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Sample records for 29si cp-mas nmr

  1. Structures and thermal and hydrothermal stabilities of sulfonated poly(organosiloxanes) by /sup 29/Si and /sup 13/C CP/MAS NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, S.; Ono, Y.; Nakata, S.; Asaoka, S.

    1987-03-12

    High-resolution /sup 29/Si and /sup 13/C cross polarization/magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR spectroscopies have been applied to poly((sulfophenyl)siloxane) and poly((sulfopropyl)siloxane) in order to examine their thermal and hydrothermal stability. The effects of the treatments on the catalytic activity for the alcohol dehydration were also studied. Under nonsteaming conditions, both siloxanes have much higher thermal stability than Amberlyst-15. Thermal stability is in a decreasing order, poly((sulfophenyl)siloxane) (573 K) > poly((sulfopropyl)siloxane) (543 K) > Amberlyst-15 (468 K), while the thermal stability under steaming conditions is in the order of poly((sulfopropyl)siloxane) (543 K) > poly((sulfophenyl)siloxane) = Amberlyst-15 (468 K). The thermal degradation of the poly((sulfophenyl)siloxane) mainly occurs by the rupture of the C-Si bonds between the benzene ring and the siloxane chain. The steam greatly affects the thermal stability of poly((sulfophenyl)siloxane). Thus, under steaming conditions, thermal degradation occurred at much lower temperatures than under nonsteaming conditions. The thermal degradation of the poly((sulfopropyl)siloxane) mainly occurs at the C-C bond in the sulfopropyl groups. Steam does not affect the thermal stability of poly((sulfopropyl)siloxane).

  2. Coherence selection in double CP MAS NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jen-Hsien; Chou, Fang-Chieh; Tzou, Der-Lii M.

    2008-11-01

    Applications of double cross-polarization (CP) magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy, via 1H/ 15N and then 15N/ 13C coherence transfers, for 13C coherence selection are demonstrated on a 15N/ 13C-labeled N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc) compound. The 15N/ 13C coherence transfer is very sensitive to the settings of the experimental parameters. To resolve explicitly these parameter dependences, we have systematically monitored the 13C{ 15N/ 1H} signal as a function of the rf field strength and the MAS frequency. The data reveal that the zero-quantum coherence transfer, with which the 13C effective rf field is larger than that of the 15N by the spinning frequency, would give better signal sensitivity. We demonstrate in one- and two-dimensional double CP experiments that spectral editing can be achieved by tailoring the experimental parameters, such as the rf field strengths and/or the MAS frequency.

  3. Line shapes in CP/MAS NMR spectra of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Shigenobu; Hayamizu, Kikuko

    1993-02-01

    Cross polarization (CP) from 1H to quadrupolar nuclei with S = 3/2 has been carried out under magic-angle-spinning (MAS) conditions for powder samples of Na 2B 4O 7·10H 2O and H 3BO 3. The line shapes in the CP/MAS NMR spectra are different from those in the spectra measured with the single pulse sequence combined with 1H dipolar decoupling. Furthermore, the line shapes are found to be dependent on the measuring conditions such as the pulse amplitude for the quadrupolar nuclei. The spin-locking experiments demonstrate that line shapes in CP/MAS NMR spectra are largely dependent on the spin-locking efficiency.

  4. One- and two-dimensional exchange J-resolved CP-MAS NMR spectrum of adamantane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takegoshi, K.; McDowell, C. A.

    1986-02-01

    A combined technique of 1D and 2D exchange NMR and J-resolved CP-MAS NMR of dilute spins in solids and its application to study a spin exchange process of abundant spins in solids is described, and demonstrated for powdered adamantane. A high-resolution J-resolved NMR spectrum of a 13C nucleus obtained by applying homonuclear decoupling and magic angle sample spinning is employed to label the spin states of 1H spins bonded to the 13C nucleus. Perspective 2D exchange spectra are employed to map out connectivity between the proton spin states, and the rate constants for the 1H spin exchange involved are determined by 1D exchange NMR techniques. Discussions based on the total energy conservation enable us to conclude that the observed spin exchange processes are to be ascribed mainly to the flip-flop motion of 1H spins; the spin-lattice process is negligible. The rate constant for the flip-flop motion of the proton spins is determined to be (7±2)×103 s-1 at room temperature.

  5. Thermal maturity of type II kerogen from the New Albany Shale assessed by13C CP/MAS NMR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner-Zwanziger, U.; Lis, G.; Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, A.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal maturity of oil and gas source rocks is typically quantified in terms of vitrinite reflectance, which is based on optical properties of terrestrial woody remains. This study evaluates 13C CP/MAS NMR parameters in kerogen (i.e., the insoluble fraction of organic matter in sediments and sedimentary rocks) as proxies for thermal maturity in marine-derived source rocks where terrestrially derived vitrinite is often absent or sparse. In a suite of samples from the New Albany Shale (Middle Devonian to the Early Mississippian, Illinois Basin) the abundance of aromatic carbon in kerogen determined by 13C CP/MAS NMR correlates linearly well with vitrinite reflectance. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Determination of the structural changes by Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy on native corn starch with plasticizers

    SciTech Connect

    Cozar, O.; Filip, C.; Tripon, C.; Cioica, N.; Coţa, C.; Nagy, E. M.

    2013-11-13

    The plasticizing - antiplasticizing effect of water and glycerol contents on native corn starch samples is investigated by FT-Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy. The presence of both amorphous and crystalline structural phases was evidenced in pure native corn starch and also in the samples containing plasticizers. Among the crystalline starch structures, the A- and V- types were suggested by CP/MAS NMR spectra.

  7. A 4-mm Probe for C-13 CP/MAS NMR of Solids at 21.15 T

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobsen, Hans J.; Daugaard, P; Hald, E; Rice, D; Kupce, Eriks; Ellis, Paul D. )

    2002-05-31

    With the recent announcement of a persistent 21.15 Tesla (i.e., 900 MHz for 1H NMR) narrow-bore (54 mm bore) superconducting magnet by Oxford Instruments and the associated Unity INOVA-900 console by Varian Inc. we were challenged with the task of designing a double-resonance broadband solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR probe in particular for evaluating the 13C-{1H} cross-polarization (CP) MAS NMR experiment on this magnet and spectrometer system. In this communication we report the successful construction of an efficient X-1H/19F double resonance multinuclear MAS probe for this purpose along with our preliminary results on its performance at the 900 MHz spectrometer.

  8. Solid-state 109Ag CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy of some diammine silver(I) complexes.

    PubMed

    Bowmaker, Graham A; Harris, Robin K; Assadollahzadeh, Behnam; Apperley, David C; Hodgkinson, Paul; Amornsakchai, Pornsawan

    2004-09-01

    Solid-state cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR spectra were recorded for the compounds [Ag(NH3)2]2SO4, [Ag(NH3)2]2SeO4 and [Ag(NH3))]NO3, all of which contain the linear or nearly linear two-coordinate [Ag(NH3)2]+ ion. The 109Ag CP/MAS NMR spectra show centrebands and associated spinning sideband manifolds typical for systems with moderately large shielding anisotropy, and splittings due to indirect 1J(109Ag,14N) spin-spin coupling. Spinning sideband analysis was used to determine the 109Ag shielding anisotropy and asymmetry parameters Deltasigma and eta from these spectra, yielding anisotropies in the range 1500-1600 ppm and asymmetry parameters in the range 0-0.3. Spectra were also recorded for 15N and (for the selenate) 77Se. In all cases the number of resonances observed is as expected for the crystallographic asymmetric units. The crystal structure of the selenate is reported for the first time. One-bond (107, 109Ag,15N) coupling constants are found to have magnitudes in the range 60-65 Hz. Density functional calculations of the Ag shielding tensor for model systems yield results that are in good agreement with the experimentally determined shielding parameters, and suggest that in the solid compounds Deltasigma and eta are reduced and increased, respectively, from the values calculated for the free [Ag(NH3)2]+ ion (1920 ppm and 0, respectively), primarily as a result of cation-cation interactions, for which there is evidence from the presence of metal-over-metal stacks of [Ag(NH3)2]+ ions in the solid-state structures of these compounds. PMID:15307067

  9. Polydisperse methyl β-cyclodextrin–epichlorohydrin polymers: variable contact time 13C CP-MAS solid-state NMR characterization

    PubMed Central

    Mallard, Isabelle; Baudelet, Davy; Castiglione, Franca; Ferro, Monica; Panzeri, Walter; Ragg, Enzio

    2015-01-01

    Summary The polymerization of partially methylated β-cyclodextrin (CRYSMEB) with epichlorohydrin was carried out in the presence of a known amount of toluene as imprinting agent. Three different preparations (D1, D2 and D3) of imprinted polymers were obtained and characterized by solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy under cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) conditions. The polymers were prepared by using the same synthetic conditions but with different molar ratios of imprinting agent/monomer, leading to morphologically equivalent materials but with different absorption properties. The main purpose of the work was to find a suitable spectroscopic descriptor accounting for the different imprinting process in three homogeneous polymeric networks. The polymers were characterized by studying the kinetics of the cross-polarization process. This approach is based on variable contact time CP-MAS spectra, referred to as VCP-MAS. The analysis of the VCP-MAS spectra provided two relaxation parameters: T CH (the CP time constant) and T 1ρ (the proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame). The results and the analysis presented in the paper pointed out that T CH is sensitive to the imprinting process, showing variations related to the toluene/cyclodextrin molar ratio used for the preparation of the materials. Conversely, the observed values of T 1ρ did not show dramatic variations with the imprinting protocol, but rather confirmed that the three polymers are morphologically similar. Thus the combined use of T CH and T 1ρ can be helpful for the characterization and fine tuning of imprinted polymeric matrices. PMID:26877800

  10. Polydisperse methyl β-cyclodextrin-epichlorohydrin polymers: variable contact time (13)C CP-MAS solid-state NMR characterization.

    PubMed

    Mallard, Isabelle; Baudelet, Davy; Castiglione, Franca; Ferro, Monica; Panzeri, Walter; Ragg, Enzio; Mele, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The polymerization of partially methylated β-cyclodextrin (CRYSMEB) with epichlorohydrin was carried out in the presence of a known amount of toluene as imprinting agent. Three different preparations (D1, D2 and D3) of imprinted polymers were obtained and characterized by solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy under cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) conditions. The polymers were prepared by using the same synthetic conditions but with different molar ratios of imprinting agent/monomer, leading to morphologically equivalent materials but with different absorption properties. The main purpose of the work was to find a suitable spectroscopic descriptor accounting for the different imprinting process in three homogeneous polymeric networks. The polymers were characterized by studying the kinetics of the cross-polarization process. This approach is based on variable contact time CP-MAS spectra, referred to as VCP-MAS. The analysis of the VCP-MAS spectra provided two relaxation parameters: T CH (the CP time constant) and T 1ρ (the proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame). The results and the analysis presented in the paper pointed out that T CH is sensitive to the imprinting process, showing variations related to the toluene/cyclodextrin molar ratio used for the preparation of the materials. Conversely, the observed values of T 1ρ did not show dramatic variations with the imprinting protocol, but rather confirmed that the three polymers are morphologically similar. Thus the combined use of T CH and T 1ρ can be helpful for the characterization and fine tuning of imprinted polymeric matrices. PMID:26877800

  11. High-resolution solid-state 13C CP MAS NMR spectra of some β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes with nitriles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okazaki, M.; McDowell, C. A.

    1983-11-01

    β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes of 3-aminobenzonitrile, 4-aminobenzonitrile, and adamantane-1-carbonitrile were studied by means of high-resolution solid-state CP MAS 13C NMR spectroscopy. The interactions between the host and guest molecules are discussed.

  12. CP-MAS 207Pb with 19F decoupling NMR spectroscopy: medium range investigation in fluoride materials.

    PubMed

    Bureau, B; Silly, G; Buzaré, J Y

    1999-11-01

    The isotropic chemical shift of 207Pb is used to perform structural investigations of crystalline fluoride compounds (PbF2, Pb2ZnF6, PbGaF5, Pb3Ga2F12 and Pb9Ga2F24) and transition metal fluoride glasses (TMFG) of the PZG family (PbF2-ZnF2-GaF3). Using 207Pb Cross Polarisation Magic Angle Spinning (CP-MAS) NMR with 19F decoupling, it is shown that the isotropic chemical shift of 207Pb varies on a large scale (1000 ppm) and that the main changes of its value are not due to the nearest neighbour fluorines but may be related to the number of next nearest neighbour (nnn) Pb2+ ions. In this way, it is demonstrated that 207Pb chemical shift is an interesting probe to investigate medium range order in either crystalline or glassy fluoride systems. The 207Pb delta(iso) parameter has been linearly correlated to the number of nnn Pb2+ ions. PMID:10670899

  13. The study of a monocotyledon abscission zone using microscopic, chemical, enzymatic and solid state 13C CP/MAS NMR analyses.

    PubMed

    Henderson, J; Davies, H A; Heyes, S J; Osborne, D J

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated distinguishing features in cells of the abscission zone of a monocotyledon fruit, the oil palm Elaeis guineensis. The cell walls of the abscission zone and the subtending mesocarp and pedicel have been analysed by light and transmission electron microscopy, by chemical methods and by solid state 13C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy. Results show that these abscission zone cells have specific characteristics which include high levels of unmethylated pectin in the walls and an inducible (x35) polygalacturonase enzyme expression. Together these findings help to explain the localised precision of cell separation events. PMID:11219806

  14. Solid state structure by X-ray and 13C CP/MAS NMR of new 5-[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowska, Kinga; Maciejewska, Dorota; Dobrzycki, Łukasz; Socha, Pawel

    2016-05-01

    5-[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarin (1) and 6-acetyl-5-[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarin (2), structurally related, were synthesized using both conventional and microwave-assisted approach. An impact of acetyl groups on the molecular structure of coumarin derivatives has been examined. Crystals of 2 were investigated using single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction techniques. Compound 2 crystallizes forming two polymorphs (denoted as 2_1 and 2_2), both belonging to P21/c space group. Both polymorphs are comparably stable and can be formed simultaneously during crystallization process. The solid state structure was also analysed using the fully resolved 13C CP/MAS NMR. The double signals with the intensity ratio of about 1:1 which were observed in the 13C CP/MAS NMR spectrum of compound 1 must arise due to the presence of two conformers of 1. In contrast, NMR spectrum recorded for powder mixture of two polymorphs of compound 2 displays no signal splitting. This is related to structural similarities of molecules in both polymorphs.

  15. Glycerin-Induced Conformational Changes in Bombyx mori Silk Fibroin Film Monitored by (13)C CP/MAS NMR and ¹H DQMAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Endo, Masanori; Hirayama, Misaki; Arai, Hiroki; Aoki, Akihiro; Tasei, Yugo

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the stiff and brittle characteristics of pure Bombyx mori (B. mori) silk fibroin (SF) film in the dry state, glycerin (Glyc) has been used as a plasticizer. However, there have been very limited studies on the structural characterization of the Glyc-blended SF film. In this study, (13)C Cross Polarization/Magic Angle Spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (CP/MAS NMR) was used to monitor the conformational changes in the films by changing the Glyc concentration. The presence of only 5 wt % Glyc in the film induced a significant conformational change in SF where Silk I* (repeated type II β-turn and no α-helix) newly appeared. Upon further increase in Glyc concentration, the percentage of Silk I* increased linearly up to 9 wt % Glyc and then tended to be almost constant (30%). This value (30%) was the same as the fraction of Ala residue within the Silk I* form out of all Ala residues of SF present in B. mori mature silkworm. The ¹H DQMAS NMR spectra of Glyc-blended SF films confirmed the appearance of Silk I* in the Glyc-blended SF film. A structural model of Glyc-SF complex including the Silk I* form was proposed with the guidance of the Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation using ¹H-¹H distance constraints obtained from the ¹H Double-Quantum Magic Angle Spinning (DQMAS) NMR spectra. PMID:27618034

  16. Conformations of solid 2-methyl-4-( p-X-phenylazo)imidazoles by 13C CP MAS NMR spectroscopy and PM3 semi-empirical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewska, Dorota

    1999-03-01

    Solid 2-methyl-4-( p-X-phenylazo)imidazoles form hydrogen bonded chains with N-H⋯N bonds and C-H⋯O or C-H⋯N interaction. Depending on the nature and orientation of the substituents X it was possible to identify one tautomer if XH ( 2), Br ( 3), NO 2 ( 4) and the two, a- and b-tautomers in the crystal unit if XOCH 3 ( 1). The 13C CP MAS NMR spectra of ( 4) indicate the presence of phenyl ring dynamics. A preferred structure present in the solid state is that with different lengths of C1'-N and C4-N bonds and with higher dipole moment.

  17. A study of structure and dynamics of poly(aspartic acid) sodium/poly(vinyl alcohol) blends by 13C CP/MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Ando, I.

    1999-09-01

    Solid state 13C CP/MAS NMR measurements have been carried out on poly(aspartic acid) sodium (PAANa)/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) blends over a wide range of temperatures. From these experimental results, it is found that the main-chain conformations of PAANa in PAANa/PVA blends take the α-helix form over a wide range of blend ratios, and, in contrast, the conformation and dynamics of the side chains of PAANa are strongly influenced by the formation of an intermolecular hydrogen bond between the carboxyl group of the side chains and the hydroxyl group of PVA. The behavior of the proton spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame ( T1 ρ(H)) and the laboratory frame ( T1(H)) indicates that when the blend ratio of PAANa and PVA is 1:1, they are miscible.

  18. Solid state structure of new 5-[2-(N,N-diethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarins by X-ray and 13C CP/MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowska, Kinga; Hejchman, Elżbieta; Dobrzycki, Łukasz; Maciejewska, Dorota

    2015-05-01

    5-[2-(N,N-diethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarin (1) and 6-acetyl-5-[2-(N,N-diethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarin (2) were synthesized in a traditional way and microwave-assisted synthesis. Crystals of 2 in form of hydrochloride salt (3) were investigated using single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. In the crystal lattice of 3 there is only one type of strong hydrogen bond present involving protonated amino group and chloride anion. The whole structure is dominated by weak C-H…Cl-, C-H…O contacts. There is also visible aggregation of cations in stacks due to π-π interactions. The solid state structures of 1 and 2 derived from 13C CP/MAS NMR spectra were also proposed.

  19. Residue specific hydration of primary cell wall potato pectin identified by solid-state 13C single-pulse MAS and CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Flemming H; Byg, Inge; Damager, Iben; Diaz, Jerome; Engelsen, Søren B; Ulvskov, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Hydration of rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) derived from potato cell wall was analyzed by (13)C single-pulse (SP) magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and (13)C cross-polarization (CP) MAS nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and supported by (2)H SP/MAS NMR experiments. The study shows that the arabinan side chains hydrate more readily than the galactan side chains and suggests that the overall hydration properties can be controlled by modifying the ratio of these side chains. Enzymatic modification of native (NA) RG-I provided samples with reduced content of arabinan (sample DA), galactan (sample DG), or both side chains (sample DB). Results of these samples suggested that hydration properties were determined by the length and character of the side chains. NA and DA exhibited similar hydration characteristics, whereas DG and DB were difficult to hydrate because of the less hydrophilic properties of the rhamnose-galacturonic acid (Rha-GalA) backbone in RG-I. Potential food ingredient uses of RG-I by tailoring of its structure are discussed. PMID:21462966

  20. Analysis of mercerization process based on the intensity change of deconvoluted resonances of (13)C CP/MAS NMR: Cellulose mercerized under cooling and non-cooling conditions.

    PubMed

    Miura, Kento; Nakano, Takato

    2015-08-01

    The area intensity change of C1, C4, and C6 in spectrum obtained by (13)C CP/MAS NMR and the mutual relationship between their changes were examined for cellulose samples treated with various concentrations of aqueous NaOH solutions under non-cooling and cooling conditions. The area intensity of C1-up and C6-down changed cooperatively with that of C4-down which corresponds to the crystallinity of samples: "-up" and "-down" are the up- and down- field component in a splitting peak of NMR spectrum, respectively. The intensity change of C1-up starts to decrease with decreasing in that of C4-down after that of C6-down is almost complete. These changes were more clearly observed for samples treated under cooling condition. It can be suggested that their characteristic change relates closely to the change in conformation of cellulose chains by induced decrystallization and the subsequent crystallization of cellulose II, and presumed that their changes at microscopic level relate to the macroscopic morphological changes such as contraction along the length of cellulose chains and recovery along the length. PMID:26042706

  1. Effect of organic matter application on CP-MAS-13C-NMR spectra of humic acids from a brown soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, S.

    2009-04-01

    The humified SOM or humic substances (HS) composed of humic acid (HA), fulvic acid (FA) and humin (HM) represent the most microbially recalcitrant and stable reservoir of organic carbon in soil (Piccolo et al., 2004). OM applications can influence the amount and structural characteristics of HS(Dou et al., 2008). During the past few decades, there has been much research on HS, but their chemical structure is still not fully understood (Dong, 2006).CP-MAS-13C-NMR spectroscopy was considered as an effective method to study structures of HS without dissolving problem compared with liquid 13C-NMR (Conte et al., 1997; Dou et al., 2008). It can directly measure the carbon framework and reflect the nature of HS transformation after OM application (Spaccini et al., 2000). For that reason, this method was applied in this study. The objective of this paper was to clarify the effect of long term OM application on the changes of structural characteristics in HAs, which provided new information for improving soil fertility by OM application. The experiment was carried out on a brown soil (Paleudalf in USDA Soil Taxonomy) at Shenyang Agricultural University, Liaoning province, China (N41°48'-E123°25'). The experiment included 3 treatments: zero-treatment (CKbr), and two pig manure (PM) treatments (O1 and O2) at the rates of 0.9 t ha-1 and 1.8 t ha-1 of organic carbon, respectively. The samples of the HA fraction were extracted, separated and purified according to the method described by Dou et al. (1991). Elemental composition, Differential thermal analysis (DTA), -lgK value, FT-IR and CP-MAS- 13C-NMR of HAs were performed. Effects on the contents of orgaic carbon and its composition. The contents of TOC were from 8.77 g kg-1 to 12.25 g kg-1. The relative contents in TOC for WSS, HA, and FA were 6.87%, 14.2% and 19.8%. Comparing the CKbr, the contents of WSS, HA and FA for O1 and O2 increased, but relative contents of WSS and FA decreased. The content of the HA increased after

  2. Effect of organic matter application on CP-MAS-13C-NMR spectra of humic acids from a brown soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, S.

    2009-04-01

    The humified SOM or humic substances (HS) composed of humic acid (HA), fulvic acid (FA) and humin (HM) represent the most microbially recalcitrant and stable reservoir of organic carbon in soil (Piccolo et al., 2004). OM applications can influence the amount and structural characteristics of HS(Dou et al., 2008). During the past few decades, there has been much research on HS, but their chemical structure is still not fully understood (Dong, 2006).CP-MAS-13C-NMR spectroscopy was considered as an effective method to study structures of HS without dissolving problem compared with liquid 13C-NMR (Conte et al., 1997; Dou et al., 2008). It can directly measure the carbon framework and reflect the nature of HS transformation after OM application (Spaccini et al., 2000). For that reason, this method was applied in this study. The objective of this paper was to clarify the effect of long term OM application on the changes of structural characteristics in HAs, which provided new information for improving soil fertility by OM application. The experiment was carried out on a brown soil (Paleudalf in USDA Soil Taxonomy) at Shenyang Agricultural University, Liaoning province, China (N41°48'-E123°25'). The experiment included 3 treatments: zero-treatment (CKbr), and two pig manure (PM) treatments (O1 and O2) at the rates of 0.9 t ha-1 and 1.8 t ha-1 of organic carbon, respectively. The samples of the HA fraction were extracted, separated and purified according to the method described by Dou et al. (1991). Elemental composition, Differential thermal analysis (DTA), -lgK value, FT-IR and CP-MAS- 13C-NMR of HAs were performed. Effects on the contents of orgaic carbon and its composition. The contents of TOC were from 8.77 g kg-1 to 12.25 g kg-1. The relative contents in TOC for WSS, HA, and FA were 6.87%, 14.2% and 19.8%. Comparing the CKbr, the contents of WSS, HA and FA for O1 and O2 increased, but relative contents of WSS and FA decreased. The content of the HA increased after

  3. CaCl 2 -Accelerated Hydration of Tricalcium Silicate: A STXM Study Combined with 29 Si MAS NMR

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Qinfei; Ge, Yong; Geng, Guoqing; Bae, Sungchul; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Tmore » he effect of calcium chloride (CaCl 2 ) on tricalcium silicate (C 3 S) hydration was investigated by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) with Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectra and 29 Si MAS NMR. STXM is demonstrated to be a powerful tool for studying the chemical composition of a cement-based hydration system.he Ca L 3,2 -edge NEXAFS spectra obtained by examining C 3 S hydration in the presence of CaCl 2 showed that this accelerator does not change the coordination of calcium in the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H), which is the primary hydration product. O K-edge NEXAFS is also very useful in distinguishing the chemical components in hydrated C 3 S. Based on the Ca L 3,2 -edge spectra and chemical component mapping, we concluded that CaCl 2 prefers to coexist with unhydrated C 3 S instead of C-S-H. In Si K-edge NEXAFS analysis, CaCl 2 increases the degree of silicate polymerization of C-S-H in agreement with the 29 Si CP/MAS NMR results, which show that the presence of CaCl 2 in hydrated C 3 S considerably accelerates the formation of middle groups ( Q 2 ) and branch sites ( Q 3 ) in the silicate chains of C-S-H gel at 1-day hydration.« less

  4. Conformation analysis and molecular mobility of ethylene and tetrafluoroethylene copolymer using solid-state 19F MAS and 1H --> 19F CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Aimi, Keitaro; Ando, Shinji

    2004-07-01

    The changes in the conformation and molecular mobility accompanied by a phase transition in the crystalline domain were analyzed for ethylene (E) and tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) copolymer, ETFE, using variable-temperature (VT) solid-state 19F magic angle spinning (MAS) and 1H --> 19F cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR spectroscopy. The shifts of the signals for fluorines in TFE units to higher frequency and the continuing decrease and increase in the T1rho(F) values suggest that conformational exchange motions exist in the crystalline domain between 42 and 145 degrees C. Quantum chemical calculations of magnetic shielding constants showed that the high-frequency shift of TFE units should be induced by trans to gauche conformational changes at the CH2-CF2 linkage in the E-TFE unit. Although the 19F signals of the crystalline domain are substantially overlapped with those of the amorphous domain at ambient probe temperature (68 degrees C), they were successfully distinguished by using the dipolar filter and spin-lock pulse sequences at 145 degrees C. The dipolar coupling constants for the crystalline domain, which can be estimated by fitting the dipolar oscillation behaviors in the 1H --> 19F CP curve, showed a significant decrease with increasing temperature from 42 to 145 degrees C. This is due to the averaging of 1H-19F dipolar interactions originating from the molecular motion in the crystalline domain. The increase in molecular mobility in the crystalline domain was clearly shown by VT T1rho(F) and 1H --> 19F CP measurements in the phase transition temperature range. PMID:15181627

  5. Modification of olefin polymerization catalysts. III. A sup 13 C CP-MAS NMR study of adsorption of silyl ethers on MgCl sub 2 -supported Ziegler-Natta catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Pakkanen, T.T.; Vaehaesarja, E.; Pakkanen, T.A. ); Iiskola, E.; Sormunen, P. )

    1990-02-01

    A {sup 13}C CP-MAS NMR and elemental analysis study of adsorption and interaction of silyl ethers, RSi(OMe){sub 3} (R = Et, Ph, OMe), as internal and external electron donors with MgCl{sub 2}-supported Ziegler-Natta catalyst has been carried out. A chemical activation of anhydrous MgCl{sub 2} with EtOH and AlEt{sub 3} produces a high-surface-area support stabilized by an organoaluminum compound, AlEt{sub 2}(OEt). In a treatment of the aluminum-modified MgCl{sub 2} support with silyl ether, the aluminum surface complex is retained and silyl ether is almost totally incorporated into the support. {sup 13}C CP-MAS NMR data of the methoxy region indicate that a mobile liquid-like silyl ether species dominates, except in the case of Si(OMe){sub 4}, where a more strongly bound species is also present on the support. TiCl{sub 4} treatment removes the weakly adsorbed silyl ether species, leaving a species which is attributed to an aluminum-bound silyl ether surface complex. No evidence of titanium-bound silyl ether species was found in the solid state or in solution where TiCl{sub 4} undergoes with silyl ethers an exchange reaction forming a yellow solid identified as (TiCl{sub 2}(OMe){sub 2}){sub x}. Activation of the catalyst with AlEt{sub 3} at a high Al:Ti ratio produces a material with a low silyl ether coverage showing a weak methoxy signal in {sup 13}C CP-MAS. The linewidths of the observed signals in {sup 13}C CP-MAS NMR are in the range 5-10 ppm at every stage of preparation of the catalyst, indicating heterogeneity of the coordination sites on the surface of chemically activated MgCl{sub 2}.

  6. 13C and 15N—Chemical Shift Anisotropy of Ampicillin and Penicillin-V Studied by 2D-PASS and CP/MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Lee, Young K.; Levitt, Malcolm H.

    1998-11-01

    The principal values of the chemical shift tensors of all13C and15N sites in two antibiotics, ampicillin and penicillin-V, were determined by 2-dimensionalphaseadjustedspinningsideband (2D-PASS) and conventional CP/MAS experiments. The13C and15N chemical shift anisotropies (CSA), and their confidence limits, were evaluated using a Mathematica program. The CSA values suggest a revised assignment of the 2-methyl13C sites in the case of ampicillin. We speculate on a relationship between the chemical shift principal values of many of the13C and15N sites and the β-lactam ring conformation.

  7. /sup 29/Si NMR study of the surface of pyrogenic silica modified by methylchlorosilanes

    SciTech Connect

    Brie, V.V.; Gorlov, Yu.I.; Chuiko, A.A.

    1986-11-01

    Cross-polarization /sup 29/Si NMR spectra have been used for aerosil modified by methyl-chlorosilanes to identify surface organosilicon compounds and their reactions during hydrolysis and methanolysis.

  8. Solution state structure determination of silicate oligomers by 29SI NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Cho, Herman; Felmy, Andrew R; Craciun, Raluca; Keenum, J Patrick; Shah, Neil; Dixon, David A

    2006-02-22

    Evidence for nine new solution state silicate oligomers has been discovered by (29)Si NMR homonuclear correlation experiments of (29)Si-enriched samples. In addition to enhancing signal sensitivity, the isotopic enrichment increases the probability of the (29)Si-(29)Si two-bond scalar couplings that are necessary for the observation of internuclear correlations in 2-D experiments. The proposed assignments are validated by comparisons of experimental and simulated cross-peaks obtained with high digital resolution. The internuclear connectivity indicated by the NMR data suggests that several of these oligomers can have multiple stereoisomers, including conformers and/or diastereomers. The stabilities of these oligomers and their possible stereoisomers have been investigated by electronic structure calculations. PMID:16478188

  9. 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR spectra of mullites from different kaolinites.

    PubMed

    He, Hongping; Guo, Jiugao; Zhu, Jianxi; Yuan, Peng; Hu, Cheng

    2004-04-01

    Mullites synthesized from four kaolinites with different random defect densities have been studied by 27Al and 29Si magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS NMR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). All these mullites show the same XRD pattern. However, 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR spectra reveal that the mullites derived from kaolinites with high defect densities, have a sillimanite-type Al/Si ordering scheme and are low in silica, whereas those mullites derived from kaolinites with low defect densities, consist of both sillimanite- and mullite-type Al/Si ordering schemes and are rich in silica. PMID:15084323

  10. Solution State Structure Determination of Silicate Oligomers by 29Si NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Herman M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Craciun, Raluca; Keenum, Johnathan P.; Shah, Neil K.; Dixon, David A.

    2006-02-22

    Evidence for nine new solution state silicate oligomers has been discovered by 29Si NMR homonuclear correlation experiments of 29Si-enriched samples. In addition to enhancing signal sensitivity, the isotopic enrichment increases the probability of the 29Si–29Si two-bond scalar couplings that are necessary for the observation of internuclear correlations in 2-D experiments. The proposed assignments are validated by comparisons of experimental and simulated crosspeaks obtained with high digital resolution. The internuclear connectivity indicated by the NMR data suggests that several of these oligomers can have multiple stereoisomers, including conformers and/or diastereomers. The stability of these oligomers and their possible stereoisomers have been investigated by electronic structure calculations.

  11. Differentiating and characterizing geminal silanols in silicas by (29)Si NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Murray, David K

    2010-12-01

    Single and geminal hydroxyl species in silicas have been characterized using solid-state (29)Si NMR spectroscopy. Differentiating hydroxyl types is important in understanding their roles in chemical toxicity mechanisms for inhaled crystalline silicas responsible for silicosis. (1)H-(29)Si cross polarization NMR spectroscopy has been employed to obtain (29)Si NMR chemical shift data and signal accrual and relaxation characteristics. Spectral deconvolution is used to examine relative single and geminal hydroxyl resonance areas for a series of representative silicas and silica gels. Silicon-containing materials examined include 1878a quartz, and 1879a cristobalite from the National Institute for Science and Technology, kaolin, and several widely used respirable silicas and silica gels. Geminal hydroxyls were observed in every case, with relative resonance areas accounting for 21-65% of total hydroxyl signals. Factors affecting relative areas measured as a function of contact time, relaxation, and surface area are discussed. Subsequent (29)Si and (31)P NMR studies of a silica coated with various sodium hydrogen phosphates show preferential single silanol-phosphate interaction for basic phosphates, and oligomerization products for acidic phosphates. Geminal hydroxyl resonance areas displayed significant error (4-17%) for low surface area silicas, limiting this method to studies exhibiting major changes in chemical or spectroscopic properties. PMID:20825948

  12. Study of chemically inequivalent N(CH3)4 ions in [N(CH3)4]2ZnBr4 near the phase transition temperature using 1H MAS NMR, 13C CP/MAS NMR, and 14N NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2016-02-01

    The temperature dependences of the chemical shifts and intensities of 1H, 13C, and 14N nuclei in tetramethylammonium tetrabromozincate, [N(CH3)4]2ZnBr4, were investigated using single-crystal nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to elucidate the structural geometry near the phase transition temperature. Based on the analysis of the 13C cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR and 14N NMR spectra, the two chemically inequivalent N(1) (CH3)4 and N(2) (CH3)4 ions were distinguished. Furthermore, the 14N NMR spectrum at the phase transition temperature indicated the existence of the ferroelastic characteristics of the N(CH3)4 ions.

  13. Characterization of the wound-induced material in Citrus paradisi fruit peel by carbon-13 CP-MAS solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lai, Simona; Lai, Adolfo; Stange, Richard R; McCollum, T Greg; Schirra, Mario

    2003-05-01

    Grapefruit, Citrus paradisi, were injured, inoculated with Penicillium digitatum and incubated under conditions favourable for the accumulation of defence related material. Histochemical examination revealed that tissues adjacent to inoculated injuries contained phloroglucinol-HCl (PG-HCl) reactive material. Solvent washed cell wall preparations of intact and injured-inoculated peel were further purified using a mixture of cell wall degrading enzymes. Samples from injured inoculated tissue contained PG-HCl reactive globular material in addition to the fragments of xylem and cuticle found in controls. The principal chemical moieties of the material that accumulates in grapefruit injuries during wound-healing were studied by solid state 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning NMR. A complete assignment of the NMR signals was made. From the analysis evidence was found that cellulose and hemicellulose are the biopolymers present in the intact peel samples, in addition, relevant quantities of cutin were found in the residues of enzyme digest. The NMR difference spectrum intact- wounded peels showed resonances which were attributed to all major functional groups of the aromatic-aliphatic suberin polyester of new material produced by the wounds. Information on the latter polyester was obtained by analyzing the T(1)rho (1H) relaxation. PMID:12711139

  14. Examination of the structure in solid state of amino analogs of 4,4‧-[1,5-pentanediylbis(oxy)]bisbenzonitrile by means of X-ray diffraction, 13C CP/MAS NMR, and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewska, Dorota; Wolska, Irena; Żabiński, Jerzy

    2008-05-01

    A single crystal of X-ray diffraction structures is presented for 4,4'-[1,5-(3-oxapentanediylbis(amino))]bisbenzonitrile 2 and 4,4'-[1,5-( N-methyl-3-azapentane-diylbis(oxy))]bisbenzonitrile 3. The molecular structures of these derivatives differ especially in conformations of the central linker: in 2 this linker adopts a trans/ gauche conformation, whereas in 3 - a fully extended conformation. The N atoms in various positions of the aliphatic linker change dramatically the molecular packing mode of both bisnitriles. But in both cases the nitrile groups take part in intermolecular hydrogen bonds: a type of N sbnd H···N in 2 and of C sbnd H···N in 3. Various conformations of both molecules were reflected in 13C CP/MAS NMR spectra in solid state as single and double resonance patterns for 2 and 3, respectively. A preliminary anticancer assay against 60 cell lines of 3 reveals strong growth inhibition of leukemia, melanoma, and renal cancer cells.

  15. I: Low Frequency NMR and NQR Using a dc SQUID. II: Variable-temperature 13C CP/MAS of Organometallics

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegeweid, M.A.

    1995-11-29

    NMR and NQR at low frequencies are difficult prospects due to small nuclear spin polarization. Furthermore, the sensitivity'of the inductive pickup circuitry of standard spectrometers is reduced as the frequency is lowered. I have used a cw-SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) spectrometer, which has no such frequency dependence, to study the local atomic environment of {sup 14}N via the quadrupolar interaction. Because {sup 14}N has spin I = 1 and a 0-6 MHz frequency range, it is not possible to obtain well-resolved spectra in high magnetic fields. I have used a technique to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances via their effect on neighboring protons mediated by the heteronuclear dipolar interaction to study peptides and narcotics. The sensitivity of the SQUID is not enough to measure low-frequency surface (or other low spin density) systems. The application of spin-polarized xenon has been previously used to enhance polarization in conventional NMR experiments. Because xenon only polarizes spins with which it is in contact, it is surface selective. While differences in chemical shifts between surface and bulk spins are not large, it is expected that the differences in quadrupole coupling constant should be very large due to the drastic change of the electric field gradient surrounding spins at the surface. With this in mind, I have taken preliminary steps to measure SQUID detected polarization transfer from Xe to another spin species at 4.2 K and in small magnetic fields (<50 G). In this regime, the spin-lattice relaxation of xenon is dependent on the applied magnetic field. The results of our efforts to characterize the relaxation of xenon are presented. The final section describes the solid-state variable-temperature (VT) one- and two-dimensional {sup 13}C cross polarization (CP)/magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR of Hf({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}({eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}, Zr({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 3}({eta}{sup 1}-C

  16. Pseudo-symmetry, rotation- and inversion-twinning of a structure with dinuclear and trinuclear Cd complexes. CP-MAS-NMR and IR spectroscopies characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soudani, Sarra; Zeller, Matthias; Wenger, Emmanuel; Jelsch, Christian; Lefebvre, Frédéric; Nasr, Cherif Ben

    2014-10-01

    The structure of the complex [C18H30Cd3Cl6N18S12·2(C18H30Cd2Cl3N18S12)·CdCl4], or [L6Cd3Cl6·2(L6Cd2Cl3)·CdCl4], with L being 2-amino-5-(methylthio)-1,3,4-thiadiazole, C3H5N3S2, crystallizes in the trigonal polar space group R3. The crystal packing features three chemically distinct cadmium complex species with eight crystallographically independent Cd(II) ions distributed over two types of L ligand complexes with two and three Cd(II) centers, respectively, and a tetrachlorocadmate(II) ion. The coordination environment of the cadmium ions in the dinuclear and trinuclear complexes is a distorted octahedron. The tetrachlorocadmate(II) is disordered around a crystallographic threefold rotation axis, which is, in turn, inducing disorder onto the two methyl-thio groups in closest proximity to a CdCl4 anion. The crystal under investigation was found to be twinned by rotational and inversion merohedry. In the higher symmetry setting, the trinuclear complex would feature exact inversion symmetry, and the two binuclear cationic complexes would be inversion counterparts of each other. The R3bar symmetry is broken by a mismatch of less than 1 Å between one pair of ligands L between the dinuclear cations, which feature slightly different rotational angles around the Cd ion in the otherwise symmetry equivalent complexes. This compound is also investigated by FT-IR and solid-state 13CCP-MAS NMR spectroscopies.

  17. {sup 13}C chemical shift anisotropies for carbonate ions in cement minerals and the use of {sup 13}C, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR in studies of Portland cement including limestone additions

    SciTech Connect

    Sevelsted, Tine F.; Herfort, Duncan

    2013-10-15

    {sup 13}C isotropic chemical shifts and chemical shift anisotropy parameters have been determined for a number of inorganic carbonates relevant in cement chemistry from slow-speed {sup 13}C MAS or {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR spectra (9.4 T or 14.1 T) for {sup 13}C in natural abundance. The variation in the {sup 13}C chemical shift parameters is relatively small, raising some doubts that different carbonate species in Portland cement-based materials may not be sufficiently resolved in {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectra. However, it is shown that by combining {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR carbonate anions in anhydrous and hydrated phases can be distinguished, thereby providing valuable information about the reactivity of limestone in cement blends. This is illustrated for three cement pastes prepared from an ordinary Portland cement, including 0, 16, and 25 wt.% limestone, and following the hydration for up to one year. For these blends {sup 29}Si MAS NMR reveals that the limestone filler accelerates the hydration for alite and also results in a smaller fraction of tetrahedrally coordinated Al incorporated in the C-S-H phase. The latter result is more clearly observed in {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectra of the cement–limestone blends and suggests that dissolved aluminate species in the cement–limestone blends readily react with carbonate ions from the limestone filler, forming calcium monocarboaluminate hydrate. -- Highlights: •{sup 13}C chemical shift anisotropies for inorganic carbonates from {sup 13}C MAS NMR. •Narrow {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift range (163–171 ppm) for inorganic carbonates. •Anhydrous and hydrated carbonate species by {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR. •Limestone accelerates the hydration for alite in Portland – limestone cements. •Limestone reduces the amount of aluminium incorporated in the C-S-H phase.

  18. Chiral Magnetism in an Itinerant Helical Magnet, MnSi - An Extended 29Si NMR Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuoka, Hiroshi; Motoya, Kiyoichiro; Majumder, Mayukh; Witt, Sebastian; Krellner, Cornelius; Baenitz, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The microscopic magnetism in the helical, conical and ferromagnetically polarized phases in an itinerant helical magnet, MnSi, has been studied by an extended 29Si NMR at zero field and under external magnetic fields. The temperature dependence of the staggered moment, MQ(T), determined by the 29Si NMR frequency, ν(T), and the nuclear relaxation rate, 1/T1(T), at zero field is in general accord with the SCR theory for weak itinerant ferromagnetic metals and its extension to helical magnets. The external field dependence of resonance frequency, ν(H), follows a vector sum of the contributions from the atomic hyperfine and macroscopic fields with a field induced moment characteristic to itinerant magnets. A discontinuous jump of the resonance frequency at the critical field, Hc, between the conical and the polarized phases has also been found, which suggests a first order like change of the electronic states at Hc.

  19. Sol-gel kinetics: /sup 29/SI NMR and a statistical reaction model

    SciTech Connect

    Assink, R.A.; Kay, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    Sol-gel processes allow one to prepare novel materials at low processing temperatures. A detailed understanding of the chemical kinetics of such systems is important to fully exploit the unique features of sol-gel processing. This paper describes a systematic approach to the study of sol-gel kinetics which employs /sup 29/Si NMR spectroscopy and kinetic modelling techniques. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Aggregation of [Au(CN)4]- anions: examination by crystallography and 15N CP-MAS NMR and the structural factors influencing intermolecular Au···N interactions.

    PubMed

    Geisheimer, Andrew R; Wren, John E C; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Sakai, Ken; Kroeker, Scott; Leznoff, Daniel B

    2011-02-21

    To investigate the factors influencing the formation of intermolecular Au···NC interactions between [Au(CN)(4)](-) units, a series of [cation](n+)[Au(CN)(4)](n) double salts was synthesized, structurally characterized and probed by IR and (15)N{(1)H} CP-MAS NMR spectroscopy. Thus, [(n)Bu(4)N][Au(CN)(4)], [AsPh(4)][Au(CN)(4)], [N(PPh(3))(2)][Au(CN)(4)], [Co(1,10-phenanthroline)(3)][Au(CN)(4)](2), and [Mn(2,2';6',2''-terpyridine)(2)][Au(CN)(4)](2) show [Au(CN)(4)](-) anions that are well-separated from one another; no Au-Au or Au···NC interactions are present. trans-[Co(1,2-diaminoethane)(2)Cl(2)][Au(CN)(4)] forms a supramolecular structure, where trans-[Co(en)(2)Cl(2)](+) and [Au(CN)(4)](-) ions are found in separate layers connected by Au-CN···H-N hydrogen-bonding; weak Au···NC coordinate bonds complete octahedral Au(III) centers, and support a 2-D (4,4) network motif of [Au(CN)(4)](-)-units. A similar structure-type is formed by [Co(NH(3))(6)][Au(CN)(4)](3)·(H(2)O)(4). In [Ni(1,2-diaminoethane)(3)][Au(CN)(4)](2), intermolecular Au···NC interactions facilitate formation of 1-D chains of [Au(CN)(4)](-) anions in the supramolecular structure, which are separated from one another by [Ni(en)(3)](2+) cations. In [1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane-H][Au(CN)(4)], the monoprotonated amine cation forms a hydrogen-bond to the [Au(CN)(4)](-) unit on one side, while coordinating to the axial sites of the gold(III) center through the unprotonated amine on the other, thereby generating a 2-D (4,4) net of cations and anions; an additional, uncoordinated [Au(CN)(4)](-)-unit lies in the central space of each grid. This body of structural data indicates that cations with hydrogen-bonding groups can induce intermolecular Au···NC interactions, while the cationic charge, shape, size, and aromaticity have little effect. While the ν(CN) values are poor indicators of the presence or absence of N-cyano bridging between [Au(CN)(4)](-)-units (partly because of the very low

  1. Experimental (X-ray, (13)C CP/MAS NMR, IR, RS, INS, THz) and Solid-State DFT Study on (1:1) Co-Crystal of Bromanilic Acid and 2,6-Dimethylpyrazine.

    PubMed

    Łuczyńska, Katarzyna; Drużbicki, Kacper; Lyczko, Krzysztof; Dobrowolski, Jan Cz

    2015-06-01

    A combined structural, vibrational spectroscopy, and solid-state DFT study of the hydrogen-bonded complex of bromanilic acid with 2,6-dimethylpyrazine is reported. The crystallographic structure was determined by means of low-temperature single-crystal X-ray diffraction, which reveals the molecular units in their native protonation states, forming one-dimensional infinite nets of moderate-strength O···H-N hydrogen bonds. The nature of the crystallographic forces, stabilizing the studied structure, has been drawn by employing the noncovalent interactions analysis. It was found that, in addition to the hydrogen bonding, the intermolecular forces are dominated by stacking interactions and C-H···O contacts. The thermal and calorimetric analysis was employed to probe stability of the crystal phase. The structural analysis was further supported by a computationally assisted (13)C CP/MAS NMR study, providing a complete assignment of the recorded resonances. The vibrational dynamics was explored by combining the optical (IR, Raman, TDs-THz) and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy techniques with the state-of-the-art solid-state density functional theory (DFT) computations. Despite the quasi-harmonic approximation assumed throughout the study, an excellent agreement between the theoretical and experimental data was achieved over the entire spectral range, allowing for a deep and possibly thorough understanding of the vibrational characteristics of the system. Particularly, the significant influence of the long-range dipole coupling on the IR spectrum has been revealed. On the basis of a wealth of information gathered, the recent implementation of a dispersion-corrected linear-response scheme has been extensively examined. PMID:25961154

  2. Quantitative {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy of cement and silica fume containing paramagnetic impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Hilbig, H. . E-mail: hilbig@cbm.bv.tum.de; Koehler, F.H.; Schiessl, P.

    2006-02-15

    The low natural abundance and the long spin lattice relaxation time of {sup 29}Si lead to long measurement times and/or low signal-to-noise ratios using {sup 29}Si magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy. By contrast, samples containing paramagnetic iron ions have much shorter relaxation times, making measurements up to seven times more efficient, but at the same time making quantitative analysis unreliable. To solve the problem, the spin-lattice relaxation times of ordinary Portland cement (opc) and silica fume with and without iron content has been determined with inversion recovery experiments. The effect of varying the spectrum repetition time on the quantitative analysis is demonstrated for mixtures of opc with silica fume. For opc and silica fume with iron impurities repetition times as short as 5 s has permitted accurate quantitative analysis of the silicates present in these materials.

  3. Tetrahedral site ordering in synthetic gallium albite: A 29Si MAS NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherriff, Barbara L.; Fleet, Michael E.; Burns, Peter C.

    1991-09-01

    The ordering of Si in the tetrahedral sites of gallium albite (NaGaSi 3O 8) has been studied by MAS NMR and Rietveld structure refinement of X-ray powder diffraction data. Low structural state (ordered) material was annealed at about 800°C under a load pressure of 1 kbar, and by Rietveld refinement has tetrahedral-site occupancies for Si of T1O = 0.24(3), T1m = 0.89(2), T2O = 0.98(2), and T2m = 0.89(2), respectively. Corresponding Si occupancies for high structural state (disordered) material are 0.71(2), 0.78(1), 0.76(2), and 0.74(2), respectively. The 29Si MAS NMR spectra of low gallium albite is equivalent to the three-peak spectrum of natural (Amelia) albite, with resonances at -89.6, -96.4, and -104.2 ppm but with relative peak areas of 0.79:1.0:0.77. The tetrahedral-site occupancies derived from the MAS NMR spectrum are in good agreement with those obtained by Rietveld refinement and, in particular, indicate that the -96.4 ppm peak must correspond to Si in T2O. This is the first independent assignment of the 29Si peak at -96 ppm in the spectrum of ordered albite to the T2O site. A peak at -96 ppm is also resolved in the spectrum of high gallium albite. The systematic differences in peak position between the 29Si MAS NMR spectra of low gallium albite and those of Amelia albite cannot be explained simply by the direct replacement of Al by Ga, without a change in angle at the bridging oxygen atoms.

  4. Relativistic environmental effects in (29)Si NMR chemical shifts of halosilanes: light nucleus, heavy environment.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Sergey V; Rusakov, Yury Yu; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2015-06-01

    Relativistic calculations of (29)Si NMR shielding constants (chemical shifts) in the series of halosilanes SiX(n)H(4-n) (X = F, Cl, Br and I) are performed within a full four-component relativistic Dirac's scheme using relativistic Dyall's basis sets. Three different theoretical levels are tested in the computation of (29)Si NMR chemical shifts in comparison with experiment: namely, four-component relativistic GIAO-DFT, four-component relativistic GIAO-RPA, and a hybrid scheme of a nonrelativistic GIAO-MP2 with taking into account relativistic corrections using the four-component relativistic GIAO-RPA. The DFT results give larger relativistic effects as compared to the RPA data which might be rationalized in terms of the manifestation of correlation effects taken into account at the DFT level and not accounted for at the uncorrelated RPA level. Taking into account solvent effects slightly improves agreement with experiment, however, being not a matter of principle. Generally, relativistic pure nonempirical wave function methods perform much better as compared to relativistic DFT methods when benchmarked to experiment. PMID:25946056

  5. 29Si NMR study of structural ordering in aluminosilicate geopolymer gels.

    PubMed

    Duxson, Peter; Provis, John L; Lukey, Grant C; Separovic, Frances; van Deventer, Jannie S J

    2005-03-29

    A systematic series of aluminosilicate geopolymer gels was synthesized and then analyzed using 29Si magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) in combination with Gaussian peak deconvolution to characterize the short-range ordering in terms of T-O-T bonds (where T is Al or Si). The effect of nominal Na2O/(Na2O + K2O) and Si/Al ratios on short-range network ordering was quantified by deconvolution of the 29Si MAS NMR spectra into individual Gaussian peaks representing different Q4(mAl) silicon centers. The deconvolution procedure developed in this work is applicable to other aluminosilicate gel systems. The short-range ordering observed here indicates that Loewenstein's Rule of perfect aluminum avoidance may not apply strictly to geopolymeric gels, although further analyses are required to quantify the degree of aluminum avoidance. Potassium geopolymers appeared to exhibit a more random Si/Al distribution compared to that of mixed-alkali and sodium systems. This work provides a quantitative account of the silicon and aluminum ordering in geopolymers, which is essential for extending our understanding of the mechanical strength, chemical and thermal stability, and fundamental structure of these systems. PMID:15779981

  6. Gel synthesis of magnesium silicates: A 29Si magic angle spinning NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, J. Stephen; Millard, Roberta L.

    1990-01-01

    The formation of the magnesium silicate minerals forsterite, enstatite, and roedderite by heating of amorphous “protosilicate” gels precipitated from aqueous solution has been studied by 29Si MAS nmr. Gentle drying of the hydrogels at 110° C gives materials with broad nmr signals that do not differ appreciably with preparation conditions, but the minerals formed by heating at 750° C or higher are greatly dependent on the precipitation and washing conditions of the original gel. The rare mineral roedderite, best known from studies of unequilibrated enstatite chondrite meteorites, becomes a major species along with forsterite when the hydrogels are washed with sodium hydroxide solution before drying and heating to 750° C.

  7. 27Al and 29Si solid-state NMR characterization of calcium-aluminosilicate-hydrate.

    PubMed

    Pardal, Xiaolin; Brunet, Francine; Charpentier, Thibault; Pochard, Isabelle; Nonat, André

    2012-02-01

    Calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is the main constituent of hydrated cement paste and determines its cohesive properties. Because of the environmental impact of cement industry, it is more and more common to replace a part of the clinker in cement by secondary cementitious materials (SCMs). These SCMs are generally alumina-rich and as a consequence some aluminum is incorporated into the C-S-H. This may have consequences on the cohesion and durability of the material, and it is thus of importance to know the amount and the location of Al in C-S-H and what the parameters are that control these features. The present paper reports the (29)Si and (27)Al MAS NMR analyses of well-characterized C-A-S-H samples (C-S-H containing Al). These samples were synthesized using an original procedure that successfully leads to pure C-A-S-H of controlled compositions in equilibrium with well-characterized solutions. The (27)Al MAS NMR spectra were quantitatively interpreted assuming a tobermorite-like structure for C-A-S-H to determine the aluminum location in this structure. For this purpose, an in-house written software was used which allows decomposing several spectra simultaneously using the same constrained spectral parameters for each resonance but with variable intensities. The hypothesis on the aluminum location in the C-A-S-H structure determines the proportion of each silicon site. Therefore, from the (27)Al NMR quantitative results and the chemical composition of each sample, the intensity of each resonance line in the (29)Si spectra was set. The agreement between the experimental and calculated (29)Si MAS NMR spectra corroborates the assumed C-A-S-H structure and the proposed Al incorporation mechanism. The consistency between the results obtained for all compositions provides another means to assess the assumptions on the C-A-S-H structure. It is found that Al substitutes Si mainly in bridging positions and moderately in pairing positions in some conditions. Al in

  8. Solid-state 27Al and 29Si NMR characterization of hydrates formed in calcium aluminate silica fume mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, P.; Rivas Mercury, J. M.; de Aza, A. H.; Turrillas, X.; Sobrados, I.; Sanz, J.

    2008-08-01

    Partially deuterated Ca 3Al 2(SiO 4) y(OH) 12-4y-Al(OH) 3 mixtures, prepared by hydration of Ca 3Al 2O 6 (C 3A), Ca 12Al 14O 33 (C 12A 7) and CaAl 2O 4 (CA) phases in the presence of silica fume, have been characterized by 29Si and 27Al magic-angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) spectroscopies. NMR spectroscopy was used to characterize anhydrous and fully hydrated samples. In hydrated compounds, Ca 3Al 2(OH) 12 and Al(OH) 3 phases were detected. From the quantitative analysis of 27Al NMR signals, the Al(OH) 3/Ca 3Al 2(OH) 12 ratio was deduced. The incorporation of Si into the katoite structure, Ca 3Al 2(SiO 4) 3-x(OH) 4x, was followed by 27Al and 29Si NMR spectroscopies. Si/OH ratios were determined from the quantitative analysis of 27Al MAS-NMR components associated with Al(OH) 6 and Al(OSi)(OH) 5 environments. The 29Si NMR spectroscopy was also used to quantify the unreacted silica and amorphous calcium aluminosilicate hydrates formed, C-S-H and C-A-S-H for short. From 29Si NMR spectra, the amount of Si incorporated into different phases was estimated. Si and Al concentrations, deduced by NMR, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry, and Rietveld analysis of both X-ray and neutron data, indicate that only a part of available Si is incorporated in katoite structures.

  9. Deteriorated hardened cement paste structure analyzed by XPS and {sup 29}Si NMR techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Kurumisawa, Kiyofumi; Nawa, Toyoharu; Owada, Hitoshi; Shibata, Masahito

    2013-10-15

    In this report, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and {sup 29}Si-MAS-NMR was used for the evaluation of deteriorated hardened cement pastes. The deterioration by ammonium nitrate solution was accompanied by changes in the pore structure as well as by structural changes in the C–S–H in the hardened cement paste. The CaO/SiO{sub 2} ratio of the C–S–H decreased with the progress of deterioration, there was also polymerization of the silicate in the C–S–H. It was confirmed that the degree of polymerization of silicate of the C–S–H in hardened cement paste can be determined by XPS. It was also shown that the polymerization depends on the structure of the C–S–H. -- Highlights: •The polymerization of silicate of the C–S–H in the HCP can be observed by XPS. •The structure of C–S–H changed with the degree of calcium leaching. •The NMR result about silicate in C–S–H was in good agreement with the XPS result.

  10. 1H, 13C and 29Si NMR of tetramethylsilane in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltunen, Y.; Jokisaari, J.

    1990-12-01

    The 1H, 13C and 29Si NMR spectra of tetramethylsilane (TMS) dissolved in two nematic liquid crystals (LC) and in their three mixtures were recorded. The proton—proton, proton—carbon and proton—silicon dipolar couplings, which arise from molecular deformation in the LC environment, were determined. The results for the 2DHH, 4DHH, 3DCH and 2DSiH couplings show only a small variation as a function of the composition of the LC mixture. On the contrary, the one-bond CH dipolar coupling is markedly solvent dependent: it varies from -6.22 Hz (in ZLI 1167) to +3.63 Hz (in phase IV). The 1DCH coupling of TMS vanishes in a certain mixture of the two liquid crystals; this mixture, however, is not the same as that in which the corresponding coupling of methane was earlier observed to vanish. This different behaviour of TMS and methane may be due to the additional torques which act on the SiC bonds of TMS.

  11. Identification of tetrahedrally ordered Si-O-Al environments in molecular sieves by { 27Al}- 29Si REAPDOR NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapathy, S.; Kumar, Rajiv; Montouillout, V.; Fernandez, C.; Amoureux, J. P.

    2004-05-01

    The silicon sites tetrahedrally connected to aluminum in framework positions of a molecular sieve may be identified by a selective reintroduction of the hetero-nuclear 27Al- 29Si dipolar interaction through Rotational Echo Adiabatic Passage DOuble Resonance (REAPDOR) NMR. In this rotor synchronized 29Si MAS experiment, an effective dipolar dephasing of the Si-O-Al, over Si-O-Si, environments is shown to aid in the identification of silicon sites in the immediate vicinity of aluminum. Application of the method in the structurally interesting and novel molecular sieve ETAS-10 provides valuable insights on the details of aluminum substitution in the zeolite lattice and further leads to the first direct NMR estimate of Al-Si distance ( rAl-Si=323±5 pm) in ETAS-10.

  12. Investigation of hydrolysis and condensation in organically modified sol-gel systems: {sup 29}Si NMR and the INEPT sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, T.M.; Assink, R.A.; Loy, D.A.

    1996-06-01

    The spectral editing properties of the {sup 29}Si NMR INEPT heteronuclear transfer experiment have been utilized for the identification and characterization of hydrolysis and initial condensation products in methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) sol-gel materials. {sup 29}Si NMR assignments in MTMS are complicated by a small spectral dispersion ({approximately} 0.5 ppm) and two different {sup 29}Si-{sup 1}H J couplings. By using analytical expressions for the INEPT signal response with multiple heteronuclear J couplings, unambiguous spectral assignments can be made. For this organomethoxysilane the rate of hydrolysis was found to be very rapid and significantly faster than either the water or alcohol producing condensation reactions. The hydrolysis species of both the MTMS monomer and its initial T{sup 1} condensation products follow statistical distributions that can be directly related to the extent of the hydrolysis reactions. The role of the statistical distribution of hydrolysis products on the production and synthetic control of organically modified sol-gels is discussed.

  13. {sup 29}Si MAS-NMR study of the short-range order in potassium borosilicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, S.W.; Bhatnagar, A.; Parameswar, C.; Feller, S.; MacKenzie, J.

    1995-04-01

    Potassium borosilicate glasses were prepared in families having the general formula of RK{sub 2}O{center_dot}B{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}NSiO{sub 2}, where R is the ratio of potassium oxide to boron oxide and N is the ratio of silicon dioxide to boron oxide. The glasses were prepared for values of R ranging from 0 to 7.0 in the families N = 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0. {sup 29}Si MAS-NMR measurements were performed on these glasses to determine the short-range order around the silicon atom. A model of proportional sharing of the added potassium oxide between the silicate and the borate groups was suggested. This model was tested against other suggested models where proportional sharing begins after a minimum amount of potassium oxide, R{sub 0}, and was observed to provide a better fit to the {sup 29}Si chemical shifts obtained. As was observed in the {sup 29}Si MAS-NMR studies of the RLi{sub 2}O{center_dot}B{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}NSiO{sub 2} glasses, the proportional sharing model with R{sub 0} = 0 is in stark disagreement with that proposed by the {sup 11}B NMR studies of the alkali borosilicate glasses. This problem is as yet not understood. Since K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} was used as the starting material for K{sub 2}O, it was observed that at large R values, R > R{sub CO{sub 2}}, where R{sub CO{sub 2}} = 2.3 for N = 1, R{sub CO{sub 2}} = 4.0 for N = 2, and R{sub CO{sub 2}} = 5.0 for N = 4, CO{sub 2} was retained in the melt in the fashion similar to that observed for other high-alkali borate and silicate glasses. The N = 0.5 family did not exhibit retention at the compositions studied. {sup 29}Si MAS-NMR could be used to determine where CO{sub 2} retention began in composition and the proportion of K{sub 2}O/K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} in the melt (glass).

  14. Supramolecular self-organisation and conformational isomerism of a binuclear O,O'-dipropyl dithiophosphate gold(I) complex, [Au2{S2P(OC3H7)2}2]: Synthesis, (13)C and (31)P CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy, single-crystal X-ray diffraction study and thermal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Rodina, Tatyana A; Korneeva, Eugenia V; Antzutkin, Oleg N; Ivanov, Alexander V

    2015-10-01

    Crystalline one-dimensional polymeric catena-poly[bis(μ2-O,O'-dipropyldithiophosphato-S,S')digold(I)] (Au-Au) (1) was prepared and studied using (13)C and (31)P CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. To elucidate the structural function of Dtph ligands in crystalline gold(I) O,O'-dipropyl dithiophosphate, the chemical shift anisotropy parameters (δaniso and η) were calculated from spinning sideband manifolds in (31)P MAS NMR spectra. A novel structure of the gold(I) compound comprises two isomeric, non-centrosymmetric binuclear molecules of [Au2{S2P(OC3H7)2}2] (isomers 'A' and 'B'), whose four Dtph groups display structural inequivalence. In each isomeric binuclear molecule of 1, a pair of μ2-bridging dipropyl Dtph ligands almost symmetrically links two neighbouring gold atoms, forming an extensive eight-membered metallocycle [Au2S4P2], while the intramolecular aurophilic Au⋯Au bond additionally stabilises this central cyclic moiety. At the supramolecular level of complex 1, intermolecular aurophilic Au⋯Au bonds yield almost linear infinite polymeric chains (⋯'A'⋯'B'⋯'A'⋯'B'⋯)n. The thermal behaviour of this compound was studied by the simultaneous thermal analysis (STA) technique (a combination of TG and DSC) under an argon atmosphere. PMID:26004097

  15. Impact of structural differences in carcinopreventive agents indole-3-carbinol and 3,3'-diindolylmethane on biological activity. An X-ray, ¹H-¹⁴N NQDR, ¹³C CP/MAS NMR, and periodic hybrid DFT study.

    PubMed

    Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia; Latosińska, Magdalena; Szafrański, Marek; Seliger, Janez; Žagar, Veselko; Burchardt, Dorota V

    2015-09-18

    Three experimental techniques (1)H-(14)N NQDR, (13)C CP/MAS NMR and X-ray and Density Functional Theory (GGA/BLYP with PBC) and Hirshfeld surfaces were applied for the structure-activity oriented studies of two phyto-antioxidants and anticarcinogens: indole-3-carbinol, I3C, and 3,3'-diindolylmethane, DIM, (its bioactive metabolite). One set of (14)N NQR frequencies for DIM (2.310, 2.200 and 0.110 MHz at 295K) and I3C (2.315, 1.985 and 0.330 MHz at 160K) was recorded. The multiplicity of NQR lines recorded at RT revealed high symmetry (chemical and physical equivalence) of both methyl indazole rings of DIM. Carbonyl (13)C CSA tensor components were calculated from the (13)C CP/MAS solid state NMR spectrum of I3C recorded under fast and slow spinning. At room temperature the crystal structure of I3C is orthorhombic: space group Pca21, Z=4, a=5.78922(16), b=15.6434(7) and c=8.4405(2)Å. The I3C molecules are aggregated into ribbons stacked along [001]. The oxygen atomsare disorderedbetween the two sites of different occupancy factors. It implies that the crystal is built of about 70% trans and 30% gauche conformers, and apart from the weak OH⋯O hydrogen bonds (O⋯O=3.106Å) the formation of alternative O'H⋯O bonds (O'⋯O=2.785Å) is possible within the 1D ribbons. The adjacent ribbons are further stabilised by O'H⋯O bonds (O'⋯O=2.951Å). The analysis of spectra and intermolecular interactions pattern by experimental techniques was supported by solid (periodic) DFT calculations. The knowledge of the topology and competition of the interactions in crystalline state shed some light on the preferred conformations of CH2OH in I3C and steric hindrance of methyl indole rings in DIM. A comparison of the local environment in gas phase and solid permitted drawing some conclusions on the nature of the interactions required for effective processes of recognition and binding of a given anticarcinogen to the protein or nucleic acid. PMID:26066413

  16. Characterization of nanoparticles in diluted clear solutions for Silicalite-1 zeolite synthesis using liquid 29Si NMR, SAXS and DLS.

    PubMed

    Follens, L R A; Aerts, A; Haouas, M; Caremans, T P; Loppinet, B; Goderis, B; Vermant, J; Taulelle, F; Martens, J A; Kirschhock, C E A

    2008-09-28

    Clear solutions for colloidal Silicalite-1 synthesis were prepared by reacting tetraethylorthosilicate in aqueous tetrapropylammonium hydroxide solution. A dilution series with water resulting in clear solutions with a TEOS ratio TPAOH ratio H2O molar ratio of 25 : 9 : 152 up to 25 : 9 : 15,000 was analysed using liquid 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Particle sizes were derived independently from DLS and from the combination of SAXS and NMR. NMR allowed quantitative characterization of silicon distributed over nanoparticles and dissolved oligomeric silicate polyanions. In all samples studied, the majority of silicon (78-90%) was incorporated in the nanoparticle fraction. In concentrated suspensions, silicate oligomers were mostly double-ring species (D3R, D4R, D5R, D6R). Dilution with water caused their depolymerisation. Contrarily, the internal condensation and size of nanoparticles increased with increasing dilution. SAXS revealed a decrease of effective nanoparticle surface charge upon dilution, reducing the effective particle interactions. With DLS, the reduction of nanoparticle interactions could be confirmed monitoring the collective diffusion mode. The observed evolution of nanoparticle characteristics provides insight in the acceleration of the Silicalite-1 crystallization upon dilution, in view of different crystallization models proposed in the literature. PMID:18956092

  17. The Amblygonite (LiAlPO{sub 4}F)-Montebrasite (LiAlPO{sub 4}OH) Solid Solution: A Combined powder and single-crystal neutron diffraction and solid-state {sup 6}Li MAS, CP MAS, and REDOR NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Groat, Lee A.; Chakoumakos, Bryan C.; Brouwer, Darren H.; Hoffman, Christina M.; Fyfe, Colin A.; Morell, Heiko; Schultz, Arthur J.

    2003-01-01

    The amblygonite-montebrasite series of minerals, common constituents of granitic pegmatites and topaz-bearing granites, show complete solid solution with ideal composition LiAlPO{sub 4}(F, OH). These compounds are ideal for studying F {leftrightarrow} OH solid solution in minerals because natural members of the series generally show little deviation from the ideal composition. In this study, we used powder and single-crystal neutron diffraction and solid-state {sup 6}Li MAS, CP MAS, and REDOR NMR techniques to study the effect of F {leftrightarrow} OH substitution on the series. Lattice parameters refined from single-crystal neutron diffraction data show increasing b and decreasing a, c, and V with increasing F/(F + OH). The volume is highest for the OH end-member because of the presence of an additional atom (H). The a and c parameters decrease with increasing F/(F + OH) because the O-H vector is close to the a-c plane and the Al-OH/F vectors are approximately parallel to c. Lattice parameters refined from neutron powder diffraction patterns collected at lower T show that thermal contraction increases with F/(F + OH), presumably because the F anion takes up less space than the OH molecule. The results show that the OH/F position is always fully occupied. The H displacement ellipsoid shows little change with occupancy, which obviously corresponds negatively with increasing F/(F + OH). However, the Li displacement ellipsoid becomes extremely large and anisotropic with increasing F fraction. Most of the distortion is associated with the U{sub 3} eigenvalue, which lies between the c and c* directions. U{sub eq} values corresponding to the Li atom show a greater reduction with decreasing temperature than the other atoms. The temperature dependence of Li is the same regardless of F content. Even when extrapolated to absolute zero the Li displacement ellipsoid is very large, which implies a large static disorder.

  18. Correlations between 29Si, 17O and 1H NMR properties and local structures in silicates: an ab initio calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, X.; Kanzaki, M.

    In order to gain insight into the correlations between 29Si, 17O and 1H NMR properties (chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling parameters) and local structures in silicates, ab initio self-consistent field Hartree-Fock molecular orbital calculations have been carried out on silicate clusters of various polymerizations and intertetrahedral (Si-O-Si) angles. These include Si(OH)4 monomers (isolated as well as interacting), Si2O(OH)6 dimers (C2 symmetry) with the Si-O-Si angle fixed at 5° intervals from 120° to 180°, Si3O2(OH)8 linear trimers (C2 symmetry) with varying Si-O-Si angles, Si3O3(OH)6 three-membered rings (D3 and C1 symmetries), Si4O4(OH)8 four-membered ring (C4 symmetry) and Si8O12(OH)8 octamer (D4 symmetry). The calculated 29Si, 17O and 1H isotropic chemical shifts (δiSi, δiO and δiH) for these clusters are all close to experimental NMR data for similar local structures in crystalline silicates. The calculated 17O quadrupolar coupling constants (QCC) of the bridging oxygens (Si-O-Si) are also in good agreement with experimental data. The calculated 17O QCC of silanols (Si-O-H) are much larger than those of the bridging oxygens, but unfortunately there are no experimental data for similar groups in well-characterized crystalline phases for comparison. There is a good correlation between δiSi and the mean Si-O-Si angle for both Q1 and Q2, where Qn denotes Si with n other tetrahedral Si next-nearest neighbors. Both the δiO and the 17O electric field gradient asymmetry parameter, η of the bridging oxygens have been found to depend strongly on the O site symmetry, in addition to the Si-O-Si angle. On the other hand, the 17O QCC seems to be influenced little by structural parameters other than the Si-O-Si angle, and is thus expected to be the most reliable 17O NMR parameter that can be used to decipher Si-O-Si angle distribution information. Both the 17O QCC and the 2H QCC of silanols decrease with decreasing length of hydrogen bond to a second O atom

  19. Calculation of 29Si NMR shifts of silicate complexes with carbohydrates, amino acids, and muhicarboxylic acids: potential role in biological silica utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Nita

    2004-01-01

    The existence of ether or ester-like complexes of silicate with organic compounds has long been debated in the literature on biological utilization of silicon. Comparison of theoretically calculated 29Si NMR chemical shifts for such complexes with experimentally measured values in biological systems could provide a diagnostic tool for identifying which, if any of these molecules exist under physiological conditions. Results are presented here for ab initio molecular orbital calculations of 29Si NMR shifts and formation energies of silicate complexes with polyalcohols, sugar-acids, pyranose sugars, amino acids and multicarboxylic acids. The effects of functional group and molecular structure including ligand size, denticity, ring size, silicon polymerization and coordination number on calculated 29Si shifts were considered. The potential role of such compounds in biological silica utilization pathways is discussed. 29Si NMR shifts and energies were calculated at the HF/6-311+G(2d,p)//HF/6-31G* level. The main result is that only five-membered rings containing penta- and hexa-coordinated Si can explain experimentally observed resonances at ˜ -101 and -141 ppm. Further, the heptet observed in 1H- 29Si coupled spectra can only be explained by structures where Si bonds to oxygens atoms in H-C-O-Si linkages with six symmetrically equivalent H atoms. While compounds containing quadra-coordinated silicon may exist in intracellular silicon storage pools within diatoms, calculated reaction energies suggest that the organism has no thermodynamic advantage in taking up extracellular organ-silicate compounds, instead of silicic acid, from the ambient aqueous environment. Hyper-coordinated complexes are deemed unlikely for transport and storage, though they may exist as transient reactive intermediates or activated complexes during enzymatically- catalyzed silica polymerization, as known previously from sol-gel silica synthesis studies.

  20. Solid-state {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si NMR characterization of hydrates formed in calcium aluminate-silica fume mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, P.; Rivas Mercury, J.M.

    2008-08-15

    Partially deuterated Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}(SiO{sub 4}){sub y}(OH){sub 12-4y}-Al(OH){sub 3} mixtures, prepared by hydration of Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6} (C{sub 3}A), Ca{sub 12}Al{sub 14}O{sub 33} (C{sub 12}A{sub 7}) and CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} (CA) phases in the presence of silica fume, have been characterized by {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al magic-angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) spectroscopies. NMR spectroscopy was used to characterize anhydrous and fully hydrated samples. In hydrated compounds, Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 12} and Al(OH){sub 3} phases were detected. From the quantitative analysis of {sup 27}Al NMR signals, the Al(OH){sub 3}/Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 12} ratio was deduced. The incorporation of Si into the katoite structure, Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 3-x}(OH){sub 4x}, was followed by {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si NMR spectroscopies. Si/OH ratios were determined from the quantitative analysis of {sup 27}Al MAS-NMR components associated with Al(OH){sub 6} and Al(OSi)(OH){sub 5} environments. The {sup 29}Si NMR spectroscopy was also used to quantify the unreacted silica and amorphous calcium aluminosilicate hydrates formed, C-S-H and C-A-S-H for short. From {sup 29}Si NMR spectra, the amount of Si incorporated into different phases was estimated. Si and Al concentrations, deduced by NMR, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry, and Rietveld analysis of both X-ray and neutron data, indicate that only a part of available Si is incorporated in katoite structures. - Graphical abstract: Transmission electron micrograph of CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}-microsilica mixture hydrated at 90 deg. C for 31 days showing a cubic Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2.0{+-}}{sub 0.2}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 0.9{+-}}{sub 0.2}(OH){sub 1.8} crystal surrounded by unreacted amorphous silica spheres.

  1. Influence of glass composition and alteration solution on leached silicate glass structure: A solid-state NMR investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, Frédéric; Gaillard, Marina; Jollivet, Patrick; Charpentier, Thibault

    2006-05-01

    A multinuclear solid-state NMR investigation of the structure of the amorphous alteration products (so called gels) that form during the aqueous alteration of silicate glasses is reported. The studied glass compositions are of increasing complexity, with addition of aluminum, calcium, and zirconium to a sodium borosilicate glass. Two series of gels were obtained, in acidic and in basic solutions, and were analyzed using 1H, 29Si, and 27Al MAS NMR spectroscopy. Advanced NMR techniques have been employed such as 1H- 29Si and 1H- 27Al cross-polarization (CP) MAS NMR, 1H double quantum (DQ) MAS NMR and 27Al multiple quantum (MQ) MAS NMR. Under acidic conditions, 29Si CP MAS NMR data show that the repolymerized silicate networks have similar configuration. Zirconium as a second nearest neighbor increases the 29Si isotropic chemical shift. The gel porosity is influenced by the pristine glass composition, modifying the silicon-proton interactions. From 1H DQ and 1H- 29Si CP MAS NMR experiments, it was possible to discriminate between silanol groups (isolated or not) and physisorbed molecular water near Si (Q 2), Si (Q 3), and Si (Q 4) sites, as well as to gain insight into the hydrogen-bonding interaction and the mobility of the proton species. These experiments were also carried out on heated samples (180 °C) to evidence hydrogen bonds between hydroxyl groups on molecular water. Alteration in basic media resulted in a gel structure that is more dependent on the initial glass composition. 27Al MQMAS NMR data revealed an exchange of charge compensating cations of the [AlO 4] - groups during glass alteration. 1H- 27Al CP MAS NMR data provide information about the proximities of these two nuclei and two aluminum environments have been distinguished. The availability of these new structural data should provide a better understanding of the impact of glass composition on the gel structure depending on the nature of the alteration solution.

  2. Empirical Calculations of {sup 29}Si NMR Chemical Shielding Tensors: A Partial Charge Model Investigation of Hydrolysis in Organically Modified Alkoxy Silanes

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd M.; Henry, Marc

    1999-08-05

    Organically modified alkoxy silanes play an important role in tailoring different properties of silica produced by the sol-gel method. Changes in the size and functionality of the organic group allows control of both physical and chemical properties of the resulting gel, with the kinetics of the polymerization process playing an important role in the design of new siloxane materials. High resolution {sup 29}Si NMR has proven to be valuable tool for monitoring the polymerization reaction, and has been used to investigate a variety of organically modified alkoxy silane systems.

  3. High-Frequency (13)C and (29)Si NMR Chemical Shifts in Diamagnetic Low-Valence Compounds of Tl(I) and Pb(II): Decisive Role of Relativistic Effects.

    PubMed

    Vícha, Jan; Marek, Radek; Straka, Michal

    2016-02-15

    The (13)C and (29)Si NMR signals of ligand atoms directly bonded to Tl(I) or Pb(II) heavy-element centers are predicted to resonate at very high frequencies, up to 400 ppm for (13)C and over 1000 ppm for (29)Si, outside the typical experimental NMR chemical-shift ranges for a given type of nuclei. The large (13)C and (29)Si NMR chemical shifts are ascribed to sizable relativistic spin-orbit effects, which can amount to more than 200 ppm for (13)C and more than 1000 ppm for (29)Si, values unexpected for diamagnetic compounds of the main group elements. The origin of the vast spin-orbit contributions to the (13)C and (29)Si NMR shifts is traced to the highly efficient 6p → 6p* metal-based orbital magnetic couplings and related to the 6p orbital-based bonding together with the low-energy gaps between the occupied and virtual orbital subspaces in the subvalent Tl(I) and Pb(II) compounds. New NMR spectral regions for these compounds are suggested based on the fully relativistic density functional theory calculations in the Dirac-Coulomb framework carefully calibrated on the experimentally known NMR data for Tl(I) and Pb(II) complexes. PMID:26820039

  4. On reasons of 29Si NMR chemical shift/structure relations for silicon oxides, nitrides, and carbides: an individual-gauge-for-localized-orbitals study.

    PubMed

    Wolff, R; Jancke, H; Radeglia, R

    1997-12-01

    For alpha-quartz, monoclinic ZSM-5, alpha- and beta-Si3N4 and SiC-6H polytype, the silicon chemical shifts have been calculated using the IGLO (individual gauge for localized orbitals) method and models of different size in real crystal geometry. The result is a theoretical chemical shift scale, which is very similar to the corresponding experimental scale from 29Si MAS NMR experiments. It is shown that the assignment of isotropic silicon chemical shifts of crystallized solids based on theory is a method of practical applicability, also in cases where experimental methods or empirical relations fail. The two NMR spectral lines of alpha-Si3N4 are for the first time assigned to the crystallographic positions. The partition of the silicon chemical shifts into localized contributions from different parts of the model allows insight into the interactions around the resonance nucleus due to substituent and geometry variations leading to silicon chemical shifts. PMID:9477448

  5. Investigations on the Crystal-Chemical Behavior of Transition-Metal-Bearing Aluminosilicate Garnet Solid Solutions Using 27Al and 29Si NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palke, A. C.; Geiger, C. A.; Stebbins, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    The petrological importance of silicate garnet is derived from the presence of three distinct cation sites of varying size and coordination number. This allows for a wide range of trace, minor, and major element substitutions. However, a full and precise crystal-chemical understanding of the nature of transition metals in garnet is not at hand. Possible mechanisms of various charge-balanced substitutions (e.g. octahedral Ti4+ or tetrahedral Al3+) and the structural state of solid solutions (i.e. short- to long-range ordering) need study. We report on ongoing efforts in these directions using 27Al and 29Si Magic-Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS-NMR) spectroscopy. Early work on synthetic and natural Fe- and Mn-bearing pyrope- and grossular-rich garnets focused on the effect these paramagnetic transition metals have in measuring and interpreting NMR spectra. These results have been expanded with NMR measurements on synthetic pyrope-rich garnets containing other paramagnetic transition metals including Cr3+, V3+, Co2+, and Ni2+ as well as diamagnetic Ti4+. NMR peaks are severely broadened in the presence of even small concentrations of Cr3+, Mn2+, and Fe3+ leading to a loss of spectral resolution. On the other hand, the spectra of garnet containing V3+, Fe2+, Co2+, and Ni2+ have better resolution and show separate paramagnetically shifted NMR peaks. In some cases, crystal-chemical information can be obtained because of the large frequency separations between the NMR peaks that can be assigned to various local atomic configurations around Al and Si. Furthermore, the 27Al NMR spectrum of a synthetic pyrope garnet with about 2% diamagnetic Ti4+ on the octahedral site showed the absence of any tetrahedral Al3+, which rules out the substitution mechanism VITi + IVAl = VIAl + IVSi in the solid solution. Our NMR investigations on garnet are now being made at the exploratory level. We think that NMR spectra of diamagnetic garnet can provide information on a

  6. Metal Carbonation of Forsterite in Supercritical CO2 and H2O Using Solid State 29Si, 13C NMR Spectroscop

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Hu, Jian Z.; Hoyt, David W.; Sears, Jesse A.; Wang, Chong M.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2010-03-11

    Ex situ solid state NMR was used for the first time to study fundamental mineral carbonation processes and reaction extent relevant to geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) using a model silicate mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4)+supercriticalCO2 with and without H2O. Run conditions were 80 C and 96 atm. 29Si NMR clearly shows that in the absence of CO2, the role of H2O is to hydrolyze surface Mg-O-Si bonds to produce dissolved Mg2+, and mono- and oligomeric hydroxylated silica species. Surface hydrolysis products contain only Q0 (Si(OH)4) and Q1(Si(OH)3OSi) species. An equilibrium between Q0, Q1 and Mg2+ with a saturated concentration equivalent to less than 3.2% of the Mg2SiO4 conversion is obtained at a reaction time of up to 7 days. Using scCO2 without H2O, no reaction is observed within 7 days. Using both scCO2 and H2O, the surface reaction products for silica are mainly Q3 (SiOH(OSi)3) species accompanied by a lesser amount of Q2 (Si(OH)2(OSi)2) and Q4 (Si(OSi)4). However, no Q0 and Q1 were detected, indicating the carbonic acid formation/deprotonation and magnesite (MgCO3) precipitation reactions are faster than the forsterite hydrolysis process. Thus it can be concluded that the Mg2SiO4 hydrolysis process is the rate limiting step of the overall mineral carbonation process. 29Si NMR combined with XRD, TEM, SAED and EDX further reveal that the reaction is a surface reaction with the Mg2SiO4 crystallite in the core and with condensed Q2-Q4 species forming amorphous surface layers. 13C MAS NMR identified a possible reaction intermediate as (MgCO3)4-Mg(OH)2-5H2O. However, at long reaction times only crystallite magnesite MgCO3 products are observed.

  7. Water and magmas: insights about the water solution mechanisms in alkali silicate melts from infrared, Raman, and 29Si solid-state NMR spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Losq, Charles; Mysen, Bjorn O.; Cody, George D.

    2015-12-01

    Degassing of water during the ascent of hydrous magma in a volcanic edifice produces dramatic changes in the magma density and viscosity. This can profoundly affect the dynamics of volcanic eruptions. The water exsolution history, in turn, is driven by the water solubility and solution mechanisms in the silicate melt. Previous studies pointed to dissolved water in silicate glasses and melts existing as molecules (H2Omol species) and hydroxyl groups, OH. These latter OH groups commonly are considered bonded to Si4+ but may form other bonds, such as with alkali or alkaline-earth cations, for instance. Those forms of bonding influence the structure of hydrous melts in different ways and, therefore, their properties. As a result, exsolution of water from magmas may have different eruptive consequences depending on the initial bonding mechanisms of the dissolved water. However, despite their importance, the solution mechanisms of water in silicate melts are not clear. In particular, how chemical composition of melts affects water solubility and solution mechanism is not well understood. In the present experimental study, components of such information are reported via determination of how water interacts with the cationic network of alkali (Li, Na, and K) silicate quenched melts. Results from 29Si single-pulse magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (29Si SP MAS NMR), infrared, and Raman spectroscopies show that decreasing the ionic radius of alkali metal cation in silicate melts results in decreasing fraction of water dissolved as OH groups. The nature of OH bonding also changes as the alkali ionic radius changes. Therefore, as the speciation and bonding of water controls the degree of polymerization of melts, water will have different effects on the transport properties of silicate melts depending on their chemical composition. This conclusion, in turn, may affect volcanic phenomena related to the viscous relaxation of hydrous magmas, such as for instance the

  8. Lead exchange into zeolite and clay minerals: A [sup 29]Si, [sub 27]Al, [sup 23]Na solid-state NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, J.J.; Sherriff, B.L. )

    1993-08-01

    Chabazite, vermiculite, montmorillonite, hectorite, and kaolinite were used to remove Pb, through ion exchange, from 0.01 M aqueous Pb(NO[sub 3])[sub 2] solutions. These minerals contained 27 (Na-chabazite), 16, 9, 9, and 0.5 wt % of Pb, respectively, after equilibration with the solutions. Ion exchange reached equilibrium within 24 h for Na-chabazite and vermiculite, but in less than 5 min for montmorillonite and hectorite. Na-chabazite took up more Pb than natural (Ca, Na)-chabazite (7 wt % Pb), whereas no such difference was observed in different cation forms of the clay minerals. Calcite impurities, associated with the clay minerals, effectively removed Pb from the aqueous solutions by the precipitation of cerussite (PbCO[sub 3]). [sup 29]Si, [sup 27]Al, and [sup 23]Na magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), [sup 23]Na double rotation (DOR) NMR, and [sup 23]Na variable-temperature MAS NMR were used to study the ion exchange mechanisms. In Na-chabazite, cations in all three possible sites take part in the fast chemical exchange. The chemical exchange passes from the fast exchange regime to the slow regime at [minus]80 to [minus]100[degrees]C. One site contains a relatively low population of exchangeable cations. The other two more shielded sites contain most of the exchangeable cation. The exchangeable cations in chabazite and vermiculite were found to be close to the SiO[sub 4] and AlO[sub 4] tetrahedra, while those in the other clay minerals were more distant. Two sites (or groups of sites) for exchangeable cations were observed in hectorite. Lead tended to occupy the one which corresponds to the [minus]8 ppM peak on the [sup 23]Na MAS NMR spectrum. The behavior of the exchangeable cations in the interlayer sites was similar in all the clay minerals studied. 27 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Carbonation of C–S–H and C–A–S–H samples studied by {sup 13}C, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sevelsted, Tine F.; Skibsted, Jørgen

    2015-05-15

    Synthesized calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) samples with Ca/Si ratios of 0.66, 1.0, and 1.5 have been exposed to atmospheric CO{sub 2} at room temperature and high relative humidity and studied after one to 12 weeks. {sup 29}Si NMR reveals that the decomposition of C–S–H caused by carbonation involves two steps and that the decomposition rate decreases with increasing Ca/Si ratio. The first step is a gradual decalcification of the C–S–H where calcium is removed from the interlayer and defect sites in the silicate chains until Ca/Si = 0.67 is reached, ideally corresponding to infinite silicate chains. In the seconds step, calcium from the principal layers is consumed, resulting in the final decomposition of the C–S–H and the formation of an amorphous silica phase composed of Q{sup 3} and Q{sup 4} silicate tetrahedra. The amount of solid carbonates and of carbonate ions in a hydrous environment increases with increasing Ca/Si ratio for the C–S–H, as shown by {sup 13}C NMR. For C–A–S–H samples with Ca/Si = 1.0 and 1.5, {sup 27}Al NMR demonstrates that all aluminium sites associated with the C–S–H are consumed during the carbonation reactions and incorporated mainly as tetrahedral Al(–OSi){sub 4} units in the amorphous silica phase. A small amount of penta-coordinated Al sites has also been identified in the silica phase.

  10. 29Si-NMR study of magnetic anisotropy and hyperfine interactions in the uranium-bsed ferromagnet UNiSi2

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Hironori; Baek, Seung H; Bauer, Eric D; Ronning, Filip; Thompson, J D

    2009-01-01

    UNiSi{sub 2} orders ferromagnetically below T{sub Curie} = 95 K. This material crystallizes in the orthorhombic CeNiSi{sub 2}-type structure. The uranium atoms form double-layers, which are stacked along the crystallographic b axis (the longest axis). From magnetization measurement the easy (hard) magnetization axis is found to be the c axis (b axis). {sup 29}Si-NMR measurements have been performed in the paramagnetic state. In UNiSi{sub 2}, two crystallographic Si sites exist with orthorhombic local symmetry. The Knight shifts on each Si site have been estimated from the spectra of random and oriented powders. The transferred hyperfine couplings have been also derived. It is found that the transferred hyperfine coupling constants on each Si site are nearly isotropic, and that their Knight shift anisotropy comes from that of the bulk susceptibility. The nuclear-spin lattice relaxation rate 1/T{sub 1} shows temperature-independent behavior, which indicates the existence of localized 5f electron.

  11. Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles Loaded with Surfactant: Low Temperature Magic Angle Spinning 13C and 29Si NMR Enhanced by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Lafon, Olivier; Thankamony, Aany S. Lilly; Kokayashi, Takeshi; Carnevale, Diego; Vitzthum, Veronika; Slowing, Igor I.; Kandel, Kapil; Vezin, Herve; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Pruski, Marek

    2012-12-21

    We show that dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) can be used to enhance NMR signals of 13C and 29Si nuclei located in mesoporous organic/inorganic hybrid materials, at several hundreds of nanometers from stable radicals (TOTAPOL) trapped in the surrounding frozen disordered water. The approach is demonstrated using mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN), functionalized with 3-(N-phenylureido)propyl (PUP) groups, filled with the surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The DNP-enhanced proton magnetization is transported into the mesopores via 1H–1H spin diffusion and transferred to rare spins by cross-polarization, yielding signal enhancements εon/off of around 8. When the CTAB molecules are extracted, so that the radicals can enter the mesopores, the enhancements increase to εon/off ≈ 30 for both nuclei. A quantitative analysis of the signal enhancements in MSN with and without surfactant is based on a one-dimensional proton spin diffusion model. The effect of solvent deuteration is also investigated.

  12. 29Si NMR investigation of ORMOSIL layers used as luminophores' sol-gel matrices in a UV optical fibre sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chodkowska, Eliza M.; Rayss, Jan

    2007-07-01

    The paper concerns the results of ORMOSIL layer's applied in an optical fibre ultraviolet sensor Nuclear Magnetic Resonance investigation. The layer which substituted for optical fibre's cladding in device's sensing part acted as a matrix for a coumarin's derivative. The dye is able to convert ultraviolet into visible radiation which could be easily detected. Thanks to the fact that the refractive indices of ORMOSIL layers may be controlled and reach a value characteristic for the fused silica glass a satisfying sensitivity of the device can be achieved. However it may be expected that both the structure and the composition of ORMOSIL matrices could influence the organic dye's behaviour. The aim of the experiment presented in the paper was to prove a relation between the sol's condensation time and a composition of the obtained gel's structure. The obtained NMR spectra gave the evidence of non-condensed -Si-O-C IIH 5(H) moieties existence in the solid gels. Moreover, even a 42-days-long process does not lead to the total condensation of ethoxysilanes' molecules. It is probable that the remaining ethoxy or silanol groups interact with transducer's molecules as well as influence the refractive index of the gel layer.

  13. (1)H-(13)C-(29)Si triple resonance and REDOR solid-state NMR-A tool to study interactions between biosilica and organic molecules in diatom cell walls.

    PubMed

    Wisser, Dorothea; Brückner, Stephan I; Wisser, Florian M; Althoff-Ospelt, Gerhard; Getzschmann, Jürgen; Kaskel, Stefan; Brunner, Eike

    2015-01-01

    Triple resonance solid-state NMR experiments using the spin combination (1)H-(13)C-(29)Si are still rarely found in the literature. This is due to the low natural abundance of the two heteronuclei. Such experiments are, however, increasingly important to study hybrid materials such as biosilica and others. A suitable model substance, ideally labeled with both (13)C and (29)Si, is thus very useful to optimize the experiments before applying them to studies of more complex samples such as biosilica. Tetraphenoxysilane could be synthesized in an easy, two-step synthesis including double isotope labelling. Using tetraphenoxysilane, we established a (1)H-(13)C-(29)Si double CP-based HETCOR experiment and applied it to diatom biosilica from the diatom species Thalassiosira pseudonana. Furthermore, we carried out (1)H-(13)C{(29)Si} CP-REDOR experiments in order to estimate the distance between the organic matrix and the biosilica. Our experiments on diatom biosilica strongly indicate a close contact between polyamine-containing parts of the organic matrix and the silica. This corroborates the assumption that the organic matrix is essential for the control of the cell wall formation. PMID:25638422

  14. Effect of iron content on the structure and disorder of iron-bearing sodium silicate glasses: A high-resolution 29Si and 17O solid-state NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyo-Im; Sur, Jung Chul; Lee, Sung Keun

    2016-01-01

    Despite its geochemical importance and implications for the properties of natural magmatic melts, understanding the detailed structure of iron-bearing silicate glasses remains among the outstanding problems in geochemistry. This is mainly because solid-state NMR techniques, one of the most versatile experimental methods to probe the structure of oxide glasses, cannot be fully utilized for exploring the structural details of iron-bearing glasses as the unpaired electrons in Fe induce strong local magnetic fields that mask the original spectroscopic features (i.e., paramagnetic effect). Here, we report high-resolution 29Si and 17O solid-state NMR spectra of iron-bearing sodium silicate glasses (Na2O-Fe2O3-SiO2, Fe3+/ΣFe = 0.89 ± 0.04, thus containing both ferric and ferrous iron) with varying XFe2O3 [=Fe2O3/(Na2O + Fe2O3)], containing up to 22.9 wt% Fe2O3. This compositional series involves Fe-Na substitution at constant SiO2 contents of 66.7 mol% in the glasses. For both nuclides, the NMR spectra exhibit a decrease in the signal intensities and an increase in the peak widths with increasing iron concentration partly because of the paramagnetic effect. Despite the intrinsic difficulties that result from the pronounced paramagnetic effect, the 29Si and 17O NMR results yield structural details regarding the effect of iron content on Q speciation, spatial distribution of iron, and the extent of polymerization in the iron-bearing silicate glasses. The 29Si NMR spectra show an apparent increase in highly polymerized Q species with increasing XFe2O3 , suggesting an increase in the degree of melt polymerization. The 17O 3QMAS NMR spectra exhibit well-resolved non-bridging oxygen (NBO, Na-O-Si) and bridging oxygen (BO, Si-O-Si) peaks with varying iron concentration. By replacing Na2O with Fe2O3 (and thus with increasing iron content), the fraction of Na-O-Si decreases. Quantitative consideration of this effect confirms that the degree of polymerization is likely to

  15. (29)Si, (47)Ti, (49)Ti and (195)Pt solid state MAS NMR spectroscopic investigations of ternary silicides TPtSi, germanides TPtGe (T = Ti, Zr, Hf) and stannide TiPtSn.

    PubMed

    Benndorf, Christopher; Eckert, Hellmut; Pöttgen, Rainer

    2016-05-10

    Eight ternary tetrelides TPtX (T = Ti, Zr, Hf; X = Si, Ge, Sn) were synthesized from the elements by arc-melting and subsequent annealing. TiPtSi, ZrPtSi, ZrPtGe, HfPtSi and HfPtGe crystallize with the orthorhombic TiNiSi type structure, in the space group Pnma. The structures of HfPtSi (a = 654.44(9), b = 387.97(6), c = 750.0(1) pm, wR2 = 0.0592, 411 F(2) values, 20 variables) and HfPtGe (a = 660.36(7), b = 395.18(4), c = 763.05(8) pm, wR2 = 0.0495, 430 F(2) values, 20 variables) were refined from single crystal X-ray diffractometer data. TiPtSn adopts the cubic MgAgAs type. TiPtGe is dimorphic with a TiNiSi type high-temperature modification which transforms to cubic LT-TiPtGe (MgAgAs type). All phases were investigated by high resolution (29)Si, (47)Ti, (49)Ti and (195)Pt solid state MAS NMR spectroscopy. In the cubic compounds, the (47/49)Ti NMR signals are easily detected owing to the absence of quadrupolar broadening effects. The (195)Pt resonances of the orthorhombic compounds are characterized by strongly negative isotropic Knight shifts and large Knight shift anisotropies, whereas positive isotropic Knight shifts and no anisotropies are observed for the cubic compounds. These results indicate that the phase transition in TiPtGe is associated with dramatic changes in the electronic properties. Within each group of isotypic compounds the isotropic (29)Si, (47/49)Ti and (195)Pt Knight shifts show systematic dependences on the transition metal or tetrel atomic number, suggesting that the numerical values are influenced by the electronegativities of the metallic (or metalloid) neighbours. PMID:27097719

  16. Solid-state NMR characterization of Mowry Formation shales

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.

    1992-04-01

    Solid-state {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si NMR measurements were carried out on a series of petroleum source rocks from the Mowry Formation of the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. The objectives of this study wereto use CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR measurements to monitor changes in the carbon structure of the kerogen that result from depth of burial, and to examine the feasibility of {sup 29}Si NMR for studying the thermal alteration of clay minerals during diagenesis. Carbon and silicon NMR measurements were made on a suite of samples covering a present-day depth interval of 3,000 to 11,500 ft.In general, the NMR results endorsed other geochemical analyses that were performed on the source rocks as part of another study to examine pressure compartmentalization in the Mowry Formation. The carbon aromaticity of the kerogen increased with depth of burial, and at depths greater that approximately 10,000 ft the kerogen showed little capacity to generate additional oil because of the small fraction of residual aliphatic carbon. By combining NMR and Rock-Eval measurements, an estimate of the hydrogen budget was obtained. The calculations indicated that approximately 20% of the kerogen was converted to hydrocarbons, and that sufficient hydrogen was liberated from aromatization and condensation reactions to stabilize the generated products. The {sup 29}Si NMR spectra were characterized by a relatively sharp quartz resonance and a broad resonance from the clay minerals. With increasing depth of burial, the clay resonance became broader and shifted slightly downfield. These changes qualitatively support X-ray analysis that shows progressive alteration of illite to smectite with depth of burial.

  17. Solid-state NMR characterization of Mowry Formation shales

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.

    1992-04-01

    Solid-state [sup 13]C and [sup 29]Si NMR measurements were carried out on a series of petroleum source rocks from the Mowry Formation of the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. The objectives of this study wereto use CP/MAS [sup 13]C NMR measurements to monitor changes in the carbon structure of the kerogen that result from depth of burial, and to examine the feasibility of [sup 29]Si NMR for studying the thermal alteration of clay minerals during diagenesis. Carbon and silicon NMR measurements were made on a suite of samples covering a present-day depth interval of 3,000 to 11,500 ft.In general, the NMR results endorsed other geochemical analyses that were performed on the source rocks as part of another study to examine pressure compartmentalization in the Mowry Formation. The carbon aromaticity of the kerogen increased with depth of burial, and at depths greater that approximately 10,000 ft the kerogen showed little capacity to generate additional oil because of the small fraction of residual aliphatic carbon. By combining NMR and Rock-Eval measurements, an estimate of the hydrogen budget was obtained. The calculations indicated that approximately 20% of the kerogen was converted to hydrocarbons, and that sufficient hydrogen was liberated from aromatization and condensation reactions to stabilize the generated products. The [sup 29]Si NMR spectra were characterized by a relatively sharp quartz resonance and a broad resonance from the clay minerals. With increasing depth of burial, the clay resonance became broader and shifted slightly downfield. These changes qualitatively support X-ray analysis that shows progressive alteration of illite to smectite with depth of burial.

  18. The Local Structural State of Aluminosilicate Garnet Solid Solutions: An Investigation of Grospydite Garnet from the Roberts Victor Kimberlite Using Paramagnetically Shifted 27Al and 29Si MAS NMR Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, C. A.; Palke, A. C.; Stebbins, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Most rock-forming silicates are substitutional solid solutions. Over the years extensive research has been done to determine their structural and crystal chemical properties. Here, the distribution of cations, or order-disorder behavior, is of central importance. In the case of aluminosilicate garnet solid solutions (X3Al2Si3O12 with X = Mg, Fe2+, Mn2+ and Ca) it has been shown that both synthetic and natural crystals have random long-range X-cation disorder in space group Ia-3d, as given by X-ray single-crystal diffraction measurements. However, the structural state of natural garnets at the local scale is not known. Garnet from a grospydite xenolith from the Roberts Victor kimberlite, South Africa, was studied by 27Al and 29Si MAS NMR spectroscopy. The research thrust was placed on measuring and analyzing paramagnetically shifted resonances to determine the local (short range) structural state of the X-cations in a grossular-rich ternary aluminosilicate garnet solid solution. The garnet crystals are compositionally homogeneous based on microprobe analysis, showing no measurable zoning, and have the formula Grs46.7Prp30.0Alm23.3. The garnet is cubic with the standard garnet space group Ia-3d. The 27Al MAS NMR spectrum shows a very broad asymmetric resonance located between about 100 and -50 ppm. It consists of a number of individual overlapping paramagnetically shifted resonances, which are difficult to analyze quantitatively. The 29Si MAS NMR spectrum, showing better resolution, has two observable resonances termed S0 and S4. S0 is located between about -60 ppm and -160 ppm and S4 is centered at roughly 95 ppm. Both S0 and S4 are composite resonances in nature containing many overlapping individual peaks. S0 contains information on local cation configurations whereby an isolated SiO4 group in the garnet structure does not have an edge-shared Fe2+-containing dodecahedron. S4 involves local configurations where there is one edge-shared dodecahedron containing Fe2

  19. Water speciation in sodium silicate glasses (quenched melts): A comprehensive NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, X.; Kanzaki, M.; Eguchi, J.

    2012-12-01

    reported relative to TMS. The 1H MAS NMR spectra show broad peaks covering a chemical shift range of 1 to 17 ppm, with peak maxima near 4 and 15 ppm for more Si-rich compositions and near 12 ppm for less Si-rich compositions. The 1H-29Si-1H and 23Na-1H cross-polarization (CP) MAS NMR spectra for all the hydrous Na silicate glasses suggest negligible NaOH species, which, if present, should show enhanced relative intensity with 23Na-1H CP and the opposite with 1H-29Si-1H CP. All the observed 1H NMR intensities can be attributed to SiOH species of a range of hydrogen-bonding distances, plus a small amount of molecular H2O for higher water-content samples that contribute to intensities around 6 ppm. In conclusion, our combined 1H MAS NMR and double-resonance (1H-29Si-1H and 23Na-1H CP) MAS NMR study on Na silicate glasses of a range of Na/Si ratios has confirmed that water dissolves predominantly as SiOH and molecular H2O species in Na silicate melts (glasses), consistent with the trend predicted from studies on the Ca-Mg silicate system [1,2]. References:[1] Xue, X. Y.; Kanzaki, M. J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 2009, 92, 2803-2830. [2] Xue, X. Y.; Kanzaki, M. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 2004, 68, 5027-5057.

  20. Dynamic nuclear polarization of {sup 29}Si nuclei in isotopically controlled phosphorus doped silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Hiroshi; Itahashi, Tatsumasa; Itoh, Kohei M.; Vlasenko, Leonid S.; Vlasenko, Marina P.

    2009-07-15

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of {sup 29}Si nuclei in isotopically controlled silicon single crystals with the {sup 29}Si isotope abundance f{sub 29Si} varied from 1.2% to 99.2% is reported. It was found that both the DNP enhancement and {sup 29}Si nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time under saturation of the electron paramagnetic resonance transitions of phosphorus donors increase with the decrease in the {sup 29}Si abundance. A remarkably large steady-state DNP enhancement, E{sup ss}=2680 which is comparable to the theoretical upper limit of 3310, has been achieved through the ''resolved'' solid effect that has been identified clearly in the f{sub 29Si}=1.2% sample. The DNP enhancement depends not only on the {sup 29}Si abundance but also on the electron spin-lattice relaxation time that can be controlled by temperature and/or illumination. The linewidth of {sup 29}Si NMR spectra after DNP shows a linear dependence on f{sub 29Si} for f{sub 29Si}{<=}10% and changes to a square-root dependence for f{sub 29Si}{>=}50%. Comparison of experimentally determined nuclear polarization time with nuclear spin diffusion coefficients indicates that the rate of DNP is limited by the polarization transfer rather than by spin diffusion.

  1. Organometallic derivatives of furan. LII. Synthesis of carbofunctional furylsilanes and their /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C, and /sup 29/Si NMR spectroscopic and quantum-chemical investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Lukevits, E.; Erchak, N.P.; Castro, I.; Popelis, Yu.Yu.; Kozyrev, A.K.; Anoshkin, V.I.; Kovalev, I.F.

    1986-03-10

    Under the standard conditions for the synthesis of furan compounds it is possible to obtain the carbofunctional derivatives of silylated furfural with retention of the trimethylsilyl group in the ring. By NMR and CNDO/2 LCAO MO methods and also as a result of the investigation of the chemical characteristics of silylated furfural and its carbofunctional derivatives it was established that the introduction of a trimethylsilyl group at position 5 of the furan ring does not change the reactivity of the carbofunctional substituents at position 2. The electronic effects of the substituents are hardly transmitted through the furan ring at all. The effect of substituents in the carbofunctional furylsilanes on the electronic structure of the ring is additive.

  2. Constraints on the structure and dynamics of the β-cristobalite polymorphs of SiO2 and AlPO4 from 31P, 27Al and 29Si NMR spectroscopy to 770 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Brian L.; Thompson, John G.; Xiao, Yuehui; Kirkpatrick, R. James

    1993-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic data are presented for the cristobalite polymorphs of AlPO4 and SiO2 from RT to 770 K, through their respective α- β transitions. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data include chemical shifts for 31P, 27Al, and 29Si, 27Al quadrupole coupling parameters, and 31P and 27Al spin-lattice relaxation rates. Also presented are electron diffraction patterns of β-cristobalite AlPO4 that show diffuse scattering similar to that reported previously for SiO2. For the α-phases of both AlPO4 and SiO2, the chemical shifts decrease approximately linearly with increasing temperature from RT to Tc and discontinuously by -2 to -3 ppm from α to β. This result is consistent with a small, continuous increase in the mean T-O-T angle (<θ>) of the α-phases with increasing T and an increase of <θ> by about 4° across the α- β transition for both cristobalite and its AlPO4 analogue. Based on the 29Si chemical shifts, the mean Si-O-Si angle for β-cristobalite is 152.7±1° near Tc. For AlPO4-cristobalite, the 27Al nuclear quadrupole coupling constant (CQ) decreases approximately linearly from 1.2 MHz at RT to 0.94 MHz near Tc (493±10 K). At the α- β transition the 27Al CQ approaches zero, in agreement with the cubic average structure observed by diffraction. The satellite transitions retain a small frequency distribution above the α- β transition from electric field gradients attributed to defects. The short-range cubic symmetry of the Al-site and non-linear Al-O-P angle support a dynamically disordered model of the β-cristobalite structure. Complete averaging of the 27Al quadrupole coupling in the β-phase indicates that the lifetime of any short-range ordered domains must be shorter than about 1 μs.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance linewidth and spin diffusion in {sup 29}Si isotopically controlled silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Hiroshi; Itoh, Kohei M.; Vlasenko, Leonid S.

    2008-10-15

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study was performed with n-type silicon single crystals containing {sup 29}Si isotope abundance f ranges from 1.2% to 99.2%. The nuclear spin diffusion coefficient D has been determined from the linewidth of significantly enhanced {sup 29}Si NMR signals utilizing a developed dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) method. The {sup 29}Si NMR linewidth depends linearly on f, at least when f<10%, and approaches {proportional_to}f{sup 1/2} dependence when f>50%. The estimated {sup 29}Si nuclear spin diffusion time T{sub sd} between phosphorus atoms used for DNP is more than ten times shorter than the nuclear polarization time T{sub 1}{sup p} of {sup 29}Si nuclei around phosphorus. Therefore, the regime of 'rapid spin diffusion' is realized in the DNP experiments.

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE WOUND INDUCED MATERIAL IN CITRUS FRUIT PEEL BY CARBON-13 CP-MAS SOLID STATE NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are conflicting views regarding the chemical composition of the induced, phloroglucinol-HCl (PG-HCl) reacting, material accumulating in injured citrus peel tissues. Grapefruit, Citrus paradisi, were injured, inoculated with Peicillium digitatum and incubated under contitions favorable to the a...

  5. Solid-State NMR Characterization of Mixed Phosphonic Acid Ligand Binding and Organization on Silica Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Davidowski, Stephen K; Holland, Gregory P

    2016-04-01

    As ligand functionalization of nanomaterials becomes more complex, methods to characterize the organization of multiple ligands on surfaces is required. In an effort to further the understanding of ligand-surface interactions, a combination of multinuclear ((1)H, (29)Si, (31)P) and multidimensional solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques was utilized to characterize the phosphonic acid functionalization of fumed silica nanoparticles using methylphosphonic acid (MPA) and phenylphosphonic acid (PPA). (1)H → (29)Si cross-polarization (CP)-magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR was used to selectively detect silicon atoms near hydrogen atoms (primarily surface species); these results indicate that geminal silanols are preferentially depleted during the functionalization with phosphonic acids. (1)H → (31)P CP-MAS solid-state NMR measurements on the functionalized silica nanoparticles show three distinct resonances shifted upfield (lower ppm) and broadened compared to the resonances of the crystalline ligands. Quantitative (31)P MAS solid-state NMR measurements indicate that ligands favor a monodentate binding mode. When fumed silica nanoparticles were functionalized with an equal molar ratio of MPA and PPA, the MPA bound the nanoparticle surface preferentially. Cross-peaks apparent in the 2D (1)H exchange spectroscopy (EXSY) NMR measurements of the multiligand sample at short mixing times indicate that the MPA and PPA are spatially close (≤5 Å) on the surface of the nanostructure. Furthermore, (1)H-(1)H double quantum-single quantum (DQ-SQ) back-to-back (BABA) 2D NMR spectra further confirmed that MPA and PPA are strongly dipolar coupled with observation of DQ intermolecular contacts between the ligands. DQ experimental buildup curves and simulations indicate that the average distance between MPA and PPA is no further than 4.2 ± 0.2 Å. PMID:26914738

  6. Modifier cation effects on 29Si nuclear shielding anisotropies in silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltisberger, Jay H.; Florian, Pierre; Keeler, Eric G.; Phyo, Pyae A.; Sanders, Kevin J.; Grandinetti, Philip J.

    2016-07-01

    We have examined variations in the 29Si nuclear shielding tensor parameters of SiO4 tetrahedra in a series of seven alkali and alkaline earth silicate glass compositions, Cs2O · 4.81 SiO2, Rb2O · 3.96 SiO2, Rb2O · 2.25 SiO2, K2O · 4.48 SiO2, Na2O · 4.74 SiO2, BaO · 2.64 SiO2, and SrO · 2.36 SiO2, using natural abundance 29Si two-dimensional magic-angle flipping (MAF) experiments. Our analyses of these 2D spectra reveal a linear dependence of the 29Si nuclear shielding anisotropy of Q(3) sites on the Si-non-bridging oxygen bond length, which in turn depends on the cation potential and coordination of modifier cations to the non-bridging oxygen. We also demonstrate how a combination of Cu2+ as a paramagnetic dopant combined with echo train acquisition can reduce the total experiment time of 29Si 2D NMR measurements by two orders of magnitude, enabling higher throughput 2D NMR studies of glass structure.

  7. Modifier cation effects on (29)Si nuclear shielding anisotropies in silicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Baltisberger, Jay H; Florian, Pierre; Keeler, Eric G; Phyo, Pyae A; Sanders, Kevin J; Grandinetti, Philip J

    2016-07-01

    We have examined variations in the (29)Si nuclear shielding tensor parameters of SiO4 tetrahedra in a series of seven alkali and alkaline earth silicate glass compositions, Cs2O·4.81 SiO2, Rb2O·3.96 SiO2, Rb2O·2.25 SiO2, K2O·4.48 SiO2, Na2O·4.74 SiO2, BaO·2.64 SiO2, and SrO·2.36 SiO2, using natural abundance (29)Si two-dimensional magic-angle flipping (MAF) experiments. Our analyses of these 2D spectra reveal a linear dependence of the (29)Si nuclear shielding anisotropy of Q((3)) sites on the Si-non-bridging oxygen bond length, which in turn depends on the cation potential and coordination of modifier cations to the non-bridging oxygen. We also demonstrate how a combination of Cu(2+) as a paramagnetic dopant combined with echo train acquisition can reduce the total experiment time of (29)Si 2D NMR measurements by two orders of magnitude, enabling higher throughput 2D NMR studies of glass structure. PMID:27187210

  8. {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS spectroscopy of layer silicates in Argonne premium coals.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A. R.; Botto, R. E.; Chemistry; DOA

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si NMR were employed to characterize layered silicates in the suite of eight Argonne Premium coals. Analyses were performed on native coals directly, or fractions isolated by sink-float techniques. Mineral phases of kaolinite, quartz, and illite-montmorillinite clays could readily be distinguished nonquantitatively by {sup 29}Si NMR techniques using direct detection or cross polarization. {sup 27}Al NMR was used to determine quantitatively the amounts of tetrahedral and octahedral aluminum forms present. The {sup 27}Al NMR results were consistent with mineralogical analyses by XRD, showing that increases in tetrahedral content paralleled illitization of the clay minerals. A remarkably good relationship also was found between the total amount of tetrahedral aluminum associated with the mineral matter and degree of maturation of the organic matter in the coal. The data suggest that illitization of the clays can be used as a mineralogical thermal maturity indicator for Type II kerogens, as demonstrated for the Argonne Premium coals, provided that contributions from organo-chelated aluminum species and detrital mineral matter are taken into account.

  9. Observation of solid-state 103Rh NMR by cross-polarization.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Brian L; Houston, Jacqueline R; Feng, Jian; Casey, William H

    2006-03-29

    Using 103Rh[1H] cross-polarization (CP) methods, we have obtained solid-state 103Rh NMR spectra for diamagnetic Rh(III) compounds. The isotropic chemical shift and chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) are reported for a crystalline form of the dihydroxy-bridged Rh(III) dimer and for a salt of the oxo-centered acetate-bridged Rh(III) trimer, from analysis of conventional CP/MAS spectra. Comparison of the CP kinetics of the dimer with new crystal structure data suggests a strategy for predicting 103Rh CP/MAS properties in solids. PMID:16551090

  10. Incorporation of phosphorus guest ions in the calcium silicate phases of Portland cement from 31P MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Søren L; Jakobsen, Hans J; Skibsted, Jørgen

    2010-06-21

    Portland cements may contain small quantities of phosphorus (typically below 0.5 wt % P(2)O(5)), originating from either the raw materials or alternative sources of fuel used to heat the cement kilns. This work reports the first (31)P MAS NMR study of anhydrous and hydrated Portland cements that focuses on the phase and site preferences of the (PO(4))(3-) guest ions in the main clinker phases and hydration products. The observed (31)P chemical shifts (10 to -2 ppm), the (31)P chemical shift anisotropy, and the resemblance of the lineshapes in the (31)P and (29)Si MAS NMR spectra strongly suggest that (PO(4))(3-) units are incorporated in the calcium silicate phases, alite (Ca(3)SiO(5)) and belite (Ca(2)SiO(4)), by substitution for (SiO(4))(4-) tetrahedra. This assignment is further supported by a determination of the spin-lattice relaxation times for (31)P in alite and belite, which exhibit the same ratio as observed for the corresponding (29)Si relaxation times. From simulations of the intensities, observed in inversion-recovery spectra for a white Portland cement, it is deduced that 1.3% and 2.1% of the Si sites in alite and belite, respectively, are replaced by phosphorus. Charge balance may potentially be achieved to some extent by a coupled substitution mechanism where Ca(2+) is replaced by Fe(3+) ions, which may account for the interaction of the (31)P spins with paramagnetic Fe(3+) ions as observed for the ordinary Portland cements. A minor fraction of phosphorus may also be present in the separate phase Ca(3)(PO(4))(2), as indicated by the observation of a narrow resonance at delta((31)P) = 3.0 ppm for two of the studied cements. (31)P{(1)H} CP/MAS NMR spectra following the hydration of a white Portland cement show that the resonances from the hydrous phosphate species fall in the same spectral range as observed for (PO(4))(3-) incorporated in alite. This similarity and the absence of a large (31)P chemical shift ansitropy indicate that the hydrous (PO(4

  11. Investigations of the structure and "interfacial" surface chemistry of Bioglass (RTM) materials by solid-state multinuclear NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Gautam

    formation of surface silica species and follow the formation of phosphate species, respectively, while cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) 29Si and 31P NMR have provided information about low intensity NMR peaks due to various silicon- and phosphorus-species present in the vicinity of associated protons on the surface of in vitro reacted BioglassRTM materials. The solid-state NMR investigations of the "interfacial" surface reactions of BioglassRTM materials are discussed in the context of the structure of these materials and the influence of this structure on the kinetics and the mechanism of their "interfacial" surface chemistry. (Abstract shortened by UMI.) BioglassRTM, trademark, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 32611.

  12. No Detectable Change in In-Plane 29Si Knight Shift in the Superconducting State of URu2Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Taisuke; Sakai, Hironori; Tokunaga, Yo; Kambe, Shinsaku; Matsuda, Tatsuma D.; Haga, Yoshinori

    2016-07-01

    Using a high-quality single crystal of URu2Si2, we performed 29Si Knight shift measurements with an applied magnetic field Ha along the crystalline a-axis, i.e., along the magnetic hard axis, for temperatures down to 50 mK. The narrow, single-peak 29Si NMR spectrum obtained from this crystal allowed us to examine the temperature variation of the Knight shift K(T), and hence, that of the variation of the spin susceptibility with sensitivity on the order of 0.001%. At this precision, no observable change in K(T) was detected from 50 mK up to the superconducting transition at TSC(Ha) ˜ 1 K. Our results correspond to either an extremely small spin susceptibility in the hidden-order state along the magnetic hard axis or to possible spin-triplet superconductivity in this system.

  13. 1H NMR relaxation in urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R. E.; Bacher, Alfred D.; Dybowski, C.

    2007-11-01

    Proton NMR spin-lattice relaxation times T1 were measured for urea as a function of temperature. An activation energy of 46.3 ± 4.7 kJ/mol was extracted and compared with the range of 38-65 kJ/mol previously reported in the literature as measured by different magnetic resonance techniques. In addition, proton NMR spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame T1 ρ were measured as a function of temperature. These measurements provide acquisition conditions for the 13C and 15N CP/MAS spectra of pure urea in the crystalline phase.

  14. Tumbling motions of NH2(CH3)2 ions in [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4 studied using 1H MAS NMR and 13C CP/MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nam Hee; Choi, Jae Hun; Lim, Ae Ran

    2014-12-01

    The structure and the phase transition temperatures of [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4 were determined using X-ray diffraction and DSC, respectively. The temperature dependence of chemical shifts and the spin-lattice relaxation time T1ρ in the rotating frame were measured for the 1H and 13C nuclei in [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4. From these results, it was observed that the structural change by chemical shifts does not occur with temperature. However, T1ρ for 1H and 13C in [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4 showed a minimum, and it is apparent that both T1ρ values are governed by the same tumbling motions. The activation energies of tumbling motions for 1H and 13C are nearly the same owing to the connection between CH3 and NH2 ions in the [NH2(CH3)2]+ group.

  15. Magic-angle-spinning NMR studies of zeolite SAPO-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freude, D.; Ernst, H.; Hunger, M.; Pfeifer, H.; Jahn, E.

    1988-01-01

    SAPO-5 was synthesized using triethylamine as template. Magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR of 1H, 27Al, 29Si and 31P was used to study the silicon incorporation into the framework and the nature of the Brønsted sites. 1H MAS NMR shows two types of bridging hydroxyl groups. 29Si MAS NMR indicates that silicon substitutes mostly for phosphorus and that there is a small amount of crystalline SiO 2 in the zeolite powder.

  16. NMR characterization and sorption behavior of agricultural and forest soil humic substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengliang; Berns, Anne E.; Séquaris, Jean-Marie; Klumpp, Erwin

    2010-05-01

    Humic substances are the predominant components of the organic matter in the terrestrial system, which are not only important for the physicochemical properties of soil but are also dominant factors for controlling the environmental behaviors and fates of some organic contaminants, such as hydrophobic compounds. Nonylphenol [4-(1-ethyl-1, 3 dimethylpentyl) phenol] (NP), a ubiquitous hydrophobic pollutant, has recently focused the attention owing to its endocrine disruptors property. Sorption behavior of NP on humic substances, which were isolated from agricultural and forest soils, was investigated by using the dialysis technique at room temperature. 14C-labeled NP was used to quantify the partitioning behavior. Humic substances were characterized by 13C Cross-Polarization/Magic-Angle-Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CP/MAS NMR). The results showed that the partition parameters of NP on various humic acids were slightly different. Relationships between partition coefficients and the functional groups of humic substances identified by CP/MAS NMR were analyzed.

  17. Synthesis and solid state NMR characterization of novel peptide/silica hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Werner, Mayke; Heil, Andreas; Rothermel, Niels; Breitzke, Hergen; Groszewicz, Pedro Braga; Thankamony, Aany Sofia; Gutmann, Torsten; Buntkowsky, Gerd

    2015-11-01

    The successful synthesis and solid state NMR characterization of silica-based organic-inorganic hybrid materials is presented. For this, collagen-like peptides are immobilized on carboxylate functionalized mesoporous silica (COOH/SiOx) materials. A pre-activation of the silica material with TSTU (O-(N-Succinimidyl)-N,N,N',N'-tetramethyluronium tetrafluoroborate) is performed to enable a covalent binding of the peptides to the linker. The success of the covalent immobilization is indicated by the decrease of the (13)C CP-MAS NMR signal of the TSTU moiety. A qualitative distinction between covalently bound and adsorbed peptide is feasible by (15)N CP-MAS Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP). The low-field shift of the (15)N signal of the peptide's N-terminus clearly identifies it as the binding site. The DNP enhancement allows the probing of natural abundance (15)N nuclei, rendering expensive labeling of peptides unnecessary. PMID:26411982

  18. Solid-state NMR studies of theophylline co-crystals with dicarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Pindelska, Edyta; Sokal, Agnieszka; Szeleszczuk, Lukasz; Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2014-11-01

    In this work, three polycrystalline materials containing co-crystals of theophylline with malonic, maleic, and glutaric acids were studied using (13)C, (15)N and (1)H solid-state NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. The NMR assignments were supported by gauge including projector augmented waves (GIPAW) calculations of chemical shielding, performed using X-ray determined geometry. The experimental (13)C cross polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR results and the calculated isotropic chemical shifts were in excellent agreement. A rapid and convenient method for theophylline co-crystals crystal structure analysis has been proposed for co-crystals, which are potentially new APIs. PMID:25194346

  19. 1H, 13C MAS NMR and GIAO-CPHF calculations of chloramphenicol, thiamphenicol and their pyrrole analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żołek, Teresa; Paradowska, Katarzyna; Krajewska, Dorota; Różański, Andrzej; Wawer, Iwona

    2003-02-01

    The 13C CP MAS and 1H MAS NMR and ab initio (GIAO-CPHF) calculations were used to obtain structural information on two known antibiotics: chloramphenicol, and thiamphenicol, and two new analogues: DL- threo-1-(1-methyl-4-nitro-pyrrole-2-yl)-2-dichloroacetamidopropane-1,3-diol and DL- threo-1-(1-methylsulfonylpyrrole-3-yl)-2-dichloroacetamidopropane-1,3-diol.

  20. Revealing Structural Details of SiCO Ceramics with GIPAW Calculations of Model Structures and Analysis of Experimental 29Si Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, John; Kroll, Peter

    2015-03-01

    The occurrence of the various SiCxO4-x (1 <=x <=4) mixed tetrahedra in silicon oxycarbide (SiCO) is often quantified by means of experimental 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance. The structural centers are assigned to individual peaks in the spectrum, which can be integrated to give the relative populations. Using a recently-developed method, we show that is is also possible to recover information on the connectivity of these tetrahedra. By combining a huge library of model structures an GIPAW calculations, we show that simple relations exist between the Si-O-Si linking angles and the 29Si NMR chemical shift. In this work, we perform detailed analyses of SiCO 29Si NMR spectra available in literature. We extract angular distributions in agreement with the experimental X-ray and neutron diffraction data. Furthermore, in glasses with large amounts of so-called ``free'' carbon, we observe a significant portion of the {Si}O4 tetrahedra which have disproportionately large angles. These angles indicate the presence of internal SiO2 surfaces or cages-like voids, similar to those found in zeolites or clathrates. This analysis suggests that in SiCO, the ``free'' carbon is incorporated into these voids, which produces strain on the bonding angles of the surrounding host glass.

  1. Microscopic control of 29Si nuclear spins near phosphorus donors in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvinen, J.; Zvezdov, D.; Ahokas, J.; Sheludyakov, S.; Vainio, O.; Lehtonen, L.; Vasiliev, S.; Fujii, Y.; Mitsudo, S.; Mizusaki, T.; Gwak, M.; Lee, SangGap; Lee, Soonchil; Vlasenko, L.

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate an efficient control of 29Si nuclear spins for specific lattice sites near 31P donors in silicon at temperatures below 1 K and in a high magnetic field of 4.6 T. Excitation of the forbidden electron-nuclear transitions leads to a pattern of well-resolved holes and peaks in the electron spin resonance (ESR) lines of 31P . The pattern originates from dynamic polarization (DNP) of the 29Si nuclear spins near the donors via the solid effect. DNP of 29Si is demonstrated also with the Overhauser effect where the allowed ESR transitions are excited. In this case mostly the remote 29Si nuclei having weak interaction with the donors are polarized, which results in a single hole and a sharp peak pair in the ESR spectrum. Our work shows that the solid effect can be used for initialization of 29Si nuclear spin qubits near the donors.

  2. Comparison of structure in solid state of new 1,5- bis(4-cyano-2,6-dimethoxyphenoxy)alkanes by means of 13C CP/MAS NMR and X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żabiński, Jerzy; Wolska, Irena; Maciejewska, Dorota

    2007-05-01

    The synthesis and structural studies in solid state of new 1,5- bis(4-cyano-2,6-dimethoxyphenoxy)-3-oxapentane 1 and 1,5- bis(4-cyano-2,6-methoxyphenoxy)pentane 2 are presented. The observed complicated network of intermolecular interaction with participation of nitrile groups could play a role in their interaction with the biological target. In vitro screen against 60 human tumor cell lines revealed that compound 1 has promising growth inhibitory power GI 50 against SR (leukemia) and HOP-92 (non-small lung cancer) equal to 4.33 ×10 -6 and 1.03 ×10 -5 M, respectively.

  3. Development of DNP-Enhanced High-Resolution Solid-State NMR System for the Characterization of the Surface Structure of Polymer Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horii, Fumitaka; Idehara, Toshitaka; Fujii, Yutaka; Ogawa, Isamu; Horii, Akifumi; Entzminger, George; Doty, F. David

    2012-07-01

    A dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced cross-polarization/magic-angle spinning (DNP/CP/MAS) NMR system has been developed by combining a 200 MHz Chemagnetics CMX-200 spectrometer operating at 4.7 T with a high-power 131.5 GHz Gyrotron FU CW IV. The 30 W sub-THz wave generated in a long pulse TE _{{41}}^{{(1)}} mode with a frequency of 5 Hz was successfully transmitted to the modified Doty Scientific low-temperature CP/MAS probe through copper smooth-wall circular waveguides. Since serious RF noises on NMR signals by arcing in the electric circuit of the probe and undesired sample heating were induced by the continuous sub-THz wave pulse irradiation with higher powers, the on-off sub-THz wave pulse irradiation synchronized with the NMR detection was developed and the appropriate setting of the irradiation time and the cooling time corresponding to the non-irradiation time was found to be very effective for the suppression of the arcing and the sample heating. The attainable maximum DNP enhancement was more than 30 folds for C1 13 C-enriched D-glucose dissolved in the frozen medium containing mono-radical 4-amino-TEMPO. The first DNP/CP/MAS 13 C NMR spectra of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) sub-micron particles were obtained at the dispersed state in the same frozen medium, indicating that DNP-enhanced 1H spins effectively diffuse from the medium to the PMMA particles through their surface and are detected as high-resolution 13 C spectra in the surficial region to which the 1H spins reach. On the basis of these results, the possibility of the DNP/CP/MAS NMR characterization of the surface structure of nanomaterials including polymer materials was discussed.

  4. Accelerating Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Analysis of Soil Organic Matter with Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normand, A. E.; Smith, A. N.; Long, J. R.; Reddy, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    13C magic angle spinning (MAS) solid state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (ssNMR) has become an essential tool for discerning the chemical composition of soil organic matter (SOM). However, the technique is limited due to the inherent insensitivity of NMR resulting in long acquisition times, especially for low carbon (C) soil. The pursuits of higher magnetic fields or concentrating C with hydrofluoric acid are limited solutions for signal improvement. Recent advances in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) have addressed the insensitivity of NMR. DNP utilizes the greater polarization of an unpaired electron in a given magnetic field and transfers that polarization to an NMR active nucleus of interest via microwave irradiation. Signal enhancements of up to a few orders of magnitude have been achieved for various DNP experiments. In this novel study, we conduct DNP 13C cross-polarization (CP) MAS ssNMR experiments of SOM varying in soil C content and chemical composition. DNP signal enhancements reduce the experiment run time allowing samples with low C to be analyzed in hours rather than days. We compare 13C CP MAS ssNMR of SOM with multiple magnetic field strengths, hydrofluoric acid treatment, and novel DNP approaches. We also explore DNP surface enhanced NMR Spectroscopy (SENP) to determine the surface chemistry of SOM. The presented results and future DNP MAS ssNMR advances will lead to further understanding of the nature and processes of SOM.

  5. Nuclear spin decoherence of neutral 31P donors in silicon: Effect of environmental 29Si nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Evan S.; Tyryshkin, A. M.; Morton, J. J. L.; Abe, E.; Tojo, S.; Itoh, K. M.; Thewalt, M. L. W.; Lyon, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    Spectral diffusion arising from 29Si nuclear spin flip-flops, known to be a primary source of electron spin decoherence in silicon, is also predicted to limit the coherence times of neutral donor nuclear spins in silicon. Here, the impact of this mechanism on 31P nuclear spin coherence is measured as a function of 29Si concentration using X -band pulsed electron nuclear double resonance. The 31P nuclear spin echo decays show that decoherence is controlled by 29Si flip-flops resulting in both fast (exponential) and slow (nonexponential) spectral diffusion processes. The decay times span a range from 100 ms in crystals containing 50% 29Si to 3 s in crystals containing 1% 29Si. These nuclear spin echo decay times for neutral donors are orders of magnitude longer than those reported for ionized donors in natural silicon. The electron spin of the neutral donors "protects" the donor nuclear spins by suppressing 29Si flip-flops within a "frozen core," as a result of the detuning of the 29Si spins caused by their hyperfine coupling to the electron spin.

  6. A study of the aging of silicone breast implants using 29Si, 1H relaxation and DSC measurements.

    PubMed

    Birkefeld, Anja Britta; Eckert, Hellmut; Pfleiderer, Bettina

    2004-08-01

    In this study 26 previously implanted silicone breast implants from the same manufacturer (Dow Corning) were investigated with two different analytical methods to characterize potential aging processes such as migration of monomer material from the gel and shell to local and distant sites, chemical alterations of the polymer, and infiltration of body compounds such as lipids. (1)H and (29)Si NMR relaxation measurements (spin-lattice, T1, and spin-spin, T2, relaxation times) were used to study the molecular dynamics of polysiloxane chains, both in gels and in shells. In addition, changes in physical properties were monitored by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results of these measurements indicate that NMR relaxation times are influenced by implant generation, implantation time, shell texture and implant status. (1)H T2 values of shells and gels show a tendency to increase with increasing implantation time, indicating higher mobility and possible disintegration of the polymer network of older implants. Furthermore, the data suggest that aging also involves the migration of low cyclic molecular weight (LMW) silicone and linear chain polymer material from the gels into the shells. The high "bleeding" rate of second-generation (G2) implants (implantation period around 1973-1985), exhibiting thin shells is reflected in reduced relaxation times of these devices, most likely due to a loss of low molecular weight fractions from the gels. Moreover, "gel bleeding" also influences the melting behavior observed in DSC studies. Increased shell rigidity (high Tm and Tg) tends to be correlated with longer (29)Si relaxation times of the corresponding gels, suggesting a reduced transfer of LMW silicones and linear chain polymer from the gel to the shell and to the outside. Remarkably, textured implants seem to be less susceptible to degradation processes than implants with thin shells. PMID:15046931

  7. Differential cross sections measurement of 28Si(p,p/γ)28Si and 29Si(p,p/γ)29Si reactions for PIGE applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokar, A.; Kakuee, O.; Lamehi-Rachti, M.

    2016-03-01

    Differential cross sections for gamma-ray emission from the 28Si(p,p/γ)28Si (Eγ = 1779 keV) and the 29Si(p,p/γ)29Si (Eγ = 1273 keV) nuclear reactions were measured in the energy range of 2.0-3.2 MeV and 2.0-3.0 MeV, respectively. The thin Si targets were prepared by evaporating natural SiO onto self-supporting Ag films. The gamma-rays and backscattered protons were detected simultaneously. An HPGe detector placed at an angle of 90° with respect to beam direction was employed to collect gamma-rays while an ion implanted Si detector placed at a scattering angle of 165° was used to detect backscattered protons. The great advantage of this work is that differential cross sections were obtained with a procedure irrespective of absolute value of the collected beam charge.

  8. Quantitative solid state NMR analysis of residues from acid hydrolysis of loblolly pine wood.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Carsten; Marzialetti, Teresita; Hoskins, Travis J C; Valenzuela Olarte, Mariefel B; Agrawal, Pradeep K; Jones, Christopher W

    2009-10-01

    The composition of solid residues from hydrolysis reactions of loblolly pine wood with dilute mineral acids is analyzed by (13)C Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning (CP MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Using this method, the carbohydrate and lignin fractions are quantified in less than 3h as compared to over a day using wet chemical methods. In addition to the quantitative information, (13)C CP MAS NMR spectroscopy provides information on the formation of additional extractives and pseudo lignin from the carbohydrates. Being a non-destructive technique, NMR spectroscopy provides unambiguous evidence of the presence of side reactions and products, which is a clear advantage over the wet chemical analytical methods. Quantitative results from NMR spectroscopy and proximate analysis are compared for the residues from hydrolysis of loblolly pine wood under 13 different conditions; samples were treated either at 150 degrees C or 200 degrees C in the presence of various acids (HCl, H(2)SO(4), H(3)PO(4), HNO(3) and TFA) or water. The lignin content determined by both methods differed on averaged by 2.9 wt% resulting in a standard deviation of 3.5 wt%. It is shown that solid degradation products are formed from saccharide precursors under harsh reaction conditions. These degradation reactions limit the total possible yield of monosaccharides from any subsequent reaction. PMID:19477123

  9. Combined experimental and computational NMR study of crystalline and amorphous zeolitic imidazolate frameworks.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Emma F; Bennett, Thomas D; Mellot-Draznieks, Caroline; Gervais, Christel; Blanc, Frédéric; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2015-10-14

    Zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) have attracted great interest in recent years due to their high chemical and thermal stability with promising applications in gas storage and separations. We investigate the structures of three different crystalline ZIFs - ZIF-4, ZIF-8, ZIF-zni - and their amorphous counterparts using high field (13)C and (15)N CP MAS NMR. The high field (20 T) allows for the observation of all crystallographically independent carbon and nitrogen atoms in the crystalline ZIFs. Combining our experimental results with density functional theory calculations enabled the assignment of all chemical shifts. The crystalline spectra reveal the potential of high field NMR to distinguish between two ZIF polymorphs, ZIF-4 and ZIF-zni, with identical [Zn(C3H3N2)2] chemical compositions. (13)C and (15)N CP MAS NMR data obtained for the amorphous ZIFs clearly showed signal broadening upon amorphization, confirming the retention of chemical composition and the structural similarity of amorphous ZIF-4 and ZIF-zni. In the case of amorphous ZIF-8, we present evidence for the partial de-coordination of the 2-methyl imidazole linker. PMID:26351979

  10. ¹³C solid-state NMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in solid drug formulations, Part I: Chemical shifts assignment.

    PubMed

    Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Zielińska-Pisklak, Monika Agnieszka; Szeleszczuk, Łukasz; Wawer, Iwona

    2016-04-15

    Solid-state NMR is an excellent and useful method for analyzing solid-state forms of drugs. In the (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra of the solid dosage forms many of the signals originate from the excipients and should be distinguished from those of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). In this work the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in the solid drug formulations: anhydrous α-lactose, α-lactose monohydrate, mannitol, sucrose, sorbitol, sodium starch glycolate type A and B, starch of different origin, microcrystalline cellulose, hypromellose, ethylcellulose, methylcellulose, hydroxyethylcellulose, sodium alginate, magnesium stearate, sodium laurilsulfate and Kollidon(®) were analyzed. Their (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra were recorded and the signals were assigned, employing the results (R(2): 0.948-0.998) of GIPAW calculations and theoretical chemical shifts. The (13)C ssNMR spectra for some of the studied excipients have not been published before while for the other signals in the spectra they were not properly assigned or the assignments were not correct. The results summarize and complement the data on the (13)C ssNMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients and are essential for further NMR studies of API-excipient interactions in the pharmaceutical formulations. PMID:26845204

  11. 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance study of URu2Si2 under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirer, K. R.; Dioguardi, A. P.; Bush, B. T.; Crocker, J.; Lin, C. H.; Klavins, P.; Cooley, J. C.; Maple, M. B.; Chang, K. B.; Poeppelmeier, K. R.; Curro, N. J.

    2016-01-01

    We report 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of single crystals and aligned powders of URu2Si2 under pressure in the hidden order and paramagnetic phases. We find that the Knight shift decreases with applied pressure, consistent with previous measurements of the static magnetic susceptibility. Previous measurements of the spin lattice relaxation time revealed a partial suppression of the density of states below 30 K. This suppression persists under pressure, and the onset temperature is mildly enhanced.

  12. Hydrocarbon-bridged polysiloxane and polysilsesquioxane network materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jamison, G.M.; Loy, D.A.; Assink, R.A.; Shea, K.J.

    1994-12-31

    Hexylene and phenylene-bridged polymethylsiloxane xerogels X-2 and X-4, respectively, were prepared by the sol-gel hydrolysis and condensation of 1, 6-bis(diethoxymethylsilyl)hexane 1 and 1, 4-bis(diethoxymethylsilyl)benzene 2 under acidic and basic conditions. These polymerizations afforded network polymers in the form of wet gels within several hours. The gels were processed to afford xerogels whose characteristics (determined by solid state {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si CP MAS NMR spectroscopy and nitrogen sorption porosimetry) were compared and contrasted with those of their analogous polysilsesquioxanes. {sup 29}Si CP MAS NMR indicates a high degree of hydrolysis and polycondensation; porosimetry measurements reveal that the materials have significant surface areas, save for the acid-catalyzed hexylene gels X-2.

  13. Hydrogen Bonds in Crystalline Imidazoles Studied by 15N NMR and ab initio MO Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Takahiro; Nagatomo, Shigenori; Masui, Hirotsugu; Nakamura, Nobuo; Hayashi, Shigenobu

    1999-07-01

    Intermolecular hydrogen bonds of the type N-H...N in crystals of imidazole and its 4-substituted and 4,5-disubstituted derivatives were studied by 15N CP/MAS NMR and an ab initio molecular orbital (MO) calculation. In the 15N CP/MAS NMR spectrum of each of the imidazole derivatives, two peaks due to the two different functional groups, >NH and =N-, were observed. The value of the 15N isotropic chemical shift for each nitrogen atom depends on both the length of the intermolecular hydrogen bond and the kind of the substituent or substituents. It was found that the difference between the experimen-tal chemical shifts of >NH and =N-varies predominantly with the hydrogen bond length but does not show any systematic dependence on the kind of substituent. The ab initio MO calculations suggest that the hydrogen bond formation influences the 15N isotropic chemical shift predominantly, and that the difference between the 15N isotropic chemical shift of >NH and =N-varies linearly with the hydrogen bond length.

  14. Optical hyperpolarization and inductive readout of 31P donor nuclei in natural abundance single crystal 29Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Thomas; Haas, Holger; Deshpande, Rahul; Gumann, Patryk; Cory, David

    2016-05-01

    We optically polarize and inductively detect 31P donor nuclei in single crystal silicon at high magnetic fields (6 . 7T). Samples include both natural abundance 29Si and an isotopically purified 28Si sample. We observe dipolar order in the 29Si nuclear spins through a spin-locking measurement. This provides a means of characterizing spin transport in the vicinity of the 31P donors.

  15. Applications of high resolution NMR to geochemistry: crystalline, glass, and molten silicates

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, E.

    1985-11-01

    The nuclear spin interactions and the associated quantum mechanical dynamics which are present in solid state NMR are introduced. A brief overview of aluminosilicate structure is presented and crystalline structure is then reviewed, with emphasis on the contributions made by /sup 29/Si NMR spectroscopy. The local structure of glass aluminosilicates as observed by NMR, is presented with analysis of the information content of /sup 29/Si spectra. A high-temperature (to 1300/sup 0/C) NMR spectroscopic investigation of the local environment and dynamics of molecular motion in molten aluminosilicates is described. A comparison is made of silicate liquid, glass, and crystalline local structure. The atomic and molecular motions present in a melt are investigated through relaxation time (T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/) measurements as a function of composition and temperature for /sup 23/Na and /sup 29/Si.

  16. Roles of chemically inequivalent N(CH3)4 ions in phase transition temperatures in [N(CH3)4]2CoCl4 by single-crystal NMR and MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2014-06-01

    The temperature dependences of the 1H and 13C spin-lattice relaxation time in the laboratory frame, T1, and in the rotating frame, T1ρ, in [N(CH3)4]2CoCl4 were measured by static nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR. In the ferroelastic phase, 1H T1ρ underwent molecular motion according to the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound theory. Two inequivalent ions, a-N(CH3)4 and b-N(CH3)4, were identified by 13C cross polarization (CP)/MAS NMR. On the basis of the 13C NMR results, the existence of two chemically inequivalent a-N(CH3)4 and b-N(CH3)4 ions in the ferroelectric phase and the existence of the ferroelastic twin structure of the N(CH3)4 ions in the ferroelastic phase were discussed.

  17. Sodium ion effect on silk fibroin conformation characterized by solid-state NMR and generalized 2D NMR NMR correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Qing-Xia; Zhou, Ping

    2008-07-01

    In the present work, we investigated Na + ion effect on the silk fibroin (SF) conformation. Samples are Na +-involved regenerated silk fibroin films. 13C CP-MAS NMR demonstrates that as added [Na +] increases, partial silk fibroin conformation transit from helix-form to β-form at certain Na + ion concentration which is much higher than that in Bombyx mori silkworm gland. The generalized two-dimensional NMR-NMR correlation analysis reveals that silk fibroin undergoes several intermediate states during its conformation transition process as [Na +] increase. The appearance order of the intermediates is followed as: helix and/or random coil → helix-like → β-sheet-like → β-sheet, which is the same as that produced by pH decrease from 6.8 to 4.8 in the resultant regenerated silk fibroin films. The binding sites of Na + to silk fibroin might involve the carbonyl oxygen atom of certain amino acids sequence which could promote the formation of β-sheet conformation. Since the Na +sbnd O bond is weak, the ability of Na + inducing the secondary structure transition is weaker than those of Ca 2+, Cu 2+ and even K +. It is maybe a reason why the sodium content is much lower than potassium in the silkworm gland.

  18. Structure analysis and spectroscopic characterization of 2-Fluoro-3-Methylpyridine-5-Boronic Acid with experimental (FT-IR, Raman, NMR and XRD) techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alver, Özgür; Dikmen, Gökhan

    2016-03-01

    Possible stable conformers, geometrical molecular structures, vibrational properties as well as band assignments, nuclear magnetic shielding tensors of 2-Fluoro-3-Methylpyridine-5-Boronic Acid (2F3MP5BA) were studied experimentally and theoretically using FT-IR, Raman, (CP/MAS) NMR and XRD spectroscopic methods. FT-IR and Raman spectra were evaluated in the region of 3500-400 cm-1, and 3200-400 cm-1, respectively. The optimized geometric structures, vibrational wavenumbers and nuclear magnetic shielding tensors were examined using Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) hybrid density functional theory method with 6-311++G(d, p) basis set. 1H, 13C NMR chemical shifts were calculated using the gauge invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. 1H, 13C, APT and HETCOR NMR experiments of title molecule were carried out in DMSO solution. 13C CP/MAS NMR measurement was done with 4 mm zirconium rotor and glycine was used as an external standard. Single crystal of 2F3MP5BA was also prepared for XRD measurements. Assignments of vibrational wavenumbers were also strengthened by calculating the total energy distribution (TED) values using scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) method.

  19. Synthesis of Long-T1 Silicon Nanoparticles for Hyperpolarized 29Si Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Tonya M.; Cassidy, Maja C.; Lee, Menyoung; Ganguly, Shreyashi; Marcus, Charles M.; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the synthesis, materials characterization and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of amorphous and crystalline silicon nanoparticles for use as hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agents. The particles were synthesized by means of a metathesis reaction between sodium silicide (Na4Si4) and silicon tetrachloride (SiCl4) and were surface functionalized with a variety of passivating ligands. The synthesis scheme results in particles of diameter ~10 nm with long size-adjusted 29Si spin lattice relaxation (T1) times (> 600 s), which are retained after hyperpolarization by low temperature DNP. PMID:23350651

  20. Optimized Spectral Editing of 13C MAS NMR Spectra of Rigid Solids Using Cross-Polarization Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangill, R.; Rastrupandersen, N.; Bildsoe, H.; Jakobsen, H. J.; Nielsen, N. C.

    Combinations of 13C magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments employing cross polarization (CP), cross polarization-depolarization (CPD), and cross polarization-depolarization-repolarization are analyzed quantitatively to derive simple and general procedures for optimized spectral editing of 13C CP/MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids by separation of the 13C resonances into CH n subspectra ( n = 0, 1, 2, and 3). Special attention is devoted to a differentiation by CPD/MAS of CH and CH 2 resonances since these groups behave quite similarly during spin lock under Hartmann-Hahn match and are therefore generally difficult to distinguish unambiguously. A general procedure for the design of subexperiments and linear combinations of their spectra to provide optimized signal-to-noise ratios for the edited subspectra is described. The technique is illustrated by a series of edited 13C CP/MAS spectra for a number of rigid solids ranging from simple organic compounds (sucrose and l-menthol) to complex pharmaceutical products (calcipotriol monohydrate and vitamin D 3) and polymers (polypropylene, polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinyl chloride, and polystyrene).

  1. Solid-state NMR analysis of coals and shales from the Mesaverde Group, Green River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.; MacGowan, D.B.

    1993-08-01

    Samples of coals and shales from the Almond Formation of the Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming were analyzed using solid-state {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques of cross polarization with magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS). The samples were taken from a present-day depth of burial ranging from {approximately}3,000 to {approximately}15,000 ft. In addition, CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR measurements were made on residues from the hydrous pyrolysis of Almond coal. The hydrous pyrolysis experiments were conducted isothermally for 72 hr in the temperature range of 290 to 360{degree}C (554 to 680{degree}F). In general, the maturation trends observed by NMR for the naturally and artificially matured samples were in agreement with results obtained from other geochemical analyses. The NMR spectra of the naturally matured shale samples showed only a small aliphatic component at depths greater than about 12,000 ft, indicating little capacity for hydrocarbon generation at depths greater than this. Vitrinite reflectance measurements placed the oil window at between 4,500 and 14,500 ft. NMR measurements of the hydrous pyrolysis residues showed a clear loss of aliphatic carbon, relative to the aromatic carbon, with temperature. For the residue obtained from the highest study temperature (360{degree}C/680{degree}F), there was a 60% depletion of the hydrocarbon-producing aliphatic components. The trends in loss of aliphatic carbon with temperature suggested a means of defining a geochemical transformation ratio in terms of the loss of the aliphatic carbon fraction. A good correlation was found between the NMR transformation ratio and the production index determined by Rock-Eval pyrolysis measurements.

  2. Study of the mechanism of diatom cell division by means of 29Si isotope tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audinot, J.-N.; Guignard, C.; Migeon, H.-N.; Hoffmann, L.

    2006-07-01

    Diatoms are delicate unicellular organisms enclosed in a silica frustule, that is made up of two valves. Multiplication of the diatoms occurs by ordinary mitotic cell division. During cell division each cell produces two daughter cells, each of them keeping one of the two valves of the mother cell and producing a new valve by absorbing the silicon present in the environment. The NanoSIMS 50 allows ion imaging to be performed on diatoms in order to determine the site of fixation of silicon. The aim of this study was to observe and compare the mechanism of the construction of the new valve after cell division. To this end, different types of diatoms have been transferred in a culture medium enriched with 29Si and after several days, the distribution of the different isotopes of silicon has been determined by NanoSIMS50 imaging. The construction of new valves has been observed and the isotopic ratio has been determined.

  3. Study of the ferroelastic phase transition in the tetraethylammonium compound [N(C2H5)4]2ZnBr4 by magic-angle spinning and static NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2016-03-01

    The ferroelastic phase transition of tetraethylammonium compound [N(C2H5)4]2ZnBr4 at the phase transition temperature (TC) = 283 K was characterized by magic-angle spinning (MAS) and static nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and confirmed by optical polarizing spectroscopy. The structural geometry near TC was studied in terms of the chemical shifts and the spin-lattice relaxation times T1ρ in the rotating frame for 1H MAS NMR and 13C cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR. The two inequivalent ethyl groups were distinguishable in the 13C NMR spectrum, and the T1ρ results indicate that they undergo tumbling motion above TC in a coupled manner. From the 14N NMR results, the two nitrogen nuclei in the N(C2H5)4+ ions were distinguishable above TC, and the splitting in the spectra below TC was related to the ferroelastic domains with different orientations.

  4. NMR Studies of the Li-Mg-N-H Phases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Robert; Reiter, J. W.; Kulleck, J. G.; Hwang, S.-J.; Luo, Weifang

    2007-03-01

    Solid state NMR including magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and cross-polarization (CP) MAS experiments have been used to characterize various amide and imide phases containing Li and/or Mg. MAS-NMR spectra for the ^1H, ^6Li, ^7Li, and ^15N nuclei have been obtained to improve understanding on formation, processing, and degradation behavior. Only limited information could be obtained from the proton and ^7Li MAS-NMR spectra to due large dipolar interactions and small chemical shifts. However, more success was obtained from the ^6Li and ^15N nuclei although their very long spin-lattice relaxation times did impact signal acquisition times. For example, three distinct ^6Li peaks were resolved from LiNH2 phases that were clearly separated from the LiH secondary phase in these samples. While the ^15N spectra for LiNH2 phase in isotopically enriched samples exhibited only a single peak at least three distinct ^15N peaks were observed from the similarly enriched Mg amide samples. These differences will be related to crystal structures. The NMR spectra also revealed very little motion in these hydrides upon to nearly 500 K.

  5. {sup 29}Si solid state NMR investigation of pozzolanic reaction occurring in lime-treated Ca-bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Pomakhina, Elena; Deneele, Dimitri; Gaillot, Anne-Claire; Paris, Michael; Ouvrard, Guy

    2012-04-15

    Lime is widely used as additive to improve the mechanical properties of natural soil used in earthworks. However, the physico-chemical mechanisms involved are yet not well understood. In order to develop and optimize this treatment method, a better understanding of the interaction between lime and the minerals of the soils, in particular clay minerals, is required. In this study, Ca-bentonite was treated with 2, 5 and 10 wt.% of lime during 1 to 98 days. Modifications in the Si local environment were then monitored by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance to investigate the pozzolanic reaction. All the soil mineral phases contribute to the release of Si and to the pozzolanic reaction, with a rapid and total consumption of Si-polymorph and an exacerbated dissolution of montmorillonite. Mechanism of C-S-H formation, function of the Ca content in the system, was found to match the sorosilicate-tobermorite model described in cement systems.

  6. The guest ordering and dynamics in urea inclusion compounds studied by solid-state 1H and 13C MAS NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaorong; Müller, Klaus

    2011-12-01

    Urea inclusion compounds with different guest species were studied by 13C CP MAS and 1H MAS NMR spectroscopy. It is possible to arrange the asymmetric guest species in three different ways: head-head, head-tail and tail-tail. 13C CP MAS NMR studies indicate that the preference arrangement is determined by the interaction strength of the end functional groups. 13C relaxation experiments are used to study the dynamic properties of urea inclusion compounds. 13C relaxation studies on urea inclusion compounds with n-alkane or decanoic acid show that the 13C T1 and 13C T1ρ values exhibit the position dependence towards the center of the chain, indicating internal chain mobility. The analysis of variable-temperature 13C T1ρ experiments on urea inclusion compounds with hexadecane and pentadecane, for the first time, suggests that chain fluctuations and lateral motion of n-alkane guests may contribute to the 13C T1ρ relaxation.

  7. Rapid solid-state NMR of deuterated proteins by interleaved cross-polarization from 1H and 2H nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjerring, Morten; Paaske, Berit; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Akbey, Ümit; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel sampling strategy, interleaving acquisition of multiple NMR spectra by exploiting initial polarization subsequently from 1H and 2H spins, taking advantage of their different T1 relaxation times. Different 1H- and 2H-polarization based spectra are in this way simultaneously recorded improving either information content or sensitivity by adding spectra. The so-called Relaxation-optimized Acquisition of Proton Interleaved with Deuterium (RAPID) 1H → 13C/ 2H → 13C CP/MAS multiple-acquisition method is demonstrated by 1D and 2D experiments using a uniformly 2H, 15N, 13C-labeled α-spectrin SH3 domain sample with all or 30% back-exchanged labile 2H to 1H. It is demonstrated how 1D 13C CP/MAS or 2D 13C- 13C correlation spectra initialized with polarization from either 1H or 2H may be recorded simultaneously with flexibility to be added or used individually for spectral editing. It is also shown how 2D 13C- 13C correlation spectra may be recorded interleaved with 2H- 13C correlation spectra to obtain 13C- 13C correlations along with information about dynamics from 2H sideband patterns.

  8. A Solid-State NMR Investigation of MQ Silicone Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, Sergey G; Volkov, Vitaly I; Tatarinova, Elena A; Muzafarov, Aziz M

    2013-01-01

    The structure of MQ copolymers of the general chemical formula [(CH3)3SiO0.5]m [SiO2]n was characterized by means of solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The MQ copolymers are highly branched polycyclic compounds (densely cross-linked nanosized networks). MQ copolymers were prepared by hydrolytic polycondensation in active medium. (29)Si NMR spectra were obtained by single pulse excitation (or direct polarization, DP) and cross-polarization (CP) (29)Si{(1)H} techniques in concert with MAS. It was shown that material consist of monofunctional M (≡SiO Si (CH3)3) and two types of tetrafunctional Q units: Q(4) ((≡SiO)4 Si) and Q(3) ((≡SiO)3 SiOH). Spin-lattice relaxation times T 1 measurements of (29)Si nuclei and analysis of (29)Si{(1)H} variable contact time signal intensities allowed us to obtain quantitative data on the relative content of different sites in copolymers. These investigations indicate that MQ copolymers represent dense structure with core and shell. PMID:23914072

  9. Effects of structural differences on the NMR chemical shifts in cinnamic acid derivatives: Comparison of GIAO and GIPAW calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeleszczuk, Łukasz; Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Zielińska-Pisklak, Monika; Wawer, Iwona

    2016-06-01

    In this article we report the results of combined theoretical and experimental structural studies on cinnamic acid derivatives (CADs), one of the main groups of secondary metabolites present in various medicinal plant species and food products of plant origin. The effects of structural differences in CADs on their spectroscopic properties were studied in detail by both: solid-state NMR and GIAO/GIPAW calculations. Theoretical computations were used in order to perform signal assignment in 13C CP/MAS NMR spectra of the cinnamic, o-coumaric, m-coumaric, p-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic, sinapic and 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acids, and to evaluate the accuracy of GIPAW and GIAO methodology.

  10. Calculation of inelastic electron-nucleus scattering form factors of 29Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, A. D.; Al-Dahan, N.; Sharrad, F. I.; Hossain, I.

    2014-08-01

    Inelastic electron scattering form factors for 29Si nucleus with total angular momentum and positive parity (Jπ) and excited energy (3/2+, 1.273 MeV; 5/2+, 2.028 MeV; 3/2+, 2.425 MeV and 7/2+, 4.079 MeV) have been calculated using higher energy configurations outside the sd-shell. The calculations of inelastic form factors up to the first- and second-order with and without core-polarization (CP) effects were compared with the available experimental data. The calculations of inelastic electron scattering form factors up to the first-order with CP effects are in agreement with the experimental data, excepted for states 3/2+(1.273 MeV) and 5/2+(2.028 MeV) and without this effect are failed for all states. Furthermore, the calculations of inelastic electron scattering form factors up to the second-order with CP effects are in agreement with the experimental data for 3/2+(1.273 MeV) and 5/2+(2.028 MeV).

  11. Silver-109 NMR spectroscopy of inorganic solids.

    PubMed

    Penner, Glenn H; Li, Wenli

    2004-09-01

    In this study the (109)Ag NMR spectra of the following solid inorganic silver-containing compounds were investigated: AgNO(3), AgNO(2), Ag(2)SO(4), Ag(2)SO(3), AgCO(3), Ag(3)PO(4), AgCl, AgBr, AgI, AgSO(3)CH(3), silver p-toluenesulfonate, NaAg(CN)(2), KAg(CN)(2), K(3)Ag(CN)(4), Me(4)NAgCl(2), silver diethylthiocarbamate, silver lactate, silver acetate, silver citrate, and bis[(N,N(1)-di-tert-butylformamidinato)silver(I)]. The magic angle spinning (MAS) spectra of all compounds were obtained. In some cases, when protons were available, the (1)H to (109)Ag cross-polarization (CP) technique was used to enhance the signal and shorten the experimental relaxation delay. It was possible to obtain slow MAS (or CP/MAS) or nonspinning spectra for 10 samples, allowing the determination of the principal components of the (109)Ag chemical shift (CS) tensors. The isotropic chemical shifts and the CS tensors are discussed in light of the available crystal structures. The need for an accepted standard for referencing (109)Ag chemical shifts and the use of AgSO(3)CH(3) as a CP setup sample are also discussed. PMID:15332810

  12. Multinuclear NMR approach to coal fly ash characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, D.A.

    1991-09-01

    This report describes the application of various nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to study the hydration kinetics and mechanisms, the structural properties, and the adsorption characteristics of coal fly ash. Coal fly ash samples were obtained from the Dave Johnston and Laramie River electric power generating plants in Wyoming. Hydrogen NMR relaxation times were measured as a function of time to observe the kinetics of hydration for the two coal fly ashes at different temperatures and water-to-cement ration. The kinetic data for the hydrated coal fly ashes were compared to the hydration of portland cement. The mechanism used to describe the kinetic data for the hydration of portland cement was applied, with reservation, to describe the hydration of the coal fly ashes. The results showed that the coal fly ashes differ kinetically from that of portland cement and from each other. Consequently, both coal fly ashes were judged to be poorer cementitious materials than portland cement. Carbon-13 NMR CP/MAS spectra were obtained for the anhydrous coal fly ashes in an effort to determine the type of organic species that may be present, either adsorbed on the surface or entrained.

  13. NMR study of ferroelastic phase transition of tetramethylammonium tetrabromocobaltate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran; Kim, Sun Ha

    2016-09-01

    Static and magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments were carried out on 1H, 13C, and 14N nuclei in order to understand the structural changes of the N(CH3)4 groups in [N(CH3)4]2CoBr4 near the ferroelastic phase transition temperature TC. The two chemically inequivalent N(CH3)4 groups were distinguished using 13C cross-polarization/(CP)MAS and 14N static NMR. The changes in chemical shifts, line intensities, and the spin-lattice relaxation time near TC can be correlated with the changing structural geometry, which underlies the phase transition. The 14N NMR spectra indicated a crystal symmetry change at TC, which is related to the ferroelastic domain with different orientations of the N(CH3)4 groups. The ferroelastic domain walls were confirmed by optical polarizing microscopy, and the wall orientations were described by the Sapriel theory. The transition to the ferroelastic phase was found to be related to the orientational ordering of the N(CH3)4 groups.

  14. The calculated magnetic, electronic and thermodynamic properties of Ce3Co29Si4B10 compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Jin-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Xu; Hu, Yao-Wen; Zhang, Guo-Hua; Cheng, Hai-Xia; Li, Lu; Qian, Ping

    2016-05-01

    The magnetic moment, lattice parameter and atom fraction coordinates for Ce3Co29Si4B10 are calculated by the first-principles GGA+U method, and the results indicate that the calculated and experimental values are basically accordant when U=2.6 eV. We study the interaction effect and orbital hybridization between Co and Ce atoms. The projected density of states at U=2.6 eV which provided by Co-2c, Ce-2b and Ce-4d sites are contrasted with else U values. Meanwhile the electron density of states for different sites and the distance between various atoms are exhibited. In addition, the thermodynamic properties of Ce3Co29Si4B10 are evaluated by using a series of interatomic pair potentials.

  15. ^13C Solid NMR Study of Devulcanization and Revulcanization of SBR Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, J.; Levin, V.; Isayev, A.; von Meerwall, E.

    1996-03-01

    As part of a larger effort in support of recycling of rubber-based composites, we have used ^13C CP-MAS NMR spectroscopy and relaxation to study molecular and segmental mobilities in styrene-butadiene random copolymers before and after sulfur crosslinking, after subsequent devulcanization using a thermal ultrasound technique, and following revulcanization. Tracking the cis-trans ratio indicates that overall network crosslink density increases during each of these steps, including devulcanization, which produces mesoscale network aggregates and substantial amounts of sol. This observation is confirmed by the transverse (T_2) relaxation times, which show that molecular/segmental mobilities monotonically decrease in the same sequence. Analysis of these effects requires the invocation of alterations in sulfur crosslinking, i.e. density, distribution, and functionality, including extensive cyclization. Measurements of the glass transition temperatures in melt, network, sol , and revulcanizate are in accord with this picture.

  16. Effect of plastic deformation on the magnetic properties and dislocation luminescence of isotopically enriched silicon {sup 29}Si:B

    SciTech Connect

    Koplak, O. V.; Shteynman, E. A.; Tereschenko, A. N.; Morgunov, R. B.

    2015-09-15

    A correlation between the temperature dependences of the D1-line intensity of dislocation luminescence and the magnetic moment of plastically deformed isotopically enriched crystals {sup 29}Si:B is found. It is established that the magnetic susceptibility of the deformed crystals obtained by integration of the spectra of electron spin resonance and the D1-line intensity undergo similar nonmonotonic variations with temperature varying in the range of 20–32 K.

  17. THE ROTATIONAL SPECTRA OF {sup 29}SiC{sub 2} AND {sup 30}SiC{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kokkin, D. L.; Bruenken, S.; Young, K. H.; Patel, N. A.; Gottlieb, C. A.; Thaddeus, P.; McCarthy, M. C.

    2011-10-01

    The rotational spectra of {sup 29}SiC{sub 2} and {sup 30}SiC{sub 2}, two silicon isotopic species of the abundant astronomical ring {sup 28}SiC{sub 2}, have been characterized in the millimeter band between 140 and 360 GHz in a low pressure discharge through SiH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, and Ar. Precise rotational and centrifugal distortion constants have been derived for both species by fitting a standard asymmetric top Hamiltonian to 38 a-type transitions of {sup 29}SiC{sub 2} and 35 of {sup 30}SiC{sub 2}; the data sets include transitions up to K{sub a} = 8 and at least J = 16. With these new measurements in hand, the most intense radio transitions of both species either have been measured or can now be predicted to better than 1 km s{sup -1} in equivalent radial velocity up to 500 GHz, more than adequate accuracy for spectral line identifications in circumstellar shells of evolved carbon stars such as IRC+10216 where SiC{sub 2} is conspicuous. More than 10 new lines of {sup 29}SiC{sub 2} and {sup 30}SiC{sub 2} have been identified between 295 and 354 GHz in the interferometric spectral line survey of IRC+10216 with the Submillimeter Array.

  18. Isotopic tracing (D, 18O and 29Si) to understand the alteration on historic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verney-Carron, Aurélie; Saheb, Mandana; Valle, Nathalie; Mangin, Denis; Remusat, Laurent; Loisel, Claudine

    2015-04-01

    In order to better preserve historic glasses, e.g. stained glass windows, the understanding of their alteration mechanisms and of what controls the kinetics corresponding to each process is required. The ancient stained glasses are characterized by thick alteration layers, continuous or as pits, that are cracked or lost. Therefore, if a passivating role of the alteration layer has been proved on some other kinds of glass (such as basaltic or nuclear glass) in aqueous medium, the issue can be addressed for low durable stained glass weathered in varying atmospheric conditions. The mechanism of alteration layer formation was first investigated by performing dynamic and static experiments on model medieval glasses altered with a solution doped in 29Si at different concentrations (or saturation degrees). Solid analyses were carried out by SIMS and solution by HR-ICP-MS. Medieval stained glass has mainly a potash-lime-silica composition with a low content in alumina. The alkaline and alkaline-earth elements have thus a modifier role in the glassy network. This structural difference compared to boro- or alumino-silicate glasses could induce differences in the alteration mechanisms. However, the analysis of the Si isotopic signature of the gel layer highlighted that diffusion, but also hydrolysis/condensation reactions, are also involved in the gel layer formation process, leading to a structural and textural reorganization. The second objective was to determine the kinetic role of the alteration layer, and especially to trace the circulation of water once the altered layer is formed. For that, ancient glasses were exposed to simulated rainfall events / drying periods cycles during 3 months by using a solution doped in D and 18O. NanoSIMS analyses have shown that the transport in the alteration layer is mainly driven by diffusion in the porosity despite the presence of cracks that could have been preferential ways of circulation. This demonstrates also a potential

  19. Probing silicon and aluminium chemical environments in silicate and aluminosilicate glasses by solid state NMR spectroscopy and accurate first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambuzzi, Elisa; Pedone, Alfonso; Menziani, Maria Cristina; Angeli, Frédéric; Caurant, Daniel; Charpentier, Thibault

    2014-01-01

    Silicon and aluminium chemical environments in silicate and aluminosilicate glasses with compositions 60SiO2·20Na2O·20CaO (CSN), 60SiO2·20Al2O3·20CaO (CAS), 78SiO2·11Al2O3·11Na2O (NAS) and 60SiO2·10Al2O3·10Na2O·20CaO (CASN) have been investigated by 27Al and 29Si solid state magic angle spinning (MAS) and multiple quantum MAS (MQMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. To interpret the NMR data, first-principles calculations using density functional theory were performed on structural models of these glasses. These models were generated by Shell-model molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The theoretical NMR parameters and spectra were computed using the gauge including projected augmented wave (GIPAW) method and spin-effective Hamiltonians, respectively. This synergetic computational-experimental approach offers a clear structural characterization of these glasses, particularly in terms of network polymerization, chemical disorder (i.e. Si and Al distribution in second coordination sphere) and modifier cation distributions. The relationships between the local structural environments and the 29Si and 27Al NMR parameters are highlighted, and show that: (i) the isotropic chemical shift of both 29Si and 27Al increases of about +5 ppm for each Al added in the second sphere and (ii) both the 27Al and 29Si isotropic chemical shifts linearly decrease with the reduction of the average Si/Al-O-T bond angle. Conversely, 27Al and 29Si NMR parameters are much less sensitive to the connectivity with triple bridging oxygen atoms, precluding their indirect detection from 27Al and 29Si NMR.

  20. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: [sup 13]C-NMR analysis of CONSOL THF-soluble residual materials from the Wilsonville coal liquefaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Solum, M.S.; Pugmire, R.J. )

    1992-11-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using CP/MAS [sup 13]C-NMR spectroscopy for the chemical structural examination of distillation resid materials derived from direct coal liquefaction. A set of twelve carbon skeletal-structure parameters and eight molecular structural descriptors were derived from the NMR data. The technique was used previously to determine these parameters for coal and char, and in the construction of a coal pyrolysis model. The method was applied successfully to the tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble portion of eleven 850[degrees]F[sup +] distillation resids and one 850[degrees]F[sup +] distillation resid which contained ash and insoluble organic material (IOM). The results of this study demonstrate that this analytical method can provide data for construction of a model of direct coal liquefaction. Its further development and use is justified based on these results.

  1. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: {sup 13}C-NMR analysis of CONSOL THF-soluble residual materials from the Wilsonville coal liquefaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Solum, M.S.; Pugmire, R.J.

    1992-11-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using CP/MAS {sup 13}C-NMR spectroscopy for the chemical structural examination of distillation resid materials derived from direct coal liquefaction. A set of twelve carbon skeletal-structure parameters and eight molecular structural descriptors were derived from the NMR data. The technique was used previously to determine these parameters for coal and char, and in the construction of a coal pyrolysis model. The method was applied successfully to the tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble portion of eleven 850{degrees}F{sup +} distillation resids and one 850{degrees}F{sup +} distillation resid which contained ash and insoluble organic material (IOM). The results of this study demonstrate that this analytical method can provide data for construction of a model of direct coal liquefaction. Its further development and use is justified based on these results.

  2. Substitution of Si in SAPO-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingqiao; Liu, Xinsheng; Song, Tianyou; Hu, Jianzhi; Qiu, Jianqing

    1989-04-01

    A series of SAPO-5 samples with different numbers of silicon atoms are investigated by chemical analysis, XRD and CP/MAS NMR. The results indicate that the lines at about -102 and -110 ppm observed in the 29Si NMR spectra of the SAPO-5 samples are due to the non-framework silicon phase which is structurally similar to the synthesis gel. The corrected framework compositions of SAPO-5 samples strongly suggest that Si is only substituted by framework P (case 2). Si simultaneously substituted by both framework P and Al (case 3) is unlikely.

  3. Interactions of bupivacaine with a molecularly imprinted polymer in a monolithic format studied by NMR.

    PubMed

    Courtois, Julien; Fischer, Gerd; Schauff, Siri; Albert, Klaus; Irgum, Knut

    2006-01-15

    A trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate-based monolith of dimensions carefully chosen to fit exactly in a standard 4-mm solid-state CP/MAS NMR rotor was photopolymerized and subsequently molecularly imprinted with bupivacaine using a grafting protocol with methacrylic acid and ethylene dimethacrylate as monomers. As no crushing or grinding of the monolith was necessary, additional unspecific surface area was not created. This procedure ascertains that differences observed between imprinted and nonimprinted polymers are due only to graft imprinted surfaces and give therefore better results in NMR spectroscopy due to less unspecific interactions between analyte and monolith. This improves the comparability to chromatographic evaluations where uncrushed monolithic columns are also used. To track interactions between analyte and stationary phase, the saturation transfer difference (STD) technique was applied on the polymer in the suspended state using the same solvent as in the chromatographic evaluation. This relatively new NMR method has to our knowledge not been used on chromatographic materials before. By using STD NMR on pristine monoliths, it was possible to measure large differences between the imprinted or nonimprinted polymers and the analyte indicating significant differences in the interaction mechanisms. These could be directly correlated with retention differences observed in chromatographic evaluations. PMID:16408943

  4. Analysis of the bond-valence method for calculating (29) Si and (31) P magnetic shielding in covalent network solids.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Sean T; Alkan, Fahri; Iuliucci, Robbie J; Mueller, Karl T; Dybowski, Cecil

    2016-07-01

    (29) Si and (31) P magnetic-shielding tensors in covalent network solids have been evaluated using periodic and cluster-based calculations. The cluster-based computational methodology employs pseudoatoms to reduce the net charge (resulting from missing co-ordination on the terminal atoms) through valence modification of terminal atoms using bond-valence theory (VMTA/BV). The magnetic-shielding tensors computed with the VMTA/BV method are compared to magnetic-shielding tensors determined with the periodic GIPAW approach. The cluster-based all-electron calculations agree with experiment better than the GIPAW calculations, particularly for predicting absolute magnetic shielding and for predicting chemical shifts. The performance of the DFT functionals CA-PZ, PW91, PBE, rPBE, PBEsol, WC, and PBE0 are assessed for the prediction of (29) Si and (31) P magnetic-shielding constants. Calculations using the hybrid functional PBE0, in combination with the VMTA/BV approach, result in excellent agreement with experiment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27117609

  5. Sensitivity enhancement of 29Si double-quantum dipolar recoupling spectroscopy by Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill acquisition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, M.; Madhu, P. K.; Dittmer, J.; Nielsen, N. C.; Ganapathy, S.

    2009-08-01

    An enhancement in the detection sensitivity of dipolar recoupled 29Si double-quantum magic-angle spinning experiment is shown with a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) train of π pulses during the acquisition period. Symmetry-adapted pulse schemes, such as POST-C7 and SR26411, are used for the double-quantum excitation. Application of POST-C7-CPMG method for framework characterisation is demonstrated in the disordered and catalytically important ZSM-5 molecular sieve. Based on the observed double-quantum dipole-dipole correlations and the known T-site Si connectivities, the assignment of all the signals is made for the orthorhombic phase of the as-synthesised (CN form) material.

  6. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement solid-state NMR studies of heterogeneous catalytic reaction over HY zeolite using natural abundance reactant.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Li, Shenhui; Su, Yongchao; Li, Bojie; Deng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement solid-state NMR (PRE ssNMR) technique was used to investigate catalytic reaction over zeolite HY. After introducing paramagnetic Cu(II) ions into the zeolite, the enhancement of longitudinal relaxation rates of nearby nuclei, i.e.(29)Si of the framework and (13)C of the absorbents, was measured. It was demonstrated that the PRE ssNMR technique facilitated the fast acquisition of NMR signals to monitor the heterogeneous catalytic reaction (such as acetone to hydrocarbon) using natural abundance reactants. PMID:25616847

  7. Solid-state NMR study of fluorinated steroids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai-Jay; Lin, Su-Ching; Huang, Shing-Jong; Ching, Wei-Min; Hung, Chen-Hsiung; Tzou, Der-Lii M

    2014-02-01

    Solid-state {(1)H}(13)C cross-polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR spectroscopy was performed to analyze two fluorinated steroids, i.e., betamethasone (BMS) and fludrocortisone acetate (FCA), that have fluorine attached to C9, as well as two non-fluorinated analogs, i.e., prednisolone (PRD) and hydrocortisone 21-acetate (HCA). The (13)C signals of BMS revealed multiplet patterns with splittings of 16-215Hz, indicating multiple ring conformations, whereas the (13)C signals of FCA, HCA, and PRD exhibited only singlet patterns, implying a unique conformation. In addition, BMS and FCA exhibited substantial deviation (>3.5ppm) in approximately half of the (13)C signals and significant deviation (>45ppm) in the (13)C9 signal compared to PRD and HCA, respectively. In this study, we demonstrate that fluorinated steroids, such as BMS and FCA, have steroidal ring conformation(s) that are distinct from non-fluorinated analogs, such as PRD and HCA. PMID:24316163

  8. Variable temperature NMR characterization of α-glycine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R. E.; Dybowski, C.

    2008-10-01

    Proton NMR spin-lattice relaxation times in the laboratory frame ( T1) and in the rotating frame ( T1ρ) were measured as a function of temperature for a static sample of α-glycine. Both T1 and T1ρ data can be fit quantitatively by a single thermally-activated motion (the modulation of the dipolar coupling by random hopping about the threefold axis of the -NH 3 group), with no addition of other mechanisms at any temperature between 173 and 415 K. An activation energy of 21.7 ± 1 kJ/mol was extracted and is compared with previously reported values for both α- and γ-glycine. Such comparisons allow the correction of glycine polymorphs misidentified in the literature. The minimum in T1 at 325 K corresponds to a correlation time of 0.53 ns. Chemical shifts as a function of temperature were measured by 1H CRAMPS and by 13C and 15N CP/MAS experiments. These results are discussed relative to a previous report of anomalous electrical behavior in α-glycine within this temperature range.

  9. EXAFS and DFT study of the cadmium and lead adsorption on modified silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Arce, Valeria B; Gargarello, Romina M; Ortega, Florencia; Romañano, Virginia; Mizrahi, Martín; Ramallo-López, José M; Cobos, Carlos J; Airoldi, Claudio; Bernardelli, Cecilia; Donati, Edgardo R; Mártire, Daniel O

    2015-12-01

    Silica nanoparticles of 7 nm diameter were modified with (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTES) and characterized by CP-MAS (13)C and (29)Si NMR, FTIR, zeta potential measurements, and thermogravimetry. The particles were shown to sorb successfully divalent lead and cadmium ions from aqueous solution. Lead complexation with these silica nanoparticles was clearly confirmed by EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) with synchrotron light measurements. Predicted Pb-N and Pb-C distances obtained from quantum-chemical calculations are in very good agreement with the EXAFS determinations. The calculations also support the higher APTES affinity for Pb(2+) compared to Cd(2+). PMID:26135536

  10. Synthesis and chemical functionalization of high surface area dendrimer-based xerogels and their use as new catalyst supports

    SciTech Connect

    Kriesel, J.W.; Tilley, T.D.

    2000-04-01

    Second- and third-generation alkoxysilyl-terminated carbosilane dendrimers have been used as building blocks for the synthesis of high surface area xerogels, which were characterized by {sup 29}Si CP MAS NMR spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption/desorption porosimetry, IR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These gels were shown to be very selective and significantly more active (in terms of yield and initial rate) than the Shell catalyst derived from treatment of silica with Ti(O{sup i}Pr){sub 4}.

  11. Formation of p-cresol:piperazine complex in solution monitored by spin-lattice relaxation times and pulsed field gradient NMR diffusion measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Carvalho, Erika Martins; Velloso, Marcia Helena Rodrigues; Tinoco, Luzineide Wanderley; Figueroa-Villar, José Daniel

    2003-10-01

    A study of the nature of the anthelmintic p-cresol:piperazine complex in chloroform solution has been conducted using different NMR techniques: self-diffusion coefficients using DOSY; NOE, NULL, and double-selective T1 measurements to determine inter-molecular distances; and selective and non-selective T1 measurements to determine correlation times. The experimental results in solution and CP-MAS were compared to literature X-ray diffraction data using molecular modeling. It was shown that the p-cresol:piperazine complex exists in solution in a very similar manner as it does in the solid state, with one p-cresol molecule hydrogen bonded through the hydroxyl hydrogen to each nitrogen atom of piperazine. The close correspondence between the X-ray diffraction data and the inter-proton distances obtained by NULL and double selective excitation techniques indicate that those methodologies can be used to determine inter-molecular distances in solution.

  12. Moving NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico; Danieli, Ernesto; Gong, Qingxia; Greferath, Marcus; Haber, Agnes; Kolz, Jürgen; Perlo, Juan

    2008-12-01

    Initiated by the use of NMR for well logging, portable NMR instruments are being developed for a variety of novel applications in materials testing and process analysis and control. Open sensors enable non-destructive testing of large objects, and small, cup-size magnets become available for high throughput analysis by NMR relaxation and spectroscopy. Some recent developments of mobile NMR are reviewed which delineate the direction into which portable NMR is moving.

  13. Solid-state distortions of nominally square-planar palladium and platinum (R sub 3 P) sub 2 MX sub 2 complexes as determined by a combination of sup 13 C( sup 1 H) and sup 31 P( sup 31 H) NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rahn, J.A.; Nelson, J.H. ); O'Donnell, D.J.; Pamer, A.R. )

    1989-06-28

    Phosphorus-31 and carbon-13 NMR spectra have been obtained for a series of 20 (R{sub 3}P){sub 2}MX{sub 2} complexes (R{sub 3}P = MePh{sub 2}P and Me{sub 2}PhP; M = Pd, Pt; X = Cl, Br, I, CN, N{sub 3}) in the solid state by cross-polarization and magic-angle-spinning (CP/MAS) techniques. Comparison of these data with spectral data obtained at 300 K in CDCl{sub 3} solutions was made in order to investigate the influence of local symmetry on {sup 31}P and {sup 13}C chemical shifts in the solid state. It was found that most of these compounds, which have regular square-planar geometries in solution, are distorted in the solid state. The solid-state distortions are evidenced by additional {sup 31}P and {sup 13}C resonances in the CP/MAS spectra as compared to the solution spectra. The nature and degree of these distortions are discussed. 25 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Structure and dynamics of homoleptic beryllocenes: a solid-state 9Be and 13C NMR study.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ivan; Macdonald, Charles L B; Schurko, Robert W

    2004-11-19

    The correlation between anisotropic 9Be NMR (quadrupolar and chemical shielding) interactions and the structure and dynamics in [Cp2Be], [Cp2*Be], and [(C5Me4H)2Be] is examined by solid-state 9Be NMR spectroscopy, as well as by ab initio and hybrid density functional theory calculations. The 9Be quadrupole coupling constants in the three compounds correspond well to the relative degrees of spherical ground-state electronic symmetry of the environment about beryllium. Theoretical computations of NMR interaction tensors are in excellent agreement with experimental values and aid in understanding the origins of NMR interaction tensors and their correlation to molecular symmetry. Variable-temperature (VT) 9Be and 13C NMR experiments reveal a highly fluxional structure in the condensed phase of [Cp2Be]. In particular, the pathway by which the Cp rings of [Cp2Be] 'invert' coordination modes is examined in detail using hybrid density functional theory in order to inspect variations of the 9Be NMR interaction tensors. The activation energy for the 'inversion' process is found to be 36.9 kJ mol(-1) from chemical exchange analysis of 13C VT CP/MAS NMR spectra. The low-temperature (ca. -100 degrees C) X-ray crystal structures of all three compounds have been collected and refined, and are in agreement with previously reported structures. In addition, the structure of the same Cp2Be crystal was determined at 20 degrees C and displays features consistent with increased intramolecular motion, supporting observations by 9Be VT NMR spectroscopy. PMID:15484199

  15. The nature and fate of natural resins in the geosphere - VIII - NMR and Py-GC-MS characterization of soluble labdanoid polymers isolated from holocene class I resins.

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, D. J.; Hatcher, P. G.; Botto, R. E.; Muntean, J. V.; Michaels, B.; Anderson, K. B.; Chemistry; Pennsylvania State Univ.; Amoco Oil Co.

    1997-01-01

    Soluble polylabdanoids isolated by sequential solvent extraction have been characterized by liquid-state {sup 13}C- and {sup 1}H NMR and {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H HMQC (heteronuclear correlation) NMR spectroscopy in addition to solid-state NMR and Py-GC-MS techniques. Two Holocene resins originating from Santander, Colombia and Mombasa, Kenya were analyzed. Soluble polymers were isolated by extraction with a 1:1 (v/v) methylene chloride-methanol mixture following sequential extractions with methylene chloride and methanol. The molecular weight of polymer extracts was shown by GPC analyses to exceed that of non-polymeric occluded terpenoids. Py-GC-MS, solid-state {sup 13}C CP/MAS and {sup 13}C cross-polarization/depolarization NMR spectroscopy results indicated that chemical compositions of soluble polymers isolated from immature resins are highly representative of the structure of corresponding insoluble polymers, i.e. polylabdatrienes. These data provide evidence for cross-linking or cyclization of side-chain olefinic carbons during or shortly after polymerization. Generally, the characterization of soluble resin polymers by liquid-state NMR spectroscopy has proven to be an excellent means for investigating the maturation mechanism of polylabdanoid resinites, and has potential for furthering the application of Class I resinites as geothermal indicators.

  16. Calcium silicate hydrates investigated by solid-state high resolution {sup 1}H and {sup 29}Si nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Meducin, Fabienne . E-mail: meducin@cnrs-orleans.fr; Bresson, Bruno; Lequeux, Nicolas; Noirfontaine, Marie-Noelle de; Zanni, Helene

    2007-05-15

    This work focuses on phases formed during cement hydration under high pressure and temperature: portlandite Ca(OH){sub 2} (CH); hillebrandite Ca{sub 2}(SiO{sub 3})(OH){sub 2} ({beta}-dicalcium silicate hydrate); calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H); jaffeite Ca{sub 6}(Si{sub 2}O{sub 7})(OH){sub 6} (tricalcium silicate hydrate); {alpha}-C{sub 2}SH Ca{sub 2}(SiO{sub 3})(OH){sub 2} ({alpha}-dicalcium silicate hydrate); xonotlite Ca{sub 6}(Si{sub 6}O{sub 17})(OH){sub 2} and kilchoanite Ca{sub 6}(SiO{sub 4})(Si{sub 3}O{sub 10}). Portlandite and hillebrandite were synthesized and characterised by high resolution solid-state {sup 1}H and {sup 29}Si Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. In addition, information from the literature concerning the last five phases was gathered. In certain cases, a schematic 3D-structure could be determined. These data allow identification of the other phases present in a mixture. Their morphology was also observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy.

  17. Solid state NMR of SiO 2 nanotube coated ammonium tartrate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, A. R.; Schueneman, G. T.; Novak, B. M.

    1999-04-01

    Ammonium tartrate crystal and SiO 2 nanotube coated ammonium tartrate crystal were studied by 13C CP/MAS NMR, and the structure of two samples were verified using the 13C NMR spectrum. The spin-lattice relaxation times for the carbons in the rotating frame, T1 ρ, have been measured as a function of temperature. All relaxation times of the carbons in the two materials undergo slow motions, i.e. motions on the slow side of the T1 ρ minimum. From these relaxation times, we determine the activation energy for the ammonium tartrate crystal and SiO 2 nanotube coated ammonium tartrate crystal, respectively. The activation energies for the SiO 2 nanotube coated ammonium tartrate crystal were found to be generally higher than those of ammonium tartrate crystal. We think that the higher activation energy for the hydrocarbon in the SiO 2 nanotube coated ammonium tartrate crystal is because of the bonding between the oxygen in the SiO 2 nanotube and the hydroxyl group of the ammonium tartrate crystal.

  18. NMR Studies of Spin Decoherence in Phosphorus-doped Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Dementyev, A. E.; Liu, M.; Barrett, S. E.

    2002-03-01

    Understanding nuclear spin dynamics in Si:P is an important step(B.E. Kane, quant-ph/0003031.) towards the realization of semiconductor spin-based qubits(B.E. Kane, Nature 393, 133 (1998).). We present measurements of NMR spectra and relaxation times for both ^29Si and ^31P, in fields up to 15.3 Tesla. Our progress towards Optically Pumped Nuclear Magnetic Resonance(A.E. Dementyev, P.Khandelwal, N.N. Kuzma, S.E. Barrett, L.N. Pfeiffer, K.W.West, Solid State Commun. 119, 217 (2001).) (OPNMR) of Si:P will be described.

  19. Structural and dynamic characterization of Li(12)Si(7) and Li(12)Ge(7) using solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Dupke, Sven; Langer, Thorsten; Pöttgen, Rainer; Winter, Martin; Eckert, Hellmut

    2012-04-01

    Local environments and lithium ion dynamics in the binary lithium silicide Li(12)Si(7), and the analogous germanium compound have been characterized by detailed (6)Li, (7)Li, and (29)Si variable temperature static and magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments. In the MAS-NMR spectra, individual lithium sites are generally well-resolved at temperatures below 200K, whereas at higher temperatures partial site averaging is observed on the kHz timescale. The observed lithium chemical shift ranges of up to 60 ppm indicate a significant amount of electronic charge stored on the lithium species, consistent with the expectation of the extended Zintl-Klemm-Bussmann concept used for the theoretical description of lithium silicides. Furthermore the strongly diamagnetic chemical shifts observed for the lithium ions situated directly above the five-membered Si(5) rings suggest the possibility of aromatic ring currents in these structural elements. This assignment is confirmed further by (29)Si{(7)Li} CPMAS-heteronuclear correlation experiments. The (29)Si MAS-NMR spectra of Li(12)Si(7), aided by 2-D J-resolved spectroscopy, are well suited for differentiating between the individual sites within the silicon framework, while further detailed connectivity information is available on the basis of 2-D INADEQUATE and radio frequency driven recoupling (RFDR) spectra. Variable temperature static (7)Li NMR spectra reveal the onset of strong motional narrowing effects, illustrating high lithium ionic mobilities in both of these compounds. PMID:21996453

  20. Interactions between Nafion resin and protonated dodecylamine modified montmorillonite: a solid state NMR study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limin; Xu, Jun; Hou, Guangjin; Tang, Huiru; Deng, Feng

    2007-07-01

    A series of nanocomposites have been prepared from perfluorosulfonylfluoride copolymer resin (Nafion) and layered montmorillonite (MMT) modified with protonated dodecylamine by conventional sol-gel intercalation. The structure of these nanocomposite materials have been characterized using FT-IR, elemental analysis, XRD and solid state NMR techniques, including 19F magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR, 19F NMR relaxation time measurements, 29Si MAS, 1H MAS, 1H-13C cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CPMAS), and 1H-13C heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) 2D NMR. The results showed that thermal stability of Nafion was improved moderately by the addition of dodecylamine modified MMT without intercalation. FT-IR and 29Si MAS NMR results indicated that dodecylamine modification did not result in obvious changes in the MMT lattice structure. The XRD results showed that the protonated dodecylamine has been embedded and intercalated into the MMT interlayers, whereas Nafion was not. Elemental analysis results also suggested that some dodecylamine was adsorbed on the surface of MMT. 1H-13C HETCOR 2D NMR experiment clearly indicated that strong electrostatic interactions were present between the NH+3 group of dodecylamine and the fluorine-containing groups (CF3, OCF2, and SCF2) of Nafion resin. Such electrostatic interactions are probably the major contributors for the improved thermal stability of the resultant composite materials. PMID:17382953

  1. Hydration properties of regioselectively etherified celluloses monitored by 2H and 13C solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Flemming H; Schöbitz, Michael; Schaller, Jens

    2012-06-20

    The hydration properties of 2,3-O-hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) and 2,3-O-hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) were analyzed by multi-nuclear solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy. By 13C single-pulse (SP) MAS and cross-polarization (CP) MAS NMR, differences between the immobile regions and all parts of the polysaccharides were detected as a function of hydration. Complementary information about the water environments was observed by 2H MAS NMR. By this approach it was demonstrated that side chains in 2,3-O-HPC and 2,3-O-HEC were easier to hydrate than the cellulose backbone. Furthermore the motion of water was more restricted (slower) in 2,3-O-HPC than in 2,3-O-HEC. For both polysaccharides the hydration could be explained by a two-step process: in step one increased ordering of the immobile regions occurs after which the entire polymer is hydrated in step two. PMID:24750769

  2. (13)C, (15)N CPMAS NMR and GIAO DFT calculations of stereoisomeric oxindole alkaloids from Cat's Claw (Uncaria tomentosa).

    PubMed

    Paradowska, Katarzyna; Wolniak, Michał; Pisklak, Maciej; Gliński, Jan A; Davey, Matthew H; Wawer, Iwona

    2008-11-01

    Oxindole alkaloids, isolated from the bark of Uncaria tomentosa [Willd. ex Schult.] Rubiaceae, are considered to be responsible for the biological activity of this herb. Five pentacyclic and two tetracyclic alkaloids were studied by solid-state NMR and theoretical GIAO DFT methods. The (13)C and (15)N CPMAS NMR spectra were recorded for mitraphylline, isomitraphylline, pteropodine (uncarine C), isopteropodine (uncarine E), speciophylline (uncarine D), rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline. Theoretical GIAO DFT calculations of shielding constants provide arguments for identification of asymmetric centers and proper assignment of NMR spectra. These alkaloids are 7R/7S and 20R/20S stereoisomeric pairs. Based on the (13)C CP MAS chemical shifts the 7S alkaloids (delta C3 70-71ppm) can be easily and conveniently distinguished from 7R (deltaC3 74.5-74.9ppm), also 20R (deltaC20 41.3-41.7ppm) from the 20S (deltaC20 36.3-38.3ppm). The epiallo-type isomer (3R, 20S) of speciophylline is characterized by a larger (15)N MAS chemical shift of N4 (64.6ppm) than the allo-type (3S, 20S) of isopteropodine (deltaN4 53.3ppm). (15)N MAS chemical shifts of N1-H in pentacyclic alkaloids are within 131.9-140.4ppm. PMID:19019638

  3. 15N NMR investigation of the reduction and binding of TNT in an aerobic bench scale reactor simulating windrow composting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Pennington, J.C.; Hayes, C.A.

    2002-01-01

    T15NT was added to a soil of low organic carbon content and composted for 20 days in an aerobic bench scale reactor. The finished whole compost and fulvic acid, humic acid, humin, and lignocellulose fractions extracted from the compost were analyzed by solid-state CP/MAS and DP/MAS 15N NMR. 15N NMR spectra provided direct spectroscopic evidence for reduction of TNT followed by covalent binding of the reduced metabolites to organic matter of the composted soil, with the majority of metabolite found in the lignocellulose fraction, by mass also the major fraction of the compost. In general, the types of bonds formed between soil organic matter and reduced TNT amines in controlled laboratory reactions were observed in the spectra of the whole compost and fractions, confirming that during composting TNT is reduced to amines that form covalent bonds with organic matter through aminohydroquinone, aminoquinone, heterocyclic, and imine linkages, among others. Concentrations of imine nitrogens in the compost spectra suggestthat covalent binding bythe diamines 2,4DANT and 2,6DANT is a significant process in the transformation of TNT into bound residues. Liquid-phase 15N NMR spectra of the fulvic acid and humin fractions provided possible evidence for involvement of phenoloxidase enzymes in covalent bond formation.

  4. A study of conformational stability of poly(L-alanine), poly(L-valine), and poly(L-alanine)/poly(L-valine) blends in the solid state by (13)C cross-polarization/magic angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Murata, Katsuyoshi; Kuroki, Shigeki; Kimura, Hideaki; Ando, Isao

    2002-06-01

    13C cross-polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR and (1)H T(1rho) experiments of poly(L-alanine) (PLA), poly(L-valine) (PLV), and PLA/PLV blends have been carried out in order to elucidate the conformational stability of the polypeptides in the solid state. These were prepared by adding a trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) solution of the polymer with a 2.0 wt/wt % of sulfuric acid (H(2)SO(4)) to alkaline water. From these experimental results, it is clarified that the conformations of PLA and PLV in their blends are strongly influenced by intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions that cause their miscibility at the molecular level. PMID:11948439

  5. Inherent interface defects in thermal (211)Si/SiO{sub 2}:{sup 29}Si hyperfine interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Iacovo, Serena E-mail: andre.stesmans@fys.kuleuven.be; Stesmans, Andre E-mail: andre.stesmans@fys.kuleuven.be

    2014-10-21

    Low temperature electron spin resonance (ESR) studies were carried out on ‘higher index’ (211)Si/SiO{sub 2} interfaces thermally grown in the temperature range T{sub ox} = 400–1066°C. The data reveal the presence of two species of a P{sub b}-type interface defect, exhibiting a significant difference in defect density. On the basis of the pertinent ESR parameters and interface symmetry, the basic defect is typified as P{sub b0}{sup (211)}, close to the Pb0 center observed in standard (100)Si/SiO{sub 2}. The dominant type is found to pertain to defected Si atoms at (111)Si-face terraces with the dangling bond along the [111] direction at ∼19.5°C with the interface normal, these sites thus apparently predominantly accounting for interface mismatch adaptation. The total of the P{sub b}-type defect appearance clearly reflects the higher-index nature of the interface. It is found that T{sub ox} = 750°C is required to minimize the P{sub b0}{sup (211)} defect density through relaxation of the oxide (interface). Q-band ESR saturation spectroscopy reveals an anisotropic {sup 29}Si (nuclear spin I=1/2) hyperfine (hf) doublet associated with the central P{sub b0}{sup (211)} Zeeman signal, with hf parameters closest to those of the similar hf structure of the P{sub b0}{sup (110)} defect in thermal (110)Si/SiO{sub 2}, adducing independent support to the P{sub b0}{sup (211)} typification.

  6. Electrostatic interplay: The interaction triangle of polyamines, silicic acid, and phosphate studied through turbidity measurements, silicomolybdic acid test, and 29Si NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jantschke, Anne; Spinde, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Summary The discovery of long-chain polyamines as biomolecules that are tightly associated to biosilica in diatom cell walls has inspired numerous in vitro studies aiming to characterize polyamine–silica interactions. The determination of these interactions at the molecular level is of fundamental interest on one hand for the understanding of cell wall biogenesis in diatoms and on the other hand for designing bioinspired materials synthesis approaches. The present contribution deals with the influence of amines and polyamines upon the initial self-assembly processes taking place during polyamine-mediated silica formation in solution. The influence of phosphate upon these processes is studied. For this purpose, sodium metasilicate solutions containing additives such as polyallylamine, allylamine and others in the presence/absence of phosphate were investigated. The analyses are based mainly on turbidity measurements yielding information about the early aggregation steps which finally give rise to the formation and precipitation of silica. PMID:25551030

  7. Electrostatic interplay: The interaction triangle of polyamines, silicic acid, and phosphate studied through turbidity measurements, silicomolybdic acid test, and (29)Si NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jantschke, Anne; Spinde, Katrin; Brunner, Eike

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of long-chain polyamines as biomolecules that are tightly associated to biosilica in diatom cell walls has inspired numerous in vitro studies aiming to characterize polyamine-silica interactions. The determination of these interactions at the molecular level is of fundamental interest on one hand for the understanding of cell wall biogenesis in diatoms and on the other hand for designing bioinspired materials synthesis approaches. The present contribution deals with the influence of amines and polyamines upon the initial self-assembly processes taking place during polyamine-mediated silica formation in solution. The influence of phosphate upon these processes is studied. For this purpose, sodium metasilicate solutions containing additives such as polyallylamine, allylamine and others in the presence/absence of phosphate were investigated. The analyses are based mainly on turbidity measurements yielding information about the early aggregation steps which finally give rise to the formation and precipitation of silica. PMID:25551030

  8. NMR spectroscopic study of organic phosphate esters coprecipitated with calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Brian L.; Zhang, Zelong; Kubista, Laura; Frisia, Silvia; Borsato, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Organic phosphorus incorporated in calcite during laboratory precipitation experiments and in natural cave deposits was investigated by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For calcite precipitated in the presence of organic phosphoesters of varying size and functionality, solid-state 31P{1H} CP/MAS NMR shows that the phosphoesters were incorporated intact into the solid. Systematic changes in the 31P NMR chemical shift of the phosphate group were observed between the solid phosphoester and that incorporated in the solid precipitate, yielding 31P NMR chemical shifts of the coprecipitates in the range of +1.8 to -2.2 ppm. These chemical shifts are distinct from that of similarly prepared calcite coprecipitated with inorganic phosphate, 3.5 ppm. Only minor changes were noted in the phosphoester 31P chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) which suggests no significant change in the local structure of the phosphate group, which is dominated by C-O-P bonding. Close spatial proximity of the organic phosphate group to calcite structural components was revealed by 31P/13C rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) experiments for coprecipitates prepared with 13C-labeled carbonate. All coprecipitates showed significant 31P dephasing effects upon 13C-irradiation, signaling atomic-scale proximity to carbonate carbon. The dephasing rate for smaller organophosphate molecules is similar to that observed for inorganic phosphate, whereas much slower dephasing was observed for larger molecules having long and/or bulky side-chains. This result suggests that small organic molecules can be tightly enclosed within the calcite structure, whereas significant structural disruption required to accommodate the larger organic molecules leads to longer phosphate-carbonate distances. Comparison of 31P NMR spectroscopic data from the synthetic coprecipitates with those from calcite moonmilk speleothems indicates that phosphorus occurs mainly as inorganic orthophosphate in the natural deposits, although small

  9. Quantitative solid-state 13C NMR with signal enhancement by multiple cross polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert L.; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2014-02-01

    A simple new method is presented that yields quantitative solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) 13C NMR spectra of organic materials with good signal-to-noise ratios. It achieves long (>10 ms) cross polarization (CP) from 1H without significant magnetization losses due to relaxation and with a moderate duty cycle of the radio-frequency irradiation, by multiple 1-ms CP periods alternating with 1H spin-lattice relaxation periods that repolarize the protons. The new method incorporates previous techniques that yield less distorted CP/MAS spectra, such as a linear variation (“ramp”) of the radio-frequency field strength, and it overcomes their main limitation, which is T1ρ relaxation of the spin-locked 1H magnetization. The ramp of the radio-frequency field strength and the asymptotic limit of cross polarization makes the spectral intensity quite insensitive to the exact field strengths used. The new multiCP pulse sequence is a “drop-in” replacement for previous CP methods and produces no additional data-processing burden. Compared to the only reliable quantitative 13C NMR method for unlabeled solids previously available, namely direct-polarization NMR, the measuring time is reduced by more than a factor of 50, enabling higher-throughput quantitative NMR studies. The new multiCP technique is validated with 14-kHz MAS on amino-acid derivatives, plant matter, a highly aromatic humic acid, and carbon materials made by low-temperature pyrolysis.

  10. Chromatographic NMR in NMR solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, Caroline; Viel, Stéphane; Delaurent, Corinne; Ziarelli, Fabio; Excoffier, Grégory; Caldarelli, Stefano

    2008-10-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated that pseudo-chromatographic NMR experiments could be performed using typical chromatographic solids and solvents. This first setup yielded improved separation of the spectral components of the NMR spectra of mixtures using PFG self-diffusion measurements. The method (dubbed Chromatographic NMR) was successively shown to possess, in favorable cases, superior resolving power on non-functionalized silica, compared to its LC counterpart. To further investigate the applicability of the method, we studied here the feasibility of Chromatographic NMR in common deuterated solvents. Two examples are provided, using deuterated chloroform and water, for homologous compounds soluble in these solvents, namely aromatic molecules and alcohols, respectively.

  11. 15N NMR investigation of the covalent binding of reduced TNT amines to soil humic acid, model compounds, and lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Thorn, K A; Kennedy, K R

    2002-09-01

    The five major reductive degradation products of TNT-4ADNT (4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene), 2ADNT (2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene), 2,4DANT (2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene), 2,6DANT (2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene), and TAT (2,4,6-triaminotoluene)-labeled with 15N in the amine positions, were reacted with the IHSS soil humic acid and analyzed by 15N NMR spectrometry. In the absence of catalysts, all five amines underwent nucleophilic addition reactions with quinone and other carbonyl groups in the soil humic acid to form both heterocyclic and nonheterocyclic condensation products. Imine formation via 1,2-addition of the amines to quinone groups in the soil humic acid was significant with the diamines and TAT but not the monoamines. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzed an increase in the incorporation of all five amines into the humic acid. In the case of the diamines and TAT, HRP also shifted the binding away from heterocyclic condensation product toward imine formation. A comparison of quantitative liquid phase with solid-state CP/MAS 15N NMR indicated that the CP experiment underestimated imine and heterocyclic nitrogens in humic acid, even with contact times optimal for observation of these nitrogens. Covalent binding of the mono- and diamines to 4-methylcatechol, the HRP catalyzed condensation of 4ADNT and 2,4DANT to coniferyl alcohol, and the binding of 2,4DANT to lignocellulose with and without birnessite were also examined. PMID:12322752

  12. The T1 ρ13C spin-lattice relaxation time of interpenetrating networks by solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran; Schueneman, G. T.; Novak, B. M.

    1999-02-01

    Poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) interpenetrated with 5% SiO 2 (PHEMA-IPN) were studied by 13C CP/MAS NMR. From these results, the structure of two polymers were verified by 13C NMR. Spin-lattice relaxation times for the polymer carbons in the rotating frame, T1 ρ, have been measured as a function of temperature. The T1 ρ spin-lattice relaxation times of the α-quarternary and carbonyl in the PHEMA and PHEMA-IPN undergo slow motions, i.e., motions on the slow side of the T1 ρ minimum, while those of the 1-,2-, β-methylene, and 3-methyl undergo fast motions, i.e., motions on the fast side of the T1 ρ minimum. From these T1 ρ spin-lattice relaxation times, we discuss the mobility, the correlation time, and activation energy for the PHEMA and PHEMA-IPN, respectively. The activation energies for the PHEMA-IPN were found to be generally higher than those of PHEMA. The higher activation energy for the side-chain 2-methylene in the PHEMA-IPN is attributed to bonding between the SiO 2 and the hydroxyl group of the PHEMA.

  13. 15N NMR investigation of the covalent binding of reduced TNT amines to soil humic acid, model compounds, and lignocellulose

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Kennedy, K.R.

    2002-01-01

    The five major reductive degradation products of TNT-4ADNT (4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene), 2ADNT (2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene), 2,4DANT (2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene), 2,6DANT (2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene), and TAT (2,4,6-triaminotoluene)-labeled with 15N in the amine positions, were reacted with the IHSS soil humic acid and analyzed by 15N NMR spectrometry. In the absence of catalysts, all five amines underwent nucleophilic addition reactions with quinone and other carbonyl groups in the soil humic acid to form both heterocyclic and nonheterocyclic condensation products. Imine formation via 1,2-addition of the amines to quinone groups in the soil humic acid was significant with the diamines and TAT but not the monoamines. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzed an increase in the incorporation of all five amines into the humic acid. In the case of the diamines and TAT, HRP also shifted the binding away from heterocyclic condensation product toward imine formation. A comparison of quantitative liquid phase with solid-state CP/MAS 15N NMR indicated that the CP experiment underestimated imine and heterocyclic nitrogens in humic acid, even with contact times optimal for observation of these nitrogens. Covalent binding of the mono- and diamines to 4-methylcatechol, the HRP catalyzed condensation of 4ADNT and 2,4DANT to coniferyl alcohol, and the binding of 2,4DANT to lignocellulose with and without birnessite were also examined.

  14. Structural changes in C–S–H gel during dissolution: Small-angle neutron scattering and Si-NMR characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Trapote-Barreira, Ana; Porcar, Lionel; Cama, Jordi; Soler, Josep M.; Allen, Andrew J.

    2015-06-15

    Flow-through experiments were conducted to study the calcium–silicate–hydrate (C–S–H) gel dissolution kinetics. During C–S–H gel dissolution the initial aqueous Ca/Si ratio decreases to reach the stoichiometric value of the Ca/Si ratio of a tobermorite-like phase (Ca/Si = 0.83). As the Ca/Si ratio decreases, the solid C–S–H dissolution rate increases from (4.5 × 10{sup −} {sup 14} to 6.7 × 10{sup −} {sup 12}) mol m{sup −} {sup 2} s{sup −} {sup 1}. The changes in the microstructure of the dissolving C–S–H gel were characterized by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and {sup 29}Si magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 29}Si-MAS NMR). The SANS data were fitted using a fractal model. The SANS specific surface area tends to increase with time and the obtained fit parameters reflect the changes in the nanostructure of the dissolving solid C–S–H within the gel. The {sup 29}Si MAS NMR analyses show that with dissolution the solid C–S–H structure tends to a more ordered tobermorite structure, in agreement with the Ca/Si ratio evolution.

  15. Advanced solid-state NMR characterization of marine dissolved organic matter isolated using the coupled reverse osmosis/electrodialysis method.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jingdong; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Pignatello, Joseph J; Perdue, E Michael

    2012-06-01

    Advanced (13)C solid-state techniques were employed to investigate the major structural characteristics of two surface-seawater dissolved organic matter (DOM) samples isolated using the novel coupled reverse osmosis/electrodialysis method. The NMR techniques included quantitative (13)C direct polarization/magic angle spinning (DP/MAS) and DP/MAS with recoupled dipolar dephasing, (13)C cross-polarization/total sideband suppression (CP/TOSS), (13)C chemical shift anisotropy filter, CH, CH(2), and CH(n) selection, two-dimensional (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear correlation NMR (2D HETCOR), 2D HETCOR combined with dipolar dephasing, and (15)N cross-polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS). The two samples (Coastal and Marine DOM) were collected at the mouth of the Ogeechee River and in the Gulf Stream, respectively. The NMR results indicated that they were structurally distinct. Coastal DOM contained significantly more aromatic and carbonyl carbons whereas Marine DOM was markedly enriched in alkoxy carbon (e.g., carbohydrate-like moieties). Both samples contained significant amide N, but Coastal DOM had nitrogen bonded to aromatic carbons. Our dipolar-dephased spectra indicated that a large fraction of alkoxy carbons were not protonated. For Coastal DOM, our NMR results were consistent with the presence of the major structural units of (1) carbohydrate-like moieties, (2) lignin residues, (3) peptides or amino sugars, and (4) COO-bonded alkyls. For Marine DOM, they were (1) carbohydrate-like moieties, (2) peptides or amino sugars, and (3) COO-bonded alkyls. In addition, both samples contained significant amounts of nonpolar alkyl groups. The potential sources of the major structural units of DOM were discussed in detail. Nonprotonated O-alkyl carbon content was proposed as a possible index of humification. PMID:22553962

  16. N-15 NMR study of the immobilization of 2,4- and 2,6-dinitrotoluene in aerobic compost

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Pennington, J.C.; Kennedy, K.R.; Cox, L.G.; Hayes, C.A.; Porter, B.E.

    2008-01-01

    Large-scale aerobic windrow composting has been used to bioremediate washout lagoon soils contaminated with the explosives TNT (2,4,6- trinitrotoluene) and RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine) at several sites within the United States. We previously used 15N NMR to investigate the reduction and binding of T15NT in aerobic bench -scale reactors simulating the conditions of windrow composting. These studies have been extended to 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4DNT) and 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,6DNT), which, as impurities in TNT, are usually present wherever soils have been contaminated with TNT. Liquid-state 15N NMR analyses of laboratory reactions between 4-methyl-3-nitroaniline-15N, the major monoamine reduction product of 2,4DNT, and the Elliot soil humic acid, both in the presence and absence of horseradish peroxidase, indicated that the amine underwent covalent binding with quinone and other carbonyl groups in the soil humic acid to form both heterocyclic and non-heterocyclic condensation products. Liquid-state 15N NMR analyses of the methanol extracts of 20 day aerobic bench-scale composts of 2,4-di-15N-nitrotoluene and 2,6-di-15N-nitrotoluene revealed the presence of nitrite and monoamine, but not diamine, reduction products, indicating the occurrence of both dioxygenase enzyme and reductive degradation pathways. Solid-state CP/MAS 15N NMR analyses of the whole composts, however, suggested that reduction to monoamines followed by covalent binding of the amines to organic matter was the predominant pathway. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  17. A [sup 13]C NMR study of ethylene adsorbed on reduced and oxygen-covered Ag surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Plischke, J.K.; Benesi, A.J.; Vannice, M.A. )

    1992-11-01

    [sup 13]C-enriched ethylene was adsorbed on both clean and oxygen-covered Ag particles dispersed on [eta]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]. Irreversibly adsorbed C[sub 2]H[sub 4] on O-covered Ag exhibited an upfield shift of [minus]20 ppm relative to gas-phase C[sub 2]H[sub 4], whereas a narrower line and smaller shift of [minus]5 ppm occurred for C[sub 2]H[sub 4] reversibly adsorbed on reduced Ag. In addition to the resonance at 103 ppm for irreversibly adsorbed C[sub 2]H[sub 4], CP/MAS NMR spectra also gave resonances at 179, 170, 164, 159, and 19 ppm for the O-covered Ag sample. The CP/MAS spectrum for Ag acetate powder clearly identified the 179- and 19-ppm peaks as those associated with the carboxyl and methyl carbons of the acetate anion, and the peaks at 159, 164, and 170 ppm were assigned to oxalate, formate, and carbonate (or possibly acetic anhydride) species, respectively, based on previous studies. When heated to 473 K the adsorbed C[sub 2]H[sub 4] disappeared and only acetate and oxalate groups were observed, and continued heating to 573 K removed almost all resonances. No C[sub 2]H[sub 4]O was unambiguously detected, thus with this unpromoted Ag catalyst utilizing a high-surface-area alumina the observable surface species appeared to be those associated with complete combustion, with acetate and oxalate predominating during reaction. These results directly confirm the presence of an Ag acetate species which has been proposed previously to be an intermediate in complete combustion, and the presence of the other three species support earlier tentative assignments based on IR and TPR spectroscopy. Chemical shifts at 61, 28, and 13 ppm were indicative of alkoxy species formed on Bronsted-acid sites on the Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] surface. 58 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Luminescence dynamics and {sup 13}C NMR characteristics of dinuclear complexes exhibiting coupled lanthanide(III) cation pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, K.D.; Bailey-Folkes, S.A.; Kahwa, I.A.

    1992-08-20

    Luminescence and cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) {sup 13}C NMR properties of lanthanide dinuclear macrocyclic complexes of a compartmental Schiff base chelate (1) derived from the condensation of 2,6-diformyl-p-cresol and 3,6-dioxa-1,8-octanediamine are reported. The Schiff base chromophore in 1 is a strong light absorber and an efficient sensitizer for intense Tb{sup 3+}({sup 5}D{sub 4}) and Eu{sup 3+}({sup 5}D{sub 0})(T < 110 K ) emission which does not exhibit self-quenching effects. Emission from Tb{sup 3+} is sensitized by the ligand singlet state; in striking contrast, Eu{sup 3+} emission is sensitized by the triplet state and reveals an unusual nonradiative quenching process at T > 110 K with a thermal barrier of {approx} 2300 cm{sup {minus}1}. Weak emission is observed from Dy{sup 3+}({sup 4}F{sub 9/2}), Sm{sup 3+}({sup 4}G{sub 5/2}), and Pr{sup 3+}({sup 1}D{sub 2}) diluted in Gd{sup 3+} (i.e., from Gd{sup 3+}-Ln{sup 3+} heteropairs, Ln = Pr, Sm, Dy). Intramolecular metal-metal (Ln-Ln = 4 {Angstrom}) interactions account for the greatly quenched emission from Sm{sup 3+}-Sm{sup 3+} and Dy{sup 3+}-Dy{sup 3+} homopairs compared to Gd{sup 3+}-Ln heteropairs (Ln = Sm, Dy). Gd{sup 3+}-Ln{sup 3+} emission lifetimes at 77 K are 1610 (Tb{sup 3+}), 890 (Eu{sup 3+}), 14 (Dy{sup 3+}) and {approx} 13 {mu}s (Sm{sup 3+}). Nonradiative relaxation processes at 77 K in dilute Ln{sup 3+}:Gd{sub 2}1(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, being temperature independent for Sm{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} but temperature dependent for Tb{sup 3+}, follow the energy gap law with {alpha} {approx} - 10{sup {minus}3} cm and B {approx} 2 x 10{sup 8} s{sup {minus}1}. CP-MAS data show paramagnetic broadening of {sup 13}C resonances which increases with the magnetic moment of Ln{sup 3+}. Surprisingly, no significant shifts in resonance positions corresponding to the changing nature of paramagnetic Ln{sup 3+} ions are observed. 43 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Multi-dimensional 1H- 13C HETCOR and FSLG-HETCOR NMR study of sphingomyelin bilayers containing cholesterol in the gel and liquid crystalline states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Gregory P.; Alam, Todd M.

    2006-08-01

    13C cross polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) and 1H MAS NMR spectra were collected on egg sphingomyelin (SM) bilayers containing cholesterol above and below the liquid crystalline phase transition temperature ( Tm). Two-dimensional (2D) dipolar heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectra were obtained on SM bilayers in the liquid crystalline ( Lα) state for the first time and display improved resolution and chemical shift dispersion compared to the individual 1H and 13C spectra and significantly aid in spectral assignment. In the gel ( Lβ) state, the 1H dimension suffers from line broadening due to the 1H- 1H homonuclear dipolar coupling that is not completely averaged by the combination of lipid mobility and MAS. This line broadening is significantly suppressed by implementing frequency switched Lee-Goldburg (FSLG) homonuclear 1H decoupling during the evolution period. In the liquid crystalline ( Lα) phase, no improvement in line width is observed when FSLG is employed. All of the observed resonances are assignable to cholesterol and SM environments. This study demonstrates the ability to obtain 2D heteronuclear correlation experiments in the gel state for biomembranes, expands on previous SM assignments, and presents a comprehensive 1H/ 13C NMR assignment of SM bilayers containing cholesterol. Comparisons are made to a previous report on cholesterol chemical shifts in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers. A number of similarities and some differences are observed and discussed.

  20. The application of solid-state NMR spectroscopy to study candesartan cilexetil (TCV-116) membrane interactions. Comparative study with the AT1R antagonist drug olmesartan

    PubMed Central

    Ntountaniotis, Dimitrios; Kellici, Tahsin; Tzakos, Andreas; Kolokotroni, Pinelopi; Tselios, Theodore; Becker-Baldus, Johanna; Glaubitz, Clemens; Lin, Sonyan; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Mavromoustakos, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    AT1 receptor (AT1R) antagonists exert their antihypertensive effects by preventing the vasoconstrictive hormone AngII to bind to the AT1 receptor. It has been proposed that these biological effects are mediated through a two-step mechanism reaction. In the first step, they are incorporated in the core of the lipid bilayers and in the second step they reach the active site of the receptor through lateral diffusion. In this model, drug/membrane interactions are key elements for the drugs achieving inhibition at the AT1 receptor. In this work, the interactions of the prodrug candesartan cilexetil (TCV-116) with lipid bilayers are studied at molecular detail. Solid-state 13C-CP/MAS, 2D 1H-1H NOESY NMR spectroscopy and in silico calculations are used. TCV-116 and olmesartan, another drug which acts as an AT1R antagonist are compared for their dynamic effects in lipid bilayers using solid-state 2H-NMR. We find a similar localization of TCV-116 compared to other AT1 antagonists in the intermediate polar region. In addition, we can identify specific local interactions. These interactions may be associated in part with the discrete pharmacological profiles observed for different antagonists. PMID:24946142

  1. Solid-state NMR spin-echo investigation of the metalloproteins parvalbumin, concanavalin A, and pea and lentil lectins, substituted with cadmium-113

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Paul S.; Bhattacharyya, Lokesh; Ellis, Paul D.; Brewer, C. Fred

    Solid-state 113Cd NMR spectroscopy of static powder samples of 113Cd-substituted metalloproteins, parvalbumin, concanavalin A, and pea and lentil lectins, was carried out. Cross polarization followed by application of a train of uniformly spaced π pulses was employed to investigate the origin of residual cadmium NMR linewidths observed previously in these proteins. Fourier transformation of the resulting spin-echo train yielded spectra consisting of uniformly spaced lines having linewidths of the order of 1-2 ppm. The observed linewidths were not influenced by temperature as low as -50°C or by extent of protein hydration. Since the echo-train pulse sequence is able to eliminate inhomogeneous but not homogeneous contributions to the linewidths, there is a predominant inhomogeneous contribution to cadmium linewidths in the protein CP/MAS spectra. However, significant changes in spectral intensities were observed with change in temperature and extent of protein hydration. These intensity changes are attributed for parvalbumin and concanavalin A to changes in cross-polarization efficiency with temperature and hydration. For pea and lentil lectins, this effect is attributed to the elimination of static disorder at the pea and lentil S2 metal-ion sites due to sugar binding.

  2. A solid-state NMR investigation into microphase separation in polyurethane thermoplastic elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Meltzer, A.D.; Lantman, C.W.; Steppan, S.; Seneker, S.; Wehrle, B.

    1993-12-31

    A combination of {sup 13}C-CP-MAS and static {sup 2}H-NMR techniques were used to study phase separation in polyurethane thermoplastic elastomers. The segmented polymers were prepared from hard segments comprised of 4,4{prime}-dicyclohexylmethane diisocyanate (DCHDI) chain extended with 1,4-butanediol, and soft segments of either poly(propylene glycol) or poly(butylene adipate). The DCHDI was prepared so as to contain different levels of the various geometric isomers, i.e., the cis,cis, cis,trans and trans,trans isomers, in order to monitor the influence of the trans,trans content on segmental mobility and phase separation. Lineshape analysis of static {sup 2}H-NMR spectra of samples selectively labelled in the chain extender indicate the trans,trans isomer constrains motion much more effectively than the other isomers of DCHDI at temperatures above the dynamic glass transition temperature of the soft phase and below the melting point of the hard domains. This is confirmed both by {sup 1}H-spin diffusion and t{sub 1{rho}} relaxation data. The data also indicate that the samples prepared with less trans-trans DCHDI have a much more significant interphase region than when DCHDI with a higher trans,trans content was employed, or that the higher trans-trans content allows for better hard domain formation. This insinuates that a relatively small amount of the trans,trans isomer of the DCHDI is more effective in allowing for the formation of physical cross-links than a larger amount of a statistical distribution of the diisocyanate, as corroborated by DSC and DMTA.

  3. Comparison of celery (Apium graveolens L.) collenchyma and parenchyma cell wall polysaccharides enabled by solid-state (13)C NMR.

    PubMed

    Zujovic, Zoran; Chen, Da; Melton, Laurence D

    2016-02-01

    Collenchyma cells with their thickened walls are one of specific mechanical support tissues for plants, while parenchyma cells are thin walled and serve multiple functions. The parenchyma tissue is what you enjoy eating, while collenchyma, because of its fibrous nature, is not so attractive. Celery is a useful model for comparing the cell walls (CWs) of the two cell types such as collenchyma and parenchyma. However, to date, the structural characteristics of collenchyma and parenchyma cell walls from the same plant have not been compared. Monosaccharide composition suggested the collenchyma cell walls contained less pectin but more hemicellulose in comparison to parenchyma. High-resolution solid-state NMR spectra of highly mobile pectins revealed that the arabinan signals were more evident in the collenchyma spectrum, while galactan showed a much stronger resonance in the parenchyma spectrum. In addition, methyl esterified and non-esterified galacturonic acid signals were observed in parenchyma CWs, but only the latter one appeared in the collenchyma. The ratio of cellulose surface/interior obtained from CP/MAS spectra for collenchyma suggested the cellulose microfibrils were ~2.4 nm, while in the parenchyma, these were somewhat larger. X-ray diffraction indicated the size of the cellulose microfibrils were the same for both types of CWs. PMID:26717549

  4. Cross polarization and magic angle sample spinning NMR spectra of model organic compounds. 1. Highly protonated molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Alemany, L.B.; Grant, D.M.; Pugmire, R.J.; Alger, T.D.; Zilm, K.W.

    1983-04-20

    CP/MAS /sup 13/C NMR spectra were obtained at various contact times on ten solid organic compounds containing a variety of simple functional groups. The spectra show that signal intensities that agree with atomic ratios can be obtained with a contact time of 2.25 ms and often with a contact time as short as about 1 ms. Computer analysis of signal intensities obtained at a minimum of ten different contact times provides T/sub CH/ data that are consistent with these experimental results. The experimental results are also consistent with the previously reported lack of significant variation in the spectra of complex organic solids obtained with contact times of about 1 to 3 ms. In general, nonprotonated carbon atoms polarize more slowly than protonated carbon atoms. The compounds exhibit a wide range of proton spin lattice relaxation times. Some compounds exhibit more resonances than are found in the /sup 13/C(/sup 1/H) spectra of the compounds in solution because the crystalline environment removes the nominal spatial equivalence found for carbon atoms related to each other by unimolecular symmetry elements.

  5. Structural implications of water dissolution in haplogranitic glasses from NMR spectroscopy: influence of total water content and mixed alkali effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, B. C.; Riemer, T.; Kohn, S. C.; Holtz, F.; Dupree, R.

    2001-09-01

    To study the effects of total water content and alkali substitution on the structure of aluminosilicate glasses, two series of glasses belonging to the ternary system Quartz (Qz)-Albite (Ab)-Orthoclase (Or) were synthesized and investigated with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Series I consisted of seven glasses with normative composition Ab 39Or 32Qz 29 (AOQ) and water contents ranging from 0 to 6 wt%. Series II consisted of dry and hydrous glasses (˜2.0 wt% H 2O) with five compositions along the join Qz 37Ab 63-Qz 34Or 66 (AQ-OQ) varying the alkali content (Na/K) at constant Si/Al ratio. All glasses were investigated with 1H, 23Na, 27Al and 29Si magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR. 29Si MAS spectra of AOQ glasses showed no change upon hydration, suggesting little variation of the Si environments although the large linewidth of the 29Si signal may hide the presence of some Si Q 3-OH. The isotropic chemical shift (δ iso) of 27Al showed no change upon hydration, regardless of the amount of dissolved water. The 27Al mean quadrupolar coupling constant (C q) decreased with increasing water content, indicating a general increase of symmetry of the charge distribution around Al, which suggests the absence of significant amounts of Al Q 3-OH. Nonetheless, the evolution of C q upon hydration suggests a correlation with OH concentration in the quenched glass. The evolution of 23Na isotropic chemical shifts upon hydration appears to be correlated with total water content or with the concentration of dissolved H 2O molecules. In general, the NMR data are consistent with the water solubility model of Kohn et al. (1989), involving the exchange of charge balancing cations by protons. However, in addition to the presence of molecular water, 1H-NMR results showed at least two types of OH groups of which one may be related to Al-OH. Although the small intensity of this signal indicates that only a minor fraction of OH groups is present in this species, it demonstrates

  6. MAS-NMR study of lithium zinc silicate glasses and glass-ceramics with various ZnO content

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, Madhumita; Kothiyal, Govind P.; Montagne, Lionel Delevoye, Laurent

    2008-02-15

    Lithium zinc silicate glasses of composition (mol%): 17.5Li{sub 2}O-(72-x)SiO{sub 2}-xZnO-5.1Na{sub 2}O-1.3P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-4.1B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 5.5{<=}x{<=}17.7, were prepared by conventional melt-quenched technique and converted to glass-ceramic by controlled crystallization process. {sup 29}Si and {sup 31}P MAS-NMR was used to characterize the structure of both glass and glass-ceramic samples. Despite the complex glass composition, Q{sup 2}, Q{sup 3} and Q{sup 4} sites are identified from {sup 29}Si MAS-NMR, which relative intensities are found to vary with the ZnO content, indicating a network depolymerization by ZnO. Moreover, well separated Q{sup 3} and Q{sup 4} resonances for low ZnO content indicates the occurrence of phase separation. From {sup 31}P MAS-NMR, it is seen that phosphorus is mainly present in the form of ortho-(Q{sup 0}) and pyro-phosphate (Q{sup 1}) structural units and variation of ZnO content did not have much effect on these resonances, which provides an additional evidence for phase separation in the glass. On conversion to glass-ceramics, lithium disilicate (Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}), lithium zinc ortho-silicate (Li{sub 3}Zn{sub 0.5}SiO{sub 4}), tridymite (SiO{sub 2}) and cristobalite (SiO{sub 2}) were identified as major silicate crystalline phases. Using {sup 29}Si MAS-NMR, quantification of these silicate crystalline phases is carried out and correlated with the ZnO content in the glass-ceramics samples. In addition, {sup 31}P spectra unambiguously revealed the presence of crystalline Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and (Na,Li){sub 3}PO{sub 4} in the glass-ceramics. - Graphical abstract: {sup 29}Si and {sup 31}P MAS-NMR analyses were carried out on multi-component Li{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2}-ZnO-Na{sub 2}O-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses and glass-ceramics developed for sealing application. Structural data are reported, including phase separation process and quantification of amorphous and crystalline phases.

  7. Probing the Carbonyl Functionality of a Petroleum Resin and Asphaltene through Oximation and Schiff Base Formation in Conjunction with N-15 NMR.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Kevin A; Cox, Larry G

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in spectroscopic techniques, there is uncertainty regarding the nature of the carbonyl groups in the asphaltene and resin fractions of crude oil, information necessary for an understanding of the physical properties and environmental fate of these materials. Carbonyl and hydroxyl group functionalities are not observed in natural abundance 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of asphaltenes and resins and therefore require spin labeling techniques for detection. In this study, the carbonyl functionalities of the resin and asphaltene fractions from a light aliphatic crude oil that is the source of groundwater contamination at the long term USGS study site near Bemidji, Minnesota, have been examined through reaction with 15N-labeled hydroxylamine and aniline in conjunction with analysis by solid and liquid state 15N NMR. Ketone groups were revealed through 15N NMR detection of their oxime and Schiff base derivatives, and esters through their hydroxamic acid derivatives. Anilinohydroquinone adducts provided evidence for quinones. Some possible configurations of the ketone groups in the resin and asphaltene fractions can be inferred from a consideration of the likely reactions that lead to heterocyclic condensation products with aniline and to the Beckmann reaction products from the initially formed oximes. These include aromatic ketones and ketones adjacent to quaternary carbon centers, β-hydroxyketones, β-diketones, and β-ketoesters. In a solid state cross polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) 15N NMR spectrum recorded on the underivatized asphaltene as a control, carbazole and pyrrole-like nitrogens were the major naturally abundant nitrogens detected. PMID:26556054

  8. Probing the carbonyl functionality of a petroleum resin and asphaltene through oximation and schiff base formation in conjunction with N-15 NMR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in spectroscopic techniques, there is uncertainty regarding the nature of the carbonyl groups in the asphaltene and resin fractions of crude oil, information necessary for an understanding of the physical properties and environmental fate of these materials. Carbonyl and hydroxyl group functionalities are not observed in natural abundance 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of asphaltenes and resins and therefore require spin labeling techniques for detection. In this study, the carbonyl functionalities of the resin and asphaltene fractions from a light aliphatic crude oil that is the source of groundwater contamination at the long term USGS study site near Bemidji, Minnesota, have been examined through reaction with 15N-labeled hydroxylamine and aniline in conjunction with analysis by solid and liquid state 15N NMR. Ketone groups were revealed through 15N NMR detection of their oxime and Schiff base derivatives, and esters through their hydroxamic acid derivatives. Anilinohydroquinone adducts provided evidence for quinones. Some possible configurations of the ketone groups in the resin and asphaltene fractions can be inferred from a consideration of the likely reactions that lead to heterocyclic condensation products with aniline and to the Beckmann reaction products from the initially formed oximes. These include aromatic ketones and ketones adjacent to quaternary carbon centers, β-hydroxyketones, β-diketones, and β-ketoesters. In a solid state cross polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) 15N NMR spectrum recorded on the underivatized asphaltene as a control, carbazole and pyrrole-like nitrogens were the major naturally abundant nitrogens detected.

  9. Probing the Carbonyl Functionality of a Petroleum Resin and Asphaltene through Oximation and Schiff Base Formation in Conjunction with N-15 NMR

    PubMed Central

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in spectroscopic techniques, there is uncertainty regarding the nature of the carbonyl groups in the asphaltene and resin fractions of crude oil, information necessary for an understanding of the physical properties and environmental fate of these materials. Carbonyl and hydroxyl group functionalities are not observed in natural abundance 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of asphaltenes and resins and therefore require spin labeling techniques for detection. In this study, the carbonyl functionalities of the resin and asphaltene fractions from a light aliphatic crude oil that is the source of groundwater contamination at the long term USGS study site near Bemidji, Minnesota, have been examined through reaction with 15N-labeled hydroxylamine and aniline in conjunction with analysis by solid and liquid state 15N NMR. Ketone groups were revealed through 15N NMR detection of their oxime and Schiff base derivatives, and esters through their hydroxamic acid derivatives. Anilinohydroquinone adducts provided evidence for quinones. Some possible configurations of the ketone groups in the resin and asphaltene fractions can be inferred from a consideration of the likely reactions that lead to heterocyclic condensation products with aniline and to the Beckmann reaction products from the initially formed oximes. These include aromatic ketones and ketones adjacent to quaternary carbon centers, β-hydroxyketones, β-diketones, and β-ketoesters. In a solid state cross polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) 15N NMR spectrum recorded on the underivatized asphaltene as a control, carbazole and pyrrole-like nitrogens were the major naturally abundant nitrogens detected. PMID:26556054

  10. Clay-polymer nanocomposite material from the delamination of kaolinite in the presence of sodium polyacrylate.

    PubMed

    Letaief, Sadok; Detellier, Christian

    2009-09-15

    A chemical route for the delamination of kaolinite in a polymeric matrix is reported in this work. The strategy that was used is based on mixing polyelectrolytes of opposite charges, an organic polyanion, polyacrylate, with an inorganic polycation resulting from the modification of the internal surfaces of kaolinite. The delamination was carried out by the reaction of sodium polyacrylate (PANa) with kaolinite whose internal aluminol surfaces were previously grafted with triethanolamine and subsequently quaternized with iodomethane (TOIM-K) to form an extended lamellar inorganic polycation. X-ray diffraction as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed the complete delamination of the kaolinite particles. 13C CP/MAS NMR showed the removal of the ammonium groups resulting from hydrolysis of the internal surfaces once exposed, and 29Si CP/MAS NMR spectra were in agreement with the retention of the 1:1 aluminosilicate kaolinite layers structures. From the thermogravimetry (TG) data, the respective percentages in mass of PA and kaolinite in the delaminated nanocomposite could be estimated to be 61% and 39%, respectively, in the conditions of the particular experiment. The procedure was repeated several times to show the reproducibility of the delamination. The interlayer functionalization of kaolinite was crucial for the success of the delamination procedure. SEM pictures show that some individual kaolinite platelets fold and form curved structures. PMID:19518083

  11. A multinuclear static NMR study of geopolymerisation

    SciTech Connect

    Favier, Aurélie; Habert, Guillaume; Roussel, Nicolas; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-09-15

    Geopolymers are inorganic binders obtained by alkali activation of aluminosilicates. While the structure of geopolymers is now well understood, the details of the geopolymerisation reaction and their impact on the rheology of the paste remain uncertain. In this work, we follow the elastic properties of a paste made with metakaolin and sodium silicate solution. After the first sharp increase of elastic modulus occurring a few hundred of seconds after mixing and related to the heterogeneous formation of an alumina–silicate gel with a molar ratio Si/Al < 4 located at the grains boundaries, we focus on the progressive increase in elastic modulus on a period of few hours during the setting of the geopolymer. In this study, we combine the study of rheological properties of the paste with {sup 23}Na, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si static NMR measurement in order to better understand the origin of this second increase in elastic modulus. Our results show that, after a few hours, Al and Na evolution in the liquid phase are concomitant. This suggests the precipitation of an aluminosilicate phase where Al is in tetrahedral position and Na compensates the charge. Furthermore, Si speciation confirms this result and allows us to identify the precipitation of a product, which has a chemical composition close to the final composition of geopolymer. This study provides strong evidence for a heterogeneous formation of an aluminosilicate glass directly from the first gel and the silicate solution without the need for a reorganisation of Gel 1 into Gel 2.

  12. Metal Carbonation of Forsterite in Wet Supercritical CO2: The Role of H2O Studied by Solid State C-13 and Si-29 NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.; Kwak, J.; Turcu, R. V.; Rosso, K. M.; Ilton, E. S.; Wang, C.; Sears, J. A.; Felmy, A. R.; Hoyt, D. W.

    2010-12-01

    Selected as a model mineral carbonation system for geological carbon sequestration in mafic host rocks, chemical mechanisms of forsterite carbonation in supercritical CO2 containing water varied from dry to well above saturation, including at saturation, were investigated by a combination of solid state NMR (C-13 SP-, CP-MAS, Si-29 SP-, CP-MAS), XRD, TEM and XPS. Run conditions were 80 degrees (C) and 75 bars. Major findings are as follows. At high water contents where a bulk aqueous solution coexisted with water-saturated scCO2, forsterite was converted into magnesite and a separate Mg-free amorphous SiO2 reaction product characterized by highly polymerized oligomeric Q4, and to a lesser extent by Q3 silica species. As the amount of added water was reduced, hydrated intermediate reaction products that did not evolve to magnesite could be identified until at zero water no reaction intermediates or magnesite carbonation products were observed. The intermediate reaction products identified were a complex mixture of partially hydrated/hydroxylated magnesium carbonate species and a variety of surface silica species with low polymerization extent. The intermediates were mainly in an amorphous state, forming a thin layer on the surface. Formation of these intermediate species consumes water by hydrolysis of Mg-O-Si linkages at the forsterite surface as well as by incorporation of water in the lattice. If insufficient water is available, the reaction is found not to proceed far enough to form magnesite and amorphous SiO2. Water in excess of this limit appears necessary for the intermediates to evolve to anhydrous magnesite, a process that is expected to liberate water for continued reaction. Hence, for a given fluid/forsterite ratio there appears to be a water threshold (i.e., the formation of H2O film with sufficient thickness estimated to be between 3.2 and 18.4 nm) above which a significant portion of the water is recycled in an apparent quasi-catalytic role for the

  13. Solid-state NMR characterization of the structure and thermal stability of hybrid organic-inorganic compounds based on a HLaNb2O7 Dion-Jacobson layered perovskite.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Alice S; Ferrara, Chiara; Marculescu, Adriana Mossuto; Giannici, Francesco; Martorana, Antonino; Mustarelli, Piercarlo; Tealdi, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    Dion-Jacobson phases, like MLaNb2O7, are an interesting class of ion-exchangeable layered perovskites possessing electronic and photocatalytic properties. Their protonated and organo-modified homologues, in particular, have already been indicated as promising catalysts. However, the structural analysis of these highly tailorable materials is still incomplete, and both the intercalation process and thermal stability of the included organic moieties are far from being completely understood. In this study, we present a thorough solid-state NMR characterization of HLaNb2O7·xH2O intercalated with different amounts of octylamine, or with decylamine. Samples were analyzed as prepared, and after thermal treatment at different temperatures up to 220 °C. The substitution of pristine proton ions was followed via(1)H MAS NMR spectroscopy, whereas the alkyl chains were monitored through (13)C((1)H) CP MAS experiments. The interactions in the interlayer space were explored using (13)C((1)H) 2D heteronuclear correlation experiments. We demonstrate that some of the protons are involved in the functionalization reaction, and some of them are in close proximity to the alkyl ammonium chains. Heating of the hybrid materials leads first to a rearrangement of the alkyl chains and then to their degradation. The spatial arrangement of the chains, their interactions and the thermal behavior of the materials depend on the extent of the functionalization, and on the nature of the intercalated alkyl ammonium ions. PMID:27440133

  14. The role of Al in C-S-H: NMR, XRD, and compositional results for precipitated samples

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, G.K.; Young, J. Francis; Kirkpatrick, R. James . E-mail: kirkpat@uiuc.edu

    2006-01-15

    X-ray diffraction, compositional analysis, and {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectroscopy of Al-substituted tobermorite-type C-S-H made by precipitation from solution provide significant new insight into the structural mechanisms of Al-substitution in this important and complicated phase. Al occurs in 4-, 5-, and 6-coordination (Al[4], Al[5], and Al[6]) and plays multiple structural roles. Al[4] occurs on the bridging tetrahedra of the drierkette Al-silicate chains, and Al[5] and Al[6] occur in the interlayer and perhaps on particle surfaces. Al does not enter either the central Ca-O sheet or the pairing tetrahedra of the tobermorite-type layers. Al[4] occurs on three types of bridging sites, Q{sup 3} sites that bridge across the interlayer; Q{sup 2} sites that are charge balanced by interlayer Ca{sup +2}, Na{sup +}, or H{sup +}; and Q{sup 2} sites that are most likely charge balanced by interlayer or surface Al[5] and Al[6] through Al[4]-O-Al[5,6] linkages. Although the data presented here are for relatively well-crystallized tobermorite-type C-S-H with C/S ratios {<=} 1.2, comparable spectral features for hydrated white cement pastes in previously published papers [M.D. Andersen, H.J. Jakobsen, J. Skibsted, Incorporation of aluminum in the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) of hydrated Portland cements: a high-field {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR investigation Inorg. Chem. 42 (2003) 2280-2287; M.D. Andersen, H.J. Jakobsen, J. Skibsted, Characterization of white Portland cement hydration and the C-S-H structure in the presence of sodium aliminate by {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, Cem. Concr. Res. 43 (2004) 857-868; M.D. Andersen, H. J. Jakobsen, J. Skibsted, A new aluminum-hydrate phase in hydrated Portland cements characterized by {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, Cem. Concr. Res., submitted for publication.] indicate the presence of similar structural environments in the C-S-H of such pastes, and by implication OPC pastes.

  15. 13C-NMR Assessment of the Pattern of Organic Matter Transformation during Domestic Wastewater Treatment by Autothermal Aerobic Digestion (ATAD)

    PubMed Central

    Piterina, Anna V.; Barlett, John; Pembroke, J. Tony

    2009-01-01

    The pattern of biodegradation and the chemical changes occurring in the macromolecular fraction of domestic sludge during autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion (ATAD) was monitored and characterised via solid-state 13C-NMR CP-MAS. Major indexes such as aromaticity, hydrophobicity and alkyl/O-alkyl ratios calculated for the ATAD processed biosolids were compared by means of these values to corresponding indexes reported for sludges of different origin such as manures, soil organic matter and certain types of compost. Given that this is the first time that these techniques have been applied to ATAD sludge, the data indicates that long-chain aliphatics are easily utilized by the microbial populations as substrates for metabolic activities at all stages of aerobic digestion and serve as a key substrate for the temperature increase, which in turn results in sludge sterilization. The ATAD biosolids following treatment had a prevalence of O-alkyl domains, a low aromaticity index (10.4%) and an alkyl/O-alkyl ratio of 0.48 while the hydrophobicity index of the sludge decreased from 1.12 to 0.62 during the treatment. These results have important implications for the evolution of new ATAD modalities particularly in relation to dewatering and the future use of ATAD processed biosolids as a fertilizer, particularly with respect to hydrological impacts on the soil behaviour. PMID:19742161

  16. A solid-state NMR investigation of the structure of mesoporous silica nanoparticle supported rhodium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, Jennifer; Huang, Yulin; Natella, Michael; Cai, Yang; Lin, Victor S.-Y.; Pruski, Marek

    2009-01-04

    A detailed study of the chemical structure of mesoporous silica catalysts containing rhodium ligands and nanoparticles (RhP-MSN) was carried out by multi-dimensional solid-state NMR techniques. The degree of functionalization of the rhodium-phosphinosilyl complex to the surface of the RhP-MSN channels was determined by {sup 29}Si NMR experiments. The structural assignments of the rhodium-phosphinosilyl complex were unambiguously determined by employing the novel, indirectly detected heteronuclear correlation ({sup 13}C-{sup 1}H and {sup 31}P-{sup 1}H idHETCOR) techniques, which indicated that oxidation of the attached phosphinosilyl groups and detachment of Rh was enhanced upon syngas conversion.

  17. The crystallization of hectorite clays as monitored by small angle X-ray scattering and NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Carrado, K. A.; Xu, L.; Seifert, S.; Gregory, D.; Song, K.; Botto, R. E.

    1999-12-13

    The authors have probed the 48-hr crystallization of a magnesium silicate clay called hectorite. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) at the Advanced Photon Source using aliquots ex situ has revealed that data is consistent with ex situ XRD, TGA, AFM, and IR data in that all these techniques see clay crystallite beginning to form in the first few hours of reaction. Tetraethylammonium (TEA) ions are used to aid crystallization and become incorporated as the exchange cations within the interlayers. {sup 13}C NMR shows that 80% of the final TEA loading is accomplished in the first 10 hrs. {sup 29}Si NMR displays a visible clay silicate peak after just 1 hr. In addition, the first in situ study of clay crystallization of any kind was performed by in situ SAXS. Results are consistent with the ex situ data as well as showing the sensitivity of SAXS to sol gel reactions occurring on the order of minutes.

  18. Magic-angle-spinning NMR studies of acid sites in zeolite H-ZSM-5

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, E.; Ernst, H.; Freude, D.; Froehlich, T.; Hunger, M.; Pfeifer, H. )

    1991-01-01

    {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 27}Al, and {sup 29}Si magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR was used to elucidate the nature of the catalytic activity of zeolite H-ZSM-5. {sup 1}H MAS NMR of sealed samples after mild hydrothermal dealumination shows that the enhanced activity for n-hexane cracking is not due to an enhanced Bronstead acidity. The concentrations of the various OH groups and aluminous species suggest that the reason for the enhanced catalytic activity is the interaction of the n-hexane molecule with a bridging hydroxyl group and with extra-framework aluminium species, which give rise to the enhanced activity, cannot be easily removed from their positions, and are therefore immobilized by the zeolitic framework.

  19. Structure of hydrous aluminosilicate glasses along the diopside anorthite join: A comprehensive one- and two-dimensional 1H and 27Al NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Xianyu; Kanzaki, Masami

    2008-05-01

    We have taken a systematic approach utilizing advanced solid-state NMR techniques to gain new insights into the controversial issue concerning the dissolution mechanisms of water in aluminosilicate melts (glasses). A series of quenched anhydrous and hydrous (˜2 wt% H 2O) glass samples along the diopside (Di, CaMgSi 2O 6)—anorthite (An, CaAl 2Si 2O 8) join with varying An components (0, 20, 38, 60, 80, and 100 mol %) have been studied. A variety of NMR techniques, including one-dimensional (1D) 1H and 27Al MAS NMR, and 27Al → 1H cross-polarization (CP) MAS NMR, as well as two-dimensional (2D) 1H double-quantum (DQ) MAS NMR, 27Al triple-quantum (3Q) MAS NMR, and 27Al → 1H heteronuclear correlation NMR (HETCOR) and 3QMAS/HETCOR NMR, have been applied. These data revealed the presence of SiOH, free OH ((Ca,Mg)OH) and AlOH species in the hydrous glasses, with the last mostly interconnected with Si and residing in the more polymerized parts of the structure. Thus, there are no fundamental differences in water dissolution mechanisms for Al-free and Al-bearing silicate melts (glasses), both involving two competing processes: the formation of SiOH/AlOH that is accompanied by the depolymerization of the network structure, and the formation of free OH that has an opposite effect. The latter is more important for depolymerized compositions corresponding to mafic and ultramafic magmas. Aluminum is dominantly present in four coordination (Al IV), but a small amount of five-coordinate Al (Al V) is also observed in all the anhydrous and hydrous glasses. Furthermore, six-coordinate Al (Al VI) is also present in most of the hydrous glasses. As Al of higher coordinations are favored by high pressure, Al VIOH and Al VOH may become major water species at higher pressures corresponding to those of the Earth's mantle.

  20. N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic natural organic matter samples of the International Humic Substances Society

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Cox, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    The naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic NOM samples from the International Humic Substances Society has been characterized by solid state CP/MAS 15N NMR. Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite humic acid. Aquatic samples include Suwannee River humic, fulvic and reverse osmosis isolates, Nordic humic and fulvic acids and Pony Lake fulvic acid. Additionally, Nordic and Suwannee River XAD-4 acids and Suwannee River hydrophobic neutral fractions were analyzed. Similar to literature reports, amide/aminoquinone nitrogens comprised the major peaks in the solid state spectra of the soil humic and fulvic acids, along with heterocyclic and amino sugar/terminal amino acid nitrogens. Spectra of aquatic samples, including the XAD-4 acids, contain resolved heterocyclic nitrogen peaks in addition to the amide nitrogens. The spectrum of the nitrogen enriched, microbially derived Pony Lake, Antarctica fulvic acid, appeared to contain resonances in the region of pyrazine, imine and/or pyridine nitrogens, which have not been observed previously in soil or aquatic humic substances by 15N NMR. Liquid state 15N NMR experiments were also recorded on the Elliot soil humic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid, both to examine the feasibility of the techniques, and to determine whether improvements in resolution over the solid state could be realized. For both samples, polarization transfer (DEPT) and indirect detection (1H-15N gHSQC) spectra revealed greater resolution among nitrogens directly bonded to protons. The amide/aminoquinone nitrogens could also be observed by direct detection experiments.

  1. N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic natural organic matter samples of the International Humic Substances Society

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2009-02-28

    The naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic NOM samples from the International Humic Substances Society has been characterized by solid state CP/MAS ¹⁵N NMR. Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite humic acid. Aquatic samples include Suwannee River humic, fulvic and reverse osmosis isolates, Nordic humic and fulvic acids and Pony Lake fulvic acid. Additionally, Nordic and Suwannee River XAD-4 acids and Suwannee River hydrophobic neutral fractions were analyzed. Similar to literature reports, amide/aminoquinone nitrogens comprised the major peaks in the solid state spectra of the soil humic and fulvic acids, along with heterocyclic and amino sugar/terminal amino acid nitrogens. Spectra of aquatic samples, including the XAD-4 acids, contain resolved heterocyclic nitrogen peaks in addition to the amide nitrogens. The spectrum of the nitrogen enriched, microbially derived Pony Lake, Antarctica fulvic acid, appeared to contain resonances in the region of pyrazine, imine and/or pyridine nitrogens, which have not been observed previously in soil or aquatic humic substances by ¹⁵N NMR. Liquid state ¹⁵N NMR experiments were also recorded on the Elliot soil humic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid, both to examine the feasibility of the techniques, and to determine whether improvements in resolution over the solid state could be realized. For both samples, polarization transfer (DEPT) and indirect detection (¹H–¹⁵N gHSQC) spectra revealed greater resolution among nitrogens directly bonded to protons. The amide/aminoquinone nitrogens could also be observed by direct detection experiments.

  2. Phosphate ions in bone: identification of a calcium-organic phosphate complex by 31P solid-state NMR spectroscopy at early stages of mineralization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y; Ackerman, J L; Strawich, E S; Rey, C; Kim, H-M; Glimcher, M J

    2003-05-01

    Previous 31P cross-polarization and differential cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP/MAS and DCP/MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy studies of native bone and of the isolated crystals of the calcified matrix synthesized by osteoblasts in cell culture identified and characterized the major PO(-3)(4) phosphate components of the mineral phase. The isotropic and anisotropic chemical shift parameters of the minor HPO(-2)(4) component in bone mineral and in mineral deposited in osteoblast cell cultures were found to differ significantly from those of brushite, octacalcium phosphate, and other synthetic calcium phosphates. However, because of in vivo and in vitro evidence that phosphoproteins may play a significant role in the nucleation of the solid mineral phase of calcium phosphate in bone and other vertebrate calcified tissues, the focus of the current solid-state 31P NMR experiments was to detect the possible presence of and characterize the phosphoryl groups of phosphoproteins in bone at the very earliest stages of bone mineralization, as well as the possible presence of calcium-phosphoprotein complexes. The present study demonstrates that by far the major phosphate components identified by solid-state 31P NMR in the very earliest stages of mineralization are protein phosphoryl groups which are not complexed with calcium. However, very small amounts of calcium-complexed protein phosphoryl groups as well as even smaller, trace amounts of apatite crystals were also present at the earliest phases of mineralization. These data support the hypothesis that phosphoproteins complexed with calcium play a significant role in the initiation of bone calcification. PMID:12724829

  3. 1H to 13C Energy Transfer in Solid State NMR Spectroscopy of Natural Organic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berns, Anne E.; Conte, Pellegrino

    2010-05-01

    ., van Lagen, B., Buurman, P. & de Jager, P.A., 1997. Quantitative Aspects of Solid-State 13C-NMR Spectra of Humic Substances from Soils of Volcanic Systems. Geoderma, 80, 327-338. Conte, P., Piccolo, A., van Lagen, B., Buurman, P. & Hemminga, M.A., 2002. Elemental quantitation of natural organic matter by CPMAS C-13 NMR spectroscopy. Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, 21, 158-170. Conte, P., Spaccini, R. & Piccolo, A., 2004. State of the art of CPMAS C-13-NMR spectroscopy applied to natural organic matter. Progress in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, 44, 215-223. Dria, K.J., Sachleben, J.R. & Hatcher, P.G., 2002. Solid-state carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance of humic acids at high magnetic field strengths. Journal of Environmental Quality, 31, 393-401. Kiem, R., Knicker, H., Korschens, M. & Kogel-Knabner, I., 2000. Refractory organic carbon in C-depleted arable soils, as studied by C-13 NMR spectroscopy and carbohydrate analysis. Organic Geochemistry, 31, 655-668. Kögel-Knabner, I., 2000. Analytical approaches for characterizing soil organic matter. Organic Geochemistry, 31, 609-625. Mao, J.D., Hu, W.G., Schmidt-Rohr, K., Davies, G., Ghabbour, E.A. & Xing, B., 2000. Quantitative characterization of humic substances by solid-state carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 64, 873-884. Metz, G., Ziliox, M. & Smith, S.O., 1996. Towards quantitative CP-MAS NMR. Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, 7, 155-160. Preston, C.M., 2001. Carbon-13 solid-state NMR of soil organic matter - using the technique effectively. Canadian Journal of Soil Science, 81, 255-270. Smernik, R.J. & Oades, J.M., 2000a. The use of spin counting for determining quantitation in solid state C-13 NMR spectra of natural organic matter 1. Model systems and the effects of paramagnetic impurities. Geoderma, 96, 101-129. Smernik, R.J. & Oades, J.M., 2000b. The use of spin counting for determining quantitation in solid state C-13 NMR spectra of natural

  4. Stationary phases with special structural properties for high-throughput separation techniques: preparation, characterization and applications.

    PubMed

    Buszewski, Boguslaw; Welerowicz, Tomasz

    2004-06-01

    Stationary phases with specific structural properties for high-throughput liquid chromatographic (LC) techniques are described. Special attention was paid to phases with special structural properties, mainly containing internal functional group (e.g. amide). Such materials are generally called "embedded phases". There are phases created in amidation process of aminopropylated silica gel, especially phases based on biological compounds, like phospholipids and cholesterol, which are called immobilized artificial membranes (IAM's). The synthesis and applications of polar embedded amide LC stationary phases were also reviewed. Methods of characterization of synthesized packing materials were presented, with general focusing on spectroscopic measurements like (13C and 29Si CP/MAS NMR and FT-IR), elemental and thermal analysis as well as chromatographic quantitative structure-retention relationships (QSRR) and extended chemometric tests. The potential applications of various dedicated stationary phases in a high-throughput LC screening procedures were also presented. PMID:15200378

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Hybrid Materials Consisting of n-octadecyltriethoxysilane by Using n-Hexadecylamine as Surfactant and Q0 and T0 Cross-Linkers

    PubMed Central

    Warad, Ismail; Omar Abd-Elkader, H; Al-Resayes, Saud; Husein, Ahmad; Al-Nuri, Mohammed; Boshaala, Ahmed; Al-Zaqri, Nabil; Ben Hadda, Taibi

    2012-01-01

    Novel hybrid xerogel materials were synthesized by a sol-gel procedure. n-octadecyltriethoxysilane was co-condensed with and without different cross-linkers using Q0 and T0 mono-functionalized organosilanes in the presence of n-hexadecylamine with different hydroxyl silica functional groups at the surface. These polymer networks have shown new properties, for example, a high degree of cross-linking and hydrolysis. Two different synthesis steps were carried out: simple self-assembly followed by sol-gel transition and precipitation of homogenous sols. Due to the lack of solubility of these materials, the compositions of the new materials were determined by infrared spectroscopy, 13C and 29Si CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. PMID:22754364

  6. Porosity in hexylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes: Effects of monomer concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Baugher, B.; Loy, D.A.; Assink, R.A.; Prabakar, S.; Shea, K.J.; Oviatt, H.

    1994-12-31

    Hexylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes can be prepared as mesoporous or non-porous xerogels simply by switching from basic to acidic polymerization conditions. In this study, we looked at the effect of monomer concentration on porosity of hexylene-bridged xerogels prepared under acidic and basic conditions. 1, 6-Hexylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes were prepared by sol-gel polymerizations of 1, 6-bis(triethoxysilyl)hexane 1 with concentrations between 0. 1 to 1.2 M in ethanol. Gelation times ranged from seconds for 1.2 M concentration to months for 0.2 M. The gels were processed into xerogels by an aqueous work-up and the dry gels characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), solid state {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si CP MAS NMR spectroscopy, and gas sorption porosimetry.

  7. Comparison of bridged polysilsesquioxane xerogels prepared from methoxy-, ethoxy-, and propoxy-silyl monomers

    SciTech Connect

    Baugher, B.M.; Loy, D.A.

    1996-10-01

    Hydrocarbon-bridged polysilsesquioxanes are prepared by the sol-gel polymerization of monomers with more than one trialkoxysilyl groups attached directly to the bridging group by Si-C bonds. While the effects of varying the length of the bridging group (length, rigidity, etc.), monomer concentration, and type of catalyst have been studied, the effect of different alkoxy ligands on the silicon atoms has not been investigated. For this study, 1, 6-bis(triethoxysilyl)hexane 1, 1,6-bis(trimethoxysilyl)hexane 2, and 1,6-bis(tripropoxysilyl)hexane 3 were polymerized under acidic and basic conditions in ethanol, methanol, and n-propanol respectively as well as tetrahydrofuran (THF). The resulting gels were processed to afford xerogels that were characterized by SEM, solid state {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning (CP MAS) NMR spectroscopy, nitrogen and CO{sub 2} sorption porosimetry.

  8. Comparison of bridged polysilsesquioxane xerogels prepared from methoxy- and ethoxy-silyl monomers

    SciTech Connect

    Loy, D.A.; Baugher, B.; Assink, R.A.; Prabakar, S.; Shea, K.J.

    1994-12-31

    Hydrocarbon-bridged polysilsesquioxanes are prepared by the sol-gel polymerization of monomers with more than one trialkoxysilyl group attached directly to the bridging group by Si-C bonds. While the effects of varying the identity of the bridging group (length, rigidity, etc.), monomer concentration, and type of catalyst have been studied, the effect of different alkoxy ligands on the silicon atoms has not been investigated. For this study, 1, 6-- bis(triethoxysilyl)hexane 1 and 1, 6-bis(trimethoxysilyl)hexane 2 were polymerized under acidic and basic conditions in ethanol and methanol, respectively, and in tetrahydrofuran (THF). The resulting gels were processed to afford xerogels that were characterized by SEM, solid state {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning (CP MAS) NMR spectroscopy, and nitrogen sorption porosimetry.

  9. Rapid synthesis of a versatile organic/inorganic hybrid material based on pyrogenic silica.

    PubMed

    Becuwe, M; Cazier, F; Woisel, P; Landy, D; Delattre, F

    2010-10-01

    An efficient approach has been developed to synthesize a new versatile organo-silica material by non-conventional method (microwave irradiation and ultrasonic vibration) from amorphous pyrogenic silica and has been compared with thermic procedure. The samples were fully characterized by FTIR, solid-state (29)Si and (13)C CP/MAS NMR, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by N(2)-sorption isotherms measurements. The functionalization of silicon dioxide by 4-(chloromethylphenyl) trichlorosilane has been easily achieved by ultrasound irradiation in a very short time with high loading of organic fragments. Significant different sizes of pores were observed according to conventional or non-conventional synthesis procedure. In addition, new structural properties have been created with the emergence of a mesoporosity. PMID:20580377

  10. Solid-state NMR identification and quantification of newly formed aluminosilicate phases in weathered kaolinite systems.

    PubMed

    Crosson, Garry S; Choi, Sunkyung; Chorover, Jon; Amistadi, Mary Kay; O'Day, Peggy A; Mueller, Karl T

    2006-01-19

    The weathering of a specimen kaolinite clay was studied over the course of 369 d via solid-state 29Si magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and high-field 27Al MAS NMR. The chosen baseline solution conditions (0.05 mol kg-1 of Al, 2 mol kg-1 of Na+, 1 mol kg-1 of NO3-, 1 mol kg-1 of OH-, and pH approximately 13.8) approximate those of solutions leaking from waste tanks at the Hanford Site in Richland, WA. Nonradioactive Cs and Sr cations were added to this synthetic tank waste leachate (STWL) solution at concentrations of 10(-3), 10(-4), and 10(-5) molal (m) to represent their radionuclide counterparts. The transformations of silicon- and aluminum-containing solid phase species were monitored quantitatively by using NMR spectroscopy, with the resulting spectra directly reporting the influence of the initial Cs and Sr on formation and transformation of the neo-formed solids. At the lowest concentration of Cs and Sr employed (10(-5) m in each cation) peaks consistent with the formation of zeolite-like minerals were detected via 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR as early as 33 d. At concentrations of 10(-3) m in each cation, new silicon species are not detected until 93 d, although neophases containing four-coordinate aluminum were detectable at earlier reaction times via 27Al MAS NMR. At the highest magnetic field strengths employed in this NMR study, deconvolutions of resonances detected in the tetrahedral region of the 27Al MAS spectra yielded multiple components, indicating the existence of at least four new aluminum-containing phases. Two of these phases are identified as sodalite and cancrinite through comparison with diffuse-reflectance infrared (DRIFT) spectra and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) results, while a third phase may correlate with a previously detected aluminum-rich chabazite phase. All measurable solid reaction products have been quantified via their 27Al MAS resonances acquired at high magnetic field strengths (17.6 T), and

  11. Solid-State NMR Identification and Quantification of Newly Formed Aluminosilicate Phases in Weathered Kaolinite Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Crosson, Garry S.; Choi, Sunkyung; Chorover, Jon; Amistadi, Mary K.; O'Day, Peggy A.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2006-01-19

    The weathering of a specimen kaolinite clay was studied over the course of 369 d via solid-state 29Si magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and high-field 27Al MAS NMR. The chosen baseline solution conditions (0.05 mol kg-1 of Al, 2 mol kg-1 of Na+, 1 mol kg-1 of NO3 -, 1 mol kg-1 of OH-, and pH ~13.8) approximate those of solutions leaking from waste tanks at the Hanford Site in Richland, WA. Nonradioactive Cs and Sr cations were added to this synthetic tank waste leachate (STWL) solution at concentrations of 10-3, 10-4, and 10-5 molal (m) to represent their radionuclide counterparts. The transformations of silicon- and aluminum-containing solid phase species were monitored quantitatively by using NMR spectroscopy, with the resulting spectra directly reporting the influence of the initial Cs and Sr on formation and transformation of the neo-formed solids. At the lowest concentration of Cs and Sr employed (10-5 m in each cation) peaks consistent with the formation of zeolite-like minerals were detected via 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR as early as 33 d. At concentrations of 10-3 m in each cation, new silicon species are not detected until 93 d, although neophases containing four-coordinate aluminum were detectable at earlier reaction times via 27Al MAS NMR. At the highest magnetic field strengths employed in this NMR study, deconvolutions of resonances detected in the tetrahedral region of the 27Al MAS spectra yielded multiple components, indicating the existence of at least four new aluminum-containing phases. Two of these phases are identified as sodalite and cancrinite through comparison with diffuse-reflectance infrared (DRIFT) spectra and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) results, while a third phase may correlate with a previously detected aluminum-rich chabazite phase. All measurable solid reaction products have been quantified via their 27Al MAS resonances acquired at high magnetic field strengths (17.6 T), and the quantitative

  12. Direct Speciation of Phosphorus in Alum-Amended Poultry Litter: Solid-State 31P NMR Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Hunger, Stefan; Cho, Herman M.; Sims, James T.; Sparks, Donald L.

    2004-02-01

    Amending poultry litter (PL) with aluminum sulfate (alum) has proven to be effective in reducing water-soluble phosphorus (P) in the litter and in runoff from fields that have received PL applications; it has therefore been suggested as a best management practice. Although its effectiveness has been demonstrated on a macroscopic scale in the field, little is known about P speciation in either alumamended or unamended litter. This knowledge is important for the evaluation of the long-term stability and bioavailability of P, which is a necessary prerequisite for the assessment of the sustainability of intensive poultry operations. Both solid state MAS and CP-MAS {sup 31}P NMR as well as {sup 31}P({sup 27}Al) TRAPDOR were used to investigate P speciation in alumamended and unamended PL. The results indicate the presence of a complex mixture of organic and inorganic orthophosphate phases. A calcium phosphate phase, probably a surface precipitate on calcium carbonate, could be identified in both unamended and alum-amended PL, as well as physically bound HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. Phosphate associated with Al was found in the alum-amended PL, most probably a mixture of a poorly ordered wavellite and phosphate surface complexes on aluminum hydroxide that had been formed by the hydrolysis of alum. However, a complex mixture of organic and inorganic phosphate species could not be resolved. Phosphate associated with Al comprised on average 40{+-}14% of the total P in alum-amended PL, whereas calcium phosphate phases comprised on average 7{+-}4% in the alum-amended PL and 14{+-}5% in the unamended PL.

  13. NMR analysis of biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is usually analyzed by the various methods called for in standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is not one of these methods. However, NMR, with 1H-NMR commonly applied, can be useful in a variety of applications related to biodiesel. These include monit...

  14. Ab Initio Quality NMR Parameters in Solid-State Materials Using a High-Dimensional Neural-Network Representation.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Jérôme; Xie, Yu; Pickard, Chris J; Hassanali, Ali A

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most powerful experimental tools to probe the local atomic order of a wide range of solid-state compounds. However, due to the complexity of the related spectra, in particular for amorphous materials, their interpretation in terms of structural information is often challenging. These difficulties can be overcome by combining molecular dynamics simulations to generate realistic structural models with an ab initio evaluation of the corresponding chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling tensors. However, due to computational constraints, this approach is limited to relatively small system sizes which, for amorphous materials, prevents an adequate statistical sampling of the distribution of the local environments that is required to quantitatively describe the system. In this work, we present an approach to efficiently and accurately predict the NMR parameters of very large systems. This is achieved by using a high-dimensional neural-network representation of NMR parameters that are calculated using an ab initio formalism. To illustrate the potential of this approach, we applied this neural-network NMR (NN-NMR) method on the (17)O and (29)Si quadrupolar coupling and chemical shift parameters of various crystalline silica polymorphs and silica glasses. This approach is, in principal, general and has the potential to be applied to predict the NMR properties of various materials. PMID:26730889

  15. Characterization by solid-state NMR and selective dissolution techniques of anhydrous and hydrated CEM V cement pastes

    SciTech Connect

    Brunet, F.; Charpentier, T.; Chao, C.N.; Peycelon, H.; Nonat, A.

    2010-02-15

    The long term behaviour of cement based materials is strongly dependent on the paste microstructure and also on the internal chemistry. A CEM V blended cement containing pulverised fly ash (PFA) and blastfurnace slag (BFS) has been studied in order to understand hydration processes which influence the paste microstructure. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy with complementary X-ray diffraction analysis and selective dissolution techniques have been used for the characterization of the various phases (C{sub 3}S, C{sub 2}S, C{sub 3}A and C{sub 4}AF) of the clinker and additives and then for estimation of the degree of hydration of these same phases. Their quantification after simulation of experimental {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectra has allowed us to follow the hydration of recent (28 days) and old (10 years) samples that constitutes a basis of experimental data for the prediction of hydration model.

  16. Design of C18 Organic Phases with Multiple Embedded Polar Groups for Ultraversatile Applications with Ultrahigh Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Mallik, Abul K; Qiu, Hongdeng; Oishi, Tomohiro; Kuwahara, Yutaka; Takafuji, Makoto; Ihara, Hirotaka

    2015-07-01

    For the first time, we synthesized multiple embedded polar groups (EPGs) containing linear C18 organic phases. The new materials were characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, (1)H NMR, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT), solid-state (13)C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR, suspended-state (1)H NMR, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). (29)Si CP/MAS NMR was carried out to investigate the degree of cross-linking of the silane and silane functionality of the modified silica. Solid-state (13)C CP/MAS NMR and suspended-state (1)H NMR spectroscopy indicated a higher alkyl chain order for the phase containing four EPGs than for the phase with three EPGs. To correlate the NMR results with temperature-dependent chromatographic studies, standard reference materials (SRM 869b and SRM 1647e), a column selectivity test mixture for liquid chromatography was employed. A single EPG containing the C18 phase was also prepared in a similar manner to be used as a reference column especially for the separation of basic and polar compounds in reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC), respectively. Detailed chromatographic characterization of the new phases was performed in terms of their surface coverage, hydrophobic selectivity, shape selectivity, hydrogen bonding capacity, and ion-exchange capacity at pH 2.7 and 7.6 for RPLC as well as their hydrophilicity, the selectivity for hydrophilic-hydrophobic substituents, the selectivity for the region and configurational differences in hydrophilic substituents, the evaluation of electrostatic interactions, and the evaluation of the acidic-basic nature for HILIC-mode separation. Furthermore, peak shapes for the basic analytes propranolol and amitriptyline were studied as a function of the number of EPGs on the C18 phases in the RPLC. The chromatographic performance of multiple EPGs containing C18 HILIC phases is illustrated

  17. Natural abundance (14)N and (15)N solid-state NMR of pharmaceuticals and their polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Veinberg, Stanislav L; Johnston, Karen E; Jaroszewicz, Michael J; Kispal, Brianna M; Mireault, Christopher R; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Schurko, Robert W

    2016-06-29

    (14)N ultra-wideline (UW), (1)H{(15)N} indirectly-detected HETCOR (idHETCOR) and (15)N dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments, in combination with plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of (14)N EFG tensors, were utilized to characterize a series of nitrogen-containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including HCl salts of scopolamine, alprenolol, isoprenaline, acebutolol, dibucaine, nicardipine, and ranitidine. A case study applying these methods for the differentiation of polymorphs of bupivacaine HCl is also presented. All experiments were conducted upon samples with naturally-abundant nitrogen isotopes. For most of the APIs, it was possible to acquire frequency-stepped UW (14)N SSNMR spectra of stationary samples, which display powder patterns corresponding to pseudo-tetrahedral (i.e., RR'R''NH(+) and RR'NH2(+)) or other (i.e., RNH2 and RNO2) nitrogen environments. Directly-excited (14)N NMR spectra were acquired using the WURST-CPMG pulse sequence, which incorporates WURST (wideband, uniform rate, and smooth truncation) pulses and a CPMG (Carr-Purcell Meiboom-Gill) refocusing protocol. In certain cases, spectra were acquired using (1)H → (14)N broadband cross-polarization, via the BRAIN-CP (broadband adiabatic inversion - cross polarization) pulse sequence. These spectra provide (14)N electric field gradient (EFG) tensor parameters and orientations that are particularly sensitive to variations in local structure and intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions. The (1)H{(15)N} idHETCOR spectra, acquired under conditions of fast magic-angle spinning (MAS), used CP transfers to provide (1)H-(15)N chemical shift correlations for all nitrogen environments, except for two sites in acebutolol and nicardipine. One of these two sites (RR'NH2(+) in acebutolol) was successfully detected using the DNP-enhanced (15)N{(1)H} CP/MAS measurement, and one (RNO2 in nicardipine) remained elusive due to the absence of

  18. Solid-state NMR in the analysis of drugs and naturally occurring materials.

    PubMed

    Paradowska, Katarzyna; Wawer, Iwona

    2014-05-01

    This article presents some of the solid-state NMR (SSNMR) techniques used in the pharmaceutical and biomedical research. Solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR provides structural information on powder amorphous solids for which single-crystal diffraction structures cannot be obtained. NMR is non-destructive; the powder sample may be used for further studies. Quantitative results can be obtained, although solid-state NMR spectra are not normally quantitative. As compared with other techniques, MAS NMR is insensitive and requires a significant amount of the powder sample (2-100mg) to fill the 1.3-7 mm ZrO2 rotor. This is its main drawback, since natural compounds isolated from plants, microorganisms or cell cultures are difficult to obtain in quantities higher than a few milligrams. Multinuclear MAS NMR routinely uses (1)H and (13)C nuclei, less frequently (15)N, (19)F, (31)P, (77)Se, (29)Si, (43)Ca or (23)Na. The article focuses on the pharmaceutical applications of SSNMR, the studies were aimed to control over manufacturing processes (e.g. crystallization and milling) investigation of chemical and physical stability of solid forms both as pure drug and in a formulated product. SSNMR is used in combination with some other analytical methods (DSC, XRD, FT-IR) and theoretical calculations of NMR parameters. Biologically active compounds, such as amino acids and small peptides, steroids and flavonoids were studied by SSNMR methods (part 4) providing valuable structural information. The SSNMR experiments performed on biopolymers and large natural products like proteins, cellulose and lipid layers are commented upon briefly in part 5. PMID:24173236

  19. {sup 29}Si attribution of the 1.3 mT hyperfine structure of the E{sup '}{sub g}amma centers in amorphous SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Vaccaro, G.; Agnello, S.; Buscarino, G.; Nuccio, L.; Grandi, S.; Mustarelli, P.

    2009-05-01

    We report an experimental investigation by electron paramagnetic resonance of the doublet of lines split by approx1.3 mT and centered on the E{sup '}{sub g}amma center resonance line in the spectrum of irradiated amorphous SiO{sub 2}. Commercial and sol-gel materials, some of which subjected to hydrogen-deuterium exchange, were investigated. Exposure to gamma or beta rays at room temperature of the samples and subsequent thermal treatments were carried out to induce the defects and to study their thermal stability. In all the materials used the ratio between the signal of the E{sup '}{sub g}amma centers and that of the 1.3 mT doublet is constant and independent of the OH and OD contents. Furthermore, the 1.3 mT doublet and the E{sup '}{sub g}amma center feature similar thermal stability. These results support the attribution of the 1.3 mT doublet to the hyperfine interaction between the unpaired electron magnetic moment of the E{sup '}{sub g}amma center and the nuclear magnetic moment of a second near neighboring {sup 29}Si atom. Our results also suggest that the E{sup '}{sub g}amma site needs an appropriate surrounding of {sup 29}Si in back-bond configuration to experience this hyperfine interaction.

  20. Structural features of a bituminous coal and their changes during low-temperature oxidation and loss of volatiles investigated by advanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mao, J.-D.; Schimmelmann, A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Hatcher, P.G.; Li, Y.

    2010-01-01

    /MAS spectrum. DP/MAS, but not CP/MAS, allowed us to detect the changes during low-temperature oxidation and loss of volatiles. These results demonstrate the applicability of advanced solid-state NMR techniques in chemical characterization of coal. ?? 2010 American Chemical Society.

  1. Two dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schram, J.; Bellama, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Two dimensional NMR represents a significant achievement in the continuing effort to increase solution in NMR spectroscopy. This book explains the fundamentals of this new technique and its analytical applications. It presents the necessary information, in pictorial form, for reading the ''2D NMR,'' and enables the practicing chemist to solve problems and run experiments on a commercial spectrometer by using the software provided by the manufacturer.

  2. Intramolecular condensation reactions of {alpha},{omega}-bis(triethoxysilyl)alkanes. Formation of cyclic disilsesquioxanes

    SciTech Connect

    Loy, D.A.; Carpenter, J.P.; Myers, S.A.; Assink, R.A.; Small, J.H.; Greaves, J.; Shea, K.J.

    1996-09-04

    In this paper, we used mass spectrometry and {sup 29}Si NMR spectroscopy to discover that the length of the alkylene-bridging groups had a pronounced effect on the competition between cyclization and polymerization of {alpha},{omega}-bis(triethoxysilyl)alkanes and on the formation of polymeric gels. While the intramolecular reaction clearly slows gelation, the cyclic disilsesquioxanes are still tetrafunctional monomers theoretically capable of forming polymeric gels. If the ring structures, which bear a striking resemblence to carbohydrates, are preserved through the polymerization, the resulting poly(cyclic disilsesquioxane) gels may have structural similarities to branched or cross-linked carbohydrates, such as cellulose or chitosan. Under base-catalyzed sol-gel polymerization conditions, 3 and 4 (six- and seven-membered cyclic disilsesquioxanes, respectively) quickly reacted to give gels with significant ring opening as determined from the {sup 29}Si chemical shifts in solid-state (CP MAS) NMR spectra. However, gels prepared under acidic conditions reveal some or all of the cyclic disilsesquioxane functionality was preserved in the polymers. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Investigations of adsorption sites on oxide surfaces using solid-state NMR and TPD-IGC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombeck, Rebecca A.

    diameters and thermal histories. The bulk structural features in both compositions of glass fibers were identified using high-resolution 29Si, 27Al, and 11B magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopic measurements. In multi-component glasses, the determination of silicon, aluminum, and boron distributions becomes difficult due to the competitive nature of the network-modifying oxides among the network-forming oxides. In pure silicates, 29Si MAS NMR can often resolve resonances arising from silicate tetrahedron having varying numbers of bridging oxygens. In aluminoborosilicate glasses, aluminum is present in four-, five-, and six- coordination with oxygen as neighbors. The speciation of the aluminum can be determined using 27Al MAS NMR. The fraction of tetrahedral boron species in the glass fibers were measured using 11B MAS NMR, which is typically used to study the short-range structure of borate containing glasses such as alkali borate, borosilicate, and aluminoborosilicate glasses. While solid-state NMR is a powerful tool for elucidating bonding environments and coordination changes in the glass structure, it cannot quantitatively probe low to moderate surface area samples due to insufficient spins. Chemical probes either physisorbed or chemisorbed to the fiber's surface can increase the surface selectivity of NMR for analysis of samples with low surface areas and provide information about the local molecular structure of the reactive surface site. Common chemical probe molecules contain NMR active nuclei such as 19F or may be enriched with 13C. A silyating agent, (3,3,3-trifluoropropyl)dimethylchlorosilane (TFS), reacts with reactive surface hydroxyls, which can be quantified by utilizing the NMR active nucleus (19F) contained in the probe molecule. The observed 19F MAS NMR peak area is integrated and compared against a standard of known fluorine spins (concentration), allowing the number of reactive hydroxyl sites to be quantified. IGC is a method used to study the

  4. Correlations between 11B NMR parameters and structural characters in borate and borosilicate minerals investigated by high-resolution MAS NMR and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bing; Sun, Zhaohua; Yao, Yefeng; Pan, Yuanming

    2012-05-01

    Borates consisting of diverse fundamental building blocks (FBB) formed from complex polymerization of planar triangular [Bϕ3] groups and tetrahedral [Bϕ4] groups, where ϕ = O and OH, provide an excellent opportunity for investigation of correlations between the NMR parameters and local structures. However, previous studies suggested that the 11B NMR parameters in borates are insensitive to local structural environments other than the B coordination number, in contrast to those documented for 29Si, 23Na and 27Al in silicates, and no correlation between 11B chemical shifts and the sum of bond valences has been established for borate minerals with hydroxyl groups or molecular water in the structures. In this study, high-resolution NMR spectra have been acquired at the ultra high field of 21 T as well as at 14 T for selected borate and borosilicate minerals, and have been used to extract high-precision NMR parameters by using combined ab initio theoretical calculations and spectral simulations. These new NMR parameters reveal subtle correlations with various structural characters, especially the effects of the 11B chemical shifts from the bridging oxygen atom(s), site symmetry, symmetry of FBB, the sum of bond valences, as well as the next-nearest-neighbor cations and hydrogen bonding. Also, these results provide new insights into the shielding mechanism for 11B in borate and borosilicate minerals. In particular, this study demonstrates that the small variation in 11B chemical shifts can still be used to probe the local structural environments and that the established correlations can be used to investigate the structural details in borates and amorphous materials.

  5. Elemental and structural analysis of silicon forms in herbal drugs using silicon-29 MAS NMR and WD-XRF spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Pajchel, L; Nykiel, P; Kolodziejski, W

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this work was to study concentration of silicon and its structural forms present in herbal drugs. Equisetum arvense and Urtica dioica L. from teapot bags, dietary supplements (tablets and capsules) containing those herbs, dry extract obtained from a teapot bag of E. arvense, and samples of the latter herb harvested in wild habitat over four months were studied using wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WD-XRF) and high-resolution solid-state (29)Si NMR. The highest concentration of Si, ca. 27mg/g, was found in the herbal material from the teapot bags containing E. arvense. The Si content in natural E. arvense (whole plants) increased from May to August by ca. 7mg/g, reaching value 26mg/g. Three different silicon forms were detected in the studied herbal samples: Si(OSi)4 (Q(4)), Si(OH)(OSi)3 (Q(3)) and Si(OH)2(OSi)2 (Q(2)). Those sites were populated in E. arvense in the following order: Q(4)≫Q(3)>Q(2). A dramatic, ca. 50-fold decrease of the Si concentration during the infusion process was observed. The infusion process and the subsequent drying procedure augmented population of the Q(4) sites at the cost of the Q(2) sites. The WD-XRF and (29)Si NMR methods occurred useful and complementary in the study of herbal materials. PMID:21813258

  6. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1988-08-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 32 refs., 56 figs.

  7. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1986-09-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 55 figs.

  8. Sensitive, quantitative carbon-13 NMR spectra by mechanical sample translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, Kevin J.; Allen, Mary; Martin, Rachel W.; Shaka, A. J.

    2009-04-01

    Collecting a truly quantitative carbon-13 spectrum is a time-consuming chore. Very long relaxation delays, required between transients to allow the z-magnetization, M z, of the spin with the longestT1 to return to the equilibrium value, M0, must precede each transient. These long delays also reduce sensitivity, as fewer transients per unit time can be acquired. In addition, sometimes T1 is not known to within even a factor of two: a conservative guess for the relaxation delay then leads to very low sensitivity. We demonstrate a fresh method to bypass these problems and collect quantitative carbon-13 spectra by swapping the sample volume after each acquisition with a different portion where the magnetization is already equilibrated to M0. Loading larger sample volumes of 10-20 mL into an unusually long (1520 mm) 5 mm OD. NMR tube and vertically sliding the tube between acquisitions accomplishes the swap. The relaxation delay can then be skipped altogether. The spectra are thus both quantitative, and far more sensitive. We demonstrate the moving tube technique on two small molecules (thymol and butylhydroxytoluene) and show good carbon-13 quantification. The gain in sensitivity can be as much as 10-fold for slowly-relaxing 13C resonances. These experiments show that quantitative, sensitive carbon-13 spectra are possible whenever sufficient sample volumes are available. The method is applicable to any slow-relaxing nuclear spin species, such as 29Si, 15N and other low-γ nuclei.

  9. NMR logging apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, David O; Turner, Peter

    2014-05-27

    Technologies including NMR logging apparatus and methods are disclosed. Example NMR logging apparatus may include surface instrumentation and one or more downhole probes configured to fit within an earth borehole. The surface instrumentation may comprise a power amplifier, which may be coupled to the downhole probes via one or more transmission lines, and a controller configured to cause the power amplifier to generate a NMR activating pulse or sequence of pulses. Impedance matching means may be configured to match an output impedance of the power amplifier through a transmission line to a load impedance of a downhole probe. Methods may include deploying the various elements of disclosed NMR logging apparatus and using the apparatus to perform NMR measurements.

  10. Silver and Gold NMR

    PubMed Central

    Zangger, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    Silver and gold, together with copper, form the transition metal group IB elements in the periodic table and possess very different nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic properties. While there is only one gold isotope (197Au), which has a spin of 3/2 and therefore a quadrupole moment, silver occurs in two isotopic forms (109Ag and 109Au), both of which have a spin 1/2 and similar NMR spectroscopic properties. The unfavorable properties of gold have prevented its NMR spectroscopic investigation thus far. On the other hand, there are several reports of silver NMR. However, the low sensitivity of silver, combined with its long relaxation times have rendered the direct detection of silver possible only with concentrations greater than a few tenth molar. Reviewed here are the general limitations of silver NMR and some techniques to partially overcome these limitations, as well as a summary of currently available chemical shift and scalar coupling data on 109Ag. PMID:18475898

  11. Molecular ordering of mixed surfactants in mesoporous silicas: A solid-state NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Mao, Kanmi; Wang, Shy-Guey; Lin, Victor S.-Y.; Pruski, Marek

    2011-02-17

    The use of mixed surfactants in the synthesis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) is of importance in the context of adjusting pore structures, sizes and morphologies. In the present study, the arrangement of molecules in micelles produced from a mixture of two surfactants, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) was detailed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Proximities of methyl protons in the trimethylammonium headgroup of CTAB and protons in the pyridinium headgroup of CPB were observed under fast magic angle spinning (MAS) by {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H double quantum (DQ) MAS NMR and NOESY. This result suggested that CTAB and CPB co-exist in the pores without forming significant monocomponent domain structures. {sup 1}H-{sup 29}Si heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) NMR showed that protons in the headgroups of CTAB are in closer proximity to the silica surface than those in the CPB headgroups. The structural information obtained in this investigation leads to better understanding of the mechanisms of self-assembly and their role in determining the structure and morphology of mesoporous materials.

  12. Studies on silicon NMR characterization and kinetic modeling of the structural evolution of siloxane-based materials and their applications in drug delivery and adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambati, Jyothirmai

    This dissertation presents studies of the synthetic processes and applications of siloxane-based materials. Kinetic investigations of bridged organoalkoxysilanes that are precursors to organic-inorganic hybrid polysilsesquioxanes are a primary focus. Quick gelation despite extensive cyclization is found during the polymerization of bridged silane precursors except for silanes with certain short bridges. This work is an attempt to characterize and understand some of the distinct features of bridged silanes using experimental characterization, kinetic modeling and simulation. In addition to this, the dissertation shows how the properties of siloxane-materials can be engineered for drug delivery and adsorption. The phase behavior of polymerizing mixtures is first investigated to identify the solutions that favor kinetic characterization. Microphase separation is found to cause gradual loss of NMR signal for certain initial compositions. Distortionless Enhancement by Polarization Transfer 29Si NMR is employed to identify the products of polymerization of some short-bridged silanes under no signal loss conditions. This technique requires knowing indirect 29Si-1H scalar coupling constants which sometimes cannot be measured due to second-order effects. However, the B3LYP density functional method with 6-31G basis set is found to predict accurate 29Si- 1H coupling constants of organoalkoxysilanes and siloxanes. The scalar coupling constants thus estimated are employed to resolve non-trivial coupled NMR spectra and quantitative kinetic modeling is performed using the DEPT Si NMR transients. In order to investigate the role of the organic bridging group, the structural evolution of bridged and non-bridged silanes are compared using Monte Carlo simulations. Kinetic and simulation models suggest that cyclization plays a key role right from the onset of polymerization for bridged silanes even more than in non-bridged silanes. The simulations indicate that the carbosiloxane

  13. Crystal structure, NMR study, dielectric relaxation and AC conductivity of a new compound [Cd3(SCN)2Br6(C2H9N2)2]n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, K.; Kamoun, S.; Ayedi, H. Ferid; Arous, M.

    2013-11-01

    The crystal structure, the 13C NMR spectroscopy and the complex impedance have been carried out on [Cd3(SCN)2Br6(C2H9N2)2]n. Crystal structure shows a 2D polymeric network built up of two crystallographically independent cadmium atoms with two different octahedral coordinations. This compound exhibits a phase transition at (T=355±2 K) which has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-rays powder diffraction, AC conductivity and dielectric measurements. Examination of 13C CP/MAS line shapes shows indirect spin-spin coupling (14N and 13C) with a dipolar coupling constant of 1339 Hz. The AC conductivity of this compound has been carried out in the temperature range 325-376 K and the frequency range from 10-2 Hz to 10 MHz. The impedance data were well fitted to two equivalent electrical circuits. The results of the modulus study reveal the presence of two distinct relaxation processes. One, at low frequency side, is thermally activated due to the ionic conduction of the crystal and the other, at higher frequency side, gradually disappears when temperature reaches 355 K which is attributed to the localized dipoles in the crystal. Moreover, the temperature dependence of DC-conductivity in both phases follows the Arrhenius law and the frequency dependence of σ(ω,T) follows Jonscher's universal law. The near values of activation energies obtained from the conductivity data and impedance confirm that the transport is through the ion hopping mechanism.

  14. In situ microscopic studies on the structures and phase behaviors of SF/PEG films using solid-state NMR and Raman imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Congheng; Yao, Ting; Tu, Sidong; Xu, Weijie; Han, Yi; Zhou, Ping

    2016-06-28

    In order to overcome the drawbacks of silk fibroin (SF)-based materials, SF has been blended with some polymers. Before using the blend material, understanding of the structures and phase behaviors of the blend is thought to be essential. In this study, solid-state (13)C CP-MAS NMR and Raman imaging techniques were used to study the structures and phase behaviors of blends of SF with polyethylene glycol (PEG) at a molecular weight that varied from 2 to 20 kDa and a blend ratio of SF/PEG from 95/5 to 70/30 (w/w%) at the molecular and microscopic levels. It is found that the conformational transition of SF to the β-sheet increased as the PEG content increased, while the amount of the formed β-sheet conformers was decreased as the PEG molecular weight increased for a given content. It is also observed that SF was incompatible with PEG to some extent. The phase separation into "sea" and "island" domains took place in the SF/PEG blend films. SF was dominantly present in the "sea" domain, while PEG in the "island" domains. The conformation of SF in the interface between SF and PEG was changed to the β-sheet, while that in the protein-rich domain remained in the random coil and/or helix conformation. These observations suggest that the specifically expected materials, for example, the silk-based microspheres or scaffold materials can be manufactured by controlling the molecular weight and content of PEG in the blend system. PMID:27255417

  15. Synthesis and characterization of cellulose 3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate silica hybrid spheres for enantioseparation of chiral β-blockers.

    PubMed

    Weng, Xilun; Bao, Zongbi; Xing, Huabin; Zhang, Zhiguo; Yang, Qiwei; Su, Baogen; Yang, Yiwen; Ren, Qilong

    2013-12-20

    A cellulose derivative-based chiral stationary phase (CSP) is considered one of the most widely applied CSPs due to its powerful enantioseparation ability. The high loading capacity and mechanical strength of CSPs are crucial for their application in preparative chromatography, such as a simulated moving bed. Compared to traditional cellulose-based CSPs that have been adsorbed onto chromatographic supports, organic-inorganic hybrid CSPs exhibit a potentially higher loading capacity and mechanical strength by increasing the density of chiral recognition groups. A hybrid cellulose 3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate chiral stationary phase (organic/inorganic: 70/30, w/w) was prepared via a sol-gel method and characterized with several analytical techniques, including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and (29)Si cross polarization/magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ((29)Si CP/MAS NMR). In addition, the as-synthesized hybrid chiral silica spheres were treated with an end-capping process to mask the residual silica hydroxyl groups. Compared to a commercial Chiralpak IB column, better separation of β-blocker drugs, including pindolol (selectivity of 5.55), metoprolol (2.30), propranolol (1.96), bisoprolol (1.74) and atenolol (1.46), on the end-capped CSP was achieved using liquid chromatography, which suggests that the packing material synthesized in this work has sufficient chiral discriminating ability for the effective separation of β-blocker drugs. PMID:24231262

  16. MAS-NMR studies of lithium aluminum silicate (LAS) glasses and glass-ceramics having different Li{sub 2}O/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Ananthanarayanan, A.; Kothiyal, G.P.; Montagne, L.; Revel, B.

    2010-01-15

    Emergence of phases in lithium aluminum silicate (LAS) glasses of composition (wt%) xLi{sub 2}O-71.7SiO{sub 2}-(17.7-x)Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-4.9K{sub 2}O-3.2B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-2.5P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (5.1<=x<=12.6) upon heat treatment were studied. {sup 29}Si, {sup 27}Al, {sup 31}P and {sup 11}B MAS-NMR were employed for structural characterization of both LAS glasses and glass-ceramics. In glass samples, Al is found in tetrahedral coordination, while P exists mainly in the form of orthophosphate units. B exists as BO{sub 3} and BO{sub 4} units. {sup 27}Al NMR spectra show no change with crystallization, ruling out the presence of any Al containing phase. Contrary to X-ray diffraction studies carried out, {sup 11}B (high field 18.8 T) and {sup 29}Si NMR spectra clearly indicate the unexpected crystallization of a borosilicate phase (Li,K)BSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}, whose structure is similar to the aluminosilicate virgilite. Also, lithium disilicate (Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}), lithium metasilicate (Li{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}) and quartz (SiO{sub 2}) were identified in the {sup 29}Si NMR spectra of the glass-ceramics. {sup 31}P NMR spectra of the glass-ceramics revealed the presence of Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and a mixed phase (Li,K){sub 3}PO{sub 4} at low alkali concentrations. - Graphical Abstract: The {sup 11}B MAS-NMR spectra of lithium aluminum silicate (LAS) glass-ceramics indicating the formation of Li/KBSiO{sub 6} phase. This phase is isostructural with virgilite and cannot be distinguished in X-ray diffractograms.

  17. NMR imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    In the past several years, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has become an established technique in diagnostic medicine and biomedical research. Although much of the work in this field has been directed toward development of whole-body imagers, James Aguayo, Stephen Blackband, and Joseph Schoeninger of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine working with Markus Hintermann and Mark Mattingly of Bruker Medical Instruments, recently developed a small-bore NMR microscope with sufficient resolution to image a single African clawed toad cell (Nature 1986, 322, 190-91). This improved resolution should lead to increased use of NMR imaging for chemical, as well as biological or physiological, applications. The future of NMR microscopy, like that of many other newly emerging techniques, is ripe with possibilities. Because of its high cost, however, it is likely to remain primarily a research tool for some time. ''It's like having a camera,'' says Smith. ''You've got a way to look at things at very fine levels, and people are going to find lots of uses for it. But it is a very expensive technique - it costs $100,000 to add imaging capability once you have a high-resolution NMR, which itself is at least a $300,000 instrument. If it can answer even a few questions that can't be answered any other way, though, it may be well worth the cost.''

  18. The abundance of 28Si32S, 29Si32S, 28Si34S, and 30Si32S in the inner layers of the envelope of IRC+10216

    PubMed Central

    Fonfría, J. P.; Cernicharo, J.; Richter, M. J.; Fernández-López, M.; Prieto, L. Velilla; Lacy, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    We present high spectral resolution mid-IR observations of SiS towards the C-rich AGB star IRC+10216 carried out with the Texas Echelon-cross-Echelle Spectrograph mounted on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. We have identified 204 ro-vibrational lines of 28Si32S, 26 of 29Si32S, 20 of 28Si34S, and 15 of 30Si32S in the frequency range 720 – 790 cm−1. These lines belong to bands v = 1 – 0, 2 – 1, 3 – 2, 4–3, and 5–4, and involve rotational levels with Jlow ≲ 90. About 30 per cent of these lines are unblended or weakly blended and can be partially or entirely fitted with a code developed to model the mid-IR emission of a spherically symmetric circumstellar envelope composed of expanding gas and dust. The observed lines trace the envelope at distances to the star ≲ 35R⋆(≃ 0″.7). The fits are compatible with an expansion velocity of 1+2.5(r/R⋆ −1) km s−1 between 1 and 5R⋆, 11 km s−1 between 5 and 20R⋆, and 14.5 km s−1 outwards. The derived abundance profile of 28Si32S with respect to H2 is 4.9 × 10−6 between the stellar photosphere and 5R⋆, decreasing linearly down to 1.6 × 10−6 at 20R⋆ and to 1.3 × 10−6 at 50R⋆. 28Si32S seems to be rotationally under LTE in the region of the envelope probed with our observations and vibrationally out of LTE in most of it. There is a red-shifted emission excess in the 28Si32S lines of band v = 1 – 0 that cannot be found in the lines of bands v = 2 – 1, 3 – 2, 4 – 3, and 5 – 4. This excess could be explained by an enhancement of the vibrational temperature around 20R⋆ behind the star. The derived isotopic ratios 28Si/29Si, and 32S/34S are 17 and 14, compatible with previous estimates. PMID:26997679

  19. Bioinspired insights into silicic acid stabilization mechanisms: the dominant role of polyethylene glycol-induced hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Preari, Melina; Spinde, Katrin; Lazic, Joëlle; Brunner, Eike; Demadis, Konstantinos D

    2014-03-19

    Mono- and disilicic acids were stabilized by uncharged polyethylene glycols (PEGs) in silica-supersaturated solutions (the starting solution contained 500 ppm/8.3 mM sodium orthosilicate, Na2SiO3·5H2O, expressed as SiO2) at pH = 7, most likely by hydrogen bonding between the silanol groups and -CH2-CH2-O-ether moieties. The stabilization was monitored by measuring molybdate-reactive silica and also by a combination of liquid- and solid-state (29)Si NMR spectroscopy. It depends on PEG concentration (20-100 ppm) and molecular weight (1550-20,000 Da). Two narrow (29)Si NMR signals characteristic for monosilicic acid (Q(0)) and disilicic acid (Q(1)) can be observed in (29)Si NMR spectra of solutions containing PEG 10000 with intensities distinctly higher than the control, that is, in the absence of PEG. Silica-containing precipitates are observed in the presence of PEG, in contrast to the gel formed in the absence of PEG. These precipitates exhibit similar degrees of silica polycondensation as found in the gel as can be seen from the (29)Si MAS NMR spectra. However, the (2)D HETCOR spectra show different (1)H NMR signal shifts: The signal due to H-bonded SiOH/H2O, which is found at 6 ppm in the control, is shifted to ~7 ppm in the PEG-containing precipitate. This indicates the formation of slightly stronger H-bonds than in the control sample, most likely between PEG and the silica species. The presence of PEG in these precipitates is unequivocally proven by (13)C CP MAS NMR spectroscopy. The (13)C signal of PEG significantly shifts and is much narrower in the precipitates as compared to the pristine PEG, indicating that PEG is embedded into the silica or at least bound to its surface (or both), and not phase separated. FT-IR spectra corroborate the above arguments. The H-bonding between silanol and ethereal O perturbs the band positions attributed to vibrations involving the O atom. This work may invoke an alternative way to envision silica species stabilization

  20. SYNCHROTRON X-RAY MICROTOMOGRAPHY, ELECTRON PROBE MICROANALYSIS, AND NMR OF TOLUENE WASTE IN CEMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    BUTLER,L.G.

    1999-07-22

    Synchrotron X-ray microtomography shows vesicular structures for toluene/cement mixtures, prepared with 1.22 to 3.58 wt% toluene. Three-dimensional imaging of the cured samples shows spherical vesicles, with diameters ranging from 20 to 250 {micro}m; a search with EPMA for vesicles in the range of 1-20 {micro}m proved negative. However, the total vesicle volume, as computed from the microtomography images, accounts for less than 10% of initial toluene. Since the cements were cured in sealed bottles, the larger portion of toluene must be dispersed within the cement matrix. Evidence for toluene in the cement matrix comes from {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, which shows a reduction in chain silicates with added toluene. Also, {sup 2}H NMR of d{sub 8}-toluene/cement samples shows high mobility for all, toluene and thus no toluene/cement binding. A model that accounts for all observations follows: For loadings below about 3 wt%, most toluene is dispersed in the cement matrix, with a small fraction of the initial toluene phase separating from the cement paste and forming vesicular structures that are preserved in the cured cement. Furthermore, at loadings above 3 wt%, the abundance of vesicles formed during toluene/cement paste mixing leads to macroscopic phase separation (most toluene floats to the surface of the cement paste).

  1. Dual Species NMR Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Joshua; Korver, Anna; Thrasher, Daniel; Walker, Thad

    2016-05-01

    We present progress towards a dual species nuclear magnetic oscillator using synchronous spin exchange optical pumping. By applying the bias field as a sequence of alkali 2 π pulses, we generate alkali polarization transverse to the bias field. The alkali polarization is then modulated at the noble gas resonance so that through spin exchange collisions the noble gas becomes polarized. This novel method of NMR suppresses the alkali field frequency shift by at least a factor of 2500 as compared to longitudinal NMR. We will present details of the apparatus and measurements of dual species co-magnetometry using this method. Research supported by the NSF and Northrop-Grumman Corp.

  2. Dilute RKKY model for NMR line broadening in the hidden-order state of URu2Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walstedt, R. E.; Kambe, S.; Tokunaga, Y.; Sakai, H.

    2016-01-01

    A well-known analytic model for Lorentzian broadening of metallic NMR lines by dilute localized magnetic centers embedded in a lattice has been applied to the case of the twofold-symmetry magnetism in URu2Si2 reported by R. Okazaki et al. [Science 331, 439 (2011), 10.1126/science.1197358]. The observed Lorentzian spectra are accounted for with a simple formula giving the 29Si NMR linewidth in terms of the susceptibility of the magnetic-broadening centers and a Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) coupling parameter. The concentration of such centers is estimated as c ˜0.01 . A numerical simulation of these effects confirms Lorentzian broadening with no measurable NMR shift and a width in reasonable agreement with the analytical model. The simulation shows further that domain effects on these spectra are largely absent. A four-site extended model of the broadening centers gives an estimate of the twofold susceptibility within a factor of 2 of the torque value of the susceptibility. Hypothetical superlattice effects are shown to be easily smoothed over by convolution with background Lorentzian broadening.

  3. Screening proteins for NMR suitability

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Adelinda A.; Semesi, Anthony; Garcia, Maite; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary NMR spectroscopy is an invaluable tool in structural genomics. Identification of protein samples that are amenable to structure determination by NMR spectroscopy requires efficient screening. Here, we describe how we prepare multiple samples in parallel and screen by NMR. The method described here is applicable to large structural genomics projects but can easily be scaled down for application to small structural biology projects since all the equipments used are those commonly found in any NMR structural biology laboratory. PMID:24590717

  4. Modern NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelinski, Lynn W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses direct chemical information that can be obtained from modern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, concentrating on the types of problems that can be solved. Shows how selected methods provide information about polymers, bipolymers, biochemistry, small organic molecules, inorganic compounds, and compounds oriented in a magnetic…

  5. Enantiodiscrimination by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Uccello-Barretta, Gloria; Balzano, Federica; Salvadori, Piero

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of enantiorecognition processes involves the detection of enantiomeric species as well as the study of chiral discrimination mechanisms. In both fields Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy plays a fundamental role, providing several tools, based on the use of suitable chiral auxiliaries, for observing distinct signals of enantiomers and for investigating the complexation phenomena involved in enantiodiscrimination processes. PMID:17100610

  6. A multinuclear solid state NMR spectroscopic study of the structural evolution of disordered calcium silicate sol-gel biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhongjie; Jones, Julian R; Hanna, John V; Smith, Mark E

    2015-01-28

    Disordered sol-gel prepared calcium silicate biomaterials show significant, composition dependent ability to bond with bone. Bone bonding is attributed to rapid hydroxycarbonate apatite (HCA) formation on the glass surface after immersion in body fluid (or implantation). Atomic scale details of the development of the structure of (CaO)x(SiO2)1-x (x = 0.2, 0.3 and 0.5) under heat treatment and subsequent dissolution in simulated body fluid (SBF) are revealed through a multinuclear solid state NMR approach using one-dimensional (17)O, (29)Si, (31)P and (1)H. Central to this study is the combination of conventional static and magic angle spinning (MAS) and two-dimensional (2D) triple quantum (3Q) (17)O NMR experiments that can readily distinguish and quantify the bridging (BOs) and non-bridging (NBOs) oxygens in the silicate network. Although soluble calcium is present in the sol, the (17)O NMR results reveal that the sol-gel produced network structure is initially dominated by BOs after gelation, aging and drying (e.g. at 120 °C), indicating a nanoscale mixture of the calcium salt and a predominantly silicate network. Only once the calcium salt is decomposed at elevated temperatures do the Ca(2+) ions become available to break BO. Apatite forming ability in SBF depends strongly on the surface OH and calcium content. The presence of calcium aids HCA formation via promotion of surface hydration and the ready availability of Ca(2+) ions. (17)O NMR shows the rapid loss of NBOs charge balanced by calcium as it is leached into the SBF. The formation of nanocrystalline, partially ordered HCA can be detected via(31)P NMR. This data indicates the importance of achieving the right balance of BO/NBO for optimal biochemical response and network properties. PMID:25494341

  7. 224} studied by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Y; Fang, X; Kögerler, P

    2014-05-14

    7Li nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies have been performed to investigate magnetic properties and spin dynamics of Mn3+ (S = 2) spins in the giant polyoxometalate molecule {Mn40W224}. The 7Li-NMR line width is proportional to the external magnetic field H as expected in a paramagnetic state above 3 K. Below this temperature the line width shows a sudden increase and is almost independent of H, which indicates freezing of the local Mn3+ spins. The temperature dependence of T1 for both 1H and 7Li reveals slow spin dynamics at low temperatures, consistent with spin freezing. The slow spin dynamics is also evidenced by the observation of a peak of 1/T2 around 3 K, where the fluctuation frequency of spins is of the order of ~200 kHz. An explicit form of the temperature dependence of the fluctuation frequency of Mn3+ spins is derived from the nuclear relaxation data.

  8. The NMR phased array.

    PubMed

    Roemer, P B; Edelstein, W A; Hayes, C E; Souza, S P; Mueller, O M

    1990-11-01

    We describe methods for simultaneously acquiring and subsequently combining data from a multitude of closely positioned NMR receiving coils. The approach is conceptually similar to phased array radar and ultrasound and hence we call our techniques the "NMR phased array." The NMR phased array offers the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and resolution of a small surface coil over fields-of-view (FOV) normally associated with body imaging with no increase in imaging time. The NMR phased array can be applied to both imaging and spectroscopy for all pulse sequences. The problematic interactions among nearby surface coils is eliminated (a) by overlapping adjacent coils to give zero mutual inductance, hence zero interaction, and (b) by attaching low input impedance preamplifiers to all coils, thus eliminating interference among next nearest and more distant neighbors. We derive an algorithm for combining the data from the phased array elements to yield an image with optimum SNR. Other techniques which are easier to implement at the cost of lower SNR are explored. Phased array imaging is demonstrated with high resolution (512 x 512, 48-cm FOV, and 32-cm FOV) spin-echo images of the thoracic and lumbar spine. Data were acquired from four-element linear spine arrays, the first made of 12-cm square coils and the second made of 8-cm square coils. When compared with images from a single 15 x 30-cm rectangular coil and identical imaging parameters, the phased array yields a 2X and 3X higher SNR at the depth of the spine (approximately 7 cm). PMID:2266841

  9. NMR imaging of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Rothwell, W.P.

    1988-03-01

    A method for obtaining at least one petrophysical property of a porous material containing therein at least one preselected fluid, is described, comprising: NMR imaging the material to generate signals dependent upon both M(0) and T/sub 1/ and M(0) and T/sub 2/, generating separate M(0), T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ images from the signals, and determining at least one petrophysical property from at least one of the images.

  10. NMR Studies of Peroxidases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitch, Nigel Charles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Peroxidases are a haem-containing group of enzymes with a wide diversity of function within biological systems. While a common characteristic is the ability to catalyse the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water, it is the accompanying processes of hormone synthesis and degradation which have generated such a high level of interest. However, information at the molecular level is limited to a single well-resolved crystal structure, that of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. This thesis presents a strategy for the investigation of peroxidase structure and function based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a technique which has the ability to address aspects of both protein structure and protein dynamics in solution. The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques has been developed in the context of plant peroxidases, notably the isoenzyme HRP-C derived from the horseradish root. Characterisation of the proton NMR spectra of HRP -C in resting and ligated states provided new information enabling the structure of the binding site for aromatic donor molecules, such as indole-3-propionic, ferulic and benzhydroxamic acids, to be resolved. In order to overcome difficulties encountered with a protein of the complexity of peroxidase, additional information was obtained from chemical shift parameters and the use of peroxidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis. A comparative study using NMR spectroscopy was undertaken for wild-type recombinant HRP-C expressed in Escherichia coli, and two protein variants with substitutions made to residues located on the distal side of the haem pocket, Phe41 to Val and Arg38 to Lys. NMR analyses of a plant peroxidase from barley grains and the fungal peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus were also successful using methods conceived with HRP-C. Examination of three specifically constructed recombinant protein variants of C. cinereus

  11. Geochemical kinetics via the Swift-Connick equations and solution NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harley, Steven J.; Ohlin, C. André; Casey, William H.

    2011-07-01

    Signal analysis in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy is among the most powerful methods to quantify reaction rates in aqueous solutions. To this end, the Swift-Connick approximations to the Bloch-McConnell equations have been used extensively to estimate rate parameters for elementary reactions. The method is primarily used for 17O NMR in aqueous solutions, but the list of geochemically relevant nuclei that can be used is long, and includes 29Si, 27Al, 19F, 13C and many others of particular interest to geochemists. Here we review the derivation of both the Swift-Connick and Bloch-McConnell equations and emphasize assumptions and quirks. For example, the equations were derived for CW-NMR, but are used with modern pulse FT-NMR and can be applied to systems that have exchange rates that are shorter than the lifetime of a typical pulse. The method requires a dilute solution where the minor reacting species contributes a negligible amount of total magnetization. We evaluate the sensitivity of results to this dilute-solution requirement and also highlight the need for chemically well-defined systems if reliable data are to be obtained. The limitations in using longitudinal relaxation to estimate reaction rate parameters are discussed. Finally, we provide examples of the application of the method, including ligand exchanges from aqua ions and hydrolysis complexes, that emphasize its flexibility. Once the basic requirements of the Swift-Connick method are met, it allows geochemists to establish rates of elementary reactions. Reactions at this scale lend themselves well to methods of computational simulation and could provide key tests of accuracy.

  12. Bayesian reconstruction of projection reconstruction NMR (PR-NMR).

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ji Won

    2014-11-01

    Projection reconstruction nuclear magnetic resonance (PR-NMR) is a technique for generating multidimensional NMR spectra. A small number of projections from lower-dimensional NMR spectra are used to reconstruct the multidimensional NMR spectra. In our previous work, it was shown that multidimensional NMR spectra are efficiently reconstructed using peak-by-peak based reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) algorithm. We propose an extended and generalized RJMCMC algorithm replacing a simple linear model with a linear mixed model to reconstruct close NMR spectra into true spectra. This statistical method generates samples in a Bayesian scheme. Our proposed algorithm is tested on a set of six projections derived from the three-dimensional 700 MHz HNCO spectrum of a protein HasA. PMID:25218584

  13. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    Within Cluster A, Partial Project A1, the pore space exploration by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) plays a central role. NMR is especially convenient since it probes directly the state and dynamics of the substance of interest: water. First, NMR is applied as relaxometry, where the degree of saturation but also the pore geometry controls the NMR signature of natural porous systems. Examples are presented where soil samples from the Selhausen, Merzenhausen (silt loams), and Kaldenkirchen (sandy loam) test sites are investigated by means of Fast Field Cycling Relaxometry at different degrees of saturation. From the change of the relaxation time distributions with decreasing water content and by comparison with conventional water retention curves we conclude that the fraction of immobile water is characterized by T1 < 5 ms. Moreover, the dependence of the relaxation rate on magnetic field strength allows the identification of 2D diffusion at the interfaces as the mechanism which governs the relaxation process (Pohlmeier et al. 2009). T2 relaxation curves are frequently measured for the rapid characterization of soils by means of the CPMG echo train. Basically, they contain the same information about the pore systems like T1 curves, since mostly the overall relaxation is dominated by surface relaxivity and the surface/volume ratio of the pores. However, one must be aware that T2 relaxation is additionally affected by diffusion in internal gradients, and this can be overcome by using sufficiently short echo times and low magnetic fields (Stingaciu et al. 2009). Second, the logic continuation of conventional relaxation measurements is the 2-dimensional experiment, where prior to the final detection of the CPMG echo train an encoding period is applied. This can be T1-encoding by an inversion pulse, or T2 encoding by a sequence of 90 and 180° pulses. During the following evolution time the separately encoded signals can mix and this reveals information about

  14. Synthesis and characterization of K(8-x)(H2)ySi46.

    PubMed

    Neiner, Doinita; Okamoto, Norihiko L; Yu, Ping; Leonard, Sharon; Condron, Cathie L; Toney, Michael F; Ramasse, Quentin M; Browning, Nigel D; Kauzlarich, Susan M

    2010-02-01

    A hydrogen-containing inorganic clathrate with the nominal composition, K(7)(H(2))(3)Si(46), has been prepared in 98% yield by the reaction of K(4)Si(4) with NH(4)Br. Rietveld refinement of the powder X-ray diffraction data is consistent with the clathrate type I structure. Elemental analysis and (1)H MAS NMR confirmed the presence of hydrogen in this material. Type I clathrate structure is built up from a Si framework with two types of cages where the guest species, in this case K and H(2), can reside: a large cage composed of 24 Si, in which the guest resides in the 6d position, and a smaller one composed of 20 Si, in which the guest occupies the 2a position (cubic space group Pm3n). Potassium occupancy was examined using spherical aberration (Cs) corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) STEM experimental and simulated images indicated that the K is deficient in both the 2a and the 6d sites. (1)H and (29)Si MAS NMR are consistent with the presence of H(2) in a restricted environment and the clathrate I structure, respectively. FTIR and (29)Si{(1)H} CP MAS NMR results show no evidence for a Si-H bond, suggesting that hydrogen is present as H(2) in interstitial sites. Thermal gravimetry (TG) mass spectrometry (MS) provide additional confirmation of H(2) with hydrogen loss at approximately 400 degrees C. PMID:20039690

  15. Summary of Miniature NMR Development

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Gennady; Feinerman, Alan

    2000-12-31

    The effort in this project has been in 3 distinct directions: (1) First, they focused on development of miniature microfabricated micro-coil NMR detectors with maximum Signal-to-Noise (SNR) ratio. (2) Secondly, they focused on design of miniature micro-coil NMR detectors that have minimal effect on the NMR spectrum distortions. (3) Lastly they focused on the development of a permanent magnet capable of generating fields on the order of 1 Tesla with better than 10 ppm uniformity.

  16. Synthesis of mesoporous hollow silica nanospheres using polymeric micelles as template and their application as a drug-delivery carrier.

    PubMed

    Sasidharan, Manickam; Zenibana, Haruna; Nandi, Mahasweta; Bhaumik, Asim; Nakashima, Kenichi

    2013-10-01

    Mesoporous hollow silica nanospheres with uniform particle sizes of 31-33 nm have been successfully synthesized by cocondensation of tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) and alkyltrimethoxysilanes [RSi(OR)3], where the latter also acts as a porogen. ABC triblock copolymer micelles of poly(styrene-b-2-vinyl pyridine-b-ethylene oxide) (PS-PVP-PEO) with a core-shell-corona architecture have been employed as a soft template at pH 4. The cationic shell block with 2-vinyl pyridine groups facilitates the condensation of silica precursors under the sol-gel reaction conditions. Phenyltrimethoxysilane, octyltriethoxysilane, and octadecyltriethoxysilanes were used as porogens for generating mesopores in the shell matrix of hollow silica and the octadecyl precursor produced the largest mesopore among the different porogens, of dimension ca. 4.1 nm. The mesoporous hollow particles were thoroughly characterized by small-angle X-ray diffraction (SXRD), thermal (TG/DTA) and nitrogen sorption analyses, infra-red (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C-CP MAS NMR and (29)Si MAS NMR) spectroscopies, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The mesoporous hollow silica nanospheres have been investigated for drug-delivery application by an in vitro method using ibuprofen as a model drug. The hollow silica nanospheres exhibited higher storage capacity than the well-known mesoporous silica MCM-41. Propylamine functionalized hollow particles show a more sustained release pattern than their unfunctionalized counterparts, suggesting a huge potential of hollow silica nanospheres in the controlled delivery of small drug molecules. PMID:23887599

  17. Characterization of reactive intermediates by multinuclear diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy (DOSY).

    PubMed

    Li, Deyu; Keresztes, Ivan; Hopson, Russell; Williard, Paul G

    2009-02-17

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the most powerful and widely utilized technique for determining molecular structure. Although traditional NMR data analysis involves the correlation of chemical shift, coupling constant, and NOE interactions to specific structural features, a largely overlooked method introduced more than 40 years ago, pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE), measures diffusion coefficients of molecules in solution, thus providing their relative particle sizes. In the early 1990s, the PGSE sequence was incorporated into a two-dimensional experiment, dubbed diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy (DOSY), in which one dimension represents chemical shift data while the second dimension resolves species by their diffusion properties. This combination provides a powerful tool for identifying individual species in a multicomponent solution, earning the nickname "chromatography by NMR". In this Account, we describe our efforts to utilize DOSY techniques to characterize organometallic reactive intermediates in solution in order to correlate structural data to solid-state crystal structures determined by X-ray diffraction and to discover the role of aggregate formation and solvation states in reaction mechanisms. In 2000, we reported our initial efforts to employ DOSY techniques in the characterization of reactive intermediates such as organolithium aggregates. Since then, we have explored DOSY experiments with various nuclei beyond (1)H, including (6)Li, (7)Li, (11)B, (13)C, and (29)Si. Additionally, we proposed a diffusion coefficient-formula weight relationship to determine formula weight, aggregation number, and solvation state of reactive intermediates. We also introduced an internal reference system to correlate the diffusion properties of unknown reactive intermediates with known inert molecular standards, such as aromatic compounds, terminal olefins, cycloolefins, and tetraalkylsilanes. Furthermore, we utilized DOSY to interpret the role of aggregation number

  18. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140–600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology. PMID:24639915

  19. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR.

    PubMed

    Nanni, Emilio A; Barnes, Alexander B; Griffin, Robert G; Temkin, Richard J

    2011-08-29

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140-600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology. PMID:24639915

  20. Structural investigations of borosilicate glasses containing MoO 3 by MAS NMR and Raman spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caurant, D.; Majérus, O.; Fadel, E.; Quintas, A.; Gervais, C.; Charpentier, T.; Neuville, D.

    2010-01-01

    High molybdenum concentration in glass compositions may lead to alkali and alkaline-earth molybdates crystallization during melt cooling that must be controlled particularly during the preparation of highly radioactive nuclear glassy waste forms. To understand the effect of molybdenum addition on the structure of a simplified nuclear glass and to know how composition changes can affect molybdates crystallization tendency, the structure of two glass series belonging to the SiO 2-B 2O 3-Na 2O-CaO-MoO 3 system was studied by 29Si, 11B, 23Na MAS NMR and Raman spectroscopies by increasing MoO 3 or B 2O 3 concentrations. Increasing MoO 3 amount induced an increase of the silicate network reticulation but no significant effect was observed on the proportion of BO4- units and on the distribution of Na + cations in glass structure. By increasing B 2O 3 concentration, a strong evolution of the distribution of Na + cations was observed that could explain the evolution of the nature of molybdate crystals (CaMoO 4 or Na 2MoO 4) formed during melt cooling.

  1. Li dynamics in carbon-rich polymer-derived SiCN ceramics probed by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seung-Ho; Reinold, Lukas; Graczyk-Zajac, Magdalena; Riedel, Ralf; Hammerath, Franziska; Buechner, Bernd; Grafe, Hajo

    2014-03-01

    We report 7Li, 29Si, and 13C NMR studies of two different carbon-rich SiCN ceramics SiCN-1 and SiCN-3 derived from the preceramic polymers polyphenylvinylsilylcarbodiimide and polyphenylvinylsilazane, respectively. From the spectral analysis of the three nuclei at room temperature, we find that only the 13C spectrum is strongly influenced by Li insertion/extraction, suggesting that carbon phases are the major electrochemically active sites for Li storage. Temperature and Larmor frequency (ωL) dependences of the 7Li linewidth and spin-lattice relaxation rates T1-1 are described by an activated law with the activation energy EA of 0.31 eV and the correlation time τ0 in the high temperature limit of 1.3 ps. The 3 / 2 power law dependence of T1-1 on ωL which deviates from the standard Bloembergen, Purcell, and Pound (BPP) model implies that the Li motion on the μs timescale is governed by continuum diffusion mechanism rather than jump diffusion. On the other hand, the rotating frame relaxation rate T1ρ-1 results suggest that the slow motion of Li on the ms timescale may be affected by complex diffusion and/or non-diffusion processes.

  2. Solid-state 13C NMR analysis of Lower Cretaceous Baganuur (Mongolia) lignite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdenetsogt, B.; Lee, I.; Lee, S.; Ko, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The transformation of plant matter into peat and coal has two steps, called the biochemical and geochemical stages of coalification. Biochemical coalification begins with the accumulation of dead vegetable matter and ends at the rank of subbituminous coal. The rank of Baganuur lignite ranges from lignite to subbituminous coal. It is transition between biochemical and physico-chemical coalification stages. The changes of chemical structure of coal during the transition between above mentioned two stages were studied by solid state CP/MAS 13C NMR. The most predominant alteration is the disappearance of the resonances from oxygenated aliphatic carbons (63 ppm), protonated aromatic carbons (114 ppm), oxygen-substituted aromatic carbons (144 ppm) and carbonyl carbons (195 ppm). In addition, the intensity of resonances from methoxyl carbons (56 ppm) and oxygenated aliphatic carbons (72 ppm) decreased. While the intensities of resonance from aliphatic (30 ppm), protonated aromatic (125 ppm) and carboxyl carbon (174 ppm) increased or remained almost constant. The relative percent of O-substituted aromatic carbons decreased by ~25% mainly due to the intensity loss of the peak at 144 ppm, indicating removal of O-containing functional groups substituted to aromatic carbons. It is consistent with the decreased relative percent (~75%) of the peak at 114 ppm from protonated aromatic carbons nearby oxygen-substituted aromatic carbons. In addition, the resonance from 125 ppm was shifted to 128 ppm and its relative area increased by ~20%, indicating replacement of O-substituent of aromatic rings by hydrogen or carbon. Protonated aromatic carbons at least two bond away from an oxygen-substituted aromatic carbons give a resonance at 125 ppm and carbon-substituted aromatic carbons give a resonance at 130-132 ppm. With the increase relative percent of C-substituted aromatic carbons, their resonance were overlapped with protonated aromatic carbons and shifted to higher ppm. A decreasing

  3. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Croasmun, W.R.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Written for chemists and biochemists who are not NMR spectroscopists, but who wish to use the new techniques of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, this book brings together for the first time much of the practical and experimental data needed. It also serves as information source for industrial, academic, and graduate student researchers who already use NMR spectroscopy, but not yet in two dimensions. The authors describe the use of 2-D NMR in a wide variety of chemical and biochemical fields, among them peptides, steroids, oligo- and poly-saccharides, nucleic acids, natural products (including terpenoids, alkaloids, and coal-derived heterocyclics), and organic synthetic intermediates. They consider throughout the book both the advantages and limitations of using 2-D NMR.

  4. Spin-coated and PECVD low dielectric constant porous organosilicate films studied by 1D and 2D solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Gerbaud, Guillaume; Hediger, Sabine; Bardet, Michel; Favennec, Laurent; Zenasni, Aziz; Beynet, Julien; Gourhant, Olivier; Jousseaume, Vincent

    2009-11-14

    In the research field of the sub-65 nm semiconductor industry, organosilicate SiOCH films with low dielectric constant (k < 2.4) need to be developed in order to improve the performance of integrated circuits [International Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS), San Jose, CA, 2004]. One way to produce SiOCH films of low dielectric constant is to introduce pores into the film. This is usually obtained in two steps. Firstly, co-deposition of a matrix precursor, with a sacrificial organic porogen, either by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) or spin-coating. Secondly, application of a specific thermal treatment to remove the porogen and create the porosity. This last step can be improved by adding to the thermal process a super-critical CO(2) treatment, an UV irradiation or an electronic bombardment (e-beam). In this study, the two deposition processes as well as the various treatments applied to eliminate the porogens were evaluated and compared using high-resolution solid-state NMR. For this purpose, hybrid (containing porogens) and porous films were extensively characterized on the basis of their (1)H, (13)C and (29)Si high-resolution NMR spectra. Information was obtained concerning the crosslinking of the Si skeleton. Spectral features could be correlated to the processes used. Isotropic chemical shift analyses and 2D correlation NMR experiments were used to show the existence and nature of the interactions between the matrix precursor and the organic porogen. PMID:19851550

  5. Use of solid waste for chemical stabilization: Adsorption isotherms and {sup 13}C solid-state NMR study of hazardous organic compounds sorbed on coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, D.A.; Lane, D.C.; Rovani, J.F.; Cox, J.D.; Clark, J.A.; Miknis, F.P.

    1993-09-01

    Adsorption of hazardous organic compounds on the Dave Johnston plant fly ash is described. Fly ash from Dave Johnston and Laramie River power plants were characterized using elemental, x-ray, and {sup 29}Si NMR; the Dave Johnston (DJ) fly ash had higher quartz contents, while the Laramie River fly ash had more monomeric silicate anions. Adsorption data for hydroaromatics and chlorobenzenes indicate that the adsorption capacity of DJ coal fly ash is much less than that of activated carbon by a factor of >3000; but it is needed to confirm that solid-gas and solid-liquid equilibrium isotherms can indeed be compared. However, for pyridine, pentachlorophenol, naphthalene, and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, the DJ fly ash appears to adsorb these compounds nearly as well as activated carbon. {sup 13}C NMR was used to study the adsorption of hazardous org. cpds on coal fly ash; the nuclear spin relaxation times often were very long, resulting in long experimental times to obtain a spectrum. Using a jumbo probe, low concentrations of some hazardous org. cpds could be detected; for pentachlorophenol adsorbed onto fly ash, the chemical shift of the phenolic carbon was changed. Use of NMR to study the adsorption needs further study.

  6. An investigation of catalytic active phase-support interactions by IR, NMR and x-ray absorption spectroscopies. Progress report, January 15, 1991--July 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, G.L.

    1993-07-01

    Active catalytic phases (metal, mixed metals, oxide or mixed oxides) interacting with oxide support can affect percentage exposed, the morphology of supported particles, the degree of reducibility of cations, etc., in a variety of ways. Solid state {sup 29}Si NMR was used to obtain a new correlation between partial charge on the Si which comprises a part of the SiOHAl Br{o}nsted acid structure in amorphous silica-aluminas. We also describe two potential improvements in solid state NMR applied to catalysts and catalysts supports. One is experimental, dynamic angle spinning NMR, a new technique for obtaining high resolution spectra of quadrupolar nuclei, e.g., {sup 27}Al. The second approach is an alternative to the standard fast Fourier transform of the free induction decay to convert from the time to spectral domain, the maximum entropy method. Effect of different methods of preparation of Pd/L-zeolites is described. By comparison to analogous Pt systems, it is the inherent chemistry of the L-zeolite which results in better dispersion when impregnation preparation is used relative to ion exchange preparation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to compare the effect of support (SiO{sub 2} and L-zeolite) on the degree and kind of Pt-Ni interaction. When supported in L-zeolite and promoted with Ni, Pt has improved stability both with regard to self-poisoning and sulfur catalyzed agglomeration.

  7. Molecular-Level Understanding of the Encapsulation and Dissolution of Poorly Water-Soluble Ibuprofen by Functionalized Organic Nanotubes Using Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nan; Higashi, Kenjirou; Kikuchi, Junko; Ando, Shigeru; Kameta, Naohiro; Ding, Wuxiao; Masuda, Mitsutoshi; Shimizu, Toshimi; Ueda, Keisuke; Yamamoto, Keiji; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2016-05-19

    A comprehensive study of the encapsulation and dissolution of the poorly water-soluble drug ibuprofen (IBU) using two types of organic nanotubes (ONT-1 and ONT-2) was conducted. ONT-1 and ONT-2 had similar inner and outer diameters, but these surfaces were functionalized with different groups. IBU was encapsulated by each ONT via solvent evaporation. The amount of IBU in the ONTs was 9.1 and 29.2 wt % for ONT-1 and ONT-2, respectively. Dissolution of IBU from ONT-1 was very rapid, while from ONT-2 it was slower after the initial burst release. One-dimensional (1D) (1)H, (13)C, and two-dimensional (2D) (1)H-(13)C solid-state NMR measurements using fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) at a rate of 40 kHz revealed the molecular state of the encapsulated IBU in each ONT. Extremely mobile IBU was observed inside the hollow nanosapce of both ONT-1 and ONT-2 using (13)C MAS NMR with a single pulse (SP) method. Interestingly, (13)C cross-polarization (CP) MAS NMR demonstrated that IBU also existed on the outer surface of both ONTs. The encapsulation ratios of IBU inside the hollow nanospaces versus on the outer surfaces were calculated by waveform separation to be approximately 1:1 for ONT-1 and 2:1 for ONT-2. Changes in (13)C chemical shifts showed the intermolecular interactions between the carboxyl group of IBU and the amino group on the ONT-2 inner surface. The cationic ONT-2 could form the stronger electrostatic interactions with IBU in the hollow nanosapce than anionic ONT-1. On the other hand, 2D (1)H-(13)C NMR indicated that the hydroxyl groups of the glucose unit on the outer surface of the ONTs interacted with the carboxyl group of IBU in both ONT-1 and ONT-2. The changes in peak shape and chemical shift of the ONT glucose group after IBU encapsulation were larger in ONT-2 than in ONT-1, indicating a stronger interaction between IBU and the outer surface of ONT-2. The smaller amount of IBU encapsulation and rapid IBU dissolution from ONT-1 could be due to the weak

  8. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  9. Integrative NMR for biomolecular research.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woonghee; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Dashti, Hesam; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Tonelli, Marco; Westler, William M; Butcher, Samuel E; Henzler-Wildman, Katherine A; Markley, John L

    2016-04-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful technique for determining structural and functional features of biomolecules in physiological solution as well as for observing their intermolecular interactions in real-time. However, complex steps associated with its practice have made the approach daunting for non-specialists. We introduce an NMR platform that makes biomolecular NMR spectroscopy much more accessible by integrating tools, databases, web services, and video tutorials that can be launched by simple installation of NMRFAM software packages or using a cross-platform virtual machine that can be run on any standard laptop or desktop computer. The software package can be downloaded freely from the NMRFAM software download page ( http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/download_packages.html ), and detailed instructions are available from the Integrative NMR Video Tutorial page ( http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/integrative.html ). PMID:27023095

  10. Polarization transfer NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Sillerud, Laurel O.; van Hulsteyn, David B.

    1990-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) image is obtained with spatial information modulated by chemical information. The modulation is obtained through polarization transfer from a first element representing the desired chemical, or functional, information, which is covalently bonded and spin-spin coupled with a second element effective to provide the imaging data. First and second rf pulses are provided at first and second frequencies for exciting the imaging and functional elements, with imaging gradients applied therebetween to spatially separate the nuclei response for imaging. The second rf pulse is applied at a time after the first pulse which is the inverse of the spin coupling constant to select the transfer element nuclei which are spin coupled to the functional element nuclei for imaging. In a particular application, compounds such as glucose, lactate, or lactose, can be labeled with .sup.13 C and metabolic processes involving the compounds can be imaged with the sensitivity of .sup.1 H and the selectivity of .sup.13 C.

  11. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping [sup 129]Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the [sup 131]Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  12. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping {sup 129}Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the {sup 131}Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  13. Multispectral Analysis of NMR Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butterfield, R. L.; Vannier, M. W. And Associates; Jordan, D.

    1985-01-01

    Conference paper discusses initial efforts to adapt multispectral satellite-image analysis to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) scans of human body. Flexibility of these techniques makes it possible to present NMR data in variety of formats, including pseudocolor composite images of pathological internal features. Techniques do not have to be greatly modified from form in which used to produce satellite maps of such Earth features as water, rock, or foliage.

  14. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gerald II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2010-06-15

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  15. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2008-11-25

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  16. Automated protein NMR resonance assignments.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiang; Xu, Dong; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Lin, Guohui

    2003-01-01

    NMR resonance peak assignment is one of the key steps in solving an NMR protein structure. The assignment process links resonance peaks to individual residues of the target protein sequence, providing the prerequisite for establishing intra- and inter-residue spatial relationships between atoms. The assignment process is tedious and time-consuming, which could take many weeks. Though there exist a number of computer programs to assist the assignment process, many NMR labs are still doing the assignments manually to ensure quality. This paper presents (1) a new scoring system for mapping spin systems to residues, (2) an automated adjacency information extraction procedure from NMR spectra, and (3) a very fast assignment algorithm based on our previous proposed greedy filtering method and a maximum matching algorithm to automate the assignment process. The computational tests on 70 instances of (pseudo) experimental NMR data of 14 proteins demonstrate that the new score scheme has much better discerning power with the aid of adjacency information between spin systems simulated across various NMR spectra. Typically, with automated extraction of adjacency information, our method achieves nearly complete assignments for most of the proteins. The experiment shows very promising perspective that the fast automated assignment algorithm together with the new score scheme and automated adjacency extraction may be ready for practical use. PMID:16452794

  17. NMR Relaxation and Petrophysical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Marc

    2011-03-01

    NMR relaxation is routinely used in the field of geosciences to give basic petrophysical properties such as porosity, pore size distribution, saturation etc. In this tutorial, we focus on the pore size distribution deduced from NMR. We recall the basic principle used in the interpretation of the NMR signal and compare the results with other standard petrophysical techniques such as mercury pore size distribution, BET specific surface measurements, thin section visualizations. The NMR pore size distribution is a unique information available on water saturated porous media and can give similar results as MICP in certain situations. The scaling of NMR relaxation time distribution (s) into pore sizes (μm) requires the knowledge of the surface relaxivity (μm/s) and we recommend using specific surface measurements as an independent determination of solid surface areas. With usual surface relaxivities, the NMR technique can explore length-scales starting from nano-meters and ending around 100 μm. Finally, we will introduce briefly recent techniques sensitive to the pore to pore diffusional exchange, providing new information on the connectivity of the pore network, but showing another possibility of discrepancy in the determination of pore size distribution with standard techniques.

  18. Medical applications of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy with stable isotopes. Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy are summarized. For the most part examples from the March 1983 Puerto Rico symposium are used to illustrate the utility of NMR in medicine. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  19. jsNMR: an embedded platform-independent NMR spectrum viewer.

    PubMed

    Vosegaard, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    jsNMR is a lightweight NMR spectrum viewer written in JavaScript/HyperText Markup Language (HTML), which provides a cross-platform spectrum visualizer that runs on all computer architectures including mobile devices. Experimental (and simulated) datasets are easily opened in jsNMR by (i) drag and drop on a jsNMR browser window, (ii) by preparing a jsNMR file from the jsNMR web site, or (iii) by mailing the raw data to the jsNMR web portal. jsNMR embeds the original data in the HTML file, so a jsNMR file is a self-transforming dataset that may be exported to various formats, e.g. comma-separated values. The main applications of jsNMR are to provide easy access to NMR data without the need for dedicated software installed and to provide the possibility to visualize NMR spectra on web sites. PMID:25641013

  20. NMR Imaging: Instrumentation and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingle, Jeremy Mark

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis presents three original contributions to the field of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR): the experimental framework and analysis for the measurement of a new imaging parameter to describe perfusion; the measurement and analysis of magnetic field inhomogeneity and a practical correction system for their reduction; a novel system for the synchronous control of NMR experiments based on the microprogrammed concept. The thesis begins with an introduction to the theory of NMR. The application of NMR to imaging is also introduced with emphasis on the techniques which developed into those in common use today. Inaccurate determination of the traditional NMR parameters (T_1 and T_2 and the molecular diffusion coefficient) can be caused by non-diffusive fluid movement within the sample. The experimental basis for determining a new imaging parameter --the Perfusion coefficient--is presented. This provides a measure of forced isotropic fluid motion through an organ or tissue. The instrumentation required for conducting NMR experiments is described in order to introduce the contribution made in this area during this research: A sequence controller. The controller is based on the concept of microprogramming and enables completely synchronous output of 128 bits of data. The software for the generation and storage of control data and the regulation of the data to provide experimental control is microcomputer based. It affords precise and accurate regulation of the magnetic field gradients, the rf synthesizer and the spectrometer for spectroscopic and imaging applications. Fundamental to the science of NMR is the presence of a magnetic field. A detailed study of the analysis of magnetic field inhomogeneity in terms of spherical harmonics is presented. The field of a whole body imaging system with poor inhomogeneity was measured and analyzed to determine and describe the components of the inhomogeneity. Finally a

  1. Hybrid materials of SBA-16 functionalized by rare earth (Eu 3+, Tb 3+) complexes of modified β-diketone (TTA and DBM): Covalently bonding assembly and photophysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yajuan; Yan, Bing; Li, Ying

    2010-04-01

    Novel mesoporous SBA-16 type of hybrids TTA-S16 and DBM-S16 were synthesized by co-condensation of modified β-diketone (TTA-Si and DBM-Si, DBM=1,3-diphenyl-1,3- propanepione, TTA=2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) in the presence of Pluronic F127 as template, which were confirmed by FTIR, XRD, 29Si CP-MAS NMR, and N 2 adsorption measurements. Novel organic-inorganic mesoporous luminescent hybrid containing RE3+ (Eu 3+, Tb 3+) complexes covalently attached to the functionalized ordered mesoporous SBA-16 (TTA-S16 and DBM-S16), which were designated as bpy- RE-TTA-S16 and bpy- RE-DBM-S16, were obtained by sol-gel process. The luminescence properties of these resulting materials were characterized in detail, and the results reveal that mesoporous hybrid material bpy-Eu-TTA-S16 present stronger luminescent intensities, longer lifetimes, and higher luminescent quantum efficiencies than the corresponding DBM-containing materials bpy-Eu-DBM-S16, while bpy-Tb-DBM-S16 exhibit the stronger characteristic emission of Tb 3+ and longer lifetime than the corresponding TTA-containing materials bpy-Tb-TTA-S16.

  2. Solid state synthesis of water-dispersible silicon nanoparticles from silica nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kravitz, Keren; Kamyshny, Alexander; Gedanken, Aharon; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2010-06-15

    A solid state synthesis for obtaining nanocrystalline silicon was performed by high temperature reduction of commercial amorphous nanosilica with magnesium powder. The obtained silicon powder contains crystalline silicon phase with lattice spacings characteristic of diamond cubic structure (according to high resolution TEM), and an amorphous phase. In {sup 29}Si CP MAS NMR a broad multicomponent peak corresponding to silicon is located at -61.28 to -69.45 ppm, i.e. between the peaks characteristic of amorphous and crystalline Si. The powder has displayed red luminescence while excited under UV illumination, due to quantum confinement within the nanocrystals. The silicon nanopowder was successfully dispersed in water containing poly(vinyl alcohol) as a stabilizing agent. The obtained dispersion was also characterized by red photoluminescence with a band maximum at 710 nm, thus enabling future functional coating applications. - Graphical abstract: High temperature reduction of amorphous nanosilica with magnesium powder results in the formation of powder containing crystalline silicon phase The powder displays red luminescence while excited under UV illumination, due to quantum confinement within the Si nanocrystals, and can be successfully dispersed in water containing poly(vinyl alcohol) as a stabilizing agent. The obtained dispersion was also characterized by red photoluminescence, thus enabling future functional coating applications.

  3. Immobilization of carbonic anhydrase on spherical SBA-15 for hydration and sequestration of CO2.

    PubMed

    Vinoba, Mari; Bhagiyalakshmi, Margandan; Jeong, Soon Kwan; Yoon, Yeo Ii; Nam, Sung Chan

    2012-02-01

    Bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA) was immobilized on spherical SBA-15 through various approaches, including covalent attachment (BCA-CA), adsorption (BCA-ADS), and cross-linked enzyme aggregation (BCA-CLEA). The spherical SBA-15 was characterized by XRD, BET, and FE-SEM analysis. (29)Si CP-MAS NMR was used to confirm the 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane grafting (an intermediate step in the immobilization technique), and the immobilization of BCA was confirmed by FT-IR spectrum. The catalytic activities for hydration of CO(2) were calculated for free and immobilized BCA with and without buffer. The K(cat) values for free BCA, BCA-CLEA, BCA-CA and BCA-ADS were 0.79, 0.78, 0.58 and 0.36 s(-1), respectively, indicating that BCA-CLEA showed a comparatively higher hydration of CO(2) than BCA-CA and BCA-ADS, which was nearly the same as free BCA. The amount of CaCO(3) precipitated over free BCA, BCA-CLEA, BCA-CA and BCA-ADS were 140, 138, 135 and 130 mg, respectively. Performance studies, including assays on reusability, thermal stability and storage stability, were also carried out for BCA-CLEA. The results confirmed that BCA-CLEA is reusable, thermally stable and, withstands storage, and is thus a suitable candidate for use in hydration and sequestration of CO(2). PMID:22024402

  4. NMR planar microcoil for microanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorli, B.; Chateaux, J. F.; Quiquerez, L.; Bouchet-Fakri, L.; Briguet, A.; Morin, P.

    2006-11-01

    This article deals with the analysis of small sample volume by using a planar microcoil and a micromachined cavity. This microcoil is used as a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) radio frequency detection coil in order to perform in vitro NMR analysis of the sample introduced into the microcavity. It is a real challenging task to develop microsystem for NMR spectrum extraction for smaller and smaller sample volume. Moreover, it is advantageous that these microsystems could be integrated in a Micro Total Analysing System (μ -TAS) as an analysing tool. In this paper, NMR theory, description, fabrication process and electrical characterization of planar microcoils receiver are described. Results obtained on NMR microspectroscopy experiments have been performed on water and ethanol, using a 1 mm diameter planar coil. This microcoil is tuned and matched at 85.13 MHz which is the Larmor frequency of proton in a 2 T magnetic field. This paper has been presented at “3e colloque interdisciplinaire en instrumentation (C2I 2004)”, École Normale Supérieure de Cachan, 29 30 janvier 2004.

  5. Improving NMR Structures of RNA.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Guillermo A; Clore, G Marius; Schwieters, Charles D

    2016-05-01

    Here, we show that modern solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures of RNA exhibit more steric clashes and conformational ambiguities than their crystallographic X-ray counterparts. To tackle these issues, we developed RNA-ff1, a new force field for structure calculation with Xplor-NIH. Using seven published NMR datasets, RNA-ff1 improves covalent geometry and MolProbity validation criteria for clashes and backbone conformation in most cases, relative to both the previous Xplor-NIH force field and the original structures associated with the experimental data. In addition, with smaller base-pair step rises in helical stems, RNA-ff1 structures enjoy more favorable base stacking. Finally, structural accuracy improves in the majority of cases, as supported by complete residual dipolar coupling cross-validation. Thus, the reported advances show great promise in bridging the quality gap that separates NMR and X-ray structures of RNA. PMID:27066747

  6. Theoretical analysis of NMR shieldings in XSe and XTe (X = Si, Ge, Sn and Pb): the spin-rotation constant saga.

    PubMed

    Demissie, Taye Beyene

    2016-01-28

    The nuclear spin-rotation (NSR) and absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding tensors of the nuclei in the series of X(77)Se and X(125)Te (X = (29)Si, (73)Ge, (119)Sn and (207)Pb) are calculated using four-component relativistic density functional theory (DFT) and coupled-cluster singles-doubles with a perturbative triples correction (CCSD(T)). The results for the NSR constants are compared to available experimental data. The best theoretical estimates are obtained when relativistic corrections from DFT are added to the accurate non-relativistic CCSD(T) results. All the calculated NSR constants are in excellent agreement with the corresponding experimental values. Even though there are previously estimated absolute shielding constants and spans from experimental NSR tensors, new accurate values are reported following the same approach used to calculate the NSR constants in this study. The main reasons for the discrepancy between the previously reported NMR properties and the accurate results obtained in this study are also discussed. PMID:26741559

  7. High-resolution solid-state NMR study of the occurrence and thermal transformations of silicon-containing species in biomass materials

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, J.C.C.; Emmerich, F.G.; Bonagamba, T.J.

    2000-03-01

    The occurrence of silicon in two kinds of biomass (rice hulls and endocarp of babassu coconut) and the thermal transformations taking place in these materials under heat treatments are studied here. The authors report also the production, characterization, and study of carbonaceous materials with high SiC content through the carbothermal reduction of silica, using these natural precursors. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si room temperature high-resolution solid-state NMR measurements are used in the characterization and study of the materials as well as the process of SiC formation. Important conclusions about the nature of silicon in these types of biomass and the effects of heat treatments on the structure of silicon-containing species are derived from the results presented. It is shown that silicon in these materials occurs in two distinct forms: amorphous hydrated silica and organically bound silicon species. The influence of spin-lattice relaxation dynamics on the NMR spectra is discussed, evidencing the role played by the paramagnetic defects produced in the materials through pyrolysis.

  8. Structural analysis of high-silica ferrierite with different structure-directing agents by solid-state NMR and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Oka, Hideyuki; Ohki, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    The host-guest interaction in high-silica ferrierite (FER) with different structure-directing agents (SDA), pyridine and piperidine, was analyzed by solid-state (29)Si NMR relaxation experiments and molecular-orbital calculations. Qualitative and quantitative knowledge of the SDA structure obtained by these methods provides significant insight for understanding the functions in a template, and the stabilizing role of the SDA. Relaxation experiments show a larger magnetic dipolar interaction between the silicon and hydrogen atoms in piperidine as compared to that in pyridine, and the results correlate with the bonding property in terms of the distance between the zeolite framework and the SDA. The (1)H MAS NMR spectrum shows that the pyridine molecules mainly act as pore fillers in the pyridine-FER. In contrast, it was presumed that piperidine, adjacent to the aluminosilicate framework and framework defects, acted as a counter cation to balance the charge in the piperidine-FER. H(+)-FER synthesized with piperidine shows a lower hydrothermal stability as compared to that synthesized with pyridine. The hydrothermal stability of H(+)-FER is discussed by considering the contributions of framework defects and the different properties pertaining to the bonding between the zeolite framework and the SDA. PMID:20410561

  9. Calculation of the 13C NMR shieldings of the C0 2 complexes of aluminosilicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tossell, J. A.

    1995-04-01

    13C NMR shieldings have been calculated using the random-phase-approximation, localized-orbital local-origins version of ab initio coupled Hartree-Fuck perturbation theory for CO 2 and and for several complexes formed by the reaction of CO 2 with molecular models for aluminosilicate glasses, H 3TOT'H3 3-n, T,T' = Si,Al. Two isomeric forms of the CO 2-aluminosilicate complexes have been considered: (1) "CO 2-like" complexes, in which the CO 2 group is bound through carbon to a bridging oxygen and (2) "CO 3-like" complexes, in which two oxygens of a central CO 3 group form bridging bonds to the two TH 3 groups. The CO 2-like isomer of CO 2-H 3SiOSiH 3 is quite weakly bonded and its 13C isotropic NMR shielding is almost identical to that in free CO 2. As Si is progressively replaced by Al in the - H terminated aluminosilicate model, the CO 2-like isomers show increasing distortion from the free CO 2 geometry and their 13C NMR shieldings decrease uniformly. The calculated 13C shielding value for H 3AlO(CO 2)AlH 3-2 is only about 6 ppm larger than that calculated for point charge stabilized CO 3-2. However, for a geometry of H 3SiO(CO 2) AlH 3-1, in which the bridging oxygen to C bond length has been artificially increased to that found in the - OH terminated cluster (OH) 3SiO(CO 2)Al(OH) 3-1, the calculated 13C shielding is almost identical to that for free CO 2. The CO 3-like isomers of the CO 2-aluminosili-cate complexes show carbonate like geometries and 13C NMR shieldings about 4-9 ppm larger than those of carbonate for all T,T' pairs. For the Si,Si tetrahedral atom pair the CO 2-like isomer is more stable energetically, while for the Si,Al and Al,Al cases the CO 3-like isomer is more stable. Addition of Na + ions to the CO 3-2 or H 3AlO(CO 2)AlH 3-2 complexes reduces the 13C NMR shieldings by about 10 ppm. Complexation with either Na + or CO 2 also reduces the 29Si NMR shieldings of the aluminosilicate models, while the changes in 27Al shielding with Na + or CO 2

  10. A SENSITIVE NMR THERMOMETER FOR MULTINUCLEI FT NMR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pernicious problem in multinuclei FT NMR is accurate measurement of sample temperature. This arises from several factors including widespread use of high-power decoupling, large sample tubes (with potentially large temperature gradients across the sample volume), and lack of su...

  11. Protein-Inhibitor Interaction Studies Using NMR

    PubMed Central

    Ishima, Rieko

    2015-01-01

    Solution-state NMR has been widely applied to determine the three-dimensional structure, dynamics, and molecular interactions of proteins. The designs of experiments used in protein NMR differ from those used for small-molecule NMR, primarily because the information available prior to an experiment, such as molecular mass and knowledge of the primary structure, is unique for proteins compared to small molecules. In this review article, protein NMR for structural biology is introduced with comparisons to small-molecule NMR, such as descriptions of labeling strategies and the effects of molecular dynamics on relaxation. Next, applications for protein NMR are reviewed, especially practical aspects for protein-observed ligand-protein interaction studies. Overall, the following topics are described: (1) characteristics of protein NMR, (2) methods to detect protein-ligand interactions by NMR, and (3) practical aspects of carrying out protein-observed inhibitor-protein interaction studies. PMID:26361636

  12. "Solvent Effects" in 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaleiro, Jose A. S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simple undergraduate experiment in chemistry dealing with the "solvent effects" in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Stresses the importance of having students learn NMR spectroscopy as a tool in analytical chemistry. (TW)

  13. Push-through Direction Injectin NMR Automation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) are the two major spectroscopic techniques successfully used in metabolomics studies. The non-invasive, quantitative and reproducible characteristics make NMR spectroscopy an excellent technique for detection of endogeno...

  14. Deuterium Exchange Kinetics by NMR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a physical chemistry experiment which allows such concepts as kinetics, catalysis, isotope shifts, coupling constants, and the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for quantitative work to be covered in the same exercise. Background information, experimental procedures used, and typical results obtained are included. (JN)

  15. Petrophysical applications of NMR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, W.P.; Vinegar, H.J.

    1985-12-01

    A system for obtaining high-resolution NMR images of oil field cores is described. Separate proton density and T/sub 2/ relaxation images are obtained to distinguish spatial variations of fluid-filled porosity and the physical nature of the pores. Results are presented for typical sandstones.

  16. QUANTITATIVE 15N NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Line intensities in 15N NMR spectra are strongly influenced by spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times, relaxation mechanisms and experimental conditions. Special care has to be taken in using 15N spectra for quantitative purposes. Quantitative aspects are discussed for the 1...

  17. Probing Structure Property Relationships in Complex Engineering Silicones by 1H NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, S C; Gjersing, E L; Maxwell, R S; Eastwood, E; Bowen, D; Stephens, T

    2006-07-14

    It is generally accepted that the properties of polymeric materials are controlled by the network structure and the reactions by which they have been constructed. These properties include the bulk moduli at creation, but also the properties as a function of age during use. In order to interpret mechanical properties and predict the time dependent changes in these properties, detailed knowledge of the effect of structural changes must be obtained. The degree and type of crosslinking, the molecular weight between crosslinks, the number of elastically ineffective chains (loops, dangling chain ends, sol-fraction) must be characterized. A number of theoretical and experimental efforts have been reported in the last few years on model networks prepared by endlinking reactions and the relationships of those structures with the ultimate mechanical properties. A range of experimental methods have been used to investigate structure including rheometric, scattering, infrared, {sup 29}Si MAS and CPMAS, {sup 1}H relaxation measurements, and recently {sup 1}H multiple quantum methods. Characterization of the growth of multiple quantum coherences have recently been shown to provide detailed insight into silicone network structure by the ability to selective probe the individual components of the polymer network, such as the polymer-filler interface or network chains. We have employed recently developed MQ methods to investigate the structure-property relationships in a series of complex, endlinked filled-PDMS blends. Here, a systematic study of the relationship between the molecular formulation, as dictated by the amount and type of crosslinks present and by the remaining network chains, and the segmental dynamics as observed by MQ NMR was performed.

  18. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-05-27

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed a delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  19. Solution NMR of large molecules and assemblies†

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Mark P.; McElroy, Craig A.; Amero, Carlos D.

    2008-01-01

    Solution NMR spectroscopy represents a powerful tool for examining the structure and function of biological macromolecules. The advent of multidimensional (2D–4D) NMR, together with the widespread use of uniform isotopic labeling of proteins and RNA with the NMR-active isotopes, 15N and 13C, opened the door to detailed analyses of macromolecular structure, dynamics and interactions of smaller macromolecules (< ~25 kDa). Over the past 10 years, advances in NMR and isotope labeling methods have expanded the range of NMR-tractable targets by at least an order of magnitude. Here we briefly describe the methodological advances that allow NMR spectroscopy of large macromolecules and their complexes, and provide a perspective on the wide range of applications of NMR to biochemical problems. PMID:17209543

  20. Two-dimensional NMR spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, T.C.

    1987-06-01

    This article is the second in a two-part series. In part one (ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, May 15) the authors discussed one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and some relatively advanced nuclear spin gymnastics experiments that provide a capability for selective sensitivity enhancements. In this article and overview and some applications of two-dimensional NMR experiments are presented. These powerful experiments are important complements to the one-dimensional experiments. As in the more sophisticated one-dimensional experiments, the two-dimensional experiments involve three distinct time periods: a preparation period, t/sub 0/; an evolution period, t/sub 1/; and a detection period, t/sub 2/.

  1. NMR investigation of Ag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Kwanghyo; Jang, Zeehoon

    2013-01-01

    109Ag nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and relaxation measurements have been performed on two powder samples of Ag nanoparticles with average sizes of 20 nm and 80 nm. The measurements have been done in an external field of 9.4 T and in the temperature range 10 K < T < 280 K. The 109Ag NMR spectra for both samples have close to Lorentzian shapes and turn out to be mixtures of homogeneous and inhomogeneous lines. The linewidth Δ ν at room temperature is 1.3 kHz for both samples and gradually increases with decreasing temperature. Both the Knight shift ( K) and the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/ T 1) are observed to be almost identical to the values reported for the bulk Ag metal, whereby the Korringa ratio R(= K 2 T 1 T/S) is found to be 2.0 for both samples in the investigated temperature range.

  2. REDOR NMR for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Cegelski, Lynette

    2014-01-01

    Rotational-Echo DOuble-Resonance (REDOR) NMR is a powerful and versatile solid-state NMR measurement that has been recruited to elucidate drug modes of action and to drive the design of new therapeutics. REDOR has been implemented to examine composition, structure, and dynamics in diverse macromolecular and whole-cell systems, including taxol-bound microtubules, enzyme-cofactor-inhibitor ternary complexes, and antibiotic-whole-cell complexes. The REDOR approach involves the integrated design of specific isotopic labeling strategies and the selection of appropriate REDOR experiments. By way of example, this digest illustrates the versatility of the REDOR approach, with an emphasis on the practical considerations of experimental design and data interpretation. PMID:24035486

  3. Na/Ca Intermixing around Silicate and Phosphate Groups in Bioactive Phosphosilicate Glasses Revealed by Heteronuclear Solid-State NMR and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Renny; Stevensson, Baltzar; Edén, Mattias

    2015-04-30

    We characterize the intermixing of network-modifying Na(+)/Ca(2+) ions around the silicate (QSi(n)) and phosphate (QP(n)) tetrahedra in a series of 16 Na2O–CaO–SiO2–P2O5 glasses, whose P content and silicate network connectivity were varied independently. The set includes both bioactive and bioinactive compositions and also encompasses two soda-lime-silicate members devoid of P, as well as two CaO–SiO2 glasses and one Na2O–SiO2–P2O5 glass. The various Si/P↔Na/Ca contacts were probed by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations together with heteronuclear magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experimentation utilizing (23)Na{(31)P} and (23)Na{(29)Si} REDOR, as well as (31)P{ (23)Na} and (29)Si{(23)Na} REAPDOR. We introduce an approach for quantifying the extent of Na(+)/Ca(2+) ordering around a given QP(n) or QSi(n) group, encoded by the preference factor 0⩽ PM ⩽ 1 conveying the relative weights of a random cation intermixing (PM = 0) and complete preference/ordering (PM = 1) for one of the species M, which represents either Na(+) or Ca(2+). The MD-derived preference factors reveal phosphate and silicate species surrounded by Na(+)/Ca(2+) ions intermixed nearly randomly (PM ≲ 0.15), except for the QSi(4) and QSi(1) groups, which manifest more significant cation ordering with preference for Na+ and Ca2+, respectively. The overall weak preferences are essentially independent of the Si and P contents of the glass, whereas PM primarily correlates with the total amount of network modifiers: as the latter is increased, the Na/Ca distribution around the {QP(0), QSi(1), QSi(2)} groups with preference for Ca2(+ )tend to randomize (i.e., PCa decreases), while the PNa-values grow slightly for the {QP(1), QSi(3), QSi(4)} species already preferring coordination of Na. The set of experimental preference factors {PCa} for the orthophosphate (QP(0)) groups extracted from (31)P{(23)Na} REAPDOR NMR-derived M2(P–Na) dipolar second moments agrees

  4. NMR Hyperpolarization Techniques for Biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Goodson, Boyd M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in NMR hyperpolarization have enabled a wide array of new in vivo molecular imaging modalities—ranging from functional imaging of the lungs to metabolic imaging of cancer. This Concept article explores selected advances in methods for the preparation and use of hyperpolarized contrast agents, many of which are already at or near the phase of their clinical validation in patients. PMID:25470566

  5. Measurement of deformations by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytchenkoff, Dimitri; Rodts, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Two NMR data acquisition protocols together with corresponding data processing algorithms for locating macroscopic objects, measuring distances between them or monitoring their displacements or deformations with microscopic precision are presented and discussed. The performance of the methods is demonstrated by applying them to the measurement of deformations of a freely supported beam under loading. We believe that our methods will find their applications in mechanics, civil engineering and medicine.

  6. Hyperpolarized 131Xe NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stupic, Karl F.; Cleveland, Zackary I.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 131Xe with up to 2.2% spin polarization (i.e., 5000-fold signal enhancement at 9.4 T) was obtained after separation from the rubidium vapor of the spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) process. The SEOP was applied for several minutes in a stopped-flow mode, and the fast, quadrupolar-driven T1 relaxation of this spin I = 3/2 noble gas isotope required a rapid subsequent rubidium removal and swift transfer into the high magnetic field region for NMR detection. Because of the xenon density dependent 131Xe quadrupolar relaxation in the gas phase, the SEOP polarization build-up exhibits an even more pronounced dependence on xenon partial pressure than that observed in 129Xe SEOP. 131Xe is the only stable noble gas isotope with a positive gyromagnetic ratio and shows therefore a different relative phase between hp signal and thermal signal compared to all other noble gases. The gas phase 131Xe NMR spectrum displays a surface and magnetic field dependent quadrupolar splitting that was found to have additional gas pressure and gas composition dependence. The splitting was reduced by the presence of water vapor that presumably influences xenon-surface interactions. The hp 131Xe spectrum shows differential line broadening, suggesting the presence of strong adsorption sites. Beyond hp 131Xe NMR spectroscopy studies, a general equation for the high temperature, thermal spin polarization, P, for spin I⩾1/2 nuclei is presented. PMID:21051249

  7. Scalable NMR spectroscopy with semiconductor chips

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Dongwan; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Sun, Nan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Ham, Donhee

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art NMR spectrometers using superconducting magnets have enabled, with their ultrafine spectral resolution, the determination of the structure of large molecules such as proteins, which is one of the most profound applications of modern NMR spectroscopy. Many chemical and biotechnological applications, however, involve only small-to-medium size molecules, for which the ultrafine resolution of the bulky, expensive, and high-maintenance NMR spectrometers is not required. For these applications, there is a critical need for portable, affordable, and low-maintenance NMR spectrometers to enable in-field, on-demand, or online applications (e.g., quality control, chemical reaction monitoring) and co-use of NMR with other analytical methods (e.g., chromatography, electrophoresis). As a critical step toward NMR spectrometer miniaturization, small permanent magnets with high field homogeneity have been developed. In contrast, NMR spectrometer electronics capable of modern multidimensional spectroscopy have thus far remained bulky. Complementing the magnet miniaturization, here we integrate the NMR spectrometer electronics into 4-mm2 silicon chips. Furthermore, we perform various multidimensional NMR spectroscopies by operating these spectrometer electronics chips together with a compact permanent magnet. This combination of the spectrometer-electronics-on-a-chip with a permanent magnet represents a useful step toward miniaturization of the overall NMR spectrometer into a portable platform. PMID:25092330

  8. Scalable NMR spectroscopy with semiconductor chips.

    PubMed

    Ha, Dongwan; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Sun, Nan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Ham, Donhee

    2014-08-19

    State-of-the-art NMR spectrometers using superconducting magnets have enabled, with their ultrafine spectral resolution, the determination of the structure of large molecules such as proteins, which is one of the most profound applications of modern NMR spectroscopy. Many chemical and biotechnological applications, however, involve only small-to-medium size molecules, for which the ultrafine resolution of the bulky, expensive, and high-maintenance NMR spectrometers is not required. For these applications, there is a critical need for portable, affordable, and low-maintenance NMR spectrometers to enable in-field, on-demand, or online applications (e.g., quality control, chemical reaction monitoring) and co-use of NMR with other analytical methods (e.g., chromatography, electrophoresis). As a critical step toward NMR spectrometer miniaturization, small permanent magnets with high field homogeneity have been developed. In contrast, NMR spectrometer electronics capable of modern multidimensional spectroscopy have thus far remained bulky. Complementing the magnet miniaturization, here we integrate the NMR spectrometer electronics into 4-mm(2) silicon chips. Furthermore, we perform various multidimensional NMR spectroscopies by operating these spectrometer electronics chips together with a compact permanent magnet. This combination of the spectrometer-electronics-on-a-chip with a permanent magnet represents a useful step toward miniaturization of the overall NMR spectrometer into a portable platform. PMID:25092330

  9. Advanced NMR technology for bioscience and biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, P.C.; Hernandez, G.; Trewhella, J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Boumenthal, D.K.; Kennedy, M.A.; Moore, G.J.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). NMR plays critical roles in bioscience and biotechnology in both imaging and structure determination. NMR is limited, however, by the inherent low sensitivity of the NMR experiment and the demands for spectral resolution required to study biomolecules. The authors addressed both of these issues by working on the development of NMR force microscopy for molecular imaging, and high field NMR with isotope labeling to overcome limitations in the size of biomolecules that can be studied using NMR. A novel rf coil design for NMR force microscopy was developed that increases the limits of sensitivity in magnetic resonance detection for imaging, and the authors demonstrated sub-surface spatial imaging capabilities. The authors also made advances in the miniaturization of two critical NMR force microscope components. They completed high field NMR and isotope labeling studies of a muscle protein complex which is responsible for regulating muscle contraction and is too large for study using conventional NMR approaches.

  10. Development of LC-13C NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorn, H. C.; Wang, J. S.; Glass, T. E.

    1986-01-01

    This study involves the development of C-13 nuclear resonance as an on-line detector for liquid chromatography (LC-C-13 NMR) for the chemical characterization of aviation fuels. The initial focus of this study was the development of a high sensitivity flow C-13 NMR probe. Since C-13 NMR sensitivity is of paramount concern, considerable effort during the first year was directed at new NMR probe designs. In particular, various toroid coil designs were examined. In addition, corresponding shim coils for correcting the main magnetic field (B sub 0) homogeneity were examined. Based on these initial probe design studies, an LC-C-13 NMR probe was built and flow C-13 NMR data was obtained for a limited number of samples.

  11. Pseudogap in Fe2VGa: NMR evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, C. S.; Ross, Joseph H.

    2001-02-01

    We report the results of a 51V and 69Ga nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of Fe2VGa at temperatures between 4 and 450 K. The presence of magnetic antisite defects is deduced from the NMR linewidth, which displays a Curie-law temperature dependence. The absence of associated NMR shifts indicates the material to be intrinsically nonmagnetic. At low temperatures the NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate exhibits Korringa behavior, indicating a small carrier density at the Fermi level. At elevated temperatures, the Knight shifts and NMR relaxation rates go over to a thermally activated response, a semiconductor-like behavior. These results are consistent with pseudogap features identified by recent band structure calculations. The Fermi level density of states deduced from NMR is considerably smaller than given by the specific heat coefficient, γ. The electronic properties are compared to the isostructural semimetal Fe2VAl.

  12. Applications of NMR in Dairy Research

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Anthony D.; Rochfort, Simone J.

    2014-01-01

    NMR is a robust analytical technique that has been employed to investigate the properties of many substances of agricultural relevance. NMR was first used to investigate the properties of milk in the 1950s and has since been employed in a wide range of studies; including properties analysis of specific milk proteins to metabolomics techniques used to monitor the health of dairy cows. In this brief review, we highlight the different uses of NMR in the dairy industry. PMID:24958391

  13. Hyphenated low-field NMR techniques: combining NMR with NIR, GPC/SEC and rheometry.

    PubMed

    Räntzsch, Volker; Wilhelm, Manfred; Guthausen, Gisela

    2016-06-01

    Hyphenated low-field NMR techniques are promising characterization methods for online process analytics and comprehensive offline studies of soft materials. By combining different analytical methods with low-field NMR, information on chemical and physical properties can be correlated with molecular dynamics and complementary chemical information. In this review, we present three hyphenated low-field NMR techniques: a combination of near-infrared spectroscopy and time-domain NMR (TD-NMR) relaxometry, online (1) H-NMR spectroscopy measured directly after size exclusion chromatographic (SEC, also known as GPC) separation and a combination of rheometry and TD-NMR relaxometry for highly viscous materials. Case studies are reviewed that underline the possibilities and challenges of the different hyphenated low-field NMR methods. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25854997

  14. Probing surface interactions by combining NMR cryoporometry and NMR relaxometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J.; Stark, S. C.; Strange, J. H.

    2005-06-01

    To further expand on the understanding of surface interactions at the liquid/solid interface on pore walls, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques of cryoporometry and relaxometry have been combined. The combination of these techniques allows variations in NMR relaxation parameters from pore surface to volume ratio changes and from surface interaction changes to be distinguished. By studying a range of sol-gel silicas from two different sources, it was noted that the relaxation time measurements were not consistent with the pore diameters determined by cryoporometry and N2 gas adsorption. Instead distinctly different relaxivity constants were determined for each absorbate in each of the two brands of silica. It was clear that the relaxation times were modified by more than just the pore geometry. Independent experiments on the two brands of silica suggested that the relaxometry results were heavily influenced by the concentration of paramagnetic relaxation centres in the silica gels. The strength of surface interaction, and hence surface affinity, was seen to depend on the liquid in the pores. Using this difference in surface affinities, binary mixtures of alkanes placed in sol-gel silicas were separated via preferential absorption and their components identified using cryoporometry, whereas the components could not be distinguished in the bulk liquid.

  15. Spin-Exchange-Pumped NMR Gyros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, T. G.; Larsen, M. S.

    We present the basic theory governing spin-exchange pumped NMR gyros. We review the basic physics of spin-exchange collisions and relaxation as they pertain to precision NMR. We present a simple model of operation as an NMR oscillator and use it to analyze the dynamic response and noise properties of the oscillator. We discuss the primary systematic errors (differential alkali fields, quadrupole shifts, and offset drifts) that limit the bias stability, and discuss methods to minimize them. We give with a brief overview of a practical implementation and performance of an NMR gyro built by Northrop-Grumman Corporation, and conclude with some comments about future prospects.

  16. NMR studies of isotopically labeled RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pardi, A.

    1994-12-01

    In summary, the ability to generate NMR quantities of {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs has led to the development of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques for simplifying the resonance assignment and structure determination of RNAs. These methods for synthesizing isotopically labeled RNAs are only several years old, and thus there are still relatively few applications of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques to RNA. However, given the critical role that RNAs play in cellular function, one can expect to see an increasing number of NMR structural studies of biologically active RNAs.

  17. Solid-state NMR and Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Opella, Stanley J.

    2015-01-01

    The native environment for a membrane protein is a phospholipid bilayer. Because the protein is immobilized on NMR timescales by the interactions within a bilayer membrane, solid-state NMR methods are essential to obtain high-resolution spectra. Approaches have been developed for both unoriented and oriented samples, however, they all rest on the foundation of the most fundamental aspects solid-state NMR, and the chemical shift and homo- and hetero-nuclear dipole-dipole interactions. Solid-state NMR has advanced sufficiently to enable the structures of membrane proteins to be determined under near-native conditions in phospholipid bilayers. PMID:25681966

  18. NMR exposure sensitizes tumor cells to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ghibelli, L; Cerella, C; Cordisco, S; Clavarino, G; Marazzi, S; De Nicola, M; Nuccitelli, S; D'Alessio, M; Magrini, A; Bergamaschi, A; Guerrisi, V; Porfiri, L M

    2006-03-01

    NMR technology has dramatically contributed to the revolution of image diagnostic. NMR apparatuses use combinations of microwaves over a homogeneous strong (1 Tesla) static magnetic field. We had previously shown that low intensity (0.3-66 mT) static magnetic fields deeply affect apoptosis in a Ca2+ dependent fashion (Fanelli et al., 1999 FASEBJ., 13;95-102). The rationale of the present study is to examine whether exposure to the static magnetic fields of NMR can affect apoptosis induced on reporter tumor cells of haematopoietic origin. The impressive result was the strong increase (1.8-2.5 fold) of damage-induced apoptosis by NMR. This potentiation is due to cytosolic Ca2+ overload consequent to NMR-promoted Ca2+ influx, since it is prevented by intracellular (BAPTA-AM) and extracellular (EGTA) Ca2+ chelation or by inhibition of plasma membrane L-type Ca2+ channels. Three-days follow up of treated cultures shows that NMR decrease long term cell survival, thus increasing the efficiency of cytocidal treatments. Importantly, mononuclear white blood cells are not sensitised to apoptosis by NMR, showing that NMR may increase the differential cytotoxicity of antitumor drugs on tumor vs normal cells. This strong, differential potentiating effect of NMR on tumor cell apoptosis may have important implications, being in fact a possible adjuvant for antitumor therapies. PMID:16528477

  19. Analytical Applications of NMR: Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Stuart A.

    1982-01-01

    Highlights a symposium on analytical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), discussing pulse Fourier transformation technique, two-dimensional NMR, solid state NMR, and multinuclear NMR. Includes description of ORACLE, an NMR data processing system at Syracuse University using real-time color graphics, and algorithms for…

  20. Access to NMR Spectroscopy for Two-Year College Students: The NMR Site at Trinity University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Nancy S.; Shanklin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Students at two-year colleges and small four-year colleges have often obtained their exposure to NMR spectroscopy through "canned" spectra because the cost of an NMR spectrometer, particularly a high-field spectrometer, is prohibitive in these environments. This article describes the design of a NMR site at Trinity University in which spectral…

  1. NMR studies of oriented molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, S.W.

    1981-11-01

    Deuterium and proton magnetic resonance are used in experiments on a number of compounds which either form liquid crystal mesophases themselves or are dissolved in a liquid crystal solvent. Proton multiple quantum NMR is used to simplify complicated spectra. The theory of nonselective multiple quantum NMR is briefly reviewed. Benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal are used to demonstrate several outcomes of the theory. Experimental studies include proton and deuterium single quantum (..delta..M = +-1) and proton multiple quantum spectra of several molecules which contain the biphenyl moiety. 4-Cyano-4'-n-pentyl-d/sub 11/-biphenyl (5CB-d/sub 11/) is studied as a pure compound in the nematic phase. The obtained chain order parameters and dipolar couplings agree closely with previous results. Models for the effective symmetry of the biphenyl group in 5CB-d/sub 11/ are tested against the experimental spectra. The dihedral angle, defined by the planes containing the rings of the biphenyl group, is found to be 30 +- 2/sup 0/ for 5DB-d/sub 11/. Experiments are also described for 4,4'-d/sub 2/-biphenyl, 4,4' - dibromo-biphenyl, and unsubstituted biphenyl.

  2. Picoliter H-1 NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R. ); Wind, Robert A. )

    2002-02-01

    A RF probe that fits inside the bore of a small gradient coil package is described for routine 1H-NMR microscopy measurements on small samples. The probe operates at 500 MHz and houses a 267-um-diameter solenoid transceiver. When used in three dimensional chemical shift imaging (3D-CSI) experiments, the measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is shown to be within 20-30 percent of theoretical limits formulated by only considering the solenoid's resistive losses. This is illustrated using a 100-um-diameter globule of triacylglycerols ({approx}900mM) that may be an oocyte precursor in young Xenopus Laevis frogs, and water sample containing choline at a concentration often found in live cells ({approx}33mM). In chemical shift images generated using a few thousand scans, the choline methyl line is found to have an acceptable SNR in resolved from just 5 picoliters in the Xenopus globule. It is concluded that the probe's sensitivity is sufficient for performing 1H-NMR on picoliter-scale volumes in biological cells and tissues.

  3. NMR Spectroscopy and Its Value: A Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used by chemists. Furthermore, the use of NMR spectroscopy to solve structures of macromolecules or to examine protein-ligand interactions is popular. Yet, few students entering graduate education in biological sciences have been introduced to this method or its utility. Over the last six…

  4. An Integrated Laboratory Project in NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Pendley, Bradford D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an advanced NMR project that can be done with a 60-MHz continuous-wave proton spectrometer. Points out the main purposes are to give students experience in second-order NMR analysis, the simplification of spectra by raising the frequency, and the effect of non-hydrogen nuclei on proton resonances. (MVL)

  5. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this…

  6. Using Cloud Storage for NMR Data Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soulsby, David

    2012-01-01

    An approach using Google Groups as method for distributing student-acquired NMR data has been implemented. We describe how to configure NMR spectrometer software so that data is uploaded to a laboratory section specific Google Group, thereby removing bottlenecks associated with printing and processing at the spectrometer workstation. Outside of…

  7. A Guided Inquiry Approach to NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, Laura E.; Lisensky, George C.; Spencer, Brock

    1998-04-01

    We present a novel way to introduce NMR spectroscopy into the general chemistry curriculum as part of a week-long aspirin project in our one-semester introductory course. Aspirin is synthesized by reacting salicylic acid and acetic anhydride. Purity is determined by titration and IR and NMR spectroscopy. Students compare IR and NMR spectra of their aspirin product to a series of reference spectra obtained by the class. Students are able to interpret the IR spectra of their aspirin using IR data from previous experiments. NMR is introduced by having students collect 1H NMR spectra of a series of reference compounds chosen to include some of the structural features of aspirin and compare spectra and structures of the reference compounds to develop a correlation chart for chemical shifts. This process is done in small groups using shared class data and is guided by a series of questions designed to relate the different kinds of hydrogen atoms to number and position of peaks in the NMR spectrum. Students then identify the peaks in the NMR spectrum of their aspirin product and relate percent purity by titration with spectral results and percent yield. This is an enjoyable project that combines the synthesis of a familiar material with a guided inquiry-based introduction to NMR spectroscopy.

  8. Large NMR signals and polarization asymmetries.

    SciTech Connect

    Penttila, S. I.

    1998-11-25

    A large modulation in the series Q-meter can lead to nonlinear NMR signals and asymmetric polarization values. With a careful circuit analysis the nonlinearity can be estimated and corrections to polarization can be determined as a function of the strength of the modulation. We describe the recent LAMPF polarized proton target experiment, its NMR measurement and corrections to the measured polarizations.

  9. Periodic organosilica hollow nanospheres as anode materials for lithium ion rechargeable batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasidharan, Manickam; Nakashima, Kenichi; Gunawardhana, Nanda; Yokoi, Toshiyuki; Ito, Masanori; Inoue, Masamichi; Yusa, Shin-Ichi; Yoshio, Masaki; Tatsumi, Takashi

    2011-11-01

    Polymeric micelles with core-shell-corona architecture have been found to be the efficient colloidal templates for synthesis of periodic organosilica hollow nanospheres over a broad pH range from acidic to alkaline media. In alkaline medium, poly (styrene-b-[3-(methacryloylamino)propyl] trimethylammonium chloride-b-ethylene oxide) (PS-PMAPTAC-PEO) micelles yield benzene-silica hollow nanospheres with molecular scale periodicity of benzene groups in the shell domain of hollow particles. Whereas, an acidic medium (pH 4) produces diverse hollow particles with benzene, ethylene, and a mixture of ethylene and dipropyldisulfide bridging functionalities using poly(styrene-b-2-vinyl pyridine-b-ethylene oxide) (PS-PVP-PEO) micelles. These hollow particles were thoroughly characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), thermogravimetric analysis (TG/DTA), Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance (29Si MAS NMR and 13CP-MAS NMR), Raman spectroscopy, and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analyses. The benzene-silica hollow nanospheres with molecular scale periodicity in the shell domain exhibit higher cycling performance of up to 300 cycles in lithium ion rechargeable batteries compared with micron-sized dense benzene-silica particles.Polymeric micelles with core-shell-corona architecture have been found to be the efficient colloidal templates for synthesis of periodic organosilica hollow nanospheres over a broad pH range from acidic to alkaline media. In alkaline medium, poly (styrene-b-[3-(methacryloylamino)propyl] trimethylammonium chloride-b-ethylene oxide) (PS-PMAPTAC-PEO) micelles yield benzene-silica hollow nanospheres with molecular scale periodicity of benzene groups in the shell domain of hollow particles. Whereas, an acidic medium (pH 4) produces diverse hollow particles with benzene, ethylene, and a mixture of ethylene and

  10. Robust, integrated computational control of NMR experiments to achieve optimal assignment by ADAPT-NMR.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Arash; Tonelli, Marco; Sahu, Sarata C; Singarapu, Kiran K; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Markley, John L

    2012-01-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) represents a groundbreaking prototype for automated protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. With a [(13)C,(15)N]-labeled protein sample loaded into the NMR spectrometer, ADAPT-NMR delivers complete backbone resonance assignments and secondary structure in an optimal fashion without human intervention. ADAPT-NMR achieves this by implementing a strategy in which the goal of optimal assignment in each step determines the subsequent step by analyzing the current sum of available data. ADAPT-NMR is the first iterative and fully automated approach designed specifically for the optimal assignment of proteins with fast data collection as a byproduct of this goal. ADAPT-NMR evaluates the current spectral information, and uses a goal-directed objective function to select the optimal next data collection step(s) and then directs the NMR spectrometer to collect the selected data set. ADAPT-NMR extracts peak positions from the newly collected data and uses this information in updating the analysis resonance assignments and secondary structure. The goal-directed objective function then defines the next data collection step. The procedure continues until the collected data support comprehensive peak identification, resonance assignments at the desired level of completeness, and protein secondary structure. We present test cases in which ADAPT-NMR achieved results in two days or less that would have taken two months or more by manual approaches. PMID:22427982

  11. NMR and MRI apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; Kelso, Nathan; Lee, SeungKyun; Moessle, Michael; Myers, Whittier; McDermott, Robert; ten Haken, Bernard; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas

    2007-03-06

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. Additional signal to noise benefits are obtained by use of a low noise polarization coil, comprising litz wire or superconducting materials. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  12. Probing Cancer Cell Metabolism Using NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hollinshead, Kate E R; Williams, Debbie S; Tennant, Daniel A; Ludwig, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Altered cellular metabolism is now accepted to be at the core of many diseases including cancer. Over the past 20 years, NMR has become a core technology to study these metabolic perturbations in detail. This chapter reviews current NMR-based methods for steady-state metabolism and, in particular, the use of non-radioactive stable isotope-enriched tracers. Opportunities and challenges for each method, such as 1D (1)H NMR spectroscopy and (13)C carbon-based NMR spectroscopic methods, are discussed. Ultimately, the combination of NMR and mass spectra as orthogonal technologies are required to compensate for the drawbacks of each technique when used singly are discussed. PMID:27325263

  13. Background suppression in MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Jeffery L.; Beck, Larry W.; Ferguson, David B.; Haw, James F.

    Pulse sequences for suppressing background signals from spinning modules used in magic-angle spinning NMR are described. These pulse sequences are based on spatially selective composite 90° pulses originally reported by Bax, which provide for no net excitation of spins outside the homogeneous region of the coil. We have achieved essentially complete suppression of background signals originating from our Vespel spinning module (which uses a free-standing coil) in both 1H and 13C spectra without notable loss in signal intensity. Successful modification of both Bloch decay and cross-polarization pulse sequences to include spatially selective pulses was essential to acquire background-free spectra for weak samples. Background suppression was also found to be particularly valuable for both T1 and T1 ϱ, relaxation measurements.

  14. NMR solution structure of butantoxin.

    PubMed

    Holaday, S K; Martin, B M; Fletcher, P L; Krishna, N R

    2000-07-01

    The NMR structure of a new toxin, butantoxin (BuTX), which is present in the venoms of the three Brazilian scorpions Tityus serrulatus, Tityus bahiensis, and Tityus stigmurus, has been investigated. This toxin was shown to reversibly block the Shaker B potassium channels (K(d) approximately 660 nM) and inhibit the proliferation of T-cells and the interleukin-2 production of antigen-stimulated T-helper cells. BuTX is a 40 amino acid basic protein stabilized by the four disulfide bridges: Cys2-Cys5, Cys10-Cys31, Cys16-Cys36, and Cys20-Cys38. The latter three are conserved among all members of the short-chain scorpion toxin family, while the first is unique to BuTX. The three-dimensional structure of BuTX was determined using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. NOESY, phase sensitive COSY (PH-COSY), and amide hydrogen exchange data were used to generate constraints for molecular modeling calculations. Distance geometry and simulated annealing calculations were performed to generate a family of 49 structures free of constraint violations. The secondary structure of BuTX consists of a short 2(1/2) turn alpha-helix (Glu15-Phe23) and a beta-sheet. The beta-sheet is composed of two well-defined antiparallel strands (Gly29-Met32 and Lys35-Cys38) connected by a type-I' beta-turn (Asn33-Asn34). Residues Cys5-Ala9 form a quasi-third strand of the beta-sheet. The N-terminal C2-C5 disulfide bridge unique to this toxin does not appear to confer stability to the protein. PMID:10864437

  15. Synthesis of acid-base bifunctional mesoporous materials by oxidation and thermolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiaofang; Zou, Yongcun; Wu, Shujie; Liu, Heng; Guan, Jingqi; Kan, Qiubin

    2011-06-15

    Graphical abstract: A novel and efficient method has been developed for the synthesis of acid-base bifunctional catalyst. The obtained sample of SO{sub 3}H-MCM-41-NH{sub 2} containing amine and sulfonic acids exhibits excellent catalytic activity in aldol condensation reaction. Research highlights: {yields} Synthesize acid-base bifunctional mesoporous materials SO{sub 3}H-MCM-41-NH{sub 2}. {yields} Oxidation and then thermolysis to generate acidic site and basic site. {yields} Exhibit good catalytic performance in aldol condensation reaction between acetone and various aldehydes. -- Abstract: A novel and efficient method has been developed for the synthesis of acid-base bifunctional catalyst SO{sub 3}H-MCM-41-NH{sub 2}. This method was achieved by co-condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) and (3-triethoxysilylpropyl) carbamicacid-1-methylcyclohexylester (3TAME) in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), followed by oxidation and then thermolysis to generate acidic site and basic site. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron micrographs (TEM) show that the resultant materials keep mesoporous structure. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), back titration, solid-state {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR and solid-state {sup 29}Si MAS NMR confirm that the organosiloxanes were condensed as a part of the silica framework. The bifunctional sample (SO{sub 3}H-MCM-41-NH{sub 2}) containing amine and sulfonic acids exhibits excellent acid-basic properties, which make it possess high activity in aldol condensation reaction between acetone and various aldehydes.

  16. Highly efficient luminescent hybrid materials covalently linking with europium(III) complexes via a novel fluorinated beta-diketonate ligand: synthesis, characterization and photophysical properties.

    PubMed

    Francis, Biju; Ambili Raj, D B; Reddy, M L P

    2010-09-14

    A novel highly fluorinated beta-diketonate ligand, 1-(3,5-bis(benzyloxy)phenyl)-4,4,5,5,5-pentafluoropentane-1,3-dione (HBBPPF) and its corresponding europium(III) ternary complex, Eu(BBPPF)(3)(DDXPO) [DDXPO = 4,5-bis(diphenylphosphino)-9,9-dimethylxanthene oxide] were synthesized via a dexterously designed routine, characterized and its photophysical properties (PL) investigated. PL measurement results indicated that the europium(III) ternary complex exhibits intense red emission under UV light excitation with a solid-state quantum yield of 39%. An organic-inorganic mesoporous luminescent hybrid material was also constructed by linking the ternary europium(III) complex to the functionalized hexagonal mesoporous MCM-41 through the modified beta-diketonate ligand (SiBBPPF-Na). Beta-diketonate grafted to the coupling agent 3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl isocyanate was used as the precursor for the preparation of mesoporous materials. A modified MCM-41 mesoporous material containing ternary europium(iii) complex covalently bonded to the silica-based network, designated as Eu(BBPPF-Si)(3)(DDXPO)/MCM-41, was obtained by interacting SiBBPPF-Na with europium nitrate, DDXPO and MCM-41 via a ligand-exchange reaction. The new mesoporous hybrid material was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, thermogravimetry, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, FT-IR, (29)Si CP MAS NMR and (13)C NMR solid-state techniques, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Eu(BBPPF-Si)(3)(DDXPO)/MCM-41 exhibits an efficient intramolecular energy transfer process from the silylated beta-diketonate to the central Eu(3+), namely, the "antenna effect", which favours a strong luminescent intensity (quantum yield = 43%). Thermogravimetric analysis on Eu(BBPPF-Si)(3)(DDXPO)/MCM-41 demonstrated that the thermal stability of the lanthanide complex was evidently improved as it was covalently bonded to the mesoporous MCM-41 matrix. PMID:20628688

  17. Spectroscopic Investigation of the Mechanisms Responsible for the Superior Stability of Hybrid Class 1/Class 2 CO2 Sorbents: A New Class 4 Category.

    PubMed

    Wilfong, Walter Christopher; Kail, Brian W; Jones, Christopher W; Pacheco, Carlos; Gray, McMahan L

    2016-05-25

    Hybrid Class 1/Class 2 supported amine CO2 sorbents demonstrate superior performance under practical steam conditions, yet their amine immobilization and stabilization mechanisms are unclear. Uncovering the interactions responsible for the sorbents' robust features is critical for further improvements and can facilitate practical applications. We employ solid state (29)Si CP-MAS and 2-D FSLG (1)H-(13)C CP HETCOR NMR spectroscopies to probe the overall molecular interactions of aminosilane/silica, polyamine [poly(ethylenimine), PEI]/silica, and hybrid aminosilane/PEI/silica sorbents. A unique, sequential impregnation sorbent preparation method is executed in a diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) setup to decouple amine binding mechanisms at the amine-silica interface from those within bulk amine layers. These mechanisms are correlated with each sorbents' resistance to accelerated liquid H2O and TGA steam treatments (H2O stability) and to oxidative degradation (thermal stability). High percentages of CO2 capture retained (PCR) and organic content retained (OCR) values after H2O testing of N-(3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl)ethylenediamine (TMPED)/PEI and (3-aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane (APTMS)/PEI hybrid sorbents are associated with a synergistic stabilizing effect of the amine species observed during oxidative degradation (thermal gravimetric analysis-differential scanning calorimetry, TGA-DSC). Solid state NMR spectroscopy reveals that the synergistic effect of the TMPED/PEI mixture is manifested by the formation of hydrogen-bonded PEI-NH2···NH2-TMPED and PEI-NH2···HO-Si/O-Si-O (TMPED, T(2)) linkages within the sorbent. DRIFTS further determines that PEI enhances the grafting of TMPED to silica and that PEI is dispersed among a stable network of polymerized TMPED in the bulk, utilizing H-bonded linkages. These findings provide the scientific basis for establishing a Class 4 category for aminosilane/polyamine/silica hybrid sorbents

  18. Synthesis, characterization, and solid-state NMR investigation of organically modified bentonites and their composites with LDPE.

    PubMed

    Borsacchi, Silvia; Sudhakaran, Umayal; Geppi, Marco; Ricci, Lucia; Liuzzo, Vincenzo; Ruggeri, Giacomo

    2013-07-23

    Polymer/clay nanocomposites show remarkably improved properties (mechanical properties, as well as decreased gas permeability and flammability, etc.) with respect to their microscale counterparts and pristine polymers. Due to the substantially apolar character of most of the organic polymers, natural occurring hydrophilic clays are modified into organophilic clays with consequent increase of the polymer/clay compatibility. Different strategies have been developed for the preparation of nanocomposites with improved properties, especially aimed at achieving the best dispersion of clay platelets in the polymer matrix. In this paper we present the preparation and characterization of polymer/clay nanocomposites composed of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and natural clay, montmorillonite-containing bentonite. Two different forms of the clay have been considered: the first, a commercial organophilic bentonite (Nanofil 15), obtained by exchanging the natural cations with dimethyldioctadecylammonium (2C18) cations, and the second, obtained by performing a grafting reaction of an alkoxysilane containing a polymerizable group, 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (TSPM), onto Nanofil 15. Both the clays and LDPE/clay nanocomposites were characterized by thermal, FT-IR, and X-ray diffraction techniques. The samples were also investigated by means of (29)Si, (13)C, and (1)H solid-state NMR, obtaining information on the structural properties of the modified clays. Moreover, by exploiting the effect of bentonite paramagnetic (Fe(3+)) ions on proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1's), useful information about the extent of the polymer-clay dispersion and their interfacial interactions could be obtained. PMID:23786424

  19. An Introduction to Biological NMR Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP). PMID:23831612

  20. Solid-State NMR Investigations of the Immobilization of a BF4 Salt of a Palladium(II) Complex on Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Wiench, Jerzy W.; Michon, Christophe; Ellern, Arkady; Hazendonk, Paul; Iuga, Adriana; Angelici, Robert J.; Pruski, Marek

    2009-08-03

    The structure of the silica supported palladium(II) complex [Pd(dppp)(S{sub 2}C-NEt{sub 2})]BF{sub 4} (abbreviated as [Pd(dppp)(dtc)]BF{sub 4}, where dppp is Ph{sub 2}P(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}PPh{sub 2}) and interactions between the [Pd(dppp)(dtc)]{sup +} cation, the BF{sub 4}{sup -} anion, and the silica surface are studied using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The unsupported, crystalline form of [Pd(dppp)(dtc)]BF{sub 4} is also investigated, both by X-ray diffraction and NMR. The structures of the cation and anion are found to be essentially the same in both unsupported and supported complex. The [Pd(dppp)(dtc)]BF{sub 4} loading has been determined by quantitative measurements of {sup 11}B, {sup 19}F, and {sup 31}P intensities, whereas the arrangement of anions and cations on the surface of silica has been established by two-dimensional heteronuclear correlation experiments involving {sup 1}H, {sup 11}B, {sup 13}C, {sup 19}F, {sup 29}Si, and {sup 31}P nuclei. At low coverages, the [Pd(dppp)(dtc)]{sup +} cations are located near the BF{sub 4}{sup -} anions, which in turn are immobilized directly on the surface near the Q{sup 4} sites. At higher loadings, which in this study corresponded to 0.06-0.15 mmol/g, the complexes stack on top of each other, despite the fact that the directly adsorbed molecules take up less than 10% of the silica surface. The relevance of these findings to heterogeneous catalysis is discussed.

  1. MAS NMR of HIV-1 protein assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Quinn, Caitlin M.; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The negative global impact of the AIDS pandemic is well known. In this perspective article, the utility of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to answer pressing questions related to the structure and dynamics of HIV-1 protein assemblies is examined. In recent years, MAS NMR has undergone major technological developments enabling studies of large viral assemblies. We discuss some of these evolving methods and technologies and provide a perspective on the current state of MAS NMR as applied to the investigations into structure and dynamics of HIV-1 assemblies of CA capsid protein and of Gag maturation intermediates.

  2. Scalar operators in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Boqin

    1991-11-01

    Selectivity and resolution of solid-state NMR spectra are determined by dispersion of local magnetic fields originating from relaxation effects and orientation-dependent resonant frequencies of spin nuclei. Theoretically, the orientation-dependent resonant frequencies can be represented by a set of irreducible tensors. Among these tensors, only zero rank tensors (scalar operators) are capable of providing high resolution NMR spectra. This thesis presents a series of new developments in high resolution solid-state NMR concerning the reconstruction of various scalar operators motion in solid C{sub 60} is analyzed.

  3. Probing porous media with gas diffusion NMR.

    PubMed

    Mair, R W; Wong, G P; Hoffmann, D; Hurlimann, M D; Patz, S; Schwartz, L M; Walsworth, R L

    1999-10-18

    We show that gas diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance (GD-NMR) provides a powerful technique for probing the structure of porous media. In random packs of glass beads, using both laser-polarized and thermally polarized xenon gas, we find that GD-NMR can accurately measure the pore space surface-area-to-volume ratio, S/V rho, and the tortuosity, alpha (the latter quantity being directly related to the system's transport properties). We also show that GD-NMR provides a good measure of the tortuosity of sandstone and complex carbonate rocks. PMID:11543587

  4. MAS NMR of HIV-1 protein assemblies.

    PubMed

    Suiter, Christopher L; Quinn, Caitlin M; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The negative global impact of the AIDS pandemic is well known. In this perspective article, the utility of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to answer pressing questions related to the structure and dynamics of HIV-1 protein assemblies is examined. In recent years, MAS NMR has undergone major technological developments enabling studies of large viral assemblies. We discuss some of these evolving methods and technologies and provide a perspective on the current state of MAS NMR as applied to the investigations into structure and dynamics of HIV-1 assemblies of CA capsid protein and of Gag maturation intermediates. PMID:25797001

  5. On electrophoretic NMR. Exploring high conductivity samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielejewski, Michał; Giesecke, Marianne; Furó, István

    2014-06-01

    The performance of a new electrophoretic NMR (eNMR) method that uses a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill echo train with repeated electric field reversal is investigated. We show that this pulse sequence, with acronym CPMGER, yields strongly reduced artifacts from convective flow effects caused by the simultaneous presence of electroosmotic and thermal driving forces. We demonstrate the achieved improvements in various aqueous solutions. Ultimately, the method can be used for obtaining electrophoretic mobilities by eNMR without relying on uncharged reference molecules, otherwise a significant limitation for electrophoretic experiments performed with nuclei other than 1H.

  6. Probing porous media with gas diffusion NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Wong, G. P.; Hoffmann, D.; Hurlimann, M. D.; Patz, S.; Schwartz, L. M.; Walsworth, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    We show that gas diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance (GD-NMR) provides a powerful technique for probing the structure of porous media. In random packs of glass beads, using both laser-polarized and thermally polarized xenon gas, we find that GD-NMR can accurately measure the pore space surface-area-to-volume ratio, S/V rho, and the tortuosity, alpha (the latter quantity being directly related to the system's transport properties). We also show that GD-NMR provides a good measure of the tortuosity of sandstone and complex carbonate rocks.

  7. NMR data handbook for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Beall, P.T.; Amtey, S.R.; Kasturi, S.R.

    1984-01-01

    The text is divided into 10 chapters, each of which covers a specific block of material and has its own references. The volume is meant to serve as a laboratory handbook and a desk reference, containing basic NMR theory, useful formulae and physical constants, and compiled data from the NMR literature. The volume attempts to cover the development of biological NMR through several decades of in vitro experiments that have laid the groundwork for and pointed to profitable areas of investigation for new in vivo techniques.

  8. NMR Analysis of Unknowns: An Introduction to 2D NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, David E.; Warren, Steven E.

    2005-01-01

    A study combined 1D (one-dimensional) and 2D (two-dimensional) NMR spectroscopy to solve structural organic problems of three unknowns, which include 2-, 3-, and 4-heptanone. Results showed [to the first power]H NMR and [to the thirteenth power]C NMR signal assignments for 2- and 3-heptanone were more challenging than for 4-heptanone owing to the…

  9. NMR Methods to Study Dynamic Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Grutsch, Sarina; Brüschweiler, Sven; Tollinger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides a unique toolbox of experimental probes for studying dynamic processes on a wide range of timescales, ranging from picoseconds to milliseconds and beyond. Along with NMR hardware developments, recent methodological advancements have enabled the characterization of allosteric proteins at unprecedented detail, revealing intriguing aspects of allosteric mechanisms and increasing the proportion of the conformational ensemble that can be observed by experiment. Here, we present an overview of NMR spectroscopic methods for characterizing equilibrium fluctuations in free and bound states of allosteric proteins that have been most influential in the field. By combining NMR experimental approaches with molecular simulations, atomistic-level descriptions of the mechanisms by which allosteric phenomena take place are now within reach. PMID:26964042

  10. Epitope mapping by solution NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bardelli, M; Livoti, E; Simonelli, L; Pedotti, M; Moraes, A; Valente, A P; Varani, L

    2015-06-01

    Antibodies play an ever more prominent role in basic research as well as in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical sectors. Characterizing their epitopes, that is, the region that they recognize on their target molecule, is useful for purposes ranging from molecular biology research to vaccine design and intellectual property protection. Solution NMR spectroscopy is ideally suited to the atomic level characterization of intermolecular interfaces and, as a consequence, to epitope discovery. Here, we illustrate how NMR epitope mapping can be used to rapidly and accurately determine protein antigen epitopes. The basic concept is that differences in the NMR signal of an antigen free or bound by an antibody will identify epitope residues. NMR epitope mapping provides more detailed information than mutagenesis or peptide mapping and can be much more rapid than X-ray crystallography. Advantages and drawbacks of this technique are discussed together with practical considerations. PMID:25726811

  11. Quantitative analysis of NMR spectra with chemometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winning, H.; Larsen, F. H.; Bro, R.; Engelsen, S. B.

    2008-01-01

    The number of applications of chemometrics to series of NMR spectra is rapidly increasing due to an emerging interest for quantitative NMR spectroscopy e.g. in the pharmaceutical and food industries. This paper gives an analysis of advantages and limitations of applying the two most common chemometric procedures, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR), to a designed set of 231 simple alcohol mixture (propanol, butanol and pentanol) 1H 400 MHz spectra. The study clearly demonstrates that the major advantage of chemometrics is the visualisation of larger data structures which adds a new exploratory dimension to NMR research. While robustness and powerful data visualisation and exploration are the main qualities of the PCA method, the study demonstrates that the bilinear MCR method is an even more powerful method for resolving pure component NMR spectra from mixtures when certain conditions are met.

  12. A New Microcell Technique for NMR Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Sophia J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a new laboratory technique for working with small samples of compounds used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Demonstrates how microcells can be constructed for each experiment and samples can be recycled. (TW)

  13. NMR and optical studies of piezoelectric polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, V.H.; Tuthill, G.F.

    1993-01-01

    Progress is reported in several areas dealing with piezoelectric (electroactive) polymers (mostly vinylidene fluoride, trifluoroethylene, copolymers, PVF[sub 2]) and liquid crystals. Optical studies, neutron scattering, NMR, thermal, theory and modeling were done.

  14. NMR-Assisted Molecular Docking Methodologies.

    PubMed

    Sturlese, Mattia; Bellanda, Massimo; Moro, Stefano

    2015-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular docking are regularly being employed as helpful tools of drug discovery research. Molecular docking is an extremely rapid method to evaluate possible binders from a large chemical library in a fast and cheap manner. NMR techniques can directly detect a protein-ligand interaction, can determine the corresponding association constant, and can consistently identify the ligand binding cavity. Consequently, molecular docking and NMR techniques are naturally complementary techniques where the combination of the two has the potential to improve the overall efficiency of drug discovery process. In this review, we would like to summarize the state of the art of docking methods which have been recently bridged to NMR experiments to identify novel and effective therapeutic drug candidates. PMID:27490497

  15. Interfaces in polymer nanocomposites - An NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhme, Ute; Scheler, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is applied for the investigation of polymer nanocomposites. Solid-state NMR is applied to study the modification steps to compatibilize layered double hydroxides with non-polar polymers. 1H relaxation NMR gives insight on the polymer dynamics over a wide range of correlation times. For the polymer chain dynamics the transverse relaxation time T2 is most suited. In this presentation we report on two applications of T2 measurements under external mechanical stress. In a low-field system relaxation NMR studies are performed in-situ under uniaxial stress. High-temperature experiments in a Couette cell permit the investigation of the polymer dynamics in the melt under shear flow.

  16. Rheology of Blood by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Song-I.; Marseille, Oliver; Gehlen, Christa; Blümich, Bernhard

    2001-09-01

    Pipe flow of blood in tubes of 1 and 7 mm inner diameter, respectively, was investigated employing two-dimensional NMR velocity imaging and PFG propagator measurements at different Reynolds numbers between 10 and 3500. The results are compared to flow of a water/glycerol mixture of matching viscosity under identical conditions. The transition from laminar to turbulent flow is observed by both a flattening of the velocity profile and a change of the propagator shape. For blood flow this transition is found to be shifted toward higher Reynolds numbers as compared to the transition of the water/glycerol mixture. This observation is in agreement with predictions from hydraulic measurements and is a consequence of the non-Newtonian flow characteristics of blood as a suspension of erythrocytes and plasma. Likewise, a deviation from the laminar flow condition is observed for blood at low Reynolds numbers between 10 and 100. This phenomenon is unknown for Newtonian liquids and is explained by the onset of a geometrical arrangement of the erythrocytes, the so-called rouleaux effect.

  17. Rheology of blood by NMR.

    PubMed

    Han, S I; Marseille, O; Gehlen, C; Blümich, B

    2001-09-01

    Pipe flow of blood in tubes of 1 and 7 mm inner diameter, respectively, was investigated employing two-dimensional NMR velocity imaging and PFG propagator measurements at different Reynolds numbers between 10 and 3500. The results are compared to flow of a water/glycerol mixture of matching viscosity under identical conditions. The transition from laminar to turbulent flow is observed by both a flattening of the velocity profile and a change of the propagator shape. For blood flow this transition is found to be shifted toward higher Reynolds numbers as compared to the transition of the water/glycerol mixture. This observation is in agreement with predictions from hydraulic measurements and is a consequence of the non-Newtonian flow characteristics of blood as a suspension of erythrocytes and plasma. Likewise, a deviation from the laminar flow condition is observed for blood at low Reynolds numbers between 10 and 100. This phenomenon is unknown for Newtonian liquids and is explained by the onset of a geometrical arrangement of the erythrocytes, the so-called rouleaux effect. PMID:11531367

  18. The Nature of Secondary Interactions at Electrophilic Metal Sites of Molecular and Silica-Supported Organolutetium Complexes from Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Conley, Matthew P; Lapadula, Giuseppe; Sanders, Kevin; Gajan, David; Lesage, Anne; del Rosal, Iker; Maron, Laurent; Lukens, Wayne W; Copéret, Christophe; Andersen, Richard A

    2016-03-23

    Lu[CH(SiMe3)2]3 reacts with [SiO2-700] to give [(≡SiO)Lu[CH(SiMe3)2]2] and CH2(SiMe3)2. [(≡SiO)Lu[CH(SiMe3)2]2] is characterized by solid-state NMR and EXAFS spectroscopy, which show that secondary Lu···C and Lu···O interactions, involving a γ-CH3 and a siloxane bridge, are present. From X-ray crystallographic analysis, the molecular analogues Lu[CH(SiMe3)2]3-x[O-2,6-tBu-C6H3]x (x = 0-2) also have secondary Lu···C interactions. The (1)H NMR spectrum of Lu[CH(SiMe3)2]3 shows that the -SiMe3 groups are equivalent to -125 °C and inequivalent below that temperature, ΔG(⧧)(Tc = 148 K) = 7.1 kcal mol(-1). Both -SiMe3 groups in Lu[CH(SiMe3)2]3 have (1)JCH = 117 ± 1 Hz at -140 °C. The solid-state (13)C CPMAS NMR spectrum at 20 °C shows three chemically inequivalent resonances in the area ratio of 4:1:1 (12:3:3); the J-resolved spectra for each resonance give (1)JCH = 117 ± 2 Hz. The (29)Si CPMAS NMR spectrum shows two chemically inequivalent resonances with different values of chemical shift anisotropy. Similar observations are obtained for Lu[CH(SiMe3)2]3-x[O-2,6-tBu-C6H3]x (x = 1 and 2). The spectroscopic data point to short Lu···Cγ contacts corresponding to 3c-2e Lu···Cγ-Siβ interactions, which are supported by DFT calculations. Calculated natural bond orbital (NBO) charges show that Cγ carries a negative charge, while Lu, Hγ, and Siβ carry positive charges; as the number of O-based ligands increases so does the positive charge at Lu, which in turns shortens the Lu···Cγ distance. The change in NBO charges and the resulting changes in the spectroscopic and crystallographic properties show how ligands and surface-support sites rearrange to accommodate these changes, consistent with Pauling's electroneutrality concept. PMID:26887899

  19. Chromium liquid waste inertization in an inorganic alkali activated matrix: leaching and NMR multinuclear approach.

    PubMed

    Ponzoni, Chiara; Lancellotti, Isabella; Barbieri, Luisa; Spinella, Alberto; Saladino, Maria Luisa; Martino, Delia Chillura; Caponetti, Eugenio; Armetta, Francesco; Leonelli, Cristina

    2015-04-01

    A class of inorganic binders, also known as geopolymers, can be obtained by alkali activation of aluminosilicate powders at room temperature. The process is affected by many parameters (curing time, curing temperature, relative humidity etc.) and leads to a resistant matrix usable for inertization of hazardous waste. In this study an industrial liquid waste containing a high amount of chromium (≈ 2.3 wt%) in the form of metalorganic salts is inertized into a metakaolin based geopolymer matrix. One of the innovative aspects is the exploitation of the water contained in the waste for the geopolymerization process. This avoided any drying treatment, a common step in the management of liquid hazardous waste. The evolution of the process--from the precursor dissolution to the final geopolymer matrix hardening--of different geopolymers containing a waste amount ranging from 3 to 20%wt and their capability to inertize chromium cations were studied by: i) the leaching tests, according to the EN 12,457 regulation, at different curing times (15, 28, 90 and 540 days) monitoring releases of chromium ions (Cr(III) and Cr(VI)) and the cations constituting the aluminosilicate matrix (Na, Si, Al); ii) the humidity variation for different curing times (15 and 540 days); iii) SEM characterization at different curing times (28 and 540 days); iv) the trend of the solution conductivity and pH during the leaching test; v) the characterization of the short-range ordering in terms of TOT bonds (where T is Al or Si) by (29)Si and (27)Al solid state magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (ss MAS NMR) for geopolymers containing high amounts of waste (10-20%wt). The results show the formation of a stable matrix after only 15 days independently on the waste amount introduced; the longer curing times increase the matrices stabilities and their ability to immobilize chromium cations. The maximum amount of waste that can be inertized is around 10 wt% after a curing time of 28 days

  20. Modern NMR spectroscopy: a guide for chemists

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, J.K.M.; Hunter, B.K.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the authors of Modern NMR Spectroscopy is to bridge the communication gap between the chemist and the spectroscopist. The approach is nonmathematical, descriptive, and pictorial. To illustrate the ideas introduced in the text, the authors provide original spectra obtained specially for this purpose. Examples include spectroscopy of protons, carbon, and less receptive nuclei of interest to inorganic chemists. The authors succeed in making high-resolution NMR spectroscopy comprehensible for the average student or chemist.

  1. Frontiers of NMR in Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect

    1999-08-25

    NMR spectroscopy is expanding the horizons of structural biology by determining the structures and describing the dynamics of blobular proteins in aqueous solution, as well as other classes of proteins including membrane proteins and the polypeptides that form the aggregates diagnostic of prion and amyloid diseases. Significant results are also emerging on DNA and RNA oligomers and their complexes with proteins. This meeting focused attention on key structural questions emanating from molecular biology and how NMR spectroscopy can be used to answer them.

  2. NMR of Membrane Proteins: Beyond Crystals.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Sundaresan; Overduin, Michael; Bonev, Boyan B

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are essential for the flow of signals, nutrients and energy between cells and between compartments of the cell. Their mechanisms can only be fully understood once the precise structures, dynamics and interactions involved are defined at atomic resolution. Through advances in solution and solid state NMR spectroscopy, this information is now available, as demonstrated by recent studies of stable peripheral and transmembrane proteins. Here we highlight recent cases of G-protein coupled receptors, outer membrane proteins, such as VDAC, phosphoinositide sensors, such as the FAPP-1 pleckstrin homology domain, and enzymes including the metalloproteinase MMP-12. The studies highlighted have resulted in the determination of the 3D structures, dynamical properties and interaction surfaces for membrane-associated proteins using advanced isotope labelling strategies, solubilisation systems and NMR experiments designed for very high field magnets. Solid state NMR offers further insights into the structure and multimeric assembly of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, as well as into interactions with ligands and targets. Remaining challenges for wider application of NMR to membrane structural biology include the need for overexpression and purification systems for the production of isotope-labelled proteins with fragile folds, and the availability of only a few expensive perdeuterated detergents.Step changes that may transform the field include polymers, such as styrene maleic acid, which obviate the need for detergent altogether, and allow direct high yield purification from cells or membranes. Broader demand for NMR may be facilitated by MODA software, which instantly predicts membrane interactive residues that can subsequently be validated by NMR. In addition, recent developments in dynamic nuclear polarization NMR instrumentation offer a remarkable sensitivity enhancement from low molarity samples and cell surfaces. These advances illustrate the current

  3. NMR studies of multiphase flows II

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, S.A.; Caprihan, A.; Fukushima, E.

    1995-12-31

    NMR techniques for measurements of spatial distribution of material phase, velocity and velocity fluctuation are being developed and refined. Versions of these techniques which provide time average liquid fraction and fluid phase velocity have been applied to several concentrated suspension systems which will not be discussed extensively here. Technical developments required to further extend the use of NMR to the multi-phase flow arena and to provide measurements of previously unobtainable parameters are the focus of this report.

  4. Multidimensional NMR spectroscopy in a single scan.

    PubMed

    Gal, Maayan; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-11-01

    Multidimensional NMR has become one of the most widespread spectroscopic tools available to study diverse structural and functional aspects of organic and biomolecules. A main feature of multidimensional NMR is the relatively long acquisition times that these experiments demand. For decades, scientists have been working on a variety of alternatives that would enable NMR to overcome this limitation, and deliver its data in shorter acquisition times. Counting among these methodologies is the so-called ultrafast (UF) NMR approach, which in principle allows one to collect arbitrary multidimensional correlations in a single sub-second transient. By contrast to conventional acquisitions, a main feature of UF NMR is a spatiotemporal manipulation of the spins that imprints the chemical shift and/or J-coupling evolutions being sought, into a spatial pattern. Subsequent gradient-based manipulations enable the reading out of this information and its multidimensional correlation into patterns that are identical to those afforded by conventional techniques. The current review focuses on the fundamental principles of this spatiotemporal UF NMR manipulation, and on a few of the methodological extensions that this form of spectroscopy has undergone during the years. PMID:26249041

  5. 33S NMR cryogenic probe for taurine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobo, Fumio; Takahashi, Masato; Maeda, Hideaki

    2009-03-01

    With the goal of a S33 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe applicable to in vivo NMR on taurine-biological samples, we have developed the S33 NMR cryogenic probe, which is applicable to taurine solutions. The NMR sensitivity gain relative to a conventional broadband probe is as large as 3.5. This work suggests that improvements in the preamplifier could allow NMR measurements on 100 μM taurine solutions, which is the level of sensitivity necessary for biological samples.

  6. Sensitivity of nonuniform sampling NMR.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Melissa R; Suiter, Christopher L; Henry, Geneive E; Rovnyak, James; Hoch, Jeffrey C; Polenova, Tatyana; Rovnyak, David

    2015-06-01

    Many information-rich multidimensional experiments in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can benefit from a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhancement of up to about 2-fold if a decaying signal in an indirect dimension is sampled with nonconsecutive increments, termed nonuniform sampling (NUS). This work provides formal theoretical results and applications to resolve major questions about the scope of the NUS enhancement. First, we introduce the NUS Sensitivity Theorem in which any decreasing sampling density applied to any exponentially decaying signal always results in higher sensitivity (SNR per square root of measurement time) than uniform sampling (US). Several cases will illustrate this theorem and show that even conservative applications of NUS improve sensitivity by useful amounts. Next, we turn to a serious limitation of uniform sampling: the SNR by US decreases for extending evolution times, and thus total experimental times, beyond 1.26T2 (T2 = signal decay constant). Thus, SNR and resolution cannot be simultaneously improved by extending US beyond 1.26T2. We find that NUS can eliminate this constraint, and we introduce the matched NUS SNR Theorem: an exponential sampling density matched to the signal decay always improves the SNR with additional evolution time. Though proved for a specific case, broader classes of NUS densities also improve SNR with evolution time. Applications of these theoretical results are given for a soluble plant natural product and a solid tripeptide (u-(13)C,(15)N-MLF). These formal results clearly demonstrate the inadequacies of applying US to decaying signals in indirect nD-NMR dimensions, supporting a broader adoption of NUS. PMID:25901905

  7. Study on ethyl groups with two different orientations in [N(C2H5)4]2CuBr4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2016-06-01

    The crystal structure and phase transition temperature of [N(C2H5)4]2CuBr4 are studied using X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC); measurements revealed a tetragonal structure and the two phase transition temperatures TC of 204 K and 255.5 K. The structural geometry near TC is discussed in terms of the chemical shifts for 1H magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and 13C cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR. The two inequivalent ethyl groups are distinguishable by the 13C NMR spectrum. The molecular motions are discussed in terms of the spin-lattice relaxation times T1ρ in the rotating frame for 1H MAS NMR and 13C CP/MAS NMR. The T1ρ results reveal that the ethyl groups undergo tumbling motion, and furthermore that the ethyl groups are highly mobile.

  8. Use of NMR and NMR Prediction Software to Identify Components in Red Bull Energy Drinks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Andre J.; Shirzadi, Azadeh; Burrow, Timothy E.; Dicks, Andrew P.; Lefebvre, Brent; Corrin, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed as part of an upper-level undergraduate analytical chemistry course is described. Students investigate two popular soft drinks (Red Bull Energy Drink and sugar-free Red Bull Energy Drink) by NMR spectroscopy. With assistance of modern NMR prediction software they identify and quantify major components in each…

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Fukushima, Eiichi; Roeder, Stephen B. W.; Assink, Roger A.; Gibson, Atholl A. V.

    1986-01-01

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio-frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

  10. Calibration of NMR well logs from carbonate reservoirs with laboratory NMR measurements and μXRCT

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Harris E.; Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Yue; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-12-31

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log data has the potential to provide in-situ porosity, pore size distributions, and permeability of target carbonate CO₂ storage reservoirs. However, these methods which have been successfully applied to sandstones have yet to be completely validated for carbonate reservoirs. Here, we have taken an approach to validate NMR measurements of carbonate rock cores with independent measurements of permeability and pore surface area to volume (S/V) distributions using differential pressure measurements and micro X-ray computed tomography (μXRCT) imaging methods, respectively. We observe that using standard methods for determining permeability from NMR data incorrectly predicts these values by orders of magnitude. However, we do observe promise that NMR measurements provide reasonable estimates of pore S/V distributions, and with further independent measurements of the carbonate rock properties that universally applicable relationships between NMR measured properties may be developed for in-situ well logging applications of carbonate reservoirs.

  11. BOOK REVIEW: NMR Imaging of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard

    2003-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of materials is a field of increasing importance. Applications extend from fundamental science like the characterization of fluid transport in porous rock, catalyst pellets and hemodialysers into various fields of engineering for process optimization and product quality control. While the results of MRI imaging are being appreciated by a growing community, the methods of imaging are far more diverse for materials applications than for medical imaging of human beings. Blümich has delivered the first book in this field. It was published in hardback three years ago and is now offered as a paperback for nearly half the price. The text provides an introduction to MRI imaging of materials covering solid-state NMR spectroscopy, imaging methods for liquid and solid samples, and unusual MRI in terms of specialized approaches to spatial resolution such as an MRI surface scanner. The book represents an excellent and thorough treatment which will help to grow research in materials MRI. Blümich developed the treatise over many years for his research students, graduates in chemistry, physics and engineering. But it may also be useful for medical students looking for a less formal discussion of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The structure of this book is easy to perceive. The first three chapters cover an introduction, the fundamentals and methods of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The book starts at the ground level where no previous knowledge about NMR is assumed. Chapter 4 discusses a wide variety of transformations beyond the Fourier transformation. In particular, the Hadamard transformation and the 'wavelet' transformation are missing from most related books. This chapter also includes a description of noise-correlation spectroscopy, which promises the imaging of large objects without the need for extremely powerful radio-frequency transmitters. Chapters 5 and 6 cover basic imaging methods. The following chapter about the use of relaxation and

  12. NMR techniques in the study of cardiovascular structure and functions

    SciTech Connect

    Osbakken, M.; Haselgrove, J.

    1987-01-01

    The chapter titles of this book are: Introduction to NMR Techniques;Theory of NMR Probe Design;Overview of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Cardiovascular System;Vascular Anatomy and Physiology Studied with NMR Techniques;Assessment of Myocardial Ischemia and Infarction by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging;The Use of MRI in Congenital Heart Disease;Cardiomyopathies and Myocarditis Studied with NMR Techniques;Determination of Myocardial Mechanical Function with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques;Determination of Flow Using NMR Techniques;The Use of Contrast Agents in Cardiac MRI;Can Cardiovascular Disease Be Effectively Evaluated with NMR Spectroscopy. NMR Studies of ATP Synthesis Reactions in the Isolated Heart;Studies of Intermediary Metabolism in the Heart by 13C NMR Spectroscopy;23Na and 39K NMR Spectroscopic Studies of the Intact Beating Heart;and Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Using Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

  13. NMR studies of cation transport across membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shochet, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    /sup 23/Na NMR Studies of cation transport across membranes were conducted both on model and biological membranes. Two ionophores, the carrier monensin and the channel-former gramicidin, were chosen to induce cation transport in large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The distinction between the NMR signals arising from the two sides of the membrane was achieved by the addition of an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent to the outer solution. The kinetics of the cation transport across the membrane was observed simultaneously monitoring the changes in the /sup 23/Na NMR signals of both compartments. Two mathematical models were developed for the estimation of the transport parameters of the monensin- and gramicidin-induced cation transport. The models were able to fit the experimental data very well. A new method for the estimation of the volume trapped inside the vesicles was developed. The method uses the relative areas of the intra- and extravesicular NMR signals arising from a suspension of vesicles bathed in the same medium they contain, as a measure for the relative volumes of these compartments. Sodium transport across biological membranes was studied by /sup 23/ NMR, using suspensions of cultured nerve cells. The sodium influx through voltage-gated channels was studied using the channel modifier batrachotoxin in combination with scorpion toxin.

  14. Theoretical NMR correlations based Structure Discussion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The constitutional assignment of natural products by NMR spectroscopy is usually based on 2D NMR experiments like COSY, HSQC, and HMBC. The actual difficulty of the structure elucidation problem depends more on the type of the investigated molecule than on its size. The moment HMBC data is involved in the process or a large number of heteroatoms is present, a possibility of multiple solutions fitting the same data set exists. A structure elucidation software can be used to find such alternative constitutional assignments and help in the discussion in order to find the correct solution. But this is rarely done. This article describes the use of theoretical NMR correlation data in the structure elucidation process with WEBCOCON, not for the initial constitutional assignments, but to define how well a suggested molecule could have been described by NMR correlation data. The results of this analysis can be used to decide on further steps needed to assure the correctness of the structural assignment. As first step the analysis of the deviation of carbon chemical shifts is performed, comparing chemical shifts predicted for each possible solution with the experimental data. The application of this technique to three well known compounds is shown. Using NMR correlation data alone for the description of the constitutions is not always enough, even when including 13C chemical shift prediction. PMID:21797997

  15. NMR structural studies on antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Sönnichsen, F D; Davies, P L; Sykes, B D

    1998-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a structurally diverse class of proteins that bind to ice and inhibit its growth in a noncolligative manner. This adsorption-inhibition mechanism operating at the ice surface results in a lowering of the (nonequilibrium) freezing point below the melting point. A lowering of approximately 1 degree C, which is sufficient to prevent fish from freezing in ice-laden seawater, requires millimolar AFP levels in the blood. The solubility of AFPs at these millimolar concentrations and the small size of the AFPs (typically 3-15 kDa) make them ideal subjects for NMR analysis. Although fish AFPs are naturally abundant, seasonal expression, restricted access to polar fishes, and difficulties in separating numerous similar isoforms have made protein expression the method of choice for producing AFPs for structural studies. Expression of recombinant AFPs has also facilitated NMR analysis by permitting isotopic labeling with 15N and 13C and has permitted mutations to be made to help with the interpretation of NMR data. NMR analysis has recently solved two AFP structures and provided valuable information about the disposition of ice-binding side chains in a third. The potential exists to solve other AFP structures, including the newly described insect AFPs, and to use solid-state NMR techniques to address fundamental questions about the nature of the interaction between AFPs and ice. PMID:9923697

  16. Wide-line NMR and protein hydration.

    PubMed

    Tompa, K; Bokor, M; Tompa, P

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, the reader is introduced to the basics of wide-line NMR, with particular focus on the following: (1) basic theoretical and experimental NMR elements, necessary before switching the spectrometer and designing the experiment, (2) models/theories for the interpretation of measured data, (3) definition of wide-line NMR spectrometry, the description of the measurement and evaluation variants, useful hints for the novice, (4) advice on selecting the solvent, which is not a trivial task, (5) a note of warning that not all data are acceptable in spite of the statistical confidence. Finally, we wrap up the chapter with the results on two proteins (a globular and an intrinsically disordered). PMID:22760320

  17. Remote tuning of NMR probe circuits.

    PubMed

    Kodibagkar, V D; Conradi, M S

    2000-05-01

    There are many circumstances in which the probe tuning adjustments cannot be located near the rf NMR coil. These may occur in high-temperature NMR, low-temperature NMR, and in the use of magnets with small diameter access bores. We address here circuitry for connecting a fixed-tuned probe circuit by a transmission line to a remotely located tuning network. In particular, the bandwidth over which the probe may be remotely tuned while keeping the losses in the transmission line acceptably low is considered. The results show that for all resonant circuit geometries (series, parallel, series-parallel), overcoupling of the line to the tuned circuit is key to obtaining a large tuning bandwidth. At equivalent extents of overcoupling, all resonant circuit geometries have nearly equal remote tuning bandwidths. Particularly for the case of low-loss transmission line, the tuning bandwidth can be many times the tuned circuit's bandwidth, f(o)/Q. PMID:10783273

  18. Review of NMR characterization of pyrolysis oils

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hao, Naijia; Ben, Haoxi; Yoo, Chang Geun; Adhikari, Sushil; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-08-24

    Here, pyrolysis of renewable biomass has been developed as a method to produce green fuels and chemicals in response to energy security concerns as well as to alleviate environmental issues incurred with fossil fuel usage. However, pyrolysis oils still have limited commercial application, mainly because unprocessed oils cannot be readily blended with current petroleum-based transportation fuels. To better understand these challenges, researchers have applied diverse characterization techniques in the development of bio-oil studies. In particular, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a key spectroscopic characterization method through analysis of bio-oil components. This review highlights the NMR strategies for pyrolysis oil characterizationmore » and critically discusses the applications of 1H, 13C, 31P, 19F, and two-dimensional (2-D NMR) analyses such as heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) in representative pyrolysis oil studies.« less

  19. A modularized pulse programmer for NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wenping; Bao, Qingjia; Yang, Liang; Chen, Yiqun; Liu, Chaoyang; Qiu, Jianqing; Ye, Chaohui

    2011-02-01

    A modularized pulse programmer for a NMR spectrometer is described. It consists of a networked PCI-104 single-board computer and a field programmable gate array (FPGA). The PCI-104 is dedicated to translate the pulse sequence elements from the host computer into 48-bit binary words and download these words to the FPGA, while the FPGA functions as a sequencer to execute these binary words. High-resolution NMR spectra obtained on a home-built spectrometer with four pulse programmers working concurrently demonstrate the effectiveness of the pulse programmer. Advantages of the module include (1) once designed it can be duplicated and used to construct a scalable NMR/MRI system with multiple transmitter and receiver channels, (2) it is a totally programmable system in which all specific applications are determined by software, and (3) it provides enough reserve for possible new pulse sequences.

  20. Hybrid materials of SBA-16 functionalized by rare earth (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}) complexes of modified beta-diketone (TTA and DBM): Covalently bonding assembly and photophysical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yajuan; Yan Bing; Li Ying

    2010-04-15

    Novel mesoporous SBA-16 type of hybrids TTA-S16 and DBM-S16 were synthesized by co-condensation of modified beta-diketone (TTA-Si and DBM-Si, DBM=1,3-diphenyl-1,3- propanepione, TTA=2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) in the presence of Pluronic F127 as template, which were confirmed by FTIR, XRD, {sup 29}Si CP-MAS NMR, and N{sub 2} adsorption measurements. Novel organic-inorganic mesoporous luminescent hybrid containing RE{sup 3+} (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}) complexes covalently attached to the functionalized ordered mesoporous SBA-16 (TTA-S16 and DBM-S16), which were designated as bpy-RE-TTA-S16 and bpy-RE-DBM-S16, were obtained by sol-gel process. The luminescence properties of these resulting materials were characterized in detail, and the results reveal that mesoporous hybrid material bpy-Eu-TTA-S16 present stronger luminescent intensities, longer lifetimes, and higher luminescent quantum efficiencies than the corresponding DBM-containing materials bpy-Eu-DBM-S16, while bpy-Tb-DBM-S16 exhibit the stronger characteristic emission of Tb{sup 3+} and longer lifetime than the corresponding TTA-containing materials bpy-Tb-TTA-S16. - Graphical abstract: Novel organic-inorganic mesoporous luminescent hybrids containing RE{sup 3+} complex covalently attached to the beta-diketone-functionalized ordered mesoporous SBA-16, which were designated as bpy-RE-TTA-S16 and bpy-RE-DBM-S16, were obtained by sol-gel process.

  1. Periodic mesoporous organosilicas with co-existence of diurea and sulfanilamide as an effective drug delivery carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Parambadath, Surendran; Rana, Vijay Kumar; Moorthy, Santha; Chu, Sang-Wook; Park, Shin-Kyu; Lee, Daewoo; Sung, Giju; Ha, Chang-Sik

    2011-05-15

    In this article we report the synthesis of new periodic mesoporous organosilicas (PMOs) with the co-existence of diurea and sulfanilamide-bridged organosilica that are potentially useful for controlled drug release system. The materials possess hexagonal pores with a high degree of uniformity and show long-range order as confirmed by the measurements of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), N{sub 2} adsorption isotherms, and transmission electron microscopy(TEM). FT-IR and solid state {sup 29}Si MAS and {sup 13}C CP MAS NMR spectroscopic analyses proved that the bridging groups in the framework are not cleaved and covalently attached in the walls of the PMOs. It was found that the organic functionality could be introduced in a maximum of 10 mol% with respect to the total silicon content and be thermally stable up to 230 {sup o}C. The synthesized materials were shown to be particularly suitable for adsorption and desorption of hydrophilic/hydrophobic drugs from a phosphate buffer solution at pH 7.4. -- Graphical Abstract: We report the synthesis of new periodic mesoporous organosilicas (PMOs) with the co-existence of diurea and sulfanilamide-bridged organosilica that are potentially useful for controlled drug release system. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} Synthesis of new periodic mesoporous organosilicas (PMOs) with the co-existence of diurea and sulfanilamide-bridged organosilica that are potentially useful for controlled drug release system. {yields} The organic functionality could be introduced in a maximum of 10 mol% with respect to the total silicon content and be thermally stable up to 230 {sup o}C. {yields} The synthesized materials were shown to be particularly suitable for adsorption and desorption of hydrophilic/hydrophobic drugs from a phosphate buffer solution at pH 7.4.

  2. Thermal pretreatments of superficially porous silica particles for high-performance liquid chromatography: Surface control, structural characterization and chromatographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mignot, Mélanie; Sebban, Muriel; Tchapla, Alain; Mercier, Olivier; Cardinael, Pascal; Peulon-Agasse, Valérie

    2015-11-01

    This study reports the impact of thermal pretreatment between 400 and 1100°C on superficially porous silica particles (e.g. core-shell, fused-core; here abbreviated as SPP silica). The different thermally pretreated SPP silica (400°C, 900°C and 1100°C) were chemically bonded with an octadecyl chain under microwave irradiation. The bare SPP silica, thermally untreated and pretreated, as well as the chemically bonded phases (CBPs) were fully characterized by elemental analysis, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT), and solid state cross polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) (29)Si NMR. The chromatographic properties of the overall set of C18-thermally pretreated SPP silica stationary phases were determined using the Tanaka test. Complementary, the simplified Veuthey test was used to deeply study the silanol activity, considering a set of 7 basic solutes with various physicochemical properties. Both tests were also performed on different commercial SPP silica columns and different types of bonding chemistry (C18, Phenyl-hexyl, RP-amide, C30, aQ). Multivariate data analyses (hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis) were carried out to define groups of stationary phases with similar chromatographic properties and situate them in relation to those commercially available. These different C18-thermally pretreated SPP silicas represented a wide range of stationary phases as they were spread out along the score plot. Moreover, this study highlighted that the thermal pretreatment improved the chemical stability of the SPP silica compare to untreated SPP silica and untreated porous silica. Consequently, higher thermal pretreatment can be applied (up to 900°C) before functionalization without destruction of the silica matrix. Indeed, a significantly lower dissolution of the thermally pretreated SPP silica under aggressive conditions could allow the use of the corresponding functionalized stationary phases at high

  3. Quantitative investigation of a hybrid Ziegler-Natta catalyst support prepared by grafting di(n-butyl)magnesium onto partially dehydroxylated silica.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Yung; Scott, Susannah L

    2011-04-11

    MgCl(2)-modified silica is an important component of some Ziegler-Natta catalysts used in the manufacture of polyethylene. Information about the structure of the dispersed magnesium sites formed by the reaction of di-n-butylmagnesium (nBu(2)Mg) with silica was sought to provide a basis for understanding their subsequent interactions with transition-metal or co-catalyst components. From infrared spectra and elemental analysis, we deduced that nBu(2)Mg reacts with porous silica in two ways: about half (47%, 0.99 mmol g(-1)) is grafted through protonolysis by surface hydroxyl groups (≡SiOH), whereas the other half (53%, 1.11 mmol g(-1)) reacts directly with siloxane bonds (≡SiOSi≡). In the (29)Si and (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra of Sylopol-2100 silica pretreated at 500 °C then modified with nBu(2)Mg at room temperature, both alkylsilicon and alkylmagnesium sites are evident. The alkylmagnesium-modified silica surface is proposed to contain dimers and/or tetramers with the empirical formula [≡SiOMg(nBu)](n). Upon exposure of nBu(2)Mg-modified silica to anhydrous HCl, alkanes are liberated, hydroxyl groups are regenerated, and water is formed. The appearance of water suggests condensation of hydroxyl group pairs, induced by the coordinatively unsaturated nanoclusters (MgCl(2))(n) that arise by ligand exchange on the silica-supported n-butylmagnesium oligomers. PMID:21433118

  4. The influence of applied silica nanoparticles on a bio-renewable castor oil based polyurethane nanocomposite and its physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Seeni Meera, Kamal Mohamed; Murali Sankar, Rajavelu; Paul, Jaya; Jaisankar, Sellamuthu N; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2014-05-28

    Novel bio-renewable castor oil based polyurethane (PU)-silica nanocomposite films were prepared using castor oil, 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate and dibutyltin dilaurate in tetrahydrofuran at room temperature. ATR-FTIR spectra confirm the formation of polyurethane and the presence of silica nanoparticles in the polyurethane matrix. The increase of Si nanoparticle content shifts the peak position of N-H and C[double bond, length as m-dash]O (both hydrogen and non-hydrogen bonded) groups present in the polyurethane structure. Furthermore, Raman spectra confirmed the urethane-amide interaction present in the polyurethane-silica nanocomposites. (29)Si CP/MAS NMR spectra evidence the formation and the presence of completely condensed SiO2 species in the polyurethane nanocomposite films. The incorporation of silica nanoparticles increases the thermal stability of the above-mentioned polyurethane films, which can be seen from the increase in activation energy (Ea) values of the degradation process. The Ea values at two stages (Tmax1 and Tmax2) of the degradation process are 133, 139 and 157, 166 kJ mol(-1) for PU control and PU-5AMS (5 wt% amine modified silica nanoparticles), respectively. DSC results prove the interfacial interaction present between silica nanoparticles and the polyurethane hard segment, which decreases the melting temperature. Optical transmittance of the polyurethane films decreased with increasing silica content due to the scattering at the interfaces between the silica nanoparticles and polyurethane. It is interesting to note that the presence of silica nanoparticles gives reinforcement to polyurethane film, thereby increasing the storage modulus up to 24% for PU-5AMS. FE-SEM and HR-TEM images confirm the presence of silica nanoparticles in the polyurethane matrix. PMID:24714842

  5. Exploring the distribution of copper-Schiff base complex covalently anchored onto the surface of mesoporous MCM 41 silica

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Udayshankar G. . E-mail: usingh@engr.ucsb.edu; Williams, Ruth T. . E-mail: r.t.williams@open.ac.uk; Hallam, Keith R. . E-mail: k.r.hallam@bristol.ac.uk; Allen, Geoffrey C. . E-mail: g.c.allen@bristol.ac.uk

    2005-11-15

    A series of copper-Schiff base MCM 41 materials, synthesized by post-synthetic grafting, was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and nitrogen sorption (77 K) to explore distribution of the copper-Schiff base complex immobilized on the porous Si-MCM 41. Additional information on the physico-chemical properties of the functionalized materials was obtained by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), CHN microanalysis, FTIR spectroscopy, {sup 29}Si and {sup 13}C CP MAS NMR spectroscopy. The effect of copper-Schiff base complex loading and reaction times on the surface properties of Si-MCM 41 (surface area and pore parameters) in addition to its distribution within the Si-MCM 41 was explored by nitrogen sorption and XPS coupled with argon etching. Argon etching of a surface to a depth of 45 A confirmed that the copper-Schiff base complex was distributed both on the external surface (pore end) and within the pores of Si-MCM 41. The amount of complex located in the pores at this depth was about one-third of the amount detected on the external surface of MCM 41. Nitrogen sorption isotherms measured at 77 K confirmed the reduction in total pore volume and surface area was the result of pore narrowing of Si-MCM 41 following grafting of complex in the 8 h samples. A significant decrease in surface area and pore volume for the 20 h sample (longer reaction time), with the highest copper loading (0.65 mmol g{sup -1}), confirmed pore blocking in this material. The uneven distribution of the copper complex between the external and internal surface of Si-MCM 41 was attributed to the bulky nature of the complex, which restricted access to the pores.

  6. An NMR Study of Microvoids in Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, James; Mattrix, Larry

    1996-01-01

    An understanding of polymer defect structures, like microvoids in polymeric matrices, is most crucial to their fabrication and application potential. In this project guest atoms are introduced into the microvoids in PMR-15 and NMR is used to determine microvoid sizes and locations. Xenon is a relatively inert probe that would normally not be found naturally in polymer or in NMR probe materials. There are two NMR active Xenon isotopes, Xe-129 and Xe-131. The Xe atom has a very high polarizability, which makes it sensitive to the intracrystalline environment of polymers. Interactions between the Xe atoms and the host matrix perturb and Xe electron cloud, deshielding the nuclei, and thereby expanding the range of the observed NMR chemical shifts. This chemical shift range which may be as large as 5000 ppm, permits subtle structural and chemical effects to be studied with high sensitivity. The Xe-129-NMR line shape has been found to vary in response to changes in the pore symmetry of the framework hosts in Zeolites and Clathrasil compounds. Before exposure to Xe gas, the PMR-15 samples were dried in a vacuum oven at 150 C for 48 hours. The samples were then exposed to Xe gas at 30 psi for 72 hours and sealed in glass tubes with 1 atmosphere of Xenon gas. Xenon gas at 1 atmosphere was used to tune up the spectrometer and to set up the appropriate NMR parameters. A series of spectra were obtained interspersed with applications of vacuum and heating to drive out the adsorbed Xe and determine the role of Xe-Xe interactions in the observed chemical shift.

  7. Hyperpolarized Xenon for NMR and MRI Applications

    PubMed Central

    Witte, Christopher; Kunth, Martin; Döpfert, Jörg; Rossella, Federica; Schröder, Leif

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) suffer from intrinsic low sensitivity because even strong external magnetic fields of ~10 T generate only a small detectable net-magnetization of the sample at room temperature 1. Hence, most NMR and MRI applications rely on the detection of molecules at relative high concentration (e.g., water for imaging of biological tissue) or require excessive acquisition times. This limits our ability to exploit the very useful molecular specificity of NMR signals for many biochemical and medical applications. However, novel approaches have emerged in the past few years: Manipulation of the detected spin species prior to detection inside the NMR/MRI magnet can dramatically increase the magnetization and therefore allows detection of molecules at much lower concentration 2. Here, we present a method for polarization of a xenon gas mixture (2-5% Xe, 10% N2, He balance) in a compact setup with a ca. 16000-fold signal enhancement. Modern line-narrowed diode lasers allow efficient polarization 7 and immediate use of gas mixture even if the noble gas is not separated from the other components. The SEOP apparatus is explained and determination of the achieved spin polarization is demonstrated for performance control of the method. The hyperpolarized gas can be used for void space imaging, including gas flow imaging or diffusion studies at the interfaces with other materials 8,9. Moreover, the Xe NMR signal is extremely sensitive to its molecular environment 6. This enables the option to use it as an NMR/MRI contrast agent when dissolved in aqueous solution with functionalized molecular hosts that temporarily trap the gas 10,11. Direct detection and high-sensitivity indirect detection of such constructs is demonstrated in both spectroscopic and imaging mode. PMID:22986346

  8. An optical NMR spectrometer for Larmor-beat detection and high-resolution POWER NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, J. G.; Marohn, J. A.; Carson, P. J.; Shykind, D. A.; Hwang, J. Y.; Miller, M. A.; Weitekamp, D. P.

    2008-06-01

    Optical nuclear magnetic resonance (ONMR) is a powerful probe of electronic properties in III-V semiconductors. Larmor-beat detection (LBD) is a sensitivity optimized, time-domain NMR version of optical detection based on the Hanle effect. Combining LBD ONMR with the line-narrowing method of POWER (perturbations observed with enhanced resolution) NMR further enables atomically detailed views of local electronic features in III-Vs. POWER NMR spectra display the distribution of resonance shifts or line splittings introduced by a perturbation, such as optical excitation or application of an electric field, that is synchronized with a NMR multiple-pulse time-suspension sequence. Meanwhile, ONMR provides the requisite sensitivity and spatial selectivity to isolate local signals within macroscopic samples. Optical NMR, LBD, and the POWER method each introduce unique demands on instrumentation. Here, we detail the design and implementation of our system, including cryogenic, optical, and radio-frequency components. The result is a flexible, low-cost system with important applications in semiconductor electronics and spin physics. We also demonstrate the performance of our systems with high-resolution ONMR spectra of an epitaxial AlGaAs /GaAs heterojunction. NMR linewidths down to 4.1Hz full width at half maximum were obtained, a 103-fold resolution enhancement relative any previous optically detected NMR experiment.

  9. 13C NMR Metabolomics: INADEQUATE Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Clendinen, Chaevien S.; Pasquel, Christian; Ajredini, Ramadan; Edison, Arthur S.

    2015-01-01

    The many advantages of 13C NMR are often overshadowed by its intrinsically low sensitivity. Given that carbon makes up the backbone of most biologically relevant molecules, 13C NMR offers a straightforward measurement of these compounds. Two-dimensional 13C-13C correlation experiments like INADEQUATE (incredible natural abundance double quantum transfer experiment) are ideal for the structural elucidation of natural products and have great but untapped potential for metabolomics analysis. We demonstrate a new and semi-automated approach called INETA (INADEQUATE network analysis) for the untargeted analysis of INADEQUATE datasets using an in silico INADEQUATE database. We demonstrate this approach using isotopically labeled Caenorhabditis elegans mixtures. PMID:25932900

  10. 14 N NMR of tetrapropylammonium based crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dib, E.; Mineva, T.; Gaveau, P.; Alonso, B.

    2015-07-01

    We have investigated using 14N NMR different types of materials containing tetrapropylammonium cations. We consider the tetrapropylammonium bromide crystal as well as two different microporous materials silicalite-1 and AlPO-5, with MFI and AFI topology respectively, where the tetrapropylammonium cation plays the role of structure directing agent. 14N NMR quadrupolar coupling parameters were determined experimentally for all the crystals. In addition calculations based on Density Functional Theory with empirical dispersion (DFT-D) were performed on the MFI type zeolite. The sensitivity of the 14N quadrupolar coupling parameters to the spatial distribution of the anions in the zeolite's framework is emphasized.

  11. Tritiation methods and tritium NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jaiswal, D.K.; Morimoto, H.; Salijoughian, M.; Williams, P.G.

    1991-09-01

    We have used a simple process for the production of highly tritiated water and characterized the product species by {sup 1}H and {sup 3}H NMR spectroscopy. The water is readily manipulated and used in subsequent reactions either as T{sub 2}O, CH{sub 3}COOT or CF{sub 3}COOT. Development of tritiated diimide has progressed to the point where cis-hydrogenated products at 1-20 Ci/mmole S.A. are possible. Tri-n-butyl tin tritide has been produced at >95% tritium content and well characterized by multinuclear NMR techniques. 27 refs., 3 figs.

  12. NMR investigation of the quantum pigeonhole effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    V. S., Anjusha; Hegde, Swathi S.; Mahesh, T. S.

    2016-02-01

    NMR quantum simulators have been used for studying various quantum phenomena. Here, using a four-qubit NMR quantum simulator, we investigate the recently postulated quantum pigeonhole effect. In this phenomenon, a set of three particles in a two-path interferometer often appears to be in such a superposition that no two particles can be assigned a single path, thus exhibiting the nonclassical behavior. In our experiments, quantum pigeons are emulated by three nuclear qubits whose states are probed jointly and noninvasively by an ancillary spin. The experimental results are in good agreement with quantum theoretical predictions.

  13. NMR Microscopy - Micron-Level Resolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Wing-Chi Edmund

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been developed into a powerful and widely used diagnostic tool since the invention of techniques using linear magnetic field gradients in 1973. The variety of imaging contrasts obtainable in MRI, such as spin density, relaxation times and flow rate, gives MRI a significant advantage over other imaging techniques. For common diagnostic applications, image resolutions have been in the order of millimeters with slice thicknesses in centimeters. For many research applications, however, resolutions in the order of tens of microns or smaller are needed. NMR Imaging in these high resolution disciplines is known as NMR microscopy. Compared with conventional microscopy, NMR microscopy has the advantage of being non-invasive and non-destructive. The major obstacles of NMR microscopy are low signal-to-noise ratio and effects due to spin diffusion. To overcome these difficulties, more sensitive RF probes and very high magnetic field gradients have to be used. The most effective way to increase sensitivity is to build smaller probes. Microscope probes of different designs have been built and evaluated. Magnetic field gradient coils that can produce linear field gradients up to 450 Gauss/cm were also assembled. In addition, since microscope probes often employ remote capacitors for RF tuning, the associated signal loss in the transmission line was studied. Imaging experiments have been carried out in a 2.1 Tesla small bore superconducting magnet using the typical two-dimensional spin warp imaging technique. Images have been acquired for both biological and non-biological samples. The highest resolution was obtained in an image of a nerve bundle from the spinal cord of a racoon and has an in-plane resolution of 4 microns. These experiments have demonstrated the potential application of NMR microscopy to pathological research, nervous system study and non -destructive testings of materials. One way to further improve NMR microscopy is

  14. Magic Angle Spinning NMR of Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Caitlin; Lu, Manman; Suiter, Christopher L.; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Viruses, relatively simple pathogens, are able to replicate in many living organisms and to adapt to various environments. Conventional atomic-resolution structural biology techniques, X-ray crystallography and solution NMR spectroscopy provided abundant information on the structures of individual proteins and nucleic acids comprising viruses; however, viral assemblies are not amenable to analysis by these techniques because of their large size, insolubility, and inherent lack of long-range order. In this article, we review the recent advances in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy that enabled atomic-resolution analysis of structure and dynamics of large viral systems and give examples of several exciting case studies. PMID:25919197

  15. Sensitive detection of NMR for thin films.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soonchil

    2015-10-01

    NMR can provide valuable information about thin films, but its relatively low sensitivity allows data acquisition only from bulk samples. The sensitivity problem is circumvented by detection schemes with higher sensitivity and/or enhanced polarization. In most of these ingenious techniques, electrons play a central role through hyperfine interactions with the nuclei of interest or the conversion of the spin orientation to an electric charge. The state of the art in NMR is the control of a single nuclear spin state, the complete form of which is one of the ultimate goals of nanotechnology. PMID:26549846

  16. The Quiet Renaissance of Protein NMR

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Paul J.; Chen, Jiang; Cho, Min-Kyu; Kim, Ji-Hun; Lu, Zhenwei; Mathew, Sijo; Peng, Dungeng; Song, Yuanli; Van Horn, Wade D.; Zhuang, Tiandi; Sönnichsen, Frank D.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    From roughly 1985 through the start of the new millennium, the cutting edge of solution protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was to a significant extent driven by the aspiration to determine structures. Here we survey recent advances in protein NMR that herald a renaissance in which a number of its most important applications reflect the broad problem-solving capability displayed by this method during its classical era during the 1970s and early 80s. “Without receivers fitted and kept in order, the air may tingle and thrill with the message, but it will not reach my spirit and consciousness.” Mary Slessor, Calabar, circa 1910 PMID:23368985

  17. NMR Stark Spectroscopy: New Methods to Calibrate NMR Sensitivity to Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasek, Matthew R.

    The influence of electrostatics on NMR parameters is well accepted. Thus, NMR is a promising route to probe electrical features within molecules and materials. However, applications of NMR Stark effects (E-field induced changes in spin energy levels) have been elusive. I have developed new approaches to resolve NMR Stark effects from an applied E field. This calibrates nuclear probes whose spectral response might later be used to evaluate internal E fields that are critical to function, such as those due to local charge distributions or sample structure. I will present two novel experimental approaches for direct calibration of NMR quadrupolar Stark effects (QSEs). In the first, steady-state (few-second) excitation by an E field at twice the NMR frequency (2ω 0) is used to saturate spin magnetization. The extent of saturation vs. E-field amplitude calibrates the QSE response rate, while measurements vs sample orientation determine tensorial character. The second method instead synchronizes short (few µs) pulses of the 2ω0 E field with a multiple-pulse NMR sequence. This, “POWER” (Perturbations Observed With Enhanced Resolution) approach enables more accurate measure of small QSEs (i.e. few Hz spectral changes). A 2nd key advantage is the ability to define tensorial response without reorienting the sample, but instead varying the phase of the 2ω0 field. I will describe these experiments and my home-built NMR “Stark probe”, employed on a conventional wide-bore solid-state NMR system. Results with GaAs demonstrate each method, while extensions to a wider array of molecular and material systems may now be possible using these methods.

  18. Solid-state NMR imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Dieckman, Stephen L.; Ellingson, William A.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for use with a solid-state NMR spectrometer includes a special imaging probe with linear, high-field strength gradient fields and high-power broadband RF coils using a back projection method for data acquisition and image reconstruction, and a real-time pulse programmer adaptable for use by a conventional computer for complex high speed pulse sequences.

  19. Hyperpolarized NMR Probes for Biological Assays

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Sebastian; Jensen, Pernille R.; Karlsson, Magnus; Lerche, Mathilde H.

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, the development of nuclear spin polarization enhanced (hyperpolarized) molecular probes has opened up new opportunities for studying the inner workings of living cells in real time. The hyperpolarized probes are produced ex situ, introduced into biological systems and detected with high sensitivity and contrast against background signals using high resolution NMR spectroscopy. A variety of natural, derivatized and designed hyperpolarized probes has emerged for diverse biological studies including assays of intracellular reaction progression, pathway kinetics, probe uptake and export, pH, redox state, reactive oxygen species, ion concentrations, drug efficacy or oncogenic signaling. These probes are readily used directly under natural conditions in biofluids and are often directly developed and optimized for cellular assays, thus leaving little doubt about their specificity and utility under biologically relevant conditions. Hyperpolarized molecular probes for biological NMR spectroscopy enable the unbiased detection of complex processes by virtue of the high spectral resolution, structural specificity and quantifiability of NMR signals. Here, we provide a survey of strategies used for the selection, design and use of hyperpolarized NMR probes in biological assays, and describe current limitations and developments. PMID:24441771

  20. A Primer of Fourier Transform NMR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macomber, Roger S.

    1985-01-01

    Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a new spectroscopic technique that is often omitted from undergraduate curricula because of lack of instructional materials. Therefore, information is provided to introduce students to the technique of data collection and transformation into the frequency domain. (JN)

  1. Solid-state NMR for bacterial biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, Courtney; Cegelski, Lynette

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria associate with surfaces and one another by elaborating an extracellular matrix to encapsulate cells, creating communities termed biofilms. Biofilms are beneficial in some ecological niches, but also contribute to the pathogenesis of serious and chronic infectious diseases. New approaches and quantitative measurements are needed to define the composition and architecture of bacterial biofilms to help drive the development of strategies to interfere with biofilm assembly. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is uniquely suited to the examination of insoluble and complex macromolecular and whole-cell systems. This article highlights three examples that implement solid-state NMR to deliver insights into bacterial biofilm composition and changes in cell-wall composition as cells transition to the biofilm lifestyle. Most recently, solid-state NMR measurements provided a total accounting of the protein and polysaccharide components in the extracellular matrix of an Escherichia coli biofilm and transformed our qualitative descriptions of matrix composition into chemical parameters that permit quantitative comparisons among samples. We present additional data for whole biofilm samples (cells plus the extracellular matrix) that complement matrix-only analyses. The study of bacterial biofilms by solid-state NMR is an exciting avenue ripe with many opportunities and we close the article by articulating some outstanding questions and future directions in this area.

  2. Solid-state NMR imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Dieckman, S.L.; Ellingson, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    An accessory for use with a solid-state NMR spectrometer includes a special imaging probe with linear, high-field strength gradient fields and high-power broadband RF coils using a back projection method for data acquisition and image reconstruction, and a real-time pulse programmer adaptable for use by a conventional computer for complex high speed pulse sequences.

  3. Structural Studies of Biological Solids Using NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution structure and dynamics of biological molecules are important in understanding their function. While studies have been successful in solving the structures of water-soluble biomolecules, it has been proven difficult to determine the structures of membrane proteins and fibril systems. Recent studies have shown that solid-state NMR is a promising technique and could be highly valuable in studying such non-crystalline and non-soluble biosystems. I will present strategies to study the structures of such challenging systems and also about the applications of solid-state NMR to study the modes of membrane-peptide interactions for a better assessment of the prospects of antimicrobial peptides as substitutes to antibiotics in the control of human disease. Our studies on the mechanism of membrane disruption by LL-37 (a human antimicrobial peptide), analogs of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide magainin2 extracted from the skin of the African frog Xenopus Laevis, and pardaxin will be presented. Solid-state NMR experiments were used to determine the secondary structure, dynamics and topology of these peptides in lipid bilayers. Similarities and difference in the cell-lysing mechanism, and their dependence on the membrane composition, of these peptides will be discussed. Atomic-level resolution NMR structures of amyloidogenic proteins revealing the misfolding pathway and early intermediates that play key roles in amyloid toxicity will also be presented.

  4. Increasing the quantitative bandwidth of NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Power, J E; Foroozandeh, M; Adams, R W; Nilsson, M; Coombes, S R; Phillips, A R; Morris, G A

    2016-02-18

    The frequency range of quantitative NMR is increased from tens to hundreds of kHz by a new pulse sequence, CHORUS. It uses chirp pulses to excite uniformly over very large bandwidths, yielding accurate integrals even for nuclei such as (19)F that have very wide spectra. PMID:26789115

  5. NMR analysis of a fluorocarbon copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.; Smith, C.H.

    1987-10-01

    Vinylidene fluoride (VF/sub 2/) can be copolymerized with chlorotrifluoroethylene (CTFE) in an aqueous emulsion using a peroxide chain initiator. The physical properties of the resulting fluorocarbon polymer depend on the ratio of VF/sub 2/ to CTFE and the randomness of the copolymerization. When CTFE and VF are polymerized in an approximately 3:1 mole ratio, the resulting polymer is soluble in acetone (and other solvents) at room temperature. Using proton and fluorine-19 NMR, the mole ratio of CTFE to VF/sub 2/, the emulsifier (perfluorodecanoate) concentration, and the randomness of copolymerization can be determined. A trifluorotoluene internal standard is added to a d/sub 6/-acetone solution of the fluoropolymer. Proton NMR is used to determine the amount of VF/sub 2/. Fluorine-19 NMR is used to measure the amount of emulsifier and the randomness of copolymerization. Each analysis requires about 5 minutes, and is quite precise, with relative standard deviations from 3 to 10% (10 replicates analyzed). In addition, the results from NMR analyses agree well with wet chemical analyses. 4 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. SQUID detected NMR in microtesla magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlachov, Andrei N.; Volegov, Petr L.; Espy, Michelle A.; George, John S.; Kraus, Robert H.

    2004-09-01

    We have built an NMR system that employs a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detector and operates in measurement fields of 2-25 μT. The system uses a pre-polarizing field from 4 to 30 mT generated by simple room-temperature wire-wound coils that are turned off during measurements. The instrument has an open geometry with samples located outside the cryostat at room-temperature. This removes constraints on sample size and allows us to obtain signals from living tissue. We have obtained 1H NMR spectra from a variety of samples including water, mineral oil, and a live frog. We also acquired gradient encoded free induction decay (FID) data from a water-plastic phantom in the μT regime, from which simple projection images were reconstructed. NMR signals from samples inside metallic containers have also been acquired. This is possible because the penetration skin depth is much greater at the low operating frequencies of this system than for conventional systems. Advantages to ultra-low field NMR measurements include lower susceptibility artifacts caused by high strength polarizing and measurement fields, and negligible line width broadening due to measurement field inhomogeneity, reducing the burden of producing highly homogeneous fields.

  7. Advanced Laboratory NMR Spectrometer with Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biscegli, Clovis; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of an inexpensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer suitable for use in advanced laboratory courses. Applications to the nondestructive analysis of the oil content in corn seeds and in monitoring the crystallization of polymers are presented. (SK)

  8. Combining solid-state NMR spectroscopy with first-principles calculations - a guide to NMR crystallography.

    PubMed

    Ashbrook, Sharon E; McKay, David

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in the application of first-principles calculations of NMR parameters to periodic systems have resulted in widespread interest in their use to support experimental measurement. Such calculations often play an important role in the emerging field of "NMR crystallography", where NMR spectroscopy is combined with techniques such as diffraction, to aid structure determination. Here, we discuss the current state-of-the-art for combining experiment and calculation in NMR spectroscopy, considering the basic theory behind the computational approaches and their practical application. We consider the issues associated with geometry optimisation and how the effects of temperature may be included in the calculation. The automated prediction of structural candidates and the treatment of disordered and dynamic solids are discussed. Finally, we consider the areas where further development is needed in this field and its potential future impact. PMID:27117884

  9. An NMR study of microvoids in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, James; Mattix, Larry

    1995-01-01

    An understanding of polymer defect structures, like microvoids in polymeric matrices, is crucial to their fabrication and application potential. In this project guest atoms are introduced into the microvoids in PMR-15 and NMR is used to determine microvoid sizes and locations. Xenon is a relatively inert probe that would normally be found naturally in polymer or in NMR probe materials. There are two NMR active xenon isotopes, Xe-129 and Xe-131. The Xe atom has a very high polarizability, which makes it sensitive to the intracrystalline environment of polymers. Interactions between the Xe atoms and the host matrix perturb the Xe electron cloud, deshielding the nuclei, and thereby expanding the range of the observed NMR chemical shifts. This chemical shift range which may be as large as 5000 ppm, permits subtle structural and chemical effects to be studied with high sensitivity. The Xe(129)-NMR line shape has been found to vary in response to changes in the pore symmetry of the framework hosts line Zeolites and Clathrasil compounds. Before exposure to Xe gas, the PMR-15 samples were dried in a vacuum oven at 150 C for 48 hours. The samples were then exposed to Xe gas at 30 psi for 72 hours and sealed in glass tubes with 1 atmosphere of xenon gas. Xenon gas at 1 atmosphere was used to tune up the spectrometer and to set up the appropriate NMR parameters. A single Xe-129 line at 83.003498 Mhz (with protons at 300 Mhz) was observed for the gas. With the xenon charged PMR-15 samples, a second broader line is observed 190 ppm downfield from the gas line (also observed). The width of the NMR line from the Xe-129 absorbed in the polymer is at least partially due to the distribution of microvoid sizes. From the chemical shift (relative to the gas line) and the line width, we estimate the average void sizes to be 2.74 +/- 0.20 angstroms. Since Xe-129 has such a large chemical shift range (approximately 5000 ppm), we expect the chemical shift anisotropy to contribute to the

  10. Superoxygenated Water as an Experimental Sample for NMR Relaxometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nestle, Nikolaus; Dakkouri, Marwan; Rauscher, Hubert

    2004-01-01

    The increase in NMR relaxation rates as a result of dissolved paramagnetic species on the sample of superoxygenated drinking water is demonstrated. It is concluded that oxygen content in NMR samples is an important issue and can give rise to various problems in the interpretation of both spectroscopic and NMR imaging or relaxation experiments.

  11. Applications of Diffusion Ordered Spectroscopy (DOSY-NMR)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diffusion-ordered NMR (DOSY-NMR) is a powerful, but under-utilized, technique for the investigation of mixtures based on translational diffusion rates. DOSY spectra allow for determination by NMR of components that may differ in molecular weight, geometry or complexation. Typical applications coul...

  12. Solid-state NMR studies of supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John M; Forse, Alexander C; Grey, Clare P

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors, or 'supercapacitors' are attracting increasing attention as high-power energy storage devices for a wide range of technological applications. These devices store charge through electrostatic interactions between liquid electrolyte ions and the surfaces of porous carbon electrodes. However, many aspects of the fundamental mechanism of supercapacitance are still not well understood, and there is a lack of experimental techniques which are capable of studying working devices. Recently, solid-state NMR has emerged as a powerful tool for studying the local environments and behaviour of electrolyte ions in supercapacitor electrodes. In this Trends article, we review these recent developments and applications. We first discuss the basic principles underlying the mechanism of supercapacitance, as well as the key NMR observables that are relevant to the study of supercapacitor electrodes. We then review some practical aspects of the study of working devices using ex situ and in situ methodologies and explain the key advances that these techniques have allowed on the study of supercapacitor charging mechanisms. NMR experiments have revealed that the pores of the carbon electrodes contain a significant number of electrolyte ions in the absence of any charging potential. This has important implications for the molecular mechanisms of supercapacitance, as charge can be stored by different ion adsorption/desorption processes. Crucially, we show how in situ NMR experiments can be used to quantitatively study and characterise the charging mechanism, with the experiments providing the most detailed picture of charge storage to date, offering the opportunity to design enhanced devices. Finally, an outlook for future directions for solid-state NMR in supercapacitor research is offered. PMID:26974032

  13. NMR Constraints Analyser: a web-server for the graphical analysis of NMR experimental constraints.

    PubMed

    Heller, Davide Martin; Giorgetti, Alejandro

    2010-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy together with X-ray crystallography, are the main techniques used for the determination of high-resolution 3D structures of biological molecules. The output of an NMR experiment includes a set of lower and upper limits for the distances (constraints) between pairs of atoms. If the number of constraints is high enough, there will be a finite number of possible conformations (models) of the macromolecule satisfying the data. Thus, the more constraints are measured, the better defined these structures will be. The availability of a user-friendly tool able to help in the analysis and interpretation of the number of experimental constraints per residue, is thus of valuable importance when assessing the levels of structure definition of NMR solved biological macromolecules, in particular, when high-quality structures are needed in techniques such as, computational biology approaches, site-directed mutagenesis experiments and/or drug design. Here, we present a free publicly available web-server, i.e. NMR Constraints Analyser, which is aimed at providing an automatic graphical analysis of the NMR experimental constraints atom by atom. The NMR Constraints Analyser server is available from the web-page http://molsim.sci.univr.it/constraint. PMID:20513646

  14. OPENCORE NMR: open-source core modules for implementing an integrated FPGA-based NMR spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kazuyuki

    2008-06-01

    A tool kit for implementing an integrated FPGA-based NMR spectrometer [K. Takeda, A highly integrated FPGA-based nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78 (2007) 033103], referred to as the OPENCORE NMR spectrometer, is open to public. The system is composed of an FPGA chip and several peripheral boards for USB communication, direct-digital synthesis (DDS), RF transmission, signal acquisition, etc. Inside the FPGA chip have been implemented a number of digital modules including three pulse programmers, the digital part of DDS, a digital quadrature demodulator, dual digital low-pass filters, and a PC interface. These FPGA core modules are written in VHDL, and their source codes are available on our website. This work aims at providing sufficient information with which one can, given some facility in circuit board manufacturing, reproduce the OPENCORE NMR spectrometer presented here. Also, the users are encouraged to modify the design of spectrometer according to their own specific needs. A home-built NMR spectrometer can serve complementary roles to a sophisticated commercial spectrometer, should one comes across such new ideas that require heavy modification to hardware inside the spectrometer. This work can lower the barrier of building a handmade NMR spectrometer in the laboratory, and promote novel and exciting NMR experiments. PMID:18374613

  15. Toward a Rational Design of Bioactive Glasses with Optimal Structural Features: Composition–Structure Correlations Unveiled by Solid-State NMR and MD Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The physiological responses of silicate-based bioactive glasses (BGs) are known to depend critically on both the P content (nP) of the glass and its silicate network connectivity (N̅BOSi). However, while the bioactivity generally displays a nonmonotonic dependence on nP itself, recent work suggest that it is merely the net orthophosphate content that directly links to the bioactivity. We exploit molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with 31P and 29Si solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to explore the quantitative relationships between N̅BOSi, nP, and the silicate and phosphate speciations in a series of Na2O–CaO–SiO2–P2O5 glasses spanning 2.1 ≤ N̅BOSi ≤ 2.9 and variable P2O5 contents up to 6.0 mol %. The fractional population of the orthophosphate groups remains independent of nP at a fixed N̅BOSi-value, but is reduced slightly as N̅BOSi increases. Nevertheless, P remains predominantly as readily released orthophosphate ions, whose content may be altered essentially independently of the network connectivity, thereby offering a route to optimize the glass bioactivity. We discuss the observed composition-structure links in relation to known composition-bioactivity correlations, and define how Na2O–CaO–SiO2–P2O5 compositions exhibiting an optimal bioactivity can be designed by simultaneously altering three key parameters: the silicate network connectivity, the (ortho)phosphate content, and the nNa/nCa molar ratio. PMID:24364818

  16. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2007-05-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  17. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-05-30

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  18. SQUID detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-10-03

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  19. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, John; Pines, Alexander; McDermott, Robert F.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2008-12-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  20. NMR CHARACTERIZATIONS OF PROPERTIES OF HETEROGENEOUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    C.T. Philip Chang; Changho Choi; Jeromy T. Hollenshead; Rudi Michalak; Jack Phan; Ramon Saavedra; John C. Slattery; Jinsoo Uh; Randi Valestrand; A. Ted Watson; Song Xue

    2005-01-01

    A critical and long-standing need within the petroleum industry is the specification of suitable petrophysical properties for mathematical simulation of fluid flow in petroleum reservoirs (i.e., reservoir characterization). The development of accurate reservoir characterizations is extremely challenging. Property variations may be described on many scales, and the information available from measurements reflect different scales. In fact, experiments on laboratory core samples, well-log data, well-test data, and reservoir-production data all represent information potentially valuable to reservoir characterization, yet they all reflect information about spatial variations of properties at different scales. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) provide enormous potential for developing new descriptions and understandings of heterogeneous media. NMR has the rare capability to probe permeable media non-invasively, with spatial resolution, and it provides unique information about molecular motions and interactions that are sensitive to morphology. NMR well-logging provides the best opportunity ever to resolve permeability distributions within petroleum reservoirs. We develop MRI methods to determine, for the first time, spatially resolved distributions of porosity and permeability within permeable media samples that approach the intrinsic scale: the finest resolution of these macroscopic properties possible. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the permeability is actually resolved at a scale smaller than the sample. In order to do this, we have developed a robust method to determine of relaxation distributions from NMR experiments and a novel implementation and analysis of MRI experiments to determine the amount of fluid corresponding to imaging regions, which are in turn used to determine porosity and saturation distributions. We have developed a novel MRI experiment to determine velocity distributions within flowing experiments, and

  1. Multiecho scheme advances surface NMR for aquifer characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunewald, Elliot; Walsh, David

    2013-12-01

    nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is increasingly used as a method to noninvasively characterize aquifers. This technology follows a successful history of NMR logging, applied over decades to estimate hydrocarbon reservoir properties. In contrast to logging, however, surface methods have utilized relatively simple acquisition sequences, from which pore-scale properties may not be reliably and efficiently estimated. We demonstrate for the first time the capability of sophisticated multiecho measurements to rapidly record a surface NMR response that more directly reflects aquifer characteristics. Specifically, we develop an adaptation of the multipulse Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence, widely used in logging, to measure the T2 relaxation response in a single scan. We validate this approach in a field surface NMR data set and by direct comparison with an NMR log. Adoption of the CPMG marked a landmark advancement in the history of logging NMR; we have now realized this same advancement in the surface NMR method.

  2. Crystal structure of MCM-70: A microporous material with high framework density.

    PubMed

    Dorset, Douglas L; Kennedy, Gordon J

    2005-07-28

    The crystal structure of the borosilicate MCM-70 (siliceous framework formula Si12O24) was determined from synchrotron powder diffraction data with the program FOCUS. The framework crystallizes in space group Pmn2(1), where a = 13.663, b = 4.779, c = 8.723 A, and forms 1D ellipsoidal 10-ring channels with the following dimensions: 5.0 x 3.1 A. Rietveld refinement of the model against synchrotron powder data from solvated material gives Rwp = 0.15, R(F2) = 0.11. In addition to the four tetrahedral sites and seven framework oxygens, one potassium position is found during this refinement. Because of the unreasonable geometry of five putative extraframework oxygen sites, another synchrotron pattern was obtained from a dehydrated specimen. A refinement in space group P1n1 (removing the mirror operation of Pmn2(1)), where a = 13.670, b = 4.781, c = 8.687 A, and beta = 90.24 degrees , verified that the previous framework geometry is preserved as well as the potassium position. One extraframework oxygen was located that would yield a reasonable K-O distance. The existence of potassium is verified by electron energy dispersive spectroscopic measurements as well as quantitative elemental analysis. (There are approximately 2.35 K sites per 12 Si in the unit cell.) It is likely that the constricted channels occlude KOH. 11B and 29Si MAS NMR measurements indicate a framework SiO2/B2O3 of approximately 40:1, which is consistent with a wavelength dispersive spectroscopic measurement. The silicate framework density is 2.10 gm/cm3. The resulting framework density for T sites, 21.1, is unusually high for a zeolite, just below the value for paracelsian (21.4) or scapolite (21.8), each of which also has a smallest four-ring loop. The 1H --> 29Si CP MAS measurements suggest sample heterogeneity, that is, a portion of the sample that is strongly coupled to hydrogen and efficiently cross polarizes and another portion that does not. PMID:16852743

  3. NMR shielding calculations across the periodic table: diamagnetic uranium compounds. 2. Ligand and metal NMR.

    PubMed

    Schreckenbach, Georg

    2002-12-16

    In this and a previous article (J. Phys. Chem. A 2000, 104, 8244), the range of application for relativistic density functional theory (DFT) is extended to the calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shieldings and chemical shifts in diamagnetic actinide compounds. Two relativistic DFT methods are used, ZORA ("zeroth-order regular approximation") and the quasirelativistic (QR) method. In the given second paper, NMR shieldings and chemical shifts are calculated and discussed for a wide range of compounds. The molecules studied comprise uranyl complexes, [UO(2)L(n)](+/-)(q); UF(6); inorganic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)Cl(n), n = 0-6; and organometallic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n), n = 0-5. Uranyl complexes include [UO(2)F(4)](2-), [UO(2)Cl(4)](2-), [UO(2)(OH)(4)](2-), [UO(2)(CO(3))(3)](4-), and [UO(2)(H(2)O)(5)](2+). For the ligand NMR, moderate (e.g., (19)F NMR chemical shifts in UF(6-n)Cl(n)) to excellent agreement [e.g., (19)F chemical shift tensor in UF(6) or (1)H NMR in UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n)] has been found between theory and experiment. The methods have been used to calculate the experimentally unknown (235)U NMR chemical shifts. A large chemical shift range of at least 21,000 ppm has been predicted for the (235)U nucleus. ZORA spin-orbit appears to be the most accurate method for predicting actinide metal chemical shifts. Trends in the (235)U NMR chemical shifts of UF(6-n)L(n) molecules are analyzed and explained in terms of the calculated electronic structure. It is argued that the energy separation and interaction between occupied and virtual orbitals with f-character are the determining factors. PMID:12470051

  4. NMR studies of nucleic acid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid structures have to satisfy two diametrically opposite requirements; on one hand they have to adopt well-defined 3D structures that can be specifically recognized by proteins; on the other hand, their structures must be sufficiently flexible to undergo very large conformational changes that are required during key biochemical processes, including replication, transcription, and translation. How do nucleic acids introduce flexibility into their 3D structure without losing biological specificity? Here, I describe the development and application of NMR spectroscopic techniques in my laboratory for characterizing the dynamic properties of nucleic acids that tightly integrate a broad set of NMR measurements, including residual dipolar couplings, spin relaxation, and relaxation dispersion with sample engineering and computational approaches. This approach allowed us to obtain fundamental new insights into directional flexibility in nucleic acids that enable their structures to change in a very specific functional manner. PMID:24149218

  5. NMR with excitation modulated by Frank sequences.

    PubMed

    Blümich, Bernhard; Gong, Qingxia; Byrne, Eimear; Greferath, Marcus

    2009-07-01

    Miniaturized NMR is of growing importance in bio-, chemical, and -material sciences. Other than the magnet, bulky components are the radio-frequency power amplifier and the power supply or battery pack. We show that constant flip-angle excitation with phase modulation following a particular type of polyphase perfect sequences results in low peak excitation power at high response peak power. It has ideal power distribution in both the time domain and the frequency domain. A savings in peak excitation power of six orders of magnitude has been realized compared to conventionally pulsed excitation. Among others, the excitation promises to be of use for button-cell operated miniature NMR devices as well as for complying with specific-absorption-rate regulations in high-field medical imaging. PMID:19386525

  6. NMR-based diffusion lattice imaging.

    PubMed

    Laun, Frederik Bernd; Müller, Lars; Kuder, Tristan Anselm

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion experiments are widely employed as they yield information about structures hindering the diffusion process, e.g., about cell membranes. While it has been shown in recent articles that these experiments can be used to determine the shape of closed pores averaged over a volume of interest, it is still an open question how much information can be gained in open well-connected systems. In this theoretical work, it is shown that the full structure information of connected periodic systems is accessible. To this end, the so-called "SEquential Rephasing by Pulsed field-gradient Encoding N Time intervals" (SERPENT) sequence is used, which employs several diffusion encoding gradient pulses with different amplitudes. Two two-dimensional solid matrices that are surrounded by an NMR-visible medium are considered: a hexagonal lattice of cylinders and a rectangular lattice of isosceles triangles. PMID:27078384

  7. Nuclear spin noise in NMR revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrand, Guillaume; Luong, Michel

    2015-09-07

    The theoretical shapes of nuclear spin-noise spectra in NMR are derived by considering a receiver circuit with finite preamplifier input impedance and a transmission line between the preamplifier and the probe. Using this model, it becomes possible to reproduce all observed experimental features: variation of the NMR resonance linewidth as a function of the transmission line phase, nuclear spin-noise signals appearing as a “bump” or as a “dip” superimposed on the average electronic noise level even for a spin system and probe at the same temperature, pure in-phase Lorentzian spin-noise signals exhibiting non-vanishing frequency shifts. Extensive comparisons to experimental measurements validate the model predictions, and define the conditions for obtaining pure in-phase Lorentzian-shape nuclear spin noise with a vanishing frequency shift, in other words, the conditions for simultaneously obtaining the spin-noise and frequency-shift tuning optima.

  8. Multifunctional pulse sequence generator for pulse NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongsheng

    1988-06-01

    A new multifunctional pulse sequence generator has been designed and constructed. It can conveniently generate various pulse sequences used in nuclear-magnetic resonance (NMR) to measure the spin-lattice relaxation time T1, the spin-spin relaxation time T2, and the spin-locking relaxation time T1 ρ. It can also be used in pulse Fourier transform NMR and double resonance. The intervals of pulses can increase automatically with sequence repetitions and the generator can be used in two-dimensional spectrum measurement and spin-density imaging research. The sequences can be generated through four different triggering methods and there are two synchronous pulse outputs and fifteen auxiliary pulse outputs, so the generator can be conveniently interfaced with a computer or other instruments. The circuitry, functions, and features of the generator are described in this article.

  9. Some nitrogen-14 NMR studies in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Pratum, T.K.

    1983-11-01

    The first order quadrupolar perturbation of the /sup 14/N NMR spectrum yields information regarding the static and dynamic properties of the surrounding electronic environment. Signal to noise problems caused by long /sup 14/N longitudinal relaxation times (T/sub 1/) and small equilibrium polarizations are reduced by rotating frame cross polarization (CP) experiments between /sup 14/N and /sup 1/H. Using quadrupolar echo and CP techniques, the /sup 14/N quadrupolar coupling constants (e/sup 2/qQ/h) and asymmetry parameters (eta) have been obtained for a variety of tetraalkylammonium compounds by observation of their quadrupolar powder patterns at various temperatures. For choline chloride and iodide the /sup 14/N NMR powder patterns exhibit the effects of anisotropic molecular motion, while choline bromide spectra show no such effects.

  10. NMR spectral analysis using prior knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Takuma; Nagata, Kenji; Okada, Masato; Kigawa, Takanori

    2016-03-01

    Signal assignment is a fundamental step for analyses of protein structure and dynamics with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Main-chain signal assignment is achieved with a sequential assignment method and/or an amino-acid selective stable isotope labeling (AASIL) method. Combinatorial selective labeling (CSL) methods, as well as our labeling strategy, stable isotope encoding (SiCode), were developed to reduce the required number of labeled samples, since one of the drawbacks of AASIL is that many samples are needed. Signal overlapping in NMR spectra interferes with amino-acid determination by CSL and SiCode. Since spectral deconvolution by peak fitting with a gradient method cannot resolve closely overlapped signals, we developed a new method to perform both peak fitting and amino acid determination simultaneously, with a replica exchange Monte Carlo method, incorporating prior knowledge of stable-isotope labeling ratios and the amino-acid sequence of the protein.

  11. NMR-based diffusion lattice imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laun, Frederik Bernd; Müller, Lars; Kuder, Tristan Anselm

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion experiments are widely employed as they yield information about structures hindering the diffusion process, e.g., about cell membranes. While it has been shown in recent articles that these experiments can be used to determine the shape of closed pores averaged over a volume of interest, it is still an open question how much information can be gained in open well-connected systems. In this theoretical work, it is shown that the full structure information of connected periodic systems is accessible. To this end, the so-called "SEquential Rephasing by Pulsed field-gradient Encoding N Time intervals" (SERPENT) sequence is used, which employs several diffusion encoding gradient pulses with different amplitudes. Two two-dimensional solid matrices that are surrounded by an NMR-visible medium are considered: a hexagonal lattice of cylinders and a rectangular lattice of isosceles triangles.

  12. NMR studies of nucleic acid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2013-12-01

    Nucleic acid structures have to satisfy two diametrically opposite requirements; on one hand they have to adopt well-defined 3D structures that can be specifically recognized by proteins; on the other hand, their structures must be sufficiently flexible to undergo very large conformational changes that are required during key biochemical processes, including replication, transcription, and translation. How do nucleic acids introduce flexibility into their 3D structure without losing biological specificity? Here, I describe the development and application of NMR spectroscopic techniques in my laboratory for characterizing the dynamic properties of nucleic acids that tightly integrate a broad set of NMR measurements, including residual dipolar couplings, spin relaxation, and relaxation dispersion with sample engineering and computational approaches. This approach allowed us to obtain fundamental new insights into directional flexibility in nucleic acids that enable their structures to change in a very specific functional manner.

  13. Nuclear spin noise in NMR revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrand, Guillaume; Huber, Gaspard; Luong, Michel; Desvaux, Hervé

    2015-09-01

    The theoretical shapes of nuclear spin-noise spectra in NMR are derived by considering a receiver circuit with finite preamplifier input impedance and a transmission line between the preamplifier and the probe. Using this model, it becomes possible to reproduce all observed experimental features: variation of the NMR resonance linewidth as a function of the transmission line phase, nuclear spin-noise signals appearing as a "bump" or as a "dip" superimposed on the average electronic noise level even for a spin system and probe at the same temperature, pure in-phase Lorentzian spin-noise signals exhibiting non-vanishing frequency shifts. Extensive comparisons to experimental measurements validate the model predictions, and define the conditions for obtaining pure in-phase Lorentzian-shape nuclear spin noise with a vanishing frequency shift, in other words, the conditions for simultaneously obtaining the spin-noise and frequency-shift tuning optima.

  14. Highly flexible pulse programmer for NMR applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dart, J.; Burum, D. P.; Rhim, W. K.

    1980-01-01

    A pulse generator for NMR application is described. Eighteen output channels are provided to allow use in single and double resonance experiments. Complex pulse sequences may be generated by loading instructions into a 256-word by 16-bit program memory. Features of the pulse generator include programmable time delays from 0.5 micros to 1000 s, branching and looping instructions, and the ability to be loaded and operated either manually or from a PDP-11/10 computer.

  15. Quantitative calibration of radiofrequency NMR Stark effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasek, Matthew R.; Kempf, James G.

    2011-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) Stark responses can occur in quadrupolar nuclei for an electric field oscillating at twice the usual NMR frequency (2ω0). Calibration of responses to an applied E field is needed to establish nuclear spins as probes of native E fields within material and molecular systems. We present an improved approach and apparatus for accurate measurement of quadrupolar Stark effects. Updated values of C14 (the response parameter in cubic crystals) were obtained for both 69Ga and 75As in GaAs. Keys to improvement include a modified implementation of voltage dividers to assess the 2ω0 amplitude, |E|, and the stabilization of divider response by reduction of stray couplings in 2ω0 circuitry. Finally, accuracy was enhanced by filtering sets of |E| through a linear response function that we established for the radiofrequency amplifier. Our approach is verified by two types of spectral results. Steady-state 2ω0 excitation to presaturate NMR spectra yielded C14 = (2.59 ± 0.06) × 1012 m-1 for 69Ga at room-temperature and 14.1 T. For 75As, we obtained (3.1 ± 0.1) × 1012 m-1. Both values reconcile with earlier results from 77 K and below 1 T, whereas current experiments are at room temperature and 14.1 T. Finally, we present results where few-microsecond pulses of the 2ω0 field induced small (tens of Hz) changes in high-resolution NMR line shapes. There too, spectra collected vs |E| agree with the model for response, further establishing the validity of our protocols to specify |E|.

  16. Theory of NMR in Superconducting Multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuboki, Kazuhiro; Fukuyama, Hidetoshi

    1988-09-01

    Motivated by experiments of NMR on superconductor(S)-normal-metal(N) multi-layer system, we have calculated the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate, T1-1, for both N and S layers based on the bilayer model of McMillan for the proximity effect. The results of calculation are in essential agreement with experiments by Aoki et al. and Imai et al.

  17. Theory of NMR for superconducting superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuboki, Kazuhiro; Fukuyama, Hidetoshi

    1988-06-01

    Motivated by experiments of NMR on superconductor(S)-normal-metal(N) multilayer system, we have calculated the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate,T1-1, for both N and S metals based on the bilayer model of McMillan for the proximity effect. The results of calculations are in essential agreement with experiments by Aoki et al. and Imai et al.

  18. Multiple-quantum NMR in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Yu-Sze; Pines, A.

    1983-03-01

    Multiple-quantum NMR has typically been observed in small groups of spins in isolated molecules. Due to the profusion of spin transitions in a solid, individual lines are unresolved. Excitation of high quantum transitions by normal schemes is thus difficult. To ensure that overlapping lines add constructively and to enhance sensitivity, time-reversal pulse sequences are used to generate all lines in phase. Up to 22-quantum 1H absorption in solid adamantane is observed.

  19. Multiple-quantum NMR in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Y.; Pines, A.

    1983-03-15

    Multiple-quantum NMR has typically been observed in small groups of spins in isolated molecules. Due to the profusion of spin transitions in a solid, individual lines are unresolved. Excitation of high quantum transitions by normal schemes is thus difficult. To ensure that overlapping lines add constructively and to enhance sensitivity, time-reversal pulse sequences are used to generate all lines in phase. Up to 22-quantum /sup 1/H absorption in solid adamantane is observed.

  20. Metal ion uptake from aqueous solution by olive stones: a carbon-13 solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance and potentiometric study.

    PubMed

    Nurchi, Valeria Marina; Floris, Costantino; Pinna, Rosalba; Fiol, Núria; Villaescusa, Isabel

    2007-10-01

    The use of biomasses that result from the agriculture and food industries in removing heavy metals from wastewaters is attracting increasing interest. We present a joined potentiometric and cross polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) carbon-13 (13C) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study on the interaction of olive stones with copper(II), nickel(II), and cadmium(II). The potentiometric measurements allow both to distinguish two kind of basic sites in the olive stones and to postulate the coordination models for the three studied metals. The NMR spectral analysis allows the attribution of the different signals to the components of the olive stone matrix. A comparison of CP-MAS 13C NMR spectra of the samples after metal treatment suggests a specific complexation between metal ions and hydroxyl groups on guaiacyl and syringyl moieties. PMID:17966704

  1. Nonclassical correlation in NMR quadrupolar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Soares-Pinto, D. O.; Auccaise, R.; Azevedo, E. R. de; Bonagamba, T. J.; Celeri, L. C.; Maziero, J.; Serra, R. M.; Fanchini, F. F.

    2010-06-15

    The existence of quantum correlation (as revealed by quantum discord), other than entanglement and its role in quantum-information processing (QIP), is a current subject for discussion. In particular, it has been suggested that this nonclassical correlation may provide computational speedup for some quantum algorithms. In this regard, bulk nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been successfully used as a test bench for many QIP implementations, although it has also been continuously criticized for not presenting entanglement in most of the systems used so far. In this paper, we report a theoretical and experimental study on the dynamics of quantum and classical correlations in an NMR quadrupolar system. We present a method for computing the correlations from experimental NMR deviation-density matrices and show that, given the action of the nuclear-spin environment, the relaxation produces a monotonic time decay in the correlations. Although the experimental realizations were performed in a specific quadrupolar system, the main results presented here can be applied to whichever system uses a deviation-density matrix formalism.

  2. Statistical filtering for NMR based structure generation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The constitutional assignment of natural products by NMR spectroscopy is usually based on 2D NMR experiments like COSY, HSQC, and HMBC. The difficulty of a structure elucidation problem depends more on the type of the investigated molecule than on its size. Saturated compounds can usually be assigned unambiguously by hand using only COSY and 13C-HMBC data, whereas condensed heterocycles are problematic due to their lack of protons that could show interatomic connectivities. Different computer programs were developed to aid in the structural assignment process, one of them COCON. In the case of unsaturated and substituted molecules structure generators frequently will generate a very large number of possible solutions. This article presents a "statistical filter" for the reduction of the number of results. The filter works by generating 3D conformations using smi23d, a simple MD approach. All molecules for which the generation of constitutional restraints failed were eliminated from the result set. Some structural elements removed by the statistical filter were analyzed and checked against Beilstein. The automatic removal of molecules for which no MD parameter set could be created was included into WEBCOCON. The effect of this filter varies in dependence of the NMR data set used, but in no case the correct constitution was removed from the resulting set. PMID:21835037

  3. NMR methodologies for studying mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Alves, Tiago C; Jarak, Ivana; Carvalho, Rui A

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a technique with an increasing importance in the study of metabolic diseases. Its initial important role in the determination of chemical structures (1, 2) has been considerably overcome by its potential for the in vivo study of metabolism (3-5). The main characteristic that makes this technique so attractive is its noninvasiveness. Only nuclei capable of transitioning between energy states, in the presence of an intense and constant magnetic field, are studied. This includes abundant nuclei such as proton ((1)H) and phosphorous ((31)P), as well as stable isotopes such as deuterium ((2)H) and carbon 13 ((13)C). This allows a wide range of applications that vary from the determination of water distribution in tissues (as obtained in a magnetic resonance imaging scan) to the calculation of metabolic fluxes under ex vivo and in vivo conditions without the need to use radioactive tracers or tissue biopsies (as in a magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) scan). In this chapter, some technical aspects of the methodology of an NMR/MRS experiment as well as how it can be used to study mitochondrial bioenergetics are overviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of in vivo MRS versus high-resolution NMR using proton high rotation magic angle spinning (HRMAS) of tissue biopsies and tissue extracts are also discussed. PMID:22057574

  4. Sol-gel kinetics by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Assink, R.A.; Kay, B.D.

    1991-01-01

    The chemical synthesis of advanced ceramic and glass materials by the sol-gel process has become an area of increasing activity in the field of material science. The sol-gel process provides a means to prepare homogeneous, high purity materials with tailored chemical and physical properties. This paper surveyed the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of silicon-based sol-gel kinetics. A review of the various models which have been used to analyze the chemical kinetics of various sol-gel systems was presented. The utility of NMR spectroscopy was demonstrated in investigating the influence that various reaction conditions have on the reaction pathways by which sol-gel derived materials are synthesized. By observing in a direct fashion the chemical pathway of the sol-gel, it is often possible to relate the final properties of the material to the formulation and reaction conditions of the sol-gel. The study of reaction kinetics by NMR is expected to play an increasingly important role in understanding sol-gel processing and material properties. 15 refs. (DP)

  5. DFT and NMR parameterized conformation of valeranone.

    PubMed

    Torres-Valencia, J Martín; Meléndez-Rodríguez, Myriam; Alvarez-García, Rocío; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2004-10-01

    A Monte Carlo random search using molecular mechanics, followed by geometry optimization of each minimum energy structure employing density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G* level and a Boltzmann analysis of the total energies, generated accurate molecular models which describe the conformational behavior of the antispasmodic bicyclic sesquiterpene valeranone (1). The theoretical H-C-C-H dihedral angles gave the corresponding 1H, 1H vicinal coupling constants using a generalized Karplus-type equation. In turn, the 3J(H,H) values were used as initial input data for the spectral simulation of 1, which after iteration provided an excellent correlation with the experimental 1H NMR spectrum. The calculated 3J(H,H) values closely predicted the experimental values, excepting the coupling constant between the axial hydrogen alpha to the carbonyl group and the equatorial hydrogen beta to the carbonyl group (J(2beta, 3beta)). The difference is explained in terms of the electron density distribution found in the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of 1. The simulated spectrum, together with 2D NMR experiments, allowed the total assignment of the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of 1. PMID:15366065

  6. Rhodopsin-lipid interactions studied by NMR.

    PubMed

    Soubias, Olivier; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The biophysical properties of the lipid matrix are known to influence function of integral membrane proteins. We report on a sample preparation method for reconstitution of membrane proteins which uses porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) filters with 200-nm-wide pores of high density. The substrate permits formation of tubular, single membranes that line the inner surface of pores. One square centimeter of filter with a thickness of 60μm yields on the order of 500cm(2) of solid-supported single bilayer surface, sufficient for NMR studies. The tubular bilayers are free of detergent, fully hydrated, and accessible for ligands from one side of the membrane. The use of AAO filters greatly improves reproducibility of the reconstitution process such that the influence of protein on lipid order parameters can be studied with high resolution. As an example, results for the G protein-coupled receptor of class A, bovine rhodopsin, are shown. By (2)H NMR order parameter measurements, it is detected that rhodopsin insertion elastically deforms membranes near the protein. Furthermore, by (1)H saturation-transfer NMR under conditions of magic angle spinning, we demonstrate detection of preferences in interactions of rhodopsin with particular lipid species. It is assumed that function of integral membrane proteins depends on both protein-induced elastic deformations of the lipid matrix and preferences for interaction of the protein with particular lipid species in the first layer of lipids surrounding the protein. PMID:23374188

  7. NMR quantitation: influence of RF inhomogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Huaping; Harwood, John; Raftery, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The NMR peak integral is ideally linearly dependent on the sine of excitation angle (θ), which has provided unsurpassed flexibility in quantitative NMR by allowing the use of a signal of any concentration as the internal concentration reference. Controlling the excitation angle is particularly critical for solvent proton concentration referencing to minimize the negative impact of radiation damping, and to reduce the risk of receiver gain compression. In practice, due to the influence of RF inhomogeneity for any given probe, the observed peak integral is not exactly proportional to sin θ. To evaluate the impact quantitatively, we introduce a RF inhomogeneity factor I(θ) as a function of the nominal pulse excitation angle and propose a simple calibration procedure. Alternatively, I(θ) can be calculated from the probe’s RF profile, which can be readily obtained as a gradient image of an aqueous sample. Our results show that without consideration of I(θ), even for a probe with good RF homogeneity, up to 5% error can be introduced due to different excitation pulse angles used for the analyte and the reference. Hence, a simple calibration of I(θ) can eliminate such errors and allow an accurate description of the observed NMR signal’s dependence on the excitation angle in quantitative analysis. PMID:21919056

  8. Earth's field NMR; a surface moisture detector?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Eiichi; Altobelli, Stephen; McDowell, Andrew; Zhang, Tongsheng

    2012-10-01

    Earth's field NMR (EFNMR), being free of magnets, would be an ideal teaching medium as well as a mobile NMR technique except for its weak S/N. The common EFNMR apparatus uses a powerful prepolarization field to enhance the spin magnetization before the experiment. We introduce a coil design geared to larger but manageable samples with sufficient sensitivity without prepolarization to move EFNMR closer to routine use and to provide an inexpensive teaching tool. Our coil consists of parallel wires spread out on a plywood to form a current sheet with the current return wires separated so they will not influence the main part of the coil assembly. The sensitive region is a relatively thin region parallel to the coil and close to it. A single turn of the coil is wound to be topologically equivalent to a figure-8. The two crossing segments in the center of a figure-8 form two of the parallel wires of the flat coil. Thus, a two-turn figure-8 has four crossing wires so its topologically equivalent coil will have four parallel wires with currents in phase. Together with the excellent sensitivity, this coil offers outstanding interference rejection because of the figure-8 geometry. An example of such a coil has 328 parallel wires covering a ˜1 meter square plywood which yields a good NMR signal from 26 liters of water spread out roughly over the area of the coil in less than one minute in a nearby park.

  9. NMR Studies of Dynamic Biomolecular Conformational Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Torchia, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR approaches can provide nearly complete sequential signal assignments of isotopically enriched biomolecules. The availability of assignments together with measurements of spin relaxation rates, residual spin interactions, J-couplings and chemical shifts provides information at atomic resolution about internal dynamics on timescales ranging from ps to ms, both in solution and in the solid state. However, due to the complexity of biomolecules, it is not possible to extract a unique atomic-resolution description of biomolecular motions even from extensive NMR data when many conformations are sampled on multiple timescales. For this reason, powerful computational approaches are increasingly applied to large NMR data sets to elucidate conformational ensembles sampled by biomolecules. In the past decade, considerable attention has been directed at an important class of biomolecules that function by binding to a wide variety of target molecules. Questions of current interest are: “Does the free biomolecule sample a conformational ensemble that encompasses the conformations found when it binds to various targets; and if so, on what time scale is the ensemble sampled?” This article reviews recent efforts to answer these questions, with a focus on comparing ensembles obtained for the same biomolecules by different investigators. A detailed comparison of results obtained is provided for three biomolecules: ubiquitin, calmodulin and the HIV-1 trans-activation response RNA. PMID:25669739

  10. Discrete analysis of stochastic NMR.II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S. T. S.; Rods, M. S.; Newmark, R. D.; Budinger, T. F.

    Stochastic NMR is an efficient technique for high-field in vivo imaging and spectroscopic studies where the peak RF power required may be prohibitively high for conventional pulsed NMR techniques. A stochastic NMR experiment excites the spin system with a sequence of RF pulses where the flip angles or the phases of the pulses are samples of a discrete stochastic process. In a previous paper the stochastic experiment was analyzed and analytic expressions for the input-output cross-correlations, average signal power, and signal spectral density were obtained for a general stochastic RF excitation. In this paper specific cases of excitation with random phase, fixed flip angle, and excitation with two random components in quadrature are analyzed. The input-output cross-correlation for these two types of excitations is shown to be Lorentzian. Line broadening is the only spectral distortion as the RF excitation power is increased. The systematic noise power is inversely proportional to the number of data points N used in the spectral reconstruction. The use of a complete maximum length sequence (MLS) may improve the signal-to-systematic-noise ratio by 20 dB relative to random binary excitation, but peculiar features in the higher-order autocorrelations of MLS cause noise-like distortion in the reconstructed spectra when the excitation power is high. The amount of noise-like distortion depends on the choice of the MLS generator.

  11. Calibration of NMR well logs from carbonate reservoirs with laboratory NMR measurements and μXRCT

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mason, Harris E.; Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Yue; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-12-31

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log data has the potential to provide in-situ porosity, pore size distributions, and permeability of target carbonate CO₂ storage reservoirs. However, these methods which have been successfully applied to sandstones have yet to be completely validated for carbonate reservoirs. Here, we have taken an approach to validate NMR measurements of carbonate rock cores with independent measurements of permeability and pore surface area to volume (S/V) distributions using differential pressure measurements and micro X-ray computed tomography (μXRCT) imaging methods, respectively. We observe that using standard methods for determining permeability from NMR data incorrectlymore » predicts these values by orders of magnitude. However, we do observe promise that NMR measurements provide reasonable estimates of pore S/V distributions, and with further independent measurements of the carbonate rock properties that universally applicable relationships between NMR measured properties may be developed for in-situ well logging applications of carbonate reservoirs.« less

  12. Guiding automated NMR structure determination using a global optimization metric, the NMR DP score.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Mao, Binchen; Xu, Fei; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2015-08-01

    ASDP is an automated NMR NOE assignment program. It uses a distinct bottom-up topology-constrained network anchoring approach for NOE interpretation, with 2D, 3D and/or 4D NOESY peak lists and resonance assignments as input, and generates unambiguous NOE constraints for iterative structure calculations. ASDP is designed to function interactively with various structure determination programs that use distance restraints to generate molecular models. In the CASD-NMR project, ASDP was tested and further developed using blinded NMR data, including resonance assignments, either raw or manually-curated (refined) NOESY peak list data, and in some cases (15)N-(1)H residual dipolar coupling data. In these blinded tests, in which the reference structure was not available until after structures were generated, the fully-automated ASDP program performed very well on all targets using both the raw and refined NOESY peak list data. Improvements of ASDP relative to its predecessor program for automated NOESY peak assignments, AutoStructure, were driven by challenges provided by these CASD-NMR data. These algorithmic improvements include (1) using a global metric of structural accuracy, the discriminating power score, for guiding model selection during the iterative NOE interpretation process, and (2) identifying incorrect NOESY cross peak assignments caused by errors in the NMR resonance assignment list. These improvements provide a more robust automated NOESY analysis program, ASDP, with the unique capability of being utilized with alternative structure generation and refinement programs including CYANA, CNS, and/or Rosetta. PMID:26081575

  13. Development of Halbach magnet for portable NMR device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doğan, N.; Topkaya, R.; Subaşi, H.; Yerli, Y.; Rameev, B.

    2009-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has enormous potential for various applications in industry as the on-line or at-line test/control device of process environments. Advantage of NMR is its non-destructive nature, because it does not require the measurement probe to have a contact with the tested media. Despite of the recent progress in this direction, application of NMR in industry is still very limited. This is related to the technical and analytical complications of NMR as a method, and high cost of NMR analyzers available at the market. However in many applications, NMR is a very useful technique to test various products and to monitor quantitatively industrial processes. Fortunately usually there is no need in a high-field superconducting magnets to obtain the high-resolution spectra with the detailed information on chemical shifts and coupling-constant. NMR analyzers are designed to obtain the relaxation parameters by measuring the NMR spectra in the time domain rather than in frequency domain. Therefore it is possible to use small magnetic field (and low frequency of 2-60 MHz) in NMR systems, based on permanent magnet technology, which are specially designed for specific at-line and on-line process applications. In this work we present the permanent magnet system developed to use in the portative NMR devices. We discuss the experimental parameters of the designed Halbach magnet system and compare them with results of theoretical modelling.

  14. Protein Structure Determination Using Protein Threading and Sparse NMR Data

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, O.H.; Einstein, J.R.; Xu, D.; Xu, Y.

    1999-11-14

    It is well known that the NMR method for protein structure determination applies to small proteins and that its effectiveness decreases very rapidly as the molecular weight increases beyond about 30 kD. We have recently developed a method for protein structure determination that can fully utilize partial NMR data as calculation constraints. The core of the method is a threading algorithm that guarantees to find a globally optimal alignment between a query sequence and a template structure, under distance constraints specified by NMR/NOE data. Our preliminary tests have demonstrated that a small number of NMR/NOE distance restraints can significantly improve threading performance in both fold recognition and threading-alignment accuracy, and can possibly extend threading's scope of applicability from structural homologs to structural analogs. An accurate backbone structure generated by NMR-constrained threading can then provide a significant amount of structural information, equivalent to that provided by the NMR method with many NMR/NOE restraints; and hence can greatly reduce the amount of NMR data typically required for accurate structure determination. Our preliminary study suggests that a small number of NMR/NOE restraints may suffice to determine adequately the all-atom structure when those restraints are incorporated in a procedure combining threading, modeling of loops and sidechains, and molecular dynamics simulation. Potentially, this new technique can expand NMR's capability to larger proteins.

  15. NMR spectroscopy of experimentally shocked single crystal quartz: A reexamination of the NMR shock barometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiske, P. S.; Gratz, A. J.; Nellis, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    Cygan and others report a broadening of the Si-29 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) peak for synthetic quartz powders with increasing shock pressure which they propose as a shock wave barometer for natural systems. These results are expanded by studying single crystal quartz shocked to 12 and 33 GPa using the 6.5 m two-stage light-gas gun at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Our NMR results differ substantially from those of Cygan and others and suggest that the proposed shock wave barometer may require refinement. The difference in results between this study and that of Cygan and others is most likely caused by different starting materials (single crystal vs. powder) and different shock loading histories. NMR results from single crystal studies may be more applicable to natural systems.

  16. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C.; Markley, John L.

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-13C, U-15N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of 1H, 13C, and 15N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  17. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C; Markley, John L

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-(13)C, U-(15)N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D (1)H-(15)N and (1)H-(13)C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use. PMID:24091140

  18. NMR Wool Tube: a novel method for NMR solution analysis of derivatized glass surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cholewa, Olivia Maria

    2004-08-13

    Glass wool was placed within an NMR tube as a solid support for the covalent attachment of a molecule to allow for a simple one-dimensional 1H FT NMR solution analysis. This novel procedure avoids the use of expensive sample tubes or platforms, as required for magic angle or fast spinning, exotic pulse sequences, isotopic labeling or the use of a large number of scans to provide the ability to analyze the structure, mobility, ligand binding, and solvent interactions of the surface bound molecule. PMID:15387199

  19. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  20. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity.

  1. Lithium Polymer Electrolytes and Solid State NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkeley, Emily R.

    2004-01-01

    Research is being done at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) developing new kinds of batteries that do not depend on a solution. Currently, batteries use liquid electrolytes containing lithium. Problems with the liquid electrolyte are (1) solvents used can leak out of the battery, so larger, more restrictive, packages have to be made, inhibiting the diversity of application and decreasing the power density; (2) the liquid is incompatible with the lithium metal anode, so alternative, less efficient, anodes are required. The Materials Department at GRC has been working to synthesize polymer electrolytes that can replace the liquid electrolytes. The advantages are that polymer electrolytes do not have the potential to leak so they can be used for a variety of tasks, small or large, including in the space rover or in space suits. The polymers generated by Dr. Mary Ann Meador's group are in the form of rod -coil structures. The rod aspect gives the polymer structural integrity, while the coil makes it flexible. Lithium ions are used in these polymers because of their high mobility. The coils have repeating units of oxygen which stabilize the positive lithium by donating electron density. This aids in the movement of the lithium within the polymer, which contributes to higher conductivity. In addition to conductivity testing, these polymers are characterized using DSC, TGA, FTIR, and solid state NMR. Solid state NMR is used in classifying materials that are not soluble in solvents, such as polymers. The NMR spins the sample at a magic angle (54.7') allowing the significant peaks to emerge. Although solid state NMR is a helpful technique in determining bonding, the process of preparing the sample and tuning it properly are intricate jobs that require patience; especially since each run takes about six hours. The NMR allows for the advancement of polymer synthesis by showing if the expected results were achieved. Using the NMR, in addition to looking at polymers, allows for

  2. Understanding NMR relaxometry of partially water-saturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Jorand, R.; Nordlund, C.; Klitzsch, N.

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry measurements are commonly used to characterize the storage and transport properties of water-saturated rocks. Estimations of these properties are based on the direct link of the initial NMR signal amplitude to porosity (water content) and of the NMR relaxation time to pore size. Herein, pore shapes are usually assumed to be spherical or cylindrical. However, the NMR response at partial water saturation for natural sediments and rocks may differ strongly from the responses calculated for spherical or cylindrical pores, because these pore shapes do not account for water menisci remaining in the corners of desaturated angular pores. Therefore, we consider a bundle of pores with triangular cross sections. We introduce analytical solutions of the NMR equations at partial saturation of these pores, which account for water menisci of desaturated pores. After developing equations that describe the water distribution inside the pores, we calculate the NMR response at partial saturation for imbibition and drainage based on the deduced water distributions. For this pore model, the NMR amplitudes and NMR relaxation times at partial water saturation strongly depend on pore shape, i.e., arising from the capillary pressure and pore shape-dependent water distribution in desaturated pores with triangular cross sections. Even so, the NMR relaxation time at full saturation only depends on the surface-to-volume ratio of the pore. Moreover, we show the qualitative agreement of the saturation-dependent relaxation-time distributions of our model with those observed for rocks and soils.

  3. Rotational Doppler Effect and Barnett Field in Spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudo, Hiroyuki; Harii, Kazuya; Matsuo, Mamoru; Ieda, Jun'ichi; Ono, Masao; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Saitoh, Eiji

    2015-04-01

    We report the observation of the rotational Doppler effect using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We have developed a coil-spinning technique that enables measurements by rotating a detector and fixing a sample. We found that the rotational Doppler effect gives rise to NMR frequency shifts equal to the rotation frequency. We formulate the rotational Doppler effect and the Barnett field using a vector model for the nuclear magnetic moment. This formulation reveals that, with just the sample rotating, both effects cancel each other, thereby explaining the absence of an NMR frequency shift in conventional sample-spinning NMR measurements.

  4. Measurement of vorticity diffusion by NMR microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jennifer R; Callaghan, Paul T

    2010-05-01

    In a Newtonian fluid, vorticity diffuses at a rate determined by the kinematic viscosity. Here we use rapid NMR velocimetry, based on a RARE sequence, to image the time-dependent velocity field on startup of a fluid-filled cylinder and therefore measure the diffusion of vorticity. The results are consistent with the solution to the vorticity diffusion equation where the angular velocity on the outside surface of the fluid, at the cylinder's rotating wall, is fixed. This method is a means of measuring kinematic viscosity for low viscosity fluids without the need to measure stress. PMID:20189854

  5. Analysis of multiple pulse NMR in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W.-K.; Elleman, D. D.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The general problems associated with the removal of the effects of dipolar broadening from solid-state NMR spectra are analyzed. The effects of finite pulse width and H sub 1 inhomogeneity are shown to have limited the resolution of previous pulse cycles, and a new eight-pulse cycle designed to minimize these problems is discussed. Spectra for F-19 in CaF2 taken with this cycle are presented which show residual linewidth near 10 Hz. The feasibility of measuring proton chemical shift tensors is discussed.

  6. NMR Characterizations of Properties of Heterogeneous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Uh, Jinsoo; Phan, Jack; Xue, Dong; Watson, A. Ted

    2003-01-28

    The overall goal of this project was to develop reliable methods for resolving macroscopic properties important for describing the flow of one or more fluid phases in reservoirs from formation measurements. During this reporting period, the determination of surface relaxivity from NMR data was investigated. A new method for determining the surface relaxivity from measured data was developed and tested with data obtained from an Exxon sample. The new method avoids the use of a certain mathematical short-time approximation in the data analysis, which has been shown to be unsuitable.

  7. NMR measurements in SSC dipole D00001

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.; Hanft, R.W.; Strait, J.B.

    1986-09-12

    The first 16.5 m long SSC dipole magnet (D00001) had its field intensity measured as a function of position with a custom made NMR magnetometer. A short description of the probe is presented. The data obtained (most of it near 2 T spaced apart by one inch) shows an average transfer function of 1.02830 T/KA with position dependent values deviating from the average by up to .00130 T/KA revealing contruction inhomogeneities that were measured with a sensitivity of 25 ppM.

  8. MULTIPLE-QUANTUM NMR IN SOLIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Y-S.

    1982-11-01

    Time domain multiple-quantum (MQ) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for spectral simplification and for providing new information on molecular dynamics. In this thesis, applications of MQ NMR are presented and show distinctly the advantages of this method over the conventional single-quantum NMR. Chapter 1 introduces the spin Hamiltonians, the density matrix formalism and some basic concepts of MQ NMR spectroscopy. In chapter 2, {sup 14}N double-quantum coherence is observed with high sensitivity in isotropic solution, using only the magnetization of bound protons. Spin echoes are used to obtain the homogeneous double-quantum spectrum and to suppress a large H{sub 2}O solvent signal. Chapter 3 resolves the main difficulty in observing high MQ transitions in solids. Due to the profusion of spin transitions in a solid, individual lines are unresolved. Excitation and detection of high quantum transitions by normal schemes are thus difficult. To ensure that overlapping lines add constructively and thereby to enhance sensitivity, time-reversal pulse sequences are used to generate all lines in phase. Up to 22-quantum {sup 1}H absorption in solid adamantane is observed. A time dependence study shows an increase in spin correlations as the excitation time increased. In chapter 4, a statistical theory of MQ second moments is developed for coupled spins of spin I = 1/2. The model reveals that the ratio of the average dipolar coupling to the rms value largely determines the dependence of second moments on the number of quanta. The results of this model are checked against computer-calculated and experimental second moments, and show good agreement. A simple scheme is proposed in chapter 5 for sensitivity improvement in a MQ experiment. The scheme involves acquiring all of the signal energy available in the detection period by applying pulsed spinlocking and sampling between pulses. Using this technique on polycrystalline adamantane, a large

  9. Quenched Hydrogen Exchange NMR of Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with a number of human diseases. These aggregatively misfolded intermolecular β-sheet assemblies constitute some of the most challenging targets in structural biology because to their complexity, size, and insolubility. Here, protocols and controls are described for experiments designed to study hydrogen-bonding in amyloid fibrils indirectly, by transferring information about amide proton occupancy in the fibrils to the dimethyl sulfoxide-denatured state. Since the denatured state is amenable to solution NMR spectroscopy, the method can provide residue-level-resolution data on hydrogen exchange for the monomers that make up the fibrils. PMID:26453215

  10. High resolution 1H NMR of a lipid cubic phase using a solution NMR probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle-Roden, E.; Hoefer, N.; Dey, K. K.; Grandinetti, P. J.; Caffrey, M.

    2007-11-01

    The cubic mesophase formed by monoacylglycerols and water is an important medium for the in meso crystallogenesis of membrane proteins. To investigate molecular level lipid and additive interactions within the cubic phase, a method was developed for improving the resolution of 1H NMR spectra when using a conventional solution state NMR probe. Using this approach we obtained well-resolved J-coupling multiplets in the one-dimensional NMR spectrum of the cubic-Ia3d phase prepared with hydrated monoolein. A high resolution t-ROESY two-dimensional 1H NMR spectrum of the cubic-Ia3d phase is also reported. Using this new methodology, we have investigated the interaction of two additive molecules, L-tryptophan and ruthenium-tris(2,2-bipyridyl) dichloride (rubipy), with the cubic mesophase. Based on the measured chemical shift differences when changing from an aqueous solution to the cubic phase, we conclude that L-tryptophan experiences specific interactions with the bilayer interface, whereas rubipy remains in the aqueous channels and does not associate with the lipid bilayer.

  11. Touch NMR: An NMR Data Processing Application for the iPad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Qiyue; Chen, Zhiwei; Yan, Zhiping; Wang, Cheng; Chen, Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has become one of the most powerful technologies to aid research in numerous scientific disciplines. With the development of consumer electronics, mobile devices have played increasingly important roles in our daily life. However, there is currently no application available for mobile devices able to…

  12. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoaceticum metabolic profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G.; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrey V.; Sears, Jesse A.; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R.; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Majors, Paul D.

    2014-06-20

    An in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch-growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution, high sensitivity NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In-situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at an NMR frequency of 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600 MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in-situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process in real time, enabling identification of intermediate and end-point metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with the HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts.

  13. NMR assessment on bone simulated under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Q.; Qin, Y.

    Introduction Microgravity-induced bone loss has been suggested to be similar to disuse-osteoporosis on Earth which constitutes a challenging public health problem No current non-destructive method can provide the microstructural changes in bone particularly on cortical bone Recently the authors have applied low field nuclear magnetic resonance NMR spin-spin relaxation technique and computational analysis method to determine the porosity pore size distribution and microdamage of cortical bone 1-3 The studies by the authors have shown that this technology can be used to characterize microstructural changes as well as bone water distribution bound and mobile water changes of weightless treated simulating a microgravity condition turkey and mouse cortical bone We further determinate that the NMR spin-spin relaxation time T 2 spectrum derived parameters can be used as descriptions of bone quality e g matrix water distribution and porosity size distributions and alone or in combination with current techniques bone mineral density measurements more accurately predict bone mechanical properties Methods underline Bone sample preparation Two kinds of animal samples were collected and prepared for designed experiments from SUNY Cortical bones of the mid-diaphyses of the ulnae of 1-year-old male turkeys were dissected from freshly slaughtered animals Eight samples were categorized from normal or control and four samples were 4-week disuse treated by functionally isolated osteotomies disuse A total of 12

  14. Characterizing carbohydrate-protein interactions by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bewley, Carole A.; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between proteins and soluble carbohydrates and/or surface displayed glycans are central to countless recognition, attachment and signaling events in biology. The physical chemical features associated with these binding events vary considerably, depending on the biological system of interest. For example, carbohydrate-protein interactions can be stoichiometric or multivalent, the protein receptors can be monomeric or oligomeric, and the specificity of recognition can be highly stringent or rather promiscuous. Equilibrium dissociation constants for carbohydrate binding are known to vary from micromolar to millimolar, with weak interactions being far more prevalent; and individual carbohydrate binding sites can be truly symmetrical or merely homologous, and hence, the affinities of individual sites within a single protein can vary, as can the order of binding. Several factors, including the weak affinities with which glycans bind their protein receptors, the dynamic nature of the glycans themselves, and the non-equivalent interactions among oligomeric carbohydrate receptors, have made NMR an especially powerful tool for studying and defining carbohydrate-protein interactions. Here we describe those NMR approaches that have proven to be the most robust in characterizing these systems, and explain what type of information can (or cannot) be obtained from each. Our goal is to provide to the reader the information necessary for selecting the correct experiment or sets of experiments to characterize their carbohydrate-protein interaction of interest. PMID:23784792

  15. The D0 solenoid NMR magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Sten Uldall Hansen Terry Kiper, Tom Regan, John Lofgren et al.

    2002-11-20

    A field monitoring system for the 2 Tesla Solenoid of the D0 detector is described. It is comprised of a very small NMR probe cabled to a DSP based signal processing board. The design magnetic field range is from 1.0 to 2.2 Tesla, corresponding to an RF frequency range of 42.57 to 93.67 MHz. The desired an accuracy is one part in 10{sup 5}. To minimize material in the interaction region of the D0 detector, the overall thickness of the NMR probe is 4 mm, including its mounting plate, and its width is 10 mm. To minimize cable mass, 4mm diameter IMR-100A cables are used for transmitting the RF signals from a nearby patch panel 25 meters to each of four probes mounted within the bore of the solenoid. RG213U cables 45 meters long are used to send the RF from the movable counting house to the patch panel. With this setup, the detector signal voltage at the moving counting room is in the range of 250-400 mV.

  16. Algorithmic cooling and scalable NMR quantum computers

    PubMed Central

    Boykin, P. Oscar; Mor, Tal; Roychowdhury, Vwani; Vatan, Farrokh; Vrijen, Rutger

    2002-01-01

    We present here algorithmic cooling (via polarization heat bath)—a powerful method for obtaining a large number of highly polarized spins in liquid nuclear-spin systems at finite temperature. Given that spin-half states represent (quantum) bits, algorithmic cooling cleans dirty bits beyond the Shannon's bound on data compression, by using a set of rapidly thermal-relaxing bits. Such auxiliary bits could be implemented by using spins that rapidly get into thermal equilibrium with the environment, e.g., electron spins. Interestingly, the interaction with the environment, usually a most undesired interaction, is used here to our benefit, allowing a cooling mechanism. Cooling spins to a very low temperature without cooling the environment could lead to a breakthrough in NMR experiments, and our “spin-refrigerating” method suggests that this is possible. The scaling of NMR ensemble computers is currently one of the main obstacles to building larger-scale quantum computing devices, and our spin-refrigerating method suggests that this problem can be resolved. PMID:11904402

  17. Assessment of Bone Microstructural Changes by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Qingwen; Wang, Xiaodu

    2008-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that age related increases in bone porosity without significant changes in bone mineral density (BMD) (without bone microstructural information) result in a decrease in bone strength. Bone fracture toughness is also significantly correlated to changes in porosity, microarchitecture, collagen integrity, microdamage, and water distribution, all of which are measures of bone quality. Unfortunately, current technology does not allow the non-destructive and non-invasive detection of bone water distribution or other measures of bone quality including microporosity. On the other hand, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) proton spin-spin (T2) relaxation time measurements and computational analytical method have been used to determine microstructural characteristics of various types of fluid filled porous materials. The study in here is to demonstrate that non-destructive and non-invasive NMR proton spin-spin (T2) relaxation techniques has been developed and applied to quantify the porosity, pore size distribution and water distribution in human cortical bone. This new bone microstructural information can then be used as descriptions of bone quality and, along or in combination with existing method (BMD) to more accurately assess bone fracture risk, and the results could help doctors and researchers to detect osteoporosis and other conditions related to weak bones in persons.

  18. NMR crystallography: the use of chemical shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Robin K.

    2004-10-01

    Measurements of chemical shifts obtained from magic-angle spinning NMR spectra (together with quantum mechanical computations of shielding) can provide valuable information on crystallography. Examples are given of the determination of crystallographic asymmetric units, of molecular symmetry in the solid-state environment, and of crystallographic space group assignment. Measurements of full tensor components for 199Hg have given additional coordination information. The nature of intermolecular hydrogen bonding in cortisone acetate polymorphs and solvates is obtained from chemical shift information, also involving measurement of the full tensor parameters. The resulting data have been used as restraints, built into the computation algorithm, in the analysis of powder diffraction patterns to give full crystal structures. A combination of quantum mechanical computation of shielding and measurement of proton chemical shifts (obtained by high-speed MAS) leads to the determination of the position of a proton in an intermolecular hydrogen bond. A recently-developed computer program specifically based on crystallographic repetition has been shown to give acceptable results. Moreover, NMR chemical shifts can distinguish between static and dynamic disorder in crystalline materials and can be used to determine modes and rates of molecular exchange motion.

  19. Methods for spatial localization in NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    Several unique coil configurations were developed that have applications in nuclear magnetic resonance. These include a number of designs appropriate for use as rf surface coils, and two configurations developed as NMR magnets. The magnetic field profiles were calculated for each of these designs, from which field strength and homogeneity information were obtained. The rf coil configurations modelled include the opposed loop, opposed half loop, bicycle wheel, opposed bicycle wheel, and semi-toroid. The opposed loop design was studied in detail in terms of the theoretical spatial sensitivity and selectivity it offers. A number of NMR experiments were performed to test the validity of these theoretical calculations. This configuration produces a field that is substantially reduced near the coil itself, compared with the field produced by a single loop surface coil, but that rises to a maximum along the coil axis yielding a somewhat homogeneous region that may be used to achieve a degree of spatial localization. Several comparison schemes are used to evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of both the single loop and the opposed loop coil. The opposed coil concept also has been applied to the design of magnets. The results of calculations on the homogeneity and field strength possible with an opposed solenoid magnet are presented.

  20. NMR measurements in solutions of dialkylimidazolium haloaluminates

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, S.; Saboungi, M.L.; Klingler, R.J.; Chen, M.J.; Rathke, J.W.

    1992-06-01

    {sup 27}Al and {sup 35}Cl NMR spectra of AlCl{sub 3}-1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (EMIC) melts were measured for initial compositions ranging from 50 to 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} at various temperatures. It was shown by changing the preaquisition delay time (DE value) that the dominant aluminum species are AlCl{sub 4}{sup {minus}} in the melt formed by mixing 50 mol % with EMIC and Al{sub 2}Cl{sub 7}{sup {minus}} in the 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} melt. In the equimolar mixture, the chemical shift of {sup 27}Al NMR spectrum is 103.28 ppm and the line width is 22.83Hz. In the 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} mixture, the chemical shift is 103.41 ppm and the line width is 2624Hz. A third species observed at 97 ppm in the {sup 27}Al spectra for the 55 and 60 mol % AlCl{sub 3} mixtures is identified to be a product of the reaction with residual water. The relaxation rates for each species in the melts were determined.

  1. ¹³C cross-polarization magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of the solid drug forms with low concentration of an active ingredient-propranolol case.

    PubMed

    Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Zielińska-Pisklak, Monika; Szeleszczuk, Lukasz; Wawer, Iwona

    2014-05-01

    Solid State NMR is a method that could be widely used for analyzing solid state forms of drugs in their original formulations. However, when the concentration of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in the final drug form is low, (13)C CP MAS NMR methods using standard parameters are not efficient. An example of this situation is propranolol, an important drug from the group of beta-blockers whose concentration in the final drug form is low (below 10%). Basing on the differences in the CP kinetics and relaxation parameters for propranolol and the excipients the authors suggest the proper set of the CP MAS experimental parameters that would allow one to analyze API even in small concentrations in the solid drug formulations. PMID:23911072

  2. Chemolytic and solid-state spectroscopic evaluation of organic matter transformation during vermicomposting of sugar industry wastes.

    PubMed

    Sen, Biswarup; Chandra, T S

    2007-05-01

    The molecular structure of humic acid (HA) extracted was investigated by FT-IR and (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy during the vermicomposting of sugar industry wastes, viz. pressmud, trash and bagasse for 60days. A rapid decrease in C/N and lignocellulosic (lignin, cellulose, hemicellulose) content was observed in vermicompost during early phase of the process. The FT-IR and (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra of HA indicated a high rate of change in structure with increase in the alkyl C/O-alkyl C ratio during the process. Aromatic structures and carboxyl groups showed an initial increase but decreased after approximately 40days indicating extensive mineralization during final stages of vermicomposting. PMID:17157000

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF METABOLITES IN SMALL FISH BIOFLUIDS AND TISSUES BY NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been utilized for assessing ecotoxicity in small fish models by means of metabolomics. Two fundamental challenges of NMR-based metabolomics are the detection limit and characterization of metabolites (or NMR resonance assignments...

  4. NMR of platinum catalysts: Double NMR of chemisorbed carbon monoxide and a model for the platinum NMR line shape

    SciTech Connect

    Makowka, C.D.; Slichter, C.P. ); Sinfelt, J.H. )

    1985-05-01

    The authors report observation of the NMR line of {sup 195}Pt atoms in the surface layer of small platinum-metal particles on which {sup 13}CO has been chemisorbed. The surface {sup 195}Pt atoms are resolved from those of {sup 195}Pt atoms deeper in the particle by spin-echo double resonance between {sup 195}Pt and {sup 13}C. The particles, supported on {eta}-alumina, had dispersions (fraction of the atoms that are on the surface) of 26% and 76%. Comparison with {sup 195}Pt resonance in Pt carbonyls suggests that the magnitude of the Knight shift of the surface Pt is less than 0.2%. Analysis of the {sup 195}Pt spin-lattice relaxation indicates that the small surface Knight shift results from cancellation of 6s and 5d core-polarization contributions as was found theoretically by Weinert and Freeman for clean Pt surfaces. The {sup 13}C-{sup 195}Pt indirect spin coupling is found to be very similar to those in diamagnetic platinum carbonyl molecules. The results show that CO bonds via the C atom and verify that concepts from studies of large single crystals are valid for the small particles. The key features of the {sup 195}Pt line shapes in these small platinum particles are described by a simple phenomenological model of the spatial Knight-shift variation inside these particles. The model successfully describes the major structure seen in the NMR line shapes of samples with dispersions ranging from 5% to 76%.

  5. Probe for high resolution NMR with sample reorientation

    DOEpatents

    Pines, A.; Samoson, A.

    1990-02-06

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions are zero. 8 figs.

  6. Chemical Equilibrium in Supramolecular Systems as Studied by NMR Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Gaitano, Gustavo; Tardajos, Gloria

    2004-01-01

    Undergraduate students are required to study the chemical balance in supramolecular assemblies constituting two or more interacting species, by using proton NMR spectrometry. A good knowledge of physical chemistry, fundamentals of chemical balance, and NMR are pre-requisites for conducting this study.

  7. Structure calculation, refinement and validation using CcpNmr Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Simon P.; Goult, Benjamin T.; Fogh, Rasmus H.; Boucher, Wayne; Stevens, Tim J.; Laue, Ernest D.; Vuister, Geerten W.

    2015-01-01

    CcpNmr Analysis provides a streamlined pipeline for both NMR chemical shift assignment and structure determination of biological macromolecules. In addition, it encompasses tools to analyse the many additional experiments that make NMR such a pivotal technique for research into complex biological questions. This report describes how CcpNmr Analysis can seamlessly link together all of the tasks in the NMR structure-determination process. It details each of the stages from generating NMR restraints [distance, dihedral, hydrogen bonds and residual dipolar couplings (RDCs)], exporting these to and subsequently re-importing them from structure-calculation software (such as the programs CYANA or ARIA) and analysing and validating the results obtained from the structure calculation to, ultimately, the streamlined deposition of the completed assignments and the refined ensemble of structures into the PDBe repository. Until recently, such solution-structure determination by NMR has been quite a laborious task, requiring multiple stages and programs. However, with the new enhancements to CcpNmr Analysis described here, this process is now much more intuitive and efficient and less error-prone. PMID:25615869

  8. Heteronuclear Multidimensional Protein NMR in a Teaching Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Nathan T.

    2016-01-01

    Heteronuclear multidimensional NMR techniques are commonly used to study protein structure, function, and dynamics, yet they are rarely taught at the undergraduate level. Here, we describe a senior undergraduate laboratory where students collect, process, and analyze heteronuclear multidimensional NMR experiments using an unstudied Ig domain (Ig2…

  9. Probe for high resolution NMR with sample reorientation

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Samoson, Ago

    1990-01-01

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions are zero.

  10. Straightforward and complete deposition of NMR data to the PDBe.

    PubMed

    Penkett, Christopher J; van Ginkel, Glen; Velankar, Sameer; Swaminathan, Jawahar; Ulrich, Eldon L; Mading, Steve; Stevens, Tim J; Fogh, Rasmus H; Gutmanas, Aleksandras; Kleywegt, Gerard J; Henrick, Kim; Vranken, Wim F

    2010-10-01

    We present a suite of software for the complete and easy deposition of NMR data to the PDB and BMRB. This suite uses the CCPN framework and introduces a freely downloadable, graphical desktop application called CcpNmr Entry Completion Interface (ECI) for the secure editing of experimental information and associated datasets through the lifetime of an NMR project. CCPN projects can be created within the CcpNmr Analysis software or by importing existing NMR data files using the CcpNmr FormatConverter. After further data entry and checking with the ECI, the project can then be rapidly deposited to the PDBe using AutoDep, or exported as a complete deposition NMR-STAR file. In full CCPN projects created with ECI, it is straightforward to select chemical shift lists, restraint data sets, structural ensembles and all relevant associated experimental collection details, which all are or will become mandatory when depositing to the PDB. Instructions and download information for the ECI are available from the PDBe web site at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pdbe/nmr/deposition/eci.html . PMID:20680401

  11. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect

    George J. Hirasaki; Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-09-05

    The objective of this report is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity. Oil based drilling fluids can have an adverse effect on NMR well logging if it alters the wettability of the formation. The effect of various surfactants on wettability and surface relaxivity are evaluated for silica sand. The relation between the relaxation time and diffusivity distinguishes the response of brine, oil, and gas in a NMR well log. A new NMR pulse sequence in the presence of a field gradient and a new inversion technique enables the T{sub 2} and diffusivity distributions to be displayed as a two-dimensional map. The objectives of pore morphology and rock characterization are to identify vug connectivity by using X-ray CT scan, and to improve NMR permeability correlation. Improved estimation of permeability from NMR response is possible by using estimated tortuosity as a parameter to interpolate between two existing permeability models.

  12. {sup 17}O NMR investigations of oxidative degradation in polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, T.M.; Celina, M.; Assink, R.A.; Gillen, K.T.; Clough, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    We have initiated studies using both solution and solid state magic angle spinning {sup 17}O NMR for a series of oxidatively aged polymers. This short note reports the solution {sup 17}O NMR for oxidatively degraded polypropylene, ethylene-propylene-diene, polyisoprene, and nitrile rubber. Enriched O{sub 2} is used during the accelerated aging. 3 figs, 7 refs.

  13. NMR-Metabolic Methodology in the Study of GM Foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 1H NMR methodology used in the study of genetically modified (GM) foodstuff is discussed. The study of transgenic lettuce (Lactuca sativa cv "Luxor") over-expressing the KNAT1 gene from Arabidopsis is presented as a novel study-case. The 1H NMR metabolic profiling was carried out. Twenty-two wat...

  14. Functional groups identified by solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal manure is generally high in organic matter intensity so it is well suitable for 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Solid-state 13C NMR techniques used in characterizing organic matter and its components include, but are not limited to, cross-polarization /magic angle spinning (CP...

  15. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. Applications for chemists and biochemists

    SciTech Connect

    Croasmun, W.R.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2-D NMR) has become a very powerful class of experiments (in the hands of an adept scientist) with broad adaptability to new situations. It is the product of a happy marriage between modern pulse FT-NMR technology, with its large memory and high-speed computers, and the physicists and chemists who love to manipulate spin systems. Basic 2-D experiments are now a standard capability of modern NMR spectrometers, and this timely book intends to make 2-D NMR users of those who are familiar with normal 1-D NMR. The 2-D NMR goal is correlation of the lines of the observed NMR spectrum with other properties of the system. This book deals with applications to high-resolution spectrum analysis, utilizing either coupling between the NMR-active nuclei or chemical exchange to perform the correlation. The coupling can be scalar (through bonds) or direct through space (within 5 A). The coupling may be homonuclear (between like nuclei) or heteronuclear.

  16. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoacetica metabolic profiles.

    PubMed

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrei V; Sears, Jesse A; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R; Ahring, Birgitte K; Majors, Paul D

    2014-10-01

    An in situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600-MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol, and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process, enabling identification of intermediate and endpoint metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts. PMID:24946863

  17. Facing and Overcoming Sensitivity Challenges in Biomolecular NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan-Henrik; Boebinger, Gregory S; Comment, Arnaud; Duckett, Simon; Edison, Arthur S; Engelke, Frank; Griesinger, Christian; Griffin, Robert G; Hilty, Christian; Maeda, Hidaeki; Parigi, Giacomo; Prisner, Thomas; Ravera, Enrico; van Bentum, Jan; Vega, Shimon; Webb, Andrew; Luchinat, Claudio; Schwalbe, Harald; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-08-01

    In the Spring of 2013, NMR spectroscopists convened at the Weizmann Institute in Israel to brainstorm on approaches to improve the sensitivity of NMR experiments, particularly when applied in biomolecular settings. This multi-author interdisciplinary Review presents a state-of-the-art description of the primary approaches that were considered. Topics discussed included the future of ultrahigh-field NMR systems, emerging NMR detection technologies, new approaches to nuclear hyperpolarization, and progress in sample preparation. All of these are orthogonal efforts, whose gains could multiply and thereby enhance the sensitivity of solid- and liquid-state experiments. While substantial advances have been made in all these areas, numerous challenges remain in the quest of endowing NMR spectroscopy with the sensitivity that has characterized forms of spectroscopies based on electrical or optical measurements. These challenges, and the ways by which scientists and engineers are striving to solve them, are also addressed. PMID:26136394

  18. Synchronous Spin Exchange Optical Pumping for Precision NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korver, Anna; Weber, Josh; Thrasher, Daniel; Walker, Thad

    2016-05-01

    We present the successful execution of synchronous spin exchange optical pumping for precision NMR. In this novel form of NMR, the bias field is applied as a sequence of alkali 2 π pulses; the resulting transverse alkali polarization is then modulated at the NMR frequency and spin exchange collisions build up a transverse precessing noble gas polarization. As compared to longitudinally pumped NMR, this method suppresses the alkali frequency shift by over a factor of 2500. We also discuss how we use synchronous spin exchange optical pumping to excite two noble gas species simultaneously. With dual species operation, we are able to use one species to lock the magnetic field while the other is left to detect nonmagnetic interactions. This method promises to achieve NMR frequency uncertainties of 100nHz/√{ Hz}. Research supported by the NSF and Northrop-Grumman Corp.

  19. Studies of organic paint binders by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyros, A.; Anglos, D.

    2006-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is applied to the study of aged binding media used in paintings, namely linseed oil, egg tempera and an acrylic medium. High resolution 1D and 2D NMR experiments establish the state of hydrolysis and oxidation of the linseed and egg tempera binders after five years of aging, by determining several markers sensitive to the hydrolytic and oxidative processes of the binder lipid fraction. The composition of the acrylic binder co-polymer is determined by 2D NMR spectroscopy, while the identification of a surfactant, poly(ethylene glycol), found in greater amounts in aged acrylic medium, is reported. The non-destructive nature of the proposed analytical NMR methodology, and minimization of the amount of binder material needed through the use of sophisticated cryoprobes and hyphenated LC-NMR techniques, make NMR attractive for the arts analyst, in view of its rapid nature and experimental simplicity.

  20. Membrane Protein Structure and Dynamics from NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Mei; Zhang, Yuan; Hu, Fanghao

    2012-05-01

    We review the current state of membrane protein structure determination using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Multidimensional magic-angle-spinning correlation NMR combined with oriented-sample experiments has made it possible to measure a full panel of structural constraints of membrane proteins directly in lipid bilayers. These constraints include torsion angles, interatomic distances, oligomeric structure, protein dynamics, ligand structure and dynamics, and protein orientation and depth of insertion in the lipid bilayer. Using solid-state NMR, researchers have studied potassium channels, proton channels, Ca2+ pumps, G protein-coupled receptors, bacterial outer membrane proteins, and viral fusion proteins to elucidate their mechanisms of action. Many of these membrane proteins have also been investigated in detergent micelles using solution NMR. Comparison of the solid-state and solution NMR structures provides important insights into the effects of the solubilizing environment on membrane protein structure and dynamics.