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Sample records for 293t cells expressing

  1. Lentiviral Vectors Mediate Long-Term and High Efficiency Transgene Expression in HEK 293T cells

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yingying; Yan, Renhe; Li, Andrew; Zhang, Yanling; Li, Jinlong; Du, Hongyan; Chen, Baihong; Wei, Wenjin; Zhang, Yi; Sumners, Colin; Zheng, Haifa; Li, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Objectives:Lentiviral vectors have been used successfully to rapidly produce decigram quantities of active recombinant proteins in mammalian cell lines. To optimize the protein production platform, the roles of Ubiquitous Chromatin Opening Element (UCOE), an insulator, and selected promoters were evaluated based on efficiency and stability of foreign gene expression mediated by lentiviral vectors. Methods: Five lentiviral vectors, pFIN-EF1α-GFP-2A-mCherH-WPRE containing EF1α promoter and HS4 insulator, p'HR.cppt.3'1.2kb-UCOE-SFFV-eGFP containing SFFV promoter and UCOE, pTYF-CMV(β-globin intron)-eGFP containing CMV promoter and β-globin intron, pTYF-CMV-eGFP containing CMV promoter, and pTYF-EF1α-eGFP with EF1α promoter were packaged, titered, and then transduced into 293T cells (1000 viral genomes per cell). The transduced cells were passaged once every three days at a ratio of 1:10. Expression level and stability of the foreign gene, green fluorescence protein (GFP), was evaluated using fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. Furthermore, we constructed a hepatitis C virus (HCV) E1 recombinant lentiviral vector, pLV-CMV-E1, driven by the CMV promoter. This vector was packaged and transduced into 293T cells, and the recombinant cell lines with stable expression of E1 protein were established by limiting dilution. Results:GFP expression in 293T cells transduced with the five lentiviral vectors peaked between passages 3 and 5 and persisted for more than 5 weeks. The expression was prolonged in the cells transduced with TYF-CMV (β-globin intron)-eGFP or TYF-CMV-eGFP, demonstrating less than a 50% decrease even at 9 weeks post transduction (p>0.05). The TYF-CMV-eGFP-transduced cells began with a higher level of GFP expression than other vectors did. The percentage of GFP positive cells for any of the five lentiviral vectors sustained over time. Moreover, the survival rates of all transfected cells exceeded 80% at both 5 and 9 weeks post transduction

  2. A Cleavable N-Terminal Signal Peptide Promotes Widespread Olfactory Receptor Surface Expression in HEK293T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Blythe D.; Natarajan, Niranjana; Protzko, Ryan J.; Acres, Omar W.; Pluznick, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) are G protein-coupled receptors that detect odorants in the olfactory epithelium, and comprise the largest gene family in the genome. Identification of OR ligands typically requires OR surface expression in heterologous cells; however, ORs rarely traffic to the cell surface when exogenously expressed. Therefore, most ORs are orphan receptors with no known ligands. To date, studies have utilized non-cleavable rhodopsin (Rho) tags and/or chaperones (i.e. Receptor Transporting Protein, RTP1S, Ric8b and Gαolf) to improve surface expression. However, even with these tools, many ORs still fail to reach the cell surface. We used a test set of fifteen ORs to examine the effect of a cleavable leucine-rich signal peptide sequence (Lucy tag) on OR surface expression in HEK293T cells. We report here that the addition of the Lucy tag to the N-terminus increases the number of ORs reaching the cell surface to 7 of the 15 ORs (as compared to 3/15 without Rho or Lucy tags). Moreover, when ORs tagged with both Lucy and Rho were co-expressed with previously reported chaperones (RTP1S, Ric8b and Gαolf), we observed surface expression for all 15 receptors examined. In fact, two-thirds of Lucy-tagged ORs are able to reach the cell surface synergistically with chaperones even when the Rho tag is removed (10/15 ORs), allowing for the potential assessment of OR function with only an 8-amino acid Flag tag on the mature protein. As expected for a signal peptide, the Lucy tag was cleaved from the mature protein and did not alter OR-ligand binding and signaling. Our studies demonstrate that widespread surface expression of ORs can be achieved in HEK293T cells, providing promise for future large-scale deorphanization studies. PMID:23840901

  3. Regulation of transforming growth factor beta 1 gene expression by dihydropteridine reductase in kidney 293T cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yanting; Gong, Yuewen; Zhang, Haojun; Dong, Xi; Zhao, Tingting; Burczynski, Frank J; Wang, Guqi; Sun, Sifan; Zhu, Bin; Han, Wenbing; Wang, Hongpan; Li, Ping

    2013-06-01

    Quinoid dihydropteridine reductase (QDPR) is an enzyme involved in the metabolic pathway of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). BH4 is an essential cofactor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and can catalyze arginine to citrulline to release nitric oxide. Point mutations of QDPR have been found in the renal cortex of spontaneous Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) diabetic rats. However, the role of QDPR in DN is not clear. This study investigates the effects of QDPR overexpression and knockdown on gene expression in the kidney. Rat QDPR cDNA was cloned into pcDNA3.1 vector and transfected in human kidney cells (293T). The expression of NOS, transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), Smad3, and NADPH oxidase were examined by RT-PCR and Western blot analyses. BH4 was assayed by using ELISA. Expression of QDPR was significantly decreased and TGF-β1 and Smad3 were increased in the renal cortex of diabetic rats. Transfection of QDPR into 293T cells increased the abundance of QDPR in cytoplasm and significantly reduced the expression of TGF-β1, Smad3, and the NADPH oxidases NOX1 and NOX4. Moreover, abundance of neuronal NOS (nNOS) mRNA and BH4 content were significantly increased. Furthermore, inhibition of QDPR resulted in a significant increase in TGF-β1 expression. In conclusion, QDPR might be an important factor mediating diabetic nephropathy through its regulation of TGF-β1/Smad3 signaling and NADPH oxidase. PMID:23668792

  4. Plasmonic activation of gold nanorods for remote stimulation of calcium signaling and protein expression in HEK 293T cells.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Rodriguez, Sandra P; Sauer, Jeremy P; Stanley, Sarah A; Qian, Xi; Gottesdiener, Andrew; Friedman, Jeffrey M; Dordick, Jonathan S

    2016-10-01

    Remote activation of specific cells of a heterogeneous population can provide a useful research tool for clinical and therapeutic applications. Here, we demonstrate that photostimulation of gold nanorods (AuNRs) using a tunable near-infrared (NIR) laser at specific longitudinal surface plasmon resonance wavelengths can induce the selective and temporal internalization of calcium in HEK 293T cells. Biotin-PEG-Au nanorods coated with streptavidin Alexa Fluor-633 and biotinylated anti-His antibodies were used to decorate cells genetically modified with His-tagged TRPV1 temperature-sensitive ion channel and AuNRs conjugated to biotinylated RGD peptide were used to decorate integrins in unmodified cells. Plasmonic activation can be stimulated at weak laser power (0.7-4.0 W/cm(2) ) without causing cell damage. Selective activation of TRPV1 channels could be controlled by laser power between 1.0 and 1.5 W/cm(2) . Integrin targeting robustly stimulated calcium signaling due to a dense cellular distribution of nanoparticles. Such an approach represents a functional tool for combinatorial activation of cell signaling in heterogeneous cell populations. Our results suggest that it is possible to induce cell activation via NIR-induced gold nanorod heating through the selective targeting of membrane proteins in unmodified cells to produce calcium signaling and downstream expression of specific genes with significant relevance for both in vitro and therapeutic applications. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2228-2240. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27563853

  5. Using HEK293T Expression System to Study Photoactive Plant Cryptochromes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liang; Wang, Xu; Deng, Weixian; Mo, Weiliang; Gao, Jie; Liu, Qing; Zhang, Chuanyu; Wang, Qin; Lin, Chentao; Zuo, Zecheng

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes are photolyase-like blue light receptors that are conserved in plants and animals. Although the light-dependent catalytic mechanism of photolyase is well studied, the photochemical mechanism of cryptochromes remains largely unknown. Lack of an appropriate protein expression system to obtain photochemically active cryptochrome holoproteins is a technical obstacle for the study of plant cryptochromes. We report here an easy-to-use method to express and study Arabidopsis cryptochrome in HEK293T cells. Our results indicate that Arabidopsis cryptochromes expressed in HEK293T are photochemically active. We envision a broad use of this method in the functional investigation of plant proteins, especially in the large-scale analyses of photochemical activities of cryptochromes such as blue light-dependent protein–protein interactions. PMID:27446167

  6. Characterization of embryonic stem-like cells derived from HEK293T cells through miR302/367 expression and their potentiality to differentiate into germ-like cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Long; Zhu, Haijing; Wu, Jiang; Li, Na; Hua, Jinlian

    2014-10-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have great value for regenerative medicine, but are facing problems of low efficiency. MicroRNAs are a recently discovered class of 19-25 nt small RNAs that negatively target mRNAs. miR302/367 cluster has been demonstrated to reprogram mouse and human somatic cells to iPS cells without exogenous transcription factors, however, the repetition and differentiation potentiality of miR302/367-induced pluripotent stem (mirPS) cells need to be improved. Here, we showed overexpression of miR302/367 cluster reprogrammed human embryonic kidney 293T cells into mirPS cells in serum-free N2B27-based medium. The mirPS cells had similar morphology with embryonic stem cells, and expressed pluripotent markers including Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and Nanog. In addition, through formation of embryoid bodies, various cells and tissues from three germ layers could be determined. Moreover, we examined the potential of mirPS cells differentiating into germ cells both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, these data might provide a new source of cells and technique for the investigation of the mechanisms underlying reprogramming and pluripotency. PMID:24091881

  7. A Human Embryonic Kidney 293T Cell Line Mutated at the Golgi α-Mannosidase II Locus*

    PubMed Central

    Crispin, Max; Chang, Veronica T.; Harvey, David J.; Dwek, Raymond A.; Evans, Edward J.; Stuart, David I.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Lord, J. Michael; Spooner, Robert A.; Davis, Simon J.

    2009-01-01

    Disruption of Golgi α-mannosidase II activity can result in type II congenital dyserythropoietic anemia and induce lupus-like autoimmunity in mice. Here, we isolated a mutant human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cell line called Lec36, which displays sensitivity to ricin that lies between the parental HEK 293T cells, in which the secreted and membrane-expressed proteins are dominated by complex-type glycosylation, and 293S Lec1 cells, which produce only oligomannose-type N-linked glycans. Stem cell marker 19A was transiently expressed in the HEK 293T Lec36 cells and in parental HEK 293T cells with and without the potent Golgi α-mannosidase II inhibitor, swainsonine. Negative ion nano-electrospray ionization mass spectra of the 19A N-linked glycans from HEK 293T Lec36 and swainsonine-treated HEK 293T cells were qualitatively indistinguishable and, as shown by collision-induced dissociation spectra, were dominated by hybrid-type glycosylation. Nucleotide sequencing revealed mutations in each allele of MAN2A1, the gene encoding Golgi α-mannosidase II: a point mutation that mapped to the active site was found in one allele, and an in-frame deletion of 12 nucleotides was found in the other allele. Expression of the wild type but not the mutant MAN2A1 alleles in Lec36 cells restored processing of the 19A reporter glycoprotein to complex-type glycosylation. The Lec36 cell line will be useful for expressing therapeutic glycoproteins with hybrid-type glycans and as a sensitive host for detecting mutations in human MAN2A1 causing type II congenital dyserythropoietic anemia. PMID:19465480

  8. Measuring Ca2+-Dependent Modulation of Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channels in HEK-293T Cells.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jessica R; Lee, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca(2+) (Cav) channels regulate a variety of biological processes, such as muscle contraction, gene expression, and neurotransmitter release. Cav channels are subject to diverse forms of regulation, including those involving the Ca(2+) ions that permeate the pore. High voltage-activated Cav channels undergo Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation (CDI) and facilitation (CDF), which can regulate processes such as cardiac rhythm and synaptic plasticity. CDI and CDF differ slightly between Cav1 (L-type) and Cav2 (P/Q-, N-, and R-type) channels. Human embryonic kidney cells transformed with SV40 large T-antigen (HEK-293T) are advantageous for studying CDI and CDF of a particular type of Cav channel. HEK-293T cells do not express endogenous Cav channels, but Cav channels can be expressed exogenously at high levels in these cells by transient transfection. This protocol describes how to characterize and analyze Ca(2+)-dependent modulation of recombinant Cav channels in HEK-293T cells. PMID:27587775

  9. Characterization of crude Echis carinatus venom-induced cytotoxicity in HEK 293T cells

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Rebecca D; Kim, Ethan S; Girton, Lance W; McMurry, Jonathan L; Francis, Joshua W; Albrecht, Eric A

    2011-01-01

    Echis carinatus (saw-scaled viper) produces potent hemorrhagic venom that causes the development of apoptotic and necrotic tissues. In this study, we used polyethyleneimine (PEI) to enhance cellular adherence, and to determine whether the substrate attachment influenced the survival of cells treated with crude E. carinatus venom. Human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells were grown for 18hr in tissue culture plates with or without polyethyleneimine (PEI), and were then stimulated with crude E. carinatus venom for 3 or 12hr. HEK 293T cells grown without PEI displayed a robust oxidative response to corresponding substrate detachment, loss of plasma membrane integrity and decreased cell viability. Cells grown on PEI adsorbed substrates demonstrated prolonged substrate attachment resulting in significantly higher cell viabilities. These observations suggest that the cytotoxicity of crude E. carinatus venom is dependent upon cellular detachment. PMID:22331993

  10. Characterization of crude Echis carinatus venom-induced cytotoxicity in HEK 293T cells.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Rebecca D; Kim, Ethan S; Girton, Lance W; McMurry, Jonathan L; Francis, Joshua W; Albrecht, Eric A

    2011-01-01

    Echis carinatus (saw-scaled viper) produces potent hemorrhagic venom that causes the development of apoptotic and necrotic tissues. In this study, we used polyethyleneimine (PEI) to enhance cellular adherence, and to determine whether the substrate attachment influenced the survival of cells treated with crude E. carinatus venom. Human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells were grown for 18hr in tissue culture plates with or without polyethyleneimine (PEI), and were then stimulated with crude E. carinatus venom for 3 or 12hr. HEK 293T cells grown without PEI displayed a robust oxidative response to corresponding substrate detachment, loss of plasma membrane integrity and decreased cell viability. Cells grown on PEI adsorbed substrates demonstrated prolonged substrate attachment resulting in significantly higher cell viabilities. These observations suggest that the cytotoxicity of crude E. carinatus venom is dependent upon cellular detachment. PMID:22331993

  11. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals a Signature Profile for Tick-Borne Flavivirus Persistence in HEK 293T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Jennifer; Offerdahl, Danielle K.; Martens, Craig; Sturdevant, Daniel; Turner, Charles V.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Bloom, Marshall E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tick-borne flaviviruses (TBFVs) cause febrile illnesses, which may progress to severe encephalitis and/or death in humans globally. Most people who recover from severe acute disease suffer from debilitating neurological sequelae, which may be due to viral persistence, infection-induced neurological cell damage, host response, or some combination of these. Acute TBFV infection of human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells in vitro results in the death of >95% of infected cells by day 5. However, replacing cell growth medium allows surviving cells to repopulate and become persistently infected for extended periods of time. The mechanisms responsible for initiation and maintenance of viral persistence remain vague. We subjected the HEK 293T cell transcriptome to deep sequencing to identify genes differentially expressed during acute infection and persistent infection. A total of 451 genes showed unique significant differential expression levels in persistently infected cells relative to the acute phase of infection. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis results suggested that the expression of prosurvival oncogenes AKT2 and ERBB2 was upregulated in persistently infected cells, whereas proapoptotic genes, such as Bad and the beta interferon 1 (IFN-β1) gene, were downregulated. Genes encoding antiviral cytokines such as the CCL5, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and CXCL10 genes were upregulated during the acute phase, but the same genes were relatively quiescent in persistently infected cells. Exogenous induction of apoptosis demonstrated that persistently infected cells were resistant to apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. In summary, the differential transcriptome profiles of acute-phase compared to persistently infected HEK 293T cells demonstrated an evasion of apoptosis, which may be critical for a chronic TBFV infection state. These results provide a basis for further study of the mechanisms of TBFV persistence. PMID:27222466

  12. HEK293T Cells Are Heterozygous for CCR5 Delta 32 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Chunxia; Jia, Xiaopeng; Lu, Lingling; Ma, Ping; Wei, Min

    2016-01-01

    C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a receptor for chemokines and a co-receptor for HIV-1 entry into the target CD4+ cells. CCR5 delta 32 deletion is a loss-of-function mutation, resistant to HIV-1 infection. We tried to induce the CCR5 delta 32 mutation harnessing the genome editing technique, CRISPR-Cas9 (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats, CRISPR and CRISPR associated protein 9, Cas9) in the commonly used cell line human embryonic kidney HEK 293T cells. Surprisingly, we found that HEK293T cells are heterozygous for CCR5 delta 32 mutation, in contrast to the wild type CCR5 cells, human acute T cell leukemia cell line Jurkat and human breast adenocarcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 cells. This finding indicates that at least one human cell line is heterozygous for the CCR5 delta 32 mutation. We also found that in PCR amplification, wild type CCR5 DNA and mutant delta 32 DNA can form mismatched heteroduplex and move slowly in gel electrophoresis. PMID:27042825

  13. Inhibition of NAMPT pathway by FK866 activates the function of p53 in HEK293T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, Basant Kumar; Dittrich, Tino; Chandra, Prakash; Becker, Annette; Lippka, Yannick; Selvakumar, Divakarvel; Klusmann, Jan-Henning; Reinhardt, Dirk; Welte, Karl

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In 293T cells, p53 is considered to be inactive due to its interaction with the large T-antigen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylation of p53 at lysine 382 is important for its functional activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First evidence to document the presence of a functional p53 in 293T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of NAMPT/SIRT pathway by FK866 in 293T cells increases the functional activity of p53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This activation of p53 involves reversible acetylation of p53 at lysine 382. -- Abstract: Inactivation of p53 protein by endogenous and exogenous carcinogens is involved in the pathogenesis of different human malignancies. In cancer associated with SV-40 DNA tumor virus, p53 is considered to be non-functional mainly due to its interaction with the large T-antigen. Using the 293T cell line (HEK293 cells transformed with large T antigen) as a model, we provide evidence that p53 is one of the critical downstream targets involved in FK866-mediated killing of 293T cells. A reduced rate of apoptosis and an increased number of cells in S-phase was accompanied after knockdown of p53 in these cells. Inhibition of NAMPT by FK866, or inhibition of SIRT by nicotinamide decreased proliferation and triggered death of 293T cells involving the p53 acetylation pathway. Additionally, knockdown of p53 attenuated the effect of FK866 on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest. The data presented here shed light on two important facts: (1) that p53 in 293T cells is active in the presence of FK866, an inhibitor of NAMPT pathway; (2) the apoptosis induced by FK866 in 293T cells is associated with increased acetylation of p53 at Lys382, which is required for the functional activity of p53.

  14. Measured Effects of Wnt3a on Proliferation of HEK293T Cells Depend on the Applied Assay

    PubMed Central

    Reischmann, Patricia; Fiebeck, Johanna; von der Weiden, Nadine; Müller, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway has been associated with many essential cell processes. This study aims to examine the effects of Wnt signaling on proliferation of cultured HEK293T cells. Cells were incubated with Wnt3a, and the activation of the Wnt pathway was followed by analysis of the level of the β-catenin protein and of the expression levels of the target genes MYC and CCND1. The level of β-catenin protein increased up to fourfold. While the mRNA levels of c-Myc and cyclin D1 increased slightly, the protein levels increased up to a factor of 1.5. Remarkably, MTT and BrdU assays showed different results when measuring the proliferation rate of Wnt3a stimulated HEK293T cells. In the BrdU assays an increase of the proliferation rate could be detected, which correlated to the applied Wnt3a concentration. Oppositely, this correlation could not be shown in the MTT assays. The MTT results, which are based on the mitochondrial activity, were confirmed by analysis of the succinate dehydrogenase complex by immunofluorescence and by western blotting. Taken together, our study shows that Wnt3a activates proliferation of HEK293 cells. These effects can be detected by measuring DNA synthesis rather than by measuring changes of mitochondrial activity. PMID:26798342

  15. HIV-1 Resistant CDK2-Knockdown Macrophage-Like Cells Generated from 293T Cell-Derived Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Jerebtsova, Marina; Kumari, Namita; Xu, Min; de Melo, Gustavo Brito Alvim; Niu, Xiaomei; Jeang, Kuan-Teh; Nekhai, Sergei

    2012-07-26

    A major challenge in studies of human diseases involving macrophages is low yield and heterogeneity of the primary cells and limited ability of these cells for transfections and genetic manipulations. To address this issue, we developed a simple and efficient three steps method for somatic 293T cells reprogramming into monocytes and macrophage-like cells. First, 293T cells were reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) through a transfection-mediated expression of two factors, Oct-4 and Sox2, resulting in a high yield of iPSC. Second, the obtained iPSC were differentiated into monocytes using IL-3 and M-CSF treatment. And third, monocytes were differentiated into macrophage-like cells in the presence of M-CSF. As an example, we developed HIV-1-resistant macrophage-like cells from 293T cells with knockdown of CDK2, a factor critical for HIV-1 transcription. Our study provides a proof-of-principle approach that can be used to study the role of host cell factors in HIV-1 infection of human macrophages. PMID:22934150

  16. HIV-1 Resistant CDK2-Knockdown Macrophage-Like Cells Generated from 293T Cell-Derived Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jerebtsova, Marina; Kumari, Namita; Xu, Min; de Melo, Gustavo Brito Alvim; Niu, Xiaomei; Jeang, Kuan-Teh; Nekhai, Sergei

    2012-01-01

    A major challenge in studies of human diseases involving macrophages is low yield and heterogeneity of the primary cells and limited ability of these cells for transfections and genetic manipulations. To address this issue, we developed a simple and efficient three steps method for somatic 293T cells reprogramming into monocytes and macrophage-like cells. First, 293T cells were reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) through a transfection-mediated expression of two factors, Oct-4 and Sox2, resulting in a high yield of iPSC. Second, the obtained iPSC were differentiated into monocytes using IL-3 and M-CSF treatment. And third, monocytes were differentiated into macrophage-like cells in the presence of M-CSF. As an example, we developed HIV-1-resistant macrophage-like cells from 293T cells with knockdown of CDK2, a factor critical for HIV-1 transcription. Our study provides a proof-of-principle approach that can be used to study the role of host cell factors in HIV-1 infection of human macrophages. PMID:22934150

  17. Production of human factor VIII-FL in 293T cells using the bicistronic MGMT(P140K)-retroviral vector.

    PubMed

    Fontes, A M; Melo, F U F; Greene, L J; Faça, V M; Lin, Y; Gerson, S L; Covas, D T

    2012-01-01

    Hemophilia A is the most common X-linked bleeding disorder; it is caused by deficiency of coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). Replacement therapy with rFVIII produced from human cell line is a major goal for treating hemophilia patients. We prepared a full-length recombinant FVIII (FVIII-FL), using the pMFG-P140K retroviral vector. The IRES DNA fragment was cloned upstream to the P140K gene, providing a 9.34-kb bicistronic vector. FVIII-FL cDNA was then cloned upstream to IRES, resulting in a 16.6-kb construct. In parallel, an eGFP control vector was generated, resulting in a 10.1- kb construct. The 293T cells were transfected with these constructs, generating the 293T-FVIII-FL/P140K and 293T-eGFP/P140K cell lines. In 293T-FVIII-FL/P140K cells, FVIII and P140K mRNAs levels were 4,410 (±931.7)- and 295,400 (±75,769)-fold higher than in virgin cells. In 293T-eGFP/P140K cells, the eGFP and P140K mRNAs levels were 1,501,000 (±493,700)- and 308,000 (±139,300)-fold higher than in virgin cells. The amount of FVIII-FL was 0.2 IU/mL and 45 ng/mL FVIII cells or 4.4 IU/μg protein. These data demonstrate the efficacy of the bicistronic retroviral vector expressing FVIII-FL and MGMT(P140K), showing that it could be used for producing the FVIII-FL protein in a human cell line. PMID:22576836

  18. Increasing cellular uptake of mesoporous silica nanoparticles in human embryonic kidney cell line 293T cells by using Lipofectamine 2000.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiandong; Teng, Zhaogang; Tian, Ying; Fang, Tian; Ma, Jie; Sun, Jin; Zhu, Feipeng; Wu, Jinrong; Wang, Xin; Yang, Nannan; Zhou, Xiaojun; Yun, Shifeng; Lu, Guangming

    2013-11-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are ideal nanocarriers that have recently gained attention in important bioapplications such as drug, gene, and protein delivery. The efficacy of endocytosis greatly affects the biological functions of MSNs. In the present study, we investigated the effect of cationic liposomes of Lipofectamine 2000 on cellular uptake of MSNs and the cytotoxicity of cationic liposomes combining with MSNs both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, mesoporous silica nanoparticles with an average diameter of 130 nm and negative surface charge were synthesized and characterized. The possible role of Lipofectamine 2000 in cellular uptake of MSNs was evaluated in human embryonic kidney cell line 293T cells by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and with inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis. The toxicities of liposomes combining with MSNs were tested in vitro via cell apoptosis assay and MTT cell viability assay, and in vivo by histological examination of six organs of mice after intravenous injection. The endocytosis efficiency of MSNs in human embryonic kidney 293T cells was greatly increased using Lipofectamine 2000 compared with controls (P < 0.001). No apparent in vitro or in vivo cytotoxicity was found for Lipofectamine 2000 combining with MSNs. Our data indicate that cationic liposomes of Lipofectamine 2000 has the potential to greatly increase cellular uptake of MSNs with negative surface charge in human renal 293T cells without apparent toxicity. PMID:24059087

  19. Human dipeptidyl peptidase III regulates G-protein coupled receptor-dependent Ca2+ concentration in human embryonic kidney 293T cells.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Subhash C; Singh, Ratnakar; Chauhan, Shyam S

    2016-06-01

    The precise biological function of human dipeptidyl peptidase III (hDPP III) is poorly understood. Using luciferase reporter constructs responsive to change in Ca2+ and/or cAMP and Fura 2-AM fluorometric assay, we show a significant decrease in intracellular Ca2+ following hDPP III overexpression and angiotensin II stimulation in angiotensin II type 1 receptor (G-protein coupled receptor, GPCR) expressing HEK293T cells. Silencing the expression of hDPP III by siRNA reversed the effect of hDPP III overexpression with a concomitant increase in Ca2+. These results, for the first time, show involvement of hDPP III in GPCR dependent Ca2+ regulation in HEK293T cells. PMID:26887037

  20. Development of a Model System for Tick-Borne Flavivirus Persistence in HEK 293T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mlera, Luwanika; Offerdahl, Danielle K.; Martens, Craig; Porcella, Stephen F.; Melik, Wessam

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We devised a model system to study persistent infection by the tick-borne flavivirus Langat virus (LGTV) in 293T cells. Infection with a molecularly cloned LGTV strain produced an acute lytic crisis that left few surviving cells. The culture was repopulated by cells that were ~90% positive for LGTV E protein, thus initiating a persistent infection that was maintained for at least 35 weeks without additional lytic crises. Staining of cells for viral proteins and ultrastructural analysis revealed only minor differences from the acute phase of infection. Infectious LGTV decreased markedly over the study period, but the number of viral genomes remained relatively constant, suggesting the development of defective interfering particles (DIPs). Viral genome changes were investigated by RNA deep sequencing. At the initiation of persistent infection, levels of DIPs were below the limit of detection at a coverage depth of 11,288-fold, implying that DIPs are not required for initiation of persistence. However, after 15 passages, DIPs constituted approximately 34% of the total LGTV population (coverage of 1,293-fold). Furthermore, at this point, one specific DIP population predominated in which nucleotides 1058 to 2881 had been deleted. This defective genome specified an intact polyprotein that coded for a truncated fusion protein containing 28 N-terminal residues of E and 134 C-terminal residues of NS1. Such a fusion protein has not previously been described, and a possible function in persistent infection is uncertain. DIPs are not required for the initiation of persistent LGTV infection but may play a role in the maintenance of viral persistence. PMID:26045539

  1. Pharmacological characterization of emerging synthetic cannabinoids in HEK293T cells and hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Costain, Willard J; Tauskela, Joseph S; Rasquinha, Ingrid; Comas, Tanya; Hewitt, Melissa; Marleau, Vincent; Soo, Evelyn C

    2016-09-01

    There has been a worldwide proliferation of synthetic cannabinoids that have become marketed as legal alternatives to cannabis (marijuana). Unfortunately, there is a dearth of information about the pharmacological effects of many of these emerging synthetic cannabinoids (ESCs), which presents a challenge for regulatory authorities that need to take such scientific evidence into consideration in order to regulate ECSs as controlled substances. We aimed to characterize the pharmacological properties of ten ESCs using two cell based assays that enabled the determination of potency and efficacy relative to a panel of well-characterized cannabinoids. Agonist-mediated inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels was monitored in live HEK293T cells transfected with human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene (CNR1) and pGloSensor-22F. Pharmacological analysis of this data indicated that all of the ESCs tested were full agonists, with the following rank order of potency: Win 55212-2≈5F-PB-22≈AB-PINACA≈EAM-2201≈MAM-2201>JWH-250≈ PB-22>AKB48 N-(5FP)>AKB-48≈STS-135>XLR-11. Assessment of agonist-stimulated depression of Ca(2+) transients was also used to confirm the efficacy of five ESCs (XLR-11, JWH-250, AB-PINACA, 5F-PB-22, and MAM-2201) in cultured primary hippocampal neurons. This work aims to help inform decisions made by regulatory agencies concerned with the profusion of these poorly characterized recreational drugs. PMID:27260125

  2. Protective effect of reduced glutathione C60 derivative against hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in HEK 293T cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Zhou, Chi; He, Jun; Hu, Zheng; Guan, Wen-Chao; Liu, Sheng-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and free radicals cause oxidative stress, which induces cellular injuries, metabolic dysfunction, and even cell death in various clinical abnormalities. Fullerene (C60) is critical for scavenging oxygen free radicals originated from cell metabolism, and reduced glutathione (GSH) is another important endogenous antioxidant. In this study, a novel water-soluble reduced glutathione fullerene derivative (C60-GSH) was successfully synthesized, and its beneficial roles in protecting against H2O2-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in cultured HEK 293T cells were investigated. Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance were used to confirm the chemical structure of C60-GSH. Our results demonstrated that C60-GSH prevented the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated cell damage. Additionally, C60-GSH pretreatment significantly attenuated H2O2-induced superoxide dismutase (SOD) consumption and malondialdehyde (MDA) elevation. Furthermore, C60-GSH inhibited intracellular calcium mobilization, and subsequent cell apoptosis via bcl-2/bax-caspase-3 signaling pathway induced by H2O2 stimulation in HEK 293T cells. Importantly, these protective effects of C60-GSH were superior to those of GSH. In conclusion, these results suggested that C60-GSH has potential to protect against H2O2-induced cell apoptosis by scavenging free radicals and maintaining intracellular calcium homeostasis without evident toxicity. PMID:27376803

  3. Components of chicken egg white extract smaller than 3 kDa in size promote 293T cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Guang-Ping; Yao, Xiang; Wang, Jin-Xiang; Liu, Ju-Fen; Shu, Fan; Li, Zi-An; Pang, Rong-Qing; Pan, Xing-Hua

    2016-08-01

    We previously found that chicken egg white extract could promote cell survival and proliferation. In the present study, we further separated this extract into its components to identify those primarily responsible for promoting cell proliferation. Components of differing molecular weight were separated from chicken egg white extract by ultrafiltration and 293T cell cultures were supplemented with various concentrations. The effects on cell proliferation were subsequently determined by a CellTiter 96 Aqueous One Solution Cell Proliferation Assay kit (Promega). We demonstrate that components from chicken egg white smaller than 3 kDa in size are able to function as active ingredients promoting cellular proliferation. This discovery may identify a new and convenient additive for cell culture media to promote cell growth and proliferation. PMID:26541834

  4. Impact of phosphomimetic and non-phosphorylatable mutations of phospholemman on L-type calcium channels gating in HEK 293T cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Kai; Wang, Yue-Peng; Zhou, Zhi-Wen; Jiang, Yi-Bo; Li, Wei; Chen, Xiao-Meng; Li, Yi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Phospholemman (PLM) is an important phosphorylation substrate for protein kinases A and C in the heart. Until now, the association between PLM phosphorylation status and L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) gating has not been fully understood. We investigated the kinetics of LTCCs in HEK 293T cells expressing phosphomimetic or nonphosphorylatable PLM mutants. Methods: The LTCCs gating was measured in HEK 293T cells transfected with LTCC and wild-type (WT) PLM, phosphomimetic or nonphosphorylatable PLM mutants: 6263AA, 6869AA, AAAA, 6263DD, 6869DD or DDDD. Results: WT PLM significantly slowed LTCCs activation and deactivation while enhanced voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI). PLM mutants 6869DD and DDDD significantly increased the peak of the currents. 6263DD accelerated channel activation, while 6263AA slowed it more than WT PLM. 6869DD significantly enhanced PLM-induced increase of VDI. AAAA slowed the channel activation more than 6263AA, and DDDD accelerated the channel VDI more than 6869DD. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that phosphomimetic PLM could stimulate LTCCs and alter their dynamics, while PLM nonphosphorylatable mutant produced the opposite effects. PMID:25656605

  5. COG Complex Complexities: Detailed Characterization of a Complete Set of HEK293T Cells Lacking Individual COG Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Bailey Blackburn, Jessica; Pokrovskaya, Irina; Fisher, Peter; Ungar, Daniel; Lupashin, Vladimir V.

    2016-01-01

    The Conserved Oligomeric Golgi complex is an evolutionarily conserved multisubunit tethering complex (MTC) that is crucial for intracellular membrane trafficking and Golgi homeostasis. The COG complex interacts with core vesicle docking and fusion machinery at the Golgi; however, its exact mechanism of action is still an enigma. Previous studies of COG complex were limited to the use of CDGII (Congenital disorders of glycosylation type II)-COG patient fibroblasts, siRNA mediated knockdowns, or protein relocalization approaches. In this study we have used the CRISPR approach to generate HEK293T knock-out (KO) cell lines missing individual COG subunits. These cell lines were characterized for glycosylation and trafficking defects, cell proliferation rates, stability of COG subunits, localization of Golgi markers, changes in Golgi structure, and N-glycan profiling. We found that all KO cell lines were uniformly deficient in cis/medial-Golgi glycosylation and each had nearly abolished binding of Cholera toxin. In addition, all cell lines showed defects in Golgi morphology, retrograde trafficking and sorting, sialylation and fucosylation, but severities varied according to the affected subunit. Lobe A and Cog6 subunit KOs displayed a more severely distorted Golgi structure, while Cog2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 knock outs had the most hypo glycosylated form of Lamp2. These results led us to conclude that every subunit is essential for COG complex function in Golgi trafficking, though to varying extents. We believe that this study and further analyses of these cells will help further elucidate the roles of individual COG subunits and bring a greater understanding to the class of MTCs as a whole. PMID:27066481

  6. Electron tomography of HEK293T cells using scanning electron microscope-based scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    You, Yun-Wen; Chang, Hsun-Yun; Liao, Hua-Yang; Kao, Wei-Lun; Yen, Guo-Ji; Chang, Chi-Jen; Tsai, Meng-Hung; Shyue, Jing-Jong

    2012-10-01

    Based on a scanning electron microscope operated at 30 kV with a homemade specimen holder and a multiangle solid-state detector behind the sample, low-kV scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is presented with subsequent electron tomography for three-dimensional (3D) volume structure. Because of the low acceleration voltage, the stronger electron-atom scattering leads to a stronger contrast in the resulting image than standard TEM, especially for light elements. Furthermore, the low-kV STEM yields less radiation damage to the specimen, hence the structure can be preserved. In this work, two-dimensional STEM images of a 1-μm-thick cell section with projection angles between ±50° were collected, and the 3D volume structure was reconstructed using the simultaneous iterative reconstructive technique algorithm with the TomoJ plugin for ImageJ, which are both public domain software. Furthermore, the cross-sectional structure was obtained with the Volume Viewer plugin in ImageJ. Although the tilting angle is constrained and limits the resulting structural resolution, slicing the reconstructed volume generated the depth profile of the thick specimen with sufficient resolution to examine cellular uptake of Au nanoparticles, and the final position of these nanoparticles inside the cell was imaged. PMID:23026379

  7. Characterization of Cav1.4 Complexes (α11.4, β2, and α2δ4) in HEK293T Cells and in the Retina*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Amy; Wang, Shiyi; Williams, Brittany; Hagen, Jussara; Scheetz, Todd E.; Haeseleer, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    In photoreceptor synaptic terminals, voltage-gated Cav1.4 channels mediate Ca2+ signals required for transmission of visual stimuli. Like other high voltage-activated Cav channels, Cav1.4 channels are composed of a main pore-forming Cav1.4 α1 subunit and auxiliary β and α2δ subunits. Of the four distinct classes of β and α2δ, β2 and α2δ4 are thought to co-assemble with Cav1.4 α1 subunits in photoreceptors. However, an understanding of the functional properties of this combination of Cav subunits is lacking. Here, we provide evidence that Cav1.4 α1, β2, and α2δ4 contribute to Cav1.4 channel complexes in the retina and describe their properties in electrophysiological recordings. In addition, we identified a variant of β2, named here β2X13, which, along with β2a, is present in photoreceptor terminals. Cav1.4 α1, β2, and α2δ4 were coimmunoprecipitated from lysates of transfected HEK293 cells and mouse retina and were found to interact in the outer plexiform layer of the retina containing the photoreceptor synaptic terminals, by proximity ligation assays. In whole-cell patch clamp recordings of transfected HEK293T cells, channels (Cav1.4 α1 + β2X13) containing α2δ4 exhibited weaker voltage-dependent activation than those with α2δ1. Moreover, compared with channels (Cav1.4 α1 + α2δ4) with β2a, β2X13-containing channels exhibited greater voltage-dependent inactivation. The latter effect was specific to Cav1.4 because it was not seen for Cav1.2 channels. Our results provide the first detailed functional analysis of the Cav1.4 subunits that form native photoreceptor Cav1.4 channels and indicate potential heterogeneity in these channels conferred by β2a and β2X13 variants. PMID:25468907

  8. Use of the heteroduplex mobility assay and cell sorting to select genome sequences of the CCR5 gene in HEK 293T cells edited by transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Nerys-Junior, Arildo; Costa, Lendel C.; Braga-Dias, Luciene P.; Oliveira, Márcia; Rossi, Átila D.; da Cunha, Rodrigo Delvecchio; Gonçalves, Gabriel S.; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2014-01-01

    Engineered nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) are one of the most promising tools for modifying genomes. These site-specific enzymes cause double-strand breaks that allow gene disruption or gene insertion, thereby facilitating genetic manipulation. The major problem associated with this approach is the labor-intensive procedures required to screen and confirm the cellular modification by nucleases. In this work, we produced a TALEN that targets the human CCR5 gene and developed a heteroduplex mobility assay for HEK 293T cells to select positive colonies for sequencing. This approach provides a useful tool for the quick detection and easy assessment of nuclease activity. PMID:24688299

  9. Use of the heteroduplex mobility assay and cell sorting to select genome sequences of the CCR5 gene in HEK 293T cells edited by transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Nerys-Junior, Arildo; Costa, Lendel C; Braga-Dias, Luciene P; Oliveira, Márcia; Rossi, Atila D; da Cunha, Rodrigo Delvecchio; Gonçalves, Gabriel S; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2014-03-01

    Engineered nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) are one of the most promising tools for modifying genomes. These site-specific enzymes cause double-strand breaks that allow gene disruption or gene insertion, thereby facilitating genetic manipulation. The major problem associated with this approach is the labor-intensive procedures required to screen and confirm the cellular modification by nucleases. In this work, we produced a TALEN that targets the human CCR5 gene and developed a heteroduplex mobility assay for HEK 293T cells to select positive colonies for sequencing. This approach provides a useful tool for the quick detection and easy assessment of nuclease activity. PMID:24688299

  10. Nephrotoxicity evaluation of a new cembrane diterpene from Euphorbiae pekinensis Radix with HEK 293T cells and the toxicokinetics study in rats using a sensitive and reliable UFLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Ziying; Zhang, Ruowen; Hou, Pengyi; Bi, Kaishun; Chen, Xiaohui

    2016-02-01

    (-)-(1S)-15-Hydroxy-18-carboxycembrene, the first cembrane-type diterpenoid found in the family Euphorbiaceae, isolated from Euphorbiae pekinensis Radix, was identified to be nephrotoxic using HEK 293T cells. Tests on cell morphology, cell viability and biochemical markers about oxidation stress were carried out using inverted microscope, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and commercial kits respectively, which proved the diterpene time- and dose-dependently decreased cells proliferation. Besides, a sensitive and robust UFLC-MS/MS method was developed and fully validated to investigate the in vivo behavior in rats of the diterpene after oral administration of Euphorbiae pekinensis Radix extracts at a dosage of 9g/kg. The method showed a good linearity in tested range (3-1500ng/mL) with acceptable accuracy and precision. The recovery of the diterpene was more than 85% and the matrix effect was within ±20%. The toxicokinetics parameters indicate the diterpene reached Cmax quickly and slowly eliminate. The study proved the newly found diterpene was one of the nephrotoxic substances of Euphorbiae pekinensis Radix and revealed its toxicokinetics behavior. PMID:26683989

  11. HMGB4 is expressed by neuronal cells and affects the expression of genes involved in neural differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rouhiainen, Ari; Zhao, Xiang; Vanttola, Päivi; Qian, Kui; Kulesskiy, Evgeny; Kuja-Panula, Juha; Gransalke, Kathleen; Grönholm, Mikaela; Unni, Emmanual; Meistrich, Marvin; Tian, Li; Auvinen, Petri; Rauvala, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    HMGB4 is a new member in the family of HMGB proteins that has been characterized in sperm cells, but little is known about its functions in somatic cells. Here we show that HMGB4 and the highly similar rat Transition Protein 4 (HMGB4L1) are expressed in neuronal cells. Both proteins had slow mobility in nucleus of living NIH-3T3 cells. They interacted with histones and their differential expression in transformed cells of the nervous system altered the post-translational modification statuses of histones in vitro. Overexpression of HMGB4 in HEK 293T cells made cells more susceptible to cell death induced by topoisomerase inhibitors in an oncology drug screening array and altered variant composition of histone H3. HMGB4 regulated over 800 genes in HEK 293T cells with a p-value ≤0.013 (n = 3) in a microarray analysis and displayed strongest association with adhesion and histone H2A -processes. In neuronal and transformed cells HMGB4 regulated the expression of an oligodendrocyte marker gene PPP1R14a and other neuronal differentiation marker genes. In conclusion, our data suggests that HMGB4 is a factor that regulates chromatin and expression of neuronal differentiation markers. PMID:27608812

  12. [HIV-1 infection up-regulating expression of interferon-stimulated gene 15 in cell lines].

    PubMed

    Wu, Huan-mei; Sun, Jun; Meng, Zhe-feng; Zhang, Xiao-yan; Xu, Jian-qing

    2013-09-01

    To investigate whether HIV-1 infection affects expression of interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) and determine the antiviral effect of ISG15 in vitro, ISG15 expression at transcription and protein level and supernatant p24 of HIV-1 was detected in various HIV-1 infected or transfected cell lines, respec tively. HIV-1 molecular clone pNL4-3 was used to transfect 293T, TZM-bl and HeLa cells while HIV-1 pseudo-typed virus was used to infect Jurkat, MT-1 and THP-1 cells. After twenty-four hours post infection or transfection, cells were harvested for extraction of total RNAs and subsequently used in real time PCR for quantification of ISG15 transcriptional expression. After forty-eight hours post infection or transfection, cells were harvested for extraction of total proteins to detect ISG15 protein expression. A significant up-regulation of ISG15 at transcription level was observed in HIV-1 infected or transfected cell lines, particulaly in THP-1 and TZM-bl cells. Up-regulation of ISG15 protein was observed only in TZM-bl cell. Cotransfection of ISG15 and HIV-1 indicated that ISG15 inhibited production of HIV-1 progeny virus in a dose and time depend manner in 293T cell but not TZM-bl cell. These results revealed upregulating ISG15 expression in transcriptional level and potential antagonistic mechanism against ISG15 by HIV-1 infection, simultanelusly. PMID:24386835

  13. Evaluating cell-surface expression and measuring activation of mammalian odorant receptors in heterologous cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Hanyi; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental question in olfaction is which odorant receptors (ORs) are activated by a given odorant. A major roadblock to investigate odorant-OR relationship in mammals has been an inability to express ORs in heterologous cells suitable for screening active ligands for ORs. The discovery of the receptor-transporting protein (RTP) family has facilitated the effective cell-surface expression of ORs in heterologous cells. The establishment of a robust heterologous expression system for mammalian ORs facilitates the high-throughput “deorphanization” of these receptors by matching them to their cognate ligands. This protocol details the method used for evaluating the cell-surface expression and measuring the functional activation of ORs of transiently-expressed mammalian odorant receptors in HEK293T cells. The stages of odorant receptor cell-surface expression include cell culture preparation, transfer of cells, transfection, and immunocytochemistry/flow cytometry, odorant stimulation, and luciferase assay. This protocol can be completed in a period of 3 days from transfer of cells to cell-surface expression detection and/or measurement of functional activation. PMID:18772867

  14. Using intron splicing trick for preferential gene expression in transduced cells: an approach for suicide gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Pourzadegan, F; Shariati, L; Taghizadeh, R; Khanahmad, H; Mohammadi, Z; Tabatabaiefar, M A

    2016-01-01

    Suicide gene therapy is one of the most innovative approaches in which a potential toxic gene is delivered to the targeted cancer cell by different target delivery methods. We constructed a transfer vector to express green fluorescent protein (GFP) in transduced cells but not in packaging cells. We placed gfp under the control of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter, which is positioned between the two long-terminal repeats in reverse direction. The intron-2 sequence of the human beta globin gene with two poly-A signals and several stop codons on the antisense strand was placed on the leading strand between the CMV promoter and gfp. For lentiviral production, the HEK293T and line were co-transfected with the PMD2G, psPAX2 and pLentiGFP-Ins2 plasmids. The HEK293T and line were transduced with this virus. PCR was performed for evaluation of intron splicing in transduced cells. The GFP expression was seen in 65% of the cells transduced. The PCR amplification of the genomic DNA of transduced cells confirmed the splicing of intron 2. The strategy is significant to accomplish our goal for preserving the packaging cells from the toxic gene expression during viral assembly and the resultant reduction in viral titration. Also it serves to address several other issues in the gene therapy. PMID:26679755

  15. An efficient platform for screening expression and crystallization of glycoproteins produced in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeffrey E.; Fusco, Marnie L.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2010-01-01

    Glycoproteins mediate multiple, diverse and critical cellular functions, that are desirable to explore by structural analysis. However, structure determination of these molecules has been hindered by difficulties expressing milligram quantities of stable, homogeneous protein and in determining, which modifications will yield samples amenable to structural studies. We describe a platform proven effective for rapidly screening expression and crystallization of challenging glycoprotein targets produced in mammalian cells. Here, multiple glycoprotein constructs are produced in parallel by transient expression of adherent human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells and subsequently screened in small quantities for crystallization by microfluidic free interface diffusion. As a result, recombinant proteins are produced and processed in a native, mammalian environment and crystallization screening can be accomplished with as little as 65 μg of protein. Moreover, large numbers of constructs can be screened for expression and crystallization and scaled up for structural studies in a matter of five weeks. PMID:19373230

  16. Single Cell Analysis to locate the Restriction Point with respect to E2F Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimienta, R.; Johnson, A.

    2011-12-01

    The restriction point is a G1-phase checkpoint that regulates passage through the cell cycle and is misregulated in all known types of cancer. The Rb-E2F switch is thought to be one of the most relevant molecular mechanisms which regulate the restriction point in mammalian cells. However, recent experiments have brought the timing of the restriction point into question. In previous studies, cells were analyzed as populations and this prevented an accurate determination of the restriction point. By creating and analyzing an E2F-GFP reporter in single cells, we can pinpoint the timing of E2F activation and determine whether it coincides with the restriction point. Using calcium phosphate and Fugene,we transfected human embryonic kidney (293T) cells with a CMV-GFP plasmid and an E2F-GFP reporter. Based on our results, it appears that calcium phosphate is more effective than Fugene at transfecting mammalian cells. The calcium phosphate transfection had 9.59% more fluorescent cells than Fugene. However, this result only occurred with the CMV-GFP plasmid and not the E2F-GFP reporter, which was not properly expressed in human embryonic kidney (293T) cells. We will continue troubleshooting to fix this reporter as we proceed with our research. Once the reporter is properly cloned, we will transfect it into retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE1-hTERT) cells using the calcium phosphate method. RPE1-hTERT cells are an immortalized with telomerase and are more close to normal cells than tumor-derived cell lines. Through this research we will better comprehend commitment to the mammalian cell cycle.

  17. Enhanced protein expression in mammalian cells using engineered SUMO fusions: secreted phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Peroutka, Raymond J; Elshourbagy, Nabil; Piech, Tara; Butt, Tauseef R

    2008-09-01

    SUMOylation, the covalent attachment of SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier), is a eukaryotic post-translational event that has been demonstrated to play a critical role in several biological processes. When used as an N-terminal tag or fusion partner, SUMO has been shown to enhance functional protein production significantly by improving folding, solubility, and stability. We have engineered several SUMOs and, through their fusion, developed a system for enhancing the expression and secretion of complex proteins. To demonstrate the fidelity of this fusion technology, secreted phospholipase A(2) proteins (sPLA(2)) were produced using HEK-293T and CHO-K1 cells. Five mouse sPLA(2) homologs were expressed and secreted in mammalian cell cultures using SUMO or SUMO-derived, N-terminal fusion partners. Mean and median increases of 43- and 18-fold, respectively, were obtained using novel SUMO mutants that are resistant to digestion by endogenous deSUMOylases. PMID:18539905

  18. Cancer-specific binary expression system activated in mice by bacteriophage HK022 Integrase.

    PubMed

    Elias, Amer; Spector, Itay; Sogolovsky-Bard, Ilana; Gritsenko, Natalia; Rask, Lene; Mainbakh, Yuli; Zilberstein, Yael; Yagil, Ezra; Kolot, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Binary systems based on site-specific recombination have been used for tumor specific transcription targeting of suicide genes in animal models. In these binary systems a site specific recombinase or integrase that is expressed from a tumor specific promoter drives tumor specific expression of a cytotoxic gene. In the present study we developed a new cancer specific binary expression system activated by the Integrase (Int) of the lambdoid phage HK022. We demonstrate the validity of this system by the specific expression of a luciferase (luc) reporter in human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cells and in a lung cancer mouse model. Due to the absence viral vectors and of cytotoxicity the Int based binary system offers advantages over previously described counterparts and may therefore be developed into a safer cancer cell killing system. PMID:27117628

  19. Cancer-specific binary expression system activated in mice by bacteriophage HK022 Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Amer; Spector, Itay; Sogolovsky-Bard, Ilana; Gritsenko, Natalia; Rask, Lene; Mainbakh, Yuli; Zilberstein, Yael; Yagil, Ezra; Kolot, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Binary systems based on site-specific recombination have been used for tumor specific transcription targeting of suicide genes in animal models. In these binary systems a site specific recombinase or integrase that is expressed from a tumor specific promoter drives tumor specific expression of a cytotoxic gene. In the present study we developed a new cancer specific binary expression system activated by the Integrase (Int) of the lambdoid phage HK022. We demonstrate the validity of this system by the specific expression of a luciferase (luc) reporter in human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cells and in a lung cancer mouse model. Due to the absence viral vectors and of cytotoxicity the Int based binary system offers advantages over previously described counterparts and may therefore be developed into a safer cancer cell killing system. PMID:27117628

  20. Human cell lines: A promising alternative for recombinant FIX production.

    PubMed

    de Sousa Bomfim, Aline; Cristina Corrêa de Freitas, Marcela; Picanço-Castro, Virgínia; de Abreu Soares Neto, Mário; Swiech, Kamilla; Tadeu Covas, Dimas; Maria de Sousa Russo, Elisa

    2016-05-01

    Factor IX (FIX) is a vitamin K-dependent protein, and it has become a valuable pharmaceutical in the Hemophilia B treatment. We evaluated the potential of recombinant human FIX (rhFIX) expression in 293T and SK-Hep-1 human cell lines. SK-Hep-1-FIX cells produced higher levels of biologically active protein. The growth profile of 293T-FIX cells was not influenced by lentiviral integration number into the cellular genome. SK-Hep-1-FIX cells showed a significantly lower growth rate than SK-Hep-1 cells. γ-carboxylation process is significant to FIX biological activity, thus we performed a expression analysis of genes involved in this process. The 293T gene expression suggests that this cell line could efficiently carboxylate FIX, however only 28% of the total secreted protein is active. SK-Hep-1 cells did not express high amounts of VKORC1 and carboxylase, but this cell line secreted large amounts of active protein. Enrichment of culture medium with Ca(+2) and Mg(+2) ions did not affect positively rhFIX expression in SK-Hep-1 cells. In 293T cells, the addition of 0.5 mM Ca(+2) and 1 mM Mg(+2) resulted in higher rhFIX concentration. SK-Hep-1 cell line proved to be very effective in rhFIX production, and it can be used as a novel biotechnological platform for the production of recombinant proteins. PMID:26802680

  1. [Eukaryotic expression and application of HCV Hebei strain E2 extracellular core region].

    PubMed

    Ye, Chuantao; Bian, Peiyu; Weng, Daihui; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Ying; Lei, Yingfeng; Jia, Zhansheng

    2016-06-01

    Objective To express core region of HCV1b (Hebei strain) E2 protein (E2c) by eukaryotic system, and establish the detection method of specific anti-HCV E2 antibody in the sera from hepatitis C patients. Methods Based on the literature, the E2c gene was modified from the HCV1b gene and synthesized via overlapping PCR. Thereafter, the E2c gene including tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) signal peptide was cloned into the pCI-neo eukaryotic expression vector, and the product was named pCI-tpa-1bE2c. After HEK293T cells were transfected with pCI-tpa-1bE2c, the supernatant was collected, condensed and purified. Its specificity was identified by Western blotting. Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-based ELISA was used to detect the antibody against HCVE2 in the sera from hepatitis C patients. Results Modified HCV E2c protein was successfully expressed in HEK293T cells and the GNA-based ELISA was developed for detecting the antibody against HCV E2 in the sera from hepatitis C patients. Conclusion HCV-1bE2c protein can be effectively expressed in HEK293T cells and applied clinically. PMID:27371839

  2. Agonist-dependent modulation of cell surface expression of the cold receptor TRPM8.

    PubMed

    Toro, Carlos A; Eger, Stephanie; Veliz, Luis; Sotelo-Hitschfeld, Pamela; Cabezas, Deny; Castro, Maite A; Zimmermann, Katharina; Brauchi, Sebastian

    2015-01-14

    The spatial and temporal distribution of receptors constitutes an important mechanism for controlling the magnitude of cellular responses. Several members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel family can regulate their function by modulating their expression at the plasma membrane (PM) through rapid vesicular translocation and fusion. The mechanisms underlying this regulation are not completely understood, and the contribution of vesicular trafficking to physiological function is unknown. TRPM8 receptors are expressed in mammalian peripheral sensory neurons and are essential for the detection of cold temperatures. Previously, we showed that TRPM8-containing vesicles are segregated into three main pools, immobile at the PM, simple diffusive and corralled-hopping. Here, we show that channel expression at the PM is modulated by TRPM8 agonists in F11 and HEK293T cells. Our results support a model in which the activation of TRPM8 channels, located at the PM, induces a short-lived recruitment of a TRPM8-containing vesicular pool to the cell surface causing a transitory increase in the number of functional channels, affecting intrinsic properties of cold receptor responses. We further demonstrate the requirement of intact vesicular trafficking to support sustained cold responses in the skin of mice. PMID:25589752

  3. Several Human Liver Cell Expressed Apolipoproteins Complement HCV Virus Production with Varying Efficacy Conferring Differential Specific Infectivity to Released Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Doepke, Mandy; Vieyres, Gabrielle; Todt, Daniel; Wölk, Benno; Vondran, Florian W. R.; Geffers, Robert; Lauber, Chris; Kaderali, Lars; Penin, François; Pietschmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE), an exchangeable apolipoprotein, is necessary for production of infectious Hepatitis C virus (HCV) particles. However, ApoE is not the only liver-expressed apolipoprotein and the role of other apolipoproteins for production of infectious HCV progeny is incompletely defined. Therefore, we quantified mRNA expression of human apolipoproteins in primary human hepatocytes. Subsequently, cDNAs encoding apolipoproteins were expressed in 293T/miR-122 cells to explore if they complement HCV virus production in cells that are non-permissive due to limiting endogenous levels of human apolipoproteins. Primary human hepatocytes expressed high mRNA levels of ApoA1, A2, C1, C3, E, and H. ApoA4, A5, B, D, F, J, L1, L2, L3, L4, L6, M, and O were expressed at intermediate levels, and C2, C4, and L5 were not detected. All members of the ApoA and ApoC family of lipoproteins complemented HCV virus production in HCV transfected 293T/miR-122 cells, albeit with significantly lower efficacy compared with ApoE. In contrast, ApoD expression did not support production of infectious HCV. Specific infectivity of released particles complemented with ApoA family members was significantly lower compared with ApoE. Moreover, the ratio of extracellular to intracellular infectious virus was significantly higher for ApoE compared to ApoA2 and ApoC3. Since apolipoproteins complementing HCV virus production share amphipathic alpha helices as common structural features we altered the two alpha helices of ApoC1. Helix breaking mutations in both ApoC1 helices impaired virus assembly highlighting a critical role of alpha helices in apolipoproteins supporting HCV assembly. In summary, various liver expressed apolipoproteins with amphipathic alpha helices complement HCV virus production in human non liver cells. Differences in the efficiency of virus assembly, the specific infectivity of released particles, and the ratio between extracellular and intracellular infectivity point to

  4. [Construction of IK6 recombinant lentiviral vector and its expression and biologic feature in THP1 cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Na; Liu, Ya-Nan; Xiao, Min; Ding, Xiao-Yi; Zhou, Jian-Feng; Li, Chun-Rui

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to construct a lentiviral vector carrying IK6 gene and to observe the expression of IK6 as well as related biologic feature in THP1 cells, so as to provide an effective method to further investigate the role of this gene in leukemia. The IK6 gene was obtained by using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Then IK6 was recombined with the pGC-FU vector to construct a recombinant lentiviral vector named pGC-FU-IK6 gene-GFP,which was confirmed by PCR and sequencing. The 293T cells were transfected with pGC-FU- IK6-GFP by using Lipofectamine 2000. After examining the titer of the virus, pGC-FU- IK6-GFP was used to transfect THP1 cells. The transfection efficiency was detected by flow cytometry, and the expression level of mRNA and IK6-GFP fusion protein were confirmed by RT-PCR and Western blot respectively. Then the impact of IK6 on apoptosis and cell cycle was analyzed. The results showed that the IK6 gene was obtained by RT-PCR and connected into the linearized lentiviral vector to successfully constructed target plasmid named pGC-FU-IK6-GFP with Amp resistant. The target plasmid was transfected into 293T cells and the virus titer was 2.0×10(9)TU/ml. Next, THP1 cells were transfected with pGC-FU-IK6-GFP and the efficiency was up to 90%. The detection of the IK6 mRNA and IK6-GFP fusion protein in target cells showed that IK6 could promote target cell clone formation and inhibit apoptosis, but had no significant effect on the cell cycle. It is concluded that virus vector carrying IK6 gene had been successfully constructed and expressed in THP1 stably. Biology studies of target THP1 cell shows that the IK6 is likely to interfere with the function of normal Ikaros protein as tumor suppressor, and it exerts a potential anti-apoptotic effect. Thus, IK6 can promote leukemia cell growth. However, there is no significant effect on the cell cycle. It provides an effective method for exploring the function of IK6 in acute

  5. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of tyrosinase expressing tumours in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laufer, Jan; Jathoul, Amit; Johnson, Peter; Zhang, Edward; Lythgoe, Mark; Pedley, R. Barbara; Pule, Martin; Beard, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Two human tumour cell lines (K562, 293T) were stably transfected to achieve the genetic expression of tyrosinase, which is involved in the production of the pigment eumelanin. The cells were injected subcutaneously into nude mice to form tumour xenografts, which were imaged over a period of up to 26 days using an all-optical photoacoustic imaging system. 3D photoacoustic images of the tumours and the surrounding vasculature were acquired at excitation wavelengths ranging from 600nm to 770nm. The images showed tumour growth and continued tyrosinase expression over the full 26 day duration of the study. These findings were confirmed by histological analysis of excised tumour samples.

  6. Retroviruses Pseudotyped with the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike Protein Efficiently Infect Cells Expressing Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Michael J.; Dorfman, Tatyana; Li, Wenhui; Wong, Swee Kee; Li, Yanhan; Kuhn, Jens H.; Coderre, James; Vasilieva, Natalya; Han, Zhongchao; Greenough, Thomas C.; Farzan, Michael; Choe, Hyeryun

    2004-01-01

    Infection of receptor-bearing cells by coronaviruses is mediated by their spike (S) proteins. The coronavirus (SARS-CoV) that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) infects cells expressing the receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Here we show that codon optimization of the SARS-CoV S-protein gene substantially enhanced S-protein expression. We also found that two retroviruses, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and murine leukemia virus, both expressing green fluorescent protein and pseudotyped with SARS-CoV S protein or S-protein variants, efficiently infected HEK293T cells stably expressing ACE2. Infection mediated by an S-protein variant whose cytoplasmic domain had been truncated and altered to include a fragment of the cytoplasmic tail of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein was, in both cases, substantially more efficient than that mediated by wild-type S protein. Using S-protein-pseudotyped SIV, we found that the enzymatic activity of ACE2 made no contribution to S-protein-mediated infection. Finally, we show that a soluble and catalytically inactive form of ACE2 potently blocked infection by S-protein-pseudotyped retrovirus and by SARS-CoV. These results permit studies of SARS-CoV entry inhibitors without the use of live virus and suggest a candidate therapy for SARS. PMID:15367630

  7. Observation of "wired" cell communication over 10-μm and 20-μm poly(dimethylsiloxane) barriers in tetracycline inducible expression systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ching-Te; Chi, Cheng-Yu; Wu, Pei-Yi; Chuang, Fang-Tzu; Lin, Yueh-Chien; Liu, Hao-Kai; Huang, Guan-Syuan; Tsai, Tzu-Ching; Wo, Andrew M.; Lee, Hsinyu; Lee, Si-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Communication between cells and extracellular environments is of interest because of its critical roles in cell development and differentiation. Particularly, this signal transduction is commonly believed to rely on the contact and binding of the participating molecules/proteins, suggesting that the binding distance needed is less than a few nanometers. However, it is difficult to precisely match the rapidly binding interaction which depends on the probability of molecular collision in living systems, raising a hypothesis that another mechanism exists, could promote this signal communication, and remains unknown. Here we report that a long-range signal delivery over 10-μm and 20-μm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) barriers can be observed in microfluidically tetracycline (Tet) inducible expression systems. Results show that a significant increment of the long-range induced green fluorescent protein in human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK 293T) cells by the stimulation of Tet is demonstrated, and that such a signal induction is not dominated by Tet diffusion and displays a specific bindingless property. In addition, our experimental results, combined with theoretical modeling, suggest that this communication exhibits a bump-shaped characteristic depending on barrier thickness, materially structural property, surface roughness, and agonist concentration. It strongly relies on the PDMS barrier to delivery signal; therefore, we call such a mechanism as "wired" cell communication instead of wireless. These results could ignite interests in the novel and "wired" cell communication, which we call it X-signal, and in the use of such systems for the study of cellular biology and development of new drug.

  8. Retroviral vectors encoding ADA regulatory locus control region provide enhanced T-cell-specific transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Murine retroviral vectors have been used in several hundred gene therapy clinical trials, but have fallen out of favor for a number of reasons. One issue is that gene expression from viral or internal promoters is highly variable and essentially unregulated. Moreover, with retroviral vectors, gene expression is usually silenced over time. Mammalian genes, in contrast, are characterized by highly regulated, precise levels of expression in both a temporal and a cell-specific manner. To ascertain if recapitulation of endogenous adenosine deaminase (ADA) expression can be achieved in a vector construct we created a new series of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MuLV) based retroviral vector that carry human regulatory elements including combinations of the ADA promoter, the ADA locus control region (LCR), ADA introns and human polyadenylation sequences in a self-inactivating vector backbone. Methods A MuLV-based retroviral vector with a self-inactivating (SIN) backbone, the phosphoglycerate kinase promoter (PGK) and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), as a reporter gene, was generated. Subsequent vectors were constructed from this basic vector by deletion or addition of certain elements. The added elements that were assessed are the human ADA promoter, human ADA locus control region (LCR), introns 7, 8, and 11 from the human ADA gene, and human growth hormone polyadenylation signal. Retroviral vector particles were produced by transient three-plasmid transfection of 293T cells. Retroviral vectors encoding eGFP were titered by transducing 293A cells, and then the proportion of GFP-positive cells was determined using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Non T-cell and T-cell lines were transduced at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 0.1 and the yield of eGFP transgene expression was evaluated by FACS analysis using mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) detection. Results Vectors that contained the ADA LCR were preferentially expressed in T-cell

  9. CMF608-a novel mechanical strain-induced bone-specific protein expressed in early osteochondroprogenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Segev, Orit; Samach, Aviva; Faerman, Alexander; Kalinski, Hagar; Beiman, Merav; Gelfand, Anna; Turam, Hagit; Boguslavsky, Shlomit; Moshayov, Anat; Gottlieb, Helen; Kazanov, Eugeniy; Nevo, Zvi; Robinson, Dror; Skaliter, Rami; Einat, Paz; Binderman, Itzhak; Feinstein, Elena

    2004-02-01

    Microarray gene expression analysis was utilized to identify genes upregulated in primary rat calvaria cultures in response to mechanical force. One of the identified genes designated CMF608 appeared to be novel. The corresponding full-length cDNA was cloned and characterized in more details. It encodes a putative 2597 amino acid protein containing N-terminal signal peptide, six leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), and 12 immunoglobulin-like repeats, 10 of which are clustered within the C-terminus. Expression of CMF608 is bone-specific and the main type of CMF608-positive cells is mesenchymal osteochondroprogenitors with fibroblast-like morphology. These cells reside in the perichondral fibrous ring of La Croix, periosteum, endosteum of normal bone as well as in the activated periosteum and early fibrous callus generated postfracture. Expression of CMF608 is notably absent from the regions of endochondral ossification. Mature bone cell types do not produce CMF608 with the exception of chondrocytes of the tangential layer of the articular cartilage, which are thought to be under constant mechanical loading. Ectopic expression of CMF608 in HEK293T cells shows that the protein is subjected to post-translational processing and its N-terminal approximately 90 kDa polypeptide can be found in the conditioned medium. Ectopic expression of either the full-length cDNA of CMF608 or of its N-terminal region in CMF608-negative ROS17/2.8 rat osteosarcoma cells results in transfected clones displaying increased proliferation rate and the characteristics of less-differentiated osteoblasts compared to the control cells. Our data indicate that CMF608 is a unique marker of early osteochondroprogenitor cells. We propose that it could be functionally involved in maintenance of the osteochondroprogenitor cells pool and its down-regulation precedes terminal differentiation. PMID:14962803

  10. Real-time monitoring of cisplatin cytotoxicity on three-dimensional spheroid tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Baek, NamHuk; Seo, Ok Won; Lee, Jaehwa; Hulme, John; An, Seong Soo A

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultivation is a powerful technique for monitoring and understanding diverse cellular mechanisms in developmental cancer and neuronal biology, tissue engineering, and drug development. 3D systems could relate better to in vivo models than two-dimensional (2D) cultures. Several factors, such as cell type, survival rate, proliferation rate, and gene and protein expression patterns, determine whether a particular cell line can be adapted to a 3D system. The 3D system may overcome some of the limitations of 2D cultures in terms of cell-cell communication and cell networks, which are essential for understanding differentiation, structural organization, shape, and extended connections with other cells or organs. Here, the effect of the anticancer drug cisplatin, also known as cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) or CDDP, on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generation was investigated using 3D spheroid-forming cells and real-time monitoring for 7 days. First, 12 cell lines were screened for their ability to form 3D spheroids: prostate (DU145), testis (F9), embryonic fibroblast (NIH-3T3), muscle (C2C12), embryonic kidney (293T), neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y), adenocarcinomic alveolar basal epithelial cell (A549), cervical cancer (HeLa), HeLa contaminant (HEp2), pituitary epithelial-like cell (GH3), embryonic cell (PA317), and osteosarcoma (U-2OS) cells. Of these, eight cell lines were selected: NIH-3T3, C2C12, 293T, SH-SY5Y, A549, HeLa, PA317, and U-2OS; and five underwent real-time monitoring of CDDP cytotoxicity: HeLa, A549, 293T, SH-SY5Y, and U-2OS. ATP generation was blocked 1 day after addition of 50 μM CDDP, but cytotoxicity in HeLa, A549, SH-SY5Y, and U-2OS cells could be visualized only 4 days after treatment. In 293T cells, CDDP failed to kill entirely the culture and ATP generation was only partially blocked after 1 day. This suggests potential CDDP resistance of 293T cells or metabolic clearance of the drug. Real-time monitoring and ATP

  11. Real-time monitoring of cisplatin cytotoxicity on three-dimensional spheroid tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Baek, NamHuk; Seo, Ok Won; Lee, Jaehwa; Hulme, John; An, Seong Soo A

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultivation is a powerful technique for monitoring and understanding diverse cellular mechanisms in developmental cancer and neuronal biology, tissue engineering, and drug development. 3D systems could relate better to in vivo models than two-dimensional (2D) cultures. Several factors, such as cell type, survival rate, proliferation rate, and gene and protein expression patterns, determine whether a particular cell line can be adapted to a 3D system. The 3D system may overcome some of the limitations of 2D cultures in terms of cell–cell communication and cell networks, which are essential for understanding differentiation, structural organization, shape, and extended connections with other cells or organs. Here, the effect of the anticancer drug cisplatin, also known as cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) or CDDP, on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generation was investigated using 3D spheroid-forming cells and real-time monitoring for 7 days. First, 12 cell lines were screened for their ability to form 3D spheroids: prostate (DU145), testis (F9), embryonic fibroblast (NIH-3T3), muscle (C2C12), embryonic kidney (293T), neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y), adenocarcinomic alveolar basal epithelial cell (A549), cervical cancer (HeLa), HeLa contaminant (HEp2), pituitary epithelial-like cell (GH3), embryonic cell (PA317), and osteosarcoma (U-2OS) cells. Of these, eight cell lines were selected: NIH-3T3, C2C12, 293T, SH-SY5Y, A549, HeLa, PA317, and U-2OS; and five underwent real-time monitoring of CDDP cytotoxicity: HeLa, A549, 293T, SH-SY5Y, and U-2OS. ATP generation was blocked 1 day after addition of 50 μM CDDP, but cytotoxicity in HeLa, A549, SH-SY5Y, and U-2OS cells could be visualized only 4 days after treatment. In 293T cells, CDDP failed to kill entirely the culture and ATP generation was only partially blocked after 1 day. This suggests potential CDDP resistance of 293T cells or metabolic clearance of the drug. Real-time monitoring and ATP

  12. Transient expression of recombinant ACKR4 (CCRL1) gene, an atypical chemokine receptor in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells.

    PubMed

    Parsi, Bahareh; Esmaeili, Abolghasem; Hashemi, Mohammad; Behjati, Mohaddeseh

    2016-07-01

    ACKR4 also called CCX-CKR, CCRL1 as a member of atypical chemokine receptors, regulates the biological responses by clearance or transporting homeostatic chemokines such as CCL19, CCL21, CCL25, and CXCL13. Since these chemokines are involved in cancer development and metastasis, ACKR4 could have inhibition roles in cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Forming complexes with chemokine receptors by ACKR4 as in the case of hCXCR3 which lead to chemotaxis prevention is the other function of this protein is. However, as an atypical chemokine receptor, ACKR4 is less well-characterized compared to other members. Here, as the first step in understanding the molecular mechanisms of ACKR4 action, transfectants in HEK293T cell, was generated. In this study, ACKR4 coding sequence was cloned and human embryonic kidney 293T cells were used for recombinant production of ACKR4 protein. The liposome-mediated transfection with ACKR4 CDs, were detected in ACKR4 positive cells as early as 48 h post-transfection. The production of ACKR4 protein was confirmed using RT-PCR, dot blot, western blot, and flow cytometry. ACKR4 may represent a novel molecular target in cancer therapy, which might provide a chance for new therapeutic strategy. Therefore, the first step in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of ACKR4 action is generation ACKR4-HEK293T recombinant cells. PMID:27168154

  13. Proliferation inhibition of astrocytes, neurons, and non-glial cells by intracellularly expressed human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat protein.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Betty Y; He, Johnny J

    2004-04-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat protein is one of the soluble neurotoxins. Most studies have to date focused on Tat as an extracellular molecule and its role in neuronal apoptosis, as recombinant Tat protein is often used in these studies. In this study, we expressed Tat protein in astrocytes and neurons, and examined its effects on these cells. We found that Tat expression resulted in growth inhibition of astrocytes, neurons, as well as non-glial cells 293T. We further showed that Tat interacted with a number of cell cycle-related proteins including cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D3, Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk1/Cdc2, cdc6, p27, p53, p63, hdlg, and PCNA. These data demonstrate that Tat inhibited cell proliferation when expressed intracellularly, and suggest that Tat interactions with multiple cell cycle regulators may account for this anti-proliferative effect. These results support the notion that Tat-induced neuropathogenesis is mediated by multiple mechanisms involving both intracellular and extracellular Tat protein. PMID:15050687

  14. Generation of a Genome Scale Lentiviral Vector Library for EF1α Promoter-Driven Expression of Human ORFs and Identification of Human Genes Affecting Viral Titer

    PubMed Central

    Škalamera, Dubravka; Dahmer, Mareike; Purdon, Amy S.; Wilson, Benjamin M.; Ranall, Max V.; Blumenthal, Antje; Gabrielli, Brian; Gonda, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    The bottleneck in elucidating gene function through high-throughput gain-of-function genome screening is the limited availability of comprehensive libraries for gene overexpression. Lentiviral vectors are the most versatile and widely used vehicles for gene expression in mammalian cells. Lentiviral supernatant libraries for genome screening are commonly generated in the HEK293T cell line, yet very little is known about the effect of introduced sequences on the produced viral titer, which we have shown to be gene dependent. We have generated an arrayed lentiviral vector library for the expression of 17,030 human proteins by using the GATEWAY® cloning system to transfer ORFs from the Mammalian Gene Collection into an EF1alpha promoter-dependent lentiviral expression vector. This promoter was chosen instead of the more potent and widely used CMV promoter, because it is less prone to silencing and provides more stable long term expression. The arrayed lentiviral clones were used to generate viral supernatant by packaging in the HEK293T cell line. The efficiency of transfection and virus production was estimated by measuring the fluorescence of IRES driven GFP, co-expressed with the ORFs. More than 90% of cloned ORFs produced sufficient virus for downstream screening applications. We identified genes which consistently produced very high or very low viral titer. Supernatants from select clones that were either high or low virus producers were tested on a range of cell lines. Some of the low virus producers, including two previously uncharacterized proteins were cytotoxic to HEK293T cells. The library we have constructed presents a powerful resource for high-throughput gain-of-function screening of the human genome and drug-target discovery. Identification of human genes that affect lentivirus production may lead to improved technology for gene expression using lentiviral vectors. PMID:23251614

  15. Simvastatin enhances bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Hong; Sung, Arthur; Zhao, Guohua; Shi, Lingfang; Qiu Daoming; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Kao, Peter N. . E-mail: peterkao@stanford.edu

    2006-01-06

    Statins confer therapeutic benefits in systemic and pulmonary vascular diseases. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptors serve essential signaling functions in cardiovascular development and skeletal morphogenesis. Mutations in BMP receptor type II (BMPR2) are associated with human familial and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and pathologic neointimal proliferation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells within small pulmonary arteries. In severe experimental pulmonary hypertension, simvastatin reversed disease and conferred a 100% survival advantage. Here, modulation of BMPR2 gene expression by simvastatin is characterized in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T, pulmonary artery smooth muscle, and lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs). A 1.4 kb BMPR2 promoter containing Egr-1 binding sites confers reporter gene activation in 293T cells which is partially inhibited by simvastatin. Simvastatin enhances steady-state BMPR2 mRNA and protein expression in HLMVEC, through posttranscriptional mRNA stabilization. Simvastatin induction of BMPR2 expression may improve BMP-BMPR2 signaling thereby enhancing endothelial differentiation and function.

  16. Camelid reporter gene imaging: a generic method for in vivo cell tracking

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To combine the sensitivity of bioluminescent imaging (BLI) with the 3D and quantitative properties of pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/micro-computed tomography (CT) (phSPECT/micro-CT), we generated stable cell lines that express a yellow-fluorescent protein (YFP) and Gaussia luciferase (GLuc) fusion protein (YFP/GLuc). For in vivo phSPECT detection of this YFP/GLuc protein, a nanobody, targeted against yellow and green fluorescent proteins (anti-YFP-Nb), was site specifically labelled with 99mTc. Methods Human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293T) were cultured and passaged every 3 days. 10E5 cells were transduced with YFP/GLuc-containing vector: both membrane-targeted (MT-YFP/GLuc) and non-targeted (YFP/GLuc) fusion proteins were developed. These vectors were compared against a SKOV-3 cell line stably expressing green fluorescent-firefly luciferase (GFP/Fluc) and HEK293T cells expressing red fluorescent protein in combination with a Gaussia luciferase (Red/GLuc). Transduction efficiencies were scored by fluorescence microscopy, and transduced cells were enriched by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). GLuc and FLuc functionality was tested in vitro by list-mode BLI. Subsequently, cells were transplanted subcutaneously in athymic (nu/nu) mice (MT-YFP/GLuc: n = 4, YFP/GLuc: n = 6, GFP/FLuc: n = 6, Red/GLuc: n = 4). Labelling efficiency of anti-YFP-Nb was measured using instant thin layer chromatography. One week after transplantation, 99mTc-labelled anti-YFP-Nb was injected intravenously and pinhole (ph) SPECT/micro-CT was performed, followed by in vivo BLI. Results Cells showed high levels of fluorescence after transduction. The cells containing the MT-YFP/GLuc were positive on fluorescence microscopy, with the fluorescent signal confined to the cell membrane. After cell sorting, transduced cells were assayed by BLI and showed a significantly higher light output both in vitro and in vivo compared with non

  17. Susceptibility to virus-cell fusion at the plasma membrane is reduced through expression of HIV gp41 cytoplasmic domains

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowsky, Katharina; Luksza, Julia; Dittmar, Matthias T.

    2008-06-20

    The cytoplasmic tail of the HIV transmembrane protein plays an important role in viral infection. In this study we analyzed the role of retroviral cytoplasmic tails in modulating the cytoskeleton and interfering with virus-cell fusion. HeLaP4 cells expressing different HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs showed reduced acetylated tubulin levels whereas the cytoplasmic tail of MLV did not alter microtubule stability indicating a unique function for the lentiviral cytoplasmic tail. The effect on tubulin is mediated through the membrane proximal region of the HIV cytoplasmic tail and was independent of membrane localization. Site-directed mutagenesis identified three motifs in the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail required to effect the reduction in acetylated tubulin. Both the Yxx{phi} domain and amino acids 21 to 45 of the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail need to be present to change the level of acetylated tubulin in transfected cells. T-cells stably expressing one HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail derived construct showed also a reduction in acetylated tubulin thus confirming the importance of this effect not only for HeLaP4 and 293T cells. Challenge experiments using transiently transfected HeLaP4 cells and T cells stably expressing an HIV cytoplasmic tail construct revealed both reduced virus-cell fusion and replication of HIV-1{sub NL4.3} compared to control cells. In the virus-cell fusion assay only virions pseudotyped with either HIV or MLV envelopes showed reduced fusion efficiency, whereas VSV-G pseudotyped virions where not affected by the expression of HIV derived cytoplasmic tail constructs, indicating that fusion at the plasma but not endosomal membrane is affected. Overexpression of human histone-deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) and constitutively active RhoA resulted in a reduction of acetylated tubulin and reduced virus-cell fusion as significant as that observed following expression of HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs. Inhibition of HDAC6 showed a strong increase in acetylated tubulin and

  18. Using inositol as a biocompatible ligand for efficient transgene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Bellis, Susan L; Fan, Yiwen; Wu, Yunkun

    2015-01-01

    Transgene transfection techniques using cationic polymers such as polyethylenimines (PEIs) and PEI derivatives as gene vectors have shown efficacy, although they also have shortcomings. PEIs have decent DNA-binding capability and good cell internalization performance, but they cannot deliver gene payloads very efficiently to cell nuclei. In this study, three hyperbranched polyglycerol-polyethylenimine (PG6-PEI) polymers conjugated with myo-inositol (INO) molecules were developed. The three resulting PG6-PEI-INO polymers have an increased number of INO ligands per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 1 had only 14 carboxymethyl INO (CMINO) units per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 2 had approximately 130 CMINO units per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 3 had as high as 415 CMINO units approximately. Mixing PG6-PEI-INO polymers with DNA produced compact nanocomposites. We then performed localization studies using fluorescent microscopy. As the number of conjugated inositol ligands increased in PG6-PEI-INO polymers, there was a corresponding increase in accumulation of the polymers within 293T cell nuclei. Transfection performed with spherical 293T cells yielded 82% of EGFP-positive cells when using PG6-PEI-INO 3 as the vehicle. Studies further revealed that extracellular adenosine triphosphate (eATP) can inhibit the transgene efficiency of PG6-PEI-INO polymers, as compared with PEI and PG6-PEI that were not conjugated with inositol. Our work unveiled the possibility of using inositol as an effective ligand for transgene expression. PMID:25926732

  19. Using inositol as a biocompatible ligand for efficient transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Bellis, Susan L; Fan, Yiwen; Wu, Yunkun

    2015-01-01

    Transgene transfection techniques using cationic polymers such as polyethylenimines (PEIs) and PEI derivatives as gene vectors have shown efficacy, although they also have shortcomings. PEIs have decent DNA-binding capability and good cell internalization performance, but they cannot deliver gene payloads very efficiently to cell nuclei. In this study, three hyperbranched polyglycerol-polyethylenimine (PG6-PEI) polymers conjugated with myo-inositol (INO) molecules were developed. The three resulting PG6-PEI-INO polymers have an increased number of INO ligands per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 1 had only 14 carboxymethyl INO (CMINO) units per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 2 had approximately 130 CMINO units per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 3 had as high as 415 CMINO units approximately. Mixing PG6-PEI-INO polymers with DNA produced compact nanocomposites. We then performed localization studies using fluorescent microscopy. As the number of conjugated inositol ligands increased in PG6-PEI-INO polymers, there was a corresponding increase in accumulation of the polymers within 293T cell nuclei. Transfection performed with spherical 293T cells yielded 82% of EGFP-positive cells when using PG6-PEI-INO 3 as the vehicle. Studies further revealed that extracellular adenosine triphosphate (eATP) can inhibit the transgene efficiency of PG6-PEI-INO polymers, as compared with PEI and PG6-PEI that were not conjugated with inositol. Our work unveiled the possibility of using inositol as an effective ligand for transgene expression. PMID:25926732

  20. Direct Detection of Diverse Metabolic Changes in Virally Transformed and Tax-Expressing Cells by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sripadi, Prabhakar; Shrestha, Bindesh; Easley, Rebecca L.; Carpio, Lawrence; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Chevalier, Sebastien; Mahieux, Renaud; Kashanchi, Fatah; Vertes, Akos

    2010-01-01

    Background Viral transformation of a cell starts at the genetic level, followed by changes in the proteome and the metabolome of the host. There is limited information on the broad metabolic changes in HTLV transformed cells. Methods and Principal Findings Here, we report the detection of key changes in metabolites and lipids directly from human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 and type 3 (HTLV1 and HTLV3) transformed, as well as Tax1 and Tax3 expressing cell lines by laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) mass spectrometry (MS). Comparing LAESI-MS spectra of non-HTLV1 transformed and HTLV1 transformed cells revealed that glycerophosphocholine (PC) lipid components were dominant in the non-HTLV1 transformed cells, and PC(O-32∶1) and PC(O-34∶1) plasmalogens were displaced by PC(30∶0) and PC(32∶0) species in the HTLV1 transformed cells. In HTLV1 transformed cells, choline, phosphocholine, spermine and glutathione, among others, were downregulated, whereas creatine, dopamine, arginine and AMP were present at higher levels. When comparing metabolite levels between HTLV3 and Tax3 transfected 293T cells, there were a number of common changes observed, including decreased choline, phosphocholine, spermine, homovanillic acid, and glycerophosphocholine and increased spermidine and N-acetyl aspartic acid. These results indicate that the lipid metabolism pathway as well as the creatine and polyamine biosynthesis pathways are commonly deregulated after expression of HTLV3 and Tax3, indicating that the noted changes are likely due to Tax3 expression. N-acetyl aspartic acid is a novel metabolite that is upregulated in all cell types and all conditions tested. Conclusions and Significance We demonstrate the high throughput in situ metabolite profiling of HTLV transformed and Tax expressing cells, which facilitates the identification of virus-induced perturbations in the biochemical processes of the host cells. We found virus type-specific (HTLV1 vs. HTLV3), expression

  1. Cell Surface Expression Level Variation between Two Common Human Leukocyte Antigen Alleles, HLA-A2 and HLA-B8, Is Dependent on the Structure of the C Terminal Part of the Alpha 2 and the Alpha 3 Domains

    PubMed Central

    Dellgren, Christoffer; Nehlin, Jan O.; Barington, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Constitutive cell surface expression of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class I antigens vary extremely from tissue to tissue and individual antigens may differ widely in expression levels. Down-regulation of class I expression is a known immune evasive mechanism used by cancer cells and viruses. Moreover, recent observations suggest that even minor differences in expression levels may influence the course of viral infections and the frequency of complications to stem cell transplantation. We have shown that some human multipotent stem cells have high expression of HLA-A while HLA-B is only weakly expressed, and demonstrate here that this is also the case for the human embryonic kidney cell line HEK293T. Using quantitative flow cytometry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction we found expression levels of endogenous HLA-A3 (median 71,204 molecules per cell) 9.2-fold higher than the expression of-B7 (P = 0.002). Transfection experiments with full-length HLA-A2 and -B8 encoding plasmids confirmed this (54,031 molecules per cell vs. 2,466, respectively, P = 0.001) independently of transcript levels suggesting a post-transcriptional regulation. Using chimeric constructs we found that the cytoplasmic tail and the transmembrane region had no impact on the differential cell surface expression. In contrast, ~65% of the difference could be mapped to the six C-terminal amino acids of the alpha 2 domain and the alpha 3 domain (amino acids 176–284), i.e. amino acids not previously shown to be of importance for differential expression levels of HLA class I molecules. We suggest that the differential cell surface expression of two common HLA-A and–B alleles is regulated by a post-translational mechanism that may involve hitherto unrecognized molecules. PMID:26258424

  2. HIV gene expression from intact proviruses positioned in bacterial artificial chromosomes at integration sites previously identified in latently infected T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eipers, Peter G.; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Morrow, Casey D.

    2011-02-05

    HIV integration predominantly occurs in introns of transcriptionally active genes. To study the impact of the integration site on HIV gene expression, a complete HIV-1 provirus (with GFP as a fusion with Nef) was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) at three sites previously identified in latent T cells of patients: topoisomerase II (Top2A), DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), or basic leucine transcription factor 2 (BACH2). Transfection of BAC-HIV into 293 T cells resulted in a fourfold difference in production of infectious HIV-1. Cell lines were established that contained BAC-Top2A, BAC-DNMT1, or BAC-BACH2, but only BAC-DNMT1 spontaneously produced virus, albeit at a low level. Stimulation with TNF-{alpha} resulted in virus production from four of five BAC-Top2A and all BAC-DNMT1 cell lines, but not from the BAC-BACH2 lines. The results of these studies highlight differences between integration sites identified in latent T cells to support virus production and reactivation from latency.

  3. Bioinformatics analysis and expression of a novel protein ROP48 in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Wang, Lin; Zhou, Aihua; Lu, Gang; Li, Qihang; Wang, Zhilin; Zhu, Meiyan; Zhou, Huaiyu; Cong, Hua; He, Shenyi

    2016-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular apicomplexan parasite, and can infect warmblooded animals and humans all over the world. In the past years, ROP family genes encoding particular proteins of T. gondii had made a great contribution to toxoplasmosis. In this study, we used multiple bioinformatics approaches to predict the physical and chemical characteristics, transmembrane domain, epitope, and topological structure of the rhoptry protein 48 (ROP48). The results indicated that ROP48 protein was mainly located in the membrane and had several positive linear-B cell epitopes and Th-cell epitopes, which suggested that ROP48 is a potential DNA vaccine candidate against toxoplasmosis. Then the PCR product amplified from the ROP48 cDNA was inserted into a pEASY-T1 vector to build a recombinant cloning plasmid. After sequencing, ROP48 was subcloned into a eukaryotic expression plasmid pEGFP-C1 to obtain pEGFP-C1-ROP48 (pROP48). After identification by PCR and restriction enzyme digestion, the recombinant plasmid pROP48 was transfected into HEK 293-T cell and identified by RT-PCR. The results showed that the eukaryotic expression plasmid pROP48 was constructed and transfected to the cells of HEK 293-T successfully. Western blotting showed that the expressed proteins can be recognized by anti-STAg mouse sera. PMID:27078655

  4. Construction and characterization of a full-length infectious simian T-cell lymphotropic virus type 3 molecular clone.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Sébastien Alain; Walic, Marine; Calattini, Sara; Mallet, Adeline; Prévost, Marie-Christine; Gessain, Antoine; Mahieux, Renaud

    2007-06-01

    Together with their simian T-cell lymphotropic virus (STLV) equivalent, human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), HTLV-2, and HTLV-3 form the primate T-cell lymphotropic virus (PTLV) group. Over the years, understanding the biology and pathogenesis of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 has been widely improved by the creation of molecular clones. In contrast, so far, PTLV-3 experimental studies have been restricted to the overexpression of the tax gene using reporter assays. We have therefore decided to construct an STLV-3 molecular clone. We generated a full-length STLV-3 proviral clone (8,891 bp) by PCR amplification of overlapping fragments. This STLV-3 molecular clone was then transfected into 293T cells. Reverse transcriptase PCR experiments followed by sequence analysis of the amplified products allowed us to establish that both gag and tax/rex mRNAs were transcribed. Western blotting further demonstrated the presence of the STLV-3 p24gag protein in the cell culture supernatant from transfected cells. Transient transfection of 293T cells and of 293T-long terminal repeat-green fluorescent protein cells with the STLV-3 clone promoted syncytium formation, a hallmark of PTLV Env expression, as well as the appearance of fluorescent cells, also demonstrating that the Tax3 protein was expressed. Virus particles were visible by electron microscopy. These particles are infectious, as demonstrated by our cell-free-infection experiments with purified virions. All together, our data demonstrate that the STLV-3 molecular clone is functional and infectious. This clone will give us a unique opportunity to study in vitro the different pX transcripts and the putative presence of antisense transcripts and to evaluate the PTLV-3 pathogenicity in vivo. PMID:17428869

  5. A synthetic cGMP-sensitive gene switch providing Viagra(®)-controlled gene expression in mammalian cells and mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeuk; Folcher, Marc; Charpin-El Hamri, Ghislaine; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a universal second messenger that is synthesized from guanosine triphosphate (GTP) by guanylyl cyclases (GCs) and hydrolyzed into guanosine monophosphate (GMP) by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Small-molecule drugs that induce high cGMP levels in specialized tissues by boosting GC activity or inhibiting PDE activity have become the predominant treatment strategy for a wide range of medical conditions, including congestive heart failure, pulmonary hypertension, atherosclerosis-based claudication and erectile dysfunction. By fusing the cGMP receptor protein (CRP) of Rhodospirillum centenum to the Herpes simplex-derived transactivation domain VP16, we created a novel synthetic mammalian cGMP-sensing transcription factor (GTA) that activates synthetic promoters (PGTA) containing newly identified GTA-specific operator sites in a concentration-dependent manner. In cell lines expressing endogenous natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPR-A) (HeLa), GTA/PGTA-driven transgene expression was induced by B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP; Nesiritide(®)) in a concentration-dependent manner, which activated NPR-A׳s intracellular GC domain and triggered a corresponding cGMP surge. Ectopic expression of NPR-A in NPR-A-negative cell lines (HEK-293T) produced high cGMP levels and mediated maximum GTA/PGTA-driven transgene expression, which was suppressed by co-expression of PDEs (PDE-3A, PDE-5A and PDE-9A) and was re-triggered by the corresponding PDE inhibitor drugs (Pletal(®), Perfan(®), Primacor(®) (PDE-3A), Viagra(®), Levitra(®), Cialis(®) (PDE-5A) and BAY73-6691 (PDE-9A)). Mice implanted with microencapsulated designer cells co-expressing the GTA/PGTA device with NPR-A and PDE-5A showed control of blood SEAP levels through administration of sildenafil (Viagra(®)). Designer cells engineered for PDE inhibitor-modulated transgene expression may provide a cell-based PDE-targeting drug discovery platform and enable drug-adjusted gene- and cell

  6. Strategies for multigene expression in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Maysam; Berger, Philipp

    2014-09-01

    Multigene delivery systems for heterologous multiprotein expression in mammalian cells are a key technology in contemporary biological research. Multiprotein expression is essential for a variety of applications, including multiparameter analysis of living cells in vitro, changing the fate of stem cells, or production of multiprotein complexes for structural biology. Depending on the application, these expression systems have to fulfill different requirements. For some applications, homogenous expression in all cells with defined stoichiometry is necessary, whereas other applications need long term expression or require that the proteins are not modified at the N- and C-terminus. Here we summarize available multiprotein expression systems and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. PMID:25034976

  7. Experimental evidences for hsa-miR-497-5p as a negative regulator of SMAD3 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jafarzadeh, Meisam; Soltani, Bahram M; Dokanehiifard, Sadat; Kay, Maryam; Aghdami, Nasser; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2016-07-25

    The SMAD family comprises of transcription factors that function as signal transducers of transforming growth factor (TGFβ) superfamily members. MiRNAs are a class of small noncoding RNAs that may play a major role in post transcriptional regulation of SMAD genes. Here, we intended to investigate if hsa-miR-497-5p is capable of regulating SMAD3 gene expression. Hsa-miR-497-5p was bioinformatically predicted as a candidate regulator of SMAD3 gene expression and then, hsa-miR-497-5p expression status was analyzed in different cell lines using RT-qPCR. Overexpression of hsa-miR-497-5p in HEK293t cells resulted in downregulation of SMAD3 which was detected by RT-qPCR and western analysis. Further, dual luciferase assay results supported direct interaction of hsa-miR-497-5p with 3'-UTR sequences of SMAD3 transcript. Overexpression of hsa-miR-497-5p in HEK293t cells resulted in cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase, detected by flow cytometry. Overall, accumulative results indicated that hsa-miR-497-5p by targeting SMAD3 is potentially one of the regulators of the TGFβ signaling pathway. PMID:27063509

  8. Analysis of the N-terminal region of human MLKL, as well as two distinct MLKL isoforms, reveals new insights into necroptotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Arnež, Katja Hrovat; Kindlova, Michaela; Bokil, Nilesh J.; Murphy, James M.; Sweet, Matthew J.; Gunčar, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    The pseudokinase mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL) is an essential effector of necroptotic cell death. Two distinct human MLKL isoforms have previously been reported, but their capacities to trigger cell death have not been compared directly. Herein, we examine these two MLKL isoforms, and further probe the features of the human MLKL N-terminal domain that are required for cell death. Expression in HEK293T cells of the N-terminal 201 amino acids (aa) of human MLKL is sufficient to cause cell death, whereas expression of the first 154 aa is not. Given that aa 1–125 are able to initiate necroptosis, our findings indicate that the helix that follows this region restrains necroptotic activity, which is again restored in longer constructs. Furthermore, MLKL isoform 2 (MLKL2), which lacks much of the regulatory pseudokinase domain, is a much more potent inducer of cell death than MLKL isoform 1 (MLKL1) in ectopic expression studies in HEK293T cells. Modelling predicts that a C-terminal helix constrains the activity of MLKL1, but not MLKL2. Although both isoforms are expressed by human monocyte-derived macrophages at the mRNA level, MLKL2 is expressed at much lower levels. We propose that it may have a regulatory role in controlling macrophage survival, either in the steady state or in response to specific stimuli. PMID:26704887

  9. Trans-spliced Cas9 allows cleavage of HBB and CCR5 genes in human cells using compact expression cassettes.

    PubMed

    Fine, Eli J; Appleton, Caleb M; White, Douglas E; Brown, Matthew T; Deshmukh, Harshavardhan; Kemp, Melissa L; Bao, Gang

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 systems have been used in a wide variety of biological studies; however, the large size of CRISPR/Cas9 presents challenges in packaging it within adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) for clinical applications. We identified a two-cassette system expressing pieces of the S. pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) protein which splice together in cellula to form a functional protein capable of site-specific DNA cleavage. With specific CRISPR guide strands, we demonstrated the efficacy of this system in cleaving the HBB and CCR5 genes in human HEK-293T cells as a single Cas9 and as a pair of Cas9 nickases. The trans-spliced SpCas9 (tsSpCas9) displayed ~35% of the nuclease activity compared with the wild-type SpCas9 (wtSpCas9) at standard transfection doses, but had substantially decreased activity at lower dosing levels. The greatly reduced open reading frame length of the tsSpCas9 relative to wtSpCas9 potentially allows for more complex and longer genetic elements to be packaged into an AAV vector including tissue-specific promoters, multiplexed guide RNA expression, and effector domain fusions to SpCas9. For unknown reasons, the tsSpCas9 system did not work in all cell types tested. The use of protein trans-splicing may help facilitate exciting new avenues of research and therapeutic applications through AAV-based delivery of CRISPR/Cas9 systems. PMID:26126518

  10. Gene transduction in mammalian cells using Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus assisted by glycoprotein 64 of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Tatsuya; Sugioka, Saki; Itagaki, Kohei; Park, Enoch Y.

    2016-01-01

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), an alphabaculovirus, has been widely utilized for protein expression in not only insect cells but also mammalian cells. AcMNPV is closely related to Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV), and nucleotide sequences of AcMNPV genes have high similarity with those of BmNPV. However, the transduction of BmNPV into mammalian cells has not been reported. In this study, we constructed a recombinant BmNPV (BmNPVΔbgp/AcGP64/EGFP) whose surface 64 kDa glycoprotein (BmGP64) was substituted with that from AcMNPV (AcGP64). BmNPVΔbgp/AcGP64/EGFP also carried an EGFP gene under the control of the CMV promoter. BmNPVΔbgp/AcGP64/EGFP successfully transduced HEK293T cells. In comparison, a control construct (BmNPVΔbgp/BmGP64/EGFP) which possessed BmGP64 instead of AcGP64 did not express EGFP in HEK293T cells. The transduction efficiency of BmNPVΔbgp/AcGP64/EGFP was lower than that of an AcMNPV based-BacMam GFP transduction control. This result indicates that AcGP64 facilitates BmNPV transduction into HEK293T cells. BmNPV can be prepared easily on a large scale because BmNPV can infect silkworm larvae without any special equipment, even though specific diet is needed for silkworm rearing. BmNPV gene transduction into mammalian cells can potentially be applied easily for gene delivery into mammalian cells. PMID:27562533

  11. Characterization of proteins by in-cell NMR spectroscopy in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Letizia; Luchinat, Enrico; Banci, Lucia

    2016-06-01

    In-cell NMR spectroscopy is a unique tool for characterizing biological macromolecules in their physiological environment at atomic resolution. Recent progress in NMR instruments and sample preparation methods allows functional processes, such as metal uptake, disulfide-bond formation and protein folding, to be analyzed by NMR in living, cultured human cells. This protocol describes the necessary steps to overexpress one or more proteins of interest inside human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cells, and it explains how to set up in-cell NMR experiments. The cDNA is transiently transfected as a complex with a cationic polymer (DNA:PEI (polyethylenimine)), and protein expression is carried on for 2-3 d, after which the NMR sample is prepared. (1)H and (1)H-(15)N correlation NMR experiments (for example, using band-selective optimized flip-angle short-transient heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (SOFAST-HMQC)) can be carried out in <2 h, ensuring cell viability. Uniform (15)N labeling and amino-acid-specific (e.g., cysteine, methionine) labeling schemes are possible. The entire procedure takes 4 d from cell culture seeding to NMR data collection. PMID:27196722

  12. Is Hydrogen Peroxide a Suitable Apoptosis Inducer for All Cell Types?

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jinmei; Wan, Chunyun; Guo, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is currently the most widely used apoptosis inducer due to its broad cytotoxic efficacy against nearly all cell types. However, equivalent cytotoxicity is achieved over a wide range of doses, although the reasons for this differential sensitivity are not always clear. In this study, three kinds of cells, the 293T cell line, primary fibroblasts, and terminally differentiated myocardial cells, were treated with a wide range of H2O2 doses. Times to apoptosis initiation and end were measured cytochemically and the changes in expression of caspase-9, P53, NF-κB, and RIP were determined by RT-PCR. The 293T cell line was the most sensitive to H2O2, undergoing necroptosis and/or apoptosis at all concentrations from 0.1 to 1.6 mM. At > 0.4 mM, H2O2 also caused necroptosis in primary cells. At < 0.4 mM, however, primary cells exhibited classic signs of apoptosis, although they tended to survive for 36 hours in < 0.2 mM H2O2. Thus, H2O2 is a broadly effective apoptosis inducer, but the dose range differs by cell type. For cell lines, a low dose is required and the exposure time must be reduced compared to primary cells to avoid cell death primarily by necroptosis or necrosis. PMID:27595106

  13. Toxoplasma gondii ROP18: potential to manipulate host cell mitochondrial apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liang; Wang, Xiao; Li, Yunhui; Liu, Yuan; Su, Danhua; Fu, Tao; Guo, Fei; Gu, Liangping; Jiang, Xugan; Chen, Shengxia; Cao, Jianping

    2016-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that may manipulate host cell mitochondrial apoptosis pathways. In our experiment, 293T cells were transfected with the p3×FLAG-CMV-Myc-ROP18 vector and expressed the ROP18-Myc fusion protein. Cell apoptosis was induced by 0.5 μg/mL actinomycin D (ActD) and was detected by Annexin V-FITC/PI assay. The cell mitochondrial membrane potential was determined by JC-1. Cytochrome c (Cyto-c) from mitochondria and the cytoplasm was measured by Western blot. The Bcl-2 and Bax coding gene expression levels were detected by real-time PCR. We found, in vitro, that T. gondii ROP18 significantly suppressed 293T cell apoptosis induced by ActD and maintained mitochondrial membrane potential and integrity, thereby preventing the release of Cyto-c from mitochondria into the cytoplasm. The ratio of Bcl-2/Bax in ROP18-overexpressing cells was significantly higher than that of the negative control. Therefore, we speculate that ROP18 could suppress host cell apoptosis via the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway in vitro. PMID:27021182

  14. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNAs (EBERs) are present in fractions related to exosomes released by EBV-transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Waqar; Philip, Pretty S; Tariq, Saeed; Khan, Gulfaraz

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an oncogenic herpesvirus associated with a number of human malignancies of epithelial and lymphoid origin. However, the mechanism of oncogenesis is unclear. A number of viral products, including EBV latent proteins and non-protein coding RNAs have been implicated. Recently it was reported that EBV-encoded small RNAs (EBERs) are released from EBV infected cells and they can induce biological changes in cells via signaling from toll-like receptor 3. Here, we investigated if these abundantly expressed non-protein coding EBV RNAs (EBER-1 and EBER-2) are excreted from infected cells in exosomal fractions. Using differential ultracentrifugation we isolated exosomes from three EBV positive cell lines (B95-8, EBV-LCL, BL30-B95-8), one EBER-1 transfected cell line (293T-pHEBo-E1) and two EBV-negative cell lines (BL30, 293T-pHEBo). The identity of purified exosomes was determined by electron microscopy and western blotting for CD63. The presence of EBERs in cells, culture supernatants and purified exosomal fractions was determined using RT-PCR and confirmed by sequencing. Purified exosomal fractions were also tested for the presence of the EBER-1-binding protein La, using western blotting. Both EBER-1 and EBER-2 were found to be present not only in the culture supernatants, but also in the purified exosome fractions of all EBV-infected cell lines. EBER-1 could also be detected in exosomal fractions from EBER-1 transfected 293T cells whilst the fractions from vector only transfectants were clearly negative. Furthermore, purified exosomal fractions also contained the EBER-binding protein (La), supporting the notion that EBERs are most probably released from EBV infected cells in the form of EBER-La complex in exosomes. PMID:24896633

  15. Surface expression of the Anoctamin-1 (ANO1) channel is suppressed by protein-protein interactions with β-COP.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Sun; Bae, Yeonju; Park, Nammi; Yoo, Jae Cheal; Cho, Chang-Hoon; Ryoo, Kanghyun; Hwang, Eun Mi; Park, Jae-Yong

    2016-06-24

    Anoctamin-1 (ANO1) is a Ca(2+)-activated chloride channel (CaCC) that plays important physiological roles in normal and cancerous tissues. However, the plasma membrane trafficking mechanisms of ANO1 remain poorly characterized. In yeast two-hybrid screening experiments, we observed direct interactions of ANO1 with β-COP, which is a subunit of Coat Protein Complex I (COPI). This interaction was then confirmed using several in vitro and in vivo binding assays. Moreover, the cotransfection of β-COP with ANO1 into HEK293T cells led to decreased the surface expression and the channel activity of ANO1. Accordingly, endogenous ANO1 was associated with β-COP in U251 glioblastoma cells, and silencing of β-COP enhanced surface expression and whole-cell currents of ANO1 in these cells. Taken together, these data suggest that β-COP negatively regulates ANO1 surface expression. PMID:27207835

  16. Human neuroepithelial cells express NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Christopher D; Fowler, M; Jackson, T H; Houghton, J; Warren, A; Nanda, A; Chandler, I; Cappell, B; Long, A; Minagar, A; Alexander, J S

    2003-11-13

    L-glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter, binds to both ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. In certain parts of the brain the BBB contains two normally impermeable barriers: 1) cerebral endothelial barrier and 2) cerebral epithelial barrier. Human cerebral endothelial cells express NMDA receptors; however, to date, human cerebral epithelial cells (neuroepithelial cells) have not been shown to express NMDA receptor message or protein. In this study, human hypothalamic sections were examined for NMDA receptors (NMDAR) expression via immunohistochemistry and murine neuroepithelial cell line (V1) were examined for NMDAR via RT-PCR and Western analysis. We found that human cerebral epithelium express protein and cultured mouse neuroepithelial cells express both mRNA and protein for the NMDA receptor. These findings may have important consequences for neuroepithelial responses during excitotoxicity and in disease. PMID:14614784

  17. Immunoaffinity purification of the functional 20S proteasome from human cells via transient overexpression of specific proteasome subunits.

    PubMed

    Livinskaya, Veronika A; Barlev, Nickolai A; Nikiforov, Andrey A

    2014-05-01

    The proteasome is a multi-subunit proteolytic complex that plays a central role in protein degradation in all eukaryotic cells. It regulates many vital cellular processes therefore its dysfunction can lead to various pathologies including cancer and neurodegeneration. Isolation of enzymatically active proteasomes is a key step to the successful study of the proteasome regulation and functions. Here we describe a simple and efficient protocol for immunoaffinity purification of the functional 20S proteasomes from human HEK 293T cells after transient overexpression of specific proteasome subunits tagged with 3xFLAG. To construct 3xFLAG-fusion proteins, DNA sequences encoding the 20S proteasome subunits PSMB5, PSMA5, and PSMA3 were cloned into mammalian expression vector pIRES-hrGFP-1a. The corresponding recombinant proteins PSMB5-3xFLAG, PSMA5-3xFLAG, or PSMA3-3xFLAG were transiently overexpressed in human HEK 293T cells and were shown to be partially incorporated into the intact proteasome complexes. 20S proteasomes were immunoprecipitated from HEK 293T cell extracts under mild conditions using antibodies against FLAG peptide. Isolation of highly purified 20S proteasomes were confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting using antibodies against different proteasome subunits. Affinity purified 20S proteasomes were shown to possess chymotrypsin- and trypsin-like peptidase activities confirming their functionality. This simple single-step affinity method of the 20S proteasome purification can be instrumental to subsequent functional studies of proteasomes in human cells. PMID:24583181

  18. Foxp3 expression in human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Karanikas, Vaios; Speletas, Matthaios; Zamanakou, Maria; Kalala, Fani; Loules, Gedeon; Kerenidi, Theodora; Barda, Angeliki K; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I; Germenis, Anastasios E

    2008-01-01

    Objective Transcription factor forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) specifically characterizes the thymically derived naturally occurring regulatory T cells (Tregs). Limited evidence indicates that it is also expressed, albeit to a lesser extent, in tissues other than thymus and spleen, while, very recently, it was shown that Foxp3 is expressed by pancreatic carcinoma. This study was scheduled to investigate whether expression of Foxp3 transcripts and mature protein occurs constitutively in various tumor types. Materials and methods Twenty five tumor cell lines of different tissue origins (lung cancer, colon cancer, breast cancer, melanoma, erythroid leukemia, acute T-cell leukemia) were studied. Detection of Foxp3 mRNA was performed using both conventional RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR while protein expression was assessed by immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry, using different antibody clones. Results Foxp3 mRNA as well as Foxp3 protein was detected in all tumor cell lines, albeit in variable levels, not related to the tissue of origin. This expression correlated with the expression levels of IL-10 and TGFb1. Conclusion We offer evidence that Foxp3 expression, characterizes tumor cells of various tissue origins. The biological significance of these findings warrants further investigation in the context of tumor immune escape, and especially under the light of current anti-cancer efforts interfering with Foxp3 expression. PMID:18430198

  19. Decorin expression in quiescent myogenic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Takanori Nozu, Kenjiro; Kishioka, Yasuhiro; Wakamatsu, Jun-ichi; Hattori, Akihito

    2008-06-06

    Satellite cells are quiescent muscle stem cells that promote postnatal muscle growth and repair. When satellite cells are activated by myotrauma, they proliferate, migrate, differentiate, and ultimately fuse to existing myofibers. The remainder of these cells do not differentiate, but instead return to quiescence and remain in a quiescent state until activation begins the process again. This ability to maintain their own population is important for skeletal muscle to maintain the capability to repair during postnatal life. However, the mechanisms by which satellite cells return to quiescence and maintain the quiescent state are still unclear. Here, we demonstrated that decorin mRNA expression was high in cell cultures containing a higher ratio of quiescent satellite cells when satellite cells were stimulated with various concentrations of hepatocyte growth factor. This result suggests that quiescent satellite cells express decorin at a high level compared to activated satellite cells. Furthermore, we examined the expression of decorin in reserve cells, which were undifferentiated myoblasts remaining after induction of differentiation by serum-deprivation. Decorin mRNA levels in reserve cells were higher than those in differentiated myotubes and growing myoblasts. These results suggest that decorin participates in the quiescence of myogenic cells.

  20. Vertebrate Cells Express Protozoan Antigen after Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Mark St. J.; Dvorak, James A.

    1980-04-01

    Epimastigotes, the invertebrate host stage of Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite causing Chagas' disease in man, were fused with vertebrate cells by using polyethylene glycol. Hybrid cells were selected on the basis of T. cruzi DNA complementation of biochemical deficiencies in the vertebrate cells. Some clones of the hybrid cells expressed T. cruzi-specific antigen. It might be possible to use selected antigens obtained from the hybrids as vaccines for immunodiagnosis or for elucidation of the pathogenesis of Chagas' disease.

  1. Imaging gene expression in single living cells

    PubMed Central

    Shav-Tal, Yaron; Singer, Robert H.; Darzacq, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Technical advances in the field of live-cell imaging have introduced the cell biologist to a new, dynamic, subcellular world. The static world of molecules in fixed cells has now been extended to the time dimension. This allows the visualization and quantification of gene expression and intracellular trafficking events of the studied molecules and the associated enzymatic processes in individual cells, in real time. PMID:15459666

  2. Fundamentals of Expression in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Expression of proteins in mammalian cells is a key technology important for many functional studies on human and higher eukaryotic genes. Studies include the mapping of protein interactions, solving protein structure by crystallization and X-ray diffraction or solution phase NMR and the generation of antibodies to enable a range of studies to be performed including protein detection in vivo. In addition the production of therapeutic proteins and antibodies, now a multi billion dollar industry, has driven major advances in cell line engineering for the production of grams per liter of active proteins and antibodies. Here the key factors that need to be considered for successful expression in HEK293 and CHO cells are reviewed including host cells, expression vector design, transient transfection methods, stable cell line generation and cultivation conditions. PMID:27165328

  3. The degradation of the inwardly rectifying potassium channel, Kir2.1, depends on the expression level: examination with fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Okada, Masayoshi; Kano, Masataka; Matsuda, Hiroko

    2013-08-28

    The expression of ion channels is regulated by their synthesis as well as degradation, and some ion channels are degraded in an expression level-dependent way. Recently, new techniques of fluorescent proteins have been developed and seem to be useful to study protein degradation. To examine the regulation of the degradation of strongly inwardly rectifying potassium channel (Kir2.1) and the usefulness of the fluorescent proteins, we constructed Kir2.1 fusion proteins with SNAP tag and fluorescent timer (FT). The SNAP tag, which covalently binds to a specific membrane-permeable fluorescent dye, enables a pulse-chase experiment with fluorescence. When the SNAP-Kir2.1 proteins were expressed in 293T cells by low and high expression plasmids, the half-life of the fusion protein expressed by a high-expression plasmid was shorter (18.2±1.9 h) than that expressed by a low-expression plasmid (35.1+2.3h). The addition of Ba(2+), a selective blocker of Kir2.1, slowed the degradation, suggesting a current-dependency of degradation. Consistently, patch-clamp recording showed that cultivation in the presence of Ba(2+) increased the whole cell conductance of SNAP-Kir2.1. Since the fluorescence of FT changes gradually changes from green to red, the green/red ratio should allow us to monitor the changes in the degradation rate of FT-Kir2.1. Using this method, we confirmed the slower degradation by Ba(2+). The results suggest a homeostatic regulation of the degradation of Kir2.1 in the 293T cells, and the usefulness of fluorescence-based methods for examining the degradation of ion channels. PMID:23850646

  4. CD43 expression in B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Treasure, J.; Lane, A.; Jones, D. B.; Wright, D. H.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To determine the expression of CD43 in frozen sections in a range of B cell lymphomas. METHODS: The monoclonal antibody WR14, clustered provisionally in the Fourth Leucocyte Typing Workshop as a CD43 reagent, was investigated by epitope blocking studies on formalin fixed reactive lymph node tissue, using the established CD43 antibody MT1, to validate its use as a CD43 reagent. CD43 expression was studied in 131 immunophenotypically defined B cell lymphomas, including lymphocytic lymphoma (Lc, n = 13), centrocytic lymphoma (Cc, n = 14), and a range of follicle centre cell lymphomas (FCC) including centroblastic/centrocytic follicular (CbCcF, n = 48), centroblastic diffuse (CbD, n = 39), centroblastic/centrocytic diffuse (CbCcD, n = 4), centroblastic follicular and diffuse (Cb FD, n = 3) and centroblastic/centrocytic follicular and diffuse (CbCc FD, n = 1). Nine lymphomas of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) were also examined. RESULTS: Epitope blocking studies showed that WR14 is a CD43 reagent that binds to an epitope identical with or close to that recognised by MT1. Eleven of 13 (84%) cases of Lc and 11 of 14 (78%) cases of Cc expressed CD43; 87 of 95 (91%) cases of FCC did not. All eight low grade lymphomas of MALT were negative. One high grade lymphoma, transformed from a low grade MALT lymphoma, was positive for CD43. The expression of CD43 by tumours of B cell lineage was associated with the expression of CD5 (p < 0.001) although either antigen could occasionally be found in the absence of the other. CONCLUSION: CD43 reagents can be used in conjunction with CD5 antibodies for the immunophenotypic discrimination of follicle centre cell lymphomas from non-follicle centre cell lymphomas. Images PMID:1280654

  5. Directed evolution of a G protein-coupled receptor for expression, stability, and binding selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Casim A.; Dodevski, Igor; Kenig, Manca; Dudli, Stefan; Mohr, Anja; Hermans, Emmanuel; Plückthun, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    We outline a powerful method for the directed evolution of integral membrane proteins in the inner membrane of Escherichia coli. For a mammalian G protein-coupled receptor, we arrived at a sequence with an order-of-magnitude increase in functional expression that still retains the biochemical properties of wild type. This mutant also shows enhanced heterologous expression in eukaryotes (12-fold in Pichia pastoris and 3-fold in HEK293T cells) and greater stability when solubilized and purified, indicating that the biophysical properties of the protein had been under the pressure of selection. These improvements arise from multiple small contributions, which would be difficult to assemble by rational design. In a second screen, we rapidly pinpointed a single amino acid substitution in wild type that abolishes antagonist binding while retaining agonist-binding affinity. These approaches may alleviate existing bottlenecks in structural studies of these targets by providing sufficient quantities of stable variants in defined conformational states. PMID:18812512

  6. Dental enamel cells express functional SOCE channels

    PubMed Central

    Nurbaeva, Meerim K.; Eckstein, Miriam; Concepcion, Axel R.; Smith, Charles E.; Srikanth, Sonal; Paine, Michael L.; Gwack, Yousang; Hubbard, Michael J.; Feske, Stefan; Lacruz, Rodrigo S.

    2015-01-01

    Dental enamel formation requires large quantities of Ca2+ yet the mechanisms mediating Ca2+ dynamics in enamel cells are unclear. Store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) channels are important Ca2+ influx mechanisms in many cells. SOCE involves release of Ca2+ from intracellular pools followed by Ca2+ entry. The best-characterized SOCE channels are the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels. As patients with mutations in the CRAC channel genes STIM1 and ORAI1 show abnormal enamel mineralization, we hypothesized that CRAC channels might be an important Ca2+ uptake mechanism in enamel cells. Investigating primary murine enamel cells, we found that key components of CRAC channels (ORAI1, ORAI2, ORAI3, STIM1, STIM2) were expressed and most abundant during the maturation stage of enamel development. Furthermore, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) but not ryanodine receptor (RyR) expression was high in enamel cells suggesting that IP3Rs are the main ER Ca2+ release mechanism. Passive depletion of ER Ca2+ stores with thapsigargin resulted in a significant raise in [Ca2+]i consistent with SOCE. In cells pre-treated with the CRAC channel blocker Synta-66 Ca2+ entry was significantly inhibited. These data demonstrate that enamel cells have SOCE mediated by CRAC channels and implicate them as a mechanism for Ca2+ uptake in enamel formation. PMID:26515404

  7. Cell cycle gene expression under clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemenko, Olga

    2016-07-01

    Cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) are main regulators of the cell cycle of eukaryotes. It's assumes a significant change of their level in cells under microgravity conditions and by other physical factors actions. The clinorotation use enables to determine the influence of gravity on simulated events in the cell during the cell cycle - exit from the state of quiet stage and promotion presynthetic phase (G1) and DNA synthesis phase (S) of the cell cycle. For the clinorotation effect study on cell proliferation activity is the necessary studies of molecular mechanisms of cell cycle regulation and development of plants under altered gravity condition. The activity of cyclin D, which is responsible for the events of the cell cycle in presynthetic phase can be controlled by the action of endogenous as well as exogenous factors, but clinorotation is one of the factors that influence on genes expression that regulate the cell cycle.These data can be used as a model for further research of cyclin - CDK complex for study of molecular mechanisms regulation of growth and proliferation. In this investigation we tried to summarize and analyze known literature and own data we obtained relatively the main regulators of the cell cycle in altered gravity condition.

  8. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of Enpp6

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Junko; Kato, Kazuki; Mihara, Emiko; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Takagi, Junichi; Nishimasu, Hiroshi; Aoki, Junken; Nureki, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Enpp (ectonucleotide phosphodiesterase/pyrophosphatase) 6 is a membrane-bound glycoprotein that hydrolyzes choline-containing compounds such as lysophosphatidylcholine and glycerophosphorylcholine, and presumably participates in choline metabolism. The catalytic domain of mouse Enpp6 was expressed in HEK293T cells, purified using the TARGET tag/P20.1-Sepharose system and crystallized. An X-ray diffraction data set was collected to 1.8 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 63.7, b = 68.8, c = 69.7 Å, α = 60.6, β = 87.0, γ = 68.1°. Assuming the presence of two protein molecules per asymmetric unit, the solvent content was estimated to be 49.5%. PMID:24915096

  9. Hes-1 SUMOylation by protein inhibitor of activated STAT1 enhances the suppressing effect of Hes-1 on GADD45α expression to increase cell survival

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hairy and Enhancer of split 1 (Hes-1) is a transcriptional repressor that plays an important role in neuronal differentiation and development, but post-translational modifications of Hes-1 are much less known. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether Hes-1 could be SUMO-modified and identify the candidate SUMO acceptors on Hes-1. We also wished to examine the role of the SUMO E3 ligase protein inhibitor of activated STAT1 (PIAS1) in SUMOylation of Hes-1 and the molecular mechanism of Hes-1 SUMOylation. Further, we aimed to identify the molecular target of Hes-1 and examine how Hes-1 SUMOylation affects its molecular target to affect cell survival. Results In this study, by using HEK293T cells, we have found that Hes-1 could be SUMO-modified and Hes-1 SUMOylation was greatly enhanced by the SUMO E3 ligase PIAS1 at Lys8, Lys27 and Lys39. Furthermore, Hes-1 SUMOylation stabilized the Hes-1 protein and increased the transcriptional suppressing activity of Hes-1 on growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein alpha (GADD45α) expression. Overexpression of GADD45α increased, whereas knockdown of GADD45αα expression decreased cell apoptosis. In addition, H2O2 treatment increased the association between PIAS1 and Hes-1 and enhanced the SUMOylation of Hes-1 for endogenous protection. Overexpression of Hes-1 decreased H2O2-induced cell death, but this effect was blocked by transfection of the Hes-1 triple sumo-mutant (Hes-1 3KR). Overexpression of PIAS1 further facilitated the anti-apoptotic effect of Hes-1. Moreover, Hes-1 SUMOylation was independent of Hes-1 phosphorylation and vice versa. Conclusions The present results revealed, for the first time, that Hes-1 could be SUMO-modified by PIAS1 and GADD45α is a novel target of Hes-1. Further, Hes-1 SUMOylation mediates cell survival through enhanced suppression of GADD45α expression. These results revealed a novel role of Hes-1 in addition to its involvement in Notch signaling. They also

  10. Protein kinase C shifts the voltage dependence of KCNQ/M channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Nakajo, Koichi; Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2005-11-15

    It is well established that stimulation of G(q)-coupled receptors such as the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor inhibits KCNQ/M currents. While it is generally accepted that this muscarinic inhibition is mainly caused by the breakdown of PIP(2), the role of the subsequent activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is not well understood. By reconstituting M currents in Xenopus oocytes, we observed that stimulation of coexpressed M1 receptors with 10 microm oxotremorine M (oxo-M) induces a positive shift (4-30 mV, depending on which KCNQ channels are expressed) in the conductance-voltage relationship (G-V) of KCNQ channels. When we applied phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a potent PKC activator, we observed a large positive shift (17.8 +/- 1.6 mV) in the G-V curve for KCNQ2, while chelerythrine, a PKC inhibitor, attenuated the shift caused by the stimulation of M1 receptors. By contrast, reducing PIP(2) had little effect on the G-V curve for KCNQ2 channels; although pretreating cells with 10 mum wortmannin for 30 min reduced KCNQ2 current amplitude by 80%, the G-V curve was shifted only slightly (5 mV). Apparently, the shift induced by muscarinic stimulation in Xenopus oocytes was mainly caused by PKC activation. When KCNQ2/3 channels were expressed in HEK 293T cells, the G-V curve seemed already to be shifted in a positive direction, even before activation of PKC, and PMA failed to shift the curve any further. That alkaline phosphatase in the patch pipette shifted the G-V curve in a negative direction suggests KCNQ2/3 channels are constitutively phosphorylated in HEK 293T cells. PMID:16179364

  11. Expression of bacterial genes in plant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fraley, R T; Rogers, S G; Horsch, R B; Sanders, P R; Flick, J S; Adams, S P; Bittner, M L; Brand, L A; Fink, C L; Fry, J S; Galluppi, G R; Goldberg, S B; Hoffmann, N L; Woo, S C

    1983-01-01

    Chimeric bacterial genes conferring resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics have been inserted into the Agrobacterium tumefaciens tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid and introduced into plant cells by in vitro transformation techniques. The chimeric genes contain the nopaline synthase 5' and 3' regulatory regions joined to the genes for neomycin phosphotransferase type I or type II. The chimeric genes were cloned into an intermediate vector, pMON120, and inserted into pTiB6S3 by recombination and then introduced into petunia and tobacco cells by cocultivating A. tumefaciens cells with protoplast-derived cells. Southern hybridization was used to confirm the presence of the chimeric genes in the transformed plant tissues. Expression of the chimeric genes was determined by the ability of the transformed cells to proliferate on medium containing normally inhibitory levels of kanamycin (50 micrograms/ml) or other aminoglycoside antibiotics. Plant cells transformed by wild-type pTiB6S3 or derivatives carrying the bacterial neomycin phosphotransferase genes with their own promoters failed to grow under these conditions. The significance of these results for plant genetic engineering is discussed. Images PMID:6308651

  12. MMP-13 is involved in oral cancer cell metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shun-Hong; Law, Ching-Hsuan; Kuo, Ping-Hsueh; Hu, Ren-Yu; Yang, Ching-Chieh; Chung, Ting-Wen; Li, Ji-Min; Lin, Li-Hsun; Liu, Yi-Chung; Liao, En-Chi; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Wei, Yu-Shan; Lin, Chi-Chen; Chang, Chien-Wen; Chou, Hsiu-Chuan; Wang, Wen-Ching; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr; Wang, Lu-Hai; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Chan, Hong-Lin; Lyu, Ping-Chiang

    2016-01-01

    The oral cancer cell line OC3-I5 with a highly invasive ability was selected and derived from an established OSCC line OC3. In this study, we demonstrated that matrix metalloproteinases protein MMP-13 was up-regulated in OC3-I5 than in OC3 cells. We also observed that expression of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers including Twist, p-Src, Snail1, SIP1, JAM-A, and vinculin were increased in OC3-I5 compared to OC3 cells, whereas E-cadherin expression was decreased in the OC3-I5 cells. Using siMMP-13 knockdown techniques, we showed that siMMP-13 not only reduced the invasion and migration, but also the adhesion abilities of oral cancer cells. In support of the role of MMP-13 in metastasis, we used MMP-13 expressing plasmid-transfected 293T cells to enhance MMP-13 expression in the OC3 cells, transplanting the MMP-13 over expressing OC3 cells into nude mice led to enhanced lung metastasis. In summary, our findings show that MMP-13 promotes invasion and metastasis in oral cancer cells, suggesting altered expression of MMP-13 may be utilized to impede the process of metastasis. PMID:26958809

  13. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C.

    2013-07-01

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  14. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C.

    2013-07-26

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  15. A protocol for heterologous expression and functional assay for mouse pheromone receptors.

    PubMed

    Dey, Sandeepa; Zhan, Senmiao; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    Innate social behaviors like intermale aggression, fear, and mating rituals are important for survival and propagation of a species. In mice, these behaviors have been implicated to be mediated by peptide pheromones that are sensed by a class of G protein-coupled receptors, vomeronasal receptor type 2 (V2Rs), expressed in the pheromone-detecting vomeronasal organ (VNO) (Chamero et al., Nature 450:899-902, 2007; Haga et al., Nature 466:118-122, 2010; Kimoto et al., Curr Biol 17:1879-1884, 2007; Leinders-Zufall et al., Nat Neurosci 12:1551-1558, 2009; Papes et al., Cell 141:692-703, 2010). Matching V2Rs with their cognate ligands is required to understand what receptors the biologically relevant pheromones are acting on. However, this goal has been greatly limited by the unavailability of appropriate heterologous tools commonly used to carry out receptor deorphanization, due to the fact that this family of receptors fails to traffic to the surface of heterologous cells. We have demonstrated that calreticulin, a housekeeping chaperone commonly expressed in most eukaryotic cells, is sparsely expressed in the vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs). Stable knock down of calreticulin in a HEK293T derived cell line (R24 cells) allows us to functionally express V2Rs on the surface of heterologous cells. In this chapter we describe protocols for maintenance and expansion of the R24 cell line and functional assays for V2Rs using these cells. PMID:24014358

  16. Gene Expression by Mouse Inner Ear Hair Cells during Development

    PubMed Central

    Scheffer, Déborah I.; Shen, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear are essential for hearing and balance. As a consequence, pathogenic variants in genes specifically expressed in hair cells often cause hereditary deafness. Hair cells are few in number and not easily isolated from the adjacent supporting cells, so the biochemistry and molecular biology of hair cells can be difficult to study. To study gene expression in hair cells, we developed a protocol for hair cell isolation by FACS. With nearly pure hair cells and surrounding cells, from cochlea and utricle and from E16 to P7, we performed a comprehensive cell type-specific RNA-Seq study of gene expression during mouse inner ear development. Expression profiling revealed new hair cell genes with distinct expression patterns: some are specific for vestibular hair cells, others for cochlear hair cells, and some are expressed just before or after maturation of mechanosensitivity. We found that many of the known hereditary deafness genes are much more highly expressed in hair cells than surrounding cells, suggesting that genes preferentially expressed in hair cells are good candidates for unknown deafness genes. PMID:25904789

  17. Dopamine D1 and corticotrophin-releasing hormone type-2α receptors assemble into functionally interacting complexes in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Fuenzalida, J; Galaz, P; Araya, K A; Slater, P G; Blanco, E H; Campusano, J M; Ciruela, F; Gysling, K

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Dopamine and corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH; also known as corticotrophin-releasing factor) are key neurotransmitters in the interaction between stress and addiction. Repeated treatment with cocaine potentiates glutamatergic transmission in the rat basolateral amygdala/cortex pathway through a synergistic action of D1-like dopamine receptors and CRH type-2α receptors (CRF2α receptors). We hypothesized that this observed synergism could be instrumented by heteromers containing the dopamine D1 receptor and CRF2α receptor. Experimental Approach D1/CRF2α receptor heteromerization was demonstrated in HEK293T cells using co-immunoprecipitation, BRET and FRET assays, and by using the heteromer mobilization strategy. The ability of D1 receptors to signal through calcium, when singly expressed or co-expressed with CRF2α receptors, was evaluated by the calcium mobilization assay. Key Results D1/CRF2α receptor heteromers were observed in HEK293T cells. When singly expressed, D1 receptors were mostly located at the cell surface whereas CRF2α receptors accumulated intracellularly. Interestingly, co-expression of both receptors promoted D1 receptor intracellular and CRF2α receptor cell surface targeting. The heteromerization of D1/CRF2α receptors maintained the signalling through cAMP of both receptors but switched D1 receptor signalling properties, as the heteromeric D1 receptor was able to mobilize intracellular calcium upon stimulation with a D1 receptor agonist. Conclusions and Implications D1 and CRF2α receptors are capable of heterodimerization in living cells. D1/CRF2α receptor heteromerization might account, at least in part, for the complex physiological interactions established between dopamine and CRH in normal and pathological conditions such as addiction, representing a new potential pharmacological target. PMID:25073922

  18. T cells stimulate catabolic gene expression by the stromal cells from giant cell tumor of bone

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Robert W.; Ghert, Michelle; Singh, Gurmit

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two T cell lines stimulate PTHrP, RANKL, MMP13 gene expression in GCT cell cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD40 expressed by stromal cells; CD40L detected in whole tumor but not cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of CD40L treatment on GCT cells increased PTHrP and MMP13 gene expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTHrP treatment increased MMP13 expression, while inhibition decreased expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T cells may stimulate GCT stromal cells and promote the osteolysis of the tumor. -- Abstract: The factors that promote the localized bone resorption by giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) are not fully understood. We investigated whether T cells could contribute to bone resorption by stimulating expression of genes for parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, and the receptor activator of nuclear-factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL). Two cell lines, Jurkat clone E6-1 and D1.1, were co-cultured with isolated GCT stromal cells. Real-time PCR analyses demonstrated a significant increase of all three genes following 48 h incubation, and PTHrP and MMP-13 gene expression was also increased at 24 h. Further, we examined the expression of CD40 ligand (CD40L), a protein expressed by activated T cells, and its receptor, CD40, in GCT. Immunohistochemistry results revealed expression of the CD40 receptor in both the stromal cells and giant cells of the tumor. RNA collected from whole GCT tissues showed expression of CD40LG, which was absent in cultured stromal cells, and suggests that CD40L is expressed within GCT. Stimulation of GCT stromal cells with CD40L significantly increased expression of the PTHrP and MMP-13 genes. Moreover, we show that inhibition of PTHrP with neutralizing antibodies significantly decreased MMP13 expression by the stromal cells compared to IgG-matched controls, whereas stimulation with PTHrP (1-34) increased MMP-13 gene expression. These

  19. Murine somatic cell nuclear transfer using reprogrammed donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hoin; Park, Jong Im; Roh, Sangho

    2016-01-01

    In vivo-matured mouse oocytes were enucleated, and a single murine embryonic fibroblast (control or reprogrammed by introducing extracts from murine testis tissue, which showed expression of male germ cell-specific genes) was injected into the cytoplasm of the oocytes. The rate of blastocyst development and expression levels of Oct-4, Eomes and Cdx-2 were not significantly different in both experimental groups. However, the expression levels of Nanog, Sox9 and Glut-1 were significantly increased when reprogrammed cells were used as donor nuclei. Increased expression of Nanog can be supportive of complete reprogramming of somatic cell nuclear transfer murine embryos. The present study suggested that donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes can be reconstructed and can develop into embryos with normal high expression of developmentally essential genes. PMID:26369430

  20. Distinguishing human cell types based on housekeeping gene signatures.

    PubMed

    Oyolu, Chuba; Zakharia, Fouad; Baker, Julie

    2012-03-01

    'In this report, we use single cell gene expression to identify transcriptional patterns emerging during the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into the endodermal lineage. Endoderm-specific transcripts are highly variable between individual CXCR4(+) endodermal cells, suggesting that either the cells generated from in vitro differentiation are distinct or that these embryonic cells tolerate a high degree of transcript variability. Housekeeping transcripts, on the other hand, are far more consistently expressed within the same cellular population. However, when we compare the levels of housekeeping transcripts between hESCs and derived endoderm, patterns emerge that can be used to clearly separate the two embryonic cell types. We further compared four additional human cell types, including 293T, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC), HepG2, and endoderm-derived iPSC. In each case, the relative levels of housekeeping transcripts defined a particular cell fate. Interestingly, we find that three transcripts, LDHA, NONO, and ACTB, contribute the most to this diversity and together serve to segregate all six cell types. Overall, this suggests that levels of housekeeping transcripts, which are expressed within all cells, can be leveraged to distinguish between human cell types and thus may serve as important biomarkers for stem cell biology and other disciplines. PMID:22162332

  1. [Identification of Env-specific monoclonal antibodies from Chinese HIV-1 infected person by B cell activation and RT-PCR cloning].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Min; Xu, Ke; Yu, Shuang-Qing; Ding, Lin-Lin; Luo, Hai-Yan; Flinko, Robin; Lewis, George K; Feng, Xia; Shao, Ji-Rong; Guan, Yong-Jun; Zeng, Yi

    2012-06-01

    To obtain protective human monoclonal antibody from HIV-1 infected person, we adapted a technology for isolating antigen specific monoclonal antibody from human memory B cells through in vitro B cell activation coupled with RT-PCT and expression cloning. Human B cells were purified by negative sorting from PBMCs of HIV-1 infected individuals and memory B cells were further enriched using anti-CD27 microbeads. Two hundred memory B cells per well were cultured in 96-well round-bottom plates Env-specific antibodies in supernatants were with feeder cells in medium containing EBV and CpG. screened by ELISA after 1-2 weeks' culture. Cells from positive wells of Env-specific antibody were harvested and total RNA was isolated. Human VH and Vkappa or Vlambda genes were amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into IgG1 and kappa or lambda expressing vectors. Functional VH and Vkappa or Vlambda were identified by cotransfecting 293T cells with individual heavy chain and light chain clones followed by analysis of culture supernatants by ELISA for Env-specific antibodies. Finally, corresponding mAb was produced by transient transfection of 293T cells with the identified VH and Vkappa/lambda pair and purified by protein A affinity chromatography. Purified monocolonal antibodies were used for HIV-1 specific antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and neutralizing activity assay. Four monocolonal Env-specific antibodies were isolated from one HIV-1 subtype B' infected individual. Two of them showed strong ADCC activity and one showed weak neutralizing activity against HIV-1. Its further studies on their application in therapeutic or prophylactic vaccines against HIV-1 should be grounded. PMID:22978159

  2. A new idea for simple and rapid monitoring of gene expression: requirement of nucleotide sequences encoding an N-terminal HA tag in the T7 promoter-driven expression in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jeong-Mi; Kim, Goo-Young; Rhim, Hyangshuk

    2012-10-01

    Mammalian expression vectors are used to overexpress genes of interest in mammalian cells. High temperature requirement protein A1 (HtrA1), used as a specific target, was expressed from the pHA-M-HtrA1 plasmid in HEK293T cells, inducing cell death. Expression of HtrA1 was driven by the pHA-M-HtrA1 mammalian expression vector in E. coli resulting in growth suppression of E. coli in an HtrA1 serine protease-dependent manner. By using various combinations of promoters, target genes and N-terminal tags, the T7 promoter and N-terminal HA tag in the mammalian expression vector were shown to be responsible for expression of target genes in E. coli. Thus the pHA-M-HtrA1 plasmid can be used as a novel, rapid pre-test system for expression and cytotoxicity of the specific target gene in E. coli before assessing its functions in mammalian cells. PMID:22714269

  3. Global gene expression analyses of hematopoietic stem cell-like cell lines with inducible Lhx2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Karin; Wirta, Valtteri; Dahl, Lina; Bruce, Sara; Lundeberg, Joakim; Carlsson, Leif; Williams, Cecilia

    2006-01-01

    Background Expression of the LIM-homeobox gene Lhx2 in murine hematopoietic cells allows for the generation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-like cell lines. To address the molecular basis of Lhx2 function, we generated HSC-like cell lines where Lhx2 expression is regulated by a tet-on system and hence dependent on the presence of doxycyclin (dox). These cell lines efficiently down-regulate Lhx2 expression upon dox withdrawal leading to a rapid differentiation into various myeloid cell types. Results Global gene expression of these cell lines cultured in dox was compared to different time points after dox withdrawal using microarray technology. We identified 267 differentially expressed genes. The majority of the genes overlapping with HSC-specific databases were those down-regulated after turning off Lhx2 expression and a majority of the genes overlapping with those defined as late progenitor-specific genes were the up-regulated genes, suggesting that these cell lines represent a relevant model system for normal HSCs also at the level of global gene expression. Moreover, in situ hybridisations of several genes down-regulated after dox withdrawal showed overlapping expression patterns with Lhx2 in various tissues during embryonic development. Conclusion Global gene expression analysis of HSC-like cell lines with inducible Lhx2 expression has identified genes putatively linked to self-renewal / differentiation of HSCs, and function of Lhx2 in organ development and stem / progenitor cells of non-hematopoietic origin. PMID:16600034

  4. Isolation of Functional Tubulin Dimers and of Tubulin-Associated Proteins from Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nuo; Signorile, Luca; Basu, Sreya; Ottema, Sophie; Lebbink, Joyce H G; Leslie, Kris; Smal, Ihor; Dekkers, Dick; Demmers, Jeroen; Galjart, Niels

    2016-07-11

    The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton forms a dynamic filamentous network that is essential for many processes, including mitosis, cell polarity and shape, neurite outgrowth and migration, and ciliogenesis [1, 2]. MTs are built up of α/β-tubulin heterodimers, and their dynamic behavior is in part regulated by tubulin-associated proteins (TAPs). Here we describe a novel system to study mammalian tubulins and TAPs. We co-expressed equimolar amounts of triple-tagged α-tubulin and β-tubulin using a 2A "self-cleaving" peptide and isolated functional fluorescent tubulin dimers from transfected HEK293T cells with a rapid two-step approach. We also produced two mutant tubulins that cause brain malformations in tubulinopathy patients [3]. We then applied a paired mass-spectrometry-based method to identify tubulin-binding proteins in HEK293T cells and describe both novel and known TAPs. We find that CKAP5 and the CLASPs, which are MT plus-end-tracking proteins with TOG(L)-domains [4], bind tubulin efficiently, as does the Golgi-associated protein GCC185, which interacts with the CLASPs [5]. The N-terminal TOGL domain of CLASP1 contributes to tubulin binding and allows CLASP1 to function as an autonomous MT-growth-promoting factor. Interestingly, mutant tubulins bind less well to a number of TAPs, including CLASPs and GCC185, and incorporate less efficiently into cellular MTs. Moreover, expression of these mutants in cells impairs several MT-growth-related processes involving TAPs. Thus, stable tubulin-TAP interactions regulate MT nucleation and growth in cells. Combined, our results provide a resource for investigating tubulin interactions and functions and widen the spectrum of tubulin-related disease mechanisms. PMID:27291054

  5. Expression and function of ryanodine receptors in nonexcitable cells.

    PubMed

    Bennett, D L; Cheek, T R; Berridge, M J; De Smedt, H; Parys, J B; Missiaen, L; Bootman, M D

    1996-03-15

    We have used reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to investigate the expression of ryanodine receptors in several excitable and nonexcitable cell types. Consistent with previous reports, we detected ryanodine receptor expression in brain, heart, and skeletal muscle. In addition, we detected ryanodine receptor expression in various other excitable cells including PC 12 and A7r5 cells. Several muscle cell lines (BC3H1, C2C12, L6, and Sol8) weakly expressed ryanodine receptor when undifferentiated but strongly expressed type 1 and type 3 ryanodine receptor isoforms when differentiated into a muscle phenotype. Only 2 (HeLa and LLC-PK1 cells) out of 11 nonexcitable cell types examined expressed ryanodine receptors. Expression of ryanodine receptors at the protein level in these cells was confirmed using [3H]ryanodine binding. We also investigated the function of ryanodine receptors in Ca2+ signaling in HeLa cells using single-cell Fura-2 imaging. Neither caffeine nor ryanodine caused a detectable elevation of cytoplasmic Ca2+ in single HeLa cells. However, ryanodine caused a significant decrease in the amplitude of Ca 2+ signals evoked by repetitive stimulation with ATP. These studies show that ryanodine receptors are expressed in some nonexcitable cell types and furthermore suggest that the ryanodine receptors may be involved in a subtle regulation of intracellular Ca2+ responses. PMID:8626432

  6. Co-expression of Ubiquitin gene and capsid protein gene enhances the potency of DNA immunization of PCV2 in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid that co-expressed ubiquitin and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) virus capsid protein (Cap), denoted as pc-Ub-Cap, and a plasmid encoding PCV2 virus Cap alone, denoted as pc-Cap, were transfected into 293T cells. Indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) and confocal microscopy were performed to measure the cellular expression of Cap. Three groups of mice were then vaccinated once every three weeks for a total of three doses with pc-Ub-Cap, pc-Cap or the empty vector pCAGGS, followed by challenging all mice intraperitoneally with 0.5 mL 106.5 TCID50/mL PCV2. To characterize the protective immune response against PCV2 infection in mice, assays of antibody titer (including different IgG isotypes), flow cytometric analysis (FCM), lymphocyte proliferation, cytokine production and viremia were evaluated. The results showed that pc-Ub-Cap and pc-Cap were efficiently expressed in 293T cells. However, pc-Ub-Cap-vaccinated animals had a significantly higher level of Cap-specific antibody and induced a stronger Th1 type cellular immune response than did pc-Cap-vaccinated animals, suggesting that ubiquitin conjugation improved both the cellular and humoral immune responses. Additionally, viral replication in blood was lower in the pc-Ub-Cap-vaccinated group than in the pc-Cap and empty vector groups, suggesting that the protective immunity induced by pc-Ub-Cap is superior to that induced by pc-Cap. PMID:21624113

  7. Systematic characterization of lncRNAs' cell-to-cell expression heterogeneity in glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jun; Zhuang, Yan; Huang, Shuyu; Ma, Binbin; Chen, Puxiang; Li, Xiaodong; Zhang, Bo; Li, Zhiguang; Jin, Bilian

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common malignant adult brain tumor generally associated with high level of cellular heterogeneity and a dismal prognosis. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as novel mediators of tumorigenesis. Recently developed single-cell RNA-seq provides an unprecedented way for analysis of the cell-to-cell variability in lncRNA expression profiles. Here we comprehensively examined the expression patterns of 2,003 lncRNAs in 380 cells from five primary GBMs and two glioblastoma stem-like cell (GSC) lines. Employing the self-organizing maps, we displayed the landscape of the lncRNA expression dynamics for individual cells. Further analyses revealed heterogeneous nature of lncRNA in abundance and splicing patterns. Moreover, lncRNA expression variation is also ubiquitously present in the established GSC lines composed of seemingly identical cells. Through comparative analysis of GSC and corresponding differentiated cell cultures, we defined a stemness signature by the set of 31 differentially expressed lncRNAs, which can disclose stemness gradients in five tumors. Additionally, based on known classifier lncRNAs for molecular subtypes, each tumor was found to comprise individual cells representing four subtypes. Our systematic characterization of lncRNA expression heterogeneity lays the foundation for future efforts to further understand the function of lncRNA, develop valuable biomarkers, and enhance knowledge of GBM biology. PMID:26918340

  8. Insulin stimulates movement of sorting nexin 9 between cellular compartments: a putative role mediating cell surface receptor expression and insulin action.

    PubMed Central

    MaCaulay, S Lance; Stoichevska, Violet; Grusovin, Julian; Gough, Keith H; Castelli, Laura A; Ward, Colin W

    2003-01-01

    SNX9 (sorting nexin 9) is one member of a family of proteins implicated in protein trafficking. This family is characterized by a unique PX (Phox homology) domain that includes a proline-rich sequence and an upstream phospholipid binding domain. Many sorting nexins, including SNX9, also have a C-terminal coiled region. SNX9 additionally has an N-terminal SH3 (Src homology 3) domain. Here we have investigated the cellular localization of SNX9 and the potential role it plays in insulin action. SNX9 had a cytosolic and punctate distribution, consistent with endosomal and cytosolic localization, in 3T3L1 adipocytes. It was excluded from the nucleus. The SH3 domain was responsible, at least in part, for the membrane localization of SNX9, since expression of an SH3-domain-deleted GFP (green fluorescent protein)-SNX9 fusion protein in HEK293T cells rendered the protein cytosolic. Membrane localization may also be attributed in part to the PX domain, since in vitro phospholipid binding studies demonstrated SNX9 binding to polyphosphoinositides. Insulin induced movement of SNX9 to membrane fractions from the cytosol. A GST (glutathione S-transferase)-SNX9 fusion protein was associated with IGF1 (insulin-like growth factor 1) and insulin receptors in vitro. A GFP-SNX9 fusion protein, overexpressed in 3T3L1 adipocytes, co-immunoprecipitated with insulin receptors. Furthermore, overexpression of this GFP-SNX9 fusion protein in CHOT cells decreased insulin binding, consistent with a role for SNX9 in the trafficking of insulin receptors. Microinjection of 3T3L1 cells with an antibody against SNX9 inhibited stimulation by insulin of GLUT4 translocation. These results support the involvement of SNX9 in insulin action, via an influence on the processing/trafficking of insulin receptors. A secondary role in regulation of the cellular processing, transport and/or subcellular localization of GLUT4 is also suggested. PMID:12917015

  9. Probing cell-free gene expression noise in femtoliter volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Karig, David K; Jung, Seung-Yong; Srijanto, Bernadeta R; Collier, Pat; Simpson, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    Cell-free systems offer a simplified and flexible context that enables important biological reactions while removing complicating factors such as fitness, division, and mutation that are associated with living cells. However, cell-free expression in unconfined spaces is missing important elements of expression in living cells. In particular, the small volume of living cells can give rise to significant stochastic effects, which are negligible in bulk cell-free reactions. Here, we confine cell-free gene expression reactions to cell relevant 20 fL volumes (between the volumes of E. coli and S. cerevisiae), in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) containers. We demonstrate that expression efficiency varies widely at this volume, and we analyze gene expression noise. Noise analysis reveals signatures of translational bursting while noise dynamics suggest that overall cell-free expression is limited by a diminishing translation rate. In addition to offering a unique approach to understanding noise in gene circuits, our work contributes to a deeper understanding of the biophysical properties of cell-free expression systems, thus aiding efforts to harness cell-free systems for synthetic biology applications.

  10. The N-terminal CEBPA mutant in acute myeloid leukemia impairs CXCR4 expression.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yuan-Yeh; Hou, Hsin-An; Chen, Yin-Kai; Li, Li-Yu; Chen, Po-Hsuen; Tseng, Mei-Hsuan; Huang, Chi-Fei; Lee, Fen-Yu; Liu, Ming-Chih; Liu, Chia-Wen; Chou, Wen-Chien; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Tang, Jih-Luh; Yao, Ming; Tien, Hwei-Fang

    2014-12-01

    CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) is an essential regulator for homing and maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells within the bone marrow niches. Analysis of clinical implications of bone marrow CXCR4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia showed not only higher CXCR4 expression was an independent poor prognostic factor, irrespective of age, white blood cell counts, cytogenetics, and mutation status of NPM1/FLT3-ITD and CEBPA, but also showed CXCR4 expression was inversely associated with mutations of CEBPA, a gene encoding transcription factor C/EBPα. Patients with wild-type CEBPA had significantly higher CXCR4 expression than those with mutated CEBPA. We hypothesized that CEBPA might influence the expression of CXCR4. To test this hypothesis, we first examined endogenous CXCR4 expression in 293T and K562 cells over-expressing wild-type C/EBPα p42 and demonstrated that CXCR4 levels were increased in these cells, whilst the expression of the N-terminal mutant, C/EBPα p30, diminished CXCR4 transcription. We further showed p42 was bound to the CXCR4 promoter by the chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Induction of p42 in the inducible K562-C/EBPα cell lines increased the chemotactic migration. Moreover, decreased expression of C/EBPα by RNA interference decreased levels of CXCR4 protein expression in U937 cells, thereby abrogating CXCR4-mediated chemotaxis. Our results provide, for the first time, evidence that C/EBPα indeed regulates the activation of CXCR4, which is critical for the homing and engraftment of acute myeloid leukemia cells, while p30 mutant impairs CXCR4 expression. PMID:25193961

  11. Estradiol Upregulates c-FLIPlong Expression in Anterior Pituitary Cells.

    PubMed

    Jaita, G; Zárate, S; Ferraris, J; Gottardo, M F; Eijo, G; Magri, M L; Pisera, D; Seilicovich, A

    2016-04-01

    Anterior pituitary cell turnover depends on a tight balance between proliferation and apoptosis. We have previously shown that estrogens sensitize anterior pituitary cells to pro-apoptotic stimuli. c-FLIP (cellular-FLICE-inhibitory-protein) isoforms are regulatory proteins of apoptosis triggered by death receptors. c-FLIPshort isoform competes with procaspase-8 inhibiting its activation. However, c-FLIPlong isoform may have a pro- or anti-apoptotic function depending on its expression level. In the present study, we explored whether estrogens modulate c-FLIP expression in anterior pituitary cells from ovariectomized (OVX) rats and in GH3 cells, a somatolactotrope cell line. Acute administration of 17β-estradiol to OVX rats increased c-FLIPlong expression in the anterior pituitary gland without changing c-FLIPshort expression as assessed by Western blot. Estradiol in vitro also increased c-FLIPlong expression in anterior pituitary cells but not in GH3 cells. As determined by flow cytometry, the percentage of anterior pituitary cells expressing c-FLIP was higher than in GH3 cells. However, c-FLIP fluorescence intensity in GH3 cells was higher than in anterior pituitary cells. FasL increased the percentage of TUNEL-positive GH3 cells incubated either with or without estradiol suggesting that the pro-apoptotic action of Fas activation is estrogen-independent. Our results show that unlike what happens in nontumoral pituitary cells, estrogens do not modulate either c-FLIPlong expression or FasL-induced apoptosis in GH3 cells. The stimulatory effect of estradiol on c-FLIPlong expression could be involved in the sensitizing effect of this steroid to apoptosis in anterior pituitary cells. The absence of this estrogenic action in tumor pituitary cells could be involved in their tumor-like behavior. PMID:26566102

  12. Pharmacologic suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Vallina, L; Yañez, R; Blanco, B; Gil, M; Russell, S J

    2000-04-01

    Adoptive therapy with autologous T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors (chTCRs) is of potential interest for the treatment of malignancy. To limit possible T-cell-mediated damage to normal tissues that weakly express the targeted tumor antigen (Ag), we have tested a strategy for the suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells. Jurkat T cells were transduced with an anti-hapten chTCR tinder the control of a tetracycline-suppressible promoter and were shown to respond to Ag-positive (hapten-coated) but not to Ag-negative target cells. The engineered T cells were then reacted with hapten-coated target cells at different effector to target cell ratios before and after exposure to tetracycline. When the engineered T cells were treated with tetracycline, expression of the chTCR was greatly decreased and recognition of the hapten-coated target cells was completely suppressed. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells may be a useful strategy to limit the toxicity of the approach to cancer gene therapy. PMID:10811469

  13. TOX expression in cutaneous B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Anne M R; Jansen, Patty M; Willemze, Rein

    2016-08-01

    Thymocyte selection-associated high-mobility group box (TOX) is aberrantly expressed in cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. In a recent study, TOX expression was noted unexpectedly in the follicle center (germinal center) B-cells of reactive lymph nodes and tonsils, used as external controls. To evaluate whether TOX is also expressed by cutaneous B-cell lymphomas, TOX immunohistochemistry was performed on skin biopsies of 44 patients with primary and secondary cutaneous B-cell proliferations. TOX was expressed not only in the reactive follicle center cells of lymph nodes, tonsils, cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia, and primary cutaneous marginal zone lymphomas, but also by the neoplastic follicle center cells of 16/17 patients with primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma (PCFCL) and 7/7 patients with cutaneous manifestations of systemic follicular lymphoma (FL). Notably, TOX showed a very similar expression pattern as BCL6, a marker of germinal center B-cells. In 4/10 patients with a BCL6(+) primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type (PCDLBCL,LT) and in 2/2 patients with a secondary cutaneous BCL6(+) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), TOX was expressed by more than 50 % of the neoplastic B-cells. In contrast, in 3/3 BCL6(-) PCDLBCL,LT, TOX was completely negative or weakly expressed by a minor proportion of the neoplastic B-cells. In conclusion, TOX is expressed not only by neoplastic T-cells, but also by both reactive and neoplastic follicle center (germinal center) B-cells and a proportion of BCL6(+) PCDLBCL,LT and secondary cutaneous BCL6(+) DLBCL. The functional significance of TOX expression in reactive and neoplastic B-cells remains to be elucidated. PMID:27180090

  14. Characteristics and EGFP expression of goat mammary gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Y-M; He, X-Y; Zhang, Y

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to establish a goat mammary gland epithelial (GMGE) cell line, and (ii) to determine if these GMGE cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing following transfection with a reporter gene, enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). Primary culture of GMGE cells was achieved by outgrowth of migrating cells from the fragments of the mammary gland tissue of a lactating goat. The passage 16 GMGE cells were transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. The expression of Cell keratins of epithelial cells in GMGE cells was test by immunofluorescence. Βeta-Casein gene mRNA was test for GMGE cells by RT-PCR. The results showed that when grown at low density on a plastic substratum, the GMGE cells formed islands, and when grown to confluency, the cells formed a monolayer and aggregated with the characteristic cobble-stone morphology of epithelial cells. GMGE cells could form dome-like structure which looked like nipple, and the lumen-like structures formed among the cells. Several blister-like structures appeared in the appearance of the cells. The GMGE cells contained different cell types, majority of the cells were short shuttle-like or polygon which were beehive-like. A part of cells were round and flat, a small number of cells were elongated. Some of the GMGE cells contained milk drops. The cell nuclei were round which had 2-4 obvious cores. The expression of Cell keratins demonstrated the property of epithelial cells in GMGE cells by immunofluorescence. The GMGE cells could express transcript encoding a Βeta-Casein protein. EGFP gene was successfully transferred into the GMGE cells, and the transfected cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing. In conclusion, we have established a EGFP gene transfected GMGE (ET-GMGE) cell line and maintained it long-term in culture by continuous subculturing. PMID:20113446

  15. Evaluation of the major royal jelly proteins as an alternative to fetal bovine serum in culturing human cell lines*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Di; Xin, Xiao-xuan; Qian, Hao-cheng; Yu, Zhang-yin; Shen, Li-rong

    2016-01-01

    Royal jelly (RJ) is a well-known bioactive substance. It contains large amounts of major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs), which express growth-factor-like activity in several animal and human cell lines. However, the question on whether MRJPs possess growth-factor-like activity on all types of cell cultures remains. In order to determine whether MRJPs can be used as an alternative to fetal bovine serum (FBS) in different types of human cell culture, the proliferation of the complex serum with different ratios of MRJPs/FBS (M/F) was evaluated on five cell lines: 293T, HFL-I, 231, HCT116, and Changliver using MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) assay. The proliferation activity of the combination of the complex M/F serum with cytokines on the test cell lines was also measured. The results demonstrated that the complex serum with M/F 6/4 possessed the highest proliferation activity similar to or in excess of FBS. However, no activity of complex medium with M/F 6/4 was observed in 231 cells, indicating a selectivity of MRJPs on cell types. Compared with the complex medium with M/F 6/4, the complex medium with M/F 6/4 together with two cytokines, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-transferrin-selenium (ITS), promoted proliferations of Changliver, 293T, HCT116, and HFL-I by 18.73%‒56.19% (P<0.01). Our findings demonstrate that MRJPs could partially replace FBS in culturing many human cell lines. PMID:27256681

  16. Evaluation of the major royal jelly proteins as an alternative to fetal bovine serum in culturing human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Xin, Xiao-Xuan; Qian, Hao-Cheng; Yu, Zhang-Yin; Shen, Li-Rong

    2016-06-01

    Royal jelly (RJ) is a well-known bioactive substance. It contains large amounts of major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs), which express growth-factor-like activity in several animal and human cell lines. However, the question on whether MRJPs possess growth-factor-like activity on all types of cell cultures remains. In order to determine whether MRJPs can be used as an alternative to fetal bovine serum (FBS) in different types of human cell culture, the proliferation of the complex serum with different ratios of MRJPs/FBS (M/F) was evaluated on five cell lines: 293T, HFL-I, 231, HCT116, and Changliver using MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) assay. The proliferation activity of the combination of the complex M/F serum with cytokines on the test cell lines was also measured. The results demonstrated that the complex serum with M/F 6/4 possessed the highest proliferation activity similar to or in excess of FBS. However, no activity of complex medium with M/F 6/4 was observed in 231 cells, indicating a selectivity of MRJPs on cell types. Compared with the complex medium with M/F 6/4, the complex medium with M/F 6/4 together with two cytokines, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-transferrin-selenium (ITS), promoted proliferations of Changliver, 293T, HCT116, and HFL-I by 18.73%‒56.19% (P<0.01). Our findings demonstrate that MRJPs could partially replace FBS in culturing many human cell lines. PMID:27256681

  17. Advantages and applications of CAR-expressing natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Glienke, Wolfgang; Esser, Ruth; Priesner, Christoph; Suerth, Julia D.; Schambach, Axel; Wels, Winfried S.; Grez, Manuel; Kloess, Stephan; Arseniev, Lubomir; Koehl, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to donor T cells, natural killer (NK) cells are known to mediate anti-cancer effects without the risk of inducing graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). In order to improve cytotoxicity against resistant cancer cells, auspicious efforts have been made with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) expressing T- and NK cells. These CAR-modified cells express antigen receptors against tumor-associated surface antigens, thus redirecting the effector cells and enhancing tumor-specific immunosurveillance. However, many cancer antigens are also expressed on healthy tissues, potentially leading to off tumor/on target toxicity by CAR-engineered cells. In order to control such potentially severe side effects, the insertion of suicide genes into CAR-modified effectors can provide a means for efficient depletion of these cells. While CAR-expressing T cells have entered successfully clinical trials, experience with CAR-engineered NK cells is mainly restricted to pre-clinical investigations and predominantly to NK cell lines. In this review we summarize the data on CAR expressing NK cells focusing on the possible advantage using these short-lived effector cells and discuss the necessity of suicide switches. Furthermore, we address the compliance of such modified NK cells with regulatory requirements as a new field in cellular immunotherapy. PMID:25729364

  18. Deviation from major codons in the Toll-like receptor genes is associated with low Toll-like receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Fei; Cao, Weiping; Chan, Edmund; Tay, Puei Nam; Cahya, Florence Feby; Zhang, Haifeng; Lu, Jinhua

    2005-01-01

    Microbial structures activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and TLR-mediated cell signalling elicits and regulates host immunity. Most TLRs are poorly expressed but the underlying expression mechanism is not clear. Examination TLR sequences revealed that most human TLR genes deviated from using major human codons. CD14 resembles TLRs in sequence but its gene preferentially uses major codons. Indeed, CD14 expression on monocytes was higher than expression of TLR1 and TLR2. The TLR9 gene is abundant in major codons and it also showed higher expression than TLR1, TLR2 and TLR7 in transfected 293T cells. Change of the 5′-end 302 base pairs of the TLR2 sequence into major human codons markedly increased TLR2 expression, which led to increased TLR2-mediated constitutive nuclear factor-κB activation. Change of the 5′-end 381 base pairs of the CD14 sequence into prevalent TLR codons markedly reduced CD14 expression. These results collectively show that the deviation of TLR sequences from using major codons dictates the low TLR expression and this may protect the host against excessive inflammation and tissue damages. PMID:15606798

  19. Transferrin receptor expression by stimulated cells in mixed lymphocyte culture.

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, M; Bacon, P A; Symmons, D P; Walton, K W

    1985-01-01

    Transferrin receptor (TRFr) expression by cells in mixed lymphocyte culture increases steadily for the first 5 days, but then reaches a plateau. By the sixth day in culture, about 20% of viable cells express TRFr in two-way mixed lymphocyte reactions. This subpopulation of TRFr-positive cells represents the proliferating population; it is heterogeneous, containing T-cell blasts and smaller cells which are a mixture of T and non-T cells. A small group of non-T cells have phenotypic similarity to natural killer (NK) cells. T cells appear to divide earlier in the course of the response than non-T cells. The biphasic nature of this response and the slower non-T reactivity may be due to a secondary stimulation of non-T cells by factors released from activated T cells (such as interleukin-2). PMID:2982734

  20. Robust Inference of Cell-to-Cell Expression Variations from Single- and K-Cell Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Manikandan; Martins, Andrew J.; Tsang, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying heterogeneity in gene expression among single cells can reveal information inaccessible to cell-population averaged measurements. However, the expression level of many genes in single cells fall below the detection limit of even the most sensitive technologies currently available. One proposed approach to overcome this challenge is to measure random pools of k cells (e.g., 10) to increase sensitivity, followed by computational “deconvolution” of cellular heterogeneity parameters (CHPs), such as the biological variance of single-cell expression levels. Existing approaches infer CHPs using either single-cell or k-cell data alone, and typically within a single population of cells. However, integrating both single- and k-cell data may reap additional benefits, and quantifying differences in CHPs across cell populations or conditions could reveal novel biological information. Here we present a Bayesian approach that can utilize single-cell, k-cell, or both simultaneously to infer CHPs within a single condition or their differences across two conditions. Using simulated as well as experimentally generated single- and k-cell data, we found situations where each data type would offer advantages, but using both together can improve precision and better reconcile CHP information contained in single- and k-cell data. We illustrate the utility of our approach by applying it to jointly generated single- and k-cell data to reveal CHP differences in several key inflammatory genes between resting and inflammatory cytokine-activated human macrophages, delineating differences in the distribution of ‘ON’ versus ‘OFF’ cells and in continuous variation of expression level among cells. Our approach thus offers a practical and robust framework to assess and compare cellular heterogeneity within and across biological conditions using modern multiplexed technologies. PMID:27438699

  1. Robust Inference of Cell-to-Cell Expression Variations from Single- and K-Cell Profiling.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Manikandan; Martins, Andrew J; Tsang, John S

    2016-07-01

    Quantifying heterogeneity in gene expression among single cells can reveal information inaccessible to cell-population averaged measurements. However, the expression level of many genes in single cells fall below the detection limit of even the most sensitive technologies currently available. One proposed approach to overcome this challenge is to measure random pools of k cells (e.g., 10) to increase sensitivity, followed by computational "deconvolution" of cellular heterogeneity parameters (CHPs), such as the biological variance of single-cell expression levels. Existing approaches infer CHPs using either single-cell or k-cell data alone, and typically within a single population of cells. However, integrating both single- and k-cell data may reap additional benefits, and quantifying differences in CHPs across cell populations or conditions could reveal novel biological information. Here we present a Bayesian approach that can utilize single-cell, k-cell, or both simultaneously to infer CHPs within a single condition or their differences across two conditions. Using simulated as well as experimentally generated single- and k-cell data, we found situations where each data type would offer advantages, but using both together can improve precision and better reconcile CHP information contained in single- and k-cell data. We illustrate the utility of our approach by applying it to jointly generated single- and k-cell data to reveal CHP differences in several key inflammatory genes between resting and inflammatory cytokine-activated human macrophages, delineating differences in the distribution of 'ON' versus 'OFF' cells and in continuous variation of expression level among cells. Our approach thus offers a practical and robust framework to assess and compare cellular heterogeneity within and across biological conditions using modern multiplexed technologies. PMID:27438699

  2. Chemokine receptor expression by inflammatory T cells in EAE

    PubMed Central

    Mony, Jyothi Thyagabhavan; Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines direct cellular infiltration to tissues, and their receptors and signaling pathways represent targets for therapy in diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The chemokine CCL20 is expressed in choroid plexus, a site of entry of T cells to the central nervous system (CNS). The CCL20 receptor CCR6 has been reported to be selectively expressed by CD4+ T cells that produce the cytokine IL-17 (Th17 cells). Th17 cells and interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-producing Th1 cells are implicated in induction of MS and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We have assessed whether CCR6 identifies specific inflammatory T cell subsets in EAE. Our approach was to induce EAE, and then examine chemokine receptor expression by cytokine-producing T cells sorted from CNS at peak disease. About 7% of CNS-infiltrating CD4+ T cells produced IFNγ in flow cytometric cytokine assays, whereas less than 1% produced IL-17. About 1% of CD4+ T cells produced both cytokines. CCR6 was expressed by Th1, Th1+17 and by Th17 cells, but not by CD8+ T cells. CD8+ T cells expressed CXCR3, which was also expressed by CD4+ T cells, with no correlation to cytokine profile. Messenger RNA for IFNγ, IL-17A, and the Th1 and Th17-associated transcription factors T-bet and RORγt was detected in both CCR6+ and CXCR3+ CD4+ T cells. IFNγ, but not IL-17A mRNA expression was detected in CD8+ T cells in CNS. CCR6 and CD4 were co-localized in spinal cord infiltrates by double immunofluorescence. Consistent with flow cytometry data some but not all CD4+ T cells expressed CCR6 within infiltrates. CD4-negative CCR6+ cells included macrophage/microglial cells. Thus we have for the first time directly studied CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the CNS of mice with peak EAE, and determined IFNγ and IL17 expression by cells expressing CCR6 and CXCR3. We show that neither CCR6 or CXCR3 align with CD4 T cell subsets, and Th1 or mixed Th1+17 predominate in EAE. PMID:25071447

  3. Geometry of the Gene Expression Space of Individual Cells

    PubMed Central

    Korem, Yael; Szekely, Pablo; Hart, Yuval; Sheftel, Hila; Hausser, Jean; Mayo, Avi; Rothenberg, Michael E.; Kalisky, Tomer; Alon, Uri

    2015-01-01

    There is a revolution in the ability to analyze gene expression of single cells in a tissue. To understand this data we must comprehend how cells are distributed in a high-dimensional gene expression space. One open question is whether cell types form discrete clusters or whether gene expression forms a continuum of states. If such a continuum exists, what is its geometry? Recent theory on evolutionary trade-offs suggests that cells that need to perform multiple tasks are arranged in a polygon or polyhedron (line, triangle, tetrahedron and so on, generally called polytopes) in gene expression space, whose vertices are the expression profiles optimal for each task. Here, we analyze single-cell data from human and mouse tissues profiled using a variety of single-cell technologies. We fit the data to shapes with different numbers of vertices, compute their statistical significance, and infer their tasks. We find cases in which single cells fill out a continuum of expression states within a polyhedron. This occurs in intestinal progenitor cells, which fill out a tetrahedron in gene expression space. The four vertices of this tetrahedron are each enriched with genes for a specific task related to stemness and early differentiation. A polyhedral continuum of states is also found in spleen dendritic cells, known to perform multiple immune tasks: cells fill out a tetrahedron whose vertices correspond to key tasks related to maturation, pathogen sensing and communication with lymphocytes. A mixture of continuum-like distributions and discrete clusters is found in other cell types, including bone marrow and differentiated intestinal crypt cells. This approach can be used to understand the geometry and biological tasks of a wide range of single-cell datasets. The present results suggest that the concept of cell type may be expanded. In addition to discreet clusters in gene-expression space, we suggest a new possibility: a continuum of states within a polyhedron, in which the

  4. Geometry of the Gene Expression Space of Individual Cells.

    PubMed

    Korem, Yael; Szekely, Pablo; Hart, Yuval; Sheftel, Hila; Hausser, Jean; Mayo, Avi; Rothenberg, Michael E; Kalisky, Tomer; Alon, Uri

    2015-07-01

    There is a revolution in the ability to analyze gene expression of single cells in a tissue. To understand this data we must comprehend how cells are distributed in a high-dimensional gene expression space. One open question is whether cell types form discrete clusters or whether gene expression forms a continuum of states. If such a continuum exists, what is its geometry? Recent theory on evolutionary trade-offs suggests that cells that need to perform multiple tasks are arranged in a polygon or polyhedron (line, triangle, tetrahedron and so on, generally called polytopes) in gene expression space, whose vertices are the expression profiles optimal for each task. Here, we analyze single-cell data from human and mouse tissues profiled using a variety of single-cell technologies. We fit the data to shapes with different numbers of vertices, compute their statistical significance, and infer their tasks. We find cases in which single cells fill out a continuum of expression states within a polyhedron. This occurs in intestinal progenitor cells, which fill out a tetrahedron in gene expression space. The four vertices of this tetrahedron are each enriched with genes for a specific task related to stemness and early differentiation. A polyhedral continuum of states is also found in spleen dendritic cells, known to perform multiple immune tasks: cells fill out a tetrahedron whose vertices correspond to key tasks related to maturation, pathogen sensing and communication with lymphocytes. A mixture of continuum-like distributions and discrete clusters is found in other cell types, including bone marrow and differentiated intestinal crypt cells. This approach can be used to understand the geometry and biological tasks of a wide range of single-cell datasets. The present results suggest that the concept of cell type may be expanded. In addition to discreet clusters in gene-expression space, we suggest a new possibility: a continuum of states within a polyhedron, in which the

  5. Fragments of Target Cells are Internalized into Retroviral Envelope Protein-Expressing Cells during Cell-Cell Fusion by Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Izumida, Mai; Kamiyama, Haruka; Suematsu, Takashi; Honda, Eri; Koizumi, Yosuke; Yasui, Kiyoshi; Hayashi, Hideki; Ariyoshi, Koya; Kubo, Yoshinao

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses enter into host cells by fusion between viral and host cell membranes. Retroviral envelope glycoprotein (Env) induces the membrane fusion, and also mediates cell-cell fusion. There are two types of cell-cell fusions induced by the Env protein. Fusion-from-within is induced by fusion between viral fusogenic Env protein-expressing cells and susceptible cells, and virions induce fusion-from-without by fusion between adjacent cells. Although entry of ecotropic murine leukemia virus (E-MLV) requires host cell endocytosis, the involvement of endocytosis in cell fusion is unclear. By fluorescent microscopic analysis of the fusion-from-within, we found that fragments of target cells are internalized into Env-expressing cells. Treatment of the Env-expressing cells with an endocytosis inhibitor more significantly inhibited the cell fusion than that of the target cells, indicating that endocytosis in Env-expressing cells is required for the cell fusion. The endocytosis inhibitor also attenuated the fusion-from-without. Electron microscopic analysis suggested that the membrane fusion resulting in fusion-from-within initiates in endocytic membrane dents. This study shows that two types of the viral cell fusion both require endocytosis, and provides the cascade of fusion-from-within. PMID:26834711

  6. Characteristics and EGFP expression of porcine mammary gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue-Mao; He, Xiao-Ying

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were to establish a porcine mammary gland epithelial (PMGE) cell line, and to determine if these PMGE cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing following transfection with a reporter gene, enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). Primary culture of PMGE cells was achieved by outgrowth of migrating cells from the fragments of the mammary gland tissue of a lactating pig. The passage sixteen PMGE cells were transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. The expression of Cell keratins of epithelial cells in PMGE cells was tested by immunofluorescence. Βeta-Casein gene mRNA was tested for PMGE cells by RT-PCR. The results showed that PMGE cells could form dome-like structure which looked like nipple, and the cells contained different cell types. The expression of Cell keratins demonstrated the property of epithelial cells, and the PMGE cells could express transcript encoding a Βeta-Casein protein. EGFP gene was successfully transferred into the PMGE cells, and the transfected cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing. In conclusion, we have established a EGFP gene transfected porcine mammary gland epithelial (ET-PMGE) cell line. PMID:20400167

  7. HeLa Based Cell Free Expression Systems for Expression of Plasmodium Rhoptry Proteins.

    PubMed

    Yadavalli, Raghavendra; Sam-Yellowe, Tobili

    2015-01-01

    Malaria causes significant global morbidity and mortality. No routine vaccine is currently available. One of the major reasons for lack of a vaccine is the challenge of identifying suitable vaccine candidates. Malarial proteins expressed using prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell based expression systems are poorly glycosylated, generally insoluble and undergo improper folding leading to reduced immunogenicity. The wheat germ, rabbit reticulocyte lysate and Escherichia coli lysate cell free expression systems are currently used for expression of malarial proteins. However, the length of expression time and improper glycosylation of proteins still remains a challenge. We demonstrate expression of Plasmodium proteins in vitro using HeLa based cell free expression systems, termed "in vitro human cell free expression systems". The 2 HeLa based cell free expression systems transcribe mRNA in 75 min and 3 µl of transcribed mRNA is sufficient to translate proteins in 90 min. The 1-step expression system is a transcription and translation coupled expression system; the transcription and co-translation occurs in 3 hr. The process can also be extended for 6 hr by providing additional energy. In the 2-step expression system, mRNA is first transcribed and then added to the translation mix for protein expression. We describe how to express malaria proteins; a hydrophobic PF3D7_0114100 Maurer's Cleft - 2 transmembrane (PfMC-2TM) protein, a hydrophilic PF3D7_0925900 protein and an armadillo repeats containing protein PF3D7_1361800, using the HeLa based cell free expression system. The proteins are expressed in micro volumes employing 2-step and 1-step expression strategies. An affinity purification method to purify 25 µl of proteins expressed using the in vitro human cell free expression system is also described. Protein yield is determined by Bradford's assay and the expressed and purified proteins can be confirmed by western blotting analysis. Expressed recombinant proteins can be

  8. Etoposide sensitizes neuroblastoma cells expressing caspase 8 to TRAIL.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Ryung; Lee, Myoung Woo; Kim, Dae Seong; Jo, Ha Yeong; Lee, Soo Hyun; Chueh, Hee Won; Jung, Hye Lim; Yoo, Keon Hee; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe

    2012-01-01

    TRAIL [TNF (tumour necrosis factor)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand] is a promising agent for clinical use since it kills a wide range of tumour cells without affecting normal cells. We provide evidence that pretreatment with etoposide significantly enhanced TRAIL-mediated apoptosis via up-regulation of DR5 (death receptor 5 or TRAIL-R2) expression in the caspase 8 expressing neuroblastoma cell line, SK-N-MC. In addition, sequential treatment with etoposide and TRAIL increased caspases 8, 9 and 3 activation, Mcl-1 cleavage and Bid truncation, which suggests that the ability of etoposide and TRAIL to induce apoptosis is mediated through activation of an intrinsic signalling pathway. Although TRAIL-R2 expression increased in IMR-32 cells in response to etoposide treatment, cell death was not increased by concurrent treatment with TRAIL compared with etoposide alone, because the cells lacked caspase 8 expression. Restoration of caspase 8 expression by exposure to IFNγ (interferon γ) sensitizes IMR-32 cells to TRAIL. Moreover, pretreatment with etoposide increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis in caspase 8 restored IMR-32 cells through activation of a caspase cascade that included caspases 8, 9 and 3. These results indicate that the etoposide-mediated sensitization of neuroblastoma cells to TRAIL is associated with an increase in TRAIL-R2 expression and requires caspase 8 expression. These observations support the potential use of a combination of etoposide and TRAIL in future clinical trials. PMID:23124518

  9. Differential expression and function of CD27 in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells expressing ZAP-70.

    PubMed

    Lafarge, Sandrine T; Hou, Sen; Pauls, Samantha D; Johnston, James B; Gibson, Spencer B; Marshall, Aaron J

    2015-07-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a malignancy driven by abberant B cell signaling and survival. Leukemic B cells accumulate in the peripheral blood and the lymphoid organs where contact with stromal cells and T cells provide critical survival signals. Clinical severity of CLL is associated with several prognostic markers including expression of the kinase ZAP-70. ZAP-70 expression enhances signaling via the B cell antigen receptor and is associated with increased cell adhesion and migration capacity. Here we report that ZAP-70-positive CLL patients display significantly higher expression of the TNF superfamily receptor and memory marker CD27 than do ZAP-70 negative patients. CD27 expression by CLL was acutely elevated upon BCR cross-linking, or upon ectopic expression of ZAP-70. CD27 expression correlated with functional capacity to adhere to stromal cells and antibody blockade of CD27 impaired CLL binding to stroma. These results provide the first evidence for differential expression of CD27 among CLL prognostic groups, suggest a role for ZAP-70 dependent signaling in CD27 induction and implicate CD27 in cell-cell interactions with the lymphoid tissue microenvironment. PMID:26002513

  10. Calreticulin: Roles in Cell-Surface Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yue; Dey, Sandeepa; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    In order to perform their designated functions, proteins require precise subcellular localizations. For cell-surface proteins, such as receptors and channels, they are able to transduce signals only when properly targeted to the cell membrane. Calreticulin is a multi-functional chaperone protein involved in protein folding, maturation, and trafficking. However, evidence has been accumulating that calreticulin can also negatively regulate the surface expression of certain receptors and channels. In these instances, depletion of calreticulin enhances cell-surface expression and function. In this review, we discuss the role of calreticulin with a focus on its negative effects on the expression of cell-surface proteins. PMID:25230046

  11. CD39 Expression Identifies Terminally Exhausted CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Adland, Emily; Yates, Kathleen; Pauken, Kristen E.; Cosgrove, Cormac; Ledderose, Carola; Junger, Wolfgang G.; Robson, Simon C.; Wherry, E. John; Alter, Galit; Goulder, Philip J. R.; Klenerman, Paul; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Lauer, Georg M.; Haining, W. Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Exhausted T cells express multiple co-inhibitory molecules that impair their function and limit immunity to chronic viral infection. Defining novel markers of exhaustion is important both for identifying and potentially reversing T cell exhaustion. Herein, we show that the ectonucleotidse CD39 is a marker of exhausted CD8+ T cells. CD8+ T cells specific for HCV or HIV express high levels of CD39, but those specific for EBV and CMV do not. CD39 expressed by CD8+ T cells in chronic infection is enzymatically active, co-expressed with PD-1, marks cells with a transcriptional signature of T cell exhaustion and correlates with viral load in HIV and HCV. In the mouse model of chronic Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus infection, virus-specific CD8+ T cells contain a population of CD39high CD8+ T cells that is absent in functional memory cells elicited by acute infection. This CD39high CD8+ T cell population is enriched for cells with the phenotypic and functional profile of terminal exhaustion. These findings provide a new marker of T cell exhaustion, and implicate the purinergic pathway in the regulation of T cell exhaustion. PMID:26485519

  12. Determining Physical Mechanisms of Gene Expression Regulation from Single Cell Gene Expression Data.

    PubMed

    Ezer, Daphne; Moignard, Victoria; Göttgens, Berthold; Adryan, Boris

    2016-08-01

    Many genes are expressed in bursts, which can contribute to cell-to-cell heterogeneity. It is now possible to measure this heterogeneity with high throughput single cell gene expression assays (single cell qPCR and RNA-seq). These experimental approaches generate gene expression distributions which can be used to estimate the kinetic parameters of gene expression bursting, namely the rate that genes turn on, the rate that genes turn off, and the rate of transcription. We construct a complete pipeline for the analysis of single cell qPCR data that uses the mathematics behind bursty expression to develop more accurate and robust algorithms for analyzing the origin of heterogeneity in experimental samples, specifically an algorithm for clustering cells by their bursting behavior (Simulated Annealing for Bursty Expression Clustering, SABEC) and a statistical tool for comparing the kinetic parameters of bursty expression across populations of cells (Estimation of Parameter changes in Kinetics, EPiK). We applied these methods to hematopoiesis, including a new single cell dataset in which transcription factors (TFs) involved in the earliest branchpoint of blood differentiation were individually up- and down-regulated. We could identify two unique sub-populations within a seemingly homogenous group of hematopoietic stem cells. In addition, we could predict regulatory mechanisms controlling the expression levels of eighteen key hematopoietic transcription factors throughout differentiation. Detailed information about gene regulatory mechanisms can therefore be obtained simply from high throughput single cell gene expression data, which should be widely applicable given the rapid expansion of single cell genomics. PMID:27551778

  13. Determining Physical Mechanisms of Gene Expression Regulation from Single Cell Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Moignard, Victoria; Göttgens, Berthold; Adryan, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Many genes are expressed in bursts, which can contribute to cell-to-cell heterogeneity. It is now possible to measure this heterogeneity with high throughput single cell gene expression assays (single cell qPCR and RNA-seq). These experimental approaches generate gene expression distributions which can be used to estimate the kinetic parameters of gene expression bursting, namely the rate that genes turn on, the rate that genes turn off, and the rate of transcription. We construct a complete pipeline for the analysis of single cell qPCR data that uses the mathematics behind bursty expression to develop more accurate and robust algorithms for analyzing the origin of heterogeneity in experimental samples, specifically an algorithm for clustering cells by their bursting behavior (Simulated Annealing for Bursty Expression Clustering, SABEC) and a statistical tool for comparing the kinetic parameters of bursty expression across populations of cells (Estimation of Parameter changes in Kinetics, EPiK). We applied these methods to hematopoiesis, including a new single cell dataset in which transcription factors (TFs) involved in the earliest branchpoint of blood differentiation were individually up- and down-regulated. We could identify two unique sub-populations within a seemingly homogenous group of hematopoietic stem cells. In addition, we could predict regulatory mechanisms controlling the expression levels of eighteen key hematopoietic transcription factors throughout differentiation. Detailed information about gene regulatory mechanisms can therefore be obtained simply from high throughput single cell gene expression data, which should be widely applicable given the rapid expansion of single cell genomics. PMID:27551778

  14. Stochasticity in gene expression in a cell-sized compartment.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kazuya; Tsuru, Saburo; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2015-05-15

    The gene expression in a clonal cell population fluctuates significantly, and its relevance to various cellular functions is under intensive debate. A fundamental question is whether the fluctuation is a consequence of the complexity and redundancy in living cells or an inevitable attribute of the minute microreactor nature of cells. To answer this question, we constructed an artificial cell, which consists of only necessary components for the gene expression (in vitro transcription and translation system) and its boundary as a microreactor (cell-sized lipid vesicle), and investigated the gene expression noise. The variation in the expression of two fluorescent proteins was decomposed into the components that were correlated and uncorrelated between the two proteins using a method similar to the one used by Elowitz and co-workers to analyze the expression noise in E. coli. The observed fluctuation was compared with a theoretical model that expresses the amplitude of noise as a function of the average number of intermediate molecules and products. With the assumption that the transcripts are partly active, the theoretical model was able to well describe the noise in the artificial system. Furthermore, the same measurement for E. coli cells harboring an identical plasmid revealed that the E. coli exhibited a similar level of expression noise. Our results demonstrated that the level of fluctuation found in bacterial cells is mostly an intrinsic property that arises even in a primitive form of the cell. PMID:25280237

  15. CARD14 Expression in Dermal Endothelial Cells in Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Harden, Jamie L.; Lewis, Steven M.; Pierson, Katherine C.; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Lentini, Tim; Ortenzio, Francesca S.; Zaba, Lisa C.; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Bowcock, Anne M.; Lowes, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the caspase recruitment domain, family member 14 (CARD14) gene have recently been described in psoriasis patients, and explain the psoriasis susceptibility locus 2 (PSORS2). CARD14 is a scaffolding protein that regulates NF-κB activation, and psoriasis-associated CARD14 mutations lead to enhanced NF-κB signaling. CARD14 is expressed mainly in epidermal keratinocytes, but also in unidentified dermal cells. In this manuscript, the identity of the dermal cell types expressing CARD14, as well the potential functional consequence of overactive CARD14 in these dermal cell types, was determined. Using two-color immunofluorescence, dermal CARD14 did not co-localize with T-cells, dendritic cells, or macrophages. However, dermal CARD14 did highly co-localize with CD31+ endothelial cells (ECs). CARD14 was also expressed non-dermal endothelial cells, such as aortic endothelial cells, which may indicate a role of CARD14+ECs in the systemic inflammation and cardiovascular comorbidities associated with psoriasis. Additionally, phosphorylated NF-κB was found in psoriatic CARD14+ CD31+ ECs, demonstrating this pathway is active in dermal ECs in psoriasis. Transfection of dermal ECs with psoriasis-associated CARD14 mutations resulted in increased expression of several chemokines, including CXCL10, IL-8, and CCL2. These results provide preliminary evidence that CARD14 expression in ECs may contribute to psoriasis through increased expression of chemokines and facilitating recruitment of immune cells into skin. PMID:25369198

  16. CARD14 expression in dermal endothelial cells in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Harden, Jamie L; Lewis, Steven M; Pierson, Katherine C; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Lentini, Tim; Ortenzio, Francesca S; Zaba, Lisa C; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Bowcock, Anne M; Lowes, Michelle A

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the caspase recruitment domain, family member 14 (CARD14) gene have recently been described in psoriasis patients, and explain the psoriasis susceptibility locus 2 (PSORS2). CARD14 is a scaffolding protein that regulates NF-κB activation, and psoriasis-associated CARD14 mutations lead to enhanced NF-κB signaling. CARD14 is expressed mainly in epidermal keratinocytes, but also in unidentified dermal cells. In this manuscript, the identity of the dermal cell types expressing CARD14, as well the potential functional consequence of overactive CARD14 in these dermal cell types, was determined. Using two-color immunofluorescence, dermal CARD14 did not co-localize with T-cells, dendritic cells, or macrophages. However, dermal CARD14 did highly co-localize with CD31(+) endothelial cells (ECs). CARD14 was also expressed non-dermal endothelial cells, such as aortic endothelial cells, which may indicate a role of CARD14(+)ECs in the systemic inflammation and cardiovascular comorbidities associated with psoriasis. Additionally, phosphorylated NF-κB was found in psoriatic CARD14(+) CD31(+) ECs, demonstrating this pathway is active in dermal ECs in psoriasis. Transfection of dermal ECs with psoriasis-associated CARD14 mutations resulted in increased expression of several chemokines, including CXCL10, IL-8, and CCL2. These results provide preliminary evidence that CARD14 expression in ECs may contribute to psoriasis through increased expression of chemokines and facilitating recruitment of immune cells into skin. PMID:25369198

  17. PCGF2 negatively regulates arsenic trioxide-induced PML-RARA protein degradation via UBE2I inhibition in NB4 cells.

    PubMed

    Jo, Sungsin; Lee, Young Lim; Kim, Sojin; Lee, Hongki; Chung, Heekyoung

    2016-07-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is a therapeutic agent for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) which induces PML-RARA protein degradation via enhanced UBE2I-mediated sumoylation. PCGF2, a Polycomb group protein, has been suggested as an anti-SUMO E3 protein by inhibiting the sumoylation of UBE2I substrates, HSF2 and RANGAP1, via direct interaction. Thus, we hypothesized that PCGF2 might play a role in ATO-induced PML-RARA degradation by interacting with UBE2I. PCGF2 protein was down-regulated upon ATO treatment in human APL cell line, NB4. Knockdown of PCGF2 in NB4 cells, in the absence of ATO treatment, was sufficient to induce sumoylation-, ubiquitylation- and PML nuclear body-mediated degradation of PML-RARA protein. Moreover, overexpression of PCGF2 protected ATO-mediated degradation of ectopic and endogenous PML-RARA in 293T and NB4 cells, respectively. In 293T cells, UBE2I-mediated PML-RARA degradation was reduced upon PCGF2 co-expression. In addition, UBE2I-mediated sumoylation of PML-RARA was reduced upon PCGF2 co-expression and PCGF2-UBE2I interaction was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. Likewise, endogenous PCGF2-UBE2I interaction was detected by co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence assays in NB4 cells. Intriguingly, upon ATO-treatment, such interaction was disrupted and UBE2I was co-immunoprecipitated or co-localized with its SUMO substrate, PML-RARA. Taken together, our results suggested a novel role of PCGF2 in ATO-mediated degradation of PML-RARA that PCGF2 might act as a negative regulator of UBE2I via direct interaction. PMID:27030546

  18. CD40 expression in Wehi-164 cell line

    PubMed Central

    Ebadi, Padideh; Pourfathollah, Ali Akbar; Soheili, Zahra Soheila; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    CD40-CD154 interaction is an important process for cellular and humoral immunity regulation and can be effective in the body’s defense against tumors. In the present study, we evaluated the expression of CD40 in Wehi-164 cell line. CD40 expressions on the cell surface and in the cytoplasm were assessed by flow cytometry and intracellular staining assay, respectively. Also, the mRNA expression was identified by real time-PCR. The obtained results showed the high mRNA and cytoplasmic protein expression of CD40 but no surface expression. These results suggest that the Wehi-164 cell line down regulates expression of CD40 on the surface for evasion of immune system. PMID:20496113

  19. Molecular Background of Estrogen Receptor Gene Expression in Endometriotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Masao; Taniguchi, Fuminori; Harada, Tasuku

    2016-07-01

    The molecular background of estrogen receptor (ER) expression is important to understand the pathophysiology of the high estrogen environment in endometriosis. However, the molecular details have not been fully understood. The objective of this study is to evaluate the molecular background of ERα and ERβ messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in endometriotic cells. The following summarizes our observations: (1) ERα mRNA expression in endometriotic cells was estimated to be approximately one-tenth of that in endometrial cells. (2) Three mRNAs, which include 3 different 5'-untranslated exons tagged to an open reading frame of wild-type ERα, were detected. (3) Expression of ERβ mRNA depends mostly on 0N promoter and includes 2 open reading frames: one for a wild-type ERβ1 and another for a splice variant ERβ2. (4) Expression of ERβ1 mRNA was approximately 40-fold higher than that in endometrial cells. (5) Expression of ERβ2 mRNA was almost at a comparable level of the ERβ1. 9 (6) ERα and ERβ mRNAs are equivalently expressed in endometriotic cells. These observations show the molecular background of ER mRNA expression in endometriotic cells and provide a clue to further understanding the estrogen-dependent pathophysiology leading to clinical application in endometriosis. PMID:26704524

  20. Cyclin Dl expression in B-cell non Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Aref, Salah; Mossad, Y; El-Khodary, T; Awad, M; El-Shahat, E

    2006-10-01

    Disorders of the cell cycle regulatory machinery play a key role in the pathogenesis of cancer. Over-expression of cyclin D1 protein has been reported in several solid tumors and certain lymphoid malignancies, but little is known about the effect of its expression on clinical behavior and outcome in B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In this study, we investigated the expression of cyclin Dl in group of patients with NHL and correlated the results with the clinical and laboratory data. The degree of expression of cyclin Dl protein was evaluated by flow cytometry in a group of NHL patients (n = 46) and in normal control group (n = 10). Cyclin Dl over expression was detected in 10 out of 46 (21.7%) patients; they were 5/5-mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) (100%) and 5/28 large B-cell lymphoma (17.8%). All other NHL subtypes showed normal cyclin D1 expression. The clinical signs (hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and B-symptoms, clinical staging) and laboratory data (hemoglobin, white cell count (WBCs), platelet count, and bone marrow infiltration) were not significantly different between NHL subgroup with cyclin Dl over expression and that with normal cyclin Dl expression. Serum lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) levels and lymphadenopathy were significantly higher in NHL group with cyclin D1 over expression as compared to those without. Also, cyclin D1 over expression is associated with poor outcome of NHL patients. Cyclin Dl over expression was evident among all cases of MCL and few cases of large B-cell lymphoma. Cyclin Dl over expression might be used as adjuvant tool for diagnosis of MCL; has role in NHL biology and is bad prognostic index in NHL. PMID:17607588

  1. Expression of MIF and CD74 in leukemic cell lines: correlation to DR expression destiny.

    PubMed

    Georgouli, Mirella; Papadimitriou, Lina; Glymenaki, Maria; Patsaki, Valia; Athanassakis, Irene

    2016-06-01

    Invariant chain (Ii) or CD74 is a non-polymorphic glycoprotein, which apart from its role as a chaperone dedicated to MHCII molecules, is known to be a high-affinity receptor for macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). The present study aimed to define the roles of CD74 and MIF in the immune surveillance escape process. Towards this direction, the cell lines HL-60, Raji, K562 and primary pre-B leukemic cells were examined for expression and secretion of MIF. Flow cytometry analysis detected high levels of MIF and intracellular/membrane CD74 expression in all leukemic cells tested, while MIF secretion was shown to be inversely proportional to intracellular HLA-DR (DR) expression. In the MHCII-negative cells, IFN-γ increased MIF expression and induced its secretion in HL-60 and K562 cells, respectively. In K562 cells, CD74 (Iip33Iip35) was shown to co-precipitate with HLA-DOβ (DOβ), inhibiting thus MIF or DR binding. Induced expression of DOα in K562 (DOα-DOβ+) cells in different transfection combinations decreased MIF expression and secretion, while increasing surface DR expression. Thus, MIF could indeed be part of the antigen presentation process. PMID:26866879

  2. Flavonoids inhibit the platelet TxA2 signalling pathway and antagonize TxA2 receptors (TP) in platelets and smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, José A; Navarro-Nuñez, Leyre; Lozano, María L; Martínez, Constantino; Vicente, Vicente; Gibbins, Jonathan M; Rivera, José

    2007-01-01

    What is already known about this subject Flavonoids are largely recognized as potential inhibitors of platelet function, through nonspecific mechanisms such as antioxidant activity and/or inhibition of several enzymes and signalling proteins. In addition, we, and few others, have shown that certain antiaggregant flavonoids may behave as specific TXA2 receptor (TP) ligands in platelets. Whether flavonoids interact with TP isoforms in other cell types is not known, and direct evidence that flavonoid–TP interaction inhibits signalling downstream TP has not been shown. What this study adds This study first demonstrates that certain flavonoids behave as ligands for both TP isoforms, not only in platelets, but also in human myometrium and in TP-transfected HEK 293T cells. Differences in the effect of certain flavonoids in platelet signalling, induced by either U46619 or thrombin, suggest that abrogation of downstream TP signalling is related to their specific blockage of the TP, rather than to a nonspecific effect on tyrosine kinases or other signalling proteins. Aims Flavonoids may affect platelet function by several mechanisms, including antagonism of TxA2 receptors (TP). These TP are present in many tissues and modulate different signalling cascades. We explored whether flavonoids affect platelet TP signalling, and if they bind to TP expressed in other cell types. Methods Platelets were treated with flavonoids, or other selected inhibitors, and then stimulated with U46619. Similar assays were performed in aspirinized platelets activated with thrombin. Effects on calcium release were analysed by fluorometry and changes in whole protein tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of ERK 1/2 by Western blot analysis. The binding of flavonoids to TP in platelets, human myometrium and TPα- and TPβ-transfected HEK 293T cells was explored using binding assays and the TP antagonist 3H-SQ29548. Results Apigenin, genistein, luteolin and quercetin impaired U46619-induced calcium

  3. Biased Allelic Expression in Human Primary Fibroblast Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Christelle; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Santoni, Federico; Delaneau, Olivier; Fort, Alexandre; Popadin, Konstantin Y.; Garieri, Marco; Falconnet, Emilie; Ribaux, Pascale; Guipponi, Michel; Padioleau, Ismael; Carninci, Piero; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.

    2015-01-01

    The study of gene expression in mammalian single cells via genomic technologies now provides the possibility to investigate the patterns of allelic gene expression. We used single-cell RNA sequencing to detect the allele-specific mRNA level in 203 single human primary fibroblasts over 133,633 unique heterozygous single-nucleotide variants (hetSNVs). We observed that at the snapshot of analyses, each cell contained mostly transcripts from one allele from the majority of genes; indeed, 76.4% of the hetSNVs displayed stochastic monoallelic expression in single cells. Remarkably, adjacent hetSNVs exhibited a haplotype-consistent allelic ratio; in contrast, distant sites located in two different genes were independent of the haplotype structure. Moreover, the allele-specific expression in single cells correlated with the abundance of the cellular transcript. We observed that genes expressing both alleles in the majority of the single cells at a given time point were rare and enriched with highly expressed genes. The relative abundance of each allele in a cell was controlled by some regulatory mechanisms given that we observed related single-cell allelic profiles according to genes. Overall, these results have direct implications in cellular phenotypic variability. PMID:25557783

  4. Optimizing transient recombinant protein expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Ralph F; Wall, Vanessa E; Esposito, Dominic

    2012-01-01

    Transient gene expression (TGE) in mammalian cells has become a routine process for expressing recombinant proteins in cell lines such as human embryonic kidney 293 and Chinese hamster ovary cells. The rapidly increasing need for recombinant proteins requires further improvements in TGE technology. While a great deal of focus has been directed toward optimizing the secretion of antibodies and other naturally secreted targets, much less work has been done on ways to improve cytoplasmic expression in mammalian cells. The benefits to protein production in mammalian cells, particularly for eukaryotic proteins, should be very significant - glycosylation and other posttranslational modifications will likely be native or near-native, solubility and protein folding would likely improve overexpression in heterologous hosts, and expression of proteins in their proper intracellular compartments is much more likely to occur. Improvements in this area have been slow, however, due to limited development of the cell culture processes needed for low-cost, higher-throughput expression in mammalian cells, and the relatively low diversity of DNA vectors for protein production in these systems. Here, we describe how the use of recombinational cloning, coupled with improvements in transfection protocols which increase speed and lower cost, can be combined to make mammalian cells much more amenable for routine recombinant protein expression. PMID:21987258

  5. Evidence of tricellulin expression by immune cells, particularly microglia.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Cibelle; Silva, Sandra Leitão; Pereira, Pedro; Fernandes, Adelaide; Brites, Dora; Brito, Maria A

    2011-06-17

    Tight junctions (TJs) are elaborate structures located on the apical region of epithelial cells that limit paracellular permeability. Tricellulin is a recently discovered TJ protein, which is concentrated at the structurally specialized tricellular TJs but also present at bicellular contacts between epithelial cells, namely in the stomach. Interestingly, several TJ proteins have been found in other than epithelial cells, as astrocytes, and tricellulin mRNA expression was reported in mature dendritic cells. These findings prompted us to look for tricellulin expression in both epithelial and immune cells in the stomach, as well as in microglia, the brain resident immunocompetent cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of human stomach tissue sections revealed peroxidase staining at three-corner contact sites, as well as at the contact between two adjacent epithelial cells, thus evidencing the expression of tricellulin not only at tricellullar but at bicellular junctions as well. Such analysis, further revealed tricellulin immunostaining in cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage, scattered throughout the lamina propria. Cultured rat microglia exhibited a notorious tricellulin staining, consistent with an extensive expression of the protein along the cell, which was not absolutely coincident with the lysosomal marker CD68. Detection of mRNA expression by real-time PCR provided supportive evidence for the expression of the TJ protein in microglia. These data demonstrate for the first time that microglia express a TJ protein. Moreover, the expression of tricellulin both in microglia and in the stomach immune cells point to a possible role of this new TJ protein in the immune system. PMID:21624353

  6. Long none coding RNA HOTTIP/HOXA13 act as synergistic role by decreasing cell migration and proliferation in Hirschsprung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Hua; Zhu, Dongmei; Xu, Cao; Zhu, Hairong; Chen, Pingfa; Li, Hongxing; Liu, Xiang; Xia, Yankai; Tang, Weibing

    2015-08-07

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been confirmed to be associated with various human diseases. However, whether they are associated with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) progression remains unclear. In this study, we designed the experiment to explore the relationship between lncRNA HOTTIP and HOXA13, and their pathogenicity to HSCR. Quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot were performed to detect the levels of lncRNA, mRNAs, and proteins in colon tissues from 79 patients with HSCR and 79 controls. Small RNA interference transfection was used to study the function experiments in human 293T and SK-N-BE cell lines. The cell viability and activities were detected by the transwell assays, CCK8 assay, and flow cytometry, respectively. LncRNA HOTTIP and HOXA13 were significantly down-regulated in HSCR compared to the controls. Meanwhile, the declined extent of their expression levels makes sense between two main phenotype of HSCR. SiRNA-mediated knock-down of HOTTIP or HOXA13 correlated with decreased levels of each other and both reduced the cell migration and proliferation without affecting cell apoptosis or cell cycle. Our study demonstrates that aberrant reduction of HOTTIP and HOXA13, which have a bidirectional regulatory loop, may play an important role in the pathogenesis of HSCR. - Highlights: • LncRNA HOTTIP and HOXA13 are both down-regulated in HSCR. • HOTTIP and HOXA13 can regulate each other in 293T and SK-N-BE(2) cell lines. • Both HOTTIP and HOXA13 can decrease cell migration and proliferation.

  7. Regulated expression of erythropoietin by two human hepatoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, M.A.; Glass, G.A.; Cunningham, J.M.; Bunn, H.F.

    1987-11-01

    The development of a cell culture system that produces erythropoietin (Epo) in a regulated manner has been the focus of much effort. The authors have screened multiple renal and hepatic cell lines for either constitutive or regulated expression of Epo. Only the human hepatoma cell lines, Hep3B and HepG2, made significant amounts of Epo as measured both by radioimmunoassay and in vitro bioassay (as much as 330 milliunits per 10/sup 6/ cells in 24 hr). The constitutive production of Epo increased dramatically as a function of cell density in both cell lines. At cell densities < 3.3 x 10/sup 5/ cells per cm/sup 2/, there was little constitutive release of Epo in the medium. With Hep3B cells grown at low cell densities, a mean 18-fold increase in Epo expression was seen in response to hypoxia and a 6-fold increase was observed in response to incubation in medium containing 50 ..mu..M cobalt(II) chloride. At similar low cell densities, Epo production in HepG2 cells could be enhanced an average of about 3-fold by stimulation with either hypoxia or cobalt(II) chloride. Upon such stimulation, both cell lines demonstrated markedly elevated levels of Epo mRNA. Hence, both Hep3B and HepG2 cell lines provide an excellent in vitro system in which to study the physiological regulation of Epo expression.

  8. Generation of new peptide-Fc fusion proteins that mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against different types of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sioud, Mouldy; Westby, Phuong; Olsen, Julie Kristine E.; Mobergslien, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), a key effector function for the clinical effectiveness of monoclonal antibodies, is triggered by the engagement of the antibody Fc domain with the Fcγ receptors expressed by innate immune cells such as natural killer (NK) cells and macrophages. Here, we fused cancer cell-binding peptides to the Fc domain of human IgG1 to engineer novel peptide-Fc fusion proteins with ADCC activity. The designed fusion proteins were expressed in human embryonic kidney 293T cells, followed by purification and characterization by western blots. One of the engineered variants (WN-Fc), bound with high affinity to a wide range of solid tumor cell lines (e.g., colon, lung, prostate, skin, ovarian, and mammary tumors). Treatment of cancer cells with the engineered peptide-Fc fusions in the presence of effector NK cells potentially enhanced cytotoxicity, degranulation, and interferon-γ production by NK cells when compared to cells treated with the Fc control. The presence of competing peptides inhibited NK cell activation. Furthermore, a bispecific peptide-Fc fusion protein activated NK cells against HER-1- and/or HER-2-expressing cancer cells. Collectively, the engineered peptide-Fc fusions constitute a new promising strategy to recruit and activate NK cells against tumor cells, a primary goal of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26605373

  9. Gene expression promoted by the SV40 DNA targeting sequence and the hypoxia-responsive element under normoxia and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Sacramento, C B; Moraes, J Z; Denapolis, P M A; Han, S W

    2010-08-01

    The main objective of the present study was to find suitable DNA-targeting sequences (DTS) for the construction of plasmid vectors to be used to treat ischemic diseases. The well-known Simian virus 40 nuclear DTS (SV40-DTS) and hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) sequences were used to construct plasmid vectors to express the human vascular endothelial growth factor gene (hVEGF). The rate of plasmid nuclear transport and consequent gene expression under normoxia (20% O2) and hypoxia (less than 5% O2) were determined. Plasmids containing the SV40-DTS or HRE sequences were constructed and used to transfect the A293T cell line (a human embryonic kidney cell line) in vitro and mouse skeletal muscle cells in vivo. Plasmid transport to the nucleus was monitored by real-time PCR, and the expression level of the hVEGF gene was measured by ELISA. The in vitro nuclear transport efficiency of the SV40-DTS plasmid was about 50% lower under hypoxia, while the HRE plasmid was about 50% higher under hypoxia. Quantitation of reporter gene expression in vitro and in vivo, under hypoxia and normoxia, confirmed that the SV40-DTS plasmid functioned better under normoxia, while the HRE plasmid was superior under hypoxia. These results indicate that the efficiency of gene expression by plasmids containing DNA binding sequences is affected by the concentration of oxygen in the medium. PMID:20640386

  10. Expression of Secretogranin III in Chicken Endocrine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morikawa, Satomi; Shinmura, Naoki; Moki, Hiroaki; Yasui, Tadashi; Tsukise, Azuma; Torii, Seiji; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Maeda, Yoshinori; Hosaka, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    The expression of secretogranin III (SgIII) in chicken endocrine cells has not been investigated. There is limited data available for the immunohistochemical localization of SgIII in the brain, pituitary, and pancreatic islets of humans and rodents. In the present study, we used immunoblotting to reveal the similarities between the expression patterns of SgIII in the common endocrine glands of chickens and rats. The protein–protein interactions between SgIII and chromogranin A (CgA) mediate the sorting of CgA/prohormone core aggregates to the secretory granule membrane. We examined these interactions using co-immunoprecipitation in chicken endocrine tissues. Using immunohistochemistry, we also examined the expression of SgIII in a wide range of chicken endocrine glands and gastrointestinal endocrine cells (GECs). SgIII was expressed in the pituitary, pineal, adrenal (medullary parts), parathyroid, and ultimobranchial glands, but not in the thyroid gland. It was also expressed in GECs of the stomach (proventriculus and gizzard), small and large intestines, and pancreatic islet cells. These SgIII-expressing cells co-expressed serotonin, somatostatin, gastric inhibitory polypeptide, glucagon-like peptide-1, glucagon, or insulin. These results suggest that SgIII is expressed in the endocrine cells that secrete peptide hormones, which mature via the intragranular enzymatic processing of prohormones and physiologically active amines in chickens. PMID:25673289

  11. SNORD116 and SNORD115 change expression of multiple genes and modify each other's activity.

    PubMed

    Falaleeva, Marina; Surface, Justin; Shen, Manli; de la Grange, Pierre; Stamm, Stefan

    2015-11-10

    The loss of two gene clusters encoding small nucleolar RNAs, SNORD115 and SNORD116 contribute to Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), the most common syndromic form of obesity in humans. SNORD115 and SNORD116 are considered to be orphan C/D box snoRNAs (SNORDs) as they do not target rRNAs or snRNAs. SNORD115 exhibits sequence complementarity towards the serotonin receptor 2C, but SNORD116 shows no extended complementarities to known RNAs. To identify molecular targets, we performed genome-wide array analysis after overexpressing SNORD115 and SNORD116 in HEK 293T cells, either alone or together. We found that SNORD116 changes the expression of over 200 genes. SNORD116 mainly changed mRNA expression levels. Surprisingly, we found that SNORD115 changes SNORD116's influence on gene expression. In similar experiments, we compared gene expression in post-mortem hypothalamus between individuals with PWS and aged-matched controls. The synopsis of these experiments resulted in 23 genes whose expression levels were influenced by SNORD116. Together our results indicate that SNORD115 and SNORD116 influence expression levels of multiple genes and modify each other activity. PMID:26220404

  12. Regulation of global gene expression and cell proliferation by APP.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yili; Zhang, Si; Xu, Qin; Zou, Haiyan; Zhou, Weihui; Cai, Fang; Li, Tingyu; Song, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), caused by trisomy of chromosome 21, is one of the most common genetic disorders. Patients with DS display growth retardation and inevitably develop characteristic Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology, including neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques. The expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) is increased in both DS and AD patients. To reveal the function of APP and elucidate the pathogenic role of increased APP expression in DS and AD, we performed gene expression profiling using microarray method in human cells overexpressing APP. A set of genes are significantly altered, which are involved in cell cycle, cell proliferation and p53 signaling. We found that overexpression of APP inhibits cell proliferation. Furthermore, we confirmed that the downregulation of two validated genes, PSMA5 and PSMB7, inhibits cell proliferation, suggesting that the downregulation of PSMA5 and PSMB7 is involved in APP-induced cell proliferation impairment. Taken together, this study suggests that APP regulates global gene expression and increased APP expression inhibits cell proliferation. Our study provides a novel insight that APP overexpression may contribute to the growth impairment in DS patients and promote AD pathogenesis by inhibiting cell proliferation including neural stem cell proliferation and neurogenesis. PMID:26936520

  13. Regulation of global gene expression and cell proliferation by APP

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yili; Zhang, Si; Xu, Qin; Zou, Haiyan; Zhou, Weihui; Cai, Fang; Li, Tingyu; Song, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), caused by trisomy of chromosome 21, is one of the most common genetic disorders. Patients with DS display growth retardation and inevitably develop characteristic Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neuropathology, including neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques. The expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) is increased in both DS and AD patients. To reveal the function of APP and elucidate the pathogenic role of increased APP expression in DS and AD, we performed gene expression profiling using microarray method in human cells overexpressing APP. A set of genes are significantly altered, which are involved in cell cycle, cell proliferation and p53 signaling. We found that overexpression of APP inhibits cell proliferation. Furthermore, we confirmed that the downregulation of two validated genes, PSMA5 and PSMB7, inhibits cell proliferation, suggesting that the downregulation of PSMA5 and PSMB7 is involved in APP-induced cell proliferation impairment. Taken together, this study suggests that APP regulates global gene expression and increased APP expression inhibits cell proliferation. Our study provides a novel insight that APP overexpression may contribute to the growth impairment in DS patients and promote AD pathogenesis by inhibiting cell proliferation including neural stem cell proliferation and neurogenesis. PMID:26936520

  14. Expression Profiling of Developing Zebrafish Retinal Cells.

    PubMed

    Mullally, Madelyn; Albrecht, Caitlin; Horton, Mary; Laboissonniere, Lauren A; Goetz, Jillian J; Chowdhury, Rebecca; Manning, Alicia; Wester, Andrea K; Bose, Quinton; Trimarchi, Jeffrey M

    2016-08-01

    During retinal development, a variety of different types of neurons are produced. Understanding how each of these types of retinal nerve cells is generated is important from a developmental biology perspective. It is equally important if one is interested in how to regenerate cells after an injury or a disease. To gain more insight into how retinal neurons develop in the zebrafish, we performed single-cell mRNA profiling and in situ hybridizations (ISHs) on retinal sections and whole-mount zebrafish. Through the series of ISHs, designed and performed solely by undergraduate students in the laboratory, we were able to retrospectively identify our single-cell mRNA profiles as most likely coming from developing amacrine cells. Further analysis of these profiles will reveal genes that can be mutated using genome editing techniques. Together these studies increase our knowledge of the genes driving development of different cell types in the zebrafish retina. PMID:26982811

  15. ALDH isozymes downregulation affects cell growth, cell motility and gene expression in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreb, Jan S; Baker, Henry V; Chang, Lung-Ji; Amaya, Maria; Lopez, M Cecilia; Ostmark, Blanca; Chou, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Background Aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 are highly expressed in non small cell lung cancer. Neither the mechanisms nor the biologic significance for such over expression have been studied. Methods We have employed oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze changes in gene profiles in A549 lung cancer cell line in which ALDH activity was reduced by up to 95% using lentiviral mediated expression of siRNA against both isozymes (Lenti 1+3). Stringent analysis methods were used to identify gene expression patterns that are specific to the knock down of ALDH activity and significantly different in comparison to wild type A549 cells (WT) or cells similarly transduced with green fluorescent protein (GFP) siRNA. Results We confirmed significant and specific down regulation of ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 in Lenti 1+3 cells and in comparison to 12 other ALDH genes detected. The results of the microarray analysis were validated by real time RT-PCR on RNA obtained from Lenti 1+3 or WT cells treated with ALDH activity inhibitors. Detailed functional analysis was performed on 101 genes that were significantly different (P < 0.001) and their expression changed by ≥ 2 folds in the Lenti 1+3 group versus the control groups. There were 75 down regulated and 26 up regulated genes. Protein binding, organ development, signal transduction, transcription, lipid metabolism, and cell migration and adhesion were among the most affected pathways. Conclusion These molecular effects of the ALDH knock-down are associated with in vitro functional changes in the proliferation and motility of these cells and demonstrate the significance of ALDH enzymes in cell homeostasis with a potentially significant impact on the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:19025616

  16. Engineering Cells to Improve Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Su; Shiloach, Joseph; Betenbaugh, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular engineering of bacteria, fungi, insect cells and mammalian cells is a promising methodology to improve recombinant protein production for structural, biochemical, and commercial applications. Increased understanding of the host organism biology has suggested engineering strategies targeting bottlenecks in transcription, translation, protein processing and secretory pathways, as well as cell growth and survival. A combination of metabolic engineering and synthetic biology has been used to improve the properties of cells for protein production, which has resulted in enhanced yields of multiple protein classes. PMID:24704806

  17. Over-expression of secreted proteins from mammalian cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Annamarie C; Barton, William A

    2014-01-01

    Secreted mammalian proteins require the development of robust protein over-expression systems for crystallographic and biophysical studies of protein function. Due to complex disulfide bonds and distinct glycosylation patterns preventing folding and expression in prokaryotic expression hosts, many secreted proteins necessitate production in more complex eukaryotic expression systems. Here, we elaborate on the methods used to obtain high yields of purified secreted proteins from transiently or stably transfected mammalian cell lines. Among the issues discussed are the selection of appropriate expression vectors, choice of signal sequences for protein secretion, availability of fusion tags for enhancing protein stability and purification, choice of cell line, and the large-scale growth of cells in a variety of formats. PMID:24510886

  18. Development of a recombinant antibody to target peptides and proteins to sialoadhesin-expressing macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sialoadhesin (Sn)-expressing monocytes/macrophages have been associated with several diseases like inflammatory and autoimmune disorders as well as viral infections, and they also appear to play a role in the initiation of an adaptive immune response. This makes Sn-expressing cells not only attractive targets for cell-directed therapies, but also an appealing target for vaccination. Furthermore, since Sn was shown to be an endocytic receptor, the conjugation of effector molecules to an Sn-specific ligand should allow intracellular delivery of these conjugates. Previously, we developed functional Sn-specific immunoconjugates that were generated via chemical coupling. Although successful, the system requires significant optimization for each immunoconjugate to be made. To generate a more flexible and controlled system, we developed a recombinant antibody vector allowing the creation of genetic antibody fusion constructs. This paper reports on the characterization of the recombinant antibody and the evaluation of its use for Sn-directed targeting. Results The variable domains of the porcine Sn-specific monoclonal antibody 41D3 were sequenced and cloned in frame with a mouse IgG1 backbone. Transfection of HEK293T cells with the resulting plasmid led to the secretion of fully assembled IgG into the culture medium. This recombinant antibody rec41D3 was shown to specifically bind to porcine Sn with a comparable affinity as the native monoclonal antibody. In addition, rec41D3 also induced Sn endocytosis in primary macrophages and resided for prolonged times in early/late endosomes. To allow the generation of antibody fusion constructs, a multiple cloning site was introduced at the C-terminus of the heavy chain. Two fusion constructs were generated, one containing a V5 peptide tag and one containing an eGFP molecule. Both constructs were shown to be efficiently produced in HEK293T cells and easily purified using standard protein G chromatography. In addition

  19. Analysis of variation of amplitudes in cell cycle gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Delong; Gaido, Kevin W; Wolfinger, Russ

    2005-01-01

    Background Variation in gene expression among cells in a population is often considered as noise produced from gene transcription and post-transcription processes and experimental artifacts. Most studies on noise in gene expression have emphasized a few well-characterized genes and proteins. We investigated whether different cell-arresting methods have impacts on the maximum expression levels (amplitudes) of a cell cycle related gene. Results By introducing random noise, modeled by a von Mises distribution, to the phase angle in a sinusoidal model in a cell population, we derived a relationship between amplitude and the distribution of noise in maximum transcription time (phase). We applied our analysis to Whitfield's HeLa cell cycle data. Our analysis suggests that among 47 cell cycle related genes common to the 2nd experiment (thymidine-thymidine method) and the 4th experiment (thymidine-nocodazole method): (i) the amplitudes of CDC6 and PCNA, which are expressed during G1/S phase, are smaller in the 2nd experiment than in the 4th, while the amplitude of CDC20, which is expressed during G2/M phase, is smaller in the 4th experiment; and (ii) the two cell-arresting methods had little impact on the amplitudes of the other 43 genes in the 2nd and 4th experiments. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that procedures that arrest cells in different stages of the cell cycle differentially affect expression of some cell cycle related genes once the cells are released from arrest. The impact of the cell-arresting method on expression of a cell cycle related gene can be quantitatively estimated from the ratio of two estimated amplitudes in two experiments. The ratio can be used to gauge the variation in the phase/peak expression time distribution involved in stochastic transcription and post-transcriptional processes for the gene. Further investigations are needed using normal, unperturbed and synchronized HeLa cells as a reference to compare how many cell cycle related genes

  20. Protein kinase B/Akt1 inhibits autophagy by down-regulating UVRAG expression

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wonseok; Ju, Ji-hyun; Lee, Kyung-min; Nam, KeeSoo; Oh, Sunhwa; Shin, Incheol

    2013-02-01

    Autophagy, or autophagocytosis, is a selective intracellular degradative process involving the cell's own lysosomal apparatus. An essential component in cell development, homeostasis, repair and resistance to stress, autophagy may result in either cell death or survival. The targeted region of the cell is sequestered within a membrane structure, the autophagosome, for regulation of the catabolic process. A key factor in both autophagosome formation and autophagosome maturation is a protein encoded by the ultraviolet irradiation resistance-associated gene (UVRAG). Conversely, the serine/threonine-specific protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt), which regulates survival in various cancers, inhibits autophagy through mTOR activation. We found that Akt1 may also directly inhibit autophagy by down-regulating UVRAG both in a 293T transient transfection system and breast cancer cells stably expressing Akt1. The UVRAG with mutations at putative Akt1-phosphorylation sites were still inhibited by Akt1, and dominant-negative Akt1 also inhibited UVRAG expression, suggesting that Akt1 down-regulates UVRAG by a kinase activity-independent mechanism. We showed that Akt1 overexpression in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells down-regulated UVRAG transcription. Cells over-expressing Akt1 were more resistant than control cells to ultraviolet light-induced autophagy and exhibited the associated reduction in cell viability. Levels of the autophagosome indicator protein LC3B-II and mRFP-GFP-LC3 were reduced in cells that over-expressing Akt1. Inhibiting Akt1 by siRNA or reintroducing UVRAG gene rescued the level of LC3B-II in UV-irradiation. Altogether, these data suggest that Akt1 may inhibit autophagy by decreasing UVRAG expression, which also sensitizes cancer cells to UV irradiation.

  1. Langerhans' cell expression of the selectin ligand, sialyl Lewis x.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, E L; Barker, J N; Allen, M H; Chu, A C; Groves, R W; MacDonald, D M

    1994-01-01

    Cellular adhesion molecules play a central role in leucocyte migration through peripheral blood and tissues. A crucial stage in these events in selectin-mediated adhesion involving E-selectin expressed on activated endothelium interacting with a range of carbohydrate ligands expressed by specific subpopulations of leucocytes. As such mechanisms may be relevant to bone marrow-derived dendritic epidermal Langerhans' cell (LC) migration, expression of these carbohydrate ligands was assessed immunocytochemically in whole skin biopsies and in epidermal cell suspensions obtained from adult humans. Double-labelling experiments revealed that sialyl Lewis x, recognized by the monoclonal antibody CSLEX1, was expressed on epidermal LC (n = 9). Furthermore, expression was enhanced at 24 hr following epicutaneous application of antigen and in the inflammatory disorder psoriasis (n = 10). E-selectin was concomitantly strongly expressed on dermal endothelium in psoriasis and allergic contact dermatitis. Intradermal injection of the T-cell-derived cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) led to increased LC expression of sialyl Lewis x. In epidermal cell suspensions, in contrast to keratinocytes, CD1a+ cells expressed sialyl Lewis x, intensity of which was enhanced after 4 days in culture. CSLEX1 staining could be abolished and CD15 (non-sialated Lewis x) expression induced by saponification and treatment with neuraminidase. Expression of other selectin ligands was also examined. While the cutaneous lymphocyte antigen defined by the monoclonal antibody HECA-452 reacted with a small minority of LC, sialyl Lewis a and sulphatide were not expressed under any experimental conditions. These studies indicate that E-selectin-sialyl Lewis x interactions are potentially important in LC migration, both into and out of skin. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7512530

  2. Ectopic ERK Expression Induces Phenotypic Conversion of C10 Cells and Alters DNA Methyltransferase Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2012-05-04

    In some model systems constitutive extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) activation is sufficient to promote an oncogenic phenotype. Here we investigate whether constitutive ERK expression influences phenotypic conversion in murine C10 type II alveolar epithelial cells. C10 cells were stably transduced with an ERK1-green fluorescent protein (ERK1-GFP) chimera or empty vector and ectopic ERK expression was associated with the acquisition of soft agar focus-forming potential in late passage, but not early passage cells. Late passage ERK1-GFP cells exhibited a significant increase in the expression of DNA methyl transferases (DNMT1 and 3b) and a marked increase in sensitivity to 5-azacytidine (5-azaC)-mediated toxicity, relative to early passage ERK1-GFP cells and vector controls. The expression of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA) and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) were significantly increased in late passage cells, suggesting enhanced DNA damage recognition and repair activity which we interpret as a reflection of genomic instability. Phospho-ERK levels were dramatically decreased in late passage ERK1-GFP cells, relative to early passage and vector controls, and phospho-ERK levels were restored by treatment with sodium orthovanadate, indicating a role for phosphatase activity in this response. Collectively these observations suggest that ectopic ERK expression promotes phenotypic conversion of C10 cells that is associated with latent effects on epigenetic programming and phosphatase activities.

  3. An Exercise to Estimate Differential Gene Expression in Human Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaudhry, M. Ahmad

    2006-01-01

    The expression of genes in cells of various tissue types varies considerably and is correlated with the function of a particular organ. The pattern of gene expression changes in diseased tissues, in response to therapy or infection and exposure to environmental mutagens, chemicals, ultraviolet light, and ionizing radiation. To better understand…

  4. Behavioral experience induces zif268 expression in mature granule cells but suppresses its expression in immature granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Huckleberry, Kylie A.; Kane, Gary A.; Mathis, Rita J.; Cook, Sarah G.; Clutton, Jonathan E.; Drew, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of neurons are born each day in the dentate gyrus (DG), but many of these cells die before reaching maturity. Both death and survival of adult-born neurons are regulated by neuronal activity in the DG. The immediate-early gene (IEG) zif268 appears to be an important mediator of these effects, as its expression can be induced by neural activity and knockout of zif268 impairs survival of adult-born neurons (Richardson et al., 1992; Veyrac et al., 2013). Despite the apparent importance of zif268 for adult neurogenesis, its behavior-induced expression has not been fully characterized in adult-born neurons. Here we characterize behavior-evoked expression of zif268 in mature and newborn dentate granule cells (DGCs). We first quantified zif268 expression in doublecortin-positive (DCX+) immature neurons and in the general granule cell population after brief exposure to a novel environment (NE). In the general granule cell population, zif268 expression peaked 1 h after NE exposure and returned to baseline by 8 h post-exposure. However, in the DCX+ cells, zif268 expression was suppressed relative to home cage for at least 8 h post-exposure. We next asked whether suppression of zif268 in DCX+ immature cells occurs in other behavioral paradigms that recruit the hippocampus. Exposure to Morris water maze (MWM) training, an enriched environment, or a NE caused approximately equal suppression of zif268 expression in DCX+ cells and approximately equal activation of zif268 expression among the general granule cell population. The same behavioral procedures activated zif268 expression in 6-week-old BrdU-labeled adult-born neurons, indicating that zif268 suppression is specific to immature neurons. Finally, we asked whether zif268 suppression varied as a function of age within the DCX+ population, which ranges in age from 0 to approximately 4 weeks. NE exposure had no significant effect on zif268 expression in 2- or 4-week-old BrdU-labeled neurons, but it significantly

  5. Neurogenin 3 Expressing Cells in the Human Exocrine Pancreas Have the Capacity for Endocrine Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Danielle L.; O’Driscoll, Marci; Sheets, Timothy P.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Oberholzer, Jose; McGarrigle, James J.; Shamblott, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenin 3 (NGN3) is necessary and sufficient for endocrine differentiation during pancreatic development and is expressed by a population of progenitor cells that give rise exclusively to hormone-secreting cells within islets. NGN3 protein can be detected in the adult rodent pancreas only following certain types of injury, when it is transiently expressed by exocrine cells undergoing reprogramming to an endocrine cell fate. Here, NGN3 protein can be detected in 2% of acinar and duct cells in living biopsies of histologically normal adult human pancreata and 10% in cadaveric biopsies of organ donor pancreata. The percentage and total number of NGN3+ cells increase during culture without evidence of proliferation or selective cell death. Isolation of highly purified and viable NGN3+ cell populations can be achieved based on coexpression of the cell surface glycoprotein CD133. Transcriptome and targeted expression analyses of isolated CD133+ / NGN3+ cells indicate that they are distinct from surrounding exocrine tissue with respect to expression phenotype and Notch signaling activity, but retain high level mRNA expression of genes indicative of acinar and duct cell function. NGN3+ cells have an mRNA expression profile that resembles that of mouse early endocrine progenitor cells. During in vitro differentiation, NGN3+ cells express genes in a pattern characteristic of endocrine development and result in cells that resemble beta cells on the basis of coexpression of insulin C-peptide, chromogranin A and pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1. NGN3 expression in the adult human exocrine pancreas marks a dedifferentiating cell population with the capacity to take on an endocrine cell fate. These cells represent a potential source for the treatment of diabetes either through ex vivo manipulation, or in vivo by targeting mechanisms controlling their population size and endocrine cell fate commitment. PMID:26288179

  6. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, L.O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, B.E.

    1998-10-13

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol. 13 figs.

  7. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous gene

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2007-03-20

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  8. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  9. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2000-08-22

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  10. Abnormally high expression of proteasomes in human leukemic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kumatori, A; Tanaka, K; Inamura, N; Sone, S; Ogura, T; Matsumoto, T; Tachikawa, T; Shin, S; Ichihara, A

    1990-01-01

    Proteasomes are eukaryotic ring-shaped or cylindrical particles with multicatalytic protease activities. To clarify the involvement of proteasomes in tumorigenesis of human blood cells, we compared their expression in human hematopoietic malignant tumor cells with that in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Immunohistochemical staining showed considerably increased concentrations of proteasomes in leukemic cells from the bone marrow of patients with various types of leukemia and the predominant localization of these proteasomes in the nuclei. Moreover, enzyme immunoassay and Northern blot analysis indicated that the concentrations of proteasomes and their mRNA levels were consistently much higher in a variety of malignant human hematopoietic cell lines than in resting peripheral lymphocytes and monocytes from healthy adults. Proteasome expression was also greatly increased in normal blood mononuclear cells during blastogenic transformation induced by phytohemagglutinin; their expression increased in parallel with induction of DNA synthesis and returned to the basal level with progress of the cell cycle. Thus, abnormally high expression of proteasomes may play an important role in transformation and proliferation of blood cells and in specific functions of hematopoietic tumor cells. Images PMID:2205851

  11. Amino Acids Regulate Transgene Expression in MDCK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Torrente, Marta; Guetg, Adriano; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Arps, Lisa; Ruckstuhl, Lisa; Camargo, Simone M. R.; Verrey, François

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression and cell growth rely on the intracellular concentration of amino acids, which in metazoans depends on extracellular amino acid availability and transmembrane transport. To investigate the impact of extracellular amino acid concentrations on the expression of a concentrative amino acid transporter, we overexpressed the main kidney proximal tubule luminal neutral amino acid transporter B0AT1-collectrin (SLC6A19-TMEM27) in MDCK cell epithelia. Exogenously expressed proteins co-localized at the luminal membrane and mediated neutral amino acid uptake. However, the transgenes were lost over few cell culture passages. In contrast, the expression of a control transgene remained stable. To test whether this loss was due to inappropriately high amino acid uptake, freshly transduced MDCK cell lines were cultivated either with physiological amounts of amino acids or with the high concentration found in standard cell culture media. Expression of exogenous transporters was unaffected by physiological amino acid concentration in the media. Interestingly, mycoplasma infection resulted in a significant increase in transgene expression and correlated with the rapid metabolism of L-arginine. However, L-arginine metabolites were shown to play no role in transgene expression. In contrast, activation of the GCN2 pathway revealed by an increase in eIF2α phosphorylation may trigger transgene derepression. Taken together, high extracellular amino acid concentration provided by cell culture media appears to inhibit the constitutive expression of concentrative amino acid transporters whereas L-arginine depletion by mycoplasma induces the expression of transgenes possibly via stimulation of the GCN2 pathway. PMID:24797296

  12. UV-induced changes in cell cycle and gene expression within rabbit lens epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sidjanin, D.; Grdina, D.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1994-11-01

    Damage to lens epithelial cells is a probable initiation process in cataract formation induced by ultraviolet radiation. These experiments investigated the ability of 254 nm radiation on cell cycle progression and gene expression in rabbit lens epithelial cell line N/N1003A. No changes in expression of c-fos, c-jun, alpha- tubulin, or vimentin was observed following UV exposure. Using flow cytometry, an accumulation of cells in G1/S phase of the cell cycle 1 hr following exposure. The observed changes in gene expression, especially the decreased histone transcripts reported here may play a role in UV induced inhibition of cell cycle progression.

  13. Caveolin-1-mediated suppression of cyclooxygenase-2 via a beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef-dependent transcriptional mechanism reduced prostaglandin E2 production and survivin expression.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Diego A; Tapia, Julio C; Fernandez, Jaime G; Torres, Vicente A; Muñoz, Nicolas; Galleguillos, Daniela; Leyton, Lisette; Quest, Andrew F G

    2009-04-01

    Augmented expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and enhanced production of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) are associated with increased tumor cell survival and malignancy. Caveolin-1 is a scaffold protein that has been proposed to function as a tumor suppressor in human cancer cells, although mechanisms underlying this ability remain controversial. Intriguingly, the possibility that caveolin-1 regulates the expression of COX-2 has not been explored. Here we show that augmented caveolin-1 expression in cells with low basal levels of this protein, such as human colon cancer (HT29, DLD-1), breast cancer (ZR75), and embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cells reduced COX-2 mRNA and protein levels and beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef and COX-2 gene reporter activity, as well as the production of PGE(2) and cell proliferation. Moreover, COX-2 overexpression or PGE(2) supplementation increased levels of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein survivin by a transcriptional mechanism, as determined by PCR analysis, survivin gene reporter assays and Western blotting. Furthermore, addition of PGE(2) to the medium prevented effects attributed to caveolin-1-mediated inhibition of beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef-dependent transcription. Finally, PGE(2) reduced the coimmunoprecipitation of caveolin-1 with beta-catenin and their colocalization at the plasma membrane. Thus, by reducing COX-2 expression, caveolin-1 interrupts a feedback amplification loop involving PGE(2)-induced signaling events linked to beta-catenin/Tcf/Lef-dependent transcription of tumor survival genes including cox-2 itself and survivin. PMID:19244345

  14. Expression and purification of recombinant nattokinase in Spodoptera frugiperda cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxiang; Wang, Xiaoli; Xiong, Shaoling; Zhang, Jing; Cai, Litao; Yang, Yanyan

    2007-10-01

    A recombinant baculovirus, rv-egfp-NK, containing a reporter gene encoding the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), was used to express nattokinase (NK), a fibrinolytic enzyme, in Spodoptera frugiperda (SF-9) cells. The recombinant protein also included a histidine tag for purification using Ni(2+) resins. The recombinant NK, approximately 30 kDa, retained fibrinolytic activity (60 U/ml). The integration of the EGFP expression cassette in the Bac-to-Bac system is thus an effective method for the expression and purification of recombinant NK protein in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. PMID:17581705

  15. Human rhabdomyosarcoma cells express functional erythropoietin receptor: Potential therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    PONIEWIERSKA-BARAN, AGATA; SUSZYNSKA, MALWINA; SUN, WENYUE; ABDELBASET-ISMAIL, AHMED; SCHNEIDER, GABRIELA; BARR, FREDERIC G.; RATAJCZAK, MARIUSZ Z.

    2015-01-01

    The erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) is expressed by cells from the erythroid lineage; however, evidence has accumulated that it is also expressed by some solid tumors. This is an important observation, because recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) is employed in cancer patients to treat anemia related to chemo/radiotherapy. In our studies we employed eight rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell lines (three alveolar-type RMS cell lines and five embrional-type RMS cell lines), and mRNA samples obtained from positive, PAX7-FOXO1-positive, and fusion-negative RMS patient samples. Expression of EpoR was evaluated by RT-PCR, gene array and FACS. The functionality of EpoR in RMS cell lines was evaluated by chemotaxis, adhesion, and direct cell proliferation assays. In some of the experiments, RMS cells were exposed to vincristine (VCR) in the presence or absence of EPO to test whether EPO may impair the therapeutic effect of VCR. We report for a first time that functional EpoR is expressed in human RMS cell lines as well as by primary tumors from RMS patients. Furthermore, EpoR is detectably expressed in both embryonal and alveolar RMS subtypes. At the functional level, several human RMS cell lines responded to EPO stimulation by enhanced proliferation, chemotaxis, cell adhesion, and phosphorylation of MAPKp42/44 and AKT. Moreover, RMS cells became more resistant to VCR treatment in the presence of EPO. Our findings have important potential clinical implications, indicating that EPO supplementation in RMS patients may have the unwanted side effect of tumor progression. PMID:26412593

  16. Human rhabdomyosarcoma cells express functional erythropoietin receptor: Potential therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Poniewierska-Baran, Agata; Suszynska, Malwina; Sun, Wenyue; Abdelbaset-Ismail, Ahmed; Schneider, Gabriela; Barr, Frederic G; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2015-11-01

    The erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) is expressed by cells from the erythroid lineage; however, evidence has accumulated that it is also expressed by some solid tumors. This is an important observation, because recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) is employed in cancer patients to treat anemia related to chemo/radiotherapy. In our studies we employed eight rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell lines (three alveolar-type RMS cell lines and five embrional-type RMS cell lines), and mRNA samples obtained from positive, PAX7-FOXO1-positive, and fusion-negative RMS patient samples. Expression of EpoR was evaluated by RT-PCR, gene array and FACS. The functionality of EpoR in RMS cell lines was evaluated by chemotaxis, adhesion, and direct cell proliferation assays. In some of the experiments, RMS cells were exposed to vincristine (VCR) in the presence or absence of EPO to test whether EPO may impair the therapeutic effect of VCR. We report for a first time that functional EpoR is expressed in human RMS cell lines as well as by primary tumors from RMS patients. Furthermore, EpoR is detectably expressed in both embryonal and alveolar RMS subtypes. At the functional level, several human RMS cell lines responded to EPO stimulation by enhanced proliferation, chemotaxis, cell adhesion, and phosphorylation of MAPKp42/44 and AKT. Moreover, RMS cells became more resistant to VCR treatment in the presence of EPO. Our findings have important potential clinical implications, indicating that EPO supplementation in RMS patients may have the unwanted side effect of tumor progression. PMID:26412593

  17. Magnetic field-controlled gene expression in encapsulated cells

    PubMed Central

    Ortner, Viktoria; Kaspar, Cornelius; Halter, Christian; Töllner, Lars; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Walzer, Johann; Günzburg, Walter H.; Dangerfield, John A.; Hohenadl, Christine; Czerny, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Cell and gene therapies have an enormous range of potential applications, but as for most other therapies, dosing is a critical issue, which makes regulated gene expression a prerequisite for advanced strategies. Several inducible expression systems have been established, which mainly rely on small molecules as inducers, such as hormones or antibiotics. The application of these inducers is difficult to control and the effects on gene regulation are slow. Here we describe a novel system for induction of gene expression in encapsulated cells. This involves the modification of cells to express potential therapeutic genes under the control of a heat inducible promoter and the co-encapsulation of these cells with magnetic nanoparticles. These nanoparticles produce heat when subjected to an alternating magnetic field; the elevated temperatures in the capsules then induce gene expression. In the present study we define the parameters of such systems and provide proof-of-principle using reporter gene constructs. The fine-tuned heating of nanoparticles in the magnetic field allows regulation of gene expression from the outside over a broad range and within short time. Such a system has great potential for advancement of cell and gene therapy approaches. PMID:22197778

  18. Leukomogenic factors downregulate heparanase expression in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eshel, Rinat; Ben-Zaken, Olga; Vainas, Oded; Nadir, Yona; Minucci, Saverio; Polliack, Aaron; Naparstek, Ella; Vlodavsky, Israel; Katz, Ben-Zion; E-mail: bkatz@tasmc.healt.gov.il

    2005-10-07

    Heparanase is a heparan sulfate-degrading endoglycosidase expressed by mature monocytes and myeloid cells, but not by immature hematopoietic progenitors. Heparanase gene expression is upregulated during differentiation of immature myeloid cells. PML-RAR{alpha} and PLZF-RAR{alpha} fusion gene products associated with acute promyelocytic leukemia abrogate myeloid differentiation and heparanase expression. AML-Eto, a translocation product associated with AML FAB M2, also downregulates heparanase gene expression. The common mechanism that underlines the activity of these three fusion gene products involves the recruitment of histone deacetylase complexes to specific locations within the DNA. We found that retinoic acid that dissociates PML-RAR{alpha} from the DNA, and which is used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia patients, restores heparanase expression to normal levels in an acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line. The retinoic acid effects were also observed in primary acute promyelocytic leukemia cells and in a retinoic acid-treated acute promyelocytic leukemia patient. Histone deacetylase inhibitor reverses the downregulation of heparanase expression induced by the AML-Eto fusion gene product in M2 type AML. In summary, we have characterized a link between leukomogenic factors and the downregulation of heparanase in myeloid leukemic cells.

  19. Inducible regulation of GDNF expression in human neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, ShuYan; Ren, Ping; Guan, YunQian; Zou, ChunLin; Fu, LinLin; Zhang, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) holds promises for treating neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease. Human neural stem cells (hNSCs) have proved to be a suitable cell delivery vehicle for the safe and efficient introduction of GDNF into the brain. In this study, we used hNSCs-infected with a lentivirus encoding GDNF and the hygromycin resistance gene as such vehicles. A modified tetracycline operator 7 (tetO7) was inserted into a region upstream of the EF1-α promoter to drive GDNF expression. After hygromycin selection, hNSCs were infected with a lentivirus encoding a KRAB-tetracycline repressor fusion protein (TTS). TTS bound to tetO7 and suppressed the expression of GDNF in hNSCs. Upon administration of doxycycline (Dox) the TTS-tetO7 complex separated and the expression of GDNF resumed. The hNSCs infected with GDNF expressed the neural stem cell specific markers, nestin and sox2, and exhibited no significant change in proliferation rate. However, the rate of apoptosis in hNSCs expressing GDNF was lower compared with normal NSCs in response to actinomycin treatment. Furthermore, a higher percentage of Tuj-1 positive cells were obtained from GDNF-producing NSCs under conditions that induced differentiation compared to control NSCs. The inducible expression of GDNF in hNSCs may provide a system for the controllable delivery of GDNF in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23269553

  20. All-optical regulation of gene expression in targeted cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yisen; He, Hao; Li, Shiyang; Liu, Dayong; Lan, Bei; Hu, Minglie; Cao, Youjia; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-06-01

    Controllable gene expression is always a challenge and of great significance to biomedical research and clinical applications. Recently, various approaches based on extra-engineered light-sensitive proteins have been developed to provide optogenetic actuators for gene expression. Complicated biomedical techniques including exogenous genes engineering, transfection, and material delivery are needed. Here we present an all-optical method to regulate gene expression in targeted cells. Intrinsic or exogenous genes can be activated by a Ca2+-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) driven by a short flash of femtosecond-laser irradiation. When applied to mesenchymal stem cells, expression of a differentiation regulator Osterix can be activated by this method to potentially induce differentiation of them. A laser-induced ``Ca2+-comb'' (LiCCo) by multi-time laser exposure is further developed to enhance gene expression efficiency. This noninvasive method hence provides an encouraging advance of gene expression regulation, with promising potential of applying in cell biology and stem-cell science.

  1. Estradiol regulates MICA expression in human endometrial cells

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Satarupa; Pioli, Patricia A.; Conejo-Garcia, Jose; Wira, Charles R.; Sentman, Charles L.

    2008-01-01

    The human endometrium undergoes cyclical changes regulated by sex hormones. Evidence suggests sex hormones regulate NK cell recruitment into the uterus in large numbers. NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on human NK cells, γδ and CD8 T cells. NKG2D ligands are known to be sensors of cellular “stress”. In this study, we investigated whether sex hormones directly regulate expression of NKG2D ligands in the human uterus. Estradiol increased MICA expression on uterine epithelial cells; regulation was estrogen receptor-dependent. Real-time PCR analysis showed that NKG2D ligands MICA and MICB were expressed in the human endometrium. MICA protein was detected primarily on epithelial cells, and greater expression was observed in immunohistochemical analysis of tissues from patients in the secretory phase of the menstrual cycle. Thus, estrogens regulate expression of MICA. These data suggest hormonal regulation of innate immunity and NKG2D-mediated recognition in other tissues and diseases where estrogen may be involved. PMID:18728002

  2. The expression of ADAMTS13 in human microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anyou; Duan, Qiaohong; Wu, Jingsheng; Liu, Xin; Sun, Zimin

    2016-06-01

    ADAMTS13, as a specific von Willebrand factor (VWF)-cleaving protease, prevents microvascular thrombosis of VWF/platelet thrombi. It has been reported that human vascular endothelial cells could also synthesize and secrete ADAMTS13, and these reports were focused in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells. Considering the particularity of its huge quantity and structure of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs) in the body, whether ADAMTS13 is expressed in HMECs also needs to be confirmed. To investigate whether ADAMTS13 is expressed in HMECs. Real-time PCR (RT-PCR) amplification detected ADAMTS13 mRNA in HMEC-1 cell line. The expression and distribution of ADAMTS13 protein and VWF were detected by fluorescence immunoassay and western blot. We observed the expression and distribution of ADAMTS13 in HMECs. We confirmed the expression of ADAMTS13 mRNA in HMEC-1, and found that there were some partly common distributions of ADAMTS13 protein and VWF. This study provides the evidence that HMECs also express ADAMTS13. HMECs might also be a primary source for human plasma ADAMTS13. The overlap region for the distribution of ADAMTS13 and VWF suggests that ADAMTS13 might have a potential regulation role for VWF inside cells. PMID:26366828

  3. Expression of the somatostatin gene in human astrocytoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Mercure, L; Tannenbaum, G S; Schipper, H M; Phaneuf, D; Wainberg, M A

    1996-01-01

    Somatostatin (somatotropin release-inhibiting hormone; SRIH) has been demonstrated in neurons of the central nervous system (CNS) as well as in endocrine cells of the pancreas and gastrointestinal tract and can suppress various immune functions including lymphocyte proliferation, immunoglobulin synthesis, and cytokine production. Since astrocytes possess antigen-presenting activity and can secrete a wide array of immunoregulatory and inflammatory cytokines, we studied SRIH gene expression in both astrocyte cell lines and mitogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes from healthy donors. We now report by means of a complementary DNA-based reverse transcription PCR that differential levels of SRIH mRNA were expressed in 9 of 11 human astrocytoma cell lines tested but were undetectable in activated peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes as well as in a variety of human lymphocyte and monocyte cell lines. The synthesis and secretion of SRIH protein by astrocytoma cells that expressed SRIH transcripts were confirmed by specific radioimmunoassay of cell culture fluids. These findings support the notion that SRIH gene expression occurs in human astrocytoma cells but not in mature lymphoid cells of the immune system. PMID:8991628

  4. PAX8 Expression in Ovarian Surface Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Emily; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Gayther, Simon A; Lawrenson, Kate

    2015-01-01

    High-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC) is usually diagnosed at a late stage and is associated with poor prognosis. Understanding early stage disease biology is essential in developing clinical biomarkers to detect HGSOC earlier. While recent studies indicate that HGSOCs arise from fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells (FTSECs), a considerable body of evidence also suggests that HGSOC can also arise from ovarian surface epithelial cells (OSECs). PAX8 is overexpressed in HGSOCs and expressed in FTSECs, but there are conflicting reports about PAX8 expression in OSECs. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively characterize PAX8 expression in a large series of OSECs, and to investigate the role of PAX8 in early HGSOC development. PAX8 protein expression was analyzed in the OSECs of 27 normal ovaries and 7 primary OSEC cultures using immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescent cytochemistry. PAX8 mRNA expression was quantified in 66 primary OSEC cultures. Cellular transformation was evaluated in OSECs expressing a PAX8 construct. PAX8 was expressed by 44-71% of OSECs. Calretinin and E-cadherin were frequently co-expressed with PAX8. Expression of PAX8 in OSECs decreased cellular migration (P=0.028), but had no other effects on cellular transformation. In addition, PAX8 expression was significantly increased (P=0.003) in an in vitro stepwise model of neoplastic transformation. In conclusion, PAX8 is frequently expressed by OSECs and endogenous levels of PAX8 expression are non-transforming. These data indicate that in OSECs PAX8 expression may represent a normal state and that OSECs may represent an origin of HGSOCs. PMID:26079312

  5. HLA antigen expression in enteropathy associated T cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Ashton-Key, M; Singh, N; Pan, L X; Smith, M E

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the occurrence of abnormal patterns of HLA-ABC and HLA-DR expression in enteropathy associated T cell lymphoma and to relate such abnormalities to the Epstein Barr virus (EBV) status of the tumours. METHODS: Eleven enteropathy associated T cell lymphomas were immunostained with HC10 (HLA-ABC heavy chain) and TAL 1B5 (HLA-DR alpha chain) monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal anti-beta 2 microglobulin (beta 2m, the HLA-ABC light chain) antibodies. In situ hybridisation for EBV using EBER probes was performed on all cases. RESULTS: Tumour cells of two of 11 patients were EBER positive. One of these showed partial, and the other, complete loss of beta 2m. HLA-DR expression was undetectable in both patients. Of the remaining nine EBER negative tumours, two were HLA-ABC heavy chain negative or showed only occasional positive cells and five of nine showed partial or complete loss of the HLA-ABC light chain, beta 2m. Seven of the nine cases were either negative for HLA-DR or showed weak expression in a proportion of tumour cells. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that low or absent HLA-ABC and HLA-DR antigen expression occurs commonly in enteropathy associated T cell lymphoma. These abnormal patterns of HLA expression may be associated with escape from immune attack which, in a minority of patients, could be directed against EBV antigens. Images PMID:8813950

  6. Cell-Free Expression of G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    PubMed

    Segers, Kenneth; Masure, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The large-scale production of recombinant G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is one of the major bottlenecks that hamper functional and structural studies of this important class of integral membrane proteins. Heterologous overexpression of GPCRs often results in low yields of active protein, usually due to a combination of several factors, such as low expression levels, protein insolubility, host cell toxicity, and the need to use harsh and often denaturing detergents (e.g., SDS, LDAO, OG, and DDM, among others) to extract the recombinant receptor from the host cell membrane. Many of these problematic issues are inherently linked to cell-based expression systems and can therefore be circumvented by the use of cell-free systems. In this unit, we provide a range of protocols for the production of GPCRs in a cell-free expression system. Using this system, we typically obtain GPCR expression levels of ∼1 mg per ml of reaction mixture in the continuous-exchange configuration. Although the protocols in this unit have been optimized for the cell-free expression of GPCRs, they should provide a good starting point for the production of other classes of membrane proteins, such as ion channels, aquaporins, carrier proteins, membrane-bound enzymes, and even large molecular complexes. PMID:26237676

  7. Expression of cFLIPL Determines the Basal Interaction of Bcl-2 With Beclin-1 and Regulates p53 Dependent Ubiquitination of Beclin-1 During Autophagic Stress.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Kishu; Pathak, Chandramani

    2016-08-01

    Autophagy and apoptosis are two different physiological processes, which is required for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. The apoptosis associated proteins such as Bcl-2 and p53 have a close association with autophagic proteins HMGB1 and Beclin-1 to modulate autophagic signaling. We demonstrate here the involvement of anti-apoptotic protein cFLIPL in the regulation of autophagy during cellular stress. We found that ectopic expression of cFLIPL decreases the sensitivity of HEK 293T cells against rapamycin and H2 O2 induced autophagic stress. Notably, the selective knockdown of cFLIPL augments autophagic stress in the cells accompanied with JNK1 activation and p53 dependent ubiquitination of Beclin-1. However, re-expression of cFLIPL in cFLIP knockdown cells restores autophagic equilibrium collectively with reversible effects on JNK1 and Beclin-1 integrity. The co-immunoprecipitation analysis suggests that cFLIPL is essential to maintain the canonical interaction of Bcl-2 with Beclin-1 to regulate autophagic stress and cell death. Altogether, our findings suggest that expression of cFLIPL regulates the basal interaction of Bcl-2 with Beclin-1 and substantiates p53 dependent ubiquitination of Beclin-1 during autophagic stress to determine the fate of cell death or survival. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1757-1768, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26682748

  8. Expression profiling. Combinatorial labeling of single cells for gene expression cytometry.

    PubMed

    Fan, H Christina; Fu, Glenn K; Fodor, Stephen P A

    2015-02-01

    We present a technically simple approach for gene expression cytometry combining next-generation sequencing with stochastic barcoding of single cells. A combinatorial library of beads bearing cell- and molecular-barcoding capture probes is used to uniquely label transcripts and reconstruct the digital gene expression profile of thousands of individual cells in a single experiment without the need for robotics or automation. We applied the technology to dissect the human hematopoietic system and to characterize heterogeneous response to in vitro stimulation. High sensitivity is demonstrated by detection of low-abundance transcripts and rare cells. Under current implementation, the technique can analyze a few thousand cells simultaneously and can readily scale to 10,000s or 100,000s of cells. PMID:25657253

  9. Significance of Parafibromin Expression in Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Inju; Lee, Mija; Lim, Sharon; Hong, Ran

    2016-01-01

    Background: Parafibromin is a product of the tumor suppressor gene that has been studied as a potential indicator of tumor aggressiveness in the parathyroid, breast, colorectum, and stomach. However, the clinical significance and potential function of parafibromin expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of parafibromin in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) and to verify its potential as a biomarker of tumor behavior. Methods: Parafibromin expression was evaluated in 30 cases of LSCC using immunohistochemistry. The correlations between parafibromin expression and clinicopathologic parameters were investigated. Results: Parafibromin expression was positive in 15 cases (50%) and negative in 15 cases (50%). Tumor size and T stage showed a statistically significant inverse relationship with parafibromin expression (p=.028 and p<.001, respectively). Parafibromin expression was not associated with age, sex, lymph node metastasis, tumor differentiation, or tumor location. There was no statistically significant relationship between parafibromin expression and progression-free survival in the patients (p>.05). Conclusions: Our results indicate that the downregulation or loss of parafibromin expression can be employed as a novel marker of tumor progression or aggressiveness in LSCC. PMID:27334641

  10. B cell priming for extrafollicular antibody responses requires Bcl-6 expression by T cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sau K; Rigby, Robert J; Zotos, Dimitra; Tsai, Louis M; Kawamoto, Shimpei; Marshall, Jennifer L; Ramiscal, Roybel R; Chan, Tyani D; Gatto, Dominique; Brink, Robert; Yu, Di; Fagarasan, Sidonia; Tarlinton, David M; Cunningham, Adam F; Vinuesa, Carola G

    2011-07-01

    T follicular helper cells (Tfh cells) localize to follicles where they provide growth and selection signals to mutated germinal center (GC) B cells, thus promoting their differentiation into high affinity long-lived plasma cells and memory B cells. T-dependent B cell differentiation also occurs extrafollicularly, giving rise to unmutated plasma cells that are important for early protection against microbial infections. Bcl-6 expression in T cells has been shown to be essential for the formation of Tfh cells and GC B cells, but little is known about its requirement in physiological extrafollicular antibody responses. We use several mouse models in which extrafollicular plasma cells can be unequivocally distinguished from those of GC origin, combined with antigen-specific T and B cells, to show that the absence of T cell-expressed Bcl-6 significantly reduces T-dependent extrafollicular antibody responses. Bcl-6(+) T cells appear at the T-B border soon after T cell priming and before GC formation, and these cells express low amounts of PD-1. Their appearance precedes that of Bcl-6(+) PD-1(hi) T cells, which are found within the GC. IL-21 acts early to promote both follicular and extrafollicular antibody responses. In conclusion, Bcl-6(+) T cells are necessary at B cell priming to form extrafollicular antibody responses, and these pre-GC Tfh cells can be distinguished phenotypically from GC Tfh cells. PMID:21708925

  11. SPARC expression induces cell cycle arrest via STAT3 signaling pathway in medulloblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chetty, Chandramu; Dontula, Ranadheer; Gujrati, Meena; Lakka, Sajani S.

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ectopic expression of SPARC impaired cell proliferation in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression induces STAT3 mediated cell cycle arrest in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression significantly inhibited pre-established tumor growth in nude-mice. -- Abstract: Dynamic cell interaction with ECM components has profound influence in cancer progression. SPARC is a component of the ECM, impairs the proliferation of different cell types and modulates tumor cell aggressive features. We previously reported that SPARC expression significantly impairs medulloblastoma tumor growth in vivo. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of SPARC inhibits medulloblastoma cell proliferation. MTT assay indicated a dose-dependent reduction in tumor cell proliferation in adenoviral mediated expression of SPARC full length cDNA (Ad-DsRed-SP) in D425 and UW228 cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed that Ad-DsRed-SP-infected cells accumulate in the G2/M phase of cell cycle. Further, immunoblot and immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that SPARC induced G2/M cell cycle arrest was mediated through inhibition of the Cyclin-B-regulated signaling pathway involving p21 and Cdc2 expression. Additionally, expression of SPARC decreased STAT3 phosphorylation at Tyr-705; constitutively active STAT3 expression reversed SPARC induced G2/M arrest. Ad-DsRed-SP significantly inhibited the pre-established orthotopic tumor growth and tumor volume in nude-mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor sections from mice treated with Ad-DsRed-SP showed decreased immunoreactivity for pSTAT3 and increased immunoreactivity for p21 compared to tumor section from mice treated with mock and Ad-DsRed. Taken together our studies further reveal that STAT3 plays a key role in SPARC induced G2/M arrest in medulloblastoma cells. These new findings provide a molecular basis for the mechanistic understanding of the

  12. 293 cells express both epithelial as well as mesenchymal cell adhesion molecules

    PubMed Central

    INADA, MASAKAZU; IZAWA, GENYA; KOBAYASHI, WAKAKO; OZAWA, MASAYUKI

    2016-01-01

    The 293 cell line, used extensively in various types of studies due to the ease with which these cells can be transfected, was thought to be derived by the transformation of primary cultures of human embryonic kidney cells with sheared adenovirus type 5 DNA. Although the 293 cells were assumed to originate from epithelial cells, the exact origin of these cells remains unknown. Previous attempts to characterize these cells combined immunostaining, immunoblot analysis and microarray analysis to demonstrate that 293 cells express neurofilament subunits, α-internexin, and several other proteins typically found in neurons. These findings raised the possibility that the 293 cell line may have originated from human neuronal lineage cells. Contrary to this suggestion, in this study, we found that the 293 cells expressed N-cadherin and vimentin, which are marker proteins expressed in mesenchymal cells. Furthermore, the 293 cells also expressed E-cadherin, cytokeratins 5/8 and desmoglein 2, which are epithelial cell markers. When the cells, primarily cultured from the kidneys of Clawn miniature swine and passaged 10–15 generations [termed porcine kidney epithelial (PKE) cells] were examined, they were found to be positive for the expression of both mesenchymal and epithelial markers. Thus, transformation by adenovirus was not necessary for the cells to express N-cadherin. Occludin and zonula occludens (ZO)-1, two components of tight junctions in epithelial and endothelial cells, were detected in the 293 and the PKE cells. Thus, the findings of the present study demonstrate that 293 cells retain several characteristics of epithelial cells. PMID:27121032

  13. Reduced Ang2 expression in aging endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hohensinner, P J; Ebenbauer, B; Kaun, C; Maurer, G; Huber, K; Wojta, J

    2016-06-01

    Aging endothelial cells are characterized by increased cell size, reduced telomere length and increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, we describe here that aging reduces the migratory distance of endothelial cells. Furthermore, we observe an increase of the quiescence protein Ang1 and a decrease of the endothelial activation protein Ang2 upon aging. Supplementing Ang2 to aged endothelial cells restored their migratory capacity. We conclude that aging shifts the balance of the Ang1/Ang2 network favouring a quiescent state. Activation of endothelial cells in aging might be necessary to enhance wound healing capacities. PMID:27137842

  14. Immunoglobulin Expression in Non-Lymphoid Lineage and Neoplastic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhengshan; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Gu, Jiang

    2009-01-01

    It has traditionally been believed that the production of immunoglobulin (Ig) molecules is restricted to B lineage cells. However, immunoglobulin genes and proteins have been recently found in a variety of types of cancer cells, as well as some proliferating epithelial cells and neurons. The immunoglobulin molecules expressed by these cells consist predominantly of IgG, IgM, and IgA, and the light chains expressed are mainly kappa chains. Recombination activating genes 1 and 2, which are required for V(D)J recombination, are also expressed in these cells. Knowledge about the function of these non-lymphoid cell-derived immunoglobulins is limited. Preliminary data suggests that Ig secreted by epithelial cancer cells has some unidentified capacity to promote the growth and survival of tumor cells. As immunoglobulins are known to have a wide spectrum of important functions, the discovery of non-lymphoid cells and cancers that produce immunoglobulin calls for in-depth investigation of the functional and pathological significance of this previously unrecognized phenomenon. PMID:19246641

  15. Survivin expression is associated with lens epithelial cell proliferation and fiber cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mansergh, Fiona C.; Boulton, Michael E.; Gunhaga, Lena

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Survivin (Birc5) is the smallest member of the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) protein family, which regulates the cell cycle/apoptosis balance. The purpose of this study was to examine Survivin expression in the embryonic chick lens, in chick lens epithelial cell cultures, and in the postnatal mouse lens. Methods Survivin expression was examined using a combination of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and immunocytochemistry. To correlate Survivin expression with the timing of proliferation, we determined the profile of cell proliferation in the developing lens using the cell cycle marker proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in quantitative western blotting and immunocytochemistry studies. We also examined the expression of PCNA and the extent of denucleation using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated biotin-dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) of lentoids (lens fiber-like cells) during chick lens epithelial cell differentiation in vitro. Results At embryonic day (ED) 4, Survivin immunostaining was present in two pools in lens epithelial cells and fiber cells: cytoplasmic and nuclear. The nuclear staining became more pronounced as the lens epithelial cells differentiated into lens fiber cells. At ED12, Survivin staining was observed in lens fiber cell nuclei containing marginalized chromatin, indicative of early denucleation events. Using western blotting, Survivin expression peaked at ED6, diminishing thereafter. This profile of expression correlated with the events in chick lens epithelial cell cultures: i) increased Survivin expression was associated with an increase in PCNA staining up to day 6 of culture and ii) downregulation of Survivin expression at day 8 of culture was coincident with a dramatic decrease in PCNA staining and an increase in TdT-mediated biotin-dUTP nick-end labeling in lentoids. In early postnatal mouse lenses, Survivin and PCNA were highly expressed and decreased thereafter during

  16. Paclitaxel inhibits selenoprotein S expression and attenuates endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hong-Shuang; Yu, Pei-Pei; Sun, Ying; Wang, Dan-Feng; Deng, Xiao-Fen; Bao, Yong-Li; Song, Jun; Sun, Lu-Guo; Song, Zhen-Bo; Li, Yu-Xin

    2016-06-01

    The primary effect of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response or unfolded protein response (UPR) is to reduce the load of unfolded protein and promote survival. However, prolonged and severe ER stress leads to tissue injury and serious diseases. Thus, it is important to identify drugs that can attenuate ER stress for the treatment of diseases. Natural products continue to provide lead compounds for drug discovery and front‑line pharmacotherapy for people worldwide. Previous studies have indicated that selenoprotein S (SelS) is a sensitive and ideal maker of ER stress. In the present study, a firefly luciferase reporter driven by the SelS gene promoter was used to screen for natural compounds capable of attenuating ER stress. From this, paclitaxel (PTX) was identified to efficiently inhibit the promoter activity of the SelS gene, and further results revealed that PTX significantly inhibited the tunicamycin‑induced upregulation of SelS at the mRNA and protein levels in HepG2 and HEK293T cells. In addition, PTX was able to efficiently inhibit the expression of the ER stress marker, glucose‑regulated protein 78, in ER stress, indicating that PTX may reverse ER stress. Taken together, these results suggest that PTX is able to inhibit SelS expression during ER stress and attenuate ER stress. PMID:27109260

  17. Paclitaxel inhibits selenoprotein S expression and attenuates endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    QIN, HONG-SHUANG; YU, PEI-PEI; SUN, YING; WANG, DAN-FENG; DENG, XIAO-FEN; BAO, YONG-LI; SONG, JUN; SUN, LU-GUO; SONG, ZHEN-BO; LI, YU-XIN

    2016-01-01

    The primary effect of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response or unfolded protein response (UPR) is to reduce the load of unfolded protein and promote survival. However, prolonged and severe ER stress leads to tissue injury and serious diseases. Thus, it is important to identify drugs that can attenuate ER stress for the treatment of diseases. Natural products continue to provide lead compounds for drug discovery and front-line pharmacotherapy for people worldwide. Previous studies have indicated that selenoprotein S (SelS) is a sensitive and ideal maker of ER stress. In the present study, a firefly luciferase reporter driven by the SelS gene promoter was used to screen for natural compounds capable of attenuating ER stress. From this, paclitaxel (PTX) was identified to efficiently inhibit the promoter activity of the SelS gene, and further results revealed that PTX significantly inhibited the tunicamycin-induced upregulation of SelS at the mRNA and protein levels in HepG2 and HEK293T cells. In addition, PTX was able to efficiently inhibit the expression of the ER stress marker, glucose-regulated protein 78, in ER stress, indicating that PTX may reverse ER stress. Taken together, these results suggest that PTX is able to inhibit SelS expression during ER stress and attenuate ER stress. PMID:27109260

  18. Enhanced expression of codon optimized interferon gamma in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Bevan Kai-Sheng; Yusufi, Faraaz N K; Mariati; Yang, Yuansheng; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2013-09-10

    The human interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is a potential drug candidate for treating various diseases due to its immunomodulatory properties. The efficient production of this protein can be achieved through a popular industrial host, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. However, recombinant expression of foreign proteins is typically suboptimal possibly due to the usage of non-native codon patterns within the coding sequence. Therefore, we demonstrated the application of a recently developed codon optimization approach to design synthetic IFN-γ coding sequences for enhanced heterologous expression in CHO cells. For codon optimization, earlier studies suggested to establish the target usage distribution pattern in terms of selected design parameters such as individual codon usage (ICU) and codon context (CC), mainly based on the host's highly expressed genes. However, our RNA-Seq based transcriptome profiling indicated that the ICU and CC distribution patterns of different gene expression classes in CHO cell are relatively similar, unlike other microbial expression hosts, Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This finding was further corroborated through the in vivo expression of various ICU and CC optimized IFN-γ in CHO cells. Interestingly, the CC-optimized genes exhibited at least 13-fold increase in expression level compared to the wild-type IFN-γ while a maximum of 10-fold increase was observed for the ICU-optimized genes. Although design criteria based on individual codons, such as ICU, have been widely used for gene optimization, our experimental results suggested that codon context is relatively more effective parameter for improving recombinant IFN-γ expression in CHO cells. PMID:23876479

  19. Expression and stabilization of bacterial luciferase in mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Stacey S.; Dionisi, Hebe M.; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2004-06-01

    Current mammalian bioreporters using either firefly luciferase (luc) or GFP constructs require lysis and/or exogenous excitation to evoke a measurable response. Consequently, these cells cannot serve as continuous, on-line monitoring devices for in vivo imaging. Bacterial luciferase, lux, produces a photonic reaction that is cyclic, resulting in autonomous signal generation without the requirement for exogenous substrates or external activation. Therefore, lux-based bioluminescent bioreporters are the only truly autonomous light-generating sensors in existence. Unfortunately, the bacterial lux system has not yet been efficiently expressed in mammalian cells. In this research, three approaches for optimal expression of the a and b subunits of the bacterial luciferase protein were compared and reporter signal stability was evaluated from stably transfected human embryonic kidney cells. Maximum light levels were obtained from cells expressing the luciferase subunits linked with an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). Cells harboring this construct produced bioluminescence equaling 2.6 X 106 photons/sec compared to 7.2 X 104 photons/sec obtained from cells expressing the luciferase from a dual promoter vector and 3.5 X 104 photons/sec from a Lux fusion protein. Furthermore, the bioluminescence levels remained stable for more than forty cell passages (5 months) in the absence of antibiotic selection. After this time, bioluminescence signals dropped at a rate of approximately 5% per cell passage. These data indicate that mammalian cell lines can be engineered to efficiently express the bacterial lux system, thus lending themselves to possible long-term continuous monitoring or imaging applications in vivo.

  20. Microvesicle and tunneling nanotube mediated intercellular transfer of g-protein coupled receptors in cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Guescini, M.; Leo, G.; Genedani, S.; Carone, C.; Pederzoli, F.; Ciruela, F.; Guidolin, D.; Stocchi, V.; Mantuano, M.; Borroto-Escuela, D.O.; Fuxe, K.; Agnati, L.F.

    2012-03-10

    Recent evidence shows that cells exchange collections of signals via microvesicles (MVs) and tunneling nano-tubes (TNTs). In this paper we have investigated whether in cell cultures GPCRs can be transferred by means of MVs and TNTs from a source cell to target cells. Western blot, transmission electron microscopy and gene expression analyses demonstrate that A{sub 2A} and D{sub 2} receptors are present in released MVs. In order to further demonstrate the involvement of MVs in cell-to-cell communication we created two populations of cells (HEK293T and COS-7) transiently transfected with D{sub 2}R-CFP or A{sub 2A}R-YFP. These two types of cells were co-cultured, and FRET analysis demonstrated simultaneously positive cells to the D{sub 2}R-CFP and A{sub 2A}R-YFP. Fluorescence microscopy analysis also showed that GPCRs can move from one cell to another also by means of TNTs. Finally, recipient cells pre-incubated for 24 h with A{sub 2A}R positive MVs were treated with the adenosine A{sub 2A} receptor agonist CGS-21680. The significant increase in cAMP accumulation clearly demonstrated that A{sub 2A}Rs were functionally competent in target cells. These findings demonstrate that A{sub 2A} receptors capable of recognizing and decoding extracellular signals can be safely transferred via MVs from source to target cells.

  1. Expression of apoptotic regulatory molecules in renal cell carcinoma: elevated expression of Fas ligand.

    PubMed

    Olive, C; Cheung, C; Nicol, D; Falk, M C

    1999-02-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common renal neoplasm. Despite being infiltrated by tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), these TIL are unable to control tumour growth in vivo, suggesting that the cytotoxic capacity of TIL against RCC is impaired, or that the tumour cells are resistant to killing and therefore escape detection by the immune system. It is postulated that the expression of apoptotic regulatory molecules in RCC favours tumour cell survival. The present study has therefore determined the expression of Fas (APO-1/CD95), Fas ligand (Fas L) and bcl-2 in these tumours. The expression of Fas, Fas L and bcl-2 mRNA transcripts was determined in RCC, normal kidney and peripheral blood by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), following RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis from tissues and cell samples. Transcript levels were measured by densitometry after Southern blot hybridization of PCR products with internal radio-labelled oligonucleotide probes; a densitometry score was assigned to each hybridizing DNA band and expressed as a ratio of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase content. In peripheral blood, the expression of Fas L and bcl-2 transcripts was similar between patients and normal healthy individuals; however, Fas transcript expression was significantly down-regulated in the patients' versus normal peripheral blood (P = 0.026). Most interestingly, significantly up-regulated Fas L expression was observed in RCC compared to normal kidney (P = 0.041). In contrast, bcl-2 transcripts were well represented in normal kidney but markedly decreased in RCC (P = 0.021). The expression of Fas transcripts in normal kidney and RCC was variable. These data demonstrate elevated expression of Fas L transcripts in RCC, but the functional relevance of this remains to be investigated. PMID:10101681

  2. Transcriptional Regulation of Tlr11 Gene Expression in Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhenyu; Shi, Zhongcheng; Sanchez, Amir; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Mingyao; Yang, Jianghua; Wang, Fen; Zhang, Dekai

    2009-01-01

    As sensors of invading microorganisms, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are expressed not only on macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) but also on epithelial cells. In the TLR family, Tlr11 appears to have the unique feature in that it is expressed primarily on epithelial cells, although it is also expressed on DCs and macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that transcription of the Tlr11 gene is regulated through two cis-acting elements, one Ets-binding site and one interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-binding site. The Ets element interacts with the epithelium-specific transcription factors, ESE-1 and ESE-3, and the IRF motif interacts with IRF-8. Thus, Tlr11 expression on epithelial cells is regulated by the transcription factors that are presumably distinct from transcription factors that regulate the expression of TLRs in innate immune cells such as macrophages and DCs. Our results imply that the distinctive transcription regulatory machinery for TLRs on epithelium may represent a promising new avenue for the development of epithelia-specific therapeutic interventions. PMID:19801549

  3. Regulation of somatic cell reprogramming through inducible mir-302 expression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi-Lung; Chang, Donald C; Lin, Chun-Hung; Ying, Shao-Yao; Leu, Davey; Wu, David T S

    2011-02-01

    Global demethylation is required for early zygote development to establish stem cell pluripotency, yet our findings reiterate this epigenetic reprogramming event in somatic cells through ectopic introduction of mir-302 function. Here, we report that induced mir-302 expression beyond 1.3-fold of the concentration in human embryonic stem (hES) H1 and H9 cells led to reprogramming of human hair follicle cells (hHFCs) to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. This reprogramming mechanism functioned through mir-302-targeted co-suppression of four epigenetic regulators, AOF2 (also known as KDM1 or LSD1), AOF1, MECP1-p66 and MECP2. Silencing AOF2 also caused DNMT1 deficiency and further enhanced global demethylation during somatic cell reprogramming (SCR) of hHFCs. Re-supplementing AOF2 in iPS cells disrupted such global demethylation and induced cell differentiation. Given that both hES and iPS cells highly express mir-302, our findings suggest a novel link between zygotic reprogramming and SCR, providing a regulatory mechanism responsible for global demethylation in both events. As the mechanism of conventional iPS cell induction methods remains largely unknown, understanding this microRNA (miRNA)-mediated SCR mechanism may shed light on the improvements of iPS cell generation. PMID:20870751

  4. Generation of expression plasmids for angiostatin, endostatin and TIMP-2 for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Indraccolo, S; Minuzzo, S; Gola, E; Habeler, W; Carrozzino, F; Noonan, D; Albini, A; Santi, L; Amadori, A; Chieco-Bianchi, L

    1999-01-01

    Antiangiogenic therapy may represent a promising approach to cancer treatment. Indeed, the efficacy of endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors, including angiostatin, endostatin and TIMPs, has been demonstrated in many types of solid tumors in animal models. In view of the possible problems associated with long-term administration of inhibitors as recombinant proteins, we propose their delivery as nucleic acids through a gene therapy approach. To this end, eukaryotic expression constructs for murine angiostatin and endostatin as well as human TIMP-2 were generated, and characterized in vitro. All constructs carry the relevant cDNAs under the control of the strong HCMV promoter/enhancer, and cleavable leader signals to allow protein secretion. Expression of the angiogenesis inhibitors was detected by in vitro transcription/translation experiments as well as transfection of 293T cells, followed by Western blotting (WB) or radioimmunoprecipitation analysis of both cell lysates and supernatants (SNs). These constructs might be used for in vivo intramuscular delivery of plasmid DNA and as a set of reagents for the development of retroviral as well as adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors expressing angiogenesis inhibitors. PMID:10669955

  5. MicroRNA-223 Enhances Radiation Sensitivity of U87MG Cells In Vitro and In Vivo by Targeting Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Liping; Zhu, Ji; Zaorsky, Nicholas G.; Deng, Yun; Wu, Xingzhong; Liu, Yong; Liu, Fangqi; Cai, Guoxiang; Gu, Weilie; Shen, Lijun; Zhang, Zhen

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein is important in the DNA damage response because it repairs radiation-induced damage in cancers. We examined the effect of microRNA-223 (miR-223), a regulator of ATM expression, on radiation sensitivity of cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Human embryonic kidney 293 T (293T) cells were infected with pLL3.7-miR-223 plasmid to generate the pLL3.7-miR-223 and -empty virus (EV) lentivirus (miR-223 and EV). A dual luciferase assay in which the reporter contained wild-type 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of ATM was performed. U87MG cells were infected with miR-223 or EV to establish the overexpressed stable cell lines (U87-223 or U87-EV, respectively). Cells were irradiated in vitro, and dose enhancement ratios at 2 Gy (DER{sub 2}) were calculated. Hind legs of BALB/c athymic mice were injected with U87-223 or U87-EV cells; after 2 weeks, half of the tumors were irradiated. Tumor volumes were tracked for a total of 5 weeks. Results: The dual luciferase reporter assay showed a significant reduction in luciferase activity of 293T cells cotransfected with miR-223 and the ATM 3′UTR compared to that in EV control. Overexpression of miR-223 in U87MG cells showed that ATM expression was significantly downregulated in the U87-223 cells compared to that in U87-EV (ATM/β-actin mRNA 1.0 vs 1.5, P<.05). U87-223 cells were hypersensitive to radiation compared to U87-EV cells in vitro (DER{sub 2} = 1.32, P<.01). Mice injected with miR-223-expressing tumors had almost the same tumors after 3 weeks (1.5 cm{sup 3} vs 1.7 cm{sup 3}). However, irradiation significantly decreased tumor size in miR-223-expressing tumors compared to those in controls (0.033 cm{sup 3} vs 0.829 cm{sup 3}). Conclusions: miR-223 overexpression downregulates ATM expression and sensitizes U87 cells to radiation in vitro and in vivo. MicroRNA-223 may be a novel cancer-targeting therapy, although its cancer- and patient-specific roles are

  6. Functional Capacity of Shiga-Toxin Promoter Sequences in Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mejías, María P.; Fernández-Brando, Romina J.; Panek, Cecilia A.; Ramos, Maria V.; Fernández, Gabriela C.; Isturiz, Martín; Ghiringhelli, Pablo D.; Palermo, Marina S.

    2013-01-01

    Shiga toxins (Stx) are the main virulence factors in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) infections, causing diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The genes encoding for Shiga toxin-2 (Stx2) are located in a bacteriophage. The toxin is formed by a single A subunit and five B subunits, each of which has its own promoter sequence. We have previously reported the expression of the B subunit within the eukaryotic environment, probably driven by their own promoter. The aim of this work was to evaluate the ability of the eukaryotic machinery to recognize stx2 sequences as eukaryotic-like promoters. Vero cells were transfected with a plasmid encoding Stx2 under its own promoter. The cytotoxic effect on these cells was similar to that observed upon incubation with purified Stx2. In addition, we showed that Stx2 expression in Stx2-insensitive BHK eukaryotic cells induced drastic morphological and cytoskeletal changes. In order to directly evaluate the capacity of the wild promoter sequences of the A and B subunits to drive protein expression in mammalian cells, GFP was cloned under eukaryotic-like putative promoter sequences. GFP expression was observed in 293T cells transfected with these constructions. These results show a novel and alternative way to synthesize Stx2 that could contribute to the global understanding of EHEC infections with immediate impact on the development of treatments or vaccines against HUS. PMID:23451160

  7. c-myc protooncogene expression in mouse erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lachman, H M

    1989-01-01

    Murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells are erythroid progenitors whose programs of erythroid differentiation has been interrupted by transformation with the Friend virus complex. As a result of the ability of certain chemicals such as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) to induce terminal erythroid differentiation, the cells have been used as a model for understanding the molecular basis of cellular differentiation. Recent work on MEL cells as well as other differentiating systems indicates that expression of cellular protooncogenes is implicated in chemically mediated differentiation. In MEL cells the expression of the c-myc protooncogene undergoes unusual biphasic changes following inducer treatment. Levels of c-myc mRNA decrease 10- to 20-fold between 1 and 2 hr and are then reexpressed between 12 and 24 hr. These changes occur as a result of complex transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulatory events. Recent DNA transfection experiments, in which MEL cells were transfected with myc expression vectors, indicate that both the early decrease in c-myc expression and its subsequent reexpression are important events in the differentiation pathway. The work on MEL cells, as well as on other models of differentiation, is directed at understanding the molecular basis of leukemogenic transformation and cellular differentiation. The ability of c-myc, as well as other protooncogenes, to influence both of these events indicates that cellular protooncogenes play a central role in their regulation. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. PMID:2647476

  8. Expression Profiling of Single Mammalian Cells – Small is Beautiful

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    Increasingly mRNA expression patterns established using a variety of molecular technologies such as cDNA microarrays, SAGE and cDNA display are being used to identify potential regulatory genes and as a means of providing valuable insights into the biological status of the starting sample. Until recently, the application of these techniques has been limited to mRNA isolated from millions or, at very best, several thousand cells thereby restricting the study of small samples and complex tissues. To overcome this limitation a variety of amplification approaches have been developed which are capable of broadly evaluating mRNA expression patterns in single cells. This review will describe approaches that have been employed to examine global gene expression patterns either in small numbers of cells or, wherever possible, in actual isolated single cells. The first half of the review will summarize the technical aspects of methods developed for single-cell analysis and the latter half of the review will describe the areas of biological research that have benefited from single-cell expression analysis. PMID:11025531

  9. Sp3 regulates fas expression in lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pang, H; Miranda, K; Fine, A

    1998-01-01

    By transducing an apoptotic signal in immune effector cells, Fas has been directly implicated in the control of immunological activity. Expression and functional results, however, have also suggested a role for Fas in regulating cell turnover in specific epithelial populations. To characterize factors responsible for Fas expression in epithelial cells, approximately 3 kb of the 5' flanking region of the mouse Fas gene was isolated. By rapid amplification of cDNA ends and primer extension, transcriptional start sites were identified within 50 bp upstream of the translation start site. Transient transfection of promoter-luciferase constructs in a mouse lung epithelial cell line, MLE-15, localized promoter activity to the first 77 bp of upstream sequence. By using a 60 bp DNA probe (-18 to -77) in electrophoretic mobility-shift assays, three shifted complexes were found. Incubation with excess cold Sp1 oligonucleotide or an anti-Sp3 antibody inhibited complex formation. Site-directed mutagenesis of the Sp1 site resulted in 60-70% loss of promoter activity. In Drosophila SL-2 cells, promoter activity was markedly increased by co-transfection of an Sp3 expression construct. These results show that the Sp3 protein is involved in regulating Fas gene expression in lung epithelial cells. PMID:9639581

  10. SNAP25 Expression in Mammalian Retinal Horizontal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Arlene A.; Brandstätter, Johann Helmut; Morgans, Catherine W.; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal cells mediate inhibitory feedforward and feedback lateral interactions in the outer retina at photoreceptor terminals and bipolar cell dendrites; however, the mechanisms that underlie synaptic transmission from mammalian horizontal cells are poorly understood. The localization of a vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter (VGAT) to horizontal cell processes in primate and rodent retinae suggested that mammalian horizontal cells release transmitter in a vesicular manner. Toward determining whether the molecular machinery for vesicular transmitter release is present in horizontal cells, we investigated the expression of SNAP25 (synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa), a key SNARE protein, by immunocytochemistry with cell type-specific markers in the retinae of mouse, rat, rabbit, and monkey. Different commercial antibodies to SNAP25 were tested on vertical sections of retina. We report the robust expression of SNAP25 in both plexiform layers. Double labeling with SNAP25 and calbindin antibodies demonstrated that horizontal cell processes and their endings in photoreceptor triad synapses were strongly labeled for both proteins in mouse, rat, rabbit, and monkey retinae. Double labeling with parvalbumin antibodies in monkey retina verified SNAP25 immunoreactivity in all horizontal cells. Pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy in rabbit retina confirmed expression of SNAP25 in lateral elements within photoreceptor triad synapses. The SNAP25 immunoreactivity in the plexiform layers and outer nuclear layer fell into at least three patterns depending on the antibody, suggesting a differential distribution of SNAP25 isoforms. The presence of SNAP25a and SNAP25b isoforms in mouse retina was established by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. SNAP25 expression in mammalian horizontal cells along with other SNARE proteins is consistent with vesicular exocytosis. PMID:21280047

  11. Ligand-selective activation of heterologously-expressed mammalian olfactory receptor.

    PubMed

    Ukhanov, K; Bobkov, Y; Corey, E A; Ache, B W

    2014-10-01

    Mammalian olfactory receptors (ORs) appear to have the capacity to couple to multiple G protein-coupled signaling pathways in a ligand-dependent selective manner. To better understand the mechanisms and molecular range of such ligand selectivity, we expressed the mouse eugenol OR (mOR-EG) in HEK293T cells together with Gα15 to monitor activation of the phospholipase-C (PLC) signaling pathway and/or Gαolf to monitor activation of the adenylate cyclase (AC) signaling pathway, resulting in intracellular Ca(2+) release and/or Ca(2+) influx through a cyclic nucleotide-gated channel, respectively. PLC-dependent responses differed dynamically from AC-dependent responses, allowing them to be distinguished when Gα15 and Gαolf were co-expressed. The dynamic difference in readout was independent of the receptor, the heterologous expression system, and the ligand concentration. Of 17 reported mOR-EG ligands tested, including eugenol, its analogs, and structurally dissimilar compounds (mousse cristal, nootkatone, orivone), some equally activated both signaling pathways, some differentially activated both signaling pathways, and some had no noticeable effect even at 1-5mM. Our findings argue that mOR-EG, when heterologously expressed, can couple to two different signaling pathways in a ligand selective manner. The challenge now is to determine the potential of mOR-EG, and perhaps other ORs, to activate multiple signaling pathways in a ligand selective manner in native ORNs. PMID:25149566

  12. Ligand-selective activation of heterologously-expressed mammalian olfactory receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ukhanov, K.; Bobkov, Y.; Corey, E.A.; Ache, B.W.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian olfactory receptors (ORs) appear to have the capacity to couple to multiple G protein-coupled signaling pathways in a ligand-dependent selective manner. To better understand the mechanisms and molecular range of such ligand selectivity, we expressed the mouse eugenol OR (mOR-EG) in HEK293T cells together with Gα15 to monitor activation of the phospholipase-C (PLC) signaling pathway and/or Gαolf to monitor activation of the adenylate cyclase (AC) signaling pathway, resulting in intracellular Ca2+ release and/or Ca2+ influx through a cyclic nucleotide-gated channel, respectively. PLC-dependent responses differed dynamically from AC-dependent responses, allowing them to be distinguished when Gα15 and Gαolf were co-expressed. The dynamic difference in readout was independent of the receptor, the heterologous expression system, and the ligand concentration. Of 17 reported mOR-EG ligands tested, including eugenol, its analogs, and structurally dissimilar compounds (mousse cristal, nootkatone, orivone), some equally activated both signaling pathways, some differentially activated both signaling pathways, and some had no noticeable effect even at 1-5 mM. Our findings argue that mOR-EG, when heterologously expressed, can couple to two different signaling pathways in a ligand selective manner. The challenge now is to determine the potential of mOR-EG, and perhaps other ORs, to activate multiple signaling pathways in a ligand selective manner in native ORNs. PMID:25149566

  13. Regulation of cell-to-cell variability in divergent gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chao; Wu, Shuyang; Pocetti, Christopher; Bai, Lu

    2016-03-01

    Cell-to-cell variability (noise) is an important feature of gene expression that impacts cell fitness and development. The regulatory mechanism of this variability is not fully understood. Here we investigate the effect on gene expression noise in divergent gene pairs (DGPs). We generated reporters driven by divergent promoters, rearranged their gene order, and probed their expressions using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH). We show that two genes in a co-regulated DGP have higher expression covariance compared with the separate, tandem and convergent configurations, and this higher covariance is caused by more synchronized firing of the divergent transcriptions. For differentially regulated DGPs, the regulatory signal of one gene can stochastically `leak' to the other, causing increased gene expression noise. We propose that the DGPs' function in limiting or promoting gene expression noise may enhance or compromise cell fitness, providing an explanation for the conservation pattern of DGPs.

  14. Relation of CD30 expression to survival and morphology in large cell B cell lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Noorduyn, L A; de Bruin, P C; van Heerde, P; van de Sandt, M M; Ossenkoppele, G J; Meijer, C J

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To investigate whether CD30 expression is correlated with anaplastic morphology, and whether this correlated with a better survival in large cell B cell lymphomas, as has been described for T cell lymphomas. METHODS--CD30 expression was investigated using frozen sections in a series of 146 large cell B cell lymphomas. Clinical data and follow up information were collected from 25 lymphomas with strong CD30 expression, 30 lymphomas with partial CD30 expression, and a control group of 25 lymphomas which did not express CD30. RESULTS--Morphological distinction between anaplastic and non-anaplastic tumours was difficult. Of the cases with an anaplastic morphology, 50% were CD30 positive, as were 24% of the polymorphic centroblastic B cell lymphomas. Only 65% of the morphologically non-anaplastic tumours were completely CD30 negative. There was no difference in survival among patients with lymphomas expressing CD30 and those that did not. Patients with morphologically anaplastic B cell lymphomas did not differ in their survivals from those with other high grade B cell lymphomas. Clinical stage at presentation was the only variable that was significantly associated with survival. CONCLUSIONS--CD30 expression occurs frequently in large cell B cell lymphomas and is poorly related to anaplastic morphology. Morphological distinction between anaplastic and non-anaplastic tumours is difficult. In contrast to T cell lymphomas, CD30 positive B cell lymphomas do not show a relatively favourable clinical course. The results presented here raise serious doubts as to whether large cell B cell lymphoma, based on the expression of CD30 or anaplastic morphology, can really be termed a separate entity. Images PMID:8132806

  15. Targeting telomerase-expressing cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ouellette, Michel M; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The role of telomeres and telomerase as a target for cancer therapeutics is an area of continuing interest. This review is intended to provide an update on the field, pointing to areas in which our knowledge remains deficient and exploring the details of the most promising areas being advanced into clinical trials. Topics that will be covered include the role of dysfunctional telomeres in cellular aging and how replicative senescence provides an initial barrier to the emergence of immortalized cells, a hallmark of cancer. As an important translational theme, this review will consider possibilities for selectively targeting telomeres and telomerase to enhance cancer therapy. The role of telomerase as an immunotherapy, as a gene therapy approach using telomerase promoter driven oncolytic viruses and as a small oligonucleotide targeted therapy (Imetelstat) will be discussed. PMID:21332640

  16. Targeting telomerase-expressing cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ouellette, Michel M; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2011-07-01

    The role of telomeres and telomerase as a target for cancer therapeutics is an area of continuing interest. This review is intended to provide an update on the field, pointing to areas in which our knowledge remains deficient and exploring the details of the most promising areas being advanced into clinical trials. Topics that will be covered include the role of dysfunctional telomeres in cellular aging and how replicative senescence provides an initial barrier to the emergence of immortalized cells, a hallmark of cancer. As an important translational theme, this review will consider possibilities for selectively targeting telomeres and telomerase to enhance cancer therapy. The role of telomerase as an immunotherapy, as a gene therapy approach using telomerase promoter driven oncolytic viruses and as a small oligonucleotide targeted therapy (Imetelstat) will be discussed. PMID:21332640

  17. Human Neural Cells Transiently Express Reelin during Olfactory Placode Development

    PubMed Central

    Antal, M. Cristina; Samama, Brigitte; Ghandour, M. Said; Boehm, Nelly

    2015-01-01

    Reelin, an extracellular glycoprotein is essential for migration and correct positioning of neurons during development. Since the olfactory system is known as a source of various migrating neuronal cells, we studied Reelin expression in the two chemosensory olfactory systems, main and accessory, during early developmental stages of human foetuses/embryos from Carnegie Stage (CS) 15 to gestational week (GW) 14. From CS 15 to CS 18, but not at later stages, a transient expression of Reelin was detected first in the presumptive olfactory and then in the presumptive vomeronasal epithelium. During the same period, Reelin-positive cells detach from the olfactory/vomeronasal epithelium and migrate through the mesenchyme beneath the telencephalon. Dab 1, an adaptor protein of the Reelin pathway, was simultaneously expressed in the migratory mass from CS16 to CS17 and, at later stages, in the presumptive olfactory ensheathing cells. Possible involvements of Reelin and Dab 1 in the peripheral migrating stream are discussed. PMID:26270645

  18. Protein expression analyses at the single cell level.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Masae; Karagiannis, Peter; Taniguchi, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology explains how genetic information is converted into its end product, proteins, which are responsible for the phenotypic state of the cell. Along with the protein type, the phenotypic state depends on the protein copy number. Therefore, quantification of the protein expression in a single cell is critical for quantitative characterization of the phenotypic states. Protein expression is typically a dynamic and stochastic phenomenon that cannot be well described by standard experimental methods. As an alternative, fluorescence imaging is being explored for the study of protein expression, because of its high sensitivity and high throughput. Here we review key recent progresses in fluorescence imaging-based methods and discuss their application to proteome analysis at the single cell level. PMID:25197931

  19. Human Neural Cells Transiently Express Reelin during Olfactory Placode Development.

    PubMed

    Antal, M Cristina; Samama, Brigitte; Ghandour, M Said; Boehm, Nelly

    2015-01-01

    Reelin, an extracellular glycoprotein is essential for migration and correct positioning of neurons during development. Since the olfactory system is known as a source of various migrating neuronal cells, we studied Reelin expression in the two chemosensory olfactory systems, main and accessory, during early developmental stages of human foetuses/embryos from Carnegie Stage (CS) 15 to gestational week (GW) 14. From CS 15 to CS 18, but not at later stages, a transient expression of Reelin was detected first in the presumptive olfactory and then in the presumptive vomeronasal epithelium. During the same period, Reelin-positive cells detach from the olfactory/vomeronasal epithelium and migrate through the mesenchyme beneath the telencephalon. Dab 1, an adaptor protein of the Reelin pathway, was simultaneously expressed in the migratory mass from CS16 to CS17 and, at later stages, in the presumptive olfactory ensheathing cells. Possible involvements of Reelin and Dab 1 in the peripheral migrating stream are discussed. PMID:26270645

  20. Regulation of gene expression in ovarian cancer cells by luteinizing hormone receptor expression and activation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Since a substantial percentage of ovarian cancers express gonadotropin receptors and are responsive to the relatively high concentrations of pituitary gonadotropins during the postmenopausal years, it has been suggested that receptor activation may contribute to the etiology and/or progression of the neoplasm. The goal of the present study was to develop a cell model to determine the impact of luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor (LHR) expression and LH-mediated LHR activation on gene expression and thus obtain insights into the mechanism of gonadotropin action on ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) carcinoma cells. Methods The human ovarian cancer cell line, SKOV-3, was stably transfected to express functional LHR and incubated with LH for various periods of time (0-20 hours). Transcriptomic profiling was performed on these cells to identify LHR expression/activation-dependent changes in gene expression levels and pathways by microarray and qRT-PCR analyses. Results Through comparative analysis on the LHR-transfected SKOV-3 cells exposed to LH, we observed the differential expression of 1,783 genes in response to LH treatment, among which five significant families were enriched, including those of growth factors, translation regulators, transporters, G-protein coupled receptors, and ligand-dependent nuclear receptors. The most highly induced early and intermediate responses were found to occupy a network impacting transcriptional regulation, cell growth, apoptosis, and multiple signaling transductions, giving indications of LH-induced apoptosis and cell growth inhibition through the significant changes in, for example, tumor necrosis factor, Jun and many others, supportive of the observed cell growth reduction in in vitro assays. However, other observations, e.g. the substantial up-regulation of the genes encoding the endothelin-1 subtype A receptor, stromal cell-derived factor 1, and insulin-like growth factor II, all of which are potential therapeutic

  1. Tolerance Associated Gene Expression following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pidala, Joseph; Bloom, Gregory C.; Eschrich, Steven; Sarwal, Minnie; Enkemann, Steve; Betts, Brian C.; Beato, Francisca; Yoder, Sean; Anasetti, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Biologic markers of immune tolerance may facilitate tailoring of immune suppression duration after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). In a cross-sectional study, peripheral blood samples were obtained from tolerant (n = 15, median 38.5 months post-HCT) and non-tolerant (n = 17, median 39.5 post-HCT) HCT recipients and healthy control subjects (n = 10) for analysis of immune cell subsets and differential gene expression. There were no significant differences in immune subsets across groups. We identified 281 probe sets unique to the tolerant (TOL) group and 122 for non-tolerant (non-TOL). These were enriched for process networks including NK cell cytotoxicity, antigen presentation, lymphocyte proliferation, and cell cycle and apoptosis. Differential gene expression was enriched for CD56, CD66, and CD14 human lineage-specific gene expression. Differential expression of 20 probe sets between groups was sufficient to develop a classifier with > 90% accuracy, correctly classifying 14/15 TOL cases and 15/17 non-TOL cases. These data suggest that differential gene expression can be utilized to accurately classify tolerant patients following HCT. Prospective investigation of immune tolerance biologic markers is warranted. PMID:25774806

  2. Conserved Expression Signatures between Medaka and Human Pigment Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Schartl, Manfred; Kneitz, Susanne; Wilde, Brigitta; Wagner, Toni; Henkel, Christiaan V.; Spaink, Herman P.; Meierjohann, Svenja

    2012-01-01

    Aberrations in gene expression are a hallmark of cancer cells. Differential tumor-specific transcript levels of single genes or whole sets of genes may be critical for the neoplastic phenotype and important for therapeutic considerations or useful as biomarkers. As an approach to filter out such relevant expression differences from the plethora of changes noted in global expression profiling studies, we searched for changes of gene expression levels that are conserved. Transcriptomes from massive parallel sequencing of different types of melanoma from medaka were generated and compared to microarray datasets from zebrafish and human melanoma. This revealed molecular conservation at various levels between fish models and human tumors providing a useful strategy for identifying expression signatures strongly associated with disease phenotypes and uncovering new melanoma molecules. PMID:22693581

  3. Reproductive fitness advantage of BCR-ABL expressing leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Traulsen, Arne; Pacheco, Jorge M; Dingli, David

    2010-08-01

    Mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes confer a fitness advantage to cells that can lead to cancer. The tumor phenotype normally results from the interaction of many mutant genes making it difficult to estimate the fitness advantage provided by any oncogene, except when tumors depend on one oncogene only. We utilize a model of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), to quantitate the fitness advantage conferred by expression of BCR-ABL in hematopoietic cells from in vivo patient data. We show that BCR-ABL expression provides a high fitness advantage, which explains why this single mutation drives the chronic phase of CML. PMID:20153920

  4. Do CD8 effector cells need IL-7R expression to become resting memory cells?

    PubMed

    Buentke, Eva; Mathiot, Anne; Tolaini, Mauro; Di Santo, James; Zamoyska, Rose; Seddon, Benedict

    2006-09-15

    The role for IL-7R expression in the differentiation of effector T cells into resting memory remains controversial. Here, using a conditional IL-7R transgenic model, we were able to test directly whether CD8 effector T cells require IL-7R expression for their differentiation into resting memory cells. In the absence of IL-7R expression, effector cells transferred into "full" hosts underwent a protracted and unremitting contraction compared with IL-7R-expressing control cells and were unable to develop into long-term resting memory cells. Surprisingly, when the same effector cells were transferred into empty T-cell-deficient hosts, they could generate long-lived fully functional resting memory cells independently of IL-7R expression. Formation of these latter cells was found to be dependent on IL-15, because the same IL-7R-deficient effector cells were rapidly lost from IL-15-deficient hosts, having a half-life of less than 40 hours. Therefore, our data suggest that, under physiological conditions, both IL-7 and IL-15 synergize to promote the formation of memory cells directly by limiting the contraction of effectors that occurs following an immune response and that reexpression of IL-7R is a key checkpoint in the regulation of this process. PMID:16705084

  5. Expression of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase protects ramos B cells from oxidation-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Karp, D R; Shimooku, K; Lipsky, P E

    2001-02-01

    The ectoenzyme, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT, EC ) cleaves glutathione (GSH) to facilitate the recapture of cysteine for synthesis of intracellular GSH. The impact of GGT expression on cell survival during oxidative stress was investigated using the human B cell lymphoblastoid cell line, Ramos. Ramos cells did not express surface GGT and exhibited no GGT enzyme activity. In contrast, Ramos cells stably transfected with the human GGT cDNA expressed high levels of surface GGT and enzymatic activity. GGT-transfected Ramos cells were protected from apoptosis when cultured in cyst(e)ine-deficient medium. The GGT-expressing cells also had lower levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Homocysteic acid and alanine, inhibitors of cystine and cysteine uptake, respectively, caused increased ROS content and diminished viability of GGT expressing cells. Exogenous GSH increased the viability of the GGT-transfected cells more effectively than that of control cells, whereas the products of GSH metabolism prevented death of both the control and GGT-transfected cells comparably. These data indicate that GGT cleavage of GSH and the subsequent recapture of cysteine and cystine allow cells to maintain low levels of cellular ROS and thereby avoid apoptosis induced by oxidative stress. PMID:11080500

  6. Cell-by-Cell Dissection of Gene Expression and Chromosomal Interactions Reveals Consequences of Nuclear Reorganization

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The functional consequences of long-range nuclear reorganization were studied in a cell-by-cell analysis of gene expression and long-range chromosomal interactions in the Drosophila eye and eye imaginal disk. Position-effect variegation was used to stochastically perturb gene expression and probe nuclear reorganization. Variegating genes on rearrangements of Chromosomes X, 2, and 3 were probed for long-range interactions with heterochromatin. Studies were conducted only in tissues known to express the variegating genes. Nuclear structure was revealed by fluorescence in situ hybridization with probes to the variegating gene and heterochromatin. Gene expression was determined alternately by immunofluorescence against specific proteins and by eye pigment autofluorescence. This allowed cell-by-cell comparisons of nuclear architecture between cells in which the variegating gene was either expressed or silenced. Very strong correlations between heterochromatic association and silencing were found. Expressing cells showed a broad distribution of distances between variegating genes and their own centromeric heterochromatin, while silenced cells showed a very tight distribution centered around very short distances, consistent with interaction between the silenced genes and heterochromatin. Spatial and temporal analysis of interactions with heterochromatin indicated that variegating genes primarily associate with heterochromatin in cells that have exited the cell cycle. Differentiation was not a requirement for association, and no differences in association were observed between cell types. Thus, long-range interactions between distal chromosome regions and their own heterochromatin have functional consequences for the organism. PMID:15737020

  7. From single-cell to cell-pool transcriptomes: stochasticity in gene expression and RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; McCue, Ken; Schroth, Gary P; Gertz, Jason; Myers, Richard M; Wold, Barbara J

    2014-03-01

    Single-cell RNA-seq mammalian transcriptome studies are at an early stage in uncovering cell-to-cell variation in gene expression, transcript processing and editing, and regulatory module activity. Despite great progress recently, substantial challenges remain, including discriminating biological variation from technical noise. Here we apply the SMART-seq single-cell RNA-seq protocol to study the reference lymphoblastoid cell line GM12878. By using spike-in quantification standards, we estimate the absolute number of RNA molecules per cell for each gene and find significant variation in total mRNA content: between 50,000 and 300,000 transcripts per cell. We directly measure technical stochasticity by a pool/split design and find that there are significant differences in expression between individual cells, over and above technical variation. Specific gene coexpression modules were preferentially expressed in subsets of individual cells, including one enriched for mRNA processing and splicing factors. We assess cell-to-cell variation in alternative splicing and allelic bias and report evidence of significant differences in splice site usage that exceed splice variation in the pool/split comparison. Finally, we show that transcriptomes from small pools of 30-100 cells approach the information content and reproducibility of contemporary RNA-seq from large amounts of input material. Together, our results define an experimental and computational path forward for analyzing gene expression in rare cell types and cell states. PMID:24299736

  8. Neuropilin 1 expression correlates with differentiation status of epidermal cells and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Shahrabi-Farahani, Shokoufeh; Wang, Lili; Zwaans, Bernadette M M; Santana, Jeans M; Shimizu, Akio; Takashima, Seiji; Kreuter, Michael; Coultas, Leigh; D'Amore, Patricia A; Arbeit, Jeffrey M; Akslen, Lars A; Bielenberg, Diane R

    2014-07-01

    Neuropilins (NRPs) are cell surface receptors for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and SEMA3 (class 3 semaphorin) family members. The role of NRPs in neurons and endothelial cells has been investigated, but the expression and role of NRPs in epithelial cells is much less clear. Herein, the expression and localization of NRP1 was investigated in human and mouse skin and squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Results indicated that NRP1 mRNA and protein was expressed in the suprabasal epithelial layers of the skin sections. NRP1 staining did not overlap with that of keratin 14 (K14) or proliferating cell nuclear antigen, but did co-localize with staining for keratin 1, indicating that differentiated keratinocytes express NRP1. Similar to the expression of NRP1, VEGF-A was expressed in suprabasal epithelial cells, whereas Nrp2 and VEGFR2 were not detectable in the epidermis. The expression of NRP1 correlated with a high degree of differentiation in human SCC specimens, human SCC xenografts, and mouse K14-HPV16 transgenic SCC. UVB irradiation of mouse skin induced Nrp1 upregulation. In vitro, Nrp1 was upregulated in primary keratinocytes in response to differentiating media or epidermal growth factor-family growth factors. In conclusion, the expression of NRP1 is regulated in the skin and is selectively produced in differentiated epithelial cells. NRP1 may function as a reservoir to sequester VEGF ligand within the epithelial compartment, thereby modulating its bioactivity. PMID:24791743

  9. Polyclonal T-Cells Express CD1a in Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) Lesions

    PubMed Central

    West, Jennifer A.; Olsen, Sharon L.; Mitchell, Jenée M.; Priddle, Ross E.; Luke, Jennifer M.; Åkefeldt, Selma Olsson; Henter, Jan-Inge; Turville, Christopher; Kannourakis, George

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a complex and poorly understood disorder that has characteristics of both inflammatory and neoplastic disease. By using eight-colour flow cytometry, we have identified a previously unreported population of CD1a+/CD3+ T-cells in LCH lesions. The expression of CD1a is regarded as a hallmark of this disease; however, it has always been presumed that it was only expressed by pathogenic Langerhans cells (LCs). We have now detected CD1a expression by a range of T-cell subsets within all of the LCH lesions that were examined, establishing that CD1a expression in these lesions is no longer restricted to pathogenic LCs. The presence of CD1a+ T-cells in all of the LCH lesions that we have studied to date warrants further investigation into their biological function to determine whether these cells are important in the pathogenesis of LCH. PMID:25343480

  10. Single-cell PCR profiling of gene expression in hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Teles, José; Enver, Tariq; Pina, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Single-cell analysis of gene expression offers the possibility of exploring cellular and molecular heterogeneity in stem and developmental cell systems, including cancer, to infer routes of cellular specification and their respective gene regulatory modules. PCR-based technologies, although limited to the analysis of a predefined set of genes, afford a cost-effective balance of throughput and biological information and have become a method of choice in stem cell laboratories. Here we describe an experimental and analytical protocol based on the Fluidigm microfluidics platform for the simultaneous expression analysis of 48 or 96 genes in multiples of 48 or 96 cells. We detail wet laboratory procedures and describe clustering, principal component analysis, correlation, and classification tools for the inference of cellular pathways and gene networks. PMID:25062620

  11. Spatial reconstruction of single-cell gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Satija, Rahul; Farrell, Jeffrey A.; Gennert, David; Schier, Alexander F.; Regev, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    Spatial localization is a key determinant of cellular fate and behavior, but spatial RNA assays traditionally rely on staining for a limited number of RNA species. In contrast, single-cell RNA-seq allows for deep profiling of cellular gene expression, but established methods separate cells from their native spatial context. Here we present Seurat, a computational strategy to infer cellular localization by integrating single-cell RNA-seq data with in situ RNA patterns. We applied Seurat to spatially map 851 single cells from dissociated zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos, inferring a transcriptome-wide map of spatial patterning. We confirmed Seurat’s accuracy using several experimental approaches, and used it to identify a set of archetypal expression patterns and spatial markers. Additionally, Seurat correctly localizes rare subpopulations, accurately mapping both spatially restricted and scattered groups. Seurat will be applicable to mapping cellular localization within complex patterned tissues in diverse systems. PMID:25867923

  12. Syndecan-4-expressing muscle progenitor cells in the SP engraft as satellite cells during muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kathleen Kelly; Hall, John K; Troy, Andrew A; Cornelison, D D W; Majka, Susan M; Olwin, Bradley B

    2009-03-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells, located between the basal lamina and plasma membrane of myofibers, are required for skeletal muscle regeneration. The capacity of satellite cells as well as other cell lineages including mesoangioblasts, mesenchymal stem cells, and side population (SP) cells to contribute to muscle regeneration has complicated the identification of a satellite stem cell. We have characterized a rare subset of the muscle SP that efficiently engrafts into the host satellite cell niche when transplanted into regenerating muscle, providing 75% of the satellite cell population and 30% of the myonuclear population, respectively. These cells are found in the satellite cell position, adhere to isolated myofibers, and spontaneously undergo myogenesis in culture. We propose that this subset of SP cells (satellite-SP cells), characterized by ABCG2, Syndecan-4, and Pax7 expression, constitutes a self-renewing muscle stem cell capable of generating both satellite cells and their myonuclear progeny in vivo. PMID:19265661

  13. Immunohistological recognition of cyclin D1 expression by non-lymphoid cells among lymphoid neoplastic cells.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, Zainalabideen; Turley, Helen; Gatter, Kevin; Pezzella, Francesco

    2014-03-01

    Cyclin D1 immunostaining of non-neoplastic cells has been a source of diagnostic confusion especially in lymphoproliferative lesions. This study has reviewed these in two hundred and thirty-one haematopathological samples stained for cyclin D1. Most cases were formalin-fixed except for a few bone marrow trephines, which were B-5 fixed, and EDTA decalcified. Overall, 94% (216/231) of cases showed one or more types of non-neoplastic cells expressing Cyclin D1 of variable intensity. Endothelial cells and histiocytes were the most commonly identified Cyclin D1 positive cells being positive in 92% (214/231) of cases. Other normal cell types identified included fat cells, stromal fibroblasts, glial cells, spermatocytes, smooth muscle cells, osteoblasts and where present epithelial cells. Many normal cell types can express cyclinD1. Knowledge of these is useful to prevent misinterpretation of cyclin D1 positive tumours. PMID:23758159

  14. Robust enumeration of cell subsets from tissue expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Aaron M.; Liu, Chih Long; Green, Michael R.; Gentles, Andrew J.; Feng, Weiguo; Xu, Yue; Hoang, Chuong D.; Diehn, Maximilian; Alizadeh, Ash A.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce CIBERSORT, a method for characterizing cell composition of complex tissues from their gene expression profiles. When applied to enumeration of hematopoietic subsets in RNA mixtures from fresh, frozen, and fixed tissues, including solid tumors, CIBERSORT outperformed other methods with respect to noise, unknown mixture content, and closely related cell types. CIBERSORT should enable large-scale analysis of RNA mixtures for cellular biomarkers and therapeutic targets (http://cibersort.stanford.edu). PMID:25822800

  15. Improved expression systems for regulated expression in Salmonella infecting eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Medina, Carlos; Camacho, Eva María; Flores, Amando; Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Santero, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    In this work we describe a series of improvements to the Salmonella-based salicylate-inducible cascade expression system comprised of a plasmid-borne expression module, where target gene expression is driven by the P(m) promoter governed by the XylS2 regulator, and a genome-integrated regulatory module controlled by the nahR/P(sal) system. We have constructed a set of high and low-copy number plasmids bearing modified versions of the expression module with a more versatile multiple cloning site and different combinations of the following elements: (i) the nasF transcriptional attenuator, which reduces basal expression levels, (ii) a strong ribosome binding site, and (iii) the Type III Secretion System (TTSS) signal peptide from the effector protein SspH2 to deliver proteins directly to the eukaryotic cytosol following bacterial infection of animal cells. We show that different expression module versions can be used to direct a broad range of protein production levels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the efficient reduction of basal expression by the nasF attenuator allows the cloning of genes encoding highly cytotoxic proteins such as colicin E3 even in the absence of its immunity protein. Additionally, we show that the Salmonella TTSS is able to translocate most of the protein produced by this regulatory cascade to the cytoplasm of infected HeLa cells. Our results indicate that these vectors represent useful tools for the regulated overproduction of heterologous proteins in bacterial culture or in animal cells, for the cloning and expression of genes encoding toxic proteins and for pathogenesis studies. PMID:21829692

  16. Improved Expression Systems for Regulated Expression in Salmonella Infecting Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Carlos; Camacho, Eva María; Flores, Amando; Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Santero, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    In this work we describe a series of improvements to the Salmonella-based salicylate-inducible cascade expression system comprised of a plasmid-borne expression module, where target gene expression is driven by the Pm promoter governed by the XylS2 regulator, and a genome-integrated regulatory module controlled by the nahR/Psal system. We have constructed a set of high and low-copy number plasmids bearing modified versions of the expression module with a more versatile multiple cloning site and different combinations of the following elements: (i) the nasF transcriptional attenuator, which reduces basal expression levels, (ii) a strong ribosome binding site, and (iii) the Type III Secretion System (TTSS) signal peptide from the effector protein SspH2 to deliver proteins directly to the eukaryotic cytosol following bacterial infection of animal cells. We show that different expression module versions can be used to direct a broad range of protein production levels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the efficient reduction of basal expression by the nasF attenuator allows the cloning of genes encoding highly cytotoxic proteins such as colicin E3 even in the absence of its immunity protein. Additionally, we show that the Salmonella TTSS is able to translocate most of the protein produced by this regulatory cascade to the cytoplasm of infected HeLa cells. Our results indicate that these vectors represent useful tools for the regulated overproduction of heterologous proteins in bacterial culture or in animal cells, for the cloning and expression of genes encoding toxic proteins and for pathogenesis studies. PMID:21829692

  17. Reduced migration of MLH1 deficient colon cancer cells depends on SPTAN1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Defects in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protein MLH1 are frequently observed in sporadic and hereditary colorectal cancers (CRC). Affected tumors generate much less metastatic potential than the MLH1 proficient forms. Although MLH1 has been shown to be not only involved in postreplicative MMR but also in several MMR independent processes like cytoskeletal organization, the connection between MLH1 and metastasis remains unclear. We recently identified non-erythroid spectrin αII (SPTAN1), a scaffolding protein involved in cell adhesion and motility, to interact with MLH1. In the current study, the interaction of MLH1 and SPTAN1 and its potential consequences for CRC metastasis was evaluated. Methods Nine cancer cell lines as well as fresh and paraffin embedded colon cancer tissue from 12 patients were used in gene expression studies of SPTAN1 and MLH1. Co-expression of SPTAN1 and MLH1 was analyzed by siRNA knock down of MLH1 in HeLa, HEK293, MLH1 positive HCT116, SW480 and LoVo cells. Effects on cellular motility were determined in MLH1 deficient HCT116 and MLH1 deficient HEK293T compared to their MLH1 proficient sister cells, respectively. Results MLH1 deficiency is clearly associated with SPTAN1 reduction. Moreover, siRNA knock down of MLH1 decreased the mRNA level of SPTAN1 in HeLa, HEK293 as well as in MLH1 positive HCT116 cells, which indicates a co-expression of SPTAN1 by MLH1. In addition, cellular motility of MLH1 deficient HCT116 and MLH1 deficient HEK293T cells was impaired compared to the MLH1 proficient sister clones. Consequently, overexpression of SPTAN1 increased migration of MLH1 deficient cells while knock down of SPTAN1 decreased cellular mobility of MLH1 proficient cells, indicating SPTAN1-dependent migration ability. Conclusions These data suggest that SPTAN1 levels decreased in concordance with MLH1 reduction and impaired cellular mobility in MLH1 deficient colon cancer cells. Therefore, aggressiveness of MLH1-positive CRC might be

  18. Global gene expression response to telomerase in bovine adrenocortical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Perrault, Steven D.; Hornsby, Peter J.; Betts, Dean H. . E-mail: bettsd@uoguelph.ca

    2005-09-30

    The infinite proliferative capability of most immortalized cells is dependent upon the presence of the enzyme telomerase and its ability to maintain telomere length and structure. However, telomerase may be involved in a greater system than telomere length regulation, as recent evidence has shown it capable of increasing wound healing in vivo, and improving cellular proliferation rate and survival from apoptosis in vitro. Here, we describe the global gene expression response to ectopic telomerase expression in an in vitro bovine adrenocortical cell model. Telomerase-immortalized cells showed an increased ability for proliferation and survival in minimal essential medium above cells transgenic for GFP. cDNA microarray analyses revealed an altered cell state indicative of increased adrenocortical cell proliferation regulated by the IGF2 pathway and alterations in members of the TGF-B family. As well, we identified alterations in genes associated with development and wound healing that support a model that high telomerase expression induces a highly adaptable, progenitor-like state.

  19. Ikaros expression sensitizes leukemic cells to the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    He, Licai; Gao, Shenmeng; Zhu, Zhenfeng; Chen, Shang; Gu, Haihua

    2016-01-01

    Ikaros is an important transcription factor involved in the development and differentiation of hematopoietic cells. However, its role in the treatment of hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemia is less well understood. In the present study, it was observed by data mining of the Oncomine database that high expression levels of full-length Ikaros (IK1) is correlated with increased sensitivity of cancer cells to treatments with chemotherapeutic drugs, including doxorubicin (DOX). To examine the functional significance of this observation, the expression of IK1 in a leukemia cell line was altered, and the response of leukemic cells to DOX treatment was analyzed. It was observed that overexpression of IK1 could enhance DOX-induced apoptosis, while knockdown of IK1 attenuated DOX-induced apoptosis in leukemic cells. Further experiments demonstrated that IK1 sensitized leukemic cells to DOX-induced apoptosis, probably through upregulation of caspase-9. These data suggest that high expression levels of IK1 may be a potential biomarker to predict responses of leukemia patients to treatment with chemotherapy.

  20. Serial analysis of gene expression in a microglial cell line.

    PubMed

    Inoue, H; Sawada, M; Ryo, A; Tanahashi, H; Wakatsuki, T; Hada, A; Kondoh, N; Nakagaki, K; Takahashi, K; Suzumura, A; Yamamoto, M; Tabira, T

    1999-12-01

    We used the serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) method to systematically analyze transcripts present in a microglial cell line. Over 10,000 SAGE tags were sequenced, and shown to represent 6,013 unique transcripts. Among the diverse transcripts that had not been previously detected in microglia were those for cytokines such as endothelial monocyte-activating polypeptide I (EMAP I), and for cell surface antigens, including adhesion molecules such as CD9, CD53, CD107a, CD147, CD162 and mast cell high affinity IgE receptor. In addition, we detected transcripts that were characteristic of hematopoietic cells or mesodermal structures, such as E3 protein, A1, EN-7, B94, and ufo. Furthermore, the profile contained a transcript, Hn1, that is important in hematopoietic cells and neurological development (Tang et al. Mamm Genome 8:695-696, 1997), suggesting the probable neural differentiation of microglia from the hematopoietic system in development. Messenger RNA expression of these genes was confirmed by RT-PCR in primary cultures of microglia. Significantly, this is the first systematic profiling of the genes expressed in a microglial cell line. The identification and further characterization of the genes described here should provide potential new targets for the study of microglial biology. PMID:10559785

  1. AIRE expressing marginal zone dendritic cells balances adaptive immunity and T-follicular helper cell recruitment.

    PubMed

    Lindmark, Evelina; Chen, Yunying; Georgoudaki, Anna-Maria; Dudziak, Diana; Lindh, Emma; Adams, William C; Loré, Karin; Winqvist, Ola; Chambers, Benedict J; Karlsson, Mikael C I

    2013-05-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome Type I (APS I) results in multiple endocrine organ destruction and is caused by mutations in the Autoimmune regulator gene (AIRE). In the thymic stroma, cells expressing the AIRE gene dictate T cell education and central tolerance. Although this function is the most studied, AIRE is also expressed in the periphery in DCs and stromal cells. Still, how AIRE regulated transcription modifies cell behaviour in the periphery is largely unknown. Here we show that AIRE is specifically expressed by 33D1(+) DCs and dictates the fate of antibody secreting cell movement within the spleen. We also found that AIRE expressing 33D1(+) DCs expresses self-antigens as exemplified by the hallmark gene insulin. Also, as evidence for a regulatory function, absence of Aire in 33D1(+) DCs led to reduced levels of the chemokine CXCL12 and increased co-stimulatory properties. This resulted in altered activation and recruitment of T-follicular helper cells and germinal centre B cells. The altered balance leads to a change of the early response to a T cell-dependent antigen in Aire(-/-) mice. These findings add to the understanding of how specific DC subtypes regulate the early responses during T cell-dependent antibody responses within the spleen and further define the role of AIRE in the periphery as regulator of self-antigen expression and lymphocyte migration. PMID:23265639

  2. Gene cataloging and expression profiling in human gastric cancer cells by expressed sequence tags.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam-Soon; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Oh, Jung-Hwa; Lee, Ju-Yeon; Oh, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Jeong-Min; Park, Hong-Seog; Kim, Sangsoo; Song, Kyu-Sang; Rho, Seung-Moo; Yoo, Hyang-Sook; Kim, Yong Sung

    2004-06-01

    To understand the molecular mechanism associated with gastric carcinogenesis, we identified genes expressed in gastric cancer cell lines and tissues. Of 97,609 high-quality ESTs sequenced from 36 cDNA libraries, 92,545 were coalesced into 10,418 human Unigene clusters (Build 151). The gene expression profile was produced by counting the cluster frequencies in each library. Although the profiles of highly expressed genes varied greatly from library to library, those genes related to cell structure formation, heat shock proteins, the glycolysis pathway, and the signaling pathway were highly represented in human gastric cancer cell lines and in primary tumors. Conversely, the genes encoding immunoglobulins, ribosomal proteins, and digestive proteins were down-regulated in gastric cancer cell lines and tissues compared to normal tissues. The transcription levels of some of these genes were confirmed by RT-PCR. We found that genes related to cell adhesion, apoptosis, and cytoskeleton formation were particularly up-regulated in the gastric cancer cell lines established from malignant ascites compared to those from primary tumors. This comprehensive molecular profiling of human gastric cancer should be useful for elucidating the genetic events associated with human gastric cancer. PMID:15177556

  3. Human clusterin gene expression is confined to surviving cells during in vitro programmed cell death.

    PubMed Central

    French, L E; Wohlwend, A; Sappino, A P; Tschopp, J; Schifferli, J A

    1994-01-01

    Clusterin is a serum glycoprotein endowed with cell aggregating, complement inhibitory, and lipid binding properties, and is also considered as a specific marker of dying cells, its expression being increased in various tissues undergoing programmed cell death (PCD). However, no study has so far directly shown that cells expressing clusterin in these tissues are actually apoptotic as defined by morphological and biochemical criteria. We have studied cellular clusterin gene expression in vitro using three different models of PCD: (a) ultraviolet B (UV-B) irradiation of human U937, HeLa, and A431 cell lines, (b) in vitro aging of human peripheral blood neutrophils (PMNs), and (c) dexamethasone-induced cell death of the human lymphoblastoid cell line CEM-C7. In all three models, the classical morphological and biochemical features of PCD observed did not correlate with an increase, but with either a marked decrease or an absence of clusterin gene expression as assessed by Northern blot analysis. In situ hybridization of U937 and A431 cells after UV-B irradiation revealed, in addition, that only morphologically normal cells that are surviving continue to express the clusterin gene. Our results demonstrate that in the human myeloid, lymphoid, and epithelial cell types studied, clusterin gene expression is not a prerequisite to their death by apoptosis. In addition, and most interestingly, in situ hybridization of U937 and A431 cells revealed that only surviving cells express the clusterin gene after the induction of PCD, thus providing novel evidence suggesting that clusterin may be associated with cell survival within tissues regressing as a consequence of PCD. Images PMID:8113419

  4. Development of human cells with RXFP1 knockdown using retroviral delivery of microRNA against human RXFP1.

    PubMed

    Yong, K L; Callander, G E; Bergin, R; Samuel, C S; Bathgate, R A D

    2013-01-01

    To study the specific actions of relaxin through RXFP1 in human cells, it would be advantageous to develop cell populations with permanent RXFP1 knockdown (KD). We have developed and assessed four microRNA against human RXFP1. One of the four designed microRNA displayed significant RXFP1 KD as assessed by reduced relaxin binding when co-transfected with human RXFP1 into HEK-293T cells. The selected microRNA sequence was subsequently retrovirally delivered into the human dermal fibroblast cell line BJ3 which natively expresses RXFP1. The RXFP1 KD BJ3 cells displayed diminished RXFP1 mRNA expression and complete loss of ability of relaxin treatment to reduce collagen deposition after TGF-beta1 stimulation. The retroviral expression of miRNA to successfully silence RXFP1 expression is an invaluable tool to investigate receptor specificity, signalling and possible off-target effects of newly developed relaxin analogs. PMID:24640558

  5. PDGFR-{beta} expression in small cell lung cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, Eric T.; Gonzalez, Adriana; Massion, Pierre P.; Olson, Sandra J.; Albert, Jeffrey M.; Shyr, Yu; Carbone, David P.; Johnson, David H.; Hallahan, Dennis E.; Lu Bo . E-mail: bo.lu@vanderbilt.edu

    2007-02-01

    Background: Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and PDGFR-{beta} are expressed and have been found to have prognostic value in several human cancers. Data in non-small-cell cancer cell lines have suggested that PDGFR is a therapeutic target for drug development. In the current study PDGFR-{beta} expression and prognostic value in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) was investigated. Methods and Materials: Paraffin-embedded tissue blocks from 53 patients with limited and extensive stage SCLC were obtained for immunohistochemical staining. Tumors from each patient were sampled 3 times and stained with PDGFR-{beta} specific antibody. Patients were divided into low and high staining groups based on intensity. Results: There was high intensity PDGFR-{beta} staining in 20 patients with SCLC. Another 29 expressed low intensity PDGFR-{beta} staining, with only 4 patients showing no PDGFR-{beta} staining. There was no statistically significant difference in 5 year overall survival between patients with low levels of PDGFR-{beta} staining vs. those with high level staining SCLC tumors (p = 0.538). Conclusions: The present study found that the majority of SCLC patients express, at least, a low level of PDGF-{beta}. However, the level of PDGFR-{beta} expression was not a statistically significant predictor of 5 year overall survival in SCLC.

  6. Live-Cell, Temporal Gene Expression Analysis of Osteogenic Differentiation in Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Hetal V.; Voruganti, Indu S.; Jayasuriya, Chathuraka; Chen, Qian

    2014-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are a widely investigated type of mesenchymal stem cells with great potential for musculoskeletal regeneration. However, the use of ASCs is complicated by their cellular heterogeneity, which exists at both the population and single-cell levels. This study demonstrates a live-cell assay to investigate gene expression in ASCs undergoing osteogenesis using fluorescently tagged DNA hybridization probes called molecular beacons. A molecular beacon was designed to target the mRNA sequence for alkaline phosphatase (ALPL), a gene characteristically expressed during early osteogenesis. The percentage of cells expressing this gene in a population was monitored daily to quantify the uniformity of the differentiation process. Differentiating ASC populations were repeatedly measured in a nondestructive fashion over a 10-day period to obtain temporal gene expression data. Results showed consistent expression patterns for the investigated osteogenic genes in response to induction medium. Peak signal level, indicating when the most cells expressed ALPL at once, was observed on days 3–5. The differentiation response of sample populations was generally uniform when assessed on a well-by-well basis over time. The expression of alkaline phosphatase is consistent with previous studies of osteogenic differentiation, suggesting that molecular beacons are a viable means of monitoring the spatiotemporal gene expression of live, differentiating ASCs. PMID:24367991

  7. Association of luteinizing hormone receptor gene expression with cell cycle progression in granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Jennifer D.; Seekallu, Srinivas V.; VandeVoort, Catherine A.; Chaffin, Charles L.

    2009-01-01

    During hormonally induced ovarian follicle growth, granulosa cell proliferation increases and returns to baseline prior to the administration of an ovulatory stimulus. Several key genes appear to follow a similar pattern, including the luteinizing hormone receptor (LHCGR), suggesting an association between cell cycle progression and gene expression. The expression of LHCGR mRNA in granulosa cells isolated from immature rats and treated in culture with FSH increased in a time-dependent manner, whereas administration of the cell cycle inhibitor mimosine completely suppressed expression. Although forskolin was able to induce luteinization in cells treated with mimosine, human chorionic gonadotropin had no effect, indicating the functional loss of LHCGR. The effects of mimosine on cell cycle progression and LHCGR mRNA expression were reversible within 24 h of mimosine removal. Cell cycle inhibition did not alter the stability of LHCGR mRNA, indicating that the primary effect was at the transcriptional level. To determine whether the relationship between LHCGR expression and cell cycle were relevant in vivo, immature rats were given a bolus of PMSG, followed by a second injection of either saline or PMSG 24 h later to augment levels of proliferation. The expression of LHCGR mRNA was elevated in the ovaries of animals receiving a supplement of PMSG. Mimosine also blocked cell cycle progression and LHCGR mRNA expression in macaque granulosa cells isolated following controlled ovarian stimulation cycles and in two different mouse Leydig tumor lines. These data collectively indicate that LHCGR mRNA is expressed as a function of the passage of cells across the G1-S phase boundary. PMID:19293332

  8. Calretinin mediates apoptosis in small cell lung cancer cells expressing tetraspanin CD9☆

    PubMed Central

    He, Ping; Kuhara, Hanako; Tachibana, Isao; Jin, Yingji; Takeda, Yoshito; Tetsumoto, Satoshi; Minami, Toshiyuki; Kohmo, Satoshi; Hirata, Haruhiko; Takahashi, Ryo; Inoue, Koji; Nagatomo, Izumi; Kida, Hiroshi; Kijima, Takashi; Naka, Tetsuji; Morii, Eiichi; Kawase, Ichiro; Kumanogoh, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    A majority of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells lack a metastasis suppressor, tetraspanin CD9, and CD9 expression promotes their apoptosis. By a proteomics-based approach, we compared an SCLC cell line with its CD9 transfectant and found that a calcium-binding neuronal protein, calretinin, is upregulated in CD9-positive SCLC cells. Ectopic or anticancer drug-induced CD9 expression upregulated calretinin, whereas CD9 knockdown down-regulated calretinin in SCLC cells. When calretinin was knocked down, CD9-positive SCLC cells revealed increased Akt phosphorylation and decreased apoptosis. These results suggest that CD9 positively regulates the expression of calretinin that mediates proapoptotic effect in SCLC cells. PMID:23772398

  9. Firefly luciferase gene: structure and expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    de Wet, J R; Wood, K V; DeLuca, M; Helinski, D R; Subramani, S

    1987-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the luciferase gene from the firefly Photinus pyralis was determined from the analysis of cDNA and genomic clones. The gene contains six introns, all less than 60 bases in length. The 5' end of the luciferase mRNA was determined by both S1 nuclease analysis and primer extension. Although the luciferase cDNA clone lacked the six N-terminal codons of the open reading frame, we were able to reconstruct the equivalent of a full-length cDNA using the genomic clone as a source of the missing 5' sequence. The full-length, intronless luciferase gene was inserted into mammalian expression vectors and introduced into monkey (CV-1) cells in which enzymatically active firefly luciferase was transiently expressed. In addition, cell lines stably expressing firefly luciferase were isolated. Deleting a portion of the 5'-untranslated region of the luciferase gene removed an upstream initiation (AUG) codon and resulted in a twofold increase in the level of luciferase expression. The ability of the full-length luciferase gene to activate cryptic or enhancerless promoters was also greatly reduced or eliminated by this 5' deletion. Assaying the expression of luciferase provides a rapid and inexpensive method for monitoring promoter activity. Depending on the instrumentation employed to detect luciferase activity, we estimate this assay to be from 30- to 1,000-fold more sensitive than assaying chloramphenicol acetyltransferase expression. Images PMID:3821727

  10. Profiling Eph receptor expression in cells and tissues

    PubMed Central

    Noberini, Roberta; Rubio de la Torre, Elena; Pasquale, Elena B.

    2012-01-01

    The Eph receptor tyrosine kinase family includes many members, which are often expressed together in various combinations and can promiscuously interact with multiple ephrin ligands, generating intricate networks of intracellular signals that control physiological and pathological processes. Knowing the entire repertoire of Eph receptors and ephrins expressed in a biological sample is important when studying their biological roles. Moreover, given the correlation between Eph receptor/ephrin expression and cancer pathogenesis, their expression patterns could serve important diagnostic and prognostic purposes. However, profiling Eph receptor and ephrin expression has been challenging. Here we describe a novel and straightforward approach to catalog the Eph receptors present in cultured cells and tissues. By measuring the binding of ephrin Fc fusion proteins to Eph receptors in ELISA and pull-down assays, we determined that a mixture of four ephrins is suitable for isolating both EphA and EphB receptors in a single pull-down. We then used mass spectrometry to identify the Eph receptors present in the pull-downs and estimate their relative levels. This approach was validated in cultured human cancer cell lines, human tumor xenograft tissue grown in mice, and mouse brain tissue. The new mass spectrometry approach we have developed represents a useful tool for the identification of the spectrum of Eph receptors present in a biological sample and could also be extended to profiling ephrin expression. PMID:22568954

  11. A microfluidic platform for regulating signal transduction in single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Pak Kin; Yu, Fuqu; Sun, Ren; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2004-11-01

    Recent progress in micro cell culture systems has lead to new approaches in cell biology studies. Using micro devices for cell culturing possesses distinctive advantages over traditional methods. Length scale matching facilitates manipulation and detection at the single cell level. Previously, we have demonstrated generation of various stimulations such as spatial chemical gradient, electric field, and shear stress to study the dynamic responses of individual cells. Dynamic stimulations and continuous monitoring in a microfluidic system can be useful in studying different aspects of cellular process. In this work, we present a microfluidic platform for regulating nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) signal transduction in human embryonic kidney 293T cells. Time-varying bio-chemical stimulants, such as interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor, are introduced into the microchannel to activate the NF-kB signaling pathway. The dynamic responses of individual cells are monitored with the expression of reporter gene, green fluorescent protein. Regulation of the NF-kB activity is successfully demonstrated. This work is supported by CMISE through NASA URETI program.

  12. TPD52 expression increases neutral lipid storage within cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Kamili, Alvin; Roslan, Nuruliza; Frost, Sarah; Cantrill, Laurence C; Wang, Dongwei; Della-Franca, Austin; Bright, Robert K; Groblewski, Guy E; Straub, Beate K; Hoy, Andrew J; Chen, Yuyan; Byrne, Jennifer A

    2015-09-01

    Tumor protein D52 (TPD52) is amplified and/or overexpressed in cancers of diverse cellular origins. Altered cellular metabolism (including lipogenesis) is a hallmark of cancer development, and protein-protein associations between TPD52 and known regulators of lipid storage, and differential TPD52 expression in obese versus non-obese adipose tissue, suggest that TPD52 might regulate cellular lipid metabolism. We found increased lipid droplet numbers in BALB/c 3T3 cell lines stably expressing TPD52, compared with control and TPD52L1-expressing cell lines. TPD52-expressing 3T3 cells showed increased fatty acid storage in triglyceride (from both de novo synthesis and uptake) and formed greater numbers of lipid droplets upon oleic acid supplementation than control cells. TPD52 colocalised with Golgi, but not endoplasmic reticulum (ER), markers and also showed partial colocalisation with lipid droplets coated with ADRP (also known as PLIN2), with a proportion of TPD52 being detected in the lipid droplet fraction. Direct interactions between ADRP and TPD52, but not TPD52L1, were demonstrated using the yeast two-hybrid system, with ADRP-TPD52 interactions confirmed using GST pulldown assays. Our findings uncover a new isoform-specific role for TPD52 in promoting intracellular lipid storage, which might be relevant to TPD52 overexpression in cancer. PMID:26183179

  13. Cell surface expression and biosynthesis of epithelial Na+ channels.

    PubMed Central

    Prince, L S; Welsh, M J

    1998-01-01

    The epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) complex is composed of three homologous subunits: alpha, beta and gamma. Mutations in ENaC subunits can increase the number of channels on the cell surface, causing a hereditary form of hypertension called Liddle's syndrome, or can decrease channel activity, causing pseudohypoaldosteronism type I, a salt-wasting disease of infancy. To investigate surface expression, we studied ENaC subunits expressed in COS-7 and HEK293 cells. Using surface biotinylation and protease sensitivity, we found that when individual ENaC subunits are expressed alone, they traffic to the cell surface. The subunits are glycosylated with high-mannose oligosaccharides, but seem to have the carbohydrate removed before they reach the cell surface. Moreover, subunits form a complex that cannot be disrupted by several non-ionic detergents. The pattern of glycosylation and detergent solubility/insolubility persists when the N-teminal and C-terminal cytoplasmic regions of ENaC are removed. With co-expression of all three ENaC subunits, the insoluble complex is the predominant species. These results show that ENaC and its family members are unique in their trafficking, biochemical characteristics and post-translational modifications. PMID:9841884

  14. Construction and gene expression analysis of a single-stranded DNA minivector based on an inverted terminal repeat of adeno-associated virus.

    PubMed

    Ping, Han; Liu, Xiaomei; Zhu, Dongqin; Li, Taiming; Zhang, Chun

    2015-04-01

    The plasmid vectors currently used for nonviral gene transfer have the disadvantage of carrying a bacterial backbone and an antibiotic resistance gene, which may cause side effects. The adeno-associated virus (AAV) genome is a linear single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecule with palindromic inverted terminal repeat (ITR) sequences forming double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) hairpin (HP) structures at each end. Based on the AAV genome, we constructed an AAV-ITR ssDNA minivector that consists of a GFP expression cassette flanked by both ITR sequences of 125 nucleotides. The minivectors were produced by digestion of the parental plasmids followed by denaturation. The self-complementary inverted T-shaped HP structure of the minivector was automatically formed. The HEK 293T cells were transfected with the AAV-ITR ssDNA minivector, plasmid, and dsDNA expression cassette. The results showed that AAV-ITR ssDNA minivector had relatively low gene expression efficiency in vitro. However, we found that the GFP expression efficiency of the D sequence-deleted AAV-ITR ssDNA minivector was significantly increased and was similar to those obtained with the plasmid and dsDNA expression cassette. Our data suggest that the AAV-ITR ssDNA minivector may be a new type of gene expression vector for gene therapy besides the virus and plasmid. PMID:25555376

  15. Differential expression and interaction of host factors augment HIV-1 gene expression in neonatal mononuclear cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaravaradan, Vasudha; Mehta, Roshni; Harris, David T.; Zack, Jerome A.; Ahmad, Nafees

    2010-04-25

    We have previously shown a higher level of HIV-1 replication and gene expression in neonatal (cord) blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) compared with adult blood cells (PBMC), which could be due to differential expression of host factors. We performed the gene expression profile of CBMC and PBMC and found that 8013 genes were expressed at higher levels in CBMC than PBMC and 8028 genes in PBMC than CBMC, including 1181 and 1414 genes upregulated after HIV-1 infection in CBMC and PBMC, respectively. Several transcription factors (NF-kappaB, E2F, HAT-1, TFIIE, Cdk9, Cyclin T1), signal transducers (STAT3, STAT5A) and cytokines (IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-10) were upregulated in CBMC than PBMC, which are known to influence HIV-1 replication. In addition, a repressor of HIV-1 transcription, YY1, was down regulated in CBMC than PBMC and several matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-7, -12, -14) were significantly upregulated in HIV-1 infected CBMC than PBMC. Furthermore, we show that CBMC nuclear extracts interacted with a higher extent to HIV-1 LTR cis-acting sequences, including NF-kappaB, NFAT, AP1 and NF-IL6 compared with PBMC nuclear extracts and retroviral based short hairpin RNA (shRNA) for STAT3 and IL-6 down regulated their own and HIV-1 gene expression, signifying that these factors influenced differential HIV-1 gene expression in CBMC than PBMC.

  16. PROFILES OF GENE EXPRESSION ASSOCIATED WITH TETRACYCLINE OVER EXPRESSION OF HSP70 IN MCF-7 BREAST CANCER CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Profiles of gene expression associated with tetracycline over expression of HSP70 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) protect cells from damage through their function as molecular chaperones. Some cancers reveal high levels of HSP70 expression in asso...

  17. Enhancement of endothelial cell migration by constitutively active LPA{sub 1}-expressing tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kitayoshi, Misaho; Kato, Kohei; Tanabe, Eriko; Yoshikawa, Kyohei; Fukui, Rie; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutated LPA{sub 1} stimulates cell migration of endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF expressions are increased by mutated LPA{sub 1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPA signaling via mutated LPA{sub 1} is involved in angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutated LPA{sub 1} promotes cancer cell progression. -- Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors belong to G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors (LPA receptors; LPA{sub 1} to LPA{sub 6}). They indicate a variety of cellular response by the interaction with LPA, including cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Recently, we have reported that constitutive active mutated LPA{sub 1} induced the strong biological effects of rat neuroblastoma B103 cells. In the present study, we examined the effects of mutated LPA{sub 1} on the interaction between B103 cells and endothelial F-2 cells. Each LPA receptor expressing B103 cells were maintained in serum-free DMEM and cell motility assay was performed with a Cell Culture Insert. When F-2 cells were cultured with conditioned medium from Lpar1 and Lpar3-expressing cells, the cell motility of F-2 cells was significantly higher than control cells. Interestingly, the motile activity of F-2 cells was strongly induced by mutated LPA{sub 1} than other cells, correlating with the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf)-A and Vegf-C. Pretreatment of LPA signaling inhibitors inhibited F-2 cell motility stimulated by mutated LPA{sub 1}. These results suggest that activation of LPA signaling via mutated LPA{sub 1} may play an important role in the promotion of angiogenesis in rat neuroblastoma cells.

  18. Antitumor effects of celecoxib in COX-2 expressing and non-expressing canine melanoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Kyoung-won; Coh, Ye-rin; Rebhun, Robert B.; Ahn, Jin-ok; Han, Sei-Myung; Lee, Hee-woo; Youn, Hwa-Young

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a potential target for chemoprevention and cancer therapy. Celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, inhibits cell growth of various types of human cancer including malignant melanoma. In dogs, oral malignant melanoma represents the most common oral tumor and is often a fatal disease. Therefore, there is a desperate need to develop additional therapeutic strategies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anticancer effects of celecoxib on canine malignant melanoma cell lines that express varying levels of COX-2. Celecoxib induced a significant anti-proliferative effect in both LMeC and CMeC-1 cells. In the CMeC cells, treatment of 50 µM celecoxib caused an increase in cells in the G0/G1 and a decreased proportion of cells in G-2 phase. In the LMeC cells, 50 µM of celecoxib led to an increase in the percentage of cells in the sub-G1 phase and a significant activation of caspase-3 when compared to CMeC-1 cells. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that celecoxib exhibits antitumor effects on canine melanoma LMeC and CMeC-1 cells by induction of G1-S cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Our data suggest that celecoxib might be effective as a chemotherapeutic agent against canine malignant melanoma. PMID:24656746

  19. Altered enteroendocrine cell expression in T cell receptor alpha chain knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Rubin, D C; Zhang, H; Qian, P; Lorenz, R G; Hutton, K; Peters, M G

    2000-10-15

    Mice lacking T cell receptor alpha chain (TCRalpha(-/-)) develop inflammation of the colon. We have examined the effect of this inflammation on the colonic epithelium by studying markers of epithelial cuff, enteroendocrine, and immune cell differentiation. Using immunohistochemical techniques, colons were compared in normal C57/BL6 and murine TCR alpha(-/-) mice aged 2 and 3 weeks and 3-11 months. TCR alpha(-/-) mice aged 3-11 months had histologic evidence of inflammation with increased expression of CD45, CD4+, CD8+, and B220+ cells and a decrease in expression of IgA+ cells. There was a decrease in the number of cholecystokinin, serotonin, and neurotensin enteroendocrine expressing cells in the colon of TCR alpha(-/-) mice. These changes were not present in 2-3-week-old suckling/weaning mice. In contrast, peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY), glucagon-like peptide-1, and gastrin expression did not change and small intestinal enteroendocrine cells remained unaltered. The change in colonic enteroendocrine cell expression appears to be a specific response, since only a subset of these cells was altered, and the epithelium was intact by histologic analysis. The absence of functional T cells in TCR alpha(-/-) colon has a marked effect on differentiation of a specific subpopulation of enteroendocrine cells, prior to loss of integrity of the epithelium. PMID:11054861

  20. Immunotoxin BL22 induces apoptosis in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells dependent on Bcl-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Bogner, Christian; Dechow, Tobias; Ringshausen, Ingo; Wagner, Michaela; Oelsner, Madlen; Lutzny, Gloria; Licht, Thomas; Peschel, Christian; Pastan, Ira; Kreitman, Robert J; Decker, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an incurable mature B cell proliferation, combining the unfavourable clinical features of aggressive and indolent lymphomas. The blastic variant of MCL has an even worse prognosis and new treatment options are clearly needed. We analysed the effects of BL22, an immunotoxin composed of the Fv portion of an anti- CD22 antibody fused to a 38-kDa Pseudomonas exotoxin-A fragment on four MCL cell lines as well as on primary cells of four MCL patients. Apoptosis induction by BL22 was much more pronounced in MCL cell lines with low Bcl-2 expression (NCEB-1, JeKo-1 and JVM-2) compared to Granta-519 cells with high Bcl-2 expression. While the expression of the antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1 declined (NCEB-1, Granta-519), Bcl-2 levels remained unchanged in Granta-519 cells. However transfection of BCL2 cDNA into NCEB-1, JeKo-1 and JVM-2 cells significantly reduced BL22-mediated toxicity. Accordingly we examined the effects of Bcl-2 inactivation in Granta-519 cells using siRNA. Indeed, apoptosis induction was strongly enhanced in Granta-519 cells with silenced Bcl-2. Our results were confirmed in freshly isolated MCL-cells from patients with leukaemic MCL. We conclude that Bcl-2 expression is important for mediating resistance against the immunotoxin BL22 in MCL cells. PMID:19821820

  1. Proteomics Based Identification of Cell Migration Related Proteins in HBV Expressing HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Huixing; Li, Xi; Chan, Vincent; Chen, Wei Ning

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics study was performed to investigate the specific protein expression profiles of HepG2 cells transfected with mutant HBV compared with wildtype HBV genome, aiming to identify the specific functions of SH3 binding domain (proline rich region) located in HBx. In addition to the cell movement and kinetics changes due to the expression of HBV genome we have observed previously, here we further targeted to explore the specific changes of cellular proteins and potential intracellular protein interactions, which might provide more information of the potential cellular mechanism of the differentiated cell movements. Specific changes of a number of proteins were shown in global protein profiling in HepG2 cells expressing wildtype HBV, including cell migration related proteins, and interestingly the changes were found recovered by SH3 binding domain mutated HBV. The distinctive expressions of proteins were validated by Western blot analysis. PMID:24763314

  2. Single-cell gene expression profiling reveals functional heterogeneity of undifferentiated human epidermal cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, David W. M.; Jensen, Kim B.; Trotter, Matthew W. B.; Connelly, John T.; Broad, Simon; Watt, Fiona M.

    2013-01-01

    Human epidermal stem cells express high levels of β1 integrins, delta-like 1 (DLL1) and the EGFR antagonist LRIG1. However, there is cell-to-cell variation in the relative abundance of DLL1 and LRIG1 mRNA transcripts. Single-cell global gene expression profiling showed that undifferentiated cells fell into two clusters delineated by expression of DLL1 and its binding partner syntenin. The DLL1+ cluster had elevated expression of genes associated with endocytosis, integrin-mediated adhesion and receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. Differentially expressed genes were not independently regulated, as overexpression of DLL1 alone or together with LRIG1 led to the upregulation of other genes in the DLL1+ cluster. Overexpression of DLL1 and LRIG1 resulted in enhanced extracellular matrix adhesion and increased caveolin-dependent EGFR endocytosis. Further characterisation of CD46, one of the genes upregulated in the DLL1+ cluster, revealed it to be a novel cell surface marker of human epidermal stem cells. Cells with high endogenous levels of CD46 expressed high levels of β1 integrin and DLL1 and were highly adhesive and clonogenic. Knockdown of CD46 decreased proliferative potential and β1 integrin-mediated adhesion. Thus, the previously unknown heterogeneity revealed by our studies results in differences in the interaction of undifferentiated basal keratinocytes with their environment. PMID:23482486

  3. MS-HRM assay identifies high levels of epigenetic heterogeneity in human immortalized cell lines.

    PubMed

    Putnik, Milica; Wojdacz, Tomasz K; Pournara, Angeliki; Vahter, Marie; Wallberg, Annika E

    2015-04-15

    Immortalized cell lines are widely used in genetic and epigenetic studies, from exploration of basic molecular pathways to evaluation of disease-specific cellular properties. They are also used in biotechnology, e.g., in drug toxicity tests and vaccine production. Cellular and genetic uniformity is the main feature of immortalized cell lines and it has been particularly advantageous in functional genomic research, which has in recent years been expanded to include epigenetic mechanisms of gene expression regulation. Using the MS-HRM technique, we demonstrated heterogeneity in locus-specific methylation patterns in different cell cultures of four human cell lines: HEK293, HEK293T, LCL and DU145. Our results show that some human immortalized cell lines consist of cells that differ in the methylation status of specific loci, i.e., that they are epigenetically heterogeneous. We show that even two cultures of the same cell line obtained from different laboratories can differ in the methylation status of the specific loci. The results indicated that epigenetic uniformity of the cell lines cannot be assumed in experiments which utilize cell cultures and that the methylation status of the specific loci in the immortalized cell lines should be re-characterized and carefully profiled before epigenetic studies are performed. PMID:25644772

  4. Higher expression of SIRT1 induced resistance of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells to cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qintong; Wang, Wengong

    2015-01-01

    Background High expression of Sirtuin type 1 (SIRT1) exists in some cancer cells. However, it is still unclear whether SIRT1 affects the sensitivity of esophageal cancer cells to cisplatin. This study was designed to explore the relationship between SIRT1 expression and resistance of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells to cisplatin and reveal the underlying mechanism. Methods The tissue samples of 68 ESCC patients were collected from Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital, China. All the patients had undergone cisplatin based combination chemotherapy. The expression of SIRT1and Noxa in tissue samples were analyzed by quantitative real-time reverse PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blot. Human ESCC cell line (ECa9706 cells) was cultured and a cisplatin-resistant subline (ECa9706-CisR cells) was established by continuous exposure to cisplatin at different concentrations. The expression of SIRT1 and Noxa in both cell lines was analyzed by qRT-PCR and Western blot. siRNA technology was utilized to down-regulate the SIRT1 expression in ECa9706-CisR cells. The influence of SIRT1 silence on sensitivity of ECa9706-CisR cells to cisplatin was confirmed using CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry. Furthermore, the level change of Noxa after SIRT1 silence in ECa9706-CisR cells was determined by qRT-PCR and Western blot. Result SIRT1 and Noxa expression in chemo-resistant patients was significantly increased and decreased respectively, compared with chemo-sensitive patients. SIRT1 expression in ECa9706-CisR cells was significantly increased with a lower Noxa level, compared with normal ECa9706 cells. Cisplatin 5 µM could cause proliferation inhibition, G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis in ECa9706-CisR cells and these effects could be enhanced dramatically by SIRT1 silencing. Moreover, Noxa expression was increased after treated with SIRT1 siRNA. Conclusions Over-expression of SIRT1 may cause resistance of ESCC cells to cisplatin through the mechanism involved with Noxa expression. PMID

  5. Isolation of genes predominantly expressed in guard cells and epidermal cells of Nicotiana glauca.

    PubMed

    Smart, L B; Cameron, K D; Bennett, A B

    2000-04-01

    Guard cells are specialized and metabolically active cells which arise during the differentiation of the epidermis. Using Nicotiana glauca epidermal peels as a source of purified guard cells, we have constructed a cDNA library from guard cell RNA. In order to isolate genes that are predominantly expressed in guard cells, we performed a differential screen of this library, comparing the hybridization of a radiolabeled cDNA probe synthesized from guard cell RNA to that from a mesophyll cell cDNA probe. Sixteen clones were isolated based on their greater level of hybridization with the guard cell probe. Of these, eight had high homology to lipid transfer protein (LTP), two were similar to glycine-rich protein (GRP), and one displayed high homology to proline-rich proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPRP2, AtPRP4) and from potato guard cells (GPP). Northern analysis confirmed that one or more NgLTP genes, NgGRP1, and NgGPP1 are all differentially expressed, with highest levels in guard cells, and low or undetectable levels in mesophyll cells and in roots. In addition, all are induced to some degree in drought-stressed guard cells. NgLTP and NgGRP1 expression was localized by in situ hybridization to the guard cells and pavement cells in the epidermis. NgGRP1 expression was also detected in cells of the vasculature. Genomic Southern analysis indicated that LTP is encoded by a family of highly similar genes in N. glauca. This work has identified members of a subset of epidermis- and guard cell-predominant genes, whose protein products are likely to contribute to the unique properties acquired by guard cells and pavement cells during differentiation. PMID:10890533

  6. Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 glycoprotein B: recombinant expression and antibody recognition.

    PubMed

    Dry, Inga; Todd, Helen; Deane, David; Percival, Ann; Mclean, Kevin; Inglis, Neil F; Manson, Erin D T; Haig, David M; Nayuni, Shilpa; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey M; Grant, Dawn M; Bartley, Kathryn; Stewart, James P; Russell, George C

    2016-03-01

    The gammaherpesvirus alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1) causes fatal malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) in susceptible species including cattle, but infects its reservoir host, wildebeest, without causing disease. Pathology in cattle may be influenced by virus-host cell interactions mediated by the virus glycoproteins. Cloning and expression of a haemagglutinin-tagged version of the AlHV-1 glycoprotein B (gB) was used to demonstrate that the AlHV-1-specific monoclonal antibody 12B5 recognised gB and that gB was the main component of the gp115 complex of AlHV-1, a glycoprotein complex of five components identified on the surface of AlHV-1 by immunoprecipitation and radiolabelling. Analysis of AlHV-1 virus particles showed that the native form of gB was detected by mAb 12B5 as a band of about 70 kDa, whilst recombinant gB expressed by transfected HEK293T cells appeared to be subject to additional cleavage and incomplete post-translational processing. Antibody 12B5 recognised an epitope on the N-terminal furin-cleaved fragment of gB on AlHV-1 virus particles. It could be used to detect recombinant and virus-expressed gB on western blots and on the surface of infected cells by flow cytometry, whilst recombinant gB was detected on the surface of transfected cells by immunofluorescence. Recombinant gB has potential as an antigen for ELISA detection of MCF virus infection and as a candidate vaccine antigen. PMID:26650040

  7. Pancreatic beta cells express a diverse set of homeobox genes.

    PubMed Central

    Rudnick, A; Ling, T Y; Odagiri, H; Rutter, W J; German, M S

    1994-01-01

    Homeobox genes, which are found in all eukaryotic organisms, encode transcriptional regulators involved in cell-type differentiation and development. Several homeobox genes encoding homeodomain proteins that bind and activate the insulin gene promoter have been described. In an attempt to identify additional beta-cell homeodomain proteins, we designed primers based on the sequences of beta-cell homeobox genes cdx3 and lmx1 and the Drosophila homeodomain protein Antennapedia and used these primers to amplify inserts by PCR from an insulinoma cDNA library. The resulting amplification products include sequences encoding 10 distinct homeodomain proteins; 3 of these proteins have not been described previously. In addition, an insert was obtained encoding a splice variant of engrailed-2, a homeodomain protein previously identified in the central nervous system. Northern analysis revealed a distinct pattern of expression for each homeobox gene. Interestingly, the PCR-derived clones do not represent a complete sampling of the beta-cell library because no inserts encoding cdx3 or lmx1 protein were obtained. Beta cells probably express additional homeobox genes. The abundance and diversity of homeodomain proteins found in beta cells illustrate the remarkable complexity and redundancy of the machinery controlling beta-cell development and differentiation. Images PMID:7991607

  8. Vitamin H-regulated transgene expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Weber, Wilfried; Bacchus, William; Daoud-El Baba, Marie; Fussenegger, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Although adjustable transgene expression systems are considered essential for future therapeutic and biopharmaceutical manufacturing applications, the currently available transcription control modalities all require side-effect-prone inducers such as immunosupressants, hormones and antibiotics for fine-tuning. We have designed a novel mammalian transcription-control system, which is reversibly fine-tuned by non-toxic vitamin H (also referred to as biotin). Ligation of vitamin H, by engineered Escherichia coli biotin ligase (BirA), to a synthetic biotinylation signal fused to the tetracycline-dependent transactivator (tTA), enables heterodimerization of tTA to a streptavidin-linked transrepressor domain (KRAB), thereby abolishing tTA-mediated transactivation of specific target promoters. As heterodimerization of tTA to KRAB is ultimately conditional upon the presence of vitamin H, the system is vitamin H responsive. Transgenic Chinese hamster ovary cells, engineered for vitamin H-responsive gene expression, showed high-level, adjustable and reversible production of a human model glycoprotein in bench-scale culture systems, bioreactor-based biopharmaceutical manufacturing scenarios, and after implantation into mice. The vitamin H-responsive expression systems showed unique band pass filter-like regulation features characterized by high-level expression at low (0-2 nM biotin), maximum repression at intermediate (100-1000 nM biotin), and high-level expression at increased (>100 000 nM biotin) biotin concentrations. Sequential ON-to-OFF-to-ON, ON-to-OFF and OFF-to-ON expression profiles with graded expression transitions can all be achieved by simply increasing the level of a single inducer molecule without exchanging the culture medium. These novel expression characteristics mediated by an FDA-licensed inducer may foster advances in therapeutic cell engineering and manufacturing of difficult-to-produce protein therapeutics. PMID:17827215

  9. Human vascular smooth muscle cells express a urate transporter.

    PubMed

    Price, Karen L; Sautin, Yuri Y; Long, David A; Zhang, Li; Miyazaki, Hiroki; Mu, Wei; Endou, Hitoshi; Johnson, Richard J

    2006-07-01

    An elevated serum uric acid is associated with the development of hypertension and renal disease. Renal regulation of urate excretion is largely controlled by URAT1 (SLC22A12), a member of the organic anion transporter superfamily. This study reports the specific expression of URAT1 on human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells, as assessed by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis. Expression of URAT1 was localized to the cell membrane. Evidence that the URAT1 transporter was functional was provided by the finding that uptake of 14C-urate was significantly inhibited in the presence of probenecid, an organic anion transporter inhibitor. It is proposed that URAT1 may provide a mechanism by which uric acid enters the human vascular smooth muscle cell, a finding that may be relevant to the role of uric acid in cardiovascular disease. PMID:16775029

  10. Stem Cell-Associated Marker Expression in Canine Hair Follicles.

    PubMed

    Gerhards, Nora M; Sayar, Beyza S; Origgi, Francesco C; Galichet, Arnaud; Müller, Eliane J; Welle, Monika M; Wiener, Dominique J

    2016-03-01

    Functional hair follicle (HF) stem cells (SCs) are crucial to maintain the constant recurring growth of hair. In mice and humans, SC subpopulations with different biomarker expression profiles have been identified in discrete anatomic compartments of the HF. The rare studies investigating canine HF SCs have shown similarities in biomarker expression profiles to that of mouse and human SCs. The aim of our study was to broaden the current repertoire of SC-associated markers and their expression patterns in the dog. We combined analyses on the expression levels of CD34, K15, Sox9, CD200, Nestin, LGR5 and LGR6 in canine skin using RT-qPCR, the corresponding proteins in dog skin lysates, and their expression patterns in canine HFs using immunohistochemistry. Using validated antibodies, we were able to define the location of CD34, Sox9, Keratin15, LGR5 and Nestin in canine HFs and confirm that all tested biomarkers are expressed in canine skin. Our results show similarities between the expression profile of canine, human and mouse HF SC markers. This repertoire of biomarkers will allow us to conduct functional studies and investigate alterations in the canine SC compartment of different diseases, like alopecia or skin cancer with the possibility to extend relevant findings to human patients. PMID:26739040

  11. Expression of cell cycle regulator cdk2ap1 suppresses tumor cell phenotype by non-cell autonomous mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zolochevska, Olga; Figueiredo, Marxa L.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of expressing the cell cycle regulator cdk2ap1 in epithelial or stromal cell compartments to reduce SCC growth in vitro and in vivo. Cell autonomous and/or non-cell autonomous expression of cdk2ap1 reduced tumor growth and invasion and altered cell cycle, adhesion, invasion, angiogenesis, and apoptotic gene expression, as assessed by several in vitro phenotype assays, quantitative real time PCR, and in vivo molecular imaging using a novel three-way xenograft animal model. Our findings suggest that the interactions between cancer cells and fibroblasts that promote abnormal growth can be minimized by expressing cdk2ap1, supporting a novel concept by which tumor/growth suppressor genes can impact tumorigenesis phenotypes from non-cell autonomous interactions within the tumor microenvironment. PMID:19515604

  12. Characterization of TLX Expression in Neural Stem Cells and Progenitor Cells in Adult Brains

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengxiu; Sun, Guoqiang; Murai, Kiyohito; Ye, Peng; Shi, Yanhong

    2012-01-01

    TLX has been shown to play an important role in regulating the self-renewal and proliferation of neural stem cells in adult brains. However, the cellular distribution of endogenous TLX protein in adult brains remains to be elucidated. In this study, we used immunostaining with a TLX-specific antibody to show that TLX is expressed in both neural stem cells and transit-amplifying neural progenitor cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of adult mouse brains. Then, using a double thymidine analog labeling approach, we showed that almost all of the self-renewing neural stem cells expressed TLX. Interestingly, most of the TLX-positive cells in the SVZ represented the thymidine analog-negative, relatively quiescent neural stem cell population. Using cell type markers and short-term BrdU labeling, we demonstrated that TLX was also expressed in the Mash1+ rapidly dividing type C cells. Furthermore, loss of TLX expression dramatically reduced BrdU label-retaining neural stem cells and the actively dividing neural progenitor cells in the SVZ, but substantially increased GFAP staining and extended GFAP processes. These results suggest that TLX is essential to maintain the self-renewing neural stem cells in the SVZ and that the GFAP+ cells in the SVZ lose neural stem cell property upon loss of TLX expression.Understanding the cellular distribution of TLX and its function in specific cell types may provide insights into the development of therapeutic tools for neurodegenerative diseases by targeting TLX in neural stem/progenitors cells. PMID:22952666

  13. Expression of TIA-1 and TIA-2 in T cell malignancies and T cell lymphocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Matutes, E; Coelho, E; Aguado, M J; Morilla, R; Crawford, A; Owusu-Ankomah, K; Catovsky, D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the reactivity with TIA-1 and TIA-2, two monoclonal antibodies that recognise, respectively, granular structures in T lymphocytes and the T cell receptor chain in cells from a variety of T cell disorders. METHODS: Cytoplasmic staining with TIA-1 and TIA-2 was carried out by the immunoalkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase technique in 67 cases with a T cell disorder: 31 large granular lymphocyte (LGL) leukaemia, nine T-prolymphocytic leukaemia (T-PLL), five Sezary syndrome, four peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL), 13 T cell lymphocytosis, and five T-acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL). All had over 75% abnormal T cells which were CD2+, CD3+, CD5+, CD7+, and negative with B cell markers. RESULTS: TIA-1 was positive in 77% cases of LGL leukaemia and half of the PTCL and T-ALL, whereas it was negative in all Sezary syndrome and most T-PLL (8/9) and reactive T-lymphocytosis (10/13). In LGL leukaemia, TIA-1 was positive irrespective of the membrane phenotype, whether CD8+, CD4- or CD4+, CD8-, and was more often positive in cases where cells were CD16+, CD56+, or CD57+. TIA-2 was positive in 60% of cases encompassing all diagnostic types of T cell disorder. There was no correlation between TIA-2 expression and that of other T cell markers, activation antigens, and natural killer markers. CONCLUSIONS: The pattern of TIA-1 expression in T cell malignancies may help in the differential diagnosis among LGL leukaemia (high expression), T cell lymphocytosis and other T cell diseases (low expression). As TIA-2 is expressed in over 95% mature T lymphocytes and thymic cells, its assessment may be useful to demonstrate aberrant phenotypes which can be exploited for detecting minimal residual disease. Images PMID:8655683

  14. [The expression and significance of hnRNPD in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells].

    PubMed

    Geng, Yangyang; Zhang, Lulu; Xu, Miaomiao; Sheng, Wenjiong; Dong, Aijing; Cao, Jinming; Cao, Jianping

    2015-12-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein D (hnRNPD) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tissues and the relationship between hnRNPD expression and the clinicopathological features of ESCC, and to study the effect of down-regulated hnRNPD on the proliferation of ESCC cells and explore its potential mechanism. Methods The expression of hnRNPD protein in ESCC tissues and the normal paracancerous tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry. The siRNA-hnRNPD was transfected into ESCC cells and the silence effect was verified by Western blotting. MTT assay and clone formation assay were used to evaluate the proliferation of ESCC cells after down-regulation of hnRNPD genes. Cell apoptosis was examined by annexin V-phycoerythrin/7-aminoactinomycin D (annexin V-PE/7-AAD) staining and flow cytometry. Results The expression of hnRNPD protein in ESCC tissues was significantly higher than that of the normal paracancerous tissues, and the expression was closely related with neoplasm staging. Down-regulation of hnRNPD inhibited the proliferation and clonality of ESCC cells. Compared with the control group, siRNA targeting hnRNPD significantly promoted cell apoptosis. Conclusion Down-regulation of hnRNPD inhibits the proliferation of ESCC cells by promoting cell apoptosis. PMID:26648300

  15. 'Fluorescent Cell Chip' for immunotoxicity testing: Development of the c-fos expression reporter cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Trzaska, Dominika; Zembek, Patrycja; Olszewski, Maciej; Adamczewska, Violetta; Ulleras, Erik; Dastych, JarosIaw . E-mail: jdastych@cbm.pan.pl

    2005-09-01

    The Fluorescent Cell Chip for in vitro immunotoxicity testing employs cell lines derived from lymphocytes, mast cells, and monocytes-macrophages transfected with various EGFP cytokine reporter gene constructs. While cytokine expression is a valid endpoint for in vitro immunotoxicity screening, additional marker for the immediate-early response gene expression level could be of interest for further development and refinement of the Fluorescent Cell Chip. We have used BW.5147.3 murine thymoma transfected with c-fos reporter constructs to obtain reporter cell lines expressing ECFP under the control of murine c-fos promoter. These cells upon serum withdrawal and readdition and incubation with heavy metal compounds showed paralleled induction of c-Fos expression as evidenced by Real-Time PCR and ECFP fluorescence as evidenced by computer-supported fluorescence microscopy. In conclusion, we developed fluorescent reporter cell lines that could be employed in a simple and time-efficient screening assay for possible action of chemicals on c-Fos expression in lymphocytes. The evaluation of usefulness of these cells for the Fluorescent Cell Chip-based detection of immunotoxicity will require additional testing with a larger number of chemicals.

  16. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Protein Expression in Basal Cell Adenomas and Basal Cell Adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Tesdahl, Brennan A; Wilson, Thomas C; Hoffman, Henry T; Robinson, Robert A

    2016-06-01

    Basal cell adenomas and basal cell adenocarcinomas show marked histomorphologic similarity and are separated microscopically primarily by the invasive characteristics of the adenocarcinomas. We wished to explore potential differences in the expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition associated proteins in these two tumor types. A tissue microarray was constructed utilizing 29 basal cell adenomas and 16 basal cell adenocarcinomas. Immunohistochemical expression of E-cadherin, beta-catenin, Twist 1 and vimentin were investigated. Both tumors expressed all proteins in a relatively similar manner. Nuclear beta-catenin was essentially limited to the abluminal cell populations in both tumor types. E-cadherin was limited largely to luminal locations but was more prevalent in the adenocarcinomas as compared to the adenomas. Primarily abluminal expression for vimentin was seen, sometimes present in an apical dot-like pattern. Distinct populations of cellular expression of these four markers of epithelial mesenchymal transition were present but were similar in locations in both tumors with no patterns discerned to separate basal cell adenoma from basal cell adenocarcinoma. Given these findings, the mechanisms by which basal cell adenocarcinoma is able to invade while its counterpart, basal cell adenoma can not, may be more complex than in other tumor types. PMID:26442856

  17. Polony analysis of gene expression in ES cells and blastocysts

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, C.; Poppino, R.; Sheridan, R.; Moley, K.; Mitra, R.; Gottlieb, D.

    2007-01-01

    Expression profiling of stem cells is challenging due to their small numbers and heterogeneity. The PCR colony (polony) approach has theoretical advantages as an assay for stem cells but has not been applied to small numbers of cells. An assay has been developed that is sensitive enough to detect mRNAs from small numbers of ES cells and from fractions of a single mouse blastocyst. Genes assayed include Oct3, Rex1, Nanog, Cdx2 and GLUT-1. The assay is highly sensitive so that multiple mRNAs from a single blastocyst were easily detected in the same assay. In its present version, the assay is an attractive alternative to conventional RT–PCR for profiling small populations of stem cells. The assay is also amenable to improvements that will increase its sensitivity and ability to analyze many cDNAs simultaneously. PMID:18073198

  18. Expression of Hyaluronidase by Tumor Cells Induces Angiogenesis in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dacai; Pearlman, Eric; Diaconu, Eugenia; Guo, Kun; Mori, Hiroshi; Haqqi, Tariq; Markowitz, Sanford; Willson, James; Sy, Man-Sun

    1996-07-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a proteoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and is important for the maintenance of tissue architecture. Depolymerization of hyaluronic acid may facilitate tumor invasion. In addition, oligosaccharides of hyaluronic acid have been reported to induce angiogenesis. We report here that a hyaluronidase similar to the one on human sperm is expressed by metastatic human melanoma, colon carcinoma, and glioblastoma cell lines and by tumor biopsies from patients with colorectal carcinomas, but not by tissues from normal colon. Moreover, angiogenesis is induced by hyaluronidase+ tumor cells but not hyaluronidase- tumor cells and can be blocked by an inhibitor of hyaluronidase. Tumor cells thus use hyaluronidase as one of the ``molecular saboteurs'' to depolymerize hyaluronic acid to facilitate invasion. As a consequence, breakdown products of hyaluronic acid can further promote tumor establishment by inducing angiogenesis. Hyaluronidase on tumor cells may provide a target for anti-neoplastic drugs.

  19. Expression of Aquaporin-6 in Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sun Young; Lee, Eung Suk; Ohn, Young-Hoon; Park, Tae Kwann

    2016-08-01

    Several aquaporins (AQPs) have been identified to be present in the eyes, and it has been suggested that they are involved in the movement of water and small solutes. AQP6, which has low water permeability and transports mainly anions, was recently discovered in the eyes. In the present study, we investigate the localization of AQP6 in the rat retina and show that AQP6 is selectively localized to the ganglion cell layer and the outer plexiform layer. Along with the gradual decrease in retinal ganglion cells after a crushing injury of optic nerve, immunofluorescence signals of AQP6 gradually decreased. Confocal microscope images confirmed AQP6 expression in retinal ganglion cells and Müller cells in vitro. Therefore, AQP6 might participate in water and anion transport in these cells. PMID:26526333

  20. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Tang, Dean G.

    2016-01-01

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features. PMID:26924072

  1. Functional inhibition of aquaporin-3 with a gold-based compound induces blockage of cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Serna, Ana; Galán-Cobo, Ana; Rodrigues, Claudia; Sánchez-Gomar, Ismael; Toledo-Aral, Juan José; Moura, Teresa F; Casini, Angela; Soveral, Graça; Echevarría, Miriam

    2014-11-01

    AQP3 has been correlated with higher transport of glycerol, increment of ATP content, and larger proliferation capacity. Recently, we described the gold(III) complex Auphen as a very selective and potent inhibitor of AQP3's glycerol permeability (Pgly ). Here we evaluated Auphen effect on the proliferation of various mammalian cell lines differing in AQP3 expression level: no expression (PC12), moderate (NIH/3T3) or high (A431) endogenous expression, cells stably expressing AQP3 (PC12-AQP3), and human HEK293T cells transiently transfected (HEK-AQP3) for AQP3 expression. Proliferation was evaluated in the absence or presence of Auphen (5 μM) by counting number of viable cells and analyzing 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. Auphen reduced ≈50% the proliferation in A431 and PC12-AQP3, ≈15% in HEK-AQP3 and had no effect in PC12-wt and NIH/3T3. Strong arrest in the S-G2/M phases of the cell cycle, supported by analysis of cyclins (A, B1, D1, E) levels, was observed in AQP3-expressing cells treated with Auphen. Flow-cytometry of propidium iodide incorporation and measurements of mitochondrial dehydrogenases activity confirmed absence of cytotoxic effect of the drug. Functional studies evidenced ≈50% inhibition of A431 Pgly by Auphen, showing that the compound's antiproliferative effect correlates with its ability to inhibit AQP3 Pgly . Role of Cys-40 on AQP3 permeability blockage by Auphen was confirmed by analyzing the mutated protein (AQP3-Ser-40). Accordingly, cells transfected with mutated AQP3 gained resistance to the antiproliferative effect of Auphen. These results highlight an Auphen inhibitory effect on proliferation of cells expressing AQP3 and suggest a targeted therapeutic effect on carcinomas with large AQP3 expression. PMID:24676973

  2. Resveratrol Represses Pokemon Expression in Human Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yutao; Cui, Jiajun; Xue, Feng; Overstreet, Anne-Marie; Zhan, Yiping; Shan, Dapeng; Li, Hui; Li, Hui; Wang, Yongjun; Zhang, Mengmeng; Yu, Chunjiang; Xu, Zhi-Qing David

    2016-03-01

    POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor (Pokemon), an important proto-oncoprotein, is a transcriptional repressor that regulates the expression of many genes and plays an important role in tumorigenesis. Resveratrol (RSV), a natural polyphenolic compound, has many beneficial biological effects on health. In this study, we investigated the role of Pokemon in RSV-induced biological effects and the effect of RSV on the expression of Pokemon in glioma cells. We found that overexpression of Pokemon decreased RSV-induced cell apoptosis, senescence, and anti-proliferative effects. Moreover, we showed that RSV could efficiently decrease the activity of the Pokemon promoter and the expression of Pokemon. Meanwhile, RSV also inhibited Sp1 DNA binding activity to the Pokemon promoter; whereas, it did not influence the expression and nuclear translocation of Sp1. In addition, we found that RSV could increase the recruitment of HDAC1, but decreased p300 to the Pokemon promoter. Taken together, all these results extended our understanding on the anti-cancer mechanism of RSV in glioma cells. PMID:25875864

  3. [Establishment of lentivirus-mediated system of double suicide genes and its killing effects on K562 cells].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yi-Rong; Liu, Chun-Sheng; Chen, Xue-Liang; Ma, Dao-Xin

    2004-02-01

    To establish lentivirus-mediated system of double suicide genes and explore its killing effects on K562 cells, lentivirus transfer vector for double suicide genes was constructed using molecular methods, three plasmids of lentivirus gene transfer vector system were transferred into packaging cell line 293T using lipofectine method, the transfer effect was observed through fluorescence microscopy, the lentivirus particles were observed by means of electron microscopy. High titer of lentivirus was harvested from the supernatant of virus-producing cell culture and concentrated by high-speed centrifugation with Poly-L-Lysine (PLL). The K562 cells were infected with the concentrated supernatant containing the virus with the double suicide genes. Fluorescence microscopy and RT- PCR confirmed the integration and expression of extraneous gene. The cytotoxicity to these transgenic cells treated with 5-FC and GCV was measured by MTT assays. The growth inhibition ratio (GIR) of cells and inhibition concentration 50 (IC(50)) were counted. After administration of GCV and 5-FC, the changes of those cells were observed through scanning electron microscope. The results showed that lentivirus transfer vector with double suicide genes was constructed successfully. The above-mentioned plasmids were effectively transferred into 293T cells. So much green fluorescence was observed through fluorescence microscope. A lot of lentivirus particles were observed through transmission electron microscope. Double suicide genes mediated by lentivirus were stably integrated and expressed in K562 cells after infection with the concentrated virus using fluorescence microscopy and RT-PCR. The GIR of K562 cells using GCV or 5-FC was 48.73% or 50.69% respectively and it was apparently higher than that of untransfected cells (P < 0.01). When using GCV and 5-FC together, the GIR was 87.69%, which was apparently higher than that of group using GCV or 5-FC alone (P < 0.01). In conclusion, lentivirus

  4. Tangeretin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through upregulation of PTEN expression in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li-Li; Wang, Da-Wei; Yu, Xu-Dong; Zhou, Yan-Ling

    2016-07-01

    Tangeretin (TANG), present in peel of citrus fruits, has been shown to various medicinal properties such as chemopreventive and neuroprotective. However, the chemopreventive effect of TANG on glioblastoma cells has not been examined. The present study was designed to explore the anticancer potential of TANG in glioblastoma cells and to investigate the related mechanism. Human glioblastoma U-87MG and LN-18 cells were treated with 45μM concentration of TANG and cell growth was measured by MTT assay. The cell cycle distribution and cell death were measured by flow cytometry. The expression of cell cycle and apoptosis related genes were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR and western blot. The cells treated with TANG were significantly increased cell growth suppression and cell death effects than vehicle treated cells. Further, TANG treatment increases G2/M arrest and apoptosis by modulating PTEN and cell-cycle regulated genes such as cyclin-D and cdc-2 mRNA and protein expressions. Moreover, the ability of TANG to decrease cell growth and to induce cell death was compromised when PTEN was knockdown by siRNA. Taken together, the chemopreventive effect of TANG is associated with regulation of cell-cycle and apoptosis in glioblastoma, thereby attenuating glioblastoma cell growth. Hence, the present findings suggest that TANG may be a therapeutic agent for glioblastoma treatment. PMID:27261630

  5. Stem cells and germ cells: microRNA and gene expression signatures.

    PubMed

    Dyce, Paul William; Toms, Derek; Li, Julang

    2010-04-01

    The study of primordial germ cell development in vivo is hampered by their low numbers and inaccessibility. Recent research has shown the ability of embryonic and adult stem cells to differentiate into primordial germ cells and more mature gametes and this generation of germ cells in vitro may be an attractive model for their study. One of the biggest challenges facing in vitro differentiation of stem cells into primordial germ cells is the lack of markers to clearly distinguish the two. As both cell types originate early in embryonic development they share many pluripotent markers such as OCT4, VASA, FRAGILIS, and NANOG. Genome wide microarray profiling has been used to identify transcriptome patterns unique to primordial germ cells. A more thorough analysis of the temporal and quantitative expression of a panel of genes may be more robust in distinguishing these two cell populations. MicroRNAs, short RNA molecules that have been shown to regulate translation through interactions with mRNA transcripts, have also recently come under investigation for the role they may play in pluripotency. Attempts to elucidate key microRNAs responsible for both stem cell and primordial germ cell characteristics have recently been undertaken. Unique microRNAs, either individually or as global profiles, may also help to distinguish differentiated primordial germ cells from stem cells in vitro. This review will examine gene expression and microRNA signatures in stem cells and germ cells as ways to distinguish these closely related cell types. PMID:20183803

  6. Differentiation of embryonic stem cells conditionally expressing neurogenin 3.

    PubMed

    Treff, Nathan R; Vincent, Robert K; Budde, Melisa L; Browning, Victoria L; Magliocca, Joseph F; Kapur, Vivek; Odorico, Jon S

    2006-11-01

    Expression of the proendocrine gene neurogenin 3 (Ngn3) is required for the development of pancreatic islets. To better characterize the molecular events regulated by Ngn3 during development, we have determined the expression profiles of murine embryonic stem cells (mESCs) uniformly induced to overexpress Ngn3. An mESC line was created in order to induce Ngn3 by adding doxycycline to the culture medium. Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed to identify genes regulated by Ngn3 in a variety of contexts, including undifferentiated ESCs and differentiating embryoid bodies (EBs). Genes regulated by Ngn3 in a context-independent manner were identified and analyzed using systematic gene ontology tools. This analysis revealed Notch signaling as the most significantly regulated signaling pathway (p = .009). This result is consistent with the hypothesis that Ngn3 expression makes the cell competent for Notch signaling to be activated and, conversely, more sensitive to Notch signaling inhibition. Indeed, EBs induced to express Ngn3 were significantly more sensitive to gamma-secretase inhibitor-mediated Notch signaling inhibition (p < .0001) when compared with uninduced EBs. Moreover, we find that Ngn3 induction in differentiating ESCs results in significant increases in insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin expression. PMID:16809427

  7. Cell-free protein expression based on extracts from CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Brödel, Andreas K; Sonnabend, Andrei; Kubick, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Protein expression systems are widely used in biotechnology and medicine for the efficient and economic production of therapeutic proteins. Today, cultivated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the market dominating mammalian cell-line for the production of complex therapeutic proteins. Despite this outstanding potential of CHO cells, no high-yield cell-free system based on translationally active lysates from these cells has been reported so far. To date, CHO cell extracts have only been used as a foundational research tool for understanding mRNA translation (Lodish et al., 1974; McDowell et al., 1972). In the present study, we address this fact by establishing a novel cell-free protein expression system based on extracts from cultured CHO cells. Lysate preparation, adaptation of in vitro reaction conditions and the construction of particular expression vectors are considered for high-yield protein production. A specific in vitro expression vector, which includes an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) from the intergenic region (IGR) of the Cricket paralysis virus (CrPV), has been constructed in order to obtain optimal performance. The IGR IRES is supposed to bind directly to the eukaryotic 40S ribosomal subunit thereby bypassing the process of translation initiation, which is often a major bottleneck in cell-free systems. The combination of expression vector and optimized CHO cell extracts enables the production of approximately 50 µg/mL active firefly luciferase within 4 h. The batch-type cell-free coupled transcription-translation system has the potential to perform post-translational modifications, as shown by the glycosylation of erythropoietin. Accordingly, the system contains translocationally active endogenous microsomes, enabling the co-translational incorporation of membrane proteins into biological membranes. Hence, the presented in vitro translation system is a powerful tool for the fast and convenient optimization of expression constructs, the

  8. Single-cell transcriptome analysis reveals coordinated ectopic gene expression patterns in medullary thymic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Brennecke, Philip; Reyes, Alejandro; Pinto, Sheena; Rattay, Kristin; Nguyen, Michelle; Küchler, Rita; Huber, Wolfgang; Kyewski, Bruno; Steinmetz, Lars M.

    2015-01-01

    Expression of tissue-restricted self-antigens (TRAs) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) is essential for self-tolerance induction and prevents autoimmunity, with each TRA being expressed in only a few mTECs. How this process is regulated in single mTECs and coordinated at the population level, such that the varied single-cell patterns add up to faithfully represent TRAs, is poorly understood. Here we used single-cell RNA-sequencing and provide evidence for numerous recurring TRA co-expression patterns, each present in only a subset of mTECs. Co-expressed genes clustered in the genome and showed enhanced chromatin accessibility. Our findings characterize TRA expression in mTECs as a coordinated process, which might involve local re-modeling of chromatin and thus ensures a comprehensive representation of the immunological self. PMID:26237553

  9. Development of monoclonal antibodies specifically recognizing the endogenous sterile alpha motif and HD domain 1 protein in porcine cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shen; Zhou, Yan-Jun; Zhan, Yuan; Yu, Ling-Xue; Jiang, Yi-Feng; Tong, Wu; Tong, Guang-Zhi

    2014-10-01

    The sterile alpha motif and HD domain 1 (SAMHD1) protein has been identified as a novel innate immunity restriction factor that participates in processes crucial to the viral life cycle. In the present study, we describe a procedure to generate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against porcine SAMHD1 and investigate its characteristics to analyze the expression of endogenous SAMHD1. The open reading frame of porcine SAMHD1 was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pCold-TF DNA to construct a recombinant plasmid pcold-pSAMHD1 and induce expression of recombinant porcine SAMHD1 protein by IPTG in Escherichia coli Rosetta. The purified recombinant porcine SAMHD1 protein was used to prepare MAbs of SAMHD1. After subcloning five times hybridoma cell clones expressing SAMHD1, MAbs were generated. Western blot analysis and indirect immunofluorescence assay showed that the overexpressed porcine SAMHD1 in 293T cells and endogenous SAMHD1 protein in porcine cell lines could be specifically recognized by the MAbs produced in this study. In conclusion, specific MAbs of porcine SAMHD1 are reported, and these MAbs provide a valuable tool for further studies of SAMHD1-mediated signaling in virus-infected cells to elucidate the underlying antiviral mechanism. PMID:25358004

  10. Development of Monoclonal Antibodies Specifically Recognizing the Endogenous Sterile Alpha Motif and HD Domain 1 Protein in Porcine Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shen; Zhou, Yan-jun; Zhan, Yuan; Yu, Ling-xue; Jiang, Yi-feng; Tong, Wu

    2014-01-01

    The sterile alpha motif and HD domain 1 (SAMHD1) protein has been identified as a novel innate immunity restriction factor that participates in processes crucial to the viral life cycle. In the present study, we describe a procedure to generate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against porcine SAMHD1 and investigate its characteristics to analyze the expression of endogenous SAMHD1. The open reading frame of porcine SAMHD1 was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pCold-TF DNA to construct a recombinant plasmid pcold-pSAMHD1 and induce expression of recombinant porcine SAMHD1 protein by IPTG in Escherichia coli Rosetta. The purified recombinant porcine SAMHD1 protein was used to prepare MAbs of SAMHD1. After subcloning five times hybridoma cell clones expressing SAMHD1, MAbs were generated. Western blot analysis and indirect immunofluorescence assay showed that the overexpressed porcine SAMHD1 in 293T cells and endogenous SAMHD1 protein in porcine cell lines could be specifically recognized by the MAbs produced in this study. In conclusion, specific MAbs of porcine SAMHD1 are reported, and these MAbs provide a valuable tool for further studies of SAMHD1-mediated signaling in virus-infected cells to elucidate the underlying antiviral mechanism. PMID:25358004

  11. Recombinant Hendra viruses expressing a reporter gene retain pathogenicity in ferrets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hendra virus (HeV) is an Australian bat-borne zoonotic paramyxovirus that repeatedly spills-over to horses causing fatal disease. Human cases have all been associated with close contact with infected horses. Methods A full-length antigenome clone of HeV was assembled, a reporter gene (GFP or luciferase) inserted between the P and M genes and transfected to 293T cells to generate infectious reporter gene-encoding recombinant viruses. These viruses were then assessed in vitro for expression of the reporter genes. The GFP expressing recombinant HeV was used to challenge ferrets to assess the virulence and tissue distribution by monitoring GFP expression in infected cells. Results Three recombinant HeV constructs were successfully cloned and rescued; a wild-type virus, a GFP-expressing virus and a firefly luciferase-expressing virus. In vitro characterisation demonstrated expression of the reporter genes, with levels proportional to the initial inoculum levels. Challenge of ferrets with the GFP virus demonstrated maintenance of the fatal phenotype with disease progressing to death consistent with that observed previously with the parental wild-type isolate of HeV. GFP expression could be observed in infected tissues collected from animals at euthanasia. Conclusions Here, we report on the first successful rescue of recombinant HeV, including wild-type virus and viruses expressing two different reporter genes encoded as an additional gene cassette inserted between the P and M genes. We further demonstrate that the GFP virus retained the ability to cause fatal disease in a well-characterized ferret model of henipavirus infection despite the genome being an extra 1290 nucleotides in length. PMID:23521919

  12. CD40 antigen is expressed by endothelial cells and tumor cells in Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Pammer, J.; Plettenberg, A.; Weninger, W.; Diller, B.; Mildner, M.; Uthman, A.; Issing, W.; Stürzl, M.; Tschachler, E.

    1996-01-01

    The CD40 antigen is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor/nerve growth factor receptor superfamily and is involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Using different monoclonal antibodies, we found CD40 expression by immunohistochemistry on CD31- and CD34-positive Kaposi's sarcoma spindle cells in all tumors of 18 HIV-1 seropositive and 4 HIV-1 seronegative patients. Western blot analysis of tumor lysates detected a 48- to 50-kd glycoprotein corresponding to the CD40 antigen expressed by B lymphocytes. CD40 expression was also detectable in one of four cultures of spindle cells derived from Kaposi sarcoma tissue. Treatment of the CD40-positive spindle cells but not of the CD40-negative ones with interferon-gamma up-regulated CD40 surface expression. Besides on Kaposi sarcoma tumor cells, CD40 was distinctly present on vascular endothelial cells in areas within and adjacent to the tumors and in benign inflammatory lesions such as granulation tissue of HIV-1-negative patients. In contrast, CD34-negative endothelia of thin walled vessels, most likely lymphatics, were predominantly CD40 negative. Only faint or no CD40 expression was found on endothelial cells in normal skin. We conclude from our data that expression of the CD40 antigen by endothelial cells is up-regulated during tissue inflammation. As signaling through CD40 is able to increase cell survival, expression of CD40 by Kaposi sarcoma tumor cells might play an important role in the pathogenesis of this neoplasm. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:8623911

  13. Expression of cubilin in mouse testes and Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Y S; Seo, J T; Ahn, H S; Gye, M C

    2016-04-01

    Cubilin (cubn) is a receptor for vitamins and various protein ligands. Cubn lacks a transmembrane domain but anchors to apical membranes by forming complexes with Amnionless or Megalin. In an effort to better understand the uptake of nutrients in testis, we analysed cubn expression in the developing mice testes. In testes, cubn mRNA increased from birth to adulthood. In the inter-stitium and isolated seminiferous tubules, neonatal increase in cubn mRNA until 14 days post-partum (pp) was followed by a marked increase at puberty (28 days pp). Cubn was found in the gonocytes, spermatogonia, spermatocytes and spermatids in the developing testes. In adult testes, strong Cubn immunoreactivity was found in the elongating spermatids, suggesting the role of Cubn in endocytosis during early spermiogenesis. In Sertoli cells and peritubular cells, Cubn immunoreactivity was weak throughout the testis development. In the inter-stitium, Cubn immunoreactivity was found in foetal Leydig cells, was weak to negligible in the stem cells and progenitor Leydig cells and was strong in immature and adult Leydig cells, demonstrating a positive association between Cubn and steroidogenic activity of Leydig cells. Collectively, these results suggest that Cubn may participate in the endocytotic uptake of nutrients in germ cells and somatic cells, supporting the spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis in mouse testes. PMID:26148765

  14. Lipopolysaccharide induces autotaxin expression in human monocytic THP-1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Song; Zhang Junjie

    2009-01-09

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a secreted enzyme with lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity, which converts lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) into lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive phospholipid involved in numerous biological activities, including cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration. In the present study, we found that bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a well-known initiator of the inflammatory response, induced ATX expression in monocytic THP-1 cells. The activation of PKR, JNK, and p38 MAPK was required for the ATX induction. The LPS-induced ATX in THP-1 cells was characterized as the {beta} isoform. In the presence of LPC, ATX could promote the migrations of THP-1 and Jurkat cells, which was inhibited by pertussis toxin (PTX), an inhibitor of Gi-mediated LPA receptor signaling. In summary, LPS induces ATX expression in THP-1 cells via a PKR, JNK and p38 MAPK-mediated mechanism, and the ATX induction is likely to enhance immune cell migration in proinflammatory response by regulating LPA levels in the microenvironment.

  15. Multiple melanocortin receptors are expressed in bone cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhong, Qing; Sridhar, Supriya; Ruan, Ling; Ding, Ke-Hong; Xie, Ding; Insogna, Karl; Kang, Baolin; Xu, Jianrui; Bollag, Roni J.; Isales, Carlos M.

    2005-01-01

    Melanocortin receptors belong to the seven transmembrane domain, G-protein coupled family of receptors. There are five members of this receptor family labeled MC1R-MC5R. These receptors are activated by fragments derived from a larger molecule, proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and include ACTH, alpha beta and gamma-MSH and beta-endorphin. Because of in vitro and in vivo data suggesting direct effects of these POMC molecules on bone and bone turnover, we examined bone and bone derived cells for the presence of the various members of the melanocortin receptor family. We report that the five known melanocortin receptors are expressed to varying degrees in osteoblast-like and osteoclastic cells. POMC fragments increased proliferation and expression of a variety of genes in osteoblastic cells. Furthermore, POMC mRNA was detected in osteoclastic cells. These data demonstrate that POMC-derived peptide hormones acting through high affinity melanocortin receptors have specific effects on bone cells. Thus, in addition to the indirect effects of POMC-derived hormones on bone turnover through their modulation of steroid hormone secretion, POMC fragments may have direct and specific effects on bone cell subpopulations.

  16. Expression of CD34 on human B cell precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, C; Eaves, C J; Lansdorp, P M

    1991-01-01

    CD34 is a 110-kD glycoprotein previously shown by a variety of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to be expressed selectively on immature hematopoietic cells. However, more detailed characterization of CD34+ cells has been hampered by lack of anti-CD34 MoAbs that can be labelled directly with fluorochromes to facilitate subpopulation analysis by multi-parameter flow cytometry. We have recently isolated a murine anti-CD34 MoAb, designated as 8G12, that can be directly labelled with fluorochromes such as FITC. In this study, we have exploited this property of 8G12 to compare the reactivity of 8G12 and My10 with normal and leukaemic human marrow cells and to characterize normal early human B cell precursors by two- and three-colour immunofluorescence analysis. Comparison of three-colour staining profiles of normal bone marrow cells incubated with both 8G12 and MY10, and either anti-CD10 or anti-CD19 MoAb revealed the reactivity patterns of 8G12 and MY10 to be indistinguishable. This conclusion was confirmed by a similar comparative analysis of 8G12 and MY10 staining of blood and bone marrow cells from 4 patients with B lineage acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Of interest, both 8G12 and MY10 detected a CD34+CD10+CD19- population in normal adult bone marrow. To determine whether a CD34+CD10+CD19- precursor population previously reported by others to exist in fetal liver could also be identified, CD10+CD16- marrow cells were first isolated by FACS and the sorted cells then re-analysed for expression of CD19 and CD34. These studies showed that all of the sorted CD10+ cells that expressed CD34 appeared to coexpress CD19. No CD34+CD10+CD19- cells were detected (at a sensitivity of less than or equal to 0.1%). Further studies will be required to determine whether a very minor population of CD34+CD10+CD19- cells may still be generated in the normal development of B cells in adult human marrow. PMID:1712682

  17. Gene expression profiling of cancer stem cell in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Dong-Cheol; Sung, Ji-Min; Cho, Hee-Jung; Yi, Hee; Seo, Kun-Ho; Choi, In-Soo; Kim, Dong-Ku; Kim, Jin-Suk; El-Aty AM, Abd; Shin, Ho-Chul

    2007-01-01

    Background The studies on cancer-stem-cells (CSCs) have attracted so much attention in recent years as possible therapeutic implications. This study was carried out to investigate the gene expression profile of CSCs in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Results We isolated CSCs from A549 cell line of which side population (SP) phenotype revealed several stem cell properties. After staining the cell line with Hoechst 33342 dye, the SP and non-side population (non-SP) cells were sorted using flow cytometric analysis. The mRNA expression profiles were measured using an Affymetrix GeneChip® oligonucleotide array. Among the sixty one differentially expressed genes, the twelve genes inclusive three poor prognostic genes; Aldo-keto reductase family 1, member C1/C2 (AKR1C1/C2), Transmembrane 4 L six family member 1 nuclear receptor (TM4SF1), and Nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 1 (NR0B1) were significantly up-regulated in SP compared to non-SP cells. Conclusion This is the first report indicating the differences of gene expression pattern between SP and non-SP cells in A549 cells. We suggest that the up-regulations of the genes AKR1C1/C2, TM4SF1 and NR0B1 in SP of human adenocarcinoma A549 cells could be a target of poor prognosis in anti-cancer therapy. PMID:18034892

  18. Effects of space flight exposure on cell growth, tumorigenicity and gene expression in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng; Li, Yuehui; Zhang, Zhijie; Luo, Chen; Tong, Yongqing; Zhou, Guohua; Xie, Pingli; Hu, Jinyue; Li, Guancheng

    2008-12-01

    It is well recognized that harsh outer space environment, consisting of microgravity and radiation, poses significant health risks for human cells. To investigate potential effects of the space environment exposure on cancer cells we examined the biological changes in Caski cells carried by the "Shen Zhou IV" spaceship. After exposure for 7 days in spaceflight, 1440 survival subclonal cell lines were established and 4 cell lines were screened. 44F10 and 17E3 were selected because of their increased cell proliferation and tumorigenesis, while 48A9 and 31F2 had slower cytological events. Experiments with cell proliferation assay, flow cytometry, soft agar assay, tumorigenesis assay and DNA microarray analysis have shown that selected cell lines presented multiple biological changes in cell morphology, cell growth, tumorigenicity and gene expression. These results suggest that space environment exposure can make significant biological impact on cancer cells and provide an entry point to find the immunological target of tumorigenesis.

  19. Gene expression and cell turnover in human renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Woolf, A S; Winyard, P J

    2000-01-01

    Kidney malformations are common causes of chronic renal failure in children. Dysplastic kidneys represent a unique model of perturbed epithelial-mesenchymal interaction which leads to the formation of malformed branching tubules surrounded by undifferentiated and metaplastic mesenchymal cells. We have found that human dysplastic epithelia express PAX2 (a transcription factor), BCL2 (a survival factor) and galectin-3 (a cell adhesion/signaling molecule). These genes are implicated in oncogenesis and their persistent expression may drive proliferation of dysplastic cysts, hence explaining the massive growth of some multicystic dysplastic kidneys. We have also detected prominent apoptosis in undifferentiated tissues around dysplastic epithelia, and this may provide a potential mechanism for the well-documented regression of dysplastic kidneys. Hence, although these kidneys may not have any excretory function, it is incorrect to consider them as 'end stage organs' because they are highly active in terms of cell turnover and gene expression; furthermore, these processes can be correlated with patterns of tissue growth and involution. Further elucidation of 'molecular lesions' in renal malformations may lead to novel therapies to enhance the differentiation of progenitor cells. PMID:10668206

  20. Interferon-γ Reduces Melanosomal Antigen Expression and Recognition of Melanoma Cells by Cytotoxic T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Le Poole, I. Caroline; Riker, Adam I.; Quevedo, M. Eugenia; Stennett, Lawrence S.; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M.; Kast, W. Martin; Robinson, June K.; Nickoloff, Brian J.

    2002-01-01

    In malignant melanoma, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes are frequently reactive with melanosomal antigens. Achieving complete remissions by peptide therapy is frequently hampered by metastases evading immune recognition. The tumor microenvironment seems to favor reduced expression of target antigens by melanoma cells. Among candidate factors, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) (102 to 103 U/ml) suppressed expression of antigens MART-1, TRP-1, and gp100 by M14 melanoma cells as shown by immunohistology and fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, reducing MART-1 expression by >65%. Northern blot analysis revealed that reduced expression was regulated at the transcriptional level, demonstrating a 79% reduction in MART-1 transcript abundance after 32 hours of IFN-γ treatment. To evaluate consequences of IFN-γ exposure for immune recognition, MART-1-responsive T cells were reacted with pretreated HLA-matched melanoma cells. Cytotoxicity was reduced up to 78% by IFN-γ pretreatment, and was restored by addition of MART-1 peptide AAGIGILTV for 2 hours. Examination of melanoma lesions by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed up to 188-fold more abundant IFN-γ transcripts when compared to control skin. Laser capture microdissection and immunohistology localized most IFN-γ-producing T cells to the tumor stroma. Reduced MART-1 expression was frequently observed in adjacent tumor cells. Consequently, IFN-γ may enhance inflammatory responses yet hamper effective recognition of melanoma cells. PMID:11839572

  1. Immortalized bovine mammary epithelial cells express stem cell markers and differentiate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hu, Han; Zheng, Nan; Gao, Haina; Dai, Wenting; Zhang, Yangdong; Li, Songli; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-08-01

    The bovine mammary epithelial cell is a secretory cell, and its cell number and secretory activity determine milk production. In this study, we immortalized a bovine mammary epithelial cell line by SV40 large T antigen gene using a retrovirus based on Chinese Holstein primary mammary epithelial cells (CMEC) cultured in vitro. An immortalized bovine mammary epithelial cell line surpassed the 50-passage mark and was designated the CMEC-H. The immortalized mammary epithelial cells grew in close contact with each other and exhibited the typical cobblestone morphology characteristic with obvious boundaries. The telomerase expression of CMEC-H has consistently demonstrated the presence of telomerase activity as an immortalized cell line, but the cell line never induced tumor formation in nude mice. CMEC-H expressed epithelial (cytokeratins CK7, CK8, CK18, and CK19), mesenchymal (vimentin), and stem/progenitor (CD44 and p63) cell markers. The induced expression of milk proteins, αS1 -casein, β-casein, κ-casein, and butyrophilin, indicated that CMEC-H maintained the synthesis function of the mammary epithelial cells. The established immortalized bovine mammary epithelial cell line CMEC-H is capable of self-renewal and differentiation and can serve as a valuable reagent for studying the physiological mechanism of the mammary gland. PMID:27189858

  2. Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells in Cutaneous Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Austin Huy; Koenck, Carleigh; Quirk, Shannon K; Lim, Victoria M; Mitkov, Mario V; Trowbridge, Ryan M; Hunter, William J; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2015-10-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays an important role in the progression of melanoma, the prototypical immunologic cutaneous malignancy. The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM) family of innate immune receptors modulates inflammatory and innate immune signaling. It has been investigated in various neoplastic diseases, but not in melanoma. This study examines the expression of TREM-1 (a proinflammatory amplifier) and TREM-2 (an anti-inflammatory modulator and phagocytic promoter) in human cutaneous melanoma and surrounding tissue. Indirect immunofluorescence staining was performed on skin biopsies from 10 melanoma patients and staining intensity was semiquantitatively scored. Expression of TREM-1 and TREM-2 was higher in keratinocytes than melanoma tissue (TREM-1: p < 0.01; TREM-2: p < 0.01). Whereas TREM-2 was the dominant isoform expressed in normal keratinocytes, TREM-1 expression predominated in melanoma tissue (TREM-1 to TREM-2 ratio: keratinocytes = 0.78; melanoma = 2.08; p < 0.01). The increased TREM ratio in melanoma tissue could give rise to a proinflammatory and protumor state of the microenvironment. This evidence may be suggestive of a TREM-1/TREM-2 paradigm in which relative levels dictate inflammatory and immune states, rather than absolute expression of one or the other. Further investigation regarding this paradigm is warranted and could carry prognostic or therapeutic value in treatment for melanoma. PMID:26184544

  3. Expression of functional leptin receptors in rodent Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Caprio, M; Isidori, A M; Carta, A R; Moretti, C; Dufau, M L; Fabbri, A

    1999-11-01

    Several studies indicate that the size of body fat stores and the circulating levels of the adipocyte-derived hormone leptin are able to influence the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The leptin-hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal interactions have been mainly studied at the level of the central nervous system. In this study, we investigated the possibility that leptin may have direct effects on the rodent Leydig cell function. To probe this hypothesis, we first analyzed the expression of leptin receptors (OB-R) in rodent Leydig cells in culture. RT-PCR studies showed that rat Leydig cells express both the long (OB-Rb) and short isoform (OB-Ra) of leptin receptor, whereas MLTC-1 cells (a murine Leydig tumor cell line) express only the long isoform. Short-term (30-90 min) incubation of rat Leydig cells with increasing concentrations ofleptin (2-500 ng/ml) led to a significant and dose-dependent inhibition of human (h)CG-stimulated testosterone (T) production (approximately 60% reduction, IC50 = 20 ng/ml) but no change in basal androgen release. Also, leptin (150 ng/ml) amplified hCG-induced intracellular cAMP formation (1- to 2-fold) without modifying basal cAMP levels. Subsequent experiments showed that leptin inhibited 8Br-cAMP-stimulated T production, indicating that leptin's effect is exerted beyond cAMP. The inhibitory effect of leptin on hCG-induced T secretion was accompanied by a significant reduction of androstenedione and a concomitant rise of the precursor metabolites pregnenolone, progesterone, and 17-OH-progesterone, conceivable with a leptin-induced lesion of 17,20 lyase activity. Separate experiments performed with the MLTC-1 cells (not expressing cytochrome P450-17alpha) showed that leptin, though amplifying hCG-stimulated cAMP production, did not modify hCG-stimulated pregnenolone and progesterone release. These results further indicate that leptin action on steroidogenesis occurs downstream of progesterone synthesis. Northern Blot

  4. Constitutive and functional expression of YB-1 in microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Keilhoff, G; Titze, M; Esser, T; Langnaese, K; Ebmeyer, U

    2015-08-20

    Y-box-binding protein (YB-1) is a member of the cold-shock protein family and participates in a wide variety of DNA/RNA-dependent cellular processes including DNA repair, transcription, mRNA splicing, packaging, and translation. At the cellular level, YB-1 is involved in cell proliferation and differentiation, stress responses, and malignant cell transformation. A general role for YB-1 during inflammation has also been well described; however, there are minimal data concerning YB-1 expression in microglia, which are the immune cells of the brain. Therefore, we studied the expression of YB-1 in a clinically relevant global ischemia model for neurological injury following cardiac arrest. This model is characterized by massive neurodegeneration of the hippocampal CA1 region and the subsequent long-lasting activation of microglia. In addition, we studied YB-1 expression in BV-2 cells, which are an accepted microglia culture model. BV-2 cells were stressed by oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD), OGD-relevant mediators, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and phagocytosis-inducing cell debris and nanoparticles. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), we show constitutive expression of YB-1 transcripts in unstressed BV-2 cells. The functional upregulation of the YB-1 protein was demonstrated in microglia in vivo and in BV-2 cells in vitro. All stressors except for LPS were potent enhancers of the level of YB-1 protein, which appears to be regulated primarily by proteasomal degradation and, to a lesser extent, by the activation (phosphorylation) of the translation initiation factor eIF4E. The proteasome of BV-2 cells is impaired by OGD, which results in decreased protein degradation and therefore increased levels of YB-1 protein. LPS induces proteasome activity, which enables the level of YB-1 protein to remain at control levels despite enhanced protein ubiquitination. The proteasome inhibitor MG-132 was able to increase YB-1 protein levels in control and LPS

  5. ELK3 Expression Correlates With Cell Migration, Invasion, and Membrane Type 1-Matrix Metalloproteinase Expression in MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Heo, Sun-Hee; Lee, Je-Yong; Yang, Kyung-Min; Park, Kyung-Soon

    2015-01-01

    ELK3 is a member of the Ets family of transcription factors. Its expression is associated with angiogenesis, vasculogenesis, and chondrogenesis. ELK3 inhibits endothelial migration and tube formation through the regulation of MT1-MMP transcription. This study assessed the function of ELK3 in breast cancer (BC) cells by comparing its expression between basal and luminal cells in silico and in vitro. In silico analysis showed that ELK3 expression was higher in the more aggressive basal BC cells than in luminal BC cells. Similarly, in vitro analysis showed that ELK3 mRNA and protein expression was higher in basal BC cells than in normal cells and luminal BC cells. To investigate whether ELK3 regulates basal cell migration or invasion, knockdown was achieved by siRNA in the basal BC cell line MDA-MB-231. Inhibition of ELK3 expression decreased cell migration and invasion and downregulated MT1-MMP, the expression of which is positively correlated with tumor cell invasion. In silico analysis revealed that ELK3 expression was associated with that of MT1-MMP in several BC cell lines (0.98 Pearson correlation coefficient). Though MT1-MMP expression was upregulated upon ELK3 nuclear translocation, ELK3 did not directly bind to the 1.3-kb promoter region of the MT1-MMP gene. These results suggest that ELK3 plays a positive role in the metastasis of BC cells by indirectly regulating MT1-MMP expression. PMID:26637400

  6. Mesenchymal stem cells expressing neural antigens instruct a neurogenic cell fate on neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Croft, Adam P; Przyborski, Stefan A

    2009-04-01

    The neurogenic response to injury in the postnatal brain is limited and insufficient for restoration of function. Recent evidence suggests that transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into the injured brain is associated with improved functional recovery, mediated in part through amplification in the endogenous neurogenic response to injury. In the current study we investigate the interactions between bone marrow-derived MSCs and embryonic neural stem cells (NSCs) plus their differentiated progeny using an in vitro co-culture system. Two populations of MSCs were used, MSCs induced to express neural antigens (nestin+, Tuj-1+, GFAP+) and neural antigen negative MSCs. Following co-culture of induced MSCs with differentiating NSC/progenitor cells a significant increase in Tuj-1+ neurons was detected compared to co-cultures of non-induced MSCs in which an increase in astrocyte (GFAP+) differentiation was observed. The effect was mediated by soluble interactions between the two cell populations and was independent of any effect on cell death and proliferation. Induced and non-induced MSCs also promoted the survival of Tuj-1+ cell progeny in long-term cultures and both promoted axonal growth, an effect also seen in differentiating neuroblastoma cells. Therefore, MSCs provide instructive signals that are able to direct the differentiation of NSCs and promote axonal development in neuronal progeny. The data indicates that the nature of MSC derived signals is dependent not only on their microenvironment but on the developmental status of the MSCs. Pre-manipulation of MSCs prior to transplantation in vivo may be an effective means of enhancing the endogenous neurogenic response to injury. PMID:19159625

  7. Klf4 expression in conventional dendritic cells is required for T helper 2 cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Tussiwand, Roxane; Everts, Bart; Grajales-Reyes, Gary E.; Kretzer, Nicole M.; Iwata, Arifumi; Bagaitkar, Juhi; Wu, Xiaodi; Wong, Rachel; Anderson, David A.; Murphy, Theresa L.; Pearce, Edward J.; Murphy, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The two major lineages of classical dendritic cells (cDCs) express and require either IRF8 or IRF4 transcription factors for their development and function. IRF8-dependent cDCs promote anti-viral and T-helper 1 (Th1) cell responses, whereas IRF4-expressing cDCs have been implicated in controlling both Th2 and Th17 cell responses. Here, we have provided evidence that Kruppel-like factor 4 (Klf4) is required in IRF4-expressing cDCs to promote Th2 but not Th17 cell responses in vivo. Conditional Klf4 deletion within cDCs impaired Th2 cell responses during Schistosoma mansoni infection, Schistosoma egg antigen (SEA) immunization, and house dust mite challenge (HDM), without affecting cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL), Th1 and Th17 cell responses to herpes simplex virus, Toxoplasma gondii and Citrobacter rodentium infections. Further, Klf4 deletion reduced IRF4 expression in pre-cDCs and resulted in selective loss of IRF4-expressing cDCs subsets in several tissues. These results indicate that Klf4 guides a transcriptional program promoting IRF4-expressing cDCs heterogeneity. PMID:25992862

  8. Endothelial Cell Integrin Laminin Receptor Expression in Multiple Sclerosis Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, Raymond A.; Hinojoza, Julian R.; Maeda, Atsuko; Chen, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Laminin, a major glycoprotein component of vessel basement membranes, is recognized by β1- and β3-integrins expressed on endothelial cells. To determine how endothelial cell integrins might function in multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions, integrin laminin receptors and laminin were analyzed in central nervous system samples from MS patients and controls by immunohistochemistry. In active MS lesions, endothelial cell VLA-6 and β1 subunits were decreased compared to controls whereas αv subunit and VLA-1 were increased. In chronic inactive lesions β1, VLA-6 and αv were the same as controls but VLA-1 remained increased. α3 subunit was constant in all samples. By immunoelectron microscopy VLA-1, VLA-6, β1, and laminin were distributed throughout endothelial cells; αv was adjacent to and on luminal surfaces; αv and VLA-1 were on intercellular junctions. These results indicate distinct regulation and functions of these integrins in different lesion stages. In active lesions decreased endothelial cell β1/VLA-6 could result in their detachment from laminin thereby facilitating leukocyte transvascular migration and blood-brain barrier breakdown. αv and VLA-1 on intercellular junctions may participate in re-establishing vessel integrity after leukocyte migration. Luminal surface αv also likely binds intraluminal ligands and cells. In chronic inactive plaques persistently elevated endothelial cell VLA-1 correlates with longstanding endothelial cell and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. PMID:9708801

  9. Calpain expression in lymphoid cells. Increased mRNA and protein levels after cell activation.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, R V; Goust, J M; Chakrabarti, A K; Barbosa, E; Hogan, E L; Banik, N L

    1995-02-10

    Although calpain is ubiquitously present in human tissues and is thought to play a role in demyelination, its activity is very low in resting normal lymphocytes. To determine the nature of calpain expression at the mRNA and protein levels in human lymphoid cells, we studied human T lymphocytic, B lymphocytic, and monocytic lines as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Stimulation of cells with the phorbol ester phorbol myristate acetate and the calcium ionophore A23187 resulted in increased calpain mRNA and protein expression. Calpain mRNA expression is also increased in human T cells stimulated with anti-CD3. A dissociation between the increases of RNA and protein suggested that calpain could be released from the cells; the subsequent experiments showed its presence in the extracellular environment. 5,6-Dichloro-1b-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, a reversible inhibitor of mRNA synthesis, reduced calpain mRNA levels by 50-67% and protein levels by 72-91%. Its removal resulted in resumption of both calpain mRNA and protein synthesis. Cycloheximide, a translational inhibitor, reduced calpain protein levels by 77-81% and calpain mRNA levels by 96% in activated THP-1 cells. Interferon-gamma induced calpain mRNA and protein in U-937 and THP-1 cells. Dexamethasone increased mRNA expression in THP-1 cells. Our results indicate that activation of lymphoid cells results in de novo synthesis and secretion of calpain. PMID:7852311

  10. Inducible T-cell receptor expression in precursor T cells for leukemia control.

    PubMed

    Hoseini, S S; Hapke, M; Herbst, J; Wedekind, D; Baumann, R; Heinz, N; Schiedlmeier, B; Vignali, D A A; van den Brink, M R M; Schambach, A; Blazar, B R; Sauer, M G

    2015-07-01

    Co-transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells with those engineered to express leukemia-reactive T-cell receptors (TCRs) and differentiated ex vivo into precursor T cells (preTs) may reduce the risk of leukemia relapse. As expression of potentially self-(leukemia-) reactive TCRs will lead to negative selection or provoke autoimmunity upon thymic maturation, we investigated a novel concept whereby TCR expression set under the control of an inducible promoter would allow timely controlled TCR expression. After in vivo maturation and gene induction, preTs developed potent anti-leukemia effects. Engineered preTs provided protection even after repeated leukemia challenges by giving rise to effector and central memory cells. Importantly, adoptive transfer of TCR-transduced allogeneic preTs mediated anti-leukemia effect without evoking graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Earlier transgene induction forced CD8(+) T-cell development was required to obtain a mature T-cell subset of targeted specificity, allowed engineered T cells to efficiently pass positive selection and abrogated the endogenous T-cell repertoire. Later induction favored CD4 differentiation and failed to produce a leukemia-reactive population emphasizing the dominant role of positive selection. Taken together, we provide new functional insights for the employment of TCR-engineered precursor cells as a controllable immunotherapeutic modality with significant anti-leukemia activity. PMID:25652739

  11. Sensitivities of Two Zebrafish TRPA1 Paralogs to Chemical and Thermal Stimuli Analyzed in Heterologous Expression Systems.

    PubMed

    Oda, Mai; Kurogi, Mako; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Saitoh, Osamu

    2016-03-01

    Transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) is the only member of the mouse, chick, and frog TRPA family, whereas 2 paralogs (zTRPA1a and zTRPA1b) are present in zebrafish. We herein investigated functional differences in the 2 zebrafish TRPA1s. HEK293T cells were used as heterologous expression systems, and the sensitivities of these cells to 4 chemical irritants (allyl isothiocyanate [AITC], caffeine, auto-oxidized epigallocatechin gallate [EGCG], and hydrogen peroxide [H2O2]) were compared with Ca(2+) imaging techniques. Sensitivities to the activators for AITC, oxidized EGCG, and H2O2 were higher in cells expressing zTRPA1a than in those expressing zTRPA1b, whereas caffeine appeared to activate both cells equally. We also characterized the thermal sensitivity of Xenopus oocytes expressing each TRPA1 electrophysiologically using a 2-electrode voltage clamp. Although endogenous currents induced by a cold stimulation were observed in control oocytes in some batches, oocytes expressing zTRPA1b showed significantly stronger cold- and heat-induced responses. However, significant thermal activation was not observed in oocytes expressing zTRPA1a. The results obtained using in vitro expression systems suggest that zTRPA1a is specialized for chemical sensing, whereas zTRPA1b responds to thermal stimuli. Furthermore, characterization of the chimeric molecule of TRPA1a and 1b revealed the importance of the N-terminal region in chemical and thermal sensing by zTRPA1s. PMID:26826723

  12. Hypoxia-mediated regulation of gene expression in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Shu-Ching; Claffey, Kevin P.

    1998-01-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying oxygen sensing in mammalian cells has been extensively investigated in the areas of glucose transport, glycolysis, erythropoiesis, angiogenesis and catecholamine metabolism. Expression of functionally operative representative proteins in these specific areas, such as the glucose transporter 1, glycolytic enzymes, erythropoietin, vascular endothelial growth factor and tyrosine hydroxylase are all induced by hypoxia. Recent studies demonstrated that both transcriptional activation and post-transcriptional mechanisms are important to the hypoxia-mediated regulation of gene expression. In this article, the cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors involved in the transcriptional activation of gene expression will be reviewed. In addition, the mechanisms of post-transcriptional mRNA stabilization will also be addressed. We will discuss whether these two processes of regulation of hypoxia-responsive genes are mechanistically linked and co-operative in nature. PMID:10319016

  13. Expression of Stem Cell Markers in the Human Fetal Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Metsuyanim, Sally; Harari-Steinberg, Orit; Buzhor, Ella; Omer, Dorit; Pode-Shakked, Naomi; Ben-Hur, Herzl; Halperin, Reuvit; Schneider, David; Dekel, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    In the human fetal kidney (HFK) self-renewing stem cells residing in the metanephric mesenchyme (MM)/blastema are induced to form all cell types of the nephron till 34th week of gestation. Definition of useful markers is crucial for the identification of HFK stem cells. Because wilms' tumor, a pediatric renal cancer, initiates from retention of renal stem cells, we hypothesized that surface antigens previously up-regulated in microarrays of both HFK and blastema-enriched stem-like wilms' tumor xenografts (NCAM, ACVRIIB, DLK1/PREF, GPR39, FZD7, FZD2, NTRK2) are likely to be relevant markers. Comprehensive profiling of these putative and of additional stem cell markers (CD34, CD133, c-Kit, CD90, CD105, CD24) in mid-gestation HFK was performed using immunostaining and FACS in conjunction with EpCAM, an epithelial surface marker that is absent from the MM and increases along nephron differentiation and hence can be separated into negative, dim or bright fractions. No marker was specifically localized to the MM. Nevertheless, FZD7 and NTRK2 were preferentially localized to the MM and emerging tubules (<10% of HFK cells) and were mostly present within the EpCAMneg and EpCAMdim fractions, indicating putative stem/progenitor markers. In contrast, single markers such as CD24 and CD133 as well as double-positive CD24+CD133+ cells comprise >50% of HFK cells and predominantly co-express EpCAMbright, indicating they are mostly markers of differentiation. Furthermore, localization of NCAM exclusively in the MM and in its nephron progenitor derivatives but also in stroma and the expression pattern of significantly elevated renal stem/progenitor genes Six2, Wt1, Cited1, and Sall1 in NCAM+EpCAM- and to a lesser extent in NCAM+EpCAM+ fractions confirmed regional identity of cells and assisted us in pinpointing the presence of subpopulations that are putative MM-derived progenitor cells (NCAM+EpCAM+FZD7+), MM stem cells (NCAM+EpCAM-FZD7+) or both (NCAM+FZD7+). These results and

  14. Recombinant genomes which express chloramphenicol acetyltransferase in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, C.M.; Moffat, L.F.; Howard, B.H.

    1982-09-01

    The authors constructed a series of recombinant genomes which directed expression of the enzyme chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in mammalian cells. The prototype recombinant in this series, pSV2-cat, consisted of the beta-lactamase gene and origin of replication from pBR322 coupled to a simian virus 40 (SV40) early transcription region into which CAT coding sequences were inserted. Readily measured levels of CAT accumulated within 48 h after the introduction of pSV2-cat DNA into African green monkey kidney CV-1 cells. Because endogenous CAT activity is not present in CV-1 or other mammalian cells, and because rapid, sensitive assays for CAT activity are available, these recombinants provided a uniquely convenient system for monitoring the expression of foreign DNAs in tissue culture cells. To demonstrate the usefulness of this system, we constructed derivatives of pSV2-cat from which part or all of the SV 40 promoter region was removed. Deletion of one copy of the 72-base-pair repeat sequence in the SV40 promoter caused no significant decrease in CAT synthesis in monkey kidney CV-1 cells; however, an additional deletion of 50 base pairs from the second copy of the repeats reduced CAT synthesis to 11% of its level in the wild type. They also constructed a recombinant, pSVO-cat, in which the entire SV40 promoter region was removed and a unique HindIII site was substituted for the insertion of other promoter sequences.

  15. Ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis in yeast cells expressing neurotoxic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Ralf J.

    2015-01-01

    Critically impaired protein degradation is discussed to contribute to neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's, Huntington's, Alzheimer's, and motor neuron diseases. Misfolded, aggregated, or surplus proteins are efficiently degraded via distinct protein degradation pathways, including the ubiquitin-proteasome system, autophagy, and vesicular trafficking. These pathways are regulated by covalent modification of target proteins with the small protein ubiquitin and are evolutionary highly conserved from humans to yeast. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an established model for deciphering mechanisms of protein degradation, and for the elucidation of pathways underlying programmed cell death. The expression of human neurotoxic proteins triggers cell death in yeast, with neurotoxic protein-specific differences. Therefore, yeast cell death models are suitable for analyzing the role of protein degradation pathways in modulating cell death upon expression of disease-causing proteins. This review summarizes which protein degradation pathways are affected in these yeast models, and how they are involved in the execution of cell death. I will discuss to which extent this mimics the situation in other neurotoxic models, and how this may contribute to a better understanding of human disorders. PMID:25814926

  16. cDNA expression cloning in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, B J

    2001-05-01

    This unit contains protocols for expression cloning in mammalian cells. Either calcium phosphate- or liposome-mediated transfection of mammalian cells, or virus infection and liposome-mediated transfection are used to screen pools derived from a cDNA library. cDNA pools are prepared for cloning from library-transformed E. coli grown in liquid culture medium or on antibiotic-containing selection plates. Results of screening assays for expression can be detected using autoradiography of dishes of cultured cells to identify clones, direct visualization of radiolabeled cells on emulsion-coated and developed chamber slides, detection and quantification of gene activity by a functional (transport) assay with scintillation counting, or detection using a filter-based assay for binding of radioligand to membranes or whole cells. The most critical step of any cDNA cloning project is the establishment of the screening protocol. Therefore, the bioassay for the gene product must be established prior to executing any of these protocols, including construction of the cDNA library. PMID:18428491

  17. Memory B cells contribute to rapid Bcl6 expression by memory follicular helper T cells.

    PubMed

    Ise, Wataru; Inoue, Takeshi; McLachlan, James B; Kometani, Kohei; Kubo, Masato; Okada, Takaharu; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2014-08-12

    In primary humoral responses, B-cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6) is a master regulator of follicular helper T (TFH) cell differentiation; however, its activation mechanisms and role in memory responses remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that survival of CXCR5(+) TFH memory cells, and thus subsequent recall antibody response, require Bcl6 expression. Furthermore, we show that, upon rechallenge with soluble antigen Bcl6 in memory TFH cells is rapidly induced in a dendritic cell-independent manner and that peptide:class II complexes (pMHC) on cognate memory B cells significantly contribute to this induction. Given the previous evidence that antigen-specific B cells residing in the follicles acquire antigens within minutes of injection, our results suggest that memory B cells present antigens to the cognate TFH memory cells, thereby contributing to rapid Bcl6 reexpression and differentiation of the TFH memory cells during humoral memory responses. PMID:25071203

  18. Memory B cells contribute to rapid Bcl6 expression by memory follicular helper T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ise, Wataru; Inoue, Takeshi; McLachlan, James B.; Kometani, Kohei; Kubo, Masato; Okada, Takaharu; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2014-01-01

    In primary humoral responses, B-cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6) is a master regulator of follicular helper T (TFH) cell differentiation; however, its activation mechanisms and role in memory responses remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that survival of CXCR5+ TFH memory cells, and thus subsequent recall antibody response, require Bcl6 expression. Furthermore, we show that, upon rechallenge with soluble antigen Bcl6 in memory TFH cells is rapidly induced in a dendritic cell-independent manner and that peptide:class II complexes (pMHC) on cognate memory B cells significantly contribute to this induction. Given the previous evidence that antigen-specific B cells residing in the follicles acquire antigens within minutes of injection, our results suggest that memory B cells present antigens to the cognate TFH memory cells, thereby contributing to rapid Bcl6 reexpression and differentiation of the TFH memory cells during humoral memory responses. PMID:25071203

  19. P53 protein expression in human leukemia and lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Koníková, E; Kusenda, J

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the value of p53 protein overexpression in human leukemia and lymphoma cells. We examined PB and/or BM samples on a series of 111 patients with immunophenotypically defined hematological malignancies at diagnosis, in remission and in relapsed disease comparing to 20 control samples of healthy individuals. p53 protein has been studied by flow cytometry using three monoclonal antibodies specific for epitopes on N-terminus (Bp53-12, DO-1) and central region (DO-11) of p53 protein. Our findigs showed, that p53 expression may contribute to phenotype of leukemic cells and that overexpression of this protein is often associated with progression of disease. All samples of early B-ALL patients and samples of patients with immunophenotypically defined T- cell disorders examined at diagnosis of disease were p53 positive. Eleven of 19 patient samples from AML at diagnosis showed also increased expression of p53 protein. The cells of all patients who responded to therapy with complete immunophenotypically defined remission were p53 negative. Relapsed T-, B- ALL and AML develop p53 alteration. We reported positive p53 expression in cells of patients with advanced stages of CLL in comparison to them with initial stage of disease at examination. As well as in the group of B- cell lymphomas only samples of patients with generalized FCC lymphoma at diagnosis were p53 positive. We detected p53 positive cells in immunologically defined myeloid blast crisis of CML opposite to p53 negativity in chronic phase of disease. The finding of p53 positive BM cells without immunophenotypic blast markers in two of followed cases documented the contributing value of p53 detection in their characterization. On the basis of above findings we conclude, that cytofluorometric determination of p53 expression may contribute to the better definition of leukemic phenotype. Loss of the normal p53 function may be important in the genesis of some leukemias

  20. Diversity of Gene Expression in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Cui, Li; Kuo, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding tumor diversity has been a long-lasting and challenging question for researchers in the field of cancer heterogeneity or tumor evolution. Studies have reported that compared to normal cells, there is a higher genetic diversity in tumor cells, while higher genetic diversity is associated with higher progression risks of tumor. We thus hypothesized that tumor diversity also holds true at the gene expression level. To test this hypothesis, we used t-test to compare the means of Simpson’s diversity index for gene expression (SDIG) between tumor and non-tumor samples. We found that the mean SDIG in tumor tissues is significantly higher than that in the non-tumor or normal tissues (P < 0.05) for most datasets. We also combined microarrays and next-generation sequencing data for validation. This cross-platform and cross-experimental validation greatly increased the reliability of our results. PMID:26779818

  1. Murine Hematopoietic Stem cells and Progenitors Express Adrenergic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Muthu, Kuzhali; Iyer, Sivaraman; He, L-K.; Szilagyi, Andrea; Gamelli, Richard L; Shankar, Ravi; Jones, Stephen B

    2007-01-01

    Association between the nervous and immune system is well documented. Immune cells originate within the bone marrow that is innervated. Thermal injury induces adrenergic stimulation, augments monocytopoiesis and alters the β-adrenergic receptor (AR) profile of bone marrow monocyte committed progenitors. This provides an impetus to study AR expression in hematopoietic progenitors along myeloid lineage. Using FACS analysis and confocal microscopy, we report the expression of α1-, α2- and β2- AR in enriched populations of ER-MP20+ and ER-MP12+ myeloid progenitors, CD117+ and CD34+ multi-potential progenitors and more importantly pluripotent stem cells suggesting a plausible role for catecholamine in hematopoietic development. PMID:17428548

  2. Limitations of allotopic expression of mitochondrial genes in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Oca-Cossio, Jose; Kenyon, Lesley; Hao, Huiling; Moraes, Carlos T

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of expressing mitochondrial DNA-coded genes in the nuclear-cytoplasmic compartment provides an attractive system for genetic treatment of mitochondrial disorders associated with mitochondrial DNA mutations. In theory, by recoding mitochondrial genes to adapt them to the universal genetic code and by adding a DNA sequence coding for a mitochondrial-targeting sequence, one could achieve correct localization of the gene product. Such transfer has occurred in nature, and certain species of algae and plants express a number of polypeptides that are commonly coded by mtDNA in the nuclear-cytoplasmic compartment. In the present study, allotopic expression of three different mtDNA-coded polypeptides (ATPase8, apocytochrome b, and ND4) into COS-7 and HeLa cells was analyzed. Among these, only ATPase8 was correctly expressed and localized to mitochondria. The full-length, as well as truncated forms, of apocytochrome b and ND4 decorated the periphery of mitochondria, but also aggregated in fiber-like structures containing tubulin and in some cases also vimentin. The addition of a hydrophilic tail (EGFP) to the C terminus of these polypeptides did not change their localization. Overexpression of molecular chaperones also did not have a significant effect in preventing aggregations. Allotopic expression of apocytochrome b and ND4 induced a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in transfected cells, which can lead to cell death. Our observations suggest that only a subset of mitochondrial genes can be replaced allotopically. Analyses of the hydrophobic patterns of different polypeptides suggest that hydrophobicity of the N-terminal segment is the main determinant for the importability of peptides into mammalian mitochondria. PMID:14573482

  3. MicroRNA-378 Regulates Adiponectin Expression in Adipose Tissue: A New Plausible Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Masayoshi; Shimabukuro, Michio; Yagi, Shusuke; Nishimoto, Sachiko; Kozuka, Chisayo; Fukuda, Daiju; Soeki, Takeshi; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Tsutsui, Masato; Sata, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    Aims Mechanisms regulating adiponectin expression have not been fully clarified. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression, are involved in biological processes, including obesity and insulin resistance. We evaluated whether the miRNA-378 pathway is involved in regulating adiponectin expression. Methods and Results First, we determined a putative target site for miRNA-378 in the 3 prime untranslated region (3'UTR) of the adiponectin gene by in silico analysis. The levels of adiponectin mRNA and protein were decreased in 3T3-L1 cells overexpressing the mimic of miRNA-378. Luminescence activity in HEK293T cells expressing a renilla-luciferase-adiponectin-3'UTR sequence was inhibited by overexpressing the mimic of miRNA-378, and the decrease was reversed by adding the inhibitor of miRNA-378. Moreover, we confirmed the inhibitory effects of the mimic were cancelled in a deleted mutant of the miR-378 3′-UTR binding site. Addition of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) led a upregulation of miR-378 and downregulation of adiponectin at mRNA and protein levels in 3T3-L1 cells. Level of miR-378 was higher and mRNA level of adiponectin was lower in diabetic ob/ob mice than those of normal C57BL/6 mice and levels of miR378 and adiponectin were negatively well correlated (r = −0.624, p = 0.004). Conclusions We found that levels of miRNA-378 could modulate adiponectin expression via the 3'UTR sequence-binding site. Our findings warrant further investigations into the role of miRNAs in regulating the adiponectin expression. PMID:25379946

  4. Cathepsins B and L activate Ebola but not Marburg virus glycoproteins for efficient entry into cell lines and macrophages independent of TMPRSS2 expression.

    PubMed

    Gnirss, Kerstin; Kühl, Annika; Karsten, Christina; Glowacka, Ilona; Bertram, Stephanie; Kaup, Franziska; Hofmann, Heike; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2012-03-01

    Ebola (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV) cause severe hemorrhagic fever. The host cell proteases cathepsin B and L activate the Zaire ebolavirus glycoprotein (GP) for cellular entry and constitute potential targets for antiviral intervention. However, it is unclear if different EBOV species and MARV equally depend on cathepsin B/L activity for infection of cell lines and macrophages, important viral target cells. Here, we show that cathepsin B/L inhibitors markedly reduce 293T cell infection driven by the GPs of all EBOV species, independent of the type II transmembrane serine protease TMPRSS2, which cleaved but failed to activate EBOV-GPs. Similarly, a cathepsin B/L inhibitor blocked macrophage infection mediated by different EBOV-GPs. In contrast, MARV-GP-driven entry exhibited little dependence on cathepsin B/L activity. Still, MARV-GP-mediated entry was efficiently blocked by leupeptin. These results suggest that cathepsins B/L promote entry of EBOV while MARV might employ so far unidentified proteases for GP activation. PMID:22222211

  5. Expression of human angiogenin in cultured baby hamster kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kurachi, K.; Rybak, S.M.; Fett, J.W.; Shapiro, R.; Strydom, D.J.; Olson, K.A.; Riordan, J.F.; Davie, E.W.; Vallee, B.L.

    1988-08-23

    Baby hamster kidney cells were transformed with DNA sequences derived from the gene for human angiogenin. Expression was under the transcriptional control of the inducible mouse metallothionein 1 promoter. Recombinant angiogenin was purified and shown to be chemically, biologically, and enzymatically indistinguishable from the natural product. The large-scale production of recombinant angiogenin achieved should facilitate detailed studies into the structure-function relationships of this potent angiogenic molecule.

  6. Interfacial polymerization for colorimetric labeling of protein expression in cells.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Jacob L; Sheldon, Phillip R; Hoversten, Liv J; Romero, Gabriela; Balasubramaniam, Vivek; Berron, Brad J

    2014-01-01

    Determining the location of rare proteins in cells typically requires the use of on-sample amplification. Antibody based recognition and enzymatic amplification is used to produce large amounts of visible label at the site of protein expression, but these techniques suffer from the presence of nonspecific reactivity in the biological sample and from poor spatial control over the label. Polymerization based amplification is a recently developed alternative means of creating an on-sample amplification for fluorescence applications, while not suffering from endogenous labels or loss of signal localization. This manuscript builds upon polymerization based amplification by developing a stable, archivable, and colorimetric mode of amplification termed Polymer Dye Labeling. The basic concept involves an interfacial polymer grown at the site of protein expression and subsequent staining of this polymer with an appropriate dye. The dyes Evans Blue and eosin were initially investigated for colorimetric response in a microarray setting, where both specifically stained polymer films on glass. The process was translated to the staining of protein expression in human dermal fibroblast cells, and Polymer Dye Labeling was specific to regions consistent with desired protein expression. The labeling is stable for over 200 days in ambient conditions and is also compatible with modern mounting medium. PMID:25536421

  7. Interfacial Polymerization for Colorimetric Labeling of Protein Expression in Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lilly, Jacob L.; Sheldon, Phillip R.; Hoversten, Liv J.; Romero, Gabriela; Balasubramaniam, Vivek; Berron, Brad J.

    2014-01-01

    Determining the location of rare proteins in cells typically requires the use of on-sample amplification. Antibody based recognition and enzymatic amplification is used to produce large amounts of visible label at the site of protein expression, but these techniques suffer from the presence of nonspecific reactivity in the biological sample and from poor spatial control over the label. Polymerization based amplification is a recently developed alternative means of creating an on-sample amplification for fluorescence applications, while not suffering from endogenous labels or loss of signal localization. This manuscript builds upon polymerization based amplification by developing a stable, archivable, and colorimetric mode of amplification termed Polymer Dye Labeling. The basic concept involves an interfacial polymer grown at the site of protein expression and subsequent staining of this polymer with an appropriate dye. The dyes Evans Blue and eosin were initially investigated for colorimetric response in a microarray setting, where both specifically stained polymer films on glass. The process was translated to the staining of protein expression in human dermal fibroblast cells, and Polymer Dye Labeling was specific to regions consistent with desired protein expression. The labeling is stable for over 200 days in ambient conditions and is also compatible with modern mounting medium. PMID:25536421

  8. Melanoma cells express ICOS ligand to promote the activation and expansion of T-regulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Orozco, Natalia; Li, Yufeng; Wang, Yijun; Liu, Shijuan; Hwu, Patrick; Liu, Yong-Jun; Dong, Chen; Radvanyi, Laszlo

    2010-01-01

    CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T-regulatory cells (Tregs) accumulate in tumors, however little is known about how the tumor environment influences this process. Here we show that human melanomas express ICOS-ligand (ICOS-L/B7H) that can provide costimulation through ICOS for the expansion of activated Tregs maintaining high Foxp3 and CD25 expression as well as suppressive function. Thus, ICOS-L expression by melanoma tumor cells may directly drive Treg activation and expansion in the tumor microenvironment as another mechanism of immune evasion. PMID:21098714

  9. PECAM-1 is involved in BCR/ABL signaling and may downregulate imatinib-induced apoptosis of Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Nan; Kurosu, Tetsuya; Oshikawa, Gaku; Nagao, Toshikage; Miura, Osamu

    2013-02-01

    PECAM-1 (CD31) is an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM)-containing surface glycoprotein expressed on various hematopoietic cells as well as on endothelial cells. PECAM-1 has been shown to play roles in regulation of adhesion, migration and apoptosis. The BCR/ABL fusion tyrosine kinase is expressed in chronic myeloid leukemia and Philadelphia-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells, and its inhibition by the clinically used tyrosine kinase inhibitors imatinib or dasatinib induces apoptosis of these cells. In the present study, we demonstrate that PECAM-1 is tyrosine phospho-rylated in its ITIM motifs in various BCR/ABL-expressing cells including primary leukemia cells. Studies using imatinib and dasatinib as well as transient expression experiments in 293T cells revealed that PECAM-1 was phosphorylated directly by BCR/ABL, which was enhanced by the imatinib-resistant E255K and T315I mutations, or partly by the Src family tyrosine kinases, including Lyn, which were activated dependently or independently on BCR/ABL. We also demonstrate by using a substrate trapping mutant of SHP2 that tyrosine phosphorylated PECAM-1 binds SHP2 and is a major substrate for this tyrosine phosphatase in BCR/ABL-expressing cells. Overexpression of PECAM-1 in BCR/ABL-expressing cells, including K562 human leukemia cells, enhanced cell adhesion and partially inhibited imatinib-induced apoptosis involving mitochondria depolarization and caspase-3 cleavage, at least partly, in an ITIM-independent manner. These data suggest that PECAM-1 may play a role in regulation of apoptosis as well as adhesion of BCR/ABL-expressing cells to modulate their imatinib sensitivity and would be a possible candidate for therapeutic target in Ph+ leukemias. PMID:23233201

  10. SATB2 is expressed in Merkel cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Mari; Agnarsdóttir, Margrét; Edqvist, Per-Henrik; Coter, Anna; Ponten, Fredrik

    2016-08-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare aggressive skin cancer with neuroendocrine differentiation. With immunohistochemistry, the tumor cells stain for both neuroendocrine (i.e., synaptophysin and chromogranin A) and epithelial markers. The epithelial marker cytokeratin 20 (CK20) stains positive with immunohistochemistry in a vast majority of MCCs. The expression of the special AT-rich sequence-binding protein (SATB2) was analyzed in MCC (n = 20) together with other forms of skin cancer and neuroendocrine tumors (n = 51) using immunohistochemistry. The results were compared to the expression of CK20, synaptophysin, and chromogranin A. The majority of the MCCs stained positive for synaptophysin and chromogranin A (95 vs 80 % respectively), and 75 % of the MCCs showed cytoplasmic positivity for CK20 and nuclear positivity for SATB2, with two discordant cases lacking expression of one of these markers. We conclude that immunohistochemistry for SATB2 can be used as an additional marker with similar sensitivity and specificity as CK20 for the diagnosis of Merkel cell carcinoma, suggesting a clinical utility in difficult cases where MCC is suspected. PMID:27262585

  11. Regulation of histone gene expression during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Meshi, T; Taoka, K I; Iwabuchi, M

    2000-08-01

    The steady-state level of histone mRNAs fluctuates coordinately with chromosomal DNA synthesis during the cell cycle. Such an S phase-specific expression pattern results from transcriptional activation of histone genes coupled with the onset of replication and from transcriptional repression of the genes as well as specific destabilization of histone mRNAs around the end of the S phase. Proliferation-coupled and S phase-specific expression of histone genes is primarily achieved by the activities of the proximal promoter regions, where several conserved cis-acting elements have been identified. Among them, three kinds of Oct-containing composite elements (OCEs) play a pivotal role in S phase-specific transcriptional activation. Other ones, such as Nona, solo-Oct, and CCGTC motifs, appear to modulate the functions of OCEs to enhance or repress the transcriptional level, possibly depending on the state of the cells. Here, we review the growing evidence concerning the regulatory mechanisms by which plant histone genes are expressed S phase-specifically in proliferating cells. PMID:11089867

  12. Targeted radiosensitization of cells expressing truncated DNA polymerase {beta}.

    PubMed

    Neijenhuis, Sari; Verwijs-Janssen, Manon; van den Broek, Lenie J; Begg, Adrian C; Vens, Conchita

    2010-11-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is an effective anticancer treatment, although failures still occur. To improve radiotherapy, tumor-targeted strategies are needed to increase radiosensitivity of tumor cells, without influencing normal tissue radiosensitivity. Base excision repair (BER) and single-strand break repair (SSBR) contribute to the determination of sensitivity to IR. A crucial protein in BER/SSBR is DNA polymerase β (polβ). Aberrant polβ expression is commonly found in human tumors and leads to inhibition of BER. Here, we show that truncated polβ variant (polβ-Δ)-expressing cells depend on homologous recombination (HR) for survival after IR, indicating that a considerable fraction of polβ-Δ-induced lesions are subject to repair by HR. Increased sensitization was found not to result from involvement in DNA-dependent protein kinase-dependent nonhomologous end joining, the other major double-strand break repair pathway. Caffeine and the ATM inhibitor Ku55933 cause polβ-Δ-dependent radiosensitization. Consistent with the observed HR dependence and the known HR-modulating activity of ATM, polβ-Δ-expressing cells showed increased radiosensitization after BRCA2 knockdown that is absent under ATM-inhibited conditions. Our data suggest that treatment with HR modulators is a promising therapeutic strategy for exploiting defects in the BER/SSBR pathway in human tumors. PMID:20978197

  13. A novel variant of aquaporin 3 is expressed in killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) intestine

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Dawoon; Adamo, Meredith A.; Lehman, Rebecca M.; Barnaby, Roxanna; Jackson, Craig E.; Jackson, Brian P.; Shaw, Joseph R.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) are euryhaline teleosts that are widely used in environmental and toxicological studies, and they are tolerant to arsenic, in part due to very low assimilation of arsenic from the environment. The mechanism of arsenic uptake by the intestine, a major route of arsenic uptake in humans is unknown. Thus, the goal of this study was to determine if aquaglyceroporins (AQP), which transport water and other small molecules including arsenite across cell membranes, are expressed in the killifish intestine, and whether AQP expression is affected by osmotic stress. Through RT-PCR and sequence analysis of PCR amplicons, we demonstrated that the intestine expresses kfAQP3a and kfAQP3b, two previously identified variants, and also identified a novel variant of killifish AQP3 (kfAQP3c) in the intestine. The variants likely represent alternate splice forms. A BLAST search of the F. heteroclitus reference genome revealed that the AQP3 gene resides on a single locus, while an alignment of the AQP3 sequence among 384 individuals from eight population ranging from Rhode Island to North Carolina revealed that its coding sequence was remarkably conserved with no fixed polymorphism residing in the region that distinguishes these variants. We further demonstrate that the novel variant transports arsenite into HEK293T cells. Whereas kfAQP3a, which does not transport arsenite, was expressed in both freshwater (FW) and saltwater (SW) acclimated fish, kfAQP3b, an arsenic transporter, was expressed only in FW acclimated fish, and kfAQP3c was expressed only in SW acclimated fish. Thus, we have identified a novel, putative splice variant of kfAQP3, kfAQP3c, which transports arsenic and is expressed only in SW acclimated fish. PMID:25766383

  14. Expression of insulin-like growth factor family genes in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Białożyt, Michał; Plato, Marta; Mazurek, Urszula; Braczkowska, Bogumiła

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Despite significant progress in the pathology of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), diagnostic and predictive factors of major importance have not been discovered. Some hopes are associated with insulin-like growth factors. The aim of the study was to compare the expression of genes for insulin-like growth factor family in tumours and in tissue of kidneys without cancer. Material and methods Fifty-two patients years with clear cell renal cell cancer were qualified to the study group; patients nephrectomised because of hydronephrosis were included in the control group. Expression of genes were evaluated by RT-PCR. Results Expression of IGFR-1 gene in tumour accounts for about 60% of cases. The incidence is higher than in corresponding adjacent non-cancerous kidney tissues and higher (but with no statistical significance) than in kidney without cancer. Expression of IGFR-2 gene in tumours has not been established. The incidence of the expression in corresponding adjacent non-cancerous kidney tissues is small. Expression of this gene has been present in all specimens from kidneys without cancer. Expression of IGFBP-3 gene ascertained in all (except four) cases of ccRCC and in the majority of clippings from adjacent tissue. It was not found in kidneys from the control group. IGF-1, IGF-2, and IGFR-1 mRNA copy numbers in ccRCC were higher than in the material from the control group PMID:27358591

  15. Estrogen-related receptor γ modulates cell proliferation and estrogen signaling in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ijichi, Nobuhiro; Shigekawa, Takashi; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Osaki, Akihiko; Saeki, Toshiaki; Inoue, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is primarily a hormone-dependent tumor that can be regulated by status of steroid hormones including estrogen and progesterone. Estrogen-related receptors (ERRs) are orphan nuclear receptors most closely related to estrogen receptor (ER) and much attention has been recently paid to the functions of ERRs in breast cancer in terms of the interactions with ER. In the present study, we investigated the expression of ERRγ in human invasive breast cancers by immunohistochemical analysis (n=110) obtained by radical mastectomy. Nuclear immunoreactivity of ERRγ was detected in 87 cases (79%) and tended to correlate with the lymph node status. No significant associations were observed with other clinicopathological characteristics, including the expression levels of both estrogen and progesterone receptors. In MCF-7 breast cancer cells, we demonstrated that ERRγ mRNA was up-regulated dose-dependently by estrogen, and that this up-regulation of ERRγ mRNA by estrogen was abolished by ICI 182,780 treatment. We also demonstrated that exogenously transfected ERRγ increased MCF-7 cell proliferation. Furthermore, ERRγ enhanced estrogen response element (ERE)-driven transcription in MCF-7 cells. In 293T cells, ERRγ could also stimulate ERE-mediated transcription with or without ERα. These results suggest that ERRγ plays an important role as a modulator of estrogen signaling in breast cancer cells. PMID:20883782

  16. Streamlined platform for short hairpin RNA interference and transgenesis in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Khandelia, Piyush; Yap, Karen; Makeyev, Eugene V

    2011-08-01

    Sequence-specific gene silencing by short hairpin (sh) RNAs has recently emerged as an indispensable tool for understanding gene function and a promising avenue for drug discovery. However, a wider biomedical use of this approach is hindered by the lack of straightforward methods for achieving uniform expression of shRNAs in mammalian cell cultures. Here we report a high-efficiency and low-background (HILO) recombination-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) technology that yields virtually homogeneous cell pools containing doxycycline-inducible shRNA elements in a matter of days and with minimal efforts. To ensure immediate utility of this approach for a wider research community, we modified 11 commonly used human (A549, HT1080, HEK293T, HeLa, HeLa-S3, and U2OS) and mouse (CAD, L929, N2a, NIH 3T3, and P19) cell lines to be compatible with the HILO-RMCE process. Because of its technical simplicity and cost efficiency, the technology will be advantageous for both low- and high-throughput shRNA experiments. We also provide evidence that HILO-RMCE will facilitate a wider range of molecular and cell biology applications by allowing one to rapidly engineer cell populations expressing essentially any transgene of interest. PMID:21768390

  17. Functional analysis of the sea urchin-derived arylsulfatase (Ars)-element in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Watanabe, Sachiko; Sakamoto, Naoaki; Sato, Masahiro; Akasaka, Koji

    2006-09-01

    An insulator is a DNA sequence that has both enhancer-blocking activity, through its ability to modify the influence of neighboring cis-acting elements, and a barrier function that protects a transgene from being silenced by surrounding chromatin. Previously, we isolated and characterized a 582-bp-long element from the sea urchin arylsulfatase gene (Ars). This Ars-element was effective in sea urchin and Drosophila embryos and in plant cells. To investigate Ars-element activity in mammalian cells, we placed the element between the cytomegalovirus enhancer and a luciferase (luc) expression cassette. In contrast to controls lacking the Ars-element, NIH3T3 and 293T cells transfected with the element-containing construct displayed reduced luciferase activities. The Ars-element therefore acts as an enhancer-blocking element in mammalian cells. We assessed the barrier activity of the Ars-element using vectors in which a luc expression cassette was placed between two elements. Transfection experiments demonstrated that luc activity in these vectors was approximately ten-fold higher than in vectors lacking elements. Luc activities were well maintained even after 12 weeks in culture. Our observations demonstrate that the Ars-element has also a barrier activity. These results indicated that the Ars-element act as an insulator in mammalian cells. PMID:16923122

  18. Effect of Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 Expression on Intracellular Granule Movement in Pancreatic α Cells.

    PubMed

    Yokawa, Satoru; Furuno, Tadahide; Suzuki, Takahiro; Inoh, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Ryo; Hirashima, Naohide

    2016-09-01

    Although glucagon secreted from pancreatic α cells plays a role in increasing glucose concentrations in serum, the mechanism regulating glucagon secretion from α cells remains unclear. Cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1), identified as an adhesion molecule in α cells, has been reported not only to communicate among α cells and between nerve fibers, but also to prevent excessive glucagon secretion from α cells. Here, we investigated the effect of CADM1 expression on the movement of intracellular secretory granules in α cells because the granule transport is an important step in secretion. Spinning disk microscopic analysis showed that granules moved at a mean velocity of 0.236 ± 0.010 μm/s in the mouse α cell line αTC6 that expressed CADM1 endogenously. The mean velocity was significantly decreased in CADM1-knockdown (KD) cells (mean velocity: 0.190 ± 0.016 μm/s). The velocity of granule movement decreased greatly in αTC6 cells treated with the microtubule-depolymerizing reagent nocodazole, but not in αTC6 cells treated with the actin-depolymerizing reagent cytochalasin D. No difference in the mean velocity was observed between αTC6 and CADM1-KD cells treated with nocodazole. These results suggest that intracellular granules in pancreatic α cells move along the microtubule network, and that CADM1 influences their velocity. PMID:27262873

  19. Cyclic hypoxia does not alter RAD51 expression or PARP inhibitor cell kill in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Kumareswaran, Ramya; Chaudary, Naz; Jaluba, Karolina; Meng, Alice; Sykes, Jenna; Borhan, Asm; Hill, Richard P; Bristow, Robert G

    2015-09-01

    Solid tumors contain regions of chronic and cyclic hypoxia. Chronic hypoxia can downregulate RAD51 and sensitize cells to PARP inhibition. Herein, we show that RAD51 expression, cell survival and toxicity to PARP inhibition is not affected under cyclic hypoxic conditions. This suggests that PARP inhibition may be selectively toxic in tumor sub-regions associated with chronic hypoxia. PMID:25842967

  20. Insect cell transformation vectors that support high level expression and promoter assessment in insect cell culture.

    PubMed

    Shirk, Paul D; Furlong, Richard B

    2016-01-01

    A somatic transformation vector, pDP9, was constructed that provides a simplified means of producing permanently transformed cultured insect cells that support high levels of protein expression of foreign genes. The pDP9 plasmid vector incorporates DNA sequences from the Junonia coenia densovirus that are involved in integration of the densovirus in insect cell chromosomes and a promoter/enhancer system that results in high levels of expression. The plasmid also contains two markers that permit selection of transformed insect cells by antibiotic resistance or by cell-sorting for fluorescent protein expression. Transformation of Bombyx mori Bm5 or Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cultured cells with the pDP9 vectors results in the integration of the pDP9 plasmid into genomic DNA of Bm5 and Sf9 cells. pDP9 contains a multiple cloning site (MCS) 3' of the densoviral P9 promoter and insertion of a protein coding sequence within the MCS results in high level expression by pDP9 transformed cells. P9 driven transcription in the pDP9 transformed Sf9 cells produced foreign gene transcript levels that were 30 fold higher than actin 3 driven transgenes and equivalent to hr5IE1 driven transgenes. The pDP9 vector transformation results in the efficient selection of clones for assessment of promoter activity. PMID:26794473

  1. CONCISE REVIEW Micro RNA Expression in Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmipathy, Uma; Hart, Ronald P.

    2009-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) isolated from various adult tissue sources have the capacity to self-renew and to differentiate into multiple lineages. Both of these processes are tightly regulated by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. Emerging evidence indicates that the class of single-stranded non-coding RNAs known as “microRNAs” also plays a critical role in this process. First described in nematodes and plants, microRNAs have been shown to modulate major regulatory mechanisms in eukaryotic cells involved in a broad array of cellular functions. Studies with various types of embryonic as well as adult stem cells indicate an intricate network of microRNAs regulating key transcription factors and other genes which in turn determine cell fate. In addition, expression of unique microRNAs in specific cell types serves as a useful diagnostic marker to define a particular cell type. MicroRNAs are also found to be regulated by extracellular signaling pathways that are important for differentiation into specific tissues, suggesting that they play a role in specifying tissue identity. In this review we describe the importance of microRNAs in stem cells focusing on our current understanding of microRNAs in MSC and their derivatives. PMID:17991914

  2. Short-chain ceramides depress integrin cell surface expression and function in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Morad, Samy A F; Bridges, Lance C; Almeida Larrea, Alex D; Mayen, Anthony L; MacDougall, Matthew R; Davis, Traci S; Kester, Mark; Cabot, Myles C

    2016-07-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is highly metastatic, significantly so to liver, a characteristic that embodies one of the most challenging aspects of treatment. The integrin family of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion receptors plays a central role in migration and invasion, functions that underlie metastatic potential. In the present work we sought to determine the impact of ceramide, which plays a key modulatory role in cancer suppression, on integrin cell surface expression and function in CRC cells in order to reveal possible ceramide-centric effects on tumor cell motility. Human CRC cells LoVo, HT-29, and HCT-116 were employed, which represent lines established from primary and metastatic sites. A cell-permeable, short-chain analog, C6-ceramide, was used as ceramide mimic. Exposure of cells to C6-ceramide (24 h) promoted a dose-dependent (2.5-10 µM) decrease in the expression of cell surface β1 and β4 integrin subunits in all cell lines; at 10 µM C6-ceramide, the decreases ranged from 30 to 50% of the control. Expression of cell surface αVβ6 integrin, which is associated with advanced invasion in CRC, was also suppressed by C6-ceramide. Decreases in integrin expression translated to diminished cellular adhesion, 50% of the control at 5 µM C6-ceramide, and markedly reduced cellular migration, approximately 30-40% of the control in all cell lines. Physicochemical examination revealed potent efficacy of nano-formulated C6-ceramide, but inferior activity of dihydro-C6-ceramide and L-C6-ceramide, compared to the unsaturated counterpart and the natural d-enantiomer, respectively. These studies demonstrate novel actions of ceramides that may have application in suppression of tumor metastasis, in addition to their known tumor suppressor effects. PMID:27045476

  3. Adhesion Molecule Expression in Human Endothelial Cells under Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudimov, E. G.; Andreeva, E. R.; Buravkova, L. B.

    2013-02-01

    High gravisensitivity of endothelium is now well recognized. Therefore, the microgravity can be one of the main factors affecting the endothelium in space flight. In this work we studied the effects of gravity vector randomization (3D-clinorotation in RPM) on the viability of endothelial cells from human umbilical vein (HUVEC) and the expression of adhesion molecules on its surface. After RPM exposure, HUVEC conditioning medium was collected for cytokines evaluation, a part of vials was used for immunocytochemistry and other one - for cytofluorimetric analysis of ICAM-I, VCAM-I, PECAM-I, E-selectin, Endoglin, VE-cadherin expression. The viability of HUVEC and constitutive expression of EC marker molecules PECAM-I and Endoglin were similar in all experimental groups both after 6 and 24 hrs of exposure. There were no differences in ICAM-I and E-selectin expression on HUVEC in 3 groups after 6 hrs of exposure. 24 hrs incubation has provoked decrease in ICAM-I and E-selectin expression. Thus, gravity vector randomization can lead to the disruption of ECs monolayer.

  4. Mutational study of sapovirus expression in insect cells

    PubMed Central

    Hansman, Grant S; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Oka, Tomoichiro; Natori, Katsuro; Takeda, Naokazu

    2005-01-01

    Human sapovirus (SaV), an agent of human gastroenteritis, cannot be grown in cell culture, but expression of the recombinant capsid protein (rVP1) in a baculovirus expression system results in the formation of virus-like particles (VLPs). In this study we compared the time-course expression of two different SaV rVP1 constructs. One construct had the native sequence (Wt construct), whereas the other had two nucleotide point mutations in which one mutation caused an amino acid substitution and one was silent (MEG-1076 construct). While both constructs formed VLPs morphologically similar to native SaV, Northern blot analysis indicated that the MEG-1076 rVP1 mRNA had increased steady-state levels. Furthermore, Western blot analysis and an antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that the MEG-1076 construct had increased expression levels of rVP1 and yields of VLPs. Interestingly, the position of the mutated residue was strictly conserved residue among other human SaV strains, suggesting an important role for rVP1 expression. PMID:15727685

  5. Simvastatin modulates mesenchymal stromal cell proliferation and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zanette, Dalila Lucíola; Lorenzi, Julio Cesar Cetrulo; Panepucci, Rodrigo Alexandre; Palma, Patricia Vianna Bonini; Dos Santos, Daiane Fernanda; Prata, Karen Lima; Silva, Wilson Araújo

    2015-01-01

    Statins are widely used hypocholesterolemic drugs that block the mevalonate pathway, responsible for the biosysnthesis of cholesterol. However, statins also have pleiotropic effects that interfere with several signaling pathways. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are a heterogeneous mixture of cells that can be isolated from a variety of tissues and are identified by the expression of a panel of surface markers and by their ability to differentiate in vitro into osteocytes, adipocytes and chondrocytes. MSC were isolated from amniotic membranes and bone marrows and characterized based on ISCT (International Society for Cell Therapy) minimal criteria. Simvastatin-treated cells and controls were directly assayed by CFSE (Carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester) staining to assess their cell proliferation and their RNA was used for microarray analyses and quantitative PCR (qPCR). These MSC were also evaluated for their ability to inhibit PBMC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) proliferation. We show here that simvastatin negatively modulates MSC proliferation in a dose-dependent way and regulates the expression of proliferation-related genes. Importantly, we observed that simvastatin increased the percentage of a subset of smaller MSC, which also were actively proliferating. The association of MSC decreased size with increased pluripotency and the accumulating evidence that statins may prevent cellular senescence led us to hypothesize that simvastatin induces a smaller subpopulation that may have increased ability to maintain the entire pool of MSC and also to protect them from cellular senescence induced by long-term cultures/passages in vitro. These results may be important to better understand the pleiotropic effects of statins and its effects on the biology of cells with regenerative potential. PMID:25874574

  6. Expression-Enhanced Fluorescent Proteins Based on Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein for Super-resolution Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Duwé, Sam; De Zitter, Elke; Gielen, Vincent; Moeyaert, Benjamien; Vandenberg, Wim; Grotjohann, Tim; Clays, Koen; Jakobs, Stefan; Van Meervelt, Luc; Dedecker, Peter

    2015-10-27

    "Smart fluorophores", such as reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins, are crucial for advanced fluorescence imaging. However, only a limited number of such labels is available, and many display reduced biological performance compared to more classical variants. We present the development of robustly photoswitchable variants of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), named rsGreens, that display up to 30-fold higher fluorescence in E. coli colonies grown at 37 °C and more than 4-fold higher fluorescence when expressed in HEK293T cells compared to their ancestor protein rsEGFP. This enhancement is not due to an intrinsic increase in the fluorescence brightness of the probes, but rather due to enhanced expression levels that allow many more probe molecules to be functional at any given time. We developed rsGreens displaying a range of photoswitching kinetics and show how these can be used for multimodal diffraction-unlimited fluorescence imaging such as pcSOFI and RESOLFT, achieving a spatial resolution of ∼70 nm. By determining the first ever crystal structures of a negative reversibly switchable FP derived from Aequorea victoria in both the "on"- and "off"-conformation we were able to confirm the presence of a cis-trans isomerization and provide further insights into the mechanisms underlying the photochromism. Our work demonstrates that genetically encoded "smart fluorophores" can be readily optimized for biological performance and provides a practical strategy for developing maturation- and stability-enhanced photochromic fluorescent proteins. PMID:26308583

  7. First knockdown gene expression in bat (Hipposideros armiger) brain mediated by lentivirus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Zhu, Tengteng; Jones, Gareth; Zhang, Junpeng; Sun, Yi

    2013-06-01

    Lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) is a potent experimental tool for investigating gene functions in vitro and in vivo. It has advantages that transgenic technology lacks. However, in vivo applications are difficult to apply in the central nervous system of non-model organisms due to the lack of a standard brain atlas and genetic information. Here, we report the development of an in vivo gene delivery system used in bat brain tissue for the first time, based on lentivirus (LV) vectors expressing short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting Hipposideros armiger forkhead box P2 (FoxP2). In vitro transfection into HEK 293T cell with the vector bearing the cassettes encoding FoxP2 shRNA verified the knockdown efficiency. Pseudovirus particles were administered via stereotactic intracerebral microinjection into the anterior cingulate cortex of H. armiger. FoxP2 is of major interest because of its role in sensorimotor coordination and probably in echolocation. Subsequent in situ hybridization validated the in vivo silencing of the target gene. This report demonstrates that LV-mediated expression of RNAi could achieve effective gene silencing in bats, a non-model organism, and will assist in elucidating the functions of bat genes. PMID:22965420

  8. Bone Marrow Cells Expressing Clara Cell Secretory Protein Increase Epithelial Repair After Ablation of Pulmonary Clara Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bustos, Martha L; Mura, Marco; Marcus, Paula; Hwang, David; Ludkovski, Olga; Wong, Amy P; Waddell, Thomas K

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported a subpopulation of bone marrow cells (BMC) that express Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP), generally felt to be specific to lung Clara cells. Ablation of lung Clara cells has been reported using a transgenic mouse that expresses thymidine kinase under control of the CCSP promoter. Treatment with ganciclovir results in permanent elimination of CCSP+ cells, failure of airway regeneration, and death. To determine if transtracheal delivery of wild-type bone marrow CCSP+ cells is beneficial after ablation of lung CCSP+ cells, transgenic mice were treated with ganciclovir followed by transtracheal administration of CCSP+ or CCSP− BMC. Compared with mice administered CCSP− cells, mice treated with CCSP+ cells had more donor cells lining the airway epithelium, where they expressed epithelial markers including CCSP. Although donor CCSP+ cells did not substantially repopulate the airway, their administration resulted in increased host ciliated cells, better preservation of airway epithelium, reduction of inflammatory cells, and an increase in animal survival time. Administration of CCSP+ BMC is beneficial after permanent ablation of lung Clara cells by increasing bronchial epithelial repair. Therefore, CCSP+ BMC could be important for treatment of lung diseases where airways re-epithelialization is compromised. PMID:23609017

  9. Orai1 Expression Is Closely Related with Favorable Prognostic Factors in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Store-operated calcium (Ca2+) entry (SOCE) is the principal Ca2+ entry route in non-excitable cells, including cancer cells. We previously demonstrated that Orai1 and STIM1, the molecular components of SOCE, are involved in tumorigenesis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC). However, a clinical relevance of Orai1 and STIM1 expression in CCRCC has been ill-defined. Here, we investigated the expression of Orai1 and STIM1 in CCRCC, and compared their expression with clinico-pathological parameters of CCRCC and the patients’ outcome. Immunohistochemical staining for Orai1 and STIM1 was performed on 126 formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue of CCRCC and western blot analysis for Orai1 was performed on the available fresh tissue. The results were compared with generally well-established clinicopathologic prognostic factors in CCRCC and patient survival. Membrane protein Orai1 is expressed in the nuclei in CCRCC, whereas STIM1 shows the cytosolic expression pattern in immunohistochemical staining. Orai1 expression level is inversely correlated with CCRCC tumor grade, whereas STIM1 expression level is not associated with tumor grade. The higher Orai1 expression is significantly associated with lower Fuhrman nuclear grade, pathologic T stage, and TNM stage and with favorable prognosis. The expression level of STIM1 is not correlated with CCRCC grade and clinical outcomes. Orai1 expression in CCRCC is associated with tumor progression and with favorable prognostic factors. These results suggest that Orai1 is an attractive prognostic marker and therapeutic target for CCRCC.

  10. Orai1 Expression Is Closely Related with Favorable Prognostic Factors in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lkhagvadorj, Sayamaa; Kim, Ji-Hee; Oh, Sung-Soo; Lee, Mi-Ra; Jung, Jae Hung; Chung, Hyun Chul; Cha, Seung-Kuy; Eom, Minseob

    2016-06-01

    Store-operated calcium (Ca(2+)) entry (SOCE) is the principal Ca(2+) entry route in non-excitable cells, including cancer cells. We previously demonstrated that Orai1 and STIM1, the molecular components of SOCE, are involved in tumorigenesis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC). However, a clinical relevance of Orai1 and STIM1 expression in CCRCC has been ill-defined. Here, we investigated the expression of Orai1 and STIM1 in CCRCC, and compared their expression with clinico-pathological parameters of CCRCC and the patients' outcome. Immunohistochemical staining for Orai1 and STIM1 was performed on 126 formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue of CCRCC and western blot analysis for Orai1 was performed on the available fresh tissue. The results were compared with generally well-established clinicopathologic prognostic factors in CCRCC and patient survival. Membrane protein Orai1 is expressed in the nuclei in CCRCC, whereas STIM1 shows the cytosolic expression pattern in immunohistochemical staining. Orai1 expression level is inversely correlated with CCRCC tumor grade, whereas STIM1 expression level is not associated with tumor grade. The higher Orai1 expression is significantly associated with lower Fuhrman nuclear grade, pathologic T stage, and TNM stage and with favorable prognosis. The expression level of STIM1 is not correlated with CCRCC grade and clinical outcomes. Orai1 expression in CCRCC is associated with tumor progression and with favorable prognostic factors. These results suggest that Orai1 is an attractive prognostic marker and therapeutic target for CCRCC. PMID:27247496

  11. Co-Expression of Cancer Stem Cell Markers Corresponds to a Pro-Tumorigenic Expression Profile in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Skoda, Jan; Hermanova, Marketa; Loja, Tomas; Nemec, Pavel; Neradil, Jakub; Karasek, Petr; Veselska, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains one of the most lethal malignancies. Its dismal prognosis is often attributed to the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that have been identified in PDAC using various markers. However, the co-expression of all of these markers has not yet been evaluated. Furthermore, studies that compare the expression levels of CSC markers in PDAC tumor samples and in cell lines derived directly from those tumors are lacking. Here, we analyzed the expression of putative CSC markers-CD24, CD44, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), CD133, and nestin-by immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and quantitative PCR in 3 PDAC-derived cell lines and by immunohistochemistry in 3 corresponding tumor samples. We showed high expression of the examined CSC markers among all of the cell lines and tumor samples, with the exception of CD24 and CD44, which were enriched under in vitro conditions compared with tumor tissues. The proportions of cells positive for the remaining markers were comparable to those detected in the corresponding tumors. Co-expression analysis using flow cytometry revealed that CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells represented a significant population of the cells (range, 43 to 72%) among the cell lines. The highest proportion of CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells was detected in the cell line derived from the tumor of a patient with the shortest survival. Using gene expression profiling, we further identified the specific pro-tumorigenic expression profile of this cell line compared with the profiles of the other two cell lines. Together, CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells are present in PDAC cell lines derived from primary tumors, and their increased proportion corresponds with a pro-tumorigenic gene expression profile. PMID:27414409

  12. Co-Expression of Cancer Stem Cell Markers Corresponds to a Pro-Tumorigenic Expression Profile in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Skoda, Jan; Hermanova, Marketa; Loja, Tomas; Nemec, Pavel; Neradil, Jakub; Karasek, Petr; Veselska, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains one of the most lethal malignancies. Its dismal prognosis is often attributed to the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that have been identified in PDAC using various markers. However, the co-expression of all of these markers has not yet been evaluated. Furthermore, studies that compare the expression levels of CSC markers in PDAC tumor samples and in cell lines derived directly from those tumors are lacking. Here, we analyzed the expression of putative CSC markers—CD24, CD44, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), CD133, and nestin—by immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and quantitative PCR in 3 PDAC-derived cell lines and by immunohistochemistry in 3 corresponding tumor samples. We showed high expression of the examined CSC markers among all of the cell lines and tumor samples, with the exception of CD24 and CD44, which were enriched under in vitro conditions compared with tumor tissues. The proportions of cells positive for the remaining markers were comparable to those detected in the corresponding tumors. Co-expression analysis using flow cytometry revealed that CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells represented a significant population of the cells (range, 43 to 72%) among the cell lines. The highest proportion of CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells was detected in the cell line derived from the tumor of a patient with the shortest survival. Using gene expression profiling, we further identified the specific pro-tumorigenic expression profile of this cell line compared with the profiles of the other two cell lines. Together, CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells are present in PDAC cell lines derived from primary tumors, and their increased proportion corresponds with a pro-tumorigenic gene expression profile. PMID:27414409

  13. Association between FBP1 and hypoxia-related gene expression in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    NING, XIANG-HUI; LI, TENG; GONG, YAN-QING; HE, QUN; SHEN, QI; PENG, SHUANG-HE; WANG, JIANG-YI; CHEN, JIN-CHAO; GUO, YING-LU; GONG, KAN

    2016-01-01

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase 1 (FBP1) is a rate-limiting enzyme in gluconeogenesis. Recently, the catalytic activity-independent function of FBP1, hypoxia-induced factor (HIF) repression in the nucleus, was identified. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between FBP1 and hypoxia-related gene expression in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). The protein expression levels of FBP1, HIF-1α, HIF-2α, erythropoietin (EPO) and carbonic anhydrase IX (CA9) were assessed by immunohistochemical staining of ccRCC paraffin blocks from 123 patients using the tissue microarray technique. The expression level of FBP1 was then correlated with various clinicopathological factors, and the protein expression levels of HIF-1α, HIF-2α, EPO and CA9. Clinicopathological factors, including age, gender, T stage and Fuhrman grade, were not significantly different between patients with low and high FBP1 expression in ccRCC (P>0.05). FBP1 protein expression level was significantly correlated with the expression levels of HIF-1α (P=0.005) and EPO (P=0.010), but not significantly correlated with the expression levels of HIF-2α (P=0.123) and CA9 (P=0.513) in ccRCC tissues. The current findings confirm the association between FBP1 and hypoxia-related gene expression, and may facilitate understanding of the mechanisms of ccRCC tumorigenesis. PMID:27313747

  14. Overrepresentation of IL-10-Expressing B Cells Suppresses Cytotoxic CD4+ T Cell Activity in HBV-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hongwu; Zhu, Zun-Qiang; Zhang, Zhang-Yun; Zhao, Ludong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common cancer with poor prognosis and low five-year survival rate. A strong and effective CD4+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity was associated with better survival and low recurrence rate in HCC, but the regulatory mechanism that controls CD4+ T cell cytotoxicity in HCC patients is not fully examined. Given that IL-10-expressing B cells could suppress the inflammation of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, T helper 1 (Th1) cells and Th17 cells, while promoting regulatory T (Treg) cell differentiation, we examined the role of IL-10-expressing B cells in HBV-related HCC patients. We found that compared to healthy controls, HCC patients exhibited significantly higher frequencies of IL-10-expressing B cells, which were negatively correlated with the frequencies of granzyme A, granzyme B, and perforin expressing CD4+ T cells. Surface molecule Tim-1 was preferentially expressed on IL-10-expressing B cells. Therefore, we separated total B cells into Tim-1+ and Tim-1- B cells. CD4+ T cells incubated with Tim-1+ B cells exhibited significantly reduced levels of granzyme A, granzyme B and perforin expression, compared to the CD4+ T cells incubated with Tim-1- B cells. Antagonizing IL-10 in culture rescued CD4+ T cell cytotoxicity. Compared to that in peripheral blood, the level of IL-10-expressing B cells were further upregulated in resected tumor, while the level of CD4+ cytotoxic T cells was downregulated. The negative correlations between IL-10-expressing B cells and CD4+ cytotoxic T cells were also observed in tumor-infiltrating cells. Together, our data revealed an additional antitumor mechanism mediated by IL-10-expressing B cells. PMID:27136203

  15. Overrepresentation of IL-10-Expressing B Cells Suppresses Cytotoxic CD4+ T Cell Activity in HBV-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hongwei; Lin, Fuhuang; Tan, Hongwu; Zhu, Zun-Qiang; Zhang, Zhang-Yun; Zhao, Ludong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common cancer with poor prognosis and low five-year survival rate. A strong and effective CD4+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity was associated with better survival and low recurrence rate in HCC, but the regulatory mechanism that controls CD4+ T cell cytotoxicity in HCC patients is not fully examined. Given that IL-10-expressing B cells could suppress the inflammation of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, T helper 1 (Th1) cells and Th17 cells, while promoting regulatory T (Treg) cell differentiation, we examined the role of IL-10-expressing B cells in HBV-related HCC patients. We found that compared to healthy controls, HCC patients exhibited significantly higher frequencies of IL-10-expressing B cells, which were negatively correlated with the frequencies of granzyme A, granzyme B, and perforin expressing CD4+ T cells. Surface molecule Tim-1 was preferentially expressed on IL-10-expressing B cells. Therefore, we separated total B cells into Tim-1+ and Tim-1- B cells. CD4+ T cells incubated with Tim-1+ B cells exhibited significantly reduced levels of granzyme A, granzyme B and perforin expression, compared to the CD4+ T cells incubated with Tim-1- B cells. Antagonizing IL-10 in culture rescued CD4+ T cell cytotoxicity. Compared to that in peripheral blood, the level of IL-10-expressing B cells were further upregulated in resected tumor, while the level of CD4+ cytotoxic T cells was downregulated. The negative correlations between IL-10-expressing B cells and CD4+ cytotoxic T cells were also observed in tumor-infiltrating cells. Together, our data revealed an additional antitumor mechanism mediated by IL-10-expressing B cells. PMID:27136203

  16. Regulation of. beta. -cell glucose transporter gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ling; Alam, Tausif; Johnson, J.H.; Unger, R.H. Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Dallas, TX ); Hughes, S.; Newgard, C.B. )

    1990-06-01

    It has been postulated that a glucose transporter of {beta} cells (GLUT-2) may be important in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. To determine whether this transporter is constitutively expressed or regulated, the authors subjected conscious unrestrained Wistar rats to perturbations in glucose homeostasis and quantitated {beta}-cell GLUT-2 mRNA by in situ hybridization. After 3 hr of hypoglycemia, GLUT-2 and proinsulin mRNA signal densities were reduced by 25% of the level in control rats. After 4 days, GLUT-2 and proinsulin mRNA densities were reduced by 85% and 65%, respectively. After 12 days of hypoglycemia, the K{sub m} for 3-O-methyl-D-glucose transport in isolated rat islets, normally 18-20 mM, was 2.5 mM. This provides functional evidence of a profound reduction of high K{sub m} glucose transporter in {beta} cells. In contrast, GLUT-2 was only slightly reduced by hypoglycemia in liver. To determine the effect of prolonged hyperglycemia, they also infused animals with 50% (wt/vol) glucose for 5 days. Hyperglycemic clamping increased GLUT-2 mRNA by 46% whereas proinsulin mRNA doubled. They conclude that GLUT-2 expression in {beta} cells, but not liver, is subject to regulation by certain perturbations in blood glucose homeostasis.

  17. An artificial cell based on gene expression in vesicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noireaux, Vincent

    2006-03-01

    A new experimental approach is presented to build an artificial cell using the translation machinery of a cell-free expression system as the hardware and a DNA synthetic program as the software. Cytoplasmic extracts, encapsulated in phospholipid vesicles, are used to assemble custom-made genetic circuits to develop the functions of a minimal cell. The objective is to understand how a DNA algorithm can be designed to build an operating system that has some of the properties of life. We show how a long-lived bioreactor is built to carry out in vitro transcription and translation in cell-sized vesicles. To develop the synthetic membrane into an active interface, a few amphipathic peptides and an insertion mechanism of integral membrane proteins have been tested. With vesicles composed of different phospholipids, the fusion protein alpha-hemolysin-eGFP can be expressed to reveal patterns on the membrane. Finally, specific degradation mechanisms are introduced to create a sink for the synthesized messengers and proteins. Perspectives and limitations of this approach will be discussed.

  18. A Progenitor Cell Expressing Transcription Factor RORγt Generates All Human Innate Lymphoid Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Scoville, Steven D; Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L; Zhang, Michael H; Chen, Li; Zhang, Xiaoli; Keller, Karen A; Hughes, Tiffany; Chen, Luxi; Cheng, Stephanie; Bergin, Stephen M; Mao, Hsiaoyin C; McClory, Susan; Yu, Jianhua; Carson, William E; Caligiuri, Michael A; Freud, Aharon G

    2016-05-17

    The current model of murine innate lymphoid cell (ILC) development holds that mouse ILCs are derived downstream of the common lymphoid progenitor through lineage-restricted progenitors. However, corresponding lineage-restricted progenitors in humans have yet to be discovered. Here we identified a progenitor population in human secondary lymphoid tissues (SLTs) that expressed the transcription factor RORγt and was unique in its ability to generate all known ILC subsets, including natural killer (NK) cells, but not other leukocyte populations. In contrast to murine fate-mapping data, which indicate that only ILC3s express Rorγt, these human progenitor cells as well as human peripheral blood NK cells and all mature ILC populations expressed RORγt. Thus, all human ILCs can be generated through an RORγt(+) developmental pathway from a common progenitor in SLTs. These findings help establish the developmental signals and pathways involved in human ILC development. PMID:27178467

  19. A cationic cholesterol based nanocarrier for the delivery of p53-EGFP-C3 plasmid to cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Misra, Santosh K; Naz, Sarwat; Kondaiah, Paturu; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2014-01-01

    The p53 protein mediated anti-tumor strategy is limited due to the lack of suitable delivery agent with insignificant immunogenic response, serum compatibility, and early and easy detection of the transfected cell population. To overcome these problems, we generated a p53-EGFP-C3 fusion construct which expressed easily detectable green fluorescence protein (GFP) and allowed an estimation of p53 mediated anti-tumor activity. A mixture of cationic cholesterol gemini (Chol-5L) with natural lipid, DOPE (molar ratio 1:4), acronymed as Chol-5LD, formed a nano-liposome as characterized by various physical methods. The prepared clone was evaluated for the expression of GFP and functional p53 in HeLa and two additional cell lines with varied p53 status namely, H1299 (p53(-/-)) and HEK293T (p53(+/+)). Transfected cells were screened using RT-PCR, Western blotting, FACS analysis, MTT, Trypan blue assay and visualized under a fluorescence microscope. The p53-EGFP-C3 fusion protein induced apoptosis in cancer cells as evident from DNA fragmentation, cell cycle analysis, Annexin-V staining and PARP cleavage assays. The transfection and apoptosis induction efficiency of Chol-5LD was significantly higher than commercial reagents Lipofectamine2000 and Effectene irrespective of the cell lines examined. Further it significantly decreases the xenograft tumor volume in nude mice tumors via apoptosis as observed in H&E staining. PMID:24211075

  20. Identification of Vulnerable Cell Types in Major Brain Disorders Using Single Cell Transcriptomes and Expression Weighted Cell Type Enrichment.

    PubMed

    Skene, Nathan G; Grant, Seth G N

    2016-01-01

    The cell types that trigger the primary pathology in many brain diseases remain largely unknown. One route to understanding the primary pathological cell type for a particular disease is to identify the cells expressing susceptibility genes. Although this is straightforward for monogenic conditions where the causative mutation may alter expression of a cell type specific marker, methods are required for the common polygenic disorders. We developed the Expression Weighted Cell Type Enrichment (EWCE) method that uses single cell transcriptomes to generate the probability distribution associated with a gene list having an average level of expression within a cell type. Following validation, we applied EWCE to human genetic data from cases of epilepsy, Schizophrenia, Autism, Intellectual Disability, Alzheimer's disease, Multiple Sclerosis and anxiety disorders. Genetic susceptibility primarily affected microglia in Alzheimer's and Multiple Sclerosis; was shared between interneurons and pyramidal neurons in Autism and Schizophrenia; while intellectual disabilities and epilepsy were attributable to a range of cell-types, with the strongest enrichment in interneurons. We hypothesized that the primary cell type pathology could trigger secondary changes in other cell types and these could be detected by applying EWCE to transcriptome data from diseased tissue. In Autism, Schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease we find evidence of pathological changes in all of the major brain cell types. These findings give novel insight into the cellular origins and progression in common brain disorders. The methods can be applied to any tissue and disorder and have applications in validating mouse models. PMID:26858593

  1. Identification of Vulnerable Cell Types in Major Brain Disorders Using Single Cell Transcriptomes and Expression Weighted Cell Type Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Skene, Nathan G.; Grant, Seth G. N.

    2016-01-01

    The cell types that trigger the primary pathology in many brain diseases remain largely unknown. One route to understanding the primary pathological cell type for a particular disease is to identify the cells expressing susceptibility genes. Although this is straightforward for monogenic conditions where the causative mutation may alter expression of a cell type specific marker, methods are required for the common polygenic disorders. We developed the Expression Weighted Cell Type Enrichment (EWCE) method that uses single cell transcriptomes to generate the probability distribution associated with a gene list having an average level of expression within a cell type. Following validation, we applied EWCE to human genetic data from cases of epilepsy, Schizophrenia, Autism, Intellectual Disability, Alzheimer's disease, Multiple Sclerosis and anxiety disorders. Genetic susceptibility primarily affected microglia in Alzheimer's and Multiple Sclerosis; was shared between interneurons and pyramidal neurons in Autism and Schizophrenia; while intellectual disabilities and epilepsy were attributable to a range of cell-types, with the strongest enrichment in interneurons. We hypothesized that the primary cell type pathology could trigger secondary changes in other cell types and these could be detected by applying EWCE to transcriptome data from diseased tissue. In Autism, Schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease we find evidence of pathological changes in all of the major brain cell types. These findings give novel insight into the cellular origins and progression in common brain disorders. The methods can be applied to any tissue and disorder and have applications in validating mouse models. PMID:26858593

  2. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is regulated by butyrate induced epigenetic modulation of gene expression in bovine cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present evidence that butyrate induced histone acetylation regulates miRNA expression. MicroRNA expression microarray profiling revealed that 35 miRNA transcripts are significantly (p <0.05) differentially expressed after cells were treated with 10 mM butyrate. Among them, 11 transcripts are dif...

  3. MicroRNA Expression Patterns Related to Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Infection in Human Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hong; Lee, Linkiat; Caramuta, Stefano; Höög, Anders; Browaldh, Nanna; Björnhagen, Viveca; Larsson, Catharina; Lui, Weng-Onn

    2014-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive and lethal type of neuroendocrine skin cancer. Mutated Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) is commonly found in MCC, and leads to upregulation of the survivin oncogene. However, ∼20% of MCC tumors do not have detectable MCV, suggesting alternative etiologies for this tumor type. In this study, our aim was to evaluate microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles and their associations with MCV status and clinical outcomes in MCC. We showed that miRNA expression profiles were distinct between MCV-positive (MCV+) and MCV-negative (MCV−) MCCs and further validated that miR-203, miR-30a-3p, miR-769-5p, miR-34a, miR-30a-5p, and miR-375 were significantly different. We also identified a subset of miRNAs associated with tumor metastasis and MCC-specific survival. Functionally, overexpression of miR-203 was found to inhibit cell growth, induce cell cycle arrest, and regulate survivin expression in MCV− MCC cells, but not in MCV+ MCC cells. Our findings reveal a mechanism of survivin expression regulation in MCC cells, and provide insights into the role of miRNAs in MCC tumorigenesis. PMID:23962809

  4. [Envelope protein of Jaagsiekte sheep retrovious expressed in NIH3T3 cells promotes cell proliferation].

    PubMed

    DU, Fangyuan; Chen, Dayong; Zhang, Yufei; Sun, Xiaolin; Guo, Wenqing; Liu, Shuying

    2016-09-01

    Objective To explore the influence of the exogenous Jaagsiekte sheep retrovious (exJSRV) envelope protein (Env) on NIH3T3 cell proliferation. Methods A recombinant plasmid pcDNA4/myc-His/exJSRV- env carrying exJSRV- env gene was constructed, and then the correctness of the recombinant plasmid was identified by PCR, restriction enzyme digestion and sequencing. The recombinant plasmid pcDNA4/myc-His/exJSRV- env was transiently transfected into NIH3T3 cells by Lipofectamine(TM) LTX. After the transfection of the recombinant plasmid, the expression of exJSRV- env was detected by reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting. The effect of Env on cell proliferation was investigated by CCK-8 assay and plate colony formation assay. Results The recombinant eukaryotic expression plasmid containing exJSRV- env was successfully constructed as identified by PCR, restriction enzyme identification and sequencing. After the recombinant plasmid was transiently transfected into NIH3T3 cells, reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting showed the expression of exJSRV- env , and Env promoted NIH3T3 cell proliferation significantly. Conclusion JSRV Env was expressed successfully in the NIH3T3 cells and promoted the proliferation of NIH3T3 cells. PMID:27609573

  5. Selective Differentiation into Hematopoietic and Cardiac Cells from Pluripotent Stem Cells Based on the Expression of Cell Surface Markers.

    PubMed

    Okada, Atsumasa; Tashiro, Katsuhisa; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Kawabata, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Flk1-expressing (+) mesodermal cells are useful source for the generation of hematopoietic cells and cardiomyocytes from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). However, they have been reported as a heterogenous population that includes hematopoietic and cardiac progenitors. Therefore, to provide a method for a highly efficient production of hematopoietic cells and cardiomyocytes, cell surface markers are often used for separating these progenitors in Flk1(+) cells. Our recent study has shown that the expression of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), a tight junction component molecule, could divide mouse and human PSC- and mouse embryo-derived Flk1(+) cells into Flk1(+)CAR(-) and Flk1(+)CAR(+) cells. Flk1(+)CAR(-) and Flk1(+)CAR(+) cells efficiently differentiated into hematopoietic cells and cardiomyocytes, respectively. These results indicate that CAR is a novel cell surface marker for separating PSC-derived Flk1(+) mesodermal cells into hematopoietic and cardiac progenitors. We herein describe a differentiation method from PSCs into hematopoietic cells and cardiomyocytes based on CAR expression. PMID:26138986

  6. Prion propagation in cells expressing PrP glycosylation mutants.

    PubMed

    Salamat, Muhammad K; Dron, Michel; Chapuis, Jérôme; Langevin, Christelle; Laude, Hubert

    2011-04-01

    Infection by prions involves conversion of a host-encoded cell surface protein (PrP(C)) to a disease-related isoform (PrP(Sc)). PrP(C) carries two glycosylation sites variably occupied by complex N-glycans, which have been suggested by previous studies to influence the susceptibility to these diseases and to determine characteristics of prion strains. We used the Rov cell system, which is susceptible to sheep prions, to generate a series of PrP(C) glycosylation mutants with mutations at one or both attachment sites. We examined their subcellular trafficking and ability to convert into PrP(Sc) and to sustain stable prion propagation in the absence of wild-type PrP. The susceptibility to infection of mutants monoglycosylated at either site differed dramatically depending on the amino acid substitution. Aglycosylated double mutants showed overaccumulation in the Golgi compartment and failed to be infected. Introduction of an ectopic glycosylation site near the N terminus fully restored cell surface expression of PrP but not convertibility into PrP(Sc), while PrP(C) with three glycosylation sites conferred cell permissiveness to infection similarly to the wild type. In contrast, predominantly aglycosylated molecules with nonmutated N-glycosylation sequons, produced in cells expressing glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchorless PrP(C), were able to form infectious PrP(Sc). Together our findings suggest that glycosylation is important for efficient trafficking of anchored PrP to the cell surface and sustained prion propagation. However, properly trafficked glycosylation mutants were not necessarily prone to conversion, thus making it difficult in such studies to discern whether the amino acid changes or glycan chain removal most influences the permissiveness to prion infection. PMID:21248032

  7. A Gene Expression Signature for Chemoradiosensitivity of Colorectal Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Spitzner, Melanie; Emons, Georg; Kramer, Frank; Gaedcke, Jochen; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Scharf, Jens-Gerd; Burfeind, Peter; Becker, Heinz; Beissbarth, Tim; Ghadimi, B. Michael; Ried, Thomas; Grade, Marian

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The standard treatment of patients with locally advanced rectal cancers comprises preoperative 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy followed by standardized surgery. However, tumor response to multimodal treatment has varied greatly, ranging from complete resistance to complete pathologic regression. The prediction of the response is, therefore, an important clinical need. Methods and Materials: To establish in vitro models for studying the molecular basis of this heterogeneous tumor response, we exposed 12 colorectal cancer cell lines to 3 {mu}M of 5-fluorouracil and 2 Gy of radiation. The differences in treatment sensitivity were then correlated with the pretherapeutic gene expression profiles of these cell lines. Results: We observed a heterogeneous response, with surviving fractions ranging from 0.28 to 0.81, closely recapitulating clinical reality. Using a linear model analysis, we identified 4,796 features whose expression levels correlated significantly with the sensitivity to chemoradiotherapy (Q <.05), including many genes involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway or cell cycle genes. These data have suggested a potential relevance of the insulin and Wnt signaling pathways for treatment response, and we identified STAT3, RASSF1, DOK3, and ERBB2 as potential therapeutic targets. The microarray measurements were independently validated for a subset of these genes using real-time polymerase chain reactions. Conclusion: We are the first to report a gene expression signature for the in vitro chemoradiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells. We anticipate that this analysis will unveil molecular biomarkers predictive of the response of rectal cancers to chemoradiotherapy and enable the identification of genes that could serve as targets to sensitize a priori resistant primary tumors.

  8. Hexabromocyclododecane Decreases Tumor-cell-binding Capacity and Cell-Surface Protein Expression of Human Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hinkson, Natasha C.; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2010-01-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a flame retardant that decreases the lytic function of human natural killer (NK) cells. NK cells defend against tumor cells and virally infected cells. Thus, HBCD has the potential to increase cancer incidence and viral infections. NK cells must bind to their targets for lysis to occur. Thus, concentrations of HBCD that decrease lytic function were examined for their ability to alter NK binding to tumor targets. Levels of HBCD that caused a loss of binding function were examined for effects on expression of cell surface proteins needed for binding. NK cells exposed to HBCD for 24 h, 48 h, or 6 days or to HBCD for 1 h followed by 24 h, 48 h, or 6 days in HBCD-free media were examined for binding function and cell surface protein expression. The results indicated that exposure of NK cells to 10 μM HBCD for 24 h (which caused a greater than 90% loss of lytic function) caused a very significant decrease in NK cell binding function (70.9%), and in CD16 and CD56 cell-surface protein expression (57.8%, and 24.6% respectively). NK cells exposed to 10 μM HBCD for 1 h followed by 24 h in HBCD-free media (which caused a 89.3% loss of lytic function) showed decreased binding function (79.2%), and CD 16 expression (48.1%). Results indicate that HBCD exposures decreased binding function as well as cell-surface marker expression in NK cells and that these changes may explain the losses of lytic function induced by certain HBCD exposures. PMID:19938002

  9. Regulation of cell-to-cell variability in divergent gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chao; Wu, Shuyang; Pocetti, Christopher; Bai, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Cell-to-cell variability (noise) is an important feature of gene expression that impacts cell fitness and development. The regulatory mechanism of this variability is not fully understood. Here we investigate the effect on gene expression noise in divergent gene pairs (DGPs). We generated reporters driven by divergent promoters, rearranged their gene order, and probed their expressions using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH). We show that two genes in a co-regulated DGP have higher expression covariance compared with the separate, tandem and convergent configurations, and this higher covariance is caused by more synchronized firing of the divergent transcriptions. For differentially regulated DGPs, the regulatory signal of one gene can stochastically ‘leak' to the other, causing increased gene expression noise. We propose that the DGPs' function in limiting or promoting gene expression noise may enhance or compromise cell fitness, providing an explanation for the conservation pattern of DGPs. PMID:27010670

  10. RD2-MolPack-Chim3, a Packaging Cell Line for Stable Production of Lentiviral Vectors for Anti-HIV Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stornaiuolo, Anna; Piovani, Bianca Maria; Bossi, Sergio; Zucchelli, Eleonora; Corna, Stefano; Salvatori, Francesca; Mavilio, Fulvio; Bordignon, Claudio; Rizzardi, Gian Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Over the last two decades, several attempts to generate packaging cells for lentiviral vectors (LV) have been made. Despite different technologies, no packaging clone is currently employed in clinical trials. We developed a new strategy for LV stable production based on the HEK-293T progenitor cells; the sequential insertion of the viral genes by integrating vectors; the constitutive expression of the viral components; and the RD114-TR envelope pseudotyping. We generated the intermediate clone PK-7 expressing constitutively gag/pol and rev genes and, by adding tat and rd114-tr genes, the stable packaging cell line RD2-MolPack, which can produce LV carrying any transfer vector (TV). Finally, we obtained the RD2-MolPack-Chim3 producer clone by transducing RD2-MolPack cells with the TV expressing the anti-HIV transgene Chim3. Remarkably, RD114-TR pseudovirions have much higher potency when produced by stable compared with transient technology. Most importantly, comparable transduction efficiency in hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) is obtained with 2-logs less physical particles respect to VSV-G pseudovirions produced by transient transfection. Altogether, RD2-MolPack technology should be considered a valid option for large-scale production of LV to be used in gene therapy protocols employing HSC, resulting in the possibility of downsizing the manufacturing scale by about 10-fold in respect to transient technology. PMID:23767932

  11. Regulatory role of neuron-restrictive silencing factor in expression of TRPC1

    SciTech Connect

    Ohba, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Yoichiro; Suzuki, Takashi; Miyoshi, Ichiro; Nakayama, Shinnsuke; Satoh, Eisaku; Iino, Kenji; Sasano, Hironobu; Mori, Yasuo; Kuromitsu, Sadao; Imagawa, Keiichi; Saito, Yoshihiko; Iijima, Toshihiko; Ito, Hiroshi; Murakami, Manabu . E-mail: mmura0123@hotmail.co.jp

    2006-12-22

    Neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF) binds its consensus element to repress the transcription of various genes. The dominant-negative form (dnNRSF) has a hypertrophic effect on cardiogenesis through an unidentified mechanism. We examined the involvement of transient receptor potential (TRP) channel proteins, using transgenic mice overexpressing dnNRSF (dnNRSF mice). Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays revealed an interaction between NRSF and a neuron-restrictive silencer element-like sequence in intron 4 of TRPC1 genomic DNA. According to RT-PCR and Western analyses, TRPC1 was up-regulated in dnNRSF mouse heart. Transient overexpression of TRPC1 in HEK 293T cells increased the activity of the nuclear factor in activated T cells (NFAT) promoter and stimulated store-operated Ca{sup 2+} channel (SOCC)-mediated Ca{sup 2+} entry. Transfection of TRPC1 into primary cardiomyocytes increased NFAT activity, indicating a major role for TRPC1 in NFAT activation. Our findings strongly suggest that NRSF regulates TRP1 gene expression and causes changes in the levels of calcium entry through SOCCs.

  12. CXCL12 expression by healthy and malignant ovarian epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background CXCL12 has been widely reported to play a biologically relevant role in tumor growth and spread. In epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), CXCL12 enhances tumor angiogenesis and contributes to the immunosuppressive network. However, its prognostic significance remains unclear. We thus compared CXCL12 status in healthy and malignant ovaries, to assess its prognostic value. Methods Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze CXCL12 expression in the reproductive tracts, including the ovaries and fallopian tubes, of healthy women, in benign and borderline epithelial tumors, and in a series of 183 tumor specimens from patients with advanced primary EOC enrolled in a multicenter prospective clinical trial of paclitaxel/carboplatin/gemcitabine-based chemotherapy (GINECO study). Univariate COX model analysis was performed to assess the prognostic value of clinical and biological variables. Kaplan-Meier methods were used to generate progression-free and overall survival curves. Results Epithelial cells from the surface of the ovary and the fallopian tubes stained positive for CXCL12, whereas the follicles within the ovary did not. Epithelial cells in benign, borderline and malignant tumors also expressed CXCL12. In EOC specimens, CXCL12 immunoreactivity was observed mostly in epithelial tumor cells. The intensity of the signal obtained ranged from strong in 86 cases (47%) to absent in 18 cases (<10%). This uneven distribution of CXCL12 did not reflect the morphological heterogeneity of EOC. CXCL12 expression levels were not correlated with any of the clinical parameters currently used to determine EOC prognosis or with HER2 status. They also had no impact on progression-free or overall survival. Conclusion Our findings highlight the previously unappreciated constitutive expression of CXCL12 on healthy epithelia of the ovary surface and fallopian tubes, indicating that EOC may originate from either of these epithelia. We reveal that CXCL12 production by malignant

  13. Developmental expression of dysbindin in Muller cells of rat retina.

    PubMed

    Matteucci, Andrea; Gaddini, Lucia; Macchia, Gianfranco; Varano, Monica; Petrucci, Tamara C; Macioce, Pompeo; Malchiodi-Albedi, Fiorella; Ceccarini, Marina

    2013-11-01

    Dysbindin, the product of the DTNBP1 gene, was identified by yeast two hybrid assay as a binding partner of dystrobrevin, a cytosolic component of the dystrophin protein complex. Although its functional role has not yet been completely elucidated, the finding that dysbindin assembles into the biogenesis of lysosome related organelles complex 1 (BLOC-1) suggests that it participates in intracellular trafficking and biogenesis of organelles and vesicles. Dysbindin is ubiquitous and in brain is expressed primarily in neurons. Variations at the dysbindin gene have been associated with increased risk for schizophrenia. As anomalies in retinal function have been reported in patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders, we investigated the expression of dysbindin in the retina. Our results show that differentially regulated dysbindin isoforms are expressed in rat retina during postnatal maturation. Interestingly, we found that dysbindin is mainly localized in Müller cells. The identification of dysbindin in glial cells may open new perspectives for a better understanding of the functional involvement of this protein in visual alterations associated to neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:23954924

  14. Aging: a portrait from gene expression profile in blood cells.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Elisa; Mazza, Emilia Maria Cristina; Dyar, Kenneth Allen; Pogliaghi, Silvia; Bruseghini, Paolo; Morandi, Carlo; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Gelati, Matteo; Guidi, Gian Cesare; Bicciato, Silvio; Schiaffino, Stefano; Schena, Federico; Capelli, Carlo

    2016-08-01

    The availability of reliable biomarkers of aging is important not only to monitor the effect of interventions and predict the timing of pathologies associated with aging but also to understand the mechanisms and devise appropriate countermeasures. Blood cells provide an easily available tissue and gene expression profiles from whole blood samples appear to mirror disease states and some aspects of the aging process itself. We report here a microarray analysis of whole blood samples from two cohorts of healthy adult and elderly subjects, aged 43±3 and 68±4 years, respectively, to monitor gene expression changes in the initial phase of the senescence process. A number of significant changes were found in the elderly compared to the adult group, including decreased levels of transcripts coding for components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which correlate with a parallel decline in the maximum rate of oxygen consumption (VO2max), as monitored in the same subjects. In addition, blood cells show age-related changes in the expression of several markers of immunosenescence, inflammation and oxidative stress. These findings support the notion that the immune system has a major role in tissue homeostasis and repair, which appears to be impaired since early stages of the aging process. PMID:27545843

  15. Cell-specific regulation of type II phospholipase A2 expression in rat mesangial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Konieczkowski, M; Sedor, J R

    1993-01-01

    IL-1 stimulates mesangial cells to synthesize specific proteins, including a non-pancreatic (Type II) phospholipase A2 (PLA2). We have studied the regulation of PLA2 by proinflammatory mediators, implicated in the pathogenesis of glomerulonephritis, and have assessed whether the activation of second messenger systems modulates or mimics PLA2 gene expression by cytokines. IL-1 alpha and beta, TNF alpha, and LPS, but not serum, IL-2, or PDGF, potently induce PLA2 mRNA, and enzyme expression. IL-1-stimulated mesangial cells express a 1.0 kB PLA2 mRNA transcript that is induced in a dose- and time-dependent manner. IL-1-stimulated increases in steady-state PLA2 mRNA abundance result from a moderate increase in PLA2 transcription rate that is amplified by the prolonged persistence of the transcript. Forskolin and dibutyryl cAMP potentiate IL-1-induced PLA2 mRNA and enzyme expression, but have no effect in the absence of cytokine. 12-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate, sn-1, 2-dioctanoyl glycerol or 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol fail to induce PLA2 expression or to alter the effect of IL-1 when coincubated with the cytokine. In contrast, serum deprivation for 24 h specifically enhances IL-1-stimulated PLA2. Genistein potentiates PLA2 mRNA expression in cells exposed to both IL-1 and serum. The inhibitory effect of serum on IL-1-induced PLA2 mRNA abundance is reproduced by PDGF but not dexamethasone. These data demonstrate that the signaling pathways directly engaged by IL-1 to induce PLA2 expression in mesangial cells interact with several second messenger systems in a cell-specific manner. We speculate that IL-1 induces specialized changes in mesangial cell structure and function through direct activation of a transcription factor(s), that result in induction of a specific gene set. Images PMID:8227365

  16. Consolidated pretreatment and hydrolysis of plant biomass expressing cell wall degrading enzymes

    DOEpatents

    Raab, R. Michael; Zhang, Dongcheng; Bougri, Oleg

    2016-02-02

    Methods for consolidated pretreatment and hydrolysis of genetically engineered plants expressing cell wall degrading enzymes are provided. Expression cassettes and vectors for making transgenic plants are described. Plants engineered to express one or more cell wall degrading enzymes using expression cassettes and vectors of the invention are also provided.

  17. A proteomic chronology of gene expression through the cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Tony; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Shlien, Adam; Soroka, Dominique; Mills, Allie; Emanuele, Michael J; Stratton, Michael R; Lamond, Angus I

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances have enabled the analysis of cellular protein and RNA levels with unprecedented depth and sensitivity, allowing for an unbiased re-evaluation of gene regulation during fundamental biological processes. Here, we have chronicled the dynamics of protein and mRNA expression levels across a minimally perturbed cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia cells using centrifugal elutriation combined with mass spectrometry-based proteomics and RNA-Seq, avoiding artificial synchronization procedures. We identify myeloid-specific gene expression and variations in protein abundance, isoform expression and phosphorylation at different cell cycle stages. We dissect the relationship between protein and mRNA levels for both bulk gene expression and for over ∼6000 genes individually across the cell cycle, revealing complex, gene-specific patterns. This data set, one of the deepest surveys to date of gene expression in human cells, is presented in an online, searchable database, the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd/). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01630.001 PMID:24596151

  18. Telomere uncapping by the G-quadruplex ligand RHPS4 inhibits clonogenic tumour cell growth in vitro and in vivo consistent with a cancer stem cell targeting mechanism.

    PubMed

    Phatak, P; Cookson, J C; Dai, F; Smith, V; Gartenhaus, R B; Stevens, M F G; Burger, A M

    2007-04-23

    The pentacyclic acridinium methosulfate salt RHPS4 induces the 3'single-stranded guanine-rich telomeric overhang to fold into a G-quadruplex structure. Stabilisation of the latter is incompatible with an attachment of telomerase to the telomere and thus G-quadruplex ligands can effectively inhibit both the catalytic and capping functions of telomerase. In this study, we examined mechanisms underlying telomere uncapping by RHPS4 in uterus carcinoma cells (UXF1138L) with short telomeres and compared the susceptibility of bulk and clonogenic cancer cells to the G-quadruplex ligand. We show that treatment of UXF1138L cells with RHPS4 leads to the displacement of the telomerase catalytic subunit (hTERT) from the nucleus, induction of telomere-initiated DNA-damage signalling and chromosome fusions. We further report that RHPS4 is more potent against cancer cells that grow as colonies in soft agar than cells growing as monolayers. Human cord blood and HEK293T embryonic kidney cell colony forming units, however, were more resistant to RHPS4. RHPS4-treated UXF1138L xenografts had a decreased clonogenicity, showed loss of nuclear hTERT expression and an induction of mitotic abnormalities compared with controls. Although single-agent RHPS4 had limited in vivo efficacy, a combination of RHPS4 with the mitotic spindle poison Taxol caused tumour remissions and further enhancement of telomere dysfunction. PMID:17406367

  19. Telomere uncapping by the G-quadruplex ligand RHPS4 inhibits clonogenic tumour cell growth in vitro and in vivo consistent with a cancer stem cell targeting mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Phatak, P; Cookson, J C; Dai, F; Smith, V; Gartenhaus, R B; Stevens, M F G; Burger, A M

    2007-01-01

    The pentacyclic acridinium methosulfate salt RHPS4 induces the 3′single-stranded guanine-rich telomeric overhang to fold into a G-quadruplex structure. Stabilisation of the latter is incompatible with an attachment of telomerase to the telomere and thus G-quadruplex ligands can effectively inhibit both the catalytic and capping functions of telomerase. In this study, we examined mechanisms underlying telomere uncapping by RHPS4 in uterus carcinoma cells (UXF1138L) with short telomeres and compared the susceptibility of bulk and clonogenic cancer cells to the G-quadruplex ligand. We show that treatment of UXF1138L cells with RHPS4 leads to the displacement of the telomerase catalytic subunit (hTERT) from the nucleus, induction of telomere-initiated DNA-damage signalling and chromosome fusions. We further report that RHPS4 is more potent against cancer cells that grow as colonies in soft agar than cells growing as monolayers. Human cord blood and HEK293T embryonic kidney cell colony forming units, however, were more resistant to RHPS4. RHPS4-treated UXF1138L xenografts had a decreased clonogenicity, showed loss of nuclear hTERT expression and an induction of mitotic abnormalities compared with controls. Although single-agent RHPS4 had limited in vivo efficacy, a combination of RHPS4 with the mitotic spindle poison Taxol caused tumour remissions and further enhancement of telomere dysfunction. PMID:17406367

  20. Identification of novel proteins differentially expressed in pluripotent embryonic stem cells and differentiated cells.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Kei; Watanabe-Susaki, Kanako; Kowno, Megumi; Takada, Hitomi; Intoh, Atsushi; Yamanaka, Yuko; Hirano, Hisashi; Sugino, Hiromu; Asashima, Makoto; Kurisaki, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian pluripotent stem cells possess properties of self-renewal and pluripotency. These abilities are maintained by the strict regulation of pluripotent stem cell-specific transcription factor network and unique properties of chromatin in the stem cells. Although these major signaling pathways robustly control the characteristics of stem cells, other regulatory factors, such as metabolic pathways, are also known to modulate stem cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we fractionated protein samples from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells cultured with or without the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Protein expression was quantified by 2-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). In total, 44 proteins were identified as being differentially expressed in the pluripotent stem cells and the differentiated cells. Surprisingly, half of the identified proteins were the proteins localized in mitochondria, which supply cellular energy and regulate cell cycle, development, and cell death. Some of these identified proteins are involved in the metabolic function and the regulation of pluripotency. Further analysis of the identified proteins could provide new information for the manipulation of pluripotency in ES cells. PMID:26399336

  1. A systematic approach for testing expression of human full-length proteins in cell-free expression systems

    PubMed Central

    Langlais, Claudia; Guilleaume, Birgit; Wermke, Nadja; Scheuermann, Tina; Ebert, Lars; LaBaer, Joshua; Korn, Bernhard

    2007-01-01

    Background The growing field of proteomics and systems biology is resulting in an ever increasing demand for purified recombinant proteins for structural and functional studies. Here, we show a systematic approach to successfully express a full-length protein of interest by using cell-free and cell-based expression systems. Results In a pre-screen, we evaluated the expression of 960 human full-length open reading frames in Escherichia coli (in vivo and in vitro). After analysing the protein expression rate and solubility, we chose a subset of 87 plasmids yielding no protein product in E. coli in vivo. These targets were subjected to a more detailed analysis comparing a prokaryotic cell-free E. coli system with an eukaryotic wheat germ system. In addition, we determined the expression rate, yield and solubility of those proteins. After sequence optimisation for the E. coli in vitro system and generating linear templates for wheat germ expression, the success rate of cell-free protein expression reached 93%. Conclusion We have demonstrated that protein expression in cell-free systems is an appropriate technology for the successful expression of soluble full-length proteins. In our study, wheat germ expression using a two compartment system is the method of choice as it shows high solubility and high protein yield. PMID:17915018

  2. SREBP inhibits VEGF expression in human smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Motoyama, Koka; Fukumoto, Shinya . E-mail: sfukumoto@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp; Koyama, Hidenori; Emoto, Masanori; Shimano, Hitoshi; Maemura, Koji; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2006-03-31

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are transcription factors that regulate expression of genes encoding enzymes for lipid biosynthesis. SREBPs are activated by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins). Statins have been also reported to suppress vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Therefore, we hypothesized that SREBPs are involved in statin-mediated regulation of VEGF production in VSMCs. SREBP1 was robustly expressed, and was activated by atorvastatin in VSMCs, as demonstrated by increased levels of the mature nuclear form of SREBP1, and increased promoter activities of a reporter containing sterol regulatory elements by atorvastatin. Moreover, overexpression of SREBP1a dose-dependently suppressed VEGF promoter activity. Site-specific mutation or deletion of the proximal Sp1 sites reduced the inhibitory effects of SREBP1a on VEGF promoter activity. These data demonstrated that SREBP1, activated by atorvastatin, suppressed VEGF expression through the indirect interaction with the proximal tandem Sp1 sites in VSMCs.

  3. Foxp3 expressing regulatory T-cells in allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Nouri-Aria, Kayhan T

    2009-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma, rhinitis and eczema are increasing in prevalence worldwide, in particular in industrialised countries affecting up to 20% of the population. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) have been shown to be critical in T-cell homeostasis and in the maintenance of immune responses, such as prevention of autoimmunity and hampering allergic diseases. The so-called 'natural' CD4+CD25+ Tregs and/or IL-10-producing Tr1 cells have been shown to be responsible for the protection of immune tolerance and intact immune reactions following exposure to allergens such as aeroallergens or food allergens. In this regard, both cell-cell contact (through membrane bound TGF-beta or via suppressive molecules such as CLTA-4) and soluble cytokine-(TGF-beta and IL-10) dependent mechanisms have been shown to contribute to the ability of Tregs to operate effectively. The transcription factor Foxp3, a member of the forkhead-winged helix family, appears to be critical in the suppressive abilities of regulatory T-cells. Adoptive transfer of CD4+CD25+ Tregs from healthy to diseased animals corroborated and provided further evidence of the vital role of these populations in the prevention or cure of certain autoimmune conditions. Clinical improvement seen after allergen immunotherapy for allergic diseases such as rhinitis and asthma has also been associated with the induction of IL-10 and TGF-beta producing Trl cells as well as Foxp3 expressing CD4+CD25+ T-cells, resulting in the suppression ofTh2 cytokine milieu. Activation and expansion ofantigen-specific CD4+CD25+ Tregs in vivo using adjuvants such as IL-10 or pharmacological agents such as low dose steroids or vitamin D3 could represent novel approaches to induce antigen-specific tolerance in immune-mediated conditions such as allergic asthma, autoimmune disease and the rejection of transplanted organs in man. PMID:20429425

  4. Inhibition of protein synthesis by the T cell receptor-inducible human TDAG51 gene product.

    PubMed

    Hinz, T; Flindt, S; Marx, A; Janssen, O; Kabelitz, D

    2001-05-01

    The T cell death associated gene 51 (TDAG51) was shown to be required for T cell receptor (TCR)-dependent induction of Fas/Apo1/CD95 expression in a murine T cell hybridoma. Despite the absence of a nuclear localization sequence and a nucleic acid binding domain, it was suggested to be localized in the nucleus and to function as a transcription factor regulating Fas-expression. However, we demonstrate that the human (h)TDAG51 protein is localized in the cytoplasm and the nucleoli, suggesting a role in ribosome biogenesis and/or translation regulation. Indeed, it strongly inhibited translation of a luciferase mRNA in a reticulocyte translational extract. Furthermore, cotransfection of hTDAG51 and the luciferase gene into 293T cells resulted in a strong inhibition of luciferase mRNA translation. Our findings were further strengthened by isolating in a yeast two-hybrid screen three proteins which are involved in the regulation of translation. We speculate that hTDAG51 couples TCR signaling to inhibition of protein biosynthesis in activated T lymphocytes. PMID:11369516

  5. Murine retroviruses activate B cells via interaction with toll-like receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Rassa, John C.; Meyers, Jennifer L.; Zhang, Yuanming; Kudaravalli, Rama; Ross, Susan R.

    2002-01-01

    Although most retroviruses require activated cells as their targets for infection, it is not known how this is achieved in vivo. A candidate protein for the activation of B cells by either mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) or murine leukemia virus is the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a component of the innate immune system. MMTV caused B cell activation in C3H/HeN mice but not in C3H/HeJ or BALB/c (C.C3H Tlr4lps-d) congenic mice, both of which have a mutant TLR4 gene. This activation was independent of viral gene expression, because it occurred after treatment of MMTV with ultraviolet light or 2,2′-dithiodipyridine and in azidothymidine-treated mice. Nuclear extracts prepared from the lymphocytes of MMTV-injected C3H/HeN but not C3H/HeJ mice showed increased nuclear factor κB activity. Additionally, the MMTV- and Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope proteins coimmunoprecipitated with TLR4 when expressed in 293T cells. The MMTV receptor failed to coimmunoprecipitate with TLR4, suggesting that MMTV/TLR4 interaction is independent of virus attachment and fusion. These results identify retroviral proteins that interact with a mammalian toll receptor and show that direct activation by such viruses may initiate in vivo infection pathways. PMID:11854525

  6. Receptor tyrosine kinase expression of circulating tumor cells in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Gerhard; Rath, Barbara; Klameth, Lukas; Hochmair, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has a poor prognosis and is found disseminated at first presentation in the majority of cases. The cell biological mechanisms underlying metastasis and drug resistance are not clear. SCLC is characterized by high numbers of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and we were able to expand several CTC lines ex vivo and to relate chitinase-3-like-1/YKL-40 (CHI3L1) as marker. Availability of expanded SCLC CTC cells allowed for a screening of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) expressed. The metastatic CHI3L1-negative SCLC cell line SCLC26A, established from a pleural effusion was used for comparison. The CTC cell line BHGc10 was found to exhibit increased expression of RYK, AXL, Tie-1, Dtk, ROR1/2, several ephrins (Eph) and FGF/EGF receptors compared to SCLC26A. All of these RTKs have been associated with cell motility, invasion and poor prognosis in diverse cancer entities without knowledge of their association with CTCs. The identification of RYK, AXL and ROR1/2 as pseudokinases, lacking activity, seems to be related to the observed failure of RTK inhibitors in SCLC. These kinases are involved in the noncanonical WNT pathway and their expression in SCLC CTCs represents a cancer stem cell-like phenotype. PMID:26328272

  7. Expression of the vault RNA protects cells from undergoing apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Amort, Melanie; Nachbauer, Birgit; Tuzlak, Selma; Kieser, Arnd; Schepers, Aloys; Villunger, Andreas; Polacek, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Non-protein-coding RNAs are a functionally versatile class of transcripts exerting their biological roles on the RNA level. Recently, we demonstrated that the vault complex-associated RNAs (vtRNAs) are significantly upregulated in Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-infected human B cells. Very little is known about the function(s) of the vtRNAs or the vault complex. Here, we individually express latent EBV-encoded proteins in B cells and identify the latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) as trigger for vtRNA upregulation. Ectopic expression of vtRNA1-1, but not of the other vtRNA paralogues, results in an improved viral establishment and reduced apoptosis, a function located in the central domain of vtRNA1-1. Knockdown of the major vault protein has no effect on these phenotypes revealing that vtRNA1-1 and not the vault complex contributes to general cell death resistance. This study describes a NF-κB-mediated role of the non-coding vtRNA1-1 in inhibiting both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. PMID:25952297

  8. Sustained Arc expression in adult-generated granule cells.

    PubMed

    Meconi, Alicia; Lui, Erika; Marrone, Diano F

    2015-08-31

    The dentate gyrus (DG) plays a critical role in memory formation and maintenance. Fitting this specialized role, the DG has many unique characteristics. In addition to being one of the few places in which new neurons are continually added in adulthood, the region also shows a unique long-term sustained transcriptional response of the immediate-early gene Arc to sensory input. Although we know that adult-generated granule cells are reliably recruited into behaviorally-driven neuronal network, it remains unknown whether they display robust late-phase sustained transcription in response to activity like their developmentally-generated counterparts. Since this late-phase of transcription is required for enduring plasticity, knowing if sustained transcription appears as soon as these cells are incorporated provides information on their potential for plasticity. To address this question, adult F344 rats were injected with BrdU (50mg/kg/day for 5 days) and 4 weeks later explored a novel environment. Arc expression in both BrdU- and BrdU+ neurons was determined 0.5h, 1h, 2h, 6h, 8h, 12h, or 24h following this behavior. Recently-generated granule cells showed a robust sustained Arc expression following a discrete behavioral experience. These data provide information on a potential mechanism to sculpt the representations of events occurring within hours of each other to create uncorrelated representations of episodes despite a highly excitable population of neurons. PMID:26219984

  9. Tolerogenic IDO+ Dendritic Cells Are Induced by PD-1-Expressing Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Cecilia Pessoa; Ferreira, Ana Carolina Franco; Pinho, Mariana Pereira; de Moraes, Cristiano Jacob; Bergami-Santos, Patrícia Cruz; Barbuto, José Alexandre Marzagão

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are tissue resident cells, rich in inflammatory mediators, involved in allergic reactions, and with an increasingly recognized role in immunomodulation. Dendritic cells (DCs), on the other hand, are central to the determination of immune response patterns, being highly efficient antigen-presenting cells that respond promptly to changes in their microenvironment. Here, we show that direct cell contact between immature monocyte-derived DCs (iDCs) and MC bends DCs toward tolerance induction. DCs that had direct contact with MC (MC-iDC) decreased HLA-DR but increased PD-L1 expression and stimulated regulatory T lymphocytes, which expresses FoxP3+, secrete TGF-β and IL-10, and suppress the proliferation of mitogen-stimulated naïve T lymphocytes. Furthermore, MC-iDC expressed higher levels of indoleamine-2,3-deoxigenase (IDO), a phenomenon that was blocked by treatment of MC with anti-PD-1 or by the treatment of DCs with anti-PD-L1 or anti-PD-L2, but not by blocking of H1 and H2 histamine receptors on DCs. Contact with MC also increased phosphorylated STAT-3 levels in iDCs. When a STAT-3 inhibitor, JSI-124, was added to the DCs before contact with MC, the MC-iDC recovered their ability to induce allogeneic T cell proliferation and did not increase their IDO expression. PMID:26834749

  10. Germ Cell Nuclear Factor (GCNF) Represses Oct4 Expression and Globally Modulates Gene Expression in Human Embryonic Stem (hES) Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongran; Wang, Xiaohong; Xu, Xueping; Kyba, Michael; Cooney, Austin J.

    2016-01-01

    Oct4 is considered a key transcription factor for pluripotent stem cell self-renewal. It binds to specific regions within target genes to regulate their expression and is downregulated upon induction of differentiation of pluripotent stem cells; however, the mechanisms that regulate the levels of human Oct4 expression remain poorly understood. Here we show that expression of human Oct4 is directly repressed by germ cell nuclear factor (GCNF), an orphan nuclear receptor, in hES cells. Knockdown of GCNF by siRNA resulted in maintenance of Oct4 expression during RA-induced hES cell differentiation. While overexpression of GCNF promoted repression of Oct4 expression in both undifferentiated and differentiated hES cells. The level of Oct4 repression was dependent on the level of GCNF expression in a dose-dependent manner. mRNA microarray analysis demonstrated that overexpression of GCNF globally regulates gene expression in undifferentiated and differentiated hES cells. Within the group of altered genes, GCNF down-regulated 36% of the genes, and up-regulated 64% in undifferentiated hES cells. In addition, GCNF also showed a regulatory gene pattern that is different from RA treatment during hES cell differentiation. These findings increase our understanding of the mechanisms that maintain hES cell pluripotency and regulate gene expression during the differentiation process. PMID:26769970

  11. Casein gene expression in mouse mammary epithelial cell lines: Dependence upon extracellular matrix and cell type

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, D.; Oborn, C.J. ); Li, M.L.; Bissell, M.J. )

    1987-09-01

    The COMMA-D mammary cell line exhibits mammary-specific functional differentiation under appropriate conditions in cell culture. The cytologically heterogeneous COMMA-D parental line and the clonal lines DB-1, TA-5, and FA-1 derived from the COMMA-D parent were examined for similar properties of functional differentiation. In monolayer cell culture, the cell lines DB-1, TA-5, FA-1, and MA-4 were examined for expression of mammary-specific and epithelial-specific proteins by an indirect immunofluorescence assay. The clonal cell lines were relatively homogeneous in their respective staining properties and seemed to represent three subpopulations found in the heterogeneous parental COMMA-D lines. None of the four clonal lines appeared to represent myoepithelial cells. The cell lines were examined for expression of {beta}-casein mRNA in the presence or absence of prolactin. The inducibility of {beta}-casein in the COMMA-D cell line was further enhanced by a reconstituted basement membrane preparation enriched in laminin, collagen IV, and proteoglycans. These results support the hypothesis that the functional response of inducible mammary cell populations is a result of interaction among hormones, multiple extracellular matrix components, and specific cell types.

  12. Differential gene expression in mouse spermatogonial stem cells and embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yinshan; Feng, Meiying; Liu, Shanshan; Wei, Hengxi; Li, Li; Zhang, Xianwei; Shen, Chao; Zhang, Shouquan; Ma, Ningfang

    2016-01-01

    Mouse spermatogonial stem cells (mSSCs) may be reprogrammed to become pluripotent stem cells under in vitro culture conditions, due to epigenetic modifications, which are closely associated with the expression of transcription factors and epigenetic factors. Thus, this study was conducted to compare the gene expression of transcription factors and epigenetic factors in mSSCs and mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Firstly, the freshly isolated mSSCs [mSSCs (f)] were enriched by magnetic-activated cell sorting with Thy1.2 (CD90.2) microbeads, and the typical morphological characteristics were maintained under in vitro culture conditions for over 5 months to form long-term propagated mSSCs [mSSCs (l)]. These mSSCs (l) expressed pluripotency-associated genes and were induced to differentiate into sperm. Our findings indicated that the mSSCs (l) expressed high levels of the transcription factors, Lin28 and Prmt5, and the epigenetic factors, Tet3, Parp1, Max, Tert and Trf1, in comparison with the mESCs, with the levels of Prmt5, Tet3, Parp1 and Tert significantly higher than those in the mESCs. There was no significant difference in Kdm2b expression between mSSCs (l) and mESCs. Furthermore, the gene expression of N-Myc, Dppa2, Tbx3, Nr5a2, Prmt5, Tet3, Parp1, Max, Tert and Trf1 in the mSSCs (l) was markedly higher in comparison to that in the mSSCs (f). Collectively, our results suggest that the mSSCs and the mESCs displayed differential gene expression profiles, and the mSSCs possessed the potential to acquire pluripotency based on the high expression of transcription factors and epigenetic factors. These data may provide novel insights into the reprogramming mechanism of mSSCs. PMID:27353491

  13. Cell-surface targeting of α2-adrenergic receptors — Inhibition by a transport deficient mutant through dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fuguo; Filipeanu, Catalin M.; Duvernay, Matthew T.; Wu, Guangyu

    2009-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that the α2B-adrenergic receptor mutant, in which the F(x)6IL motif in the membrane-proximal carboxyl terminus were mutated to alanines (α2B-ARm), is deficient in export from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In this report, we determined if α2B-ARm could modulate transport from the ER to the cell surface and signaling of its wild-type counterpart. Transient expression of α2B-ARm in HEK293T cells markedly inhibited cell-surface expression of wild-type α2B-AR, as measured by radioligand binding. Subcellular localization demonstrated that α2B-ARm trapped α2B-AR in the ER. The α2B-AR was shown to form homodimers and heterodimers with α2B-ARm as measured by co-immunoprecipitation of the receptors tagged with green fluorescent protein and hemagglutinin epitopes. In addition to α2B-AR, the transport of α2A-AR and α2C-AR to the cell surface was also inhibited by α2B-ARm. Furthermore, transient expression of α2B-ARm significantly reduced cell-surface expression of endogenous α2-AR in NG108-15 and HT29 cells. Consistent with its effect on α2-AR cell-surface expression, α2B-ARm attenuated α2A-AR- and α2B-AR-mediated ERK1/2 activation. These data demonstrated that the ER-retained mutant α2B-ARm conferred a dominant negative effect on the cell-surface expression of wild-type α2-AR, which is likely mediated through heterodimerization. These data indicate a crucial role of ER export in the regulation of cell-surface targeting and signaling of G protein-coupled receptors. PMID:15961277

  14. [Construction and expression of a eukaryotic vector co-expressing immunodominant antigens of CFP10, ESAT6, Ag85A and Ag85B of Mycobacterium tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Li, Wu; Deng, Guangcun; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yujiong

    2014-02-01

    CFP10, ESAT6, Antigen 85A (Ag85A) and antigen 85B (Ag85B) are the key immunodominant antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In order to construct a eukaryotic vector able to co-express the four genes in one vector, we amplified the target gene fragments encoding the CFP10, ESAT6, Ag85A and Ag85B antigens and inserted them into the multicloning site of the shuttle plasmid vector pcDNA3.1 (+), of which the CFP10 and ESAT6 encoding genes were in frame fused with a linker encoding (Gly4Ser)3 residue, before the fused gene was inserted downstream of CMV promoter with a bovine growth hormone poly A(BGH pA) sequence at the 3'-end; Ag85A and Ag85B encoding genes were fused with a separation of internal ribosome entry site (IRES) sequence before the fused gene cassette was inserted downstream of RSV promoter with a BGH pA sequence at the 3'-end. The final plasmid containing all four genes was confirmed by sequence analysis and designated as pcDNA-CFP10-ESAT6-Ag85A-Ag85B (pcDNA-CEAB). In order to verify the ability of this construct to express target proteins, we then transfected the recombinant plasmid into Human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells and harvested the cell lysates, and the cell lysates were then separated by SDS-PAGE and subjected to Western blot analysis 48 h after transfection. All four of the target proteins were detected in the cell lysates against the respective specific antibodies, suggesting that we have successfully constructed a eukaryotic vector co-expressing the four immunodominant antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which lay a foundation for the further study of the immunogenicity and protective activity of the four antigens. PMID:24941747

  15. Expression changes of cell-cell adhesion-related genes in colorectal tumors

    PubMed Central

    BUJKO, MATEUSZ; KOBER, PAULINA; MIKULA, MICHAL; LIGAJ, MARCIN; OSTROWSKI, JERZY; SIEDLECKI, JANUSZ ALEKSANDER

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tissues achieve a highly organized structure due to cell-cell junction complexes. Carcinogenesis is accompanied by changes in cell interactions and tissue morphology, which appear in the early stages of benign tumors and progress along with invasive potential. The aim of the present study was to analyze the changes in expression levels of genes encoding intercellular junction proteins that have been previously identified to be differentially expressed in colorectal tumors compared with normal mucosa samples (fold change, >2.5) in genome-wide expression profiling. The expression of 20 selected genes was assessed using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in 26 colorectal cancer, 42 adenoma and 24 normal mucosa samples. Between these tissue types, differences were observed in the mRNA levels of genes encoding adherens junction proteins (upregulation of CDH3 and CDH11, and downregulation of CDH19 and PTPRF), tight junction proteins (upregulation of CLDN1 and CLDN2, and downregulation of CLDN5, CLDN8, CLDN23, CLDN15, JAM2 and CGN) and desmosomes (upregulation of DSC3 and DSG3, and downregulation of DSC2), in addition to a decrease in the expression of certain other genes involved in intercellular connections: PCDHB14, PCDH7, MUPCDH and NEO1. The differences between tissue types were statistically significant, and separate clustering of normal adenoma and carcinoma samples was observed in a hierarchical clustering analysis. These results indicate that the morphological changes in neoplastic colon tissue that occur during the ‘adenoma-carcinoma sequence’ are accompanied by specific changes in the expression of multiple genes encoding the majority of cell-cell junction complexes. The particular differential expression patterns appear to be consistent among patients with cancer and adenoma, in addition to normal mucosa samples. PMID:26137091

  16. HIPSTR and thousands of lncRNAs are heterogeneously expressed in human embryos, primordial germ cells and stable cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yunusov, Dinar; Anderson, Leticia; DaSilva, Lucas Ferreira; Wysocka, Joanna; Ezashi, Toshihiko; Roberts, R. Michael; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are transcribed into numerous regulatory long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Compared to mRNAs, lncRNAs display higher developmental stage-, tissue-, and cell-subtype-specificity of expression, and are generally less abundant in a population of cells. Despite the progress in single-cell-focused research, the origins of low population-level expression of lncRNAs in homogeneous populations of cells are poorly understood. Here, we identify HIPSTR (Heterogeneously expressed from the Intronic Plus Strand of the TFAP2A-locus RNA), a novel lncRNA gene in the developmentally regulated TFAP2A locus. HIPSTR has evolutionarily conserved expression patterns, its promoter is most active in undifferentiated cells, and depletion of HIPSTR in HEK293 and in pluripotent H1BP cells predominantly affects the genes involved in early organismal development and cell differentiation. Most importantly, we find that HIPSTR is specifically induced and heterogeneously expressed in the 8-cell-stage human embryos during the major wave of embryonic genome activation. We systematically explore the phenomenon of cell-to-cell variation of gene expression and link it to low population-level expression of lncRNAs, showing that, similar to HIPSTR, the expression of thousands of lncRNAs is more highly heterogeneous than the expression of mRNAs in the individual, otherwise indistinguishable cells of totipotent human embryos, primordial germ cells, and stable cell lines. PMID:27605307

  17. HIPSTR and thousands of lncRNAs are heterogeneously expressed in human embryos, primordial germ cells and stable cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yunusov, Dinar; Anderson, Leticia; DaSilva, Lucas Ferreira; Wysocka, Joanna; Ezashi, Toshihiko; Roberts, R Michael; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are transcribed into numerous regulatory long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Compared to mRNAs, lncRNAs display higher developmental stage-, tissue-, and cell-subtype-specificity of expression, and are generally less abundant in a population of cells. Despite the progress in single-cell-focused research, the origins of low population-level expression of lncRNAs in homogeneous populations of cells are poorly understood. Here, we identify HIPSTR (Heterogeneously expressed from the Intronic Plus Strand of the TFAP2A-locus RNA), a novel lncRNA gene in the developmentally regulated TFAP2A locus. HIPSTR has evolutionarily conserved expression patterns, its promoter is most active in undifferentiated cells, and depletion of HIPSTR in HEK293 and in pluripotent H1BP cells predominantly affects the genes involved in early organismal development and cell differentiation. Most importantly, we find that HIPSTR is specifically induced and heterogeneously expressed in the 8-cell-stage human embryos during the major wave of embryonic genome activation. We systematically explore the phenomenon of cell-to-cell variation of gene expression and link it to low population-level expression of lncRNAs, showing that, similar to HIPSTR, the expression of thousands of lncRNAs is more highly heterogeneous than the expression of mRNAs in the individual, otherwise indistinguishable cells of totipotent human embryos, primordial germ cells, and stable cell lines. PMID:27605307

  18. Fibronectin and asialoglyprotein receptor mediate hepatitis B surface antigen binding to the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Wang, Feng; Tian, Linlin; Su, Jing; Zhu, Xiangqian; Lin, Li; Ding, Xiaoran; Wang, Xuejun; Wang, Shengqi

    2010-06-01

    Both fibronectin and the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) have been identified by some investigators as partners for hepatitis B virus (HBV) envelope proteins. Because fibronectin is a natural ligand for ASGPR, we speculated that HBV might attach to ASGPR expressed on the hepatocyte surface via fibronectin. To test this hypothesis, we first confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation that ASGPR, fibronectin and HBsAg bind to each other in HepG2.2.15 cells, and possible binding domains were identified by GST pull-down. In addition, by measuring binding of HBsAg to cells, we found that ASGPR and fibronectin enhanced the binding capability of HBsAg to HepG2 cells, and even to 293T and CHO cells, which normally do not bind HBV. In conclusion, our findings suggest that both fibronectin and ASGPR mediate HBsAg binding to the cell surface, which provides further evidence for the potential roles of these two proteins in mediating HBV binding to liver cells. PMID:20364278

  19. Cardiac Progenitor Cell Commitment is Inhibited by Nuclear Akt Expression

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Kimberlee M.; Din, Shabana; Gude, Natalie; Konstandin, Mathias H.; Wu, Weitao; Quijada, Pearl; Sussman, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Stem cell therapies to regenerate damaged cardiac tissue represent a novel approach to treat heart disease. However, the majority of adoptively transferred stem cells delivered to damaged myocardium do not survive long enough to impart protective benefits, resulting in modest functional improvements. Strategies to improve survival and proliferation of stem cells show promise for significantly enhancing cardiac function and regeneration. Objective Determine if injected cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) genetically modified to overexpress nuclear Akt (CPCeA) increase structural and functional benefits to infarcted myocardium relative to control CPCs. Methods and Results CPCeA exhibit significantly increased proliferation and secretion of paracrine factors compared to CPCs. However, CPCeA exhibit impaired capacity for lineage commitment in vitro. Infarcted hearts receiving intramyocardial injection of CPCeA have increased recruitment of endogenous c-kit cells compared to CPCs, but neither population provides long-term functional and structural improvements compared to saline injected controls. Pharmacologic inhibition of Akt alleviated blockade of lineage commitment in CPCeA. Conclusions Although overexpression of nuclear Akt promotes rapid proliferation and secretion of protective paracrine factors, the inability of CPCeA to undergo lineage commitment hinders their capacity to provide functional or structural benefits to infarcted hearts. Despite enhanced recruitment of endogenous CPCs, lack of functional improvement in CPCeA treated hearts demonstrates CPC lineage commitment is essential to the regenerative response. Effective stem cell therapies must promote cellular survival and proliferation without inhibiting lineage commitment. Since CPCeA exhibit remarkable proliferative potential, an inducible system mediating nuclear Akt expression could be useful to augment cell therapy approaches. PMID:21350213

  20. Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into insulin, somatostatin, and glucagon expressing cells

    SciTech Connect

    Timper, Katharina; Seboek, Dalma; Eberhardt, Michael; Linscheid, Philippe; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Keller, Ulrich; Mueller, Beat; Zulewski, Henryk . E-mail: henryk.zulewski@unibas.ch

    2006-03-24

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from mouse bone marrow were shown to adopt a pancreatic endocrine phenotype in vitro and to reverse diabetes in an animal model. MSC from human bone marrow and adipose tissue represent very similar cell populations with comparable phenotypes. Adipose tissue is abundant and easily accessible and could thus also harbor cells with the potential to differentiate in insulin producing cells. We isolated human adipose tissue-derived MSC from four healthy donors. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed the stem cell markers nestin, ABCG2, SCF, Thy-1 as well as the pancreatic endocrine transcription factor Isl-1. The cells were induced to differentiate into a pancreatic endocrine phenotype by defined culture conditions within 3 days. Using quantitative PCR a down-regulation of ABCG2 and up-regulation of pancreatic developmental transcription factors Isl-1, Ipf-1, and Ngn3 were observed together with induction of the islet hormones insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin.

  1. Rat visceral yolk sac cells: viability and expression of cell markers during maternal diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Aires, M.B.; Santos, J.R.A.; Souza, K.S.; Farias, P.S.; Santos, A.C.V.; Fioretto, E.T.; Maria, D.A.

    2015-01-01

    The function of the visceral yolk sac (VYS) is critical for embryo organogenesis until final fetal development in rats, and can be affected by conditions such as diabetes. In view of the importance of diabetes during pregnancy for maternal and neonatal health, the objective of this study was to assess fetal weight, VYS cell markers, and viability in female Wistar rats (200-250 g) with induced diabetes (alloxan, 37 mg/kg) on the 8th gestational day (gd 8). At gd 15, rats from control (n=5) and diabetic (n=5) groups were anesthetized and laparotomized to remove the uterine horns for weighing of fetuses and collecting the VYS. Flow cytometry was used for characterizing VYS cells, and for determining mitochondrial activity, cell proliferation, DNA ploidy, cell cycle phases, and caspase-3 activity. Fetal weight was reduced in the diabetic group. Expression of the cell markers CD34, VEGFR1, CD115, CD117, CD14, CCR2, CD90, CD44, STRO-1, OCT3/4, and Nanog was detected in VYS cells in both groups. In the diabetic group, significantly decreased expression of CD34 (P<0.05), CCR2 (P<0.001), and OCT3/4 (P<0.01), and significantly increased expression of CD90 (P<0.05), CD117 (P<0.01), and CD14 (P<0.05) were observed. VYS cells with inactive mitochondria, activated caspase-3, and low proliferation were present in the rats with diabetes. Severe hyperglycemia caused by maternal diabetes had negative effects on pregnancy, VYS cell viability, and the expression of cell markers. PMID:26176314

  2. Combined Single-Cell Functional and Gene Expression Analysis Resolves Heterogeneity within Stem Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Nicola K.; Kent, David G.; Buettner, Florian; Shehata, Mona; Macaulay, Iain C.; Calero-Nieto, Fernando J.; Sánchez Castillo, Manuel; Oedekoven, Caroline A.; Diamanti, Evangelia; Schulte, Reiner; Ponting, Chris P.; Voet, Thierry; Caldas, Carlos; Stingl, John; Green, Anthony R.; Theis, Fabian J.; Göttgens, Berthold

    2015-01-01

    Summary Heterogeneity within the self-renewal durability of adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) challenges our understanding of the molecular framework underlying HSC function. Gene expression studies have been hampered by the presence of multiple HSC subtypes and contaminating non-HSCs in bulk HSC populations. To gain deeper insight into the gene expression program of murine HSCs, we combined single-cell functional assays with flow cytometric index sorting and single-cell gene expression assays. Through bioinformatic integration of these datasets, we designed an unbiased sorting strategy that separates non-HSCs away from HSCs, and single-cell transplantation experiments using the enriched population were combined with RNA-seq data to identify key molecules that associate with long-term durable self-renewal, producing a single-cell molecular dataset that is linked to functional stem cell activity. Finally, we demonstrated the broader applicability of this approach for linking key molecules with defined cellular functions in another stem cell system. PMID:26004780

  3. PD-1 expression on dendritic cells suppresses CD8+ T cell function and antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Tong Seng; Chew, Valerie; Sieow, Je Lin; Goh, Siting; Yeong, Joe Poh-Sheng; Soon, Ai Ling; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Programmed death one (PD-1) is a well-established co-inhibitory regulator that suppresses proliferation and cytokine production of T cells. Despite remarkable progress in delineating the functional roles of PD-1 on T lymphocytes, little is known about the regulatory role of PD-1 expressed on myeloid cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we show that CD8+ T cells can be more potently activated to secrete IL-2 and IFNγ by PD-1-deficient DCs compared to wild-type DCs. Adoptive transfer of PD-1-deficient DCs demonstrated their superior capabilities in inducing antigen-specific CD8+ T cell proliferation in vivo. In addition, we provide first evidence demonstrating the existence of peripheral blood DCs and CD11c+ tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells that co-express PD-1 in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The existence of PD-1-expressing HCC-infiltrating DCs (HIDCs) was further supported in a mouse model of HCC. Intratumoral transfer of PD-1-deficient DCs rendered recipient mice resistant to the growth of HCC by promoting tumor-infiltrating CD8+ effector T cells to secrete perforin and granzyme B. This novel finding provides a deeper understanding of the role of PD-1 in immune regulation and has significant implications for cancer immunotherapies targeting PD-1. PMID:27141339

  4. Human Natural Killer cell expression of ULBP2 is associated with a mature functional phenotype.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Kiva; McSharry, Brian P; Keating, Sinéad; Petrasca, Andreea; O'Reilly, Vincent P; Keane, Joseph; Doherty, Derek G; Gardiner, Clair M

    2016-10-01

    NKG2D is an important activating receptor expressed on NK cells. Ligands (termed NKG2DL) for this receptor include ULBP1-6, MICA and MICB in humans; they are upregulated in stressed, cancerous or infected cells where they engage NKG2D to induce NK cell cytotoxicity and cytokine production. Expression of NKG2DL on effector cells has been described in mice and more recently in human cells. We confirm that NK cell lines and IL-2 stimulated primary human NK cells also express the NKG2DL, ULBP2. However, expression of ULBP2 was not a result of transfer from a non-NK cell to an NK cell and in contrast to recent reports we saw no evidence that ULBP2 expression targeted these NK cells for fratricide or for cytotoxicity by NKG2D-expressing, non-NK effector cells. ULBP2 expression was however linked to expression of mature CD57(+) NK cells. In particular, expression of ULBP2 was strongest on those NK cells that had evidence of recent activation and proliferation. We suggest that ULBP2 could be used to identify recently activated "mature" NK cells. Defining this phenotype would be useful for understanding the ontogeny on human NK cells. PMID:27349945

  5. Glioma cell integrin expression and their interactions with integrin antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Mattern, Ralph-Heiko; Read, Susana B.; Pierschbacher, Michael D.; Sze, Chun-I; Eliceiri, Brian P.; Kruse, Carol A.

    2005-01-01

    Summary A panel of human glioma cell explants was screened for integrin expression by flow cytometry using ανβ-specific antibodies. A lower percentage of the glioma cells were positive for the ανβ3 (mean % positive = 20.8%) integrin, whereas higher percentages were positive for the ανβ5 (mean % positive = 72.7%), VLA5α (mean % positive = 87%) and VLAβ1 (mean % positive = 41.7%) integrins. A series of RGD peptides was designed, synthesized and tested for binding to integrin receptors. Based on the results of the binding to the isolated integrin receptors and the expression of integrins on glioma cell lines, a peptide that binds potently to the ανβ3, ανβ5 and α5β1 was selected for further investigations with regards to its effect on glioma cells. The peptide, Ac-c[(Pen)-Tyr(Me)-Ala-Arg-Gly-Asp-Asn-Tic-Cys]NH2 (RGD peptide), exhibited high potential for use in clinical intracranial administration since it had good stability in rat brain cell homogenates placed into artificial cerebrospinal fluid. Using an HPLC method for quantification of peptides in rat brain cell homogenates, we could demonstrate the half-life of the RGD peptide approximated 20 hr. Relative to a scrambled peptide control (non-RGD sequence, same amino acids), the experimental RGD peptide significantly decreased glioma cell proliferation of the entire panel of rat and human glioma cells tested. Adhesion of recently passaged glioma cells to glioma-derived extracellular matrix protein-coated plates was inhibited significantly by the RGD peptide. The peptide also reversed attachment of plated glioma cells. The RGD peptide caused some, but not substantial, glioma cell injury, as evidenced by a quantitative in vitro nuclear DNA morphologic assay and by a flow cytometric assay employing 7-amino actinomycin D (7AAD). We histologically monitored for toxicity caused by various doses of the RGD peptide infused repeatedly into normal cannulated rat brain. At safe doses, the experimental RGD

  6. Effect of Interaction between Chromatin Loops on Cell-to-Cell Variability in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tianshou

    2016-01-01

    According to recent experimental evidence, the interaction between chromatin loops, which can be characterized by three factors—connection pattern, distance between regulatory elements, and communication form, play an important role in determining the level of cell-to-cell variability in gene expression. These quantitative experiments call for a corresponding modeling effect that addresses the question of how changes in these factors affect variability at the expression level in a systematic rather than case-by-case fashion. Here we make such an effort, based on a mechanic model that maps three fundamental patterns for two interacting DNA loops into a 4–state model of stochastic transcription. We first show that in contrast to side-by-side loops, nested loops enhance mRNA expression and reduce expression noise whereas alternating loops have just opposite effects. Then, we compare effects of facilitated tracking and direct looping on gene expression. We find that the former performs better than the latter in controlling mean expression and in tuning expression noise, but this control or tuning is distance–dependent, remarkable for moderate loop lengths, and there is a limit loop length such that the difference in effect between two communication forms almost disappears. Our analysis and results justify the facilitated chromatin–looping hypothesis. PMID:27153118

  7. Gene expression profile of HIV-1 Tat expressing cells: a close interplay between proliferative and differentiation signals

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, Cynthia; Santiago, Francisco; Deng, Longwen; Eadie, Carolyne; Zilberman, Irene; Kehn, Kylene; Maddukuri, Anil; Baylor, Shanese; Wu, Kaili; Lee, Chee Gun; Pumfery, Anne; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2002-01-01

    Background Expression profiling holds great promise for rapid host genome functional analysis. It is plausible that host expression profiling in an infection could serve as a universal phenotype in virally infected cells. Here, we describe the effect of one of the most critical viral activators, Tat, in HIV-1 infected and Tat expressing cells. We utilized microarray analysis from uninfected, latently HIV-1 infected cells, as well as cells that express Tat, to decipher some of the cellular changes associated with this viral activator. Results Utilizing uninfected, HIV-1 latently infected cells, and Tat expressing cells, we observed that most of the cellular host genes in Tat expressing cells were down-regulated. The down-regulation in Tat expressing cells is most apparent on cellular receptors that have intrinsic receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) activity and signal transduction members that mediate RTK function, including Ras-Raf-MEK pathway. Co-activators of transcription, such as p300/CBP and SRC-1, which mediate gene expression related to hormone receptor genes, were also found to be down-regulated. Down-regulation of receptors may allow latent HIV-1 infected cells to either hide from the immune system or avoid extracellular differentiation signals. Some of the genes that were up-regulated included co-receptors for HIV-1 entry, translation machinery, and cell cycle regulatory proteins. Conclusions We have demonstrated, through a microarray approach, that HIV-1 Tat is able to regulate many cellular genes that are involved in cell signaling, translation and ultimately control the host proliferative and differentiation signals. PMID:12069692

  8. Bladder cancer cells secrete while normal bladder cells express but do not secrete AGR2

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Melissa E.; Quek, Sue-Ing; True, Lawrence D.; Seiler, Roland; Fleischmann, Achim; Bagryanova, Lora; Kim, Sara R.; Chia, David; Goodglick, Lee; Shimizu, Yoshiko; Rosser, Charles J.; Gao, Yuqian; Liu, Alvin Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anterior gradient 2 (AGR2) is a cancer-associated secreted protein found predominantly in adenocarcinomas. Given its ubiquity in solid tumors, cancer-secreted AGR2 could be a useful biomarker in urine or blood for early detection. However, normal organs express and might also secrete AGR2, which would impact its utility as a cancer biomarker. Uniform AGR2 expression is found in the normal bladder urothelium. Little AGR2 is secreted by the urothelial cells as no measurable amounts could be detected in urine. The urinary proteomes of healthy people contain no listing for AGR2. Likewise, the blood proteomes of healthy people also contain no significant peptide counts for AGR2 suggesting little urothelial secretion into capillaries of the lamina propria. Expression of AGR2 is lost in urothelial carcinoma, with only 25% of primary tumors observed to retain AGR2 expression in a cohort of lymph node-positive cases. AGR2 is secreted by the urothelial carcinoma cells as urinary AGR2 was measured in the voided urine of 25% of the cases analyzed in a cohort of cancer vs. non-cancer patients. The fraction of AGR2-positive urine samples was consistent with the fraction of urothelial carcinoma that stained positive for AGR2. Since cancer cells secrete AGR2 while normal cells do not, its measurement in body fluids could be used to indicate tumor presence. Furthermore, AGR2 has also been found on the cell surface of cancer cells. Taken together, secretion and cell surface localization of AGR2 are characteristic of cancer, while expression of AGR2 by itself is not. PMID:26894971

  9. Comparison of two expression systems using COS7 cells and yeast cells for expression of heart/muscle-type carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1.

    PubMed

    Hada, Takuya; Kato, Yumiko; Obana, Eriko; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Yamazaki, Naoshi; Hashimoto, Mitsuru; Yamamoto, Takenori; Shinohara, Yasuo

    2012-03-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), catalyzing the transfer of the acyl group from acyl-CoA to carnitine to form acylcarnitine, is located at the outer mitochondrial membrane. Because it is easily inactivated by solubilization, expression systems using living cells are essential for its functional characterization. COS7 cells or yeast cells are often utilized for this purpose; however, the advantages/disadvantages of the use of these cells or the question as to how the CPT1 enzyme expressed by these cells differs are still uncertain. In this study, we characterized the heart/muscle-type isozyme of rat CPT1 (CPT1b) expressed by these two cellular expression systems. The mitochondrial fraction prepared from yeast cells expressing CPT1b showed 25% higher CPT1 activity than that obtained from COS7 cells. However, the expression level of CPT1b in the former was 3.8 times lower than that in the latter; and thus, under the present experimental conditions, the specific activity of CPT1b expressed in yeast cells was estimated to be approximately five times higher than that expressed in COS7 cells. Possible reasons for this difference are discussed. PMID:22266133

  10. Expression and rearrangement of the ROS1 gene in human glioblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Birchmeier, C.; Sharma, S.; Wigler, M.

    1987-12-01

    The human ROS1 gene, which possibly encodes a growth factor receptor, was found to be expressed in human tumor cell lines. In a survey of 45 different human cell lines, the authors found ROS1 to be expressed in glioblastoma-derived cell lines at high levels and not to be expressed at all, or expressed at very low levels, in the remaining cell lines. The ROS1 gene was present in normal copy numbers in all cell lines that expressed the gene. However, in one particular glioblastoma line, they detected a potentially activating mutation at the ROS1 locus.

  11. Comparison of Lentiviral Packaging Mixes and Producer Cell Lines for RNAi Applications.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Christian; Hosiner, Stefanie; Tichy, Brigitte; Aldrian, Silke; Hajdu, Stefan; Nürnberger, Sylvia

    2015-06-01

    Lentiviral transduction is a highly efficient DNA delivery method for RNA interference applications. However, obtaining high lentiviral titers of shRNA and miRNA encoding vectors is challenging, since shRNA and miRNA cassettes have been shown to reduce lentiviral titers. In this study, we compare four commercially available packaging mixes and two producer cell lines in order to optimize lentiviral production for gene silencing experiments. Lentiviral vectors encoding a miRNA sequence and emerald green fluorescence protein were co-transfected with ViraPower™, Lenti-X™ HTX, MISSION(®) Lentiviral or Trans-Lentiviral™ packaging mix in HEK-293T or 293FT cells. After transducing HeLa cells with virus-containing supernatant, lentiviral titers were determined by flow cytomerty. In both cell lines, the highest lentiviral titer was obtained with MISSION(®) Lentiviral packaging mix, followed by ViraPower™, Lenti-X™ HTX, and Trans-Lentiviral™. On average, HEK-293T cells produced 6.2-fold higher lentiviral titers than 293FT cells (p < 0.001). With the combination of MISSION(®) Lentiviral packaging mix and HEK-293T cells, an up to 48.5-fold higher lentiviral titer was reached compared to other packaging mixes and producer cell lines. The optimized selection of packaging mix and cell line described in this work should facilitate the production of high-titer lentiviruses for gene silencing experiments. PMID:25616840

  12. Detection of constitutive heterodimerization of the integrin Mac-1 subunits by fluorescence resonance energy transfer in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Guo; Yang Huayan; Wang Chen; Zhang Feng; You Zhendong; Wang Guiying; He Cheng; Chen Yizhang . E-mail: yzchen0928@yahoo.com; Xu Zhihan . E-mail: zzxu@mail.shcnc.ac.cn

    2006-08-04

    Macrophage differentiation antigen associated with complement three receptor function (Mac-1) belongs to {beta}{sub 2} subfamily of integrins that mediate important cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Biochemical studies have indicated that Mac-1 is a constitutive heterodimer in vitro. Here, we detected the heterodimerization of Mac-1 subunits in living cells by means of two fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) techniques (fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy) and our results demonstrated that there is constitutive heterodimerization of the Mac-1 subunits and this constitutive heterodimerization of the Mac-1 subunits is cell-type independent. Through FRET imaging, we found that heterodimers of Mac-1 mainly localized in plasma membrane, perinuclear, and Golgi area in living cells. Furthermore, through analysis of the estimated physical distances between cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fused to Mac-1 subunits, we suggested that the conformation of Mac-1 subunits is not affected by the fusion of CFP or YFP and inferred that Mac-1 subunits take different conformation when expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells, respectively.

  13. Endothelial cell expression of haemoglobin α regulates nitric oxide signalling.

    PubMed

    Straub, Adam C; Lohman, Alexander W; Billaud, Marie; Johnstone, Scott R; Dwyer, Scott T; Lee, Monica Y; Bortz, Pamela Schoppee; Best, Angela K; Columbus, Linda; Gaston, Benjamin; Isakson, Brant E

    2012-11-15

    Models of unregulated nitric oxide (NO) diffusion do not consistently account for the biochemistry of NO synthase (NOS)-dependent signalling in many cell systems. For example, endothelial NOS controls blood pressure, blood flow and oxygen delivery through its effect on vascular smooth muscle tone, but the regulation of these processes is not adequately explained by simple NO diffusion from endothelium to smooth muscle. Here we report a new model for the regulation of NO signalling by demonstrating that haemoglobin (Hb) α (encoded by the HBA1 and HBA2 genes in humans) is expressed in human and mouse arterial endothelial cells and enriched at the myoendothelial junction, where it regulates the effects of NO on vascular reactivity. Notably, this function is unique to Hb α and is abrogated by its genetic depletion. Mechanistically, endothelial Hb α haem iron in the Fe(3+) state permits NO signalling, and this signalling is shut off when Hb α is reduced to the Fe(2+) state by endothelial cytochrome b5 reductase 3 (CYB5R3, also known as diaphorase 1). Genetic and pharmacological inhibition of CYB5R3 increases NO bioactivity in small arteries. These data reveal a new mechanism by which the regulation of the intracellular Hb α oxidation state controls NOS signalling in non-erythroid cells. This model may be relevant to haem-containing globins in a broad range of NOS-containing somatic cells. PMID:23123858

  14. Differential regulation and expression of hyaluronan synthases in human articular chondrocytes, synovial cells and osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Recklies, A D; White, C; Melching, L; Roughley, P J

    2001-01-01

    Recently three isoforms of hyaluronan synthase (HAS), the enzyme responsible for hyaluronate/hyaluronan (HA) biosynthesis, have been cloned, allowing us to study their expression pattern. Our objective was to determine which of the HAS isoenzymes were expressed in human articular chondrocytes, synovial fibroblasts and osteosarcoma cells, whether their expression could be modulated by growth factors (insulin-like growth factor-1, basic fibroblast growth factor and transforming growth factor (TGF-beta1) and cytokines [interleukin 1beta1 (IL-1beta)], and whether changes in the rate of HA synthesis by the cells correlated with changes in mRNA levels for one or more of the HAS isoforms. All three HAS isoforms were found to be expressed in the cultured cells analysed in this study, although the relative proportions varied for each cell type. HAS2 mRNA was usually predominant in chondrocytes, whereas synovial cells contained increased amounts of HAS1. HAS3 was always the least abundant message. The rapidly growing osteosarcoma cells contained almost exclusively HAS2 message. HAS usage in uncultured cartilage and synovial tissues was similar to that in the cultured cells, with HAS2 message being the predominant species in cartilage and HAS1 usually being the predominant species in synovium. HA synthesis was stimulated by the growth factors, but the extent of the response was cell-type specific. Synovial cells responded particularly well to IL-1beta, and showed a unique synergistic response when IL-1beta was used in combination with TGF-beta1. This response was much reduced in articular chondrocytes and absent in the osteosarcoma cells. Analysis of changes in HAS message levels indicated that there was often no correlation with the changes in HA secretion following exposure to growth factors. Although HAS-1 mRNA was increased in synovial cells after exposure to TGF-beta1/IL-1beta, the magnitude of the change was far less than the effect on HA synthesis. Our data thus

  15. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cell proliferation and human papillomavirus oncogene expression in cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongtao; Gao, Peng; Zheng, Jie

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • As{sub 2}O{sub 3} inhibits growth of cervical cancer cells and expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. • HPV-negative cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. • HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-16 positive cancer cells. • Down-regulation of HPV oncogenes by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is partially due to the diminished AP-1 binding. - Abstract: Arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) has shown therapeutic effects in some leukemias and solid cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of its anticancer efficacy have not been clearly elucidated, particularly in solid cancers. Our previous data showed that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} induced apoptosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA-immortalized human cervical epithelial cells and cervical cancer cells and inhibited the expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. In the present study, we systemically examined the effects of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} on five human cervical cancer cell lines and explored the possible molecular mechanisms. MTT assay showed that HPV-negative C33A cells were more sensitive to growth inhibition induced by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, and HPV 18-positive HeLa and C4-I cells were more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV 16-positive CaSki and SiHa cells. After As{sub 2}O{sub 3} treatment, both mRNA and protein levels of HPV E6 and E7 obviously decreased in all HPV positive cell lines. In contrast, p53 and Rb protein levels increased in all tested cell lines. Transcription factor AP-1 protein expression decreased significantly in HeLa, CaSki and C33A cells with ELISA method. These results suggest that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a potential anticancer drug for cervical cancer.

  16. Non-cell-autonomous effects of vector-expressed regulatory RNAs in mammalian heart cells.

    PubMed

    Kizana, E; Cingolani, E; Marbán, E

    2009-09-01

    In mammalian cells, small regulatory RNA molecules are able to modulate gene expression in a cell-autonomous manner. In contrast, this mechanism of gene regulation can occur systemically in plants and nematodes. The existence of similar cell-to-cell transmission in mammalian cells has been explored, but generalizibilty and mechanistic insights have remained elusive. Here, we show that small regulatory RNA molecules are capable of a non-cell-autonomous effect between primary cardiac myocytes through a gap-junction-dependent mechanism. Co-culture experiments showed that both Dicer-processed small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and Drosha-processed microRNAs (miRNAs) were capable of target gene knockdown and physiological effects in a non-cell-autonomous manner. Target gene siRNA molecules were detected in recipient cells, indicating transfer of the primary effector molecule. All of these effects were abrogated by dominant-negative molecular suppression of gap junction function. Our results show that both siRNAs and miRNAs are capable of a non-cell-autonomous effect between mammalian cells through gap junctions. The recognition of this biological process raises the novel therapeutic prospect of a bystander effect after gene transfer to tissues bearing gap junctions and for cell engineering with a view to creating regulatory RNA donor cells that exert their influence throughout a syncytium. PMID:19516277

  17. Bisphenol A disrupts gene expression in human placental trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Rajakumar, Chandrew; Guan, Haiyan; Langlois, David; Cernea, Maria; Yang, Kaiping

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the effect of bisphenol A (BPA) on human placental gene expression using primary trophoblast cells as an in vitro model system. Trophoblast cells were isolated from human placentas at term, cultured and then exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of BPA (0.1-2 μg/ml) for up to 24h, after which levels of 11β-HSD2 mRNA, protein and activity were determined by standard radiometric conversion assay, western blotting, and qRT-PCR, respectively. The mRNA levels of several other prominent placental hormones/factors were also assessed by qRT-PCR. BPA dramatically increased levels of 11β-HSD2 activity, protein and mRNA in a time- and concentration-dependent manner (> 4-fold). BPA also augmented aromatase, glucose transporter-1, CRH, and hCG mRNA levels while reducing the level of leptin mRNA. These findings demonstrate that BPA severely disrupts human placental gene expression in vitro, which suggests that exposure to BPA may contribute to altered placental function and consequent pregnancy complications. PMID:25784278

  18. Sequence and Expression Analyses of Ethylene Response Factors Highly Expressed in Latex Cells from Hevea brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Piyatrakul, Piyanuch; Yang, Meng; Putranto, Riza-Arief; Pirrello, Julien; Dessailly, Florence; Hu, Songnian; Summo, Marilyne; Theeravatanasuk, Kannikar; Leclercq, Julie; Kuswanhadi; Montoro, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    The AP2/ERF superfamily encodes transcription factors that play a key role in plant development and responses to abiotic and biotic stress. In Hevea brasiliensis, ERF genes have been identified by RNA sequencing. This study set out to validate the number of HbERF genes, and identify ERF genes involved in the regulation of latex cell metabolism. A comprehensive Hevea transcriptome was improved using additional RNA reads from reproductive tissues. Newly assembled contigs were annotated in the Gene Ontology database and were assigned to 3 main categories. The AP2/ERF superfamily is the third most represented compared with other transcription factor families. A comparison with genomic scaffolds led to an estimation of 114 AP2/ERF genes and 1 soloist in Hevea brasiliensis. Based on a phylogenetic analysis, functions were predicted for 26 HbERF genes. A relative transcript abundance analysis was performed by real-time RT-PCR in various tissues. Transcripts of ERFs from group I and VIII were very abundant in all tissues while those of group VII were highly accumulated in latex cells. Seven of the thirty-five ERF expression marker genes were highly expressed in latex. Subcellular localization and transactivation analyses suggested that HbERF-VII candidate genes encoded functional transcription factors. PMID:24971876

  19. In vivo gene silencing of CD81 by lentiviral expression of small interference RNAs suppresses cocaine-induced behaviour.

    PubMed

    Bahi, Amine; Boyer, Frederic; Kolira, Manoj; Dreyer, Jean-Luc

    2005-03-01

    The tetraspanin CD81 is induced in the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway after cocaine administration. To further investigate its role, a regulatable lentivirus (Lenti-CD81) bearing the CD81 gene under the control of a tetracycline-inducible promoter and lentiviruses expressing short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeted against CD81 (Lenti-CD81-shRNAs) have been prepared. Infection of HEK293T cells in vitro with Lenti-CD81-shRNAs resulted in 96.5% gene silencing (from quantitative real-time PCR(qRT-PCR) and immunocytochemistry). In vivo delivery of Lenti-CD81-shRNA into the nucleus accumbens or ventral tegmental area resulted in 91.3 and 94% silencing of endogenous CD81, respectively. Stereotaxic injection of Lenti-CD81 into these regions, resulting in CD81 overexpression, induced a four- to fivefold increase in locomotor activity after chronic cocaine administration, which returned to basal levels when Lenti-CD81-shRNA had been coinjected or when CD81 expression was blocked by doxycycline. Furthermore, silencing endogenous CD81 in vivo resulted in a significant decrease in locomotor activity over controls, again suppressing cocaine-induced behaviour. PMID:15715673

  20. High expression of prolactin receptor is associated with cell survival in cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The altered expression of prolactin (PRL) and its receptor (PRLR) has been implicated in breast and other types of cancer. There are few studies that have focused on the analysis of PRL/PRLR in cervical cancer where the development of neoplastic lesions is influenced by the variation of the hormonal status. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of PRL/PRLR and the effect of PRL treatment on cell proliferation and apoptosis in cervical cancer cell lines. Results High expression of multiple PRLR forms and PRLvariants of 60–80 kDa were observed in cervical cancer cell lines compared with non-tumorigenic keratinocytes evaluated by Western blot, immunofluorecence and real time PCR. Treatment with PRL (200 ng/ml) increased cell proliferation in HeLa cells determined by the MTT assay at day 3 and after 1 day a protective effect against etoposide induced apoptosis in HeLa, SiHa and C-33A cervical cancer cell lines analyzed by the TUNEL assay. Conclusions Our data suggests that PRL/PRLR signaling could act as an important survival factor for cervical cancer. The use of an effective PRL antagonist may provide a better therapeutic intervention in cervical cancer. PMID:24148306

  1. Identification of a novel gene expressed in activated natural killer cells and T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, C.A.; Schall, R.P.; He, H.; Cairns, J.S. )

    1992-01-15

    The authors have isolated a cDNA clone from a human activated NK cell-derived cDNA library that identifies a transcript [NK4] that is selectively expressed in lymphocytes. The expression of this transcript is increased after activation of T cells by mitogens or activation of NK cells by IL-2 (lymphokine-activated killer cells). The transcript levels demonstrated by Northern blot analysis increase by 12 h after activation, remain high for at least 48 h, and require protein synthesis for expression. Southern blot analysis of B lymphoblastoid lines derived from 18 unrelated individuals reveal variable banding patterns suggestive of polymorphism within the NK4 gene. No homology was found between the sequence of the coding region of this transcript and any sequences in the GenBank data base. Sequence homology to the U1 small nuclear RNA was found within the 3[prime] untranslated region immediately upstream of the site of polyadenylation, suggesting a possible role for U1 in the polyadenylation process. Sequence analysis indicates the transcript would encode a protein having a mass of 27 kDa. The presence of a signal sequence and lack of a transmembrane region suggests that the protein is secreted. In addition, the protein contains an RGD sequence that may be involved in cellular adhesion. This transcript appears to encode a novel product common to the activation pathways of both NK cells and T cells. 50 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Enterovirus 71 inhibits cellular type I interferon signaling by downregulating JAK1 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Zhang, Zhe; Zhao, Xinghui; Yu, Rui; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Wu, Shipo; Liu, Ju; Chi, Xiangyang; Song, Xiaohong; Fu, Ling; Yu, Yingqun; Hou, Lihua; Chen, Wei

    2014-08-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection can cause severe disease and lead to death in children. Recurring outbreaks of EV71 have been reported in several countries. Interferons (IFNs) have been used for decades to treat several types of viral infection, but have a limited ability to inhibit EV71 replication. Herein, we intend to investigate the mechanisms by which EV71 inhibits the cellular type I IFN response. In this study, MRC-5 (human embryonic lung fibroblast) or RD (human rhabdomyosarcoma) cells were infected with EV71, and then treated with or without IFN-α2b. Cells were harvested and analyzed by flow cytometry to determine the level of IFNAR1. Cell lysis were prepared to detect the levels of STAT1, STAT2, phosphorylated STAT1, phosphorylated STAT2, IFNAR1, JAK1, and TYK2 by Western blotting. The phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2 induced by IFN were inhibited without significant downregulation of IFNAR1 in EV71-infected cells. The EV71-induced suppression of STAT1 and STAT2 phosphorylation was not rescued by the protein tyrosine phosphatases inhibitor, and was independent of suppressor of cytokine signaling protein 1/3 levels. The phosphorylation of JAK1 and TYK2 were inhibited accompanied by EV71-induced downregulation of JAK1, which occurred at a post-transcriptional level and was proteasome independent. JAK1 expression did not decrease, and IFN-α-stimulated STAT1 and STAT2 phosphorylation were not blocked in HEK293T cells overexpressing the EV71 viral protein 2A or 3C. This study demonstrates that EV71 inhibits the cellular type I IFN antiviral pathway by downregulating JAK1, while the expression of IFNAR1 does not significantly alter in EV71-infected cells. Additionally, the EV71 viral proteins 2A and 3C do not act as antagonists of cellular type I IFN signaling. PMID:24905060

  3. Human Skin Cells That Express Stage-Specific Embryonic Antigen 3 Associate with Dermal Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vega Crespo, Agustin; Awe, Jason P.; Reijo Pera, Renee

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Stage-specific embryonic antigen 3 (SSEA3) is a glycosphingolipid that has previously been used to identify cells with stem cell-like, multipotent, and pluripotent characteristics. A rare subpopulation of SSEA3-expressing cells exists in the dermis of adult human skin. These SSEA3-expressing cells undergo a significant increase in cell number in response to injury, suggesting a possible role in regeneration. These SSEA3-expressing regeneration-associated (SERA) cells were derived through primary cell culture, purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), and characterized. Longer in vitro culture of the primary skin cells led to lower SSEA3 expression stability after FACS-based purification, suggesting that the current culture conditions may need to be optimized to permit the large-scale expansion of SERA cells. The SERA cells demonstrated a global transcriptional state that was most similar to bone marrow- and fat-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and the highest expressing SSEA3-expressing cells co-expressed CD105 (clone 35). However, while a rare population of MSCs was observed in primary human skin cell cultures that could differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts, or chondrocytes, SERA cells did not possess this differentiation capacity, suggesting that there are at least two different rare subpopulations in adult human skin primary cultures. The identification, efficient purification, and large-scale expansion of these rare subpopulations (SERA cells and MSCs) from heterogeneous adult human skin primary cell cultures may have applications for future patient-specific cellular therapies. PMID:23514702

  4. Phenotypic and functional characteristics of IL-21-expressing CD8(+) T cells in human nasal polyps.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Li; Jia, Lei; Bai, Lu; He, Long; Yang, Binyan; Wu, Changyou; Li, Huabin

    2016-01-01

    Although CD4(+) T cells are recognized to play an important role in the inflammatory response of nasal polyps (NPs), the biological functions of CD8(+) T cells in polypogenesis remain unclear. In this study, we analyzed cell markers, cytokine expression and transcription factors in IL-21-expressing CD8(+) T cells in polyp tissues of NP patients. The results showed that the majority of IL-21-producing CD8(+) T cells were effector memory cells and they co-expressed IFN-γ. IL-21-expressing CD8(+) T cells in polyp tissues expressed higher CXCR5, PD-1, and ICOS levels than cells in control tissues and showed significantly higher T-bet and Bcl-6 expression levels compared with IL-21(-)CD8(+) T cells. Purified polyp CD8(+) T cells promoted IgG production from isolated polyp B cells in vitro, and recombinant IL-12 modulated the expression of IL-21, IFN-γ and CD40L in purified polyp CD8(+) T cells. Moreover, the percentage of IL-21(+)CD8(+) T cells in polyp tissues was positively correlated with endoscopic and CT scan scores in NP patients. These findings indicated that polyp CD8(+) T cells, by co-expressing IL-21 and IFN-γ and other markers, display a Tfh cell functionality, which is associated with the clinical severity of NP patients. PMID:27468819

  5. Phenotypic and functional characteristics of IL-21-expressing CD8+ T cells in human nasal polyps

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Li; Jia, Lei; Bai, Lu; He, Long; Yang, Binyan; Wu, Changyou; Li, Huabin

    2016-01-01

    Although CD4+ T cells are recognized to play an important role in the inflammatory response of nasal polyps (NPs), the biological functions of CD8+ T cells in polypogenesis remain unclear. In this study, we analyzed cell markers, cytokine expression and transcription factors in IL-21-expressing CD8+ T cells in polyp tissues of NP patients. The results showed that the majority of IL-21-producing CD8+ T cells were effector memory cells and they co-expressed IFN-γ. IL-21-expressing CD8+ T cells in polyp tissues expressed higher CXCR5, PD-1, and ICOS levels than cells in control tissues and showed significantly higher T-bet and Bcl-6 expression levels compared with IL-21−CD8+ T cells. Purified polyp CD8+ T cells promoted IgG production from isolated polyp B cells in vitro, and recombinant IL-12 modulated the expression of IL-21, IFN-γ and CD40L in purified polyp CD8+ T cells. Moreover, the percentage of IL-21+CD8+ T cells in polyp tissues was positively correlated with endoscopic and CT scan scores in NP patients. These findings indicated that polyp CD8+ T cells, by co-expressing IL-21 and IFN-γ and other markers, display a Tfh cell functionality, which is associated with the clinical severity of NP patients. PMID:27468819

  6. Titanium phosphate glass microcarriers induce enhanced osteogenic cell proliferation and human mesenchymal stem cell protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Lakhkar, Nilay J; M Day, Richard; Kim, Hae-Won; Ludka, Katarzyna; Mordan, Nicola J; Salih, Vehid; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have developed 50- to 100-µm-sized titanium phosphate glass microcarriers (denoted as Ti5) that show enhanced proliferation of human mesenchymal stem cells and MG63 osteosarcoma cells, as well as enhanced human mesenchymal stem cell expression of bone differentiation markers, in comparison with commercially available glass microspheres at all time points. We also demonstrate that these microcarriers provide superior human mesenchymal stem cell proliferation with conventional Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle medium than with a specially developed commercial stem cell medium. The microcarrier proliferative capacity is revealed by a 24-fold increase in MG63 cell numbers in spinner flask bioreactor studies performed over a 7-day period, versus only a 6-fold increase in control microspheres under the same conditions; the corresponding values of Ti5 and control microspheres under static culture are 8-fold and 7-fold, respectively. The capability of guided osteogenic differentiation is confirmed by ELISAs for bone morphogenetic protein-2 and osteopontin, which reveal significantly greater expression of these markers, especially osteopontin, by human mesenchymal stem cells on the Ti5 microspheres than on the control. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy images reveal favorable MG63 and human mesenchymal stem cell adhesion on the Ti5 microsphere surfaces. Thus, the results demonstrate the suitability of the developed microspheres for use as microcarriers in bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:26668711

  7. Insulin Receptor Expression in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma and Its Relation to Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Lkhagvadorj, Sayamaa; Oh, Sung Soo; Lee, Mi-Ra; Jung, Jae Hung; Chung, Hyun Chul; Cha, Seung-Kuy

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Both insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 signaling are key regulators of energy metabolism, cellular growth, proliferation, and survival. The IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is ov