Science.gov

Sample records for 28-day repeated dose

  1. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents. 799.9305 Section 799.9305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS Health...

  2. Acute and repeated dose (28 days) oral safety studies of ALIBIRD in rats.

    PubMed

    Anadón, Arturo; Martínez, María A; Ares, Irma; Castellano, Victor; Martínez-Larrañaga, Maria R; Corzo, Nieves; Olano, Agustin; Montilla, Antonia; Recio, Isidra; Martínez-Maqueda, Daniel; Miralles, Beatriz; Fornari, Tiziana; García-Risco, Mónica R; Gonzalez, Monserrat; Reglero, Guillermo

    2013-07-01

    ALIBIRD, a test substance composed of oligosaccharides derived from lactulose, a hydrolysate of a whey protein concentrate, and a supercritical extract of rosemary (1:0.5:0.05), was prepared in the laboratory and evaluated for its safety as a multifunctional food additive. In oral toxicity studies (acute and 28 days repeated dose) using Wistar rats, ALIBIRD was administered in a single oral gavage dose of 2,000 mg/kg of body weight and resulted in no adverse events or mortality; a daily dose of 2,000 mg/kg of body weight for 28 days by gavage also resulted in no adverse effects or mortality. No abnormal clinical signs, behavioral changes, body weight changes, or changes in food and water consumption occurred in either study. There were no changes in hematological and serum chemistry values, organ weights, or gross or histological characteristics. Based on test results, it is concluded that ALIBIRD is well tolerated in rats at an acute and subchronic (28 days) dose of 2,000 mg/kg of body weight. PMID:23834798

  3. Immunotoxicity of silver nanoparticles in an intravenous 28-day repeated-dose toxicity study in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nanosilver is used in a variety of medical and consumer products because of its antibacterial activity. This wide application results in an increased human exposure. Knowledge on the systemic toxicity of nanosilver is, however, relatively scarce. In a previous study, the systemic toxicity of 20 nm silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) was studied in a 28-day repeated-dose toxicity study in rats. Ag-NP were intravenously administered with a maximum dose of 6 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day. Several immune parameters were affected: reduced thymus weight, increased spleen weight and spleen cell number, a strongly reduced NK cell activity, and reduced IFN-γ production were observed. Methods Prompted by these affected immune parameters, we wished to assess exposure effects on the functional immune system. Therefore, in the present study the T-cell dependent antibody response (TDAR) to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) was measured in a similar 28-day intravenous repeated-dose toxicity study. In addition, a range of immunological parameters was measured. Data obtained using the benchmark dose (BMD) approach were analyzed by fitting dose-response models to the parameters measured. Results A reduction in KLH-specific IgG was seen, with a lowest 5% lower confidence bound of the BMD (BMDL) of 0.40 mg/kg bw/day. This suggests that Ag-NP induce suppression of the functional immune system. Other parameters sensitive to Ag-NP exposure were in line with our previous study: a reduced thymus weight with a BMDL of 0.76 mg/kg bw/day, and an increased spleen weight, spleen cell number, and spleen cell subsets, with BMDLs between 0.36 and 1.11 mg/kg bw/day. Because the effects on the spleen are not reflected by increased KLH-specific IgG, they, however, do not suggest immune stimulation. Conclusions Intravenous Ag-NP administration in a 28-day repeated-dose toxicity study induces suppression of the functional immune system. This finding underscores the importance to study the TDAR to

  4. Integration of Mutation and Chromosomal Damage Endpoints into 28-Day Repeat Dose Toxicology Studies

    PubMed Central

    Dertinger, Stephen D.; Phonethepswath, Souk; Franklin, Dean; Weller, Pamela; Torous, Dorothea K.; Bryce, Steven M.; Avlasevich, Svetlana; Bemis, Jeffrey C.; Hyrien, Ollivier; Palis, James; MacGregor, James T.

    2010-01-01

    Two endpoints of genetic toxicity, mutation at the X-linked Pig-a gene and chromosomal damage in the form of micronucleated reticulocytes (MN-RETs), were evaluated in blood samples obtained from 28-day repeat-dosing studies typical of those employed in toxicity evaluations. Male Wistar Han rats were treated at 24-h intervals on days 1 through 28 with one of five prototypical genotoxicants: N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea, 7,12-dimethyl-12-benz[a]anthracene, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO), benzo(a)pyrene, and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. Flow cytometric scoring of CD59-negative erythrocytes (indicative of glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor deficiency and hence Pig-a mutation) was performed using blood specimens obtained on days −1, 15, 29, and 56. Blood specimens collected on days 4 and 29 were evaluated for MN-RET frequency using flow cytometry–based MicroFlow Kits. With the exception of 4NQO, each chemical induced significant increases in the frequency of MN-RETs on days 4 and 29. All five agents increased the frequency of mutant phenotype (CD59 negative) reticulocytes (RETs) and erythrocytes. Mutation responses in RETs occurred earlier than in erythrocytes and tended to peak, or nearly peak, at day 29. In contrast, the mutant phenotype erythrocyte responses were modest on day 29 and required additional time to reach their maximal value. The observed kinetics were expected based on the known turnover of RETs and erythrocytes. The data show that RETs can serve as an appropriate indicator cell population for 28-day studies. Collectively, these data suggest that blood-based genotoxicity endpoints can be effectively incorporated into routine toxicology studies, a strategy that would reduce animal usage while providing valuable genetic toxicity information within the context of other toxicological endpoints. PMID:20202993

  5. Acute toxicity and the 28-day repeated dose study of a Siddha medicine Nuna Kadugu in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nuna Kadugu (NK), a Siddha medicine prepared from leaves and fruits of Morinda Pubescens, used for the treatment of various skin diseases. Though NK has been widely used for several decades, no scientific report was available on its safety. Present study was undertaken to demonstrate the oral toxicity of NK in Sprague Dawley rats. Methods Acute and 28-day repeated oral toxicity studies were performed following OECD test guidelines 423 and 407, respectively, with minor modifications. In acute oral toxicity study, NK was administered at 2000mg/kg b.wt., p.o and animals were observed for toxic signs at 0, 0.5, 1, 4, 24 h and for next 14 days. Gross pathology was performed at the end of the study. In repeated dose, the 28- day oral toxicity study, NK was administered at 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg b.wt./p.o/day. Two satellite groups (control and high dose) were also maintained to determine the delayed onset toxicity of NK. Animals were observed for mortality, morbidity, body weight changes, feed and water intake. Haematology, clinical biochemistry, electrolytes, gross pathology, relative organ weight and histopathological examination were performed. Results In acute toxicity study, no treatment related death or toxic signs were observed with NK administration. In the repeated dose study, no significant differences in body weight changes, food / water intake, haematology, clinical biochemistry and electrolytes content were observed between control and NK groups. No gross pathological findings and difference in relative organ weights were observed between control and NK treated rats. Histopathological examination revealed no abnormalities with NK treatment. Conclusion Acute study reveals that the LD50 of NK is greater than 2000mg/kg, b.wt. in fasted female rats and can be classified as Category 5. 28-day repeated oral toxicity demonstrates that the No Observed Adverse Effect Level of NK is greater than 900 mg/kg b.wt./day, p.o in rats. There were no delayed effects

  6. Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study of moniliformin in rats.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Martina; Atosuo, Janne; Jestoi, Marika; Nathanail, Alexis V; Kokkonen, Ulla-Maija; Anttila, Marjukka; Koivisto, Pertti; Lilius, Esa-Matti; Peltonen, Kimmo

    2015-02-17

    Moniliformin is a Fusarium mycotoxin mainly produced by several species infecting grains in different climatic conditions. According to our previous studies, it is acutely toxic to rats, with an LD50 cut-off value of 25mg/kg b.w. To further assess the possible health risks of low dose exposure to moniliformin, a subacute oral toxicity study was conducted in Sprague-Dawley rats, adapting OECD guideline 407. Five dose groups and two satellite groups, each consisting of five male rats, were daily exposed to moniliformin by gavage. Two rats in the highest dose group, showed decreased activity followed by acute heart failure and death. The rats of the lower doses (<9mg/kg b.w.) showed no signs of toxicity. The daily intake of moniliformin strongly reduced the phagocytic activity of neutrophils in all dose groups. The decrease continued in the satellite group during the follow-up period, indicating a severe impact on the immune system and a LOAEL value of 3mg/kg b.w. for moniliformin. Moniliformin was rapidly excreted into urine, ranging between 20.2 and 31.5% daily and showed no signs of accumulation. The concentration of moniliformin in faeces was less than 2%, which suggests efficient absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25482064

  7. Acute and repeated doses (28 days) oral toxicity study of glycosides based standardized fenugreek seed extract in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Kandhare, Amit D; Bodhankar, Subhash L; Mohan, V; Thakurdesai, Prasad A

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the present work was to study acute and subacute (28-days repeated dose) oral toxicity effect of glycosides based standardized fenugreek seed extract (SFSE-G) in vivo. SFSE-G was prepared by resin-based chromatography and standardized to glycosides namely trigoneoside Ib (76%) and vicenin 1 (15%). The acute oral toxicity (AOT) and subacute toxicity studies were performed in Swiss albino mice (5 mice/sex/group) as per OECD 425 (up-and-down procedure) and OCED 407 guidelines respectively. Acute oral administration of 5000mg/kg of SFSE-G showed 40% mortality with no mortality in lower dosages. The subacute oral administration of SFSE-G did not show observational or toxicological effects on the body or organ weights, food consumption, ophthalmic effects, locomotor activity, hematology, blood biochemistry, urinalysis, or histopathology at dose 250mg/kg. However, SFSE-G (1000mg/kg) showed mortality and minor alterations to body weight, relative liver weights, hematology and blood chemistry parameters related to treatment but it was within normal laboratory ranges. In conclusion, SFSE-G showed median lethal dose (LD50) more than 4350mg/kg and no-observed adverse effect levels (NOAEL) of 250mg/kg for both sexes during AOT and sub-acute toxicity study, respectively. PMID:25979642

  8. Repeated dose (28-day) administration of silver nanoparticles of varied size and coating does not significantly alter the indigenous murine gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Wilding, Laura A; Bassis, Christine M; Walacavage, Kim; Hashway, Sara; Leroueil, Pascale R; Morishita, Masako; Maynard, Andrew D; Philbert, Martin A; Bergin, Ingrid L

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as antimicrobials in a number of applications, including topical wound dressings and coatings for consumer products and biomedical devices. Ingestion is a relevant route of exposure for AgNPs, whether occurring unintentionally via Ag dissolution from consumer products, or intentionally from dietary supplements. AgNP have also been proposed as substitutes for antibiotics in animal feeds. While oral antibiotics are known to have significant effects on gut bacteria, the antimicrobial effects of ingested AgNPs on the indigenous microbiome or on gut pathogens are unknown. In addition, AgNP size and coating have been postulated as significantly influential towards their biochemical properties and the influence of these properties on antimicrobial efficacy is unknown. We evaluated murine gut microbial communities using culture-independent sequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments following 28 days of repeated oral dosing of well-characterized AgNPs of two different sizes (20 and 110 nm) and coatings (PVP and Citrate). Irrespective of size or coating, oral administration of AgNPs at 10 mg/kg body weight/day did not alter the membership, structure or diversity of the murine gut microbiome. Thus, in contrast to effects of broad-spectrum antibiotics, repeat dosing of AgNP, at doses equivalent to 2000 times the oral reference dose and 100-400 times the effective in vitro anti-microbial concentration, does not affect the indigenous murine gut microbiome. PMID:26525505

  9. Estimation of acute oral toxicity using the No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) from the 28 day repeated dose toxicity studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Bulgheroni, Anna; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Hartung, Thomas; Prieto, Pilar

    2009-02-01

    Acute systemic toxicity is one of the areas of particular concern due to the 2009 deadline set by the 7th Amendment of the Cosmetics Directive (76/768/EEC), which introduces a testing and marketing ban of cosmetic products with ingredients tested on animals. The scientific community is putting considerable effort into developing and validating non-animal alternatives in this area. However, it is unlikely that validated and regulatory accepted alternative methods and/or strategies will be available in March 2009. Following the initiatives undertaken in the pharmaceutical industry to waive the acute oral toxicity testing before going to clinical studies by using information from other in vivo studies, we proposed an approach to identify non-toxic compounds (LD50>2000mg/kg) using information from 28 days repeated dose toxicity studies. Taking into account the high prevalence of non-toxic substances (87%) in the New Chemicals Database, it was possible to set a NOAEL threshold of 200mg/kg that allowed the correct identification of 63% of non-toxic compounds, while <1% of harmful compounds were misclassified as non-toxic. Since repeated dose toxicity studies can be performed in vivo until 2013, the proposed approach could have an immediate impact for the testing of cosmetic ingredients. PMID:18977273

  10. Differences in gene expression profiles in the liver between carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic isomers of compounds given to rats in a 28-day repeat-dose toxicity study.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Koji; Kawano, Yukiko; Kawakami, Yuuki; Moriwaki, Norichika; Sekijima, Masaru; Otsuka, Masanori; Yakabe, Yoshikuni; Miyaura, Hideki; Saito, Koichi; Sumida, Kayo; Shirai, Tomoyuki

    2006-12-15

    Some compounds have structural isomers of which one is apparently carcinogenic, and the other not. Because of the similarity of their chemical structures, comparisons of their effects can allow gene expression elicited in response to the basic skeletons of the isomers to be disregarded. We compared the gene expression profiles of male Fischer 344 rats administered by daily oral gavage up to 28 days using an in-house oligo microarray. 2-Acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF), 2,4-diaminotoluene (2,4-DAT), 2-nitropropane (2-NP), and 2-nitro-p-phenylenediamine (2-NpP) are hepatocarcinogenic. However, their isomers, 4-acetylaminofluorene (4-AAF), 2,6-diaminotoluene (2,6-DAT), 1-nitropropane (1-NP), and 4-nitro-o-phenylenediamine (4-NoP), are non-hepatocarcinogenic. Because of the limited carcinogenicity of 2-NpP, we attempted to perform two-parametric comparison analyses with (1) a set of 4 isomers: 2-AAF, 2,4-DAT, 2-NP, and 2-NpP as "carcinogenic", and 4-AAF, 2,6-DAT, 1-NP, and 4-NoP as "non-carcinogenic"; and (2) a set of 3 isomers: 2-AAF, 2,4-DAT, and 2-NP, as "carcinogenic", and 4-AAF, 2,6-DAT, and 1-NP as "non-carcinogenic". After ratio filtering and Welch's approximate t-test analysis, 54 and 28 genes were selected from comparisons between the sets of 3 and 4 isomers, respectively, for day 28 data. Using hierarchical clustering analysis with the 54 or 28 genes, 2-AAF, 2,4-DAT, and 2-NP clustered into a "carcinogenic" branch. 2-NpP was in the same cluster as 4-NoP and 4-AAF. This clustering corresponded to the previous finding that 2-NpP is not carcinogenic in male Fischer 344 rats, which indicates that comparing the differences in gene expression elicited by different isomers is an effective method of developing a prediction system for carcinogenicity. PMID:17070881

  11. Evaluation of Genotoxicity and 28-day Oral Dose Toxicity on Freeze-dried Powder of Tenebrio molitor Larvae (Yellow Mealworm)

    PubMed Central

    Han, So-Ri; Yun, Eun-Young; Kim, Ji-Young; Hwang, Jae Sam; Jeong, Eun Ju

    2014-01-01

    The larval form of Tenebrio molitor (T. molitor) has been eaten in many countries and provides benefits as a new food source of protein for humans. However, no information exists regarding its safety for humans. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the genotoxicity and repeated dose oral toxicity of the freeze-dried powder of T. molitor larvae. The genotoxic potential was evaluated by a standard battery testing: bacterial reverse mutation test, in vitro chromosome aberration test, and in vivo micronucleus test. To assess the repeated dose toxicity, the powder was administered once daily by oral gavage to Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats at dose levels of 0, 300, 1000 and 3000 mg/kg/day for 28 days. The parameters which were applied to the study were mortality, clinical signs, body and organ weights, food consumption, ophthalmology, urinalysis, hematology, serum chemistry, gross findings and histopathologic examination. The freezedried powder of T. molitor larvae was not mutagenic or clastogenic based on results of in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity assays. Furthermore, no treatment-related changes or findings were observed in any parameters in rats after 28 days oral administration. In conclusion, the freeze-dried powder of T. molitor larvae was considered to be non-genotoxic and the NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level) was determined to be 3000 mg/kg/day in both sexes of SD rats under our experimental conditions. PMID:25071922

  12. Genotoxic effects of chromium oxide nanoparticles and microparticles in Wistar rats after 28 days of repeated oral exposure.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shailendra Pratap; Chinde, Srinivas; Kamal, Sarika Srinivas Kalyan; Rahman, M F; Mahboob, M; Grover, Paramjit

    2016-02-01

    The nanotechnology industry has advanced rapidly in the last 10 years giving rise to the growth of the nanoparticles (NPs) with great potential in various arenas. However, the same properties that make NPs interesting raise concerns because their toxicity has not been explored. The in vivo toxicology of chromium oxide (Cr2O3)-NPs is not known till date. Therefore, this study investigated the 28-day repeated toxicity after 30, 300 and 1000 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day oral treatment with Cr2O3-NPs and Cr2O3 microparticles (MPs) in Wistar rats. The mean size of Cr2O3-NPs and Cr2O3-MPs was 34.89 ± 2.65 nm and 3.76 ± 3.41 μm, respectively. Genotoxicity was assessed using comet, micronucleus and chromosomal aberration (CA) assays. The results revealed a significant increase in DNA damage in peripheral blood leucocytes and liver, micronuclei and CA in bone marrow after exposure of 300 and 1000 mg/kg doses of Cr2O3-NPs and Cr2O3-MPs only at 1000 mg/kg bw/day. Cr biodistribution was observed in all the tissues in a dose-dependent manner. The maximum amount of Cr was found in the kidneys and least in the brain of the treated rats. More of the Cr was excreted in the faeces than in the urine. Furthermore, nanotreated rats displayed much higher absorption and tissue accumulation. These findings provide initial data of the probable genotoxicity and biodistribution of NPs and MPs of Cr2O3 generated through repeated oral treatment. PMID:26503004

  13. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... section 3 of TSCA and in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The... concentration, erythrocyte count, total and differential leukocyte count, platelet count and a measure of blood clotting time/potential. (ii) Blood samples should be taken from a named site just prior to or as part...

  14. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... section 3 of TSCA and in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The... concentration, erythrocyte count, total and differential leukocyte count, platelet count and a measure of blood clotting time/potential. (ii) Blood samples should be taken from a named site just prior to or as part...

  15. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... section 3 of TSCA and in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The... aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase, and...

  16. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... section 3 of TSCA and in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The... aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase, and...

  17. Cuprizone decreases intermediate and late-stage progenitor cells in hippocampal neurogenesis of rats in a framework of 28-day oral dose toxicity study

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Hajime; Tanaka, Takeshi; Kimura, Masayuki; Mizukami, Sayaka; Saito, Fumiyo; Imatanaka, Nobuya; Akahori, Yumi; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2015-09-15

    Developmental exposure to cuprizone (CPZ), a demyelinating agent, impairs intermediate-stage neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of rat offspring. To investigate the possibility of alterations in adult neurogenesis following postpubertal exposure to CPZ in a framework of general toxicity studies, CPZ was orally administered to 5-week-old male rats at 0, 120, or 600 mg/kg body weight/day for 28 days. In the subgranular zone (SGZ), 600 mg/kg CPZ increased the number of cleaved caspase-3{sup +} apoptotic cells. At ≥ 120 mg/kg, the number of SGZ cells immunoreactive for TBR2, doublecortin, or PCNA was decreased, while that for SOX2 was increased. In the granule cell layer, CPZ at ≥ 120 mg/kg decreased the number of postmitotic granule cells immunoreactive for NEUN, CHRNA7, ARC or FOS. In the dentate hilus, CPZ at ≥ 120 mg/kg decreased phosphorylated TRKB{sup +} interneurons, although the number of reelin{sup +} interneurons was unchanged. At 600 mg/kg, mRNA levels of Bdnf and Chrna7 were decreased, while those of Casp4, Casp12 and Trib3 were increased in the dentate gyrus. These data suggest that CPZ in a scheme of 28-day toxicity study causes endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis of granule cell lineages, resulting in aberrations of intermediate neurogenesis and late-stage neurogenesis and following suppression of immediate early gene-mediated neuronal plasticity. Suppression of BDNF signals to interneurons caused by decreased cholinergic signaling may play a role in these effects of CPZ. The effects of postpubertal CPZ on neurogenesis were similar to those observed with developmental exposure, except for the lack of reelin response, which may contribute to a greater decrease in SGZ cells. - Highlights: • Effect of 28-day CPZ exposure on hippocampal neurogenesis was examined in rats. • CPZ suppressed intermediate neurogenesis and late-stage neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. • CPZ suppressed BDNF signals to interneurons by decrease of

  18. Repeated-dose liver micronucleus assay: an investigation with 2-nitropropane, a hepatocarcinogen.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Satoru; Araki, Tetsuro; Nakajima, Mikio; Kusuoka, Osamu; Uchida, Keisuke; Sato, Norihiro; Tanabe, Yoko; Takahashi, Kaori; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Tsurui, Kazuyuki

    2015-03-01

    The utility of the repeated-dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay in the detection of a genotoxic hepatocarcinogen was evaluated. In this paper, a rat hepatocarcinogen, 2-nitropropane (2-NP), was administered orally to young adult rats for 14 and 28 days without a partial hepatectomy or a mitogen, and the micronucleus induction in liver was examined using a simple method to isolate hepatocytes. In addition, a bone marrow micronucleus assay was conducted concomitantly. The frequency of micronucleated hepatocytes induced by 2-NP increased significantly in both the 14- and 28-day repeated-dose studies, while the bone marrow micronucleus assays were negative in each study. These results indicate that the RDLMN assay is useful for detecting a genotoxic hepatocarcinogen that is negative in bone marrow micronucleus assays and is a suitable in vivo genotoxicity test method for integration into a repeated-dose general toxicity study. PMID:25892624

  19. Phase I dose-escalation and pharmacokinetic study of ispinesib, a kinesin spindle protein inhibitor, administered on days 1 and 15 of a 28-day schedule in patients with no prior treatment for advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Henry L; Philco, Manuel; Pimentel, Patricia; Kiyan, Miriam; Monsalvo, Maria Laura; Conlan, Maureen G; Saikali, Khalil G; Chen, Michael M; Seroogy, Joseph J; Wolff, Andrew A; Escandon, Rafael D

    2012-03-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics, and antitumor activity of ispinesib, a kinesin spindle protein inhibitor. Patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer who had received only prior neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy were treated with escalating doses of ispinesib administered as a 1-h infusion on days 1 and 15 every 28 days until toxicity or progression of disease. Doses were escalated until dose-limiting toxicity was observed in two out of six patients during cycle 1. A total of 16 patients were treated at three dose levels: 10 mg/m (n=3), 12 mg/m (n=6), and 14 mg/m (n=7). Forty-four percent of the patients had locally advanced disease and 56% had metastatic disease; 50% were estrogen receptor positive, 44% were progesterone receptor positive, 25% human epidermal growth factor 2 were positive, and 31% triple (estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor 2) negative. Sixty-nine percent of patients were chemo-naive. The maximum tolerated dose was 12 mg/m and dose-limiting toxicity was grade 3 increased aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase. The most common toxicities included neutropenia (88%; 38% grade 3 and 44% grade 4), increased alanine aminotransferase (56%), anemia (38%), increased aspartate aminotransferase (31%), and diarrhea (31%). No neuropathy, mucositis, or alopecia was reported. Among the 15 patients evaluable for antitumor activity, there were three partial responses, one confirmed by the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (7% response rate). Nine patients (60%) had stable disease lasting at least 42 days, with four (27%) lasting for at least 90 days. Disease stabilization (partial responses+stable disease) was observed in 11 (73.3%) patients. In conclusion, ispinesib was well tolerated when administered on days 1 and 15 every 28 days. Limited activity was observed with this schedule in patients with previously untreated advanced breast cancer

  20. Repeated-dose liver and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus assays for quinoline in rats.

    PubMed

    Uno, Fuyumi; Tanaka, Jin; Ueda, Maya; Nagai, Miho; Fukumuro, Masahito; Natsume, Masakatsu; Oba, Michiyo; Akahori, Ayaka; Masumori, Shoji; Takami, Shigeaki; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Kougo, Yuriko; Ohyama, Wakako; Narumi, Kazunori; Fujiishi, Yohei; Okada, Emiko; Hayashi, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    Repeated-dose liver, bone marrow, and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus assays that use young adult rats were evaluated in a collaborative study that was organized by the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society-Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group. A genotoxic hepatocarcinogen quinoline was orally administered to independent groups of five Crl:CD (SD) male rats at doses of 30, 60 and 120mg/kg for 14 days and at doses of 15, 30 and 60mg/kg for 28 days. After treatment, the livers were harvested and hepatocytes were isolated by collagenase treatment. The frequency of micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs) increased significantly in both the 14- and 28-day repeated dose studies. However, the frequency of micronucleated cells did not increase in the bone marrow, stomach or colon cells, which were not quinoline-induced carcinogenic target organs in the rats. These results indicate that a repeated-dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay using young adult rats is capable of detecting the genotoxicity of quinoline at the target organ of carcinogenicity. The protocol may also permit the integration of the genotoxic endpoint into general repeated-dose toxicity studies. Furthermore, we elucidated that conducting the micronucleus assay in multiple organs could potentially assess organ specificity. PMID:25892622

  1. Acute and repeated dose toxicity studies of different β-cyclodextrin-based nanosponge formulations.

    PubMed

    Shende, Pravin; Kulkarni, Yogesh A; Gaud, R S; Deshmukh, Kiran; Cavalli, Roberta; Trotta, Francesco; Caldera, Fabrizio

    2015-05-01

    Nanosponges (NS) show promising results in different fields such as medicine, agriculture, water purification, fire engineering and so on. The present study was designed to evaluate toxicity of different NS formulations (namely, S1-S6) synthesized with different cross-linking agents such as carbonyl diimidazole, pyromellitic dianhydride and hexamethylene diisocynate; and preparation methods in experimental animals. Acute and repeated dose toxicity studies of formulations were carried out as per OECD guidelines 423 and 407, respectively. For acute toxicity study, formulations were administered to female rats at doses of 300 and 2000 mg/kg orally. The general behaviour of the rats was continuously monitored for 1 h after dosing, periodically during the first 24 h and daily thereafter for a total of 14 days. On day 14, animals were fasted overnight, weighed, and sacrificed. After sacrification, animals were subjected to necropsy. For repeated dose toxicity study, rats of either sex were orally administered with formulations at the dose of 300 mg/kg per day for a period of 28 days. The maximally tolerated dose of all formulations was found to be 2000 mg/kg. Repeated administration of formulations for 28 days did not show any significant changes in haematological and biochemical parameters in experimental animals. These results indicate that the formulations are safe, when tested in experimental animals. PMID:25754724

  2. [Pharmacokinetics of cefatrizine administered in repeated doses].

    PubMed

    Couet, W; Reigner, B G; Lefebvre, M A; Bizouard, J; Fourtillan, J B

    1988-05-01

    Twelve healthy volunteers received cefatrizine orally at doses equal to 500 mg every 12 h for 5 days. Cefatrizine was assayed by high performance liquid chromatography in plasma and urines collected after the first and/or the last administration. Cefatrizine absorption was rapid; its peak plasma level was reached at time 1.79 +/- 0.07 h following the first dose, it was equal to 7.37 +/- 0.31 micrograms.ml-1. Its apparent elimination half-life was equal to 1.50 +/- 0.05 h, it explains the lack of accumulation with time during multiple administrations every 12 hours. Comparisons between peak plasma concentration and area under curves following the first and last dosing showed significant (p less than 0.01) but weak (close to 15%) reduction of these 2 parameters with time which could be explained by a slight reduction of cefatrizine absorption with time. In conclusion, cefatrizine does not accumulate when administered repeatedly at a dose equal to 500 mg every 12 h in young adult, and its pharmacokinetics is virtually linear with time. PMID:3043350

  3. 28-Day dietary exposure of mice to a low total dose (7 mg/kg) of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) alters neither the cellular compositions of the thymus and spleen nor humoral immune responses: does the route of administration play a pivotal role in PFOS-induced immunotoxicity?

    PubMed

    Qazi, Mousumi Rahman; Nelson, B Dean; Depierre, Joseph W; Abedi-Valugerdi, Manuchehr

    2010-01-12

    Short-term exposure of mice to high doses of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), an ubiquitous and highly persistent environmental contaminant, induces various metabolic changes and toxic effects, including immunotoxicity. However, extrapolation of these findings to the long-term, low-dose exposures to which humans are subject is highly problematic. In this connection, recent studies have concluded that sub-chronic (28-day) exposure of mice by oral gavage to doses of PFOS that result in serum levels comparable to those found in general human populations suppress adaptive immunity. Because of the potential impact of these findings on environmental research and monitoring, we have examined here whether sub-chronic dietary exposure (a major route of human exposure) to a similarly low-dose of PFOS also suppress adaptive immune responses. Dietary treatment of male B6C3F1 mice for 28 days with a dose of PFOS that resulted in a serum concentration of 11mug/ml (ppm) significantly reduced body weight gain and increased liver mass. However, this treatment did not alter the cellular compositions of the thymus and spleen; the number of splenic cells secreting IgM antibodies against sheep red blood cell (SRBC); serum levels of IgM and IgG antibodies specifically towards SRBC; or circulating levels of IgM antibodies against the T-cell-independent antigen trinitrophenyl conjugated to lipopolysaccharide (TNP-LPS). These findings indicate that such sub-chronic dietary exposure of mice to PFOS resulting in serum levels approximately 8-85-fold greater than those observed in occupationally exposed individuals does not exert adverse effects on adaptive immunity. PMID:19900501

  4. Safety assessment of EPA-rich triglyceride oil produced from yeast: genotoxicity and 28-day oral toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Belcher, Leigh A; MacKenzie, Susan A; Donner, Maria; Sykes, Greg P; Frame, Steven R; Gillies, Peter J

    2011-02-01

    The 28-day repeat-dose oral and genetic toxicity of eicosapentaenoic acid triglyceride oil (EPA oil) produced from genetically modified Yarrowia lipolytica yeast were assessed. Groups of rats received 0 (olive oil), 940, 1880, or 2820 mg EPA oil/kg/day, or fish oil (sardine/anchovy source) by oral gavage. Lower total serum cholesterol was seen in all EPA and fish oil groups. Liver weights were increased in the medium and high-dose EPA (male only), and fish oil groups but were considered non-adverse physiologically adaptive responses. Increased thyroid follicular cell hypertrophy was observed in male high-dose EPA and fish oil groups, and was considered to be an adaptive response to high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids. No adverse test substance-related effects were observed on body weight, nutritional, or other clinical or anatomic pathology parameters. The oil was not mutagenic in the in vitro Ames or mouse lymphoma assay, and was not clastogenic in the in vivo mouse micronucleus test. In conclusion, exposure for 28 days to EPA oil derived from yeast did not produce adverse effects at doses up to 2820 mg/kg/day and was not genotoxic. The safety profile of the EPA oil in these tests was comparable to a commercial fish oil. PMID:20868718

  5. Repeated dose liver and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus assays using N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine in young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Tomomi; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Hori, Hisako; Fujii, Wataru; Ohyama, Wakako

    2015-03-01

    N-Methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) is a direct-acting mutagen that induces tumors in the glandular stomach, but not in the liver or colon, of rats after oral administration. To evaluate the performance of repeated dose liver and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus (MN) assays in young adult rats, MNNG was administered by oral gavage to male CD (SD) rats aged 6 weeks at doses of 0 (vehicle; 2.5% DMSO aqueous solution), 3.125, 6.25, 12.5, and 25mg/kg/day once daily for 14 and 28 days, and the MN frequencies were examined in the hepatocytes, glandular stomach cells, and colonic cells. The MN induction in immature erythrocytes in the bone marrow of these animals was also simultaneously evaluated. The frequencies of micronucleated (MNed) glandular stomach cells were significantly increased in all MNNG treatment groups in a dose-dependent manner in both repeated dose studies. In contrast, the frequencies of MNed hepatocytes and colonic cells were not significantly increased compared to the vehicle control. In the bone marrow, a small but significant increase in the frequency of MNed immature erythrocytes was observed only at the highest dose in the 28-day study. Since a clear positive result in the glandular stomach agrees with the tissue specificity of tumor induction by this chemical, the MN assay with the glandular stomach, which is a direct contact site with high concentrations of test substances administered by oral gavage, may be useful for detecting genotoxic compounds that are short-lived in vivo, such as MNNG. PMID:25892628

  6. Biokinetics in repeated-dosing in vitro drug toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Nynke I; Di Consiglio, Emma; Blaauboer, Bas J; Testai, Emanuela

    2015-12-25

    The aim of the EU FP7 Predict-IV project was to improve the predictivity of in vitro assays for unwanted effects of drugs after repeated dosing. The project assessed the added benefit of integrating long-lived in vitro organotypic cell systems with 'omics' technologies and in silico modelling, including systems biology and pharmacokinetic assessments. RPTEC/TERT1 kidney cells, primary rat and human hepatocytes, HepaRG liver cells and 2D and 3D primary brain cultures were dosed daily or every other day for 14 days to a selection of drugs varying in their mechanism of pharmacological action. Since concentration-effect relationships not only depend on the activity of the drug or the sensitivity of the target, but also on the distribution of compounds in the in vitro system, the concentration of a selection of drugs in cells, microtitre plate plastic and medium was measured over time. Results, reviewed in this paper, indicate that lipophilic drugs bind significantly to plastic labware. A few drugs, including less lipophilic drugs, bind to cell-attachment matrices. Chemicals that reach high concentrations in cells, including cyclosporin A and amiodarone, significantly accumulate over time after repeated dosing, partly explaining their increased toxicity after repeated dosing, compared to a single dose. PMID:26362508

  7. Repeated dose toxicity of alfa-cypermethrin in rats.

    PubMed

    Manna, S; Bhattacharyya, D; Mandal, T K; Das, S

    2004-09-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the subacute effect of alpha-cypermethrin (alpha-CP) in rats. Alfacypermethrin a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide, dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and oral LD50 was investigated after administering orally different doses in rats and was determined as 145 mg/kg. Other groups of rats were given repeated daily oral dose (1/10 LD50) of alpha-CP for 30 days. The animals were sacrificed on 31st day. Activities of various enzymes, cytochrome P450 and b5 contents in liver, hepatic antioxidant status, tissue residue concentration, haemogram and pathological changes were studied. It increased the serum aminotransaminases (AST, ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities and blood glucose level significantly. alpha-CP decreased RBC count, PCV and Hb level significantly. It significantly decreased cytochrome P450 in liver. Residues were present in different tissues. It increased malondialdehyde (MDA) level, while decreased the activities of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glycogen level in liver significantly. Mild to moderate histological alterations were observed in lungs, liver, stomach, kidneys, testes and cerebellum. So repeated daily oral doses of alpha-CP at 1/10LD50 altered the biochemical parameters, decreased cytochrome P450 content, antioxidant status, which correlated with histopathological changes of tissues. PMID:15365239

  8. Surrogates of protection in repeated low-dose challenge experiments.

    PubMed

    Long, Dustin M; Hudgens, Michael G; Wu, Chih-Da

    2015-05-10

    A critical step toward developing a successful vaccine to control the human immunodeficiency virus pandemic entails evaluation of vaccine candidates in non-human primates (NHPs). Historically, these studies have usually entailed challenges (i.e., exposures) with very high doses of a simian version of human immunodeficiency virus, resulting in infection of all NHPs in the experiment after a single challenge. More recently, researchers have begun to conduct repeated low-dose challenge (RLC) studies in NHPs that are believed to more closely mimic typical exposure in natural human transmission settings. One objective of RLC studies is to assess whether measured immune responses to vaccination can serve as surrogate endpoints for the primary endpoint of interest, namely infection. In this paper, different designs of RLC studies for assessing a binary surrogate of protection are considered. PMID:25628249

  9. Surrogates of Protection in Repeated Low-Dose Challenge Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Long, Dustin M.; Hudgens, Michael G.; Wu, Chih-Da

    2015-01-01

    A critical step toward developing a successful vaccine to control the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pandemic entails evaluation of vaccine candidates in non-human primates (NHPs). Historically, these studies have usually entailed challenges (i.e., exposures) with very high doses of a simian version of HIV, resulting in infection of all NHPs in the experiment after a single challenge. More recently, researchers have begun to conduct repeated low-dose challenge (RLC) studies in NHPs that are believed to more closely mimic typical exposure in natural human transmission settings. One objective of RLC studies is to assess whether measured immune responses to vaccination can serve as surrogate endpoints for the primary endpoint of interest, namely infection. In this paper, different designs of RLC studies for assessing a binary surrogate of protection are considered. PMID:25628249

  10. In vivo genotoxicity evaluation of lung cells from Fischer 344 rats following 28 days of inhalation exposure to MWCNTs, plus 28 days and 90 days post-exposure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Sik; Sung, Jae Hyuck; Choi, Byung Gil; Ryu, Hyeon Yeol; Song, Kyung Seuk; Shin, Jae Hoon; Lee, Jong Seong; Hwang, Joo Hwan; Lee, Ji Hyun; Lee, Gun Ho; Jeon, Kisoo; Ahn, Kang Ho; Yu, Il Je

    2014-03-01

    Despite their useful physico-chemical properties, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) continue to cause concern over occupational and human health due to their structural similarity to asbestos. Thus, to evaluate the toxic and genotoxic effect of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on lung cells in vivo, eight-week-old rats were divided into four groups (each group = 25 animals), a fresh air control (0 mg/m(3)), low (0.17 mg/m(3)), middle (0.49 mg/m(3)), and high (0.96 mg/m(3)) dose group, and exposed to MWCNTs via nose-only inhalation 6 h per day, 5 days per week for 28 days. The count median length and geometric standard deviation for the MWCNTs determined by TEM were 330.18 and 1.72 nm, respectively, and the MWCNT diameters ranged from 10 to 15 nm. Lung cells were isolated from five male and five female rats in each group on day 0, day 28 (only from males) and day 90 following the 28-day exposure. The total number of animals used was 15 male and 10 female rats for each concentration group. To determine the genotoxicity of the MWCNTs, a single cell gel electrophoresis assay (Comet assay) was conducted on the rat lung cells. As a result of the exposure, the olive tail moments were found to be significantly higher (p < 0.05) in the male and female rats from all the exposed groups when compared with the fresh air control. In addition, the high-dose exposed male and middle and high-dose exposed female rats retained DNA damage, even 90 days post-exposure (p < 0.05). To investigate the mode of genotoxicity, the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and inflammatory cytokine levels (TNF-α, TGF- β, IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-12 and IFN-γ) were also measured. For the male rats, the H2O2 levels were significantly higher in the middle (0 days post-exposure) and high- (0 days and 28 days post-exposure) dose groups (p < 0.05). Conversely, the female rats showed no changes in the H2O2 levels. The inflammatory cytokine levels in the

  11. Toxicity from repeated doses of acetaminophen in children: Assessment of causality and dose in reported cases

    PubMed Central

    Heard, Kennon; Bui, Alison; Mlynarchek, Sara L; Green, Jody L.; Bond, G. Randall; Clark, Richard F.; Kozer, Eran; Koff, Raymond S.; Dart, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Liver injury has been reported in children treated with repeated doses of acetaminophen. The objective of this study is to identify and validate reports of liver injury or death in children younger than 6 years of age following repeated therapeutic doses of acetaminophen. Methods We reviewed United States (US) Poison Center data, peer-reviewed literature, US FDA Adverse event reports and US Manufacturer safety reports describing adverse effects following acetaminophen administration. Reports that described hepatic abnormalities (description of liver injury or abnormal laboratory testing) or death following administration to children younger than 6 years of age were included. The identified reports were double abstracted and then reviewed by an expert panel to determine if the hepatic injury was related to acetaminophen, and whether the dose of acetaminophen was therapeutic (≤75 mg/kg) or supra-therapeutic. Results Our search yielded 2531 reports of adverse events associated with acetaminophen use. From these cases, we identified 76 cases of hepatic injury and 26 deaths associated with repeated acetaminophen administration. There were 6 cases of hepatic abnormalities and no deaths associated with what our panel determined to be therapeutic doses. A large proportion of cases could not be fully evaluated due to incomplete case reporting. Conclusions While we identified numerous examples of liver injury and death following repeated doses of acetaminophen, all of the deaths and all but 6 cases of hepatic abnormalities involved doses greater than 75 mg/kg/day. This study suggests that the doses of less than 75 mg/kg/day of acetaminophen are safe for children younger than 6 years of age. PMID:22407198

  12. The effects of repeated low-dose sarin exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, T.-M. . E-mail: tsungming.a.shih@us.army.mil; Hulet, S.W.; McDonough, J.H.

    2006-09-01

    This project assessed the effects of repeated low-dose exposure of guinea pigs to the organophosphorus nerve agent sarin. Animals were injected once a day, 5 days per week (Monday-Friday), for 2 weeks with fractions (0.3x, 0.4x, 0.5x, or 0.6x) of the established LD{sub 5} dose of sarin (42 {mu}g/kg, s.c.). The animals were assessed for changes in body weight, red blood cell (RBC) acetylcholinesterase (AChE) levels, neurobehavioral reactions to a functional observational battery (FOB), cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) power spectrum, and intrinsic acetylcholine (ACh) neurotransmitter (NT) regulation over the 2 weeks of sarin exposure and for up to 12 days postinjection. No guinea pig receiving 0.3, 0.4 or 0.5 x LD{sub 5} of sarin showed signs of cortical EEG seizures despite decreases in RBC AChE levels to as low as 10% of baseline, while seizures were evident in animals receiving 0.6 x LD{sub 5} of sarin as early as the second day; subsequent injections led to incapacitation and death. Animals receiving 0.5 x LD{sub 5} sarin showed obvious signs of cholinergic toxicity; overall, 2 of 13 animals receiving 0.5 x LD{sub 5} sarin died before all 10 injections were given, and there was a significant increase in the angle of gait in the animals that lived. By the 10th day of injection, the animals receiving saline were significantly easier to remove from their cages and handle and significantly less responsive to an approaching pencil and touch on the rump in comparison with the first day of testing. In contrast, the animals receiving 0.4 x LD{sub 5} sarin failed to show any significant reductions in their responses to an approaching pencil and a touch on the rump as compared with the first day. The 0.5 x LD{sub 5} sarin animals also failed to show any significant changes to the approach and touch responses and did not adjust to handling or removal from the cage from the first day of injections to the last day of handling. Thus, the guinea pigs receiving the 0

  13. Clenbuterol Distribution and Residues in Goat Tissues After the Repeated Administration of a Growth-Promoting Dose.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhen; Yao, Ting; Qin, Yuchang; Yang, Xiaowei; Li, Jun; Li, Junguo; Gu, Xu

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the deposition and depletion process of clenbuterol (CL) in goat tissues, plasma and urine after the repeated administration of a growth-promoting dose. The experiment was conducted in 24 goats (21 treated and 3 controls). Treated animals were administered orally in a dose of 16 µg/kg body mass once daily for 21 consecutive days and randomly sacrificed on days 0.25, 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 of the withdrawal period. CL in goat tissues was extracted with organic solvents and determined using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The depletion rates of tissue differed significantly. The highest concentrations of CL in all tissues are detected on day 0.25 of treatment discontinuation. After administration had been discontinued for 28 days, CL still residues in all tissues, especially, in whole eye, where the concentrations reach 363.29 ± 31.60 μg/kg. These findings confirmed that the whole eye, which are rich in pigment, showed a much higher concentration than any other studied tissue during the withdrawal period. PMID:25910488

  14. Analysis of repeated low-dose challenge studies.

    PubMed

    Nolen, Tracy L; Hudgens, Michael G; Senb, Pranab K; Koch, Gary G

    2015-05-30

    Preclinical evaluation of candidate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccines entails challenge studies whereby non-human primates such as macaques are vaccinated with either an active or control vaccine and then challenged (exposed) with a simian-version of HIV. Repeated low-dose challenge (RLC) studies in which each macaque is challenged multiple times (either until infection or some maximum number of challenges is reached) are becoming more common in an effort to mimic natural exposure to HIV in humans. Statistical methods typically employed for the testing for a vaccine effect in RLC studies include a modified version of Fisher's exact test as well as large sample approaches such as the usual log-rank test. Unfortunately, these methods are not guaranteed to provide a valid test for the effect of vaccination. On the other hand, valid tests for vaccine effect such as the exact log-rank test may not be easy to implement using software available to many researchers. This paper details which statistical approaches are appropriate for the analysis of RLC studies, and how to implement these methods easily in SAS or R. PMID:25752266

  15. A 28-day gavage toxicity study in Fischer 344 rats with 3-methylfuran.

    PubMed

    Gill, Santokh; Kavanagh, Meghan; Cherry, Wendy; Barker, Michael; Weld, Madeline; Cooke, Gerard M

    2015-02-01

    3-Methylfuran is produced in foods during food processing and preservation techniques that involve heat treatment such as cooking, jarring, canning, and pasteurization. Currently, there are no studies available on the toxicity of 3-methylfuran. We conducted a 28-day gavage toxicity study (7 days per week) using doses of 0.0, 0.1, 0.3, 1.5, 3.0, 6.0, 12.0, and 25.0 mg/kg bw/day in order to determine the dose range needed to establish a no observed adverse effect level and to better characterize nonneoplastic effects including those affecting hematology, clinical biochemistry, gross morphology, and histopathology. Histological changes of the liver were noted in all treated animals and gross changes were noted beginning at 3.0 mg/kg bw/kg. Alterations in the activity of serum enzymes indicative of effects on the liver were observed, including increases in levels of alanine transaminase and alkaline phosphatase at the highest dose. There was a significant increase in serum thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), which was not accompanied by histological changes in the thyroid. For the most part, statistically significant changes were seen only at the highest dose for hematology and at the 2 highest doses for clinical chemistry parameters. In contrast, mild histological lesions in the liver were observed even at the lowest dose of 0.1 mg/kg bw/day. PMID:24907037

  16. Evaluation of a repeated dose liver micronucleus assay in rats treated with two genotoxic hepatocarcinogens, dimethylnitrosamine and 2-acetylaminofluorene: the possibility of integrating micronucleus tests with multiple tissues into a repeated dose general toxicity study.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Rie; Takasawa, Hironao; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Ohyama, Wakako; Okada, Emiko; Narumi, Kazunori; Fujiishi, Yohei; Wako, Yumi; Yasunaga, Katsuaki; Hattori, Akiko; Kawabata, Masayoshi; Nakadate, Kiyoko; Nakagawa, Munehiro; Hamada, Shuichi

    2015-03-01

    As part of a collaborative study by the Collaborative Study Group for Micronucleus Test (CSGMT) of the Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group (MMS) in the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society (JEMS), the present study evaluated the effectiveness of the repeated dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay. Two genotoxic hepatocarcinogens, dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) and 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF), were administered orally to male rats (6 weeks old at the initial dosing) once daily for 14 and 28 days to evaluate the micronucleus (MN) inducibility in the liver. In addition, these chemicals were evaluated for MN inducibility in the bone marrow (BM) and gastrointestinal (GI) tract, i.e. glandular stomach and colon of the same animals used in the RDLMN assay. As a result, both chemicals produced positive results in the liver, although a weak positive response was given by 2-AAF. DMN gave negative results in the tissues other than the liver. 2-AAF produced positive responses in the BM and glandular stomach, and a prominent response was particularly observed in the glandular stomach, which is directly exposed to the test chemicals by gavage. The present results suggest that the RDLMN assay is a useful method for detecting genotoxic hepatocarcinogens, and that it is especially effective for evaluating test chemicals, such as DMN, undetectable by the BM and GI tract MN assay. Moreover, the results in this investigation indicate that the use of multiple tissues in the study integrating the MN tests is more effective than using a single tissue, for detection of the MN induction produced by chemical exposure to rats, and helps to determine the characteristics of the test chemicals. PMID:25892620

  17. Physiological effects following administration of Citrus aurantium for 28 days in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Deborah K.; Pellicore, Linda S.

    2012-06-15

    Background: Since ephedra-containing dietary supplements were banned from the US market, manufacturers changed their formulations by eliminating ephedra and replacing with other botanicals, including Citrus aurantium, or bitter orange. Bitter orange contains, among other compounds, synephrine, a chemical that is chemically similar to ephedrine. Since ephedrine may have cardiovascular effects, the goal of this study was to investigate the cardiovascular effects of various doses of bitter orange extract and pure synephrine in rats. Method: Female Sprague–Dawley rats were dosed daily by gavage for 28 days with synephrine from two different extracts. One extract contained 6% synephrine, and the other extract contained 95% synephrine. Doses were 10 or 50 mg synephrine/kg body weight from each extract. Additionally, caffeine was added to these doses, since many dietary supplements also contain caffeine. Telemetry was utilized to monitor heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature and QT interval in all rats. Results and conclusion: Synephrine, either as the bitter orange extract or as pure synephrine, increased heart rate and blood pressure. Animals treated with 95% synephrine showed minimal effects on heart rate and blood pressure; more significant effects were observed with the bitter orange extract suggesting that other components in the botanical can alter these physiological parameters. The increases in heart rate and blood pressure were more pronounced when caffeine was added. None of the treatments affected uncorrected QT interval in the absence of caffeine.

  18. 28-Day inhalation toxicity of graphene nanoplatelets in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Kwon; Shin, Jae Hoon; Lee, Jong Seong; Hwang, Joo Hwan; Lee, Ji Hyun; Baek, Jin Ee; Kim, Tae Gyu; Kim, Boo Wook; Kim, Jin Sik; Lee, Gun Ho; Ahn, Kangho; Han, Sung Gu; Bello, Dhimiter; Yu, Il Je

    2016-09-01

    Graphene, a two-dimensional engineered nanomaterial, is now being used in many applications, such as electronics, biological engineering, filtration, lightweight and strong nanocomposite materials, and energy storage. However, there is a lack of information on the potential health effects of graphene in humans based on inhalation, the primary engineered nanomaterial exposure pathway in workplaces. Thus, an inhalation toxicology study of graphene was conducted using a nose-only inhalation system for 28 days (6 h/day and 5 days/week) with male Sprague-Dawley rats that were then allowed to recover for 1-, 28-, and 90-day post-exposure period. Animals were separated into 4 groups (control, low, moderate, and high) with 15 male rats (5 rats per time point) in each group. The measured mass concentrations for the low, moderate, and high exposure groups were 0.12, 0.47, and 1.88 mg/m(3), respectively, very close to target concentrations of 0.125, 0.5, and 2 mg/m(3). Airborne graphene exposure was monitored using several real-time instrumentation over 10 nm to 20 μm for size distribution and number concentration. The total and respirable elemental carbon concentrations were also measured using filter sampling. Graphene in the air and biological media was traced using transmission electron microscopy. In addition to mortality and clinical observations, the body weights and food consumption were recorded weekly. At the end of the study, the rats were subjected to a full necropsy, blood samples were collected for blood biochemical tests, and the organ weights were measured. No dose-dependent effects were recorded for the body weights, organ weights, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid inflammatory markers, and blood biochemical parameters at 1-day post-exposure and 28-day post-exposure. The inhaled graphenes were mostly ingested by macrophages. No distinct lung pathology was observed at the 1-, 28- and 90-day post-exposure. The inhaled graphene was translocated to lung

  19. Toxicological evaluation of isopropylparaben and isobutylparaben mixture in Sprague-Dawley rats following 28 days of dermal exposure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Ji; Kwack, Seung Jun; Lim, Seong Kwang; Kim, Yeon Joo; Roh, Tae Hyun; Choi, Seul Min; Kim, Hyung Sik; Lee, Byung Mu

    2015-11-01

    The alkyl esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (Parabens) have been of concern due to their probable endocrine disrupting property especially in baby consumer products. The safety of parabens for use as a preservative in cosmetics has come into controversy, and thus consumer demand for paraben-free products is ever increasing. Thus, more comprehensive studies are needed to conclusively determine the safety of the multiple prolonged exposure to parabens with cosmetic ingredients. This study was conducted to investigate the potential repeated 28 days dermal toxicity (50, 100, 300, or 600 mg/kg bw/day) of isopropylparaben (IPP), isobutylparaben (IBP), or the mixture of IPP and IBP in rats. There were no significant changes in body and organ weights in any group. However, histopathological examinations showed that weak or moderate skin damages were observed in female rats by macroscopic and microscopic evaluations. In female rats, no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELs) of IPP with no skin lesion and IBP for skin hyperkeratosis, were estimated to be 600 mg/kg bw/day, and 50 mg/kg bw/day, respectively. With regard skin hyperkeratosis, the lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAEL) of the mixture of IPP and IBP was estimated to be 50 mg/kg bw/day. Analysis of six serum hormones (estrogen, testosterone, insulin, T3, TSH, or FSH) in animals showed that only FSH was dose-dependently decreased in the mixture groups of 100 mg/kg bw/day or higher. These data suggest that the mixture of IPP and IBP showed a synergistic dermal toxicity in rats and should be considered for future use in consumer products. PMID:26359141

  20. Evaluation of repeated dose micronucleus assays of the liver and gastrointestinal tract using potassium bromate: a report of the collaborative study by CSGMT/JEMS.MMS.

    PubMed

    Okada, Emiko; Fujiishi, Yohei; Narumi, Kazunori; Kado, Shoichi; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Kaneko, Kimiyuki; Ohyama, Wakako

    2015-03-01

    The food additive potassium bromate (KBrO3) is known as a renal carcinogen and causes chromosomal aberrations in vitro without metabolic activation and in vivo in hematopoietic and renal cells. As a part of a collaborative study by the Mammalian Mutagenicity Study group, which is a subgroup of the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society, we administered KBrO3 to rats orally for 4, 14, and 28 days and examined the micronucleated (MNed) cell frequency in the liver, glandular stomach, colon, and bone marrow to confirm whether the genotoxic carcinogen targeting other than liver and gastrointestinal (GI) tract was detected by the repeated dose liver and GI tract micronucleus (MN) assays. In our study, animals treated with KBrO3 showed some signs of toxicity in the kidney and/or stomach. KBrO3 did not increase the frequency of MNed cells in the liver and colon in any of the repeated dose studies. However, KBrO3 increased the frequency of MNed cells in the glandular stomach and bone marrow. Additionally, the MNed cell frequency in the glandular stomach was not significantly affected by the difference in the length of the administration period. These results suggest that performing the MN assay using the glandular stomach, which is the first tissue to contact agents after oral ingestion, is useful for evaluating the genotoxic potential of chemicals and that the glandular stomach MN assay could be integrated into general toxicity studies. PMID:24637080

  1. The added value of the 90-day repeated dose oral toxicity test for industrial chemicals with a low (sub)acute toxicity profile in a high quality dataset.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Katy; Andrew, David J; Rego, Laura

    2014-08-01

    A survey conducted on the EU Notification of New Substances (NONS) database suggested that for industrial chemicals with a profile of low toxicity in (sub)acute toxicity tests there is little added value to the conduct of the 90-day repeated dose study. Avoiding unnecessary animal testing is a central aim of the EU REACH chemicals legislation; therefore we sought to verify the profile using additional data. The OECD's eChemPortal was searched for substances that had both a 28-day and a 90-day study and their robust study summaries were then examined from the ECHA CHEM database. Out of 182 substances with high quality 28-day and 90-day study results, only 18 reported no toxicity of any kind in the (sub)acute tests. However, for 16 of these there were also no reported signs of toxicity at or close to the limit dose (1000mg/kgbw/d) in the 90-day study. Restricting the 'low (sub)acute toxicity in a high quality dataset' profile to general industrial chemicals of no known biological activity, whilst allowing irritant substances, increases the data set and improves the prediction to 95% (20 substances out of 21 substances). The low toxicity profile appears to be of low prevalence within industrial chemicals (10-15%), nevertheless, avoidance of the conduct of a redundant 90-day study for this proportion of the remaining REACH phase-in substances would avoid the use of nearly 50,000 animals and save industry 50million Euros, with no impact on the assessment of human health. PMID:24768988

  2. Repeated administration of low-dose cisplatin in mice induces fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Cierra N; Doll, Mark A; Dupre, Tess V; Shah, Parag P; Subathra, Marimuthu; Siow, Deanna; Arteel, Gavin E; Megyesi, Judit; Beverly, Levi J; Siskind, Leah J

    2016-03-15

    Cisplatin, a chemotherapeutic used for the treatment of solid cancers, has nephrotoxic side effects leading to acute kidney injury (AKI). Cisplatin cannot be given to patients that have comorbidities that predispose them to an increased risk for AKI. Even without these comorbidities, 30% of patients administered cisplatin will develop kidney injury, requiring the oncologist to withhold or reduce the next dose, leading to a less effective therapeutic regimen. Although recovery can occur after one episode of cisplatin-induced AKI, longitudinal studies have indicated that multiple episodes of AKI lead to the development of chronic kidney disease, an irreversible disease with no current treatment. The standard mouse model of cisplatin-induced AKI consists of one high dose of cisplatin (>20 mg/kg) that is lethal to the animal 3 days later. This model does not accurately reflect the dosing regimen patients receive nor does it allow for the long-term study of kidney function and biology. We have developed a repeated dosing model whereby cisplatin is given once a week for 4 wk. Comparison of the repeated dosing model with the standard dosing model demonstrated that inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were induced in the repeated dosing model, but levels of cell death were lower in the repeated dosing model. The repeated dosing model had increased levels of fibrotic markers (fibronectin, transforming growth factor-β, and α-smooth muscle actin) and interstitial fibrosis. These data indicate that the repeated dosing model can be used to study the AKI to chronic kidney disease progression as well as the mechanisms of this progression. PMID:26739893

  3. Repeated Post- or Presession Cocaine Administration: Roles of Dose and Fixed-Ratio Schedule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkston, Jonathan W.; Branch, Marc N.

    2004-01-01

    Effects of repeated administration of cocaine to animals behaving under operant contingencies have depended on when the drug is given. Moderate doses given presession have generally led to a decrease in the drug's effect, an outcome usually referred to as tolerance. When these same doses have been given after sessions, the usual result has been no…

  4. Elimination kinetics of disulfiram in alcoholics after single and repeated doses.

    PubMed

    Faiman, M D; Jensen, J C; Lacoursiere, R B

    1984-10-01

    Elimination kinetics of disulfiram were determined in 15 male alcoholics after 250 mg disulfiram taken by mouth as a single dose and again after 12 days of dosing. Apparent t 1/2s were calculated for disulfiram, diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC), diethyldithiocarbamate-methyl ester (DDTC-Me), diethylamine (DEA), and carbon disulfide (CS2) and were found to be 7.3, 15.5, 22.1, 13.9, and 8.9 hr. Elimination t 1/2 for CS2 in breath was 13.3 hr. Average time to reach maximal plasma concentration after either single or repeated doses was 8 to 10 hr for disulfiram, DDTC, DDTC-Me, DEA, and CS2 in breath, while plasma CS2 concentration peaked 5 to 6 hr after disulfiram. In these studies, 22.4% and 31.3% of the disulfiram after single and repeated dosing was eliminated in the breath during one dosing interval. In urine, 1.7% and 8.3% of the disulfiram dose was eliminated as DDTC-glucuronide after single and repeated dosing, while DEA accounted for 1.6% and 5.7% of the dose. There was marked intersubject variability in plasma levels of disulfiram and its metabolites. This variability may be the result of the lipid solubility of disulfiram, differences in plasma protein binding, or the effect of enterohepatic cycling. PMID:6090051

  5. Repeated high-dose (5 × 108 TCID50) toxicity study of a third generation smallpox vaccine (IMVAMUNE) in New Zealand white rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Tree, Julia A.; Hall, Graham; Rees, Peter; Vipond, Julia; Funnell, Simon G. P.; Roberts, Allen D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Concern over the release of variola virus as an agent of bioterrorism remains high and a rapid vaccination regimen is desirable for use in the event of a confirmed release of virus. A single, high-dose (5×108 TCID50) of Bavarian Nordic's IMVAMUNE was tested in a Phase-II clinical trial, in humans, as a substitute for the standard (1×108 TCID50), using a 2-dose, 28-days apart regimen. Prior to this clinical trial taking place a Good Laboratory Practice, repeated high-dose, toxicology study was performed using IMVAMUNE, in New Zealand white rabbits and the results are reported here. Male and female rabbits were dosed twice, subcutaneously, with 5×108 TCID50 of IMVAMUNE (test) or saline (control), 7-days apart. The clinical condition, body-weight, food consumption, haematology, blood chemistry, immunogenicity, organ-weight, and macroscopic and microscopic pathology were investigated. Haematological investigations indicated changes within the white blood cell profile that were attributed to treatment with IMVAMUNE; these comprised slight increases in neutrophil and monocyte numbers, on study days 1-3 and a marginal increase in lymphocyte numbers on day 10. Macroscopic pathology revealed reddening at the sites of administration and thickened skin in IMVAMUNE, treated animals. After the second dose of IMVAMUNE 9/10 rabbits seroconverted, as detected by antibody ELISA on day 10, by day 21, 10/10 rabbits seroconverted. Treatment-related changes were not detected in other parameters. In conclusion, the subcutaneous injection of 2 high-doses of IMVAMUNE, to rabbits, was well tolerated producing only minor changes at the site of administration. Vaccinia-specific antibodies were raised in IMVAMUNE-vaccinated rabbits only. PMID:26836234

  6. Repeated high-dose (5 × 10(8) TCID50) toxicity study of a third generation smallpox vaccine (IMVAMUNE) in New Zealand white rabbits.

    PubMed

    Tree, Julia A; Hall, Graham; Rees, Peter; Vipond, Julia; Funnell, Simon G P; Roberts, Allen D

    2016-07-01

    Concern over the release of variola virus as an agent of bioterrorism remains high and a rapid vaccination regimen is desirable for use in the event of a confirmed release of virus. A single, high-dose (5×10(8) TCID50) of Bavarian Nordic's IMVAMUNE was tested in a Phase-II clinical trial, in humans, as a substitute for the standard (1×10(8) TCID50), using a 2-dose, 28-days apart regimen. Prior to this clinical trial taking place a Good Laboratory Practice, repeated high-dose, toxicology study was performed using IMVAMUNE, in New Zealand white rabbits and the results are reported here. Male and female rabbits were dosed twice, subcutaneously, with 5×10(8) TCID50 of IMVAMUNE (test) or saline (control), 7-days apart. The clinical condition, body-weight, food consumption, haematology, blood chemistry, immunogenicity, organ-weight, and macroscopic and microscopic pathology were investigated. Haematological investigations indicated changes within the white blood cell profile that were attributed to treatment with IMVAMUNE; these comprised slight increases in neutrophil and monocyte numbers, on study days 1-3 and a marginal increase in lymphocyte numbers on day 10. Macroscopic pathology revealed reddening at the sites of administration and thickened skin in IMVAMUNE, treated animals. After the second dose of IMVAMUNE 9/10 rabbits seroconverted, as detected by antibody ELISA on day 10, by day 21, 10/10 rabbits seroconverted. Treatment-related changes were not detected in other parameters. In conclusion, the subcutaneous injection of 2 high-doses of IMVAMUNE, to rabbits, was well tolerated producing only minor changes at the site of administration. Vaccinia-specific antibodies were raised in IMVAMUNE-vaccinated rabbits only. PMID:26836234

  7. A 4-week Repeated dose Oral Toxicity Study of Mecasin in Sprague-Dawley Rats to Determine the Appropriate Doses for a 13-week, Repeated Toxicity Test

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Eunhye; Lee, Jongchul; Lee, Seongjin; Park, Manyong; Song, Inja; Son, Ilhong; Song, Bong-Keun; Kim, Dongwoung; Lee, Jongdeok

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In this study, we investigated the 4-week repeated-dose oral toxicity of gami-jakyak gamcho buja decoction (Mecasin) to develop safe treatments. Methods: In order to investigate the 4-week oral toxicity of Mecasin, we administered Mecasin orally to rats. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into four groups of five male and five female animals per group: group 1 being the control group and groups 2, 3, and 4 being the experimental groups. Doses of Mecasin of 500, 1,000, and 2,000 mg/kg of body weight were administered to the experimental groups, and a dose of normal saline solution of 10 mL/kg was administered to the control group. We examined the survival rate, weight, clinical signs, and gross findings for four weeks. This study was conducted under the approval of the Institutional Animal Ethics Committee. Results: No deaths occurred in any of the four groups. No significant changes in weights or food consumption between the control group and the experimental groups were observed. Serum biochemistry revealed that some groups showed significant decrease in inorganic phosphorus (IP) (P < 0.05). During necropsy on the rats, one abnormal macroscopic feature, a slight loss of fur, was observed in the mid dosage (1,000 mg/ kg) male group. No abnormalities were observed in any other rats. In histopathological findings, the tubular basophilia and cast of the kidney and extramedullary hematopoiesis of the spleen were found. However, those changes were minimal and had occurred naturally or sporadically. No other organ abnormalities were observed. Conclusion: During this 4-week, repeated, oral toxicity test of Mecasin in SD rats, no toxicity changes due to Mecasin were observed in any of the male or the female rats in the high dosage group. Thus, we suggest that the doses in a 13-week, repeated test should be 0, 500, 1,000, and 2,000 mg/kg respectively. PMID:26998389

  8. Human pharmacology of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) after repeated doses taken 4 h apart Human pharmacology of MDMA after repeated doses taken 4 h apart.

    PubMed

    Farré, Magí; Tomillero, Angels; Pérez-Mañá, Clara; Yubero, Samanta; Papaseit, Esther; Roset, Pere-Nolasc; Pujadas, Mitona; Torrens, Marta; Camí, Jordi; de la Torre, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) is a popular psychostimulant, frequently associated with multiple administrations over a short period of time. Repeated administration of MDMA in experimental settings induces tolerance and metabolic inhibition. The aim is to determine the acute pharmacological effects and pharmacokinetics resulting from two consecutive 100mg doses of MDMA separated by 4h. Ten male volunteers participated in a randomized, double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled trial. The four conditions were placebo plus placebo, placebo plus MDMA, MDMA plus placebo, and MDMA plus MDMA. Outcome variables included pharmacological effects and pharmacokinetic parameters. After a second dose of MDMA, most effects were similar to those after a single dose, despite a doubling of MDMA concentrations (except for systolic blood pressure and reaction time). After repeated MDMA administration, a 2-fold increase was observed in MDMA plasma concentrations. For a simple dose accumulation MDMA and MDA concentrations were higher (+23.1% Cmax and +17.1% AUC for MDMA and +14.2% Cmax and +10.3% AUC for MDA) and HMMA and HMA concentrations lower (-43.3% Cmax and -39.9% AUC for HMMA and -33.2% Cmax and -35.1% AUC for HMA) than expected, probably related to MDMA metabolic autoinhibition. Although MDMA concentrations doubled after the second dose, most pharmacological effects were similar or slightly higher in comparison to the single administration, except for systolic blood pressure and reaction time which were greater than predicted. The pharmacokinetic-effects relationship suggests that when MDMA is administered at a 4h interval there exists a phenomenon of acute tolerance to its effects. PMID:26073279

  9. In vivo flow cytometric Pig-a and micronucleus assays: highly sensitive discrimination of the carcinogen/noncarcinogen pair benzo(a)pyrene and pyrene using acute and repeated-dose designs.

    PubMed

    Torous, Dorothea K; Phonethepswath, Souk; Avlasevich, Svetlana L; Mereness, Jared; Bryce, Steven M; Bemis, Jeffrey C; Weller, Pamela; Bell, Sara; Gleason, Carol; Custer, Laura L; MacGregor, James T; Dertinger, Stephen D

    2012-07-01

    Combining multiple genetic toxicology endpoints into a single in vivo study, and/or integrating one or more genotoxicity assays into general toxicology studies, is attractive because it reduces animal use and enables comprehensive comparative analysis using toxicity, metabolism, and pharmacokinetic information from the same animal. This laboratory has developed flow cytometric scoring techniques for monitoring two blood-based genotoxicity endpoints-micronucleated reticulocyte frequency and gene mutation at the Pig-a locus-thereby making combination and integration studies practical. The ability to effectively monitor these endpoints in short-term and repeated dosing schedules was investigated with the carcinogen/noncarcinogen pair benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and pyrene (Pyr). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated via oral gavage for 3 or 28 consecutive days with several dose levels of Pyr, including maximum tolerated doses. BP exposure was administered by the same route but at one dose level, 250 or 125 mg/kg/day for 3-day and 28-day studies, respectively. Serial blood samples were collected up to Day 45, and were analyzed for Pig-a mutation with a dual labeling method (SYTO 13 in combination with anti-CD59-PE) that facilitated mutant cell frequency measurements in both total erythrocytes and the reticulocyte subpopulation. A mutant cell enrichment step based on immunomagnetic column separation was used to increase the statistical power of the assay. BP induced robust mutant reticulocyte responses by Day 15, and elevated frequencies persisted until study termination. Mutant erythrocyte responses lagged mutant reticulocyte responses, with peak incidences observed on Day 30 of the 3-day study (43-fold increase) and on Day 42 of the 28-day study (171-fold increase). No mutagenic effects were apparent for Pyr. Blood samples collected on Day 4, and Day 29 for the 28-day study, were evaluated for micronucleated reticulocyte frequency. Significant increases in micronucleus

  10. Evaluation of the toxicological safety of erinacine A-enriched Hericium erinaceus in a 28-day oral feeding study in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Li, I-Chen; Chen, Yen-Lien; Lee, Li-Ya; Chen, Wan-Ping; Tsai, Yueh-Ting; Chen, Chin-Chu; Chen, Chin-Shuh

    2014-08-01

    Natural products have attained great importance as they are believed to be the new alternative medicines for conventional therapy. As numerous studies have proved the tremendous medicinal values of Hericium erinaceus, it is necessary to take into account its safety as well as its risk for the recipient. However, mushroom mycelium has an identity distinct from mushrooms, as two specific classes of compounds, hericenones and erinacines, can only be extracted from both the fruit body and the cultured mycelium, respectively. Therefore, this is the first report on the evaluation of the toxicity of H.erinaceus mycelium, enriched with 5mg/g erinacine A, by a 28-day repeated oral administration study in Sprague-Dawley rats. Three doses of 1 (Low), 2 (Mid) and 3 (High) g/kg body weight/day were selected for the study while distilled water served as control. All animals survived to the end of the study. No abnormal changes were observed in clinical signs. No adverse or test article-related differences were found in urinalysis, haematology and serum biochemistry parameters, between the treatment and control groups. No gross pathological findings and histopathological differences were seen. Therefore, the no-observed-adverse-effect level of erinacine A-enriched H.erinaceus is greater than 3g/kgbody weight/day. PMID:24810469

  11. Prolonged central mu-opioid receptor occupancy after single and repeated nalmefene dosing.

    PubMed

    Ingman, Kimmo; Hagelberg, Nora; Aalto, Sargo; Någren, Kjell; Juhakoski, Auni; Karhuvaara, Sakari; Kallio, Antero; Oikonen, Vesa; Hietala, Jarmo; Scheinin, Harry

    2005-12-01

    The opioid antagonist nalmefene offers an alternative to traditional pharmacological treatments for alcoholism. The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between nalmefene plasma concentration and central mu-opioid receptor occupancy after a clinically effective dose (20 mg, orally). Pharmacokinetics and mu-opioid receptor occupancy of nalmefene after single and repeated dosing over 7 days was studied in 12 healthy subjects. Serial blood samples were obtained after both dosings, and pharmacokinetic parameters for nalmefene and main metabolites were determined. Central mu-opioid receptor occupancy of nalmefene was measured with positron emission tomography (PET) and [(11)C]carfentanil at four time points (3, 26, 50, 74 h) after both dosings. Nalmefene was rapidly absorbed in all subjects. The mean t(1/2) of nalmefene was 13.4 h after single and repeated dosing. The accumulation of nalmefene and its main metabolites in plasma during the repeated dosing period was as expected for a drug with linear pharmacokinetics, and steady-state was reached for all analytes. Both nalmefene dosings resulted in a very high occupancy at mu-opioid receptors (87-100%), and the decline in the occupancy was similar after both dosings but clearly slower than the decline in the plasma concentration of nalmefene or metabolites. High nalmefene occupancy (83-100%) persisted at 26 h after the dosings. The prolonged mu-opioid receptor occupancy by nalmefene indicates slow dissociation of the drug from mu-opioid receptors. These results support the rational of administering nalmefene when needed before alcohol drinking, and they additionally suggest that a high mu-opioid receptor occupancy can be maintained when nalmefene is taken once daily. PMID:15956985

  12. Comparison of methionine sources around requirement levels using a methionine efficacy method in 0 to 28 day old broilers.

    PubMed

    Agostini, P S; Dalibard, P; Mercier, Y; Van der Aar, P; Van der Klis, J D

    2016-03-01

    The addition of methionine in the poultry feed industry is still facing the relative efficacy dilemma between DL-methionine (DLM) and hydroxy-methionine (HMTBA). The aim of this study was to compare the effect of dietary DLM and HMTBA on broiler performance at different levels of total sulfur amino acids (TSAA). The treatments consisted of a basal diet without methionine addition, and 4 increasing methionine doses for both sources resulting in TSAA/Lysine ratios from 0.62 to 0.73 in the starter phase and 0.59 to 0.82 in the grower phase. The comparison of product performance was performed by three-way ANOVA analysis and by methionine efficacy calculation as an alternative method of comparison. Growth results obtained during the starter phase with the different methionine supplementations did not show significant growth responses to TSAA levels, indicating a lower methionine requirement in the starter phase than currently assumed. However, a significant methionine dose effect was obtained for the period 10 to 28 day of age and for the entire growth period of 0 to 28 day of age. Excepting a significant gender effect, the statistical analysis did not allow for the discrimination of methionine sources, and no interaction between source and dose level was observed up to 28 days of age. A significant interaction between source and dose level was observed for methionine efficacy for the grower phase, and the total growth period showed better HMTBA efficacy at higher TSAA value. The exponential model fitted to each methionine source for body weight response depending on methionine intake or for feed conversion ratio (FCR) depending on methionine doses did not allow the methionine sources to be distinguished. Altogether, these results conclude that methionine sources lead to similar performances response when compared at TSAA values around the broiler requirement level. These results also showed that at TSAA values above requirement, HMTBA had a better methionine efficacy

  13. PULMONARY FUNCTION AND PATHOLOGY IN CATS EXPOSED 28 DAYS TO DIESEL EXHAUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Young adult male cats were exposed 28 days, 20 hours per day, to a 1:14 dilution of diesel exhaust emissions. Following termination of exposure, the following pulmonary function measurements were carried out: lung volumes, maximum expiratory flow rates (MEF), MEF at 50%, 25% and ...

  14. Different dosing regimens of repeated ketamine administration have opposite effects on novelty processing in rats.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Anett; Sivanandan, Brindan; Tolledo, Edgor Cole; Woldegabriel, Jacob; Ito, Rutsuko

    2016-08-01

    Repeated exposure to sub-anesthetic doses of ketamine in rats has been shown to induce cognitive deficits, as well as behavioral changes akin to the negative symptoms of schizophrenia, giving much face validity to the use of ketamine administration as a pharmacological model of schizophrenia. This study sought to further characterize the behavioral effects of two different ketamine pre-treatment regimens, focusing primarily on the effects of repeated ketamine administration on novelty processing, a capacity that is disrupted in schizophrenia. Rats received 5 or 14 intra-peritoneal injections of 30mg/kg ketamine or saline across 5 or 7days, respectively. They were then tested in an associative mismatch detection task to examine their ability to detect novel configurations of familiar audio-visual sequences. Furthermore, rats underwent a sequential novel object and novel object location exploration task. Subsequently, rats were also tested on the delayed matching to place T-maze task, sucrose preference task and locomotor tests involving administering a challenge dose of amphetamine (AMPH). The high-dose ketamine pre-treatment regimen elicited impairments in mismatch detection and working memory. In contrast, the low-dose ketamine pre-treatment regimen improved performance of novelty detection. In addition, low-dose ketamine pre-treated rats showed locomotor sensitization following an AMPH challenge, while the high-dose ketamine pre-treated rats showed an attenuated locomotor response to AMPH, compared to control rats. These findings demonstrate that different regimens of repeated ketamine administration induce alterations in novelty processing in opposite directions, and that differential neural adaptations occurring in the mesolimbic dopamine system may underlie these effects. PMID:27064663

  15. Repeated dose titration versus age-based method in electroconvulsive therapy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Aten, Jan Jaap; Oudega, Mardien; van Exel, Eric; Stek, Max L; van Waarde, Jeroen A

    2015-06-01

    In electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), a dose titration method (DTM) was suggested to be more individualized and therefore more accurate than formula-based dosing methods. A repeated DTM (every sixth session and dose adjustment accordingly) was compared to an age-based method (ABM) regarding treatment characteristics, clinical outcome, and cognitive functioning after ECT. Thirty-nine unipolar depressed patients dosed using repeated DTM and 40 matched patients treated with ABM were compared. Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were assessed at baseline and at the end of the index course, as well as the total number of ECT sessions. Both groups were similar regarding age, sex, psychotic features, mean baseline MADRS, and median baseline MMSE. At the end of the index course, the two methods showed equal outcome (mean end MADRS, 11.6 ± 8.3 in DTM and 9.5 ± 7.6 in ABM (P = 0.26); median end MMSE, 28 (25-29) and 28 (25-29.8), respectively (P = 0.81). However, the median number of all ECT sessions differed 16 (11-22) in DTM versus 12 (10-14.8) in ABM; P = 0.02]. Using regression analysis, dosing method and age were independently associated with the total number of ECT sessions, with less sessions needed in ABM (P = 0.02) and in older patients (P = 0.001). In this comparative cohort study, ABM and DTM showed equal outcome for depression and cognition. However, the median ECT course duration in repeated DTM appeared longer. Additionally, higher age was associated with shorter ECT courses regardless of the dosing method. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:25804765

  16. Short Communication: Viremic Control Is Independent of Repeated Low-Dose SHIVSF162p3 Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Tara R.; Hanson, Debra; Vishwanathan, Sundaram A.; Butler, Katherine; Dobard, Charles; Garcia-Lerma, Gerardo; Radzio, Jessica; Smith, James; McNicholl, Janet M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The repeat low-dose virus challenge model is commonly used in nonhuman primate studies of HIV transmission and biomedical preventions. For some viruses or challenge routes, it is uncertain whether the repeated exposure design might induce virus-directed innate or adaptive immunity that could affect infection or viremic outcomes. Retrospective cohorts of male Indian rhesus (n=40) and female pigtail (n=46) macaques enrolled in repeat low-dose rectal or vaginal SHIVSF162p3 challenge studies, respectively, were studied to compare the relationship between the number of previous exposures and peak plasma SHIV RNA levels or viral load area under the curve (AUC), surrogate markers of viral control. Repeated mucosal exposures of 10 or 50 TCID50 of virus for rectal and vaginal exposures, respectively, were performed. Virus levels were measured by quantitative reverse-transcriptase real-time PCR. The cumulative number of SHIVSF162p3 exposures did not correlate with observed peak virus levels or with AUC in rectally challenged rhesus macaques [peak: rho (ρ)=0.04, p=0.8; AUC: ρ=0.33, p=0.06] or vaginally challenged pigtail macaques (peak: ρ=−0.09, p=0.7; AUC: ρ=0.11, p=0.6). Infections in these models occur independently of exposure history and provide assurance that neither inoculation route nor number of exposures required for infection correlates with postinfection viremia. These data also indicate that both the vaginal and rectal repeated low-dose virus exposure models using SHIVSF162p3 provide a reliable system for nonhuman primate studies. PMID:25313448

  17. Proposal of an in silico profiler for categorisation of repeat dose toxicity data of hair dyes.

    PubMed

    Nelms, M D; Ates, G; Madden, J C; Vinken, M; Cronin, M T D; Rogiers, V; Enoch, S J

    2015-05-01

    This study outlines the analysis of 94 chemicals with repeat dose toxicity data taken from Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety opinions for commonly used hair dyes in the European Union. Structural similarity was applied to group these chemicals into categories. Subsequent mechanistic analysis suggested that toxicity to mitochondria is potentially a key driver of repeat dose toxicity for chemicals within each of the categories. The mechanistic hypothesis allowed for an in silico profiler consisting of four mechanism-based structural alerts to be proposed. These structural alerts related to a number of important chemical classes such as quinones, anthraquinones, substituted nitrobenzenes and aromatic azos. This in silico profiler is intended for grouping chemicals into mechanism-based categories within the adverse outcome pathway paradigm. PMID:24888375

  18. Pharmacokinetics and tolerance of cefuroxime axetil in volunteers during repeated dosing.

    PubMed Central

    Sommers, D K; Van Wyk, M; Williams, P E; Harding, S M

    1984-01-01

    A total of 158 volunteers each received 21 repeated oral doses of 500 mg of cefuroxime axetil (CAE) during four comparative cross-over trials. Pharmacokinetics were studied in 8 volunteers (CAE versus ampicillin), relative bioavailability and tolerance were studied in 100 volunteers (CAE versus pivmecillinam and CAE versus pivampicillin), and tolerance alone was studied in 50 volunteers (CAE versus ampicillin). Overall, urinary recoveries of the active antibiotics ranked absorption of the drugs in the order least to greatest: pivmecillinam, ampicillin, CAE, and pivampicillin. The pharmacokinetics of CAE and ampicillin did not change after repeated dosing. Peak serum levels of cefuroxime were significantly higher than those of ampicillin after doses 1 and 21 but the urinary recoveries of both antibiotics were around 35% of the dose. CAE was as well tolerated as ampicillin but there were smaller numbers of episodes of fluid bowel motions on pivmecillinam and pivampicillin than on CAE, which may have been due to the smaller amounts of active antibiotic in the doses of the pivaloyloxymethyl esters. PMID:6721467

  19. Inclusion of Safety Pharmacology Endpoints in Repeat-Dose Toxicity Studies.

    PubMed

    Redfern, Will S

    2015-01-01

    Whereas pharmacological responses tend to be fairly rapid in onset and are therefore detectable after a single dose, some diminish on repeated dosing, and others increase in magnitude and therefore can be missed or underestimated in single-dose safety pharmacology studies. Safety pharmacology measurements can be incorporated into repeat-dose toxicity studies, either routinely or on an ad hoc basis. Drivers for this are both scientific (see above) and regulatory (e.g. ICH S6, S7, S9). There are inherent challenges in achieving this: the availability of suitable technical and scientific expertise in the test facility, unsuitable laboratory conditions, use of simultaneous (as opposed to staggered) dosing, requirement for toxicokinetic sampling, unsuitability of certain techniques (e.g. use of anaesthesia, surgical implantation, food restriction), equipment availability at close proximity and sensitivity of the methods to detect small, clinically relevant, changes. Nonetheless, 'fit-for-purpose' data can still be acquired without requiring additional animals. Examples include assessment of behaviour, sensorimotor, visual and autonomic functions, ambulatory ECG and blood pressure, echocardiography, respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic function. This is entirely achievable if the safety pharmacology measurements are relatively unobtrusive, both with respect to the animals and to the toxicology study itself. Careful pharmacological validation of any methods used, and establishing their detection sensitivity, is vital to ensure the credibility of generated data. PMID:26091647

  20. Comparison of distribution and toxicity following repeated oral dosing of different vanadium oxide nanoparticles in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jung; Lee, Gwang-Hee; Yoon, Cheolho; Kim, Dong-Wan

    2016-10-01

    Vanadium is an important ultra-trace element derived from fuel product combustion. With the development of nanotechnology, vanadium oxide nanoparticles (VO NPs) have been considered for application in various fields, thus the possibility of release into the environment and human exposure is also increasing. Considering that verification of bioaccumulation and relevant biological responses are essential for safe application of products, in this study, we aimed to identify the physicochemical properties that determine their health effects by comparing the biological effects and tissue distribution of different types of VO NPs in mice. For this, we prepared five types of VO NPs, commercial (C)-VO2 and -V2O5 NPs and synthetic (S)-VO2, -V2O3, and -V2O5 NPs. While the hydrodynamic diameter of the two types of C-VO NPs was irregular and impossible to measure, those of the three types of S-VO NPs was in the range of 125-170nm. The S- and C-V2O5 NPs showed higher dissolution rates compared to other VO NPs. We orally dosed the five types of VO NPs (70 and 210μg/mouse, approximately 2 and 6mg/kg) to mice for 28 days and compared their biodistribution and toxic effects. We found that S-V2O5 and S-V2O3 NPs more accumulated in tissues compared to other three types of VO NPs, and the accumulated level was in order of heart>liver>kidney>spleen. Additionally, tissue levels of redox reaction-related elements and electrolytes (Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+)) were most clearly altered in the heart of treated mice. Notably, all S- and C-VO NPs decreased the number of WBCs at the higher dose, while total protein and albumin levels were reduced at the higher dose of S-V2O5 and S-V2O3 NPs. Taken together, we conclude that the biodistribution and toxic effects of VO NPs depend on their dissolution rates and size (surface area). Additionally, we suggest that further studies are needed to clarify effects of VO NPs on functions of the heart and the immune system. PMID:27288913

  1. The OSIRIS Weight of Evidence approach: ITS for the endpoints repeated-dose toxicity (RepDose ITS).

    PubMed

    Tluczkiewicz, Inga; Batke, Monika; Kroese, Dinant; Buist, Harrie; Aldenberg, Tom; Pauné, Eduard; Grimm, Helvi; Kühne, Ralph; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Mangelsdorf, Inge; Escher, Sylvia E

    2013-11-01

    In the FP6 European project OSIRIS, Integrated Testing Strategies (ITSs) for relevant toxicological endpoints were developed to avoid new animal testing and thus to reduce time and costs. The present paper describes the development of an ITS for repeated-dose toxicity called RepDose ITS which evaluates the conditions under which in vivo non-guideline studies are reliable. In a tiered approach three aspects of these "non-guideline" studies are assessed: the documentation of the study (reliability), the quality of the study design (adequacy) and the scope of examination (validity). The reliability is addressed by the method "Knock-out criteria", which consists of four essential criteria for repeated-dose toxicity studies. A second tool, termed QUANTOS (Quality Assessment of Non-guideline Toxicity Studies), evaluates and weights the adequacy of the study by using intra-criterion and inter-criteria weighting. Finally, the Coverage approach calculates a probability that the detected Lowest-Observed-Effect-Level (LOEL) is similar to the LOEL of a guideline study dependent on the examined targets and organs of the non-guideline study. If the validity and adequacy of the non-guideline study are insufficient for risk assessment, the ITS proposes to apply category approach or the Threshold of Toxicological Concern (TTC) concept, and only as a last resort new animal-testing. PMID:23439429

  2. Dose dependent effect of GnRH analogue on pregnancy rate of repeat breeder crossbred cows.

    PubMed

    Kharche, S D; Srivastava, S K

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of treating repeat breeder dairy crossbred cows with different doses of GnRH analogue through i.m. at the time of artificial insemination, on pregnancy rates from their first service after treatment and overall pregnancy rates. One hundred and thirty seven crossbred dairy cows with a history of repeat breeding and eligible after 6-8 infertile services but clinically free of diseases were selected for the study. The animals were randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 (n = 55) cows were treated intramuscularly with each 20 microg Buserelin-acetate (Receptal, Hoechst Roussel Vet GmbH) at the time of artificial insemination. Group 2 (n = 40) cows were treated intramuscularly with each 10 microg Buserelin-acetate at the time of artificial insemination. Group 3 (n = 42) cows were treated intramuscularly with saline as control at the time of artificial insemination. The first service pregnancy rates in Groups 1-3 were 45, 25 and 17%, respectively. Similarly, the overall conception rates in Groups 1-3 were 87, 58 and 48%, respectively. The results indicated that the pregnancy rate in crossbred cows could be improved by the GnRH treatment. The higher dose of GnRH significantly increased (P < 0.05) the first service as well as overall pregnancy rate in a dose dependent manner in repeat breeder crossbred cow bred previously 6-8 times unsuccessfully. PMID:16787717

  3. Repeated Low-Dose Influenza Virus Infection Causes Severe Disease in Mice: a Model for Vaccine Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yufeng; Wang, Xiang; Zhang, Hongbo; Tang, Xinying; Li, Min; Yao, Jufang; Jin, Xia; Ertl, Hildegund C. J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza infection causes severe disease and death in humans. In traditional vaccine research and development, a single high-dose virus challenge of animals is used to evaluate vaccine efficacy. This type of challenge model may have limitations. In the present study, we developed a novel challenge model by infecting mice repeatedly in short intervals with low doses of influenza A virus. Our results show that compared to a single high-dose infection, mice that received repeated low-dose challenges showed earlier morbidity and mortality and more severe disease. They developed higher vial loads, more severe lung pathology, and greater inflammatory responses and generated only limited influenza A virus-specific B and T cell responses. A commercial trivalent influenza vaccine protected mice against a single high and lethal dose of influenza A virus but was ineffective against repeated low-dose virus challenges. Overall, our data show that the repeated low-dose influenza A virus infection mouse model is more stringent and may thus be more suitable to select for highly efficacious influenza vaccines. IMPORTANCE Influenza epidemics and pandemics pose serious threats to public health. Animal models are crucial for evaluating the efficacy of influenza vaccines. Traditional models based on a single high-dose virus challenge may have limitations. Here, we describe a new mouse model based on repeated low-dose influenza A virus challenges given within a short period. Repeated low-dose challenges caused more severe disease in mice, associated with higher viral loads and increased lung inflammation and reduced influenza A virus-specific B and T cell responses. A commercial influenza vaccine that was shown to protect mice from high-dose challenge was ineffective against repeated low-dose challenges. Overall, our results show that the low-dose repeated-challenge model is more stringent and may therefore be better suited for preclinical vaccine efficacy studies. PMID

  4. Subacute (28-day) toxicity of furfural in Fischer 344 rats: a comparison of the oral and inhalation route.

    PubMed

    Arts, Josje H E; Muijser, Hans; Appel, Marko J; Frieke Kuper, C; Bessems, Jos G M; Woutersen, Ruud A

    2004-09-01

    The subacute oral and inhalation toxicity of furfural vapour was studied in Fischer 344 rats to investigate whether route-to-route extrapolation could be employed to derive the limit value for inhalation exposure from oral toxicity data. Groups of 5 rats per sex were treated by gavage daily for 28 days at dose levels of 6-192 mg/kg bw/day, or exposed by inhalation to concentrations of 20-1280 mg/m3 (6 h/day, 5 days/week) or 160-1280 mg/m3 (3 h/day, 5 days/week) for 28 days. Controls received vehicle (corn oil) or were exposed to clean air. Daily oral treatment with the highest dose of furfural (initially 192 mg/kg bw/day, later reduced to 144 mg/kg bw/day and finally to 120 mg/kg bw/day) resulted in mortality, and in increases in absolute and relative kidney and liver weight in surviving females of this group. Exposure of rats by inhalation for 6 h/day, 5 days/week for 28 days induced mortality at concentrations of 640 mg/m3 and above within 1-8 days. At 640 mg/m3 (3 h/day) and at 320 mg/m3 (3 and 6 h/day) and below, however, exposure was tolerated without serious clinical effects. In contrast, histopathological nasal changes were seen even at the lowest concentration of 20 mg/m3. With increasing exposure concentration, the nasal effects increased in incidence and severity and also expanded from the anterior part to the posterior part, including the olfactory epithelium. It was concluded that the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for oral toxicity was 96 mg/kg bw/day. The NOAEL for systemic inhalation toxicity was comparable, i.e. 92 mg/kg bw/day (corresponding to 320 mg/m3 (6 h/day) or 640 mg/m3 (3 h/day)) assuming 100% absorption. The presence of the histopathological nasal changes at the lowest tested concentration of 20 mg/m3 (corresponding to 6 mg/kg bw/day) proves that for locally acting substances like furfural extrapolation from the oral to the inhalation route is not valid. PMID:15234069

  5. The 14-day repeated dose liver micronucleus test with methapyrilene hydrochloride using young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kenji; Ochi, Akimu; Koda, Akira; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Doi, Takaaki

    2015-03-01

    The repeated dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay using young adult rats has the potential to detect genotoxic hepatocarcinogens that can be integrated into a general toxicity study. The assay methods were thoroughly validated by 19 Japanese facilities. Methapyrilene hydrochloride (MP), known to be a non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogen, was examined in the present study. MP was dosed orally at 10, 30 and 100mg/kg/day to 6-week-old male Crl:CD (SD) rats daily for 14 days. Treatment with MP resulted in an increase in micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs) with a dosage of only 100mg/kg/day. At this dose level, cytotoxicity followed by regenerative cell growth was noted in the liver. These findings suggest that MP may induce clastogenic effects indirectly on the liver or hepatotoxicity of MP followed by regeneration may cause increase in spontaneous incidence of MNHEPs. PMID:24768639

  6. The haemotoxicity of mitomycin in a repeat dose study in the female CD-1 mouse

    PubMed Central

    Molyneux, Gemma; Gibson, Frances M; Gordon-Smith, Edward C; Pilling, Andrew M; Liu, Kai Chiu; Rizzo, Sian; Sulsh, Susan; Turton, John A

    2005-01-01

    Mitomycin (MMC), like many antineoplastic drugs, induces a predictable, dose-related, bone marrow depression in man and laboratory animals; this change is generally reversible. However, there is evidence that MMC may also cause a late-stage or residual bone marrow injury. The present study in female CD-1 mice investigated the haematological and bone marrow changes induced by MMC in a repeat dose study lasting 50 days. Control and MMC-treated mice were dosed intraperitoneally on eight occasions over 18 days with vehicle, or MMC at 2.5 mg/kg, autopsied (n = 6–12) at 1, 7, 14, 28, 42 and 50 days after the final dose and haematological changes investigated. Femoral nucleated bone marrow cell counts and levels of apoptosis were also evaluated and clonogenic assays carried out; serum levels of FLT3 ligand (FL) were assessed. At day 1 post-dosing, MMC induced significant reductions in RBC, Hb and haematocrit (HCT) values, and there were decreases in reticulocyte, platelet, and femoral nucleated cell counts (FNCC); neutrophil, lymphocyte and monocyte values were also significantly reduced. On days 7 and 14 post-dosing, all haematological parameters showed evidence of a return towards normal values, but at these times, and at day 28, values for RBC and FNCC remained significantly reduced in comparison with controls. At days 42 and 50 post-dosing, many haematological parameters in MMC-treated mice had returned to control levels; however, there remained evidence of late-stage effects on RBC, Hb and HCT values, and FNCC also continued to be significantly decreased. Results for granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units and erythroid colonies showed a profound decrease immediately post-dosing, but a return to normal values was evident at day 50. Serum FL concentrations demonstrated very significant increases in the immediate post-dosing period, but a return to normal was seen at day 50 post-dosing; a relatively similar pattern was seen in the number of apoptotic femoral

  7. Repeated exposure to sublethal doses of the organophosphorus compound VX activates BDNF expression in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Pizarro, Jose M; Chang, Wenling E; Bah, Mariama J; Wright, Linnzi K M; Saviolakis, George A; Alagappan, Arun; Robison, Christopher L; Shah, Jinesh D; Meyerhoff, James L; Cerasoli, Douglas M; Midboe, Eric G; Lumley, Lucille A

    2012-04-01

    The highly toxic organophosphorus compound VX [O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl]methylphosphonate] is an irreversible inhibitor of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Prolonged inhibition of AChE increases endogenous levels of acetylcholine and is toxic at nerve synapses and neuromuscular junctions. We hypothesized that repeated exposure to sublethal doses of VX would affect genes associated with cell survival, neuronal plasticity, and neuronal remodeling, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). We examined the time course of BDNF expression in C57BL/6 mouse brain following repeated exposure (1/day × 5 days/week × 2 weeks) to sublethal doses of VX (0.2 LD(50) and 0.4 LD(50)). BDNF messenger RNA expression was significantly (p < 0.05) elevated in multiple brain regions, including the dentate gyrus, CA3, and CA1 regions of the hippocampal formation, as well as the piriform cortex, hypothalamus, amygdala, and thalamus, 72 h after the last 0.4 LD(50) VX exposure. BDNF protein expression, however, was only increased in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Whether increased BDNF in response to sublethal doses of VX exposure is an adaptive response to prevent cellular damage or a precursor to impending brain damage remains to be determined. If elevated BDNF is an adaptive response, exogenous BDNF may be a potential therapeutic target to reduce the toxic effects of nerve agent exposure. PMID:22240983

  8. Differential effects of clozapine and pimozide on fixed-ratio responding during repeated dosing.

    PubMed

    Wiley, J L; Compton, A D; Porter, J H

    1994-05-01

    Previous research has shown that the differential development of tolerance to the disruption of operant responding produced by repeated dosing with pimozide (PMZ) or clozapine (CLZ) can distinguish these two drugs. In the present study, the effects of PMZ (1 mg/kg) and CLZ (10 mg/kg) on response rate and response duration in rats lever pressing for food reward under a fixed-ratio 30 (FR-30) operant schedule were examined. PMZ suppressed response rates across all 10 days of drug dosing; CLZ produced an initial response rate decrease, with partial recovery (50%) occurring within the 10 day period. Similarly, PMZ produced an increase in response duration that persisted into the postdrug vehicle-injection period, while CLZ did not significantly change response duration. The prolonged suppression of FR responding produced by PMZ is similar to the lack of tolerance to this drug in other types of operant schedules. In contrast, CLZ's effects on response rate are schedule dependent. These results suggest that changes in response duration with repeated dosing may more reliably differentiate typical and atypical neuroleptics than do changes in response rate under FR schedules. PMID:8029297

  9. Histamine2-receptor antagonists: Rapid development of tachyphylaxis with repeat dosing

    PubMed Central

    McRorie, Johnson W; Kirby, James A; Miner, Philip B

    2014-01-01

    Histamine2-receptor antagonists (H2RAs) are available over-the-counter (OTC) for the treatment and prevention of heartburn, but more than occasional, single-dose use can lead to rapid development of tachyphylaxis. The aim of this review is to assess the published evidence regarding the development of tachyphylaxis with repeat usage of H2RAs. PubMed and SCOPUS were searched across all years to identify clinical studies that examined the development of tachyphylaxis with repeated dosing of H2RAs. Although a single (first) dose of an H2RA can be effective for controlling gastric acid and preventing or relieving food-related heartburn, numerous studies confirm that tachyphylaxis, also known as tolerance, is consistently detected at the first time point assessed after the first dose, including the second day and/or second dose. Even if symptom relief is achieved with an H2RA, it may be due to desensitization of the esophagus to acid exposure, potentially providing symptom relief without significantly decreasing esophageal acid exposure. When recommending OTC drugs for treatment of frequent heartburn, clinicians should be aware of the potential for rapid development of tachyphylaxis in patients who use H2RAs for 2 or more consecutive days. Even if symptom relief is achieved, it may be due to desensitization of the esophagus to acid by the H2RA, potentially providing symptom relief without significantly decreasing esophageal acid exposure. Other strategies, such as an OTC proton pump inhibitor, may be needed to optimize management of frequent heartburn. PMID:24868486

  10. Single- and repeated-dose toxicities of aloe fermentation products in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Kyoung; Baik, Soon-Ok; Choi, Soo-Young; Lee, Jae-Young

    2011-01-01

    In this study, aloe fermentation products were derived from mycelia from 3 mushrooms: Ganoderma lucidum (AG), Hericium erinaceum (AH), and Phellinus linteus (AP). Levels of aloin A and B increased with fermentation time. The highest levels were measured on the fifth day of fermentation. β-Glucan levels decreased with fermentation time. The safety of aloe fermentation products were examined in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were orally administered the three aloe fermentation products at dose levels of 1, 2 or 5 g/kg for single-dose toxicity test and 0.5, 1, or 2 g/kg for repeated-dose toxicity test. There were no significant differences in body weight gain between vehicle control and AG-, AH- or AP-treated rats. Also, significant changes in daily feed intake and water consumption were not observed. In hematological analysis, none of the parameters were affected by aloe fermentation products with mushroom mycelia. This suggests that there are no negative effects on homeostasis and immunity. In blood biochemistry analysis, none of the markers were affected by feeding rats with AG, AH or AP. Similarly, there were no significant effects on markers for liver, kidney, skeletal and heart muscle functions. No remarkable lesions were observed in these organs at histopathology. Since there were no adverse effects of AG, AH and AP in single- or repeated-dose toxicity tests, even at higher doses than normal, we conclude that the aloe fermentation products with mushroom mycelia possess long-term safety and could be candidates as multifunctional nutrients for the improvement of intestinal function and immunity. PMID:21998613

  11. Pharmacokinetics of repeated doses of intravenous cocaine across the menstrual cycle in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Evans, Suzette M; Foltin, Richard W

    2006-01-01

    Numerous studies in rodents suggest that there are sex differences in response to cocaine that are related to fluctuations in the ovarian hormones of females. Given that female rhesus monkeys have menstrual cycles that are remarkably similar to those of humans, they provide an ideal laboratory animal model for assessing the effects of cocaine across the menstrual cycle. The present study assessed the effects of 4 injections of intravenous (i.v.) cocaine (0.00, 0.25 or 0.50 mg/kg), spaced 15 min apart, in 4 female rhesus monkeys. Each monkey was tested with each dose during 4 phases of the menstrual cycle: menses, midfollicular, periovulatory and midluteal. Estradiol and progesterone levels were measured each session before cocaine administration to verify phase of the menstrual cycle. Cocaine and cocaine metabolite levels were measured 5 min after each cocaine dose and 5, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 120 min after the last cocaine dose. Similarly, levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and prolactin levels were measured before, 5, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 120 min after the last cocaine dose. Cocaine and metabolite levels increased as a function of dose, but there were minimal differences across the menstrual cycle following repeated injections of cocaine. With a few exceptions, LH levels decreased as a function of time within the session, with no differences as a function of cocaine dose. Cocaine produced transient increases in LH levels during the luteal phase, with maximal levels occurring after the second cocaine injection. Lastly, cocaine substantially decreased prolactin levels across all menstrual cycle phases. Taken together, these data indicate that any behavioral differences observed either across the menstrual cycle or between males and females, are probably not related to alterations in the pharmacokinetics of cocaine across the menstrual cycle. PMID:16426669

  12. A 13-week dermal repeat-dose neurotoxicity study of hydrodesulfurized kerosene in rats.

    PubMed

    Breglia, Rudolph; Bui, Quang; Burnett, Donald; Koschier, Francis; Lapadula, Elizabeth; Podhasky, Paula; Schreiner, Ceinwen; White, Russell

    2014-01-01

    A 13-week dermal repeat-dose toxicity study was conducted with hydrodesulfurized (HDS) kerosene, a test material that also met the commercial specifications for aviation turbine fuel (jet A). The objectives were to assess the potential for target organ toxicity and neurotoxicity. The HDS kerosene was applied to the shaved backs of Sprague-Dawley CD rats, 12/sex/group, 6 h/d, 5 d/wk in doses of 0 (vehicle control), 165 mg/kg (20% HDS kerosene), 330 mg/kg (40% HDS kerosene), or 495 mg/kg (60% HDS kerosene). Additional rats (12/sex) from the control and the high-dose groups were held without treatment for 4 weeks to assess recovery. Standard parameters of toxicity were investigated during the in-life phase. At necropsy, organs were weighed and selected tissues were processed for microscopic evaluation. Neurobehavioral evaluations included tests of motor activity and functional observations that were conducted pretest, at intervals during the exposure period and after recovery. No test substance-related effects on mortality, clinical observations (except dermal irritation), body weight, or clinical chemistry values were observed. A dose-related increase in skin irritation, confirmed histologically as minimal, was evident at the dosing site. The only statistically significant change considered potentially treatment related was an increase in the neutrophil count in females at 13 weeks. No test article-related effects were observed in the neurobehavioral assessments or gross or microscopic findings in the peripheral or central nervous system tissues in any of the dose groups. Excluding skin irritation, the no observed adverse effect level value for all effects was considered 495 mg/kg/d. PMID:24351872

  13. Coenzyme Q10 Abrogated the 28 Days Aluminium Chloride Induced Oxidative Changes in Rat Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Anuradha S.; Nirwane, Abhijit; Kamble, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to elucidate the impact of oral administration of aluminium chloride for 28 days with respect to oxidative stress in the cerebral cortex of female rats. Further, to investigate the potentials of Coenzyme (Co) Q10 (4, 8, and 12 mg/kg, i.p.) in mitigating the detrimental changes. Materials and Methods: Biochemical estimations of cerebral lipid peroxidation (LPO), reduced glutathione (GSH), vitamin E and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were carried out after 28 days of aluminium chloride (AlCl3) and Co Q10 exposures along with histopathological examination of cerebral cortex of the rats. Results: Subacute exposure to AlCl3(5 mg/kg) led to significant decrease in levels of GSH, vitamin E and activities of SOD, CAT, GPx, and an increase in LPO of cerebral cortex. These aberrations were restored by Co Q10 (12 mg/kg, i.p.). This protection offered was comparable to that of L-deprenyl (1 mg/kg, i.p.) which served as a reference standard. Histopathological evaluations confirmed that the normal cerebral morphology was maintained by Co Q10. Conclusion: Thus, AlCl3 exposure hampers the activities of various antioxidant enzymes and induces oxidative stress in cerebral cortex of female Wistar rats. Supplementation with intraperitoneal Co Q10 abrogated these deleterious effects of AlCl3. PMID:25253934

  14. Mineral and nitrogen balance study - Results of metabolic observations on Skylab II 28-day orbital mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whedon, G. D.; Lutwak, L.; Reid, J.; Rambaut, P.; Whittle, M.; Smith, M.; Leach, C.

    1975-01-01

    The prediction that various stresses of flight, particularly weightlessness, would bring about significant derangements in the metabolism of the musculoskeletal system has been based on various balance-study observations of long-term immobilized or inactive bed rest. The three astronauts of Skylab II consumed a planned dietary intake of major metabolic elements in mixed foods and beverages and provided virtually complete collections of excreta for 31 days preflight, 28 days inflight, and 17 days postflight. Analyses showed that, in varying degree among the crewmen, urinary calcium increased gradually during flight in a pattern similar to that observed in bed-rest studies. Fecal calcium excretion did not change significantly, but calcium balance, owing to the urinary calcium rise, became either negative or less positive than in preflight measurement. Increased excretion and negative nitrogen and phosphorus balances inflight indicated appreciable loss of muscle tissue in all three crewmen. Significant losses also occurred inflight in potassium, sodium, and magnesium. Based on the similarity in pattern and degree between these observations of calcium, phosphorus, and nitrogen loss, musculoskeletal integrity would not be threatened in space flights of up to at least 3 months. However, if similar changes occur in the planed Skylab flights for considerably more than 28 days, concern for capable musculoskeletal function should be serious for flights of very many months' duration.

  15. Behavioral toxicity and physiological changes from repeated exposure to fluorene administered orally or intraperitoneally to adult male Wistar rats: A dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Peiffer, Julie; Grova, Nathalie; Hidalgo, Sophie; Salquèbre, Guillaume; Rychen, Guido; Bisson, Jean-François; Appenzeller, Brice M R; Schroeder, Henri

    2016-03-01

    Fluorene is one of the most abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment by reason of its high volatility. Demonstrated to be a neurotoxicant through inhalation, it was also identified as a contributive PAH to food contamination. Since no data are available on its oral neurotoxicity, the purpose of the present study was to assess the behavioral and physiological toxicity of repeated oral administration of fluorene to adult Wistar male rats. Animals were daily treated with fluorene at 1, 10 or 100mg/kg/day for 28 consecutive days. Administration was intraperitoneal (i.p.) or oral (p.o.) to evaluate the influence of the route of exposure on fluorene toxicity. Following this period of treatment, animals in both groups were subjected to similar cognitive evaluations, namely anxiety (elevated-plus maze), locomotor activity (open-field) and learning and memory abilities (eight-arm maze and avoidance test of an aversive light stimulus), as well as physiological measurements. The behavioral testing occurred from the 28th to the 60th day of the experiment during which fluorene treatment continued uninterrupted. At the end of this period, the concentration levels of fluorene and of three of its monohydroxylated metabolites in blood and brain were determined using a GC-MS/MS method. The results demonstrated a reduction in rat anxiety level at the lowest doses administered (1 and 10mg/kg/day) regardless of the treatment route, whereas locomotor activity and learning abilities remained unchanged. Moreover, a less significant weight gain was noticed in animals i.p.- and p.o.-treated with 100mg/kg/day during the 28-day period of treatment, which, upon comparison with the three other groups, induced a body weight gap that was maintained throughout the experiment. Significant increases in relative liver weight were also observed in a dose-dependent manner in orally treated rats and only in animal treated i.p. with 100mg/kg/day. According to the dose, higher

  16. Hematological effects of repeated graded doses of the methanol extract of Paullinia pinnata (Linn.) leaves in Wistar albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Adeyemo-Salami, Oluwatoyin A.; Ewuola, Emmanuel O.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Paullinia pinnata is a medicinal plant used for the treatment of various diseases, including anemia in West Africa. Aim: This study was carried out to investigate the effect of increasing doses of the methanolic leaves extract of P. pinnata on hematological parameters in rats. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six male Wistar albino rats were grouped into six groups of six animals each. Five doses; 50,100, 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg body weight of the P. pinnata extract were administered separately to five groups. The sixth group served as a control and received only the vehicle (70% physiological saline: 30% Tween 80 [v/v]). Administration was done orally daily for 28 days at 24 h interval. On day 29, the animals were made inactive, blood was then collected from the heart and various hematological parameters were evaluated. Statistical Analysis: Analysis of variance was employed. Results: The packed cell volume and red blood cell count increased significantly (P < 0.05) in the treatment groups except at 200 mg/kg dose. The hemoglobin concentration increased in all the treatment groups. The values for the neutrophils at 50, 100, 200 and 800 mg/kg doses were higher than that of the control. The white blood cell count increased significantly (P < 0.05) at 50 and 400 mg/kg doses compared to the control and exceeded the normal physiological range. Conclusion: The maximum tolerable dose is 200 mg/kg body weight of the methanolic leaves extract of P. pinnata and the extract has anti-anemic property with the ability to increase neutrophils count. PMID:26109785

  17. Repeated dose and reproductive/developmental toxicity of perfluorododecanoic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hina; Fujii, Sakiko; Takahashi, Mika; Matsumoto, Mariko; Hirata-Koizumi, Mutsuko; Ono, Atsushi; Hirose, Akihiko

    2015-11-01

    Perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs) are a series of environmental contaminants that have received attention because of their possible adverse effects on wildlife and human health. Although many toxicological studies have been performed on perfluorooctanoic acid with carbon chain length C8, available toxicity data on PFCAs with longer chains are still insufficient to evaluate their hazard. A combined repeated dose and reproductive/developmental toxicity screening study for perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA; C12) was conducted in accordance with OECD guideline 422 to fill these toxicity data gaps. PFDoA was administered by gavage to male and female rats at 0.1, 0.5, or 2.5 mg/kg/day. The administration of PFDoA at 0.5 and 2.5 mg/kg/day for 42-47 days mainly affected the liver, in which hypertrophy, necrosis, and inflammatory cholestasis were noted. Body weight gain was markedly inhibited in the 2.5 mg/kg/day group, and a decrease in hematopoiesis in the bone marrow and atrophic changes in the spleen, thymus, and adrenal gland were also observed. Regarding reproductive/developmental toxicity, various histopathological changes, including decreased spermatid and spermatozoa counts, were observed in the male reproductive organs, while continuous diestrous was observed in the females of the 2.5 mg/kg/day group. Seven of twelve females receiving 2.5 mg/kg/day died during late pregnancy while four other females in this group did not deliver live pups. No reproductive or developmental parameters changed at 0.1 or 0.5 mg/kg/day. Based on these results, the NOAELs of PFDoA were concluded to be 0.1 mg/kg/day for repeated dose toxicity and 0.5 mg/kg/day for reproductive/developmental toxicity. PMID:24753098

  18. Adhesion of leukocytes to dermal endothelial cells is induced after single-dose, but reduced after repeated doses of UVA.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, M; Pirthauer, M; Plewig, G

    1997-12-01

    Approximately 20-50% of ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation delivered to the skin surface may reach the human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) that play a pivotal role in cellular inflammatory tissue; however, the pathophysiologic role of HDMEC in UVA-induced skin changes is largely unknown. Based on previous in vivo and in vitro studies revealing UVA-induced expression of endothelial adhesion molecules, we studied isolated HDMEC under various conditions in order to further delineate the impact of UVA on these cells. The expression of cell adhesion molecules was determined by flow cytometry and the resulting changes of stable adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells were quantitated for granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes using a newly developed multicellular adhesion assay. Additionally, antibody blocking experiments were performed to delineate the role of individual cell adhesion molecules in UVA-induced leukocyte adherence. High-dose polychromatic UVA (25 J per cm2, maximal emission at 375 nm) induced intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and E-selectin with different kinetics but correlating the adhesion of leukocyte subsets. This effect subsided, however, in the course of 3-6 daily applied UVA doses. Moreover, pro-inflammatory cytokine challenge by tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1-alpha resulted in significantly weaker induction of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and E-selectin in repeatedly UVA-exposed HDMEC. Differential quantitation of peripheral blood derived granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes revealed reduced adhesion particularly of lymphocytes followed by monocytes and granulocytes compared with leukocyte adhesion to nonirradiated but cytokine-stimulated HDMEC. It is concluded that UVA substantially influences endothelial cell adhesion molecules expression and thus directly interferes with leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. Divergent UVA-induced effects in this respect can be attributed to the mode of UV exposure

  19. Aortic Coarctation 28 Days after an Arterial Switch Operation in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Toru; Higaki, Takashi; Okura, Masahiro; Kojima, Ai; Uchita, Shunji; Izutani, Hironori

    2016-01-01

    Aortic coarctation rarely occurs after an arterial switch operation for D-transposition of the great arteries with intact ventricular septum. We report the case of a neonate patient in whom aortic coarctation developed 28 days after an uncomplicated arterial switch operation. Preoperatively, the aorta was noted to have an irregular shape, but there was no pressure gradient across the lesion. The patient underwent successful reoperation to correct the coarctation. We hope that our report raises awareness of a rare early complication after arterial switch operation with intact ventricular septum, and the need to carefully monitor the aortic isthmus in patients who have aortic irregularities, even in the absence of a pressure gradient. PMID:27547151

  20. Effects of repeated dosing with mechanistically distinct antinociceptive ligands in a rat model of neuropathic spinal cord injury pain

    PubMed Central

    Hama, Aldric T; Pearson, James P; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    A lack of efficacy of some analgesic drugs has been previously described in rats with neuropathic spinal cord injury (SCI) pain. It has been suggested that repeated dosing in these animals over time may eventually lead to efficacy. However, it is also possible that efficacy may diminish over time with repeated dosing. This study evaluated the efficacy of various drugs upon repeated dosing over time in a rat model of SCI pain. Four weeks following an acute spinal cord compression at the mid-thoracic level, rats developed decreased hind paw withdrawal threshold, suggestive of below level neuropathic hypersensitivity. Either cannabinoid (CB) receptor agonist CP 55,940, the anticonvulsant carbamazepine or gabapentin, the antidepressant amitriptyline or vehicle was administered over a period of 7 days. Neither carbamazepine nor amitriptyline demonstrated efficacy either after a single or repeated dosing. Beginning with a 50% efficacious dose of gabapentin, the effect of gabapentin in SCI rats neither increased nor decreased over the treatment period. The antinociceptive effect of CP 55,940 was maintained for the entire treatment period, which was mediated by CB1 but not CB2 receptors. The current data suggest that sustained antinociception can be obtained with some drugs in rats with neuropathic SCI pain. Furthermore, the current data do not substantiate the notion that repeated treatment with initially ineffective drugs will eventually lead to efficacy; treatments that are not acutely effective are unlikely to demonstrate clinical efficacy. PMID:25505583

  1. Haematological and immunological effects of repeated dose exposure of rats to integerrimine N-oxide from Senecio brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Elias, Fabiana; Latorre, Andreia O; Pípole, Fernando; Haraguchi, Mitsue; Górniak, Silvana L; Hueza, Isis M

    2011-09-01

    This study is the first in the literature to focus attention on the possible immunotoxic effect of integerrimine N-oxide content in the butanolic residue (BR) of Senecio brasiliensis, a poisonous hepatotoxic plant that contains pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs). PAs have been reported as a pasture and food contaminant and as herbal medicine used worldwide and are responsible for poisoning events in livestock and human beings. After the plant extraction, BR extracted from Senecio brasiliensis was found to contain approximately 70% integerrimine N-oxide by elemental and spectral analyses ((1)H and (13)C NMR), which was administered to adult male Wistar Hannover rats at doses of 3, 6 and 9 mg/kg for 28 days. Body weight gain, food consumption, lymphoid organs, neutrophil analysis, humoural immune response, cellular immune response and lymphocyte analysis were evaluated. Our study showed that integerrimine N-oxide could promote an impairment in the body weight gain, interference with blood cell counts and a reducing T cell proliferative activity in rats; however, no differences in the neutrophil activities, lymphocytes phenotyping and humoural and cellular immune responses were observed. It is concluded that doses of integerrimine N-oxide here employed did not produce marked immunotoxic effects. PMID:21722699

  2. Inhibitory effect of single and repeated doses of nilotinib on the pharmacokinetics of CYP3A substrate midazolam.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hefei; Sheng, Jennifer; Ko, Jin H; Zheng, Cheng; Zhou, Wei; Priess, Petra; Lin, Wen; Novick, Steven

    2015-04-01

    Effects of single and repeated doses of nilotinib on the pharmacokinetics of midazolam, a cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) substrate, were assessed in 2 separate studies. In the single-dose nilotinib study, 18 healthy subjects were randomized to 6 treatment sequences to receive single dose of nilotinib 600 mg, midazolam 4 mg, and coadministration of both in a crossover manner. In the repeated-dose nilotinib study, 19 chronic myeloid leukemia patients took a single dose of midazolam 2 mg on days 1 and 13, and nilotinib 400 mg twice daily from days 2-13. In the single-dose study, the geometric mean ratio of the area under the plasma concentration time curve extrapolated to infinity (AUC(inf)) of midazolam plus nilotinib vs. midazolam was 1.3 (90%CI, 1.2-1.5) and the maximum observed serum concentration (C(max)) was 1.2 (90%CI, 1.0-1.4). In the repeated-dose study, the values for AUC(inf) and C(max) were 2.6 (90%CI, 2.1-3.3) and 2.0 (90%CI, 1.7-2.4), respectively. These results indicate that single-dose and repeated-dose administration of nilotinib results in weak and moderate inhibition of CYP3A, respectively. Therefore, appropriate monitoring and dose adjustment may be needed for drugs that are mainly metabolized by CYP3A, and have narrow therapeutic index, when coadministered with nilotinib. PMID:25418605

  3. Repeated low-dose exposures to sarin, soman, or VX affect acoustic startle in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Smith, C D; Lee, R B; Moran, A V; Sipos, M L

    2016-01-01

    Chemical warfare nerve agents (CWNAs) are known to cause behavioral abnormalities in cases of human exposures and in animal models. The behavioral consequences of single exposures to CWNAs that cause observable toxic signs are particularly well characterized in animals; however, less is known regarding repeated smaller exposures that may or may not cause observable toxic signs. In the current study, guinea pigs were exposed to fractions (0.1, 0.2, or 0.4) of a medial lethal dose (LD50) of sarin, soman, or VX for two weeks. On each exposure day, and for a post-exposure period, acoustic startle response (ASR) was measured in each animal. Although relatively few studies use guinea pigs to measure behavior, this species is ideal for CWNA-related experiments because their levels of carboxylesterases closely mimic those of humans, unlike rats or mice. Results showed that the 0.4 LD50 doses of soman and VX transiently increased peak startle amplitude by the second week of injections, with amplitude returning to baseline by the second week post-exposure. Sarin also increased peak startle amplitude independent of week. Latencies to peak startle and PPI were affected by agent exposure but not consistently among the three agents. Most of the changes in startle responses returned to baseline following the cessation of exposures. These data suggest that doses of CWNAs not known to produce observable toxic signs in guinea pigs can affect behavior in the ASR paradigm. Further, these deficits are transient and usually return to baseline shortly after the end of a two-week exposure period. PMID:26829110

  4. Repeat doses of prenatal corticosteroids for women at risk of preterm birth for improving neonatal health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, Caroline A; McKinlay, Christopher JD; Middleton, Philippa; Harding, Jane E

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been unclear whether repeat dose(s) of prenatal corticosteroids are beneficial. Objectives To assess the effectiveness and safety of repeat dose(s) of prenatal corticosteroids. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (31 March 2011), searched reference lists of retrieved studies and contacted authors for further data. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of women who had already received a single course of corticosteroids seven or more days previously and considered still at risk of preterm birth. Data collection and analysis We assessed trial quality and extracted data independently. Main results We included 10 trials (more than 4730 women and 5650 babies) with low to moderate risk of bias. Treatment of women who remain at risk of preterm birth seven or more days after an initial course of prenatal corticosteroids with repeat dose(s), compared with no repeat corticosteroid treatment, reduced the risk of their infants experiencing the primary outcomes respiratory distress syndrome (risk ratio (RR) 0.83, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.75 to 0.91, eight trials, 3206 infants, numbers needed to treat (NNT) 17, 95% CI 11 to 32) and serious infant outcome (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.75 to 0.94, seven trials, 5094 infants, NNT 30, 95% CI 19 to 79). Treatment with repeat dose(s) of corticosteroid was associated with a reduction in mean birthweight (mean difference (MD) −75.79 g, 95% CI −117.63 to −33.96, nine trials, 5626 infants). However, outcomes that adjusted birthweight for gestational age (birthweight Z scores, birthweight multiples of the median and small-for-gestational age) did not differ between treatment groups. At early childhood follow-up no statistically significant differences were seen for infants exposed to repeat prenatal corticosteroids compared with unexposed infants for the primary outcomes (total deaths; survival free of any disability or major disability; disability; or

  5. Evaluation of the repeated-dose liver and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus assays with 22 chemicals using young adult rats: summary of the collaborative study by the Collaborative Study Group for the Micronucleus Test (CSGMT)/The Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society (JEMS) - Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group (MMS).

    PubMed

    Hamada, Shuichi; Ohyama, Wakako; Takashima, Rie; Shimada, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Kazumi; Kawakami, Satoru; Uno, Fuyumi; Sui, Hajime; Shimada, Yasushi; Imamura, Tadashi; Matsumura, Shoji; Sanada, Hisakazu; Inoue, Kenji; Muto, Shigeharu; Ogawa, Izumi; Hayashi, Aya; Takayanagi, Tomomi; Ogiwara, Yosuke; Maeda, Akihisa; Okada, Emiko; Terashima, Yukari; Takasawa, Hironao; Narumi, Kazunori; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Sano, Masaki; Ohashi, Nobuyuki; Morita, Takeshi; Kojima, Hajime; Honma, Masamitsu; Hayashi, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    The repeated-dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay using young adult rats has the potential to detect hepatocarcinogens. We conducted a collaborative study to assess the performance of this assay and to evaluate the possibility of integrating it into general toxicological studies. Twenty-four testing laboratories belonging to the Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group, a subgroup of the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society, participated in this trial. Twenty-two model chemicals, including some hepatocarcinogens, were tested in 14- and/or 28-day RDLMN assays. As a result, 14 out of the 16 hepatocarcinogens were positive, including 9 genotoxic hepatocarcinogens, which were reported negative in the bone marrow/peripheral blood micronucleus (MN) assay by a single treatment. These outcomes show the high sensitivity of the RDLMN assay to hepatocarcinogens. Regarding the specificity, 4 out of the 6 non-liver targeted genotoxic carcinogens gave negative responses. This shows the high organ specificity of the RDLMN assay. In addition to the RDLMN assay, we simultaneously conducted gastrointestinal tract MN assays using 6 of the above carcinogens as an optional trial of the collaborative study. The MN assay using the glandular stomach, which is the first contact site of the test chemical when administered by oral gavage, was able to detect chromosomal aberrations with 3 test chemicals including a stomach-targeted carcinogen. The treatment regime was the 14- and/or 28-day repeated-dose, and the regime is sufficiently promising to incorporate these methods into repeated-dose toxicological studies. The outcomes of our collaborative study indicated that the new techniques to detect chromosomal aberrations in vivo in several tissues worked successfully. PMID:25892619

  6. Preclinical pharmacokinetic evaluation of resveratrol trimethyl ether in sprague-dawley rats: the impacts of aqueous solubility, dose escalation, food and repeated dosing on oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hai-Shu; Ho, Paul C

    2011-10-01

    Resveratrol trimethyl ether (trans-3,5,4'-trimethoxystilbene, RTE) is a naturally occurring and pharmacologically active resveratrol derivative. To evaluate its suitability as a drug candidate, a pharmacokinetic study was carried out in Sprague-Dawley rats with the emphasis to identify the impact of aqueous solubility, dose escalation, food, and repeated dosing on its oral bioavailability. Upon single intravenous administration (5 mg/kg), RTE displayed moderate clearance (35.5 ± 5.3 mL/min/kg) and a fairly long terminal elimination half-life (511 ± 136 min); dose escalation (5-20 mg/kg) did not cause nonlinear pharmacokinetics. When given orally in suspension (60 mg/kg), RTE was poorly absorbed with negligible bioavailability (< 1.5%), fasting further decreased its bioavailability (<1%). However, when administered in a solution formulated with randomly methylated-β-cyclodextrin (15 mg/kg), RTE was rapidly absorbed with good bioavailability (46.5 ± 4.8%). Dose escalation resulted in increased bioavailability (64.6 ± 8.0%) at the dose of 60 mg/kg. Repeated RTE dosing (7 daily oral doses) did not alter the clearance, terminal elimination half-life and bioavailability. In summary, the aqueous solubility of RTE was a barrier to oral absorption; repeated RTE administrations did not alter its pharmacokinetic profiles; as RTE possessed appropriate pharmacokinetic profiles, further investigation on RTE as a drug candidate is warranted. PMID:21520090

  7. Immunotoxicity evaluation of jet a jet fuel in female rats after 28-day dermal exposure.

    PubMed

    Mann, Cynthia M; Peachee, Vanessa L; Trimmer, Gary W; Lee, Ji-Eun; Twerdok, Lorraine E; White, Kimber L

    2008-01-01

    The potential for jet fuel to modulate immune functions has been reported in mice following dermal, inhalation, and oral routes of exposure; however, a functional evaluation of the immune system in rats following jet fuel exposure has not been conducted. In this study potential effects of commercial jet fuel (Jet A) on the rat immune system were assessed using a battery of functional assays developed to screen potential immunotoxic compounds. Jet A was applied to the unoccluded skin of 6- to 7-wk-old female Crl:CD (SD)IGS BR rats at doses of 165, 330, or 495 mg/kg/d for 28 d. Mineral oil was used as a vehicle to mitigate irritation resulting from repeated exposure to jet fuel. Cyclophosphamide and anti-asialo GM1 were used as positive controls for immunotoxic effects. In contrast to reported immunotoxic effects of jet fuel in mice, dermal exposure of rats to Jet A did not result in alterations in spleen or thymus weights, splenic lymphocyte subpopulations, immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibody-forming cell response to the T-dependent antigen, sheep red blood cells (sRBC), spleen cell proliferative response to anti-CD3 antibody, or natural killer (NK) cell activity. In each of the immunotoxicological assays conducted, the positive control produced the expected results, demonstrating the assay was capable of detecting an effect if one had occurred. Based on the immunological parameters evaluated under the experimental conditions of the study, Jet A did not adversely affect immune responses of female rats. It remains to be determined whether the observed difference between this study and some other studies reflects a difference in the immunological response of rats and mice or is the result of other factors. PMID:18338284

  8. Strengths and limitations of using repeat-dose toxicity studies to predict effects on fertility.

    PubMed

    Dent, M P

    2007-08-01

    The upcoming European chemicals legislation REACH (Registration, Evaluation, and Authorisation of Chemicals) will require the risk assessment of many thousands of chemicals. It is therefore necessary to develop intelligent testing strategies to ensure that chemicals of concern are identified whilst minimising the testing of chemicals using animals. Xenobiotics may perturb the reproductive cycle, and for this reason several reproductive studies are recommended under REACH. One of the endpoints assessed in this battery of tests is mating performance and fertility. Animal tests that address this endpoint use a relatively large number of animals and are also costly in terms of resource, time, and money. If it can be shown that data from non-reproductive studies such as in-vitro or repeat-dose toxicity tests are capable of generating reliable alerts for effects on fertility then some animal testing may be avoided. Available rat sub-chronic and fertility data for 44 chemicals that have been classified by the European Union as toxic to fertility were therefore analysed for concordance of effects. Because it was considered appropriate to read across data for some chemicals these data sets were considered relevant for 73 of the 102 chemicals currently classified as toxic to reproduction (fertility) under this system. For all but 5 of these chemicals it was considered that a well-performed sub-chronic toxicity study would have detected pathology in the male, and in some cases, the female reproductive tract. Three showed evidence of direct interaction with oestrogen or androgen receptors (linuron, nonylphenol, and fenarimol). The remaining chemicals (quinomethionate and azafenidin) act by modes of action that do not require direct interaction with steroid receptors. However, both these materials caused in-utero deaths in pre-natal developmental toxicity studies, and the relatively low NOAELs and the nature of the hazard identified in the sub-chronic tests provides an alert

  9. ANALYTICAL RESULTS OF MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLE POURED JULY 25, 2012 - CURED 28 DAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A. D.; Best, D. R.; Reigel, M. M.

    2012-09-18

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use Colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. Samples 8.1.2, 8.2.2, 8.3.2, and 8.4.2 were received on 8/1/2012 and analyzed after curing for 28 days. The average total density measured by the ASTM method C 642 was 2.09 g/cm{sup 3}, within the lower bound of 1.88 g/cm{sup 3}. The average partial hydrogen density was 7.48E-02 g/cm{sup 3} as measured using method ASTM E 1311 and met the lower bound of 6.04E-02 g/cm{sup 3}. The average measured partial boron density was 1.71E-01 g/cm{sup 3} which met the lower bound of 1.65E-01 g/cm{sup 3} measured by the ASTM C 1301 method.

  10. Glycerol Monolaurate Microbicide Protection against Repeat High-Dose SIV Vaginal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Ashley T.; Rakasz, Eva; Schultz-Darken, Nancy; Nephew, Karla; Weisgrau, Kimberly L.; Reilly, Cavan S.; Li, Qingsheng; Southern, Peter J.; Rothenberger, Meghan; Peterson, Marnie L.; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Measures to prevent sexual mucosal transmission are critically needed, particularly to prevent transmission to young women at high risk in the microepidemics in South Africa that disproportionally contribute to the continued pandemic. To that end, microbicides containing anti-retroviral (ARV) agents have been shown to prevent transmission, but with efficacy limited both by adherence and pre-existing innate immune and inflammatory conditions in the female reproductive tract (FRT). Glycerol monolaurate (GML) has been proposed as a microbicide component to enhance efficacy by blocking these transmission-facilitating innate immune response to vaginal exposure. We show here in an especially rigorous test of protection in the SIV-rhesus macaque model of HIV-1 transmission to women, that GML used daily and before vaginal challenge protects against repeat high doses of SIV by criteria that include virological and immunological assays to detect occult infection. We also provide evidence for indirect mechanisms of action in GML-mediated protection. Developing a sustained formulation for GML delivery could contribute an independent, complementary protective component to an ARV-containing microbicide. PMID:26057743

  11. The dose-response effects of repeated subacute sarin exposure on guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Hulet, S W; McDonough, J H; Shih, T-M

    2002-07-01

    The present study assessed the effects of repeated subacute exposure to the organophosphorous nerve agent, sarin. Guinea pigs were injected five times per week (Monday-Friday) for 2 weeks with fractions of the established LD(50) dose of sarin (42 microg/kg sc). The animals were assessed for the development of cortical EEG seizures. Changes in body weight, red blood cell (RBC) acetylcholinesterase (AChE) levels and neurobehavioral reactions to a functional observational battery were monitored over the 2 weeks of sarin exposure and for an extended postinjection period. There were dose-related changes in body weight and RBC AChE levels. No guinea pigs receiving 0.3, 0.4 or 0.5 x LD(50) of sarin showed signs of cortical EEG seizures despite decreases in RBC AChE levels to as low as 10% of baseline. Seizures were evident in animals receiving 0.6 x LD(50) of sarin as early as the second day, and subsequent injections led to incapacitation and death. Animals receiving 0.5 x LD(50) sarin showed obvious signs of cholinergic toxicity, which included a significant increase in their angle of gait. Overall, 2/13 animals receiving 0.5 x LD(50) sarin died before all 10 injections were given. By the 10th day of injections, the animals receiving saline were significantly easier to remove from their cages and handle as compared to the first day of injections. They were also significantly less responsive to an approaching pencil and touch on the rump in comparison to the first day of testing. In contrast, the animals receiving 0.4 x LD(50) sarin failed to show any significant reductions in their responses to an approaching pencil and a touch on the rump as compared to the first day. The 0.5 x LD(50) sarin animals failed to show any significant changes to the approach response and touch response and did not adjust to handling or cage removal from the first day of injections to the last day of handling. In summary, the guinea pigs receiving the 0.4 x LD(50) and 0.5 x LD(50) doses of

  12. 40 CFR 799.9365 - TSCA combined repeated dose toxicity study with the reproduction/developmental toxicity screening...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false TSCA combined repeated dose toxicity study with the reproduction/developmental toxicity screening test. 799.9365 Section 799.9365 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL...

  13. Evaluation of the pharmacokinetic interaction between repeated doses of rifapentine or rifampin and a single dose of bedaquiline in healthy adult subjects.

    PubMed

    Winter, Helen; Egizi, Erica; Murray, Stephen; Erondu, Ngozi; Ginsberg, Ann; Rouse, Doris J; Severynse-Stevens, Diana; Pauli, Elliott

    2015-02-01

    This study assessed the effects of rifapentine or rifampin on the pharmacokinetics of a single dose of bedaquiline and its M2 metabolite in healthy subjects using a two-period single-sequence design. In period 1, subjects received a single dose of bedaquiline (400 mg), followed by a 28-day washout. In period 2, subjects received either rifapentine (600 mg) or rifampin (600 mg) from day 20 to day 41, as well as a single bedaquiline dose (400 mg) on day 29. The pharmacokinetic profiles of bedaquiline and M2 were compared over 336 h after the administration of bedaquiline alone and in combination with steady-state rifapentine or rifampin. Coadministration of bedaquiline with rifapentine or rifampin resulted in lower bedaquiline exposures. The geometric mean ratios (GMRs) and 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for the maximum observed concentration (Cmax), area under the concentration-time curve to the last available concentration time point (AUC0-t), and AUC extrapolated to infinity (AUC0-inf) of bedaquiline were 62.19% (53.37 to 72.47), 42.79% (37.77 to 48.49), and 44.52% (40.12 to 49.39), respectively, when coadministered with rifapentine. Similarly, the GMRs and 90% CIs for the Cmax, AUC0-t, and AUC0-inf of bedaquiline were 60.24% (51.96 to 69.84), 41.36% (37.70 to 45.36), and 47.32% (41.49 to 53.97), respectively, when coadministered with rifampin. The Cmax, AUC0-t, and AUC0-inf of M2 were also altered when bedaquiline was coadministered with rifapentine or rifampin. Single doses of bedaquiline, administered alone or with multiple doses of rifapentine or rifampin, were well tolerated, with no safety concerns related to coadministration. Daily administration of rifapentine to patients with tuberculosis presents the same drug interaction challenges as rifampin and other rifamycins. Strong inducers of the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme CYP3A4 should be avoided when considering the use of bedaquiline. (This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov under identifier NCT02216331

  14. Incremental effects of 28 days of beta-alanine supplementation on high-intensity cycling performance and blood lactate in masters female cyclists.

    PubMed

    Glenn, J M; Gray, M; Stewart, R; Moyen, N E; Kavouras, S A; DiBrezzo, R; Turner, R; Baum, J

    2015-12-01

    Within the aging population, there exists a subset of individuals termed masters athletes (MA). As masters-level competition increases in popularity, MA must find methods to enhance individual athletic performance. Longitudinal beta-alanine (BA) supplementation is suggested to enhance physical capability during exercise; however, these effects have not been evaluated in MA. To examine the longitudinal effects of BA on time to exhaustion (TTE), total work completed (TWC), and lactate clearance in female MA cyclists. Twenty-two female MA (age = 53.3 ± 1.0) participated in this double-blind design. Subjects were randomly assigned to BA (n = 11; 800 mg BA + 8 g dextrose) or placebo (PLA; n = 11; 8 g dextrose) groups and supplemented 4 doses/day over 28 days. Every 7 days, subjects completed a cycling TTE at 120% VO2max, and TWC was calculated. Blood lactate was measured at baseline, immediate post, and 20-min post each TTE. No significant differences existed between groups for any variable at baseline (p > 0.05). After 28 days supplementation, BA had greater TTE (23 vs 1% change) and TWC (21 vs 2% change) than PLA (p < 0.05). Following the 20-min TTE recovery, lactate was 24% lower in BA compared to PLA (4.35 vs. 5.76 mmol/L, respectively). No differences existed for variables during intermittent weeks. 28 days of BA supplementation increased cycling performance via an enhanced time to exhaustion and total work completed with associated lactate clearance during passive rest in female MA. PMID:26255281

  15. Validation study of the combined repeated-dose toxicity and genotoxicity assay using gpt delta rats

    PubMed Central

    Akagi, Jun-ichi; Toyoda, Takeshi; Cho, Young-Man; Mizuta, Yasuko; Nohmi, Takehiko; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Ogawa, Kumiko

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic rodents carrying reporter genes to detect organ-specific in vivo genetic alterations are useful for risk assessment of genotoxicity that causes cancer. Thus, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development has established the guideline for genotoxicity tests using transgenic animals, which may be combined with repeated-dose toxicity studies. Here, we provide evidence to support equivalence of gpt delta and wild type (WT) rats in terms of toxicological responses to a genotoxic hepatocarcinogen, N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN), and a non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogen, di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP). gpt delta rats treated with DEHP showed similar increases in liver and kidney weights, serum albumin, albumin/globulin ratios, and incidence of diffuse hepatocyte hypertrophy compared to WT F344 and Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats. DEN-treated gpt delta rats showed equivalent increases in the number and area of precancerous GST-P-positive foci in the liver compared to WT rats. The livers of DEN-treated gpt delta rats also showed increased frequencies of gpt and Spi− mutations; such changes were not observed in DEHP-treated gpt delta rats. These results indicated that gpt delta rats (both F344 and SD backgrounds) showed comparable DEHP-induced toxicity and DEN-induced genotoxicity to those observed in WT rats. With regard to the administration period, the general toxicity of 1.2% DEHP was evident throughout the experimental period, and the genotoxicity of 10 p.p.m. DEN could be detected after 2 weeks of administration and further increased at 4 weeks. These results suggested that combined assays using gpt delta rats could detect both general toxicity and genotoxicity by the canonical 4-week administration protocol. Therefore, this assay using gpt delta rats would be applicable for risk assessment including early detection of genotoxic carcinogens and ultimately serve to reduce cancer risks in humans from environmental chemicals. PMID:25683344

  16. Validation study of the combined repeated-dose toxicity and genotoxicity assay using gpt delta rats.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Jun-Ichi; Toyoda, Takeshi; Cho, Young-Man; Mizuta, Yasuko; Nohmi, Takehiko; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Ogawa, Kumiko

    2015-05-01

    Transgenic rodents carrying reporter genes to detect organ-specific in vivo genetic alterations are useful for risk assessment of genotoxicity that causes cancer. Thus, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development has established the guideline for genotoxicity tests using transgenic animals, which may be combined with repeated-dose toxicity studies. Here, we provide evidence to support equivalence of gpt delta and wild type (WT) rats in terms of toxicological responses to a genotoxic hepatocarcinogen, N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN), and a non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogen, di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP). gpt delta rats treated with DEHP showed similar increases in liver and kidney weights, serum albumin, albumin/globulin ratios, and incidence of diffuse hepatocyte hypertrophy compared to WT F344 and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. DEN-treated gpt delta rats showed equivalent increases in the number and area of precancerous GST-P-positive foci in the liver compared to WT rats. The livers of DEN-treated gpt delta rats also showed increased frequencies of gpt and Spi(-) mutations; such changes were not observed in DEHP-treated gpt delta rats. These results indicated that gpt delta rats (both F344 and SD backgrounds) showed comparable DEHP-induced toxicity and DEN-induced genotoxicity to those observed in WT rats. With regard to the administration period, the general toxicity of 1.2% DEHP was evident throughout the experimental period, and the genotoxicity of 10 p.p.m. DEN could be detected after 2 weeks of administration and further increased at 4 weeks. These results suggested that combined assays using gpt delta rats could detect both general toxicity and genotoxicity by the canonical 4-week administration protocol. Therefore, this assay using gpt delta rats would be applicable for risk assessment including early detection of genotoxic carcinogens and ultimately serve to reduce cancer risks in humans from environmental chemicals. PMID:25683344

  17. Acute and 28-Day Subacute Toxicity Studies of Hexane Extracts of the Roots of Lithospermum erythrorhizon in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Chung-Tack; Kim, Myoung-Jun; Moon, Seol-Hee; Jeon, Yu-Rim; Hwang, Jae-Sik; Nam, Chunja; Park, Chong-Woo; Lee, Sun-Ho; Na, Jae-Bum; Park, Chan-Sung; Park, Hee-Won; Lee, Jung-Min; Jang, Ho-Song; Park, Sun-Hee; Han, Kyoung-Goo; Choi, Young Whan; Lee, Hye-Yeong; Kang, Jong-Koo

    2015-12-01

    Lithospermum erythrorhizon has long been used as a traditional oriental medicine. In this study, the acute and 28-day subacute oral dose toxicity studies of hexane extracts of the roots of L. erythrorhizon (LEH) were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats. In the acute toxicity study, LEH was administered once orally to 5 male and 5 female rats at dose levels of 500, 1,000, and 2,000 mg/kg. Mortality, clinical signs, and body weight changes were monitored for 14 days. Salivation, soft stool, soiled perineal region, compound-colored stool, chromaturia and a decrease in body weight were observed in the extract-treated groups, and no deaths occurred during the study. Therefore, the approximate lethal dose (ALD) of LEH in male and female rats was higher than 2,000 mg/kg. In the subacute toxicity study, LEH was administered orally to male and female rats for 28 days at dose levels of 25, 100, and 400 mg/kg/day. There was no LEH-related toxic effect in the body weight, food consumption, ophthalmology, hematology, clinical chemistry and organ weights. Compound-colored (black) stool, chromaturia and increased protein, ketone bodies, bilirubin and occult blood in urine were observed in the male and female rats treated with the test substance. In addition, the necropsy revealed dark red discoloration of the kidneys, and the histopathological examination showed presence of red brown pigment or increased hyaline droplets in the renal tubules of the renal cortex. However, there were no test substance-related toxic effects in the hematology and clinical chemistry, and no morphological changes were observed in the histopathological examination of the kidneys. Therefore, it was determined that there was no significant toxicity because the changes observed were caused by the intrinsic color of the test substance. These results suggest that the no-observed-adverse-effect Level (NOAEL) of LEH is greater than 400 mg/kg/day in both sexes. PMID:26877842

  18. Acute and 28-Day Subacute Toxicity Studies of Hexane Extracts of the Roots of Lithospermum erythrorhizon in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chung-Tack; Kim, Myoung-Jun; Moon, Seol-Hee; Jeon, Yu-Rim; Hwang, Jae-Sik; Nam, Chunja; Park, Chong-Woo; Lee, Sun-Ho; Na, Jae-Bum; Park, Chan-Sung; Park, Hee-Won; Lee, Jung-Min; Jang, Ho-Song; Park, Sun-Hee; Han, Kyoung-Goo; Choi, Young Whan

    2015-01-01

    Lithospermum erythrorhizon has long been used as a traditional oriental medicine. In this study, the acute and 28-day subacute oral dose toxicity studies of hexane extracts of the roots of L. erythrorhizon (LEH) were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats. In the acute toxicity study, LEH was administered once orally to 5 male and 5 female rats at dose levels of 500, 1,000, and 2,000 mg/kg. Mortality, clinical signs, and body weight changes were monitored for 14 days. Salivation, soft stool, soiled perineal region, compound-colored stool, chromaturia and a decrease in body weight were observed in the extract-treated groups, and no deaths occurred during the study. Therefore, the approximate lethal dose (ALD) of LEH in male and female rats was higher than 2,000 mg/kg. In the subacute toxicity study, LEH was administered orally to male and female rats for 28 days at dose levels of 25, 100, and 400 mg/kg/day. There was no LEH-related toxic effect in the body weight, food consumption, ophthalmology, hematology, clinical chemistry and organ weights. Compound-colored (black) stool, chromaturia and increased protein, ketone bodies, bilirubin and occult blood in urine were observed in the male and female rats treated with the test substance. In addition, the necropsy revealed dark red discoloration of the kidneys, and the histopathological examination showed presence of red brown pigment or increased hyaline droplets in the renal tubules of the renal cortex. However, there were no test substance-related toxic effects in the hematology and clinical chemistry, and no morphological changes were observed in the histopathological examination of the kidneys. Therefore, it was determined that there was no significant toxicity because the changes observed were caused by the intrinsic color of the test substance. These results suggest that the no-observed-adverse-effect Level (NOAEL) of LEH is greater than 400 mg/kg/day in both sexes. PMID:26877842

  19. Dietary Lysine Responses of Male Broilers From 14 to 28 Days of Age Subjected to Different Environmental Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary amino acid requirements are influenced by environmental conditions. Two experiments examined growth responses of Ross × Ross TP 16 male broilers fed diets varying in digestible (dig) Lys concentrations from 14 to 28 days of age under different environmental conditions. Experiment 1 was condu...

  20. 29 CFR 553.230 - Maximum hours standards for work periods of 7 to 28 days-section 7(k).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-section 7(k). 553.230 Section 553.230 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR... AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Fire Protection and Law Enforcement Employees of Public Agencies Overtime... protection activities is 7.57 hours per day (rounded) and the ratio of 171 hours to 28 days for...

  1. 29 CFR 553.230 - Maximum hours standards for work periods of 7 to 28 days-section 7(k).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-section 7(k). 553.230 Section 553.230 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR... AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Fire Protection and Law Enforcement Employees of Public Agencies Overtime... protection activities is 7.57 hours per day (rounded) and the ratio of 171 hours to 28 days for...

  2. 29 CFR 553.230 - Maximum hours standards for work periods of 7 to 28 days-section 7(k).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-section 7(k). 553.230 Section 553.230 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR... AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Fire Protection and Law Enforcement Employees of Public Agencies Overtime... protection activities is 7.57 hours per day (rounded) and the ratio of 171 hours to 28 days for...

  3. Collaborative study on fifteen compounds in the rat-liver Comet assay integrated into 2- and 4-week repeat-dose studies.

    PubMed

    Rothfuss, Andreas; O'Donovan, Mike; De Boeck, Marlies; Brault, Dominique; Czich, Andreas; Custer, Laura; Hamada, Shuichi; Plappert-Helbig, Ulla; Hayashi, Makoto; Howe, Jonathan; Kraynak, Andrew R; van der Leede, Bas-jan; Nakajima, Madoka; Priestley, Catherine; Thybaud, Veronique; Saigo, Kazuhiko; Sawant, Satin; Shi, Jing; Storer, Richard; Struwe, Melanie; Vock, Esther; Galloway, Sheila

    2010-09-30

    A collaborative trial was conducted to evaluate the possibility of integrating the rat-liver Comet assay into repeat-dose toxicity studies. Fourteen laboratories from Europe, Japan and the USA tested fifteen chemicals. Two chemicals had been previously shown to induce micronuclei in an acute protocol, but were found negative in a 4-week Micronucleus (MN) Assay (benzo[a]pyrene and 1,2-dimethylhydrazine; Hamada et al., 2001); four genotoxic rat-liver carcinogens that were negative in the MN assay in bone marrow or blood (2,6-dinitrotoluene, dimethylnitrosamine, 1,2-dibromomethane, and 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline); three compounds used in the ongoing JaCVAM (Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods) validation study of the acute liver Comet assay (2,4-diaminotoluene, 2,6-diaminotoluene and acrylamide); three pharmaceutical-like compounds (chlordiazepoxide, pyrimethamine and gemifloxacin), and three non-genotoxic rodent liver carcinogens (methapyrilene, clofibrate and phenobarbital). Male rats received oral administrations of the test compounds, daily for two or four weeks. The top dose was meant to be the highest dose producing clinical signs or histopathological effects without causing mortality, i.e. the 28-day maximum tolerated dose. The liver Comet assay was performed according to published recommendations and following the protocol for the ongoing JaCVAM validation trial. Laboratories provided liver Comet assay data obtained at the end of the long-term (2- or 4-week) studies together with an evaluation of liver histology. Most of the test compounds were also investigated in the liver Comet assay after short-term (1-3 daily) administration to compare the sensitivity of the two study designs. MN analyses were conducted in bone marrow or peripheral blood for most of the compounds to determine whether the liver Comet assay could complement the MN assay for the detection of genotoxins after long-term treatment. Most of the liver genotoxins

  4. BEHAVIORAL AND NEUROCHEMICAL CHANGES IN RATS DOSED REPEATEDLY WITH DIISOPROPYLFLUOROPHOSPHATE (DFP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Behavioral effects of organophosphates (OPs) typically decrease with repeated exposure, despite persistence of OP-induced inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and downregulation of muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors. o characterize this tolerance phenomenon, rats were ...

  5. Dose regimens, variability, and complications associated with using repeat-bolus dosing to extend a surgical plane of anesthesia in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Samer M; Hankenson, F Claire; Heng, Kathleen; McKinstry-Wu, Andrew; Kelz, Max B; Marx, James O

    2014-11-01

    Extending a surgical plane of anesthesia in mice by using injectable anesthetics typically is accomplished by repeat-bolus dosing. We compared the safety and efficacy of redosing protocols administered either during an anesthetic surgical plane (maintaining a continuous surgical plane, CSP), or immediately after leaving this plane (interrupted surgical plane, ISP) in C57BL/6J mice. Anesthesia was induced with ketamine, xylazine, and acepromazine (80, 8, and 1 mg/kg IP, respectively), and redosing protocols included 25% (0.25K), 50% (0.5K), or 100% (1.0K) of the initial ketamine dose or 25% (0.25KX) or 50% (0.5KX) of the initial ketamine-xylazine dose. In the ISP group, the surgical plane was extended by 13.8 ± 2.1 min (mean ± SEM) after redosing for the 0.25K redose with 50% returning to a surgical plane, 42.7 ± 4.5 min for the 0.5K redose with 88% returning to a surgical plane, and 44.3 ± 15.4 min for the 1.0K redose, 52.8 ± 7.2 min for the 0.25KX redose, and 45.9 ± 2.9 min for the 0.5KX redose, with 100% of mice returning to a surgical plane of anesthesia in these 3 groups. Mortality rates for ISP groups were 0%, 12%, 33%, 12%, and 18%, respectively. Mice in CSP groups had 50% mortality, independent of the repeat-dosing protocol. We recommend redosing mice with either 50% of the initial ketamine dose or 25% of the initial ketamine-xylazine dose immediately upon return of the pedal withdrawal reflex to extend the surgical plane of anesthesia in mice, optimize the extension of the surgical plane, and minimize mortality. PMID:25650976

  6. Dose Regimens, Variability, and Complications Associated with Using Repeat-Bolus Dosing to Extend a Surgical Plane of Anesthesia in Laboratory Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Samer M; Hankenson, F Claire; Heng, Kathleen; McKinstry-Wu, Andrew; Kelz, Max B; Marx, James O

    2014-01-01

    Extending a surgical plane of anesthesia in mice by using injectable anesthetics typically is accomplished by repeat-bolus dosing. We compared the safety and efficacy of redosing protocols administered either during an anesthetic surgical plane (maintaining a continuous surgical plane, CSP), or immediately after leaving this plane (interrupted surgical plane, ISP) in C57BL/6J mice. Anesthesia was induced with ketamine, xylazine, and acepromazine (80, 8, and 1 mg/kg IP, respectively), and redosing protocols included 25% (0.25K), 50% (0.5K), or 100% (1.0K) of the initial ketamine dose or 25% (0.25KX) or 50% (0.5KX) of the initial ketamine–xylazine dose. In the ISP group, the surgical plane was extended by 13.8 ± 2.1 min (mean ± SEM) after redosing for the 0.25K redose with 50% returning to a surgical plane, 42.7 ± 4.5 min for the 0.5K redose with 88% returning to a surgical plane, and 44.3 ± 15.4 min for the 1.0K redose, 52.8 ± 7.2 min for the 0.25KX redose, and 45.9 ± 2.9 min for the 0.5KX redose, with 100% of mice returning to a surgical plane of anesthesia in these 3 groups. Mortality rates for ISP groups were 0%, 12%, 33%, 12%, and 18%, respectively. Mice in CSP groups had 50% mortality, independent of the repeat-dosing protocol. We recommend redosing mice with either 50% of the initial ketamine dose or 25% of the initial ketamine–xylazine dose immediately upon return of the pedal withdrawal reflex to extend the surgical plane of anesthesia in mice, optimize the extension of the surgical plane, and minimize mortality. PMID:25650976

  7. Supra-nutritional vitamin E supplementation for 28 days before slaughter maximises muscle vitamin E concentration in finisher pigs.

    PubMed

    Kim, J C; Jose, C G; Trezona, M; Moore, K L; Pluske, J R; Mullan, B P

    2015-12-01

    A 4 × 3 factorial experiment (n=8 pigs per treatment combination) was conducted with 96 female Landrace × Large White pigs to examine the required level of dietary vitamin E and optimum feeding duration before slaughter to maximise muscle vitamin E content in the Longissimus thoracis et lumborum (LTL) muscle. The respective factors were four dietary levels of vitamin E (supplemented as dl-α-tocopheryl acetate; 35, 300, 500, and 700 IU/kg) and three feeding durations (14, 28 and 42 days before slaughter). Vitamin E concentration in the LTL was maximised at 6 mg/kg, which was achieved by feeding a 700 IU vitamin E diet for 28 days before slaughter (P<0.001). There was no further increase in the vitamin E content of the LTL by feeding the high vitamin E diet more than 28 days before slaughter. PMID:26313847

  8. Repeated dose liver micronucleus assay using adult mice with multiple genotoxicity assays concurrently performed as a combination test.

    PubMed

    Hagio, Soichiro; Furukawa, Satoshi; Abe, Masayoshi; Kuroda, Yusuke; Hayashi, Seigo; Ogawa, Izumi

    2014-06-01

    Recently, the liver micronucleus (MN) assay using young adult rats with repeated administrations has been investigated by employing a new method without partial hepatectomy or in situcollagenase perfusion as the repeated dose liver MN (RDLMN) assay by Narumi et al. (2012). In our study, in order to investigate the possibility of the RDLMN assay using young adult mice instead of rats and the feasibility of employing some genotoxicity assays along with the RDLMN assay as a combination test, two genotoxic carcinogens (N,N-diethylnitrosoamine (DEN) and cisplatin (CIS)) and a nongenotoxic carcinogen (phenobarbital sodium (PHE)) were administered to mice for 15 or 29 days. Then, the liver MN assay, peripheral blood (PB) MN assay and comet assay using the liver and kidney were concurrently performed as a combination test. DEN showed positive responses to all endpoints except MN induction in PB after 15 days of repeat administration. A cross-linking agent, CIS, showed MN induction in liver after 29 days of repeat administration, and in PB after 15 and 29 days of repeat administration, although the comet assay yielded negative responses for both organs at both sampling times. PHE yielded negative responses for all endpoints. In conclusion, it is suggested that the RDLMN assay using mice is a feasible method to be integrated into the general repeated toxicity test along with the combination assays, i.e., comet assay or PB MN assay, which would help in risk assessment for carcinogenicity by comparing the results of combination assays with each other. PMID:24849678

  9. Repeated exposure to an ambient level of NO2 enhances asthmatic response to a nonsymptomatic allergen dose.

    PubMed

    Strand, V; Svartengren, M; Rak, S; Barck, C; Bylin, G

    1998-07-01

    We investigated the effects of NO2 and allergen on lung function in a repeated exposure model. For 4 subsequent days, 16 subjects with mild asthma and allergy to birch or grass pollen were exposed at rest to either purified air or 500 microg x m(-3) NO2 for 30 min in an exposure chamber. Four hours later, an individually determined nonsymptomatic allergen dose was inhaled. Lung function (forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)) was measured by a portable spirometer at early phase (EP) 15 min after allergen and at late phase (LP) 3-10 h after allergen. Subjective symptoms and medication were followed by diary cards. Asthmatic response was significantly increased after repeated exposure to NO2 and allergen compared to air and allergen. The 4-day mean fall in FEV1 after NO2 was at EP -25% versus -0.4% for air (p=0.02) and at LP -4.4% versus -1.9% for air (p=0.01, ANOVA). An increase in EP response was seen already after a single NO2 exposure (p=0.03). There was a tendency (p=0.07) towards increased night-time symptoms of asthma after NO2 plus allergen. Although the effects were small, the results indicate that a repeated short exposure to an ambient level of NO2 enhances the airway response to a nonsymptomatic allergen dose. PMID:9701406

  10. Downregulation of immediate-early genes linking to suppression of neuronal plasticity in rats after 28-day exposure to glycidol

    SciTech Connect

    Akane, Hirotoshi; Saito, Fumiyo; Shiraki, Ayako; Takeyoshi, Masahiro; Imatanaka, Nobuya; Itahashi, Megu; Murakami, Tomoaki; Shibutani, Makoto

    2014-09-01

    We previously found that the 28-day oral toxicity study of glycidol at 200 mg/kg/day in rats resulted in axonopathy in both the central and peripheral nervous systems and aberrations in the late-stage of hippocampal neurogenesis targeting the process of neurite extension. To capture the neuronal parameters in response to glycidol toxicity, these animals were subjected to region-specific global gene expression profiling in four regions of cerebral and cerebellar architectures, followed by immunohistochemical analysis of selected gene products. Expression changes of genes related to axonogenesis and synaptic transmission were observed in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, cingulate cortex and cerebellar vermis at 200 mg/kg showing downregulation in most genes. In the corpus callosum, genes related to growth, survival and functions of glial cells fluctuated their expression. Immunohistochemically, neurons expressing gene products of immediate-early genes, i.e., Arc, Fos and Jun, decreased in their number in the dentate granule cell layer, cingulate cortex and cerebellar vermis. We also applied immunohistochemical analysis in rat offspring after developmental exposure to glycidol through maternal drinking water. The results revealed increases of Arc{sup +} neurons at 1000 ppm and Fos{sup +} neurons at ≥ 300 ppm in the dentate granule cell layer of offspring only at the adult stage. These results suggest that glycidol suppressed neuronal plasticity in the brain after 28-day exposure to young adult animals, in contrast to the operation of restoration mechanism to increase neuronal plasticity at the adult stage in response to aberrations in neurogenesis after developmental exposure. - Highlights: • Neuronal toxicity parameters after 28-day glycidol treatment were examined in rats. • Region-specific global gene expression profiling was conducted in brain regions. • Cortical tissues downregulated genes on axonogenesis and synaptic transmission. • Cortical tissues

  11. The repeated dose toxicity of a zinc oxide/hexachloroethane smoke.

    PubMed

    Marrs, T C; Colgrave, H F; Edginton, J A; Brown, R F; Cross, N L

    1988-01-01

    Mice, rats and guinea pigs were exposed to the smoke produced by ignition of a zinc oxide/hexachloroethane pyrotechnic composition, 1 h/day, 5 days/week, at three different dose levels, together with controls. The animals received 100 exposures except for the high dose guinea pigs, which underwent 15 exposures, because of high death rate during the first few days of exposure. The test material had very little effect on weight gain, but there was a high rate of early deaths in the top dose of mice. A variety of incidental findings was seen in both decedents and survivors, but organ specific toxicity was, with one exception, confined to the respiratory tract. The most important of these findings was a statistically significant increase in the frequency of alveologenic carcinoma in the high dose group mice (p less than 0.01) and a statistically significant trend in the prevalence of the same tumour over all dose groups and the controls. A variety of inflammatory changes was seen in the lungs of all species and some appeared to be treatment-related. Fatty change in the mouse liver was more common in the middle and high dose groups than the controls. The aetiology of the tumour incidence is discussed and it is pointed out that hexachloroethane and zinc, as well as carbon tetrachloride, which may be present in the smoke, may be animal carcinogens in appropriate circumstances. Carbon tetrachloride is a known human carcinogen. PMID:3196147

  12. Repeated-dose liver and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus assays with CI Solvent Yellow 14 (Sudan I) using young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Shoji; Ikeda, Naohiro; Hamada, Shuichi; Ohyama, Wakako; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Kasamatsu, Toshio; Nishiyama, Naohiro

    2015-03-01

    The in vivo genotoxicity of CI Solvent Yellow 14 (Sudan I) was examined using repeated-dose liver and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus (MN) assays in young adult rats. Sudan I is a mono-azo dye based on aniline and 1-amino-2-hydroxynaphthalene. This dye was demonstrated as a rat liver carcinogen in a National Toxicology Program (NTP) bioassay, and genotoxicity was noted in a rat bone marrow micronucleus (BMMN) assay. In the present study, Sudan I was administered orally to rats for 14-days, and the MN frequency in the liver, stomach, colon, and bone marrow were analyzed. The frequency of micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs) was not significantly increased by the administration of the Sudan I. Gastrointestinal tract MNs were also not induced. However, in the BMMN assay, a significant increase in micronucleated immature erythrocytes (MNIMEs) was observed in a dose-dependent manner. While Sudan I has been reported to lack hepatic genotoxicity, it has also exhibited tumor-promoting activities. These results are consistent with the lack of induction of MN in the hepatocytes. The lack of MN induction in cells of the gastrointestinal tract was also logical because azo-compounds are reported to be unlikely to induce DNA damage in the rat gut. The repeated-dose rat liver and gastrointestinal tract MN assays have the potential to be used in the evaluation of the genotoxicity of a chemical in each organ in accordance with its mode of action. PMID:25892626

  13. Repeated-Doses Toxicity Study of the Essential Oil of Hyptis martiusii Benth. (Lamiaceae) in Swiss Mice

    PubMed Central

    Freire Rocha Caldas, Germana; Araújo, Alice Valença; Albuquerque, Giwellington Silva; Silva-Neto, Jacinto da Costa; Costa-Silva, João Henrique; de Menezes, Irwin Rose Alencar; Leite, Ana Cristina Lima; da Costa, José Galberto Martins; Wanderley, Almir Gonçalves

    2013-01-01

    Hyptis martiusii Benth. (Lamiaceae) is found in abundance in Northeastern Brazil where it is used in traditional medicine to treat gastric disorders. Since there are no studies reporting the toxicity and safety profile of this species, we investigated repeated-doses toxicity of the essential oil of Hyptis martiusii (EOHM). Swiss mice of both sexes were orally treated with EOHM (100 and 500 mg/kg) for 30 days, and biochemical, hematological, and morphological parameters were determined. No toxicity signs or deaths were recorded during the treatment with EOHM. The body weight gain was not affected, but there was an occasional variation in water and food consumption among mice of both sexes treated with both doses. The hematological and biochemical profiles did not show significant differences except for a decrease in the MCV and an increase in albumin, but these variations are within the limits described for the species. The microscopic analysis showed changes in liver, kidneys, lungs, and spleen; however, these changes do not have clinical relevance since they varied among the groups, including the control group. The results indicate that the treatment of repeated-doses with the essential oil of Hyptis martiusii showed low toxicity in mice. PMID:24151521

  14. Effects of methiothepin on changes in brain serotonin release induced by repeated administration of high doses of anorectic serotoninergic drugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardier, A. M.; Kaakkola, S.; Erfurth, A.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    We previously observed, using in vivo microdialysis, that the potassium-evoked release of frontocortical serotonin (5-HT) is suppressed after rats receive high doses (30 mg/kg, i.p., daily for 3 days) of fluoxetine, a selective blocker of 5-HT reuptake. We now describe similar impairments in 5-HT release after repeated administration of two other 5-HT uptake blockers, zimelidine and sertraline (both at 20 mg/kg, i.p. for 3 days) as well as after dexfenfluramine (7.5 mg/kg, i.p. daily for 3 days), a drug which both releases 5-HT and blocks its reuptake. Doses of these indirect serotonin agonists were about 4-6 times the drug's ED50 in producing anorexia, a serotonin-related behavior. In addition, methiothepin (20 microM), a non-selective receptor antagonist, locally perfused through the dialysis probe 24 h after the last drug injection, enhanced K(+)-evoked release of 5-HT at serotoninergic nerve terminals markedly in control rats and slightly in rats treated with high doses of dexfenfluramine or fluoxetine. On the other hand, pretreatment with methiothepin (10 mg/kg, i.p.) one hour before each of the daily doses of fluoxetine or dexfenfluramine given for 3 days, totally prevented the decrease in basal and K(+)-evoked release of 5-HT. Finally, when methiothepin was injected systemically the day before the first of 3 daily injections of dexfenfluramine, it partially attenuated the long-term depletion of brain 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels induced by repeated administration of high doses of dexfenfluramine. These data suggest that drugs which bring about the prolonged blockade of 5-HT reuptake - such as dexfenfluramine and fluoxetine - can, by causing prolonged increases in intrasynaptic 5-HT levels as measured by in vivo microdialysis, produce receptor-mediated long-term changes in the processes controlling serotonin levels and dynamics.

  15. Toxicologic evaluation of tungsten: 28-day inhalation study of tungsten blue oxide in rats.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Narayanan; Hu, Shu-Chieh; Sullivan, Dennis; Muzzio, Miguel; Detrisac, Carol J; Venezia, Carmen

    2012-12-01

    The toxicity and toxicokinetics of tungsten blue oxide (TBO) were examined. TBO is an intermediate in the production of tungsten powder, and has shown the potential to cause cellular damage in in vitro studies. However, in vivo evidence seems to indicate a lack of adverse effects. The present study was undertaken to address the dearth of longer-term inhalation toxicity studies of tungsten oxides by investigating the biological responses induced by TBO when administered via nose-only inhalation to rats at levels of 0.08, 0.325, and 0.65 mg TBO/L of air for 6 h/day for 28 consecutive days, followed by a 14-day recovery period. Inhaled TBO was absorbed systemically and blood levels of tungsten increased as inhaled concentration increased. Among the tissues analyzed for tungsten levels, lung, femur and kidney showed increased levels, with lung at least an order of magnitude greater than kidney or femur. By exposure day 14, tungsten concentration in tissues had reached steady-state. Increased lung weight was noted for both terminal and recovery animals and was attributed to deposition of TBO in the lungs, inducing a macrophage influx. Microscopic evaluation of tissues revealed a dose-related increase in alveolar pigmented macrophages, alveolar foreign material and individual alveolar foamy macrophages in lung. After a recovery period there was a slight reduction in the incidence and severity of histopathological findings. Based on the absence of other adverse effects, the increased lung weights and the microscopic findings were interpreted as nonadverse response to exposure and were not considered a specific reaction to TBO. PMID:23216159

  16. Assessment of the drug interaction potential and single- and repeat-dose pharmacokinetics of the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib.

    PubMed

    Suttle, A Benjamin; Grossmann, Kenneth F; Ouellet, Daniele; Richards-Peterson, Lauren E; Aktan, Gursel; Gordon, Michael S; LoRusso, Patricia M; Infante, Jeffrey R; Sharma, Sunil; Kendra, Kari; Patel, Manish; Pant, Shubham; Arkenau, Hendrik-Tobias; Middleton, Mark R; Blackman, Samuel C; Botbyl, Jeff; Carson, Stanley W

    2015-04-01

    The induction of CYP2C9 by dabrafenib using S-warfarin as a probe and the effects of a CYP3A inhibitor (ketoconazole) and a CYP2C8 inhibitor (gemfibrozil) on dabrafenib pharmacokinetics were evaluated in patients with BRAF V600 mutation-positive tumors. Dabrafenib single- and repeat-dose pharmacokinetics were also evaluated. S-warfarin AUC(0- ∞) decreased 37% and Cmax increased 18% with dabrafenib. Dabrafenib AUC(0- τ) and C(max) increased 71% and 33%, respectively, with ketoconazole. Hydroxy- and desmethyl-dabrafenib AUC(0-τ) increased 82% and 68%, respectively, and AUC for carboxy-dabrafenib decreased 16%. Dabrafenib AUC(0-τ) increased 47%, with no change in C(max), after gemfibrozil co-administration. Gemfibrozil did not affect systemic exposure to dabrafenib metabolites. Single- and repeat-dose dabrafenib pharmacokinetics were consistent with previous reports. All cohorts used the commercial capsules. More-frequent monitoring of international normalized ratios is recommended in patients receiving warfarin during initiation or discontinuation of dabrafenib. Substitution of strong inhibitors or strong inducers of CYP3A or CYP2C8 is recommended during treatment with dabrafenib. PMID:25449654

  17. The ToxBank Data Warehouse: Supporting the Replacement of In Vivo Repeated Dose Systemic Toxicity Testing.

    PubMed

    Kohonen, Pekka; Benfenati, Emilio; Bower, David; Ceder, Rebecca; Crump, Michael; Cross, Kevin; Grafström, Roland C; Healy, Lyn; Helma, Christoph; Jeliazkova, Nina; Jeliazkov, Vedrin; Maggioni, Silvia; Miller, Scott; Myatt, Glenn; Rautenberg, Michael; Stacey, Glyn; Willighagen, Egon; Wiseman, Jeff; Hardy, Barry

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the SEURAT-1 (Safety Evaluation Ultimately Replacing Animal Testing-1) research cluster, comprised of seven EU FP7 Health projects co-financed by Cosmetics Europe, is to generate a proof-of-concept to show how the latest technologies, systems toxicology and toxicogenomics can be combined to deliver a test replacement for repeated dose systemic toxicity testing on animals. The SEURAT-1 strategy is to adopt a mode-of-action framework to describe repeated dose toxicity, combining in vitro and in silico methods to derive predictions of in vivo toxicity responses. ToxBank is the cross-cluster infrastructure project whose activities include the development of a data warehouse to provide a web-accessible shared repository of research data and protocols, a physical compounds repository, reference or "gold compounds" for use across the cluster (available via wiki.toxbank.net), and a reference resource for biomaterials. Core technologies used in the data warehouse include the ISA-Tab universal data exchange format, REpresentational State Transfer (REST) web services, the W3C Resource Description Framework (RDF) and the OpenTox standards. We describe the design of the data warehouse based on cluster requirements, the implementation based on open standards, and finally the underlying concepts and initial results of a data analysis utilizing public data related to the gold compounds. PMID:27481023

  18. Repeated Administration of High-Dose Intermittent Rifapentine Reduces Rifapentine and Moxifloxacin Plasma Concentrations▿

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, Kelly; Flexner, Charles; Hackman, Judith; Peloquin, Charles A.; Nuermberger, Eric; Chaisson, Richard E.; Dorman, Susan E.

    2008-01-01

    Moxifloxacin- and rifapentine-based regimens are under investigation for the treatment of tuberculosis. However, rifapentine may induce enzymes that metabolize moxifloxacin, resulting in decreased moxifloxacin concentrations. In this phase I, two-period, sequential-design study, 13 subjects received 400 mg moxifloxacin daily for 4 days followed by daily moxifloxacin coadministered with 900 mg rifapentine thrice weekly. Pharmacokinetic analyses were performed after the 4th and 19th doses of moxifloxacin and after the 1st and 7th doses of rifapentine. For moxifloxacin, the mean area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0-24) decreased by 17.2% (P = 0.0006) when the drug was coadministered with rifapentine, and the mean half-life (t1/2) decreased from 11.1 to 8.9 h (P = 0.0033). For rifapentine, the mean AUC0-48 after seven thrice-weekly doses decreased by 20.3% (P = 0.0035) compared to the AUC0-48 after the first dose, and the mean t1/2 decreased from 18.5 to 14.8 h (P = 0.0004). The AUC0-48 for the 25-desacetyl-rifapentine metabolite diminished 21%. Two days after completing the study drugs, one subject developed a fever and hepatitis, and another developed a flu-like illness with a rash. In conclusion, rifapentine modestly reduced moxifloxacin concentrations. Changes consistent with rifapentine autoinduction of metabolism were seen. Adverse reactions in two subjects may have represented rifamycin hypersensitivity syndrome, although some features were atypical. PMID:18765687

  19. The haemotoxicity of azathioprine in repeat dose studies in the female CD-1 mouse

    PubMed Central

    Molyneux, Gemma; Gibson, Frances M; Chen, Christabelle M; Marway, Harpal K; McKeag, Sean; Mifsud, Charles V J; Pilling, Andrew M; Whayman, Matthew J; Turton, John A

    2008-01-01

    Azathioprine (AZA) is a cytotoxic immunosuppressive drug used in the prevention of rejection in organ transplants and the treatment of auto-immune diseases. However, AZA is haemotoxic causing significant bone marrow depression. The present studies were to characterize the haemotoxicity of AZA in the female CD-1 mouse. In Experiment 1, a dose-ranging study, with AZA gavaged daily for 10 days, clinical evidence of toxicity was evident at 125 mg/kg and above. Experiment 2 was a dose–response study with AZA gavaged daily for 10 days at 40–120 mg/kg. At day 1 after the final dose, AZA induced a dose-related pancytopaenia, reduced femoral marrow cellularity, increases in serum levels of the cytokine fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand, reduction in granulocyte-monocyte colony-forming units and erythroid colonies, and increased bone marrow apoptosis. Histology demonstrated hepatocyte hypertrophy, thymic atrophy, reduced splenic extramedullary haemopoiesis, and reduced cellularity of sternal bone marrow. In Experiment 3, AZA was dosed for 10 days at 100 mg/kg with autopsies at 1, 3, 9, 22, 29, 43 and 57 days postdosing. At 1, 3 and 9 days, haematological parameters reflected changes in Experiment 2. At 22/29 days, many blood parameters were returning towards normal; at 43/57 days, most parameters compared with controls. However, there was some evidence of a persistent (i.e. residual/late-stage) mild reduction in RBC and erythroid progenitor cell counts at day 43/57. We conclude that the CD-1 mouse provides an acceptable model for the haemotoxicity of AZA in man. PMID:18336531

  20. Metabolite profiles of rats in repeated dose toxicological studies after oral and inhalative exposure.

    PubMed

    Fabian, E; Bordag, N; Herold, M; Kamp, H; Krennrich, G; Looser, R; Ma-Hock, L; Mellert, W; Montoya, G; Peter, E; Prokudin, A; Spitzer, M; Strauss, V; Walk, T; Zbranek, R; van Ravenzwaay, B

    2016-07-25

    The MetaMap(®)-Tox database contains plasma-metabolome and toxicity data of rats obtained from oral administration of 550 reference compounds following a standardized adapted OECD 407 protocol. Here, metabolic profiles for aniline (A), chloroform (CL), ethylbenzene (EB), 2-methoxyethanol (ME), N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and tetrahydrofurane (THF), dosed inhalatively for six hours/day, five days a week for 4 weeks were compared to oral dosing performed daily for 4 weeks. To investigate if the oral and inhalative metabolome would be comparable statistical analyses were performed. Best correlations for metabolome changes via both routes of exposure were observed for toxicants that induced profound metabolome changes. e.g. CL and ME. Liver and testes were correctly identified as target organs. In contrast, route of exposure dependent differences in metabolic profiles were noted for low profile strength e.g. female rats dosed inhalatively with A or THF. Taken together, the current investigations demonstrate that plasma metabolome changes are generally comparable for systemic effects after oral and inhalation exposure. Differences may result from kinetics and first pass effects. For compounds inducing only weak changes, the differences between both routes of exposure are visible in the metabolome. PMID:27153797

  1. A 4-week Repeated Dose Toxicity Study of Glycine in Rats by Gavage Administration

    PubMed Central

    Shibui, Yusuke; Miwa, Tadashi; Yamashita, Mayumi; Chin, Keigi; Kodama, Terutaka

    2013-01-01

    In order to examine the toxicity profile of glycine, an authorized food additive, a solution of glycine in water for injection was administered orally (via gavage) to male SD rats (Crl:CD(SD)) once daily for 4 weeks at doses of 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg/day in a volume of 10 mL/kg. Control animals received vehicle only. No animals died, and no glycine-related changes were observed in body weight, food consumption, water consumption, hematology, organ weight, gross pathological examination or histopathological examination. In urinalysis, daily urinary volume and urinary Cl excretion were significantly higher in the 2000 mg/kg/day dose group, and urine pH and urinary protein showed lower trends in the glycine-treated groups. However, these changes were considered to be of little toxicological significance, because there were no histopathological changes in the kidneys or urinary bladder and no changes in other urinary parameters. As regards blood chemistry, phospholipids were significantly higher in the 2000 mg/kg/day dose group. However, the increase was small and was not considered to be toxicologically significant. In conclusion, none of the animals in any of the glycine-treated groups showed changes that were considered toxicologically significant. Therefore, the no-observed-adverse-effect level of glycine was estimated to be at least 2000 mg/kg/day under the conditions of this study. PMID:24526813

  2. A 4-week Repeated Dose Toxicity Study of Glycine in Rats by Gavage Administration.

    PubMed

    Shibui, Yusuke; Miwa, Tadashi; Yamashita, Mayumi; Chin, Keigi; Kodama, Terutaka

    2013-12-01

    In order to examine the toxicity profile of glycine, an authorized food additive, a solution of glycine in water for injection was administered orally (via gavage) to male SD rats (Crl:CD(SD)) once daily for 4 weeks at doses of 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg/day in a volume of 10 mL/kg. Control animals received vehicle only. No animals died, and no glycine-related changes were observed in body weight, food consumption, water consumption, hematology, organ weight, gross pathological examination or histopathological examination. In urinalysis, daily urinary volume and urinary Cl excretion were significantly higher in the 2000 mg/kg/day dose group, and urine pH and urinary protein showed lower trends in the glycine-treated groups. However, these changes were considered to be of little toxicological significance, because there were no histopathological changes in the kidneys or urinary bladder and no changes in other urinary parameters. As regards blood chemistry, phospholipids were significantly higher in the 2000 mg/kg/day dose group. However, the increase was small and was not considered to be toxicologically significant. In conclusion, none of the animals in any of the glycine-treated groups showed changes that were considered toxicologically significant. Therefore, the no-observed-adverse-effect level of glycine was estimated to be at least 2000 mg/kg/day under the conditions of this study. PMID:24526813

  3. Period trends in rate of suicide in first 28 days after discharge from psychiatric hospital in Scotland, 1968-92.

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, J. R.; Juszczak, E.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine period trends in the rate of suicide in the first 28 days after discharge from psychiatric hospital. DESIGN--Cohort study of patients discharged from psychiatric hospital. SETTING--Scotland. SUBJECTS--All patients aged 15-84 who were discharged from Scottish psychiatric hospitals during 1968 to 1992. OUTCOME MEASURE--The rate of suicide (classified as codes E950-9 and E980-9 according to the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision) within 28 days of discharge per 100,000 person years at risk for five year periods during 1968 to 1992. Crude, within cohort rates and externally standardised rates were calculated. RESULTS--Overall, 196 male patients committed suicide in 20,520 person years at risk, and 171 female patients committed suicide in 24,114 person years at risk. A significant linear trend was seen in period effect on externally standardised mortality ratios in both sexes: a decrease in male patients (P = 0.008) and an increase in female patients (P = 0.0001). The adjusted standardised mortality ratio in 1988-92 compared with 1968-72 was 0.62 (95% confidence interval 0.39 to 0.98) in male patients and 2.73 (1.64 to 4.56) in female patients. CONCLUSION--The increase in the rate of suicide in the 28 days after discharge in female psychiatric patients makes this an increasingly important period to target. The rise has occurred against the background of a reduction of 60% in the number of psychiatric beds for adults. PMID:7640540

  4. Effects of 28-Day Beta-Alanine Supplementation on Isokinetic Exercise Performance and Body Composition in Female Masters Athletes.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Jordan M; Gray, Michelle; Stewart, Rodger W; Moyen, Nicole E; Kavouras, Stavros A; DiBrezzo, Ro; Turner, Ronna; Baum, Jamie I; Stone, Matthew S

    2016-01-01

    Beta-alanine (BA) supplementation increases exercise performance due to increases in the intramuscular lactate buffer, carnosine. Females are more sensitive to these increases and results are further pronounced in trained individuals. Baseline intramuscular carnosine levels also naturally decrease with age; therefore, trained older females may experience augmented benefits from BA supplementation. However, the ability of BA to increase lower-body isokinetic strength (ISO) in female masters athletes (MA) is unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the longitudinal effects of BA supplementation on ISO, handgrip strength (HG), and body composition in female MA cyclists. Twenty-two subjects participated in this double-blind randomized study. Subjects were randomized into 2 groups (placebo [PLA] = 8 g dextrose; BA = 800 mg + 8 g dextrose) and supplemented 4 times per day for 28 days. ISO, HG, and body composition were evaluated at baseline and at the same day/time each week over the 28-day intervention. No differences existed between groups at baseline or at the 7, 14, and 21 days time points for any variables (p > 0.05). When evaluating ISO (isokinetic) after 28 days, total work performed during the final third of the assessment (24.0 vs. -16.8% change) in flexion and average peak torque (5.4 vs. 2.9% change) in extension were significantly increased from baseline in BA compared with PLA (p ≤ 0.05). No differences existed for HG or body composition after supplementation. Twenty-eight days of BA supplementation increased peak torque and work completed, indicating BA improves lower-body exercise performance in female MA. PMID:26110349

  5. Ingesting a preworkout supplement containing caffeine, creatine, β-alanine, amino acids, and B vitamins for 28 days is both safe and efficacious in recreationally active men.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Kristina L; Moon, Jordan R; Fairman, Ciaran M; Spradley, Brandon D; Tai, Chih-Yin; Falcone, Paul H; Carson, Laura R; Mosman, Matt M; Joy, Jordan M; Kim, Michael P; Serrano, Eric R; Esposito, Enrico N

    2014-05-01

    oxygen consumption per unit time at which ventilatory threshold occurred (presupplementation, 64.38% ± 6.63%; postsupplementation, 70.63% ± 6.39%) and leg press one-repetition maximum (presupplementation, 218.75 ± 38.43 kg; postsupplementation, 228.75 ± 44.79 kg) were observed in the SUP only. No adverse effects were noted for renal and hepatic clinical blood markers, resting heart rate, or BP. Supplements containing similar ingredients and doses should be safe for ingestion periods lasting up to 28 days in healthy, recreationally trained, college-aged men. PMID:24916558

  6. Single- and Repeated-Dose Pharmacokinetics of Ceftaroline in Plasma and Soft Tissues of Healthy Volunteers for Two Different Dosing Regimens of Ceftaroline Fosamil.

    PubMed

    Matzneller, Peter; Lackner, Edith; Lagler, Heimo; Wulkersdorfer, Beatrix; Österreicher, Zoe; Zeitlinger, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Ceftaroline fosamil (CPT-F) is currently approved for use for the treatment of complicated skin and soft tissue infections and community-acquired pneumonia at 600 mg twice daily (q12h), but other dosing regimens are under evaluation. To date, very limited data on the soft tissue pharmacokinetics (PK) of the active compound, ceftaroline (CPT), are available. CPT concentrations in the plasma, muscle, and subcutis of 12 male healthy volunteers were measured by microdialysis after single and repeated intravenous administration of 600 mg CPT-F q12h or three times daily (q8h) in two groups of 6 subjects each. Relevant PK and PK/pharmacodynamic (PD) parameters were calculated and compared between groups. In plasma, the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) from 0 to 24 h for total CPT and the cumulative percentage of the dosing interval during which the free drug concentrations exceeded the MIC (fTMIC) for unbound CPT for the currently established threshold of 1 mg/liter were significantly higher in the group receiving CPT-F q8h. Exposure to free drug in soft tissues was higher in the group receiving CPT-F q8h, but high interindividual variability in relevant PK parameters was observed. The mean ratios of the AUC from time zero to the end of the dosing interval (AUC0-τ) for free CPT in soft tissues and the AUC0-τ for the calculated free fraction in plasma at steady state ranged from 0.66 to 0.75. Administration of CPT-F q8h led to higher levels of drug exposure in all investigated compartments. When MIC values above 1 mg/liter were assumed, the calculated fTMIC after dosing q12h was markedly lower than that after dosing q8h. The clinical implications of these differences are discussed in light of recently completed clinical phase III and PK/PD studies. PMID:27044549

  7. Pharmacokinetics and distribution of voriconazole in body fluids of dogs after repeated oral dosing.

    PubMed

    Lemetayer, J D; Dowling, P M; Taylor, S M; Papich, M G

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this project was to determine the pharmacokinetics of voriconazole and its concentration in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), aqueous humor, and synovial fluid in five healthy dogs following once daily oral dose of 6 mg/kg for 2 weeks. Body fluid and plasma drug concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Mild to moderate gastrointestinal adverse effects were seen. The mean AUC0-24 : minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ratio was 15.23 for a chosen MIC of 1 μg/mL, which is lower than the recommended target of 20-25 and also lower than previously reported in dogs, perhaps reflecting induction of metabolizing enzymes by multiple dosing. Voriconazole concentrations in the CSF, aqueous humor, and synovial fluid were only 13-30% the concurrent plasma concentration, which is lower than previously reported in other species. Results of this study suggest that twice daily, administration may be necessary to maintain therapeutic plasma concentrations in dogs but further studies are warranted. PMID:25691353

  8. Intra-tumor distribution of PEGylated liposome upon repeated injection: No possession by prior dose.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Abu Lila, Amr S; Nishio, Miho; Tanaka, Masao; Ando, Hidenori; Kiwada, Hiroshi; Ishida, Tatsuhiro

    2015-12-28

    Liposomes have proven to be a viable means for the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to solid tumors. However, significant variability has been detected in their intra-tumor accumulation and distribution, resulting in compromised therapeutic outcomes. We recently examined the intra-tumor accumulation and distribution of weekly sequentially administered oxaliplatin (l-OHP)-containing PEGylated liposomes. In that study, the first and second doses of l-OHP-containing PEGylated liposomes were distributed diversely and broadly within tumor tissues, resulting in a potent anti-tumor efficacy. However, little is known about the mechanism underlying such a diverse and broad liposome distribution. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the influence of dosage interval on the intra-tumor accumulation and distribution of "empty" PEGylated liposomes. Intra-tumor distribution of sequentially administered "empty" PEGylated liposomes was altered in a dosing interval-dependent manner. In addition, the intra-tumor distribution pattern was closely related to the chronological alteration of tumor blood flow as well as vascular permeability in the growing tumor tissue. These results suggest that the sequential administrations of PEGylated liposomes in well-spaced intervals might allow the distribution to different areas and enhance the total bulk accumulation within tumor tissue, resulting in better therapeutic efficacy of the encapsulated payload. This study may provide useful information for a better design of therapeutic regimens involving multiple administrations of nanocarrier drug delivery systems. PMID:26548975

  9. A Long-Acting Integrase Inhibitor Protects Female Macaques from Repeated High-Dose Intravaginal SHIV Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Chasity D.; Yueh, Yun Lan; Spreen, William R.; St. Bernard, Leslie; Boente-Carrera, Mar; Rodriguez, Kristina; Gettie, Agegnehu; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi; Blanchard, James; Ford, Susan; Mohri, Hiroshi; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia; Hong, Zhi; Ho, David D.; Markowitz, Martin

    2015-01-01

    GSK1265744 long-acting (GSK744 LA) is a strand-transfer inhibitor of HIV/SIV integrase and was shown to be an effective pre-exposure prophylaxis agent in a low-dose intrarectal SHIV rhesus macaque challenge model. Here, we examined the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of GSK744 LA as PrEP against repeat high-dose intravaginal SHIV challenge in female rhesus macaques treated with Depo-Provera which promotes viral transmission vaginally. When Depo-Provera-treated female rhesus macaques were dosed with 50 mg/kg of GSK744 LA monthly, systemic and tissue drug concentrations were lower than previously observed in male rhesus macaques. GSK744 concentrations were 5-fold lower on average in cervical tissues than rectal tissues. Eight female rhesus macaques were treated with GSK744 LA at week 0, and four female rhesus macaques served as controls. All animals received a high dose challenge of SHIV162P3 at week 1. No infection was detected in GSK744 LA-treated rhesus macaques, whereas viremia was detected 1 to 2 weeks after SHIV challenge in all control animals. The GSK744 LA-treated rhesus macaques were given a second administration of drug at week 4 and further challenged at weeks 5 and 7. GSK744 LA treatment protected 6 of 8 female rhesus macaques against three high-dose SHIV challenges, whereas all control animals became infected after the first challenge (P = 0.0003, log-rank test). These results support further clinical development of GSK744 LA for pre-exposure prophylaxis. PMID:25589630

  10. Acute and sub-chronic (28 days) oral toxicity evaluation of tincture Baccharis trimera (Less) Backer in male and female rodent animals.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Andreia R H; Reginato, Fernanda Z; Guex, Camille G; Figueredo, Kássia C; da C Araldi, Isabel C; de Freitas, Robson B; Boligon, Aline A; Athayde, Margareth L; Mazzanti, Cinthia Melazzo de Andrade; Hübscher, Gilberti H; de F Bauermann, Liliane

    2016-02-01

    The infusion of Baccharis trimera (Less) DC, popularly known as "carqueja" (broom), is popularly used in the treatment of hepatic and digestive problems. In this study, we evaluated the acute and sub-chronic oral toxicities of B. trimera tincture on male and female Wistar rats according to Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD, guidelines 423 e 407, respectively). The B. trimera tincture was administered by oral gavage in a single dose (2000 mg/kg) in doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg daily for 28 days. Blood was collected to analyze hematological and biochemical parameters. Kidneys and liver were homogenized to determine lipid peroxidation and δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (δ-ALA-D) and catalase (CAT) enzyme activities. In acute treatment, tincture did not induce any signs of toxicity or mortality. Daily oral administration produced no significant changes in the hematological and biochemical parameters, except for the hepatic enzymes alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) and aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT) that showed a reduction in both sexes. Moreover, the B. trimera tincture did not increase lipid peroxidation or affected ALA-D and CAT activities. In conclusion, the tincture of B. trimera may be considered relatively safe in this protocol. PMID:26522812

  11. Toxicological assessment of heavy straight run naphtha in a repeated dose/reproductive toxicity screening test.

    PubMed

    McKee, Richard H; Steup, David; Schreiner, Ceinwen; Podhasky, Paula; Malley, Linda A; Roberts, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Gasoline blending stocks (naphthas) are comprised of normal, iso- and cycloparaffins and aromatic hydrocarbons with carbon numbers ranging from C4 to C12. Heavy straight run naphtha (HSRN, CAS number 64741-41-9) was selected for toxicity screening because substances of this type contain relatively high levels (28%) of cycloparaffins by comparison to other naphtha streams and the data complement toxicity information on other gasoline blending streams. Rats were exposed by inhalation to wholly vaporized material at levels of approximately 100, 500, or 3000 parts per million (ppm) daily to screen the potential for systemic toxicity, neurotoxicity, reproductive toxicity, and developmental effects to postnatal day 4. All animals survived the treatment period. Principal effects of repeated exposure included increased liver weights in males and females, increased kidney weights in males, and histological changes in the thyroid, secondary to liver enzyme induction. These changes were not considered to be toxicologically meaningful and are not relevant to humans. There were no treatment-related effects in functional observation tests or motor activity; no significant reductions in fertility or changes in other reproductive parameters; and no evidence of developmental toxicity in offspring. The overall no observed adverse effect concentration was 3000 ppm (approximately 13, 600 mg/m(3)). In conclusion the HSRN effects on liver and kidney are consistent with the results of other studies of volatile fractions or other naphthas or formulated gasoline, and there were no HSRN effects on neurological developmental or reproductive parameters. PMID:24179027

  12. Defining upper gastrointestinal bleeding from linked primary and secondary care data and the effect on occurrence and 28 day mortality

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Primary care records from the UK have frequently been used to identify episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in studies of drug toxicity because of their comprehensive population coverage and longitudinal recording of prescriptions and diagnoses. Recent linkage within England of primary and secondary care data has augmented this data but the timing and coding of concurrent events, and how the definition of events in linked data effects occurrence and 28 day mortality is not known. Methods We used the recently linked English Hospital Episodes Statistics and General Practice Research Database, 1997–2010, to define events by; a specific upper gastrointestinal bleed code in either dataset, a specific bleed code in both datasets, or a less specific but plausible code from the linked dataset. Results This approach resulted in 81% of secondary care defined bleeds having a corresponding plausible code within 2 months in primary care. However only 62% of primary care defined bleeds had a corresponding plausible HES admission within 2 months. The more restrictive and specific case definitions excluded severe events and almost halved the 28 day case fatality when compared to broader and more sensitive definitions. Conclusions Restrictive definitions of gastrointestinal bleeding in linked datasets fail to capture the full heterogeneity in coding possible following complex clinical events. Conversely too broad a definition in primary care introduces events not severe enough to warrant hospital admission. Ignoring these issues may unwittingly introduce selection bias into a study’s results. PMID:23148590

  13. A 4-Week, Repeated, Intravenous Dose, Toxicity Test of Mountain Ginseng Pharmacopuncture in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwangho; Yu, Junsang; Sun, Seungho; Kwon, Kirok; Lim, Chungsan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Mountain ginseng pharmacopuncture (MGP) is a pharmacopuncture made by distilling extract from mountain cultivated ginseng or mountain wild ginseng. This pharmacopuncture is injected intravenously, which is a quick, lossless way of strongly tonifying Qi function. The present study was undertaken to evaluate a 4-week, repeated, intravenous injection, toxicity test of MGP in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Methods: Twenty male and female 6-week-old SD rats were used as subjects. We divided the SD rats into 4 groups: the high-dosage (10 mL/kg), medium-dosage (5 mL/kg), low-dosage (2.5 mL/kg) and control (normal saline) groups. MGP or normal saline was injected intravenously into the caudal vein of the rats once daily for 4 weeks. Clinical signs, body weights, and food consumption were monitored during the observation period, and hematology, serum biochemistry, organ weight, necropsy, and histological examinations were conducted once the observations had been completed. Results: No mortality was observed in any of the groups during the observation period. No changes due to MGP were observed in the experimental groups regarding clinical signs, body weights, food consumption, hematology, serum biochemistry, organ weight and necropsy. No histological changes due to MGP were observed in any of the male or female rats in the high-dosage group. Conclusion: During this 4-week, repeated, intravenous injection, toxicity test of MGP in SD rats, no toxic changes due to MGP were observed in any of the male or female rats in the high-dosage group. Thus, we suggest that the high and the low doses in a 13-week, repeated test should be 10 mL/kg and 2.5 mL/kg, respectively. PMID:25780717

  14. Real-time PCR quantification of infectious laryngotracheitis virus in chicken tissues, faeces, isolator-dust and bedding material over 28 days following infection reveals high levels in faeces and dust.

    PubMed

    Roy, Parimal; Fakhrul Islam, A F M; Burgess, Susan K; Hunt, Peter W; McNally, Jody; Walkden-Brown, Stephen W

    2015-11-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an important disease of chickens caused by ILT virus (ILTV). We used the Australian SA2 and A20 vaccine strains of ILTV to determine tissue distribution and excretion characteristics of ILTV in specific-pathogen-free chickens and to determine whether ILTV is readily detectable in environmental samples such as faeces, bedding material and dust using real-time quantitative PCR. Three groups of 10 freshly hatched chicks were placed in isolators and infected orally with high doses of the two strains of vaccine virus or left unchallenged as controls. Over a 28-day post-infection (p.i.) period, faecal and serum samples were collected at frequent intervals from six individually identified chickens in each group. Dust and litter samples from the isolators were collected less frequently. Tissue samples were collected from three to four sacrificed or dead/euthanized birds at 6, 14 and 28 days p.i. Infection resulted in clinical ILT, a pronounced antibody response and sustained qPCR detection of the viral genome in the trachea, Harderian gland, lung and kidney up to 28 days p.i. A high level of the viral genome was also detected in faeces between 2 and 7 days p.i., declining by about approximately four orders of magnitude to low, but detectable, levels at 21 and 28 days p.i. The finding of high-level shedding of ILTV in faeces warrants further investigation into the epidemiological role of this, and the sustained high levels of ILTV observed in dust suggest that it may be a useful sample material for monitoring ILTV status in flocks. PMID:26294959

  15. Combined repeated dose and reproductive/developmental toxicity screening test of 4-methoxy-2-nitroaniline in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsubokura, Yasuhiro; Aso, Sunao; Koga, Takayuki; Kikuchi, Junichi; Kobayashi, Toshio; Hoshuyama, Satsuki; Oshima, Yutaka; Miyata, Katsumi; Kusune, Yuji; Muroi, Takako; Yoshida, Tomohiko; Hasegawa, Ryuichi; Ajimi, Shozo; Furukawa, Kotaro

    2015-10-01

    4-Methoxy-2-nitroaniline (4M2NA) is widely used as an intermediate for the synthesis of dyes, pigments and other chemical compounds. Since 4M2NA has amino-group and nitro-group on the benzene ring, it was expected that it induced obvious hemolytic anemia. We conducted a combined repeated dose and reproductive/developmental toxicity screening test according to Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Test Guideline No. 422 (OECD TG 422) to enrich the toxic information and ensure the safety of 4M2NA. 4M2NA was administered to Crl:CD(SD) male and female rats by gavage at 0, 12.5, 75 or 450 mg/kg/day for 42 to maximum of 54 days through pre-mating, mating, pregnancy and lactation periods. An extramedullary hematopoiesis and congestion in spleen, and higher reticulocyte ratio were noted in only females at 450 mg/kg/day without decreased anemic parameters in the hematological examination. Hypertrophy of centrilobular hepatocytes in both sexes was observed with increased relative liver weight at 450 mg/kg/day. Furthermore, the diffuse follicular cell hypertrophy of the thyroid was observed in females at 450 mg/kg/day. No abnormalities were detected in the reproductive indices of copulation, delivery or fetal viability. We concluded the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for repeated-dose toxicity was 75 mg/kg/day based on the trace evidences of hemolytic anemia, and the NOAEL for reproductive/developmental toxicity as 450 mg/kg/day based on no toxicological concerns for reproductive endpoints. The hemolytic anemia was much milder than expected. Thus, we discussed the reason of this much less hemolytic effect from the point of view of the structural characteristics of 4M2NA. PMID:25367778

  16. Utility of models to predict 28-day or 30-day unplanned hospital readmissions: an updated systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huaqiong; Della, Phillip R; Roberts, Pamela; Goh, Louise; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S

    2016-01-01

    Objective To update previous systematic review of predictive models for 28-day or 30-day unplanned hospital readmissions. Design Systematic review. Setting/data source CINAHL, Embase, MEDLINE from 2011 to 2015. Participants All studies of 28-day and 30-day readmission predictive model. Outcome measures Characteristics of the included studies, performance of the identified predictive models and key predictive variables included in the models. Results Of 7310 records, a total of 60 studies with 73 unique predictive models met the inclusion criteria. The utilisation outcome of the models included all-cause readmissions, cardiovascular disease including pneumonia, medical conditions, surgical conditions and mental health condition-related readmissions. Overall, a wide-range C-statistic was reported in 56/60 studies (0.21–0.88). 11 of 13 predictive models for medical condition-related readmissions were found to have consistent moderate discrimination ability (C-statistic ≥0.7). Only two models were designed for the potentially preventable/avoidable readmissions and had C-statistic >0.8. The variables ‘comorbidities’, ‘length of stay’ and ‘previous admissions’ were frequently cited across 73 models. The variables ‘laboratory tests’ and ‘medication’ had more weight in the models for cardiovascular disease and medical condition-related readmissions. Conclusions The predictive models which focused on general medical condition-related unplanned hospital readmissions reported moderate discriminative ability. Two models for potentially preventable/avoidable readmissions showed high discriminative ability. This updated systematic review, however, found inconsistent performance across the included unique 73 risk predictive models. It is critical to define clearly the utilisation outcomes and the type of accessible data source before the selection of the predictive model. Rigorous validation of the predictive models with moderate-to-high discriminative

  17. Zinc oxide nanoparticles: a 90-day repeated-dose dermal toxicity study in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hwa Jung; Seo, Mu Yeb; Jung, Sung Kyu; Maeng, Eun Ho; Lee, Seung-Young; Jang, Dong-Hyouk; Lee, Taek-Jin; Jo, Ki-Yeon; Kim, Yu-Ri; Cho, Kyu-Bong; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Lee, Beom Jun; Son, Sang Wook

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) works as a long-lasting, broad-spectrum physical sunblock, and can prevent skin cancer, sunburn, and photoaging. Nanosized ZnO particles are used often in sunscreens due to consumer preference over larger sizes, which appear opaque when dermally applied. Although the US Food and Drug Administration approved the use of nanoparticles (NPs) in sunscreens in 1999, there are ongoing safety concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate the subchronic toxicity of ZnO NPs after dermal application according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Test Guidelines 411 using Good Laboratory Practice. Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into eight (one control, one vehicle control, three experimental, and three recovery) groups. Different concentrations of ZnO NPs were dermally applied to the rats in the experimental groups for 90 days. Clinical observations as well as weight and food consumption were measured and recorded daily. Hematology and biochemistry parameters were determined. Gross pathologic and histopathologic examinations were performed on selected tissues from all animals. Analyses of tissue were undertaken to determine target organ tissue distribution. There was no increased mortality in the experimental group. Although there was dose-dependent irritation at the site of application, there were no abnormal findings related to ZnO NPs in other organs. Increased concentrations of ZnO in the liver, small intestine, large intestine, and feces were thought to result from oral ingestion of ZnO NPs via licking. Penetration of ZnO NPs through the skin seemed to be limited via the dermal route. This study demonstrates that there was no observed adverse effect of ZnO NPs up to 1,000 mg/kg body weight when they are applied dermally. PMID:25565832

  18. 13-week repeated dose toxicity study of l-tyrosine in rats by daily oral administration.

    PubMed

    Shibui, Yusuke; Manabe, Yasuhiro; Kodama, Terutaka; Gonsho, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the potential toxicity of l-tyrosine, 4 groups of Crl:CD(SD) rats of both sexes were administered l-tyrosine in water suspension by gavage once daily for 13 weeks at doses of 0 (vehicle), 200, 600 or 2000 mg/kg bw/day. Findings related to l-tyrosine administration were as follows. Edema of the cornified layer at the limiting ridge or forestomach was seen in 600 mg/kg bw/day female group and in both sexes of 2000 mg/kg bw/day group. In the liver, increased weight and hypertrophy of centrilobular hepatocytes were seen in both sexes at 2000 mg/kg bw/day, associated with slight increases in ALT and AST. Regarding the kidney morphology and function, increased hyaline droplets in the proximal tubules and increased urinary protein were seen in the 2000 mg/kg bw/day male group. In addition, increased kidney weight was also observed in both sexes of the 2000 mg/kg bw/day group, although the histological changes attributable to the weight increase remained unclear. As for blood chemistry, increases in triglycerides, total cholesterol, phospholipids, potassium ion, calcium, total protein, and α1 globulin were also seen in both sexes at 2000 mg/kg bw/day. Thus, in this study the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of l-tyrosine was considered to be 600 mg/kg bw/day for males and 200 mg/kg bw/day for females. PMID:26646752

  19. Zinc oxide nanoparticles: a 90-day repeated-dose dermal toxicity study in rats.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hwa Jung; Seo, Mu Yeb; Jung, Sung Kyu; Maeng, Eun Ho; Lee, Seung-Young; Jang, Dong-Hyouk; Lee, Taek-Jin; Jo, Ki-Yeon; Kim, Yu-Ri; Cho, Kyu-Bong; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Lee, Beom Jun; Son, Sang Wook

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) works as a long-lasting, broad-spectrum physical sunblock, and can prevent skin cancer, sunburn, and photoaging. Nanosized ZnO particles are used often in sunscreens due to consumer preference over larger sizes, which appear opaque when dermally applied. Although the US Food and Drug Administration approved the use of nanoparticles (NPs) in sunscreens in 1999, there are ongoing safety concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate the subchronic toxicity of ZnO NPs after dermal application according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Test Guidelines 411 using Good Laboratory Practice. Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into eight (one control, one vehicle control, three experimental, and three recovery) groups. Different concentrations of ZnO NPs were dermally applied to the rats in the experimental groups for 90 days. Clinical observations as well as weight and food consumption were measured and recorded daily. Hematology and biochemistry parameters were determined. Gross pathologic and histopathologic examinations were performed on selected tissues from all animals. Analyses of tissue were undertaken to determine target organ tissue distribution. There was no increased mortality in the experimental group. Although there was dose-dependent irritation at the site of application, there were no abnormal findings related to ZnO NPs in other organs. Increased concentrations of ZnO in the liver, small intestine, large intestine, and feces were thought to result from oral ingestion of ZnO NPs via licking. Penetration of ZnO NPs through the skin seemed to be limited via the dermal route. This study demonstrates that there was no observed adverse effect of ZnO NPs up to 1,000 mg/kg body weight when they are applied dermally. PMID:25565832

  20. Advantages of Repeated Low Dose against Single High Dose of Kainate in C57BL/6J Mouse Model of Status Epilepticus: Behavioral and Electroencephalographic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Beamer, Edward; Sills, Graeme J.; Thippeswamy, Thimmasettappa

    2014-01-01

    A refined kainate (KA) C57BL/6J mouse model of status epilepticus (SE) using a repeated low dose (RLD) of KA (5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal; at 30 min intervals) was compared with the established single high dose (SHD) of KA (20 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) model. In the RLD group, increased duration of convulsive motor seizures (CMS, Racine scale stage ≥3) with a significant reduction in mortality from 21% to 6% and decreased variability in seizure severity between animals/batches were observed when compared to the SHD group. There was a significant increase in the percentage of animals that reached stage-5 seizures (65% versus 96%) in the RLD group. Integrated real-time video-EEG analysis of both groups, using NeuroScore software, revealed stage-specific spikes and power spectral density characteristics. When the seizures progressed from non-convulsive seizures (NCS, stage 1–2) to CMS (stage 3–5), the delta power decreased which was followed by an increase in gamma and beta power. A transient increase in alpha and sigma power marked the transition from NCS to CMS with characteristic ‘high frequency trigger’ spikes on the EEG, which had no behavioral expression. During SE the spike rate was higher in the RLD group than in the SHD group. Overall these results confirm that RLD of KA is a more robust and consistent mouse model of SE than the SHD of KA mouse model. PMID:24802808

  1. Toxicity evaluation of zinc aluminium levodopa nanocomposite via oral route in repeated dose study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kura, Aminu Umar; Cheah, Pike-See; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Hassan, Zurina; Tengku Azmi, Tengku Ibrahim; Hussein, Nor Fuzina; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2014-05-01

    nanocomposite; it is also dose-dependent that needs further assessment.

  2. Toxicity evaluation of zinc aluminium levodopa nanocomposite via oral route in repeated dose study.

    PubMed

    Kura, Aminu Umar; Cheah, Pike-See; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Hassan, Zurina; Tengku Azmi, Tengku Ibrahim; Hussein, Nor Fuzina; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2014-01-01

    orally administered levodopa intercalated nanocomposite; it is also dose-dependent that needs further assessment. PMID:24948886

  3. Repeated, high-dose dextromethorphan treatment decreases neurogenesis and results in depression-like behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Po, Kai Ting; Siu, Andrew Man-Hong; Lau, Benson Wui-Man; Chan, Jackie Ngai-Man; So, Kwok-Fai; Chan, Chetwyn C H

    2015-07-01

    Abuse of cough mixture is increasingly prevalent worldwide. Clinical studies showed that chronic consumption of cough mixture at high dosages may lead to psychiatric symptoms, especially affective disturbances, with the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The present study aims at exploring the effect of repeated, high-dose dextromethorphan (DXM, a common active component of cough mixture) treatment on adult hippocampal neurogenesis, which is associated with pathophysiology of mood disturbances. After treatment with a high-dose of DXM (40 mg/kg/day) for 2 weeks, Sprague-Dawley rats showed increased depression-like behavior when compared to the control animals. Neurogenesis in the hippocampus was suppressed by DXM treatment, which was indicated by decreases in number of proliferative cells and doublecortin (an immature neuron marker)-positive new neurons. Furthermore, the dendritic complexity of the immature neurons was suppressed by DXM treatment. These findings suggest that DXM induces depression- and anxiety-like behavior and suppresses neurogenesis in rats. The current experimental paradigm may serve as an animal model for study on affective effect of cough mixture abuse, rehabilitation treatment options for abusers and the related neurological mechanisms. PMID:25939533

  4. Safety assessment of SDA soybean oil: results of a 28-day gavage study and a 90-day/one generation reproduction feeding study in rats.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Bruce G; Lemen, Joan K; Ahmed, Gulam; Miller, Kathleen D; Kirkpatrick, Jeannie; Fleeman, Tammye

    2008-12-01

    Long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) in the diet reduce risk of cardiac mortality. Fish oils are a dietary source of LC-PUFAs (EPA, DHA) but intake is low in Western diets. Adding beneficial amounts of LC-PUFAs to foods is limited by their instability and potential to impart off-flavors. Stearidonic acid (SDA), a precursor of EPA in man, is more stable than EPA/DHA in food matrices. SDA is present in fish oils (0.5-4%) and in nutraceuticals (echium, borage oil). Genes for Delta6, Delta15 desaturases were introduced into soybeans that convert linoleic and alpha-linolenic acid to SDA (15-30% fatty acids). Since addition of SDA soybean oil into human foods increases SDA intake, toxicology studies were undertaken to assess its safety. In a 28-day pilot study, rats were gavaged with SDA soybean oil at dosages up to 3g/kg body weight/day; no treatment-related adverse effects were observed. A 90-day/one generation rat reproduction study was subsequently conducted where SDA soybean oil was added to diets to provide daily doses of 1.5 and 4 g/kg body weight. There were no treatment-related adverse effects on parental animals or on reproductive performance and progeny development. PMID:18804141

  5. Absence of adverse effects of sodium metabisulphite in manufactured biscuits: results of subacute (28-days) and subchronic (85-days) feeding studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Ribera, D; Jonker, D; Narbonne, J F; O'Brien, J; Antignac, E

    2001-02-01

    Sulphites are extensively used in the food and drinks industry. Their toxicity has been previously evaluated by addition to the diet or drinking water of laboratory animals. Because interactions between sulphites and food constituents occur, the present work was conducted to determine the subacute and subchronic toxicity of sulphite-bound compounds in a finished product: manufactured biscuits. The studies were performed on Sprague Dawley, rats for 28 and 85 days of dietary exposure. Diets were prepared from sulphited or untreated (controls) biscuits with the addition of sugar, protein, vitamins and minerals according to the nutritional requirements of the animals. Groups of 10 male and 10 female rats were administered diets containing sulphited biscuits at levels of 0, 10, 35 and 75%, corresponding to 10-15, 35-45, 150-170 and 310-340 mg SO2/kg diet. In both studies, no death or clinical abnormalities were reported. Growth rate, food consumption and food conversion efficiency were not affected by treatment. No dose-related changes were observed for haematology, clinical chemistry, ocular examination, renal-function, urinalysis, organ weights or gross and microscopic examinations. The liver concentrations of vitamins A, B1, C and E were not significantly changed except for an increase in vitamin E in high-dose males after 28 days' exposure. Based on these data, the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of sulphites in baked biscuits was judged to be 310 mg SO2/kg diet or 25 mg/kg body weight/day. PMID:11288907

  6. Intakes of culinary herbs and spices from a food frequency questionnaire evaluated against 28-days estimated records

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Worldwide, herbs and spices are much used food flavourings. However, little data exist regarding actual dietary intake of culinary herbs and spices. We developed a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for the assessment of habitual diet the preceding year, with focus on phytochemical rich food, including herbs and spices. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the intakes of herbs and spices from the FFQ with estimates of intake from another dietary assessment method. Thus we compared the intake estimates from the FFQ with 28 days of estimated records of herb and spice consumption as a reference method. Methods The evaluation study was conducted among 146 free living adults, who filled in the FFQ and 2-4 weeks later carried out 28 days recording of herb and spice consumption. The FFQ included a section with questions about 27 individual culinary herbs and spices, while the records were open ended records for recording of herbs and spice consumption exclusively. Results Our study showed that the FFQ obtained slightly higher estimates of total intake of herbs and spices than the total intake assessed by the Herbs and Spice Records (HSR). The correlation between the two assessment methods with regard to total intake was good (r = 0.5), and the cross-classification suggests that the FFQ may be used to classify subjects according to total herb and spice intake. For the 8 most frequently consumed individual herbs and spices, the FFQ obtained good estimates of median frequency of intake for 2 herbs/spices, while good estimates of portion sizes were obtained for 4 out of 8 herbs/spices. Conclusions Our results suggested that the FFQ was able to give good estimates of frequency of intake and portion sizes on group level for several of the most frequently used herbs and spices. The FFQ was only able to fairly rank subjects according to frequency of intake of the 8 most frequently consumed herbs and spices. Other studies are warranted to further explore the

  7. Cellular analysis of residual hemopoietic deficiencies in mice after 4 repeated doses of 4. 5 Gray x rays

    SciTech Connect

    Hendry, J.H.; Xu, C.X.; Testa, N.G.

    1983-11-01

    A sub-optimal plateau in numbers of femoral stem-cells (CFU-S) in mice after 4 doses of 4.5 Gray x rays (each separated by 21 days), was shown to persist at 20 to 30% of control up to 1 year after the last dose, when about 50% of the mice had survived. The concentration of white cells in the blood was maintained persistently at about 70% of control, whereas the concentration of red cells was normal up to 4 months and then it declined to about 75% of control at 10 months after irradiation. Concentrations of some committed progenitor cells in the marrow (GM-CFC and ERC), which are capable of amplification cell divisions, were intermediate between the concentrations of marrow stem cells and mature blood cells in both the granuloid and the erythroid cell lineages, respectively. Hence increased amplification was a mechanism operating for a prolonged period in the production of numbers of mature cells. The numbers were subnormal, however, and this corresponded to only 1 extra amplification division on average. There was a slow decline after 6 months in the numbers of CFU-S, BFU-E and GM-CFC, and in the hematocrit, with reference to age-matched controls. The decline was due partly to a prevention of the natural increase in cell numbers in the marrow with the age of the mice, which was also seen with the femoral content of a stromal progenitor cell (CFU-F). A defect in the repeatedly-irradiated CFU-S population was detected as a persistent inability to produce colonies containing the same number of daughter CFU-S as contained in colonies derived from unirradiated marrow and assayed at the same time.

  8. Phenolic acid protects of renal damage induced by ochratoxin A in a 28-days-oral treatment in rats.

    PubMed

    Cariddi, L N; Escobar, F M; Sabini, M C; Campra, N A; Bagnis, G; Decote-Ricardo, D; Freire-de-Lima, C G; Mañas, F; Sabini, L I; Dalcero, A M

    2016-04-01

    The present study aimed to characterize the chlorogenic acid (ChlA) capacity to reverse the toxic effects induced by ochratoxin A (OTA) in a subacute toxicity test in rats. Male Wistar rats were fed orally by gavage for 28 days with OTA (0.4mg/kg bw/day), ChlA (5mg/kg bw/day) or the combination OTA (0.4mg/kg bw/day)+ChlA (5mg/kg bw/day). No deaths, no decrease in feed intake or body weight in any experimental group were recorded. The negative control group and the animals treated with ChlA alone showed no changes in any parameters evaluated. In OTA-treated group significant changes such as decrease in urine volume, proteinuria, occult blood, increase in serum creatinine values; decrease in absolute and relative kidney weight and characteristics histopathological lesions that indicated kidney damage were observed. However, limited effect on oxidative stress parameters were detected in kidneys of OTA-treated group. Animals treated with the combination OTA+ChlA were showed as negative control group in the evaluation of several parameters of toxicity. In conclusion, ChlA, at given concentration, improved biochemical parameters altered in urine and serum and pathological damages in kidneys induced by OTA exposure, showing a good protective activity, but not by an apparent antioxidant mechanism. PMID:26987112

  9. Assessing Sediment Toxicity from Navigational Pools of the Upper Mississippi River Using a 28-Day Hyalella azteca Test

    PubMed

    Kemble; Brunson; Canfield; Dwyer; Ingersoll

    1998-08-01

    To assess the extent of sediment contamination in the Upper Mississippi River (UMR) system after the flood of 1993, sediment samples were collected from 24 of the 26 navigational pools in the river and from one site in the Saint Croix River in the summer of 1994. Whole-sediment tests were conducted with the amphipod Hyalella azteca for 28 days measuring the effects on survival, growth, and sexual maturation. Amphipod survival was significantly reduced in only one sediment (13B) relative to the control and reference sediments. Body length of amphipods was significantly reduced relative to the control and reference sediments in only one sample (26C). Sexual maturation was not significantly reduced in any treatment when compared to the control and reference sediments. No significant correlations were observed between survival, growth, and maturation to either the physical or chemical characteristics of the sediment samples from the river. When highly reliable effect range medians (ERMs) were used to evaluate sediment chemistry, 47 of 49 (96%) of the samples were correctly classified as nontoxic. These results indicate that sediment samples from the Upper Mississippi River are relatively uncontaminated compared to other areas of known contamination in the United States. PMID:9680510

  10. Psychomotor performance during a 28 day head-down tilt with and without lower body negative pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traon, A. Pavy-le; de Feneyrols, A. Rous; Cornac, A.; Abdeseelam, R.; N'uygen, D.; Lazerges, M.; Güell, A.; Bes, A.

    Several factors may affect psychomotor performance in space: sensory-motor changes, sleep disturbances, psychological modifications induced by the social isolation and confinement. However, psychomotor performance is difficult to assess. A battery of standardized and computerized tests, so-called "Automated Portable Test System" (APTS) was devised to ascertain the cognitive, perceptive and motor abilities and their possible fluctuations according to environmental effects. Antiorthostatic bedrest, often used to simulate weightlessness, (particularly cardiovascular modifications) also constitutes a situation of social confinement and isolation. During two bedrest experiments (with head-down tilt of -6°) of 28 days each, we intended to assess psychomotor performance of 6 males so as to determine whether: —on the one hand, it could be altered by remaining in decubitus; —on the other, the Lower Body Negative Pressure sessions, designed to prevent orthostatic intolerance back on Earth, could improve the performance. To accomplish this, part of the APTS tests as well as an automated perceptive attention test were performed. No downgrading of psychomotor performance was observed. On the contrary, the tasks were more accurately performed over time. In order to assess the experimental conditions on the acquisition phase, the learning curves were modelled. A beneficial effect of the LBNP sessions on simple tests involving the visual-motor coordination and attention faculties can only be regarded as a mere trend. Methods used in this experiment are also discussed.

  11. Assessing sediment toxicity from navigational pools of the Upper Mississippi River using a 28-day Hyalella azteca test

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kemble, N.E.; Brunson, E.L.; Canfield, T.J.; Dwyer, F.J.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    1998-01-01

    To assess the extent of sediment contamination in the Upper Mississippi River (UMR) system after the flood of 1993, sediment samples were collected from 24 of the 26 navigational pools in the river and from one site in the Saint Croix River in the summer of 1994. Whole-sediment tests were conducted with the amphipod Hyalella azteca for 28 days measuring the effects on survival, growth, and sexual maturation. Amphipod survival was significantly reduced in only one sediment (13B) relative to the control and reference sediments. Body length of amphipods was significantly reduced relative to the control and reference sediments in only one sample (26C). Sexual maturation was not significantly reduced in any treatment when compared to the control and reference sediments. No significant correlations were observed between survival, growth, and maturation to either the physical or chemical characteristics of the sediment samples from the river. When highly reliable effect range medians (ERMs) were used to evaluate sediment chemistry, 47 of 49 (96%) of the samples were correctly classified as nontoxic. These results indicate that sediment samples from the Upper Mississippi River are relatively uncontaminated compared to other areas of known contamination in the United States.

  12. Characterization of pulmonary protein profiles in response to zinc oxide nanoparticles in mice: a 24-hour and 28-day follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chih-Hong; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Chen, Jen-Kun; Hsiao, Ta-Chih; Lai, Ching-Huang; Jones, Tim P; BéruBé, Kelly A; Hong, Gui-Bing; Ho, Kin-Fai; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Although zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) are recognized to cause systemic disorders, little is known about the mechanisms that underlie the time-dependent differences that occur after exposure. The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanistic differences at 24 hours and 28 days after the exposure of BALB/c mice to ZnONPs via intratracheal instillation. An isobaric tag for the relative and absolute quantitation coupled with liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the differential protein expression, biological processes, molecular functions, and pathways. A total of 18 and 14 proteins displayed significant changes in the lung tissues at 24 hours and 28 days after exposure, respectively, with the most striking changes being observed for S100-A9 protein. Metabolic processes and catalytic activity were the main biological processes and molecular functions, respectively, in the responses at the 24-hour and 28-day follow-up times. The glycolysis/gluconeogenesis pathway was continuously downregulated from 24 hours to 28 days, whereas detoxification pathways were activated at the 28-day time-point after exposure. A comprehensive understanding of the potential time-dependent effects of exposure to ZnONPs was provided, which highlights the metabolic mechanisms that may be important in the responses to ZnONP. PMID:26251593

  13. Characterization of pulmonary protein profiles in response to zinc oxide nanoparticles in mice: a 24-hour and 28-day follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chih-Hong; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Chen, Jen-Kun; Hsiao, Ta-Chih; Lai, Ching-Huang; Jones, Tim P; BéruBé, Kelly A; Hong, Gui-Bing; Ho, Kin-Fai; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Although zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) are recognized to cause systemic disorders, little is known about the mechanisms that underlie the time-dependent differences that occur after exposure. The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanistic differences at 24 hours and 28 days after the exposure of BALB/c mice to ZnONPs via intratracheal instillation. An isobaric tag for the relative and absolute quantitation coupled with liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the differential protein expression, biological processes, molecular functions, and pathways. A total of 18 and 14 proteins displayed significant changes in the lung tissues at 24 hours and 28 days after exposure, respectively, with the most striking changes being observed for S100-A9 protein. Metabolic processes and catalytic activity were the main biological processes and molecular functions, respectively, in the responses at the 24-hour and 28-day follow-up times. The glycolysis/gluconeogenesis pathway was continuously downregulated from 24 hours to 28 days, whereas detoxification pathways were activated at the 28-day time-point after exposure. A comprehensive understanding of the potential time-dependent effects of exposure to ZnONPs was provided, which highlights the metabolic mechanisms that may be important in the responses to ZnONP. PMID:26251593

  14. Nutrition Composition and Single, 14-Day and 13-Week Repeated Oral Dose Toxicity Studies of the Leaves and Stems of Rubus coreanus Miquel.

    PubMed

    Om, Ae-Son; Song, Yu-Na; Noh, GeonMin; Kim, HaengRan; Choe, JeongSook

    2016-01-01

    The leaves and stems of the plant Rubus coreanus Miquel (RCMLS) are rich in vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals which have antioxidant, anti-hemolytic, anti-inflammatory, anti-fatigue and anti-cancer effects. However, RCMLS is not included in the Korean Food Standards Codex due to the lack of safety assurance concerning RCMLS. We evaluated single and repeated oral dose toxicity of RCMLS in Sprague-Dawley rats. RCMLS did not induce any significant toxicological changes in both male and female rats at a single doses of 2500 mg/kg/day. Repeated oral dose toxicity studies showed no adverse effects in clinical signs, body weight, food consumption, ophthalmic examination, urinalysis, hematology, serum biochemistry, necropsy findings, organ weight, and histopathology at doses of 625, 1250, and 2500 mg/kg/day. The LD50 and LOAEL of RCMLS might be over 2500 mg/kg body weight/day and no target organs were identified. Therefore, this study revealed that single and repeated oral doses of RCMLS are safe. PMID:26760987

  15. Threshold-like dose of local beta irradiation repeated throughout the life span of mice for induction of skin and bone tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Ootsuyama, A.; Tanooka, H. )

    1991-01-01

    The backs of female ICR mice were irradiated with beta rays from 90Sr-90Y three times a week throughout life. Previously we observed 100% tumor incidence at five different dose levels ranging from 1.5 to 11.8 Gy per exposure, but no tumor on repeated irradiation with 1.35 Gy for 300 days. In the present study, delay of tumor development was again seen at a dose of 1.5 Gy per exposure, with further delay at 1.0 Gy. The final tumor incidence was 100% with these two doses. At 0.75 Gy per exposure, no tumor appeared within 790 days after the start of irradiation, but one osteosarcoma and one squamous cell carcinoma did finally appear. These findings indicate a threshold-like response of tumor induction in this repeated irradiation system and further suggest that the apparent threshold may be somewhat less than 0.75 Gy per exposure.

  16. Reduction of suture associated inflammation after 28 days using novel biocompatible pseudoprotein poly(ester amide) biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Karina A; Hooper, Rachel Campbell; Boyko, Tatiana; Golas, Alyssa R; van Harten, Michel; Wu, D Q; Weinstein, Andrew; Chu, C C; Spector, Jason A

    2015-02-01

    Sutures elicit an inflammatory response, which may impede the healing process and result in wound complications. We recently reported a novel family of biocompatible, biodegradable polymers, amino acid-based poly(ester amide)s (AA-PEA), which we have shown to significantly attenuate the foreign body inflammatory response in vitro. Two types of AA-PEA (Phe-PEA and Arg-Phe-PEA) were used to coat silk or plain-gut sutures, which were implanted in the gluteus muscle of C57BL/6 mice, while the uncoated control sutures were implanted in the contralateral side. After 3, 7, 14, and 28 days the mean area of inflammation surrounding the sutures was compared. Phe-PEA coating of silk sutures significantly decreased inflammation compared with noncoated controls (67.8 ± 17.4% after 3d [p = 0.0014], 51.6 ± 7.2% after 7d [p < 0.001], and 37.3 ± 8.3% after 28d [p = 0.0001]) when assessed via analysis of photomicrographs using digital image software. Phe-PEA coated plain-gut sutures were similarly assessed and demonstrated a significant decrease in the mean area of inflammation across all time points (54.1 ± 8.3% after 3 d, 41.4 ± 3.9% after 7 d, 71.5 ± 8.1% after 14 d, 78.4 ± 8.5%, and after 28 d [all p < 0.0001]). Arg-Phe-PEA coated silk demonstrated significantly less inflammation compared to noncoated controls (61.3 ± 9.4% after 3 d, 44.7 ± 4.7% after 7 d, 19.6 ± 8%, and 38.3 ± 6.8% after 28 d [all p < 0.0001]), as did coated plain-gut (37.4 ± 8.3% after 3 d [p = 0.0004], 55.0 ± 7.8% after 7 d [p < 0.0001], 46.0 ± 4.6% after 14 d [p < 0.0001], and 59.0 ± 7.9% after 28 d [p < 0.0001]). Both Phe-PEA and Arg-Phe-PEA coatings significantly decrease the inflammatory response to sutures in vivo for up to 28 days. PMID:24916020

  17. Collaborative work on evaluation of ovarian toxicity. 6) Two- or four-week repeated-dose studies and fertility study of cisplatin in female rats.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Yusuke; Furubo, Eiko; Matsuno, Takayuki; Fukui, Rie; Kizawa, Kazuo; Kozaki, Tsukasa; Sanzen, Takahiro

    2009-01-01

    The main aim of the present study is to determine the optimal administration period of cisplatin with regards to its toxic effects on ovarian morphology in the repeated-dose toxicity study. Cisplatin was administered to female SD rats intraperitoneally once daily at dose levels of 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg for 2 weeks, or at dose levels of 0.125, 0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg for 4 weeks in the repeated-dose toxicity study. In the female fertility study, 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg of cisplatin were administered in the same manner from 14 days prior to mating to Day 7 of gestation. In the repeated-dose toxicity study, a decrease in large follicle, an increase in atresia of medium and large follicles, and/or a decrease in currently formed corpus luteum were observed in animals receiving 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg for 2 weeks, and decreases in small and/or large follicles and an increase in atresia of large follicle were observed in animals receiving 0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg for 4 weeks on the histopathological examination of the ovaries. In the female fertility study, the copulation and fertility indices in the animals receiving 1.0 mg/kg tended to be lower than those in the control animals. In conclusion, histopathological changes in the ovary that were attributable to cisplatin dosing were detected by detailed observation of the ovary in the 2-week study; and therefore, a 2-week administration period is sufficient to evaluate the ovarian toxicity of cisplatin. PMID:19265292

  18. An 18-Month Study of the Safety and Efficacy of Repeated Courses of Inhaled Aztreonam Lysine in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Oermann, Christopher M.; Retsch-Bogart, George Z.; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Gibson, Ronald L.; McCoy, Karen S.; Montgomery, A. Bruce; Cooper, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Chronic airway infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) causes morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Additional anti-PA therapies are needed to improve health status and health-related quality of life. AIR-CF3 was an international 18-month, open-label study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of repeated courses of aztreonam for inhalation solution (AZLI, now marketed as Cayston®) in patients aged ≥6 years with CF and PA infection who previously participated in one of two Phase 3 studies: AIR-CF1 or AIR-CF2. Patients received up to nine courses (28 days on/28 days off) of 75 mg AZLI two (BID) or three times daily (TID) based on randomization in the previous trials. 274 patients, mean age 28.5 years (range: 8–74 years), participated. Mean treatment adherence was high (92.0% BID group, 88.0% TID group). Hospitalization rates were low and adverse events were consistent with CF With each course of AZLI, FEV1 and scores on the Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire-Revised Respiratory Symptomscale improved and bacterial density in sputum was reduced. Benefits waned in the 28 days off therapy, but weight gain was sustained over the 18months. There were no sustained decreases in PA susceptibility. A dose response was observed; AZLI TID-treated patients demonstrated greater improvements in lung function and respiratory symptoms over 18 months. Repeated intermittent 28-day courses of AZLI treatment were well tolerated. Clinical benefits in pulmonary function, health-related quality of life, and weight were observed with each course of therapy. AZLI is a safe and effective new therapy in patients with CF and PA airway infection. PMID:20672296

  19. Use of a statistical model to predict the potential for repeated dose and developmental toxicity of dermally administered crude oil and relation to reproductive toxicity.

    PubMed

    McKee, Richard H; Nicolich, Mark; Roy, Timothy; White, Russell; Daughtrey, Wayne C

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum (commonly called crude oil) is a complex substance primarily composed of hydrocarbon constituents. Based on the results of previous toxicological studies as well as occupational experience, the principal acute toxicological hazards are those associated with exposure by inhalation to volatile hydrocarbon constituents and hydrogen sulfide, and chronic hazards are associated with inhalation exposure to benzene and dermal exposure to polycyclic aromatic compounds. The current assessment was an attempt to characterize the potential for repeated dose and/or developmental effects of crude oils following dermal exposures and to generalize the conclusions across a broad range of crude oils from different sources. Statistical models were used to predict the potential for repeated dose and developmental toxicity from compositional information. The model predictions indicated that the empirical data from previously tested crude oils approximated a "worst case" situation, and that the data from previously tested crude oils could be used as a reasonable basis for characterizing the repeated dose and developmental toxicological hazards of crude oils in general. PMID:24179028

  20. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter, 28-Day, Polysomnographic Study of Gabapentin in Transient Insomnia Induced by Sleep Phase Advance

    PubMed Central

    Furey, Sandy A.; Hull, Steven G.; Leibowitz, Mark T.; Jayawardena, Shyamalie; Roth, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective: To evaluate multiple doses of gabapentin 250 mg on polysomnography (PSG) and participant-reported sleep assessments in a 5-h phase advance insomnia model. Methods: Adults reporting occasional disturbed sleep received gabapentin 250 mg (n = 128) or placebo (n = 128). On Days 1 and 28, participants received medication 30 min before bedtime and were in bed from 17:00 to 01:00, ∼5 h before their habitual bedtime. Sleep was assessed by PSG, a post sleep questionnaire, and the Karolinska Sleep Diary. Next-day residual effects and tolerability were evaluated. On Days 2-27, participants took medication at home 30 min before their habitual bedtime. Results: Treatment-group demographics were comparable. Gabapentin resulted in significantly less PSG wake after sleep onset (WASO) compared with placebo on Day 1 (primary endpoint, mean: 107.0 versus 149.1 min, p ≤ 0.001) and Day 28 (113.6 versus 152.3 min, p = 0.002), and significantly greater total sleep time (TST; Day 1: 347.6 versus 283.9 min; Day 28: 335.3 versus 289.1 min) (p ≤ 0.001). Participant-reported WASO and TST also showed significant treatment effects on both days. Gabapentin was associated with less %stage1 on Day 1, and greater %REM on Day 28, versus placebo. During home use, gabapentin resulted in significantly less participant-reported WASO and higher ratings of sleep quality. Gabapentin was well tolerated (most common adverse events: headache, somnolence) with no evidence of next-day impairment. Conclusion: Gabapentin 250 mg resulted in greater PSG and participant-reported sleep duration following a 5-h phase advance on Day 1 and Day 28 of use without evidence of next-day impairment, and greater sleep duration during at-home use. Citation: Furey SA, Hull SG, Leibowitz MT, Jayawardena S, Roth T. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter, 28-day, polysomnographic study of gabapentin in transient insomnia induced by sleep phase advance. J Clin Sleep Med 2014

  1. Sputum Tobramycin Concentrations in Cystic Fibrosis Patients with Repeated Administration of Inhaled Tobramycin

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, Julia; Moss, Richard; Genatossio, Alan; McNamara, Sharon; Burns, Jane L.; Anderson, Gail; Rosenfeld, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Dosing of tobramycin solution for inhalation (TSI) in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients was based on single-dose pharmacokinetic studies. This investigation was prompted by evidence of possible antibiotic accumulation in respiratory secretions with repeated dosing. The objectives were to evaluate whether tobramycin accumulates in respiratory secretions with repeated inhalation, compare total and biologically active tobramycin concentrations in CF sputum, and evaluate sputum induction for obtaining secretions for drug concentration assay. Methods : Individuals with CF ≥10 years of age were enrolled at the beginning of a course of TSI, 300 mg twice daily for 28 days. Two study visits were conducted, 1–2 days and 24–28 days after initiation of TSI treatment. Induced sputum and expectorated sputum samples were collected for measurement of trough and peak tobramycin concentrations at each visit. Total tobramycin concentrations were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography and bioactive concentrations by bioassay. Results Twenty participants completed the study. Trough concentrations were similar at visits 1 and 2, as were peak concentrations. Trough bioactive and total tobramycin concentrations were similar (mean ratio 1.2, 95% CI 0.56, 1.87), but peak bioactive concentrations were significantly lower than peak total concentrations (mean ratio 0.33, 95% CI 0.23, 0.44). Sputum induction was well tolerated. Conclusions : No evidence of significant drug accumulation in respiratory secretions with repeat dosing of TSI was seen. Peak bioactive concentrations, although lower than peak total concentrations, were still generally well within the bactericidal range. Sputum induction as a method for determining airway drug concentrations appears safe and feasible. PMID:22620494

  2. Effect of repeated ('binge') dosing of MDMA to rats housed at normal and high temperature on neurotoxic damage to cerebral 5-HT and dopamine neurones.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Veronica; O'shea, Esther; Saadat, Kathryn S; Elliott, J Martin; Colado, M Isabel; Green, A Richard

    2004-09-01

    The technique of 'binge' dosing (several doses in one session) by recreational users of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) requires evaluation in terms of its consequences on the acute hyperthermic response and long-term neurotoxicity. We examined the neurotoxic effects of this dosing schedule on 5-HT and dopamine neurones in the rat brain. When repeated (three) doses of MDMA (2, 4 and 6 mg/kg i.p.) were given 3 h apart to rats housed at 19 degrees C, a dose-dependent acute hyperthermia and long-term loss of 5-HT was observed in several brain regions (hippocampus, cortex and striatum), with an approximate 50% loss following 3 x 4 mg/kg and 65% decrease following 3 x 6 mg/kg. No decrease in striatal dopamine content was detected. When MDMA (4 mg/kg i.p.) was given repeatedly to rats housed at 30 degrees C, a larger acute hyperthermic response than that observed in rats treated at 19 degrees C environment was seen (maximum response 2.6 +/- 0.1 degrees C versus 1.3 +/- 0.2 degrees C). A long-term cerebral 5-HT loss of approximately 65% was also detected in both the cortex and hippocampus, but no loss in striatal dopamine content occurred. These data emphasize the increased acute hyperthermic response and neurotoxicity which occurs when MDMA is administered in a hot room environment compared to normal room temperature conditions, and support the view that MDMA is a selective 5-HT neurotoxin, even when a binge dosing schedule is employed and the rats are present in a hot environment. PMID:15358986

  3. Four-Week Repeated Intravenous Dose Toxicity and Toxicokinetic Study of TS-DP2, a Novel Human Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, JooBuom; Lee, Kyungsun; Choe, Keunbum; Jung, Hyunseob; Cho, Hyunseok; Choi, Kiseok; Kim, Taegon; Kim, Seojin; Lee, Hyeong-Seok; Cha, Mi-Jin; Song, Si-Whan; Lee, Chul Kyu; Chun, Gie-Taek

    2015-01-01

    TS-DP2 is a recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) manufactured by TS Corporation. We conducted a four-week study of TS-DP2 (test article) in repeated intravenous doses in male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Lenograstim was used as a reference article and was administered intravenously at a dose of 1000 μg/kg/day. Rats received TS-DP2 intravenously at doses of 250, 500, and 1000 μg/kg/day once daily for 4 weeks, and evaluated following a 2-week recovery period. Edema in the hind limbs and loss of mean body weight and body weight gain were observed in both the highest dose group of TS-DP2 and the lenograstim group in male rats. Fibro-osseous lesions were observed in the lenograstim group in both sexes, and at all groups of TS-DP2 in males, and at doses of TS-DP2 500 μg/kg/day and higher in females. The lesion was considered a toxicological change. Therefore, bone is the primary toxicological target of TS-DP2. The lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAEL) in males was 250 μg/kg/day, and no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) in females was 250 μg/kg/day in this study. In the toxicokinetic study, the serum concentrations of G-CSF were maintained until 8 hr after administration. The systemic exposures (AUC0-24h and C0) were not markedly different between male and female rats, between the administration periods, or between TS-DP2 and lenograstim. In conclusion, TS-DP2 shows toxicological similarity to lenograstim over 4-weeks of repeated doses in rats. PMID:26877840

  4. Effect of single and repeat doses of casopitant on the pharmacokinetics of CYP450 3A4 substrates midazolam and nifedipine

    PubMed Central

    Zamuner, Stefano; Johnson, Brendan M; Pagliarusco, Sabrina; Fina, Paolo; Peroni, Michela; Fiore, Monica; Adams, Laurel M; Fernandes, Sofia A

    2010-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the impact of single and repeated doses casopitant on the pharmacokinetics of single dose midazolam and nifedipine (CYP3A substrates) in healthy subjects. The effect on debrisoquine metabolism (CYP2D6 substrate) was also assessed. METHODS Three open-label studies were conducted in healthy subjects. In the first study subjects received single dose 50 or 100 mg oral casopitant, single dose 5 mg oral midazolam and single dose 10 mg oral debrisoquine. In the other two studies subjects received repeated doses of 10 mg (study 2), 30, or 120 mg oral casopitant and single doses of 5 mg oral midazolam (study 2) and single doses of 10 mg oral nifedipine (study 3). Plasma concentration–time data were analyzed using standard non-compartmental methods. The effect of casopitant on all probes was assessed using geometric means ratios and corresponding 90% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS The AUC(0,∞) of midazolam was increased 1.44-fold (90% CI 1.35, 1.54) and 1.52-fold (90% CI 1.41, 1.65) after co-administration with a single dose of 50 or 100 mg casopitant, respectively. Debrisoquine metabolism was unchanged. After 3 days of casopitant administration, midazolam AUC(0,∞) was increased 1.45- (90% CI 1.32, 1.59), 2.02- (90% CI 1.75, 2.32), and 2.67-fold (90% CI 2.18, 3.27) after co-administration with 10, 30 or 120 mg casopitant, respectively. After 14 days of casopitant administration, midazolam AUC(0,∞) was increased 1.51- (90% CI 1.40, 1.63) to 3.49-fold (90% CI 2.98, 4.08). After 3 days of casopitant administration, nifedipine AUC(0,∞) was increased 1.56- (90% CI 1.37, 1.78) and 1.77-fold (90% CI 1.54, 2.04) after co-administration with 30 or 120 mg casopitant, respectively. Similar increases in nifedipine exposure were observed after 14 days of casopitant administration. CONCLUSIONS Casopitant is a dose- and duration-dependent weak to moderate inhibitor of CYP3A. PMID:20840445

  5. Lactate is an ideal non-invasive marker for evaluating temporal alterations in cell stress and toxicity in repeat dose testing regimes.

    PubMed

    Limonciel, Alice; Aschauer, Lydia; Wilmes, Anja; Prajczer, Sinikka; Leonard, Martin O; Pfaller, Walter; Jennings, Paul

    2011-12-01

    Technological developments are driving in vitro methods towards integrated "omic" strategies. However, there is still an over reliance on classical viability assays for dose range finding. Such assays are not readily suited to the investigation of subtle alterations in cell function and most require termination of the experiment, which makes it difficult to monitor temporal alterations in repeat-dose long term exposure experiments. To this end, we investigated the use of lactate production as a marker of cell stress in long term repeat dose experiments. We conducted daily exposures to eight compounds at five concentrations for 14 days on human renal proximal tubular cells (RPTEC/TERT1), human hepatoma cells (HepaRG) and mouse fibroblasts (BALB-3T3) cells. Compounds were chosen from a training set used in the 7th EU Framework project Predict-IV and consisted of amiodarone, diclofenac, troglitazone, cadmium chloride, cephaloridine, cidofovir, cyclosporine A and buflomedil. At days 1, 3, 7 and 14, lactate was measured in the supernatant medium. At day 14, cells were assayed for resazurin reduction capability and subsequently lysed in methanol for ATP determination. Compound-induced loss of viability was comparable across all cell lines. For all cell types, when cell viability was compromised at day 14, lactate production was induced during the treatment period. In some situations, lactate also fell below control values, indicating cell death. Thus, temporal alterations in supernatant lactate provides information on the time and concentration of stress induction and the time and concentration where cell death becomes the dominant factor. Supernatant lactate production is a simple, cheap and non-invasive parameter. Since many molecular pathways converge on the glycolytic pathway, enhanced lactate production may be considered as a global marker of sub-lethal injury and thus an ideal marker for investigating temporal alterations in long term repeat dose testing in vitro

  6. Repeat spinal anesthesia in cesarean section: A comparison between 10 mg and 12 mg doses of intrathecal hyperbaric (0.05%) bupivacaine repeated after failed spinal anesthesia: A prospective, parallel group study

    PubMed Central

    Bhar, Debasish; RoyBasunia, Sandip; Das, Anjan; Chhaule, Subinay; Mondal, Sudipta Kumar; Bisai, Subrata; Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Mandal, Subrata Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Spinal anesthesia for cesarean section is not a 100% successful technique. At times, despite straightforward insertion and drug administration, intrathecal anesthesia for cesarean section fails to obtain any sensory or motor block. Very few studies and literature are available regarding repeat administration of spinal anesthesia and its drug dosage, especially after first spinal failure in cesarean section lower segment cesarean section (LSCS) due to fear of the excessive spread of drug. The aim of our study is to compare the outcome between two different doses of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine repeated intrathecally after failed spinal. Materials and Methods: After taking informed consent and Ethical Committee approval this prospective, randomized single-blinded study was conducted in 100 parturients of American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II who were posted for elective LSCS and had Bromage score 0 and no sensory block even at L4 dermatome after 10 min of first spinal anesthesia; were included in the study. Group A (n = 50) patients received 2.4 ml and Group B (n = 50) patients received 2 ml of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine respectively for administering repeat spinal anesthesia. Heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), oxygen saturation, respiratory rate and electrocardiogram were monitored both intra- and post-operatively and complications were recorded. Results: Incidence of high spinal, bradycardia, hypotension, respiratory complications, and nausea vomiting are significantly higher in Group A compared to Group B (P < 0.05). SBP, DBP, and HR were significantly low in Group A patients compared to Group B in the first 10 min (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Spinal anesthesia can be safely repeated in the cesarean section with 10 mg of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine provided after first spinal anesthesia, the level of sensory block is below L4 and motor power in Bromage scale is 0. PMID:27212775

  7. A 1-year trial of repeated high-dose intravenous iron isomaltoside 1000 to maintain stable hemoglobin levels in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Reinisch, Walter; Altorjay, Istvan; Zsigmond, Ferenc; Primas, Christian; Vogelsang, Harald; Novacek, Gottfried; Reinisch, Sieglinde; Thomsen, Lars L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective. Iron isomaltoside 1000 (Monofer®) is a high-dose intravenous (IV) iron, which in a recent 8 weeks trial in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) subjects with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) demonstrated good tolerability and efficacy. The present trial is an extension to this trial, which evaluates the need for additional high IV iron doses to maintain a stable hemoglobin (Hb) ≥12.0 g/dl. Material and methods. This was a prospective, open-label, 12 months trial of European IBD subjects willing to participate after completing the lead-in trial. Subjects were allowed re-dosing with 500–2000 mg single doses of iron isomaltoside 1000 infused over ∼15 min at 3 months intervals depending on a predefined algorithm. Outcome measures included Hb, safety parameters and need for additional iron dosing. Results. A total of 39 subjects were enrolled of which 34 subjects required re-dosing with a median cumulative 1-year dose of 1.8 g (mean cumulative dose 2.2 g). The mean (SD) Hb was 12.3 (1.5) g/dl at baseline, 12.8 (1.6) g/dl at 3 months, 12.8 (1.6) g/dl at 6 months, 12.9 (1.4) g/dl at 9 months and 12.9 (1.6) g/dl at 12 months. Seventy-four percent of subjects who had an Hb ≥12.0 g/dl at baseline were able to maintain Hb ≥12.0 g/dl till the end of the trial at 12 months. Nonserious probably related hypersensitivity reactions without significant hypotension were reported at the beginning of the infusion in two subjects, who recovered without sequelae. Conclusion. Repeated treatment of iron deficiency with iron isomaltoside 1000 could avoid episodes of IDA without major safety issues. PMID:25900645

  8. Repeated dosing of ABT-102, a potent and selective TRPV1 antagonist, enhances TRPV1-mediated analgesic activity in rodents, but attenuates antagonist-induced hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Honore, Prisca; Chandran, Prasant; Hernandez, Gricelda; Gauvin, Donna M; Mikusa, Joseph P; Zhong, Chengmin; Joshi, Shailen K; Ghilardi, Joseph R; Sevcik, Molly A; Fryer, Ryan M; Segreti, Jason A; Banfor, Patricia N; Marsh, Kennan; Neelands, Torben; Bayburt, Erol; Daanen, Jerome F; Gomtsyan, Arthur; Lee, Chih-Hung; Kort, Michael E; Reilly, Regina M; Surowy, Carol S; Kym, Philip R; Mantyh, Patrick W; Sullivan, James P; Jarvis, Michael F; Faltynek, Connie R

    2009-03-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a ligand-gated ion channel that functions as an integrator of multiple pain stimuli including heat, acid, capsaicin and a variety of putative endogenous lipid ligands. TRPV1 antagonists have been shown to decrease inflammatory pain in animal models and to produce limited hyperthermia at analgesic doses. Here, we report that ABT-102, which is a potent and selective TRPV1 antagonist, is effective in blocking nociception in rodent models of inflammatory, post-operative, osteoarthritic, and bone cancer pain. ABT-102 decreased both spontaneous pain behaviors and those evoked by thermal and mechanical stimuli in these models. Moreover, we have found that repeated administration of ABT-102 for 5-12 days increased its analgesic activity in models of post-operative, osteoarthritic, and bone cancer pain without an associated accumulation of ABT-102 concentration in plasma or brain. Similar effects were also observed with a structurally distinct TRPV1 antagonist, A-993610. Although a single dose of ABT-102 produced a self-limiting increase in core body temperature that remained in the normal range, the hyperthermic effects of ABT-102 effectively tolerated following twice-daily dosing for 2 days. Therefore, the present data demonstrate that, following repeated administration, the analgesic activity of TRPV1 receptor antagonists is enhanced, while the associated hyperthermic effects are attenuated. The analgesic efficacy of ABT-102 supports its advancement into clinical studies. PMID:19135797

  9. Plasma levels of a low-dose constant-rate-infusion of ketamine and its effect on single and repeated nociceptive stimuli in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Bergadano, Alessandra; Andersen, Ole K; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Theurillat, Regula; Thormann, Wolfgang; Spadavecchia, Claudia

    2009-11-01

    This study quantitatively investigated the analgesic action of a low-dose constant-rate-infusion (CRI) of racemic ketamine (as a 0.5 mg kg(-1) bolus and at a dose rate of 10 microg kg(-1) min(-1)) in conscious dogs using a nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR) and with enantioselective measurement of plasma levels of ketamine and norketamine. Withdrawal reflexes evoked by transcutaneous single and repeated electrical stimulation (10 pulses, 5 Hz) of the digital plantar nerve were recorded from the biceps femoris muscle using surface electromyography. Ketamine did not affect NWR thresholds or the recruitment curves after a single nociceptive stimulation. Temporal summation (as evaluated by repeated stimuli) and the evoked behavioural response scores were however reduced compared to baseline demonstrating the antinociceptive activity of ketamine correlated with the peak plasma concentrations. Thereafter the plasma levels at pseudo-steady-state did not modulate temporal summation. Based on these experimental findings low-dose ketamine CRI cannot be recommended for use as a sole analgesic in the dog. PMID:18706837

  10. Lung cancer susceptibility among atomic bomb survivors in relation to CA repeat number polymorphism of epidermal growth factor receptor gene and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kengo; Nakachi, Kei; Imai, Kazue; Cologne, John B; Niwa, Yasuharu; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Hayashi, Tomonori

    2009-12-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Prevention could be improved by identifying susceptible individuals as well as improving understanding of interactions between genes and etiological environmental agents, including radiation exposure. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-signaling pathway, regulating cellular radiation sensitivity, is an oncogenic cascade involved in lung cancer, especially adenocarcinoma. The cytosine adenine (CA) repeat number polymorphism in the first intron of EGFR has been shown to be inversely correlated with EGFR production. It is hypothesized that CA repeat number may modulate individual susceptibility to lung cancer. Thus, we carried out a case-cohort study within the Japanese atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivor cohort to evaluate a possible association of CA repeat polymorphism with lung cancer risk in radiation-exposed or negligibly exposed (<5 mGy) A-bomb survivors. First, by dividing study subjects into Short and Long genotypes, defined as the summed CA repeat number of two alleles < or = 37 and > or = 38, respectively, we found that the Short genotype was significantly associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, specifically adenocarcinoma, among negligibly exposed subjects. Next, we found that prior radiation exposure significantly enhanced lung cancer risk of survivors with the Long genotype, whereas the risk for the Short genotype did not show any significant increase with radiation dose, resulting in indistinguishable risks between these genotypes at a high radiation dose. Our findings imply that the EGFR pathway plays a crucial role in assessing individual susceptibility to lung adenocarcinoma in relation to radiation exposure. PMID:19843645

  11. Acute and subacute (28 days) oral toxicity assessment of the oil extracted from Acrocomia aculeata pulp in rats.

    PubMed

    Traesel, Giseli Karenina; de Souza, Juliane Coelho; de Barros, Aline Lima; Souza, Marcos Alexandre; Schmitz, Wanderley Onofre; Muzzi, Rozanna Marques; Oesterreich, Silvia Aparecida; Arena, Arielle Cristina

    2014-12-01

    Acrocomia aculeata, popularly known as “bocaiúva”, is a species used for nutritional purposes and for the treatment of various diseases, as it has, among other things, high levels of antioxidant compounds. This study aimed to assess the toxicological profile of A. aculeata, through acute and subacute toxicity tests. Male and female rats (Wistar) received by gavage 2000 mg/kg of oil extracted from the pulp of A. aculeata (OPAC) for the acute toxicity test and 125, 250, 500 or 1000 mg/kg of OPAC for subacute toxicity test. In the acute toxicity study no mortality or behavioral changes were observed in rats treated with 2000 mg/kg, indicating that the LD50 is higher than this dose. In the subacute toxicity test, the tested doses produced no significant changes in hematological, biochemical or histopathological parameters in the animals exposed. These results demonstrate the absence of acute and subacute toxicity after oral exposure to A. aculeata oil in rats. However, further studies in animals and in humans are needed in order to have sufficient safety evidence for its use in humans. PMID:25445758

  12. Development of QSAR models using artificial neural network analysis for risk assessment of repeated-dose, reproductive, and developmental toxicities of cosmetic ingredients.

    PubMed

    Hisaki, Tomoka; Aiba Née Kaneko, Maki; Yamaguchi, Masahiko; Sasa, Hitoshi; Kouzuki, Hirokazu

    2015-04-01

    Use of laboratory animals for systemic toxicity testing is subject to strong ethical and regulatory constraints, but few alternatives are yet available. One possible approach to predict systemic toxicity of chemicals in the absence of experimental data is quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis. Here, we present QSAR models for prediction of maximum "no observed effect level" (NOEL) for repeated-dose, developmental and reproductive toxicities. NOEL values of 421 chemicals for repeated-dose toxicity, 315 for reproductive toxicity, and 156 for developmental toxicity were collected from Japan Existing Chemical Data Base (JECDB). Descriptors to predict toxicity were selected based on molecular orbital (MO) calculations, and QSAR models employing multiple independent descriptors as the input layer of an artificial neural network (ANN) were constructed to predict NOEL values. Robustness of the models was indicated by the root-mean-square (RMS) errors after 10-fold cross-validation (0.529 for repeated-dose, 0.508 for reproductive, and 0.558 for developmental toxicity). Evaluation of the models in terms of the percentages of predicted NOELs falling within factors of 2, 5 and 10 of the in-vivo-determined NOELs suggested that the model is applicable to both general chemicals and the subset of chemicals listed in International Nomenclature of Cosmetic Ingredients (INCI). Our results indicate that ANN models using in silico parameters have useful predictive performance, and should contribute to integrated risk assessment of systemic toxicity using a weight-of-evidence approach. Availability of predicted NOELs will allow calculation of the margin of safety, as recommended by the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety (SCCS). PMID:25786522

  13. Dose-additivity modeling for acute and repeated exposure to a mixture of N-methycarbamate Pesticides

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity of N-methylcarbamate pesticides is attributed to the reversible inhibition of cholinesterase (ChE) enzymes in the central and peripheral nervous system. The inhibition of ChE following a single exposure to this class of pesticides has been modeled using a dose-additi...

  14. Compared efficacy of repeated annual and semi-annual doses of ivermectin and diethylcarbamazine for prevention of Wuchereria bancrofti filariasis in French Polynesia. Final evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cartel, J L; Spiegel, A; Nguyen Ngnoc, L; Cardines, R; Plichart, R; Martin, P M; Roux, J F; Moulia-Pelat, J P

    1992-06-01

    In October 1989, 58 apparently healthy Polynesian Wuchereria bancrofti carriers, in whom microfilarial (mf) density was greater than or equal to 100 mf/ml, were randomly allocated to treatment groups receiving single doses of either ivermectin at 100 mcg/kg or diethylcarbamazine (DEC) at 3 and 6 mg/kg. Six months later, half of the carriers initially treated with ivermectin 100 mcg/kg or DEC 3 mg/kg were given a second similar dose while the rest were given a placebo. Six months later again, all of the carriers received a last treatment dose similar to the initial one. The results observed during the 12-month period which followed this last treatment have confirmed that (i) in terms of immediate clearance or complete negativation of microfilaremia, the efficacy of ivermectin is higher than that of DEC (at dosage of 3 or 6 mg/kg), (ii) DEC is more effective than ivermectin in sustaining the reduction of microfilaremia over a longer period of time and (iii) the efficacy of repeated single doses of either DEC 3 mg/kg or ivermectin 100 mcg/kg is much higher when given semi-annually than annually.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1519031

  15. Maternal care alterations induced by repeated ethanol leads to heightened consumption of the drug and motor impairment during adolescence: a dose-response analysis.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Luciano F; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Spear, Norman E; Molina, Juan C

    2011-07-01

    Maternal ethanol exposure during lactation induces behavioral alterations in offspring, including disruptions in motor skills and heightened ethanol ingestion during adolescence. These behavioral outcomes appear to partially depend on ethanol-induced disruptions in maternal care. The present study assessed motor skills and ethanol intake in adolescent rats raised by dams that had been repeatedly given ethanol during lactation. Female rats (postpartum days [PDs] 3-13) were administered ethanol (0.5, 1.5, or 2.5 g/kg) or vehicle every other day and allowed to freely interact with their pups. During adolescence, the offspring were evaluated for motor coordination (accelerating rotarod test) and oral ethanol self administration. The lowest maternal ethanol dose (0.5 g/kg) mildly affected motor performance, whereas the higher doses (1.5 and 2.5 g/kg) resulted in motor coordination impairment and greater ethanol intake. Maternal care behavior was affected by ethanol in a dose-dependent fashion. These results indicate that early experience with ethanol during lactation, even when the drug dosage is kept relatively low, leads to long-term consequences in offspring. Dose-response effects on maternal care behavior (i.e., nest building, crouching) may underlie disruptions in motor development and greater ethanol intake resulting from these early ethanol experiences. PMID:21334354

  16. Repeated low-dose kainate administration in C57BL/6J mice produces temporal lobe epilepsy pathology but infrequent spontaneous seizures.

    PubMed

    Umpierre, Anthony D; Bennett, Isaiah V; Nebeker, Lismore D; Newell, Thomas G; Tian, Bruce B; Thomson, Kyle E; White, H Steve; White, John A; Wilcox, Karen S

    2016-05-01

    More efficient or translationally relevant approaches are needed to model acquired temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in genetically tractable mice. The high costs associated with breeding and maintaining transgenic, knock-in, or knock-out lines place a high value on the efficiency of induction and animal survivability. Herein, we describe our approaches to model acquired epilepsy in C57BL/6J mice using repeated, low-dose kainate (KA) administration paradigms. Four paradigms (i.p.) were tested for their ability to induce status epilepticus (SE), temporal lobe pathology, and the development of epilepsy. All four paradigms reliably induce behavioral and/or electrographic SE without mortality over a 7d period. Two of the four paradigms investigated produce features indicative of TLE pathology, including hippocampal cell death, widespread astrogliosis, and astrocyte expression of mGluR5, a feature commonly reported in TLE models. Three of the investigated paradigms were able to produce aberrant electrographic features, such as interictal spiking in cortex. However, only one paradigm, previously published by others, produces spontaneous recurrent seizures over an eight week period. Presentation of spontaneous seizures is rare (N=2/14), with epilepsy preferentially developing in animals having a high number of seizures during SE. Overall, repeated, low-dose KA administration improves the efficiency and pathological relevance of a systemic KA insult, but does not produce a robust epilepsy phenotype under the experimental paradigms described herein. PMID:26896834

  17. Repeated doses of gamma rays induce resistance to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine in Chinese hamster cells

    SciTech Connect

    Osmak, M.

    1988-09-01

    Chinese hamster V79 cells were preirradiated repeatedly with gamma rays and then exposed to ultraviolet (uv) light or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). The cell killing and induction of mutation at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase locus were examined following these treatments. Cells preirradiated with multiple fractions of gamma rays exhibit the same sensitivity to uv light as the control cells with respect to cell survival and mutation induction. Following treatment with MNNG, resistance to cell killing was observed along with a decreased frequency of mutations induced. These results indicate that the progeny of cells irradiated with multiple fractions of gamma rays could display subsequent changes in sensitivity to lethal and mutagenic effects of additional treatment with DNA-damaging agents.

  18. Prognostic factors of 28 days survival rate in patients with a first acute myocardial infarction based on gender in Isfahan, Iran (2000-2009)

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadian, Mahdi; Hosseini, Shidokht; Salehiniya, Hamid; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Roohafza, Hamid Reza; Khazaei, Salman; Soltani, Shahin; Sarrafkia, Ali; Golshahi, Jafar; Mohammadian-Hafshejani, Abdollah

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Determinant prognostic factors of 28 days survival rate in patients with a first acute myocardial infarction (AMI) based on gender in teen year’s period in Isfahan, Iran, was the aim of this study. METHODS This study is a prospective hospital-based study that consisted, all patients with AMI admitted to all hospitals (private and universal hospitals) in Isfahan and Najafabad (Iran) during 2000-2009. To determinant the prognostic factors of 28 days survival rate in patients based on gender, analysis conducted separately for male and female. In analysis, we use of t-test, log Rank tests, Kaplan-Meier method, and univariate and multivariate Cox regression model. RESULTS Short-term (28 days) survival rate was 92.5% in male and 86.7% in female (P < 0.001). The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of death for age group 80 years and older was 12.7 [95% confidence interval (CI): 5.14-31.3] in male and 8.78 (95% CI: 1.2-63.1) in female. HR for acute transmural MI of the unspecified site in male was 8.9 (95% CI: 4.68-16.97) and in female 9.33 (95% CI: 4.42-19.7). HR for receive of streptokinase in male was 1.11 (95% CI: 0.94-1.31) and in female was 0.69 (95% CI: 0.56-0.84). CONCLUSION Short-term survival rate in male was a higher than female. In male age, anatomic location of MI and hospital status and in female streptokinase use and anatomic location of MI was the most important prognostic factors of survival in-patient with AMI in Isfahan. PMID:26862341

  19. Effects of repeated low-dose exposure of the nerve agent VX on monoamine levels in different brain structures in mice.

    PubMed

    Graziani, S; Christin, D; Daulon, S; Breton, P; Perrier, N; Taysse, L

    2014-05-01

    In a previous report, alterations of the serotonin metabolism were previously reported in mice intoxicated with repeated low doses of soman. In order to better understand the effects induced by repeated low-dose exposure to organophosphorus compounds on physiological and behavioural functions, the levels of endogenous monoamines (serotonin and dopamine) in different brain areas in mice intoxicated with sublethal dose of (O-ethyl-S-[2(di-isopropylamino) ethyl] methyl phosphonothioate) (VX) were analysed by HPLC method with electrochemical detection. Animals were injected once a day for three consecutive days with 0.10 LD50 of VX (5 μg/kg, i.p). Neither severe signs of cholinergic toxicity nor pathological changes in brain tissue of exposed animals were observed. Cholinesterase (ChE) activity was only inhibited in plasma (a maximum of 30% inhibition 24 h after the last injection of VX), but remained unchanged in the brain. Serotonin and dopamine (DA) metabolism appeared significantly modified. During the entire period of investigation, at least one of the three parameters investigated (i.e. DA and DOPAC levels and DOPAC/DA ratio) was modified. During the toxic challenge, an increase of the serotonin metabolism was noted in hippocampus (HPC), hypothalamus/thalamus, pons medulla and cerebellum (CER). This increase was maintained 4 weeks after exposure in HPC, pons medulla and CER whereas a decrease in cortex 3 weeks after the toxic challenge was observed. The lack of correlation between brain ChE activity and neurochemical outcomes points out to independent mechanisms. The involvement in possibly long-lasting behavioural disorders is discussed. PMID:24676701

  20. Influence of Two Depuration Periods on the Activity and Transcription of Antioxidant Enzymes in Tilapia Exposed to Repeated Doses of Cylindrospermopsin under Laboratory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ríos, Victoria; Guzmán-Guillén, Remedios; Moreno, Isabel M.; Prieto, Ana I.; Puerto, María; Jos, Angeles; Cameán, Ana M.

    2014-01-01

    The cyanobacterial toxin Cylindrospermopsin (CYN), a potent protein synthesis inhibitor, is increasingly being found in freshwater bodies infested by cyanobacterial blooms worldwide. Moreover, it has been reported to be implicated in human intoxications and animal mortality. Recently, the alteration of the activity and gene expression of some glutathione related enzymes in tilapias (Oreochromis niloticus) exposed to a single dose of CYN has been reported. However, little is known about the effects induced by repeated doses of this toxin in tilapias exposed by immersion and the potential reversion of these biochemical alterations after two different depuration periods (3 or 7 days). In the present study, tilapias were exposed by immersion to repeated doses of a CYN-containing culture of Aphanizomenon ovalisporum during 14 days, and then were subjected to depuration periods (3 or 7 days) in clean water in order to examine the potential reversion of the effects observed. The activity and relative mRNA expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and soluble glutathione-S-transferases (sGST), and also the sGST protein abundance by Western blot analysis were evaluated in liver and kidney of fish. Results showed significant alterations in most of the parameters evaluated and their recovery after 3 days (GPx activity, sGST relative abundance) or 7 days (GPx gene expression, sGST activity). These findings not only confirm the oxidative stress effects produced in fish by cyanobacterial cells containing CYN, but also show the effectiveness of depuration processes in mitigating the CYN-containing culture toxic effects. PMID:24632554

  1. Topographical distribution of decrements and recovery in muscarinic receptors from rat brains repeatedly exposed to sublethal doses of soman

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, L.; Pazdernik, T.L.; Jackson, J.L.; Nelson, S.R.; Samson, F.E.; McDonough, J.H. Jr.

    1984-08-01

    (3H)Quinuclidinyl benzilate binding to rat brain muscarinic receptors decreased after repeated exposure to soman, a potent organophosphorus cholinesterase inhibitor. The topographical distribution of this decrement was analyzed by quantitative receptor autoradiography. After 4 weeks of soman, three times a week, quinuclidinyl benzilate binding decreased to 67 to 80% of control in frontal and parietal cortex, caudate-putamen, lateral septum, hippocampal body, dentate gyrus, superior colliculus, nucleus of the fifth nerve, and central grey. Minor or no decreases were observed in thalamic or hypothalamic nuclei, reticular formation, pontine nuclei, inferior colliculus, nucleus of the seventh nerve, and cerebellum. Scatchard analyses of saturation curves using frontal cortex sections from soman-treated rats revealed a decrease in maximal quinuclidinyl benzilate binding from that in control rats and a return toward control levels by 24 days without any significant change in affinity. These brain areas showing significant decrements in muscarinic receptors recovered with a similar time course. An estimate of the time for 50% recovery for some of the brain areas was 14 days for superior colliculus, 16 days for cortex, and 19 days for hippocampal body. The application of quantitative receptor autoradiography to analyze receptor alterations has been valuable in localizing the telencephalon as a region more susceptible to change in receptor concentration.

  2. Central nervous system effects of the interaction between risperidone (single dose) and the 5-HT6 antagonist SB742457 (repeated doses) in healthy men

    PubMed Central

    Liem-Moolenaar, Marieke; Rad, Mandana; Zamuner, Stefano; Cohen, Adam F; Lemme, Francesca; Franson, Kari L; van Gerven, Joop M A; Pich, Emilio Merlo

    2011-01-01

    AIM Several lines of evidence suggest a possible role of 5-HT6receptor antagonists in cognitive dysfunction of schizophrenia. Atypical antipsychotics, such as risperidone, are currently used in these disorders. Therefore, the pharmacological interactions between the 5-HT6 antagonist SB-742457 and risperidone were investigated in the light of possible co-medication. METHODS A randomized, double-blind, two-way crossover design was used to study the interaction between multiple doses SB-742457 50 mg and a single dose risperidone 2 mg in 18 healthy subjects. RESULTS Treatment was well tolerated. The most common adverse event was somnolence in 83% during the combination vs. 50% of subjects after risperidone, 32% after placebo and 11% after SB-742457. Combination treatment produced a statistically significant increase in the maximum plasma concentration of risperidone and had no effect on SB-742457 pharmacokinetics. Risperidone decreased saccadic peak velocity, finger tapping, adaptive tracking, subjective alertness, delayed word recognition and body sway and increased electroencephalogram (EEG) theta power and prolactin. The only pharmacodynamic interaction of risperidone and SB-742457 was an increase of absolute EEG alpha (ratio = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.11, 1.40, P = 0.0004) and beta power (ratio = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.03, 1.27, P = 0.016). No significant effects of SB-742457 alone were found. CONCLUSION The pharmacokinetic interactions between SB-742457 and risperidone detected in this study were not clinically relevant. The increase in EEG alpha and beta power is incompatible with enhanced risperidone activity, but could point to mild arousing effects of the combination. Most pharmacodynamic changes of risperidone are consistent with previously reported data. The potential cognitive effects of SB-742457 remain to be established. PMID:21223356

  3. 26-week repeated oral dose toxicity study of UP446, a combination of defined extracts of Scutellaria baicalensis and Acacia catechu, in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Yimam, Mesfin; Lee, Young Chul; Jia, Qi

    2016-07-01

    The needs for relatively safe botanical alternatives to relieve symptoms associated to arthritis have continued to grow in parallel with the ageing population. UP446, a standardized bioflavonoid composition from the roots of Scutellaria baicalensis and the heartwoods of Acacia catechu, has been used as over the counter joint care dietary supplements and a prescription medical food. Significant safety data have been documented in rodents and human for this composition. Here we evaluated the potential adverse effects of orally administered UP446 in beagle dogs following a 26-week repeated oral dose toxicity study. UP446 at doses of 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg/day were administered orally to beagle dogs for 26 weeks. A 4-week recovery group from the high dose (1000 mg/kg) and vehicle treated groups were included. No morbidity or mortality was observed for the duration of the study. No significant differences between groups in body weights, food consumption, ophthalmological examinations, electrocardiograms, urinalysis, hematology, clinical chemistry, organ weights, gross pathology and histopathology were documented. Emesis, loose feces and diarrhea were noted in both genders at the 1000 mg/kg treatment groups. These clinical signs were considered to be reversible as they were not evident in the recovery period. In conclusion, the no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) of UP446 was considered to be 500 mg/kg/day both in male and female beagle dogs. PMID:27125835

  4. Prospective evaluation of potential toxicity of repeated doses of Thymus vulgaris L. extracts in rats by means of clinical chemistry, histopathology and NMR-based metabonomic approach.

    PubMed

    Benourad, Fouzia; Kahvecioglu, Zehra; Youcef-Benkada, Mokhtar; Colet, Jean-Marie

    2014-10-01

    In the field of natural extracts, research generally focuses on the study of their biological activities for food, cosmetic, or pharmacological purposes. The evaluation of their adverse effects is often overlooked. In this study, the extracts of Thymus vulgaris L. were obtained by two different extraction methods. Intraperitoneal injections of both extracts were given daily for four days to male Wistar Han rats, at two different doses for each extract. The evaluation of the potential toxic effects included histopathological examination of liver, kidney, and lung tissues, as well as serum biochemistry of liver and kidney parameters, and (1)H-NMR-based metabonomic profiles of urine. The results showed that no histopathological changes were observed in the liver and kidney in rats treated with both extracts of thyme. Serum biochemical investigations revealed significant increases in blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and uric acid in animals treated with polyphenolic extract at both doses. In these latter groups, metabonomic analysis revealed alterations in a number of urine metabolites involved in the energy metabolism in liver mitochondria. Indeed, the results showed alterations of glycolysis, Krebs cycle, and β-oxidative pathways as evidenced by increases in lactate and ketone bodies, and decreases in citrate, α-ketoglutarate, creatinine, hippurate, dimethylglycine, and dimethyalanine. In conclusion, this work showed that i.p. injection of repeated doses of thyme extracts causes some disturbances of intermediary metabolism in rats. The metabonomic study revealed interesting data which could be further used to determine the cellular pathways affected by such treatments. PMID:24574060

  5. Screening study for repeated dose and reproductive/developmental toxicity of rubber accelerator, N,N-dicyclohexyl-2-benzothiazolesulfenamide, in rats.

    PubMed

    Ema, Makoto; Ito, Yoshihiko; Matsumoto, Mariko; Hirose, Akihiko; Kamata, Eiichi

    2007-01-01

    A screening study for a vulcanization accelerator N,N-dicyclohexyl-2-benzothiazole-sulfenamide (DCBS) was performed in rats. Rats were given DCBS by gavage daily at 0, 6, 25, 100, or 400 mg/kg. Males were dosed for a total of 44 days beginning 14 days before mating. Females were dosed for a total of 40-51 days beginning 14 days before mating to day 3 of lactation. Toxicologic changes were significantly noted only at 400 mg/kg. Three females died. An increased incidence of females showing decreased locomotor activity, soil of the lower abdominal fur, and reddish tears was observed. A lowered body weight was found in males and females. Increased urinary ketones and serum inorganic phosphorus and decreased serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase in males were found. Increased absolute and relative weights of the kidneys in males and decreased absolute weight of the thymus in both sexes were noted. Significant fatty degeneration of the renal tubular epithelia, vacuolation of the adrenocortical cells, and atrophy of the spleen were observed in females. Significant decreases in the gestation index, numbers of corpura lutea, implantations, pups born and pups born alive, live birth index, and viability index were detected. It is concluded that the No Observed Adverse Effect Levels (NOAELs) for repeat dose and reproductive/developmental toxicity are 100 mg kg-1 day-1 in this screening study. PMID:17613004

  6. Repeated high-dose chemotherapy followed by purged autologous bone marrow transplantation as consolidation therapy in metastatic neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, O; Benhamou, E; Beaujean, F; Kalifa, C; Lejars, O; Patte, C; Behard, C; Flamant, F; Thyss, A; Deville, A

    1987-08-01

    Among 62 children over 1 year of age at diagnosis, who were treated for stage IV neuroblastoma, 33 entered complete remission (CR) or good partial remission (GPR) after conventional therapy and received high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with in vitro purged autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) as consolidation therapy. The HDC was a combination of carmustine (BCNU), teniposide (VM-26), and melphalan. Thirty-three patients received one course of this regimen, and 18 received two courses. At present, 16 of the 33 grafted patients are alive in continuous CR, with a median follow-up of 28 months. Toxicity of this regimen was tolerable, principally marked by bone marrow depression and gastrointestinal (GI) tract complications. Four complication-related deaths were observed. Relapse post-ABMT occurred most often in the bone marrow. Under this treatment, actuarial disease-free survival is improved compared with that observed under conventional therapy. PMID:3305792

  7. Unnecessary antibiotic use for mild acute respiratory infections during 28-day follow-up of 823 children under five in rural Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quynh Hoa; Nguyen, Thi Kim Chuc; Ho, Dang Phuc; Larsson, Mattias; Eriksson, Bo; Lundborg, Cecilia Stålsby

    2011-11-01

    Few prospective studies regarding antibiotic use for mild acute respiratory infections (ARI) have been conducted in community settings. This paper aimed to assess knowledge of children's caregivers and actual antibiotic use for children under five and to identify factors associated with antibiotic treatment for mild ARIs. Caregivers in 828 households in Bavi, Vietnam, were interviewed using a structured questionnaire assessing both knowledge and practice. Subsequently, 823 children were followed for 28 days to collect information regarding symptoms and drug use. For management of ARIs, only 13% of caregivers demonstrated correct overall knowledge in accordance with standard guidelines. The symptoms of the most recent illness were consistent with mild ARI in 79% of cases, and antibiotics were used in 71% of these. During the 28-day period, 62% of children had been given antibiotics and 63% of antibiotic courses were used for mild ARIs. One-half of the mild ARI episodes and 63% of the children with mild ARIs were treated with antibiotics. Most of the unnecessary antibiotic treatment was recommended by healthcare providers (82%). Most of the children had been administered antibiotics for common colds, although most caregivers believed that antibiotics were not required. Antibiotics were unnecessarily recommended at health facilities in the area. PMID:21962293

  8. [Retrospective Analysis of the Afatinib Clinical Pathway during the 28-Day Introductory Period-The Japanese Style of Collaborative Drug Therapy Management(J-CDTM)].

    PubMed

    Iwata, Kaori; Ryota, Noriko; Hikita, Ami; Sando, Masumi; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Tamiya, Motohiro; Azuma, Yuichiro; Tani, Eriko; Hamaguchi, Masanari; Tanaka, Ayako; Shiroyama, Takayuki; Morishita, Naoko; Okamoto, Norio; Futagami, Sumiko; Hirashima, Tomonori

    2015-08-01

    Afatinib is a newly approved second-generation epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibito r(EGFR-TKI). Afatinib has been shown to prolongthe overall survival of patients with non-small cell lungcancer (NSCLC) with EGFR mutations compared with the standard chemotherapy. However, Grade 3 or 4 toxicities, includingdiarrhea, rash, paronychia, and stomatitis, have been observed more frequently in patients treated with afatinib than in those treated with first-generation EGFR-TKIs. Accordingly, our institution developed an afatinib clinical pathway (the afatinib pathway), which was designed by certified nurses, medical physicians, and certified pharmacists, with the goal of reducing the severity of diarrhea and rash that occur most frequently duringthe 28-day introductory period of afatinib treatment. Between May and October 2014, afatinib was administered accordingto the afatinib pathway to 14 patients with NSCLC and EGFR mutations. Of these patients, only one (7.1%) experienced Grade 3 diarrhea. No other patient experienced Grade 3 or 4 toxicity. The afatinib pathway was effective in reducingthe severities of the diarrhea and rash duringthe 28-day introductory period of the afatinib treatment. Our implementation of the afatinib pathway could be considered the Japanese style of collaborative drugtherapy management (J-CDTM). PMID:26321711

  9. [A relative bioavailability study of 2 oral formulations of omeprazole after their administration in repeated doses to healthy volunteers].

    PubMed

    Richards, J P; Gimeno, M; Moreland, T A; McEwen, J

    1999-04-01

    To determine the relative bioavailability of Ulceral (study formula) with respect to Losec (reference standard formula) and establish their bioequivalence daily doses of 20 mg of omeprazole were given during 5 consecutive days to 24 healthy volunteers. No significant differences were observed in the area under the curve (AUC0-t), a parameter directly related to the inhibition of acid secretion induced by omeprazole. The confidence interval of 90% for the difference between the two formulations for AUC0-t was within the interval of acceptance (0.80-1.25). The confidence interval for the difference between the two formulations for Cmax were also within the range of acceptance (0.70-1.43). In relation to the time for achieving (Cmax (tmax), the difference between the two formulations and the confidence interval of 95% for the tmax was 0.75 (-0.5-1.75) h indicating that no significant differences were observed between the two treatments. This study confirms the bioequivalence of Ulceral with the standard reference formulation as well as the tolerability of the two formulae. PMID:10349786

  10. Chip-based human liver-intestine and liver-skin co-cultures--A first step toward systemic repeated dose substance testing in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maschmeyer, Ilka; Hasenberg, Tobias; Jaenicke, Annika; Lindner, Marcus; Lorenz, Alexandra Katharina; Zech, Julie; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Sonntag, Frank; Hayden, Patrick; Ayehunie, Seyoum; Lauster, Roland; Marx, Uwe; Materne, Eva-Maria

    2015-09-01

    Systemic repeated dose safety assessment and systemic efficacy evaluation of substances are currently carried out on laboratory animals and in humans due to the lack of predictive alternatives. Relevant international regulations, such as OECD and ICH guidelines, demand long-term testing and oral, dermal, inhalation, and systemic exposure routes for such evaluations. So-called "human-on-a-chip" concepts are aiming to replace respective animals and humans in substance evaluation with miniaturized functional human organisms. The major technical hurdle toward success in this field is the life-like combination of human barrier organ models, such as intestine, lung or skin, with parenchymal organ equivalents, such as liver, at the smallest biologically acceptable scale. Here, we report on a reproducible homeostatic long-term co-culture of human liver equivalents with either a reconstructed human intestinal barrier model or a human skin biopsy applying a microphysiological system. We used a multi-organ chip (MOC) platform, which provides pulsatile fluid flow within physiological ranges at low media-to-tissue ratios. The MOC supports submerse cultivation of an intact intestinal barrier model and an air-liquid interface for the skin model during their co-culture with the liver equivalents respectively at (1)/100.000 the scale of their human counterparts in vivo. To increase the degree of organismal emulation, microfluidic channels of the liver-skin co-culture could be successfully covered with human endothelial cells, thus mimicking human vasculature, for the first time. Finally, exposure routes emulating oral and systemic administration in humans have been qualified by applying a repeated dose administration of a model substance - troglitazone - to the chip-based co-cultures. PMID:25857839

  11. Protocol of the adaptive study of IL-2 dose frequency on regulatory T cells in type 1 diabetes (DILfrequency): a mechanistic, non-randomised, repeat dose, open-label, response-adaptive study

    PubMed Central

    Truman, Lucy A; Pekalski, Marcin L; Kareclas, Paula; Evangelou, Marina; Walker, Neil M; Howlett, James; Mander, Adrian P; Kennet, Jane; Wicker, Linda S; Bond, Simon; Todd, John A; Waldron-Lynch, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing β cells in the pancreatic islets, leading to insulinopenia and hyperglycaemia. Genetic analyses indicate that alterations of the interleukin-2 (IL-2) pathway mediating immune activation and tolerance predispose to T1D, specifically the polymorphic expression of the IL-2 receptor-α chain (CD25) on T lymphocytes. Replacement of physiological doses of IL-2 could restore self-tolerance and prevent further autoimmunity by enhancing the function of CD4+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) to limit the activation of auto reactive T effector cells (Teffs). In this experimental medicine study, we use an adaptive trial design to determine the optimal dosing regimen for IL-2 to improve Treg function while limiting activation of Teffs in participants with T1D. Methods and analysis The Adaptive study of IL-2 dose frequency on Tregs in type 1 diabetes(DILfrequency) is a mechanistic, non-randomised, repeat dose open-label, response-adaptive study of 36 participants with T1D. The objective is to establish the optimal dose and frequency of ultra-low dose IL-2: to increase Treg frequency within the physiological range, to increase CD25 expression on Tregs, without increasing CD4+ Teffs. DILfrequency has an initial learning phase where 12 participants are allocated to six different doses and frequencies followed by an interim statistical analysis. After analysis of the learning phase, the Dose and Frequency Committee will select the optimal targets for Treg frequency, Treg CD25 expression and Teff frequency. Three groups of eight participants will be treated consecutively in the confirming phase. Each dose and frequency selected will be based on statistical analysis of all data collected from the previous groups. Ethics Ethical approval for DILfrequency was granted on 12 August 2014. Results The results of this study will be reported, through peer-reviewed journals, conference presentations and

  12. Microfilariae recurrence in Polynesian Wuchereria bancrofti carriers treated with repeated single doses of 100 micrograms/kg of ivermectin.

    PubMed

    Cartel, J L; Moulia-Pelat, J P; Glaziou, P; Nguyen, L N; Chanteau, S; Roux, J F; Spiegel, A

    1993-01-01

    Forty-six Polynesian carriers of Wuchereria bancrofti were treated with 3 successive single doses of ivermectin, 100 micrograms/kg, given every 6 months. Immediate microfilaricidal activity of ivermectin was excellent in all carriers, since residual mean microfilaraemia levels, 2 d after each of the 3 treatments, were less than 1% of pretreatment levels. Before initial treatment, geometric mean microfilaraemia was 500 microfilaria (mf)/ml for the whole group (range 21-6398 mf/ml); 6 months after each successive treatment it was 197, 108 and 87 mg/ml, respectively, 39.4, 21.6 and 17.4% of the pre-initial treatment level. By considering the mean percentage recurrent level at 6 months after the 3rd treatment (36.8%) as a threshold, it was possible to classify the carriers into 2 groups: 17 in whom the percentage recurrent level was > 36.8% and who were considered as 'fast repopulating' individuals, and the remaining 29 who were considered as 'slow repopulating' individuals. In the latter group, 6 months after each of the 3 treatments, the recurrent microfilaremia levels were 22.7%, 8.0% and 4.9% of the pre-initial treatment level, respectively, while they were 95.1%, > 100% and > 100% in the former. The constant recurrence of mf suggests that ivermectin, at a dosage of 100 micrograms/kg, had no effect on adult worms in 'fast repopulating' individuals, whereas the progressive lessening in recurrence of mf suggests some activity (sterilizing or killing) of ivermectin on W. bancrofti macrofilariae in 'slow repopulating' individuals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8249089

  13. Antithrombotic effect of repeated doses of the ethanolic extract of local olive (Olea europaea L.) leaves in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Dub, Abdallah M; Dugani, Aisha M

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of thromboembolic diseases is increasing, and they are a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Mediterranean diet is known for its high content of olive products, especially olive oil, which has known cardiovascular health benefits, including those on blood pressure, cholesterol level, and thrombogenesis. All previous animal and clinical studies investigating the beneficial antithrombotic effects of olives have focused on olive oil and a few on olive leaves (OLEs). In this study, the ethanolic extract of OLE was evaluated for its antithrombotic activity in the rabbit model of thrombosis induced by ligature of the vena cava and intravenous administration of tissue thromboplastin. Pre-treatment with 100 or 200 mg/kg per day of the ethanolic extract for 8 weeks significantly prolonged the prothrombin time (PT) in comparison to the control group (12.10 ± 0.35 sec and 14.38 ± 0.29 sec vs. 10.8 ± 0.32 sec, p < 0.05 and 0.001, respectively). In comparison to the control group, the same doses had no statistically significant effect on thrombus weight (16.85 ± 0.67 mg, 16.32 ± 0.35 mg, and 17.81 ± 0.75 mg; p = 0.18 and 0.06) or on activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) (19.17 ± 0.33 sec, 19.12 ± 0.73 sec, and 18.97 ± 0.41 sec; p = 0.36 and 0.43, respectively). One important finding in this study concerns thrombus morphology. In the extract treatment groups, the thrombus was filament-like and did not adhere to blood vessel walls, whereas in the control group the thrombus was thick and almost completely occluded the vein. Therefore, these results suggest that OLE ethanolic extract can modify the extrinsic coagulation pathway as evidenced by the prolongation of PT and changes in thrombus morphology, enough to justify further research to evaluate its possible antithrombotic effects. PMID:23702352

  14. Adverse reaction to ceftriaxone in a 28-day-old infant undergoing urgent craniotomy due to epidural hematoma: review of neonatal biliary pseudolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Bartkowska-Śniatkowska, Alicja; Jończyk-Potoczna, Katarzyna; Zielińska, Marzena; Rosada-Kurasińska, Jowita

    2015-01-01

    The debate as to whether to administer ceftriaxone to neonates is likely to continue. Ceftriaxone has numerous advantages for critically ill pediatric patients. However, it is also known to contribute substantially to the development of biliary pseudolithiasis. Although pediatric patients rarely develop gallbladder disorders, this complication may lead to adverse events in high-risk patients with predisposing factors, particularly in neonates and infants treated with ceftriaxone. In this paper we present an interesting case report of a 28-day-old neonate with spontaneous severe epidural hematoma who developed biliary pseudolithiasis related to the use of ceftriaxone. We also discuss the efficacy of ceftriaxone in neonates and infants. Neonatologists and pediatric intensivists should be aware of the higher risk of co-existence of hyperbilirubinemia and gallbladder disorders while using ceftriaxone in pediatric settings. PMID:26170682

  15. The Diet of Inmates: An Analysis of a 28-Day Cycle Menu Used in a Large County Jail in the State of Georgia.

    PubMed

    Cook, Emma A; Lee, Yee Ming; White, B Douglas; Gropper, Sareen S

    2015-10-01

    Given the many well-documented relationships between diet and health, growing medical care expenses for those incarcerated, and limited information on foods served in correctional facilities, this study examined the nutritional adequacy of a 28-day cycle menu used in a large county jail in Georgia. When compared with Dietary Reference Intakes, provisions of energy (female inmates only), sodium, saturated fat, and cholesterol exceeded recommendations. Magnesium, potassium, and vitamins A, D, and E met less than two thirds of recommendations. Compared with MyPlate recommendations, grains were overrepresented, while vegetables, fruits, and dairy were underrepresented in the menu. Small menu changes could improve the menu's nutrient content and potentially increase inmates' health and well-being. PMID:26276135

  16. Renal Hemodynamic and Morphological Changes after 7 and 28 Days of Leptin Treatment: The Participation of Angiotensin II via the AT1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Thieme, Karina; Oliveira-Souza, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The role of hyperleptinemia in cardiovascular diseases is well known; however, in the renal tissue, the exact site of leptin’s action has not been established. This study was conducted to assess the effect of leptin treatment for 7 and 28 days on renal function and morphology and the participation of angiotensin II (Ang II), through its AT1 receptor. Rats were divided into four groups: sham, losartan (10 mg/kg/day, s.c.), leptin (0.5 mg/kg/day for the 7 days group and 0.25 mg/kg/day for the 28 days group) and leptin plus losartan. Plasma leptin, Ang II and endothelin 1 (ET-1) levels were measured using an enzymatic immuno assay. The systolic blood pressure (SBP) was evaluated using the tail-cuff method. The renal plasma flow (RPF) and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were determined by p-aminohippuric acid and inulin clearance, respectively. Urinary Na+ and K+ levels were also analyzed. Renal morphological analyses, desmin and ED-1 immunostaining were performed. Proteinuria was analyzed by silver staining. mRNA expression of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) components, TNF-α and collagen type III was analyzed by quantitative PCR. Our results showed that leptin treatment increased Ang II plasma levels and progressively increased the SBP, achieving a pre-hypertension state. Rats treated with leptin 7 days showed a normal RPF and GFR, but increased filtration fraction (FF) and natriuresis. However, rats treated with leptin for 28 showed a decrease in the RPF, an increase in the FF and no changes in the GFR or tubular function. Leptin treatment-induced renal injury was demonstrated by: glomerular hypertrophy, increased desmin staining, macrophage infiltration in the renal tissue, TNF-α and collagen type III mRNA expression and proteinuria. In conclusion, our study demonstrated the progressive renal morphological changes in experimental hyperleptinemia and the interaction between leptin and the RAS on these effects. PMID:25793389

  17. Foxp3(+)-Treg cells enhanced by repeated low-dose gamma-irradiation attenuate ovalbumin-induced allergic asthma in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Bum Soo; Hong, Gwan Ui; Ro, Jai Youl

    2013-05-01

    Gamma radiation is used for several therapeutic indications such as cancers and autoimmune diseases. Low-dose whole-body γ irradiation has been shown to activate immune responses in several ways, however, the effect and mechanism of irradiation on allergic asthma remains poorly understood. This study investigated whether or not irradiation exacerbates allergic asthma responses and its potential mechanism. C57BL/6 mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) to induce asthma. The mice received whole-body irradiation once daily for 3 consecutive days with a dose of 0.667 Gy using (137)Cs γ rays 24 h before every OVA challenge. Repeated low-dose irradiation reduced OVA-specific IgE levels, the number of inflammatory cells including mast cells, goblet cell hyperplasia, collagen deposition, airway hyperresponsiveness, expression of inflammatory cytokines, CCL2/CCR2, as well as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 activities. All of these factors were increased in BAL cells and lung tissue of OVA-challenged mice. Irradiation increased the number of Treg cells, expression of interleukin (IL)-10, IL-2 and IL-35 in BAL cells and lung tissue. Irradiation also increased Treg cell-expressed Foxp3 and IL-10 by NF-κB and RUNX1 in OVA-challenged mice. Furthermore, while Treg cell-expressing OX40 and IL-10 were enhanced in lung tissue or act-bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) with Treg cells, but BMMCs-expressing OX40L and TGF-β were decreased. The data suggest that irradiation enhances Foxp3(+)- and IL-10-producing Treg cells, which reduce OVA-induced allergic airway inflammation and tissue remodeling through the down-regulation of migration by the CCL2/CCR2 axis and activation of mast cells via OX40/OX40L in lung tissue of OVA-challenged mice. PMID:23560633

  18. An aqueous extract of Salacia oblonga root, a herb-derived peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha activator, by oral gavage over 28 days induces gender-dependent hepatic hypertrophy in rats.

    PubMed

    Rong, Xianglu; Kim, Moon Sun; Su, Ning; Wen, Suping; Matsuo, Yukimi; Yamahara, Johji; Murray, Michael; Li, Yuhao

    2008-06-01

    Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-alpha by natural and synthetic chemicals induces hepatic hypertrophy. An aqueous extract of Salacia oblonga root (SOW) is an Ayurvedic medicine with anti-diabetic and anti-obesity properties. In the present study, it was found that SOW (100, 300 and 900mg/kg, once daily by oral gavage over a 28 day period) elicited dose-related increases in liver weight (LW) by 1.6%, 13.4% and 42.5%, respectively, and in the ratio of LW to body weight by 8.8%, 16.7% and 40.2%, respectively, in male rats. These effects were less pronounced in females. SOW selectively increased liver mass in male rats but Sudan red staining was not different, which indicates that hepatic lipid accumulation was similar in both genders. However, SOW even at the highest dosage did not influence serum ALT and AST activities in male or female rats. Moreover, SOW was found to activate PPAR-alpha in human hepatoma-derived HepG2 cells, as evidenced by the upregulation of PPAR-alpha and acyl-CoA oxidase mRNA expression. Thus, SOW-dependent PPAR-alpha activation may precede the development of the gender difference in hepatic hypertrophy; this process may be influenced by sex hormone status. PMID:18397819

  19. Efficacy and safety of extended dosing schedules of CC-486 (oral azacitidine) in patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Manero, G; Gore, S D; Kambhampati, S; Scott, B; Tefferi, A; Cogle, C R; Edenfield, W J; Hetzer, J; Kumar, K; Laille, E; Shi, T; MacBeth, K J; Skikne, B

    2016-01-01

    CC-486, the oral formulation of azacitidine (AZA), is an epigenetic modifier and DNA methyltransferase inhibitor in clinical development for treatment of hematologic malignancies. CC-486 administered for 7 days per 28-day treatment cycle was evaluated in a phase 1 dose-finding study. AZA has a short plasma half-life and DNA incorporation is S-phase-restricted; extending CC-486 exposure may increase the number of AZA-affected diseased target cells and maximize therapeutic effects. Patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) received 300 mg CC-486 once daily for 14 days (n=28) or 21 days (n=27) of repeated 28-day cycles. Median patient age was 72 years (range 31–87) and 75% of patients had International Prognostic Scoring System Intermediate-1 risk MDS. Median number of CC-486 treatment cycles was 7 (range 2–24) for the 14-day dosing schedule and 6 (1–24) for the 21-day schedule. Overall response (complete or partial remission, red blood cell (RBC) or platelet transfusion independence (TI), or hematologic improvement) (International Working Group 2006) was attained by 36% of patients receiving 14-day dosing and 41% receiving 21-day dosing. RBC TI rates were similar with both dosing schedules (31% and 38%, respectively). CC-486 was generally well-tolerated. Extended dosing schedules of oral CC-486 may provide effective long-term treatment for patients with lower-risk MDS. PMID:26442612

  20. Efficacy and safety of extended dosing schedules of CC-486 (oral azacitidine) in patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Manero, G; Gore, S D; Kambhampati, S; Scott, B; Tefferi, A; Cogle, C R; Edenfield, W J; Hetzer, J; Kumar, K; Laille, E; Shi, T; MacBeth, K J; Skikne, B

    2016-04-01

    CC-486, the oral formulation of azacitidine (AZA), is an epigenetic modifier and DNA methyltransferase inhibitor in clinical development for treatment of hematologic malignancies. CC-486 administered for 7 days per 28-day treatment cycle was evaluated in a phase 1 dose-finding study. AZA has a short plasma half-life and DNA incorporation is S-phase-restricted; extending CC-486 exposure may increase the number of AZA-affected diseased target cells and maximize therapeutic effects. Patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) received 300 mg CC-486 once daily for 14 days (n=28) or 21 days (n=27) of repeated 28-day cycles. Median patient age was 72 years (range 31-87) and 75% of patients had International Prognostic Scoring System Intermediate-1 risk MDS. Median number of CC-486 treatment cycles was 7 (range 2-24) for the 14-day dosing schedule and 6 (1-24) for the 21-day schedule. Overall response (complete or partial remission, red blood cell (RBC) or platelet transfusion independence (TI), or hematologic improvement) (International Working Group 2006) was attained by 36% of patients receiving 14-day dosing and 41% receiving 21-day dosing. RBC TI rates were similar with both dosing schedules (31% and 38%, respectively). CC-486 was generally well-tolerated. Extended dosing schedules of oral CC-486 may provide effective long-term treatment for patients with lower-risk MDS. PMID:26442612

  1. Repeated low-dose organophosphate DFP exposure leads to the development of depression and cognitive impairment in a rat model of Gulf War Illness.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Kristin F; Deshpande, Laxmikant S

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 175,000-250,000 of the returning veterans from the 1991 Persian Gulf War exhibit chronic multi-symptom illnesses that includes neurologic co-morbidities such as depression, anxiety and cognitive impairments. Amongst a host of causative factors, exposure to low levels of the nerve agent Sarin has been strongly implicated for expression of Gulf War Illness (GWI). Nerve agents similar to pesticides are organophosphate (OP) compounds. There is evidence from civilian population that exposure to OPs such as in agricultural workers and nerve agents such as the survivors and first-responders of the Tokyo subway Sarin gas attack suffer from chronic neurological problems similar to GWI symptoms. Given this unique chemical profile, OPs are ideal to study the effects of nerve agents and develop models of GWI in civilian laboratories. In this study, we used repeated low-dose exposure to OP agent diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) over a 5-day period to approximate the duration and level of Sarin exposure during the Persian Gulf War. We tested the rats at 3-months post DFP exposure. Using a battery of behavioral assays, we observed the presence of symptoms of chronic depression, anxiety and memory problems as characterized by increased immobility time in the Forced Swim Test, anhedonia in the Sucrose Preference Test, anxiety in the Elevated Plus Maze, and spatial memory impairments in the Object Location Test, respectively. Chronic low dose DFP exposure was also associated with hippocampal neuronal damage as characterized by the presence of Fluoro-Jade staining. Given that OP exposure is considered a leading cause of GWI related morbidities, this animal model will be ideally suited to study underlying molecular mechanisms for the expression of GWI neurological symptoms and identify drugs for the effective treatment of GWIs. PMID:26619911

  2. Influence of Exercise on the Metabolic Profile Caused by 28 days of Bed Rest with Energy Deficit and Amino Acid Supplementation in Healthy Men

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Naomi E.; Cadena, Samuel M.; Cloutier, Gregory; Vega-López, Sonia; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Castaneda-Sceppa, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Objective Muscle loss and metabolic changes occur with disuse [i.e. bed rest (BR)]. We hypothesized that BR would lead to a metabolically unhealthy profile defined by: increased circulating tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, decreased circulating insulin-like-growth-factor (IGF)-1, decreased HDL-cholesterol, and decreased muscle density (MD; measured by mid-thigh computerized tomography). Methods We investigated the metabolic profile after 28 days of BR with 8±6% energy deficit in male individuals (30-55 years) randomized to resistance exercise with amino acid supplementation (RT, n=24) or amino acid supplementation alone (EAA, n=7). Upper and lower body exercises were performed in the horizontal position. Blood samples were taken at baseline, after 28 days of BR and 14 days of recovery. Results We found a shift toward a metabolically unfavourable profile after BR [compared to baseline (BLN)] in both groups as shown by decreased HDL-cholesterol levels (EAA: BLN: 39±4 vs. BR: 32±2 mg/dL, RT: BLN: 39±1 vs. BR: 32±1 mg/dL; p<0.001) and Low MD (EAA: BLN: 27±4 vs. BR: 22±3 cm2, RT: BLN: 28±2 vs. BR: 23±2 cm2; p<0.001). A healthier metabolic profile was maintained with exercise, including NormalMD (EAA: BLN: 124±6 vs. BR: 110±5 cm2, RT: BLN: 132±3 vs. BR: 131±4 cm2; p<0.001, time-by-group); although, exercise did not completely alleviate the unfavourable metabolic changes seen with BR. Interestingly, both groups had increased plasma IGF-1 levels (EAA: BLN:168±22 vs. BR 213±20 ng/mL, RT: BLN:180±10 vs. BR: 219±13 ng/mL; p<0.001) and neither group showed TNFα changes (p>0.05). Conclusions We conclude that RT can be incorporated to potentially offset the metabolic complications of BR. PMID:25317071

  3. A 28-day rat inhalation study with an integrated molecular toxicology endpoint demonstrates reduced exposure effects for a prototypic modified risk tobacco product compared with conventional cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Kogel, Ulrike; Schlage, Walter K; Martin, Florian; Xiang, Yang; Ansari, Sam; Leroy, Patrice; Vanscheeuwijck, Patrick; Gebel, Stephan; Buettner, Ansgar; Wyss, Christoph; Esposito, Marco; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C

    2014-06-01

    Towards a systems toxicology-based risk assessment, we investigated molecular perturbations accompanying histopathological changes in a 28-day rat inhalation study combining transcriptomics with classical histopathology. We demonstrated reduced biological activity of a prototypic modified risk tobacco product (pMRTP) compared with the reference research cigarette 3R4F. Rats were exposed to filtered air or to three concentrations of mainstream smoke (MS) from 3R4F, or to a high concentration of MS from a pMRTP. Histopathology revealed concentration-dependent changes in response to 3R4F that were irritative stress-related in nasal and bronchial epithelium, and inflammation-related in the lung parenchyma. For pMRTP, significant changes were seen in the nasal epithelium only. Transcriptomics data were obtained from nasal and bronchial epithelium and lung parenchyma. Concentration-dependent gene expression changes were observed following 3R4F exposure, with much smaller changes for pMRTP. A computational-modeling approach based on causal models of tissue-specific biological networks identified cell stress, inflammation, proliferation, and senescence as the most perturbed molecular mechanisms. These perturbations correlated with histopathological observations. Only weak perturbations were observed for pMRTP. In conclusion, a correlative evaluation of classical histopathology together with gene expression-based computational network models may facilitate a systems toxicology-based risk assessment, as shown for a pMRTP. PMID:24632068

  4. [Temporal trends in myocardial infarct morbidity, mortality and 28-day fatalities and medical management. Results of the Augsburg Myocardial Infarct Register 1985 to 1992].

    PubMed

    Löwel, H; Lewis, M; Keil, U; Hörmann, A; Bolte, H D; Willich, S; Gostomzyk, J

    1995-08-01

    Between 1985 and 1992 a significant decrease in rates of acute myocardial infarction (AMI; fatal and non fatal, including prehospital cardiac death) from 533 cases per 100,000 population of 455 cases was observed in the 25- to 74-year-old male study population (linear regression model: -13%, p < 0.01). In the corresponding female study population the AMI rate increased from 153 cases per 100,000 population in 1985 to 153 cases in 1992 (linear regression model: +18%, p < 0.05). The decrease was only in 50- to 59-year-old male AMI patients without changes in risk factors (smoking, diabetes, hypertension, recurrent AMI) but with a decrease in patients with a history of angina pectoris, which may have been caused by intensified medical treatment of AMI endangered patients. Over time 34% of the patients died before hospitalization and another 19% died within the first 24 h after hospitalization. The register results show an underestimation of the coronary mortality by the official cause of death statistics. In contrast, the significant increase in treatment with thrombolytics (men from 16% to 38%, women from 8% to 42%), beta-blockers (men from 48% to 69%, women from 45% to 71%), and antiplatelets (men from 55% to 94%, women from 52% to 91%) was not related to any significant changes in 28-day case fatality of the 24-h survivors (men and women 13% to 14%). Without media campaigns, for the increased number of cases hospitalized within 4 h after the event (1985-1987 men 50%, women 42%; 1990-1992 58% and 60%; p < 0.01) thrombolytic treatment shows an increase from 25% in men and 17% in women (1985-1987) to 54% in men and 47% in women (1990-1992; p < 0.01). PMID:7571765

  5. Resistance training and timed essential amino acids protect against the loss of muscle mass and strength during 28 days of bed rest and energy deficit

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Naomi; Cloutier, Gregory J.; Cadena, Samuel M.; Layne, Jennifer E.; Nelsen, Carol A.; Freed, Alicia M.; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Castaneda-Sceppa, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    Spaceflight and bed rest (BR) result in losses of muscle mass and strength. Resistance training (RT) and amino acid (AA) supplementation are potential countermeasures to minimize these losses. However, it is unknown if timing of supplementation with exercise can optimize benefits, particularly with energy deficit. We examined the effect of these countermeasures on body composition, strength, and insulin levels in 31 men (ages 31–55 yr) during BR (28 days) followed by active recovery (14 days). Subjects were randomly assigned to essential AA supplementation (AA group, n = 7); RT with AA given 3 h after training (RT group, n = 12); or RT with AA given 5 min before training (AART group, n = 12). Energy intake was reduced by 8 ± 6%. Midthigh muscle area declined with BR for the AA > RT > AART groups: −11%, −3%, −4% (P = 0.05). Similarly, greatest losses in lower body muscle strength were seen in the AA group (−22%). These were attenuated in the exercising groups [RT (−8%) and AART (−6%; P < 0.05)]. Fat mass and midthigh intramuscular fat increased after BR in the AA group (+3% and +14%, respectively), and decreased in the RT (−5% and −4%) and AART groups (−1 and −5%; P = 0.05). Muscle mass and strength returned toward baseline after recovery, but the AA group showed the lowest regains. Combined resistance training with AA supplementation pre- or postexercise attenuated the losses in muscle mass and strength by approximately two-thirds compared with AA supplement alone during BR and energy deficit. These data support the efficacy of combined AA and RT as a countermeasure against muscle wasting due to low gravity. PMID:18483167

  6. Signal Increase on Unenhanced T1-Weighted Images in the Rat Brain After Repeated, Extended Doses of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Gregor; Lenhard, Diana Constanze; Sieber, Martin Andrew; Lohrke, Jessica; Frenzel, Thomas; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In this prospective preclinical study, we evaluated T1-weighted signal intensity in the deep cerebellar nuclei (CN) and globus pallidus (GP) up to 24 days after repeated administration of linear and macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) using homologous imaging and evaluation methods as in the recently published retrospective clinical studies. In a second part of the study, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces were evaluated for contrast enhancement by fluid-attenuated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods Sixty adult male Wistar-Han rats were randomly divided into a control and 5 GBCA groups (n = 10 per group). The administered GBCAs were gadodiamide, gadopentetate dimeglumine, and gadobenate dimeglumine (linear GBCAs) as well as gadobutrol and gadoterate meglumine (macrocyclic GBCAs) and saline (control). Over a period of 2 weeks, the animals received 10 intravenous injections at a dose of 2.5 mmol Gd/kg body weight, each on 5 consecutive days per week. Before GBCA administration, as well as 3 and 24 days after the last injection, a whole-brain MRI was performed using a standard T1-weighted 3-dimensional turbo spin echo sequence on a clinical 1.5 T scanner. The ratios of signal intensities in deep CN to pons (CN/Po) and GP to thalamus (GP/Th) were determined. For the evaluation of the CSF spaces, 18 additional rats were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 3 per group) that received the same GBCAs as in the first part of the study. After MR cisternography for anatomical reference, a fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence was performed before and 1 minute after intravenous injection of a dose of 1 mmol Gd/kg body weight GBCA or saline. Results A significantly increased signal intensity ratio of CN/Po was observed 3 and 24 days after the last injection of gadodiamide and gadobenate dimeglumine. No significant changes were observed between the 2 time points. Gadopentetate dimeglumine injection led to a moderately elevated

  7. Should Patient Setup in Lung Cancer Be Based on the Primary Tumor? An Analysis of Tumor Coverage and Normal Tissue Dose Using Repeated Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Elmpt, Wouter van; Oellers, Michel; Lambin, Philippe; De Ruysscher, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluation of the dose distribution for lung cancer patients using a patient setup procedure based on the bony anatomy or the primary tumor. Methods and materials: For 39 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer, the planning fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) scan was registered to a repeated FDG-PET/CT scan made in the second week of treatment. Two patient setup methods were analyzed based on the bony anatomy or the primary tumor. The original treatment plan was copied to the repeated scan, and target and normal tissue structures were delineated. Dose distributions were analyzed using dose-volume histograms for the primary tumor, lymph nodes, lungs, and spinal cord. Results: One patient showed decreased dose coverage of the primary tumor caused by progressive disease and required replanning to achieve adequate coverage. For the other patients, the minimum dose to the primary tumor did not significantly deviate from the planned dose: -0.2 {+-} 1.7% (p = 0.71) and -0.1 {+-} 1.7% (p = 0.85) for the bony anatomy setup and the primary tumor setup, respectively. For patients (n = 31) with nodal involvement, 10% showed a decrease in minimum dose larger than 5% for the bony anatomy setup and 13% for the primary tumor setup. The mean lung dose exceeded the maximum allowed 20 Gy in 21% of the patients for the bony anatomy setup and in 13% for the primary tumor setup, whereas for the spinal cord this occurred in 10% and 13% of the patients, respectively. Conclusions: In 10% and 13% of patients with nodal involvement, setup based on bony anatomy or primary tumor, respectively, led to important dose deviations in nodal target volumes. Overdosage of critical structures occurred in 10-20% of the patients. In cases of progressive disease, repeated imaging revealed underdosage of the primary tumor. Development of practical ways for setup procedures based on repeated high-quality imaging of all tumor sites during radiotherapy

  8. Nitrogen removal and mass balance in newly-formed Myriophyllum aquaticum mesocosm during a single 28-day incubation with swine wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Zhang, Shunan; Wang, Yi; Li, Yong; Xiao, Runlin; Li, Hongfang; He, Yang; Zhang, Miaomiao; Wang, Di; Li, Xi; Wu, Jinshui

    2016-01-15

    The aim of this research was to assess the applicability of Myriophyllum (M.) aquaticum for swine wastewater treatment. Nitrogen (N) removal processes were investigated in M. aquaticum mesocosms with swine wastewater (SW), 50% diluted swine wastewater (50% SW), and two strengths of synthetic wastewater, 200 mg [Formula: see text] L(-1) (200 [Formula: see text] ) and 400 mg [Formula: see text] L(-1) (400 [Formula: see text] ). During a 28-day incubation period, the average [Formula: see text] and TN removal rates were 99.8% and 94.2% for 50% SW and 99.8% and 93.8% for SW, which were greater than 86.5% and 83.7% for 200 [Formula: see text] , and 73.7% and 74.1% for 400 [Formula: see text] , respectively. A maximum areal total nitrogen (TN) removal rate of 157.8 mg N m(-2) d(-1) was found in M. aquaticum mesocosms with SW. During the incubation period, the observed dynamics of [Formula: see text] concentrations in water and gene copy numbers of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), nirK and nirS in soil unraveled strong nitrification and denitrification processes occurring in M. aquaticum mesocosms with swine wastewater. The N mass balance analysis indicated that plant uptake and soil N accumulation accounted for 17.9-42.2% and 18.0-43.8% of the initial TN load, respectively. The coupled nitrification and denitrification process was calculated to account for, on average, 36.8% and 62.8% of TN removal for 50% SW and SW, respectively. These findings demonstrated that the N uptake by M. aquaticum contributed to a considerable proportion of N removal. In particular, the activities of ammonia-oxidizing and denitrification microbes responsible for nitrification and denitrification processes in M. aquaticum mesocosm accelerated [Formula: see text] and TN removal from swine wastewater. PMID:26607567

  9. Serological analysis of human anti-human antibody responses in colon cancer patients treated with repeated doses of humanized monoclonal antibody A33.

    PubMed

    Ritter, G; Cohen, L S; Williams, C; Richards, E C; Old, L J; Welt, S

    2001-09-15

    Mouse monoclonal antibody A33 (mAb A33) recognizes a M(r) 43,000 cell surface glycoprotein (designated A33) expressed in human colonic epithelium and colon cancer but absent from most other normal tissues. In patients, mAb A33 localizes with high specificity to colon cancer and is retained for up to 6 weeks in the cancer but cleared rapidly from normal colon (5-6 days). As a carrier of (125)I or (131)I, mAb A33 has shown antitumor activity. Induction of strong human anti-mouse antibody (immunoglobulin; HAMA) responses in patients, however, limits the use of the murine mAb A33 to very few injections. A humanized version of this antibody (huAb A33) has been prepared for Phase I and II clinical studies in patients with colon cancer. In those studies, immunogenicity of huAb A33 has been monitored using a novel, highly sensitive BIACORE method, which allows measurement of human anti-human antibodies (HAHAs) without the use of secondary reagents. We found that 63% (26 of 41) of the patients treated with repeated doses of huAb A33 developed HAHAs against a conformational antigenic determinant located in the V(L) and V(H) regions of huAb A33. Detailed serological analysis showed two distinct types of HAHAs. HAHA of type I (49% of patients) was characterized by an early onset with peak HAHA levels after 2 weeks of treatment, which declined with ongoing huAb A33 treatment. HAHA of type II (17% of patients) was characterized by a typically later onset of HAHA than in type I and by progressively increasing HAHA levels with each subsequent huAb A33 administration. Colon cancer patients with type I HAHAs did not develop infusion-related adverse events. In contrast, HAHA of type II was indicative of infusion-related adverse events. By using this new method, we were able to distinguish these two types of HAHAs in patients while on antibody treatment, allowing patients to be removed from study prior to the onset of severe infusion-related adverse events. PMID:11559561

  10. Distribution of radio-labeled N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine in Sprague-Dawley rats and its effect on glutathione metabolism following single and repeat dosing by oral gavage.

    PubMed

    Arfsten, Darryl P; Johnson, Eric W; Wilfong, Erin R; Jung, Anne E; Bobb, Andrew J

    2007-01-01

    were measured in the skin and kidney in association with repeat administration of 1,200 mg/kg NAC. Glutathione peroxidase (GxP) activity was increased in the skin, kidney, and liver suggesting that oxidative stress was occurring in these tissues in response to repeat dosing with NAC. Overall, the results of this study present the possibility that NAC could provide some benefit in preventing or reducing toxicity related to exposure to chemical irritants (particularly sulfur mustard) in some tissues by increasing tissue NAC and/or cysteine levels, GSH concentrations, and GST activity. However, follow-on studies in animals are needed to confirm that oral administration of single and multiple doses of NAC can significantly reduce skin, eye, and lung toxicity associated with sulfur mustard exposure. The finding that GxP activity is elevated, albeit transiently, following repeat administration of NAC suggests that repeat administration of NAC may induce oxidative stress in some tissues and further studies are needed to confirm this finding. PMID:17612979

  11. Dose-Response for Multiple Biomarkers of Exposure and Genotoxic Effect Following Repeated Treatment of Rats with the Alkylating Agents, MMS and MNU.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhiying; LeBaron, Matthew J; Schisler, Melissa R; Zhang, Fagen; Bartels, Michael J; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar; Pottenger, Lynn H

    2016-05-01

    The nature of the dose-response relationship for various in vivo endpoints of exposure and effect were investigated using the alkylating agents, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and methylnitrosourea (MNU). Six male F344 rats/group were dosed orally with 0, 0.5, 1, 5, 25 or 50mg/kg bw/day (mkd) of MMS, or 0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 5, 10, 25 or 50 mkd of MNU, for 4 consecutive days and sacrificed 24h after the last dose. The dose-responses for multiple biomarkers of exposure and genotoxic effect were investigated. In MMS-treated rats, the hemoglobin adduct level, a systemic exposure biomarker, increased linearly with dose (r (2) = 0.9990, P < 0.05), indicating the systemic availability of MMS; however, the N7MeG DNA adduct, a target exposure biomarker, exhibited a non-linear dose-response in blood and liver tissues. Blood reticulocyte micronuclei (MN), a genotoxic effect biomarker, exhibited a clear no-observed-genotoxic-effect-level (NOGEL) of 5 mkd as a point of departure (PoD) for MMS. Two separate dose-response models, the Lutz and Lutz model and the stepwise approach using PROC REG both supported a bilinear/threshold dose-response for MN induction. Liver gene expression, a mechanistic endpoint, also exhibited a bilinear dose-response. Similarly, in MNU-treated rats, hepatic DNA adducts, gene expression changes and MN all exhibited clear PoDs, with a NOGEL of 1 mkd for MN induction, although dose-response modeling of the MNU-induced MN data showed a better statistical fit for a linear dose-response. In summary, these results provide in vivo data that support the existence of clear non-linear dose-responses for a number of biologically significant events along the pathway for genotoxicity induced by DNA-reactive agents. PMID:26040483

  12. Randomised clinical trial: safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of repeated doses of TAK-438 (vonoprazan), a novel potassium-competitive acid blocker, in healthy male subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, H; Sakurai, Y; Nishimura, A; Okamoto, H; Hibberd, M; Jenkins, R; Yoneyama, T; Ashida, K; Ogama, Y; Warrington, S

    2015-01-01

    Background TAK-438 (vonoprazan) is a potassium-competitive acid blocker that reversibly inhibits gastric H+, K+-ATPase. Aim To evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of TAK-438 in healthy Japanese and non-Japanese men. Methods In two Phase I, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, healthy men (Japan N = 60; UK N = 48) received TAK-438 10–40 mg once daily at a fixed dose level for 7 consecutive days. Assessments included safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (intragastric pH). Results Plasma concentration–time profiles of TAK-438 at all dose levels showed rapid absorption (median Tmax ≤2 h). Mean elimination half-life was up to 9 h. Exposure was slightly greater than dose proportional, with no apparent time-dependent inhibition of metabolism. There was no important difference between the two studies in AUC0-tau on Day 7. TAK-438 caused dose-dependent acid suppression. On Day 7, mean 24-h intragastric pH>4 holding time ratio (HTR) with 40 mg TAK-438 was 100% (Japan) and 93.2% (UK), and mean night-time pH>4 HTR was 100% (Japan) and 90.4% (UK). TAK-438 was well tolerated. The frequency of adverse events was similar at all dose levels and there were no serious adverse events. There were no important increases in serum alanine transaminase activity. Serum gastrin and pepsinogen I and II concentrations increased with TAK-438 dose. Conclusions TAK-438 in multiple rising oral dose levels of 10–40 mg once daily for 7 days was safe and well tolerated in healthy men and caused rapid, profound and sustained suppression of gastric acid secretion throughout each 24-h dosing interval. Clinicaltrials.gov identifiers: NCT02123953 and NCT02141711. PMID:25707624

  13. A repeated dose comparison of three benzodiazepine derivative (nitrazepam, flurazepam and flunitrazepam) on subjective appraisals of sleep and measures of psychomotor performance the morning following night-time medication.

    PubMed

    Hindmarch, I

    1977-11-01

    Repeated doses of 5 mg nitrazepam, 15 mg flurazepam, and 1 mg flunitrazepam improved subjective assessments of the ease of getting to sleep and the perceived quality of induced sleep in a population of 30 healthy volunteers. The subjective reports of improved sleep inducement were related to a perceived difficulty in awakening from sleep the morning following medication. This subjectively reported "hangover" is also shown in the impairment of mental arithmetic abilities as measured on the serial subtraction of sevens technique. However, complex psychomotor performance is unaffected by repeated administration of these three benzodiazepine derivatives, although these later results are somewhat equivocal. Evidence of a "rebound phenomenon" following 4 nights' withdrawal of active medication is shown in both subjective and objective measures of sleep and early morning behaviour. PMID:22990

  14. Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling After Repeated Administrations of RBP-6000, a New, Subcutaneously Injectable, Long-Acting, Sustained-Release Formulation of Buprenorphine, for the Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder.

    PubMed

    Laffont, Celine M; Gomeni, Roberto; Heidbreder, Christian; Jones, J P; Nasser, Azmi F

    2016-07-01

    RBP-6000 is a novel sustained-release formulation of buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid use disorder, which has been designed for once-monthly (28 days) subcutaneous (SC) injections. A population pharmacokinetic (PK) model was developed to describe the time course of buprenorphine plasma concentrations after repeated SC injections of RBP-6000 at 50 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg, or 300 mg in treatment-seeking opioid-dependent subjects previously on sublingual buprenorphine (Subutex(®) ) treatment. The μ-opioid receptor occupancy was predicted using a previously developed PK/PD Emax model. The results of the population PK analysis jointly with the predicted level of μ-opioid receptor occupancy provided quantitative criteria for clinical dose selection for RBP-6000: the dose of 300 mg every 28 days seems appropriate for immediately achieving an effective exposure after the first SC injection and to maintain effective levels of exposure during chronic treatment. Furthermore, simulations conducted to evaluate the potential impact of a holiday in drug intake indicated that in the unexpected event of a 2-week holiday, levels of μ-opioid receptor occupancy remained consistently above 70% with no significant loss of drug efficacy. This analysis indicated that RBP-6000 has the potential for becoming an effective treatment for opioid-dependent subjects by addressing compliance issues associated with the current once-a-day treatments. PMID:26479717

  15. Repeating thermocouple

    SciTech Connect

    Falk, R. A.

    1985-06-04

    Disclosed herein is a repeating use thermocouple assembly and method of making the same in which a cavity adjacent the tip of the thermocouple is filled with a thermosetting foundry sand and baked in place to provide support for the thermocouple tube without causing stresses during use which could cause breakage of the thermocouple tube.

  16. Withdrawal from repeated administration of a low dose of reserpine induced opposing adaptive changes in the noradrenaline and serotonin system function: a behavioral and neurochemical ex vivo and in vivo studies in the rat.

    PubMed

    Antkiewicz-Michaluk, Lucyna; Wąsik, Agnieszka; Możdżeń, Edyta; Romańska, Irena; Michaluk, Jerzy

    2015-03-01

    Reserpine is an inhibitor of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) and monoamine releaser, so it can be used as a pharmacological model of depression. In the present paper, we investigated the behavioral and neurochemical effects of withdrawal from acute and repeated administration of a low dose of reserpine (0.2 mg/kg) in Wistar Han rats. We demonstrated the behavioral and receptor oversensitivity (postsynaptic dopamine D1) during withdrawal from chronic reserpine. It was accompanied by a significant increase in motility in the locomotor activity test and climbing behavior in the forced swim test (FST). Neurochemical studies revealed that repeated but not acute administration the a low dose of reserpine triggered opposing adaptive changes in the noradrenergic and serotonin system function analyzed during reserpine withdrawal, i.e. 48 h after the last injection. The tissue concentration of noradrenaline was significantly decreased in the hypothalamus and nucleus accumbens only after repeated drug administration (by about 20% and 35% vs. control; p<0.05, respectively). On the other hand, the concentration of its extraneuronal metabolite, normetanephrine (NM) increased significantly in the VTA during withdrawal both from acute and chronic reserpine. The serotonin concentration was significantly reduced in the VTA after chronic reserpine (by about 40% vs. the control group, p<0.05) as well as its main metabolite, 5-HIAA (by about 30% vs. control; p<0.05) in the VTA and hypothalamus. Dopamine and its metabolites were not changed after acute or chronic reserpine administration. In vivo microdialysis studies clearly evidenced the lack of the effect of a single dose of reserpine, and its distinct effects after chronic treatment on the release of noradrenaline and serotonin in the rat striatum. In fact, the withdrawal from repeated administration of reserpine significantly increased an extraneuronal concentration of noradrenaline in the rat striatum but at the same

  17. scAAVIL-1ra dosing trial in a large animal model and validation of long-term expression with repeat administration for osteoarthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, L R; Grieger, J C; Phillips, J N; Khan, N; Gray, S J; McIlwraith, C W; Samulski, R J

    2015-07-01

    A gene therapeutic approach to treat osteoarthritis (OA) appears to be on the horizon for millions of people who suffer from this disease. Previously we described optimization of a scAAVIL-1ra gene therapeutic vector and initially tested this in an equine model verifying long-term intrasynovial IL-1ra protein at therapeutic levels. Using this vector, we carried out a dosing trial in six horses to verify protein levels and establish a dose that would express relevant levels of therapeutic protein for extended periods of time (8 months). A novel arthroscopic procedure used to detect green fluorescence protein (GFP) fluorescence intrasynovially confirmed successful transduction of the scAAVGFP vector in both the synovial and cartilage tissues. No evidence of intra-articular toxicity was detected. Immune responses to vector revealed development of neutralizing antibodies (Nabs) within 2 weeks of administration, which persisted for the duration of the study but did not lower protein expression intra-articularly. Re-dosing with a different serotype to attain therapeutic levels of protein confirmed establishment of successful transduction. This is the first study in an equine model to establish a dosing/redosing protocol, as well as examine the Nab response to capsid and supports further clinical investigation to determine the clinical efficacy of scAAVIL-1ra to treat OA. PMID:25902762

  18. Dose-escalated CHOP plus etoposide (MegaCHOEP) followed by repeated stem cell transplantation for primary treatment of aggressive high-risk non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Glass, Bertram; Kloess, Marita; Bentz, Martin; Schlimok, Günter; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Feller, Alfred; Trümper, Lorenz; Loeffler, Markus; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Schmitz, Norbert

    2006-04-15

    Feasibility, safety, and efficacy of a 4-course high-dose chemotherapy (HDT) protocol including autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT) after courses 2, 3, and 4 was investigated in 110 patients, aged 18 to 60 years, with primary diagnosis of aggressive NHL (aNHL), and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) levels above normal. At dose level 1 (DL1), course 1 consisted of cyclophosphamide 1500 mg/m2, doxorubicin (Adriamycin) 70 mg/m2, vincristine 2 mg, etoposide 450 mg/m2, and prednisone 500 mg. With courses 2 and 3 cyclophosphamide and etoposide were escalated to 4500 mg/m2 and 600 mg/m2, respectively. With course 4 cyclophosphamide and etoposide were given at 6000 mg/m2 and 1000 mg/m2, respectively. At DL2 etoposide was further increased to 600, 960, 960, and 1480 mg/m2 with courses 1 to 4, respectively. Therapy as per protocol was completed by 81.8% of patients. Overall survival at 5 years was 67.2%, freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) was 62.1%, and treatment-related mortality was 4.5%. There was a trend to better FFTF at DL2 compared to DL1 (66.9% versus 54.2%). Repetitive HDT with escalated CHOP plus etoposide is feasible and effective treatment of patients with aNHL. DL2 of this therapy is being used in an ongoing phase 3 study. PMID:16384932

  19. Safety evaluation of AB-LIFE(®) (Lactobacillus plantarum CECT 7527, 7528 and 7529): Antibiotic resistance and 90-day repeated-dose study in rats.

    PubMed

    Mukerji, Pushkor; Roper, Jason M; Stahl, Buffy; Smith, Amy B; Burns, Frank; Rae, Jessica Caverly; Yeung, Nicolas; Lyra, Anna; Svärd, Laura; Saarinen, Markku T; Alhoniemi, Esa; Ibarra, Alvin; Ouwehand, Arthur C

    2016-06-01

    AB-LIFE(®) is a probiotic product consisting of equal parts of three strains of Lactobacillus plantarum (CECT 7527, 7528, and 7529) blended with inert excipients. Whole genome sequencing was performed on each of the three strains. Antibiotic resistance was evaluated by genomic mining for resistance genes, and assessment for transferability. No risk of transfer potential was identified for any antibiotic resistance genes in the three strains. AB-LIFE(®) was evaluated for potential subchronic oral toxicity in rats, with dosages of 300 and 1000 mg/kg BW/day (equivalent to 5.55 × 10(10) and 1.85 × 10(11) CFU/kg BW/day). Survival of the three test strains through the gastrointestinal tract was supported by fecal analysis. No adverse effects were identified with respect to in-life parameters, clinical or anatomic pathology, translocation, or fecal chemical analyses. The no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for AB-LIFE(®) in male and female rats was 1000 mg/kg BW/day (1.85 × 10(11) CFU of AB-LIFE(®)/kg BW/day), the highest dose level evaluated. These results, in conjunction with a previous acute toxicity study in rats, support the conclusion that AB-LIFE(®) is safe for human consumption. PMID:27016492

  20. Collaborative work on evaluation of ovarian toxicity. 4) Two- or four-week repeated dose study of 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide in female rats.

    PubMed

    Ito, Atsushi; Mafune, Naomi; Kimura, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    To determine the optimal administration period for evaluation of ovarian toxicity of 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD), VCD was intraperitoneally administered to female Sprague-Dawley rats at 0 (Control), 5, 20 and 80 mg/kg once a day for 2 or 4 weeks (2- or 4-week study). To identify small follicles, serial sections of the ovaries were stained with routine hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry. In the 4-week study, decrease in small follicles was observed in the ovaries at 20 and 80 mg/kg. In the 2-week study, the same change was also observed at 80 mg/kg. Identification of small follicles using PCNA-stained slides was easier than that using HE-stained slides. In conclusion, histopathological findings in the ovaries are important for evaluation of female reproductive toxicity of VCD, and ovarian toxicity of VCD can be detected by administration for 2 weeks at an appropriate dose level. Furthermore, PCNA immunohistochemistry is effective for evaluation of small follicle destruction in chemical-induced ovarian toxicity. PMID:19265289

  1. Antidepressant-like effect of tetrahydroisoquinoline amines in the animal model of depressive disorder induced by repeated administration of a low dose of reserpine: behavioral and neurochemical studies in the rat.

    PubMed

    Antkiewicz-Michaluk, Lucyna; Wąsik, Agnieszka; Możdżeń, Edyta; Romańska, Irena; Michaluk, Jerzy

    2014-07-01

    Animal models are widely used to study antidepressant-like effect in rodents. However, it should be mentioned that pharmacological models do not always take into account the complexity of the disease process. In the present paper, we demonstrated that repeated but not acute treatment with a low dose of reserpine (0.2 mg/kg i.p.) led to a pharmacological model of depression which was based on its inhibitory effect on the vesicular monoamine transporter 2, and monoamines depleting action in the brain. In fact, we observed that chronic treatment with a low dose of reserpine induced a distinct depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test (FST), and additionally, it produced a significant decrease in the level of dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin in the brain structures. 1,2,3,4-Tetrahydroisoquinoline (TIQ) and its close methyl derivative, 1-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (1MeTIQ) are exo/endogenous amines present naturally in the mammalian brain which demonstrated a significant antidepressant-like effect in the FST and the reserpine model of depression in the rat. Both compounds, TIQ and 1MeTIQ, administered chronically in a dose of 25 mg/kg (i.p.) together with reserpine completely antagonized reserpine-produced depression as assessed by the immobility time and swimming time. Biochemical data were in agreement with behavioral experiments and demonstrated that chronic treatment with a low dose of reserpine in contrast to acute administration produced a significant depression of monoamines in the brain structures and impaired their metabolism. These neurochemical effects obtained after repeated reserpine (0.2 mg/kg i.p.) in the brain structures were completely antagonized by joint TIQ or 1MeTIQ (25 mg/kg i.p.) administration with chronic reserpine. A possible molecular mechanism of action of TIQ and 1MeTIQ responsible for their antidepressant action is discussed. On the basis of the presented behavioral and biochemical studies, we suggest that both

  2. Replicating Adenovirus-Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Recombinant Priming and Envelope Protein Boosting Elicits Localized, Mucosal IgA Immunity in Rhesus Macaques Correlated with Delayed Acquisition following a Repeated Low-Dose Rectal SIVmac251 Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Peng; Patterson, L. Jean; Kuate, Seraphin; Brocca-Cofano, Egidio; Thomas, Michael A.; Venzon, David; Zhao, Jun; DiPasquale, Janet; Fenizia, Claudio; Lee, Eun Mi; Kalisz, Irene; Kalyanaraman, Vaniambadi S.; Pal, Ranajit; Montefiori, David; Keele, Brandon F.

    2012-01-01

    We have shown that sequential replicating adenovirus type 5 host range mutant human immunodeficiency virus/simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV/SIV) recombinant priming delivered first intranasally (i.n.) plus orally and then intratracheally (i.t.), followed by envelope protein boosting, elicits broad cellular immunity and functional, envelope-specific serum and mucosal antibodies that correlate with protection from high-dose SIV and simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenges in rhesus macaques. Here we extended these studies to compare the standard i.n./i.t. regimen with additional mucosal administration routes, including sublingual, rectal, and vaginal routes. Similar systemic cellular and humoral immunity was elicited by all immunization routes. Central and effector memory T cell responses were also elicited by the four immunization routes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and jejunal, rectal, and vaginal tissue samples. Cellular responses in vaginal tissue were more compartmentalized, being induced primarily by intravaginal administration. In contrast, all immunization routes elicited secretory IgA (sIgA) responses at multiple mucosal sites. Following a repeated low-dose intrarectal (i.r.) challenge with SIVmac251 at a dose transmitting one or two variants, protection against acquisition was not achieved except in one macaque in the i.r. immunized group. All immunized macaques exhibited reduced peak viremia compared to that of controls, correlated inversely with prechallenge serum antienvelope avidity, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) titers, and percent antibody-dependent cell-mediated viral inhibition. Both antibody avidity and ADCC titers were correlated with the number of exposures required for infection. Notably, we show for the first time a significant correlation of vaccine-induced sIgA titers in rectal secretions with delayed acquisition. Further investigation of the characteristics and properties of the sIgA should elucidate the

  3. Ketoprofen versus paracetamol (acetaminophen) or ibuprofen in the management of fever: results of two randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, parallel-group, repeated-dose, multicentre, phase III studies in children.

    PubMed

    Kokki, Hannu; Kokki, Merja

    2010-01-01

    Fever is a common symptom in children and one of the major concerns of parents of younger and preschool-age children. To compare the efficacy and safety of ketoprofen with that of paracetamol (acetaminophen) and ibuprofen in the treatment of febrile conditions in children. Two prospective, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, repeated-dose, multicentre, phase III studies with two parallel groups in each study were conducted in primary-care outpatient clinics. Children aged 6 months to 6 years presenting with a febrile condition and an oral body temperature of > or =38.8 degrees C or rectal temperature of > or =39 degrees C were eligible for inclusion. Patients were randomized to receive either ketoprofen syrup 0.5 mg/kg, ibuprofen suspension 5 mg/kg or paracetamol suspension 15 mg/kg every 6 hours by the oral route. The primary outcome measure was the change in temperature at 3 hours (H3), compared with baseline (H0). All three treatments provided similar mean maximum decreases of 1.4-1.5 degrees C in body temperature at H3 compared with H0. Use of ketoprofen was not associated with any increased risk of adverse events compared with the two reference compounds. Ketoprofen 0.5 mg/kg appeared to be equivalent to the standard antipyretic doses of the reference products ibuprofen 5 mg/kg and paracetamol 15 mg/kg. Ketoprofen at the 0.5 mg/kg dose should be an effective and safe option for symptomatic management of fever in children. PMID:20380479

  4. Cumulative effects from repeated exposures to ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kaidbey, K.H.; Kligman, A.M.

    1981-05-01

    Repeated exposures to subliminal doses of UVR, given at 24-hr intervals, resulted in a lowering of the erythema threshold dose. At erythemogenically equivalent doses, UV-A was the most effective and UV-C the least. A similar and more pronounced effect was observed following repeated exposures to subthreshold doses of UV-A and topically applied 8-methoxypsoralen. These findings provide quantitative evidence for the cumulative nature of acute UVR damage in human skin.

  5. Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    SciTech Connect

    Aubuchon, Adam C.; Chan, Michael D.; Lovato, James F.; Balamucki, Christopher J.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Deguzman, Allan F.; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Shaw, Edward G.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Repeat gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS) for recurrent or persistent trigeminal neuralgia induces an additional response but at the expense of an increased incidence of facial numbness. The present series summarized the results of a repeat treatment series at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, including a multivariate analysis of the data to identify the prognostic factors for treatment success and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and December 2007, 37 patients underwent a second GKRS application because of treatment failure after a first GKRS treatment. The mean initial dose in the series was 87.3 Gy (range, 80-90). The mean retreatment dose was 84.4 Gy (range, 60-90). The dosimetric variables recorded included the dorsal root entry zone dose, pons surface dose, and dose to the distal nerve. Results: Of the 37 patients, 81% achieved a >50% pain relief response to repeat GKRS, and 57% experienced some form of trigeminal dysfunction after repeat GKRS. Two patients (5%) experienced clinically significant toxicity: one with bothersome numbness and one with corneal dryness requiring tarsorraphy. A dorsal root entry zone dose at repeat treatment of >26.6 Gy predicted for treatment success (61% vs. 32%, p = .0716). A cumulative dorsal root entry zone dose of >84.3 Gy (72% vs. 44%, p = .091) and a cumulative pons surface dose of >108.5 Gy (78% vs. 44%, p = .018) predicted for post-GKRS numbness. The presence of any post-GKRS numbness predicted for a >50% decrease in pain intensity (100% vs. 60%, p = .0015). Conclusion: Repeat GKRS is a viable treatment option for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, although the patient assumes a greater risk of nerve dysfunction to achieve maximal pain relief.

  6. Repeated Course Enrollments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windham, Patricia

    This report resents tables of repeated course enrollment data in Florida community colleges for the fall 1993 cohort. Overall, the percent of repeats in college preparatory courses was greater than that of college credit courses. Within ICS codes, the highest percentage of credit repeat enrollments was in mathematics; the second highest was in…

  7. Dynamic Evolutionary Changes in Blood Flow Measured by MDCT in a Hepatic VX2 Tumor Implant over an Extended 28-day Growth Period: Time-Density Curve Analysis1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hanping; Exner, Agata A.; Shi, Hong; Bear, Joshua; Haaga, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives The enhancement pattern of malignant tumors has been studied in short-term animal models (7–14 days), but the reported results have been variable and inconsistent. The purpose of this study was to investigate the changing blood flow characteristics of VX2 tumors implanted in rabbit livers with contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) to establish a predictable pattern of vascular evolution over an extended 28-day growth period. Materials and Methods VX2 carcinoma was implanted in livers of 10 male New Zealand White rabbits. Dynamic CT (2/seconds × 60 seconds) was conducted on days 7, 14, 21, and 28 after tumor implantation. Enhancement parameters of time-density curve (TDC), time to start (T0), time to peak (TP), maximum enhancement (ΔH), slope of enhancement (SLe), and washout (SLw) in tumor center, tumor rim, and normal liver were analyzed. Tumor samples corresponding to CT images of one tumor on days 14 and 21 and seven tumors on day 28 were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and anti-CD31 monoclonal antibody. The relationship between enhancement parameters and histology parameters (thickness of tumor border, extent of blood stasis, and luminar vessel density) was analyzed. Results Consistent growth, appearance, and vascular changes occurred in 7 of 10 animals over the 4-week observation period. Peripheral rim-like enhancement was noted in CT images. TDC analysis showed that tumor rim enhancement was pronounced and more rapid than normal liver initially but this difference diminished with tumor progression. The SLe, SLw, and ΔH decreased from 10.03 ± 3.25 Hu/second, 0.42 ± 0.25 Hu/sec, and 58.00 ± 25.27 Hu on day 7 to 5.86 ± 2.73 Hu/second, 0.10 ± 0.13 Hu/second, and 37.78 ± 8.89 Hu/second on day 28, respectively. TP increased from 12.71 ± 4.85 seconds on day 7 to 25.57 ± 7.75 seconds on day 28. No significant changes were noted on the TDC parameters in normal liver. The maximum density difference between

  8. Reconfigurable multiport EPON repeater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Masayuki; Inohara, Ryo; Agata, Akira; Horiuchi, Yukio

    2009-11-01

    An extended reach EPON repeater is one of the solutions to effectively expand FTTH service areas. In this paper, we propose a reconfigurable multi-port EPON repeater for effective accommodation of multiple ODNs with a single OLT line card. The proposed repeater, which has multi-ports in both OLT and ODN sides, consists of TRs, BTRs with the CDR function and a reconfigurable electrical matrix switch, can accommodate multiple ODNs to a single OLT line card by controlling the connection of the matrix switch. Although conventional EPON repeaters require full OLT line cards to accommodate subscribers from the initial installation stage, the proposed repeater can dramatically reduce the number of required line cards especially when the number of subscribers is less than a half of the maximum registerable users per OLT. Numerical calculation results show that the extended reach EPON system with the proposed EPON repeater can save 17.5% of the initial installation cost compared with a conventional repeater, and can be less expensive than conventional systems up to the maximum subscribers especially when the percentage of ODNs in lightly-populated areas is higher.

  9. Revisiting the TALE repeat.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Wu, Jianping; Pan, Xiaojing; Yan, Nieng

    2014-04-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors specifically bind to double stranded (ds) DNA through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each TAL effector (TALE) repeat comprises 33-35 amino acids and recognizes one specific DNA base through a highly variable residue at a fixed position in the repeat. Structural studies have revealed the molecular basis of DNA recognition by TALE repeats. Examination of the overall structure reveals that the basic building block of TALE protein, namely a helical hairpin, is one-helix shifted from the previously defined TALE motif. Here we wish to suggest a structure-based re-demarcation of the TALE repeat which starts with the residues that bind to the DNA backbone phosphate and concludes with the base-recognition hyper-variable residue. This new numbering system is consistent with the α-solenoid superfamily to which TALE belongs, and reflects the structural integrity of TAL effectors. In addition, it confers integral number of TALE repeats that matches the number of bound DNA bases. We then present fifteen crystal structures of engineered dHax3 variants in complex with target DNA molecules, which elucidate the structural basis for the recognition of bases adenine (A) and guanine (G) by reported or uncharacterized TALE codes. Finally, we analyzed the sequence-structure correlation of the amino acid residues within a TALE repeat. The structural analyses reported here may advance the mechanistic understanding of TALE proteins and facilitate the design of TALEN with improved affinity and specificity. PMID:24622844

  10. Quantum repeated games revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frąckiewicz, Piotr

    2012-03-01

    We present a scheme for playing quantum repeated 2 × 2 games based on Marinatto and Weber’s approach to quantum games. As a potential application, we study the twice repeated Prisoner’s Dilemma game. We show that results not available in the classical game can be obtained when the game is played in the quantum way. Before we present our idea, we comment on the previous scheme of playing quantum repeated games proposed by Iqbal and Toor. We point out the drawbacks that make their results unacceptable.

  11. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Vetting,M.; Hegde, S.; Fajardo, J.; Fiser, A.; Roderick, S.; Takiff, H.; Blanchard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S, T,A, V][D, N][L, F]-[S, T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure revealed that the pentapeptide repeats encode the folding of a novel right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix. MfpA binds to DNA gyrase and inhibits its activity. The rod-shaped, dimeric protein exhibits remarkable size, shape and electrostatic similarity to DNA.

  12. Serial observations after high dose talc slurry in the rabbit model for pleurodesis.

    PubMed

    Xie, C; Teixeira, L R; Wang, N; McGovern, J P; Light, R W

    1998-01-01

    The mechanisms leading to a pleurodesis after the intrapleural injection of a sclerosing agent are not completely understood. The purpose of the present study was to make serial observations over 28 days on the pleural fluid findings and the gross and microscopic changes in the pleura after talc slurry administered intrapleurally at a high dose. Sixty-six rabbits received 400 mg/kg talc slurry. Ten to 12 rabbits were sacrificed 1, 2, 4, 7, 14, and 28 days after the intrapleural injection. At sacrifice the pleural fluid was measured and analyzed, and the pleural surfaces were studied grossly and microscopically. The intrapleural injection of 400 mg/kg talc slurry resulted in an acute exudative pleural effusion that persisted for 4 days. There was a progressive increase in the gross and microscopic fibrosis over the 28 days. Talc was present at the time of sacrifice in all animals. At 28 days there was a clinically significant pleurodesis in all rabbits; pleurodesis was not observed before this time. From this study we conclude that the intrapleural injection of 400 mg/kg talc slurry leads to an acute exudative pleural effusion and clinically significant pleurodesis that is present on day 28 but not day 14. It appears that the production of a pleurodesis requires higher doses of talc in rabbits without a chest tube than in humans with a chest tube. PMID:9685526

  13. Digital repeat analysis; setup and operation.

    PubMed

    Nol, J; Isouard, G; Mirecki, J

    2006-06-01

    Since the emergence of digital imaging, there have been questions about the necessity of continuing reject analysis programs in imaging departments to evaluate performance and quality. As a marketing strategy, most suppliers of digital technology focus on the supremacy of the technology and its ability to reduce the number of repeats, resulting in less radiation doses given to patients and increased productivity in the department. On the other hand, quality assurance radiographers and radiologists believe that repeats are mainly related to positioning skills, and repeat analysis is the main tool to plan training needs to up-skill radiographers. A comparative study between conventional and digital imaging was undertaken to compare outcomes and evaluate the need for reject analysis. However, digital technology still being at its early development stages, setting a credible reject analysis program became the major task of the study. It took the department, with the help of the suppliers of the computed radiography reader and the picture archiving and communication system, over 2 years of software enhancement to build a reliable digital repeat analysis system. The results were supportive of both philosophies; the number of repeats as a result of exposure factors was reduced dramatically; however, the percentage of repeats as a result of positioning skills was slightly on the increase for the simple reason that some rejects in the conventional system qualifying for both exposure and positioning errors were classified as exposure error. The ability of digitally adjusting dark or light images reclassified some of those images as positioning errors. PMID:16421768

  14. Honesty through repeated interactions.

    PubMed

    Rich, Patricia; Zollman, Kevin J S

    2016-04-21

    In the study of signaling, it is well known that the cost of deception is an essential element for stable honest signaling in nature. In this paper, we show how costs for deception can arise endogenously from repeated interactions between individuals. Utilizing the Sir Philip Sidney game as an illustrative case, we show that repeated interactions can sustain honesty with no observable signal costs, even when deception cannot be directly observed. We provide a number of potential experimental tests for this theory which distinguish it from the available alternatives. PMID:26869213

  15. Effect of high-dose ciclosporin on the immune response to primary and booster vaccination in immunocompetent cats.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Elizabeth S; VanLare, Karen A; Roycroft, Linda M; King, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    Ciclosporin (Atopica oral solution for cats 100 mg/ml; Novartis Animal Health) was recently approved for use in cats with feline hypersensitivity dermatitis. The immunosuppressant effect of ciclosporin on the ability of cats to mount an immune response following vaccination was determined. Thirty-two healthy, immunocompetent adult cats (16 cats/group) were treated with either ciclosporin for 56 days at a dose of 24 mg/kg once daily or sham dosed. Prior to treatment, cats had an adequate antibody response to primary vaccination against feline calicivirus (FCV), feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1), feline panleukopenia virus (FPV), feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and rabies. Booster vaccination or novel vaccination with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) was administered 28 days after initiation of treatment with ciclosporin. There were no differences between the ciclosporin-treated and control cats for FCV and FPV antibody titers following booster vaccination. There were delays/reductions in antibody response to FHV-1, FeLV and rabies in treated cats; however, adequate protection was achieved in response to all booster vaccinations. Following primary vaccination with FIV, control cats showed a response, but treated cats showed no antibody production. Adverse events commonly associated with ciclosporin treatment, including diarrhea/loose stool, vomiting, salivation and regurgitation, were reported. In adult cats treated with 24 mg/kg/day of ciclosporin (more than three times the therapeutic dose), vaccine titer levels were adequate for protection following booster vaccination. In contrast, treated cats failed to mount a humoral response to a novel (FIV) vaccination, suggesting that memory B-cell immune responses remain intact during repeated high-dose ciclosporin administration in cats, but that primary immune responses are impaired. PMID:24820998

  16. Triggering of repeated earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, G. A.; Zakrzhevskaya, N. A.; Sobolev, D. G.

    2016-03-01

    Based on the analysis of the world's earthquakes with magnitudes M ≥ 6.5 for 1960-2013, it is shown that they cause global-scale coherent seismic oscillations which most distinctly manifest themselves in the period interval of 4-6 min during 1-3 days after the event. After these earthquakes, a repeated shock has an increased probability to occur in different seismically active regions located as far away as a few thousand km from the previous event, i.e., a remote interaction of seismic events takes place. The number of the repeated shocks N( t) decreases with time, which characterizes the memory of the lithosphere about the impact that has occurred. The time decay N( t) can be approximated by the linear, exponential, and powerlaw dependences. No distinct correlation between the spatial locations of the initial and repeated earthquakes is revealed. The probable triggering mechanisms of the remote interaction between the earthquakes are discussed. Surface seismic waves traveling several times around the Earth's, coherent oscillations, and global source are the most preferable candidates. This may lead to the accumulation and coalescence of ruptures in the highly stressed or weakened domains of a seismically active region, which increases the probability of a repeated earthquake.

  17. Repeated Causal Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagmayer, York; Meder, Bjorn

    2013-01-01

    Many of our decisions refer to actions that have a causal impact on the external environment. Such actions may not only allow for the mere learning of expected values or utilities but also for acquiring knowledge about the causal structure of our world. We used a repeated decision-making paradigm to examine what kind of knowledge people acquire in…

  18. Bidirectional Manchester repeater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, J.

    1980-01-01

    Bidirectional Manchester repeater is inserted at periodic intervals along single bidirectional twisted pair transmission line to detect, amplify, and transmit bidirectional Manchester 11 code signals. Requiring only 18 TTL 7400 series IC's, some line receivers and drivers, and handful of passive components, circuit is simple and relatively inexpensive to build.

  19. Repeat radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Awad, Ahmed J; Walcott, Brian P; Stapleton, Christopher J; Ding, Dale; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Loeffler, Jay S

    2015-06-01

    We perform a systematic review of repeat radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM) with an emphasis on lesion obliteration rates and complications. Radiosurgery is an accepted treatment modality for AVM located in eloquent cortex or deep brain structures. For residual or persistent lesions, repeat radiosurgery can be considered if sufficient time has passed to allow for a full appreciation of treatment effects, usually at least 3years. A systematic review was performed in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. References for this review were identified by searches of MEDLINE, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases. A total of 14 studies comprising 733 patients met the review criteria and were included. For series that reported target dose at both first and repeat treatments, the weighted means were 19.42Gy and 19.06Gy, respectively. The mean and median obliteration rate for the repeat radiosurgery treatments were 61% (95% confidence interval 51.9-71.7%) and 61.5%, respectively. The median follow up following radiosurgery ranged from 19.5 to 80months. Time to complete obliteration after the repeat treatment ranged from 21 to 40.8months. The most common complications of repeat radiosurgery for AVM included hemorrhage (7.6%) and radiation-induced changes (7.4%). Repeat radiosurgery can be used to treat incompletely obliterated AVM with an obliteration rate of 61%. Complications are related to treatment effect latency (hemorrhage risk) as well as radiation-induced changes. Repeat radiosurgery can be performed at 3 years following the initial treatment, allowing for full realization of effects from the initial treatment prior to commencing therapy. PMID:25913746

  20. Impact of Infection Dose and Previous Serum Antibodies against the Locus of Enterocyte Effacement Proteins on Escherichia coli O157:H7 Shedding in Calves following Experimental Infection.

    PubMed

    Martorelli, L; Hovde, C J; Vilte, D A; Albanese, A; Zotta, E; Ibarra, C; Cantet, R J C; Mercado, E C; Cataldi, A

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is the main causative agent of haemolytic uremic syndrome. Cattle are the main reservoir of these bacteria, and have been shown to develop immune response to colonization. Our aim was to investigate the faecal shedding pattern of E. coli O157:H7 in calves challenged intragastrically with either 10(8) or 10(10) CFU, as well as the ability of specific preexisting antibodies to reduce shedding of the pathogen. Shedding was analysed by direct counting as well as enrichment of rectoanal mucosal swabs. Statistical analysis was performed using a linear model for repeated measures with and without the inclusion of preexisting antibodies against the carboxy-terminal fraction of intimin-γ (γ-intimin C280) as a covariable. Results suggest that there is a statistical difference in the area under the shedding curves between both doses for 14 as well as 28 days after challenge (p = 0.0069 and 0.0209, resp.). This difference is increased when the prechallenge antibodies are taken into account (p = 0.0056 and 0.0185). We concluded that the bacterial dose influences shedding on calves experimentally challenged and that preexisting antibodies against E. coli O157:H7 γ-intimin C280 could partially reduce faecal excretion. PMID:26167480

  1. Impact of Infection Dose and Previous Serum Antibodies against the Locus of Enterocyte Effacement Proteins on Escherichia coli O157:H7 Shedding in Calves following Experimental Infection

    PubMed Central

    Martorelli, L.; Hovde, C. J.; Vilte, D. A.; Albanese, A.; Zotta, E.; Ibarra, C.; Cantet, R. J. C.; Mercado, E. C.; Cataldi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is the main causative agent of haemolytic uremic syndrome. Cattle are the main reservoir of these bacteria, and have been shown to develop immune response to colonization. Our aim was to investigate the faecal shedding pattern of E. coli O157:H7 in calves challenged intragastrically with either 108 or 1010 CFU, as well as the ability of specific preexisting antibodies to reduce shedding of the pathogen. Shedding was analysed by direct counting as well as enrichment of rectoanal mucosal swabs. Statistical analysis was performed using a linear model for repeated measures with and without the inclusion of preexisting antibodies against the carboxy-terminal fraction of intimin-γ (γ-intimin C280) as a covariable. Results suggest that there is a statistical difference in the area under the shedding curves between both doses for 14 as well as 28 days after challenge (p = 0.0069 and 0.0209, resp.). This difference is increased when the prechallenge antibodies are taken into account (p = 0.0056 and 0.0185). We concluded that the bacterial dose influences shedding on calves experimentally challenged and that preexisting antibodies against E. coli O157:H7 γ-intimin C280 could partially reduce faecal excretion. PMID:26167480

  2. Single and Multiple Dose Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Safety of the Novel Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 Enzyme Inhibitor Darapladib in Healthy Chinese Subjects: An Open Label Phase-1 Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chaoying; Tompson, Debra; Magee, Mindy; Chen, Qian; Liu, Yan Mei; Zhu, Wenjing; Zhao, Hongxin; Gross, Annette S.; Liu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Darapladib is a lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) inhibitor. This study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and safety of darapladib in healthy Chinese subjects. Methods Twenty-four subjects received darapladib 160 mg orally, approximately 1 hour after a standard breakfast, as a single dose and once daily for 28 days. Non-compartmental methods were used to determine the single and multiple dose pharmacokinetics of darapladib and its metabolite SB-553253. Repeat dose Lp-PLA2 activity and safety were evaluated. Results Systemic exposure (AUC(0-T), Cmax geometric mean (CVb%)) of darapladib was higher after multiple-dosing (519 ng.h/mL (33.3%), 34.4 ng/mL (49.9%)) compared to single-dose administration (153 ng.h/mL (69.0%), 17.9 ng/mL (55.2%). The steady-state accumulation ratio was less than unity (Rs = 0.80), indicating time-dependent pharmacokinetics of darapladib. Darapladib steady-state was reached by Day 14 of once daily dosing. Systemic exposure to SB-553253 was lower than darapladib with median (SB-553253: darapladib) ratios for AUC(0-τ) of 0.0786 for single dose and 0.0532 for multiple dose administration. On Day 28, pre-dose and maximum inhibition of Lp-PLA2 activity was approximately 70% and 75% relative to the baseline value, respectively and was dependent of darapladib concentration. The most common adverse events (≥ 21% subjects) were abnormal faeces, abnormal urine odour, diarrhoea and nasopharyngitis. Conclusion Darapladib 160 mg single and repeat doses were profiled in healthy Chinese subjects. Single dose systemic exposure to darapladib in healthy Chinese subjects was consistent with that observed previously in Western subjects whereas steady-state systemic exposure was approximately 65% higher in Chinese than Western subjects. The Lp-PLA2 activity and adverse event profile were similar in healthy Chinese and previous reports in Western subjects. Ethnic-specific dose adjustment of darapladib is

  3. Safety of Repeated Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Louie, John D.; Iagaru, Andrei H.; Goris, Michael L.; Sze, Daniel Y.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Repeated radioembolization (RE) treatments carry theoretically higher risk of radiation-induced hepatic injury because of the liver's cumulative memory of previous exposure. We performed a retrospective safety analysis on patients who underwent repeated RE. Methods: From 2004 to 2011, a total of 247 patients were treated by RE. Eight patients (5 men, 3 women, age range 51-71 years) underwent repeated treatment of a targeted territory, all with resin microspheres (SIR-Spheres; Sirtex, Lane Cove, Australia). Adverse events were graded during a standardized follow-up. In addition, the correlation between the occurrence of RE-induced liver disease (REILD) and multiple variables was investigated in univariate and multivariate analyses in all 247 patients who received RE. Results: Two patients died shortly after the second treatment (at 84 and 107 days) with signs and symptoms of REILD. Both patients underwent whole liver treatment twice (cumulative doses 3.08 and 2.66 GBq). The other 6 patients demonstrated only minor toxicities after receiving cumulative doses ranging from 2.41 to 3.88 GBq. All patients experienced objective tumor responses. In the whole population, multifactorial analysis identified three risk factors associated with REILD: repeated RE (p = 0.036), baseline serum total bilirubin (p = 0.048), and baseline serum aspartate aminotransferase (p = 0.043). Repeated RE proved to be the only independent risk factor for REILD in multivariate analysis (odds ratio 9.6; p = 0.002). Additionally, the administered activity per target volume (in GBq/L) was found to be an independent risk factor for REILD, but only in whole liver treatments (p = 0.033). Conclusion: The risk of REILD appears to be elevated for repeated RE. Objective tumor responses were observed, but establishment of safety limits will require improvement in dosimetric measurement and prediction.

  4. Full-dose capecitabine with local radiotherapy: one of the treatment options for inoperable T4 breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hirowatari, Hisako; Karasawa, Kumiko; Izawa, Hiromi; Ito, Kana; Sasai, Keisuke; Furuya, Tomohisa; Ozawa, Shuichi; Arakawa, Atsushi; Orihata, Gotaro; Saito, Mitsue

    2011-04-01

    A 48-year-old woman presented with a 15-cm diameter tumor in her left breast with fixation to the chest wall and palpable axillary lymph nodes. Pathology study showed pure-type mucinous carcinoma. Pretreatment staging investigations showed multiple lung metastases, which resulted in the diagnosis of T4N2M1 breast cancer. Four cycles of cyclophosphamide 700 mg/m(2)/epirubicin 70 mg/m(2) (CE) were performed initially, but the tumors decreased only within the treatment response criteria of stable disease (SD). The second regimen of docetaxel could not continue due to drug allergy. Two more cycles of CE did not improve the situation. Then, treatment was continued with full-dose capecitabine with local radiotherapy. She received radiotherapy to the left breast and axillary region with 60 Gy/30 fractions/6 weeks and concomitant capecitabine 2400 mg/body twice daily for 21 days; the cycles were repeated every 28 days. After radiotherapy, tumors decreased in size, and the skin ulceration disappeared. She continued to receive capecitabine on the same schedule. She now has no palpable tumor in her left breast and no tumor in the axilla or lung on CT. She is alive and well 6 years after radiotherapy. PMID:21519998

  5. Clinical experience and results of treatment with suprofen in pediatrics. 3rd communication: Antipyretic effect and tolerability of repeat doses of suprofen and paracetamol syrup in hospitalized children/A single-blind study.

    PubMed

    Weippl, G; Michos, N; Sundal, E J; Stocker, H

    1985-01-01

    Antipyretic effect and tolerability of alpha-methyl-4-(2-thienylcarbonyl)-phenyl acetic acid (suprofen, Suprol), syrup and paracetamol (acetaminophen) were compared within the scope of the present randomized single-blind study; the test population included a total of 115 children ranging in age from 6 months to 12 years. All patients were admitted to the hospital with an average temperature of 39.3 degrees C, their disease being caused by bacterial or viral infections. The dose levels for treatment with syrup depended upon the children's age and body weight. Treatment was in most cases given for two days; a three-times-a-day schedule was used. The (rectal) temperature as well as pulse and respiratory rates were measured prior to treatment and 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 h after first administration of the test preparations. The results showed that the antipyretic effect of suprofen was in both age groups at all rating times statistically significantly superior to that of paracetamol. Pulse and respiratory rates dropped in both age groups after treatment; the means were within the normal range at all rating times. Adverse drug reactions were seen in 5 patients on suprofen and in 3 cases on paracetamol. It is, however, questionable whether such reactions are drug-dependent. PMID:3911963

  6. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  7. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  8. Inhibition of breast cancer cell proliferation in repeated and non-repeated treatment with zoledronic acid

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Zoledronic acid is used to treat bone metastases and has been shown to reduce skeletal-related events and exert antitumor activity. The present in vitro study investigates the mechanism of action of Zoledronic Acid on breast cancer cell lines with different hormonal and HER2 patterns. Furthermore, we investigated the efficacy of repeated versus non-repeated treatments. Methods The study was performed on 4 breast cancer cell lines (BRC-230, SkBr3, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). Non-repeated treatment (single exposure of 168 hrs’ duration) with zoledronic acid was compared with repeated treatment (separate exposures, each of 48 hrs’ duration, for a total of 168 hrs) at different dosages. A dose–response profile was generated using sulforhodamine B assay. Apoptosis was evaluated by TUNEL assay and biomolecular characteristics were analyzed by western blot. Results Zoledronic acid produced a dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation in all cell lines. Anti-proliferative activity was enhanced with the repeated treatment, proving to be statistically significant in the triple-negative lines. In these lines repeated treatment showed a cytocidal effect, with apoptotic cell death caused by caspase 3, 8 and 9 activation and decreased RAS and pMAPK expression. Apoptosis was not observed in estrogen receptor-positive line: p21 overexpression suggested a slowing down of cell cycle. A decrease in RAS and pMAPK expression was seen in HER2-overexpressing line after treatment. Conclusions The study suggests that zoledronic acid has an antitumor activity in breast cancer cell lines. Its mechanism of action involves the decrease of RAS and RHO, as in osteoclasts. Repeated treatment enhances antitumor activity compared to non-repeated treatment. Repeated treatment has a killing effect on triple-negative lines due to apoptosis activation. Further research is warranted especially in the treatment of triple-negative breast cancer. PMID:23173568

  9. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques for duct leakage using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards. The three duct leak measurement methods assessed in this report are the two duct pressurization methods that are commonly used by many practitioners and the DeltaQ technique. These are methods B, C and A, respectively of the ASTM E1554 standard. Although it would be useful to evaluate other duct leak test methods, this study focused on those test methods that are commonly used and are required in various test standards, such as BPI (2010), RESNET (2014), ASHRAE 62.2 (2013), California Title 24 (CEC 2012), DOE Weatherization and many other energy efficiency programs.

  10. Repeated measures with zeros.

    PubMed

    Berk, K N; Lachenbruch, P A

    2002-08-01

    Consider repeated measures data with many zeros. For the case with one grouping factor and one repeated measure, we examine several models, assuming that the nonzero data are roughly lognormal. One of the simplest approaches is to model the zeros as left-censored observations from the lognormal distribution. A random effect is assumed for subjects. The censored model makes a strong assumption about the relationship between the zeros and the nonzero values. To check on this, you can instead assume that some of the zeros are 'true' zeros and model them as Bernoulli. Then the other values are modeled with a censored lognormal. A logistic model is used for the Bernoulli p, the probability of a true nonzero. The fit of the pure left-censored lognormal can be assessed by testing the hypothesis that p is 1, as described by Moulton and Halsey. The model can also be simplified by omitting the censoring, leaving a logistic model for the zeros and a lognormal model for the nonzero values. This is approximately equivalent to modeling the zero and nonzero values separately, a two-part model. In contrast to the censored model, this model assumes only a slight relationship (a covariance component) between the occurrence of zeros and the size of the nonzero values. The models are compared in terms of an example with data from children's private speech. PMID:12197298

  11. Repeat Customer Success in Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bess, Melissa M.; Traub, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Four multi-session research-based programs were offered by two Extension specialist in one rural Missouri county. Eleven participants who came to multiple Extension programs could be called "repeat customers." Based on the total number of participants for all four programs, 25% could be deemed as repeat customers. Repeat customers had…

  12. RepeatsDB: a database of tandem repeat protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Di Domenico, Tomás; Potenza, Emilio; Walsh, Ian; Gonzalo Parra, R.; Giollo, Manuel; Minervini, Giovanni; Piovesan, Damiano; Ihsan, Awais; Ferrari, Carlo; Kajava, Andrey V.; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.

    2014-01-01

    RepeatsDB (http://repeatsdb.bio.unipd.it/) is a database of annotated tandem repeat protein structures. Tandem repeats pose a difficult problem for the analysis of protein structures, as the underlying sequence can be highly degenerate. Several repeat types haven been studied over the years, but their annotation was done in a case-by-case basis, thus making large-scale analysis difficult. We developed RepeatsDB to fill this gap. Using state-of-the-art repeat detection methods and manual curation, we systematically annotated the Protein Data Bank, predicting 10 745 repeat structures. In all, 2797 structures were classified according to a recently proposed classification schema, which was expanded to accommodate new findings. In addition, detailed annotations were performed in a subset of 321 proteins. These annotations feature information on start and end positions for the repeat regions and units. RepeatsDB is an ongoing effort to systematically classify and annotate structural protein repeats in a consistent way. It provides users with the possibility to access and download high-quality datasets either interactively or programmatically through web services. PMID:24311564

  13. Repeated dosing of digoxin-fragmented antibody in preterm eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Adair, C D; Buckalew, V M; Kipikasa, J; Torres, C; Stallings, S P; Briery, C M

    2009-02-01

    Early onset eclampsia has significant morbidity and mortality for both the mother and fetus. No effective treatment exists at present except delivery and seizure prophylaxis with magnesium sulfate. We report the novel use of a fragmented ovine antibody against digoxin for the treatment of eclampsia. A 16-year-old primagravida at 29 weeks 5/7 days gestation presented with clinical diagnosis of eclampsia and was treated with compassionate off-label use of digoxin-fragmented ovine antibody (Digibind Glaxo Smith Kline, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA). Improvement of her underlying disorder during a 48 h treatment window was noted without adverse maternal or neonatal outcome. We suggest digoxin-fragmented ovine antibody as a possible intervention in preterm pregnancies complicated by pre-eclampsia or eclampsia. PMID:19177044

  14. Comparison of the repeated dose toxicity of isomers of dinitrotoluene.

    PubMed

    Lent, Emily May; Crouse, Lee C B; Quinn, Michael J; Wallace, Shannon M

    2012-03-01

    Dinitrotoluene (DNT) is a nitroaromatic explosive used in propellant mixtures and in the production of plastics. Isomers of DNT were administered daily via oral gavage to male Sprague-Dawley rats for 14 days to determine the subacute toxicity of individual isomers of DNT. The 3,5-DNT isomer was the most toxic isomer, inducing weight loss and mortality within 3 days. Cyanosis and anemia were observed for all isomers. Exposure to 2,4-, 2,6-, and 3,5-DNT resulted in decreased testes mass and degenerative histopathological changes. Increased splenic mass was observed for 2,4-, 2,6-, and 2,5-DNT. Extramedullary hematopoiesis of the spleen was noted for all isomers, while lymphoid hyperplasia of the spleen was noted for all isomers except 2,5-DNT. Increased liver mass was observed for 2,3-DNT and 3,4-DNT. Hepatocellular lesions were observed for 2,6-DNT and 2,4-DNT. Neurotoxic effects were noted for 3,4-DNT, 2,4-DNT, and 3,5-DNT. PMID:22422434

  15. Saturation of repeated quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haapasalo, Erkka; Heinosaari, Teiko; Kuramochi, Yui

    2016-08-01

    We study sequential measurement scenarios where the system is repeatedly subjected to the same measurement process. We first provide examples of such repeated measurements where further repetitions of the measurement do not increase our knowledge on the system after some finite number of measurement steps. We also prove, however, that repeating the Lüders measurement of an unsharp two-outcome observable never saturates in this sense, and we characterize the observable measured in the limit of infinitely many repetitions. Our result implies that a repeated measurement can be used to correct the inherent noise of an unsharp observable.

  16. Phase I trial of low-dose oral Clofarabine in myelodysplastic syndromes patients who have failed frontline therapy.

    PubMed

    Rudrapatna, Venkatesh K; Morley, Kimberly; Boucher, Kenneth M; Pierson, Andrew S; Shull, Christian T; Kushner, James P; Shami, Paul J

    2015-08-01

    We investigated protracted low-dose oral Clofarabine for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Adults with an International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) score of INT-1 or higher who had failed first line therapy were eligible. INT-1 patients had to be transfusion-dependent. We started with oral Clofarabine at 5mg (fixed dose) daily for 10 consecutive days on a 28-day cycle. Toxicity prompted a modification to 1mg PO daily for 10 days and then 1mg PO daily for 7 days. Patients received treatment indefinitely until loss of response or unacceptable toxicity. Nine patients (5 women) were enrolled and evaluable (median age 65 years; range 55-81). A 10-day regimen of oral Clofarabine at 5mg/day induced Grade IV pancytopenia. A dose of 1 mg/day for 7/28 days was very well tolerated without significant toxicity. Three patients had responses (2 with responses lasting up to 21 and 51 cycles) defined as stable disease in spite of no significant change on bone marrow evaluation. Low-dose oral Clofarabine (1mg daily for 7/28 days) proved both effective and safe for patients with MDS who had failed prior therapy. This patient population is particularly sensitive to more protracted Clofarabine treatment schedules. PMID:26038120

  17. Evaluation of radiation dose to neonates in a special care baby unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzimami, K.; Sulieman, A.; Yousif, A.; Babikir, E.; Salih, I.

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patient entrance surface dose (ESD), organ dose and effective dose for neonates in the special care baby unit (SCBU) up to 28 days after birth. A total of 135 patients were examined during 4 months. ESDs were calculated from patient exposure parameters using DosCal software. Effective doses were calculated using software from the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). The mean patient ESD per procedure was 80±0.02 μGy. The mean and range of the effective dose per procedure were 0.02 (0.01-0.3) mSv. The radiation dose in this study was higher compared to previous studies. A dedicated X-ray machine with additional filtration is recommended for patient dose reductions.

  18. Absence of bacterial resistance following repeat exposure to photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedigo, Lisa A.; Gibbs, Aaron J.; Scott, Robert J.; Street, Cale N.

    2009-06-01

    The prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria necessitates exploration of alternative approaches to treat hospital and community acquired infections. The aim of this study was to determine whether bacterial pathogens develop resistance to antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) during repeated sub-lethal challenge. Antibiotic sensitive and resistant strains of S. aureus and antibiotic sensitive E. coli were subjected to repeat PDT treatments using a methylene blue photosensitizer formulation and 670 nm illumination from a non-thermal diode laser. Parameters were adjusted such that kills were <100% so that surviving colonies could be passaged for subsequent exposures. With each repeat, kills were compared to those using non-exposed cultures of the same strain. Oxacillin resistance was induced in S. aureus using a disc diffusion method. For each experiment, "virgin" and "repeat" cultures were exposed to methylene blue at 0.01% w/v and illuminated with an energy dose of 20.6 J/cm2. No significant difference in killing of E. coli (repeat vs. virgin culture) was observed through 11 repeat exposures. Similar results were seen using MSSA and MRSA, wherein kill rate did not significantly differ from control over 25 repeat exposures. In contrast, complete oxacillin resistance could be generated in S. aureus over a limited number of exposures. PDT is effective in the eradication of pathogens including antibiotic resistance strains. Furthermore, repeated sub-lethal exposure does not induce resistance to subsequent PDT treatments. The absence of resistance formation represents a significant advantage of PDT over traditional antibiotics.

  19. Repeated intravenous doxapram induces phrenic motor facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, MS; Lee, KZ; Gonzalez-Rothi, EJ; Fuller, DD

    2013-01-01

    Doxapram is a respiratory stimulant used to treat hypoventilation. Here we investigated whether doxapram could also trigger respiratory neuroplasticity. Specifically, we hypothesized that intermittent delivery of doxapram at low doses would lead to long-lasting increases (i.e., facilitation) of phrenic motor output in anesthetized, vagotomized, and mechanically-ventilated rats. Doxapram was delivered intravenously in a single bolus (2 or 6 mg/kg) or as a series of 3 injections (2 mg/kg) at 5 min intervals. Control groups received pH-matched saline injections (vehicle) or no treatment (anesthesia time control). Doxapram evoked an immediate increase in phrenic output in all groups, but a persistent increase in burst amplitude only occurred after repeated dosing with 2 mg/kg. At 60 min following the last injection, phrenic burst amplitude was 168±24% of baseline (%BL) in the group receiving 3 injections (P < 0.05 vs. controls), but was 103±8%BL and 112±4%BL in the groups receiving a single dose of 2 or 6 mg/kg, respectively. Following bilateral section of the carotid sinus nerves, the acute phrenic response to doxapram (2 mg/kg) was reduced by 68% suggesting that at low doses the drug was acting primarily via the carotid chemoreceptors. We conclude that intermittent application of doxapram can trigger phrenic neuroplasticity, and this approach might be of use in the context of respiratory rehabilitation following neurologic injury. PMID:24013015

  20. Repeat Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Acoustic Neuromas

    SciTech Connect

    Kano, Hideyuki; Kondziolka, Douglas; Niranjan, Ajay M.Ch.; Flannery, Thomas J.; Flickinger, John C.; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for acoustic neuromas, we assessed tumor control, clinical outcomes, and the risk of adverse radiation effects in patients whose tumors progressed after initial management. Methods and Materials: During a 21-year experience at our center, 1,352 patients underwent SRS as management for their acoustic neuromas. We retrospectively identified 6 patients who underwent SRS twice for the same tumor. The median patient age was 47 years (range, 35-71 years). All patients had imaging evidence of tumor progression despite initial SRS. One patient also had incomplete surgical resection after initial SRS. All patients were deaf at the time of the second SRS. The median radiosurgery target volume at the time of the initial SRS was 0.5 cc and was 2.1 cc at the time of the second SRS. The median margin dose at the time of the initial SRS was 13 Gy and was 11 Gy at the time of the second SRS. The median interval between initial SRS and repeat SRS was 63 months (range, 25-169 months). Results: At a median follow-up of 29 months after the second SRS (range, 13-71 months), tumor control or regression was achieved in all 6 patients. No patient developed symptomatic adverse radiation effects or new neurological symptoms after the second SRS. Conclusions: With this limited experience, we found that repeat SRS for a persistently enlarging acoustic neuroma can be performed safely and effectively.

  1. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  2. Sequence repeats and protein structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Trinh X.; Trovato, Antonio; Seno, Flavio; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Maritan, Amos

    2012-11-01

    Repeats are frequently found in known protein sequences. The level of sequence conservation in tandem repeats correlates with their propensities to be intrinsically disordered. We employ a coarse-grained model of a protein with a two-letter amino acid alphabet, hydrophobic (H) and polar (P), to examine the sequence-structure relationship in the realm of repeated sequences. A fraction of repeated sequences comprises a distinct class of bad folders, whose folding temperatures are much lower than those of random sequences. Imperfection in sequence repetition improves the folding properties of the bad folders while deteriorating those of the good folders. Our results may explain why nature has utilized repeated sequences for their versatility and especially to design functional proteins that are intrinsically unstructured at physiological temperatures.

  3. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-04-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories.

  4. All-photonic quantum repeaters.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  5. Estimating repeatability of egg size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, P.L.; Rockwell, R.F.; Sedinger, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    Measures of repeatability have long been used to assess patterns of variation in egg size within and among females. We compared different analytical approaches for estimating repeatability of egg size of Black Brant. Separate estimates of repeatability for eggs of each clutch size and laying sequence number varied from 0.49 to 0.64. We suggest that using the averaging egg size within clutches results in underestimation of variation within females and thereby overestimates repeatability. We recommend a nested design that partitions egg-size variation within clutches, among clutches within females, and among females. We demonstrate little variation in estimates of repeatability resulting from a nested model controlling for egg laying sequence and a nested model in which we assumed laying sequence was unknown.

  6. TAK-228 (formerly MLN0128), an investigational oral dual TORC1/2 inhibitor: A phase I dose escalation study in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or Waldenström's macroglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Ghobrial, Irene M; Siegel, David S; Vij, Ravi; Berdeja, Jesus G; Richardson, Paul G; Neuwirth, Rachel; Patel, Chirag G; Zohren, Fabian; Wolf, Jeffrey L

    2016-06-01

    The PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathways are frequently dysregulated in multiple human cancers, including multiple myeloma (MM), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), and Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM). This was the first clinical study to evaluate the safety, tolerability, maximal-tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), pharmacokinetics, and preliminary clinical activity of TAK-228, an oral TORC1/2 inhibitor, in patients with MM, NHL, or WM. Thirty-nine patients received TAK-228 once daily (QD) at 2, 4, 6, or 7 mg, or QD for 3 days on and 4 days off each week (QDx3d QW) at 9 or 12 mg, in 28-day cycles. The overall median age was 61.0 years (range 46-85); 31 patients had MM, four NHL, and four WM. Cycle 1 DLTs occurred in five QD patients (stomatitis, urticaria, blood creatinine elevation, fatigue, and nausea and vomiting) and four QDx3d QW patients (erythematous rash, fatigue, asthenia, mucosal inflammation, and thrombocytopenia). The MTDs were determined to be 4 mg QD and 9 mg QDx3d QW. Thirty-six patients (92%) reported at least one drug-related toxicity; the most common grade ≥3 drug-related toxicities were thrombocytopenia (15%), fatigue (10%), and neutropenia (5%). TAK-228 exhibited a dose-dependent increase in plasma exposure and no appreciable accumulation with repeat dosing; mean plasma elimination half-life was 6-8 hr. Of the 33 response-evaluable patients, one MM patient had a minimal response, one WM patient achieved partial response, one WM patient had a minor response, and 18 patients (14 MM, two NHL, and two WM) had stable disease. These findings encourage further studies including combination strategies. PMID:26800393

  7. Repeat Gamma Knife surgery for vestibular schwannomas

    PubMed Central

    Lonneville, Sarah; Delbrouck, Carine; Renier, Cécile; Devriendt, Daniel; Massager, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gamma Knife (GK) surgery is a recognized treatment option for the management of small to medium-sized vestibular schwannoma (VS) associated with high-tumor control and low morbidity. When a radiosurgical treatment fails to stop tumor growth, repeat GK surgery can be proposed in selected cases. Methods: A series of 27 GK retreatments was performed in 25 patients with VS; 2 patients underwent three procedures. The median time interval between GK treatments was 45 months. The median margin dose used for the first, second, and third GK treatments was 12 Gy, 12 Gy, and 14 Gy, respectively. Six patients (4 patients for the second irradiation and 2 patients for the third irradiation) with partial tumor regrowth were treated only on the growing part of the tumor using a median margin dose of 13 Gy. The median tumor volume was 0.9, 2.3, and 0.7 cc for the first, second, and third treatments, respectively. Stereotactic positron emission tomography (PET) guidance was used for dose planning in 6 cases. Results: Mean follow-up duration was 46 months (range 24–110). At the last follow-up, 85% of schwannomas were controlled. The tumor volume decreased, remained unchanged, or increased after retreatment in 15, 8, and 4 cases, respectively. Four patients had PET during follow-up, and all showed a significant metabolic decrease of the tumor. Hearing was not preserved after retreatment in any patients. New facial or trigeminal palsy did not occur after retreatment. Conclusions: Our results support the long-term efficacy and low morbidity of repeat GK treatment for selected patients with tumor growth after initial treatment. PMID:26500799

  8. Early initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy in the management of septic shock: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The use of low-dose steroid therapy in the management of septic shock has been extensively studied. However, the association between the timing of low-dose steroid therapy and the outcome has not been evaluated. Therefore, we evaluated whether early initiation of low-dose steroid therapy is associated with mortality in patients with septic shock. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 178 patients who received low-dose corticosteroid therapy for septic shock between January 2008 and December 2009. Time-dependent Cox regression models were used to adjust for potential confounding factors in the association between the time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy and in-hospital mortality. Results The study population consisted of 107 men and 71 women with a median age of 66 (interquartile range, 54 to 71) years. The 28-day mortality was 44% and low-dose corticosteroid therapy was initiated within a median of 8.5 (3.8 to 19.1) hours after onset of septic shock-related hypotension. Median time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy was significantly shorter in survivors than in non-survivors (6.5 hours versus 10.4 hours; P = 0.0135). The mortality rates increased significantly with increasing quintiles of time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy (P = 0.0107 for trend). Other factors associated with 28-day mortality were higher Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) 3 (P < 0.0001) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores (P = 0.0007), dose of vasopressor at the time of initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy (P < 0.0001), need for mechanical ventilation (P = 0.0001) and renal replacement therapy (P < 0.0001), while the impaired adrenal reserve did not affect 28-day mortality (81% versus 82%; P = 0.8679). After adjusting for potential confounding factors, the time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy was still significantly associated with 28-day mortality (adjusted odds

  9. Protein Repeats from First Principles.

    PubMed

    Turjanski, Pablo; Parra, R Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Becher, Verónica; Ferreiro, Diego U

    2016-01-01

    Some natural proteins display recurrent structural patterns. Despite being highly similar at the tertiary structure level, repeating patterns within a single repeat protein can be extremely variable at the sequence level. We use a mathematical definition of a repetition and investigate the occurrences of these in sequences of different protein families. We found that long stretches of perfect repetitions are infrequent in individual natural proteins, even for those which are known to fold into structures of recurrent structural motifs. We found that natural repeat proteins are indeed repetitive in their families, exhibiting abundant stretches of 6 amino acids or longer that are perfect repetitions in the reference family. We provide a systematic quantification for this repetitiveness. We show that this form of repetitiveness is not exclusive of repeat proteins, but also occurs in globular domains. A by-product of this work is a fast quantification of the likelihood of a protein to belong to a family. PMID:27044676

  10. Protein Repeats from First Principles

    PubMed Central

    Turjanski, Pablo; Parra, R. Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Becher, Verónica; Ferreiro, Diego U.

    2016-01-01

    Some natural proteins display recurrent structural patterns. Despite being highly similar at the tertiary structure level, repeating patterns within a single repeat protein can be extremely variable at the sequence level. We use a mathematical definition of a repetition and investigate the occurrences of these in sequences of different protein families. We found that long stretches of perfect repetitions are infrequent in individual natural proteins, even for those which are known to fold into structures of recurrent structural motifs. We found that natural repeat proteins are indeed repetitive in their families, exhibiting abundant stretches of 6 amino acids or longer that are perfect repetitions in the reference family. We provide a systematic quantification for this repetitiveness. We show that this form of repetitiveness is not exclusive of repeat proteins, but also occurs in globular domains. A by-product of this work is a fast quantification of the likelihood of a protein to belong to a family. PMID:27044676

  11. Protein Repeats from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turjanski, Pablo; Parra, R. Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Becher, Verónica; Ferreiro, Diego U.

    2016-04-01

    Some natural proteins display recurrent structural patterns. Despite being highly similar at the tertiary structure level, repeating patterns within a single repeat protein can be extremely variable at the sequence level. We use a mathematical definition of a repetition and investigate the occurrences of these in sequences of different protein families. We found that long stretches of perfect repetitions are infrequent in individual natural proteins, even for those which are known to fold into structures of recurrent structural motifs. We found that natural repeat proteins are indeed repetitive in their families, exhibiting abundant stretches of 6 amino acids or longer that are perfect repetitions in the reference family. We provide a systematic quantification for this repetitiveness. We show that this form of repetitiveness is not exclusive of repeat proteins, but also occurs in globular domains. A by-product of this work is a fast quantification of the likelihood of a protein to belong to a family.

  12. Determinants of the Repeated Bout Effect Following Lengthening Contractions

    PubMed Central

    DiPasquale, Dana M.; Bloch, Robert J.; Lovering, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Stresses to skeletal muscle often result in injury. A subsequent bout of the same activity performed days or even weeks after an initial bout results in significantly less damage. The underlying causes of this phenomenon, termed the “repeated bout effect” (RBE), are unclear. This study compared the protective effect of two different injury protocols on the ankle dorsiflexors in the rat. We hypothesized that the RBE would occur soon after the initial injury and persist for several weeks, and that the RBE would occur even if the second injury was performed under different biomechanical conditions than the first. Design In this controlled laboratory study, the dorsiflexor muscles in the left hindlimbs of adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats (N = 75) were subjected to 10 repetitions of large-strain lengthening contractions or 150 repetitions of small-strain lengthening contractions. Results Both protocols induced a significant (P < 0.001) and similar loss of isometric torque (~50%) following the first bout of contractions. The RBE occurred as early as 2 days after injury and remained high for 14 days (P < 0.001), but diminished by 28 days and was lost by 42 days. The small-strain contractions offered a protective effect against a subsequent large-strain contraction, but not vice-versa. Although the RBE did not occur sooner than day 2, the early recovery following a second large strain injury performed 8 h after the first was two-fold greater than following a single injury. Conclusions The RBE is both rapid in onset and prolonged, and some but not all injuries can protect against different types of subsequent injury. PMID:21862912

  13. Limitations on quantum key repeaters.

    PubMed

    Bäuml, Stefan; Christandl, Matthias; Horodecki, Karol; Winter, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A major application of quantum communication is the distribution of entangled particles for use in quantum key distribution. Owing to noise in the communication line, quantum key distribution is, in practice, limited to a distance of a few hundred kilometres, and can only be extended to longer distances by use of a quantum repeater, a device that performs entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. The existence of noisy entangled states that are undistillable but nevertheless useful for quantum key distribution raises the question of the feasibility of a quantum key repeater, which would work beyond the limits of entanglement distillation, hence possibly tolerating higher noise levels than existing protocols. Here we exhibit fundamental limits on such a device in the form of bounds on the rate at which it may extract secure key. As a consequence, we give examples of states suitable for quantum key distribution but unsuitable for the most general quantum key repeater protocol. PMID:25903096

  14. Hysteresis of magnetostructural transitions: Repeatable and non-repeatable processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provenzano, Virgil; Della Torre, Edward; Bennett, Lawrence H.; ElBidweihy, Hatem

    2014-02-01

    The Gd5Ge2Si2 alloy and the off-stoichiometric Ni50Mn35In15 Heusler alloy belong to a special class of metallic materials that exhibit first-order magnetostructural transitions near room temperature. The magnetic properties of this class of materials have been extensively studied due to their interesting magnetic behavior and their potential for a number of technological applications such as refrigerants for near-room-temperature magnetic refrigeration. The thermally driven first-order transitions in these materials can be field-induced in the reverse order by applying a strong enough field. The field-induced transitions are typically accompanied by the presence of large magnetic hysteresis, the characteristics of which are a complicated function of temperature, field, and magneto-thermal history. In this study we show that the virgin curve, the major loop, and sequentially measured MH loops are the results of both repeatable and non-repeatable processes, in which the starting magnetostructural state, prior to the cycling of field, plays a major role. Using the Gd5Ge2Si2 and Ni50Mn35In15 alloys, as model materials, we show that a starting single phase state results in fully repeatable processes and large magnetic hysteresis, whereas a mixed phase starting state results in non-repeatable processes and smaller hysteresis.

  15. Repeated swim stress alters brain benzodiazepine receptors measured in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Weizman, R.; Weizman, A.; Kook, K.A.; Vocci, F.; Deutsch, S.I.; Paul, S.M.

    1989-06-01

    The effects of repeated swim stress on brain benzodiazepine receptors were examined in the mouse using both an in vivo and in vitro binding method. Specific in vivo binding of (/sup 3/H)Ro15-1788 to benzodiazepine receptors was decreased in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and striatum after repeated swim stress (7 consecutive days of daily swim stress) when compared to nonstressed mice. In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding was unaltered after repeated swim stress in the cerebellum and pons medulla. The stress-induced reduction in in vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding did not appear to be due to altered cerebral blood flow or to an alteration in benzodiazepine metabolism or biodistribution because there was no difference in (14C)iodoantipyrine distribution or whole brain concentrations of clonazepam after repeated swim stress. Saturation binding experiments revealed a change in both apparent maximal binding capacity and affinity after repeated swim stress. Moreover, a reduction in clonazepam's anticonvulsant potency was also observed after repeated swim stress (an increase in the ED50 dose for protection against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures), although there was no difference in pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure threshold between the two groups. In contrast to the results obtained in vivo, no change in benzodiazepine receptor binding kinetics was observed using the in vitro binding method. These data suggest that environmental stress can alter the binding parameters of the benzodiazepine receptor and that the in vivo and in vitro binding methods can yield substantially different results.

  16. Repeating seismic events in China.

    PubMed

    Schaff, David P; Richards, Paul G

    2004-02-20

    About 10% of seismic events in and near China from 1985 to 2000 were repeating events not more than about 1 kilometer from each other. We cross-correlated seismograms from approximately 14,000 earthquakes and explosions and measured relative arrival times to approximately 0.01 second, enabling lateral location precision of about 100 to 300 meters. Such precision is important for seismic hazard studies, earthquake physics, and nuclear test ban verification. Recognition and measurement of repeating signals in archived data and the resulting improvement in location specificity quantifies the inaccuracy of current procedures for picking onset times and locating events. PMID:14976310

  17. Pure laparoscopic hepatectomy as repeat surgery and repeat hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Isetani, Masashi; Morise, Zenichi; Kawabe, Norihiko; Tomishige, Hirokazu; Nagata, Hidetoshi; Kawase, Jin; Arakawa, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess clinical outcomes of laparoscopic hepatectomy (LH) in patients with a history of upper abdominal surgery and repeat hepatectomy. METHODS: This study compared the perioperative courses of patients receiving LH at our institution that had or had not previously undergone upper abdominal surgery. Of the 80 patients who underwent LH, 22 had prior abdominal surgeries, including hepatectomy (n = 12), pancreatectomy (n = 3), cholecystectomy and common bile duct excision (n = 1), splenectomy (n = 1), total gastrectomy (n = 1), colectomy with the involvement of transverse colon (n = 3), and extended hysterectomy with extensive lymph-node dissection up to the upper abdomen (n = 1). Clinical indicators including operating time, blood loss, hospital stay, and morbidity were compared among the groups. RESULTS: Eighteen of the 22 patients who had undergone previous surgery had severe adhesions in the area around the liver. However, there were no conversions to laparotomy in this group. In the 58 patients without a history of upper abdominal surgery, the median operative time was 301 min and blood loss was 150 mL. In patients with upper abdominal surgical history or repeat hepatectomy, the operative times were 351 and 301 min, and blood loss was 100 and 50 mL, respectively. The median postoperative stay was 17, 13 and 12 d for patients with no history of upper abdominal surgery, patients with a history, and patients with repeat hepatectomy, respectively. There were five cases with complications in the group with no surgical history, compared to only one case in the group with a prior history. There were no statistically significant differences in the perioperative results between the groups with and without upper abdominal surgical history, or with repeat hepatectomy. CONCLUSION: LH is feasible and safe in patients with a history of upper abdominal surgery or repeat hepatectomy. PMID:25624731

  18. Dose-Dependent Adverse Effects of Salinomycin on Male Reproductive Organs and Fertility in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Olajumoke Omolara; Bhadauria, Smrati; Rath, Srikanta Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Salinomycin is used as an antibiotic in animal husbandry. Its implication in cancer therapy has recently been proposed. Present study evaluated the toxic effects of Salinomycin on male reproductive system of mice. Doses of 1, 3 or 5 mg/kg of Salinomycin were administered daily for 28 days. Half of the mice were sacrificed after 24 h of the last treatment and other half were sacrificed 28 days after withdrawal of treatment. Effects of SAL on body and reproductive organ weights were studied. Histoarchitecture of testis and epididymis was evaluated along with ultrastructural changes in Leydig cells. Serum and testicular testosterone and luteinizing hormones were estimated. Superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation, catalase and lactate dehydrogenase activities were measured. Spermatozoa count, morphology, motility and fertility were evaluated. Expression patterns of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage proteins (CYP11A1) were assessed by Western blotting. Salinomycin treatment was lethal to few mice and retarded body growth in others with decreased weight of testes and seminal vesicles in a dose dependent manner. Seminiferous tubules in testes were disrupted and the epithelium of epididymis showed frequent occurrence of vacuolization and necrosis. Leydig cells showed hypertrophied cytoplasm with shrunken nuclei, condensed mitochondria, proliferated endoplasmic reticulum and increased number of lipid droplets. Salinomycin decreased motility and spermatozoa count with increased number of abnormal spermatozoa leading to infertility. The testosterone and luteinizing hormone levels were decreased in testis but increased in serum at higher doses. Depletion of superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione with increased lipid peroxidation in both testis and epididymis indicated generation of oxidative stress. Suppressed expression of StAR and CYP11A1 proteins indicates inhibition of steroidogenesis

  19. Repeated in vivo electrochemical activation and the biological effects of microelectromechanical systems drug delivery device.

    PubMed

    Shawgo, Rebecca S; Voskerician, Gabriela; Duc, Hong Linh Ho; Li, Yawen; Lynn, Aaron; MacEwan, Matthew; Langer, Robert; Anderson, James M; Cima, Michael J

    2004-12-15

    The repeated activation of a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) drug delivery device was studied in vivo in rats to examine the effect of implantation on the device operation and the effect of electrochemical activation on the inflammatory and wound-healing response. The MEMS devices were fabricated from a silicon wafer into which reservoirs were etched and covered with gold membranes. The membranes were electrochemically removed when an anodic voltage was applied. Devices were implanted subcutaneously both with and without stainless steel mesh cages for 4, 7, 14, 21, or 28 days before activation. Devices were activated every other day for five activations. Leukocyte concentrations indicated that both the application of voltage and the gold corrosion products elevated the inflammatory response which was resolved within 48 h after each activation. The efficiency of gold membrane removal was not impaired throughout the implantation, although a bimodal distribution of background current densities was observed after long implantation times. The thickness of the fibrous capsule surrounding the MEMS devices was similar between activated and control devices explanted at each time point. It was concluded that the repeated activation of MEMS drug delivery devices was successful and the activation produced an acceptable biological response that resolved promptly. PMID:15508122

  20. Do Twelfths Terminate or Repeat?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Rebecca; Burnison, Erica

    2015-01-01

    When finding the decimal equivalent of a fraction with 12 in the denominator, will it terminate or repeat? This question came from a seventh grader in author Erica Burnison's class as the student was pondering a poster generated by one of her classmates. Not only was the question intriguing, but it also affirmed the belief in the power of…

  1. Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins and Cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.

    2009-10-16

    Cyanobacteria are unique in many ways and one unusual feature is the presence of a suite of proteins that contain at least one domain with a minimum of eight tandem repeated five-residues (Rfr) of the general consensus sequence A[N/D]LXX. The function of such pentapeptide repeat proteins (PRPs) are still unknown, however, their prevalence in cyanobacteria suggests that they may play some role in the unique biological activities of cyanobacteria. As part of an inter-disciplinary Membrane Biology Grand Challenge at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) and Washington University in St. Louis, the genome of Cyanothece 51142 was sequenced and its molecular biology studied with relation to circadian rhythms. The genome of Cyanothece encodes for 35 proteins that contain at least one PRP domain. These proteins range in size from 105 (Cce_3102) to 930 (Cce_2929) kDa with the PRP domains ranging in predicted size from 12 (Cce_1545) to 62 (cce_3979) tandem pentapeptide repeats. Transcriptomic studies with 29 out of the 35 genes showed that at least three of the PRPs in Cyanothece 51142 (cce_0029, cce_3083, and cce_3272) oscillated with repeated periods of light and dark, further supporting a biological function for PRPs. Using X-ray diffraction crystallography, the structure for two pentapeptide repeat proteins from Cyanothece 51142 were determined, cce_1272 (aka Rfr32) and cce_4529 (aka Rfr23). Analysis of their molecular structures suggests that all PRP may share the same structural motif, a novel type of right-handed quadrilateral β-helix, or Rfr-fold, reminiscent of a square tower with four distinct faces. Each pentapeptide repeat occupies one face of the Rfr-fold with four consecutive pentapeptide repeats completing a coil that, in turn, stack upon each other to form “protein skyscrapers”. Details of the structural features of the Rfr-fold are reviewed here together with a discussion for the possible role of end

  2. Observations of Soft Gamma Repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2004-01-01

    Magnetars (Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars) are a subclass of neutron stars characterized by their recurrent X-ray bursts. While in an active (bursting) state (lasting anywhere between days and years), they are emit&ng hundreds of predominantly soft (kT=30 kev), short (0.1-100 ms long) events. Their quiescent source x-ray light ewes exhibit puhlions rotational period rate changes (spin-down) indicate that their magnetic fields are extremely high, of the order of 10^14- 10^l5 G. Such high B-field objects, dubbed "magnetars", had been predicted to exist in 1992, but the first concrete observational evidence were obtained in 1998 for two of these sources. I will discuss here the history of Soft Gamma Repeaters, and their spectral, timing and flux characteristics both in the persistent and their burst emission.

  3. A repeating fast radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitler, L. G.; Scholz, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  4. A repeating fast radio burst.

    PubMed

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star. PMID:26934226

  5. Immune Responses to Single-Dose Versus Double-Dose Hepatitis B Vaccines in Healthcare Workers not Responding to the Primary Vaccine Series: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Joukar, Farahnaz; Mansour-Ghanaei, Fariborz; Naghipour, Mohammad-Reza; Asgharnezhad, Mehrnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background Recommendations to immunize healthcare workers (HCWs) against hepatitis B are well known. However, a proportion of individuals do not respond to the primary standard three-dose HB vaccination schedule. Objectives The current study aimed to evaluate whether a double-dose HB booster vaccine could induce better protective anti-HB titers than a single-dose booster in non-protected HCWs. Materials and Methods This was a randomized clinical trial. A total of 91 HCWs not responding to the primary vaccine series in 2014 were enrolled. The participants were randomized into two groups that received a double dose of the HB vaccine containing 40 µg of antigen or a single dose of the HB vaccine containing 20 µg of antigen in three doses (at zero, one and six months after vaccination). Blood samples were collected before vaccinations and 28 days after the third dose to assess the seroconversion rate, according to the anti-HB antibody titer threshold of > 10 mIU/mL. Results The seroconversion rates were 93.2% and 87.2% after the first booster doses of the double-dose and single-dose HB vaccines, respectively (P = 0.64). In the double-dose HB vaccine group, the seroconversion rate was 97.8% compared with 89.6% in the single-dose group following the second vaccine dose (P = 0.83). All of the participants in both groups were seroprotected after the third HB vaccine dose. Conclusions Both the single- and double-dose HB vaccines were adequately immunogenic, and the double-dose HB vaccine was not significantly more immunogenic than the single-dose vaccine in terms of the seroconversion rates of HCWs who had not responded to the primary vaccine series. PMID:27148385

  6. Telomerase Repeated Amplification Protocol (TRAP)

    PubMed Central

    Mender, Ilgen; Shay, Jerry W.

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres are found at the end of eukaryotic linear chromosomes, and proteins that bind to telomeres protect DNA from being recognized as double-strand breaks thus preventing end-to-end fusions (Griffith et al., 1999). However, due to the end replication problem and other factors such as oxidative damage, the limited life span of cultured cells (Hayflick limit) results in progressive shortening of these protective structures (Hayflick and Moorhead, 1961; Olovnikov, 1973). The ribonucleoprotein enzyme complex telomerase-consisting of a protein catalytic component hTERT and a functional RNA component hTR or hTERC- counteracts telomere shortening by adding telomeric repeats to the end of chromosomes in ~90% of primary human tumors and in some transiently proliferating stem-like cells (Shay and Wright, 1996; Shay and Wright, 2001). This results in continuous proliferation of cells which is a hallmark of cancer. Therefore, telomere biology has a central role in aging, cancer progression/metastasis as well as targeted cancer therapies. There are commonly used methods in telomere biology such as Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) (Mender and Shay, 2015b), Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP) and Telomere dysfunction Induced Foci (TIF) analysis (Mender and Shay, 2015a). In this detailed protocol we describe Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP). The TRAP assay is a popular method to determine telomerase activity in mammalian cells and tissue samples (Kim et al., 1994). The TRAP assay includes three steps: extension, amplification, and detection of telomerase products. In the extension step, telomeric repeats are added to the telomerase substrate (which is actually a non telomeric oligonucleotide, TS) by telomerase. In the amplification step, the extension products are amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific primers (TS upstream primer and ACX downstream primer) and in the detection step, the presence or absence of telomerase is

  7. Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative coded modulation scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation' (ARA coded modulation). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes that are combined with high level modulation. Thus at the decoder belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA coded modulation on a graph, provided a demapper transforms the received in-phase and quadrature samples to reliability of the bits.

  8. Repeated allergen exposure reduce early phase airway response and leukotriene release despite upregulation of 5-lipoxygenase pathways

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Allergen induced early phase airway response and airway plasma exudation are predominantly mediated by inflammatory mast cell mediators including histamine, cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) and thromboxane A2 (TXA2). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether repeated allergen exposure affects early phase airway response to allergen challenge. Methods A trimellitic anhydride (TMA) sensitized guinea pig model was used to investigate the effects of low dose repeated allergen exposure on cholinergic airway responsiveness, early phase airway response and plasma exudation, as well as local airway production of mast cell derived cysteinyl leukotrienes and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) after allergen challenge. Results Repeated low dose allergen exposure increased cholinergic airway responsiveness. In contrast, early phase airway response and plasma exudation in response to a high-dose allergen challenge were strongly attenuated after repeated low dose allergen exposure. Inhibition of the airway response was unspecific to exposed allergen and independent of histamine receptor blocking. Furthermore, a significant reduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2 was found in the airways of animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen. However, in vitro stimulation of airway tissue from animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen with arachidonic acid and calcium ionophore (A23187) induced production of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2, suggesting enhanced activity of 5-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase pathways. Conclusions The inhibition of the early phase airway response, cysteinyl leukotriene and TXB2 production after repeated allergen exposure may result from unresponsive effector cells. PMID:22439792

  9. Crowding by a repeating pattern

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Sarah; Pelli, Denis G.

    2015-01-01

    Theinability to recognize a peripheral target among flankers is called crowding. For a foveal target, crowding can be distinguished from overlap masking by its sparing of detection, linear scaling with eccentricity, and invariance with target size.Crowding depends on the proximity and similarity of the flankers to the target. Flankers that are far from or dissimilar to the target do not crowd it. On a gray page, text whose neighboring letters have different colors, alternately black and white, has enough dissimilarity that it might escape crowding. Since reading speed is normally limited by crowding, escape from crowding should allow faster reading. Yet reading speed is unchanged (Chung & Mansfield, 2009). Why? A recent vernier study found that using alternating-color flankers produces strong crowding (Manassi, Sayim, & Herzog, 2012). Might that effect occur with letters and reading? Critical spacing is the minimum center-to-center target–flanker spacing needed to correctly identify the target. We measure it for a target letter surrounded by several equidistant flanker letters of the same polarity, opposite polarity, or mixed polarity: alternately white and black. We find strong crowding in the alternating condition, even though each flanker letter is beyond its own critical spacing (as measured in a separate condition). Thus a periodic repeating pattern can produce crowding even when the individual elements do not. Further, in all conditions we find that, once a periodic pattern repeats (two cycles), further repetition does not affect critical spacing of the innermost flanker. PMID:26024457

  10. 47 CFR 22.1015 - Repeater operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repeater operation. 22.1015 Section 22.1015 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Offshore Radiotelephone Service § 22.1015 Repeater operation. Offshore central stations may be used as repeater stations provided that...

  11. Repeated Reading. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Repeated reading" is an academic practice that aims to increase oral reading fluency. "Repeated reading" can be used with students who have developed initial word reading skills but demonstrate inadequate reading fluency for their grade level. During "repeated reading," a student sits in a quiet location with a…

  12. Importance of Decision Support Implementation in Emergency Department Vancomycin Dosing

    PubMed Central

    Faine, Brett; Mohr, Nicholas; Harland, Kari K.; Rolfes, Kathryn; Porter, Blake; Fuller, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The emergency department (ED) plays a critical role in the management of life-threatening infection. Prior data suggest that ED vancomycin dosing is frequently inappropriate. The objective is to assess the impact of an electronic medical record (EMR) intervention designed to improve vancomycin dosing accuracy, on vancomycin dosing and clinical outcomes in critically ill ED patients. Methods Retrospective before-after cohort study of all patients (n=278) treated with vancomycin in a 60,000-visit Midwestern academic ED (March 2008 and April 2011) and admitted to an intensive care unit. The primary outcome was the proportion of vancomycin doses defined as “appropriate” based on recorded actual body weight. We also evaluated secondary outcomes of mortality and length of stay. Results The EMR dose calculation tool was associated with an increase in mean vancomycin dose ([14.1±5.0] vs. [16.5±5.7] mg/kg, p<0.001) and a 10.3% absolute improvement in first-dose appropriateness (34.3% vs. 24.0%, p=0.07). After controlling for age, gender, methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus infection, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, 28-day in-hospital mortality (odds ratio OR 1.72; 95% CI [0.76–3.88], p=0.12) was not affected. Conclusion A computerized decision-support tool is associated with an increase in mean vancomycin dose in critically ill ED patients, but not with a statistically significant increase in therapeutic vancomycin doses. The impact of decision-support tools should be further explored to optimize compliance with accepted antibiotic guidelines and to potentially affect clinical outcome. PMID:26265968

  13. Linear Synchronous Motor Repeatability Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, C.R.

    2002-10-18

    A cart system using linear synchronous motors was being considered for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP). One of the applications in the PIP was the movement of a stack of furnace trays, filled with the waste form (pucks) from a stacking/unstacking station to several bottom loaded furnaces. A system was ordered to perform this function in the PIP Ceramic Prototype Test Facility (CPTF). This system was installed and started up in SRTC prior to being installed in the CPTF. The PIP was suspended and then canceled after the linear synchronous motor system was started up. This system was used to determine repeatability of a linear synchronous motor cart system for the Modern Pit Facility.

  14. Lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone in Japanese patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma: A phase II study.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kenshi; Shinagawa, Atsushi; Uchida, Toshiki; Taniwaki, Masafumi; Hirata, Hirokazu; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Matsue, Kosei; Ogawa, Yoshiaki; Shimizu, Takayuki; Otsuka, Maki; Matsumoto, Morio; Iida, Shinsuke; Terui, Yasuhito; Matsumura, Itaru; Ikeda, Takashi; Takezako, Naoki; Ogaki, Yumi; Midorikawa, Shuichi; Houck, Vanessa; Ervin-Haynes, Annette; Chou, Takaaki

    2016-05-01

    In the FIRST trial (MM-020), lenalidomide plus low-dose dexamethasone (Rd) reduced the risk of disease progression or death compared with combination melphalan-prednisone-thalidomide. As the FIRST trial did not include any Japanese patients, the efficacy and safety of continuous treatment with Rd was evaluated in 26 Japanese patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (NDMM) in a single-arm, multicenter, open-label phase II trial (MM-025). Patients received lenalidomide on days 1-21 of each 28-day cycle, with a starting dose of 25 mg/day (dose adjusted for renal impairment), and 40 mg/day dexamethasone (dose adjusted for age) on days 1, 8, 15 and 22 of each 28-day cycle until disease progression or discontinuation for any reason. In the efficacy evaluable population, overall response rate was 87.5%, including 29.2% of patients who achieved a complete response/very good partial response. Median durations of response, progression-free survival and overall survival have not been reached. The most common grade 3-4 adverse events were neutropenia (23%) and anemia (19%). The efficacy and safety of Rd were consistent with data from larger studies, including the FIRST trial, thereby supporting the use of Rd continuous in Japanese patients with NDMM who are ineligible for stem cell transplantation. PMID:26914369

  15. Sublinear response in lacZ mutant frequency of Muta™ Mouse spermatogonial stem cells after low dose subchronic exposure to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jason M; Walker, Mike; Sivathayalan, Ahalya; Douglas, George R; Yauk, Carole L; Marchetti, Francesco

    2015-05-01

    The transgenic rodent mutation assay was used to compare the dose-response relationship of lacZ mutant frequency (MF) in spermatogonial stem cells exposed acutely or subchronically to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU). Muta(™) Mouse males were exposed orally to 0, 25, 50, or 100 mg/kg ENU for acute exposures and 0, 1, 2, or 5 mg/(kg day) for 28-day subchronic exposures. LacZ MF was measured in sperm collected 70 days post-exposure to target spermatogonial stem cells. Dose-response data were fit to linear, quadratic, exponential, or power models. Acute exposure resulted in a dose-dependent increase in MF that was significant (P < 0.05) at all doses tested and was best described by a quadratic dose-response model that was linear in the low dose range. In contrast, similar total doses fragmented over a 28-day subchronic exposure only resulted in a significant increase in lacZ MF at the highest dose tested. Therefore, the subchronic no observable genotoxic effect level (NOGEL) was 2 mg/(kg day) (or 56 mg/kg total dose). The subchronic dose-response was best described by the exponential and power models, which were sublinear in the low dose range. Benchmark dose lower confidence limits (BMDLs) for acute and subchronic exposure were 3.0 and 1.0 mg/(kg day) (or 27.4 mg/kg total dose), respectively. These findings are supportive of a saturable DNA repair mechanism as the mutagenic mode of action for ENU in spermatogonia and imply that sufficiently low exposures would not cause appreciable genotoxic effects over background. This may have important implications for the quantitative risk assessment of germ cell mutagens. PMID:25598316

  16. SU-E-T-315: The Change of Optically Stimulated Luminescent Dosimeters (OSLDs) Sensitivity by Accumulated Dose and High Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Han, S; Jung, H; Kim, M; Ji, Y; Kim, K; Choi, S; Park, S; Yoo, H; Yi, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to evaluate radiation sensitivity of optical stimulated luminance dosimeters (OSLDs) by accumulated dose and high dose. Methods: This study was carried out in Co-60 unit (Theratron 780, AECL, and Canada) and used InLight MicroStar reader (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL) for reading. We annealed for 30 min using optical annealing system which contained fluorescent lamps (Osram lumilux, 24 W, 280 ∼780 nm). To evaluate change of OSLDs sensitivity by repeated irradiation, the dosimeters were repeatedly irradiated with 1 Gy. And whenever a repeated irradiation, we evaluated OSLDs sensitivity. To evaluate OSLDs sensitivity after accumulated dose with 5 Gy, We irradiated dose accumulatively (from 1 Gy to 5 Gy) without annealing. And OSLDs was also irradiated with 15, 20, 30 Gy to certify change of OSLDs sensitivity after high dose irradiation. After annealing them, they were irradiated with 1Gy, repeatedly. Results: The OSLDs sensitivity increased up to 3% during irradiating seven times and decreased continuously above 8 times. That dropped by about 0.35 Gy per an irradiation. Finally, after 30 times irradiation, OSLDs sensitivity decreased by about 7%. For accumulated dose from 1 Gy to 5 Gy, OSLDs sensitivity about 1 Gy increased until 4.4% after second times accumulated dose compared with before that. OSLDs sensitivity about 1 Gy decreased by 1.6% in five times irradiation. When OSLDs were irradiated ten times with 1Gy after irradiating high dose (10, 15, 20 Gy), OSLDs sensitivity decreased until 6%, 9%, 12% compared with it before high dose irradiation, respectively. Conclusion: This study certified OSLDs sensitivity by accumulated dose and high dose. When irradiated with 1Gy, repeatedly, OSLDs sensitivity decreased linearly and the reduction rate of OSLDs sensitivity after high dose irradiation had dependence on irradiated dose.

  17. Induction of osteosarcomas in mouse lumbar vertebrae by repeated external beta-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ootsuyama, A.; Tanooka, H.

    1989-03-15

    Besides skin tumors, osteosarcomas were induced at high frequency in the lumbar vertebrae of ICR mice by repeated local external irradiation of the back with /sup 90/Sr-/sup 90/Y beta-rays when irradiation was repeated three times a week until tumors appeared. The optimum dose range for osteosarcoma induction was 250-350 cGy per exposure at the surface of the back, or 125-175 cGy at the depth of the center of the bone. With the same irradiation schedule, the optimal dose of radiation for induction of osteosarcomas was much lower than that for induction of skin tumors.

  18. Trinucleotide Repeats: A Structural Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Bruno; Fernandes, Sara; Abreu, Isabel A.; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansions are present in a wide range of genes involved in several neurological disorders, being directly involved in the molecular mechanisms underlying pathogenesis through modulation of gene expression and/or the function of the RNA or protein it encodes. Structural and functional information on the role of TNR sequences in RNA and protein is crucial to understand the effect of TNR expansions in neurodegeneration. Therefore, this review intends to provide to the reader a structural and functional view of TNR and encoded homopeptide expansions, with a particular emphasis on polyQ expansions and its role at inducing the self-assembly, aggregation and functional alterations of the carrier protein, which culminates in neuronal toxicity and cell death. Detail will be given to the Machado-Joseph Disease-causative and polyQ-containing protein, ataxin-3, providing clues for the impact of polyQ expansion and its flanking regions in the modulation of ataxin-3 molecular interactions, function, and aggregation. PMID:23801983

  19. Observations of Soft Gamma Repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2005-01-01

    Magnetars (Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars) are a subclass of neutron stars characterized by their recurrent X-ray bursts. While in an active (bursting) state (lasting anywhere between days and years), they are emitting hundreds of predominantly soft (kl'=30 kev), short (0.1 - 100 ms long) events. Their quiescent source X-ray light curves exhibit pulsations in the narrow range of 5-1 1 s; estimates of these rotational period rate changes (spin-down) indicate that their magnetic fields are extremely high, of the order of 10A14-10A15 G. Such high B-field objects, dubbed "magnetars", had been predicted to exist in 1992, but the first concrete observational evidence was obtained in 1998 for two of these sources. Very recently, SGR1806-20 emitted a giant flare, which was detected in the radio with a multitude of telescopes under an extensive international campaign. These observations have revealed exciting new results, never seen before in any of the other magnetar sources. I will discuss here these results and their relevance to our understanding of the nature of magnetars.

  20. Modeling Repeatedly Flaring δ Sunspots.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-03-11

    Active regions (ARs) appearing on the surface of the Sun are classified into α, β, γ, and δ by the rules of the Mount Wilson Observatory, California on the basis of their topological complexity. Amongst these, the δ sunspots are known to be superactive and produce the most x-ray flares. Here, we present results from a simulation of the Sun by mimicking the upper layers and the corona, but starting at a more primitive stage than any earlier treatment. We find that this initial state consisting of only a thin subphotospheric magnetic sheet breaks into multiple flux tubes which evolve into a colliding-merging system of spots of opposite polarity upon surface emergence, similar to those often seen on the Sun. The simulation goes on to produce many exotic δ sunspot associated phenomena: repeated flaring in the range of typical solar flare energy release and ejective helical flux ropes with embedded cool-dense plasma filaments resembling solar coronal mass ejections. PMID:27015469

  1. Competition impedes the recovery of Daphnia magna from repeated insecticide pulses.

    PubMed

    Dolciotti, Ida; Foit, Kaarina; Herkelrath, Anna; Liess, Matthias

    2014-02-01

    The effects of multiple insecticide pulses on non-target organisms have rarely been investigated in combination with relevant biotic interactions, such as competition. In this study, we examined the effects of two repeated pulses of the insecticide pirimicarb (3, 10, 24 μg/L) on populations of Daphnia magna with or without competition. To investigate the influence of competition, half of the test systems were supplemented with the pirimicarb-insensitive species Culex pipiens. The pesticide pulses were followed by a recovery period of 28 days, which corresponded to approximately three generation times for D. magna. The one-species setup with the Daphnia populations and the two-species setup with both the Daphnia and Culex populations had a precontamination period of 30 days so that intra- and interspecific competitions were present prior to the insecticide pulse. Short-term effects on the survival of the Daphnia population were observed in both setups immediately after each insecticide pulse at the highest concentration level. In the one-species setup, the short-term effects on population survival were increased by intraspecific competition. However, the Daphnia populations in the one-species setup recovered and reached the control level within approximately two weeks after each insecticide pulse. In contrast, in the two-species setup at the highest concentration, we observed culmination of insecticide effects: the Daphnia populations did not recover and their abundance was below the control level until the end of the observation time. Their recovery was impeded by the presence of the competing species C. pipiens for at least four weeks. At low concentrations, no culmination of effects was observed. We conclude that repeated toxicant pulses on populations that are challenged with interspecific competition may result in a multigenerational culmination of toxicant effects. PMID:24373889

  2. A randomized clinical trial to determine the efficacy of manufacturers’ recommended doses of omega-3 fatty acids from different sources in facilitating cardiovascular disease risk reduction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Omega-3 fatty acids confer beneficial health effects, but North Americans are lacking in their dietary omega-3-rich intake. Supplementation is an alternative to consumption of fish; however, not all omega-3 products are created equal. The trial objective was to compare the increases in blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids after consumption of four different omega-3 supplements, and to assess potential changes in cardiovascular disease risk following supplementation. Methods This was an open-label, randomized, cross-over study involving thirty-five healthy subjects. Supplements and daily doses (as recommended on product labels) were: Concentrated Triglyceride (rTG) fish oil: EPA of 650 mg, DHA of 450 mg Ethyl Ester (EE) fish oil: EPA of 756 mg, DHA of 228 mg Phospholipid (PL) krill oil: EPA of 150 mg, DHA of 90 mg Triglyceride (TG) salmon oil: EPA of 180 mg, DHA of 220 mg. Subjects were randomly assigned to consume one of four products, in random order, for a 28-day period, followed by a 4-week washout period. Subsequent testing of the remaining three products, followed by 4-week washout periods, continued until each subject had consumed each of the products. Blood samples before and after supplementation were quantified for fatty acid analysis using gas chromatography, and statistically analysed using ANOVA for repeated measures. Results At the prescribed dosage, the statistical ranking of the four products in terms of increase in whole blood omega-3 fatty acid levels was concentrated rTG fish oil > EE fish oil > triglyceride TG salmon oil > PL krill oil. Whole blood EPA percentage increase in subjects consuming concentrated rTG fish oil was more than four times that of krill and salmon oil. Risk reduction in several elements of cardiovascular disease was achieved to a greater extent by the concentrated rTG fish oil than by any other supplement. Krill oil and (unconcentrated) triglyceride oil were relatively unsuccessful in this aspect of the

  3. Repeated Sprints: An Independent Not Dependent Variable.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jonathan M; Macpherson, Tom W; Spears, Iain R; Weston, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    The ability to repeatedly perform sprints has traditionally been viewed as a key performance measure in team sports, and the relationship between repeated-sprint ability (RSA) and performance has been explored extensively. However, when reviewing the repeated-sprint profile of team-sports match play it appears that the occurrence of repeated-sprint bouts is sparse, indicating that RSA is not as important to performance as commonly believed. Repeated sprints are, however, a potent and time-efficient training strategy, effective in developing acceleration, speed, explosive leg power, aerobic power, and high-intensity-running performance--all of which are crucial to team-sport performance. As such, we propose that repeated-sprint exercise in team sports should be viewed as an independent variable (eg, a means of developing fitness) as opposed to a dependent variable (eg, a means of assessing fitness/performance). PMID:27197118

  4. Strengthening concept learning by repeated testing

    PubMed Central

    Wiklund-Hörnqvist, Carola; Jonsson, Bert; Nyberg, Lars

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether repeated testing with feedback benefits learning compared to rereading of introductory psychology key-concepts in an educational context. The testing effect was examined immediately after practice, after 18 days, and at a five-week delay in a sample of undergraduate students (n = 83). The results revealed that repeated testing with feedback significantly enhanced learning compared to rereading at all delays, demonstrating that repeated retrieval enhances retention compared to repeated encoding in the short- and the long-term. In addition, the effect of repeated testing was beneficial for students irrespectively of working memory capacity. It is argued that teaching methods involving repeated retrieval are important to consider by the educational system. PMID:24313425

  5. Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 130 Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database (Web, free access)   Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database is intended to benefit research and application of short tandem repeat DNA markers for human identity testing. Facts and sequence information on each STR system, population data, commonly used multiplex STR systems, PCR primers and conditions, and a review of various technologies for analysis of STR alleles have been included.

  6. Understanding and identifying amino acid repeats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong; Nijveen, Harm

    2014-07-01

    Amino acid repeats (AARs) are abundant in protein sequences. They have particular roles in protein function and evolution. Simple repeat patterns generated by DNA slippage tend to introduce length variations and point mutations in repeat regions. Loss of normal and gain of abnormal function owing to their variable length are potential risks leading to diseases. Repeats with complex patterns mostly refer to the functional domain repeats, such as the well-known leucine-rich repeat and WD repeat, which are frequently involved in protein–protein interaction. They are mainly derived from internal gene duplication events and stabilized by ‘gate-keeper’ residues, which play crucial roles in preventing inter-domain aggregation. AARs are widely distributed in different proteomes across a variety of taxonomic ranges, and especially abundant in eukaryotic proteins. However, their specific evolutionary and functional scenarios are still poorly understood. Identifying AARs in protein sequences is the first step for the further investigation of their biological function and evolutionary mechanism. In principle, this is an NP-hard problem, as most of the repeat fragments are shaped by a series of sophisticated evolutionary events and become latent periodical patterns. It is not possible to define a uniform criterion for detecting and verifying various repeat patterns. Instead, different algorithms based on different strategies have been developed to cope with different repeat patterns. In this review, we attempt to describe the amino acid repeat-detection algorithms currently available and compare their strategies based on an in-depth analysis of the biological significance of protein repeats. PMID:23418055

  7. Lambda Exonuclease Digestion of CGG Trinucleotide Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Conroy, R.S.; Koretsky, A.P.; Moreland, J.

    2011-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome and other triplet repeat diseases are characterized by an elongation of a repeating DNA triplet. The ensemble-averaged lambda exonuclease digestion rate of different substrates, including one with an elongated FMR1 gene containing 120 CGG repeats, was measured using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Using magnetic tweezers sequence-dependent digestion rates and pausing was measured for individual lambda exonucleases. Within the triplet repeats a lower average and narrower distribution of rates and a higher frequency of pausing was observed. PMID:19562332

  8. Approaching improved adhesive bonding repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlette, Christian; Müller, Tobias; Roβmann, Jürgen; Brecher, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Today, the precision of micro-optics assembly is mostly limited by the accuracy of the bonding process ― and in the case of adhesive bonding by the prediction and compensation of adhesive shrinkage during curing. In this contribution, we present a novel approach to address adhesive bonding based on hybrid control system theory. In hybrid control, dynamic systems are described as "plants" which produce discrete and/or continuous outputs from given discrete and/or continuous inputs, thus yielding a hybrid state space description of the system. The task of hybrid controllers is to observe the plant and to generate a discrete and/or continuous input sequence that guides or holds the plant in a desired target state region while avoiding invalid or unwanted intermediate states. Our approach is based on a series of experiments carried out in order to analyze, define and decouple the dependencies of adhesive shrinkage on multiple parameters, such as application geometries, fixture forces and UV intensities. As some of the dependencies describe continuous effects (e.g. shrinkage from UV intensity) and other dependencies describe discrete state transitions (e.g. fixture removal during curing), the resulting model of the overall bonding process is a hybrid dynamic system in the general case. For this plant model, we then propose a concept of sampling-based parameter search as a basis to design suitable hybrid controllers, which have the potential to optimize process control for a selection of assembly steps, thus improving the repeatability of related production steps like beam-shaping optics or mounting of turning mirrors for fiber coupling.

  9. Effect of high-dose Ascorbic acid on vasopressor's requirement in septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Zabet, Mohadeseh Hosseini; Mohammadi, Mostafa; Ramezani, Masoud; Khalili, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Effects of ascorbic acid on hemodynamic parameters of septic shock were evaluated in nonsurgical critically ill patients in limited previous studies. In this study, the effect of high-dose ascorbic acid on vasopressor drug requirement was evaluated in surgical critically ill patients with septic shock. Methods: Patients with septic shock who required a vasopressor drug to maintain mean arterial pressure >65 mmHg were assigned to receive either 25 mg/kg intravenous ascorbic acid every 6 h or matching placebo for 72 h. Vasopressor dose and duration were considered as the primary outcomes. Duration of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) stay and 28-day mortality has been defined as secondary outcomes. Findings: During the study period, 28 patients (14 in each group) completed the trial. Mean dose of norepinephrine during the study period (7.44 ± 3.65 vs. 13.79 ± 6.48 mcg/min, P = 0.004) and duration of norepinephrine administration (49.64 ± 25.67 vs. 71.57 ± 1.60 h, P = 0.007) were significantly lower in the ascorbic acid than the placebo group. No statistically significant difference was detected between the groups regarding the length of ICU stay. However, 28-day mortality was significantly lower in the ascorbic acid than the placebo group (14.28% vs. 64.28%, respectively; P = 0.009). Conclusion: High-dose ascorbic acid may be considered as an effective and safe adjuvant therapy in surgical critically ill patients with septic shock. The most effective dose of ascorbic acid and the best time for its administration should be determined in future studies. PMID:27162802

  10. Skeletal Muscle Inflammation Following Repeated Bouts of Lengthening Contractions in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Deyhle, Michael R.; Gier, Amanda M.; Evans, Kaitlyn C.; Eggett, Dennis L.; Nelson, W. Bradley; Parcell, Allen C.; Hyldahl, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle responds to exercise-induced damage by orchestrating an adaptive process that protects the muscle from damage by subsequent bouts of exercise, a phenomenon called the repeated bout effect (RBE). The mechanisms underlying the RBE are not understood. We hypothesized that an attenuated inflammation response following a repeated bout of lengthening contractions (LC) would be coincidental with a RBE, suggesting a potential relationship. Fourteen men (n = 7) and women (n = 7) completed two bouts of lengthening contractions (LC) separated by 28 days. Muscle biopsies were taken before the first bout (B1) from the non-exercised leg, and from the exercised leg 2- and 27-d post-B1 and 2-d following the second bout (B2). A 29-plex cytokine array identified alterations in inflammatory cytokines. Immunohistochemistry quantified inflammatory cell infiltration and major histocompatibility complex class 1 (MHC-1). Muscle soreness was attenuated in the days following B2 relative to B1, indicating a RBE. Intramuscular monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP1) and interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP10) increased following B2 relative to the pre-exercise sample (7–52 and 11–36 pg/ml, respectively p < 0.05). Interleukin 4 (IL4) decreased (26–13 pg/ml, p < 0.05) following B2 relative to the pre-exercise sample. Infiltration of CD68+ macrophages and CD8+ T-cells were evident following B2, but not B1. Moreover, CD8+ T-cells were observed infiltrating apparently necrotic muscle fibers. No changes in MHC-1 were found. We conclude that inflammation is not attenuated following a repeated bout of LC and that CD8+ T-cells may play a role in muscle adaptation following LC. Moreover, it appears that the muscle or the immune system becomes sensitized to an initial bout of damaging exercise such that inflammatory cell infiltration into the muscle is enhanced upon a repeated bout of damaging exercise. PMID:26793125

  11. Dose audit failures and dose augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herring, C.

    1999-01-01

    Standards EN 552 and ISO 11137, covering radiation sterilization, are technically equivalent in their requirements for the selection of the sterilization dose. Dose Setting Methods 1 and 2 described in Annex B of ISO 11137 can be used to meet these requirements for the selection of the sterilization dose. Both dose setting methods require a dose audit every 3 months to determine the continued validity of the sterilization dose. This paper addresses the subject of dose audit failures and investigations into their cause. It also presents a method to augment the sterilization dose when the number of audit positives exceeds the limits imposed by ISO 11137.

  12. Personalised dosing: Printing a dose of one's own medicine.

    PubMed

    Alomari, Mustafa; Mohamed, Fatima H; Basit, Abdul W; Gaisford, Simon

    2015-10-30

    Ink-jet printing is a versatile, precise and relatively inexpensive method of depositing small volumes of solutions with remarkable accuracy and repeatability. Although developed primarily as a technology for image reproduction, its areas of application have expanded significantly in recent years. It is particularly suited to the manufacture of low dose medicines or to short production runs and so offers a potential manufacturing solution for the paradigm of personalised medicines. This review discusses the technical and clinical aspects of ink-jet printing that must be considered in order for the technology to become widely adopted in the pharmaceutical arena and considers applications in the literature. PMID:25498157

  13. All Repeats are Not Equal: A Module-Based Approach to Guide Repeat Protein Design

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Lynne

    2013-01-01

    Repeat proteins composed of tandem arrays of a short structural motif often mediate protein-protein interactions. Past efforts to design repeat protein-based molecular recognition tools have focused on the creation of templates from the consensus of individual repeats, regardless of their natural context. Such an approach assumes that all repeats are essentially equivalent. In this study we present the results of a ‘module-based’ approach, in which modules composed of tandem repeats are aligned to identify repeat-specific features. Using this approach to analyze tetratricopeptide repeat modules that contain 3 tandem repeats (3TPRs), we identify two classes of 3TPR modules with distinct structural signatures that are correlated with different sets of functional residues. Our analyses also reveal a high degree of correlation between positions across the entire ligand-binding surface, indicative of a coordinated, coevolving binding surface. Extension of our analyses to different repeat protein modules reveals more examples of repeat-specific features, especially in armadillio repeat (ARM) modules. In summary, the module-based analyses that we present effectively capture key repeat-specific features that will be important to include in future repeat protein design templates. PMID:23434848

  14. 47 CFR 97.205 - Repeater station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Special Operations § 97.205 Repeater station. (a) Any amateur station licensed to a holder of a Technician, General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class operator license may be a repeater. A holder of...

  15. 47 CFR 97.205 - Repeater station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Special Operations § 97.205 Repeater station. (a) Any amateur station licensed to a holder of a Technician, General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class operator license may be a repeater. A holder of...

  16. 47 CFR 97.205 - Repeater station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Special Operations § 97.205 Repeater station. (a) Any amateur station licensed to a holder of a Technician, General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class operator license may be a repeater. A holder of...

  17. 47 CFR 97.205 - Repeater station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Special Operations § 97.205 Repeater station. (a) Any amateur station licensed to a holder of a Technician, General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class operator license may be a repeater. A holder of...

  18. 47 CFR 97.205 - Repeater station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Special Operations § 97.205 Repeater station. (a) Any amateur station licensed to a holder of a Technician, General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class operator license may be a repeater. A holder of...

  19. The Effects of Repeaters on Test Equating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrulis, Richard S.; And Others

    The purpose of this investigation was to establish the effects of repeaters on test equating. Since consideration was not given to repeaters in test equating, such as in the derivation of equations by Angoff (1971), the hypothetical effect needed to be established. A case study was examined which showed results on a test as expected; overall mean…

  20. The Effects of Repeaters on Test Equating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrulis, Richard S.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The effects of repeaters (testees included in both administrations of two forms of a test) on the test equating process are examined. It is shown that repeaters do effect test equating and tend to lower the cutoff point for passing the test. (JKS)

  1. Evaluating a Group Repeated Reading Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klubnik, Cynthia Adele

    2009-01-01

    Fluency has been identified as an important component of effective reading instruction, and repeated reading has been shown to improve oral reading fluency. In order to improve the efficiency of repeated reading interventions, more research is needed on the effectiveness of small group reading interventions. An alternating treatments, single…

  2. Laparoscopic repeat hepatectomy after right hepatopancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Igami, Tsuyoshi; Komaya, Kenichi; Hirose, Tomoaki; Ebata, Tomoki; Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Sugawara, Gen; Mizuno, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Junpei; Nagino, Masato

    2016-08-01

    Although laparoscopic hepatectomy is widely accepted for primary hepatectomy, the clinical value of laparoscopic hepatectomy for repeat hepatectomy is still challenging. We herein describe our experience with laparoscopic repeat hepatectomy after right hepatopancreaticoduodenectomy. A 72-year-old woman who had undergone right hepatopancreaticoduodenectomy for perihilar cholangiocarcinoma 31 months prior was diagnosed with liver metastasis in segment 3. We performed laparoscopic repeat hepatectomy. Because mild adhesions in the left side of the abdominal cavity were detected by laparoscopy, the planned procedure was accomplished. The operative time and intraoperative blood loss were 139 min and less than 1 mL, respectively. The patient was discharged at 6 days after surgery and was healthy with no evidence of recurrence at 21 months after laparoscopic repeat hepatectomy. Laparoscopic repeat hepatectomy is a suitable and safe procedure for minor hepatectomy, provided that careful technique is used after the working space is secured under pneumoperitoneum. PMID:27221034

  3. Repeated Testing Produces Superior Transfer of Learning Relative to Repeated Studying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    The present research investigated whether test-enhanced learning can be used to promote transfer. More specifically, 4 experiments examined how repeated testing and repeated studying affected retention and transfer of facts and concepts. Subjects studied prose passages and then either repeatedly restudied or took tests on the material. One week…

  4. EFFECT OF EPISODIC WEEKLY NICOTINE ADMINISTRATION ON REPEATED ACQUISITION IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our prior research showed both tolerance and sensitization to nicotine?s effects on motor activity with weekly dosing. This experiment determined the generality of this finding to conditioned behavior. After extended training on a repeated acquisition/performance schedule all ra...

  5. Photodynamic therapy repeated without reinjection of Photofrin (porfimer sodium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaughan, James S.

    1998-05-01

    Background and objective: To compare the effectiveness in decreasing the amount of obstruction caused by endobronchial tumors when they are retreated with photodynamic therapy (PDT) several weeks after injection of PhotofrinR (porfimer sodium). Study design, materials and methods: The percentage of endobronchial obstruction from tumors before PDT and at the end of toilet bronchoscopy of 91 sites with PDT performed within 4 days after injection of porfimer sodium was compared to that obtained when PDT was repeated without re-injection of porfimer sodium in the time frames 2 - 4 weeks after injection to 11 sites and the period 4 - 8 weeks after injection to 17 sites. All patients were injected intravenously with 60 mg of PhotofrinR per square meter of body surface and all treatments were done with a power density of 500 mW/CF and a light dose of 400 J/CF delivered from cylinder diffusing fibers. Results: Paired Student's t tests and Wilcoxon signed ranks tests showed significant decreases in the percentage of endobronchial obstruction regardless of whether the PDT was first performed or repeated. Unpaired Student's t tests and Mann-Whitney U statistical comparisons showed a significant difference between the decrease of obstruction when treatment was performed within the first 4 days after injection (mean 41%) as compared to the repeated group 2 to 4 weeks after injection (mean 16%) and the group treated 4 to 8 weeks after injection (mean 19%). However there was no significant difference in the amount of decrease of obstruction between the 2 - 4 week group and the 4 - 8 week group. Conclusions: Photodynamic therapy to relieve endobronchial obstruction can be repeated without reinjection of PhotofrinR up to 8 weeks after injection with a significant decrease in the amount of obstruction. However, it will only be about 1/3 as effective as the initial treatment performed within the first four days of injection.

  6. Striatal patch compartment lesions reduce stereotypy following repeated cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Murray, Ryan C; Logan, Mary C; Horner, Kristen A

    2015-08-27

    Stereotypy can be characterized as inflexible, repetitive behaviors that occur following repeated exposure to psychostimulants, such as cocaine (COC). Stereotypy may be related to preferential activation of the patch (striosome) compartment of striatum, as enhanced relative activation of the patch compartment has been shown to positively correlate with the emergence of stereotypy following repeated psychostimulant treatment. However, the specific contribution of the patch compartment to COC-induced stereotypy following repeated exposure is unknown. To elucidate the involvement of the patch compartment to the development of stereotypy following repeated COC exposure, we determined if destruction of this sub-region altered COC-induced behaviors. The neurons of the patch compartment were ablated by bilateral infusion of the neurotoxin dermorphin-saporin (DERM-SAP; 17 ng/μl) into the striatum. Animals were allowed to recover for eight days following the infusion, and then were given daily injections of COC (25mg/kg) or saline for one week, followed by a weeklong drug-free period. Animals were then given a challenge dose of saline or COC, observed for 2h in activity chambers and sacrificed. The number of mu-labeled patches in the striatum were reduced by DERM-SAP pretreatment. In COC-treated animals DERM-SAP pretreatment significantly reduced the immobilization and intensity of stereotypy but increased locomotor activity. DERM-SAP pretreatment attenuated COC-induced c-Fos expression in the patch compartment, while enhancing COC-induced c-Fos expression in the matrix compartment. These data indicate that the patch compartment contributes to repetitive behavior and suggests that alterations in activity in the patch vs matrix compartments may underlie to this phenomenon. PMID:26100338

  7. Finding and Characterizing Repeats in Plant Genomes.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Jacques; Peterlongo, Pierre; Tempel, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Plant genomes contain a particularly high proportion of repeated structures of various types. This chapter proposes a guided tour of available software that can help biologists to look for these repeats and check some hypothetical models intended to characterize their structures. Since transposable elements are a major source of repeats in plants, many methods have been used or developed for this large class of sequences. They are representative of the range of tools available for other classes of repeats and we have provided a whole section on this topic as well as a selection of the main existing software. In order to better understand how they work and how repeats may be efficiently found in genomes, it is necessary to look at the technical issues involved in the large-scale search of these structures. Indeed, it may be hard to keep up with the profusion of proposals in this dynamic field and the rest of the chapter is devoted to the foundations of the search for repeats and more complex patterns. The second section introduces the key concepts that are useful for understanding the current state of the art in playing with words, applied to genomic sequences. This can be seen as the first stage of a very general approach called linguistic analysis that is interested in the analysis of natural or artificial texts. Words, the lexical level, correspond to simple repeated entities in texts or strings. In fact, biologists need to represent more complex entities where a repeat family is built on more abstract structures, including direct or inverted small repeats, motifs, composition constraints as well as ordering and distance constraints between these elementary blocks. In terms of linguistics, this corresponds to the syntactic level of a language. The last section introduces concepts and practical tools that can be used to reach this syntactic level in biological sequence analysis. PMID:26519414

  8. Do gamma-ray burst sources repeat?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, C. A.; Hartmann, D. H.; Brainerd, J. J.; Briggs, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Pendleton, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Blumenthal, G.; Brock, M.

    1994-01-01

    The demonstration of repeated gamma-ray bursts from an individual source would severely constrain burst source models. Recent reports of evidence for repetition in the first BATSE burst catalog have generated renewed interest in this issue. Here, we analyze the angular distribution of 585 bursts of the second BATSE catalog (Meegan et al. 1994). We search for evidence of burst recurrence using the nearest and farthest neighbor statistic ad the two-point angular correlation function. We find the data to be consistent with the hypothesis that burst sources do not repeat; however, a repeater fraction of up to about 20% of the bursts cannot be excluded.

  9. DNA Replication Dynamics of the GGGGCC Repeat of the C9orf72 Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Thys, Ryan Griffin; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    DNA has the ability to form a variety of secondary structures in addition to the normal B-form DNA, including hairpins and quadruplexes. These structures are implicated in a number of neurological diseases and cancer. Expansion of a GGGGCC repeat located at C9orf72 is associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. This repeat expands from two to 24 copies in normal individuals to several hundreds or thousands of repeats in individuals with the disease. Biochemical studies have demonstrated that as little as four repeats have the ability to form a stable DNA secondary structure known as a G-quadruplex. Quadruplex structures have the ability to disrupt normal DNA processes such as DNA replication and transcription. Here we examine the role of GGGGCC repeat length and orientation on DNA replication using an SV40 replication system in human cells. Replication through GGGGCC repeats leads to a decrease in overall replication efficiency and an increase in instability in a length-dependent manner. Both repeat expansions and contractions are observed, and replication orientation is found to influence the propensity for expansions or contractions. The presence of replication stress, such as low-dose aphidicolin, diminishes replication efficiency but has no effect on instability. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrates a replication stall with as few as 20 GGGGCC repeats. These results suggest that replication of the GGGGCC repeat at C9orf72 is perturbed by the presence of expanded repeats, which has the potential to result in further expansion, leading to disease. PMID:26463209

  10. DNA Replication Dynamics of the GGGGCC Repeat of the C9orf72 Gene.

    PubMed

    Thys, Ryan Griffin; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2015-11-27

    DNA has the ability to form a variety of secondary structures in addition to the normal B-form DNA, including hairpins and quadruplexes. These structures are implicated in a number of neurological diseases and cancer. Expansion of a GGGGCC repeat located at C9orf72 is associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. This repeat expands from two to 24 copies in normal individuals to several hundreds or thousands of repeats in individuals with the disease. Biochemical studies have demonstrated that as little as four repeats have the ability to form a stable DNA secondary structure known as a G-quadruplex. Quadruplex structures have the ability to disrupt normal DNA processes such as DNA replication and transcription. Here we examine the role of GGGGCC repeat length and orientation on DNA replication using an SV40 replication system in human cells. Replication through GGGGCC repeats leads to a decrease in overall replication efficiency and an increase in instability in a length-dependent manner. Both repeat expansions and contractions are observed, and replication orientation is found to influence the propensity for expansions or contractions. The presence of replication stress, such as low-dose aphidicolin, diminishes replication efficiency but has no effect on instability. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrates a replication stall with as few as 20 GGGGCC repeats. These results suggest that replication of the GGGGCC repeat at C9orf72 is perturbed by the presence of expanded repeats, which has the potential to result in further expansion, leading to disease. PMID:26463209

  11. Repeated Nrf2 stimulation using sulforaphane protects fibroblasts from ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Sherin T.; Bergström, Petra; Hammarsten, Ola

    2014-05-01

    Most of the cytotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation is mediated by radical-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Cellular protection from free radicals can be stimulated several fold by sulforaphane-mediated activation of the transcription factor Nrf2 that regulates more than 50 genes involved in the detoxification of reactive substances and radicals. Here, we report that repeated sulforaphane treatment increases radioresistance in primary human skin fibroblasts. Cells were either treated with sulforaphane for four hours once or with four-hour treatments repeatedly for three consecutive days prior to radiation exposure. Fibroblasts exposed to repeated-sulforaphane treatment showed a more pronounced dose-dependent induction of Nrf2-regulated mRNA and reduced amount of radiation-induced free radicals compared with cells treated once with sulforaphane. In addition, radiation- induced DNA double-strand breaks measured by gamma-H2AX foci were attenuated following repeated sulforaphane treatment. As a result, cellular protection from ionizing radiation measured by the 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) assay was increased, specifically in cells exposed to repeated sulforaphane treatment. Sulforaphane treatment was unable to protect Nrf2 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, indicating that the sulforaphane-induced radioprotection was Nrf2-dependent. Moreover, radioprotection by repeated sulforaphane treatment was dose-dependent with an optimal effect at 10 uM, whereas both lower and higher concentrations resulted in lower levels of radioprotection. Our data indicate that the Nrf2 system can be trained to provide further protection from radical damage. - Highlights: • Repeated treatment with sulforaphane protects fibroblasts from ionizing radiation • Repeated sulforaphane treatment attenuates radiation induced ROS and DNA damage • Sulforaphane mediated protection is Nrf2 dependent.

  12. Sensitization and Tolerance Following Repeated Exposure to Caffeine and Alcohol in Mice

    PubMed Central

    May, Christina E.; Haun, Harold L.; Griffin, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Energy drinks are popular mixers with alcohol. While energy drinks contain many ingredients, caffeine is an important pharmacologically active component and is generally present in larger amounts than in other caffeinated beverages. In these studies, we investigated the hypothesis that caffeine would influence the effects of alcohol (ethanol) on conditioned taste aversion, ataxia and locomotor activity after repeated exposure. Methods Four groups of mice were exposed by oral gavage twice daily to vehicle, ethanol (4 g/kg), caffeine (15 mg/kg), or the ethanol/caffeine combination. Conditioned taste aversion to saccharin and ataxia in the parallel rod task were evaluated after 8 or 16 gavages, respectively, using ethanol (1–3 g/kg) or ethanol/caffeine (3mg/kg + 2 g/kg) challenges. In addition, locomotor activity was evaluated initially and after repeated exposure to oral gavage of these drugs and doses. Results Repeated oral gavage of ethanol produced significant locomotor sensitization, with those mice increasing total distance traveled by 2-fold. The locomotor response to caffeine, while significantly greater than vehicle gavage, did not change with repeated exposure. On the other hand, repeated gavage of caffeine/ethanol combination produced a substantial increase in total distance traveled after repeated exposure (~4-fold increase). After repeated ethanol exposure, there was significant tolerance to ethanol in the conditioned taste aversion and parallel rod tests. However, neither a history of caffeine exposure nor including caffeine influenced ethanol-induced conditioned taste aversion. Interestingly, a history of caffeine exposure increased the ataxic response to the caffeine/ethanol combination and appeared to reduce the ataxic response to high doses of ethanol. Conclusion The data support the general hypothesis that repeated exposure to caffeine influences the response to ethanol. Together with previously published work, these data indicate

  13. DNA Triplet Repeat Expansion and Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ravi R.; Pluciennik, Anna; Napierala, Marek; Wells, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair is a conserved antimutagenic pathway that maintains genomic stability through rectification of DNA replication errors and attenuation of chromosomal rearrangements. Paradoxically, mutagenic action of mismatch repair has been implicated as a cause of triplet repeat expansions that cause neurological diseases such as Huntington disease and myotonic dystrophy. This mutagenic process requires the mismatch recognition factor MutSβ and the MutLα (and/or possibly MutLγ) endonuclease, and is thought to be triggered by the transient formation of unusual DNA structures within the expanded triplet repeat element. This review summarizes the current knowledge of DNA mismatch repair involvement in triplet repeat expansion, which encompasses in vitro biochemical findings, cellular studies, and various in vivo transgenic animal model experiments. We present current mechanistic hypotheses regarding mismatch repair protein function in mediating triplet repeat expansions and discuss potential therapeutic approaches targeting the mismatch repair pathway. PMID:25580529

  14. Validation of a track repeating algorithm for intensity modulated proton therapy: clinical cases study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yepes, Pablo P.; Eley, John G.; Liu, Amy; Mirkovic, Dragan; Randeniya, Sharmalee; Titt, Uwe; Mohan, Radhe

    2016-04-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) methods are acknowledged as the most accurate technique to calculate dose distributions. However, due its lengthy calculation times, they are difficult to utilize in the clinic or for large retrospective studies. Track-repeating algorithms, based on MC-generated particle track data in water, accelerate dose calculations substantially, while essentially preserving the accuracy of MC. In this study, we present the validation of an efficient dose calculation algorithm for intensity modulated proton therapy, the fast dose calculator (FDC), based on a track-repeating technique. We validated the FDC algorithm for 23 patients, which included 7 brain, 6 head-and-neck, 5 lung, 1 spine, 1 pelvis and 3 prostate cases. For validation, we compared FDC-generated dose distributions with those from a full-fledged Monte Carlo based on GEANT4 (G4). We compared dose-volume-histograms, 3D-gamma-indices and analyzed a series of dosimetric indices. More than 99% of the voxels in the voxelized phantoms describing the patients have a gamma-index smaller than unity for the 2%/2 mm criteria. In addition the difference relative to the prescribed dose between the dosimetric indices calculated with FDC and G4 is less than 1%. FDC reduces the calculation times from 5 ms per proton to around 5 μs.

  15. Validation of a track repeating algorithm for intensity modulated proton therapy: clinical cases study.

    PubMed

    Yepes, Pablo P; Eley, John G; Liu, Amy; Mirkovic, Dragan; Randeniya, Sharmalee; Titt, Uwe; Mohan, Radhe

    2016-04-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) methods are acknowledged as the most accurate technique to calculate dose distributions. However, due its lengthy calculation times, they are difficult to utilize in the clinic or for large retrospective studies. Track-repeating algorithms, based on MC-generated particle track data in water, accelerate dose calculations substantially, while essentially preserving the accuracy of MC. In this study, we present the validation of an efficient dose calculation algorithm for intensity modulated proton therapy, the fast dose calculator (FDC), based on a track-repeating technique. We validated the FDC algorithm for 23 patients, which included 7 brain, 6 head-and-neck, 5 lung, 1 spine, 1 pelvis and 3 prostate cases. For validation, we compared FDC-generated dose distributions with those from a full-fledged Monte Carlo based on GEANT4 (G4). We compared dose-volume-histograms, 3D-gamma-indices and analyzed a series of dosimetric indices. More than 99% of the voxels in the voxelized phantoms describing the patients have a gamma-index smaller than unity for the 2%/2 mm criteria. In addition the difference relative to the prescribed dose between the dosimetric indices calculated with FDC and G4 is less than 1%. FDC reduces the calculation times from 5 ms per proton to around 5 μs. PMID:26961764

  16. Pulmonary instillation of low doses of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in mice leads to particle retention and gene expression changes in the absence of inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, Mainul; Saber, Anne T.; Guo, Charles; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Jensen, Keld A.; Yauk, Carole L.; Williams, Andrew; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Hakan; Halappanavar, Sabina

    2013-06-15

    We investigated gene expression, protein synthesis, and particle retention in mouse lungs following intratracheal instillation of varying doses of nano-sized titanium dioxide (nano-TiO{sub 2}). Female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to rutile nano-TiO{sub 2} via single intratracheal instillations of 18, 54, and 162 μg/mouse. Mice were sampled 1, 3, and 28 days post-exposure. The deposition of nano-TiO{sub 2} in the lungs was assessed using nanoscale hyperspectral microscopy. Biological responses in the pulmonary system were analyzed using DNA microarrays, pathway-specific real-time RT-PCR (qPCR), gene-specific qPCR arrays, and tissue protein ELISA. Hyperspectral mapping showed dose-dependent retention of nano-TiO{sub 2} in the lungs up to 28 days post-instillation. DNA microarray analysis revealed approximately 3000 genes that were altered across all treatment groups (± 1.3 fold; p < 0.1). Several inflammatory mediators changed in a dose- and time-dependent manner at both the mRNA and protein level. Although no influx of neutrophils was detected at the low dose, changes in the expression of several genes and proteins associated with inflammation were observed. Resolving inflammation at the medium dose, and lack of neutrophil influx in the lung fluid at the low dose, were associated with down-regulation of genes involved in ion homeostasis and muscle regulation. Our gene expression results imply that retention of nano-TiO{sub 2} in the absence of inflammation over time may potentially perturb calcium and ion homeostasis, and affect smooth muscle activities. - Highlights: • Pulmonary effects following exposure to low doses of nano-TiO{sub 2} were examined. • Particle retention in lungs was assessed using nanoscale hyperspectral microscopy. • Particles persisted up to 28 days in lungs in all dose groups. • Inflammation was the pathway affected in the high dose group at all time points. • Ion homeostasis and muscle activity pathways were affected in the low dose

  17. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics with Extended Dosing of CC-486 in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Cogle, Christopher R.; Gore, Steven D.; Hetzer, Joel; Kumar, Keshava; Skikne, Barry; MacBeth, Kyle J.

    2015-01-01

    CC-486 (oral azacitidine) is an epigenetic modifier in development for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia. In part 1 of this two-part study, a 7-day CC-486 dosing schedule showed clinical activity, was generally well tolerated, and reduced DNA methylation. Extending dosing of CC-486 beyond 7 days would increase duration of azacitidine exposure. We hypothesized that extended dosing would therefore provide more sustained epigenetic activity. Reported here are the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles of CC-486 extended dosing schedules in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from part 2 of this study. PK and/or PD data were available for 59 patients who were sequentially assigned to 1 of 4 extended CC-486 dosing schedules: 300mg once-daily or 200mg twice-daily for 14 or 21 days per 28-day cycle. Both 300mg once-daily schedules and the 200mg twice-daily 21-day schedule significantly (all P < .05) reduced global DNA methylation in whole blood at all measured time points (days 15, 22, and 28 of the treatment cycle), with sustained hypomethylation at cycle end compared with baseline. CC-486 exposures and reduced DNA methylation were significantly correlated. Patients who had a hematologic response had significantly greater methylation reductions than non-responding patients. These data demonstrate that extended dosing of CC-486 sustains epigenetic effects through the treatment cycle. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00528983 PMID:26296092

  18. The European Medicines Agency Review of Pomalidomide in Combination With Low-Dose Dexamethasone for the Treatment of Adult Patients With Multiple Myeloma: Summary of the Scientific Assessment of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Beatriz; Hemmings, Robert; Camarero, Jorge; Sancho-Lopez, Arantxa; Salmonson, Tomas; Gisselbrecht, Christian; Laane, Edward; Pignatti, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    On August 5, 2013, a marketing authorization valid throughout the European Union (EU) was issued for pomalidomide in combination with dexamethasone for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma (MM) who have received at least two prior treatment regimens, including both lenalidomide and bortezomib, and have demonstrated disease progression on the last therapy. Pomalidomide is an immunomodulating agent. The recommended starting dose of pomalidomide is 4 mg once daily taken on days 1–21 of repeated 28-day cycles. The main evidence of efficacy for pomalidomide in MM was based on a phase III multicenter, randomized, open-label study (CC-4047-MM-003) in which pomalidomide plus low-dose dexamethasone therapy (POM+LoDEX) was compared with high-dose dexamethasone alone (HiDEX) in previously treated adult patients with relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma who had received at least two prior treatment regimens, including both lenalidomide and bortezomib, and had demonstrated disease progression on the last therapy. For the intent-to-treat population, median progression-free survival based on International Myeloma Working Group criteria was 15.7 weeks (95% confidence interval [CI]: 13.0–20.1) in the POM+LoDEX group versus 8.0 weeks (95% CI: 7.0–9.0) in the HiDEX group (log-rank p value <.001). Overall survival (secondary endpoint) was also different in the two treatment groups (hazard ratio 0.53 [95% CI: 0.37–0.74]). The most commonly reported adverse reactions to pomalidomide in clinical studies were anemia (45.7%), neutropenia (45.3%) and thrombocytopenia (27%), fatigue (28.3%), pyrexia (21%), peripheral edema (13%), and infections including pneumonia (10.7%). Peripheral neuropathy adverse reactions were reported in 12.3% of patients, and venous embolic or thrombotic (VTE) adverse reactions were reported in 3.3% of patients. Pomalidomide is expected to be teratogenic. This paper summarizes the scientific review of the

  19. Stalled DNA Replication Forks at the Endogenous GAA Repeats Drive Repeat Expansion in Friedreich's Ataxia Cells.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Jeannine; Bhalla, Angela D; Butler, Jill Sergesketter; Puckett, James W; Dervan, Peter B; Rosenwaks, Zev; Napierala, Marek

    2016-08-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is caused by the expansion of GAA repeats located in the Frataxin (FXN) gene. The GAA repeats continue to expand in FRDA patients, aggravating symptoms and contributing to disease progression. The mechanism leading to repeat expansion and decreased FXN transcription remains unclear. Using single-molecule analysis of replicated DNA, we detected that expanded GAA repeats present a substantial obstacle for the replication machinery at the FXN locus in FRDA cells. Furthermore, aberrant origin activation and lack of a proper stress response to rescue the stalled forks in FRDA cells cause an increase in 3'-5' progressing forks, which could enhance repeat expansion and hinder FXN transcription by head-on collision with RNA polymerases. Treatment of FRDA cells with GAA-specific polyamides rescues DNA replication fork stalling and alleviates expansion of the GAA repeats, implicating DNA triplexes as a replication impediment and suggesting that fork stalling might be a therapeutic target for FRDA. PMID:27425605

  20. Automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeat markers

    SciTech Connect

    Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P. |

    1994-09-01

    The dinucleotide repeats (i.e., microsatellites) such as CA-repeats are a highly polymorphic, highly abundant class of PCR-amplifiable markers that have greatly streamlined genetic mapping experimentation. It is expected that over 30,000 such markers (including tri- and tetranucleotide repeats) will be characterized for routine use in the next few years. Since only size determination, and not sequencing, is required to determine alleles, in principle, dinucleotide repeat genotyping is easily performed on electrophoretic gels, and can be automated using DNA sequencers. Unfortunately, PCR stuttering with these markers generates not one band for each allele, but a pattern of bands. Since closely spaced alleles must be disambiguated by human scoring, this poses a key obstacle to full automation. We have developed methods that overcome this obstacle. Our model is that the observed data is generated by arithmetic superposition (i.e., convolution) of multiple allele patterns. By quantitatively measuring the size of each component band, and exploiting the unique stutter pattern associated with each marker, closely spaced alleles can be deconvolved; this unambiguously reconstructs the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} allele bands, with stutter artifact removed. We used this approach in a system for automated diagnosis of (X-linked) Duchenne muscular dystrophy; four multiplexed CA-repeats within the dystrophin gene were assayed on a DNA sequencer. Our method accurately detected small variations in gel migration that shifted the allele size estimate. In 167 nonmutated alleles, 89% (149/167) showed no size variation, 9% (15/167) showed 1 bp variation, and 2% (3/167) showed 2 bp variation. We are currently developing a library of dinucleotide repeat patterns; together with our deconvolution methods, this library will enable fully automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeats from sizing data.

  1. Repeated dose toxicity and relative potency of 1,2,3,4,6,7-hexachloronaphthalene (PCN 66) 1,2,3,5,6,7-hexachloronaphthalene (PCN 67) compared to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) for induction of CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and thymic atrophy in female Harlan Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Hooth, Michelle J.; Nyska, Abraham; Fomby, Laurene M.; Vasconcelos, Daphne Y.; Vallant, Molly; DeVito, Michael J.; Walker, Nigel J.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we assessed the relative toxicity and potency of the chlorinated naphthalenes 1,2,3,4,6,7-hexachloronaphthalene (PCN 66) and 1,2,3,5,6,7-hexachloronaphthalene (PCN 67) relative to that of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Chemicals were administered in corn oil:acetone (99:1) by gavage to female Harlan Sprague-Dawley rats at dosages of 0 (vehicle), 500, 1500, 5000, 50000 and 500000 ng/kg (PCN 66 and PCN 67) and 1, 3, 10, 100, and 300 ng/kg (TCDD) for 2 weeks. Histopathologic changes were observed in the thymus, liver and lung of TCDD treated animals and in the liver and thymus of PCN treated animals. Significant increases in CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 associated enzyme activity were observed in all animals exposed to TCDD, PCN 66 and PCN 67. Dose response modeling of CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and thymic atrophy gave ranges of estimated relative potencies, as compared to TCDD, of 0.0015-0.0072, for PCN 66 and 0.00029-0.00067 for PCN 67. Given that PCN 66 and PCN 67 exposure resulted in biochemical and histopathologic changes similar to that seen with TCDD, this suggests that they should be included in the WHO Toxic Equivalency Factor (TEF) scheme, although the estimated relative potencies indicate that these hexachlorinated naphthalenes should not contribute greatly to the overall human body burden of dioxin-like activity. PMID:22813907

  2. Preferential induction of the AhR gene battery in HepaRG cells after a single or repeated exposure to heterocyclic aromatic amines

    SciTech Connect

    Dumont, Julie Josse, Rozenn Lambert, Carine Antherieu, Sebastien Laurent, Veronique Loyer, Pascal Robin, Marie-Anne Guillouzo, Andre

    2010-11-15

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) are two of the most common heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA) produced during cooking of meat, fish and poultry. Both HAA produce different tumor profiles in rodents and are suspected to be carcinogenic in humans. In order to better understand the molecular basis of HAA toxicity, we have analyzed gene expression profiles in the metabolically competent human HepaRG cells using pangenomic oligonucleotide microarrays, after either a single (24-h) or a repeated (28-day) exposure to 10 {mu}M PhIP or MeIQx. The most responsive genes to both HAA were downstream targets of the arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR): CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 after both time points and CYP1B1 and ALDH3A1 after 28 days. Accordingly, CYP1A1/1A2 induction in HAA-treated HepaRG cells was prevented by chemical inhibition or small interference RNA-mediated down-regulation of the AhR. Consistently, HAA induced activity of the CYP1A1 promoter, which contains a consensus AhR-related xenobiotic-responsive element (XRE). In addition, several other genes exhibited both time-dependent and compound-specific expression changes with, however, a smaller magnitude than previously reported for the prototypical AhR target genes. These changes concerned genes mainly related to cell growth and proliferation, apoptosis, and cancer. In conclusion, these results identify the AhR gene battery as the preferential target of PhIP and MeIQx in HepaRG cells and further support the hypothesis that intake of HAA in diet might increase human cancer risk.

  3. Culmination of Low-Dose Pesticide Effects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pesticides applied in agriculture can affect the structure and function of nontarget populations at lower doses and for longer timespans than predicted by the current risk assessment frameworks. We identified a mechanism for this observation. The populations of an aquatic invertebrate (Culex pipiens) exposed over several generations to repeated pulses of low concentrations of the neonicotinoid insecticide (thiacloprid) continuously declined and did not recover in the presence of a less sensitive competing species (Daphnia magna). By contrast, in the absence of a competitor, insecticide effects on the more sensitive species were only observed at concentrations 1 order of magnitude higher, and the species recovered more rapidly after a contamination event. The underlying processes are experimentally identified and reconstructed using a simulation model. We conclude that repeated toxicant pulse of populations that are challenged with interspecific competition may result in a multigenerational culmination of low-dose effects. PMID:23859631

  4. Variable efficacy of repeated annual influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Smith, D J; Forrest, S; Ackley, D H; Perelson, A S

    1999-11-23

    Conclusions have differed in studies that have compared vaccine efficacy in groups receiving influenza vaccine for the first time to efficacy in groups vaccinated more than once. For example, the Hoskins study [Hoskins, T. W., Davis, J. R., Smith, A. J., Miller, C. L. & Allchin, A. (1979) Lancet i, 33-35] concluded that repeat vaccination was not protective in the long term, whereas the Keitel study [Keitel, W. A., Cate, T. R., Couch, R. B., Huggins, L. L. & Hess, K. R. (1997) Vaccine 15, 1114-1122] concluded that repeat vaccination provided continual protection. We propose an explanation, the antigenic distance hypothesis, and test it by analyzing seven influenza outbreaks that occurred during the Hoskins and Keitel studies. The hypothesis is that variation in repeat vaccine efficacy is due to differences in antigenic distances among vaccine strains and between the vaccine strains and the epidemic strain in each outbreak. To test the hypothesis, antigenic distances were calculated from historical hemagglutination inhibition assay tables, and a computer model of the immune response was used to predict the vaccine efficacy of individuals given different vaccinations. The model accurately predicted the observed vaccine efficacies in repeat vaccinees relative to the efficacy in first-time vaccinees (correlation 0.87). Thus, the antigenic distance hypothesis offers a parsimonious explanation of the differences between and within the Hoskins and Keitel studies. These results have implications for the selection of influenza vaccine strains, and also for vaccination strategies for other antigenically variable pathogens that might require repeated vaccination. PMID:10570188

  5. Quantum key distribution over probabilistic quantum repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirloo, Jeyran; Razavi, Mohsen; Majedi, A. Hamed

    2010-09-01

    A feasible route toward implementing long-distance quantum key distribution (QKD) systems relies on probabilistic schemes for entanglement distribution and swapping as proposed in the work of Duan, Lukin, Cirac, and Zoller (DLCZ) [Nature (London)NATUAS0028-083610.1038/35106500 414, 413 (2001)]. Here, we calculate the conditional throughput and fidelity of entanglement for DLCZ quantum repeaters by accounting for the DLCZ self-purification property in the presence of multiple excitations in the ensemble memories as well as loss and other sources of inefficiency in the channel and measurement modules. We then use our results to find the generation rate of secure key bits for QKD systems that rely on DLCZ quantum repeaters. We compare the key generation rate per logical memory employed in the two cases with and without a repeater node. We find the crossover distance beyond which the repeater system outperforms the nonrepeater one. That provides us with the optimum internode distancing in quantum repeater systems. We also find the optimal excitation probability at which the QKD rate peaks. Such an optimum probability, in most regimes of interest, is insensitive to the total distance.

  6. Repeatability and heritability of response to superovulation in Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Tonhati, H; Lôbo, R B; Oliveira, H N

    1999-04-15

    The objective of this study was to estimate the relative effects of genetic and phenotypic factors on the efficacy and efficiency of superovulation for Holstein-Friesian cows reared in Brazil. A database, established by the Associacao Brasileira de Criadores de Bovinos da Raca Holandesa, consisting of a total of 5387 superovulations of 2941 cows distributed over 473 herds and sired by 690 bulls was used for the analysis. The records were analyzed by MTDFREML (Multiple Trait Derivative-Free Restricted Maximum Likelihood), using a repeatability animal model. The fixed effects included in the model were contemporaneous group (veterinarian, herd, year and season of the superovulation); number of semen doses; cow age; and superovulation order. The estimated repeatability of the number of the transferable embryos was low (0.13), and the estimated heritability was 0.03. These results indicate that environmental factors play a critical role in the response of a cow to a superovulation treatment. There is little evidence that future responses to superovulation by individual females can be predicted by previous treatment(s) or that superovulation response is an heritable trait. PMID:10729033

  7. Rate analysis for a hybrid quantum repeater

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardes, Nadja K.; Loock, Peter van

    2011-01-15

    We present a detailed rate analysis for a hybrid quantum repeater assuming perfect memories and using optimal probabilistic entanglement generation and deterministic swapping routines. The hybrid quantum repeater protocol is based on atomic qubit-entanglement distribution through optical coherent-state communication. An exact, analytical formula for the rates of entanglement generation in quantum repeaters is derived, including a study on the impacts of entanglement purification and multiplexing strategies. More specifically, we consider scenarios with as little purification as possible and we show that for sufficiently low local losses, such purifications are still more powerful than multiplexing. In a possible experimental scenario, our hybrid system can create near-maximally entangled (F=0.98) pairs over a distance of 1280 km at rates of the order of 100 Hz.

  8. Do gamma-ray burst sources repeat?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles A.; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Brainerd, J. J.; Briggs, Michael S.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald; Blumenthal, George; Brock, Martin

    1995-01-01

    The demonstration of repeated gamma-ray bursts from an individual source would severely constrain burst source models. Recent reports (Quashnock and Lamb, 1993; Wang and Lingenfelter, 1993) of evidence for repetition in the first BATSE burst catalog have generated renewed interest in this issue. Here, we analyze the angular distribution of 585 bursts of the second BATSE catalog (Meegan et al., 1994). We search for evidence of burst recurrence using the nearest and farthest neighbor statistic and the two-point angular correlation function. We find the data to be consistent with the hypothesis that burst sources do not repeat; however, a repeater fraction of up to about 20% of the observed bursts cannot be excluded.

  9. Nucleic acid recognition by tandem helical repeats.

    PubMed

    Rubinson, Emily H; Eichman, Brandt F

    2012-02-01

    Protein domains constructed from tandem α-helical repeats have until recently been primarily associated with protein scaffolds or RNA recognition. Recent crystal structures of human mitochondrial termination factor MTERF1 and Bacillus cereus alkylpurine DNA glycosylase AlkD bound to DNA revealed two new superhelical tandem repeat architectures capable of wrapping around the double helix in unique ways. Unlike DNA sequence recognition motifs that rely mainly on major groove read-out, MTERF and ALK motifs locate target sequences and aberrant nucleotides within DNA by resculpting the double-helix through extensive backbone contacts. Comparisons between MTERF and ALK repeats, together with recent advances in ssRNA recognition by Pumilio/FBF (PUF) domains, provide new insights into the fundamental principles of protein-nucleic acid recognition. PMID:22154606

  10. The puzzle of the triple repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Morell, V.

    1993-06-04

    Two years ago, when researchers discovered the gene that causes a hereditary form of mental retardation known as fragile-X syndrome, they also turned up a mutation so unexpected geneticists are still scratching their heads over it. The defect, which makes genes balloon in size by adding extra copies of a three base-pair repeated sequence of DNA, was the first of its kind. Despite decades of study, nothing like it had ever been seen in any of the species that laid the foundations for modern genetics: bacteria, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, and the mouse. The mutations caused by these expanding trinucleotide repeats turned out be common causes of human disease. In the past 2 years, they have been fingered as the culprits in three hereditary disorders besides fragile-X syndrome: myotronic dystrophy, spinobullar muscular atrophy (also known as Kennedy's disease), and just this March-Huntington's disease. The FMR-1 gene, which is the one at fault in fragile-X syndrome, shows just how much the trinucleotide repeats can expand. The normal gene carries at most 50 copies of the CGG trinucleotide. But in children who inherit the gene from these carriers and actually develop mental retardation and the other fragile-X symptoms, the FMR-1 gene may have hundreds to thousands of CGG repeats. Huge expansions of another trinucleotide repeat (CTG) can also occur from one generation to the next in the gene that causes myotonic dystrophy (DM), while smaller, although no less devastating, expansions in the CAG trinucleotide repeat lead to Huntington's and Kennedy's diseases.

  11. Dose sculpting with generalized equivalent uniform dose

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Qiuwen; Djajaputra, David; Liu, Helen H.; Dong Lei; Mohan, Radhe; Wu, Yan

    2005-05-01

    With intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), a variety of user-defined dose distribution can be produced using inverse planning. The generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) has been used in IMRT optimization as an alternative objective function to the conventional dose-volume-based criteria. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of gEUD optimization to fine tune the dose distributions of IMRT plans. We analyzed the effect of gEUD-based optimization parameters on plan quality. The objective was to determine whether dose distribution to selected structures could be improved using gEUD optimization without adversely altering the doses delivered to other structures, as in sculpting. We hypothesized that by carefully defining gEUD parameters (EUD{sub 0} and n) based on the current dose distributions, the optimization system could be instructed to search for alternative solutions in the neighborhood, and we could maintain the dose distributions for structures already satisfactory and improve dose for structures that need enhancement. We started with an already acceptable IMRT plan optimized with any objective function. The dose distribution was analyzed first. For structures that dose should not be changed, a higher value of n was used and EUD{sub 0} was set slightly higher/lower than the EUD value at the current dose distribution for critical structures/targets. For structures that needed improvement in dose, a higher to medium value of n was used, and EUD{sub 0} was set to the EUD value or slightly lower/higher for the critical structure/target at the current dose distribution. We evaluated this method in one clinical case each of head and neck, lung and prostate cancer. Dose volume histograms, isodose distributions, and relevant tolerance doses for critical structures were used for the assessment. We found that by adjusting gEUD optimization parameters, the dose distribution could be improved with only a few iterations. A larger value of n

  12. Absorbed Dose and Dose Equivalent Calculations for Modeling Effective Dose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Andrew; Lee, Kerry

    2010-01-01

    While in orbit, Astronauts are exposed to a much higher dose of ionizing radiation than when on the ground. It is important to model how shielding designs on spacecraft reduce radiation effective dose pre-flight, and determine whether or not a danger to humans is presented. However, in order to calculate effective dose, dose equivalent calculations are needed. Dose equivalent takes into account an absorbed dose of radiation and the biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation. This is important in preventing long-term, stochastic radiation effects in humans spending time in space. Monte carlo simulations run with the particle transport code FLUKA, give absorbed and equivalent dose data for relevant shielding. The shielding geometry used in the dose calculations is a layered slab design, consisting of aluminum, polyethylene, and water. Water is used to simulate the soft tissues that compose the human body. The results obtained will provide information on how the shielding performs with many thicknesses of each material in the slab. This allows them to be directly applicable to modern spacecraft shielding geometries.

  13. Structures of designed armadillo-repeat proteins show propagation of inter-repeat interface effects

    PubMed Central

    Reichen, Christian; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Hansen, Simon; Grütter, Markus G.; Plückthun, Andreas; Mittl, Peer R. E.

    2016-01-01

    The armadillo repeat serves as a scaffold for the development of modular peptide-recognition modules. In order to develop such a system, three crystal structures of designed armadillo-repeat proteins with third-generation N-caps (YIII-type), four or five internal repeats (M-type) and second-generation C-caps (AII-type) were determined at 1.8 Å (His-YIIIM4AII), 2.0 Å (His-YIIIM5AII) and 1.95 Å (YIIIM5AII) resolution and compared with those of variants with third-generation C-caps. All constructs are full consensus designs in which the internal repeats have exactly the same sequence, and hence identical conformations of the internal repeats are expected. The N-cap and internal repeats M1 to M3 are indeed extremely similar, but the comparison reveals structural differences in internal repeats M4 and M5 and the C-cap. These differences are caused by long-range effects of the C-cap, contacting molecules in the crystal, and the intrinsic design of the repeat. Unfortunately, the rigid-body movement of the C-terminal part impairs the regular arrangement of internal repeats that forms the putative peptide-binding site. The second-generation C-cap improves the packing of buried residues and thereby the stability of the protein. These considerations are useful for future improvements of an armadillo-repeat-based peptide-recognition system. PMID:26894544

  14. Structures of designed armadillo-repeat proteins show propagation of inter-repeat interface effects.

    PubMed

    Reichen, Christian; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Hansen, Simon; Grütter, Markus G; Plückthun, Andreas; Mittl, Peer R E

    2016-01-01

    The armadillo repeat serves as a scaffold for the development of modular peptide-recognition modules. In order to develop such a system, three crystal structures of designed armadillo-repeat proteins with third-generation N-caps (YIII-type), four or five internal repeats (M-type) and second-generation C-caps (AII-type) were determined at 1.8 Å (His-YIIIM4AII), 2.0 Å (His-YIIIM5AII) and 1.95 Å (YIIIM5AII) resolution and compared with those of variants with third-generation C-caps. All constructs are full consensus designs in which the internal repeats have exactly the same sequence, and hence identical conformations of the internal repeats are expected. The N-cap and internal repeats M1 to M3 are indeed extremely similar, but the comparison reveals structural differences in internal repeats M4 and M5 and the C-cap. These differences are caused by long-range effects of the C-cap, contacting molecules in the crystal, and the intrinsic design of the repeat. Unfortunately, the rigid-body movement of the C-terminal part impairs the regular arrangement of internal repeats that forms the putative peptide-binding site. The second-generation C-cap improves the packing of buried residues and thereby the stability of the protein. These considerations are useful for future improvements of an armadillo-repeat-based peptide-recognition system. PMID:26894544

  15. Tenderness of pasture versus grain fed beef aged 14 and 28 days

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumer interest in pasture versus grain fed beef has been on the rise in recent years. This interest could be sparked by the public’s concerns of beef management techniques and processing impacts on the nutrition and safety of their food, as well as the environmental impact of each management type...

  16. Perfluorooctanoic acid exposure for 28 days affects glucose homeostasis and induces insulin hypersensitivity in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shengmin; Zhang, Hongxia; Zheng, Fei; Sheng, Nan; Guo, Xuejiang; Dai, Jiayin

    2015-06-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are widely used in many applications due to their unique physical and chemical characteristics. Because of the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndromes, including obesity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, concern has arisen about the roles of environmental pollutants in such diseases. Earlier epidemiologic studies showed a potential association between perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and glucose metabolism, but how PFOA influences glucose homeostasis is still unknown. Here, we report on the modulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-serine/threonine protein kinase (PI3K-AKT) signaling pathway in the livers of mice after 28 d of exposure to PFOA. Compared with normal mice, PFOA exposure significantly decreased the expression of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) protein and affected the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway in the liver. Tolerance tests further indicated that PFOA exposure induced higher insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in mice. Biochemical analysis revealed that PFOA exposure reduced hepatic glycogen synthesis, which might be attributed to gluconeogenesis inhibition. The levels of several circulating proteins were altered after PFOA exposure, including proteins potentially related to diabetes and liver disease. Our results suggest that PFOA affected glucose metabolism and induced insulin hypersensitivity in mice.

  17. Changes in body fluid compartments during a 28-day bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortney, Suzanne M.; Hyatt, Kenneth H.; Davis, John E.; Vogel, John M.

    1991-01-01

    Serial isotope measurements were used to obtain measurements of the body fluid responses of 10 22-29-year-old men during 28 d of simulated microgravity (bed rest). The subjects were maintained on a controlled metabolic diet for 7 d before the study, during 14 d of ambulatory control, 28 d of horizontal bed rest, and 14 d of ambulant recovery. Fluid compartments were measured on control days 1 and 9, bed rest days 2, 14, and 28, and recovery days 7 and 14. By day 2 of bed rest, plasma volume and extracellular volume (ECV) decreased significantly by an average 209 and 533 ml, respectively. Red cell volume and total body water (TBW) decreased more slowly, with average losses of 128 and 1316 ml, respectively, after 28 d of bed rest. Early in the bed rest, TBW loss was mostly from the ECV. Thereafter, the TBW deficit was derived from the intracellular compartment, which decreased an average of 838 ml after 28 d. These results suggest losses from all fluid compartments during bed rest, with no evidence of restoration of ECV after 1-2 weeks.

  18. Jet fuel kerosene is not immunosuppressive in mice or rats following inhalation for 28 days.

    PubMed

    White, Kimber L; DeLorme, Michael P; Beatty, Patrick W; Smith, Matthew J; Peachee, Vanessa L

    2013-01-01

    Previous reports indicated that inhalation of JP-8 aviation turbine fuel is immunosuppressive. However, in some of those studies, the exposure concentrations were underestimated, and percent of test article as vapor or aerosol was not determined. Furthermore, it is unknown whether the observed effects are attributable to the base hydrocarbon fuel (jet fuel kerosene) or to the various fuel additives in jet fuels. The present studies were conducted, in compliance with Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations, to evaluate the effects of jet fuel kerosene on the immune system, in conjunction with an accurate, quantitative characterization of the aerosol and vapor exposure concentrations. Two female rodent species (B6C3F1 mice and Crl:CD rats) were exposed by nose-only inhalation to jet fuel kerosene at targeted concentrations of 0, 500, 1000, or 2000 mg/m(3) for 6 h daily for 28 d. Humoral, cell-mediated, and innate immune functions were subsequently evaluated. No marked effects were observed in either species on body weights, spleen or thymus weights, the T-dependent antibody-forming cell response (plaque assay), or the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response. With a few exceptions, spleen cell numbers and phenotypes were also unaffected. Natural killer (NK) cell activity in mice was unaffected, while the NK assessment in rats was not usable due to an unusually low response in all groups. These studies demonstrate that inhalation of jet fuel kerosene for 28 d at levels up to 2000 mg/m(3) did not adversely affect the functional immune responses of female mice and rats. PMID:24028664

  19. Jet Fuel Kerosene is not Immunosuppressive in Mice or Rats Following Inhalation for 28 Days

    PubMed Central

    White, Kimber L.; DeLorme, Michael P.; Beatty, Patrick W.; Smith, Matthew J.; Peachee, Vanessa L.

    2013-01-01

    Previous reports indicated that inhalation of JP-8 aviation turbine fuel is immunosuppressive. However, in some of those studies, the exposure concentrations were underestimated, and percent of test article as vapor or aerosol was not determined. Furthermore, it is unknown whether the observed effects are attributable to the base hydrocarbon fuel (jet fuel kerosene) or to the various fuel additives in jet fuels. The present studies were conducted, in compliance with Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations, to evaluate the effects of jet fuel kerosene on the immune system, in conjunction with an accurate, quantitative characterization of the aerosol and vapor exposure concentrations. Two female rodent species (B6C3F1 mice and Crl:CD rats) were exposed by nose-only inhalation to jet fuel kerosene at targeted concentrations of 0, 500, 1000, or 2000 mg/m3 for 6 h daily for 28 d. Humoral, cell-mediated, and innate immune functions were subsequently evaluated. No marked effects were observed in either species on body weights, spleen or thymus weights, the T-dependent antibody-forming cell response (plaque assay), or the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response. With a few exceptions, spleen cell numbers and phenotypes were also unaffected. Natural killer (NK) cell activity in mice was unaffected, while the NK assessment in rats was not usable due to an unusually low response in all groups. These studies demonstrate that inhalation of jet fuel kerosene for 28 d at levels up to 2000 mg/m3 did not adversely affect the functional immune responses of female mice and rats. PMID:24028664

  20. Perfluorooctanoic acid exposure for 28 days affects glucose homeostasis and induces insulin hypersensitivity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shengmin; Zhang, Hongxia; Zheng, Fei; Sheng, Nan; Guo, Xuejiang; Dai, Jiayin

    2015-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are widely used in many applications due to their unique physical and chemical characteristics. Because of the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndromes, including obesity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, concern has arisen about the roles of environmental pollutants in such diseases. Earlier epidemiologic studies showed a potential association between perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and glucose metabolism, but how PFOA influences glucose homeostasis is still unknown. Here, we report on the modulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-serine/threonine protein kinase (PI3K-AKT) signaling pathway in the livers of mice after 28 d of exposure to PFOA. Compared with normal mice, PFOA exposure significantly decreased the expression of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) protein and affected the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway in the liver. Tolerance tests further indicated that PFOA exposure induced higher insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in mice. Biochemical analysis revealed that PFOA exposure reduced hepatic glycogen synthesis, which might be attributed to gluconeogenesis inhibition. The levels of several circulating proteins were altered after PFOA exposure, including proteins potentially related to diabetes and liver disease. Our results suggest that PFOA affected glucose metabolism and induced insulin hypersensitivity in mice. PMID:26066376

  1. Benchmark Dose Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Finite doses are employed in experimental toxicology studies. Under the traditional methodology, the point of departure (POD) value for low dose extrapolation is identified as one of these doses. Dose spacing necessarily precludes a more accurate description of the POD value. ...

  2. Fast range-corrected proton dose approximation method using prior dose distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Peter C.; Cheung, Joey; Zhu, X. Ronald; Sahoo, Narayan; Court, Laurence; Dong, Lei

    2012-06-01

    For robust plan optimization and evaluation purposes, one needs a computationally efficient way to calculate dose distributions and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) under various changes in the variables associated with beam delivery and images. In this study, we report an approximate method for rapid calculation of dose when setup errors and anatomical changes occur during proton therapy. This fast dose approximation method calculates new dose distributions under various circumstances based on the prior knowledge of dose distribution from a reference setting. In order to validate the method, we calculated and compared the dose distributions from our approximation method to the dose distributions calculated from a clinically commissioned treatment planning system which was used as the ground truth. The overall accuracy of the proposed method was tested against varying degrees of setup error and anatomical deformation for selected patient cases. The setup error was simulated by rigid shifts of the patient; while the anatomical deformation was introduced using weekly acquired repeat CT data sets. We evaluated the agreement between the dose approximation method and full dose recalculation using a 3D gamma index and the root-mean-square (RMS) and maximum deviation of the cumulative dose volume histograms (cDVHs). The average passing rate of 3D gamma analysis under 3% dose and 3 mm distance-to-agreement criteria were 96% and 89% for setup errors and severe anatomy changes, respectively. The average of RMS and maximum deviation of the cDVHs under the setup error was 0.5% and 1.5%, respectively for all structures considered. Similarly, the average of RMS and maximum deviations under the weekly anatomical change were 0.6% and 2.7%, respectively. Our results show that the fast dose approximation method was able to account for the density variation of the patient due to the setup and anatomical changes with acceptable accuracy while significantly improving the computation time.

  3. Open-label trial of three dosage regimens of fixed-dose combination of artemisinin and naphthoquine for treating uncomplicated falciparum malaria in calabar, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of anti-malarial drug combinations with artemisinin, or with one of its derivatives, is now widely recommended to overcome drug resistance in falciparum malaria. Fixed-dose combination of artemisinin and naphthoquine is a new generation artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) offered as a single dose therapy. The aim of the study was to assess the therapeutic efficacy, safety and tolerability of three dosage schedules of fixed-dose combination of artemisinin (125 mg) and naphthoquine (50 mg) for treating uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria among adolescents and adults in Calabar, South-east Nigeria. Method A total of 121 patients aged ≥15 years with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria were enrolled and randomly assigned to three dosage schedules: (A) 700 mg (four tablets) single dose; (B) 700 mg 12-hourly x two doses; and (C) 1,400 mg (eight tablets) single dose. Patients were observed for 28 days, with clinical, parasitological, and haematological assessments. Results A total of 108 patients completed the study. The overall 28-day cure rate was 88.9%. Day 28-cure rates of the three dosage schedules were 85.3%, 93.1% and 88.9% for Group A, B and C respectively. Adverse events were few and mild, the commonest being weakness and headache; there was no serious adverse event. Conclusion Concerns for emergence of parasite resistance due to the use of artemisinin-naphthoquine as single dose regimen is likely to compromise the usefulness of this potentially important combination treatment. A robust multi-centre trial is recommended to evaluate a three-day regimen with potentials to achieve high cure rates while minimizing the risk of emergence of resistant parasite strains. PMID:23232095

  4. Phase I/II Study of Sorafenib in Combination with Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy Using Low-Dose Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Ueshima, Kazuomi; Kudo, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Kumada, Takashi; Chung, Hobyung; Hagiwara, Satoru; Inoue, Tatsuo; Yada, Norihisa; Kitai, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a phase I/II study in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) to determine the recommended dose, as well as the safety and efficacy, of combination therapy of sorafenib with hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) using low dose cisplatin (CDDP) and 5-fluorouracil (5FU). Cohorts consisting of 3-6 patients with HCC received an escalated dose of CDDP and 5-FU until a maximum-tolerated dose was achieved. The treatment regimen was as follows: oral administration of sorafenib (400 mg twice daily for 28 days) combined with HAIC using CDDP (14-20 mg/m2, on days 1 and 8) and 5-FU (170-330 mg/m2, continuously on days 1-5 and 8-12) via an implanted catheter system). Each treatment cycle consisted of 28 days and three cycles of combination therapy. At the end of the first cycle, adverse events were evaluated and future dose escalation was determined. Eighteen patients with advanced HCC were enrolled. Dose-limiting toxicity was observed in two patients from cohort 1 (erythema multiforme and grade 4 thrombocytopenia) and in one patient from cohort 2 (erythema multiforme). Seven of the 18 patients achieved a partial response, seven showed stable disease, two were diagnosed as progressive disease, and two were not assessable. The response rate was 38.9% and the disease control rate was 77.8%. The time-to-progression was 9.7 months and the 1-year survival rate was 88.2%. Oral administration of 400 mg of sorafenib twice daily, 20 mg/m2 of intra-arterial infusion of CDDP, and 5-FU at 330 mg/m2 are the recommended doses for combination therapy, which was well tolerated and efficacious. This combination therapy may be a promising treatment for patients with advanced HCC. A large prospective randomized multicenter study (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01214343) is ongoing. PMID:26734580

  5. Cumulative Intertrial Inhibition in Repeated Visual Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takeda, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    In the present study the author examined visual search when the items remain visible across trials but the location of the target varies. Reaction times for inefficient search cumulatively increased with increasing numbers of repeated search trials, suggesting that inhibition for distractors carried over successive trials. This intertrial…

  6. Human adaptation to repeated cold immersions.

    PubMed Central

    Golden, F S; Tipton, M J

    1988-01-01

    1. The present investigation was designed to examine human adaptation to intermittent severe cold exposure and to assess the effect of exercise on any adaptation obtained. 2. Sixteen subjects were divided into two equal groups. Each subject performed ten head-out immersions; two into thermoneutral water which was then cooled until they shivered vigorously, and eight into water at 15 degrees C for 40 min. During the majority of the 15 degrees C immersions, one group (dynamic group) exercised whilst the other (static group) rested. 3. Results showed that both groups responded to repeated cold immersions with a reduction in their initial responses to cold. The time course of these reductions varied, however, between responses. 4. Only the static group developed a reduced metabolic response to prolonged resting immersion. 5. It is concluded that repeated resting exposure to cold was the more effective way of producing an adaptation. The performance of exercise during repeated exposure to cold prevented the development of an adaptive reduction in the metabolic response to cold during a subsequent resting immersion. In addition, many of the adaptations obtained during repeated resting exposure were overridden or masked during a subsequent exercising immersion. PMID:3411500

  7. History repeats itself: genomic divergence in copepods.

    PubMed

    Renaut, Sébastien; Dion-Côté, Anne-Marie

    2016-04-01

    Press stop, erase everything from now till some arbitrary time in the past and start recording life as it evolves once again. Would you see the same tape of life playing itself over and over, or would a different story unfold every time? The late Steven Jay Gould called this experiment replaying the tape of life and argued that any replay of the tape would lead evolution down a pathway radically different from the road actually taken (Gould 1989). This thought experiment has puzzled evolutionary biologists for a long time: how repeatable are evolutionary events? And if history does indeed repeat itself, what are the factors that may help us predict the path taken? A powerful means to address these questions at a small evolutionary scale is to study closely related populations that have evolved independently, under similar environmental conditions. This is precisely what Pereira et al. () set out to do using marine copepods Tigriopus californicus, and present their results in this issue of Molecular Ecology. They show that evolution can be repeatable and even partly predictable, at least at the molecular level. As expected from theory, patterns of divergence were shaped by natural selection. At the same time, strong genetic drift due to small population sizes also constrained evolution down a similar evolutionary road, and probably contributed to repeatable patterns of genomic divergence. PMID:27012819

  8. The Effect of Repeaters on Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, HeeKyoung; Kolen, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Test equating might be affected by including in the equating analyses examinees who have taken the test previously. This study evaluated the effect of including such repeaters on Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) equating using a population invariance approach. Three-parameter logistic (3-PL) item response theory (IRT) true score and…

  9. Epigenetics and Triplet-Repeat Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nageshwaran, Sathiji; Festenstein, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The term “junk DNA” has been reconsidered following the delineation of the functional significance of repetitive DNA regions. Typically associated with centromeres and telomeres, DNA repeats are found in nearly all organisms throughout their genomes. Repetitive regions are frequently heterochromatinized resulting in silencing of intrinsic and nearby genes. However, this is not a uniform rule, with several genes known to require such an environment to permit transcription. Repetitive regions frequently exist as dinucleotide, trinucleotide, and tetranucleotide repeats. The association between repetitive regions and disease was emphasized following the discovery of abnormal trinucleotide repeats underlying spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy’s disease) and fragile X syndrome of mental retardation (FRAXA) in 1991. In this review, we provide a brief overview of epigenetic mechanisms and then focus on several diseases caused by DNA triplet-repeat expansions, which exhibit diverse epigenetic effects. It is clear that the emerging field of epigenetics is already generating novel potential therapeutic avenues for this group of largely incurable diseases. PMID:26733936

  10. A Structured Group Program for Repeat Dieters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Kathleen

    1989-01-01

    Describes a structured group program for women who repeatedly diet and may be at risk of developing more serious eating disorders. Discusses sessions focusing on eating behavior as well as internal factors that contribute to low body esteem and food and weight preoccupation. Evaluates effectiveness of program by self-reports of members of two…

  11. Repeated Transmissions In Mobile/Satellite Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Tsun-Yee; Clare, Loren P.

    1988-01-01

    Repetition increases throughput and decreases delay. Paper discusses theoretical performance of communication system for land-mobile stations with satellite relay using ALOHA random-access protocol modified for repeated transimssions. Methods and conclusions contribute to general understanding of packet communications in fading channels.

  12. Y Se Repite = And It Repeats Itself

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzew, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses Y Se Repite [And It Repeats Itself], a project she conceptualized due to the growing number of Latino/a Mexican migrant workers in dairy farms in the state of Vermont. In 2006, approximately 2,000 Latinos/as--most of them undocumented Mexican migrant workers--worked throughout the state's dairy farms, yet…

  13. Epigenetics and Triplet-Repeat Neurological Diseases.

    PubMed

    Nageshwaran, Sathiji; Festenstein, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The term "junk DNA" has been reconsidered following the delineation of the functional significance of repetitive DNA regions. Typically associated with centromeres and telomeres, DNA repeats are found in nearly all organisms throughout their genomes. Repetitive regions are frequently heterochromatinized resulting in silencing of intrinsic and nearby genes. However, this is not a uniform rule, with several genes known to require such an environment to permit transcription. Repetitive regions frequently exist as dinucleotide, trinucleotide, and tetranucleotide repeats. The association between repetitive regions and disease was emphasized following the discovery of abnormal trinucleotide repeats underlying spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease) and fragile X syndrome of mental retardation (FRAXA) in 1991. In this review, we provide a brief overview of epigenetic mechanisms and then focus on several diseases caused by DNA triplet-repeat expansions, which exhibit diverse epigenetic effects. It is clear that the emerging field of epigenetics is already generating novel potential therapeutic avenues for this group of largely incurable diseases. PMID:26733936

  14. Is Retrieval Mediated after Repeated Testing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kole, James A.; Healy, Alice F.

    2013-01-01

    In 2 main experiments, the mediated priming effect was used to determine whether retrieval continues to be mediated after repeated testing. In each experiment, participants used the keyword method to learn French vocabulary, then completed a modified lexical decision task in which they first translated a French word, and then made a lexical…

  15. Repeat abortions in New York City, 2010.

    PubMed

    Toprani, Amita; Cadwell, Betsy L; Li, Wenhui; Sackoff, Judith; Greene, Carolyn; Begier, Elizabeth

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to describe factors associated with the number of past abortions obtained by New York City (NYC) abortion patients in 2010. We calculated rates of first and repeat abortion by age, race/ethnicity, and neighborhood-level poverty and the mean number of self-reported past abortions by age, race/ethnicity, neighborhood-level poverty, number of living children, education, payment method, marital status, and nativity. We used negative binomial regression to predict number of past abortions by patient characteristics. Of the 76,614 abortions reported for NYC residents in 2010, 57% were repeat abortions. Repeat abortions comprised >50% of total abortions among the majority of sociodemographic groups we examined. Overall, mean number of past abortions was 1.3. Mean number of past abortions was higher for women aged 30-34 years (1.77), women with ≥5 children (2.50), and black non-Hispanic women (1.52). After multivariable regression, age, race/ethnicity, and number of children were the strongest predictors of number of past abortions. This analysis demonstrates that, although socioeconomic disparities exist, all abortion patients are at high risk for repeat unintended pregnancy and abortion. PMID:25779755

  16. Building Fluency through the Repeated Reading Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    For the last two years the author has used Repeated Reading (RR) to teach reading fluency in English as a Foreign Language classrooms in colleges and universities in Japan. RR is a method where the student reads and rereads a text silently or aloud from two to four times to reach a predetermined level of speed, accuracy, and comprehension. RR…

  17. Repeater For A Digital-Communication Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Guzman, Esteban; Olson, Stephen; Heaps, Tim

    1993-01-01

    Digital repeater circuit designed to extend range of communication on MIL-STD-1553 bus beyond original maximum allowable length of 300 ft. Circuit provides two-way communication, one way at time, and conforms to specifications of MIL-STD-1553. Crosstalk and instability eliminated.

  18. Testing Multiple Outcomes in Repeated Measures Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lix, Lisa M.; Sajobi, Tolulope

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates procedures for controlling the familywise error rate (FWR) when testing hypotheses about multiple, correlated outcome variables in repeated measures (RM) designs. A content analysis of RM research articles published in 4 psychology journals revealed that 3 quarters of studies tested hypotheses about 2 or more outcome…

  19. Blood Donation by Elderly Repeat Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Zeiler, Thomas; Lander-Kox, Jutta; Alt, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Upper age limits for blood donors are intended to protect elderly blood donors from donor reactions. However, due to a lack of data about adverse reactions in elderly blood donors, upper age limits are arbitrary and vary considerably between different countries. Methods Here we present data from 171,231 voluntary repeat whole blood donors beyond the age of 68 years. Results Blood donations from repeat blood donors beyond the age of 68 years increased from 2,114 in 2005 to 38,432 in 2012 (from 0,2% to 4.2% of all whole blood donations). Adverse donor reactions in repeat donors decreased with age and were lower than in the whole group (0.26%), even in donors older than 71 years (0.16%). However, from the age of 68 years, the time to complete recovery after donor reactions increased. Donor deferrals were highest in young blood donors (21.4%), but increased again in elderly blood donors beyond 71 years (12.6%). Conclusion Blood donation by regular repeat blood donors older than 71 years may be safely continued. However, due to a lack of data for donors older than 75 years, blood donation in these donors should be handled with great caution. PMID:25254019

  20. New Fixed-Dose Artesunate-Mefloquine Formulation against Multidrug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum in Adults: a Comparative Phase IIb Safety and Pharmacokinetic Study with Standard-Dose Nonfixed Artesunate plus Mefloquine▿

    PubMed Central

    Krudsood, S.; Looareesuwan, S.; Tangpukdee, N.; Wilairatana, P.; Phumratanaprapin, W.; Leowattana, W.; Chalermrut, K.; Ramanathan, S.; Navaratnam, V.; Olliaro, P.; Vaillant, M.; Kiechel, J. R.; Taylor, W. R. J.

    2010-01-01

    A new fixed-dose artesunate (AS)-mefloquine (MQ) was assessed in adults hospitalized for 28 days with uncomplicated drug-resistant falciparum malaria. The patients (n = 25/arm) were treated with (i) two fixed-dose tablets (AS-MQ arm; 100 mg AS-200 mg MQ/tablet) daily for 3 days (days 0, 1, and 2) or (ii) nonfixed AS (AS-plus-MQ arm; 4 mg/kg of body weight/day for 3 days) plus MQ (15 mg/kg on day 1 and 10 mg/kg on day 2), dosed by weight. Clinical laboratory electrocardiogram (ECG), adverse events (AEs), efficacy, and pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed over 28 days. Both regimens were well tolerated. No AEs were drug related. Two serious AEs of malaria-induced hypotension occurring in the AS-MQ arm necessitated rescue treatment. There were no significant changes in hematology, biochemistry, or PR and QRS intervals. For all patients, mean Fridericia-corrected QT intervals were significantly (P ≤ 0.0027) prolonged on day 3 (407 ms) and day 7 (399 ms) versus day 0 (389 ms), in parallel with significant (P ≤ 0.0003) falls in heart rates (67 [day 3], 73 [day 7], and 83 [day 0] beats/minute). Fixed-nonfixed formulations were bioequivalent for MQ, but not for AS and dihydroartemisinin (DHA). One AS-MQ patient developed a new infection on day 28; his day 28 plasma MQ concentration was 503.8 ng/ml. Fixed-dose AS-MQ was well tolerated, had pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles broadly similar to those of nonfixed AS plus MQ, and is a suitable replacement. PMID:20547795

  1. Accuracy of velocities from repeated GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akarsu, V.; Sanli, D. U.; Arslan, E.

    2015-04-01

    Today repeated GPS measurements are still in use, because we cannot always employ GPS permanent stations due to a variety of limitations. One area of study that uses velocities/deformation rates from repeated GPS measurements is the monitoring of crustal motion. This paper discusses the quality of the velocities derived using repeated GPS measurements for the aim of monitoring crustal motion. From a global network of International GNSS Service (IGS) stations, we processed GPS measurements repeated monthly and annually spanning nearly 15 years and estimated GPS velocities for GPS baseline components latitude, longitude and ellipsoidal height. We used web-based GIPSY for the processing. Assuming true deformation rates can only be determined from the solutions of 24 h observation sessions, we evaluated the accuracy of the deformation rates from 8 and 12 h sessions. We used statistical hypothesis testing to assess the velocities derived from short observation sessions. In addition, as an alternative control method we checked the accuracy of GPS solutions from short observation sessions against those of 24 h sessions referring to statistical criteria that measure the accuracy of regression models. Results indicate that the velocities of the vertical component are completely affected when repeated GPS measurements are used. The results also reveal that only about 30% of the 8 h solutions and about 40% of 12 h solutions for the horizontal coordinates are acceptable for velocity estimation. The situation is much worse for the vertical component in which none of the solutions from campaign measurements are acceptable for obtaining reliable deformation rates.

  2. Repeated methylphenidate treatment in adolescent rats alters gene regulation in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Cindy L; Steiner, Heinz

    2003-09-01

    Methylphenidate is a psychostimulant which inhibits the dopamine transporter and produces dopamine overflow in the striatum, similar to the effects of cocaine. Excessive dopamine action is often associated with changes in gene expression in dopamine-receptive neurons. Little is known about methylphenidate's effects on gene regulation. We investigated whether a methylphenidate treatment regimen known to produce behavioural changes would alter gene expression in the striatum. Using in situ hybridization histochemistry, we assessed the effects of acute and repeated methylphenidate treatment on the expression of immediate-early genes (c-fos, zif 268) and neuropeptides (dynorphin, substance P, enkephalin) in adolescent rats. Acute methylphenidate treatment (0-10 mg/kg, i.p.) produced a dose-dependent increase in the expression of c-fos and zif 268. These effects were most pronounced in the dorsal striatum at middle to caudal striatal levels, and were found for doses as low as 2 mg/kg. Repeated treatment with methylphenidate (10 mg/kg/day, 7 days) increased the expression of dynorphin, which was highly correlated with the acute immediate-early gene response across different striatal regions. Moreover, after repeated methylphenidate treatment, cocaine-induced expression of c-fos and zif 268, as well as of substance P, was significantly attenuated throughout the striatum. These effects of repeated methylphenidate treatment mirror those produced by repeated treatment with cocaine or other psychostimulants and are considered to reflect drug-induced neuroadaptations. Thus, our findings demonstrate that acute and repeated methylphenidate treatment can produce molecular alterations similar to other psychostimulants. PMID:14511337

  3. The inhalation toxicity of di- and triethanolamine upon repeated exposure.

    PubMed

    Gamer, A O; Rossbacher, R; Kaufmann, W; van Ravenzwaay, B

    2008-06-01

    Systemic and respiratory tract (RT) toxicity of triethanolamine (TEA) was assessed in a 28-day nose-only inhalation study in Wistar rats (10animals/sex, concentrations: 0, 20, 100, 500mg/m3; 5 days/week, 6h/day). In two nose-only 90-day inhalation studies, with similar exposure design, Wistar rats were exposed to 0, 15, 150, 400mg/m3 diethanolamine (DEA) (DEA Study 1:13animals/sex, general subchronic study) and to 0, 1.5, 3, 8mg/m3 (DEA Study 2:10animals/sex) to specifically investigate respiratory tract toxicity. Only DEA induced systemic toxicity at or above 150mg/m3 (body and organ weight changes, clinical- and histo-pathological changes indicative for mild blood, liver, kidney and testicular effects). Neurotoxicity was not observed for both substances. Exposure to both substances resulted in laryngeal epithelial changes starting from 3mg/m3 for DEA (reversible metaplasia at the base of the epiglottis, inflammation at higher concentrations extending into the trachea) or from 20mg/m3 for TEA (focal inflammation, starting in single male animals). TEA appears to be less potent with respect to systemic toxicity and RT irritancy than DEA. The 90-day no adverse effect concentration" (NOAEC) for changes due to TEA exposure in the respiratory tract was 4.7mg/m3 derived by extrapolation from the NOAEC of the 28day study. PMID:18420328

  4. Learning with repeated-game strategies.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Christos A; Romero, Julian

    2014-01-01

    We use the self-tuning Experience Weighted Attraction model with repeated-game strategies as a computer testbed to examine the relative frequency, speed of convergence and progression of a set of repeated-game strategies in four symmetric 2 × 2 games: Prisoner's Dilemma, Battle of the Sexes, Stag-Hunt, and Chicken. In the Prisoner's Dilemma game, we find that the strategy with the most occurrences is the "Grim-Trigger." In the Battle of the Sexes game, a cooperative pair that alternates between the two pure-strategy Nash equilibria emerges as the one with the most occurrences. In the Stag-Hunt and Chicken games, the "Win-Stay, Lose-Shift" and "Grim-Trigger" strategies are the ones with the most occurrences. Overall, the pairs that converged quickly ended up at the cooperative outcomes, whereas the ones that were extremely slow to reach convergence ended up at non-cooperative outcomes. PMID:25126053

  5. Interoperability in encoded quantum repeater networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, Shota; Choi, Byung-Soo; Devitt, Simon; Suzuki, Shigeya; Van Meter, Rodney

    2016-04-01

    The future of quantum repeater networking will require interoperability between various error-correcting codes. A few specific code conversions and even a generalized method are known, however, no detailed analysis of these techniques in the context of quantum networking has been performed. In this paper we analyze a generalized procedure to create Bell pairs encoded heterogeneously between two separate codes used often in error-corrected quantum repeater network designs. We begin with a physical Bell pair and then encode each qubit in a different error-correcting code, using entanglement purification to increase the fidelity. We investigate three separate protocols for preparing the purified encoded Bell pair. We calculate the error probability of those schemes between the Steane [[7,1,3

  6. Quantum repeater with continuous variable encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linshu; Albert, Victor V.; Michael, Marios; Muralidharan, Sreraman; Zou, Changling; Jiang, Liang

    2016-05-01

    Quantum communication enables faithful quantum state transfer between different parties and protocols for cryptographic purposes. However, quantum communication over long distances (>1000km) remains challenging due to optical channel attenuation. This calls for investigation on developing novel encoding schemes that correct photon loss errors efficiently. In this talk, we introduce the generalization of multi-component Schrödinger cat states and propose to encode quantum information in these cat states for ultrafast quantum repeaters. We detail the quantum error correction procedures at each repeater station and characterize the performance of this novel encoding scheme given practical imperfections, such as coupling loss. A comparison with other quantum error correcting codes for bosonic modes will be discussed.

  7. Overcoming fixation with repeated memory suppression.

    PubMed

    Angello, Genna; Storm, Benjamin C; Smith, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Fixation (blocks to memories or ideas) can be alleviated not only by encouraging productive work towards a solution, but, as the present experiments show, by reducing counterproductive work. Two experiments examined relief from fixation in a word-fragment completion task. Blockers, orthographically similar negative primes (e.g., ANALOGY), blocked solutions to word fragments (e.g., A_L_ _GY) in both experiments. After priming, but before the fragment completion test, participants repeatedly suppressed half of the blockers using the Think/No-Think paradigm, which results in memory inhibition. Inhibiting blockers did not alleviate fixation in Experiment 1 when conscious recollection of negative primes was not encouraged on the fragment completion test. In Experiment 2, however, when participants were encouraged to remember negative primes at fragment completion, relief from fixation was observed. Repeated suppression may nullify fixation effects, and promote creative thinking, particularly when fixation is caused by conscious recollection of counterproductive information. PMID:24575886

  8. [VESTIBULAR FUNCTION AFTER REPEATED SPACE FLIGHTS].

    PubMed

    Naumov, I A; Kornilova, L N; Glukhikh, D O; Pavlova, A S; Khabarova, E V; Ekimovsky, G A; Vasin, A V

    2015-01-01

    Results of the vestibular function testing of 32 cosmonauts on return from repeated 125- to 215-day space flights (SF) on the International space station are presented. The cosmonauts were tested twice before flight (baseline data collection) and on days 1-2, 4-5 and 8-9 after landing. Electro- and video-oculography were used to register simultaneously eye and head movements. It was found that deadaptation following a repeated stay in long-duration SF takes statistically much shorter time. Most often, atypical vestibular disorders and changed patterns of the otolith-semicircular canal interaction are observed in cosmonauts who have made their maiden flights to microgravity. PMID:26934788

  9. Repeated interactions in open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bruneau, Laurent; Joye, Alain; Merkli, Marco

    2014-07-15

    Analyzing the dynamics of open quantum systems has a long history in mathematics and physics. Depending on the system at hand, basic physical phenomena that one would like to explain are, for example, convergence to equilibrium, the dynamics of quantum coherences (decoherence) and quantum correlations (entanglement), or the emergence of heat and particle fluxes in non-equilibrium situations. From the mathematical physics perspective, one of the main challenges is to derive the irreversible dynamics of the open system, starting from a unitary dynamics of the system and its environment. The repeated interactions systems considered in these notes are models of non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics. They are relevant in quantum optics, and more generally, serve as a relatively well treatable approximation of a more difficult quantum dynamics. In particular, the repeated interaction models allow to determine the large time (stationary) asymptotics of quantum systems out of equilibrium.

  10. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Samuel; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Accumulate-repeat-accumulate-accumulate (ARAA) codes have been proposed, inspired by the recently proposed accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA) codes. These are error-correcting codes suitable for use in a variety of wireless data-communication systems that include noisy channels. ARAA codes can be regarded as serial turbolike codes or as a subclass of low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes, and, like ARA codes they have projected graph or protograph representations; these characteristics make it possible to design high-speed iterative decoders that utilize belief-propagation algorithms. The objective in proposing ARAA codes as a subclass of ARA codes was to enhance the error-floor performance of ARA codes while maintaining simple encoding structures and low maximum variable node degree.

  11. Capture and analysis of radiation dose reports for radiology.

    PubMed

    Midgley, S M

    2014-12-01

    Radiographic imaging systems can produce records of exposure and dose parameters for each patient. A variety of file formats are in use including plain text, bit map images showing pictures of written text and radiation dose structured reports as text or extended markup language files. Whilst some of this information is available with image data on the hospital picture archive and communication system, access is restricted to individual patient records, thereby making it difficult to locate multiple records for the same scan protocol. This study considers the exposure records and dose reports from four modalities. Exposure records for mammography and general radiography are utilized for repeat analysis. Dose reports for fluoroscopy and computed tomography (CT) are utilized to study the distribution of patient doses for each protocol. Results for dosimetric quantities measured by General Radiography, Fluoroscopy and CT equipment are summarised and presented in the Appendix. Projection imaging uses the dose (in air) area product and derived quantities including the dose to the reference point as a measure of the air kerma reaching the skin, ignoring movement of the beam for fluoroscopy. CT uses the dose indices CTDIvol and dose length product as a measure of the dose per axial slice, and to the scanned volume. Suitable conversion factors are identified and used to estimate the effective dose to an average size patient (for CT and fluoroscopy) and the entrance skin dose for fluoroscopy. PMID:25315104

  12. Repeatability of Response to Asthma Medications

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ann; Tantisira, Kelan; Li, Lingling; Schuemann, Brooke; Weiss, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Background Pharmacogenetic studies of drug response in asthma assume that patients respond consistently to a treatment but that treatment response varies across patients, however, no formal studies have demonstrated this. Objective To determine the repeatability of commonly used outcomes for treatment response to asthma medications: bronchodilator response, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and provocative concentration of methacholine producing a 20% decline in FEV1 (PC20). Methods The Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP) was a multi-center clinical trial of children randomized to receiving budesonide, nedocromil, or placebo. We determined the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for each outcome over repeated visits over four years in CAMP using mixed effects regression models. We adjusted for the covariates: age, race/ethnicity, height, family income, parental education, and symptom score. We incorporated each outcome for each child as repeated outcome measurements and stratified by treatment group. Results The ICC for bronchodilator response was 0.31 in the budesonide group, 0.35 in the nedocromil group, and 0.40 in the placebo group, after adjusting for covariates. The ICC for FEV1 was 0.71 in the budesonide group, 0.60 in the nedocromil group, and 0.69 in the placebo group, after adjusting for covariates. The ICC for PC20 was 0.67 in the budesonide and placebo groups and 0.73 in the nedocromil group, after adjusting for covariates. Conclusion The within treatment group repeatability of FEV1 and PC20 are high; thus these phenotypes are heritable. FEV1 and PC20 may be better phenotypes than bronchodilator response for studies of treatment response in asthma. PMID:19064281

  13. Automatic-repeat-request error control schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S.; Costello, D. J., Jr.; Miller, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    Error detection incorporated with automatic-repeat-request (ARQ) is widely used for error control in data communication systems. This method of error control is simple and provides high system reliability. If a properly chosen code is used for error detection, virtually error-free data transmission can be attained. Various types of ARQ and hybrid ARQ schemes, and error detection using linear block codes are surveyed.

  14. A New Property of Repeating Decimals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arledge, Jane; Tekansik, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    As extended by Ginsberg, Midi's theorem says that if the repeated section of a decimal expansion of a prime is split into appropriate blocks and these are added, the result is a string of nines. We show that if the expansion of 1/p[superscript n+1] is treated the same way, instead of being a string of nines, the sum is related to the period of…

  15. Nucleosome repeat lengths and columnar chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Trifonov, Edward N

    2016-06-01

    Thorough quantitative study of nucleosome repeat length (NRL) distributions, conducted in 1992 by J. Widom, resulted in a striking observation that the linker lengths between the nucleosomes are quantized. Comparison of the NRL average values with the MNase cut distances predicted from the hypothetical columnar structure of chromatin (this work) shows a close correspondence between the two. This strongly suggests that the NRL distribution, actually, reflects the dominant role of columnar chromatin structure common for all eukaryotes. PMID:26208520

  16. Androgen receptor polymorphism (CAG repeats) and androgenicity.

    PubMed

    Canale, D; Caglieresi, C; Moschini, C; Liberati, C D; Macchia, E; Pinchera, A; Martino, E

    2005-09-01

    Objective Polymorphism of the androgen receptor (AR) has been related to various pathophysiological conditions, such as osteoporosis and infertility. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the frequency of distribution in a normal Italian population and to assess CAG repeats (CAGr) in other conditions, such as hypoandrogenism, potentially influenced by AR polymorphism. Patients and measurements CAGr polymorphism was determined in a group of 91 healthy normoandrogenized subjects, 29 hypoandrogenized patients (hypoplasia of prostate and seminal vesicles, reduced beard or body hair, etc.) and 29 infertile patients by direct sequencing. Results The mean (+/- SD) number of CAG repeats [(CAGr)n] was 21.5 (+/- 1.7) in the control group, 21.4 (+/- 2.0) in the infertile patients and 24.0 (+/- 2.9) in the hypoandrogenic males. The difference was statistically significant between this last group and the other two (P < 0.0001), while there was no difference between normal controls and infertile patients. The frequency distribution showed a shift towards higher CAG length in hypoandrogenized patients compared to controls and infertile patients. If we used a cut-off point of 24.9 (2 SD above the mean), the percentage of patients with 25 or more CAGr repeats was 38% among hypoandrogenized patients, 7% among infertile patients and 5% among the control group. In hypoandrogenized subjects (CAGr)n correlated slightly with testis and prostate volume. The number of CAG repeats was not associated with any of the hormonal parameters, including testosterone, evaluated in the three groups. Conclusions Our normal population, representing subjects from Central Italy, is superimposable on other European populations with regard to (CAGr)n distribution. Hypoandrogenic males have a shift in the frequency distribution towards longer (CAGr)n. Infertile patients are not statistically different from the control group. These findings suggest that, given the same amount of circulating

  17. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate-Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Inspired by recently proposed Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate (ARA) codes [15], in this paper we propose a channel coding scheme called Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate (ARAA) codes. These codes can be seen as serial turbo-like codes or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, and they have a projected graph or protograph representation; this allows for a high-speed iterative decoder implementation using belief propagation. An ARAA code can be viewed as a precoded Repeat-and-Accumulate (RA) code with puncturing in concatenation with another accumulator, where simply an accumulator is chosen as the precoder; thus ARAA codes have a very fast encoder structure. Using density evolution on their associated protographs, we find examples of rate-lJ2 ARAA codes with maximum variable node degree 4 for which a minimum bit-SNR as low as 0.21 dB from the channel capacity limit can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Such a low threshold cannot be achieved by RA or Irregular RA (IRA) or unstructured irregular LDPC codes with the same constraint on the maximum variable node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators we can construct families of higher rate ARAA codes with thresholds that stay close to their respective channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results show comparable performance with the best-known LDPC codes but with very low error floor even at moderate block sizes.

  18. Multiplexing schemes for quantum repeater networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, Luciano; Van Meter, Rodney

    2011-08-01

    When built, quantum repeaters will allow the distribution of entangled quantum states across large distances, playing a vital part in many proposed quantum technologies. Enabling multiple users to connect through the same network will be key to their real-world deployment. Previous work on repeater technologies has focussed only on simple entanglment production, without considering the issues of resource scarcity and competition that necessarily arise in a network setting. In this paper we simulated a thirteen-node network with up to five flows sharing different parts of the network, measuring the total throughput and fairness for each case. Our results suggest that the Internet-like approach of statistical multiplexing use of a congested link gives the highest aggregate throughput. Time division multiplexing and buffer space multiplexing were slightly less effective, but all three schemes allow the sum of multiple flows to substantially exceed that of any one flow, improving over circuit switching by taking advantage of resources that are forced to remain idle in circuit switching. All three schemes proved to have excellent fairness. The high performance, fairness and simplicity of implementation support a recommendation of statistical multiplexing for shared quantum repeater networks.

  19. Genomic Repeat Abundances Contain Phylogenetic Signal

    PubMed Central

    Dodsworth, Steven; Chase, Mark W.; Kelly, Laura J.; Leitch, Ilia J.; Macas, Jiří; Novák, Petr; Piednoël, Mathieu; Weiss-Schneeweiss, Hanna; Leitch, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    A large proportion of genomic information, particularly repetitive elements, is usually ignored when researchers are using next-generation sequencing. Here we demonstrate the usefulness of this repetitive fraction in phylogenetic analyses, utilizing comparative graph-based clustering of next-generation sequence reads, which results in abundance estimates of different classes of genomic repeats. Phylogenetic trees are then inferred based on the genome-wide abundance of different repeat types treated as continuously varying characters; such repeats are scattered across chromosomes and in angiosperms can constitute a majority of nuclear genomic DNA. In six diverse examples, five angiosperms and one insect, this method provides generally well-supported relationships at interspecific and intergeneric levels that agree with results from more standard phylogenetic analyses of commonly used markers. We propose that this methodology may prove especially useful in groups where there is little genetic differentiation in standard phylogenetic markers. At the same time as providing data for phylogenetic inference, this method additionally yields a wealth of data for comparative studies of genome evolution. PMID:25261464

  20. [Effect of dosed diet restriction on physiological remodeling and bioelectric properties of bone].

    PubMed

    Levashov, M I; Ianko, R V; Chaka, E G; Safonov, S L

    2014-07-01

    The effect of dosed diet restriction on the physiological remodeling and bioelectric properties of bone tissue was studied in 48 male Wistar rats 3- and 18-months of age. The rate of bone tissue apposition was studied by the dynamic histomorphometry method (intravital tetracycline labeling). Electric potentials on the periosteal surface of the freshly isolated femurs were recorded. The magnitude of dielectric loss factor was determined to assess the quality of bone tissue. The control rats received a standard diet. The experimental rats received a limited diet (60 % of the standard mass) for 28 days. The magnitude and rate of the bone tissue apposition on the endosteal and periosteal surface of the tibia were less by 38.4% and 122.7% respectively in experimental rats after dosed diet restriction. Electric potential in the metaphyseal-epiphyseal growth zones of the femur was 29.7% lower, and the dielectric loss factor increased by 15.8%. The bone tissue apposition rate and the electric potential magnitude were increased 10 days after completion of the dosed diet restriction. The magnitude of the dielectric loss factor decreased after returning to the standard diet. Key words: dosed diet restriction, bone, remodelling, bioelectric properties. PMID:25669112

  1. Sensitivity to low-dose radiation in radiosensitive wasted mice

    SciTech Connect

    Paunesku, T.; Protic, M.; Woloschak, G. E.

    1999-11-12

    Mice homozygous for the autosomal recessive wasted mutation (wst/wst) have abnormalities in T-lymphocytes and in the anterior motor neuron cells of the spinal cord, leading to sensitivity to low doses of ionizing radiation, hind limb paralysis, and immunodeficiency. This defect results in a failure to gain weight by 20 days and death at 28 days of age. The wasted mutation (previously mapped to mouse chromosome 2) is shown to be a 3-bp deletion in a T-cell-specific (and perhaps motor-neuron-specific) regulatory region (promoter) of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) gene on mouse chromosome 2. A regulatory element is also shown to be important in PCNA expression in T-lymphocytes and motor neuron cells afflicted by the 3-bp deletion in the PCNA promoter. The model is as follows: Absence of PCNA expression in the thymuses (and motor neurons) of wasted mice causes cellular apoptosis; this absence of expression is mediated by a positive transactor that can bind to the wild-type but not the wasted mutant PCNA promoter; the bound protein induces late expression of PCNA in T-lymphocytes and prevents onset of radiation sensitivity in the cells.

  2. Repeated buckling of composite shear panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Josef; Weller, Tanchum

    1990-01-01

    Failures in service of aerospace structures and research at the Technion Aircraft Structures Laboratory have revealed that repeatedly buckled stiffened shear panels might be susceptible to premature fatigue failures. Extensive experimental and analytical studies have been performed at Technion on repeated buckling, far in excess of initial buckling, for both metal and composite shear panels with focus on the influence of the surrounding structure. The core of the experimental investigation consisted of repeated buckling and postbuckling tests on Wagner beams in a three-point loading system under realistic test conditions. The effects of varying sizes of stiffeners, of the magnitude of initial buckling loads, of the panel aspect ratio and of the cyclic shearing force, V sub cyc, were studied. The cyclic to critical shear buckling ratios, (V sub cyc/V sub cr) were on the high side, as needed for efficient panel design, yet all within possible flight envelopes. The experiments were supplemented by analytical and numerical analyses. For the metal shear panels the test and numerical results were synthesized into prediction formulas, which relate the life of the metal shear panels to two cyclic load parameters. The composite shear panels studied were hybrid beams with graphite/epoxy webs bonded to aluminum alloy frames. The test results demonstrated that composite panels were less fatigue sensitive than comparable metal ones, and that repeated buckling, even when causing extensive damage, did not reduce the residual strength by more than 20 percent. All the composite panels sustained the specified fatigue life of 250,000 cycles. The effect of local unstiffened holes on the durability of repeatedly buckled shear panels was studied for one series of the metal panels. Tests on 2024 T3 aluminum panels with relatively small unstiffened holes in the center of the panels demonstrated premature fatigue failure, compared to panels without holes. Preliminary tests on two graphite

  3. Modeling Single and Repeated Dose Pharmacokinetics of PFOA in Mice (J)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) displays complicated pharmacokinetics in that serum concentrations indicate long half-lives despite which steady state appears to be achieved rapidly. In this study, serum and tissue concentration time-courses were obtained for male and female CD1 m...

  4. Toxicokinetic differences between two major HBCD stereoisomers: Effect of dose, time, repeated exposure and route

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a flame retardant primarily added to foam insulation used in buildings. Current demands for energy-efficient construction are increasing its use worldwide. This emerging global contaminant is a mixture of 3 stereoisomers [alpha (a), beta (B), gamm...

  5. Toxicokinetics of the Flame Retardant Hexabromocyclododecane Gamma: Effect of Dose, Timing, Route, Repeated Exposure and Metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1,2,5,6,9,10-Hexabromocyclododecane-gamma ('-HBCD) is the predominate diastereoisomer in the commercial HBCD mixture used as a flame retardant in a wide variety of consumer products. Three main diastereoisomers, alpha (a), beta (ß) and gamma (') comprise the commercial mixture. Despite the '-diaster...

  6. ACUTE, 14-DAY REPEATED DOSING, AND 90-DAY SUBCHRONIC TOXICITY STUDIES OF POTASSIUM PICLORAM (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Potassium picloram was administered either by gavage (acute studies) or in drinking water to male and female Sprague-Dawley derived rats (14-day and 90-day studies). The acute oral LD50 was 950 mg/kg (812-1120) for males and 686 mg/kg (599-786) for females. Depression, prostratio...

  7. Toxicokinetics of the Flame Retardant Hexabromocylodecane alpha: Effect of dose, timing, route, repeated exposure and metabolism

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alpha-hexabromocyclododecane (a-HBCD) is an emerging persistent organic pollutant present in the hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) commercial mixture. HBCD is used as an additive flame retardant in a wide variety of household consumer products. Three main stereoisomers, alpha (a), be...

  8. TOXICOKINETICS OF THE FLAME RETARDANT HEXABROMOCYCLODODECANE GAMMA: EFFECT OF DOSE, TIMING, ROUTE, REPEATED EXPOSURE AND METABOLISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    1,2,5,6,9,10-Hexabromocyc1ododecane-gamma (y-HBCD) is the predominate diastereoisomer in the commercial HBCD mixture used as a flame retardant in a wide variety of consumer products. Three main diastereoisomers, alpha (a), beta (B) and gamma (y) comprise the commercial mixture. D...

  9. Clinical and Pathological Effects of Short-term Cyanide Repeated Dosing to Goats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this work is to determine and describe the effects of subacute cyanide toxicity to goats. Eight female goats were divided into two groups. The first group of five animals was treated with 8.0mg KCN kg-1 body weight day -1 for seven consecutive days. The second group of three animal...

  10. Toxicokinetics of the flame retardant hexabromocyclododecane alpha: effect of dose, timing, route, repeated exposure and metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is an additive flame retardant in many household products. Three stereoisomers, alpha (a), beta (b), and gamma (g), comprise roughly 10%, 10%, and 80% of the mixture, respectively. a-HBCD is the major stereoisomer found in biota, including breast milk and blood in Nor...

  11. Use of effective dose.

    PubMed

    Harrison, J D; Balonov, M; Martin, C J; Ortiz Lopez, P; Menzel, H-G; Simmonds, J R; Smith-Bindman, R; Wakeford, R

    2016-06-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103 provided a detailed explanation of the purpose and use of effective dose and equivalent dose to individual organs and tissues. Effective dose has proven to be a valuable and robust quantity for use in the implementation of protection principles. However, questions have arisen regarding practical applications, and a Task Group has been set up to consider issues of concern. This paper focusses on two key proposals developed by the Task Group that are under consideration by ICRP: (1) confusion will be avoided if equivalent dose is no longer used as a protection quantity, but regarded as an intermediate step in the calculation of effective dose. It would be more appropriate for limits for the avoidance of deterministic effects to the hands and feet, lens of the eye, and skin, to be set in terms of the quantity, absorbed dose (Gy) rather than equivalent dose (Sv). (2) Effective dose is in widespread use in medical practice as a measure of risk, thereby going beyond its intended purpose. While doses incurred at low levels of exposure may be measured or assessed with reasonable reliability, health effects have not been demonstrated reliably at such levels but are inferred. However, bearing in mind the uncertainties associated with risk projection to low doses or low dose rates, it may be considered reasonable to use effective dose as a rough indicator of possible risk, with the additional consideration of variation in risk with age, sex and population group. PMID:26980800

  12. A Complete and Accurate Ab Initio Repeat Finding Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lian, Shuaibin; Chen, Xinwu; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Xiaoli; Dai, Xianhua

    2016-03-01

    It has become clear that repetitive sequences have played multiple roles in eukaryotic genome evolution including increasing genetic diversity through mutation, changes in gene expression and facilitating generation of novel genes. However, identification of repetitive elements can be difficult in the ab initio manner. Currently, some classical ab initio tools of finding repeats have already presented and compared. The completeness and accuracy of detecting repeats of them are little pool. To this end, we proposed a new ab initio repeat finding tool, named HashRepeatFinder, which is based on hash index and word counting. Furthermore, we assessed the performances of HashRepeatFinder with other two famous tools, such as RepeatScout and Repeatfinder, in human genome data hg19. The results indicated the following three conclusions: (1) The completeness of HashRepeatFinder is the best one among these three compared tools in almost all chromosomes, especially in chr9 (8 times of RepeatScout, 10 times of Repeatfinder); (2) in terms of detecting large repeats, HashRepeatFinder also performed best in all chromosomes, especially in chr3 (24 times of RepeatScout and 250 times of Repeatfinder) and chr19 (12 times of RepeatScout and 60 times of Repeatfinder); (3) in terms of accuracy, HashRepeatFinder can merge the abundant repeats with high accuracy. PMID:26272474

  13. Kinetics of selected di-n-butyl phthalate metabolites and fetal testosterone following repeated and single administration in pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Clewell, Rebecca A; Kremer, John J; Williams, Carla C; Campbell, Jerry L; Sochaski, Mark A; Andersen, Melvin E; Borghoff, Susan J

    2009-01-01

    Human exposure to phthalic acid diesters occurs through a variety of pathways as a result of their widespread use in consumer products and plastics. Repeated doses of di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) from gestation day (GD) 12 to 19 disrupt testosterone synthesis and male sexual development in the fetal rat. Currently little is known about the disposition of DBP metabolites, such as monobutyl phthalate (MBP) and its glucuronide conjugate (MBP-G), during gestation after repeated exposure to DBP. In order to gain a better understanding of the effect of repeated dosing on maternal and fetal metabolism and distribution, pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were given a single dose of 500 mg/kg DBP on GD 19 or daily doses of 50, 100, and 500 mg/(kg day) from GD 12 to 19 via corn oil gavage. Dose-response evaluation revealed a non-linear increase in maternal and fetal plasma concentrations of MBP. Maternal and fetal MBP levels were slightly lower in animals after 8 days of dosing at 500 mg/(kg day). Fetal plasma MBP levels closely followed maternal plasma, while the appearance and elimination of MBP-G in fetal plasma were significantly delayed. MBP-G accumulated over time in the amniotic fluid. Inhibition of testosterone was rapid in fetal testes when exposed to DBP (500 mg/(kg day)) on GD 19. Within 24h, the level of inhibition in the fetus was similar between animals exposed to a single or multiple daily doses of 500 mg/(kg day). Examination of testosterone time-course data indicates a rapid recovery to normal levels within 24h post-dosing at DBP doses of 50 and 100 mg/(kg day), with a rebound to higher than normal concentrations at later time-points. MBP kinetics in fetal testes allows direct comparison of active metabolite concentrations and testosterone response in the fetal testes. PMID:19010379

  14. Impact of repeated chlorotoluron application on its degradation in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocarek, Martin; Kodesova, Radka; Drabek, Ondrej; Kozak, Josef

    2010-05-01

    The effect of repeated chlorotoluron application on its degradation was studied under the field condition in Haplic Chernozem. Chlorotoluron was applied repeatedly (dose of 0.025 mg.m-2) on the top of the soil profile in years 2006, 2008 and 2009. Climatic data as a daily minimal and maximal temperature and daily rainfall were collected during the experiment. Pressure heads at 4 depths (10, 25, 50, 80 cm) were measured using tensiometers. Soil-water contents and temperatures at 5 depths (5, 10, 25, 50, 80 cm) were monitored using the ECH20 EC-TE sensors. The suction cups were used to take soil-water samples at various depths (5, 10, 25, 50 cm) to indentify presence of the herbicide during 140 days period. In addition, soil samples were taken from layers 2 cm thick (to the depth of 50 cm) 35, 50 and 140 day after the herbicide application to measure a total content of the applied herbicide in each layer within the soil profile. Herbicide concentrations in soil extracts and soil water samples were analyzed using the HPLC technology. The total chlorotoluron content within the monitored soil profile was evaluated, and the herbicide field degradation rate and half-life were calculated. Chlorotoluron was not detected below the depth of 32 cm during the entire experimental periods. Chlorotoluron field half-lives estimated in this study were 28.4, 33.4 and 32.3 days in 2006, 2008 and 2009, respectively. The herbicide half-lives were also measured in the laboratory under the controlled soil-water content and temperature conditions: 20.6 days (28 C, 40% soil-water content per mass), 33.16 days (28 C, 20% soil-water content per mass); 27.76 days (20 C, 40% soil-water content per mass); 39.85 days (20 C, 20% soil-water content per mass); 32.27 days (10 C, 40% soil-water content per mass); 45.7 days (10 C, 20% soil-water content per mass). The field herbicide half-lives (obtained under the similar average temperature and soil-water content conditions) corresponded to half

  15. Repeatability of a running heat tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Mee, Jessica A; Doust, Jo; Maxwell, Neil S

    2015-01-01

    At present there is no standardised heat tolerance test (HTT) procedure adopting a running mode of exercise. Current HTTs may misdiagnose a runner's susceptibility to a hyperthermic state due to differences in exercise intensity. The current study aimed to establish the repeatability of a practical running test to evaluate individual's ability to tolerate exercise heat stress. Sixteen (8M, 8F) participants performed the running HTT (RHTT) (30 min, 9 km h(-1), 2% elevation) on two separate occasions in a hot environment (40 °C and 40% relative humidity). There were no differences in peak rectal temperature (RHTT1: 38.82 ± 0.47 °C, RHTT2: 38.86 ± 0.49 °C, Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC)=0.93, typical error of measure (TEM) = 0.13 °C), peak skin temperature (RHTT1: 38.12 ± 0.45, RHTT2: 38.11 ± 0.45 °C, ICC = 0.79, TEM = 0.30 °C), peak heart rate (RHTT1: 182 ± 15 beats min(-1), RHTT2: 183 ± 15 beats min(-1), ICC = 0.99, TEM = 2 beats min(-1)), nor sweat rate (1721 ± 675 g h(-1), 1716 ± 745 g h(-1), ICC = 0.95, TEM = 162 g h(-1)) between RHTT1 and RHTT2 (p>0.05). Results demonstrate good agreement, strong correlations and small differences between repeated trials, and the TEM values suggest low within-participant variability. The RHTT was effective in differentiating between individuals physiological responses; supporting a heat tolerance continuum. The findings suggest the RHTT is a repeatable measure of physiological strain in the heat and may be used to assess the effectiveness of acute and chronic heat alleviating procedures. PMID:25774031

  16. Simple sequence repeats in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Power, Peter M; Sweetman, W A; Gallacher, N J; Woodhall, M R; Kumar, G A; Moxon, E R; Hood, D W

    2009-03-01

    Simple sequence repeat (SSRs) of DNA are subject to high rates of mutation and are important mediators of adaptation in Haemophilus influenzae. Previous studies of the Rd KW20 genome identified the primacy of tetranucleotide SSRs in mediating phase variation (the rapid reversible switching of gene expression) of surface exposed structures such as lipopolysaccharide. The recent sequencing of the genomes of multiple strains of H. influenzae allowed the comparison of the SSRs (repeat units of one to nine nucleotides in length) in detail across four complete H. influenzae genomes and then comparison with a further 12 genomes when they became available. The SSR loci were broadly classified into three groups: (1) those that did not vary; (2) those for which some variation between strains was observed but this could not be linked to variation of gene expression; and (3) those that both varied and were located in regions consistent with mediating phase variable gene expression. Comparative analysis of 988 SSR associated loci confirmed that tetranucleotide repeats were the major mediators of phase variation and extended the repertoire of known tetranucleotide SSR loci by identifying ten previously uncharacterised tetranucleotide SSR loci with the potential to mediate phase variation which were unequally distributed across the H. influenzae pan-genome. Further, analysis of non-tetranucleotide SSR in the 16 strains revealed a number of mononucleotide, dinucleotide, pentanucleotide, heptanucleotide, and octanucleotide SSRs which were consistent with these tracts mediating phase variation. This study substantiates previous findings as to the important role that tetranucleotide SSRs play in H. influenzae biology. Two Brazilian isolates showed the most variation in their complement of SSRs suggesting the possibility of geographic and phenotypic influences on SSR distribution. PMID:19095084

  17. Capping motifs stabilize the leucine-rich repeat protein PP32 and rigidify adjacent repeats.

    PubMed

    Dao, Thuy P; Majumdar, Ananya; Barrick, Doug

    2014-06-01

    Capping motifs are found to flank most β-strand-containing repeat proteins. To better understand the roles of these capping motifs in organizing structure and stability, we carried out folding and solution NMR studies on the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain of PP32, which is composed of five tandem LRR, capped by α-helical and β-hairpin motifs on the N- and C-termini. We were able to purify PP32 constructs lacking either cap and containing destabilizing substitutions. Removing the C-cap results in complete unfolding of PP32. Removing the N-cap has a much less severe effect, decreasing stability but retaining much of its secondary structure. In contrast, the dynamics and tertiary structure of the first two repeats are significantly perturbed, based on (1)H-(15)N relaxation studies, chemical shift perturbations, and residual dipolar couplings. However, more distal repeats (3 to C-cap) retain their native tertiary structure. In this regard, the N-cap drives the folding of adjacent repeats from what appears to be a molten-globule-like state. This interpretation is supported by extensive analysis using core packing substitutions in the full-length and N-cap-truncated PP32. This work highlights the importance of caps to the stability and structural integrity of β-strand-containing LRR proteins, and emphasizes the different contributions of the N- and C-terminal caps. PMID:24659532

  18. Cataractogenesis after Repeat Laser in situ Keratomileusis

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M.; Ghabra, Marwan

    2012-01-01

    There has been the unsubstantiated clinical impression that laser refractive surgery accelerates cataract development along with solid experimental data about the cataractogenic effects of excimer laser treatment. We present the first documented case of significant cataract formation in a young myope after repeat excimer laser ablation necessitating phacoemulsification with a posterior chamber implant. Proposed explanations include focusing of the ablation wave on the posterior capsule (acoustic wave lens epithelial damage), photooxidative stress of the lens (ultraviolet and inflammatory oxidative stress), and corticosteroid-induced cataract (lens toxicity). PMID:22949915

  19. Mars orbits with daily repeating ground traces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noreen, Gary K.; Kerridge, Stuart; Diehl, Roger; neelon, Joseph; Ely, Todd; Turner, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    This paper derives orbits at Mars with ground traces that repeat at the same times every solar day (sol). A relay orbiter in such an orbit would pass over insitu probes at the same times every sol, ensuring consistent coverage and simplifying mission design and operations. 42 orbits in five classes are characteried: 14 cicular equatorial prograde orbits; 14 circular equatorial retrograde orbits; 11 circular sun synchrounous orbits; 2 eccentroc equatorial orbits; 1 eccentric critcally inclined orbit. the paper reports on the performance of a relay orbiter in some of the orbits.

  20. Innovative collaboration to prevent repeated adolescent pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Saunders, R B; Brown, H N

    1997-01-01

    Nurse educators from a university setting and staff from the county health department collaborated to establish an innovative program to prevent repeated pregnancy in adolescents. Called Dollar-A-Day and patterned after the original in Denver, CO, the program was operated jointly for 5 years and today continues to operate under the auspices of the health department. Success of the venture is attributed to use of skills in assessment, building, managing, and evaluating, as described by Loxley (1997). These elements were used to construct a context for collaboration. PMID:9397869

  1. Multifunctional protein: cardiac ankyrin repeat protein*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Na; Xie, Xiao-jie; Wang, Jian-an

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP) not only serves as an important component of muscle sarcomere in the cytoplasm, but also acts as a transcription co-factor in the nucleus. Previous studies have demonstrated that CARP is up-regulated in some cardiovascular disorders and muscle diseases; however, its role in these diseases remains controversial now. In this review, we will discuss the continued progress in the research related to CARP, including its discovery, structure, and the role it plays in cardiac development and heart diseases. PMID:27143260

  2. Distillation by repeated measurements: Continuous spectrum case

    SciTech Connect

    Bellomo, Bruno; Compagno, Giuseppe; Nakazato, Hiromichi; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2010-12-15

    Repeated measurements on one part of a bipartite system strongly affect the other part that is not measured, the dynamics of which is regulated by an effective contracted evolution operator. When the spectrum of this operator is discrete, the nonmeasured system is driven into a pure state, irrespective of the initial state, provided that the spectrum satisfies certain conditions. We show here that, even in the case of continuous spectrum, an effective distillation can occur under rather general conditions. We confirm it by applying our formalism to a simple model.

  3. Hypermnesia: the role of repeated testing.

    PubMed

    Roediger, H L; Payne, D G

    1982-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine whether the increased recall of pictures across repeated tests (hypermnesia) is due to increasing strength of imaginal traces during the retention interval or to increased retrieval practice from prior tests. Subjects studied 60 pictures and then recalled them after various delays that were filled with instructions and, in two cases, reading a passage. Recall on a first test showed no change with retention interval. With retention interval held constant, however, the number of pictures recalled varied directly with the number of prior tests subjects had been given. This finding points up the critical nature of retrieval factors in producing hypermnesia. PMID:6210744

  4. An investigation of electromagnetic launcher repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyse, Mark W.; Cornette, James B.; Brown, Jere L.

    1992-07-01

    Electromagnetic launcher (EML) performance repeatability has been identified as a potential development issue for several years. Investigation of this issue has been difficult because an EML that is powered on a relatively continuous basis to provide long duration operation has not been available. A battery charged capacitor power system has enabled long duration, 6 to 7 seconds, EML experiments. This paper provides a summary of an experiment to investigate EML launch to launch performance consistency. A series of 8 ten-shot bursts, each separated by 15 to 30 minutes, performed in a single day using a single set of bore materials is the subject of this paper.

  5. An investigation of electromagnetic launch repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornette, James B.; Heyse, Mark W.; Brown, Jere L.

    1993-01-01

    Electromagnetic launcher (EML) performance repeatability has been identified as a potential development issue for several years. Investigation of this issue has been difficult because an EML that is powered on a relatively continuous basis to provide long duration operation has not been available. A battery charged capacitor power system has enabled long duration, 6 to 7 seconds, EML experiments. This paper provides a summary of an experiment to investigate EML launch to launch performance consistency. A series of 8 ten-shot bursts, each separated by 15 to 30 minutes, performed in a single day using a single set of bore materials is the subject of this paper.

  6. Platelet peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in repeated stress

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, D.E.; Bidder, M.; Gavish, M. ); Weizman, A.; Karp, L.; Tyano, S. ); Grinshpoon, A.; Bleich, A.

    1991-01-01

    ({sup 3}H)PK 11195 binding to platelet membranes and plasma stress hormones were studied in soldiers at the beginning of a parachute training course, following 6 days of preparatory exercises, and after the fourth actual parachute jump. A slight reduction (15%; NS) in the number of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) was detected at the end of the exercise period, prior to the first jump. Reduced density of PBR was observed immediately after the repeated actual jumps. Equilibrium dissociation constants were not affected by the stressful situation. Plasma cortisol and prolactin levels remained unaltered during the entire study period.

  7. Entanglement replication via quantum repeated interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendenbaum, Pierre; Platini, Thierry; Karevski, Dragi

    2015-04-01

    We study entanglement creation between two independent XX chains, which are repeatedly coupled locally to spin-1/2 Bell pairs. We show analytically that in the steady state the entanglement of the Bell pairs is perfectly transferred to the chains, generating large-scale interchain pair correlations. However, before the steady state is reached, within a growing causal region around the interacting locus the chains are found in a current driven nonequilibrium steady state (NESS). In the NESS, the chains cross entanglement decays exponentially with respect to the distance to the boundary sites with a typical length scale which is inversely proportional to the driving current.

  8. Repeated ketamine treatment induces sex-specific behavioral and neurochemical effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Thelen, Connor; Sens, Jonathon; Mauch, Joseph; Pandit, Radhika; Pitychoutis, Pothitos M

    2016-10-01

    One of the most striking discoveries in the treatment of major depression was the finding that infusion of a single sub-anesthetic dose of ketamine induces rapid and sustained antidepressant effects in treatment-resistant depressed patients. However, ketamine's antidepressant-like actions are transient and can only be sustained by repeated drug treatment. Despite the fact that women experience major depression at roughly twice the rate of men, research regarding the neurobiological antidepressant-relevant effects of ketamine has focused almost exclusively on the male sex. Importantly, knowledge regarding the sex-differentiated effects, the frequency and the dose on which repeated ketamine administration stops being beneficial, is limited. In the current study, we investigated the behavioral, neurochemical and synaptic molecular effects of repeated ketamine treatment (10mg/kg; 21days) in male and female C57BL/6J mice. We report that ketamine induced beneficial antidepressant-like effects in male mice, but induced both anxiety-like (i.e., decreased time spent in the center of the open field arena) and depressive-like effects (i.e., enhanced immobility duration in the forced swim test; FST) in their female counterparts. Moreover, repeated ketamine treatment induced sustained sex-differentiated neurochemical and molecular effects, as it enhanced hippocampal synapsin protein levels and serotonin turnover in males, but attenuated glutamate and aspartate levels in female mice. Taken together, our findings indicate that repeated ketamine treatment induces opposite behavioral effects in male and female mice, and thus, present data have far-reaching implications for the sex-oriented use of ketamine in both experimental and clinical research settings. PMID:27343934

  9. Comparison of creatine monohydrate and carbohydrate supplementation on repeated jump height performance.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Chad A; Benardot, Dan; Cody, Mildred; Thompson, Walter R

    2008-07-01

    Creatine monohydrate (CrMH) supplementation aids the ability to maintain performance during repeated bouts of high-intensity exercise, including jump performance. However, carbohydrate supplementation may also provide similar benefits and is less expensive. This study compared the effects of an energy-free placebo, 2 different caloric concentrations of carbohydrate drinks, and a CrMH supplement on repeated jump heights. Sixty active males (mean age, 22 +/- 3.2 years) performed 2 sets of countermovement static jump height tests (10 jumps over 60 seconds) separated by 5 days to determine the differential effects of the placebo, carbohydrate, and CrMH on jump height sustainability over 10 jumps. Subjects were randomly assigned to groups (15 subjects per group) to receive daily doses (x5 days) of carbohydrate drinks containing 100 or 250 kilocalories (kcal), a 25-g CrMH supplement, or an energy-free placebo. After 5 days, the CrMH group experienced a significant weight gain (+1.52; +/-0.89 kg, p < 0.01), while the other groups did not. The 2 levels of carbohydrate and CrMH supplements were all significantly better at sustaining jump height than the energy-free placebo over the final 3-4 jumps. The 250-kcal carbohydrate-supplemented group experienced a level of benefit (p < 0.01) that was at least equal to that of the CrMH group (p < 0.05), suggesting that the higher dose of carbohydrate was as effective as CrMH in maintaining repeated bouts of high-intensity activity as measured by repeated static jumps. Given the equivalent performance improvement and the absence of weight gain, the carbohydrate supplementation could be considered the preferred option for weight-conscious power athletes involved in activities that require repeated- motion high-intensity activities. PMID:18545204

  10. Daily Bone Alignment With Limited Repeat CT Correction Rivals Daily Ultrasound Alignment for Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    O'Daniel, Jennifer C.; Dong Lei Zhang Lifei; Wang He; Tucker, Susan L.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Lee, Andrew K.; Cheung, Rex; Cox, James D.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Mohan, Radhe

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of daily ultrasound (US)- and computed tomography (CT)-guided alignments with an off-line correction protocol using daily bone alignment plus a correction factor for systematic internal prostate displacement (CF{sub ID}). Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients underwent CT scans three times weekly using an integrated CT-linear accelerator system, followed by alignment using US for daily radiotherapy. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans were designed with our current clinical margins. The treatment plan was copied onto the repeat CT images and aligned using several methods: (1) bone alignment plus CF{sub ID} after three off-line CT scans (bone+3CT), (2) bone alignment plus CF{sub ID} after six off-line CT scans (bone+6CT), (3) US alignment, and (4) CT alignment. The accuracy of the repeated US and CT measurements to determine the CF{sub ID} was compared. The target dosimetric effect was quantified. Results: The CF{sub ID} for internal systematic prostate displacements was more accurately measured with limited repeat CT scans than with US (residual error, 0.0 {+-} 0.7 mm vs. 2.0 {+-} 3.2 mm). Bone+3CT, bone+6CT, and US provided equivalent prostate and seminal vesicle dose coverage, but bone+3CT and bone+6CT produced more precise daily alignments. Daily CT alignment provided the greatest target dose coverage. Conclusion: Daily bone alignment plus CF{sub ID} for internal systematic prostate displacement provided better daily alignment precision and equivalent dose coverage compared with daily US alignment. The CF{sub ID} should be based on at least three repeat CT scans, which could be collected before the start of treatment or during the first 3 treatment days. Daily bone alignment plus CF{sub ID} provides another option for accurate prostate cancer patient positioning.

  11. Hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction in chronic fatigue syndrome, and the effects of low-dose hydrocortisone therapy.

    PubMed

    Cleare, A J; Miell, J; Heap, E; Sookdeo, S; Young, L; Malhi, G S; O'Keane, V

    2001-08-01

    -blind, placebo-controlled cross-over design, with 28 days on each treatment. They underwent repeated 24-h urinary free cortisol collections, a human CRH test, and an insulin stress test after both active and placebo arms of treatment. Looking at all subjects, 24-h urinary free cortisol was higher after active compared with placebo treatments, but 0900-h cortisol levels and the ACTH and cortisol responses to human CRH and the insulin stress test did not differ. However, a differential effect was seen in those patients who responded to active treatment (defined as a reduction in fatigue score to the median population level or less). In this group, there was a significant increase in the cortisol response to human CRH, which reversed the previously observed blunted responses seen in these patients. We conclude that the improvement in fatigue seen in some patients with chronic fatigue syndrome during hydrocortisone treatment is accompanied by a reversal of the blunted cortisol responses to human CRH. PMID:11502777

  12. Rapid automatic detection and alignment of repeats in protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Heger, A; Holm, L

    2000-11-01

    Many large proteins have evolved by internal duplication and many internal sequence repeats correspond to functional and structural units. We have developed an automatic algorithm, RADAR, for segmenting a query sequence into repeats. The segmentation procedure has three steps: (i) repeat length is determined by the spacing between suboptimal self-alignment traces; (ii) repeat borders are optimized to yield a maximal integer number of repeats, and (iii) distant repeats are validated by iterative profile alignment. The method identifies short composition biased as well as gapped approximate repeats and complex repeat architectures involving many different types of repeats in the query sequence. No manual intervention and no prior assumptions on the number and length of repeats are required. Comparison to the Pfam-A database indicates good coverage, accurate alignments, and reasonable repeat borders. Screening the Swissprot database revealed 3,000 repeats not annotated in existing domain databases. A number of these repeats had been described in the literature but most were novel. This illustrates how in times when curated databases grapple with ever increasing backlogs, automatic (re)analysis of sequences provides an efficient way to capture this important information. PMID:10966575

  13. Determination of the radiation dose from administered apolipoprotein tracers in humans.

    PubMed

    Venkatakrishnan, V; Fisher, W R; Zech, L A

    1997-10-01

    Radioactive tracers are routinely used in investigation of the metabolism of apolipoprotein kinetics. Here, metabolic studies of apolipoprotein tracers labeled with radioiodine were analyzed to determine the absorbed radiation dose received by the subject. This analysis used compartmental modeling techniques to evaluate the radiation dose to various organs and the total body resulting from radioiodinated tracer injection. In this approach, we combined the published kinetic models of iodine and those of specific apolipoproteins. From the solution of the integrated compartmental models, residence times of the radiation in various source organs, in particular the thyroid, whole body, bladder, and red bone marrow, have been determined for the apolipoproteins apoA-I, apoA-II, very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-apoB, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-apoB, each labeled with iodine 123, 133, 124, 131, 126, and 125. These tabulated values were used to calculate radiation doses to the different target organs. The thyroid is the organ that receives the largest dose of delivered radiation, and the importance of the duration of administration of iodine salts in blocking radiation to the thyroid is demonstrated. Optimal block times of 28 days for 131I and 42 days for 125I-labeled apolipoprotein tracers are proposed. When such a protocol is followed, the radiation dose to the thyroid and other organs is small by comparison to radiation doses allowed for workers whose occupation exposes them to radiation. The importance of frequent voiding to reduce the radiation dose to the bladder has also been demonstrated. PMID:9322813

  14. Sequence analysis of Vicia faba repeated DNA, the FokI repeat element.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, A; Yakura, K; Tanifuji, S

    1984-01-01

    A type of highly repeated DNA sequences present in the genome of Vicia faba was detected by digestion its nuclear DNA with FokI endonuclease and fractionating the digests on polyacrylamide gels. Four fragments of 59, 108, 177 and 246 bp of the FokI repeated sequences were collected from the gels and their primary structures were determined by the method of Maxam and Gilbert. These repeated DNA sequences were shown to be a multiple tandem array of a 59 bp sequence element. And its nucleotide sequence was almost completely conserved among all the sequence members of each the size class and also among these classes. This sequence element consists of a duplet of an about the duplet has an incomplete dyad symmetrical structure. Images PMID:6089113

  15. Dose-Dependent Effects of a Soluble Dietary Fibre (Pectin) on Food Intake, Adiposity, Gut Hypertrophy and Gut Satiety Hormone Secretion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Clare L.; Williams, Patricia A.; Garden, Karen E.; Thomson, Lynn M.; Ross, Alexander W.

    2015-01-01

    Soluble fermentable dietary fibre elicits gut adaptations, increases satiety and potentially offers a natural sustainable means of body weight regulation. Here we aimed to quantify physiological responses to graded intakes of a specific dietary fibre (pectin) in an animal model. Four isocaloric semi-purified diets containing 0, 3.3%, 6.7% or 10% w/w apple pectin were offered ad libitum for 8 or 28 days to young adult male rats (n = 8/group). Measurements were made of voluntary food intake, body weight, initial and final body composition by magnetic resonance imaging, final gut regional weights and histology, and final plasma satiety hormone concentrations. In both 8- and 28-day cohorts, dietary pectin inclusion rate was negatively correlated with food intake, body weight gain and the change in body fat mass, with no effect on lean mass gain. In both cohorts, pectin had no effect on stomach weight but pectin inclusion rate was positively correlated with weights and lengths of small intestine and caecum, jejunum villus height and crypt depth, ileum crypt depth, and plasma total glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY) concentrations, and at 8 days was correlated with weight and length of colon and with caecal mucosal depth. Therefore, the gut’s morphological and endocrine adaptations were dose-dependent, occurred within 8 days and were largely sustained for 28 days during continued dietary intervention. Increasing amounts of the soluble fermentable fibre pectin in the diet proportionately decreased food intake, body weight gain and body fat content, associated with proportionately increased satiety hormones GLP-1 and PYY and intestinal hypertrophy, supporting a role for soluble dietary fibre-induced satiety in healthy body weight regulation. PMID:25602757

  16. Characteristics of repeatedly assaultive psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Convit, A; Isay, D; Otis, D; Volavka, J

    1990-10-01

    Investigations of assaults in psychiatric hospitals have found that a small proportion of inpatients are responsible for a large percentage of the violence that occurs. In a large state hospital patients who were repeatedly violent (recidivists) were compared with patients who were violent only once or twice (nonrecidivists), and the relationships between repeatedly violent behavior and gender, age, and diagnosis were examined. All reports of violent incidents over a six-month period for a population of 1,552 inpatients--a total of 497 incidents involving 313 patients--were reviewed. Seventy patients were involved in three or more incidents each and were responsible for 53 percent of all violence. Recidivist men inflicted serious injuries at a rate ten times higher than that for all the other violent patients. Recidivist women were significantly younger than nonrecidivist assaultive women and were about the same mean age as the assaultive men. Recidivist women were also more likely to have organic brain disorder or personality disorder. PMID:2242874

  17. Nanostructured functional films from engineered repeat proteins

    PubMed Central

    Grove, Tijana Z.; Regan, Lynne; Cortajarena, Aitziber L.

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental advances in biotechnology, medicine, environment, electronics and energy require methods for precise control of spatial organization at the nanoscale. Assemblies that rely on highly specific biomolecular interactions are an attractive approach to form materials that display novel and useful properties. Here, we report on assembly of films from the designed, rod-shaped, superhelical, consensus tetratricopeptide repeat protein (CTPR). We have designed three peptide-binding sites into the 18 repeat CTPR to allow for further specific and non-covalent functionalization of films through binding of fluorescein labelled peptides. The fluorescence signal from the peptide ligand bound to the protein in the solid film is anisotropic, demonstrating that CTPR films can impose order on otherwise isotropic moieties. Circular dichroism measurements show that the individual protein molecules retain their secondary structure in the film, and X-ray scattering, birefringence and atomic force microscopy experiments confirm macroscopic alignment of CTPR molecules within the film. This work opens the door to the generation of innovative biomaterials with tailored structure and function. PMID:23594813

  18. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  19. Dangling chain elastomers as repeatable fibrillar adhesives.

    PubMed

    Sitti, Metin; Cusick, Brian; Aksak, Burak; Nese, Alper; Lee, Hyung-il; Dong, Hongchen; Kowalewski, Tomasz; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2009-10-01

    This work reports on repeatable adhesive materials prepared by controlled grafting of dangling hetero chains from polymer elastomers. The dangling chain elastomer system was prepared by grafting poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PBA) chains from prefunctionalized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer networks using atom transfer radical polymerization. To study the effects of chain growth and network strain as they relate to network adhesion mechanics, various lengths of PBA chains with degree of polymerizations (DP) of 65, 281, 508, and 1200 were incorporated into the PDMS matrix. PBA chains with a DP value of 281 grafted from a flat PDMS substrate showed the highest (approximately 3.5-fold) enhancement of nano- and macroscale adhesion relative to a flat raw (ungrafted and not prefunctionalized) PDMS substrate. Moreover, to study the effect of PBA dangling chains on adhesion in fibrillar elastomer structures inspired by gecko foot hairs, a dip-transfer fabrication method was used to graft PBA chains with a DP value of 296 from the tip endings of mushroom-shaped PDMS micropillars. A PBA chain covered micropillar array showed macroscale adhesion enhancement up to approximately 7 times relative to the flat ungrafted prefunctionalized PDMS control substrate, showing additional nonoptimized approximately 2-fold adhesion enhancement due to fibrillar structuring and mushroom-shaped tip ending. These dangling hetero chains on elastomer micro-/nanofibrillar structures may provide a novel fabrication platform for multilength scale, repeatable, and high-strength fibrillar adhesives inspired by gecko foot hairs. PMID:20355863

  20. Learning with repeated-game strategies

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, Christos A.; Romero, Julian

    2014-01-01

    We use the self-tuning Experience Weighted Attraction model with repeated-game strategies as a computer testbed to examine the relative frequency, speed of convergence and progression of a set of repeated-game strategies in four symmetric 2 × 2 games: Prisoner's Dilemma, Battle of the Sexes, Stag-Hunt, and Chicken. In the Prisoner's Dilemma game, we find that the strategy with the most occurrences is the “Grim-Trigger.” In the Battle of the Sexes game, a cooperative pair that alternates between the two pure-strategy Nash equilibria emerges as the one with the most occurrences. In the Stag-Hunt and Chicken games, the “Win-Stay, Lose-Shift” and “Grim-Trigger” strategies are the ones with the most occurrences. Overall, the pairs that converged quickly ended up at the cooperative outcomes, whereas the ones that were extremely slow to reach convergence ended up at non-cooperative outcomes. PMID:25126053

  1. Airborne Radar Interferometric Repeat-Pass Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Michel, Thierry R.; Jones, Cathleen E.; Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Chapman, Bruce D.; Fore, Alexander; Simard, Marc; Zebker, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    Earth science research often requires crustal deformation measurements at a variety of time scales, from seconds to decades. Although satellites have been used for repeat-track interferometric (RTI) synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) mapping for close to 20 years, RTI is much more difficult to implement from an airborne platform owing to the irregular trajectory of the aircraft compared with microwave imaging radar wavelengths. Two basic requirements for robust airborne repeat-pass radar interferometry include the ability to fly the platform to a desired trajectory within a narrow tube and the ability to have the radar beam pointed in a desired direction to a fraction of a beam width. Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is equipped with a precision auto pilot developed by NASA Dryden that allows the platform, a Gulfstream III, to nominally fly within a 5 m diameter tube and with an electronically scanned antenna to position the radar beam to a fraction of a beam width based on INU (inertial navigation unit) attitude angle measurements.

  2. Distributed parameter modeling of repeated truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Han-Ching

    1994-01-01

    A new approach to find homogeneous models for beam-like repeated flexible structures is proposed which conceptually involves two steps. The first step involves the approximation of 3-D non-homogeneous model by a 1-D periodic beam model. The structure is modeled as a 3-D non-homogeneous continuum. The displacement field is approximated by Taylor series expansion. Then, the cross sectional mass and stiffness matrices are obtained by energy equivalence using their additive properties. Due to the repeated nature of the flexible bodies, the mass, and stiffness matrices are also periodic. This procedure is systematic and requires less dynamics detail. The first step involves the homogenization from a 1-D periodic beam model to a 1-D homogeneous beam model. The periodic beam model is homogenized into an equivalent homogeneous beam model using the additive property of compliance along the generic axis. The major departure from previous approaches in literature is using compliance instead of stiffness in homogenization. An obvious justification is that the stiffness is additive at each cross section but not along the generic axis. The homogenized model preserves many properties of the original periodic model.

  3. Distribution of repeat unit differences between alleles at tandem repeat microsatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, L. |; Zhong, Y.; Chakraborty, R.

    1994-09-01

    PCR-based assays of tandemly repeated microsatellite loci detect genetic variation from which alleles may be scored by their repeat unit lengths. Comparison of allele sizes from such data yields a probability distribution (P{sub k}) of repeat unit differences (k) between alleles segregating in a population. We show that this distribution (P{sub k}; k = 0, 1,2,...) provides insight regarding the mechanism of production of new alleles at such loci and the demographic history of populations, far better than that obtained from other summary measures (e.g., heterozygosity, number of alleles, and the range of allele sizes). The distributions of P{sub k} under multi-step stepwise models of mutation are analytically derived, which show that when a population is at equilibrium under the mutation-drift balance, the distribution of repeat unit differences between alleles is positively skewed with a mode larger than zero. However, when the heterozygosity at a locus is low (say, less than 40%), P{sub k} is a monotonically decreasing function of k. Applications of this theory to data on repeat unit sizes at over 1,240 microsatellite loci from the Caucasians, categorized by the average heterozygosity of loci, indicate that at most microsatellite loci new alleles are produced by stepwise mutations, and this is consistent with the replication slippage mechanism of mutations. The repeat size changes of mutants are probably within one or two units of alleles from which the mutants arise. Distributions of P{sub k} at microsatellite loci located within genes show evidence of allele size constraints. No significant evidence of recent expansion of population sizes in the Caucasians is detected by the distribution of P{sub k}.

  4. New insights into the genetic instability in CCTG repeats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Pei; Lam, Sik Lok

    2015-10-01

    Tetranucleotide CCTG repeat expansion is associated with myotonic dystrophy type 2, which is an inherited and progressive muscle degeneration disease. Yet, no cure is available and the molecular mechanism of repeat expansion remains elusive. In this study, we used high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to reveal a mini-dumbbell structure formed by two CCTG repeats. Upon slippage in the nascent strand during DNA replication, the formation of the mini-dumbbell provides a possible pathway for a two-repeat expansion. In addition, fast exchange between two competing mini-dumbbells among three repeats results in a mini-loop structure that accounts for one-repeat expansion. These mini-dumbbell and mini-loop intermediates can also co-exist at multiple sites in CCTG repeats, leading to three or larger size repeat expansions. PMID:26384951

  5. Receptionist input to quality and safety in repeat prescribing in UK general practice: ethnographic case study

    PubMed Central

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Russell, Jill; Myall, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe, explore, and compare organisational routines for repeat prescribing in general practice to identify contributors and barriers to safety and quality. Design Ethnographic case study. Setting Four urban UK general practices with diverse organisational characteristics using electronic patient records that supported semi-automation of repeat prescribing. Participants 395 hours of ethnographic observation of staff (25 doctors, 16 nurses, 4 healthcare assistants, 6 managers, and 56 reception or administrative staff), and 28 documents and other artefacts relating to repeat prescribing locally and nationally. Main outcome measures Potential threats to patient safety and characteristics of good practice. Methods Observation of how doctors, receptionists, and other administrative staff contributed to, and collaborated on, the repeat prescribing routine. Analysis included mapping prescribing routines, building a rich description of organisational practices, and drawing these together through narrative synthesis. This was informed by a sociological model of how organisational routines shape and are shaped by information and communications technologies. Results Repeat prescribing was a complex, technology-supported social practice requiring collaboration between clinical and administrative staff, with important implications for patient safety. More than half of requests for repeat prescriptions were classed as “exceptions” by receptionists (most commonly because the drug, dose, or timing differed from what was on the electronic repeat list). They managed these exceptions by making situated judgments that enabled them (sometimes but not always) to bridge the gap between the idealised assumptions about tasks, roles, and interactions that were built into the electronic patient record and formal protocols, and the actual repeat prescribing routine as it played out in practice. This work was creative and demanded both explicit and tacit knowledge

  6. Deposition of 7-aminoflunitrazepam and flunitrazepam in hair after a single dose of Rohypnol.

    PubMed

    Negrusz, A; Moore, C M; Hinkel, K B; Stockham, T L; Verma, M; Strong, M J; Janicak, P G

    2001-09-01

    In recent years, there has been a notable increase in the number of reports on drug-facilitated sexual assault. Benzodiazepines are the most common so-called "date-rape" drugs, with flunitrazepam (Rohypnol) being one of the most frequently mentioned. The aim of this study was to determine whether flunitrazepam and its major metabolite 7-aminoflunitrazepam could be detected in hair collected from ten healthy volunteers after receiving a single 2 mg dose of Rohypnol using solid phase extraction and NCI-GC-MS. Such data would be of great importance to law enforcement agencies trying to determine the best time interval for hair collection from a victim of drug-facilitated sexual assault in order to reveal drug use. Ten healthy volunteers (eight women and two men, 21 to 49 years old) participated in the study. The following hair samples were collected from each volunteer: one before flunitrazepam administration, and 1, 3, 5, 14, 21, and 28 days after. In five volunteers, 7-aminoflunitrazepam was detected 24 h after flunitrazepam administration and remained in hair throughout the entire 28-day study period (0.6-8.0 pg/mg). In two cases, 7-aminoflunitrazepam appeared in hair 21 days after drug intake (0.5-2.7 pg/mg), and in two subjects 14 days later (0.5-5.4 pg/mg). In one volunteer, 7-aminoflunitrazepam was detected on day 14 and 21 but concentrations were below the quantitation limit. Flunitrazepam was detected in some samples but all concentrations were below the quantitation limit (0.5-2.3 pg/mg). PMID:11569557

  7. 47 CFR 80.1179 - On-board repeater limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false On-board repeater limitations. 80.1179 Section... SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Voluntary Radio Installations On-Board Communications § 80.1179 On-board repeater limitations. When an on-board repeater is used, the following limitations must...

  8. Erroneous Memories Arising from Repeated Attempts to Remember

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkel, Linda A.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of repeated and prolonged attempts at remembering on false memory rates was assessed in three experiments. Participants saw and imagined pictures and then made repeated recall attempts before taking a source memory test. Although the number of items recalled increased with repeated tests, the net gains were associated with more source…

  9. Neutron dose equivalent meter

    DOEpatents

    Olsher, Richard H.; Hsu, Hsiao-Hua; Casson, William H.; Vasilik, Dennis G.; Kleck, Jeffrey H.; Beverding, Anthony

    1996-01-01

    A neutron dose equivalent detector for measuring neutron dose capable of accurately responding to neutron energies according to published fluence to dose curves. The neutron dose equivalent meter has an inner sphere of polyethylene, with a middle shell overlying the inner sphere, the middle shell comprising RTV.RTM. silicone (organosiloxane) loaded with boron. An outer shell overlies the middle shell and comprises polyethylene loaded with tungsten. The neutron dose equivalent meter defines a channel through the outer shell, the middle shell, and the inner sphere for accepting a neutron counter tube. The outer shell is loaded with tungsten to provide neutron generation, increasing the neutron dose equivalent meter's response sensitivity above 8 MeV.

  10. Repeat Testing Effects on Credentialing Exams: Are Repeaters Misinformed or Uninformed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinberg, Richard A.; Raymond, Mark R.; Haist, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    To mitigate security concerns and unfair score gains, credentialing programs routinely administer new test material to examinees retesting after an initial failing attempt. Counterintuitively, a small but growing body of recent research suggests that repeating the identical form does not create an unfair advantage. This study builds upon and…

  11. Who Repeats Algebra, and How Does Initial Performance Relate to Improvement When the Course Is Repeated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Anthony; Jaquet, Karina; Finkelstein, Neal

    2016-01-01

    The information provided in this report shows how students perform when they repeat algebra I and how the level of improvement varies depending on initial course performance and the academic measure (course grades or CST scores). This information can help inform decisions and policies regarding whether and under what circumstances students should…

  12. Aging and repeated thought suppression success.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Ann E; Smyth, Frederick L; Beadel, Jessica R; Teachman, Bethany A

    2013-01-01

    Intrusive thoughts and attempts to suppress them are common, but while suppression may be effective in the short-term, it can increase thought recurrence in the long-term. Because intentional suppression involves controlled processing, and many aspects of controlled processing decline with age, age differences in thought suppression outcomes may emerge, especially over repeated thought suppression attempts as cognitive resources are expended. Using multilevel modeling, we examined age differences in reactions to thought suppression attempts across four thought suppression sequences in 40 older and 42 younger adults. As expected, age differences were more prevalent during suppression than during free monitoring periods, with younger adults indicating longer, more frequent thought recurrences and greater suppression difficulty. Further, younger adults' thought suppression outcomes changed over time, while trajectories for older adults' were relatively stable. Results are discussed in terms of older adults' reduced thought recurrence, which was potentially afforded by age-related changes in reactive control and distractibility. PMID:23776442

  13. Semiconductor structures for repeated velocity overshoot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J. A., Jr.; Capasso, F.; Thornber, K. K.

    1982-12-01

    The conditions required for obtaining repeated velocity overshoot in semiconductors are discussed. Two classes of structures that provide these conditions are considered. The structures are seen as holding promise for achieving average drift velocities well in excess of the maximum steady-state velocity over distances ranging from submicron to tens of microns. In structures of the first class, the stairstep in potential is achieved by using a graded bandgap that is similar to the avalanche photodetector described by Williams et al. (1982), where the composition is graded from GaAs to Al(0.2)Ga(0.8)As. The second class of structures uses alternating planar doped charge sheets, as described by Malik et al. (1980).

  14. [The repeat reliability of somatosensory evoked potentials].

    PubMed

    Strenge, H

    1989-09-01

    The test-immediate-retest reliability of latency and amplitude values of cervical and cortical somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) to median nerve stimulation was assessed in 86 normal subjects aged 15 to 71 years. In addition to the stability of data between repeat trials within one test session the standard errors of measurement and the interpretable differences for SEP measures were calculated according to measurement theory. The study revealed retest correlations rtt greater than 0.80 for all latency measures of the cervical and cortical SEPs and all cortical amplitude parameters. The highest stability was found for the latency measures of the cervical components P10, N11, N13, the cortical components P16 and N20 and for the amplitude N20/P25. PMID:2507277

  15. Simple sequence repeats in bryophyte mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chao-Xian; Zhu, Rui-Liang; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are thought to be common in plant mitochondrial (mt) genomes, but have yet to be fully described for bryophytes. We screened the mt genomes of two liverworts (Marchantia polymorpha and Pleurozia purpurea), two mosses (Physcomitrella patens and Anomodon rugelii) and two hornworts (Phaeoceros laevis and Nothoceros aenigmaticus), and detected 475 SSRs. Some SSRs are found conserved during the evolution, among which except one exists in both liverworts and mosses, all others are shared only by the two liverworts, mosses or hornworts. SSRs are known as DNA tracts having high mutation rates; however, according to our observations, they still can evolve slowly. The conservativeness of these SSRs suggests that they are under strong selection and could play critical roles in maintaining the gene functions. PMID:24491104

  16. Trochlear Nerve Schwannoma With Repeated Intratumoral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengfei; Bao, Yuhai; Zhang, Wenchuan

    2016-09-01

    Trochlear nerve schwannoma is extremely rare, with only 35 pathologically confirmed patients being reported in the literature. Here, the authors report a patient of trochlear nerve schwannoma in the prepontine cistern manifesting as facial pain and double vision and presenting the image characteristics of repeated intratumoral hemorrhage, which has never been reported in the literature. Total tumor along with a portion of the trochlear nerve was removed by using a retrosigmoid approach. Facial pain disappeared after operation, and the diplopia remained. Follow-up studies have shown no tumor recurrence for 2 years and the simultaneous alleviation of diplopia. Information regarding the clinical presentation, radiological features and surgical outcomes of trochlear nerve schwannoma are discussed and reviewed in the paper. PMID:27607129

  17. The hidden price of repeated traumatic exposure.

    PubMed

    Levy-Gigi, Einat; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2014-07-01

    Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated reduced hippocampal volume in trauma-exposed individuals without posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the implications of such a deficit in this non-clinical population are still unclear. Animal and human models of PTSD suggest that hippocampal deficit may result in impaired learning and use of associations between contextual information and aversive events. Previous study has shown that individuals with PTSD have a selective impairment in reversing the negative outcome of context-related information. The aim of this study was to test whether non-PTSD individuals who are repeatedly exposed to traumatic events display similar impairment. To that end, we compared the performance of active-duty firefighters who are frequently exposed to traumatic events as part of their occupational routine and civilian matched-controls with no history of trauma-exposure. We used a novel cue-context reversal paradigm, which separately evaluates reversal of negative and positive outcomes of cue and context-related information. As predicted, we found that while both trauma-exposed firefighters and unexposed matched-controls were able to acquire and retain stimulus-outcome associations, firefighters struggled to learn that a previously negative context is later associated with a positive outcome. This impairment did not correlate with levels of PTSD, anxiety or depressive symptoms. The results suggest that similar to individuals with PTSD, highly exposed individuals fail to associate traumatic outcomes with their appropriate context. This impairment may reflect a possible hidden price of repeated traumatic exposure, which is not necessarily associated with PTSD diagnosis, and may affect the way highly exposed individuals interpret and react to their environment. PMID:24810272

  18. Pharmacological characterization of repeated administration of the first generation abused synthetic cannabinoid CP47,497.

    PubMed

    Grim, Travis W; Samano, Kimberly L; Ignatowska-Jankowska, Bogna; Tao, Qing; Sim-Selly, Laura J; Selley, Dana E; Wise, Laura E; Poklis, Alphonse; Lichtman, Aron H

    2016-05-01

    A series of in vivo and in vitro assays were conducted to characterize the pharmacological effects of the first generation abused synthetic cannabinoid CP47,497, a racemic bicyclic cannabinoid that is similar in structure to the potent, high-efficacy synthetic cannabinoid CP55,940. CP47,497 was less efficacious than CP55,940 in activating G-proteins and dose-dependently produced common CB1 receptor-dependent pharmacological effects (i.e. catalepsy, hypothermia, antinociception, and hypolocomotion). CP47,497 also substituted for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in the mouse drug discrimination, indicating that both drugs elicited a similar interceptive stimulus. The pharmacological effects of CP47,497 underwent tolerance following repeated administration and showed cross-tolerance following repeated THC administration, further suggesting a common cannabimimetic mechanism of action. Finally, the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant precipitated similar magnitudes of somatic withdrawal responses in mice treated repeatedly with THC or CP47,497. Taken together, these data verify the acute cannabimimetic effects of CP47,497, and indicate tolerance and dependence following repeated administration. The assays used here provide a straightforward approach to characterize the emerging next generation of abused synthetic cannabinoids. PMID:27149200

  19. Ceftriaxone attenuates locomotor activity induced by acute and repeated cocaine exposure in mice.

    PubMed

    Tallarida, Christopher S; Corley, Gladys; Kovalevich, Jane; Yen, William; Langford, Dianne; Rawls, Scott M

    2013-11-27

    Ceftriaxone (CTX) decreases locomotor activation produced by initial cocaine exposure and attenuates development of behavioral sensitization produced by repeated cocaine exposure. An important question that has not yet been answered is whether or not CTX reduces behavioral sensitization to cocaine in cases in which the antibiotic is administered only during the period of cocaine absence that follows repeated cocaine exposure and precedes reintroduction to cocaine. We investigated this question using C57BL/6 mice. Mice pretreated with cocaine (15mg/kg×14 days) and then challenged with cocaine (15mg/kg) after 30 days of cocaine absence displayed sensitization of locomotor activity. For combination experiments, CTX injected during the 30 days of cocaine absence attenuated behavioral sensitization produced by cocaine challenge. In the case in which CTX was injected together with cocaine for 14 days, development of behavioral sensitization to cocaine challenge was also reduced. CTX attenuated the increase in locomotor activity produced by acute cocaine exposure; however, its efficacy was dependent on the dose of cocaine as inhibition was detected against 30mg/kg, but not 15mg/kg, of cocaine. These results from mice indicate that CTX attenuates locomotor activity produced by acute and repeated cocaine exposure and counters cocaine's locomotor activating properties in a paradigm in which the antibiotic is injected during the period of forced cocaine absence that follows repeated cocaine exposure. PMID:24120434

  20. Trichosanthin inhibits integration of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 through depurinating the long-terminal repeats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen-Long; Feng, Du; Wu, Ju; Sui, Sen-Fang

    2010-04-01

    Trichosanthin (TCS) is a type I ribosome-inactivating protein with potent inhibitory activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1. However, the anti-viral mechanism remains elusive. By a well-accepted HIV-1 integration assay, we demonstrated that TCS prevents HIV-1 DNA integration in a dose dependent manner in cell culture. At the same condition, TCS fails to induce obvious cytotoxicity and is also unable to interference viral early events such as viral entry, uncoating or reverse transcription. The HIV-1 integrase can integrate HIV-1 long-terminal repeats into cellular chromosome. The interaction of TCS with these viral integration components was also examined, indicating that TCS does not interact with HIV-1 integrase by the GST-pull down assay, but binds to the long terminal repeats in a transient manner. We further revealed that TCS can efficiently depurinate HIV-1 long-terminal repeats, which may be responsible for the inhibitory activity on HIV-1 integration. In conclusion, we elucidated that TCS specifically inhibits HIV-1 integration by depurinating the long-terminal repeats. PMID:19669933

  1. Repeated cocaine administration promotes long-term potentiation induction in rat medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiung-Chun; Lin, Hsiao-Ju; Hsu, Kuei-Sen

    2007-08-01

    Although drug-induced adaptations in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) may contribute to several core aspects of addictive behaviors, it is not clear yet whether drugs of abuse elicit changes in synaptic plasticity at the PFC excitatory synapses. Here we report that, following repeated cocaine administration (15 mg/kg/day intraperitoneal injection for 5 consecutive days) with a 3-day withdrawal, excitatory synapses to layer V pyramidal neurons in rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) become highly sensitive to the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) by repeated correlated presynaptic and postsynaptic activity. This promoted LTP induction is caused by cocaine-induced reduction of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptor-mediated inhibition of mPFC pyramidal neurons. In contrast, in slices from rats treated with saline or a single dose of cocaine, the same LTP induction protocol did not induce significant LTP unless the blockade of GABA(A) receptors. Blockade of the D1-like receptors specifically prevented the cocaine-induced enhancement of LTP. Repeated cocaine exposure reduced the GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic currents in mPFC pyramidal neurons. Biotinylation experiments revealed a significant reduction of surface GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit expression in mPFC slices from repeated cocaine-treated rats. These findings support an important role for cocaine-induced enhancement of synaptic plasticity in the PFC in the development of drug-associated behavioral plasticity. PMID:17050645

  2. Genesis, effects and fates of repeats in prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Treangen, Todd J; Abraham, Anne-Laure; Touchon, Marie; Rocha, Eduardo P C

    2009-05-01

    DNA repeats are causes and consequences of genome plasticity. Repeats are created by intrachromosomal recombination or horizontal transfer. They are targeted by recombination processes leading to amplifications, deletions and rearrangements of genetic material. The identification and analysis of repeats in nearly 700 genomes of bacteria and archaea is facilitated by the existence of sequence data and adequate bioinformatic tools. These have revealed the immense diversity of repeats in genomes, from those created by selfish elements to the ones used for protection against selfish elements, from those arising from transient gene amplifications to the ones leading to stable duplications. Experimental works have shown that some repeats do not carry any adaptive value, while others allow functional diversification and increased expression. All repeats carry some potential to disorganize and destabilize genomes. Because recombination and selection for repeats vary between genomes, the number and types of repeats are also quite diverse and in line with ecological variables, such as host-dependent associations or population sizes, and with genetic variables, such as the recombination machinery. From an evolutionary point of view, repeats represent both opportunities and problems. We describe how repeats are created and how they can be found in genomes. We then focus on the functional and genomic consequences of repeats that dictate their fate. PMID:19396957

  3. Studies of an expanded trinucleotide repeat in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, P.; Wang, S.; Merry, D.

    1994-09-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a progressive motor neuron disease caused by expansion of a trinucleotide repeat in the androgen receptor gene (AR{sup exp}). AR{sup exp} repeats expand further or contract in approximately 25% of transmissions. Analogous {open_quotes}dynamic mutations{close_quotes} have been reported in other expanded trinucleotide repeat disorders. We have been developing a mouse model of this disease using a transgenic approach. Expression of the SBMA AR was documented in transgenic mice with an inducible promoter. No phenotypic effects of transgene expression were observed. We have extended our previous results on stability of the expanded trinucleotide repeat in transgenic mice in two lines carrying AR{sup exp}. Tail DNA was amplified by PCR using primers spanning the repeat on 60 AR{sup exp} transgenic mice from four different transgenic lines. Migration of the PCR product through an acrylamide gel showed no change of the 45 CAG repeat length in any progeny. Similarly, PCR products from 23 normal repeat transgenics showed no change from the repeat length of the original construct. Unlike the disease allele in humans, the expanded repeat AR cDNA in transgenic mice showed no change in repeat length with transmission. The relative stability of CAG repeats seen in the transgenic mice may indicate either differences in the fidelity of replicative enzymes, or differences in error identification and repair between mice and humans. Integration site or structural properties of the transgene itself might also play a role.

  4. Analysis of separate isolates of Bordetella pertussis repeated DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    McPheat, W L; Hanson, J H; Livey, I; Robertson, J S

    1989-06-01

    Two independent isolates of a Bordetella pertussis repeated DNA unit were sequenced and shown to be an insertion sequence element with five nucleotide differences between the two copies. The sequences were 1053 bp in length with near-perfect terminal inverted repeats of 28 bp, had three open reading frames, and were each flanked by short direct repeats. The two insertion sequences showed considerable homology to two other B. pertussis repeated DNA sequences reported recently: IS481 and a 530 bp repeated DNA unit. The B. pertussis insertion sequence would appear to comprise a group of closely related sequences differing mainly in flanking direct repeats and the terminal inverted repeats. The two isolates reported here, which were from the adenylate cyclase and agglutinogen 2 regions of the genome, were numbered IS48lvl and IS48lv2 respectively. PMID:2559151

  5. Structural and Energetic Characterization of the Ankyrin Repeat Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Parra, R. Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Verstraete, Nina; Ferreiro, Diego U.

    2015-01-01

    Ankyrin repeat containing proteins are one of the most abundant solenoid folds. Usually implicated in specific protein-protein interactions, these proteins are readily amenable for design, with promising biotechnological and biomedical applications. Studying repeat protein families presents technical challenges due to the high sequence divergence among the repeating units. We developed and applied a systematic method to consistently identify and annotate the structural repetitions over the members of the complete Ankyrin Repeat Protein Family, with increased sensitivity over previous studies. We statistically characterized the number of repeats, the folding of the repeat-arrays, their structural variations, insertions and deletions. An energetic analysis of the local frustration patterns reveal the basic features underlying fold stability and its relation to the functional binding regions. We found a strong linear correlation between the conservation of the energetic features in the repeat arrays and their sequence variations, and discuss new insights into the organization and function of these ubiquitous proteins. PMID:26691182

  6. Dose tracking and dose auditing in a comprehensive computed tomography dose-reduction program.

    PubMed

    Duong, Phuong-Anh; Little, Brent P

    2014-08-01

    Implementation of a comprehensive computed tomography (CT) radiation dose-reduction program is a complex undertaking, requiring an assessment of baseline doses, an understanding of dose-saving techniques, and an ongoing appraisal of results. We describe the role of dose tracking in planning and executing a dose-reduction program and discuss the use of the American College of Radiology CT Dose Index Registry at our institution. We review the basics of dose-related CT scan parameters, the components of the dose report, and the dose-reduction techniques, showing how an understanding of each technique is important in effective auditing of "outlier" doses identified by dose tracking. PMID:25129210

  7. Toxicology study assessing efficacy and safety of repeated administration of lipid/DNA complexes to mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Alton, E W F W; Boyd, A C; Cheng, S H; Davies, J C; Davies, L A; Dayan, A; Gill, D R; Griesenbach, U; Higgins, T; Hyde, S C; Innes, J A; McLachlan, G; Porteous, D; Pringle, I; Scheule, R K; Sumner-Jones, S

    2014-01-01

    For gene therapy to improve lung function in cystic fibrosis (CF) subjects, repeated administration of the gene transfer agent over the lifetime of patients is likely to be necessary. This requirement limits the utility of adenoviral and adeno-associated viral vectors (both previously evaluated in CF gene therapy trials) because of induced adaptive immune responses that render repeated dosing ineffective. For CF gene therapy trials, non-viral vectors are currently the only viable option. We previously showed that the cationic lipid formulation GL67A is the most efficient of several non-viral vectors analysed for airway gene transfer. Here, we assessed the efficacy and safety of administering 12 inhaled doses of GL67A complexed with pGM169, a CpG-free plasmid encoding human CFTR complementary DNA, into mice. We show that repeated administration of pGM169/GL67A to murine lungs is feasible, safe and achieves reproducible, dose-related and persistent gene expression (>140 days after each dose) using an aerosol generated by a clinically relevant nebuliser. This study supports progression into the first non-viral multidose lung trial in CF patients. PMID:24196086

  8. Repeated stereotactic body radiotherapy for oligometastatic prostate cancer recurrence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the outcome of prostate cancer (PCa) patients diagnosed with oligometastatic disease at recurrence and treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods Non-castrate patients with up to 3 synchronous metastases (bone and/or lymph nodes) diagnosed on positron emission tomography - computed tomography, following biochemical recurrence after local curative treatment, were treated with (repeated) SBRT to a dose of 50 Gy in 10 fractions or 30 Gy in 3 fractions. Androgen deprivation therapy-free survival (ADT-FS) defined as the time interval between the first day of SBRT and the initiation of ADT was the primary endpoint. ADT was initiated if more than 3 metastases were detected during follow-up even when patients were still asymptomatic. Secondary endpoints were local control, progression free survival (PFS) and toxicity. Toxicity was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Results With a median follow-up from time of SBRT of 2 years, we treated 50 patients with 70 metastatic lesions with a local control rate of 100%. The primary involved metastatic sites were lymph nodes (54%), bone (44%), and viscera (2%). The median PFS was 19 mo (95% CI: 13–25 mo) with 75% of recurring patients having ≤3 metastases. A 2nd and 3rd course of SBRT was delivered in 19 and 6 patients respectively. This results in a median ADT-FS of 25 months (20–30 mo). On univariate analysis, only a short PSA doubling time was a significant predictor for both PFS (HR: 0.90, 95% CI: 0.82 – 0.99) and ADT-FS (HR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.71 – 0.97). Ten patients (20%) developed toxicity following treatment, which was classified as grade I in 7 and grade II in 3 patients. Conclusion Repeated SBRT for oligometastatic prostate cancer postpones palliative androgen deprivation therapy with 2 years without grade III toxicity. PMID:24920079

  9. Hemodialysis Dose and Adequacy

    MedlinePlus

    ... a patient's Kt/V is extremely low, the measurement should be repeated, unless a reason for the low Kt/V is obvious. Obvious reasons include treatment interruption, problems with blood or solution flow, and a problem in sampling either the pre- ...

  10. Dosimetric investigation of high dose rate, gated IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Teh; Chen Yan; Hossain, Murshed; Li, Jinsheng; Ma, C.-M.

    2008-11-15

    Increasing the dose rate offers time saving for IMRT delivery but the dosimetric accuracy is a concern, especially in the case of treating a moving target. The objective of this work is to determine the effect of dose rate associated with organ motion and gated treatment using step-and-shoot IMRT delivery. Both measurements and analytical simulation on clinical plans are performed to study the dosimetric differences between high dose rate and low dose rate gated IMRT step-and-shoot delivery. Various sites of IMRT plans for liver, lung, pancreas, and breast cancers were delivered to a custom-made motorized phantom, which simulated sinusoidal movement. Repeated measurements were taken for gated and nongated delivery with different gating settings and three dose rates, 100, 500, and 1000 MU/min using ion chambers and extended dose range films. For the study of the residual motion effect for individual segment dose and composite dose of IMRT plans, our measurements with 30%-60% phase gating and without gating for various dose rates were compared. A small but clinically acceptable difference in delivered dose was observed between 1000, 500, and 100 MU/min at 30%-60% phase gating. A simulation is presented, which can be used for predicting dose profiles for patient cases in the presence of motion and gating to confirm that IMRT step-and-shoot delivery with gating for 1000 MU/min are not much different from 500 MU/min. Based on the authors sample plan analyses, our preliminary results suggest that using 1000 MU/Min dose rate is dosimetrically accurate and efficient for IMRT treatment delivery with gating. Nonetheless, for the concern of patient care and safety, a patient specific QA should be performed as usual for IMRT plans for high dose rate deliveries.

  11. Detection of repeating and "anti-repeating" earthquakes in the Bucaramanga Nest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, S. A.; Prieto, G.; Beroza, G. C.

    2011-12-01

    The Bucaramanga Nest, beneath northern Colombia represents the densest concentration of intermediate-depth earthquakes in the world. The roughly 11 km3 volume produces approximately 15 events per day, yielding an active catalog of seismicity well separated from surrounding seismic activity. We correlate template-event waveforms from known earthquakes to continuous records from the Colombian National (RSNC) seismic network. Typical repeating events are identified as well as the more curious "anti-repeat" events for which seismograms show reversed polarity and nearly perfect anti-correlation. These events are of particular interest as they are not known for shallow, crustal earthquake populations. By compiling a more complete catalog of earthquakes, and by developing precise relative locations, we seek to understand the temporal and size variations of these recurring events in the Bucaramanga Nest.

  12. Comparison of simple sequence repeats in 19 Archaea.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, S

    2006-01-01

    All organisms that have been studied until now have been found to have differential distribution of simple sequence repeats (SSRs), with more SSRs in intergenic than in coding sequences. SSR distribution was investigated in Archaea genomes where complete chromosome sequences of 19 Archaea were analyzed with the program SPUTNIK to find di- to penta-nucleotide repeats. The number of repeats was determined for the complete chromosome sequences and for the coding and non-coding sequences. Different from what has been found for other groups of organisms, there is an abundance of SSRs in coding regions of the genome of some Archaea. Dinucleotide repeats were rare and CG repeats were found in only two Archaea. In general, trinucleotide repeats are the most abundant SSR motifs; however, pentanucleotide repeats are abundant in some Archaea. Some of the tetranucleotide and pentanucleotide repeat motifs are organism specific. In general, repeats are short and CG-rich repeats are present in Archaea having a CG-rich genome. Among the 19 Archaea, SSR density was not correlated with genome size or with optimum growth temperature. Pentanucleotide density had an inverse correlation with the CG content of the genome. PMID:17183484

  13. REPdenovo: Inferring De Novo Repeat Motifs from Short Sequence Reads

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chong; Nielsen, Rasmus; Wu, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Repeat elements are important components of eukaryotic genomes. One limitation in our understanding of repeat elements is that most analyses rely on reference genomes that are incomplete and often contain missing data in highly repetitive regions that are difficult to assemble. To overcome this problem we develop a new method, REPdenovo, which assembles repeat sequences directly from raw shotgun sequencing data. REPdenovo can construct various types of repeats that are highly repetitive and have low sequence divergence within copies. We show that REPdenovo is substantially better than existing methods both in terms of the number and the completeness of the repeat sequences that it recovers. The key advantage of REPdenovo is that it can reconstruct long repeats from sequence reads. We apply the method to human data and discover a number of potentially new repeats sequences that have been missed by previous repeat annotations. Many of these sequences are incorporated into various parasite genomes, possibly because the filtering process for host DNA involved in the sequencing of the parasite genomes failed to exclude the host derived repeat sequences. REPdenovo is a new powerful computational tool for annotating genomes and for addressing questions regarding the evolution of repeat families. The software tool, REPdenovo, is available for download at https://github.com/Reedwarbler/REPdenovo. PMID:26977803

  14. Measuring pacemaker dose: a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Studenski, Matthew T; Xiao, Ying; Harrison, Amy S

    2012-01-01

    Recently in our clinic, we have seen an increased number of patients presenting with pacemakers and defibrillators. Precautions are taken to develop a treatment plan that minimizes the dose to the pacemaker because of the adverse effects of radiation on the electronics. Here we analyze different dosimeters to determine which is the most accurate in measuring pacemaker or defibrillator dose while at the same time not requiring a significant investment in time to maintain an efficient workflow in the clinic. The dosimeters analyzed here were ion chambers, diodes, metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFETs), and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters. A simple phantom was used to quantify the angular and energy dependence of each dosimeter. Next, 8 patients plans were delivered to a Rando phantom with all the dosimeters located where the pacemaker would be, and the measurements were compared with the predicted dose. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image was obtained to determine the dosimeter response in the kilovoltage energy range. In terms of the angular and energy dependence of the dosimeters, the ion chamber and diode were the most stable. For the clinical cases, all the dosimeters match relatively well with the predicted dose, although the ideal dosimeter to use is case dependent. The dosimeters, especially the MOSFETS, tend to be less accurate for the plans, with many lateral beams. Because of their efficiency, we recommend using a MOSFET or a diode to measure the dose. If a discrepancy is observed between the measured and expected dose (especially when the pacemaker to field edge is <10 cm), we recommend analyzing the treatment plan to see whether there are many lateral beams. Follow-up with another dosimeter rather than repeating multiple times with the same type of dosimeter. All dosimeters should be placed after the CBCT has been acquired. PMID:21875785

  15. Measuring pacemaker dose: A clinical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Studenski, Matthew T.; Xiao Ying; Harrison, Amy S.

    2012-07-01

    Recently in our clinic, we have seen an increased number of patients presenting with pacemakers and defibrillators. Precautions are taken to develop a treatment plan that minimizes the dose to the pacemaker because of the adverse effects of radiation on the electronics. Here we analyze different dosimeters to determine which is the most accurate in measuring pacemaker or defibrillator dose while at the same time not requiring a significant investment in time to maintain an efficient workflow in the clinic. The dosimeters analyzed here were ion chambers, diodes, metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFETs), and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters. A simple phantom was used to quantify the angular and energy dependence of each dosimeter. Next, 8 patients plans were delivered to a Rando phantom with all the dosimeters located where the pacemaker would be, and the measurements were compared with the predicted dose. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image was obtained to determine the dosimeter response in the kilovoltage energy range. In terms of the angular and energy dependence of the dosimeters, the ion chamber and diode were the most stable. For the clinical cases, all the dosimeters match relatively well with the predicted dose, although the ideal dosimeter to use is case dependent. The dosimeters, especially the MOSFETS, tend to be less accurate for the plans, with many lateral beams. Because of their efficiency, we recommend using a MOSFET or a diode to measure the dose. If a discrepancy is observed between the measured and expected dose (especially when the pacemaker to field edge is <10 cm), we recommend analyzing the treatment plan to see whether there are many lateral beams. Follow-up with another dosimeter rather than repeating multiple times with the same type of dosimeter. All dosimeters should be placed after the CBCT has been acquired.

  16. Know your dose: RADDOSE

    PubMed Central

    Paithankar, Karthik S.; Garman, Elspeth F.

    2010-01-01

    The program RADDOSE is widely used to compute the dose absorbed by a macromolecular crystal during an X-ray diffraction experiment. A number of factors affect the absorbed dose, including the incident X-ray flux density, the photon energy and the composition of the macromolecule and of the buffer in the crystal. An experimental dose limit for macromolecular crystallography (MX) of 30 MGy at 100 K has been reported, beyond which the biological information obtained may be compromised. Thus, for the planning of an optimized diffraction experiment the estimation of dose has become an additional tool. A number of approximations were made in the original version of RADDOSE. Recently, the code has been modified in order to take into account fluorescent X-­ray escape from the crystal (version 2) and the inclusion of incoherent (Compton) scattering into the dose calculation is now reported (version 3). The Compton cross-section, although negligible at the energies currently commonly used in MX, should be considered in dose calculations for incident energies above 20 keV. Calculations using version 3 of RADDOSE reinforce previous studies that predict a reduction in the absorbed dose when data are collected at higher energies compared with data collected at 12.4 keV. Hence, a longer irradiation lifetime for the sample can be achieved at these higher energies but this is at the cost of lower diffraction intensities. The parameter ‘diffraction-dose efficiency’, which is the diffracted intensity per absorbed dose, is revisited in an attempt to investigate the benefits and pitfalls of data collection using higher and lower energy radiation, particularly for thin crystals. PMID:20382991

  17. Power Line Integrity Monitor and Repeater

    SciTech Connect

    Svoboda, John

    2005-09-30

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed a power system integrity monitor and repeater that provide real time status of the integrity of the physical structure of power poles and transmission towers. It may be applied to other structures, such as pipelines or cell towers, which have multiple segments that can cover hundreds of miles. Sensors and on-board processing provide indication of tampering or impending damage to the structure with information provided to the central operations center or supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) for mitigative actions. This software runs on a series of small, inexpensive, low power electronic sensor platforms that are mounted on each tower of an electric power transmission or distribution system for the purpose of communicating system integrity to a central location. The software allows each platform to: 1) interface with sensors that monitor tower integrity, 2) record and analyze events, 3) communicate sensor information to other sensor platforms located on adjacent towers or to a central monitoring location, and 4) derive, conserve, and store platform power from the transmission of electric power.

  18. Repeating covalent structure of streptococcal M protein.

    PubMed Central

    Beachey, E H; Seyer, J M; Kang, A H

    1978-01-01

    We have attempted to identify the covalent structure of the M protein molecule of group A streptococci that is responsible for inducing type-specific, protective immunity. M protein was extracted from type 24 streptococci, purified, and cleaved with cyanogen bromide. Seven cyanogen bromide peptides were purified and further characterized. Together, the peptides account for the entire amino acid content of the M protein molecule. Each of the purified peptides possessed the type-specific determinant that inhibits opsonic antibodies for group A streptococci. The primary structures of the amino-terminal regions of each of the purified peptides was studied by automated Edman degradation. The partial sequences of two of the peptides were found to be identical to each other and to that of the uncleaved M protein molecule through at least the first 27 residues. The amino-terminal sequences of the remaining five peptides were identical to each other through the twentieth residue but completely different from the amino-terminal region of the other two peptides. However, the type-specific immunoreactivity and the incomplete analysis of the primary structure of the seven peptides suggest that the antiphagocytic determinant resides in a repeating amino acid sequence in the M protein molecule. PMID:80011

  19. Hydrological Modeling and Repeatability with Brokering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easton, Z. M.; Collick, A.; Srinivasan, R.; Braeckel, A.; Nativi, S.; McAlister, C.; Wright, D. J.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Fuka, D.

    2014-12-01

    Data brokering aims to provide those in the hydrological sciences with access to relevant data to represent physical, biological, and chemical characteristics researchers need to accelerate discovery in their domain. Environmental models are useful tools to understand the behavior of hydrological systems. Unfortunately, parameterization of these models requires many different data sources from different disciplines (e.g., atmospheric, geoscience, ecology). In hydrological modeling, the traditional procedure for model initialization starts with obtaining elevation models, land-use characterizations, soils maps, and weather data. It is often the researcher's past experience with these datasets that determines which datasets will be used in a study, and often newer, more suitable data products exist. An added complexity is that various science communities have differing data formats, storage protocols and manipulation methods, which makes use by a non domain scientist difficult and time consuming. We propose data brokering as a means to address several of these challenges. We present two test case scenarios in which researchers attempt to reproduce hydrological model results using 1) general internet based data gathering techniques, and 2) a scientific data brokering interface. We show that data brokering increases the efficiency with which data are collected, models are initialized, and results are analyzed. As an added benefit, it appears brokering significantly increases the repeatability of a study.

  20. Global Seismic Oscillations in Soft Gamma Repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Robert C.

    1998-05-01

    There is evidence that soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) are neutron stars that experience frequent starquakes, possibly driven by an evolving, ultrastrong magnetic field. The empirical power-law distribution of SGR burst energies, analogous to the Gutenberg-Richter law for earthquakes, exhibits a turnover at high energies, consistent with a global limit on the crust fracture size. With such large starquakes occurring, the significant excitation of global seismic oscillations (GSOs) seems likely. Moreover, GSOs may be self-exciting in a stellar crust that is strained by many randomly oriented stresses. We explain why low-order toroidal modes, which preserve the shape of the star and have observable frequencies as low as ~30 Hz, may be especially susceptible to excitation. We estimate the eigenfrequencies as a function of stellar mass and radius, as well as their magnetic and rotational shiftings/splittings. We also describe ways in which these modes might be detected and damped. There is marginal evidence for 23 ms oscillations in the hard initial pulse of the 1979 March 5 event. This could be due to the 3t0 mode in a neutron star with B~1014 G or less, or it could be the fundamental toroidal mode if the field in the deep crust of SGR 0526-66 is ~4×1015 G, in agreement with other evidence. If confirmed, GSOs would give corroborating evidence for crust-fracturing magnetic fields in SGRs: B>~1014 G.