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Sample records for 2a catalytic subunit

  1. Catalytic Subunit 1 of Protein Phosphatase 2A Is a Subunit of the STRIPAK Complex and Governs Fungal Sexual Development

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Anna; Krisp, Christoph; Wolters, Dirk A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The generation of complex three-dimensional structures is a key developmental step for most eukaryotic organisms. The details of the molecular machinery controlling this step remain to be determined. An excellent model system to study this general process is the generation of three-dimensional fruiting bodies in filamentous fungi like Sordaria macrospora. Fruiting body development is controlled by subunits of the highly conserved striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex, which has been described in organisms ranging from yeasts to humans. The highly conserved heterotrimeric protein phosphatase PP2A is a subunit of STRIPAK. Here, catalytic subunit 1 of PP2A was functionally characterized. The Δpp2Ac1 strain is sterile, unable to undergo hyphal fusion, and devoid of ascogonial septation. Further, PP2Ac1, together with STRIPAK subunit PRO22, governs vegetative and stress-related growth. We revealed in vitro catalytic activity of wild-type PP2Ac1, and our in vivo analysis showed that inactive PP2Ac1 blocks the complementation of the sterile deletion strain. Tandem affinity purification, followed by mass spectrometry and yeast two-hybrid analysis, verified that PP2Ac1 is a subunit of STRIPAK. Further, these data indicate links between the STRIPAK complex and other developmental signaling pathways, implying the presence of a large interconnected signaling network that controls eukaryotic developmental processes. The insights gained in our study can be transferred to higher eukaryotes and will be important for understanding eukaryotic cellular development in general. PMID:27329756

  2. Quantitative proteomics reveals novel protein interaction partners of PP2A catalytic subunit in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangmin; Damacharla, Divyasri; Ma, Danjun; Qi, Yue; Tagett, Rebecca; Draghici, Sorin; Kowluru, Anjaneyulu; Yi, Zhengping

    2016-03-15

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is one of the major serine/threonine phosphatases. We hypothesize that PP2A regulates signaling cascades in pancreatic β-cells in the context of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Using co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) and tandem mass spectrometry, we globally identified the protein interaction partners of the PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac) in insulin-secreting pancreatic β-cells. Among the 514 identified PP2Ac interaction partners, 476 were novel. This represents the first global view of PP2Ac protein-protein interactions caused by hyperglycemic conditions. Additionally, numerous PP2Ac partners were found involved in a variety of signaling pathways in the β-cell function, such as insulin secretion. Our data suggest that PP2A interacts with various signaling proteins necessary for physiological insulin secretion as well as signaling proteins known to regulate cell dysfunction and apoptosis in the pancreatic β-cells. PMID:26780722

  3. Mutations in the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Type 2a Protein Phosphatase Catalytic Subunit Reveal Roles in Cell Wall Integrity, Actin Cytoskeleton Organization and Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Evans, DRH.; Stark, MJR.

    1997-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutations were generated in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PPH22 gene that, together with its homologue PPH21, encode the catalytic subunit of type 2A protein phosphatase (PP2A). At the restrictive temperature (37°), cells dependent solely on pph22(ts) alleles for PP2A function displayed a rapid arrest of proliferation. Ts(-) pph22 mutant cells underwent lysis at 37°, showing an accompanying viability loss that was suppressed by inclusion of 1 M sorbitol in the growth medium. Ts(-) pph22 mutant cells also displayed defects in bud morphogenesis and polarization of the cortical actin cytoskeleton at 37°. PP2A is therefore required for maintenance of cell integrity and polarized growth. On transfer from 24° to 37°, Ts(-) pph22 mutant cells accumulated a 2N DNA content indicating a cell cycle block before completion of mitosis. However, during prolonged incubation at 37°, many Ts(-) pph22 mutant cells progressed through an aberrant nuclear division and accumulated multiple nuclei. Ts(-) pph22 mutant cells also accumulated aberrant microtubule structures at 37°, while under semi-permissive conditions they were sensitive to the microtubule-destabilizing agent benomyl, suggesting that PP2A is required for normal microtubule function. Remarkably, the multiple defects of Ts(-) pph22 mutant cells were suppressed by a viable allele (SSD1-v1) of the polymorphic SSD1 gene. PMID:9071579

  4. PKA catalytic subunit mutations in adrenocortical Cushing's adenoma impair association with the regulatory subunit.

    PubMed

    Calebiro, Davide; Hannawacker, Annette; Lyga, Sandra; Bathon, Kerstin; Zabel, Ulrike; Ronchi, Cristina; Beuschlein, Felix; Reincke, Martin; Lorenz, Kristina; Allolio, Bruno; Kisker, Caroline; Fassnacht, Martin; Lohse, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    We recently identified a high prevalence of mutations affecting the catalytic (Cα) subunit of protein kinase A (PKA) in cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas. The two identified mutations (Leu206Arg and Leu199_Cys200insTrp) are associated with increased PKA catalytic activity, but the underlying mechanisms are highly controversial. Here we utilize a combination of biochemical and optical assays, including fluorescence resonance energy transfer in living cells, to analyze the consequences of the two mutations with respect to the formation of the PKA holoenzyme and its regulation by cAMP. Our results indicate that neither mutant can form a stable PKA complex, due to the location of the mutations at the interface between the catalytic and the regulatory subunits. We conclude that the two mutations cause high basal catalytic activity and lack of regulation by cAMP through interference of complex formation between the regulatory and the catalytic subunits of PKA. PMID:25477193

  5. Functional diversification of maize RNA polymerase IV and V subtypes via alternative catalytic subunits.

    PubMed

    Haag, Jeremy R; Brower-Toland, Brent; Krieger, Elysia K; Sidorenko, Lyudmila; Nicora, Carrie D; Norbeck, Angela D; Irsigler, Andre; LaRue, Huachun; Brzeski, Jan; McGinnis, Karen; Ivashuta, Sergey; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Chandler, Vicki L; Pikaard, Craig S

    2014-10-01

    Unlike nuclear multisubunit RNA polymerases I, II, and III, whose subunit compositions are conserved throughout eukaryotes, plant RNA polymerases IV and V are nonessential, Pol II-related enzymes whose subunit compositions are still evolving. Whereas Arabidopsis Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in four or five of their 12 subunits, respectively, and differ from one another in three subunits, proteomic analyses show that maize Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in six subunits but differ from each other only in their largest subunits. Use of alternative catalytic second subunits, which are nonredundant for development and paramutation, yields at least two subtypes of Pol IV and three subtypes of Pol V in maize. Pol IV/Pol V associations with MOP1, RMR1, AGO121, Zm_DRD1/CHR127, SHH2a, and SHH2b extend parallels between paramutation in maize and the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway in Arabidopsis. PMID:25284785

  6. Functional Diversification of Maize RNA Polymerase IV and V subtypes via Alternative Catalytic Subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Brower-Toland, Brent; Krieger, Elysia K.; Sidorenko, Lyudmila; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Irsigler, Andre; LaRue, Huachun; Brzeski, Jan; Mcginnis, Karen A.; Ivashuta, Sergey; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Chandler, Vicki L.; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2014-10-01

    Unlike nuclear multisubunit RNA polymerases I, II, and III, whose subunit compositions are conserved throughout eukaryotes, plant RNA polymerases IV and V are nonessential, Pol II-related enzymes whose subunit compositions are still evolving. Whereas Arabidopsis Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in four or five of their 12 subunits, respectively, and differ from one another in three subunits, proteomic ana- lyses show that maize Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in six subunits but differ from each other only in their largest subunits. Use of alternative catalytic second subunits, which are nonredundant for development and paramutation, yields at least two sub- types of Pol IV and three subtypes of Pol V in maize. Pol IV/Pol V associations with MOP1, RMR1, AGO121, Zm_DRD1/CHR127, SHH2a, and SHH2b extend parallels between paramutation in maize and the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway in Arabidopsis.

  7. A Novel Interaction of the Catalytic Subunit of Protein Phosphatase 2A with the Adaptor Protein CIN85 Suppresses Phosphatase Activity and Facilitates Platelet Outside-in αIIbβ3 Integrin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Khatlani, Tanvir; Pradhan, Subhashree; Da, Qi; Shaw, Tanner; Buchman, Vladimir L; Cruz, Miguel A; Vijayan, K Vinod

    2016-08-12

    The transduction of signals generated by protein kinases and phosphatases are critical for the ability of integrin αIIbβ3 to support stable platelet adhesion and thrombus formation. Unlike kinases, it remains unclear how serine/threonine phosphatases engage the signaling networks that are initiated following integrin ligation. Because protein-protein interactions form the backbone of signal transduction, we searched for proteins that interact with the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2Ac). In a yeast two-hybrid study, we identified a novel interaction between PP2Ac and an adaptor protein CIN85 (Cbl-interacting protein of 85 kDa). Truncation and alanine mutagenesis studies revealed that PP2Ac binds to the P3 block ((396)PAIPPKKPRP(405)) of the proline-rich region in CIN85. The interaction of purified PP2Ac with CIN85 suppressed phosphatase activity. Human embryonal kidney 293 αIIbβ3 cells overexpressing a CIN85 P3 mutant, which cannot support PP2Ac binding, displayed decreased adhesion to immobilized fibrinogen. Platelets contain the ∼85 kDa CIN85 protein along with the PP2Ac-CIN85 complex. A myristylated cell-permeable peptide derived from residues 395-407 of CIN85 protein (P3 peptide) disrupted the platelet PP2Ac-CIN85 complex and decreased αIIbβ3 signaling dependent functions such as platelet spreading on fibrinogen and thrombin-mediated fibrin clot retraction. In a phospho-profiling study P3 peptide treated platelets also displayed decreased phosphorylation of several signaling proteins including Src and GSK3β. Taken together, these data support a role for the novel PP2Ac-CIN85 complex in supporting integrin-dependent platelet function by dampening the phosphatase activity. PMID:27334924

  8. Visualization of Subunit Interactions and Ternary Complexes of Protein Phosphatase 2A in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Shu-Ting; Chiang, Shang-Ju; Lai, Tai-Yu; Cheng, Yu-Ling; Chung, Cheng-En; Kuo, Spencer C. H.; Reece, Kelie M.; Chen, Yung-Cheng; Chang, Nan-Shan; Wadzinski, Brian E.; Chiang, Chi-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a ubiquitous phospho-serine/threonine phosphatase that controls many diverse cellular functions. The predominant form of PP2A is a heterotrimeric holoenzyme consisting of a scaffolding A subunit, a variable regulatory B subunit, and a catalytic C subunit. The C subunit also associates with other interacting partners, such as α4, to form non-canonical PP2A complexes. We report visualization of PP2A complexes in mammalian cells. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analysis of PP2A subunit interactions demonstrates that the B subunit plays a key role in directing the subcellular localization of PP2A, and confirms that the A subunit functions as a scaffold in recruiting the B and C subunits to form a heterotrimeric holoenzyme. BiFC analysis also reveals that α4 promotes formation of the AC core dimer. Furthermore, we demonstrate visualization of specific ABC holoenzymes in cells by combining BiFC and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (BiFC-FRET). Our studies not only provide direct imaging data to support previous biochemical observations on PP2A complexes, but also offer a promising approach for studying the spatiotemporal distribution of individual PP2A complexes in cells. PMID:25536081

  9. Structure of the Tribolium castaneum Telomerase Catalytic Subunit TERT

    SciTech Connect

    Gillis,A.; Schuller, A.; Skordalakes, E.

    2008-01-01

    A common hallmark of human cancers is the overexpression of telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein complex that is responsible for maintaining the length and integrity of chromosome ends. Telomere length deregulation and telomerase activation is an early, and perhaps necessary, step in cancer cell evolution. Here we present the high-resolution structure of the Tribolium castaneum catalytic subunit of telomerase, TERT. The protein consists of three highly conserved domains, organized into a ring-like structure that shares common features with retroviral reverse transcriptases, viral RNA polymerases and B-family DNA polymerases. Domain organization places motifs implicated in substrate binding and catalysis in the interior of the ring, which can accommodate seven to eight bases of double-stranded nucleic acid. Modelling of an RNA-DNA heteroduplex in the interior of this ring demonstrates a perfect fit between the protein and the nucleic acid substrate, and positions the 3'-end of the DNA primer at the active site of the enzyme, providing evidence for the formation of an active telomerase elongation complex.

  10. Identification and Characterization of an Alternatively Spliced Isoform of the Human Protein Phosphatase 2Aα Catalytic Subunit*

    PubMed Central

    Migueleti, Deivid L. S.; Smetana, Juliana H. C.; Nunes, Hugo F.; Kobarg, Jörg; Zanchin, Nilson I. T.

    2012-01-01

    PP2A is the main serine/threonine-specific phosphatase in animal cells. The active phosphatase has been described as a holoenzyme consisting of a catalytic, a scaffolding, and a variable regulatory subunit, all encoded by multiple genes, allowing for the assembly of more than 70 different holoenzymes. The catalytic subunit can also interact with α4, TIPRL (TIP41, TOR signaling pathway regulator-like), the methyl-transferase LCMT-1, and the methyl-esterase PME-1. Here, we report that the gene encoding the catalytic subunit PP2Acα can generate two mRNA types, the standard mRNA and a shorter isoform, lacking exon 5, which we termed PP2Acα2. Higher levels of the PP2Acα2 mRNA, equivalent to the level of the longer PP2Acα mRNA, were detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells that were left to rest for 24 h. After this time, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells are still viable and the PP2Acα2 mRNA decreases soon after they are transferred to culture medium, showing that generation of the shorter isoform depends on the incubation conditions. FLAG-tagged PP2Acα2 expressed in HEK293 is catalytically inactive. It displays a specific interaction profile with enhanced binding to the α4 regulatory subunit, but no binding to the scaffolding subunit and PME-1. Consistently, α4 out-competes PME-1 and LCMT-1 for binding to both PP2Acα isoforms in pulldown assays. Together with molecular modeling studies, this suggests that all three regulators share a common binding surface on the catalytic subunit. Our findings add important new insights into the complex mechanisms of PP2A regulation. PMID:22167190

  11. The A1 Subunit of Shiga Toxin 2 Has Higher Affinity for Ribosomes and Higher Catalytic Activity than the A1 Subunit of Shiga Toxin 1.

    PubMed

    Basu, Debaleena; Li, Xiao-Ping; Kahn, Jennifer N; May, Kerrie L; Kahn, Peter C; Tumer, Nilgun E

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections can lead to life-threatening complications, including hemorrhagic colitis (HC) and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), which is the most common cause of acute renal failure in children in the United States. Stx1 and Stx2 are AB5 toxins consisting of an enzymatically active A subunit associated with a pentamer of receptor binding B subunits. Epidemiological evidence suggests that Stx2-producing E. coli strains are more frequently associated with HUS than Stx1-producing strains. Several studies suggest that the B subunit plays a role in mediating toxicity. However, the role of the A subunits in the increased potency of Stx2 has not been fully investigated. Here, using purified A1 subunits, we show that Stx2A1 has a higher affinity for yeast and mammalian ribosomes than Stx1A1. Biacore analysis indicated that Stx2A1 has faster association and dissociation with ribosomes than Stx1A1. Analysis of ribosome depurination kinetics demonstrated that Stx2A1 depurinates yeast and mammalian ribosomes and an RNA stem-loop mimic of the sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) at a higher catalytic rate and is a more efficient enzyme than Stx1A1. Stx2A1 depurinated ribosomes at a higher level in vivo and was more cytotoxic than Stx1A1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Stx2A1 depurinated ribosomes and inhibited translation at a significantly higher level than Stx1A1 in human cells. These results provide the first direct evidence that the higher affinity for ribosomes in combination with higher catalytic activity toward the SRL allows Stx2A1 to depurinate ribosomes, inhibit translation, and exhibit cytotoxicity at a significantly higher level than Stx1A1. PMID:26483409

  12. The alpha subunit of nitrile hydratase is sufficient for catalytic activity and post-translational modification.

    PubMed

    Nelp, Micah T; Astashkin, Andrei V; Breci, Linda A; McCarty, Reid M; Bandarian, Vahe

    2014-06-24

    Nitrile hydratases (NHases) possess a mononuclear iron or cobalt cofactor whose coordination environment includes rare post-translationally oxidized cysteine sulfenic and sulfinic acid ligands. This cofactor is located in the α-subunit at the interfacial active site of the heterodimeric enzyme. Unlike canonical NHases, toyocamycin nitrile hydratase (TNHase) from Streptomyces rimosus is a unique three-subunit member of this family involved in the biosynthesis of pyrrolopyrimidine antibiotics. The subunits of TNHase are homologous to the α- and β-subunits of prototypical NHases. Herein we report the expression, purification, and characterization of the α-subunit of TNHase. The UV-visible, EPR, and mass spectra of the α-subunit TNHase provide evidence that this subunit alone is capable of synthesizing the active site complex with full post-translational modifications. Remarkably, the isolated post-translationally modified α-subunit is also catalytically active with the natural substrate, toyocamycin, as well as the niacin precursor 3-cyanopyridine. Comparisons of the steady state kinetic parameters of the single subunit variant to the heterotrimeric protein clearly show that the additional subunits impart substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency. We conclude that the α-subunit is the minimal sequence needed for nitrile hydration providing a simplified scaffold to study the mechanism and post-translational modification of this important class of catalysts. PMID:24914472

  13. The RCN1-encoded A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A increases phosphatase activity in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deruere, J.; Jackson, K.; Garbers, C.; Soll, D.; Delong, A.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a heterotrimeric serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase, comprises a catalytic C subunit and two distinct regulatory subunits, A and B. The RCN1 gene encodes one of three A regulatory subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana. A T-DNA insertion mutation at this locus impairs root curling, seedling organ elongation and apical hypocotyl hook formation. We have used in vivo and in vitro assays to gauge the impact of the rcn1 mutation on PP2A activity in seedlings. PP2A activity is decreased in extracts from rcn1 mutant seedlings, and this decrease is not due to a reduction in catalytic subunit expression. Roots of mutant seedlings exhibit increased sensitivity to the phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and cantharidin in organ elongation assays. Shoots of dark-grown, but not light-grown seedlings also show increased inhibitor sensitivity. Furthermore, cantharidin treatment of wild-type seedlings mimics the rcn1 defect in root curling, root waving and hypocotyl hook formation assays. In roots of wild-type seedlings, RCN1 mRNA is expressed at high levels in root tips, and accumulates to lower levels in the pericycle and lateral root primordia. In shoots, RCN1 is expressed in the apical hook and the basal, rapidly elongating cells in etiolated hypocotyls, and in the shoot meristem and leaf primordia of light-grown seedlings. Our results show that the wild-type RCN1-encoded A subunit functions as a positive regulator of the PP2A holoenzyme, increasing activity towards substrates involved in organ elongation and differential cell elongation responses such as root curling.

  14. Protein kinase A catalytic subunit isoform PRKACA; History, function and physiology.

    PubMed

    Turnham, Rigney E; Scott, John D

    2016-02-15

    Our appreciation of the scope and influence of second messenger signaling has its origins in pioneering work on the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Also called protein kinase A (PKA), this holoenzyme exists as a tetramer comprised of a regulatory (R) subunit dimer and two catalytic (C) subunits. Upon binding of two molecules of the second messenger cAMP to each R subunit, a conformational change in the PKA holoenzyme occurs to release the C subunits. These active kinases phosphorylate downstream targets to propagate cAMP responsive cell signaling events. This article focuses on the discovery, structure, cellular location and physiological effects of the catalytic subunit alpha of protein kinase A (encoded by the gene PRKACA). We also explore the potential role of this essential gene as a molecular mediator of certain disease states. PMID:26687711

  15. The variable subunit associated with protein phosphatase 2A0 defines a novel multimember family of regulatory subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Zolnierowicz, S; Van Hoof, C; Andjelković, N; Cron, P; Stevens, I; Merlevede, W; Goris, J; Hemmings, B A

    1996-01-01

    Two protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) holoenzymes were isolated from rabbit skeletal muscle containing, in addition to the catalytic and PR65 regulatory subunits, proteins of apparent molecular masses of 61 and 56 kDa respectively. Both holoenzymes displayed low basal phosphorylase phosphatase activity, which could be stimulated by protamine to an extent similar to that of previously characterized PP2A holoenzymes. Protein micro-sequencing of tryptic peptides derived from the 61 kDa protein, termed PR61, yielded 117 residues of amino acid sequence. Molecular cloning by enrichment of specific mRNAs, followed by reverse transcription-PCR and cDNA library screening, revealed that this protein exists in multiple isoforms encoded by at least three genes, one of which gives rise to several splicing variants. Comparisons of these sequences with the available databases identified one more human gene and predicted another based on a rabbit cDNA-derived sequence, thus bringing the number of genes encoding PR61 family members to five. Peptide sequences derived from PR61 corresponded to the deduced amino acid sequences of either alpha or beta isoforms, indicating that the purified PP2A preparation was a mixture of at least two trimers. In contrast, the 56 kDa subunit (termed PR56) seems to correspond to the epsilon isoform of PR61. Several regulatory subunits of PP2A belonging to the PR61 family contain consensus sequences for nuclear localization and might therefore target PP2A to nuclear substrates. PMID:8694763

  16. Protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit B56α limits phosphatase activity in the heart.

    PubMed

    Little, Sean C; Curran, Jerry; Makara, Michael A; Kline, Crystal F; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Xu, Zhaobin; Wu, Xiangqiong; Polina, Iuliia; Musa, Hassan; Meadows, Allison M; Carnes, Cynthia A; Biesiadecki, Brandon J; Davis, Jonathan P; Weisleder, Noah; Györke, Sandor; Wehrens, Xander H; Hund, Thomas J; Mohler, Peter J

    2015-07-21

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine-selective holoenzyme composed of a catalytic, scaffolding, and regulatory subunit. In the heart, PP2A activity is requisite for cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and central in adrenergic signaling. We found that mice deficient in the PP2A regulatory subunit B56α (1 of 13 regulatory subunits) had altered PP2A signaling in the heart that was associated with changes in cardiac physiology, suggesting that the B56α regulatory subunit had an autoinhibitory role that suppressed excess PP2A activity. The increase in PP2A activity in the mice with reduced B56α expression resulted in slower heart rates and increased heart rate variability, conduction defects, and increased sensitivity of heart rate to parasympathetic agonists. Increased PP2A activity in B56α(+/-) myocytes resulted in reduced Ca(2+) waves and sparks, which was associated with decreased phosphorylation (and thus decreased activation) of the ryanodine receptor RyR2, an ion channel on intracellular membranes that is involved in Ca(2+) regulation in cardiomyocytes. In line with an autoinhibitory role for B56α, in vivo expression of B56α in the absence of altered abundance of other PP2A subunits decreased basal phosphatase activity. Consequently, in vivo expression of B56α suppressed parasympathetic regulation of heart rate and increased RyR2 phosphorylation in cardiomyocytes. These data show that an integral component of the PP2A holoenzyme has an important inhibitory role in controlling PP2A enzyme activity in the heart. PMID:26198358

  17. Characterization of the Aalpha and Abeta subunit isoforms of protein phosphatase 2A: differences in expression, subunit interaction, and evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jin; Pham, Huong T; Ruediger, Ralf; Walter, Gernot

    2003-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is very versatile owing to a large number of regulatory subunits and its ability to interact with numerous other proteins. The regulatory A subunit exists as two closely related isoforms designated Aalpha and Abeta. Mutations have been found in both isoforms in a variety of human cancers. Although Aalpha has been intensely studied, little is known about Abeta. We generated Abeta-specific antibodies and determined the cell cycle expression, subcellular distribution, and metabolic stability of Abeta in comparison with Aalpha. Both forms were expressed at constant levels throughout the cell cycle, but Aalpha was expressed at a much higher level than Abeta. Both forms were found predominantly in the cytoplasm, and both had a half-life of approx. 10 h. However, Aalpha and Abeta differed substantially in their expression patterns in normal tissues and in tumour cell lines. Whereas Aalpha was expressed at similarly high levels in all tissues and cell lines, Abeta expression varied greatly. In addition, in vivo studies with epitope-tagged Aalpha and Abeta subunits demonstrated that Abeta is a markedly weaker binder of regulatory B and catalytic C subunits than Aalpha. Construction of phylogenetic trees revealed that the conservation of Aalpha during the evolution of mammals is extraordinarily high in comparison with both Abeta and cytochrome c, suggesting that Aalpha is involved in more protein-protein interactions than Abeta. We also measured the binding of polyoma virus middle tumour antigen and simian virus 40 (SV40) small tumour antigen to Aalpha and Abeta. Whereas both isoforms bound polyoma virus middle tumour antigen equally well, only Aalpha bound SV40 small tumour antigen. PMID:12370081

  18. Nuclear Export and Centrosome Targeting of the Protein Phosphatase 2A Subunit B56α

    PubMed Central

    Flegg, Cameron P.; Sharma, Manisha; Medina-Palazon, Cahora; Jamieson, Cara; Galea, Melanie; Brocardo, Mariana G.; Mills, Kate; Henderson, Beric R.

    2010-01-01

    Protein phosphatase (PP) 2A is a heterotrimeric enzyme regulated by specific subunits. The B56 (or B′/PR61/PPP2R5) class of B-subunits direct PP2A or its substrates to different cellular locations, and the B56α, -β, and -ϵ isoforms are known to localize primarily in the cytoplasm. Here we studied the pathways that regulate B56α subcellular localization. We detected B56α in the cytoplasm and nucleus, and at the nuclear envelope and centrosomes, and show that cytoplasmic localization is dependent on CRM1-mediated nuclear export. The inactivation of CRM1 by leptomycin B or by siRNA knockdown caused nuclear accumulation of ectopic and endogenous B56α. Conversely, CRM1 overexpression shifted B56α to the cytoplasm. We identified a functional nuclear export signal at the C terminus (NES; amino acids 451–469), and site-directed mutagenesis of the NES (L461A) caused nuclear retention of full-length B56α. Active NESs were identified at similar positions in the cytoplasmic B56-β and ϵ isoforms, but not in the nuclear-localized B56-δ or γ isoforms. The transient expression of B56α induced nuclear export of the PP2A catalytic (C) subunit, and this was blocked by the L461A NES mutation. In addition, B56α co-located with the PP2A active (A) subunit at centrosomes, and its centrosome targeting involved sequences that bind to the A-subunit. Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP) assays revealed dynamic and immobile pools of B56α-GFP, which was rapidly exported from the nucleus and subject to retention at centrosomes. We propose that B56α can act as a PP2A C-subunit chaperone and regulates PP2A activity at diverse subcellular locations. PMID:20378546

  19. Purification and properties of catalytic subunit of branched-chain -keto acid dehydrogenase phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, L.J.; Damuni, Z.

    1987-05-01

    The catalytic subunit of the branched-chain -keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) phosphatase has been purified over 50,000-fold from extracts of bovine kidney mitochondria. The apparently homogeneous protein consists of a single polypeptide chain with an apparent M/sub r/ of about 33,000 as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. BCKDH phosphatase, with apparent M/sub r/ of 460,000 was dissociated to its catalytic subunit, with no apparent change in activity, at an early stage in the purification procedure by treatment with 6 M urea. The specific activity of the catalytic subunit was 1500-2500 units/mg. The catalytic subunit exhibited approx.10% maximal activity with TSP-labeled pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, but was inactive with phosphorylase a and with p-nitrophenyl phosphate. The catalytic subunit, like the M/sub r/ 460,000 species, was inhibited by nanomolar concentrations of BCKDH phosphatase inhibitor protein, was unaffected by protein phosphatase inhibitor 1 and inhibitor 2, and was inhibited by nucleoside tri- and diphosphates, but not by nucleoside monophosphates.

  20. Protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunits perform distinct functional roles in the maize pathogen Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Shin, Joon-Hee; Kim, Jung-Eun; Malapi-Wight, Martha; Choi, Yoon-E; Shaw, Brian D; Shim, Won-Bo

    2013-06-01

    Fusarium verticillioides is a pathogen of maize causing ear rot and stalk rot. The fungus also produces fumonisins, a group of mycotoxins linked to disorders in animals and humans. A cluster of genes, designated FUM genes, plays a key role in the synthesis of fumonisins. However, our understanding of the regulatory mechanism of fumonisin biosynthesis is still incomplete. We have demonstrated previously that Cpp1, a protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) catalytic subunit, negatively regulates fumonisin production and is involved in cell shape maintenance. In general, three PP2A subunits, structural A, regulatory B and catalytic C, make up a heterotrimer complex to perform regulatory functions. Significantly, we identified two PP2A regulatory subunits in the F. verticillioides genome, Ppr1 and Ppr2, which are homologous to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cdc55 and Rts1, respectively. In this study, we hypothesized that Ppr1 and Ppr2 are involved in the regulation of fumonisin biosynthesis and/or cell development in F. verticillioides, and generated a series of mutants to determine the functional role of Ppr1 and Ppr2. The PPR1 deletion strain (Δppr1) resulted in drastic growth defects, but increased microconidia production. The PPR2 deletion mutant strain (Δppr2) showed elevated fumonisin production, similar to the Δcpp1 strain. Germinating Δppr1 conidia formed abnormally swollen cells with a central septation site, whereas Δppr2 showed early hyphal branching during conidia germination. A kernel rot assay showed that the mutants were slow to colonize kernels, but this is probably a result of growth defects rather than a virulence defect. Results from this study suggest that two PP2A regulatory subunits in F. verticillioides carry out distinct roles in the regulation of fumonisin biosynthesis and fungal development. PMID:23452277

  1. Involvement of tryptophans at the catalytic and subunit-binding domains of transcarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G K; Beegen, H; Wood, H G

    1988-08-01

    Transcarboxylase from Propionibacterium shermanii is a multisubunit enzyme. It consists of one central hexameric subunit to which six outer dimeric subunits are attached through twelve biotinyl subunits. Both the central and the outer subunits are multi-tryptophan (Trp) proteins, and each contains 5 Trps per monomer. The roles of the Trps during catalysis and assembly of the enzyme have been studied by using N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) oxidation as a probe. Modification of approximately 10 Trps of the total 90 Trps of the intact enzyme results in loss of activity. Both the substrates, viz., methylmalonyl-CoA and pyruvate, afford protection (approximately 50%) against inactivation caused by NBS. Analyses of tryptic peptide maps and intrinsic fluorescence studies have indicated that modification of 10 Trps of the whole enzyme does not cause extensive conformational changes. Therefore, the Trps appear to be essential for catalytic activity. NBS modification of the individual subunits at pH 6.5 has demonstrated differential reactivity of their Trps. Modification of the exposed/reactive Trps of either one of the subunits significantly affects the subunit assembly with the complementary unmodified subunits to form active enzyme. It is proposed that Trps are involved at the subunit-binding domains of either the central or the outer subunit of transcarboxylase, in addition to those critical for catalysis. PMID:3191102

  2. Two Arabidopsis ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase Large Subunits (APL1 and APL2) Are Catalytic1

    PubMed Central

    Ventriglia, Tiziana; Kuhn, Misty L.; Ruiz, Ma Teresa; Ribeiro-Pedro, Marina; Valverde, Federico; Ballicora, Miguel A.; Preiss, Jack; Romero, José M.

    2008-01-01

    ADP-glucose (Glc) pyrophosphorylase (ADP-Glc PPase) catalyzes the first committed step in starch biosynthesis. Higher plant ADP-Glc PPase is a heterotetramer (α2β2) consisting of two small and two large subunits. There is increasing evidence that suggests that catalytic and regulatory properties of the enzyme from higher plants result from the synergy of both types of subunits. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), two genes encode small subunits (APS1 and APS2) and four large subunits (APL1–APL4). Here, we show that in Arabidopsis, APL1 and APL2, besides their regulatory role, have catalytic activity. Heterotetramers formed by combinations of a noncatalytic APS1 and the four large subunits showed that APL1 and APL2 exhibited ADP-Glc PPase activity with distinctive sensitivities to the allosteric activator (3-phosphoglycerate). Mutation of the Glc-1-P binding site of Arabidopsis and potato (Solanum tuberosum) isoforms confirmed these observations. To determine the relevance of these activities in planta, a T-DNA mutant of APS1 (aps1) was characterized. aps1 is starchless, lacks ADP-Glc PPase activity, APS1 mRNA, and APS1 protein, and is late flowering in long days. Transgenic lines of the aps1 mutant, expressing an inactivated form of APS1, recovered the wild-type phenotype, indicating that APL1 and APL2 have catalytic activity and may contribute to ADP-Glc synthesis in planta. PMID:18614708

  3. Two Arabidopsis ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase large subunits (APL1 and APL2) are catalytic.

    PubMed

    Ventriglia, Tiziana; Kuhn, Misty L; Ruiz, Ma Teresa; Ribeiro-Pedro, Marina; Valverde, Federico; Ballicora, Miguel A; Preiss, Jack; Romero, José M

    2008-09-01

    ADP-glucose (Glc) pyrophosphorylase (ADP-Glc PPase) catalyzes the first committed step in starch biosynthesis. Higher plant ADP-Glc PPase is a heterotetramer (alpha(2)beta(2)) consisting of two small and two large subunits. There is increasing evidence that suggests that catalytic and regulatory properties of the enzyme from higher plants result from the synergy of both types of subunits. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), two genes encode small subunits (APS1 and APS2) and four large subunits (APL1-APL4). Here, we show that in Arabidopsis, APL1 and APL2, besides their regulatory role, have catalytic activity. Heterotetramers formed by combinations of a noncatalytic APS1 and the four large subunits showed that APL1 and APL2 exhibited ADP-Glc PPase activity with distinctive sensitivities to the allosteric activator (3-phosphoglycerate). Mutation of the Glc-1-P binding site of Arabidopsis and potato (Solanum tuberosum) isoforms confirmed these observations. To determine the relevance of these activities in planta, a T-DNA mutant of APS1 (aps1) was characterized. aps1 is starchless, lacks ADP-Glc PPase activity, APS1 mRNA, and APS1 protein, and is late flowering in long days. Transgenic lines of the aps1 mutant, expressing an inactivated form of APS1, recovered the wild-type phenotype, indicating that APL1 and APL2 have catalytic activity and may contribute to ADP-Glc synthesis in planta. PMID:18614708

  4. Structural Characterization of the Catalytic Subunit of a Novel RNA Splicing Endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Calvin, Kate; Hall, Michelle D.; Xu, Fangmin; Xue, Song; Li, Hong

    2010-07-13

    The RNA splicing endonuclease is responsible for recognition and excision of nuclear tRNA and all archaeal introns. Despite the conserved RNA cleavage chemistry and a similar enzyme assembly, currently known splicing endonuclease families have limited RNA specificity. Different from previously characterized splicing endonucleases in Archaea, the splicing endonuclease from archaeum Sulfolobus solfataricus was found to contain two different subunits and accept a broader range of substrates. Here, we report a crystal structure of the catalytic subunit of the S. solfataricus endonuclease at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. The structure, together with analytical ultracentrifugation analysis, identifies the catalytic subunit as an inactive but stable homodimer, thus suggesting the possibility of two modes of functional assembly for the active enzyme.

  5. Kinetics of acrylodan-labelled cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit denaturation.

    PubMed

    Kivi, Rait; Loog, Mart; Jemth, Per; Järv, Jaak

    2013-10-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to study denaturation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit labeled with an acrylodan moiety. The dye was covalently bound to a cystein residue introduced into the enzyme by replacement of arginine in position 326 in the native sequence, located near the enzyme active center. This labeling had no effect on catalytic activity of the enzyme, but provided possibility to monitor changes in protein structure through measuring the fluorescence spectrum of the dye, which is sensitive to changes in its environment. This method was used to monitor denaturation of the protein kinase catalytic subunit and study the kinetics of this process as well as influence of specific ligands on stability of the protein. Stabilization of the enzyme structure was observed in the presence of adenosine triphosphate, peptide substrate RRYSV and inhibitor peptide PKI[5-24]. PMID:24048767

  6. Structural and biochemical characterization of human PR70 in isolation and in complex with the scaffolding subunit of protein phosphatase 2A.

    PubMed

    Dovega, Rebecca; Tsutakawa, Susan; Quistgaard, Esben M; Anandapadamanaban, Madhanagopal; Löw, Christian; Nordlund, Pär

    2014-01-01

    Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a major Ser/Thr phosphatase involved in the regulation of various cellular processes. PP2A assembles into diverse trimeric holoenzymes, which consist of a scaffolding (A) subunit, a catalytic (C) subunit and various regulatory (B) subunits. Here we report a 2.0 Å crystal structure of the free B''/PR70 subunit and a SAXS model of an A/PR70 complex. The crystal structure of B''/PR70 reveals a two domain elongated structure with two Ca2+ binding EF-hands. Furthermore, we have characterized the interaction of both binding partner and their calcium dependency using biophysical techniques. Ca2+ biophysical studies with Circular Dichroism showed that the two EF-hands display different affinities to Ca2+. In the absence of the catalytic C-subunit, the scaffolding A-subunit remains highly mobile and flexible even in the presence of the B''/PR70 subunit as judged by SAXS. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry studies and SAXS data support that PR70 and the A-subunit have high affinity to each other. This study provides additional knowledge about the structural basis for the function of B'' containing holoenzymes. PMID:25007185

  7. Cloning and characterization of homeologous cellulose synthase catalytic subunit 2 genes from allotetraploid cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cellulose synthase catalytic subunits (CesAs) are the catalytic sites within a multisubunit complex for cellulose biosynthesis in plants. CesAs have been extensively studied in diploid plants, but are not well characterized in polyploid plants. Gossypium hirsutum is an allotetraploid cotton specie...

  8. Involvement of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and of HA95 in pre-mRNA splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Kvissel, Anne-Katrine . E-mail: a.k.kvissel@basalmed.uio.no; Orstavik, Sigurd; Eikvar, Sissel; Brede, Gaute; Jahnsen, Tore; Collas, Philippe; Akusjaervi, Goeran; Skalhegg, Bjorn Steen

    2007-08-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is a holoenzyme consisting of two catalytic (C) subunits bound to a regulatory (R) subunit dimer. Stimulation by cAMP dissociates the holoenzyme and causes translocation to the nucleus of a fraction of the C subunit. Apart from transcription regulation, little is known about the function of the C subunit in the nucleus. In the present report, we show that both C{alpha} and C{beta} are localized to spots in the mammalian nucleus. Double immunofluorescence analysis of splicing factor SC35 with the C subunit indicated that these spots are splicing factor compartments (SFCs). Using the E1A in vivo splicing assay, we found that catalytically active C subunits regulate alternative splicing and phosphorylate several members of the SR-protein family of splicing factors in vitro. Furthermore, nuclear C subunits co-localize with the C subunit-binding protein homologous to AKAP95, HA95. HA95 also regulates E1A alternative splicing in vivo, apparently through its N-terminal domain. Localization of the C subunit to SFCs and the E1A splicing pattern were unaffected by cAMP stimulation. Our findings demonstrate that the nuclear PKA C subunit co-locates with HA95 in SFCs and regulates pre-mRNA splicing, possibly through a cAMP-independent mechanism.

  9. Cloning and expression of the gene encoding catalytic subunit of thermostable glucose dehydrogenase from Burkholderia cepacia in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Inose, Ken; Fujikawa, Masako; Yamazaki, Tomohiko; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Sode, Koji

    2003-02-21

    We have cloned a 1620-nucleotide gene encoding the catalytic subunit (alpha subunit) of a thermostable glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) from Burkholderia cepacia. The FAD binding motif was found in the N-terminal region of the alpha subunit. The deduced primary structure of the alpha subunit showed about 48% identity to the catalytic subunits of sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) from Gluconobacter oxydans and 2-keto-D-gluconate dehydrogenases (2KGDH) from Erwinia herbicola and Pantoea citrea. The alpha subunit of B. cepacia was expressed in Escherichia coli in its active water-soluble form, showing maximum dye-mediated GDH activity at 70 degrees C, retaining high thermal stability. A putative open reading frame (ORF) of 507 nucleotides was also found upstream of the alpha subunit encoding an 18-kDa peptide, designated as gamma subunit. The deduced primary structure of gamma subunit showed about 30% identity to the small subunits of the SDH from G. oxydans and 2KGDHs from E. herbicola and P. citrea. PMID:12573242

  10. Structural Basis for Telomerase Catalytic Subunit TERT Binding to RNA Template and Telomeric DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M.; Gillis, A; Futahashi, M; Fujiwara, H; Skordalakes, E

    2010-01-01

    Telomerase is a specialized DNA polymerase that extends the 3{prime} ends of eukaryotic linear chromosomes, a process required for genomic stability and cell viability. Here we present the crystal structure of the active Tribolium castaneum telomerase catalytic subunit, TERT, bound to an RNA-DNA hairpin designed to resemble the putative RNA-templating region and telomeric DNA. The RNA-DNA hybrid adopts a helical structure, docked in the interior cavity of the TERT ring. Contacts between the RNA template and motifs 2 and B{prime} position the solvent-accessible RNA bases close to the enzyme active site for nucleotide binding and selectivity. Nucleic acid binding induces rigid TERT conformational changes to form a tight catalytic complex. Overall, TERT-RNA template and TERT-telomeric DNA associations are remarkably similar to those observed for retroviral reverse transcriptases, suggesting common mechanistic aspects of DNA replication between the two families of enzymes.

  11. Activity, expression and function of a second Drosophila protein kinase a catalytic subunit gene

    SciTech Connect

    Melendez, A.; Li, W.; Kalderon, D.

    1995-12-01

    The DC2 was isolated previously on the basis of sequence similarity to DC0, the major Drosophila protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit gene. We show here that the 67-kD Drosophila DC2 protein behaves as a PKA catalytic subunit in vitro. DC2 is transcribed in mesodermal anlagen of early embryos. This expression depends on dorsal but on neither twist nor snail activity. DC2 transcriptional fusions mimic this embryonic expression and are also expressed in subsets of cells in the optic lamina, wing disc and leg discs of third instar larvae. A saturation screen of a small deficiency interval containing DC2 for recessive lethal mutations yielded no DC2 alleles. We therefore isolated new deficiencies to generate deficiency trans-heterozygotes that lacked DC2 activity. These animals were viable and fertile. The absence of DC2 promoter did not efficiently rescue a variety of DC0 mutant phenotypes. These observations indicate that DC2 is not an essential gene and is unlikely to be functionally redundant with DC0, which has multiple unique functions during development. 62 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Activity, Expression and Function of a Second Drosophila Protein Kinase a Catalytic Subunit Gene

    PubMed Central

    Melendez, A.; Li, W.; Kalderon, D.

    1995-01-01

    The DC2 gene was isolated previously on the basis of sequence similarity to DCO, the major Drosophila protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit gene. We show here that the 67-kD Drosophila DC2 protein behaves as a PKA catalytic subunit in vitro. DC2 is transcribed in mesodermal anlagen of early embryos. This expression depends on dorsal but on neither twist nor snail activity. DC2 transcriptional fusions mimic this embryonic expression and are also expressed in subsets of cells in the optic lamina, wing disc and leg discs of third instar larvae. A saturation screen of a small deficiency interval containing DC2 for recessive lethal mutations yielded no DC2 alleles. We therefore isolated new deficiencies to generate deficiency trans-heterozygotes that lacked DC2 activity. These animals were viable and fertile. The absence of DC2 did not affect the viability or phenotype of imaginal disc cells lacking DC0 activity or embryonic hatching of animals with reduced DC0 activity. Furthermore, transgenes expressing DC2 from a DC0 promoter did not efficiently rescue a variety of DC0 mutant phenotypes. These observations indicate that DC2 is not an essential gene and is unlikely to be functionally redundant with DC0, which has multiple unique functions during development. PMID:8601490

  13. The NMDA receptor NR2A subunit regulates proliferation of MKN45 human gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Kanako; Kanno, Takeshi; Oshima, Tadayuki; Miwa, Hiroto; Tashiro, Chikara; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2008-03-07

    The present study investigated proliferation of MKN28 and MKN45 human gastric cancer cells regulated by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit. The NMDA receptor antagonist DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (AP5) inhibited proliferation of MKN45 cells, but not MKN28 cells. Of the NMDA subunits such as NR1, NR2 (2A, 2B, 2C, and 2D), and NR3 (3A and 3B), all the NMDA subunit mRNAs except for the NR2B subunit mRNA were expressed in both MKN28 and MKN45 cells. MKN45 cells were characterized by higher expression of the NR2A subunit mRNA and lower expression of the NR1 subunit mRNA, but MKN28 otherwise by higher expression of the NR1 subunit mRNA and lower expression of the NR2A subunit mRNA. MKN45 cell proliferation was also inhibited by silencing the NR2A subunit-targeted gene. For MKN45 cells, AP5 or knocking-down the NR2A subunit increased the proportion of cells in the G{sub 1} phase of cell cycling and decreased the proportion in the S/G{sub 2} phase. The results of the present study, thus, suggest that blockage of NMDA receptors including the NR2A subunit suppresses MKN45 cell proliferation due to cell cycle arrest at the G{sub 1} phase; in other words, the NR2A subunit promotes MKN45 cell proliferation by accelerating cell cycling.

  14. DIRECT MODULATION OF THE PROTEIN KINASE A CATALYTIC SUBUNIT α BY GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR TYROSINE KINASES

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, George B.; Howe, Alan K.; Nickl, Christian K.; Dostmann, Wolfgang R.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Deming, Paula B.

    2011-01-01

    The cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) regulates processes such as cell proliferation and migration following activation of growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), yet the signaling mechanisms that link PKA with growth factor receptors remain largely undefined. Here we report that RTKs can directly modulate the function of the catalytic subunit of PKA (PKA-C) through post-translational modification. In vitro kinase assays revealed that both the epidermal growth factor and platelet derived growth factor receptors (EGFR and PDGFR, respectively) tyrosine phosphorylate PKA-C. Mass spectrometry identified tyrosine 330 (Y330) as a receptor-mediated phosphorylation site and mutation of Y330 to phenylalanine (Y330F) all but abolished the RTK-mediated phosphorylation of PKA-C in vitro. Y330 resides within a conserved region at the C-terminal tail of PKA-C that allosterically regulates enzymatic activity. Therefore, the effect of phosphorylation at Y330 on the activity of PKA-C was investigated. The Km for a peptide substrate was markedly decreased when PKA-C subunits were tyrosine phosphorylated by the receptors as compared to un-phosphorylated controls. Importantly, tyrosine-phosphorylated PKA-C subunits were detected in cells stimulated with EGF, PDGF and FGF2 and in fibroblasts undergoing PDGF-mediated chemotaxis. These results demonstrate a direct, functional interaction between RTKs and PKA-C and identify tyrosine phosphorylation as a novel mechansim for regulating PKA activity. PMID:21866565

  15. PRKACA: the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and adrenocortical tumors.

    PubMed

    Berthon, Annabel S; Szarek, Eva; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic-AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is the main effector of cAMP signaling in all tissues. Inactivating mutations of the PRKAR1A gene, coding for the type 1A regulatory subunit of PKA, are responsible for Carney complex and primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD). PRKAR1A inactivation and PKA dysregulation have been implicated in various types of adrenocortical pathologies associated with ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome (AICS) from PPNAD to adrenocortical adenomas and cancer, and other forms of bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasias (BAH). More recently, mutations of PRKACA, the gene coding for the catalytic subunit C alpha (Cα), were also identified in the pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumors. PRKACA copy number gain was found in the germline of several patients with cortisol-producing BAH, whereas the somatic Leu206Arg (c.617A>C) recurrent PRKACA mutation was found in as many as half of all adrenocortical adenomas associated with AICS. In vitro analysis demonstrated that this mutation led to constitutive Cα activity, unregulated by its main partners, the PKA regulatory subunits. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the involvement of PRKACA in adrenocortical tumorigenesis, and our understanding of PKA's role in adrenocortical lesions. We also discuss potential therapeutic advances that can be made through targeting of PRKACA and the PKA pathway. PMID:26042218

  16. Inhibition of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide

    SciTech Connect

    Toner-Webb, J.; Taylor, S.S.

    1987-11-17

    The hydrophobic carbodiimide dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) has been shown to inhibit the catalytic (C) subunit of adenosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate dependent protein kinase in a time-dependent, irreversible manner. The rate of inactivation was first order and showed saturation kinetics with an apparent K/sub i/ of 60 ..mu..M. Magnesium adenosine 5'-triphosphate (MgATP) was capable of protecting against this inhibition, whereas neither a synthetic peptide substrate nor histone afforded protection. Mg alone afforded some protection. When the catalytic subunit was aggregated with the regulatory subunit in the holoenzyme complex, no inhibition was observed. The inhibition was enhanced at low pH, suggesting that a carboxylic acid group was the target for interaction with DCCD. On the basis of the protection studies, it is most likely that this carboxylic acid group is associated with the MgATP binding site, perhaps serving as a ligand for the metal. Efforts to identify the site that was modified by DCCD were made. In no case was radioactivity incorporated into the protein, suggesting that the irreversible inhibition was due to an intramolecular cross-link between a reactive carboxylic acid group and a nearby amino group. Differential peptide mapping identified a single peptide that was consistently lost as a consequence of DCCD inhibition. This peptide (residues 166-189) contained four carboxylic acid residues as well as an internal Lys. Two of these carboxyl groups, Asp-166 and Asp-184, are conserved in all protein kinases, including oncogene transforming proteins and growth factor receptors, and thus are likely to play an essential role.

  17. Alternative splicing generates a second isoform of the catalytic A subunit of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Hernando, N; Bartkiewicz, M; Collin-Osdoby, P; Osdoby, P; Baron, R

    1995-01-01

    We have identified a second isoform of the catalytic A subunit of the vacuolar H+ pump in chicken osteoclasts. In this isoform (A2) a 72-bp cassette replaces a 90-bp cassette present in the classical A1 isoform. The A1-specific cassette encodes a region of the protein that contains one of the three ATP-binding consensus sequences (the P-loop) identified in this polypeptide, as well as the pharmacologically relevant Cys254. In contrast, the A2-specific cassette does not contain any of these features. These two isoforms, which appear to be ubiquitously expressed, are encoded by a single gene and are generated by alternative splicing of two mutually exclusive exons. The alternative RNA processing involves the recognition of a single site, the boundary between the A2- and A1-specific exons, as either acceptor (in A1) or donor (in A2) splice site. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7597085

  18. Phosphoryl transfer reaction snapshots in crystals: Insights into the mechanism of protein kinase a catalytic subunit

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Heller, William T.; Kovalevskyi, Andrii Y.; Langan, Paul; Tian, Jianhui

    2015-06-19

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca2+ ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, themore » thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca2+ cations with Mg2+ ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. As a result, the present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date.« less

  19. Phosphoryl transfer reaction snapshots in crystals: Insights into the mechanism of protein kinase a catalytic subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Heller, William T.; Kovalevskyi, Andrii Y.; Langan, Paul; Tian, Jianhui

    2015-06-19

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca2+ ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, the thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca2+ cations with Mg2+ ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. As a result, the present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date.

  20. Stable interactions between DNA polymerase δ catalytic and structural subunits are essential for efficient DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Brocas, Clémentine; Charbonnier, Jean-Baptiste; Dhérin, Claudine; Gangloff, Serge; Maloisel, Laurent

    2010-10-01

    Eukaryotic DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ) activity is crucial for chromosome replication and DNA repair and thus, plays an essential role in genome stability. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pol δ is a heterotrimeric complex composed of the catalytic subunit Pol3, the structural B subunit Pol31, and Pol32, an additional auxiliary subunit. Pol3 interacts with Pol31 thanks to its C-terminal domain (CTD) and this interaction is of functional importance both in DNA replication and DNA repair. Interestingly, deletion of the last four C-terminal Pol3 residues, LSKW, in the pol3-ct mutant does not affect DNA replication but leads to defects in homologous recombination and in break-induced replication (BIR) repair pathways. The defect associated with pol3-ct could result from a defective interaction between Pol δ and a protein involved in recombination. However, we show that the LSKW motif is required for the interaction between Pol3 C-terminal end and Pol31. This loss of interaction is relevant in vivo since we found that pol3-ct confers HU sensitivity on its own and synthetic lethality with a POL32 deletion. Moreover, pol3-ct shows genetic interactions, both suppression and synthetic lethality, with POL31 mutant alleles. Structural analyses indicate that the B subunit of Pol δ displays a major conserved region at its surface and that pol31 alleles interacting with pol3-ct, correspond to substitutions of Pol31 amino acids that are situated in this particular region. Superimposition of our Pol31 model on the 3D architecture of the phylogenetically related DNA polymerase α (Pol α) suggests that Pol3 CTD interacts with the conserved region of Pol31, thus providing a molecular basis to understand the defects associated with pol3-ct. Taken together, our data highlight a stringent dependence on Pol δ complex stability in DNA repair. PMID:20813592

  1. Inactivation of the protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A results in morphological and transcriptional defects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    van Zyl, W; Huang, W; Sneddon, A A; Stark, M; Camier, S; Werner, M; Marck, C; Sentenac, A; Broach, J R

    1992-01-01

    We have determined that TPD3, a gene previously identified in a screen for mutants defective in tRNA biosynthesis, most likely encodes the A regulatory subunit of the major protein phosphatase 2A species in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The predicted amino acid sequence of the product of TPD3 is highly homologous to the sequence of the mammalian A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A. In addition, antibodies raised against Tpd3p specifically precipitate a significant fraction of the protein phosphatase 2A activity in the cell, and extracts of tpd3 strains yield a different chromatographic profile of protein phosphatase 2A than do extracts of isogenic TPD3 strains. tpd3 deletion strains generally grow poorly and have at least two distinct phenotypes. At reduced temperatures, tpd3 strains appear to be defective in cytokinesis, since most cells become multibudded and multinucleate following a shift to 13 degrees C. This is similar to the phenotype obtained by overexpression of the protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit or by loss of CDC55, a gene that encodes a protein with homology to a second regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A. At elevated temperatures, tpd3 strains are defective in transcription by RNA polymerase III. Consistent with this in vivo phenotype, extracts of tpd3 strains fail to support in vitro transcription of tRNA genes, a defect that can be reversed by addition of either purified RNA polymerase III or TFIIIB. These results reinforce the notion that protein phosphatase 2A affects a variety of biological processes in the cell and provide an initial identification of critical substrates for this phosphatase. Images PMID:1328868

  2. Interaction of Ku protein and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit with nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Dynan, W S; Yoo, S

    1998-01-01

    The Ku protein-DNA-dependent protein kinase system is one of the major pathways by which cells of higher eukaryotes respond to double-strand DNA breaks. The components of the system are evolutionarily conserved and homologs are known from a number of organisms. The Ku protein component binds directly to DNA ends and may help align them for ligation. Binding of Ku protein to DNA also nucleates formation of an active enzyme complex containing the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). The interaction between Ku protein, DNA-PKcs and nucleic acids has been extensively investigated. This review summarizes the results of these biochemical investigations and relates them to recent molecular genetic studies that reveal highly characteristic repair and recombination defects in mutant cells lacking Ku protein or DNA-PKcs. PMID:9512523

  3. Oestrogen receptors interact with the α-catalytic subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lipovka, Yulia; Chen, Hao; Vagner, Josef; Price, Theodore J.; Tsao, Tsu-Shuen; Konhilas, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Normal and pathological stressors engage the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signalling axis to protect the cell from energetic pressures. Sex steroid hormones also play a critical role in energy metabolism and significantly modify pathological progression of cardiac disease, diabetes/obesity and cancer. AMPK is targeted by 17β-oestradiol (E2), the main circulating oestrogen, but the mechanism by which E2 activates AMPK is currently unknown. Using an oestrogen receptor α/β (ERα/β) positive (T47D) breast cancer cell line, we validated E2-dependent activation of AMPK that was mediated through ERα (not ERβ) by using three experimental strategies. A series of co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that both ERs associated with AMPK in cancer and striated (skeletal and cardiac) muscle cells. We further demonstrated direct binding of ERs to the α-catalytic subunit of AMPK within the βγ-subunit-binding domain. Finally, both ERs interacted with the upstream liver kinase B 1 (LKB1) kinase complex, which is required for E2-dependent activation of AMPK. We conclude that E2 activates AMPK through ERα by direct interaction with the βγ-binding domain of AMPKα. PMID:26374855

  4. Protein Phosphatase 1 β Paralogs Encode the Zebrafish Myosin Phosphatase Catalytic Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Jayashankar, Vaishali; Nguyen, Michael J.; Carr, Brandon W.; Zheng, Dale C.; Rosales, Joseph B.; Rosales, Joshua B.; Weiser, Douglas C.

    2013-01-01

    Background The myosin phosphatase is a highly conserved regulator of actomyosin contractility. Zebrafish has emerged as an ideal model system to study the in vivo role of myosin phosphatase in controlling cell contractility, cell movement and epithelial biology. Most work in zebrafish has focused on the regulatory subunit of the myosin phosphatase called Mypt1. In this work, we examined the critical role of Protein Phosphatase 1, PP1, the catalytic subunit of the myosin phosphatase. Methodology/Principal Findings We observed that in zebrafish two paralogous genes encoding PP1β, called ppp1cba and ppp1cbb, are both broadly expressed during early development. Furthermore, we found that both gene products interact with Mypt1 and assemble an active myosin phosphatase complex. In addition, expression of this complex results in dephosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain and large scale rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. Morpholino knock-down of ppp1cba and ppp1cbb results in severe defects in morphogenetic cell movements during gastrulation through loss of myosin phosphatase function. Conclusions/Significance Our work demonstrates that zebrafish have two genes encoding PP1β, both of which can interact with Mypt1 and assemble an active myosin phosphatase. In addition, both genes are required for convergence and extension during gastrulation and correct dosage of the protein products is required. PMID:24040418

  5. Epac, not PKA catalytic subunit, is required for 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhenyu; Mei, Fang C; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2010-01-01

    Cyclic AMP plays a critical role in adipocyte differentiation and maturation. However, it is not clear which of the two intracellular cAMP receptors, exchange protein directly activated by cAMP/cAMP-regulated guanine nucleotide exchange factor or protein kinase A/cAMP-dependent protein kinase, is essential for cAMP-mediated adipocyte differentiation. In this study, we utilized a well-defined adipose differentiation model system, the murine preadipocyte line 3T3-L1, to address this issue. We showed that knocking down Epac expression in 3T3-L1 cells using lentiviral based small hairpin RNAs down-regulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma expression and dramatically inhibited adipogenic conversion of 3T3-L1 cells while inhibiting PKA catalytic subunit activity by two mechanistically distinct inhibitors, heat stable protein kinase inhibitor and H89, had no effect on 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation. Moreover, cAMP analog selectively activating Epac was not able to stimulate adipogenic conversion. Our study demonstrated that while PKA catalytic activity is dispensable, activation of Epac is necessary but not sufficient for adipogenic conversion of 3T3-L1 cells. PMID:20036887

  6. Cloning and Characterization of TaPP2AbB"-α, a Member of the PP2A Regulatory Subunit in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dan; Li, Ang; Mao, Xinguo; Jing, Ruilian

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a major Serine/Threonine protein phosphatase, consists of three subunits; a highly conserved structural subunit A, a catalytic subunit C, and a highly variable regulatory subunit B which determines the substrate specificity. Although the functional mechanism of PP2A in signaling transduction in Arabidopsis is known, their physiological roles in wheat remain to be characterized. In this study, we identified a novel regulatory subunit B, TaPP2AbB"-α, in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Subcellular localization indicated that TaPP2AbB"-α is located in the cell membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus. It interacts with both TaPP2Aa and TaPP2Ac. Expression pattern analyses revealed that TaPP2AbB"-α is strongly expressed in roots, and responds to NaCl, polyethylene glycol (PEG), cold and abscisic acid (ABA) stresses at the transcription level. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing TaPP2AbB"-α developed more lateral roots, especially when treated with mannitol or NaCl. These results suggest that TaPP2AbB"-α, in conjunction with the other two PP2A subunits, is involved in multi-stress response, and positively regulates lateral root development under osmotic stress. PMID:24709994

  7. Protein kinase A catalytic subunit primed for action: Time-lapse crystallography of Michaelis complex formation

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Parks, Jerry M.; Langan, Paul; Kovalevskyi, Andrey Y.; Heller, William T.

    2015-11-12

    The catalytic subunit of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKAc) catalyzes the transfer of the γ-phosphate of bound Mg2ATP to a serine or threonine residue of a protein substrate. Here, time-lapse X-ray crystallography was used to capture a series of complexes of PKAc with an oligopeptide substrate and unreacted Mg2ATP, including the Michaelis complex, that reveal important geometric rearrangements in and near the active site preceding the phosphoryl transfer reaction. Contrary to the prevailing view, Mg2+ binds first to the M1 site as a complex with ATP and is followed by Mg2+ binding to the M2 site. Furthermore, the target serine hydroxyl of the peptide substrate rotates away from the active site toward the bulk solvent, which breaks the hydrogen bond with D166. In conclusion, the serine hydroxyl of the substrate rotates back toward D166 to form the Michaelis complex with the active site primed for phosphoryl transfer.

  8. Sampling the conformational space of the catalytic subunit of human γ-secretase.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiao-chen; Rajendra, Eeson; Yang, Guanghui; Shi, Yigong; Scheres, Sjors H W

    2015-01-01

    Human γ-secretase is an intra-membrane protease that cleaves many different substrates. Aberrant cleavage of Notch is implicated in cancer, while abnormalities in cutting amyloid precursor protein lead to Alzheimer's disease. Our previous cryo-EM structure of γ-secretase revealed considerable disorder in its catalytic subunit presenilin. Here, we describe an image classification procedure that characterizes molecular plasticity at the secondary structure level, and apply this method to identify three distinct conformations in our previous sample. In one of these conformations, an additional transmembrane helix is visible that cannot be attributed to the known components of γ-secretase. In addition, we present a γ-secretase structure in complex with the dipeptidic inhibitor N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-L-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT). Our results reveal how conformational mobility in the second and sixth transmembrane helices of presenilin is greatly reduced upon binding of DAPT or the additional helix, and form the basis for a new model of how substrate enters the transmembrane domain. PMID:26623517

  9. Evaluation of variation in the phosphoinositide-3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha oncogene and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, K N; Garcia-Closas, M; Fredericksen, Z; Kosel, M; Pankratz, V S; Hopper, J L; Dite, G S; Apicella, C; Southey, M C; Schmidt, M K; Broeks, A; Van ‘t Veer, L J; Tollenaar, R A E M; Fasching, P A; Beckmann, M W; Hein, A; Ekici, A B; Johnson, N; Peto, J; dos Santos Silva, I; Gibson, L; Sawyer, E; Tomlinson, I; Kerin, M J; Chanock, S; Lissowska, J; Hunter, D J; Hoover, R N; Thomas, G D; Milne, R L; Pérez, JI Arias; González-Neira, A; Benítez, J; Burwinkel, B; Meindl, A; Schmutzler, R K; Bartrar, C R; Hamann, U; Ko, Y D; Brüning, T; Chang-Claude, J; Hein, R; Wang-Gohrke, S; Dörk, T; Schürmann, P; Bremer, M; Hillemanns, P; Bogdanova, N; Zalutsky, J V; Rogov, Y I; Antonenkova, N; Lindblom, A; Margolin, S; Mannermaa, A; Kataja, V; Kosma, V-M; Hartikainen, J; Chenevix-Trench, G; Chen, X; Peterlongo, P; Bonanni, B; Bernard, L; Manoukian, S; Wang, X; Cerhan, J; Vachon, C M; Olson, J; Giles, G G; Baglietto, L; McLean, C A; Severi, G; John, E M; Miron, A; Winqvist, R; Pylkäs, K; Jukkola-Vuorinen, A; Grip, M; Andrulis, I; Knight, J A; Glendon, G; Mulligan, A M; Cox, A; Brock, I W; Elliott, G; Cross, S S; Pharoah, P P; Dunning, A M; Pooley, K A; Humphreys, M K; Wang, J; Kang, D; Yoo, K-Y; Noh, D-Y; Sangrajrang, S; Gabrieau, V; Brennan, P; McKay, J; Anton-Culver, H; Ziogas, A; Couch, F J; Easton, D F

    2011-01-01

    Background: Somatic mutations in phosphoinositide-3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) are frequent in breast tumours and have been associated with oestrogen receptor (ER) expression, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 overexpression, lymph node metastasis and poor survival. The goal of this study was to evaluate the association between inherited variation in this oncogene and risk of breast cancer. Methods: A single-nucleotide polymorphism from the PIK3CA locus that was associated with breast cancer in a study of Caucasian breast cancer cases and controls from the Mayo Clinic (MCBCS) was genotyped in 5436 cases and 5280 controls from the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) study and in 30 949 cases and 29 788 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Results: Rs1607237 was significantly associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer in MCBCS, CGEMS and all studies of white Europeans combined (odds ratio (OR)=0.97, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.95–0.99, P=4.6 × 10−3), but did not reach significance in the BCAC replication study alone (OR=0.98, 95% CI 0.96–1.01, P=0.139). Conclusion: Common germline variation in PIK3CA does not have a strong influence on the risk of breast cancer PMID:22033276

  10. Functional control of the Candida albicans cell wall by catalytic protein kinase A subunit Tpk1

    PubMed Central

    Fanning, S; Xu, W; Beaurepaire, C; Suhan, JP; Nantel, A; Mitchell, AP

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The cyclic AMP-protein kinase A pathway governs numerous biological features of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. The catalytic protein kinase A subunits, Tpk1 (orf19.4892) and Tpk2 (orf19.2277), have divergent roles, and most studies indicate a more pronounced role for Tpk2. Here we dissect two Tpk1-responsive properties: adherence and cell wall integrity. Homozygous tpk1/tpk1 mutants are hyperadherent, and a Tpk1 defect enables biofilm formation in the absence of Bcr1, a transcriptional regulator of biofilm adhesins. A quantitative gene expression-based assay reveals that tpk1/tpk1 and bcr1/bcr1 genotypes show mixed epistasis, as expected if Tpk1 and Bcr1 act mainly in distinct pathways. Overexpression of individual Tpk1-repressed genes indicates that cell surface proteins Als1, Als2, Als4, Csh1, and Csp37 contribute to Tpk1-regulated adherence. Tpk1 is also required for cell wall integrity, but has no role in the gene expression response to cell wall inhibition by caspofungin. Interestingly, increased expression of the adhesin gene ALS2 confers a cell wall defect, as manifested in hypersensitivity to the cell wall inhibitor caspofungin and a shallow cell wall structure. Our findings indicate that Tpk1 governs C. albicans cell wall properties through repression of select cell surface protein genes. PMID:22882910

  11. Sampling the conformational space of the catalytic subunit of human γ-secretase

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiao-chen; Rajendra, Eeson; Yang, Guanghui; Shi, Yigong; Scheres, Sjors HW

    2015-01-01

    Human γ-secretase is an intra-membrane protease that cleaves many different substrates. Aberrant cleavage of Notch is implicated in cancer, while abnormalities in cutting amyloid precursor protein lead to Alzheimer's disease. Our previous cryo-EM structure of γ-secretase revealed considerable disorder in its catalytic subunit presenilin. Here, we describe an image classification procedure that characterizes molecular plasticity at the secondary structure level, and apply this method to identify three distinct conformations in our previous sample. In one of these conformations, an additional transmembrane helix is visible that cannot be attributed to the known components of γ-secretase. In addition, we present a γ-secretase structure in complex with the dipeptidic inhibitor N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-L-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT). Our results reveal how conformational mobility in the second and sixth transmembrane helices of presenilin is greatly reduced upon binding of DAPT or the additional helix, and form the basis for a new model of how substrate enters the transmembrane domain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11182.001 PMID:26623517

  12. Computational modeling of acrylodan-labeled cAMP dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit unfolding.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Aleksei; Kivi, Rait; Järv, Jaak

    2016-04-01

    Structure of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit, where the asparagine residue 326 was replaced with acrylodan-cystein conjugate to implement this fluorescence reporter group into the enzyme, was modeled by molecular dynamics (MD) method and the positioning of the dye molecule in protein structure was characterized at temperatures 300K, 500K and 700K. It was found that the acrylodan moiety, which fluorescence is very sensitive to solvating properties of its microenvironment, was located on the surface of the native protein at 300K that enabled its partial solvation with water. At high temperatures the protein structure significantly changed, as the secondary and tertiary structure elements were unfolded and these changes were sensitively reflected in positioning of the dye molecule. At 700K complete unfolding of the protein occurred and the reporter group was entirely expelled into water. However, at 500K an intermediate of the protein unfolding process was formed, where the fluorescence reporter group was directed towards the protein interior and buried in the core of the formed molten globule state. This different positioning of the reporter group was in agreement with the two different shifts of emission spectrum of the covalently bound acrylodan, observed in the unfolding process of the protein. PMID:26896699

  13. Protein kinase A catalytic subunit primed for action: Time-lapse crystallography of Michaelis complex formation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Parks, Jerry M.; Langan, Paul; Kovalevskyi, Andrey Y.; Heller, William T.

    2015-11-12

    The catalytic subunit of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKAc) catalyzes the transfer of the γ-phosphate of bound Mg2ATP to a serine or threonine residue of a protein substrate. Here, time-lapse X-ray crystallography was used to capture a series of complexes of PKAc with an oligopeptide substrate and unreacted Mg2ATP, including the Michaelis complex, that reveal important geometric rearrangements in and near the active site preceding the phosphoryl transfer reaction. Contrary to the prevailing view, Mg2+ binds first to the M1 site as a complex with ATP and is followed by Mg2+ binding to the M2 site. Furthermore, themore » target serine hydroxyl of the peptide substrate rotates away from the active site toward the bulk solvent, which breaks the hydrogen bond with D166. In conclusion, the serine hydroxyl of the substrate rotates back toward D166 to form the Michaelis complex with the active site primed for phosphoryl transfer.« less

  14. Protein Kinase A Catalytic Subunit Primed for Action: Time-Lapse Crystallography of Michaelis Complex Formation.

    PubMed

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana; Parks, Jerry M; Langan, Paul; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Heller, William T

    2015-12-01

    The catalytic subunit of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKAc) catalyzes the transfer of the γ-phosphate of bound Mg2ATP to a serine or threonine residue of a protein substrate. Here, time-lapse X-ray crystallography was used to capture a series of complexes of PKAc with an oligopeptide substrate and unreacted Mg2ATP, including the Michaelis complex, that reveal important geometric rearrangements in and near the active site preceding the phosphoryl transfer reaction. Contrary to the prevailing view, Mg(2+) binds first to the M1 site as a complex with ATP and is followed by Mg(2+) binding to the M2 site. Concurrently, the target serine hydroxyl of the peptide substrate rotates away from the active site toward the bulk solvent, which breaks the hydrogen bond with D166. Lastly, the serine hydroxyl of the substrate rotates back toward D166 to form the Michaelis complex with the active site primed for phosphoryl transfer. PMID:26585512

  15. Musashi1 Impacts Radio-Resistance in Glioblastoma by Controlling DNA-Protein Kinase Catalytic Subunit.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Patricia Rosa; Gorthi, Aparna; da Silva, Acarizia E; Tonapi, Sonal S; Vo, Dat T; Burns, Suzanne C; Qiao, Mei; Uren, Philip J; Yuan, Zhi-Min; Bishop, Alexander J R; Penalva, Luiz O F

    2016-09-01

    The conserved RNA-binding protein Musashi1 (MSI1) has been characterized as a stem cell marker, controlling the balance between self-renewal and differentiation and as a key oncogenic factor in numerous solid tumors, including glioblastoma. To explore the potential use of MSI1 targeting in therapy, we studied MSI1 in the context of radiation sensitivity. Knockdown of MSI1 led to a decrease in cell survival and an increase in DNA damage compared to control in cells treated with ionizing radiation. We subsequently examined mechanisms of double-strand break repair and found that loss of MSI1 reduces the frequency of nonhomologous end-joining. This phenomenon could be attributed to the decreased expression of DNA-protein kinase catalytic subunit, which we have previously identified as a target of MSI1. Collectively, our results suggest a role for MSI1 in double-strand break repair and that its inhibition may enhance the effect of radiotherapy. PMID:27470713

  16. Impaired Discrimination Learning in Mice Lacking the NMDA Receptor NR2A Subunit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brigman, Jonathan L.; Feyder, Michael; Saksida, Lisa M.; Bussey, Timothy J.; Mishina, Masayoshi; Holmes, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) mediate certain forms of synaptic plasticity and learning. We used a touchscreen system to assess NR2A subunit knockout mice (KO) for (1) pairwise visual discrimination and reversal learning and (2) acquisition and extinction of an instrumental response requiring no pairwise discrimination. NR2A KO mice…

  17. Interplay between Ku, Artemis, and the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit at DNA ends.

    PubMed

    Drouet, Jérôme; Frit, Philippe; Delteil, Christine; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Salles, Bernard; Calsou, Patrick

    2006-09-22

    Repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) by the nonhomologous end-joining pathway in mammals requires at least seven proteins involved in a simplified two-step process: (i) recognition and synapsis of the DNA ends dependent on the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) formed by the Ku70/Ku80 heterodimer and the catalytic subunit DNA-PKcs in association with Artemis; (ii) ligation dependent on the DNA ligase IV.XRCC4.Cernunnos-XLF complex. The Artemis protein exhibits exonuclease and endonuclease activities that are believed to be involved in the processing of a subclass of DSB. Here, we have analyzed the interactions of Artemis and nonhomologous end-joining pathway proteins both in a context of human nuclear cell extracts and in cells. DSB-inducing agents specifically elicit the mobilization of Artemis to damaged chromatin together with DNA-PK and XRCC4/ligase IV proteins. DNA-PKcs is necessary for the loading of Artemis on damaged DNA and is the main kinase that phosphorylates Artemis in cells damaged with highly efficient DSB producers. Under kinase-preventive conditions, both in vitro and in cells, Ku-mediated assembly of DNA-PK on DNA ends is responsible for a dissociation of the DNA-PKcs. Artemis complex. Conversely, DNA-PKcs kinase activity prevents Artemis dissociation from the DNA-PK.DNA complex. Altogether, our data allow us to propose a model in which a DNA-PKcs-mediated phosphorylation is necessary both to activate Artemis endonuclease activity and to maintain its association with the DNA end site. This tight functional coupling between the activation of both DNA-PKcs and Artemis may avoid improper processing of DNA. PMID:16857680

  18. 2′,6′-Dihalostyrylanilines, Pyridines, and Pyrimidines for the Inhibition of the Catalytic Subunit of Methionine S-Adenosyltransferase-2

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of the catalytic subunit of the heterodimeric methionine S-adenosyl transferase-2 (MAT2A) with fluorinated N,N-dialkylaminostilbenes (FIDAS agents) offers a potential avenue for the treatment of liver and colorectal cancers where upregulation of this enzyme occurs. A study of structure–activity relationships led to the identification of the most active compounds as those with (1) either a 2,6-difluorostyryl or 2-chloro-6-fluorostyryl subunit, (2) either an N-methylamino or N,N-dimethylamino group attached in a para orientation relative to the 2,6-dihalostyryl subunit, and (3) either an N-methylaniline or a 2-(N,N-dimethylamino)pyridine ring. These modifications led to FIDAS agents that were active in the low nanomolar range, that formed water-soluble hydrochloride salts, and that possessed the desired property of not inhibiting the human hERG potassium ion channel at concentrations at which the FIDAS agents inhibit MAT2A. The active FIDAS agents may inhibit cancer cells through alterations of methylation reactions essential for cancer cell survival and growth. PMID:24950374

  19. S-Glutathionylation of the Na,K-ATPase Catalytic α Subunit Is a Determinant of the Enzyme Redox Sensitivity*

    PubMed Central

    Petrushanko, Irina Yu.; Yakushev, Sergej; Mitkevich, Vladimir A.; Kamanina, Yuliya V.; Ziganshin, Rustam H.; Meng, Xianyu; Anashkina, Anastasiya A.; Makhro, Asya; Lopina, Olga D.; Gassmann, Max; Makarov, Alexander A.; Bogdanova, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Na,K-ATPase is highly sensitive to changes in the redox state, and yet the mechanisms of its redox sensitivity remain unclear. We have explored the possible involvement of S-glutathionylation of the catalytic α subunit in redox-induced responses. For the first time, the presence of S-glutathionylated cysteine residues was shown in the α subunit in duck salt glands, rabbit kidneys, and rat myocardium. Exposure of the Na,K-ATPase to oxidized glutathione (GSSG) resulted in an increase in the number of S-glutathionylated cysteine residues. Increase in S-glutathionylation was associated with dose- and time-dependent suppression of the enzyme function up to its complete inhibition. The enzyme inhibition concurred with S-glutathionylation of the Cys-454, -458, -459, and -244. Upon binding of glutathione to these cysteines, the enzyme was unable to interact with adenine nucleotides. Inhibition of the Na,K-ATPase by GSSG did not occur in the presence of ATP at concentrations above 0.5 mm. Deglutathionylation of the α subunit catalyzed by glutaredoxin or dithiothreitol resulted in restoration of the Na,K-ATPase activity. Oxidation of regulatory cysteines made them inaccessible for glutathionylation but had no profound effect on the enzyme activity. Regulatory S-glutathionylation of the α subunit was induced in rat myocardium in response to hypoxia and was associated with oxidative stress and ATP depletion. S-Glutathionylation was followed by suppression of the Na,K-ATPase activity. The rat α2 isoform was more sensitive to GSSG than the α1 isoform. Our findings imply that regulatory S-glutathionylation of the catalytic subunit plays a key role in the redox-induced regulation of Na,K-ATPase activity. PMID:22798075

  20. S-glutathionylation of the Na,K-ATPase catalytic α subunit is a determinant of the enzyme redox sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Petrushanko, Irina Yu; Yakushev, Sergej; Mitkevich, Vladimir A; Kamanina, Yuliya V; Ziganshin, Rustam H; Meng, Xianyu; Anashkina, Anastasiya A; Makhro, Asya; Lopina, Olga D; Gassmann, Max; Makarov, Alexander A; Bogdanova, Anna

    2012-09-14

    Na,K-ATPase is highly sensitive to changes in the redox state, and yet the mechanisms of its redox sensitivity remain unclear. We have explored the possible involvement of S-glutathionylation of the catalytic α subunit in redox-induced responses. For the first time, the presence of S-glutathionylated cysteine residues was shown in the α subunit in duck salt glands, rabbit kidneys, and rat myocardium. Exposure of the Na,K-ATPase to oxidized glutathione (GSSG) resulted in an increase in the number of S-glutathionylated cysteine residues. Increase in S-glutathionylation was associated with dose- and time-dependent suppression of the enzyme function up to its complete inhibition. The enzyme inhibition concurred with S-glutathionylation of the Cys-454, -458, -459, and -244. Upon binding of glutathione to these cysteines, the enzyme was unable to interact with adenine nucleotides. Inhibition of the Na,K-ATPase by GSSG did not occur in the presence of ATP at concentrations above 0.5 mm. Deglutathionylation of the α subunit catalyzed by glutaredoxin or dithiothreitol resulted in restoration of the Na,K-ATPase activity. Oxidation of regulatory cysteines made them inaccessible for glutathionylation but had no profound effect on the enzyme activity. Regulatory S-glutathionylation of the α subunit was induced in rat myocardium in response to hypoxia and was associated with oxidative stress and ATP depletion. S-Glutathionylation was followed by suppression of the Na,K-ATPase activity. The rat α2 isoform was more sensitive to GSSG than the α1 isoform. Our findings imply that regulatory S-glutathionylation of the catalytic subunit plays a key role in the redox-induced regulation of Na,K-ATPase activity. PMID:22798075

  1. Elastase-like Activity Is Dominant to Chymotrypsin-like Activity in 20S Proteasome's β5 Catalytic Subunit.

    PubMed

    Bensinger, Dennis; Neumann, Theresa; Scholz, Christoph; Voss, Constantin; Knorr, Sabine; Kuckelkorn, Ulrike; Hamacher, Kay; Kloetzel, Peter-Michael; Schmidt, Boris

    2016-07-15

    The ubiquitin/proteasome system is the major protein degradation pathway in eukaryotes with several key catalytic cores. Targeting the β5 subunit with small-molecule inhibitors is an established therapeutic strategy for hematologic cancers. Herein, we report a mouse-trap-like conformational change that influences molecular recognition depending on the substitution pattern of a bound ligand. Variation of the size of P1 residues from the highly β5-selective proteasome inhibitor BSc2118 allows for discrimination between inhibitory strength and substrate conversion. We found that increasing molecular size strengthens inhibition, whereas decreasing P1 size accelerates substrate conversion. Evaluation of substrate hydrolysis after silencing of β5 activity reveals significant residual activity for large residues exclusively. Thus, classification of the β5 subunit as chymotrypsin-like and the use of the standard tyrosine-containing substrate should be reconsidered. PMID:27111844

  2. Examination of an active-site electrostatic node in the cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, B. D.; Tsigelny, I.; Adams, J. A.; Taylor, S. S.

    1996-01-01

    The active site of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit harbors a cluster of acidic residues-Asp 127, Glu 170, Glu 203, Glu 230, and Asp 241-that are not conserved throughout the protein kinase family. Based on crystal structures of the catalytic subunit, these amino acids are removed from the site of phosphoryl transfer and are implicated in substrate recognition. Glu 230, the most buried of these acidic residues, was mutated to Ala (rC[E230A]) and Gln (rC[E230Q]) and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. In contrast to the mostly insoluble and destabilized rC[E230A], rC[E230Q] is largely soluble, purifies like wild-type enzyme, and displays wild-type-like thermal stability. The mutation in rC[E230Q] causes an order of magnitude decrease in the affinity for a heptapeptide substrate, Kemptide. In addition, two independent kinetic techniques were used to dissect phosphoryl transfer and product release steps in the reaction pathway. Viscosometric and pre-steady-state quench-flow analyses revealed that the phosphoryl transfer rate constant decreases by an order of magnitude, whereas the product release rate constant remains unperturbed. Electrostatic alterations in the rC[E230Q] active site were assessed using modeling techniques that provide molecular interpretations for the substrate affinity and phosphoryl transfer rate decreases observed experimentally. These observations indicate that subsite recognition elements in the catalytic subunit make electrostatic contributions that are important not only for peptide affinity, but also for catalysis. Protein kinases may, therefore, discriminate substrates by not only binding them tightly, but also by only turning over ones that complement the electrostatic character of the active site. PMID:8819164

  3. Vacuolar H[sup +]-ATPase 69-kilodalton catalytic subunit cDNA from developing cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) ovules

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, T.A. )

    1993-06-01

    This study investigates the molecular events of vacuole ontogeny in rapidly elongated cotton plant cells. Within the DNA coding region, the cotton and carrot cDNA clones exhibit 82.2% nucleotide sequence homology; at the amino acid level cotton and carrot catalytic subunits exhibited 95.7% identity and 2.1% amino acid similarity. When aligned with the analogous sequences from yeast, the cotton protein shared only 60.5% amino acid identity and 12.7% similarity. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  4. PP2A binds to the LIM domains of lipoma-preferred partner through its PR130/B″ subunit to regulate cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Veerle; Zwaenepoel, Karen; Rossé, Carine; Petit, Marleen M R; Goris, Jozef; Parker, Peter J

    2016-04-15

    Here, we identify the LIM protein lipoma-preferred partner (LPP) as a binding partner of a specific protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) heterotrimer that is characterised by the regulatory PR130/B″α1 subunit (encoded byPPP2R3A). The PR130 subunit interacts with the LIM domains of LPP through a conserved Zn(2+)-finger-like motif in the differentially spliced N-terminus of PR130. Isolated LPP-associated PP2A complexes are catalytically active. PR130 colocalises with LPP at multiple locations within cells, including focal contacts, but is specifically excluded from mature focal adhesions, where LPP is still present. An LPP-PR130 fusion protein only localises to focal adhesions upon deletion of the domain of PR130 that binds to the PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2A/C), suggesting that PR130-LPP complex formation is dynamic and that permanent recruitment of PP2A activity might be unfavourable for focal adhesion maturation. Accordingly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of PR130 increases adhesion of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells onto collagen I and decreases their migration in scratch wound and Transwell assays. Complex formation with LPP is mandatory for these PR130-PP2A functions, as neither phenotype can be rescued by re-expression of a PR130 mutant that no longer binds to LPP. Our data highlight the importance of specific, locally recruited PP2A complexes in cell adhesion and migration dynamics. PMID:26945059

  5. Theoretical study of the catalytic mechanism of E1 subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xiang; Liu, Yongjun

    2013-11-12

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (PDHc) is a member of a family of 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase (OADH) multienzyme complexes involved in several central points of oxidative metabolism, and the E1 subunit is the most important component in the entire PDHc catalytic system, which catalyzes the reversible transfer of an acetyl group from a pyruvate to the lipoyl group of E2 subunit lipoly domain. In this article, the catalytic mechanism of the E1 subunit has been systematically studied using density functional theory (DFT). Four possible pathways with different general acid/base catalysts in decarboxylation and reductive acylation processes were explored. Our calculation results indicate that the 4'-amino pyrimidine of ThDP and residue His128 are the most likely proton donors in the decarboxylation and reductive acylation processes, respectively. During the reaction, each C-C and C-S bond formation or cleavage process, except for the liberation of CO2, is always accompanied by a proton transfer between the substrates and proton donors. The liberation of CO2 is calculated to be the rate-limiting step for the overall reaction, with an energy barrier of 13.57 kcal/mol. The decarboxylation process is endothermic by 5.32 kcal/mol, whereas the reductive acylation process is exothermic with a value of 5.74 kcal/mol. The assignment of protonation states of the surrounding residues can greatly influence the reaction. Residues His128 and His271 play roles in positioning the first substrate pyruvate and second substrate lipoyl group, respectively. PMID:24171427

  6. Localization of sulfonylurea receptor subunits, SUR2A and SUR2B, in rat heart.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming; He, Hui-Jing; Suzuki, Ryoji; Liu, Ke-Xiang; Tanaka, Osamu; Sekiguchi, Masaki; Itoh, Hideaki; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Abe, Hiroshi

    2007-08-01

    To understand the possible functions and subcellular localizations of sulfonylurea receptors (SURs) in cardiac muscle, polyclonal anti-SUR2A and anti-SUR2B antisera were raised. Immunoblots revealed both SUR2A and SUR2B expression in mitochondrial fractions of rat heart and other cellular fractions such as microsomes and cell membranes. Immunostaining detected ubiquitous expression of both SUR2A and SUR2B in rat heart in the atria, ventricles, interatrial and interventricular septa, and smooth muscles and endothelia of the coronary arteries. Electron microscopy revealed SUR2A immunoreactivity in the cell membrane, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and mitochondria. SUR2B immunoreactivity was mainly localized in the mitochondria as well as in the ER and cell membrane. Thus, SUR2A and SUR2B are not only the regulatory subunits of sarcolemmal K(ATP) channels but may also function as regulatory subunits in mitochondrial K(ATP) channels and play important roles in cardioprotection. PMID:17438353

  7. Neuroprotective effects of the catalytic subunit of telomerase: A potential therapeutic target in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    González-Giraldo, Yeimy; Forero, Diego A; Echeverria, Valentina; Gonzalez, Janneth; Ávila-Rodriguez, Marco; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Barreto, George E

    2016-07-01

    Senescence plays an important role in neurodegenerative diseases and involves key molecular changes induced by several mechanisms such as oxidative stress, telomere shortening and DNA damage. Potential therapeutic strategies directed to counteract these molecular changes are of great interest for the prevention of the neurodegenerative process. Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein composed of a catalytic subunit (TERT) and a RNA subunit (TERC). It is known that the telomerase is involved in the maintenance of telomere length and is a highly expressed protein in embryonic stages and decreases in adult cells. In the last decade, a growing number of studies have shown that TERT has neuroprotective effects in cellular and animal models after a brain injury. Significantly, differences in TERT expression between controls and patients with major depressive disorder have been observed. More recently, TERT has been associated with the decrease in reactive oxygen species and DNA protection in mitochondria of neurons. In this review, we highlight the role of TERT in some neurodegenerative disorders and discuss some studies focusing on this protein as a potential target for neuroprotective therapies. PMID:27095058

  8. Pin1 Interacts with the Epstein-Barr Virus DNA Polymerase Catalytic Subunit and Regulates Viral DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Narita, Yohei; Ryo, Akihide; Kawashima, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Atsuko; Kanda, Teru; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase NIMA-interacting 1 (Pin1) protein is known as a regulator which recognizes phosphorylated Ser/Thr-Pro motifs and increases the rate of cis and trans amide isomer interconversion, thereby altering the conformation of its substrates. We found that Pin1 knockdown using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) technology resulted in strong suppression of productive Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA replication. We further identified the EBV DNA polymerase catalytic subunit, BALF5, as a Pin1 substrate in glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown and immunoprecipitation assays. Lambda protein phosphatase treatment abolished the binding of BALF5 to Pin1, and mutation analysis of BALF5 revealed that replacement of the Thr178 residue by Ala (BALF5 T178A) disrupted the interaction with Pin1. To further test the effects of Pin1 in the context of virus infection, we constructed a BALF5-deficient recombinant virus. Exogenous supply of wild-type BALF5 in HEK293 cells with knockout recombinant EBV allowed efficient synthesis of viral genome DNA, but BALF5 T178A could not provide support as efficiently as wild-type BALF5. In conclusion, we found that EBV DNA polymerase BALF5 subunit interacts with Pin1 through BALF5 Thr178 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Pin1 might modulate EBV DNA polymerase conformation for efficient, productive viral DNA replication. PMID:23221557

  9. Human intestinal maltase-glucoamylase: crystal structure of the N-terminal catalytic subunit and basis of inhibition and substrate specificity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human maltase-glucoamylase (MGAM) is one of the two enzymes responsible for catalyzing the last glucose-releasing step in starch digestion. MGAM is anchored to the small-intestinal brush-border epithelial cells and contains two homologous glycosyl hydrolase family 31 catalytic subunits: an N-termina...

  10. Cellulose synthase catalytic subunit (CesA) genes associated with primary or secondary wall biosynthesis in developing cotton fibers (Gossypium hirsutum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fibers are unicellular seed trichomes and consist of almost pure cellulose. During the transition from elongation growth to secondary wall thickening, the rate of cellulose biosynthesis in fibers rises nearly 100-fold. Although the first two cellulose synthase catalytic subunits (CesAs) wer...

  11. Proteomic analysis of human norepinephrine transporter complexes reveals associations with protein phosphatase 2A anchoring subunit and 14-3-3 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Uhna; Jennings, Jennifer L.; Link, Andrew J.; Blakely, Randy D.; E-mail: andy.blakely@vanderbilt.edu

    2005-08-05

    The norepinephrine transporter (NET) terminates noradrenergic signals by clearing released NE at synapses. NET regulation by receptors and intracellular signaling pathways is supported by a growing list of associated proteins including syntaxin1A, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic subunit (PP2A-C), PICK1, and Hic-5. In the present study, we sought evidence for additional partnerships by mass spectrometry-based analysis of proteins co-immunoprecipitated with human NET (hNET) stably expressed in a mouse noradrenergic neuroblastoma cell line. Our initial proteomic analyses reveal multiple peptides derived from hNET, peptides arising from the mouse PP2A anchoring subunit (PP2A-Ar) and peptides derived from 14-3-3 proteins. We verified physical association of NET with PP2A-Ar via co-immunoprecipitation studies using mouse vas deferens extracts and with 14-3-3 via a fusion pull-down approach, implicating specifically the hNET NH{sub 2}-terminus for interactions. The transporter complexes described likely support mechanisms regulating transporter activity, localization, and trafficking.

  12. Catalytic mechanism and substrate specificity of the β-subunit of the voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel

    PubMed Central

    Tipparaju, Srinivas M.; Barski, Oleg A.; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2008-01-01

    The β-subunits of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are members of aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. These proteins regulate inactivation and membrane localization of Kv1 and Kv4 channels. The Kvβ proteins bind to pyridine nucleotides with high affinity; however, their catalytic properties remain unclear. Here we report that recombinant rat Kvβ2 catalyzes the reduction of a wide range of aldehydes and ketones. The rate of catalysis was slower (0.06 to 0.2 min−1) than that of other AKRs, but displayed the expected hyperbolic dependence on substrate concentration, with no evidence of allosteric cooperativity. Catalysis was prevented by site-directed substitution of Tyr-90 with phenylalanine, indicating that the acid-base catalytic residue, identified in other AKRs, has a conserved function in Kvβ2. The protein catalyzed the reduction of a broad range of carbonyls including aromatic carbonyls, electrophilic aldehydes and prostaglandins, phospholipid and sugar aldehydes. Little or no activity was detected with carbonyl steroids. Initial velocity profiles were consistent with an ordered bi-bi rapid-equilibrium mechanism in which NADPH binding precedes carbonyl binding. Significant primary kinetic isotope effects (2.0 – 3.1) were observed under single and multiple turnover conditions, indicating that the bond-breaking chemical step is rate-limiting. Structure-activity relationships with a series of para-substituted benzaldehydes indicated that the electronic interactions predominate during substrate binding and that no significant charge develops during the transition state. These data strengthen the view that Kvβ proteins are catalytically-active AKRs that impart redox-sensitivity to Kv channels. PMID:18672894

  13. Deciphering Radical Transport in the Catalytic Subunit of Class I Ribonucleotide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Holder, Patrick G.; Pizano, Arturo A.; Anderson, Bryce L.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    Incorporation of 2,3,6-trifluorotyrosine (F3Y) and a rhenium bipyridine ([Re]) photooxidant into a peptide corresponding to the C-terminus of the β protein (βC19) of Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) allows for the temporal monitoring of radical transport into the α2 subunit of RNR. Injection of the photogenerated F3Y radical from the [Re]–F3Y–βC19 peptide into the surface accessible Y731 of the α2 subunit is only possible when the second Y730 is present. With the Y–Y established, radical transport occurs with a rate constant of 3 × 105 s−1. Point mutations that disrupt the Y–Y dyad shut down radical transport. The ability to obviate radical transport by disrupting the hydrogen bonding network of the amino acids composing the co-linear proton-coupled electron transfer pathway in α2 suggests a finely tuned evolutionary adaptation of RNR to control the transport of radicals in this enzyme. PMID:22121977

  14. Structure of a catalytic dimer of the α- and β-subunits of the F-ATPase from Paracoccus denitrificans at 2.3 Å resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Morales-Ríos, Edgar; Montgomery, Martin G.; Leslie, Andrew G. W.; García-Trejo, José J.; Walker, John E.

    2015-09-23

    The structure of the αβ heterodimer of the F-ATPase from the α-proteobacterium P. denitrificans has been determined at 2.3 Å resolution. It corresponds to the ‘open’ or ‘empty’ catalytic interface found in other F-ATPases. The structures of F-ATPases have predominantly been determined from mitochondrial enzymes, and those of the enzymes in eubacteria have been less studied. Paracoccus denitrificans is a member of the α-proteobacteria and is related to the extinct protomitochondrion that became engulfed by the ancestor of eukaryotic cells. The P. denitrificans F-ATPase is an example of a eubacterial F-ATPase that can carry out ATP synthesis only, whereas many others can catalyse both the synthesis and the hydrolysis of ATP. Inhibition of the ATP hydrolytic activity of the P. denitrificans F-ATPase involves the ζ inhibitor protein, an α-helical protein that binds to the catalytic F{sub 1} domain of the enzyme. This domain is a complex of three α-subunits and three β-subunits, and one copy of each of the γ-, δ- and ∊-subunits. Attempts to crystallize the F{sub 1}–ζ inhibitor complex yielded crystals of a subcomplex of the catalytic domain containing the α- and β-subunits only. Its structure was determined to 2.3 Å resolution and consists of a heterodimer of one α-subunit and one β-subunit. It has no bound nucleotides, and it corresponds to the ‘open’ or ‘empty’ catalytic interface found in other F-ATPases. The main significance of this structure is that it aids in the determination of the structure of the intact membrane-bound F-ATPase, which has been crystallized.

  15. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Garbers, C; DeLong, A; Deruére, J; Bernasconi, P; Söll, D

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis. Images PMID:8641277

  16. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbers, C.; DeLong, A.; Deruere, J.; Bernasconi, P.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

  17. Differential role of PKA catalytic subunits in mediating phenotypes caused by knockout of the Carney complex gene Prkar1a.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhirong; Pringle, Daphne R; Jones, Georgette N; Kelly, Kimberly M; Kirschner, Lawrence S

    2011-10-01

    The Carney complex is an inherited tumor predisposition caused by activation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase [protein kinase A (PKA)] resulting from mutation of the PKA-regulatory subunit gene PRKAR1A. Myxomas and tumors in cAMP-responsive tissues are cardinal features of this syndrome, which is unsurprising given the important role played by PKA in modulating cell growth and function. Previous studies demonstrated that cardiac-specific knockout of Prkar1a causes embryonic heart failure and myxomatous degeneration in the heart, whereas limited Schwann cell-specific knockout of the gene causes schwannoma formation. In this study, we sought to determine the role of PKA activation in this phenotype by using genetic means to reduce PKA enzymatic activity. To accomplish this goal, we introduced null alleles of the PKA catalytic subunits Prkaca (Ca) or Prkacb (Cb) into the Prkar1a-cardiac knockout (R1a-CKO) or limited Schwann cell knockout (R1a-TEC3KO) line. Heterozygosity for Prkaca rescued the embryonic lethality of the R1a-CKO, although mice had a shorter than normal lifespan and died from cardiac failure with atrial thrombosis. In contrast, heterozygosity for Prkacb only enabled the mice to survive 1 extra day during embryogenesis. Biochemical analysis indicated that reduction of Ca markedly reduced PKA activity in embryonic hearts, whereas reduction of Cb had minimal effects. In R1a-TEC3KO mice, tumorigenesis was completely suppressed by a heterozygosity for Prkaca, and by more than 80% by heterozygosity for Prkacb. These data suggest that both developmental and tumor phenotypes caused by Prkar1a mutation result from excess PKA activity due to PKA-Ca. PMID:21852354

  18. The Protein Phosphatase 2A Regulatory Subunit B56γ Mediates Suppression of T Cell Receptor (TCR)-induced Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Breuer, Rebecca; Becker, Michael S.; Brechmann, Markus; Mock, Thomas; Arnold, Rüdiger; Krammer, Peter H.

    2014-01-01

    NF-κB is an important transcription factor in the immune system, and aberrant NF-κB activity contributes to malignant diseases and autoimmunity. In T cells, NF-κB is activated upon TCR stimulation, and signal transduction to NF-κB activation is triggered by a cascade of phosphorylation events. However, fine-tuning and termination of TCR signaling are only partially understood. Phosphatases oppose the role of kinases by removing phosphate moieties. The catalytic activity of the protein phosphatase PP2A has been implicated in the regulation of NF-κB. PP2A acts in trimeric complexes in which the catalytic subunit is promiscuous and the regulatory subunit confers substrate specificity. To understand and eventually target NF-κB-specific PP2A functions it is essential to define the regulatory PP2A subunit involved. So far, the regulatory PP2A subunit that mediates NF-κB suppression in T cells remained undefined. By performing a siRNA screen in Jurkat T cells harboring a NF-κB-responsive luciferase reporter, we identified the PP2A regulatory subunit B56γ as negative regulator of NF-κB in TCR signaling. B56γ was strongly up-regulated upon primary human T cell activation, and B56γ silencing induced increased IκB kinase (IKK) and IκBα phosphorylation upon TCR stimulation. B56γ silencing enhanced NF-κB activity, resulting in increased NF-κB target gene expression including the T cell cytokine IL-2. In addition, T cell proliferation was increased upon B56γ silencing. These data help to understand the physiology of PP2A function in T cells and the pathophysiology of diseases involving PP2A and NF-κB. PMID:24719332

  19. Unfolding-resistant translocase targeting: a novel mechanism for outer mitochondrial membrane localization exemplified by the Bbeta2 regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A.

    PubMed

    Dagda, Ruben K; Barwacz, Chris A; Cribbs, J Thomas; Strack, Stefan

    2005-07-22

    Heterotrimeric serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) consists of scaffolding (A), catalytic (C), and variable (B, B', and B'') subunits. Variable subunits dictate subcellular localization and substrate specificity of the PP2A holoenzyme. The Bbeta regulatory subunit gene is mutated in spinocerebellar ataxia type 12, and one of its splice variants, Bbeta2, targets PP2A to mitochondria to promote apoptosis in PC12 cells (Dagda, R. K., Zaucha, J. A., Wadzinski, B. E., and Strack, S. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 24976-24985). Here, we report that Bbeta2 is localized to the outer mitochondrial membrane by a novel mechanism, combining a cryptic mitochondrial import signal with a structural arrest domain. Scanning mutagenesis demonstrates that basic and hydrophobic residues mediate mitochondrial association and the proapoptotic activity of Bbeta2. When fused to green fluorescent protein, the N terminus of Bbeta2 acts as a cleavable mitochondrial import signal. Surprisingly, full-length Bbeta2 is not detectably cleaved and is retained at the outer mitochondrial membrane, even though it interacts with the TOM22 import receptor, as shown by luciferase complementation in intact cells. Mutations that open the C-terminal beta-propeller of Bbeta2 facilitate mitochondrial import, indicating that this rigid fold acts as a stop-transfer domain by resisting the partial unfolding step prerequisite for matrix translocation. Because hybrids of prototypical import and beta-propeller domains recapitulate this behavior, we predict the existence of other similarly localized proteins and a selection against highly stable protein folds in the mitochondrial matrix. This unfolding-resistant targeting to the mitochondrial translocase is necessary but not sufficient for the proapoptotic activity of Bbeta2, which also requires association with the rest of the PP2A holoenzyme. PMID:15923182

  20. Structure of a catalytic dimer of the α- and β-subunits of the F-ATPase from Paracoccus denitrificans at 2.3 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Ríos, Edgar; Montgomery, Martin G.; Leslie, Andrew G. W.; García-Trejo, José J.; Walker, John E.

    2015-01-01

    The structures of F-ATPases have predominantly been determined from mitochondrial enzymes, and those of the enzymes in eubacteria have been less studied. Paracoccus denitrificans is a member of the α-proteobacteria and is related to the extinct protomitochondrion that became engulfed by the ancestor of eukaryotic cells. The P. denitrificans F-ATPase is an example of a eubacterial F-ATPase that can carry out ATP synthesis only, whereas many others can catalyse both the synthesis and the hydrolysis of ATP. Inhibition of the ATP hydrolytic activity of the P. denitrificans F-ATPase involves the ζ inhibitor protein, an α-helical protein that binds to the catalytic F1 domain of the enzyme. This domain is a complex of three α-subunits and three β-subunits, and one copy of each of the γ-, δ- and ∊-subunits. Attempts to crystallize the F1–ζ inhibitor complex yielded crystals of a subcomplex of the catalytic domain containing the α- and β-subunits only. Its structure was determined to 2.3 Å resolution and consists of a heterodimer of one α-subunit and one β-subunit. It has no bound nucleotides, and it corresponds to the ‘open’ or ‘empty’ catalytic interface found in other F-ATPases. The main significance of this structure is that it aids in the determination of the structure of the intact membrane-bound F-ATPase, which has been crystallized. PMID:26457523

  1. Evolutionary Analysis of the B56 Gene Family of PP2A Regulatory Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Lauren M.; Cho, Hyuk; Choudhary, Madhusudan; Seeling, Joni M.

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is an abundant serine/threonine phosphatase that functions as a tumor suppressor in numerous cell-cell signaling pathways, including Wnt, myc, and ras. The B56 subunit of PP2A regulates its activity, and is encoded by five genes in humans. B56 proteins share a central core domain, but have divergent amino- and carboxy-termini, which are thought to provide isoform specificity. We performed phylogenetic analyses to better understand the evolution of the B56 gene family. We found that B56 was present as a single gene in eukaryotes prior to the divergence of animals, fungi, protists, and plants, and that B56 gene duplication prior to the divergence of protostomes and deuterostomes led to the origin of two B56 subfamilies, B56αβε and B56γδ. Further duplications led to three B56αβε genes and two B56γδ in vertebrates. Several nonvertebrate B56 gene names are based on distinct vertebrate isoform names, and would best be renamed. B56 subfamily genes lack significant divergence within primitive chordates, but each became distinct in complex vertebrates. Two vertebrate lineages have undergone B56 gene loss, Xenopus and Aves. In Xenopus, B56δ function may be compensated for by an alternatively spliced transcript, B56δ/γ, encoding a B56δ-like amino-terminal region and a B56γ core. PMID:25950761

  2. Structure, function, and post-translational regulation of the catalytic and modifier subunits of glutamate cysteine ligase

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Christopher C.; Backos, Donald S.; Mohar, Isaac; White, Collin C.; Forman, Henry J.; Kavanagh, Terrance J.

    2009-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is a tripeptide composed of glutamate, cysteine, and glycine. The first and rate-limiting step in GSH synthesis is catalyzed by glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL, previously known as γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase). GCL is a heterodimeric protein composed of catalytic (GCLC) and modifier (GCLM) subunits that are expressed from different genes. GCLC catalyzes a unique γ-carboxyl linkage from glutamate to cysteine and requires ATP and Mg++ as cofactors in this reaction. GCLM increases the Vmax and Kcat of GCLC, decreases the Km for glutamate and ATP, and increases the Ki for GSH-mediated feedback inhibition of GCL. While post-translational modifications of GCLC (e.g. phosphorylation, myristoylation, caspase-mediated cleavage) have modest effects on GCL activity, oxidative stress dramatically affects GCL holoenzyme formation and activity. Pyridine nucleotides can also modulate GCL activity in some species. Variability in GCL expression is associated with several disease phenotypes and transgenic mouse and rat models promise to be highly useful for investigating the relationships between GCL activity, GSH synthesis, and disease in humans. PMID:18812186

  3. The Catalytic Subunit of DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Coordinates with Polo-Like Kinase 1 to Facilitate Mitotic Entry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Jong; Shang, Zeng-Fu; Lin, Yu-Fen; Sun, Jingxin; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Saha, Debabrata; Chen, Benjamin P C

    2015-04-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is the key regulator of the non-homologous end joining pathway of DNA double-strand break repair. We have previously reported that DNA-PKcs is required for maintaining chromosomal stability and mitosis progression. Our further investigations reveal that deficiency in DNA-PKcs activity caused a delay in mitotic entry due to dysregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1), the key driving force for cell cycle progression through G2/M transition. Timely activation of Cdk1 requires polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1), which affects modulators of Cdk1. We found that DNA-PKcs physically interacts with Plk1 and could facilitate Plk1 activation both in vitro and in vivo. Further, DNA-PKcs-deficient cells are highly sensitive to Plk1 inhibitor BI2536, suggesting that the coordination between DNA-PKcs and Plk1 is not only crucial to ensure normal cell cycle progression through G2/M phases but also required for cellular resistance to mitotic stress. On the basis of the current study, it is predictable that combined inhibition of DNA-PKcs and Plk1 can be employed in cancer therapy strategy for synthetic lethality. PMID:25925375

  4. A role for protein kinase CK2 in cell proliferation: evidence using a kinase-inactive mutant of CK2 catalytic subunit alpha.

    PubMed

    Lebrin, F; Chambaz, E M; Bianchini, L

    2001-04-12

    Protein kinase CK2 is an ubiquitous and pleiotropic Ser/Thr protein kinase composed of two catalytic (alpha and/or alpha') and two regulatory (beta) subunits generally combined to form alpha(2)beta(2), alphaalpha'beta(2), or alpha'(2)beta(2) heterotetramers. To gain more insight into the role of CK2 in the control of proliferation in mammalian cells, overexpression of isolated CK2 subunits alpha, alpha', or beta was carried out in two fibroblast cell lines: NIH3T3 and CCL39. To interfere with CK2 cellular functions, cells were also transfected with a kinase-inactive mutant of CK2alpha catalytic subunit: CK2alpha-K68A. In NIH3T3 cells, overexpression of either wild-type subunit (alpha, alpha' or beta) had no effect on cell proliferation. In contrast, overexpression of the CK2alpha kinase-deficient mutant induced a marked inhibition of cell proliferation. This resulted from a defect in G1/S progression as demonstrated in transient transfection experiments in both NIH3T3 and CCL39 cells using BrdU incorporation measurements and in CCL39 clones stably overexpressing the CK2alpha-K68A mutant by growth curve analysis. We demonstrated that the kinase-negative mutant has the capacity to integrate the endogenous CK2 subunit pool both as an isolated kinase-inactive alpha subunit and as associated to the beta subunit in a kinase-inactive tetramer. Finally we showed that expression of the kinase-inactive mutant interferes with phosphorylation of an endogenous CK2 substrate; we speculate that optimal phosphorylation of target proteins by CK2 is required to achieve optimal cell cycle progression. PMID:11360185

  5. The Protein Phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit Twins stabilizes Plk4 to induce centriole amplification

    PubMed Central

    Brownlee, Christopher W.; Klebba, Joey E.; Buster, Daniel W.

    2011-01-01

    Centriole duplication is a tightly regulated process that must occur only once per cell cycle; otherwise, supernumerary centrioles can induce aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. Plk4 (Polo-like kinase 4) activity initiates centriole duplication and is regulated by ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. Throughout interphase, Plk4 autophosphorylation triggers its degradation, thus preventing centriole amplification. However, Plk4 activity is required during mitosis for proper centriole duplication, but the mechanism stabilizing mitotic Plk4 is unknown. In this paper, we show that PP2A (Protein Phosphatase 2ATwins) counteracts Plk4 autophosphorylation, thus stabilizing Plk4 and promoting centriole duplication. Like Plk4, the protein level of PP2A’s regulatory subunit, Twins (Tws), peaks during mitosis and is required for centriole duplication. However, untimely Tws expression stabilizes Plk4 inappropriately, inducing centriole amplification. Paradoxically, expression of tumor-promoting simian virus 40 small tumor antigen (ST), a reported PP2A inhibitor, promotes centrosome amplification by an unknown mechanism. We demonstrate that ST actually mimics Tws function in stabilizing Plk4 and inducing centriole amplification. PMID:21987638

  6. Phosphorylation of the protein kinase A catalytic subunit is induced by cyclic AMP deficiency and physiological stresses in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    McInnis, Brittney; Mitchell, Jessica; Marcus, Stevan

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} cAMP deficiency induces phosphorylation of PKA catalytic subunit (Pka1) in S. pombe. {yields} Pka1 phosphorylation is further induced by physiological stresses. {yields} Pka1 phosphorylation is not induced in cells lacking the PKA regulatory subunit. {yields} Results suggest that cAMP-independent Pka1 phosphorylation is stimulatory in nature. -- Abstract: In the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is not essential for viability under normal culturing conditions, making this organism attractive for investigating mechanisms of PKA regulation. Here we show that S. pombe cells carrying a deletion in the adenylate cyclase gene, cyr1, express markedly higher levels of the PKA catalytic subunit, Pka1, than wild type cells. Significantly, in cyr1{Delta} cells, but not wild type cells, a substantial proportion of Pka1 protein is hyperphosphorylated. Pka1 hyperphosphorylation is strongly induced in cyr1{Delta} cells, and to varying degrees in wild type cells, by both glucose starvation and stationary phase stresses, which are associated with reduced cAMP-dependent PKA activity, and by KCl stress, the cellular adaptation to which is dependent on PKA activity. Interestingly, hyperphosphorylation of Pka1 was not detected in either cyr1{sup +} or cyr1{Delta} S. pombe strains carrying a deletion in the PKA regulatory subunit gene, cgs1, under any of the tested conditions. Our results demonstrate the existence of a cAMP-independent mechanism of PKA catalytic subunit phosphorylation, which we propose could serve as a mechanism for inducing or maintaining specific PKA functions under conditions in which its cAMP-dependent activity is downregulated.

  7. Studies of mice with cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) defects reveal the critical role of PKA's catalytic subunits in anxiety.

    PubMed

    Briassoulis, George; Keil, Margaret F; Naved, Bilal; Liu, Sophie; Starost, Matthew F; Nesterova, Maria; Gokarn, Nirmal; Batistatos, Anna; Wu, T John; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-07-01

    Cyclic adenosine mono-phosphate-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is critically involved in the regulation of behavioral responses. Previous studies showed that PKA's main regulatory subunit, R1α, is involved in anxiety-like behaviors. The purpose of this study was to determine how the catalytic subunit, Cα, might affect R1α's function and determine its effects on anxiety-related behaviors. The marble bury (MB) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests were used to assess anxiety-like behavior and the hotplate test to assess nociception in wild type (WT) mouse, a Prkar1a heterozygote (Prkar1a(+/-)) mouse with haploinsufficiency for the regulatory subunit (R1α), a Prkaca heterozygote (Prkaca(+/-)) mouse with haploinsufficiency for the catalytic subunit (Cα), and a double heterozygote mouse (Prkar1a(+/-)/Prkaca(+/-)) with haploinsufficiency for both R1α and Cα. We then examined specific brain nuclei involved in anxiety. Results of MB test showed a genotype effect, with increased anxiety-like behavior in Prkar1a(+/-) and Prkar1a(+/-)/Prkaca(+/-) compared to WT mice. In the EPM, Prkar1a(+/-) spent significantly less time in the open arms, while Prkaca(+/-) and Prkar1a(+/-)/Prkaca(+/-) mice displayed less exploratory behavior compared to WT mice. The loss of one Prkar1a allele was associated with a significant increase in PKA activity in the basolateral (BLA) and central (CeA) amygdala and ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) in both Prkar1a(+/-) and Prkar1a(+/-)/Prkaca(+/-) mice. Alterations of PKA activity induced by haploinsufficiency of its main regulatory or most important catalytic subunits result in anxiety-like behaviors. The BLA, CeA, and VMH are implicated in mediating these PKA effects in brain. PMID:26992826

  8. Co-activation of NR2A and NR2B subunits induces resistance to fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Leaderbrand, Katherine; Corcoran, Kevin A; Radulovic, Jelena

    2014-09-01

    Unpredictable stress is known to profoundly enhance susceptibility to fear and anxiety while reducing the ability to extinguish fear when threat is no longer present. Accordingly, partial aversive reinforcement, via random exposure to footshocks, induces fear that is resistant to extinction. Here we sought to determine the hippocampal mechanisms underlying susceptibility versus resistance to context fear extinction as a result of continuous (CR) and partial (PR) reinforcement, respectively. We focused on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunits 2A and B (NR2A and NR2B) as well as their downstream signaling effector, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), based on their critical role in the acquisition and extinction of fear. Pharmacological inactivation of NR2A, but not NR2B, blocked extinction after CR, whereas inactivation of NR2A, NR2B, or both subunits facilitated extinction after PR. The latter finding suggests that co-activation of NR2A and NR2B contributes to persistent fear following PR. In contrast to CR, PR increased membrane levels of ERK and NR2 subunits after the conditioning and extinction sessions, respectively. In parallel, nuclear activation of ERK was significantly reduced after the extinction session. Thus, co-activation and increased surface expression of NR2A and NR2B, possibly mediated by ERK, may cause persistent fear. These findings suggest that patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may benefit from antagonism of specific NR2 subunits. PMID:24055686

  9. Protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunits affecting plant innate immunity, energy metabolism, and flowering time – joint functions among B'η subfamily members

    PubMed Central

    Kataya, Amr RA; Heidari, Behzad; Lillo, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a heterotrimeric complex comprising a catalytic, scaffolding, and regulatory subunit. The regulatory subunits are essential for substrate specificity and localization of the complex and are classified into B/B55, B', and B” non-related families in higher plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the close paralogs B'η, B'θ, B'γ, and B'ζ were further classified into a subfamily of B' called B'η. Here we present results that consolidate the evidence for a role of the B'η subfamily in regulation of innate immunity, energy metabolism and flowering time. Proliferation of the virulent Pseudomonas syringae in B'θ knockout mutant decreased in comparison with wild type plants. Additionally, B'θ knockout plants were delayed in flowering, and this phenotype was supported by high expression of FLC (FLOWERING LOCUS C). B'ζ knockout seedlings showed growth retardation on sucrose-free medium, indicating a role for B'ζ in energy metabolism. This work provides insight into functions of the B'η subfamily members, highlighting their regulation of shared physiological traits while localizing to distinct cellular compartments. PMID:26039486

  10. Requirement for the Kinase Activity of Human DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Catalytic Subunit in DNA Strand Break Rejoining

    PubMed Central

    Kurimasa, Akihiro; Kumano, Satoshi; Boubnov, Nikolai V.; Story, Michael D.; Tung, Chang-Shung; Peterson, Scott R.; Chen, David J.

    1999-01-01

    The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is an enormous, 470-kDa protein serine/threonine kinase that has homology with members of the phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase superfamily. This protein contributes to the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by assembling broken ends of DNA molecules in combination with the DNA-binding factors Ku70 and Ku80. It may also serve as a molecular scaffold for recruiting DNA repair factors to DNA strand breaks. This study attempts to better define the role of protein kinase activity in the repair of DNA DSBs. We constructed a contiguous 14-kb human DNA-PKcs cDNA and demonstrated that it can complement the DNA DSB repair defects of two mutant cell lines known to be deficient in DNA-PKcs (M059J and V3). We then created deletion and site-directed mutations within the conserved PI 3-kinase domain of the DNA-PKcs gene to test the importance of protein kinase activity for DSB rejoining. These DNA-PKcs mutant constructs are able to express the protein but fail to complement the DNA DSB or V(D)J recombination defects of DNA-PKcs mutant cells. These results indicate that the protein kinase activity of DNA-PKcs is essential for the rejoining of DNA DSBs in mammalian cells. We have also determined a model structure for the DNA-PKcs kinase domain based on comparisons to the crystallographic structure of a cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. This structure gives some insight into which amino acid residues are crucial for the kinase activity in DNA-PKcs. PMID:10207111

  11. Identification of DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Catalytic Subunit (DNA-PKcs) as a Novel Target of Bisphenol A

    PubMed Central

    Nashimoto, Akihiro; Hase, Yasuyoshi; Sakamoto, Satoshi; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Handa, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) forms the backbone of plastics and epoxy resins used to produce packaging for various foods and beverages. BPA is also an estrogenic disruptor, interacting with human estrogen receptors (ER) and other related nuclear receptors. Nevertheless, the effects of BPA on human health remain unclear. The present study identified DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) as a novel BPA-binding protein. DNA-PKcs, in association with the Ku heterodimer (Ku70/80), is a critical enzyme involved in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Low levels of DNA-PK activity are previously reported to be associated with an increased risk of certain types of cancer. Although the Kd for the interaction between BPA and a drug-binding mutant of DNA-PKcs was comparatively low (137 nM), high doses of BPA were required before cellular effects were observed (100–300 μM). The results of an in vitro kinase assay showed that BPA inhibited DNA-PK kinase activity in a concentration-dependent manner. In M059K cells, BPA inhibited the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs at Ser2056 and H2AX at Ser139 in response to ionizing radiation (IR)-irradiation. BPA also disrupted DNA-PKcs binding to Ku70/80 and increased the radiosensitivity of M059K cells, but not M059J cells (which are DNA-PKcs-deficient). Taken together, these results provide new evidence of the effects of BPA on DNA repair in mammalian cells, which are mediated via inhibition of DNA-PK activity. This study may warrant the consideration of the possible carcinogenic effects of high doses of BPA, which are mediated through its action on DNA-PK. PMID:23227178

  12. The Catalytic Subunit of Protein Phosphatase 1 Gamma Regulates Thrombin-Induced Murine Platelet αIIbβ3 Function

    PubMed Central

    Gushiken, Francisca C.; Hyojeong, Han; Pradhan, Subhashree; Langlois, Kimberly W.; Alrehani, Nawaf; Cruz, Miguel A.; Rumbaut, Rolando E.; Vijayan, K. Vinod

    2009-01-01

    Background Hemostasis and thrombosis are regulated by agonist-induced activation of platelet integrin αIIbβ3. Integrin activation, in turn is mediated by cellular signaling via protein kinases and protein phosphatases. Although the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c) interacts with αIIbβ3, the role of PP1c in platelet reactivity is unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings Using γ isoform of PP1c deficient mice (PP1cγ−/−), we show that the platelets have moderately decreased soluble fibrinogen binding and aggregation to low concentrations of thrombin or protease-activated receptor 4 (PAR4)-activating peptide but not to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen or collagen-related peptide (CRP). Thrombin-stimulated PP1cγ−/− platelets showed decreased αIIbβ3 activation despite comparable levels of αIIbβ3, PAR3, PAR4 expression and normal granule secretion. Functions regulated by outside-in integrin αIIbβ3 signaling like adhesion to immobilized fibrinogen and clot retraction were not altered in PP1cγ−/− platelets. Thrombus formation induced by a light/dye injury in the cremaster muscle venules was significantly delayed in PP1cγ−/− mice. Phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3)β-serine 9 that promotes platelet function, was reduced in thrombin-stimulated PP1cγ−/− platelets by an AKT independent mechanism. Inhibition of GSK3β partially abolished the difference in fibrinogen binding between thrombin-stimulated wild type and PP1cγ−/− platelets. Conclusions/Significance These studies illustrate a role for PP1cγ in maintaining GSK3β-serine9 phosphorylation downstream of thrombin signaling and promoting thrombus formation via fibrinogen binding and platelet aggregation. PMID:20016849

  13. The over-expression of the β2 catalytic subunit of the proteasome decreases homologous recombination and impairs DNA double-strand break repair in human cells.

    PubMed

    Collavoli, Anita; Comelli, Laura; Cervelli, Tiziana; Galli, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    By a human cDNA library screening, we have previously identified two sequences coding two different catalytic subunits of the proteasome which increase homologous recombination (HR) when overexpressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we investigated the effect of proteasome on spontaneous HR and DNA repair in human cells. To determine if the proteasome has a role in the occurrence of spontaneous HR in human cells, we overexpressed the β2 subunit of the proteasome in HeLa cells and determined the effect on intrachromosomal HR. Results showed that the overexpression of β2 subunit decreased HR in human cells without altering the cell proteasome activity and the Rad51p level. Moreover, exposure to MG132 that inhibits the proteasome activity reduced HR in human cells. We also found that the expression of the β2 subunit increases the sensitivity to the camptothecin that induces DNA double-strand break (DSB). This suggests that the β2 subunit has an active role in HR and DSB repair but does not alter the intracellular level of the Rad51p. PMID:21660142

  14. The Over-expression of the β2 Catalytic Subunit of the Proteasome Decreases Homologous Recombination and Impairs DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Collavoli, Anita; Comelli, Laura; Cervelli, Tiziana; Galli, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    By a human cDNA library screening, we have previously identified two sequences coding two different catalytic subunits of the proteasome which increase homologous recombination (HR) when overexpressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we investigated the effect of proteasome on spontaneous HR and DNA repair in human cells. To determine if the proteasome has a role in the occurrence of spontaneous HR in human cells, we overexpressed the β2 subunit of the proteasome in HeLa cells and determined the effect on intrachromosomal HR. Results showed that the overexpression of β2 subunit decreased HR in human cells without altering the cell proteasome activity and the Rad51p level. Moreover, exposure to MG132 that inhibits the proteasome activity reduced HR in human cells. We also found that the expression of the β2 subunit increases the sensitivity to the camptothecin that induces DNA double-strand break (DSB). This suggests that the β2 subunit has an active role in HR and DSB repair but does not alter the intracellular level of the Rad51p. PMID:21660142

  15. Evolutionary connection between the catalytic subunits of DNA-dependent RNA polymerases and eukaryotic RNA-dependent RNA polymerases and the origin of RNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Koonin, Eugene V; Aravind, L

    2003-01-01

    Background The eukaryotic RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDRP) is involved in the amplification of regulatory microRNAs during post-transcriptional gene silencing. This enzyme is highly conserved in most eukaryotes but is missing in archaea and bacteria. No evolutionary relationship between RDRP and other polymerases has been reported so far, hence the origin of this eukaryote-specific polymerase remains a mystery. Results Using extensive sequence profile searches, we identified bacteriophage homologs of the eukaryotic RDRP. The comparison of the eukaryotic RDRP and their homologs from bacteriophages led to the delineation of the conserved portion of these enzymes, which is predicted to harbor the catalytic site. Further, detailed sequence comparison, aided by examination of the crystal structure of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (DDRP), showed that the RDRP and the β' subunit of DDRP (and its orthologs in archaea and eukaryotes) contain a conserved double-psi β-barrel (DPBB) domain. This DPBB domain contains the signature motif DbDGD (b is a bulky residue), which is conserved in all RDRPs and DDRPs and contributes to catalysis via a coordinated divalent cation. Apart from the DPBB domain, no similarity was detected between RDRP and DDRP, which leaves open two scenarios for the origin of RDRP: i) RDRP evolved at the onset of the evolution of eukaryotes via a duplication of the DDRP β' subunit followed by dramatic divergence that obliterated the sequence similarity outside the core catalytic domain and ii) the primordial RDRP, which consisted primarily of the DPBB domain, evolved from a common ancestor with the DDRP at a very early stage of evolution, during the RNA world era. The latter hypothesis implies that RDRP had been subsequently eliminated from cellular life forms and might have been reintroduced into the eukaryotic genomes through a bacteriophage. Sequence and structure analysis of the DDRP led to further insights into the evolution of RNA polymerases

  16. Site-specific cleavage by metal ion cofactors and inhibitors of M1 RNA, the catalytic subunit of RNase P from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kazakov, S; Altman, S

    1991-01-01

    The location of phosphate residues involved in specific centers for binding of metal ions in M1 RNA, the catalytic RNA subunit of RNase P from Escherichia coli, was determined by analysis of induction of cleavage of RNA by metal ions. At pH 9.5, Mg2+ catalyzes cleavage of M1 RNA at five principal sites. Under certain conditions, Mn2+ and Ca2+ can each replace Mg2+ as the cofactor in the processing of precursor tRNAs by M1 RNA and P RNA, the RNA subunit of RNase P from Bacillus subtilis. These cations, as well as various metal ion inhibitors of the catalytic activity of M1 RNA, also promote cleavage of M1 RNA in a specific manner. Certain conditions that affect the catalytic activity of M1 RNA also alter the rate of metal ion-induced cleavage at the various sites. From these results and a comparison of cleavage of M1 RNA with that of a deletion mutant of M1 RNA and of P RNA, we have identified two different centers for binding of metal ions in M1 RNA that are important for the processing of the precursor to tRNA(Tyr) from E. coli. There is also a center for the binding of metal ions in the substrate, close to the site of cleavage by M1 RNA. Images PMID:1718000

  17. Two highly-related regulatory subunits of PP2A exert opposite effects on TGF-β/Activin/Nodal signalling

    PubMed Central

    Batut, Julie; Schmierer, Bernhard; Cao, Jing; Raftery, Laurel A.; Hill, Caroline S.; Howell, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Summary We identify Bα (PPP2R2A) and Bδ (PPP2R2D), two highly-related members of the B family of regulatory subunits of the protein phosphatase PP2A, as important modulators of TGF-β/Activin/Nodal signalling, which affect the pathway in opposite ways. Knockdown of Bα in Xenopus embryos or mammalian tissue culture cells suppresses TGF-β/Activin/Nodal-dependent responses, whereas knockdown of Bδ enhances these responses. Moreover, in Drosophila, overexpression of Smad2 rescues a severe wing phenotype caused by overexpression of the single Drosophila PP2A B subunit, Twins. We show that in vertebrates Bα enhances TGF-β/Activin/Nodal signalling by stabilising the basal levels of type I receptor, whereas Bδ negatively modulates these pathways by restricting receptor activity. Thus, these highly-related members of the same subfamily of PP2A regulatory subunits differentially regulate TGF-β/Activin/Nodal signalling to elicit opposing biological outcomes. PMID:18697906

  18. The prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition reflected in the evolution of the V/F/A-ATPase catalytic and proteolipid subunits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilario, E.; Gogarten, J. P.

    1998-01-01

    Changes in the primary and quarternary structure of vacuolar and archaeal type ATPases that accompany the prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition are analyzed. The gene encoding the vacuolar-type proteolipid of the V-ATPase from Giardia lamblia is reported. Giardia has a typical vacuolar ATPase as observed from the common motifs shared between its proteolipid subunit and other eukaryotic vacuolar ATPases, suggesting that the former enzyme works as a hydrolase in this primitive eukaryote. The phylogenetic analyses of the V-ATPase catalytic subunit and the front and back halves of the proteolipid subunit placed Giardia as the deepest branch within the eukaryotes. Our phylogenetic analysis indicated that at least two independent duplication and fusion events gave rise to the larger proteolipid type found in eukaryotes and in Methanococcus. The spatial distribution of the conserved residues among the vacuolar-type proteolipids suggest a zipper-type interaction among the transmembrane helices and surrounding subunits of the V-ATPase complex. Important residues involved in the function of the F-ATP synthase proteolipid have been replaced during evolution in the V-proteolipid, but in some cases retained in the archaeal A-ATPase. Their possible implication in the evolution of V/F/A-ATPases is discussed.

  19. Cloning and characterization of the gene for the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase in the aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, J C; Borges, A C; Marques, M do V; Gomes, S L

    1994-01-15

    We have isolated and characterized cDNA and genomic DNA clones encoding the catalytic subunit (C) of cAMP-dependent protein kinase in the aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii. The C-subunit amino acid sequence derived from the nucleotide sequence predicts a basic polypeptide of 424 residues, excluding the initiator methionine, which by amino-terminal sequence analysis has been shown to be absent from the mature protein. The Blastocladiella C presents a 70-amino-acid extension at the amino terminus, when aligned to the mouse C alpha subunit, being one of the largest C subunits already characterized. The B. emersonii C-gene-coding region is interrupted by three introns, ranging in size over 57-69 bp. The positions of the introns are quite different from those found in other species, suggesting a considerable amount of evolutionary drift in the gene structure. The 5'-flanking region lacks recognizable TATA or CCAAT sequences, is remarkably high in GC content (70%), and primer extension experiments indicate that transcription initiates from multiple sites. Several sequence motifs were identified in the promoter region which could be involved in the developmental control of this gene. PMID:8307021

  20. Structure of the Protein Phosphatase 2A Holoenzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,Y.; Xing, Y.; Chen, Y.; Chao, Y.; Lin, Z.; Fan, E.; Yu, J.; Strack, S.; Jeffrey, P.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays an essential role in many aspects of cellular physiology. The PP2A holoenzyme consists of a heterodimeric core enzyme, which comprises a scaffolding subunit and a catalytic subunit, and a variable regulatory subunit. Here we report the crystal structure of the heterotrimeric PP2A holoenzyme involving the regulatory subunit B'/B56/PR61. Surprisingly, the B'/PR61 subunit has a HEAT-like (huntingtin-elongation-A subunit-TOR-like) repeat structure, similar to that of the scaffolding subunit. The regulatory B'/B56/PR61 subunit simultaneously interacts with the catalytic subunit as well as the conserved ridge of the scaffolding subunit. The carboxyterminus of the catalytic subunit recognizes a surface groove at the interface between the B'/B56/PR61 subunit and the scaffolding subunit. Compared to the scaffolding subunit in the PP2A core enzyme, formation of the holoenzyme forces the scaffolding subunit to undergo pronounced conformational rearrangements. This structure reveals significant ramifications for understanding the function and regulation of PP2A.

  1. PSMB9 Codon 60 Polymorphisms Have No Impact on the Activity of the Immunoproteasome Catalytic Subunit B1i Expressed in Multiple Types of Solid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Eun; Ao, Lin; Miller, Zachary; Kim, Kyungbo; Wu, Ying; Jang, Eun Ryoung; Lee, Eun Young; Kim, Kyung Bo; Lee, Wooin

    2013-01-01

    The proteasome is a key regulator of cellular protein homeostasis and is a clinically validated anticancer target. The immunoproteasome, a subtype of proteasome expressed mainly in hematopoietic cells, was initially recognized for its role in antigen presentation during the immune response. Recently, the immunoproteasome has been implicated in several disease conditions including cancer and autoimmune disorders, but many of the factors contributing to these pathological processes remain unknown. In particular, the codon 60 polymorphism of the PSMB9 gene encoding the β1i immunoproteasome catalytic subunit has been investigated in the context of a variety of diseases. Despite this, previous studies have so far reported inconsistent findings regarding the impact of this polymorphism on proteasome activity. Thus, we set out to investigate the impact of the PSMB9 codon 60 polymorphism on the expression and activity of the β1i immunoproteasome subunit in a panel of human cancer cell lines. The β1i-selective fluorogenic substrate Acetyl-Pro-Ala-Leu-7-amino-4-methylcoumarin was used to specifically measure β1i catalytic activity. Our results indicate that the codon 60 Arg/His polymorphism does not significantly alter the expression and activity of β1i among the cell lines tested. Additionally, we also examined the expression of β1i in clinical samples from colon and pancreatic cancer patients. Our immunohistochemical analyses showed that ∼70% of clinical colon cancer samples and ∼53% of pancreatic cancer samples have detectable β1i expression. Taken together, our results indicate that the β1i subunit of the immunoproteasome is frequently expressed in colon and pancreatic cancers but that the codon 60 genetic variants of β1i display similar catalytic activities and are unlikely to contribute to the significant inter-cell-line and inter-individual variabilities in the immunoproteasome activity. PMID:24040045

  2. Direct interaction between the catalytic subunit of the calmodulin-sensitive adenylate cyclase from bovine brain with /sup 125/I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin and /sup 125/I-labeled calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Minocherhomjee, A.M.; Selfe, S.; Flowers, N.J.; Storm, D.R.

    1987-07-14

    A calmodulin-sensitive adenylate cyclase has been purified to apparent homogeneity from bovine cerebral cortex using calmodulin-Sepharose followed by forskolin-Sepharose and wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose. The final product appeared as one major polypeptide of approximately 135,000 daltons on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. This polypeptide was a major component of the protein purified through calmodulin-Sepharose. The catalytic subunit was stimulated 3-4-fold by calmodulin (CaM) with a turnover number greater than 1000 min/sup -1/ and was directly inhibited by adenosine. The catalytic subunit of the enzyme interacted directly with /sup 125/I-CaM on a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel overlay system, and this interaction was Ca/sup 2 +/ concentration dependent. In addition, the catalytic subunit was shown to directly bind /sup 125/I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin using a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel overlay technique, and N-acetylglucosamine inhibited binding of the lectin to the catalytic subunit. Calmodulin did not inhibit binding of wheat germ agglutinin to the catalytic subunit, and the binding of calmodulin was unaffected by wheat germ agglutinin. These data illustrate that the catalytic subunit of the calmodulin-sensitive adenylate cyclase is a glycoprotein which interacts directly with calmodulin and that adenosine can inhibit the enzyme without intervening receptors or G coupling proteins. It is concluded that the catalytic subunit of adenylate cyclase is a transmembrane protein with a domain accessible from the outer surface of the cell.

  3. Curcumin treatment recovery the decrease of protein phosphatase 2A subunit B induced by focal cerebral ischemia in Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Fawad-Ali; Park, Dong-Ju; Gim, Sang-Ah

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin provides various biological effects through its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Moreover, curcumin exerts a neuroprotective effect against ischemic condition-induced brain damage. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a ubiquitous serine and threonine phosphatase with various cell functions and broad substrate specificity. Especially PP2A subunit B plays an important role in nervous system. This study investigated whether curcumin regulates PP2A subunit B expression in focal cerebral ischemia. Cerebral ischemia was induced surgically by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Adult male rats were injected with either vehicle or curcumin (50 mg/kg) 1 h after MCAO and cerebral cortex tissues were isolated 24 h after MCAO. A proteomics study, reverse transverse-PCR and Western blot analyses were performed to examine PP2A subunit B expression levels. We identified a reduction in PP2A subunit B expression in MCAO-operated animals using a proteomic approach. However, curcumin treatment prevented injury-induced reductions in PP2A subunit B levels. Reverse transverse-PCR and Western blot analyses confirmed that curcumin treatment attenuated the injury-induced reduction in PP2A subunit B levels. These findings can suggest that the possibility that curcumin maintains levels of PP2A subunit B in response to cerebral ischemia, which likely contributes to the neuroprotective function of curcumin in cerebral ischemic injury. PMID:26472966

  4. Elevated breast cancer risk in irradiated BALB/c mice associates with unique functional polymorphism of the Prkdc (DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit) gene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Y.; Okayasu, R.; Weil, M. M.; Silver, A.; McCarthy, M.; Zabriskie, R.; Long, S.; Cox, R.; Ullrich, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    Female BALB/c mice are unusually radiosensitive and more susceptible than C57BL/6 and other tested inbred mice to ionizing radiation (IR)-induced mammary tumors. This breast cancer susceptibility is correlated with elevated susceptibility for mammary cell transformation and genomic instability following irradiation. In this study, we report the identification of two BALB/c strain-specific polymorphisms in the coding region of Prkdc, the gene encoding the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit, which is known to be involved in DNA double-stranded break repair and post-IR signal transduction. First, we identified an A --> G transition at base 11530 resulting in a Met --> Val conversion at codon 3844 (M3844V) in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase domain upstream of the scid mutation (Y4046X). Second, we identified a C --> T transition at base 6418 resulting in an Arg --> Cys conversion at codon 2140 (R2140C) downstream of the putative leucine zipper domain. This unique PrkdcBALB variant gene is shown to be associated with decreased DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit activity and with increased susceptibility to IR-induced genomic instability in primary mammary epithelial cells. The data provide the first evidence that naturally arising allelic variation in a mouse DNA damage response gene may associate with IR response and breast cancer risk.

  5. Heterologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase from pigeon erythrocytes under the action of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, K.M.; Bulargina, T.V.; Severin, E.S.

    1985-09-20

    Preincubation of the plasma membranes from pigeon erythrocytes with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase leads to desensitization of adenylate cyclase of the erythrocytes. The adenylate cyclase activity, measured in the presence of 10 ..mu..M isoproterenol and 50 ..mu..M GTP-..gamma..-S, is decreased by 40% in 10 min of incubation, while the activity in the presence of 50 ..mu..M GTP-..gamma..-S is decreased by 35% in 20 min. The decrease in the adenylate cyclase activity is due to an increase in the lag phase of activation of the enzyme in the presence of a GTP analog stable to hydrolysis and a decrease in the activity in the steady-state phase of activation. Heterologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase under the action of cAMP-dependent protein kinase is coupled with a decrease in the number of ..beta..-adrenoreceptors capable of passing into a state of high affinity for antagonists in the absence of guanylic nucleotides. The influence of the catalytic subunit on adenylate cyclase entirely models the process of desensitization of the enzyme absorbed in the influence of isoproterenol or cAMP on erythrocytes.

  6. Selective role of the catalytic PI3K subunit p110β in impaired higher-order cognition in Fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Christina; Raj, Nisha; Molinaro, Gemma; Allen, Amanda G.; Whyte, Alonzo J.; Gibson, Jay R.; Huber, Kimberly M.; Gourley, Shannon L.; Bassell, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Distinct isoforms of the PI3K catalytic subunit have specialized functions in the brain, but their role in cognition is unknown. Here, we show that the catalytic subunit p110β plays an important role in prefrontal cortex (PFC)-dependent cognitive defects in mouse models of Fragile X syndrome (FXS), an inherited intellectual disability. FXS is caused by loss of function of the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP), which binds and translationally represses mRNAs. PFC-selective knockdown of p110β, an FMRP target that is translationally upregulated in FXS, reverses deficits in higher cognition in Fmr1 knockout mice. Genetic full-body reduction of p110β in Fmr1 knockout mice normalizes excessive PI3K activity, restores stimulus-induced protein synthesis, and corrects increased dendritic spine density and behavior. Notably, adult-onset PFC-selective Fmr1 knockdown mice show impaired cognition, which is rescued by simultaneous p110β knockdown. Our results suggest that FMRP-mediated control of p110β is crucial for neuronal protein synthesis and cognition. PMID:25921527

  7. PB2 subunit of avian influenza virus subtype H9N2: a pandemic risk factor.

    PubMed

    Sediri, Hanna; Thiele, Swantje; Schwalm, Folker; Gabriel, Gülsah; Klenk, Hans-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses of subtype H9N2 that are found worldwide are occasionally transmitted to humans and pigs. Furthermore, by co-circulating with other influenza subtypes, they can generate new viruses with the potential to also cause zoonotic infections, as observed in 1997 with H5N1 or more recently with H7N9 and H10N8 viruses. Comparative analysis of the adaptive mutations in polymerases of different viruses indicates that their impact on the phylogenetically related H9N2 and H7N9 polymerases is higher than on the non-related H7N7 and H1N1pdm09 polymerases. Analysis of polymerase reassortants composed of subunits of different viruses demonstrated that the efficient enhancement of polymerase activity by H9N2-PB2 does not depend on PA and PB1. These observations suggest that the PB2 subunit of the H9N2 polymerase has a high adaptive potential and may therefore be an important pandemic risk factor. PMID:26560088

  8. Modification of the catalytic subunit of bovine heart cAMP-dependent protein kinase with affinity labels related to peptide substrates.

    PubMed

    Bramson, H N; Thomas, N; Matsueda, R; Nelson, N C; Taylor, S S; Kaiser, E T

    1982-09-25

    The modification and concomitant inactivation of the catalytic subunit of bovine heart cAMP-dependent protein kinase with affinity analogs of peptide substrates potentially capable of undergoing disulfide interchange with enzyme-bound sulfhydryl groups have been used to probe the active site associated with peptide binding. The regeneration of catalytic activity on treatment of the modified enzymes with dithiothreitol and the observation that prior reaction with 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) blocks the modification of the kinase by these reagents are consistent with the proposal that only thiol residues are reacting. The affinity analog Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Cys(3-nitro-2-pyridinesulfenyl)-Leu-Gly, 1, and the closely related peptide AcLeu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Cys(3-nitro-2-pyridinesulfenyl)-Leu-Gly-OEt, 3, react with a single sulfhydryl as shown by the stoichiometry of the release of the 3-nitro-2-pyridinesulfenyl group and the amount of label incorporated in the enzyme when the radioactively labeled peptide analog of 3 (peptide 4) is employed as the modifying agent. The kinetics of the reaction of 1 with 4.3 microM catalytic subunit was monophasic (employing substrate in excess conditions), yielding an apparent value of KI of approximately 40 microM and a k2 value of approximately 0.25 s-1. The low value of the observed KI, together with the observation that protein kinase substrates inhibit the modification reactions, suggest strongly that the cysteine residue undergoing reaction is in the vicinity of the active site. By trypsin-catalyzed degradation and identification of the peptide segment modified by covalent attachment of the peptide portion of the radioactive analog 4, the single cysteine modified was identified as cysteine-198. PMID:6286662

  9. Structural basis of H2A.Z recognition by SRCAP chromatin-remodeling subunit YL1.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoping; Shan, Shan; Pan, Lu; Zhao, Jicheng; Ranjan, Anand; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Zhuqiang; Huang, Yingzi; Feng, Hanqiao; Wei, Debbie; Huang, Li; Liu, Xuehui; Zhong, Qiang; Lou, Jizhong; Li, Guohong; Wu, Carl; Zhou, Zheng

    2016-04-01

    Histone variant H2A.Z, a universal mark of dynamic nucleosomes flanking gene promoters and enhancers, is incorporated into chromatin by SRCAP (SWR1), an ATP-dependent, multicomponent chromatin-remodeling complex. The YL1 (Swc2) subunit of SRCAP (SWR1) plays an essential role in H2A.Z recognition, but how it achieves this has been unclear. Here, we report the crystal structure of the H2A.Z-binding domain of Drosophila melanogaster YL1 (dYL1-Z) in complex with an H2A.Z-H2B dimer at 1.9-Å resolution. The dYL1-Z domain adopts a new whip-like structure that wraps over H2A.Z-H2B, and preferential recognition is largely conferred by three residues in loop 2, the hyperacidic patch and the extended αC helix of H2A.Z. Importantly, this domain is essential for deposition of budding yeast H2A.Z in vivo and SRCAP (SWR1)-catalyzed histone H2A.Z replacement in vitro. Our studies distinguish YL1-Z from known H2A.Z chaperones and suggest a hierarchical mechanism based on increasing binding affinity facilitating H2A.Z transfer from SRCAP (SWR1) to the nucleosome. PMID:26974124

  10. Hydrogen Sulfide Upregulates Glutamate–Cysteine Ligase Catalytic Subunit, Glutamate–Cysteine Ligase Modifier Subunit, and Glutathione and Inhibits Interleukin-1β Secretion in Monocytes Exposed to High Glucose Levels

    PubMed Central

    Huning, Laura; Micinski, David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Glutathione (GSH) deficiency and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) upregulation are linked to the progression of vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis. The consumption of sulfide-rich vegetables is known to lower the risk of atherosclerosis. This study examined the hypothesis that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) upregulates the glutamate–cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC) and GSH and inhibits IL-1β in a monocyte cell model. U937 monocytes were supplemented with H2S (0–12.5 μM) for 2 hr and then exposed to a control or high glucose (HG, 25 mM) for 22 hr. Levels of GCLC and glutamate–cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM) expression were determined by western blotting and GSH using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and IL-1β using enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). H2S significantly (P<0.05) upregulated expression of GCLC and GCLM, and formation of GSH, and inhibited IL-1β secretion in controls and HG-treated monocytes. This is the first demonstration of H2S upregulation of GCLC and GSH and inhibition of IL-1β levels, which may be what mediates the beneficial effects of H2S-rich compounds in mitigating the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis. PMID:24665821

  11. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase alpha catalytic subunit interacts with Cdc68/Spt16 and with Pob3, a protein similar to an HMG1-like protein.

    PubMed Central

    Wittmeyer, J; Formosa, T

    1997-01-01

    We have used DNA polymerase alpha affinity chromatography to identify factors involved in eukaryotic DNA replication in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two proteins that bound to the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase alpha (Pol1 protein) are encoded by the essential genes CDC68/SPT16 and POB3. The binding of both proteins was enhanced when extracts lacking a previously characterized polymerase binding protein, Ctf4, were used. This finding suggests that Cdc68 and Pob3 may compete with Ctf4 for binding to Pol1. Pol1 and Pob3 were coimmunoprecipitated from whole-cell extracts with antiserum directed against Cdc68, and Pol1 was immunoprecipitated from whole-cell extracts with antiserum directed against the amino terminus of Pob3, suggesting that these proteins may form a complex in vivo. CDC68 also interacted genetically with POL1 and CTF4 mutations; the maximum permissive temperature of double mutants was lower than for any single mutant. Overexpression of Cdc68 in a pol1 mutant strain dramatically decreased cell viability, consistent with the formation or modulation of an essential complex by these proteins in vivo. A mutation in CDC68/SPT16 had previously been shown to cause pleiotropic effects on the regulation of transcription (J. A. Prendergrast et al., Genetics 124:81-90, 1990; E. A. Malone et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:5710-5717, 1991; A. Rowley et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:5718-5726, 1991), with a spectrum of phenotypes similar to those caused by mutations in the genes encoding histone proteins H2A and H2B (Malone et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:5710-5717, 1991). We show that at the nonpermissive temperature, cdc68-1 mutants arrest as unbudded cells with a 1C DNA content, consistent with a possible role for Cdc68 in the prereplicative stage of the cell cycle. The cdc68-1 mutation caused elevated rates of chromosome fragment loss, a phenotype characteristic of genes whose native products are required for normal DNA metabolism. However, this mutation did not

  12. The tamas gene, identified as a mutation that disrupts larval behavior in Drosophila melanogaster, codes for the mitochondrial DNA polymerase catalytic subunit (DNApol-gamma125).

    PubMed Central

    Iyengar, B; Roote, J; Campos, A R

    1999-01-01

    From a screen of pupal lethal lines of Drosophila melanogaster we identified a mutant strain that displayed a reproducible reduction in the larval response to light. Moreover, this mutant strain showed defects in the development of the adult visual system and failure to undergo behavioral changes characteristic of the wandering stage. The foraging third instar larvae remained in the food substrate for a prolonged period and died at or just before pupariation. Using a new assay for individual larval photobehavior we determined that the lack of response to light in these mutants was due to a primary deficit in locomotion. The mutation responsible for these phenotypes was mapped to the lethal complementation group l(2)34Dc, which we renamed tamas (translated from Sanskrit as "dark inertia"). Sequencing of mutant alleles demonstrated that tamas codes for the mitochondrial DNA polymerase catalytic subunit (DNApol-gamma125). PMID:10581287

  13. PP2A regulatory subunit Bα controls endothelial contractility and vessel lumen integrity via regulation of HDAC7.

    PubMed

    Martin, Maud; Geudens, Ilse; Bruyr, Jonathan; Potente, Michael; Bleuart, Anouk; Lebrun, Marielle; Simonis, Nicolas; Deroanne, Christophe; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Soubeyran, Philippe; Peixoto, Paul; Mottet, Denis; Janssens, Veerle; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Claes, Filip; Carmeliet, Peter; Kettmann, Richard; Gerhardt, Holger; Dequiedt, Franck

    2013-09-11

    To supply tissues with nutrients and oxygen, the cardiovascular system forms a seamless, hierarchically branched, network of lumenized tubes. Here, we show that maintenance of patent vessel lumens requires the Bα regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Deficiency of Bα in zebrafish precludes vascular lumen stabilization resulting in perfusion defects. Similarly, inactivation of PP2A-Bα in cultured ECs induces tubulogenesis failure due to alteration of cytoskeleton dynamics, actomyosin contractility and maturation of cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) contacts. Mechanistically, we show that PP2A-Bα controls the activity of HDAC7, an essential transcriptional regulator of vascular stability. In the absence of PP2A-Bα, transcriptional repression by HDAC7 is abrogated leading to enhanced expression of the cytoskeleton adaptor protein ArgBP2. ArgBP2 hyperactivates RhoA causing inadequate rearrangements of the EC actomyosin cytoskeleton. This study unravels the first specific role for a PP2A holoenzyme in development: the PP2A-Bα/HDAC7/ArgBP2 axis maintains vascular lumens by balancing endothelial cytoskeletal dynamics and cell-matrix adhesion. PMID:23955003

  14. Mapping of a conformational epitope on the cashew allergen Ana o 2: a discontinuous large subunit epitope dependent upon homologous or heterologous small subunit association.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lixin; Willison, LeAnna N; Porter, Lauren; Robotham, Jason M; Teuber, Suzanne S; Sathe, Shridhar K; Roux, Kenneth H

    2010-05-01

    The 11S globulins are members of the cupin protein superfamily and represent an important class of tree nut allergens for which a number of linear epitopes have been mapped. However, specific conformational epitopes for these allergens have yet to be described. We have recently reported a cashew Ana o 2 conformational epitope defined by murine mAb 2B5 and competitively inhibited by a subset of patient IgE antibodies. The 2B5 epitope appears to reside on the large (acidic) subunit, is dependent upon small (basic) subunit association for expression, and is highly susceptible to denaturation. Here we fine map the epitope using a combination of recombinant chimeric cashew Ana o 2-soybean Gly m 6 chimeras, deletion and point mutations, molecular modeling, and electron microscopy of 2B5-Ana o 2 immune complexes. Key residues appear confined to a 24 amino acid segment near the N-terminus of the large subunit peptide, a portion of which makes direct contact with the small subunit. These data provide an explanation for both the small subunit dependence and the structurally labile nature of the epitope. PMID:20362338

  15. Cloning and sequence analysis of a full-length cDNA of SmPP1cb encoding turbot protein phosphatase 1 beta catalytic subunit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Fei; Guo, Huarong; Wang, Jian

    2008-02-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation, catalyzed by protein kinases and phosphatases, is an important and versatile mechanism by which eukaryotic cells regulate almost all the signaling processes. Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is the first and well-characterized member of the protein serine/threonine phosphatase family. In the present study, a full-length cDNA encoding the beta isoform of the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1(PP1cb), was for the first time isolated and sequenced from the skin tissue of flatfish turbot Scophthalmus maximus, designated SmPP1cb, by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique. The cDNA sequence of SmPP1cb we obtained contains a 984 bp open reading frame (ORF), flanked by a complete 39 bp 5' untranslated region and 462 bp 3' untranslated region. The ORF encodes a putative 327 amino acid protein, and the N-terminal section of this protein is highly acidic, Met-Ala-Glu-Gly-Glu-Leu-Asp-Val-Asp, a common feature for PP1 catalytic subunit but absent in protein phosphatase 2B (PP2B). And its calculated molecular mass is 37 193 Da and pI 5.8. Sequence analysis indicated that, SmPP1cb is extremely conserved in both amino acid and nucleotide acid levels compared with the PP1cb of other vertebrates and invertebrates, and its Kozak motif contained in the 5'UTR around ATG start codon is GXXAXXGXX ATGG, which is different from mammalian in two positions A-6 and G-3, indicating the possibility of different initiation of translation in turbot, and also the 3'UTR of SmPP1cb is highly diverse in the sequence similarity and length compared with other animals, especially zebrafish. The cloning and sequencing of SmPP1cb gene lays a good foundation for the future work on the biological functions of PP1 in the flatfish turbot.

  16. Differential photoaffinity labeling of catalytic subunits of NaK-ATPase with carrier-free /sup 125/I-cardiac glycosides

    SciTech Connect

    Lowndes, J.; Hokin-Neaverson, M.; Ruoho, A.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have obtained evidence for structural differences in the cardiac glycoside binding site between the ..cap alpha.. and ..cap alpha..(+) forms of the catalytic subunit of NaK-ATPase, using three closely related photoaffinity derivatives of the cardiotonic steroid, digitoxigenin. (/sup 125/I)N-(p-azido-m-iodo-o-hydroxybenzoyl)-4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-galactosyl digitoxigenin (IA-GaD), (/sup 125/I)N-(3-(p-azido-m-iodophenyl)-propionyl)-4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-ga-lactosyl digitoxigenin (AIPP-GaD) and (/sup 125/I)N-(3-(p-azido-m-iodophenyl)-propionyl)-4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-glucosyl digitoxi-genin (AIPP-GluD) were synthesized. AIPP-GaD and AIPP-GluD are stereoisomers. Eel electroplax and dog kidney NaK-ATPase (..cap alpha.. form) and rat brain synaptosomes (rich in ..cap alpha..(+) form) were photolabelled and then analyzed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. Photolysis with either carrier-free IA-GaD or AIPP-GluD gave ouabain-protectable labelling of NaK-ATPase catalytic subunit from all three tissues. However, photolysis with AIPP-GaD showed protectable labelling of the enzyme from eel and kidney but not from brain. This suggests a structural difference in the ..cap alpha..(+) form which results in either an inability to bind AIPP-GaD, or, perhaps more likely, an absence of a photoinsertion site in the correct location in the ..cap alpha..(+) form, as compared with the ..cap alpha.. form. It is of interest that the labelling pattern of the enzyme in the human erythrocyte resembles that of the brain enzyme.

  17. Histone H2A.Z subunit exchange controls consolidation of recent and remote memory.

    PubMed

    Zovkic, Iva B; Paulukaitis, Brynna S; Day, Jeremy J; Etikala, Deepa M; Sweatt, J David

    2014-11-27

    Memory formation is a multi-stage process that initially requires cellular consolidation in the hippocampus, after which memories are downloaded to the cortex for maintenance, in a process termed systems consolidation. Epigenetic mechanisms regulate both types of consolidation, but histone variant exchange, in which canonical histones are replaced with their variant counterparts, is an entire branch of epigenetics that has received limited attention in the brain and has never, to our knowledge, been studied in relation to cognitive function. Here we show that histone H2A.Z, a variant of histone H2A, is actively exchanged in response to fear conditioning in the hippocampus and the cortex, where it mediates gene expression and restrains the formation of recent and remote memory. Our data provide evidence for H2A.Z involvement in cognitive function and specifically implicate H2A.Z as a negative regulator of hippocampal consolidation and systems consolidation, probably through downstream effects on gene expression. Moreover, alterations in H2A.Z binding at later stages of systems consolidation suggest that this histone has the capacity to mediate stable molecular modifications required for memory retention. Overall, our data introduce histone variant exchange as a novel mechanism contributing to the molecular basis of cognitive function and implicate H2A.Z as a potential therapeutic target for memory disorders. PMID:25219850

  18. Structural bases of dimerization of yeast telomere protein Cdc13 and its interaction with the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase [alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jia; Yang, Yuting; Wan, Ke; Mao, Ninghui; Yu, Tai-Yuan; Lin, Yi-Chien; DeZwaan, Diane C.; Freeman, Brian C.; Lin, Jing-Jer; Lue, Neal F.; Lei, Ming

    2011-08-24

    Budding yeast Cdc13-Stn1-Ten1 (CST) complex plays an essential role in telomere protection and maintenance, and has been proposed to be a telomere-specific replication protein A (RPA)-like complex. Previous genetic and structural studies revealed a close resemblance between Stn1-Ten1 and RPA32-RPA14. However, the relationship between Cdc13 and RPA70, the largest subunit of RPA, has remained unclear. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal OB (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding) fold of Cdc13. Although Cdc13 has an RPA70-like domain organization, the structures of Cdc13 OB folds are significantly different from their counterparts in RPA70, suggesting that they have distinct evolutionary origins. Furthermore, our structural and biochemical analyses revealed unexpected dimerization by the N-terminal OB fold and showed that homodimerization is probably a conserved feature of all Cdc13 proteins. We also uncovered the structural basis of the interaction between the Cdc13 N-terminal OB fold and the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase {alpha} (Pol1), and demonstrated a role for Cdc13 dimerization in Pol1 binding. Analysis of the phenotypes of mutants defective in Cdc13 dimerization and Cdc13-Pol1 interaction revealed multiple mechanisms by which dimerization regulates telomere lengths in vivo. Collectively, our findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms and evolution of Cdc13.

  19. Negative Factor from SIV Binds to the Catalytic Subunit of the V-ATPase to Internalize CD4 and to Increase Viral Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Mandic, Robert; Fackler, Oliver T.; Geyer, Matthias; Linnemann, Thomas; Zheng, Yong-Hui; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2001-01-01

    The accessory protein negative factor (Nef) from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is required for optimal viral infectivity and the progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Nef interacts with the endocytic machinery, resulting in the down-regulation of cluster of differentiation antigen 4 (CD4) and major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) molecules on the surface of infected cells. Mutations in the C-terminal flexible loop of Nef result in a lower rate of internalization by this viral protein. However, no loop-dependent binding of Nef to adaptor protein-2 (AP-2), which is the adaptor protein complex that is required for the internalization of proteins from the plasma membrane, could be demonstrated. In this study we investigated the relevance of different motifs in Nef from SIVmac239 for its internalization, CD4 down-regulation, binding to components of the trafficking machinery, and viral infectivity. Our data suggest that the binding of Nef to the catalytic subunit H of the vacuolar membrane ATPase (V-ATPase) facilitates its internalization. This binding depends on the integrity of the whole flexible loop. Subsequent studies on Nef mutant viruses revealed that the flexible loop is essential for optimal viral infectivity. Therefore, our data demonstrate how Nef contacts the endocytic machinery in the absence of its direct binding to AP-2 and suggest an important role for subunit H of the V-ATPase in viral infectivity. PMID:11179428

  20. Modulation of GluK2a subunit-containing kainate receptors by 14-3-3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Changcheng; Qiao, Haifa; Zhou, Qin; Wang, Yan; Wu, Yuying; Zhou, Yi; Li, Yong

    2013-08-23

    Kainate receptors (KARs) are one of the ionotropic glutamate receptors that mediate excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) with characteristically slow kinetics. Although mechanisms for the slow kinetics of KAR-EPSCs are not totally understood, recent evidence has implicated a regulatory role of KAR-associated proteins. Here, we report that decay kinetics of GluK2a-containing receptors is modulated by closely associated 14-3-3 proteins. 14-3-3 binding requires PKC-dependent phosphorylation of serine residues localized in the carboxyl tail of the GluK2a subunit. In transfected cells, 14-3-3 binding to GluK2a slows desensitization kinetics of both homomeric GluK2a and heteromeric GluK2a/GluK5 receptors. Moreover, KAR-EPSCs at mossy fiber-CA3 synapses decay significantly faster in the 14-3-3 functional knock-out mice. Collectively, these results demonstrate that 14-3-3 proteins are an important regulator of GluK2a-containing KARs and may contribute to the slow decay kinetics of native KAR-EPSCs. PMID:23861400

  1. Self-assembly Is Prerequisite for Catalysis of Fe(II) Oxidation by Catalytically Active Subunits of Ferritin*

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Kourosh Honarmand; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2015-01-01

    Fe(III) storage by ferritin is an essential process of the iron homeostasis machinery. It begins by translocation of Fe(II) from outside the hollow spherical shape structure of the protein, which is formed as the result of self-assembly of 24 subunits, to a di-iron binding site, the ferroxidase center, buried in the middle of each active subunit. The pathway of Fe(II) to the ferroxidase center has remained elusive, and the importance of self-assembly for the functioning of the ferroxidase center has not been investigated. Here we report spectroscopic and metal ion binding studies with a mutant of ferritin from Pyrococcus furiosus (PfFtn) in which self-assembly was abolished by a single amino acid substitution. We show that in this mutant metal ion binding to the ferroxidase center and Fe(II) oxidation at this site was obliterated. However, metal ion binding to a conserved third site (site C), which is located in the inner surface of each subunit in the vicinity of the ferroxidase center and is believed to be the path for Fe(II) to the ferroxidase center, was not disrupted. These results are the basis of a new model for Fe(II) translocation to the ferroxidase center: self-assembly creates channels that guide the Fe(II) ions toward the ferroxidase center directly through the protein shell and not via the internal cavity and site C. The results may be of significance for understanding the molecular basis of ferritin-related disorders such as neuroferritinopathy in which the 24-meric structure with 432 symmetry is distorted. PMID:26370076

  2. Molecular genetic analysis of Rts1p, a B' regulatory subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein phosphatase 2A.

    PubMed

    Shu, Y; Yang, H; Hallberg, E; Hallberg, R

    1997-06-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene RTS1 encodes a protein homologous to a variable B-type regulatory subunit of the mammalian heterotrimeric serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). We present evidence showing that Rts1p assembles into similar heterotrimeric complexes in yeast. Strains in which RTS1 has been disrupted are temperature sensitive (ts) for growth, are hypersensitive to ethanol, are unable to grow with glycerol as their only carbon source, and accumulate at nonpermissive temperatures predominantly as large-budded cells with a 2N DNA content and a nondivided nucleus. This cell cycle arrest can be overcome and partial suppression of the ts phenotype of rts1-null cells occurs if the gene CLB2, encoding a Cdc28 kinase-associated B-type cyclin, is expressed on a high-copy-number plasmid. However, CLB2 overexpression has no suppressive effects on other aspects of the rts1-null phenotype. Expression of truncated forms of Rts1p can also partially suppress the ts phenotype and can fully suppress the inability of cells to grow on glycerol and the hypersensitivity of cells to ethanol. By contrast, the truncated forms do not suppress the accumulation of large-budded cells at high temperatures. Coexpression of truncated Rts1p and high levels of Clb2p fully suppresses the ts phenotype, indicating that the inhibition of growth of rts1-null cells at high temperatures is due to both stress-related and cell cycle-related defects. Genetic analyses show that the role played by Rts1p in PP2A regulation is distinctly different from that played by the other known variable B regulatory subunit, Cdc55p, a protein recently implicated in checkpoint control regulation. PMID:9154823

  3. Small subunit of a cold-resistant plant, Timothy, does not significantly alter the catalytic properties of Rubisco in transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Fukayama, Hiroshi; Koga, Atsushi; Hatanaka, Tomoko; Misoo, Shuji

    2015-04-01

    Effects of overexpression of high activity-type Rubisco small subunit (RbcS) from a cold-resistant plant, timothy (Phleum pratense), on kinetic properties of Rubisco were studied in rice (Oryza sativa). The full-length mRNA sequence of timothy RbcS (PpRbcS1) was determined by 5'RACE and 3'RACE. The coding sequence of PpRbcS1 was fused to the chlorophyll a/b-binding protein promoter and introduced into rice. PpRbcS was highly expressed in leaf blade and accounted for approximately 30 % of total RbcS in homozygous transgenic lines. However, the catalytic turnover rate and K m for CO2 of Rubisco did not significantly change in these transgenic lines compared to non-transgenic rice, suggesting that PpRbcS1 is not effective for improvement of catalytic efficiency of rice Rubisco. The photosynthetic rate and growth were essentially unchanged, whereas the photosynthetic rate at low CO2 condition was marginally increased in transgenic lines. Rubisco content was significantly increased, whereas soluble protein, nitrogen, and chlorophyll contents were unchanged in transgenic lines compared to non-transgenic rice. Because the kinetic properties were similar, observed slight increase in photosynthetic rate at low CO2 is considered to be large due to increase in Rubisco content in transgenic lines. Introduction of foreign RbcS is an effective approach for the improvement of Rubisco kinetics and photosynthesis. However, in this study, it was suggested that RbcS of high activity-type Rubisco, even showing higher amino acid identity with rice RbcS, did not always enhance the catalytic turnover rate of Rubisco in rice. Thus, we should carefully select RbcS to be overexpressed before introduction. PMID:25595546

  4. An Anilinoquinazoline Derivative Inhibits Tumor Growth through Interaction with hCAP-G2, a Subunit of Condensin II

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Hironobu; Genma, Hiroaki; Takashima, Hideaki; Tokunaga, Mayuko; Ono, Takao; Hirano, Tatsuya; Du, Wenlin; Yamada, Taketo; Doi, Nobuhide; Iijima, Shiro; Hattori, Yutaka; Yanagawa, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    We screened 46 novel anilinoquinazoline derivatives for activity to inhibit proliferation of a panel of human cancer cell lines. Among them, Q15 showed potent in vitro growth-inhibitory activity towards cancer cell lines derived from colorectal cancer, lung cancer and multiple myeloma. It also showed antitumor activity towards multiple myeloma KMS34 tumor xenografts in lcr/scid mice in vivo. Unlike the known anilinoquinazoline derivative gefitinib, Q15 did not inhibit cytokine-mediated intracellular tyrosine phosphorylation. Using our mRNA display technology, we identified hCAP-G2, a subunit of condensin II complex, which is regarded as a key player in mitotic chromosome condensation, as a Q15 binding partner. Immunofluorescence study indicated that Q15 compromises normal segregation of chromosomes, and therefore might induce apoptosis. Thus, our results indicate that hCAP-G2 is a novel therapeutic target for development of drugs active against currently intractable neoplasms. PMID:23028663

  5. Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) Regulatory Subunits ParA and PabA Orchestrate Septation and Conidiation and Are Essential for PP2A Activity in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Guo-wei; Jiang, Ping; Qiao, Wei-ran; Zhang, Yuan-wei; Wei, Wen-fan

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a major intracellular protein phosphatase that regulates multiple aspects of cell growth and metabolism. Different activities of PP2A and subcellular localization are determined by its regulatory subunits. Here we identified and characterized the functions of two protein phosphatase regulatory subunit homologs, ParA and PabA, in Aspergillus nidulans. Our results demonstrate that ParA localizes to the septum site and that deletion of parA causes hyperseptation, while overexpression of parA abolishes septum formation; this suggests that ParA may function as a negative regulator of septation. In comparison, PabA displays a clear colocalization pattern with 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)-stained nuclei, and deletion of pabA induces a remarkable delayed-septation phenotype. Both parA and pabA are required for hyphal growth, conidiation, and self-fertilization, likely to maintain normal levels of PP2A activity. Most interestingly, parA deletion is capable of suppressing septation defects in pabA mutants, suggesting that ParA counteracts PabA during the septation process. In contrast, double mutants of parA and pabA led to synthetic defects in colony growth, indicating that ParA functions synthetically with PabA during hyphal growth. Moreover, unlike the case for PP2A-Par1 and PP2A-Pab1 in yeast (which are negative regulators that inactivate the septation initiation network [SIN]), loss of ParA or PabA fails to suppress defects of temperature-sensitive mutants of the SEPH kinase of the SIN. Thus, our findings support the previously unrealized evidence that the B-family subunits of PP2A have comprehensive functions as partners of heterotrimeric enzyme complexes of PP2A, both spatially and temporally, in A. nidulans. PMID:25280816

  6. Evasion of the Innate Immune Response: the Old World Alphavirus nsP2 Protein Induces Rapid Degradation of Rpb1, a Catalytic Subunit of RNA Polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Akhrymuk, Ivan; Kulemzin, Sergey V.

    2012-01-01

    The Old World alphaviruses are emerging human pathogens with an ability to cause widespread epidemics. The latest epidemic of Chikungunya virus, from 2005 to 2007, affected over 40 countries in Africa, Asia, and Europe. The Old World alphaviruses are highly cytopathic and known to evade the cellular antiviral response by inducing global inhibition of transcription in vertebrate cells. This function was shown to be mediated by their nonstructural nsP2 protein; however, the detailed mechanism of this phenomenon has remained unknown. Here, we report that nsP2 proteins of Sindbis, Semliki Forest, and Chikungunya viruses inhibit cellular transcription by inducing rapid degradation of Rpb1, a catalytic subunit of the RNAPII complex. This degradation of Rpb1 is independent of the nsP2-associated protease activity, but, instead, it proceeds through nsP2-mediated Rpb1 ubiquitination. This function of nsP2 depends on the integrity of the helicase and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferase-like domains, and point mutations in either of these domains abolish Rpb1 degradation. We go on to show that complete degradation of Rpb1 in alphavirus-infected cells occurs within 6 h postinfection, before other previously described virus-induced changes in cell physiology, such as apoptosis, autophagy, and inhibition of STAT1 phosphorylation, are detected. Since Rpb1 is a subunit that catalyzes the polymerase reaction during RNA transcription, degradation of Rpb1 plays an indispensable role in blocking the activation of cellular genes and downregulating cellular antiviral response. This indicates that the nsP2-induced degradation of Rpb1 is a critical mechanism utilized by the Old World alphaviruses to subvert the cellular antiviral response. PMID:22514352

  7. Mapping the Hydrogen Bond Networks in the Catalytic Subunit of Protein Kinase A Using H/D Fractionation Factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Geoffrey C; Srivastava, Atul K; Kim, Jonggul; Taylor, Susan S; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-07-01

    Protein kinase A is a prototypical phosphoryl transferase, sharing its catalytic core (PKA-C) with the entire kinase family. PKA-C substrate recognition, active site organization, and product release depend on the enzyme's conformational transitions from the open to the closed state, which regulate its allosteric cooperativity. Here, we used equilibrium nuclear magnetic resonance hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) fractionation factors (φ) to probe the changes in the strength of hydrogen bonds within the kinase upon binding the nucleotide and a pseudosubstrate peptide (PKI5-24). We found that the φ values decrease upon binding both ligands, suggesting that the overall hydrogen bond networks in both the small and large lobes of PKA-C become stronger. However, we observed several important exceptions, with residues displaying higher φ values upon ligand binding. Notably, the changes in φ values are not localized near the ligand binding pockets; rather, they are radiated throughout the entire enzyme. We conclude that, upon ligand and pseudosubstrate binding, the hydrogen bond networks undergo extensive reorganization, revealing that the open-to-closed transitions require global rearrangements of the internal forces that stabilize the enzyme's fold. PMID:26030372

  8. Liver GlucokinaseA456V Induces Potent Hypoglycemia without Dyslipidemia through a Paradoxical Induction of the Catalytic Subunit of Glucose-6-Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Vidal-Alabró, Anna; Gómez-Valadés, Alícia G.; Méndez-Lucas, Andrés; Llorens, Jordi; Bartrons, Ramon; Bermúdez, Jordi; Perales, Jose C.

    2011-01-01

    Recent reports point out the importance of the complex GK-GKRP in controlling glucose and lipid homeostasis. Several GK mutations affect GKRP binding, resulting in permanent activation of the enzyme. We hypothesize that hepatic overexpression of a mutated form of GK, GKA456V, described in a patient with persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI) and could provide a model to study the consequences of GK-GKRP deregulation in vivo. GKA456V was overexpressed in the liver of streptozotocin diabetic mice. Metabolite profiling in serum and liver extracts, together with changes in key components of glucose and lipid homeostasis, were analyzed and compared to GK wild-type transfected livers. Cell compartmentalization of the mutant but not the wild-type GK was clearly affected in vivo, demonstrating impaired GKRP regulation. GKA456V overexpression markedly reduced blood glucose in the absence of dyslipidemia, in contrast to wild-type GK-overexpressing mice. Evidence in glucose utilization did not correlate with increased glycogen nor lactate levels in the liver. PEPCK mRNA was not affected, whereas the mRNA for the catalytic subunit of glucose-6-phosphatase was upregulated ~4 folds in the liver of GKA456V-treated animals, suggesting that glucose cycling was stimulated. Our results provide new insights into the complex GK regulatory network and validate liver-specific GK activation as a strategy for diabetes therapy. PMID:22194744

  9. miR-502 inhibits cell proliferation and tumor growth in hepatocellular carcinoma through suppressing phosphoinositide 3-kinase catalytic subunit gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Suling; Li, Fang; Chai, Haiyun; Tao, Xin; Wang, Haili; Ji, Aifang

    2015-08-21

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a key role in carcinogenesis and tumor progression in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In the present study, we demonstrated that miR-502 significantly inhibits HCC cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. G1/S cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of HCC cells were induced by miR-502. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase catalytic subunit gamma (PIK3CG) was identified as a direct downstream target of miR-502 in HCC cells. Notably, overexpression of PIK3CG reversed the inhibitory effects of miR-502 in HCC cells. Our findings suggest that miR-502 functions as a tumor suppressor in HCC via inhibition of PI3KCG, supporting its utility as a promising therapeutic gene target for this tumor type. - Highlights: • miR-502 suppresses HCC cell proliferation in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. • miR-502 regulates cell cycle and apoptosis in HCC cells. • PIK3CG is a direct target of miR-502. • miR-502 and PIK3CG expression patterns are inversely correlated in HCC tissues.

  10. Nonsense mutation at Tyr-4046 in the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit of severe combined immune deficiency mice

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Ryoko; Fujimori, Akira; Hamatani, Kiyohiro; Mita, Kazuei; Saito, Toshiyuki; Mori, Masahiko; Fukumura, Ryutaro; Morimyo, Mitsuoki; Muto, Masahiro; Itoh, Masahiro; Tatsumi, Kouichi; Abe, Masumi

    1997-01-01

    The severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mouse was reported as an animal model for human immune deficiency. Through the course of several studies, the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) gene came to be considered a candidate for the SCID-responsible gene. We isolated an ORF of the murine DNA-PKcs gene from SCID mice and their parent strain C.B-17 mice and determined the DNA sequences. The ORF of the murine DNA-PKcs gene contained 4128-aa residues and had 78.9% homology with the human DNA-PKcs gene. A particularly important finding is that a T to A transversion results in the substitution of termination codon in SCID mice for the Tyr-4046 in C.B-17 mice. No other mutation was detected in the ORF of the gene. The generality of this transversion was confirmed using four individual SCID and wild-type mice. The substitution took place in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase domain, and the mutated gene encodes the truncated products missing 83 residues of wild-type DNA-PKcs products. Furthermore, the quantity of DNA-PKcs transcript in wild-type and SCID cells was almost equal. These observations indicate that the DNA-PKcs gene is the SCID-responsible gene itself and that the detected mutation leads to the SCID aberration. PMID:9122213

  11. Genetic Interactions between Reg1/Hex2 and Glc7, the Gene Encoding the Protein Phosphatase Type 1 Catalytic Subunit in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Huang, D.; Chun, K. T.; Goebl, M. G.; Roach, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    Mutations in GLC7, the gene encoding the type 1 protein phosphatase catalytic subunit, cause a variety of abberrant phenotypes in yeast, such as impaired glycogen synthesis and relief of glucose repression of the expression of some genes. Loss of function of the REG1/HEX2 gene, necessary for glucose repression of several genes, was found to suppress the glycogen-deficient phenotype of the glc7-1 allele. Deletion of REG1 in a wild-type background led to overaccumulation of glycogen as well as slow growth and an enlarged cell size. However, loss of REG1 did not suppress other phenotypes associated with GLC7 mutations, such as inability to sporulate or, in cells bearing the glc7(Y-170) allele, lack of growth at 14°. The effect of REG1 deletion on glycogen accumulation is not simply due to derepression of glucose-repressed genes, although it does require the presence of SNF1, which encodes a protein kinase essential for expression of glucose-repressed genes and for glycogen accumulation. We propose that REG1 has a role in controlling glycogen accumulation. PMID:8722767

  12. Inactivation of the Catalytic Subunit of cAMP-Dependent Protein Kinase A Causes Delayed Appressorium Formation and Reduced Pathogenicity of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides

    PubMed Central

    Priyatno, Tri Puji; Abu Bakar, Farah Diba; Kamaruddin, Nurhaida; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Abdul Murad, Abdul Munir

    2012-01-01

    The cyclic AMP- (cAMP-) dependent protein kinase A signaling pathway is one of the major signaling pathways responsible for regulation of the morphogenesis and pathogenesis of several pathogenic fungi. To evaluate the role of this pathway in the plant pathogenic fungus, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A, CgPKAC, was cloned, inactivated, and the mutant was analyzed. Analysis of the Cgpkac mutant generated via gene replacement showed that the mutants were able to form appressoria; however, their formation was delayed compared to the wild type. In addition, the mutant conidia underwent bipolar germination after appressoria formation, but no appressoria were generated from the second germ tube. The mutants also showed reduced ability to adhere to a hydrophobic surface and to degrade lipids localized in the appressoria. Based on the number of lesions produced during a pathogenicity test, the mutant's ability to cause disease in healthy mango fruits was reduced, which may be due to failure to penetrate into the fruit. These findings indicate that cAMP-dependent protein kinase A has an important role in regulating morphogenesis and is required for pathogenicity of C. gloeosporioides. PMID:22666136

  13. Acute hypoxia differentially affects the NMDA receptor NR1, NR2A and NR2B subunit mRNA levels in the developing chick optic tectum: stage-dependent plasticity in the 2B-2A ratio.

    PubMed

    Vacotto, Marina; Rapacioli, Melina; Flores, Vladimir; de Plazas, Sara Fiszer

    2010-10-01

    It is known that the NMDA-R NR1 subunit is needed for the receptor activity and that under hypoxia the evolution toward apoptosis or neuronal survival depends on the balance NR2A/NR2B subunits. This paper analyzes the effect of acute hypoxia on the above mentioned subunits mRNAs during development. The mean percentage of NR1+ neurons displayed the higher plasticity during development while the NR2A+ neurons the higher stability. Acute hypoxia increased the mean percentage of NR1+ and NR2B+ neurons at ED12 but only that of NR1+ neurons at ED18. Acute hypoxia increased the levels of expression of NR1 and NR2B mRNAs at ED12 without changes in the NR2A mRNA. During early stages there is a higher sensitivity to change the subunits mRNA levels under a hypoxic treatment. At ED12 acute hypoxia increased the probability of co-expression of the NR1-NR2A and NR1-NR2B subunits combinations, the level of NR1 and NR2B and the ratio NR2B/NR2A. These conditions facilitate the evolution towards apoptosis. PMID:20596770

  14. [Beta]-Adrenergic Receptor Activation Rescues Theta Frequency Stimulation-Induced LTP Deficits in Mice Expressing C-Terminally Truncated NMDA Receptor GluN2A Subunits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Teena D.; Watabe, Ayako M.; Indersmitten, Tim; Komiyama, Noboru H.; Grant, Seth G. N.; O'Dell, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Through protein interactions mediated by their cytoplasmic C termini the GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) have a key role in the formation of NMDAR signaling complexes at excitatory synapses. Although these signaling complexes are thought to have a crucial role in NMDAR-dependent forms of synaptic plasticity such as long-term…

  15. Effects of light and the regulatory B-subunit composition of protein phosphatase 2A on the susceptibility of Arabidopsis thaliana to aphid (Myzus persicae) infestation

    PubMed Central

    Rasool, Brwa; Karpinska, Barbara; Konert, Grzegorz; Durian, Guido; Denessiouk, Konstantin; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Foyer, Christine H.

    2014-01-01

    The interactions between biotic and abiotic stress signaling pathways are complex and poorly understood but protein kinase/phosphatase cascades are potentially important components. Aphid fecundity and susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae infection were determined in the low light-grown Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and in mutant lines defective in either the protein phosphatase (PP)2A regulatory subunit B'γ (gamma; pp2a-b'γ) or B'ζ (zeta; pp2a-b'ζ1-1 and pp2a-b'ζ 1-2) and in gamma zeta double mutants (pp2a-b'γζ) lacking both subunits. All the mutants except for pp2a-b'ζ 1-1 had significantly lower leaf areas than the wild type. Susceptibility to P. syringae was similar in all genotypes. In contrast, aphid fecundity was significantly decreased in the pp2a-b'γ mutant relative to the wild type but not in the pp2a-b'γζ double mutant. A high light pre-treatment, which led to a significant increase in rosette growth in all mutant lines but not in the wild type, led to a significant decrease in aphid fecundity in all genotypes. The high light pre-treatment abolished the differences in aphid resistance observed in the pp2a-b'γ mutant relative to the wild type. The light and CO2 response curves for photosynthesis were changed in response to the high light pre-treatment, but the high light effects were similar in all genotypes. These data demonstrate that a pre-exposure to high light and the composition of B-subunits on the trimeric PP2A holoenzymes are important in regulating plant resistance to aphids. The functional specificity for the individual regulatory B-subunits may therefore limit aphid colonization, depending on the prevailing abiotic stress environment. PMID:25191331

  16. Nuclear Respiratory Factor 1 Controls Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2A Transcription to Provide a Mechanism for Coordinate Expression of Respiratory Chain Subunits*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Bindu; Yu, Gengsheng; Gulick, Tod

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear respiratory factors NRF1 and NRF2 regulate the expression of nuclear genes encoding heme biosynthetic enzymes, proteins required for mitochondrial genome transcription and protein import, and numerous respiratory chain subunits. NRFs thereby coordinate the expression of nuclear and mitochondrial genes relevant to mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration. Only two of the nuclear-encoded respiratory chain subunits have evolutionarily conserved tissue-specific forms: the cytochrome c oxidase (COX) subunits VIa and VIIa heart/muscle (H) and ubiquitous (L) isoforms. We used genome comparisons to conclude that the promoter regions of COX6AH and COX7AH lack NRF sites but have conserved myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) elements. We show that MEF2A mRNA is induced with forced expression of NRF1 and that the MEF2A 5′-regulatory region contains an evolutionarily conserved canonical element that binds endogenous NRF1 in chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. NRF1 regulates MEF2A promoter-reporters according to overexpression, RNA interference underexpression, and promoter element mutation studies. As there are four mammalian MEF2 isotypes, we used an isoform-specific antibody in ChIP to confirm MEF2A binding to the COX6AH promoter. These findings support a role for MEF2A as an intermediary in coordinating respiratory chain subunit expression in heart and muscle through a NRF1 → MEF2A → COXH transcriptional cascade. MEF2A also bound the MEF2A and PPARGC1A promoters in ChIP, placing it within a feedback loop with PGC1α in controlling NRF1 activity. Interruption of this cascade and loop may account for striated muscle mitochondrial defects in mef2a null mice. Our findings also account for the previously described indirect regulation by NRF1 of other MEF2 targets in muscle such as GLUT4. PMID:18222924

  17. Nuclear respiratory factor 1 controls myocyte enhancer factor 2A transcription to provide a mechanism for coordinate expression of respiratory chain subunits.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Bindu; Yu, Gengsheng; Gulick, Tod

    2008-05-01

    Nuclear respiratory factors NRF1 and NRF2 regulate the expression of nuclear genes encoding heme biosynthetic enzymes, proteins required for mitochondrial genome transcription and protein import, and numerous respiratory chain subunits. NRFs thereby coordinate the expression of nuclear and mitochondrial genes relevant to mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration. Only two of the nuclear-encoded respiratory chain subunits have evolutionarily conserved tissue-specific forms: the cytochrome c oxidase (COX) subunits VIa and VIIa heart/muscle (H) and ubiquitous (L) isoforms. We used genome comparisons to conclude that the promoter regions of COX6A(H) and COX7A(H) lack NRF sites but have conserved myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) elements. We show that MEF2A mRNA is induced with forced expression of NRF1 and that the MEF2A 5'-regulatory region contains an evolutionarily conserved canonical element that binds endogenous NRF1 in chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. NRF1 regulates MEF2A promoter-reporters according to overexpression, RNA interference underexpression, and promoter element mutation studies. As there are four mammalian MEF2 isotypes, we used an isoform-specific antibody in ChIP to confirm MEF2A binding to the COX6A(H) promoter. These findings support a role for MEF2A as an intermediary in coordinating respiratory chain subunit expression in heart and muscle through a NRF1 --> MEF2A --> COX(H) transcriptional cascade. MEF2A also bound the MEF2A and PPARGC1A promoters in ChIP, placing it within a feedback loop with PGC1alpha in controlling NRF1 activity. Interruption of this cascade and loop may account for striated muscle mitochondrial defects in mef2a null mice. Our findings also account for the previously described indirect regulation by NRF1 of other MEF2 targets in muscle such as GLUT4. PMID:18222924

  18. Inhibition of hepatitis C virus by an M1GS ribozyme derived from the catalytic RNA subunit of Escherichia coli RNase P

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a human pathogen causing chronic liver disease in about 200 million people worldwide. However, HCV resistance to interferon treatment is one of the important clinical implications, suggesting the necessity to seek new therapies. It has already been shown that some forms of the catalytic RNA moiety from E. coli RNase P, M1 RNA, can be introduced into the cytoplasm of mammalian cells for the purpose of carrying out targeted cleavage of mRNA molecules. Our study is to use an engineering M1 RNA (i.e. M1GS) for inhibiting HCV replication and demonstrates the utility of this ribozyme for antiviral applications. Results By analyzing the sequence and structure of the 5′ untranslated region of HCV RNA, a putative cleavage site (C67-G68) was selected for ribozyme designing. Based on the flanking sequence of this site, a targeting M1GS ribozyme (M1GS-HCV/C67) was constructed by linking a custom guide sequence (GS) to the 3′ termini of catalytic RNA subunit (M1 RNA) of RNase P from Escherichia coli through an 88 nt-long bridge sequence. In vitro cleavage assays confirmed that the engineered M1GS ribozyme cleaved the targeted RNA specifically. Moreover, ~85% reduction in the expression levels of HCV proteins and >1000-fold reduction in viral growth were observed in supernatant of cultured cells that transfected the functional ribozyme. In contrast, the HCV core expression and viral growth were not significantly affected by a “disabled” ribozyme (i.e. M1GS-HCV/C67*). Moreover, cholesterol-conjugated M1GS ribozyme (i.e. Chol-M1GS-HCV/C67) showed almost the same bioactivities with M1GS-HCV/C67, demonstrating the potential to improve in vivo pharmacokinetic properties of M1GS-based RNA therapeutics. Conclusion Our results provide direct evidence that the M1GS ribozyme can function as an antiviral agent and effectively inhibit gene expression and multiplication of HCV. PMID:24885776

  19. Reduced levels of NR2A and NR2B subunits of NMDA receptor and PSD-95 in the prefrontal cortex in major depression

    PubMed Central

    Feyissa, Anteneh M.; Zyga, Agata; Stockmeier, Craig A.; Karolewicz, Beata

    2009-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging and postmortem studies have demonstrated abnormalities in glutamatergic transmission in major depression. Glutamate NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors are one of the major mediators of excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. At synaptic sites, NMDA receptors are linked with postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) that plays a key role in mediating trafficking, clustering, and downstream signaling events, following receptor activation. In this study, we examined the expression of NMDA receptor subunits NR1, NR2A, and NR2B as well as PSD-95 in the anterior prefrontal cortex (PFC) using Western blot method. Cortical samples were obtained from age, gender and postmortem interval matched depressed and psychiatrically healthy controls. The results revealed that there was a reduced expression of the NMDA receptor subunits NR2A (−54%) and NR2B (−48%), and PSD-95 protein level (−40%) in the PFC of depressed subjects relative to controls, with no change in the NR1 subunit. The alterations in NMDA receptor subunits, especially the NR2A and NR2B, as well as PSD-95 suggest an abnormality in the NMDA receptor signaling in the PFC in major depression. Our findings in conjunction with recent clinical, cellular, and neuroimaging studies further implicate the involvement of glutamate neurotransmission in the pathophysiology of depression. This study provides additional evidence that NMDA receptor complex is a target for discovery of novel antidepressants. PMID:18992785

  20. GluN2A and GluN2B subunit-containing NMDA receptors in hippocampal plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Shipton, Olivia A.; Paulsen, Ole

    2014-01-01

    N-Methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent synaptic plasticity is a strong candidate to mediate learning and memory processes that require the hippocampus. This plasticity is bidirectional, and how the same receptor can mediate opposite changes in synaptic weights remains a conundrum. It has been suggested that the NMDAR subunit composition could be involved. Specifically, one subunit composition of NMDARs would be responsible for the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP), whereas NMDARs with a different subunit composition would be engaged in the induction of long-term depression (LTD). Unfortunately, the results from studies that have investigated this hypothesis are contradictory, particularly in relation to LTD. Nevertheless, current evidence does suggest that the GluN2B subunit might be particularly important for plasticity and may make a synapse bidirectionally malleable. In particular, we conclude that the presence of GluN2B subunit-containing NMDARs at the postsynaptic density might be a necessary, though not a sufficient, condition for the strengthening of individual synapses. This is owing to the interaction of GluN2B with calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and is distinct from its contribution as an ion channel. PMID:24298164

  1. The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase is required for cellular resistance to oxidative stress independent of DNA double strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengxia; Lin, Yu-Fen; Palchik, Guillermo; Matsunaga, Shinji; Wang, Dong; Chen, Benjamin P.C.

    2014-01-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) are the two major kinases involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, and are required for cellular resistance to ionizing radiation. While ATM is the key upstream kinase for DSB signaling, DNA-PKcs is primarily involved in DSB repair through the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) mechanism. In addition to DSB repair, ATM has been shown to be involved in oxidative stress response and could be activated directly in vitro upon hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment. However, the role of DNA-PKcs in cellular response to oxidative stress is not clear. We hypothesize that DNA-PKcs may participate in the regulation of ATM activation in response to oxidative stress, and that this regulatory role is independent of its role in DNA double strand break repair. Our findings reveal that H2O2 induces hyperactivation of ATM signaling in DNA-PKcs deficient, but not Ligase 4 deficient cells, suggesting an NHEJ-independent role for DNA-PKcs. Furthermore, DNA-PKcs deficiency leads to the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and to a decrease in cellular survival against H2O2. For the first time, our results reveal that DNA-PKcs plays a non-canonical role in the cellular response to oxidative stress, which is independent from its role in NHEJ. In addition, DNA-PKcs is a critical regulator of the oxidative stress response and contributes to the maintenance of redox homeostasis. Our findings reveal that DNA-PKcs is required for cellular resistance to oxidative stress and suppression of ROS build-up independently to its function in DSB repair. PMID:25224041

  2. O-GlcNAcylation of protein kinase A catalytic subunits enhances its activity: a mechanism linked to learning and memory deficits in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shutao; Jin, Nana; Gu, Jianlan; Shi, Jianhua; Sun, Jianming; Chu, Dandan; Zhang, Liang; Dai, Chun-Ling; Gu, Jin-Hua; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized clinically by memory loss and cognitive decline. Protein kinase A (PKA)-CREB signaling plays a critical role in learning and memory. It is known that glucose uptake and O-GlcNAcylation are reduced in AD brain. In this study, we found that PKA catalytic subunits (PKAcs) were posttranslationally modified by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc). O-GlcNAcylation regulated the subcellular location of PKAcα and PKAcβ and enhanced their kinase activity. Upregulation of O-GlcNAcylation in metabolically active rat brain slices by O-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-d-glucopyranosylidenamino) N-phenylcarbamate (PUGNAc), an inhibitor of N-acetylglucosaminidase, increased the phosphorylation of tau at the PKA site, Ser214, but not at the non-PKA site, Thr205. In contrast, in rat and mouse brains, downregulation of O-GlcNAcylation caused decreases in the phosphorylation of CREB at Ser133 and of tau at Ser214, but not at Thr205. Reduction in O-GlcNAcylation through intracerebroventricular injection of 6-diazo-5-oxo-l-norleucine (DON), the inhibitor of glutamine fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase, suppressed PKA-CREB signaling and impaired learning and memory in mice. These results indicate that in addition to cAMP and phosphorylation, O-GlcNAcylation is a novel mechanism that regulates PKA-CREB signaling. Downregulation of O-GlcNAcylation suppresses PKA-CREB signaling and consequently causes learning and memory deficits in AD. PMID:26840030

  3. Isoform-specific interactions between meprin metalloproteases and the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A: significance in acute and chronic kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Niyitegeka, Jean-Marie V.; Bastidas, Adam C.; Newman, Robert H.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2014-01-01

    Meprin metalloproteases are abundantly expressed in the brush-border membranes of kidney proximal tubules. Meprins are implicated in ischemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced renal injury and diabetic nephropathy. The protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway modulates extracellular matrix metabolism in diabetic kidneys. The present study evaluated isoform-specific interactions between the catalytic subunit of PKA (PKA C) and meprins. To this end, cytosolic-enriched kidney proteins from meprin αβ double knockout mice, and purified forms of recombinant mouse PKA Cα, Cβ1, and Cβ2, were incubated with activated forms of either homomeric meprin A or meprin B. The cleaved protein products were subjected to SDS-PAGE and analyzed by Coomassie staining and Western blot analysis. While meprin A only cleaved PKA Cβ1, meprin B cleaved all three PKA C isoforms. Analysis of the proteolytic fragments by mass spectrometry revealed that meprin A and B cleave the PKA C isoforms at defined sites, resulting in unique cleavage products. Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics demonstrated that meprin B-mediated cleavage of PKA Cα occurs at a rate consistent with that of other physiologically relevant meprin substrates. Meprin cleavage decreased the kinase activity of PKA Cα, Cβ1, and Cβ2. PKA C levels were higher in diabetic kidneys, with evidence of in vivo fragmentation in wild-type diabetic kidneys. Confocal microscopy showed localization of meprin A in the glomeruli of diabetic kidneys. At 3 h post-IR, PKA C levels in proximal tubules decreased compared with distal tubules, which lack meprins. These data suggest that meprins may impact kidney injury, in part, via modulation of PKA signaling pathways. PMID:25354939

  4. Adaptation of HepG2 cells to a steady-state reduction in the content of protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) catalytic subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Boylan, Joan M.; Salomon, Arthur R.; Tantravahi, Umadevi; Gruppuso, Philip A.

    2015-07-15

    Protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) is a ubiquitous Ser/Thr phosphatase involved in an array of cellular processes. To assess the potential of PP6 as a therapeutic target in liver disorders, we attenuated expression of the PP6 catalytic subunit in HepG2 cells using lentiviral-transduced shRNA. Two PP6 knock-down (PP6KD) cell lines (90% reduction of PP6-C protein content) were studied in depth. Both proliferated at a rate similar to control cells. However, flow cytometry indicated G2/M cell cycle arrest that was accounted for by a shift of the cells from a diploid to tetraploid state. PP6KD cells did not show an increase in apoptosis, nor did they exhibit reduced viability in the presence of bleomycin or taxol. Gene expression analysis by microarray showed attenuated anti-inflammatory signaling. Genes associated with DNA replication were downregulated. Mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic analysis yielded 80 phosphopeptides representing 56 proteins that were significantly affected by a stable reduction in PP6-C. Proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA damage repair and pre-mRNA splicing were overrepresented among these. PP6KD cells showed intact mTOR signaling. Our studies demonstrated involvement of PP6 in a diverse set of biological pathways and an adaptive response that may limit the effectiveness of targeting PP6 in liver disorders. - Highlights: • Lentiviral-transduced shRNA was used to generate a stable knockdown of PP6 in HepG2 cells. • Cells adapted to reduced PP6; cell proliferation was unaffected, and cell survival was normal. • However, PP6 knockdown was associated with a transition to a tetraploid state. • Genomic profiling showed downregulated anti-inflammatory signaling and DNA replication. • Phosphoproteomic profiling showed changes in proteins associated with DNA replication and repair.

  5. Differential contribution of the NR1- and NR2A-subunits to the selectivity filter of recombinant NMDA receptor channels.

    PubMed Central

    Wollmuth, L P; Kuner, T; Seeburg, P H; Sakmann, B

    1996-01-01

    1. The molecular determinants for the narrow constriction of recombinant N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor channels composed of wild-type and mutant NR1- and NR2A-subunits were studied in Xenopus oocytes. 2. The relative permeability of differently sized organic cations was used as an indicator of the size of the narrow constriction. From measured reversal potentials under bi-ionic conditions with K+ as the reference solution, permeability ratios were calculated with the Lewis equation. 3. For wild-type NMDA receptor channels, five organic cations showed clear reversal potentials, with permeability ratios (PX/PK): ammonium, 1.28; methylammonium, 0.48; dimethylammonium (DMA), 0.20; diethylammonium, 0.07; and dimethylethanol-ammonium, 0.02. 4. Mutation of the N-site asparagine (N) to glutamine (Q) at homologous positions in either NR1 (position 598) or NR2A (position 595) increased the permeability of DMA relative to wild-type channels about equally. However, for larger sized organic cations, the NR1(N598Q) mutation had stronger effects on increasing their permeability whereas the NR2A(N595Q) mutation was without effect. These changes in organic cation permeability suggest that the NR1(N598Q) mutation increases the pore size while the NR2A(N595Q) mutation does not. 5. Channels in which the NR1 N-site asparagine was replaced by the smaller glycine (G), NR1(N598G)-NR2A, showed the largest increase in pore size of all sites examined in either subunit. In contrast, in the NR2A-subunit the same N-site substitution to glycine produced only small effects on pore size. 6. For the NR2A-subunit, an asparagine residue (position 596) on the C-terminal side of the N-site, when mutated to larger or smaller sized amino acids, produced large, volume-specific effects on pore size. The mutant channel NR1-NR2A(N596G) had the largest increase in pore size of all sites examined in the NR2A-subunit. In contrast, mutation of the homologous position in the NR1-subunit had no effect on

  6. Identification of Glu-519 as the catalytic nucleophile in beta-mannosidase 2A from Cellulomonas fimi.

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, D; He, S; Withers, S G; Warren, R A

    2000-01-01

    Incubation of the beta-mannosidase Man2A from Cellulomonas fimi with 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-beta-D-mannosyl fluoride (2FMan beta F) resulted in time-dependent inactivation of the enzyme (inactivation rate constant k(i)=0.57 min(-1), dissociation constant for the inactivator K(i)=0.41 mM) through the accumulation of a covalent 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-alpha-D-mannosyl-beta-mannosidase 2A (2FMan-Man2A) enzyme intermediate, as observed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The stoichiometry of inactivation was 1:1. Removal of excess inactivator and regeneration of active enzyme by transglycosylation of the covalently attached inhibitor to gentiobiose [Glc beta(1-6)Glc] demonstrated that the covalent intermediate was catalytically competent. Comparison by MS of the peptic digests of 2FMan-Man2A with peptic digests of native Man2A revealed a peptide of m/z 1520 that was unique to 2FMan-Man2A, and one of m/z 1036.5 that was unique to a Man2A peptide. Their sequences, determined by collision-induced fragmentation, were CSEFGFQGPPTW and FGFQGPPTW, corresponding to residues 517-528 and 520-528 of Man2A respectively. The difference in mass of 483.5 between the two peptides equals the sum of the masses of the tripeptide CSE plus that of 2-fluoromannose. It was concluded that in 2FMan-Man2A, the 2-fluoromannose esterified to Glu-519 blocks hydrolysis of the Glu-519-Phe-520 peptide bond, and that Glu-519 is the catalytic nucleophile in this enzyme. This residue is conserved in all members of family 2 of the glycosyl hydrolases. This represents the first ever labelling and identification of an active-site nucleophile in a beta-mannosidase. PMID:11042141

  7. Theoretical models of catalytic domains of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A with Zn2+ and Mn2+ metal dications and putative bioligands in their catalytic centers.

    PubMed

    Woźniak-Celmer, E; Ołdziej, S; Ciarkowski, J

    2001-01-01

    The oligomeric metalloenzymes protein phosphatases dephosphorylate OH groups of Ser/Thr or Tyr residues of proteins whose actions depend on the phosphorus signal. The catalytic units of Ser/Thr protein phosphatases 1, 2A and 2B (PP1c, PP2Ac and PP2Bc, respectively), which exhibit about 45% sequence similarity, have their active centers practically identical. This feature strongly suggests that the unknown structure of PP2Ac could be successfully homology-modeled from the known structures of PP1c and/or PP2Bc. Initially, a theoretical model of PP1c was built, including a phosphate and a metal dication in its catalytic site. The latter was modeled, together with a structural hydroxyl anion, as a triangular pseudo-molecule (Zno or Mno), composed of two metal cations (double Zn2+ or Mn2+, respectively) and the OH- group. To the free PP1c two inhibitor sequences R29RRRPpTPAMLFR40 of DARPP-32 and R30RRRPpTPATLVLT42 of Inhibitor-1, and two putative substrate sequences LRRApSVA and QRRQRKpRRTI were subsequently docked. In the next step, a free PP2Ac model was built via homology re-modeling of the PP1c template and the same four sequences were docked to it. Thus, together, 20 starting model complexes were built, allowing for combination of the Zno and Mno pseudo-molecules, free enzymes and the peptide ligands docked in the catalytic sites of PP1c and PP2Ac. All models were subsequently subjected to 250-300 ps molecular dynamics using the AMBER 5.0 program. The equilibrated trajectories of the final 50 ps were taken for further analyses. The theoretical models of PP1c complexes, irrespective of the dication type, exhibited increased mobilities in the following residue ranges: 195-200, 273-278, 287-209 for the inhibitor sequences and 21-25, 194-200, 222-227, 261, 299-302 for the substrate sequences. Paradoxically, the analogous PP2Ac models appeared much more stable in similar simulations, since only their "prosegment" residues 6-10 and 14-18 exhibited an increased mobility

  8. Molecular cloning and heterologous expression of a cDNA encoding a mouse glutathione S-transferase Yc subunit possessing high catalytic activity for aflatoxin B1-8,9-epoxide.

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, J D; Judah, D J; Neal, G E; Nguyen, T

    1992-01-01

    Resistance to the carcinogenic effects of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) in the mouse is due to the constitutive expression of an Alpha-class glutathione S-transferase (GST), YcYc, with high detoxification activity towards AFB1-8,9-epoxide. A cDNA clone (pmusGST Yc) for a murine GST Yc polypeptide has been isolated. Sequencing has shown the cDNA insert of pmusGST Yc to be 922 bp in length, with an open reading frame of 663 bp that encodes a polypeptide of M(r) 25358. The primary structure of the murine GST Yc subunit predicted by pmusGST Yc is in complete agreement with the partial amino acid sequence of the aflatoxin-metabolizing mouse liver GST described previously [McLellan, Kerr, Cronshaw & Hayes (1991) Biochem. J. 276, 461-469]. A plasmid, termed pKK-musGST Yc, which permits the expression of the murine Yc subunit in Escherichia coli, has been constructed. The murine GST expressed in E. coli was purified and found to be catalytically active towards several GST substrates, including AFB1-8,9-epoxide. This enzyme was also found to possess electrophoretic and immunochemical properties closely similar to those of the GST Yc subunit from mouse liver. However, the GST synthesized in E. coli and the constitutive mouse liver Alpha-class GST exhibited small differences in their chromatographic behaviour during reverse-phase h.p.l.c. Automated Edman degradation revealed alanine to be the N-terminal amino acid in the GST Yc subunit expressed in E. coli, whereas the enzyme in mouse liver possesses a blocked N-terminus. Although sequencing showed that the purified Yc subunit from E. coli lacked the initiator methionine, the amino acid sequence obtained over the first eleven N-terminal residues agreed with that predicted from the cDNA clone, pmusGST Yc. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the mouse Yc polypeptide with the primary structures of the rat Alpha-class GST enzymes revealed that it is more closely related to the ethoxyquin-induced rat liver Yc2 subunit than to

  9. Modification of the Catalytic Function of Human Hydroxysteroid Sulfotransferase hSULT2A1 by Formation of Disulfide Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xiaoyan; Teesch, Lynn M.

    2013-01-01

    The human cytosolic sulfotransferase hSULT2A1 catalyzes the sulfation of a broad range of xenobiotics, as well as endogenous hydroxysteroids and bile acids. Reversible modulation of the catalytic activity of this enzyme could play important roles in its physiologic functions. Whereas other mammalian sulfotransferases are known to be reversibly altered by changes in their redox environment, this has not been previously shown for hSULT2A1. We have examined the hypothesis that the formation of disulfide bonds in hSULT2A1 can reversibly regulate the catalytic function of the enzyme. Three thiol oxidants were used as model compounds to investigate their effects on homogeneous preparations of hSULT2A1: glutathione disulfide, 5,5′-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid), and 1,1’-azobis(N,N-dimethylformamide) (diamide). Examination of the effects of disulfide bond formation with these agents indicated that the activity of the enzyme is reversibly altered. Studies on the kinetics of the hSULT2A1-catalyzed sulfation of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) showed the effects of disulfide bond formation on the substrate inhibition characteristics of the enzyme. The effects of these agents on the binding of substrates and products, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry identification of the disulfides formed, and structural modeling of the modified enzyme were examined. Our results indicate that conformational changes at cysteines near the nucleotide binding site affect the binding of both the nucleotide and DHEA to the enzyme, with the specific effects dependent on the structure of the resulting disulfide. Thus, the formation of disulfide bonds in hSULT2A1 is a potentially important reversible mechanism for alterations in the rates of sulfation of both endogenous and xenobiotic substrates. PMID:23444386

  10. Induction of p53-Independent Apoptosis by the Adenovirus E4orf4 Protein Requires Binding to the Bα Subunit of Protein Phosphatase 2A

    PubMed Central

    Marcellus, Richard C.; Chan, Helen; Paquette, Denis; Thirlwell, Sarah; Boivin, Dominique; Branton, Philip E.

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the E4orf4 protein of human adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) induces p53-independent apoptosis. We believe that this process may play a role in cell death and viral spread at the final stages of productive infection. E4orf4 may also be of therapeutic value in treating some diseases, including cancer, through its ability to induce apoptosis when expressed individually. The only previously identified biochemical function of E4orf4 is its ability to associate with the Bα subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). We have used a genetic approach to determine the role of such interactions in E4orf4-induced cell death. E4orf4 deletion mutants were of only limited value, as all were highly defective. We found that E4orf4 proteins from most if not all adenovirus serotypes induced cell death, and thus point mutations were introduced that converted the majority of highly conserved residues to alanines. Such mutants were used to correlate Bα-subunit binding, association with PP2A activity, and cell killing following the transfection of appropriate cDNAs into p53-null H1299 or C33A cells. The results indicated that binding of the Bα subunit is essential for induction of cell death, as every mutant that failed to bind efficiently was totally defective for cell killing. This class of mutations (class I) largely involved residues between amino acids 51 and 89. Almost all E4orf4 mutant proteins that associated with PP2A killed cancer cells at high levels; however, several mutants that associated with significant levels of PP2A were defective for killing (class II). Thus, binding of E4orf4 to PP2A is essential for induction of p53-independent apoptosis, but E4orf4 may possess one or more additional functions required for cell killing. PMID:10933694

  11. A region of the rat N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2A subunit that is sufficient for potentiation by phorbol esters.

    PubMed

    Grant, E R; Guttmann, R P; Seifert, K M; Lynch, D R

    2001-09-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are modulated by protein kinase C (PKC) in vivo and in heterologous expression systems. In heterologous expression systems, PKC-mediated modulation is subunit specific with NR2A-containing receptors being potentiated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), while NR2C-containing receptors are inhibited or unaffected. In the present study we have produced chimeric receptors containing NR2A and NR2C to define the components of NR2A which are sufficient for potentiation by PMA. Amino acids 1105-1400 of NR2A placed onto the C-terminus of NR2C at amino acid 1102 was the minimum region sufficient for producing a PMA-stimulated receptor. This suggests that this region contains structural determinants for PKC-mediated potentiation of NR2A receptors. PMID:11524145

  12. FXYD2, a γ subunit of Na+,K+-ATPase, maintains persistent mechanical allodynia induced by inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Cai, Bing; Li, Kai-Cheng; Hu, Xu-Ye; Lu, Ying-Jin; Wang, Qiong; Bao, Lan; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Na+,K+-ATPase (NKA) is required to generate the resting membrane potential in neurons. Nociceptive afferent neurons express not only the α and β subunits of NKA but also the γ subunit FXYD2. However, the neural function of FXYD2 is unknown. The present study shows that FXYD2 in nociceptive neurons is necessary for maintaining the mechanical allodynia induced by peripheral inflammation. FXYD2 interacted with α1NKA and negatively regulated the NKA activity, depolarizing the membrane potential of nociceptive neurons. Mechanical allodynia initiated in FXYD2-deficient mice was abolished 4 days after inflammation, whereas it persisted for at least 3 weeks in wild-type mice. Importantly, the FXYD2/α1NKA interaction gradually increased after inflammation and peaked on day 4 post inflammation, resulting in reduction of NKA activity, depolarization of neuron membrane and facilitation of excitatory afferent neurotransmission. Thus, the increased FXYD2 activity may be a fundamental mechanism underlying the persistent hypersensitivity to pain induced by inflammation. PMID:25633594

  13. Inhibitor-1 and -2 of PP2A have preference between PP2A complexes.

    PubMed

    Hino, Hirotsugu; Takaki, Kaori; Mochida, Satoru

    2015-11-13

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) forms tens of kinds of complexes with different substrate specificity and functions by using various regulatory B subunits. But how these complexes' activities are regulated separately is not well understood. Here we showed unequal enzyme inhibition of each form by two proteinous PP2A inhibitors, I1(PP2A) and I2(PP2A). Immunoprecipitation assay using Xenopus egg extract showed that I1(PP2A) bound B″/PR48, and I2(PP2A) bound B56γ and B″/PR48 among four B subunits analyzed. Thus I1(PP2A) and I2(PP2A) seem to have B-subunit specificity. These results support the hypothesis that PP2A complexes containing common catalytic subunit are individually regulated for their separate functions in vivo. PMID:26449453

  14. Molecular basis of the selectivity of the immunoproteasome catalytic subunit LMP2-specific inhibitor revealed by molecular modeling and dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Lei, Beilei; Abdul Hameed, Mohamed Diwan M; Hamza, Adel; Wehenkel, Marie; Muzyka, Jennifer L; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Kim, Kyung-Bo; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2010-09-30

    Given that immunoproteasome inhibitors are currently being developed for a variety of potent therapeutic purposes, the unique specificity of an α',β'-epoxyketone peptide (UK101) toward the LMP2 subunit of the immunoproteasome (analogous to β5 subunit of the constitutive proteasome) has been investigated in this study for the first time by employing homology modeling, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) binding free energy calculations. On the basis of the simulated binding structures, the calculated binding free energies are in qualitative agreement with the corresponding experimental data, and the selectivity of UK101 is explained reasonably. The observed selectivity of UK101 for the LMP2 subunit is rationalized by the requirement for both a linear hydrocarbon chain at the N terminus and a bulky group at the C terminus of the inhibitor, because the LMP2 subunit has a much more favorable hydrophobic pocket interacting with the linear hydrocarbon chain, and the bulky group at the C terminus has a steric clash with the Tyr 169 in β5 subunit. Finally, our results help to clarify why UK101 is specific to the LMP2 subunit of immunoproteasome, and this investigation should be valuable for rational design of more potent LMP2-specific inhibitors. PMID:20812720

  15. Molecular Basis of the Selectivity of the Immunoproteasome Catalytic Subunit LMP2-Specific Inhibitor Revealed by Molecular Modeling and Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Beilei; AbdulHameed, Mohamed Diwan M.; Hamza, Adel; Wehenkel, Marie; Muzyka, Jennifer L.; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Kim, Kyung-Bo; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2010-01-01

    Given that immunoproteasome inhibitors are currently being developed for a variety of potent therapeutic purposes, the unique specificity of an α′,β′-epoxyketone peptide (UK101) towards the LMP2 subunit of the immunoproteasome (analogous to β5 subunit of the constitutive proteasome) has been investigated in this study for the first time by employing homology modeling, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) binding free energy calculations. Based on the simulated binding structures, the calculated binding free energies are in qualitative agreement with the corresponding experimental data and the selectivity of UK101 is explained reasonably. The observed selectivity of UK101 for the LMP2 subunit is rationalized by the requirement for both a linear hydrocarbon chain at the N-terminus and a bulky group at the C-terminus of the inhibitor, because that LMP2 subunit has a much more favorable hydrophobic pocket interacting with the linear hydrocarbon chain, and the bulky group at the C-terminus has a steric clash with the Tyr 169 in β5 subunit. Finally, our results help to clarify why UK101 is specific to the LMP2 subunit of immunoproteasome, and this investigation should be valuable for rational design of more potent LMP2-specific inhibitors. PMID:20812720

  16. Identification of a new site in the S1 ligand binding region of the NMDA receptor NR2A subunit involved in receptor activation by glutamate.

    PubMed

    Lummis, Sarah C R; Fletcher, Elizabeth J; Green, Tim

    2002-03-01

    Activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors requires the binding of both glutamate and glycine to independent sites on the receptor. These ligands bind to NR2 and NR1 subunits respectively. Ligand binding residues are located in two non-contiguous domains, S1 and S2, which have been implicated in glutamate binding in other ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits. To further define the amino acids through which glutamate activates the receptor, we generated single-site mutations to the NR2A subunit, and expressed them with wild type NR1 in HEK 293 cells. Using calcium imaging and whole cell patch clamp we determined glutamate and glycine potencies. Of the eight residues mutated we identified five (E413, K484, A508, G685 and G688), whose mutation leads to a large reduction (from 4- to 1000-fold) in glutamate potency, consistent with a role for these residues in receptor activation by glutamate. The potency of glycine was largely unchanged by these mutations. Thus our results extend the knowledge base of residues involved in NMDA receptor function and identifies a new site in S1, in the region of A508, that has a role in receptor activation by glutamate. PMID:11955515

  17. Global Analysis of Serine/Threonine and Tyrosine Protein Phosphatase Catalytic Subunit Genes in Neurospora crassa Reveals Interplay Between Phosphatases and the p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arit; Servin, Jacqueline A.; Park, Gyungsoon; Borkovich, Katherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphatases are integral components of the cellular signaling machinery in eukaryotes, regulating diverse aspects of growth and development. The genome of the filamentous fungus and model organism Neurospora crassa encodes catalytic subunits for 30 protein phosphatase genes. In this study, we have characterized 24 viable N. crassa phosphatase catalytic subunit knockout mutants for phenotypes during growth, asexual development, and sexual development. We found that 91% of the mutants had defects in at least one of these traits, whereas 29% possessed phenotypes in all three. Chemical sensitivity screens were conducted to reveal additional phenotypes for the mutants. This resulted in the identification of at least one chemical sensitivity phenotype for 17 phosphatase knockout mutants, including novel chemical sensitivities for two phosphatase mutants lacking a growth or developmental phenotype. Hence, chemical sensitivity or growth/developmental phenotype was observed for all 24 viable mutants. We investigated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation profiles in the phosphatase mutants and identified nine potential candidates for regulators of the p38 MAPK. We demonstrated that the PP2C class phosphatase pph-8 (NCU04600) is an important regulator of female sexual development in N. crassa. In addition, we showed that the Δcsp-6 (ΔNCU08380) mutant exhibits a phenotype similar to the previously identified conidial separation mutants, Δcsp-1 and Δcsp-2, that lack transcription factors important for regulation of conidiation and the circadian clock. PMID:24347630

  18. Neonatal prebiotic (BGOS) supplementation increases the levels of synaptophysin, GluN2A-subunits and BDNF proteins in the adult rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Williams, Sarah; Chen, Li; Savignac, Helene M; Tzortzis, George; Anthony, Daniel C; Burnet, Philip W J

    2016-03-01

    Compelling data suggest that perturbations in microbial colonization of the gut in early-life, influences neurodevelopment and adult brain function. If this is the case, then ensuring the growth of beneficial bacteria at an early age will lead to optimal brain development and maturation. We have tested whether feeding neonatal rats daily (from post-natal days 3-21) with a galacto-oligosaccharide prebiotic (Bimuno®, BGOS) or a control solution, alters the levels of hippocampal N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunits (GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2B), synaptic proteins (synaptophysin, MAP2, and GAP43) and brain-derived-neurotrophic factor (BDNF), at post-natal days 22 and 56. The administration of BGOS significantly elevated GluN2A subunits, synaptophysin and BDNF in the hippocampus of 22 day old rats. The effect was also observed on day 56 (26 days after the feeding ceased). The levels of all other proteins (GluN1, GluN2B, MAP2, GAP43) remained unaltered. Increased GluN2A, synaptophysin, BDNF, but not MAP2, may suggest that neonatal BGOS feeding alters neurotransmission rather than synaptic architecture. Although the functional consequences of our findings require further investigation, the current study confirms that the manipulation of gut bacteria in early-life, has central effects that persist until at least young adulthood. PMID:26682524

  19. SWI/SNF-mutant cancers depend on catalytic and non-catalytic activity of EZH2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kimberly H; Kim, Woojin; Howard, Thomas P; Vazquez, Francisca; Tsherniak, Aviad; Wu, Jennifer N; Wang, Weishan; Haswell, Jeffrey R; Walensky, Loren D; Hahn, William C; Orkin, Stuart H; Roberts, Charles W M

    2015-12-01

    Human cancer genome sequencing has recently revealed that genes that encode subunits of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes are frequently mutated across a wide variety of cancers, and several subunits of the complex have been shown to have bona fide tumor suppressor activity. However, whether mutations in SWI/SNF subunits result in shared dependencies is unknown. Here we show that EZH2, a catalytic subunit of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), is essential in all tested cancer cell lines and xenografts harboring mutations of the SWI/SNF subunits ARID1A, PBRM1, and SMARCA4, which are several of the most frequently mutated SWI/SNF subunits in human cancer, but that co-occurrence of a Ras pathway mutation is correlated with abrogation of this dependence. Notably, we demonstrate that SWI/SNF-mutant cancer cells are primarily dependent on a non-catalytic role of EZH2 in the stabilization of the PRC2 complex, and that they are only partially dependent on EZH2 histone methyltransferase activity. These results not only reveal a shared dependency of cancers with genetic alterations in SWI/SNF subunits, but also suggest that EZH2 enzymatic inhibitors now in clinical development may not fully suppress the oncogenic activity of EZH2. PMID:26552009

  20. SWI/SNF mutant cancers depend upon catalytic and non–catalytic activity of EZH2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kimberly H.; Kim, Woojin; Howard, Thomas P.; Vazquez, Francisca; Tsherniak, Aviad; Wu, Jennifer N.; Wang, Weishan; Haswell, Jeffrey R.; Walensky, Loren D.; Hahn, William C.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Roberts, Charles W. M.

    2016-01-01

    Human cancer genome sequencing has recently revealed that genes encoding subunits of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes are frequently mutated across a wide variety of cancers, and several subunits of the complex have been shown to have bona fide tumor suppressor activity1. However, whether mutations in SWI/SNF subunits result in shared dependencies is unknown. Here we show that EZH2, a catalytic subunit of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), is essential in all tested cancer cell lines and xenografts harboring mutations of the SWI/SNF subunits ARID1A, PBRM1, and SMARCA4, which are several of the most frequently mutated SWI/SNF subunits in human cancer but that co–occurrence of a Ras pathway mutation correlates with abrogation of this dependence. Surprisingly, we demonstrate that SWI/SNF mutant cancer cells are primarily dependent upon a non–catalytic role of EZH2 in stabilization of the PRC2 complex, and only partially dependent on EZH2 histone methyltransferase activity. These results not only reveal a shared dependency of cancers with genetic alterations in SWI/SNF subunits, but also suggest that EZH2 enzymatic inhibitors now in clinical development may not fully suppress the oncogenic activity of EZH2. PMID:26552009

  1. Catalytic Asymmetric Synthesis of Dihydropyrido[1,2-a]indoles from Nitrones and Allenoates.

    PubMed

    Pace, Wiktoria H; Mo, Dong-Liang; Reidl, Tyler W; Wink, Donald J; Anderson, Laura L

    2016-08-01

    An asymmetric method for the synthesis of dihydropyrido[1,2-a]indoles from mixtures of nitrones and allenoates has been developed. This transformation showcases the use of squaramide catalysis in a complicated cascade system that has been shown to be highly sensitive to reaction conditions and substituent effects. The new method provides access to enantiomerically enriched dihydropyridoindoles from modular, non-indole reagents. The optimization and scope of the new transformation is discussed in addition to initial mechanistic experiments that indicate the role of the catalyst. PMID:27346675

  2. Protein phosphatases PP2A, PP4 and PP6: mediators and regulators in development and responses to environmental cues.

    PubMed

    Lillo, Cathrine; Kataya, Amr R A; Heidari, Behzad; Creighton, Maria T; Nemie-Feyissa, Dugassa; Ginbot, Zekarias; Jonassen, Else M

    2014-12-01

    The three closely related groups of serine/threonine protein phosphatases PP2A, PP4 and PP6 are conserved throughout eukaryotes. The catalytic subunits are present in trimeric and dimeric complexes with scaffolding and regulatory subunits that control activity and confer substrate specificity to the protein phosphatases. In Arabidopsis, three scaffolding (A subunits) and 17 regulatory (B subunits) proteins form complexes with five PP2A catalytic subunits giving up to 255 possible combinations. Three SAP-domain proteins act as regulatory subunits of PP6. Based on sequence similarities with proteins in yeast and mammals, two putative PP4 regulatory subunits are recognized in Arabidopsis. Recent breakthroughs have been made concerning the functions of some of the PP2A and PP6 regulatory subunits, for example the FASS/TON2 in regulation of the cellular skeleton, B' subunits in brassinosteroid signalling and SAL proteins in regulation of auxin transport. Reverse genetics is starting to reveal also many more physiological functions of other subunits. A system with key regulatory proteins (TAP46, TIP41, PTPA, LCMT1, PME-1) is present in all eukaryotes to stabilize, activate and inactivate the catalytic subunits. In this review, we present the status of knowledge concerning physiological functions of PP2A, PP4 and PP6 in Arabidopsis, and relate these to yeast and mammals. PMID:24810976

  3. Mechanisms of HIV-tat-Induced Phosphorylation of N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor Subunit 2A in Human Primary Neurons

    PubMed Central

    King, Jessie E.; Eugenin, Eliseo A.; Hazleton, Joy E.; Morgello, Susan; Berman, Joan W.

    2010-01-01

    HIV infection of the central nervous system results in neurological dysfunction in a large number of individuals. NeuroAIDS is characterized by neuronal injury and loss, yet there is no evidence of HIV-infected neurons. Neuronal damage and dropout must therefore be due to indirect effects of HIV infection of other central nervous system cells through elaboration of inflammatory factors and neurotoxic viral proteins, including the viral transactivator, tat. We previously demonstrated that HIV-tat-induced apoptosis in human primary neurons is dependent on N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activity. NMDAR activity is regulated by various mechanisms including NMDAR phosphorylation, which may lead to neuronal dysfunction and apoptosis in pathological conditions. We now demonstrate that tat treatment of human neurons results in tyrosine (Y) phosphorylation of the NMDAR subunit 2A (NR2A) in a src kinase–dependent manner. In vitro kinase assays and in vivo data indicated that NR2A Y1184, Y1325, and Y1425 are phosphorylated. Tat treatment of neuronal cultures enhanced phosphorylation of NR2A Y1325, indicating that this site is tat sensitive. Human brain tissue sections from HIV-infected individuals with encephalitis showed an increased phosphorylation of NR2A Y1325 in neurons as compared with uninfected and HIV-infected individuals without encephalitis. These findings suggest new avenues of treatment for HIV-associated cognitive impairment. PMID:20448061

  4. The human gene (CSNK2A1) coding for the casein kinase II subunit [alpha] is located on chromosome 20 and contains tandemly arranged Alu repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Wirkner, U.; Lichter, P.; Pyerin, W. ); Voss, H.; Ansorge, W. )

    1994-01-15

    The authors have isolated and characterized an 18.9-kb genomic clone representing a central portion of the human casein kinase II (CKII) subunit [alpha] gene (CSNK2A1). Using the whole clone as a probe, the gene was localized on chromosome 20p13. The clone contains eight exons whose sequences comprise bases 102 to 824 of the coding region of the human CKII[alpha]. The exon/intron splice junctions conform to the gt/ag rule. Three of the nine introns are located at positions corresponding to those in the CKII[alpha] gene of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The introns contain eight complete and eight incomplete Alu repeats. Some of the Alu sequences are arranged in tandems of two or three, which seem to originate from insertions of younger Alu sequences into the poly(A) region of previously integrated Alu sequences, as indicated by flanking direct repeats. 50 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Neonatal seizures alter NMDA glutamate receptor GluN2A and 3A subunit expression and function in hippocampal CA1 neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chengwen; Sun, Hongyu; Klein, Peter M; Jensen, Frances E

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal seizures are commonly caused by hypoxic and/or ischemic injury during birth and can lead to long-term epilepsy and cognitive deficits. In a rodent hypoxic seizure (HS) model, we have previously demonstrated a critical role for seizure-induced enhancement of the AMPA subtype of glutamate receptor (GluA) in epileptogenesis and cognitive consequences, in part due to GluA maturational upregulation of expression. Similarly, as the expression and function of the N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptor (GluN) is also developmentally controlled, we examined how early life seizures during the critical period of synaptogenesis could modify GluN development and function. In a postnatal day (P)10 rat model of neonatal seizures, we found that seizures could alter GluN2/3 subunit composition of GluNs and physiological function of synaptic GluNs. In hippocampal slices removed from rats within 48-96 h following seizures, the amplitudes of synaptic GluN-mediated evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) were elevated in CA1 pyramidal neurons. Moreover, GluN eEPSCs showed a decreased sensitivity to GluN2B selective antagonists and decreased Mg(2+) sensitivity at negative holding potentials, indicating a higher proportion of GluN2A and GluN3A subunit function, respectively. These physiological findings were accompanied by a concurrent increase in GluN2A phosphorylation and GluN3A protein. These results suggest that altered GluN function and expression could potentially contribute to future epileptogenesis following neonatal seizures, and may represent potential therapeutic targets for the blockade of future epileptogenesis in the developing brain. PMID:26441533

  6. The PP2A Regulatory Subunit Tap46, a Component of the TOR Signaling Pathway, Modulates Growth and Metabolism in Plants[W

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Chang Sook; Han, Jeong-A; Lee, Ho-Seok; Lee, Semi; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2011-01-01

    Tap42/α4, a regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A, is a downstream effector of the target of rapamycin (TOR) protein kinase, which regulates cell growth in coordination with nutrient and environmental conditions in yeast and mammals. In this study, we characterized the functions and phosphatase regulation of plant Tap46. Depletion of Tap46 resulted in growth arrest and acute plant death with morphological markers of programmed cell death. Tap46 interacted with PP2A and PP2A-like phosphatases PP4 and PP6. Tap46 silencing modulated cellular PP2A activities in a time-dependent fashion similar to TOR silencing. Immunoprecipitated full-length and deletion forms of Arabidopsis thaliana TOR phosphorylated recombinant Tap46 protein in vitro, supporting a functional link between Tap46 and TOR. Tap46 depletion reproduced the signature phenotypes of TOR inactivation, such as dramatic repression of global translation and activation of autophagy and nitrogen mobilization, indicating that Tap46 may act as a positive effector of TOR signaling in controlling those processes. Additionally, Tap46 silencing in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) BY-2 cells caused chromatin bridge formation at anaphase, indicating its role in sister chromatid segregation. These findings suggest that Tap46, in conjunction with associated phosphatases, plays an essential role in plant growth and development as a component of the TOR signaling pathway. PMID:21216945

  7. The Catalytic Properties of Hybrid Rubisco Comprising Tobacco Small and Sunflower Large Subunits Mirror the Kinetically Equivalent Source Rubiscos and Can Support Tobacco Growth1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Sharwood, Robert Edward; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Maliga, Pal; Whitney, Spencer Michael

    2008-01-01

    Plastomic replacement of the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Rubisco large subunit gene (rbcL) with that from sunflower (Helianthus annuus; rbcLS) produced tobaccoRst transformants that produced a hybrid Rubisco consisting of sunflower large and tobacco small subunits (LsSt). The tobaccoRst plants required CO2 (0.5% v/v) supplementation to grow autotrophically from seed despite the substrate saturated carboxylation rate, Km, for CO2 and CO2/O2 selectivity of the LsSt enzyme mirroring the kinetically equivalent tobacco and sunflower Rubiscos. Consequently, at the onset of exponential growth when the source strength and leaf LsSt content were sufficient, tobaccoRst plants grew to maturity without CO2 supplementation. When grown under a high pCO2, the tobaccoRst seedlings grew slower than tobacco and exhibited unique growth phenotypes: Juvenile plants formed clusters of 10 to 20 structurally simple oblanceolate leaves, developed multiple apical meristems, and the mature leaves displayed marginal curling and dimpling. Depending on developmental stage, the LsSt content in tobaccoRst leaves was 4- to 7-fold less than tobacco, and gas exchange coupled with chlorophyll fluorescence showed that at 2 mbar pCO2 and growth illumination CO2 assimilation in mature tobaccoRst leaves remained limited by Rubisco activity and its rate (approximately 11 μmol m−2 s−1) was half that of tobacco controls. 35S-methionine labeling showed the stability of assembled LsSt was similar to tobacco Rubisco and measurements of light transient CO2 assimilation rates showed LsSt was adequately regulated by tobacco Rubisco activase. We conclude limitations to tobaccoRst growth primarily stem from reduced rbcLS mRNA levels and the translation and/or assembly of sunflower large with the tobacco small subunits that restricted LsSt synthesis. PMID:17993544

  8. MPX-004 and MPX-007: New Pharmacological Tools to Study the Physiology of NMDA Receptors Containing the GluN2A Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Volkmann, Robert A.; Fanger, Christopher M.; Anderson, David R.; Sirivolu, Venkata Ramana; Paschetto, Kathy; Gordon, Earl; Virginio, Caterina; Gleyzes, Melanie; Buisson, Bruno; Steidl, Esther; Mierau, Susanna B.; Fagiolini, Michela; Menniti, Frank S.

    2016-01-01

    GluN2A is the most abundant of the GluN2 NMDA receptor subunits in the mammalian CNS. Physiological and genetic evidence implicate GluN2A-containing receptors in susceptibility to autism, schizophrenia, childhood epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disorders such as Rett Syndrome. However, GluN2A-selective pharmacological probes to explore the therapeutic potential of targeting these receptors have been lacking. Here we disclose a novel series of pyrazine-containing GluN2A antagonists exemplified by MPX-004 (5-(((3-chloro-4-fluorophenyl)sulfonamido)methyl)-N-((2-methylthiazol-5-yl)methyl)pyrazine-2-carboxamide) and MPX-007 (5-(((3-fluoro-4-fluorophenyl)sulfonamido)methyl)-N-((2-methylthiazol-5-yl)methyl)methylpyrazine-2-carboxamide). MPX-004 and MPX-007 inhibit GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors expressed in HEK cells with IC50s of 79 nM and 27 nM, respectively. In contrast, at concentrations that completely inhibited GluN2A activity these compounds have no inhibitory effect on GluN2B or GluN2D receptor-mediated responses in similar HEK cell-based assays. Potency and selectivity were confirmed in electrophysiology assays in Xenopus oocytes expressing GluN2A-D receptor subtypes. Maximal concentrations of MPX-004 and MPX-007 inhibited ~30% of the whole-cell current in rat pyramidal neurons in primary culture and MPX-004 inhibited ~60% of the total NMDA receptor-mediated EPSP in rat hippocampal slices. GluN2A-selectivity at native receptors was confirmed by the finding that MPX-004 had no inhibitory effect on NMDA receptor mediated synaptic currents in cortical slices from GRIN2A knock out mice. Thus, MPX-004 and MPX-007 offer highly selective pharmacological tools to probe GluN2A physiology and involvement in neuropsychiatric and developmental disorders. PMID:26829109

  9. MPX-004 and MPX-007: New Pharmacological Tools to Study the Physiology of NMDA Receptors Containing the GluN2A Subunit.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Robert A; Fanger, Christopher M; Anderson, David R; Sirivolu, Venkata Ramana; Paschetto, Kathy; Gordon, Earl; Virginio, Caterina; Gleyzes, Melanie; Buisson, Bruno; Steidl, Esther; Mierau, Susanna B; Fagiolini, Michela; Menniti, Frank S

    2016-01-01

    GluN2A is the most abundant of the GluN2 NMDA receptor subunits in the mammalian CNS. Physiological and genetic evidence implicate GluN2A-containing receptors in susceptibility to autism, schizophrenia, childhood epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disorders such as Rett Syndrome. However, GluN2A-selective pharmacological probes to explore the therapeutic potential of targeting these receptors have been lacking. Here we disclose a novel series of pyrazine-containing GluN2A antagonists exemplified by MPX-004 (5-(((3-chloro-4-fluorophenyl)sulfonamido)methyl)-N-((2-methylthiazol-5-yl)methyl)pyrazine-2-carboxamide) and MPX-007 (5-(((3-fluoro-4-fluorophenyl)sulfonamido)methyl)-N-((2-methylthiazol-5-yl)methyl)methylpyrazine-2-carboxamide). MPX-004 and MPX-007 inhibit GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors expressed in HEK cells with IC50s of 79 nM and 27 nM, respectively. In contrast, at concentrations that completely inhibited GluN2A activity these compounds have no inhibitory effect on GluN2B or GluN2D receptor-mediated responses in similar HEK cell-based assays. Potency and selectivity were confirmed in electrophysiology assays in Xenopus oocytes expressing GluN2A-D receptor subtypes. Maximal concentrations of MPX-004 and MPX-007 inhibited ~30% of the whole-cell current in rat pyramidal neurons in primary culture and MPX-004 inhibited ~60% of the total NMDA receptor-mediated EPSP in rat hippocampal slices. GluN2A-selectivity at native receptors was confirmed by the finding that MPX-004 had no inhibitory effect on NMDA receptor mediated synaptic currents in cortical slices from GRIN2A knock out mice. Thus, MPX-004 and MPX-007 offer highly selective pharmacological tools to probe GluN2A physiology and involvement in neuropsychiatric and developmental disorders. PMID:26829109

  10. Kir6.2 activation by sulfonylurea receptors: a different mechanism of action for SUR1 and SUR2A subunits via the same residues

    PubMed Central

    Principalli, Maria A; Dupuis, Julien P; Moreau, Christophe J; Vivaudou, Michel; Revilloud, Jean

    2015-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K-ATP channels) play a key role in adjusting the membrane potential to the metabolic state of cells. They result from the unique combination of two proteins: the sulfonylurea receptor (SUR), an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein, and the inward rectifier K+ channel Kir6.2. Both subunits associate to form a heterooctamer (4 SUR/4 Kir6.2). SUR modulates channel gating in response to the binding of nucleotides or drugs and Kir6.2 conducts potassium ions. The activity of K-ATP channels varies with their localization. In pancreatic β-cells, SUR1/Kir6.2 channels are partly active at rest while in cardiomyocytes SUR2A/Kir6.2 channels are mostly closed. This divergence of function could be related to differences in the interaction of SUR1 and SUR2A with Kir6.2. Three residues (E1305, I1310, L1313) located in the linker region between transmembrane domain 2 and nucleotide-binding domain 2 of SUR2A were previously found to be involved in the activation pathway linking binding of openers onto SUR2A and channel opening. To determine the role of the equivalent residues in the SUR1 isoform, we designed chimeras between SUR1 and the ABC transporter multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1), and used patch clamp recordings on Xenopus oocytes to assess the functionality of SUR1/MRP1 chimeric K-ATP channels. Our results reveal that the same residues in SUR1 and SUR2A are involved in the functional association with Kir6.2, but they display unexpected side-chain specificities which could account for the contrasted properties of pancreatic and cardiac K-ATP channels. PMID:26416970

  11. The catalytic subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase is a substrate for the activated platelet-derived growth factor receptor, but not for middle-T antigen-pp60c-src complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Roche, S; Dhand, R; Waterfield, M D; Courtneidge, S A

    1994-01-01

    The interaction of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-K) with polyoma-virus middle-T antigen-pp60c-src (mT:cSrc) complexes and with the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor has been investigated. Firstly, we undertook reconstitution studies, using proteins derived from a baculovirus expression system. The p110 catalytic subunit of the PI 3-K associated with tyrosine kinases only when complexed with the p85 alpha regulatory subunit. Both p85 alpha and p110 were substrates of the PDGF receptor. In contrast, only the p85 alpha subunit was detectably phosphorylated when PI 3-K was associated with mT:cSrc. Secondly, we studied PI 3-K in mammalian cells. In mT-antigen-transformed NIH-3T3 cells neither p85 alpha nor p110 was phosphorylated on tyrosine residues in vivo, even though p85 alpha was a substrate in kinase assays in vitro. In quiescent NIH-3T3 cells, PI 3-K showed detectable activity in vitro; PDGF stimulation resulted in a rapid and transient association of PI 3-K with the receptor, which was correlated with a transient increase in intrinsic P13-K activity (approx. 2-fold). The activated PDGF receptor phosphorylated p110 in vitro, at one major site. In vivo, PDGF stimulation induced tyrosine phosphorylation of p110 that persisted for at least 1 h after stimulation. Immunodepletion of the PDGF receptor from stimulated cell lysates showed that p110 was released from the receptor in a tyrosine-phosphorylated form. From these results we conclude that (i) the mT:cSrc complex and the PDGF receptor differ in their association with PI 3-K activity, (ii) PDGF receptor appears to activate PI 3-K in vivo both by relocation of the enzyme and by stimulation of its intrinsic activity, and (iii) tyrosine phosphorylation of the p110 subunit by the PDGF receptor may play a role in PI 3-K regulation in some circumstances. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7519847

  12. Ca2+/calmodulin-stimulated PDE1 regulates the beta-catenin/TCF signaling through PP2A B56 gamma subunit in proliferating vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kye-Im; Jono, Hirofumi; Miller, Clint L.; Cai, Yujun; Lim, Soyeon; Liu, Xuan; Gao, Pingjin; Abe, Jun-Ichi; Li, Jian-Dong; Yan, Chen

    2010-01-01

    The phenotypic change of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), from a “contractile” phenotype to “synthetic” phenotype, is crucial for pathogenic vascular remodeling in vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis. Ca2+-calmodulin stimulated phosphodiesterase 1 (PDE1) isozymes, including PDE1A and PDE1C, play integral roles in regulating the proliferation of synthetic VSMCs. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) remain unknown. In this study, we explore the role and mechanism of PDE1 isoforms in regulating β-catenin/TCF signaling in VSMCs, a pathway important for vascular remodeling through promoting VSMC growth and survival. We found that inhibition of PDE1 activity markedly attenuated β-catenin/TCF signaling by down-regulating β-catenin protein. The effect of PDE1 inhibition on β-catenin protein reduction is exerted via promoting GSK3β activation, β-catenin phosphorylation, and subsequent β-catenin protein degradation. Moreover, PDE1 inhibition specifically upregulated phosphatase PP2A B56γ subunit gene expression, which is responsible for the effects of PDE1 inhibition on GSK3β and β-catenin/TCF signaling. Further more, the effect of PDE1 inhibition on β-catenin was specifically mediated by PDE1A but not PDE1C isozyme. Interestingly, in synthetic VSMCs PP2A B56γ, phospho-GSK3β, and phospho-β-catenin were all found in the nucleus, suggesting that PDE1A regulates nuclear β-catenin protein stability through the nuclear PP2A-GSK3β-β-catenin signaling axis. Taken together these findings provide direct evidence for the first time that PP2A B56γ is a critical mediator for PDE1A in the regulation of β-catenin signaling in proliferating VSMCs. PMID:21078118

  13. Suppressor of MEK null (SMEK)/protein phosphatase 4 catalytic subunit (PP4C) is a key regulator of hepatic gluconeogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Young-Sil; Lee, Min-Woo; Ryu, Dongryeol; Kim, Jeong Ho; Ma, Hui; Seo, Woo-Young; Kim, Yo-Na; Kim, Su Sung; Lee, Chul Ho; Hunter, Tony; Choi, Cheol Soo; Montminy, Marc R.; Koo, Seung-Hoi

    2010-01-01

    Fasting promotes hepatic gluconeogenesis to maintain glucose homeostasis. The cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcriptional coactivator 2 (CRTC2) is responsible for transcriptional activation of gluconeogenic genes and is critical for conveying the opposing hormonal signals of glucagon and insulin in the liver. Here, we show that suppressor of MEK null 1 (SMEK1) and SMEK2 [protein phosphatase 4 (PP4) regulatory subunits 3a and 3b, respectively] are directly involved in the regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism in mice. Expression of hepatic SMEK1/2 is up-regulated during fasting or in mouse models of insulin-resistant conditions in a Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-gamma Coactivator 1α (PGC-1α)-dependent manner. Overexpression of SMEK promotes elevations in plasma glucose with increased hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression, whereas depletion of the SMEK proteins reduces hyperglycemia and enhances CRTC2 phosphorylation; the effect is blunted by S171A CRTC2, which is refractory to salt-inducible kinase (SIK)-dependent inhibition. Taken together, we would propose that mammalian SMEK/PP4C proteins are involved in the regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism through dephosphorylation of CRTC2. PMID:20876121

  14. Increased epidermal tumors and increased skin wound healing in transgenic mice overexpressing the catalytic subunit of telomerase, mTERT, in basal keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    González-Suárez, Eva; Samper, Enrique; Ramírez, Angel; Flores, Juana M.; Martín-Caballero, Juan; Jorcano, José L.; Blasco, María A.

    2001-01-01

    Telomerase transgenics are an important tool to assess the role of telomerase in cancer, as well as to evaluate the potential use of telomerase for gene therapy of age-associated diseases. Here, we have targeted the expression of the catalytic component of mouse telomerase, mTERT, to basal keratinocytes using the bovine keratin 5 promoter. These telomerase-transgenic mice are viable and show histologically normal stratified epithelia with high levels of telomerase activity and normal telomere length. Interestingly, the epidermis of these mice is highly responsive to the mitogenic effects of phorbol esters, and it is more susceptible than that of wild-type littermates to the development skin tumors upon chemical carcinogenesis. The epidermis of telomerase-transgenic mice also shows an increased wound-healing rate compared with wild-type littermates. These results suggest that, contrary to the general assumption, telomerase actively promotes proliferation in cells that have sufficiently long telomeres and unravel potential risks of gene therapy for age-associated diseases based on telomerase upregulation. PMID:11387197

  15. The catalytic subunit of shiga-like toxin 1 interacts with ribosomal stalk proteins and is inhibited by their conserved C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, Andrew J; Poon, Gregory M K; Bolewska-Pedyczak, Eleonora; Srikumar, Tharan; Jeram, Stanley M; Raught, Brian; Gariépy, Jean

    2008-04-25

    Shiga-like toxin 1 (SLT-1) is a type II ribosome-inactivating protein; its A(1) domain blocks protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells by catalyzing the depurination of a single adenine base in 28 S rRNA. The molecular mechanism leading to this site-specific depurination event is thought to involve interactions with eukaryotic ribosomal proteins. Here, we present evidence that the A(1) chain of SLT-1 binds to the ribosomal proteins P0, P1, and P2. These proteins were identified from a HeLa cell lysate by tandem mass spectrometry, and subsequently confirmed to bind to SLT-1 A(1) chain by yeast-two-hybrid and pull-down experiments using candidate full-length proteins. Moreover, the removal of the last 17 amino acids of either protein P1 or P2 abolishes the interaction with the A(1) chain, whereas P0, lacking this common C terminus, still binds to the A(1) domain. In vitro pull-down experiments using fusion protein-tagged C-terminal peptides corresponding to the common 7, 11, and 17 terminal residues of P1 and P2 confirmed that the A(1) chain of SLT-1 as well as the A chain of ricin bind to this shared C-terminal peptide motif. More importantly, a synthetic peptide corresponding to the 17 amino acid C terminus of P1 and P2 was shown to inhibit the ribosome-inactivating function of the A(1) chain of SLT-1 in an in vitro transcription and translation-coupled assay. These results suggest a role for the ribosomal stalk in aiding the A(1) chain of SLT-1 and other type II ribosome-inactivating proteins in localizing its catalytic domain near the site of depurination in the 28 S rRNA. PMID:18358491

  16. Interaction of factor XIII subunits.

    PubMed

    Katona, Eva; Pénzes, Krisztina; Csapó, Andrea; Fazakas, Ferenc; Udvardy, Miklós L; Bagoly, Zsuzsa; Orosz, Zsuzsanna Z; Muszbek, László

    2014-03-13

    Coagulation factor XIII (FXIII) is a heterotetramer consisting of 2 catalytic A subunits (FXIII-A2) and 2 protective/inhibitory B subunits (FXIII-B2). FXIII-B, a mosaic protein consisting of 10 sushi domains, significantly prolongs the lifespan of catalytic subunits in the circulation and prevents their slow progressive activation in plasmatic conditions. In this study, the biochemistry of the interaction between the 2 FXIII subunits was investigated. Using a surface plasmon resonance technique and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-type binding assay, the equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for the interaction was established in the range of 10(-10) M. Based on the measured Kd, it was calculated that in plasma approximately 1% of FXIII-A2 should be in free form. This value was confirmed experimentally by measuring FXIII-A2 in plasma samples immunodepleted of FXIII-A2B2. Free plasma FXIII-A2 is functionally active, and when activated by thrombin and Ca(2+), it can cross-link fibrin. In cerebrospinal fluid and tears with much lower FXIII subunit concentrations, >80% of FXIII-A2 existed in free form. A monoclonal anti-FXIII-B antibody that prevented the interaction between the 2 subunits reacted with the recombinant combined first and second sushi domains of FXIII-B, and its epitope was localized to the peptide spanning positions 96 to 103 in the second sushi domain. PMID:24408323

  17. Solution structure analysis of the conformational changes that occur upon the binding of the protein kinase inhibitor peptide to the catalytic subunit of the cAMP dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.D.; Walsh, D.A.; Olah, G.A.; Sosnick, T.R.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-10-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering experiments have been used to examine both the secondary structure content and overall conformation, respectively, of the catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase and to characterize the structural change that occurs upon binding of the protein kinase inhibitor peptide, PKI(5-22)amide. While the secondary structure of the enzyme is unaltered by the binding of PKI(5-22)amide, a large overall conformational change occurs resulting in a compaction of the enzyme that is characterized by a 2{angstrom} decrease in radius of gyration, Rg, and an 11{angstrom} decrease in the maximum linear dimension, d{sub max}. We have modeled the conformational change as a simple rotation of the upper and lower lobes of the kinase by 39{degrees} about a molecular hinge defined by Glyl25, resulting in a closure of the cleft between the two lobes of the kinase. These data are evaluated with respect to recent x-ray crystallographic studies of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, CDK2 protein kinase, and the MAP kinase ERK2. In addition, the implications that these findings have for the remainder of the protein kinase family are discussed.

  18. Transcription of the catalytic 180-kDa subunit gene of mouse DNA polymerase alpha is controlled by E2F, an Ets-related transcription factor, and Sp1.

    PubMed

    Izumi, M; Yokoi, M; Nishikawa, N S; Miyazawa, H; Sugino, A; Yamagishi, M; Yamaguchi, M; Matsukage, A; Yatagai, F; Hanaoka, F

    2000-07-24

    We have isolated a genomic DNA fragment spanning the 5'-end of the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of mouse DNA polymerase alpha. The nucleotide sequence of the upstream region was G/C-rich and lacked a TATA box. Transient expression assays in cycling NIH 3T3 cells demonstrated that the GC box of 20 bp (at nucleotides -112/-93 with respect to the transcription initiation site) and the palindromic sequence of 14 bp (at nucleotides -71/-58) were essential for basal promoter activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that Sp1 binds to the GC box. We also purified a protein capable of binding to the palindrome and identified it as GA-binding protein (GABP), an Ets- and Notch-related transcription factor. Transient expression assays in synchronized NIH 3T3 cells revealed that three variant E2F sites near the transcription initiation site (at nucleotides -23/-16, -1/+7 and +17/+29) had no basal promoter activity by themselves, but were essential for growth-dependent stimulation of the gene expression. These data indicate that E2F, GABP and Sp1 regulate the gene expression of this principal replication enzyme. PMID:11004506

  19. Silencing expression of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase by small interfering RNA sensitizes human cells for radiation-induced chromosome damage, cell killing, and mutation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Yuanlin; Zhang, Qinming; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Liber, Howard L.; Bedford, Joel S.

    2002-01-01

    Targeted gene silencing in mammalian cells by RNA interference (RNAi) using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) was recently described by Elbashir et al. (S. M. Elbashir et al., Nature (Lond.), 411: 494-498, 2001). We have used this methodology in several human cell strains to reduce expression of the Prkdc (DNA-PKcs) gene coding for the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) that is involved in the nonhomologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks. We have also demonstrated a radiosensitization for several phenotypic endpoints of radiation damage. In low-passage normal human fibroblasts, siRNA knock-down of DNA-PKcs resulted in a reduced capacity for restitution of radiation-induced interphase chromosome breaks as measured by premature chromosome condensation, an increased yield of acentric chromosome fragments at the first postirradiation mitosis, and an increased radiosensitivity for cell killing. For three strains of related human lymphoblasts, DNA-PKcs-targeted siRNA transfection resulted in little or no increase in radiosensitivity with respect to cell killing, a 1.5-fold decrease in induced mutant yield in TK6- and p53-null NH32 cells, but about a 2-fold increase in induced mutant yield in p53-mutant WTK1 cells at both the hypoxanthine quanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) and the thymidine kinase loci.

  20. A subset of RAB proteins modulates PP2A phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Francesca; Mattioni, Anna; Boldt, Karsten; Panni, Simona; Santonico, Elena; Castagnoli, Luisa; Ueffing, Marius; Cesareni, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is one of the most abundant serine-threonine phosphatases in mammalian cells. PP2A is a hetero-trimeric holoenzyme participating in a variety of physiological processes whose deregulation is often associated to cancer. The specificity and activity of this phosphatase is tightly modulated by a family of regulatory B subunits that dock the catalytic subunit to the substrates. Here we characterize a novel and unconventional molecular mechanism controlling the activity of the tumor suppressor PP2A. By applying a mass spectrometry-based interactomics approach, we identified novel PP2A interacting proteins. Unexpectedly we found that a significant number of RAB proteins associate with the PP2A scaffold subunit (PPP2R1A), but not with the catalytic subunit (PPP2CA). Such interactions occur in vitro and in vivo in specific subcellular compartments. Notably we demonstrated that one of these RAB proteins, RAB9, competes with the catalytic subunit PPP2CA in binding to PPP2R1A. This competitive association has an important role in controlling the PP2A catalytic activity, which is compromised in several solid tumors and leukemias. PMID:27611305

  1. A subset of RAB proteins modulates PP2A phosphatase activity

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Francesca; Mattioni, Anna; Boldt, Karsten; Panni, Simona; Santonico, Elena; Castagnoli, Luisa; Ueffing, Marius; Cesareni, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is one of the most abundant serine–threonine phosphatases in mammalian cells. PP2A is a hetero-trimeric holoenzyme participating in a variety of physiological processes whose deregulation is often associated to cancer. The specificity and activity of this phosphatase is tightly modulated by a family of regulatory B subunits that dock the catalytic subunit to the substrates. Here we characterize a novel and unconventional molecular mechanism controlling the activity of the tumor suppressor PP2A. By applying a mass spectrometry-based interactomics approach, we identified novel PP2A interacting proteins. Unexpectedly we found that a significant number of RAB proteins associate with the PP2A scaffold subunit (PPP2R1A), but not with the catalytic subunit (PPP2CA). Such interactions occur in vitro and in vivo in specific subcellular compartments. Notably we demonstrated that one of these RAB proteins, RAB9, competes with the catalytic subunit PPP2CA in binding to PPP2R1A. This competitive association has an important role in controlling the PP2A catalytic activity, which is compromised in several solid tumors and leukemias. PMID:27611305

  2. Chlorinated Biphenyl Quinones and Phenyl-2,5-benzoquinone Differentially Modify the Catalytic Activity of Human Hydroxysteroid Sulfotransferase hSULT2A1

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xiaoyan; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Teesch, Lynn M.; Robertson, Larry W.; Duffel, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Human hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) catalyzes the sulfation of a broad range of environmental chemicals, drugs, and other xenobiotics in addition to endogenous compounds that include hydroxysteroids and bile acids. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent environmental contaminants, and oxidized metabolites of PCBs may play significant roles in the etiology of their adverse health effects. Quinones derived from oxidative metabolism of PCBs (PCB-quinones) react with nucleophilic sites in proteins and also undergo redox cycling to generate reactive oxygen species. This, along with the sensitivity of hSULT2A1 to oxidative modification at cysteine residues led us to hypothesize that electrophilic PCB-quinones react with hSULT2A1 to alter its catalytic function. Thus, we examined the effects of four phenylbenzoquinones on the ability of hSULT2A1 to catalyze the sulfation of the endogenous substrate, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). The quinones studied were 2′-chlorophenyl-2,5-benzoquinone (2′-Cl-BQ), 4′-chlorophenyl-2,5-benzoquinone (4′-Cl-BQ), 4′-chlorophenyl-3,6-dichloro-2,5-benzoquinone (3,6,4′-triCl-BQ), and phenyl-2,5-benzoquinone (PBQ). At all concentrations examined, pretreatment of hSULT2A1 with the PCB-quinones decreased catalytic activity of hSULT2A1. Pretreatment with low concentrations of PBQ, however, increased the catalytic activity of the enzyme, while higher concentrations inhibited catalysis. A decrease in substrate inhibition with DHEA was seen following preincubation of hSULT2A1 with all of the quinones. Proteolytic digestion of the enzyme followed by LC/MS analysis indicated PCB-quinone- and PBQ-adducts at Cys55 and Cys199, as well as oxidation products at methionines in the protein. Equilibrium binding experiments and molecular modeling suggested that changes due to these modifications may affect the nucleotide binding site and the entrance to the sulfuryl acceptor binding site of hSULT2A1. PMID:24059442

  3. Inhibitory effects of total saponin from Korean Red Ginseng on [Ca2+]i mobilization through phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type I in human platelets

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jung-Hae; Kwon, Hyuk-Woo; Cho, Hyun-Jeong; Rhee, Man Hee; Park, Hwa-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background Intracellular Ca2+([Ca2+]i) is a platelet aggregation-inducing molecule. Therefore, understanding the inhibitory mechanism of [Ca2+]i mobilization is very important to evaluate the antiplatelet effect of a substance. This study was carried out to understand the Ca2+-antagonistic effect of total saponin from Korean Red Ginseng (KRG-TS). Methods We investigated the Ca2+-antagonistic effect of KRG-TS on cyclic nucleotides-associated phosphorylation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type I (IP3RI) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in thrombin (0.05 U/mL)-stimulated human platelet aggregation. Results The inhibition of [Ca2+]i mobilization by KRG-TS was increased by a PKA inhibitor (Rp-8-Br-cAMPS), which was more stronger than the inhibition by a cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG) inhibitor (Rp-8-Br-cGMPS). In addition, Rp-8-Br-cAMPS inhibited phosphorylation of PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) (Thr197) by KRG-TS. The phosphorylation of IP3RI (Ser1756) by KRG-TS was very strongly inhibited by Rp-8-Br-cAMPS compared with that by Rp-8-Br-cGMPS. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of [Ca2+]i mobilization by KRG-TS is more strongly dependent on a cAMP/PKA pathway than a cGMP/PKG pathway. KRG-TS also inhibited the release of adenosine triphosphate and serotonin. In addition, only G-Rg3 of protopanaxadiol in KRG-TS inhibited thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. Conclusion These results strongly indicate that KRG-TS is a potent beneficial compound that inhibits [Ca2+]i mobilization in thrombin–platelet interactions, which may result in the prevention of platelet aggregation-mediated thrombotic disease. PMID:26869828

  4. QRFP-43 inhibits lipolysis by preventing ligand-induced complex formation between perilipin A, caveolin-1, the catalytic subunit of protein kinase and hormone-sensitive lipase in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Mulumba, Mukandila; Granata, Riccarda; Marleau, Sylvie; Ong, Huy

    2015-05-01

    QRFP (RFamide) peptides are neuropeptides involved in food intake and adiposity regulation in rodents. We have previously shown that QRFP-43 (43RFa) and QRFP-26 (26RFa) inhibited isoproterenol (ISO)-induced lipolysis in adipocytes. However, the antilipolytic signaling pathways activated by QRFP peptides have not been investigated. In the present study, 3T3-L1 adipocytes were used to identify the main pathways involved in QRFP-43 decreasing ISO-induced lipolysis. Our results show that QRFP-43 reduced ISO-induced phosphorylation of perilipin A (PLIN) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) on Ser660 by 43 and 25%, respectively, but increased Akt phosphorylation by 44%. However, the inhibition of phosphodiesterase 3B (PDE3B), a regulator of lipolysis activated by Akt, did not reverse the antilipolytic effect of QRFP-43. PDE3B inhibition reversed the decrease of Ser660 HSL phosphorylation associated with QRFP-43 antilipolytic effect. QRFP-43 also prevented PKC activation and ISO-induced Src kinases activation leading to the inhibition of the caveolin-1 (CAV-1) translocation on lipid droplets. Indeed, QRFP-43 attenuated phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced lipolysis and ISO-induced extracellular signal-regulated and Src kinases by 28, 37 and 48%, respectively. The attenuation of ISO-induced lipolysis by QRFP-43 was associated with a decrease of phosphorylated Ser660 HSL, PKA-catalytic (PKA-c) subunit and CAV-1 translocation on lipid droplets by 37, 50 and 46%, respectively. The decrease in ISO-induced CAV-1 and PKA-c translocation was associated with a reduction of PLIN phosphorylation by 44% in QRFP-43-treated adipocytes. These results suggest that QRFP-43 attenuated ISO-induced lipolysis by preventing the formation of an active complex on lipid droplets and the activation of Src kinases and PKC. PMID:25677823

  5. Mutations in the PP2A regulatory subunit B family genes PPP2R5B, PPP2R5C and PPP2R5D cause human overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Loveday, Chey; Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Clarke, Matthew; Westwood, Isaac; Renwick, Anthony; Ramsay, Emma; Nemeth, Andrea; Campbell, Jennifer; Joss, Shelagh; Gardner, McKinlay; Zachariou, Anna; Elliott, Anna; Ruark, Elise; van Montfort, Rob; Rahman, Nazneen

    2015-09-01

    Overgrowth syndromes comprise a group of heterogeneous disorders characterised by excessive growth parameters, often in association with intellectual disability. To identify new causes of human overgrowth, we have been undertaking trio-based exome sequencing studies in overgrowth patients and their unaffected parents. Prioritisation of functionally relevant genes with multiple unique de novo mutations revealed four mutations in protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) regulatory subunit B family genes protein phosphatase 2, regulatory Subunit B', beta (PPP2R5B); protein phosphatase 2, regulatory Subunit B', gamma (PPP2R5C); and protein phosphatase 2, regulatory Subunit B', delta (PPP2R5D). This observation in 3 related genes in 111 individuals with a similar phenotype is greatly in excess of the expected number, as determined from gene-specific de novo mutation rates (P = 1.43 × 10(-10)). Analysis of exome-sequencing data from a follow-up series of overgrowth probands identified a further pathogenic mutation, bringing the total number of affected individuals to 5. Heterozygotes shared similar phenotypic features including increased height, increased head circumference and intellectual disability. The mutations clustered within a region of nine amino acid residues in the aligned protein sequences (P = 1.6 × 10(-5)). We mapped the mutations onto the crystal structure of the PP2A holoenzyme complex to predict their molecular and functional consequences. These studies suggest that the mutations may affect substrate binding, thus perturbing the ability of PP2A to dephosphorylate particular protein substrates. PP2A is a major negative regulator of v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 (AKT). Thus, our data further expand the list of genes encoding components of the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signalling cascade that are disrupted in human overgrowth conditions. PMID:25972378

  6. Arabidopsis DPB3-1, a DREB2A Interactor, Specifically Enhances Heat Stress-Induced Gene Expression by Forming a Heat Stress-Specific Transcriptional Complex with NF-Y Subunits[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Hikaru; Mizoi, Junya; Tanaka, Hidenori; Maruyama, Kyonosin; Qin, Feng; Osakabe, Yuriko; Morimoto, Kyoko; Ohori, Teppei; Kusakabe, Kazuya; Nagata, Maika; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    DEHYDRATION-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT BINDING PROTEIN2A (DREB2A) is a key transcription factor for drought and heat stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. DREB2A induces the expression of dehydration- and heat stress-inducible genes under the corresponding stress conditions. Target gene selectivity is assumed to require stress-specific posttranslational regulation, but the mechanisms of this process are not yet understood. Here, we identified DNA POLYMERASE II SUBUNIT B3-1 (DPB3-1), which was previously annotated as NUCLEAR FACTOR Y, SUBUNIT C10 (NF-YC10), as a DREB2A interactor, through a yeast two-hybrid screen. The overexpression of DPB3-1 in Arabidopsis enhanced the expression of a subset of heat stress-inducible DREB2A target genes but did not affect dehydration-inducible genes. Similarly, the depletion of DPB3-1 expression resulted in reduced expression of heat stress-inducible genes. Interaction and expression pattern analyses suggested the existence of a trimer comprising NF-YA2, NF-YB3, and DPB3-1 that could synergistically activate a promoter of the heat stress-inducible gene with DREB2A in protoplasts. These results suggest that DPB3-1 could form a transcriptional complex with NF-YA and NF-YB subunits and that the identified trimer enhances heat stress-inducible gene expression during heat stress responses in cooperation with DREB2A. We propose that the identified trimer contributes to the target gene selectivity of DREB2A under heat stress conditions. PMID:25490919

  7. Photo-catalytic oxidation of cyclohexane over TiO2: a novel interpretation of temperature dependent performance.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Ana Rita; Berger, Rob; Moulijn, Jacob A; Mul, Guido

    2011-01-28

    The rate of cyclohexane photo-catalytic oxidation to cyclohexanone over anatase TiO(2) was studied at temperatures between 23 and 60 °C by in situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, and the kinetic parameters were estimated using a microkinetic model. At low temperatures, surface cyclohexanone formation is limited by cyclohexane adsorption due to unfavorable desorption of H(2)O, rather than previously proposed slow desorption of the product cyclohexanone. Up to 50 °C, the activation energy for photocatalytic cyclohexanone formation is zero, while carboxylates are formed with an activation energy of 18.4 ± 3.3 kJ mol(-1). Above 50 °C, significant (thermal) oxidation of cyclohexanone contributes to carboxylate formation. The irreversibly adsorbed carboxylates lead to deactivation of the catalyst, and are most likely the predominant cause of the non-Arrhenius behavior at relatively high reaction temperatures, rather than cyclohexane adsorption limitations. The results imply that elevating the reaction temperature of photocatalytic cyclohexane oxidation reduces selectivity, and is not a means to suppress catalyst deactivation. PMID:21152664

  8. The expression profile of acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) subunits ASIC1a, ASIC1b, ASIC2a, ASIC2b, and ASIC3 in the esophageal vagal afferent nerve subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Dusenkova, Svetlana; Ru, Fei; Surdenikova, Lenka; Nassenstein, Christina; Hatok, Jozef; Dusenka, Robert; Banovcin, Peter; Kliment, Jan; Tatar, Milos

    2014-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) have been implicated in esophageal acid sensing and mechanotransduction. However, insufficient knowledge of ASIC subunit expression profile in esophageal afferent nerves hampers the understanding of their role. This knowledge is essential because ASIC subunits form heteromultimeric channels with distinct functional properties. We hypothesized that the esophageal putative nociceptive C-fiber nerves (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, TRPV1-positive) express multiple ASIC subunits and that the ASIC expression profile differs between the nodose TRPV1-positive subtype developmentally derived from placodes and the jugular TRPV1-positive subtype derived from neural crest. We performed single cell RT-PCR on the vagal afferent neurons retrogradely labeled from the esophagus. In the guinea pig, nearly all (90%–95%) nodose and jugular esophageal TRPV1-positive neurons expressed ASICs, most often in a combination (65–75%). ASIC1, ASIC2, and ASIC3 were expressed in 65–75%, 55–70%, and 70%, respectively, of both nodose and jugular TRPV1-positive neurons. The ASIC1 splice variants ASIC1a and ASIC1b and the ASIC2 splice variant ASIC2b were similarly expressed in both nodose and jugular TRPV1-positive neurons. However, ASIC2a was found exclusively in the nodose neurons. In contrast to guinea pig, ASIC3 was almost absent from the mouse vagal esophageal TRPV1-positive neurons. However, ASIC3 was similarly expressed in the nonnociceptive TRPV1-negative (tension mechanoreceptors) neurons in both species. We conclude that the majority of esophageal vagal nociceptive neurons express multiple ASIC subunits. The placode-derived nodose neurons selectively express ASIC2a, known to substantially reduce acid sensitivity of ASIC heteromultimers. ASIC3 is expressed in the guinea pig but not in the mouse vagal esophageal TRPV1-positive neurons, indicating species differences in ASIC expression. PMID:25190475

  9. Structure of Protein Phosphatase 2A Core Enzyme Bound to Tumor-Inducing Toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Xing,Y.; Xu, Y.; Chen, Y.; Jeffrey, P.; Chao, Y.; Lin, Z.; Li, Z.; Strack, S.; Stock, J.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The serine/threonine phosphatase protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays an essential role in many aspects of cellular functions and has been shown to be an important tumor suppressor. The core enzyme of PP2A comprises a 65 kDa scaffolding subunit and a 36 kDa catalytic subunit. Here we report the crystal structures of the PP2A core enzyme bound to two of its inhibitors, the tumor-inducing agents okadaic acid and microcystin-LR, at 2.6 and 2.8 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The catalytic subunit recognizes one end of the elongated scaffolding subunit by interacting with the conserved ridges of HEAT repeats 11-15. Formation of the core enzyme forces the scaffolding subunit to undergo pronounced structural rearrangement. The scaffolding subunit exhibits considerable conformational flexibility, which is proposed to play an essential role in PP2A function. These structures, together with biochemical analyses, reveal significant insights into PP2A function and serve as a framework for deciphering the diverse roles of PP2A in cellular physiology.

  10. Chronic brain inflammation causes a reduction in GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of NMDA receptors and an increase in the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Neuroinflammation plays a key role in the initiation and progression of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Chronic neuroinflammation results in diminished synaptic plasticity and loss of GluN1 N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the hippocampus, leading to the cognitive deficits that are the most common symptoms of AD. Therefore, it is suggested that chronic inflammation may alter expression levels of GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of NMDA receptors and associated intracellular signalling. Chronic neuroinflammation was induced by chronic infusion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into the fourth ventricle in Fischer-344 rats. The status of hippocampus-dependent memory was evaluated in control rats and rats chronically infused with LPS. Microglial activation in the hippocampus was examined using immunohistochemical staining. Western blot analysis was used to measure membrane levels of GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of NMDA receptors and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in the hippocampi of these rats, and immunofluorescent double labeling was used to assess the cellular location of MAPK. Microglial activation was observed in the hippocampi of rats that showed memory impairments with chronic LPS infusion. Chronic LPS infusion reduced the levels of GluN2A and GluN2B and increased the levels of phosphorylated MAPKs in the hippocampus. MAPK-positive immunoreactivity was observed mostly in the neurons and also in non-neuronal cells. Reductions in GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of NMDA receptors coupled with altered MAPK signaling, in response to inflammatory stimuli may be related to the cognitive deficits observed in AD. PMID:24761931

  11. Three Immunoproteasome-Associated Subunits Cooperatively Generate a Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Epitope of Epstein-Barr Virus LMP2A by Overcoming Specific Structures Resistant to Epitope Liberation

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yoshinori; Kondo, Eisei; Demachi-Okamura, Ayako; Akatsuka, Yoshiki; Tsujimura, Kunio; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Morishima, Yasuo; Takahashi, Toshitada; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka

    2006-01-01

    The precise roles of gamma interferon-inducible immunoproteasome-associated molecules in generation of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes have yet to be fully elucidated. We describe here a unique epitope derived from the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) presented by HLA-A*2402 molecules. Generation of the epitope, designated LMP2A222-230, from the full-length protein requires the immunoproteasome subunit low-molecular-weight protein 7 (ip-LMP7) and the proteasome activator 28-α subunit and is accelerated by ip-LMP2, as revealed by gene expression experiments using an LMP2A222-230-specific CTL clone as a responder in enzyme-linked immunospot assays. The unequivocal involvement of all three components was confirmed by RNA interference gene silencing. Interestingly, the LMP2A222-230 epitope could be efficiently generated from incomplete EBV-LMP2A fragments that were produced by puromycin treatment or gene-engineered shortened EBV-LMP2A lacking some of its hydrophobic domains. In addition, epitope generation was increased by a single amino acid substitution from leucine to alanine immediately flanking the C terminus, this being predicted by a web-accessible program to increase the cleavage strength. Taken together, the data indicate that the generation of LMP2A222-230 is influenced not only by extrinsic factors such as immunoproteasomes but also by intrinsic factors such as the length of the EBV-LMP2A protein and proteasomal cleavage strength at specific positions in the source antigen. PMID:16378990

  12. Two EPR-detectable [4Fe-4S] clusters, N2a and N2b, are bound to the NuoI (TYKY) subunit of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I) from Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Chevallet, Mireille; Dupuis, Alain; Issartel, Jean-Paul; Lunardi, Joël; van Belzen, Ronald; Albracht, Simon P J

    2003-03-01

    NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductases (Complex I) contain a subunit, TYKY in the bovine enzyme and NuoI in the enzyme from Rhodobacter capsulatus, which is assumed to bind two [4Fe-4S] clusters because it contains two sets of conserved cysteine motifs similar to those found in the 2[4Fe-4S] ferredoxins. It was recently shown that the TYKY subunit is not an ordinary 2[4Fe-4S] ferredoxin, but has a unique amino acid sequence, which is only found in NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductases and certain membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenases expected to be involved in redox-linked proton translocation [FEBS Lett. 485 (2000) 1]. We have generated a set of R. capsulatus mutants in which five out of the eight conserved cysteine residues in NuoI were replaced by other amino acids. The resulting mutants fell into three categories with virtually no, intermediate or quite normal Complex I activities. EPR-spectroscopic analysis of the membranes of the C67S and C106S mutants, two mutants belonging to the second and third group, respectively, showed a specific 50% decrease of the EPR signal attributed to cluster N2. It is concluded that the NuoI (TYKY) subunit binds two clusters N2, called N2a and N2b, which exhibit very similar spectral features when analyzed by X-band EPR spectroscopy. PMID:12615348

  13. Safety and Immunogenicity of an Adjuvanted Herpes Zoster Subunit Candidate Vaccine in HIV-Infected Adults: A Phase 1/2a Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Berkowitz, Elchonon M.; Moyle, Graeme; Stellbrink, Hans-Jürgen; Schürmann, Dirk; Kegg, Stephen; Stoll, Matthias; El Idrissi, Mohamed; Oostvogels, Lidia; Heineman, Thomas C.; Brockmeyer, Norbert; deJesus, Edwin; Esser, Stefan; Hawkins, Trevor; Lalezari, Jacob; Orkin, Chloe; Schneider, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected individuals are at increased risk of herpes zoster (HZ), even in the antiretroviral therapy (ART) era. Because concerns exist about the use of live-attenuated vaccines in immunocompromised individuals, a subunit vaccine may be an appropriate alternative. Methods. This phase 1/2, randomized, placebo-controlled study evaluated the immunogenicity and safety of an investigational HZ subunit vaccine (HZ/su). Three cohorts of HIV-infected adults aged ≥18 years were enrolled: 94 ART recipients with a CD4+ T-cell count of ≥200 cells/mm3, 14 ART recipients with a CD4+ T-cell count of 50–199 cells/mm3, and 15 ART-naive adults with a CD4+ T-cell count of ≥500 cells/mm3. Subjects received 3 doses of HZ/su (50 µg varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein E [gE] combined with AS01B adjuvant) or 3 doses of saline at months 0, 2, and 6. Results. One month after dose 3, serum anti-gE antibody concentrations and frequencies of gE-specific CD4+ T cells were higher following HZ/su vaccination than after receipt of saline (P < .0001). Median cell-mediated immune responses peaked after dose 2. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses persisted until the end of the study (month 18). No vaccination-related serious adverse events were reported. No sustained impact on HIV load or CD4+ T-cell count was noted following vaccinations. Conclusions. HZ/su was immunogenic and had a clinically acceptable safety profile in HIV-infected adults. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01165203. PMID:25371534

  14. De novo mutations in CSNK2A1 are associated with neurodevelopmental abnormalities and dysmorphic features.

    PubMed

    Okur, Volkan; Cho, Megan T; Henderson, Lindsay; Retterer, Kyle; Schneider, Michael; Sattler, Shannon; Niyazov, Dmitriy; Azage, Meron; Smith, Sharon; Picker, Jonathan; Lincoln, Sharyn; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Brady, Lauren; Bjornsson, Hans T; Applegate, Carolyn; Dameron, Amy; Willaert, Rebecca; Baskin, Berivan; Juusola, Jane; Chung, Wendy K

    2016-07-01

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) can be used to efficiently identify de novo genetic variants associated with genetically heterogeneous conditions including intellectual disabilities. We have performed WES for 4102 (1847 female; 2255 male) intellectual disability/developmental delay cases and we report five patients with a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with developmental delay, intellectual disability, behavioral problems, hypotonia, speech problems, microcephaly, pachygyria and dysmorphic features in whom we have identified de novo missense and canonical splice site mutations in CSNK2A1, the gene encoding CK2α, the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2, a ubiquitous serine/threonine kinase composed of two regulatory (β) and two catalytic (α and/or α') subunits. Somatic mutations in CSNK2A1 have been implicated in various cancers; however, this is the first study to describe a human condition associated with germline mutations in any of the CK2 subunits. PMID:27048600

  15. Inherent conformational flexibility of F1-ATPase α-subunit.

    PubMed

    Hahn-Herrera, Otto; Salcedo, Guillermo; Barril, Xavier; García-Hernández, Enrique

    2016-09-01

    The core of F1-ATPase consists of three catalytic (β) and three noncatalytic (α) subunits, forming a hexameric ring in alternating positions. A wealth of experimental and theoretical data has provided a detailed picture of the complex role played by catalytic subunits. Although major conformational changes have only been seen in β-subunits, it is clear that α-subunits have to respond to these changes in order to be able to transmit information during the rotary mechanism. However, the conformational behavior of α-subunits has not been explored in detail. Here, we have combined unbiased molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and calorimetrically measured thermodynamic signatures to investigate the conformational flexibility of isolated α-subunits, as a step toward deepening our understanding of its function inside the α3β3 ring. The simulations indicate that the open-to-closed conformational transition of the α-subunit is essentially barrierless, which is ideal to accompany and transmit the movement of the catalytic subunits. Calorimetric measurements of the recombinant α-subunit from Geobacillus kaustophilus indicate that the isolated subunit undergoes no significant conformational changes upon nucleotide binding. Simulations confirm that the nucleotide-free and nucleotide-bound subunits show average conformations similar to that observed in the F1 crystal structure, but they reveal an increased conformational flexibility of the isolated α-subunit upon MgATP binding, which might explain the evolutionary conserved capacity of α-subunits to recognize nucleotides with considerable strength. Furthermore, we elucidate the different dependencies that α- and β-subunits show on Mg(II) for recognizing ATP. PMID:27137408

  16. The role of GluN2A and GluN2B NMDA receptor subunits in AgRP and POMC neurons on body weight and glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Üner, Aykut; Gonçalves, Gabriel H.M.; Li, Wenjing; Porceban, Matheus; Caron, Nicole; Schönke, Milena; Delpire, Eric; Sakimura, Kenji; Bjørbæk, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hypothalamic agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) expressing neurons play critical roles in control of energy balance. Glutamatergic input via n-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) is pivotal for regulation of neuronal activity and is required in AgRP neurons for normal body weight homeostasis. NMDARs typically consist of the obligatory GluN1 subunit and different GluN2 subunits, the latter exerting crucial differential effects on channel activity and neuronal function. Currently, the role of specific GluN2 subunits in AgRP and POMC neurons on whole body energy and glucose balance is unknown. Methods We used the cre-lox system to genetically delete GluN2A or GluN2B only from AgRP or POMC neurons in mice. Mice were then subjected to metabolic analyses and assessment of AgRP and POMC neuronal function through morphological studies. Results We show that loss of GluN2B from AgRP neurons reduces body weight, fat mass, and food intake, whereas GluN2B in POMC neurons is not required for normal energy balance control. GluN2A subunits in either AgRP or POMC neurons are not required for regulation of body weight. Deletion of GluN2B reduces the number of AgRP neurons and decreases their dendritic length. In addition, loss of GluN2B in AgRP neurons of the morbidly obese and severely diabetic leptin-deficient Lepob/ob mice does not affect body weight and food intake but, remarkably, leads to full correction of hyperglycemia. Lepob/ob mice lacking GluN2B in AgRP neurons are also more sensitive to leptin's anti-obesity actions. Conclusions GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors in AgRP neurons play a critical role in central control of body weight homeostasis and blood glucose balance via mechanisms that likely involve regulation of AgRP neuronal survival and structure, and modulation of hypothalamic leptin action. PMID:26500840

  17. A polymorphic motif in the small subunit of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase modulates interactions between the small and large subunits.

    PubMed

    Cross, Joanna M; Clancy, Maureen; Shaw, Janine R; Boehlein, Susan K; Greene, Thomas W; Schmidt, Robert R; Okita, Thomas W; Hannah, L Curtis

    2005-02-01

    The heterotetrameric, allosterically regulated enzyme, adenosine-5'-diphosphoglucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in starch synthesis. Despite vast differences in allosteric properties and a long evolutionary separation, heterotetramers of potato small subunit and maize large subunit have activity comparable to either parent in an Escherichia coli expression system. In contrast, co-expression of maize small subunit with the potato large subunit produces little activity as judged by in vivo activity stain. To pinpoint the region responsible for differential activity, we expressed chimeric maize/potato small subunits in E. coli. This identified a 55-amino acid motif of the potato small subunit that is critical for glycogen production when expressed with the potato large subunit. Potato and maize small subunit sequences differ at five amino acids in this motif. Replacement experiments revealed that at least four amino acids of maize origin were required to reduce staining. An AGPase composed of a chimeric potato small subunit containing the 55-amino acid maize motif with the potato large subunit exhibited substantially less affinity for the substrates, glucose-1-phosphate and ATP and an increased Ka for the activator, 3-phosphoglyceric acid. Placement of the potato motif into the maize small subunit restored glycogen synthesis with the potato large subunit. Hence, a small polymorphic motif within the small subunit influences both catalytic and allosteric properties by modulating subunit interactions. PMID:15686515

  18. Immunoproteasome Assembly: Cooperative Incorporation of Interferon γ (IFN-γ)–inducible Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Thomas A.; Nandi, Dipankar; Cruz, Miguel; Fehling, Hans Jörg; Kaer, Luc Van; Monaco, John J.; Colbert, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    LMP2, LMP7, and MECL are interferon γ–inducible catalytic subunits of vertebrate 20S proteasomes, which can replace constitutive catalytic subunits (delta, X, and Z, respectively) during proteasome biogenesis. We demonstrate that MECL requires LMP2 for efficient incorporation into preproteasomes, and preproteasomes containing LMP2 and MECL require LMP7 for efficient maturation. The latter effect depends on the presequence of LMP7, but not on LMP7 catalytic activity. This cooperative mechanism favors the assembly of homogeneous “immunoproteasomes” containing all three inducible subunits, suggesting that these subunits act in concert to enhance proteasomal generation of major histocompatibility complex class I–binding peptides. PMID:9419215

  19. Human cytomegalovirus carries serine/threonine protein phosphatases PP1 and a host-cell derived PP2A.

    PubMed Central

    Michelson, S; Turowski, P; Picard, L; Goris, J; Landini, M P; Topilko, A; Hemmings, B; Bessia, C; Garcia, A; Virelizier, J L

    1996-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV), a herpesvirus, is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. When studying hyper-immediate-early events after contact between CMV virions and the cell membrane, we observed a hypophosphorylation of cellular proteins within 10 min. This can be explained in part by our finding that purified CMV contains serine/threonine protein phosphatase activities. Biochemical analyses indicate that this protein phosphatase activity has all characteristics of type 1 and 2A protein phosphatases (PP1 and PP2A). Specifically, PP1 accounts for approximately 30% and PP2A accounts for the remaining 70% of the phosphorylase phosphatase activity found. CMV produced in astrocytoma cells stably expressing an amino-terminally tagged PP2A catalytic subunit contained tagged enzyme, thus demonstrating the cellular origin of CMV-associated PP2A. PP2A is specifically found inside the virus, associated with the nucleocapsid fraction. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of purified virus revealed the presence of the catalytic subunits of PP2A and PP1. Furthermore, the catalytic subunit of PP2A appears to be complexed to the regulatory subunits PR65 and PR55, which is also the most abundant configuration of this enzyme found in the host cells. Incubation of virus with okadaic acid before contact of CMV with cells prevented hypophosphorylation of cellular proteins, thus demonstrating the role of CMV-associated phosphatases in this phenomenon. CMV can thus transport an active enzyme from one cell to another. PMID:8627658

  20. Identification of a regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 1 which mediates blue light signaling for stomatal opening.

    PubMed

    Takemiya, Atsushi; Yamauchi, Shota; Yano, Takayuki; Ariyoshi, Chie; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a eukaryotic serine/threonine protein phosphatase comprised of a catalytic subunit (PP1c) and a regulatory subunit that modulates catalytic activity, subcellular localization and substrate specificity. PP1c positively regulates stomatal opening through blue light signaling between phototropins and the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase in guard cells. However, the regulatory subunit functioning in this process is unknown. We identified Arabidopsis PRSL1 (PP1 regulatory subunit2-like protein1) as a regulatory subunit of PP1c. Tautomycin, a selective inhibitor of PP1c, inhibited blue light responses of stomata in the single mutants phot1 and phot2, supporting the idea that signals from phot1 and phot2 converge on PP1c. We obtained PRSL1 based on the sequence similarity to Vicia faba PRS2, a PP1c-binding protein isolated by a yeast two-hybrid screen. PRSL1 bound to Arabidopsis PP1c through its RVxF motif, a consensus PP1c-binding sequence. Arabidopsis prsl1 mutants were impaired in blue light-dependent stomatal opening, H(+) pumping and phosphorylation of the H(+)-ATPase, but showed normal phototropin activities. PRSL1 complemented the prsl1 phenotype, but not if the protein carried a mutation in the RVxF motif, suggesting that PRSL1 functions through binding PP1c via the RVxF motif. PRSL1 did not affect the catalytic activity of Arabidopsis PP1c but it stimulated the localization of PP1c in the cytoplasm. We conclude that PRSL1 functions as a regulatory subunit of PP1 and regulates blue light signaling in stomata. PMID:22585556

  1. The levels of the GluN2A NMDA receptor subunit are modified in both the neonatal and adult rat brain by an early experience involving denial of maternal contact.

    PubMed

    Manatos, V; Stylianopoulou, F; Stamatakis, A

    2016-01-26

    The composition of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor receptor in GluN2A/GluN2B subunits is important in determining its characteristics and its role in plasticity, a property of the brain which is known to be critically affected by early experiences. In the present work we employed an early experience model involving either receipt (RER) or denial (DER) of the expected reward of maternal contact within the context of learning by the pups of a T-maze on postnatal days (PND) 10-13. We investigated the effects of the RER and DER early experiences on GluN1, GluN2A and GluN2B levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus and amygdala of the rat. We show that on PND13 the DER animals had lower GluN2A levels in the PFC. In adulthood DER males had higher GluN2A levels in the hippocampus, both under basal conditions and after exposure to a novel environment. The early experiences did not affect the response to the novelty. After exposure to a novel environment animals of all three groups (DER, RER, Control) responded with an increase in GluN2A levels in the brain areas examined. We did not detect any effects on GluN1 or GluN2B levels. The alterations in GluN2A levels observed in the DER animals could in part be responsible for their behavioral phenotype, described previously, which includes an increased susceptibility for the expression of depressive-like behavior. PMID:26679226

  2. Protein phosphatase 2A: a highly regulated family of serine/threonine phosphatases implicated in cell growth and signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, V; Goris, J

    2001-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) comprises a family of serine/threonine phosphatases, minimally containing a well conserved catalytic subunit, the activity of which is highly regulated. Regulation is accomplished mainly by members of a family of regulatory subunits, which determine the substrate specificity, (sub)cellular localization and catalytic activity of the PP2A holoenzymes. Moreover, the catalytic subunit is subject to two types of post-translational modification, phosphorylation and methylation, which are also thought to be important regulatory devices. The regulatory ability of PTPA (PTPase activator), originally identified as a protein stimulating the phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity of PP2A, will also be discussed, alongside the other regulatory inputs. The use of specific PP2A inhibitors and molecular genetics in yeast, Drosophila and mice has revealed roles for PP2A in cell cycle regulation, cell morphology and development. PP2A also plays a prominent role in the regulation of specific signal transduction cascades, as witnessed by its presence in a number of macromolecular signalling modules, where it is often found in association with other phosphatases and kinases. Additionally, PP2A interacts with a substantial number of other cellular and viral proteins, which are PP2A substrates, target PP2A to different subcellular compartments or affect enzyme activity. Finally, the de-regulation of PP2A in some specific pathologies will be touched upon. PMID:11171037

  3. Effects of sex and chronic neonatal nicotine treatment on Na²⁺/K⁺/Cl⁻ co-transporter 1, K⁺/Cl⁻ co-transporter 2, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, NMDA receptor subunit 2A and NMDA receptor subunit 2B mRNA expression in the postnatal rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Damborsky, J C; Winzer-Serhan, U H

    2012-12-01

    Chronic exposure to nicotine during the first postnatal week in rats, a developmental period that corresponds to the third trimester of human gestation, results in sexually dimorphic long-term functional defects in the adult hippocampus. One potential cause could be the sex-specific differences in the maturation of GABA(A) receptor-mediated responses from excitatory to inhibitory, which depends on the expression of the Na(2+)/K(+)/Cl(-) co-transporter 1 (NKCC1) and the K(+)/Cl(-) co-transporter 2 (KCC2). In the rat hippocampus, this switch occurs during the first and second postnatal week in females and males, respectively, and is regulated by nicotinic receptor activation. Excitatory GABAergic signaling can increase brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression, which might exacerbate sex differences by impacting synaptogenesis. We hypothesized that chronic neonatal nicotine (CNN) exposure differentially regulates the expression of these co-transporters and BDNF in males and females. We use quantitative isotopic in situ hybridization to examine the expression of mRNAs for NKCC1, KCC2, BDNF, and NMDA receptor subunit 2A (NR2A) and NMDA receptor subunit 2B (NR2B) in the postnatal day (P) 5 and 8 rat hippocampi in both sexes that were either control-treated or with 6mg/kg/day nicotine in milk formula (CNN) via gastric intubation starting at P1. In line with prolonged GABAergic excitation, we found that at P5 males had significantly higher mRNA expression of NKCC1 and BDNF than females. CNN treatment resulted in a significant increase in KCC2 and BDNF mRNA expression in male but not female hippocampus (p<0.05). Males also had higher expression of NR2A and lower expression of NR2B at P5 compared to females (p<0.05). At P8, there were neither sex nor treatment effects on mRNA expression, indicating the end of a critical period for sensitivity to nicotine. These results suggest that differential maturation of GABA(A)R-mediated responses result in sex

  4. PP2A: The Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing?

    PubMed Central

    Kiely, Maeve; Kiely, Patrick A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a major serine/threonine phosphatase in cells. It consists of a catalytic subunit (C), a structural subunit (A), and a regulatory/variable B-type subunit. PP2A has a critical role to play in homeostasis where its predominant function is as a phosphatase that regulates the major cell signaling pathways in cells. Changes in the assembly, activity and substrate specificity of the PP2A holoenzyme have a direct role in disease and are a major contributor to the maintenance of the transformed phenotype in cancer. We have learned a lot about how PP2A functions from specific mutations that disrupt the core assembly of PP2A and from viral proteins that target PP2A and inhibit its effect as a phosphatase. This prompted various studies revealing that restoration of PP2A activity benefits some cancer patients. However, our understanding of the mechanism of action of this is limited because of the complex nature of PP2A holoenzyme assembly and because it acts through a wide variety of signaling pathways. Information on PP2A is also conflicting as there are situations whereby inactivation of PP2A induces apoptosis in many cancer cells. In this review we discuss this relationship and we also address many of the pertinent and topical questions that relate to novel therapeutic strategies aimed at altering PP2A activity. PMID:25867001

  5. B56δ-related protein phosphatase 2A dysfunction identified in patients with intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Houge, Gunnar; Haesen, Dorien; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Mehta, Sarju; Parker, Michael J.; Wright, Michael; Vogt, Julie; McKee, Shane; Tolmie, John L.; Cordeiro, Nuno; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Willemsen, Marjolein H.; Reijnders, Margot R.F.; Berland, Siren; Hayman, Eli; Lahat, Eli; Brilstra, Eva H.; van Gassen, Koen L.I.; Zonneveld-Huijssoon, Evelien; de Bie, Charlotte I.; Hoischen, Alexander; Eichler, Evan E.; Holdhus, Rita; Steen, Vidar M.; Døskeland, Stein Ove; Hurles, Matthew E.; FitzPatrick, David R.; Janssens, Veerle

    2015-01-01

    Here we report inherited dysregulation of protein phosphatase activity as a cause of intellectual disability (ID). De novo missense mutations in 2 subunits of serine/threonine (Ser/Thr) protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) were identified in 16 individuals with mild to severe ID, long-lasting hypotonia, epileptic susceptibility, frontal bossing, mild hypertelorism, and downslanting palpebral fissures. PP2A comprises catalytic (C), scaffolding (A), and regulatory (B) subunits that determine subcellular anchoring, substrate specificity, and physiological function. Ten patients had mutations within a highly conserved acidic loop of the PPP2R5D-encoded B56δ regulatory subunit, with the same E198K mutation present in 6 individuals. Five patients had mutations in the PPP2R1A-encoded scaffolding Aα subunit, with the same R182W mutation in 3 individuals. Some Aα cases presented with large ventricles, causing macrocephaly and hydrocephalus suspicion, and all cases exhibited partial or complete corpus callosum agenesis. Functional evaluation revealed that mutant A and B subunits were stable and uncoupled from phosphatase activity. Mutant B56δ was A and C binding–deficient, while mutant Aα subunits bound B56δ well but were unable to bind C or bound a catalytically impaired C, suggesting a dominant-negative effect where mutant subunits hinder dephosphorylation of B56δ-anchored substrates. Moreover, mutant subunit overexpression resulted in hyperphosphorylation of GSK3β, a B56δ-regulated substrate. This effect was in line with clinical observations, supporting a correlation between the ID degree and biochemical disturbance. PMID:26168268

  6. Subunit architecture of general transcription factor TFIIH.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Brian J; Brignole, Edward J; Azubel, Maia; Murakami, Kenji; Voss, Neil R; Bushnell, David A; Asturias, Francisco J; Kornberg, Roger D

    2012-02-01

    Structures of complete 10-subunit yeast TFIIH and of a nested set of subcomplexes, containing 5, 6, and 7 subunits, have been determined by electron microscopy (EM) and 3D reconstruction. Consistency among all the structures establishes the location of the "minimal core" subunits (Ssl1, Tfb1, Tfb2, Tfb4, and Tfb5), and additional densities can be specifically attributed to Rad3, Ssl2, and the TFIIK trimer. These results can be further interpreted by placement of previous X-ray structures into the additional densities to give a preliminary picture of the RNA polymerase II preinitiation complex. In this picture, the key catalytic components of TFIIH, the Ssl2 ATPase/helicase and the Kin28 protein kinase are in proximity to their targets, downstream promoter DNA and the RNA polymerase C-terminal domain. PMID:22308316

  7. Autosomal-Recessive Mutations in the tRNA Splicing Endonuclease Subunit TSEN15 Cause Pontocerebellar Hypoplasia and Progressive Microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Breuss, Martin W; Sultan, Tipu; James, Kiely N; Rosti, Rasim O; Scott, Eric; Musaev, Damir; Furia, Bansri; Reis, André; Sticht, Heinrich; Al-Owain, Mohammed; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Reuter, Miriam S; Abou Jamra, Rami; Trotta, Christopher R; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2016-07-01

    The tRNA splicing endonuclease is a highly evolutionarily conserved protein complex, involved in the cleavage of intron-containing tRNAs. In human it consists of the catalytic subunits TSEN2 and TSEN34, as well as the non-catalytic TSEN54 and TSEN15. Recessive mutations in the corresponding genes of the first three are known to cause pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH) types 2A-C, 4, and 5. Here, we report three homozygous TSEN15 variants that cause a milder version of PCH2. The affected individuals showed progressive microcephaly, delayed developmental milestones, intellectual disability, and, in two out of four cases, epilepsy. None, however, displayed the central visual failure seen in PCH case subjects where other subunits of the TSEN are mutated, and only one was affected by the extensive motor defects that are typical in other forms of PCH2. The three amino acid substitutions impacted the protein level of TSEN15 and the stoichiometry of the interacting subunits in different ways, but all resulted in an almost complete loss of in vitro tRNA cleavage activity. Taken together, our results demonstrate that mutations in any known subunit of the TSEN complex can cause PCH and progressive microcephaly, emphasizing the importance of its function during brain development. PMID:27392077

  8. A surface plasmon resonance study of the interactions between the component subunits of protein kinase CK2 and two protein substrates, casein and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Benítez, M J; Cochet, C; Jiménez, J S

    2001-11-01

    Surface plasmon resonance has been used to study the interaction between the subunits composing protein kinase CK2 (two catalytic, alpha-subunits, and two regulatory, beta-subunits), as well as the interaction of each subunit with two types of protein substrates, casein, the phosphorylation of which is activated by the regulatory subunit, and calmodulin, which belongs to the kind of substrates on which the catalytic subunit is downregulated by the regulatory subunit. The interaction of casein with the catalytic subunit differs from the interaction with the holoenzyme. Similarly to the interaction with the regulatory subunit, the catalytic subunit interacts with the protein substrate forming a very stable, irreversible complex. The reconstituted holoenzyme, however, binds casein reversibly, displaying a binding mode similar to that displayed by the regulatory subunit. The interaction of calmodulin with the catalytic subunit gives place, like in the case of casein, to an irreversible complex. The interactions with the regulatory subunit and with the holoenzyme were practically negligible, and the interaction with the regulatory subunit disappeared upon increasing the temperature value to close to 30 degrees C. The presence of polylysine induced a high increase in the extent of calmodulin binding to the holoenzyme. The results obtained suggest that CK2beta subunit and protein substrates share a common, or at least an overlapping, site of interaction on the catalytic subunit. The interaction between both subunits would prevent substrates from binding irreversibly to alpha subunit, and, at the same time, it would generate a new and milder site of interaction between the whole holoenzyme and the protein substrate. The main difference between casein and calmodulin would consist in the lower affinity display by the last for the new site generated upon the binding of the regulatory subunit, in the absence of polycations like polylysine. PMID:11827172

  9. Identification of protein phosphatase 2A as an interacting protein of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulos, Panagiotis S; Jacob, Wright; Neumann, Sebastian; Kutsch, Miriam; Wolters, Dirk; Tan, Eng K; Bichler, Zoë; Herrmann, Christian; Heumann, Rolf

    2016-06-01

    Mutations in the gene coding for the multi-domain protein leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are the leading cause of genetically inherited Parkinson's disease (PD). Two of the common found mutations are the R1441C and G2019S. In this study we identified protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) as an interacting partner of LRRK2. We were able to demonstrate that the Ras of complex protein (ROC) domain is sufficient to interact with the three subunits of PP2A in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells and in HeLa cells. The alpha subunit of PP2A is interacting with LRRK2 in the perinuclear region of HeLa cells. Silencing the catalytic subunit of PP2A by shRNA aggravated cellular degeneration induced by the pathogenic R1441C-LRRK2 mutant expressed in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. A similar enhancement of apoptotic nuclei was observed by downregulation of the catalytic subunit of PP2A in cultured cortical cells derived from neurons overexpressing the pathogenic mutant G2019S-LRRK2. Conversely, pharmacological activation of PP2A by sodium selenate showed a partial neuroprotection from R1441C-LRRK2-induced cellular degeneration. All these data suggest that PP2A is a new interacting partner of LRRK2 and reveal the importance of PP2A as a potential therapeutic target in PD. PMID:26894577

  10. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatase type 5 (PP5)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, Mark R.; Ciszak, Ewa M.; Honkanen, Richard E.

    2004-01-01

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) is a member of the PPP-gene family of protein phosphatases that is widely expressed in mammalian tissues and is highly conserved among eukaryotes. PP5 associates with several proteins that affect signal transduction networks, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90)-heterocomplex, the CDC16 and CDC27 subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex, elF2alpha kinase, the A subunit of PP2A, the G12-alpha / G13-alpha subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins and DNA-PK. The catalytic domain of PP5 (PP5c) shares 35-45% sequence identity with the catalytic domains of other PPP-phosphatases, including protein phosphatase-1 (PP1), -2A (PP2A), -2B / calcineurin (PP2B), -4 (PP4), -6 (PP6), and -7 (PP7). Like PP1, PP2A and PP4, PP5 is also sensitive to inhibition by okadaic acid, microcystin, cantharidin, tautomycin, and calyculin A. Here we report the crystal structure of the PP5 catalytic domain (PP5c) at a resolution of 1.6 angstroms. From this structure we propose a mechanism for PP5-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoprotein substrates, which requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a conserved Asp(sup 271)-M(sub 1):M(sub 2)-W(sup 1)-His(sup 304)-Asp(sup 274) catalytic motif. The structure of PP5c provides a possible structural basis for explaining the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases, which are among the most powerful known catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of the PP5c should also aid development of type-specific inhibitors.

  11. Specific Inhibition of Herpes Simplex Virus DNA Polymerase by Helical Peptides Corresponding to the Subunit Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digard, Paul; Williams, Kevin P.; Hensley, Preston; Brooks, Ian S.; Dahl, Charles E.; Coen, Donald M.

    1995-02-01

    The herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase consists of two subunits-a catalytic subunit and an accessory subunit, UL42, that increases processivity. Mutations affecting the extreme C terminus of the catalytic subunit specifically disrupt subunit interactions and ablate virus replication, suggesting that new antiviral drugs could be rationally designed to interfere with polymerase heterodimerization. To aid design, we performed circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation studies, which revealed that a 36-residue peptide corresponding to the C terminus of the catalytic subunit folds into a monomeric structure with partial α-helical character. CD studies of shorter peptides were consistent with a model where two separate regions of α-helix interact to form a hairpin-like structure. The 36-residue peptide and a shorter peptide corresponding to the C-terminal 18 residues blocked UL42-dependent long-chain DNA synthesis at concentrations that had no effect on synthesis by the catalytic subunit alone or by calf thymus DNA polymerase δ and its processivity factor. These peptides, therefore, represent a class of specific inhibitors of herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase that act by blocking accessory-subunit-dependent synthesis. These peptides or their structures may form the basis for the synthesis of clinically effective drugs.

  12. Biogenesis and Assembly of Eukaryotic Cytochrome c Oxidase Catalytic Core

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Ileana C.; Fontanesi, Flavia; Liu, Jingjing; Barrientos, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. COX is a multimeric enzyme formed by subunits of dual genetic origin which assembly is intricate and highly regulated. The COX catalytic core is formed by three mitochondrial DNA encoded subunits, Cox1, Cox2 and Cox3, conserved in the bacterial enzyme. Their biogenesis requires the action of messenger-specific and subunit-specific factors which facilitate the synthesis, membrane insertion, maturation or assembly of the core subunits. The study of yeast strains and human cell lines from patients carrying mutations in structural subunits and COX assembly factors has been invaluable to identify these ancillary factors. Here we review the current state of knowledge of the biogenesis and assembly of the eukaryotic COX catalytic core and discuss the degree of conservation of the players and mechanisms operating from yeast to human. PMID:21958598

  13. How subunit coupling produces the γ-subunit rotary motion in F1-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Jingzhi; Karplus, Martin

    2008-01-01

    FoF1-ATP synthase manufactures the energy “currency,” ATP, of living cells. The soluble F1 portion, called F1-ATPase, can act as a rotary motor, with ATP binding, hydrolysis, and product release, inducing a torque on the γ-subunit. A coarse-grained plastic network model is used to show at a residue level of detail how the conformational changes of the catalytic β-subunits act on the γ-subunit through repulsive van der Waals interactions to generate a torque that drives unidirectional rotation, as observed experimentally. The simulations suggest that the calculated 85° substep rotation is driven primarily by ATP binding and that the subsequent 35° substep rotation is produced by product release from one β-subunit and a concomitant binding pocket expansion of another β-subunit. The results of the simulation agree with single-molecule experiments [see, for example, Adachi K, et al. (2007) Cell 130:309–321] and support a tri-site rotary mechanism for F1-ATPase under physiological condition. PMID:18216260

  14. A new sodium channel {alpha}-subunit gene (Scn9a) from Schwann cells maps to the Scn1a, Scn2a, Scn3a cluster of mouse chromosome 2

    SciTech Connect

    Beckers, M.C.; Ernst, E.; Gros, P.

    1996-08-15

    We have used a total of 27 AXB/BXA recombinant inbred mouse strains to determine the chromosomal location of a newly identified gene encoding an {alpha}-subunit isoform of the sodium channel from Schwann cells, Scn9a. Linkage analysis established that Scn9a mapped to the proximal segment of mouse chromosome 2. The segregation of restriction fragment length polymorphisms in 145 progeny from a Mus spretus x C57BL/6J backcross indicates that Scn9a is very tightly linked to Scn1a (gene encoding the type I sodium channel {alpha}-subunit of the brain) and forms part of a cluster of four Scna genes located on mouse chromosome 2. 17 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Localization of the gene encoding the [alpha][sub 2]/[delta] subunit (CACNL2A) of the human skeletal muscle voltage-dependent Ca[sup 2+] channel to chromosome 7q21-q22 by somatic cell hybrid analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, P.A.; Hogan, K.; Gregg, R.G. ); Scherer, S.W.; Tsui, L.C. Hospital for Sick Children, Ontario )

    1994-01-01

    Activation of voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) by membrane depolarization triggers key cellular responses such as contraction, secretion, excitation, and electrical signaling. The skeletal muscle L-type VDCC is a heteromultimer complex containing four subunits, [alpha][sub 1],[alpha][sub 2]/[delta],[beta][sub 1], and [gamma]. The [alpha][sub 2]/[delta] subunit, an integral component of the VDCC, appears to modulate the channel kinetics. The [alpha][sub 2]/[delta] gene is expressed in many tissues, including skeletal muscle, brain, heart, and lung, and cDNAs representing the skeletal muscle and brain isoforms have been isolated. DNA sequence comparisons indicate that these cDNAs are encoding by a single gene. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Regioselective, Solvent- and Metal-Free Chalcogenation of Imidazo[1,2-a]pyridines by Employing I2 /DMSO as the Catalytic Oxidation System.

    PubMed

    Rafique, Jamal; Saba, Sumbal; Rosário, Alisson R; Braga, Antonio L

    2016-08-01

    Highly efficient molecular-iodine-catalyzed chalcogenations (S and Se) of imidazo[1,2-a]pyridines were achieved by using diorganoyl dichalcogenides under solvent-free conditions. This approach afforded the desired products that had been chalcogenated regioselectively at the C3 position in up to 96 % yield by using DMSO as an oxidant, in the absence of a metal catalyst, and under an inert atmosphere. This mild, green approach allowed the preparation of different types of chalcogenated imidazo[1,2-a]pyridines with structural diversity. Furthermore, the current protocol was also extended to other N-heterocyclic cores. PMID:27388454

  17. The three Type 2A protein phosphatases, PP2Ac, PP4c and PP6c, are differentially regulated by Alpha4.

    PubMed

    LeNoue-Newton, Michele L; Wadzinski, Brian E; Spiller, Benjamin W

    2016-06-17

    Alpha4 is a non-canonical regulatory subunit of Type 2A protein phosphatases that interacts directly with the phosphatase catalytic subunits (PP2Ac, PP4c, and PP6c) and is upregulated in a variety of cancers. Alpha4 modulates phosphatase expression levels and activity, but the molecular mechanism of this regulation is unclear, and the extent to which the various Type 2A catalytic subunits associate with Alpha4 is also unknown. To determine the relative fractions of the Type 2A catalytic subunits associated with Alpha4, we conducted Alpha4 immunodepletion experiments in HEK293T cells and found that a significant fraction of total PP6c is associated with Alpha4, whereas a minimal fraction of total PP2Ac is associated with Alpha4. To facilitate studies of phosphatases in the presence of mutant or null Alpha4 alleles, we developed a facile and rapid method to simultaneously knockdown and rescue Alpha4 in tissue culture cells. This approach has the advantage that levels of endogenous Alpha4 are dramatically reduced by shRNA expression thereby simplifying interpretation of mutant phenotypes. We used this system to show that knockdown of Alpha4 preferentially impacts the expression of PP4c and PP6c compared to expression levels of PP2Ac. PMID:27169767

  18. Essential 170-kDa subunit for degradation of crystalline cellulose by Clostridium cellulovorans cellulase

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, O.; Doi, R.H. )

    1990-03-01

    The cellulase complex from Clostridium cellulovorans has been purified and its subunit composition determined. The complex exhibits cellulase activity against crystalline cellulose as well as carboxymethylcellulase (CMCase) and cellobiohydrolase activities. Three major subunits are present with molecular masses of 170, 100, and 70 kDa. The 100-kDa subunit is the major CMCase, although at least four other, minor subunits show CMCase activity. The 170-kDa subunit has the highest affinity for cellulose, does not have detectable enzymatic activity, but is necessary for cellulase activity. Immunological studies indicate that the 170-kDa subunit is not required for binding of the catalytic subunits to cellulose and therefore does not function solely as an anchor protein. Thus this core subunit must have multiple functions. The authors propose a working hypothesis that the binding of the 170-kDa subunit converts the crystalline cellulose to a form that is capable of being hydrolyzed in a cooperative fashion by the associated catalytic subunits.

  19. Cloning, sequence determination, and regulation of the ribonucleotide reductase subunits from Plasmodium falciparum: a target for antimalarial therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, H; Salem, J S; Li, L S; Yang, F D; Mama, S; Wang, Z M; Fisher, A; Hamann, C S; Cooperman, B S

    1993-01-01

    Malaria remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, accounting for more than one million deaths annually. We have focused on the reduction of ribonucleotides to 2'-deoxyribonucleotides, catalyzed by ribonucleotide reductase, which represents the rate-determining step in DNA replication as a target for antimalarial agents. We report the full-length DNA sequence corresponding to the large (PfR1) and small (PfR2) subunits of Plasmodium falciparum ribonucleotide reductase. The small subunit (PfR2) contains the major catalytic motif consisting of a tyrosyl radical and a dinuclear Fe site. Whereas PfR2 shares 59% amino acid identity with human R2, a striking sequence divergence between human R2 and PfR2 at the C terminus may provide a selective target for inhibition of the malarial enzyme. A synthetic oligopeptide corresponding to the C-terminal 7 residues of PfR2 inhibits mammalian ribonucleotide reductase at concentrations approximately 10-fold higher than that predicted to inhibit malarial R2. The gene encoding the large subunit (PfR1) contains a single intron. The cysteines thought to be involved in the reduction mechanism are conserved. In contrast to mammalian ribonucleotide reductase, the genes for PfR1 and PfR2 are located on the same chromosome and the accumulation of mRNAs for the two subunits follow different temporal patterns during the cell cycle. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8415692

  20. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic RNA polymerases have homologous core subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Sweetser, D; Nonet, M; Young, R A

    1987-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerases are complex aggregates whose component subunits are functionally ill-defined. The gene that encodes the 140,000-dalton subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase II was isolated and studied in detail to obtain clues to the protein's function. This gene, RPB2, exists in a single copy in the haploid genome. Disruption of the gene is lethal to the yeast cell. RPB2 encodes a protein of 138,750 daltons, which contains sequences implicated in binding purine nucleotides and zinc ions and exhibits striking sequence homology with the beta subunit of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. These observations suggest that the yeast and the E. coli subunit have similar roles in RNA synthesis, as the beta subunit contains binding sites for nucleotide substrates and a portion of the catalytic site for RNA synthesis. The subunit homologies reported here, and those observed previously with the largest RNA polymerase subunit, indicate that components of the prokaryotic RNA polymerase "core" enzyme have counterparts in eukaryotic RNA polymerases. PMID:3547406

  1. Glucose-induced posttranslational activation of protein phosphatases PP2A and PP1 in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Castermans, Dries; Somers, Ils; Kriel, Johan; Louwet, Wendy; Wera, Stefaan; Versele, Matthias; Janssens, Veerle; Thevelein, Johan M

    2012-01-01

    The protein phosphatases PP2A and PP1 are major regulators of a variety of cellular processes in yeast and other eukaryotes. Here, we reveal that both enzymes are direct targets of glucose sensing. Addition of glucose to glucose-deprived yeast cells triggered rapid posttranslational activation of both PP2A and PP1. Glucose activation of PP2A is controlled by regulatory subunits Rts1, Cdc55, Rrd1 and Rrd2. It is associated with rapid carboxymethylation of the catalytic subunits, which is necessary but not sufficient for activation. Glucose activation of PP1 was fully dependent on regulatory subunits Reg1 and Shp1. Absence of Gac1, Glc8, Reg2 or Red1 partially reduced activation while Pig1 and Pig2 inhibited activation. Full activation of PP2A and PP1 was also dependent on subunits classically considered to belong to the other phosphatase. PP2A activation was dependent on PP1 subunits Reg1 and Shp1 while PP1 activation was dependent on PP2A subunit Rts1. Rts1 interacted with both Pph21 and Glc7 under different conditions and these interactions were Reg1 dependent. Reg1-Glc7 interaction is responsible for PP1 involvement in the main glucose repression pathway and we show that deletion of Shp1 also causes strong derepression of the invertase gene SUC2. Deletion of the PP2A subunits Pph21 and Pph22, Rrd1 and Rrd2, specifically enhanced the derepression level of SUC2, indicating that PP2A counteracts SUC2 derepression. Interestingly, the effect of the regulatory subunit Rts1 was consistent with its role as a subunit of both PP2A and PP1, affecting derepression and repression of SUC2, respectively. We also show that abolished phosphatase activation, except by reg1Δ, does not completely block Snf1 dephosphorylation after addition of glucose. Finally, we show that glucose activation of the cAMP-PKA (protein kinase A) pathway is required for glucose activation of both PP2A and PP1. Our results provide novel insight into the complex regulatory role of these two major protein

  2. Haploinsufficiency for either one of the type-II regulatory subunits of protein kinase A improves the bone phenotype of Prkar1a+/- mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sisi; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Mertz, Edward L; Tsang, Kitman; Starost, Matthew F; Salpea, Paraskevi; Faucz, Fabio R; Szarek, Eva; Nesterova, Maria; Leikin, Sergey; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-11-01

    Carney Complex (CNC), a human genetic syndrome predisposing to multiple neoplasias, is associated with bone lesions such as osteochondromyxomas (OMX). The most frequent cause for CNC is PRKAR1A deficiency; PRKAR1A codes for type-I regulatory subunit of protein kinase A (PKA). Prkar1a(+/-) mice developed OMX, fibrous dysplasia-like lesions (FDL) and other tumors. Tumor tissues in these animals had increased PKA activity due to an unregulated PKA catalytic subunit and increased PKA type II (PKA-II) activity mediated by the PRKAR2A and PRKAR2B subunits. To better understand the effect of altered PKA activity on bone, we studied Prkar2a and Prkar2b knock out (KO) and heterozygous mice; none of these mice developed bone lesions. When Prkar2a(+/-) and Prkar2b(+/-) mice were used to generate Prkar1a(+/-)Prkar2a(+/-) and Prkar1a(+/-)Prkar2b(+/-) animals, bone lesions formed that looked like those of the Prkar1a(+/-) mice. However, better overall bone organization and mineralization and fewer FDL lesions were found in both double heterozygote groups, indicating a partial restoration of the immature bone structure observed in Prkar1a(+/-) mice. Further investigation indicated increased osteogenesis and higher new bone formation rates in both Prkar1a(+/-)Prkar2a(+/-) and Prkar1a(+/-)Prkar2b(+/-) mice with some minor differences between them. The observations were confirmed with a variety of markers and studies. PKA activity measurements showed the expected PKA-II decrease in both double heterozygote groups. Thus, haploinsufficiency for either of PKA-II regulatory subunits improved bone phenotype of mice haploinsufficient for Prkar1a, in support of the hypothesis that the PRKAR2A and PRKAR2B regulatory subunits were in part responsible for the bone phenotype of Prkar1a(+/-) mice. PMID:26246497

  3. Protein Phosphatase 2A Holoenzyme Is Targeted to Peroxisomes by Piggybacking and Positively Affects Peroxisomal β-Oxidation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kataya, Amr R.A.; Heidari, Behzad; Hagen, Lars; Kommedal, Roald; Slupphaug, Geir; Lillo, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic, highly conserved serine (Ser)/threonine-specific protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) functions as a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic (C), scaffolding (A), and regulatory (B) subunit. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), five, three, and 17 genes encode different C, A, and B subunits, respectively. We previously found that a B subunit, B′θ, localized to peroxisomes due to its C-terminal targeting signal Ser-Ser-leucine. This work shows that PP2A C2, C5, andA2 subunits interact and colocalize with B′θ in peroxisomes. C and A subunits lack peroxisomal targeting signals, and their peroxisomal import depends on B′θ and appears to occur by piggybacking transport. B′θ knockout mutants were impaired in peroxisomal β-oxidation as shown by developmental arrest of seedlings germinated without sucrose, accumulation of eicosenoic acid, and resistance to protoauxins indole-butyric acid and 2,4-dichlorophenoxybutyric acid. All of these observations strongly substantiate that a full PP2A complex is present in peroxisomes and positively affects β-oxidation of fatty acids and protoauxins. PMID:25489022

  4. PKA regulatory subunit expression in tooth development.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Sílvia Ferreira; Kawasaki, Katsushige; Kawasaki, Maiko; Volponi, Ana Angelova; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago; Gomes, Carolina Cavaliéri; Sharpe, Paul T; Ohazama, Atsushi

    2014-05-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) plays critical roles in many biological processes including cell proliferation, cell differentiation, cellular metabolism and gene regulation. Mutation in PKA regulatory subunit, PRKAR1A has previously been identified in odontogenic myxomas, but it is unclear whether PKA is involved in tooth development. The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of alpha isoforms of PKA regulatory subunit (Prkar1a and Prkar2a) in mouse and human odontogenesis by in situ hybridization. PRKAR1A and PRKAR2A mRNA transcription was further confirmed in a human deciduous germ by qRT-PCR. Mouse Prkar1a and human PRKAR2A exhibited a dynamic spatio-temporal expression in tooth development, whereas neither human PRKAR1A nor mouse Prkar2a showed their expression in odontogenesis. These isoforms thus showed different expression pattern between human and mouse tooth germs. PMID:24755349

  5. Transcriptional regulators of Na,K-ATPase subunits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiqin; Langhans, Sigrid A.

    2015-01-01

    The Na,K-ATPase classically serves as an ion pump creating an electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane that is essential for transepithelial transport, nutrient uptake and membrane potential. In addition, Na,K-ATPase also functions as a receptor, a signal transducer and a cell adhesion molecule. With such diverse roles, it is understandable that the Na,K-ATPase subunits, the catalytic α-subunit, the β-subunit and the FXYD proteins, are controlled extensively during development and to accommodate physiological needs. The spatial and temporal expression of Na,K-ATPase is partially regulated at the transcriptional level. Numerous transcription factors, hormones, growth factors, lipids, and extracellular stimuli modulate the transcription of the Na,K-ATPase subunits. Moreover, epigenetic mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of Na,K-ATPase expression. With the ever growing knowledge about diseases associated with the malfunction of Na,K-ATPase, this review aims at summarizing the best-characterized transcription regulators that modulate Na,K-ATPase subunit levels. As abnormal expression of Na,K-ATPase subunits has been observed in many carcinoma, we will also discuss transcription factors that are associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a crucial step in the progression of many tumors to malignant disease. PMID:26579519

  6. Catalytic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Aaron, Timothy Mark; Shah, Minish Mahendra; Jibb, Richard John

    2009-03-10

    A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

  7. A Cooperative Escherichia coli Aspartate Transcarbamoylase without Regulatory Subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Mendes, K.; Kantrowitz, E

    2010-01-01

    Here we report the isolation, kinetic characterization, and X-ray structure determination of a cooperative Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) without regulatory subunits. The native ATCase holoenzyme consists of six catalytic chains organized as two trimers bridged noncovalently by six regulatory chains organized as three dimers, c{sub 6}r{sub 6}. Dissociation of the native holoenzyme produces catalytically active trimers, c{sub 3}, and nucleotide-binding regulatory dimers, r{sub 2}. By introducing specific disulfide bonds linking the catalytic chains from the upper trimer site specifically to their corresponding chains in the lower trimer prior to dissociation, a new catalytic unit, c{sub 6}, was isolated consisting of two catalytic trimers linked by disulfide bonds. Not only does the c{sub 6} species display enhanced enzymatic activity compared to the wild-type enzyme, but the disulfide bonds also impart homotropic cooperativity, never observed in the wild-type c3. The c{sub 6} ATCase was crystallized in the presence of phosphate and its X-ray structure determined to 2.10 {angstrom} resolution. The structure of c{sub 6} ATCase liganded with phosphate exists in a nearly identical conformation as other R-state structures with similar values calculated for the vertical separation and planar angles. The disulfide bonds linking upper and lower catalytic trimers predispose the active site into a more active conformation by locking the 240s loop into the position characteristic of the high-affinity R state. Furthermore, the elimination of the structural constraints imposed by the regulatory subunits within the holoenzyme provides increased flexibility to the c{sub 6} enzyme, enhancing its activity over the wild-type holoenzyme (c{sub 6}r{sub 6}) and c{sub 3}. The covalent linkage between upper and lower catalytic trimers restores homotropic cooperativity so that a binding event at one or so active sites stimulates binding at the other sites. Reduction

  8. Intracellular dissociation and reassembly of prolyl 4-hydroxylase:the alpha-subunits associated with the immunoglobulin-heavy-chain binding protein (BiP) allowing reassembly with the beta-subunit.

    PubMed Central

    John, D C; Bulleid, N J

    1996-01-01

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4-H) consists of two distinct polypeptides; the catalytically more important alpha-subunit and the beta-subunit, which is identical to the multifunctional enzyme protein disulphide isomerase. The enzyme appears to be assembled in vivo into an alpha 2 beta 2 tetramer from newly synthesized alpha-subunits associating with an endogenous pool of beta-subunits. Using a cell-free system, we have shown previously that enzyme assembly is redox-dependent and that assembled alpha-subunits are intramolecularly disulphide-bonded [John and Bulleid (1994) Biochemistry 33, 14018-14025]. Here we have studied this assembly process within intact cells by expressing both subunits in COS-1 cells. Newly synthesized alpha-subunits were shown to assemble with the beta-subunit, to form insoluble aggregates, or to remain soluble but not associate with the beta-subunit. Treatment of cells with dithiothreitol (DTT) led to dissociation of P4-H into subunits and on removal of DTT the enzyme reassembled. This reassembly was ATP-dependent, suggesting an interaction with an ATP-dependent chaperone. This was confirmed when immunoglobulin-heavy-chain binding protein (BiP) and alpha-subunits were co-immunoprecipitated with antibodies against the alpha-subunit and BiP, respectively. These results indicate that unassembled alpha-subunits are maintained in an assembly-competent form by interacting with the molecular chaperone BiP. PMID:8760347

  9. Organocatalysis in heterocyclic synthesis: DABCO as a mild and efficient catalytic system for the synthesis of a novel class of quinazoline, thiazolo [3,2-a]quinazoline and thiazolo[2,3-b] quinazoline derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There are only limited publications devoted to the synthesis of especially thiazolo[3,2-a]quinazoline which involved reaction of 2-mercaptopropargyl quinazolin-4-one with various aryl iodides catalyzed by Pd-Cu or by condensation of 2-mercapto-4-oxoquinazoline with chloroacetic acid, inspite of this procedure was also reported in the literature to afford the thiazolo [2,3-b] quinazoline. So the multistep synthesis of the thiazolo[3,2-a]- quinazoline suffered from some flaws and in this study we have synthesized a novel class of thiazoloquinazolines by a simple and convenient method involving catalysis by 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO). Results A new and convenient one-pot synthesis of a novel class of 2-arylidene-2H-thiazolo[3,2-a]quinazoline-1,5-diones 9a-i was established through the reaction between methyl-2-(2-thio-cyanatoacetamido)benzoate (4) and a variety of arylidene malononitriles 8a-i in the presence of DABCO as a mild and efficient catalytic system via a Michael type addition reaction and a mechanism for formation of the products observed is proposed. Moreover 4 was converted to ethyl-2-[(4-oxo-3,4-dihydroquinazolin-2-yl)thio]acetate (10) upon reflux in ethanol containing DABCO as catalyst. The latter was reacted with aromatic aldehydes and dimethylformamide dimethylacetal (DMF-DMA) to afford a mixture of two regioselectively products with identical percentage yield, these two products were identified as thiazolo[3,2-a]quinazoline 9,13 and thiazolo[2,3-b]quinazoline 11,12 derivatives respectively. The structure of the compounds prepared in this study was elucidated by different spectroscopic tools of analyses also the X-ray single crystal technique was employed in this study for structure elucidation, Z/E potential isomerism configuration determination and to determine the regioselectivity of the reactions. Conclusion A simple and efficient one-pot synthesis of a novel class of 2-arylidene-2H-thiazolo[3,2-a]quinazoline-1,5-diones 9a

  10. Crystal Structure of the Oxazolidinone Antibiotic Linezolid Bound to the 50S Ribosomal Subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Ippolito,J.; Kanyo, Z.; Wang, D.; Franceschi, F.; Moore, P.; Steitz, T.; Duffy, E.

    2008-01-01

    The oxazolidinone antibacterials target the 50S subunit of prokaryotic ribosomes. To gain insight into their mechanism of action, the crystal structure of the canonical oxazolidinone, linezolid, has been determined bound to the Haloarcula marismortui 50S subunit. Linezolid binds the 50S A-site, near the catalytic center, which suggests that inhibition involves competition with incoming A-site substrates. These results provide a structural basis for the discovery of improved oxazolidinones active against emerging drug-resistant clinical strains.

  11. PR65A Phosphorylation Regulates PP2A Complex Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kotlo, Kumar; Xing, Yongna; Lather, Sonia; Grillon, Jean Michel; Johnson, Keven; Skidgel, Randal A.; Solaro, R. John; Danziger, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Serine-threonine Protein phosphatase 2 A (PP2A), a member of the PPP family of phosphatases, regulates a variety of essential cellular processes, including cell-cycling, DNA replication, transcription, translation, and secondary signaling pathways. In the heart, increased PP2A activity/signaling has been linked to cardiac remodeling, contractile dysfunction and, in failure, arrythmogenicity. The core PP2A complex is a hetero-trimeric holoenzyme consisting of a 36 kDa catalytic subunit (PP2Ac); a regulatory scaffold subunit of 65 kDa (PR65A or PP2Aa); and one of at least 18 associated variable regulatory proteins (B subunits) classified into 3 families. In the present study, three in vivo sites of phosphorylation in cardiac PR65A are identified (S303, T268, S314). Using HEK cells transfected with recombinant forms of PR65A with phosphomimetic (P-PR65A) and non-phosphorylated (N-PR65A) amino acid substitutions at these sites, these phosphorylations were shown to inhibit the interaction of PR65A with PP2Ac and PP2A holoenzyme signaling. Forty-seven phospho-proteins were increased in abundance in HEK cells transfected with P-PR65A versus N-PR65A by phospho-protein profiling using 2D-DIGE analysis on phospho-enriched whole cell protein extracts. Among these proteins were elongation factor 1α (EF1A), elongation factor 2, heat shock protein 60 (HSP60), NADPH-dehydrogenase 1 alpha sub complex, annexin A, and PR65A. Compared to controls, failing hearts from the Dahl rat had less phosphorylated PR65A protein abundance and increased PP2A activity. Thus, PR65A phosphorylation is an in vivo mechanism for regulation of the PP2A signaling complex and increased PP2A activity in heart failure. PMID:24465463

  12. Structure and catalysis of acylaminoacyl peptidase: closed and open subunits of a dimer oligopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Harmat, Veronika; Domokos, Klarissza; Menyhárd, Dóra K; Palló, Anna; Szeltner, Zoltán; Szamosi, Ilona; Beke-Somfai, Tamás; Náray-Szabó, Gábor; Polgár, László

    2011-01-21

    Acylaminoacyl peptidase from Aeropyrum pernix is a homodimer that belongs to the prolyl oligopeptidase family. The monomer subunit is composed of one hydrolase and one propeller domain. Previous crystal structure determinations revealed that the propeller domain obstructed the access of substrate to the active site of both subunits. Here we investigated the structure and the kinetics of two mutant enzymes in which the aspartic acid of the catalytic triad was changed to alanine or asparagine. Using different substrates, we have determined the pH dependence of specificity rate constants, the rate-limiting step of catalysis, and the binding of substrates and inhibitors. The catalysis considerably depended both on the kind of mutation and on the nature of the substrate. The results were interpreted in terms of alterations in the position of the catalytic histidine side chain as demonstrated with crystal structure determination of the native and two mutant structures (D524N and D524A). Unexpectedly, in the homodimeric structures, only one subunit displayed the closed form of the enzyme. The other subunit exhibited an open gate to the catalytic site, thus revealing the structural basis that controls the oligopeptidase activity. The open form of the native enzyme displayed the catalytic triad in a distorted, inactive state. The mutations affected the closed, active form of the enzyme, disrupting its catalytic triad. We concluded that the two forms are at equilibrium and the substrates bind by the conformational selection mechanism. PMID:21084296

  13. The light subunit of system bo,+ is fully functional in the absence of the heavy subunit

    PubMed Central

    Reig, Núria; Chillarón, Josep; Bartoccioni, Paola; Fernández, Esperanza; Bendahan, Annie; Zorzano, Antonio; Kanner, Baruch; Palacín, Manuel; Bertran, Joan

    2002-01-01

    The heteromeric amino acid transporters are composed of a type II glycoprotein and a non-glycosylated polytopic membrane protein. System bo,+ exchanges dibasic for neutral amino acids. It is composed of rBAT and bo,+AT, the latter being the polytopic membrane subunit. Mutations in either of them cause malfunction of the system, leading to cystinuria. bo,+AT-reconstituted systems from HeLa or MDCK cells catalysed transport of arginine that was totally dependent on the presence of one of the bo,+ substrates inside the liposomes. rBAT was essential for the cell surface expression of bo,+AT, but it was not required for reconstituted bo,+AT transport activity. No system bo,+ transport was detected in liposomes derived from cells expressing rBAT alone. The reconstituted bo,+AT showed kinetic asymmetry. Expressing the cystinuria-specific mutant A354T of bo,+AT in HeLa cells together with rBAT resulted in defective arginine uptake in whole cells, which was paralleled by the reconstituted bo,+AT activity. Thus, subunit bo,+AT by itself is sufficient to catalyse transmembrane amino acid exchange. The polytopic subunits may also be the catalytic part in other heteromeric transporters. PMID:12234930

  14. Raney nickel catalytic device

    DOEpatents

    O'Hare, Stephen A.

    1978-01-01

    A catalytic device for use in a conventional coal gasification process which includes a tubular substrate having secured to its inside surface by expansion a catalytic material. The catalytic device is made by inserting a tubular catalytic element, such as a tubular element of a nickel-aluminum alloy, into a tubular substrate and heat-treating the resulting composite to cause the tubular catalytic element to irreversibly expand against the inside surface of the substrate.

  15. Physical association of GPR54 C-terminal with protein phosphatase 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Barry J.; Wang Zixuan; Mobley, La'Tonya; Khosravi, Davood; Fujii, Nobutaka; Navenot, Jean-Marc; Peiper, Stephen C.

    2008-12-26

    KiSS1 was discovered as a metastasis suppressor gene and subsequently found to encode kisspeptins (KP), ligands for a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR), GPR54. This ligand-receptor pair was later shown to play a critical role in the neuro-endocrine regulation of puberty. The C-terminal cytoplasmic (C-ter) domain of GPR54 contains a segment rich in proline and arginine residues that corresponds to the primary structure of four overlapping SH3 binding motifs. Yeast two hybrid experiments identified the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-C) as an interacting protein. Pull-down experiments with GST fusion proteins containing the GPR54 C-ter confirmed binding to PP2A-C in cell lysates and these complexes contained phosphatase activity. The proline arginine rich segment is necessary for these interactions. The GPR54 C-ter bound directly to purified recombinant PP2A-C, indicating the GPR54 C-ter may form complexes involving the catalytic subunit of PP2A that regulate phosphorylation of critical signaling intermediates.

  16. Structural basis of protein phosphatase 2A stable latency

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Li; Stanevich, Vitali; Satyshur, Kenneth A; Kong, Mei; Watkins, Guy R.; Wadzinski, Brian E.; Sengupta, Rituparna; Xing, Yongna

    2013-01-01

    The catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2Ac) is stabilized in a latent form by α4, a regulatory protein essential for cell survival and biogenesis of all PP2A complexes. Here we report the structure of α4 bound to the N-terminal fragment of PP2Ac. This structure suggests that α4 binding to the full-length PP2Ac requires local unfolding near the active site, which perturbs the scaffold subunit binding site at the opposite surface via allosteric relay. These changes stabilize an inactive conformation of PP2Ac and convert oligomeric PP2A complexes to the α4 complex upon perturbation of the active site. The PP2Ac–α4 interface is essential for cell survival and sterically hinders a PP2A ubiquitination site, important for the stability of cellular PP2Ac. Our results show that α4 is a scavenger chaperone that binds to and stabilizes partially folded PP2Ac for stable latency, and reveal a mechanism by which α4 regulates cell survival, and biogenesis and surveillance of PP2A holoenzymes. PMID:23591866

  17. The Serine Protease Plasmin Cleaves the Amino-terminal Domain of the NR2A Subunit to Relieve Zinc Inhibition of the N-Methyl-d-aspartate Receptors*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hongjie; Vance, Katie M.; Junge, Candice E.; Geballe, Matthew T.; Snyder, James P.; Hepler, John R.; Yepes, Manuel; Low, Chian-Ming; Traynelis, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    Zinc is hypothesized to be co-released with glutamate at synapses of the central nervous system. Zinc binds to NR1/NR2A N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors with high affinity and inhibits NMDAR function in a voltage-independent manner. The serine protease plasmin can cleave a number of substrates, including protease-activated receptors, and may play an important role in several disorders of the central nervous system, including ischemia and spinal cord injury. Here, we demonstrate that plasmin can cleave the native NR2A amino-terminal domain (NR2AATD), removing the functional high affinity Zn2+ binding site. Plasmin also cleaves recombinant NR2AATD at lysine 317 (Lys317), thereby producing a ∼40-kDa fragment, consistent with plasmin-induced NR2A cleavage fragments observed in rat brain membrane preparations. A homology model of the NR2AATD predicts that Lys317 is near the surface of the protein and is accessible to plasmin. Recombinant expression of NR2A with an amino-terminal deletion at Lys317 is functional and Zn2+ insensitive. Whole cell voltage-clamp recordings show that Zn2+ inhibition of agonist-evoked NMDA receptor currents of NR1/NR2A-transfected HEK 293 cells and cultured cortical neurons is significantly reduced by plasmin treatment. Mutating the plasmin cleavage site Lys317 on NR2A to alanine blocks the effect of plasmin on Zn2+ inhibition. The relief of Zn2+ inhibition by plasmin occurs in PAR1-/- cortical neurons and thus is independent of interaction with protease-activated receptors. These results suggest that plasmin can directly interact with NMDA receptors, and plasmin may increase NMDA receptor responses through disruption or removal of the amino-terminal domain and relief of Zn2+ inhibition. PMID:19240037

  18. Both NR2A and NR2B Subunits of the NMDA Receptor Are Critical for Long-Term Potentiation and Long-Term Depression in the Lateral Amygdala of Horizontal Slices of Adult Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Tobias; Albrecht, Doris; Gebhardt, Christine

    2009-01-01

    The lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA) is implicated in emotional and social behaviors. We recently showed that in horizontal brain slices, activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) is a requirement for persistent synaptic alterations in the LA, such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). In the LA, NR2A- and NR2B-type NMDRs…

  19. Functional analysis of Drosophila DNA polymerase ε p58 subunit

    PubMed Central

    Sahashi, Ritsuko; Matsuda, Risa; Suyari, Osamu; Kawai, Mieko; Yoshida, Hideki; Cotterill, Sue; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2013-01-01

    DNA polymerase ε (polε) plays a central role in DNA replication in eukaryotic cells, and has been suggested to the main synthetic polymerase on the leading strand. It is a hetero-tetrameric enzyme, comprising a large catalytic subunit (the A subunit ~250 kDa), a B subunit of ~60 kDa in most species (~80 kDa in budding yeast) and two smaller subunits (each ~20 kDa). In Drosophila, two subunits of polε (dpolε) have been identified. One is the 255 kDa catalytic subunit (dpolεp255), and the other is the 58 kDa subunit (dpolεp58). The functions of the B subunit have been mainly studied in budding yeast and mammalian cell culture, few studies have been performed in the context of an intact multicellular organism and therefore its functions in this context remain poorly understood. To address this we examined the in vivo role of dpolεp58 in Drosophila. A homozygous dpolεp58 mutant is pupal lethal, and the imaginal discs are less developed in the third instar larvae. In the eye discs of this mutant S phases, as measured by BrdU incorporation assays, were significantly reduced. In addition staining with an anti-phospho histone H3 (PH3) antibody, (a marker of M phase), was increased in the posterior region of eye discs, where usually cells stop replicating and start differentiation. These results indicate that dpolεp58 is essential for Drosophila development and plays an important role in progression of S phase in mitotic cell cycles. We also observed that the size of nuclei in salivary gland cells were decreased in dpolεp58 mutant, indicating that dpolεp58 also plays a role in endoreplication. Furthermore we detect a putative functional interaction between dpolε and ORC2 in discs suggesting that polε plays a role in the initiation of DNA replication in Drosophila. PMID:24224125

  20. Accessory subunit of mitochondrial DNA polymerase from Drosophila embryos. Cloning, molecular analysis, and association in the native enzyme.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Farr, C L; Kaguni, L S

    1997-05-23

    A full-length cDNA of the accessory (beta) subunit of mitochondrial DNA polymerase from Drosophila embryos has been obtained, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The cDNA clone encodes a polypeptide with a deduced amino acid sequence of 361 residues and a predicted molecular mass of 41 kDa. The gene encoding the beta subunit lies within 4 kilobase pairs of that for the catalytic subunit in the Drosophila genome, on the left arm of chromosome 2. The two genes have similar structural features and share several common DNA sequence elements in their upstream regions, suggesting the possibility of coordinate regulation. A human cDNA homolog of the accessory subunit was identified, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The human sequence encodes a polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 43 kDa that shows a high degree of amino acid sequence similarity to the Drosophila beta subunit. Subunit-specific rabbit antisera, directed against the recombinant catalytic and accessory subunit polypeptides overexpressed and purified from Escherichia coli, recognize specifically and immunoprecipitate the native enzyme from Drosophila embryos. Demonstration of the physical association of the two subunits in the Drosophila enzyme and identification of a human accessory subunit homolog provide evidence for a common heterodimeric structure for animal mitochondrial DNA polymerases. PMID:9153213

  1. Localization of individual subunits of protein kinase CK2 to the endoplasmic reticulum and to the Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Faust, M; Jung, M; Günther, J; Zimmermann, R; Montenarh, M

    2001-11-01

    The protein kinase CK2 is composed of two catalytic alpha- or alpha'- and two regulatory beta-subunits. In mammalian cells there is ample evidence for the presence of individual CK2 subunits beside the holoenzyme. By immunofluorescence studies using peptide antibodies which allow us to detect the CK2alpha-, alpha'- and beta-subunits we found all three subunits to be co-localized with a 58 KDa Golgi protein which is specific for the Golgi complex. Subfractionation studies using dog pancreas cells revealed the presence of all three subunits of CK2 at the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER)/Golgi fraction whereas the rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) harboured only the catalytic alpha- and alpha'-subunits. We found that the microsomal preparation from dog pancreas cells contained CK2 which phosphorylated a CK2 specific synthetic peptide and which was heparin sensitive. Furthermore, we could immunoprecipitate the CK2alpha-subunit that exhibited a kinase activity which phosphorylated a CK2 specific substrate and which was heparin sensitive. Protease digestion experiments revealed that the CK2 subunits were located on the cytosolic side of the rER and the sER/Golgi complex. Thus, we could demonstrate an asymmetric distribution of the CK2 subunits at the rER and sER/Golgi complex. Since the CK2alpha- and alpha'-subunits exhibit a substrate specificity which is different from the CK2 holoenzyme one might speculate that the asymmetric distribution of the CK2 holoenzyme and the CK2 catalytic subunits may have regulatory functions. PMID:11827177

  2. Ligand-induced formation of a transient tryptophan synthase complex with αββ subunit stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Ehrmann, Alexander; Richter, Klaus; Busch, Florian; Reimann, Julia; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Sterner, Reinhard

    2010-12-28

    The prototypical tryptophan synthases form a stable heterotetrameric αββα complex in which the constituting TrpA and TrpB1 subunits activate each other in a bidirectional manner. The hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus does not contain a TrpB1 protein but instead two members of the phylogenetically distinct family of TrpB2 proteins, which are encoded within (sTrpB2i) and outside (sTrpB2a) the tryptophan operon. It has previously been shown that sTrpB2a does not functionally or structurally interact with sTrpA, whereas sTrpB2i substantially activates sTrpA in a unidirectional manner. However, in the absence of catalysis, no physical complex between sTrpB2i and sTrpA could be detected. In order to elucidate the structural requirements for complex formation, we have analyzed the interaction between sTrpA (α-monomer) and sTrpB2i (ββ-dimer) by means of spectroscopy, analytical gel filtration, and analytical ultracentrifugation, as well as isothermal titration calorimetry. In the presence of the TrpA ligand glycerol 3-phosphate (GP) and the TrpB substrate l-serine, sTrpA and sTrpB2i formed a physical complex with a thermodynamic dissociation constant of about 1 μM, indicating that the affinity between the α- and ββ-subunits is weaker by at least 1 order of magnitude than the affinity between the corresponding subunits of prototypical tryptophan synthases. The observed stoichiometry of the complex was 1 subunit of sTrpA per 2 subunits of sTrpB2i, which corresponds to a αββ quaternary structure and testifies to a strong negative cooperativity for the binding of the α-monomers to the ββ-dimer. The analysis of the interaction between sTrpB2i and sTrpA in the presence of several substrate, transition state, and product analogues suggests that the αββ complex remains stable during the whole catalytic cycle and disintegrates into α- and ββ-subunits upon the release of the reaction product tryptophan. The formation of a transient tryptophan

  3. Controlling tetramer formation, subunit rotation and DNA ligation during Hin-catalyzed DNA inversion

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yong; Johnson, Reid C.

    2015-01-01

    Two critical steps controlling serine recombinase activity are the remodeling of dimers into the chemically active synaptic tetramer and the regulation of subunit rotation during DNA exchange. We identify a set of hydrophobic residues within the oligomerization helix that controls these steps by the Hin DNA invertase. Phe105 and Met109 insert into hydrophobic pockets within the catalytic domain of the same subunit to stabilize the inactive dimer conformation. These rotate out of the catalytic domain in the dimer and into the subunit rotation interface of the tetramer. About half of residue 105 and 109 substitutions gain the ability to generate stable synaptic tetramers and/or promote DNA chemistry without activation by the Fis/enhancer element. Phe106 replaces Phe105 in the catalytic domain pocket to stabilize the tetramer conformation. Significantly, many of the residue 105 and 109 substitutions support subunit rotation but impair ligation, implying a defect in rotational pausing at the tetrameric conformer poised for ligation. We propose that a ratchet-like surface involving Phe105, Met109 and Leu112 within the rotation interface functions to gate the subunit rotation reaction. Hydrophobic residues are present in analogous positions in other serine recombinases and likely perform similar functions. PMID:26056171

  4. Subunit Arrangement and Function in NMDA Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa,H.; Singh, S.; Mancusso, R.; Gouaux, E.

    2005-01-01

    Excitatory neurotransmission mediated by NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors is fundamental to the physiology of the mammalian central nervous system. These receptors are heteromeric ion channels that for activation require binding of glycine and glutamate to the NR1 and NR2 subunits, respectively. NMDA receptor function is characterized by slow channel opening and deactivation, and the resulting influx of cations initiates signal transduction cascades that are crucial to higher functions including learning and memory. Here we report crystal structures of the ligand-binding core of NR2A with glutamate and that of the NR1-NR2A heterodimer with glutamate and glycine. The NR2A-glutamate complex defines the determinants of glutamate and NMDA recognition, and the NR1-NR2A heterodimer suggests a mechanism for ligand-induced ion channel opening. Analysis of the heterodimer interface, together with biochemical and electrophysiological experiments, confirms that the NR1-NR2A heterodimer is the functional unit in tetrameric NMDA receptors and that tyrosine 535 of NR1, located in the subunit interface, modulates the rate of ion channel deactivation.

  5. Structural Mechanism of Demethylation and Inactivation of Protein Phosphatase 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Xing,Y.; Li, Z.; Chen, Y.; Stock, J.; Jeffrey, P.; Shi, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is an important serine/threonine phosphatase that plays a role in many biological processes. Reversible carboxyl methylation of the PP2A catalytic subunit is an essential regulatory mechanism for its function. Demethylation and negative regulation of PP2A is mediated by a PP2A-specific methylesterase PME-1, which is conserved from yeast to humans. However, the underlying mechanism of PME-1 function remains enigmatic. Here we report the crystal structures of PME-1 by itself and in complex with a PP2A heterodimeric core enzyme. The structures reveal that PME-1 directly binds to the active site of PP2A and that this interaction results in the activation of PME-1 by rearranging the catalytic triad into an active conformation. Strikingly, these interactions also lead to inactivation of PP2A by evicting the manganese ions that are required for the phosphatase activity of PP2A. These observations identify a dual role of PME-1 that regulates PP2A activation, methylation, and holoenzyme assembly in cells.

  6. B′-protein phosphatase 2A is a functional binding partner of delta-retroviral integrase

    PubMed Central

    Maertens, Goedele N.

    2016-01-01

    To establish infection, a retrovirus must insert a DNA copy of its RNA genome into host chromatin. This reaction is catalysed by the virally encoded enzyme integrase (IN) and is facilitated by viral genus-specific host factors. Herein, cellular serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is identified as a functional IN binding partner exclusive to δ-retroviruses, including human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) and bovine leukaemia virus (BLV). PP2A is a heterotrimer composed of a scaffold, catalytic and one of any of four families of regulatory subunits, and the interaction is specific to the B′ family of the regulatory subunits. B′-PP2A and HTLV-1 IN display nuclear co-localization, and the B′ subunit stimulates concerted strand transfer activity of δ-retroviral INs in vitro. The protein–protein interaction interface maps to a patch of highly conserved residues on B′, which when mutated render B′ incapable of binding to and stimulating HTLV-1 and -2 IN strand transfer activity. PMID:26657642

  7. B'-protein phosphatase 2A is a functional binding partner of delta-retroviral integrase.

    PubMed

    Maertens, Goedele N

    2016-01-01

    To establish infection, a retrovirus must insert a DNA copy of its RNA genome into host chromatin. This reaction is catalysed by the virally encoded enzyme integrase (IN) and is facilitated by viral genus-specific host factors. Herein, cellular serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is identified as a functional IN binding partner exclusive to δ-retroviruses, including human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) and bovine leukaemia virus (BLV). PP2A is a heterotrimer composed of a scaffold, catalytic and one of any of four families of regulatory subunits, and the interaction is specific to the B' family of the regulatory subunits. B'-PP2A and HTLV-1 IN display nuclear co-localization, and the B' subunit stimulates concerted strand transfer activity of δ-retroviral INs in vitro. The protein-protein interaction interface maps to a patch of highly conserved residues on B', which when mutated render B' incapable of binding to and stimulating HTLV-1 and -2 IN strand transfer activity. PMID:26657642

  8. Instability of toxin A subunit of AB5 toxins in the bacterial periplasm caused by deficiency of their cognate B subunits

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Hyun; Ryu, Su Hyang; Lee, Sang-Ho; Lee, Yong-Hoon; Lee, Sang-Rae; Huh, Jae-Won; Kim, Sun-Uk; Kim, Ekyune; Kim, Sunghyun; Jon, Sangyong; Bishop, Russell E.; Chang, Kyu-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin (STx) belongs to the AB5 toxin family and is transiently localized in the periplasm before secretion into the extracellular milieu. While producing outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) containing only A subunit of the toxin (STxA), we created specific STx1B- and STx2B-deficient mutants of E. coli O157:H7. Surprisingly, STxA subunit was absent in the OMVs and periplasm of the STxB-deficient mutants. In parallel, the A subunit of heat-labile toxin (LT) of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) was absent in the periplasm of the LT-B-deficient mutant, suggesting that instability of toxin A subunit in the absence of the B subunit is a common phenomenon in the AB5 bacterial toxins. Moreover, STx2A was barely detectable in the periplasm of E. coli JM109 when stx2A was overexpressed alone, while it was stably present when stxB was co-expressed. Compared with STx2 holotoxin, purified STx2A was degraded rapidly by periplasmic proteases when assessed for in vitro proteolytic susceptibility, suggesting that the B subunit contributes to stability of the toxin A subunit in the periplasm. We propose a novel role for toxin B subunits of AB5 toxins in protection of the A subunit from proteolysis during holotoxin assembly in the periplasm. PMID:21762677

  9. Switchable catalytic DNA catenanes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lianzhe; Lu, Chun-Hua; Willner, Itamar

    2015-03-11

    Two-ring interlocked DNA catenanes are synthesized and characterized. The supramolecular catenanes show switchable cyclic catalytic properties. In one system, the catenane structure is switched between a hemin/G-quadruplex catalytic structure and a catalytically inactive state. In the second catenane structure the catenane is switched between a catalytically active Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzyme-containing catenane and an inactive catenane state. In the third system, the interlocked catenane structure is switched between two distinct catalytic structures that include the Mg(2+)- and the Zn(2+)-dependent DNAzymes. PMID:25642796

  10. Disruption of genes encoding subunits of yeast vacuolar H(+)-ATPase causes conditional lethality.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, H; Nelson, N

    1990-01-01

    The main function of vacuolar H(+)-ATPases in eukaryotic cells is to generate proton and electrochemical gradients across the membranes of the vacuolar system. The enzyme is composed of a catalytic sector with five subunits (A-E) and a membrane sector containing at least two subunits (a and c). We disrupted two genes of this enzyme, in yeast cells, one encoding a subunit of the membrane sector (subunit c) and another encoding a subunit of the catalytic sector (subunit B). The resulting mutants did not grow in medium with a pH value higher than 6.5 and grew well only within a narrow pH range around 5.5. Transformation of the mutants with plasmids containing the corresponding genes repaired the mutations. Thus failure to lower the pH in the vacuolar system of yeast, and probably other eukaryotic cells, is lethal and the mutants may survive only if a low external pH allows for this acidification by fluid-phase endocytosis. Images PMID:2139726

  11. Role of the Rubisco small subunit. Final report for period May 1, 1997--April 30,2000

    SciTech Connect

    Spreitzer, Robert J.

    2000-10-04

    CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} are mutually competitive at the active site of ribulose-1,5-biphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). Rubisco contains two subunits, each present in eight copies. The 15-kD small subunit is coded by a family of nuclear RbcS genes. Until now, the role of the small subunit in Rubisco structure or catalytic efficiency is not known. Because of other work in eliminating the two RbcS genes in the green algo Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, it is now possible to address questions about the structure-function relationships of the eukaryotic small subunit. There are three specific aims in this project: (1) Alanine scanning mutagenesis is being used to dissect the importance of the {beta}A/{beta}B loop, a feature unique to the eukaryotic small subunit. (2) Random mutagenesis is being used to identify additional residues or regions of the small subunit that are important for holoenzyme assembly and function. (3) Attempts are being made to express foreign small subunits in Chlamydomonas to examine the contribution of small subunits to holoenzyme assembly, catalytic efficiency, and CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} specificity.

  12. Directed evolution of the tryptophan synthase β-subunit for stand-alone function recapitulates allosteric activation.

    PubMed

    Buller, Andrew R; Brinkmann-Chen, Sabine; Romney, David K; Herger, Michael; Murciano-Calles, Javier; Arnold, Frances H

    2015-11-24

    Enzymes in heteromeric, allosterically regulated complexes catalyze a rich array of chemical reactions. Separating the subunits of such complexes, however, often severely attenuates their catalytic activities, because they can no longer be activated by their protein partners. We used directed evolution to explore allosteric regulation as a source of latent catalytic potential using the β-subunit of tryptophan synthase from Pyrococcus furiosus (PfTrpB). As part of its native αββα complex, TrpB efficiently produces tryptophan and tryptophan analogs; activity drops considerably when it is used as a stand-alone catalyst without the α-subunit. Kinetic, spectroscopic, and X-ray crystallographic data show that this lost activity can be recovered by mutations that reproduce the effects of complexation with the α-subunit. The engineered PfTrpB is a powerful platform for production of Trp analogs and for further directed evolution to expand substrate and reaction scope. PMID:26553994

  13. Catalytic properties of the eukaryotic exosome.

    PubMed

    Chlebowski, Aleksander; Tomecki, Rafał; López, María Eugenia Gas; Séraphin, Bertrand; Dziembowski, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    The eukaryotic exosome complex is built around the backbone of a 9-subunit ring similar to phosporolytic ribonucleases such as RNase PH and polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase). Unlike those enzymes, the ring is devoid of any detectable catalytic activities, with the possible exception of the plant version of the complex. Instead, the essential RNA decay capability is supplied by associated hydrolytic ribonucleases belonging to the Dis3 and Rrp6 families. Dis3 proteins are endowed with two different activities: the long known processive 3'-5' exonucleolytic one and the recently discovered endonucleolytic one. Rrp6 proteins are distributive exonucleases. This chapter will review the current knowledge about the catalytic properties of theses nucleases and their interplay within the exosome holocomplex. PMID:21618875

  14. Catalytic properties of the eukaryotic exosome.

    PubMed

    Chlebowski, Aleksander; Tomecki, Rafał; Gas López, María Eugenia; Séraphin, Bertrand; Dziembowski, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    The eukaryotic exosome complex is built around the backbone of a 9-subunit ring similar to phosporolytic ribonucleases such as RNase PH and polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase). Unlike those enzymes, the ring is devoid of any detectable catalytic activities, with the possible exception of the plant version of the complex. Instead, the essential RNA decay capability is supplied by associated hydrolytic ribonucleases belonging to the Dis3 and Rrp6 families. Dis3 proteins are endowed with two different activities: the long known processive 3'-5' exonucleolytic one and the recently discovered endonucleolytic one. Rrp6 proteins are distributive exonucleases. This chapter will review the current knowledge about the catalytic properties of theses nucleases and their interplay within the exosome holocomplex. PMID:21713678

  15. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) has a potential role in CAPE-induced apoptosis of CCRF-CEM cells via effecting human telomerase reverse transcriptase activity.

    PubMed

    Avci, Cigir Biray; Sahin, Fahri; Gunduz, Cumhur; Selvi, Nur; Aydin, Hikmet Hakan; Oktem, Gulperi; Topcuoglu, Nejat; Saydam, Guray

    2007-12-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is one of the most effective components of propolis which is collected by honey bees. The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of CAPE in the CCRF-CEM cell line and to clarify the role of serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) activity as an underlining mechanism of CAPE-induced apoptosis. Trypan blue dye exclusion test and XTT methods were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity and ELISA based oligonucleotide detection, which can be seen during apoptosis, was used to determine apoptosis. Acridine orange/ethidium bromide dye technique was also used to evaluate apoptosis. The cytotoxic effect of CAPE was detected in a dose and time dependent manner with the IC(50) of 1 muM. ELISA and acridine orange/ethidium bromide methods have shown remarkable apoptosis at 48th hour in CAPE treated cells. To investigate the role of PP2A in CAPE-induced apoptosis of CCRF-CEM cells, we performed combination studies with CAPE and, Calyculin A and Okadaic acid, which are very well known inhibitors of PP2A, in IC(20) of inhibitors and IC(50) of CAPE. Combination studies revealed synergistic effect of both drugs by concomitant use. Western blot analyses of PP2A catalytic and regulatory subunits showed down-regulation of expression of PP2A catalytic subunit in CAPE treated cells at 48th hour. Since, PP2A is important in hTERT (telomerase catalytic subunit) activation and deactivation, we also performed hTERT activity in CAPE treated cells simultaneously. Treating cells with IC(50) of CAPE for 96 h with the intervals of 24 h showed marked reduction of hTERT activity. The reduction of hTERT activity in CAPE treated CCRF-CEM cells was more prominent in the initial 48 h. The variation of hTERT activity in CAPE treated CCRF-CEM cells may be the reason for the protein phosphatase interaction that occurred after treatment with CAPE. PMID:17852432

  16. Nucleotide-Protectable Labeling of Sulfhydryl Groups in Subunit I of the ATPhase from Halobacterium Saccharovorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulzner, Michael; Stan-Lotter, Helga; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1992-01-01

    A membrane-bound ATPase from the archaebacterium Halobacterium saccharovorum is inhibited by N-ethyl-maleimide in a nucleotide-protectable manner. When the enzyme was incubated with N-[C-14]jethylmaleimide, the bulk of radioactivity was as- sociated with the 87,000-Da subunit (subunit 1). ATP, ADP, or AMP reduced incorporation of the inhibitor. No charge shift of subunit I was detected following labeling with N-ethylmaleimide, indicating an electroneutral reaction. The results are consistent with the selective modification of sulfhydryl groups in subunit I at or near the catalytic site and are further evidence of a resemblance between this archaebacterial ATPase and the vacuolar-type ATPases.

  17. Five monomeric hemocyanin subunits from Portunus trituberculatus: purification, spectroscopic characterization, and quantitative evaluation of phenol monooxygenase activity.

    PubMed

    Fujieda, Nobutaka; Yakiyama, Aki; Itoh, Shinobu

    2010-11-01

    Five kinds of monomeric subunits of arthropod hemocyanin have been isolated from swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus hemolymph. The copper centers holding a peroxo species, [(μ-η2:η2-peroxo)dicopper(II)], of these subunits exhibited almost the same UV-vis and visible region CD spectroscopic properties, indicating that they have a similar copper coordination geometry and an electronic structure. Under anaerobic conditions, the oxy-forms of the monomeric subunits were stable in 0.5 M borate buffer (pH 9.0) and reacted with 4-methylphenol (p-cresol) to show the phenolases (cresolase/phenol monooxygenase) activity in the presence of urea. To compare the phenolase (monooxygenase) reactivity, the reactivity of the isolated subunits has been examined quantitatively by using a simplified catalytic system, where the initial product catechol is trapped with borate anion of the buffer solution to prevent following catecholase reaction (Yamazaki and Itoh, 2003). The far-UV region CD spectra were measured in order to clarify the relationship between the content of the secondary structure and the phenolase reactivity. Even though the monomeric subunits exhibit a weak catalytic phenol monooxygenase activity, addition of urea (3 M) significantly enhances their catalytic activity. The differences of the phenolase activity among the monomeric subunits has been discussed on the basis of the spectroscopic analysis and reactivity studies in order to shed light on the enzymatic function of the arthropod hemocyanin in vivo. PMID:20727990

  18. Two stage catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvin, Mary Anne (Inventor); Bachovchin, Dennis (Inventor); Smeltzer, Eugene E. (Inventor); Lippert, Thomas E. (Inventor); Bruck, Gerald J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A catalytic combustor (14) includes a first catalytic stage (30), a second catalytic stage (40), and an oxidation completion stage (49). The first catalytic stage receives an oxidizer (e.g., 20) and a fuel (26) and discharges a partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture (36). The second catalytic stage receives the partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture and further oxidizes the mixture. The second catalytic stage may include a passageway (47) for conducting a bypass portion (46) of the mixture past a catalyst (e.g., 41) disposed therein. The second catalytic stage may have an outlet temperature elevated sufficiently to complete oxidation of the mixture without using a separate ignition source. The oxidation completion stage is disposed downstream of the second catalytic stage and may recombine the bypass portion with a catalyst exposed portion (48) of the mixture and complete oxidation of the mixture. The second catalytic stage may also include a reticulated foam support (50), a honeycomb support, a tube support or a plate support.

  19. Ostreococcus tauri ADP-glucose Pyrophosphorylase Reveals Alternative Paths for the Evolution of Subunit Roles*

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Misty L.; Falaschetti, Christine A.; Ballicora, Miguel A.

    2009-01-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase controls starch synthesis in plants and is an interesting case to study the evolution and differentiation of roles in heteromeric enzymes. It includes two homologous subunits, small (S) and large (L), that originated from a common photosynthetic eukaryotic ancestor. In present day organisms, these subunits became complementary after loss of certain roles in a process described as subfunctionalization. For instance, the potato tuber enzyme has a noncatalytic L subunit that complements an S subunit with suboptimal allosteric properties. To understand the evolution of catalysis and regulation in this family, we artificially synthesized both subunit genes from the unicellular alga Ostreococcus tauri. This is among the most ancient species in the green lineage that diverged from the ancestor of all green plants and algae. After heterologous gene expression, we purified and characterized the proteins. The O. tauri enzyme was not redox-regulated, suggesting that redox regulation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases appeared later in evolution. The S subunit had a typical low apparent affinity for the activator 3-phosphoglycerate, but it was atypically defective in the catalytic efficiency (Vmax/Km) for the substrate Glc-1-P. The L subunit needed the S subunit for soluble expression. In the presence of a mutated S subunit (to avoid interference), the L subunit had a high apparent affinity for 3-phosphoglycerate and substrates suggesting a leading role in catalysis. Therefore, the subfunctionalization of the O. tauri enzyme was different from previously described cases. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first biochemical description of a system with alternative subfunctionalization paths. PMID:19737928

  20. Proteome-wide search for PP2A substrates in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Manuel; Zhurinsky, Jacob; Iglesias-Romero, Ana B; Sanchez-Romero, Maria A; Flor-Parra, Ignacio; Tomas-Gallardo, Laura; Perez-Pulido, Antonio J; Jimenez, Juan; Daga, Rafael R

    2014-06-01

    PP2A (protein phosphatase 2A) is a major phosphatase in eukaryotic cells that plays an essential role in many processes. PP2A mutations in Schizosaccharomyces pombe result in defects of cell cycle control, cytokinesis and morphogenesis. Which PP2A substrates are responsible for these changes is not known. In this work, we searched for PP2A substrates in S. pombe using two approaches, 2D-DIGE analysis of PP2A complex mutants and identification of PP2A interacting proteins. In both cases, we used MS to identify proteins of interest. In the DIGE experiment, we compared proteomes of wild-type S. pombe, deletion of pta2, the phosphoactivator of the PP2A catalytic subunit, and pab1-4, a mutant of B-type PP2A regulatory subunit. A total of 1742 protein spots were reproducibly resolved by 2D-DIGE and 51 spots demonstrated significant changes between PP2A mutants and the wild-type control. MS analysis of these spots identified 27 proteins that include key regulators of glycerol synthesis, carbon metabolism, amino acid biosyntesis, vitamin production, and protein folding. Importantly, we independently identified a subset of these proteins as PP2A binding partners by affinity precipitation, suggesting they may be direct targets of PP2A. We have validated our approach by demonstrating that phosphorylation of Gpd1, a key enzyme in glycerol biogenesis, is regulated by PP2A and that ability of cells to respond to osmotic stress by synthesizing glycerol is compromised in the PP2A mutants. Our work contributes to a better understanding of PP2A function and identifies potential PP2A substrates. PMID:24634168

  1. Structure of the ATP Synthase Catalytic Complex (F1) from Escherichia coli in an Autoinhibited conformation

    SciTech Connect

    G Cingolani; T Duncan

    2011-12-31

    ATP synthase is a membrane-bound rotary motor enzyme that is critical for cellular energy metabolism in all kingdoms of life. Despite conservation of its basic structure and function, autoinhibition by one of its rotary stalk subunits occurs in bacteria and chloroplasts but not in mitochondria. The crystal structure of the ATP synthase catalytic complex (F{sub 1}) from Escherichia coli described here reveals the structural basis for this inhibition. The C-terminal domain of subunit {var_epsilon} adopts a heretofore unknown, highly extended conformation that inserts deeply into the central cavity of the enzyme and engages both rotor and stator subunits in extensive contacts that are incompatible with functional rotation. As a result, the three catalytic subunits are stabilized in a set of conformations and rotational positions distinct from previous F{sub 1} structures.

  2. Influence of Conformation of M. tuberculosis RNase P Protein Subunit on Its Function

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Alla; Ubaid-ullah, Shah; Ramteke, Anup K.; Batra, Janendra K

    2016-01-01

    RNase P is an essential enzyme that processes 5' end leader sequence of pre-tRNA to generate mature tRNA. The bacterial RNase Ps contain a RNA subunit and one protein subunit, where the RNA subunit contains the catalytic activity. The protein subunit which lacks any catalytic activity, relaxes the ionic requirements for holoenzyme reaction and is indispensable for pre-tRNA cleavage in vivo. In the current study, we reconstituted the M. tuberculosis RNase P holoenzyme in vitro. We prepared the RNase P protein through two different strategies that differ in the conditions under which the recombinant M. tuberculosis protein, expressed in E. coli was purified. The mycobacterial RNase P protein which was purified under native conditions subsequent to isolation from inclusion bodies and in vitro renaturation, was capable of cleaving pre-tRNA specifically without the requirement of RNase P RNA. However, the preparation that was purified under denaturing conditions and refolded subsequently lacked any inherent pre-tRNA processing activity and cleaved the substrate only as a component of the holoenzyme with the RNA subunit. We found that the two RNase P protein preparations attained alternative conformations and differed with respect to their stability as well. PMID:27088505

  3. The ribosomal subunit assembly line

    PubMed Central

    Dlakić, Mensur

    2005-01-01

    Recent proteomic studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified nearly 200 proteins, other than the structural ribosomal proteins, that participate in the assembly of ribosomal subunits and their transport from the nucleus. In a separate line of research, proteomic studies of mature plant ribosomes have revealed considerable variability in the protein composition of individual ribosomes. PMID:16207363

  4. F{sub o}F{sub 1}-ATPase activity regulated by external links on {beta} subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jie; Zhang, Xiao-ai; Shu, Yao-Gen; Yue, Jia-Chang

    2010-01-01

    F{sub o}F{sub 1}-ATPase activity is regulated by external links on {beta} subunits with different molecular weight. It is inhibited when anti-{beta} subunit antibody, streptavidin and H9 antibody link on the {beta} subunits successively, but is activated when virus was binded. Western blotting indicated that the employed anti-{beta} antibody target was on the non-catalytic site of the {beta} subunit. Furthermore, an ESR study of spin-labeled ATP (SL-ATP) showed that the affinity of ATP to the holoenzyme increases with increasing external links on the {beta} subunits. This simple regulation method may have great potential in the design of rapid, free labeled, sensitive and selective biosensors.

  5. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  6. Catalytic cracking process

    DOEpatents

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; Baker, Richard W.

    2001-01-01

    Processes and apparatus for providing improved catalytic cracking, specifically improved recovery of olefins, LPG or hydrogen from catalytic crackers. The improvement is achieved by passing part of the wet gas stream across membranes selective in favor of light hydrocarbons over hydrogen.

  7. Dephosphorylation of Tctex2-related dynein light chain by type 2A protein phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Kazuo

    2002-10-01

    Sperm flagellar movements are regulated by cAMP-dependent protein phosphorylation. Tctex2-related light chain of outer arm dynein is a well-defined phosphorylated protein that is phosphorylated at activation of sperm motility. Here, the protein phosphatase that dephosphorylates Tctex2-related dynein light chain (LC2) has been characterized in salmonid fish sperm. Most of the phosphatase activity against LC2 is found in Triton-soluble fraction of flagella but trace extent of the activity is retained in the axoneme. The dephosphorylation of LC2 is inhibited by okadaic acid at more than 1nM, whereas that of dynein alpha heavy chain is inhibited at more than 10nM. The addition of Ca(2+) gives no direct effect on LC2 dephosphorylation, but it accelerates the dephosphorylation of the regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, resulting in the decrease of LC2 phosphorylation. The activity to dephosphorylate the LC2 is separated by MonoQ ion-exchange column chromatography along with the immunoreactivity to the antibody against the catalytic subunit of type 2A protein phosphatase. These results suggest that LC2 is dephosphorylated by type 2A protein phosphatase and that dynein alpha heavy chain and the regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase are dephosphorylated by other types of protein phosphatases. PMID:12359223

  8. The testis-specific Cα2 subunit of PKA is kinetically indistinguishable from the common Cα1 subunit of PKA

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The two variants of the α-form of the catalytic (C) subunit of protein kinase A (PKA), designated Cα1 and Cα2, are encoded by the PRKACA gene. Whereas Cα1 is ubiquitous, Cα2 expression is restricted to the sperm cell. Cα1 and Cα2 are encoded with different N-terminal domains. In Cα1 but not Cα2 the N-terminal end introduces three sites for posttranslational modifications which include myristylation at Gly1, Asp-specific deamidation at Asn2 and autophosphorylation at Ser10. Previous reports have implicated specific biological features correlating with these modifications on Cα1. Since Cα2 is not modified in the same way as Cα1 we tested if they have distinct biochemical activities that may be reflected in different biological properties. Results We show that Cα2 interacts with the two major forms of the regulatory subunit (R) of PKA, RI and RII, to form cAMP-sensitive PKAI and PKAII holoenzymes both in vitro and in vivo as is also the case with Cα1. Moreover, using Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR), we show that the interaction patterns of the physiological inhibitors RI, RII and PKI were comparable for Cα2 and Cα1. This is also the case for their potency to inhibit catalytic activities of Cα2 and Cα1. Conclusion We conclude that the regulatory complexes formed with either Cα1 or Cα2, respectively, are indistinguishable. PMID:21812984

  9. Cardiac Function Is Regulated by B56α-mediated Targeting of Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) to Contractile Relevant Substrates*

    PubMed Central

    Kirchhefer, Uwe; Brekle, Christiane; Eskandar, John; Isensee, Gunnar; Kučerová, Dana; Müller, Frank U.; Pinet, Florence; Schulte, Jan S.; Seidl, Matthias D.; Boknik, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Dephosphorylation of important myocardial proteins is regulated by protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), representing a heterotrimer that is comprised of catalytic, scaffolding, and regulatory (B) subunits. There is a multitude of B subunit family members directing the PP2A holoenzyme to different myocellular compartments. To gain a better understanding of how these B subunits contribute to the regulation of cardiac performance, we generated transgenic (TG) mice with cardiomyocyte-directed overexpression of B56α, a phosphoprotein of the PP2A-B56 family. The 2-fold overexpression of B56α was associated with an enhanced PP2A activity that was localized mainly in the cytoplasm and myofilament fraction. Contractility was enhanced both at the whole heart level and in isolated cardiomyocytes of TG compared with WT mice. However, peak amplitude of [Ca]i did not differ between TG and WT cardiomyocytes. The basal phosphorylation of cardiac troponin inhibitor (cTnI) and the myosin-binding protein C was reduced by 26 and 35%, respectively, in TG compared with WT hearts. The stimulation of β-adrenergic receptors by isoproterenol (ISO) resulted in an impaired contractile response of TG hearts. At a depolarizing potential of −5 mV, the ICa,L current density was decreased by 28% after administration of ISO in TG cardiomyocytes. In addition, the ISO-stimulated phosphorylation of phospholamban at Ser16 was reduced by 27% in TG hearts. Thus, the increased PP2A-B56α activity in TG hearts is localized to specific subcellular sites leading to the dephosphorylation of important contractile proteins. This may result in higher myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity and increased basal contractility in TG hearts. These effects were reversed by β-adrenergic stimulation. PMID:25320082

  10. The Ubiquitin E3 Ligase NOSIP Modulates Protein Phosphatase 2A Activity in Craniofacial Development

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmeister, Meike; Prelle, Carola; Küchler, Philipp; Kovacevic, Igor; Moser, Markus; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Oess, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly is a common developmental disorder in humans characterised by incomplete brain hemisphere separation and midface anomalies. The etiology of holoprosencephaly is heterogeneous with environmental and genetic causes, but for a majority of holoprosencephaly cases the genes associated with the pathogenesis could not be identified so far. Here we report the generation of knockout mice for the ubiquitin E3 ligase NOSIP. The loss of NOSIP in mice causes holoprosencephaly and facial anomalies including cleft lip/palate, cyclopia and facial midline clefting. By a mass spectrometry based protein interaction screen we identified NOSIP as a novel interaction partner of protein phosphatase PP2A. NOSIP mediates the monoubiquitination of the PP2A catalytic subunit and the loss of NOSIP results in an increase in PP2A activity in craniofacial tissue in NOSIP knockout mice. We conclude, that NOSIP is a critical modulator of brain and craniofacial development in mice and a candidate gene for holoprosencephaly in humans. PMID:25546391

  11. AMP-activated protein kinase kinase: detection with recombinant AMPK alpha1 subunit.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Stephen R; O'Donnell, John B; Hammet, Andrew; Stapleton, David; Habinowski, Susan A; Means, Anthony R; Kemp, Bruce E; Witters, Lee A

    2002-05-10

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a heterotrimeric serine/threonine protein kinase important for the responses to metabolic stress. It consists of a catalytic alpha subunit and two non-catalytic subunits, beta and gamma, and is regulated both by the allosteric action of AMP and by phosphorylation of the alpha and beta subunits catalyzed by AMPKK(s) and autophosphorylation. The Thr172 site on the alpha subunit has been previously characterized as an activating phosphorylation site. Using bacterially expressed AMPK alpha1 subunit proteins, we have explored the role of Thr172-directed AMPKKs in alpha subunit regulation. Recombinant alpha1 subunit proteins, representing the N-terminus, have been expressed as maltose binding protein (MBP) 6x His fusion proteins and purified to homogeneity by Ni(2+) chromatography. Both wild-type alpha1(1-312) and alpha1(1-312)T172D are inactive when expressed in bacteria, but the former can be fully phosphorylated (1 mol/mol) on Thr172 and activated by a surrogate AMPKK, CaMKKbeta. The corresponding AMPKalpha1(1-392), an alpha construct containing its autoinhibitory sequence, can be similarly phosphorylated, but it remains inactive. In an insulinoma cell line, either low glucose or 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAR) treatment leads to activation and T172 phosphorylation of endogenous AMPK. Under the same conditions of cell incubation, we have identified an AMPKK activity that both phosphorylates and activates the recombinant alpha1(1-312), but this Thr172-directed AMPKK activity is unaltered by low glucose or AICAR, indicating that it is constitutively active. PMID:12051742

  12. PP2A Regulates HDAC4 Nuclear Import

    PubMed Central

    Paroni, Gabriela; Cernotta, Nadia; Dello Russo, Claudio; Gallinari, Paola; Pallaoro, Michele; Foti, Carmela; Talamo, Fabio; Orsatti, Laura; Steinkühler, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Different signal-regulated serine/threonine kinases phosphorylate class II histone deacetylases (HDACs) to promote nuclear export, cytosolic accumulation, and activation of gene transcription. However, little is known about mechanisms operating in the opposite direction, which, possibly through phosphatases, should promote class II HDACs nuclear entry and subsequent gene repression. Here we show that HDAC4 forms a complex with the PP2A holoenzyme Cα, Aα, B/PR55α. In vitro and in vivo binding studies demonstrate that the N-terminus of HDAC4 interacts with the catalytic subunit of PP2A. HDAC4 is dephosphorylated by PP2A and experiments using okadaic acid or RNA interference have revealed that PP2A controls HDAC4 nuclear import. Moreover, we identified serine 298 as a putative phosphorylation site important for HDAC4 nuclear import. The HDAC4 mutant mimicking phosphorylation of serine 298 is defective in nuclear import. Mutation of serine 298 to alanine partially rescues the defect in HDAC4 nuclear import observed in cells with down-regulated PP2A. These observations suggest that PP2A, via the dephosphorylation of multiple serines including the 14-3-3 binding sites and serine 298, controls HDAC4 nuclear import. PMID:18045992

  13. Suppression of Scant Identifies Endos as a Substrate of Greatwall Kinase and a Negative Regulator of Protein Phosphatase 2A in Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Rangone, Hélène; Wegel, Eva; Gatt, Melanie K.; Yeung, Eirene; Flowers, Alexander; Debski, Janusz; Dadlez, Michal; Janssens, Veerle; Carpenter, Adelaide T. C.; Glover, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays a major role in dephosphorylating the targets of the major mitotic kinase Cdk1 at mitotic exit, yet how it is regulated in mitotic progression is poorly understood. Here we show that mutations in either the catalytic or regulatory twins/B55 subunit of PP2A act as enhancers of gwlScant, a gain-of-function allele of the Greatwall kinase gene that leads to embryonic lethality in Drosophila when the maternal dosage of the mitotic kinase Polo is reduced. We also show that heterozygous mutant endos alleles suppress heterozygous gwlScant; many more embryos survive. Furthermore, heterozygous PP2A mutations make females heterozygous for the strong mutation polo11 partially sterile, even in the absence of gwlScant. Heterozygosity for an endos mutation suppresses this PP2A/polo11 sterility. Homozygous mutation or knockdown of endos leads to phenotypes suggestive of defects in maintaining the mitotic state. In accord with the genetic interactions shown by the gwlScant dominant mutant, the mitotic defects of Endos knockdown in cultured cells can be suppressed by knockdown of either the catalytic or the Twins/B55 regulatory subunits of PP2A but not by the other three regulatory B subunits of Drosophila PP2A. Greatwall phosphorylates Endos at a single site, Ser68, and this is essential for Endos function. Together these interactions suggest that Greatwall and Endos act to promote the inactivation of PP2A-Twins/B55 in Drosophila. We discuss the involvement of Polo kinase in such a regulatory loop. PMID:21852956

  14. Molecular constituents of maxi KCa channels in human coronary smooth muscle: predominant alpha + beta subunit complexes.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y; Meera, P; Song, M; Knaus, H G; Toro, L

    1997-08-01

    1. Human large-conductance voltage- and calcium-sensitive K+ (maxi KCa) channels are composed of at least two subunits: the pore-forming subunit, alpha, and a modulatory subunit, beta. Expression of the beta subunit induces dramatic changes in alpha subunit function. It increases the apparent Ca2+ sensitivity and it allows dehydrosoyasaponin I (DHS-I) to upregulate the channel. 2. The functional coupling of maxi KCa channel alpha and beta subunits in freshly dissociated human coronary smooth muscle cells was assessed. To distinguish maxi KCa currents modulated by the beta subunit, we examined (a) their apparent Ca2+ sensitivity, as judged from the voltage necessary to half-activate the channel (V1/2), and (b) their activation by DHS-I. 3. In patches with unitary currents, the majority of channels were half-activated near -85 mV at 18 microM Ca2+, a value similar to that obtained when the human KCa channel alpha (HSLO) and beta (HKV,Ca beta) subunits are co-expressed. A small number of channels half-activated around 0 mV, suggesting the activity of the alpha subunit alone. 4. The properties of macroscopic currents were consistent with the view that most pore-forming alpha subunits were coupled to beta subunits, since the majority of currents had values for V1/2 near to -90 mV, and currents were potentiated by DHS-I. 5. We conclude that in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells, most maxi KCa channels are composed of alpha and beta subunits. The higher Ca2+ sensitivity of maxi KCa channels, resulting from their coupling to beta subunits, suggests an important role of this channel in regulating coronary tone. Their massive activation by micromolar Ca2+ concentrations may lead to a large hyperpolarization causing profound changes in coronary blood flow and cardiac function. PMID:9279807

  15. Molecular constituents of maxi KCa channels in human coronary smooth muscle: predominant alpha + beta subunit complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Y; Meera, P; Song, M; Knaus, H G; Toro, L

    1997-01-01

    1. Human large-conductance voltage- and calcium-sensitive K+ (maxi KCa) channels are composed of at least two subunits: the pore-forming subunit, alpha, and a modulatory subunit, beta. Expression of the beta subunit induces dramatic changes in alpha subunit function. It increases the apparent Ca2+ sensitivity and it allows dehydrosoyasaponin I (DHS-I) to upregulate the channel. 2. The functional coupling of maxi KCa channel alpha and beta subunits in freshly dissociated human coronary smooth muscle cells was assessed. To distinguish maxi KCa currents modulated by the beta subunit, we examined (a) their apparent Ca2+ sensitivity, as judged from the voltage necessary to half-activate the channel (V1/2), and (b) their activation by DHS-I. 3. In patches with unitary currents, the majority of channels were half-activated near -85 mV at 18 microM Ca2+, a value similar to that obtained when the human KCa channel alpha (HSLO) and beta (HKV,Ca beta) subunits are co-expressed. A small number of channels half-activated around 0 mV, suggesting the activity of the alpha subunit alone. 4. The properties of macroscopic currents were consistent with the view that most pore-forming alpha subunits were coupled to beta subunits, since the majority of currents had values for V1/2 near to -90 mV, and currents were potentiated by DHS-I. 5. We conclude that in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells, most maxi KCa channels are composed of alpha and beta subunits. The higher Ca2+ sensitivity of maxi KCa channels, resulting from their coupling to beta subunits, suggests an important role of this channel in regulating coronary tone. Their massive activation by micromolar Ca2+ concentrations may lead to a large hyperpolarization causing profound changes in coronary blood flow and cardiac function. Images Figure 1 PMID:9279807

  16. A bioinformatic and computational study of myosin phosphatase subunit diversity

    PubMed Central

    Dippold, Rachael P.

    2014-01-01

    Variability in myosin phosphatase (MP) subunits may provide specificity in signaling pathways that regulate muscle tone. We utilized public databases and computational algorithms to investigate the phylogenetic diversity of MP regulatory (PPP1R12A-C) and inhibitory (PPP1R14A-D) subunits. The comparison of exonic coding sequences and expression data confirmed or refuted the existence of isoforms and their tissue-specific expression in different model organisms. The comparison of intronic and exonic sequences identified potential expressional regulatory elements. As examples, smooth muscle MP regulatory subunit (PPP1R12A) is highly conserved through evolution. Its alternative exon E24 is present in fish through mammals with two invariant features: 1) a reading frame shift generating a premature termination codon and 2) a hexanucleotide sequence adjacent to the 3′ splice site hypothesized to be a novel suppressor of exon splicing. A characteristic of the striated muscle MP regulatory subunit (PPP1R12B) locus is numerous and phylogenetically variable transcriptional start sites. In fish this locus only codes for the small (M21) subunit, suggesting the primordial function of this gene. Inhibitory subunits show little intragenic variability; their diversity is thought to have arisen by expansion and tissue-specific expression of different gene family members. We demonstrate differences in the regulatory landscape between smooth muscle enriched (PPP1R14A) and more ubiquitously expressed (PPP1R14B) family members and identify deeply conserved intronic sequence and predicted transcriptional cis-regulatory elements. This bioinformatic and computational study has uncovered a number of attributes of MP subunits that supports selection of ideal model organisms and testing of hypotheses regarding their physiological significance and regulated expression. PMID:24898838

  17. ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by human replication factor C requires participation of multiple subunits.

    PubMed

    Cai, J; Yao, N; Gibbs, E; Finkelstein, J; Phillips, B; O'Donnell, M; Hurwitz, J

    1998-09-29

    Human replication factor C (hRFC) is a five-subunit protein complex (p140, p40, p38, p37, and p36) that acts to catalytically load proliferating cell nuclear antigen onto DNA, where it recruits DNA polymerase delta or epsilon to the primer terminus at the expense of ATP, leading to processive DNA synthesis. We have previously shown that a subcomplex of hRFC consisting of three subunits (p40, p37, and p36) contained DNA-dependent ATPase activity. However, it is not clear which subunit(s) hydrolyzes ATP, as all five subunits include potential ATP binding sites. In this report, we introduced point mutations in the putative ATP-binding sequences of each hRFC subunit and examined the properties of the resulting mutant hRFC complex and the ATPase activity of the hRFC or the p40.p37.p36 complex. A mutation in any one of the ATP binding sites of the p36, p37, p40, or p140 subunits markedly reduced replication activity of the hRFC complex and the ATPase activity of the hRFC or the p40.p37.p36 complex. A mutation in the ATP binding site of the p38 subunit did not alter the replication activity of hRFC. These findings indicate that the replication activity of hRFC is dependent on efficient ATP hydrolysis contributed to by the action of four hRFC subunits. PMID:9751713

  18. Basal protein phosphatase 2A activity restrains cytokine expression: role for MAPKs and tristetraprolin.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Mostafizur; Rumzhum, Nowshin N; Morris, Jonathan C; Clark, Andrew R; Verrills, Nicole M; Ammit, Alaina J

    2015-01-01

    PP2A is a master controller of multiple inflammatory signaling pathways. It is a target in asthma; however the molecular mechanisms by which PP2A controls inflammation warrant further investigation. In A549 lung epithelial cells in vitro we show that inhibition of basal PP2A activity by okadaic acid (OA) releases restraint on MAPKs and thereby increases MAPK-mediated pro-asthmatic cytokines, including IL-6 and IL-8. Notably, PP2A inhibition also impacts on the anti-inflammatory protein - tristetraprolin (TTP), a destabilizing RNA binding protein regulated at multiple levels by p38 MAPK. Although PP2A inhibition increases TTP mRNA expression, resultant TTP protein builds up in the hyperphosphorylated inactive form. Thus, when PP2A activity is repressed, pro-inflammatory cytokines increase and anti-inflammatory proteins are rendered inactive. Importantly, these effects can be reversed by the PP2A activators FTY720 and AAL(s), or more specifically by overexpression of the PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2A-C). Moreover, PP2A plays an important role in cytokine expression in cells stimulated with TNFα; as inhibition of PP2A with OA or PP2A-C siRNA results in significant increases in cytokine production. Collectively, these data reveal the molecular mechanisms of PP2A regulation and highlight the potential of boosting the power of endogenous phosphatases as novel anti-inflammatory strategies to combat asthmatic inflammation. PMID:25985190

  19. Targeting the Large Subunit of Human Ribonucleotide Reductase for Cancer Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wijerathna, Sanath R.; Ahmad, Md. Faiz; Xu, Hai; Fairman, James W.; Zhang, Andrew; Kaushal, Prem Singh; Wan, Qun; Kiser, Jianying; Dealwis, Chris G.

    2011-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) is a crucial enzyme in de novo DNA synthesis, where it catalyses the rate determining step of dNTP synthesis. RRs consist of a large subunit called RR1 (α), that contains two allosteric sites and one catalytic site, and a small subunit called RR2 (β), which houses a tyrosyl free radical essential for initiating catalysis. The active form of mammalian RR is an αnβm hetero oligomer. RR inhibitors are cytotoxic to proliferating cancer cells. In this brief review we will discuss the three classes of RR, the catalytic mechanism of RR, the regulation of the dNTP pool, the substrate selection, the allosteric activation, inactivation by ATP and dATP, and the nucleoside drugs that target RR. We will also discuss possible strategies for developing a new class of drugs that disrupts the RR assembly. PMID:23115527

  20. Structural basis for translational surveillance by the large ribosomal subunit-associated protein quality control complex

    PubMed Central

    Lyumkis, Dmitry; Oliveira dos Passos, Dario; Tahara, Erich B.; Webb, Kristofor; Bennett, Eric J.; Vinterbo, Staal; Potter, Clinton S.; Carragher, Bridget; Joazeiro, Claudio A. P.

    2014-01-01

    All organisms have evolved mechanisms to manage the stalling of ribosomes upon translation of aberrant mRNA. In eukaryotes, the large ribosomal subunit-associated quality control complex (RQC), composed of the listerin/Ltn1 E3 ubiquitin ligase and cofactors, mediates the ubiquitylation and extraction of ribosome-stalled nascent polypeptide chains for proteasomal degradation. How RQC recognizes stalled ribosomes and performs its functions has not been understood. Using single-particle cryoelectron microscopy, we have determined the structure of the RQC complex bound to stalled 60S ribosomal subunits. The structure establishes how Ltn1 associates with the large ribosomal subunit and properly positions its E3-catalytic RING domain to mediate nascent chain ubiquitylation. The structure also reveals that a distinguishing feature of stalled 60S particles is an exposed, nascent chain-conjugated tRNA, and that the Tae2 subunit of RQC, which facilitates Ltn1 binding, is responsible for selective recognition of stalled 60S subunits. RQC components are engaged in interactions across a large span of the 60S subunit surface, connecting the tRNA in the peptidyl transferase center to the distally located nascent chain tunnel exit. This work provides insights into a mechanism linking translation and protein degradation that targets defective proteins immediately after synthesis, while ignoring nascent chains in normally translating ribosomes. PMID:25349383

  1. Catalytic distillation process

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1982-01-01

    A method for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C.sub.4 feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  2. Catalytic distillation process

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  3. Evolution of catalytic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, G. F.

    1993-01-01

    An RNA-based evolution system was constructed in the laboratory and used to develop RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. By controlling the nature of the catalytic task that the molecules must perform in order to survive, it is possible to direct the evolving population toward the expression of some desired catalytic behavior. More recently, this system has been coupled to an in vitro translation procedure, raising the possibility of evolving protein enzymes in the laboratory to produce novel proteins with desired catalytic properties. The aim of this line of research is to reduce darwinian evolution, the fundamental process of biology, to a laboratory procedure that can be made to operate in the service of organic synthesis.

  4. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  5. Clean catalytic combustor program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekstedt, E. E.; Lyon, T. F.; Sabla, P. E.; Dodds, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    A combustor program was conducted to evolve and to identify the technology needed for, and to establish the credibility of, using combustors with catalytic reactors in modern high-pressure-ratio aircraft turbine engines. Two selected catalytic combustor concepts were designed, fabricated, and evaluated. The combustors were sized for use in the NASA/General Electric Energy Efficient Engine (E3). One of the combustor designs was a basic parallel-staged double-annular combustor. The second design was also a parallel-staged combustor but employed reverse flow cannular catalytic reactors. Subcomponent tests of fuel injection systems and of catalytic reactors for use in the combustion system were also conducted. Very low-level pollutant emissions and excellent combustor performance were achieved. However, it was obvious from these tests that extensive development of fuel/air preparation systems and considerable advancement in the steady-state operating temperature capability of catalytic reactor materials will be required prior to the consideration of catalytic combustion systems for use in high-pressure-ratio aircraft turbine engines.

  6. Tomato Fruit Polygalacturonase Isozyme 1 (Characterization of the [beta] Subunit and Its State of Assembly in Vivo).

    PubMed Central

    Moore, T.; Bennett, A. B.

    1994-01-01

    Polygalacturonase isozyme 1 (PG1) is a heterodimer comprising a catalytic and noncatalytic or [beta] subunit, whereas polygalacturonase isozyme 2 (PG2) comprises only the catalytic subunit. To assess the state of assembly of PG1 in vivo, both subunits were purified to homogeneity and used to study assembly of the heterodimer. PG1 could be reconstituted in vitro from purified [beta] subunit and purified PG2 under a wide range of salt and pH conditions, and PG1 reconstituted in vitro was indistinguishable from PG1 isolated from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruit. Specific antibodies indicated that the [beta] subunit was present in fruit of all developmental stages, but absent in vegetative tissue. The state of assembly of PG1 in vivo was tested based on the differential thermal stability of PG1 and PG2 by heating segments of ripe fruit pericarp tissue. Temperatures well below those required to inactivate PG1 in vitro caused the loss of activity of both PG1 and PG2, suggesting that only heat-labile PG2 is present in vivo. In addition, when extracts of ripe fruit were rigorously maintained and analyzed at 4[deg]C, PG1 was absent or barely detectable. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that PG1 can assemble spontaneously and is essentially absent in intact tomato fruit but forms artifactually from PG2 and the [beta] subunit during the extraction of tomato fruit tissue when low temperatures are not rigorously maintained. PMID:12232422

  7. The hybrid four-CBS-domain KINβγ subunit functions as the canonical γ subunit of the plant energy sensor SnRK1.

    PubMed

    Ramon, Matthew; Ruelens, Philip; Li, Yi; Sheen, Jen; Geuten, Koen; Rolland, Filip

    2013-07-01

    The AMPK/SNF1/SnRK1 protein kinases are a family of ancient and highly conserved eukaryotic energy sensors that function as heterotrimeric complexes. These typically comprise catalytic α subunits and regulatory β and γ subunits, the latter function as the energy-sensing modules of animal AMPK through adenosine nucleotide binding. The ability to monitor accurately and adapt to changing environmental conditions and energy supply is essential for optimal plant growth and survival, but mechanistic insight in the plant SnRK1 function is still limited. In addition to a family of γ-like proteins, plants also encode a hybrid βγ protein that combines the Four-Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS)-domain (FCD) structure in γ subunits with a glycogen-binding domain (GBD), typically found in β subunits. We used integrated functional analyses by ectopic SnRK1 complex reconstitution, yeast mutant complementation, in-depth phylogenetic reconstruction, and a seedling starvation assay to show that only the hybrid KINβγ protein that recruited the GBD around the emergence of the green chloroplast-containing plants, acts as the canonical γ subunit required for heterotrimeric complex formation. Mutagenesis and truncation analysis further show that complex interaction in plant cells and γ subunit function in yeast depend on both a highly conserved FCD and a pre-CBS domain, but not the GBD. In addition to novel insight into canonical AMPK/SNF/SnRK1 γ subunit function, regulation and evolution, we provide a new classification of plant FCD genes as a convenient and reliable tool to predict regulatory partners for the SnRK1 energy sensor and novel FCD gene functions. PMID:23551663

  8. Two-subunit enzymes involved in eukaryotic post-transcriptional tRNA modification

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Michael P; Phizicky, Eric M

    2014-01-01

    tRNA modifications are crucial for efficient and accurate protein translation, with defects often linked to disease. There are 7 cytoplasmic tRNA modifications in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that are formed by an enzyme consisting of a catalytic subunit and an auxiliary protein, 5 of which require only a single subunit in bacteria, and 2 of which are not found in bacteria. These enzymes include the deaminase Tad2-Tad3, and the methyltransferases Trm6-Trm61, Trm8-Trm82, Trm7-Trm732, and Trm7-Trm734, Trm9-Trm112, and Trm11-Trm112. We describe the occurrence and biological role of each modification, evidence for a required partner protein in S. cerevisiae and other eukaryotes, evidence for a single subunit in bacteria, and evidence for the role of the non-catalytic binding partner. Although it is unclear why these eukaryotic enzymes require partner proteins, studies of some 2-subunit modification enzymes suggest that the partner proteins help expand substrate range or allow integration of cellular activities. PMID:25625329

  9. Electrostatic interactions in catalytic centers of F1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebnaya, Alexandra F.; Romanovsky, Yury M.; Tikhonov, Alexander N.

    2003-10-01

    F1-ATPase is one of the most important enzymes of membrane bioenergetics. F1-ATPase is the constituent complex that provides the ATP formation from ADP and inorganic phosphate (Pi) at the expense of energy of electrochemical gradient of hydrogen ions generated across the energy transducing mitochondrial, chloroplast or bacterial membrane. F1-ATPase is a reversible molecular machine that can work as a proton pump due to energy released in the course of ATP hydrolysis (ATPase reaction). The unusual feature of this enzyme is that it operates as a rotary molecular motor. Recently, using the fluorescence microscopy method for the real time visualization of molecular mobility of individual molecules, it was demonstrated directly that the ATP hydrolysis by F1-ATPase is accompanied by unidirectional rotations of mobile subunits (rotor) of F1F0-ATP synthase. In this work, we calculated the contribution of electrostatic interactions between charged groups of a substrate (MgATP), products molecules (MgADP and Pi), and charged amino acid residuals of ATPase molecule to the energy changes associated with the substrate binding and their chemical transformations in the catalytic centers located at the interface of α and β subunits of the enzyme (oligomer complex α3β3γ of bovine mitochondria ATPase). A catalytic cycle of ATP hydrolysis considered in our work includes conformational changes of α and β subunits caused by unidirectional rotations of an eccentric γ subunit. The knowledge of energy characteristics and force field in catalytic center of an enzyme in different conformational states may be important for further simulation dynamic properties of ATP synthase complex.

  10. Catalytic coherence transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Kaifeng; Singh, Uttam; Wu, Junde

    2016-04-01

    Catalytic coherence transformations allow the otherwise impossible state transformations using only incoherent operations with the aid of an auxiliary system with finite coherence that is not being consumed in any way. Here we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for the deterministic and stochastic catalytic coherence transformations between a pair of pure quantum states. In particular, we show that the simultaneous decrease of a family of Rényi entropies of the diagonal parts of the states under consideration is a necessary and sufficient condition for the deterministic catalytic coherence transformations. Similarly, for stochastic catalytic coherence transformations we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for achieving a higher optimal probability of conversion. We thus completely characterize the coherence transformations among pure quantum states under incoherent operations. We give numerous examples to elaborate our results. We also explore the possibility of the same system acting as a catalyst for itself and find that indeed self-catalysis is possible. Further, for the cases where no catalytic coherence transformation is possible we provide entanglement-assisted coherence transformations and find the necessary and sufficient conditions for such transformations.

  11. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J; Hryn, John N; Elam, Jeffrey W

    2013-08-27

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features Including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity. Also provided is a method for producing a catalytic membrane having flow-through pores and discreet catalytic clusters adhering to the inside surfaces of the pores.

  12. Transient catalytic combustor model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    A quasi-steady gas phase and thermally thin substrate model is used to analyze the transient behavior of catalytic monolith combustors in fuel lean operation. The combustor response delay is due to the substrate thermal inertia. Fast response is favored by thin substrate, short catalytic bed length, high combustor inlet and final temperatures, and small gas channel diameters. The calculated gas and substrate temperature time history at different axial positions provides an understanding of how the catalytic combustor responds to an upstream condition change. The computed results also suggest that the gas residence times in the catalytic bed in the after bed space are correlatable with the nondimensional combustor response time. The model also performs steady state combustion calculations; and the computed steady state emission characteristics show agreement with available experimental data in the range of parameters covered. A catalytic combustor design for automotive gas turbine engine which has reasonably fast response ( 1 second) and can satisfy the emission goals in an acceptable total combustor length is possible.

  13. R-subunit Isoform Specificity in Protein Kinase A: Distinct Features of Protein Interfaces in PKA Types I and II by Amide H/2H exchange Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Ganesh S.; Hotchko, Matthew; Brown, Simon H.J.; Ten Eyck, Lynn F.; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2009-01-01

    The two isoforms (RI and RII) of the regulatory (R) subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase or protein kinase A (PKA) are similar in sequence yet have different biochemical properties and physiological functions. To further understand the molecular basis for R-isoform-specificity, the interactions of the RIIβ isoform with the PKA catalytic (C) subunit were analyzed by amide H/2H exchange mass spectrometry to compare solvent accessibility of RIIβ and the C subunit in their free and complexed states. Direct mapping of the RIIβ-C interface revealed important differences between the intersubunit interfaces in the type I and type II holoenzyme complexes. These differences are seen in both the R-subunits as well as the C-subunit. Unlike the type I isoform, the type II isoform complexes require both cAMP-binding domains, and ATP is not obligatory for high affinity interactions with the C-subunit. Surprisingly, the C-subunit mediates distinct, overlapping surfaces of interaction with the two R-isoforms despite a strong homology in sequence and similarity in domain organization. Identification of a remote allosteric site on the C-subunit that is essential for interactions with RII, but not RI subunits, further highlights the considerable diversity in interfaces found in higher order protein complexes mediated by the C-subunit of PKA. PMID:17942118

  14. The Multiple Personalities of the Regulatory Subunit of Protein Kinase CK2: CK2 Dependent and CK2 Independent Roles Reveal a Secret Identity for CK2β

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 (formerly casein kinase II), an enzyme that participates in a wide variety of cellular processes, has traditionally been classified as a stable tetrameric complex consisting of two catalytic CK2α or CK2α' subunits and two regulatory CK2β subunits. While consideration of CK2 as a tetrameric complex remains relevant, significant evidence has emerged to challenge the view that its individual subunits exist exclusively within these complexes. This review will summarize biochemical and genetic evidence indicating that the regulatory CK2β subunit exists and performs functions independently of CK2 tetramers. For example, unbalanced expression of catalytic and regulatory CK2 subunits has been observed in a variety of tissues and tumors. Furthermore, localization studies including live cell imaging have demonstrated that while the catalytic and regulatory subunits of CK2 exhibit extensive co-localization, independent mobility of the individual CK2 subunits can also be observed within cells. Identification of proteins that interact with CK2β in the absence of catalytic CK2 subunits reinforces the notion that CK2β has functions distinct from CK2 and begins to offer insights into these CK2-independent functions. In this respect, the discovery that CK2β can interact with and modulate the activity of a number of other serine/threonine protein kinases including A-Raf, c-Mos and Chk1 is particularly striking. This review will discuss the interactions between CK2β and these protein kinases with special emphasis on the properties of CK2β that mediate these interactions and on the implications of these interactions in yielding new prospects for elucidation of the cellular functions of CK2β. PMID:15951851

  15. Subunit Compositions of the RNA-Silencing Enzymes Pol IV and Pol V Reveal Their Origins as Specialized Forms of RNA Polymerase II

    SciTech Connect

    Ream, Thomas S.; Haag, J. R.; Wierzbicki, A. T.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Zhu, J. K.; Hagen, G.; Guilfoyle, T. J.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2009-01-30

    In addition to RNA polymerases I, II and III, which are multi-subunit RNA polymerases found in all eukaryotes, plants have catalytic subunits for two additional nuclear RNA polymerases, abbreviated as Pol IV and Pol V (formerly Pol IVa and Pol IVb, respectively). Pol IV and Pol V play non-redundant roles in siRNA-directed DNA methylation and gene silencing pathways.

  16. The Structural Basis for Tight Control of PP2A Methylation and Function by LCMT-1

    SciTech Connect

    V Stanevich; L Jiang; K Satyshur; Y Li; P Jeffrey; Z Li; P Menden; M Semmelhack; Y Xing

    2011-12-31

    Proper formation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) holoenzymes is essential for the fitness of all eukaryotic cells. Carboxyl methylation of the PP2A catalytic subunit plays a critical role in regulating holoenzyme assembly; methylation is catalyzed by PP2A-specific methyltransferase LCMT-1, an enzyme required for cell survival. We determined crystal structures of human LCMT-1 in isolation and in complex with PP2A stabilized by a cofactor mimic. The structures show that the LCMT-1 active-site pocket recognizes the carboxyl terminus of PP2A, and, interestingly, the PP2A active site makes extensive contacts to LCMT-1. We demonstrated that activation of the PP2A active site stimulates methylation, suggesting a mechanism for efficient conversion of activated PP2A into substrate-specific holoenzymes, thus minimizing unregulated phosphatase activity or formation of inactive holoenzymes. A dominant-negative LCMT-1 mutant attenuates the cell cycle without causing cell death, likely by inhibiting uncontrolled phosphatase activity. Our studies suggested mechanisms of LCMT-1 in tight control of PP2A function, important for the cell cycle and cell survival.

  17. The Structural Basis for Tight Control of PP2A Methylation and Function by LCMT-1

    SciTech Connect

    Stanevich, Vitali; Jiang, Li; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Li, Yongfeng; Jeffrey, Philip D.; Li, Zhu; Menden, Patrick; Semmelhack, Martin F.; Xing, Yongna

    2012-05-29

    Proper formation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) holoenzymes is essential for the fitness of all eukaryotic cells. Carboxyl methylation of the PP2A catalytic subunit plays a critical role in regulating holoenzyme assembly; methylation is catalyzed by PP2A-specific methyltransferase LCMT-1, an enzyme required for cell survival. We determined crystal structures of human LCMT-1 in isolation and in complex with PP2A stabilized by a cofactor mimic. The structures show that the LCMT-1 active-site pocket recognizes the carboxyl terminus of PP2A, and, interestingly, the PP2A active site makes extensive contacts to LCMT-1. We demonstrated that activation of the PP2A active site stimulates methylation, suggesting a mechanism for efficient conversion of activated PP2A into substrate-specific holoenzymes, thus minimizing unregulated phosphatase activity or formation of inactive holoenzymes. A dominant-negative LCMT-1 mutant attenuates the cell cycle without causing cell death, likely by inhibiting uncontrolled phosphatase activity. Our studies suggested mechanisms of LCMT-1 in tight control of PP2A function, important for the cell cycle and cell survival.

  18. Catalytic hydrotreating process

    DOEpatents

    Karr, Jr., Clarence; McCaskill, Kenneth B.

    1978-01-01

    Carbonaceous liquids boiling above about 300.degree. C such as tars, petroleum residuals, shale oils and coal-derived liquids are catalytically hydrotreated by introducing the carbonaceous liquid into a reaction zone at a temperature in the range of 300.degree. to 450.degree. C and a pressure in the range of 300 to 4000 psig for effecting contact between the carbonaceous liquid and a catalytic transition metal sulfide in the reaction zone as a layer on a hydrogen permeable transition metal substrate and then introducing hydrogen into the reaction zone by diffusing the hydrogen through the substrate to effect the hydrogenation of the carbonaceous liquid in the presence of the catalytic sulfide layer.

  19. Catalytic membranes beckon

    SciTech Connect

    Caruana, C.M.

    1994-11-01

    Chemical engineers here and abroad are finding that the marriage of catalysts and membranes holds promise for faster and more specific reactions, although commercialization of this technology is several years away. Catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) combine a heterogeneous catalyst and a permselective membrane. Reactions performed by CMRs provide higher yields--sometimes as much as 50% higher--because of better reaction selectivity--as opposed to separation selectivity. CMRs also can work at very high temperatures, using ceramic materials that would not be possible with organic membranes. Although the use of CMRs is not widespread presently, the development of new membranes--particularly porous ceramic and zeolite membranes--will increase the potential to improve yields of many catalytic processes. The paper discusses ongoing studies, metal and advanced materials for membranes, the need for continued research, hydrogen recovery from coal-derived gases, catalytic oxidation of sulfides, CMRs for water purification, and oxidative coupling of methane.

  20. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    DOEpatents

    Voecks, Gerald E.

    1990-03-20

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  1. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  2. Characterisation of the tryptophan synthase alpha subunit in maize

    PubMed Central

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Weigang, Linda; Fießelmann, Andreas; Letzel, Thomas; Frey, Monika; Gierl, Alfons; Glawischnig, Erich

    2008-01-01

    Background In bacteria, such as Salmonella typhimurium, tryptophan is synthesized from indole-3-glycerole phosphate (IGP) by a tryptophan synthase αββα heterotetramer. Plants have evolved multiple α (TSA) and β (TSB) homologs, which have probably diverged in biological function and their ability of subunit interaction. There is some evidence for a tryptophan synthase (TS) complex in Arabidopsis. On the other hand maize (Zea mays) expresses the TSA-homologs BX1 and IGL that efficiently cleave IGP, independent of interaction with TSB. Results In order to clarify, how tryptophan is synthesized in maize, two TSA homologs, hitherto uncharacterized ZmTSA and ZmTSAlike, were functionally analyzed. ZmTSA is localized in plastids, the major site of tryptophan biosynthesis in plants. It catalyzes the tryptophan synthase α-reaction (cleavage of IGP), and forms a tryptophan synthase complex with ZmTSB1 in vitro. The catalytic efficiency of the α-reaction is strongly enhanced upon complex formation. A 160 kD tryptophan synthase complex was partially purified from maize leaves and ZmTSA was identified as native α-subunit of this complex by mass spectrometry. ZmTSAlike, for which no in vitro activity was detected, is localized in the cytosol. ZmTSAlike, BX1, and IGL were not detectable in the native tryptophan synthase complex in leaves. Conclusion It was demonstrated in vivo and in vitro that maize forms a tryptophan synthase complex and ZmTSA functions as α-subunit in this complex. PMID:18430213

  3. Structural analysis of the α subunit of Na(+)/K(+) ATPase genes in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Thabet, Rahma; Rouault, J-D; Ayadi, Habib; Leignel, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The Na(+)/K(+) ATPase is a ubiquitous pump coordinating the transport of Na(+) and K(+) across the membrane of cells and its role is fundamental to cellular functions. It is heteromer in eukaryotes including two or three subunits (α, β and γ which is specific to the vertebrates). The catalytic functions of the enzyme have been attributed to the α subunit. Several complete α protein sequences are available, but only few gene structures were characterized. We identified the genomic sequences coding the α-subunit of the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, from the whole-genome shotgun contigs (WGS), NCBI Genomes (chromosome), Genomic Survey Sequences (GSS) and High Throughput Genomic Sequences (HTGS) databases across distinct phyla. One copy of the α subunit gene was found in Annelida, Arthropoda, Cnidaria, Echinodermata, Hemichordata, Mollusca, Placozoa, Porifera, Platyhelminthes, Urochordata, but the nematodes seem to possess 2 to 4 copies. The number of introns varied from 0 (Platyhelminthes) to 26 (Porifera); and their localization and length are also highly variable. Molecular phylogenies (Maximum Likelihood and Maximum Parsimony methods) showed some clusters constituted by (Chordata/(Echinodermata/Hemichordata)) or (Plathelminthes/(Annelida/Mollusca)) and a basal position for Porifera. These structural analyses increase our knowledge about the evolutionary events of the α subunit genes in the invertebrates. PMID:26812300

  4. Calcineurin B-like domains in the large regulatory alpha/beta subunits of phosphorylase kinase.

    PubMed

    Carrière, Cathelène; Mornon, Jean-Paul; Venien-Bryan, Catherine; Boisset, Nicolas; Callebaut, Isabelle

    2008-06-01

    Phosphorylase kinase (PhK) is a large hexadecameric complex that catalyzes the phosphorylation and activation of glycogen phosphorylase (GP). It consists in four copies each of a catalytic subunit (gamma) and three regulatory subunits (alpha beta delta). Delta corresponds to endogenous calmodulin, whereas little is known on the molecular architecture of the large alpha and beta subunits, which probably arose from gene duplication. Here, using sensitive methods of sequence analysis, we show that the C-terminal domain (named domain D) of these alpha and beta subunits can be significantly related to calcineurin B-like (CBL) proteins. CBL are members of the EF-hand family that are involved in the regulation of plant-specific kinases of the CIPK/PKS family, and relieve autoinhibition of their target kinases by binding to their regulatory region. The relationship highlighted here suggests that PhK alpha and/or beta domain D may be involved in a similar regulation mechanism, a hypothesis which is supported by the experimental observation of a direct interaction between domain D of PhKalpha and the regulatory region of the Gamma subunit. This finding, together the identification of significant similarities of domain D with the preceding domain C, may help to understand the molecular mechanism by which PhK alpha and/or beta domain D might regulate PhK activity. PMID:18320589

  5. Comparison of the specificities and catalytic activities of hammerhead ribozymes and DNA enzymes with respect to the cleavage of BCR-ABL chimeric L6 (b2a2) mRNA.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, T; Warashina, M; Tanabe, T; Tani, K; Asano, S; Taira, K

    1997-08-01

    With the eventual goal of developing a treatment for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), attempts have been made to design hammerhead ribozymes that can specifically cleave BCR-ABL fusion mRNA. In the case of L6 BCR-ABL fusion mRNA (b2a2 type; BCR exon 2 is fused to ABL exon 2), which has no effective cleavage sites for conventional hammerhead ribozymes near the BCR-ABL junction, it has proved very difficult to cleave the chimeric mRNA specifically. Several hammerhead ribozymes with relatively long junction-recognition sequences have poor substrate-specificity. Therefore, we explored the possibility of using newly selected DNA enzymes that can cleave RNA molecules with high activity to cleave L6 BCR-ABL fusion (b2a2) mRNA. In contrast to the results with the conventional ribozymes, the newly designed DNA enzymes, having higher flexibility for selection of cleavage sites, were able to cleave this chimeric RNA molecule specifically at sites close to the junction. Cleavage occurred only within the abnormal BCR-ABL mRNA, without any cleavage of the normal ABL or BCR mRNA. Thus, these chemically synthesized DNA enzymes seem to be potentially useful for application in vivo , especially for the treatment of CML, if we can develop exogenous delivery strategies. PMID:9224607

  6. Identification of novel transcriptional regulators of PKA subunits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by quantitative promoter-reporter screening.

    PubMed

    Pautasso, Constanza; Reca, Sol; Chatfield-Reed, Kate; Chua, Gordon; Galello, Fiorella; Portela, Paula; Zaremberg, Vanina; Rossi, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    The cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) signaling is a broad pathway that plays important roles in the transduction of environmental signals triggering precise physiological responses. However, how PKA achieves the cAMP-signal transduction specificity is still in study. The regulation of expression of subunits of PKA should contribute to the signal specificity. Saccharomyces cerevisiae PKA holoenzyme contains two catalytic subunits encoded by TPK1, TPK2 and TPK3 genes, and two regulatory subunits encoded by BCY1 gene. We studied the activity of these gene promoters using a fluorescent reporter synthetic genetic array screen, with the goal of systematically identifying novel regulators of expression of PKA subunits. Gene ontology analysis of the identified modulators showed enrichment not only in the category of transcriptional regulators, but also in less expected categories such as lipid and phosphate metabolism. Inositol, choline and phosphate were identified as novel upstream signals that regulate transcription of PKA subunit genes. The results support the role of transcription regulation of PKA subunits in cAMP specificity signaling. Interestingly, known targets of PKA phosphorylation are associated with the identified pathways opening the possibility of a reciprocal regulation. PKA would be coordinating different metabolic pathways and these processes would in turn regulate expression of the kinase subunits. PMID:27188886

  7. Hollow fiber catalytic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yi Hua; Moser, W.; Shelekhin, A.; Pien, Shyhing

    1993-09-01

    The objective of the present research is to investigate the possibility of the enhancement of the H{sub 2}S thermal decomposition in the IGCC system by employing the hollow fiber catalytic membrane reactor. To accomplish the objective, the following major components in the analysis of the high temperature membrane reactor must be investigated: high-temperature stability of the porous glass membrane; catalytic properties of MoS{sub 2} and of the porous glass membrane; catalytic decomposition of H{sub 2}S in a packed bed reactor; catalytic decomposition of 100%, 8.6%, and 1.1% H{sub 2}S gas mixtures in the membrane reactor. The study has been shown that the conversion of the H{sub 2}S can be increased in the packed bed membrane reactor compared to the equilibrium conversion on the shell side. The development of a mathematical model for the proposed process is in progress. The model will enable optimization of the H{sub 2}S decomposition. These conditions include selectivity factors and pressure drop across the membrane.

  8. Monolithic catalytic igniters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    La Ferla, R.; Tuffias, R. H.; Jang, Q.

    1993-01-01

    Catalytic igniters offer the potential for excellent reliability and simplicity for use with the diergolic bipropellant oxygen/hydrogen as well as with the monopropellant hydrazine. State-of-the-art catalyst beds - noble metal/granular pellet carriers - currently used in hydrazine engines are limited by carrier stability, which limits the hot-fire temperature, and by poor thermal response due to the large thermal mass. Moreover, questions remain with regard to longevity and reliability of these catalysts. In this work, Ultramet investigated the feasibility of fabricating monolithic catalyst beds that overcome the limitations of current catalytic igniters via a combination of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) iridium coatings and chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) refractory ceramic foams. It was found that under all flow conditions and O2:H2 mass ratios tested, a high surface area monolithic bed outperformed a Shell 405 bed. Additionally, it was found that monolithic catalytic igniters, specifically porous ceramic foams fabricated by CVD/CVI processing, can be fabricated whose catalytic performance is better than Shell 405 and with significantly lower flow restriction, from materials that can operate at 2000 C or higher.

  9. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, D.; Sunder, S.

    1986-12-02

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids. 1 fig.

  10. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar; Sunder, Swaminathan

    1986-01-01

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids.

  11. Tor proteins and protein phosphatase 2A reciprocally regulate Tap42 in controlling cell growth in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Y; Broach, J R

    1999-01-01

    Tor proteins, homologous to DNA-dependent protein kinases, participate in a signal transduction pathway in yeast that regulates protein synthesis and cell wall expansion in response to nutrient availability. The anti-inflammatory drug rapamycin inhibits yeast cell growth by inhibiting Tor protein signaling. This leads to diminished association of a protein, Tap42, with two different protein phosphatase catalytic subunits; one encoded redundantly by PPH21 and PPH22, and one encoded by SIT4. We show that inactivation of either Cdc55 or Tpd3, which regulate Pph21/22 activity, results in rapamycin resistance and that this resistance correlates with an increased association of Tap42 with Pph21/22. Furthermore, we show Tor-dependent phosphorylation of Tap42 both in vivo and in vitro and that this phosphorylation is rapamycin sensitive. Inactivation of Cdc55 or Tpd3 enhances in vivo phosphorylation of Tap42. We conclude that Tor phosphorylates Tap42 and that phosphorylated Tap42 effectively competes with Cdc55/Tpd3 for binding to the phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit. Furthermore, Cdc55 and Tpd3 promote dephosphorylation of Tap42. Thus, Tor stimulates growth-promoting association of Tap42 with Pph21/22 and Sit4, while Cdc55 and Tpd3 inhibit this association both by direct competition and by dephosphorylation of Tap42. These results establish Tap42 as a target of Tor and add further refinement to the Tor signaling pathway. PMID:10329624

  12. Catalytic Activity of a Binary Informational Macromolecule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reader, John S.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules are thought to have played a prominent role in the early history of life on Earth based on their ability both to encode genetic information and to exhibit catalytic function. The modern genetic alphabet relies on two sets of complementary base pairs to store genetic information. However, due to the chemical instability of cytosine, which readily deaminates to uracil, a primitive genetic system composed of the bases A, U, G and C may have been difficult to establish. It has been suggested that the first genetic material instead contained only a single base-pairing unie'. Here we show that binary informational macromolecules, containing only two different nucleotide subunits, can act as catalysts. In vitro evolution was used to obtain ligase ribozymes composed of only 2,6-diaminopurine and uracil nucleotides, which catalyze the template-directed joining of two RNA molecules, one bearing a 5'-triphosphate and the other a 3'-hydroxyl. The active conformation of the fastest isolated ribozyme had a catalytic rate that was about 36,000-fold faster than the uncatalyzed rate of reaction. This ribozyme is specific for the formation of biologically relevant 3',5'-phosphodiester linkages.

  13. YC-1 BINDING TO THE BETA SUBUNIT OF SOLUBLE GUANYLYL CYCLASE OVERCOMES ALLOSTERIC INHIBITION BY THE ALPHA SUBUNIT

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Rahul; Fritz, Bradley G.; The, Juliana; Issaian, Aaron; Weichsel, Andrzej; David, Cynthia L.; Campbell, Eric; Hausrath, Andrew C.; Rassouli-Taylor, Leida; Garcin, Elsa D.; Gage, Matthew J.; Montfort, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is a heterodimeric heme protein and the primary nitric oxide receptor. NO binding stimulates cyclase activity, leading to regulation of cardiovascular physiology and making sGC an attractive target for drug discovery. YC-1 and related compounds stimulate sGC both independently and synergistically with NO and CO binding; however, where the compounds bind and how they work remains unknown. Using linked-equilibria binding measurements, surface plasmon resonance, and domain truncations in Manduca sexta and bovine sGC, we demonstrate that YC-1 binds near or directly to the heme-containing domain of the beta subunit. In the absence of CO, YC-1 binds with Kd = 9–21 μM, depending on construct. In the presence of CO, these values decrease to 0.6–1.1 μM. Pfizer compound 25 bound ~10-fold weaker than YC-1 in the absence of CO whereas compound BAY 41–2272 bound particularly tightly in the presence of CO (Kd = 30–90 nM). Additionally, we found that CO binding is much weaker to heterodimeric sGC proteins (Kd = 50–100 μM) than to the isolated heme domain (Kd = 0.2 μM for Manduca beta H-NOX/PAS). YC-1 greatly enhanced CO binding to heterodimeric sGC, as expected (Kd = ~1 μM). These data indicate the alpha subunit induces a heme pocket conformation with lower affinity for CO and NO. YC-1 family compounds bind near the heme domain, overcoming the alpha subunit effect and inducing a heme pocket conformation with high affinity. We propose this high-affinity conformation is required for the full-length protein to achieve high catalytic activity. PMID:24328155

  14. Crystal structure of the human protein kinase CK2 regulatory subunit reveals its zinc finger-mediated dimerization.

    PubMed Central

    Chantalat, L; Leroy, D; Filhol, O; Nueda, A; Benitez, M J; Chambaz, E M; Cochet, C; Dideberg, O

    1999-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 is a tetramer composed of two alpha catalytic subunits and two beta regulatory subunits. The structure of a C-terminal truncated form of the human beta subunit has been determined by X-ray crystallography to 1.7 A resolution. One dimer is observed in the asymmetric unit of the crystal. The most striking feature of the structure is the presence of a zinc finger mediating the dimerization. The monomer structure consists of two domains, one entirely alpha-helical and one including the zinc finger. The dimer has a crescent shape holding a highly acidic region at both ends. We propose that this acidic region is involved in the interactions with the polyamines and/or catalytic subunits. Interestingly, conserved amino acid residues among beta subunit sequences are clustered along one linear ridge that wraps around the entire dimer. This feature suggests that protein partners may interact with the dimer through a stretch of residues in an extended conformation. PMID:10357806

  15. Mitsunobu Reactions Catalytic in Phosphine and a Fully Catalytic System

    PubMed Central

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-01-01

    The Mitsunobu reaction is renowned for its mild reaction conditions and broad substrate tolerance, but has limited utility in process chemistry and industrial applications due to poor atom economy and the generation of stoichiometric phosphine oxide and hydrazine by-products that complicate purification. A catalytic Mitsunobu reaction using innocuous reagents to recycle these by-products would overcome both of these shortcomings. Herein we report a protocol that is catalytic in phosphine (1-phenylphospholane) employing phenylsilane to recycle the catalyst. Integration of this phosphine catalytic cycle with Taniguchi’s azocarboxylate catalytic system provided the first fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction. PMID:26347115

  16. Mitsunobu Reactions Catalytic in Phosphine and a Fully Catalytic System.

    PubMed

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-10-26

    The Mitsunobu reaction is renowned for its mild reaction conditions and broad substrate tolerance, but has limited utility in process chemistry and industrial applications due to poor atom economy and the generation of stoichiometric phosphine oxide and hydrazine by-products that complicate purification. A catalytic Mitsunobu reaction using innocuous reagents to recycle these by-products would overcome both of these shortcomings. Herein we report a protocol that is catalytic in phosphine (1-phenylphospholane) employing phenylsilane to recycle the catalyst. Integration of this phosphine catalytic cycle with Taniguchi's azocarboxylate catalytic system provided the first fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction. PMID:26347115

  17. Cloning of the cDNAs for the small subunits of bovine and human DNA polymerase {delta} and chromosomal location of the human gene (POLD2)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian; Tan, Cheng-Keat; Downey, K.M.

    1995-09-01

    cDNAs encoding the small subunit of bovine and human DNA polymerase {delta} have been cloned and sequenced. The predicted polypeptides, 50,885 and 51,289 Daltons, respectively, are 94% identical, similar to the catalytic subunits. The high degree of conservation of the polypeptides suggests an essential function for the small subunit in the heterodimeric core enzyme. Although the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase 5 shares significant homology with those of the herpes virus family of DNA polymerases, the small subunit of mammalian DNA polymerase 6 is not homologous to the small subunit of either herpes simplex virus type 1 DNA polymerase (UL42 protein) or the Epstein-Barr virus DNA polymerase (BMRF1 protein). Searches of the protein databases failed to detect significant homology with any protein sequenced thus far. PCR analysis of DNA from a panel of human-hamster hybrid cell lines localized the gene (POLD2) for the small subunit of DNA polymerase 5 to human chromosome 7. 45 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. 28 CFR 51.6 - Political subunits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Political subunits. 51.6 Section 51.6 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF SECTION 5 OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED General Provisions § 51.6 Political subunits. All...

  19. 28 CFR 51.6 - Political subunits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Political subunits. 51.6 Section 51.6 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF SECTION 5 OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED General Provisions § 51.6 Political subunits. All...

  20. 28 CFR 51.6 - Political subunits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Political subunits. 51.6 Section 51.6 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF SECTION 5 OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED General Provisions § 51.6 Political subunits. All...

  1. 28 CFR 51.6 - Political subunits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Political subunits. 51.6 Section 51.6 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF SECTION 5 OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED General Provisions § 51.6 Political subunits. All...

  2. 28 CFR 51.6 - Political subunits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Political subunits. 51.6 Section 51.6 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF SECTION 5 OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED General Provisions § 51.6 Political subunits. All...

  3. A new light on the meiotic DSB catalytic complex.

    PubMed

    Robert, Thomas; Vrielynck, Nathalie; Mézard, Christine; de Massy, Bernard; Grelon, Mathilde

    2016-06-01

    Meiotic recombination is initiated by the formation of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). More than 15 years ago, Spo11 was identified as the protein responsible for meiotic DSB formation, notably because of its striking similarities with the A subunit of topoisomerase VI (TopoVI). TopoVI are enzymes that modify DNA topology by generating transient DSBs and are active as heterotetramers, composed of two A and two B subunits. A2 dimers catalyse the DNA cleavage reaction, whereas the B subunits regulate A2 conformation, DNA capture, cleavage and re-ligation. The recent identification in plants and mammals of a B-like TopoVI subunit that interacts with SPO11 and is required for meiotic DSB formation makes us to reconsider our understanding of the meiotic DSB catalytic complex. We provide here an overview of the knowledge on TopoVI structure and mode of action and we compare them with their meiotic counterparts. This allows us to discuss the nature, structure and functions of the meiotic TopoVI-like complex during meiotic DSB formation. PMID:26995551

  4. Impact of Ancillary Subunits on Ventricular Repolarization

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Geoffrey W.; Xu, Xianghua; Roepke, Torsten K.

    2007-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels generate the outward K+ ion currents that constitute the primary force in ventricular repolarization. Kv channels comprise tetramers of pore-forming α subunits and, in probably the majority of cases in vivo, ancillary or β subunits that help define the properties of the Kv current generated. Ancillary subunits can be broadly categorized as cytoplasmic or transmembrane, and can modify Kv channel trafficking, conductance, gating, ion selectivity, regulation and pharmacology. Because of their often profound effects on Kv channel function, studies of the molecular correlates of ventricular repolarization must take into account ancillary subunits as well as α subunits. Cytoplasmic ancillary subunits include the Kvβ subunits, which regulate a range of Kv channels and may link channel gating to redox potential; and the KChIPs, which appear most often associated with Kv4 subfamily channels that generate the ventricular Ito current. Transmembrane ancillary subunits include the MinK-related proteins (MiRPs) encoded by KCNE genes, which modulate members of most Kv α subunit subfamilies; and the putative 12-transmembrane domain KCR1 protein which modulates hERG. In some cases, such as the ventricular IKs channel complex, it is well-established that the KCNQ1 α subunit must co-assemble with the MinK (KCNE1) single transmembrane domain ancillary subunit for recapitulation of the characteristic, unusually slowly-activating IKs current. In other cases it is not so clear-cut, and in particular the roles of the other MinK-related proteins (MiRPs 1–4) in regulating cardiac Kv channels such as KCNQ1 and hERG in vivo are under debate. MiRP1 alters hERG function and pharmacology, and inherited MiRP1 mutations are associated with inherited and acquired arrhythmias, but controversy exists over the native role of MiRP1 in regulating hERG (and therefore ventricular IKr) in vivo. Some ancillary subunits may exhibit varied expression to shape

  5. Catalytic Antioxidants and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Tamara R.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Oxidative stress, resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, or neuroinflammation, is implicated in numerous neurodegenerative conditions. Damage due to superoxide, hydroxyl radical, and peroxynitrite has been observed in diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, as well as in acute conditions that lead to neuronal death, such as stroke and epilepsy. Antioxidant therapies to remove these toxic compounds have been of great interest in treating these disorders. Catalytic antioxidants mimic the activities of superoxide dismutase or catalase or both, detoxifying superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, and in some cases, peroxynitrite and other toxic species as well. Several compounds have demonstrated efficacy in in vitro and in animal models of neurodegeneration, leading to optimism that catalytic antioxidants may prove to be useful therapies in human disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 555–569. PMID:18754709

  6. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  7. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  8. Organization of Subunits in the Membrane Domain of the Bovine F-ATPase Revealed by Covalent Cross-linking*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jennifer; Ding, ShuJing; Walpole, Thomas B.; Holding, Andrew N.; Montgomery, Martin G.; Fearnley, Ian M.; Walker, John E.

    2015-01-01

    The F-ATPase in bovine mitochondria is a membrane-bound complex of about 30 subunits of 18 different kinds. Currently, ∼85% of its structure is known. The enzyme has a membrane extrinsic catalytic domain, and a membrane intrinsic domain where the turning of the enzyme's rotor is generated from the transmembrane proton-motive force. The domains are linked by central and peripheral stalks. The central stalk and a hydrophobic ring of c-subunits in the membrane domain constitute the enzyme's rotor. The external surface of the catalytic domain and membrane subunit a are linked by the peripheral stalk, holding them static relative to the rotor. The membrane domain contains six additional subunits named ATP8, e, f, g, DAPIT (diabetes-associated protein in insulin-sensitive tissues), and 6.8PL (6.8-kDa proteolipid), each with a single predicted transmembrane α-helix, but their orientation and topography are unknown. Mutations in ATP8 uncouple the enzyme and interfere with its assembly, but its roles and the roles of the other five subunits are largely unknown. We have reacted accessible amino groups in the enzyme with bifunctional cross-linking agents and identified the linked residues. Cross-links involving the supernumerary subunits, where the structures are not known, show that the C terminus of ATP8 extends ∼70 Å from the membrane into the peripheral stalk and that the N termini of the other supernumerary subunits are on the same side of the membrane, probably in the mitochondrial matrix. These experiments contribute significantly toward building up a complete structural picture of the F-ATPase. PMID:25851905

  9. Catalytic reforming catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, W.C.; Kluksdahl, H.E.

    1980-12-09

    An improved catalyst, having a reduced fouling rate when used in a catalytic reforming process, said catalyst comprising platinum disposed on an alumina support wherein the alumina support is obtained by removing water from aluminum hydroxide produced as a by-product from a ziegler higher alcohol synthesis reaction, and wherein the alumina is calcined at a temperature of 1100-1400/sup 0/F so as to have a surface area of 165 to 215 square meters per gram.

  10. Catalytic combustion nears application

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    This article is a brief review of efforts to develope a catalytic combustion system with emissions levels less than 10 ppm. Two efforts are discussed: (1) tests by General Electric using a GE Frame 7E/9E and 7F/9F gas turbine, and (2) tests by AES using a Kawasaki M1A-13A industrial gas turbine. The latter also employs a heat recovery steam generator and produces 3 MWe and 28,000 lbm/hr of steam.

  11. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J.; Hryn, John N.; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2009-12-01

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity.

  12. Reduction and Methyl Transfer Kinetics of the Alpha Subunit from Acetyl-Coenzyme A Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Xiangshi Tan; Christopher Sewell; Qingwu Yang; Paul A. Lindahl

    2003-01-15

    OAK-B135 Stopped-flow was used to evaluate the methylation and reduction kinetics of the isolated alpha subunit of acetyl-Coenzyme A synthase from Moorella thermoacetica. This catalytically active subunit contains a novel Ni-X-Fe4S4 cluster and a putative unidentified n =2 redox site called D. The D-site must be reduced for a methyl group to transfer from a corrinoid-iron-sulfur protein, a key step in the catalytic synthesis of acetyl-CoA. The Fe4S4 component of this cluster is also redox active, raising the possibility that it is the D-site or a portion thereof. Results presented demonstrate that the D-site reduces far faster than the Fe4S4 component, effectively eliminating this possibility. Rather, this component may alter catalytically important properties of the Ni center. The D-site is reduced through a pathway that probably does not involve the Fe4S4 component of this active-site cluster.

  13. Protein phosphatase 2A dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Sontag, Jean-Marie; Sontag, Estelle

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a large family of enzymes that account for the majority of brain Ser/Thr phosphatase activity. While PP2A enzymes collectively modulate most cellular processes, sophisticated regulatory mechanisms are ultimately responsible for ensuring isoform-specific substrate specificity. Of particular interest to the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) field, alterations in PP2A regulators and PP2A catalytic activity, subunit expression, methylation and/or phosphorylation, have been reported in AD-affected brain regions. “PP2A” dysfunction has been linked to tau hyperphosphorylation, amyloidogenesis and synaptic deficits that are pathological hallmarks of this neurodegenerative disorder. Deregulation of PP2A enzymes also affects the activity of many Ser/Thr protein kinases implicated in AD. This review will more specifically discuss the role of the PP2A/Bα holoenzyme and PP2A methylation in AD pathogenesis. The PP2A/Bα isoform binds to tau and is the primary tau phosphatase. Its deregulation correlates with increased tau phosphorylation in vivo and in AD. Disruption of PP2A/Bα-tau protein interactions likely contribute to tau deregulation in AD. Significantly, alterations in one-carbon metabolism that impair PP2A methylation are associated with increased risk for sporadic AD, and enhanced AD-like pathology in animal models. Experimental studies have linked deregulation of PP2A methylation with down-regulation of PP2A/Bα, enhanced phosphorylation of tau and amyloid precursor protein, tau mislocalization, microtubule destabilization and neuritic defects. While it remains unclear what are the primary events that underlie “PP2A” dysfunction in AD, deregulation of PP2A enzymes definitely affects key players in the pathogenic process. As such, there is growing interest in developing PP2A-centric therapies for AD, but this may be a daunting task without a better understanding of the regulation and function of specific PP2A enzymes. PMID:24653673

  14. Cleft Lip Repair: The Hybrid Subunit Method.

    PubMed

    Tollefson, Travis T

    2016-04-01

    The unilateral cleft lip repair is one of the most rewarding and challenging of plastic surgery procedures. Surgeons have introduced a variety of straight line, geometric, and rotation-advancement designs, while in practice the majority of North American surgeons have been using hybrids of the rotation-advancement techniques. The anatomic subunit approach was introduced in 2005 by Fisher and has gained popularity, with early adopters of the design touting its simplicity and effectiveness. The objectives of this article are to summarize the basic tenets of respecting the philtral subunit, accurate measurement and planning, and tips for transitioning to this subunit approach. PMID:27097136

  15. Lack of substrate inhibition in a monomeric form of human cytosolic SULT2A1.

    PubMed

    Cook, Ian T; Leyh, Thomas S; Kadlubar, Susan A; Falany, Charles N

    2010-12-01

    Mammalian cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs) frequently show substrate inhibition during the sulfation of increasing concentrations of substrates. SULT2A1, a major human liver isoform responsible for the conjugation of hydroxysteroids, bile acids and aliphatic hydroxyl groups in drugs and xenobiotics, is a homodimer and displays substrate inhibition during the conjugation of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). Maltose binding protein (MBP)-SULT2A1 fusion protein, produced as an intermediate step in the purification of the SULT2A1 homodimer, elutes during size exclusion chromatography as a monomer. The initial-rate parameters (Km and Vmax) of the monomer (MBP-SULT2A1) and native SULT2A1 dimer for DHEA sulfation are extremely similar; however, the monomer is not inhibited by DHEA. Intrinsic fluorescence studies show that two DHEA molecules bind each SULT2A1 subunit, one in the catalytic site and one in an apparent allosteric site. Lack of dimerization in the MBP-SULT2A1 fusion protein decreased the Kd for binding of DHEA at the allosteric site. These results suggest that formation of the homodimer is associated with structural re-arrangements leading to increased DHEA binding at an allo-steric site that is associated with substrate inhibition. PMID:25961208

  16. Lack of substrate inhibition in a monomeric form of human cytosolic SULT2A1.

    PubMed

    Cook, Ian T; Leyh, Thomas S; Kadlubar, Susan A; Falany, Charles N

    2010-12-01

    Mammalian cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs) frequently show substrate inhibition during the sulfation of increasing concentrations of substrates. SULT2A1, a major human liver isoform responsible for the conjugation of hydroxysteroids, bile acids and aliphatic hydroxyl groups in drugs and xenobiotics, is a homodimer and displays substrate inhibition during the conjugation of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). Maltose binding protein (MBP)-SULT2A1 fusion protein, produced as an intermediate step in the purification of the SULT2A1 homodimer, elutes during size exclusion chromatography as a monomer. The initial-rate parameters (K(m) and V(max)) of the monomer (MBP-SULT2A1) and native SULT2A1 dimer for DHEA sulfation are extremely similar; however, the monomer is not inhibited by DHEA. Intrinsic fluorescence studies show that two DHEA molecules bind each SULT2A1 subunit, one in the catalytic site and one in an apparent allosteric site. Lack of dimerization in the MBP-SULT2A1 fusion protein decreased the K(d) for binding of DHEA at the allosteric site. These results suggest that formation of the homodimer is associated with structural rearrangements leading to increased DHEA binding at an allosteric site that is associated with substrate inhibition. PMID:21822453

  17. Mutational analysis of subunit i beta2 (MECL-1) demonstrates conservation of cleavage specificity between yeast and mammalian proteasomes.

    PubMed

    Salzmann, U; Kral, S; Braun, B; Standera, S; Schmidt, M; Kloetzel, P M; Sijts, A

    1999-07-01

    Proteasomes are the major protein-degrading complexes in the cytosol and regulate many cellular processes. To examine the functional importance of the MC14/MECL-1 proteasome active site subunits, cell lines expressing a catalytically inactive form of MECL-1 were established. Whereas mutant MECL-1 was readily incorporated into cytosolic proteasomes, replacing the constitutive MC14 subunit, removal of the prosequence was incomplete indicating that its processing required autocatalytic cleavage. Functional analyses showed that the absence of the MC14/MECL-1 active sites abrogated proteasomal trypsin-like activity, but did not affect other catalytic activities. Our data demonstrate a conservation of cleavage specificity between mammalian and yeast proteasomes. PMID:10413086

  18. Coordinate pretranslational control of cAMP-dependent protein kinase subunit expression during development in the water mold Blastocladiella emersonii.

    PubMed

    Marques, M do V; Borges, A C; de Oliveira, J C; Gomes, S L

    1992-02-01

    The aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii provides a system for studying the regulation of expression of regulatory (R) and catalytic (C) subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Blastocladiella cells contain a single PKA with properties very similar to type II kinases of mammalian tissues. During development cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity and its associated cAMP-binding activity change drastically. We have previously shown that the increase in cAMP-binding activity during sporulation is due to de novo synthesis of R subunit and to an increase in the translatable mRNA coding for R (Marques et al., Eur. J. Biochem. 178, 803, 1989). In the present work we have continued these studies to investigate the mechanism by which the changes in the level of kinase activity take place. The C subunit of Blastocladiella has been purified; antiserum has been raised against it and used to determine amounts of C subunit throughout the fungus' life cycle. A sharp increase in C subunit content occurs during sporulation and peaks at the zoospore stage. Northern blot analyses, using Blastocladiella C and R cDNA probes, have shown that the levels of C and R mRNAs parallel their intracellular protein concentrations. These results indicate a coordinate pretranslational control for C and R subunit expression during differentiation in Blastocladiella. PMID:1309711

  19. Role of Small Subunit in Mediating Assembly of Red-type Form I Rubisco

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Jidnyasa; Mueller-Cajar, Oliver; Tsai, Yi-Chin C.; Hartl, F. Ulrich; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit

    2015-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is the key enzyme involved in photosynthetic carbon fixation, converting atmospheric CO2 to organic compounds. Form I Rubisco is a cylindrical complex composed of eight large (RbcL) subunits that are capped by four small subunits (RbcS) at the top and four at the bottom. Form I Rubiscos are phylogenetically divided into green- and red-type. Some red-type enzymes have catalytically superior properties. Thus, understanding their folding and assembly is of considerable biotechnological interest. Folding of the green-type RbcL subunits in cyanobacteria is mediated by the GroEL/ES chaperonin system, and assembly to holoenzyme requires specialized chaperones such as RbcX and RAF1. Here, we show that the red-type RbcL subunits in the proteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides also fold with GroEL/ES. However, assembly proceeds in a chaperone-independent manner. We find that the C-terminal β-hairpin extension of red-type RbcS, which is absent in green-type RbcS, is critical for efficient assembly. The β-hairpins of four RbcS subunits form an eight-stranded β-barrel that protrudes into the central solvent channel of the RbcL core complex. The two β-barrels stabilize the complex through multiple interactions with the RbcL subunits. A chimeric green-type RbcS carrying the C-terminal β-hairpin renders the assembly of a cyanobacterial Rubisco independent of RbcX. Our results may facilitate the engineering of crop plants with improved growth properties expressing red-type Rubisco. PMID:25371207

  20. Heterogeneous catalytic conversion of CO2: a comprehensive theoretical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yawei; Chan, Siew Hwa; Sun, Qiang

    2015-05-01

    The conversion of CO2 into fuels and useful chemicals has been intensively pursued for renewable, sustainable and green energy. However, due to the negative adiabatic electron affinity (EA) and large ionization potential (IP), the CO2 molecule is chemically inert, thus making the conversion difficult under normal conditions. Novel catalysts, which have high stability, superior efficiency and low cost, are urgently needed to facilitate the conversion. As the first step to design such catalysts, understanding the mechanisms involved in CO2 conversion is absolutely indispensable. In this review, we have summarized the recent theoretical progress in mechanistic studies based on density functional theory, kinetic Monte Carlo simulation, and microkinetics modeling. We focus on reaction channels, intermediate products, the key factors determining the conversion of CO2 in solid-gas interface thermocatalytic reduction and solid-liquid interface electrocatalytic reduction. Furthermore, we have proposed some possible strategies for improving CO2 electrocatalysis and also discussed the challenges in theory, model construction, and future research directions.

  1. Silencing PP2A inhibitor by lenti-shRNA interference ameliorates neuropathologies and memory deficits in tg2576 mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gong-Ping; Wei, Wei; Zhou, Xin; Shi, Hai-Rong; Liu, Xing-Hua; Chai, Gao-Shang; Yao, Xiu-Qing; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Peng, Cai-Xia; Hu, Juan; Li, Xia-Chun; Wang, Qun; Wang, Jian-Zhi

    2013-12-01

    Deficits of protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) play a crucial role in tau hyperphosphorylation, amyloid overproduction, and synaptic suppression of Alzheimer's disease (AD), in which PP2A is inactivated by the endogenously increased inhibitory protein, namely inhibitor-2 of PP2A (I2(PP2A)). Therefore, in vivo silencing I2(PP2A) may rescue PP2A and mitigate AD neurodegeneration. By infusion of lentivirus-shRNA targeting I2(PP2A) (LV-siI2(PP2A)) into hippocampus and frontal cortex of 11-month-old tg2576 mice, we demonstrated that expression of LV-siI2(PP2A) decreased remarkably the elevated I2(PP2A) in both mRNA and protein levels. Simultaneously, the PP2A activity was restored with the mechanisms involving reduction of the inhibitory binding of I2(PP2A) to PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2AC), repression of the inhibitory Leu309-demethylation and elevation of PP2AC. Silencing I2(PP2A) induced a long-lasting attenuation of amyloidogenesis in tg2576 mice with inhibition of amyloid precursor protein hyperphosphorylation and β-secretase activity, whereas simultaneous inhibition of PP2A abolished the antiamyloidogenic effects of I2(PP2A) silencing. Finally, silencing I2(PP2A) could improve learning and memory of tg2576 mice with preservation of several memory-associated components. Our data reveal that targeting I2(PP2A) can efficiently rescue Aβ toxicities and improve the memory deficits in tg2576 mice, suggesting that I2(PP2A) could be a promising target for potential AD therapies. PMID:23922015

  2. Subunits of ADA-two-A-containing (ATAC) or Spt-Ada-Gcn5-acetyltrasferase (SAGA) Coactivator Complexes Enhance the Acetyltransferase Activity of GCN5.

    PubMed

    Riss, Anne; Scheer, Elisabeth; Joint, Mathilde; Trowitzsch, Simon; Berger, Imre; Tora, László

    2015-11-27

    Histone acetyl transferases (HATs) play a crucial role in eukaryotes by regulating chromatin architecture and locus specific transcription. GCN5 (KAT2A) is a member of the GNAT (Gcn5-related N-acetyltransferase) family of HATs. In metazoans this enzyme is found in two functionally distinct coactivator complexes, SAGA (Spt Ada Gcn5 acetyltransferase) and ATAC (Ada Two A-containing). These two multiprotein complexes comprise complex-specific and shared subunits, which are organized in functional modules. The HAT module of ATAC is composed of GCN5, ADA2a, ADA3, and SGF29, whereas in the SAGA HAT module ADA2b is present instead of ADA2a. To better understand how the activity of human (h) hGCN5 is regulated in the two related, but different, HAT complexes we carried out in vitro HAT assays. We compared the activity of hGCN5 alone with its activity when it was part of purified recombinant hATAC or hSAGA HAT modules or endogenous hATAC or hSAGA complexes using histone tail peptides and full-length histones as substrates. We demonstrated that the subunit environment of the HAT complexes into which GCN5 incorporates determines the enhancement of GCN5 activity. On histone peptides we show that all the tested GCN5-containing complexes acetylate mainly histone H3K14. Our results suggest a stronger influence of ADA2b as compared with ADA2a on the activity of GCN5. However, the lysine acetylation specificity of GCN5 on histone tails or full-length histones was not changed when incorporated in the HAT modules of ATAC or SAGA complexes. Our results thus demonstrate that the catalytic activity of GCN5 is stimulated by subunits of the ADA2a- or ADA2b-containing HAT modules and is further increased by incorporation of the distinct HAT modules in the ATAC or SAGA holo-complexes. PMID:26468280

  3. Structural basis for the subunit assembly of the anaphase-promoting complex.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Anne; Stengel, Florian; Zhang, Ziguo; Enchev, Radoslav I; Kong, Eric H; Morris, Edward P; Robinson, Carol V; da Fonseca, Paula C A; Barford, David

    2011-02-10

    The anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C) is an unusually large E3 ubiquitin ligase responsible for regulating defined cell cycle transitions. Information on how its 13 constituent proteins are assembled, and how they interact with co-activators, substrates and regulatory proteins is limited. Here, we describe a recombinant expression system that allows the reconstitution of holo APC/C and its sub-complexes that, when combined with electron microscopy, mass spectrometry and docking of crystallographic and homology-derived coordinates, provides a precise definition of the organization and structure of all essential APC/C subunits, resulting in a pseudo-atomic model for 70% of the APC/C. A lattice-like appearance of the APC/C is generated by multiple repeat motifs of most APC/C subunits. Three conserved tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) subunits (Cdc16, Cdc23 and Cdc27) share related superhelical homo-dimeric architectures that assemble to generate a quasi-symmetrical structure. Our structure explains how this TPR sub-complex, together with additional scaffolding subunits (Apc1, Apc4 and Apc5), coordinate the juxtaposition of the catalytic and substrate recognition module (Apc2, Apc11 and Apc10 (also known as Doc1)), and TPR-phosphorylation sites, relative to co-activator, regulatory proteins and substrates. PMID:21307936

  4. Differential distribution of calpain small subunit 1 and 2 in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Peter; Papp, Henrietta; Halasy, Katalin; Farkas, Attila; Farkas, Bence; Tompa, Peter; Kása, Peter

    2004-04-01

    Calpains, the Ca(2+)-dependent thiol proteases, are abundant in the nervous tissue. The ubiquitous enzyme forms in mammals are heterodimers consisting of a specific, micro or m, large (catalytic) subunit and, apparently, a common small (regulatory) subunit (CSS1). Recently, however, we described a second form of small subunit (CSS2), which is of restricted occurrence [Schád, E., Farkas, A., Jékely, G., Tompa, P. & Friedrich, P. (2002) Biochem. J., 362, 383-388]. Here we analysed the distribution of immunoreactivity in various parts of rat brain against two anti-CSS1 and two anti-CSS2 antibodies by correlated light and electron microscopy. Remarkably, the antibodies showed differential distribution in various parts of rat cortex: anti-CSS1 reacted mainly with perikarya and dendrites, whereas anti-CSS2 was more prominent in axons. In serial sections CSS2 and synaptophysin gave very similar patterns, i.e. these epitopes seem to colocalize. Electron microscopy confirmed that CSS1 was mainly localized postsynaptically in dendrites and somata, whereas CSS2 was found presynaptically. The hypothesis is advanced that these distinct distributions of calpain subunits may be related to the transport of these enzymes in nerve cells. PMID:15078555

  5. The Trypanosoma brucei protein phosphatase gene: polycistronic transcription with the RNA polymerase II largest subunit gene.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, R; Cornelissen, A W

    1990-01-01

    We have previously described the trypanosomal gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) and found that two almost identical genes are encoded within the Trypanosoma brucei genome. Here we show by Southern analyses that the 5' breakpoint between both loci is located approximately 7.5 kb upstream of the RNAP II genes. Northern analyses revealed that the 5' duplicated segment contains at least four other genes, which are transcribed in both bloodstream and procyclic trypanosomes. The gene located immediately upstream of the RNAP II gene in both loci was characterized by sequence analyses. The deduced amino acid sequences show a high degree of similarity to the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase class 1 (PP1) genes. S1 mapping provided strong evidence in support of the fact that the PP1 and RNAP II genes belong to a single transcription unit. Images PMID:2169604

  6. Catalytic reforming methods

    DOEpatents

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  7. An alternating GluN1-2-1-2 subunit arrangement in mature NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Riou, Morgane; Stroebel, David; Edwardson, J Michael; Paoletti, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) form glutamate-gated ion channels that play a critical role in CNS physiology and pathology. Together with AMPA and kainate receptors, NMDARs are known to operate as tetrameric complexes with four membrane-embedded subunits associating to form a single central ion-conducting pore. While AMPA and some kainate receptors can function as homomers, NMDARs are obligatory heteromers composed of homologous but distinct subunits, most usually of the GluN1 and GluN2 types. A fundamental structural feature of NMDARs, that of the subunit arrangement around the ion pore, is still controversial. Thus, in a typical NMDAR associating two GluN1 and two GluN2 subunits, there is evidence for both alternating 1/2/1/2 and non-alternating 1/1/2/2 arrangements. Here, using a combination of electrophysiological and cross-linking experiments, we provide evidence that functional GluN1/GluN2A receptors adopt the 1/2/1/2 arrangement in which like subunits are diagonal to one another. Moreover, based on the recent crystal structure of an AMPA receptor, we show that in the agonist-binding and pore regions, the GluN1 subunits occupy a "proximal" position, closer to the central axis of the channel pore than that of GluN2 subunits. Finally, results obtained with reducing agents that differ in their membrane permeability indicate that immature (intracellular) and functional (plasma-membrane inserted) pools of NMDARs can adopt different subunit arrangements, thus stressing the importance of discriminating between the two receptor pools in assembly studies. Elucidating the quaternary arrangement of NMDARs helps to define the interface between the subunits and to understand the mechanism and pharmacology of these key signaling receptors. PMID:22493736

  8. Catalytic considerations in temperature measurement.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, R. L.; Crossman, G. R.; Chitnis, R. V.

    1972-01-01

    Literature discussing catalytic activity in platinum group temperature sensors is surveyed. Methods for the determination and/or elimination of catalytic activity are reported. A particular application of the literature is discussed in which it is possible to infer that a shielded platinum total temperature probe does not experience significant catalytic activity in the wake of a supersonic hydrogen burner, while a bare iridium plus rhodium, iridium thermocouple does. It is concluded that catalytic data corrections are restricted and that it is preferable to coat the temperature sensor with a noncatalytic coating. Furthermore, the desirability of transparent coatings is discussed.

  9. Retention of NMDA receptor NR2 subunits in the lumen of endoplasmic reticulum in targeted NR1 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Fukaya, Masahiro; Kato, Akira; Lovett, Chanel; Tonegawa, Susumu; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2003-01-01

    Glutamate is a major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, and the N-methyl-d-aspartate-selective glutamate receptor (NR) consisting of the NR1 subunit and an NR2 or NR3 subunit plays crucial roles in synaptic transmission, plasticity, and learning and memory. By using a knockout mouse strain, in which the NR1 gene deletion is primarily targeted to the CA1 pyramidal cells of the hippocampus, we investigated the in vivo effect of the loss of the NR1 subunit on the cellular expression and intracellular distribution of the NR2 subunits. The NR1 gene deletion had no apparent effect on the levels of NR2A or NR2B mRNA but led to severe reductions of NR2A and NR2B protein in dendrites of CA1 pyramidal cells. This reduced dendritic distribution of the NR2 subunits accompanied their robust accumulation in perikarya, where they were condensed in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum as electron-dense granules. These granules were also observed in CA1 pyramidal cells of the control mice but they were much fewer and contained no detectable levels of the NR2 subunit. The effect of the NR1 knockout on intracellular localization of the NR2 subunits was specific in that no such effect was observed for the GluR1 and PSD-95, two other major postsynaptic proteins. These results suggest that the NR1 subunit plays a crucial role in the release of the NR2 subunit from the endoplasmic reticulum in hippocampal pyramidal cells in vivo, and when the NR1 subunit is unavailable, the NR2 subunits are retained and aggregate into intracisternal granules. PMID:12676993

  10. ATP synthase from Escherichia coli: Mechanism of rotational catalysis, and inhibition with the ε subunit and phytopolyphenols.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi-Matsui, Mayumi; Sekiya, Mizuki; Futai, Masamitsu

    2016-02-01

    ATP synthases (FoF1) are found ubiquitously in energy-transducing membranes of bacteria, mitochondria, and chloroplasts. These enzymes couple proton transport and ATP synthesis or hydrolysis through subunit rotation, which has been studied mainly by observing single molecules. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of rotational catalysis of ATP synthases, mainly that from Escherichia coli, emphasizing the high-speed and stochastic rotation including variable rates and an inhibited state. Single molecule studies combined with structural information of the bovine mitochondrial enzyme and mutational analysis have been informative as to an understanding of the catalytic site and the interaction between rotor and stator subunits. We discuss the similarity and difference in structure and inhibitory regulation of F1 from bovine and E. coli. Unlike the crystal structure of bovine F1 (α3β3γ), that of E. coli contains a ε subunit, which is a known inhibitor of bacterial and chloroplast F1 ATPases. The carboxyl terminal domain of E. coli ε (εCTD) interacts with the catalytic and rotor subunits (β and γ, respectively), and then inhibits rotation. The effects of phytopolyphenols on F1-ATPase are also discussed: one of them, piceatannol, lowered the rotational speed by affecting rotor/stator interactions. PMID:26589785

  11. Calcineurin Subunits A and B Interact to Regulate Growth and Asexual and Sexual Development in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Tamuli, Ranjan; Deka, Rekha; Borkovich, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Calcineurin is a calcium/calmodulin dependent protein phosphatase in eukaryotes that consists of a catalytic subunit A and a regulatory subunit B. Previous studies in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa had suggested that the catalytic subunit of calcineurin might be an essential protein. We generated N. crassa strains expressing the A (cna-1) and B (cnb-1) subunit genes under the regulation of Ptcu-1, a copper-responsive promoter. In these strains, addition of bathocuproinedisulfonic acid (BCS), a copper chelator, results in induction of cna-1 and cnb-1, while excess Cu2+ represses gene expression. Through analysis of these strains under repressing and inducing conditions, we found that the calcineurin is required for normal growth, asexual development and female fertility in N. crassa. Moreover, we isolated and analyzed cnb-1 mutant alleles generated by repeat-induced point mutation (RIP), with the results further supporting roles for calcineurin in growth and fertility in N. crassa. We demonstrated a direct interaction between the CNA-1 and CNB-1 proteins using an assay system developed to study protein-protein interactions in N. crassa. PMID:27019426

  12. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  13. Catalytic cracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Gladrow, E.M.; Winter, W.E.

    1980-04-29

    The octane number of a cracked naphtha can be significantly improved in a catalytic cracking unit, without significant decrease in naphtha yield, by maintaining certain critical concentrations of metals on the catalyst, suitably by blending or adding a heavy metals-containing component to the gas oil feed. Suitably, in a catalytic cracking process unit wherein a gas oil feed is cracked in a cracking reactor (Zone) at an elevated temperature in the presence of a cracking catalyst, the cracking catalyst is regenerated in a regenerator (Regeneration zone) by burning coke off the catalyst, and catalyst is circulated between the reactor and regenerator, sufficient of a metals-containing heavy feedstock is admixed, intermittantly or continuously, with the gas oil feed to deposit metals on said catalyst and raise the metals-content of said catalyst to a level of from about 1500 to about 6000 parts per million, preferably from about 2500 to about 4000 parts per million expressed as equivalent nickel, base the weight of the catalyst, and said metals level is maintained on the catalyst throughout the operation by withdrawing high metals-containing catalyst and adding low metals-containing catalyst to the regenerator.

  14. RYBP-PRC1 Complexes Mediate H2A Ubiquitylation at Polycomb Target Sites Independently of PRC2 and H3K27me3

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Lígia; Dimitrova, Emilia; Oxley, David; Webster, Judith; Poot, Raymond; Demmers, Jeroen; Bezstarosti, Karel; Taylor, Stephen; Ura, Hiroki; Koide, Hiroshi; Wutz, Anton; Vidal, Miguel; Elderkin, Sarah; Brockdorff, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Summary Polycomb-repressive complex 1 (PRC1) has a central role in the regulation of heritable gene silencing during differentiation and development. PRC1 recruitment is generally attributed to interaction of the chromodomain of the core protein Polycomb with trimethyl histone H3K27 (H3K27me3), catalyzed by a second complex, PRC2. Unexpectedly we find that RING1B, the catalytic subunit of PRC1, and associated monoubiquitylation of histone H2A are targeted to closely overlapping sites in wild-type and PRC2-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), demonstrating an H3K27me3-independent pathway for recruitment of PRC1 activity. We show that this pathway is mediated by RYBP-PRC1, a complex comprising catalytic subunits of PRC1 and the protein RYBP. RYBP-PRC1 is recruited to target loci in mESCs and is also involved in Xist RNA-mediated silencing, the latter suggesting a wider role in Polycomb silencing. We discuss the implications of these findings for understanding recruitment and function of Polycomb repressors. PMID:22325148

  15. Proteomic Analysis of the Mammalian Katanin Family of Microtubule-severing Enzymes Defines Katanin p80 subunit B-like 1 (KATNBL1) as a Regulator of Mammalian Katanin Microtubule-severing.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Keith; Senese, Silvia; Kuang, Jiaen; Bui, Ngoc; Ongpipattanakul, Chayanid; Gholkar, Ankur; Cohn, Whitaker; Capri, Joseph; Whitelegge, Julian P; Torres, Jorge Z

    2016-05-01

    The Katanin family of microtubule-severing enzymes is critical for remodeling microtubule-based structures that influence cell division, motility, morphogenesis and signaling. Katanin is composed of a catalytic p60 subunit (A subunit, KATNA1) and a regulatory p80 subunit (B subunit, KATNB1). The mammalian genome also encodes two additional A-like subunits (KATNAL1 and KATNAL2) and one additional B-like subunit (KATNBL1) that have remained poorly characterized. To better understand the factors and mechanisms controlling mammalian microtubule-severing, we have taken a mass proteomic approach to define the protein interaction module for each mammalian Katanin subunit and to generate the mammalian Katanin family interaction network (Katan-ome). Further, we have analyzed the function of the KATNBL1 subunit and determined that it associates with KATNA1 and KATNAL1, it localizes to the spindle poles only during mitosis and it regulates Katanin A subunit microtubule-severing activity in vitro Interestingly, during interphase, KATNBL1 is sequestered in the nucleus through an N-terminal nuclear localization signal. Finally KATNB1 was able to compete the interaction of KATNBL1 with KATNA1 and KATNAL1. These data indicate that KATNBL1 functions as a regulator of Katanin A subunit microtubule-severing activity during mitosis and that it likely coordinates with KATNB1 to perform this function. PMID:26929214

  16. Catalytic reactor with disposable cartridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccullough, C. M.

    1973-01-01

    Catalytic reactor, disposable cartridge enclosing iron catalyst, acts as container for solid carbon formed by decomposition of carbon monoxide. Deposition of carbon in other parts of oxygen recovery system does not occur because of lack of catalytic activity; filters trap carbon particles and prevent their being transported outside reaction zone.

  17. GRIN2A

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Samantha J.; Mayes, Angela K.; Verhoeven, Andrea; Mandelstam, Simone A.; Morgan, Angela T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To delineate the specific speech deficits in individuals with epilepsy-aphasia syndromes associated with mutations in the glutamate receptor subunit gene GRIN2A. Methods: We analyzed the speech phenotype associated with GRIN2A mutations in 11 individuals, aged 16 to 64 years, from 3 families. Standardized clinical speech assessments and perceptual analyses of conversational samples were conducted. Results: Individuals showed a characteristic phenotype of dysarthria and dyspraxia with lifelong impact on speech intelligibility in some. Speech was typified by imprecise articulation (11/11, 100%), impaired pitch (monopitch 10/11, 91%) and prosody (stress errors 7/11, 64%), and hypernasality (7/11, 64%). Oral motor impairments and poor performance on maximum vowel duration (8/11, 73%) and repetition of monosyllables (10/11, 91%) and trisyllables (7/11, 64%) supported conversational speech findings. The speech phenotype was present in one individual who did not have seizures. Conclusions: Distinctive features of dysarthria and dyspraxia are found in individuals with GRIN2A mutations, often in the setting of epilepsy-aphasia syndromes; dysarthria has not been previously recognized in these disorders. Of note, the speech phenotype may occur in the absence of a seizure disorder, reinforcing an important role for GRIN2A in motor speech function. Our findings highlight the need for precise clinical speech assessment and intervention in this group. By understanding the mechanisms involved in GRIN2A disorders, targeted therapy may be designed to improve chronic lifelong deficits in intelligibility. PMID:25596506

  18. A p.R369G POLG2 mutation associated with adPEO and multiple mtDNA deletions causes decreased affinity between polymerase γ subunits

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Kate; Young, Matthew J.; Blakely, Emma L.; Longley, Matthew J.; Turnbull, Douglass M.; Copeland, William C.; Taylor, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymerase γ (pol γ) is the sole enzyme required to replicate and maintain the integrity of the mitochondrial genome. It comprises two subunits, a catalytic p140 subunit and a smaller p55 accessory subunit encoded by the POLG2 gene. We describe the molecular characterization of a potential dominant POLG2 mutation (p.R369G) in a patient with adPEO and multiple mtDNA deletions. Biochemical studies of the recombinant mutant p55 protein showed a reduced affinity to the pol γ p140 subunit, leading to impaired processivity of the holoenzyme complex but did not show sensitivity to N-ethylmalaimide (NEM) inhibition, inferring a novel disease mechanism. PMID:22155748

  19. Amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) vicilin subunit structure.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, Alejandra; Martínez, E Nora; Rogniaux, Hélène; Geairon, Audrey; Añón, M Cristina

    2010-12-22

    The 7S-globulin fraction is a minor component of the amaranth storage proteins. The present work provides new information about this protein. The amaranth 7S-globulin or vicilin presented a sedimentation coefficient of 8.6 ± 0.6 S and was composed of main subunits of 66, 52, 38, and 16 kDa. On the basis of mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of tryptic fragments, the 52, 38, and 16 kDa subunits presented sequence homology with sesame vicilin, whereas the 66 kDa subunit showed sequence similarity with a putative vicilin. Several characteristics of the 66 kDa subunit were similar to members of the convicilin family. Results support the hypothesis that the 7S-globulin molecules are composed of subunits coming from at least two gene families with primary products of 66 and 52 kDa, respectively. According to the present information, amaranth vicilin may be classified into the vicilin group that includes pea, broad bean, and sesame vicilins, among others. PMID:21117690

  20. Turning off of GluN2B subunits and turning on of CICR in hippocampal LTD induction after developmental GluN2 subunit switch.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Hiroki; Mukai, Hideyuki

    2015-11-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) are essential for the induction of synaptic plasticity that mediates activity-dependent refinement of neural circuits during development. GluN2B subunits of NMDARs are abundant at synapses in the immature hippocampus and begin to be replaced by GluN2A subunits with the help of casein kinase 2 activity in the second postnatal week, the critical period for the GluN2 subunit switch (Sanz-Clemente et al. (2000) Neuron 67:984-996). However, the physiological role of GluN2B subunits in the hippocampus during this critical period has not been elucidated. Here, we report that GluN2B subunits mediate the induction of long-term depression (LTD) in the CA1 region of the hippocampus only until this period. Ifenprodil and Ro25-6981, selective inhibitors of NMDARs containing GluN2B subunits, blocked LTD in postnatal Day 11-14 (P11-14) rat hippocampal slices but not in P18-22 hippocampus. Just a few days after P14, synaptic NMDAR currents became narrower than those at P11-14, and calcium influx through NMDARs must be reduced. We found that calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) through ryanodine receptors starts to support the induction of NMDAR-dependent LTD at P18-22. Intracellular application of thapsigargin and ryanodine, inhibitors of Ca2+ -ATP pumps on internal stores and ryanodine receptors, respectively, did not at all affect LTD in the hippocampus at P11-14 but completely blocked LTD in the P18-22 hippocampus. Therefore, calcium influx through NMDAR with GluN2B subunits is sufficient to induce LTD at P11-14, after which CICR compensates for the decrease in calcium influx during LTD induction. PMID:25727316

  1. Catalytic conversions of chlorodecalin

    SciTech Connect

    Takhistov, U.V.; Kovyazin, V.E.

    1985-10-01

    This paper studies catalytic conversions of chlorinated decahydronaphthalene (chlorodecalin), since the introduction of chlorine into the hydrocarbon molecule would facilitate formation of the original carbonium ion required for conversion to adamantane. Analysis of the fractions obtained showed that two main products are formed: the tricyclic hydrocarbon C/sub 10/H/sub 16/ and the bicyclic hydrocarbon C/sub 10/H/sub 16/. Therefore, the C/sub 10/H/sub 17/ cation formed by removal of chlorine from chlorodecalin, C/sub 10/H/sub 17/CI, undergoes changes in two directions: addition of hydride ions from other chlorodecalin molecules to form Decalin, and loss of a proton to give a tricyclic system of the adamantane weries and its isomer. Introduction of a substituent (chlorine) into the Decalin molecule made it possible to conduct the process at low temperatures.

  2. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  3. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  4. ``OPTICAL Catalytic Nanomotors''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosary-Oyong, Se, Glory

    D. Kagan, et.al, 2009:'' a motion-based chemical sensing involving fuel-driven nanomotors is demonstrated. The new protocol relies on the use of an optical microscope for tracking charge in the speed of nanowire motors in the presence of target analyte''. Synthetic nanomotors are propelled by catalytic decomposition of .. they do not require external electric, magnetic or optical fields as energy... Accompanying Fig 2.6(a) of optical micrograph of a partial monolayer of silica microbeads [J.Gibbs, 2011 ] retrieves WF Paxton:''rods were characterized by transmission electron & dark-field optical microscopy..'' & LF Valadares:''dimer due to the limited resolution of optical microscopy, however the result..'. Acknowledged to HE. Mr. Prof. SEDIONO M.P. TJONDRONEGORO.

  5. Bifunctional catalytic electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisar, Alan (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Clarke, Eric (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to an oxygen electrode for a unitized regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell and the unitized regenerative fuel cell having the oxygen electrode. The oxygen electrode contains components electrocatalytically active for the evolution of oxygen from water and the reduction of oxygen to water, and has a structure that supports the flow of both water and gases between the catalytically active surface and a flow field or electrode chamber for bulk flow of the fluids. The electrode has an electrocatalyst layer and a diffusion backing layer interspersed with hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. The diffusion backing layer consists of a metal core having gas diffusion structures bonded to the metal core.

  6. Modulation of the skeletal muscle sodium channel alpha-subunit by the beta 1-subunit.

    PubMed

    Wallner, M; Weigl, L; Meera, P; Lotan, I

    1993-12-28

    Co-expression of cloned sodium channel beta 1-subunit with the rat skeletal muscle-subunit (alpha microI) accelerated the macroscopic current decay, enhanced the current amplitude, shifted the steady state inactivation curve to more negative potentials and decreased the time required for complete recovery from inactivation. Sodium channels expressed from skeletal muscle mRNA showed a similar behaviour to that observed from alpha microI/beta 1, indicating that beta 1 restores 'physiological' behaviour. Northern blot analysis revealed that the Na+ channel beta 1-subunit is present in high abundance (about 0.1%) in rat heart, brain and skeletal muscle, and the hybridization with untranslated region of the 'brain' beta 1 cDNA to skeletal muscle and heart mRNA indicated that the different Na+ channel alpha-subunits in brain, skeletal muscle and heart may share a common beta 1-subunit. PMID:8282123

  7. Genetic diagnostic test of hepatocellular carcinoma by telomerase catalytic subunit mRNA.

    PubMed

    Wada, E; Hisatomi, H; Moritoyo, T; Kanamaru, T; Hikiji, K

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between telomerase activity and telomere length and between telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) mRNA and telomere length. Both cancerous and non-cancerous tissues were studied in individuals with hepatic carcinoma. In this study, the telomere length in HCC livers had a wide range, no clear significant correlation was found between hTERT mRNA and telomere length. Telomerase activity was more strongly correlated with hTERT mRNA than with telomere length. The correlation between hTERT mRNA and telomerase activity shown here indicates that hTERT mRNA has potential for cancer diagnosis. PMID:9769378

  8. PP2A regulates kinetochore-microtubule attachment during meiosis I in oocyte.

    PubMed

    Tang, An; Shi, Peiliang; Song, Anying; Zou, Dayuan; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Pengyu; Huang, Zan; Wang, Qinghua; Lin, Zhaoyu; Gao, Xiang

    2016-06-01

    Studies using in vitro cultured oocytes have indicated that the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a major serine/threonine protein phosphatase, participates in multiple steps of meiosis. Details of oocyte maturation regulation by PP2A remain unclear and an in vivo model can provide more convincing information. Here, we inactivated PP2A by mutating genes encoding for its catalytic subunits (PP2Acs) in mouse oocytes. We found that eliminating both PP2Acs caused female infertility. Oocytes lacking PP2Acs failed to complete 1(st) meiotic division due to chromosome misalignment and abnormal spindle assembly. In mitosis, PP2A counteracts Aurora kinase B/C (AurkB/C) to facilitate correct kinetochore-microtubule (KT-MT) attachment. In meiosis I in oocyte, we found that PP2Ac deficiency destabilized KT-MT attachments. Chemical inhibition of AurkB/C in PP2Ac-null oocytes partly restored the formation of lateral/merotelic KT-MT attachments but not correct KT-MT attachments. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that PP2Acs are essential for chromosome alignments and regulate the formation of correct KT-MT attachments in meiosis I in oocytes. PMID:27096707

  9. Crystal structures capture three states in the catalytic cycle of a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) synthase.

    PubMed

    Smith, Amber Marie; Brown, William Clay; Harms, Etti; Smith, Janet L

    2015-02-27

    PLP synthase (PLPS) is a remarkable single-enzyme biosynthetic pathway that produces pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) from glutamine, ribose 5-phosphate, and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. The intact enzyme includes 12 synthase and 12 glutaminase subunits. PLP synthesis occurs in the synthase active site by a complicated mechanism involving at least two covalent intermediates at a catalytic lysine. The first intermediate forms with ribose 5-phosphate. The glutaminase subunit is a glutamine amidotransferase that hydrolyzes glutamine and channels ammonia to the synthase active site. Ammonia attack on the first covalent intermediate forms the second intermediate. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate reacts with the second intermediate to form PLP. To investigate the mechanism of the synthase subunit, crystal structures were obtained for three intermediate states of the Geobacillus stearothermophilus intact PLPS or its synthase subunit. The structures capture the synthase active site at three distinct steps in its complicated catalytic cycle, provide insights into the elusive mechanism, and illustrate the coordinated motions within the synthase subunit that separate the catalytic states. In the intact PLPS with a Michaelis-like intermediate in the glutaminase active site, the first covalent intermediate of the synthase is fully sequestered within the enzyme by the ordering of a generally disordered 20-residue C-terminal tail. Following addition of ammonia, the synthase active site opens and admits the Lys-149 side chain, which participates in formation of the second intermediate and PLP. Roles are identified for conserved Asp-24 in the formation of the first intermediate and for conserved Arg-147 in the conversion of the first to the second intermediate. PMID:25568319

  10. Rat hepatic (Na/sup +/, K/sup +/)-ATPase:. cap alpha. =subunit isolation by immunoaffinity chromatography and structural analysis by peptide mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Hubert, J.J.; Schenk, D.B.; Skelly, H.; Leffert, H.L.

    1986-07-01

    The catalytic ..cap alpha..-subunit of rat hepatic (Na/sup +/, K/sup +/)-ATPase (EC 3.6.1.3) has been isolated by immunoaffinity chromatography from microsomes solubilized in n-dodecyl octaethylene glycol monoether. The procedure employs an anticatalytic mouse monoclonal antibody (9-A5) covalently linked to Sepharose 4B that specifically block phosphorylation of the sodium pump's ..cap alpha..-subunit from (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP. The hepatic subunit is virtually identical with purified rat, dog, and human renal ..cap alpha..-subunits as judged by its apparent molecular weight after polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate (M/sub r/ 92K) and its two-dimensional tryptic and chymotryptic peptide maps on cellulose-coated thin-layer plates. In contrast, the structures of authentic renal ..beta..-subunits from the three species differ significantly from each other as judged by their peptide maps; no detectable homologies are seen between their chymotryptic maps and those of putative hepatic ..beta..-subunits (M/sub r/ 50K and 55K) eluted from 9-A5-Spharose. Additional studies of ouabain-sensitive /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes reveal inhibition curves with single inflection points in the absence or presence of pump-stimulating peptides like insulin, glucagon, and epidermal growth factor. These findings indicate that rat hepatocytes express only one of two know structurally conserved forms of catalytic subunit (the renallike ..cap alpha.. form) and, if at all, structurally divergent forms of the sodium pump's ..beta..-subunit.

  11. Unsteady catalytic processes and sorption-catalytic technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagoruiko, A. N.

    2007-07-01

    Catalytic processes that occur under conditions of the targeted unsteady state of the catalyst are considered. The highest efficiency of catalytic processes was found to be ensured by a controlled combination of thermal non-stationarity and unsteady composition of the catalyst surface. The processes based on this principle are analysed, in particular, catalytic selective reduction of nitrogen oxides, deep oxidation of volatile organic impurities, production of sulfur by the Claus process and by hydrogen sulfide decomposition, oxidation of sulfur dioxide, methane steam reforming and anaerobic combustion, selective oxidation of hydrocarbons, etc.

  12. Expression of alpha subunit of alpha glucosidase II in adult mouse brain regions and selective organs

    PubMed Central

    Anji, Antje; Miller, Hayley; Raman, Chandrasekar; Phillips, Mathew; Ciment, Gary; Kumari, Meena

    2014-01-01

    Alpha glucosidase II (GII), a resident of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and an important enzyme in folding of nascent glycoproteins, is heterodimeric consisting of alpha (GIIα) and beta (GIIβ) subunits. The catalytic GIIα subunit with the help of mannose 6-phosphate receptor homology (MRH) domain of GIIβ sequentially hydrolyzes two α-1-3-linked glucose residues in the 2nd step of N-linked oligosaccharide-mediated protein folding. The soluble GIIα subunit is retained in the ER through its interaction with the HDEL-containing GIIβ subunit. N-glycosylation and correct protein folding is crucial for protein stability, trafficking, and cell surface expression of several proteins in the brain. Alterations in N-glycosylation lead to abnormalities in neuronal migration and mental retardation, various neurodegenerative diseases, and invasion of malignant gliomas. Inhibitors of GII are used to inhibit cell proliferation and migration in a variety of different pathologies such as viral infection, cancer and diabetes. In spite of the widespread usage of GIIα inhibitory drugs and the role of GIIα in brain function little is known about its expression in brain and other tissues. Here, we report generation of a highly specific chicken antibody to GIIα subunit and its characterization by Western blotting and immunoprecipitation using cerebral cortical extracts. Using this antibody we show that the GIIα protein is highly expressed in testis, kidney, and lung, with the least amount in heart. GIIα polypeptide levels in whole brain were comparable to spleen. However, higher expression of GIIα protein was detected in cerebral cortex reflecting its continuous requirement in correct folding of cell surface proteins. PMID:25131991

  13. L-type calcium channel β subunit modulates angiotensin II responses in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Hermosilla, Tamara; Moreno, Cristian; Itfinca, Mircea; Altier, Christophe; Armisén, Ricardo; Stutzin, Andres; Zamponi, Gerald W; Varela, Diego

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin II regulation of L-type calcium currents in cardiac muscle is controversial and the underlying signaling events are not completely understood. Moreover, the possible role of auxiliary subunit composition of the channels in Angiotensin II modulation of L-type calcium channels has not yet been explored. In this work we study the role of Ca(v)β subunits and the intracellular signaling responsible for L-type calcium current modulation by Angiotensin II. In cardiomyocytes, Angiotensin II exposure induces rapid inhibition of L-type current with a magnitude that is correlated with the rate of current inactivation. Semi-quantitative PCR of cardiomyocytes at different days of culture reveals changes in the Ca(v)β subunits expression pattern that are correlated with the rate of current inactivation and with Angiotensin II effect. Over-expression of individual b subunits in heterologous systems reveals that the magnitude of Angiotensin II inhibition is dependent on the Ca(v)β subunit isoform, with Ca(v)β(1b) containing channels being more strongly regulated. Ca(v)β(2a) containing channels were insensitive to modulation and this effect was partially due to the N-terminal palmitoylation sites of this subunit. Moreover, PLC or diacylglycerol lipase inhibition prevents the Angiotensin II effect on L-type calcium channels, while PKC inhibition with chelerythrine does not, suggesting a role of arachidonic acid in this process. Finally, we show that in intact cardiomyocytes the magnitude of calcium transients on spontaneous beating cells is modulated by Angiotensin II in a Ca(v)β subunit-dependent manner. These data demonstrate that Ca(v)β subunits alter the magnitude of inhibition of L-type current by Angiotensin II. PMID:21525790

  14. Heteromeric assembly of P2X subunits

    PubMed Central

    Saul, Anika; Hausmann, Ralf; Kless, Achim; Nicke, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Transcripts and/or proteins of P2X receptor (P2XR) subunits have been found in virtually all mammalian tissues. Generally more than one of the seven known P2X subunits have been identified in a given cell type. Six of the seven cloned P2X subunits can efficiently form functional homotrimeric ion channels in recombinant expression systems. This is in contrast to other ligand-gated ion channel families, such as the Cys-loop or glutamate receptors, where homomeric assemblies seem to represent the exception rather than the rule. P2XR mediated responses recorded from native tissues rarely match exactly the biophysical and pharmacological properties of heterologously expressed homomeric P2XRs. Heterotrimerization of P2X subunits is likely to account for this observed diversity. While the existence of heterotrimeric P2X2/3Rs and their role in physiological processes is well established, the composition of most other P2XR heteromers and/or the interplay between distinct trimeric receptor complexes in native tissues is not clear. After a description of P2XR assembly and the structure of the intersubunit ATP-binding site, this review summarizes the distribution of P2XR subunits in selected mammalian cell types and the biochemically and/or functionally characterized heteromeric P2XRs that have been observed upon heterologous co-expression of P2XR subunits. We further provide examples where the postulated heteromeric P2XRs have been suggested to occur in native tissues and an overview of the currently available pharmacological tools that have been used to discriminate between homo- and heteromeric P2XRs. PMID:24391538

  15. Vaults and telomerase share a common subunit, TEP1.

    PubMed

    Kickhoefer, V A; Stephen, A G; Harrington, L; Robinson, M O; Rome, L H

    1999-11-12

    Vaults are large cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes of undetermined function. Mammalian vaults have two high molecular mass proteins of 193 and 240 kDa. We have identified a partial cDNA encoding the 240-kDa vault protein and determined it is identical to the mammalian telomerase-associated component, TEP1. TEP1 is the mammalian homolog of the Tetrahymena p80 telomerase protein and has been shown to interact specifically with mammalian telomerase RNA and the catalytic protein subunit hTERT. We show that while TEP1 is a component of the vault particle, vaults have no detectable telomerase activity. Using a yeast three-hybrid assay we demonstrate that several of the human vRNAs interact in a sequence-specific manner with TEP1. The presence of 16 WD40 repeats in the carboxyl terminus of the TEP1 protein is a convenient number for this protein to serve a structural or organizing role in the vault, a particle with eight-fold symmetry. The sharing of the TEP1 protein between vaults and telomerase suggests that TEP1 may play a common role in some aspect of ribonucleoprotein structure, function, or assembly. PMID:10551828

  16. Effect of protein S-nitrosylation on autolysis and catalytic ability of μ-calpain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Li, Yupin; Wang, Mengqin; Zhou, Guanghong; Zhang, Wangang

    2016-12-15

    The effect of S-nitrosylation on the autolysis and catalytic ability of μ-calpain in vitro in the presence of 50μM Ca(2 +) was investigated. μ-Calpain was incubated with different concentrations of nitric oxide donor S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and subsequently reacted with purified myofibrils. Results showed that the amount of 80kDa μ-calpain subunit significantly decreased as GSNO increased from 0 to 300μM, but increases of GSNO to 300, 500 and 1000μM did not result in further inhibition. The catalytic ability of nitrosylated μ-calpain to degrade titin, nebulin, troponin-T and desmin was significantly reduced when the GSNO concentration was higher than 300μM. The cysteine residues of μ-calpain at positions 49, 351, 384, and 592 in the catalytic subunit and at 142 in small subunit were S-nitrosylated, which could be responsible for decreased μ-calpain activity. Thus, S-nitrosylation can negatively regulate the activation of μ-calpain resulting in decreased proteolytic ability on myofibrils. PMID:27451206

  17. The B55α-containing PP2A holoenzyme dephosphorylates FOXO1 in islet β-cells under oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ling; Guo, Shuangli; Brault, Marie; Harmon, Jamie; Robertson, R. Paul; Hamid, Rizwan; Stein, Roland; Yang, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The FOXO1 (forkhead box O1) transcription factor influences many key cellular processes, including those important in metabolism, proliferation and cell death. Reversible phosphorylation of FOXO1 at Thr24 and Ser256 regulates its subcellular localization, with phosphorylation promoting cytoplasmic localization, whereas dephosphorylation triggers nuclear import and transcriptional activation. In the present study, we used biochemical and molecular approaches to isolate and link the serine/threonine PP2A (protein phosphatase 2A) holoenzyme containing the B55α regulatory subunit, with nuclear import of FOXO1 in pancreatic islet β-cells under oxidative stress, a condition associated with cellular dysfunction in Type 2 diabetes. The mechanism of FOXO1 dephosphorylation and nuclear translocation was investigated in pancreatic islet INS-1 and βTC-3 cell lines subjected to oxidative stress. A combined chemical cross-linking and MS strategy revealed the association of FOXO1 with a PP2A holoenzyme composed of the catalytic C, structural A and B55α regulatory subunits. Knockdown of B55α in INS-1 cells reduced FOXO1 dephosphorylation, inhibited FOXO1 nuclear translocation and attenuated oxidative stress-induced cell death. Furthermore, both B55α and nuclear FOXO1 levels were increased under hyperglycaemic conditions in db/db mouse islets, an animal model of Type 2 diabetes. We conclude that B55α-containing PP2A is a key regulator of FOXO1 activity in vivo. PMID:22417654

  18. The E3 Ubiquitin Ligase- and Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-binding Domains of the Alpha4 Protein Are Both Required for Alpha4 to Inhibit PP2A Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    LeNoue-Newton, Michele; Watkins, Guy R.; Zou, Ping; Germane, Katherine L.; McCorvey, Lisa R.; Wadzinski, Brian E.; Spiller, Benjamin W.

    2012-04-30

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is regulated through a variety of mechanisms, including post-translational modifications and association with regulatory proteins. Alpha4 is one such regulatory protein that binds the PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac) and protects it from polyubiquitination and degradation. Alpha4 is a multidomain protein with a C-terminal domain that binds Mid1, a putative E3 ubiquitin ligase, and an N-terminal domain containing the PP2Ac-binding site. In this work, we present the structure of the N-terminal domain of mammalian Alpha4 determined by x-ray crystallography and use double electron-electron resonance spectroscopy to show that it is a flexible tetratricopeptide repeat-like protein. Structurally, Alpha4 differs from its yeast homolog, Tap42, in two important ways: (1) the position of the helix containing the PP2Ac-binding residues is in a more open conformation, showing flexibility in this region; and (2) Alpha4 contains a ubiquitin-interacting motif. The effects of wild-type and mutant Alpha4 on PP2Ac ubiquitination and stability were examined in mammalian cells by performing tandem ubiquitin-binding entity precipitations and cycloheximide chase experiments. Our results reveal that both the C-terminal Mid1-binding domain and the PP2Ac-binding determinants are required for Alpha4-mediated protection of PP2Ac from polyubiquitination and degradation.

  19. Subunit b-Dimer of the Escherichia coli ATP Synthase Can Form Left-Handed Coiled-Coils

    PubMed Central

    Wise, John G.; Vogel, Pia D.

    2008-01-01

    One remaining challenge to our understanding of the ATP synthase concerns the dimeric coiled-coil stator subunit b of bacterial synthases. The subunit b-dimer has been implicated in important protein interactions that appear necessary for energy conservation and that may be instrumental in energy conservation during rotary catalysis by the synthase. Understanding the stator structure and its interactions with the rest of the enzyme is crucial to the understanding of the overall catalytic mechanism. Controversy exists on whether subunit b adopts a classic left-handed or a presumed right-handed dimeric coiled-coil and whether or not staggered pairing between nonhomologous residues in the homodimer is required for intersubunit packing. In this study we generated molecular models of the Escherichia coli subunit b-dimer that were based on the well-established heptad-repeat packing exhibited by left-handed, dimeric coiled-coils by employing simulated annealing protocols with structural restraints collected from known structures. In addition, we attempted to create hypothetical right-handed coiled-coil models and left- and right-handed models with staggered packing in the coiled-coil domains. Our analyses suggest that the available structural and biochemical evidence for subunit b can be accommodated by classic left-handed, dimeric coiled-coil quaternary structures. PMID:18326648

  20. Isoform-specific interactions of Na,K-ATPase subunits are mediated via extracellular domains and carbohydrates

    PubMed Central

    Schmalzing, Günther; Ruhl, Karina; Gloor, Sergio M.

    1997-01-01

    The functional unit of the Na,K-ATPase consists of a catalytic α subunit noncovalently linked with a glycoprotein subunit, β. Using ouabain binding assays and immunoprecipitation of rodent α/β complexes, we show here that all six possible isozymes between three α and two β isoforms can be formed in Xenopus oocytes. Two isoform-specific differences in α/β interactions are observed: (i) α1/β1 and α2/β2 complexes, in contrast to α1/β2 complexes, are stable against Triton X-100-mediated dissociation, and (ii) β2 subunits must carry N-glycans to combine with α1 but not with α2. The interacting surfaces are mainly exposed to the extracellular side because coexpression of a truncated β1 subunit comprising the ectodomain results in assembly with α1 and α2, but not with α3; the β2 ectodomain combines with α2 only. A chimera consisting of 81% and 19% of the α1 N terminus and α2 C terminus, respectively, behaves like α2 and coprecipitates with the β2 ectodomain. In contrast, the reciprocal chimera does not coprecipitate with the β2 ectodomain. These results provide evidence for a selective interaction of Na,K-ATPase α and β subunits. PMID:9037019

  1. Partial proteolysis as a probe of the conformation of the gamma subunit in activated soluble and membrane-bound chloroplast coupling factor 1.

    PubMed

    Schumann, J; Richter, M L; McCarty, R E

    1985-09-25

    Treatments that enhance the latent ATPase activity of the chloroplast coupling factor (CF1) also induce hypersensitivity of the gamma subunit toward trypsin. A number of different gamma subunit cleavage products are formed (Moroney, J. V., and McCarty, R. E. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 5910-5914). We have compared the gamma cleavage products of membrane-bound and isolated CF1, activated either by reduction of the gamma disulfide bond or by removal of the epsilon subunit. The gamma subunit of isolated CF1 lacking the epsilon subunit was cleaved to a 27,000-Da species. The same cleavage site became exposed following energy-dependent conformational changes in the membrane-bound enzyme. Activation by reduction of the gamma disulfide bond also exposed this site. However, the gamma subunit of reduced CF1 was cleaved rapidly at an additional site and trypsin treatment gave rise to a 25,000-Da gamma species. The small peptide generated by the second cleavage contains one of the cysteinyl residues of the reduced disulfide bridge of gamma. This peptide dissociates from the enzyme and can be isolated by gel filtration. The close proximity of the trypsin cleavage sites to the disulfide bond of gamma is discussed with respect to the effects of tryptic cleavage on the ATPase activity of CF1. The data indicate that structural changes in a limited region of the gamma subunit strongly influence the catalytic properties of both soluble and membrane-bound CF1. PMID:2864336

  2. Fluid Mechanical Matching of H+-ATP Synthase Subunit c-Ring with Lipid Membranes Revealed by 2H Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Masatoshi; Struts, Andrey V.; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Brown, Michael F.; Akutsu, Hideo

    2008-01-01

    The F1Fo-ATP synthase utilizes the transmembrane H+ gradient for the synthesis of ATP. Fo subunit c-ring plays a key role in transporting H+ through Fo in the membrane. We investigated the interactions of Escherichia coli subunit c with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC-d54) at lipid/protein ratios of 50:1 and 20:1 by means of 2H-solid-state NMR. In the liquid-crystalline state of DMPC, the 2H-NMR moment values and the order parameter (SCD) profile were little affected by the presence of subunit c, suggesting that the bilayer thickness in the liquid-crystalline state is matched to the transmembrane hydrophobic surface of subunit c. On the other hand, hydrophobic mismatch of subunit c with the lipid bilayer was observed in the gel state of DMPC. Moreover, the viscoelasticity represented by a square-law function of the 2H-NMR relaxation was also little influenced by subunit c in the fluid phase, in contrast with flexible nonionic detergents or rigid additives. Thus, the hydrophobic matching of the lipid bilayer to subunit c involves at least two factors, the hydrophobic length and the fluid mechanical property. These findings may be important for the torque generation in the rotary catalytic mechanism of the F1Fo-ATPse molecular motor. PMID:18310246

  3. PEST sequences in cAMP-dependent protein kinase subunits of the aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii are necessary for in vitro degradation by endogenous proteases.

    PubMed

    Borges, A C; Gomes, S L

    2000-05-01

    During Blastocladiella emersonii germination, the regulatory (R) and the catalytic (C) subunits of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) are rapidly and concurrently degraded, after PKA activation in response to a transient increase in intracellular cAMP levels. The possibility that PEST sequences could be acting as proteolytic recognition signals in this process was investigated, and high score PEST sequences were found in both B. emersonii R and C subunits. Deletions in the PEST sequences were obtained by site-directed mutagenesis and the different PKA subunits were independently expressed in Escherichia coli. Proteolysis assays of the various R and C recombinant forms, using B. emersonii cell extracts as the source of proteases, showed a strong correlation between the presence of high score PEST sequences and susceptibility to degradation. Furthermore, the amino-terminal sequence of the proteolytic fragments indicated that the cleavage sites in both subunits are located at or near the PEST regions. The PEST sequence in B. emersonii C subunit, which when deleted or disrupted leads to resistance to proteolysis, is entirely contained in the 72-amino-acid extension located in the N-terminus of the protein. C subunit mutants carrying deletions in this region displayed little difference in their kinetic properties or enzyme thermostability. These results suggest that the N-terminal extension may only play a role in C subunit degradation. PMID:10844679

  4. Residues in three conserved regions of the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase are required for quaternary structure

    SciTech Connect

    Fitchen, J.H.; McIntosh, L. ); Knight, S.; Andersson, I.; Branden, C.I. )

    1990-08-01

    To explore the role of individual residues in the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, small subunits with single amino acid substitutions in three regions of relative sequence conservation were produced by directed mutagenesis of the rbcS gene from Anabaena 7120. These altered small subunits were cosythesized with large subunits (from an expressed Anabaena rbcL gene) in Escherichia coli. Mutants were analyzed for effects on quaternary structure and catalytic activity. Changing Glu-13S (numbering used is that of the spinach enzyme) to Val, Trp-67S to Arg, Pro-73S to His, or Tyr-98S to Asn prevented accumulation of stable holoenzyme. Interpretation of these results using a model for the three-dimensional structure of the spinach enzyme based on x-ray crystallographic data suggests that our small subunit mutants containing substitutions at positions 13S and 67S probably do not assemble because of mispairing or nonpairing of charged residues on the interfacing surfaces of the large and small subunits. The failure of small subunits substituted at positions 73S or 98S to assemble correctly may result from disruption of intersubunit or intrasubunit hydrophobic pockets, respectively.

  5. Catalytic Microtube Rocket Igniter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Deans, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Devices that generate both high energy and high temperature are required to ignite reliably the propellant mixtures in combustion chambers like those present in rockets and other combustion systems. This catalytic microtube rocket igniter generates these conditions with a small, catalysis-based torch. While traditional spark plug systems can require anywhere from 50 W to multiple kW of power in different applications, this system has demonstrated ignition at less than 25 W. Reactants are fed to the igniter from the same tanks that feed the reactants to the rest of the rocket or combustion system. While this specific igniter was originally designed for liquid methane and liquid oxygen rockets, it can be easily operated with gaseous propellants or modified for hydrogen use in commercial combustion devices. For the present cryogenic propellant rocket case, the main propellant tanks liquid oxygen and liquid methane, respectively are regulated and split into different systems for the individual stages of the rocket and igniter. As the catalyst requires a gas phase for reaction, either the stored boil-off of the tanks can be used directly or one stream each of fuel and oxidizer can go through a heat exchanger/vaporizer that turns the liquid propellants into a gaseous form. For commercial applications, where the reactants are stored as gases, the system is simplified. The resulting gas-phase streams of fuel and oxidizer are then further divided for the individual components of the igniter. One stream each of the fuel and oxidizer is introduced to a mixing bottle/apparatus where they are mixed to a fuel-rich composition with an O/F mass-based mixture ratio of under 1.0. This premixed flow then feeds into the catalytic microtube device. The total flow is on the order of 0.01 g/s. The microtube device is composed of a pair of sub-millimeter diameter platinum tubes connected only at the outlet so that the two outlet flows are parallel to each other. The tubes are each

  6. Oxidant regulated inter-subunit disulfide bond formation between ASIC1a subunits

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Xiang-ming; Wang, Runping; Collier, Dan M.; Snyder, Peter M.; Wemmie, John A.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The acid-sensing ion channel-1a (ASIC1a) is composed of 3 subunits and is activated by a decrease in extracellular pH. It plays an important role in diseases associated with a reduced pH and production of oxidants. Previous work showed that oxidants reduce ASIC1a currents. However, the effects on channel structure and composition are unknown. We found that ASIC1a formed inter-subunit disulfide bonds and the oxidant H2O2 increased this link between subunits. Cys-495 in the ASIC1a C terminus was particularly important for inter-subunit disulfide bond formation, although other C-terminal cysteines contributed. Inter-subunit disulfide bonds also produced some ASIC1a complexes larger than trimers. Inter-subunit disulfide bond formation reduced the proportion of ASIC1a located on the cell surface and contributed to the H2O2-induced decrease in H+-gated current. These results indicate that channel function is controlled by disulfide bond formation between intracellular residues on distinct ASIC1a subunits. They also suggest a mechanism by which the redox state can dynamically regulate membrane protein activity by forming intracellular bridges. PMID:19218436

  7. Structure of the Cmr2 Subunit of the CRISPR-Cas RNA Silencing Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Cocozaki, Alexis I.; Ramia, Nancy F.; Shao, Yaming; Hale, Caryn R.; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.; Li, Hong

    2012-08-10

    Cmr2 is the largest and an essential subunit of a CRISPR RNA-Cas protein complex (the Cmr complex) that cleaves foreign RNA to protect prokaryotes from invading genetic elements. Cmr2 is thought to be the catalytic subunit of the effector complex because of its N-terminal HD nuclease domain. Here, however, we report that the HD domain of Cmr2 is not required for cleavage by the complex in vitro. The 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of Pyrococcus furiosus Cmr2 (lacking the HD domain) reveals two adenylyl cyclase-like and two {alpha}-helical domains. The adenylyl cyclase-like domains are arranged as in homodimeric adenylyl cyclases and bind ADP and divalent metals. However, mutagenesis studies show that the metal- and ADP-coordinating residues of Cmr2 are also not critical for cleavage by the complex. Our findings suggest that another component provides the catalytic function and that the essential role by Cmr2 does not require the identified ADP- or metal-binding or HD domains in vitro.

  8. Assembly of NADH: ubiquinone reductase (complex I) in Neurospora mitochondria. Independent pathways of nuclear-encoded and mitochondrially encoded subunits.

    PubMed

    Tuschen, G; Sackmann, U; Nehls, U; Haiker, H; Buse, G; Weiss, H

    1990-06-20

    NADH:ubiquinone reductase, the respiratory chain complex I of mitochondria, consists of some 25 nuclear-encoded and seven mitochondrially encoded subunits, and contains as redox groups one FMN, probably one internal ubiquinone and at least four iron-sulphur clusters. We are studying the assembly of the enzyme in Neurospora crassa. The flux of radioactivity in cells that were pulse-labelled with [35S]methionine was followed through immunoprecipitable assembly intermediates into the holoenzyme. Labelled polypeptides were observed to accumulate transiently in a Mr 350,000 intermediate complex. This complex contains all mitochondrially encoded subunits of the enzyme as well as subunits encoded in the nucleus that have no homologous counterparts in a small, merely nuclear-encoded form of the NADH:ubiquinone reductase made by Neurospora crassa cells poisoned with chloramphenicol. With regard to their subunit compositions, the assembly intermediate and small NADH:ubiquinone reductase complement each other almost perfectly to give the subunit composition of the large complex I. These results suggest that two pathways exist in the assembly of complex I that independently lead to the preassembly of two major parts, which subsequently join to form the complex. One preassembled part is related to the small form of NADH:ubiquinone reductase and contributes most of the nuclear-encoded subunits, FMN, three iron-sulphur clusters and the site for the internal ubiquinone. The other part is the assembly intermediate and contributes all mitochondrially encoded subunits, one iron-sulphur cluster and the catalytic site for the substrate ubiquinone. We discuss the results with regard to the evolution of the electron pathway through complex I. PMID:2141652

  9. Catalytic Mechanisms for Phosphotriesterases

    PubMed Central

    Bigley, Andrew N.; Raushel, Frank M.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphotriesters are one class of highly toxic synthetic compounds known as organophosphates. Wide spread usage of organophosphates as insecticides as well as nerve agents has lead to numerous efforts to identify enzymes capable of detoxifying them. A wide array of enzymes has been found to have phosphotriesterase activity including phosphotriesterase (PTE), methyl parathion hydrolase (MPH), organophosphorus acid anhydrolase (OPAA), diisopropylfluorophosphatase (DFP), and paraoxonase 1 (PON1). These enzymes differ widely in protein sequence and three-dimensional structure, as well as in catalytic mechanism, but they also share several common features. All of the enzymes identified as phosphotriesterases are metal-dependent hydrolases that contain a hydrophobic active site with three discrete binding pockets to accommodate the substrate ester groups. Activation of the substrate phosphorus center is achieved by a direct interaction between the phosphoryl oxygen and a divalent metal in the active site. The mechanistic details of the hydrolytic reaction differ among the various enzymes with both direct attack of a hydroxide as well as covalent catalysis being found. PMID:22561533

  10. Catalytic Membrane Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, T.J.; Brinker, C.J.; Gardner, T.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Sault, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    The proposed "catalytic membrane sensor" (CMS) was developed to generate a device which would selectively identify a specific reagent in a complex mixture of gases. This was to be accomplished by modifying an existing Hz sensor with a series of thin films. Through selectively sieving the desired component from a complex mixture and identifying it by decomposing it into Hz (and other by-products), a Hz sensor could then be used to detect the presence of the select component. The proposed "sandwich-type" modifications involved the deposition of a catalyst layered between two size selective sol-gel layers on a Pd/Ni resistive Hz sensor. The role of the catalyst was to convert organic materials to Hz and organic by-products. The role of the membraneo was to impart both chemical specificity by molecukir sieving of the analyte and converted product streams, as well as controlling access to the underlying Pd/Ni sensor. Ultimately, an array of these CMS elements encompassing different catalysts and membranes were to be developed which would enable improved selectivity and specificity from a compiex mixture of organic gases via pattern recognition methodologies. We have successfully generated a CMS device by a series of spin-coat deposited methods; however, it was determined that the high temperature required to activate the catalyst, destroys the sensor.

  11. CaMKII associates with CaV1.2 L-type calcium channels via selected β subunits to enhance regulatory phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Abiria, Sunday A.; Colbran, Roger J.

    2010-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) facilitates L-type Calcium Channel (LTCC) activity physiologically, but may exacerbate LTCC-dependent pathophysiology. We previously showed that CaMKII forms stable complexes with voltage-gated calcium channel β1b or β2a subunits, but not with the β3 or β4 subunits (Grueter et al 2008, Biochemistry, 47:1760–1767). CaMKII-dependent facilitation of CaV1.2 LTCCs requires Thr498 phosphorylation in the β2a subunit (Grueter et al, 2006, Mol Cell, 23:641–650), but the relationship of this modulation to CaMKII interactions with LTCC subunits is unknown. Here we show that CaMKII co-immunoprecipitates with forebrain LTCCs that contain CaV1.2α1 and β1 or β2 subunits, but is not detected in LTCC complexes containing β4 subunits.4 CaMKIIα can be specifically tethered to the I/II linker of CaV1.2α1 subunits in vitro by the β1b or β2a subunits. Efficient targeting of CaMKIIα to the full-length CaV1.2α1 subunit in transfected HEK293 cells requires CaMKII binding to the β2a subunit. Moreover, disruption of CaMKII binding substantially reduced phosphorylation of β2a at Thr498 within the LTCC complex, without altering overall phosphorylation of Cav1.2α1 and β subunits. These findings demonstrate a biochemical mechanism underlying LTCC facilitation by CaMKII. PMID:19840220

  12. Catalytic Enantioselective Synthesis of Halocyclopropanes.

    PubMed

    Pons, Amandine; Ivashkin, Pavel; Poisson, Thomas; Charette, André B; Pannecoucke, Xavier; Jubault, Philippe

    2016-04-25

    A catalytic asymmetric synthesis of halocyclopropanes is described. The developed method is based on a carbenoid cyclopropanation of 2-haloalkenes with tert-butyl α-cyano-α-diazoacetate using a chiral rhodium catalyst that permits access to a broad range of highly functionalized chiral halocyclopropanes (F, Cl, Br, and I) in good yields, moderate diastereoselectivity, and excellent enantiomeric ratios. The reported methodology represents the first general catalytic enantioselective approach to halocyclopropanes. PMID:26945553

  13. Glucosidase II β Subunit Modulates N-Glycan Trimming in Fission Yeasts and Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Stigliano, Ivan D.; Caramelo, Julio J.; Labriola, Carlos A.; Parodi, Armando J.

    2009-01-01

    Glucosidase II (GII) plays a key role in glycoprotein biogenesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). It is responsible for the sequential removal of the two innermost glucose residues from the glycan (Glc3Man9GlcNAc2) transferred to Asn residues in proteins. GII participates in the calnexin/calreticulin cycle; it removes the single glucose unit added to folding intermediates and misfolded glycoproteins by the UDP-Glc:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase. GII is a heterodimer whose α subunit (GIIα) bears the glycosyl hydrolase active site, whereas its β subunit (GIIβ) role is controversial and has been reported to be involved in GIIα ER retention and folding. Here, we report that in the absence of GIIβ, the catalytic subunit GIIα of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (an organism displaying a glycoprotein folding quality control mechanism similar to that occurring in mammalian cells) folds to an active conformation able to hydrolyze p-nitrophenyl α-d-glucopyranoside. However, the heterodimer is required to efficiently deglucosylate the physiological substrates Glc2Man9GlcNAc2 (G2M9) and Glc1Man9GlcNAc2 (G1M9). The interaction of the mannose 6-phosphate receptor homologous domain present in GIIβ and mannoses in the B and/or C arms of the glycans mediates glycan hydrolysis enhancement. We present evidence that also in mammalian cells GIIβ modulates G2M9 and G1M9 trimming. PMID:19605557

  14. A single subunit, Dis3, is essentially responsible for yeast exosome core activity.

    PubMed

    Dziembowski, Andrzej; Lorentzen, Esben; Conti, Elena; Séraphin, Bertrand

    2007-01-01

    The conserved core of the exosome, the major eukaryotic 3' --> 5' exonuclease, contains nine subunits that form a ring similar to the phosphorolytic bacterial PNPase and archaeal exosome, as well as Dis3. Dis3 is homologous to bacterial RNase II, a hydrolytic enzyme. Previous studies have suggested that all subunits are active 3' --> 5' exoRNases. We show here that Dis3 is responsible for exosome core activity. The purified exosome core has a hydrolytic, processive and Mg(2+)-dependent activity with characteristics similar to those of recombinant Dis3. Moreover, a catalytically inactive Dis3 mutant has no exosome core activity in vitro and shows in vivo RNA degradation phenotypes similar to those resulting from exosome depletion. In contrast, mutations in Rrp41, the only subunit carrying a conserved phosphorolytic site, appear phenotypically not different from wild-type yeast. We observed that the yeast exosome ring mediates interactions with protein partners, providing an explanation for its essential function. PMID:17173052

  15. Crystal Structure of the 25 kDa Subunit of Human Cleavage Factor I{m}

    SciTech Connect

    Coseno,M.; Martin, G.; Berger, C.; Gilmartin, G.; Keller, W.; Doublie, S.

    2008-01-01

    Cleavage factor Im is an essential component of the pre-messenger RNA 3'-end processing machinery in higher eukaryotes, participating in both the polyadenylation and cleavage steps. Cleavage factor Im is an oligomer composed of a small 25 kDa subunit (CF Im25) and a variable larger subunit of either 59, 68 or 72 kDa. The small subunit also interacts with RNA, poly(A) polymerase, and the nuclear poly(A)-binding protein. These protein-protein interactions are thought to be facilitated by the Nudix domain of CF Im25, a hydrolase motif with a characteristic {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} fold and a conserved catalytic sequence or Nudix box. We present here the crystal structures of human CF Im25 in its free and diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A) bound forms at 1.85 and 1.80 Angstroms, respectively. CF Im25 crystallizes as a dimer and presents the classical Nudix fold. Results from crystallographic and biochemical experiments suggest that CF Im25 makes use of its Nudix fold to bind but not hydrolyze ATP and Ap4A. The complex and apo protein structures provide insight into the active oligomeric state of CF Im and suggest a possible role of nucleotide binding in either the polyadenylation and/or cleavage steps of pre-messenger RNA 3'-end processing.

  16. Reconstitution of CF IA from overexpressed subunits reveals stoichiometry and provides insights into molecular topology

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, James; Shikov, Sergei; Kuehner, Jason N.; Liriano, Melissa; Lee, Eunhee; Stafford, Walter; Poulsen, Mathias Bach; Harrison, Celia; Moore, Claire; Bohm, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Yeast Cleavage Factor I (CF I) is an essential complex of five proteins that binds signal sequences at the 3′ end of yeast mRNA. CF I is required for correct positioning of a larger protein complex, CPF, which contains the catalytic subunits executing mRNA cleavage and polyadenylation. CF I is composed of two parts, CF IA and Hrp1. The CF IA has only four subunits, Rna14, Rna15, Pcf11, and Clp1, but the structural organization has not been fully established. Using biochemical and biophysical methods, we demonstrate that CF IA can be reconstituted from bacterially-expressed proteins and that it has 2:2:1:1 stoichiometry of its four proteins, respectively. We also describe mutations that disrupt the dimer interface of Rna14 while preserving the other subunit interactions. Based on our results and existing interaction data, we present a topological model for heterohexameric CF IA and its association with RNA and Hrp1. PMID:22026644

  17. Subunits of the Drosophila CCR4-NOT complex and their roles in mRNA deadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Temme, Claudia; Zhang, Lianbing; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Ihling, Christian; Chartier, Aymeric; Sinz, Andrea; Simonelig, Martine; Wahle, Elmar

    2010-01-01

    The CCR4-NOT complex is the main enzyme catalyzing the deadenylation of mRNA. We have investigated the composition of this complex in Drosophila melanogaster by immunoprecipitation with a monoclonal antibody directed against NOT1. The CCR4, CAF1 (=POP2), NOT1, NOT2, NOT3, and CAF40 subunits were associated in a stable complex, but NOT4 was not. Factors known to be involved in mRNA regulation were prominent among the other proteins coprecipitated with the CCR4-NOT complex, as analyzed by mass spectrometry. The complex was localized mostly in the cytoplasm but did not appear to be a major component of P bodies. Of the known CCR4 paralogs, Nocturnin was found associated with the subunits of the CCR4-NOT complex, whereas Angel and 3635 were not. RNAi experiments in Schneider cells showed that CAF1, NOT1, NOT2, and NOT3 are required for bulk poly(A) shortening and hsp70 mRNA deadenylation, but knock-down of CCR4, CAF40, and NOT4 did not affect these processes. Overexpression of catalytically dead CAF1 had a dominant-negative effect on mRNA decay. In contrast, overexpression of inactive CCR4 had no effect. We conclude that CAF1 is the major catalytically important subunit of the CCR4-NOT complex in Drosophila Schneider cells. Nocturnin may also be involved in mRNA deadenylation, whereas there is no evidence for a similar role of Angel and 3635. PMID:20504953

  18. Apo- and Cellopentaose-bound Structures of the Bacterial Cellulose Synthase Subunit BcsZ

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, Olga; Zimmer, Jochen

    2012-10-25

    Cellulose, a very abundant extracellular polysaccharide, is synthesized in a finely tuned process that involves the activity of glycosyl-transferases and hydrolases. The cellulose microfibril consists of bundles of linear {beta}-1,4-glucan chains that are synthesized inside the cell; however, the mechanism by which these polymers traverse the cell membrane is currently unknown. In Gram-negative bacteria, the cellulose synthase complex forms a trans-envelope complex consisting of at least four subunits. Although three of these subunits account for the synthesis and translocation of the polysaccharide, the fourth subunit, BcsZ, is a periplasmic protein with endo-{beta}-1,4-glucanase activity. BcsZ belongs to family eight of glycosyl-hydrolases, and its activity is required for optimal synthesis and membrane translocation of cellulose. In this study we report two crystal structures of BcsZ from Escherichia coli. One structure shows the wild-type enzyme in its apo form, and the second structure is for a catalytically inactive mutant of BcsZ in complex with the substrate cellopentaose. The structures demonstrate that BcsZ adopts an ({alpha}/{alpha}){sub 6}-barrel fold and that it binds four glucan moieties of cellopentaose via highly conserved residues exclusively on the nonreducing side of its catalytic center. Thus, the BcsZ-cellopentaose structure most likely represents a posthydrolysis state in which the newly formed nonreducing end has already left the substrate binding pocket while the enzyme remains attached to the truncated polysaccharide chain. We further show that BcsZ efficiently degrades {beta}-1,4-glucans in in vitro cellulase assays with carboxymethyl-cellulose as substrate.

  19. An abnormal N-heterocyclic carbene based nickel complex for catalytic reduction of nitroarenes.

    PubMed

    Vijaykumar, Gonela; Mandal, Swadhin K

    2016-05-01

    Herein we report the synthesis of a nickel(ii) dichloro complex bearing an abnormal N-heterocyclic carbene (aNHC). The NiCl2(aNHC)2 complex has been used as an efficient catalyst for the reduction of nitroarenes with hydrosilanes to give aromatic amines in good to excellent yields. This catalytic protocol can tolerate functional groups such as halides, alkenes or nitriles. Furthermore, the longevity of the catalyst was tested in successive catalytic cycles, which indicates a sustained catalytic activity over multiple catalytic cycles. PMID:27041677

  20. Tau pathology involves protein phosphatase 2A in parkinsonism-dementia of Guam.

    PubMed

    Arif, Mohammad; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Garruto, Ralph M; Iqbal, Khalid

    2014-01-21

    Parkinsonism-dementia (PD) of Guam is a neurodegenerative disease with parkinsonism and early-onset Alzheimer-like dementia associated with neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein, tau. β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) has been suspected of being involved in the etiology of PD, but the mechanism by which BMAA leads to tau hyperphosphorylation is not known. We found a decrease in protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity associated with an increase in inhibitory phosphorylation of its catalytic subunit PP2Ac at Tyr(307) and abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau in brains of patients who had Guam PD. To test the possible involvement of BMAA in the etiopathogenesis of PD, we studied the effect of this environmental neurotoxin on PP2A activity and tau hyperphosphorylation in mouse primary neuronal cultures and metabolically active rat brain slices. BMAA treatment significantly decreased PP2A activity, with a concomitant increase in tau kinase activity resulting in elevated tau hyperphosphorylation at PP2A favorable sites. Moreover, we found an increase in the phosphorylation of PP2Ac at Tyr(307) in BMAA-treated rat brains. Pretreatment with metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) and Src antagonists blocked the BMAA-induced inhibition of PP2A and the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, indicating the involvement of an Src-dependent PP2A pathway. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that BMAA treatment dissociated PP2Ac from mGluR5, making it available for phosphorylation at Tyr(307). These findings suggest a scenario in which BMAA can lead to tau pathology by inhibiting PP2A through the activation of mGluR5, the consequent release of PP2Ac from the mGluR5-PP2A complex, and its phosphorylation at Tyr(307) by Src. PMID:24395787

  1. Tau pathology involves protein phosphatase 2A in Parkinsonism-dementia of Guam

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Mohammad; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Garruto, Ralph M.; Iqbal, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Parkinsonism-dementia (PD) of Guam is a neurodegenerative disease with parkinsonism and early-onset Alzheimer-like dementia associated with neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein, tau. β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) has been suspected of being involved in the etiology of PD, but the mechanism by which BMAA leads to tau hyperphosphorylation is not known. We found a decrease in protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity associated with an increase in inhibitory phosphorylation of its catalytic subunit PP2Ac at Tyr307 and abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau in brains of patients who had Guam PD. To test the possible involvement of BMAA in the etiopathogenesis of PD, we studied the effect of this environmental neurotoxin on PP2A activity and tau hyperphosphorylation in mouse primary neuronal cultures and metabolically active rat brain slices. BMAA treatment significantly decreased PP2A activity, with a concomitant increase in tau kinase activity resulting in elevated tau hyperphosphorylation at PP2A favorable sites. Moreover, we found an increase in the phosphorylation of PP2Ac at Tyr307 in BMAA-treated rat brains. Pretreatment with metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) and Src antagonists blocked the BMAA-induced inhibition of PP2A and the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, indicating the involvement of an Src-dependent PP2A pathway. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that BMAA treatment dissociated PP2Ac from mGluR5, making it available for phosphorylation at Tyr307. These findings suggest a scenario in which BMAA can lead to tau pathology by inhibiting PP2A through the activation of mGluR5, the consequent release of PP2Ac from the mGluR5–PP2A complex, and its phosphorylation at Tyr307 by Src. PMID:24395787

  2. Lyn sustains oncogenic signaling in chronic lymphocytic leukemia by strengthening SET-mediated inhibition of PP2A.

    PubMed

    Zonta, Francesca; Pagano, Mario Angelo; Trentin, Livio; Tibaldi, Elena; Frezzato, Federica; Trimarco, Valentina; Facco, Monica; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Pavan, Valeria; Ribaudo, Giovanni; Bordin, Luciana; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Brunati, Anna Maria

    2015-06-11

    Aberrant protein kinase activities, and the consequent dramatic increase of Ser/Thr and -Tyr phosphorylation, promote the deregulation of the survival pathways in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), which is crucial to the pathogenesis and progression of the disease. In this study, we show that the tumor suppressor protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), one of the major Ser/Thr phosphatases, is in an inhibited form because of the synergistic contribution of 2 events, the interaction with its physiologic inhibitor SET and the phosphorylation of Y307 of the catalytic subunit of PP2A. The latter event is mediated by Lyn, a Src family kinase previously found to be overexpressed, delocalized, and constitutively active in CLL cells. This Lyn/PP2A axis accounts for the persistent high level of phosphorylation of the phosphatase's targets and represents a key connection linking phosphotyrosine- and phosphoserine/threonine-mediated oncogenic signals. The data herein presented show that the disruption of the SET/PP2A complex by a novel FTY720-analog (MP07-66) devoid of immunosuppressive effects leads to the reactivation of PP2A, which in turn triggers apoptosis of CLL cells. When used in combination with SFK inhibitors, the action of MP07-66 is synergistically amplified, providing a new option in the therapeutic strategy for CLL patients. PMID:25931585

  3. Movements of the ɛ-subunit during catalysis and activation in single membrane-bound H+-ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Boris; Diez, Manuel; Zarrabi, Nawid; Gräber, Peter; Börsch, Michael

    2005-01-01

    F0F1-ATP synthases catalyze proton transport-coupled ATP synthesis in bacteria, chloroplasts, and mitochondria. In these complexes, the ɛ-subunit is involved in the catalytic reaction and the activation of the enzyme. Fluorescence-labeled F0F1 from Escherichia coli was incorporated into liposomes. Single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) revealed that the ɛ-subunit rotates stepwise showing three distinct distances to the b-subunits in the peripheral stalk. Rotation occurred in opposite directions during ATP synthesis and hydrolysis. Analysis of the dwell times of each FRET state revealed different reactivities of the three catalytic sites that depended on the relative orientation of ɛ during rotation. Proton transport through the enzyme in the absence of nucleotides led to conformational changes of ɛ. When the enzyme was inactive (i.e. in the absence of substrates or without membrane energization), three distances were found again, which differed from those of the active enzyme. The three states of the inactive enzyme were unequally populated. We conclude that the active–inactive transition was associated with a conformational change of ɛ within the central stalk. PMID:15920483

  4. Structural Comparison, Substrate Specificity, and Inhibitor Binding of AGPase Small Subunit from Monocot and Dicot: Present Insight and Future Potential

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Manabendra D.; Modi, Mahendra K.

    2014-01-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) is the first rate limiting enzyme of starch biosynthesis pathway and has been exploited as the target for greater starch yield in several plants. The structure-function analysis and substrate binding specificity of AGPase have provided enormous potential for understanding the role of specific amino acid or motifs responsible for allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanisms, which facilitate the engineering of AGPases. We report the three-dimensional structure, substrate, and inhibitor binding specificity of AGPase small subunit from different monocot and dicot crop plants. Both monocot and dicot subunits were found to exploit similar interactions with the substrate and inhibitor molecule as in the case of their closest homologue potato tuber AGPase small subunit. Comparative sequence and structural analysis followed by molecular docking and electrostatic surface potential analysis reveal that rearrangements of secondary structure elements, substrate, and inhibitor binding residues are strongly conserved and follow common folding pattern and orientation within monocot and dicot displaying a similar mode of allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanism. The results from this study along with site-directed mutagenesis complemented by molecular dynamics simulation will shed more light on increasing the starch content of crop plants to ensure the food security worldwide. PMID:25276800

  5. Blocking protein phosphatase 2A signaling prevents endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and renal fibrosis: a peptide-based drug therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yuanjun; Guo, Yanyan; Liu, Ping; Zeng, Rui; Ning, Yong; Pei, Guangchang; Li, Yueqiang; Chen, Meixue; Guo, Shuiming; Li, Xiaoqing; Han, Min; Xu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) contributes to the emergence of fibroblasts and plays a significant role in renal interstitial fibrosis. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a major serine/threonine protein phosphatase in eukaryotic cells and regulates many signaling pathways. However, the significance of PP2A in EndMT is poorly understood. In present study, the role of PP2A in EndMT was evaluated. We demonstrated that PP2A activated in endothelial cells (EC) during their EndMT phenotype acquisition and in the mouse model of obstructive nephropathy (i.e., UUO). Inhibition of PP2A activity by its specific inhibitor prevented EC undergoing EndMT. Importantly, PP2A activation was dependent on tyrosine nitration at 127 in the catalytic subunit of PP2A (PP2Ac). Our renal-protective strategy was to block tyrosine127 nitration to inhibit PP2A activation by using a mimic peptide derived from PP2Ac conjugating a cell penetrating peptide (CPP: TAT), termed TAT-Y127WT. Pretreatment withTAT-Y127WT was able to prevent TGF-β1-induced EndMT. Administration of the peptide to UUO mice significantly ameliorated renal EndMT level, with preserved density of peritubular capillaries and reduction in extracellular matrix deposition. Taken together, these results suggest that inhibiting PP2Ac nitration using a mimic peptide is a potential preventive strategy for EndMT in renal fibrosis.

  6. Genetic exploration of interactive domains in RNA polymerase II subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, C; Okamura, S; Young, R

    1990-01-01

    The two large subunits of RNA polymerase II, RPB1 and RPB2, contain regions of extensive homology to the two large subunits of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. These homologous regions may represent separate protein domains with unique functions. We investigated whether suppressor genetics could provide evidence for interactions between specific segments of RPB1 and RPB2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A plasmid shuffle method was used to screen thoroughly for mutations in RPB2 that suppress a temperature-sensitive mutation, rpb1-1, which is located in region H of RPB1. All six RPB2 mutations that suppress rpb1-1 were clustered in region I of RPB2. The location of these mutations and the observation that they were allele specific for suppression of rpb1-1 suggests an interaction between region H of RPB1 and region I of RPB2. A similar experiment was done to isolate and map mutations in RPB1 that suppress a temperature-sensitive mutation, rpb2-2, which occurs in region I of RPB2. These suppressor mutations were not clustered in a particular region. Thus, fine structure suppressor genetics can provide evidence for interactions between specific segments of two proteins, but the results of this type of analysis can depend on the conditional mutation to be suppressed. Images PMID:2183012

  7. Recent Advances in Subunit Vaccine Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Vartak, Abhishek; Sucheck, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    The lower immunogenicity of synthetic subunit antigens, compared to live attenuated vaccines, is being addressed with improved vaccine carriers. Recent reports indicate that the physio-chemical properties of these carriers can be altered to achieve optimal antigen presentation, endosomal escape, particle bio-distribution, and cellular trafficking. The carriers can be modified with various antigens and ligands for dendritic cells targeting. They can also be modified with adjuvants, either covalently or entrapped in the matrix, to improve cellular and humoral immune responses against the antigen. As a result, these multi-functional carrier systems are being explored for use in active immunotherapy against cancer and infectious diseases. Advancing technology, improved analytical methods, and use of computational methodology have also contributed to the development of subunit vaccine carriers. This review details recent breakthroughs in the design of nano-particulate vaccine carriers, including liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, and inorganic nanoparticles. PMID:27104575

  8. Recent Advances in Subunit Vaccine Carriers.

    PubMed

    Vartak, Abhishek; Sucheck, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    The lower immunogenicity of synthetic subunit antigens, compared to live attenuated vaccines, is being addressed with improved vaccine carriers. Recent reports indicate that the physio-chemical properties of these carriers can be altered to achieve optimal antigen presentation, endosomal escape, particle bio-distribution, and cellular trafficking. The carriers can be modified with various antigens and ligands for dendritic cells targeting. They can also be modified with adjuvants, either covalently or entrapped in the matrix, to improve cellular and humoral immune responses against the antigen. As a result, these multi-functional carrier systems are being explored for use in active immunotherapy against cancer and infectious diseases. Advancing technology, improved analytical methods, and use of computational methodology have also contributed to the development of subunit vaccine carriers. This review details recent breakthroughs in the design of nano-particulate vaccine carriers, including liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, and inorganic nanoparticles. PMID:27104575

  9. Tight Binding of the Phosphorylated α Subunit of Initiation Factor 2 (eIF2α) to the Regulatory Subunits of Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor eIF2B Is Required for Inhibition of Translation Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Thanuja; Pavitt, Graham D.; Zhang, Fan; Dever, Thomas E.; Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    2001-01-01

    Translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2) is a heterotrimeric protein that transfers methionyl-initiator tRNAMet to the small ribosomal subunit in a ternary complex with GTP. The eIF2 phosphorylated on serine 51 of its α subunit [eIF2(αP)] acts as competitive inhibitor of its guanine nucleotide exchange factor, eIF2B, impairing formation of the ternary complex and thereby inhibiting translation initiation. eIF2B is comprised of catalytic and regulatory subcomplexes harboring independent eIF2 binding sites; however, it was unknown whether the α subunit of eIF2 directly contacts any eIF2B subunits or whether this interaction is modulated by phosphorylation. We found that recombinant eIF2α (glutathione S-transferase [GST]–SUI2) bound to the eIF2B regulatory subcomplex in vitro, in a manner stimulated by Ser-51 phosphorylation. Genetic data suggest that this direct interaction also occurred in vivo, allowing overexpressed SUI2 to compete with eIF2(αP) holoprotein for binding to the eIF2B regulatory subcomplex. Mutations in SUI2 and in the eIF2B regulatory subunit GCD7 that eliminated inhibition of eIF2B by eIF2(αP) also impaired binding of phosphorylated GST-SUI2 to the eIF2B regulatory subunits. These findings provide strong evidence that tight binding of phosphorylated SUI2 to the eIF2B regulatory subcomplex is crucial for the inhibition of eIF2B and attendant downregulation of protein synthesis exerted by eIF2(αP). We propose that this regulatory interaction prevents association of the eIF2B catalytic subcomplex with the β and γ subunits of eIF2 in the manner required for GDP-GTP exchange. PMID:11438658

  10. NMR solution structure of the theta subunit of DNA polymerase III from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Keniry, M. A.; Berthon, H. A.; Yang, J. Y.; Miles, C. S.; Dixon, N. E.

    2000-01-01

    The catalytic core of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III contains three tightly associated subunits (alpha, epsilon, and theta). The theta subunit is the smallest, but the least understood of the three. As a first step in a program aimed at understanding its function, the structure of the theta subunit has been determined by triple-resonance multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Although only a small protein, theta was difficult to assign fully because approximately one-third of the protein is unstructured, and some sections of the remaining structured parts undergo intermediate intramolecular exchange. The secondary structure was deduced from the characteristic nuclear Overhauser effect patterns, the 3J(HN alpha) coupling constants and the consensus chemical shift index. The C-terminal third of the protein, which has many charged and hydrophilic amino acid residues, has no well-defined secondary structure and exists in a highly dynamic state. The N-terminal two-thirds has three helical segments (Gln10-Asp19, Glu38-Glu43, and His47-Glu54), one short extended segment (Pro34-Ala37), and a long loop (Ala20-Glu29), of which part may undergo intermediate conformational exchange. Solution of the three-dimensional structure by NMR techniques revealed that the helices fold in such a way that the surface of theta is bipolar, with one face of the protein containing most of the acidic residues and the other face containing most of the long chain basic residues. Preliminary chemical shift mapping experiments with a domain of the epsilon subunit have identified a loop region (Ala20-Glu29) in theta as the site of association with epsilon. PMID:10794414

  11. Rotenone Activates Phagocyte NADPH Oxidase through Binding to Its Membrane Subunit gp91phox

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Feng; Chen, Shih-heng; Zhang, Dan; Wilson, Belinda; Hong, Jau-shyong; Gao, Hui-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Rotenone, a widely used pesticide, reproduces Parkinsonism in rodents and associates with increased risk for Parkinson’s disease. We previously reported rotenone increased superoxide production through stimulating microglial phagocyte NADPH oxidase (PHOX). The present study identified a novel mechanism by which rotenone activates PHOX. Ligand-binding assay revealed that rotenone directly bound to membrane gp91phox, the catalytic subunit of PHOX; such binding was inhibited by diphenyleneiodonium, a PHOX inhibitor with a binding site on gp91phox. Functional studies showed both membrane and cytosolic subunits were required for rotenone-induced superoxide production in cell-free systems, intact phagocytes, and COS7 cells transfected with membrane subunits (gp91phox/p22phox) and cytosolic subunits (p67phox and p47phox). Rotenone-elicited extracellular superoxide release in p47phox-deficient macrophages suggested rotenone enabled to activate PHOX through a p47phox-independent mechanism. Increased membrane translocation of p67phox, elevated binding of p67phox to rotenone-treated membrane fractions, and co-immunoprecipitation of p67phox and gp91phox in rotenone-treated wild-type and p47phox-deficient macrophages indicated p67phox played a critical role in rotenone-induced PHOX activation via its direct interaction with gp91phox. Rac1, a Rho-like small GTPase, enhanced p67phox-gp91phox interaction; Rac1 inhibition decreased rotenone-elicited superoxide release. In conclusion, rotenone directly interacted with gp91phox; such an interaction triggered membrane translocation of p67phox, leading to PHOX activation and superoxide production. PMID:22094225

  12. Staggering of subunits in NMDAR channels.

    PubMed Central

    Sobolevsky, Alexander I; Rooney, LeeAnn; Wollmuth, Lonnie P

    2002-01-01

    Functional N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are heteromultimers formed by NR1 and NR2 subunits. The M3 segment, as contributed by NR1, forms the core of the extracellular vestibule, including binding sites for channel blockers, and represents a critical molecular link between ligand binding and channel opening. Taking advantage of the substituted cysteine accessibility method along with channel block and multivalent coordination, we studied the contribution of the M3 segment in NR2C to the extracellular vestibule. We find that the M3 segment in NR2C, like that in NR1, contributes to the core of the extracellular vestibule. However, the M3 segments from the two subunits are staggered relative to each other in the vertical axis of the channel. Compared to NR1, homologous positions in NR2C, including those in the highly conserved SYTANLAAF motif, are located about four amino acids more externally. The staggering of subunits may represent a key structural feature underlying the distinct functional properties of NMDARs. PMID:12496098

  13. Phosphorylation of Leukotriene C4 Synthase at Serine 36 Impairs Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shabbir; Ytterberg, A Jimmy; Thulasingam, Madhuranayaki; Tholander, Fredrik; Bergman, Tomas; Zubarev, Roman; Wetterholm, Anders; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes; Haeggström, Jesper Z

    2016-08-26

    Leukotriene C4 synthase (LTC4S) catalyzes the formation of the proinflammatory lipid mediator leukotriene C4 (LTC4). LTC4 is the parent molecule of the cysteinyl leukotrienes, which are recognized for their pathogenic role in asthma and allergic diseases. Cellular LTC4S activity is suppressed by PKC-mediated phosphorylation, and recently a downstream p70S6k was shown to play an important role in this process. Here, we identified Ser(36) as the major p70S6k phosphorylation site, along with a low frequency site at Thr(40), using an in vitro phosphorylation assay combined with mass spectrometry. The functional consequences of p70S6k phosphorylation were tested with the phosphomimetic mutant S36E, which displayed only about 20% (20 μmol/min/mg) of the activity of WT enzyme (95 μmol/min/mg), whereas the enzyme activity of T40E was not significantly affected. The enzyme activity of S36E increased linearly with increasing LTA4 concentrations during the steady-state kinetics analysis, indicating poor lipid substrate binding. The Ser(36) is located in a loop region close to the entrance of the proposed substrate binding pocket. Comparative molecular dynamics indicated that Ser(36) upon phosphorylation will pull the first luminal loop of LTC4S toward the neighboring subunit of the functional homotrimer, thereby forming hydrogen bonds with Arg(104) in the adjacent subunit. Because Arg(104) is a key catalytic residue responsible for stabilization of the glutathione thiolate anion, this phosphorylation-induced interaction leads to a reduction of the catalytic activity. In addition, the positional shift of the loop and its interaction with the neighboring subunit affect active site access. Thus, our mutational and kinetic data, together with molecular simulations, suggest that phosphorylation of Ser(36) inhibits the catalytic function of LTC4S by interference with the catalytic machinery. PMID:27365393

  14. Comprehensive Characterization of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Catalytic Domain by Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Deyang; Peng, Ying; Ayaz-Guner, Serife; Gregorich, Zachery R.; Ge, Ying

    2016-02-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is essential in regulating energy metabolism in all eukaryotic cells. It is a heterotrimeric protein complex composed of a catalytic subunit (α) and two regulatory subunits (β and γ). C-terminal truncation of AMPKα at residue 312 yielded a protein that is active upon phosphorylation of Thr172 in the absence of β and γ subunits, which is refered to as the AMPK catalytic domain and commonly used to substitute for the AMPK heterotrimeric complex in in vitro kinase assays. However, a comprehensive characterization of the AMPK catalytic domain is lacking. Herein, we expressed a His-tagged human AMPK catalytic domin (denoted as AMPKΔ) in E. coli, comprehensively characterized AMPKΔ in its basal state and after in vitro phosphorylation using top-down mass spectrometry (MS), and assessed how phosphorylation of AMPKΔ affects its activity. Unexpectedly, we found that bacterially-expressed AMPKΔ was basally phosphorylated and localized the phosphorylation site to the His-tag. We found that AMPKΔ had noticeable basal activity and was capable of phosphorylating itself and its substrates without activating phosphorylation at Thr172. Moreover, our data suggested that Thr172 is the only site phosphorylated by its upstream kinase, liver kinase B1, and that this phosphorylation dramatically increases the kinase activity of AMPKΔ. Importantly, we demonstrated that top-down MS in conjunction with in vitro phosphorylation assay is a powerful approach for monitoring phosphorylation reaction and determining sequential order of phosphorylation events in kinase-substrate systems.

  15. Catalytic combustion with steam injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.; Tacina, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of steam injection on (1) catalytic combustion performance, and (2) the tendency of residual fuel to burn in the premixing duct upstream of the catalytic reactor were determined. A petroleum residual, no. 2 diesel, and a blend of middle and heavy distillate coal derived fuels were tested. Fuel and steam were injected together into the preheated airflow entering a 12 cm diameter catalytic combustion test section. The inlet air velocity and pressure were constant at 10 m/s and 600 kPa, respectively. Steam flow rates were varied from 24 percent to 52 percent of the air flow rate. The resulting steam air mixture temperatures varied from 630 to 740 K. Combustion temperatures were in the range of 1200 to 1400 K. The steam had little effect on combustion efficiency or emissions. It was concluded that the steam acts as a diluent which has no adverse effect on catalytic combustion performance for no. 2 diesel and coal derived liquid fuels. Tests with the residual fuel showed that upstream burning could be eliminated with steam injection rates greater than 30 percent of the air flow rate, but inlet mixture temperatures were too low to permit stable catalytic combustion of this fuel.

  16. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the soluble domain of the oligosaccharyltransferase STT3 subunit from the thermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    SciTech Connect

    Igura, Mayumi; Maita, Nobuo; Obita, Takayuki; Kamishikiryo, Jun; Maenaka, Katsumi; Kohda, Daisuke

    2007-09-01

    The C-terminal soluble domain of the catalytic subunit (STT3) of the oligosaccharyltransferase from P. furiosus was purified and crystallized. A native crystal and a SeMet derivative have been analyzed using X-ray diffraction. Oligosaccharyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of preassembled oligosaccharides onto asparagine residues in nascent polypeptide chains. The STT3 subunit is thought to bear the catalytic site. The C-terminal domain of the STT3 protein of Pyrococcus furiosus was expressed in Escherichia coli cells. STT3 protein prepared from two different sources, the soluble fraction and the inclusion bodies, produced crystals that diffracted to 2.7 Å. During crystallization screening, cocrystals of P. furiosus STT3 with an E. coli 50S ribosomal protein, L7/L12, were accidentally obtained. This cross-species interaction is not biologically relevant, but may be used to design a built-in polypeptide substrate for the STT3 crystals.

  17. Na Channel β Subunits: Overachievers of the Ion Channel Family.

    PubMed

    Brackenbury, William J; Isom, Lori L

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) in mammals contain a pore-forming α subunit and one or more β subunits. There are five mammalian β subunits in total: β1, β1B, β2, β3, and β4, encoded by four genes: SCN1B-SCN4B. With the exception of the SCN1B splice variant, β1B, the β subunits are type I topology transmembrane proteins. In contrast, β1B lacks a transmembrane domain and is a secreted protein. A growing body of work shows that VGSC β subunits are multifunctional. While they do not form the ion channel pore, β subunits alter gating, voltage-dependence, and kinetics of VGSCα subunits and thus regulate cellular excitability in vivo. In addition to their roles in channel modulation, β subunits are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules and regulate cell adhesion and migration. β subunits are also substrates for sequential proteolytic cleavage by secretases. An example of the multifunctional nature of β subunits is β1, encoded by SCN1B, that plays a critical role in neuronal migration and pathfinding during brain development, and whose function is dependent on Na(+) current and γ-secretase activity. Functional deletion of SCN1B results in Dravet Syndrome, a severe and intractable pediatric epileptic encephalopathy. β subunits are emerging as key players in a wide variety of physiopathologies, including epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, multiple sclerosis, Huntington's disease, neuropsychiatric disorders, neuropathic and inflammatory pain, and cancer. β subunits mediate multiple signaling pathways on different timescales, regulating electrical excitability, adhesion, migration, pathfinding, and transcription. Importantly, some β subunit functions may operate independently of α subunits. Thus, β subunits perform critical roles during development and disease. As such, they may prove useful in disease diagnosis and therapy. PMID:22007171

  18. Coordinated DNA dynamics during the human telomerase catalytic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Joseph W.; Stone, Michael D.

    2014-06-01

    The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) utilizes a template within the integral RNA subunit (hTR) to direct extension of telomeres. Telomerase exhibits repeat addition processivity (RAP) and must therefore translocate the nascent DNA product into a new RNA:DNA hybrid register to prime each round of telomere repeat synthesis. Here, we use single-molecule FRET and nuclease protection assays to monitor telomere DNA structure and dynamics during the telomerase catalytic cycle. DNA translocation during RAP proceeds through a previously uncharacterized kinetic substep during which the 3‧-end of the DNA substrate base pairs downstream within the hTR template. The rate constant for DNA primer realignment reveals this step is not rate limiting for RAP, suggesting a second slow conformational change repositions the RNA:DNA hybrid into the telomerase active site and drives the extrusion of the 5‧-end of the DNA primer out of the enzyme complex.

  19. Cobalamin Catalytic Centers for Stable Fuels Generation from Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Wesley D.; Jawdat, Benmaan I.; Ennist, Nathan M.; Warncke, Kurt

    2010-03-01

    Our aim is to design and construct protein-based artificial photosynthetic systems that reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) to stable fuel forms within the robust and adaptable (βα)8 TIM-barrel protein structure. The EutB subunit of the adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme, ethanolamine ammonia-lyase, from Salmonella typhimurium, was selected as the protein template. This system was selected because the Co^I forms of the native cobalamin (Cbl) cofactor, and the related cobinamide (Cbi), possess redox properties that are commensurate with reduction of CO2. The kinetics of photo- (excited 5'-deazariboflavin electron donor) and chemical [Ti(III)] reduction, and subsequent reaction, of the Cbl and Cbi with CO2 are measured by time-resolved UV/visible absorption spectroscopy. Products are quantified by NMR spectroscopy. The results address the efficacy of the organocobalt catalytic centers for CO2 reduction to stable fuels, towards protein device integration.

  20. Catalytic distillation water recovery subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budininkas, P.; Rasouli, F.

    1985-01-01

    An integrated engineering breadboard subsystem for the recovery of potable water from untreated urine based on the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal was designed, fabricated and tested. Unlike other evaporative methods, this process catalytically oxidizes ammonia and volatile hydrocarbons vaporizing with water to innocuous products; therefore, no pretreatment of urine is required. Since the subsystem is fabricated from commercially available components, its volume, weight and power requirements are not optimized; however, it is suitable for zero-g operation. The testing program consists of parametric tests, one month of daily tests and a continuous test of 168 hours duration. The recovered water is clear, odorless, low in ammonia and organic carbon, and requires only an adjustment of its pH to meet potable water standards. The obtained data indicate that the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal process, if further developed, would also be competitive with other water recovery systems in weight, volume and power requirements.

  1. P. berghei Telomerase Subunit TERT is Essential for Parasite Survival

    PubMed Central

    Religa, Agnieszka A.; Ramesar, Jai; Janse, Chris J.; Scherf, Artur; Waters, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Telomeres define the ends of chromosomes protecting eukaryotic cells from chromosome instability and eventual cell death. The complex regulation of telomeres involves various proteins including telomerase, which is a specialized ribonucleoprotein responsible for telomere maintenance. Telomeres of chromosomes of malaria parasites are kept at a constant length during blood stage proliferation. The 7-bp telomere repeat sequence is universal across different Plasmodium species (GGGTTT/CA), though the average telomere length varies. The catalytic subunit of telomerase, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), is present in all sequenced Plasmodium species and is approximately three times larger than other eukaryotic TERTs. The Plasmodium RNA component of TERT has recently been identified in silico. A strategy to delete the gene encoding TERT via double cross-over (DXO) homologous recombination was undertaken to study the telomerase function in P. berghei. Expression of both TERT and the RNA component (TR) in P. berghei blood stages was analysed by Western blotting and Northern analysis. Average telomere length was measured in several Plasmodium species using Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) analysis. TERT and TR were detected in blood stages and an average telomere length of ∼950 bp established. Deletion of the tert gene was performed using standard transfection methodologies and we show the presence of tert− mutants in the transfected parasite populations. Cloning of tert- mutants has been attempted multiple times without success. Thorough analysis of the transfected parasite populations and the parasite obtained from extensive parasite cloning from these populations provide evidence for a so called delayed death phenotype as observed in different organisms lacking TERT. The findings indicate that TERT is essential for P. berghei cell survival. The study extends our current knowledge on telomere biology in malaria parasites and validates further investigations

  2. Smooth-muscle caldesmon phosphatase is SMP-I, a type 2A protein phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Pato, M D; Sutherland, C; Winder, S J; Walsh, M P

    1993-07-01

    Caldesmon phosphatase was identified in chicken gizzard smooth muscle by using as substrates caldesmon phosphorylated at different sites by protein kinase C, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and cdc2 kinase. Most (approximately 90%) of the phosphatase activity was recovered in the cytosolic fraction. Gel filtration after (NH4)2SO4 fractionation of the cytosolic fraction revealed a single major peak of phosphatase activity which coeluted with calponin phosphatase [Winder, Pato and Walsh (1992) Biochem. J. 286, 197-203] and myosin LC20 phosphatase. Further purification of caldesmon phosphatase was achieved by sequential chromatography on columns of DEAE-Sephacel, omega-amino-octyl-agarose, aminopropyl-agarose and thiophosphorylated myosin LC20-Sepharose. A single peak of caldesmon phosphatase activity was detected at each step of the purification. The purified phosphatase was identified as SMP-I [Pato and Adelstein (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 6535-6538] by subunit composition (three subunits, of 60, 55 and 38 kDa) and Western blotting using antibodies against the holoenzyme which recognize all three subunits and antibodies specific for the 38 kDa catalytic subunit. SMP-I is a type 2A protein phosphatase [Pato, Adelstein, Crouch, Safer, Ingebritsen and Cohen (1983) Eur. J. Biochem. 132, 283-287; Winder et al. (1992), cited above]. Consistent with the conclusion that SMP-I is the major caldesmon phosphatase of smooth muscle, purified SMP-I from turkey gizzard dephosphorylated all three phosphorylated forms of caldesmon, whereas SMP-II, -III and -IV were relatively ineffective. Kinetic analysis of dephosphorylation by chicken gizzard SMP-I of the three phosphorylated caldesmon species and calponin phosphorylated by protein kinase C indicates that calponin is a significantly better substrate of SMP-I than are any of the three phosphorylated forms of caldesmon. We therefore suggest that caldesmon phosphorylation in vivo can be maintained after kinase

  3. Role of protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in ventricular cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Braconi Quintaje, S; Church, D J; Rebsamen, M; Valloton, M B; Hemmings, B A; Lang, U

    1996-04-25

    Incubation of cultured, neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes with 100 nM phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) induced a transient suppression of PP2A activity at 5 min, an effect that was reversed after 15 min of exposure to PMA. This inactivation was correlated with a transient increase in the phosphorylation level of the catalytic subunit of PP2A (193 +/- 38% of control levels at 5 min). Simultaneously to the transient inactivation of PP2A, we observed a rapid and reversible phosphorylation of 42-kDa MAP kinase (474 +/- 65% of control levels at 5 min, and 316 +/- 44% at 15 min) in cardiomyocytes treated with PMA. This transient phosphorylation was accompanied by a transient increase in cytosolic MAP kinase activity (209 +/- 17% of control values at 5 min and 125 +/- 7% at 15 min). Okadaic acid (1 microM ) completely blocked the decrease in the phosphorylation level and activity of MAP kinase occurring after 5 min of exposure to PMA. These data demonstrate that PP2A inactivation and MAP kinase activation are very strongly correlated in cardiomyocytes, indicating that PP2A plays a negative modulatory role in the regulation of MAP kinase activity. PMID:8629997

  4. A novel mechanism of V-type zinc inhibition of glutamate dehydrogenase results from disruption of subunit interactions necessary for efficient catalysis.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Jaclyn; Powell, Lakeila; Sinanan, Leander; Neal, Jacob; Li, Ming; Smith, Thomas; Bell, Ellis

    2011-09-01

    Bovine glutamate dehydrogenase is potently inhibited by zinc and the major impact is on V(max) suggesting a V-type effect on catalysis or product release. Zinc inhibition decreases as glutamate concentrations decrease suggesting a role for subunit interactions. With the monocarboxylic amino acid norvaline, which gives no evidence of subunit interactions, zinc does not inhibit. Zinc significantly decreases the size of the pre-steady state burst in the reaction but does not affect NADPH binding in the enzyme-NADPH-glutamate complex that governs the steady state turnover, again suggesting that zinc disrupts subunit interactions required for catalytic competence. While differential scanning calorimetry suggests zinc binds and induces a slightly conformationally more rigid state of the protein, limited proteolysis indicates that regions in the vicinity of the antennae regions and the trimer-trimer interface become more flexible. The structures of glutamate dehydrogenase bound with zinc and europium show that zinc binds between the three dimers of subunits in the hexamer, a region shown to bind novel inhibitors that block catalytic turnover, which is consistent with the above findings. In contrast, europium binds to the base of the antenna region and appears to abrogate the inhibitory effect of zinc. Structures of various states of the enzyme have shown that both regions are heavily involved in the conformational changes associated with catalytic turnover. These results suggest that the V-type inhibition produced with glutamate as the substrate results from disruption of subunit interactions necessary for efficient catalysis rather than by a direct effect on the active site conformation. PMID:21749647

  5. Studies on chromatin. II. Isolation and characterization of chromatin subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Bakayev, V V; Melnickov, A A; Osicka, V D; Varshausky, A J

    1975-01-01

    Earlier findings /1-10/ bearing on a subunit organization of chromatin were confirmed and in some points detailed. Besides this, a large-scale isolation of chromatin subunits; their protein composition, electron microscopic appearance and CsCl banding pattern are described. Although the purified chromatin subunit contains all five histones, the relative content of histone H1 i in it is two times lower than that in the original chromatin. tit is shown that a mild digestion of chromatin with staphylococcal nuclease produced not only separate chromatin subunits and their "oligomers' but also deoxyribonucleoprotein particles which sediment more slowly than subunits. It appears that these particles and subunits are produced from different initial structures in the chromatin. Finally, a crystallization of the purified chromatin subunit as a cetyltrimethyl ammonium salt is described. Images PMID:1178523

  6. Catalytic Enantioselective Carboannulation with Allylsilanes

    PubMed Central

    Ball-Jones, Nicolas R.; Badillo, Joseph J.; Tran, Ngon T.; Franz, Annaliese K.

    2015-01-01

    The first catalytic asymmetric carboannulation with allylsilanes is presented. The enantioselective [3+2] annulation is catalyzed using a Sc(III)-indapybox complex with tetrakis-[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-borate (BArF) to enhance catalytic activity and control stereoselectivity. Functionalized cyclopentanes containing a quaternary carbon are derived from alkylidene oxindole, coumarin, and malonate substrates with high stereoselectivity. The enantioselective 1,4-conjugate addition and enantioselective lactone formation (via trapping of the β-silyl carbocation) is also described. PMID:25045133

  7. Catalytic enantioselective carboannulation with allylsilanes.

    PubMed

    Ball-Jones, Nicolas R; Badillo, Joseph J; Tran, Ngon T; Franz, Annaliese K

    2014-09-01

    The first catalytic asymmetric carboannulation with allylsilanes is presented. The enantioselective [3+2] annulation is catalyzed using a scandium(III)/indapybox complex with tetrakis-[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-borate (BArF) to enhance catalytic activity and control stereoselectivity. Functionalized cyclopentanes containing a quaternary carbon center are derived from alkylidene oxindole, coumarin, and malonate substrates with high stereoselectivity. The enantioselective 1,4-conjugate addition and enantioselective lactone formation (by trapping of the β-silyl carbocation) is also described. PMID:25045133

  8. Perfluoropolyalkylether decomposition on catalytic aluminas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo

    1994-01-01

    The decomposition of Fomblin Z25, a commercial perfluoropolyalkylether liquid lubricant, was studied using the Penn State Micro-oxidation Test, and a thermal gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry unit. The micro-oxidation test was conducted using 440C stainless steel and pure iron metal catalyst specimens, whereas the thermal gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry tests were conducted using catalytic alumina pellets. Analysis of the thermal data, high pressure liquid chromatography data, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data support evidence that there are two different decomposition mechanisms for Fomblin Z25, and that reductive sites on the catalytic surfaces are responsible for the decomposition of Fomblin Z25.

  9. Structure-function analysis of the beta regulatory subunit of protein kinase CK2 by targeting embryonic stem cell.

    PubMed

    Ziercher, Léa; Filhol, Odile; Laudet, Béatrice; Prudent, Renaud; Cochet, Claude; Buchou, Thierry

    2011-10-01

    Programs that govern stem cell maintenance and pluripotency are dependent on extracellular factors and of intrinsic cell modulators. Embryonic stem (ES) cells with a specific depletion of the gene encoding the regulatory subunit of protein kinase CK2 (CK2β) revealed a viability defect. However, analysis of CK2β functions along the neural lineage established CK2β as a positive regulator for neural stem/progenitor cell (NSC) proliferation and multipotency. By using an in vitro genetic conditional approach, we demonstrate in this work that specific domains of CK2β involved in the regulatory function towards CK2 catalytic subunits are crucial structural determinants for ES cell homeostasis. PMID:21861102

  10. A role for interaction of the RNA polymerase flap domain with the sigma subunit in promoter recognition.

    PubMed

    Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Minakhin, Leonid; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Dove, Simon L; Rogulja, Dragana; Nickels, Bryce E; Hochschild, Ann; Heyduk, Tomasz; Severinov, Konstantin

    2002-02-01

    In bacteria, promoter recognition depends on the RNA polymerase sigma subunit, which combines with the catalytically proficient RNA polymerase core to form the holoenzyme. The major class of bacterial promoters is defined by two conserved elements (the -10 and -35 elements, which are 10 and 35 nucleotides upstream of the initiation point, respectively) that are contacted by sigma in the holoenzyme. We show that recognition of promoters of this class depends on the "flexible flap" domain of the RNA polymerase beta subunit. The flap interacts with conserved region 4 of sigma and triggers a conformational change that moves region 4 into the correct position for interaction with the -35 element. Because the flexible flap is evolutionarily conserved, this domain may facilitate promoter recognition by specificity factors in eukaryotes as well. PMID:11823642

  11. Cytokine induced changes in proteasome subunit composition are concentration dependent.

    PubMed

    Stohwasser, R; Kloetzel, P M

    1996-09-01

    In eukaryotes, 20S proteasome subunit composition is controlled by the cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). IFN-gamma induces the synthesis of the beta-subunits LMP2, LMP7 and MECL-1, which in consequence replace their constitutive subunit homologs delta, MB1 and MC14/Z in the 20S complex. By pulse labeling mouse RMA cells and immunoprecipitation of proteasome complexes with the antibody MP3, we have analysed the effect of different IFN-gamma concentrations on proteasomal subunit composition. Our experiments show that IFN-gamma concentrations as low as 5 U/ml induce subunit substitutions and that overall proteasomal subunit composition is dependent on the cytokine concentration used. An IFN-gamma concentration of 50 U/ml is sufficient for complete replacement of subunit delta by LMP2. In contrast, IFN-gamma treatment never induces a complete replacement of subunit MC14 by MECL-1. These subunits are present at an approximate 1:1 molar ratio, suggesting that both subunits coexist in the same 20S proteasome complex. Furthermore, different regulatory mechanisms have to be postulated for the synthesis and incorporation of the three IFN-gamma inducible proteasome subunits. Both IFN-gamma as well as IL-2 also seem to influence the modification state of the alpha subunit C8. Since the subunit composition is dependent on the cytokine concentration used and strongly influences the proteolytic properties of the 20S proteasome complex, our experiments represent a caveat for experiments in which IFN-gamma dependent proteasomal enzyme characteristics have been analysed without monitoring the subunit composition. PMID:9067255

  12. Cloning and characterization of GABAA α subunits and GABAB subunits in Xenopus laevis during development

    PubMed Central

    Kaeser, Gwendolyn E.; Rabe, Brian A.; Saha, Margaret S.

    2011-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult nervous system, acts via two classes of receptors, the ionotropic GABAA and metabotropic GABAB receptors. During the development of the nervous system GABA acts in a depolarizing, excitatory manner and plays an important role in various neural developmental processes including cell proliferation, migration, synapse formation and activity-dependent differentiation. Here we describe the spatial and temporal expression patterns of the GABAA and GABAB receptors during early development of Xenopus laevis. Using in situ hybridization and qRT-PCR, GABAA α2 was detected as a maternal mRNA. All other α-subunits were first detected by tailbud through hatching stages. Expression of the various subunits was seen in the brain, spinal cord, cranial ganglia, olfactory epithelium, pineal, and pituitary gland. Each receptor subunit showed a distinctive, unique expression pattern suggesting these receptors have specific functions and are regulated in a precise spatial and temporal manner. PMID:21384470

  13. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies a Deletion in Protein Phosphatase 2A That Affects Its Stability and Localization in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huawen; Miller, Michelle L.; Granas, David M.; Dutcher, Susan K.

    2013-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing is a powerful tool in the discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and small insertions/deletions (indels) among mutant strains, which simplifies forward genetics approaches. However, identification of the causative mutation among a large number of non-causative SNPs in a mutant strain remains a big challenge. In the unicellular biflagellate green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we generated a SNP/indel library that contains over 2 million polymorphisms from four wild-type strains, one highly polymorphic strain that is frequently used in meiotic mapping, ten mutant strains that have flagellar assembly or motility defects, and one mutant strain, imp3, which has a mating defect. A comparison of polymorphisms in the imp3 strain and the other 15 strains allowed us to identify a deletion of the last three amino acids, Y313F314L315, in a protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2A3) in the imp3 strain. Introduction of a wild-type HA-tagged PP2A3 rescues the mutant phenotype, but mutant HA-PP2A3 at Y313 or L315 fail to rescue. Our immunoprecipitation results indicate that the Y313, L315, or YFLΔ mutations do not affect the binding of PP2A3 to the scaffold subunit, PP2A-2r. In contrast, the Y313, L315, or YFLΔ mutations affect both the stability and the localization of PP2A3. The PP2A3 protein is less abundant in these mutants and fails to accumulate in the basal body area as observed in transformants with either wild-type HA-PP2A3 or a HA-PP2A3 with a V310T change. The accumulation of HA-PP2A3 in the basal body region disappears in mated dikaryons, which suggests that the localization of PP2A3 may be essential to the mating process. Overall, our results demonstrate that the terminal YFL tail of PP2A3 is important in the regulation on Chlamydomonas mating. PMID:24086163

  14. Multiple modes of regulation of the human Ino80 SNF2 ATPase by subunits of the INO80 chromatin-remodeling complex

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Conaway, Ronald C.; Conaway, Joan W.

    2013-01-01

    SNF2 family ATPases are ATP-dependent motors that often function in multisubunit complexes to regulate chromatin structure. Although the central role of SNF2 ATPases in chromatin biology is well established, mechanisms by which their catalytic activities are regulated by additional subunits of chromatin-remodeling complexes are less well understood. Here we present evidence that the human Inositol auxotrophy 80 (Ino80) SNF2 ATPase is subject to regulation at multiple levels in the INO80 chromatin-remodeling complex. The zinc finger histidine triad domain-containing protein Ies2 (Ino Eighty Subunit 2) functions as a potent activator of the intrinsic catalytic activity of the Ino80 ATPase, whereas the YL-1 family Ies6 (Ino Eighty Subunit 6) and actin-related Arp5 proteins function together to promote binding of the Ino80 ATPase to nucleosomes. These findings support the idea that both substrate recognition and the intrinsic catalytic activities of SNF2 ATPases have evolved as important sites for their regulation. PMID:24297934

  15. Shared active site architecture between archaeal PolD and multi-subunit RNA polymerases revealed by X-ray crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Sauguet, Ludovic; Raia, Pierre; Henneke, Ghislaine; Delarue, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Archaeal replicative DNA polymerase D (PolD) constitute an atypical class of DNA polymerases made of a proofreading exonuclease subunit (DP1) and a larger polymerase catalytic subunit (DP2), both with unknown structures. We have determined the crystal structures of Pyrococcus abyssi DP1 and DP2 at 2.5 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively, revealing a catalytic core strikingly different from all other known DNA polymerases (DNAPs). Rather, the PolD DP2 catalytic core has the same ‘double-psi β-barrel' architecture seen in the RNA polymerase (RNAP) superfamily, which includes multi-subunit transcriptases of all domains of life, homodimeric RNA-silencing pathway RNAPs and atypical viral RNAPs. This finding bridges together, in non-viral world, DNA transcription and DNA replication within the same protein superfamily. This study documents further the complex evolutionary history of the DNA replication apparatus in different domains of life and proposes a classification of all extant DNAPs. PMID:27548043

  16. Is the catalytic mechanism of bacteria, plant, and mammal copper-TPQ amine oxidases identical?

    PubMed

    Pietrangeli, P; Nocera, S; Mondovi, B; Morpurgo, L

    2003-04-11

    This short review is mostly concerned with the work carried out in Rome on the copper amine oxidase from bovine serum (BSAO). The first target was the copper oxidation state and its relationship with the organic cofactor. It was found that copper is not reduced on reaction with amines under anaerobic conditions or along the catalytic cycle and that it is not within bonding distance of the quinone cofactor. The copper stability in the oxidised state was supported by BSAO ability to oxidise benzylhydrazine, a slow substrate, in the presence of N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) and by the substantial catalytic activity of Co(2+)-substituted BSAO. Parallel work established that only one subunit of the dimeric enzyme readily binds reagents of the carbonyl group. Flexible hydrazides with a long aromatic tail were found to be highly specific inhibitors, suggesting the presence of an extended hydrophobic region at the catalytic site. A study by stopped-flow transient spectroscopy and steady state kinetics led to the formulation of a simplified, yet complete and consistent, catalytic mechanism for BSAO that was compared with that available for lentil seedling amine oxidase (LSAO). As in other copper amine oxidases, BSAO is inactivated by H(2)O(2) produced in the catalytic reaction, while the cofactor is stabilised in its reduced state. A conserved tyrosine hydrogen-bonded to the cofactor might be oxidised. PMID:12686125

  17. Insights into eukaryotic primer synthesis from structures of the p48 subunit of human DNA primase

    PubMed Central

    Vaithiyalingam, Sivaraja; Arnett, Diana R.; Aggarwal, Amit; Eichman, Brandt F.; Fanning, Ellen; Chazin, Walter J.

    2013-01-01

    DNA replication in all organisms requires polymerases to synthesize copies of the genome. DNA polymerases are unable to function on a bare template and require a primer. Primases are crucial RNA polymerases that perform the initial de novo synthesis, generating the first 8–10 nucleotides of the primer. Although structures of archaeal and bacterial primases have provided insights into general priming mechanisms, these proteins are not well conserved with heterodimeric (p48/p58) primases in eukaryotes. Here, we present X-ray crystal structures of the catalytic engine of a eukaryotic primase, which is contained in the p48 subunit. The structures of p48 reveal eukaryotic primases maintain the conserved catalytic prim fold domain, but with a unique sub-domain not found in the archaeal and bacterial primases. Calorimetry experiments reveal Mn2+ but not Mg2+ significantly enhances the binding of nucleotide to primase, which correlates with in vitro higher catalytic efficiency. The structure of p48 with bound UTP and Mn2+ provides insights into the mechanism of nucleotide synthesis by primase. Substitution of conserved residues involved in either metal or nucleotide binding altered nucleotide binding affinities, and yeast strains containing the corresponding Pri1p substitutions were not viable. Our results revealed two residues (S160 and H166) in direct contact with the nucleotide that were previously unrecognized as critical to the human primase active site. Comparing p48 structures to those of similar polymerases in different states of action suggests changes that would be required to attain a catalytically competent conformation capable of initiating dinucleotide synthesis. PMID:24239947

  18. Structural Basis for Catalytic Activation of a Serine Recombinase

    SciTech Connect

    Keenholtz, Ross A.; Rowland, Sally-J.; Boocock, Martin R.; Stark, W. Marshall; Rice, Phoebe A.

    2014-10-02

    Sin resolvase is a site-specific serine recombinase that is normally controlled by a complex regulatory mechanism. A single mutation, Q115R, allows the enzyme to bypass the entire regulatory apparatus, such that no accessory proteins or DNA sites are required. Here, we present a 1.86 {angstrom} crystal structure of the Sin Q115R catalytic domain, in a tetrameric arrangement stabilized by an interaction between Arg115 residues on neighboring subunits. The subunits have undergone significant conformational changes from the inactive dimeric state previously reported. The structure provides a new high-resolution view of a serine recombinase active site that is apparently fully assembled, suggesting roles for the conserved active site residues. The structure also suggests how the dimer-tetramer transition is coupled to assembly of the active site. The tetramer is captured in a different rotational substate than that seen in previous hyperactive serine recombinase structures, and unbroken crossover site DNA can be readily modeled into its active sites.

  19. Cloning of Genes Coding for the Three Subunits of Thiocyanate Hydrolase of Thiobacillus thioparus THI 115 and Their Evolutionary Relationships to Nitrile Hydratase

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Yoko; Matsushita, Yasuhiko; Kaneko, Miyuki; Kondo, Mai; Mizuno, Tadayoshi; Nyunoya, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    Thiocyanate hydrolase is a newly found enzyme from Thiobacillus thioparus THI 115 that converts thiocyanate to carbonyl sulfide and ammonia (Y. Katayama, Y. Narahara, Y. Inoue, F. Amano, T. Kanagawa, and H. Kuraishi, J. Biol. Chem. 267:9170–9175, 1992). We have cloned and sequenced the scn genes that encode the three subunits of the enzyme. The scnB, scnA, and scnC genes, arrayed in this order, contained open reading frames encoding sequences of 157, 126, and 243 amino acid residues, respectively, for the β, α, and γ subunits, respectively. Each open reading frame was preceded by a typical Shine-Dalgarno sequence. The deduced amino-terminal peptide sequences for the three subunits were in fair agreement with the chemically determined sequences. The protein molecular mass calculated for each subunit was compatible with that determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. From a computer analysis, thiocyanate hydrolase showed significant homologies to bacterial nitrile hydratases known to convert nitrile to the corresponding amide, which is further hydrolyzed by amidase to form acid and ammonia. The two enzymes were homologous over regions corresponding to almost the entire coding regions of the genes: the β and α subunits of thiocyanate hydrolase were homologous to the amino- and carboxyl-terminal halves of the β subunit of nitrile hydratase, and the γ subunit of thiocyanate hydrolase was homologous to the α subunit of nitrile hydratase. Comparisons of the catalytic properties of the two homologous enzymes support the model for the reaction steps of thiocyanate hydrolase that was previously presented on the basis of biochemical analyses. PMID:9573140

  20. Na+/K+-ATPase α-subunit in swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus: molecular cloning, characterization, and expression under low salinity stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaolin; Liu, Ping; Gao, Baoquan; Wang, Haofeng; Duan, Yafei; Xu, Wenfei; Chen, Ping

    2015-07-01

    Na+/K+-ATPases are membrane-associated enzymes responsible for the active transport of Na+ and K+ ions across cell membranes, generating chemical and electrical gradients. These enzymes' α-subunit provides catalytic function, binding and hydrolyzing ATP, and itself becoming phosphorylated during the transport cycle. In this study, Na+/K+-ATPase α-subunit cDNA was cloned from gill tissue of the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA end methods. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence revealed that the cDNA had a full-length of 3 833 base pairs (bp), with an open reading frame of 3 120 bp, 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 317 bp, and 3' UTR of 396 bp. The sequence encoded a 1 039 amino acid protein with a predicted molecular weight of 115.57 kDa and with estimated pI of 5.21. It was predicted here to possess all expected features of Na+/K+-ATPase members, including eight transmembrane domains, putative ATP-binding site, and phosphorylation site. Comparison of amino acid sequences showed that the P. trituberculatus α-subunit possessed an overall identity of 75%-99% to that of other organisms. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this α-subunit was in the same category as those of crustaceans. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis indicated that this α-subunit's transcript were most highly expressed in gill and lowest in muscle. RT-PCR analysis also revealed that α-subunit expression in crab gill decreased after 2 and 6 h, but increased after 12, 24, 48, and 72 h. In addition, α-subunit expression in hepatopancreas of crab decreased after 2-72 h. These facts indicated that the crab's Na+/K+-ATPase α-subunit was potentially involved in the observed acute response to low salinity stress.

  1. Multi site polyadenylation and transcriptional response to stress of a vacuolar type H+-ATPase subunit A gene in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Magnotta, Scot M; Gogarten, Johann Peter

    2002-01-01

    Background Vacuolar type H+-ATPases play a critical role in the maintenance of vacuolar homeostasis in plant cells. V-ATPases are also involved in plants' defense against environmental stress. This research examined the expression and regulation of the catalytic subunit of the vacuolar type H+-ATPase in Arabidopsis thaliana and the effect of environmental stress on multiple transcripts generated by this gene. Results Evidence suggests that subunit A of the vacuolar type H+-ATPase is encoded by a single gene in Arabidopsis thaliana. Genome blot analysis showed no indication of a second subunit A gene being present. The single gene identified was shown by whole RNA blot analysis to be transcribed in all organs of the plant. Subunit A was shown by sequencing the 3' end of multiple cDNA clones to exhibit multi site polyadenylation. Four different poly (A) tail attachment sites were revealed. Experiments were performed to determine the response of transcript levels for subunit A to environmental stress. A PCR based strategy was devised to amplify the four different transcripts from the subunit A gene. Conclusions Amplification of cDNA generated from seedlings exposed to cold, salt stress, and etiolation showed that transcript levels for subunit A of the vacuolar type H+-ATPase in Arabidopsis were responsive to stress conditions. Cold and salt stress resulted in a 2–4 fold increase in all four subunit A transcripts evaluated. Etiolation resulted in a slight increase in transcript levels. All four transcripts appeared to behave identically with respect to stress conditions tested with no significant differential regulation. PMID:11985780

  2. Catalytic oxidation of waste materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagow, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    Aqueous stream of human waste is mixed with soluble ruthenium salts and is introduced into reactor at temperature where ruthenium black catalyst forms on internal surfaces of reactor. This provides catalytically active surface to convert oxidizable wastes into breakdown products such as water and carbon dioxide.

  3. Social Entrepreneurs and Catalytic Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddock, Sandra A.; Post, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Social entrepreneurs are private citizens who play critical roles in bringing about catalytic changes in the public sector agenda and the perception of social issues. Factors that make their projects--such as the Partnership for a Drug-Free America and Earth Day--successful include problem complexity, credibility, and a commitment to a collective…

  4. Catalytically enhanced packed tower scrubbing

    SciTech Connect

    Stitt, E.H.; Taylor, F.J.; Kelly, K.

    1996-12-31

    An enhanced wet scrubbing process for the treatment of gas streams containing odours and low level VOC`s is presented. It comprises essentially a single scrubbing column and a fixed bed catalytic reactor through which the dilute alkaline bleach scrubbing liquor is recirculated. The process has significant cost advantages over conventional chemical scrubbing technology, and copes well with peaks in odour levels. Traditional bleach scrubbing, and the improvements in process chemistry and the flowsheet afforded by inclusion of the catalyst, are discussed. The catalyst enables many of the well known problems associated with bleach scrubbing to be overcome, and facilitates odour removal efficiencies of greater than 99% in a single column. Pilot plant data from trials on sewage treatment works are presented. These show clearly the ability of the catalytically enhanced process to achieve sulphide and odour removals in excess of 99% in the single column. Case studies of some of the existing commercial installations are given, indicating the wide range of applications, industries and scale of the installed units. Comparative data are presented, measured on a commercial unit for the conventional operation of a bleach scrubber, and with the retrofitted catalyst in use. These data show clearly the benefits of the catalytic process in terms of removal efficiencies; and hence by inference also in equipment size and costs. The catalytic process is also shown to achieve very high removal efficiencies of organo-sulphides in a single column. 8 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. CATALYTIC COMBUSTION COMPONENT AND SYSTEM PROTOTYPE DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a project to develop the components required for catalytic combustion system operation and evaluation. The systems investigated (firetube boiler, watertube boiler, and gas turbine), when integrated with the catalytic combustor, have potential for both ...

  6. Crystal structure of decameric fructose-6-phosphate aldolase from Escherichia coli reveals inter-subunit helix swapping as a structural basis for assembly differences in the transaldolase family.

    PubMed

    Thorell, Stina; Schürmann, Melanie; Sprenger, Georg A; Schneider, Gunter

    2002-05-24

    Fructose-6-phosphate aldolase from Escherichia coli is a member of a small enzyme subfamily (MipB/TalC family) that belongs to the class I aldolases. The three-dimensional structure of this enzyme has been determined at 1.93 A resolution by single isomorphous replacement and tenfold non-crystallographic symmetry averaging and refined to an R-factor of 19.9% (R(free) 21.3%). The subunit folds into an alpha/beta barrel, with the catalytic lysine residue on barrel strand beta 4. It is very similar in overall structure to that of bacterial and mammalian transaldolases, although more compact due to extensive deletions of additional secondary structural elements. The enzyme forms a decamer of identical subunits with point group symmetry 52. Five subunits are arranged as a pentamer, and two ring-like pentamers pack like a doughnut to form the decamer. A major interaction within the pentamer is through the C-terminal helix from one monomer, which runs across the active site of the neighbouring subunit. In classical transaldolases, this helix folds back and covers the active site of the same subunit and is involved in dimer formation. The inter-subunit helix swapping appears to be a major determinant for the formation of pentamers rather than dimers while at the same time preserving importing interactions of this helix with the active site of the enzyme. The active site lysine residue is covalently modified, by forming a carbinolamine with glyceraldehyde from the crystallisation mixture. The catalytic machinery is very similar to that of transaldolase, which together with the overall structural similarity suggests that enzymes of the MipB/TALC subfamily are evolutionary related to the transaldolase family. PMID:12051943

  7. [Nose surgical anatomy in six aesthetic subunits].

    PubMed

    Chaput, B; Lauwers, F; Lopez, R; Saboye, J; André, A; Grolleau, J-L; Chavoin, J-P

    2013-04-01

    The nose is a complex entity, combining aesthetic and functional roles. Descriptive anatomy is a fundamental science that it can be difficult to relate directly to our daily surgical activity. Reasoning in terms of aesthetic subunits to decide on his actions appeared to us so obvious. The aim of this paper is to resume the anatomical bases relevant to our daily practice in order to fully apprehend the restorative or cosmetic procedures. We discuss the limits of the systematization of these principles in nasal oncology. PMID:22699003

  8. MspA Nanopores from Subunit Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Pavlenok, Mikhail; Derrington, Ian M.; Gundlach, Jens H.; Niederweis, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis porin A (MspA) forms an octameric channel and represents the founding member of a new family of pore proteins. Control of subunit stoichiometry is important to tailor MspA for nanotechnological applications. In this study, two MspA monomers were connected by linkers ranging from 17 to 62 amino acids in length. The oligomeric pore proteins were purified from M. smegmatis and were shown to form functional channels in lipid bilayer experiments. These results indicated that the peptide linkers did not prohibit correct folding and localization of MspA. However, expression levels were reduced by 10-fold compared to wild-type MspA. MspA is ideal for nanopore sequencing due to its unique pore geometry and its robustness. To assess the usefulness of MspA made from dimeric subunits for DNA sequencing, we linked two M1-MspA monomers, whose constriction zones were modified to enable DNA translocation. Lipid bilayer experiments demonstrated that this construct also formed functional channels. Voltage gating of MspA pores made from M1 monomers and M1-M1 dimers was identical indicating similar structural and dynamic channel properties. Glucose uptake in M. smegmatis cells lacking porins was restored by expressing the dimeric mspA M1 gene indicating correct folding and localization of M1-M1 pores in their native membrane. Single-stranded DNA hairpins produced identical ionic current blockades in pores made from monomers and subunit dimers demonstrating that M1-M1 pores are suitable for DNA sequencing. This study provides the proof of principle that production of single-chain MspA pores in M. smegmatis is feasible and paves the way for generating MspA pores with altered stoichiometries. Subunit dimers enable better control of the chemical and physical properties of the constriction zone of MspA. This approach will be valuable both in understanding transport across the outer membrane in mycobacteria and in tailoring MspA for nanopore sequencing of DNA. PMID

  9. MspA nanopores from subunit dimers.

    PubMed

    Pavlenok, Mikhail; Derrington, Ian M; Gundlach, Jens H; Niederweis, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis porin A (MspA) forms an octameric channel and represents the founding member of a new family of pore proteins. Control of subunit stoichiometry is important to tailor MspA for nanotechnological applications. In this study, two MspA monomers were connected by linkers ranging from 17 to 62 amino acids in length. The oligomeric pore proteins were purified from M. smegmatis and were shown to form functional channels in lipid bilayer experiments. These results indicated that the peptide linkers did not prohibit correct folding and localization of MspA. However, expression levels were reduced by 10-fold compared to wild-type MspA. MspA is ideal for nanopore sequencing due to its unique pore geometry and its robustness. To assess the usefulness of MspA made from dimeric subunits for DNA sequencing, we linked two M1-MspA monomers, whose constriction zones were modified to enable DNA translocation. Lipid bilayer experiments demonstrated that this construct also formed functional channels. Voltage gating of MspA pores made from M1 monomers and M1-M1 dimers was identical indicating similar structural and dynamic channel properties. Glucose uptake in M. smegmatis cells lacking porins was restored by expressing the dimeric mspA M1 gene indicating correct folding and localization of M1-M1 pores in their native membrane. Single-stranded DNA hairpins produced identical ionic current blockades in pores made from monomers and subunit dimers demonstrating that M1-M1 pores are suitable for DNA sequencing. This study provides the proof of principle that production of single-chain MspA pores in M. smegmatis is feasible and paves the way for generating MspA pores with altered stoichiometries. Subunit dimers enable better control of the chemical and physical properties of the constriction zone of MspA. This approach will be valuable both in understanding transport across the outer membrane in mycobacteria and in tailoring MspA for nanopore sequencing of DNA. PMID

  10. The Non-Catalytic Domains of Drosophila Katanin Regulate Its Abundance and Microtubule-Disassembly Activity

    PubMed Central

    Grode, Kyle D.; Rogers, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule severing is a biochemical reaction that generates an internal break in a microtubule and regulation of microtubule severing is critical for cellular processes such as ciliogenesis, morphogenesis, and meiosis and mitosis. Katanin is a conserved heterodimeric ATPase that severs and disassembles microtubules, but the molecular determinants for regulation of microtubule severing by katanin remain poorly defined. Here we show that the non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin regulate its abundance and activity in living cells. Our data indicate that the microtubule-interacting and trafficking (MIT) domain and adjacent linker region of the Drosophila katanin catalytic subunit Kat60 cooperate to regulate microtubule severing in two distinct ways. First, the MIT domain and linker region of Kat60 decrease its abundance by enhancing its proteasome-dependent degradation. The Drosophila katanin regulatory subunit Kat80, which is required to stabilize Kat60 in cells, conversely reduces the proteasome-dependent degradation of Kat60. Second, the MIT domain and linker region of Kat60 augment its microtubule-disassembly activity by enhancing its association with microtubules. On the basis of our data, we propose that the non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin serve as the principal sites of integration of regulatory inputs, thereby controlling its ability to sever and disassemble microtubules. PMID:25886649

  11. Analysis of the phosphofructokinase subunits and isoenzymes in human tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Dunaway, G A; Kasten, T P; Sebo, T; Trapp, R

    1988-01-01

    The 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK) subunits and isoenzymes were studied in human muscle, heart, brain, liver, platelets, fibroblasts, erythrocytes, placenta and umbilical cord. In each tissue, the subunit types in the native isoenzymes were characterized by immunological titration with subunit-specific antibodies and by column chromatography on QAE (quaternary aminoethyl)-Sephadex. Further, the subunits of the partially purified native isoenzymes were resolved by SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, identified by immunoblotting, and quantified by scanning gel densitometry of silver-stained gels and immunoblots. Depending on the type of tissue, one to three subunits were detected. The Mr values of the L, M and C subunits regardless of tissue were 76,700 +/- 1400, 82,500 +/- 1640 and 86,500 +/- 1620. Of the tissues studied, only the muscle PFK isoenzymes exhibited one subunit, which was the M-type subunit. Of the other tissues studied, the PFK isoenzymes contained various amounts of all three subunits. Considering the properties of the native PFK isoenzymes, it is clear that, in human tissues, they are not simply various combinations of two or three homotetrameric isoenzymes, but complex mixtures of homotetramers and heterotetramers. The kinetic/regulatory properties of the various isoenzyme pools were found to be dependent on subunit composition. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2970843

  12. Crystal Structures Capture Three States in the Catalytic Cycle of a Pyridoxal Phosphate (PLP) Synthase*♦

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Amber Marie; Brown, William Clay; Harms, Etti; Smith, Janet L.

    2015-01-01

    PLP synthase (PLPS) is a remarkable single-enzyme biosynthetic pathway that produces pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) from glutamine, ribose 5-phosphate, and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. The intact enzyme includes 12 synthase and 12 glutaminase subunits. PLP synthesis occurs in the synthase active site by a complicated mechanism involving at least two covalent intermediates at a catalytic lysine. The first intermediate forms with ribose 5-phosphate. The glutaminase subunit is a glutamine amidotransferase that hydrolyzes glutamine and channels ammonia to the synthase active site. Ammonia attack on the first covalent intermediate forms the second intermediate. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate reacts with the second intermediate to form PLP. To investigate the mechanism of the synthase subunit, crystal structures were obtained for three intermediate states of the Geobacillus stearothermophilus intact PLPS or its synthase subunit. The structures capture the synthase active site at three distinct steps in its complicated catalytic cycle, provide insights into the elusive mechanism, and illustrate the coordinated motions within the synthase subunit that separate the catalytic states. In the intact PLPS with a Michaelis-like intermediate in the glutaminase active site, the first covalent intermediate of the synthase is fully sequestered within the enzyme by the ordering of a generally disordered 20-residue C-terminal tail. Following addition of ammonia, the synthase active site opens and admits the Lys-149 side chain, which participates in formation of the second intermediate and PLP. Roles are identified for conserved Asp-24 in the formation of the first intermediate and for conserved Arg-147 in the conversion of the first to the second intermediate. PMID:25568319

  13. Dephosphorylation of cdc25-C by a type-2A protein phosphatase: specific regulation during the cell cycle in Xenopus egg extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, P R; Hoffmann, I; Draetta, G; Karsenti, E

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the roles of type-1 (PP-1) and type-2A (PP-2A) protein-serine/threonine phosphatases in the mechanism of activation of p34cdc2/cyclin B protein kinase in Xenopus egg extracts. p34cdc2/cyclin B is prematurely activated in the extracts by inhibition of PP-2A by okadaic acid but not by specific inhibition of PP-1 by inhibitor-2. Activation of the kinase can be blocked by addition of the purified catalytic subunit of PP-2A at a twofold excess over the activity in the extract. The catalytic subunit of PP-1 can also block kinase activation, but very high levels of activity are required. Activation of p34cdc2/cyclin B protein kinase requires dephosphorylation of p34cdc2 on Tyr15. This reaction is catalysed by cdc25-C phosphatase that is itself activated by phosphorylation. We show that, in interphase extracts, inhibition of PP-2A by okadaic acid completely blocks cdc25-C dephosphorylation, whereas inhibition of PP-1 by specific inhibitors has no effect. This indicates that a type-2A protein phosphatase negatively regulates p34cdc2/cyclin B protein kinase activation primarily by maintaining cdc25-C phosphatase in a dephosphorylated, low activity state. In extracts containing active p34cdc2/cyclin B protein kinase, dephosphorylation of cdc25-C is inhibited, whereas the activity of PP-2A (and PP-1) towards other substrates is unaffected. We propose that this specific inhibition of cdc25-C dephosphorylation is part of a positive feedback loop that also involves direct phosphorylation and activation of cdc25-C by p34cdc2/cyclin B. Dephosphorylation of cdc25-C is also inhibited when cyclin A-dependent protein kinase is active, and this may explain the potentiation of p34cdc2/cyclin B protein kinase activation by cyclin A. In extracts supplemented with nuclei, the block on p34cdc2/cyclin B activation by unreplicated DNA is abolished when PP-2A is inhibited or when stably phosphorylated cdc25-C is added, but not when PP-1 is specifically inhibited. This suggests

  14. PP2A-3 interacts with ACR4 and regulates formative cell division in the Arabidopsis root

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Kun; Sandal, Priyanka; Williams, Elisabeth L.; Murphy, Evan; Stes, Elisabeth; Nikonorova, Natalia; Ramakrishna, Priya; Czyzewicz, Nathan; Montero-Morales, Laura; Kumpf, Robert; Lin, Zhefeng; van de Cotte, Brigitte; Iqbal, Mudassar; Van Bel, Michiel; Van De Slijke, Eveline; Meyer, Matthew R.; Gadeyne, Astrid; Zipfel, Cyril; De Jaeger, Geert; Van Montagu, Marc; Van Damme, Daniël; Gevaert, Kris; Rao, A. Gururaj; Beeckman, Tom; De Smet, Ive

    2016-01-01

    In plants, the generation of new cell types and tissues depends on coordinated and oriented formative cell divisions. The plasma membrane-localized receptor kinase ARABIDOPSIS CRINKLY 4 (ACR4) is part of a mechanism controlling formative cell divisions in the Arabidopsis root. Despite its important role in plant development, very little is known about the molecular mechanism with which ACR4 is affiliated and its network of interactions. Here, we used various complementary proteomic approaches to identify ACR4-interacting protein candidates that are likely regulators of formative cell divisions and that could pave the way to unraveling the molecular basis behind ACR4-mediated signaling. We identified PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2A-3 (PP2A-3), a catalytic subunit of PP2A holoenzymes, as a previously unidentified regulator of formative cell divisions and as one of the first described substrates of ACR4. Our in vitro data argue for the existence of a tight posttranslational regulation in the associated biochemical network through reciprocal regulation between ACR4 and PP2A-3 at the phosphorylation level. PMID:26792519

  15. PP2A-3 interacts with ACR4 and regulates formative cell division in the Arabidopsis root.

    PubMed

    Yue, Kun; Sandal, Priyanka; Williams, Elisabeth L; Murphy, Evan; Stes, Elisabeth; Nikonorova, Natalia; Ramakrishna, Priya; Czyzewicz, Nathan; Montero-Morales, Laura; Kumpf, Robert; Lin, Zhefeng; van de Cotte, Brigitte; Iqbal, Mudassar; Van Bel, Michiel; Van De Slijke, Eveline; Meyer, Matthew R; Gadeyne, Astrid; Zipfel, Cyril; De Jaeger, Geert; Van Montagu, Marc; Van Damme, Daniël; Gevaert, Kris; Rao, A Gururaj; Beeckman, Tom; De Smet, Ive

    2016-02-01

    In plants, the generation of new cell types and tissues depends on coordinated and oriented formative cell divisions. The plasma membrane-localized receptor kinase ARABIDOPSIS CRINKLY 4 (ACR4) is part of a mechanism controlling formative cell divisions in the Arabidopsis root. Despite its important role in plant development, very little is known about the molecular mechanism with which ACR4 is affiliated and its network of interactions. Here, we used various complementary proteomic approaches to identify ACR4-interacting protein candidates that are likely regulators of formative cell divisions and that could pave the way to unraveling the molecular basis behind ACR4-mediated signaling. We identified PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2A-3 (PP2A-3), a catalytic subunit of PP2A holoenzymes, as a previously unidentified regulator of formative cell divisions and as one of the first described substrates of ACR4. Our in vitro data argue for the existence of a tight posttranslational regulation in the associated biochemical network through reciprocal regulation between ACR4 and PP2A-3 at the phosphorylation level. PMID:26792519

  16. Overexpression of HDAC1 induces cellular senescence by Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Jian-Ying; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2011-04-15

    Highlights: {yields} Overexpression of HDAC1 induces Sp1 deacetylation and raises Sp1/p300 complex formation to bind to PP2Ac promoter. {yields} Overexpression of HDAC1 strongly inhibits the phosphorylation of pRb through up-regulation of PP2A. {yields} Overexpressed HDAC1 restrains cell proliferaction and induces cell senescence though a novel Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway. -- Abstract: Senescence is associated with decreased activities of DNA replication, protein synthesis, and cellular division, which can result in deterioration of cellular functions. Herein, we report that the growth and division of tumor cells were significantly repressed by overexpression of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1 with the Tet-off induced system or transient transfection. In addition, HDAC1 overexpression led to senescence through both an accumulation of hypophosphorylated active retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and an increase in the protein level of protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac). HDAC1 overexpression also increased the level of Sp1 deacetylation and elevated the interaction between Sp1 and p300, and subsequently that Sp1/p300 complex bound to the promoter of PP2Ac, thus leading to induction of PP2Ac expression. Similar results were obtained in the HDAC1-Tet-off stable clone. Taken together, these results indicate that HDAC1 overexpression restrained cell proliferation and induced premature senescence in cervical cancer cells through a novel Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway.

  17. TSH Receptor Cleavage Into Subunits and Shedding of the A-Subunit; A Molecular and Clinical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, Basil; McLachlan, Sandra M

    2016-04-01

    The TSH receptor (TSHR) on the surface of thyrocytes is unique among the glycoprotein hormone receptors in comprising two subunits: an extracellular A-subunit, and a largely transmembrane and cytosolic B-subunit. Unlike its ligand TSH, whose subunits are encoded by two genes, the TSHR is expressed as a single polypeptide that subsequently undergoes intramolecular cleavage into disulfide-linked subunits. Cleavage is associated with removal of a C-peptide region, a mechanism similar in some respects to insulin cleavage into disulfide linked A- and B-subunits with loss of a C-peptide region. The potential pathophysiological importance of TSHR cleavage into A- and B-subunits is that some A-subunits are shed from the cell surface. Considerable experimental evidence supports the concept that A-subunit shedding in genetically susceptible individuals is a factor contributing to the induction and/or affinity maturation of pathogenic thyroid-stimulating autoantibodies, the direct cause of Graves' disease. The noncleaving gonadotropin receptors are not associated with autoantibodies that induce a "Graves' disease of the gonads." We also review herein current information on the location of the cleavage sites, the enzyme(s) responsible for cleavage, the mechanism by which A-subunits are shed, and the effects of cleavage on receptor signaling. PMID:26799472

  18. Sodium channel β subunits: emerging targets in channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    O’Malley, Heather A.; Isom, Lori L.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are responsible for initiation and propagation of action potentials in excitable cells. VGSCs in mammalian brain are heterotrimeric complexes of α and β subunits. Originally called “auxiliary,” we now know that β subunit proteins are multifunctional signaling molecules that play roles in both excitable and non-excitable cell types, and with or without the pore-forming α subunit present. β subunits function in VGSC and potassium channel modulation, cell adhesion, and gene regulation, with particularly important roles in brain development. Mutations in the genes encoding β subunits are linked to a number of diseases, including epilepsy, sudden death syndromes like SUDEP and SIDS, and cardiac arrhythmia. While VGSC β subunit-specific drugs have not yet been developed, this protein family is an emerging therapeutic target. PMID:25668026

  19. Sodium channel β subunits: emerging targets in channelopathies.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Heather A; Isom, Lori L

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are responsible for the initiation and propagation of action potentials in excitable cells. VGSCs in mammalian brain are heterotrimeric complexes of α and β subunits. Although β subunits were originally termed auxiliary, we now know that they are multifunctional signaling molecules that play roles in both excitable and nonexcitable cell types and with or without the pore-forming α subunit present. β subunits function in VGSC and potassium channel modulation, cell adhesion, and gene regulation, with particularly important roles in brain development. Mutations in the genes encoding β subunits are linked to a number of diseases, including epilepsy, sudden death syndromes like SUDEP and SIDS, and cardiac arrhythmia. Although VGSC β subunit-specific drugs have not yet been developed, this protein family is an emerging therapeutic target. PMID:25668026

  20. Structural and functional influences of coagulation factor XIII subunit B heterozygous missense mutants

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Anne; Biswas, Arijit; Ivaskevicius, Vytautas; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The coagulation factor XIII(FXIII) is a plasma circulating heterotetrameric protransglutaminase that acts at the end of the coagulation cascade by covalently cross-linking preformed fibrin clots (to themselves and to fibrinolytic inhibitors) in order to stabilize them against fibrinolysis. It circulates in the plasma as a heterotetramer composed of two homomeric catalytic Factor XIIIA2 (FXIIIA2) and two homomeric protective/carrier Factor XIIIB2 subunit (FXIIIB2). Congenital deficiency of FXIII is of two types: severe homozygous/compound heterozygous FXIII deficiency which results in severe bleeding symptoms and mild heterozygous FXIII deficiency which is associated with mild bleeding (only upon trauma) or an asymptomatic phenotype. Defects in the F13B gene (Factor XIIIB subunit) occur more frequently in mild FXIII deficiency patients than in severe FXIII deficiency. We had recently reported secretion-related defects for seven previously reported F13B missense mutations. In the present study we further analyze the underlying molecular pathological mechanisms as well as the heterozygous expression phenotype for these mutations using a combination of in vitro heterologous expression (in HEK293T cells) and confocal microscopy. In combination with the in vitro work we have also performed an in silico solvated molecular dynamic simulation study on previously reported FXIIIB subunit sushi domain homology models in order to predict the putative structure-functional impact of these mutations. We were able to categorize the mutations into the following functional groups that: (1) affect antigenic stability as well as binding to FXIIIA subunit, that is, Cys5Arg, Cys316Phe, and Pro428Ser (2) affect binding to FXIIIA subunit with little or no influence on antigenic stability, that is, Ile81Asn and Val401Gln c) influence neither aspects and are most likely causality linked polymorphisms or functional polymorphisms, that is, Leu116Phe and Val217Ile. The Cys5Arg mutation was the

  1. Structural and functional influences of coagulation factor XIII subunit B heterozygous missense mutants.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Anne; Biswas, Arijit; Ivaskevicius, Vytautas; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2015-07-01

    The coagulation factor XIII(FXIII) is a plasma circulating heterotetrameric protransglutaminase that acts at the end of the coagulation cascade by covalently cross-linking preformed fibrin clots (to themselves and to fibrinolytic inhibitors) in order to stabilize them against fibrinolysis. It circulates in the plasma as a heterotetramer composed of two homomeric catalytic Factor XIIIA2 (FXIIIA2) and two homomeric protective/carrier Factor XIIIB2 subunit (FXIIIB2). Congenital deficiency of FXIII is of two types: severe homozygous/compound heterozygous FXIII deficiency which results in severe bleeding symptoms and mild heterozygous FXIII deficiency which is associated with mild bleeding (only upon trauma) or an asymptomatic phenotype. Defects in the F13B gene (Factor XIIIB subunit) occur more frequently in mild FXIII deficiency patients than in severe FXIII deficiency. We had recently reported secretion-related defects for seven previously reported F13B missense mutations. In the present study we further analyze the underlying molecular pathological mechanisms as well as the heterozygous expression phenotype for these mutations using a combination of in vitro heterologous expression (in HEK293T cells) and confocal microscopy. In combination with the in vitro work we have also performed an in silico solvated molecular dynamic simulation study on previously reported FXIIIB subunit sushi domain homology models in order to predict the putative structure-functional impact of these mutations. We were able to categorize the mutations into the following functional groups that: (1) affect antigenic stability as well as binding to FXIIIA subunit, that is, Cys5Arg, Cys316Phe, and Pro428Ser (2) affect binding to FXIIIA subunit with little or no influence on antigenic stability, that is, Ile81Asn and Val401Gln c) influence neither aspects and are most likely causality linked polymorphisms or functional polymorphisms, that is, Leu116Phe and Val217Ile. The Cys5Arg mutation was the

  2. Quantifying the cooperative subunit action in a multimeric membrane receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wongsamitkul, Nisa; Nache, Vasilica; Eick, Thomas; Hummert, Sabine; Schulz, Eckhard; Schmauder, Ralf; Schirmeyer, Jana; Zimmer, Thomas; Benndorf, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    In multimeric membrane receptors the cooperative action of the subunits prevents exact knowledge about the operation and the interaction of the individual subunits. We propose a method that permits quantification of ligand binding to and activation effects of the individual binding sites in a multimeric membrane receptor. The power of this method is demonstrated by gaining detailed insight into the subunit action in olfactory cyclic nucleotide-gated CNGA2 ion channels. PMID:26858151

  3. Random assembly of SUR subunits in K(ATP) channel complexes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wayland W L; Tong, Ailing; Flagg, Thomas P; Nichols, Colin G

    2008-01-01

    Sulfonylurea receptors (SURs) associate with Kir6.x subunits to form tetradimeric K(ATP) channel complexes. SUR1 and SUR2 confer differential channel sensitivities to nucleotides and pharmacological agents, and are expressed in specific, but overlapping, tissues. This raises the question of whether these different SUR subtypes can assemble in the same channel complex and generate channels with hybrid properties. To test this, we engineered dimeric constructs of wild type or N160D mutant Kir6.2 fused to SUR1 or SUR2A. Dimeric fusions formed functional, ATP-sensitive, channels. Coexpression of weakly rectifying SUR1-Kir6.2 (WTF-1) with strongly rectifying SUR1-Kir6.2[N160D] (NDF-1) in COSm6 cells results in mixed subunit complexes that exhibit unique rectification properties. Coexpression of NDF-1 and SUR2A-Kir6.2 (WTF-2) results in similar complex rectification, reflecting the presence of SUR1- and SUR2A-containing dimers in the same channel. The data demonstrate clearly that SUR1 and SUR2A subunits associate randomly, and suggest that heteromeric channels will occur in native tissues. PMID:18690055

  4. Toward selective CK2alpha and CK2alpha' inhibitors: Development of a novel whole-cell kinase assay by Autodisplay of catalytic CK2alpha'.

    PubMed

    Bollacke, Andre; Nienberg, Christian; Le Borgne, Marc; Jose, Joachim

    2016-03-20

    Human protein kinase CK2 is an emerging target for the development of novel anti-cancer therapeutics. CK2 is a tetramer composed of two