the I-GRASP spectral observations from 1.0 to 7.0 nm- Comparing I

  1. Rotator Cuff Tears

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctors because of a rotator cuff problem. A torn rotator cuff will weaken your shoulder. This means ... or more of the rotator cuff tendons is torn, the tendon no longer fully attaches to the ...

  2. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... others can be very painful. Treatment for a torn rotator cuff depends on age, health, how severe ... is, and how long you've had the torn rotator cuff. Treatment for torn rotator cuff includes: ...

  3. Rotator cuff problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... days, such as in painting and carpentry Poor posture over many years Aging Rotator cuff tears TEARS ... also help prevent rotator cuff problems. Practice good posture to keep your rotator cuff tendons and muscles ...

  4. Rotational Raman scattering (Ring effect) in satellite backscatter ultraviolet measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebula, Richard P.; Joiner, Joanna; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Hilsenrath, Ernest; McPeters, Richard D.; Park, Hongwoo

    1995-07-01

    A detailed radiative transfer calculation has been carried out to estimate the effects of rotational Raman scattering (RRS) on satellite measurements of backscattered ultraviolet radiation. Raman-scattered light is shifted in frequency from the incident light, which causes filling in of solar Fraunhofer lines in the observed backscattered spectrum (also known as the Ring effect). The magnitude of the rotational Raman scattering filling in is a function of wavelength, solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, surface pressure, and instrument spectral resolution. The filling in predicted by our model is found to be in agreement with observations from the Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Radiometer and the Nimbus-7 Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Radiometer.

  5. New measurements of rotation and differential rotation in A-F stars: are there two populations of differentially rotating stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammler-von Eiff, M.; Reiners, A.

    2012-06-01

    Context. The Sun displays differential rotation that is intimately connected to the solar dynamo and hence related to solar activity, the solar cycle, and the solar wind. Considering the detectability and habitability of planets around other stars it is important to understand the role of differential rotation in other stars. Aims: We present projected rotational velocities and new measurements of the rotational profile of some 180 nearby stars with spectral types A-F. The results are consolidated by a homogeneous compilation of basic stellar data from photometry and the identification of multiple stellar systems. New and previous measurements of rotation by line profile analysis are compiled and made available. Methods: The overall broadening profile is derived analysing spectral line shape from hundreds of spectral lines by the method of least-squares deconvolution, reducing spectral noise to a minimum. The effect of differential rotation on the broadening profile is best measured in inverse wavelength space by the first two zeros of its Fourier transform. Results: Projected rotational velocity vsini is measured for more than 110 of the sample stars. Rigid and differential rotation can be distinguished in 56 cases where vsini > 12 km s-1. We detect differential rotation rates of δΩ/Ω = 5% and more. Ten stars with significant differential rotation rates are identified. The line shapes of 46 stars are consistent with rigid rotation, even though differential rotation at very low rates might still be possible in these cases. The strongest amount of relative differential rotation (54%) detected by line profile analysis is found among F stars. Conclusions: As of now, 33 differential rotators detected by line profile analysis have been confirmed. The frequency of differential rotators decreases towards high effective temperature and rapid rotation. There is evidence for two populations of differential rotators, one of rapidly rotating A stars at the granulation

  6. Time variations of solar UV irradiance as measured by the SOLSTICE (UARS) instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, Julius; Rottman, Gary J.; Woods, Thomas N.; Wu, Fie

    1993-01-01

    An analysis is presented of solar ultraviolet irradiance measurements made by the SOLSTICE spectrometers on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). Reported observations cover the wavelength interval 119-420 nm, and the analysis discussed here is for the time period 26 Nov 1991 to 31 Dec 1992, during which time solar activity decreased in intensity. At the time of peak activity, the average 27-day variation had a relative amplitude of about 8 percent at Ly-alpha, tailing off to about 0.6 percent at 260 nm. It is shown that over the spectral interval 119-260 nm, the relative 27-day harmonic was about a factor of two larger during the strongly disturbed as compared with the moderately disturbed period.

  7. A Measurement of the Shape of the Solar Disk: The Solar Quadrupole Moment, the Solar Octopole Moment, and the Advance of Perihelion of the Planet Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lydon, T. J.; Sofia, S.

    1996-01-01

    The Solar Disk Sextant experiment has measured the solar angular diameter for a variety of solar latitudes. Combined with solar surface angular rotation data, the solar quadrupole moment J2 and the solar octopole moment J4 have been derived first by assuming constant internal angular rotation on cylinders and then by assuming constant internal angular rotation on cones. We have derived values of 1.8×10-7 for J2 and 9.8×10-7 for J4. We conclude with a discussion of errors and address the prediction of general relativity for the rate of advance of perihelion of the planet Mercury.

  8. Terrestrial Planets: Volatiles Loss & Speed of Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    There is a close relation between orbiting frequencies of terrestrial planets and intensities of their outgassing [1]. ``Sweeping'' out volatiles of their bodies is provoked and facilitated by body shaking (wave oscillations) caused by movement of celestial bodies in elliptical orbits. Non-round orbits cause inertia-gravity warpings in all spheres of the bodies producing their tectonic granulation. The higher orbiting frequency -- the smaller tectonic granula -- more thorough interior degassing. Sizes of tectonic granulas inversely proportional to orbiting frequencies are: Mars π R/2, Earth π R/4, Venus π R/6, Mercury π R/16. The atmospheric masses increase from Mars through Earth to Venus as ˜ 0. 01 : 1 : 90 (radiogenic/primordial Ar is 3000 : 300 : 1, marking degassing intensity). Mercury in this sequence should have been even more outgassed (˜ 500 times comparative to Venus, having in mind different planetary masses [2]). But now it possesses only very weak atmosphere of noble gases, Na, K -- remnants of past significant outgassing now witnessed by a great amount of small deep structurally controlled pits (craters), lobate scarps caused by strong contraction and slow rotation. The slow rotation is due to loss of angular momentum to the atmosphere now wiped out by the solar wind. The same partitioning of angular momentum occurs at Venus: slowly rotating solid body is wrapped in rapidly rotating massive atmosphere (the solid surface exposes many features of contraction due to subsidence -- vast areas of wrinkle ridges). On the contrary to slow Mercury and Venus, Earth and Mars keep their moderate rotation corresponding to their moderate and mild degassing [3]. Still further from Sun weakly outgassed gas giants rotate very rapidly. Sun itself with slowly rotating photosphere and corresponding supergranula size π R/60 is a strongly outgassed object (some think that Sun lost upto 10% of its original mass). In line with the established regularity between

  9. Gravitomagnetic field of rotating rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Matteo Luca

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the so-called gravitoelectromagnetic formalism, according to which the equations of the gravitational field can be written in analogy with classical electromagnetism, we study the gravitomagnetic field of a rotating ring, orbiting around a central body. We calculate the gravitomagnetic component of the field, both in the intermediate zone between the ring and the central body, and far away from the ring and central body. We evaluate the impact of the gravitomagnetic field on the motion of test particles and, as an application, we study the possibility of using these results, together with the Solar System ephemeris, to infer information on the spin of ring-like structures.

  10. Rotational properties of the Maria asteroid family

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M.-J.; Byun, Y.-I.; Choi, Y.-J.; Moon, H.-K.; Hinse, T. C.; Park, J.-H.; Brosch, N.; Kaplan, M.; Kaynar, S.; Uysal, Ö.; Eker, Z.; Güzel, E.; Behrend, R.; Yoon, J.-N.; Mottola, S.; Hellmich, S.

    2014-03-01

    The Maria family is regarded as an old-type (∼3 ± 1 Gyr) asteroid family that has experienced substantial collisional and dynamical evolution in the main belt. It is located near the 3:1 Jupiter mean-motion resonance area that supplies near-Earth asteroids to the inner solar system. We carried out observations of Maria family asteroids during 134 nights from 2008 July to 2013 May and derived synodic rotational periods for 51 objects, including newly obtained periods of 34 asteroids. We found that there is a significant excess of fast and slow rotators in the observed rotation rate distribution. The one-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test confirms that the spin rate distribution is not consistent with a Maxwellian at a 92% confidence level. From correlations among rotational periods, amplitudes of light curves, and sizes, we conclude that the rotational properties of Maria family asteroids have been changed considerably by non-gravitational forces such as the YORP effect. Using a light-curve inversion method, we successfully determined the pole orientations for 13 Maria members and found an excess of prograde versus retrograde spins with a ratio (N{sub p} /N{sub r} ) of 3. This implies that the retrograde rotators could have been ejected by the 3:1 resonance into the inner solar system since the formation of the Maria family. We estimate that approximately 37-75 Maria family asteroids larger than 1 km have entered near-Earth space every 100 Myr.

  11. On the Rotation of Sunspots and Their Magnetic Polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jianchuan; Yang, Zhiliang; Guo, Kaiming; Wang, Haimin; Wang, Shuo

    2016-07-01

    The rotation of sunspots of 2 yr in two different solar cycles is studied with the data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Michelson Doppler Imager instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observataory. We choose the α sunspot groups and the relatively large and stable sunspots of complex active regions in our sample. In the year of 2003, the α sunspot groups and the preceding sunspots tend to rotate counterclockwise and have positive magnetic polarity in the northern hemisphere. In the southern hemisphere, the magnetic polarity and rotational tendency of the α sunspot groups and the preceding sunspots are opposite to the northern hemisphere. The average rotational speed of these sunspots in 2003 is about 0.°65 hr‑1. From 2014 January to 2015 February, the α sunspot groups and the preceding sunspots tend to rotate clockwise and have negative magnetic polarity in the northern hemisphere. The patterns of rotation and magnetic polarity of the southern hemisphere are also opposite to those of the northern hemisphere. The average rotational speed of these sunspots in 2014/2015 is about 1.°49 hr‑1. The rotation of the relatively large and stable preceding sunspots and that of the α sunspot groups located in the same hemisphere have opposite rotational direction in 2003 and 2014/2015.

  12. Rotational preference in gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Heinen, Thomas; Jeraj, Damian; Vinken, Pia M; Velentzas, Konstantinos

    2012-06-01

    In gymnastics, most skills incorporate rotations about one or more body axes. At present, the question remains open if factors such as lateral preference and/or vestibulo-spinal asymmetry are related to gymnast's rotational preference. Therefore, we sought to explore relationships in gymnast's rotation direction between different gymnastic skills. Furthermore, we sought to explore relationships between rotational preference, lateral preference, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry. In the experiment n = 30 non-experts, n = 30 near-experts and n = 30 experts completed a rotational preference questionnaire, a lateral preference inventory, and the Unterberger-Fukuda Stepping Test. The results revealed, that near-experts and experts more often rotate rightward in the straight jump with a full turn when rotating leftward in the round-off and vice versa. The same relationship was found for experts when relating the rotation preference in the handstand with a full turn to the rotation preference in the straight jump with a full turn. Lateral preference was positively related to rotational preference in non-expert gymnasts, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry was positively related to rotational preference in experts. We suggest, that gymnasts should explore their individual rotational preference by systematically practicing different skills with a different rotation direction, bearing in mind that a clearly developed structure in rotational preference between different skills may be appropriate to develop more complex skills in gymnastics. PMID:23486362

  13. Rotational Preference in Gymnastics

    PubMed Central

    Heinen, Thomas; Jeraj, Damian; Vinken, Pia M.; Velentzas, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    In gymnastics, most skills incorporate rotations about one or more body axes. At present, the question remains open if factors such as lateral preference and/or vestibulo-spinal asymmetry are related to gymnast’s rotational preference. Therefore, we sought to explore relationships in gymnast’s rotation direction between different gymnastic skills. Furthermore, we sought to explore relationships between rotational preference, lateral preference, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry. In the experiment n = 30 non-experts, n = 30 near-experts and n = 30 experts completed a rotational preference questionnaire, a lateral preference inventory, and the Unterberger-Fukuda Stepping Test. The results revealed, that near-experts and experts more often rotate rightward in the straight jump with a full turn when rotating leftward in the round-off and vice versa. The same relationship was found for experts when relating the rotation preference in the handstand with a full turn to the rotation preference in the straight jump with a full turn. Lateral preference was positively related to rotational preference in non-expert gymnasts, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry was positively related to rotational preference in experts. We suggest, that gymnasts should explore their individual rotational preference by systematically practicing different skills with a different rotation direction, bearing in mind that a clearly developed structure in rotational preference between different skills may be appropriate to develop more complex skills in gymnastics. PMID:23486362

  14. Solar Wind Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic fields originate as coronal fields that are converted into space by the supersonic, infinitely conducting, solar wind. On average, the sun's rotation causes the field to wind up and form an Archimedes Spiral. However, the field direction changes almost continuously on a variety of scales and the irregular nature of these changes is often interpreted as evidence that the solar wind flow is turbulent.

  15. Time-variations in Solar Mean Magnetic Field from 1975-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YIN, Z.; Chen, J.; Han, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Solar variation has a profound impact on not only the space but also the earth climate related to human being. Solar magnetic evolutions are the fundamental fields for solar activity and space weather. Large-scale manifestations of solar magnetism can be described by a mean magnetic field. The solar mean magnetic field (SMMF) is the average field as observed over the entire visible disk. Large-scale solar magnetic fields have been measured at Wilcox Solar Observatory since 1975 till now; their daily observations are described and analyzed by using continuous wavelet transforms. The time-variable characteristics of short-term periods of SMMF are well demonstrated. Except the obvious the 11 years solar cycle, our results show that the SMMF has also the periods of about 1-2 year, 80-200 days, 27 days, 13.5 days, etc. The different periods appear in both the maximum and minimum years of each activity cycle and the characteristic of time variations of these periods are investigated and discussed. Revisited spectral-time analysis of variations in SMMF demonstrates the intermittent structures of short-term periodicities. Some of our results support the conclusion that ~13.5-day periodicity is significant during solar minimum phase, although the time intervals we selected are slightly different from the choice by Ye et al. in 2012. For instance, from the integrated statistic of global wavelet spectrum, we can see the peak of ~27-day is weaker than the ~13.5-day during the solar minimum. But if we look into the spectral-time areas of the local wavelet spectrum, the ~13.5-day periodicity is actually not always the prominent during the whole solar minimum phase. Even more, this period becomes the obvious variation of SMMF in the solar maximum of 1980-1981.5, in the declining portions of solar cycle of 1983-1984 and 2005-2007, in the rising portion of 1998-1999. Similarly, the ~27-day periodicity is not always leading variation of SMMF during the whole solar maximum phase

  16. Insights on Solar Twins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa Duarte, Tharcisyo Sa e.; Soares da Costa, Jefferson; Dias do Nascimento Júnior, José

    2015-08-01

    The question about how to define a real solar twin are still active. Cayrel de Strobe et al. (1981) defined a solar twin like a star having at the same time the physical parameters, Teff, gravity, bolometric magnitude, microturbulent velocity, and chemical composition. We presented the more extensive sample of solar twins known to date. From these targets we will study the behavior of the solar twins as a function of fundamentals stellar parameters, effective temperature, luminosity, age, convective envelope mass deepening (1 - M*/M⊙), lithium abundance and rotation period. We selected the solar twins from observations with the spectropolarimeters ESPaDOnS at CFHT and the Narval at TBL and also on literature. All objects have high resolution and high signal to noise. Analyze this sample of solar twins will help us to understand how these stars whether located around of the Sun's place. Our preliminary results show that the lithium abundance presents one clear correlation with stellar age. The (1 - M*/M⊙) values obtained through our method provided good agreement with the solar value. The rotation periods allow us to assess the solar twins as a function of gyrochronology.

  17. Solar skylight

    DOEpatents

    Adamson, James C.

    1984-01-01

    A reflective shutter rotates within a skylight housing in such a fashion as to control solar energy thereby providing a combination of heating, lighting, and ventilation. The skylight housing has three faces: a glazed southern face, a glazed northern face, and an open downwardly oriented face to the interior of the structure. Counter-weighted pivot arms support the shutter at either end causing the center of rotation to pass through the center of gravity. The shutter has three basic positions: In the first position, during the winter day, the shutter closes off the northern face, allowing solar energy to enter directly into the supporting structure providing heat gain and daylighting. In the second position, during the winter night, the shutter closes off the open face to the interior, providing insulation between the structure and the skylight housing. In the third position, during the non-heating season, the shutter closes off the southern face blocking unwanted heat gain but allowing diffuse northern light to penetrate for daylighting. In this last position, a means is provided for ventilating by natural convection. The apparatus can be operated either manually or by motor.

  18. The rotation of the Sun's core.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterno, L.; Sofia, S.; di Mauro, M. P.

    1996-10-01

    The rotation of the Sun's core, below 0.3Rsun_, is inferred from two independent new results. The first is based on the recent oblateness measurements carried out by the Solar Disk Sextant (SDS) instrument outside the Earth's atmosphere, and the second on the very accurate measurements of rotational splittings of the lowest degree acoustic modes, carried out in the framework of the helioseismic network IRIS. By using the theory of slowly rotating stars applied to a solar standard model, we deduce a set of rotational laws for the innermost layers, which are consistent with both the measured oblateness value and the results of the inversion of helioseismic data. The SDS and IRIS results indicate that the Sun's central regions rotate at a rate in between 1.5 and 2 times the surface equatorial angular velocity. As a result of our analysis, we deduce a quadrupole moment J_2_=2.22x10^-7^, which implies an advance of Mercury's perihelion of 42.98arcsec/c, in agreement with the theory of General Relativity and the measurements of Mercury's orbit by means of planetary radar ranging. However, very recent results obtained by the helioseismic network BISON indicate that core rotation is even slower than the polar surface rotation and therefore imply a completely different scenario than that proposed here. If we assume the intermediate solution of rigid body rotation, an alternate source of the oblateness may be attributed to a magnetic field of the order of 10^5^Gauss in the interior of the Sun.

  19. Solar still

    SciTech Connect

    Gruntman, L.R.

    1980-08-26

    A solar still adapted to float on a body of water has a toroidal evaporating chamber with sunlight admitting and absorbing, respectively, top and bottom walls for vaporizing water from the body admitted to overlie the bottom wall. A surrounding inner float ring and underlying toroidal inflatable float support the chamber. A condenser depends from and communicates with the evaporating chamber through elongate coaxial vapor outlet and air return tubes, and in turn supplies distillate to a pendent holding tank. A rotatable shaft extending coaxially down through the evaporating chamber carries a fan to propel vapor from the evaporating chamber into the condenser due to rotation of a windmill atop the chamber. A curved reflector is rotatably driven atop the inner ring to direct additional sunlight on the evaporating chamber as the sun moves overhead. An outer float ring loosely coaxially surrounds the inner float ring. The annular water surface between the float rings, covered by a transparent film, forms an oxygen production zone occupiable by oxygen producing phytoplankton fed by nutrients in water brought up from beneath the thermocline by thermosiphon flow between the warm condenser and a surrounding heat skirt. Pump units mounted on the outer float ring remove distilled water and any oxygen produced, the latter for example to a device for dissolving the oxygen below the thermocline in the body of water.

  20. Power Harvesting from Rotation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicone, Carmen; Feng, Z. C.

    2008-01-01

    We show the impossibility of harvesting power from rotational motions by devices attached to the rotating object. The presentation is suitable for students who have studied Lagrangian mechanics. (Contains 2 figures.)

  1. ROTATION RATES OF CORONAL HOLES AND THEIR PROBABLE ANCHORING DEPTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Hiremath, K. M.; Hegde, M.

    2013-02-15

    From 2001-2008, we use full-disk, SOHO/EIT 195 A calibrated images to determine latitudinal and day-to-day variations of the rotation rates of coronal holes (CHs). We estimate the weighted average of heliographic coordinates such as latitude and longitude from the central meridian on the observed solar disk. For different latitude zones between 40 Degree-Sign north and 40 Degree-Sign south, we compute rotation rates and find that, irrespective of their area, the number of days observed on the solar disk, and their latitudes, CHs rotate rigidly. Combined for all the latitude zones, we also find that CHs rotate rigidly during their evolution history. In addition, for all latitude zones, CHs follow a rigid body rotation law during their first appearance. Interestingly, the average first rotation rate ({approx}438 nHz) of CHs, computed from their first appearance on the solar disk, matches the rotation rate of the solar interior only below the tachocline.

  2. Rotations with Rodrigues' Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, E.

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears…

  3. Mechanism of rotational relaxation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanyi, J. C.; Woodall, K. B.

    1972-01-01

    A model is presented which describes the characteristic pattern of relaxation of a nonthermal rotational distribution of hydrogen halide, peaked initially at high rotational quantum number J, to a thermal distribution without generating a peak at intermediate J. A method for correcting infrared chemiluminiscence data for modest rotational relaxation is also suggested.

  4. The solar cycle variation of ozone in the stratosphere inferred from Nimbus 7 and NOAA 11 satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.; Mcpeters, R.D.

    1994-10-01

    The combined Nimbus 7 solar backscattered ultraviolet (SBUV) and NOAA 11 SBUV/2 ozone data, covering a period of more than a solar cycle (about 15 years), are used to study the UV response of ozone in the stratosphere. The study shows that about 2% change in total column ozone and about 5-7% change in ozone mixing ratio in the upper stratosphere (0.7 to 2 hPa) may be attributed to the change in the solar UV flux over a solar cycle. In the upper stratosphere, where photochemical processes are expected to play a major role, the measured solar cycle variation of ozone is significantly larger than inferred either from the photochemical models or from the ozone response to the 27-day solar UV modulation. For example, the observed solar cycle related change in ozone mixing ratio at 2 hPa is about 1% for 1% change in the solar UV flux near 200 nm. The inferred change in ozone from either the photochemical models or from the 27-day ozone-UV response is about a factor of 2-3 lower than this value.

  5. Differential Rotation via Tracking of Coronal Bright Points.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAteer, James; Boucheron, Laura E.; Osorno, Marcy

    2016-05-01

    The accurate computation of solar differential rotation is important both as a constraint for, and evidence towards, support of models of the solar dynamo. As such, the use of Xray and Extreme Ultraviolet bright points to elucidate differential rotation has been studied in recent years. In this work, we propose the automated detection and tracking of coronal bright points (CBPs) in a large set of SDO data for re-evaluation of solar differential rotation and comparison to other results. The big data aspects, and high cadence, of SDO data mitigate a few issues common to detection and tracking of objects in image sequences and allow us to focus on the use of CBPs to determine differential rotation. The high cadence of the data allows to disambiguate individual CBPs between subsequent images by allowing for significant spatial overlap, i.e., by the fact that the CBPs will rotate a short distance relative to their size. The significant spatial overlap minimizes the effects of incorrectly detected CBPs by reducing the occurrence of outlier values of differential rotation. The big data aspects of the data allows to be more conservative in our detection of CBPs (i.e., to err on the side of missing CBPs rather than detecting extraneous CBPs) while still maintaining statistically larger populations over which to study characteristics. The ability to compute solar differential rotation through the automated detection and tracking of a large population of CBPs will allow for further analyses such as the N-S asymmetry of differential rotation, variation of differential rotation over the solar cycle, and a detailed study of the magnetic flux underlying the CBPs.

  6. Solar Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Oscillations were first detected in the solar photosphere in 1962 by Leighton and students. In 1970 it was calculated that these oscillations, with a period near five minutes, were the manifestations of acoustic waves trapped in the interior. The subsequent measurements of the frequencies of global oscillation modes from the spatio-temporal power spectrum of the waves made possible the refinement of solar interior models. Over the years, increased understanding of the nuclear reaction rates, the opacity, the equation of state, convection, and gravitational settling have resulted. Mass flows shift the frequencies of modes leading to very accurate measurements of the interior rotation as a function of radius and latitude. In recent years, analogues of terrestrial seismology have led to a tomography of the interior, including measurements of global north-south flows and flow and wave speed measurements below features such as sunspots. The future of helioseismology seems bright with the approval of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, to be launched in 2008.

  7. Three-dimensional simulation of a rotating supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.; Kuroda, T.; Takiwaki, T.; Kotake, K.

    2014-05-02

    We investigate the effects of rotation on the evolution of core-collapse supernova explosion using a 15 solar mass progenitor model with a variety of neutrino luminosity and rotational velocity. Stars should have some amount of angular momentum, which would affect stellar evolution and its final explosion. In this paper we focus on the effect of rotation on gravitational collapse of a core, on a core bounce of accreting matter, and on subsequent generation and evolution of a shock wave. We find that the rotation plays a positive role for supernova explosions. More rapidly rotating models present more rapid expansion of the shock front and more energetic explosions. When the rotational speed is moderate, the shock once stalls at about 200 km away from the center similarly to a non-rotating model. Then the rotating progenitor experiences effective neutrino heating especially around an equatorial plane and explodes even with somewhat low neutrino luminosity for which the non-rotating model cannot overcome accreting matter and finally collapses. When the rotational speed is fast, the shock expands to about 300 km immediately after the core bounce and then evolves to move outward without shock stalling. We conclude that this positive effect of rotation to explosions is dominant against some possible negative aspects, for example, lower neutrino luminosity caused by less contraction of the rotating core.

  8. SEAL FOR ROTATING SHAFT

    DOEpatents

    Coffman, R.T.

    1957-12-10

    A seal is described for a rotatable shaft that must highly effective when the shaft is not rotating but may be less effective while the shaft is rotating. Weights distributed about a sealing disk secured to the shaft press the sealing disk against a tubular section into which the shiilt extends, and whem the shaft rotates, the centrifugal forces on the weights relieve the pressurc of the sealing disk against the tubular section. This action has the very desirible result of minimizing the wear of the rotating disk due to contact with the tubular section, while affording maximum sealing action when it is needed.

  9. Anomalously Weak Solar Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures on a spectrum of scales. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations, though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. Here, we analyze observations of the wavefield in the solar photosphere using techniques of time-distance helioseismology to image flows in the solar interior. We downsample and synthesize 900 billion wavefield observations to produce 3 billion cross-correlations, which we average and fit, measuring 5 million wave travel times. Using these travel times, we deduce the underlying flow systems and study their statistics to bound convective velocity magnitudes in the solar interior, as a function of depth and spherical- harmonic degree l..Within the wavenumber band l < 60, convective velocities are 20-100 times weaker than current theoretical estimates. This constraint suggests the prevalence of a different paradigm of turbulence from that predicted by existing models, prompting the question: what mechanism transports the heat flux of a solar luminosity outwards? Advection is dominated by Coriolis forces for wavenumbers l < 60, with Rossby numbers smaller than approximately 10(exp -2) at r/R-solar = 0.96, suggesting that the Sun may be a much faster rotator than previously thought, and that large-scale convection may be quasi-geostrophic. The fact that isorotation contours in the Sun are not coaligned with the axis of rotation suggests the presence of a latitudinal entropy gradient.

  10. Rotation of a Moonless Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Barnes, Jason W.; Chambers, John E.

    2013-01-01

    We numerically explore the obliquity (axial tilt) variations of a hypothetical moonless Earth. Previous work has shown that the Earth's Moon stabilizes Earth's obliquity such that it remains within a narrow range, between 22.1 deg and 24.5 deg. Without lunar influence, a frequency-map analysis by Laskar et al. showed that the obliquity could vary between 0 deg. and 85 deg. This has left an impression in the astrobiology community that a large moon is necessary to maintain a habitable climate on an Earth-like planet. Using a modified version of the orbital integrator mercury, we calculate the obliquity evolution for moonless Earths with various initial conditions for up to 4 Gyr. We find that while obliquity varies significantly more than that of the actual Earth over 100,000 year timescales, the obliquity remains within a constrained range, typically 20-25 deg. in extent, for timescales of hundreds of millions of years. None of our Solar System integrations in which planetary orbits behave in a typical manner show obliquity accessing more than 65% of the full range allowed by frequency-map analysis. The obliquities of moonless Earths that rotate in the retrograde direction are more stable than those of pro-grade rotators. The total obliquity range explored for moonless Earths with rotation periods shorter than 12 h is much less than that for slower-rotating moonless Earths. A large moon thus does not seem to be needed to stabilize the obliquity of an Earth-like planet on timescales relevant to the development of advanced life.

  11. Rotation of a Moonless Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissauer, J. J.; Barnes, J. W.; Chambers, J.

    2013-12-01

    We numerically explore the obliquity (axial tilt) variations of a hypothetical moonless Earth. Previous work has shown that the Earth's Moon stabilizes Earth's obliquity such that it remains within a narrow range, between 22.1° and 24.5°. Without lunar influence, a frequency-map analysis by Laskar et al. (Laskar, J., Joutel, F., Robutel, P. [1993]. Nature 361, 615-617) showed that the obliquity could vary between 0° and 85°. This has left an impression in the astrobiology community that a large moon is necessary to maintain a habitable climate on an Earth-like planet. Using a modified version of the orbital integrator mercury, we calculate the obliquity evolution for moonless Earths with various initial conditions for up to 4 Gyr. We find that while obliquity varies significantly more than that of the actual Earth over 100,000 year timescales, the obliquity remains within a constrained range, typically 20-25° in extent, for timescales of hundreds of millions of years. None of our Solar System integrations in which planetary orbits behave in a typical manner show obliquity accessing more than 65% of the full range allowed by frequency-map analysis. The obliquities of moonless Earths that rotate in the retrograde direction are more stable than those of prograde rotators. The total obliquity range explored for moonless Earths with rotation periods shorter than 12 h is much less than that for slower-rotating moonless Earths. A large moon thus does not seem to be needed to stabilize the obliquity of an Earth-like planet on timescales relevant to the development of advanced life.

  12. Solar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Robert; Noyes, Robert; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Canfield, Richard C.; Chupp, Edward L.; Deming, Drake; Doschek, George A.; Dulk, George A.; Foukal, Peter V.; Gilliland, Ronald L.

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of modern solar physics. Topics covered include the solar interior, the solar surface, the solar atmosphere, the Large Earth-based Solar Telescope (LEST), the Orbiting Solar Laboratory, the High Energy Solar Physics mission, the Space Exploration Initiative, solar-terrestrial physics, and adaptive optics. Policy and related programmatic recommendations are given for university research and education, facilitating solar research, and integrated support for solar research.

  13. Evolutionary models of rotating low mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Luiz Themystokliz Sanctos

    1999-11-01

    We have investigated the combined effects of rotation and internal angular momentum redistribution on the structure and evolution of low mass stars, from the pre-main sequence to the main sequence phase. As a tool for that study, the ATON stellar evolutionary code (Mazzitelli 1989; Ventura et al. 1998) has been modified in order to include those effects. Rotation was implemented according to the equipotential technique developed by Kippenhahn & Thomas (1970) and later improved by Endal & Sofia (1976). Angular momentum redistribution in radiative regions was modeled through an advection-diffusion partial differential equation based on the framework originally introduced by Chaboyer & Zahn (1992), which is based on the sole assumption of stronger turbulent transport in the horizontal direction than in the vertical one. The diffusion coefficient of this equation is obtained from characteristic lengths and velocities of typical rotation-induced hydrodynamical instabilities. This improved code was used to compute a series of rotating low mass stellar models (with masses ranging from 1.2Modot down to 0.6 Modot). Regarding the structural (hydrostatic) effects of rotation, the general features of these models show that rotating stars behave as if they were non-rotating stars of slightly lower masses, in accordance with previous results by other researchers. A study of this mass-lowering effect for the considered range of masses shows that rotation decreases lithium depletion while the star is fully convective but increases it as soon as the star develops a radiative core. The net effect is a enhanced lithium depletion, in disagreement with observational data which suggest that faster rotators in young open clusters experience less lithium depletion. Angular momentum redistribution in the considered models is very effective in smoothing their internal angular velocity profile as soon as the star reaches the zero age main sequence, but fails to reproduce the flat solar

  14. Core rotational dynamics and geological events

    PubMed

    Greff-Lefftz; Legros

    1999-11-26

    A study of Earth's fluid core oscillations induced by lunar-solar tidal forces, together with tidal secular deceleration of Earth's axial rotation, shows that the rotational eigenfrequency of the fluid core and some solar tidal waves were in resonance around 3.0 x 10(9), 1.8 x 10(9), and 3 x 10(8) years ago. The associated viscomagnetic frictional power at the core boundaries may be converted into heat and would destabilize the D" thermal layer, leading to the generation of deep-mantle plumes, and would also increase the temperature at the fluid core boundaries, perturbing the core dynamo process. Such phenomena could account for large-scale episodes of continental crust formation, the generation of flood basalts, and abrupt changes in geomagnetic reversal frequency. PMID:10576731

  15. Global Rotation of Non-Rotating Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, T.

    2001-11-01

    At its 24th General Assembly held at Manchester last year, the IAU has adopted the Celestial Ephemeris Origin (CEO) as a new longitude origin of the celestial coordinate system (Capitaine et al. 2000, IAU 2001). The CEO is the application of Guinot's non-rotating origin (NRO) to the Earth's equator (Guinot 1979, Capitaine et al. 1986, Capitaine 1990). By using the current IAU precession/nutation theory, we integrated the global orbit of CEO. It is a slightly curved zigzag pattern of the amplitude of around 23o moving secularly along the ecliptic. Among its kinematical features, we note that CEO has a large secular component of rotation with respect to the inertial reference frame. The current speed of this global rotation is as large as around -4.15 ''/yr. The negative sign shows that CEO rotates clockwise with respect to the inertial frame when viewed from the north celestial pole. Unfortunately this is a general property of NROs. On the other hand, such secular rotation does not exist for some geometrically-defined longitude origins like K, H, and Σ already discussed in Kovalevsky and McCarthy (1998). We think that the existence of a global secular rotaion means that the CEO, and NROs in general, is not appropriate to be specified as the x-axis of celestial coordinate systems.

  16. Mounts For Selective Rotation And Translation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Blade-in-groove bearings stacked to obtain necessary degrees of freedom. Mounting system allows panels to be tilted, rotated, and translated selectively. Developed for large solar reflectors or antennas composed of hexagonal panels about 6 ft. wide and 6 in. thick. With system, each panel tilted around two axes to focus antenna. At same time, each panel translates along these axes to accommodate thermal expansion and contraction without affecting focus.

  17. Solar terrestrial relationships related to thunderstorms and BUV dark current and ozone data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Solar terrestrial interactions as they affect Nimbus 4 BUV dark current and possibly affect thunderstorm occurrence are investigated. A solar wind index is calculated for 1970 to 1971. Dark current enhancements appear to be associated in some way with solar proton events and the solar wind index, but additional investigations by GSFC are required before conclusions can be drawn. Superposed epoch analysis of an index of North American thunderstorm occurrence reveals a discernible increase in the index magnitude on days 1 and 2 following solar proton events. There appears to be little or no 27 day recurrence tendency in thunderstorm occurrence frequency and no association with vorticity area index on a day to day basis.

  18. On the shape of rapidly rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, J.-P.; Ranc, C.; Morel, P.

    2010-07-01

    Aims: The critical surface of a rapidly rotating star is determined, assuming that the rotation is either uniform or shellular (angular velocity constant on level surfaces, but increasing with depth). Methods: A step beyond the classical Roche model, where the entire mass is assumed to be gathered at the center of the star, here the quadrupolar moment of the mass distribution is taken into account through a linear perturbation method. Results: The flattening (defined here as the ratio between the equatorial and the polar radius) can somewhat exceed the 3/2 value of the Roche model, depending on the strength of the interior rotation. The result is applied to a star of 7 solar masses, which is the mass of Achernar, the star with the largest flattening detected so far through optical interferometry.

  19. The Solar Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattaneo, F.

    2000-05-01

    Magnetic activity on the Sun presents us with an interesting dichotomy. On large spatial and temporal scales the solar magnetic field displays a remarkable degree of organization. The 11 years cadence of the solar cycle, Hales' polarity law, and the systematic drift of the regions of emergence of active regions towards the equator throughout the solar cycle are all indicative of a powerful organizing process. On small spatial and temporal scales, the Solar magnetic field appears random and chaotic. It is interesting that recent advances in dynamo theory provide us with a unified approach to solar magnetic activity whereby both large and small scales emerge naturally as dynamo processes associated with rotationally constrained and unconstrained scales of motions in the convection zone (or directly below it). According to this view all coherent scales of motions produce magnetic structures of comparable coherence length. Those that are further endowed with lack of reflectional symmetry by virtue of being rotationally constrained are further associated with inverse cascades that can generate magnetic structures on larger scales still. The picture that emerges is one in which dynamo action proceeds on different time scales all over the convection zone. But only in very special regions, like for instance the solar tachocline, is the magnetic field organized on large scales. This idea provides a natural explanation for the origin of active regions, ephemeral regions, and intra--network fields.

  20. The spatial rotator.

    PubMed

    Rasmusson, A; Hahn, U; Larsen, J O; Gundersen, H J G; Jensen, E B Vedel; Nyengaard, J R

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a new local volume estimator, the spatial rotator, which is based on measurements on a virtual 3D probe, using computer assisted microscopy. The basic design of the probe builds upon the rotator principle which requires only a few manual intersection markings, thus making the spatial rotator fast to use. Since a 3D probe is involved, it is expected that the spatial rotator will be more efficient than the the nucleator and the planar rotator, which are based on measurements in a single plane. An extensive simulation study shows that the spatial rotator may be more efficient than the traditional local volume estimators. Furthermore, the spatial rotator can be seen as a further development of the Cavalieri estimator, which does not require randomization of sectioning or viewing direction. The tissue may thus be sectioned in any arbitrary direction, making it easy to identify the specific tissue region under study. In order to use the spatial rotator in practice, however, it is necessary to be able to identify intersection points between cell boundaries and test rays in a series of parallel focal planes, also at the peripheral parts of the cell boundaries. In cases where over- and underprojection phenomena are not negligible, they should therefore be corrected for if the spatial rotator is to be applied. If such a correction is not possible, it is needed to avoid these phenomena by using microscopy with increased resolution in the focal plane. PMID:23488880

  1. Atmospheric General Circulations of Synchronously Rotating Terrestrial Planets: Dependence on Planetary Rotation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, S.; Ishiwatari, M.; Nakajima, K.; Takahashi, Y. O.; Morikawa, Y.; Nishizawa, S.; Hayashi, Y.-Y.

    2012-04-01

    In order to investigate a variety of climates of synchronously rotating terrestrial planets, a parameter study on the dependence on planetary rotation rate Ω is performed by using a general circulation model (GCM) with simplified hydrologic and radiative processes. The planetary rotation rate is varied from zero to the Earth's value, and other parameters such as orbital parameters, planetary radius, solar constant are set to the Earth's values. The results show that there emerge four typical atmospheric states in ascending order of planetary rotation rate as follows: States in which dayside-nightside direct circulations dominate States in which weak super rotation emerges States in which strong super rotation emerges and meridionally asymmetric patterns oscillate States in which precipitation disturbances emerge in nightside midlatitudinal regions The atmospheric state is gradually accompanied by a qualitative circulation change from state (1) to state (3) with increasing Ω from zero, although Merlis and Schneider (2010) which performed similar GCM experiments lump together cases with small planetary rotation rates under the term "slowly rotating atmospheres". For cases for planetary rotation rate with the values of 0.75-0.85 times of the terrestrial value, multiple equilibrium solutions of state (3) and state (4) are obtained. It is shown that, in addition to dry atmosphere (Edson et al., 2011), moist atmospheres on synchronously rotating planet also have multiple equilibrium solutions. Although circulation patterns and amount of sensible/latent heat transport from the dayside to the nightside changes with the change of Ω, summation of sensible heat transport and latent heat transport almost remains unchanged, and the dependence of dayside to nightside temperature contrast on Ω is small.

  2. ROTATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS DURING ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, B. J.; Li, Y.; Luhmann, J. G.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R. E-mail: yanli@ssl.berkeley.edu E-mail: spiro.k.antiochos@nasa.gov

    2009-06-01

    Understanding the connection between coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and their interplanetary counterparts (ICMEs) is one of the most important problems in solar-terrestrial physics. We calculate the rotation of erupting field structures predicted by numerical simulations of CME initiation via the magnetic breakout model. In this model, the initial potential magnetic field has a multipolar topology and the system is driven by imposing a shear flow at the photospheric boundary. Our results yield insight on how to connect solar observations of the orientation of the filament or polarity inversion line (PIL) in the CME source region, the orientation of the CME axis as inferred from coronagraph images, and the ICME flux rope orientation obtained from in situ measurements. We present the results of two numerical simulations that differ only in the direction of the applied shearing motions (i.e., the handedness of the sheared-arcade systems and their resulting CME fields). In both simulations, eruptive flare reconnection occurs underneath the rapidly expanding sheared fields transforming the ejecta fields into three-dimensional flux rope structures. As the erupting flux ropes propagate through the low corona (from 2 to 4 R{sub sun}) the right-handed breakout flux rope rotates clockwise and the left-handed breakout flux rope rotates counterclockwise, in agreement with recent observations of the rotation of erupting filaments. We find that by 3.5 R {sub sun} the average rotation angle between the flux rope axes and the active region PIL is approximately 50 deg. We discuss the implications of these results for predicting, from the observed chirality of the pre-eruption filament and/or other properties of the CME source region, the direction and amount of rotation that magnetic flux rope structures will experience during eruption. We also discuss the implications of our results for CME initiation models.

  3. Probing Coronal Mass Ejections with Faraday Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Steven R.; Fischer, P. D.; Kooi, J. E.; Buffo, J. J.

    2013-07-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are one of the most important solar phenomena in affecting conditions on Earth. There is not a consensus as to the physical mechanisms responsible for ejecting CME material from the solar atmosphere. Measurements that specify basic physical properties close to the Sun, when the CME is still evolving, should be useful in determining the correct theoretical model. One of the best observational techniques is that of Faraday rotation, a rotation in the plane of polarization of radio waves when propagating through a magnetized medium like the corona. The importance of Faraday rotation in determining the structure and evolutionary history of CMEs was discussed in Liu et al (ApJ 665, 1439, 2007). In this paper, we report Faraday rotation observations of ``constellations'' of background extragalactic radio sources near the Sun on three days in August, 2012, with the intention of observing a source occulted by a CME. Observations were made with the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. We made polarization measurements at 6 frequencies between 1.31 and 1.94 GHz. On August 2, 2012, a CME clearly visible on the LASCO C3 coronagraph occulted a radio source from our sample, 0843+1547. Preliminary data analysis shows a Faraday rotation transient for 0843+1547 which appears to be associated with the CME. The Faraday rotation measure changes from nearly 0 before CME passage, to a value of about -12 radians/square-meter before declining after CME passage. We will discuss the interpretation of these data in terms of models for CME structure, as well as the status of our observations of other sources on August 2, and on other days. This work was supported at the University of Iowa by grant ATM09-56901.

  4. ESTER: Evolution STEllaire en Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, Michel

    2013-05-01

    The ESTER code computes the steady state of an isolated star of mass larger than two solar masses. The only convective region computed as such is the core where isentropy is assumed. ESTER provides solutions of the partial differential equations, for the pressure, density, temperature, angular velocity and meridional velocity for the whole volume. The angular velocity (differential rotation) and meridional circulation are computed consistently with the structure and are driven by the baroclinic torque. The code uses spectral methods, both radially and horizontally, with spherical harmonics and Chebyshev polynomials. The iterations follow Newton's algorithm. The code is object-oriented and is written in C++; a python suite allows an easy visualization of the results. While running, PGPLOT graphs are displayed to show evolution of the iterations.

  5. Helioseismic measurement of solar torsional oscillations.

    PubMed

    Vorontsov, S V; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Schou, J; Strakhov, V N; Thompson, M J

    2002-04-01

    Bands of slower and faster rotation, the so-called torsional oscillations, are observed at the Sun's surface to migrate in latitude over the 11-year solar cycle. Here, we report on the temporal variations of the Sun's internal rotation from solar p-mode frequencies obtained over nearly 6 years by the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite. The entire solar convective envelope appears to be involved in the torsional oscillations, with phase propagating poleward and equatorward from midlatitudes at all depths throughout the convective envelope. PMID:11935019

  6. Torsional oscillations in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, V. I.; Tlatov, A. G.

    1997-07-01

    The dependence of the differential rotation of the solar corona on latitude and time is investigated using observations in the Fe XIV 5303 Angstrom line from 1940 to 1992. Five bands of fast and slow rotation relative to the average value are distinguished. The bands of slow rotation arise after the reversal of the polar magnetic field of the Sun and migrate toward the equator over the course of 8 to 15 years along the `butterfly' patterns of polar faculae and of the sunspots of the following cycle. The bands of fast rotation arise 5-6 years later and also migrate toward the equator parallel to the bands of slow rotation. The fastest latitude drift of the bands was observed from 1945 to 1955, and preceded the maximum of the 19th solar activity cycle (1955-1965). The amplitude of the azimuthal component of the coronal rotation relative to the mean rotation varied within 30 m/s. The equatorial drift velocity varied from 3 to 5 m/s. The latitude-time distribution of the zones with slow coronal rotation is associated with the appearance of high-latitude and middle-latitude coronal holes after the reversal of the solar polar magnetic field and during the solar activity maximum of the next sunspot cycle. The origin of the zones of anomalous rotation in the corona and their dynamics in the global activity cycle are discussed.

  7. Torsional oscillations in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, V. I.; Tlatov, A. G.

    1997-08-01

    The dependence of the differential rotation of the solar corona on latitude and time is investigated using observations in the Fe XIV 5303 A line from 1940 to 1992. Five bands of fast and slow rotation relative to the average value are distinguished. The bands of slow rotation arise after the reversal of the polar magnetic field of the sun and migrate toward the equator over the course of eight to 15 years along the 'butterfly' patterns of polar faculae and of the sunspots of the following cycle. The bands of fast rotation arise 5-6 years later, and also migrate toward the equator parallel to the bands of slow rotation. The fastest latitude drift of the bands was observed from 1945 to 1955 and preceded the maximum of the 19th solar activity cycle (1955-1965). The amplitude of the azimuthal component of the coronal rotation relative to the mean rotation varied within +/- 30 m/s. The equatorial drift velocity varied from 3 to 5 m/s. The latitude-time distribution of the zones with slow coronal rotation is associated with the appearance of high-latitude and middle-latitude coronal holes after the reversal of the solar polar magnetic field and during the solar activity maximum of the next sunspot cycle. The origin of the zones of anomalous rotation in the corona and their dynamics in the global activity cycle are discussed.

  8. Differential Rotation of Close Binary Stars: Application to HR 1099

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, P.; Donati, J.-F.; Wade, G. A.; Landstreet, J. D.; Oliveira, J. M.; Shorlin, S. L. S.; Sigut, T. A. A.; Collier Cameron, A.

    We propose a new method for estimating differential rotation in binary stars, for which only moderate to poor phase coverage can be obtained (rotation period of order of a few days), preventing the use of conventional cross-correlation methods. Assuming a solar-like differential rotation law with two independent parameters (equatorial rotation rate φeq and rotational shear between pole and equator dφ), we reconstruct Doppler images for different values of the two parameters, and derive the optimal φeq, dφ and associated error bars from the corresponding 2 ° map. Simulations show that φeq and dφ can be recovered with good accuracy, even if the phase coverage per rotation cycle is poor, provided the total data set is long enough. From observations of the HR 1099 K1 subgiant secured in 1998, 1999 and 2000, we obtain that the equator rotates faster than the pole with a rotational shear about 3 times smaller than solar.

  9. Recurrence of solar activity - Evidence for active longitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogart, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that the autocorrelation coefficients of the daily Wolf sunspot numbers over a period of 128 years reveal a number of interesting features of the variability of solar activity. Besides establishing periodicities for the solar rotation, solar activity cycle, and, perhaps, the 'Gleissberg Cycle', they suggest that active longitudes do exist, but with much greater strength and persistence in some solar cycles than in others. Evidence is adduced for a variation in the solar rotation period, as measured by sunspot number, of as much as two days between different solar cycles.

  10. Modeling rapidly rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, M.

    2006-06-01

    We review the quest of modeling rapidly rotating stars during the past 40 years and detail the challenges to be taken up by models facing new data from interferometry, seismology, spectroscopy... We then present the progress of the ESTER project aimed at giving a physically self-consistent model for the structure and evolution of rapidly rotating stars.

  11. Rotatable shear plate interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Duffus, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotatable shear plate interferometer comprises a transparent shear plate mounted obliquely in a tubular supporting member at 45.degree. with respect to its horizontal center axis. This tubular supporting member is supported rotatably around its center axis and a collimated laser beam is made incident on the shear plate along this center axis such that defocus in different directions can be easily measured.

  12. CONTROL ROD ROTATING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Baumgarten, A.; Karalis, A.J.

    1961-11-28

    A threaded rotatable shaft is provided which rotates in response to linear movement of a nut, the shaft being surrounded by a pair of bellows members connected to either side of the nut to effectively seal the reactor from leakage and also to store up energy to shut down the reactor in the event of a power failure. (AEC)

  13. THE OLD ROTATION, 2005

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Old Rotation (circa 1896) is the oldest, continuous cotton experiment in the world. Its 13 plots on 1 acre of land on the campus of Auburn University continue to document the long-term effects of crop rotations with and without winter legumes (crimson clover) as a source of nitrogen for cotton,...

  14. Temporal response of the polar troposphere and stratosphere to changes in the global atmospheric electric circuit associated with solar wind variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Mai Mai; Chisham, Gareth; Freeman, Mervyn P.

    2014-05-01

    The surface meteorological response in the polar regions to fluctuations in the dawn-to-dusk interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) component, By, indicates that a coupling between the Sun and Earth's weather occurs via the global atmospheric electric circuit (GEC). In particular, the difference between the mean surface pressures during times of high positive and high negative IMF By is 1 - 2 hPa in Antarctica and occurs on a relatively fast timescale compared to other proposed Sun-weather connections. Specifically, the observed time lag between the solar wind perturbation of the ionosphere-to-ground electric potential (and hence the vertical fair-weather current) and the ground level response is up to about 1 day. Here we extend this result and present further evidence that a solar wind-lower atmosphere coupling occurs via the GEC throughout the troposphere which in turn affects the stratosphere. We do this using NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data to determine the time lag of the peak correlation between IMF By and geopotential height for different pressure levels in the troposphere and stratosphere. In Antarctica, there is a statistically-significant correlation between IMF By and geopotential height within the troposphere, but not within the stratosphere. The peak in the correlation is observed at higher time lags in the upper troposphere (2 - 4 days) than in the lower troposphere (0 - 1 day). The amplitude of the correlation has a periodicity of about 27 days, associated with the effect of the rotation of the Sun on the periodicity of the solar wind magnetic field at Earth. In the Arctic, the time lag between IMF By and the meteorological response is significant and similar at different pressure levels in the troposphere and is about 0 - 1 day. A significant response is seen in the stratosphere with a time lag of about 10 days. We interpret the existence of a time lag of less than a few days in the troposphere as evidence in support of a mechanism involving the action of

  15. Green corona and solar sector structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonucci, E.; Svalgaard, L.

    1974-01-01

    Analysis of the green-line corona for the interval 1947-1970 suggests the existence of large-scale organization of the emission. The green-line emission at high northern latitudes (approximately 40 to 60 deg) is correlated with the emission at high southern latitudes 6, 15, and 24 days later, while the low-latitude green corona seems to be correlated on both sides of the equator with no time lag. These coronal features are recurrent with a 27-day period at all latitudes between plus or minus 60 deg, and these large-scale structures are believed to be associated with the solar magnetic sector structure. The high correlation between northern and southern high-latitude emission at 15 days time lag is explained as a signature of a two-sector structure, while four sectors are associated with the 6- and 24-day peaks.

  16. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Stephen S; Lo, Ian K Y

    2006-06-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is being performed by an increasing number of orthopaedic surgeons. The principles, techniques, and instrumentation have evolved to the extent that all patterns and sizes of rotator cuff tear, including massive tears, can now be repaired arthroscopically. Achieving a biomechanically stable construct is critical to biologic healing. The ideal repair construct must optimize suture-to-bone fixation, suture-to-tendon fixation, abrasion resistance of suture, suture strength, knot security, loop security, and restoration of the anatomic rotator cuff footprint (the surface area of bone to which the cuff tendons attach). By achieving optimized repair constructs, experienced arthroscopic surgeons are reporting results equal to those of open rotator cuff repair. As surgeons' arthroscopic skill levels increase through attendance at surgical skills courses and greater experience gained in the operating room, there will be an increasing trend toward arthroscopic repair of most rotator cuff pathology. PMID:16757673

  17. Interferometry for rotating sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velle, S.; Mehrabi Pari, S.; Csernai, L. P.

    2016-06-01

    The two particle interferometry method to determine the size of the emitting source after a heavy ion collision is extended. Following the extension of the method to spherical expansion dynamics, here we extend the method to rotating systems. It is shown that rotation of a cylindrically symmetric system leads to modifications, which can be perceived as spatial asymmetry by the "azimuthal HBT" method. We study an exact rotating and expanding solution of the fluid dynamical model of heavy ion reactions. We consider a source that is azimuthally symmetric in space around the axis of rotation, and discuss the features of the resulting two particle correlation function. This shows the azimuthal asymmetry arising from the rotation. We show that this asymmetry leads to results similar to those given by spatially asymmetric sources.

  18. Rotation sensor switch

    DOEpatents

    Sevec, John B.

    1978-01-01

    A protective device to provide a warning if a piece of rotating machinery slows or stops comprises a pair of hinged weights disposed to rotate on a rotating shaft of the equipment. When the equipment is rotating, the weights remain in a plane essentially perpendicular to the shaft and constitute part of an electrical circuit that is open. When the shaft slows or stops, the weights are attracted to a pair of concentric electrically conducting disks disposed in a plane perpendicular to the shaft and parallel to the plane of the weights when rotating. A disk magnet attracts the weights to the electrically conducting plates and maintains the electrical contact at the plates to complete an electrical circuit that can then provide an alarm signal.

  19. Recent VLA Observations of Coronal Faraday Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Fischer, P. D.; Buffo, J. J.; Spangler, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    Proposed mechanisms for coronal heating and acceleration of the fast solar wind, such as Joule heating by coronal currents or dissipation of Alfvén waves, depend on the magnetic field structure and plasma characteristics of the corona within heliocentric distances of 5 solar radii. Faraday rotation observations can provide unique information on the magnetic field in this region of the corona. We report on sensitive full-polarization observations of the radio galaxy 3C228 through the solar corona at heliocentric distances of 4.6 - 5.0 solar radii. The observations were made with the VLA in August of 2011. We performed these observations at 5.0 and 6.1 GHz (each with a bandwidth of 128 MHz), permitting measurements deeper in the corona than previous VLA observations at 1.4 and 1.7 GHz. While the measured Faraday rotation was lower than our a priori expectations, we can understand the magnitude of the observed Faraday rotation in terms of observed properties of the corona on the day of observation. For coronal remote sensing, an advantage of using extended extragalactic radio sources such as 3C228 is that such observations provide multiple lines of sight through the corona. Our data provide two lines of sight (separated by 46″, 33,000 km in the corona), one to a northern hotspot and the other to a southern hotspot with fractional polarizations of 14% and 8% respectively. We detected three periods over the eight-hour observing session during which there appeared to be a difference in the Faraday rotation between these two closely spaced lines of sight. These measurements yield an estimate of 2 - 4 GA for coronal currents. We did not directly detect rotation measure fluctuations. Our data impose upper limits on rotation measure fluctuations caused by coronal waves. The observed upper limits were 3.3 and 6.4 rad/m2 and are comparable to and not inconsistent with some models for Alfvén wave heating. This research was supported at the University of Iowa by grants ATM09

  20. Solar Probe Plus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, Adam

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Solar Probe Plus mission is planned to be launched in 2018 to study the upper solar corona with both.in-situ and remote sensing instrumentation. The mission will utilize 6 Venus gravity assist maneuver to gradually lower its perihelion to 9.5 Rs below the expected Alfven pOint to study the sub-alfvenic solar wind that is still at least partially co-rotates with the Sun. The detailed science objectives of this mission will be discussed. SPP will have a strong synergy with The ESA/NASA Solar orbiter mission to be launched a year ahead. Both missions will focus on the inner heliosphere and will have complimentary instrumentations. Strategies to exploit this synergy will be also presented.

  1. The Solar Dynamo Zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Soon, Willie H.; Baliunas, Sallie L.; Hall, Jeffrey C.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Henry, Gregory W.

    2016-05-01

    We present composite time series of Ca II H & K line core emission indices of up to 50 years in length for a set of 27 solar-analog stars (spectral types G0-G5; within ~10% of the solar mass) and the Sun. These unique data are available thanks to the long-term dedicated efforts of the Mount Wilson Observatory HK project, the Lowell Observatory Solar-Stellar Spectrograph, and the National Solar Observatory/Air Force Research Laboratory/Sacremento Peak K-line monitoring program. The Ca II H & K emission originates in the lower chromosphere and is strongly correlated with the presence of magnetic plage regions in the Sun. These synoptic observations allow us to trace the patterns long-term magnetic variability and explore dynamo behavior over a wide range of rotation regimes and stellar evolution timescales.

  2. Solar Tracking Error Analysis of Fresnel Reflector

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiantao; Yan, Junjie; Pei, Jie; Liu, Guanjie

    2014-01-01

    Depending on the rotational structure of Fresnel reflector, the rotation angle of the mirror was deduced under the eccentric condition. By analyzing the influence of the sun tracking rotation angle error caused by main factors, the change rule and extent of the influence were revealed. It is concluded that the tracking errors caused by the difference between the rotation axis and true north meridian, at noon, were maximum under certain conditions and reduced at morning and afternoon gradually. The tracking error caused by other deviations such as rotating eccentric, latitude, and solar altitude was positive at morning, negative at afternoon, and zero at a certain moment of noon. PMID:24895664

  3. Maximal acceleration is non-rotating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Don N.

    1998-06-01

    In a stationary axisymmetric spacetime, the angular velocity of a stationary observer whose acceleration vector is Fermi-Walker transported is also the angular velocity that locally extremizes the magnitude of the acceleration of such an observer. The converse is also true if the spacetime is symmetric under reversing both t and 0264-9381/15/6/020/img1 together. Thus a congruence of non-rotating acceleration worldlines (NAW) is equivalent to a stationary congruence accelerating locally extremely (SCALE). These congruences are defined completely locally, unlike the case of zero angular momentum observers (ZAMOs), which requires knowledge around a symmetry axis. The SCALE subcase of a stationary congruence accelerating maximally (SCAM) is made up of stationary worldlines that may be considered to be locally most nearly at rest in a stationary axisymmetric gravitational field. Formulae for the angular velocity and other properties of the SCALEs are given explicitly on a generalization of an equatorial plane, infinitesimally near a symmetry axis, and in a slowly rotating gravitational field, including the far-field limit, where the SCAM is shown to be counter-rotating relative to infinity. These formulae are evaluated in particular detail for the Kerr-Newman metric. Various other congruences are also defined, such as a stationary congruence rotating at minimum (SCRAM), and stationary worldlines accelerating radially maximally (SWARM), both of which coincide with a SCAM on an equatorial plane of reflection symmetry. Applications are also made to the gravitational fields of maximally rotating stars, the Sun and the Solar System.

  4. Magnetic energy flow in the solar wind.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modisette, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the effect of rotation (tangential flow) of the solar wind on the conclusions of Whang (1971) suggesting an increase in the solar wind velocity due to the conversion of magnetic energy to kinetic energy. It is shown that the effect of the rotation of the sun on the magnetic energy flow results in most of the magnetic energy being transported by magnetic shear stress near the sun.

  5. The Ten-Rotation Quasi-periodicity in Sunspot Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getko, R.

    2014-06-01

    Sunspot-area fluctuations over an epoch of 12 solar cycles (12 - 23) are investigated in detail using wavelets. Getko ( Universal Heliophysical Processes, IAU Symp. 257, 169, 2009) found three significant quasi-periodicities at 10, 17, and 23 solar rotations, but two longer periods could be treated as subharmonics of the ten-rotation quasi-periodicity. Therefore we focused the analysis on the occurrence of this quasi-periodicity during the low- and high-activity periods of each solar cycle. Because of the N - S asymmetry, each solar hemisphere was considered separately. The skewness of each fluctuation-probability distribution suggests that the positive and negative fluctuations could be examined separately. To avoid the problem that occurs when a few strong fluctuations create a wavelet peak, we applied fluctuation transformations for which the amplitudes at the high- and the low-activity periods are almost the same. The wavelet analyses show that the ten-rotation quasi-periodicity is mainly detected during the high-activity periods, but it also exists during a few low-activity periods. The division of each solar hemisphere into 30∘-wide longitude bins and the wavelet calculations for the areas of sunspot clusters belonging to these 30∘ bins enable one to detect longitude zones in which the ten-rotation quasi-periodicity exists. These zones are present during the whole high-activity periods and dominate the integrated spectra.

  6. ROTATING GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchini, P.; Varri, A. L.; Bertin, G.; Zocchi, A.

    2013-07-20

    Internal rotation is thought to play a major role in the dynamics of some globular clusters. However, in only a few cases has internal rotation been studied by the quantitative application of realistic and physically justified global models. Here, we present a dynamical analysis of the photometry and three-dimensional kinematics of {omega} Cen, 47 Tuc, and M15, by means of a recently introduced family of self-consistent axisymmetric rotating models. The three clusters, characterized by different relaxation conditions, show evidence of differential rotation and deviations from sphericity. The combination of line-of-sight velocities and proper motions allows us to determine their internal dynamics, predict their morphology, and estimate their dynamical distance. The well-relaxed cluster 47 Tuc is interpreted very well by our model; internal rotation is found to explain the observed morphology. For M15, we provide a global model in good agreement with the data, including the central behavior of the rotation profile and the shape of the ellipticity profile. For the partially relaxed cluster {omega} Cen, the selected model reproduces the complex three-dimensional kinematics; in particular, the observed anisotropy profile, characterized by a transition from isotropy to weakly radial anisotropy and then to tangential anisotropy in the outer parts. The discrepancy found for the steep central gradient in the observed line-of-sight velocity dispersion profile and for the ellipticity profile is ascribed to the condition of only partial relaxation of this cluster and the interplay between rotation and radial anisotropy.

  7. Rotating reactor studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Glyn O.

    1991-01-01

    Undesired gravitational effects such as convection or sedimentation in a fluid can sometimes be avoided or decreased by the use of a closed chamber uniformly rotated about a horizontal axis. In a previous study, the spiral orbits of a heavy or buoyant particle in a uniformly rotating fluid were determined. The particles move in circles, and spiral in or out under the combined effects of the centrifugal force and centrifugal buoyancy. A optimization problem for the rotation rate of a cylindrical reactor rotated about its axis and containing distributed particles was formulated and solved. Related studies in several areas are addressed. A computer program based on the analysis was upgraded by correcting some minor errors, adding a sophisticated screen-and-printer graphics capability and other output options, and by improving the automation. The design, performance, and analysis of a series of experiments with monodisperse polystyrene latex microspheres in water were supported to test the theory and its limitations. The theory was amply confirmed at high rotation rates. However, at low rotation rates (1 rpm or less) the assumption of uniform solid-body rotation of the fluid became invalid, and there were increasingly strong secondary motions driven by variations in the mean fluid density due to variations in the particle concentration. In these tests the increase in the mean fluid density due to the particles was of order 0.015 percent. To a first approximation, these flows are driven by the buoyancy in a thin crescent-shaped depleted layer on the descending side of the rotating reactor. This buoyancy distribution is balanced by viscosity near the walls, and by the Coriolis force in the interior. A full analysis is beyond the scope of this study. Secondary flows are likely to be stronger for buoyant particles, which spiral in towards the neutral point near the rotation axis under the influence of their centrifugal buoyancy. This is because the depleted layer is

  8. Rotatable seal assembly. [Patent application; rotating targets

    DOEpatents

    Logan, C.M.; Garibaldi, J.L.

    1980-11-12

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

  9. Observations of time variation in the sun's rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, M. F.; Libbrecht, K. G.

    1993-01-01

    Observations of solar p-mode frequency splittings obtained at Big Bear Solar Observatory in 1986 and during 1988-90 reveal small (about 1 percent) changes in the sun's subsurface angular velocity with solar cycle. An asymptotic inversion of the splitting data yields the latitude dependence of the rotation rate and shows that the largest changes in the angular velocity, about 4 nanoHz, occurred between 1986 and the later years, at high (about 60 deg) solar latitudes. Earlier helioseismic observations suggest that solar cycle changes in the ratio of magnetic to turbulent pressure in the solar convection zone are large enough to account for the magnitude of the observed angular velocity variations, but a detailed model of the phenomenon does not exist.

  10. Chaotic rotation of Hyperion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binzel, R. P.; Green, J. R.; Opal, C. B.

    1986-01-01

    Thomas et al. (1984) analyzed 14 Voyager 2 images of Saturn's satellite Hyperion and interpreted them to be consistent with a coherent (nonchaotic) rotation period of 13.1 days. This interpretation was criticized by Peale and Wisdom (1984), who argued that the low sampling frequency of Voyager data does not allow chaotic or nonchaotic rotation to be distinguished. New observations obtained with a higher sampling frequency are reported here which conclusively show that the 13.1 day period found by Thomas et al. was not due to coherent rotation.

  11. Acoustic rotation control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Croonquist, A. P.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A system is described for acoustically controlled rotation of a levitated object, which avoids deformation of a levitated liquid object. Acoustic waves of the same wavelength are directed along perpendicular directions across the object, and with the relative phases of the acoustic waves repeatedly switched so that one wave alternately leads and lags the other by 90 deg. The amount of torque for rotating the object, and the direction of rotation, are controlled by controlling the proportion of time one wave leads the other and selecting which wave leads the other most of the time.

  12. Detection of Solar Eigenmodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelly, B.

    Starting from a well-known phenomenon -the 5 mn solar oscillations-, this text describes the process which allows to produce the very few numbers used to infer the internal structure and rotation of the Sun with an unsurpassed accuracy. We shall describe for one part the instrumental principles, the raw data processing, and all things happening prior to the spectra computation, and for another part the techniques to obtain and validate the eigenmodes parameters. Finally we shall discuss the topic of the amplification of the oscillations by solar limb, upon which is based the helioseismology program of the PICARD space mission.

  13. The Solar-Stellar Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunker, Hannah

    2015-08-01

    The influence of rotation on stellar magnetism, and the importance of the shear layer between a radiative core and the convective envelope for the generation of magnetic fields are key to understanding solar-like dynamos. Despite having an abundance of observational constraints, the answer to the solar dynamo problem remains tantalisingly out of reach. With the advent of space-based instrumentation for asteroseismology including Kepler, CoRoT, and in the future PLATO, we can exploit the sheer number of observations, and complementary techniques to constrain the rotation of Sun-like stars.

  14. On solar oblateness measurements during the current solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, M.; Hauchecorne, A.; Irbah, A.; Bush, R. I.

    2015-12-01

    The rotation of the Sun on itself involves a flatness of the Polar Regions. The solar oblateness results from the rotation of the whole solar interior and the distribution of its mass according to the depth. Thus, possible diagnostic of the internal rotation is provided by the solar oblateness. The solar oblateness also places constraints on general relativity. Indeed, the modern era of measurements of the solar oblateness began in the 1960s with Dicke's measurements, which were useful in understanding the perihelion precession of Mercury's orbit, one of the classical tests of general relativity. Thus, for various reasons, it is necessary to better know the solar oblateness value and to study its dependence with the solar activity. Based on measurements collected from various instruments over the past 50 years, the measured solar equator-to-pole radius difference converges towards 8 mas (near 5.8 km). Now, with space era, we felt it was possible to obtain very accurate measurements of the solar equator-to-pole radius difference and its evolution over time. Thus, we developed an original method to estimate the solar equator-to-pole radius difference from two solar space missions (Solar Dynamics Observatory and PICARD). When analysing the solar radius versus angle data, we observed an anti-correlation between the limb brightness and the radius determined from the inflection point. The apparent radius was smaller if an active region was near the limb. The bright active regions were confined to low latitudes and never occur at the poles. The exact cause of this anti-correlation needs still to be understood but it is clear that it may cause an artefact in the determination of the solar oblateness leading to a negative bias, even if the more active regions were eliminated from the analysis. In this talk, we describe the method, and then present current results about solar oblateness variations after five years of solar observations (from 2010 to 2015) and linkages

  15. Lagged response of tropical tropospheric temperature to solar ultraviolet variations on intraseasonal time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, L. L.

    2016-04-01

    Correlative and regression analyses of daily ERA-Interim reanalysis data for three separate solar maximum periods confirm the existence of a temperature response to short-term (mainly ˜27 day) solar ultraviolet variations at tropical latitudes in both the lower stratosphere and troposphere. The response, which occurs at a phase lag of 6-10 days after the solar forcing peak, consists of a warming in the lower stratosphere, consistent with relative downwelling and a slowing of the mean meridional (Brewer-Dobson) circulation, and a cooling in the troposphere. The midtropospheric cooling response is most significant in the tropical Pacific, especially under positive El Niño-Southern Oscillation conditions and may be related to a reduction in the number of Madden-Julian oscillation events that propagate eastward into the central Pacific following peaks in short-term solar forcing.

  16. Solar tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    White, P.R.; Scott, D.R.

    1981-04-01

    A solar tracker for a solar collector is described in detail. The collector is angularly oriented by a motor wherein the outputs of two side-by-side photodetectors are discriminated as to three ranges: a first corresponding to a low light or darkness condition a second corresponding to light intensity lying in an intermediate range and a third corresponding to light above an intermediate range, direct sunlight. The first output drives the motor to a selected maximum easterly angular position the second enables the motor to be driven westerly at the Earth rotational rate and the third output, the separate outputs of the two photodetectors, differentially controls the direction of rotation of the motor to effect actual tracking of the Sun. Official Gazette of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

  17. Equations for Solar Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Merlaud, Alexis; De Mazière, Martine; Hermans, Christian; Cornet, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Direct sunlight absorption by trace gases can be used to quantify them and investigate atmospheric chemistry. In such experiments, the main optical apparatus is often a grating or a Fourier transform spectrometer. A solar tracker based on motorized rotating mirrors is commonly used to direct the light along the spectrometer axis, correcting for the apparent rotation of the Sun. Calculating the Sun azimuth and altitude for a given time and location can be achieved with high accuracy but different sources of angular offsets appear in practice when positioning the mirrors. A feedback on the motors, using a light position sensor close to the spectrometer, is almost always needed. This paper aims to gather the main geometrical formulas necessary for the use of a widely used kind of solar tracker, based on two 45° mirrors in altazimuthal set-up with a light sensor on the spectrometer, and to illustrate them with a tracker developed by our group for atmospheric research. PMID:22666019

  18. Solar tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, P. R.; Scott, D. R. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A solar tracker for a solar collector is described in detail. The collector is angularly oriented by a motor wherein the outputs of two side-by-side photodetectors are discriminated as to three ranges: a first corresponding to a low light or darkness condition; a second corresponding to light intensity lying in an intermediate range; and a third corresponding to light above an intermediate range, direct sunlight. The first output drives the motor to a selected maximum easterly angular position; the second enables the motor to be driven westerly at the Earth rotational rate; and the third output, the separate outputs of the two photodetectors, differentially controls the direction of rotation of the motor to effect actual tracking of the Sun.

  19. Asteroid rotation and orbit control via laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrisano, Massimo; Colombo, Camilla; Vasile, Massimiliano

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an approach to control the rotational motion of an asteroid while a spacecraft is deflecting its trajectory through laser ablation. During the deflection, the proximity motion of the spacecraft is coupled with the orbital and rotational motion of the asteroid. The combination of the deflection acceleration, solar radiation pressure, gravity field and plume impingement will force the spacecraft to drift away from the asteroid. In turn, a variation of the motion of the spacecraft produces a change in the modulus and direction of the deflection action which modifies the rotational and orbital motion of the asteroid. An on-board state estimation and control algorithm is then presented that simultaneously provides an optimal proximity control and a control of the rotational motion of the asteroid. It will be shown that the simultaneous control of the rotational and proximity motions of asteroid and spacecraft has a significant impact on the required deflection time.

  20. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... cuff are common. They include tendinitis, bursitis, and injuries such as tears. Rotator cuff tendons can become ... cuff depends on age, health, how severe the injury is, and how long you've had the ...

  1. The Rotating Mirror.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses theory of the rotating mirror, its use in measuring the velocity of the electrical signal in wires, and the velocity of light. Concludes with a description of the manometric flame apparatus developed for analyzing sound waves. (SK)

  2. Rotating mobile launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    Apparatus holds remotely piloted arm that accelerates until launching speed is reached. Then vehicle and counterweight at other end of arm are released simultaneously to avoid structural damage from unbalanced rotating forces.

  3. Rotator cuff problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... tear occurs when one of the tendons is torn from the bone from overuse or injury. Causes ... surgery with a larger incision) to repair the torn tendon. Outlook (Prognosis) With rotator cuff tendinitis, rest, ...

  4. Rotator cuff repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... already torn from chronic rotator cuff problems. A partial tear may not require surgery. Instead, rest and ... Follow any discharge and self-care instructions you are given. You will be wearing a sling when you leave the hospital. ...

  5. Rotational polarities of sudden impulses in the magnetotail lobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawano, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Kokubun, S.; Lepping, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    A sudden impulse (SI) is a sudden change in the magnetic field strength which is caused by a change in the solar wind pressure and is observed throughout the magnetosphere. In this report we have examined the rotations of the magnetic field vectors at times of SIs in the magnetotail lobe, by using IMP 6, 7, and 8 magnetometer data. The following properties have been found: (1) at the time of SI the arrowhead of the magnetic vector tends to rotate in one plane; (2) the plane of rotation tends to include the unperturbed magnetic field vector; (3) the plane of rotation tends to be aligned with the radial direction from the magnetotail axis; and (4) the magnetic vectors have a particular rotational polarity: when the plane of rotation is viewed so that the Sun is to the right of the viewed plane and the magnetotail axis is to the bottom, the arrowhead of the vector tends to rotate counterclockwise in this plane. These magnetic vector properties are consistent with those expected when part of an increase in solar wind lateral pressure squeezes the magnetotail axisymmetrically while moving tailward.

  6. Molded polymer solar water heater

    DOEpatents

    Bourne, Richard C.; Lee, Brian E.

    2004-11-09

    A solar water heater has a rotationally-molded water box and a glazing subassembly disposed over the water box that enhances solar gain and provides an insulating air space between the outside environment and the water box. When used with a pressurized water system, an internal heat exchanger is integrally molded within the water box. Mounting and connection hardware is included to provide a rapid and secure method of installation.

  7. Electromagnetic rotational actuation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Alexander Lee

    2010-08-01

    There are many applications that need a meso-scale rotational actuator. These applications have been left by the wayside because of the lack of actuation at this scale. Sandia National Laboratories has many unique fabrication technologies that could be used to create an electromagnetic actuator at this scale. There are also many designs to be explored. In this internship exploration of the designs and fabrications technologies to find an inexpensive design that can be used for prototyping the electromagnetic rotational actuator.

  8. Rotational rate sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Steven L.

    2002-01-01

    A rate sensor for angular/rotational acceleration includes a housing defining a fluid cavity essentially completely filled with an electrolyte fluid. Within the housing, such as a toroid, ions in the fluid are swept during movement from an excitation electrode toward one of two output electrodes to provide a signal for directional rotation. One or more ground electrodes within the housing serve to neutralize ions, thus preventing any effect at the other output electrode.

  9. Robot Grasps Rotating Object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian H.; Tso, Kam S.; Litwin, Todd E.; Hayati, Samad A.; Bon, Bruce B.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental robotic system semiautomatically grasps rotating object, stops rotation, and pulls object to rest in fixture. Based on combination of advanced techniques for sensing and control, constructed to test concepts for robotic recapture of spinning artificial satellites. Potential terrestrial applications for technology developed with help of system includes tracking and grasping of industrial parts on conveyor belts, tracking of vehicles and animals, and soft grasping of moving objects in general.

  10. Instability in Rotating Machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings contain 45 papers on a wide range of subjects including flow generated instabilities in fluid flow machines, cracked shaft detection, case histories of instability phenomena in compressors, turbines, and pumps, vibration control in turbomachinery (including antiswirl techniques), and the simulation and estimation of destabilizing forces in rotating machines. The symposium was held to serve as an update on the understanding and control of rotating machinery instability problems.

  11. Rotating arc spark plug

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

    2003-05-27

    A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

  12. Rotational Spectrum of Sarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, A. R. Hight; Suenram, R. D.; Samuels, Alan; Jensen, James; Ellzy, Michael W.; Lochner, J. Michael; Zeroka, Daniel

    2001-05-01

    As part of an effort to examine the possibility of using molecular-beam Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy to unambiguously detect and monitor chemical warfare agents, we report the first observation and assignment of the rotational spectrum of the nerve agent Sarin (GB) (Methylphosphonofluoridic acid 1-methyl-ethyl ester, CAS #107-44-8) at frequencies between 10 and 22 GHz. Only one of the two low-energy conformers of this organophosphorus compound (C4H10FO2P) was observed in the rotationally cold (Trot<2 K) molecular beam. The experimental asymmetric-rotor ground-state rotational constants of this conformer are A=2874.0710(9) MHz, B=1168.5776(4) MHz, C=1056.3363(4) MHz (Type A standard uncertainties are given, i.e., 1σ), as obtained from a least-squares analysis of 74 a-, b-, and c-type rotational transitions. Several of the transitions are split into doublets due to the internal rotation of the methyl group attached to the phosphorus. The three-fold-symmetry barrier to internal rotation estimated from these splittings is 677.0(4) cm-1. Ab initio electronic structure calculations using Hartree-Fock, density functional, and Moller-Plesset perturbation theories have also been made. The structure of the lowest-energy conformer determined from a structural optimization at the MP2/6-311G** level of theory is consistent with our experimental findings.

  13. An atlas of solar events: 1996 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artzner, G.; Auchère, F.; Delaboudinière, J. P.; Bougnet, M.

    2006-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are observed in the plane of the sky in coronographic images. As the solar surface is masked by an occulting disk it is not clear whether halo CMEs are directed towards or away from the Earth. Observations of the solar corona on the solar disk by the extreme ultraviolet imaging telescope (EIT) on board the Solar Heliospheric Observatory SoHO can help to resolve this. Quasi-continuous observations of the solar corona were obtained from April 1997 up to the current date at a 12 min cadence in the coronal line of FeXII, as part of a “CME watch program”. At a slower 6 h cadence an additional synoptic program investigates the chromosphere and the corona at four different wavelengths. Large coronal solar events appear when viewing animations of the CME watch program. Fainter events do appear when viewing running difference animations of the CME watch program. When looking for additional spectral information from raw running differences of the synoptic program it is difficult to disentangle intrinsic solar events from the parasitic effect of the solar rotation. We constructed at www.ias.u-psud.fr/medoc/EIT/movies/ an atlas of more than 40,000 difference images from the synoptic programme, corrected for an average solar rotation, as well as more than 200,000 instantaneous and difference images from the CME watch program. We present case studies of specific events in order to investigate the source of darkenings or dimmings in difference images, due to the removal of emitting material, the presence of obscuring material or large changes in temperature. As the beneficial effect of correcting for the solar rotation vanishes at the solar limb, we do not investigate the case of prominence Doppler dimming. As a by-product of the atlas of solar events we obtain a number of quiet time sequences well suited to precisely measure the differential solar rotation by the apparent displacement of tracers.

  14. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    DOEpatents

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  15. Chaotic Rotation of Nix and Hydra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, Mark R.

    2014-05-01

    Disk-integrated photometry of Hydra and Nix from HST during 2010-2012 show large variations, which can be attributed to a combination of the phase function and the rotational light curves of the moons. After dividing out a model phase curve, variations by more than a factor of two remain, indicating that both Nix and Hydra are distinctly irregular in shape. Unexpectedly, Nix and Hydra's variations show no correlation with orbital longitude, as one would expect for bodies in synchronous rotation. In fact, Fourier analysis of the measurements does not reveal any fixed rotation periods compatible with the data. Compounding the mystery, Nix increased in absolute brightness by about 30% between 2010 and 2012, whereas Hydra was stable.I have developed a numeric integrator that tracks the position, velocity, orientation and rotation state of a moon as it orbits the Pluto-Charon "binary planet". The moons are represented by triaxial ellipsoids with arbitrary axial ratios. Pluto and Charon follow circular orbits about their common barycenter. I have run simulations for periods of up to 1000 years and for a variety of axial ratios and starting conditions. If an object is started in synchronous rotation with its long axis pointed toward the system barycenter, then it remains synchronously locked for the duration of the integrations. However, other initial conditions commonly lead to chaotic rotation, with Lyupanov times as brief as 30 days. Moons will sometimes temporarily lock into a nearly fixed rotation state, but commonly break out again within ~ 500 days. Depending on the axial ratios, polar flips are also commonly observed; this polar wander provides a plausible explanation for the year-by-year change in the observed brightness of Nix.Chaotic rotation is rare in the solar system, having previously been noted only for Hyperion and possibly Nereid. However, both photometry and dynamical simulations support the notion that chaotic rotation is a natural state for

  16. Solar structure: Models and inferences from helioseismology

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, J.A.

    1998-12-31

    In this review the author summarizes results published during approximately the least three years concerning the state of one-dimensional solar interior modeling. She discusses the effects of refinements to the input physics, motivated by improving the agreement between calculated and observed solar oscillation frequencies, or between calculated and inferred solar structure. She has omitted two- and three-dimensional aspects of the solar structure, such as the rotation profile, detailed modeling of turbulent convection, and magnetic fields, although further progress in refining solar interior models may require including such two- and three-dimensional dynamical effects.

  17. Mercury's resonant rotation from secular orbital elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Alexander; Oberst, Jürgen; Hussmann, Hauke

    2015-11-01

    We used recently produced Solar System ephemerides, which incorporate 2 years of ranging observations to the MESSENGER spacecraft, to extract the secular orbital elements for Mercury and associated uncertainties. As Mercury is in a stable 3:2 spin-orbit resonance, these values constitute an important reference for the planet's measured rotational parameters, which in turn strongly bear on physical interpretation of Mercury's interior structure. In particular, we derive a mean orbital period of (87.96934962 ± 0.00000037) days and (assuming a perfect resonance) a spin rate of (6.138506839± 0.000000028)°/day. The difference between this rotation rate and the currently adopted rotation rate (Archinal et al. in Celest Mech Dyn Astron 109(2):101-135, 2011. doi:10.1007/s10569-010-9320-4), corresponds to a longitudinal displacement of approx. 67 m per year at the equator. Moreover, we present a basic approach for the calculation of the orientation of the instantaneous Laplace and Cassini planes of Mercury. The analysis allows us to assess the uncertainties in physical parameters of the planet, when derived from observations of Mercury's rotation.

  18. Rotational motion of Foton M-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrashkin, V. I.; Voronov, K. E.; Piyakov, I. V.; Puzin, Yu. Ya.; Sazonov, V. V.; Semkin, N. D.; Chebukov, S. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    The actual controlled rotational motion of the Foton M-4 satellite is reconstructed for the mode of single-axis solar orientation. The reconstruction was carried out using data of onboard measurements of vectors of angular velocity and the strength of the Earth's magnetic field. The reconstruction method is based on the reconstruction of the kinematic equations of the rotational motion of a solid body. According to the method, measurement data of both types collected at a certain time interval are processed together. Measurements of the angular velocity are interpolated by piecewise-linear functions, which are substituted in kinematic differential equations for a quaternion that defines the transition from the satellite instrument coordinate system to the inertial coordinate system. The obtained equations represent the kinematic model of the satellite rotational motion. A solution of these equations that approximates the actual motion is derived from the condition of the best (in the sense of the least squares method) match between the measurement data of the strength vector of the Earth's magnetic field and its calculated values. The described method makes it possible to reconstruct the actual rotational satellite motion using one solution of kinematic equations over time intervals longer than 10 h. The found reconstructions have been used to calculate the residual microaccelerations.

  19. The Role of Rotation in the Evolution of Massive Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lanz, Thierry M.

    2002-01-01

    Recent evolutionary models of massive stars predict important effects of rotation including: increasing the rate of mass-loss; lowering the effective gravity; altering the evolutionary track on the HRD; extending the main-sequence phase (both on the HR diagram and in time); and mixing of CNO-processed elements up to the stellar surface. Observations suggest that rotation is a more important factor at lower metallicities because of higher initial rotational velocities and weaker winds. This makes the SMC, a low-metallicity galaxy (Z= 0.2 solar Z), an excellent environment for discerning the role of rotation in massive stars. We report on a FUSE + STIS + optical spectral analysis of 17 O-type stars in the SMC, where we found an enormous range in N abundances. Three stars in the sample have the same (low) CN abundances as the nebular material out of which they formed, namely C = 0.085 solar C and N = 0.034 solar N. However, more than half show N approx. solar N, an enrichment factor of 30X! Such unexpectedly high levels of N have ramifications for the evolution of massive stars including precursors to supernovae. They also raise questions about the sources of nitrogen in the early universe.

  20. The Role of Rotation in the Evolution of Massive Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lanz, Thierry M.

    2003-01-01

    Recent evolutionary models of massive stars predict important effects of rotation including: increasing the rate of mass loss; lowering the effective gravity; altering the evolutionary track on the Hertzsprung-Russel Diagram (HRD); extending the main-sequence phase (both on the HR diagram and in time); and mixing of CNO-processed elements up to the stellar surface. Observations suggest that rotation is a more important factor at lower metallicities because of higher initial rotational velocities and weaker winds. This makes the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), a low-metallicity galaxy (Z=0.2 solar Z), an excellent environment for discerning the role of rotation in massive stars. We report on a FUSE+STIS+optical spectral analysis of 17 O-type stars in the SMC, where we found an enormous range in N abundances. Three stars in the sample have the same (low) CN abundances as the nebular material out of which they formed, namely C=0.085 solar C and N=0.034 solar N. However, more than half show N approx. solar N, an enrichment factor of 30X! Such unexpectedly high levels of N have ramifications for the evolution of massive stars including precursors to supernovae. They also raise questions about the sources of nitrogen in the early universe. This study was supported in part by grants from NASA's ADP, HST GO-7437, and FUSE B134.

  1. Gamma rays from accretion onto rotating black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, M. S.

    1979-01-01

    Ionized matter falling onto an isolated rotating black hole will be heated sufficiently that proton-proton collisions will produce mesons, including neutral pions, which decay into gamma rays. For massive (1000-solar mass) black holes, the resulting gamma-ray luminosity may exceed 10 to the 36th erg/s with a spectrum peaked near 20 MeV.

  2. Study of solar variability impact on nitrogen dioxide: 2004-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, Daniel-Eduard; Voiculescu, Mirela; Merlaud, Alexis; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) locally plays an important role in the radiation budget by absorbing solar radiation at ultraviolet (UV) and visible wavelengths. The influence of solar variability on the inter-annual variability and trends in nitrogen dioxide is evaluated for a period of 10 years (2004-2013) using monthly mean tropospheric NO2 measurements of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) version 2.0. Possible signatures of solar variability on nitrogen dioxide time series of NO2 over several cities were analyzed using various statistical methods. Various solar proxies were selected, in order to separate between possible links to solar irradiance and to solar wind. Several locations with different levels of pollution, located in different places of the world (Athens, Jungfraujoch, Lauder, Lisbon, Moscow, and Uccle), were selected. Observations show a clear 27 day period of the NO2 tropospheric Vertical Column Density (VCD) or total Slant Column Density (SCD). NO2 content decreases with increasing activity above polluted areas (e.g. Athens, Moscow) while for unpolluted areas there is no evident correlation (e.g. Lauder, Jungfraujoch). Possible effects of solar wind on NO2 content are observed as well, but the relationship is less clear, since polluted areas seem to respond differently to solar wind variations. The mechanism by which NO2 content can be affected by solar variations relate mainly to ozone production but other paths by which solar energy may be transferred to the lower atmosphere are investigated.

  3. A wavelet based approach to Solar-Terrestrial Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsavrias, Ch.; Hillaris, A.; Preka-Papadema, P.

    2016-05-01

    Transient and recurrent solar activity drive geomagnetic disturbances; these are quantified (amongst others) by DST , AE indices time-series. Transient disturbances are related to the Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) while recurrent disturbances are related to corotating interaction regions (CIR). We study the relationship of the geomagnetic disturbances to the solar wind drivers within solar cycle 23 where the drivers are represented by ICMEs and CIRs occurrence rate and compared to the DST and AE as follows: terms with common periodicity in both the geomagnetic disturbances and the solar drivers are, firstly, detected using continuous wavelet transform (CWT). Then, common power and phase coherence of these periodic terms are calculated from the cross-wavelet spectra (XWT) and wavelet-coherence (WTC) respectively. In time-scales of ≈27 days our results indicate an anti-correlation of the effects of ICMEs and CIRs on the geomagnetic disturbances. The former modulates the DST and AE time series during the cycle maximum the latter during periods of reduced solar activity. The phase relationship of these modulation is highly non-linear. Only the annual frequency component of the ICMEs is phase-locked with DST and AE. In time-scales of ≈1.3-1.7 years the CIR seem to be the dominant driver for both geomagnetic indices throughout the whole solar cycle 23.

  4. Rotational properties of composite polytrope models

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, S.M.

    1988-06-01

    Factional radii of gyration for both the convective envelope and the radiative core have been determined using the composite-polytrope model of Rappaport et al. (1983) which describes low-mass stars by appropriately matched polytropes n(outer) = 3/2 and n(inner) = 3. Radii of gyration computed for ZAMS stars with masses of 0.4-1.2 solar masses are used to obtain ZAMS angular momenta for low-mass rapidly rotating stars in the Pleiades and Alpha Persei clusters. Results indicate that there is little chance of observing single young early G and late F type stars in rapid rotation because of the very short timescales for braking of their thin convective envelopes. 41 references.

  5. On the unusual solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shnirman, M.; Le Mouel, J.; Blanter, E.; Courtillot, V.

    2011-12-01

    We have analyzed the properties of the 27-day recurrence of solar activity, as represented by the Wolf number WN and the 10.7 cm radio flux F10.7. We study both a "shorter" period domain of the recurrence (from 25.0 to 27.3 days) and a "longer" one (from 27.3 to 31 days). In the "longer" period domain, the last solar cycle (23) is characterized by extremely low energy, at a level which is unprecedented since 1915. In the "shorter" period domain, the irregular behavior of cycle 23 manifests itself in the very low intensity, double peaked form of the energy of the absolute derivative of both WN and F10.7. Such features have not been observed since cycle 12, 140 years ago. We discuss how these unusual features of cycle 23 may affect attempts to reconstruct backwards UV/EUV emissions and also our understanding of future solar evolution and its impact on geomagnetism and climate.

  6. Geosynchronous Relativistic Electron Events Associated with High-Speed Solar Wind Streams in 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungeun; Hwang, Junga; Lee, Jae-Jin; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Kim, Khan-Hyuk; Yi, Yu

    2009-12-01

    Recurrent enhancements of relativistic electron events at geosynchronous orbit (GREEs) were observed in 2006. These GREE enhancements were associated with high-speed solar wind streams coming from the same coronal hole. For the first six months of 2006, the occurrence of GREEs has 27 day periodicity and the GREEs were enhanced with various flux levels. Several factors have been studied to be related to GREEs: (1) High speed stream, (2) Pc5 ULF wave activity, (3) Southward IMF Bz, (4) substorm occurrence, (5) Whistler mode chorus wave, and (6) Dynamic pressure. In this paper, we have examined the effectiveness about those parameters in selected periods.

  7. The rotation of very low mass objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Alexander

    2004-10-01

    This dissertation contains an investigation of the rotation of very low mass objects, i.e. Brown Dwarfs and stars with masses <0.4 MS. Today, it is well-established that there are large populations of such VLM objects in open clusters and in the field, but our knowledge about their physical properties and evolution is still very limited. Contrary to their solar-mass siblings, VLM objects are fully convective throughout their evolution. Thus, they are not able to form a large-scale magnetic field like for example the sun. The magnetic field, in turn, is crucial for the regulation of rotation: Magnetic interaction between star and circumstellar disk ("disk-locking") and angular momentum losses through stellar winds have dominant influence on the rotational evolution. Thus, we can expect major differences in the rotational behaviour of VLM objects and solar-mass stars. The best method to investigate stellar rotation is to measure rotation periods. If a star exhibits surface features which are asymmetrically distributed, its brightness may be modulated with the rotation period. Thus, this dissertation is based on the analysis of photometric time series. Open clusters are an ideal environment for such a project, since they enable one to follow many objects at the same time. Additionally, they allow one to investigate the age and mass dependence of rotation, because distance and age of the clusters are known in good approximation. For this thesis, five open clusters were observed, which span an age range from 3 to 750 Myr. In three of them (SigmaOri, EpsilonOri, IC4665), VLM objects were identified by means of colour magnitude diagrams. The candidate lists for these three regions comprise at least 100 objects, for which photometry in at least three wavelength bands is available. About a fifth to a third of these candidates could be contaminating field stars in the fore- or background of the clusters. For the remaining two clusters (Pleiades and Praesepe), objects from

  8. Sunspot rotation. I. A consequence of flux emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturrock, Z.; Hood, A. W.; Archontis, V.; McNeill, C. M.

    2015-10-01

    Context. Solar eruptions and high flare activity often accompany the rapid rotation of sunspots. The study of sunspot rotation and the mechanisms driving this motion are therefore key to our understanding of how the solar atmosphere attains the conditions necessary for large energy release. Aims: We aim to demonstrate and investigate the rotation of sunspots in a 3D numerical experiment of the emergence of a magnetic flux tube as it rises through the solar interior and emerges into the atmosphere. Furthermore, we seek to show that the sub-photospheric twist stored in the interior is injected into the solar atmosphere by means of a definitive rotation of the sunspots. Methods: A numerical experiment is performed to solve the 3D resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations using a Lagrangian-Remap code. We track the emergence of a toroidal flux tube as it rises through the solar interior and emerges into the atmosphere investigating various quantities related to both the magnetic field and plasma. Results: Through detailed analysis of the numerical experiment, we find clear evidence that the photospheric footprints or sunspots of the flux tube undergo a rotation. Significant vertical vortical motions are found to develop within the two polarity sources after the field emerges. These rotational motions are found to leave the interior portion of the field untwisted and twist up the atmospheric portion of the field. This is shown by our analysis of the relative magnetic helicity as a significant portion of the interior helicity is transported to the atmosphere. In addition, there is a substantial transport of magnetic energy to the atmosphere. Rotation angles are also calculated by tracing selected fieldlines; the fieldlines threading through the sunspot are found to rotate through angles of up to 353° over the course of the experiment. We explain the rotation by an unbalanced torque produced by the magnetic tension force, rather than an apparent effect. The movies

  9. Solar Cookers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Richard C.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the use of solar cookers in the science classroom. Includes instructions for construction of a solar cooker, an explanation of how solar cookers work, and a number of suggested activities. (DS)

  10. Rotating Aperture System

    DOEpatents

    Rusnak, Brian; Hall, James M.; Shen, Stewart; Wood, Richard L.

    2005-01-18

    A rotating aperture system includes a low-pressure vacuum pumping stage with apertures for passage of a deuterium beam. A stator assembly includes holes for passage of the beam. The rotor assembly includes a shaft connected to a deuterium gas cell or a crossflow venturi that has a single aperture on each side that together align with holes every rotation. The rotating apertures are synchronized with the firing of the deuterium beam such that the beam fires through a clear aperture and passes into the Xe gas beam stop. Portions of the rotor are lapped into the stator to improve the sealing surfaces, to prevent rapid escape of the deuterium gas from the gas cell.

  11. Rotating ice blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorbolo, Stephane; Adami, Nicolas; Grasp Team

    2014-11-01

    The motion of ice discs released at the surface of a thermalized bath was investigated. As observed in some rare events in the Nature, the discs start spinning spontaneously. The motor of this motion is the cooling of the water close to the ice disc. As the density of water is maximum at 4°C, a downwards flow is generated from the surface of the ice block to the bottom. This flow generates the rotation of the disc. The speed of rotation depends on the mass of the ice disc and on the temperature of the bath. A model has been constructed to study the influence of the temperature of the bath. Finally, ice discs were put on a metallic plate. Again, a spontaneous rotation was observed. FNRS is thanked for financial support.

  12. IO Rotation Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    During its 1979 flyby, Voyager 2 observed Io only from a distance. However, the volcanic activity discovered by Voyager 1 months earlier was readily visible. This sequence of nine color images was collected using the Blue, Green and Orange filters from about 1.2 million kilometers. A 2.5 hour period is covered during which Io rotates 7 degrees.

    Rotating into view over the limb of Io are the plumes of the volcanoes Amirani (top) and Maui (lower). These plumes are very distinct against the black sky because they are being illuminated from behind. Notice that as Io rotates, the proportion of Io which is sunlit decreases greatly. This changing phase angle is because Io is moving between the spacecraft and the Sun.

    This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1985.

  13. Hubble the Rotation of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    These three NASA Hubble Space Telescope images of the planet Uranus reveal the motion of a pair of bright clouds in the planet's southern hemisphere, and a high altitude haze that forms a 'cap' above the planet's south pole.

    Hubble's new view was obtained on August 14, 1994, when Uranus was 1.7 billion miles (2.8 billion kilometers) from Earth. These atmospheric details were only previously seen by the Voyager 2 spacecraft, which flew by Uranus in 1986. Since then, detailed observations of Uranus's atmospheric features have not been possible because the planet is at the resolution limit of ground-based telescopes.

    Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 observed Uranus through a filter that is sensitive to light reflected by a pair of high altitude clouds. This makes a high altitude haze over Uranus' south polar region clearly visible, along with a pair of high altitude clouds or plume-type features that are 2500 and 1800 miles (4300 and 3100 kilometers) across, respectively. This sequence of images shows how the clouds (labeled A and B) rotate with the planet during the three hours that elapsed between the first two observations (left and center picture) and the five hours that elapsed between the second pair of observations (center and right picture). Some cloud motion might be due to high altitude winds on the planet. (Observations are indicated in Universal Time.)

    By tracking the motion of high-altitude clouds, the new Hubble observations will allow astronomers to make new measurements of Uranus' rotation period. Based on the previous Voyager observations, Uranus spins on its axis at a faster rate than Earth does, completing one rotation every 7 hours, 14 minutes.

    One of the four gas giant planets of our solar system, Uranus is largely featureless. Unlike Earth, Uranus' south pole points toward the Sun during part of the planet's 84-year orbit. Thanks to its high resolution and ability to make observations over many years, Hubble can follow seasonal

  14. Lattice QCD in rotating frames.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Arata; Hirono, Yuji

    2013-08-23

    We formulate lattice QCD in rotating frames to study the physics of QCD matter under rotation. We construct the lattice QCD action with the rotational metric and apply it to the Monte Carlo simulation. As the first application, we calculate the angular momenta of gluons and quarks in the rotating QCD vacuum. This new framework is useful to analyze various rotation-related phenomena in QCD. PMID:24010426

  15. Rotation of Giant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissin, Yevgeni; Thompson, Christopher

    2015-07-01

    The internal rotation of post-main sequence stars is investigated, in response to the convective pumping of angular momentum toward the stellar core, combined with a tight magnetic coupling between core and envelope. The spin evolution is calculated using model stars of initial mass 1, 1.5, and 5 {M}⊙ , taking into account mass loss on the giant branches. We also include the deposition of orbital angular momentum from a sub-stellar companion, as influenced by tidal drag along with the excitation of orbital eccentricity by a fluctuating gravitational quadrupole moment. A range of angular velocity profiles {{Ω }}(r) is considered in the envelope, extending from solid rotation to constant specific angular momentum. We focus on the backreaction of the Coriolis force, and the threshold for dynamo action in the inner envelope. Quantitative agreement with measurements of core rotation in subgiants and post-He core flash stars by Kepler is obtained with a two-layer angular velocity profile: uniform specific angular momentum where the Coriolis parameter {Co}\\equiv {{Ω }}{τ }{con}≲ 1 (here {τ }{con} is the convective time), and {{Ω }}(r)\\propto {r}-1 where {Co}≳ 1. The inner profile is interpreted in terms of a balance between the Coriolis force and angular pressure gradients driven by radially extended convective plumes. Inward angular momentum pumping reduces the surface rotation of subgiants, and the need for a rejuvenated magnetic wind torque. The co-evolution of internal magnetic fields and rotation is considered in Kissin & Thompson, along with the breaking of the rotational coupling between core and envelope due to heavy mass loss.

  16. Magnetospheres in the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Mcnutt, R.L.

    1984-11-01

    Intrinsic and induced magnetospheres of planets, moons, and comets in the solar system are described. Magnetospheric electric fields, the plasmasphere, rotational effects, and corotation and convection dominated intrinsic magnetospheres are considered. Supersonic and subsonic interactions in induced magnetospheres are discussed. (ESA)

  17. Dynamics of formation of the resonance rotations of natural celestial bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Khentov, A.A.

    1982-07-01

    The rule for formation of the observed commensurabilities of the 1:1 and 3:2 types between the rotational and orbitial motions of certain bodies of the Solar System in the course of evolution is validated. An interpretation of the rotation of Venus is proposed.

  18. Rotation Angle for the Optimum Tracking of One-Axis Trackers

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, W. F.; Dobos, A. P.

    2013-07-01

    An equation for the rotation angle for optimum tracking of one-axis trackers is derived along with equations giving the relationships between the rotation angle and the surface tilt and azimuth angles. These equations are useful for improved modeling of the solar radiation available to a collector with tracking constraints and for determining the appropriate motor revolutions for optimum tracking.

  19. Rotating flexible drag mill

    DOEpatents

    Pepper, W.B.

    1984-05-09

    A rotating parachute for decelerating objects travelling through atmosphere at subsonic or supersonic deployment speeds includes a circular canopy having a plurality of circumferentially arranged flexible panels projecting radially from a solid central disk. A slot extends radially between adjacent panels to the outer periphery of the canopy. Upon deployment, the solid disk diverts air radially to rapidly inflate the panels into a position of maximum diameter. Air impinging on the panels adjacent the panel slots rotates the parachute during its descent. Centrifugal force flattens the canopy into a constant maximum diameter during terminal descent for maximum drag and deceleration.

  20. Rotating bubble membrane radiator

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Brent J.; Coomes, Edmund P.

    1988-12-06

    A heat radiator useful for expelling waste heat from a power generating system aboard a space vehicle is disclosed. Liquid to be cooled is passed to the interior of a rotating bubble membrane radiator, where it is sprayed into the interior of the bubble. Liquid impacting upon the interior surface of the bubble is cooled and the heat radiated from the outer surface of the membrane. Cooled liquid is collected by the action of centrifical force about the equator of the rotating membrane and returned to the power system. Details regarding a complete space power system employing the radiator are given.

  1. Rotating shielded crane system

    DOEpatents

    Commander, John C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotating, radiation shielded crane system for use in a high radiation test cell, comprises a radiation shielding wall, a cylindrical ceiling made of radiation shielding material and a rotatable crane disposed above the ceiling. The ceiling rests on an annular ledge intergrally attached to the inner surface of the shielding wall. Removable plugs in the ceiling provide access for the crane from the top of the ceiling into the test cell. A seal is provided at the interface between the inner surface of the shielding wall and the ceiling.

  2. Anomalously weak solar convection

    PubMed Central

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures on a spectrum of scales. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations, though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. Here, we analyze observations of the wavefield in the solar photosphere using techniques of time-distance helioseismology to image flows in the solar interior. We downsample and synthesize 900 billion wavefield observations to produce 3 billion cross-correlations, which we average and fit, measuring 5 million wave travel times. Using these travel times, we deduce the underlying flow systems and study their statistics to bound convective velocity magnitudes in the solar interior, as a function of depth and spherical-harmonic degree ℓ. Within the wavenumber band ℓ < 60, convective velocities are 20–100 times weaker than current theoretical estimates. This constraint suggests the prevalence of a different paradigm of turbulence from that predicted by existing models, prompting the question: what mechanism transports the heat flux of a solar luminosity outwards? Advection is dominated by Coriolis forces for wavenumbers ℓ < 60, with Rossby numbers smaller than approximately 10-2 at r/R⊙ = 0.96, suggesting that the Sun may be a much faster rotator than previously thought, and that large-scale convection may be quasi-geostrophic. The fact that isorotation contours in the Sun are not coaligned with the axis of rotation suggests the presence of a latitudinal entropy gradient. PMID:22665774

  3. Helicity-vorticity turbulent pumping of magnetic fields in the solar dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipin, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    The interaction of helical convective motions and differential rotation in the solar convection zone results in turbulent drift of a large-scale magnetic field. We discuss the pumping mechanism and its impact on the solar dynamo.

  4. SOLAR MAGNETIZED 'TORNADOES': RELATION TO FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Su Yang; Veronig, Astrid; Temmer, Manuela; Wang Tongjiang; Gan Weiqun

    2012-09-10

    Solar magnetized 'tornadoes', a phenomenon discovered in the solar atmosphere, appear as tornado-like structures in the corona but are rooted in the photosphere. Like other solar phenomena, solar tornadoes are a feature of magnetized plasma and therefore differ distinctly from terrestrial tornadoes. Here we report the first analysis of solar 'tornadoes' (two papers which focused on different aspects of solar tornadoes were published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters and Nature, respectively, during the revision of this Letter). A detailed case study of two events indicates that they are rotating vertical magnetic structures probably driven by underlying vortex flows in the photosphere. They usually exist as a group and are related to filaments/prominences, another important solar phenomenon whose formation and eruption are still mysteries. Solar tornadoes may play a distinct role in the supply of mass and twists to filaments. These findings could lead to a new explanation of filament formation and eruption.

  5. Solar Magnetized "Tornadoes:" Relation to Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yang; Wang, Tongjiang; Veronig, Astrid; Temmer, Manuela; Gan, Weiqun

    2012-09-01

    Solar magnetized "tornadoes," a phenomenon discovered in the solar atmosphere, appear as tornado-like structures in the corona but are rooted in the photosphere. Like other solar phenomena, solar tornadoes are a feature of magnetized plasma and therefore differ distinctly from terrestrial tornadoes. Here we report the first analysis of solar "tornadoes" (two papers which focused on different aspects of solar tornadoes were published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters and Nature, respectively, during the revision of this Letter). A detailed case study of two events indicates that they are rotating vertical magnetic structures probably driven by underlying vortex flows in the photosphere. They usually exist as a group and are related to filaments/prominences, another important solar phenomenon whose formation and eruption are still mysteries. Solar tornadoes may play a distinct role in the supply of mass and twists to filaments. These findings could lead to a new explanation of filament formation and eruption.

  6. The rotation of the Sun: Observations at Stanford. [using the Doppler effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, J. M.; Wilcox, J. M.; Svalgaard, L.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric rotation rate using the Doppler effect made at the Stanford Solar Observatory since May 1976 are analyzed. Results show that these observations show no daily or long period variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about one percent. The average rotation rate is the same as that of the sunspot and the large-scale magnetic field structures.

  7. Rotation Periods of Nearby, Mid-to-late M Dwarfs from the MEarth Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Elisabeth R.; Irwin, Jonathan; Charbonneau, David; Berta-Thomspon, Zachary K.; West, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    Field stars provide important constraints for the late stages of stars' angular momentum evolution. We measured rotation periods ranging from 0.1 to 150 days for approximately 450 mid-to-late M dwarfs using photometry from the MEarth transiting planet survey. We use parallaxes, proper motions, and radial velocities to calculate galactic kinematics for these solar neighborhood M dwarfs. The velocity dispersions increase towards longer rotation periods, indicating that there is a relationship between rotation and age for these stars.

  8. A measurement of the shape of the solar disk: The solar quadrupole moment, the solar octopole moment, and the advance of perihelion of the planet mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Lydon, T.J.; Sofia, S.

    1996-01-01

    The Solar Disk Sextant experiment has measured the solar angular diameter for a variety of solar latitudes. Combined with solar surface angular rotation data, the solar quadrupole moment {ital J}{sub 2} and the solar octopole moment {ital J}{sub 4} have been derived first by assuming constant internal angular rotation on cylinders and then by assuming constant internal angular rotation on cones. We have derived values of 1.8{times}10{sup {minus}7} for {ital J}{sub 2} and 9.8{times}10{sup {minus}7} for {ital J}{sub 4}. We conclude with a discussion of errors and address the prediction of general relativity for the rate of advance of perihelion of the planet Mercury. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  9. Tests of Rotating Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Elliott G

    1924-01-01

    Tests were made in the no. 1 wind tunnel at Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory to determine the air forces acting on rotating cylinders with axes perpendicular to the direction of motion. One cylinder had a circular cross-section, the other that of a greek cross.

  10. Rotational waves in geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerus, Artyom; Vikulin, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The rotation model of a geoblock with intrinsic momentum was constructed by A.V. Vikulin and A.G. Ivanchin [9, 10] to describe seismicity within the Pacific Ocean margin. It is based on the idea of a rotational motion of geoblocks as the parts of the rotating body of the Earth that generates rotary deformation waves. The law of the block motion was derived in the form of the sine-Gordon equation (SG) [5, 9]; the dimensionless form of the equation is: δ2θ δ2θ δξ2 - δη2 = sinθ, (1) where θ = β/2, ξ = k0z and η = v0k0t are dimensionless coordinates, z - length of the chain of masses (blocks), t - time, β - turn angle, ν0 - representative velocity of the process, k0 - wave number. Another case analyzed was a chain of nonuniformly rotating blocks, with deviation of force moments from equilibrium positions μ, considering friction forces α along boundaries, which better matched a real-life seismic process. As a result, the authors obtained the law of motion for a block in a chain in the form of the modified SG equation [8]: δ2θ δ2θ δθ- δξ2 - δ η2 = sin θ+ α δη + μδ(ξ)sin θ (2)

  11. Troubleshooting rotating equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.F. )

    1992-10-01

    This paper reports that equipment problems in a Peruvian refinery illustrate the process engineer's role as a troubleshooter. Examples show that rotating equipment problems can stem from mechanical or process factors and involve both inspection/maintenance specialists and process engineers.

  12. Rotatable stem and lock

    DOEpatents

    Deveney, Joseph E.; Sanderson, Stephen N.

    1984-01-01

    A valve stem and lock include a housing surrounding a valve stem, a solenoid affixed to an interior wall of the housing, an armature affixed to the valve stem and a locking device for coupling the armature to the housing body. When the solenoid is energized, the solenoid moves away from the housing body, permitting rotation of the valve stem.

  13. Rotational clutter metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Salem; Halford, Carl; Moyer, Steve; Gundy, Matthew

    2009-08-01

    A new approach to linear discriminant analysis (LDA), called orthogonal rotational LDA (ORLDA) is presented. Using ORLDA and properly accounting for target size allowed development of a new clutter metric that is based on the Laplacian pyramid (LP) decomposition of clutter images. The new metric achieves correlation exceeding 98% with expert human labeling of clutter levels in a set of 244 infrared images. Our clutter metric is based on the set of weights for the LP levels that best classify images into clutter levels as manually classified by an expert human observer. LDA is applied as a preprocessing step to classification. LDA suffers from a few limitations in this application. Therefore, we propose a new approach to LDA, called ORLDA, using orthonormal geometric rotations. Each rotation brings the LP feature space closer to the LDA solution while retaining orthogonality in the feature space. To understand the effects of target size on clutter, we applied ORLDA at different target sizes. The outputs are easily related because they are functions of orthogonal rotation angles. Finally, we used Bayesian decision theory to learn class boundaries for clutter levels at different target sizes.

  14. Concepts in crop rotations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop rotations have been a part of civilization since the Middle Ages. With colonization of what would become the United States came new crops of tobacco, cotton, and corn, the first two of which would play significant roles in both the economic beginnings and social fabric of the new country, how ...

  15. Anisotropy in rotating drums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povall, Timothy; McBride, Andrew; Govender, Indresan

    2015-11-01

    An anisotropic relationship between the stress and the strain rate has been observed in two-dimensional simulations of rotating drums. The objective of this work is to investigate the structure of the constitutive relation using three-dimensional discrete-element-method simulations of a rotating drum containing identical rigid spheres for a range of rotational speeds. Anisotropy is quantified from the alignment of the stress and strain rate tensors, with the strain rate computed using a least-squares fit. It is shown that in certain regions there is a strong anisotropic relationship, regardless of the speed of rotation. The effective friction coefficient is examined in order to determine the phase space in which the μ (I) rheology is valid. Lastly, a depth-averaged approach through the flowing layer is employed to determine the relationship between the velocity tangential to the equilibrium surface and the height of the flowing layer. A power-law relationship that approaches linear at high speeds is observed. Supported by NRF/DST Scarce Skills (South Africa).

  16. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  17. Rotatable stem and lock

    DOEpatents

    Deveney, J.E.; Sanderson, S.N.

    1981-10-27

    A valve stem and lock is disclosed which includes a housing surrounding a valve stem, a solenoid affixed to an interior wall of the housing, an armature affixed to the valve stem and a locking device for coupling the armature to the housing body. When the solenoid is energized, the solenoid moves away from the housing body, permitting rotation of the valve stem.

  18. Rotating Saddle Paul Trap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueckner, Wolfgang; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a demonstration in which a ball is placed in an unstable position on a saddle shape. The ball becomes stable when it is rotated above some threshold angular velocity. The demonstration is a mechanical analog of confining a particle in a "Paul Trap". (DDR)

  19. Rotating Responsibility Reaps Rewards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Barbara; Schullery, Nancy

    2000-01-01

    Describes a process used for group assignments in a business communication course which holds all group members accountable by using a structure of rotating responsibility. Discusses selecting assignments and implementing the process, noting how this structure requires equivalent advance preparation from all members and provides opportunities for…

  20. Rotationally Actuated Prosthetic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell G., Jr.; Carden, James R.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand attached to end of remaining part of forearm and to upper arm just above elbow. Pincerlike fingers pushed apart to degree depending on rotation of forearm. Simpler in design, simpler to operate, weighs less, and takes up less space.

  1. Rotational Dynamics with Tracker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eadkhong, T.; Rajsadorn, R.; Jannual, P.; Danworaphong, S.

    2012-01-01

    We propose the use of Tracker, freeware for video analysis, to analyse the moment of inertia ("I") of a cylindrical plate. Three experiments are performed to validate the proposed method. The first experiment is dedicated to find the linear coefficient of rotational friction ("b") for our system. By omitting the effect of such friction, we derive…

  2. Wigner rotations in laser cavities.

    PubMed

    Başkal, S; Kim, Y S

    2002-08-01

    The Wigner rotation is important in many branches of physics, chemistry, and engineering sciences. It is a group theoretical effect resulting from two Lorentz boosts. The net effect is one boost followed or preceded by a rotation. While the term "Wigner rotation" is derived from Wigner's little group whose transformations leave the four-momentum of a given particle invariant, it is shown that the Wigner rotation is different from the rotations in the little group. This difference is clearly spelled out, and it is shown to be possible to construct the corresponding Wigner rotation from the little-group rotation. It is shown also that the ABCD matrix for light beams in a laser cavity shares the same mathematics as the little-group rotation, from which the Wigner rotation can be constructed. PMID:12241308

  3. ROTATIONAL SPLITTING OF PULSATION MODES

    SciTech Connect

    Deupree, Robert G.; Beslin, Wilfried

    2010-10-01

    Mode splittings produced by uniform rotation and a particular form of differential rotation are computed for two-dimensional rotating 10 M{sub sun} zero-age main sequence stellar models. The change in the character of the mode splitting is traced as a function of uniform rotation rate, and it is found that only relatively slow rotation rates are required before the mode splitting becomes asymmetric about the azimuthally symmetric (m = 0) mode. Increased rotation produces a progressively altered pattern of the individual modes with respect to each other. Large mode splittings begin to overlap with the mode splittings produced by different radial and latitudinal modes at relatively low rotation rates. The mode-splitting pattern for the differentially rotating stars we model is different than that for uniformly rotating stars, making the mode splitting a possible discriminant of the internal angular momentum distribution if one assumes that the formidable challenge of mode identification can be overcome.

  4. Rotating Stars Can Help Planets Become Habitable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    What characteristics must a terrestrial planet exhibit to have the potential to host life? Orbiting within the habitable zone of its host star is certainly a good start, but theres another important aspect: the planet has to have the right atmosphere. A recent study has determined how host stars can help their planets to lose initial, enormous gaseous envelopes and become more Earth-like.Collecting An EnvelopeWhen a terrestrial planet forms inside a gaseous protoplanetary disk, it can accumulate a significant envelope of hydrogen gas causing the planet to bear more similarity to a mini-Neptune than to Earth. Before the planet can become habitable, it must shed this enormous, primordial hydrogen envelope, so that an appropriate secondary atmosphere can form.So what determines whether a planet can get rid of its protoatmosphere? The dominant process for shedding a hydrogen atmosphere is thermal mass loss: as the planets upper atmosphere is heated by X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from the host star, the envelope evaporates.A Critical DependenceIn a recent study led by Colin Johnstone (University of Vienna), a team of scientists has developed models of this evaporation process for hydrogen planetary atmospheres. In particular, Johnstone and collaborators examine how the host stars initial rotation rate which strongly impacts the stars level of XUV activity affects the degree to which the planets hydrogen atmosphere is evaporated, and the rate at which the evaporation occurs.The authors findings can be illustrated with the example of an Earth-mass planet located in the habitable zone of a solar-mass star. In this case, the authors find four interesting regimes (shown in the plot to the right):Evolution of the hydrogen protoatmosphere of an Earth-mass planet in the habitable zone of a solar-mass star. The four lettered cases describe different initial atmospheric masses. The three curves for each case describe the stellar rotation rate: slow (red

  5. FLARING SOLAR HALE SECTOR BOUNDARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Svalgaard, L.; Hannah, I. G.; Hudson, H. S.

    2011-05-20

    The sector structure that organizes the magnetic field of the solar wind into large-scale domains has a clear pattern in the photospheric magnetic field as well. The rotation rate, 27-28.5 days, implies an effectively rigid rotation originating deeper in the solar interior than the sunspots. The photospheric magnetic field is known to be concentrated near that portion (the Hale boundary) in each solar hemisphere, where the change in magnetic sector polarity matches that between the leading and following sunspot polarities in active regions in the respective hemispheres. We report here that flares and microflares also concentrate at the Hale boundaries, implying that flux emergence and the creation of free magnetic energy in the corona also have a direct cause in the deep interior.

  6. Solar spectral irradiance and total solar irradiance at a solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benevolenskaya, E. E.; Shapovalov, S. N.; Kostuchenko, I. G.

    2014-12-01

    Results are presented for a wavelet analysis of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the ultraviolet to infrared range and total solar irradiance (TSI). The study is based on data collected by the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment ( SORCE) satellite from March 10, 2007 to January 23, 2010. Cross-wavelet analysis finds relationships of varying degrees of tightness between SSI, TSI, and magnetic flux in a sunspot zone on the surface rotation timescales of solar activity complexes. Wavelet coherence shows how magnetic flux variations within a latitudinal sunspot zone are related with spectral irradiance variations. For example, variations in ultraviolet radiation at UV 200.5 nm are in phase with those of the magnetic flux associated with solar activity complexes. However, there is an unusual interval UV 310 to 380 nm, in which coherent structures disappear and UV radiation variations do not follow the changes in the magnetic flux.

  7. Sources of the solar wind at solar activity maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, M.; Liewer, P. C.; Smith, E. J.; Skoug, R. M.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2002-12-01

    The photospheric sources of solar wind observed by the Ulysses and ACE spacecraft from 1998 to early 2001 are determined through a two-step mapping process. Solar wind speed measured at the spacecraft is used in a ballistic model to determine a foot point on a source surface at a solar distance of 2.5 solar radii. A potential-field source-surface model is then used to trace the field and flow from the source surface to the photosphere. Comparison of the polarity of the measured interplanetary field with the polarity of the photospheric source region shows good agreement for spacecraft latitudes equatorward of 60°. At higher southern latitudes, the mapping predicts that Ulysses should have observed only outward directed magnetic fields, whereas both polarities were observed. A detailed analysis is performed on four of the solar rotations for which the mapped and observed polarities were in generally good agreement. For those rotations, the solar wind mapped to both coronal holes and active regions. These findings for a period of high solar activity differ from the findings of a similar study of the solar wind in 1994-1995 when solar activity was very low. At solar minimum the fastest wind mapped to the interior of large polar coronal holes while slower wind mapped to the boundaries of those holes or to smaller low-latitude coronal holes. For the data examined in the present study, neither spacecraft detected wind from the small polar coronal holes when they existed and the speed was never as high as that observed by Ulysses at solar minimum. The principal difference between the solar wind from coronal holes and from active regions is that the O7+/O6+ ion ratio is lower for the coronal hole flow, but not as low as in the polar coronal hole flow at solar minimum. Furthermore, the active-region flows appear to be organized into several substreams unlike the more monolithic structure of flows from coronal holes. The boundaries between plasma flows from neighboring

  8. Non-linear phenomena in films of solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1979-01-01

    The paper assesses nonlinear effects in films which are associated with the instability of their shape as a result of contractions during longitudinal and transverse in-plane oscillations. The following problems are solved analytically: transverse in-plane oscillations, longitudinal oscillations in films of rotating solar sail, transverse in-plane oscillations in films of a rotating solar sail, and effect of damping in films of a rotating solar sail. The reason for damping lies in the loss of kinetic energy during absorption of the film particles by root wrinkles without reflection (absolutely inelastic shock).

  9. Solar explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccei, B. C.

    1981-04-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Passive Solar Manufactured Buildings and Solar Home Builders Programs are developing much needed cost and performance data on solar buildings produced by large-volume home builders. These programs also serve as a model on how government can work effectively with industry.

  10. Solar Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, William W.

    Presented is the utilization of solar radiation as an energy resource principally for the production of electricity. Included are discussions of solar thermal conversion, photovoltic conversion, wind energy, and energy from ocean temperature differences. Future solar energy plans, the role of solar energy in plant and fossil fuel production, and…

  11. Solar Geometry

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-09-25

    Solar Noon (GMT time) The time when the sun is due south in the ... and sunset.   Daylight average of hourly cosine solar zenith angles (dimensionless) The average cosine of the angle ... overhead during daylight hours.   Cosine solar zenith angle at mid-time between sunrise and solar noon ...

  12. Wave-driven Rotation in Supersonically Rotating Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-15

    Supersonic rotation in mirrors may be produced by radio frequency waves. The waves produce coupled diffusion in ion kinetic and potential energy. A population inversion along the diffusion path then produces rotation. Waves may be designed to exploit a natural kinetic energy source or may provide the rotation energy on their own. Centrifugal traps for fusion and isotope separation may benefit from this wave-driven rotation.

  13. Solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, D.

    1981-01-01

    The book opens with a review of the patterns of energy use and resources in the United States, and an exploration of the potential of solar energy to supply some of this energy in the future. This is followed by background material on solar geometry, solar intensities, flat plate collectors, and economics. Detailed attention is then given to a variety of solar units and systems, including domestic hot water systems, space heating systems, solar-assisted heat pumps, intermediate temperature collectors, space heating/cooling systems, concentrating collectors for high temperatures, storage systems, and solar total energy systems. Finally, rights to solar access are discussed.

  14. The evolution of rotating stars. III - Predicted surface rotation velocities for stars which conserve total angular momentum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endal, A. S.; Sofia, S.

    1979-01-01

    Predicted surface rotation velocities for Population I stars at 10, 7, 5, 3, and 1.5 solar masses are presented. The surface velocities were computed for angular momentum with no radial redistribution, complete redistribution, and partial redistribution as predicted by consideration of circulation currents in rotating stars. Near the main sequence, rotational effects can reduce the moment of inertia of a star, so nonrotating models underestimate the expected velocities for evolving stars. On the red giant branch, angular momentum redistribution reduces the surface velocity by a factor of 2 or more, relative to the velocity expected for no radial redistribution. This removes the discrepancy between predicted and observed rotation rates for the K giants and makes it unlikely that these stars lose significant amounts of angular momentum by stellar winds. Calculations indicate that improved observations of the red giants in the Hyades cluster can be used to determine how angular momentum is redistributed by convection

  15. Geometry of solar coronal rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, B. P.; Martsenyuk, O. V.; Platov, Yu. V.; Den, O. E.

    2016-02-01

    Coronal helmet streamers are the most prominent large-scale elements of the solar corona observed in white light during total solar eclipses. The base of the streamer is an arcade of loops located above a global polarity inversion line. At an altitude of 1-2 solar radii above the limb, the apices of the arches sharpen, forming cusp structures, above which narrow coronal rays are observed. Lyot coronagraphs, especially those on-board spacecrafts flying beyond the Earth's atmosphere, enable us to observe the corona continuously and at large distances. At distances of several solar radii, the streamers take the form of fairly narrow spokes that diverge radially from the Sun. This radial direction displays a continuous expansion of the corona into the surrounding space, and the formation of the solar wind. However, the solar magnetic field and solar rotation complicate the situation. The rotation curves radial streams into spiral ones, similar to water streams flowing from rotating tubes. The influence of the magnetic field is more complex and multifarious. A thorough study of coronal ray geometries shows that rays are frequently not radial and not straight. Coronal streamers frequently display a curvature whose direction in the meridional plane depends on the phase of the solar cycle. It is evident that this curvature is related to the geometry of the global solar magnetic field, which depends on the cycle phase. Equatorward deviations of coronal streamers at solar minima and poleward deviations at solar maxima can be interpreted as the effects of changes in the general topology of the global solar magnetic field. There are sporadic temporal changes in the coronal rays shape caused by remote coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagating through the corona. This is also a manifestation of the influence of the magnetic field on plasma flows. The motion of a large-scale flux rope associated with a CME away from the Sun creates changes in the structure of surrounding field

  16. Rotation of the photospheric magnetic fields: A north-south asymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonucci, E.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Scherrer, P. H.

    1989-01-01

    During most of solar cycle 21 the large-scale photospheric field rotated more rapidly in the Northern Hemisphere than in the southern. The large-scale northern field rotated with a 26.9 day period (synodic), was centered at 15 degress N, and covered a latitude zone about 24 degrees wide. The large-scale southern field rotated with a periodicity of 28.1 days, was centered at 26 degrees S, and covered a latitude zone about 32 degrees wide. Our analysis showed rotational power at only a few discrete latitudes and frequencies in each hemisphere. The center of each peak lies near the sunspot differential rotation curve. The largest scale field contributes to the configuration of the coronal and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The strength of the first harmonic of the northern field suggests that this structure may be related to the 4-sector pattern observed in the IMF polarity. The southern field had much lower power at the first harmonic of the solar rotation rate and so would contribute only to a 2-sector structure in the IMF. These results were discovered in Fourier analysis of photospheric synoptic charts obtained at the Wilcox Solar Observatory from 1976 to 1986 and confirmed in higher resolution maps from the National Solar Observatory. Mt. Wilson magnetic field measurements from solar cycle 20 show a similar north-south asymmetry.

  17. Rotatable seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Logan, Clinton M.; Garibaldi, Jack L.

    1982-01-01

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

  18. Muon spin rotation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The bulk of the muon spin rotation research work centered around the development of the muon spin rotation facility at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The collimation system was both designed and fabricated at Virginia State University. This improved collimation system, plus improvements in detectors and electronics enabled the acquisition of spectra free of background out to 15 microseconds. There were two runs at Brookhaven in 1984, one run was devoted primarily to beam development and the other run allowed several successful experiments to be performed. The effect of uniaxial strain on an Fe(Si) crystal at elevated temperature (360K) was measured and the results are incorporated herein. A complete analysis of Fe pulling data taken earlier is included.

  19. A call for rotators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountain, Gregory

    “Needed: highly motivated geoscientists willing to slow the pace of their research for 1-2 years while managing federal government support of their discipline. Assured: change of perspective; no change in pay. Contact your National Science Foundation Program Director for details.—No, this isn't an NSF job announcement; this is an open letter to members of the Earth science community from a recently “retired” NSF rotator concerned by the small number of researchers interested in a Washington tour. I learned firsthand the extent to which an individual in this position is entrusted with decision-making powers, and as a result, I believe that each of us in the research community should feel responsible for ensuring that highly qualified people serve as rotators.

  20. Rotation of FK Comae

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, S.M. )

    1990-03-01

    V sin i for the rapidly rotating G-type giant FK Com is estimated using high-resolution coude spectra and the Fourier transform approach. The result, V sin i = 159 + or - 4 km/s, agrees well with recent determinations which used direct comparison of FK Com spectra with those of artificially broadened standards. If FK Com does not differ drastically in its internal structure from more normal stars, its angular momentum is a few (perhaps 10) times larger than for single rapidly rotating stars following standard relations for the upper main sequence. It angular momentum is about 3 times smaller than that of the orbital motion in a typical W UMa-type system. 30 refs.

  1. Rotational spectrum of tryptophan

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz, M. Eugenia Cabezas, Carlos Mata, Santiago Alonso, Josè L.

    2014-05-28

    The rotational spectrum of the natural amino acid tryptophan has been observed for the first time using a combination of laser ablation, molecular beams, and Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Independent analysis of the rotational spectra of individual conformers has conducted to a definitive identification of two different conformers of tryptophan, with one of the observed conformers never reported before. The analysis of the {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants is of particular significance since it allows discrimination between structures, thus providing structural information on the orientation of the amino group. Both observed conformers are stabilized by an O–H···N hydrogen bond in the side chain and a N–H···π interaction forming a chain that reinforce the strength of hydrogen bonds through cooperative effects.

  2. A Translational Polarization Rotator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.; Wollack, Edward J.; Pisano, Giampaolo; Ackiss, Sheridan; U-Yen, Kongpop; Ng, Ming wah

    2012-01-01

    We explore a free-space polarization modulator in which a variable phase introduction between right- and left-handed circular polarization components is used to rotate the linear polarization of the outgoing beam relative to that of the incoming beam. In this device, the polarization states are separated by a circular polarizer that consists of a quarter-wave plate in combination with a wire grid. A movable mirror is positioned behind and parallel to the circular polarizer. As the polarizer-mirror distance is separated, an incident liear polarization will be rotated through an angle that is proportional to the introduced phase delay. We demonstrate a prototype device that modulates Stokes Q and U over a 20% bandwidth.

  3. Rotation of the outer layer of the sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouaoudia, Samir

    The problem of differential rotation in the radiative regions of slowly rotating main-sequence stars is addressed. Inhomogeneous compositions and magnetic fields are ignored. Although this is a classical problem is astrophysics, several fundamental questions regarding the basic magnitude and structure of the flow remain unanswered. Von Zeipel pioneered the study of this problem by showing that solid-body rotation is not possible in radiatively stable zones. The goal is to find alternatives to pure sold-body rotation. A numerical approach was tried, but found to be too ill-conditioned to give accurate results. However, in setting up the equations for numerical solutions, we solved the long-standing computational problem of how to compute efficiently high-order solutions at a coordinate singularity. The classical derivation of the von Zeipel paradox is derived analytically to be incorrect for slowly rotating stars and a new proof is shown. This new derivation shows that solid-body rotation is allowed if certain conditions are fulfilled, and that those conditions are approximately fulfilled in the outer regions of the radiative zones of solar-like stars. A first-order perturbation is used to compute the differential rotation.

  4. Effects of asteroid rotation on directed energy deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Isabella E.; Tsareva, Tatiana; Griswold, Janelle; Lubin, Philip; Hughes, Gary B.; O'Neill, Hugh; Meinhold, Peter; Suen, Jonathan; Zhang, Qicheng; Riley, Jordan; Melis, Carl; Walsh, Kevin; Brashears, Travis; Bollag, Justin; Mathew, Shana; Bible, Johanna

    2014-09-01

    Asteroids that threaten Earth could be deflected from their orbits using laser directed energy or concentrated solar energy to vaporize the surface; the ejected plume would create a reaction thrust that pushes the object away from its collision course with Earth. One concern regarding directed energy deflection approaches is that asteroids rotate as they orbit the Sun. Asteroid rotation reduces the average thrust and changes the thrust vector imparting a time profile to the thrust. A directed energy system must deliver sufficient flux to evaporate surface material even when the asteroid is rotating. Required flux levels depend on surface material composition and albedo, thermal and bulk mechanical properties of the asteroid, and asteroid rotation rate. In the present work we present results of simulations for directed energy ejecta-plume asteroid threat mitigation. We use the observed distribution of asteroid rotational rates, along with a range of material and mechanical properties, as input to a thermal-physical model of plume generation. We calculate the expected thrust profile for rotating objects. Standoff directed energy schemes that deliver at least 10 MW/m2 generate significant thrust for all but the highest conceivable rotation rates.

  5. Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pate, Brooks

    2014-06-01

    The past decade has seen several major technology advances in electronics operating at microwave frequencies making it possible to develop a new generation of spectrometers for molecular rotational spectroscopy. High-speed digital electronics, both arbitrary waveform generators and digitizers, continue on a Moore's Law-like development cycle that started around 1993 with device bandwidth doubling about every 36 months. These enabling technologies were the key to designing chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectrometers which offer significant sensitivity enhancements for broadband spectrum acquisition in molecular rotational spectroscopy. A special feature of the chirped-pulse spectrometer design is that it is easily implemented at low frequency (below 8 GHz) where Balle-Flygare type spectrometers with Fabry-Perot cavity designs become technologically challenging due to the mirror size requirements. The capabilities of CP-FTMW spectrometers for studies of molecular structure will be illustrated by the collaborative research effort we have been a part of to determine the structures of water clusters - a project which has identified clusters up to the pentadecamer. A second technology trend that impacts molecular rotational spectroscopy is the development of high power, solid state sources in the mm-wave/THz regions. Results from the field of mm-wave chirped-pulse Fourier transform spectroscopy will be described with an emphasis on new problems in chemical dynamics and analytical chemistry that these methods can tackle. The third (and potentially most important) technological trend is the reduction of microwave components to chip level using monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC) - a technology driven by an enormous mass market in communications. Some recent advances in rotational spectrometer designs that incorporate low-cost components will be highlighted. The challenge to the high-resolution spectroscopy community - as posed by Frank De

  6. On rotational conical flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrari, Carlo

    1952-01-01

    Some general properties of isoenergetic rotational conical fields are determined. For such fields, provided the physical parameters of the fluid flow are known on a conical reference surface, it being understood that they satisfy certain imposed conditions, it is shown how to construct the hodographs in the various meridional semiplanes, as the envelope of either the tangents to the hodographs or of the osculatory circles.

  7. Rotating Brush Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lattime, S. B.; Braun, M. J.; Choy. F. K.; Hendricks, R. C.; Steinetz, B. M.

    2006-01-01

    The proven technology of brush seals has been extended to the mitigation of problems arising from friction and wear at the bristle-rotor interface at high surface speeds. In prototype testing, the brush is mounted on, and free to rotate with the shaft, thus providing a complaint primary seal. A face seal positioned between the backing plate of the brush seal and the housing provides a secondary seal. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the interaction between the brush bristles and the shaft at high surface speeds as well as introduce a numerical model to simulate the bristle behavior. A test facility was constructed to study the effects of centrifugal forces on bristle deflection in a single rotating brush seal. The bristle-rotor interface was observed through a video camera, which utilized a high magnification borescope and a high frequency strobe light source. Rotational speeds of the rotor and the brush seal were measured by a magnetic and optical speed sensor, respectively. Preliminary results with speeds up to 11,000 rpm show no speed differential between the brush seal and rotor, or any instability problems associated with the brush seal. Bristle liftoff from the rotor is successfully captured on video.

  8. Rotational magnetic induction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakic, Adnan; Eskandarnia, Neda; Keong Li, Bing; Weber, Ewald; Wang, Hua; Crozier, Stuart

    2012-02-01

    In magnetic induction tomography (MIT), an array of excitation coils is typically used to apply time-varying magnetic fields to induce eddy currents in the material to be studied. The magnetic fields from the eddy currents are then detected by an array of sensing coils to form an image of passive electromagnetic properties (i.e. conductivity, permittivity and permeability). Increasing the number of transmitters and receivers can provide a better image quality at the expense of a larger and more expensive MIT system. Instead of increasing the number of coils, this study investigates the possibility of rotating a single transmit-receive coil to image the electrical properties of the sample, by emulating an array of 200 transmit-receive coils by time-division multiplexing. Engineering details on the electromechanical design and development of a rotating MIT system are presented. The experimental results indicate that representative images of conductive samples can be obtained at 5 MHz by rotating a single transmit-receive coil.

  9. Bioreactor rotating wall vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells.

  10. Coordinate-Free Rotation Operator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leubner, C.

    1979-01-01

    Suggests the use of a coordinate-free rotation operator for the teaching of rotations in Euclidean three space because of its twofold didactic advantage. Illustrates the potentialities of the coordinate-free rotation operator approach by a number of examples. (Author/GA)

  11. Goniometer-rotation-angle recorder

    SciTech Connect

    Shchagin, A.V.

    1985-12-01

    This paper describes a goniometer-rotation-angle recorder with a discrete drive. The rotation angle in a given plane is recorded by bidirectional sign counter of positive and negative drive-actuation numbers for rotations in positive and negative directions. The maximum capacity of the counter is + or - 9 decimal digits.

  12. Drift waves in rotating plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Liu, J.

    1983-09-01

    The stability of the electron drift wave is investigated in the presence of E x B plasma rotation typical of the central cell plasma in tandem mirrors. It is shown that a rotationally-driven drift wave may occur at low azimuthal mode numbers. Conditions for rotational instabilities are derived. Quasilinear formulas are given for the anomalous transport associated with the unstable fluctuations.

  13. On the Product of Rotations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trenkler, G.; Trenkler, D.

    2008-01-01

    Using the elementary tools of matrix theory, we show that the product of two rotations in the three-dimensional Euclidean space is a rotation again. For this purpose, three types of rotation matrices are identified which are of simple structure. One of them is the identity matrix, and each of the other two types can be uniquely characterized by…

  14. Rotating plug bearing and seal

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1977-01-01

    A bearing and seal structure for nuclear reactors utilizing rotating plugs above the nuclear reactor vessel. The structure permits lubrication of bearings and seals of the rotating plugs without risk of the lubricant draining into the reactor vessel below. The structure permits lubrication by utilizing a rotating outer race bearing.

  15. Superflares on solar-type stars.

    PubMed

    Maehara, Hiroyuki; Shibayama, Takuya; Notsu, Shota; Notsu, Yuta; Nagao, Takashi; Kusaba, Satoshi; Honda, Satoshi; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2012-05-24

    Solar flares are caused by the sudden release of magnetic energy stored near sunspots. They release 10(29) to 10(32) ergs of energy on a timescale of hours. Similar flares have been observed on many stars, with larger 'superflares' seen on a variety of stars, some of which are rapidly rotating and some of which are of ordinary solar type. The small number of superflares observed on solar-type stars has hitherto precluded a detailed study of them. Here we report observations of 365 superflares, including some from slowly rotating solar-type stars, from about 83,000 stars observed over 120 days. Quasi-periodic brightness modulations observed in the solar-type stars suggest that they have much larger starspots than does the Sun. The maximum energy of the flare is not correlated with the stellar rotation period, but the data suggest that superflares occur more frequently on rapidly rotating stars. It has been proposed that hot Jupiters may be important in the generation of superflares on solar-type stars, but none have been discovered around the stars that we have studied, indicating that hot Jupiters associated with superflares are rare. PMID:22622572

  16. Rotationally driven 'zebra stripes' in Earth's inner radiation belt.

    PubMed

    Ukhorskiy, A Y; Sitnov, M I; Mitchell, D G; Takahashi, K; Lanzerotti, L J; Mauk, B H

    2014-03-20

    Structured features on top of nominally smooth distributions of radiation-belt particles at Earth have been previously associated with particle acceleration and transport mechanisms powered exclusively by enhanced solar-wind activity. Although planetary rotation is considered to be important for particle acceleration at Jupiter and Saturn, the electric field produced in the inner magnetosphere by Earth's rotation can change the velocity of trapped particles by only about 1-2 kilometres per second, so rotation has been thought inconsequential for radiation-belt electrons with velocities of about 100,000 kilometres per second. Here we report that the distributions of energetic electrons across the entire spatial extent of Earth's inner radiation belt are organized in regular, highly structured and unexpected 'zebra stripes', even when the solar-wind activity is low. Modelling reveals that the patterns are produced by Earth's rotation. Radiation-belt electrons are trapped in Earth's dipole-like magnetic field, where they undergo slow longitudinal drift motion around the planet because of the gradient and curvature of the magnetic field. Earth's rotation induces global diurnal variations of magnetic and electric fields that resonantly interact with electrons whose drift period is close to 24 hours, modifying electron fluxes over a broad energy range into regular patterns composed of multiple stripes extending over the entire span of the inner radiation belt. PMID:24646996

  17. Rotationally driven `zebra stripes' in Earth's inner radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Sitnov, M. I.; Mitchell, D. G.; Takahashi, K.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Mauk, B. H.

    2014-03-01

    Structured features on top of nominally smooth distributions of radiation-belt particles at Earth have been previously associated with particle acceleration and transport mechanisms powered exclusively by enhanced solar-wind activity. Although planetary rotation is considered to be important for particle acceleration at Jupiter and Saturn, the electric field produced in the inner magnetosphere by Earth's rotation can change the velocity of trapped particles by only about 1-2 kilometres per second, so rotation has been thought inconsequential for radiation-belt electrons with velocities of about 100,000 kilometres per second. Here we report that the distributions of energetic electrons across the entire spatial extent of Earth's inner radiation belt are organized in regular, highly structured and unexpected `zebra stripes', even when the solar-wind activity is low. Modelling reveals that the patterns are produced by Earth's rotation. Radiation-belt electrons are trapped in Earth's dipole-like magnetic field, where they undergo slow longitudinal drift motion around the planet because of the gradient and curvature of the magnetic field. Earth's rotation induces global diurnal variations of magnetic and electric fields that resonantly interact with electrons whose drift period is close to 24 hours, modifying electron fluxes over a broad energy range into regular patterns composed of multiple stripes extending over the entire span of the inner radiation belt.

  18. Solar tracking apparatus and system

    SciTech Connect

    Hultberg, D.E.

    1983-01-18

    A solar tracking apparatus and system for supporting and use with solar devices. The apparatus is comprised of a pair of concentric shafts oriented parallel to the earth's rotational axis with one shaft being rotated by a motor at one revolution per day, so that a yoke rigidly attached to this shaft will follow the diurnal motion of the sun. The second concentric shaft is rotated at a rate relative to the first shaft and by means of a spherical four-bar linkage will automatically produce a rotational oscillation of a support or gimbal mounted on the yoke equal to the yearly declination of the sun. A means is also provided for advancing or retarding the diurnal motion of the yoke at specific times of the year so as to correct for anomalies in the motion of the sun, commonly known as ''the equation of time''. A means is also provided for coupling a large array of solar tracking yokes to a single central drive unit.

  19. 3D Reconstruction of a Rotating Erupting Prominence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. T.; Kliem, B.; Torok, T.

    2011-01-01

    A bright prominence associated with a coronal mass ejection (CME) was seen erupting from the Sun on 9 April 2008. This prominence was tracked by both the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) EUVI and COR1 telescopes, and was seen to rotate about the line of sight as it erupted; therefore, the event has been nicknamed the "Cartwheel CME." The threads of the prominence in the core of the CME quite clearly indicate the structure of a weakly to moderately twisted flux rope throughout the field of view, up to heliocentric heights of 4 solar radii. Although the STEREO separation was 48 deg, it was possible to match some sharp features in the later part of the eruption as seen in the 304 Angstrom line in EUVI and in the H alpha-sensitive bandpass of COR1 by both STEREO Ahead and Behind. These features could then be traced out in three dimensional space, and reprojected into a view in which the eruption is directed towards the observer. The reconstructed view shows that the alignment of the prominence to the vertical axis rotates as it rises up to a leading-edge height of approximately equals 2.5 solar radii, and then remains approximately constant. The alignment at 2.5 solar radii differs by about 115 deg. from the original filament orientation inferred from H alpha and EUV data, and the height profile of the rotation, obtained here for the first time, shows that two thirds of the total rotation is reached within approximately equals 0.5 solar radii above the photosphere. These features are well reproduced by numerical simulations of an unstable moderately twisted flux rope embedded in external flux with a relatively strong shear field component.

  20. 3D Reconstruction of a Rotating Erupting Prominence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. T.; Kliem, B.; Toeroek, T.

    2011-01-01

    A bright prominence associated with a coronal mass ejection (CME) was seen erupting from the Sun on 9 April 2008. This prominence was tracked by both the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) EUVI and COR1 telescopes, and was seen to rotate about the line of sight a it erupted; therefore, the event has been nicknamed the "Cartwheel CME." The threads of the prominence in the core of the CME quite clearly indicate the structure of a weakly to moderately twisted flux rope throughout the field of view, up to heliocentric heights of 4 solar radii. Although the STEREO separation was 48 deg, it was possible to match some sharp features in the later part of the eruption as seen in the 304 A line in EUVI and in the H-alpha-sensitive bandpass of COR I by both STEREO Ahead and Behind. These features could then be traced out in three-dimensional space, and reprojected into a view in which the eruption is directed toward the observer. The reconstructed view shows that the alignment of the prominence to the vertical axis rotates as it rises up to a leading-edge height of approximately equal to 2.5 solar radii, and then remains approximately constant. The alignment at 2.5 solar radii differs by about 115 deg from the original filament orientation inferred from H-alpha and EUV data, and the height profile of the rotation, obtained here for the first time, shows that two thirds of the total rotation are reached within approximately equal to 0.5 solar radii above the photosphere. These features are well reproduced by numerical simulations of an unstable moderately twisted flux rope embedded in external flux with a relatively strong shear field component.

  1. Depth and latitude dependence of the solar internal angular velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Edward J., Jr.; Cacciani, Alessandro; Korzennik, Sylvain; Tomczyk, Steven; Ulrich, Roger K.; Woodard, Martin F.

    1990-01-01

    One of the design goals for the dedicated helioseismology observing state located at Mount Wilson Observatory was the measurement of the internal solar rotation using solar p-mode oscillations. In this paper, the first p-mode splittings obtained from Mount Wilson are reported and compared with those from several previously published studies. It is demonstrated that the present splittings agree quite well with composite frequency splittings obtained from the comparisons. The splittings suggest that the angular velocity in the solar equatorial plane is a function of depth below the photosphere. The latitudinal differential rotation pattern visible at the surface appears to persist at least throughout the solar convection zone.

  2. Stationarity of magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    Solar wind research and studies of charged particle propagation often assume that the interplanetary magnetic field represents a stationary random process. The extent to which ensemble averages of the solar wind magnetic fields follow the asymptotic behavior predicted by the ergodic theorem was investigated. Several time periods, including a span of nearly two years, are analyzed. Data intervals which span many solar rotations satisfy the conditions of weak stationarity if the effects of solar rotation are included in the asymptotic analysis. Shorter intervals which include a small integral number of interplanetary sectors also satisfy weak stationarity. The results are illustrated using magnetometer data from the ISEE-3, Voyager and IMP spacecraft.

  3. Coronal Faraday Rotation Observations: Measurements and Limits on Plasma Inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, Salvatore; Spangler, Steven R.

    1999-11-01

    We report Faraday rotation measurements of the extended radio galaxy J0039+0319 (4C+03.01) seen through the solar corona when the source was at an average distance of 8.6 Rsolar from the center of the Sun. Nearly continuous polarimetric observations were made over an 11 hour period on 1997 March 28 with the NRAO Very Large Array at frequencies of 1465 and 1635 MHz. The observations were made near solar minimum conditions. Observations of radio galaxies have two advantages with respect to spacecraft transmitter signals. (1) The λ2 dependence of the polarization position angle expected of Faraday rotation can be verified. (2) Observations of spatially extended radio galaxies have the potential of directly measuring the propagation speed of coronal MHD irregularities. With the use of observations made when the source was far from the Sun, we measure an average rotation measure of +6.2+/-1.0 rad m-2 attributable to the corona. A rotation-measure time series was obtained for the most polarized component of the source. This rotation-measure time series showed slow variations during the observing session, with a total change of about 3 rad m-2. This variation is attributed to large-scale gradients and static plasma structures in the corona. We also obtain a weak detection of rotation-measure fluctuations on timescales of 15 minutes to 1 hour, which may be due to coronal Alfvén waves. This fluctuating component of the coronal rotation measure has an rms value <=0.40 rad m-2, comparable to previously reported detections. This measurement is then used to place model-dependent upper limits to the Alfvén wave flux at the coronal base. Depending on the precise geometry of the solar wind flow from the coronal base to 8.6 Rsolar, the inferred wave flux at the coronal base ranges from 2.4×104 to 2.3×105 ergs s-1 cm-2. These values range from slightly below to more than an order of magnitude below the wave flux needed to heat and accelerate the solar wind to its observed

  4. Earth's Variable Rotation from 750BC to present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Leslie Valentine; Hohenkerk, Catherine; Stephenson, F. Richard

    2015-08-01

    Ancient Babylonian clay tablets buried for centuries beneath the sands of the desert are part of an extensive historical archive that contains vital information about the Earth's rotation from 750BC to the present. These historical observations of solar and lunar eclipses and occultations of stars are re-analysed to determine the error of the Earth's rotational clock, usually designated by ΔT. The diagrams display the individual results for ΔT, together with the best-fitting curve through these data.

  5. Rotation of low-mass stars - A new probe of stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinsonneault, M. H.; Kawaler, Steven D.; Demarque, P.

    1990-01-01

    Models of stars of various masses and rotational parameters were developed and compared with observations of stars in open clusters of various ages in order to analyze the evolution of rotating stars from the early premain sequence to an age of 1.7 x 10 to the 9th yrs. It is shown that, for stars older than 10 to the 8th yrs and less massive than 1.1 solar mass, the surface rotation rates depend most strongly on the properties of the angular momentum loss. The trends of the currently available observations suggest that the rotation periods are a good indicator of the field-star ages.

  6. Angular Momentum Evolution of Young Solar-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amard, Louis; Palacios, Ana; Charbonnel, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    We present stellar evolution models of young solar-type stars including self consistent treatment of rotational mixing and extraction of angular momentum (AM) by magnetized wind including the most up-to-date physic of AM transport.

  7. Science Experimenter: Observing the Sun and Solar Eclipses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mims, Forrest M., III

    1991-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of simple optical aids that allow the amateur scientist to safely observe sunspots and solar eclipses and also to measure the sun's rotation. (five references) (JJK)

  8. Earth rotation derived from occultation records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sôma, Mitsuru; Tanikawa, Kiyotaka

    2016-04-01

    We determined the values of the Earth's rotation parameter, ΔT = T T - UT, around AD 500 after confirming that the value of the tidal acceleration, dot{n}, of the lunar motion remained unchanged during the period between ancient times and the present. For determining of ΔT, we used contemporaneous occultations of planets by the Moon. In general, occultation records are not useful. However, there are some records that give us a stringent condition for the range of ΔT. Records of the lunar occultations in AD 503 and AD 513 are such examples. In order to assure the usefulness of this occultation data, we used contemporaneous annular and total solar eclipses, which have not been used in the preceding work. This is the first work in which the lunar occultation data have been used as primary data to determine the value of ΔT together with auxiliary contemporaneous annular and total solar eclipses. Our ΔT value is less than a smoothed value (Stephenson 1997) by at least 450 s. The result is consistent with our earlier results obtained from solar eclipses.

  9. PERSISTENT MAGNETIC WREATHS IN A RAPIDLY ROTATING SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Benjamin P.; Toomre, Juri; Browning, Matthew K.; Brun, Allan Sacha

    2010-03-01

    When our Sun was young it rotated much more rapidly than now. Observations of young, rapidly rotating stars indicate that many possess substantial magnetic activity and strong axisymmetric magnetic fields. We conduct simulations of dynamo action in rapidly rotating suns with the three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code to explore the complex coupling between rotation, convection, and magnetism. Here, we study dynamo action realized in the bulk of the convection zone for a system rotating at 3 times the current solar rotation rate. We find that substantial organized global-scale magnetic fields are achieved by dynamo action in this system. Striking wreaths of magnetism are built in the midst of the convection zone, coexisting with the turbulent convection. This is a surprise, for it has been widely believed that such magnetic structures should be disrupted by magnetic buoyancy or turbulent pumping. Thus, many solar dynamo theories have suggested that a tachocline of penetration and shear at the base of the convection zone is a crucial ingredient for organized dynamo action, whereas these simulations do not include such tachoclines. We examine how these persistent magnetic wreaths are maintained by dynamo processes and explore whether a classical mean-field alpha-effect explains the regeneration of poloidal field. We find that the global-scale toroidal magnetic fields are maintained by an OMEGA-effect arising from the differential rotation, while the global-scale poloidal fields arise from turbulent correlations between the convective flows and magnetic fields. These correlations are not well represented by an alpha-effect that is based on the kinetic and magnetic helicities.

  10. Wind and solar powered turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, I. D.; Koh, J. L.; Holmes, M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A power generating station having a generator driven by solar heat assisted ambient wind is described. A first plurality of radially extendng air passages direct ambient wind to a radial flow wind turbine disposed in a centrally located opening in a substantially disc-shaped structure. A solar radiation collecting surface having black bodies is disposed above the fist plurality of air passages and in communication with a second plurality of radial air passages. A cover plate enclosing the second plurality of radial air passages is transparent so as to permit solar radiation to effectively reach the black bodies. The second plurality of air passages direct ambient wind and thermal updrafts generated by the black bodies to an axial flow turbine. The rotating shaft of the turbines drive the generator. The solar and wind drien power generating system operates in electrical cogeneration mode with a fuel powered prime mover.

  11. Estimating extragalactic Faraday rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppermann, N.; Junklewitz, H.; Greiner, M.; Enßlin, T. A.; Akahori, T.; Carretti, E.; Gaensler, B. M.; Goobar, A.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Pratley, L.; Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Stil, J. M.; Vacca, V.

    2015-03-01

    Observations of Faraday rotation for extragalactic sources probe magnetic fields both inside and outside the Milky Way. Building on our earlier estimate of the Galactic contribution, we set out to estimate the extragalactic contributions. We discuss the problems involved; in particular, we point out that taking the difference between the observed values and the Galactic foreground reconstruction is not a good estimate for the extragalactic contributions. We point out a degeneracy between the contributions to the observed values due to extragalactic magnetic fields and observational noise and comment on the dangers of over-interpreting an estimate without taking into account its uncertainty information. To overcome these difficulties, we develop an extended reconstruction algorithm based on the assumption that the observational uncertainties are accurately described for a subset of the data, which can overcome the degeneracy with the extragalactic contributions. We present a probabilistic derivation of the algorithm and demonstrate its performance using a simulation, yielding a high quality reconstruction of the Galactic Faraday rotation foreground, a precise estimate of the typical extragalactic contribution, and a well-defined probabilistic description of the extragalactic contribution for each data point. We then apply this reconstruction technique to a catalog of Faraday rotation observations for extragalactic sources. The analysis is done for several different scenarios, for which we consider the error bars of different subsets of the data to accurately describe the observational uncertainties. By comparing the results, we argue that a split that singles out only data near the Galactic poles is the most robust approach. We find that the dispersion of extragalactic contributions to observed Faraday depths is most likely lower than 7 rad/m2, in agreement with earlier results, and that the extragalactic contribution to an individual data point is poorly

  12. Rotation and Mass Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owocki, S.

    2008-06-01

    Stellar rotation can play an important role in structuring and enhancing the mass loss from massive stars. Initial 1D models focussed on the expected centrifugal enhancement of the line-driven mass flux from the equator of a rotating star, but the review here emphasizes that the loss of centrifugal support away from the stellar surface actually limits the steady mass flux to just the point-star CAK value, with models near critical rotation characterized by a slow, subcritical acceleration. Recent suggestions that such slow outflows might have high enough density to explain disks in Be or B[e] stars are examined in the context of 2D simulations of the ``Wind Compressed Disk'' (WCD) paradigm, together with a review of the tendency for poleward components of the line-driving force to inhibit WCD formation. When one accounts for equatorial gravity darkening, the net tendency is in fact for the relatively bright regions at higher latitude to drive a faster, denser ``bipolar'' outflow. I discuss the potential relevance for the bipolar form of nebulae from LBV stars like η Carinae, but emphasize that, since the large mass loss associated with the eruption of eta Carinae's Homunculus would heavily saturate line-driving, explaining its bipolar form requires development of analogous models for continuum-driven mass loss. I conclude with a discussion of how radiation seems inherently ill-suited to supporting or driving a geometrically thin, but optically thick disk or disk outflow. The disks inferred in Be and B[e] stars may instead be centrifugally ejected, with radiation inducing an ablation flow from the disk surface, and thus perhaps playing a greater role in destroying (rather than creating) an orbiting, circumstellar disk.

  13. Stellar Rubella: Starspots on F, G and K Stars of Different Ages and Rotation Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, E. F.; Dewarf, L. E.; Messina, S.; McCook, G. P.

    1995-05-01

    We present high precision photoelectric photometry of a sample of bright, single F, G, and K- type main-sequence and subgiant stars. Several of the stars are members of clusters or moving groups and thus have well determined ages. The majority of the stars are main-sequence to subgiant G-types stars that range in age from 70 Myr to 10 Gyr with directly measured rotation periods from 2.7 days up to 40-50 days. The observations have been carried out with Automatic Photometric Telescopes (APTs) located on Mt Hopkins, Arizona beginning in 1988; standard UBVRI \\ or uvby \\ filters were used. As expected, the youngest, fastest rotating stars in the sample typically have the largest, rotationally modulated starspot light variations. Some of the stars show relatively rapid changes in their light curves that are explained by differential rotation of the starspot groups. In addition, some of the stars that have been observed over several years show long-term, seasonal trends in their mean brightness levels that most likely arise from starspot cycles. The starspot properties (areal coverage, distribution, and temperature) are determined from the modelling of the multiwavelength light curves. For certain stars, comparisons of these photospheric starspots properties to their corresponding chromospheric, transition region, and coronal activity indicators obtained in the UV, EUV \\ and X-ray are presented and discussed. Analogies are also made to the magnetic properties of the Sun. This research is supported by NSF AST 86-16362, NASA NAG5-2160, and NAG5-2494.

  14. Pulsations of rapidly rotating stars. I. The ACOR numerical code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouazzani, R.-M.; Dupret, M.-A.; Reese, D. R.

    2012-11-01

    Context. Very high precision seismic space missions such as CoRoT and Kepler provide the means of testing the modeling of transport processes in stellar interiors. For some stars, such as solar-like and red giant stars, a rotational splitting is measured. However, to fully exploit these splittings and constrain the rotation profile, one needs to be able to calculate them accurately. For some other stars, such as δ Scuti and Be stars, for instance, the observed pulsation spectra are modified by rotation to such an extent that a perturbative treatment of the effects of rotation is no longer valid. Aims: We present here a new two-dimensional non-perturbative code called ACOR (adiabatic code of oscillation including rotation) that allows us to compute adiabatic non-radial pulsations of rotating stars without making any assumptions on the sphericity of the star, the fluid properties (i.e., baroclinicity) or the rotation profile. Methods: The 2D non-perturbative calculations fully take into account the centrifugal distortion of the star and include the full influence of the Coriolis acceleration. The numerical method is based on a spectral approach for the angular part of the modes and a fourth-order finite differences approach for the radial part. Results: We test and evaluate the accuracy of the calculations by comparing them with those coming from the TOP (two-dimensional oscillation program) for the same polytropic models. We illustrate the effects of rapid rotation on stellar pulsations through the phenomenon of avoided crossings. Conclusions: As shown by the comparison with the TOP for simple models, the code is stable, and gives accurate results up to near-critical rotation rates.

  15. Interferometric rotation sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, T. M. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An interferometric rotation sensor and control system is provided which includes a compound prism interferometer and an associated direction control system. Light entering the interferometer is split into two paths with the light in the respective paths being reflected an unequal number of times, and then being recombined at an exit aperture in phase differing relationships. Incoming light is deviated from the optical axis of the device by an angle, alpha. The angle causes a similar displacement of the two component images at the exit aperture which results in a fringe pattern. Fringe numbers are directly related to angle alpha. Various control systems of the interferometer are given.

  16. ROTATING PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Boyer, K.; Hammel, J.E.; Longmire, C.L.; Nagle, D.E.; Ribe, F.L.; Tuck, J.L.

    1961-10-24

    ABS>A method and device are described for obtaining fusion reactions. The basic concept is that of using crossed electric and magnetic fields to induce a plasma rotation in which the ionized particles follow a circumferential drift orbit on wldch a cyclotron mode of motion is superimposed, the net result being a cycloidal motion about the axis of symmetry. The discharge tube has a radial electric field and a longitudinal magnetic field. Mirror machine geometry is utilized. The device avoids reliance on the pinch effect and its associated instability problems. (AEC)

  17. Magnetopause rotational forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnerup, B. U. O.; Ledley, B. G.

    1974-01-01

    Magnetic field data from the Goddard Space Flight Center magnetometer experiment on board Ogo 5 are analyzed by the minimum-variance technique for two magnetopause crossings, believed to provide the best evidence presently available of magnetopause rotational discontinuities. Approximate agreement with predictions from MHD and first-order orbit theory is found, but available low-energy electron data suggest the presence of significant non-MHD effects. The paper also illustrates an improved method for data interval selection, a new magnetopause hodogram representation, and the utility of data simulation.

  18. Spin-Stabilized Microsatellites with Solar Concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timmerman, Paul; Shields, Virgil

    2008-01-01

    A document proposes the development of spin-stabilized microsatellites powered by solar photovoltaic cells aided by solar concentrators. Each such satellite would have a cylindrical or other axisymmetric main body with solar cells mounted in a circumferential belt-like array on its exterior surface. The solar concentrator would be a halo-like outrigger cylindrical Fresnel lens array that would be deployed from and would surround the main body, connected to the main body via spokes or similar structural members. The spacecraft would be oriented with its axis of symmetry perpendicular to the line of sight to the Sun and would be set into rotation about this axis. In effect, the solar cells and concentrator would be oriented and rotated in a "rotisserie" mode, making it possible to take advantage of the concentration of solar light while preventing localized overheating of the solar cells. In addition, the mechanical stabilization inherently afforded by the rotation could be exploited as a means of passive attitude control or, at least, of reducing the requirement for active attitude control.

  19. Solar Flare Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmahl, Edward J.; Kundu, Mukul R.

    1998-01-01

    We have continued our previous efforts in studies of fourier imaging methods applied to hard X-ray flares. We have performed physical and theoretical analysis of rotating collimator grids submitted to GSFC(Goddard Space Flight Center) for the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI). We have produced simulation algorithms which are currently being used to test imaging software and hardware for HESSI. We have developed Maximum-Entropy, Maximum-Likelihood, and "CLEAN" methods for reconstructing HESSI images from count-rate profiles. This work is expected to continue through the launch of HESSI in July, 2000. Section 1 shows a poster presentation "Image Reconstruction from HESSI Photon Lists" at the Solar Physics Division Meeting, June 1998; Section 2 shows the text and viewgraphs prepared for "Imaging Simulations" at HESSI's Preliminary Design Review on July 30, 1998.

  20. Physical characterization of fast rotator NEOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikwaya Eluo, Jean-Baptiste; Hergenrother, Carl W.

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the physical characteristics of fast rotator NEOs (sub-km sizes with H > 22) is important for two reasons: to establish properties that can constraint models of their potential hazard, and to learn about the origin and the evolution of the solar system. Technically it is difficult to cover different ranges of wavelengths using one telescope with one instrument. Setting up a network of telescopes with different instruments observing simultaneously the same object will efficiently contribute to the characterization of NEOs.ART (Arizona Robotic Telescope) is a University of Arizona initiative whose goal is to use local 2-m size telescopes to provide near real-time observations of Target of Opportunity objects covering the visible and the near- infrared wavelengths. We plan to use three telescopes of the ART project to observe fast rotator NEOs: 1) VATT (Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope) at Mount Graham (longitude: -109.8719, latitude: 32.7016, elevation: 10469 feet) with VATT-4K optical imager for photometry to estimate colors, lightcurves to get the rotation rate, and estimate the phase angle function of NEOs, 2) Bok 2.3 m at Kitt Peak (longitude: -111.6004, latitude: 31.9629, elevation: 6795 feet) with BCSpec (Boller & Chivens Spectrograph) for visible spectroscopy, and 3) Kuiper 1.5-m at Mount Bigelow (longitude: -110.7345, latitude: 32.4165, elevation: 8235 feet) with a near-infrared instrument.We report here the preliminary results of several NEOs whose rotation rate, color, and type have been estimated using photometry with images recorded with VATT-4K. 2009 SQ104 has a rotation rate of 6.85+/- 0.03 h, 2014 AY28 has a rotation rate of 0.91 +/- 0.02 h, 2014 EC of 0.54 +/-0.04 h, 2014 FA44 of 3.45 +/- 0.05 h, 2014 KS40 of 1.11 +/- 0.06 h, 2011 PT of 0.17 +/- 0.05 h, 2014 SC324 of 0.36 +/- 0.43 h, 2014 WF201 of 1.00 +/- 0.03 h. Of these objects, 2014 HM2, 2014 FA, 2014 SB145, 2011 PT fall among X-type asteroids; 2014 KS, 2014 WF are likely to be