Science.gov

Sample records for 296-c-006 ventilation system

  1. Tank vapor sampling and analysis data package for tank 241-C-106 waste retrieval sluicing system process test phase III

    SciTech Connect

    LOCKREM, L.L.

    1999-08-13

    This data package presents sampling data and analytical results from the March 28, 1999, vapor sampling of Hanford Site single-shell tank 241-C-106 during active sluicing. Samples were obtained from the 296-C-006 ventilation system stack and ambient air at several locations. Characterization Project Operations (CPO) was responsible for the collection of all SUMMATM canister samples. The Special Analytical Support (SAS) vapor team was responsible for the collection of all triple sorbent trap (TST), sorbent tube train (STT), polyurethane foam (PUF), and particulate filter samples collected at the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team used the non-electrical vapor sampling (NEVS) system to collect samples of the air, gases, and vapors from the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team collected and analyzed these samples for Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) and Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) in accordance with the sampling and analytical requirements specified in the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for Evaluation of Organic Emissions, Process Test Phase III, HNF-4212, Rev. 0-A, (LMHC, 1999). All samples were stored in a secured Radioactive Materials Area (RMA) until the samples were radiologically released and received by SAS for analysis. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) performed the radiological analyses. The samples were received on April 5, 1999.

  2. VENTILATION TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a project to develop a systems analysis of ventilation technology and provide a state-of-the-art assessment of ventilation and indoor air quality (IAQ) research needs. (NOTE: Ventilation technology is defined as the hardware necessary to bring outdoor ...

  3. C-106 tank process ventilation test

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-20

    Project W-320 Acceptance Test Report for tank 241-C-106, 296-C-006 Ventilation System Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) HNF-SD-W320-012, C-106 Tank Process Ventilation Test, was an in depth test of the 296-C-006 ventilation system and ventilation support systems required to perform the sluicing of tank C-106. Systems involved included electrical, instrumentation, chiller and HVAC. Tests began at component level, moved to loop level, up to system level and finally to an integrated systems level test. One criteria was to perform the test with the least amount of risk from a radioactive contamination potential stand point. To accomplish this a temporary configuration was designed that would simulate operation of the systems, without being connected directly to the waste tank air space. This was done by blanking off ducting to the tank and connecting temporary ducting and an inlet air filter and housing to the recirculation system. This configuration would eventually become the possible cause of exceptions. During the performance of the test, there were points where the equipment did not function per the directions listed in the ATP. These events fell into several different categories. The first and easiest problems were field configurations that did not match the design documentation. This was corrected by modifying the field configuration to meet design documentation and reperforming the applicable sections of the ATP. A second type of problem encountered was associated with equipment which did not operate correctly, at which point an exception was written against the ATP, to be resolved later. A third type of problem was with equipment that actually operated correctly but the directions in the ATP were in error. These were corrected by generating an Engineering Change Notice (ECN) against the ATP. The ATP with corrected directions was then re-performed. A fourth type of problem was where the directions in the ATP were as the equipment should operate, but the design of

  4. Protective garment ventilation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, R. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    A method and apparatus for ventilating a protective garment, space suit system, and/or pressure suits to maintain a comfortable and nontoxic atmosphere within is described. The direction of flow of a ventilating and purging gas in portions of the garment may be reversed in order to compensate for changes in environment and activity of the wearer. The entire flow of the ventilating gas can also be directed first to the helmet associated with the garment.

  5. Central Fan Integrated Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2009-05-12

    This information sheet describes one example of a ventilation system design, a central fan integrated supply (CFIS) system, a mechanical ventilation and pollutant source control to ensure that there is reasonable indoor air quality inside the house.

  6. How to Plan Ventilation Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, John H.

    1963-01-01

    Ventilation systems for factory safety demand careful planning. The increased heat loads and new processes of industry have introduced complex ventilation problems in--(1) ventilation supply, (2) duct work design, (3) space requirements, (4) hood face velocities, (5) discharge stacks, and (6) building eddies. This article describes and diagrams…

  7. Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2011-04-01

    Existing ventilation standards, including American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specify continuous operation of a defined mechanical ventilation system to provide minimum ventilation, with time-based intermittent operation as an option. This requirement ignores several factors and concerns including: other equipment such as household exhaust fans that might incidentally provide ventilation, negative impacts of ventilation when outdoor pollutant levels are high, the importance of minimizing energy use particularly during times of peak electricity demand, and how the energy used to condition air as part of ventilation system operation changes with outdoor conditions. Dynamic control of ventilation systems can provide ventilation equivalent to or better than what is required by standards while minimizing energy costs and can also add value by shifting load during peak times and reducing intake of outdoor air contaminants. This article describes the logic that enables dynamic control of whole-house ventilation systems to meet the intent of ventilation standards and demonstrates the dynamic ventilation system control concept through simulations and field tests of the Residential Integrated Ventilation-Energy Controller (RIVEC).

  8. Preoperational test report, vent building ventilation system

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Vent Building Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) for the W-030 Ventilation Building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  9. 46 CFR 111.103-1 - Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems. 111.103-1 Section 111.103-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems. Each power ventilation system...

  10. 46 CFR 111.103-1 - Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems. 111.103-1 Section 111.103-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems. Each power ventilation system...

  11. 46 CFR 111.103-1 - Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems. 111.103-1 Section 111.103-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems. Each power ventilation system...

  12. 14 CFR 252.9 - Ventilation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... as to provide the level and quality of ventilation specified and designed by the manufacturer for the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ventilation systems. 252.9 Section 252.9... REGULATIONS SMOKING ABOARD AIRCRAFT § 252.9 Ventilation systems. Air carriers shall prohibit smoking...

  13. 14 CFR 252.9 - Ventilation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... as to provide the level and quality of ventilation specified and designed by the manufacturer for the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ventilation systems. 252.9 Section 252.9... REGULATIONS SMOKING ABOARD AIRCRAFT § 252.9 Ventilation systems. Air carriers shall prohibit smoking...

  14. 14 CFR 252.9 - Ventilation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... as to provide the level and quality of ventilation specified and designed by the manufacturer for the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ventilation systems. 252.9 Section 252.9... REGULATIONS SMOKING ABOARD AIRCRAFT § 252.9 Ventilation systems. Air carriers shall prohibit smoking...

  15. 14 CFR 252.9 - Ventilation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... as to provide the level and quality of ventilation specified and designed by the manufacturer for the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ventilation systems. 252.9 Section 252.9... REGULATIONS SMOKING ABOARD AIRCRAFT § 252.9 Ventilation systems. Air carriers shall prohibit smoking...

  16. 14 CFR 252.9 - Ventilation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... as to provide the level and quality of ventilation specified and designed by the manufacturer for the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ventilation systems. 252.9 Section 252.9... REGULATIONS SMOKING ABOARD AIRCRAFT § 252.9 Ventilation systems. Air carriers shall prohibit smoking...

  17. Preoperational test report, primary ventilation system

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Primary Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides vapor space filtered venting of tanks AY101, AY102, AZ101, AZ102. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  18. 46 CFR 111.103-1 - Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... not apply to closed ventilation systems for motors or generators, diffuser fans for refrigerated... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems. 111.103-1 Section 111.103-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...

  19. 46 CFR 111.103-1 - Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... not apply to closed ventilation systems for motors or generators, diffuser fans for refrigerated... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems. 111.103-1 Section 111.103-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...

  20. Commissioning Ventilated Containment Systems in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2008-08-01

    This Best Practices Guide focuses on the specialized approaches required for ventilated containment systems, understood to be all components that drive and control ventilated enclosures and local exhaust systems within the laboratory. Geared toward architects, engineers, and facility managers, this guide provides information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories.

  1. Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Turner, W A; Bearg, D W; Brennan, T

    1995-01-01

    This chapter begins with an overview of the history of ventilation guidelines, which has led to the guidelines that are in effect today. Of particular interest is the most recent return in the past 5 years to ventilation rates that more closely reflect a mean or average of the range of guidelines that have existed over the past century. OSHA's and the EPA's recognition of the need to operate ventilation systems in buildings in an accountable manner is also of note. Of even more interest is the resurgence of the concept of minimum mixing and once-through ventilation air that has been pursued in parts of Northern Europe for the past 10 years, and in a school that is being designed with this concept in New Hampshire. In addition, the design concept of equipping office buildings with low pressure drop high efficiency particle filtration to remove fine particles from all of the air that is supplied to the occupants is being used increasingly in the U.S. This chapter also presents an overview of the various types of ventilation systems found in homes and commercial office buildings and the common indoor air quality problems that may be associated with them. It also offers an overview of common HVAC evaluation techniques that can be used to determine if a ventilation system is performing in a manner that makes sense for the use of the space and the needs of the occupants. Are the occupants receiving a reasonable supply of outdoor air? Is the air that they receive of reasonable quality? Are obvious pollutants being exhausted? Ventilation systems have become extremely complex and more difficult to run and maintain over the past 40 years. This trend will continue to drive the need for professionally maintained HVAC equipment that is serviced and run by individuals who are accountable for the quality of the air that the system delivers.

  2. 46 CFR 153.312 - Ventilation system standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... system must meet the following: (a) A ventilation system exhaust duct must discharge no less than 10 m... ventilation duct, a ventilation duct must not pass through a machinery room, an accommodation space,...

  3. Waste tank ventilation system waste material accumulations

    SciTech Connect

    Van Vleet, R.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-06

    This paper calculates the amount of material that accumulates in the ventilation systems of various Tank Waste Remediation System facilities and estimates the amount of material that could be released due to a rapid pressurization.

  4. Hydrostatic Hyperbaric Chamber Ventilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargusingh, Miriam M.

    2011-01-01

    The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber (HHC) represents the merger of several technologies in development for NASA aerospace applications, harnessed to directly benefit global health. NASA has significant experience developing composite hyperbaric chambers for a variety of applications, including the treatment of medical conditions. NASA also has researched the application of water-filled vessels to increase tolerance of acceleration forces. The combination of these two applications has resulted in the hydrostatic chamber, which has been conceived as a safe, affordable means of making hyperbaric oxygen therapy available in the developing world for the treatment of a variety of medical conditions. Specifically, hyperbaric oxygen therapy is highly-desired as a possibly curative treatment for Buruli Ulcer, an infectious condition that afflicts children in sub-Saharan Africa. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is simply too expensive and too dangerous to implement in the developing world using standard equipment. The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber technology changes the paradigm. The HHC differs from standard hyperbaric chambers in that the majority of its volume is filled with water which is pressurized by oxygen being supplied in the portion of the chamber containing the patient s head. This greatly reduces the amount of oxygen required to sustain a hyperbaric atmosphere, thereby making the system more safe and economical to operate. An effort was taken to develop an HHC system to apply HBOT to children that is simple and robust enough to support transport, assembly, maintenance and operation in developing countries. This paper details the concept for an HHC ventilation and pressurization system that will provide controlled pressurization of the system, and provide adequate washout of carbon dioxide while the subject is enclosed in the confined space during the administration of the medical treatment. The concept took into consideration operational complexity, safety to the

  5. Hydrostatic Hyperbaric Chamber Ventilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarguisingh, Miriam J.

    2012-01-01

    The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber (HHC) represents the merger of several technologies in development for NASA aerospace applications, harnessed to directly benefit global health. NASA has significant experience developing composite hyperbaric chambers for a variety of applications. NASA also has researched the application of water-filled vessels to increase tolerance of acceleration forces. The combination of these two applications has resulted in the hydrostatic chamber, which has been conceived as a safe, affordable means of making hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) available in the developing world for the treatment of a variety of medical conditions. Specifically, HBOT is highly-desired as a possibly curative treatment for Buruli Ulcer, an infectious condition that afflicts children in sub-Saharan Africa. HBOT is simply too expensive and too dangerous to implement in the developing world using standard equipment. The HHC technology changes the paradigm. The HHC differs from standard hyperbaric chambers in that the majority of its volume is filled with water which is pressurized by oxygen being supplied in the portion of the chamber containing the patient s head. This greatly reduces the amount of oxygen required to sustain a hyperbaric atmosphere, thereby making the system more safe and economical to operate. An effort was taken to develop an HHC system to apply HBOT to children that is simple and robust enough to support transport, assembly, maintenance and operation in developing countries. This paper details the concept for an HHC ventilation and pressurization system to provide controlled pressurization and adequate washout of carbon dioxide while the subject is enclosed in the confined space during the administration of the medical treatment. The concept took into consideration operational complexity, safety to the patient and operating personnel, and physiological considerations. The simple schematic, comprised of easily acquired commercial hardware

  6. Evaluating Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrich, Robb; Arena, Lois

    2013-02-01

    In an effort to improve housing options near Las Vegas, Nevada, the Clark County Community Resources Division (CCCRD) performs substantial renovations to foreclosed homes. After dramatic energy, aesthetic, and health and safety improvements are made, homes are rented or sold to qualified residents. This report describes the evaluation and selection of ventilation systems for these homes, including key considerations when selecting an ideal system. The report then describes CCCRD’s decision process with respect to ventilation.

  7. 46 CFR 154.1205 - Mechanical ventilation system: Standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mechanical ventilation system: Standards. 154.1205... Equipment Cargo Area: Mechanical Ventilation System § 154.1205 Mechanical ventilation system: Standards. (a) Each exhaust type mechanical ventilation system required under § 154.1200 (a) must have ducts...

  8. 46 CFR 154.1205 - Mechanical ventilation system: Standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mechanical ventilation system: Standards. 154.1205... Equipment Cargo Area: Mechanical Ventilation System § 154.1205 Mechanical ventilation system: Standards. (a) Each exhaust type mechanical ventilation system required under § 154.1200 (a) must have ducts...

  9. 46 CFR 154.1200 - Mechanical ventilation system: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mechanical ventilation system: General. 154.1200 Section... Equipment Cargo Area: Mechanical Ventilation System § 154.1200 Mechanical ventilation system: General. (a... cargo handling equipment must have a fixed, exhaust-type mechanical ventilation system. (b)...

  10. 46 CFR 154.1200 - Mechanical ventilation system: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mechanical ventilation system: General. 154.1200 Section... Equipment Cargo Area: Mechanical Ventilation System § 154.1200 Mechanical ventilation system: General. (a... cargo handling equipment must have a fixed, exhaust-type mechanical ventilation system. (b)...

  11. 46 CFR 154.1205 - Mechanical ventilation system: Standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mechanical ventilation system: Standards. 154.1205... Equipment Cargo Area: Mechanical Ventilation System § 154.1205 Mechanical ventilation system: Standards. (a) Each exhaust type mechanical ventilation system required under § 154.1200 (a) must have ducts...

  12. 46 CFR 154.1205 - Mechanical ventilation system: Standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mechanical ventilation system: Standards. 154.1205... Equipment Cargo Area: Mechanical Ventilation System § 154.1205 Mechanical ventilation system: Standards. (a) Each exhaust type mechanical ventilation system required under § 154.1200 (a) must have ducts...

  13. 46 CFR 154.1200 - Mechanical ventilation system: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mechanical ventilation system: General. 154.1200 Section... Equipment Cargo Area: Mechanical Ventilation System § 154.1200 Mechanical ventilation system: General. (a... cargo handling equipment must have a fixed, exhaust-type mechanical ventilation system. (b)...

  14. WASTE HANDLING BUILDING VENTILATION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect

    P.A. Kumar

    2000-06-21

    The Waste Handling Building Ventilation System provides heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) for the contaminated, potentially contaminated, and uncontaminated areas of the Monitored Geologic Repository's (MGR) Waste Handling Building (WHB). In the uncontaminated areas, the non-confinement area ventilation system maintains the proper environmental conditions for equipment operation and personnel comfort. In the contaminated and potentially contaminated areas, in addition to maintaining the proper environmental conditions for equipment operation and personnel comfort, the contamination confinement area ventilation system directs potentially contaminated air away from personnel in the WHB and confines the contamination within high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration units. The contamination confinement areas ventilation system creates airflow paths and pressure zones to minimize the potential for spreading contamination within the building. The contamination confinement ventilation system also protects the environment and the public by limiting airborne releases of radioactive or other hazardous contaminants from the WHB. The Waste Handling Building Ventilation System is designed to perform its safety functions under accident conditions and other Design Basis Events (DBEs) (such as earthquakes, tornadoes, fires, and loss of the primary electric power). Additional system design features (such as compartmentalization with independent subsystems) limit the potential for cross-contamination within the WHB. The system provides status of important system parameters and equipment operation, and provides audible and/or visual indication of off-normal conditions and equipment failures. The Waste Handling Building Ventilation System confines the radioactive and hazardous material within the building such that the release rates comply with regulatory limits. The system design, operations, and maintenance activities incorporate ALARA (as low as is

  15. Innovative ventilation system for animal anatomy laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lacey, D.R.; Smith, D.C.

    1997-04-01

    A unique ventilation system was designed and built to reduce formaldehyde fumes in the large animal anatomy lab at the Vet Medical Center at Cornell University. The laboratory includes four rooms totaling 5,500 ft{sup 2}. The main room has 2,300 ft{sup 2} and houses the laboratory where up to 60 students dissect as many as 12 horses at a time. Other rooms are a cold storage locker, an animal preparation room and a smaller lab for specialized instruction. The large animal anatomy laboratory has a history of air quality complaints despite a fairly high ventilation rate of over 10 air changes/hour. The horses are embalmed, creating a voluminous source of formaldehyde and phenol vapors. Budget constraints and increasingly stringent exposure limits for formaldehyde presented a great challenge to design a ventilation system that yields acceptable air quality. The design solution included two innovative elements: air-to-air heat recovery, and focused ventilation.

  16. Process Test Evaluation Report Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Emissions Collection (Phase 1 - 2 and 3)

    SciTech Connect

    PARKMAN, D.B.

    1999-12-29

    During sluicing of the first batch of sludge from tank 241-C-106 on November 18, 1998, an unexpected high concentration of volatile organic compounds was measured in the 296-C-006 ventilation stack. Eleven workers reported irritation related symptoms and were sent to Hanford Environmental Health Foundation (HEHF) and Kadlec Hospital for medical evaluations. No residual health effects were reported. As a result of the unexpectedly high concentrations of volatile organic compounds encountered during this November sluicing event, a phased process test designed to characterize the emission constituents was conducted on December 16, 1998, March 7, 1999, and March 28, 1999. The primary focus of this evaluation was to obtain samples of the 296-C-006 ventilation stack effluent and surrounding areas at elevated levels of volatile organic compounds initiated by sluicing. Characterization of the emission constituents was necessary to establish appropriate procedural and administrative exposure controls for continued sluicing. Additionally, this information would be used to evaluate the need for engineered equipment to mitigate any further potential chemical stack emissions. This evaluation confirms that the following actions taken during Phase I, Phase II, and Phase III of the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Emissions Collection Process Test were conservative and appropriate for continued sluicing: Implement stack limit of 500 ppm volatile organic compounds, with lower administrative limits; Ensure worker involvement through enhanced planning; Continue using the existing fenced boundary location; Continue using pressure demand fresh air respiratory protection inside the C-Farm as recommended by Industrial Hygiene; Continue using the existing respiratory protection/ take cover requirements outside the C-Farm boundary as recommended by Industrial Hygiene; Continue using existing anti-contamination clothing; Minimize the number of workers exposed to emissions; Maintain the

  17. Preoperational test report, recirculation ventilation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-11

    This represents a preoperational test report for Recirculation Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides vapor space cooling of tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102 and supports the ability to exhaust air from each tank. Each system consists of a valved piping loop, a fan, condenser, and moisture separator; equipment is located inside each respective tank farm in its own hardened building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  18. 46 CFR 154.1205 - Mechanical ventilation system: Standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Each exhaust type mechanical ventilation system required under § 154.1200 (a) must have ducts for... duct under paragraph (a) of this section must be at least 10 m (32.8 ft.) from ventilation intakes and... operational controls outside the ventilated space. (g) No ventilation duct for a gas-dangerous space may...

  19. Project Design Concept Primary Ventilation System

    SciTech Connect

    MCGREW, D.L.

    2000-10-02

    Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operation (TFRSO), Project W-3 14 was established to provide upgrades that would improve the reliability and extend the system life of portions of the waste transfer, electrical, ventilation, instrumentation and control systems for the Hanford Site Tank Farms. An assessment of the tank farm system was conducted and the results are documented in system assessment reports. Based on the deficiencies identified in the tank farm system assessment reports, and additional requirements analysis performed in support of the River Protection Project (RPP), an approved scope for the TFRSO effort was developed and documented in the Upgrade Scope Summary Report (USSR), WHC-SD-W314-RPT-003, Rev. 4. The USSR establishes the need for the upgrades and identifies the specific equipment to be addressed by this project. This Project Design Concept (PDC) is in support of the Phase 2 upgrades and provides an overall description of the operations concept for the W-314 Primary Ventilation Systems. Actual specifications, test requirements, and procedures are not included in this PDC. The PDC is a ''living'' document, which will be updated throughout the design development process to provide a progressively more detailed description of the W-314 Primary Ventilation Systems design. The Phase 2 upgrades to the Primary Ventilation Systems shall ensure that the applicable current requirements are met for: Regulatory Compliance; Safety; Mission Requirements; Reliability; and Operational Requirements.

  20. MODELING VENTILATION SYSTEM RESPONSE TO FIRE

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D

    2007-04-17

    Fires in facilities containing nuclear material have the potential to transport radioactive contamination throughout buildings and may lead to widespread downwind dispersal threatening both worker and public safety. Development and implementation of control strategies capable of providing adequate protection from fire requires realistic characterization of ventilation system response which, in turn, depends on an understanding of fire development timing and suppression system response. This paper discusses work in which published HEPA filter data was combined with CFAST fire modeling predictions to evaluate protective control strategies for a hypothetical DOE non-reactor nuclear facility. The purpose of this effort was to evaluate when safety significant active ventilation coupled with safety class passive ventilation might be a viable control strategy.

  1. Tunnel ventilation system design and management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Properly designed and functioning tunnel ventilation systems in broiler houses are essential for maintaining productivity of broilers in warm weather. Convective heat loss from high air velocity provides cooling which improves performance; however, high air velocities require larger fans and increa...

  2. 46 CFR 153.310 - Ventilation system type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation system type. 153.310 Section 153.310... CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Handling Space Ventilation § 153.310 Ventilation system type. A cargo handling space must have a...

  3. 46 CFR 153.312 - Ventilation system standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation system standards. 153.312 Section 153.312... CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Handling Space Ventilation § 153.312 Ventilation system standards. A cargo handling space...

  4. 46 CFR 153.312 - Ventilation system standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ventilation system standards. 153.312 Section 153.312... CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Handling Space Ventilation § 153.312 Ventilation system standards. A cargo handling space...

  5. 46 CFR 153.310 - Ventilation system type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation system type. 153.310 Section 153.310... CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Handling Space Ventilation § 153.310 Ventilation system type. A cargo handling space must have a...

  6. 46 CFR 153.310 - Ventilation system type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation system type. 153.310 Section 153.310... CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Handling Space Ventilation § 153.310 Ventilation system type. A cargo handling space must have a...

  7. 46 CFR 153.310 - Ventilation system type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ventilation system type. 153.310 Section 153.310... CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Handling Space Ventilation § 153.310 Ventilation system type. A cargo handling space must have a...

  8. 46 CFR 153.310 - Ventilation system type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation system type. 153.310 Section 153.310... CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Handling Space Ventilation § 153.310 Ventilation system type. A cargo handling space must have a...

  9. 46 CFR 153.312 - Ventilation system standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation system standards. 153.312 Section 153.312... CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Handling Space Ventilation § 153.312 Ventilation system standards. A cargo handling space...

  10. 46 CFR 153.312 - Ventilation system standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation system standards. 153.312 Section 153.312... CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Handling Space Ventilation § 153.312 Ventilation system standards. A cargo handling space...

  11. 33 CFR 183.610 - Powered ventilation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Powered ventilation system. 183... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Ventilation § 183.610 Powered ventilation system. (a) Each compartment in a boat that has a permanently installed gasoline engine with a cranking...

  12. 33 CFR 183.610 - Powered ventilation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Powered ventilation system. 183... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Ventilation § 183.610 Powered ventilation system. (a) Each compartment in a boat that has a permanently installed gasoline engine with a cranking...

  13. 33 CFR 183.610 - Powered ventilation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Powered ventilation system. 183... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Ventilation § 183.610 Powered ventilation system. (a) Each compartment in a boat that has a permanently installed gasoline engine with a cranking...

  14. 33 CFR 183.610 - Powered ventilation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Powered ventilation system. 183... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Ventilation § 183.610 Powered ventilation system. (a) Each compartment in a boat that has a permanently installed gasoline engine with a cranking...

  15. Heating, Ventilating, Air Conditioning and Dehumidifying Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    not be connected to other ventilating systems. Duct runs shall be as short as possible to avoid leakage of moisture. I b. Special Considerations. (1...For rectangular duct design, see the SMACNA -Low Pressure Duct Construction Standards. Under jnormal applications, a minimum duct size of 6 by 6 inches...prevent leakage of the moisture-laden discharge air into the intake duct , and the intake and discharge outlets shall be located to prevent any

  16. Ventilation efficiencies of a desk-edge-mounted task ventilation system

    SciTech Connect

    Faulkner, David; Fisk, William J.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Lee, Seung Min

    2002-03-01

    In chamber experiments, we investigated the effectiveness of a task ventilation system with an air supply nozzle located underneath the front edge of a desk and directing air toward a heated mannequin seated at the desk. The task ventilation system provided outside air, while another ventilation system provided additional space cooling but no outside air. Test variables included the vertical angle of air supply (-15{sup o} to 45{sup o} from horizontal), and the supply flow rate of (3.5 to 6.5 L s{sup -1}). Using the tracer gas step-up and step-down procedures, the measured air change effectiveness (i.e., exhaust air age divided by age of air at the mannequin's face) ranged from 1.4 to 2.7, which is higher than typically reported for commercially available task ventilation or displacement ventilation systems.

  17. Position paper -- Tank ventilation system design air flow rates

    SciTech Connect

    Goolsby, G.K.

    1995-01-04

    The purpose of this paper is to document a project position on required ventilation system design air flow rates for the waste storage tanks currently being designed by project W-236A, the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF). The Title 1 design primary tank heat removal system consists of two systems: a primary tank vapor space ventilation system; and an annulus ventilation system. At the conclusion of Title 1 design, air flow rates for the primary and annulus ventilation systems were 960 scfm and 4,400 scfm, respectively, per tank. These design flow rates were capable of removing 1,250,000 Btu/hr from each tank. However, recently completed and ongoing studies have resulted in a design change to reduce the extreme case heat load to 700,000 Btu/hr. This revision of the extreme case heat load, coupled with results of scale model evaporative testing performed by WHC Thermal Hydraulics, allow for a reduction of the design air flow rates for both primary and annulus ventilation systems. Based on the preceding discussion, ICF Kaiser Hanford Co. concludes that the design should incorporate the following design air flow rates: Primary ventilation system--500 scfm maximum and Annulus ventilation system--1,100 scfm maximum. In addition, the minimum air flow rates in the primary and annulus ventilation systems will be investigated during Title 2 design. The results of the Title 2 investigation will determine the range of available temperature control using variable air flows to both ventilation systems.

  18. Advanced Controls for Residential Whole-House Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, William; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-08-01

    Whole-house ventilation systems are becoming commonplace in new construction, remodeling/renovation, and weatherization projects, driven by combinations of specific requirements for indoor air quality (IAQ), health and compliance with standards, such as ASHRAE 62.2. Ventilation systems incur an energy penalty on the home via fan power used to drive the airflow, and the additional space-conditioning load associated with heating or cooling the ventilation air. Finding a balance between IAQ and energy use is important if homes are to be adequately ventilated while not increasing the energy burden. This study used computer simulations to examine RIVEC the Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller - a prototype ventilation controller that aims to deliver whole-house ventilation rates that comply with ventilation standards, for the minimum use of energy. Four different whole-house ventilation systems were simulated, both with and without RIVEC, so that the energy and IAQ results could be compared. Simulations were conducted for 13 US climate zones, three house designs, and three envelope leakage values. The results showed that the RIVEC controller could typically return ventilation energy savings greater than 40percent without compromising long-term chronic or short-term acute exposures to relevant indoor contaminants. Critical and average peak power loads were also reduced as a consequence of using RIVEC.

  19. Ventilation Systems Operating Experience Review for Fusion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    L. C. Cadwallader

    1999-12-01

    This report is a collection and review of system operation and failure experiences for air ventilation systems in nuclear facilities. These experiences are applicable for magnetic and inertial fusion facilities since air ventilation systems are support systems that can be considered generic to nuclear facilities. The report contains descriptions of ventilation system components, operating experiences with these systems, component failure rates, and component repair times. Since ventilation systems have a role in mitigating accident releases in nuclear facilities, these data are useful in safety analysis and risk assessment of public safety. An effort has also been given to identifying any safety issues with personnel operating or maintaining ventilation systems. Finally, the recommended failure data were compared to an independent data set to determine the accuracy of individual values. This comparison is useful for the International Energy Agency task on fusion component failure rate data collection.

  20. Measure Guideline: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrich, R.

    2014-02-01

    This document addresses adding -or improving - mechanical ventilation systems to existing homes. The purpose of ventilation is to remove contaminants from homes, and this report discusses where, when, and how much ventilation is appropriate in a home, including some discussion of relevant codes and standards. Advantages, disadvantages, and approximate costs of various system types are presented along with general guidelines for implementing the systems in homes. CARB intends for this document to be useful to decision makers and contractors implementing ventilation systems in homes. Choosing the "best" system is not always straightforward; selecting a system involves balancing performance, efficiency, cost, required maintenance, and several other factors. It is the intent of this document to assist contractors in making more informed decisions when selecting systems. Ventilation is an integral part of a high-performance home. With more air-sealed envelopes, a mechanical means of removing contaminants is critical for indoor environmental quality and building durability.

  1. Fire protection countermeasures for containment ventilation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alvares, N.; Beason, D.; Bergman, V.; Creighton, J.; Ford, H.; Lipska, A.

    1980-08-25

    The goal of this project is to find countermeasures to protect High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters, in exit ventilation ducts, from the heat and smoke generated by fire. Initially, methods were developed to cool fire-heated air by fine water spray upstream of the filters. It was recognized that smoke aerosol exposure to HEPA filters could also cause disruption of the containment system. Through testing and analysis, several methods to partially mitigate the smoke exposure to the HEPA filters were identified. A continuous, movable, high-efficiency prefilter using modified commercial equipment was designed. The technique is capable of protecting HEPA filters over the total time duration of the test fires. The reason for success involved the modification of the prefiltration media. Commercially available filter media has particle sorption efficiency that is inversely proportional to media strength. To achieve properties of both efficiency and strength, rolling filter media were laminated with the desired properties. The approach was Edisonian, but truncation in short order to a combination of prefilters was effective. The application of this technique was qualified, since it is of use only to protect HEPA filters from fire-generated smoke aerosols. It is not believed that this technique is cost effective in the total spectrum of containment systems, especially if standard fire protection systems are available in the space. But in areas of high-fire risk, where the potential fuel load is large and ignition sources are plentiful, the complication of a rolling prefilter in exit ventilation ducts to protect HEPA filters from smoke aerosols is definitely justified.

  2. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, A.; Bergey, D.

    2014-02-01

    Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. It was inferior because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  3. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, Armin; Bergey, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    In this project, Building America research team Building Science Corporation tested the effectiveness of ventilation systems at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. This was because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four system factor categories: balance, distribution, outside air source, and recirculation filtration. Recommended system factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  4. Fire protection countermeasures for containment ventilation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alvares, N.J.; Beason, D.G.; Bergman, W.; Ford, H.W.; Lipska, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    The goal of this project is to find countermeasures to protect HEPA filters in exit ventilation ducts from the heat and smoke generated by fire. Several methods for partially mitigating the smoke exposure to the HEPA filters were identified through testing and analysis. These independently involve controlling the fuel, controlling the fire, and intercepting the smoke aerosol prior to its sorption on the HEPA filter. Exit duct treatment of aerosols is not unusual in industrial applications and involves the use of scrubbers, prefilters, and inertial impaction, depending on the size, distribution, and concentration of the subject aerosol. However, when these unmodified techniques were applied to smoke aerosols from fires on materials, common to experimental laboratories of LLNL, it was found they offered minimal protection to the HEPA filters. Ultimately, a continuous, movable, high-efficiency prefilter using modified commercial equipment was designed. This technique is capable of protecting HEPA filters over the total duration of the test fires. The reason for success involved the modificaton of the prefiltration media. Commercially available filter media has a particle sorption efficiency that is inversely proportional to media strength. To achieve properties of both efficiency and strength, we laminated rolling filter media with the desired properties. It is not true that the use of rolling prefilters solely to protect HEPA filters from fire-generated smoke aerosols is cost effective in every type of containment system, especially if standard fire-protection systems are available in the space. But in areas of high fire risk, where the potential fuel load is large and ignition sources are plentiful, the complication of a rolling prefilter in exit ventilation ducts to protect HEPA filters from smoke aerosols is definitely justified.

  5. Ventilation efficiencies and thermal comfort results of a desk-edge-mounted task ventilation system

    SciTech Connect

    Faulkner, D.; Fisk, W.J.; Sullivan, D.P.; Lee, S.M.

    2003-09-01

    In chamber experiments, we investigated the ventilation effectiveness and thermal comfort of a task ventilation system with an air supply nozzle located underneath the front edge of a desk and directing air toward a heated mannequin or a human volunteer seated at the desk. The task ventilation system provided outside air, while another ventilation system provided additional space cooling but no outside air. Test variables included the vertical angle of air supply (-15{sup o} to 45{sup o} from horizontal), and the supply flow rate of (3.5 to 6.5 L s{sup -1}). Using the tracer gas step-up and step-down procedures, the measured air change effectiveness (i.e., exhaust air age divided by age of air in the breathing zone) in experiments with the mannequin ranged from 1.4 to 2.7 (median, 1.8), whereas with human subjects the air change effectiveness ranged from 1.3 to 2.3 (median, 1.6). The majority of the air change effectiveness values with the human subjects were less than values with the mannequin at comparable tests. Similarly, the tests run with supply air temperature equal to the room air temperature had lower air change effectiveness values than comparable tests with the supply air temperature lower ({approx}5 C) than the room air temperature. The air change effectiveness values are higher than typically reported for commercially available task ventilation or displacement ventilation systems. Based on surveys completed by the subjects, operation of the task ventilation system did not cause thermal discomfort.

  6. B-Plant Canyon Ventilation Control System Description

    SciTech Connect

    MCDANIEL, K.S.

    1999-08-31

    Project W-059 installed a new B Plant Canyon Ventilation System. Monitoring and control of the system is implemented by the Canyon Ventilation Control System (CVCS). This document describes the CVCS system components which include a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) coupled with an Operator Interface Unit (OIU) and application software. This document also includes an Alarm Index specifying the setpoints and technical basis for system analog and digital alarms.

  7. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: SUBSURFACE VOLATILIZATION AND VENTILATION SYSTEM (SVVS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Subsurface Volatilization and Ventilation System is an integrated technology used for attacking all phases of volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination in soil and groundwater. The SVVS technology promotes insitu remediation of soil and groundwater contaminated with or-ga...

  8. Measure Guideline: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrich, R.

    2014-02-01

    This report, developed by Building America research team CARB, addresses adding or improving mechanical ventilation systems to existing homes. The goal of this report is to assist decision makers and contractors in making informed decisions when selecting ventilation systems for homes. With more air-sealed envelopes, a mechanical means of removing contaminants is critical for indoor environmental quality and building durability. The purpose of ventilation is to remove contaminants from homes, and this report discusses where, when, and how much ventilation is appropriate in a home, including examination of relevant codes and standards. Choosing the "best" system is not always straightforward; selecting a system involves balancing performance, efficiency, cost, required maintenance, and several other factors.

  9. SUBSURFACE VOLATIZATION AND VENTILATION SYSTEM (SVVS) - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the findings associated with a Demonstration Test of Environmental Improvement Technologies’ (EIT) Subsurface Volatilization and Ventilation System (SVVS) process. The technology was evaluated under the EPA Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) ...

  10. 46 CFR 105.25-7 - Ventilation systems for cargo tank or pumping system compartment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation systems for cargo tank or pumping system... Requirements-When Cargo Tanks Are Installed Below Decks § 105.25-7 Ventilation systems for cargo tank or... ventilation outlets shall terminate more than 10 feet from any opening to the interior of the vessel...

  11. 46 CFR 105.25-7 - Ventilation systems for cargo tank or pumping system compartment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation systems for cargo tank or pumping system... Requirements-When Cargo Tanks Are Installed Below Decks § 105.25-7 Ventilation systems for cargo tank or... ventilation outlets shall terminate more than 10 feet from any opening to the interior of the vessel...

  12. 46 CFR 105.25-7 - Ventilation systems for cargo tank or pumping system compartment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation systems for cargo tank or pumping system... Requirements-When Cargo Tanks Are Installed Below Decks § 105.25-7 Ventilation systems for cargo tank or... ventilation outlets shall terminate more than 10 feet from any opening to the interior of the vessel...

  13. Simplified tools for evaluating domestic ventilation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maansson, L.G.; Orme, M.

    1999-07-01

    Within an International Energy Agency (IEA) project, Annex 27, experts from 8 countries (Canada, France, Italy, Japan, The Netherlands, Sweden, UK and USA) have developed simplified tools for evaluating domestic ventilation systems during the heating season. Tools for building and user aspects, thermal comfort, noise, energy, life cycle cost, reliability and indoor air quality (IAQ) have been devised. The results can be used both for dwellings at the design stage and after construction. The tools lead to immediate answers and indications about the consequences of different choices that may arise during discussion with clients. This paper presents an introduction to these tools. Examples applications of the indoor air quality and energy simplified tools are also provided. The IAQ tool accounts for constant emission sources, CO{sub 2}, cooking products, tobacco smoke, condensation risks, humidity levels (i.e., for judging the risk for mould and house dust mites), and pressure difference (for identifying the risk for radon or land fill spillage entering the dwelling or problems with indoor combustion appliances). An elaborated set of design parameters were worked out that resulted in about 17,000 combinations. By using multi-variate analysis it was possible to reduce this to 174 combinations for IAQ. In addition, a sensitivity analysis was made using 990 combinations. The results from all the runs were used to develop a simplified tool, as well as quantifying equations relying on the design parameters. A computerized energy tool has also been developed within this project, which takes into account air tightness, climate, window airing pattern, outdoor air flow rate and heat exchange efficiency.

  14. Anaesthesia ventilators

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rajnish K; Swaminathan, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    Anaesthesia ventilators are an integral part of all modern anaesthesia workstations. Automatic ventilators in the operating rooms, which were very simple with few modes of ventilation when introduced, have become very sophisticated with many advanced ventilation modes. Several systems of classification of anaesthesia ventilators exist based upon various parameters. Modern anaesthesia ventilators have either a double circuit, bellow design or a single circuit piston configuration. In the bellows ventilators, ascending bellows design is safer than descending bellows. Piston ventilators have the advantage of delivering accurate tidal volume. They work with electricity as their driving force and do not require a driving gas. To enable improved patient safety, several modifications were done in circle system with the different types of anaesthesia ventilators. Fresh gas decoupling is a modification done in piston ventilators and in descending bellows ventilator to reduce th incidence of ventilator induced volutrauma. In addition to the conventional volume control mode, modern anaesthesia ventilators also provide newer modes of ventilation such as synchronised intermittent mandatory ventilation, pressure-control ventilation and pressure-support ventilation (PSV). PSV mode is particularly useful for patients maintained on spontaneous respiration with laryngeal mask airway. Along with the innumerable benefits provided by these machines, there are various inherent hazards associated with the use of the ventilators in the operating room. To use these workstations safely, it is important for every Anaesthesiologist to have a basic understanding of the mechanics of these ventilators and breathing circuits. PMID:24249886

  15. Preoperational test report, primary ventilation condenser cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-10-29

    This represents the preoperational test report for the Primary Ventilation Condenser Cooling System, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system uses a closed chilled water piping loop to provide offgas effluent cooling for tanks AY101, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102; the offgas is cooled from a nominal 100 F to 40 F. Resulting condensation removes tritiated vapor from the exhaust stack stream. The piping system includes a package outdoor air-cooled water chiller with parallel redundant circulating pumps; the condenser coil is located inside a shielded ventilation equipment cell. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  16. Argonne Fuel Cycle Facility ventilation system -- modeling and results

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, D.; Feldman, E.E.; Danielson, W.F.

    1995-02-01

    This paper describes an integrated study of the Argonne-West Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) interconnected ventilation systems during various operations. Analyses and test results include first a nominal condition reflecting balanced pressures and flows followed by several infrequent and off-normal scenarios. This effort is the first study of the FCF ventilation systems as an integrated network wherein the hydraulic effects of all major air systems have been analyzed and tested. The FCF building consists of many interconnected regions in which nuclear fuel is handled, transported and reprocessed. The ventilation systems comprise a large number of ducts, fans, dampers, and filters which together must provide clean, properly conditioned air to the worker occupied spaces of the facility while preventing the spread of airborne radioactive materials to clean am-as or the atmosphere. This objective is achieved by keeping the FCF building at a partial vacuum in which the contaminated areas are kept at lower pressures than the other worker occupied spaces. The ventilation systems of FCF and the EBR-II reactor are analyzed as an integrated totality, as demonstrated. We then developed the network model shown in Fig. 2 for the TORAC code. The scope of this study was to assess the measured results from the acceptance/flow balancing testing and to predict the effects of power failures, hatch and door openings, single-failure faulted conditions, EBR-II isolation, and other infrequent operations. The studies show that the FCF ventilation systems am very controllable and remain stable following off-normal events. In addition, the FCF ventilation system complex is essentially immune to reverse flows and spread of contamination to clean areas during normal and off-normal operation.

  17. Water spray ventilator system for continuous mining machines

    DOEpatents

    Page, Steven J.; Mal, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    The invention relates to a water spray ventilator system mounted on a continuous mining machine to streamline airflow and provide effective face ventilation of both respirable dust and methane in underground coal mines. This system has two side spray nozzles mounted one on each side of the mining machine and six spray nozzles disposed on a manifold mounted to the underside of the machine boom. The six spray nozzles are angularly and laterally oriented on the manifold so as to provide non-overlapping spray patterns along the length of the cutter drum.

  18. Software Configuration Management Plan for the B-Plant Canyon Ventilation Control System

    SciTech Connect

    MCDANIEL, K.S.

    1999-08-31

    Project W-059 installed a new B Plant Canyon Ventilation System. Monitoring and control of the system is implemented by the Canyon Ventilation Control System (CVCS). This Software Configuration Management Plan provides instructions for change control of the CVCS.

  19. Radioactive waste tank ventilation system incorporating tritium control

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, P.D.

    1997-08-01

    This paper describes the development of a ventilation system for radioactive waste tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The unique design of the system is aimed at cost-effective control of tritiated water vapor. The system includes recirculation ventilation and cooling for each tank in the facility and a central exhaust air clean-up train that includes a low-temperature vapor condenser and high-efficiency mist eliminator (HEME). A one-seventh scale pilot plant was built and tested to verify predicted performance of the low-temperature tritium removal system. Tests were conducted to determine the effectiveness of the removal of condensable vapor and soluble and insoluble aerosols and to estimate the operating life of the mist eliminator. Definitive design of the ventilation system relied heavily on the test data. The unique design features of the ventilation system will result in far less release of tritium to the atmosphere than from conventional high-volume dilution systems and will greatly reduce operating costs. NESHAPs and TAPs NOC applications have been approved, and field construction is nearly complete. Start-up is scheduled for late 1996. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Measured Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max; Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of ventilation is dilute or remove indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, there will be different dilution rates and different source strengths in every zone. Most US homes have central HVAC systems, which tend to mix the air thus the indoor conditions between zones. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of exposure depending on the effectiveness of their air distribution systems and the location of sources and occupants. This paper will report on field measurements using a unique multi-tracer measurement system that has the capacity to measure not only the flow of outdoor air to each zone, but zone-to-zone transport. The paper will derive seven different metrics for the evaluation of air distribution. Measured data from two homes with different levels of natural infiltration will be used to evaluate these metrics for three different ASHRAE Standard 62.2 compliant ventilation systems. Such information can be used to determine the effectiveness of different systems so that appropriate adjustments can be made in residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.

  1. [Air quality control systems: heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC)].

    PubMed

    Bellucci Sessa, R; Riccio, G

    2004-01-01

    After a brief illustration of the principal layout schemes of Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC), the first part of this paper summarizes the standards, both voluntary and compulsory, regulating HVAC facilities design and installation with regard to the question of Indoor Air Quality (IAQ). The paper then examines the problem of ventilation systems maintenance and the essential hygienistic requirements in whose absence HVAC facilities may become a risk factor for people working or living in the building. Lastly, the paper deals with HVAC design strategies and methods, which aim not only to satisfy comfort and air quality requirements, but also to ensure easy and effective maintenance procedures.

  2. Three years of experience with a dissection table ventilation system.

    PubMed

    Martin, W D; Nemitz, J W; Hendley, A; Fisk, R M; Wells, J P

    1995-01-01

    A dissection table ventilation system that draws air across the cadaver and away from the table top was designed to fit the Shandon-Lipshaw AN-52 dissection table. Each U-shaped unit consists of a pair of hollow collection arms that attach to a collecting manifold at one end. During dissection the manifold is coupled to a central ventilation system through a flexible duct. The air from the table ventilation system is exhausted after passing through a heat recovery system. The unit is raised from the table surface during dissection of the body cavities to increase the efficiency of fume/odor removal. Eight hour exposure data for formaldehyde concentrations are presented. Data were collected from detectors positioned at selected levels above the cadaver during dissection, and above a tray on the table top containing a known volume of 4% formaldehyde or the West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine embalming fluid under varying airflow conditions. The results demonstrate that the table ventilation system is effective in reducing exposure to formaldehyde in the dissection laboratory.

  3. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SUBSURFACE VOLATILIZATION AND VENTILATION SYSTEM - BROWN & ROOT ENVIRONMENTAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Subsurface Volatilization and Ventilation System (SVVS*) is an in-situ vacuum extraction/air sparging and bioremediation technology for the treatment of subsurface organic contamination in soil and groundwater. The technology, developed by Billings and Associates, Inc., and o...

  4. Operational test report integrated system test (ventilation upgrade)

    SciTech Connect

    HARTY, W.M.

    1999-10-05

    Operational Final Test Report for Integrated Systems, Project W-030 (Phase 2 test, RECIRC and HIGH-HEAT Modes). Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks, including upgraded vapor space cooling and filtered venting of tanks AY101, Ay102, AZ101, AZ102.

  5. Multifamily Individual Heating and Ventilation Systems, Lawrence, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    The conversion of an older Massachusetts building into condominiums illustrates a safe, durable, and cost-effective solution for heating and ventilation systems that can potentially benefit millions of multifamily buildings. Merrimack Valley Habitat for Humanity (MVHfH) partnered with U.S. Department of Energy Building America team Building Science Corporation (BSC) to provide high performance affordable housing for 10 families in the retrofit of an existing mass masonry building (a former convent). The original ventilation design for the project was provided by a local engineer and consisted of a single large heat recovery ventilator (HRV) located in a mechanical room in the basement with a centralized duct system providing supply air to the main living space and exhausting stale air from the single bathroom in each apartment. This design was deemed to be far too costly to install and operate for several reasons: the large central HRV was oversized and the specified flows to each apartment were much higher than the ASHRAE 62.2 rate; an extensive system of ductwork, smoke and fire dampers, and duct chases were specified; ductwork required a significant area of dropped ceilings; and the system lacked individual ventilation control in the apartments

  6. Availability Analysis of the Ventilation Stack CAM Interlock System

    SciTech Connect

    YOUNG, J.

    2000-08-09

    Ventilation Stack Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) Interlock System failure modes, failure frequencies, and system availability have been evaluated for the RPP. The evaluation concludes that CAM availability is as high as assumed in the safety analysis and that the current routine system surveillance is adequate to maintain this availability credited in the safety analysis, nor is such an arrangement predicted to significantly improve system availability.

  7. Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning Systems, Part of Indoor Air Quality Design Tools for Schools

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The main purposes of a Heating, Ventilation, and Air-Conditioning system are to help maintain good indoor air quality through adequate ventilation with filtration and provide thermal comfort. HVAC systems are among the largest energy consumers in schools.

  8. Technology Solutions Case Study: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-01

    In multifamily buildings, particularly in the Northeast, exhaust ventilation strategies are the norm as a means of meeting both local exhaust and whole-unit mechanical ventilation rates. The issue of where the "fresh" air is coming from is gaining significance as air-tightness standards for enclosures become more stringent, and the normal leakage paths through the building envelope disappear. Researchers from the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) found that the majority of high performance, new construction, multifamily housing in the Northeast use one of four general strategies for ventilation: continuous exhaust only with no designated supply or make-up air source, continuous exhaust with ducted make-up air to apartments, continuous exhaust with supply through a make-up air device integral to the unit HVAC, and continuous exhaust with supply through a passive inlet device, such as a trickle vent. Insufficient information is available to designers on how these various systems are best applied. In this project, the CARB team evaluated the four different strategies for providing make-up air to multifamily residential buildings and developed guidelines to help contractors and building owners choose the best ventilation systems.

  9. Assisted Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Dries, David J

    2016-01-01

    Controlled Mechanical Ventilation may be essential in the setting of severe respiratory failure but consequences to the patient including increased use of sedation and neuromuscular blockade may contribute to delirium, atelectasis, and diaphragm dysfunction. Assisted ventilation allows spontaneous breathing activity to restore physiological displacement of the diaphragm and recruit better perfused lung regions. Pressure Support Ventilation is the most frequently used mode of assisted mechanical ventilation. However, this mode continues to provide a monotonous pattern of support for respiration which is normally a dynamic process. Noisy Pressure Support Ventilation where tidal volume is varied randomly by the ventilator may improve ventilation and perfusion matching but the degree of support is still determined by the ventilator. Two more recent modes of ventilation, Proportional Assist Ventilation and Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA), allow patient determination of the pattern and depth of ventilation. Proposed advantages of Proportional Assist Ventilation and NAVA include decrease in patient ventilator asynchrony and improved adaptation of ventilator support to changing patient demand. Work of breathing can be normalized with these modes as well. To date, however, a clear pattern of clinical benefit has not been demonstrated. Existing challenges for both of the newer assist modes include monitoring patients with dynamic hyperinflation (auto-positive end expiratory pressure), obstructive lung disease, and air leaks in the ventilator system. NAVA is dependent on consistent transduction of diaphragm activity by an electrode system placed in the esophagus. Longevity of effective support with this technique is unclear.

  10. VWPS: A Ventilator Weaning Prediction System with Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Austin H.; Chen, Guan-Ting

    How to wean patients efficiently off mechanical ventilation continues to be a challenge for medical professionals. In this paper we have described a novel approach to the study of a ventilator weaning prediction system (VWPS). Firstly, we have developed and written three Artificial Neural Network (ANN) algorithms to predict a weaning successful rate based on the clinical data. Secondly, we have implemented two user-friendly weaning success rate prediction systems; the VWPS system and the BWAP system. Both systems could be used to help doctors objectively and effectively predict whether weaning is appropriate for patients based on the patients' clinical data. Our system utilizes the powerful processing abilities of MatLab. Thirdly, we have calculated the performance through measures such as sensitivity and accuracy for these three algorithms. The results show a very high sensitivity (around 80%) and accuracy (around 70%). To our knowledge, this is the first design approach of its kind to be used in the study of ventilator weaning success rate prediction.

  11. 30 CFR 75.324 - Intentional changes in the ventilation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intentional changes in the ventilation system... COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.324 Intentional changes in the ventilation system. (a) A person designated by the operator shall supervise...

  12. 30 CFR 75.324 - Intentional changes in the ventilation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intentional changes in the ventilation system... COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.324 Intentional changes in the ventilation system. (a) A person designated by the operator shall supervise...

  13. 30 CFR 75.324 - Intentional changes in the ventilation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Intentional changes in the ventilation system... COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.324 Intentional changes in the ventilation system. (a) A person designated by the operator shall supervise...

  14. 30 CFR 75.324 - Intentional changes in the ventilation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intentional changes in the ventilation system... COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.324 Intentional changes in the ventilation system. (a) A person designated by the operator shall supervise...

  15. 30 CFR 75.324 - Intentional changes in the ventilation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Intentional changes in the ventilation system... COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.324 Intentional changes in the ventilation system. (a) A person designated by the operator shall supervise...

  16. Numerical simulation of volume-controlled mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan; Zhang, Bolun; Cai, Maolin; Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas

    2016-11-09

    Mechanical ventilation is a key therapy for patients who cannot breathe adequately by themselves, and dynamics of mechanical ventilation system is of great significance for life support of patients. Recently, models of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 1 lung are used to simulate the respiratory system of patients. However, humans have 2 lungs. When the respiratory characteristics of 2 lungs are different, a single-lung model cannot reflect real respiratory system. In this paper, to illustrate dynamic characteristics of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs, we propose a mathematical model of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs and conduct experiments to verify the model. Furthermore, we study the dynamics of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs. This research study can be used for improving the efficiency and safety of volume-controlled mechanical ventilation system.

  17. Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, G.C.; Corsi, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Wells, J.R.

    2006-05-01

    Chemical processes taking place in indoor environments can significantly alter the nature and concentrations of pollutants. Exposure to secondary contaminants generated in these reactions needs to be evaluated in association with many aspects of buildings to minimize their impact on occupant health and well-being. Focusing on indoor ozone chemistry, we describe alternatives for improving indoor air quality by controlling chemical changes related to building materials, ventilation systems, and occupant activities.

  18. Evaluating Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrich, R.; Arena, L.

    2013-02-01

    During the course of this project, an affordable and high performance ductwork system to directly address the problems of thermal losses, poor efficiency, and air leakage was designed. To save space and enable direct connections between different floors of the building, the ductwork system was designed in such a way that it occupied interior or exterior frame wall cavities. The ductwork system satisfied building regulations for structural support when bridging multiple floors, the spread of fire and smoke, and insulation to reduce the heat flow into or out of the building. Retrofits of urban residential buildings will be the main focus for the application of this ductwork system. Highly reflective foils and insulating materials were used to aid in the increase of the overall R-value of the ductwork itself and the wall assembly. It is expected that the proposed system will increase the efficiency of the HVAC system and the thermal resistance of the building envelope. The performance of the proposed ductwork design was numerically evaluated in a number of different ways. Our results indicate that the duct method is a very cost attractive alternative to the conventional method.

  19. Analysis of radon reduction and ventilation systems in uranium mines in China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peng-hua; Li, Xian-jie

    2012-09-01

    Mine ventilation is the most important way of reducing radon in uranium mines. At present, the radon and radon progeny levels in Chinese uranium mines where the cut and fill stoping method is used are 3-5 times higher than those in foreign uranium mines, as there is not much difference in the investments for ventilation protection between Chinese uranium mines and international advanced uranium mines with compaction methodology. In this paper, through the analysis of radon reduction and ventilation systems in Chinese uranium mines and the comparison of advantages and disadvantages between a variety of ventilation systems in terms of radon control, the authors try to illustrate the reasons for the higher radon and radon progeny levels in Chinese uranium mines and put forward some problems in three areas, namely the theory of radon control and ventilation systems, radon reduction ventilation measures and ventilation management. For these problems, this paper puts forward some proposals regarding some aspects, such as strengthening scrutiny, verifying and monitoring the practical situation, making clear ventilation plans, strictly following the mining sequence, promoting training of ventilation staff, enhancing ventilation system management, developing radon reduction ventilation technology, purchasing ventilation equipment as soon as possible in the future, and so on.

  20. Operating experience review - Ventilation systems at Department of Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Office of Special Projects (DP-35), formerly Office of Self-Assessment (DP-9), analyzed occurrences caused by problems with equipment and material and recommended the following systems for an in-depth study: (1) Selective Alpha Air Monitor (SAAM), (2) Emergency Diesel Generator, (3) Ventilation System, (4) Fire Alarm System. Further, DP-35 conducted an in-depth review of the problems associated with SAAM and with diesel generators, and made several recommendations. This study focusses on ventilation system. The intent was to determine the causes for the events related to these system that were reported in the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), to identify components that failed, and to provide technical information from the commercial and nuclear industries on the design, operation, maintenance, and surveillance related to the system and its components. From these data, sites can develop a comprehensive program of maintenance management, including surveillance, to avoid similar occurrences, and to be in compliance with the following DOE orders.

  1. Technology Solutions Case Study: Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    A. Rudd and D. Bergey

    2015-08-01

    Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs.

  2. Pressure dynamic characteristics of pressure controlled ventilation system of a lung simulator.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan; Ren, Shuai; Cai, Maolin; Xu, Weiqing; Deng, Qiyou

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation is an important life support treatment of critically ill patients, and air pressure dynamics of human lung affect ventilation treatment effects. In this paper, in order to obtain the influences of seven key parameters of mechanical ventilation system on the pressure dynamics of human lung, firstly, mechanical ventilation system was considered as a pure pneumatic system, and then its mathematical model was set up. Furthermore, to verify the mathematical model, a prototype mechanical ventilation system of a lung simulator was proposed for experimental study. Last, simulation and experimental studies on the air flow dynamic of the mechanical ventilation system were done, and then the pressure dynamic characteristics of the mechanical system were obtained. The study can be referred to in the pulmonary diagnostics, treatment, and design of various medical devices or diagnostic systems.

  3. Co-occupant's exposure to exhaled pollutants with two types of personalized ventilation strategies under mixing and displacement ventilation systems.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Niu, J; Gao, N

    2013-04-01

    Personalized ventilation (PV) system in conjunction with total ventilation system can provide cleaner inhaled air for the user. Concerns still exist about whether the normally protecting PV device, on the other hand, facilitates the dispersion of infectious agents generated by its user. In this article, two types of PV systems with upward supplied fresh air, namely a chair-based PV and one kind of desk-mounted PV systems, when combined with mixing ventilation (MV) and displacement ventilation (DV) systems, are investigated using simulation method with regard to their impacts on co-occupant's exposure to the exhaled droplet nuclei generated by the infected PV user. Simulation results of tracer gas and particles with aerodynamic diameter of 1, 5, and 10 μm from exhaled air show that, when only the infected person uses a PV, the different PV air supplying directions present very different impacts on the co-occupant's intake under DV, while no apparent differences can be observed under MV. The findings demonstrate that better inhaled air quality can always be achieved under DV when the adopted PV system can deliver conditioned fresh air in the same direction with the mainly upward airflow patterns of DV.

  4. Usability Heuristics and Qualitative Indicators for the Usability Evaluation of Touch Screen Ventilator Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katre, Dinesh; Bhutkar, Ganesh; Karmarkar, Shekhar

    A ventilator system provides respiratory support to critically ill patients in the Intensive Care Unit. Increasing complexity in the user interface, features and functionalities of ventilator systems can cause medical errors and cost the life of a patient. Therefore, the usability of ventilator systems is most crucial to ensure patient safety. We have evolved a specialized set of heuristics combined with objectively defined usability indicators for the usability evaluation of touch screen based ventilator systems. Our study presents the heuristic evaluation of three touch screen based ventilator systems manufactured by three different companies. The heuristic evaluation has been performed by four different usability evaluators to ensure the reliability of heuristics proposed in this paper. The specialized set of heuristics linked with user interface components and the objectively defined usability indicators are found more reliable in identifying specific usability problems of ventilator systems.

  5. Building America Case Study: Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts, Tyler, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    ?Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy.

  6. [Sanitary and epidemiological evaluation of the ventilation and air-conditioning systems of public buildings].

    PubMed

    Dvorianov, V V

    2012-01-01

    The microbial contamination of ventilation and air conditioning systems was examined in the administrative buildings. The author proposes a set of indicators, methods for determining the scope of investigations, as well as sampling tactics and criteria for evaluating the microbial contamination of the ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The content of yeasts and molds in the delivered air has been found to be of importance for evaluating the sanitary-and epidemiological state of ventilation systems.

  7. Overall Ventilation System Flow Network Calculation for Site Recommendation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff J. Steinhoff

    2001-08-02

    The scope of this calculation is to determine ventilation system resistances, pressure drops, airflows, and operating cost estimates for the Site Recommendation (SR) design as detailed in the ''Site Recommendation Subsurface Layout'' (BSC (Bechtel SAIC Company) 2001a). The statutory limit for emplacement of waste in Yucca Mountain is 70,000 metric tons of uranium (MTU) and is considered the base case for this report. The objective is to determine the overall repository system ventilation flow network for the monitoring phase during normal operations and to provide a basis for the system description document design descriptions. Any values derived from this calculation will not be used to support construction, fabrication, or procurement. The work scope is identified in the ''Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY01 Work Activities'' (CRWMS M&O 2001, pp. 6 and 13). In accordance with the technical work plan this calculation was prepared in accordance with AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'' and other procedures invoked by AP-3.12Q. It also incorporates the procedure AP-SI1.Q, ''Software Management''.

  8. Engineering Evaluation of the Effectiveness of DST Annulus Ventilation Systems for Corrosion Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    DALPIAZ, E.L.

    2001-06-20

    This engineering study evaluates the corrosion mitigation effectiveness of the annulus ventilation systems for the 241-AN, 241-AP, 241-AW, 241-AY, 241-AZ, and 241-SY tank farms, and provides the technical basis for the Administrative Control for DST annulus ventilation systems. The study shows that maintenance of annulus ventilation is important to mitigating risk of condensation and resulting corrosion due to postulated water ingress into DST annuli.

  9. An overview of the TA-55, Building PF-4 ventilation system

    SciTech Connect

    1994-02-22

    An overview of the TA-55, Building PF-4 ventilation system is provided in the following sections. Included are descriptions of the zone configurations, equipment-performance criteria, ventilation support systems, and the ventilation-system evaluation criteria. Section 4.2.1.1 provides a brief discussion of the ventilation system function. Section 4.2.1.2 provides details on the overall system configuration. Details of system interfaces and support systems are provided in Section 4.2.1.3. Section 4.2.1.4 describes instrumentation and control needed to operate the ventilation system. Finally, Sections 4.2.1.5 and 4.2.1.6 describe system surveillance/maintenance and Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) Limitations, respectively. Note that the numerical parameters included in this description are considered nominal; set points and other specifications actually fall within operational bands.

  10. Influence of Ventilation Ratio on Desiccant Air Conditioning System's Efficiency Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Thien Nha; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao; Hamamoto, Yoshinori

    Ventilation air is a concern for engineers since ventilated air controls indoor air contamination; additional ventilation, however, increases the energy consumption of buildings. The study investigates the energy efficiency performance of the desiccant dehumidification air conditioning system in the context of ventilation for a hot-humid climate such as summer in Japan. The investigation focuses on the variable ratio of ventilation air as required by the application of air conditioning system. The COP of the desiccant air conditioning system is determined. The evaluation is subsequently performed by comparing the desiccant based system with the conventional absorption cooling system and the vapor compression cooling system. Based on 12 desiccant rotor simulations, it is found that the desiccant regeneration temperature required varies between 47°C to 85°C as ventilation ratio increases from 0. 0 to 100%, and up to 52. 5°C as the ventilation ratio achieves 14%. The heat required for regenerating desiccant accounts for 55% and higher of the system's total heat consumption; the system is expected to be energy efficient by using wasted heat from the absorption chiller for desiccant regeneration; and its energy efficiency expands as the ratio of ventilation air rises above 15% compared with the conventional absorption cooling system. The energy efficiency also benefits as the ratio rises beyond 70% against the conventional vapor compression cooling system.

  11. Building America Case Study: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-12-01

    This document addresses adding -or improving - mechanical ventilation systems to existing homes. The purpose of ventilation is to remove contaminants from homes, and this report discusses where, when, and how much ventilation is appropriate in a home, including some discussion of relevant codes and standards. Advantages, disadvantages, and approximate costs of various system types are presented along with general guidelines for implementing the systems in homes. CARB intends for this document to be useful to decision makers and contractors implementing ventilation systems in homes. Choosing the "best" system is not always straightforward; selecting a system involves balancing performance, efficiency, cost, required maintenance, and several other factors. It is the intent of this document to assist contractors in making more informed decisions when selecting systems. Ventilation is an integral part of a high-performance home. With more air-sealed envelopes, a mechanical means of removing contaminants is critical for indoor environmental quality and building durability.

  12. Effect of Room Ventilation Rates in Rodent Rooms with Direct-Exhaust IVC Systems.

    PubMed

    Geertsema, Roger S; Lindsell, Claire E

    2015-09-01

    When IVC are directly exhausted from a rodent housing room, the air quality of the room can become independent of the intracage air quality and may reduce the need for high room ventilation rates. This study assessed the effect of decreasing the ventilation rate in rodent rooms using direct-exhaust IVC systems. The study was conducted over 16 wk and compared conditions in 8 rodent rooms that had ventilation rates of 5 to 6 air changes per hour (ACH) with those in rooms at 10 to 12 ACH. At the low ventilation rate, rooms had higher CO₂ concentrations, higher dew point temperature, and lower particulate levels and spent a greater percentage of time above the temperature set point than did rooms at the high rate. The levels of allergens and endotoxins in room air were the same regardless of the ventilation rate. Differences seen in parameters within cages at the 2 ventilation rates were operationally irrelevant. We detected no total volatile organic compounds in the room that were attributable to ammonia, regardless of the ventilation rate. Clearing the air of ethanol after a spill took longer at the low compared with high rate. However, ethanol clearance was faster at the low rate when the demand-control system was activated than at the high ventilation rate alone. Air quality in the room and in the cages were acceptable with room ventilation rates of 5 to 6 ACH in rodent rooms that use direct-exhaust IVC systems.

  13. Effect of Room Ventilation Rates in Rodent Rooms with Direct-Exhaust IVC Systems

    PubMed Central

    Geertsema, Roger S; Lindsell, Claire E

    2015-01-01

    When IVC are directly exhausted from a rodent housing room, the air quality of the room can become independent of the intracage air quality and may reduce the need for high room ventilation rates. This study assessed the effect of decreasing the ventilation rate in rodent rooms using direct-exhaust IVC systems. The study was conducted over 16 wk and compared conditions in 8 rodent rooms that had ventilation rates of 5 to 6 air changes per hour (ACH) with those in rooms at 10 to 12 ACH. At the low ventilation rate, rooms had higher CO2 concentrations, higher dew point temperature, and lower particulate levels and spent a greater percentage of time above the temperature set point than did rooms at the high rate. The levels of allergens and endotoxins in room air were the same regardless of the ventilation rate. Differences seen in parameters within cages at the 2 ventilation rates were operationally irrelevant. We detected no total volatile organic compounds in the room that were attributable to ammonia, regardless of the ventilation rate. Clearing the air of ethanol after a spill took longer at the low compared with high rate. However, ethanol clearance was faster at the low rate when the demand-control system was activated than at the high ventilation rate alone. Air quality in the room and in the cages were acceptable with room ventilation rates of 5 to 6 ACH in rodent rooms that use direct-exhaust IVC systems. PMID:26424250

  14. Experimental evaluation of the Skylab orbital workshop ventilation system concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allums, S. L.; Hastings, L. J.; Ralston, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    Extensive testing was conducted to evaluate the Orbital Workshop ventilation concept. Component tests were utilized to determine the relationship between operating characteristics at 1 and 0.34 atm. System tests were conducted at 1 atm within the Orbital Workshop full-scale mockup to assess delivered volumetric flow rate and compartment air velocities. Component tests with the Anemostat circular diffusers (plenum- and duct-mounted) demonstrated that the diffuser produced essentially equivalent airflow patterns and velocities in 1- and 0.34-atm environments. The tests also showed that the pressure drop across the diffuser could be scaled from 1 to 0.34 atm using the atmosphere pressure ratio. Fan tests indicated that the performance of a multiple, parallel-mounted fan cluster could be predicted by summing the single-fan flow rates at a given delta P.

  15. Canyon building ventilation system dynamic model -- Parameters and validation

    SciTech Connect

    Moncrief, B.R. ); Chen, F.F.K. )

    1993-01-01

    Plant system simulation crosses many disciplines. At the core is the mimic of key components in the form of mathematical models.'' These component models are functionally integrated to represent the plant. With today's low cost high capacity computers, the whole plant can be truly and effectively reproduced in a computer model. Dynamic simulation has its roots in single loop'' design, which is still a common objective in the employment of simulation. The other common objectives are the ability to preview plant operation, to anticipate problem areas, and to test the impact of design options. As plant system complexity increases and our ability to simulate the entire plant grows, the objective to optimize plant system design becomes practical. This shift in objectives from problem avoidance to total optimization by far offers the most rewarding potential. Even a small reduction in bulk materials and space can sufficiently justify the application of this technology. Furthermore, to realize an optimal plant starts from a tight and disciplined design. We believe the assurance required to execute such a design strategy can partly be derived from a plant model. This paper reports on the application of a dynamic model to evaluate the capacity of an existing production plant ventilation system. This study met the practical objectives of capacity evaluation under present and future conditions, and under normal and accidental situations. More importantly, the description of this application, in its methods and its utility, aims to validate the technology of dynamic simulation in the environment of plant system design and safe operation.

  16. Numerical investigation and recommendations for push-pull ventilation systems.

    PubMed

    Chern, Ming-Jyh; Ma, Chen-Hsuan

    2007-03-01

    This study presents numerical simulations of push-pull ventilation systems. A push-pull system is a device commonly used in capturing pollutants from large tanks used in industrial chemical processes. An air jet is blown from one side of a tank and collected by an exhaust hood on the opposite side of the tank. In this study, a finite volume model coupled with the standard k -epsilon turbulent model is employed to describe the flow structures and characteristics. Moreover, the turbulence mass transfer equation is adopted to show the concentration distribution above the open surface tank. All the flow fields can be classified according to four dominant modes, i.e., dispersion, transition, encapsulation, and strong suction. The push and pull flow velocities should be adjusted into encapsulation and strong suction modes to ensure all pollutants can be captured by the exhaust hood. Other geometric parameters such as the flange size, pull-channel size, offset distance, etc., also influence the flow characteristics. For a variety of lengths of tanks and pollutant evaporation velocities, the push and pull flow velocity must be matched to achieve optimal operation. Furthermore, the flange size and other parameters are determined to enhance the capture efficiency of the push-pull system. Recommendations for design guidelines are introduced in this study.

  17. Canyon building ventilation system dynamic model -- Parameters and validation

    SciTech Connect

    Moncrief, B.R.; Chen, F.F.K.

    1993-02-01

    Plant system simulation crosses many disciplines. At the core is the mimic of key components in the form of mathematical ``models.`` These component models are functionally integrated to represent the plant. With today`s low cost high capacity computers, the whole plant can be truly and effectively reproduced in a computer model. Dynamic simulation has its roots in ``single loop`` design, which is still a common objective in the employment of simulation. The other common objectives are the ability to preview plant operation, to anticipate problem areas, and to test the impact of design options. As plant system complexity increases and our ability to simulate the entire plant grows, the objective to optimize plant system design becomes practical. This shift in objectives from problem avoidance to total optimization by far offers the most rewarding potential. Even a small reduction in bulk materials and space can sufficiently justify the application of this technology. Furthermore, to realize an optimal plant starts from a tight and disciplined design. We believe the assurance required to execute such a design strategy can partly be derived from a plant model. This paper reports on the application of a dynamic model to evaluate the capacity of an existing production plant ventilation system. This study met the practical objectives of capacity evaluation under present and future conditions, and under normal and accidental situations. More importantly, the description of this application, in its methods and its utility, aims to validate the technology of dynamic simulation in the environment of plant system design and safe operation.

  18. Bleederless ventilation systems as a spontaneous combustion control measure in US coal mines. Information circular/1994

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.C.; Diamond, W.P.; Mucho, T.P.; Organiscak, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines conducted a worldwide literature review of bleederless ventilation practices to evaluate their use as a spontaneous combustion control measure in U.S. coal mines. Factors that must be taken into account in the design and use of these systems include seal construction, the use of ventilation control devices, the use of methane-drainage systems in gassy mines, and the ground control plan. Monitoring for the detection of spontaneous combustion and the control of methane when methane-drainage techniques are employed is critical to the successful use of a bleederless ventilation system. The report describes the types of ventilation systems used throughout the world and the spontaneous combustion risks associated with these systems.

  19. Association of ventilation system type with SBS symptoms in office workers

    SciTech Connect

    Seppanen, Olli; Fisk, William J.

    2001-02-07

    This paper provides a review and synthesis of current knowledge about the associations of ventilation system types in office buildings with sick building syndrome symptoms and discusses potential explanations for the associations. Relative to natural ventilation, air conditioning, with or without humidification, was consistently associated with a statistically significant increase in the prevalence of one or more SBS symptoms. Prevalences were typically higher by approximately 30% to 200% in the air conditioned buildings. In two of three assessments from a single study, symptom prevalences were also significantly higher in air conditioned buildings than in buildings with simple mechanical ventilation and no humidification. In approximately half of assessments, SBS symptom prevalences were significantly higher in buildings with simple mechanical ventilation than in buildings with natural ventilation. Insufficient information was available for conclusions about the potential increased risk of SBS symptoms with humidification. The statistically significant associations of mechanical ventilation and air conditioning with SBS symptoms are much more frequent than expected from chance and also not likely to be a consequence of confounding by several potential personal, job, or building related confounders. The reasons for the increases in symptom prevalences with mechanical ventilation and particularly with air conditioning remain unclear. Multiple deficiencies in HVAC system design, construction, operation, or maintenance, including some which cause pollutant emissions from HVAC systems, may contribute to the increases in symptom prevalences.

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: NEW CONDENSATOR, INC.--THE CONDENSATOR DIESEL ENGINE RETROFIT CRANKCASE VENTILATION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Environmental Technology Verification Program has tested New Condensator Inc.'s Condensator Diesel Engine Retrofit Crankcase Ventilation System. Brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC), the ratio of engine fuel consumption to the engine power output, was evaluated for engine...

  1. Project W-320 high vacuum 241-AY-102 annulus ventilation system operability test report

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-03-12

    This report documents the test results of OTP-320-001, Tank 241-AY-102 Annulus Ventilation System Testing. Included in the appendices are: (1) Supporting documentation prepared to demonstrate the structural integrity of the tank at high annulus vacuum (<20 INWG), and (2) a report that identifies potential cross connections between the primary and annulus ventilation systems. These cross connections were verified to be eliminated prior to the start of testing.

  2. VENTILATION NEEDS DURING CONSTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    C.R. Gorrell

    1998-07-23

    The purpose of this analysis is to determine ventilation needs during construction and development of the subsurface repository and develop systems to satisfy those needs. For this analysis, construction is defined as pre-emplacement excavation and development is excavation that takes place simultaneously with emplacement. The three options presented in the ''Overall Development and Emplacement Ventilation Systems'' analysis (Reference 5.5) for development ventilation will be applied to construction ventilation in this analysis as well as adding new and updated ventilation factors to each option for both construction and development. The objective of this analysis is to develop a preferred ventilation system to support License Application Design. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Description of ventilation conditions; (2) Ventilation factors (fire hazards, dust control, construction logistics, and monitoring and control systems); (3) Local ventilation alternatives; (4) Global ventilation options; and (5) Evaluation of options.

  3. Measuring Residential Ventilation System Airflows: Part 1 – Laboratory Evaluation of Airflow Meter Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, J. Chris; Turner, W. J. N.; Wray, Craig P.; Walker, Iain S.

    2012-11-30

    Building codes increasingly require tighter homes and mechanical ventilation per ASHRAE Standard 62.2. These ventilation flows must be measured so that energy is not wasted with over ventilation and occupants’ health is not compromised by under ventilation. Flow hoods are used to measure these ventilation flows, but there is currently no standard specifying the measurement procedure and measurement devices that should be used. This study evaluates the accuracy of six commercially available flow hoods under laboratory conditions configured to emulate a residential mechanical ventilation duct system. The measurements taken with the flow hoods were compared to simultaneous measurements taken by an in-line reference flow meter having a known uncertainty. Results indicate that powered flow hoods yield more accurate measurements than non-powered flow hoods, and that a majority of the flow hoods measured inlet flows more accurately than outlet flows. In several cases, there was little resemblance between the manufacturers’ stated accuracy and the accuracy we found in our laboratory measurements. It is clear that current flow hood calibration procedures may not consider field application variables such as flow asymmetry, flow angle, and flow direction. A new flow hood measurement standard that takes these ‘real world’ conditions into account should be developed to ensure that residential buildings receive the intended ventilation flows.

  4. Measuring Residential Ventilation System Airflows: Part 1 – Laboratory Evaluation of Airflow Meter Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, J. Chris; Turner, W. J. N.; Wray, Craig P.; Walker, Iain S.

    2012-11-12

    Building codes increasingly require tighter homes and mechanical ventilation per ASHRAE Standard 62.2. These ventilation flows must be measured so that energy is not wasted with over ventilation and occupants’ health is not compromised by under ventilation. Flow hoods are used to measure these ventilation flows, but there is currently no standard specifying the measurement procedure and measurement devices that should be used. This study evaluates the accuracy of six commercially available flow hoods under laboratory conditions configured to emulate a residential mechanical ventilation duct system. The measurements taken with the flow hoods were compared to simultaneous measurements taken by an in-line reference flow meter having a known uncertainty. Results indicate that powered flow hoods yield more accurate measurements than non-powered flow hoods, and that a majority of the flow hoods measured inlet flows more accurately than outlet flows. In several cases, there was little resemblance between the manufacturers’ stated accuracy and the accuracy we found in our laboratory measurements. It is clear that current flow hood calibration procedures may not consider field application variables such as flow asymmetry, flow angle, and flow direction. A new flow hood measurement standard that takes these ‘real world’ conditions into account should be developed to ensure that residential buildings receive the intended ventilation flows.

  5. A new system for continuous and remote monitoring of patients receiving home mechanical ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, L.

    2016-09-01

    Home mechanical ventilation is the treatment of patients with respiratory failure or insufficiency by means of a mechanical ventilator at a patient's home. In order to allow remote patient monitoring, several tele-monitoring systems have been introduced in the last few years. However, most of them usually do not allow real-time services, as they have their own proprietary communication protocol implemented and some ventilation parameters are not always measured. Moreover, they monitor only some breaths during the whole day, despite the fact that a patient's respiratory state may change continuously during the day. In order to reduce the above drawbacks, this work reports the development of a novel remote monitoring system for long-term, home-based ventilation therapy; the proposed system allows for continuous monitoring of the main physical quantities involved during home-care ventilation (e.g., differential pressure, volume, and air flow rate) and is developed in order to allow observations of different remote therapy units located in different places of a city, region, or country. The developed remote patient monitoring system is able to detect various clinical events (e.g., events of tube disconnection and sleep apnea events) and has been successfully tested by means of experimental tests carried out with pulmonary ventilators typically used to support sick patients.

  6. Test Protocol for Room-to-Room Distribution of Outside Air by Residential Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Barley, C. D.; Anderson, R.; Hendron, B.; Hancock, E.

    2007-12-01

    This test and analysis protocol has been developed as a practical approach for measuring outside air distribution in homes. It has been used successfully in field tests and has led to significant insights on ventilation design issues. Performance advantages of more sophisticated ventilation systems over simpler, less-costly designs have been verified, and specific problems, such as airflow short-circuiting, have been identified.

  7. Alternatives generation and analysis for double-shell tank primary ventilation systems emissions control and monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    SEDERBURG, J.P.

    1999-09-30

    This AGA addresses the question: ''What equipment upgrades, operational changes, and/or other actions are required relative to the DST tanks farms' ventilation systems to support retrieval, staging (including feed sampling), and delivery of tank waste to the Phase I private contractor?'' Issues and options for the various components within the ventilation subsystem affect each other. Recommended design requirements are presented and the preferred alternatives are detailed.

  8. 14 CFR 25.831 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Ventilation and Heating § 25.831 Ventilation... probable failures or malfunctioning of the ventilating, heating, pressurization, or other systems...

  9. 14 CFR 25.831 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Ventilation and Heating § 25.831 Ventilation... probable failures or malfunctioning of the ventilating, heating, pressurization, or other systems...

  10. 14 CFR 25.831 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Ventilation and Heating § 25.831 Ventilation... probable failures or malfunctioning of the ventilating, heating, pressurization, or other systems...

  11. 14 CFR 25.831 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Ventilation and Heating § 25.831 Ventilation... probable failures or malfunctioning of the ventilating, heating, pressurization, or other systems...

  12. 14 CFR 25.831 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Ventilation and Heating § 25.831 Ventilation... probable failures or malfunctioning of the ventilating, heating, pressurization, or other systems...

  13. Association of ventilation system type with SBS symptoms in office workers.

    PubMed

    Seppänen, O; Fisk, W J

    2002-06-01

    This paper provides a synthesis of current knowledge about the associations of ventilation system types in office buildings with sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms and discusses potential explanations for the associations. Most studies completed to date indicate that relative to natural ventilation, air conditioning, with or without humidification, was consistently associated with a statistically significant increase in the prevalence of one or more SBS symptoms, by approximately 30 to 200%. In two of three analyses from a single study (assessments), symptom prevalences were also significantly higher in air-conditioned buildings than in buildings with simple mechanical ventilation and no humidification. The available data also suggest, with less consistency, an increase in risk of symptoms with simple mechanical ventilation relative to natural ventilation. Insufficient information was available for conclusions about the potential increased risk of SBS symptoms with humidification or recirculation of return air. The statistically significant associations of mechanical ventilation and air conditioning with SBS symptoms are much more frequent than expected from chance and also not likely to be a consequence of confounding by several potential personal, job, or building-related confounders. Multiple deficiencies in HVAC system design, construction, operation, or maintenance, including some which cause pollutant emissions from HVAC systems, may contribute to the increases in symptom prevalences but other possible reasons remain unclear.

  14. Ventilation-Based Decellularization System of the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Tomoshi; Mendez, Julio; Calle, Elizabeth A.; Hatachi, Go; Doi, Ryoichiro; Zhao, Liping; Suematsu, Takashi; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Niklason, Laura E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The demand for donated organs greatly exceeds the availability. Alternatives to organ donation, such as laboratory-engineered organs, are therefore being developed. One approach is to decellularize the organ and reseed it with selected cells, ideally from the organ recipient. Organ decellularization has typically been attempted by the administration of detergents into vessels such as the portal vein in the liver. However, in the case of the lung, the airway provides another potential administration route, because it has a wide contact area between cells and detergents in the tracheal tree and alveoli. In the present study, we introduce a novel ventilation-based decellularization system for the lung and compare its efficacy to ordinary decellularization systems administering detergent through the pulmonary artery. Rat lungs were decellularized using 500 mL of 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonio]-1-Propanesulfonate (CHAPS) decellularization solution administrated through the pulmonary artery (vessel group) or through the trachea (airway group). The vessel group was infused CHAPS solution using a gravitational pressure head of 20 cmH2O. The airway group was infused with the detergent using negative pressure and positive end-expiratory pressure, for a volume 10cc with each inspiration in a bioreactor. Pathological and immunohistochemical findings indicated that components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), including proteoglycans, elastic fibers, fibronectin, and laminin, were more decreased in the airway group than in the vessel group. Western blot analysis showed that MHC class I antigen and β-actin were not detected in both decellularized groups. A collagen assay showed that collagen was 70% preserved in both groups compared to native lung. Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and DNA assays showed that GAG and DNA contents were strongly diminished in both decellularized groups, but those contents were smaller in the airway group than in the vessel group

  15. Performance evaluation of a novel personalized ventilation-personalized exhaust system for airborne infection control.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Sekhar, S C; Cheong, K W D; Raphael, B

    2015-04-01

    In the context of airborne infection control, it is critical that the ventilation system is able to extract the contaminated exhaled air within the shortest possible time. To minimize the spread of contaminated air exhaled by occupants efficiently, a novel personalized ventilation (PV)-personalized exhaust (PE) system has been developed, which aims to exhaust the exhaled air as much as possible from around the infected person (IP). The PV-PE system was studied experimentally for a particular healthcare setting based on a typical consultation room geometry and four different medical consultation positions of an IP and a healthy person (HP). Experiments using two types of tracer gases were conducted to evaluate two types of PE: Top-PE and Shoulder-PE under two different background ventilation systems: Mixing Ventilation and Displacement Ventilation. Personalized exposure effectiveness, intake fraction (iF) and exposure reduction (ε) were used as indices to evaluate the PV-PE system. The results show that the combined PV-PE system for the HP achieves the lowest intake fraction; and the use of PE system for the IP alone shows much better performance than using PV system for the HP alone.

  16. Randomised controlled trial of respiratory system compliance measurements in mechanically ventilated neonates

    PubMed Central

    Stenson, B.; Glover, R.; Wilkie, R.; Laing, I.; Tarnow-Mordi, W.

    1998-01-01

    AIM—To determine whether outcomes of neonatal mechanical ventilation could be improved by regular pulmonary function testing.
METHODS—Two hundred and forty five neonates, without immediately life threatening congenital malformations, were mechanically ventilated in the newborn period. Infants were randomly allocated to conventional clinical management (control group) or conventional management supplemented by regular measurements of static respiratory system compliance, using the single breath technique, with standardised management advice based on the results.
RESULTS—Fifty five (45%) infants in each group experienced one or more adverse outcomes. The median (quartile) durations of ventilation and oxygen supplementation were 5 (2-12) and 6 (2-34) days for the control group, and 4 (2-9) and 6 (3-36) days for the experimental group (not significant). On post-hoc secondary analysis, control group survivors were ventilated for 1269 days with a median (quartile) of 5 (2-13) days, and experimental group survivors were ventilated for 775 days with a median (quartile) duration of 3 (2-8) days (p=0.03).
CONCLUSIONS—Although primary analysis did not show any substantial benefit associated with regular measurement of static respiratory system compliance, this may reflect a type II error, and a moderate benefit has not been excluded. Larger studies are required to establish the value of on-line monitoring techniques now available with neonatal ventilators.

 PMID:9536834

  17. Mobile zone, spray booth ventilation system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-26

    This concept endeavors to reduce the volume of air (to be treated) from spray paint booths, thereby increasing efficiency and improving air pollution abatement (VOC emissions especially). Most of the ventilation air is recycled through the booth to maintain laminar flow; the machinery is located on the supply side of the booth rather than on the exhaust side. 60 to 95% reduction in spray booth exhaust rate should result. Although engineering and production prototypes have been made, demand is low.

  18. Assessment of the impact of dipped guideways on urban rail transit systems: Ventilation and safety requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The ventilation and fire safety requirements for subway tunnels with dipped profiles between stations as compared to subway tunnels with level profiles were evaluated. This evaluation is based upon computer simulations of a train fire emergency condition. Each of the tunnel configurations evaluated was developed from characteristics that are representative of modern transit systems. The results of the study indicate that: (1) The level tunnel system required about 10% more station cooling than dipped tunnel systems in order to meet design requirements; and (2) The emergency ventilation requirements are greater with dipped tunnel systems than with level tunnel systems.

  19. An evaluation of a local exhaust ventilation control system for a foundry casting-cleaning operation.

    PubMed

    Gressel, M G

    1997-05-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a local exhaust ventilation system for a foundry casting-cleaning operation in which a worker cleaned gray iron castings using a variety of handheld chipping and grinding tools. The operation originally had an exhaust system consisting only of an exhaust duct terminating approximately 1 m (3 ft) above the floor and 2 m (6 ft) from the casting-cleaning workstation. An earlier evaluation of this original control system found time-weighted average exposures to respirable silica ranging from 124 to 160 micrograms/m3. The local exhaust ventilation system evaluated in this present study consisted of a downdraft booth outfitted with a turntable for manipulating the castings. The modified local exhaust ventilation system was installed at this facility and connected to the existing plant exhaust ventilation system through the original ductwork. A direct-reading instrument was used to measure the operator's respirable aerosol exposure concentrations during a single day both before and after the installation of the new workstation. The same worker was sampled both times. The operator's activities were recorded on videotape so that the exposures associated with the various tools could be determined. While day-to-day variability could not be accounted for, depending on the type of tool used the local exhaust ventilation system reduced exposures by 59 to 79% during casting cleaning by the sampled worker when compared with the original configuration. These reductions were statistically significant.

  20. Ventilation Model

    SciTech Connect

    V. Chipman

    2002-10-05

    The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their post-closure analyses. The Ventilation Model report was initially developed to analyze the effects of preclosure continuous ventilation in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) emplacement drifts, and to provide heat removal data to support EBS design. Revision 00 of the Ventilation Model included documentation of the modeling results from the ANSYS-based heat transfer model. The purposes of Revision 01 of the Ventilation Model are: (1) To validate the conceptual model for preclosure ventilation of emplacement drifts and verify its numerical application in accordance with new procedural requirements as outlined in AP-SIII-10Q, Models (Section 7.0). (2) To satisfy technical issues posed in KTI agreement RDTME 3.14 (Reamer and Williams 2001a). Specifically to demonstrate, with respect to the ANSYS ventilation model, the adequacy of the discretization (Section 6.2.3.1), and the downstream applicability of the model results (i.e. wall heat fractions) to initialize post

  1. Dynamic Characteristics of Mechanical Ventilation System of Double Lungs with Bi-Level Positive Airway Pressure Model

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Dongkai; Zhang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    In recent studies on the dynamic characteristics of ventilation system, it was considered that human had only one lung, and the coupling effect of double lungs on the air flow can not be illustrated, which has been in regard to be vital to life support of patients. In this article, to illustrate coupling effect of double lungs on flow dynamics of mechanical ventilation system, a mathematical model of a mechanical ventilation system, which consists of double lungs and a bi-level positive airway pressure (BIPAP) controlled ventilator, was proposed. To verify the mathematical model, a prototype of BIPAP system with a double-lung simulators and a BIPAP ventilator was set up for experimental study. Lastly, the study on the influences of key parameters of BIPAP system on dynamic characteristics was carried out. The study can be referred to in the development of research on BIPAP ventilation treatment and real respiratory diagnostics. PMID:27660646

  2. Reduction of nanoparticle exposure to welding aerosols by modification of the ventilation system in a workplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myong-Hwa; McClellan, William J.; Candela, Joe; Andrews, Dan; Biswas, Pratim

    2007-01-01

    Nanometer particle size distributions were measured in booths with two different ventilation patterns in an occupational environment with welding operations underway. The measurements were used to illustrate the impact of change of ventilation methods (existing - with ventilation ducts located at the top, modified - with ventilation ducts located below the weld bench) on the aerosol size distributions at different locations: close to the weld, in the vicinity of the welder's face, and in the exhaust duct. Particle number concentrations measured in the vicinity of the welder's face (mask) during a horizontal standard arc welding process in a booth with ventilation at the top was in the range of 7.78×105 particles cm-3 with a geometric mean size of 181 nm and geometric standard deviation of 1.8. This reduced to 1.48×104 particles cm-3 in the vicinity of the welder's face with the modified ventilation system. The clearance of the welding aerosol was also faster in the modified booth (6 min compared to 11 min in a conventional booth). Particles were collected in the booth for the various test conditions, and analyzed to determine their composition and morphology. The particles were composed of hazardous heavy metals such as manganese, chromium and nickel, and had varying morphologies.

  3. Methane emissions and airflow patterns along longwall faces and through bleeder ventilation systems

    PubMed Central

    Schatzel, Steven J.; Dougherty, Heather N.

    2015-01-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted an investigation of longwall face and bleeder ventilation systems using tracer gas experiments and computer network ventilation. The condition of gateroad entries, along with the caved material’s permeability and porosity changes as the longwall face advances, determine the resistance of the airflow pathways within the longwall’s worked-out area of the bleeder system. A series of field evaluations were conducted on a four-panel longwall district. Tracer gas was released at the mouth of the longwall section or on the longwall face and sampled at various locations in the gateroads inby the shield line. Measurements of arrival times and concentrations defined airflow/gas movements for the active/completed panels and the bleeder system, providing real field data to delineate these pathways. Results showed a sustained ability of the bleeder system to ventilate the longwall tailgate corner as the panels retreated. PMID:26925166

  4. Evaluation of AY/AZ tank farm ventilation system during aging waste retrieval operations

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J.J.; Waters, E.D.

    1995-01-01

    Waste Management is currently planning to demonstrate mobilization of radioactive waste sludges in Tank 101-AZ beginning in October 1991. The retrieval system being designed will utilize mixer pumps that generate high-velocity, high-volume submerged liquid jets to mobilize settled solids. There is concern that these jets may also generate radioactive aerosols, some of which may be carried into the tank Ventilation system. The purpose of this study is to determine if the current AY/AZ ventilation system or the proposed ventilation system upgrade (Project W-030) will provide adequate deentrainment of liquid and solid aerosols during mixer pump operations, or if the radioactive aerosols will overload the HEPA filters.

  5. A numerical method to determine the steady state distribution of passive contaminant in generic ventilation systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianting; Shao, Xiaoliang; Ma, Xiaojun; Zhang, Yuanhui; Cai, Hao

    2011-08-15

    Ventilation system with air recirculation is designed to conserve energy, yet at the same time may result in transporting hazardous substance among different rooms in the same building, which is a concern in indoor air quality control. There is a lack of effective methods to predict indoor contaminant distribution primarily because of uncertainty of the contaminant concentration in supply air which in turn due to the mixing ratio of fresh and recirculation air. In this paper, a versatile numerical method to determine the pollutant distribution of ventilation system with recirculation at steady state is proposed based on typical ventilation systems with accessibility of supply air (ASA) and accessibility of contaminant source (ACS). The relationship is established between contaminant concentrations of supply air and return air in a ventilated room or zone. The concentrations of supply air and contaminant distribution in each room can be determined using such parameters as ASA and ACS. The proposed method is validated by both experimental data and numerical simulation result. The computing speed of the proposed method is compared with the iteration method. The comparisons between the proposed method and the lumped parameter model are also conducted. The advantages of the proposed method in terms of accuracy, speed and versatility make it advantageous to be applied in air quality control of complex ventilation systems with recirculation.

  6. Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning: An Annotated Bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, J. Chris; Wray, Craig P.

    2013-04-01

    Beginning with the 2008 version of Title 24, new homes in California must comply with ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2007 requirements for residential ventilation. Where installed, the limited data available indicate that mechanical ventilation systems do not always perform optimally or even as many codes and forecasts predict. Commissioning such systems when they are installed or during subsequent building retrofits is a step towards eliminating deficiencies and optimizing the tradeoff between energy use and acceptable IAQ. Work funded by the California Energy Commission about a decade ago at Berkeley Lab documented procedures for residential commissioning, but did not focus on ventilation systems. Since then, standards and approaches for commissioning ventilation systems have been an active area of work in Europe. This report describes our efforts to collect new literature on commissioning procedures and to identify information that can be used to support the future development of residential-ventilation-specific procedures and standards. We recommend that a standardized commissioning process and a commissioning guide for practitioners be developed, along with a combined energy and IAQ benefit assessment standard and tool, and a diagnostic guide for estimating continuous pollutant emission rates of concern in residences (including a database that lists emission test data for commercially-available labeled products).

  7. Ventilation and ventilators.

    PubMed

    Hayes, B

    1982-01-01

    The history of ventilation is reviewed briefly and recent developments in techniques of ventilation are discussed. Operating features of ventilators have changed in the past few years, partly as the result of clinical progress; yet, technology appears to have outstripped the clinician's ability to harness it most effectively. Clinical discipline and training of medical staff in the use of ventilators could be improved. The future is promising if clinician and designer can work together closely. Ergonomics of ventilators and their controls and the provision of alarms need special attention. Microprocessors are likely to feature prominently in the next generation of designs.

  8. A perfluorochemical loss/restoration (L/R) system for tidal liquid ventilation.

    PubMed

    Libros, R; Philips, C M; Wolfson, M R; Shaffer, T H

    2000-01-01

    Tidal liquid ventilation is the transport of dissolved respiratory gases via volume exchange of perfluorochemical (PFC) liquid to and from the PFC-filled lung. All gas-liquid surface tension is eliminated, increasing compliance and providing lung protection due to lower inflation pressures. Tidal liquid ventilation is achieved by cycling fluid from a reservoir to and from the lung by a ventilator. Current approaches are microprocessor-based with feedback control. During inspiration, warmed oxygenated PFC liquid is pumped from a fluid reservoir/gas exchanger into the lung. PFC fluid is conserved by condensing (60-80% efficiency) vapor in the expired gas. A feedback-control system was developed to automatically replace PFC lost due to condenser inefficiency. This loss/restoration (L/R) system consists of a PFC-vapor thermal detector (+/- 2.5%), pneumatics, amplifiers, a gas flow detector (+/- 1%), a PFC pump (+/- 5%), and a controller. Gravimetric studies of perflubron loss from a flask due to evaporation were compared with experimental L/R results and found to be within +/- 1.4%. In addition, when L/R studies were conducted with a previously reported liquid ventilation system over a four-hour period, the L/R system maintained system perflubron volume to within +/- 1% of prime volume and 11.5% of replacement volume, and the difference between experimental PFC loss and that of the L/R system was 1.8 mL/hr. These studies suggest that the PFC L/R system may have significant economic (appropriate dosing for PFC loss) as well as physiologic (maintenance of PFC inventory in the lungs and liquid ventilator) impact on liquid ventilation procedures.

  9. Ventilation Transport Trade Study for Future Space Suit Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempf, Robert; Vogel, Matthew; Paul, Heather L.

    2008-01-01

    A new and advanced portable life support system (PLSS) for space suit surface exploration will require a durable, compact, and energy efficient system to transport the ventilation stream through the space suit. Current space suits used by NASA circulate the ventilation stream via a ball-bearing supported centrifugal fan. As NASA enters the design phase for the next generation PLSS, it is necessary to evaluate available technologies to determine what improvements can be made in mass, volume, power, and reliability for a ventilation transport system. Several air movement devices already designed for commercial, military, and space applications are optimized in these areas and could be adapted for EVA use. This paper summarizes the efforts to identify and compare the latest fan and bearing technologies to determine candidates for the next generation PLSS.

  10. A comparison of air leakage prediction techniques for auxiliary ventilation ducting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gillies, A.D.S.; Wu, H.W.

    1999-07-01

    This paper briefly reviews prediction techniques for determination of leakage and friction along auxiliary ventilation ducting systems. In order to compare various prediction techniques that have been developed over the past, a macroscopic investigation of air leakage and friction resistance of auxiliary ventilation ducting systems has been undertaken. Measurements were conducted on 450 and 915 mm diameter fabric ducting over 100 m duct length to determine frictional resistances and the extent of leakage. Due to the high degree of accuracy required and the large volume of data that needed to be collected, electronic auxiliary ventilation ducting systems were developed based on this information. It was found that these models provided good correlation with most the existing prediction techniques. The experimental methodology relying on computer data acquisition has allowed the accuracy of measured values to be treated with a high degree of confidence. The reliability of the developed models allows prediction of leakage, frictional impedance and airflow with enhanced confidence.

  11. Assessment of Natural Ventilation System for a Typical Residential House in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antczak-Jarząbska, Romana; Krzaczek, Marek

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents the research results of field measurements campaign of natural ventilation performance and effectiveness in a residential building. The building is located in the microclimate whose parameters differ significantly in relation to a representative weather station. The measurement system recorded climate parameters and the physical variables characterizing the air flow in the rooms within 14 days of the winter season. The measurement results showed that in spite of proper design and construction of the ventilation system, unfavorable microclimatic conditions that differed from the predicted ones caused significant reduction in the efficiency of the ventilation system. Also, during some time periods, external climate conditions caused an opposite air flow direction in the vent inlets and outlets, leading to a significant deterioration of air quality and thermal comfort measured by CO2 concentration and PMV index in a residential area.

  12. Cleanup and Dismantling of Highly Contaminated Ventilation Systems Using Robotic Tools - 13162

    SciTech Connect

    Chambon, Frederic; CIZEL, Jean-Pierre

    2013-07-01

    The UP1 plant reprocessed nearly 20,000 tons of used natural uranium gas cooled reactor fuel coming from the first generation of civil nuclear reactors in France. Following operating incidents in the eighties, the ventilation system of the continuous dissolution line facility was shut down and replaced. Two types of remote controlled tool carriers were developed to perform the decontamination and dismantling operations of the highly contaminated ventilation duct network. The first one, a dedicated small robot, was designed from scratch to retrieve a thick powder deposit within a duct. The robot, managed and confined by two dedicated glove boxes, was equipped for intervention inside the ventilation duct and used for carrying various cleanup and inspection tools. The second type, consisting of robotic tools developed on the base of an industrial platform, was used for the clean-up and dismantling of the ventilation duct system. Depending on the type of work to be performed, on the shape constraints of the rooms and any equipment to be dismantled, different kinds of robotic tools were developed and installed on a Brokk 40 carrier. After more than ten years of ventilation duct D and D operations at the UP1 plant, a lot of experience was acquired about remote operations. The three main important lessons learned in terms of remote controlled operation are: characterizing the initial conditions as much as reasonably possible, performing non-radioactive full scale testing and making it as simple and modular as possible. (authors)

  13. ADMINISTRATIVE AND ENGINEERING CONTROLS FOR THE OPERATION OF VENTILATION SYSTEMS FOR UNDERGROUND RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.; Hansen, A.

    2013-11-13

    Liquid radioactive wastes from the Savannah River Site are stored in large underground carbon steel tanks. The majority of the waste is confined in double shell tanks, which have a primary shell, where the waste is stored, and a secondary shell, which creates an annular region between the two shells, that provides secondary containment and leak detection capabilities should leakage from the primary shell occur. Each of the DST is equipped with a purge ventilation system for the interior of the primary shell and annulus ventilation system for the secondary containment. Administrative flammability controls require continuous ventilation to remove hydrogen gas and other vapors from the waste tanks while preventing the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere. Should a leak from the primary to the annulus occur, the annulus ventilation would also serve this purpose. The functionality of the annulus ventilation is necessary to preserve the structural integrity of the primary shell and the secondary. An administrative corrosion control program is in place to ensure integrity of the tank. Given the critical functions of the purge and annulus ventilation systems, engineering controls are also necessary to ensure that the systems remain robust. The system consists of components that are constructed of metal (e.g., steel, stainless steel, aluminum, copper, etc.) and/or polymeric (polypropylene, polyethylene, silicone, polyurethane, etc.) materials. The performance of these materials in anticipated service environments (e.g., normal waste storage, waste removal, etc.) was evaluated. The most aggressive vapor space environment occurs during chemical cleaning of the residual heels by utilizing oxalic acid. The presence of NO{sub x} and mercury in the vapors generated from the process could potentially accelerate the degradation of aluminum, carbon steel, and copper. Once identified, the most susceptible materials were either replaced and/or plans for discontinuing operations

  14. A model-based decision support system for critiquing mechanical ventilation treatments.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, Fleur T; Abbasi, Soraya

    2012-06-01

    A computerized system for critiquing mechanical ventilation treatments is presented that can be used as an aide to the intensivist. The presented system is based on the physiological model of the subject's respiratory system. It uses modified versions of previously developed models of adult and neonatal respiratory systems to simulate the effects of different ventilator treatments on the patient's blood gases. The physiological models that have been used for research and teaching purposes by many researchers in the field include lungs, body tissue, and the brain tissue. The lung volume is continuously time-varying and the effects of shunt in the lung, changes in cardiac output and cerebral blood flow, and the arterial transport delays are included in the system. Evaluation tests were done on adult and neonate patients with different diagnoses. In both groups combined, the differences between the arterial partial pressures of CO(2) predicted by the system and the experimental values were 1.86 ± 1.6 mmHg (mean ± SD), and the differences between the predicted arterial hemoglobin oxygen saturation values, S(aO2), and the experimental values measured by using pulse oximetry, S(pO2), were 0.032 ± 0.02 (mean ± SD). The proposed system has the potential to be used alone or in combination with other decision support systems to set ventilation parameters and optimize treatment for patients on mechanical ventilation.

  15. CFD-based design of the ventilation system for the PHENIX detector

    SciTech Connect

    Parietti, L.; Martin, R.A.; Gregory, W.S.

    1996-10-01

    The three-dimensional flow and thermal fields surrounding the large PHENIX sub-atomic particle detector enclosed in the Major Facility Hall are simulated numerically in this study using the CFX finite volume, commercial, computer code. The predicted fields result from the interaction of an imposed downward ventilation system cooling flow and a buoyancy-driven thermal plume rising from the warm detector. An understanding of the thermal irregularities on the surface of the detector and in the flow surrounding is needed to assess the potential for adverse thermal expansion effects in detector subsystems, and to prevent ingestion of electronics cooling air from hot spots. With a computational model of the thermal fields on and surrounding the detector, HVAC engineers can evaluate and improve the ventilation system design prior to the start of construction. This paper summarizes modeling and results obtained for a conceptual MFH ventilation scheme.

  16. [Evaluation of a new nitric oxide delivery system during mechanical ventilation].

    PubMed

    Noguchi, T; Miyakawa, H; Mori, M; Kitano, T; Iwasaka, H; Oda, S; Taniguchi, K; Honda, N

    1994-07-01

    A new nitric oxide delivery and continuous monitoring system is described. During mechanical ventilation, this new system connected with Siemens Servo 900C ventilator was shown to be able to provide a constant inspired NO concentration (10-100 ppm) using chemiluminescence technique for NO analysis. Gas was analysed at the mixing chamber in front of the ventilator inlet and inspiratory tube connected with the soda-lime carbon-dioxide absorber. Both NO concentrations showed a good correlation (r = 0.99). The actual NO concentration from the NO supply cylinder was 1154 ppm and NO2 concentration was 14 ppm. In mongrel dogs, after 20 minutes of NO inhalation (10-100 ppm), the blood methemoglobin level reached a peak value of 2.2% starting from the pre-inhalation level of 0%. To optimize the safety of the clinical application of NO, its concentration should be measured continuously with chemiluminescence technique.

  17. Parametric instabilities of rotor-support systems with application to industrial ventilators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parszewski, Z.; Krodkiemski, T.; Marynowski, K.

    1980-01-01

    Rotor support systems interaction with parametric excitation is considered for both unequal principal shaft stiffness (generators) and offset disc rotors (ventilators). Instability regions and types of instability are computed in the first case, and parametric resonances in the second case. Computed and experimental results are compared for laboratory machine models. A field case study of parametric vibrations in industrial ventilators is reported. Computed parametric resonances are confirmed in field measurements, and some industrial failures are explained. Also the dynamic influence and gyroscopic effect of supporting structures are shown and computed.

  18. AUTOPILOT-BT: a system for knowledge and model based mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Lozano, S; Möller, K; Brendle, A; Gottlieb, D; Schumann, S; Stahl, C A; Guttmann, J

    2008-01-01

    A closed-loop system (AUTOPILOT-BT) for the control of mechanical ventilation was designed to: 1) autonomously achieve goals specified by the clinician, 2) optimize the ventilator settings with respect to the underlying disease and 3) automatically adapt to the individual properties and specific disease status of the patient. The current realization focuses on arterial oxygen saturation (SpO(2)), end-tidal CO(2) pressure (P(et)CO(2)), and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) maximizing respiratory system compliance (C(rs)). The "AUTOPILOT-BT" incorporates two different knowledge sources: a fuzzy logic control reflecting expert knowledge and a mathematical model based system that provides individualized patient specific information. A first evaluation test with respect to desired end-tidal-CO(2)-level was accomplished using an experimental setup to simulate three different metabolic CO(2) production rates by means of a physical lung simulator. The outcome of ventilator settings made by the "AUTOPILOT-BT" system was compared to those produced by clinicians. The model based control system proved to be superior to the clinicians as well as to a pure fuzzy logic based control with respect to precision and required settling time into the optimal ventilation state.

  19. Experimental study of a semi-passive ventilation grille with a feedback control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Orazio, A.; Fontana, L.; Salata, F.

    2011-08-01

    The diffusion of window frames with low air permeability, due to the energy saving regulations, has implied in several cases the worsening of the indoor microclimate and air quality. On the other hand, air-tight window frames imply uncontrolled and too high air change rates. The mechanical ventilation not always is a practicable solution because of economic reasons and because it implies energy waste. Various Italian and European environmental and energetic laws take into consideration and promote the use of controlled natural ventilation, though this definition is not associated to well defined and tested technical solutions. An adequate solution can be achieved by using semi-passive self adjustable ventilation devices, able to ensure controlled changes of indoor air. In this paper, a semi-passive damper with a feedback control system is proposed and its behavior is investigated by means of experimental study. The presented semi-passive grille allows to control the air flow rate, injected into the room by natural or artificial pressure gradient, more effectively than the usual passive ventilation grilles made available by the present industrial production. However, since the semi-passive grille has a one-way flow, in the natural ventilation of a flat the proper functioning of the system could be ensured with a more complex configuration, with respect to the passive self-regulating grilles, able to limit the flow of fresh air in the presence of high levels of Δp; conversely, it could have widespread use in applications requiring a more accurate control of airflow in case of mechanical ventilation plants.

  20. Ventilator-Related Adverse Events: A Taxonomy and Findings From 3 Incident Reporting Systems

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Julius Cuong; Williams, Tamara L; Sparnon, Erin M; Cillie, Tam K; Scharen, Hilda F; Marella, William M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2009, researchers from Johns Hopkins University's Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality; public agencies, including the FDA; and private partners, including the Emergency Care Research Institute and the University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) Safety Intelligence Patient Safety Organization, sought to form a public-private partnership for the promotion of patient safety (P5S) to advance patient safety through voluntary partnerships. The study objective was to test the concept of the P5S to advance our understanding of safety issues related to ventilator events, to develop a common classification system for categorizing adverse events related to mechanical ventilators, and to perform a comparison of adverse events across different adverse event reporting systems. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional analysis of ventilator-related adverse events reported in 2012 from the following incident reporting systems: the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority's Patient Safety Reporting System, UHC's Safety Intelligence Patient Safety Organization database, and the FDA's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience database. Once each organization had its dataset of ventilator-related adverse events, reviewers read the narrative descriptions of each event and classified it according to the developed common taxonomy. RESULTS: A Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority, FDA, and UHC search provided 252, 274, and 700 relevant reports, respectively. The 3 event types most commonly reported to the UHC and the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority's Patient Safety Reporting System databases were airway/breathing circuit issue, human factor issues, and ventilator malfunction events. The top 3 event types reported to the FDA were ventilator malfunction, power source issue, and alarm failure. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, we found that (1) through the development of a common taxonomy, adverse events from 3 reporting systems can be evaluated, (2) the types of

  1. Evaluation of Smoke Extraction Systems Versus Ventilation in Shipbuilding and Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Shipyard Ventilation Planning System Database and Training Program. ● Panel Newsletter with Specific Governmental Activity Updates on Welding Fumes...Budgets to implement improvements Ž Scheduling responsibility above those of the trades. ● Computer Equipment, Software, and Database access to properly...commercial air cleaners can be applied to restaurants, lounges, bingo centers, taverns, bowling facilities, schools, hospitals, labs, offices, data process

  2. Positive-Pressure Ventilator Systems at High Altitude: A Preliminary Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    Respiratory Distress Syndrome ( ARDS ), which is...of using mechanical ventilator systems with ARDA patients in high-altitude environments. DTIC A1 - a ADULT RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME ARDS has been...capillary pressure) pulmonary edema and acute respiratory failure. The clinical physiology of severe ARDS is characterized by three phenomena: 1)

  3. Measuring Airflow in Local Exhaust Ventilation Systems. Module 23. Vocational Education Training in Environmental Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consumer Dynamics Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This module, one of 25 on vocational education training for careers in environmental health occupations, contains self-instructional materials on measuring airflow in local exhaust ventilation systems. Following guidelines for students and instructors and an introduction that explains what the student will learn are three lessons: (1) naming each…

  4. A novel fiber-optic measurement system for the evaluation of performances of neonatal pulmonary ventilators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, L.; Scorza, A.; Botta, F.; Sciuto, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    Published standards for the performance evaluation of pulmonary ventilators are mainly directed to manufacturers rather than to end-users and often considered inadequate or not comprehensive. In order to contribute to overcome the problems above, a novel measurement system was proposed and tested with waveforms of mechanical ventilation by means of experimental trials carried out with infant ventilators typically used in neonatal intensive care units: the main quantities of mechanical ventilation in newborns are monitored, i.e. air flow rate, differential pressure and volume from infant ventilator are measured by means of two novel fiber-optic sensors (OFSs) developed and characterized by the authors, while temperature and relative humidity of air mass are obtained by two commercial transducers. The proposed fiber-optic sensors (flow sensor Q-OFS, pressure sensor P-OFS) showed measurement ranges of air flow and pressure typically encountered in neonatal mechanical ventilation, i.e. the air flow rate Q ranged from 3 l min-1 to 18 l min-1 (inspiratory) and from  -3 l min-1 to  -18 l min-1 (expiratory), the differential pressure ΔP ranged from  -15 cmH2O to 15 cmH2O. In each experimental trial carried out with different settings of the ventilator, outputs of the OFSs are compared with data from two reference sensors (reference flow sensor RF, reference pressure sensor RP) and results are found consistent: flow rate Q showed a maximum error between Q-OFS and RF up to 13 percent, with an output ratio Q RF/Q OFS of not more than 1.06  ±  0.09 (least square estimation, 95 percent confidence level, R 2 between 0.9822 and 0.9931). On the other hand the maximum error between P-OFS and RP on differential pressure ΔP was lower than 10 percent, with an output ratio ΔP RP/ΔP OFS between 0.977  ±  0.022 and 1.0  ±  0.8 (least square estimation, 95 percent confidence level, R 2 between 0.9864 and 0.9876). Despite the possible improvements

  5. 46 CFR 108.437 - Pipe sizes and discharge rates for enclosed ventilation systems for rotating electrical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pipe sizes and discharge rates for enclosed ventilation... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing... enclosed ventilation systems for rotating electrical equipment. (a) The minimum pipe size for the...

  6. 46 CFR 108.437 - Pipe sizes and discharge rates for enclosed ventilation systems for rotating electrical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pipe sizes and discharge rates for enclosed ventilation... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing... enclosed ventilation systems for rotating electrical equipment. (a) The minimum pipe size for the...

  7. 46 CFR 108.437 - Pipe sizes and discharge rates for enclosed ventilation systems for rotating electrical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pipe sizes and discharge rates for enclosed ventilation... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing... enclosed ventilation systems for rotating electrical equipment. (a) The minimum pipe size for the...

  8. The effect of spontaneous breathing on systemic interleukin-6 during ventilator weaning.

    PubMed

    Sellarés, J; Loureiro, H; Ferrer, M; Amaro, R; Farré, R; Torres, A

    2012-03-01

    During the weaning process, spontaneous breathing trials (SBTs) involve cardiopulmonary stress for ventilated patients. As interleukin (IL)-6 is a major modulator of the stress response, we hypothesised that systemic IL-6 increases during a SBT and that this increase is more evident in SBT failure. 49 SBTs of 30-min duration were performed on different mechanically ventilated patients, and classified as SBT failure or success. Blood samples were drawn before and at the end of the SBT. An additional sample was drawn 24 h later in a subset of patients (n = 39). Serum IL-6 levels and other inflammatory mediators commonly associated with stress were determined. IL-6 levels increased from mechanical ventilation to spontaneous breathing in all patients (p = 0.02) and in the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) population (p = 0.05) with SBT failure compared with success, but not in non-COPD patients (p = 0.12). After 24 h of SBT stress, IL-6 levels decreased in patients with SBT failure (under mechanical ventilation at that point) (p = 0.02) and those with weaning success (p = 0.04). No changes were observed in the remaining inflammatory mediators. Systemic IL-6 increases during a 30-min, failed SBT, especially in COPD patients. Future studies may corroborate the different IL-6 responses among different populations who initiate weaning, together with the potential clinical implications.

  9. Advanced Hybrid Spacesuit Concept Featuring Integrated Open Loop and Closed Loop Ventilation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, Brian A.; Fitzpatrick, Garret R.; Gohmert, Dustin M.; Ybarra, Rick M.; Dub, Mark O.

    2013-01-01

    A document discusses the design and prototype of an advanced spacesuit concept that integrates the capability to function seamlessly with multiple ventilation system approaches. Traditionally, spacesuits are designed to operate both dependently and independently of a host vehicle environment control and life support system (ECLSS). Spacesuits that operate independent of vehicle-provided ECLSS services must do so with equipment selfcontained within or on the spacesuit. Suits that are dependent on vehicle-provided consumables must remain physically connected to and integrated with the vehicle to operate properly. This innovation is the design and prototype of a hybrid spacesuit approach that configures the spacesuit to seamlessly interface and integrate with either type of vehicular systems, while still maintaining the ability to function completely independent of the vehicle. An existing Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES) was utilized as the platform from which to develop the innovation. The ACES was retrofitted with selected components and one-off items to achieve the objective. The ventilation system concept was developed and prototyped/retrofitted to an existing ACES. Components were selected to provide suit connectors, hoses/umbilicals, internal breathing system ducting/ conduits, etc. The concept utilizes a lowpressure- drop, high-flow ventilation system that serves as a conduit from the vehicle supply into the suit, up through a neck seal, into the breathing helmet cavity, back down through the neck seal, out of the suit, and returned to the vehicle. The concept also utilizes a modified demand-based breathing system configured to function seamlessly with the low-pressure-drop closed-loop ventilation system.

  10. Non lineal respiratory systems mechanics simulation of acute respiratory distress syndrome during mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Madorno, Matias; Rodriguez, Pablo O

    2010-01-01

    Model and simulation of biological systems help to better understand these systems. In ICUs patients often reach a complex situation where supportive maneuvers require special expertise. Among them, mechanical ventilation in patients suffering from acuter respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is specially challenging. This work presents a model which can be simulated and use to help in training of physicians and respiratory therapists to analyze the respiratory mechanics in this kind of patients. We validated the model in 2 ARDS patients.

  11. Definition and means of maintaining the ventilation system confinement portion of the PFP safety envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Dick, J.D.; Grover, G.A.; O`Brien, P.M., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-05

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant Heating Ventilation and Cooling system provides for the confinement of radioactive releases to the environment and provides for the confinement of radioactive contamination within designated zones inside the facility. This document identifies the components and procedures necessary to ensure the HVAC system provides these functions. Appendices E through J provide a snapshot of non-safety class HVAC equipment and need not be updated when the remainder of the document and Appendices A through D are updated.

  12. A microprocessor-controlled tracheal insufflation-assisted total liquid ventilation system.

    PubMed

    Parker, James Courtney; Sakla, Adel; Donovan, Francis M; Beam, David; Chekuri, Annu; Al-Khatib, Mohammad; Hamm, Charles R; Eyal, Fabien G

    2009-09-01

    A prototype time cycled, constant volume, closed circuit perfluorocarbon (PFC) total liquid ventilator system is described. The system utilizes microcontroller-driven display and master control boards, gear motor pumps, and three-way solenoid valves to direct flow. A constant tidal volume and functional residual capacity (FRC) are maintained with feedback control using end-expiratory and end-inspiratory stop-flow pressures. The system can also provide a unique continuous perfusion (bias flow, tracheal insufflation) through one lumen of a double-lumen endotracheal catheter to increase washout of dead space liquid. FRC and arterial blood gases were maintained during ventilation with Rimar 101 PFC over 2-3 h in normal piglets and piglets with simulated pulmonary edema induced by instillation of albumin solution. Addition of tracheal insufflation flow significantly improved the blood gases and enhanced clearance of instilled albumin solution during simulated edema.

  13. Demand controlled ventilating systems: Sensor market survey. Energy conservation in buildings and community systems programme, annex 18, December 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raatschen, W.; Sjoegren, M.

    The subject of indoor and outdoor air quality has generated a great deal of attention in many countries. Areas of concern include outgassing of building materials as well as occupant-generated pollutants such as carbon dioxide, moisture, and odors. Progress has also been made towards addressing issues relating to the air tightness of the building envelope. Indoor air quality studies indicate that better control of supply flow rates as well as the air distribution pattern within buildings are necessary. One method of maintaining good indoor air quality without extensive energy consumption is to control the ventilation rate according to the needs and demands of the occupants, or to preserve the building envelope. This is accomplished through the use of demand controlled ventilating (DCV) systems. The specific objective of Annex 18 is to develop guidelines for demand controlled ventilating systems based on state of the art analyses, case studies on ventilation effectiveness, and proposed ventilation rates for different users in domestic, office, and school buildings.

  14. The Effectiveness of the Methane Drainage of Rock-Mass with a U Ventilation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szlązak, Nikodem; Swolkień, Justyna

    2016-09-01

    Methane drainage is used in Polish coal mines in order to reduce mine methane emission as well as to keep methane concentration in mine workings at safe levels. The article describes the method of methane drainage used in longwall D-2 in seam 410. In Poland, coal seams are frequently mined under difficult geological conditions in the roof and in the presence of very high methane hazard. In such situations, mines usually use a system with roof caving and a U ventilation system, which means that methane is drawn off from a tail entry behind the longwall front. In this system, boreholes are drilled from a tailgate and methane is drawn off from behind longwall face. The article shows the influence of a specific ventilation system on the drainage efficiency at longwall D-2 in seam 410. At this longwall, measurements of methane emission and the efficiency of methane capture were conducted. They consisted in gauging methane concentration, air velocity, absolute air pressure and the amount of methane captured by the drainage system. Experimental data were used to estimate the variations in absolute methane-bearing capacity and ventilation methane, and - most importantly - to gauge the efficiency of methane drainage.

  15. On the thermal interaction of building structure and heating and ventilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensen, Joannes Laurentius Maria

    Developments in the field of building performance evaluation tools for thermal interaction of building structure and heating and ventilating systems are described. The technique employed is computer simulation of the integrated dynamic system comprising the occupants, the building and its heating and ventilating system. Assessment criteria from a literature review in thermal comfort to examine acceptable fluctuations in indoor climate are defined. Building and plant energy simulation within the context of Computer Aided Building Design (CABD) is described. An exisiting energy simulation environment ESP(R) (Environmental Systems Performance (Research version)) is chosen. A fluid flow network simulation module is described. Extensions to ESP(R) to predict the dynamic behavior of the heating and ventilation system are described. The coupling of fluid flow, plant side energy and mass, and building side energy simulation into one integrated program is described. A multistage verification and validation methodology is demonstrated by examples addressing each successive step. Imaginary and real world cases are described to demonstrate application of the study in a modeling orientated and a building engineering context.

  16. EVALUATION OF BEST AVAILABLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXICS (TBACT) DOUBLE SHELL TANK FARMS PRIMARY VENTILATION SYSTEM SUPPORTING WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    KELLY SE; HAASS CC; KOVACH JL; TURNER DA

    2010-06-03

    This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste throught the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP).

  17. EVALUATION OF BEST AVAILABLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXICS -TBACT- DOUBLE SHELL TANK FARMS PRIMARY VENTILATION SYSTEMS SUPPORTING WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    HAAS CC; KOVACH JL; KELLY SE; TURNER DA

    2010-06-24

    This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste through the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilizaiton Plant (WTP).

  18. Application information on typical hygrometers used in heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, J.Y.; Snyder, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    Hygrometer selection information is provided for application in heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. A general review of hygrometer literature has been provided and the most commonly used ones for HVAC are discussed. Typical hygrometer parameters are listed to indicate the type of performance that can be expected. Laboratory test results of self-regulating, salt-phase transition hygrometers are presented and discussed in detail.

  19. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Multifamily Individual Heating and Ventilation Systems, Lawrence, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    2013-11-01

    The conversion of an older Massachusetts building into condominiums illustrates a safe, durable, and cost-effective solution for heating and ventilation systems that can potentially benefit millions of multifamily buildings. In this project, Merrimack Valley Habitat for Humanity (MVHfH) partnered with U.S. Department of Energy Building America team Building Science Corporation (BSC) to provide high performance affordable housing for 10 families in the retrofit of an existing mass masonry building (a former convent).

  20. Double shell tank primary ventilation exhaust flow monitor system design description

    SciTech Connect

    Willingham, W.E., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-11

    This document describes the flow monitoring systems that will be installed on the ventilation exhaust ducts of the flammable gas watch list double shell tanks (241-AN-103, 241-AN-104, 241-AN-105, 241-AN-107, 241-AW-101 and 241-SY-103), the saltwell receiver tanks (241-AN-101 and 241-SY-102) and the cross-site receiver tank (241-AP-104).

  1. Measurement of airflow and pressure characteristics of a fan built in a car ventilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorný, Jan; Poláček, Filip; Fojtlín, Miloš; Fišer, Jan; Jícha, Miroslav

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify a set of operating points of a fan built in ventilation system of our test car. These operating points are given by the fan pressure characteristics and are defined by a pressure drop of the HVAC system (air ducts and vents) and volumetric flow rate of ventilation air. To cover a wide range of pressure drops situations, four cases of vent flaps setup were examined: (1) all vents opened, (2) only central vents closed (3) only central vents opened and (4) all vents closed. To cover a different volumetric flows, the each case was measured at least for four different speeds of fan defined by the fan voltage. It was observed that the pressure difference of the fan is proportional to the fan voltage and strongly depends on the throttling of the air distribution system by the settings of the vents flaps. In case of our test car we identified correlations between volumetric flow rate of ventilation air, fan pressure difference and fan voltage. These correlations will facilitate and reduce time costs of the following experiments with this test car.

  2. Experimental Evaluation of a Downsized Residential Air Distribution System: Comfort and Ventilation Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Jalalzadeh-Azar, A. A.

    2007-01-01

    Good air mixing not only improves thermal comfort Human thermal comfort is the state of mind that expresses satisfaction with the surrounding environment, according to ASHRAE Standard 55. Achieving thermal comfort for most occupants of buildings or other enclosures is a goal of HVAC design engineers. but also enhances ventilation effectiveness by inducing uniform supply-air diffusion. In general, the performance of an air distribution system in terms of comfort and ventilation effectiveness is influenced by the supply air temperature, velocity, and flow rate, all of which are in part dictated by the HVAC (Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning) In the home or small office with a handful of computers, HVAC is more for human comfort than the machines. In large datacenters, a humidity-free room with a steady, cool temperature is essential for the trouble-free system as well as the thermal load attributes. Any potential deficiencies associated with these design variables can be further exacerbated by an improper proximity of the supply and return outlets with respect to the thermal and geometrical characteristics of the indoor space. For high-performance houses, the factors influencing air distribution performance take on an even greater significance because of a reduced supply-air design flow rate resulting from downsized HVAC systems.

  3. Safety demonstration tests of hypothetical explosive burning in the cell and air ventilation system in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    SciTech Connect

    Nisio, G.; Suzuki, M.; Mukaide, S. )

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports on a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant equipped with an air ventilation system consisting of cells, ducts, dampers, high-efficiency particulate air filters, and blowers. This ventilation system is required to have multiple safeguards in order to confine airborne radioactive materials within the plant in the event of fire, explosion, and criticality. To evaluate these safeguards, three kinds of explosive burning tests are performed using a large-scale facility simulating the ventilation system of a reprocessing plant. In the boilover test, an organic solvent is burned on a layer of water in a burning pan to determine the magnitude of the burning caused by the sudden boiling of the water under the solvent. The optimum conditions for boilover burning are determined by the relationship between the pan size and the ventilation rate.

  4. Centrifugal Blower for Personal Air Ventilation System (PAVS) - Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    axial blower design was chosen to achieve the highest possible efficiency within the size constraints of the system. The blower is able to deliver 10...of the blower were used to minimize losses and increase efficiency through adjustments of the specific blower geometry. CFD outputs included the...functionality. 15. SUBJECT TERMS COOLING SBIR REPORTS AXIAL FLOW FANS OFF THE SHELF EQUIPMENT BLOWERS LIGHTWEIGHT CENTRIFUGAL FORCE

  5. Towards energy efficient operation of Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning systems via advanced supervisory control design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswiecinska, A.; Hibbs, J.; Zajic, I.; Burnham, K. J.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents conceptual control solution for reliable and energy efficient operation of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems used in large volume building applications, e.g. warehouse facilities or exhibition centres. Advanced two-level scalable control solution, designed to extend capabilities of the existing low-level control strategies via remote internet connection, is presented. The high-level, supervisory controller is based on Model Predictive Control (MPC) architecture, which is the state-of-the-art for indoor climate control systems. The innovative approach benefits from using passive heating and cooling control strategies for reducing the HVAC system operational costs, while ensuring that required environmental conditions are met.

  6. [A design of simple ventilator control system based on LabVIEW].

    PubMed

    Pei, Baoqing; Xu, Shengwei; Li, Hui; Li, Deyu; Pei, Yidong; He, Haixing

    2011-01-01

    This paper designed a ventilator control system to control proportional valves and motors. It used LabVIEW to control the object mentioned above and design ,validate, evaluate arithmetic, and establish hardware in loop platform. There are two system' s hierarchies. The high layer was used to run non-real time program and the low layer was used to run real time program. The two layers communicated through TCP/IP net. The program can be divided into several modules, which can be expanded and maintained easily. And the harvest in the prototype designing can be seamlessly used to embedded products. From all above, this system was useful in employing OEM products.

  7. Dehumidification Performance of Humidity Control System with Double Ventilation Sorbent Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaki, Sadao; Horibe, Akihiko; Haruki, Naoto; Nishina, Yuki; Inaba, Hideo

    The desiccant air-conditioning will be suitable for effective use of the exhaust heat. We have reported high dehumidification efficiency of the proposed system that is composed of a sorbent rotor and a refrigerating cycle. In this study, to improve the sorption efficiency of the rotor, the double ventilation rotor is proposed. After the processing air is dehumidified at the sorption area 1 of the rotor, the air is cooled and has higher relative humidity. And then, the air is blew into the sorption area 2 from the rotor opposite. The double ventilation characteristics on the influence of the division area of the rotor, the flow rate, the recovery temperature, and the temperature of the air cooler were investigated. As a result, the behavior of the double ventilation rotor is clarified and it is found that the quantity of dehumidification of the rotor is greater in the case of 1:1:2 (sorption(1): sorption(2): desorption ) division rate of the rotor than that of 1:1:1.

  8. Online Design Aid for Evaluating Manure Pit Ventilation Systems to Reduce Entry Risk.

    PubMed

    Manbeck, Harvey B; Hofstetter, Daniel W; Murphy, Dennis J; Puri, Virendra M

    2016-01-01

    On-farm manure storage pits contain both toxic and asphyxiating gases such as hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide, methane, and ammonia. Farmers and service personnel occasionally need to enter these pits to conduct repair and maintenance tasks. One intervention to reduce the toxic and asphyxiating gas exposure risk to farm workers when entering manure pits is manure pit ventilation. This article describes an online computational fluid dynamics-based design aid for evaluating the effectiveness of manure pit ventilation systems to reduce the concentrations of toxic and asphyxiating gases in the manure pits. This design aid, developed by a team of agricultural engineering and agricultural safety specialists at Pennsylvania State University, represents the culmination of more than a decade of research and technology development effort. The article includes a summary of the research efforts leading to the online design aid development and describes protocols for using the online design aid, including procedures for data input and for accessing design aid results. Design aid results include gas concentration decay and oxygen replenishment curves inside the manure pit and inside the barns above the manure pits, as well as animated motion pictures of individual gas concentration decay and oxygen replenishment in selected horizontal and vertical cut plots in the manure pits and barns. These results allow the user to assess (1) how long one needs to ventilate the pits to remove toxic and asphyxiating gases from the pit and barn, (2) from which portions of the barn and pit these gases are most and least readily evacuated, and (3) whether or not animals and personnel need to be removed from portions of the barn above the manure pit being ventilated.

  9. FLOW-i ventilator performance in the presence of a circle system leak.

    PubMed

    Lucangelo, Umberto; Ajčević, Miloš; Accardo, Agostino; Borelli, Massimo; Peratoner, Alberto; Comuzzi, Lucia; Zin, Walter A

    2017-04-01

    Recently, the FLOW-i anaesthesia ventilator was developed based on the SERVO-i intensive care ventilator. The aim of this study was to test the FLOW-i's tidal volume delivery in the presence of a leak in the breathing circuit. We ventilated a test lung model in volume-, pressure-, and pressure-regulated volume-controlled modes (VC, PC, and PRVC, respectively) with a FLOW-i. First, the circuit remained airtight and the ventilator was tested with fresh gas flows of 6, 1, and 0.3 L/min in VC, PC, and PRVC modes and facing 4 combinations of different resistive and elastic loads. Second, a fixed leak in the breathing circuit was introduced and the measurements repeated. In the airtight system, FLOW-i maintained tidal volume (VT) and circuit pressure at approximately the set values, independently of respiratory mode, load, or fresh gas flow. In the leaking circuit, set VT = 500 mL, FLOW-i delivered higher VTs in PC (about 460 mL) than in VC and PRVC, where VTs were substantially less than 500 mL. Interestingly, VT did not differ appreciably from 6 to 0.3 L/min of fresh air flow among the 3 ventilatory modes. In the absence of leakage, peak inspiratory pressures were similar, while they were 35-45 % smaller in PRVC and VC than in PC mode in the presence of leaks. In conclusion, FLOW-i maintained VT (down to fresh gas flows of 0.3 L/min) to 90 % of its preset value in PC mode, which was 4-5 times greater than in VC or PRVC modes.

  10. Online Design Aid for Evaluating Manure Pit Ventilation Systems to Reduce Entry Risk

    PubMed Central

    Manbeck, Harvey B.; Hofstetter, Daniel W.; Murphy, Dennis J.; Puri, Virendra M.

    2016-01-01

    On-farm manure storage pits contain both toxic and asphyxiating gases such as hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide, methane, and ammonia. Farmers and service personnel occasionally need to enter these pits to conduct repair and maintenance tasks. One intervention to reduce the toxic and asphyxiating gas exposure risk to farm workers when entering manure pits is manure pit ventilation. This article describes an online computational fluid dynamics-based design aid for evaluating the effectiveness of manure pit ventilation systems to reduce the concentrations of toxic and asphyxiating gases in the manure pits. This design aid, developed by a team of agricultural engineering and agricultural safety specialists at Pennsylvania State University, represents the culmination of more than a decade of research and technology development effort. The article includes a summary of the research efforts leading to the online design aid development and describes protocols for using the online design aid, including procedures for data input and for accessing design aid results. Design aid results include gas concentration decay and oxygen replenishment curves inside the manure pit and inside the barns above the manure pits, as well as animated motion pictures of individual gas concentration decay and oxygen replenishment in selected horizontal and vertical cut plots in the manure pits and barns. These results allow the user to assess (1) how long one needs to ventilate the pits to remove toxic and asphyxiating gases from the pit and barn, (2) from which portions of the barn and pit these gases are most and least readily evacuated, and (3) whether or not animals and personnel need to be removed from portions of the barn above the manure pit being ventilated. PMID:27303661

  11. Numerical simulations of the flowfields of industrial ventilation systems and solar rocket plume

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Shengtao.

    1989-01-01

    The motivation for this research is to incorporate modern numerical methods in modeling the flowfields of two systems: (1) industrial ventilation systems and (2) solar rocket plume. For both systems, calculations of the velocity, temperature, turbulence properties, and species concentration of flowfields were performed. Brief discussions of the two topics follow: (1) Industrial ventilation systems. An open vessel equipped with a push-pull ventilation system to control toxic vapor and a flanged suction inlet to control grinding particles and welding fumes has been analyzed. The computational method involves solving the two-dimensional turbulent flow equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, energy, turbulence properties, and chemical species in finite form. The method provides information needed by engineers to assess the effectiveness of their designs. In order to verify the accuracy of the theoretical analysis, a two-dimensional push-pull system prototype was set up and color schlieren photography and hot wire anemometry were performed. Favorable agreement was found between the experimental data and calculated results. (2) Solar rocket plume. The interaction of the solar rocket plume and the solar concentrator is studied by flow-field analysis. Such interaction can adversely affect the collector performance through fouling, excessive heat, or pressure loading. The geometrical shape of the concentrator is such that only the flow from the nozzle boundary layer can reach it, but the thrust levels of interest lead to very thick boundary layers. A time-marching Parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) scheme is developed to calculate the flowfields inside nozzles. The Method of Characteristics (MOC) is used to simulate the flow of rocket plume. Results show that both pressure and heat transfer effects are low, but that they increase as the chamber pressure or the thrust level size is reduced.

  12. Multifamily Ventilation Retrofit Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J.; Bergey, D.

    2012-12-01

    In multifamily buildings, central ventilation systems often have poor performance, overventilating some portions of the building (causing excess energy use), while simultaneously underventilating other portions (causing diminished indoor air quality). BSC and Innova Services Corporation performed a series of field tests at a mid-rise test building undergoing a major energy audit and retrofit, which included ventilation system upgrades.

  13. Individually Ventilated Cages Impose Cold Stress on Laboratory Mice: A Source of Systemic Experimental Variability

    PubMed Central

    David, John M; Knowles, Scott; Lamkin, Donald M; Stout, David B

    2013-01-01

    Individual ventilated cages (IVC) are increasing in popularity. Although mice avoid IVC in preference testing, they show no aversion when provided additional nesting material or the cage is not ventilated. Given the high ventilation rate in IVC, we developed 3 hypotheses: that mice housed in IVC experience more cold stress than do mice housed in static cages; that IVC-induced cold stress affects the results of experiments using mice; and that, when provided shelters, mice behaviorally thermoregulate and thereby rescue the cold-stress effects of IVC. To test these hypotheses, we housed mice in IVC, IVC with shelters, and static cages maintained at 20 to 21 °C. We quantified the cold stress of each housing system on mice by assessing nonshivering thermogenesis and brown adipose vacuolation. To test housing effects in a common, murine model of human disease, we implanted mice with subcutaneous epidermoid carcinoma cells and quantified tumor growth, tumor metabolism, and adrenal weight. Mice housed in IVC had histologic signs of cold stress and significantly higher nonshivering thermogenesis, smaller subcutaneous tumors, lower tumor metabolism, and larger adrenal weights than did mice in static cages. Shelters rescued IVC-induced nonshivering thermogenesis, adrenal enlargement, and phenotype-dependent cold-mediated histologic changes in brown adipose tissue and tumor size. IVC impose chronic cold stress on mice, alter experimental results, and are a source of systemic confounders throughout rodent-dependent research. Allowing mice to exhibit behavioral thermoregulation through seeking shelter markedly rescues the experiment-altering effects of housing-imposed cold stress, improves physiologic uniformity, and increases experimental reproducibility across housing systems. PMID:24351762

  14. TVENT1: a computer code for analyzing tornado-induced flow in ventilation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Andrae, R.W.; Tang, P.K.; Gregory, W.S.

    1983-07-01

    TVENT1 is a new version of the TVENT computer code, which was designed to predict the flows and pressures in a ventilation system subjected to a tornado. TVENT1 is essentially the same code but has added features for turning blowers off and on, changing blower speeds, and changing the resistance of dampers and filters. These features make it possible to depict a sequence of events during a single run. Other features also have been added to make the code more versatile. Example problems are included to demonstrate the code's applications.

  15. Acoustical prediction methods for heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryherd, S. R.; Wang, L. M.

    2005-09-01

    The goal of this project is to compare and contrast various aspects of acoustical prediction methods for heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. The three methods include two commonly used software programs and a custom spread sheet developed by the authors based on the American's Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Applications Handbook. Preliminary results indicate relatively good agreement between the three methods analyzed. The degree of disparity is predominately effected by the assumptions required by the end user. Research methods and results will be presented. This project provides a greater understanding of these acoustical prediction methods and their limitations.

  16. Interhospital Transport System for Critically Ill Patients: Mobile Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation without a Ventilator

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Hye Ju; Cho, Woo Hyun; Park, Jong Myung; Kim, Dohyung

    2017-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been successfully used as a method for the interhospital transportation of critically ill patients. In South Korea, a well-established ECMO interhospital transport system is lacking due to limited resources. We developed a simplified ECMO transport system without mechanical ventilation for use by public emergency medical services. Methods Eighteen patients utilized our ECMO transport system from December 2011 to September 2015. We retrospectively analyzed the indications for ECMO, the patient status during transport, and the patient outcomes. Results All transport was conducted on the ground by ambulance. The distances covered ranged from 26 to 408 km (mean, 65.9±88.1 km) and the average transport time was 56.1±57.3 minutes (range, 30 to 280 minutes). All patients were transported without adverse events. After transport, 4 patients (22.2%) underwent lung transplantation because of interstitial lung disease. Eight patients who had severe acute respiratory distress syndrome showed recovery of heart and lung function after ECMO therapy. A total of 13 patients (70.6%) were successfully taken off ECMO, and 11 patients (61.1%) survived. Conclusion Our ECMO transport system without mechanical ventilation can be considered a safe and useful method for interhospital transport and could be a good alternative option for ECMO transport in Korean hospitals with limited resources. PMID:28180097

  17. [Anesthesiological systems "Polinarkon-Vita" with microprocessor for artificial lung ventilation apparatuses and monitoring].

    PubMed

    Trushin, A I; Uliakov, G I; Reĭderman, E N

    2005-01-01

    The anesthesiological systems Polinarkon-Vita for adults and children are described. These systems were developed at VNIIMP-VITA, Ltd. on the basis of basic model of the anesthesiological system Polinarkon-E-Vita. The following new important units of the fifth generation apparatuses for inhalation anesthesia (IA) are described: Anestezist-4 monocomponent evaporator for liquid anesthetics (enfluran and isofluran); Diana, Diana-Det, and Elan-NR apparatuses for mechanical lung ventilation (MLV); dosimeters of medical gases, etc. These systems implement monitoring of vitally important functions of patient and parameters of IN and MLV. The anesthesiological systems Polinarkon-Vita are recommended for medical practice and commercially available from VNIIMP-VITA, Ltd. as small lots.

  18. DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION AND CLASSROOM VENTILATION

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Mendell, Mark J.; Davies, Molly; Eliseeva, Ekaterina; Faulkner, David; Hong, Tienzen; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2014-01-06

    This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling. Major findings included: ? The single-location carbon dioxide sensors widely used for demand controlled ventilation frequently have large errors and will fail to effectively control ventilation rates (VRs).? Multi-location carbon dioxide measurement systems with more expensive sensors connected to multi-location sampling systems may measure carbon dioxide more accurately.? Currently-available optical people counting systems work well much of the time but have large counting errors in some situations. ? In meeting rooms, measurements of carbon dioxide at return-air grilles appear to be a better choice than wall-mounted sensors.? In California, demand controlled ventilation in general office spaces is projected to save significant energy and be cost effective only if typical VRs without demand controlled ventilation are very high relative to VRs in codes. Based on the research, several recommendations were developed for demand controlled ventilation specifications in the California Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards.The research on classroom ventilation collected data over two years on California elementary school classrooms to investigate associations between VRs and student illness absence (IA). Major findings included: ? Median classroom VRs in all studied climate zones were below the California guideline, and 40percent lower in portable than permanent buildings.? Overall, one additional L/s per person of VR was associated with 1.6percent less IA. ? Increasing average VRs in California K-12 classrooms from the current average to the required level is estimated to decrease IA by 3.4percent, increasing State attendance-based funding to school districts by $33M, with $6.2 M in increased energy costs. Further VR increases would provide additional benefits

  19. Ventilation Model Report

    SciTech Connect

    V. Chipman; J. Case

    2002-12-20

    The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their post-closure analyses. The Ventilation Model report was initially developed to analyze the effects of preclosure continuous ventilation in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) emplacement drifts, and to provide heat removal data to support EBS design. Revision 00 of the Ventilation Model included documentation of the modeling results from the ANSYS-based heat transfer model. Revision 01 ICN 01 included the results of the unqualified software code MULTIFLUX to assess the influence of moisture on the ventilation efficiency. The purposes of Revision 02 of the Ventilation Model are: (1) To validate the conceptual model for preclosure ventilation of emplacement drifts and verify its numerical application in accordance with new procedural requirements as outlined in AP-SIII-10Q, Models (Section 7.0). (2) To satisfy technical issues posed in KTI agreement RDTME 3.14 (Reamer and Williams 2001a). Specifically to demonstrate, with respect to the ANSYS ventilation model, the adequacy of

  20. Estimating the energy-saving benefit of reduced-flow and/or multi-speed commercial kitchen ventilation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.; Schmid, F.; Spata, A.J.

    1999-07-01

    Kitchen exhaust ventilation systems are recognized as a major energy user within commercial food service facilities and restaurants. Minimizing the design ventilation rate of an appliance/hood system by optimizing hood performance in the laboratory is a viable strategy for reducing the makeup air heating and cooling loads as well as the exhaust and supply fan energy. Cutting back the exhaust flow under conditions of noncooking (appliance idle) can further reduce the energy load associated with a kitchen ventilation system. An optimized, two-speed exhaust system was installed within the scope of an energy-efficient, quick service restaurant (QSR) design and demonstration project. This paper evaluates the energy benefit of this variable-flow strategy as well as the savings associated with reducing the design ventilation rate (compared to an off-the-shelf exhaust hood). The paper describes a new public-domain software tool for estimating heating and cooling loads associated with the makeup air requirements of commercial kitchens. This bin-based software provides ASHRAE engineers with an alternative to hand calculations or more sophisticated hour-by-hour simulation. The dramatic impact that both makeup air set point and geographic location have on the outdoor air load is illustrated. The paper concludes with an industry-wide projection of energy savings associated with optimizing the design and operation of commercial kitchen ventilation (CKV) systems.

  1. The role of exhaust ventilation systems in reducing occupational exposure to organic solvents in a paint manufacturing factory

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Mohammad Javad; Karimi, Ali; Azari, Mansoor Rezazadeh

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the successful design and implementation of several exhaust ventilation systems in a paint manufacturing factory. The ventilation systems were designed based on American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists recommendations. The duct works, fans, and other parts were made and mounted by local manufacturers. The concentrations of toluene and xylene as the common solvents used in paint mixing factories were measured to evaluate the role of ventilation systems in controlling the organic solvents. Occupational exposure to toluene and xylene as the major pollutants was assessed with and without applying ventilation systems. For this purpose, samples were taken from breathing zone of exposed workers using personal samples. The samples were analyzed using Occupational Safety and Health Administration analytical method No.12. The samples were quantified using gas chromatography. The results showed that the ventilation systems successfully controlled toluene and xylene vapors in workplace, air well below the recommended threshold limit value of Iran (44.49 and 97.73 ppm, respectively). It was also discovered that benzene concentration in workplace air was higher than its allowable concentrations. This could be from solvents impurities that require more investigations. PMID:20040984

  2. Human paranasal sinuses and selective brain cooling: a ventilation system activated by yawning?

    PubMed

    Gallup, Andrew C; Hack, Gary D

    2011-12-01

    The function of the paranasal sinuses has been a controversial subject since the time of Galen, with many different theories advanced about their biological significance. For one, the paranasal sinuses have been regarded as warmers of respiratory air, when in actuality these structures appear to function in cooling the blood. In fact, human paranasal sinuses have been shown to have higher volumes in individuals living in warmer climates, and thus may be considered radiators of the brain. The literature suggests that the transfer of cool venous blood from the paranasal sinuses to the dura mater may provide a mechanism for the convection process of cooling produced by the evaporation of mucus within human sinuses. In turn, the dura mater may transmit these temperature changes, initiated by the cool venous blood from the heat-dissipating surfaces of the sinuses, to the cerebrospinal fluid compartments. Furthermore, it has recently been demonstrated in cadaveric dissections that the thin bony posterior wall of the maxillary sinus serves as an origin for both medial and lateral pterygoid muscle segments, an anatomic finding that had been previously underappreciated in the literature. The present authors hypothesize that the thin posterior wall of the maxillary sinus may flex during yawning, operating like a bellows pump, actively ventilating the sinus system, and thus facilitating brain cooling. Such a powered ventilation system has not previously been described in humans, although an analogous system has been reported in birds.

  3. The effect of ventilation protocols on airborne particulate matter in subway systems.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Teresa; Reche, Cristina; Minguillón, Maria Cruz; Capdevila, Marta; de Miguel, Eladio; Querol, Xavier

    2017-04-15

    As part of the European-funded IMPROVE LIFE project work programme experiments were performed in the Barcelona Metro system with the objective of better understanding the relationship between ventilation and air quality. The results demonstrate that tunnel ventilation plays an extremely important role in maintaining cleaner air and is capable of reducing both inhalable particulate matter (PM) mass and particle number concentration (>0.3μm) on platforms by over 50%, even in the presence of full-length platform screen doors. Another key influence on platform air quality is the chosen combination of fan power and forced air flow direction (impulsion of outdoor ambient air or extraction of subway indoor air): cleaner platform air was achieved using platform impulsion at higher power settings designed to ameliorate high summer temperatures underground. Reversing platform air flow from impulsion to extraction produced an immediate deterioration in PM air quality, most notably if the higher power setting was maintained, when an especially marked increase in numbers of very fine (submicron) particles was observed and attributed to tunnel air being drawn into the platform. At night, in the absence of trains and platform ventilation, platform air quality improves when tunnel fans are working at reduced power, whatever the flow direction (impulsion/extraction). Inside the air conditioned Barcelona Metro trains (where underground commuters spend most of their time) air quality is markedly better than on the platform, and unchanged A/C filters were observed capable of maintaining a similar reduction in inside train PM for at least three months.

  4. Double Shell Tank (DST) Ventilation System Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect

    SASAKI, L.M.

    2000-06-08

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for vapor samples from the primary ventilation systems of the AN, AP, AW, and AY/AZ tank farms. Sampling will be performed in accordance with Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis (Air DQO) (Mulkey 1999). The sampling will verify if current air emission estimates used in the permit application are correct and provide information for future air permit applications. Vapor samples will be obtained from tank farm ventilation systems, downstream from the tanks and upstream of any filtration. Samples taken in support of the DQO will consist of SUMMA{trademark} canisters, triple sorbent traps (TSTs), sorbent tube trains (STTs), polyurethane foam (PUF) samples. Particulate filter samples and tritium traps will be taken for radiation screening to allow the release of the samples for analysis. The following sections provide the general methodology and procedures to be used in the preparation, retrieval, transport, analysis, and reporting of results from the vapor samples.

  5. [Invention of an air forced ventilated micro-isolation cage and rack system--environment within the cages: ventilation, air flow].

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, T; Yoshida, K; Okamoto, M; Tajima, M

    1993-10-01

    A forced air ventilation system for small laboratory animals was developed. The system consists of an air handling unit with air supply and exhaust fans, a rack, hard cage covers with a large diameter air inlet and an outlet, and shoe box cages. Air flow from the supply duct, to the exhaust duct and within the cage were observed. Variations in air flow among cages was minimal. The optimal air exchange rate of the cages in this system was determined to be 60 times per hour based on the results obtained in the present study. At this air exchange rate, air flow at the base of the cages had a velocity of less than 0.09m/sec, which was within the range of recommended values for humans. The observed results show that the system developed is capable of sustaining a laboratory animal microenvironment well in terms of air flow, without too much energy cost.

  6. ASSESSMENT of POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE-BASED DEMAND CONTROL VENTILATION SYSTEM PERFORMANCE in SINGLE ZONE SYSTEMS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-21

    occupancy, per American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineers ( ASHRAE ) standards. This research aims to create a...38  Figure 15. Thermal Comfort Range ( ASHRAE , 2010a) ................................................. 46  Figure 16. Airflows to be Considered...Distribution Effectiveness ( ASHRAE 2010b) .... 51  Table 12. Baseline Outside Ventilation Air Flow

  7. System identification and closed-loop control of end-tidal CO2 in mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Jin-Oh; Dumont, Guy A; Anersmino, J Mark

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a systematic approach to system identification and closed-loop control of end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure (PETCO2) in mechanically ventilated patients. An empirical model consisting of a linear dynamic system followed by an affine transform is proposed to derive a low-order and high-fidelity representation that can reproduce the positive and inversely proportional dynamic input-output relationship between PETCO2 and minute ventilation (MV) in mechanically ventilated patients. The predictive capability of the empirical model was evaluated using experimental respiratory data collected from eighteen mechanically ventilated human subjects. The model predicted PETCO2 response accurately with a root-mean-squared error (RMSE) of 0.22+/-0.16 mmHg and a coefficient of determination (r2) of 0.81+/-0.18 (mean+/-SD) when a second-order rational transfer function was used as its linear dynamic component. Using the proposed model, a closedloop control method for PETCO2 based on a proportionalintegral (PI) compensator was proposed by systematic analysis of the system root locus. For the eighteen mechanically ventilated patient models identified, the PI compensator exhibited acceptable closed-loop response with a settling time of 1.27+/- 0.20 min and a negligible overshoot (0.51+/-1.17%), in addition to zero steady-state PETCO2 set point tracking. The physiologic implication of the proposed empirical model was analyzed by comparing it with the traditional multi-compartmental model widely used in pharmacological modeling.

  8. A study of energy use for ventilation and air-conditioning systems in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chung Hoi Philip

    Most of the local modern buildings are high-rise with enclosed structure. Mechanical ventilation and air conditioning (MVAC) systems are installed for thermal comfort. Various types of MVAC systems found in Hong Kong were critically reviewed with comments on their characteristics in energy efficiency as well as application. The major design considerations were also discussed. Besides MVAC, other energy-consuming components in commercial buildings were also identified, such as lighting, lifts and escalators, office equipment, information technology facilities, etc. A practical approach has been adopted throughout this study in order that the end results will have pragmatic value to the heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) industry in Hong Kong. Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) has become a major issue in commercial buildings worldwide including Hong Kong. Ventilation rate is no doubt a critical element in the design of HVAC systems, which can be realized more obviously in railway train compartments where the carbon dioxide level will be built up quickly when the compartments are crowded during rush hours. A study was carried out based on a simplified model using a train compartment that is equipped with an MVAC system. Overall Thermal Transfer Value (OTTV) is a single-value parameter for controlling building energy use and is relatively simple to implement legislatively. The local government has taken a first step in reacting to the worldwide concern of energy conservation and environmental protection since 1995. Different methods of OTTV calculation were studied and the computation results were compared. It gives a clear picture of the advantages and limitations for each method to the building designers. However, due to the limitations of using OTTV as the only parameter for building energy control, some new approaches to a total control of building energy use were discussed and they might be considered for future revision of the building energy codes in Hong

  9. Chemical method of checking the airtightness of ventilation systems and containment structures of buildings (with the use of Congo red)

    SciTech Connect

    Kuz'micheva, T.N.; Mazurenok, A.M.; Eliseev, V.P.; Naidenov, A.Ya.; Budarin, L.I.; Zhuchenko, E.P.

    1988-11-01

    The problem of using the chemical method for checking the airtightness of ventilation systems and containment structures with the use of indicator materials on a base of Congo red and an air-ammonia mixture as the test medium was examined. The methods and results of experimental investigations of leaks characteristic for containment structures and ventilation systems are given. Suggestions are given on a determination of the parameters of local leaks and on the practical use of the given method for evaluating the quality of sealing.

  10. Inhibition of Nitro-Oxidative Stress Attenuates Pulmonary and Systemic Injury Induced by High-Tidal Volume Mechanical Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Caro, Leticia; Nin, Nicolás; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Carolina; Ferruelo, Antonio; El Assar, Mariam; de Paula, Marta; Fernández-Segoviano, Pilar; Esteban, Andrés; Lorente, José A

    2015-07-01

    Mechanisms contributing to pulmonary and systemic injury induced by high tidal volume (VT) mechanical ventilation are not well known. We tested the hypothesis that increased peroxynitrite formation is involved in organ injury and dysfunction induced by mechanical ventilation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subject to low- (VT, 9 mL/kg; positive end-expiratory pressure, 5 cmH2O) or high- (VT, 25 mL/kg; positive end-expiratory pressure, 0 cmH2O) VT mechanical ventilation for 120 min, and received 1 of 3 treatments: 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB, 10 mg/kg, intravenous, a poly adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase [PARP] inhibitor), or the metalloporphyrin manganese(III) tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin (MnTMPyP, 5 mg/kg intravenous, a peroxynitrite scavenger), or no treatment (control group), 30 min before starting the mechanical ventilation protocol (n = 8 per group, 6 treatment groups). We measured mean arterial pressure, peak inspiratory airway pressure, blood chemistry, and gas exchange. Oxidation (fluorescence for oxidized dihydroethidium), protein nitration (immunofluorescence and Western blot for 3-nitrotyrosine), PARP protein (Western blot) and gene expression of the nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) isoforms (quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction) were measured in lung and vascular tissue. Lung injury was quantified by light microscopy. High-VT mechanical ventilation was associated with hypotension, increased peak inspiratory airway pressure, worsened oxygenation; oxidation and protein nitration in lung and aortic tissue; increased PARP protein in lung; up-regulation of NOS isoforms in lung tissue; signs of diffuse alveolar damage at histological examination. Treatment with 3AB or MnTMPyP attenuated the high-VT mechanical ventilation-induced changes in pulmonary and cardiovascular function; down-regulated the expression of NOS1, NOS2, and NOS3; decreased oxidation and nitration in lung and aortic tissue; and attenuated

  11. Effect of a ceiling fan ventilation system on finishing young bulls' health, behaviour and growth performance.

    PubMed

    Magrin, L; Brscic, M; Lora, I; Rumor, C; Tondello, L; Cozzi, G; Gottardo, F

    2016-11-24

    This research aimed at assessing the effects of a ceiling fan ventilation system on health, feeding, social behaviour and growth response of finishing young bulls fattened indoors during a mild summer season. A total of 69 Charolais young bulls were housed in six pens without any mechanical ventilation system (Control) and in six pens equipped with ceiling fans. The experimental period lasted 98 days from June until mid-September 2014. Four experimental days were considered in order to assess the effect of the ventilation system under two different microclimatic conditions: 2 alert days at monthly interval with temperature humidity index (THI) between 75 and 78, and 2 normal days with THI⩽74. Health and behaviour of the bulls were evaluated through 8-h observation sessions starting after morning feed delivery. The study was carried out during a rather cool summer with a climate average THI of 68.9 and 4 days with average THI>75. Despite these mild climate conditions, ceiling fans lowered litter moisture and acted as a preventive measure for bulls' dirtiness (odd ratio=47.9; 95% CI 19.6 to 117.4). The risk of abnormal breathing was increased for Control bulls (odd ratio=40.7; 95% CI 5.4 to 304.2). When exposed to alert THI conditions, respiration rate and panting scores increased and rumination duration dropped in Control bulls compared with bulls provided with a ceiling fan. During observations under alert THI, bulls spent less time eating, more time being inactive and consumed more water compared with normal THI conditions. Bulls' daily dry matter intake measured during the observation sessions decreased on alert compared with normal THI days (P<0.001) due to a drop of intake during the daylight hours. Ceiling fan treatment had no effect on bulls' growth performance or water consumption but these results most likely depended on the mild climate conditions. Ceiling fans proved to mitigate some of the negative effects of heat stress on bulls' behaviour (rumination

  12. Evaluation of a Mapleson D CPAP system for weaning of mechanical ventilation in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Palomero-Rodríguez, Miguel Angel; de Arteaga, Héctor Chozas; Báez, Yolanda Laporta; de Vicente Sánchez, Jesús; Carretero, Pascual Sanabria; Conde, Pilar Sánchez; Pérez Ferrer, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Over the last years, we have used a flow-inflating bag circuit with a nasotracheal or nasopharyngeal tube as an interface to deliver effective CPAP support in infants (“Mapleson D CPAP system”). The primary goal of this study was to assess the usefulness of the “Mapleson D CPAP system” for weaning of mechanical ventilation (MV) in infants who received MV over 24 h. Materials and Methods: All infants who received MV for more than 24 h in the last year were enrolled in the study. Demographic data included age, gender, weight, and admission diagnosis. Heart rate, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation were measured during MV, 2 h after the nasotracheal Mapleson D CPAP system and 2 h after extubation. Patients were classified into two groups: patients MV more than 48 h, and patients with MV fewer than 48 h. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 50 children were enrolled in the study, with a median age was 34 ± 45 months (range, 1–59 months) and median weight was 11.98 ± 9.31 kg (range, 1–48 kg). Median duration of MV was 480 h (range, 2–570). There were no significant differences in PaO2, PaCO2, and pH among MV, 2 h after the nasotracheal Mapleson D CPAP system and 2 h after extubation and spontaneous ventilation with the nasopharyngeal Mapleson D CPAP system or with nasal prongs. The overall extubation failure rate was 26% (n = 13). Weight and age were significantly associated with extubation failure (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The Mapleson D CPAP system, in our opinion, is a useful and safe alternative to more complex and expensive noninvasive CPAP and BiPAP weaning from MV in infants. PMID:27625446

  13. Ventilating Air-Conditioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinh, Khanh

    1994-01-01

    Air-conditioner provides ventilation designed to be used alone or incorporated into cooling or heating system operates efficiently only by recirculating stale air within building. Energy needed to operate overall ventilating cooling or heating system slightly greater than operating nonventilating cooling or heating system. Helps to preserve energy efficiency while satisfying need for increased forced ventilation to prevent accumulation of undesired gases like radon and formaldehyde. Provides fresh treated air to variety of confined spaces: hospital surgeries, laboratories, clean rooms, and printing shops and other places where solvents used. In mobile homes and portable classrooms, eliminates irritant chemicals exuded by carpets, panels, and other materials, ensuring healthy indoor environment for occupants.

  14. Evaluation of a Shaker Dust Collector for Use in a Recirculating Ventilation System.

    PubMed

    Peters, Thomas M; Sawvel, Russell A; Park, Jae Hong; Anthony, T Renée

    2015-01-01

    General ventilation with recirculated air may be cost-effective to control the concentration of low-toxicity, contaminants in workplaces with diffuse, dusty operations, such as in agriculture. Such systems are, however, rarely adopted with little evidence showing improved air quality and ability to operate under harsh conditions. The goal of this work was to examine the initial and long-term performance of a fabric-filter shaker dust collector (SDC) in laboratory tests and as deployed within a recirculating ventilation system in an agricultural building. In laboratory tests, collection efficiency and pressure drop were tracked over several filter loading cycles, and the recovery of filter capacity (pressure drop) from filter shaking was examined. Collection efficiencies of particles larger than 5 μm was high (>95%) even when the filter was pristine, showing effective collection of large particles that dominate inhalable concentrations typical of agricultural dusts. For respirable-sized particles, collection efficiencies were low when the filter was pristine (e.g., 27% for 1 μm) but much higher when a dust cake developed on the filter (>99% for all size particles), even after shaking (e.g., 90% for 1 μm). The first shake of a filter was observed to recovery a substantial fraction of filter capacity, with subsequent shakes providing little benefit. In field tests, the SDC performed effectively over a period of three months in winter when incorporated in a recirculating ventilation system of a swine farrowing room. Trends in collection efficiency and pressure drop with loading were similar to those observed in the laboratory with overall collection efficiencies high (>80%) when pressure drop exceeded 230 Pa, or 23% of the maximum loading recommended by the manufacturer. This work shows that the SDC can function effectively over the harsh winter in swine rearing operations. Together with findings of improved air quality in the farrowing room reported in a

  15. Evaluation of a Shaker Dust Collector for Use in a Recirculating Ventilation System

    PubMed Central

    Sawvel, Russell A.; Park, Jae Hong; Anthony, T. Renée

    2016-01-01

    General ventilation with recirculated air may be cost-effective to control the concentration of low-toxicity, contaminants in workplaces with diffuse, dusty operations, such as in agriculture. Such systems are, however, rarely adopted with little evidence showing improved air quality and ability to operate under harsh conditions. The goal of this work was to examine the initial and long-term performance of a fabric-filter shaker dust collector (SDC) in laboratory tests and as deployed within a recirculating ventilation system in an agricultural building. In laboratory tests, collection efficiency and pressure drop were tracked over several filter loading cycles, and the recovery of filter capacity (pressure drop) from filter shaking was examined. Collection efficiencies of particles larger than 5 μm was high (>95%) even when the filter was pristine, showing effective collection of large particles that dominate inhalable concentrations typical of agricultural dusts. For respirable-sized particles, collection efficiencies were low when the filter was pristine (e.g., 27% for 1 μm) but much higher when a dust cake developed on the filter (>99% for all size particles), even after shaking (e.g., 90% for 1 μm). The first shake of a filter was observed to recovery a substantial fraction of filter capacity, with subsequent shakes providing little benefit. In field tests, the SDC performed effectively over a period of three months in winter when incorporated in a recirculating ventilation system of a swine farrowing room. Trends in collection efficiency and pressure drop with loading were similar to those observed in the laboratory with overall collection efficiencies high (>80%) when pressure drop exceeded 230 Pa, or 23% of the maximum loading recommended by the manufacturer. This work shows that the SDC can function effectively over the harsh winter in swine rearing operations. Together with findings of improved air quality in the farrowing room reported in a companion

  16. [Faulty internal tube in a co-axial ventilation tube system: cause of a massive postoperative hypercapnia].

    PubMed

    Günther, J-H; Börning, P; Bahlmann, L

    2013-03-01

    This article presents the case of a patient with massive postoperative hypercapnia during mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit (ICU). With normal tidal volumes and clearly visible chest movements, adequate findings with regard to auscultation, oxygenation and correct respirator settings, no cause for the increasing hypercapnia was initially found; however, replacement of the respirator led to a return to normal carbon dioxide levels. When checking the replaced respirator a service technician found the cause of the respirator failure: the internal tube of the co-axial ventilation system was faulty leading to an increased dead space and rebreathing of carbon dioxide.

  17. Microclimate measuring and fluid‑dynamic simulation in an industrial broiler house: testing of an experimental ventilation system.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Biagio; Giametta, Ferruccio; La Fianza, Giovanna; Gentile, Andrea; Catalano, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    The environment in the broiler house is a combination of physical and biological factors generating a complex dynamic system of interactions between birds, husbandry system, light, temperature, and the aerial environment. Ventilation plays a key role in this scenario. It is pivotal to remove carbon dioxide and water vapor from the air of the hen house. Adequate ventilation rates provide the most effective method of controlling temperature within the hen house. They allow for controlling the relative humidity and can play a key role in alleviating the negative effects of high stocking density and of wet litter. In the present study the results of experimental tests performed in a breeding broiler farm are shown. In particular the efficiency of a semi transversal ventilation system was studied against the use of a pure transversal one. In order to verify the efficiency of the systems, fluid dynamic simulations were carried out using the software Comsol multiphysics. The results of this study show that a correct architectural and structural design of the building must be supported by a design of the ventilation system able to maintain the environmental parameters within the limits of the thermo‑neutral and welfare conditions and to achieve the highest levels of productivity.

  18. Mathematical model and minimal measurement system for optimal control of heated humidifiers in neonatal ventilation.

    PubMed

    Verta, Antonella; Schena, Emiliano; Silvestri, Sergio

    2010-06-01

    The control of thermo-hygrometric conditions of gas delivered in neonatal mechanical ventilation appears to be a particularly difficult task, mainly due to the vast number of parameters to be monitored and the control strategies of heated humidifiers to be adopted. In the present paper, we describe the heat and fluid exchange occurring in a heated humidifier in mathematical terms; we analyze the sensitivity of the relative humidity of outlet gas as a function of thermo-hygrometric and fluid-dynamic parameters of delivered gas; we propose a control strategy that will enable the stability of outlet gas thermo-hygrometric conditions. The mathematical model is represented by a hyper-surface containing the functional relations between the input variables, which must be measured, and the output variables, which have to remain constant. Model sensitivity analysis shows that heated humidifier efficacy and stability of outlet gas thermo-hygrometric conditions are principally influenced by four parameters: liquid surface temperature, gas flow rate, inlet gas temperature and inlet gas relative humidity. The theoretical model has been experimentally validated in typical working conditions of neonatal applications. The control strategy has been implemented by a minimal measurement system composed of three thermometers, a humidity sensor, and a flow rate sensor, and based on the theoretical model. Outlet relative humidity, contained in the range 90+/-4% and 94+/-4%, corresponding with temperature variations in the range 28+/-2 degrees C and 38+/-2 degrees C respectively, has been obtained in the whole flow rate range typical of neonatal ventilation from 1 to 10 L/min. We conclude that in order to obtain the stability of the thermo-hygrometric conditions of the delivered gas mixture: (a) a control strategy with a more complex measurement system must be implemented (i.e. providing more input variables); (b) and the gas may also need to be pre-warmed before entering the humidifying

  19. Demand Controlled Ventilation and Classroom Ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Mendell, Mark J.; Davies, Molly; Eliseeva, Ekaterina; Faulkner, David; Hong, Tienzen; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2012-05-01

    This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling.

  20. Mild hypothermia attenuates changes in respiratory system mechanics and modifies cytokine concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid during low lung volume ventilation.

    PubMed

    Dostál, P; Senkeřík, M; Pařízková, R; Bareš, D; Zivný, P; Zivná, H; Cerný, V

    2010-01-01

    Hypothermia was shown to attenuate ventilator-induced lung injury due to large tidal volumes. It is unclear if the protective effect of hypothermia is maintained under less injurious mechanical ventilation in animals without previous lung injury. Tracheostomized rats were randomly allocated to non-ventilated group (group C) or ventilated groups of normothermia (group N) and mild hypothermia (group H). After two hours of mechanical ventilation with inspiratory fraction of oxygen 1.0, respiratory rate 60 min(-1), tidal volume 10 ml x kg(-1), positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) 2 cm H2O or immediately after tracheostomy in non-ventilated animals inspiratory pressures were recorded, rats were sacrificed, pressure-volume (PV) curve of respiratory system constructed, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and aortic blood samples obtained. Group N animals exhibited a higher rise in peak inspiratory pressures in comparison to group H animals. Shift of the PV curve to right, higher total protein and interleukin-6 levels in BAL fluid were observed in normothermia animals in comparison with hypothermia animals and non-ventilated controls. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha was lower in the hypothermia group in comparison with normothermia and non-ventilated groups. Mild hypothermia attenuated changes in respiratory system mechanics and modified cytokine concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid during low lung volume ventilation in animals without previous lung injury.

  1. HOW THE LEED VENTILATION CREDIT IMPACTS ENERGY CONSUMPTION OF GSHP SYSTEMS A CASE STUDY FOR PRIMARY SCHOOLS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaobing

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the impacts of increased outdoor air (OA) ventilation on the performance of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems that heat and cool typical primary schools. Four locations Phoenix, Miami, Seattle, and Chicago are selected in this study to represent different climate zones in the United States. eQUEST, an integrated building and HVAC system energy analysis program, is used to simulate a typical primary school and the GSHP system at the four locations with minimum and 30% more than minimum OA ventilation. The simulation results show that, without an energy recovery ventilator, the 30% more OA ventilation results in an 8.0 13.3% increase in total GSHP system energy consumption at the four locations. The peak heating and cooling loads increase by 20.2 30% and 14.9 18.4%, respectively, at the four locations. The load imbalance of the ground heat exchanger is increased in hot climates but reduced in mild and cold climates.

  2. Ontology for Life-Cycle Modeling of Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) Systems: Experimental Applications Using Revit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Center, Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (ERDC-CERL) has developed a core life- cycle building information model ( BIM ) based on three...was to promote consistency and quality of content created for Building Information Models ( BIMs ) across various disciplines. The HVAC MVD was...MVD. 15. SUBJECT TERMS building information modeling ( BIM ), ontology, Army facilities, heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems

  3. 46 CFR 194.20-5 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ventilation. 194.20-5 Section 194.20-5 Shipping COAST... Ventilation. (a) Chemical storerooms shall be equipped with a power ventilation system of exhaust type. The... based upon the volume of the compartment. (1) Power ventilation units shall have nonsparking...

  4. 33 CFR 175.201 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ventilation. 175.201 Section 175... SAFETY EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS Ventilation § 175.201 Ventilation. No person may operate a boat built after... unless it is equipped with an operable ventilation system that meets the requirements of 33 CFR...

  5. 33 CFR 175.201 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ventilation. 175.201 Section 175... SAFETY EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS Ventilation § 175.201 Ventilation. No person may operate a boat built after... unless it is equipped with an operable ventilation system that meets the requirements of 33 CFR...

  6. 33 CFR 175.201 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ventilation. 175.201 Section 175... SAFETY EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS Ventilation § 175.201 Ventilation. No person may operate a boat built after... unless it is equipped with an operable ventilation system that meets the requirements of 33 CFR...

  7. 46 CFR 194.20-5 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation. 194.20-5 Section 194.20-5 Shipping COAST... Ventilation. (a) Chemical storerooms shall be equipped with a power ventilation system of exhaust type. The... based upon the volume of the compartment. (1) Power ventilation units shall have nonsparking...

  8. 30 CFR 57.8520 - Ventilation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ventilation plan. 57.8520 Section 57.8520... Underground Only § 57.8520 Ventilation plan. A plan of the mine ventilation system shall be set out by the... ventilation plan or revisions thereto shall be submitted to the District Manager for review and comments...

  9. 30 CFR 57.8520 - Ventilation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ventilation plan. 57.8520 Section 57.8520... Underground Only § 57.8520 Ventilation plan. A plan of the mine ventilation system shall be set out by the... ventilation plan or revisions thereto shall be submitted to the District Manager for review and comments...

  10. 46 CFR 111.105-21 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation. 111.105-21 Section 111.105-21 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-21 Ventilation. A ventilation duct which ventilates a...

  11. 30 CFR 57.8520 - Ventilation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ventilation plan. 57.8520 Section 57.8520... SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Ventilation Underground Only § 57.8520 Ventilation plan. A plan of the mine ventilation system shall be set out by...

  12. Uncertainties in the measured quantities of water leaving waste Tank 241-C-106 via the ventilation system

    SciTech Connect

    Minteer, D.J.

    1995-01-23

    The purpose of this analysis is to estimate the uncertainty in the measured quantity of water which typically leaves Tank 241-C-106 via the ventilation system each month. Such measurements are essential for heat removal estimation and tank liquid level verification purposes. The uncertainty associated with the current, infrequent, manual method of measurement (involves various psychrometric and pressure measurements) is suspected to be unreasonably high. Thus, the possible reduction of this uncertainty using a continuous, automated method of measurement will also be estimated. There are three major conclusions as a result of this analysis: (1) the uncertainties associated with the current (infrequent, manual) method of measuring the water which typically leaves Tank 241-C-106 per month via the ventilation system are indeed quite high (80% to 120%); (2) given the current psychrometric and pressure measurement methods and any tank which loses considerable moisture through active ventilation, such as Tank 241-C-106, significant quantities of liquid can actually leak from the tank before a leak can be positively identified via liquid level measurement; (3) using improved (continuous, automated) methods of taking the psychrometric and pressure measurements, the uncertainty in the measured quantity of water leaving Tank 241-C-106 via the ventilation system can be reduced by approximately an order of magnitude.

  13. The application of mechanical aerosol delivery systems in an in vitro model of mechanically ventilated neonates.

    PubMed

    Ehtezazi, Touraj; Turner, Mark A

    2013-12-01

    Delivery of medication to the neonatal lung using current methods is inefficient. Aerosols offer one way to improve delivery to small airways. In this in vitro work, aerosol delivery by using a micropump or a rotary valve has been evaluated in a model of the neonatal setting with a pressurised metered dose inhaler plus spacer outside of the inspiratory limb. Drug depositions were assessed by spectrophotometric analyses. Drug lung deposition was increased by adjusting the rotary valve for co-ordination between the inhalation and aerosol delivery, but this intermittent mode decreased the aerosol delivery by using the micropump. Also, decreasing the volume of spacer decreased drug deposition in test lungs by using the micropump system. At the optimum conditions, the rotary valve aerosol delivery system delivered 3.68±0.91% of the Qvar nominal dose to the test lungs, and this was 2.34±0.01% for the micropump system. In conclusion, the rotary valve aerosol delivery system provided higher amounts of drug particles to the test lungs compared to the micropump system. The advantages of these methods were that the humidity in the ventilation circuit did not affect the aerosol particles in the spacer. Further optimisation is required to improve aerosol deposition in the test lungs. The article has also a short section of recent patents relevant to aerosol delivery.

  14. Development of an Integrated Residential Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification System for Residences

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeschele, M.A.; D.A. Springer

    2008-06-18

    The Need and the Opportunity Codes such as ASHRAE 90.2 and IECC, and programs such as Energy Star and Builders Challenge, are causing new homes to be built to higher performance standards. As a result sensible cooling loads in new homes are going down, but indoor air quality prerogatives are causing ventilation rates and moisture loads to increase in humid climates. Conventional air conditioners are unable to provide the low sensible heat ratios that are needed to efficiently cool and dehumidify homes since dehumidification potential is strongly correlated with cooling system operating hours. The project team saw an opportunity to develop a system that is at least as effective as a conventional air conditioner plus dehumidifier, removes moisture without increasing the sensible load, reduces equipment cost by integrating components, and simplifies installation. Project Overview Prime contractor Davis Energy Group led a team in developing an Integrated Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification (I-HVCD) system under the DOE SBIR program. Phase I and II SBIR project activities ran from July 2003 through December 2007. Tasks included: (1) Mechanical Design and Prototyping; (2) Controls Development; (3) Laboratory and Field Testing; and (4) Commercialization Activities Technology Description. Key components of the prototype I-HVCD system include an evaporator coil assembly, return and outdoor air damper, and controls. These are used in conjunction with conventional components that include a variable speed air handler or furnace, and a two-stage condensing unit. I-HVCD controls enable the system to operate in three distinct cooling modes to respond to indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels. When sensible cooling loads are high, the system operates similar to a conventional system but varies supply airflow in response to indoor RH. In the second mode airflow is further reduced, and the reheat coil adds heat to the supply air. In the third mode, the

  15. The effects of individually ventilated cages on the respiratory systems of male and female Wistar rats from birth until adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Marchesi, Guilherme D’Aprile; de Fatima Soto, Sônia; de Castro, Isac; Rodrigues, Thiago Guimarães; Moriya, Henrique Takachi; de Almeida, Francine Maria; Pazetti, Rogerio; Heimann, Joel Claudio; Furukawa, Luzia Naôko Shinohara

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the respiratory systems of male and female rats maintained in individually ventilated cages (IVCs) from birth until adulthood. METHODS: Female Wistar rats were housed in individually ventilated cages or conventional cages (CCs) and mated with male Wistar rats. After birth and weaning, the male offspring were separated from the females and kept in cages of the same type until 12 weeks of age. RESULTS: The level of food consumption was lower in male offspring (IVC=171.7±9; CC=193.1±20) than in female offspring (IVC=100.6±7; CC=123.4±0.4), whereas the water intake was higher in female offspring (IVC=149.8±11; CC=99.2±0) than in male offspring (IVC=302.5±25; CC=249.7±22) at 11 weeks of age when housed in IVCs. The cage temperature was higher in individually ventilated cages than in conventional cages for both male (IVCs=25.9±0.5; CCs=22.95±0.3) and female (IVCs=26.2±0.3; CCs=23.1±0.3) offspring. The respiratory resistance (IVC=68.8±2.8; CC=50.6±3.0) and elastance (IVC=42.0±3.9; CC=32.4±2.0) at 300 µm/kg were higher in the female offspring housed in ventilated cages. The ciliary beat values were lower in both the male (IVCs=13.4±0.2; CC=15±0.4) and female (IVC=13.5±0.4; CC=15.9±0.6) offspring housed in individually ventilated cages than in those housed in conventional cages. The total cell (IVC=117.5±9.7; CC=285.0±22.8), neutrophil (IVC=13.1±4.8; CC=75.6±4.1) and macrophage (IVC=95.2±11.8; CC=170.0±18.8) counts in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were lower in the female offspring housed in individually ventilated cages than in those housed in conventional cages. CONCLUSIONS: The environmental conditions that exist in individually ventilated cages should be considered when interpreting the results of studies involving laboratory animals. In this study, we observed gender dimorphism in both the water consumption and respiratory mechanics of rats kept in ventilated cages. PMID:28355363

  16. Ventilation and Heart Rate Monitoring in Drivers using a Contactless Electrical Bioimpedance System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macías, R.; García, M. A.; Ramos, J.; Bragós, R.; Fernández, M.

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays, the road safety is one of the most important priorities in the automotive industry. Many times, this safety is jeopardized because of driving under inappropriate states, e.g. drowsiness, drugs and/or alcohol. Therefore several systems for monitoring the behavior of subjects during driving are researched. In this paper, a device based on a contactless electrical bioimpedance system is shown. Using the four-wire technique, this system is capable of obtaining the heart rate and the ventilation of the driver through multiple textile electrodes. These textile electrodes are placed on the car seat and the steering wheel. Moreover, it is also reported several measurements done in a controlled environment, i.e. a test room where there are no artifacts due to the car vibrations or the road state. In the mentioned measurements, the system response can be observed depending on several parameters such as the placement of the electrodes or the number of clothing layers worn by the driver.

  17. Airborne Effluent Monitoring System Certification for New Canister Storage Building Ventilation Exhaust Stack

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Maughan, A.D.

    1999-04-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted three of the six tests needed to verify that the effluent monitoring system for the new Canister Storage Building ventilation exhaust stack meets applicable regulatory performance criteria for air sampling systems at nuclear facilities. These performance criteria address both the suitability of the location for the air-sampling probe and the transport of the sample to the collection devices. The criteria covering the location for the air-sampling probe ensure that the contaminants in the stack are well mixed with the airflow at the probe location such that the extracted sample represents the whole. The sample-transport criteria ensure that the sampled contaminants are quantitatively delivered to the collection device. The specific performance criteria are described in detail in this report. The tests reported here cover the contaminant tracer uniformity and particle delivery performance criteria. These criteria were successfully met. The other three tests were conducted by the start-up staff of Duke Engineering and Services Hanford Inc. (DESH) and reported elsewhere. The Canister Storage Building is located in the 200 East Area of the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The new air-exhaust system was built under the W379 Project. The air sampling system features a probe with a single shrouded sampling nozzle, a sample delivery line, and a filter holder to collect the sample.

  18. Modelica Library for Building Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wetter, Michael

    2009-06-17

    This paper presents a freely available Modelica library for building heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. The library is based on the Modelica.Fluid library. It has been developed to support research and development of integrated building energy and control systems. The primary applications are controls design, energy analysis and model-based operation. The library contains dynamic and steady-state component models that are applicable for analyzing fast transients when designing control algorithms and for conducting annual simulations when assessing energy performance. For most models, dimensional analysis is used to compute the performance for operating points that differ from nominal conditions. This allows parameterizing models in the absence of detailed geometrical information which is often impractical to obtain during the conceptual design phase of building systems. In the first part of this paper, the library architecture and the main classes are described. In the second part, an example is presented in which we implemented a model of a hydronic heating system with thermostatic radiator valves and thermal energy storage.

  19. High frequency mechanical ventilation affects respiratory system mechanics differently in C57BL/6J and BALB/c adult mice.

    PubMed

    Hadden, Hélène

    2013-01-15

    We tested the hypothesis that high frequency ventilation affects respiratory system mechanical functions in C57BL/6J and BALB/c mice. We measured respiratory mechanics by the forced oscillation technique over 1h in anesthetized, intubated, ventilated BALB/c and C57BL/6J male mice. We did not detect any change in airway resistance, Rn, tissue damping, G, tissue elastance, H and hysteresivity, eta in BALB/c mice during 1h of ventilation at 150 or at 450 breaths/min; nor did we find a difference between BALB/c mice ventilated at 150 breaths/min compared with 450 breaths/min. Among C57BL/6J mice, except for H, all parameters remained unchanged over 1h of ventilation in mice ventilated at 150 breaths/min. However, after 10 and 30 min of ventilation at 450 breaths/min, Rn, and respiratory system compliance were lower, and eta was higher, than their starting value. We conclude that high frequency mechanical ventilation affects respiratory system mechanics differently in C57BL/6J and BALB/c adult mice.

  20. Patient-ventilator dyssynchrony during assisted invasive mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Murias, G; Villagra, A; Blanch, L

    2013-04-01

    Patient-ventilator dyssynchrony is common during mechanical ventilation. Dyssynchrony decreases comfort, prolongs mechanical ventilation and intensive care unit stays, and might lead to worse outcome. Dyssynchrony can occur during the triggering of the ventilator, the inspiration period after triggering, the transition from inspiration to expiration, and the expiratory phase. The most common dyssynchronies are delayed triggering, autotriggering, ineffective inspiratory efforts (which can occur at any point in the respiratory cycle), mismatch between the patient's and ventilator's inspiratory times, and double triggering. At present, the detection of dyssynchronies usually depends on healthcare staff observing ventilator waveforms; however, performance is suboptimal and many events go undetected. To date, technological complexity has made it impossible to evaluate patient-ventilator synchrony throughout the course of mechanical ventilation. Studies have shown that a high index of dyssynchrony may increase the duration of mechanical ventilation. Better training, better ventilatory modes, and/or computerized systems that permit better synchronization of patients' demands and ventilator outputs are necessary to improve patient-ventilator synchrony.

  1. Ventilatory failure, ventilator support, and ventilator weaning.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Martin J; Laghi, Franco; Jubran, Amal

    2012-10-01

    The development of acute ventilatory failure represents an inability of the respiratory control system to maintain a level of respiratory motor output to cope with the metabolic demands of the body. The level of respiratory motor output is also the main determinant of the degree of respiratory distress experienced by such patients. As ventilatory failure progresses and patient distress increases, mechanical ventilation is instituted to help the respiratory muscles cope with the heightened workload. While a patient is connected to a ventilator, a physician's ability to align the rhythm of the machine with the rhythm of the patient's respiratory centers becomes the primary determinant of the level of rest accorded to the respiratory muscles. Problems of alignment are manifested as failure to trigger, double triggering, an inflationary gas-flow that fails to match inspiratory demands, and an inflation phase that persists after a patient's respiratory centers have switched to expiration. With recovery from disorders that precipitated the initial bout of acute ventilatory failure, attempts are made to discontinue the ventilator (weaning). About 20% of weaning attempts fail, ultimately, because the respiratory controller is unable to sustain ventilation and this failure is signaled by development of rapid shallow breathing. Substantial advances in the medical management of acute ventilatory failure that requires ventilator assistance are most likely to result from research yielding novel insights into the operation of the respiratory control system.

  2. Adaptive lung ventilation.

    PubMed

    Linton, D M

    2001-09-01

    Adaptive lung ventilation (ALV) is a method of closed-loop mechanical ventilation analogous to modern closed-loop technology in aviation such as the autopilot and automatic landing system. The algorithm of the controller of ALV is designed to automatically provide pressure-controlled synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation (P-SIMV) and weaning as individually required in any clinical situation. The synchronized pressure limited breaths constantly adapt to the patient requirements to encourage optimal alveolar ventilation with minimal adverse physiological disturbance and timely weaning. The ease of application, efficiency, and safety of the first ALV controllers have been demonstrated in lung models, in patients with normal lungs undergoing general anesthesia, in patients requiring unusual positioning, in transition to and from one-lung anesthesia, and in long-term ventilation of patients with various lung pathologies and in weaning patients who have restrictive or obstructive pulmonary disease. Prospective comparative studies of ALV versus other currently used manually selected modes of mechanical ventilation, such as the one reported in this article, should confirm the safety and identify the benefits of this form of advanced closed-loop mechanical ventilation technology.

  3. Evaluation of a combined face ventilation system used with a remotely operated mining machine. Information circular/1982

    SciTech Connect

    Divers, E.; Jayaraman, N.; Custer, J.

    1982-11-01

    This Bureau of Mines report presents results of an underground evaluation to determine the respirable dust and gas control effectiveness of a combined (push-pull) face ventilation system for coal mines. The system utilizes both blowing and exhaust curtain, continuous miners equipped with radio remote control, and flight conveyors. Bureau of Mines tests showed a 97% reduction in respirable dust concentrations from the usual cab position. This allowed the remote control operator to be well within, and the usual cab position to exceed, Federal respirable dust standards. Tests utilizing a safe tracer gas, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), to determine the face ventilation effectiveness of the combined blowing and exhaust system showed that the system also has excellent methane dispersion capability.

  4. Measurement of HVAC system performance and local ventilation using passive perfluorocarbon tracer technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, R.N.; Goodrich, R.W.

    1995-06-01

    In April of 1993, two (2) perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) ventilation/indoor air quality assessment tests were performed in the Gleeson Hall building of the SUNY Farmingdale campus. The building was being modified, in part, as a result of significant occupant complaints of perceived poor air quality. The four story building had a basement first floor with air supplied normally by an HVAC system labelled as AC1. During this study, AC1 was inoperational and the basement interior rooms (walls) were primarily gone; the other three floors were still being used for classes. It is possible that a sense of poor air quality may have been perceived by first-floor occupants because they were working in the basement, but this issue could not be addressed. The second floor had two (2) lecture halls--Rm 202 (handled by AC4) and Rm 204 (handled by AC5); the balance of the second floor interior rooms and corridors was split between two other air handling systems, AC2 for the west side of the building and AC3 for the east side. The remaining 3rd and 4th floors were also split about evenly between AC2 and AC3. The perimeter rooms, equipped with wall units having their own outside air (OA) source plus centralized return air (RA) bypasses, were not included in this testing which was restricted to the basement floor (1st floor) and the four operating air handling systems, AC2 to AC5, during Test 1 and only AC2 to AC5 during Test 2. Two types of tests were performed using the full suite of 5 PFT types available. The first test was designed to measure the infiltration, exfiltration, and air exchange between the 5 AC zones above and the second test used the 5th tracer, which had been in the basement, as a distributed source throughout the four other zones to act as a surrogate pollutant source. This report provides final conclusions of both tests and suggestions regarding its usefulness in similar building ventilation and indoor air quality assessments.

  5. Reducing Mortality from Terrorist Releases of Chemical and Biological Agents: I. Filtration for Ventilation Systems in Commercial Building

    SciTech Connect

    Thatcher, Tracy L.; Daisey, Joan M.

    1999-09-01

    There is growing concern about potential terrorist attacks involving releases of chemical and/or biological (CB) agents, such as sarin or anthrax, in and around buildings. For an external release, the CB agent can enter the building through the air intakes of a building's mechanical ventilation system and by infiltration through the building envelope. For an interior release in a single room, the mechanical ventilation system, which often recirculates some fraction of the air within a building, may distribute the released CB agent throughout the building. For both cases, installing building systems that remove chemical and biological agents may be the most effective way to protect building occupants. Filtration systems installed in the heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems of buildings can significantly reduce exposures of building occupants in the event of a release, whether the release is outdoors or indoors. Reduced exposures can reduce the number of deaths from a terrorist attack. The purpose of this report is to provide information and examples of the design of filtration systems to help building engineers retrofit HVAC systems. The report also provides background information on the physical nature of CB agents and brief overviews of the basic principles of particle and vapor filtration.

  6. Effect of heating-ventilation-air conditioning system sanitation on airborne fungal populations in residential environments.

    PubMed

    Garrison, R A; Robertson, L D; Koehn, R D; Wynn, S R

    1993-12-01

    Commercial air duct sanitation services are advertised to the public as being effective in reducing indoor aeroallergen levels despite the absence of published supporting data. Eight residential heat-ventilation-air conditioning (HVAC) systems in six homes and seven HVAC systems in five homes in winter and summer, respectively, were sampled to determine fungal colony forming units (CFUs) prior to and after an HVAC sanitation procedure was performed by a local company. Two houses in which no sanitation procedure was performed served as controls in each study phase. Two sample sets were obtained at each HVAC system prior to cleaning in order to determine baseline CFU levels. The test HVAC systems were then cleaned, and the HVAC systems allowed to operate as desired by the residents. Posttreatment sampling was performed 48 hours and then weekly after cleaning for 8 weeks. The HVAC systems were analyzed by exposing sterile 2% malt extract media plates at a 90-degree angle to the air flow at the air supply and air return vents. The baseline CFUs were similar in the control and study houses. Eight weeks after sanitation, the study houses demonstrated an overall CFU reduction of 92% during winter and 84% during summer. No reduction in CFU values was observed over the 8-week study period for the houses selected as controls. Further, HVAC sanitation appeared to reduce the number of fungal colonies entering and leaving the HVAC system, suggesting that the HVAC contained a significant percentage of the total fungal load in these homes. These data suggest that HVAC sanitation may be an effective tool in reducing airborne fungal populations in residential environments.

  7. Use of Disinfectants and Sanitizers in Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration Systems

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This letter is to brings attention several concerns that the Agency has regarding the use of sanitizer and/or disinfectant products, and other types of antimicrobial products, to treat the surfaces of heating, ventilation

  8. Residential Ventilation: A Review of Established Systems and a Laboratory Investigation of the Fine Wire Heat Recovery Ventilator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hippel, Matthew Hans Benjamin

    A novel vehicle concept is introduced and its feasibility as an autonomous, self-propelled weather buoy for use in violent storm systems is analyzed. The vehicle concept is a spar sailboat -- consisting of only a deep keel and a sailing rig; no hull -- a design which is intended to improve longevity in rough seas as well as provide ideal placement opportunities for meteorological sensors. To evaluate the hypothetical locomotive and meteorological observation capabilities of the concept sailing spar in hurricane-like conditions, several relevant oceanographic phenomena are analyzed with the performance of the concept vehicle in mind. Enthalpy transfer from the ocean to the air is noted as the primary driving force of tropical storms and therefore becomes the measuring objective of the sailing spar. A discrete, iterative process for optimizing driving force while achieving equilibrium between the four airfoil surfaces is used to steer the sailing spar towards any objective despite variable and opposing simulated winds. Based on the limitations of sailing theory, logic is developed to autonomously navigate the sailing spar between human-selected waypoints on a digitized geographic map. Due the perceived inability to measure air-sea enthalpy exchange because the nature of tropical storms and due to its small scale, the sailing spar is deemed infeasible as a hurricane-capable meteorological observation platform.

  9. Measured performance of filtration and ventilation systems for fine and ultrafine particles and ozone in an unoccupied modern California house.

    PubMed

    Singer, B C; Delp, W W; Black, D R; Walker, I S

    2016-12-05

    This study evaluated nine ventilation and filtration systems in an unoccupied 2006 house located 250 m downwind of the I-80 freeway in Sacramento, California. Systems were evaluated for reducing indoor concentrations of outdoor particles in summer and fall/winter, ozone in summer, and particles from stir-fry cooking. Air exchange rate was measured continuously. Energy use was estimated for year-round operation in California. Exhaust ventilation without enhanced filtration provided indoor PM2.5 that was 70% lower than outdoors. Supply ventilation with MERV13 filtration provided slightly less protection, whereas supply MERV16 filtration reduced PM2.5 by 97-98% relative to outdoors. Supply filtration systems used little energy but provided no benefits for indoor-generated particles. Systems with MERV13-16 filter in the recirculating heating and cooling unit (FAU) operating continuously or 20 min/h reduced PM2.5 by 93-98%. Across all systems, removal percentages were higher for ultrafine particles and lower for black carbon, relative to PM2.5 . Indoor ozone was 3-4% of outdoors for all systems except an electronic air cleaner that produced ozone. Filtration via the FAU or portable filtration units lowered PM2.5 by 25-75% when operated over the hour following cooking. The energy for year-round operation of FAU filtration with an efficient blower motor was estimated at 600 kWh/year.

  10. Amelioration of superoxide dismutase on ventilator-induced lung injury by suppressing leukocyte in the lungs and systemic circulation.

    PubMed

    Su, Chien-Ling; Du, Wen-Yuan; Chiang, Ling-Ling; Lin, Yen-Kuang; Lee, Hui-Ling; Chen, Kuan-Hao; Wang, Jiun-; Wang, David

    2013-08-31

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is a free radical scavenger and a broad-spectrum antioxidant. Its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects have recently been noted. We studied the effects of this antioxidant on lung damage, oxidative stress, and inflammation in a model of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), using 8- to 12-wk-old Sprange-Dawley rats (n = 40). Animals were randomized and evenly divided into two experimental groups, low tidal volume (V(T)) ventilation (V(T) = 9 ml/kg) and high V(T) ventilation (V(T) = 28 ml/kg). Each group was evenly divided into two subgroups: ten animals were treated with superoxide dismutase (SOD; 10,000 U/kg i.v., 2 h prior to the ventilation) and the rests were treated with vehicle. Lung injury was evaluated by histological examination, and cells counts of red blood cells (RBC) and white blood cells (WBC) in the alveoli and the septal wall thickness in lung tissues and serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). The lung permeability was assessed by the wet-to-dry weight ratio (W/D), lung weight to body weight ratio (LW/BW) and protein concentration in broncholavage fluid (BALF). Levels of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in the lungs were evaluated by tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) and methylguanidine (MG) in BALF, respectively. SOD pretreatment significantly decreased WBC counts in systemic circulation and in alveoli, and effectively attenuated high V(T) ventilation induced lung injury by reducing hyaline membrane development, septal wall thickness, lung W/D and LW/BW and serum LDH in relation to those of the control. In addition, lung tissues MDA and MG in BALF were also notably reduced.

  11. Design and Integrate Improved Systems for Nuclear Facility Ventilation and Exhaust Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Murray E.

    2014-04-15

    Objective: The objective of this R&D project would complete the development of three new systems and integrate them into a single experimental effort. However, each of the three systems has stand-alone applicability across the DOE complex. At US DOE nuclear facilities, indoor air is filtered and ventilated for human occupancy, and exhaust air to the outdoor environment must be regulated and monitored. At least three technical standards address these functions, and the Los Alamos National Laboratory would complete an experimental facility to answer at least three questions: (1) Can the drag coefficient of a new Los Alamos air mixer be reduced for better operation in nuclear facility exhaust stacks? (2) Is it possible to verify the accuracy of a new dilution method for HEPA filter test facilities? (3) Is there a performance-based air flow metric (volumetric flow or mass flow) for operating HEPA filters? In summary, the three new systems are: a mixer, a diluter and a performance-based metric, respectively. The results of this project would be applicable to at least four technical standards: ANSI N13.1 Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities; ASTM F1471 Standard Test Method for Air Cleaning Performance of a High-Efficiency Particulate Air Filter System, ASME N511: In-Service Testing of Nuclear Air Treatment, Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Systems, and ASME AG-1: Code On Nuclear Air And Gas Treatment. All of the three proposed new systems must be combined into a single experimental device (i.e. to develop a new function of the Los Alamos aerosol wind tunnel). Technical Approach: The Radiation Protection RP-SVS group at Los Alamos has an aerosol wind tunnel that was originally (2006) designed to evaluate small air samplers (cf. US EPA 40 CFR 53.42). In 2009, the tunnel was modified for exhaust stack verifications per the ANSI N13.1 standard. In 2010, modifications were started on the

  12. A comparison of ventilator-associated pneumonia rates determined by different scoring systems in four intensive care units in the North West of England.

    PubMed

    Wallace, F A; Alexander, P D G; Spencer, C; Naisbitt, J; Moore, J A; McGrath, B A

    2015-11-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia is a common healthcare-associated infection with significant mortality, morbidity and healthcare cost, and rates have been proposed as a potential quality indicator. We examined ventilator-associated pneumonia rates as determined by different diagnostic scoring systems across four adult intensive care units in the North West of England. We also collected clinical opinions as to whether patients had ventilator-associated pneumonia, and whether patients were receiving antibiotics as treatment. Pooled ventilator-associated pneumonia rates were 36.3, 22.2, 15.2 and 1.1 per 1000 ventilator-bed days depending on the scoring system used. There was significant within-unit heterogeneity for ventilator-associated pneumonia rates calculated by the various scoring systems (all p < 0.001). Clinical opinion and antibiotic use did not correlate well with the scoring systems (k = 0.23 and k = 0.17, respectively). We therefore question whether the ventilator-associated pneumonia rate as measured by existing tools is either useful or desirable as a quality indicator.

  13. Inverse Modeling of Respiratory System during Noninvasive Ventilation by Maximum Likelihood Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saatci, Esra; Akan, Aydin

    2010-12-01

    We propose a procedure to estimate the model parameters of presented nonlinear Resistance-Capacitance (RC) and the widely used linear Resistance-Inductance-Capacitance (RIC) models of the respiratory system by Maximum Likelihood Estimator (MLE). The measurement noise is assumed to be Generalized Gaussian Distributed (GGD), and the variance and the shape factor of the measurement noise are estimated by MLE and Kurtosis method, respectively. The performance of the MLE algorithm is also demonstrated by the Cramer-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB) with artificially produced respiratory signals. Airway flow, mask pressure, and lung volume are measured from patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) under the noninvasive ventilation and from healthy subjects. Simulations show that respiratory signals from healthy subjects are better represented by the RIC model compared to the nonlinear RC model. On the other hand, the Patient group respiratory signals are fitted to the nonlinear RC model with lower measurement noise variance, better converged measurement noise shape factor, and model parameter tracks. Also, it is observed that for the Patient group the shape factor of the measurement noise converges to values between 1 and 2 whereas for the Control group shape factor values are estimated in the super-Gaussian area.

  14. Analytical and experimental studies of ventilation systems subjected to simulated tornado conditions: Verification of the TVENT computer code

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.A.; Gregory, W.S.; Ricketts, C.I.; Smith, P.R.; Littleton, P.E.; Talbott, D.V.

    1988-04-01

    Analytical and experimental studies of ventilation systems have been conducted to verify the Los Alamos National Laboratory TVENT accident analysis computer code for simulated tornado conditions. This code was developed to be a user-friendly analysis tool for designers and regulatory personnel and was designed to predict pressure and flow transients in arbitrary ventilation systems. The experimental studies used two relatively simple, yet sensitive, physical systems designed using similitude analysis. These physical models were instrumented end-to-end for pressure and volumetric flow rate and then subjected to the worst credible tornado conditions using a special blowdown apparatus. We verified TVENT by showing that it successfully predicted our experimental results. By comparing experimental results from both physical models with TVENT results, we showed that we have derived the proper similitude relations (governed by compressibility effects) for all sizes of ventilation systems. As a by-product of our studies, we determined the need for fan speed variation modeling in TVENT. This modification was made and resulted in a significant improvement in our comparisons of analytical and experimental results.

  15. [A computer-controlled closed circle system for ventilation during anesthesia and intensive care and its possibilities for patient monitoring].

    PubMed

    Verkaaik, A P; Rubreht, J; van Dijk, G; Westerkamp, B; Erdmann, W

    1991-01-01

    A computer feed back controlled anaesthesia- and intensive care ventilator has been developed with on-line and separate lung function measurement. The system design is built on the principle of a totally closed circuit (closed rebreathing respirometer) and an inspiratory "high flow", the gas being rotated through the closed circuit unidirectionally by a blower with 70 l/min. Ventilation is performed by metal membranes freely movable in membrane chambers with an internal part included into the closed circuit and an external part connected to pressurized air controlling inspiratory valves expiratory valves. The electronic valves are software controlled by the computer to exactly perform the desired preset ventilatory mode. Membrane movement are on-line measured capacitively and transformed into respective flow and volume values, whereby the compressibility of the system gas (on-line pressure recording) is taken into account. Volatile anaesthetic gases are feed back controlled to preset end expiratory values (MAC-controlled anaesthesia), circuit volume is maintained by N20-addition and oxygen is added to maintain the desired present inspiratory concentration measured with paramagnetic oxygen sensors. Ergonometric aspects led to the triangular from of the new anaesthesia and intensive care ventilator with the controlling service screen turnable to all three sides of the ventilator (high flexibility of the user) and all necessary equipment and material included into the "Anaesthesia workstation". All measured and present parameters are continuously displayed on the service (computer) screen and entered into the computer-memory in minute cycles with a memory capacity of 75 h anaesthesia. At any desired moment the memorized values can be transferred to IBM-compatible disc systems for storage or into the respective data management systems, thus at the end of anaesthesia, at the end of the working day or at the end of the week.

  16. Waste tank 241-SY-101 dome airspace and ventilation system response to a flammable gas plume burn

    SciTech Connect

    Heard, F.J.

    1995-11-01

    A series of flammable gas plume burn and transient pressure analyses have been completed for a nuclear waste tank (241-SY-101) and associated tank farm ventilation system at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford facility. The subject analyses were performed to address issues concerning the effects of transient pressures resulting from igniting a small volume of concentrated flammable gas just released from the surface of the waste as a plume and before the flammable gas concentration could be reduced by mixing with the dome airspace by local convection and turbulent diffusion. Such a condition may exist as part of an in progress episode gas release (EGR) or gas plume event. The analysis goal was to determine the volume of flammable gas that if burned within the dome airspace would result in a differential pressure, after propagating through the ventilation system, greater than the current High Efficiency Particulate Filter (HEPA) limit of 2.49 KPa (10 inches of water or 0. 36 psi). Such a pressure wave could rupture the tank ventilation system inlet and outlet HEPA filters leading to a potential release of contaminants to the environment

  17. COST EFFECTIVE VOC EMISSION CONTROL STARTEGIES FOR MILITARY, AEROSPACE,AND INDUSTRIAL PAINT SPRAY BOOTH OPERATIONS: COMBINING IMPROVED VENTILATION SYSTEMS WITH INNOVATIVE, LOW COST EMISSION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a full-scale demonstration program in which several paint booths were modified for recirculation ventilation; the booth exhaust streams are vented to an innovative volatile organic compound (VOC) emission control system having extremely low operating costs. ...

  18. Ventilation flow: Submerged

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchinson, D.

    1985-01-01

    The ventilation system on a submarine is discussed. When the submarine is submerged. The ventilation system provides a conditioned atmosphere in the ship with complete isolation from the outside. A conditioned atmosphere includes not only filtration and temperature and humidity control, but also air purification (removal of potentially harmful quantities of impurities and comtaminants) and revitalization (addition of vital life support oxygen). Carbon dioxide removal, the oxygen system, air conditioning, carbon monoxide removal, hydrogen removal, and atmosphere monitoring systems are among the topics discussed.

  19. Development and evaluation of an appraisal form to assess clinical effectiveness of adult invasive mechanical ventilation systems

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rapid developments in intensive care medicine have made mechanical ventilation an essential method in the resuscitation and comprehensive treatment of critical care patients. This study aimed to develop and evaluate an appraisal form assessing the clinical effectiveness of adult invasive mechanical ventilation systems. Methods An appraisal form was designed according to the effectiveness evaluation theory of the American Weapons Systems Effectiveness Industry Advisory Committee (WSEIAC) along with literature review and expert panel review. Content validity of the preliminary form was analyzed in a cohort of 200 patients. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis was used to assess appraisal form validity. Discriminate validity of different ventilation outcomes was analyzed by t test. Test/retest reliability and inter-scorer reliability were evaluated with 30 patients after a 2-week interval by Cronbach's alpha. Results Exploratory factor analysis showed eigenvalues for 3 dimensions (availability, dependability, capability) to be 7.85, 4.43, and 4.22, respectively. Cronbach’s α for internal consistency of the appraisal form was 0.957, and 0.922, 0.961 and 0.937, respectively, for the 3 dimensions. Test-retest reliability of 3 dimensions was 0.976, and 0.862, 0.857, 0.885, respectively. Intra-class correlation coefficient verified test-retest reliability; ICC 0.976 and 0.862, 0.857, 0.885 for 3 dimensions, respectively. Conclusions The appraisal form for clinical effectiveness of adult invasive mechanical ventilation systems has high reliability and validity and may be used in clinical setting. PMID:22747895

  20. Descriptions and diagrams of the primary and annulus ventilation systems of the double-shell tank farms as of January 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Blackman, A.E.; Waters, E.D.

    1994-12-28

    This document is a compilation of information describing the ventilation systems of the Double-Shell Tank farms (214-AN, -AP, -AW, -AW, -AY, -AZ, and -SY). A general description of the primary tank and annulus ventilation systems is given along with specific information on the high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, condensers, preheaters, exhaust fans, and piping. This information is considered to be current as of January 1988. 38 refs, 20 figs, 30 tabs.

  1. Field measurement of ventilation rates.

    PubMed

    Persily, A K

    2016-02-01

    Ventilation rates have significant impacts on building energy use and indoor contaminant concentrations, making them key parameters in building performance. Ventilation rates have been measured in buildings for many decades, and there are mature measurement approaches available to researchers and others who need to know actual ventilation rates in buildings. Despite the fact that ventilation rates are critical in interpreting indoor concentration measurements, it is disconcerting how few Indoor Air Quality field studies measure ventilation rates or otherwise characterize the ventilation design of the study building(s). This paper summarizes parameters of interest in characterizing building ventilation, available methods for quantifying these parameters, and challenges in applying these methods to different types of buildings and ventilation systems. These parameters include whole-building air change rates, system outdoor air intake rates, and building infiltration rates. Tracer gas methods are reviewed as well as system airflow rate measurements using, for example, duct traverses. Several field studies of ventilation rates conducted over the past 75 years are described to highlight the approaches employed and the findings obtained.

  2. Dynamic and quasi-static lung mechanics system for gas-assisted and liquid-assisted ventilation.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Francisco J; Gastiasoro, Elena; Rey-Santano, M Carmen; Gomez-Solaetxe, Miguel A; Publicover, Nelson G; Larrabe, Juan L

    2009-07-01

    Our aim was to develop a computerized system for real-time monitoring of lung mechanics measurements during both gas and liquid ventilation. System accuracy was demonstrated by calculating regression and percent error of the following parameters compared to standard device: airway pressure difference (Delta P(aw)), respiratory frequency (f(R) ), tidal volume (V(T)), minute ventilation (V'(E)), inspiratory and expiratory maximum flows (V'(ins,max), V'(exp,max)), dynamic lung compliance (C(L,dyn) ), resistance of the respiratory system calculated by method of Mead-Whittenberger (R(rs,MW)) and by equivalence to electrical circuits (R(rs,ele)), work of breathing (W(OB)), and overdistension. Outcome measures were evaluated as function of gas exchange, cardiovascular parameters, and lung mechanics including mean airway pressure (mP(aw)). Delata P(aw), V(T), V'(ins,max), V'(exp,max), and V'(E) measurements had correlation coefficients r = 1.00, and %error < 0.5%. f(R), C(L,dyn), R(rs,MW), R(rs,ele), and W(OB) showed r > or = 0.98 and %error < 5%. Overdistension had r = 0.87 and %error < 15%. Also, resistance was accurately calculated by a new algorithm. The system was tested in rats in which lung lavage was used to induce acute respiratory failure. After lavage, both gas- and liquid-ventilated groups had increased mP(aw) and W(OB), with decreased V(T), V'(E), C(L,dyn), R(rs,MW), and R(rs,ele) compared to controls. After 1-h ventilation, both injured group had decreased V(T), V'(E) , and C(L,dyn), with increased mP(aw), R(rs,MW), R(rs,ele), and W(OB) . In lung-injured animals, liquid ventilation restored gas exchange, and cardiovascular and lung functions. Our lung mechanics system was able to closely monitor pulmonary function, including during transitions between gas and liquid phases.

  3. Liquid ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Suman; Paswan, Anil; Prakas, S.

    2014-01-01

    Human have lungs to breathe air and they have no gills to breath liquids like fish. When the surface tension at the air-liquid interface of the lung increases as in acute lung injury, scientists started to think about filling the lung with fluid instead of air to reduce the surface tension and facilitate ventilation. Liquid ventilation (LV) is a technique of mechanical ventilation in which the lungs are insufflated with an oxygenated perfluorochemical liquid rather than an oxygen-containing gas mixture. The use of perfluorochemicals, rather than nitrogen as the inert carrier of oxygen and carbon dioxide offers a number of advantages for the treatment of acute lung injury. In addition, there are non-respiratory applications with expanding potential including pulmonary drug delivery and radiographic imaging. It is well-known that respiratory diseases are one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in intensive care unit. During the past few years several new modalities of treatment have been introduced. One of them and probably the most fascinating, is of LV. Partial LV, on which much of the existing research has concentrated, requires partial filling of lungs with perfluorocarbons (PFC's) and ventilation with gas tidal volumes using conventional mechanical ventilators. Various physico-chemical properties of PFC's make them the ideal media. It results in a dramatic improvement in lung compliance and oxygenation and decline in mean airway pressure and oxygen requirements. No long-term side-effect reported. PMID:25886321

  4. Efficacy of body ventilation system for reducing strain in warm and hot climates.

    PubMed

    Chinevere, Troy D; Cadarette, Bruce S; Goodman, Daniel A; Ely, Brett R; Cheuvront, Samuel N; Sawka, Michael N

    2008-06-01

    This study determined whether a torso-vest forced ambient air body ventilation system (BVS) reduced physiological strain during exercise-heat stress. Seven heat-acclimated volunteers attempted nine, 2-h treadmill walks at 200 W m(-2) in three environments, -40 degrees C, 20% rh (HD), 35 degrees C, 75% rh (HW), and 30 degrees C, 50% rh, (WW) wearing the Army Combat Uniform, interceptor body armor (IBA) and Kevlar helmet. Three trials in each environment were BVS turned on (BVS(On)), BVS turned off (BVS(Off)), and no BVS (IBA). In HD, BVS(On) significantly lowered core temperature (T (re)), heart rate (HR), mean skin temperature (T (sk)), mean torso skin temperature (T (torso)), thermal sensation (TS), heat storage (S), and physiological strain index (PSI), versus BVS(Off) and IBA (P < 0.05). For HW (n = 6), analyses were possible only through 60 min. Exercise tolerance time (min) during HW was significantly longer for BVS(On) (116 +/- 10 min) versus BVS(Off) (95 +/- 22 min) and IBA (96 +/- 18 min) (P < 0.05). During HW, BVS(On) lowered HR at 60 min versus IBA, T (sk) from 30 to 60 min versus BVS(Off) and IBA, and PSI from 45 to 60 min versus BVS(Off) and at 60 min versus IBA (P < 0.05). BVS(On) changes in T (re) and HR were lower in HD and HW. During WW, BVS(On) significantly lowered HR, T (sk), and T (torso) versus BVS(Off) and IBA (P < 0.05) during late exercise. Sweating rates were significantly lower for BVS(On) versus BVS(Off) and IBA in both HD and WW (P < 0.05), but not HW. These results indicate that BVS(On) reduces physiological strain in all three environments by a similar amount; however, in hot-dry conditions the BVS(Off) increases physiological strain.

  5. Examination of redirected continuous miner scrubber discharge configurations for exhaust face ventilation systems

    PubMed Central

    Organiscak, J.A.; Beck, T.W.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Office of Mine Safety and Health Research (OMSHR) has recently studied several redirected scrubber discharge configurations in its full-scale continuous miner gallery for both dust and gas control when using an exhaust face ventilation system. Dust and gas measurements around the continuous mining machine in the laboratory showed that the conventional scrubber discharge directed outby the face with a 12.2-m (40-ft) exhaust curtain setback appeared to be one of the better configurations for controlling dust and gas. Redirecting all the air toward the face equally up both sides of the machine increased the dust and gas concentrations around the machine. When all of the air was redirected toward the face on the off-curtain side of the machine, gas accumulations tended to be reduced at the face, at the expense of increased dust levels in the return and on the curtain side of the mining machine. A 6.1-m (20-ft) exhaust curtain setback without the scrubber operating resulted in the lowest dust levels around the continuous mining machine, but this configuration resulted in some of the highest levels of dust in the return and gas on the off-curtain side of the mining face. Two field studies showed some similarities to the laboratory findings, with elevated dust levels at the rear corners of the continuous miner when all of the scrubber exhaust was redirected toward the face either up the off-tubing side or equally up both sides of the mining machine. PMID:26251566

  6. The School Advanced Ventilation Engineering Software (SAVES)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The School Advanced Ventilation Engineering Software (SAVES) package is a tool to help school designers assess the potential financial payback and indoor humidity control benefits of Energy Recovery Ventilation (ERV) systems for school applications.

  7. Effectiveness of a manure scraper system for odor control in tunnel-ventilated swine finisher barns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Options for odor control from tunnel-ventilated swine barns are limited. Automated scrapers have been successful for reducing odor emissions in free-stall dairies, and for reducing H2S emissions in research-scale swine finisher rooms, but their effectiveness for reducing odor in commercial tunnel-v...

  8. A synchronization system for the analysis of biomedical signals recorded with different devices from mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Alejandro; Hernández, A Mauricio; Londoño, Zulma; Serna, Leidy Y; Mañanas, Miguel A

    2012-01-01

    Conducting research associated with mechanically ventilated patients often requires the recording of several biomedical signals to dispose of multiple sources of information to perform a robust analysis. This is especially important in the analysis of the relationship between pressure, volume and flow, signals available from mechanical ventilators, and other biopotentials such as the electromyogram of respiratory muscles, intrinsically related with the ventilatory process, but not commonly recorded in the clinical practice. Despite the usefulness of recording signals from multiple sources, few medical devices include the possibility of synchronizing its data with other provided by different biomedical equipment and some may use inaccurate sampling frequencies. Even thought a variant or inaccurate sampling rate does not affect the monitoring of critical patients, it restricts the study of simultaneous related events useful in research of respiratory system activity. In this article a device for temporal synchronization of signals recorded from multiple biomedical devices is described as well as its application in the study of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation with research purposes.

  9. [Mechanical ventilator].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Akio; Hashimoto, S

    2009-07-01

    The development of the computer technology brought reform in the field of medical equipment. Originally the mechanical ventilator was an instrument only as for running by pressure and the tool that let you breathe. However, it has a function to assist a measurement (tidal volume, peek pressure, etc.) and to wean from a ventilator. There is a case to use a mechanical ventilator for after a chest surgical operation. After the operation without the complication, it seems that there is not the special administration. However, special respiratory management is necessary in case of chronic respiratory failure and acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome. Therefore I introduce a method to use a respirator after an operation in our institution.

  10. Ventilators for noninvasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Scala, Raffaele; Naldi, Mario

    2008-08-01

    The application of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) to treat acute respiratory failure has increased tremendously both inside and outside the intensive care unit. The choice of ventilator is crucial for success of NIV in the acute setting, because poor tolerance and excessive air leaks are significantly correlated with NIV failure. Patient-ventilator asynchrony and discomfort can occur if the physician or respiratory therapist fails to adequately set NIV to respond to the patient's ventilatory demand, so clinicians need to fully understood the ventilator's technical peculiarities (eg, efficiency of trigger and cycle systems, speed of pressurization, air-leak compensation, CO(2) rebreathing, reliability of fraction of inspired oxygen reading, monitoring accuracy). A wide range of ventilators of different complexity have been introduced into clinical practice to noninvasively support patients in acute respiratory failure, but the numerous commercially available ventilators (bi-level, intermediate, and intensive care unit ventilators) have substantial differences that can influence patient comfort, patient-ventilator interaction, and, thus, the chance of NIV clinical success. This report examines the most relevant aspects of the historical evolution, the equipment, and the acute-respiratory-failure clinical application of NIV ventilators.

  11. Assessment of Energy Savings Potential from the Use of Demand Control Ventilation Systems in General Office Spaces in California

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tianzhen; Fisk, William J.

    2009-07-08

    Demand controlled ventilation (DCV) was evaluated for general office spaces in California. A medium size office building meeting the prescriptive requirements of the 2008 California building energy efficiency standards (CEC 2008) was assumed in the building energy simulations performed with the EnergyPlus program to calculate the DCV energy savings potential in five typical California climates. Three design occupancy densities and two minimum ventilation rates were used as model inputs to cover a broader range of design variations. The assumed values of minimum ventilation rates in offices without DCV, based on two different measurement methods, were 81 and 28 cfm per occupant. These rates are based on the co-author's unpublished analyses of data from EPA's survey of 100 U.S. office buildings. These minimum ventilation rates exceed the 15 to 20 cfm per person required in most ventilation standards for offices. The cost effectiveness of applying DCV in general office spaces was estimated via a life cycle cost analyses that considered system costs and energy cost reductions. The results of the energy modeling indicate that the energy savings potential of DCV is largest in the desert area of California (climate zone 14), followed by Mountains (climate zone 16), Central Valley (climate zone 12), North Coast (climate zone 3), and South Coast (climate zone 6). The results of the life cycle cost analysis show DCV is cost effective for office spaces if the typical minimum ventilation rates without DCV is 81 cfm per person, except at the low design occupancy of 10 people per 1000 ft{sup 2} in climate zones 3 and 6. At the low design occupancy of 10 people per 1000 ft{sup 2}, the greatest DCV life cycle cost savings is a net present value (NPV) of $0.52/ft{sup 2} in climate zone 14, followed by $0.32/ft{sup 2} in climate zone 16 and $0.19/ft{sup 2} in climate zone 12. At the medium design occupancy of 15 people per 1000 ft{sup 2}, the DCV savings are higher with a NPV $0

  12. System Performance Measurement Supports Design Recommendations for Solar Ventilation Preheat System (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-08-01

    Technical briefing to report the outcomes of a data monitoring effort to determine the nature of solar vent preheat system performance problems at a U.S. military installation. The analysis reports up-to-date research and findings regarding system design, helping to clarify the issue as a factor of system design, rather than a shortcoming of SVP systems.

  13. Space station ventilation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G. V.; Allen, G. E.

    1972-01-01

    A ventilation system design and selection method which is applicable to any manned vehicle were developed. The method was used to generate design options for the NASA 33-foot diameter space station, all of which meet the ventilation system design requirements. System characteristics such as weight, volume, and power were normalized to dollar costs for each option. Total system costs for the various options ranged from a worst case $8 million to a group of four which were all approximately $2 million. A system design was then chosen from the $2 million group and is presented in detail. A ventilation system layout was designed for the MSFC space station mockup which provided comfortable, efficient ventilation of the mockup. A conditioned air distribution system design for the 14-foot diameter modular space station, using the same techniques, is also presented. The tradeoff study resulted in the selection of a system which costs $1.9 million, as compared to the alternate configuration which would have cost $2.6 million.

  14. Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning: Recent Advances in Diagnostics and Controls to Improve Air-Handling System Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, Craig; Wray, Craig P.; Sherman, Max H.; Walker, I.S.; Dickerhoff, D.J.; Federspiel, C.C.

    2008-02-01

    The performance of air-handling systems in buildings needs to be improved. Many of the deficiencies result from myths and lore and a lack of understanding about the non-linear physical principles embedded in the associated technologies. By incorporating these principles, a few important efforts related to diagnostics and controls have already begun to solve some of the problems. This paper illustrates three novel solutions: one rapidly assesses duct leakage, the second configures ad hoc duct-static-pressure reset strategies, and the third identifies useful intermittent ventilation strategies. By highlighting these efforts, this paper seeks to stimulate new research and technology developments that could further improve air-handling systems.

  15. Dynamic imaging of pulmonary ventilation. Description of a novel digital fluoroscopic system.

    PubMed

    Kiuru, A; Svedström, E; Kuuluvainen, I

    1991-03-01

    A new fluoroscopic imaging device consisting of an AT-microcomputer and a digital image memory unit has been used in experimental and clinical ventilation studies during a 2-year period. Digital images with 256 shades of gray were collected during one to 3 ventilation cycles at the rate of 6 to 25 images/s and stored on an optical laser disc. Both subtracted time interval difference (TID-) images and images relative, for example, to the mean image of the cycle (REL-images) were produced. The series of images could also be evaluated dynamically using animation sequences or analyzed using region of interest calculations. The method gave dynamic information with adequate spatial resolution and was easy to use in clinical practice. The radiation dose was kept low due to the high kilovoltage and heavy beam filtration technique. In experimental studies the software enabled flexible measurements of physiological pulmonary parameters.

  16. 14 CFR 27.831 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 27.831 Ventilation. (a) The ventilating system for the pilot and passenger compartments must be designed to prevent... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ventilation. 27.831 Section...

  17. 14 CFR 27.831 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 27.831 Ventilation. (a) The ventilating system for the pilot and passenger compartments must be designed to prevent... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ventilation. 27.831 Section...

  18. 14 CFR 27.831 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 27.831 Ventilation. (a) The ventilating system for the pilot and passenger compartments must be designed to prevent... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ventilation. 27.831 Section...

  19. 14 CFR 27.831 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 27.831 Ventilation. (a) The ventilating system for the pilot and passenger compartments must be designed to prevent... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ventilation. 27.831 Section...

  20. 46 CFR 194.15-5 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Ventilation of air conditioning systems serving the chemical laboratory shall be designed so that air cannot... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation. 194.15-5 Section 194.15-5 Shipping COAST....15-5 Ventilation. (a) Operations, reactions or experiments which produce toxic, noxious or...

  1. 14 CFR 27.831 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 27.831 Ventilation. (a) The ventilating system for the pilot and passenger compartments must be designed to prevent... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ventilation. 27.831 Section...

  2. 46 CFR 194.15-5 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Ventilation of air conditioning systems serving the chemical laboratory shall be designed so that air cannot... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ventilation. 194.15-5 Section 194.15-5 Shipping COAST....15-5 Ventilation. (a) Operations, reactions or experiments which produce toxic, noxious or...

  3. A new approach to heat and moisture regeneration in the ventilation system of rooms. II. Prototype of the real device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristov, Yu. A.; Mezentsev, I. V.; Mukhin, V. A.

    2006-05-01

    This paper presents the results of investigations conducted on the real prototype of a regenerator whose operating conditions depended on the weather conditions during the testing (winter of 2004). It has been shown that the heat and moisture recovery coefficients can be purposefully and independently regulated over a wide range by selecting the quantity of the adsorbent and heat-accumulating medium. The use of the proposed device in the ventilation system of a standard two-room apartment under the conditions of Novosibirsk can lead to a 44% reduction of heating costs annually.

  4. Radioaerosol ventilation imaging in ventilator-dependent patients. Technical considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Vezina, W.; Chamberlain, M.; Vinitski, S.; King, M.; Nicholson, R.; Morgan, W.K.

    1985-11-01

    The differentiation of pulmonary embolism (PE) from regional ventilatory abnormalities accompanied by reduced perfusion requires contemporary perfusion and ventilation studies. Distinguishing these conditions in ventilator-dependent patients is aided by administering a Tc-99m aerosol to characterize regional ventilation, and by performing a conventional Tc-99m MAA perfusion study. The technique uses a simple in-house constructed apparatus. Simple photographic techniques suffice, but computer subtraction of perfusion from the combined perfusion-ventilation image renders interpretation easier if aerosol administration follows perfusion imaging. Multiple defects can be examined in a single study. Excluding normal or near-normal perfusion studies, PE was thought to be present in eight of 16 patients after perfusion imaging alone, but in only one of eight after added aerosol imaging. Angiography confirmed the diagnosis in that patient. Of the eight patients who had abnormal perfusion but were thought unlikely to have PE from the perfusion study alone, two had normal ventilation, and subsequently were shown to have PE by angiography. Because angiography was only performed on patients who were thought to have a high probability of PE on sequential perfusion-ventilation imaging, the true incidence of PE may have been higher. Aerosol ventilation imaging is a useful adjunct to perfusion imaging in patients on ventilators. It requires an efficient delivery system, particularly if aerosol administration follows perfusion imaging, as it does in this study.

  5. 46 CFR 111.103-3 - Machinery space ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Machinery space ventilation. 111.103-3 Section 111.103-3...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Remote Stopping Systems § 111.103-3 Machinery space ventilation. (a) Each machinery space ventilation system must have two controls to stop the ventilation, one of which may be the...

  6. 46 CFR 111.103-3 - Machinery space ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Machinery space ventilation. 111.103-3 Section 111.103-3...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Remote Stopping Systems § 111.103-3 Machinery space ventilation. (a) Each machinery space ventilation system must have two controls to stop the ventilation, one of which may be the...

  7. 46 CFR 111.103-3 - Machinery space ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Machinery space ventilation. 111.103-3 Section 111.103-3...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Remote Stopping Systems § 111.103-3 Machinery space ventilation. (a) Each machinery space ventilation system must have two controls to stop the ventilation, one of which may be the...

  8. 46 CFR 38.20-10 - Ventilation-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and accessible from the cargo handling deck. Such ventilation systems shall be designed to preclude... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation-T/ALL. 38.20-10 Section 38.20-10 Shipping... Ventilation § 38.20-10 Ventilation—T/ALL. (a) A power ventilation system shall be provided for...

  9. 46 CFR 111.103-3 - Machinery space ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Machinery space ventilation. 111.103-3 Section 111.103-3...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Remote Stopping Systems § 111.103-3 Machinery space ventilation. (a) Each machinery space ventilation system must have two controls to stop the ventilation, one of which may be the...

  10. 46 CFR 111.103-3 - Machinery space ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Machinery space ventilation. 111.103-3 Section 111.103-3...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Remote Stopping Systems § 111.103-3 Machinery space ventilation. (a) Each machinery space ventilation system must have two controls to stop the ventilation, one of which may be the...

  11. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on ventilation cooling is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

  12. Laboratory Ventilation and Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steere, Norman V.

    1965-01-01

    In order to meet the needs of both safety and economy, laboratory ventilation systems must effectively remove air-borne toxic and flammable materials and at the same time exhaust a minimum volume of air. Laboratory hoods are the most commonly used means of removing gases, dusts, mists, vapors, and fumed from laboratory operations. To be effective,…

  13. Understanding mechanical ventilators.

    PubMed

    Chatburn, Robert L

    2010-12-01

    The respiratory care academic community has not yet adopted a standardized system for classifying and describing modes of ventilation. As a result, there is enough confusion that patient care, clinician education and even ventilator sales are all put at risk. This article summarizes a ventilator mode taxonomy that has been extensively published over the last 15 years. Specifically, the classification system has three components: a description of the control variables within breath; a description of the sequence of mandatory and spontaneous breaths; and a specification for the targeting scheme. This three-level specification provides scalability of detail to make the mode description appropriate for the particular need. At the bedside, we need only refer to a mode briefly using the first or perhaps first and second components. To distinguish between similar modes and brand names, we would need to include all components. This taxonomy uses the equation of motion for the respiratory system as the underlying theoretical framework. All terms relevant to describing modes of mechanical ventilation are defined in an extensive appendix.

  14. Development of a Self-Tuning Controller for HVAC (Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning) Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    AD-RI69 329 DEVELOPMENT OF A SELF-TUNING CONTROLLER FORR f (HEATING VENTILATING AND.. (U) NARL CIVIL ENGINEERING LAB PORT HUENEME CA R E-KIRTS ET AL...Facilities Engineering Command I PROGRAM NO: Z0371-O1-221B0% ___ NAVAL CIVIL ENGINEERING LABORATORYT C S PORT HUENEME, CALIFORNIA 93043 LLJ Approved for...UITNUBR NAVAL CIVIL ENGINEERING LABORATORY 64710N; Port Hueneme, California 93043 Z0371-01-221B I I CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12 REPORT DATE Naval

  15. Flow-Field Characteristics of High-Temperature Annular Buoyant Jets and Their Development Laws Influenced by Ventilation System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiaping; Wang, Hai; Liu, Qiuhan

    2013-01-01

    The flow-field characteristics of high-temperature annular buoyant jets as well as the development laws influenced by ventilation system were studied using numerical methods to eliminate the pollutants effectively in this paper. The development laws of high-temperature annular buoyant jets were analyzed and compared with previous studies, including radial velocity distribution, axial velocity and temperature decay, reattachment position, cross-section diameter, volumetric flow rate, and velocity field characteristics with different pressures at the exhaust hood inlet. The results showed that when the ratio of outer diameter to inner diameter of the annulus was smaller than 5/2, the flow-field characteristics had significant difference compared to circular buoyant jets with the same outer diameter. For similar diameter ratios, reattachment in this paper occurred further downstream in contrast to previous study. Besides, the development laws of volumetric flow rate and cross-section diameter were given with different initial parameters. In addition, through analyzing air distribution characteristics under the coupling effect of high-temperature annular buoyant jets and ventilation system, it could be found that the position where maximum axial velocity occurred was changing gradually when the pressure at the exhaust hood inlet changed from 0 Pa to −5 Pa. PMID:24000278

  16. Flow-field characteristics of high-temperature annular buoyant jets and their development laws influenced by ventilation system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Huang, Yanqiu; Liu, Jiaping; Wang, Hai; Liu, Qiuhan

    2013-01-01

    The flow-field characteristics of high-temperature annular buoyant jets as well as the development laws influenced by ventilation system were studied using numerical methods to eliminate the pollutants effectively in this paper. The development laws of high-temperature annular buoyant jets were analyzed and compared with previous studies, including radial velocity distribution, axial velocity and temperature decay, reattachment position, cross-section diameter, volumetric flow rate, and velocity field characteristics with different pressures at the exhaust hood inlet. The results showed that when the ratio of outer diameter to inner diameter of the annulus was smaller than 5/2, the flow-field characteristics had significant difference compared to circular buoyant jets with the same outer diameter. For similar diameter ratios, reattachment in this paper occurred further downstream in contrast to previous study. Besides, the development laws of volumetric flow rate and cross-section diameter were given with different initial parameters. In addition, through analyzing air distribution characteristics under the coupling effect of high-temperature annular buoyant jets and ventilation system, it could be found that the position where maximum axial velocity occurred was changing gradually when the pressure at the exhaust hood inlet changed from 0 Pa to -5 Pa.

  17. Energy recovery ventilator

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, S. L.; Dravnieks, K.

    1985-04-30

    An energy recovery ventilator adapted to be mounted on a roof and adapted to be connected to the outlet of an exhaust air duct of a building ventilation system and the inlet of an air supply duct of a building ventilation system. The energy recovery ventilator includes a housing having an exhaust air chamber and a supply air chamber separated by a divider wall. A circular heat transfer wheel is position in the housing, a portion of the wheel being housed in the exhaust air chamber and a second portion of the wheel being housed in the supply air chamber, and the heat transfer wheel is caused to rotate about a central axis. An exhaust fan is housed in the exhaust air chamber and causes exhaust air to be pulled through the exhaust air duct and the heat transfer wheel and to be exhausted from the housing. A supply air fan is housed in the supply air housing above the heat transfer wheel, and causes outside air to be drawn into the supply air chamber and to be forced through the heat transfer wheel into the air supply duct.

  18. 29 CFR 1910.94 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... replacement system complying with the preceding section, general heating of the building in which the spray... maintained at not less than 65 °F. when the exhaust system is in operation or the general heating system... handled by an exhaust ventilation system. (viii) Exhaust ventilation system. A system for...

  19. 29 CFR 1910.94 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... replacement system complying with the preceding section, general heating of the building in which the spray... maintained at not less than 65 °F. when the exhaust system is in operation or the general heating system... handled by an exhaust ventilation system. (viii) Exhaust ventilation system. A system for...

  20. 29 CFR 1910.94 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... replacement system complying with the preceding section, general heating of the building in which the spray... maintained at not less than 65 °F. when the exhaust system is in operation or the general heating system... handled by an exhaust ventilation system. (viii) Exhaust ventilation system. A system for...

  1. 29 CFR 1910.94 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... replacement system complying with the preceding section, general heating of the building in which the spray... maintained at not less than 65 °F. when the exhaust system is in operation or the general heating system... handled by an exhaust ventilation system. (viii) Exhaust ventilation system. A system for...

  2. Development and Design of a User Interface for a Computer Automated Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning System

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, B.; /Fermilab

    1999-10-08

    A user interface is created to monitor and operate the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system. The interface is networked to the system's programmable logic controller. The controller maintains automated control of the system. The user through the interface is able to see the status of the system and override or adjust the automatic control features. The interface is programmed to show digital readouts of system equipment as well as visual queues of system operational statuses. It also provides information for system design and component interaction. The interface is made easier to read by simple designs, color coordination, and graphics. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermi lab) conducts high energy particle physics research. Part of this research involves collision experiments with protons, and anti-protons. These interactions are contained within one of two massive detectors along Fermilab's largest particle accelerator the Tevatron. The D-Zero Assembly Building houses one of these detectors. At this time detector systems are being upgraded for a second experiment run, titled Run II. Unlike the previous run, systems at D-Zero must be computer automated so operators do not have to continually monitor and adjust these systems during the run. Human intervention should only be necessary for system start up and shut down, and equipment failure. Part of this upgrade includes the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system (HVAC system). The HVAC system is responsible for controlling two subsystems, the air temperatures of the D-Zero Assembly Building and associated collision hall, as well as six separate water systems used in the heating and cooling of the air and detector components. The BYAC system is automated by a programmable logic controller. In order to provide system monitoring and operator control a user interface is required. This paper will address methods and strategies used to design and implement an effective user interface

  3. 46 CFR 111.103-7 - Ventilation stop stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation stop stations. 111.103-7 Section 111.103-7...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Remote Stopping Systems § 111.103-7 Ventilation stop stations. Each ventilation stop... Case of Fire Break Glass and Operate Switch to Stop Ventilation;” (c) Have the “stop” position of...

  4. 46 CFR 111.103-7 - Ventilation stop stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation stop stations. 111.103-7 Section 111.103-7...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Remote Stopping Systems § 111.103-7 Ventilation stop stations. Each ventilation stop... Case of Fire Break Glass and Operate Switch to Stop Ventilation;” (c) Have the “stop” position of...

  5. 46 CFR 38.20-10 - Ventilation-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation-T/ALL. 38.20-10 Section 38.20-10 Shipping... Ventilation § 38.20-10 Ventilation—T/ALL. (a) A power ventilation system shall be provided for compartments... equipped with power ventilation of the exhaust type having capacity sufficient to effect a complete...

  6. 46 CFR 108.185 - Ventilation for enclosed classified locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Ventilation § 108.185 Ventilation for enclosed classified locations. (a) The ventilation system for each enclosed classified location must be... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation for enclosed classified locations....

  7. 46 CFR 108.185 - Ventilation for enclosed classified locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Ventilation § 108.185 Ventilation for enclosed classified locations. (a) The ventilation system for each enclosed classified location must be... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation for enclosed classified locations....

  8. 46 CFR 108.185 - Ventilation for enclosed classified locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Ventilation § 108.185 Ventilation for enclosed classified locations. (a) The ventilation system for each enclosed classified location must be... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation for enclosed classified locations....

  9. Transmission of Mycobacterium chimaera from Heater–Cooler Units during Cardiac Surgery despite an Ultraclean Air Ventilation System

    PubMed Central

    Sommerstein, Rami; Rüegg, Christian; Kohler, Philipp; Bloemberg, Guido; Kuster, Stefan P.

    2016-01-01

    Heater–cooler units (HCUs) were recently identified as a source of Mycobacterium chimaera causing surgical site infections. We investigated transmission of this bacterium from HCUs to the surgical field by using a thermic anemometer and particle counter, videotape of an operating room equipped with an ultraclean laminar airflow ventilation system, and bacterial culture sedimentation plates in a nonventilated room. Smoke from the HCU reached the surgical field in 23 s by merging with ultraclean air. The HCU produced on average 5.2, 139, and 14.8 particles/min in the surgical field at positions Off, On/oriented toward, and On/oriented away, respectively. Culture plates were positive for M. chimaera <5 m from the HCU in the test room. These experiments confirm airborne transmission of M. chimaera aerosols from a contaminated HCU to an open surgical field despite ultraclean air ventilation. Efforts to mitigate infectious risks during surgery should consider contamination from water sources and airflow-generating devices. PMID:27070958

  10. Transmission of Mycobacterium chimaera from Heater-Cooler Units during Cardiac Surgery despite an Ultraclean Air Ventilation System.

    PubMed

    Sommerstein, Rami; Rüegg, Christian; Kohler, Philipp; Bloemberg, Guido; Kuster, Stefan P; Sax, Hugo

    2016-06-01

    Heater-cooler units (HCUs) were recently identified as a source of Mycobacterium chimaera causing surgical site infections. We investigated transmission of this bacterium from HCUs to the surgical field by using a thermic anemometer and particle counter, videotape of an operating room equipped with an ultraclean laminar airflow ventilation system, and bacterial culture sedimentation plates in a nonventilated room. Smoke from the HCU reached the surgical field in 23 s by merging with ultraclean air. The HCU produced on average 5.2, 139, and 14.8 particles/min in the surgical field at positions Off, On/oriented toward, and On/oriented away, respectively. Culture plates were positive for M. chimaera <5 m from the HCU in the test room. These experiments confirm airborne transmission of M. chimaera aerosols from a contaminated HCU to an open surgical field despite ultraclean air ventilation. Efforts to mitigate infectious risks during surgery should consider contamination from water sources and airflow-generating devices.

  11. New identification of outliers and ventilator-associated pneumonia rates from 2005 to 2007 within the German Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System.

    PubMed

    Meyer, E; Sohr, D; Gastmeier, P; Geffers, C

    2009-11-01

    This study presents data for ventilator use and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) rates from the German hospital surveillance system for nosocomial infections (KISS: Krankenhaus Infektions Surveillance System). New Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) definitions became effective during 2005 and we describe the new method used by KISS to determine individual units with data at extreme ranges. The number of VAP cases per 1000 device-days was calculated and a new visual method, specifically funnel plots, was introduced to identify outliers. The VAP rate will be highly influenced by chance variability if only a few VAP cases are observed during a low number of ventilator-days. Funnel plots take this relationship between event rate and volume of cases into account. A total of 391 intensive care units (ICUs) reported surveillance data from 8 86 816 patients and included 6896 VAPs and 3 113 983 patient-days for the period January 2005 to December 2007. The mean VAP rate according to the new CDC definitions was 5.5 cases per 1000 ventilator-days (median: 4.4). The mean ventilator use in all ICUs was 35.7 (median: 29.3). Funnel plots identified 14.3% as outliers; 34 of them as high, and 22 as low, outliers. Since 2008, visual feedback to the KISS ICUs has been supplied by funnel plots. These are less prone to misinterpretation than histograms and they indicate when investigation is required for increasing VAP.

  12. Decommissioning of Active Ventilation Systems in a Nuclear R and D Facility to Prepare for Building Demolition (Whiteshell Laboratories Decommissioning Project, Canada) - 13073

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, Brian; May, Doug; Howlett, Don; Bilinsky, Dennis

    2013-07-01

    Whiteshell Laboratories (WL) is a nuclear research establishment owned by the Canadian government and operated by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) since the early 1960's. WL is currently under a decommissioning license and the mandate is to remediate the nuclear legacy liabilities in a safe and cost effective manner. The WL Project is the first major nuclear decommissioning project in Canada. A major initiative underway is to decommission and demolish the main R and D Laboratory complex. The Building 300 R and D complex was constructed to accommodate laboratories and offices which were mainly used for research and development associated with organic-cooled reactors, nuclear fuel waste management, reactor safety, advanced fuel cycles and other applications of nuclear energy. Building 300 is a three storey structure of approximately 16,000 m{sup 2}. In order to proceed with building demolition, the contaminated systems inside the building have to be characterized, removed, and the waste managed. There is a significant focus on volume reduction of radioactive waste for the WL project. The active ventilation system is one of the significant contaminated systems in Building 300 that requires decommissioning and removal. The active ventilation system was designed to manage hazardous fumes and radioactivity from ventilation devices (e.g., fume hoods, snorkels and glove boxes) and to prevent the escape of airborne hazardous material outside of the laboratory boundary in the event of an upset condition. The system includes over 200 ventilation devices and 32 active exhaust fan units and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. The strategy to remove the ventilation system was to work from the laboratory end back to the fan/filter system. Each ventilation duct was radiologically characterized. Fogging was used to minimize loose contamination. Sections of the duct were removed by various cutting methods and bagged for temporary storage prior to disposition

  13. Heat Exchanger/Humidifier Trade Study and Conceptual Design for the Constellation Space Suit Portable Life Support System Ventilation Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Sompayrac, Robert; Conger, Bruce; Chamberlain, Mateo

    2009-01-01

    As development of the Constellation Space Suit Element progresses, designing the most effective and efficient life support systems is critical. The baseline schematic analysis for the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) indicates that the ventilation loop will need some method of heat exchange and humidification prior to entering the helmet. A trade study was initiated to identify the challenges associated with conditioning the spacesuit breathing gas stream for temperature and water vapor control, to survey technological literature and resources on heat exchanger and humidifiers to provide solutions to the problems of conditioning the spacesuit breathing gas stream, and to propose potential candidate technologies to perform the heat exchanger and humidifier functions. This paper summarizes the results of this trade study and also describes the conceptual designs that NASA developed to address these issues.

  14. Heat Exchanger/Humidifier Trade Study and Conceptual Design for the Constellation Space Suit Portable Life Support System Ventilation Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Conger, Bruce; Sompyrac, Robert; Chamberlain, Mateo

    2008-01-01

    As development of the Constellation Space Suit Element progresses, designing the most effective and efficient life support systems is critical. The baseline schematic analysis for the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) indicates that the ventilation loop will need some method of heat exchange and humidification prior to entering the helmet. A trade study was initiated to identify the challenges associated with conditioning the spacesuit breathing gas stream for temperature and water vapor control, to survey technological literature and resources on heat exchanger and humidifiers to provide solutions to the problems of conditioning the spacesuit breathing gas stream, and to propose potential candidate technologies to perform the heat exchanger and humidifier functions. This paper summarizes the results of this trade study and also describes the conceptual designs that NASA developed to address these issues.

  15. Three-dimensional finite-element simulation of a turbulent push-pull ventilation system.

    PubMed

    Flynn, M R; Ahn, K; Miller, C T

    1995-10-01

    A finite-element formulation with penalty approach to enforce continuity is employed here to simulate the three-dimensional velocity field resulting from a simple push-pull ventilation configuration. An analytic expression for the length scale and a transport equation for turbulent kinetic energy are coupled with the momentum equations. A coaxial square hood and jet are arranged with cross-draught perpendicular to the common centreline. Numerical predictions of the velocity and turbulence kinetic energy fields are evaluated in the plane of symmetry with hot film anemometry, and smoke-wire flow visualizations. The agreement of the simulated jet trajectories with flow visualizations is reasonable, as are velocities. Predictions of turbulence kinetic energy are not as good, particularly near the hood face. Despite the limitations the numerical approach is useful in assessing the impact of cross-draughts on the push-pull arrangement.

  16. 6. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST AT VENTILATION EQUIPMENT IN SOUTH VENTILATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST AT VENTILATION EQUIPMENT IN SOUTH VENTILATION HOUSE. THIS AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEM WAS INSTALLED BY PARKS-CRAMER COMPANY OF FITCHBURG, MASSACHUSETTS WHEN THE MILL WAS CONSTRUCTED IN 1923-24. ONE AIR WASHER AND FAN ROOM EXTERIOR IS VISIBLE ON THE RIGHT. THE DUCTS FROM BOTH FAN ROOMS (CURVED METAL STRUCTURES AT CENTER AND LEFT OF PHOTO) ARE CONNECTED TO A COMMON AIR SHAFT. - Stark Mill, 117 Corinth Road, Hogansville, Troup County, GA

  17. Efficiency of a tool-mounted local exhaust ventilation system for controlling dust exposure during metal grinding operations.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Jun

    2007-12-01

    In general, control of metal dust from hand-held disk grinders is difficult because such respirable dust tends to disperse in every direction around the grinding wheel and cannot be captured effectively by a conventional exhaust hood. The author described the application of a custom-made tool-mounted local exhaust ventilation (LEV) system attached to a hand-held disk grinder, and by laboratory experiments assessed its effectiveness at dust control. The effectiveness of the LEV for dust control was assessed by determining the respirable dust concentration around the grinding wheel during metal surface grinding with and without the use of the LEV. It was shown that the average respirable grinding dust concentration decreased from 7.73 mg/m(3) with the LEV off to 4.87 mg/m(3) with the LEV on, a mean dust generation reduction of about 37%.

  18. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in restaurants without separate ventilation systems for smoking and nonsmoking dining areas.

    PubMed

    Akbar-Khanzadeh, Farhang

    2003-02-01

    In this study, the author examined (a) levels of airborne pollutants from environmental tobacco smoke in 8 restaurants, and (b) changes in urinary cotinine and nicotine levels among 97 nonsmoking subjects (i.e., 40 restaurant employees, 37 patrons, and 20 referents). Airborne pollutant levels were significantly lower in the control environments than in the nonsmoking dining rooms in which smoking was not permitted, and the levels were significantly lower in the dining rooms in which smoking was not permitted than in the dining rooms in which smoking was permitted. Levels of urinary cotinine and nicotine increased among subjects in the dining rooms in which smoking was permitted, and the increase was significantly greater in employees than patrons. There was a significant positive correlation between levels of urinary nicotine increase and the levels of airborne nicotine and solanesol. The results of this study support the restriction of smoking to designated areas that have separate ventilation systems, or the prohibition of smoking in restaurants.

  19. Night ventilation control strategies in office buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhaojun; Yi, Lingli; Gao, Fusheng

    2009-10-15

    In moderate climates night ventilation is an effective and energy-efficient approach to improve the indoor thermal environment for office buildings during the summer months, especially for heavyweight construction. However, is night ventilation a suitable strategy for office buildings with lightweight construction located in cold climates? In order to answer this question, the whole energy-consumption analysis software EnergyPlus was used to simulate the indoor thermal environment and energy consumption in typical office buildings with night mechanical ventilation in three cities in northern China. The summer outdoor climate data was analyzed, and three typical design days were chosen. The most important factors influencing night ventilation performance such as ventilation rates, ventilation duration, building mass and climatic conditions were evaluated. When night ventilation operation time is closer to active cooling time, the efficiency of night ventilation is higher. With night ventilation rate of 10 ach, the mean radiant temperature of the indoor surface decreased by up to 3.9 C. The longer the duration of operation, the more efficient the night ventilation strategy becomes. The control strategies for three locations are given in the paper. Based on the optimized strategies, the operation consumption and fees are calculated. The results show that more energy is saved in office buildings cooled by a night ventilation system in northern China than ones that do not employ this strategy. (author)

  20. The Maintenance of Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning Systems and Indoor Air Quality in Schools: A Guide for School Facility Managers. Technical Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Arthur E.

    To help maintain good indoor air quality (IAQ) in schools, guidance for the development and implementation of an effective program for maintenance and operation of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems are discussed. Frequently, a building's occupants will complain about IAQ when the temperature or humidity are at uncomfortable…

  1. Summary of human responses to ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Seppanen, Olli A.; Fisk, William J.

    2004-06-01

    The effects of ventilation on indoor air quality and health is a complex issue. It is known that ventilation is necessary to remove indoor generated pollutants from indoor air or dilute their concentration to acceptable levels. But, as the limit values of all pollutants are not known, the exact determination of required ventilation rates based on pollutant concentrations and associated risks is seldom possible. The selection of ventilation rates has to be based also on epidemiological research (e.g. Seppanen et al., 1999), laboratory and field experiments (e.g. CEN 1996, Wargocki et al., 2002a) and experience (e.g. ECA 2003). Ventilation may also have harmful effects on indoor air quality and climate if not properly designed, installed, maintained and operated as summarized by Seppdnen (2003). Ventilation may bring indoors harmful substances that deteriorate the indoor environment. Ventilation also affects air and moisture flow through the building envelope and may lead to moisture problems that deteriorate the structures of the building. Ventilation changes the pressure differences over the structures of building and may cause or prevent the infiltration of pollutants from structures or adjacent spaces. Ventilation is also in many cases used to control the thermal environment or humidity in buildings. Ventilation can be implemented with various methods which may also affect health (e.g. Seppdnen and Fisk, 2002, Wargocki et al., 2002a). In non residential buildings and hot climates, ventilation is often integrated with air-conditioning which makes the operation of ventilation system more complex. As ventilation is used for many purposes its health effects are also various and complex. This paper summarizes the current knowledge on positive and negative effects of ventilation on health and other human responses. The focus of the paper is on office-type working environment and residential buildings. In the industrial premises the problems of air quality are usually

  2. The correlation of Acanthamoeba from the ventilation system with other environmental parameters in commercial buildings as possible indicator for indoor air quality

    PubMed Central

    OOI, Soo Shen; MAK, Joon Wah; CHEN, Donald K.F.; AMBU, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The free-living protozoan Acanthamoeba is an opportunistic pathogen that is ubiquitous in our environment. However, its role in affecting indoor air quality and ill-health of indoor occupants is relatively unknown. The present study investigated the presence of Acanthamoeba from the ventilation system and its correlation with other indoor air quality parameters, used in the industry code of practice and its potential as an indicator for indoor air quality. Indoor air quality assessments were carried out in nine commercial buildings with approval from the building management, and the parameters assessed were as recommended by the Department of Occupational Safety and Health. The presence of Acanthamoeba was determined through dust swabs from the ventilation system and indoor furniture. Logistic regression was performed to study the correlation between assessed parameters and occupants’ complaints. A total of 107 sampling points were assessed and 40.2% of the supplying air diffuser and blowing fan and 15% of the furniture were positive for cysts. There was a significant correlation between Acanthamoeba detected from the ventilation system with ambient total fungus count (r=0.327; p=0.01) and respirable particulates (r=0.276; p=0.01). Occupants’ sick building syndrome experience also correlated with the presence of Acanthamoeba in the ventilation system (r=0.361; p=0.01) and those detected on the furniture (r=0.290; p=0.01). Logistic regression showed that there was a five-fold probability of sick building syndrome among occupants when Acanthamoeba was detected in the ventilation system. PMID:27476379

  3. Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller

    SciTech Connect

    Staff Scientist; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max; Dickerhoff, Darryl

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller (RIVEC) to reduce the energy impact of required mechanical ventilation by 20percent, maintain or improve indoor air quality and provide demand response benefits. This represents potential energy savings of about 140 GWh of electricity and 83 million therms of natural gas as well as proportional peak savings in California. The RIVEC controller is intended to meet the 2008 Title 24 requirements for residential ventilation as well as taking into account the issues of outdoor conditions, other ventilation devices (including economizers), peak demand concerns and occupant preferences. The controller is designed to manage all the residential ventilation systems that are currently available. A key innovation in this controller is the ability to implement the concept of efficacy and intermittent ventilation which allows time shifting of ventilation. Using this approach ventilation can be shifted away from times of high cost or high outdoor pollution towards times when it is cheaper and more effective. Simulations, based on the ones used to develop the new residential ventilation requirements for the California Buildings Energy code, were used to further define the specific criteria and strategies needed for the controller. These simulations provide estimates of the energy, peak power and contaminant improvement possible for different California climates for the various ventilation systems. Results from a field test of the prototype controller corroborate the predicted performance.

  4. Ventilation Model and Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    V. Chipman

    2003-07-18

    This model and analysis report develops, validates, and implements a conceptual model for heat transfer in and around a ventilated emplacement drift. This conceptual model includes thermal radiation between the waste package and the drift wall, convection from the waste package and drift wall surfaces into the flowing air, and conduction in the surrounding host rock. These heat transfer processes are coupled and vary both temporally and spatially, so numerical and analytical methods are used to implement the mathematical equations which describe the conceptual model. These numerical and analytical methods predict the transient response of the system, at the drift scale, in terms of spatially varying temperatures and ventilation efficiencies. The ventilation efficiency describes the effectiveness of the ventilation process in removing radionuclide decay heat from the drift environment. An alternative conceptual model is also developed which evaluates the influence of water and water vapor mass transport on the ventilation efficiency. These effects are described using analytical methods which bound the contribution of latent heat to the system, quantify the effects of varying degrees of host rock saturation (and hence host rock thermal conductivity) on the ventilation efficiency, and evaluate the effects of vapor and enhanced vapor diffusion on the host rock thermal conductivity.

  5. Wii, Kinect, and Move. Heart Rate, Oxygen Consumption, Energy Expenditure, and Ventilation due to Different Physically Active Video Game Systems in College Students.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Krista S; Siebrant, Sarah M; Brown, Gregory A; Shaw, Brandon S; Shaw, Ina

    Nintendo Wii, Sony Playstation Move, and Microsoft XBOX Kinect are home video gaming systems that involve player movement to control on-screen game play. Numerous investigations have demonstrated that playing Wii is moderate physical activity at best, but Move and Kinect have not been as thoroughly investigated. The purpose of this study was to compare heart rate, oxygen consumption, and ventilation while playing the games Wii Boxing, Kinect Boxing, and Move Gladiatorial Combat. Heart rate, oxygen consumption, and ventilation were measured at rest and during a graded exercise test in 10 males and 9 females (19.8 ± 0.33 y, 175.4 ± 2.0 cm, 80.2 ± 7.7 kg,). On another day, in a randomized order, the participants played Wii Boxing, Kinect Boxing, and Move Gladiatorial Combat while heart rate, ventilation, and oxygen consumption were measured. There were no differences in heart rate (116.0 ± 18.3 vs. 119.3 ± 17.6 vs. 120.1 ± 17.6 beats/min), oxygen consumption (9.2 ± 3.0 vs. 10.6 ± 2.4 vs. 9.6 ± 2.4 ml/kg/min), or minute ventilation (18.9 ± 5.7 vs. 20.8 ± 8.0 vs. 19.7 ± 6.4 L/min) when playing Wii boxing, Kinect boxing, or Move Gladiatorial Combat (respectively). Playing Nintendo Wii Boxing, XBOX Kinect Boxing, and Sony PlayStation Move Gladiatorial Combat all increase heart rate, oxygen consumption, and ventilation above resting levels but there were no significant differences between gaming systems. Overall, playing a "physically active" home video game system does not meet the minimal threshold for moderate intensity physical activity, regardless of gaming system.

  6. Capability of air filters to retain airborne bacteria and molds in heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems.

    PubMed

    Möritz, M; Peters, H; Nipko, B; Rüden, H

    2001-07-01

    The capability of air filters (filterclass: F6, F7) to retain airborne outdoor microorganisms was examined in field experiments in two heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. At the beginning of the 15-month investigation period, the first filter stages of both HVAC systems were equipped with new unused air filters. The number of airborne bacteria and molds before and behind the filters were determined simultaneously in 14 days-intervals using 6-stage Andersen cascade impactors. Under relatively dry (< 80% R. H.) and warm (> 12 degrees C) outdoor air conditions air filters led to a marked reduction of airborne microorganism concentrations (bacteria by approximately 70% and molds by > 80%). However, during long periods of high relative humidity (> 80% R. H.) a proliferation of bacteria on air filters with subsequent release into the filtered air occurred. These microorganisms were mainly smaller than 1.1 microns therefore being part of the respirable fraction. The results showed furthermore that one possibility to avoid microbial proliferation is to limit the relative humidity in the area of the air filters to 80% R. H. (mean of 3 days), e.g. by using preheaters in front of air filters in HVAC-systems.

  7. The performance of automatic sprinkler systems in the extinguishment of incipient conveyor belt fires under ventilated conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.C.; Pro, R.W.; Lazzara, C.P.

    1995-12-31

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines conducted a study to evaluate the effectiveness of automatic water sprinkler systems in the extinguishment of incipient conveyor belt fires under ventilated conditions. Large-scale experiments were conducted using a double strand conveyor belt configuration. Standard response, pendent-type sprinklers, with activation temperatures of 100{degrees}C, were installed above and between the two strands of belting, in accordance with Federal standards for sprinkler system installations in belt drive areas. Experiments at airflows of 1.1 and 4.6 m/s showed that the sprinklers activated later, the peak heat release rate was larger, and more belting was consumed at the higher airflow. In experiments with 74{degrees}C, fast response, directional sprinklers, the sprinklers activated at the same heat release rate for both high and low Wows, but the peak heat release rate and amount of belt consumed was slightly higher at the lower airflow. Experiments were also conducted with 100{degrees}C, standard pendent sprinklers installed above the top belt, in accordance with the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Standard 123 for sprinkler system installations in conveyor belt drive areas in underground coal mines. In these experiments, the heat release rate and amount of belting consumed was larger at the higher airflow.

  8. Effectiveness of photocatalytic filter for removing volatile organic compounds in the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kuo-Pin; Lee, Grace Whei-May; Huang, Wei-Ming; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Lou, Chia-ling; Yang, Shinhao

    2006-05-01

    Nowadays, the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system has been an important facility for maintaining indoor air quality. However, the primary function of typical HVAC systems is to control the temperature and humidity of the supply air. Most indoor air pollutants, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), cannot be removed by typical HVAC systems. Thus, some air handling units for removing VOCs should be added in typical HVAC systems. Among all of the air cleaning techniques used to remove indoor VOCs, photocatalytic oxidation is an attractive alternative technique for indoor air purification and deodorization. The objective of this research is to investigate the VOC removal efficiency of the photocatalytic filter in a HVAC system. Toluene and formaldehyde were chosen as the target pollutants. The experiments were conducted in a stainless steel chamber equipped with a simplified HVAC system. A mechanical filter coated with Degussa P25 titania photocatalyst and two commercial photocatalytic filters were used as the photocatalytic filters in this simplified HVAC system. The total air change rates were controlled at 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.5 hr(-1), and the relative humidity (RH) was controlled at 30%, 50%, and 70%. The ultraviolet lamp used was a 4-W, ultraviolet-C (central wavelength at 254 nm) strip light bulb. The first-order decay constant of toluene and formaldehyde found in this study ranged from 0.381 to 1.01 hr(-1) under different total air change rates, from 0.34 to 0.433 hr(-1) under different RH, and from 0.381 to 0.433 hr(-1) for different photocatalytic filters.

  9. Laboratory and Industrial Ventilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This handbook supplements the Facilities Engineering Handbook (NHB 7320.1) and provides additional policies and criteria for uniform application to ventilation systems. It expands basic requirements, provides additional design and construction guidance, and places emphasis on those design considerations which will provide for greater effectiveness in the use of these systems. The provisions of this handbook are applicable to all NASA field installations and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Since supply of this handbook is limited, abstracts of the portion or portions applicable to a given requirement will be made for the individual specific needs encountered rather than supplying copies of the handbook as has been past practice.

  10. Central Nervous System Depressants Poisoning and Ventilator Associated Pneumonia: An Underrated Risk Factor at the Toxicological Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Hashemian, Morteza; Talaie, Haleh; Akbarpour, Samaneh; Mahdavinejad, Arezou; Mozafari, Naser

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (VAP) is the main cause of nosocomial infection at intensive care units (ICUs), which causes high mortality and morbidity. Objectives: The objective of the present survey was to identify the VAP risk and prognostic factors among poisoned patients, who were admitted to the toxicological ICU (TICU), especially central nervous system (CNS) depressants due to their prevalence and importance. Patients and Methods: A case-control study was conducted at the Loghman Hakim hospital between March 2013 and March 2014. Among 300 poisoned patients with mechanical ventilator ≥ 48 hours, 150 patients, who had developed microbiologically-confirmed VAP were considered as the VAP group and 150 without VAP were defined as the control group. The following data were collected; age, gender, type of poisoning, glasgow coma score, Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II score, length of hospital stay, previous antibiotic use, microbial culture of the trachea, body temperature, leukocyte count, and patients’ outcome. Based on the type of poisoning, patients were divided into three groups including: opioid, CNS depressants and others. All data were expressed as means (SD) for continuous variables and frequencies for categorical variables. Logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between risk factors and VAP. Results: The mean age of the patients was 33.9 ± 14.3 years. The probable VAP incidence and mortality were 22% and 18.6%, respectively. The rate of CNS depressant versus opioid use (odds ratio, 3.74; P < 0.027), APACHE II (odds ratio, 1.28; P < 0.000) and length of hospital stay (odds ratio, 2.15; P < 0.000) were the independent risk factors for VAP. While, the APACHE II score (odds ratio, 1.12; P < 0.044) and length of hospital stay (odds ratio, 2.15; P < 0.000) were the independent predictors of VAP mortality among these patients. The most common microorganisms in VAP cases were Methicillin

  11. Whole house particle removal and clean air delivery rates for in-duct and portable ventilation systems.

    PubMed

    Macintosh, David L; Myatt, Theodore A; Ludwig, Jerry F; Baker, Brian J; Suh, Helen H; Spengler, John D

    2008-11-01

    A novel method for determining whole house particle removal and clean air delivery rates attributable to central and portable ventilation/air cleaning systems is described. The method is used to characterize total and air-cleaner-specific particle removal rates during operation of four in-duct air cleaners and two portable air-cleaning devices in a fully instrumented test home. Operation of in-duct and portable air cleaners typically increased particle removal rates over the baseline rates determined in the absence of operating a central fan or an indoor air cleaner. Removal rates of 0.3- to 0.5-microm particles ranged from 1.5 hr(-1) during operation of an in-duct, 5-in. pleated media filter to 7.2 hr(-1) for an in-duct electrostatic air cleaner in comparison to a baseline rate of 0 hr(-1) when the air handler was operating without a filter. Removal rates for total particulate matter less than 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) mass concentrations were 0.5 hr(-1) under baseline conditions, 0.5 hr(-1) during operation of three portable ionic air cleaners, 1 hr(-1) for an in-duct 1-in. media filter, 2.4 hr(-1) for a single high-efficiency particle arrestance (HEPA) portable air cleaner, 4.6 hr(-1) for an in-duct 5-in. media filter, 4.7 hr(-1) during operation of five portable HEPA filters, 6.1 hr(-1) for a conventional in-duct electronic air cleaner, and 7.5 hr(-1) for a high efficiency in-duct electrostatic air cleaner. Corresponding whole house clean air delivery rates for PM2.5 attributable to the air cleaner independent of losses within the central ventilation system ranged from 2 m3/min for the conventional media filter to 32 m3/min for the high efficiency in-duct electrostatic device. Except for the portable ionic air cleaner, the devices considered here increased particle removal indoors over baseline deposition rates.

  12. Application of local exhaust ventilation system and integrated collectors for control of air pollutants in mining company.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani Shahna, Farshid; Bahrami, Abdulrahman; Farasati, Farhad

    2012-01-01

    Local exhaust ventilation (LEV) systems and integrated collectors were designed and implemented in a mining company in order to control emitted air pollutant from furnaces. The LEV was designed for capture and transition of air pollutants emitted from furnaces to the integrated collectors. The integrated collectors including four high efficiency Stairmand model cyclones for control of particulate matter, a venturi scrubber for control of the fine particles, SO(2) and a part of H(2)S to follow them, and a packed scrubber for treatment of the residual H(2)S and SO(2) were designed. Pollutants concentration were measured to determine system effectiveness. The results showed that the effectiveness of LEV for reducing workplace pollution is 91.83%, 96.32% and 83.67% for dust, SO(2) and H(2)S, respectively. Average removal efficiency of particles by combination of cyclone and venturi scrubber was 98.72%. Average removal efficiency of SO(2) and H(2)S were 95.85% and 47.13% for the venturi scrubber and 68.45% and 92.7% for the packed bed scrubber. The average removal efficiency of SO(2) and H(2)S were increased to 99.1% and 95.95% by the combination of venturi and packed bed scrubbers. According to the results, integrated collectors are a good air pollution control option for industries with economic constraints and ancient technologies.

  13. SY Tank Farm ventilation isolation option risk assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, T.B.; Morales, S.D.

    1994-03-01

    The safety of the 241-SY Tank Farm ventilation system has been under extensive scrutiny due to safety concerns associated with tank 101-SY. Hydrogen and other gases are generated and trapped in the waste below the liquid surface. Periodically, these gases are released into the dome space and vented through the exhaust system. This attention to the ventilation system has resulted in the development of several alternative ventilation system designs. The ventilation system provides the primary means of mitigation of accidents associated with flammable gases. This report provides an assessment of various alternatives ventilation system designs.

  14. Effects of pressure-controlled and volume-controlled ventilation on respiratory mechanics and systemic stress response during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Sen, Oznur; Umutoglu, Tarik; Aydın, Nurdan; Toptas, Mehmet; Tutuncu, Ayse Cigdem; Bakan, Mefkur

    2016-01-01

    Pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) is less frequently employed in general anesthesia. With its high and decelerating inspiratory flow, PCV has faster tidal volume delivery and different gas distribution. The same tidal volume setting, delivered by PCV versus volume-controlled ventilation (VCV), will result in a lower peak airway pressure and reduced risk of barotrauma. We hypothesized that PCV instead of VCV during laparoscopic surgery could achieve lower airway pressures and reduce the systemic stress response. Forty ASA I-II patients were randomly selected to receive either the PCV (Group PC, n = 20) or VCV (Group VC, n = 20) during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Blood sampling was made for baseline arterial blood gases (ABG), cortisol, insulin, and glucose levels. General anesthesia with sevoflurane and fentanyl was employed to all patients. After anesthesia induction and endotracheal intubation, patients in Group PC were given pressure support to form 8 mL/kg tidal volume and patients in Group VC was maintained at 8 mL/kg tidal volume calculated using predicted body weight. All patients were maintained with 5 cmH2O positive-end expiratory pressure (PEEP). Respiratory parameters were recorded before and 30 min after pneumoperitonium. Assessment of ABG and sampling for cortisol, insulin and glucose levels were repeated 30 min after pneumoperitonium and 60 min after extubation. The P-peak levels observed before (18.9 ± 3.8 versus 15 ± 2.2 cmH2O) and during (23.3 ± 3.8 versus 20.1 ± 2.9 cmH2O) pneumoperitoneum in Group VC were significantly higher. Postoperative partial arterial oxygen pressure (PaO2) values are higher (98 ± 12 versus 86 ± 11 mmHg) in Group PC. Arterial carbon dioxide pressure (PaCO2) values (41.8 ± 5.4 versus 36.7 ± 3.5 mmHg) during pneumoperitonium and post-operative mean cortisol and insulin levels were higher in Group VC. When compared to VCV mode, PCV mode may improve compliance during pneumoperitoneum

  15. 46 CFR 111.103-7 - Ventilation stop stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation stop stations. 111.103-7 Section 111.103-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Remote Stopping Systems § 111.103-7 Ventilation stop stations. Each ventilation...

  16. Ventilation planning at Energy West's Deer Creek mine

    SciTech Connect

    Tonc, L.; Prosser, B.; Gamble, G.

    2009-08-15

    In 2004 ventilation planning was initiated to exploit a remote area of Deer Creek mine's reserve (near Huntington, Utah), the Mill Fork Area, located under a mountain. A push-pull ventilation system was selected. This article details the design process of the ventilation system upgrade, the procurement process for the new fans, and the new fan startup testing. 5 figs., 1 photo.

  17. Application of the revised DBA source term to a non-charcoal-filtered control room ventilation system

    SciTech Connect

    Radvansky, M.S.; Metcalf, J.E.

    1997-12-01

    An outstanding licensing issue at GPU Nuclear`s Oyster Creek plant had been the question of thyroid dose to a control room operator following the Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 100 (10 CFR 100) design basis accident (DBA). Oyster Creek is a 620-MW boiling water reactor (BWR), located in New Jersey, that began commercial operation in December 1969. The calculational problem was complicated by the fact that the 28-yr-old unit was one of the few plants that did not incorporate charcoal filtration into the control room ventilation system. The main contributor to the thyroid dose in a control room habitability calculation for a BWR is main steam isolation valve (MSIV) leakage. The technical specification limit for MSIV leakage at Oyster Creek is 15.9 SCFH (maximum) for each isolation valve. The work ongoing in the development of NUREG-1465, the revised DBA source term document, provided a potential method to calculate a more realistic dose compared with the current TID-14844 source term and Regulatory Guide 1.3 input data and accident propagation assumptions. Preliminary calculations using TID-14844 suggested that expensive modifications be made to the plant. Such modifications could have economically challenged the plant`s viability.

  18. VENTILATION MODEL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    V. Chipman

    2002-10-31

    The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their postclosure analyses.

  19. 46 CFR 111.105-21 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ventilation. 111.105-21 Section 111.105-21 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL... location has the classification of that location. Each fan for ventilation of a hazardous location must...

  20. Ventilation Technical Guide, 2nd Edition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-12

    Proficiency Codes (see Table 2) Indicate Required Training Levela 3- lvl Course 5- lvl OJT 5- lvl CDCb 7- lvl Course 4.13 Mechanical Ventilation...for deficient ventilation systems A - B - a7- lvl OJT & Advanced Course have no required training level. bCDC = Career

  1. 14 CFR 23.831 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ventilation system must be designed to provide each occupant with at least 0.55 pounds of fresh air per minute... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ventilation. 23.831 Section 23.831... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Personnel...

  2. 14 CFR 23.831 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ventilation system must be designed to provide each occupant with at least 0.55 pounds of fresh air per minute... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ventilation. 23.831 Section 23.831... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Personnel...

  3. 14 CFR 23.831 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ventilation system must be designed to provide each occupant with at least 0.55 pounds of fresh air per minute... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ventilation. 23.831 Section 23.831... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Personnel...

  4. Fan System Optimization Improves Ventilation and Saves Energy at a Computer Chip Manufacturer

    SciTech Connect

    2002-01-01

    This case study describes an optimization project implemented on a fan system at Ash Grove Cement Company, which led to annual energy and maintenance savings of $16,000 and 175,000 kilowatt-hours (kWh).

  5. Solar ventilation and tempering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adámek, Karel; Pavlů, Miloš; Bandouch, Milan

    2014-08-01

    The paper presents basic information about solar panels, designed, realized and used for solar ventilation of rooms. Used method of numerical flow simulation gives good overview about warming and flowing of the air in several kinds of realized panels (window, facade, chimney). Yearlong measurements give a good base for calculations of economic return of invested capital. The operation of the system in transient period (spring, autumn) prolongs the period without classical heating of the room or building, in winter the classical heating is supported. In the summer period the system, furnished with chimney, can exhaust inner warm air together with necessary cooling of the system by gravity circulation, only. System needs not any invoiced energy source; it is supplied entirely by solar energy. Large building systems are supported by classical electric fan respectively.

  6. [Comparison of volume preset and pressure preset ventilators during daytime nasal ventilation in chronic respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Perrin, C; Wolter, P; Berthier, F; Tamisier, R; Jullien, V; Lemoigne, F; Blaive, B

    2001-02-01

    Both volume preset and pressure preset ventilators are available for domiciliary nasal ventilation. Owing to their technical characteristics, it has been suggested that impaired ventilatory mechanics might cause a drop in the tidal volume (Vt) delivered by pressure preset devices, thereby placing mechanical ventilation at risk of inefficacy. We have assessed two ventilator systems (one pressure preset and one volume preset) with regard to the tidal volume and end-tidal carbon dioxide tension (PetCO(2)) changes that may be achieved in a group of awake patients with stable chronic respiratory failure (CRF). Eleven patients with stable CRF were ventilated in the assist/control mode for two consecutive one-hour periods. One ventilator was tested each hour, in random order. The VIGIL'AIR(R) system was used to record Vt, Respiratory Rate (RR), and Inspiratory/Expiratory ratio (I/E). The deviation E (E=preset value - measured value) was calculated for each measurement. Changes in PetCO(2) and arterial oxygen saturation were determined respectively by a capnometer and a pulse oximeter. Comparison of the mean deviation of Vt calculated for the two ventilators revealed a difference in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The deviation was greatest with the pressure preset ventilator (PPV), which gave mean measured values higher than the mean preset values. The same comparison failed to reveal any difference in restrictive CRF. Comparison of the volume preset and pressure preset ventilators for RR, I/E and PetCO(2) did not reveal any difference. Compared to the volume preset ventilator, the efficacy of PPV to ventilate is not affected by the restrictive or obstructive nature of CRF. Our results show that pressure-preset ventilator is an adequate alternative to the volume-preset device for daytime non invasive ventilation in chronic respiratory insufficiency.

  7. Fungal colonization of air filters for use in heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems.

    PubMed

    Simmons, R B; Crow, S A

    1995-01-01

    New and used cellulosic air filters for HVAC systems including those treated with antimicrobials were suspended in vessels with a range of relative humidities (55-99%) and containing non-sterile potting soil which stimulates fungal growth. Most filters yielded fungi prior to suspension in the chambers but only two of 14 nontreated filters demonstrated fungal colonization following use in HVAC systems. Filters treated with antimicrobials, particularly a phosphated amine complex, demonstrated markedly less fungal colonization than nontreated filters. In comparison with nontreated cellulosic filters, fungal colonization of antimicrobial-treated cellulosic filters was selective and delayed.

  8. Using a Ventilation Controller to Optimize Residential Passive Ventilation For Energy and Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, William; Walker, Iain

    2014-08-01

    One way to reduce the energy impact of providing residential ventilation is to use passive and hybrid systems. However, these passive and hybrid (sometimes called mixed-mode) systems must still meet chronic and acute health standards for ventilation. This study uses a computer simulation approach to examine the energy and indoor air quality (IAQ) implications of passive and hybrid ventilation systems, in 16 California climate zones. Both uncontrolled and flow controlled passive stacks are assessed. A new hybrid ventilation system is outlined that uses an intelligent ventilation controller to minimise energy use, while ensuring chronic and acute IAQ standards are met. ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2010 – the United States standard for residential ventilation - is used as the chronic standard, and exposure limits for PM2.5, formaldehyde and NO2 are used as the acute standards.The results show that controlled passive ventilation and hybrid ventilation can be used in homes to provide equivalent IAQ to continuous mechanical ventilation, for less use of energy.

  9. 46 CFR 127.260 - Ventilation for accommodations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... vessel of 100 or more gross tons must be provided with a mechanical ventilation system unless the... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation for accommodations. 127.260 Section 127.260... ARRANGEMENTS Particular Construction and Arrangements § 127.260 Ventilation for accommodations. (a)...

  10. 46 CFR 58.01-45 - Machinery space, ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Machinery space, ventilation. 58.01-45 Section 58.01-45... MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-45 Machinery space, ventilation. Each machinery space must be ventilated to ensure that, when machinery or boilers are operating at full power in...

  11. 46 CFR 58.01-45 - Machinery space, ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Machinery space, ventilation. 58.01-45 Section 58.01-45... MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-45 Machinery space, ventilation. Each machinery space must be ventilated to ensure that, when machinery or boilers are operating at full power in...

  12. 46 CFR 58.01-45 - Machinery space, ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Machinery space, ventilation. 58.01-45 Section 58.01-45... MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-45 Machinery space, ventilation. Each machinery space must be ventilated to ensure that, when machinery or boilers are operating at full power in...

  13. 46 CFR 127.260 - Ventilation for accommodations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation for accommodations. 127.260 Section 127.260... ARRANGEMENTS Particular Construction and Arrangements § 127.260 Ventilation for accommodations. (a) Each... vessel of 100 or more gross tons must be provided with a mechanical ventilation system unless...

  14. 46 CFR 127.260 - Ventilation for accommodations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation for accommodations. 127.260 Section 127.260... ARRANGEMENTS Particular Construction and Arrangements § 127.260 Ventilation for accommodations. (a) Each... vessel of 100 or more gross tons must be provided with a mechanical ventilation system unless...

  15. 24 CFR 3280.710 - Venting, ventilation and combustion air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Venting, ventilation and combustion... Fuel Burning Systems § 3280.710 Venting, ventilation and combustion air. (a) The venting as required by... ventilation shall be installed within a horizontal distance of not more than ten feet from the vertical...

  16. 24 CFR 3280.710 - Venting, ventilation and combustion air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Venting, ventilation and combustion... Fuel Burning Systems § 3280.710 Venting, ventilation and combustion air. (a) The venting as required by... ventilation shall be installed within a horizontal distance of not more than ten feet from the vertical...

  17. 46 CFR 127.260 - Ventilation for accommodations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ventilation for accommodations. 127.260 Section 127.260... ARRANGEMENTS Particular Construction and Arrangements § 127.260 Ventilation for accommodations. (a) Each... vessel of 100 or more gross tons must be provided with a mechanical ventilation system unless...

  18. [Monitorization of respiratory mechanics in the ventilated patient].

    PubMed

    García-Prieto, E; Amado-Rodríguez, L; Albaiceta, G M

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring during mechanical ventilation allows the measurement of different parameters of respiratory mechanics. Accurate interpretation of these data can be useful for characterizing the situation of the different components of the respiratory system, and for guiding ventilator settings. In this review, we describe the basic concepts of respiratory mechanics, their interpretation, and their potential use in fine-tuning mechanical ventilation.

  19. 46 CFR 38.20-10 - Ventilation-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation-T/ALL. 38.20-10 Section 38.20-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS LIQUEFIED FLAMMABLE GASES Venting and Ventilation § 38.20-10 Ventilation—T/ALL. (a) A power ventilation system shall be provided for...

  20. 46 CFR 58.01-45 - Machinery space, ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Machinery space, ventilation. 58.01-45 Section 58.01-45... MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-45 Machinery space, ventilation. Each machinery space must be ventilated to ensure that, when machinery or boilers are operating at full power in...

  1. 46 CFR 58.01-45 - Machinery space, ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Machinery space, ventilation. 58.01-45 Section 58.01-45... MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-45 Machinery space, ventilation. Each machinery space must be ventilated to ensure that, when machinery or boilers are operating at full power in...

  2. 46 CFR 190.15-15 - Ventilation for living spaces and quarters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation for living spaces and quarters. 190.15-15... VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 190.15-15 Ventilation for living spaces and quarters... mechanical system unless it can be shown that a natural system will provide adequate ventilation. By...

  3. 46 CFR 190.15-15 - Ventilation for living spaces and quarters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ventilation for living spaces and quarters. 190.15-15... VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 190.15-15 Ventilation for living spaces and quarters... mechanical system unless it can be shown that a natural system will provide adequate ventilation. By...

  4. 46 CFR 190.15-15 - Ventilation for living spaces and quarters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation for living spaces and quarters. 190.15-15... VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 190.15-15 Ventilation for living spaces and quarters... mechanical system unless it can be shown that a natural system will provide adequate ventilation. By...

  5. Energy Efficient Building Ventilation Systems: Innovative Building-Integrated Enthalpy Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-15

    BEETIT Project: A2 is developing a building moisture and heat exchange technology that leverages a new material and design to create healthy buildings with lower energy use. Commercial building owners/operators are demanding buildings with greater energy efficiency and healthier indoor environments. A2 is developing a membrane-based heat and moisture exchanger that controls humidity by transferring the water vapor in the incoming fresh air to the drier air leaving the building. Unlike conventional systems, A2 locates the heat and moisture exchanger within the depths of the building’s wall to slow down the air flow and increase the surface area that captures humidity, but with less fan power. The system’s integration into the wall reduces the size and demand on the air conditioning equipment and increases liable floor area flexibility.

  6. [Evaluation of patient-ventilator synchrony of three new types of ventilators with pressure sunnort ventilation mode].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Juan; Wu, Hao; Cao, Desen

    2014-08-01

    Pressure-support ventilation (PSV) is a form of important ventilation mode. Patient-ventilator synchrony of pressure support ventilation can be divided into inspiration-triggered and expiration-triggered ones. Whether the ventilator can track the patient's inspiration and expiration very well or not is an important evaluating item of the performance of the ventilator. The ventilator should response to the patient's inspiration effort on time and deliver the air flow to the patient under various conditions, such as different patient's lung types and inspiration effort, etc. Similarly, the ventilator should be able to response to the patient's expiration action, and to decrease the patient lung's internal pressure rapidly. Using the Active Servo Lung (ASL5000) respiratory simulation system, we evaluated the spontaneous breathing of PSV mode on E5, Servo i and Evital XL. The following parameters, the delay time before flow to the patient starts once the trigger variable signaling the start of inspiration, the lowest inspiratory airway pressure generated prior to the initiation of PSV, etc. were measured.

  7. Surveillance of a Ventilated Rack System for Corynebacterium bovis by Sampling Exhaust-Air Manifolds.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Christopher A; Pugazhenthi, Umarani; Leszczynski, Jori K

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium bovis causes an opportunistic infection of nude (Foxn1, nu/nu) mice, leading to nude mouse hyperkeratotic dermatitis (scaly skin disease). Enzootic in many nude mouse colonies, C. bovis spreads rapidly to naive nude mice, despite modern husbandry practices, and is very difficult to eradicate. To facilitate rapid detection in support of eradication efforts, we investigated a surveillance method based on quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) evaluation of swabs collected from the horizontal exhaust manifold (HEM) of an IVC rack system. We first evaluated the efficacy of rack sanitation methods for removing C. bovis DNA from the HEM of racks housing endemic colonies of infected nude mice. Pressurized water used to flush the racks' air exhaust system followed by a standard rack-washer cycle was ineffective in eliminating C. bovis DNA. Only after autoclaving did all sanitized racks test negative for C. bovis DNA. We then measured the effects of stage of infection (early or established), cage density, and cage location on the rack on time-to-detection at the HEM. Stage of infection significantly affected time-to-detection, independent of cage location. Early infections required 7.3 ± 1.2 d whereas established infections required 1 ± 0 d for detection of C. bovis at the HEM. Cage density influenced the quantity of C. bovis DNA detected but not time-to-detection. The location of the cage on the rack affected the time-to-detection only during early C. bovis infections. We suggest that qPCR swabs of HEM are useful during the routine surveillance of nude mouse colonies for C. bovis infection.

  8. Surveillance of a Ventilated Rack System for Corynebacterium bovis by Sampling Exhaust-Air Manifolds

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Christopher A; Pugazhenthi, Umarani; Leszczynski, Jori K

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium bovis causes an opportunistic infection of nude (Foxn1, nu/nu) mice, leading to nude mouse hyperkeratotic dermatitis (scaly skin disease). Enzootic in many nude mouse colonies, C. bovis spreads rapidly to naive nude mice, despite modern husbandry practices, and is very difficult to eradicate. To facilitate rapid detection in support of eradication efforts, we investigated a surveillance method based on quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) evaluation of swabs collected from the horizontal exhaust manifold (HEM) of an IVC rack system. We first evaluated the efficacy of rack sanitation methods for removing C. bovis DNA from the HEM of racks housing endemic colonies of infected nude mice. Pressurized water used to flush the racks’ air exhaust system followed by a standard rack-washer cycle was ineffective in eliminating C. bovis DNA. Only after autoclaving did all sanitized racks test negative for C. bovis DNA. We then measured the effects of stage of infection (early or established), cage density, and cage location on the rack on time-to-detection at the HEM. Stage of infection significantly affected time-to-detection, independent of cage location. Early infections required 7.3 ± 1.2 d whereas established infections required 1 ± 0 d for detection of C. bovis at the HEM. Cage density influenced the quantity of C. bovis DNA detected but not time-to-detection. The location of the cage on the rack affected the time-to-detection only during early C. bovis infections. We suggest that qPCR swabs of HEM are useful during the routine surveillance of nude mouse colonies for C. bovis infection. PMID:26817981

  9. Establishment of a total liquid ventilation system using saline-based oxygen micro/nano-bubble dispersions in rats.

    PubMed

    Kakiuchi, Kenta; Matsuda, Kenichi; Harii, Norikazu; Sou, Keitaro; Aoki, Junko; Takeoka, Shinji

    2015-09-01

    Micro/nano-bubbles are practical nanomaterials designed to increase the gas content in liquids. We attempted to use oxygen micro/nano-bubble dispersions as an oxygen-rich liquid as a means for total liquid ventilation. To determine the oxygen content in the bubble dispersion, a new method based on a spectrophotometric change between oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin was established. The oxygen micro/nano-bubble dispersion was supplied to an experimental total ventilation liquid in anesthetic rats. Though the amount of dissolving oxygen was as low as 6 mg/L in physiological saline, the oxygen content in the oxygen micro/nano-bubble dispersion was increased to 45 mg/L. The positive correlation between the oxygen content and the life-saving time under liquid ventilation clearly indicates that the life-saving time is prolonged by increasing the oxygen content in the oxygen micro/nano-bubble dispersion. This is the first report indicating that the oxygen micro/nano-bubbles containing a sufficient amount of oxygen are useful in producing oxygen-rich liquid for the process of liquid ventilation.

  10. Transport of Radon Gas into a Tunnel at Yucca Mountain-Estimating Large-Scale Fractured Tuff Hydraulic Properties and Implications for the Operation of the Ventilation System

    SciTech Connect

    A. Unger; S. Finsterle; G. Bodvarsson

    2003-06-06

    Radon gas concentrations have been monitored as part of the operation of a tunnel (the Exploratory Studies Facility-ESF) at Yucca Mountain to ensure worker safety. The objective of this study was to examine the potential use of the radon data to estimate large-scale formation properties of fractured tuffs. This objective was examined by developing a numerical model, based upon the characteristics of the ESF and the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) tuff unit, capable of predicting radon concentrations for prescribed ventilation conditions. The model was used to address two specific issues. First, it was used to estimate the permeability and porosity of the fractures in the TSw at the length scale of the ESF and extending tens of meters into the TSw, which surrounds the ESF. Second, the model was used to understand the mechanism leading to radon concentrations exceeding a specified level within the ESF. The mechanism controlling radon concentrations in the ESF is a function of atmospheric barometric fluctuations being propagated down the ESF along with ventilated air flow and the slight suction induced by the ventilation exhaust fans at the South Portal of the ESF. These pressure fluctuations are dampened in the TSw fracture continuum according to its permeability and porosity. Consequently, as the barometric pressure in the ESF drops rapidly, formation gases from the TSw are pulled into the ESF, resulting in an increase in radon concentrations. Model calibration to both radon concentrations measured in the ESF and gas-phase pressure fluctuations in the TSw yielded concurrent estimates of TSw fracture permeability and porosity of l x 10{sup -11} m{sup 2} and 0.00034, respectively. The calibrated model was then used as a design tool to predict the effect of adjusting the current ventilation-system operation strategy for reducing the probability of radon gas concentrations exceeding a specified level.

  11. New modes of assisted mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Sipmann, F

    2014-05-01

    Recent major advances in mechanical ventilation have resulted in new exciting modes of assisted ventilation. Compared to traditional ventilation modes such as assisted-controlled ventilation or pressure support ventilation, these new modes offer a number of physiological advantages derived from the improved patient control over the ventilator. By implementing advanced closed-loop control systems and using information on lung mechanics, respiratory muscle function and respiratory drive, these modes are specifically designed to improve patient-ventilator synchrony and reduce the work of breathing. Depending on their specific operational characteristics, these modes can assist spontaneous breathing efforts synchronically in time and magnitude, adapt to changing patient demands, implement automated weaning protocols, and introduce a more physiological variability in the breathing pattern. Clinicians have now the possibility to individualize and optimize ventilatory assistance during the complex transition from fully controlled to spontaneous assisted ventilation. The growing evidence of the physiological and clinical benefits of these new modes is favoring their progressive introduction into clinical practice. Future clinical trials should improve our understanding of these modes and help determine whether the claimed benefits result in better outcomes.

  12. Ventilation and respiratory mechanics.

    PubMed

    Sheel, Andrew William; Romer, Lee M

    2012-04-01

    During dynamic exercise, the healthy pulmonary system faces several major challenges, including decreases in mixed venous oxygen content and increases in mixed venous carbon dioxide. As such, the ventilatory demand is increased, while the rising cardiac output means that blood will have considerably less time in the pulmonary capillaries to accomplish gas exchange. Blood gas homeostasis must be accomplished by precise regulation of alveolar ventilation via medullary neural networks and sensory reflex mechanisms. It is equally important that cardiovascular and pulmonary system responses to exercise be precisely matched to the increase in metabolic requirements, and that the substantial gas transport needs of both respiratory and locomotor muscles be considered. Our article addresses each of these topics with emphasis on the healthy, young adult exercising in normoxia. We review recent evidence concerning how exercise hyperpnea influences sympathetic vasoconstrictor outflow and the effect this might have on the ability to perform muscular work. We also review sex-based differences in lung mechanics.

  13. Power turbine ventilation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakeman, Thomas G. (Inventor); Brown, Richard W. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Air control mechanism within a power turbine section of a gas turbine engine. The power turbine section includes a rotor and at least one variable pitch propulsor blade. The propulsor blade is coupled to and extends radially outwardly of the rotor. A first annular fairing is rotatable with the propulsor blade and interposed between the propulsor blade and the rotor. A second fairing is located longitudinally adjacent to the first fairing. The first fairing and the second fairing are differentially rotatable. The air control mechanism includes a platform fixedly coupled to a radially inner end of the propulsor blade. The platform is generally positioned in a first opening and a first fairing. The platform and the first fairing define an outer space. In a first position corresponding with a first propulsor blade pitch, the platform is substantially conformal with the first fairing. In a second position corresponding with the second propulsor blade pitch, an edge portion of the platform is displaced radially outwardly from the first fairing. When the blades are in the second position and rotating about the engine axis, the displacement of the edge portion with respect to the first fairing allows air to flow from the outer space to the annular cavity.

  14. Noninvasive ventilation in trauma

    PubMed Central

    Karcz, Marcin K; Papadakos, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Trauma patients are a diverse population with heterogeneous needs for ventilatory support. This requirement depends mainly on the severity of their ventilatory dysfunction, degree of deterioration in gaseous exchange, any associated injuries, and the individual feasibility of potentially using a noninvasive ventilation approach. Noninvasive ventilation may reduce the need to intubate patients with trauma-related hypoxemia. It is well-known that these patients are at increased risk to develop hypoxemic respiratory failure which may or may not be associated with hypercapnia. Hypoxemia in these patients is due to ventilation perfusion mismatching and right to left shunt because of lung contusion, atelectasis, an inability to clear secretions as well as pneumothorax and/or hemothorax, all of which are common in trauma patients. Noninvasive ventilation has been tried in these patients in order to avoid the complications related to endotracheal intubation, mainly ventilator-associated pneumonia. The potential usefulness of noninvasive ventilation in the ventilatory management of trauma patients, though reported in various studies, has not been sufficiently investigated on a large scale. According to the British Thoracic Society guidelines, the indications and efficacy of noninvasive ventilation treatment in respiratory distress induced by trauma have thus far been inconsistent and merely received a low grade recommendation. In this review paper, we analyse and compare the results of various studies in which noninvasive ventilation was applied and discuss the role and efficacy of this ventilator modality in trauma. PMID:25685722

  15. 46 CFR 177.620 - Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces. 177.620... (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 177.620 Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces. In addition to the requirements of this subpart, ventilation systems for...

  16. 46 CFR 177.620 - Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces. 177.620... (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 177.620 Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces. In addition to the requirements of this subpart, ventilation systems for...

  17. 46 CFR 116.620 - Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces. 116.620... AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 116.620 Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces. In addition to the requirements of this subpart, ventilation systems for spaces containing machinery or fuel...

  18. 46 CFR 116.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces... PASSENGERS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 116.600 Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed... manner suitable for the purpose of the space. (b) A power ventilation system must be capable of...

  19. 46 CFR 177.620 - Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces. 177.620... (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 177.620 Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces. In addition to the requirements of this subpart, ventilation systems for...

  20. 46 CFR 116.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces... PASSENGERS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 116.600 Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed... manner suitable for the purpose of the space. (b) A power ventilation system must be capable of...

  1. 46 CFR 116.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces... PASSENGERS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 116.600 Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed... manner suitable for the purpose of the space. (b) A power ventilation system must be capable of...

  2. 46 CFR 116.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces... PASSENGERS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 116.600 Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed... manner suitable for the purpose of the space. (b) A power ventilation system must be capable of...

  3. 46 CFR 92.15-15 - Ventilation for crew quarters and, where provided, passenger spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation for crew quarters and, where provided...) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 92.15-15 Ventilation for crew..., unless it can be shown that a natural system will provide adequate ventilation. However, vessels...

  4. 46 CFR 116.620 - Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces. 116.620... AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 116.620 Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces. In addition to the requirements of this subpart, ventilation systems for spaces containing machinery or fuel...

  5. 46 CFR 177.620 - Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces. 177.620... (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 177.620 Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces. In addition to the requirements of this subpart, ventilation systems for...

  6. 46 CFR 116.620 - Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces. 116.620... AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 116.620 Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces. In addition to the requirements of this subpart, ventilation systems for spaces containing machinery or fuel...

  7. 46 CFR 92.15-15 - Ventilation for crew quarters and, where provided, passenger spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation for crew quarters and, where provided...) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 92.15-15 Ventilation for crew..., unless it can be shown that a natural system will provide adequate ventilation. However, vessels...

  8. 46 CFR 177.620 - Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces. 177.620... (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 177.620 Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces. In addition to the requirements of this subpart, ventilation systems for...

  9. 46 CFR 116.620 - Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces. 116.620... AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 116.620 Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces. In addition to the requirements of this subpart, ventilation systems for spaces containing machinery or fuel...

  10. 46 CFR 116.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces... PASSENGERS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 116.600 Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed... manner suitable for the purpose of the space. (b) A power ventilation system must be capable of...

  11. 46 CFR 116.620 - Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces. 116.620... AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 116.620 Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces. In addition to the requirements of this subpart, ventilation systems for spaces containing machinery or fuel...

  12. Guide to Home Ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    A fact sheet from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy: Ventilation refers to the exchange of indoor and outdoor air. Without proper ventilation, an otherwise insulated and airtight house will seal in harmful pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, and moisture that can damage a house.

  13. Modeling, design and thermal performance of a BIPV/T system thermally coupled with a ventilated concrete slab in a low energy solar house: Part 2, ventilated concrete slab

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yuxiang; Galal, Khaled; Athienitis, A.K.

    2010-11-15

    This paper is the second of two papers that describe the modeling and design of a building-integrated photovoltaic-thermal (BIPV/T) system thermally coupled with a ventilated concrete slab (VCS) adopted in a prefabricated, two-storey detached, low energy solar house and their performance assessment based on monitored data. The VCS concept is based on an integrated thermal-structural design with active storage of solar thermal energy while serving as a structural component - the basement floor slab ({proportional_to}33 m{sup 2}). This paper describes the numerical modeling, design, and thermal performance assessment of the VCS. The thermal performance of the VCS during the commissioning of the unoccupied house is presented. Analysis of the monitored data shows that the VCS can store 9-12 kWh of heat from the total thermal energy collected by the BIPV/T system, on a typical clear sunny day with an outdoor temperature of about 0 C. It can also accumulate thermal energy during a series of clear sunny days without overheating the slab surface or the living space. This research shows that coupling the VCS with the BIPV/T system is a viable method to enhance the utilization of collected solar thermal energy. A method is presented for creating a simplified three-dimensional, control volume finite difference, explicit thermal model of the VCS. The model is created and validated using monitored data. The modeling method is suitable for detailed parametric study of the thermal behavior of the VCS without excessive computational effort. (author)

  14. Hygiene guideline for the planning, installation, and operation of ventilation and air-conditioning systems in health-care settings - Guideline of the German Society for Hospital Hygiene (DGKH).

    PubMed

    Külpmann, Rüdiger; Christiansen, Bärbel; Kramer, Axel; Lüderitz, Peter; Pitten, Frank-Albert; Wille, Frank; Zastrow, Klaus-Dieter; Lemm, Friederike; Sommer, Regina; Halabi, Milo

    2016-01-01

    Since the publication of the first "Hospital Hygiene Guideline for the implementation and operation of air conditioning systems (HVAC systems) in hospitals" (http://www.krankenhaushygiene.de/informationen/fachinformationen/leitlinien/12) in 2002, it was necessary due to the increase in knowledge, new regulations, improved air-conditioning systems and advanced test methods to revise the guideline. Based on the description of the basic features of ventilation concepts, its hygienic test and the usage-based requirements for ventilation, the DGKH section "Ventilation and air conditioning technology" attempts to provide answers for the major air quality issues in the planning, design and the hygienically safe operation of HVAC systems in rooms of health care.

  15. Hygiene guideline for the planning, installation, and operation of ventilation and air-conditioning systems in health-care settings – Guideline of the German Society for Hospital Hygiene (DGKH)

    PubMed Central

    Külpmann, Rüdiger; Christiansen, Bärbel; Kramer, Axel; Lüderitz, Peter; Pitten, Frank-Albert; Wille, Frank; Zastrow, Klaus-Dieter; Lemm, Friederike; Sommer, Regina; Halabi, Milo

    2016-01-01

    Since the publication of the first “Hospital Hygiene Guideline for the implementation and operation of air conditioning systems (HVAC systems) in hospitals” (http://www.krankenhaushygiene.de/informationen/fachinformationen/leitlinien/12) in 2002, it was necessary due to the increase in knowledge, new regulations, improved air-conditioning systems and advanced test methods to revise the guideline. Based on the description of the basic features of ventilation concepts, its hygienic test and the usage-based requirements for ventilation, the DGKH section “Ventilation and air conditioning technology” attempts to provide answers for the major air quality issues in the planning, design and the hygienically safe operation of HVAC systems in rooms of health care. PMID:26958457

  16. Jet Ventilation during Rigid Bronchoscopy in Adults: A Focused Review.

    PubMed

    Putz, Laurie; Mayné, Alain; Dincq, Anne-Sophie

    2016-01-01

    The indications for rigid bronchoscopy for interventional pulmonology have increased and include stent placements and transbronchial cryobiopsy procedures. The shared airway between anesthesiologist and pulmonologist and the open airway system, requiring specific ventilation techniques such as jet ventilation, need a good understanding of the procedure to reduce potentially harmful complications. Appropriate adjustment of the ventilator settings including pause pressure and peak inspiratory pressure reduces the risk of barotrauma. High frequency jet ventilation allows adequate oxygenation and carbon dioxide removal even in cases of tracheal stenosis up to frequencies of around 150 min(-1); however, in an in vivo animal model, high frequency jet ventilation along with normal frequency jet ventilation (superimposed high frequency jet ventilation) has been shown to improve oxygenation by increasing lung volume and carbon dioxide removal by increasing tidal volume across a large spectrum of frequencies without increasing barotrauma. General anesthesia with a continuous, intravenous, short-acting agent is safe and effective during rigid bronchoscopy procedures.

  17. Energy Savings Potential and Research, Development, & Demonstration Opportunities for Residential Building Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Goetzler, William; Zogg, Robert; Young, Jim; Schmidt, Justin

    2012-10-01

    This report is an assessment of 135 different heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) technologies for U.S. residential buildings to identify and provide analysis on 19 priority technology options in various stages of development. The analyses include an estimation of technical energy-savings potential, descriptions of technical maturity, descriptions of non-energy benefits, descriptions of current barriers for market adoption, and descriptions of the technology's applicability to different building or HVAC equipment types. From these technology descriptions, are suggestions for potential research, development and demonstration (RD&D) initiatives that would support further development of the priority technology options.

  18. Energy Savings Potential and Research, Development, & Demonstration Opportunities for Commercial Building Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Systems

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-09-01

    This report covers an assessment of 182 different heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) technologies for U.S. commercial buildings to identify and provide analysis on 17 priority technology options in various stages of development. The analyses include an estimation of technical energy-savings potential, description of technical maturity, description of non-energy benefits, description of current barriers for market adoption, and description of the technology’s applicability to different building or HVAC equipment types. From these technology descriptions, are suggestions for potential research, development and demonstration (RD&D) initiatives that would support further development of the priority technology options.

  19. Comparison of effectiveness of sub-slab ventilation systems for indoor radon mitigation: A numerical study; Comparaison a l`aide d`un outil numerique de l`efficacite des systemes de ventilation active du sol limitant la penetration du radon dans l`habitat

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnefous, Y.C. |; Gadgil, A.J.; Allard, F.

    1992-04-01

    The functioning of an active sub-slab ventilation system (SVS) has been studied successfully with the help of a previously evaluated numerical model. The parameters explored are the permeability of the sub-slab and the gravel placed beneath it, the amplitude of applied pressure at the installation point of the system and the functioning method: depressurization or pressurization. The mechanisms contributing to the success of the two systems are identified. This numerical study shows that the presence of a layer of gravel beneath the sub-slab considerably improves the performance of the SVS. Considered separately from the extremely permeable sub-slabs, the depressurization systems perform better than the pressurization systems. 17 refs. [Francais] Le fonctionnement des Systemes de Ventilation active du Sol (SVS) a ete etudie a l`aide d`un outil numerique precedemment evalue avec succes. Les parametres explores sont les permeabilites du sol et du gravier place sous plancher bas, l`amplitude de la pression appliquee au point d`installation du systeme, et le mode de fonctionnement: Depressurisation ou Pressurisation. Les mecanismes contribuant au succes des deux systemes sont identifies. Cette etude numerique montre que la presence d`une couche de gravier sous plancher bas ameliore de facon considerable les performances des SVS. Mis a part le cas des sols extremement permeables, les systemes de Depressurisation ont de meilleures performances que les systemes de Pressurisation. 17 refs.

  20. Energy performance of a ventilation system for a block of apartments with a ground source heat pump as generation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchi, M.; Lorenzini, M.; Valdiserri, P.

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a numerical simulation of the annual performance of two different systems: a traditional one composed by a gas boiler-chiller pair and one consisting of a ground source heat pump (GSHP) both coupled to two thermal storage tanks. The systems serve a bloc of flats located in northern Italy and are assessed over a typical weather year, covering both the heating and cooling seasons. The air handling unit (AHU) coupled with the GSHP exhibits excellent characteristics in terms of temperature control, and has high performance parameters (EER and COP), which make conduction costs about 30% lower than those estimated for the traditional plant.

  1. [Ventilator-associated pneumonia and other infections].

    PubMed

    Bobik, Piotr; Siemiątkowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    One of the fundamental elements of therapy in patients hospitalised in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is mechanical ventilation (MV). MV enables sufficient gas exchange in patients with severe respiratory insufficiency, thus preserving the proper functioning of organs and systems. However, clinical and experimental studies show that mechanical ventilation may cause severe complications, e.g. lung injury (VALI, VILI), systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and, on rare occasions, multiple organ failure (MOF). Mechanical ventilation and especially endotracheal intubation are associated also with higher risk of infectious complications of the respiratory system: ventilator-associated respiratory infection (VARI) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). The complications of the MV listed above have a significant influence on the length of treatment and also on the increase of the costs of therapy and mortality of patients who stay in an ICU. These negative effects of supported breathing are the reasons for intensive research to find new biological markers of inflammation and lung injury, more sensitive and specific diagnostic instruments, more effective methods of therapy, and programs of prevention. The purpose of this article is the presentation of current knowledge concerning VAP-related infections, to allow pulmonologists and general practitioners to become more familiar with the problem. Basic and the most important data concerning the definition, epidemiology, pathophysiology, microbiology, diagnostics, treatment, and prevention of VAP have been included. Additionally, ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis (VAT) was discussed.

  2. Monitoring of intratidal lung mechanics: a Graphical User Interface for a model-based decision support system for PEEP-titration in mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Buehler, S; Lozano-Zahonero, S; Schumann, S; Guttmann, J

    2014-12-01

    In mechanical ventilation, a careful setting of the ventilation parameters in accordance with the current individual state of the lung is crucial to minimize ventilator induced lung injury. Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) has to be set to prevent collapse of the alveoli, however at the same time overdistension should be avoided. Classic approaches of analyzing static respiratory system mechanics fail in particular if lung injury already prevails. A new approach of analyzing dynamic respiratory system mechanics to set PEEP uses the intratidal, volume-dependent compliance which is believed to stay relatively constant during one breath only if neither atelectasis nor overdistension occurs. To test the success of this dynamic approach systematically at bedside or in an animal study, automation of the computing steps is necessary. A decision support system for optimizing PEEP in form of a Graphical User Interface (GUI) was targeted. Respiratory system mechanics were analyzed using the gliding SLICE method. The resulting shapes of the intratidal compliance-volume curve were classified into one of six categories, each associated with a PEEP-suggestion. The GUI should include a graphical representation of the results as well as a quality check to judge the reliability of the suggestion. The implementation of a user-friendly GUI was successfully realized. The agreement between modelled and measured pressure data [expressed as root-mean-square (RMS)] tested during the implementation phase with real respiratory data from two patient studies was below 0.2 mbar for data taken in volume controlled mode and below 0.4 mbar for data taken in pressure controlled mode except for two cases with RMS < 0.6 mbar. Visual inspections showed, that good and medium quality data could be reliably identified. The new GUI allows visualization of intratidal compliance-volume curves on a breath-by-breath basis. The automatic categorisation of curve shape into one of six shape

  3. Development of a Novel Alarm System to Improve Adaptation to Non-invasive Ventilation in Patients With High Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this case report, we want to introduce a successful way of applying non-invasive ventilation (NIV) with a full face mask in patients with high cervical spinal cord injury through a novel alarm system for communication. A 57-year-old man was diagnosed with C3 American Spinal Injury Association impairment scale (AIS) B. We applied NIV for treatment of hypercapnia. Because of mouth opening during sleep, a full face mask was the only way to use NIV. However, he could not take off the mask by himself, and this situation caused great fear. To solve this problem, we designed a novel alarm system. The best intended motion of the patient was neck rotation. Sensing was performed by a balloon sensor placed under the head of the patient. A beep sound was generated whenever the pressure was above the threshold, and more than three consecutive beeps within 3,000 ms created a loud alarm for caregivers. PMID:27847728

  4. Why We Ventilate

    SciTech Connect

    Logue, Jennifer M.; Sherman, Max H.; Price, Phil N.; Singer, Brett C.

    2011-09-01

    It is widely accepted that ventilation is critical for providing good indoor air quality (IAQ) in homes. However, the definition of"good" IAQ, and the most effective, energy efficient methods for delivering it are still matters of research and debate. This paper presents the results of work done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab to identify the air pollutants that drive the need for ventilation as part of a larger effort to develop a health-based ventilation standard. First, we present results of a hazard analysis that identified the pollutants that most commonly reach concentrations in homes that exceed health-based standards or guidelines for chronic or acute exposures. Second, we present results of an impact assessment that identified the air pollutants that cause the most harm to the U.S. population from chronic inhalation in residences. Lastly, we describe the implications of our findings for developing effective ventilation standards.

  5. Conventional mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, Joseph D.

    2010-01-01

    The provision of mechanical ventilation for the support of infants and children with respiratory failure or insufficiency is one of the most common techniques that are performed in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). Despite its widespread application in the PICUs of the 21st century, before the 1930s, respiratory failure was uniformly fatal due to the lack of equipment and techniques for airway management and ventilatory support. The operating rooms of the 1950s and 1960s provided the arena for the development of the manual skills and the refinement of the equipment needed for airway management, which subsequently led to the more widespread use of endotracheal intubation thereby ushering in the era of positive pressure ventilation. Although there seems to be an ever increasing complexity in the techniques of mechanical ventilation, its successful use in the PICU should be guided by the basic principles of gas exchange and the physiology of respiratory function. With an understanding of these key concepts and the use of basic concepts of mechanical ventilation, this technique can be successfully applied in both the PICU and the operating room. This article reviews the basic physiology of gas exchange, principles of pulmonary physiology, and the concepts of mechanical ventilation to provide an overview of the knowledge required for the provision of conventional mechanical ventilation in various clinical arenas. PMID:20927268

  6. Energy and IAQ Implications of Residential Ventilation Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, William; Walker, Iain

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluates the energy, humidity and indoor air quality (IAQ) implications of residential ventilation cooling in all U.S. IECC climate zones. A computer modeling approach was adopted, using an advanced residential building simulation tool with airflow, energy and humidity models. An economizer (large supply fan) was simulated to provide ventilation cooling while outdoor air temperatures were lower than indoor air temperatures (typically at night). The simulations were performed for a full year using one-minute time steps to allow for scheduling of ventilation systems and to account for interactions between ventilation and heating/cooling systems.

  7. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Sippola, Mark Raymond

    2002-09-01

    Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 μm were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on the

  8. 29 CFR 1915.51 - Ventilation and protection in welding, cutting and heating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Mechanical ventilation shall consist of either general mechanical ventilation systems or local exhaust systems. (ii) General mechanical ventilation shall be of sufficient capacity and so arranged as to produce... burner as close as practicable to the work. This system shall be of sufficient capacity and so...

  9. 29 CFR 1926.353 - Ventilation and protection in welding, cutting, and heating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Mechanical ventilation shall consist of either general mechanical ventilation systems or local exhaust systems. (2) General mechanical ventilation shall be of sufficient capacity and so arranged as to produce... intended to be placed by the welder or burner as close as practicable to the work. This system shall be...

  10. 29 CFR 1926.353 - Ventilation and protection in welding, cutting, and heating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Mechanical ventilation shall consist of either general mechanical ventilation systems or local exhaust systems. (2) General mechanical ventilation shall be of sufficient capacity and so arranged as to produce... intended to be placed by the welder or burner as close as practicable to the work. This system shall be...

  11. 29 CFR 1915.51 - Ventilation and protection in welding, cutting and heating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Mechanical ventilation shall consist of either general mechanical ventilation systems or local exhaust systems. (ii) General mechanical ventilation shall be of sufficient capacity and so arranged as to produce... burner as close as practicable to the work. This system shall be of sufficient capacity and so...

  12. Mechanical ventilation and respiratory mechanics during equine anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Moens, Yves

    2013-04-01

    The mechanical ventilation of horses during anesthesia remains a crucial option for optimal anesthetic management, if the possible negative cardiovascular side effects are managed, because this species is prone to hypercapnia and hypoxemia. The combined use of capnography and pitot-based spirometry provide complementary information on ventilation and respiratory mechanics, respectively. This facilitates management of mechanical ventilation in conditions of changing respiratory system compliance (ie, laparoscopy) and when investigating new ventilatory strategies including alveolar recruitment maneuvers and optimization of positive expiratory pressure.

  13. Tunnel Ventilation Control Using Reinforcement Learning Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Baeksuk; Kim, Dongnam; Hong, Daehie; Park, Jooyoung; Chung, Jin Taek; Kim, Tae-Hyung

    The main purpose of tunnel ventilation system is to maintain CO pollutant concentration and VI (visibility index) under an adequate level to provide drivers with comfortable and safe driving environment. Moreover, it is necessary to minimize power consumption used to operate ventilation system. To achieve the objectives, the control algorithm used in this research is reinforcement learning (RL) method. RL is a goal-directed learning of a mapping from situations to actions without relying on exemplary supervision or complete models of the environment. The goal of RL is to maximize a reward which is an evaluative feedback from the environment. In the process of constructing the reward of the tunnel ventilation system, two objectives listed above are included, that is, maintaining an adequate level of pollutants and minimizing power consumption. RL algorithm based on actor-critic architecture and gradient-following algorithm is adopted to the tunnel ventilation system. The simulations results performed with real data collected from existing tunnel ventilation system and real experimental verification are provided in this paper. It is confirmed that with the suggested controller, the pollutant level inside the tunnel was well maintained under allowable limit and the performance of energy consumption was improved compared to conventional control scheme.

  14. Design Feature 7: Continuous Preclosure Ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    A.T. Watkins

    1999-06-22

    This design feature (DF) is intended to evaluate the effects of continuous ventilation in the emplacement drifts during preclosure and how the effects, if any, compare to the Viability Assessment (VA) reference design for postclosure long term performance. This DF will be evaluated against a set of criteria provided by the License Application Design Selection (LADS) group. The VA reference design included a continuous ventilation airflow quantity of 0.1 m{sup 3}/s in the emplacement drifts in the design of the repository subsurface facilities. The effects of this continuous ventilation during the preclosure was considered to have a negligible effect on postclosure performance and therefore is not included during postclosure in the assessment of the long term performance. This DF discusses the effects of continuous ventilation on the emplacement drift environment and surrounding rock conditions during preclosure for three increased airflow quantities. The three cases of continuous ventilation systems are: System A, 1.0 m{sup 3}/s (Section 8), System B, 5.0 m{sup 3}/s (Section 9), and System C, 10.0 m{sup 3}/s (Section 10) in each emplacement drift split. An emplacement drift split is half total length of emplacement drift going from the east or west main to the exhaust main. The difference in each system is the quantity of airflow in the emplacement drifts.

  15. Background sound pressure fluctuations (5 DB) from overhead ventilation systems increase subjective fatigue of university students during three-hour lectures.

    PubMed

    Persinger, M A; Tiller, S G; Koren, S A

    1999-04-01

    During each of four successive sessions (once per week), 21 university students attended 3-hr. lectures. During alternative weeks the fans of the room's ventilation system were either on or off. When operating, they generated an average sound pressure that varied continuously between 60 and 65 dB. The dominant frequency of this 5-dB amplitude modulation of sound pressure was within the electroencephalographic range (5 Hz to 25 Hz). At the end of each hour of the lecture for each session each student estimated on 7-point summated rating scales fatigue (none to maximum) and concentration (poor to excellent). As a group, the students reported more fatigue during lectures when the fans were operating relative to lectures when the fans were not operating. This environmental effect explained about 30% of the variance in fatigue ratings and may be sufficient to affect adversely the attention of students within these settings.

  16. Evolution of microbial aerosol behaviour in heating, ventilating and air-conditioning systems--quantification of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Penicillium oxalicum viability.

    PubMed

    Forthomme, A; Andrès, Y; Joubert, A; Simon, X; Duquenne, P; Bemer, D; Le Coq, L

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an experimental set-up and a methodology to uniformly contaminate several filter samples with high concentrations of cultivable bacteria and fungi. An experimental set-up allows contaminating simultaneously up to four filters for range of velocities representative of heating, ventilating and air-conditioning systems. The test aerosol was composed of a microbial consortium of one bacterium (Staphylococcus epidermidis) and one fungus (Penicillium oxalicum) and aerosol generation was performed in wet conditions. Firstly, the experimental set-up was validated in regards to homogeneity of the air flows. The bioaerosol was also characterized in terms of number and particle size distribution using two particle counters: optical particle counter Grimm 1.109 (optical diameters) and TSI APS 3321 (aerodynamic diameters). Moreover, stabilities of the number of particles generated were measured. Finally, concentrations of cultivable microorganisms were measured with BioSamplers (SKC) downstream of the four filters.

  17. Evolution of microbial aerosol behaviour in heating, ventilating and air-conditioning systems--quantification of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Penicillium oxalicum viability.

    PubMed

    Forthomme, A; Andrès, Y; Joubert, A; Simon, X; Duquenne, P; Bemer, D; Le Coq, L

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an experimental set-up and a methodology to uniformly contaminate several filter samples with high concentrations of cultivable bacteria and fungi. An experimental set-up allows contaminating simultaneously up to four filters for range of velocities representative of heating, ventilating and air-conditioning systems. The test aerosol was composed of a microbial consortium of one bacterium (Staphylococcus epidermidis) and one fungus (Penicillium oxalicum) and aerosol generation was performed in wet conditions. Firstly, the experimental set-up was validated in regards to homogeneity of the air flows. The bioaerosol was also characterized in terms of the number and particle size distribution using two particle counters: optical particle counter Grimm 1.109 (optical diameters) and TSI APS 3321 (aerodynamic diameters). Moreover, stabilities of the number of particles generated were measured. Finally, concentrations of cultivable microorganisms were measured with BioSamplers SKC downstream of the four filters.

  18. ASME N511-19XX, Standard for periodic in-service testing of nuclear air treatment, heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    A draft version of the Standard is presented in this document. The Standard covers the requirements for periodic in-service testing of nuclear safety-related air treatment, heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems in nuclear facilities. The Standard provides a basis for the development of test programs and does not include acceptance criteria, except in cases where the results of one test influence the performance of other tests. The Standard covers general inspection and test requirements, reference values, inspection and test requirements, generic tests, acceptance criteria, in-service test requirements, testing following an abnormal incident, corrective action requirements, and quality assurance. Mandatory appendices provide a visual inspection checklist and four test procedures. Non-mandatory appendices provide additional information and guidance on mounting frame pressure leak test procedure, corrective action, challenge gas substitute selection criteria, and test program development. 8 refs., 10 tabs.

  19. 29 CFR 1926.57 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... replacement system complying with the preceding section, general heating of the building in which the spray... maintained at not less than 65 °F. (18.33 °C.) when the exhaust system is in operation or the general heating... specified in § 1926.55(a). When ventilation is used as an engineering control method, the system shall...

  20. 29 CFR 1926.57 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... replacement system complying with the preceding section, general heating of the building in which the spray... maintained at not less than 65 °F. (18.33 °C.) when the exhaust system is in operation or the general heating... specified in § 1926.55(a). When ventilation is used as an engineering control method, the system shall...

  1. 29 CFR 1926.57 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... replacement system complying with the preceding section, general heating of the building in which the spray... maintained at not less than 65 °F. (18.33 °C.) when the exhaust system is in operation or the general heating... specified in § 1926.55(a). When ventilation is used as an engineering control method, the system shall...

  2. 29 CFR 1926.57 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... replacement system complying with the preceding section, general heating of the building in which the spray... maintained at not less than 65 °F. (18.33 °C.) when the exhaust system is in operation or the general heating... specified in § 1926.55(a). When ventilation is used as an engineering control method, the system shall...

  3. 29 CFR 1926.57 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... replacement system complying with the preceding section, general heating of the building in which the spray... maintained at not less than 65 °F. (18.33 °C.) when the exhaust system is in operation or the general heating... specified in § 1926.55(a). When ventilation is used as an engineering control method, the system shall...

  4. Recommended Ventilation Strategies for Energy-Efficient Production Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, J.; Brown, R.; Koomey, J.; Warner, J.; Greenberg, S.

    1998-12-01

    This report evaluates residential ventilation systems for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} Homes program and recommends mechanical ventilation strategies for new, low-infiltration, energy-efficient, single-family, ENERGY STAR production (site-built tract) homes in four climates: cold, mixed (cold and hot), hot humid, and hot arid. Our group in the Energy Analysis Department at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab compared residential ventilation strategies in four climates according to three criteria: total annualized costs (the sum of annualized capital cost and annual operating cost), predominant indoor pressure induced by the ventilation system, and distribution of ventilation air within the home. The mechanical ventilation systems modeled deliver 0.35 air changes per hour continuously, regardless of actual infiltration or occupant window-opening behavior. Based on the assumptions and analysis described in this report, we recommend independently ducted multi-port supply ventilation in all climates except cold because this strategy provides the safety and health benefits of positive indoor pressure as well as the ability to dehumidify and filter ventilation air. In cold climates, we recommend that multi-port supply ventilation be balanced by a single-port exhaust ventilation fan, and that builders offer balanced heat-recovery ventilation to buyers as an optional upgrade. For builders who continue to install forced-air integrated supply ventilation, we recommend ensuring ducts are airtight or in conditioned space, installing a control that automatically operates the forced-air fan 15-20 minutes during each hour that the fan does not operate for heating or cooling, and offering ICM forced-air fans to home buyers as an upgrade.

  5. Regenerative Blower for EVA Suit Ventilation Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo; Paul, Heather L.

    2010-01-01

    Portable life support systems in future space suits will include a ventilation subsystem driven by a dedicated fan. This ventilation fan must meet challenging requirements for pressure rise, flow rate, efficiency, size, safety, and reliability. This paper describes research and development that showed the feasibility of a regenerative blower that is uniquely suited to meet these requirements. We proved feasibility through component tests, blower tests, and design analysis. Based on the requirements for the Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE) Portable Life Support System (PLSS) ventilation fan, we designed the critical elements of the blower. We measured the effects of key design parameters on blower performance using separate effects tests, and used the results of these tests to design a regenerative blower that will meet the ventilation fan requirements. We assembled a proof-of-concept blower and measured its performance at sub-atmospheric pressures that simulate a PLSS ventilation loop environment. Head/flow performance and maximum efficiency point data were used to specify the design and operating conditions for the ventilation fan. We identified materials for the blower that will enhance safety for operation in a lunar environment, and produced a solid model that illustrates the final design. The proof-of-concept blower produced the flow rate and pressure rise needed for the CSSE ventilation subsystem while running at 5400 rpm, consuming only 9 W of electric power using a non-optimized, commercial motor and controller and inefficient bearings. Scaling the test results to a complete design shows that a lightweight, compact, reliable, and low power regenerative blower can meet the performance requirements for future space suit life support systems.

  6. Understanding neonatal ventilation: strategies for decision making in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Petty, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal ventilation is an integral component of care delivered in the neonatal unit. The aim of any ventilation strategy is to support the neonate's respiratory system during compromise while limiting any long-term damage to the lungs. Understanding the principles behind neonatal ventilation is essential so that health professionals caring for sick neonates and families have the necessary knowledge to understand best practice. Given the range of existing ventilation modes and parameters available, these require explanation and clarification in the context of current evidence. Many factors can influence clinical decision making on both an individual level and within the wider perspective of neonatal care.

  7. Rethinking hospital general ward ventilation design using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yam, R; Yuen, P L; Yung, R; Choy, T

    2011-01-01

    Indoor ventilation with good air quality control minimises the spread of airborne respiratory and other infections in hospitals. This article considers the role of ventilation in preventing and controlling infection in hospital general wards and identifies a simple and cost-effective ventilation design capable of reducing the chances of cross-infection. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis is used to simulate and compare the removal of microbes using a number of different ventilation systems. Instead of the conventional corridor air return arrangement used in most general wards, air return is rearranged so that ventilation is controlled from inside the ward cubicle. In addition to boosting the air ventilation rate, the CFD results reveal that ventilation performance and the removal of microbes can be significantly improved. These improvements are capable of matching the standards maintained in a properly constructed isolation room, though at much lower cost. It is recommended that the newly identified ventilation parameters be widely adopted in the design of new hospital general wards to minimise cross-infection. The proposed ventilation system can also be retrofitted in existing hospital general wards with far less disruption and cost than a full-scale refurbishment.

  8. In vitro validation and clinical testing of an indirect calorimetry system for ventilated preterm infants that is unaffected by endotracheal tube leaks and can be used during nasal continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed

    Bauer, K; Ketteler, J; Laurenz, M; Versmold, H

    2001-03-01

    Energy expenditure measurements in ventilated preterm infants are difficult because indirect calorimetry underestimates energy expenditure during gas leaks around uncuffed endotracheal tubes routinely used in preterm infants or during nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). We, therefore, developed a breath collector that simultaneously sampled expired air expelled at the ventilator outlet and escaping via the tube leak from the infant's mouth and nose. Our breath collector was combined with a proprietary calorimeter (Deltatrac II). In vitro validation was done by methanol burning (VO(2), 13.8 mL/min; VCO(2), 9.2 mL/min) during intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) with two commonly used ventilators (Sechrist IV-100B and Infant Star). Measurement error was determined at different ventilator flows, peak inspiratory pressures of 12-24 cm H(2)O, and during a complete tube leak. The mean measurement error with both ventilators was low (VO(2) +/- 3 %, VCO(2) +/- 2 %) even during a complete tube leak and did not increase with peak inspiratory pressure. The system response time was 2 min. In vivo measurements at the bedside were performed in 25 preterm infants (body weight, 537-1402 g). Energy expenditure during IPPV was 40 +/- 9 kcal/kg per day and 46 +/- 15 kcal/kg per day during nasal CPAP. The tube leak in the preterm infants studied during IPPV was 0 to 47 %, and during nasal CPAP 84 to 97 %. In conclusion, indirect calorimetry performed with our breath collector was accurate during IPPV and nasal CPAP and was unaffected by tube leaks.

  9. Carbon-dioxide-controlled ventilation study

    SciTech Connect

    McMordie, K.L.; Carroll, D.M.

    1994-05-01

    The In-House Energy Management (IHEM) Program has been established by the U.S. Department of Energy to provide funds to federal laboratories to conduct research on energy-efficient technology. The Energy Sciences Department of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was tasked by IHEM to research the energy savings potential associated with reducing outdoor-air ventilation of buildings. By monitoring carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels in a building, outdoor air provided by the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system can be reduced to the percentage required to maintain satisfactory CO{sub 2} levels rather than ventilating with a higher outdoor-air percentage based on an arbitrary minimum outdoor-air setting. During summer months, warm outdoor air brought into a building for ventilation must be cooled to meet the appropriate cooling supply-air temperature, and during winter months, cold outdoor air must be heated. By minimizing the amount of hot or cold outdoor air brought into the HVAC system, the supply air requires less cooling or heating, saving energy and money. Additionally, the CO{sub 2} levels in a building can be monitored to ensure that adequate outdoor air is supplied to a building to maintain air quality levels. The two main considerations prior to implementing CO{sub 2}-based ventilation control are its impact on energy consumption and the adequacy of indoor air quality (IAQ) and occupant comfort. To address these considerations, six portable CO{sub 2} monitors were placed in several Hanford Site buildings to estimate the adequacy of office/workspace ventilation. The monitors assessed the potential for reducing the flow of outdoor-air to the buildings. A candidate building was also identified to monitor various ventilation control strategies for use in developing a plan for implementing and assessing energy savings.

  10. A novel personal cooling system (PCS) incorporated with phase change materials (PCMs) and ventilation fans: An investigation on its cooling efficiency.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yehu; Wei, Fanru; Lai, Dandan; Shi, Wen; Wang, Faming; Gao, Chuansi; Song, Guowen

    2015-08-01

    Personal cooling systems (PCS) have been developed to mitigate the impact of severe heat stress for humans working in hot environments. It is still a great challenge to develop PCSs that are portable, inexpensive, and effective. We studied the performance of a new hybrid PCS incorporating both ventilation fans and phase change materials (PCMs). The cooling efficiency of the newly developed PCS was investigated on a sweating manikin in two hot conditions: hot humid (HH, 34°C, 75% RH) and hot dry (HD, 34°C, 28% RH). Four test scenarios were selected: fans off with no PCMs (i.e., Fan-off, the CONTROL), fans on with no PCMs (i.e., Fan-on), fans off with fully solidified PCMs (i.e., PCM+Fan-off), and fans on with fully solidified PCMs (i.e., PCM+Fan-on). It was found that the addition of PCMs provided a 54∼78min cooling in HH condition. In contrast, the PCMs only offered a 19-39min cooling in HD condition. In both conditions, the ventilation fans greatly enhanced the evaporative heat loss compared with Fan-off. The hybrid PCS (i.e., PCM+Fan-on) provided a continuous cooling effect during the three-hour test and the average cooling rate for the whole body was around 111 and 315W in HH and HD conditions, respectively. Overall, the new hybrid PCS may be an effective means of ameliorating symptoms of heat stress in both hot-humid and hot-dry environments.

  11. Ventilation technologies scoping study

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-09-30

    This document presents the findings of a scoping study commissioned by the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program of the California Energy Commission to determine what research is necessary to develop new residential ventilation requirements for California. This study is one of three companion efforts needed to complete the job of determining the needs of California, determining residential ventilation requirements, and determining appropriate ventilation technologies to meet these needs and requirements in an energy efficient manner. Rather than providing research results, this scoping study identifies important research questions along with the level of effort necessary to address these questions and the costs, risks, and benefits of pursuing alternative research questions. In approaching these questions and level of effort, feasibility and timing were important considerations. The Commission has specified Summer 2005 as the latest date for completing this research in time to update the 2008 version of California's Energy Code (Title 24).

  12. Bench performance of ventilators during simulated paediatric ventilation.

    PubMed

    Park, M A J; Freebairn, R C; Gomersall, C D

    2013-05-01

    This study compares the accuracy and capabilities of various ventilators using a paediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome lung model. Various compliance settings and respiratory rate settings were used. The study was done in three parts: tidal volume and FiO2 accuracy; pressure control accuracy and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) accuracy. The parameters set on the ventilator were compared with either or both of the measured parameters by the test lung and the ventilator. The results revealed that none of the ventilators could consistently deliver tidal volumes within 1 ml/kg of the set tidal volume, and the discrepancy between the delivered volume and the volume measured by the ventilator varied greatly. The target tidal volume was 8 ml/kg, but delivered tidal volumes ranged from 3.6-11.4 ml/kg and the volumes measured by the ventilator ranged from 4.1-20.6 ml/kg. All the ventilators maintained pressure within 20% of the set pressure, except one ventilator which delivered pressures of up to 27% higher than the set pressure. Two ventilators maintained PEEP within 10% of the prescribed PEEP. The majority of the readings were also within 10%. However, three ventilators delivered, at times, PEEPs over 20% higher. In conclusion, as lung compliance decreases, especially in paediatric patients, some ventilators perform better than others. This study highlights situations where ventilators may not be able to deliver, nor adequately measure, set tidal volumes, pressure, PEEP or FiO2.

  13. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. A pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan involves two nuclear scan tests to measure breathing (ventilation) and circulation ( ... In: Mettler FA, Guiberteau MJ, eds. Essentials of Nuclear Medicine Imaging . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  14. 9 CFR 91.21 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... motors and fans shall be available on board, for replacement or repair of the ventilation system during the voyage. A spare motor and fan of an approved type in working order shall be aboard the vessel for... compartment on which animals are being transported aboard an ocean vessel shall be equipped with a system...

  15. 9 CFR 91.21 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... motors and fans shall be available on board, for replacement or repair of the ventilation system during the voyage. A spare motor and fan of an approved type in working order shall be aboard the vessel for... compartment on which animals are being transported aboard an ocean vessel shall be equipped with a system...

  16. Toxic Vapors and Ventilation Parameters: Evaluating the Laboratory Atmosphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Richard

    1982-01-01

    A significant amount of scientific work is done in laboratories with limited ventilation capabilities. To operate at "acceptable risk", an understanding is needed of what ventilation systems can/cannot do. A simple experiment is described which assesses conditions under which specific experiments should be performed and serves to introduce…

  17. 24 CFR 3280.710 - Venting, ventilation and combustion air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Venting, ventilation and combustion... Fuel Burning Systems § 3280.710 Venting, ventilation and combustion air. (a) The venting as required by... appliance listing and the appliance manufacturer's instructions. (b) Venting and combustion air...

  18. 24 CFR 3280.710 - Venting, ventilation and combustion air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Venting, ventilation and combustion... Fuel Burning Systems § 3280.710 Venting, ventilation and combustion air. (a) The venting as required by... appliance listing and the appliance manufacturer's instructions. (b) Venting and combustion air...

  19. Non-invasive ventilation.

    PubMed Central

    Spence, D.

    1996-01-01

    Nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation is an effective treatment for nocturnal hypoventilation secondary to chest wall deformity or respiratory muscle weakness. Physicians should be aware that, in these groups of patients, disabling breathlessness can be alleviated and established cor pulmonale reversed by the technique. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8949588

  20. The effect of two different Individually Ventilated Cage systems on anxiety-related behaviour and welfare in two strains of laboratory mouse.

    PubMed

    Burman, O; Buccarello, L; Redaelli, V; Cervo, L

    2014-01-30

    The environment in which a laboratory animal is housed can significantly influence its behaviour and welfare, acting as a potential confounding factor for those studies in which it is utilised. This study investigated the impact of two Individually Ventilated Cage (IVC) housing systems on anxiety-related behaviour and welfare indicators in two common strains of laboratory mice. Subjects were juvenile female C57BL/6J and BALB/c mice (N=128) housed in groups of four in two different IVC systems for 7weeks. System One had air delivery at the cage 'cover' level at 75 ACH (Air Changes/Hour) and System Two had air delivery at the 'animal' level at 50 ACH. Mice were assessed twice a week (e.g. bodyweight) or at the end of the study (e.g. anxiety tests). Our results showed significant differences in anxiety-related behaviour between strains and housing systems. Mice in System Two, regardless of strain, defecated more in the Elevated Plus Maze (EPM), spent less time in the open arms of the EPM, and less time in the central zone of the Open Field (OF). Strain differences in anxiety-like behaviour were seen in the increased defecation by BALB/c mice in the OF and EPM and less time spent in the open arms of the EPM compared to C57BL/6J mice. These results suggest that different IVC housing systems can influence mouse behaviour in different ways, with mice of both strains studied exhibiting more anxiety-related behaviour when housed in System Two (air entry at the 'animal' level at 50 ACH), which could impact upon experimental data.

  1. 75 FR 79026 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Ventilation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ...; Ventilation Plan and Main Fan Maintenance Record ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor (DOL) hereby... collection request (ICR) titled, ``Ventilation Plan and Main Fan Maintenance Record,'' to the Office of... required to prepare a written plan of the mine ventilation system. The plan is required to be updated...

  2. 46 CFR 119.465 - Ventilation of spaces containing diesel machinery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation of spaces containing diesel machinery. 119... MACHINERY INSTALLATION Specific Machinery Requirements § 119.465 Ventilation of spaces containing diesel... installation of ventilation system for such engines, plans or sketches showing machinery arrangement...

  3. 46 CFR 182.465 - Ventilation of spaces containing diesel machinery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation of spaces containing diesel machinery. 182... Ventilation of spaces containing diesel machinery. (a) A space containing diesel machinery must be fitted with... structure. Prior to installation of ventilation system for such engines, plans or sketches showing...

  4. 46 CFR 111.33-9 - Ventilation exhaust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Power Semiconductor Rectifier Systems § 111.33-9 Ventilation exhaust. The exhaust of each forced-air semiconductor rectifier system must: (a) Terminate in a location other than a hazardous...

  5. Intermodule ventilation studies for the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Roy G.; Reuter, James L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper examines the ability of the Space Station intermodule ventilation system to maintain centralized control of CO2 removal and O2 supply. The resulting concentration gradients that will arise are calculated by assuming steady state, ideal gas, isothermal conditions, and perfect mixing of air within and between the pressurized elements. In order to estimate the degree of mixing actually obtained for a given ventilation scheme, a program has been developed based on a potential flow solution technique. Preliminary results from this study indicate that substantial short circuiting and recirculation air flow patterns could arise if a simple duct and diffuser air exchange method at the docking port interface were employed.

  6. A collaborative, systems-level approach to eliminating healthcare-associated MRSA, central-line-associated bloodstream infections, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and respiratory virus infections.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Donna M; Staiger, Thomas O; Peterson, Gene N; Sinanan, Mika N; Angiulo, Cindy L; Makarewicz, Vanessa A; Wild, Lorie M; Whimbey, Estella E

    2012-01-01

    To achieve sustainable reductions in healthcare-associated infections (HAIs), the University of Washington Medical Center (UWMC) deployed a collaborative, systems-level initiative. With the sponsorship of senior leadership, multidisciplinary teams were established to address healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), central-line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI), ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), and respiratory virus infections. The goal of the initiative was to eliminate these four HAIs among medical center inpatients by 2012. In the first 24 months of the project, the number of healthcare-associated MRSA cases decreased 58%; CLABSI cases decreased 54%. Staff and provider compliance with infection prevention measures improved and remained strong, for example, 96% compliance with hand hygiene, 98% compliance with the recommended influenza vaccination program, and 100% compliance with the VAP bundle. Achieving these results required an array of coordinated, systems-level interventions. Critical project success factors were believed to include creating organizational alignment by declaring eliminating HAIs as an organizational breakthrough goal, having the organization's executive leadership highly engaged in the project, coordination by an experienced and effective project leader and manager, collaboration by multidisciplinary project teams, and promoting transparency of results across the organization.

  7. Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2012-08-01

    Elevated outdoor ozone levels are associated with adverse health effects. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone of outdoor origin would lower population exposures and might also lead to a reduction in ozone-associated adverse health effects. In most buildings, indoor ozone levels are diminished with respect to outdoor levels to an extent that depends on surface reactions and on the degree to which ozone penetrates the building envelope. Ozone enters buildings from outdoors together with the airflows that are driven by natural and mechanical means, including deliberate ventilation used to reduce concentrations of indoor-generated pollutants. When assessing the effect of deliberate ventilation on occupant health one should consider not only the positive effects on removing pollutants of indoor origin but also the possibility that enhanced ventilation might increase indoor levels of pollutants originating outdoors. This study considers how changes in residential ventilation that are designed to comply with ASHRAE Standard 62.2 might influence indoor levels of ozone. Simulation results show that the building envelope can contribute significantly to filtration of ozone. Consequently, the use of exhaust ventilation systems is predicted to produce lower indoor ozone concentrations than would occur with balanced ventilation systems operating at the same air-­exchange rate. We also investigated a strategy for reducing exposure to ozone that would deliberately reduce ventilation rates during times of high outdoor ozone concentration while still meeting daily average ventilation requirements.

  8. ASHRAE and residential ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.

    2003-10-01

    In the last quarter of a century, the western world has become increasingly aware of environmental threats to health and safety. During this period, people psychologically retreated away from outdoors hazards such as pesticides, smog, lead, oil spills, and dioxin to the seeming security of their homes. However, the indoor environment may not be healthier than the outdoor environment, as has become more apparent over the past few years with issues such as mold, formaldehyde, and sick-building syndrome. While the built human environment has changed substantially over the past 10,000 years, human biology has not; poor indoor air quality creates health risks and can be uncomfortable. The human race has found, over time, that it is essential to manage the indoor environments of their homes. ASHRAE has long been in the business of ventilation, but most of the focus of that effort has been in the area of commercial and institutional buildings. Residential ventilation was traditionally not a major concern because it was felt that, between operable windows and envelope leakage, people were getting enough outside air in their homes. In the quarter of a century since the first oil shock, houses have gotten much more energy efficient. At the same time, the kinds of materials and functions in houses changed in character in response to people's needs. People became more environmentally conscious and aware not only about the resources they were consuming but about the environment in which they lived. All of these factors contributed to an increasing level of public concern about residential indoor air quality and ventilation. Where once there was an easy feeling about the residential indoor environment, there is now a desire to define levels of acceptability and performance. Many institutions--both public and private--have interests in Indoor Air Quality (IAQ), but ASHRAE, as the professional society that has had ventilation as part of its mission for over 100 years, is the

  9. Summarized Data of Test Space Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Inspections from the Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation Study

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information on the characteristics of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system(s) in the entire BASE building including types of ventilation, equipment configurations, and operation and maintenance issues

  10. 46 CFR 194.20-5 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS HANDLING, USE, AND... system shall have a capacity sufficient to effect a complete change of air in not more than 4 minutes based upon the volume of the compartment. (1) Power ventilation units shall have nonsparking...

  11. 46 CFR 194.20-5 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS HANDLING, USE, AND... system shall have a capacity sufficient to effect a complete change of air in not more than 4 minutes based upon the volume of the compartment. (1) Power ventilation units shall have nonsparking...

  12. 46 CFR 194.20-5 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS HANDLING, USE, AND... system shall have a capacity sufficient to effect a complete change of air in not more than 4 minutes based upon the volume of the compartment. (1) Power ventilation units shall have nonsparking...

  13. 46 CFR 194.15-5 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS HANDLING, USE, AND... emergencies. The system shall have a capacity sufficient to effect a complete change of air in not more than 4 minutes based upon the volume of the compartment. (1) Power ventilation units shall have...

  14. 4D-Imaging of the Lung: Reproducibility of Lesion Size and Displacement on Helical CT, MRI, and Cone Beam CT in a Ventilated Ex Vivo System

    SciTech Connect

    Biederer, Juergen Dinkel, Julien; Remmert, Gregor; Jetter, Siri; Nill, Simeon; Moser, Torsten; Bendl, Rolf; Thierfelder, Carsten; Fabel, Michael; Oelfke, Uwe; Bock, Michael; Plathow, Christian; Bolte, Hendrik; Welzel, Thomas; Hoffmann, Beata; Hartmann, Guenter; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Debus, Juergen; Heller, Martin

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional (4D) imaging is a key to motion-adapted radiotherapy of lung tumors. We evaluated in a ventilated ex vivo system how size and displacement of artificial pulmonary nodules are reproduced with helical 4D-CT, 4D-MRI, and linac-integrated cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods and Materials: Four porcine lungs with 18 agarose nodules (mean diameters 1.3-1.9 cm), were ventilated inside a chest phantom at 8/min and subject to 4D-CT (collimation 24 x 1.2 mm, pitch 0.1, slice/increment 24x10{sup 2}/1.5/0.8 mm, pitch 0.1, temporal resolution 0.5 s), 4D-MRI (echo-shared dynamic three-dimensional-flash; repetition/echo time 2.13/0.72 ms, voxel size 2.7 x 2.7 x 4.0 mm, temporal resolution 1.4 s) and linac-integrated 4D-CBCT (720 projections, 3-min rotation, temporal resolution {approx}1 s). Static CT without respiration served as control. Three observers recorded lesion size (RECIST-diameters x/y/z) and axial displacement. Interobserver- and interphase-variation coefficients (IO/IP VC) of measurements indicated reproducibility. Results: Mean x/y/z lesion diameters in cm were equal on static and dynamic CT (1.88/1.87; 1.30/1.39; 1.71/1.73; p > 0.05), but appeared larger on MRI and CBCT (2.06/1.95 [p < 0.05 vs. CT]; 1.47/1.28 [MRI vs. CT/CBCT p < 0.05]; 1.86/1.83 [CT vs. CBCT p < 0.05]). Interobserver-VC for lesion sizes were 2.54-4.47% (CT), 2.29-4.48% (4D-CT); 5.44-6.22% (MRI) and 4.86-6.97% (CBCT). Interphase-VC for lesion sizes ranged from 2.28% (4D-CT) to 10.0% (CBCT). Mean displacement in cm decreased from static CT (1.65) to 4D-CT (1.40), CBCT (1.23) and MRI (1.16). Conclusions: Lesion sizes are exactly reproduced with 4D-CT but overestimated on 4D-MRI and CBCT with a larger variability due to limited temporal and spatial resolution. All 4D-modalities underestimate lesion displacement.

  15. Goal-directed critiquing by computer: ventilator management.

    PubMed

    Miller, P L

    1985-10-01

    VQ-ATTENDING is an expert system which critiques aspects of the ventilator management of a patient receiving mechanical respiratory support. To use VQ-ATTENDING, the physician first inputs medical information describing a patient, a current set of arterial blood gas results, the current ventilator settings, and a proposed set of new ventilator settings. VQ-ATTENDING then critiques the appropriateness of the proposed settings. In its current developmental implementation, VQ-ATTENDING explores a particular expert system designed feature: the ability to assess appropriate treatment goals, and to use those goals to guide the system's critiquing analysis.

  16. Ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    2009-11-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia is a pneumonia that develops initially more than 48 h from the start of tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. The route of infection is almost always through the respiratory tract. Intake of contaminants from outside the tracheal tube (silent aspiration) is considered a key route, and suctioning of secretions that have accumulated above the cuff of the endotracheal tubes is effective in preventing infection. The circuit is managed and heated-wire humidifiers and suction are manipulated based on appropriate infection control measures. To diagnose pathogens, efforts should be made to collect specimens from the pneumonia focus. Realistically, however, diagnosis can also be achieved based on the clinical course and from the results of culture of samples from tracheal aspirate. Use of prophylactic antimicrobials is not recommended, but once a diagnosis is made, antimicrobials are administered that combat the causative microorganism.

  17. Assessment of costs and benefits associated with resolution of Generic Safety Issue 143 -- Availability of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning and chilled water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Daling, P.M.; Marler, J.E.; Vo, T.V.; Phan, H.K.; Friley, J.R.

    1995-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory, under contract to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, has conducted an assessment of the values (benefits) and impacts (costs) associated with potential resolutions to Generic Issue 143--``Availability of Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) and Chilled Water Systems.`` The key objectives of the study were to (a) identify vulnerabilities related to failures of HVAC, chilled water, and room-cooling systems, (b) develop estimates of room heatup rates and safety-related equipment vulnerabilities following losses of HVAC/room-cooler systems, (c) develop estimates of the core damage frequencies and public risks associated with failures of these systems, (d) develop proposed resolution strategies to this generic issue, and (e) perform a value/impact analysis of the proposed resolutions. Detailed probabilistic risk assessments for four representative plants form the basis for the core damage frequency and public risk calculations. Internally initiated core damage sequences as well as external event were considered. Three proposed resolution strategies were developed for this safety issue, and it was determined that all three were not cost effective. Additional evaluations were performed to develop ``generic`` insights on potential design-related vulnerabilities and potential high-frequency (>10{sup {minus}4}/reactor-yr) accident sequences that involve failures of HVAC/room-cooling functions. It was concluded that, although high-frequency accident sequences may exist at some plants, these sequences are plant-specific in nature or have been resolved through hardware and/or operational changes. The plant-specific individual plant examinations appear to be an effective vehicle for identification and resolution of these plant-specific anomalies and hardware configurations.

  18. Home Mechanical Ventilation in Children.

    PubMed

    Preutthipan, Aroonwan

    2015-09-01

    The number of children dependent on home mechanical ventilation has been reported to be increasing in many countries around the world. Home mechanical ventilation has been well accepted as a standard treatment of children with chronic respiratory failure. Some children may need mechanical ventilation as a lifelong therapy. To send mechanically ventilated children back home may be more difficult than adults. However, relatively better outcomes have been demonstrated in children. Children could be safely ventilated at home if they are selected and managed properly. Conditions requiring home ventilation include increased respiratory load from airway or lung pathologies, ventilatory muscle weakness and failure of neurologic control of ventilation. Home mechanical ventilation should be considered when the patient develops progressive respiratory failure or intractable failure to wean mechanical ventilation. Polysomnography or overnight pulse oximetry plus capnometry are used to detect nocturnal hypoventilation in early stage of respiratory failure. Ventilator strategy including non-invasive and invasive approach should be individualized for each patient. The author strongly believes that parents and family members are able to take care of their child at home if they are trained and educated effectively. A good team work with dedicated members is the key factor of success.

  19. Pressure versus volume controlled modes in invasive mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Garnero, A J; Abbona, H; Gordo-Vidal, F; Hermosa-Gelbard, C

    2013-05-01

    The first generation of mechanical ventilators were controlled and cycled by pressure. Unfortunately, they did not allow control of the delivered tidal volume under changes in the dynamics of the respiratory system. This led to a second generation of ventilators that allowed volume control, hence favoring the ventilatory strategy based on normalization of the arterial gases. Studies conducted in the 1980s which related lung injury to the high ventilator pressures utilized while treating acute respiratory distress syndrome patients renewed interest in pressure-controlled mechanical ventilation. In addition, new evidence became available, leading to the development of pulmonary protective strategies aiming at preventing the progression of ventilator-induced lung injury. This review provides a detailed description of the control of pressure or volume using certain ventilatory modes, and offers a general view of their advantages and disadvantages, based on the latest available evidence.

  20. Regenerative Blower for EVA Suit Ventilation Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather; Izenson, Mike; Chen, Weibo

    2008-01-01

    Portable life support systems in future space suits will include a ventilation subsystem driven by a dedicated fan. This ventilation fan must meet challenging requirements for pressure rise, flow rate, efficiency, size, safety, and reliability. This paper describes research and development that showed the feasibility of a regenerative blower that is uniquely suited to meet these requirements. We proved feasibility through component tests, blower tests, and design analysis. Based on the requirements for the Constellation Space Suit ventilation fan, we designed the critical elements of the blower. We measured the effects of key design parameters on blower performance using separate effects tests, and used the results of these tests to design a regenerative blower that will meet the ventilation fan requirements. We assembled a proof-of-concept blower and measured its performance at low pressures that simulate a PLSS environment. We obtained head/flow performance curves over a range of operating speeds, identified the maximum efficiency point for the blower, and used these results to specify the design and operating conditions for the ventilation fan. We designed a compact motor that can drive the blower under all anticipated operating requirements and operate with high efficiency during normal operation. We identified materials for the blower that will enhance safety for operation in a lunar environment. We produced a solid model that illustrates the final design. The proof-of-concept blower produced the flow rate and pressure rise needed for the CSSS ventilation subsystem while running at 5400 rpm and consuming only 9 W of electric power and using a non-optimized, commercial motor and controller and inefficient bearings. Scaling the test results to a complete design shows that a lightweight, compact, reliable, and low power blower can meet the performance requirements for future PLSSs.

  1. New Control Design Principles Based on Measured Performance and Energy Analysis of HVAC (Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning) Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    economy cycle that does not use PI con- trol. Using PI control for both the cooling coil and the economy cycle pro- duces more than a 20 percent...savings over the same system with proportional- only control. The system using PI control for both the coil and dampers cold- deck reset is the most...Furthermore, the use of PI control instead of proportional-only control has much the same beneficial impact on system energy consumption as using -. cold

  2. Examination of bleederless ventilation practices for spontaneous combustion control in US coal mines

    SciTech Connect

    Organiscak, J.A.; Smith, A.C.; Diamond, W.P.; Mucho, T.P.

    1995-12-31

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines examined bleederless ventilation practices to evaluate their use as a spontaneous combustion control measure in U.S. coal mines. Results indicate that restricting airflow into mined-out areas (bleederless ventilation) is recognized worldwide as a spontaneous combustion control measure. However, ventilation practices commonly used to limit airflow to mined-out areas are not easily applicable to United States mining conditions, systems, experience and regulations. The types of bleederless ventilation systems used throughout the world and the spontaneous combustion risks associated with these systems are discussed. Primary design considerations for bleederless ventilation consist of the interaction of ventilation practices, methane drainage, ground control, seal construction and mine monitoring. Technological improvements needed for U.S. application of bleederless ventilation are also discussed.

  3. 46 CFR 111.105-21 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation. 111.105-21 Section 111.105-21 Shipping... REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-21 Ventilation. A ventilation duct which ventilates a hazardous location has the classification of that location. Each fan for ventilation of a hazardous location must...

  4. 46 CFR 111.105-21 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation. 111.105-21 Section 111.105-21 Shipping... REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-21 Ventilation. A ventilation duct which ventilates a hazardous location has the classification of that location. Each fan for ventilation of a hazardous location must...

  5. 46 CFR 111.105-21 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation. 111.105-21 Section 111.105-21 Shipping... REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-21 Ventilation. A ventilation duct which ventilates a hazardous location has the classification of that location. Each fan for ventilation of a hazardous location must...

  6. Modeling particle loss in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2003-04-01

    Empirical equations were developed and applied to predict losses of 0.01-100 {micro}m airborne particles making a single pass through 120 different ventilation duct runs typical of those found in mid-sized office buildings. For all duct runs, losses were negligible for submicron particles and nearly complete for particles larger than 50 {micro}m. The 50th percentile cut-point diameters were 15 {micro}m in supply runs and 25 {micro}m in return runs. Losses in supply duct runs were higher than in return duct runs, mostly because internal insulation was present in portions of supply duct runs, but absent from return duct runs. Single-pass equations for particle loss in duct runs were combined with models for predicting ventilation system filtration efficiency and particle deposition to indoor surfaces to evaluate the fates of particles of indoor and outdoor origin in an archetypal mechanically ventilated building. Results suggest that duct losses are a minor influence for determining indoor concentrations for most particle sizes. Losses in ducts were of a comparable magnitude to indoor surface losses for most particle sizes. For outdoor air drawn into an unfiltered ventilation system, most particles smaller than 1 {micro}m are exhausted from the building. Large particles deposit within the building, mostly in supply ducts or on indoor surfaces. When filters are present, most particles are either filtered or exhausted. The fates of particles generated indoors follow similar trends as outdoor particles drawn into the building.

  7. Estimating Respiratory Mechanical Parameters during Mechanical Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Barbini, Paolo

    1982-01-01

    We propose an algorithm for the estimation of the parameters of the mechanical respiratory system. The algorithm is based on non linear regression analysis with a two-compartment respiratory system model. The model used allows us to take account of the non homogeneous properties of the lungs which may cause uneven distribution of ventilation and thus affect the gas exchange in the lungs. The estimation of the parameters of such a model permits the optimization of the type of ventilation to be used in patients undergoing respiratory treatment. This can be done bearing in mind the effects of the mechanical ventilation on venous return as well as the quality of gas exchange. We have valued the performances of the estimation algorithm which is proposed on the basis of the agreement between the data and the model response, of the stability of the parameter estimates and of the standard deviations of the parameters. The parameter estimation algorithm described does not have recourse to the examination of the impedance spectra and is completely independent of the type of ventilator employed.

  8. Does Mixing Make Residential Ventilation More Effective?

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain

    2010-08-16

    Ventilation dilutes or removes indoor contaminants to reduce occupant exposure. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, there will be different dilution rates and different source strengths in every zone. The total ventilation rate is the most important factor in determining the exposure of occupants to given sources, but the zone- specific distribution of exhaust and supply air, and the mixing of ventilation air can have significant roles. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of mixing depending on several factors such as air leakage through the building envelope, air distribution systems and the location of sources and occupants. This paper reports recent results of investigations to determine the impact that air mixing has on exposures of residential occupants to prototypical contaminants of concern. Evaluations of existing field measurements and simulations reported in the literature are combined with new analyses to provide an integrated overview of the topic. The results show that for extreme cases additional mixing can be a significant factor but for typical homes looking at average exposures mixing is not helpful and can even make exposures worse.

  9. Pulmonary mechanics during mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Henderson, William R; Sheel, A William

    2012-03-15

    The use of mechanical ventilation has become widespread in the management of hypoxic respiratory failure. Investigations of pulmonary mechanics in this clinical scenario have demonstrated that there are significant differences in compliance, resistance and gas flow when compared with normal subjects. This paper will review the mechanisms by which pulmonary mechanics are assessed in mechanically ventilated patients and will review how the data can be used for investigative research purposes as well as to inform rational ventilator management.

  10. Inhaled antibiotic therapy for ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis and ventilator-associated pneumonia: an update.

    PubMed

    Abu-Salah, Tareq; Dhand, Rajiv

    2011-09-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in mechanically-ventilated patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis (VAT) was previously believed to be an intermediate stage between colonization of the lower respiratory tract and VAP. More recent data, however, suggest that VAT may be a separate entity that increases morbidity and mortality, independently of the occurrence of VAP. Some, but not all, patients with VAT progress to develop VAP. Although inhaled antibiotics alone could be effective for the treatment of VAP, the current consensus of opinion favors their role as adjuncts to systemic antimicrobial therapy for VAP. Inhaled antibiotics are increasingly employed for salvage therapy in patients with VAP due to multi-drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. In contrast to VAP, VAT could be effectively treated with inhaled antibiotic therapy alone or in combination with systemic antimicrobials.

  11. Value impact analysis of Generic Issue 143, Availability of Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning (HVAC) and Chilled Water Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Daling, P.M.; Marler, J.E.; Vo, T.V.; Phan, H.; Friley, J.R.

    1993-11-01

    This study evaluates the values (benefits) and impacts (costs) associated with potential resolutions to Generic Issue 143, ``Availability of HVAC and Chilled Water Systems.`` The study identifies vulnerabilities related to failures of HVAC, chilled water, and room cooling systems; develops estimates of room heatup rates and safety-related equipment vulnerabilities following losses of HVAC/room cooler systems; develops estimates of the core damage frequencies and public risks associated with failures of these systems; develops three proposed resolution strategies to this generic issue; and performs a value/impact analysis of the proposed resolutions. Existing probabilistic risk assessments for four representative plants, including one plant from each vendor, form the basis for the core damage frequency and public risk calculations. Both internal and external events were considered. It was concluded that all three proposed resolution strategies exceed the $1,000/person-rem cost-effectiveness ratio. Additional evaluations were performed to develop ``generic`` insights on potential design-related and configuration-related vulnerabilities and potential high-frequency ({approximately}1E-04/RY) accident sequences that involve failures of HVAC/room cooling functions. It was concluded that, although high-frequency accident sequences may exist at some plants, these high-frequency sequences are plant-specific in nature or have been resolved through hardware and/or operational changes. The plant-specific Individual Plant Examinations are an effective vehicle for identification and resolution of these plant-specific anomalies and hardware configurations.

  12. 4. VENTILATION FAN SHOWING RELATIVE POSITION IN THE AIR TUNNEL. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VENTILATION FAN SHOWING RELATIVE POSITION IN THE AIR TUNNEL. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Ozark Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  13. Barriers to Improved Ventilation in Production Housing: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Barley, C. D.

    2002-04-01

    In addressing the goals of energy-efficiency and indoor air quality (IAQ) in homes, industry teams in the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program are installing mechanical ventilation systems in tight homes.

  14. Detail of heating coil for Machine Shop (Bldg. 163) ventilation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of heating coil for Machine Shop (Bldg. 163) ventilation system Note portion of fan visible behind coil - Atchison, Topeka, Santa Fe Railroad, Albuquerque Shops, Machine Shop, 908 Second Street, Southwest, Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, NM

  15. Ventilation air, the economy cycle, and VAV

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, R.W.

    1994-10-01

    This article describes a simple yet effective method of providing both minimum and economy cycle control of outside air with a VAV system. Like most of the people in the HVAC industry, the author has been aware that there are problems with ventilation air and economy cycle outside air control when variable air volume (VAV) systems are used. It seemed obvious that the simple solution was to use an injection fan in the outside air intake to provide the minimum ventilation requirement under any operating condition of the VAV system and--presto--the problem would be solved. Recently the author was asked to prepare a seminar on HVAC controls for one of the ASHRAE chapters, with special emphasis on VAV systems. This forced him to take a careful look at the situation, and in the ensuing analysis, it became apparent that the previous look at the problem had not discovered the simplest and perhaps best solution.

  16. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Guidance for Residential High-Performance New Construction - Multifamily

    SciTech Connect

    Lstiburek, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    The measure guideline provides ventilation guidance for residential high performance multifamily construction that incorporates the requirements of the ASHRAE 62.2 ventilation and indoor air quality standard. The measure guideline focus is on the decision criteria for weighing cost and performance of various ventilation systems. The measure guideline is intended for contractors, builders, developers, designers and building code officials. The guide may also be helpful to building owners wishing to learn more about ventilation strategies available for their buildings. The measure guideline includes specific design and installation instructions for the most cost effective and performance effective solutions for ventilation in multifamily units that satisfies the requirements of ASHRAE 62.2-2016.

  17. Formaldehyde as a basis for residential ventilation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, M.H.; Hodgson, A.T.

    2002-04-28

    Traditionally, houses in the U.S. have been ventilated by passive infiltration in combination with active window opening. However in recent years, the construction quality of residential building envelopes has been improved to reduce infiltration, and the use of windows for ventilation also may have decreased due to a number of factors. Thus, there has been increased interest in engineered ventilation systems for residences. The amount of ventilation provided by an engineered system should be set to protect occupants from unhealthy or objectionable exposures to indoor pollutants, while minimizing energy costs for conditioning incoming air. Determining the correct ventilation rate is a complex task, as there are numerous pollutants of potential concern, each having poorly characterized emission rates, and poorly defined acceptable levels of exposure. One ubiquitous pollutant in residences is formaldehyde. The sources of formaldehyde in new houses are reasonably understood, and there is a large body of literature on human health effects. This report examines the use of formaldehyde as a means of determining ventilation rates and uses existing data on emission rates of formaldehyde in new houses to derive recommended levels. Based on current, widely accepted concentration guidelines for formaldehyde, the minimum and guideline ventilation rates for most new houses are 0.28 and 0.5 air changes per hour, respectively.

  18. Ventilation and infiltration in high-rise apartment buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, R.C.; Feustel, H.E.; Dickerhoff, D.J.

    1996-03-01

    Air flow, air leakage measurements and numerical simulations were made on a 13-story apartment building to characterize the ventilation rates for the individual apartments. Parametric simulations were performed for specific conditions, e.g., height, orientation, outside temperature and wind speed. Our analysis of the air flow simulations suggest that the ventilation to the individual units varies considerably. With the mechanical ventilation system disabled and no wind, units at the lower level of the building have adequate ventilation only on days with high temperature differences, while units on higher floors have no ventilation at all. Units facing the windward side will be over-ventilated when the building experiences wind directions between west and north. At the same time, leeward apartments did not experience any fresh air-because, in these cases, air flows enter the apartments from the corridor and exit through the exhaust shafts and the cracks in the facade. Even with the mechanical ventilation system operating, we found wide variation in the air flows to the individual apartments. In addition to the specific case presented here, these findings have more general implications for energy retrofits and health and comfort of occupants in high-rise apartment buildings.

  19. Pressure-supported ventilation for posterior fossa operation.

    PubMed

    Mori, N; Takahashi, H; Yanase, T; Suzuki, M

    1990-03-01

    To maintain enough gas exchange while using spontaneous respiration as a monitor of the normal brainstem function, we tried pressure-supported ventilation (PSV) with a Servo 900C ventilator (Siemens Elema AB, Sweden) on 12 otherwise healthy patients during posterior fossa operation. Ventilation mode was switched from controlled to PSV after the dura was open uneventfully in all cases but one. With a trigger level of -1 to -2 cm H2O, spontaneous respiration was triggered to start the inspiration. With supporting inspiratory pressure of 4-20 cm H2O, PaCO2 was kept at 31.7-45.9 mm Hg. The ventilatory level could be monitored breath by breath by ventilatory frequency, tidal volume, minute volume, and end-tidal CO2 concentration shown on the ventilator system. Apnea was observed in two cases during surgical manipulation around the brainstem. It was indicated immediately by the ventilator's alarm for decreased expiratory minute volume, and no sign of brainstem dysfunction was observed postoperatively. PSV was useful in maintaining adequate ventilation whereas spontaneous respiration was used as an indicator of normal brainstem function. The alarm system of the ventilator was sensitive enough to detect the surgical invasion of the brainstem at a very early stage.

  20. PI Control of a Single-Duct VAV (Variable Air Volume) HVAC (Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning) System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED PI CONTROL OF A SINGLE-DUCT VAV HVAC SYSTEM FINAL 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) S...only remaining facet of the - design is the selection of the two PI controller gain values: the propor- tional control gain K and the integral control...gain K1. These values will be p ’. . obtained once the PI controller is attached to the plant by using the pro- cedure devised by J. C. Ziegler and N. B

  1. Indicators of moisture and ventilation system contamination in U.S. office buildings as risk factors for respiratory and mucous membrane symptoms: analyses of the EPA BASE data.

    PubMed

    Mendell, Mark J; Cozen, Myrna; Lei-Gomez, Quanhong; Brightman, Howard S; Erdmann, Christine A; Girman, John R; Womble, Susan E

    2006-05-01

    We assessed associations between indicators for moisture in office buildings and weekly, building-related lower respiratory and mucous membrane symptoms in office workers, using the U.S. EPA BASE data, collected in a representative sample of 100 U.S. office buildings. We estimated the strength of associations between the symptom outcomes and moisture indicators in multivariate logistic regression models as odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), controlling for potential confounding factors and adjusting for correlation among workers in buildings. This analysis identified associations between building-related symptoms and several indicators of moisture or contamination in office buildings. One set of models showed almost a tripling of weekly building-related lower respiratory symptoms in association with lack of cleaning of the drip pans under air-conditioning cooling coils (OR [CI] = 2.8 (1.2-6.5)). Other models found that lack of cleaning of either drip pans or cooling coils was associated with increased mucous membrane symptoms (OR [CI] = 1.4 (1.1-1.9)). Slightly increased symptoms were also associated with other moisture indicators, especially mucous membrane symptoms and past water damage to building mechanical rooms (OR [CI] = 1.3 (1.0-1.7)). Overall, these findings suggest that the presence of moisture or contamination in ventilation systems or occupied spaces in office buildings may have adverse respiratory or irritant effects on workers. The analysis, however, failed to confirm several risks identified in a previous study, such as condition of drain pans or outdoor air intakes, and other hypothesized moisture risks. Studies with more rigorous measurement of environmental risks and health outcomes will be necessary to define moisture-related risks in buildings.

  2. Pressure support ventilation decreases inspiratory work of breathing during general anesthesia and spontaneous ventilation.

    PubMed

    Christie, J M; Smith, R A

    1992-08-01

    Spontaneous ventilation may offer advantages over controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV), but increase in work of breathing may diminish its usefulness. During general anesthesia, respiratory depression and increased work of breathing often preclude spontaneous ventilation, and patients then receive CMV. We compared the inspiratory work of breathing of anesthetized patients who breathed with pressure support ventilation (PSV) with that associated with a demand gas flow and a standard anesthesia circle system. We studied nine consenting patients who underwent general inhaled anesthesia with or without regional supplementation. An anesthesia/ventilator system (Siemens 900D, Solna, Sweden) provided PSV (5 cm H2O) or demand gas flow during spontaneous inspiration. Gas flow during demand breathing and PSV was initiated when inspiration produced a 2-cm H2O reduction in airway pressure. An anesthesia machine (Dräger Narkomed 3, Telford, Pa.) provided a gas flow rate of 6 L/min through a standard semiclosed circle system. Airway pressure, airway gas flow rate, and esophageal pressure were continuously transduced, and data or signals were conveyed to a computer. Tidal volume and respiratory rate were computed from the flow curve. The inspiratory work of breathing was calculated as the integral of the area subserved by a plot of esophageal pressure and tidal volume during inspiration. Heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure were recorded, and arterial blood was sampled for gas tension and pH analysis. No differences were found in pHa, Paco2, Pao2, tidal volume, respiratory rate, heart rate, or mean arterial blood pressure among the three modes of ventilation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Variability in Mechanical Ventilation: What's All the Noise About?

    PubMed

    Naik, Bhiken I; Lynch, Carl; Durbin, Charles G

    2015-08-01

    Controlled mechanical ventilation is characterized by a fixed breathing frequency and tidal volume. Physiological and mathematical models have demonstrated the beneficial effects of varying tidal volume and/or inspiratory pressure during positive-pressure ventilation. The addition of noise (random changes) to a monotonous nonlinear biological system, such as the lung, induces stochastic resonance that contributes to the recruitment of collapsed alveoli and atelectatic lung segments. In this article, we review the mechanism of physiological pulmonary variability, the principles of noise and stochastic resonance, and the emerging understanding that there are beneficial effects of variability during mechanical ventilation.

  4. Mechanical ventilation in abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Futier, E; Godet, T; Millot, A; Constantin, J-M; Jaber, S

    2014-01-01

    One of the key challenges in perioperative care is to reduce postoperative morbidity and mortality. Patients who develop postoperative morbidity but survive to leave hospital have often reduced functional independence and long-term survival. Mechanical ventilation provides a specific example that may help us to shift thinking from treatment to prevention of postoperative complications. Mechanical ventilation in patients undergoing surgery has long been considered only as a modality to ensure gas exchange while allowing maintenance of anesthesia with delivery of inhaled anesthetics. Evidence is accumulating, however, suggesting an association between intraoperative mechanical ventilation strategy and postoperative pulmonary function and clinical outcome in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Non-protective ventilator settings, especially high tidal volume (VT) (>10-12mL/kg) and the use of very low level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) (PEEP<5cmH2O) or no PEEP, may cause alveolar overdistension and repetitive tidal recruitment leading to ventilator-associated lung injury in patients with healthy lungs. Stimulated by previous findings in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, the use of lower tidal volume ventilation is becoming increasingly more common in the operating room. However, lowering tidal volume, though important, is only part of the overall multifaceted approach of lung protective mechanical ventilation. In this review, we aimed at providing the most recent and relevant clinical evidence regarding the use of mechanical ventilation in patients undergoing abdominal surgery.

  5. Fuselage ventilation under wind conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    To determine realistic fuselage ventilation rates for post-crash fires and full-scale fire tests, the effects on wind-about fuselage ventilation rate of various parameters were studied. The parameters investigated were fuselage size and shape, fuselage orientation and proximity to ground, fuselage-opening and location, and wind speed and direction.

  6. Transpired Air Collectors - Ventilation Preheating

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, C.

    2006-06-22

    Many commercial and industrial buildings have high ventilation rates. Although all that fresh air is great for indoor air quality, heating it can be very expensive. This short (2-page) fact sheet describes a technology available to use solar energy to preheat ventilation air and dramatically reduce utility bills.

  7. Difficult weaning from mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Oh, T E

    1994-07-01

    Weaning from mechanical ventilation may be influenced by factors relating to equipment, techniques and procedures. Criteria to initiate weaning and predictors of weaning outcome are generally unreliable, but mechanical work of breathing, the tidal volume: frequency ratio and the inspiratory pressure: maximal inspiratory pressure ratio may anticipate those likely to fail weaning. The optimal weaning ventilatory mode is not known, but intermittent mandatory ventilation, pressure support ventilation, and continuous positive pressure ventilation are the most commonly used. The resistances of individual components of breathing circuits are extremely important. Blow-by heated humidifiers and ventilators which compensate for the impedances of their inspiratory demand valves impose clinically acceptable spontaneous breathing loads. Close monitoring, adequate respiratory muscle rest, attention to mineral deficiencies, nutrition and pulmonary hygiene are also important parts of the weaning process.

  8. Inhalation therapy in mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Maccari, Juçara Gasparetto; Teixeira, Cassiano; Gazzana, Marcelo Basso; Savi, Augusto; Dexheimer-Neto, Felippe Leopoldo; Knorst, Marli Maria

    2015-01-01

    Patients with obstructive lung disease often require ventilatory support via invasive or noninvasive mechanical ventilation, depending on the severity of the exacerbation. The use of inhaled bronchodilators can significantly reduce airway resistance, contributing to the improvement of respiratory mechanics and patient-ventilator synchrony. Although various studies have been published on this topic, little is known about the effectiveness of the bronchodilators routinely prescribed for patients on mechanical ventilation or about the deposition of those drugs throughout the lungs. The inhaled bronchodilators most commonly used in ICUs are beta adrenergic agonists and anticholinergics. Various factors might influence the effect of bronchodilators, including ventilation mode, position of the spacer in the circuit, tube size, formulation, drug dose, severity of the disease, and patient-ventilator synchrony. Knowledge of the pharmacological properties of bronchodilators and the appropriate techniques for their administration is fundamental to optimizing the treatment of these patients. PMID:26578139

  9. Optimization of Occupancy Based Demand Controlled Ventilation in Residences

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, Dorthe K.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2011-05-01

    Although it has been used for many years in commercial buildings, the application of demand controlled ventilation in residences is limited. In this study we used occupant exposure to pollutants integrated over time (referred to as 'dose') as the metric to evaluate the effectiveness and air quality implications of demand controlled ventilation in residences. We looked at air quality for two situations. The first is that typically used in ventilation standards: the exposure over a long term. The second is to look at peak exposures that are associated with time variations in ventilation rates and pollutant generation. The pollutant generation had two components: a background rate associated with the building materials and furnishings and a second component related to occupants. The demand controlled ventilation system operated at a low airflow rate when the residence was unoccupied and at a high airflow rate when occupied. We used analytical solutions to the continuity equation to determine the ventilation effectiveness and the long-term chronic dose and peak acute exposure for a representative range of occupancy periods, pollutant generation rates and airflow rates. The results of the study showed that we can optimize the demand controlled airflow rates to reduce the quantity of air used for ventilation without introducing problematic acute conditions.

  10. Jet Ventilation during Rigid Bronchoscopy in Adults: A Focused Review

    PubMed Central

    Mayné, Alain

    2016-01-01

    The indications for rigid bronchoscopy for interventional pulmonology have increased and include stent placements and transbronchial cryobiopsy procedures. The shared airway between anesthesiologist and pulmonologist and the open airway system, requiring specific ventilation techniques such as jet ventilation, need a good understanding of the procedure to reduce potentially harmful complications. Appropriate adjustment of the ventilator settings including pause pressure and peak inspiratory pressure reduces the risk of barotrauma. High frequency jet ventilation allows adequate oxygenation and carbon dioxide removal even in cases of tracheal stenosis up to frequencies of around 150 min−1; however, in an in vivo animal model, high frequency jet ventilation along with normal frequency jet ventilation (superimposed high frequency jet ventilation) has been shown to improve oxygenation by increasing lung volume and carbon dioxide removal by increasing tidal volume across a large spectrum of frequencies without increasing barotrauma. General anesthesia with a continuous, intravenous, short-acting agent is safe and effective during rigid bronchoscopy procedures. PMID:27847813

  11. Correlation of regional breath sound with regional ventilation in emphysema

    SciTech Connect

    Ploysongsang, Y.; Pare, J.A.; Macklem, P.T.

    1982-09-01

    We measured regional breath sound intensities (Ib) by a microphone amplifier system in 8 subjects with emphysema. We also measured regional white noise transmissions (Tn) from the same areas in all subjects. The recorded areas were 5, 10, 15, and 20 cm from the apex of the lung just lateral to the right anterior midclavicular line. Xenon ventilation indexes (xenon tidal raw counts, an index of total regional ventilation; xenon equilibration raw counts, an index of ventilating lung volume; xenon ventilation per unit volume (Vr), an index of ventilation per unit volume) were also recorded from the same areas. The Ib, Tn, Ib/Tn (an index of sound generation), and xenon ventilation indexes were all expressed as a fraction of the mean value of all four recorded areas. The Ib and Ib/Tn correlated best with the xenon tidal raw counts, correlated well with the xenon equilibration raw counts, and correlated poorly with Vr. We conclude that Ib and Ib/Tn can be used to quantify regional ventilation in subjects with emphysema.

  12. Effect of a personal ambient ventilation system on physiological strain during heat stress wearing a ballistic vest.

    PubMed

    Hadid, A; Yanovich, R; Erlich, T; Khomenok, G; Moran, D S

    2008-09-01

    The present study was conducted in order to evaluate whether physiological strain is alleviated by a new personal cooling system (CS) consisting of a layered vest and integrated blower that generate a flow of air. Twelve male volunteers were exposed to climatic conditions of 40 degrees C, 40%RH (40/40), and 35 degrees C, 60%RH (35/60) during a 115 min exercise routine, followed by 70 min resting recovery, while wearing a battle dress uniform (BDU) and a ballistic vest, with (COOL) or without (NOCOOL) CS. The CS was able to attenuate the physiological strain levels during exercise, when compared to identical exposures without the CS. Temperature elevation, (DeltaT (re)) after 100 min of exercise, was lower by 0.26 +/- 0.20 and 0.34 +/- 0.21 degrees C in 40/40 and 35/60, respectively, (p < 0.05). Mean skin temperature (T(sk)) was lower by 0.9 +/- 0.4 and 0.6 +/- 0.5 degrees C for 40/40 and 35/60, respectively. Heart rate (HR) was not significantly different for COOL versus NOCOOL for 40/40. At 35/60, HR was lower by 10 beats per min (bpm) (p < 0.05). Physiological strain index (PSI) was 9 and 21% lower for the 40/40 and 35/60, respectively, for COOL versus NOCOOL (p < 0.05). Heat storage (S) rates were 19 and 24% lower and sweat rates were 21 and 25% lower for the 40/40 and 35/60, respectively, for COOL versus NOCOOL (p < 0.05). However, the CS was not effective in alleviating physiological strain during resting recovery with no difference in T (re) cooling rate, S, or HR drop rate between groups over resting recovery periods. The CS tested in this study was found to be an effective tool for lowering physiological strain while exercising but not during resting recovery. Therefore, the CS should be further developed in order to achieve greater attenuation of the thermal strain during exercise and improve effectiveness during rest. Overall, it has the potential to be useful for both military and sports personnel.

  13. A study on the ventilation method for a factory exposed to high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Lee, E.; Jeong, H.; Chung, H.

    2015-09-01

    On this work, the importance of industrial ventilation was investigated and examined the theoretical point and problems about general ventilation of factory exposed on high temperature during summer. As a case study, the ventilation planning of the PCB etching process for an electronic company was carried out and each of those characteristics were compared by installing actual ventilation systems and measuring the changing state of the working environment in accordance with ventilation method during summer. The purpose of the study is to present an efficient ventilation method for a factory with a closed structure under high temperature environment. In summary, for a factory with a sealed structure such as the target PCB manufacturing factory in this study, the forced supply and exhaust method was the most appropriate ventilation method for maintaining a low indoor air temperature and for keeping the contaminated air of the factory below the hazardous level.

  14. Weaning from mechanical ventilation: why are we still looking for alternative methods?

    PubMed

    Frutos-Vivar, F; Esteban, A

    2013-12-01

    Most patients who require mechanical ventilation for longer than 24 hours, and who improve the condition leading to the indication of ventilatory support, can be weaned after passing a first spontaneous breathing test. The challenge is to improve the weaning of patients who fail that first test. We have methods that can be referred to as traditional, such as the T-tube, pressure support or synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation (SIMV). In recent years, however, new applications of usual techniques as noninvasive ventilation, new ventilation methods such as automatic tube compensation (ATC), mandatory minute ventilation (MMV), adaptive support ventilation or automatic weaning systems based on pressure support have been described. Their possible role in weaning from mechanical ventilation among patients with difficult or prolonged weaning remains to be established.

  15. Estimation of Lung Ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Kai; Cao, Kunlin; Du, Kaifang; Amelon, Ryan; Christensen, Gary E.; Raghavan, Madhavan; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    Since the primary function of the lung is gas exchange, ventilation can be interpreted as an index of lung function in addition to perfusion. Injury and disease processes can alter lung function on a global and/or a local level. MDCT can be used to acquire multiple static breath-hold CT images of the lung taken at different lung volumes, or with proper respiratory control, 4DCT images of the lung reconstructed at different respiratory phases. Image registration can be applied to this data to estimate a deformation field that transforms the lung from one volume configuration to the other. This deformation field can be analyzed to estimate local lung tissue expansion, calculate voxel-by-voxel intensity change, and make biomechanical measurements. The physiologic significance of the registration-based measures of respiratory function can be established by comparing to more conventional measurements, such as nuclear medicine or contrast wash-in/wash-out studies with CT or MR. An important emerging application of these methods is the detection of pulmonary function change in subjects undergoing radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer. During RT, treatment is commonly limited to sub-therapeutic doses due to unintended toxicity to normal lung tissue. Measurement of pulmonary function may be useful as a planning tool during RT planning, may be useful for tracking the progression of toxicity to nearby normal tissue during RT, and can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a treatment post-therapy. This chapter reviews the basic measures to estimate regional ventilation from image registration of CT images, the comparison of them to the existing golden standard and the application in radiation therapy.

  16. Ventilator Associated Pneumonia in Children.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ivy; Schibler, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is a common complication in mechanically ventilated children and adults. There remains much controversy in the literature over the definition, treatment and prevention of VAP. The incidence of VAP is variable, depending on the definition used and can effect up to 12% of ventilated children. For the prevention and reduction of the incidence of VAP, ventilation care bundles are suggested, which include vigorous hand hygiene, head elevation and use of non-invasive ventilation strategies. Diagnosis is mainly based on the clinical presentation with a lung infection occurring after 48hours of mechanical ventilation requiring a change in ventilator settings (mainly increased oxygen requirement, a positive culture of a specimen taken preferentially using a sterile sampling technique either using a bronchoscope or a blind lavage of the airways). A new infiltrate on a chest X ray supports the diagnosis of VAP. For the treatment of VAP, initial broad-spectrum antibiotics should be used followed by a specific antibiotic therapy with a narrow target once the bacterium is confirmed.

  17. TH-E-BRF-02: 4D-CT Ventilation Image-Based IMRT Plans Are Dosimetrically Comparable to SPECT Ventilation Image-Based Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Kida, S; Bal, M; Kabus, S; Loo, B; Keall, P; Yamamoto, T

    2014-06-15

    -based plans, providing evidence to use 4D-CT ventilation imaging for clinical applications. Supported in part by Free to Breathe Young Investigator Research Grant and NIH/NCI R01 CA 093626. The authors thank Philips Radiation Oncology Systems for the Pinnacle3 treatment planning systems.

  18. 46 CFR 168.15-50 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Accommodations § 168.15-50 Ventilation. (a) All quarters must be adequately ventilated in a manner suitable to the purpose of the space and route of the vessel. (b) When mechanical ventilation is provided for... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation. 168.15-50 Section 168.15-50 Shipping...

  19. 46 CFR 168.15-50 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation. 168.15-50 Section 168.15-50 Shipping COAST... Accommodations § 168.15-50 Ventilation. (a) All quarters must be adequately ventilated in a manner suitable to the purpose of the space and route of the vessel. (b) When mechanical ventilation is provided...

  20. 46 CFR 168.15-50 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation. 168.15-50 Section 168.15-50 Shipping COAST... Accommodations § 168.15-50 Ventilation. (a) All quarters must be adequately ventilated in a manner suitable to the purpose of the space and route of the vessel. (b) When mechanical ventilation is provided...