Science.gov

Sample records for 2a protein phosphatases

  1. Dephosphorylation of chicken cardiac myofibril C-protein by protein phosphatases 1 and 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Thysseril, T.J.; Hegazy, M.G.; Schlender, K.K.

    1987-05-01

    C-Protein, which is a regulatory component of cardiac muscle myofibrils, is phosphorylated in response to US -adrenergic agonists by a cAMP-dependent mechanism and dephosphorylated in response to cholinergic agonists. It is believed that the cAMP-dependent phosphorylation is due to cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The protein phosphatase(s) involved in the dephosphorylation of C-protein has not been determined. In this study, chicken cardiac C-protein was phosphorylated with the cAMP-dependent protein kinase to about 3 mol phosphate/mol C-protein. Incubation of (TSP)C-protein with the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 or 2A rapidly removed 30-40% of TS(P). Phosphopeptide maps and phosphoamino acid analysis revealed that the major site(s) dephosphorylated by either phosphatase was a phosphothreonine residue(s) located on the same tryptic peptide and on the same CNBr fragment. Increasing the incubation period or the phosphatase concentration did not result in any further dephosphorylation of C-protein by phosphatase 1, but phosphatase 2A completely dephosphorylated C-protein. Preliminary studies showed that the major protein phosphatase associated with the myofibril was phosphatase 2A. These results indicate the phosphatase 2A may be important in the regulation of the phosphorylation state of C-protein.

  2. Spatial control of protein phosphatase 2A (de)methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Longin, Sari; Zwaenepoel, Karen; Martens, Ellen; Louis, Justin V.; Rondelez, Evelien; Goris, Jozef; Janssens, Veerle

    2008-01-01

    Reversible methylation of the protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2A{sub C}) is an important regulatory mechanism playing a crucial role in the selective recruitment of regulatory B subunits. Here, we investigated the subcellular localization of leucine carboxyl methyltransferase (LCMT1) and protein phosphatase methylesterase (PME-1), the two enzymes catalyzing this process. The results show that PME-1 is predominantly localized in the nucleus and harbors a functional nuclear localization signal, whereas LCMT1 is underrepresented in the nucleus and mainly localizes to the cytoplasm, Golgi region and late endosomes. Indirect immunofluorescence with methylation-sensitive anti-PP2A{sub C} antibodies revealed a good correlation with the methylation status of PP2A{sub C}, demethylated PP2A{sub C} being substantially nuclear. Throughout mitosis, demethylated PP2A{sub C} is associated with the mitotic spindle and during cytokinesis with the cleavage furrow. Overexpression of PME-1, but not of an inactive mutant, results in increased demethylation of PP2A{sub C} in the nucleus, whereas overexpression of a cytoplasmic PME-1 mutant lacking the NLS results in increased demethylation in the cytoplasm-in all cases, however, without any obvious functional consequences. PME-1 associates with an inactive PP2A population, regardless of its esterase activity or localization. We propose that stabilization of this inactive, nuclear PP2A pool is a major in vivo function of PME-1.

  3. Structural basis of protein phosphatase 2A stable latency

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Li; Stanevich, Vitali; Satyshur, Kenneth A; Kong, Mei; Watkins, Guy R.; Wadzinski, Brian E.; Sengupta, Rituparna; Xing, Yongna

    2013-01-01

    The catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2Ac) is stabilized in a latent form by α4, a regulatory protein essential for cell survival and biogenesis of all PP2A complexes. Here we report the structure of α4 bound to the N-terminal fragment of PP2Ac. This structure suggests that α4 binding to the full-length PP2Ac requires local unfolding near the active site, which perturbs the scaffold subunit binding site at the opposite surface via allosteric relay. These changes stabilize an inactive conformation of PP2Ac and convert oligomeric PP2A complexes to the α4 complex upon perturbation of the active site. The PP2Ac–α4 interface is essential for cell survival and sterically hinders a PP2A ubiquitination site, important for the stability of cellular PP2Ac. Our results show that α4 is a scavenger chaperone that binds to and stabilizes partially folded PP2Ac for stable latency, and reveal a mechanism by which α4 regulates cell survival, and biogenesis and surveillance of PP2A holoenzymes. PMID:23591866

  4. Carcinogenic Aspects of Protein Phosphatase 1 and 2A Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiki, Hirota; Suganuma, Masami

    Okadaic acid is functionally a potent tumor promoter working through inhibition of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A (PP1 and PP2A), resulting in sustained phosphorylation of proteins in cells. The mechanism of tumor promotion with oka-daic acid is thus completely different from that of the classic tumor promoter phorbol ester. Other potent inhibitors of PP1 and PP2A - such as dinophysistoxin-1, calyculins A-H, microcystin-LR and its derivatives, and nodularin - were isolated from marine organisms, and their structural features including the crystal structure of the PP1-inhibitor complex, tumor promoting activities, and biochemical and biological effects, are here reviewed. The compounds induced tumor promoting activity in three different organs, including mouse skin, rat glandular stomach and rat liver, initiated with three different carcinogens. The results indicate that inhibition of PP1 and PP2A is a general mechanism of tumor promotion applicable to various organs. This study supports the concept of endogenous tumor promoters in human cancer development.

  5. Structure of the Protein Phosphatase 2A Holoenzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,Y.; Xing, Y.; Chen, Y.; Chao, Y.; Lin, Z.; Fan, E.; Yu, J.; Strack, S.; Jeffrey, P.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays an essential role in many aspects of cellular physiology. The PP2A holoenzyme consists of a heterodimeric core enzyme, which comprises a scaffolding subunit and a catalytic subunit, and a variable regulatory subunit. Here we report the crystal structure of the heterotrimeric PP2A holoenzyme involving the regulatory subunit B'/B56/PR61. Surprisingly, the B'/PR61 subunit has a HEAT-like (huntingtin-elongation-A subunit-TOR-like) repeat structure, similar to that of the scaffolding subunit. The regulatory B'/B56/PR61 subunit simultaneously interacts with the catalytic subunit as well as the conserved ridge of the scaffolding subunit. The carboxyterminus of the catalytic subunit recognizes a surface groove at the interface between the B'/B56/PR61 subunit and the scaffolding subunit. Compared to the scaffolding subunit in the PP2A core enzyme, formation of the holoenzyme forces the scaffolding subunit to undergo pronounced conformational rearrangements. This structure reveals significant ramifications for understanding the function and regulation of PP2A.

  6. The RCN1-encoded A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A increases phosphatase activity in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deruere, J.; Jackson, K.; Garbers, C.; Soll, D.; Delong, A.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a heterotrimeric serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase, comprises a catalytic C subunit and two distinct regulatory subunits, A and B. The RCN1 gene encodes one of three A regulatory subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana. A T-DNA insertion mutation at this locus impairs root curling, seedling organ elongation and apical hypocotyl hook formation. We have used in vivo and in vitro assays to gauge the impact of the rcn1 mutation on PP2A activity in seedlings. PP2A activity is decreased in extracts from rcn1 mutant seedlings, and this decrease is not due to a reduction in catalytic subunit expression. Roots of mutant seedlings exhibit increased sensitivity to the phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and cantharidin in organ elongation assays. Shoots of dark-grown, but not light-grown seedlings also show increased inhibitor sensitivity. Furthermore, cantharidin treatment of wild-type seedlings mimics the rcn1 defect in root curling, root waving and hypocotyl hook formation assays. In roots of wild-type seedlings, RCN1 mRNA is expressed at high levels in root tips, and accumulates to lower levels in the pericycle and lateral root primordia. In shoots, RCN1 is expressed in the apical hook and the basal, rapidly elongating cells in etiolated hypocotyls, and in the shoot meristem and leaf primordia of light-grown seedlings. Our results show that the wild-type RCN1-encoded A subunit functions as a positive regulator of the PP2A holoenzyme, increasing activity towards substrates involved in organ elongation and differential cell elongation responses such as root curling.

  7. Protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit B56α limits phosphatase activity in the heart.

    PubMed

    Little, Sean C; Curran, Jerry; Makara, Michael A; Kline, Crystal F; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Xu, Zhaobin; Wu, Xiangqiong; Polina, Iuliia; Musa, Hassan; Meadows, Allison M; Carnes, Cynthia A; Biesiadecki, Brandon J; Davis, Jonathan P; Weisleder, Noah; Györke, Sandor; Wehrens, Xander H; Hund, Thomas J; Mohler, Peter J

    2015-07-21

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine-selective holoenzyme composed of a catalytic, scaffolding, and regulatory subunit. In the heart, PP2A activity is requisite for cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and central in adrenergic signaling. We found that mice deficient in the PP2A regulatory subunit B56α (1 of 13 regulatory subunits) had altered PP2A signaling in the heart that was associated with changes in cardiac physiology, suggesting that the B56α regulatory subunit had an autoinhibitory role that suppressed excess PP2A activity. The increase in PP2A activity in the mice with reduced B56α expression resulted in slower heart rates and increased heart rate variability, conduction defects, and increased sensitivity of heart rate to parasympathetic agonists. Increased PP2A activity in B56α(+/-) myocytes resulted in reduced Ca(2+) waves and sparks, which was associated with decreased phosphorylation (and thus decreased activation) of the ryanodine receptor RyR2, an ion channel on intracellular membranes that is involved in Ca(2+) regulation in cardiomyocytes. In line with an autoinhibitory role for B56α, in vivo expression of B56α in the absence of altered abundance of other PP2A subunits decreased basal phosphatase activity. Consequently, in vivo expression of B56α suppressed parasympathetic regulation of heart rate and increased RyR2 phosphorylation in cardiomyocytes. These data show that an integral component of the PP2A holoenzyme has an important inhibitory role in controlling PP2A enzyme activity in the heart.

  8. Protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit B56α limits phosphatase activity in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Little, Sean C.; Curran, Jerry; Makara, Michael A.; Kline, Crystal F.; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Xu, Zhaobin; Wu, Xiangqiong; Polina, Iuliia; Musa, Hassan; Meadows, Allison M.; Carnes, Cynthia A.; Biesiadecki, Brandon J.; Davis, Jonathan P.; Weisleder, Noah; Györke, Sandor; Wehrens, Xander H.; Hund, Thomas J.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine-selective holoenzyme composed of a catalytic, scaffolding, and regulatory subunit. In the heart, PP2A activity is requisite for cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and central in adrenergic signaling. We found that mice deficient in the PP2A regulatory subunit B56α (1 of 13 regulatory subunits) had altered PP2A signaling in the heart that was associated with changes in cardiac physiology, suggesting that the B56α regulatory subunit had an autoinhibitory role that suppressed excess PP2A activity. The increase in PP2A activity in the mice with reduced B56α expression resulted in slower heart rates and increased heart rate variability, conduction defects, and increased sensitivity of heart rate to parasympathetic agonists. Increased PP2A activity in B56α+/− myocytes resulted in reduced Ca2+ waves and sparks, which was associated with decreased phosphorylation (and thus decreased activation) of the ryanodine receptor RyR2, an ion channel on intracellular membranes that is involved in Ca2+ regulation in cardiomyocytes. In line with an autoinhibitory role for B56α, in vivo expression of B56α in the absence of altered abundance of other PP2A subunits decreased basal phosphatase activity. Consequently, in vivo expression of B56α suppressed parasympathetic regulation of heart rate and increased RyR2 phosphorylation in cardiomyocytes. These data show that an integral component of the PP2A holoenzyme has an important inhibitory role in controlling PP2A enzyme activity in the heart. PMID:26198358

  9. Regulation of Eye Development by Protein Serine/Threonine Phosphatases-1 and -2A.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Yang, Y; Gong, X-D; Huang, Z-X; Nie, Q; Wang, Z-F; Ji, W-K; Hu, X-H; Hu, W-F; Gong, L-L; Zhang, L; Huang, S; Qi, R-L; Yang, T-H; Chen, Z-G; Liu, W-B; Liu, Y-Z; Li, D W-C

    2015-01-01

    The protein serine/threonine phosphatases-1 and -2A are major cellular phosphatases, playing a fundamental role in organisms from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. They contribute to 90% dephosphorylation in eukaryote proteins. In the eye, both phosphatases are highly expressed and display important functions in regulating normal eye development. Moreover, they are implicated in pathogenesis through modulation of stress-induced apoptosis. Here we review the recent progresses on these aspects.

  10. Regulation of Eye Development by Protein Serine/Threonine Phosphatases-1 and -2A.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Yang, Y; Gong, X-D; Huang, Z-X; Nie, Q; Wang, Z-F; Ji, W-K; Hu, X-H; Hu, W-F; Gong, L-L; Zhang, L; Huang, S; Qi, R-L; Yang, T-H; Chen, Z-G; Liu, W-B; Liu, Y-Z; Li, D W-C

    2015-01-01

    The protein serine/threonine phosphatases-1 and -2A are major cellular phosphatases, playing a fundamental role in organisms from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. They contribute to 90% dephosphorylation in eukaryote proteins. In the eye, both phosphatases are highly expressed and display important functions in regulating normal eye development. Moreover, they are implicated in pathogenesis through modulation of stress-induced apoptosis. Here we review the recent progresses on these aspects. PMID:26592247

  11. [Role of protein phosphatase 2A in renal interstitial fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Xi, Yiyun; Li, Hua; Li, Jun; Li, Ying; Liu, Yuping; You, Yanhua; Duan, Shaobin; Liu, Hong; Sun, Lin; Peng, Youming; Liu, Fuyou

    2015-06-01

    目的:探讨蛋白磷酸酶2A(protein phosphatase 2A,PP2A)在大鼠单侧输尿管梗阻(unilateral ureteral obstruction,UUO)及TGF-β1刺激的人近端肾小管上皮细胞-2(human kidney proximal tubular epithelial-2,HK-2)的肾纤维化模型中的作用。方法:1)15只雄性SD大鼠随机分成假手术组( sham组)、模型组(UUO组)和UUO+冈田酸(okadaic acid,OA)干预组(OA组),每组各5只。术后OA组每日给予1.8%酒精稀释的OA 30 μg/kg,胃管饲喂72 h,对照组和模型组给予相等体积的1.8%酒精胃管饲喂,72 h后处死大鼠,收集血和肾组织,检测肾功能并采用免疫组织化学、Western印迹和RT-PCR法检测肾组织PP2A的c亚基(PP2Ac)、纤维连接蛋白(fibronectin,FN)、胶原-I(collagen-I,Col-I)、E-钙黏蛋白(E-cadherin,E-cad)和α平滑肌肌动蛋白(α-smooth muscle actin,α-SMA)的蛋白及mRNA的表达。2)采用台盼蓝排斥实验及MTT法找出适宜的OA浓度。常规培养HK-2细胞,随机分为对照组、TGF-β1组(TGF-β1 5 ng/mL干预24 h)、TGF-β1+OA组(TGF-β1 5 ng/mL+OA 40 nmol/L,同时干预24 h),Western印迹检测肾小管上皮细胞PP2Ac,FN,Col-I,E-cad和α-SMA 蛋白的表达。结果:1)肾功能表明UUO组尿素氮和肌酐较sham组升高,OA组尿素氮、肌酐均比UUO组下降(均P<0.05)。免疫组织化学、Western印迹和RT-PCR均显示:与sham组比较,UUO组PP2Ac,FN,Col-I和α-SMA表达升高,而E-cad表达下降(均P<0.05);与UUO组比较,OA组PP2Ac,FN,Col-I和α-SMA表达下降,E-cad表达升高(均P<0.05);2) OA 40 nmol/L为最适宜的实验质量浓度;Western印迹显示:与对照组比较,TGF-β1组PP2Ac,FN,Col-I和α-SMA表达升高,E-cad表达下降(均P<0.05);与TGF-β1组比较,TGF-β1+OA组PP2Ac,FN,Col-I和α-SMA表达下降,E-cad表达升高(均P<0.05)。结论:PP2A能促进肾间质纤维化。.

  12. Protein phosphatase 2A in stretch-induced endothelial cell proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murata, K.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    We previously proposed that activation of protein kinase C is a key mechanism for control of cell growth enhanced by cyclic strain [Rosales and Sumpio (1992): Surgery 112:459-466]. Here we examined protein phosphatase 1 and 2A activity in bovine aortic endothelial cells exposed to cyclic stain. Protein phosphatase 2A activity in the cytosol was decreased by 36.1% in response to cyclic strain for 60 min, whereas the activity in the membrane did not change. Treatment with low concentration (0.1 nM) of okadaic acid enhanced proliferation of both static and stretched endothelial cells in 10% fetal bovine serum. These data suggest that protein phosphatase 2A acts as a growth suppressor and cyclic strain may enhance cellular proliferation by inhibiting protein phosphatase 2A as well as stimulating protein kinase C.

  13. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A determines bortezomib-induced apoptosis in leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-Yu; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Kuo, Hsin-Yu; Huang, Hsiang-Po; Chen, Ming-Huang; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2013-01-01

    The multiple cellular targets affected by proteasome inhibition implicate a potential role for bortezomib, a first-in-class proteasome inhibitor, in enhancing antitumor activities in hematologic malignancies. Here, we examined the antitumor activity and drug targets of bortezomib in leukemia cells. Human leukemia cell lines were used for in vitro studies. Drug efficacy was evaluated by apoptosis assays and associated molecular events assessed by Western Blot. Gene silencing was performed by small interference RNA. Drug was tested in vivo in xenograft models of human leukemia cell lines and in primary leukemia cells. Clinical samples were assessed by immunohistochemical staining. Bortezomib differentially induced apoptosis in leukemia cells that was independent of its proteasome inhibition. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, a cellular inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, mediated the apoptotic effect of bortezomib. Bortezomib increased protein phosphatase 2A activity in sensitive leukemia cells (HL-60 and KG-1), but not in resistant cells (MOLT-3 and K562). Bortezomib’s downregulation of cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A and phospho-Akt correlated with its drug sensitivity. Furthermore, cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A negatively regulated protein phosphatase 2A activity. Ectopic expression of CIP2A up-regulated phospho-Akt and protected HL-60 cells from bortezomib-induced apoptosis, whereas silencing CIP2A overcame the resistance to bortezomib-induced apoptosis in MOLT3 and K562 cells. Importantly, bortezomib exerted in vivo antitumor activity in HL-60 xenografted tumors and induced cell death in some primary leukemic cells. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A was expressed in leukemic blasts from bone marrow samples. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A plays a major role in mediating bortezomib-induced apoptosis in leukemia cells. PMID:22983581

  14. Dephosphorylation of CDK9 by protein phosphatase 2A and protein phosphatase-1 in Tat-activated HIV-1 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Ammosova, Tatyana; Washington, Kareem; Debebe, Zufan; Brady, John; Nekhai, Sergei

    2005-01-01

    Background HIV-1 Tat protein recruits human positive transcription elongation factor P-TEFb, consisting of CDK9 and cyclin T1, to HIV-1 transactivation response (TAR) RNA. CDK9 is maintained in dephosphorylated state by TFIIH and undergo phosphorylation upon the dissociation of TFIIH. Thus, dephosphorylation of CDK9 prior to its association with HIV-1 preinitiation complex might be important for HIV-1 transcription. Others and we previously showed that protein phosphatase-2A and protein phosphatase-1 regulates HIV-1 transcription. In the present study we analyze relative contribution of PP2A and PP1 to dephosphorylation of CDK9 and to HIV-1 transcription in vitro and in vivo. Results In vitro, PP2A but not PP1 dephosphorylated autophosphorylated CDK9 and reduced complex formation between P-TEFb, Tat and TAR RNA. Inhibition of PP2A by okadaic acid inhibited basal as well as Tat-induced HIV-1 transcription whereas inhibition of PP1 by recombinant nuclear inhibitor of PP1 (NIPP1) inhibited only Tat-induced transcription in vitro. In cultured cells, low concentration of okadaic acid, inhibitory for PP2A, only mildly inhibited Tat-induced HIV-1 transcription. In contrast Tat-mediated HIV-1 transcription was strongly inhibited by expression of NIPP1. Okadaic acid induced phosphorylation of endogenous as well transiently expressed CDK9, but this induction was not seen in the cells expressing NIPP1. Also the okadaic acid did not induce phosphorylation of CDK9 with mutation of Thr 186 or with mutations in Ser-329, Thr-330, Thr-333, Ser-334, Ser-347, Thr-350, Ser-353, and Thr-354 residues involved in autophosphorylation of CDK9. Conclusion Our results indicate that although PP2A dephosphorylates autophosphorylated CDK9 in vitro, in cultured cells PP1 is likely to dephosphorylate CDK9 and contribute to the regulation of activated HIV-1 transcription. PMID:16048649

  15. A novel and essential mechanism determining specificity and activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fellner, Thomas; Lackner, Daniel H; Hombauer, Hans; Piribauer, Patrick; Mudrak, Ingrid; Zaragoza, Katrin; Juno, Claudia; Ogris, Egon

    2003-09-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is an essential intracellular serine/threonine phosphatase containing a catalytic subunit that possesses the potential to dephosphorylate promiscuously tyrosine-phosphorylated substrates in vitro. How PP2A acquires its intracellular specificity and activity for serine/threonine-phosphorylated substrates is unknown. Here we report a novel and phylogenetically conserved mechanism to generate active phospho-serine/threonine-specific PP2A in vivo. Phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator (PTPA), a protein of so far unknown intracellular function, is required for the biogenesis of active and specific PP2A. Deletion of the yeast PTPA homologs generated a PP2A catalytic subunit with a conformation different from the wild-type enzyme, as indicated by its altered substrate specificity, reduced protein stability, and metal dependence. Complementation and RNA-interference experiments showed that PTPA fulfills an essential function conserved from yeast to man.

  16. A subset of RAB proteins modulates PP2A phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Francesca; Mattioni, Anna; Boldt, Karsten; Panni, Simona; Santonico, Elena; Castagnoli, Luisa; Ueffing, Marius; Cesareni, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is one of the most abundant serine-threonine phosphatases in mammalian cells. PP2A is a hetero-trimeric holoenzyme participating in a variety of physiological processes whose deregulation is often associated to cancer. The specificity and activity of this phosphatase is tightly modulated by a family of regulatory B subunits that dock the catalytic subunit to the substrates. Here we characterize a novel and unconventional molecular mechanism controlling the activity of the tumor suppressor PP2A. By applying a mass spectrometry-based interactomics approach, we identified novel PP2A interacting proteins. Unexpectedly we found that a significant number of RAB proteins associate with the PP2A scaffold subunit (PPP2R1A), but not with the catalytic subunit (PPP2CA). Such interactions occur in vitro and in vivo in specific subcellular compartments. Notably we demonstrated that one of these RAB proteins, RAB9, competes with the catalytic subunit PPP2CA in binding to PPP2R1A. This competitive association has an important role in controlling the PP2A catalytic activity, which is compromised in several solid tumors and leukemias. PMID:27611305

  17. A subset of RAB proteins modulates PP2A phosphatase activity

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Francesca; Mattioni, Anna; Boldt, Karsten; Panni, Simona; Santonico, Elena; Castagnoli, Luisa; Ueffing, Marius; Cesareni, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is one of the most abundant serine–threonine phosphatases in mammalian cells. PP2A is a hetero-trimeric holoenzyme participating in a variety of physiological processes whose deregulation is often associated to cancer. The specificity and activity of this phosphatase is tightly modulated by a family of regulatory B subunits that dock the catalytic subunit to the substrates. Here we characterize a novel and unconventional molecular mechanism controlling the activity of the tumor suppressor PP2A. By applying a mass spectrometry-based interactomics approach, we identified novel PP2A interacting proteins. Unexpectedly we found that a significant number of RAB proteins associate with the PP2A scaffold subunit (PPP2R1A), but not with the catalytic subunit (PPP2CA). Such interactions occur in vitro and in vivo in specific subcellular compartments. Notably we demonstrated that one of these RAB proteins, RAB9, competes with the catalytic subunit PPP2CA in binding to PPP2R1A. This competitive association has an important role in controlling the PP2A catalytic activity, which is compromised in several solid tumors and leukemias. PMID:27611305

  18. Protein phosphatase 2A is requisite for the function of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Apostolidis, Sokratis A.; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Noé; Suárez-Fueyo, Abel; Dioufa, Nikolina; Ozcan, Esra; Crispín, José C.; Tsokos, Maria G.; Tsokos, George C.

    2015-01-01

    Immune homeostasis depends on the proper function of regulatory T (Treg) cells. Compromised Treg cell suppressive activity leads to autoimmune disease, graft rejection and promotes anti-tumor immunity. Here we report the previously unrecognized requirement of the serine/threonine phosphatase Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) for the function of Treg cells. Treg cells exhibited high PP2A activity and Treg cell-specific ablation of the PP2A complex resulted in a severe, multi-organ, lymphoproliferative autoimmune disorder. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed that PP2A associates with components of the mTOR pathway and suppresses mTORC1 activity. In the absence of PP2A, Treg cells altered their metabolic and cytokine profile and were unable to suppress effector immune responses. Therefore, PP2A is requisite for the function of Treg cells and the prevention of autoimmunity. PMID:26974206

  19. Protein phosphatase 2A in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: effects on cell growth and bud morphogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Ronne, H; Carlberg, M; Hu, G Z; Nehlin, J O

    1991-01-01

    We have cloned three genes for protein phosphatases in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two of the genes, PPH21 and PPH22, encode highly similar proteins that are homologs of the mammalian protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), while the third gene, PPH3, encodes a new PP2A-related protein. Disruptions of either PPH21 or PPH22 had no effects, but spores disrupted for both genes produced very small colonies with few surviving cells. We conclude that PP2A performs an important function in yeast cells. A disruption of the third gene, PPH3, did not in itself affect growth, but it completely prevented growth of spores disrupted for both PPH21 and PPH22. Thus, PPH3 provides some PP2A-complementing activity which allows for a limited growth of PP2A-deficient cells. Strains were constructed in which we could study the phenotypes caused by either excess PP2A or total PP2A depletion. We found that the level of PP2A activity has dramatic effects on cell shape. PP2A-depleted cells develop an abnormal pear-shaped morphology which is particularly pronounced in the growing bud. In contrast, overexpression of PP2A produces more elongated cells, and high-level overexpression causes a balloonlike phenotype with huge swollen cells filled by large vacuoles. Images PMID:1656215

  20. Characterization of protein phosphatase 2A acting on phosphorylated plasma membrane aquaporin of tulip petals.

    PubMed

    Azad, Abul Kalam; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shibata, Hitoshi

    2004-05-01

    A protein phosphatase holo-type enzyme (38, 65, and 75 kDa) preparation and a free catalytic subunit (38 kDa) purified from tulip petals were characterized as protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) by immunological and biochemical approaches. The plasma membrane containing the putative plasma membrane aquaporin (PM-AQP) was prepared from tulip petals, phosphorylated in vitro, and used as the substrate for both of the purified PP2A preparations. Although both preparations dephosphorylated the phosphorylated PM-AQP at 20 degrees C, only the holo-type enzyme preparation acted at 5 degrees C on the phosphorylated PM-AQP with higher substrate specificity, suggesting that regulatory subunits are required for low temperature-dependent dephosphorylation of PM-AQP in tulip petals.

  1. Structural Mechanism of Demethylation and Inactivation of Protein Phosphatase 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Xing,Y.; Li, Z.; Chen, Y.; Stock, J.; Jeffrey, P.; Shi, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is an important serine/threonine phosphatase that plays a role in many biological processes. Reversible carboxyl methylation of the PP2A catalytic subunit is an essential regulatory mechanism for its function. Demethylation and negative regulation of PP2A is mediated by a PP2A-specific methylesterase PME-1, which is conserved from yeast to humans. However, the underlying mechanism of PME-1 function remains enigmatic. Here we report the crystal structures of PME-1 by itself and in complex with a PP2A heterodimeric core enzyme. The structures reveal that PME-1 directly binds to the active site of PP2A and that this interaction results in the activation of PME-1 by rearranging the catalytic triad into an active conformation. Strikingly, these interactions also lead to inactivation of PP2A by evicting the manganese ions that are required for the phosphatase activity of PP2A. These observations identify a dual role of PME-1 that regulates PP2A activation, methylation, and holoenzyme assembly in cells.

  2. Protein Phosphatase 2A in the Regulatory Network Underlying Biotic Stress Resistance in Plants.

    PubMed

    Durian, Guido; Rahikainen, Moona; Alegre, Sara; Brosché, Mikael; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa

    2016-01-01

    Biotic stress factors pose a major threat to plant health and can significantly deteriorate plant productivity by impairing the physiological functions of the plant. To combat the wide range of pathogens and insect herbivores, plants deploy converging signaling pathways, where counteracting activities of protein kinases and phosphatases form a basic mechanism for determining appropriate defensive measures. Recent studies have identified Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) as a crucial component that controls pathogenesis responses in various plant species. Genetic, proteomic and metabolomic approaches have underscored the versatile nature of PP2A, which contributes to the regulation of receptor signaling, organellar signaling, gene expression, metabolic pathways, and cell death, all of which essentially impact plant immunity. Associated with this, various PP2A subunits mediate post-translational regulation of metabolic enzymes and signaling components. Here we provide an overview of protein kinase/phosphatase functions in plant immunity signaling, and position the multifaceted functions of PP2A in the tightly inter-connected regulatory network that controls the perception, signaling and responding to biotic stress agents in plants. PMID:27375664

  3. Protein Phosphatase 2A in the Regulatory Network Underlying Biotic Stress Resistance in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Durian, Guido; Rahikainen, Moona; Alegre, Sara; Brosché, Mikael; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa

    2016-01-01

    Biotic stress factors pose a major threat to plant health and can significantly deteriorate plant productivity by impairing the physiological functions of the plant. To combat the wide range of pathogens and insect herbivores, plants deploy converging signaling pathways, where counteracting activities of protein kinases and phosphatases form a basic mechanism for determining appropriate defensive measures. Recent studies have identified Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) as a crucial component that controls pathogenesis responses in various plant species. Genetic, proteomic and metabolomic approaches have underscored the versatile nature of PP2A, which contributes to the regulation of receptor signaling, organellar signaling, gene expression, metabolic pathways, and cell death, all of which essentially impact plant immunity. Associated with this, various PP2A subunits mediate post-translational regulation of metabolic enzymes and signaling components. Here we provide an overview of protein kinase/phosphatase functions in plant immunity signaling, and position the multifaceted functions of PP2A in the tightly inter-connected regulatory network that controls the perception, signaling and responding to biotic stress agents in plants. PMID:27375664

  4. Protein Phosphatase 2A Mediates Oxidative Stress Induced Apoptosis in Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chong-xin; Lv, Bo; Wang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the most common bone diseases, which is characterized by a systemic impairment of bone mass and fragility fractures. Age-related oxidative stress is highly associated with impaired osteoblastic dysfunctions and subsequent osteoporosis. In osteoblasts (bone formation cells), reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously generated and further cause lipid peroxidation, protein damage, and DNA lesions, leading to osteoblastic dysfunctions, dysdifferentiations, and apoptosis. Although much progress has been made, the mechanism responsible for oxidative stress induced cellular alternations and osteoblastic toxicity is still not fully elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a major protein phosphatase in mammalian cells, mediates oxidative stress induced apoptosis in osteoblasts. Our results showed that lipid peroxidation products (4-HNE) may induce dramatic oxidative stress, inflammatory reactions, and apoptosis in osteoblasts. These oxidative stress responses may ectopically activate PP2A phosphatase activity, which may be mediated by inactivation of AKT/mTOR pathway. Moreover, inhibition of PP2A activity by okadaic acid might partly prevent osteoblastic apoptosis under oxidative conditions. These findings may reveal a novel mechanism to clarify the role of oxidative stress for osteoblastic apoptosis and provide new possibilities for the treatment of related bone diseases, such as osteoporosis. PMID:26538836

  5. Protein phosphatase 2A subunit PR70 interacts with pRb and mediates its dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Magenta, Alessandra; Fasanaro, Pasquale; Romani, Sveva; Di Stefano, Valeria; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Martelli, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (pRb) regulates cell proliferation and differentiation via phosphorylation-sensitive interactions with specific targets. While the role of cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase complexes in the modulation of pRb phosphorylation has been extensively studied, relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating phosphate removal by phosphatases. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is constituted by a core dimer bearing catalytic activity and one variable B regulatory subunit conferring target specificity and subcellular localization. We previously demonstrated that PP2A core dimer binds pRb and dephosphorylates pRb upon oxidative stress. In the present study, we identified a specific PP2A-B subunit, PR70, that was associated with pRb both in vitro and in vivo. PR70 overexpression caused pRb dephosphorylation; conversely, PR70 knockdown prevented both pRb dephosphorylation and DNA synthesis inhibition induced by oxidative stress. Moreover, we found that intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization was necessary and sufficient to trigger pRb dephosphorylation and PP2A phosphatase activity of PR70 was Ca(2+) induced. These data underline the importance of PR70-Ca(2+) interaction in the signal transduction mechanisms triggered by redox imbalance and leading to pRb dephosphorylation.

  6. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human gene of the phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator (PTPA) of protein phosphatase 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoof, C.; Cayla, X.; Merlevede, W.; Goris, J.

    1995-07-20

    The PTPA gene encodes a specific phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator of the dimeric form of protein phosphatase 2A. PTPA, cloned from human genomic libraries, is encoded by one single-copy gene, composed of 10 exons and 9 introns with a total length of about 60 kb. The transcription start site was determined, and the 5{prime} flanking sequence was analyzed for its potential as a promotor. This region lacks a TATA sequence in the appropriate position relative to the transcription start, is very GC-rich, and contains upstream of the transcription start four Sp1 sites, a feature common to many TATA-less promotors. Based on the homology with DNA binding consensus sequences of transcription factors, we identified in this promotor region several putative DNA binding sites for transcription factors, such as NF-{kappa}B, Myb, Ets-1, Myc, and ATF. Transfection experiments with a construct containing the PTPA promotor region inserted 5{prime} of a luciferase reporter gene revealed that the 5{prime} flanking sequence of the PTPA gene indeed displayed promotor activity that seems to be cell-line dependent. By fluorescence in situ hybridization and G-banding, the PTPA gene was localized to the 9q34 region. The PTPA gene is positioned centromeric of c-abl in a region embracing several genes implicated in oncogenesis. 28 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Protein Phosphatase 2A as a Therapeutic Target in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Arriazu, Elena; Pippa, Raffaella; Odero, María D.

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous malignant disorder of hematopoietic progenitor cells in which several genetic and epigenetic aberrations have been described. Despite progressive advances in our understanding of the molecular biology of this disease, the outcome for most patients is poor. It is, therefore, necessary to develop more effective treatment strategies. Genetic aberrations affecting kinases have been widely studied in AML; however, the role of phosphatases remains underexplored. Inactivation of the tumor-suppressor protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is frequent in AML patients, making it a promising target for therapy. There are several PP2A inactivating mechanisms reported in this disease. Deregulation or specific post-translational modifications of PP2A subunits have been identified as a cause of PP2A malfunction, which lead to deregulation of proliferation or apoptosis pathways, depending on the subunit affected. Likewise, overexpression of either SET or cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, endogenous inhibitors of PP2A, is a recurrent event in AML that impairs PP2A activity, contributing to leukemogenesis progression. Interestingly, the anticancer activity of several PP2A-activating drugs (PADs) depends on interaction/sequestration of SET. Preclinical studies show that pharmacological restoration of PP2A activity by PADs effectively antagonizes leukemogenesis, and that these drugs have synergistic cytotoxic effects with conventional chemotherapy and kinase inhibitors, opening new possibilities for personalized treatment in AML patients, especially in cases with SET-dependent inactivation of PP2A. Here, we review the role of PP2A as a druggable tumor suppressor in AML. PMID:27092295

  8. Mutations in a new Arabidopsis cyclophilin disrupt its interaction with protein phosphatase 2A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, K.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The heterotrimeric protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a component of multiple signaling pathways in eukaryotes. Disruption of PP2A activity in Arabidopsis is known to alter auxin transport and growth response pathways. We demonstrated that the regulatory subunit A of an Arabidopsis PP2A interacts with a novel cyclophilin, ROC7. The gene for this cyclophilin encodes a protein that contains a unique 30-amino acid extension at the N-terminus, which distinguishes the gene product from all previously identified Arabidopsis cyclophilins. Altered forms of ROC7 cyclophilin with mutations in the conserved DENFKL domain did not bind to PP2A. Unlike protein phosphatase 2B, PP2A activity in Arabidopsis extracts was not affected by the presence of the cyclophilin-binding molecule cyclosporin. The ROC7 transcript was expressed to high levels in all tissues tested. Expression of an ROC7 antisense transcript gave rise to increased root growth. These results indicate that cyclophilin may have a role in regulating PP2A activity, by a mechanism that differs from that employed for cyclophilin regulation of PP2B.

  9. Physical association of GPR54 C-terminal with protein phosphatase 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Barry J.; Wang Zixuan; Mobley, La'Tonya; Khosravi, Davood; Fujii, Nobutaka; Navenot, Jean-Marc; Peiper, Stephen C.

    2008-12-26

    KiSS1 was discovered as a metastasis suppressor gene and subsequently found to encode kisspeptins (KP), ligands for a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR), GPR54. This ligand-receptor pair was later shown to play a critical role in the neuro-endocrine regulation of puberty. The C-terminal cytoplasmic (C-ter) domain of GPR54 contains a segment rich in proline and arginine residues that corresponds to the primary structure of four overlapping SH3 binding motifs. Yeast two hybrid experiments identified the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-C) as an interacting protein. Pull-down experiments with GST fusion proteins containing the GPR54 C-ter confirmed binding to PP2A-C in cell lysates and these complexes contained phosphatase activity. The proline arginine rich segment is necessary for these interactions. The GPR54 C-ter bound directly to purified recombinant PP2A-C, indicating the GPR54 C-ter may form complexes involving the catalytic subunit of PP2A that regulate phosphorylation of critical signaling intermediates.

  10. Negative control of BAK1 by protein phosphatase 2A during plant innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Segonzac, Cécile; Macho, Alberto P; Sanmartín, Maite; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Sánchez-Serrano, José Juan; Zipfel, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by surface-localized pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) activates plant innate immunity, mainly through activation of numerous protein kinases. Appropriate induction of immune responses must be tightly regulated, as many of the kinases involved have an intrinsic high activity and are also regulated by other external and endogenous stimuli. Previous evidences suggest that PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) is under constant negative regulation by protein phosphatases but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we show that protein Ser/Thr phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) controls the activation of PRR complexes by modulating the phosphostatus of the co-receptor and positive regulator BAK1. A potential PP2A holoenzyme composed of the subunits A1, C4, and B’η/ζ inhibits immune responses triggered by several PAMPs and anti-bacterial immunity. PP2A constitutively associates with BAK1 in planta. Impairment in this PP2A-based regulation leads to increased steady-state BAK1 phosphorylation, which can poise enhanced immune responses. This work identifies PP2A as an important negative regulator of plant innate immunity that controls BAK1 activation in surface-localized immune receptor complexes. PMID:25085430

  11. Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein phosphatase 2A performs an essential cellular function and is encoded by two genes.

    PubMed Central

    Sneddon, A A; Cohen, P T; Stark, M J

    1990-01-01

    Two genes (PPH21 and PPH22) encoding the yeast homologues of protein serine-threonine phosphatase 2A have been cloned from a Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomic library using a rabbit protein phosphatase 2A cDNA as a hybridization probe. The PPH genes are genetically linked on chromosome IV and are predicted to encode polypeptides each with 74% amino acid sequence identity to rabbit type 2A protein phosphatase, indicating once again the extraordinarily high degree of sequence conservation shown by protein-phosphatases from different species. The two PPH genes show less than 10% amino acid sequence divergence from each other and while disruption of either PPH gene alone is without any major effect, the double disruption is lethal. This indicates that protein phosphatase 2A activity is an essential cellular function in yeast. Measurement of type 2A protein phosphatase activity in yeast strains lacking one or other of the genes indicates that they account for most, if not all, protein phosphatase 2A activity in the cell. Images Fig. 5. PMID:2176150

  12. Modulation of plant HMG-CoA reductase by protein phosphatase 2A

    PubMed Central

    Antolín-Llovera, Meritxell; Leivar, Pablo; Arró, Montserrat; Ferrer, Albert; Boronat, Albert

    2011-01-01

    The enzyme HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) has a key regulatory role in the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis, critical not only for normal plant development, but also for the adaptation to demanding environmental conditions. Consistent with this notion, plant HMGR is modulated by many diverse endogenous signals and external stimuli. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is involved in auxin, abscisic acid, ethylene and brassinosteroid signaling and now emerges as a positive and negative multilevel regulator of plant HMGR, both during normal growth and in response to a variety of stress conditions. The interaction with HMGR is mediated by B″ regulatory subunits of PP2A, which are also calcium binding proteins. The new discoveries uncover the potential of PP2A to integrate developmental and calcium-mediated environmental signals in the control of plant HMGR. PMID:21701259

  13. Structure of a Protein Phosphatase 2A Holoenzyme: Insights into B55-Mediated Tau Dephosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Chen, Y; Zhang, P; Jeffrey, P; Shi, Y

    2008-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) regulates many essential aspects of cellular physiology. Members of the regulatory B/B55/PR55 family are thought to play a key role in the dephosphorylation of Tau, whose hyperphosphorylation contributes to Alzheimer's disease. The underlying mechanisms of the PP2A-Tau connection remain largely enigmatic. Here, we report the complete reconstitution of a Tau dephosphorylation assay and the crystal structure of a heterotrimeric PP2A holoenzyme involving the regulatory subunit B?. We show that B? specifically and markedly facilitates dephosphorylation of the phosphorylated Tau in our reconstituted assay. The B? subunit comprises a seven-bladed ? propeller, with an acidic, substrate-binding groove located in the center of the propeller. The ? propeller latches onto the ridge of the PP2A scaffold subunit with the help of a protruding ? hairpin arm. Structure-guided mutagenesis studies revealed the underpinnings of PP2A-mediated dephosphorylation of Tau.

  14. Structure of Protein Phosphatase 2A Core Enzyme Bound to Tumor-Inducing Toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Xing,Y.; Xu, Y.; Chen, Y.; Jeffrey, P.; Chao, Y.; Lin, Z.; Li, Z.; Strack, S.; Stock, J.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The serine/threonine phosphatase protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays an essential role in many aspects of cellular functions and has been shown to be an important tumor suppressor. The core enzyme of PP2A comprises a 65 kDa scaffolding subunit and a 36 kDa catalytic subunit. Here we report the crystal structures of the PP2A core enzyme bound to two of its inhibitors, the tumor-inducing agents okadaic acid and microcystin-LR, at 2.6 and 2.8 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The catalytic subunit recognizes one end of the elongated scaffolding subunit by interacting with the conserved ridges of HEAT repeats 11-15. Formation of the core enzyme forces the scaffolding subunit to undergo pronounced structural rearrangement. The scaffolding subunit exhibits considerable conformational flexibility, which is proposed to play an essential role in PP2A function. These structures, together with biochemical analyses, reveal significant insights into PP2A function and serve as a framework for deciphering the diverse roles of PP2A in cellular physiology.

  15. HSP105 Recruits Protein Phosphatase 2A To Dephosphorylate β-Catenin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Nancy; Kakunda, Michael; Pham, Victoria; Lill, Jennie R.; Du, Pan; Wongchenko, Matthew; Yan, Yibing; Firestein, Ron

    2015-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin pathway causes accumulation of β-catenin in the cytoplasm and its subsequent translocation into the nucleus to initiate the transcription of the target genes. Without Wnt stimulation, β-catenin forms a complex with axin (axis inhibitor), adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), casein kinase 1α (CK1α), and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and undergoes phosphorylation-dependent ubiquitination. Phosphatases, such as protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), interestingly, also are components of this degradation complex; therefore, a balance must be reached between phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. How this balance is regulated is largely unknown. Here we show that a heat shock protein, HSP105, is a previously unidentified component of the β-catenin degradation complex. HSP105 is required for Wnt signaling, since depletion of HSP105 compromises β-catenin accumulation and target gene transcription upon Wnt stimulation. Mechanistically, HSP105 depletion disrupts the integration of PP2A into the β-catenin degradation complex, favoring the hyperphosphorylation and degradation of β-catenin. HSP105 is overexpressed in many types of tumors, correlating with increased nuclear β-catenin protein levels and Wnt target gene upregulation. Furthermore, overexpression of HSP105 is a prognostic biomarker that correlates with poor overall survival in breast cancer patients as well as melanoma patients participating in the BRIM2 clinical study. PMID:25645927

  16. Protein phosphatases 1 and 2A promote Raf-1 activation by regulating 14-3-3 interactions.

    PubMed

    Jaumot, M; Hancock, J F

    2001-07-01

    Raf-1 activation is a complex process which involves plasma membrane recruitment, phosphorylation, protein-protein and lipid-protein interactions. We now show that PP1 and PP2A serine-threonine phosphatases also have a positive role in Ras dependent Raf-1 activation. General serine-threonine phosphatase inhibitors such sodium fluoride, or ss-glycerophosphate and sodium pyrophosphate, or specific PP1 and PP2A inhibitors including microcystin-LR, protein phosphatase 2A inhibitor I(1) or protein phosphatase inhibitor 2 all abrogate H-Ras and K-Ras dependent Raf-1 activation in vitro. A critical Raf-1 target residue for PP1 and PP2A is S259. Serine phosphatase inhibitors block the dephosphorylation of S259, which accompanies Raf-1 activation, and Ras dependent activation of mutant Raf259A is relatively resistant to serine phosphatase inhibitors. Sucrose gradient analysis demonstrates that serine phosphatase inhibition increases the total amount of 14-3-3 and Raf-1 associated with the plasma membrane and significantly alters the distribution of 14-3-3 and Raf-1 across different plasma membrane microdomains. These observations suggest that dephosphorylation of S259 is a critical early step in Ras dependent Raf-1 activation which facilitates 14-3-3 displacement. Inhibition of PP1 and PP2A therefore causes plasma membrane accumulation of Raf-1/14-3-3 complexes which cannot be activated.

  17. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbers, C.; DeLong, A.; Deruere, J.; Bernasconi, P.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

  18. B56δ-related protein phosphatase 2A dysfunction identified in patients with intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Houge, Gunnar; Haesen, Dorien; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Mehta, Sarju; Parker, Michael J.; Wright, Michael; Vogt, Julie; McKee, Shane; Tolmie, John L.; Cordeiro, Nuno; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Willemsen, Marjolein H.; Reijnders, Margot R.F.; Berland, Siren; Hayman, Eli; Lahat, Eli; Brilstra, Eva H.; van Gassen, Koen L.I.; Zonneveld-Huijssoon, Evelien; de Bie, Charlotte I.; Hoischen, Alexander; Eichler, Evan E.; Holdhus, Rita; Steen, Vidar M.; Døskeland, Stein Ove; Hurles, Matthew E.; FitzPatrick, David R.; Janssens, Veerle

    2015-01-01

    Here we report inherited dysregulation of protein phosphatase activity as a cause of intellectual disability (ID). De novo missense mutations in 2 subunits of serine/threonine (Ser/Thr) protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) were identified in 16 individuals with mild to severe ID, long-lasting hypotonia, epileptic susceptibility, frontal bossing, mild hypertelorism, and downslanting palpebral fissures. PP2A comprises catalytic (C), scaffolding (A), and regulatory (B) subunits that determine subcellular anchoring, substrate specificity, and physiological function. Ten patients had mutations within a highly conserved acidic loop of the PPP2R5D-encoded B56δ regulatory subunit, with the same E198K mutation present in 6 individuals. Five patients had mutations in the PPP2R1A-encoded scaffolding Aα subunit, with the same R182W mutation in 3 individuals. Some Aα cases presented with large ventricles, causing macrocephaly and hydrocephalus suspicion, and all cases exhibited partial or complete corpus callosum agenesis. Functional evaluation revealed that mutant A and B subunits were stable and uncoupled from phosphatase activity. Mutant B56δ was A and C binding–deficient, while mutant Aα subunits bound B56δ well but were unable to bind C or bound a catalytically impaired C, suggesting a dominant-negative effect where mutant subunits hinder dephosphorylation of B56δ-anchored substrates. Moreover, mutant subunit overexpression resulted in hyperphosphorylation of GSK3β, a B56δ-regulated substrate. This effect was in line with clinical observations, supporting a correlation between the ID degree and biochemical disturbance. PMID:26168268

  19. Protein phosphatase 2A activity is required for functional adherent junctions in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kása, Anita; Czikora, István; Verin, Alexander D; Gergely, Pál; Csortos, Csilla

    2013-09-01

    Reversible Ser/Thr phosphorylation of cytoskeletal and adherent junction (AJ) proteins has a critical role in the regulation of endothelial cell (EC) barrier function. We have demonstrated earlier that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity is important in EC barrier integrity. In the present work, macro- and microvascular EC were examined and we provided further evidence on the significance of PP2A in the maintenance of EC cytoskeleton and barrier function with special focus on the Bα (regulatory) subunit of PP2A. Immunofluorescent staining revealed that the inhibition of PP2A results in changes in the organization of EC cytoskeleton as microtubule dissolution and actin re-arrangement were detected. Depletion of Bα regulatory subunit of PP2A had similar effect on the cytoskeleton structure of the cells. Furthermore, transendothelial electric resistance measurements demonstrated significantly slower barrier recovery of Bα depleted EC after thrombin treatment. AJ proteins, VE-cadherin and β-catenin, were detected along with Bα in pull-down assay. Also, the inhibition of PP2A (by okadaic acid or fostriecin) or depletion of Bα caused β-catenin translocation from the membrane to the cytoplasm in parallel with its phosphorylation on Ser552. In conclusion, our data suggest that the A/Bα/C holoenzyme form of PP2A is essential in EC barrier integrity both in micro- and macrovascular EC. PMID:23721711

  20. Effects of regulatory subunits on the kinetics of protein phosphatase 2A.

    PubMed

    Price, N E; Mumby, M C

    2000-09-19

    Both the scaffold (A) and the regulatory (R) subunits of protein phosphatase 2A regulate enzyme activity and specificity. Heterotrimeric enzymes containing different R-subunits differ in their specific activities for substrates. Kinetic parameters for the dephosphorylation of a phosphopeptide by different oligomeric forms of PP2A were determined to begin to elucidate the molecular basis of regulatory subunit effects on phosphatase activity. Using steady state kinetics and the pH dependence of kinetic parameters, we have explored the effect of the A- and R-subunits on the kinetic and chemical mechanism of PP2A. The regulatory subunits affected a broad range of kinetic parameters. The C-subunit and AC dimer were qualitatively similar with respect to the product inhibition patterns and the pH dependence of kinetic parameters. However, a 22-fold decrease in rate and a 4.7-fold decrease in K(m) can be attributed to the presence of the A-subunit. The presence of the R2alpha (Balpha or PR55alpha) subunit caused an additional decrease in K(m) and changed the kinetic mechanism of peptide dephosphorylation. The R2alpha-subunit also caused significant changes in the pH dependence of kinetic parameters as compared to the free C subunit or AC heterodimer. The data support an important role for the regulatory subunits in determining both the affinity of PP2A heterotrimers for peptide substrates and the mechanism by which they are dephosphorylated.

  1. Protein phosphatase 2A dephosphorylates SNAP-25 through two distinct mechanisms in mouse brain synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Iida, Yuuki; Yamamori, Saori; Itakura, Makoto; Miyaoka, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Masami

    2013-03-01

    Synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25) plays an essential role in exocytotic neurotransmitter release as a t-SNARE protein. SNAP-25 is phosphorylated at Ser(187) in a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent manner, but the mechanism for dephosphorylation has yet to be clarified. We investigated SNAP-25 dephosphorylation by comparing it to growth associated protein 43 (GAP-43), another PKC-dependent presynaptic phosphoprotein, in crude mouse brain synaptosome preparations. Phosphorylation levels for both SNAP-25 and GAP-43 increased significantly after treatment with PKC activator phorbol 12, 13-dibutyrate (PDB), and ionomycin treatment induced a striking reduction in a time-dependent manner. This dephosphorylation occurred only in the presence of extracellular Ca(2+), indicating involvement of a Ca(2+)-dependent phosphatase. Ca(2+)-dependent dephosphorylation was not suppressed by calcineurin/PP2B inhibitors such as FK506 and cyclosporine A. SNAP-25 dephosphorylation, however, was suppressed by calyculin A, a non-selective inhibitor of PP1 and PP2A, and okadaic acid selective for PP2A, but not by tautomycin selective for PP1. In contrast, none of these inhibitors suppressed GAP-43 dephosphorylation. PDB-induced SNAP-25 phosphorylation was enhanced by okadaic acid in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that PP2A participates in SNAP-25 dephosphorylation through Ca(2+)-dependent and Ca(2+)-independent mechanisms but is not involved in GAP-43 dephosphorylation.

  2. Purification and characterization of protein phosphatase 2A from petals of the tulip Tulipa gesnerina.

    PubMed

    Azad, Md Abul Kalam; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shibata, Hitoshi

    2006-11-30

    The holoenzyme of protein phosphatase (PP) from tulip petals was purified by using hydrophobic interaction, anion exchange and microcystin affinity chromatography to analyze activity towards p-nitrophenyl phosphate (p-NPP). The catalytic subunit of PP was released from its endogenous regulatory subunits by ethanol precipitation and further purified. Both preparations were characterized by immunological and biochemical approaches to be PP2A. On SDS-PAGE, the final purified holoenzyme preparation showed three protein bands estimated at 38, 65, and 75 kDa while the free catalytic subunit preparation showed only the 38 kDa protein. In both preparations, the 38 kDa protein was identified immunologically as the catalytic subunit of PP2A by using a monoclonal antibody against the PP2A catalytic subunit. The final 623- and 748- fold purified holoenzyme and the free catalytic preparations, respectively, exhibited high sensitivity to inhibition by 1 nM okadaic acid when activity was measured with p-NPP. The holoenzyme displayed higher stimulation in the presence of ammonium sulfate than the free catalytic subunit did by protamine, thereby suggesting different enzymatic behaviors.

  3. Protein phosphatase 2A Cα regulates proliferation, migration, and metastasis of osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Di; Okamura, Hirohiko; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Teramachi, Jumpei; Haneji, Tatsuji

    2016-10-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most frequent primary bone tumor. Serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) participates in regulating many important physiological processes, such as cell cycle, growth, apoptosis, and signal transduction. In this study, we examined the expression and function of PP2A Cα in osteosarcoma cells. PP2A Cα expression was expected to be higher in malignant osteosarcoma tissues. PP2A Cα expression level and PP2A activity was higher in malignant osteosarcoma LM8 cells compared with that in primary osteoblasts and in the osteoblast-like cell line MC3T3-E1. Okadaic acid, an inhibitor of PP2A, reduced cell viability and induced apoptosis in LM8 cells. PP2A Cα-knockdown LM8 cells (shPP2A) exhibited less striking filopodial and lamellipodial structures than that in original LM8 cells. Focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation and NF-κB activity decreased in shPP2A-treated cells. Sensitivity to serum deprivation-induced apoptosis increased in shPP2A-treated cells, accompanied by a lower expression level of anti-apoptotic BCL-2 in these cells. Reduction of PP2A Cα resulted in a decrease in the migration ability of LM8 cells in vitro. Reduction in PP2A Cα levels in vivo suppressed proliferation and metastasis in LM8 cells. PP2A Cα expression was also higher in human osteosarcoma MG63 and SaOS-2 cells than that in primary osteoblasts and MC3T3-E1 cells, and reduction in PP2A Cα levels suppressed the cell proliferation rate and migration ability of MG63 cells. These results indicate that PP2A Cα has a critical role in the proliferation and metastasis of osteosarcoma cells; therefore, its inhibition could potentially suppress the malignancy of osteosarcoma cells. PMID:27617401

  4. The role of protein phosphatase 2A in regulating Wnt signaling and apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinghai

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a major serine/threonine-specific phosphatase and regulates a significant array of cellular events. This dissertation primarily describes the novel role of PP2A in Wnt signaling and apoptosis. First, PP2A and its B56 regulatory subunit inhibit Wnt signaling in Xenopus. PP2A is required for β- catenin degradation in vitro. A PP2A heterotrimer containing A, C, and B56 subunits was co- immunoprecipitated with axin. A, C, and B56 subunits each have ventralizing ability in Xenopus embryos. B56 was epistatically positioned downstream of GSK3β and axin but upstream of β-catenin. Second, B56-targeted PP2A is required for survival and protects from apoptosis in Drosophila. Loss of A, C, or B56 subunits by RNA interference (RNAi) induced apoptosis in S2 cells, which requires the presence of specific caspases. Epistasis analysis placed B56-targeted PP2A functionally upstream of Apaf-1, Reaper and Hid, and p53. Loss of B56-targeted PP2A in Drosophila embryos by RNAi resulted in abortion of embryo development and this phenotype was rescued by co-RNAi of Drice. Third, two conserved domains in B subunits mediate binding to the A subunit of PP2A. B subunits have no detectable sequence homology among different families. In vitro expression of a series of B56α fragments identified two distinct domains that independently bound to the A subunit. Sequence alignment of these A subunit-binding domains recognized conserved residues in B/PR55 and B'/PR72 family members that serve a similar function. Fourth, to examine whether the B56β gene within 11q12 is a tumor suppressor mutated in neuroblastoma, the DNA and RNA samples from neuroblastoma patients and cell lines were analyzed and no mutations were identified in the coding regions of the B56β gene. Finally, to identify novel regulatory subunits of PP2A in S. cerevisiae , biochemical approaches for purifying PP2A-associated novel regulators were undertaken. Although the A and C subunit complex in the

  5. Activation of protein phosphatase 2A tumor suppressor as potential treatment of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Wenwen; Sun, Qiao-Yang; Lee, Kian Leong; Ding, Ling-Wen; Wuensche, Peer; Torres-Fernandez, Lucia A.; Tan, Siew Zhuan; Tokatly, Itay; Zaiden, Norazean; Poellinger, Lorenz; Mori, Seiichi; Yang, Henry; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Koeffler, H. Phillip

    2015-01-01

    We utilized three tiers of screening to identify novel therapeutic agents for pancreatic cancers. First, we analyzed 14 pancreatic cancer cell lines against a panel of 66 small-molecule kinase inhibitors and dasatinib was the most potent. Second, we performed RNA expression analysis on 3 dasatinib-resistant and 3 dasatinib–sensitive pancreatic cancer cell lines to profile their gene expression. Third, gene profiling data was integrated with the connectivity map database to search for potential drugs. Thioridazine was one of the top ranking small molecules with highly negative enrichment. Thioridazine and its family members of phenothiazine including penfludidol caused pancreatic cancer cell death and affected protein expression levels of molecules involved in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and multiple kinase activities. This family of drugs causes activation of protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A). The drug FTY-720 (activator of PP2A) induced apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells. Silencing catalytic unit of PP2A rendered pancreatic cancer cells resistant to penfluridol. Our observations suggest potential therapeutic use of penfluridol or similar agent associated with activation of PP2A in pancreatic cancers. PMID:25637283

  6. Tau pathology involves protein phosphatase 2A in Parkinsonism-dementia of Guam

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Mohammad; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Garruto, Ralph M.; Iqbal, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Parkinsonism-dementia (PD) of Guam is a neurodegenerative disease with parkinsonism and early-onset Alzheimer-like dementia associated with neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein, tau. β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) has been suspected of being involved in the etiology of PD, but the mechanism by which BMAA leads to tau hyperphosphorylation is not known. We found a decrease in protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity associated with an increase in inhibitory phosphorylation of its catalytic subunit PP2Ac at Tyr307 and abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau in brains of patients who had Guam PD. To test the possible involvement of BMAA in the etiopathogenesis of PD, we studied the effect of this environmental neurotoxin on PP2A activity and tau hyperphosphorylation in mouse primary neuronal cultures and metabolically active rat brain slices. BMAA treatment significantly decreased PP2A activity, with a concomitant increase in tau kinase activity resulting in elevated tau hyperphosphorylation at PP2A favorable sites. Moreover, we found an increase in the phosphorylation of PP2Ac at Tyr307 in BMAA-treated rat brains. Pretreatment with metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) and Src antagonists blocked the BMAA-induced inhibition of PP2A and the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, indicating the involvement of an Src-dependent PP2A pathway. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that BMAA treatment dissociated PP2Ac from mGluR5, making it available for phosphorylation at Tyr307. These findings suggest a scenario in which BMAA can lead to tau pathology by inhibiting PP2A through the activation of mGluR5, the consequent release of PP2Ac from the mGluR5–PP2A complex, and its phosphorylation at Tyr307 by Src. PMID:24395787

  7. Tau pathology involves protein phosphatase 2A in parkinsonism-dementia of Guam.

    PubMed

    Arif, Mohammad; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Garruto, Ralph M; Iqbal, Khalid

    2014-01-21

    Parkinsonism-dementia (PD) of Guam is a neurodegenerative disease with parkinsonism and early-onset Alzheimer-like dementia associated with neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein, tau. β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) has been suspected of being involved in the etiology of PD, but the mechanism by which BMAA leads to tau hyperphosphorylation is not known. We found a decrease in protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity associated with an increase in inhibitory phosphorylation of its catalytic subunit PP2Ac at Tyr(307) and abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau in brains of patients who had Guam PD. To test the possible involvement of BMAA in the etiopathogenesis of PD, we studied the effect of this environmental neurotoxin on PP2A activity and tau hyperphosphorylation in mouse primary neuronal cultures and metabolically active rat brain slices. BMAA treatment significantly decreased PP2A activity, with a concomitant increase in tau kinase activity resulting in elevated tau hyperphosphorylation at PP2A favorable sites. Moreover, we found an increase in the phosphorylation of PP2Ac at Tyr(307) in BMAA-treated rat brains. Pretreatment with metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) and Src antagonists blocked the BMAA-induced inhibition of PP2A and the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, indicating the involvement of an Src-dependent PP2A pathway. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that BMAA treatment dissociated PP2Ac from mGluR5, making it available for phosphorylation at Tyr(307). These findings suggest a scenario in which BMAA can lead to tau pathology by inhibiting PP2A through the activation of mGluR5, the consequent release of PP2Ac from the mGluR5-PP2A complex, and its phosphorylation at Tyr(307) by Src.

  8. Tau pathology involves protein phosphatase 2A in parkinsonism-dementia of Guam.

    PubMed

    Arif, Mohammad; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Garruto, Ralph M; Iqbal, Khalid

    2014-01-21

    Parkinsonism-dementia (PD) of Guam is a neurodegenerative disease with parkinsonism and early-onset Alzheimer-like dementia associated with neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein, tau. β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) has been suspected of being involved in the etiology of PD, but the mechanism by which BMAA leads to tau hyperphosphorylation is not known. We found a decrease in protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity associated with an increase in inhibitory phosphorylation of its catalytic subunit PP2Ac at Tyr(307) and abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau in brains of patients who had Guam PD. To test the possible involvement of BMAA in the etiopathogenesis of PD, we studied the effect of this environmental neurotoxin on PP2A activity and tau hyperphosphorylation in mouse primary neuronal cultures and metabolically active rat brain slices. BMAA treatment significantly decreased PP2A activity, with a concomitant increase in tau kinase activity resulting in elevated tau hyperphosphorylation at PP2A favorable sites. Moreover, we found an increase in the phosphorylation of PP2Ac at Tyr(307) in BMAA-treated rat brains. Pretreatment with metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) and Src antagonists blocked the BMAA-induced inhibition of PP2A and the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, indicating the involvement of an Src-dependent PP2A pathway. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that BMAA treatment dissociated PP2Ac from mGluR5, making it available for phosphorylation at Tyr(307). These findings suggest a scenario in which BMAA can lead to tau pathology by inhibiting PP2A through the activation of mGluR5, the consequent release of PP2Ac from the mGluR5-PP2A complex, and its phosphorylation at Tyr(307) by Src. PMID:24395787

  9. Protein phosphatase 2A mediates resensitization of the neurokinin 1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Jane E.; Roosterman, Dirk; Cottrell, Graeme S.; Padilla, Benjamin E.; Feld, Micha; Brand, Eva; Cedron, Wendy J.; Steinhoff, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are phosphorylated and interact with β-arrestins, which mediate desensitization and endocytosis. Endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) degrades neuropeptides in endosomes and can promote recycling. Although endocytosis, dephosphorylation, and recycling are accepted mechanisms of receptor resensitization, a large proportion of desensitized receptors can remain at the cell surface. We investigated whether reactivation of noninternalized, desensitized (phosphorylated) receptors mediates resensitization of the substance P (SP) neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R). Herein, we report a novel mechanism of resensitization by which protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is recruited to dephosphorylate noninternalized NK1R. A desensitizing concentration of SP reduced cell-surface SP binding sites by only 25%, and SP-induced Ca2+ signals were fully resensitized before cell-surface binding sites started to recover, suggesting resensitization of cell-surface-retained NK1R. SP induced association of β-arrestin1 and PP2A with noninternalized NK1R. β-Arrestin1 small interfering RNA knockdown prevented SP-induced association of cell-surface NK1R with PP2A, indicating that β-arrestin1 mediates this interaction. ECE-1 inhibition, by trapping β-arrestin1 in endosomes, also impeded SP-induced association of cell-surface NK1R with PP2A. Resensitization of NK1R signaling required both PP2A and ECE-1 activity. Thus, after stimulation with SP, PP2A interacts with noninternalized NK1R and mediates resensitization. PP2A interaction with NK1R requires β-arrestin1. ECE-1 promotes this process by releasing β-arrestin1 from NK1R in endosomes. These findings represent a novel mechanism of PP2A- and ECE-1-dependent resensitization of GPCRs. PMID:21795521

  10. Protein phosphatase 2A mediates resensitization of the neurokinin 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jane E; Roosterman, Dirk; Cottrell, Graeme S; Padilla, Benjamin E; Feld, Micha; Brand, Eva; Cedron, Wendy J; Bunnett, Nigel W; Steinhoff, Martin

    2011-10-01

    Activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are phosphorylated and interact with β-arrestins, which mediate desensitization and endocytosis. Endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) degrades neuropeptides in endosomes and can promote recycling. Although endocytosis, dephosphorylation, and recycling are accepted mechanisms of receptor resensitization, a large proportion of desensitized receptors can remain at the cell surface. We investigated whether reactivation of noninternalized, desensitized (phosphorylated) receptors mediates resensitization of the substance P (SP) neurokinin 1 receptor (NK(1)R). Herein, we report a novel mechanism of resensitization by which protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is recruited to dephosphorylate noninternalized NK(1)R. A desensitizing concentration of SP reduced cell-surface SP binding sites by only 25%, and SP-induced Ca(2+) signals were fully resensitized before cell-surface binding sites started to recover, suggesting resensitization of cell-surface-retained NK(1)R. SP induced association of β-arrestin1 and PP2A with noninternalized NK(1)R. β-Arrestin1 small interfering RNA knockdown prevented SP-induced association of cell-surface NK(1)R with PP2A, indicating that β-arrestin1 mediates this interaction. ECE-1 inhibition, by trapping β-arrestin1 in endosomes, also impeded SP-induced association of cell-surface NK(1)R with PP2A. Resensitization of NK(1)R signaling required both PP2A and ECE-1 activity. Thus, after stimulation with SP, PP2A interacts with noninternalized NK(1)R and mediates resensitization. PP2A interaction with NK(1)R requires β-arrestin1. ECE-1 promotes this process by releasing β-arrestin1 from NK(1)R in endosomes. These findings represent a novel mechanism of PP2A- and ECE-1-dependent resensitization of GPCRs.

  11. Arabidopsis PHOSPHOTYROSYL PHOSPHATASE ACTIVATOR is essential for PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2A holoenzyme assembly and plays important roles in hormone signaling, salt stress response, and plant development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Hu, Rongbin; Zhu, Yinfeng; Shen, Guoxin; Zhang, Hong

    2014-11-01

    PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2A (PP2A) is a major group of serine/threonine protein phosphatases in eukaryotes. It is composed of three subunits: scaffolding subunit A, regulatory subunit B, and catalytic subunit C. Assembly of the PP2A holoenzyme in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) depends on Arabidopsis PHOSPHOTYROSYL PHOSPHATASE ACTIVATOR (AtPTPA). Reduced expression of AtPTPA leads to severe defects in plant development, altered responses to abscisic acid, ethylene, and sodium chloride, and decreased PP2A activity. In particular, AtPTPA deficiency leads to decreased methylation in PP2A-C subunits (PP2Ac). Complete loss of PP2Ac methylation in the suppressor of brassinosteroid insensitive1 mutant leads to 30% reduction of PP2A activity, suggesting that PP2A with a methylated C subunit is more active than PP2A with an unmethylated C subunit. Like AtPTPA, PP2A-A subunits are also required for PP2Ac methylation. The interaction between AtPTPA and PP2Ac is A subunit dependent. In addition, AtPTPA deficiency leads to reduced interactions of B subunits with C subunits, resulting in reduced functional PP2A holoenzyme formation. Thus, AtPTPA is a critical factor for committing the subunit A/subunit C dimer toward PP2A heterotrimer formation.

  12. Histone chaperone NAP1 mediates sister chromatid resolution by counteracting protein phosphatase 2A.

    PubMed

    Moshkin, Yuri M; Doyen, Cecile M; Kan, Tsung-Wai; Chalkley, Gillian E; Sap, Karen; Bezstarosti, Karel; Demmers, Jeroen A; Ozgur, Zeliha; van Ijcken, Wilfred F J; Verrijzer, C Peter

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome duplication and transmission into daughter cells requires the precisely orchestrated binding and release of cohesin. We found that the Drosophila histone chaperone NAP1 is required for cohesin release and sister chromatid resolution during mitosis. Genome-wide surveys revealed that NAP1 and cohesin co-localize at multiple genomic loci. Proteomic and biochemical analysis established that NAP1 associates with the full cohesin complex, but it also forms a separate complex with the cohesin subunit stromalin (SA). NAP1 binding to cohesin is cell-cycle regulated and increases during G2/M phase. This causes the dissociation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) from cohesin, increased phosphorylation of SA and cohesin removal in early mitosis. PP2A depletion led to a loss of centromeric cohesion. The distinct mitotic phenotypes caused by the loss of either PP2A or NAP1, were both rescued by their concomitant depletion. We conclude that the balanced antagonism between NAP1 and PP2A controls cohesin dissociation during mitosis. PMID:24086141

  13. Cellular Casein Kinase 2 and Protein Phosphatase 2A Modulate Replication Site Assembly of Bluetongue Virus*

    PubMed Central

    Mohl, Bjorn-Patrick; Roy, Polly

    2016-01-01

    A number of cytoplasmic replicating viruses produce cytoplasmic inclusion bodies or protein aggregates; however, a hallmark of viruses of the Reoviridae family is that they utilize these sites for purposes of replication and capsid assembly, functioning as viral assembly factories. Here we have used bluetongue virus (BTV) as a model system for this broad family of important viruses to understand the mechanisms regulating inclusion body assembly. Newly synthesized viral proteins interact with sequestered viral RNA molecules prior to capsid assembly and double-stranded RNA synthesis within viral inclusion bodies (VIBs). VIBs are predominantly comprised of a BTV-encoded non-structural protein 2 (NS2). Previous in vitro studies indicated that casein kinase 2 (CK2) mediated the phosphorylation of NS2, which regulated the propensity of NS2 to form larger aggregates. Using targeted pharmacological reagents, specific mutation in the viral genome by reverse genetics and confocal microscopy, here we demonstrate that CK2 activity is important for BTV replication. Furthermore, we show that a novel host cell factor, protein phosphatase 2A, is involved in NS2 dephosphorylation and that, together with CK2, it regulates VIB morphology and virus replication. Thus, these two host enzymes influence the dynamic nature of VIB assembly/disassembly, and these concerted activities may be relevant to the assembly and the release of these cores from VIBs. PMID:27226558

  14. A novel protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is involved in the transformation of human protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    González, Jorge; Cornejo, Alberto; Santos, Marcia R M; Cordero, Esteban M; Gutiérrez, Bessy; Porcile, Patricio; Mortara, Renato A; Sagua, Hernán; Da Silveira, José Franco; Araya, Jorge E

    2003-01-01

    Here we provide evidence for a critical role of PP2As (protein phosphatase 2As) in the transformation of Trypanosoma cruzi. In axenic medium at pH 5.0, trypomastigotes rapidly transform into amastigotes, a process blocked by okadaic acid, a potent PP2A inhibitor, at concentrations as low as 0.1 microM. 1-Norokadaone, an inactive okadaic acid analogue, did not affect the transformation. Electron microscopy studies indicated that okadaic acid-treated trypomastigotes had not undergone ultrastructural modifications, reinforcing the idea that PP2A inhibits transformation. Using a microcystin-Sepharose affinity column we purified the native T. cruzi PP2A. The enzyme displayed activity against 32P-labelled phosphorylase a that was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by okadaic acid. The protein was also submitted to MS and, from the peptides obtained, degenerate primers were used to clone a novel T. cruzi PP2A enzyme by PCR. The isolated gene encodes a protein of 303 amino acids, termed TcPP2A, which displayed a high degree of homology (86%) with the catalytic subunit of Trypanosoma brucei PP2A. Northern-blot analysis revealed the presence of a major 2.1-kb mRNA hybridizing in all T. cruzi developmental stages. Southern-blot analysis suggested that the TcPP2A gene is present in low copy number in the T. cruzi genome. These results are consistent with the mapping of PP2A genes in two chromosomal bands by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and chromoblot hybridization. Our studies suggest that in T. cruzi PP2A is important for the complete transformation of trypomastigotes into amastigotes during the life cycle of this protozoan parasite. PMID:12737627

  15. Phosphorylated protein phosphatase 2A determines poor outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cristóbal, I; Manso, R; Rincón, R; Caramés, C; Zazo, S; del Pulgar, T G; Cebrián, A; Madoz-Gúrpide, J; Rojo, F; García-Foncillas, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a tumour suppressor frequently inactivated in human cancer and its tyrosine-307 phosphorylation has been reported as a molecular inhibitory mechanism. Methods: Expression of phosphorylated PP2A (p-PP2A) was evaluated in 250 metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Chi-square, Kaplan–Meier and Cox analyses were used to determine correlations with clinical and molecular parameters and impact on clinical outcomes. Results: High p-PP2A levels were found in 17.2% cases and were associated with ECOG performance status (P=0.001) and presence of synchronous metastasis at diagnosis (P=0.035). This subgroup showed substantially worse overall survival (OS) (median OS, 6.0 vs 26.2 months, P<0.001) and progression-free survival (PFS) (median PFS, 3.8 vs 13.3 months, P<0.001). The prognostic impact of p-PP2A was particularly evident in patients aged <70 years (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that p-PP2A retained its prognostic impact for OS (hazard ratio 2.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.8–4.1; P<0.001) and PFS (hazard ratio 3.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.8–5.0; P<0.001). Conclusions: Phosphorylated PP2A is an alteration that determines poor outcome in metastatic CRC and represents a novel potential therapeutic target in this disease, thus enabling to define a subgroup of patients who could benefit from future treatments based on PP2A activators. PMID:25003662

  16. Heavy Metal-induced Metallothionein Expression Is Regulated by Specific Protein Phosphatase 2A Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liping; Ma, Lu; Bai, Qing; Zhu, Xiaonian; Zhang, Jinmiao; Wei, Qing; Li, Daochuan; Gao, Chen; Li, Jie; Zhang, Zhengbao; Liu, Caixia; He, Zhini; Zeng, Xiaowen; Zhang, Aihua; Qu, Weidong; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Chen, Wen; Xiao, Yongmei

    2014-01-01

    Induction of metallothionein (MT) expression is involved in metal homeostasis and detoxification. To identify the key pathways that regulate metal-induced cytotoxicity, we investigate how phosphorylated metal-responsive transcription factor-1 (MTF-1) contributed to induction of MT expression. Immortal human embryonic kidney cells (HEK cells) were treated with seven kinds of metals including cadmium chloride (CdCl2), zinc sulfate (ZnSO4), copper sulfate(CuSO4), lead acetate (PbAc), nickel sulfate (NiSO4), sodium arsenite (NaAsO2), and potassium bichromate (K2Cr2O7). The MT expression was induced in a dose-response and time-dependent manner upon various metal treatments. A cycle of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation was required for translocation of MTF-1 from cytoplasm to nucleus, leading to the up-regulation of MTs expression. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) participated in regulating MT expression through dephosphorylation of MTF-1. A loss-of-function screen revealed that the specific PP2A complexes containing PR110 were involved in metal-induced MT expression. Suppression of PP2A PR110 in HEK cells resulted in the persistent MTF-1 phosphorylation and the disturbance of MTF-1 nuclear translocation, which was concomitant with a significant decrease of MT expression and enhanced cytotoxicity in HEK cells. Notably, MTF-1 was found in complex with specific PP2A complexes containing the PR110 subunit upon metal exposure. Furthermore, we identify that the dephosphorylation of MTF-1 at residue Thr-254 is directly regulated by PP2A PR110 complexes and responsible for MTF-1 activation. Taken together, these findings delineate a novel pathway that determines cytotoxicity in response to metal treatments and provide new insight into the role of PP2A in cellular stress response. PMID:24962574

  17. Protein phosphatases type 2A mediate tuberization signaling in Solanum tuberosum L. leaves.

    PubMed

    País, Silvia Marina; García, María Noelia Muñiz; Téllez-Iñón, María Teresa; Capiati, Daniela Andrea

    2010-06-01

    Tuber formation in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is regulated by hormonal and environmental signals that are thought to be integrated in the leaves. The molecular mechanisms that mediate the responses to tuberization-related signals in leaves remain largely unknown. In this study we analyzed the roles of protein phosphatase type 2A catalytic subunits (PP2Ac) in the leaf responses to conditions that affect tuberization. The responses were monitored by analyzing the expression of the "tuber-specific" genes Patatin and Pin2, which are induced in tubers and leaves during tuber induction. Experiments using PP2A inhibitors, together with PP2Ac expression profiles under conditions that affect tuberization indicate that high sucrose/nitrogen ratio, which promotes tuber formation, increases the transcript levels of Patatin and Pin2, by increasing the activity of PP2As without affecting PP2Ac mRNA or protein levels. Gibberellic acid (GA), a negative regulator of tuberization, down-regulates the transcription of catalytic subunits of PP2As from the subfamily I and decreases their enzyme levels. In addition, GA inhibits the expression of Patatin and Pin2 possibly by a PP2A-independent mechanism. PP2Ac down-regulation by GA may inhibit tuberization signaling downstream of the inductive effects of high sucrose/nitrogen ratio. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that PP2As of the subfamily I may positively modulate the signaling pathways that lead to the transcriptional activation of "tuber-specific" genes in leaves, and act as molecular switches regulated by both positive and negative modulators of tuberization. PMID:20358221

  18. Regulation of autophagy by coordinated action of mTORC1 and protein phosphatase 2A.

    PubMed

    Wong, Pui-Mun; Feng, Yan; Wang, Junru; Shi, Rong; Jiang, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular catabolic process critical for cell viability and homoeostasis. Inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex-1 (mTORC1) activates autophagy. A puzzling observation is that amino acid starvation triggers more rapid autophagy than pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1, although they both block mTORC1 activity with similar kinetics. Here we find that in addition to mTORC1 inactivation, starvation also causes an increase in phosphatase activity towards ULK1, an mTORC1 substrate whose dephosphorylation is required for autophagy induction. We identify the starvation-stimulated phosphatase for ULK1 as the PP2A-B55α complex. Treatment of cells with starvation but not mTORC1 inhibitors triggers dissociation of PP2A from its inhibitor Alpha4. Furthermore, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells, whose growth depends on high basal autophagy, possess stronger basal phosphatase activity towards ULK1 and require ULK1 for sustained anchorage-independent growth. Taken together, concurrent mTORC1 inactivation and PP2A-B55α stimulation fuel ULK1-dependent autophagy. PMID:26310906

  19. A protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibition assay using a recombinant enzyme for rapid detection of microcystins.

    PubMed

    Ikehara, Tsuyoshi; Imamura, Shihoko; Oshiro, Naomasa; Ikehara, Satsuki; Shinjo, Fukiko; Yasumoto, Takeshi

    2008-06-15

    Worldwide blooms of toxic cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) commonly occur in freshwater, often in drinking water sources, necessitating routine monitoring of water quality. Microcystin-LR and related cyanobacterial toxins strongly inhibit protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and are therefore assayable by measuring the extent of PP2A inhibition. In this study, we evaluated the suitability of the catalytic subunit of recombinant PP2A (rPP2Ac) expressed with a baculovirus system for use in a microplate microcystin assay. Five microcystin analogs, microcystin-LR, -RR, -YR, -LF, and -LW, and nodularin strongly inhibited rPP2Ac activity with IC(50) values of 0.048, 0.072, 0.147, 0.096, 0.114, and 0.54 nM, respectively. Microcystin-LR in a water sample could be assayed from 0.005 to 5 ng/ml. The assay could detect the toxin at a far lower level than required by the World Health Organization for regulation of microcystin-LR or its equivalent (1 microg/L). Pretreatment or concentration of water samples with low toxin concentrations was not necessary. The microplate assay using rPP2Ac was more sensitive than an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method and a cytotoxicity assay. The genetically engineered rPP2Ac was more stable than a commercially available dimeric enzyme, producing accurate and reproducible results. Our results confirm that the rPP2Ac we prepared is an excellent tool for detecting and quantifying microcystins in water.

  20. A protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibition assay using a recombinant enzyme for rapid detection of microcystins.

    PubMed

    Ikehara, Tsuyoshi; Imamura, Shihoko; Oshiro, Naomasa; Ikehara, Satsuki; Shinjo, Fukiko; Yasumoto, Takeshi

    2008-06-15

    Worldwide blooms of toxic cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) commonly occur in freshwater, often in drinking water sources, necessitating routine monitoring of water quality. Microcystin-LR and related cyanobacterial toxins strongly inhibit protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and are therefore assayable by measuring the extent of PP2A inhibition. In this study, we evaluated the suitability of the catalytic subunit of recombinant PP2A (rPP2Ac) expressed with a baculovirus system for use in a microplate microcystin assay. Five microcystin analogs, microcystin-LR, -RR, -YR, -LF, and -LW, and nodularin strongly inhibited rPP2Ac activity with IC(50) values of 0.048, 0.072, 0.147, 0.096, 0.114, and 0.54 nM, respectively. Microcystin-LR in a water sample could be assayed from 0.005 to 5 ng/ml. The assay could detect the toxin at a far lower level than required by the World Health Organization for regulation of microcystin-LR or its equivalent (1 microg/L). Pretreatment or concentration of water samples with low toxin concentrations was not necessary. The microplate assay using rPP2Ac was more sensitive than an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method and a cytotoxicity assay. The genetically engineered rPP2Ac was more stable than a commercially available dimeric enzyme, producing accurate and reproducible results. Our results confirm that the rPP2Ac we prepared is an excellent tool for detecting and quantifying microcystins in water. PMID:18430448

  1. Regulation of autophagy by coordinated action of mTORC1 and protein phosphatase 2A

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Pui-Mun; Feng, Yan; Wang, Junru; Shi, Rong; Jiang, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular catabolic process critical for cell viability and homoeostasis. Inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex-1 (mTORC1) activates autophagy. A puzzling observation is that amino acid starvation triggers more rapid autophagy than pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1, although they both block mTORC1 activity with similar kinetics. Here we find that in addition to mTORC1 inactivation, starvation also causes an increase in phosphatase activity towards ULK1, an mTORC1 substrate whose dephosphorylation is required for autophagy induction. We identify the starvation-stimulated phosphatase for ULK1 as the PP2A–B55α complex. Treatment of cells with starvation but not mTORC1 inhibitors triggers dissociation of PP2A from its inhibitor Alpha4. Furthermore, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells, whose growth depends on high basal autophagy, possess stronger basal phosphatase activity towards ULK1 and require ULK1 for sustained anchorage-independent growth. Taken together, concurrent mTORC1 inactivation and PP2A–B55α stimulation fuel ULK1-dependent autophagy. PMID:26310906

  2. Structural and Biochemical Insights into the Regulation of Protein Phosphatase 2A by Small t Antigen of SV40

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,Y.; Xu, Y.; Bao, Q.; Xing, Y.; Li, Z.; Lin, Z.; Stock, J.; Jeffrey, P.; Shi, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The small t antigen (ST) of DNA tumor virus SV40 facilitates cellular transformation by disrupting the functions of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) through a poorly defined mechanism. The crystal structure of the core domain of SV40 ST bound to the scaffolding subunit of human PP2A reveals that the ST core domain has a novel zinc-binding fold and interacts with the conserved ridge of HEAT repeats 3-6, which overlaps with the binding site for the B' (also called PR61 or B56) regulatory subunit. ST has a lower binding affinity than B' for the PP2A core enzyme. Consequently, ST does not efficiently displace B' from PP2A holoenzymes in vitro. Notably, ST inhibits PP2A phosphatase activity through its N-terminal J domain. These findings suggest that ST may function mainly by inhibiting the phosphatase activity of the PP2A core enzyme, and to a lesser extent by modulating assembly of the PP2A holoenzymes.

  3. PKA, PKC, and the protein phosphatase 2A influence HAND factor function: a mechanism for tissue-specific transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Firulli, Beth A; Howard, Marthe J; McDaid, Jennifer R; McIlreavey, Leanne; Dionne, Karen M; Centonze, Victoria E; Cserjesi, Peter; Virshup, David M; Firulli, Anthony B

    2003-11-01

    The bHLH factors HAND1 and HAND2 are required for heart, vascular, neuronal, limb, and extraembryonic development. Unlike most bHLH proteins, HAND factors exhibit promiscuous dimerization properties. We report that phosphorylation/dephosphorylation via PKA, PKC, and a specific heterotrimeric protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) modulates HAND function. The PP2A targeting-subunit B56delta specifically interacts with HAND1 and -2, but not other bHLH proteins. PKA and PKC phosphorylate HAND proteins in vivo, and only B56delta-containing PP2A complexes reduce levels of HAND1 phosphorylation. During RCHOI trophoblast stem cell differentiation, B56delta expression is downregulated and HAND1 phosphorylation increases. Mutations in phosphorylated residues result in altered HAND1 dimerization and biological function. Taken together, these results suggest that site-specific phosphorylation regulates HAND factor functional specificity.

  4. Protein phosphatase 2A cooperates with the autophagy-related kinase UNC-51 to regulate axon guidance in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Ken-ichi; Okada, Takako; Mitani, Shohei; Gengyo-Ando, Keiko; Baillie, David L; Kohara, Yuji; Goshima, Yoshio

    2010-05-01

    UNC-51 is a serine/threonine protein kinase conserved from yeast to humans. The yeast homolog Atg1 regulates autophagy (catabolic membrane trafficking) required for surviving starvation. In C. elegans, UNC-51 regulates the axon guidance of many neurons by a different mechanism than it and its homologs use for autophagy. UNC-51 regulates the subcellular localization (trafficking) of UNC-5, a receptor for the axon guidance molecule UNC-6/Netrin; however, the molecular details of the role for UNC-51 are largely unknown. Here, we report that UNC-51 physically interacts with LET-92, the catalytic subunit of serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-C), which plays important roles in many cellular functions. A low allelic dose of LET-92 partially suppressed axon guidance defects of weak, but not severe, unc-51 mutants, and a low allelic dose of PP2A regulatory subunits A (PAA-1/PP2A-A) and B (SUR-6/PP2A-B) partially enhanced the weak unc-51 mutants. We also found that LET-92 can work cell-non-autonomously on axon guidance in neurons, and that LET-92 colocalized with UNC-51 in neurons. In addition, PP2A dephosphorylated phosphoproteins that had been phosphorylated by UNC-51. These results suggest that, by forming a complex, PP2A cooperates with UNC-51 to regulate axon guidance by regulating phosphorylation. This is the first report of a serine/threonine protein phosphatase functioning in axon guidance in vivo.

  5. 3D model for Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A armadillo domain unveils highly conserved protein-protein interaction characteristics.

    PubMed

    Dahlström, Käthe M; Salminen, Tiina A

    2015-12-01

    Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is a human oncoprotein, which exerts its cancer-promoting function through interaction with other proteins, for example Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and MYC. The lack of structural information for CIP2A significantly prevents the design of anti-cancer therapeutics targeting this protein. In an attempt to counteract this fact, we modeled the three-dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain (CIP2A-ArmRP), analyzed key areas and amino acids, and coupled the results to the existing literature. The model reliably shows a stable armadillo repeat fold with a positively charged groove. The fact that this conserved groove highly likely binds peptides is corroborated by the presence of a conserved polar ladder, which is essential for the proper peptide-binding mode of armadillo repeat proteins and, according to our results, several known CIP2A interaction partners appropriately possess an ArmRP-binding consensus motif. Moreover, we show that Arg229Gln, which has been linked to the development of cancer, causes a significant change in charge and surface properties of CIP2A-ArmRP. In conclusion, our results reveal that CIP2A-ArmRP shares the typical fold, protein-protein interaction site and interaction patterns with other natural armadillo proteins and that, presumably, several interaction partners bind into the central groove of the modeled CIP2A-ArmRP. By providing essential structural characteristics of CIP2A, the present study significantly increases our knowledge on how CIP2A interacts with other proteins in cancer progression and how to develop new therapeutics targeting CIP2A. PMID:26393783

  6. Protein Phosphatase 2A Stabilizes Human Securin, Whose Phosphorylated Forms Are Degraded via the SCF Ubiquitin Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Bernabé, Ana M.; Romero, Francisco; Limón-Mortés, M. Cristina; Tortolero, María

    2006-01-01

    Sister chromatid segregation is triggered at the metaphase-to-anaphase transition by the activation of the protease separase. For most of the cell cycle, separase activity is kept in check by its association with the inhibitory chaperone securin. Activation of separase occurs at anaphase onset, when securin is targeted for destruction by the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome E3 ubiquitin protein ligase. This results in the release of the cohesins from chromosomes, which in turn allows the segregation of sister chromatids to opposite spindle poles. Here we show that human securin (hSecurin) forms a complex with enzymatically active protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and that it is a substrate of the phosphatase, both in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of cells with okadaic acid, a potent inhibitor of PP2A, results in various hyperphosphorylated forms of hSecurin which are extremely unstable, due to the action of the Skp1/Cul1/F-box protein complex ubiquitin ligase. We propose that PP2A regulates hSecurin levels by counteracting its phosphorylation, which promotes its degradation. Misregulation of this process may lead to the formation of tumors, in which overproduction of hSecurin is often observed. PMID:16705156

  7. Sodium selenate, a protein phosphatase 2A activator, mitigates hyperphosphorylated tau and improves repeated mild traumatic brain injury outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xin L; Wright, David K; Liu, Shijie; Hovens, Christopher; O'Brien, Terence J; Shultz, Sandy R

    2016-09-01

    Mild traumatic brain injuries may result in cumulative brain damage and neurodegenerative disease. To date, there is no pharmaceutical intervention known to prevent these consequences. Hyperphosphorylated tau has been associated in this process, and protein phosphatase 2A 55 kDa regulatory B subunit (PP2A/PR55) - the major tau phosphatase - is decreased after a brain insult. Sodium selenate up-regulates PP2A/PR55 and dephosphorylates tau, and may hold promise as a treatment in the mild brain injury setting. Here we investigated sodium selenate treatment in rats given repeated mild traumatic brain injuries. Rats were given three mild fluid percussion injuries or three sham-injuries, and treated with sodium selenate (1 mg/kg/day) or saline-vehicle for three months before undergoing behavioral testing, MRI, and post-mortem analysis of brain tissue. Repeated mild traumatic brain injuries increased the phosphorylation of tau and decreased PP2A/PR55, whilst inducing brain atrophy and cognitive and sensorimotor deficits. Sodium selenate treatment increased PP2A/PR55, and decreased tau phosphorylation, brain damage, and cognitive and motor impairments in rats given repeated mild traumatic brain injuries. Our findings implicate PP2A/PR55 and tau as important mechanisms in the pathophysiological aftermath of repeated mild brain traumas, and support sodium selenate as a novel and translatable treatment for these common injuries. PMID:27163189

  8. Characterization of a protein phosphatase 2A holoenzyme that dephosphorylates the clathrin adaptors AP-1 and AP-2.

    PubMed

    Ricotta, Doris; Hansen, Jens; Preiss, Carolin; Teichert, Dominic; Höning, Stefan

    2008-02-29

    The AP-2 complex is a key factor in the formation of endocytic clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs). AP-2 sorts and packages cargo membrane proteins into CCVs, binds the coat protein clathrin, and recruits numerous other factors to the site of vesicle formation. Structural information on the AP-2 complex and biochemical work have allowed understanding its function on the molecular level, and recent studies showed that cycles of phosphorylation are key steps in the regulation of AP-2 function. The complex is phosphorylated on both large subunits (alpha- and beta2-adaptins) as well as at a single threonine residue (Thr-156) of the medium subunit mu2. Phosphorylation of mu2 is necessary for efficient cargo recruitment, whereas the functional context of the large subunit phosphorylation is unknown. Here, we show that the subunit phosphorylation of AP-2 exhibits striking differences, with calculated half-lives of <1 min for mu2, approximately 25 min for beta2, and approximately 70 min for alpha. We were also able to purify a phosphatase that dephosphorylates the mu2 subunit. The enzyme is a member of the protein phosphatase 2A family and composed of a catalytic Cbeta subunit, a scaffolding Abeta subunit, and a regulatory Balpha subunit. RNA interference knock down of the latter subunit in HeLa cells resulted in increased levels of phosphorylated adaptors and altered endocytosis, showing that a specific PP2A holoenzyme is an important regulatory enzyme in CCV-mediated transport.

  9. Cucurbitacin B reverses multidrug resistance by targeting CIP2A to reactivate protein phosphatase 2A in MCF-7/adriamycin cells.

    PubMed

    Cai, Fen; Zhang, Liang; Xiao, Xiangling; Duan, Chao; Huang, Qiuyue; Fan, Chunsheng; Li, Jian; Liu, Xuewen; Li, Shan; Liu, Ying

    2016-08-01

    Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is a human oncoprotein that is overexpressed in various tumors. A previous study found that CIP2A expression is associated with doxorubicin (Dox) resistance. In the present study, we investigated whether cucurbitacin B (CuB), a natural anticancer compound found in Cucurbitaceae, reversed multidrug resistance (MDR) and downregulated CIP2A expression in MCF-7/Adriamycin (MCF-7/Adr) cells, a human breast multidrug-resistant cancer cell line. CuB treatment significantly suppressed MCF-7/Adr cell proliferation, and reversed Dox resistance. CuB treatment also induced caspase-dependent apoptosis, decreased phosphorylation of Akt (pAkt). The suppression of pAkt was mediated through CuB-induced activation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Furthermore, CuB activated PP2A through the suppression of CIP2A. Silencing CIP2A enhanced CuB-induced growth inhibition, apoptosis and MDR inhibition in MCF-7/Adr cells. In conclusion, we found that enhancement of PP2A activity by inhibition of CIP2A promotes the reversal of MDR induced by CuB. PMID:27350399

  10. Force-inhibiting effect of Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 2A inhibitors on bovine ciliary muscle.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Minori; Takeya, Kosuke; Miyazu, Motoi; Yoshida, Akitoshi; Takai, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Ciliary muscle is a smooth muscle characterized by a rapid response to muscarinic receptor stimulation and sustained contraction. Although it is evident that these contractions are Ca2+-dependent, detailed molecular mechanisms are still unknown. In order to elucidate the role of Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in ciliary muscle contraction, we examined the effects of okadaic acid and other PP2A inhibitors on contractions induced by carbachol (CCh) and ionomycin in bovine ciliary muscle strips (BCM). Okadaic acid inhibited ionomycin-induced contraction, while it did not cause significant changes in CCh-induced contraction. Fostriecin showed similar inhibitory effects on the contraction of BCM. On the other hand, rubratoxin A inhibited both ionomycin- and CCh-induced contractions. These results indicated that PP2A was involved at least in ionomycin-induced Ca2+-dependent contraction, and that BCM had a unique regulatory mechanism in CCh-induced contraction. PMID:26727726

  11. A Novel Interaction of the Catalytic Subunit of Protein Phosphatase 2A with the Adaptor Protein CIN85 Suppresses Phosphatase Activity and Facilitates Platelet Outside-in αIIbβ3 Integrin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Khatlani, Tanvir; Pradhan, Subhashree; Da, Qi; Shaw, Tanner; Buchman, Vladimir L; Cruz, Miguel A; Vijayan, K Vinod

    2016-08-12

    The transduction of signals generated by protein kinases and phosphatases are critical for the ability of integrin αIIbβ3 to support stable platelet adhesion and thrombus formation. Unlike kinases, it remains unclear how serine/threonine phosphatases engage the signaling networks that are initiated following integrin ligation. Because protein-protein interactions form the backbone of signal transduction, we searched for proteins that interact with the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2Ac). In a yeast two-hybrid study, we identified a novel interaction between PP2Ac and an adaptor protein CIN85 (Cbl-interacting protein of 85 kDa). Truncation and alanine mutagenesis studies revealed that PP2Ac binds to the P3 block ((396)PAIPPKKPRP(405)) of the proline-rich region in CIN85. The interaction of purified PP2Ac with CIN85 suppressed phosphatase activity. Human embryonal kidney 293 αIIbβ3 cells overexpressing a CIN85 P3 mutant, which cannot support PP2Ac binding, displayed decreased adhesion to immobilized fibrinogen. Platelets contain the ∼85 kDa CIN85 protein along with the PP2Ac-CIN85 complex. A myristylated cell-permeable peptide derived from residues 395-407 of CIN85 protein (P3 peptide) disrupted the platelet PP2Ac-CIN85 complex and decreased αIIbβ3 signaling dependent functions such as platelet spreading on fibrinogen and thrombin-mediated fibrin clot retraction. In a phospho-profiling study P3 peptide treated platelets also displayed decreased phosphorylation of several signaling proteins including Src and GSK3β. Taken together, these data support a role for the novel PP2Ac-CIN85 complex in supporting integrin-dependent platelet function by dampening the phosphatase activity. PMID:27334924

  12. Diversity in genomic organisation, developmental regulation and distribution of the murine PR72/B" subunits of protein phosphatase 2A

    PubMed Central

    Zwaenepoel, Karen; Louis, Justin V; Goris, Jozef; Janssens, Veerle

    2008-01-01

    Background Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine-specific phosphatase displaying vital functions in growth and development through its role in various signalling pathways. PP2A holoenzymes comprise a core dimer composed of a catalytic C and a structural A subunit, which can associate with a variable B-type subunit. The importance of the B-type subunits for PP2A regulation cannot be overestimated as they determine holoenzyme localisation, activity and substrate specificity. Three B-type subunit families have been identified: PR55/B, PR61/B' and PR72/B", of which the latter is currently the least characterised. Results We deduced the sequences and genomic organisation of the different murine PR72/B" isoforms: three genes encode nine isoforms, five of which are abundantly expressed and give rise to genuine PP2A subunits. Thereby, one novel subunit was identified. Using Northern blotting, we examined the tissue-specific and developmental expression of these subunits. All subunits are highly expressed in heart, suggesting an important cardiac function. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a striated expression pattern of PR72 and PR130 in heart and skeletal muscle, but not in bladder smooth muscle. The subcellular localisation and cell cycle regulatory ability of several PR72/B" isoforms were determined, demonstrating differences as well as similarities. Conclusion In contrast to PR55/B and PR61/B', the PR72/B" family seems evolutionary more divergent, as only two of the murine genes have a human orthologue. We have integrated these results in a more consistent nomenclature of both human and murine PR72/B" genes and their transcripts/proteins. Our results provide a platform for the future generation of PR72/B" knockout mice. PMID:18715506

  13. Regulatory subunit B'gamma of protein phosphatase 2A prevents unnecessary defense reactions under low light in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Andrea; Wrzaczek, Michael; Scharte, Judith; Tikkanen, Mikko; Konert, Grzegorz; Rahikainen, Moona; Holmström, Maija; Hiltunen, Hanna-Maija; Rips, Stephan; Sipari, Nina; Mulo, Paula; Weis, Engelbert; von Schaewen, Antje; Aro, Eva-Mari; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa

    2011-07-01

    Light is an important environmental factor that modulates acclimation strategies and defense responses in plants. We explored the functional role of the regulatory subunit B'γ (B'γ) of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in light-dependent stress responses of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The predominant form of PP2A consists of catalytic subunit C, scaffold subunit A, and highly variable regulatory subunit B, which determines the substrate specificity of PP2A holoenzymes. Mutant leaves of knockdown pp2a-b'γ plants show disintegration of chloroplasts and premature yellowing conditionally under moderate light intensity. The cell-death phenotype is accompanied by the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide through a pathway that requires CONSTITUTIVE EXPRESSION OF PR GENES5 (CPR5). Moreover, the pp2a-b'γ cpr5 double mutant additionally displays growth suppression and malformed trichomes. Similar to cpr5, the pp2a-b'γ mutant shows constitutive activation of both salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-dependent defense pathways. In contrast to cpr5, however, pp2a-b'γ leaves do not contain increased levels of salicylic acid or jasmonic acid. Rather, the constitutive defense response associates with hypomethylation of DNA and increased levels of methionine-salvage pathway components in pp2a-b'γ leaves. We suggest that the specific B'γ subunit of PP2A is functionally connected to CPR5 and operates in the basal repression of defense responses under low irradiance.

  14. The association and prognostic relevance of cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A and inflammation in tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Seppälä, Miia; Tervo, Sanni; Pohjola, Konsta; Laranne, Jussi; Huhtala, Heini; Toppila-Salmi, Sanna; Paavonen, Timo

    2015-12-01

    Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) prevents proteolytic degradation of a universal transcription factor, c-Myc. Strong CIP2A expression associates with poor prognosis in early-stage tongue cancer and in other cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate CIP2A and mucosal inflammation in tongue hyperplasia, in tongue cancer, and in its metastasis. Retrospective tongue and lymph node specimens (n = 105) were stained immunohistochemically with polyclonal antibody anti-CIP2A. CIP2A staining intensity and inflammation were assessed semi-quantitatively with light microscopy. CIP2A was similarly detected in tongue cancer and tongue hyperplasia, whereas local inflammation was stronger in cancer (p = 0.000). CIP2A expression was increased in metastasized cancer compared to non-metastasized (p = 0.019). Markers for poorer survival were tumor size of ≥20 mm, presence of metastasis and nodal CIP2A (p = 0.031, p = 0.000, p = 0.042). Cancer patients aged ≥60 with increased inflammation predicted poor survival (p = 0.037). CIP2A and inflammation might play a role in progression of tongue cancer.

  15. Palmitate action to inhibit glycogen synthase and stimulate protein phosphatase 2A increases with risk factors for type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mott, David M.; Stone, Karen; Gessel, Mary C.; Bunt, Joy C.; Bogardus, Clifton

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that abnormal regulation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is associated with Type 2 diabetes in rodent and human tissues. Results with cultured mouse myotubes support a mechanism for palmitate activation of PP2A, leading to activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3. Phosphorylation and inactivation of glycogen synthase by glycogen synthase kinase 3 could be the mechanism for long-chain fatty acid inhibition of insulin-mediated carbohydrate storage in insulin-resistant subjects. Here, we test the effects of palmitic acid on cultured muscle glycogen synthase and PP2A activities. Palmitate inhibition of glycogen synthase fractional activity is increased in subjects with high body mass index compared with subjects with lower body mass index (r = −0.43, P = 0.03). Palmitate action on PP2A varies from inhibition in subjects with decreased 2-h plasma glucose concentration to activation in subjects with increased 2-h plasma glucose concentration (r = 0.45, P < 0.03) during oral glucose tolerance tests. The results do not show an association between palmitate effects on PP2A and glycogen synthase fractional activity. We conclude that subjects at risk for Type 2 diabetes have intrinsic differences in palmitate regulation of at least two enzymes (PP2A and glycogen synthase), contributing to abnormal insulin regulation of glucose metabolism. PMID:18056794

  16. Palmitate action to inhibit glycogen synthase and stimulate protein phosphatase 2A increases with risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mott, David M; Stone, Karen; Gessel, Mary C; Bunt, Joy C; Bogardus, Clifton

    2008-02-01

    Recent studies have suggested that abnormal regulation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is associated with Type 2 diabetes in rodent and human tissues. Results with cultured mouse myotubes support a mechanism for palmitate activation of PP2A, leading to activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3. Phosphorylation and inactivation of glycogen synthase by glycogen synthase kinase 3 could be the mechanism for long-chain fatty acid inhibition of insulin-mediated carbohydrate storage in insulin-resistant subjects. Here, we test the effects of palmitic acid on cultured muscle glycogen synthase and PP2A activities. Palmitate inhibition of glycogen synthase fractional activity is increased in subjects with high body mass index compared with subjects with lower body mass index (r = -0.43, P = 0.03). Palmitate action on PP2A varies from inhibition in subjects with decreased 2-h plasma glucose concentration to activation in subjects with increased 2-h plasma glucose concentration (r = 0.45, P < 0.03) during oral glucose tolerance tests. The results do not show an association between palmitate effects on PP2A and glycogen synthase fractional activity. We conclude that subjects at risk for Type 2 diabetes have intrinsic differences in palmitate regulation of at least two enzymes (PP2A and glycogen synthase), contributing to abnormal insulin regulation of glucose metabolism.

  17. Knockdown of microRNA-195 contributes to protein phosphatase-2A inactivation in rats with chronic brain hypoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-Di; Wang, Qin; Zong, De-Kang; Pei, Shuang-Chao; Yan, Yan; Yan, Mei-Ling; Sun, Lin-Lin; Hao, Yang-Yang; Mao, Meng; Xing, Wen-Jing; Ren, Huan; Ai, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Reduction of protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) activity is a common clinical feature of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. In this study, we observed that chronic brain hypoperfusion induced by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion of rats led to PP2A inactivation based on the increase in tyrosine-307 phosphorylation and leucine-309 demethylation of PP2AC and the depression in PP2ABα. Knockdown of miR-195 using overexpression of its antisense molecule oligonucleotide (pre-AMO-miR-195) delivered by a lentivirus (lenti-pre-AMO-miR-195) increased tyrosine-307 phosphorylation and decreased both PP2ABα expression and leucine-309 methylation; these effects were prevented by the overexpression of miR-195 using lenti-pre-miR-195 and controlled by an increase in methylesterase (PME-1) and a decrease in leucine carboxyl methyltransferase-1. In vitro studies demonstrated that miR-195 regulated PME-1 expression by binding to the Ppme1 gene 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) domain. Masking the miR-195 binding sites in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 genes prevented miR-195-induced leucine carboxyl methyltransferase-1 elevation. We concluded that the miR-195 downregulation in chronic brain hypoperfusion involved PP2A inactivity, which was mediated by the post-transcriptional regulation PME-1, APP, and β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 expression. PMID:27459928

  18. Protein Phosphatase 2A Inhibition with LB100 Enhances Radiation-Induced Mitotic Catastrophe and Tumor Growth Delay in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Ira K; Lu, Jie; Graves, Christian A; Huntoon, Kristin; Frerich, Jason M; Hanson, Ryan H; Wang, Xiaoping; Hong, Christopher S; Ho, Winson; Feldman, Michael J; Ikejiri, Barbara; Bisht, Kheem; Chen, Xiaoyuan S; Tandle, Anita; Yang, Chunzhang; Arscott, W Tristram; Ye, Donald; Heiss, John D; Lonser, Russell R; Camphausen, Kevin; Zhuang, Zhengping

    2015-07-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a tumor suppressor whose function is lost in many cancers. An emerging, though counterintuitive, therapeutic approach is inhibition of PP2A to drive damaged cells through the cell cycle, sensitizing them to radiotherapy. We investigated the effects of PP2A inhibition on U251 glioblastoma cells following radiation treatment in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model in vivo. Radiotherapy alone augmented PP2A activity, though this was significantly attenuated with combination LB100 treatment. LB100 treatment yielded a radiation dose enhancement factor of 1.45 and increased the rate of postradiation mitotic catastrophe at 72 and 96 hours. Glioblastoma cells treated with combination LB100 and radiotherapy maintained increased γ-H2AX expression at 24 hours, diminishing cellular repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Combination therapy significantly enhanced tumor growth delay and mouse survival and decreased p53 expression 3.68-fold, compared with radiotherapy alone. LB100 treatment effectively inhibited PP2A activity and enhanced U251 glioblastoma radiosensitivity in vitro and in vivo. Combination treatment with LB100 and radiation significantly delayed tumor growth, prolonging survival. The mechanism of radiosensitization appears to be related to increased mitotic catastrophe, decreased capacity for repair of DNA double-strand breaks, and diminished p53 DNA-damage response pathway activity.

  19. SET antagonist enhances the chemosensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer cells by reactivating protein phosphatase 2A

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Man-Hsin; Wang, Cheng-Yi; Chen, Yen-Lin; Chu, Pei-Yi; Hsiao, Yung-Jen; Tai, Wei-Tien; Chao, Ting-Ting; Yu, Hui-Chuan; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2016-01-01

    SET is known as a potent PP2A inhibitor, however, its oncogenic role including its tumorigenic potential and involvement in the development of chemoresistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not yet been fully discussed. In present study, we investigated the oncogenic role of SET by SET-knockdown and showed that SET silencing impaired cell growth rate, colony formation and tumor sphere formation in A549 cells. Notably, silencing SET enhanced the pro-apoptotic effects of paclitaxel, while ectopic expression of SET diminished the sensitivity of NSCLC cells to paclitaxel. Since the SET protein was shown to affect chemosensitivity, we next examined whether combining a novel SET antagonist, EMQA, sensitized NSCLC cells to paclitaxel. Both the in vitro and in vivo experiments suggested that EMQA and paclitaxel combination treatment was synergistic. Importantly, we found that downregulating p-Akt by inhibiting SET-mediated protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inactivation determined the pro-apoptotic effects of EMQA and paclitaxel combination treatment. To dissect the critical site for EMQA functioning, we generated several truncated SET proteins. By analysis of the effects of EMQA on the binding affinities of different truncated SET proteins to PP2A-catalytic subunits, we revealed that the 227–277 amino-acid sequence is critical for EMQA-induced SET inhibition. Our findings demonstrate the critical role of SET in NSCLC, particularly in the development of chemoresistance. The synergistic effects of paclitaxel and the SET antagonist shown in current study encourage further validation of the clinical potential of this combination. PMID:26575017

  20. Catalytic Subunit 1 of Protein Phosphatase 2A Is a Subunit of the STRIPAK Complex and Governs Fungal Sexual Development

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Anna; Krisp, Christoph; Wolters, Dirk A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The generation of complex three-dimensional structures is a key developmental step for most eukaryotic organisms. The details of the molecular machinery controlling this step remain to be determined. An excellent model system to study this general process is the generation of three-dimensional fruiting bodies in filamentous fungi like Sordaria macrospora. Fruiting body development is controlled by subunits of the highly conserved striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex, which has been described in organisms ranging from yeasts to humans. The highly conserved heterotrimeric protein phosphatase PP2A is a subunit of STRIPAK. Here, catalytic subunit 1 of PP2A was functionally characterized. The Δpp2Ac1 strain is sterile, unable to undergo hyphal fusion, and devoid of ascogonial septation. Further, PP2Ac1, together with STRIPAK subunit PRO22, governs vegetative and stress-related growth. We revealed in vitro catalytic activity of wild-type PP2Ac1, and our in vivo analysis showed that inactive PP2Ac1 blocks the complementation of the sterile deletion strain. Tandem affinity purification, followed by mass spectrometry and yeast two-hybrid analysis, verified that PP2Ac1 is a subunit of STRIPAK. Further, these data indicate links between the STRIPAK complex and other developmental signaling pathways, implying the presence of a large interconnected signaling network that controls eukaryotic developmental processes. The insights gained in our study can be transferred to higher eukaryotes and will be important for understanding eukaryotic cellular development in general. PMID:27329756

  1. Protein Phosphatase 2A Holoenzyme Is Targeted to Peroxisomes by Piggybacking and Positively Affects Peroxisomal β-Oxidation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kataya, Amr R.A.; Heidari, Behzad; Hagen, Lars; Kommedal, Roald; Slupphaug, Geir; Lillo, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic, highly conserved serine (Ser)/threonine-specific protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) functions as a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic (C), scaffolding (A), and regulatory (B) subunit. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), five, three, and 17 genes encode different C, A, and B subunits, respectively. We previously found that a B subunit, B′θ, localized to peroxisomes due to its C-terminal targeting signal Ser-Ser-leucine. This work shows that PP2A C2, C5, andA2 subunits interact and colocalize with B′θ in peroxisomes. C and A subunits lack peroxisomal targeting signals, and their peroxisomal import depends on B′θ and appears to occur by piggybacking transport. B′θ knockout mutants were impaired in peroxisomal β-oxidation as shown by developmental arrest of seedlings germinated without sucrose, accumulation of eicosenoic acid, and resistance to protoauxins indole-butyric acid and 2,4-dichlorophenoxybutyric acid. All of these observations strongly substantiate that a full PP2A complex is present in peroxisomes and positively affects β-oxidation of fatty acids and protoauxins. PMID:25489022

  2. A Decoy Peptide Targeted to Protein Phosphatase 1 Attenuates Degradation of SERCA2a in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Seung Pil; Oh, Jae Gyun; Kang, Dong Hoon; Kang, Ju Young; Kang, Sang Won; Hajjar, Roger J.; Park, Woo Jin

    2016-01-01

    Neointimal growth in the injured vasculature is largely facilitated by the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), which associates with reduced sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2a) activity. The gene transfer-mediated restoration of the SERCA2a level thus attenuates neointimal growth and VSMC proliferation. We previously reported that a peptide targeted to protein phosphatase 1, ψPLB-SE, normalizes SERCA2a activity in cardiomyocytes. In this study, we found that ψPLB-SE attenuated neointimal growth in balloon-injured rat carotid arteries, and the proliferation and migration of VSMC cultured in high-serum media (synthetic conditions). In parallel, ψPLB-SE inhibited the degradation of SERCA2a in the injured carotid arteries and VSMC under synthetic conditions. The calpain inhibitor MDL28170 also attenuated SERCA2a degradation and VSMC proliferation under synthetic conditions, indicating that calpain degrades SERCA2a. The Ca2+ ionophore A23187 induced SERCA2a degradation in VSMC, which was blocked by either ψPLB-SE or MDL28170. Additionally, ψPLB-SE normalized the cytosolic Ca2+ level in VSMC that was increased by either A23187 or synthetic stimulation. Collectively, these data indicate that ψPLB-SE corrects the abnormal Ca2+ handling by activating SERCA2a, which further protects SERCA2a from calpain-dependent degradation in VSMC. We conclude that ψPLB-SE may form the basis of a therapeutic strategy for vascular proliferative disorders. PMID:27792751

  3. Potential role for inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A tumor suppressor in salivary gland malignancies.

    PubMed

    Routila, Johannes; Mäkelä, Juho-Antti; Luukkaa, Heikki; Leivo, Ilmo; Irjala, Heikki; Westermarck, Jukka; Mäkitie, Antti; Ventelä, Sami

    2016-01-01

    The aetiology and pathogenesis of salivary gland malignancies remain unknown. To reveal novel molecular factors behind the development of salivary gland cancer, we performed gene expression analyses from Smgb-Tag mouse salivary gland samples. The overall purpose was to apply these results for clinical use to find new approaches for both possible therapeutic targets and more accurate diagnostic tools. Smgb-Tag mouse strain, in which salivary neoplasms arise through a dysplastic phase in submandibular glands, was investigated using genome-wide microarray expression analysis, ingenuity pathway analysis, RT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry. Thirty-eight human salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma samples were investigated using immunohistochemistry for validation purposes. Our genome-wide study showed that Ppp2r1b, a PP2A subunit encoding tumor suppressor gene, is underexpressed in submandibular gland tumors of Smgb-Tag mice. mTOR signaling pathway was significantly enriched and mTOR linked PP2A subunit gene B55 gamma was significantly underexpressed in the analyses. Furthermore, parallel immunohistochemical analysis of three PP2A inhibitors demonstrated that two PP2A inhibitors, CIP2A and SET, are highly expressed in both dysplastic and adenocarcinomatous tumors of the Smgb-Tag mice. In addition, all 38 investigated human salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma samples stained positively for CIP2A and most for SET. Finally, p-S6 staining showed activation of mTOR pathway in human adenoid cystic carcinoma samples. Our results suggest that PP2A inhibition either via PP2A subunit underexpression or PP2A inhibitor overexpression play an important role in the formation of salivary gland malignancy, potentially due to mTOR signaling activation.

  4. Hypothermic Preconditioning Reverses Tau Ontogenesis in Human Cortical Neurons and is Mimicked by Protein Phosphatase 2A Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Rzechorzek, Nina M.; Connick, Peter; Livesey, Matthew R.; Borooah, Shyamanga; Patani, Rickie; Burr, Karen; Story, David; Wyllie, David J.A.; Hardingham, Giles E.; Chandran, Siddharthan

    2015-01-01

    Hypothermia is potently neuroprotective, but the molecular basis of this effect remains obscure. Changes in neuronal tau protein are of interest, since tau becomes hyperphosphorylated in injury-resistant, hypothermic brains. Noting inter-species differences in tau isoforms, we have used functional cortical neurons differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells (hCNs) to interrogate tau modulation during hypothermic preconditioning at clinically-relevant temperatures. Key tau developmental transitions (phosphorylation status and splicing shift) are recapitulated during hCN differentiation and subsequently reversed by mild (32 °C) to moderate (28 °C) cooling — conditions which reduce oxidative and excitotoxic stress-mediated injury in hCNs. Blocking a major tau kinase decreases hCN tau phosphorylation and abrogates hypothermic neuroprotection, whilst inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A mimics cooling-induced tau hyperphosphorylation and protects normothermic hCNs from oxidative stress. These findings indicate a possible role for phospho-tau in hypothermic preconditioning, and suggest that cooling drives human tau towards an earlier ontogenic phenotype whilst increasing neuronal resilience to common neurotoxic insults. This work provides a critical step forward in understanding how we might exploit the neuroprotective benefits of cooling without cooling patients. PMID:26870825

  5. Hypothermic Preconditioning Reverses Tau Ontogenesis in Human Cortical Neurons and is Mimicked by Protein Phosphatase 2A Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rzechorzek, Nina M; Connick, Peter; Livesey, Matthew R; Borooah, Shyamanga; Patani, Rickie; Burr, Karen; Story, David; Wyllie, David J A; Hardingham, Giles E; Chandran, Siddharthan

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia is potently neuroprotective, but the molecular basis of this effect remains obscure. Changes in neuronal tau protein are of interest, since tau becomes hyperphosphorylated in injury-resistant, hypothermic brains. Noting inter-species differences in tau isoforms, we have used functional cortical neurons differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells (hCNs) to interrogate tau modulation during hypothermic preconditioning at clinically-relevant temperatures. Key tau developmental transitions (phosphorylation status and splicing shift) are recapitulated during hCN differentiation and subsequently reversed by mild (32 °C) to moderate (28 °C) cooling--conditions which reduce oxidative and excitotoxic stress-mediated injury in hCNs. Blocking a major tau kinase decreases hCN tau phosphorylation and abrogates hypothermic neuroprotection, whilst inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A mimics cooling-induced tau hyperphosphorylation and protects normothermic hCNs from oxidative stress. These findings indicate a possible role for phospho-tau in hypothermic preconditioning, and suggest that cooling drives human tau towards an earlier ontogenic phenotype whilst increasing neuronal resilience to common neurotoxic insults. This work provides a critical step forward in understanding how we might exploit the neuroprotective benefits of cooling without cooling patients. PMID:26870825

  6. An extract of Urtica dioica L. mitigates obesity induced insulin resistance in mice skeletal muscle via protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A).

    PubMed

    Obanda, Diana N; Ribnicky, David; Yu, Yongmei; Stephens, Jacqueline; Cefalu, William T

    2016-01-01

    The leaf extract of Urtica dioica L. (UT) has been reported to improve glucose homeostasis in vivo, but definitive studies on efficacy and mechanism of action are lacking. We investigated the effects of UT on obesity- induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Male C57BL/6J mice were divided into three groups: low-fat diet (LFD), high-fat diet (HFD) and HFD supplemented with UT. Body weight, body composition, plasma glucose and plasma insulin were monitored. Skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius) was analyzed for insulin sensitivity, ceramide accumulation and the post translational modification and activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). PP2A is activated by ceramides and dephosphorylates Akt. C2C12 myotubes exposed to excess free fatty acids with or without UT were also evaluated for insulin signaling and modulation of PP2A. The HFD induced insulin resistance, increased fasting plasma glucose, enhanced ceramide accumulation and PP2A activity in skeletal muscle. Supplementation with UT improved plasma glucose homeostasis and enhanced skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity without affecting body weight and body composition. In myotubes, UT attenuated the ability of FFAs to induce insulin resistance and PP2A hyperactivity without affecting ceramide accumulation and PP2A expression. UT decreased PP2A activity through posttranslational modification that was accompanied by a reduction in Akt dephosphorylation. PMID:26916435

  7. An extract of Urtica dioica L. mitigates obesity induced insulin resistance in mice skeletal muscle via protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)

    PubMed Central

    Obanda, Diana N.; Ribnicky, David; Yu, Yongmei; Stephens, Jacqueline; Cefalu, William T.

    2016-01-01

    The leaf extract of Urtica dioica L. (UT) has been reported to improve glucose homeostasis in vivo, but definitive studies on efficacy and mechanism of action are lacking. We investigated the effects of UT on obesity- induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Male C57BL/6J mice were divided into three groups: low-fat diet (LFD), high-fat diet (HFD) and HFD supplemented with UT. Body weight, body composition, plasma glucose and plasma insulin were monitored. Skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius) was analyzed for insulin sensitivity, ceramide accumulation and the post translational modification and activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). PP2A is activated by ceramides and dephosphorylates Akt. C2C12 myotubes exposed to excess free fatty acids with or without UT were also evaluated for insulin signaling and modulation of PP2A. The HFD induced insulin resistance, increased fasting plasma glucose, enhanced ceramide accumulation and PP2A activity in skeletal muscle. Supplementation with UT improved plasma glucose homeostasis and enhanced skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity without affecting body weight and body composition. In myotubes, UT attenuated the ability of FFAs to induce insulin resistance and PP2A hyperactivity without affecting ceramide accumulation and PP2A expression. UT decreased PP2A activity through posttranslational modification that was accompanied by a reduction in Akt dephosphorylation. PMID:26916435

  8. Oncogenic nexus of cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A): An oncoprotein with many hands

    PubMed Central

    De, Pradip; Carlson, Jennifer; Leyland-Jones, Brian; Dey, Nandini

    2014-01-01

    Oncoprotein CIP2A a Cancerous Inhibitor of PP2A forms an “oncogenic nexus” by virtue of its control on PP2A and MYC stabilization in cancer cells. The expression and prognostic function of CIP2A in different solid tumors including colorectal carcinoma, head & neck cancers, gastric cancers, lung carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma, esophageal cancers, pancreatic carcinoma, brain cancers, breast carcinoma, bladder cancers, ovarian carcinoma, renal cell carcinomas, tongue cancers, cervical carcinoma, prostate cancers, and oral carcinoma as well as a number of hematological malignancies are just beginning to emerge. Herein, we reviewed the recent progress in our understanding of (1) how an “oncogenic nexus” of CIP2A participates in the tumorigenic transformation of cells and (2) how we can prospect/view the clinical relevance of CIP2A in the context of cancer therapy. The review will try to understand the role of CIP2A (a) as a biomarker in cancers and evaluate the prognostic value of CIP2A in different cancers (b) as a therapeutic target in cancers and (c) in drug response and developing chemo-resistance in cancers. PMID:25015035

  9. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) has a potential role in CAPE-induced apoptosis of CCRF-CEM cells via effecting human telomerase reverse transcriptase activity.

    PubMed

    Avci, Cigir Biray; Sahin, Fahri; Gunduz, Cumhur; Selvi, Nur; Aydin, Hikmet Hakan; Oktem, Gulperi; Topcuoglu, Nejat; Saydam, Guray

    2007-12-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is one of the most effective components of propolis which is collected by honey bees. The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of CAPE in the CCRF-CEM cell line and to clarify the role of serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) activity as an underlining mechanism of CAPE-induced apoptosis. Trypan blue dye exclusion test and XTT methods were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity and ELISA based oligonucleotide detection, which can be seen during apoptosis, was used to determine apoptosis. Acridine orange/ethidium bromide dye technique was also used to evaluate apoptosis. The cytotoxic effect of CAPE was detected in a dose and time dependent manner with the IC(50) of 1 muM. ELISA and acridine orange/ethidium bromide methods have shown remarkable apoptosis at 48th hour in CAPE treated cells. To investigate the role of PP2A in CAPE-induced apoptosis of CCRF-CEM cells, we performed combination studies with CAPE and, Calyculin A and Okadaic acid, which are very well known inhibitors of PP2A, in IC(20) of inhibitors and IC(50) of CAPE. Combination studies revealed synergistic effect of both drugs by concomitant use. Western blot analyses of PP2A catalytic and regulatory subunits showed down-regulation of expression of PP2A catalytic subunit in CAPE treated cells at 48th hour. Since, PP2A is important in hTERT (telomerase catalytic subunit) activation and deactivation, we also performed hTERT activity in CAPE treated cells simultaneously. Treating cells with IC(50) of CAPE for 96 h with the intervals of 24 h showed marked reduction of hTERT activity. The reduction of hTERT activity in CAPE treated CCRF-CEM cells was more prominent in the initial 48 h. The variation of hTERT activity in CAPE treated CCRF-CEM cells may be the reason for the protein phosphatase interaction that occurred after treatment with CAPE. PMID:17852432

  10. Structural Genomics of Protein Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Almo,S.; Bonanno, J.; Sauder, J.; Emtage, S.; Dilorenzo, T.; Malashkevich, V.; Wasserman, S.; Swaminathan, S.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; et al

    2007-01-01

    The New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics (NYSGXRC) of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) has applied its high-throughput X-ray crystallographic structure determination platform to systematic studies of all human protein phosphatases and protein phosphatases from biomedically-relevant pathogens. To date, the NYSGXRC has determined structures of 21 distinct protein phosphatases: 14 from human, 2 from mouse, 2 from the pathogen Toxoplasma gondii, 1 from Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite responsible for African sleeping sickness, and 2 from the principal mosquito vector of malaria in Africa, Anopheles gambiae. These structures provide insights into both normal and pathophysiologic processes, including transcriptional regulation, regulation of major signaling pathways, neural development, and type 1 diabetes. In conjunction with the contributions of other international structural genomics consortia, these efforts promise to provide an unprecedented database and materials repository for structure-guided experimental and computational discovery of inhibitors for all classes of protein phosphatases.

  11. Proteomic analysis of human norepinephrine transporter complexes reveals associations with protein phosphatase 2A anchoring subunit and 14-3-3 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Uhna; Jennings, Jennifer L.; Link, Andrew J.; Blakely, Randy D.; E-mail: andy.blakely@vanderbilt.edu

    2005-08-05

    The norepinephrine transporter (NET) terminates noradrenergic signals by clearing released NE at synapses. NET regulation by receptors and intracellular signaling pathways is supported by a growing list of associated proteins including syntaxin1A, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic subunit (PP2A-C), PICK1, and Hic-5. In the present study, we sought evidence for additional partnerships by mass spectrometry-based analysis of proteins co-immunoprecipitated with human NET (hNET) stably expressed in a mouse noradrenergic neuroblastoma cell line. Our initial proteomic analyses reveal multiple peptides derived from hNET, peptides arising from the mouse PP2A anchoring subunit (PP2A-Ar) and peptides derived from 14-3-3 proteins. We verified physical association of NET with PP2A-Ar via co-immunoprecipitation studies using mouse vas deferens extracts and with 14-3-3 via a fusion pull-down approach, implicating specifically the hNET NH{sub 2}-terminus for interactions. The transporter complexes described likely support mechanisms regulating transporter activity, localization, and trafficking.

  12. Identification of Open Stomata1-Interacting Proteins Reveals Interactions with Sucrose Non-fermenting1-Related Protein Kinases2 and with Type 2A Protein Phosphatases That Function in Abscisic Acid Responses.

    PubMed

    Waadt, Rainer; Manalansan, Bianca; Rauniyar, Navin; Munemasa, Shintaro; Booker, Matthew A; Brandt, Benjamin; Waadt, Christian; Nusinow, Dmitri A; Kay, Steve A; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Schumacher, Karin; DeLong, Alison; Yates, John R; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-09-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) controls growth and development and regulates plant water status through an established signaling pathway. In the presence of ABA, pyrabactin resistance/regulatory component of ABA receptor proteins inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs). This, in turn, enables the activation of Sucrose Nonfermenting1-Related Protein Kinases2 (SnRK2). Open Stomata1 (OST1)/SnRK2.6/SRK2E is a major SnRK2-type protein kinase responsible for mediating ABA responses. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing an epitope-tagged OST1 in the recessive ost1-3 mutant background was used for the copurification and identification of OST1-interacting proteins after osmotic stress and ABA treatments. These analyses, which were confirmed using bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation, unexpectedly revealed homo- and heteromerization of OST1 with SnRK2.2, SnRK2.3, OST1, and SnRK2.8. Furthermore, several OST1-complexed proteins were identified as type 2A protein phosphatase (PP2A) subunits and as proteins involved in lipid and galactolipid metabolism. More detailed analyses suggested an interaction network between ABA-activated SnRK2-type protein kinases and several PP2A-type protein phosphatase regulatory subunits. pp2a double mutants exhibited a reduced sensitivity to ABA during seed germination and stomatal closure and an enhanced ABA sensitivity in root growth regulation. These analyses add PP2A-type protein phosphatases as another class of protein phosphatases to the interaction network of SnRK2-type protein kinases.

  13. Identification of Open Stomata1-Interacting Proteins Reveals Interactions with Sucrose Non-fermenting1-Related Protein Kinases2 and with Type 2A Protein Phosphatases That Function in Abscisic Acid Responses.

    PubMed

    Waadt, Rainer; Manalansan, Bianca; Rauniyar, Navin; Munemasa, Shintaro; Booker, Matthew A; Brandt, Benjamin; Waadt, Christian; Nusinow, Dmitri A; Kay, Steve A; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Schumacher, Karin; DeLong, Alison; Yates, John R; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-09-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) controls growth and development and regulates plant water status through an established signaling pathway. In the presence of ABA, pyrabactin resistance/regulatory component of ABA receptor proteins inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs). This, in turn, enables the activation of Sucrose Nonfermenting1-Related Protein Kinases2 (SnRK2). Open Stomata1 (OST1)/SnRK2.6/SRK2E is a major SnRK2-type protein kinase responsible for mediating ABA responses. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing an epitope-tagged OST1 in the recessive ost1-3 mutant background was used for the copurification and identification of OST1-interacting proteins after osmotic stress and ABA treatments. These analyses, which were confirmed using bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation, unexpectedly revealed homo- and heteromerization of OST1 with SnRK2.2, SnRK2.3, OST1, and SnRK2.8. Furthermore, several OST1-complexed proteins were identified as type 2A protein phosphatase (PP2A) subunits and as proteins involved in lipid and galactolipid metabolism. More detailed analyses suggested an interaction network between ABA-activated SnRK2-type protein kinases and several PP2A-type protein phosphatase regulatory subunits. pp2a double mutants exhibited a reduced sensitivity to ABA during seed germination and stomatal closure and an enhanced ABA sensitivity in root growth regulation. These analyses add PP2A-type protein phosphatases as another class of protein phosphatases to the interaction network of SnRK2-type protein kinases. PMID:26175513

  14. Identification of Open Stomata1-Interacting Proteins Reveals Interactions with Sucrose Non-fermenting1-Related Protein Kinases2 and with Type 2A Protein Phosphatases That Function in Abscisic Acid Responses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Waadt, Rainer; Manalansan, Bianca; Rauniyar, Navin; Munemasa, Shintaro; Booker, Matthew A.; Brandt, Benjamin; Waadt, Christian; Nusinow, Dmitri A.; Kay, Steve A.; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Schumacher, Karin; DeLong, Alison; Yates, John R.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) controls growth and development and regulates plant water status through an established signaling pathway. In the presence of ABA, pyrabactin resistance/regulatory component of ABA receptor proteins inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs). This, in turn, enables the activation of Sucrose Nonfermenting1-Related Protein Kinases2 (SnRK2). Open Stomata1 (OST1)/SnRK2.6/SRK2E is a major SnRK2-type protein kinase responsible for mediating ABA responses. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing an epitope-tagged OST1 in the recessive ost1-3 mutant background was used for the copurification and identification of OST1-interacting proteins after osmotic stress and ABA treatments. These analyses, which were confirmed using bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation, unexpectedly revealed homo- and heteromerization of OST1 with SnRK2.2, SnRK2.3, OST1, and SnRK2.8. Furthermore, several OST1-complexed proteins were identified as type 2A protein phosphatase (PP2A) subunits and as proteins involved in lipid and galactolipid metabolism. More detailed analyses suggested an interaction network between ABA-activated SnRK2-type protein kinases and several PP2A-type protein phosphatase regulatory subunits. pp2a double mutants exhibited a reduced sensitivity to ABA during seed germination and stomatal closure and an enhanced ABA sensitivity in root growth regulation. These analyses add PP2A-type protein phosphatases as another class of protein phosphatases to the interaction network of SnRK2-type protein kinases. PMID:26175513

  15. The E3 Ubiquitin Ligase- and Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-binding Domains of the Alpha4 Protein Are Both Required for Alpha4 to Inhibit PP2A Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    LeNoue-Newton, Michele; Watkins, Guy R.; Zou, Ping; Germane, Katherine L.; McCorvey, Lisa R.; Wadzinski, Brian E.; Spiller, Benjamin W.

    2012-04-30

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is regulated through a variety of mechanisms, including post-translational modifications and association with regulatory proteins. Alpha4 is one such regulatory protein that binds the PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac) and protects it from polyubiquitination and degradation. Alpha4 is a multidomain protein with a C-terminal domain that binds Mid1, a putative E3 ubiquitin ligase, and an N-terminal domain containing the PP2Ac-binding site. In this work, we present the structure of the N-terminal domain of mammalian Alpha4 determined by x-ray crystallography and use double electron-electron resonance spectroscopy to show that it is a flexible tetratricopeptide repeat-like protein. Structurally, Alpha4 differs from its yeast homolog, Tap42, in two important ways: (1) the position of the helix containing the PP2Ac-binding residues is in a more open conformation, showing flexibility in this region; and (2) Alpha4 contains a ubiquitin-interacting motif. The effects of wild-type and mutant Alpha4 on PP2Ac ubiquitination and stability were examined in mammalian cells by performing tandem ubiquitin-binding entity precipitations and cycloheximide chase experiments. Our results reveal that both the C-terminal Mid1-binding domain and the PP2Ac-binding determinants are required for Alpha4-mediated protection of PP2Ac from polyubiquitination and degradation.

  16. Protein phosphatase 2A and Cdc7 kinase regulate the DNA unwinding element-binding protein in replication initiation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanzhe; Yao, Jianhong; Poudel, Sumeet; Romer, Eric; Abu-Niaaj, Lubna; Leffak, Michael

    2014-12-26

    The DNA unwinding element (DUE)-binding protein (DUE-B) binds to replication origins coordinately with the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) helicase and the helicase activator Cdc45 in vivo, and loads Cdc45 onto chromatin in Xenopus egg extracts. Human DUE-B also retains the aminoacyl-tRNA proofreading function of its shorter orthologs in lower organisms. Here we report that phosphorylation of the DUE-B unstructured C-terminal domain unique to higher organisms regulates DUE-B intermolecular binding. Gel filtration analyses show that unphosphorylated DUE-B forms multiple high molecular weight (HMW) complexes. Several aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and Mcm2-7 proteins were identified by mass spectrometry of the HMW complexes. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase binding is RNase A sensitive, whereas interaction with Mcm2-7 is nuclease resistant. Unphosphorylated DUE-B HMW complex formation is decreased by PP2A inhibition or direct DUE-B phosphorylation, and increased by inhibition of Cdc7. These results indicate that the state of DUE-B phosphorylation is maintained by the equilibrium between Cdc7-dependent phosphorylation and PP2A-dependent dephosphorylation, each previously shown to regulate replication initiation. Alanine mutation of the DUE-B C-terminal phosphorylation target sites increases MCM binding but blocks Cdc45 loading in vivo and inhibits cell division. In egg extracts alanine mutation of the DUE-B C-terminal phosphorylation sites blocks Cdc45 loading and inhibits DNA replication. The effects of DUE-B C-terminal phosphorylation reveal a novel S phase kinase regulatory mechanism for Cdc45 loading and MCM helicase activation.

  17. Mutations which affect the inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A by simian virus 40 small-t antigen in vitro decrease viral transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Mungre, S; Enderle, K; Turk, B; Porrás, A; Wu, Y Q; Mumby, M C; Rundell, K

    1994-01-01

    Three independent point mutations within residues 97 to 103 of the simian virus 40-small-t antigen (small-t) greatly reduced the ability of purified small-t to inhibit protein phosphatase 2A in vitro. These mutations affected the interaction of small-t antigen with the protein phosphatase 2A A subunit translated in vitro, and a peptide from the region identified by these mutations released the A subunit from immune complexes. When introduced into virus, the mutations eliminated the ability of small-t to enhance viral transformation of growth-arrested rat F111 cells. In contrast, the mutant small-t antigens were unimpaired in the transactivation of the adenovirus E2 promoter, an activity which was reduced by a double mutation in small-t residues 43 and 45. Images PMID:8107228

  18. Protein phosphatase 2A, a potential regulator of actin dynamics and actin-based organelle motility in the green alga Acetabularia.

    PubMed

    Menzel, D; Vugrek, O; Frank, S; Elsner-Menzel, C

    1995-06-01

    The giant, unicellular alga Acetabularia is a well known experimental model for the study of actin-dependent intracellular organelle motility. In the cyst stage, however, which is equivalent to the gametophytic stage, organelles are immobile, even though an actin cytoskeleton is present. The reason for the lack of organelle motility at this stage has not been known. To test the hypothesis that organelle motility could be under the control of posttranslational modification by protein phosphorylation, we have treated cysts with submicromolar concentrations of okadaic acid or calyculin A, both potent inhibitors of serine/threonine protein phosphatases (ser/thr-PPases). The effects were dramatic: Instead of linear actin bundles typical for control cysts, circular arrays of actin bundles formed in the cortical cyst cytoplasm. Concomitant with the formation of these action rings, the cytoplasmic layers beneath the rings began to slowly rotate in a continuous and uniform counter-clockwise fashion. This effect suggests that protein phosphorylation acts on the actin cytoskeleton at two levels: (1) It changes the assembly properties of the actin filament system to the extent that novel cytoskeletal configurations are formed and (2) it raises the activity of putative motor proteins involved in the rotational movements to levels sufficiently high to support motility at a stage when organelle motility does not normally occur. Northern blot analysis of cyst stage-mRNA using probes specific to protein phosphatase type 1 (PP1) and type 2A (PP2A) reveals that PP2A is strongly expressed at this developmental stage whereas PP1 is not detectable, suggesting that PP2A is the likely target to the protein phosphatase inhibitors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Blocking protein phosphatase 2A signaling prevents endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and renal fibrosis: a peptide-based drug therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yuanjun; Guo, Yanyan; Liu, Ping; Zeng, Rui; Ning, Yong; Pei, Guangchang; Li, Yueqiang; Chen, Meixue; Guo, Shuiming; Li, Xiaoqing; Han, Min; Xu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) contributes to the emergence of fibroblasts and plays a significant role in renal interstitial fibrosis. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a major serine/threonine protein phosphatase in eukaryotic cells and regulates many signaling pathways. However, the significance of PP2A in EndMT is poorly understood. In present study, the role of PP2A in EndMT was evaluated. We demonstrated that PP2A activated in endothelial cells (EC) during their EndMT phenotype acquisition and in the mouse model of obstructive nephropathy (i.e., UUO). Inhibition of PP2A activity by its specific inhibitor prevented EC undergoing EndMT. Importantly, PP2A activation was dependent on tyrosine nitration at 127 in the catalytic subunit of PP2A (PP2Ac). Our renal-protective strategy was to block tyrosine127 nitration to inhibit PP2A activation by using a mimic peptide derived from PP2Ac conjugating a cell penetrating peptide (CPP: TAT), termed TAT-Y127WT. Pretreatment withTAT-Y127WT was able to prevent TGF-β1-induced EndMT. Administration of the peptide to UUO mice significantly ameliorated renal EndMT level, with preserved density of peritubular capillaries and reduction in extracellular matrix deposition. Taken together, these results suggest that inhibiting PP2Ac nitration using a mimic peptide is a potential preventive strategy for EndMT in renal fibrosis.

  20. Yeast Protein Phosphatase 2A-Cdc55 Regulates the Transcriptional Response to Hyperosmolarity Stress by Regulating Msn2 and Msn4 Chromatin Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Wolfgang; Klopf, Eva; De Wever, Veerle; Anrather, Dorothea; Petryshyn, Andriy; Roetzer, Andreas; Niederacher, Gerhard; Roitinger, Elisabeth; Dohnal, Ilse; Görner, Wolfram; Mechtler, Karl; Brocard, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    We have identified Cdc55, a regulatory B subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), as an essential activating factor for stress gene transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The presence of PP2A-Cdc55 is required for full activation of the environmental stress response mediated by the transcription factors Msn2 and Msn4. We show that PP2A-Cdc55 contributes to sustained nuclear accumulation of Msn2 and Msn4 during hyperosmolarity stress. PP2A-Cdc55 also enhances Msn2-dependent transactivation, required for extended chromatin recruitment of the transcription factor. We analyzed a possible direct regulatory role for PP2A-Cdc55 on the phosphorylation status of Msn2. Detailed mass spectrometric and genetic analysis of Msn2 showed that stress exposure causes immediate transient dephosphorylation of Msn2 which is not dependent on PP2A-Cdc55 activity. Furthermore, the Hog1 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activity is not influenced by PP2A-Cdc55. We therefore propose that the PP2A-Cdc55 phosphatase is not involved in cytosolic stress signal perception but is involved in a specific intranuclear mechanism to regulate Msn2 and Msn4 nuclear accumulation and chromatin association under stress conditions. PMID:23275436

  1. Differential induction of apoptosis in human breast tumor cells by okadaic acid and related inhibitors of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Kiguchi, Kaoru; Chubb, C.H.; Glesne, D.; Huberman, E. |; Fujiki, Hirota

    1994-09-01

    To investigate a possible relationship between apoptosis induction and protein phosphorylation in human breast carcinoma cells, the authors treated three such cell types, MB-231, MCF-7, and AU-565, wit okadaic acid (OA), an inhibitor of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, or phorbol 12 myristate 13-acetate, an activator of protein kinase C. They then examined these cells of the appearance of apoptosis markers. While OA caused multiplication arrest and cytotoxicity in all three cell lines, apoptosis was induced in MB-231 and MCF-7 cells but not in AU-565 cells. A similar cell-specific apoptosis induction was also observed after treatment with dinophysistoxin-1 (an active OA analogue) and with calyculin A (a structurally unrelated protein phosphatase inhibitor) but not with analogues that either ar inactive or penetrate epithelial cells poorly. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate also inhibited cell multiplication but was without effect in inducing apoptosis in these cells. Levels of the apoptosis-inhibitory protein BCL2 were examined in these cells, but they did to correlate with this differential susceptibility. They additionally treated the three cell types with 1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine and genistein to determine whether the AU-565 cell line would also be resistant to apoptosis induction by other chemical stimuli. Both of these agents led to the induction of apoptosis in all three cell lines. These results indicate that the AU-565 cells are specifically resistant to apoptosis induction by inhibitors of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A. This cell-specific resistance may thus allow one to identify cellular mediators of apoptosis by comparing protein phosphorylation patterns in these cells before and after treatment with OA or related inhibitors.

  2. microRNA-183 plays as oncogenes by increasing cell proliferation, migration and invasion via targeting protein phosphatase 2A in renal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Mingning Liu, Lei Chen, Lieqian Tan, Guobin Liang, Ziji Wang, Kangning Liu, Jianjun Chen, Hege

    2014-09-12

    Highlights: • miR-183 was up-regulated in renal cancer tissues. • Inhibition of endogenous miR-183 suppressed renal cancer cell growth and metastasis. • miR-183 increased cell growth and metastasis. • miR-183 regulated renal cancer cell growth and metastasis via directly targeting tumor suppressor protein phosphatase 2A. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate the function of miR-183 in renal cancer cells and the mechanisms miR-183 regulates this process. In this study, level of miR-183 in clinical renal cancer specimens was detected by quantitative real-time PCR. miR-183 was up- and down-regulated in two renal cancer cell lines ACHN and A498, respectively, and cell proliferation, Caspase 3/7 activity, colony formation, in vitro migration and invasion were measured; and then the mechanisms of miR-183 regulating was analyzed. We found that miR-183 was up-regulated in renal cancer tissues; inhibition of endogenous miR-183 suppressed in vitro cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion and stimulated Caspase 3/7 activity; up-regulated miR-183 increased cell growth and metastasis and suppressed Caspase 3/7 activity. We also found that miR-183 directly targeted tumor suppressor, specifically the 3′UTR of three subunits of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-Cα, PP2A-Cβ, and PP2A-B56-γ) transcripts, inhibiting their expression and regulated the downstream regulators p21, p27, MMP2/3/7 and TIMP1/2/3/4. These results revealed the oncogenes role of miR-183 in renal cancer cells via direct targeting protein phosphatase 2A.

  3. Structure, evolution and expression of a second subfamily of protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit genes in the rice plant (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Yu, Richard Man Kit; Wong, Minnie Man Lai; Jack, Ralph Wilson; Kong, Richard Yuen Chong

    2005-11-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is one of the major serine/threonine protein phosphatases in the cell and plays a variety of regulatory roles in metabolism and signal transduction. Previously, we described the structure and expression of two genes encoding PP2A catalytic subunits (PP2Ac)--OsPP2A-1 and OsPP2A-3--in the rice plant (Yu et al. 2003). Here, we report the isolation and characterisation of a second structurally distinguishable PP2Ac subfamily comprised of three additional isogenes, OsPP2A-2, OsPP2A-4 (each containing ten introns) and OsPP2A-5 (which contains nine introns). Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the three isogenes are ubiquitously expressed in all rice tissues during plant development, and differentially expressed in response to high salinity and the combined stresses of drought and heat. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the two PP2Ac subfamilies are descended from two ancient lineages, which derived from gene duplications that occurred after the monocotyledon-dicotyledon split. In the second subfamily, it is proposed that two duplication events were involved; in which, the initial duplication of a ten-intron primordial gene yielded OsPP2A-2 and the progenitor of OsPP2A-4 and OsPP2A-5. The OsPP2A-4/OsPP2A-5 progenitor, in turn, underwent a second duplication event, resulting in the present day OsPP2A-4 and OsPP2A-5. It is proposed that loss of the 5'-most intron from OsPP2A-5 occurred after these two duplication events. PMID:16021503

  4. Curcumin treatment recovery the decrease of protein phosphatase 2A subunit B induced by focal cerebral ischemia in Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Fawad-Ali; Park, Dong-Ju; Gim, Sang-Ah

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin provides various biological effects through its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Moreover, curcumin exerts a neuroprotective effect against ischemic condition-induced brain damage. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a ubiquitous serine and threonine phosphatase with various cell functions and broad substrate specificity. Especially PP2A subunit B plays an important role in nervous system. This study investigated whether curcumin regulates PP2A subunit B expression in focal cerebral ischemia. Cerebral ischemia was induced surgically by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Adult male rats were injected with either vehicle or curcumin (50 mg/kg) 1 h after MCAO and cerebral cortex tissues were isolated 24 h after MCAO. A proteomics study, reverse transverse-PCR and Western blot analyses were performed to examine PP2A subunit B expression levels. We identified a reduction in PP2A subunit B expression in MCAO-operated animals using a proteomic approach. However, curcumin treatment prevented injury-induced reductions in PP2A subunit B levels. Reverse transverse-PCR and Western blot analyses confirmed that curcumin treatment attenuated the injury-induced reduction in PP2A subunit B levels. These findings can suggest that the possibility that curcumin maintains levels of PP2A subunit B in response to cerebral ischemia, which likely contributes to the neuroprotective function of curcumin in cerebral ischemic injury. PMID:26472966

  5. Overexpression of SET is a recurrent event associated with poor outcome and contributes to protein phosphatase 2A inhibition in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cristóbal, Ion; Garcia-Orti, Laura; Cirauqui, Cristina; Cortes-Lavaud, Xabier; García-Sánchez, María A.; Calasanz, María J.; Odero, María D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Protein phosphatase 2A is a novel potential therapeutic target in several types of chronic and acute leukemia, and its inhibition is a common event in acute myeloid leukemia. Upregulation of SET is essential to inhibit protein phosphatase 2A in chronic myeloid leukemia, but its importance in acute myeloid leukemia has not yet been explored. Design and Methods We quantified SET expression by real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction in 214 acute myeloid leukemia patients at diagnosis. Western blot was performed in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines and in 16 patients’ samples. We studied the effect of SET using cell viability assays. Bioinformatics analysis of the SET promoter, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and luciferase assays were performed to evaluate the transcriptional regulation of SET. Results SET overexpression was found in 60/214 patients, for a prevalence of 28%. Patients with SET overexpression had worse overall survival (P<0.01) and event-free survival (P<0.01). Deregulation of SET was confirmed by western blot in both cell lines and patients’ samples. Functional analysis showed that SET promotes proliferation, and restores cell viability after protein phosphatase 2A overexpression. We identified EVI1 overexpression as a mechanism involved in SET deregulation in acute myeloid leukemia cells. Conclusions These findings suggest that SET overexpression is a key mechanism in the inhibition of PP2A in acute myeloid leukemia, and that EVI1 overexpression contributes to the deregulation of SET. Furthermore, SET overexpression is associated with a poor outcome in acute myeloid leukemia, and it can be used to identify a subgroup of patients who could benefit from future treatments based on PP2A activators. PMID:22133779

  6. Theophylline Represses IL-8 Secretion from Airway Smooth Muscle Cells Independently of Phosphodiesterase Inhibition. Novel Role as a Protein Phosphatase 2A Activator.

    PubMed

    Patel, Brijeshkumar S; Rahman, Md Mostafizur; Rumzhum, Nowshin N; Oliver, Brian G; Verrills, Nicole M; Ammit, Alaina J

    2016-06-01

    Theophylline is an old drug experiencing a renaissance owing to its beneficial antiinflammatory effects in chronic respiratory diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Multiple modes of antiinflammatory action have been reported, including inhibition of the enzymes that degrade cAMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE). Using primary cultures of airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, we recently revealed that PDE4 inhibitors can potentiate the antiinflammatory action of β2-agonists by augmenting cAMP-dependent expression of the phosphatase that deactivates mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-MAPK phosphatase (MKP)-1. Therefore, the aim of this study was to address whether theophylline repressed cytokine production in a similar, PDE-dependent, MKP-1-mediated manner. Notably, theophylline did not potentiate cAMP release from ASM cells treated with the long-acting β2-agonist formoterol. Moreover, theophylline (0.1-10 μM) did not increase formoterol-induced MKP-1 messenger RNA expression nor protein up-regulation, consistent with the lack of cAMP generation. However, theophylline (at 10 μM) was antiinflammatory and repressed secretion of the neutrophil chemoattractant cytokine IL-8, which is produced in response to TNF-α. Because theophylline's effects were independent of PDE4 inhibition or antiinflammatory MKP-1, we then wished to elucidate the novel mechanisms responsible. We investigated the impact of theophylline on protein phosphatase (PP) 2A, a master controller of multiple inflammatory signaling pathways, and show that theophylline increases TNF-α-induced PP2A activity in ASM cells. Confirmatory results were obtained in A549 lung epithelial cells. PP2A activators have beneficial effects in ex vivo and in vivo models of respiratory disease. Thus, our study is the first to link theophylline with PP2A activation as a novel mechanism to control respiratory inflammation.

  7. microRNA-183 plays as oncogenes by increasing cell proliferation, migration and invasion via targeting protein phosphatase 2A in renal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Mingning; Liu, Lei; Chen, Lieqian; Tan, Guobin; Liang, Ziji; Wang, Kangning; Liu, Jianjun; Chen, Hege

    2014-09-12

    The aim of this study was to investigate the function of miR-183 in renal cancer cells and the mechanisms miR-183 regulates this process. In this study, level of miR-183 in clinical renal cancer specimens was detected by quantitative real-time PCR. miR-183 was up- and down-regulated in two renal cancer cell lines ACHN and A498, respectively, and cell proliferation, Caspase 3/7 activity, colony formation, in vitro migration and invasion were measured; and then the mechanisms of miR-183 regulating was analyzed. We found that miR-183 was up-regulated in renal cancer tissues; inhibition of endogenous miR-183 suppressed in vitro cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion and stimulated Caspase 3/7 activity; up-regulated miR-183 increased cell growth and metastasis and suppressed Caspase 3/7 activity. We also found that miR-183 directly targeted tumor suppressor, specifically the 3'UTR of three subunits of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-Cα, PP2A-Cβ, and PP2A-B56-γ) transcripts, inhibiting their expression and regulated the downstream regulators p21, p27, MMP2/3/7 and TIMP1/2/3/4. These results revealed the oncogenes role of miR-183 in renal cancer cells via direct targeting protein phosphatase 2A.

  8. Novel effects of FTY720 on perinuclear reorganization of keratin network induced by sphingosylphosphorylcholine: Involvement of protein phosphatase 2A and G-protein-coupled receptor-12.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi Kyung; Park, Soyeun; Kim, Hyun Ji; Kim, Eun Ji; Kim, So Yeon; Kang, Gyeoung Jin; Byun, Hyun Jung; Kim, Sang Hee; Lee, Ho; Lee, Chang Hoon

    2016-03-15

    Sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) evokes perinuclear reorganization of keratin 8 (K8) filaments and regulates the viscoelasticity of metastatic cancer cells leading to enhanced migration. Few studies have addressed the compounds modulating the viscoelasticity of metastatic cancer cells. We studied the effects of sphingosine (SPH), sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), FTY720 and FTY720-phosphate (FTY720P) on SPC-induced K8 phosphorylation and reorganization using Western blot and confocal microscopy, and also evaluated the elasticity of PANC-1 cells by atomic force microscopy. FTY720, FTY720P, SPH, and S1P concentration-dependently inhibited SPC-evoked phosphorylation and reorganization of K8, and migration of PANC-1 cells. SPC triggered reduction and narrow distribution of elastic constant K and conversely, FTY720 blocked them. A common upstream regulator of JNK and ERK, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) expression was reduced by SPC, but was restored by FTY720 and FTY72P. Butyryl forskolin, a PP2A activator, suppressed SPC-induced K8 phosphorylation and okadaic acid, a PP2A inhibitor, induced K8 phosphorylation. Gene silencing of PP2A also led to K8 phosphorylation, reorganization and migration. We also investigated the involvement of GPR12, a high-affinity SPC receptor, in SPC-evoked keratin phosphorylation and reorganization. GPR12 siRNA suppressed the SPC-triggered phosphorylation and reorganization of K8. GPR12 overexpression stimulated keratin phosphorylation and reorganization even without SPC. FTY720 and FTY720P suppressed the GPR12-induced phosphorylation and reorganization of K8. The collective data indicates that FTY720 and FTY720P suppress SPC-induced phosphorylation and reorganization of K8 in PANC-1 cells by restoring the expression of PP2A via GPR12. These findings might be helpful in the development of compounds that modulate the viscoelasticity of metastatic cancer cells and various SPC actions. PMID:26872988

  9. Ref2, a regulatory subunit of the yeast protein phosphatase 1, is a novel component of cation homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Dalmau, Jofre; González, Asier; Platara, Maria; Navarrete, Clara; Martínez, José L; Barreto, Lina; Ramos, José; Ariño, Joaquín; Casamayor, Antonio

    2010-02-24

    Maintenance of cation homoeostasis is a key process for any living organism. Specific mutations in Glc7, the essential catalytic subunit of yeast protein phosphatase 1, result in salt and alkaline pH sensitivity, suggesting a role for this protein in cation homoeostasis. We screened a collection of Glc7 regulatory subunit mutants for altered tolerance to diverse cations (sodium, lithium and calcium) and alkaline pH. Among 18 candidates, only deletion of REF2 (RNA end formation 2) yielded increased sensitivity to these conditions, as well as to diverse organic toxic cations. The Ref2F374A mutation, which renders it unable to bind Glc7, did not rescue the salt-related phenotypes of the ref2 strain, suggesting that Ref2 function in cation homoeostasis is mediated by Glc7. The ref2 deletion mutant displays a marked decrease in lithium efflux, which can be explained by the inability of these cells to fully induce the Na+-ATPase ENA1 gene. The effect of lack of Ref2 is additive to that of blockage of the calcineurin pathway and might disrupt multiple mechanisms controlling ENA1 expression. ref2 cells display a striking defect in vacuolar morphogenesis, which probably accounts for the increased calcium levels observed under standard growth conditions and the strong calcium sensitivity of this mutant. Remarkably, the evidence collected indicates that the role of Ref2 in cation homoeostasis may be unrelated to its previously identified function in the formation of mRNA via the APT (for associated with Pta1) complex.

  10. Estimation of the rate constants associated with the inhibitory effect of okadaic acid on type 2A protein phosphatase by time-course analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Takai, A; Ohno, Y; Yasumoto, T; Mieskes, G

    1992-01-01

    As is often the case with tightly binding inhibitors, okadaic acid produces its inhibitory effect on type 2A protein phosphatase (PP2A) in a time-dependent manner. We measured the rate constants associated with the binding of okadaic acid to PP2A by analysing the time-course of the reduction of the p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP) phosphatase activity of the enzyme after application of okadaic acid. The rate constants for dissociation of okadaic acid from PP2A were also estimated from the time-course of the recovery of the activity from inhibition by okadaic acid after addition of a mouse IgG1 monoclonal antibody raised against the inhibitor. Our results show that the rate constants for the binding of okadaic acid and PP2A are of the order of 10(7) M-1.s-1, a typical value for reactions involving relatively large molecules, whereas those for their dissociation are in the range 10(-4)-10(-3) s-1. The very low values of the latter seems to be the determining factor for the exceedingly high affinity of okadaic acid for PP2A. The dissociation constants for the interaction of okadaic acid with the free enzyme and the enzyme-substrate complex, estimated as the ratio of the rate constants, are both in the range 30-40 pM, in agreement with the results of previous dose-inhibition analyses. PMID:1329723

  11. Metabolic Control of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II (CaMKII)-mediated Caspase-2 Suppression by the B55β/Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A)*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bofu; Yang, Chih-Sheng; Wojton, Jeffrey; Huang, Nai-Jia; Chen, Chen; Soderblom, Erik J.; Zhang, Liguo; Kornbluth, Sally

    2014-01-01

    High levels of metabolic activity confer resistance to apoptosis. Caspase-2, an apoptotic initiator, can be suppressed by high levels of nutrient flux through the pentose phosphate pathway. This metabolic control is exerted via inhibitory phosphorylation of the caspase-2 prodomain by activated Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). We show here that this activation of CaMKII depends, in part, on dephosphorylation of CaMKII at novel sites (Thr393/Ser395) and that this is mediated by metabolic activation of protein phosphatase 2A in complex with the B55β targeting subunit. This represents a novel locus of CaMKII control and also provides a mechanism contributing to metabolic control of apoptosis. These findings may have implications for metabolic control of the many CaMKII-controlled and protein phosphatase 2A-regulated physiological processes, because both enzymes appear to be responsive to alterations in glucose metabolized via the pentose phosphate pathway. PMID:25378403

  12. Protein phosphatases in pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Ortsäter, Henrik; Grankvist, Nina; Honkanen, Richard E.; Sjöholm1, Åke

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is increasing rapidly world-wide. A cardinal feature of most forms of diabetes is the lack of insulin-producing capability, due to the loss of insulin-producing β-cells, impaired glucose-sensitive insulin secretion from the β-cell, or a combination thereof, the reasons for which largely remain elusive. Reversible phosphorylation is an important and versatile mechanism for regulating the biological activity of many intracellular proteins, which, in turn, controls a variety of cellular functions. For instance, significant changes in protein kinase activities and in protein phosphorylation patterns occur subsequent to stimulation of insulin release by glucose. Therefore, the molecular mechanisms regulating phosphorylation of proteins involved in the insulin secretory process by the β-cell have been extensively investigated. However, far less is known about the role and regulation of protein dephosphorylation by various protein phosphatases. Herein we review extant data implicating serine/threonine and tyrosine phosphatases in various aspects of healthy and diabetic islet biology, ranging from control of hormonal stimulus-secretion coupling to mitogenesis and apoptosis. PMID:24681827

  13. Subunits B'γ and B'ζ of protein phosphatase 2A regulate photo-oxidative stress responses and growth in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Konert, Grzegorz; Rahikainen, Moona; Trotta, Andrea; Durian, Guido; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Khorobrykh, Sergey; Tyystjärvi, Esa; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa

    2015-12-01

    Plants survive periods of unfavourable conditions with the help of sensory mechanisms that respond to reactive oxygen species (ROS) as signalling molecules in different cellular compartments. We have previously demonstrated that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) impacts on organellar cross-talk and associated pathogenesis responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. This was evidenced by drastically enhanced pathogenesis responses and cell death in cat2 pp2a-b'γ double mutants, deficient in the main peroxisomal antioxidant enzyme CATALASE 2 and PP2A regulatory subunit B'γ (PP2A-B'γ). In the present paper, we explored the impacts of PP2A-B'γ and a highly similar regulatory subunit PP2A-B'ζ in growth regulation and light stress tolerance in Arabidopsis. PP2A-B'γ and PP2A-B'ζ display high promoter activities in rapidly growing tissues and are required for optimal growth under favourable conditions. Upon acclimation to a combination of high light, elevated temperature and reduced availability of water, however, pp2a-b'γζ double mutants grow similarly to the wild type and show enhanced tolerance against photo-oxidative stress. We conclude that by controlling ROS homeostasis and signalling, PP2A-B'γ and PP2A-B'ζ may direct acclimation strategies upon environmental perturbations, hence acting as important determinants of defence responses and light acclimation in plants.

  14. MID1 Catalyzes the Ubiquitination of Protein Phosphatase 2A and Mutations within Its Bbox1 Domain Disrupt Polyubiquitination of Alpha4 but Not of PP2Ac

    PubMed Central

    Du, Haijuan; Wu, Kuanlin; Didoronkute, Alma; Levy, Marcus V. A.; Todi, Nimish; Shchelokova, Anna; Massiah, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    MID1 is a microtubule-associated protein that belongs to the TRIM family. MID1 functions as an ubiquitin E3 ligase, and recently was shown to catalyze the polyubiquitination of, alpha4, a protein regulator of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). It has been hypothesized that MID1 regulates PP2A, requiring the intermediary interaction with alpha4. Here we report that MID1 catalyzes the in vitro ubiquitination of the catalytic subunit of PP2A (PP2Ac) in the absence of alpha4. In the presence of alpha4, the level of PP2Ac ubiquitination is reduced. Using the MID1 RING-Bbox1-Bbox2 (RB1B2) construct containing the E3 ligase domains, we investigate the functional effects of mutations within the Bbox domains that are identified in patients with X-linked Opitz G syndrome (XLOS). The RB1B2 proteins harboring the C142S, C145T, A130V/T mutations within the Bbox1 domain and C195F mutation within the Bbox2 domain maintain auto-polyubiquitination activity. Qualitatively, the RB1B2 proteins containing these mutations are able to catalyze the ubiquitination of PP2Ac. In contrast, the RB1B2 proteins with mutations within the Bbox1 domain are unable to catalyze the polyubiquitination of alpha4. These results suggest that unregulated alpha4 may be the direct consequence of these natural mutations in the Bbox1 domain of MID1, and hence alpha4 could play a greater role to account for the increased amount of PP2A observed in XLOS-derived fibroblasts. PMID:25207814

  15. Rescue of GABAB and GIRK function in the lateral habenula by protein phosphatase 2A inhibition ameliorates depression-like phenotypes in mice.

    PubMed

    Lecca, Salvatore; Pelosi, Assunta; Tchenio, Anna; Moutkine, Imane; Lujan, Rafael; Hervé, Denis; Mameli, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) encodes aversive signals, and its aberrant activity contributes to depression-like symptoms. However, a limited understanding of the cellular mechanisms underlying LHb hyperactivity has precluded the development of pharmacological strategies to ameliorate depression-like phenotypes. Here we report that an aversive experience in mice, such as foot-shock exposure (FsE), induces LHb neuronal hyperactivity and depression-like symptoms. This occurs along with increased protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity, a known regulator of GABAB receptor (GABABR) and G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channel surface expression. Accordingly, FsE triggers GABAB1 and GIRK2 internalization, leading to rapid and persistent weakening of GABAB-activated GIRK-mediated (GABAB-GIRK) currents. Pharmacological inhibition of PP2A restores both GABAB-GIRK function and neuronal excitability. As a consequence, PP2A inhibition ameliorates depression-like symptoms after FsE and in a learned-helplessness model of depression. Thus, GABAB-GIRK plasticity in the LHb represents a cellular substrate for aversive experience. Furthermore, its reversal by PP2A inhibition may provide a novel therapeutic approach to alleviate symptoms of depression in disorders that are characterized by LHb hyperactivity. PMID:26808347

  16. Inhibition of specific binding of okadaic acid to protein phosphatase 2A by microcystin-LR, calyculin-A and tautomycin: method of analysis of interactions of tight-binding ligands with target protein.

    PubMed Central

    Takai, A; Sasaki, K; Nagai, H; Mieskes, G; Isobe, M; Isono, K; Yasumoto, T

    1995-01-01

    Several groups have reported that okadaic acid (OA) and some other tight-binding protein phosphatase inhibitors including microcystin-LR (MCLR), calyculin-A and tautomycin prevent each other from binding to protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). In this paper, we have introduced an improved procedure for examining to what extent the affinity of an enzyme for a labelled tight-binding ligand is reduced by binding of an unlabelled tight-binding, ligand to the enzyme. Using this procedure, we have analysed the dose-dependent reduction of PP2A binding of [24-3H]OA by addition of OA, MCLR, calyculin-A and tautomycin. The results indicate that the binding of the unlabelled inhibitors to the PP2A molecule causes a dramatic (10(6)-10(8)-fold) increase in the dissociation constant associated with the interaction of [24-3H]OA and PP2A. This suggests that OA and the other inhibitors bind to PP2A in a mutually exclusive manner. The protein phosphatase inhibitors may share the same binding site on the PP2A molecule. We have also measured values of the dissociation constant (Ki) for the interaction of these toxins with protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). For MCLR and calyculin-A, the ratio of the Ki value obtained for PP1 to that for PP2A was in the range 4-9, whereas it was 0.01-0.02 for tautomycin. The value of tautomycin is considerably smaller than that (0.4) calculated from previously reported Ki values. PMID:7702557

  17. Abscisic Acid Promotion of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Colonization Requires a Component of the PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2A Complex1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Charpentier, Myriam; Sun, Jongho; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Oldroyd, Giles E.D.

    2014-01-01

    Legumes can establish intracellular interactions with symbiotic microbes to enhance their fitness, including the interaction with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. AM fungi colonize root epidermal cells to gain access to the root cortex, and this requires the recognition by the host plant of fungus-made mycorrhizal factors. Genetic dissection has revealed the symbiosis signaling pathway that allows the recognition of AM fungi, but the downstream processes that are required to promote fungal infection are poorly understood. Abscisic acid (ABA) has been shown to promote arbuscule formation in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Here, we show that ABA modulates the establishment of the AM symbiosis in Medicago truncatula by promoting fungal colonization at low concentrations and impairing it at high concentrations. We show that the positive regulation of AM colonization via ABA requires a PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2A (PP2A) holoenzyme subunit, PP2AB′1. Mutations in PP2AB′1 cause reduced levels of AM colonization that cannot be rescued with permissive ABA application. The action of PP2AB′1 in response to ABA is unlinked to the generation of calcium oscillations, as the pp2aB′1 mutant displays a normal calcium response. This contrasts with the application of high concentrations of ABA that impairs mycorrhizal factor-induced calcium oscillations, suggesting different modes of action of ABA on the AM symbiosis. Our work reveals that ABA functions at multiple levels to regulate the AM symbiosis and that a PP2A phosphatase is required for the ABA promotion of AM colonization. PMID:25293963

  18. Changes in Carboxy Methylation and Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Protein Phosphatase PP2A Are Associated with Epididymal Sperm Maturation and Motility.

    PubMed

    Dudiki, Tejasvi; Kadunganattil, Suraj; Ferrara, John K; Kline, Douglas W; Vijayaraghavan, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian sperm contain the serine/threonine phosphatases PP1γ2 and PP2A. The role of sperm PP1γ2 is relatively well studied. Here we confirm the presence of PP2A in sperm and show that it undergoes marked changes in methylation (leucine 309), tyrosine phosphorylation (tyrosine 307) and catalytic activity during epididymal sperm maturation. Spermatozoa isolated from proximal caput, distal caput and caudal regions of the epididymis contain equal immuno-reactive amounts of PP2A. Using demethyl sensitive antibodies we show that PP2A is methylated at its carboxy terminus in sperm from the distal caput and caudal regions but not in sperm from the proximal caput region of the epididymis. The methylation status of PP2A was confirmed by isolation of PP2A with microcystin agarose followed by alkali treatment, which causes hydrolysis of protein carboxy methyl esters. Tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm PP2A varied inversely with methylation. That is, PP2A was tyrosine phosphorylated when it was demethylated but not when methylated. PP2A demethylation and its reciprocal tyrosine phosphorylation were also affected by treatment of sperm with L-homocysteine and adenosine, which are known to elevate intracellular S-adenosylhomocysteine, a feedback inhibitor of methyltransferases. Catalytic activity of PP2A declined during epididymal sperm maturation. Inhibition of PP2A by okadaic acid or by incubation of caudal epididymal spermatozoa with L-homocysteine and adenosine resulted in increase of sperm motility parameters including percent motility, velocity, and lateral head amplitude. Demethylation or pharmacological inhibition of PP2A also leads to an increase in phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3). Our results show for the first time that changes in PP2A activity due to methylation and tyrosine phosphorylation occur in sperm and that these changes may play an important role in the regulation of sperm function. PMID:26569399

  19. Expression of protein phosphatase 2A mutants and silencing of the regulatory B alpha subunit induce a selective loss of acetylated and detyrosinated microtubules.

    PubMed

    Nunbhakdi-Craig, Viyada; Schuechner, Stefan; Sontag, Jean-Marie; Montgomery, Lisa; Pallas, David C; Juno, Claudia; Mudrak, Ingrid; Ogris, Egon; Sontag, Estelle

    2007-05-01

    Carboxymethylation and phosphorylation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic C subunit are evolutionary conserved mechanisms that critically control PP2A holoenzyme assembly and substrate specificity. Down-regulation of PP2A methylation and PP2A enzymes containing the B alpha regulatory subunit occur in Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we show that expressed wild-type and methylation- (L309 Delta) and phosphorylation- (T304D, T304A, Y307F, and Y307E) site mutants of PP2A C subunit differentially bind to B, B', and B''-type regulatory subunits in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and neuro-2a (N2a) neuroblastoma cells. They also display distinct binding affinity for microtubules (MTs). Relative to controls, expression of the wild-type, T304A and Y307F C subunits in N2a cells promotes the accumulation of acetylated and detyrosinated MTs. However, expression of the Y307E, L309 Delta, and T304D mutants, which are impaired in their ability to associate with the B alpha subunit, induces their loss. Silencing of B alpha subunit in N2a and NIH 3T3 cells is sufficient to induce a similar breakdown of acetylated and detyrosinated MTs. It also confers increased sensitivity to nocodazole-induced MT depolymerization. Our findings suggest that changes in intracellular PP2A subunit composition can modulate MT dynamics. They support the hypothesis that reduced amounts of neuronal B alpha-containing PP2A heterotrimers contribute to MT destabilization in Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Mutations in the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Type 2a Protein Phosphatase Catalytic Subunit Reveal Roles in Cell Wall Integrity, Actin Cytoskeleton Organization and Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Evans, DRH.; Stark, MJR.

    1997-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutations were generated in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PPH22 gene that, together with its homologue PPH21, encode the catalytic subunit of type 2A protein phosphatase (PP2A). At the restrictive temperature (37°), cells dependent solely on pph22(ts) alleles for PP2A function displayed a rapid arrest of proliferation. Ts(-) pph22 mutant cells underwent lysis at 37°, showing an accompanying viability loss that was suppressed by inclusion of 1 M sorbitol in the growth medium. Ts(-) pph22 mutant cells also displayed defects in bud morphogenesis and polarization of the cortical actin cytoskeleton at 37°. PP2A is therefore required for maintenance of cell integrity and polarized growth. On transfer from 24° to 37°, Ts(-) pph22 mutant cells accumulated a 2N DNA content indicating a cell cycle block before completion of mitosis. However, during prolonged incubation at 37°, many Ts(-) pph22 mutant cells progressed through an aberrant nuclear division and accumulated multiple nuclei. Ts(-) pph22 mutant cells also accumulated aberrant microtubule structures at 37°, while under semi-permissive conditions they were sensitive to the microtubule-destabilizing agent benomyl, suggesting that PP2A is required for normal microtubule function. Remarkably, the multiple defects of Ts(-) pph22 mutant cells were suppressed by a viable allele (SSD1-v1) of the polymorphic SSD1 gene. PMID:9071579

  1. CRL4–DCAF1 ubiquitin E3 ligase directs protein phosphatase 2A degradation to control oocyte meiotic maturation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chao; Ji, Shu-Yan; Sha, Qian-Qian; Sun, Qing-Yuan; Fan, Heng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Oocyte meiosis is a specialized cell cycle that gives rise to fertilizable haploid gametes and is precisely controlled in various dimensions. We recently found that E3 ubiquitin ligase CRL4 is required for female fertility by regulating DNA hydroxymethylation to maintain oocyte survival and to promote zygotic genome reprogramming. However, not all phenotypes of CRL4-deleted oocytes could be explained by this mechanism. Here we show that CRL4 controls oocyte meiotic maturation by proteasomal degradation of protein phosphatase 2A scaffold subunit, PP2A-A. Oocyte-specific deletion of DDB1 or DCAF1 (also called VPRBP) results in delayed meiotic resumption and failure to complete meiosis I along with PP2A-A accumulation. DCAF1 directly binds to and results in the poly-ubiquitination of PP2A-A. Moreover, combined deletion of Ppp2r1a rescues the meiotic defects caused by DDB1/DCAF1 deficiency. These results provide in vivo evidence that CRL4-directed PP2A-A degradation is physiologically essential for regulating oocyte meiosis and female fertility. PMID:26281983

  2. Lipid rafts regulate PCB153-induced disruption of occludin and brain endothelial barrier function through protein phosphatase 2A and matrix metalloproteinase-2

    PubMed Central

    Eum, Sung Yong; Jaraki, Dima; András, Ibolya E.; Toborek, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Occludin is an essential integral transmembrane protein regulating tight junction (TJ) integrity in brain endothelial cells. Phosphorylation of occludin is associated with its localization to TJ sites and incorporation into intact TJ assembly. The present study is focused on the role of lipid rafts in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced disruption of occludin and endothelial barrier function. Exposure of human brain endothelial cells to 2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) induced dephosphorylation of threonine residues of occludin and displacement of occludin from detergent-resistant membrane (DRM)/lipid raft fractions within 1 h. Moreover, lipid rafts modulated the reduction of occludin level through activation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) after 24 h h PCB153 treatment. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity by okadaic acid or fostriecin markedly protected against PCB153-induced displacement of occludin and increased permeability of endothelial cells. The implication of lipid rafts and PP2A signaling in these processes was further defined by co-immunoprecipitation of occludin with PP2A and caveolin-1, a marker protein of lipid rafts. Indeed, a significant MMP-2 activity was observed in lipid rafts and was increased by exposure to PCB153. The pretreatment of MMP-2 inhibitors protected against PCB153-induced loss of occludin and disruption of lipid raft structure prevented the increase of endothelial permeability. Overall, these results indicate that lipid raft-associated processes, such as PP2A and MMP-2 activation, participate in PCB153-induced disruption of occludin function in brain endothelial barrier. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to brain endothelial barrier dysfunction in response to exposure to environmental pollutants, such as ortho-substituted PCBs. PMID:26080028

  3. Lipid rafts regulate PCB153-induced disruption of occludin and brain endothelial barrier function through protein phosphatase 2A and matrix metalloproteinase-2.

    PubMed

    Eum, Sung Yong; Jaraki, Dima; András, Ibolya E; Toborek, Michal

    2015-09-15

    Occludin is an essential integral transmembrane protein regulating tight junction (TJ) integrity in brain endothelial cells. Phosphorylation of occludin is associated with its localization to TJ sites and incorporation into intact TJ assembly. The present study is focused on the role of lipid rafts in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced disruption of occludin and endothelial barrier function. Exposure of human brain endothelial cells to 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) induced dephosphorylation of threonine residues of occludin and displacement of occludin from detergent-resistant membrane (DRM)/lipid raft fractions within 1h. Moreover, lipid rafts modulated the reduction of occludin level through activation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) after 24h PCB153 treatment. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity by okadaic acid or fostriecin markedly protected against PCB153-induced displacement of occludin and increased permeability of endothelial cells. The implication of lipid rafts and PP2A signaling in these processes was further defined by co-immunoprecipitation of occludin with PP2A and caveolin-1, a marker protein of lipid rafts. Indeed, a significant MMP-2 activity was observed in lipid rafts and was increased by exposure to PCB153. The pretreatment of MMP-2 inhibitors protected against PCB153-induced loss of occludin and disruption of lipid raft structure prevented the increase of endothelial permeability. Overall, these results indicate that lipid raft-associated processes, such as PP2A and MMP-2 activation, participate in PCB153-induced disruption of occludin function in brain endothelial barrier. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to brain endothelial barrier dysfunction in response to exposure to environmental pollutants, such as ortho-substituted PCBs.

  4. Promotion of Cell Viability and Histone Gene Expression by the Acetyltransferase Gcn5 and the Protein Phosphatase PP2A in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Petty, Emily L; Lafon, Anne; Tomlinson, Shannon L; Mendelsohn, Bryce A; Pillus, Lorraine

    2016-08-01

    Histone modifications direct chromatin-templated events in the genome and regulate access to DNA sequence information. There are multiple types of modifications, and a common feature is their dynamic nature. An essential step for understanding their regulation, therefore, lies in characterizing the enzymes responsible for adding and removing histone modifications. Starting with a dosage-suppressor screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have discovered a functional interaction between the acetyltransferase Gcn5 and the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) complex, two factors that regulate post-translational modifications. We find that RTS1, one of two genes encoding PP2A regulatory subunits, is a robust and specific high-copy suppressor of temperature sensitivity of gcn5∆ and a subset of other gcn5∆ phenotypes. Conversely, loss of both PP2A(Rts1) and Gcn5 function in the SAGA and SLIK/SALSA complexes is lethal. RTS1 does not restore global transcriptional defects in gcn5∆; however, histone gene expression is restored, suggesting that the mechanism of RTS1 rescue includes restoration of specific cell cycle transcripts. Pointing to new mechanisms of acetylation-phosphorylation cross-talk, RTS1 high-copy rescue of gcn5∆ growth requires two residues of H2B that are phosphorylated in human cells. These data highlight the potential significance of dynamic phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of these deeply conserved histone residues for cell viability. PMID:27317677

  5. Effect of beta-sitosterol, a plant sterol, on growth, protein phosphatase 2A, and phospholipase D in LNCaP cells.

    PubMed

    Awad, A B; Gan, Y; Fink, C S

    2000-01-01

    Previous work from this laboratory suggests an activation of the sphingomyelin cycle as a mechanism for growth inhibition with the incorporation of beta-sitosterol (SIT) into human prostate cancer LNCaP cells. In the present study we examined two key enzymes that have been shown to play a role in the sphingomyelin cycle. Dietary sterols (SIT and cholesterol) were compared for their effect on LNCaP cell growth, phospholipase D (PLD) activity, and protein phosphatase 2A (PP 2A) activity and expression. PP 2A has been suggested as a direct in vitro target of ceramide action on cell growth and apoptosis. Ceramide also inhibits phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated PLD. SIT (16 microM) increased PP 2A activity by 50% compared with cholesterol treatment in LNCaP prostate cells; however, SIT did not alter protein levels of PP 2A. There was an increase in PLD activity in the presence of phorbol myristate acetate in cells supplemented with 16 microM SIT compared with those supplemented with cholesterol after five days of treatment. The present study suggests that the activation of PP 2A added support to the role of the activation of the sphingomyelin cycle by SIT treatment. However, the increase in PLD activity, which was modest but significant, with SIT supplementation suggests that this pathway may be modulated by other mechanisms. This includes the incorporation of SIT into cell membranes that may alter fluidity and, thus, influence the activation of membrane-bound enzymes such as PLD.

  6. Resveratrol prevents cadmium activation of Erk1/2 and JNK pathways from neuronal cell death via protein phosphatases 2A and 5.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunxiao; Zhang, Ruijie; Sun, Chenxia; Zhang, Hai; Xu, Chong; Liu, Wen; Gao, Wei; Huang, Shile; Chen, Long

    2015-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd), a toxic environmental contaminant, induces neurodegenerative disorders. Resveratrol, a natural product, has been found to exert neuroprotective effects. However, little is known regarding the effect of resveratrol on Cd-evoked neurotoxicity. Here, we show that resveratrol effectively reversed Cd-elicited cell viability reduction, morphological change, nuclear fragmentation and condensation, as well as activation of caspase-3 in neuronal cells, implying neuroprotection against Cd-poisoning by resveratrol. Further research revealed that both c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (Erk1/2) were involved in the inhibitory effect of resveratrol on Cd-induced cell death, as selective inhibitors of Erk1/2 (U0126) and JNK (SP600125), or over-expression of dominant negative mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MKK1) or dominant negative c-Jun potentiated resveratrol's prevention of Cd-induced phosphorylation of JNK and Erk1/2, as well as cell death in neuronal cells. Interestingly, resveratrol potently rescued the cells from Cd-induced suppression of protein phosphatases 2A (PP2A) and 5 (PP5) activity. Over-expression of PP2A or PP5 strengthened the inhibitory effects of resveratrol on Cd-induced activation of Erk1/2 and/or JNK, as well as cell death. The results indicate that resveratrol prevents Cd-induced activation of Erk1/2 and JNK pathways and neuronal cell death in part via activating PP2A and PP5. Our findings strongly support the notion that resveratrol may serve as a potential therapeutic agent in the prevention of Cd-induced neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A with the small molecule LB100 overcomes cell cycle arrest in osteosarcoma after cisplatin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Hong, Christopher S; Hu, Xu; Yang, Chunzhang; Wang, Herui; Zhu, Dongwang; Moon, Seogin; Dmitriev, Pauline; Lu, Jie; Chiang, Jeffrey; Zhuang, Zhengping; Zhou, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignant bone tumor and affects a significant portion of pediatric oncology patients. Although surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy confer significant survival benefits, many patients go on to develop metastatic disease, particularly to the lungs, secondary to development of drug resistance. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A with the small molecule, LB100, has demonstrated potent chemo- and radio-sensitizing properties in numerous pre-clinical tumor models. In this study, we showed that LB100 overcame DNA repair mechanisms in osteosarcoma cells treated with cisplatin, in vitro, and recapitulated these findings in an in vivo xenograft model. Notably, the addition of LB100 to cisplatin prevented development of pulmonary metastases in the majority of treated animals. Our data indicated the mechanism of chemo-sensitization by LB100 involved abrogation of the ATM/ATR-activated DNA damage response, leading to hyperphosphorylation of Chk proteins and persistent cyclin activity. In addition, LB100 exposure suppressed Akt signaling, leading to Mdm2-mediated proteasomal degradation of functional p53. Taken together, LB100 prevented repair of cisplatin-induced DNA damage, resulting in mitotic catastrophe and cell death. PMID:25942376

  8. Theoretical models of catalytic domains of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A with Zn2+ and Mn2+ metal dications and putative bioligands in their catalytic centers.

    PubMed

    Woźniak-Celmer, E; Ołdziej, S; Ciarkowski, J

    2001-01-01

    The oligomeric metalloenzymes protein phosphatases dephosphorylate OH groups of Ser/Thr or Tyr residues of proteins whose actions depend on the phosphorus signal. The catalytic units of Ser/Thr protein phosphatases 1, 2A and 2B (PP1c, PP2Ac and PP2Bc, respectively), which exhibit about 45% sequence similarity, have their active centers practically identical. This feature strongly suggests that the unknown structure of PP2Ac could be successfully homology-modeled from the known structures of PP1c and/or PP2Bc. Initially, a theoretical model of PP1c was built, including a phosphate and a metal dication in its catalytic site. The latter was modeled, together with a structural hydroxyl anion, as a triangular pseudo-molecule (Zno or Mno), composed of two metal cations (double Zn2+ or Mn2+, respectively) and the OH- group. To the free PP1c two inhibitor sequences R29RRRPpTPAMLFR40 of DARPP-32 and R30RRRPpTPATLVLT42 of Inhibitor-1, and two putative substrate sequences LRRApSVA and QRRQRKpRRTI were subsequently docked. In the next step, a free PP2Ac model was built via homology re-modeling of the PP1c template and the same four sequences were docked to it. Thus, together, 20 starting model complexes were built, allowing for combination of the Zno and Mno pseudo-molecules, free enzymes and the peptide ligands docked in the catalytic sites of PP1c and PP2Ac. All models were subsequently subjected to 250-300 ps molecular dynamics using the AMBER 5.0 program. The equilibrated trajectories of the final 50 ps were taken for further analyses. The theoretical models of PP1c complexes, irrespective of the dication type, exhibited increased mobilities in the following residue ranges: 195-200, 273-278, 287-209 for the inhibitor sequences and 21-25, 194-200, 222-227, 261, 299-302 for the substrate sequences. Paradoxically, the analogous PP2Ac models appeared much more stable in similar simulations, since only their "prosegment" residues 6-10 and 14-18 exhibited an increased mobility

  9. Specificity of a protein phosphatase inhibitor from rabbit skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, P; Nimmo, G A; Antoniw, J F

    1977-01-01

    A hear-stable protein, which is a specific inhibitor of protein phosphatase-III, was purified 700-fold from skeletal muscle by a procedure that involved heat-treatment at 95 degrees C, chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. The final step completely resolved the protein phosphatase inhibitor from the protein inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. The phosphorylase phosphatase, beta-phosphorylase kinase phosphatase, glycogen synthase phosphatase-1 and glycogen synthase phosphatase-2 activities of protein phosphatase-III [Antoniw, J. F., Nimmo, H. G., Yeaman, S. J. & Cohen, P.(1977) Biochem.J. 162, 423-433] were inhibited in a very similar manner by the protein phosphatase inhibitor and at least 95% inhibition was observed at high concentrations of inhibitor. The two forms of protein phosphatase-III, termed IIIA and IIIB, were equally susceptible to the protein phosphatase inhibitor. The protein phosphatase inhibitor was at least 200 times less effective in inhibiting the activity of protein phosphatase-I and protein phosphatase-II. The high degree of specificity of the inhibitor for protein phosphatase-III was used to show that 90% of the phosphorylase phosphatase and glycogen synthase phosphatase activities measured in muscle extracts are catalysed by protein phosphatase-III. Protein phosphatase-III was tightly associated with the protein-glycogen complex that can be isolated from skeletal muscle, whereas the protein phosphatase inhibitor and protein phosphatase-II were not. The results provide further evidence that the enzyme that catalyses the dephosphorylation of the alpha-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (protein phosphatase-II) and the enzyme that catalyses the dephosphorylation of the beta-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (protein phosphatase-III) are distinct. The results suggest that the protein phosphatase inhibitor may be a useful probe for differentiating different classes of protein phosphatases in mammalian

  10. Lipid rafts regulate PCB153-induced disruption of occludin and brain endothelial barrier function through protein phosphatase 2A and matrix metalloproteinase-2

    SciTech Connect

    Eum, Sung Yong Jaraki, Dima; András, Ibolya E.; Toborek, Michal

    2015-09-15

    Occludin is an essential integral transmembrane protein regulating tight junction (TJ) integrity in brain endothelial cells. Phosphorylation of occludin is associated with its localization to TJ sites and incorporation into intact TJ assembly. The present study is focused on the role of lipid rafts in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced disruption of occludin and endothelial barrier function. Exposure of human brain endothelial cells to 2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) induced dephosphorylation of threonine residues of occludin and displacement of occludin from detergent-resistant membrane (DRM)/lipid raft fractions within 1 h. Moreover, lipid rafts modulated the reduction of occludin level through activation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) after 24 h PCB153 treatment. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity by okadaic acid or fostriecin markedly protected against PCB153-induced displacement of occludin and increased permeability of endothelial cells. The implication of lipid rafts and PP2A signaling in these processes was further defined by co-immunoprecipitation of occludin with PP2A and caveolin-1, a marker protein of lipid rafts. Indeed, a significant MMP-2 activity was observed in lipid rafts and was increased by exposure to PCB153. The pretreatment of MMP-2 inhibitors protected against PCB153-induced loss of occludin and disruption of lipid raft structure prevented the increase of endothelial permeability. Overall, these results indicate that lipid raft-associated processes, such as PP2A and MMP-2 activation, participate in PCB153-induced disruption of occludin function in brain endothelial barrier. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to brain endothelial barrier dysfunction in response to exposure to environmental pollutants, such as ortho-substituted PCBs. - Highlights: • PCB153 disturbed human brain endothelial barrier through disruption of occludin. • Lipid raft-associated PP

  11. cAMP-stimulated protein phosphatase 2A activity associated with muscle A kinase-anchoring protein (mAKAP) signaling complexes inhibits the phosphorylation and activity of the cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase PDE4D3.

    PubMed

    Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly L; Bauman, Andrea; Mayer, Nicole; Henson, Edward; Heredia, Lorena; Ahn, Jung; McAvoy, Thomas; Nairn, Angus C; Kapiloff, Michael S

    2010-04-01

    The concentration of the second messenger cAMP is tightly controlled in cells by the activity of phosphodiesterases. We have previously described how the protein kinase A-anchoring protein mAKAP serves as a scaffold for the cAMP-dependent protein kinase PKA and the cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase PDE4D3 in cardiac myocytes. PKA and PDE4D3 constitute a negative feedback loop whereby PKA-catalyzed phosphorylation and activation of PDE4D3 attenuate local cAMP levels. We now show that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) associated with mAKAP complexes is responsible for reversing the activation of PDE4D3 by catalyzing the dephosphorylation of PDE4D3 serine residue 54. Mapping studies reveal that a C-terminal mAKAP domain (residues 2085-2319) binds PP2A. Binding to mAKAP is required for PP2A function, such that deletion of the C-terminal domain enhances both base-line and forskolin-stimulated PDE4D3 activity. Interestingly, PP2A holoenzyme associated with mAKAP complexes in the heart contains the PP2A targeting subunit B56delta. Like PDE4D3, B56delta is a PKA substrate, and PKA phosphorylation of mAKAP-bound B56delta enhances phosphatase activity 2-fold in the complex. Accordingly, expression of a B56delta mutant that cannot be phosphorylated by PKA results in increased PDE4D3 phosphorylation. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that PP2A associated with mAKAP complexes promotes PDE4D3 dephosphorylation, serving both to inhibit PDE4D3 in unstimulated cells and also to mediate a cAMP-induced positive feedback loop following adenylyl cyclase activation and B56delta phosphorylation. In general, PKA.PP2A.mAKAP complexes exemplify how protein kinases and phosphatases may participate in molecular signaling complexes to dynamically regulate localized intracellular signaling. PMID:20106966

  12. cAMP-stimulated Protein Phosphatase 2A Activity Associated with Muscle A Kinase-anchoring Protein (mAKAP) Signaling Complexes Inhibits the Phosphorylation and Activity of the cAMP-specific Phosphodiesterase PDE4D3*

    PubMed Central

    Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly L.; Bauman, Andrea; Mayer, Nicole; Henson, Edward; Heredia, Lorena; Ahn, Jung; McAvoy, Thomas; Nairn, Angus C.; Kapiloff, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    The concentration of the second messenger cAMP is tightly controlled in cells by the activity of phosphodiesterases. We have previously described how the protein kinase A-anchoring protein mAKAP serves as a scaffold for the cAMP-dependent protein kinase PKA and the cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase PDE4D3 in cardiac myocytes. PKA and PDE4D3 constitute a negative feedback loop whereby PKA-catalyzed phosphorylation and activation of PDE4D3 attenuate local cAMP levels. We now show that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) associated with mAKAP complexes is responsible for reversing the activation of PDE4D3 by catalyzing the dephosphorylation of PDE4D3 serine residue 54. Mapping studies reveal that a C-terminal mAKAP domain (residues 2085–2319) binds PP2A. Binding to mAKAP is required for PP2A function, such that deletion of the C-terminal domain enhances both base-line and forskolin-stimulated PDE4D3 activity. Interestingly, PP2A holoenzyme associated with mAKAP complexes in the heart contains the PP2A targeting subunit B56δ. Like PDE4D3, B56δ is a PKA substrate, and PKA phosphorylation of mAKAP-bound B56δ enhances phosphatase activity 2-fold in the complex. Accordingly, expression of a B56δ mutant that cannot be phosphorylated by PKA results in increased PDE4D3 phosphorylation. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that PP2A associated with mAKAP complexes promotes PDE4D3 dephosphorylation, serving both to inhibit PDE4D3 in unstimulated cells and also to mediate a cAMP-induced positive feedback loop following adenylyl cyclase activation and B56δ phosphorylation. In general, PKA·PP2A·mAKAP complexes exemplify how protein kinases and phosphatases may participate in molecular signaling complexes to dynamically regulate localized intracellular signaling. PMID:20106966

  13. Suppression of protein phosphatase 2A activity enhances Ad5/F35 adenovirus transduction efficiency in normal human B lymphocytes and in Raji cells.

    PubMed

    Cayer, Marie-Pierre; Samson, Mélanie; Bertrand, Claudia; Dumont, Nellie; Drouin, Mathieu; Jung, Daniel

    2012-02-28

    Investigation of the molecular processes which control the development and function of lymphocytes is essential for our understanding of humoral immunity, as well as lymphocyte associated pathogenesis. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer provided a powerful tool to investigate these processes. We have previously demonstrated that adenoviral vector Ad5/F35 transduces plasma cell lines at a higher efficiency than primary B cells, owing to differences in intracellular trafficking. Given that phosphatases are effectors of intracellular trafficking, here we have analyzed the effects of a panel of phosphatase inhibitors on Ad5/F35 transduction efficiency in B lymphocytes in the present study. FACS analysis was conducted to determine Ad5/F35-EYFP transduction efficiency in lymphoid cells, including human primary B cells, following serine/threonine phosphatase (PSP) inhibitor treatment. We further used confocal microscopy to analyze intracellular trafficking and fate of CY3 labeled Ad5/F35 vectors, in PSP treated lymphoid cell. Finally, we analyzed the MAPK pathway by Western blot in PSP treated cells. Adenoviral transduction efficiency was unresponsive to inhibition of PP1 whereas inhibition of PP2A by cantharidic acid, or PP1 and PP2A by okadaic acid, substantially increased transduction efficiency. Importantly, confocal microscopy analyses revealed that inhibition of PP2A shut down adenovirus recycling. Moreover, inhibition of PP2A resulted in increased phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2 and MEK1/2. Taken together, these results suggest that Ad5/F35 is more efficiently transduced in cells following PP2A inhibition. Our results are in agreement with reports indicating that PP2A is involved in the formation of recycling vesicles and might be of interest for gene therapy applications.

  14. Bacterial-like PPP protein phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Kerk, David; Uhrig, R Glen; Moorhead, Greg B

    2013-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation is a widespread modification affecting the great majority of eukaryotic cellular proteins, and whose effects influence nearly every cellular function. Protein phosphatases are increasingly recognized as exquisitely regulated contributors to these changes. The PPP (phosphoprotein phosphatase) family comprises enzymes, which catalyze dephosphorylation at serine and threonine residues. Nearly a decade ago, “bacterial-like” enzymes were recognized with similarity to proteins from various bacterial sources: SLPs (Shewanella-like phosphatases), RLPHs (Rhizobiales-like phosphatases), and ALPHs (ApaH-like phosphatases). A recent article from our laboratory appearing in Plant Physiology characterizes their extensive organismal distribution, abundance in plant species, predicted subcellular localization, motif organization, and sequence evolution. One salient observation is the distinct evolutionary trajectory followed by SLP genes and proteins in photosynthetic eukaryotes vs. animal and plant pathogens derived from photosynthetic ancestors. We present here a closer look at sequence data that emphasizes the distinctiveness of pathogen SLP proteins and that suggests that they might represent novel drug targets. A second observation in our original report was the high degree of similarity between the bacterial-like PPPs of eukaryotes and closely related proteins of the “eukaryotic-like” phyla Myxococcales and Planctomycetes. We here reflect on the possible implications of these observations and their importance for future research. PMID:24675170

  15. The Extended Family of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Andrés; Nunes-Xavier, Caroline E; Bayón, Yolanda; Pulido, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the Tyr phosphorylation status of cellular proteins results from the coordinated action of Protein Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases (PTPs). PTPs have emerged as highly regulated enzymes with diverse substrate specificity, and proteins with Tyr-dephosphorylation or Tyr-dephosphorylation-like properties can be clustered as the PTPome. This includes proteins from the PTP superfamily, which display a Cys-based catalytic mechanism, as well as enzymes from other gene families (Asp-based phosphatases, His-based phosphatases) that have converged in protein Tyr-dephosphorylation-related functions by using non-Cys-based catalytic mechanisms. Within the Cys-based members of the PTPome, classical PTPs dephosphorylate specific phosphoTyr (pTyr) residues from protein substrates, whereas VH1-like dual-specificity PTPs dephosphorylate pTyr, pSer, and pThr residues, as well as nonproteinaceous substrates, including phosphoinositides and phosphorylated carbohydrates. In addition, several PTPs have impaired catalytic activity as a result of amino acid substitutions at their active sites, but retain regulatory functions related with pTyr signaling. As a result of their relevant biological activity, many PTPs are linked to human disease, including cancer, neurodevelopmental, and metabolic diseases, making these proteins important drug targets and molecular markers in the clinic. Here, a brief overview on the biochemistry and physiology of the different groups of proteins that belong to the mammalian PTPome is presented. PMID:27514797

  16. Protein phosphatase 2a (PP2A) binds within the oligomerization domain of striatin and regulates the phosphorylation and activation of the mammalian Ste20-Like kinase Mst3

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Striatin, a putative protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) B-type regulatory subunit, is a multi-domain scaffolding protein that has recently been linked to several diseases including cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM), which causes symptoms ranging from headaches to stroke. Striatin association with the PP2A A/C (structural subunit/catalytic subunit) heterodimer alters PP2A substrate specificity, but targets and roles of striatin-associated PP2A are not known. In addition to binding the PP2A A/C heterodimer to form a PP2A holoenzyme, striatin associates with cerebral cavernous malformation 3 (CCM3) protein, the mammalian Mps one binder (MOB) homolog, Mob3/phocein, the mammalian sterile 20-like (Mst) kinases, Mst3, Mst4 and STK25, and several other proteins to form a large signaling complex. Little is known about the molecular architecture of the striatin complex and the regulation of these sterile 20-like kinases. Results To help define the molecular organization of striatin complexes and to determine whether Mst3 might be negatively regulated by striatin-associated PP2A, a structure-function analysis of striatin was performed. Two distinct regions of striatin are capable of stably binding directly or indirectly to Mob3--one N-terminal, including the coiled-coil domain, and another more C-terminal, including the WD-repeat domain. In addition, striatin residues 191-344 contain determinants necessary for efficient association of Mst3, Mst4, and CCM3. PP2A associates with the coiled-coil domain of striatin, but unlike Mob3 and Mst3, its binding appears to require striatin oligomerization. Deletion of the caveolin-binding domain on striatin abolishes striatin family oligomerization and PP2A binding. Point mutations in striatin that disrupt PP2A association cause hyperphosphorylation and activation of striatin-associated Mst3. Conclusions Striatin orchestrates the regulation of Mst3 by PP2A. It binds Mst3 likely as a dimer with CCM3 via residues lying between

  17. Role of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Alka; Agrawal, Nisha; Sharma, Manisha; Pandey, Amita; Pandey, Girdhar K.

    2015-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a crucial regulatory mechanism that controls many biological processes in eukaryotes. In plants, phosphorylation events primarily occur on serine (Ser) and threonine (Thr) residues, while in certain cases, it was also discovered on tyrosine (Tyr) residues. In contrary to plants, extensive reports on Tyr phosphorylation regulating a large numbers of biological processes exist in animals. Despite of such prodigious function in animals, Tyr phosphorylation is a least studied mechanism of protein regulation in plants. Recently, various chemical analytical procedures have strengthened the view that Tyr phosphorylation is equally prevalent in plants as in animals. However, regardless of Tyr phosphorylation events occuring in plants, no evidence could be found for the existence of gene encoding for Tyr phosphorylation i.e. the typical Tyr kinases. Various methodologies have suggested that plant responses to stress signals and developmental processes involved modifications in protein Tyr phosphorylation. Correspondingly, various reports have established the role of PTPs (Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases) in the dephosphorylation and inactivation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) hence, in the regulation of MAPK signaling cascade. Besides this, many dual specificity protein phosphatases (DSPs) are also known to bind starch and regulate starch metabolism through reversible phosphorylation. Here, we are emphasizing the significant progress on protein Tyr phosphatases to understand the role of these enzymes in the regulation of post-translational modification in plant physiology and development. PMID:26962298

  18. X-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (XIAP) Regulation of Cyclin D1 Protein Expression and Cancer Cell Anchorage-independent Growth via Its E3 Ligase-mediated Protein Phosphatase 2A/c-Jun Axis*

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zipeng; Zhang, Ruowen; Li, Jingxia; Huang, Haishan; Zhang, Dongyun; Zhang, Jingjie; Gao, Jimin; Chen, Jingyuan; Huang, Chuanshu

    2013-01-01

    The X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is a well known potent inhibitor of apoptosis; however, it is also involved in other cancer cell biological behavior. In the current study, we discovered that XIAP and its E3 ligase played a crucial role in regulation of cyclin D1 expression in cancer cells. We found that deficiency of XIAP expression resulted in a marked reduction in cyclin D1 expression. Consistently, cell cycle transition and anchorage-independent cell growth were also attenuated in XIAP-deficient cancer cells compared with those of the parental wild-type cells. Subsequent studies demonstrated that E3 ligase activity within the RING domain of XIAP is crucial for its ability to regulate cyclin D1 transcription, cell cycle transition, and anchorage-independent cell growth by up-regulating transactivation of c-Jun/AP-1. Moreover, we found that E3 ligase within RING domain was required for XIAP inhibition of phosphatase PP2A activity by up-regulation of PP2A phosphorylation at Tyr-307 in its catalytic subunit. Such PP2A phosphorylation and inactivation resulted in phosphorylation and activation of its downstream target c-Jun in turn leading to cyclin D1 expression. Collectively, our studies uncovered a novel function of E3 ligase activity of XIAP in the up-regulation of cyclin D1 expression, providing significant insight into the understanding of the biomedical significance of overexpressed XIAP in cancer development, further offering a new molecular basis for utilizing XIAP E3 ligase as a cancer therapeutic target. PMID:23720779

  19. Ceramide signaling targets the PP2A-like protein phosphatase Sit4p to impair vacuolar function, vesicular trafficking and autophagy in Isc1p deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Vitor; Medeiros, Tânia C; Vilaça, Rita; Ferreira, João; Moradas-Ferreira, Pedro; Costa, Vítor

    2016-01-01

    The vacuoles play important roles in cellular homeostasis and their functions include the digestion of cytoplasmic material and organelles derived from autophagy. Conserved nutrient signaling pathways regulate vacuolar function and autophagy, ensuring normal cell and organismal development and aging. Recent evidence implicates sphingolipids in the modulation of these processes, but the impact of ceramide signaling on vacuolar dynamics and autophagy remains largely unknown. Here, we show that yeast cells lacking Isc1p, an orthologue of mammalian neutral sphingomyelinase type 2, exhibit vacuolar fragmentation and dysfunctions, namely decreased Pep4p-mediated proteolysis and V-ATPase activity, which impairs vacuolar acidification. Moreover, these phenotypes are suppressed by downregulation of the ceramide-activated protein phosphatase Sit4p. The isc1Δ cells also exhibit defective Cvt and vesicular trafficking in a Sit4p-dependent manner, ultimately contributing to a reduced autophagic flux. Importantly, these phenotypes are also suppressed by downregulation of the nutrient signaling kinase TORC1, which is known to inhibit Sit4p and autophagy, or Sch9p. These results support a model in which Sit4p functions downstream of Isc1p in a TORC1-independent, ceramide-dependent signaling branch that impairs vacuolar function and vesicular trafficking, leading to autophagic defects in yeast.

  20. Over activation of hippocampal serine/threonine protein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A is involved in lead-induced deficits in learning and memory in young rats.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Abdur; Khan, Khalid M; Al-Khaledi, Ghanim; Khan, Islam; Al-Shemary, Tahany

    2012-06-01

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatases regulate several key cellular events in the brain, including learning and memory. These enzymes, when over-activated, are known to function as a constraint on learning and memory. We investigated whether these phosphatases are implicated in lead (Pb)-induced deficits in learning and memory. Wistar rat pups were exposed to 0.2% Pb-acetate via their dams' drinking water from postnatal day (PND) 1-21 and directly in drinking water until PND 30. Pb levels in blood, brain and hippocampus were measured and expression of PP1, PP2A, PP2B and PP5 in hippocampus was analyzed. Total phosphatase activity, and PP1 and PP2A activities were determined. Tau phosphorylation at various epitopes was determined by Western blot. Spatial learning and memory was determined by Morris water maze test. Pb exposure significantly increased levels of Pb in blood, brain and hippocampus, reduced the number of synapses in hippocampus and impaired learning and long-term memory (LTM). Short-term memory (STM) was only affected in rats at PND21. Pb exposure increased the expression and activity of PP1 and decreased phosphorylation of tau at threonine-231 in hippocampus at both PND21 and PND30. Pb-induced phosphorylation of tau at serine-199/202 (AT8) paralleled with PP2A activity; at PND21 PP2A activity increased and AT8 phosphorylation decreased; at PND30 PP2A activity decreased and AT8 phosphorylation increased. Increased PP1 activity in hippocampus by Pb is associated with learning and LTM impairment, whereas, increased PP2A activity is associated with STM impairment. These findings suggest the overactivation of PP1 and PP2A, together with changes in tau phosphorylation, as a potential mechanism of lead-induced deficits in learning and memory.

  1. Specific dephosphorylation of Janus Kinase 2 by protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianzhuo; Liu, Xidong; Chu, Huiying; Fu, Xueqi; Li, Tianbao; Hu, Lianghai; Xing, Shu; Li, Guohui; Gu, Jingkai; Zhao, Zhizhuang Joe

    2015-01-01

    Many protein kinases are activated through phosphorylation of an activation loop thereby turning on downstream signaling pathways. Activation of JAK2, a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase with an important role in growth factor and cytokine signaling, requires phosphorylation of the 1007 and 1008 tyrosyl residues. Dephosphorylation of these two sites by phosphatases presumably inactivates the enzyme, but the underlying mechanism is not known. In this study, we employed MALDI-TOF/TOF and triple quadrupole mass spectrometers to analyze qualitatively and quantitatively the dephosphorylation process by using synthetic peptides derived from the tandem autophosphorylation sites (Y1007 and Y1008) of human JAK2. We found that tyrosine phosphatases catalyzed the dephosphorylation reaction sequentially, but different enzymes exhibited different selectivity. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B caused rapid dephosphorylation of Y1008 followed by Y1007, while SHP1 and SHP2 selectively dephosphorylated Y1008 only, and yet HePTP randomly removed a single phosphate from either Y1007 or Y1008, leaving behind mono-phosphorylated peptides. The specificity of dephosphorylation was further confirmed by molecular modeling. The data reveal multiple modes of JAK2 regulation by tyrosine phosphatases, reflecting a complex, and intricate interplay between protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation.

  2. Phosphoregulation of MgcRacGAP in mitosis involves Aurora B and Cdk1 protein kinases and the PP2A phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Touré, Aminata; Mzali, Rym; Liot, Caroline; Seguin, Laetitia; Morin, Laurence; Crouin, Catherine; Chen-Yang, Ilin; Tsay, Yeou-Guang; Dorseuil, Olivier; Gacon, Gérard; Bertoglio, Jacques

    2008-04-01

    MgcRacGAP, a Rho GAP essential to cytokinesis, works both as a Rho GTPase regulator and as a scaffolding protein. MgcRacGAP interacts with MKLP1 to form the centralspindlin complex and associates with the RhoGEF Ect2. The GAP activity of MgcRacGAP is regulated by Aurora B phosphorylation. We have isolated B56epsilon, a PP2A regulatory subunit, as a new MgcRacGAP partner. We report here that (i) MgcRacGAP is phosphorylated by Aurora B and Cdk1, (ii) PP2A dephosphorylates Aurora B and Cdk1 phosphorylated sites and (iii) inhibition of PP2A abrogates MgcRacGAP/Ect2 interaction. Therefore, PP2A may regulate cytokinesis by dephosphorylating MgcRacGAP and its interacting partners.

  3. Phosphorylation of protein phosphatase inhibitor-1 by protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Bogachan; Shu, Hongjun; Fernandez, Joseph; El-Armouche, Ali; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Nairn, Angus C; Bibb, James A

    2006-08-25

    Inhibitor-1 becomes a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 when phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase at Thr(35). Moreover, Ser(67) of inhibitor-1 serves as a substrate for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in the brain. Here, we report that dephosphoinhibitor-1 but not phospho-Ser(67) inhibitor-1 was efficiently phosphorylated by protein kinase C at Ser(65) in vitro. In contrast, Ser(67) phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 was unaffected by phospho-Ser(65). Protein kinase C activation in striatal tissue resulted in the concomitant phosphorylation of inhibitor-1 at Ser(65) and Ser(67), but not Ser(65) alone. Selective pharmacological inhibition of protein phosphatase activity suggested that phospho-Ser(65) inhibitor-1 is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 1 in the striatum. In vitro studies confirmed these findings and suggested that phospho-Ser(67) protects phospho-Ser(65) inhibitor-1 from dephosphorylation by protein phosphatase 1 in vivo. Activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors resulted in the up-regulation of diphospho-Ser(65)/Ser(67) inhibitor-1 in this tissue. In contrast, the activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate-type ionotropic glutamate receptors opposed increases in striatal diphospho-Ser(65)/Ser(67) inhibitor-1 levels. Phosphomimetic mutation of Ser(65) and/or Ser(67) did not convert inhibitor-1 into a protein phosphatase 1 inhibitor. On the other hand, in vitro and in vivo studies suggested that diphospho-Ser(65)/Ser(67) inhibitor-1 is a poor substrate for cAMP-dependent protein kinase. These observations extend earlier studies regarding the function of phospho-Ser(67) and underscore the possibility that phosphorylation in this region of inhibitor-1 by multiple protein kinases may serve as an integrative signaling mechanism that governs the responsiveness of inhibitor-1 to cAMP-dependent protein kinase activation.

  4. Dephosphorylation of the Core Septin, AspB, in a Protein Phosphatase 2A-Dependent Manner Impacts Its Localization and Function in the Fungal Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Muñiz, José M; Renshaw, Hilary; Richards, Amber D; Waitt, Greg; Soderblom, Erik J; Moseley, Martin A; Asfaw, Yohannes; Juvvadi, Praveen R; Steinbach, William J

    2016-01-01

    Septins are a conserved family of GTPases that form hetero-oligomeric complexes and perform diverse functions in higher eukaryotes, excluding plants. Our previous studies in the human fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus revealed that the core septin, AspB, a CDC3 ortholog, is required for septation, conidiation, and conidial cell wall organization. Although AspB is important for these cellular functions, nothing is known about the role of kinases or phosphatases in the posttranslational regulation and localization of septins in A. fumigatus. In this study, we assessed the function of the Gin4 and Cla4 kinases and the PP2A regulatory subunit ParA, in the regulation of AspB using genetic and phosphoproteomic approaches. Gene deletion analyses revealed that Cla4 and ParA are indispensable for hyphal extension, and Gin4, Cla4, and ParA are each required for conidiation and normal septation. While deletion of gin4 resulted in larger interseptal distances and hypervirulence, a phenotype mimicking aspB deletion, deletion of cla4 and parA caused hyperseptation without impacting virulence, indicating divergent roles in regulating septation. Phosphoproteomic analyses revealed that AspB is phosphorylated at five residues in the GTPase domain (S134, S137, S247, T297, and T301) and two residues at its C-terminus (S416 and S461) in the wild-type, Δgin4 and Δcla4 strains. However, concomitant with the differential localization pattern of AspB and hyperseptation in the ΔparA strain, AspB remained phosphorylated at two additional residues, T68 in the N-terminal polybasic region and S447 in the coiled-coil domain. Generation of nonphosphorylatable and phosphomimetic strains surrounding each differentially phosphorylated residue revealed that only AspB (mt) -T68E showed increased interseptal distances, suggesting that dephosphorylation of T68 is important for proper septation. This study highlights the importance of septin phosphorylation/dephosphorylation in the regulation of A

  5. Dephosphorylation of the Core Septin, AspB, in a Protein Phosphatase 2A-Dependent Manner Impacts Its Localization and Function in the Fungal Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Muñiz, José M.; Renshaw, Hilary; Richards, Amber D.; Waitt, Greg; Soderblom, Erik J.; Moseley, Martin. A.; Asfaw, Yohannes; Juvvadi, Praveen R.; Steinbach, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Septins are a conserved family of GTPases that form hetero–oligomeric complexes and perform diverse functions in higher eukaryotes, excluding plants. Our previous studies in the human fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus revealed that the core septin, AspB, a CDC3 ortholog, is required for septation, conidiation, and conidial cell wall organization. Although AspB is important for these cellular functions, nothing is known about the role of kinases or phosphatases in the posttranslational regulation and localization of septins in A. fumigatus. In this study, we assessed the function of the Gin4 and Cla4 kinases and the PP2A regulatory subunit ParA, in the regulation of AspB using genetic and phosphoproteomic approaches. Gene deletion analyses revealed that Cla4 and ParA are indispensable for hyphal extension, and Gin4, Cla4, and ParA are each required for conidiation and normal septation. While deletion of gin4 resulted in larger interseptal distances and hypervirulence, a phenotype mimicking aspB deletion, deletion of cla4 and parA caused hyperseptation without impacting virulence, indicating divergent roles in regulating septation. Phosphoproteomic analyses revealed that AspB is phosphorylated at five residues in the GTPase domain (S134, S137, S247, T297, and T301) and two residues at its C-terminus (S416 and S461) in the wild-type, Δgin4 and Δcla4 strains. However, concomitant with the differential localization pattern of AspB and hyperseptation in the ΔparA strain, AspB remained phosphorylated at two additional residues, T68 in the N-terminal polybasic region and S447 in the coiled-coil domain. Generation of nonphosphorylatable and phosphomimetic strains surrounding each differentially phosphorylated residue revealed that only AspBmt-T68E showed increased interseptal distances, suggesting that dephosphorylation of T68 is important for proper septation. This study highlights the importance of septin phosphorylation/dephosphorylation in the regulation of A

  6. Dephosphorylation of the Core Septin, AspB, in a Protein Phosphatase 2A-Dependent Manner Impacts Its Localization and Function in the Fungal Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Muñiz, José M; Renshaw, Hilary; Richards, Amber D; Waitt, Greg; Soderblom, Erik J; Moseley, Martin A; Asfaw, Yohannes; Juvvadi, Praveen R; Steinbach, William J

    2016-01-01

    Septins are a conserved family of GTPases that form hetero-oligomeric complexes and perform diverse functions in higher eukaryotes, excluding plants. Our previous studies in the human fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus revealed that the core septin, AspB, a CDC3 ortholog, is required for septation, conidiation, and conidial cell wall organization. Although AspB is important for these cellular functions, nothing is known about the role of kinases or phosphatases in the posttranslational regulation and localization of septins in A. fumigatus. In this study, we assessed the function of the Gin4 and Cla4 kinases and the PP2A regulatory subunit ParA, in the regulation of AspB using genetic and phosphoproteomic approaches. Gene deletion analyses revealed that Cla4 and ParA are indispensable for hyphal extension, and Gin4, Cla4, and ParA are each required for conidiation and normal septation. While deletion of gin4 resulted in larger interseptal distances and hypervirulence, a phenotype mimicking aspB deletion, deletion of cla4 and parA caused hyperseptation without impacting virulence, indicating divergent roles in regulating septation. Phosphoproteomic analyses revealed that AspB is phosphorylated at five residues in the GTPase domain (S134, S137, S247, T297, and T301) and two residues at its C-terminus (S416 and S461) in the wild-type, Δgin4 and Δcla4 strains. However, concomitant with the differential localization pattern of AspB and hyperseptation in the ΔparA strain, AspB remained phosphorylated at two additional residues, T68 in the N-terminal polybasic region and S447 in the coiled-coil domain. Generation of nonphosphorylatable and phosphomimetic strains surrounding each differentially phosphorylated residue revealed that only AspB (mt) -T68E showed increased interseptal distances, suggesting that dephosphorylation of T68 is important for proper septation. This study highlights the importance of septin phosphorylation/dephosphorylation in the regulation of A

  7. The Protein Phosphatase 2A Regulatory Subunit B56γ Mediates Suppression of T Cell Receptor (TCR)-induced Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Breuer, Rebecca; Becker, Michael S.; Brechmann, Markus; Mock, Thomas; Arnold, Rüdiger; Krammer, Peter H.

    2014-01-01

    NF-κB is an important transcription factor in the immune system, and aberrant NF-κB activity contributes to malignant diseases and autoimmunity. In T cells, NF-κB is activated upon TCR stimulation, and signal transduction to NF-κB activation is triggered by a cascade of phosphorylation events. However, fine-tuning and termination of TCR signaling are only partially understood. Phosphatases oppose the role of kinases by removing phosphate moieties. The catalytic activity of the protein phosphatase PP2A has been implicated in the regulation of NF-κB. PP2A acts in trimeric complexes in which the catalytic subunit is promiscuous and the regulatory subunit confers substrate specificity. To understand and eventually target NF-κB-specific PP2A functions it is essential to define the regulatory PP2A subunit involved. So far, the regulatory PP2A subunit that mediates NF-κB suppression in T cells remained undefined. By performing a siRNA screen in Jurkat T cells harboring a NF-κB-responsive luciferase reporter, we identified the PP2A regulatory subunit B56γ as negative regulator of NF-κB in TCR signaling. B56γ was strongly up-regulated upon primary human T cell activation, and B56γ silencing induced increased IκB kinase (IKK) and IκBα phosphorylation upon TCR stimulation. B56γ silencing enhanced NF-κB activity, resulting in increased NF-κB target gene expression including the T cell cytokine IL-2. In addition, T cell proliferation was increased upon B56γ silencing. These data help to understand the physiology of PP2A function in T cells and the pathophysiology of diseases involving PP2A and NF-κB. PMID:24719332

  8. Activation of protein phosphatase 2A is responsible for increased content and inactivation of respiratory chain complex i induced by all-trans retinoic acid in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Papa, F; Sardaro, N; Lippolis, R; Panelli, D; Scacco, S

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) on cell growth and respiratory chain complex I in human keratinocyte cultures. Keratinocyte treatment results in increased level of GRIM-19 and other subunits of complex I, in particular of their carbonylated forms, associated with inhibition of its enzymatic activity. The results show that in keratinocytes ATRA-promoted phosphatase activity controls the proteostasis and activity of complex I. PMID:27358125

  9. Characterization of potato (Solanum tuberosum) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) protein phosphatases type 2A catalytic subunits and their involvement in stress responses.

    PubMed

    País, Silvia Marina; González, Marina Alejandra; Téllez-Iñón, María Teresa; Capiati, Daniela Andrea

    2009-06-01

    Protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation plays critical roles in stress responses in plants. This report presents a comparative characterization of the serine/threonine PP2A catalytic subunit family in Solanum tuberosum (potato) and S. lycopersicum (tomato), two important food crops of the Solanaceae family, based on the sequence analysis and expression profiles in response to environmental stress. Sequence homology analysis revealed six isoforms in potato and five in tomato clustered into two subfamilies (I and II). The data presented in this work show that the expression of different PP2Ac genes is regulated in response to environmental stresses in potato and tomato plants and suggest that, in general, mainly members of the subfamily I are involved in stress responses in both species. However, the differences found in the expression profiles between potato and tomato suggest divergent roles of PP2A in the plant defense mechanisms against stress in these closely related species. PMID:19330349

  10. Drosophila Syd-1, Liprin-α, and Protein Phosphatase 2A B′ Subunit Wrd Function in a Linear Pathway to Prevent Ectopic Accumulation of Synaptic Materials in Distal Axons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Long; Tian, Xiaolin; Zhu, Mingwei; Bulgari, Dinara; Böhme, Mathias A.; Goettfert, Fabian; Wichmann, Carolin; Sigrist, Stephan J.; Levitan, Edwin S.

    2014-01-01

    During synaptic development, presynaptic differentiation occurs as an intrinsic property of axons to form specialized areas of plasma membrane [active zones (AZs)] that regulate exocytosis and endocytosis of synaptic vesicles. Genetic and biochemical studies in vertebrate and invertebrate model systems have identified a number of proteins involved in AZ assembly. However, elucidating the molecular events of AZ assembly in a spatiotemporal manner remains a challenge. Syd-1 (synapse defective-1) and Liprin-α have been identified as two master organizers of AZ assembly. Genetic and imaging analyses in invertebrates show that Syd-1 works upstream of Liprin-α in synaptic assembly through undefined mechanisms. To understand molecular pathways downstream of Liprin-α, we performed a proteomic screen of Liprin-α-interacting proteins in Drosophila brains. We identify Drosophila protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) regulatory subunit B′ [Wrd (Well Rounded)] as a Liprin-α-interacting protein, and we demonstrate that it mediates the interaction of Liprin-α with PP2A holoenzyme and the Liprin-α-dependent synaptic localization of PP2A. Interestingly, loss of function in syd-1, liprin-α, or wrd shares a common defect in which a portion of synaptic vesicles, dense-core vesicles, and presynaptic cytomatrix proteins ectopically accumulate at the distal, but not proximal, region of motoneuron axons. Strong genetic data show that a linear syd-1/liprin-α/wrd pathway in the motoneuron antagonizes glycogen synthase kinase-3β kinase activity to prevent the ectopic accumulation of synaptic materials. Furthermore, we provide data suggesting that the syd-1/liprin-α/wrd pathway stabilizes AZ specification at the nerve terminal and that such a novel function is independent of the roles of syd-1/liprin-α in regulating the morphology of the T-bar structural protein BRP (Bruchpilot). PMID:24948803

  11. Standardised extract of Bacopa monniera (CDRI-08) improves contextual fear memory by differentially regulating the activity of histone acetylation and protein phosphatases (PP1α, PP2A) in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Preethi, Jayakumar; Singh, Hemant K; Venkataraman, Jois Shreyas; Rajan, Koilmani Emmanuvel

    2014-05-01

    Contextual fear conditioning is a paradigm for investigating cellular mechanisms involved in hippocampus-dependent memory. Earlier, we showed that standardised extract of Bacopa monniera (CDRI-08) improves hippocampus-dependent learning in postnatal rats by elevating the level of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), activate 5-HT3A receptors, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding (CREB) protein. In this study, we have further examined the molecular mechanism of CDRI-08 in hippocampus-dependent memory and compared to the histone deacetylase (HDACs) inhibitor sodium butyrate (NaB). To assess the hippocampus-dependent memory, wistar rat pups were subjected to contextual fear conditioning (CFC) following daily (postnatal days 15-29) administration of vehicle solution (0.5 % gum acacia + 0.9 % saline)/CDRI-08 (80 mg/kg, p.o.)/NaB (1.2 g/kg in PBS, i.p.). CDRI-08/NaB treated group showed enhanced freezing behavior compared to control group when re-exposed to the same context. Administration of CDRI-08/NaB resulted in activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase ERK/CREB signaling cascade and up-regulation of p300, Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 levels, and down-regulation of HDACs (1, 2) and protein phosphatases (PP1α, PP2A) in hippocampus following CFC. This would subsequently result in an increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) (exon IV) mRNA in hippocampus. Altogether, our results indicate that CDRI-08 enhances hippocampus-dependent contextual memory by differentially regulating histone acetylation and protein phosphatases in hippocampus.

  12. Standardised extract of Bacopa monniera (CDRI-08) improves contextual fear memory by differentially regulating the activity of histone acetylation and protein phosphatases (PP1α, PP2A) in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Preethi, Jayakumar; Singh, Hemant K; Venkataraman, Jois Shreyas; Rajan, Koilmani Emmanuvel

    2014-05-01

    Contextual fear conditioning is a paradigm for investigating cellular mechanisms involved in hippocampus-dependent memory. Earlier, we showed that standardised extract of Bacopa monniera (CDRI-08) improves hippocampus-dependent learning in postnatal rats by elevating the level of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), activate 5-HT3A receptors, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding (CREB) protein. In this study, we have further examined the molecular mechanism of CDRI-08 in hippocampus-dependent memory and compared to the histone deacetylase (HDACs) inhibitor sodium butyrate (NaB). To assess the hippocampus-dependent memory, wistar rat pups were subjected to contextual fear conditioning (CFC) following daily (postnatal days 15-29) administration of vehicle solution (0.5 % gum acacia + 0.9 % saline)/CDRI-08 (80 mg/kg, p.o.)/NaB (1.2 g/kg in PBS, i.p.). CDRI-08/NaB treated group showed enhanced freezing behavior compared to control group when re-exposed to the same context. Administration of CDRI-08/NaB resulted in activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase ERK/CREB signaling cascade and up-regulation of p300, Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 levels, and down-regulation of HDACs (1, 2) and protein phosphatases (PP1α, PP2A) in hippocampus following CFC. This would subsequently result in an increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) (exon IV) mRNA in hippocampus. Altogether, our results indicate that CDRI-08 enhances hippocampus-dependent contextual memory by differentially regulating histone acetylation and protein phosphatases in hippocampus. PMID:24610280

  13. Differentiation, early response gene expression, and apoptosis induction in human breast tumor cells by Okadaic Acid and related inhibitors of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A. Okadaic acid effects on human breast tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kiguchi, K.; Giometti, C.; Chubb, C.H.; Huberman, E.; Fujiki, H.

    1992-08-20

    Okadaic acid (OA), a tumor promoter and an inhibitor of protein phosphatases (PPH) 1 and 2A, was tested for its ability to induce events associated with differentiation and apoptosis induction in the human MCF-7, AU-565, and MB-231 breast tumor cells. Differentiation in these cells was characterized by inhibition of cell multiplication, reactivity with monoclonal antibodies to {alpha}-lactalbumin and {beta}-casein, and the appearance of large lipid droplets; apoptosis was characterized by the appearance of cells with segmented and fragmented nuclei. In the MCF-7 cell line, OA at nanomolar concentrations elicited within 5 min an increase in the phosphorylation of a set of cellular proteins, within hours expression of the early response genes, junB, c-jun, and c-fos and within days manifestation of differentiation and apoptosis markers. Differentiation and apoptosis were also induced by dinophysistoxin-1 and calyculin A, two other tumor promoters and inhibitors of PPH 1 and 2A, but not by OA tetramethyl ether, an inactive OA derivative, or microcystin LR, a PPH 1 and 2A inhibitor that penetrates epithelial cells poorly. OA induced both differentiation and apoptosis in MB-231 cells and MCF-7, but only differentiation in AU-565 cells. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a tumor promoter that is not an inhibitor of PPH 1 and 2A but rather an activator of protein kinase C, also induced within minutes the phosphorylation of proteins, within hours the expression of early response genes, and within days differentiation, but not apoptosis; yet PMA was able to attenuate apoptosis induced by the okadaic acid class of tumor promoters. These results indicate that OA and related agents can induce processes that result in tumor breast cell differentiation and apoptosis, and this induction is associated with their ability to inhibit PPH 1 and 2A. Yet apoptosis is not necessarily required for differentiation induction by these agents.

  14. Regulated protein kinases and phosphatases in cell cycle decisions

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Bela; Kapuy, Orsolya; Domingo-Sananes, Maria Rosa; Tyson, John J

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of cell physiology are controlled by protein kinases and phosphatases, which together determine the phosphorylation state of targeted substrates. Some of these target proteins are themselves kinases or phosphatases or other components of a regulatory network characterized by feedback and feed-forward loops. In this review we describe some common regulatory motifs involving kinases, phosphatases, and their substrates, focusing particularly on bistable switches involved in cellular decision processes. These general principles are applied to cell cycle transitions, with special emphasis on the roles of regulated phosphatases in orchestrating progression from one phase to the next of the DNA replication-division cycle. PMID:20678910

  15. High glucose exposure promotes activation of protein phosphatase 2A in rodent islets and INS-1 832/13 β-cells by increasing the posttranslational carboxylmethylation of its catalytic subunit.

    PubMed

    Arora, Daleep K; Machhadieh, Baker; Matti, Andrea; Wadzinski, Brian E; Ramanadham, Sasanka; Kowluru, Anjaneyulu

    2014-02-01

    Existing evidence implicates regulatory roles for protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in a variety of cellular functions, including cytoskeletal remodeling, hormone secretion, and apoptosis. We report here activation of PP2A in normal rat islets and insulin-secreting INS-1 832/13 cells under the duress of hyperglycemic (HG) conditions. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of the catalytic subunit of PP2A (PP2Ac) markedly attenuated glucose-induced activation of PP2A. HG, but not nonmetabolizable 3-O-methyl glucose or mannitol (osmotic control), significantly stimulated the methylation of PP2Ac at its C-terminal Leu-309, suggesting a novel role for this posttranslational modification in glucose-induced activation of PP2A. Moreover, knockdown of the cytosolic leucine carboxymethyl transferase 1 (LCMT1), which carboxymethylates PP2Ac, significantly attenuated PP2A activation under HG conditions. In addition, HG conditions, but not 3-O-methyl glucose or mannitol, markedly increased the expression of LCMT1. Furthermore, HG conditions significantly increased the expression of B55α, a regulatory subunit of PP2A, which has been implicated in islet dysfunction under conditions of oxidative stress and diabetes. Thapsigargin, a known inducer of endoplasmic reticulum stress, failed to exert any discernible effects on the carboxymethylation of PP2Ac, expression of LCMT1 and B55α, or PP2A activity, suggesting no clear role for endoplasmic reticulum stress in HG-induced activation of PP2A. Based on these findings, we conclude that exposure of the islet β-cell to HG leads to accelerated PP2A signaling pathway, leading to loss in glucose-induced insulin secretion. PMID:24265448

  16. Studying Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatases in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hale, Alexander James; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are a large family of signal transduction regulators that have an essential role in normal development and physiology. Aberrant activation or inactivation of PTPs is at the basis of many human diseases. The zebrafish, Danio rerio, is being used extensively to model major aspects of development and disease as well as the mechanism of regeneration of limbs and vital organs, and most classical PTPs have been identified in zebrafish. Zebrafish is an excellent model system for biomedical research because the genome is sequenced, zebrafish produce a large number of offspring, the eggs develop outside the mother and are transparent, facilitating intravital imaging, and transgenesis and (site-directed) mutagenesis are feasible. Together, these traits make zebrafish amenable for the analysis of gene and protein function. In this chapter we cover three manipulations of zebrafish embryos that we have used to study the effects of PTPs in development, regeneration, and biochemistry. Microinjection at the one-cell stage is at the basis of many zebrafish experiments and is described first. This is followed by a description for measuring regeneration of the embryonic caudal fin, a powerful and robust physiological assay. Finally, the considerable but manageable troubleshooting of several complications associated with preparing zebrafish embryos for immunoblotting is explained. Overall, this chapter provides detailed protocols for manipulating zebrafish embryo samples with a compilation of tips collected through extensive experience from the zebrafish research community. PMID:27514815

  17. A Conserved Motif Provides Binding Specificity to the PP2A-B56 Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Emil Peter Thrane; Kruse, Thomas; Davey, Norman E; López-Méndez, Blanca; Sigurðsson, Jón Otti; Montoya, Guillermo; Olsen, Jesper V; Nilsson, Jakob

    2016-08-18

    Dynamic protein phosphorylation is a fundamental mechanism regulating biological processes in all organisms. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is the main source of phosphatase activity in the cell, but the molecular details of substrate recognition are unknown. Here, we report that a conserved surface-exposed pocket on PP2A regulatory B56 subunits binds to a consensus sequence on interacting proteins, which we term the LxxIxE motif. The composition of the motif modulates the affinity for B56, which in turn determines the phosphorylation status of associated substrates. Phosphorylation of amino acid residues within the motif increases B56 binding, allowing integration of kinase and phosphatase activity. We identify conserved LxxIxE motifs in essential proteins throughout the eukaryotic domain of life and in human viruses, suggesting that the motifs are required for basic cellular function. Our study provides a molecular description of PP2A binding specificity with broad implications for understanding signaling in eukaryotes.

  18. A Conserved Motif Provides Binding Specificity to the PP2A-B56 Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Emil Peter Thrane; Kruse, Thomas; Davey, Norman E; López-Méndez, Blanca; Sigurðsson, Jón Otti; Montoya, Guillermo; Olsen, Jesper V; Nilsson, Jakob

    2016-08-18

    Dynamic protein phosphorylation is a fundamental mechanism regulating biological processes in all organisms. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is the main source of phosphatase activity in the cell, but the molecular details of substrate recognition are unknown. Here, we report that a conserved surface-exposed pocket on PP2A regulatory B56 subunits binds to a consensus sequence on interacting proteins, which we term the LxxIxE motif. The composition of the motif modulates the affinity for B56, which in turn determines the phosphorylation status of associated substrates. Phosphorylation of amino acid residues within the motif increases B56 binding, allowing integration of kinase and phosphatase activity. We identify conserved LxxIxE motifs in essential proteins throughout the eukaryotic domain of life and in human viruses, suggesting that the motifs are required for basic cellular function. Our study provides a molecular description of PP2A binding specificity with broad implications for understanding signaling in eukaryotes. PMID:27453045

  19. Discovery of Protein Phosphatase 2C Inhibitors by Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Jessica P.; Beuscher, Albert E.; Flajolet, Marc; McAvoy, Thomas; Nairn, Angus C.; Olson, Arthur; Greengard, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) is an archetype of the PPM Ser/Thr phosphatases, characterized by dependence on divalent magnesium or manganese cofactors, absence of known regulatory proteins, and resistance to all known Ser/Thr phosphatase inhibitors. We have used virtual ligand screening with the AutoDock method and the National Cancer Institute Diversity Set to identify small molecule inhibitors of PP2Cα activity at a protein substrate. These inhibitors are active in the micromolar range, and represent the first non-phosphate-based molecules found to inhibit a type 2C phosphatase. The compounds docked to three recurrent binding sites near the PP2Cα active site and displayed novel Ser/Thr phosphatase selectivity profiles. Common chemical features of these compounds may form the basis for development of a PP2C inhibitor pharmacophore and may facilitate investigation of PP2C control and cellular function. PMID:16509582

  20. Protein phosphatase 1 is a key player in nuclear events.

    PubMed

    Rebelo, Sandra; Santos, Mariana; Martins, Filipa; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A B

    2015-12-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation at serine (Ser), threonine (Thr) and tyrosine (Tyr) residues is among the major regulatory mechanism in eukaryotic cells. The eukaryotic genome encodes many protein kinases and protein phosphatases. However, the localization, activity and specificity towards phosphatase substrates are dictated by a large array of phosphatase binding and regulatory subunits. For protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) more than 200 binding subunits have been described. The various PP1 isoforms and the binding subunits can be located throughout the cell, including in the nucleus. It follows that several nuclear specific PP1 binding proteins (PIPs) have been described and these will be discussed. Among them are PNUTS (phosphatase 1 nuclear targeting subunit), NIPP1 (nuclear inhibitor of PP1) and CREB (cAMP-responsive element-binding protein), which have all been associated with transcription. In fact PP1 can associate with transcription factors fulfilling an important regulatory function, in this respect it can bind to Hox11, human factor C1 (HCF1) and myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2). PP1 also regulates cell cycle progression and centrosome maturation and splitting, again by binding to specific regulatory proteins. Moreover, PP1 together with other protein phosphatases control the entry into mitosis by regulating the activity of mitotic kinases. Thus, PP1, its binding proteins and/or the phosphorylation states of both, directly control a vast array of cell nucleus associated functions, many of which are starting to be unraveled.

  1. Protein Phosphatases Involved in Regulating Mitosis: Facts and Hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Fernandes, Gary; Lee, Chang-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Almost all eukaryotic proteins are subject to post-translational modifications during mitosis and cell cycle, and in particular, reversible phosphorylation being a key event. The recent use of high-throughput experimental analyses has revealed that more than 70% of all eukaryotic proteins are regulated by phosphorylation; however, the mechanism of dephosphorylation, counteracting phosphorylation, is relatively unknown. Recent discoveries have shown that many of the protein phosphatases are involved in the temporal and spatial control of mitotic events, such as mitotic entry, mitotic spindle assembly, chromosome architecture changes and cohesion, and mitotic exit. This implies that certain phosphatases are tightly regulated for timely dephosphorylation of key mitotic phosphoproteins and are essential for control of various mitotic processes. This review describes the physiological and pathological roles of mitotic phosphatases, as well as the versatile role of various protein phosphatases in several mitotic events. PMID:27669825

  2. Protein Phosphatases Involved in Regulating Mitosis: Facts and Hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Fernandes, Gary; Lee, Chang-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Almost all eukaryotic proteins are subject to post-translational modifications during mitosis and cell cycle, and in particular, reversible phosphorylation being a key event. The recent use of high-throughput experimental analyses has revealed that more than 70% of all eukaryotic proteins are regulated by phosphorylation; however, the mechanism of dephosphorylation, counteracting phosphorylation, is relatively unknown. Recent discoveries have shown that many of the protein phosphatases are involved in the temporal and spatial control of mitotic events, such as mitotic entry, mitotic spindle assembly, chromosome architecture changes and cohesion, and mitotic exit. This implies that certain phosphatases are tightly regulated for timely dephosphorylation of key mitotic phosphoproteins and are essential for control of various mitotic processes. This review describes the physiological and pathological roles of mitotic phosphatases, as well as the versatile role of various protein phosphatases in several mitotic events. PMID:27669825

  3. Protein Phosphatase 1α Interacting Proteins in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Sara L.C.; Domingues, Sara C.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A.B.; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a major serine/threonine-phosphatase whose activity is dependent on its binding to regulatory subunits known as PP1 interacting proteins (PIPs), responsible for targeting PP1 to a specific cellular location, specifying its substrate or regulating its action. Today, more than 200 PIPs have been described involving PP1 in panoply of cellular mechanisms. Moreover, several PIPs have been identified that are tissue and event specific. In addition, the diversity of PP1/PIP complexes can further be achieved by the existence of several PP1 isoforms that can bind preferentially to a certain PIP. Thus, PP1/PIP complexes are highly specific for a particular function in the cell, and as such, they are excellent pharmacological targets. Hence, an in-depth survey was taken to identify specific PP1α PIPs in human brain by a high-throughput Yeast Two-Hybrid approach. Sixty-six proteins were recognized to bind PP1α, 39 being novel PIPs. A large protein interaction databases search was also performed to integrate with the results of the PP1α Human Brain Yeast Two-Hybrid and a total of 246 interactions were retrieved. PMID:22321011

  4. Early glycogen synthase kinase-3β and protein phosphatase 2A independent tau dephosphorylation during global brain ischaemia and reperfusion following cardiac arrest and the role of the adenosine monophosphate kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Majd, Shohreh; Power, John H T; Koblar, Simon A; Grantham, Hugh J M

    2016-08-01

    Abnormal tau phosphorylation (p-tau) has been shown after hypoxic damage to the brain associated with traumatic brain injury and stroke. As the level of p-tau is controlled by Glycogen Synthase Kinase (GSK)-3β, Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and Adenosine Monophosphate Kinase (AMPK), different activity levels of these enzymes could be involved in tau phosphorylation following ischaemia. This study assessed the effects of global brain ischaemia/reperfusion on the immediate status of p-tau in a rat model of cardiac arrest (CA) followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We reported an early dephosphorylation of tau at its AMPK sensitive residues, Ser(396) and Ser(262) after 2 min of ischaemia, which did not recover during the first two hours of reperfusion, while the tau phosphorylation at GSK-3β sensitive but AMPK insensitive residues, Ser(202) /Thr(205) (AT8), as well as the total amount of tau remained unchanged. Our data showed no alteration in the activities of GSK-3β and PP2A during similar episodes of ischaemia of up to 8 min and reperfusion of up to 2 h, and 4 weeks recovery. Dephosphorylation of AMPK followed the same pattern as tau dephosphorylation during ischaemia/reperfusion. Catalase, another AMPK downstream substrate also showed a similar pattern of decline to p-AMPK, in ischaemic/reperfusion groups. This suggests the involvement of AMPK in changing the p-tau levels, indicating that tau dephosphorylation following ischaemia is not dependent on GSK-3β or PP2A activity, but is associated with AMPK dephosphorylation. We propose that a reduction in AMPK activity is a possible early mechanism responsible for tau dephosphorylation.

  5. Characterization of the major phosphofructokinase-dephosphorylating protein phosphatases from Ascaris suum muscle.

    PubMed

    Daum, G; Schmid, B; MacKintosh, C; Cohen, P; Hofer, H W

    1992-07-13

    In contrast to the mammalian enzyme, PFK from the nematode Ascaris suum is activated following phosphorylation (Daum et al. (1986) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 139, 215-221) catalyzed by a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (Thalhofer et al. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 952-957). In the present report, we describe the characterization of the major PFK dephosphorylating phosphatases from Ascaris muscle. Two of these phosphatases exhibit apparent M(r) values of 174,000 and 126,000, respectively, and are dissociated to active 33 kDa proteins by ethanol precipitation. Denaturing electrophoresis of each of the enzyme preparations showed two bands of M(r) 33,000 and 63,000. The enzymes are classified as type 2A phosphatases according to their inhibition by subnanomolar concentrations of okadaic acid, the lack of inhibition by heat-stable phosphatase inhibitors 1 and 2, and their preference for the alpha- rather than for the beta-subunit of phosphorylase kinase. Like other type 2A phosphatases, they exhibit broad substrate specificities, are activated by divalent cations and polycations, and inhibited by fluoride, inorganic phosphate and adenine nucleotides. In addition, we have found that PFK is also dephosphorylated by an unusual protein phosphatase. This exhibits kinetic properties similar to type 2A protein phosphatases, but has a distinctly lower sensitivity towards inhibition by okadaic acid (IC50 approx. 20 nM). Partial purification of the enzyme provided evidence that it is composed of a 30 kDa catalytic subunit and probably two other subunits (molecular masses 66 and 72 kDa). The dephosphorylation of PFK by protein phosphatases is strongly inhibited by heparin. This effect, however, is substrate-specific and does not occur with Ascaris phosphorylase a. PMID:1321672

  6. Effects of prodigiosin family compounds from Pseudoalteromonas sp. 1020R on the activities of protein phosphatases and protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Soliev, Azamjon B; Hosokawa, Kakushi; Enomoto, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain 1020R produces prodigiosin and its closely related congeners, which differ in the length of their alkyl side chains. These red-pigmented compounds were found to exhibit cytotoxicity against human leukemia cell lines. The compounds also showed dose-dependent inhibitory effects on protein phosphatase 2A and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), while remaining relatively inactive against protein kinases, including protein tyrosine kinase, Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase and protein kinases A and C. Comparative studies of the individual pigmented compounds on PTP1B inhibition showed that as the chain length of the alkyl group at the C-3 position of the compound increased, the inhibitory effect on PTP1B decreased. These results suggest that protein phosphatases but not protein kinases might be involved in the cytotoxicity of the prodigiosin family of compounds against malignant cells.

  7. The B56γ3 regulatory subunit-containing protein phosphatase 2A outcompetes Akt to regulate p27KIP1 subcellular localization by selectively dephosphorylating phospho-Thr157 of p27KIP1

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Tai-Yu; Yang, Yu-San; Hong, Wei-Fu; Chiang, Chi-Wu

    2016-01-01

    The B56γ-containing protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-B56γ) has been postulated to have tumor suppressive functions. Here, we report regulation of p27KIP1 subcellular localization by PP2A-B56γ3. B56γ3 overexpression enhanced nuclear localization of p27KIP1, whereas knockdown of B56γ3 decreased p27KIP1 nuclear localization. B56γ3 overexpression decreased phosphorylation at Thr157 (phospho-Thr157), whose phosphorylation promotes cytoplasmic localization of p27KIP1, whereas B56γ3 knockdown significantly increased the level of phospho-Thr157. In vitro, PP2A-B56γ3 catalyzed dephosphorylation of phospho-Thr157 in a dose-dependent and okadaic acid-sensitive manner. B56γ3 did not increase p27KIP1 nuclear localization by down-regulating the upstream kinase Akt activity and outcompeted a myristoylated constitutively active Akt (Aktca) in regulating Thr157 phosphorylation and subcellular localization of p27KIP1. In addition, results of interaction domain mapping revealed that both the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of p27 and a domain at the C-terminus of B56γ3 are required for interaction between p27 and B56γ3. Furthermore, we demonstrated that p27KIP1 levels are positively correlated with B56γ levels in both non-tumor and tumor parts of a set of human colon tissue specimens. However, positive correlation between nuclear p27KIP1 levels and B56γ levels was found only in the non-tumor parts, but not in tumor parts of these tissues, implicating a dysregulation in PP2A-B56γ3-regulated p27KIP1 nuclear localization in these tumor tissues. Altogether, this study provides a new mechanism by which the PP2A-B56γ3 holoenzyme plays its tumor suppressor role. PMID:26684356

  8. Insect freeze tolerance: Roles of protein phosphatases and protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Pfister, Thomas D; Storey, Kenneth B

    2006-01-01

    Freeze-tolerant larvae of the goldenrod gall fly, Eurosta solidaginis Fitch, show multiple metabolic adaptations for subzero survival including the autumn synthesis of high concentrations of polyols. The induction and regulation of cold hardiness adaptations requires the intermediary action of signal transduction enzymes. The present study evaluates changes in the activities of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), protein phosphatases 1 (PP1), 2A, 2C, and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) over the course of the winter season and also in insects exposed to -4, -20 degrees C, or anoxic conditions in the laboratory. The increased PKA and decreased PP1 over the winter season and/or at subzero temperature support a regulatory role for these enzymes in cryoprotectant polyol synthesis. PTP activities were also strongly increased under these conditions and may act to antagonize tyrosine kinase mediated cell growth and proliferation responses and, thereby, contribute to hypometabolism and diapause over the winter.

  9. [Interaction of two tumor suppressors: Phosphatase CTDSPL and Rb protein].

    PubMed

    Beniaminov, A D; Krasnov, G S; Dmitriev, A A; Puzanov, G A; Snopok, B A; Senchenko, V N; Kashuba, V I

    2016-01-01

    Earlier we established that CTDSPL gene encoding small carboxy-terminal domain serine phosphatase can be considered a classical tumor suppressor gene. Besides, transfection of tumor cell line MCF-7 with CTDSPL led to the content decrease of inactive phosphorylated form of another tumor suppressor, retinoblastoma protein (Rb), and subsequently to cell cycle arrest at the G1/S boundary. This result implied that small phosphatase CTDSPL is able to specifically dephosphorylate and activate Rb protein. In order to add some fuel to this hypothesis, in the present work we studied the interaction of two tumor suppressors CTDSPL and Rb in vitro. GST pool-down assay revealed that CTDSPL is able to precipitate Rb protein from MCF-7 cell extracts, while surface plasmon resonance technique showed that interaction of the two proteins is direct. Results of this study reassert that phosphatase CTDSPL and Rb could be involved in the common mechanism of cell cycle regulation. PMID:27414789

  10. Genetic alterations of protein tyrosine phosphatases in human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shuliang; Sedwick, David; Wang, Zhenghe

    2014-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are enzymes that remove phosphate from tyrosine residues in proteins. Recent whole-exome sequencing of human cancer genomes reveals that many PTPs are frequently mutated in a variety of cancers. Among these mutated PTPs, protein tyrosine phosphatase T (PTPRT) appears to be the most frequently mutated PTP in human cancers. Beside PTPN11 which functions as an oncogene in leukemia, genetic and functional studies indicate that most of mutant PTPs are tumor suppressor genes. Identification of the substrates and corresponding kinases of the mutant PTPs may provide novel therapeutic targets for cancers harboring these mutant PTPs. PMID:25263441

  11. Thapsigargin activates univalent- and bivalent-cation entry in human neutrophils by a SK&F I3 96365- and Gd3+-sensitive pathway and is a partial secretagogue: involvement of pertussis-toxin-sensitive G-proteins and protein phosphatases 1/2A and 2B in the signal-transduction pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel-Seifert, K; Krautwurst, D; Musgrave, I; Seifert, R

    1996-01-01

    The Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin (TG) activates bivalent-cation early in human neutrophils via depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores bu little is known about the underlying mechanism and the functional role of TG-induced cation entry. We studied the effects of TG on univalent- and bivalent cation entry, lysozyme release and superoxide-anion (O2-) formation in human neutrophils. TG, like the chemotactic peptide, N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (fMLP), stimulated entry of Ca2+, Mn2+, Ba2+, Sr2+ and Na+ in a 1-¿beta-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)propoxy]-4-methoxyphenethyl¿-1H-imidazole hydrochloride (SK&F 96365)- and Gd3+-sensitive manner. The inhibitors of protein phosphates 1/2A, calyculin A and okadaic acid, diminished TG-induced cation influxes, whereas the inhibitors of protein phosphatase 2B, cyclosporin A and FK-506, were potentiators. Pertussis toxin (PTX) partially inhibited the effects of TG on Ca2+ and Mn2+ entry. TG and fMLP activated inward currents with a linear current-voltage relationship and a reversal potential at about 0 mV. TG activated lysozyme release and potentiated fMLP-induced O2- formation. TG-induced lysozyme release was inhibited by SK&F 96365, PTX and the removal of extracellular Ca2+ or Na+. Our data show that TG activates a non-selective and SK&F 96365- and Gd3+-sensitive cation entry pathway and is a partial secretagogue. TG-stimulated cation entry involves PTX-sensitive G-proteins and protein phosphatases, with protein phosphatases 1/2A and 2B playing opposite roles. PMID:8670085

  12. Protein Ser/Thr phosphatases PPEF interact with calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Kutuzov, Mikhail A; Solov'eva, Olga V; Andreeva, Alexandra V; Bennett, Nelly

    2002-05-10

    Regulation of protein dephosphorylation by cytoplasmic Ca(2+) levels and calmodulin (CaM) is well established and considered to be mediated solely by calcineurin. Yet, recent identification of protein phosphatases with EF-hand domains (PPEF/rdgC) point to the existence of another group of Ca(2+)-dependent protein phosphatases. We have recently hypothesised that PPEF/rdgC phosphatases might possess CaM-binding sites of the IQ-type in their N-terminal domains. We now employed yeast two-hybrid system and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to test this hypothesis. We found that entire human PPEF2 interacts with CaM in the in vivo tests and that its N-terminal domain binds to CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner with nanomolar affinity in vitro. The fragments corresponding to the second exons of PPEF1 and PPEF2, containing the IQ motifs, are sufficient for specific Ca(2+)-dependent interaction with CaM both in vivo and in vitro. These findings demonstrate the existence of mammalian CaM-binding protein Ser/Thr phosphatases distinct from calcineurin and suggest that the activity of PPEF phosphatases may be controlled by Ca(2+) in a dual way: via C-terminal Ca(2+)-binding domain and via interaction of the N-terminal domain with CaM.

  13. Characterization of a PRL protein tyrosine phosphatase from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Pendyala, Prakash Rao; Ayong, Lawrence; Eatrides, Jennifer; Schreiber, Melissa; Pham, Connie; Chakrabarti, Ratna; Fidock, David A; Allen, Charles M; Chakrabarti, Debopam

    2008-03-01

    Isoprenylated proteins have important functions in cell growth and differentiation of eukaryotic cells. Inhibitors of protein prenylation in malaria have recently shown strong promise as effective antimalarials. In studying protein prenylation in the malaria protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum, we have shown earlier that the incubation of P. falciparum cells with (3)H-prenol precursors resulted in various size classes of labeled proteins. To understand the physiological function of prenylated proteins of malaria parasites, that are targets of prenyltransferase inhibitors, we searched the PlasmoDB database for proteins containing the C-terminus prenylation motif. We have identified, among other potentially prenylated proteins, an orthologue of a PRL (protein of regenerating liver) subgroup protein tyrosine phosphatases, termed PfPRL. Here, we show that PfPRL is expressed in the parasite's intraerythrocytic stages, where it partially associates with endoplasmic reticulum and within a subcompartment of the food vacuole. Additionally, PfPRL targeting parallels that of apical membrane antigen-1 in developing merozoites. Recombinant PfPRL shows phosphatase activity that is preferentially inhibited by a tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor suggesting that PfPRL functions as a tyrosine phosphatase. Recombinant PfPRL can also be farnesylated in vitro. Inhibition of malarial farnesyltransferase activity can be achieved with the heptapetide RKCHFM, which corresponds to the C-terminus of PfPRL. This study provides the first evidence for expression of enzymatically active PRL-related protein tyrosine phosphatases in malarial parasites, and demonstrates the potential of peptides derived from Plasmodium prenylated proteins as malarial farnesyltransferase inhibitors.

  14. Metals in the active site of native protein phosphatase-1.

    PubMed

    Heroes, Ewald; Rip, Jens; Beullens, Monique; Van Meervelt, Luc; De Gendt, Stefan; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-08-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) is a major protein Ser/Thr phosphatase in eukaryotic cells. Its activity depends on two metal ions in the catalytic site, which were identified as manganese in the bacterially expressed phosphatase. However, the identity of the metal ions in native PP1 is unknown. In this study, total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) was used to detect iron and zinc in PP1 that was purified from rabbit skeletal muscle. Metal exchange experiments confirmed that the distinct substrate specificity of recombinant and native PP1 is determined by the nature of their associated metals. We also found that the iron level associated with native PP1 is decreased by incubation with inhibitor-2, consistent with a function of inhibitor-2 as a PP1 chaperone. PMID:25890482

  15. Methods to distinguish various types of protein phosphatase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Brautigan, D.L.; Shriner, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    To distinguish the action of protein Tyr(P) and protein Ser(P)/Thr(P) phosphatases on /sup 32/P-labeled phosphoproteins in subcellular fractions different inhibitors and activators are utilized. Comparison of the effects of added compounds provides a convenient, indirect method to characterize dephosphorylation reactions. Protein Tyr(P) phosphatases are specifically inhibited by micromolar Zn2+ or vanadate, and show maximal activity in the presence of EDTA. The other class of cellular phosphatases, specific for protein Ser(P) and Thr(P) residues, are inhibited by fluoride and EDTA. In this class of enzymes two major functional types can be distinguished: those sensitive to inhibition by the heat-stable protein inhibitor-2 and not stimulated by polycations, and those not sensitive to inhibition and stimulated by polycations. Preparation of /sup 32/P-labeled Tyr(P) and Ser(P) phosphoproteins also is presented for the direct measurement of phosphatase activities in preparations by the release of acid-soluble (/sup 32/P)phosphate.

  16. Chemical inhibition of bacterial protein tyrosine phosphatase suppresses capsule production.

    PubMed

    Standish, Alistair J; Salim, Angela A; Zhang, Hua; Capon, Robert J; Morona, Renato

    2012-01-01

    Capsule polysaccharide is a major virulence factor for a wide range of bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. The biosynthesis of Wzy-dependent capsules in both gram-negative and -positive bacteria is regulated by a system involving a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) and a protein tyrosine kinase. However, how the system functions is still controversial. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major human pathogen, the system is present in all but 2 of the 93 serotypes found to date. In order to study this regulation further, we performed a screen to find inhibitors of the phosphatase, CpsB. This led to the observation that a recently discovered marine sponge metabolite, fascioquinol E, inhibited CpsB phosphatase activity both in vitro and in vivo at concentrations that did not affect the growth of the bacteria. This inhibition resulted in decreased capsule synthesis in D39 and Type 1 S. pneumoniae. Furthermore, concentrations of Fascioquinol E that inhibited capsule also lead to increased attachment of pneumococci to a macrophage cell line, suggesting that this compound would inhibit the virulence of the pathogen. Interestingly, this compound also inhibited the phosphatase activity of the structurally unrelated gram-negative PTP, Wzb, which belongs to separate family of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Furthermore, incubation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, which contains a homologous phosphatase, resulted in decreased capsule synthesis. Taken together, these data provide evidence that PTPs are critical for Wzy-dependent capsule production across a spectrum of bacteria, and as such represents a valuable new molecular target for the development of anti-virulence antibacterials.

  17. PP2A phosphatase acts upon SAS-5 to ensure centriole formation in C. elegans embryos.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Daiju; Flückiger, Isabelle; Polanowska, Jolanta; Keller, Debora; Reboul, Jérôme; Gönczy, Pierre

    2011-04-19

    Centrosome duplication occurs once per cell cycle and ensures that the two resulting centrosomes assemble a bipolar mitotic spindle. Centriole formation is fundamental for centrosome duplication. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the evolutionarily conserved proteins SPD-2, ZYG-1, SAS-6, SAS-5, and SAS-4 are essential for centriole formation, but how they function is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is also critical for centriole formation in C. elegans embryos. We find that PP2A subunits genetically and physically interact with the SAS-5/SAS-6 complex. Furthermore, we show that PP2A-mediated dephosphorylation promotes centriolar targeting of SAS-5 and ensures SAS-6 delivery to the site of centriole assembly. We find that PP2A is similarly needed for the presence of HsSAS-6 at centrioles and for centriole formation in human cells. These findings lead us to propose that PP2A-mediated loading of SAS-6 proteins is critical at the onset of centriole formation.

  18. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in Hypothalamic Insulin and Leptin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Dodd, Garron T; Tiganis, Tony

    2015-10-01

    The hypothalamus is critical to the coordination of energy balance and glucose homeostasis. It responds to peripheral factors, such as insulin and leptin, that convey to the brain the degree of adiposity and the metabolic status of the organism. The development of leptin and insulin resistance in hypothalamic neurons appears to have a key role in the exacerbation of diet-induced obesity. In rodents, this has been attributed partly to the increased expression of the tyrosine phosphatases Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and T cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP), which attenuate leptin and insulin signaling. Deficiencies in PTP1B and TCPTP in the brain, or specific neurons, promote insulin and leptin signaling and prevent diet-induced obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and fatty liver disease. Although targeting phosphatases and hypothalamic circuits remains challenging, recent advances indicate that such hurdles might be overcome. Here, we focus on the roles of PTP1B and TCPTP in insulin and leptin signaling and explore their potential as therapeutic targets.

  19. Structural and functional basis of protein phosphatase 5 substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Jasmeen; Dunn, Diana M.; Woodford, Mark R.; Mariotti, Laura; Schulman, Jacqualyn; Bourboulia, Dimitra; Mollapour, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    The serine/threonine phosphatase protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) regulates hormone- and stress-induced cellular signaling by association with the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). PP5-mediated dephosphorylation of the cochaperone Cdc37 is essential for activation of Hsp90-dependent kinases. However, the details of this mechanism remain unknown. We determined the crystal structure of a Cdc37 phosphomimetic peptide bound to the catalytic domain of PP5. The structure reveals PP5 utilization of conserved elements of phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP) structure to bind substrate and provides a template for many PPP–substrate interactions. Our data show that, despite a highly conserved structure, elements of substrate specificity are determined within the phosphatase catalytic domain itself. Structure-based mutations in vivo reveal that PP5-mediated dephosphorylation is required for kinase and steroid hormone receptor release from the chaperone complex. Finally, our data show that hyper- or hypoactivity of PP5 mutants increases Hsp90 binding to its inhibitor, suggesting a mechanism to enhance the efficacy of Hsp90 inhibitors by regulation of PP5 activity in tumors. PMID:27466404

  20. Phosphorylated TandeMBP: A unique protein substrate for protein phosphatase assay.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Yasunori; Yamashita, Sho; Uezato, Yuuki; Senga, Yukako; Katayama, Syouichi; Goshima, Naoki; Shigeri, Yasushi; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Kameshita, Isamu

    2016-11-15

    To analyze a variety of protein phosphatases, we developed phosphorylated TandeMBP (P-TandeMBP), in which two different mouse myelin basic protein isoforms were fused in tandem, as a protein phosphatase substrate. P-TandeMBP was prepared efficiently in four steps: (1) phosphorylation of TandeMBP by a protein kinase mixture (Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase Iδ, casein kinase 1δ, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2); (2) precipitation of both P-TandeMBP and protein kinases to remove ATP, Pi, and ADP; (3) acid extraction of P-TandeMBP with HCl to remove protein kinases; and (4) neutralization of the solution that contains P-TandeMBP with Tris. In combination with the malachite green assay, P-TandeMBP can be used to detect protein phosphatase activity without using radioactive materials. Moreover, P-TandeMBP served as an efficient substrate for PPM family phosphatases (PPM1A, PPM1B, PPM1D, PPM1F, PPM1G, PPM1H, PPM1K, and PPM1M) and PPP family phosphatase PP5. Various phosphatase activities were also detected with high sensitivity in gel filtration fractions from mouse brain using P-TandeMBP. These results indicate that P-TandeMBP might be a powerful tool for the detection of protein phosphatase activities. PMID:27565380

  1. Structural Basis for Protein Phosphatase 1 Regulation and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Peti, Wolfgang; Nairn, Angus C.; Page, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitous Ser/Thr Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) regulates diverse, essential cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, protein synthesis, muscle contraction, carbohydrate metabolism, transcription and neuronal signaling. However, the free catalytic subunit of PP1, while an effective enzyme, lacks substrate specificity. Instead, it depends on a diverse set of regulatory proteins (≥200) to confer specificity towards distinct substrates. Here, we discuss recent advances in structural studies of PP1 holoenzyme complexes and summarize the new insights these studies have provided into the molecular basis of PP1 regulation and specificity. PMID:22284538

  2. The role of serine/threonine protein phosphatases in exocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Alistair T R; Baldwin, Monique L; Rostas, John A P; Holst, Jeff; Ludowyke, Russell I

    2003-01-01

    Modulation of exocytosis is integral to the regulation of cellular signalling, and a variety of disorders (such as epilepsy, hypertension, diabetes and asthma) are closely associated with pathological modulation of exocytosis. Emerging evidence points to protein phosphatases as key regulators of exocytosis in many cells and, therefore, as potential targets for the design of novel therapies to treat these diseases. Diverse yet exquisite regulatory mechanisms have evolved to direct the specificity of these enzymes in controlling particular cell processes, and functionally driven studies have demonstrated differential regulation of exocytosis by individual protein phosphatases. This Review discusses the evidence for the regulation of exocytosis by protein phosphatases in three major secretory systems, (1) mast cells, in which the regulation of exocytosis of inflammatory mediators plays a major role in the respiratory response to antigens, (2) insulin-secreting cells in which regulation of exocytosis is essential for metabolic control, and (3) neurons, in which regulation of exocytosis is perhaps the most complex and is essential for effective neurotransmission. PMID:12749763

  3. Protein Phosphatase 1-α Regulates AS160 Ser588 and Thr642 Dephosphorylation in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pragya; Arias, Edward B; Cartee, Gregory D

    2016-09-01

    Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) phosphorylation on Thr(642) and Ser(588) by Akt is essential for insulin's full effect on glucose transport. However, protein phosphorylation is determined by the balance of actions by kinases and phosphatases, and the specific phosphatase(s) controlling AS160 dephosphorylation is (are) unknown. Accordingly, we assessed roles of highly expressed skeletal muscle serine/threonine phosphatases (PP1, PP2A, PP2B, and PP2C) on AS160 dephosphorylation. Preliminary screening of candidate phosphatases used an AS160 dephosphorylation assay. Lysates from insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle were treated with pharmacological phosphatase inhibitors and assessed for AS160 Ser(588) and Thr(642) dephosphorylation. AS160 dephosphorylation on both phosphorylation sites was unaltered by PP2B or PP2C inhibitors. Okadaic acid (low dose inhibits PP2A; high dose inhibits PP1) delayed AS160 Ser(588) (both doses) and Thr(642) (high dose only) dephosphorylation concomitant with greater Akt phosphorylation (both doses). AS160 was coimmunoprecipitated with PP1-α but not with PP1-β, PP1-γ1, or PP2A. Recombinant inhibitor-2 protein (a selective PP1 inhibitor) delayed AS160 dephosphorylation on both phosphorylation sites without altering Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore, knockdown of PP1-α but not PP1-β or PP1-γ1 by small interfering RNA caused greater AS160 Ser(588) and Thr(642) phosphorylation concomitant with unaltered Akt phosphorylation. Together, these results identified PP1-α as a regulator of AS160 Thr(642) and Ser(588) dephosphorylation in skeletal muscle.

  4. Possible protein phosphatase inhibition by bis(hydroxyethyl) sulfide, a hydrolysis product of mustard gas

    SciTech Connect

    Brimfield, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    Recently, the natural vesicant cantharidin was shown to bind exclusively to and inhibit protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in mouse tissue extracts (Li and Casida (1992) Proc. Nati. Acad. Sci. USA 89, 11867-11870). To explore the generality of this effect in vesicant action, we measured the protein serinelthreonine phosphatase activity in mouse liver cytosol (in the form of the okadaic acid inhibitable increment of p-nitrophenyl phosphate (p-NPP) phosphatase activity) in the presence of aqueous sulfur mustard or its hydrolysis product, bis(hydroxyethyl)sulfide (TDG). Sulfur mustard inhibited p-NPP hydrolysis. However, inhibition correlated with the time elapsed between thawing and the addition of mustard to the enzyme preparation, not with concentration. TDG exhibited a direct, concentration-related inhibition of p-NPP hydrolysis between 30 and 300 1LM. We conclude that sulfur mustard also has an inhibitory effect on protein serinelthreonine phosphatases. However, the inhibition is an effect of its non-alkykating hydrolysis product TDG, not of sulfur mustard itself.

  5. Networks of protein kinases and phosphatases in the individual phases of contextual fear conditioning in the C57BL/6J mouse.

    PubMed

    Mucic, Goran; Sase, Sunetra; Stork, Oliver; Lubec, Gert; Li, Lin

    2015-03-01

    Although protein kinases and phosphatases have been reported to be involved in fear memory, information about these signalling molecules in the individual phases of contextual fear conditioning (cFC) is limited. C57BL/6J mice were tested in cFC, sacrificed and hippocampi were used for screening of approximately 800 protein kinases and phosphatases by protein microarrays with subsequent Western blot confirmation of threefold higher or lower hippocampal levels as compared to foot shock controls. Immunoblotting of the protein kinases and phosphatases screened out was carried out by Western blotting. A network of protein kinases and phosphatases was generated (STRING 9.1). Animals learned the task in the paradigm and protein kinase and phosphatase levels were determined in the individual phases acquisition, consolidation and retrieval and compared to foot shock controls. Protein kinases discoidin containing receptor 2 (DDR2), mitogen activated protein kinase kinase kinase 7 (TAK1), protein phosphatases dual specificity protein phosphatase (PTEN) and protein phosphatase 2a (PP2A) were modulated in the individual phases of cFC. Phosphatidyl-inositol-3,4,5-triphosphate 3-phosphatase and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) that is interacting with PTEN were modulated as well. Freezing time was correlating with PP2A levels in the retrieval phase of cFC. The abovementioned protein kinases, phosphatases and inositol-signalling enzymes were not reported so far in cFC and the results are relevant for interpretation of previous and design of future studies in cFC or fear memory. Protein phosphatase PP2A was, however, the only signalling compound tested that was directly linked to retrieval in the cFC. PMID:25461266

  6. Protein kinase and phosphatase activities of thylakoid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, H.; Shaw, E.K.; Bennett, J.

    1987-01-01

    Dephosphorylation of the 25 and 27 kDa light-harvesting Chl a/b proteins (LHCII) of the thylakoid membranes is catalyzed by a phosphatase which differs from previously reported thylakoid-bound phosphatases in having an alkaline pH optimum (9.0) and a requirement for Mg/sup 2 +/ ions. Dephosphorylation of the 8.3 kDa psb H gene product requires a Mg/sup 2 +/ ion concentration more than 200 fold higher than that for dephosphorylation of LHC II. The 8.3 kDa and 27 kDa proteins appear to be phosphorylated by two distinct kinases, which differ in substrate specificity and sensitivity to inhibitors. The plastoquinone antagonist 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-benzoquinone (DBMIB) inhibits phosphorylation of the 27 kDa LHC II much more readily than phosphorylation of the 8.3 kDa protein. A similar pattern of inhibition is seen for two synthetic oligopeptides (MRKSATTKKAVC and ATQTLESSSRC) which are analogs of the phosphorylation sites of the two proteins. Possible modes of action of DBMIB are discussed. 45 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Functional Analysis of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in Thrombosis and Hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Rahmouni, Souad; Hego, Alexandre; Delierneux, Céline; Wéra, Odile; Musumeci, Lucia; Tautz, Lutz; Oury, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are small blood cells derived from cytoplasmic fragments of megakaryocytes and play an essential role in thrombosis and hemostasis. Platelet activation depends on the rapid phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of key signaling molecules, and a number of kinases and phosphatases have been identified as major regulators of platelet function. However, the investigation of novel signaling proteins has suffered from technical limitations due to the anucleate nature of platelets and their very limited levels of mRNA and de novo protein synthesis. In the past, experimental methods were restricted to the generation of genetically modified mice and the development of specific antibodies. More recently, novel (phospho)proteomic technologies and pharmacological approaches using specific small-molecule inhibitors have added additional capabilities to investigate specific platelet proteins.In this chapter, we report methods for using genetic and pharmacological approaches to investigate the function of platelet signaling proteins. While the described experiments focus on the role of the dual-specificity phosphatase 3 (DUSP3) in platelet signaling, the presented methods are applicable to any signaling enzyme. Specifically, we describe a testing strategy that includes (1) aggregation and secretion experiments with mouse and human platelets, (2) immunoprecipitation and immunoblot assays to study platelet signaling events, (3) detailed protocols to use selected animal models in order to investigate thrombosis and hemostasis in vivo, and (4) strategies for utilizing pharmacological inhibitors on human platelets. PMID:27514813

  8. Cytoplasmic SET induces tau hyperphosphorylation through a decrease of methylated phosphatase 2A

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The neuronal cytoplasmic localization of SET, an inhibitor of the phosphatase 2A (PP2A), results in tau hyperphosphorylation in the brains of Alzheimer patients through mechanisms that are still not well defined. Results We used primary neurons and mouse brain slices to show that SET is translocated to the cytoplasm in a manner independent of both its cleavage and over-expression. The localization of SET in the cytoplasm, either by the translocation of endogenous SET or by internalization of the recombinant full-length SET protein, induced tau hyperphosphorylation. Cytoplasmic recombinant full-length SET in mouse brain slices induced a decrease of PP2A activity through a decrease of methylated PP2A levels. The levels of methylated PP2A were negatively correlated with tau hyperphosphorylation at Ser-202 but not with the abnormal phosphorylation of tau at Ser-422. Conclusions The presence of full-length SET in the neuronal cytoplasm is sufficient to impair PP2A methylation and activity, leading to tau hyperphosphorylation. In addition, our data suggest that tau hyperphosphorylation is regulated by different mechanisms at distinct sites. The translocation of SET to the neuronal cytoplasm, the low activity of PP2A, and tau hyperphosphorylation are associated in the brains of Alzheimer patients. Our data show a link between the translocation of SET in the cytoplasm and the decrease of methylated PP2A levels leading to a decrease of PP2A activity and tau hyperphosphorylation. This chain of events may contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. PMID:24981783

  9. Inhibition of the Hematopoietic Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase by Phenoxyacetic Acids.

    PubMed

    Bobkova, Ekaterina V; Liu, Wallace H; Colayco, Sharon; Rascon, Justin; Vasile, Stefan; Gasior, Carlton; Critton, David A; Chan, Xochella; Dahl, Russell; Su, Ying; Sergienko, Eduard; Chung, Thomas D Y; Mustelin, Tomas; Page, Rebecca; Tautz, Lutz

    2011-02-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) have only recently become the focus of attention in the search for novel drug targets despite the fact that they play vital roles in numerous cellular processes and are implicated in many human diseases. The hematopoietic protein tyrosine phosphatase (HePTP) is often found dysregulated in preleukemic myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), as well as in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Physiological substrates of HePTP include the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) ERK1/2 and p38. Specific modulators of HePTP catalytic activity will be useful for elucidating mechanisms of MAPK regulation in hematopietic cells, and may also provide treatments for hematopoietic malignancies such as AML. Here we report the discovery of phenoxyacetic acids as inhibitors of HePTP. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis and in silico docking studies reveal the molecular basis of HePTP inhibition by these compounds. We also show that these compounds are able to penetrate cell membranes and inhibit HePTP in human T lymphocytes.

  10. The Ser/Thr Phosphatase PP2A Regulatory Subunit Widerborst Inhibits Notch Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Anasua; Majot, Adam T.; Bidwai, Ashok P.

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila Enhancer of split M8, an effector of Notch signaling, is regulated by protein kinase CK2. The phosphatase PP2A is thought to play an opposing (inhibitory) role, but the identity of the regulatory subunit was unknown. The studies described here reveal a role for the PP2A regulatory subunit widerborst (wdb) in three developmental contexts; the bristle, wing and the R8 photoreceptors of the eye. wdb overexpression elicits bristle and wing defects akin to reduced Notch signaling, whereas hypomorphic mutations in this PP2A subunit elicit opposite effects. We have also evaluated wdb functions using mutations in Notch and E(spl) that affect the eye. We find that the eye and R8 defects of the well-known Nspl mutation are enhanced by a hypomorphic allele of wdb, whereas they are strongly rescued by wdb overexpression. Similarly, ectopic wdb rescues the eye and R8 defects of the E(spl)D mutation, which affects the m8 gene. In addition, wdb overexpression also rescues the bristle defects of ectopically expressed M8, or the eye and R8 defects of its CK2 phosphomimetic variant M8-S159D. The latter finding suggests that PP2A may target M8 at highly conserved residues in the vicinity of the CK2 site, whose phosphorylation controls repression of Atonal and the R8 fate. Together, the studies identify PP2A-Wdb as a participant in Notch signaling, and suggest that M8 activity is controlled by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. The conservation of the phosphorylation sites between Drosophila E(spl) and the HES/HER proteins from mammals, reptiles, amphibians, birds and fish raises the prospect that this mode of regulation is widespread. PMID:25006677

  11. Regulation of receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase dimerization.

    PubMed

    van der Wijk, Thea; Blanchetot, Christophe; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2005-01-01

    Receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) are single membrane spanning proteins belonging to the family of PTPs that, together with the antagonistically acting protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs), regulate the protein phosphotyrosine levels in cells. Protein-tyrosine phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification that has a major role in cell signaling by affecting protein-protein interactions and enzymatic activities. Increasing evidence indicates that RPTPs, like RPTKs, are regulated by dimerization. For RPTPalpha, we have shown that rotational coupling of the constitutive dimers in the cell membrane determines enzyme activity. Furthermore, oxidative stress, identified as an important second messenger during the past decade, is a regulator of rotational coupling of RPTPalpha dimers. In this review, we discuss the biochemical and cell biological techniques that we use to study the regulation of RPTPs by dimerization. These techniques include (co-) immunoprecipitation, RPTP activity assays, chemical and genetic cross-linking, detection of cell surface proteins by biotinylation, and analysis of RPTPalpha dimers, using conformation-sensitive antibody binding.

  12. Protein phosphatase 1 suppresses androgen receptor ubiquitylation and degradation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaming; Han, Weiwei; Gulla, Sarah; Simon, Nicholas I; Gao, Yanfei; Cai, Changmeng; Yang, Hongmei; Zhang, Xiaoping; Liu, Jihong; Balk, Steven P; Chen, Shaoyong

    2016-01-12

    The phosphoprotein phosphatases are emerging as important androgen receptor (AR) regulators in prostate cancer (PCa). We reported previously that the protein phosphatase 1 catalytic subunit (PP1α) can enhance AR activity by dephosphorylating a site in the AR hinge region (Ser650) and thereby decrease AR nuclear export. In this study we show that PP1α increases the expression of wildtype as well as an S650A mutant AR, indicating that it is acting through one or more additional mechanisms. We next show that PP1α binds primarily to the AR ligand binding domain and decreases its ubiquitylation and degradation. Moreover, we find that the PP1α inhibitor tautomycin increases phosphorylation of AR ubiquitin ligases including SKP2 and MDM2 at sites that enhance their activity, providing a mechanism by which PP1α may suppress AR degradation. Significantly, the tautomycin mediated decrease in AR expression was most pronounced at low androgen levels or in the presence of the AR antagonist enzalutamide. Consistent with this finding, the sensitivity of LNCaP and C4-2 PCa cells to tautomycin, as assessed by PSA synthesis and proliferation, was enhanced at low androgen levels or by treatment with enzalutamide. Together these results indicate that PP1α may contribute to stabilizing AR protein after androgen deprivation therapies, and that targeting PP1α or the AR-PP1α interaction may be effective in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).

  13. AIP1 recruits phosphatase PP2A to ASK1 in tumor necrosis factor-induced ASK1-JNK activation.

    PubMed

    Min, Wang; Lin, Yan; Tang, Shibo; Yu, Luyang; Zhang, Haifeng; Wan, Ting; Luhn, Tricia; Fu, Haian; Chen, Hong

    2008-04-11

    Previously we have shown that AIP1 (apoptosis signal-regulating kinase [ASK]1-interacting protein 1), a novel member of the Ras-GAP protein family, facilitates dephosphorylation of ASK1 at pSer967 and subsequently 14-3-3 release from ASK1, leading to enhanced ASK1-JNK signaling. However, the phosphatase(s) responsible for ASK1 dephosphorylation at pSer967 has not been identified. In the present study, we identified protein phosphatase (PP)2A as a potential phosphatase in vascular endothelial cells (ECs). Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced dephosphorylation of ASK1 pSer967 in ECs was blocked by PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid. Overexpression of PP2A catalytic subunit induced dephosphorylation of ASK1 pSer967 and activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). In contrast, a catalytic inactive form of PP2A or PP2A small interfering RNA blunted TNF-induced dephosphorylation of ASK1 pSer967 and activation of JNK without effects on NF-kappaB activation. Whereas AIP1, via its C2 domain, binds to ASK1, PP2A binds to the GAP domain of AIP1. Endogenous AIP1-PP2A complex can be detected in the resting state, and TNF induces a complex formation of AIP1-PP2A with ASK1. Furthermore, TNF-induced association of PP2A with ASK1 was diminished in AIP1-knockdown ECs, suggesting a critical role of AIP1 in recruiting PP2A to ASK1. TNF-signaling molecules TRAF2 and RIP1, known to be in complex with AIP1 and activate AIP1 by phosphorylating AIP1 at Ser604, are critical for TNF-induced ASK1 dephosphorylation. Finally, PP2A and AIP1 cooperatively induce activation of ASK1-JNK signaling and EC apoptosis, as demonstrated by both overexpression and small interfering RNA knockdown approaches. Taken together, our data support a critical role of PP2A-AIP1 complex in TNF-induced activation of ASK1-JNK apoptotic signaling. PMID:18292600

  14. Protein Phosphatase-1 Inhibitor-2 Is a Novel Memory Suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongtian; Hou, Hailong; Pahng, Amanda; Gu, Hua; Nairn, Angus C.; Tang, Ya-Ping; Colombo, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation, a fundamental regulatory mechanism required for many biological processes including memory formation, is coordinated by the opposing actions of protein kinases and phosphatases. Type I protein phosphatase (PP1), in particular, has been shown to constrain learning and memory formation. However, how PP1 might be regulated in memory is still not clear. Our previous work has elucidated that PP1 inhibitor-2 (I-2) is an endogenous regulator of PP1 in hippocampal and cortical neurons (Hou et al., 2013). Contrary to expectation, our studies of contextual fear conditioning and novel object recognition in I-2 heterozygous mice suggest that I-2 is a memory suppressor. In addition, lentiviral knock-down of I-2 in the rat dorsal hippocampus facilitated memory for tasks dependent on the hippocampus. Our data indicate that I-2 suppresses memory formation, probably via negatively regulating the phosphorylation of cAMP/calcium response element-binding protein (CREB) at serine 133 and CREB-mediated gene expression in dorsal hippocampus. Surprisingly, the data from both biochemical and behavioral studies suggest that I-2, despite its assumed action as a PP1 inhibitor, is a positive regulator of PP1 function in memory formation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We found that inhibitor-2 acts as a memory suppressor through its positive functional influence on type I protein phosphatase (PP1), likely resulting in negative regulation of cAMP/calcium response element-binding protein (CREB) and CREB-activated gene expression. Our studies thus provide an interesting example of a molecule with an in vivo function that is opposite to its in vitro function. PP1 plays critical roles in many essential physiological functions such as cell mitosis and glucose metabolism in addition to its known role in memory formation. PP1 pharmacological inhibitors would thus not be able to serve as good therapeutic reagents because of its many targets. However, identification of PP1 inhibitor

  15. UIS2: A Unique Phosphatase Required for the Development of Plasmodium Liver Stages

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Mishra, Satish; Sakthivel, Ramanavelan; Fontoura, Beatriz M. A.; Nussenzweig, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium salivary sporozoites are the infectious form of the malaria parasite and are dormant inside salivary glands of Anopheles mosquitoes. During dormancy, protein translation is inhibited by the kinase UIS1 that phosphorylates serine 59 in the eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α). De-phosphorylation of eIF2α-P is required for the transformation of sporozoites into the liver stage. In mammalian cells, the de-phosphorylation of eIF2α-P is mediated by the protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). Using a series of genetically knockout parasites we showed that in malaria sporozoites, contrary to mammalian cells, the eIF2α-P phosphatase is a member of the PP2C/PPM phosphatase family termed UIS2. We found that eIF2α was highly phosphorylated in uis2 conditional knockout sporozoites. These mutant sporozoites maintained the crescent shape after delivery into mammalian host and lost their infectivity. Both uis1 and uis2 were highly transcribed in the salivary gland sporozoites but uis2 expression was inhibited by the Pumilio protein Puf2. The repression of uis2 expression was alleviated when sporozoites developed into liver stage. While most eukaryotic phosphatases interact transiently with their substrates, UIS2 stably bound to phosphorylated eIF2α, raising the possibility that high-throughput searches may identify chemicals that disrupt this interaction and prevent malaria infection. PMID:26735921

  16. Protein phosphatase Z modulates oxidative stress response in fungi.

    PubMed

    Leiter, Éva; González, Asier; Erdei, Éva; Casado, Carlos; Kovács, László; Ádám, Csaba; Oláh, Judit; Miskei, Márton; Molnar, Monika; Farkas, Ilona; Hamari, Zsuzsanna; Ariño, Joaquín; Pócsi, István; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2012-09-01

    The genome of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans harbors the gene ppzA that codes for the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase Z (PPZ), and the closely related opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus encompasses a highly similar PPZ gene (phzA). When PpzA and PhzA were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Schizosaccharomyces pombe they partially complemented the deleted phosphatases in the ppz1 or the pzh1 mutants, and they also mimicked the effect of Ppz1 overexpression in slt2 MAP kinase deficient S. cerevisiae cells. Although ppzA acted as the functional equivalent of the known PPZ enzymes its disruption in A. nidulans did not result in the expected phenotypes since it failed to affect salt tolerance or cell wall integrity. However, the inactivation of ppzA resulted in increased sensitivity to oxidizing agents like tert-butylhydroperoxide, menadione, and diamide. To demonstrate the general validity of our observations we showed that the deletion of the orthologous PPZ genes in other model organisms, such as S. cerevisiae (PPZ1) or Candida albicans (CaPPZ1) also caused oxidative stress sensitivity. Thus, our work reveals a novel function of the PPZ enzyme in A. nidulans that is conserved in very distantly related fungi.

  17. Molecular basis for TPR domain-mediated regulation of protein phosphatase 5.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Roe, S Mark; Cliff, Matthew J; Williams, Mark A; Ladbury, John E; Cohen, Patricia T W; Barford, David

    2005-01-12

    Protein phosphatase 5 (Ppp5) is a serine/threonine protein phosphatase comprising a regulatory tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain N-terminal to its phosphatase domain. Ppp5 functions in signalling pathways that control cellular responses to stress, glucocorticoids and DNA damage. Its phosphatase activity is suppressed by an autoinhibited conformation maintained by the TPR domain and a C-terminal subdomain. By interacting with the TPR domain, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and fatty acids including arachidonic acid stimulate phosphatase activity. Here, we describe the structure of the autoinhibited state of Ppp5, revealing mechanisms of TPR-mediated phosphatase inhibition and Hsp90- and arachidonic acid-induced stimulation of phosphatase activity. The TPR domain engages with the catalytic channel of the phosphatase domain, restricting access to the catalytic site. This autoinhibited conformation of Ppp5 is stabilised by the C-terminal alphaJ helix that contacts a region of the Hsp90-binding groove on the TPR domain. Hsp90 activates Ppp5 by disrupting TPR-phosphatase domain interactions, permitting substrate access to the constitutively active phosphatase domain, whereas arachidonic acid prompts an alternate conformation of the TPR domain, destabilising the TPR-phosphatase domain interface.

  18. Human neutrophil calmodulin-binding proteins: identification of the calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, W.D.; Tallant, E.A.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    The molecular events in linking neutrophil activation and ligand binding to specific membrane receptors are mediated in part by an increase in intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/. One mechanism by which Ca/sup 2 +/ may trigger neutrophil activation is through Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin (CaM)-regulated proteins and enzymes. To determine which Ca/sup 2 +//CaM-regulated enzymes may be present in the neutrophil, they have used Western blotting techniques and /sup 125/I-CaM to identify neutrophil CaM-binding proteins. Eleven proteins with molecular weights ranging from 230K to 13.5K bound /sup 125/I-CaM in a Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent manner. One predominant region of /sup 125/I-Cam binding was to a 59K protein; a protein with an identical mobility was labeled by an antisera against brain CaM-dependent phosphatase. Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent phosphatase activity, which was inhibited by the CaM antagonist trifluoperazine, was detected in a neutrophil extract; a radioimmunoassay for the phosphatase indicated that it was present in the extract at approximately 0.2 ..mu..g/mg protein. Most of the CaM-binding proteins, including the 59K protein, were rapidly degraded upon lysis of the neutrophil. There was a close correlation between the degradation of the 59K protein and the loss of Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent phosphatase activity in the neutrophil extract. Thus, human neutrophils contain numerous CaM-binding proteins which are presumably Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin-regulated enzymes and proteins; the 59K protein is a CaM-dependent phosphatase.

  19. Protein tyrosine phosphatase regulation of endothelial cell apoptosis and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Chang, J; Gorospe, M; Passaniti, A

    1996-02-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, occurs during development and may also be an important factor in many diseases. However, little is known about the signal transduction pathways regulating apoptosis. In these studies, loss of endothelial cell-substrate attachment and apoptosis after removal of growth factors was associated with dephosphorylation of tyrosine residues at the cell periphery. Dephosphorylation of total cellular proteins accompanied apoptosis and was reduced by orthovanadate, an inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Orthovanadate blocked the fragmentation of nuclear DNA, inhibited DNA laddering, and suppressed the expression of TRPM-2, an apoptosis-associated gene. The tyrosine phosphorylation levels of FAK125, erk1 (mitogen-activated kinase kinase), and cdc-2 were reduced during apoptosis. FAK125 dephosphorylation was inhibited by orthovanadate, but premature activation (tyrosine dephosphorylation) of cdc-2 was not. Orthovanadate was as effective as basic fibroblast growth factor in activating erk1 without increasing cell proliferation and in preventing the apoptosis of endothelial cells after treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha. Endothelial cell differentiation on extracellular matrix (Matrigel) was also stimulated by orthovanadate in the absence of basic fibroblast growth factor without affecting growth arrest and inhibition of DNA synthesis. Expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 (Waf1/Cip1/Sdi1) was down-regulated during the early stages of differentiation, remained low for at least 6 hours as differentiation proceeded, and increased upon completion of differentiation. Cells that failed to down-regulate p21 mRNA on Matrigel in the absence of angiogenic factors underwent apoptosis. These results suggest that protein tyrosine phosphatases are actively involved in signal transduction during apoptosis and may regulate p21 expression to inhibit endothelial cell differentiation.

  20. Phosphorylation of Protein Phosphatase Inhibitor-1 by Protein Kinase C*s

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Bogachan; Shu, Hongjun; Fernandez, Joseph; El-Armouche, Ali; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Nairn, Angus C.; Bibb, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor-1 becomes a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 when phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase at Thr35. Moreover, Ser67 of inhibitor-1 serves as a substrate for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in the brain. Here, we report that dephosphoinhibitor-1 but not phospho-Ser67 inhibitor-1 was efficiently phosphorylated by protein kinase C at Ser65 in vitro. In contrast, Ser67 phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 was unaffected by phospho-Ser65. Protein kinase C activation in striatal tissue resulted in the concomitant phosphorylation of inhibitor-1 at Ser65 and Ser67, but not Ser65 alone. Selective pharmacological inhibition of protein phosphatase activity suggested that phospho-Ser65 inhibitor-1 is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 1 in the striatum. In vitro studies confirmed these findings and suggested that phospho-Ser67 protects phospho-Ser65 inhibitor-1 from dephosphorylation by protein phosphatase 1 in vivo. Activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors resulted in the up-regulation of diphospho-Ser65/Ser67 inhibitor-1 in this tissue. In contrast, the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate-type ionotropic glutamate receptors opposed increases in striatal diphospho-Ser65/Ser67 inhibitor-1 levels. Phosphomimetic mutation of Ser65 and/or Ser67 did not convert inhibitor-1 into a protein phosphatase 1 inhibitor. On the other hand, in vitro and in vivo studies suggested that diphospho-Ser65/Ser67 inhibitor-1 is a poor substrate for cAMP-dependent protein kinase. These observations extend earlier studies regarding the function of phospho-Ser67 and underscore the possibility that phosphorylation in this region of inhibitor-1 by multiple protein kinases may serve as an integrative signaling mechanism that governs the responsiveness of inhibitor-1 to cAMP-dependent protein kinase activation. PMID:16772299

  1. TIPRL Inhibits Protein Phosphatase 4 Activity and Promotes H2AX Phosphorylation in the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Rosales, Kimberly Romero; Reid, Michael A.; Yang, Ying; Tran, Thai Q.; Wang, Wen-I; Lowman, Xazmin; Pan, Min; Kong, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in our understanding of protein kinase regulation in the DNA damage response, the mechanism that controls protein phosphatase activity in this pathway is unclear. Unlike kinases, the activity and specificity of serine/threonine phosphatases is governed largely by their associated proteins. Here we show that Tip41-like protein (TIPRL), an evolutionarily conserved binding protein for PP2A-family phosphatases, is a negative regulator of protein phosphatase 4 (PP4). Knockdown of TIPRL resulted in increased PP4 phosphatase activity and formation of the active PP4-C/PP4R2 complex known to dephosphorylate γ-H2AX. Thus, overexpression of TIPRL promotes phosphorylation of H2AX, and increases γ-H2AX positive foci in response to DNA damage, whereas knockdown of TIPRL inhibits γ-H2AX phosphorylation. In correlation with γ-H2AX levels, we found that TIPRL overexpression promotes cell death in response to genotoxic stress, and knockdown of TIPRL protects cells from genotoxic agents. Taken together, these data demonstrate that TIPRL inhibits PP4 activity to allow for H2AX phosphorylation and the subsequent DNA damage response. PMID:26717153

  2. Genetic and chemical reductions in protein phosphatase activity alter auxin transport, gravity response, and lateral root growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashotte, A. M.; DeLong, A.; Muday, G. K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Auxin transport is required for important growth and developmental processes in plants, including gravity response and lateral root growth. Several lines of evidence suggest that reversible protein phosphorylation regulates auxin transport. Arabidopsis rcn1 mutant seedlings exhibit reduced protein phosphatase 2A activity and defects in differential cell elongation. Here we report that reduced phosphatase activity alters auxin transport and dependent physiological processes in the seedling root. Root basipetal transport was increased in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings but showed normal sensitivity to the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). Phosphatase inhibition reduced root gravity response and delayed the establishment of differential auxin-induced gene expression across a gravity-stimulated root tip. An NPA treatment that reduced basipetal transport in rcn1 and cantharidin-treated wild-type plants also restored a normal gravity response and asymmetric auxin-induced gene expression, indicating that increased basipetal auxin transport impedes gravitropism. Increased auxin transport in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings did not require the AGR1/EIR1/PIN2/WAV6 or AUX1 gene products. In contrast to basipetal transport, root acropetal transport was normal in phosphatase-inhibited seedlings in the absence of NPA, although it showed reduced NPA sensitivity. Lateral root growth also exhibited reduced NPA sensitivity in rcn1 seedlings, consistent with acropetal transport controlling lateral root growth. These results support the role of protein phosphorylation in regulating auxin transport and suggest that the acropetal and basipetal auxin transport streams are differentially regulated.

  3. Differential Requirement for Pten Lipid and Protein Phosphatase Activity during Zebrafish Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Stumpf, Miriam; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The lipid- and protein phosphatase PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor genes in human cancers and many mutations found in tumor samples directly affect PTEN phosphatase activity. In order to understand the functional consequences of these mutations in vivo, the aim of our study was to dissect the role of Pten phosphatase activities during zebrafish embryonic development. As in other model organisms, zebrafish mutants lacking functional Pten are embryonically lethal. Zebrafish have two pten genes and pten double homozygous zebrafish embryos develop a severe pleiotropic phenotype around 4 days post fertilization, which can be largely rescued by re-introduction of pten mRNA at the one-cell stage. We used this assay to characterize the rescue-capacity of Pten and variants with mutations that disrupt lipid, protein or both phosphatase activities. The pleiotropic phenotype at 4dpf could only be rescued by wild type Pten, indicating that both phosphatase activities are required for normal zebrafish embryonic development. An earlier aspect of the phenotype, hyperbranching of intersegmental vessels, however, was rescued by Pten that retained lipid phosphatase activity, independent of protein phosphatase activity. Lipid phosphatase activity was also required for moderating pAkt levels at 4 dpf. We propose that the role of Pten during angiogenesis mainly consists of suppressing PI3K signaling via its lipid phosphatase activity, whereas the complex process of embryonic development requires lipid and protein phosphatase of Pten. PMID:26848951

  4. Protein phosphatase-dependent circadian regulation of intermediate-term associative memory.

    PubMed

    Michel, Maximilian; Gardner, Jacob S; Green, Charity L; Organ, Chelsea L; Lyons, Lisa C

    2013-03-01

    The endogenous circadian clock is a principal factor modulating memory across species. Determining the processes through which the circadian clock modulates memory formation is a key issue in understanding and identifying mechanisms to improve memory. We used the marine mollusk Aplysia californica to investigate circadian modulation of intermediate-term memory (ITM) and the mechanisms through which the circadian clock phase specifically suppresses memory using the operant learning paradigm, learning that food is inedible. We found that ITM, a temporally and mechanistically distinct form of memory, is rhythmically expressed under light-dark and constant conditions when induced by either massed or spaced training. Strong circadian regulation of ITM occurs with memory exhibited only by animals trained during the early subjective day; no apparent memory is expressed when training occurs during the late subjective day or night. Given the necessity of multiple persistent kinase cascades for ITM, we investigated whether protein phosphatase activity affected circadian modulation. Inhibition of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A blocked ITM when animals were trained during the early (subjective) day while resulting in phase-specific memory rescue when animals were trained late in the subjective day and early night. In contrast, inhibition of calcineurin did not block ITM when animals were trained during the early day and permitted ITM when animals were trained during the late subjective day, early evening, and throughout the night. These results demonstrate that levels of protein phosphatase activity are critical regulators of ITM and one mechanism through which the circadian clock regulates memory formation.

  5. Methods to monitor classical protein-tyrosine phosphatase oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Karisch, Robert; Neel, Benjamin G.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly H2O2, act as intracellular second messengers in many signaling pathways. Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are now believed to be important targets of ROS. PTPs contain a conserved catalytic cysteine with an unusually low pKa. This property allows PTPs to execute nucleophilic attack on substrate phosphotyrosyl residues, but also renders them highly susceptible to oxidation. Reversible oxidation, which inactivates PTPs, is emerging as an important cellular regulatory mechanism and might contribute to human diseases, including cancer. Given their potential toxicity, it seems likely that ROS generation is highly controlled within cells to restrict oxidation to those PTPs that must be inactivated for signaling to proceed. Thus, identifying ROS-inactivated PTPs could be tantamount to finding the PTP(s) that critically regulate a specific signaling pathway. This article provides an overview of the methods currently available to identify and quantify PTP oxidation and outlines future challenges in redox signaling. PMID:22577968

  6. Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Substrates and Metabolic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bakke, Jesse; Haj, Fawaz G.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis requires integration of complex signaling networks which, when deregulated, contribute to metabolic syndrome and related disorders. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has emerged as a key regulator of signaling networks that are implicated in metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we examine mechanisms that regulate PTP1B-substrate interaction, enzymatic activity and experimental approaches to identify PTP1B substrates. We then highlight findings that implicate PTP1B in metabolic regulation. In particular, insulin and leptin signaling are discussed as well as recently identified PTP1B substrates that are involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress response, cell-cell communication, energy balance and vesicle trafficking. In summary, PTP1B exhibits exquisite substrate specificity and is an outstanding pharmaceutical target for obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25263014

  7. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate and penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose inhibit protein phosphatase-1.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Andrea; Bécsi, Bálint; Kolozsvári, Bernadett; Komáromi, István; Kövér, Katalin E; Erdődi, Ferenc

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) and protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) are responsible for the dephosphorylation of the majority of phosphoserine/threonine residues in cells. In this study, we show that (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose (PGG), polyphenolic constituents of green tea and tannins, inhibit the activity of the PP1 recombinant δ-isoform of the PP1 catalytic subunit and the native PP1 catalytic subunit (PP1c) with IC(50) values of 0.47-1.35 μm and 0.26-0.4 μm, respectively. EGCG and PGG inhibit PP2Ac less potently, with IC(50) values of 15 and 6.6 μm, respectively. The structure-inhibitory potency relationships of catechin derivatives suggests that the galloyl group may play a major role in phosphatase inhibition. The interaction of EGCG and PGG with PP1c was characterized by NMR and surface plasmon resonance-based binding techniques. Competitive binding assays and molecular modeling suggest that EGCG docks at the hydrophobic groove close to the catalytic center of PP1c, partially overlapping with the binding surface of microcystin-LR or okadaic acid. This hydrophobic interaction is further stabilized by hydrogen bonding via hydroxyl/oxo groups of EGCG to PP1c residues. Comparative docking shows that EGCG binds to PP2Ac in a similar manner, but in a distinct pose. Long-term treatment (24 h) with these compounds and other catechins suppresses the viability of HeLa cells with a relative effectiveness reminiscent of their in vitro PP1c-inhibitory potencies. The above data imply that the phosphatase-inhibitory features of these polyphenols may be implicated in the wide spectrum of their physiological influence.

  8. ROTUNDA3 function in plant development by phosphatase 2A-mediated regulation of auxin transporter recycling.

    PubMed

    Karampelias, Michael; Neyt, Pia; De Groeve, Steven; Aesaert, Stijn; Coussens, Griet; Rolčík, Jakub; Bruno, Leonardo; De Winne, Nancy; Van Minnebruggen, Annemie; Van Montagu, Marc; Ponce, María Rosa; Micol, José Luis; Friml, Jiří; De Jaeger, Geert; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke

    2016-03-01

    The shaping of organs in plants depends on the intercellular flow of the phytohormone auxin, of which the directional signaling is determined by the polar subcellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin transport proteins. Phosphorylation dynamics of PIN proteins are affected by the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and the PINOID kinase, which act antagonistically to mediate their apical-basal polar delivery. Here, we identified the ROTUNDA3 (RON3) protein as a regulator of the PP2A phosphatase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana. The RON3 gene was map-based cloned starting from the ron3-1 leaf mutant and found to be a unique, plant-specific gene coding for a protein with high and dispersed proline content. The ron3-1 and ron3-2 mutant phenotypes [i.e., reduced apical dominance, primary root length, lateral root emergence, and growth; increased ectopic stages II, IV, and V lateral root primordia; decreased auxin maxima in indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)-treated root apical meristems; hypergravitropic root growth and response; increased IAA levels in shoot apices; and reduced auxin accumulation in root meristems] support a role for RON3 in auxin biology. The affinity-purified PP2A complex with RON3 as bait suggested that RON3 might act in PIN transporter trafficking. Indeed, pharmacological interference with vesicle trafficking processes revealed that single ron3-2 and double ron3-2 rcn1 mutants have altered PIN polarity and endocytosis in specific cells. Our data indicate that RON3 contributes to auxin-mediated development by playing a role in PIN recycling and polarity establishment through regulation of the PP2A complex activity.

  9. ROTUNDA3 function in plant development by phosphatase 2A-mediated regulation of auxin transporter recycling

    PubMed Central

    Karampelias, Michael; Neyt, Pia; De Groeve, Steven; Aesaert, Stijn; Coussens, Griet; Rolčík, Jakub; Bruno, Leonardo; De Winne, Nancy; Van Minnebruggen, Annemie; Van Montagu, Marc; Ponce, María Rosa; Micol, José Luis; Friml, Jiří; De Jaeger, Geert; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke

    2016-01-01

    The shaping of organs in plants depends on the intercellular flow of the phytohormone auxin, of which the directional signaling is determined by the polar subcellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin transport proteins. Phosphorylation dynamics of PIN proteins are affected by the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and the PINOID kinase, which act antagonistically to mediate their apical–basal polar delivery. Here, we identified the ROTUNDA3 (RON3) protein as a regulator of the PP2A phosphatase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana. The RON3 gene was map-based cloned starting from the ron3-1 leaf mutant and found to be a unique, plant-specific gene coding for a protein with high and dispersed proline content. The ron3-1 and ron3-2 mutant phenotypes [i.e., reduced apical dominance, primary root length, lateral root emergence, and growth; increased ectopic stages II, IV, and V lateral root primordia; decreased auxin maxima in indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)-treated root apical meristems; hypergravitropic root growth and response; increased IAA levels in shoot apices; and reduced auxin accumulation in root meristems] support a role for RON3 in auxin biology. The affinity-purified PP2A complex with RON3 as bait suggested that RON3 might act in PIN transporter trafficking. Indeed, pharmacological interference with vesicle trafficking processes revealed that single ron3-2 and double ron3-2 rcn1 mutants have altered PIN polarity and endocytosis in specific cells. Our data indicate that RON3 contributes to auxin-mediated development by playing a role in PIN recycling and polarity establishment through regulation of the PP2A complex activity. PMID:26888284

  10. ROTUNDA3 function in plant development by phosphatase 2A-mediated regulation of auxin transporter recycling.

    PubMed

    Karampelias, Michael; Neyt, Pia; De Groeve, Steven; Aesaert, Stijn; Coussens, Griet; Rolčík, Jakub; Bruno, Leonardo; De Winne, Nancy; Van Minnebruggen, Annemie; Van Montagu, Marc; Ponce, María Rosa; Micol, José Luis; Friml, Jiří; De Jaeger, Geert; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke

    2016-03-01

    The shaping of organs in plants depends on the intercellular flow of the phytohormone auxin, of which the directional signaling is determined by the polar subcellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin transport proteins. Phosphorylation dynamics of PIN proteins are affected by the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and the PINOID kinase, which act antagonistically to mediate their apical-basal polar delivery. Here, we identified the ROTUNDA3 (RON3) protein as a regulator of the PP2A phosphatase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana. The RON3 gene was map-based cloned starting from the ron3-1 leaf mutant and found to be a unique, plant-specific gene coding for a protein with high and dispersed proline content. The ron3-1 and ron3-2 mutant phenotypes [i.e., reduced apical dominance, primary root length, lateral root emergence, and growth; increased ectopic stages II, IV, and V lateral root primordia; decreased auxin maxima in indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)-treated root apical meristems; hypergravitropic root growth and response; increased IAA levels in shoot apices; and reduced auxin accumulation in root meristems] support a role for RON3 in auxin biology. The affinity-purified PP2A complex with RON3 as bait suggested that RON3 might act in PIN transporter trafficking. Indeed, pharmacological interference with vesicle trafficking processes revealed that single ron3-2 and double ron3-2 rcn1 mutants have altered PIN polarity and endocytosis in specific cells. Our data indicate that RON3 contributes to auxin-mediated development by playing a role in PIN recycling and polarity establishment through regulation of the PP2A complex activity. PMID:26888284

  11. LEPS2, a Phosphorus Starvation-Induced Novel Acid Phosphatase from Tomato1

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, James C.; Karthikeyan, Athikkattuvalasu S.; Raghothama, Kashchandra G.

    2001-01-01

    Phosphate (Pi) is one of the least available plant nutrients found in the soil. A significant amount of phosphate is bound in organic forms in the rhizosphere. Phosphatases produced by plants and microbes are presumed to convert organic phosphorus into available Pi, which is absorbed by plants. In this study we describe the isolation and characterization of a novel tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) phosphate starvation-induced gene (LePS2) representing an acid phosphatase. LePS2 is a member of a small gene family in tomato. The cDNA is 942 bp long and contains an open reading frame encoding a 269-amino acid polypeptide. The amino acid sequence of LePS2 has a significant similarity with a phosphatase from chicken. Distinct regions of the peptide also share significant identity with the members of HAD and DDDD super families of phosphohydrolases. Many plant homologs of LePS2 are found in the databases. The LePS2 transcripts are induced rapidly in tomato plant and cell culture in the absence of Pi. However, the induction is repressible in the presence of Pi. Divided root studies indicate that internal Pi levels regulate the expression of LePS2. The enhanced expression of LePS2 is a specific response to Pi starvation, and it is not affected by starvation of other nutrients or abiotic stresses. The bacterially (Escherichia coli) expressed protein exhibits phosphatase activity against the synthetic substrate p-nitrophenyl phosphate. The pH optimum of the enzyme activity suggests that LePS2 is an acid phosphatase. PMID:11161030

  12. LEPS2, a phosphorus starvation-induced novel acid phosphatase from tomato.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, J C; Karthikeyan, A S; Raghothama, K G

    2001-02-01

    Phosphate (Pi) is one of the least available plant nutrients found in the soil. A significant amount of phosphate is bound in organic forms in the rhizosphere. Phosphatases produced by plants and microbes are presumed to convert organic phosphorus into available Pi, which is absorbed by plants. In this study we describe the isolation and characterization of a novel tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) phosphate starvation-induced gene (LePS2) representing an acid phosphatase. LePS2 is a member of a small gene family in tomato. The cDNA is 942 bp long and contains an open reading frame encoding a 269-amino acid polypeptide. The amino acid sequence of LePS2 has a significant similarity with a phosphatase from chicken. Distinct regions of the peptide also share significant identity with the members of HAD and DDDD super families of phosphohydrolases. Many plant homologs of LePS2 are found in the databases. The LePS2 transcripts are induced rapidly in tomato plant and cell culture in the absence of Pi. However, the induction is repressible in the presence of Pi. Divided root studies indicate that internal Pi levels regulate the expression of LePS2. The enhanced expression of LePS2 is a specific response to Pi starvation, and it is not affected by starvation of other nutrients or abiotic stresses. The bacterially (Escherichia coli) expressed protein exhibits phosphatase activity against the synthetic substrate p-nitrophenyl phosphate. The pH optimum of the enzyme activity suggests that LePS2 is an acid phosphatase.

  13. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatase type 5 (PP5)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, Mark R.; Ciszak, Ewa M.; Honkanen, Richard E.

    2004-01-01

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) is a member of the PPP-gene family of protein phosphatases that is widely expressed in mammalian tissues and is highly conserved among eukaryotes. PP5 associates with several proteins that affect signal transduction networks, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90)-heterocomplex, the CDC16 and CDC27 subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex, elF2alpha kinase, the A subunit of PP2A, the G12-alpha / G13-alpha subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins and DNA-PK. The catalytic domain of PP5 (PP5c) shares 35-45% sequence identity with the catalytic domains of other PPP-phosphatases, including protein phosphatase-1 (PP1), -2A (PP2A), -2B / calcineurin (PP2B), -4 (PP4), -6 (PP6), and -7 (PP7). Like PP1, PP2A and PP4, PP5 is also sensitive to inhibition by okadaic acid, microcystin, cantharidin, tautomycin, and calyculin A. Here we report the crystal structure of the PP5 catalytic domain (PP5c) at a resolution of 1.6 angstroms. From this structure we propose a mechanism for PP5-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoprotein substrates, which requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a conserved Asp(sup 271)-M(sub 1):M(sub 2)-W(sup 1)-His(sup 304)-Asp(sup 274) catalytic motif. The structure of PP5c provides a possible structural basis for explaining the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases, which are among the most powerful known catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of the PP5c should also aid development of type-specific inhibitors.

  14. Defining the Protein-Protein Interaction Network of the Human Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Family.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Tran, Kim My; Aziz, Kathryn E; Sorokin, Alexey V; Chen, Junjie; Wang, Wenqi

    2016-09-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation, which plays a vital role in a variety of human cellular processes, is coordinated by protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Genomic studies provide compelling evidence that PTPs are frequently mutated in various human cancers, suggesting that they have important roles in tumor suppression. However, the cellular functions and regulatory machineries of most PTPs are still largely unknown. To gain a comprehensive understanding of the protein-protein interaction network of the human PTP family, we performed a global proteomic study. Using a Minkowski distance-based unified scoring environment (MUSE) for the data analysis, we identified 940 high confidence candidate-interacting proteins that comprise the interaction landscape of the human PTP family. Through a gene ontology analysis and functional validations, we connected the PTP family with several key signaling pathways or cellular functions whose associations were previously unclear, such as the RAS-RAF-MEK pathway, the Hippo-YAP pathway, and cytokinesis. Our study provides the first glimpse of a protein interaction network for the human PTP family, linking it to a number of crucial signaling events, and generating a useful resource for future studies of PTPs.

  15. Comparative Analysis of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases Regulating Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gyun Jee; Kim, Jaehong; Kim, Jong-Heon; Song, Seungeun; Park, Hana; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are key regulatory factors in inflammatory signaling pathways. Although PTPs have been extensively studied, little is known about their role in neuroinflammation. In the present study, we examined the expression of 6 different PTPs (PTP1B, TC-PTP, SHP2, MEG2, LYP, and RPTPβ) and their role in glial activation and neuroinflammation. All PTPs were expressed in brain and glia. The expression of PTP1B, SHP2, and LYP was enhanced in the inflamed brain. The expression of PTP1B, TC-PTP, and LYP was increased after treating microglia cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To examine the role of PTPs in microglial activation and neuroinflammation, we used specific pharmacological inhibitors of PTPs. Inhibition of PTP1B, TC-PTP, SHP2, LYP, and RPTPβ suppressed nitric oxide production in LPS-treated microglial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular injection of PTP1B, TC-PTP, SHP2, and RPTPβ inhibitors downregulated microglial activation in an LPS-induced neuroinflammation model. Our results indicate that multiple PTPs are involved in regulating microglial activation and neuroinflammation, with different expression patterns and specific functions. Thus, PTP inhibitors can be exploited for therapeutic modulation of microglial activation in neuroinflammatory diseases. PMID:27790059

  16. Druggability analysis and classification of protein tyrosine phosphatase active sites

    PubMed Central

    Ghattas, Mohammad A; Raslan, Noor; Sadeq, Asil; Al Sorkhy, Mohammad; Atatreh, Noor

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) play important roles in the pathogenesis of many diseases. The fact that no PTP inhibitors have reached the market so far has raised many questions about their druggability. In this study, the active sites of 17 PTPs were characterized and assessed for its ability to bind drug-like molecules. Consequently, PTPs were classified according to their druggability scores into four main categories. Only four members showed intermediate to very druggable pocket; interestingly, the rest of them exhibited poor druggability. Particularly focusing on PTP1B, we also demonstrated the influence of several factors on the druggability of PTP active site. For instance, the open conformation showed better druggability than the closed conformation, while the tight-bound water molecules appeared to have minimal effect on the PTP1B druggability. Finally, the allosteric site of PTP1B was found to exhibit superior druggability compared to the catalytic pocket. This analysis can prove useful in the discovery of new PTP inhibitors by assisting researchers in predicting hit rates from high throughput or virtual screening and saving unnecessary cost, time, and efforts via prioritizing PTP targets according to their predicted druggability. PMID:27757011

  17. The effect of hibernation on protein phosphatases from ground squirrel organs.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Justin A; Storey, Kenneth B

    2007-12-15

    Protein phosphorylation has been identified as a reversible mechanism for the regulated suppression of metabolism and thermogenesis during mammalian hibernation. The effects of hibernation on the activity of serine/threonine and tyrosine protein phosphatases (PP1, PP2A, PP2C and PTPs) were assessed in five organs of Richardson's ground squirrel. Each phosphatase subfamily responded differently during torpor, and each showed organ-specific patterns of activity changes. The distribution of PP1 catalytic subunit (PP1c) isoforms (alpha, delta, gamma1) was assessed in five organs, and changes in the subcellular distribution of PP1 were observed during hibernation in liver and muscle. For example, in muscle, cytosolic PP1 content increased and myofibril-associated PP1 decreased during torpor. PP1c from ground squirrel liver was purified to homogeneity and characterized; temperature effects on PP1c maximal activity suggested that temperature had little or no effect on relative dephosphorylation potential at low temperatures. However, nucleotide inhibition of PP1c by ATP, ADP and AMP was much weaker at 5 degrees C compared with 37 degrees C assay temperatures. PP2A activity decreased in three organs (brown adipose, kidney, brain) during hibernation whereas PP2C activity was increased in liver and brain. PTPs were assessed using both a general substrate (ENDpYINASL) and a substrate (DADEpYLIPQQG) specific for PTPs containing the SH2-binding site; both revealed hibernation-associated changes in PTP activities. Changes in protein phosphatase activities suggest the relative importance of these modules in controlling metabolic function and cellular processes during mammalian hibernation.

  18. Counteracting Protein Kinase Activity in the Heart: The Multiple Roles of Protein Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Silvio; Meyer-Roxlau, Stefanie; Wagner, Michael; Dobrev, Dobromir; El-Armouche, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Decades of cardiovascular research have shown that variable and flexible levels of protein phosphorylation are necessary to maintain cardiac function. A delicate balance between phosphorylated and dephosphorylated states of proteins is guaranteed by a complex interplay of protein kinases (PKs) and phosphatases. Serine/threonine phosphatases, in particular members of the protein phosphatase (PP) family govern dephosphorylation of the majority of these cardiac proteins. Recent findings have however shown that PPs do not only dephosphorylate previously phosphorylated proteins as a passive control mechanism but are capable to actively control PK activity via different direct and indirect signaling pathways. These control mechanisms can take place on (epi-)genetic, (post-)transcriptional, and (post-)translational levels. In addition PPs themselves are targets of a plethora of proteinaceous interaction partner regulating their endogenous activity, thus adding another level of complexity and feedback control toward this system. Finally, novel approaches are underway to achieve spatiotemporal pharmacologic control of PPs which in turn can be used to fine-tune misleaded PK activity in heart disease. Taken together, this review comprehensively summarizes the major aspects of PP-mediated PK regulation and discusses the subsequent consequences of deregulated PP activity for cardiovascular diseases in depth. PMID:26617522

  19. PhosphoTyrosyl Phosphatase Activator of Plasmodium falciparum: Identification of Its Residues Involved in Binding to and Activation of PP2A

    PubMed Central

    Vandomme, Audrey; Fréville, Aline; Cailliau, Katia; Kalamou, Hadidjatou; Bodart, Jean-François; Khalife, Jamal; Pierrot, Christine

    2014-01-01

    In Plasmodium falciparum (Pf), the causative agent of the deadliest form of malaria, a tight regulation of phosphatase activity is crucial for the development of the parasite. In this study, we have identified and characterized PfPTPA homologous to PhosphoTyrosyl Phosphatase Activator, an activator of protein phosphatase 2A which is a major phosphatase involved in many biological processes in eukaryotic cells. The PfPTPA sequence analysis revealed that five out of six amino acids involved in interaction with PP2A in human are conserved in P. falciparum. Localization studies showed that PfPTPA and PfPP2A are present in the same compartment of blood stage parasites, suggesting a possible interaction of both proteins. In vitro binding and functional studies revealed that PfPTPA binds to and activates PP2A. Mutation studies showed that three residues (V283, G292 and M296) of PfPTPA are indispensable for the interaction and that the G292 residue is essential for its activity. In P. falciparum, genetic studies suggested the essentiality of PfPTPA for the completion of intraerythrocytic parasite lifecycle. Using Xenopus oocytes, we showed that PfPTPA blocked the G2/M transition. Taken together, our data suggest that PfPTPA could play a role in the regulation of the P. falciparum cell cycle through its PfPP2A regulatory activity. PMID:24521882

  20. Phosphonate derivatives of tetraazamacrocycles as new inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Kobzar, Oleksandr L; Shevchuk, Michael V; Lyashenko, Alesya N; Tanchuk, Vsevolod Yu; Romanenko, Vadim D; Kobelev, Sergei M; Averin, Alexei D; Beletskaya, Irina P; Vovk, Andriy I; Kukhar, Valery P

    2015-07-21

    α,α-Difluoro-β-ketophosphonated derivatives of tetraazamacrocycles were synthesized and found to be potential inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases. N-Substituted conjugates of cyclam and cyclen with bioisosteric phosphonate groups displayed good activities toward T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase with IC50 values in the micromolar to nanomolar range and showed selectivity over PTP1B, CD45, SHP2, and PTPβ. Kinetic studies indicated that the inhibitors can occupy the region of the active site of TC-PTP. This study demonstrates a new approach which employs tetraazamacrocycles as a molecular platform for designing inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases. PMID:26058329

  1. Pharmacophore modeling for protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bharatham, Kavitha; Bharatham, Nagakumar; Lee, Keun Woo

    2007-05-01

    A three dimensional chemical feature based pharmacophore model was developed for the inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) using the CATALYST software, which would provide useful knowledge for performing virtual screening to identify new inhibitors targeted toward type II diabetes and obesity. A dataset of 27 inhibitors, with diverse structural properties, and activities ranging from 0.026 to 600 microM, was selected as a training set. Hypol, the most reliable quantitative four featured pharmacophore hypothesis, was generated from a training set composed of compounds with two H-bond acceptors, one hydrophobic aromatic and one ring aromatic features. It has a correlation coefficient, RMSD and cost difference (null cost-total cost) of 0.946, 0.840 and 65.731, respectively. The best hypothesis (Hypol) was validated using four different methods. Firstly, a cross validation was performed by randomizing the data using the Cat-Scramble technique. The results confirmed that the pharmacophore models generated from the training set were valid. Secondly, a test set of 281 molecules was scored, with a correlation of 0.882 obtained between the experimental and predicted activities. Hypol performed well in correctly discriminating the active and inactive molecules. Thirdly, the model was investigated by mapping on two PTP1B inhibitors identified by different pharmaceutical companies. The Hypol model correctly predicted these compounds as being highly active. Finally, docking simulations were performed on few compounds to substantiate the role of the pharmacophore features at the binding site of the protein by analyzing their binding conformations. These multiple validation approaches provided confidence in the utility of this pharmacophore model as a 3D query for virtual screening to retrieve new chemical entities showing potential as potent PTP1B inhibitors.

  2. A protein tyrosine phosphatase-like protein from baculovirus has RNA 5'-triphosphatase and diphosphatase activities.

    PubMed

    Takagi, T; Taylor, G S; Kusakabe, T; Charbonneau, H; Buratowski, S

    1998-08-18

    The superfamily of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) includes at least one enzyme with an RNA substrate. We recently showed that the RNA triphosphatase domain of the Caenorhabditis elegans mRNA capping enzyme is related to the PTP enzyme family by sequence similarity and mechanism. The PTP most similar in sequence to the capping enzyme triphosphatase is BVP, a dual-specificity PTP encoded by the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus. Although BVP previously has been shown to have modest tyrosine and serine/threonine phosphatase activity, we find that it is much more potent as an RNA 5'-phosphatase. BVP sequentially removes gamma and beta phosphates from the 5' end of triphosphate-terminated RNA, leaving a 5'-monophosphate end. The activity was specific for polynucleotides; nucleotide triphosphates were not hydrolyzed. A mutant protein in which the active site cysteine was replaced with serine was inactive. Three other dual-specificity PTPs (VH1, VHR, and Cdc14) did not exhibit detectable RNA phosphatase activity. Therefore, capping enzyme and BVP are members of a distinct PTP-like subfamily that can remove phosphates from RNA. PMID:9707557

  3. Characterization of protein phosphatase 5 from three lepidopteran insects: Helicoverpa armigera, Mythimna separata and Plutella xylostella.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi'en; Lü, Shumin; Zhang, Yalin

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5), a unique member of serine/threonine phosphatases, regulates a variety of biological processes. We obtained full-length PP5 cDNAs from three lepidopteran insects, Helicoverpa armigera, Mythimna separata and Plutella xylostella, encoding predicted proteins of 490 (55.98 kDa), 490 (55.82 kDa) and 491 (56.07 kDa) amino acids, respectively. These sequences shared a high identity with other insect PP5s and contained the TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) domains at N-terminal regions and highly conserved C-terminal catalytic domains. Tissue- and stage-specific expression pattern analyses revealed these three PP5 genes were constitutively expressed in all stages and in tested tissues with predominant transcription occurring at the egg and adult stages. Activities of Escherichia coli-produced recombinant PP5 proteins could be enhanced by almost 2-fold by a known PP5 activator: arachidonic acid. Kinetic parameters of three recombinant proteins against substrate pNPP were similar both in the absence or presence of arachidonic acid. Protein phosphatases inhibitors, okadaic acid, cantharidin, and endothall strongly impeded the activities of the three recombinant PP5 proteins, as well as exerted an inhibitory effect on crude protein phosphatases extractions from these three insects. In summary, lepidopteran PP5s share similar characteristics and are all sensitive to the protein phosphatases inhibitors. Our results also imply protein phosphatase inhibitors might be used in the management of lepidopteran pests. PMID:24823652

  4. Characterization of protein phosphatase 5 from three lepidopteran insects: Helicoverpa armigera, Mythimna separata and Plutella xylostella.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi'en; Lü, Shumin; Zhang, Yalin

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5), a unique member of serine/threonine phosphatases, regulates a variety of biological processes. We obtained full-length PP5 cDNAs from three lepidopteran insects, Helicoverpa armigera, Mythimna separata and Plutella xylostella, encoding predicted proteins of 490 (55.98 kDa), 490 (55.82 kDa) and 491 (56.07 kDa) amino acids, respectively. These sequences shared a high identity with other insect PP5s and contained the TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) domains at N-terminal regions and highly conserved C-terminal catalytic domains. Tissue- and stage-specific expression pattern analyses revealed these three PP5 genes were constitutively expressed in all stages and in tested tissues with predominant transcription occurring at the egg and adult stages. Activities of Escherichia coli-produced recombinant PP5 proteins could be enhanced by almost 2-fold by a known PP5 activator: arachidonic acid. Kinetic parameters of three recombinant proteins against substrate pNPP were similar both in the absence or presence of arachidonic acid. Protein phosphatases inhibitors, okadaic acid, cantharidin, and endothall strongly impeded the activities of the three recombinant PP5 proteins, as well as exerted an inhibitory effect on crude protein phosphatases extractions from these three insects. In summary, lepidopteran PP5s share similar characteristics and are all sensitive to the protein phosphatases inhibitors. Our results also imply protein phosphatase inhibitors might be used in the management of lepidopteran pests.

  5. Identification of a dual-specificity protein phosphatase that inactivates a MAP kinase from Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R.; Huang, Y.; Kieber, J.; Luan, S.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play a key role in plant responses to stress and pathogens. Activation and inactivation of MAPKs involve phosphorylation and dephosphorylation on both threonine and tyrosine residues in the kinase domain. Here we report the identification of an Arabidopsis gene encoding a dual-specificity protein phosphatase capable of hydrolysing both phosphoserine/threonine and phosphotyrosine in protein substrates. This enzyme, designated AtDsPTP1 (Arabidopsis thaliana dual-specificity protein tyrosine phosphatase), dephosphorylated and inactivated AtMPK4, a MAPK member from the same plant. Replacement of a highly conserved cysteine by serine abolished phosphatase activity of AtDsPTP1, indicating a conserved catalytic mechanism of dual-specificity protein phosphatases from all eukaryotes.

  6. Inhibition of CDC25B Phosphatase Through Disruption of Protein-Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, George; Dudkin, Sergii; Borkin, Dmitry; Ni, Wendi; Grembecka, Jolanta; Cierpicki, Tomasz

    2015-04-29

    CDC25 phosphatases are key cell cycle regulators and represent very attractive but challenging targets for anticancer drug discovery. Here, we explored whether fragment-based screening represents a valid approach to identify inhibitors of CDC25B. This resulted in identification of 2-fluoro-4-hydroxybenzonitrile, which directly binds to the catalytic domain of CDC25B. Interestingly, NMR data and the crystal structure demonstrate that this compound binds to the pocket distant from the active site and adjacent to the protein–protein interaction interface with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate. Furthermore, we developed a more potent analogue that disrupts CDC25B interaction with CDK2/Cyclin A and inhibits dephosphorylation of CDK2. Based on these studies, we provide a proof of concept that targeting CDC25 phosphatases by inhibiting their protein–protein interactions with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate represents a novel, viable opportunity to target this important class of enzymes.

  7. Responses of protein phosphatases and cAMP-dependent protein kinase in a freeze-avoiding insect, Epiblema scudderiana.

    PubMed

    Pfister, Thomas D; Storey, Kenneth B

    2006-05-01

    Larvae of the goldenrod gall moth, Epiblema scudderiana, use the freeze avoidance strategy of winter cold hardiness and show multiple metabolic adaptations for subzero survival including accumulation of large amounts of glycerol as a colligative antifreeze. Induction and regulation of cold hardiness adaptations requires the intermediary action of signal transduction enzymes. Changes in the activities of several signaling enzymes including cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), protein phosphatases 1 (PP1), 2A, 2C, and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) were monitored over the winter and during experimental exposures of larvae to subzero temperatures (-4 degrees C, a temperature that triggers rapid glycerol synthesis, or -20 degrees C, a common midwinter ambient temperature) or anoxia. A strong increase in the amount of active PP1 in the latter part of the winter may be responsible for shutting off glycogenolysis once glycerol levels are maximized. There appears to be a limited role for PKA in overwintering but PP2A and PP2C activities rose when larvae were exposed to -20 degrees C and PTP activities rose significantly over the winter months and also in response to laboratory subzero (-20 degrees C) and anoxia exposures. The strong responses by PTPs suggest that these may be involved in cell cycle and growth arrest during winter diapause.

  8. Suppression of cellular proliferation and invasion by the concerted lipid and protein phosphatase activities of PTEN

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Lindsay; Maccario, Helene; Perera, Nevin M.; Yang, Xuesong; Spinelli, Laura; Tibarewal, Priyanka; Glancy, Ben; Gray, Alex; Weijer, Cornelis J.; Downes, C. Peter; Leslie, Nick R.

    2009-01-01

    PTEN is a tumour suppressor with phosphatase activity in vitro against both lipids and proteins and other potential non-enzymatic mechanisms of action. Although the importance of PTEN’s lipid phosphatase activity in regulating the PI3K signalling pathway is recognised, the significance of PTEN’s other mechanisms of action is currently unclear. Here, we describe the systematic identification of a PTEN mutant, PTEN Y138L, with activity against lipid, but not soluble substrates. Using this mutant we provide evidence for the interfacial activation of PTEN against lipid substrates. We also show that when re-expressed at physiological levels in PTEN null U87MG glioblastoma cells the protein phosphatase activity of PTEN is not required to regulate cellular PtdInsP3 levels or the downstream protein kinase Akt/PKB. Finally, in 3D Matrigel cultures of U87MG cells similarly re-expressing PTEN mutants, both the protein and lipid phosphatase activities were required to inhibit invasion, but either activity alone significantly inhibited proliferation, albeit only weakly for the protein phosphatase activity. Our data provides a novel tool to address the significance of PTEN’s separable lipid and protein phosphatase activities and suggest that both activities act to suppress proliferation and act together to suppress invasion. PMID:19915616

  9. Catalytic and substrate promiscuity: distinct multiple chemistries catalysed by the phosphatase domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bharath; Marks, Hanna; Mitra, Sreyoshi; Smalley, David M; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-07-15

    The presence of latent activities in enzymes is posited to underlie the natural evolution of new catalytic functions. However, the prevalence and extent of such substrate and catalytic ambiguity in evolved enzymes is difficult to address experimentally given the order-of-magnitude difference in the activities for native and, sometimes, promiscuous substrate/s. Further, such latent functions are of special interest when the activities concerned do not fall into the domain of substrate promiscuity. In the present study, we show a special case of such latent enzyme activity by demonstrating the presence of two mechanistically distinct reactions catalysed by the catalytic domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase isoform δ (PTPRδ). The primary catalytic activity involves the hydrolysis of a phosphomonoester bond (C─O─P) with high catalytic efficiency, whereas the secondary activity is the hydrolysis of a glycosidic bond (C─O─C) with poorer catalytic efficiency. This enzyme also displays substrate promiscuity by hydrolysing diester bonds while being highly discriminative for its monoester substrates. To confirm these activities, we also demonstrated their presence on the catalytic domain of protein tyrosine phosphatase Ω (PTPRΩ), a homologue of PTPRδ. Studies on the rate, metal-ion dependence, pH dependence and inhibition of the respective activities showed that they are markedly different. This is the first study that demonstrates a novel sugar hydrolase and diesterase activity for the phosphatase domain (PD) of PTPRδ and PTPRΩ. This work has significant implications for both understanding the evolution of enzymatic activity and the possible physiological role of this new chemistry. Our findings suggest that the genome might harbour a wealth of such alternative latent enzyme activities in the same protein domain that renders our knowledge of metabolic networks incomplete.

  10. Stimulation of protein phosphatase activity by insulin and growth factors in 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, C.P.; McNall, S.J.; Krebs, E.G.; Fischer, E.H. )

    1988-09-01

    Incubation of Swiss mouse 3T3-D1 cells with physiological concentrations of insulin resulted in a rapid and transient activation of protein phosphatase activity as measure by using ({sup 32}P)phosphorylase {alpha} as substrate. Activation reached a maximum level (140% of control value) within 5 min of addition and returned to control levels within 20 min. The effect of insulin was dose-dependent with half-maximal activation occurring at {approx}5 nM insulin. This activity could be completely inhibited by addition of the heat-stable protein inhibitor 2, which suggests the presence of an activated type-1 phosphatase. Similar effects on phosphatase activity were seen when epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor were tested. These results suggest that some of the intracellular effects caused by insulin and growth factors are mediated through the activation of a protein phosphatase.

  11. Regulation of protein phosphatase inhibitor-1 by cyclin-dependent kinase 5.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Chan; Nishi, Akinori; Kansy, Janice W; Fernandez, Joseph; Hayashi, Kanehiro; Gillardon, Frank; Hemmings, Hugh C; Nairn, Angus C; Bibb, James A

    2007-06-01

    Inhibitor-1, the first identified endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 (PP-1), was previously reported to be a substrate for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) at Ser67. Further investigation has revealed the presence of an additional Cdk5 site identified by mass spectrometry and confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis as Ser6. Basal levels of phospho-Ser6 inhibitor-1, as detected by a phosphorylation state-specific antibody against the site, existed in specific regions of the brain and varied with age. In the striatum, basal in vivo phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of Ser6 were mediated by Cdk5, PP-2A, and PP-1, respectively. Additionally, calcineurin contributed to dephosphorylation under conditions of high Ca2+. In biochemical assays the function of Cdk5-dependent phosphorylation of inhibitor-1 at Ser6 and Ser67 was demonstrated to be an intramolecular impairment of the ability of inhibitor-1 to be dephosphorylated at Thr35; this effect was recapitulated in two systems in vivo. Dephosphorylation of inhibitor-1 at Thr35 is equivalent to inactivation of the protein, as inhibitor-1 only serves as an inhibitor of PP-1 when phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent kinase (PKA) at Thr35. Thus, inhibitor-1 serves as a critical junction between kinase- and phosphatase-signaling pathways, linking PP-1 to not only PKA and calcineurin but also Cdk5.

  12. Two ancient bacterial-like PPP family phosphatases from Arabidopsis are highly conserved plant proteins that possess unique properties.

    PubMed

    Uhrig, R Glen; Moorhead, Greg B

    2011-12-01

    Protein phosphorylation, catalyzed by the opposing actions of protein kinases and phosphatases, is a cornerstone of cellular signaling and regulation. Since their discovery, protein phosphatases have emerged as highly regulated enzymes with specificity that rivals their counteracting kinase partners. However, despite years of focused characterization in mammalian and yeast systems, many protein phosphatases in plants remain poorly or incompletely characterized. Here, we describe a bioinformatic, biochemical, and cellular examination of an ancient, Bacterial-like subclass of the phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP) family designated the Shewanella-like protein phosphatases (SLP phosphatases). The SLP phosphatase subcluster is highly conserved in all plants, mosses, and green algae, with members also found in select fungi, protists, and bacteria. As in other plant species, the nucleus-encoded Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SLP phosphatases (AtSLP1 and AtSLP2) lack genetic redundancy and phylogenetically cluster into two distinct groups that maintain different subcellular localizations, with SLP1 being chloroplastic and SLP2 being cytosolic. Using heterologously expressed and purified protein, the enzymatic properties of both AtSLP1 and AtSLP2 were examined, revealing unique metal cation preferences in addition to a complete insensitivity to the classic serine/threonine PPP protein phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and microcystin. The unique properties and high conservation of the plant SLP phosphatases, coupled to their exclusion from animals, red algae, cyanobacteria, archaea, and most bacteria, render understanding the function(s) of this new subclass of PPP family protein phosphatases of particular interest.

  13. Protein tyrosine and serine–threonine phosphatases in the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus: Identification and potential functions

    PubMed Central

    Byrum, C.A.; Walton, K.D.; Robertson, A.J.; Carbonneau, S.; Thomason, R.T.; Coffman, J.A.; McClay, D.R.

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphatases, in coordination with protein kinases, play crucial roles in regulation of signaling pathways. To identify protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and serine–threonine (ser–thr) phosphatases in the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome, 179 annotated sequences were studied (122 PTPs, 57 ser–thr phosphatases). Sequence analysis identified 91 phosphatases (33 conventional PTPs, 31 dual specificity phosphatases, 1 Class III Cysteine-based PTP, 1 Asp-based PTP, and 25 ser–thr phosphatases). Using catalytic sites, levels of conservation and constraint in amino acid sequence were examined. Nine of 25 receptor PTPs (RPTPs) corresponded to human, nematode, or fly homologues. Domain structure revealed that sea urchin-specific RPTPs including two, PTPRLec and PTPRscav, may act in immune defense. Embryonic transcription of each phosphatase was recorded from a high-density oligonucleotide tiling microarray experiment. Most RPTPs are expressed at very low levels, whereas nonreceptor PTPs (NRPTPs) are generally expressed at moderate levels. High expression was detected in MAP kinase phosphatases (MKPs) and numerous ser–thr phosphatases. For several expressed NRPTPs, MKPs, and ser–thr phosphatases, morpholino antisense-mediated knockdowns were performed and phenotypes obtained. Finally, to assess roles of annotated phosphatases in endomesoderm formation, a literature review of phosphatase functions in model organisms was superimposed on sea urchin developmental pathways to predict areas of functional activity. PMID:17087928

  14. Type One Protein Phosphatase 1 and Its Regulatory Protein Inhibitor 2 Negatively Regulate ABA Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Xie, Shaojun; Batelli, Giorgia; Wang, Bangshing; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Wang, Xingang; Xing, Lu; Lei, Mingguang; Yan, Jun; Zhu, Xiaohong; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates plant growth, development and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The core ABA signaling pathway consists of three major components: ABA receptor (PYR1/PYLs), type 2C Protein Phosphatase (PP2C) and SNF1-related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2). Nevertheless, the complexity of ABA signaling remains to be explored. To uncover new components of ABA signal transduction pathways, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen for SnRK2-interacting proteins. We found that Type One Protein Phosphatase 1 (TOPP1) and its regulatory protein, At Inhibitor-2 (AtI-2), physically interact with SnRK2s and also with PYLs. TOPP1 inhibited the kinase activity of SnRK2.6, and this inhibition could be enhanced by AtI-2. Transactivation assays showed that TOPP1 and AtI-2 negatively regulated the SnRK2.2/3/6-mediated activation of the ABA responsive reporter gene RD29B, supporting a negative role of TOPP1 and AtI-2 in ABA signaling. Consistent with these findings, topp1 and ati-2 mutant plants displayed hypersensitivities to ABA and salt treatments, and transcriptome analysis of TOPP1 and AtI-2 knockout plants revealed an increased expression of multiple ABA-responsive genes in the mutants. Taken together, our results uncover TOPP1 and AtI-2 as negative regulators of ABA signaling. PMID:26943172

  15. An overlapping kinase and phosphatase docking site regulates activity of the retinoblastoma protein.

    PubMed

    Hirschi, Alexander; Cecchini, Matthew; Steinhardt, Rachel C; Schamber, Michael R; Dick, Frederick A; Rubin, Seth M

    2010-09-01

    The phosphorylation state and corresponding activity of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb) are modulated by a balance of kinase and phosphatase activities. Here we characterize the association of Rb with the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c). A crystal structure identifies an enzyme docking site in the Rb C-terminal domain that is required for efficient PP1c activity toward Rb. The phosphatase docking site overlaps with the known docking site for cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk), and PP1 competition with Cdk-cyclins for Rb binding is sufficient to retain Rb activity and block cell-cycle advancement. These results provide the first detailed molecular insights into Rb activation and establish a novel mechanism for Rb regulation in which kinase and phosphatase compete for substrate docking. PMID:20694007

  16. Archaeal protein kinases and protein phosphatases: insights from genomics and biochemistry.

    PubMed Central

    Kennelly, Peter J

    2003-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation has long been considered a recent addition to Nature's regulatory arsenal. Early studies indicated that this molecular regulatory mechanism existed only in higher eukaryotes, suggesting that protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation had emerged to meet the particular signal-transduction requirements of multicellular organisms. Although it has since become apparent that simple eukaryotes and even bacteria are sites of protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation, the perception widely persists that this molecular regulatory mechanism emerged late in evolution, i.e. after the divergence of the contemporary phylogenetic domains. Only highly developed cells, it was reasoned, could afford the high 'overhead' costs inherent in the acquisition of dedicated protein kinases and protein phosphatases. The advent of genome sequencing has provided an opportunity to exploit Nature's phylogenetic diversity as a vehicle for critically examining this hypothesis. In tracing the origins and evolution of protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation, the members of the Archaea, the so-called 'third domain of life', will play a critical role. Whereas several studies have demonstrated that archaeal proteins are subject to modification by covalent phosphorylation, relatively little is known concerning the identities of the proteins affected, the impact on their functional properties, or the enzymes that catalyse these events. However, examination of several archaeal genomes has revealed the widespread presence of several ostensibly 'eukaryotic' and 'bacterial' protein kinase and protein phosphatase paradigms. Similar findings of 'phylogenetic trespass' in members of the Eucarya (eukaryotes) and the Bacteria suggest that this versatile molecular regulatory mechanism emerged at an unexpectedly early point in development of 'life as we know it'. PMID:12444920

  17. Alkaline phosphatase protein increases in response to prednisolone in HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hanford, W C; Kottel, R H; Fishman, W H

    1981-01-01

    Quantification of term-placental alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme protein in HeLa TCRC-1 cells grown in the presence and absence of prednisolone indicates that there is a net increase in amount of enzyme-specific protein in prednisolone-stimulated cells. In a similar analysis of HeLa D98AH2 cells, prednisolone treatment causes the appearance of term-placental alkaline phosphatase protein and the loss of the intestinal isoenzyme protein. These results support the interpretation that the response of these cells to corticosteroids is the net accumulation of alkaline phosphatase protein rather than the modification of pre-existing enzyme to a more active state. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:7340849

  18. Phosphatase activity against neurofilament proteins from bovine spinal cord: effect of aluminium and neuropsychoactive drugs.

    PubMed

    Shetty, K T; Veeranna; Guru, S C

    1992-03-16

    Protein phosphatase activity associated with neurofilament (NF) rich (Triton X-100 insoluble) fraction was extracted and partially characterised by using known inhibitors of protein phosphatases such as vanadate and fluoride. Protein phosphatase activity was demonstrated with reference to the dephosphorylation of endogenous substrate, NF protein and exogenous protein substrates, casein and phosvitin. Phosphoamino acids and beta-glycerophosphate were found to be poor substrates. Further, new observations have been made regarding the in vitro inhibitory effect of aluminium and the differential effects of some of the neuropsychoactive drugs. The findings could possibly lead to studies explaining the biochemical basis of aluminium induced neurotoxicity as well as the side effects associated with the long term medication of neuropsychoactive drugs. PMID:1320755

  19. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Knockout Accentuates Ethanol-Induced Cardiac Depression: Role of Protein Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Heng; Byra, Emily A.; Yu, Lu; Hu, Nan; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Nakayama, Keiichi I.; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Ren, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol consumption leads to myocardial contractile dysfunction possibly due to the toxicity of ethanol and its major metabolite acetaldehyde. This study was designed to examine the influence of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) knockout (KO) on acute ethanol exposure-induced cardiomyocyte dysfunction. Wild-type (WT) and ALDH2 KO mice were subjected to acute ethanol (3 g/kg, i.p.) challenge and cardiomyocyte contractile function was assessed 24 hrs later using an IonOptix® edge-detection system. Western blot analysis was performed to evaluate ALDH2, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), phosphorylation of Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). ALDH2 KO accentuated ethanol-induced elevation in cardiac acetaldehyde levels. Ethanol exposure depressed cardiomyocyte contractile function including decreased cell shortening amplitude and maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening as well as prolonged relengthening duration and a greater decline in peak shortening in response to increasing stimulus frequency, the effect of which was significantly exaggerated by ALDH2 KO. ALDH2 KO also unmasked an ethanol-induced prolongation of shortening duration. In addition, short-term in vitro incubation of ethanol-induced cardiomyocyte mechanical defects were exacerbated by the ALDH inhibitor cyanamide. Ethanol treatment dampened phosphorylation of Akt and GSK-3β associated with up-regulated PP2A, which was accentuated by ALDH2 KO. ALDH2 KO aggravated ethanol-induced decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. These results suggested that ALDH2 deficiency led to worsened ethanol-induced cardiomyocyte function, possibly due to upregulated expression of protein phosphatase, depressed Akt activation and subsequently impaired mitochondrial function. These findings depict a critical role of ALDH2 in the pathogenesis of alcoholic cardiomyopathy. PMID:20362583

  20. Arabidopsis protein phosphatase DBP1 nucleates a protein network with a role in regulating plant defense.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, José Luis; Castelló, María José; Naumann, Kai; Lassowskat, Ines; Navarrete-Gómez, Marisa; Scheel, Dierk; Vera, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana DBP1 belongs to the plant-specific family of DNA-binding protein phosphatases. Although recently identified as a novel host factor mediating susceptibility to potyvirus, little is known about DBP1 targets and partners and the molecular mechanisms underlying its function. Analyzing changes in the phosphoproteome of a loss-of-function dbp1 mutant enabled the identification of 14-3-3λ isoform (GRF6), a previously reported DBP1 interactor, and MAP kinase (MAPK) MPK11 as components of a small protein network nucleated by DBP1, in which GRF6 stability is modulated by MPK11 through phosphorylation, while DBP1 in turn negatively regulates MPK11 activity. Interestingly, grf6 and mpk11 loss-of-function mutants showed altered response to infection by the potyvirus Plum pox virus (PPV), and the described molecular mechanism controlling GRF6 stability was recapitulated upon PPV infection. These results not only contribute to a better knowledge of the biology of DBP factors, but also of MAPK signalling in plants, with the identification of GRF6 as a likely MPK11 substrate and of DBP1 as a protein phosphatase regulating MPK11 activity, and unveils the implication of this protein module in the response to PPV infection in Arabidopsis.

  1. Protein phosphatase and kinase activities possibly involved in exocytosis regulation in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed Central

    Kissmehl, R; Treptau, T; Hofer, H W; Plattner, H

    1996-01-01

    In Paramecium tetraurelia cells synchronous exocytosis induced by aminoethyldextran (AED) is accompanied by an equally rapid dephosphorylation of a 63 kDa phosphoprotein (PP63) within 80 ms. In vivo, rephosphorylation occurs within a few seconds after AED triggering. In homogenates (P)P63 can be solubilized in all three phosphorylation states (phosphorylated, dephosphorylated and rephosphorylated) and thus tested in vitro. By using chelators of different divalent cations, de- and rephosphorylation of PP63 and P63 respectively can be achieved by an endogenous protein phosphatase/kinase system. Dephosphorylation occurs in the presence of EDTA, whereas in the presence of EGTA this was concealed by phosphorylation by endogenous kinase(s), thus indicating that phosphorylation of P63 is calcium-independent. Results obtained with protein phosphatase inhibitors (okadaic acid, calyculin A) allowed us to exclude a protein serine/threonine phosphatase of type I (with selective sensitivity in Paramecium). Protein phosphatase 2C is also less likely to be a candidate because of its requirement for high Mg2+ concentrations. According to previous evidence a protein serine/threonine phosphatase of type 2B (calcineurin; CaN) is possibly involved. We have now found that bovine brain CaN dephosphorylates PP63 in vitro. Taking into account the specific requirements of this phosphatase in vitro, with p-nitrophenyl phosphate as a substrate, we have isolated a cytosolic phosphatase of similar characteristics by combined preparative gel electrophoresis and affinity-column chromatography. In Paramecium this phosphatase also dephosphorylates PP63 in vitro (after 32P labelling in vivo). Using various combinations of ion exchange, affinity and hydrophobic interaction chromatography we have also isolated three different protein kinases from the soluble fraction, i.e. a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) and a casein kinase. Among the kinases tested, PKA

  2. Cdi1, a human G1 and S phase protein phosphatase that associates with Cdk2.

    PubMed

    Gyuris, J; Golemis, E; Chertkov, H; Brent, R

    1993-11-19

    We used the interaction trap, a yeast genetic selection for interacting proteins, to isolate human cyclin-dependent kinase interactor 1 (Cdi1). In yeast, Cdi1 interacts with cyclin-dependent kinases, including human Cdc2, Cdk2, and Cdk3, but not with Ckd4. In HeLa cells, Cdi1 is expressed at the G1 to S transition, and the protein forms stable complexes with Cdk2. Cdi1 bears weak sequence similarity to known tyrosine and dual specificity phosphatases. In vitro, Cdi1 removes phosphate from tyrosine residues in model substrates, but a mutant protein that bears a lesion in the putative active site cysteine does not. Overexpression of wild-type Cdi1 delays progression through the cell cycle in yeast and HeLa cells; delay is dependent on Cdi1 phosphatase activity. These experiments identify Cdi1 as a novel type of protein phosphatase that forms complexes with cyclin-dependent kinases. PMID:8242750

  3. Partial purification and characterization of an enzyme from pea nuclei with protein tyrosine phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y L; Roux, S J

    1995-01-01

    A pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclear enzyme with protein tyrosine phosphatase activity has been partially purified and characterized. The enzyme has a molecular mass of 90 kD as judged by molecular sieve column chromatography and by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Like animal protein tyrosine phosphatases it can be inhibited by low concentrations of molybdate and vanadate. It is also inhibited by heparin and spermine but not by either the acid phosphatase inhibitors citrate and tartrate or the protein serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid. The enzyme does not require Ca2+, Mg2+, or Mn2+ for its activity but is stimulated by ethylenediaminetetraacetate and by ethyleneglycolbis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid. It dephosphorylates phosphotyrosine residues on the four different 32P-tyrosine-labeled peptides tested but not the phosphoserine/threonine residues on casein and histone. Like some animal protein tyrosine phosphatases, it has a variable pH optimum depending on the substrate used: the optimum is 5.5 when the substrate is [32P]tyrosine-labeled lysozyme, but it is 7.0 when the substrate is [32P]tyrosine-labeled poly(glutamic acid, tyrosine). It has a Km of 4 microM when the lysozyme protein is used as a substrate.

  4. Archaeal Signal Transduction: Impact of Protein Phosphatase Deletions on Cell Size, Motility, and Energy Metabolism in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius*

    PubMed Central

    Reimann, Julia; Esser, Dominik; Orell, Alvaro; Amman, Fabian; Pham, Trong Khoa; Noirel, Josselin; Lindås, Ann-Christin; Bernander, Rolf; Wright, Phillip C.; Siebers, Bettina; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the in vitro and in vivo functions of the only two identified protein phosphatases, Saci-PTP and Saci-PP2A, in the crenarchaeal model organism Sulfolobus acidocaldarius were investigated. Biochemical characterization revealed that Saci-PTP is a dual-specific phosphatase (against pSer/pThr and pTyr), whereas Saci-PP2A exhibited specific pSer/pThr activity and inhibition by okadaic acid. Deletion of saci_pp2a resulted in pronounced alterations in growth, cell shape and cell size, which could be partially complemented. Transcriptome analysis of the three strains (Δsaci_ptp, Δsaci_pp2a and the MW001 parental strain) revealed 155 genes that were differentially expressed in the deletion mutants, and showed significant changes in expression of genes encoding the archaella (archaeal motility structure), components of the respiratory chain and transcriptional regulators. Phosphoproteome studies revealed 801 unique phosphoproteins in total, with an increase in identified phosphopeptides in the deletion mutants. Proteins from most functional categories were affected by phosphorylation, including components of the motility system, the respiratory chain, and regulatory proteins. In the saci_pp2a deletion mutant the up-regulation at the transcript level, as well as the observed phosphorylation pattern, resembled starvation stress responses. Hypermotility was also observed in the saci_pp2a deletion mutant. The results highlight the importance of protein phosphorylation in regulating essential cellular processes in the crenarchaeon S. acidocaldarius. PMID:24078887

  5. Oxidative Stress Impairs the Stimulatory Effect of S100 Proteins on Protein Phosphatase 5 Activity.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Tsuchiya, Mitsumasa; Shimamoto, Seiko; Fujimoto, Tomohito; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi; Tokuda, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Ryoji

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is the consequence of an imbalance between the production of harmful reactive oxygen species and the cellular antioxidant system for neutralization, and it activates multiple intracellular signaling pathways, including apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1). Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is a serine/threonine phosphatase involved in oxidative stress responses. Previously, we reported that S100 proteins activate PP5 in a calcium-dependent manner. S100 proteins belong to a family of small EF-hand calcium-binding proteins involved in many processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and inflammation. Therefore, we investigated the effects of oxidative stress on S100 proteins, their interaction with PP5, and PP5 enzyme activity. Recombinant S100A2 was easily air-oxidized or Cu-oxidized, and oxidized S100A2 formed cross-linked dimers and higher molecular-mass complexes. The binding of oxidized S100A2 to PP5 was reduced, resulting in decreased PP5 activation in vitro. Oxidation also impaired S100A1, S100A6, S100B, and S100P to activate PP5, although the low dose of oxidized S100 proteins still activated PP5. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced S100A2 oxidation in human keratinocytes (HaCaT) and human hepatocellular carcinoma (Huh-7) cells. Furthermore, H2O2 reduced the binding of S100A2 to PP5 and decreased PP5 activation in HaCaT and Huh-7 cells. Importantly, even the low dose of S100A2 achieved by knocking down increased dephosphorylation of ASK1 and reduced caspase 3/7 activity in Huh-7 cells treated with H2O2. These results indicate that oxidative stress impairs the ability of S100 proteins to bind and activate PP5, which in turn modulates the ASK1-mediated signaling cascades involved in apoptosis. PMID:27600583

  6. Inhibitors of the Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase family (CaMKP and CaMKP-N)

    SciTech Connect

    Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Takao, Toshihiko; Nimura, Takaki; Sugiyama, Yasunori; Numano, Takamasa; Shigeri, Yasushi; Taniguchi, Takanobu; Kameshita, Isamu Ishida, Atsuhiko

    2007-11-23

    Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP) and its nuclear isoform CaMKP-N are unique Ser/Thr protein phosphatases that negatively regulate the Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) cascade by dephosphorylating multifunctional CaMKI, II, and IV. However, the lack of specific inhibitors of these phosphatases has hampered studies on these enzymes in vivo. In an attempt to obtain specific inhibitors, we searched inhibitory compounds and found that Evans Blue and Chicago Sky Blue 6B served as effective inhibitors for CaMKP. These compounds also inhibited CaMKP-N, but inhibited neither protein phosphatase 2C, another member of PPM family phosphatase, nor calcineurin, a typical PPP family phosphatase. The minimum structure required for the inhibition was 1-amino-8-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid. When Neuro2a cells cotransfected with CaMKIV and CaMKP-N were treated with these compounds, the dephosphorylation of CaMKIV was strongly suppressed, suggesting that these compounds could be used as potent inhibitors of CaMKP and CaMKP-N in vivo as well as in vitro.

  7. Ptc1 protein phosphatase 2C contributes to glucose regulation of SNF1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Amparo; Xu, Xinjing; Carlson, Marian

    2013-10-25

    The SNF1/AMP-activated protein kinases (AMPKs) function in energy regulation in eukaryotic cells. SNF1/AMPKs are αβγ heterotrimers that are activated by phosphorylation of the activation loop Thr on the catalytic subunit. Protein kinases that activate SNF1/AMPK have been identified, but the protein phosphatases responsible for dephosphorylation of the activation loop are less well defined. For Saccharomyces cerevisiae SNF1/AMPK, Reg1-Glc7 protein phosphatase 1 and Sit4 type 2A-related phosphatase function together to dephosphorylate Thr-210 on the Snf1 catalytic subunit during growth on high concentrations of glucose; reg1Δ and sit4Δ single mutations do not impair dephosphorylation when inappropriate glycogen synthesis, also caused by these mutations, is blocked. We here present evidence that Ptc1 protein phosphatase 2C also has a role in dephosphorylation of Snf1 Thr-210 in vivo. The sit4Δ ptc1Δ mutant exhibited partial defects in regulation of the phosphorylation state of Snf1. The reg1Δ ptc1Δ mutant was viable only when expressing mutant Snf1 proteins with reduced kinase activity, and Thr-210 phosphorylation of the mutant SNF1 heterotrimers was substantially elevated during growth on high glucose. This evidence, together with findings on the reg1Δ sit4Δ mutant, indicates that although Reg1-Glc7 plays the major role, all three phosphatases contribute to maintenance of the Snf1 activation loop in the dephosphorylated state during growth on high glucose. Ptc1 has overlapping functions with Reg1-Glc7 and Sit4 in glucose regulation of SNF1/AMPK and cell viability.

  8. Loss of protein phosphatase 6 in oocytes causes failure of meiosis II exit and impaired female fertility.

    PubMed

    Hu, Meng-Wen; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Teng, Yan; Jiang, Zong-Zhe; Ma, Xue-Shan; Hou, Ning; Cheng, Xuan; Schatten, Heide; Xu, Xingzhi; Yang, Xiao; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2015-10-15

    Dynamic protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, mediated by a conserved cohort of protein kinases and phosphatases, regulate cell cycle progression. Among the well-known PP2A-like protein phosphatases, protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) has been analyzed in mammalian mitosis, and Aurora A has recently been identified as its key substrate. However, the functions of PP6 in meiosis are still entirely unknown. To identify the physiological role of PP6 in female gametogenesis, Ppp6c(F/F) mice were first generated and crossed with Zp3-Cre mice to selectively disrupt Ppp6c expression in oocytes. Here, we report for the first time that PP6c is dispensable for oocyte meiotic maturation but essential for exit from meiosis II (MII) after fertilization. Depletion of PP6c caused an abnormal MII spindle and disrupted MII cytokinesis, resulting in zygotes with high risk of aneuploidy and defective early embryonic development, and thus severe subfertility. We also reveal that PP6 inactivation interferes with MII spindle formation and MII exit owing to increased Aurora A activity, and that Aurora A inhibition with MLN8237 can rescue the PP6c depletion phenotype. In conclusion, our findings uncover a hitherto unknown role for PP6 as an indispensable regulator of oocyte meiosis and female fertility.

  9. Crystal Structures of Protein Phosphatase-1 Bound to Nodularin-R and Tautomycin: A Novel Scaffold for Structure Based Drug Design of Serine/threonine Phosphatase Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Kelker, M.; Page, R; Peti, W

    2009-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 occurs in all tissues and regulates many pathways, ranging from cell-cycle progression to carbohydrate metabolism. Many naturally occurring, molecular toxins modulate PP1 activity, though the exact mechanism of this differential regulation is not understood. A detailed elucidation of these interactions is crucial for understanding the cellular basis of phosphatase function and signaling pathways but, more importantly, they can serve as the basis for highly specific therapeutics, e.g. against cancer. We report the crystal structures of PP1 in complex with nodularin-R at 1.63 {angstrom} and tautomycin at 1.70 {angstrom} resolution. The PP1:nodularin-R complex was used to demonstrate the utility of our improved PP1 production technique, which produces highly active, soluble PP1. Tautomycin is one of the few toxins that reportedly preferentially binds PP1> PP2A. Therefore, the PP1:tautomycin structure is the first complex structure with a toxin with preferred PP1 specificity. Furthermore, since tautomycin is a linear non-peptide-based toxin, our reported structure will aid the design of lead compounds for novel PP1-specific pharmaceuticals.

  10. Identification of protein tyrosine phosphatases and dual-specificity phosphatases in mammalian spermatozoa and their role in sperm motility and protein tyrosine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, L; Ortega-Ferrusola, C; Macias-Garcia, B; Salido, G M; Peña, F J; Tapia, J A

    2009-06-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases have important roles in spermatozoa; however, little is known about the presence and regulation in these cells of their counterparts in signaling, namely, protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and dual-specificity phosphatases (DSPs). The objectives of the present study were to identify PTPs and DSPs in boar, stallion, and dog spermatozoa; to characterize their subcellular distribution; and to investigate the roles of tyrosine phosphatases in maintenance of protein tyrosine phosphorylation level and in sperm motility. Using Western blotting with specific antibodies in boar and stallion sperm lysates, we unequivocally identified two PTPs (PTPRB and PTPN11) and two DSPs (DUSP3 and DUSP4). In dog sperm lysates, only PTPN11, DUSP3, and DUSP4 were detected. In all these species, we did not detect the specific signal with anti-PTPRC (CD45), CDKN3, DUSP1, DUSP2, DUSP6, DUSP9, PTPN1, PTPN3, PTPN6, PTPN7, PTPN13, PTPRA, PTPRG, PTPRJ, PTPRK, or PTPRZ antibodies. Positive matches were further investigated by indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Results showed that PTPRB was associated with the plasma membrane in the head and tail of boar and stallion spermatozoa. In agreement with Western blotting results, PTPRB antibodies did not show immunoreactivity in dog sperm analyzed by immunofluorescence. In the three species, DUSP4 was mainly found in the tail of spermatozoa, with little or no immunoreactivity in the head. PTPN11 was mainly located in the postacrosomal region in the head, whereas DUSP3 immunoreactivity was extended within the acrosome. PTPN11 and DUSP3 showed immunoreactivity in the tail that was restricted to the midpiece. Finally, we incubated boar, stallion, and dog spermatozoa with pervanadate and sodium orthovanadate, two PTP inhibitors, and analyzed overall protein tyrosine phosphorylation and assessed sperm motility. Sodium orthovanadate and pervanadate showed concentration-dependent inhibition of sperm motility that was

  11. Involvement of protein phosphatases in the destabilization of methamphetamine-associated contextual memory.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang-Jung; Huang, Chien-Hsuan; Chang, Chih-Hua; Gean, Po-Wu

    2016-09-01

    Destabilization refers to a memory that becomes unstable when reactivated and is susceptible to disruption by amnestic agents. Here we delineated the cellular mechanism underlying the destabilization of drug memory. Mice were conditioned with methamphetamine (MeAM) for 3 d, and drug memory was assessed with a conditioned place preference (CPP) protocol. Anisomycin (ANI) was administered 60 min after the CPP retrieval to disrupt reconsolidation. We found that destabilization of MeAM CPP after the application of ANI was blocked by the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist MK-801 and the NR2B antagonist ifenprodil (IFN) but not by the NR2A antagonist NVP-AAM077 (NVP). In addition, decrease in the phosphorylation of GluR1 at Serine845 (p-GluR1-Ser845), decrease in spine density, and a reduction in the AMPAR/NMDAR ratio in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) were reversed after the MK-801 treatment. The effect of ANI on destabilization was prevented by the protein phosphatase 2B (calcineurin, CaN) inhibitors cyclosporine A (CsA) and FK-506 and the protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) inhibitors calyculin A (CA) and okadaic acid (OA). These results suggest that memory destabilization involves the activation of NR2B-containing NMDARs, which in turn allows the influx of Ca(2+) Increased intracellular Ca(2+) stimulates CaN, leading to the dephosphorylation and inactivation of inhibitor 1 and the activation of PP1. PP1 then dephosphorylates p-GluR1-Ser845 to elicit AMPA receptor (AMPAR) endocytosis and destabilization of the drug memory. PMID:27531839

  12. Phosphatase control of 4E-BP1 phosphorylation state is central for glycolytic regulation of retinal protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Thomas W.; Abcouwer, Steven F.; Losiewicz, Mandy K.

    2015-01-01

    Control of protein synthesis in insulin-responsive tissues has been well characterized, but relatively little is known about how this process is regulated in nervous tissues. The retina exhibits a relatively high protein synthesis rate, coinciding with high basal Akt and metabolic activities, with the majority of retinal ATP being derived from aerobic glycolysis. We examined the dependency of retinal protein synthesis on the Akt-mTOR signaling and glycolysis using ex vivo rat retinas. Akt inhibitors significantly reduced retinal protein synthesis but did not affect glycolytic lactate production. Surprisingly, the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) markedly inhibited Akt1 and Akt3 activities, as well as protein synthesis. The effects of 2-DG, and 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (2-FDG) on retinal protein synthesis correlated with inhibition of lactate production and diminished ATP content, with all these effects reversed by provision of d-mannose. 2-DG treatment was not associated with increased AMPK, eEF2, or eIF2α phosphorylation; instead, it caused rapid dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1. 2-DG reduced total mTOR activity by 25%, but surprisingly, it did not reduce mTORC1 activity, as indicated by unaltered raptor-associated mTOR autophosphorylation and ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation. Dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1 was largely prevented by inhibition of PP1/PP2A phosphatases with okadaic acid and calyculin A, and inhibition of PPM1 phosphatases with cadmium. Thus, inhibition of retinal glycolysis diminished Akt and protein synthesis coinciding with accelerated dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1 independently of mTORC1. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism regulating protein synthesis in the retina involving an mTORC1-independent and phosphatase-dependent regulation of 4E-BP1. PMID:26199279

  13. Phosphatase control of 4E-BP1 phosphorylation state is central for glycolytic regulation of retinal protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Thomas W; Abcouwer, Steven F; Losiewicz, Mandy K; Fort, Patrice E

    2015-09-15

    Control of protein synthesis in insulin-responsive tissues has been well characterized, but relatively little is known about how this process is regulated in nervous tissues. The retina exhibits a relatively high protein synthesis rate, coinciding with high basal Akt and metabolic activities, with the majority of retinal ATP being derived from aerobic glycolysis. We examined the dependency of retinal protein synthesis on the Akt-mTOR signaling and glycolysis using ex vivo rat retinas. Akt inhibitors significantly reduced retinal protein synthesis but did not affect glycolytic lactate production. Surprisingly, the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) markedly inhibited Akt1 and Akt3 activities, as well as protein synthesis. The effects of 2-DG, and 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (2-FDG) on retinal protein synthesis correlated with inhibition of lactate production and diminished ATP content, with all these effects reversed by provision of d-mannose. 2-DG treatment was not associated with increased AMPK, eEF2, or eIF2α phosphorylation; instead, it caused rapid dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1. 2-DG reduced total mTOR activity by 25%, but surprisingly, it did not reduce mTORC1 activity, as indicated by unaltered raptor-associated mTOR autophosphorylation and ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation. Dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1 was largely prevented by inhibition of PP1/PP2A phosphatases with okadaic acid and calyculin A, and inhibition of PPM1 phosphatases with cadmium. Thus, inhibition of retinal glycolysis diminished Akt and protein synthesis coinciding with accelerated dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1 independently of mTORC1. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism regulating protein synthesis in the retina involving an mTORC1-independent and phosphatase-dependent regulation of 4E-BP1.

  14. Protein-tyrosine phosphatases: biological function, structural characteristics, and mechanism of catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z Y

    1998-01-01

    The protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) superfamily consists of tyrosine-specific phosphatases, dual specificity phosphatases, and the low-molecular-weight phosphatases. They are modulators of signal transduction pathways that regulate numerous cell functions. Malfunction of PTPases have been linked to a number of oncogenic and metabolic disease states, and PTPases are also employed by microbes and viruses for pathogenicity. There is little sequence similarity among the three subfamilies of phosphatases. Yet, three-dimensional structural data show that they share similar conserved structural elements, namely, the phosphate-binding loop encompassing the PTPase signature motif (H/V)C(X)5R(S/T) and an essential general acid/base Asp residue on a surface loop. Biochemical experiments demonstrate that phosphatases in the PTPase superfamily utilize a common mechanism for catalysis going through a covalent thiophosphate intermediate that involves the nucleophilic Cys residue in the PTPase signature motif. The transition states for phosphoenzyme intermediate formation and hydrolysis are dissociative in nature and are similar to those of the solution phosphate monoester reactions. One strategy used by these phosphatases for transition state stabilization is to neutralize the developing negative charge in the leaving group. A conformational change that is restricted to the movement of a flexible loop occurs during the catalytic cycle of the PTPases. However, the relationship between loop dynamics and enzyme catalysis remains to be established. The nature and identity of the rate-limiting step in the PTPase catalyzed reaction requires further investigation and may be dependent on the specific experimental conditions such as temperature, pH, buffer, and substrate used. In-depth kinetic and structural analysis of a representative number of phosphatases from each group of the PTPase superfamily will most likely continue to yield insightful mechanistic information that may be

  15. The protein tyrosine phosphatase Pez is a major phosphatase of adherens junctions and dephosphorylates beta-catenin.

    PubMed

    Wadham, Carol; Gamble, Jennifer R; Vadas, Mathew A; Khew-Goodall, Yeesim

    2003-06-01

    Cell-cell adhesion regulates processes important in embryonal development, normal physiology, and cancer progression. It is regulated by various mechanisms including tyrosine phosphorylation. We have previously shown that the protein tyrosine phosphatase Pez is concentrated at intercellular junctions in confluent, quiescent monolayers but is nuclear in cells lacking cell-cell contacts. We show here with an epithelial cell model that Pez localizes to the adherens junctions in confluent monolayers. A truncation mutant lacking the catalytic domain acts as a dominant negative mutant to upregulate tyrosine phosphorylation at adherens junctions. We identified beta-catenin, a component of adherens junctions, as a substrate of Pez by a "substrate trapping" approach and by in vitro dephosphorylation with recombinant Pez. Consistent with this, ectopic expression of the dominant negative mutant caused an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-catenin, demonstrating that Pez regulates the level of tyrosine phosphorylation of adherens junction proteins, including beta-catenin. Increased tyrosine phosphorylation of adherens junction proteins has been shown to decrease cell-cell adhesion, promoting cell migration as a result. Accordingly, the dominant negative Pez mutant enhanced cell motility in an in vitro "wound" assay. This suggests that Pez is also a regulator of cell motility, most likely through its action on cell-cell adhesion. PMID:12808048

  16. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases: From Housekeeping Enzymes to Master-Regulators of Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2013-01-01

    There are many misconceptions surrounding the roles of protein phosphatases in the regulation of signal transduction, perhaps the most damaging of which is the erroneous view that these enzymes exert their effects merely as constitutively active housekeeping enzymes. On the contrary, the phosphatases are critical, specific regulators of signaling in their own right and serve an essential function, in a coordinated manner with the kinases, to determine the response to a physiological stimulus. This review is a personal perspective on the development of our understanding of the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) family of enzymes. I have discussed various aspects of the structure, regulation and function of the PTP family, which I hope will illustrate the fundamental importance of these enzymes to the control of signal transduction. PMID:23176256

  17. Arabidopsis DELLA Protein Degradation Is Controlled by a Type-One Protein Phosphatase, TOPP4

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Qianqian; Wang, Wei; Guo, Xiaola; Yue, Jing; Huang, Yan; Xu, Xiufei; Li, Jia; Hou, Suiwen

    2014-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are a class of important phytohormones regulating a variety of physiological processes during normal plant growth and development. One of the major events during GA-mediated growth is the degradation of DELLA proteins, key negative regulators of GA signaling pathway. The stability of DELLA proteins is thought to be controlled by protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Up to date, no phosphatase involved in this process has been identified. We have identified a dwarfed dominant-negative Arabidopsis mutant, named topp4-1. Reduced expression of TOPP4 using an artificial microRNA strategy also resulted in a dwarfed phenotype. Genetic and biochemical analyses indicated that TOPP4 regulates GA signal transduction mainly via promoting DELLA protein degradation. The severely dwarfed topp4-1 phenotypes were partially rescued by the DELLA deficient mutants rga-t2 and gai-t6, suggesting that the DELLA proteins RGA and GAI are required for the biological function of TOPP4. Both RGA and GAI were greatly accumulated in topp4-1 but significantly decreased in 35S-TOPP4 transgenic plants compared to wild-type plants. Further analyses demonstrated that TOPP4 is able to directly bind and dephosphorylate RGA and GAI, confirming that the TOPP4-controlled phosphorylation status of DELLAs is associated with their stability. These studies provide direct evidence for a crucial role of protein dephosphorylation mediated by TOPP4 in the GA signaling pathway. PMID:25010794

  18. Arabidopsis DELLA protein degradation is controlled by a type-one protein phosphatase, TOPP4.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qianqian; Wang, Wei; Guo, Xiaola; Yue, Jing; Huang, Yan; Xu, Xiufei; Li, Jia; Hou, Suiwen

    2014-07-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are a class of important phytohormones regulating a variety of physiological processes during normal plant growth and development. One of the major events during GA-mediated growth is the degradation of DELLA proteins, key negative regulators of GA signaling pathway. The stability of DELLA proteins is thought to be controlled by protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Up to date, no phosphatase involved in this process has been identified. We have identified a dwarfed dominant-negative Arabidopsis mutant, named topp4-1. Reduced expression of TOPP4 using an artificial microRNA strategy also resulted in a dwarfed phenotype. Genetic and biochemical analyses indicated that TOPP4 regulates GA signal transduction mainly via promoting DELLA protein degradation. The severely dwarfed topp4-1 phenotypes were partially rescued by the DELLA deficient mutants rga-t2 and gai-t6, suggesting that the DELLA proteins RGA and GAI are required for the biological function of TOPP4. Both RGA and GAI were greatly accumulated in topp4-1 but significantly decreased in 35S-TOPP4 transgenic plants compared to wild-type plants. Further analyses demonstrated that TOPP4 is able to directly bind and dephosphorylate RGA and GAI, confirming that the TOPP4-controlled phosphorylation status of DELLAs is associated with their stability. These studies provide direct evidence for a crucial role of protein dephosphorylation mediated by TOPP4 in the GA signaling pathway.

  19. The SAP, a new family of proteins, associate and function positively with the SIT4 phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Luke, M M; Della Seta, F; Di Como, C J; Sugimoto, H; Kobayashi, R; Arndt, K T

    1996-01-01

    SIT4 is the catalytic subunit of a type 2A-related protein phosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is required for G1 cyclin transcription and for bud formation. SIT4 associates with several high-molecular-mass proteins in a cell cycle-dependent fashion. We purified two SIT4-associated proteins, SAP155 and SAP190, and cloned the corresponding genes. By sequence homology, we isolated two additional SAP genes, SAP185 and SAP4. Through such an association is not yet proven for SAP4, each of SAP155, SAP185, and SAP190 physically associates with SIT4 in separate complexes. The SAPs function positively with SIT4, and by several criteria, the loss of all four SAPs is equivalent to the loss of SIT4. The data suggest that the SAPs are not functional in the absence of SIT4 and likewise that SIT4 is not functional in the absence of the SAPs. The SAPs are hyperphoshorylated in cells lacking SIT4, raising the possibility that the SAPs are substrates of SIT4. By sequence similarity, the SAPs fall into two groups, the SAP4/SAP155 group and the SAP185/SAP190 group. Overexpression of a SAP from one group does not suppress the defects due to the loss of the other group. These findings and others indicate that the SAPs have distinct functions. PMID:8649382

  20. Okadaic acid indicates a major function for protein phosphatases in stimulus-response coupling of RINm5F rat insulinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mayer, P; Jochum, C; Schatz, H; Pfeiffer, A

    1994-01-01

    Stimulus-induced insulin secretion involves the activation of several protein kinases within the beta cell. Most prominent are protein kinase A, protein kinase C and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases. Protein kinase action is functionally antagonized by protein phosphatases. The four ubiquious serine/threonine protein phosphatases are termed PP-1, PP-2A, -2B and -2C. PP-1 and PP-2A are in vivo parts of major protein complexes. These complexes presumably regulate the phosphatase activity and direct the enzyme to its site of action. Therefore, PP-1 and -2A could play an important role in controlling intracellular signal transmission. Two different toxins, okadaic acid and calyculin A, both from marine invertebrates, were recently discovered and identified as potent and highly specific inhibitors of PP-1 and PP-2A. Both compounds emerged as very useful tools for studying intracellular phosphorylation events. We took advantage of these substances to investigate the significance of protein phosphatase action in stimulus-induced insulin secretion. To avoid major complexity, we confined our study to the cAMP and the phosphoinositide signal pathway. Okadaic acid alone evoked virtually no secretory response. cAMP-dependent secretion was markedly enhanced by 1 microM okadaic acid. The stimulatory effect of okadaic acid was strongly dependent on the concentration of cAMP analoga. In contrast, insulin release caused by the cholinergic agonist carbachol was not influenced by okadaic acid. Calyculin A (10 nM) slightly increased cAMP-induced secretion, but its high toxicity prohibited accurate interpretation of the data. Our findings support the idea that serine/threonine phosphatases act as important regulators in stimulus response coupling.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Myxococcus xanthus Pph2 Is a Manganese-dependent Protein Phosphatase Involved in Energy Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    García-Hernández, Raquel; Moraleda-Muñoz, Aurelio; Castañeda-García, Alfredo; Pérez, Juana; Muñoz-Dorado, José

    2009-01-01

    The multicellular behavior of the myxobacterium Myxococcus xanthus requires the participation of an elevated number of signal-transduction mechanisms to coordinate the cell movements and the sequential changes in gene expression patterns that lead to the morphogenetic and differentiation events. These signal-transduction mechanisms are mainly based on two-component systems and on the reversible phosphorylation of protein targets mediated by eukaryotic-like protein kinases and phosphatases. Among all these factors, protein phosphatases are the elements that remain less characterized. Hence, we have studied in this work the physiological role and biochemical activity of the protein phosphatase of the family PPP (phosphoprotein phosphatases) designated as Pph2, which is forming part of the same operon as the two-component system phoPR1. We have demonstrated that this operon is induced upon starvation in response to the depletion of the cell energy levels. The increase in the expression of the operon contributes to an efficient use of the scarce energy resources available for developing cells to ensure the completion of the life cycle. In fact, a Δpph2 mutant is defective in aggregation, sporulation yield, morphology of the myxospores, and germination efficiency. The yeast two-hybrid technology has shown that Pph2 interacts with the gene products of MXAN_1875 and 5630, which encode a hypothetical protein and a glutamine synthetase, respectively. Because Pph2 exhibits Ser/Thr, and to some extent Tyr, Mn2+-dependent protein phosphatase activity, it is expected that this function is accomplished by dephosphorylation of the specific protein substrates. PMID:19706604

  2. MECHANISM OF PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE INHIBITION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS (HAEC) EXPOSED TO ZN2+

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of studies have implicated zinc in the toxicity of ambient particulate matter (PM) inhalation. We previously showed that exposure to Zn2+ inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity and leads to activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in ...

  3. Seleninate in Place of Phosphate: Irreversible Inhibition of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, Mohannad; Liu, Sijiu; Zhou, Bo; Walls, Chad D.; Wu, Li; Knapp, Spencer; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2009-02-16

    A homotyrosine based seleninic acid irreversibly inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatases by forming a covalent selenosulfide linkage with the active site cysteine sulfhydryl specifically. The details of the event are revealed by model synthetic studies and by kinetic, mass spectrometric, and crystallographic characterization.

  4. Serine/threonine protein phosphatases: multi-purpose enzymes in control of defense mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatases are a group of enzymes involved in the regulation of defense mechanisms in plants. This paper describes the effects of an inhibitor of these enzymes on the expression of all of the genes associated with these defense mechanisms. The results suggest that inhibi...

  5. Identification, purification, and characterization of phosphotyrosine-specific protein phosphatases from cultured chicken embryo fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.L.; Branton, P.E.

    1984-06-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation catalyzed by a unique class of protein kinases is an important process in both normal cell proliferation and oncogenic transformation. In this study, phosphoprotein phosphatases specific for the dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine residues were partially purified from secondary chicken embryo fibroblasts, using /sup 32/P-labeled immunoglobulin G. The soluble activity was purified by using DEAE-cellulose and carboxymethyl cellulose column chromatography and gel filtration, and at least three enzyme species of apparent Mr 55,000 (pTPI), 50,000 (pTPII), and 95,000 (pTPIII) were resolved. All three enzymes possessed somewhat similar properties. They had a pH optimum of about 7.4, they were inhibited by Zn/sup 2 +/, vanadate, ATP, and ADP, and they were unaffected by divalent metal cations, EDTA, and F/sup -/ under standard assay conditions employing a physiological ionic strength. These properties suggest that they represent a class of enzymes distinct from well-known phosphoseryl-phosphothreonyl-protein phosphatases and that dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine-containing proteins may be carried out by a unique family of phosphoprotein phosphatases. Transformation by Rous sarcoma virus resulted in a small increase in phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase activity.

  6. TCTEX1D4, a novel protein phosphatase 1 interactor: connecting the phosphatase to the microtubule network

    PubMed Central

    Korrodi-Gregório, Luís; Vieira, Sandra I.; Esteves, Sara L. C.; Silva, Joana V.; Freitas, Maria João; Brauns, Ann-Kristin; Luers, Georg; Abrantes, Joana; Esteves, Pedro J.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A. B.; Fardilha, Margarida; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Reversible phosphorylation plays an important role as a mechanism of intracellular control in eukaryotes. PPP1, a major eukaryotic Ser/Thr-protein phosphatase, acquires its specificity by interacting with different protein regulators, also known as PPP1 interacting proteins (PIPs). In the present work we characterized a physiologically relevant PIP in testis. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen with a human testis cDNA library, we identified a novel PIP of PPP1CC2 isoform, the T-complex testis expressed protein 1 domain containing 4 (TCTEX1D4) that has recently been described as a Tctex1 dynein light chain family member. The overlay assays confirm that TCTEX1D4 interacts with the different spliced isoforms of PPP1CC. Also, the binding domain occurs in the N-terminus, where a consensus PPP1 binding motif (PPP1BM) RVSF is present. The distribution of TCTEX1D4 in testis suggests its involvement in distinct functions, such as TGFβ signaling at the blood–testis barrier and acrosome cap formation. Immunofluorescence in human ejaculated sperm shows that TCTEX1D4 is present in the flagellum and in the acrosome region of the head. Moreover, TCTEX1D4 and PPP1 co-localize in the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) and microtubules in cell cultures. Importantly, the TCTEX1D4 PPP1BM seems to be relevant for complex formation, for PPP1 retention in the MTOC and movement along microtubules. These novel results open new avenues to possible roles of this dynein, together with PPP1. In essence TCTEX1D4/PPP1C complex appears to be involved in microtubule dynamics, sperm motility, acrosome reaction and in the regulation of the blood–testis barrier. PMID:23789093

  7. AR-v7 protein expression is regulated by protein kinase and phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinan; Xie, Ning; Gleave, Martin E.; Rennie, Paul S.; Dong, Xuesen

    2015-01-01

    Failure of androgen-targeted therapy and progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are often attributed to sustained expression of the androgen receptor (AR) and its major splice variant, AR-v7. Although the new generation of anti-androgens such as enzalutamide effectively inhibits AR activity, accumulating pre-clinical and clinical evidence indicates that AR-v7 remains constitutively active in driving CRPC progression. However, molecular mechanisms which control AR-v7 protein expression remain unclear. We apply multiple prostate cancer cell models to demonstrate that enzalutamide induces differential activation of protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1) and Akt kinase depending on the gene context of cancer cells. The balance between PP-1 and Akt activation governs AR phosphorylation status and activation of the Mdm2 ubiquitin ligase. Mdm2 recognizes phosphorylated serine 213 of AR-v7, and induces AR-v7 ubiquitination and protein degradation. These findings highlight the decisive roles of PP-1 and Akt for AR-v7 protein expression and activities when AR is functionally blocked. PMID:26378044

  8. AR-v7 protein expression is regulated by protein kinase and phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinan; Xie, Ning; Gleave, Martin E; Rennie, Paul S; Dong, Xuesen

    2015-10-20

    Failure of androgen-targeted therapy and progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are often attributed to sustained expression of the androgen receptor (AR) and its major splice variant, AR-v7. Although the new generation of anti-androgens such as enzalutamide effectively inhibits AR activity, accumulating pre-clinical and clinical evidence indicates that AR-v7 remains constitutively active in driving CRPC progression. However, molecular mechanisms which control AR-v7 protein expression remain unclear. We apply multiple prostate cancer cell models to demonstrate that enzalutamide induces differential activation of protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1) and Akt kinase depending on the gene context of cancer cells. The balance between PP-1 and Akt activation governs AR phosphorylation status and activation of the Mdm2 ubiquitin ligase. Mdm2 recognizes phosphorylated serine 213 of AR-v7, and induces AR-v7 ubiquitination and protein degradation. These findings highlight the decisive roles of PP-1 and Akt for AR-v7 protein expression and activities when AR is functionally blocked.

  9. Demonstration of protein tyrosine phosphatase activity in the second of two homologous domains of CD45.

    PubMed

    Tan, X; Stover, D R; Walsh, K A

    1993-04-01

    It has been reported that alteration of deletion of critical residues within one of the two homologous protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase)-like domains of CD45 completely abolishes all activity, suggesting that only the more N-terminal domain is catalytically active. However, we now demonstrate, by two independent techniques, that the second (C-terminal) domain is also a viable phosphatase. Limited proteolysis by endoproteinase Lys-C or trypsin increased the phosphatase activity toward reduced, carboxymethylated, and maleylated lysozyme approximately 8-fold. A 50-kDa fragment, isolated by ion exchange chromatography, was found to be responsible for this activity. N-terminal sequencing revealed that this fragment includes less than half of the first phosphatase domain and most, if not all, of the second. In a second experiment, 109 residues, including the presumed catalytic region, were removed from domain I by site-directed mutagenesis. Expression of this construct in a mammalian cell line resulted in increased PTPase activity over nontransfected control cells. Isolation of the recombinant CD45 by immunoprecipitation and immunoaffinity chromatography revealed that it had phosphatase activity. Both of these experimental approaches demonstrate that the second conserved PTPase domain of CD45 is a functioning PTPase, but that external regulation may be required to express its activity in the context of the native molecule. PMID:8463207

  10. Purification and characterization of a protein phosphatase that dephosphorylates pyruvate kinase in an anoxia tolerant animal.

    PubMed

    Brooks, S P; Storey, K B

    1996-05-01

    A protein phosphatase that dephosphorylates pyruvate kinase (PK) in vitro was purified and characterized from the foot muscle of the anoxia tolerant gastropod mollusc Busycon canaliculatum. Purification involved three steps: negative chromatography through Blue Dextran and CM Sephadex, affinity chromatography on DEAE Sephadex and gel exclusion chromatography on Sephacryl S-400. Pyruvate kinase phosphatase (PK-Pase) activity was monitored by following changes in PK I50 values for L-alanine that had previously been linked to changes in the degree of PK phosphorylation. The purified PK-Pase gave a single band on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a molecular weight of 41 +/- 1 kdaltons. Isoelectric focusing analysis showed that the PK-Pase had an isoelectric point of 4.2 +/- 0.1. Kinetic analysis showed that the enzyme was a Type 2C protein phosphatase with a pH optimum of 6.5. Maximal activity required the presence of magnesium ions (KM = 7.9 +/- 0.6 microM) although high concentrations of Mg2+ were inhibitory (I50 = 2.3 +/- 0.4 mM). The protein phosphatase activity was not affected by either spermine, cAMP, cGMP, potassium phosphate, tartrate, NaF, HgCl2, citrate or concentrations of CaCl2 less than 10 mM. The enzyme could also use ATP, ADP, and GTP as substrates. PMID:8739044

  11. Probing Mechanistic Similarities between Response Regulator Signaling Proteins and Haloacid Dehalogenase Phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Immormino, Robert M; Starbird, Chrystal A; Silversmith, Ruth E; Bourret, Robert B

    2015-06-01

    Response regulator signaling proteins and phosphatases of the haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily share strikingly similar folds, active site geometries, and reaction chemistry. Proteins from both families catalyze the transfer of a phosphoryl group from a substrate to one of their own aspartyl residues, and subsequent hydrolysis of the phosphoprotein. Notable differences include an additional Asp that functions as an acid/base catalyst and an active site well-structured prior to phosphorylation in HAD phosphatases. Both features contribute to reactions substantially faster than those for response regulators. To investigate mechanisms underlying the functional differences between response regulators and HAD phosphatases, we characterized five double mutants of the response regulator CheY designed to mimic HAD phosphatases. Each mutant contained the extra Asp paired with a phosphatase-inspired substitution to potentially position the Asp properly. Only CheY DR (Arg as the anchor) exhibited enhanced rates of both autophosphorylation with phosphoramidate and autodephosphorylation compared to those of wild-type CheY. Crystal structures of CheY DR complexed with MoO4(2-) or WO4(2-) revealed active site hydrogen bonding networks similar to those in HAD·substrate complexes, with the extra Asp positioned for direct interaction with the leaving group (phosphorylation) or nucleophile (dephosphorylation). However, CheY DR reaction kinetics did not exhibit the pH sensitivities expected for acid/base catalysis. Biochemical analysis indicated CheY DR had an enhanced propensity to adopt the active conformation without phosphorylation, but a crystal structure revealed unphosphorylated CheY DR was not locked in the active conformation. Thus, the enhanced reactivity of CheY DR reflected partial acquisition of catalytic and structural features of HAD phosphatases. PMID:25928369

  12. Genome-wide review of transcriptional complexity in mouse protein kinases and phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Alistair RR; Taylor, Darrin F; Crowe, Mark L; Chalk, Alistair M; Waddell, Nic J; Kolle, Gabriel; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Kodzius, Rimantas; Katayama, Shintaro; Wells, Christine; Kai, Chikatoshi; Kawai, Jun; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Grimmond, Sean M

    2006-01-01

    Background Alternative transcripts of protein kinases and protein phosphatases are known to encode peptides with altered substrate affinities, subcellular localizations, and activities. We undertook a systematic study to catalog the variant transcripts of every protein kinase-like and phosphatase-like locus of mouse . Results By reviewing all available transcript evidence, we found that at least 75% of kinase and phosphatase loci in mouse generate alternative splice forms, and that 44% of these loci have well supported alternative 5' exons. In a further analysis of full-length cDNAs, we identified 69% of loci as generating more than one peptide isoform. The 1,469 peptide isoforms generated from these loci correspond to 1,080 unique Interpro domain combinations, many of which lack catalytic or interaction domains. We also report on the existence of likely dominant negative forms for many of the receptor kinases and phosphatases, including some 26 secreted decoys (seven known and 19 novel: Alk, Csf1r, Egfr, Epha1, 3, 5,7 and 10, Ephb1, Flt1, Flt3, Insr, Insrr, Kdr, Met, Ptk7, Ptprc, Ptprd, Ptprg, Ptprl, Ptprn, Ptprn2, Ptpro, Ptprr, Ptprs, and Ptprz1) and 13 transmembrane forms (four known and nine novel: Axl, Bmpr1a, Csf1r, Epha4, 5, 6 and 7, Ntrk2, Ntrk3, Pdgfra, Ptprk, Ptprm, Ptpru). Finally, by mining public gene expression data (MPSS and microarrays), we confirmed tissue-specific expression of ten of the novel isoforms. Conclusion These findings suggest that alternative transcripts of protein kinases and phosphatases are produced that encode different domain structures, and that these variants are likely to play important roles in phosphorylation-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:16507138

  13. EKPD: a hierarchical database of eukaryotic protein kinases and protein phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongbo; Liu, Zexian; Cheng, Han; Gao, Tianshun; Pan, Zhicheng; Yang, Qing; Guo, Anyuan; Xue, Yu

    2014-01-01

    We present here EKPD (http://ekpd.biocuckoo.org), a hierarchical database of eukaryotic protein kinases (PKs) and protein phosphatases (PPs), the key molecules responsible for the reversible phosphorylation of proteins that are involved in almost all aspects of biological processes. As extensive experimental and computational efforts have been carried out to identify PKs and PPs, an integrative resource with detailed classification and annotation information would be of great value for both experimentalists and computational biologists. In this work, we first collected 1855 PKs and 347 PPs from the scientific literature and various public databases. Based on previously established rationales, we classified all of the known PKs and PPs into a hierarchical structure with three levels, i.e. group, family and individual PK/PP. There are 10 groups with 149 families for the PKs and 10 groups with 33 families for the PPs. We constructed 139 and 27 Hidden Markov Model profiles for PK and PP families, respectively. Then we systematically characterized ∼50 000 PKs and >10 000 PPs in eukaryotes. In addition, >500 PKs and >400 PPs were computationally identified by ortholog search. Finally, the online service of the EKPD database was implemented in PHP + MySQL + JavaScript. PMID:24214991

  14. Expression of human protein phosphatase-1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae highlights the role of phosphatase isoforms in regulating eukaryotic functions.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Jennifer A; Kozubowski, Lukasz; Tatchell, Kelly; Shenolikar, Shirish

    2007-07-27

    Human (PP1) isoforms, PP1alpha, PP1beta, PP1gamma1, and PP1gamma2, differ in primary sequences at N and C termini that potentially bind cellular regulators and define their physiological functions. The GLC7 gene encodes the PP1 catalytic subunit with >80% sequence identity to human PP1 and is essential for viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In yeast, Glc7p regulates glycogen and protein synthesis, actin cytoskeleton, gene expression, and cell division. We substituted human PP1 for Glc7p in yeast to investigate the ability of individual isoforms to catalyze Glc7p functions. S. cerevisiae expressing human PP1 isoforms were viable. PP1alpha-expressing yeast grew more rapidly than strains expressing other isoforms. On the other hand, PP1alpha-expressing yeast accumulated less glycogen than PP1beta-or PP1gamma1-expressing yeast. Yeast expressing human PP1 were indistinguishable from WT yeast in glucose derepression. However, unlike WT yeast, strains expressing human PP1 failed to sporulate. Analysis of chimeric PP1alpha/beta subunits highlighted a critical role for their unique N termini in defining PP1alpha and PP1beta functions in yeast. Biochemical studies established that the differing association of PP1 isoforms with the yeast glycogen-targeting subunit, Gac1p, accounted for their differences in glycogen synthesis. In contrast to human PP1 expressed in Escherichia coli, enzymes expressed in yeast displayed in vitro biochemical properties closely resembling PP1 from mammalian tissues. Thus, PP1 expression in yeast should facilitate future structure-function studies of this protein serine/threonine phosphatase.

  15. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases are novel components of a polycystin complex

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Catherine A.; Ward, Heather H.; Case, Ruth L.; Thurston, Katie S.; Li, Xiaohong; Needham, Andrew; Romero, Elsa; Hyink, Deborah; Qamar, Seema; Roitbak, Tamara; Powell, Samantha; Ward, Christopher; Wilson, Patricia D.; Wandinger-Ness, Angela; Sandford, Richard N.

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is caused by mutation of PKD1 and PKD2 that encode polycystin-1 and polycystin-2. Polycystin-1 is tyrosine phosphorylated and modulates multiple signaling pathways including AP-1, but the identity of the phosphatases regulating polycystin-1 are previously uncharacterized. Here we identify members of the LAR protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP) superfamily as members of the polycystin-1complex mediated through extra- and intracellular interactions. The first extracellular PKD1 domain of polycystin-1 interacts with the first Ig domain of RPTPσ, while the polycystin-1 C-terminus of polycystin-1 interacts with the regulatory D2 phosphatase domain of RPTPγ. Additional homo- and heterotypic interactions between RPTPs recruit RPTPδ The multimeric polycystin protein complex is found localised in cilia. RPTPσ and RPTPδ are also part of a polycystin-1/E-cadherin complex known to be important for early events in adherens junction stabilisation. The interaction between polycystin-1 and RPTPγ is disrupted in ADPKD cells, while RPTPσ and RPTPδ remain closely associated with E-cadherin, largely in an intracellular location. The polycystin-1 C-terminus is an in vitro substrate of RPTPγ, which dephosphorylates the c-Src phosphorylated Y4237 residue and activates AP1-mediated transcription. The data identify RPTPs as novel interacting partners of the polycystins both in cilia and at adhesion complexes and demonstrate RPTPγ phosphatase activity is central to the molecular mechanisms governing polycystin-dependent signaling. PMID:21126580

  16. Kinetic isotope effects in the characterization of catalysis by protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Hengge, Alvan C

    2015-11-01

    Although thermodynamically favorable, the uncatalyzed hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters is extraordinarily slow, making phosphatases among the most catalytically efficient enzymes known. Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are ubiquitous in biology, and kinetic isotope effects were one of the key mechanistic tools used to discern molecular details of their catalytic mechanism and the transition state for phosphoryl transfer. Later, the unique level of detail KIEs provided led to deeper questions about the potential role of protein motions in PTP catalysis. The recent discovery that such motions are responsible for different catalytic rates between PTPs arose from questions originating from KIE data showing that the transition states and chemical mechanisms are identical, combined with structural data demonstrating superimposable active sites. KIEs also reveal perturbations to the transition state as mutations are made to residues directly involved in chemistry, and to residues that affect protein motions essential for catalysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment.

  17. Integrative Transcriptome Profiling of Cognitive Aging and Its Preservation through Ser/Thr Protein Phosphatase Regulation.

    PubMed

    Park, C Sehwan; Valomon, Amandine; Welzl, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Environmental enrichment has been reported to delay or restore age-related cognitive deficits, however, a mechanism to account for the cause and progression of normal cognitive decline and its preservation by environmental enrichment is lacking. Using genome-wide SAGE-Seq, we provide a global assessment of differentially expressed genes altered with age and environmental enrichment in the hippocampus. Qualitative and quantitative proteomics in naïve young and aged mice was used to further identify phosphorylated proteins differentially expressed with age. We found that increased expression of endogenous protein phosphatase-1 inhibitors in aged mice may be characteristic of long-term environmental enrichment and improved cognitive status. As such, hippocampus-dependent performances in spatial, recognition, and associative memories, which are sensitive to aging, were preserved by environmental enrichment and accompanied by decreased protein phosphatase activity. Age-associated phosphorylated proteins were also found to correspond to the functional categories of age-associated genes identified through transcriptome analysis. Together, this study provides a comprehensive map of the transcriptome and proteome in the aging brain, and elucidates endogenous protein phosphatase-1 inhibition as a potential means through which environmental enrichment may ameliorate age-related cognitive deficits.

  18. Chasing Phosphoarginine Proteins: Development of a Selective Enrichment Method Using a Phosphatase Trap*

    PubMed Central

    Trentini, Débora Broch; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Mechtler, Karl; Clausen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Arginine phosphorylation is an emerging post-translational protein modification implicated in the bacterial stress response. Although early reports suggested that arginine phosphorylation also occurs in higher eukaryotes, its overall prevalence was never studied using modern mass spectrometry methods, owing to technical difficulties arising from the acid lability of phosphoarginine. As shown recently, the McsB and YwlE proteins from Bacillus subtilis function as a highly specific protein arginine kinase and phosphatase couple, shaping the phosphoarginine proteome. Using a B. subtilis ΔywlE strain as a source for arginine-phosphorylated proteins, we were able to adapt mass spectrometry (MS) protocols to the special chemical properties of the arginine modification. Despite this progress, the analysis of protein arginine phosphorylation in eukaryotes is still challenging, given the great abundance of serine/threonine phosphorylations that would compete with phosphoarginine during the phosphopeptide enrichment procedure, as well as during data-dependent MS acquisition. We thus set out to establish a method for the selective enrichment of arginine-phosphorylated proteins as an initial step in the phosphoproteomic analysis. For this purpose, we developed a substrate-trapping mutant of the YwlE phosphatase that retains binding affinity toward arginine-phosphorylated proteins but cannot hydrolyze the captured substrates. By testing a number of active site substitutions, we identified a YwlE mutant (C9A) that stably binds to arginine-phosphorylated proteins. We further improved the substrate-trapping efficiency by impeding the oligomerization of the phosphatase mutant. The engineered YwlE trap efficiently captured arginine-phosphorylated proteins from complex B. subtilis ΔywlE cell extracts, thus facilitating identification of phosphoarginine sites in the large pool of cellular protein modifications. In conclusion, we present a novel tool for the selective enrichment and

  19. A selective Seoul-Fluor-based bioprobe, SfBP, for vaccinia H1-related phosphatase--a dual-specific protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Myeong Seon; Kim, Eunha; Kang, Hyo Jin; Choi, Eun Joung; Cho, Alvin R; Chung, Sang J; Park, Seung Bum

    2012-07-01

    We report a Seoul-Fluor-based bioprobe, SfBP, for selective monitoring of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). A rational design based on the structures at the active site of dual-specific PTPs can enable SfBP to selectively monitor the activity of these PTPs with a 93-fold change in brightness. Moreover, screening results of SfBP against 30 classical PTPs and 35 dual-specific PTPs show that it is selective toward vaccinia H1-related (VHR) phosphatase, a dual-specific PTP (DUSP-3).

  20. Redox-sensitive protein phosphatase activity regulates the phosphorylation state of p38 protein kinase in primary astrocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Robinson, K A; Stewart, C A; Pye, Q N; Nguyen, X; Kenney, L; Salzman, S; Floyd, R A; Hensley, K

    1999-03-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated as second messengers that activate protein kinase cascades, although the means by which ROS regulate signal transduction remains unclear. In the present study, we show that interleukin 1beta (IL1beta), H2O2, and sorbitol-induced hyperosmolarity mediate a 5- to 10-fold increase in phosphorylation (activation) of the p38 protein kinase in rat primary glial cells as measured by analyses of Western blots using an antibody directed against the dually phosphorylated (active) p38. Additionally, IL1beta was found to elicit H2O2 synthesis in these cells. Concurrent with p38 phosphorylation, all three stimulation paradigms caused an inhibition of protein phosphatase activity. Phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN), a nitrone-based free radical trap and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), a thiol reducing agent, were examined for their effects on the phosphorylation of p38 as well as phosphatase activity. Pretreatment of cells with either PBN or NAC at 1.0 mM suppressed IL1beta H2O2, and sorbitol-mediated activation of p38 and significantly increased phosphatase activity. These data suggest that ROS, particularly H2O2, are used as second messenger substances that activate p38 in part via the transient inactivation of regulatory protein phosphatases.

  1. Protein phosphatase activity and sucrose-mediated induction of fructan synthesis in wheat.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Noël, Giselle M A; Tognetti, Jorge A; Salerno, Graciela L; Wiemken, Andres; Pontis, Horacio G

    2009-10-01

    In this work, we analyze protein phosphatase (PP) involvement in the sucrose-mediated induction of fructan metabolism in wheat (Triticum aestivum). The addition of okadaic acid (OA), a PP-inhibitor, to sucrose-fed leaves reduced fructosylsucrose-synthesizing activity (FSS) induction in a dose-dependent manner. The expression of the two enzymes that contribute to FSS activity, 1-SST (1-sucrose:sucrose fructosyltransferase, E.C. 2.4.1.99) and 6-SFT (6-sucrose:fructan fructosyltransferase, E.C. 2.4.1.10), was blocked by 1 microM OA. These results suggest the involvement of a PP type 2A in sucrose signaling leading to fructan synthesis. OA addition to the feeding medium impaired both sucrose accumulation in leaves and the expression of sucrose-H+ symporter (SUT1). It is known that sucrose concentration must exceed a threshold for the induction of fructan metabolism; hence PP2A inhibition may result in lower sucrose levels than required for this induction. OA also induced the vacuolar acid invertase (acid INV) transcript levels suggesting that PP activity might play a role in carbon partitioning. Total extractable PP2A activity decreased during 24 h of treatment with sucrose, in parallel with declining sugar uptake into leaf tissues. In conclusion, our results suggest that PP2A is involved in sucrose-induction of fructan metabolism and may play a role in regulating sucrose uptake, but do not rule out that further steps in sucrose signaling pathway may be affected.

  2. Dephosphorylation of DBC1 by Protein Phosphatase 4 Is Important for p53-Mediated Cellular Functions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihye; Adelmant, Guillaume; Marto, Jarrod A; Lee, Dong-Hyun

    2015-08-01

    Deleted in breast cancer-1 (DBC1) contributes to the regulation of cell survival and apoptosis. Recent studies demonstrated that DBC is phosphorylated at Thr454 by ATM/ATR kinases in response to DNA damage, which is a critical event for p53 activation and apoptosis. However, how DBC1 phosphorylation is regulated has not been studied. Here we show that protein phosphatase 4 (PP4) dephosphorylates DBC1, regulating its role in DNA damage response. PP4R2, a regulatory subunit of PP4, mediates the interaction between DBC1 and PP4C, a catalytic subunit. PP4C efficiently dephosphorylates pThr454 on DBC1 in vitro, and the depletion of PP4C/PP4R2 in cells alters the kinetics of DBC1 phosphorylation and p53 activation, and increases apoptosis in response to DNA damage, which are compatible with the expression of the phosphomimetic DBC-1 mutant (T454E). These suggest that the PP4-mediated dephosphorylation of DBC1 is necessary for efficient damage responses in cells. PMID:26194823

  3. Dephosphorylation of DBC1 by Protein Phosphatase 4 Is Important for p53-Mediated Cellular Functions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihye; Adelmant, Guillaume; Marto, Jarrod A; Lee, Dong-Hyun

    2015-08-01

    Deleted in breast cancer-1 (DBC1) contributes to the regulation of cell survival and apoptosis. Recent studies demonstrated that DBC is phosphorylated at Thr454 by ATM/ATR kinases in response to DNA damage, which is a critical event for p53 activation and apoptosis. However, how DBC1 phosphorylation is regulated has not been studied. Here we show that protein phosphatase 4 (PP4) dephosphorylates DBC1, regulating its role in DNA damage response. PP4R2, a regulatory subunit of PP4, mediates the interaction between DBC1 and PP4C, a catalytic subunit. PP4C efficiently dephosphorylates pThr454 on DBC1 in vitro, and the depletion of PP4C/PP4R2 in cells alters the kinetics of DBC1 phosphorylation and p53 activation, and increases apoptosis in response to DNA damage, which are compatible with the expression of the phosphomimetic DBC-1 mutant (T454E). These suggest that the PP4-mediated dephosphorylation of DBC1 is necessary for efficient damage responses in cells.

  4. Evaluating transition state structures of vanadium-phosphatase protein complexes using shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Lombardo, Irma; Alvarez, Santiago; McLauchlan, Craig C; Crans, Debbie C

    2015-06-01

    Shape analysis of coordination complexes is well-suited to evaluate the subtle distortions in the trigonal bipyramidal (TBPY-5) geometry of vanadium coordinated in the active site of phosphatases and characterized by X-ray crystallography. Recent studies using the tau (τ) analysis support the assertion that vanadium is best described as a trigonal bipyramid, because this geometry is the ideal transition state geometry of the phosphate ester substrate hydrolysis (C.C. McLauchlan, B.J. Peters, G.R. Willsky, D.C. Crans, Coord. Chem. Rev. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ccr.2014.12.012 ; D.C. Crans, M.L. Tarlton, C.C. McLauchlan, Eur. J. Inorg. Chem. 2014, 4450-4468). Here we use continuous shape measures (CShM) analysis to investigate the structural space of the five-coordinate vanadium-phosphatase complexes associated with mechanistic transformations between the tetrahedral geometry and the five-coordinate high energy TBPY-5 geometry was discussed focusing on the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) enzyme. No evidence for square pyramidal geometries was observed in any vanadium-protein complexes. The shape analysis positioned the metal ion and the ligands in the active site reflecting the mechanism of the cleavage of the organic phosphate in a phosphatase. We identified the umbrella distortions to be directly on the reaction path between tetrahedral phosphate and the TBPY-5-types of high-energy species. The umbrella distortions of the trigonal bipyramid are therefore identified as being the most relevant types of transition state structures for the phosphoryl group transfer reactions for phosphatases and this may be related to the possibility that vanadium is an inhibitor for enzymes that support both exploded and five-coordinate transition states.

  5. Expression, purification, and characterization of human osteoclastic protein-tyrosine phosphatase catalytic domain in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huan; Sui, Yuan; Cui, Yue; Lin, Peng; Li, Wannan; Xing, Shu; Wang, Deli; Hu, Min; Fu, Xueqi

    2015-03-01

    Osteoclastic protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP-oc) is a structurally unique transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) that contains only a relatively small intracellular PTP catalytic domain, does not have an extracellular domain, and lacks a signal peptide proximal to the NH2 terminus. The present study reports the expression, purification, and characterization of the intracellular catalytic domain of PTP-oc (ΔPTP-oc). ΔPTP-oc was expressed in Escherichia coli cells as a fusion with a six-histidine tag and was purified via nickel affinity chromatography. When with para-nitrophenylphosphate (p-NPP) as a substrate, ΔPTP-oc exhibited classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Its responses to temperature and ionic strength were similar to those of other PTPs. The optimal pH value of ΔPTP-oc is approximately 7.0, unlike other PTPs, whose optimal pH values are approximately 5.0. PMID:25462809

  6. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human SER/THR Protein Phosphatase-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, M. R.; Honkanen, R.; Ciszak, E.

    2004-01-01

    Serinekhreonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) affects many signaling networks that regulate cell growth. Here we report the 1.6 Angstrom resolution crystal structure of PP5 catalytic domain with metal and phosphate ions in the active site. The structure reveals a mechanism for PPS-mediated catalysis that requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a conserved Asp(sup 271)-M(sub 1),-M(sub 2)-His(sup 427)-W(sup 2)-His(sup 304)-Asp(sup 274) catalytic motif, and provides a structural basis for the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases placing them among the most powerful catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of PP5 should aid development of specific inhibitors.

  7. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatase-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, M. R.; Honkanen, R.; Ciszak, E. M.

    2004-01-01

    Serinehhreonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) affects many signaling networks that regulate cell growth and cellular responses to stress. Here we report the crystal structure of the PP5 catalytic domain (PP5c) at a resolution of 1.6 A. From this structure we resolved the mechanism for PP5-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoprotein substrates, which requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a con served Aspn-271-M(sub 1):M(sub 2)-W(sup 1)-His-427-His-304-Asp-274 catalytic motif. The structure of PPSc provides a structural basis for explaining the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases, which are among the most powerful known catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of the PP5c should also aid development of type-specific inhibitors.

  8. Inhibition of CDC25B Phosphatase Through Disruption of Protein–Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    CDC25 phosphatases are key cell cycle regulators and represent very attractive but challenging targets for anticancer drug discovery. Here, we explored whether fragment-based screening represents a valid approach to identify inhibitors of CDC25B. This resulted in identification of 2-fluoro-4-hydroxybenzonitrile, which directly binds to the catalytic domain of CDC25B. Interestingly, NMR data and the crystal structure demonstrate that this compound binds to the pocket distant from the active site and adjacent to the protein–protein interaction interface with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate. Furthermore, we developed a more potent analogue that disrupts CDC25B interaction with CDK2/Cyclin A and inhibits dephosphorylation of CDK2. Based on these studies, we provide a proof of concept that targeting CDC25 phosphatases by inhibiting their protein–protein interactions with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate represents a novel, viable opportunity to target this important class of enzymes. PMID:25423142

  9. Developmental expression and function analysis of protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type D in oligodendrocyte myelination.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Q; Tan, Z; Zhao, S; Huang, H; Zhao, X; Hu, X; Zhang, Y; Shields, C B; Uetani, N; Qiu, M

    2015-11-12

    Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) are extensively expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), and have distinct spatial and temporal patterns in different cell types during development. Previous studies have demonstrated possible roles for RPTPs in axon outgrowth, guidance, and synaptogenesis. In the present study, our results revealed that protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type D (PTPRD) was initially expressed in mature neurons in embryonic CNS, and later in oligodendroglial cells at postnatal stages when oligodendrocytes undergo active axonal myelination process. In PTPRD mutants, oligodendrocyte differentiation was normal and a transient myelination delay occurred at early postnatal stages, indicating the contribution of PTPRD to the initiation of axonal myelination. Our results also showed that the remyelination process was not affected in the absence of PTPRD function after a cuprizone-induced demyelination in adult animals.

  10. Systematic Global Analysis of Genes Encoding Protein Phosphatases in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Winkelströter, Lizziane K.; Dolan, Stephen K.; Fernanda dos Reis, Thaila; Bom, Vinícius Leite Pedro; Alves de Castro, Patrícia; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Alowni, Raneem; Jones, Gary W.; Doyle, Sean; Brown, Neil Andrew; Goldman, Gustavo H.

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a fungal pathogen that causes several invasive and noninvasive diseases named aspergillosis. This disease is generally regarded as multifactorial, considering that several pathogenicity determinants are present during the establishment of this illness. It is necessary to obtain an increased knowledge of how, and which, A. fumigatus signal transduction pathways are engaged in the regulation of these processes. Protein phosphatases are essential to several signal transduction pathways. We identified 32 phosphatase catalytic subunit-encoding genes in A. fumigatus, of which we were able to construct 24 viable deletion mutants. The role of nine phosphatase mutants in the HOG (high osmolarity glycerol response) pathway was evaluated by measuring phosphorylation of the p38 MAPK (SakA) and expression of osmo-dependent genes. We were also able to identify 11 phosphatases involved in iron assimilation, six that are related to gliotoxin resistance, and three implicated in gliotoxin production. These results present the creation of a fundamental resource for the study of signaling in A. fumigatus and its implications in the regulation of pathogenicity determinants and virulence in this important pathogen. PMID:25943523

  11. Protein tyrosine phosphatase σ targets apical junction complex proteins in the intestine and regulates epithelial permeability.

    PubMed

    Murchie, Ryan; Guo, Cong-Hui; Persaud, Avinash; Muise, Aleixo; Rotin, Daniela

    2014-01-14

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)σ (PTPRS) was shown previously to be associated with susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). PTPσ(-/-) mice exhibit an IBD-like phenotype in the intestine and show increased susceptibility to acute models of murine colitis. However, the function of PTPσ in the intestine is uncharacterized. Here, we show an intestinal epithelial barrier defect in the PTPσ(-/-) mouse, demonstrated by a decrease in transepithelial resistance and a leaky intestinal epithelium that was determined by in vivo tracer analysis. Increased tyrosine phosphorylation was observed at the plasma membrane of epithelial cells lining the crypts of the small bowel and colon of the PTPσ(-/-) mouse, suggesting the presence of PTPσ substrates in these regions. Using mass spectrometry, we identified several putative PTPσ intestinal substrates that were hyper-tyrosine-phosphorylated in the PTPσ(-/-) mice relative to wild type. Among these were proteins that form or regulate the apical junction complex, including ezrin. We show that ezrin binds to and is dephosphorylated by PTPσ in vitro, suggesting it is a direct PTPσ substrate, and identified ezrin-Y353/Y145 as important sites targeted by PTPσ. Moreover, subcellular localization of the ezrin phosphomimetic Y353E or Y145 mutants were disrupted in colonic Caco-2 cells, similar to ezrin mislocalization in the colon of PTPσ(-/-) mice following induction of colitis. Our results suggest that PTPσ is a positive regulator of intestinal epithelial barrier, which mediates its effects by modulating epithelial cell adhesion through targeting of apical junction complex-associated proteins (including ezrin), a process impaired in IBD.

  12. Development of a Peptide that Selectively Activates Protein Phosphatase-1 in Living Cells**

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Jayanta; Beullens, Monique; Sukackaite, Rasa; Qian, Junbin; Lesage, Bart; Hart, Darren J; Bollen, Mathieu; Köhn, Maja

    2012-01-01

    The first cell-penetrating peptide that activates protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) by disrupting a subset of PP1 complexes in living cells has been developed. Activated PP1 rapidly dephosphorylates its substrates, counteracting kinase activity inside cells. Activation of PP1 can thus be a novel approach to study PP1 function and to counteract Ser/Thr kinase activity under pathologically increased kinase signaling. PMID:22962028

  13. Activation of SPS from darkened spinach leaves by an endogenous protein phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, S.C.; Huber, J.L. )

    1990-05-01

    Sucrose-phosphate synthase from darkened spinach leaves has a low activation state but can undergo a time-dependent activation in desalted leaf extracts that is inhibited by Pi, molybdate, okadaic acid and vanadate, but stimulated by fluoride. SPS labeled in vivo with ({sup 32}P)Pi in excised leaves in the dark loses incorporated {sup 32}P with time when extracts are incubated at 25{degree}C. This loss is largely prevented by vanadate, suggesting that an endogenous protein phosphatase can use SPS as substrate. Changes in phosphorylation state are closely paralleled by changes in SPS activation state. The spontaneous activation achieved in the extracts can be reversed by addition of 2 mM MgATP. Feeding okadaic acid to darkened leaves prevents light activation of SPS suggesting that the endogenous protein phosphatase is similar to the type-1 enzyme of animal tissues. Overall, the results are consistent with the notion that light activation of SPS involves dephosphorylation of inhibitory phosphorylation site(s). Regulation of the protein phosphatase by Pi may be of physiological significance.

  14. Characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Ser/Thr phosphatase T1 and comparison to its mammalian homolog PP5

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jee-Yeong; Johns, Jeremiah; Sinclair, Christopher; Park, Jung-Min; Rossie, Sandra

    2003-01-01

    Background Protein Ser/Thr phosphatase 5 (PP5) and its Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog protein phosphatase T1 (Ppt1p) each contain an N-terminal domain consisting of several tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs) and a C-terminal catalytic domain that is related to the catalytic subunits of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, and calcineurin. Analysis of yeast Ppt1p could provide important clues to the function of PP5 and its homologs, however it has not yet been characterized at the biochemical or cellular level. Results The specific activity of recombinant Ppt1p toward the artificial substrates 32P-myelin basic protein (MBP) and 32P-casein was similar to that of PP5. Dephosphorylation of 32P-MBP, but not 32P-casein, was stimulated by unsaturated fatty acids and by arachidoyl coenzyme A. Limited proteolysis of Ppt1p removed the TPR domain and abrogated lipid stimulation. The remaining catalytic fragment exhibited a two-fold increase in activity toward 32P-MBP, but not 32P-casein. Removal of the C terminus increased Ppt1p activity toward both substrates two fold, but did not prevent further stimulation of activity toward 32P-MBP by lipid treatment. Ppt1p was localized throughout the cell including the nucleus. Levels of PPT1 mRNA and protein peaked in early log phase growth. Conclusions Many characteristics of Ppt1p are similar to those of PP5, including stimulation of phosphatase activity with some substrates by lipids, and peak expression during periods of rapid cell growth. Unlike PP5, however, proteolytic removal of the TPR domain or C-terminal truncation only modestly increased its activity. In addition, C-terminal truncation did not prevent further activation by lipid. This suggests that these regions play only a minor role in controlling its activity compared to PP5. Ppt1p is present in both the nucleus and cytoplasm, indicating that it may function in multiple compartments. The observation that Ppt1p is most highly expressed during early log phase growth suggests

  15. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase 2 Regulates the Inflammatory Response in Sepsis▿

    PubMed Central

    Cornell, Timothy T.; Rodenhouse, Paul; Cai, Qing; Sun, Lei; Shanley, Thomas P.

    2010-01-01

    Sepsis results from a dysregulation of the regulatory mechanisms of the pro- and anti-inflammatory response to invading pathogens. The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades are key signal transduction pathways involved in the cellular production of cytokines. The dual-specific phosphatase 1 (DUSP 1), mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), has been shown to be an important negative regulator of the inflammatory response by regulating the p38 and Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) MAP kinase pathways to influence pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production. MKP-2, also a dual-specific phosphatase (DUSP 4), is a phosphatase highly homologous with MKP-1 and is known to regulate MAP kinase signaling; however, its role in regulating the inflammatory response is not known. We hypothesized a regulatory role for MKP-2 in the setting of sepsis. Mice lacking the MKP-2 gene had a survival advantage over wild-type mice when challenged with intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or a polymicrobial infection via cecal ligation and puncture. The MKP-2−/− mice also exhibited decreased serum levels of both pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-6) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10) following endotoxin challenge. Isolated bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from MKP-2−/− mice showed increased phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), decreased phosphorylation of JNK and p38, and increased induction of MKP-1 following LPS stimulation. The capacity for cytokine production increased in MKP-2−/− BMDMs following MKP-1 knockdown. These data support a mechanism by which MKP-2 targets ERK deactivation, thereby decreasing MKP-1 and thus removing the negative inhibition of MKP-1 on cytokine production. PMID:20351138

  16. Phosphonate monoesters on a thiacalix[4]arene framework as potential inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Trush, Viacheslav V; Kharchenko, Sergiy G; Tanchuk, Vsevolod Yu; Kalchenko, Vitaly I; Vovk, Andriy I

    2015-09-01

    Monoester derivatives of thiacalix[4]arene tetrakis(methylphosphonic) acid were found to be capable of inhibiting protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B. In addition, these compounds can strongly bind to human serum albumin. PMID:26205135

  17. INHIBITION OF PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY MEDIATES EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR SIGNALING IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have implicated zinc in the toxicity of ambient particulate matter (PM) inhalation. We previously showed that exposure to metal-laden PM inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity in human primary bronchial epithelial cells (HAEC) and leads t...

  18. Structural Diversity in Free and Bound States of Intrinsically Disordered Protein Phosphatase 1 Regulators

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, J.A.; Allaire, M.; Dancheck, B.; Ragusa, M.J.; Forman-Kay, J.D.; Peti, Wolfgang

    2010-09-08

    Complete folding is not a prerequisite for protein function, as disordered and partially folded states of proteins frequently perform essential biological functions. In order to understand their functions at the molecular level, we utilized diverse experimental measurements to calculate ensemble models of three nonhomologous, intrinsically disordered proteins: I-2, spinophilin, and DARPP-32, which bind to and regulate protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). The models demonstrate that these proteins have dissimilar propensities for secondary and tertiary structure in their unbound forms. Direct comparison of these ensemble models with recently determined PP1 complex structures suggests a significant role for transient, preformed structure in the interactions of these proteins with PP1. Finally, we generated an ensemble model of partially disordered I-2 bound to PP1 that provides insight into the relationship between flexibility and biological function in this dynamic complex.

  19. Leishmania mexicana: promastigotes and amastigotes secrete protein phosphatases and this correlates with the production of inflammatory cytokines in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Escalona-Montaño, A R; Ortiz-Lozano, D M; Rojas-Bernabé, A; Wilkins-Rodriguez, A A; Torres-Guerrero, H; Mondragón-Flores, R; Mondragón-Gonzalez, R; Becker, I; Gutiérrez-Kobeh, L; Aguirre-Garcia, M M

    2016-09-01

    Phosphatase activity of Leishmania spp. has been shown to deregulate the signalling pathways of the host cell. We here show that Leishmania mexicana promastigotes and amastigotes secrete proteins with phosphatase activity to the culture medium, which was higher in the Promastigote Secretion Medium (PSM) as compared with the Amastigote Secretion Medium (ASM) and was not due to cell lysis, since parasite viability was not affected by the secretion process. The biochemical characterization showed that the phosphatase activity present in PSM was higher in dephosphorylating the peptide END (pY) INASL as compared with the peptide RRA (pT)VA. In contrast, the phosphatase activity in ASM showed little dephosphorylating capacity for both peptides. Inhibition assays demonstrated that the phosphatase activity of both PSM and ASM was sensible only to protein tyrosine phosphatases inhibitors. An antibody against a protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) of Leishmania major cross-reacted with a 44·9 kDa molecule in different cellular fractions of L. mexicana promastigotes and amastigotes, however, in PSM and ASM, the antibody recognized a protein about 70 kDa. By electron microscopy, the PP2C was localized in the flagellar pocket of amastigotes. PSM and ASM induced the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-1β, IL-12p70 and IL-10 in human macrophages. PMID:27220404

  20. Pyruvate dehydrogenase/sub b/ phosphatase inhibition by NADH and dihydrolipoamide along with effects of and capacity for binding the phosphatase to the bovine kidney transacetylase-protein X subcomplex

    SciTech Connect

    Roche, T.E.; Rahmatullah, M.; Maher, J.

    1986-05-01

    NADH inhibits PDH/sub b/ phosphatase activity when /sup 32/P-PDH is associated with the intact complex but not when /sup 32/P-PDH is prepared free of other components of the complex. Addition of the transacetylase-protein X (E2-X) subcomplex both activated the phosphatase and restored NADH inhibition. Low levels of dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase associated with the subcomplex might be required for NADH inhibition. Dihydrolipoamide gave inhibition of the phosphatase equivalent to NADH and the combination did not give additional inhibition suggesting a common mechanism. Pretreatment of phosphorylated complex and phosphatase with 2.0 mM dithiothreitol nearly eliminated inhibition of the phosphatase by NADH or dihydrolipoamide. Strong arsenite inhibition of phosphatase activity occurred only in the presence of NADH suggesting modification of thiols reduced by NADH can alter phosphatase activity. Only about 6 molecules of purified phosphatase could be activated by 1 molecule of E2-X subcomplex (initial velocities measured in 15s period). Since that corresponded to the number of protein X rather than E2 subunits, protein X may contribute to the Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent binding of the phosphatase. Since protein X also contains a lipoyl moiety, it may also contribute to NADH inhibition of the phosphatase.

  1. Global Analysis of Serine/Threonine and Tyrosine Protein Phosphatase Catalytic Subunit Genes in Neurospora crassa Reveals Interplay Between Phosphatases and the p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arit; Servin, Jacqueline A.; Park, Gyungsoon; Borkovich, Katherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphatases are integral components of the cellular signaling machinery in eukaryotes, regulating diverse aspects of growth and development. The genome of the filamentous fungus and model organism Neurospora crassa encodes catalytic subunits for 30 protein phosphatase genes. In this study, we have characterized 24 viable N. crassa phosphatase catalytic subunit knockout mutants for phenotypes during growth, asexual development, and sexual development. We found that 91% of the mutants had defects in at least one of these traits, whereas 29% possessed phenotypes in all three. Chemical sensitivity screens were conducted to reveal additional phenotypes for the mutants. This resulted in the identification of at least one chemical sensitivity phenotype for 17 phosphatase knockout mutants, including novel chemical sensitivities for two phosphatase mutants lacking a growth or developmental phenotype. Hence, chemical sensitivity or growth/developmental phenotype was observed for all 24 viable mutants. We investigated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation profiles in the phosphatase mutants and identified nine potential candidates for regulators of the p38 MAPK. We demonstrated that the PP2C class phosphatase pph-8 (NCU04600) is an important regulator of female sexual development in N. crassa. In addition, we showed that the Δcsp-6 (ΔNCU08380) mutant exhibits a phenotype similar to the previously identified conidial separation mutants, Δcsp-1 and Δcsp-2, that lack transcription factors important for regulation of conidiation and the circadian clock. PMID:24347630

  2. Natural products possessing protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibitory activity found in the last decades

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Cheng-shi; Liang, Lin-fu; Guo, Yue-wei

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an overview of approximately 300 secondary metabolites with inhibitory activity against protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), which were isolated from various natural sources or derived from synthetic process in the last decades. The structure-activity relationship and the selectivity of some compounds against other protein phosphatases were also discussed. Potential pharmaceutical applications of several PTP1B inhibitors were presented. PMID:22941286

  3. Weak oligomerization of low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatase is conserved from mammals to bacteria.

    PubMed

    Blobel, Jascha; Bernadó, Pau; Xu, Huimin; Jin, Changwen; Pons, Miquel

    2009-08-01

    The well-characterized self-association of a mammalian low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (lmwPTP) produces inactive oligomers that are in equilibrium with active monomers. A role of the inactive oligomers as supramolecular proenzymes has been suggested. The oligomerization equilibrium of YwlE, a lmwPTP from Bacillus subtilis, was studied by NMR. Chemical shift data and NMR relaxation confirm that dimerization takes place through the enzyme's active site, and is fully equivalent to the dimerization previously characterized in a eukaryotic low-molecular-weight phosphatase, with similarly large dissociation constants. The similarity between the oligomerization of prokaryotic and eukaryotic phosphatases extends beyond the dimer and involves higher order oligomers detected by NMR relaxation analysis at high protein concentrations. The conservation across different kingdoms of life suggests a physiological role for lmwPTP oligomerization in spite of the weak association observed in vitro. Structural data suggest that substrate modulation of the oligomerization equilibrium could be a regulatory mechanism leading to the generation of signaling pulses. The presence of a phenylalanine residue in the dimerization site of YwlE, replacing a tyrosine residue conserved in all eukaryotic lmwPTPs, demonstrates that lmwPTP regulation by oligomerization can be independent from tyrosine phosphorylation.

  4. Nuclear localization of an O-glycosylated protein phosphotyrosine phosphatase from human cells.

    PubMed

    Meikrantz, W; Smith, D M; Sladicka, M M; Schlegel, R A

    1991-03-01

    Histochemical staining of immunoprecipitates of p65, a component of human M phase-promoting factor, identified the molecule as having phosphatase activity. The enzyme, purified 3400-fold from mitotic cell extracts by (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, DEAE chromatography, and immunoaffinity chromatography on immobilized anti-p65 IgG, was inhibited by Zn2- and Na3VO4 but not NaF or beta-glycerophosphate; 32P-labeled poly(Glu, Tyr) was more efficiently dephosphorylated than phosphorylated histone or phosphorylase a. Indirect immunofluorescence showed most of the phosphatase to be localized in the nucleus of interphase cells, with a fine, granular distribution unaltered by detergent extraction; in mitotic cells, p65 was localized on chromosomes. ELISA of subcellular fractions confirmed this localization. Immunoreactive p65 was recovered from immobilized wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) upon elution with N-acetylglucosamine; similarly, WGA recognized immunoaffinity-purified p65 on blots. Alkaline hydrolysis of blotted protein prevented WGA binding, indicating that phosphatase p65, like a small group of other nuclear proteins, contains O-linked carbohydrate terminating in N-acetylglucosamine. PMID:1647397

  5. Pez: a novel human cDNA encoding protein tyrosine phosphatase- and ezrin-like domains.

    PubMed

    Smith, A L; Mitchell, P J; Shipley, J; Gusterson, B A; Rogers, M V; Crompton, M R

    1995-04-26

    We have isolated cDNAs from normal human breast tissue and breast tumour cells that encode a protein (pez) with features of a novel non-receptor tyrosine phosphatase possessing N-terminal sequence homology to the ezrin-band 4.1-merlin-radixin protein family. Northern blot analysis indicates that pez is expressed in a variety of human tissues including kidney, skeletal muscle, lung and placenta. Fluorescence in situ hybridization has mapped pez to chromosome 1 region q32.2-41. Sequence identity to a characterized polymorphic marker confirms this localization. PMID:7733990

  6. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Mitogen Kinase Phosphatase 1: A Critical Interplay in Macrophage Biology

    PubMed Central

    Lloberas, Jorge; Valverde-Estrella, Lorena; Tur, Juan; Vico, Tania; Celada, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are necessary in multiple processes during the immune response or inflammation. This review emphasizes the critical role of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and mitogen kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in the functional activities of macrophages. While the phosphorylation of MAPKs is required for macrophage activation or proliferation, MKP-1 dephosphorylates these kinases, thus playing a balancing role in the control of macrophage behavior. MKP-1 is a nuclear-localized dual-specificity phosphatase whose expression is regulated at multiple levels, including at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. The regulatory role of MKP-1 in the interplay between MAPK phosphorylation/dephosphorylation makes this molecule a critical regulator of macrophage biology and inflammation. PMID:27446931

  7. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Mitogen Kinase Phosphatase 1: A Critical Interplay in Macrophage Biology.

    PubMed

    Lloberas, Jorge; Valverde-Estrella, Lorena; Tur, Juan; Vico, Tania; Celada, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are necessary in multiple processes during the immune response or inflammation. This review emphasizes the critical role of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and mitogen kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in the functional activities of macrophages. While the phosphorylation of MAPKs is required for macrophage activation or proliferation, MKP-1 dephosphorylates these kinases, thus playing a balancing role in the control of macrophage behavior. MKP-1 is a nuclear-localized dual-specificity phosphatase whose expression is regulated at multiple levels, including at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. The regulatory role of MKP-1 in the interplay between MAPK phosphorylation/dephosphorylation makes this molecule a critical regulator of macrophage biology and inflammation. PMID:27446931

  8. Carboxyl-terminal receptor domains control the differential dephosphorylation of somatostatin receptors by protein phosphatase 1 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Andreas; Kliewer, Andrea; Märtens, Jan Carlo; Nagel, Falko; Schulz, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We have recently identified protein phosphatase 1β (PP1β) as G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) phosphatase for the sst2 somatostatin receptor using siRNA knockdown screening. By contrast, for the sst5 somatostatin receptor we identified protein phosphatase 1γ (PP1γ) as GPCR phosphatase using the same approach. We have also shown that sst2 and sst5 receptors differ substantially in the temporal dynamics of their dephosphorylation and trafficking patterns. Whereas dephosphorylation and recycling of the sst2 receptor requires extended time periods of ∼30 min, dephosphorylation and recycling of the sst5 receptor is completed in less than 10 min. Here, we examined which receptor domains determine the selection of phosphatases for receptor dephosphorylation. We found that generation of tail-swap mutants between sst2 and sst5 was required and sufficient to reverse the patterns of dephosphorylation and trafficking of these two receptors. In fact, siRNA knockdown confirmed that the sst5 receptor carrying the sst2 tail is predominantly dephosphorylated by PP1β, whereas the sst2 receptor carrying the sst5 tail is predominantly dephosphorylated by PP1γ. Thus, the GPCR phosphatase responsible for dephosphorylation of individual somatostatin receptor subtypes is primarily determined by their different carboxyl-terminal receptor domains. This phosphatase specificity has in turn profound consequences for the dephosphorylation dynamics and trafficking patterns of GPCRs.

  9. Redox regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B involves a sulphenyl-amide intermediate.

    PubMed

    Salmeen, Annette; Andersen, Jannik N; Myers, Michael P; Meng, Tzu-Ching; Hinks, John A; Tonks, Nicholas K; Barford, David

    2003-06-12

    The second messenger hydrogen peroxide is required for optimal activation of numerous signal transduction pathways, particularly those mediated by protein tyrosine kinases. One mechanism by which hydrogen peroxide regulates cellular processes is the transient inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases through the reversible oxidization of their catalytic cysteine, which suppresses protein dephosphorylation. Here we describe a structural analysis of the redox-dependent regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), which is reversibly inhibited by oxidation after cells are stimulated with insulin and epidermal growth factor. The sulphenic acid intermediate produced in response to PTP1B oxidation is rapidly converted into a previously unknown sulphenyl-amide species, in which the sulphur atom of the catalytic cysteine is covalently linked to the main chain nitrogen of an adjacent residue. Oxidation of PTP1B to the sulphenyl-amide form is accompanied by large conformational changes in the catalytic site that inhibit substrate binding. We propose that this unusual protein modification both protects the active-site cysteine residue of PTP1B from irreversible oxidation to sulphonic acid and permits redox regulation of the enzyme by promoting its reversible reduction by thiols.

  10. TIMAP-protein phosphatase 1-complex controls endothelin-1 production via ECE-1 dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Boratkó, Anita; Veréb, Zoltán; Petrovski, Goran; Csortos, Csilla

    2016-04-01

    Endothelin induced signaling pathways can affect blood pressure and vascular tone, but the influence of endothelins on tumor cells is also significant. We have detected elevated endothelin-1 secretion from TIMAP (TGF-β inhibited membrane associated protein) depleted vascular endothelial cells. The autocrine signaling activated by the elevated endothelin-1 level through the ETB receptors evoked an angiogenic-like phenotype, the cells assumed an elongated morphology, and enhanced tube formation and wound healing abilities. The depleted protein, TIMAP, is a highly specific and abundant protein in the endothelial cells, and it is a regulatory/targeting subunit for the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c). Protein-protein interaction between the TIMAP-PP1c complex and the endothelin converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) was detected, the latter of which is a transmembrane protein that produces the biologically active 21-amino acid form of endothelin-1 from proendothelin. The results indicate that silencing of TIMAP induces a reduction in TIMAP-PP1c activity connected to ECE-1. This leads to an increase in the amount of ECE-1 protein in the plasma membrane and a consequent increase in endothelin-1 secretion. Similarly, activation of PKC, the kinase responsible for ECE-1 phosphorylation increased ECE-1 protein level in the membrane fraction of the endothelial cells. The elevated ECE-1 level was mitigated in time in normal cells, but was clearly preserved in TIMAP-depleted cells. Overall, our results indicate that PKC-phosphorylated ECE-1 is a TIMAP-PP1c substrate and this phosphatase complex has an important role in endothelin-1 production of EC through the regulation of ECE-1 activity.

  11. TIMAP-protein phosphatase 1-complex controls endothelin-1 production via ECE-1 dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Boratkó, Anita; Veréb, Zoltán; Petrovski, Goran; Csortos, Csilla

    2016-04-01

    Endothelin induced signaling pathways can affect blood pressure and vascular tone, but the influence of endothelins on tumor cells is also significant. We have detected elevated endothelin-1 secretion from TIMAP (TGF-β inhibited membrane associated protein) depleted vascular endothelial cells. The autocrine signaling activated by the elevated endothelin-1 level through the ETB receptors evoked an angiogenic-like phenotype, the cells assumed an elongated morphology, and enhanced tube formation and wound healing abilities. The depleted protein, TIMAP, is a highly specific and abundant protein in the endothelial cells, and it is a regulatory/targeting subunit for the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c). Protein-protein interaction between the TIMAP-PP1c complex and the endothelin converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) was detected, the latter of which is a transmembrane protein that produces the biologically active 21-amino acid form of endothelin-1 from proendothelin. The results indicate that silencing of TIMAP induces a reduction in TIMAP-PP1c activity connected to ECE-1. This leads to an increase in the amount of ECE-1 protein in the plasma membrane and a consequent increase in endothelin-1 secretion. Similarly, activation of PKC, the kinase responsible for ECE-1 phosphorylation increased ECE-1 protein level in the membrane fraction of the endothelial cells. The elevated ECE-1 level was mitigated in time in normal cells, but was clearly preserved in TIMAP-depleted cells. Overall, our results indicate that PKC-phosphorylated ECE-1 is a TIMAP-PP1c substrate and this phosphatase complex has an important role in endothelin-1 production of EC through the regulation of ECE-1 activity. PMID:26806547

  12. Structure of Human Dual Specificity Protein Phosphatase 23, VHZ, Enzyme-Substrate/Product Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal,R.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2008-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a crucial role in mitogenic signal transduction and regulation of cell growth and differentiation. Dual specificity protein phosphatase 23 (DUSP23) or VHZ mediates dephosphorylation of phospho-tyrosyl (pTyr) and phospho-seryl/threonyl (pSer/pThr) residues in specific proteins. In vitro, it can dephosphorylate p44ERK1 but not p54SAPK-{beta} and enhance activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38. Human VHZ, the smallest of the catalytically active protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) reported to date (150 residues), is a class I Cys-based PTP and bears the distinctive active site signature motif HCXXGXXRS(T). We present the crystal structure of VHZ determined at 1.93 angstrom resolution. The polypeptide chain adopts the typical a{beta}a PTP fold, giving rise to a shallow active site cleft that supports dual phosphorylated substrate specificity. Within our crystals, the Thr-135-Tyr-136 from a symmetry-related molecule bind in the active site with a malate ion, where they mimic the phosphorylated TY motif of the MAPK activation loop in an enzyme-substrate/product complex. Analyses of intermolecular interactions between the enzyme and this pseudo substrate/product along with functional analysis of Phe-66, Leu-97, and Phe-99 residues provide insights into the mechanism of substrate binding and catalysis in VHZ.

  13. Analysis of protein tyrosine phosphatase interactions with microarrayed phosphopeptide substrates using imaging mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Christopher J.; Hines, Harry B.; Ulrich, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Microarrays of peptide and recombinant protein libraries are routinely used for high-throughput studies of protein-protein interactions and enzymatic activities. Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is currently applied as a method to localize analytes on thin tissue sections and other surfaces. Here, we have applied IMS as a label-free means to analyze protein-peptide interactions in a microarray-based phosphatase assay. This IMS strategy visualizes the entire microarray in one composite image by collecting a pre-defined raster of MALDI-TOF MS spectra over the surface of the chip. Examining the bacterial tyrosine phosphatase YopH, we used IMS as a label-free means to visualize enzyme binding and activity with a microarrayed phosphopeptide library printed on chips coated with either gold or indium-tin oxide. Further, we demonstrate that microarray-based IMS can be coupled with surface plasmon resonance imaging to add kinetic analyses to measured binding interactions. The method described here is within the capabilities of many modern MALDI-TOF instruments and has general utility for the label-free analysis of microarray assays. PMID:23906642

  14. No obvious abnormality in mice deficient in receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta.

    PubMed

    Harroch, S; Palmeri, M; Rosenbluth, J; Custer, A; Okigaki, M; Shrager, P; Blum, M; Buxbaum, J D; Schlessinger, J

    2000-10-01

    The development of neurons and glia is governed by a multitude of extracellular signals that control protein tyrosine phosphorylation, a process regulated by the action of protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Receptor PTPbeta (RPTPbeta; also known as PTPzeta) is expressed predominantly in the nervous system and exhibits structural features common to cell adhesion proteins, suggesting that this phosphatase participates in cell-cell communication. It has been proposed that the three isoforms of RPTPbeta play a role in regulation of neuronal migration, neurite outgrowth, and gliogenesis. To investigate the biological functions of this PTP, we have generated mice deficient in RPTPbeta. RPTPbeta-deficient mice are viable, are fertile, and showed no gross anatomical alterations in the nervous system or other organs. In contrast to results of in vitro experiments, our study demonstrates that RPTPbeta is not essential for neurite outgrowth and node formation in mice. The ultrastructure of nerves of the central nervous system in RPTPbeta-deficient mice suggests a fragility of myelin. However, conduction velocity was not altered in RPTPbeta-deficient mice. The normal development of neurons and glia in RPTPbeta-deficient mice demonstrates that RPTPbeta function is not necessary for these processes in vivo or that loss of RPTPbeta can be compensated for by other PTPs expressed in the nervous system. PMID:11003666

  15. Inhibition by ajoene of protein tyrosine phosphatase activity in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Villar, R; Alvariño, M T; Flores, R

    1997-02-01

    The effects of ajoene (a potent antithrombotic agent obtained from garlic) on the tyrosine phosphorylation status of human platelet proteins were investigated by immunoblotting-based experiments using an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody. Incubation of platelets with ajoene enhanced the phosphorylation of at least four proteins (estimated MWs 76, 80, 84 and 120 kDa), both in resting platelets and in platelets subsequently stimulated with thrombin (0.1 U/ml). This effect was both dose- and incubation-time-dependent. High concentrations of ajoene (50 microM) or long periods of incubation (10 min) led to nonselective 'hyperphosphorylation' of numerous proteins. The effects of ajoene on protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity in platelet lysates were also investigated, PTP activity was inhibited when platelets were incubated with ajoene before lysis, but not when ajoene was added to lysates of platelets which had not been pre-exposed to ajoene.

  16. Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase and Kinase Specificity in Regulation of SRC and Breast Tumor Kinase* ♦

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Gaofeng; Aleem, Saadat; Yang, Ming; Miller, W. Todd; Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant evidence to the contrary, the view that phosphatases are “nonspecific” still pervades the field. Systems biology approaches to defining how signal transduction pathways are integrated at the level of whole organisms also often downplay the contribution of phosphatases, defining them as “erasers” that serve merely to restore the system to its basal state. Here, we present a study that counteracts the idea of “nonspecific phosphatases.” We have characterized two structurally similar and functionally related kinases, BRK and SRC, which are regulated by combinations of activating autophosphorylation and inhibitory C-terminal sites of tyrosine phosphorylation. We demonstrated specificity at the level of the kinases in that SRMS phosphorylated the C terminus of BRK, but not SRC; in contrast, CSK is the kinase responsible for C-terminal phosphorylation of SRC, but not BRK. For the phosphatases, we observed that RNAi-mediated suppression of PTP1B resulted in opposing effects on the activity of BRK and SRC and have defined the mechanisms underlying this specificity. PTP1B inhibited BRK by directly dephosphorylating the Tyr-342 autophosphorylation site. In contrast, PTP1B potentiated SRC activity, but not by dephosphorylating SRC itself directly; instead, PTP1B regulated the interaction between CBP/PAG and CSK. SRC associated with, and phosphorylated, the transmembrane protein CBP/PAG at Tyr-317, resulting in CSK recruitment. We identified PAG as a substrate of PTP1B, and dephosphorylation abolished recruitment of the inhibitory kinase CSK. Overall, these findings illustrate how the combinatorial effects of PTKs and PTPs may be integrated to regulate signaling, with both classes of enzymes displaying exquisite specificity. PMID:25897081

  17. Differential expression of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases accompanies the reorganisation of the retina upon laser lesion.

    PubMed

    Besser, Manuela; Horvat-Bröcker, Andrea; Eysel, Ulf T; Faissner, Andreas

    2009-09-01

    The regulation of protein phosphorylation plays an essential role in virtually all aspects of eukaryotic development. Beginning with the regulation of the cell cycle to cellular proliferation and differentiation, the delicate balance between the phosphorylating activity of kinases and the dephosphorylation by phosphatases controls the outcome of many signal transduction cascades. The generation of cellular diversity occurs in an environment that is structured by the extracellular matrix (ECM) which forms a surrounding niche for stem and progenitor cells. Cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions elicit specific signaling pathways that control cellular behavior. In pathological situations such as neural degenerating diseases, gene expression patterns and finally the composition of the ECM change dramatically. This leads to changes of cell behavior and finally results in the failure of regeneration and functional restoration in the adult central nervous system. In order to study the roles of tyrosine phosphatases and ECM in this context, we analyzed the effects of laser-induced retinal injury on the regulation of the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTP) RPTPBr7, Phogrin and RPTPbeta/zeta. The latter occurs in several isoforms, including the soluble released chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan phosphacan that is expressed in the developing retina. The receptor variants RPTPbeta/zeta(long) and RPTPbeta/zeta(short) may serve as receptors of tenascin-proteins and serve as modulators of cell intrinsic signaling in response to the ECM. Using quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis, we show here a time-dependent pattern of gene expression of these molecules following laser lesions of the retina.

  18. Structure of thermotoga maritima stationary phase survival protein SurE : a novel acid phosphatase.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R.-G; Skarina, T.; Katz, J. E.; Khachatryan, A; Vyas, S.; Arrowsmith, C. H.; Clarke, S.; Edwards, A.; Joachimiak, A.; Savchenko, A.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Toronto; Univ. of California; Clinical Genomics Centre /Proteomics, Univ. Health Network

    2001-11-01

    Background: The rpoS, nlpD, pcm, and surE genes are among many whose expression is induced during the stationary phase of bacterial growth. rpoS codes for the stationary-phase RNA polymerase {sigma} subunit, and nlpD codes for a lipoprotein. The pcm gene product repairs damaged proteins by converting the atypical isoaspartyl residues back to L-aspartyls. The physiological and biochemical functions of surE are unknown, but its importance in stress is supported by the duplication of the surE gene in E. coli subjected to high-temperature growth. The pcm and surE genes are highly conserved in bacteria, archaea, and plants. Results: The structure of SurE from Thermotoga maritima was determined at 2.0 Angstroms. The SurE monomer is composed of two domains; a conserved N-terminal domain, a Rossman fold, and a C-terminal oligomerization domain, a new fold. Monomers form a dimer that assembles into a tetramer. Biochemical analysis suggests that SurE is an acid phosphatase, with an optimum pH of 5.5-6.2. The active site was identified in the N-terminal domain through analysis of conserved residues. Structure-based site-directed point mutations abolished phosphatase activity. T. maritima SurE intra- and intersubunit salt bridges were identified that may explain the SurE thermostability. Conclusions: The structure of SurE provided information about the protein's fold, oligomeric state, and active site. The protein possessed magnesium-dependent acid phosphatase activity, but the physiologically relevant substrate(s) remains to be identified. The importance of three of the assigned active site residues in catalysis was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis.

  19. Ankyrin domain of myosin 16 influences motor function and decreases protein phosphatase catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Kengyel, András; Bécsi, Bálint; Kónya, Zoltán; Sellers, James R; Erdődi, Ferenc; Nyitrai, Miklós

    2015-05-01

    The unconventional myosin 16 (Myo16), which may have a role in regulation of cell cycle and cell proliferation, can be found in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. It has a unique, eight ankyrin repeat containing pre-motor domain, the so-called ankyrin domain (My16Ank). Ankyrin repeats are present in several other proteins, e.g., in the regulatory subunit (MYPT1) of the myosin phosphatase holoenzyme, which binds to the protein phosphatase-1 catalytic subunit (PP1c). My16Ank shows sequence similarity to MYPT1. In this work, the interactions of recombinant and isolated My16Ank were examined in vitro. To test the effects of My16Ank on myosin motor function, we used skeletal muscle myosin or nonmuscle myosin 2B. The results showed that My16Ank bound to skeletal muscle myosin (K D ≈ 2.4 µM) and the actin-activated ATPase activity of heavy meromyosin (HMM) was increased in the presence of My16Ank, suggesting that the ankyrin domain can modulate myosin motor activity. My16Ank showed no direct interaction with either globular or filamentous actin. We found, using a surface plasmon resonance-based binding technique, that My16Ank bound to PP1cα (K D ≈ 540 nM) and also to PP1cδ (K D ≈ 600 nM) and decreased its phosphatase activity towards the phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain. Our results suggest that one function of the ankyrin domain is probably to regulate the function of Myo16. It may influence the motor activity, and in complex with the PP1c isoforms, it can play an important role in the targeted dephosphorylation of certain, as yet unidentified, intracellular proteins.

  20. Balance between DBT/CKIε kinase and protein phosphatase activities regulate phosphorylation and stability of Drosophila CLOCK protein

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Edery, Isaac

    2006-01-01

    The first circadian-relevant kinase to be identified was DOUBLE-TIME (DBT) in Drosophila, a homolog of vertebrate CKIε, which regulates the progressive phosphorylation and stability of PERIOD (PER) proteins in animals. A negative feedback loop wherein PER directly inhibits the transcriptional activity of the CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC) heterodimer is central to the generation of molecular rhythms and normal progression of the clock in Drosophila. We show that DBT activity is required for the phase-specific hyperphosphorylation of CLK in vivo, an event that correlates with times of maximal repression in per RNA levels. The ability of DBT to hyperphosphorylate CLK, enhance its degradation, and evoke modest inhibition of CLK-dependent transactivation from circadian promoter elements was directly shown in cultured Drosophila cells. Intriguingly, DBT seems to function in close partnership with the PER-relevant protein phosphatase 2A, resulting in dynamic equilibrium between hypo- and hyperphosphorylated isoforms of CLK. This balancing mechanism might act to stabilize the limiting levels of CLK against stochastic fluctuations minimizing the propagation of “molecular noise” in the feedback circuitry. Also, the subcellular localization of CLK was altered from predominately nuclear to strong cytoplasmic staining in the presence of PER. These results suggest that, in contrast to mammalian clocks, circadian transcriptional inhibition in Drosophila involves displacement of the positive factors from chromatin. These results also demonstrate that DBT can target both negative and positive factors in circadian feedback loops and support a conserved role for dynamic regulation of reversible phosphorylation in directly modulating the activities of circadian transcription factors. PMID:16603629

  1. The Protein Phosphatases of Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803: Open Reading Frames sll1033 and sll1387 Encode Enzymes That Exhibit both Protein-Serine and Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase Activity In Vitro.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ruiliang; Potters, M B.; Shi, Liang; Kennelly, Peter J.

    2005-09-01

    The open reading frames (ORFs) encoding two potential protein-serine/threonine phosphatases from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 were cloned and their protein products expressed in Escherichia coli cells. The product of ORF sll1033, SynPPM3, is a homologue of the PPM family of protein-serine/threonine phosphatases found in all eukaryotes as well as many members of the Bacteria. Surprisingly, the recombinant protein phosphatase dephosphorylated phosphotyrosine- as well as phosphoserine-containing proteins in vitro. While kinetic analyses indicate that the enzyme was more efficient at dephosphorylating the latter, replacement of Asp(608) by asparagine enhanced activity toward a phosphotyrosine-containing protein fourfold. The product of ORF sll1387, SynPPP1, is the sole homolog of the PPP family of protein phosphatases encoded by the genome of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. Like many other bacterial PPPs, the enzyme dephosphorylated phosphoserine- and phosphotyrosine-containing proteins with comparable efficiencies. However, while previously described PPPs from prokaryotic organisms required the addition of exogenous metal ion cofactors, such as Mg(2+) or Mn(2+), for activity, recombinantly produced SynPPP1 displayed near-maximal activity in the absence of added metals. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry indicated that recombinant SynPPP1 contained significant quantities, 0.32 to 0.44 mol/mole total, of Mg and Mn. In this respect, the cyanobacterial enzyme resembled eukaryotic members of the PPP family, which are metalloproteins. mRNA encoding SynPPP1 or SynPPM3 could be detected in cells grown under many, but not all, environmental conditions.

  2. Potential Role for Purple Acid Phosphatase in the Dephosphorylation of Wall Proteins in Tobacco Cells1[W

    PubMed Central

    Kaida, Rumi; Serada, Satoshi; Norioka, Naoko; Norioka, Shigemi; Neumetzler, Lutz; Pauly, Markus; Sampedro, Javier; Zarra, Ignacio; Hayashi, Takahisa; Kaneko, Takako S.

    2010-01-01

    It is not yet known whether dephosphorylation of proteins catalyzed by phosphatases occurs in the apoplastic space. In this study, we found that tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) purple acid phosphatase could dephosphorylate the phosphoryl residues of three apoplastic proteins, two of which were identified as α-xylosidase and β-glucosidase. The dephosphorylation and phosphorylation of recombinant α-xylosidase resulted in a decrease and an increase in its activity, respectively, when xyloglucan heptasaccharide was used as a substrate. Attempted overexpression of the tobacco purple acid phosphatase NtPAP12 in tobacco cells not only decreased the activity levels of the glycosidases but also increased levels of xyloglucan oligosaccharides and cello-oligosaccharides in the apoplast during the exponential phase. We suggest that purple acid phosphatase controls the activity of α-xylosidase and β-glucosidase, which are responsible for the degradation of xyloglucan oligosaccharides and cello-oligosaccharides in the cell walls. PMID:20357138

  3. Kinetic isotope effects in the characterization of catalysis by protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Hengge, Alvan C

    2015-11-01

    Although thermodynamically favorable, the uncatalyzed hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters is extraordinarily slow, making phosphatases among the most catalytically efficient enzymes known. Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are ubiquitous in biology, and kinetic isotope effects were one of the key mechanistic tools used to discern molecular details of their catalytic mechanism and the transition state for phosphoryl transfer. Later, the unique level of detail KIEs provided led to deeper questions about the potential role of protein motions in PTP catalysis. The recent discovery that such motions are responsible for different catalytic rates between PTPs arose from questions originating from KIE data showing that the transition states and chemical mechanisms are identical, combined with structural data demonstrating superimposable active sites. KIEs also reveal perturbations to the transition state as mutations are made to residues directly involved in chemistry, and to residues that affect protein motions essential for catalysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment. PMID:25840000

  4. Low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase: Multifaceted functions of an evolutionarily conserved enzyme.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Anna; Paoli, Paolo; Santi, Alice; Mugnaioni, Camilla; Toti, Alessandra; Camici, Guido; Cirri, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    Originally identified as a low molecular weight acid phosphatase, LMW-PTP is actually a protein tyrosine phosphatase that acts on many phosphotyrosine-containing cellular proteins that are primarily involved in signal transduction. Differences in sequence, structure, and substrate recognition as well as in subcellular localization in different organisms enable LMW-PTP to exert many different functions. In fact, during evolution, the LMW-PTP structure adapted to perform different catalytic actions depending on the organism type. In bacteria, this enzyme is involved in the biosynthesis of group 1 and 4 capsules, but it is also a virulence factor in pathogenic strains. In yeast, LMW-PTPs dephosphorylate immunophilin Fpr3, a peptidyl-prolyl-cis-trans isomerase member of the protein chaperone family. In humans, LMW-PTP is encoded by the ACP1 gene, which is composed of three different alleles, each encoding two active enzymes produced by alternative RNA splicing. In animals, LMW-PTP dephosphorylates a number of growth factor receptors and modulates their signalling processes. The involvement of LMW-PTP in cancer progression and in insulin receptor regulation as well as its actions as a virulence factor in a number of pathogenic bacterial strains may promote the search for potent, selective and bioavailable LMW-PTP inhibitors. PMID:27421795

  5. Usage of tautomycetin, a novel inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), reveals that PP1 is a positive regulator of Raf-1 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Shinya; Shima, Hiroshi; Tanuma, Nobuhiro; Matsuura, Nobuyasu; Takekawa, Mutsuhiro; Urano, Takeshi; Kataoka, Tohru; Ubukata, Makoto; Kikuchi, Kunimi

    2003-01-01

    Protein phosphatase type 1 (PP1), together with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), is a major eukaryotic serine/threonine protein phosphatase involved in regulation of numerous cell functions. Although the roles of PP2A have been studied extensively using okadaic acid, a well known inhibitor of PP2A, biological analysis of PP1 has remained restricted because of lack of a specific inhibitor. Recently we reported that tautomycetin (TC) is a highly specific inhibitor of PP1. To elucidate the biological effects of TC, we demonstrated in preliminary experiments that treatment of COS-7 cells with 5 microm TC for 5 h inhibits endogenous PP1 by more than 90% without affecting PP2A activity. Therefore, using TC as a specific PP1 inhibitor, the biological effect of PP1 on MAPK signaling was examined. First, we found that inhibition of PP1 in COS-7 cells by TC specifically suppresses activation of ERK, among three MAPK kinases (ERK, JNK, and p38). TC-mediated inhibition of PP1 also suppressed activation of Raf-1, resulting in the inactivation of the MEK-ERK pathway. To examine the role of PP1 in regulation of Raf-1, we overexpressed the PP1 catalytic subunit (PP1C) in COS-7 cells and found that PP1C enhanced activation of Raf-1 activity, whereas phosphatase-dead PP1C blocked Raf-1 activation. Furthermore, a physical interaction between PP1C and Raf-1 was also observed. These data strongly suggest that PP1 positively regulates Raf-1 in vivo.

  6. Soybean nodule autoregulation receptor kinase phosphorylates two kinase-associated protein phosphatases in vitro.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Akira; Hirani, Tripty A; Oakes, Marie; Kereszt, Attila; Kobe, Bostjan; Djordjevic, Michael A; Gresshoff, Peter M

    2008-09-12

    The NARK (nodule autoregulation receptor kinase) gene, a negative regulator of cell proliferation in nodule primordia in several legumes, encodes a receptor kinase that consists of an extracellular leucine-rich repeat and an intracellular serine/threonine protein kinase domain. The putative catalytic domain of NARK was expressed and purified as a maltose-binding or a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The recombinant NARK proteins showed autophosphorylation activity in vitro. Several regions of the NARK kinase domain were shown by mass spectrometry to possess phosphoresidues. The kinase-inactive protein K724E failed to autophosphorylate, as did three other proteins corresponding to phenotypically detected mutants defective in whole plant autoregulation of nodulation. A wild-type NARK fusion protein transphosphorylated a kinase-inactive mutant NARK fusion protein, suggesting that it is capable of intermolecular autophosphorylation in vitro. In addition, Ser-861 and Thr-963 in the NARK kinase catalytic domain were identified as phosphorylation sites through site-directed mutagenesis. The genes coding for the kinase-associated protein phosphatases KAPP1 and KAPP2, two putative interacting components of NARK, were isolated. NARK kinase domain phosphorylated recombinant KAPP proteins in vitro. Autophosphorylated NARK kinase domain was, in turn, dephosphorylated by both KAPP1 and KAPP2. Our results suggest a model for signal transduction involving NARK in the control of nodule development.

  7. Identification and Biochemical Characterization of Protein Phosphatase 5 from the Cantharidin-Producing Blister Beetle, Epicauta chinensis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi’en; Lü, Shumin; Zhang, Yalin

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is a unique member of serine/threonine phosphatases which has been recognized in regulation of diverse cellular processes. A cDNA fragment encoding PP5 (EcPP5) was cloned and characterized from the cantharidin-producing blister beetle, E. chinensis. EcPP5 contains an open reading frame of 1500 bp that encodes a protein of 56.89 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence shares 88% and 68% identities to the PP5 of Tribolium castaneum and humans, respectively. Analysis of the primary sequence shows that EcPP5 has three TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) motifs at its N-terminal region and contains a highly conserved C-terminal catalytic domain. RT-PCR reveals that EcPP5 is expressed in all developmental stages and in different tissues. The recombinant EcPP5 (rEcPP5) was produced in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The purified protein exhibited phosphatase activity towards pNPP (p-nitrophenyl phosphate) and phosphopeptides, and its activity can be enhanced by arachidonic acid. In vitro inhibition study revealed that protein phosphatase inhibitors, okadaic acid, cantharidin, norcantharidin and endothall, inhibited its activity. Further, protein phosphatase activity of total soluble protein extract from E. chinensis adults could be impeded by these inhibitors suggesting there might be some mechanism to protect this beetle from being damaged by its self-produced cantharidin. PMID:24351830

  8. Role of Protein Phosphorylation and Tyrosine Phosphatases in the Adrenal Regulation of Steroid Synthesis and Mitochondrial Function.

    PubMed

    Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Gorostizaga, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana F; Mori Sequeiros García, M Mercedes; Maloberti, Paula M; Orlando, Ulises D; Mele, Pablo G; Poderoso, Cecilia; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2016-01-01

    In adrenocortical cells, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) promotes the activation of several protein kinases. The action of these kinases is linked to steroid production, mainly through steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), whose expression and activity are dependent on protein phosphorylation events at genomic and non-genomic levels. Hormone-dependent mitochondrial dynamics and cell proliferation are functions also associated with protein kinases. On the other hand, protein tyrosine dephosphorylation is an additional component of the ACTH signaling pathway, which involves the "classical" protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), such as Src homology domain (SH) 2-containing PTP (SHP2c), and members of the MAP kinase phosphatase (MKP) family, such as MKP-1. PTPs are rapidly activated by posttranslational mechanisms and participate in hormone-stimulated steroid production. In this process, the SHP2 tyrosine phosphatase plays a crucial role in a mechanism that includes an acyl-CoA synthetase-4 (Acsl4), arachidonic acid (AA) release and StAR induction. In contrast, MKPs in steroidogenic cells have a role in the turn-off of the hormonal signal in ERK-dependent processes such as steroid synthesis and, perhaps, cell proliferation. This review analyzes the participation of these tyrosine phosphates in the ACTH signaling pathway and the action of kinases and phosphatases in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and steroid production. In addition, the participation of kinases and phosphatases in the signal cascade triggered by different stimuli in other steroidogenic tissues is also compared to adrenocortical cell/ACTH and discussed.

  9. Role of Protein Phosphorylation and Tyrosine Phosphatases in the Adrenal Regulation of Steroid Synthesis and Mitochondrial Function.

    PubMed

    Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Gorostizaga, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana F; Mori Sequeiros García, M Mercedes; Maloberti, Paula M; Orlando, Ulises D; Mele, Pablo G; Poderoso, Cecilia; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2016-01-01

    In adrenocortical cells, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) promotes the activation of several protein kinases. The action of these kinases is linked to steroid production, mainly through steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), whose expression and activity are dependent on protein phosphorylation events at genomic and non-genomic levels. Hormone-dependent mitochondrial dynamics and cell proliferation are functions also associated with protein kinases. On the other hand, protein tyrosine dephosphorylation is an additional component of the ACTH signaling pathway, which involves the "classical" protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), such as Src homology domain (SH) 2-containing PTP (SHP2c), and members of the MAP kinase phosphatase (MKP) family, such as MKP-1. PTPs are rapidly activated by posttranslational mechanisms and participate in hormone-stimulated steroid production. In this process, the SHP2 tyrosine phosphatase plays a crucial role in a mechanism that includes an acyl-CoA synthetase-4 (Acsl4), arachidonic acid (AA) release and StAR induction. In contrast, MKPs in steroidogenic cells have a role in the turn-off of the hormonal signal in ERK-dependent processes such as steroid synthesis and, perhaps, cell proliferation. This review analyzes the participation of these tyrosine phosphates in the ACTH signaling pathway and the action of kinases and phosphatases in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and steroid production. In addition, the participation of kinases and phosphatases in the signal cascade triggered by different stimuli in other steroidogenic tissues is also compared to adrenocortical cell/ACTH and discussed. PMID:27375556

  10. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity of CD45 is activated by sequential phosphorylation by two kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Stover, D R; Walsh, K A

    1994-01-01

    We describe a potential regulatory mechanism for the transmembrane protein-tyrosine phosphatase CD45. Phosphorylation on both tyrosine and serine residues in vitro results in an activation of CD45 specifically toward one artificial substrate but not another. The activation of these kinases appears to be order dependent, as it is enhanced when phosphorylation of tyrosine precedes that of serine but phosphorylation in the reverse order yields no activation. Any of four protein-tyrosine kinases tested, in combination with the protein-serine/threonine kinase, casein kinase II, was capable of mediating this activation in vitro. The time course of phosphorylation of CD45 in response to T-cell activation is consistent with the possibility that this regulatory mechanism is utilized in vivo. Images PMID:7518565

  11. Dual-Specificity Phosphatase 4 Regulates STAT5 Protein Stability and Helper T Cell Polarization*

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Fang-Hsuean; Chan, Yi-Chiao; Huang, Ching-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Immune responses are critically regulated by the functions of CD4 helper T cells. Based on their secreted cytokines, helper T cells are further categorized into different subsets like Treg or Th17 cells, which suppress or promote inflammatory responses, respectively. Signals from IL-2 activate the transcription factor STAT5 to promote Treg but suppress Th17 cell differentiation. Our previous results found that the deficiency of a dual-specificity phosphatase, DUSP4, induced STAT5 hyper-activation, enhanced IL-2 signaling, and increased T cell proliferation. In this report, we examined the effects of DUSP4 deficiency on helper T cell differentiation and STAT5 regulation. Our in vivo data showed that DUSP4 mice were more resistant to the induction of autoimmune encephalitis, while in vitro differentiations revealed enhanced iTreg and reduced Th17 polarization in DUSP4-deficient T cells. To study the cause of this altered helper T cell polarization, we performed luciferase reporter assays and confirmed that, as predicted by our previous report, DUSP4 over-expression suppressed the transcription factor activity of STAT5. Surprisingly, we also found that DUSP4-deficient T but not B cells exhibited elevated STAT5 protein levels, and over-expressed DUSP4 destabilized STAT5 in vitro; moreover, this destabilization required the phosphatase activity of DUSP4, and was insensitive to MG132 treatment. Finally, domain-mapping results showed that both the substrate-interacting and the phosphatase domains of DUSP4 were required for its optimal interaction with STAT5, while the coiled-coil domain of STAT5 appeared to hinder this interaction. Our data thus provide the first genetic evidence that DUSP4 is important for helper T cell development. In addition, they also help uncover the novel, DUSP4-mediated regulation of STAT5 protein stability. PMID:26710253

  12. Phosphorylation of dis2 protein phosphatase at the C-terminal cdc2 consensus and its potential role in cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Yamano, H; Ishii, K; Yanagida, M

    1994-01-01

    We show that the fission yeast dis2 protein phosphatase, which is highly similar to mammalian type 1 phosphatase, is a phosphoprotein containing phosphoserine (phospho-S) and threonine (phospho-T). It has several phosphorylation sites, two of which locate in the C-terminus. Phospho-T was abolished in the alanine substitution mutant at the C-terminal T316, which is conserved as a residue in the cdc2 consensus, TPPR, in a number of type 1-like phosphatases. In G2-arrested cdc2-L7 cells, the degree of T316 phosphorylation was reduced, whereas it was enhanced in metaphase-arrested nuc2-663 mutant cells. Phospho-T was produced in dis2 by fission yeast cdc2 kinase, but not in the substitution mutant A316, indicating that the T316 residue was the site for cdc2 kinase in vitro. Phosphatase activity of wild type dis2 was reduced by incubation with cdc2 kinase, but that of mutant dis2-A316 was not. Phosphorylation of T316 hence has a potential significance in cell cycle control in conjunction with cdc2 kinase activation and inactivation. Overexpression phenotypes of wild type dis2+, sds21+ and mutant dis2-A316, sds21-TPPR genes were consistent with negative regulation of dis2 by phosphorylation. This type of regulation would explain why cells harboring the dis2-11 mutation enter mitosis but fail to exit from it. Images PMID:7957097

  13. Characterization and genomic mapping of genes and pseudogenes of a new human protein tyrosine phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhaoyang; Lee, Cheng-Chi; Monckton, D.G.

    1996-07-01

    Previously described protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are classified into three types according to their sequence homology and structural features. Here we describe the characterization of genes and pseudogenes of a member of a fourth type of PTP, designated protein tyrosine phosphatase 4A (PTP4A). The 167-amino-acid human PTPs, but does not show any other sequence homology to any of the previously described PTPs. Two cDNA encoding PTP4A that differed in their noncoding regions were isolated. Another cDNA that has a high level of sequence identity with these two cDNAs and a deletion in the coding region was also isolated. Northern analysis using a probe from a common 3{prime}-untranslated region of the cDNAs recognized mRNAs of about 2 and 4 kb. Both species of mRNA were seen in all human adult and fetal tissues tested. Fluorescence in situ hybridization mapping of the corresponding yeast artificial chromosome clones and sequence-tagged site analysis suggested that one of the PTP4A coding genes is located at 1p35 and the other is on chromosome 11. A processed pseudogene for PTP4A was found in the BRCA1 region of 17q21 and shares 96% sequence identity to one of the PTP4A coding cDNAs. Our studies also suggest the existence of another processed pseudogene on chromosome 11. 31 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Optimization of intracellular microcystin-LR extraction for its analysis by protein phosphatase inhibition assay.

    PubMed

    Sevilla, E; Smienk, H; Razquin, P; Mata, L; Peleato, M L

    2009-01-01

    Microcystins are toxins produced by some strains of cyanobacteria. Several methods have been developed to allow the quantification of microcystins, which are mainly endotoxins. Among those methods, the protein phosphatase inhibition assay is a good candidate as a screening method because of its sensitivity, simplicity and specificity. In this work a method for intracellular microcystin extraction in field water samples and lab cyanobacterial cultures prior to their analysis by protein phosphatase inhibition assay has been optimized. Microcystin-LR and Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 were used as reference microcystin and strain, respectively, in order to optimize the protocol. The protocol consists on filtering the sample through a nylon filter of 0.8 microm, filter extraction with methanol 80% 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) 0.1% tween 20, extract centrifugation and supernatant dilution (1/20). The establishment of an extraction protocol was carried out determining the extraction volume, time of extraction and number of extractions. The advantages of the method developed in this work are basically its simplicity and avoiding the use of specific and expensive equipment.

  15. A RP-UFLC Assay for Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases: Focus on Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-Receptor Type 2 (PTPN2).

    PubMed

    Duval, Romain; Bui, Linh-Chi; Berthelet, Jérémy; Dairou, Julien; Mathieu, Cécile; Guidez, Fabien; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Cools, Jan; Chomienne, Christine; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are involved in numerous signaling pathways and dysfunctions of certain of these enzymes have been linked to several human diseases including cancer and autoimmune diseases. PTPN2 is a PTP mainly expressed in hematopoietic cells and involved in growth factor and JAK/STAT signaling pathways. Loss of function analyses in patients with mutation/deletion of the PTPN2 gene and knock-out mouse models indicate that PTPN2 acts as a tumor suppressor in T-cell malignancies and as a regulator of inflammation and immunity. The use of sensitive and quantitative assays is of prime importance to better characterize the biochemical properties of PTPN2 and its biological roles. We report a highly sensitive non-radioactive assay that allows the measurement of the activity of purified PTPN2 and of endogenous PTPN2 immunoprecipitated on agarose beads. The assay relies on separation and quantitation by reverse-phase ultra fast liquid chromatography (RP-UFLC) of a fluorescein-labeled phosphotyrosine peptide substrate derived from the sequence of STAT1. The applicability and reliability of this approach is supported by kinetic and mechanistic studies using PTP inhibitors. More broadly, our PTPN2 assay provides the basis for the design of flexible methods for the measurement of other PTPs. PMID:26040922

  16. A rapid lateral flow immunoassay for the detection of tyrosine phosphatase-like protein IA-2 autoantibodies in human serum.

    PubMed

    Kikkas, Ingrid; Mallone, Roberto; Larger, Etienne; Volland, Hervé; Morel, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from the destruction of pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells and is strongly associated with the presence of islet autoantibodies. Autoantibodies to tyrosine phosphatase-like protein IA-2 (IA-2As) are considered to be highly predictive markers of T1D. We developed a novel lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) based on a bridging format for the rapid detection of IA-2As in human serum samples. In this assay, one site of the IA-2As is bound to HA-tagged-IA-2, which is subsequently captured on the anti-HA-Tag antibody-coated test line on the strip. The other site of the IA-2As is bound to biotinylated IA-2, allowing the complex to be visualized using colloidal gold nanoparticle-conjugated streptavidin. For this study, 35 serum samples from T1D patients and 44 control sera from non-diabetic individuals were analyzed with our novel assay and the results were correlated with two IA-2A ELISAs. Among the 35 serum samples from T1D patients, the IA-2A LFIA, the in-house IA-2A ELISA and the commercial IA-2A ELISA identified as positive 21, 29 and 30 IA-2A-positive sera, respectively. The major advantages of the IA-2A LFIA are its rapidity and simplicity.

  17. A Rapid Lateral Flow Immunoassay for the Detection of Tyrosine Phosphatase-Like Protein IA-2 Autoantibodies in Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Kikkas, Ingrid; Mallone, Roberto; Larger, Etienne; Volland, Hervé; Morel, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from the destruction of pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells and is strongly associated with the presence of islet autoantibodies. Autoantibodies to tyrosine phosphatase-like protein IA-2 (IA-2As) are considered to be highly predictive markers of T1D. We developed a novel lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) based on a bridging format for the rapid detection of IA-2As in human serum samples. In this assay, one site of the IA-2As is bound to HA-tagged-IA-2, which is subsequently captured on the anti-HA-Tag antibody-coated test line on the strip. The other site of the IA-2As is bound to biotinylated IA-2, allowing the complex to be visualized using colloidal gold nanoparticle-conjugated streptavidin. For this study, 35 serum samples from T1D patients and 44 control sera from non-diabetic individuals were analyzed with our novel assay and the results were correlated with two IA-2A ELISAs. Among the 35 serum samples from T1D patients, the IA-2A LFIA, the in-house IA-2A ELISA and the commercial IA-2A ELISA identified as positive 21, 29 and 30 IA-2A-positive sera, respectively. The major advantages of the IA-2A LFIA are its rapidity and simplicity. PMID:25047039

  18. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 negatively regulates MAPK signaling in mouse hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Koichi; Goto, Motomitsu; Onoue, Takeshi; Tsunekawa, Taku; Shibata, Miyuki; Hagimoto, Shigeru; Ito, Yoshihiro; Banno, Ryoichi; Suga, Hidetaka; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Oiso, Yutaka; Arima, Hiroshi

    2014-05-21

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) is shown to negatively regulate MAPK signaling in various peripheral tissues as well as the central nervous system such as cortex, striatum and hippocampus. In this study, we examined whether MKP-1 regulates MAPK signaling in the mouse hypothalamus. Intraperitoneal injection of TNFα significantly increased MKP-1 mRNA expression in paraventricular and arcuate nuclei in the hypothalamus. TNFα treatment induced increases in MKP-1 expression at both mRNA and protein levels, accompanied by the inactivation of MAPK signaling in mouse hypothalamic explants. Inhibition of MKP-1 by its inhibitor or siRNA increased MAPK activity in the explants. Our data indicate that MKP-1 negatively regulates MAPK signaling in the mouse hypothalamus.

  19. PSTPIP: A Tyrosine Phosphorylated Cleavage Furrow–associated Protein that Is a Substrate for a PEST Tyrosine Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Susan; Dowbenko, Donald; Cheng, Jill; Li, Wenlu; Brush, Jennifer; Utzig, Suzan; Simanis, Viesturs; Lasky, Laurence A.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated proteins which interact with the PEST-type protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTP hematopoietic stem cell fraction (HSCF), using the yeast two-hybrid system. This resulted in the identification of proline, serine, threonine phosphatase interacting protein (PSTPIP), a novel member of the actin- associated protein family that is homologous to Schizosaccharomyces pombe CDC15p, a phosphorylated protein involved with the assembly of the actin ring in the cytokinetic cleavage furrow. The binding of PTP HSCF to PSTPIP was induced by a novel interaction between the putative coiled-coil region of PSTPIP and the COOH-terminal, proline-rich region of the phosphatase. PSTPIP is tyrosine phosphorylated both endogenously and in v-Src transfected COS cells, and cotransfection of dominant-negative PTP HSCF results in hyperphosphorylation of PSTPIP. This dominant-negative effect is dependent upon the inclusion of the COOH-terminal, proline-rich PSTPIP-binding region of the phosphatase. Confocal microscopy analysis of endogenous PSTPIP revealed colocalization with the cortical actin cytoskeleton, lamellipodia, and actin-rich cytokinetic cleavage furrow. Overexpression of PSTPIP in 3T3 cells resulted in the formation of extended filopodia, consistent with a role for this protein in actin reorganization. Finally, overexpression of mammalian PSTPIP in exponentially growing S. pombe results in a dominant-negative inhibition of cytokinesis. PSTPIP is therefore a novel actin-associated protein, potentially involved with cytokinesis, whose tyrosine phosphorylation is regulated by PTP HSCF. PMID:9265651

  20. A Nucleoporin Docks Protein Phosphatase 1 to Direct Meiotic Chromosome Segregation and Nuclear Assembly.

    PubMed

    Hattersley, Neil; Cheerambathur, Dhanya; Moyle, Mark; Stefanutti, Marine; Richardson, Amelia; Lee, Kian-Yong; Dumont, Julien; Oegema, Karen; Desai, Arshad

    2016-09-12

    During M-phase entry in metazoans with open mitosis, the concerted action of mitotic kinases disassembles nuclei and promotes assembly of kinetochores-the primary microtubule attachment sites on chromosomes. At M-phase exit, these major changes in cellular architecture must be reversed. Here, we show that the conserved kinetochore-localized nucleoporin MEL-28/ELYS docks the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c) to direct kinetochore disassembly-dependent chromosome segregation during oocyte meiosis I and nuclear assembly during the transition from M phase to interphase. During oocyte meiosis I, MEL-28-PP1c disassembles kinetochores in a timely manner to promote elongation of the acentrosomal spindles that segregate homologous chromosomes. During nuclear assembly, MEL-28 recruits PP1c to the periphery of decondensed chromatin, where it directs formation of a functional nuclear compartment. Thus, a pool of phosphatase activity associated with a kinetochore-localized nucleoporin contributes to two key events that occur during M-phase exit in metazoans: kinetochore disassembly and nuclear reassembly. PMID:27623381

  1. Protein tyrosine phosphatase α in the dorsomedial striatum promotes excessive ethanol-drinking behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ben Hamida, Sami; Darcq, Emmanuel; Wang, Jun; Wu, Su; Phamluong, Khanhky; Kharazia, Viktor; Ron, Dorit

    2013-09-01

    We previously found that excessive ethanol drinking activates Fyn in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) (Wang et al., 2010; Gibb et al., 2011). Ethanol-mediated Fyn activation in the DMS leads to the phosphorylation of the GluN2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, to the enhancement of the channel's activity, and to the development and/or maintenance of ethanol drinking behaviors (Wang et al., 2007, 2010). Protein tyrosine phosphatase α (PTPα) is essential for Fyn kinase activation (Bhandari et al., 1998), and we showed that ethanol-mediated Fyn activation is facilitated by the recruitment of PTPα to synaptic membranes, the compartment where Fyn resides (Gibb et al., 2011). Here we tested the hypothesis that PTPα in the DMS is part of the Fyn/GluN2B pathway and is thus a major contributor to the neuroadaptations underlying excessive ethanol intake behaviors. We found that RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated PTPα knockdown in the DMS reduces excessive ethanol intake and preference in rodents. Importantly, no alterations in water, saccharine/sucrose, or quinine intake were observed. Furthermore, downregulation of PTPα in the DMS of mice significantly reduces ethanol-mediated Fyn activation, GluN2B phosphorylation, and ethanol withdrawal-induced long-term facilitation of NMDAR activity without altering the intrinsic features of DMS neurons. Together, these results position PTPα upstream of Fyn within the DMS and demonstrate the important contribution of the phosphatase to the maladaptive synaptic changes that lead to excessive ethanol intake.

  2. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PTPRS Is an Inhibitory Receptor on Human and Murine Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bunin, Anna; Sisirak, Vanja; Ghosh, Hiyaa S.; Grajkowska, Lucja T.; Hou, Z. Esther; Miron, Michelle; Yang, Cliff; Ceribelli, Michele; Uetani, Noriko; Chaperot, Laurence; Plumas, Joel; Hendriks, Wiljan; Tremblay, Michel L.; Haecker, Hans; Staudt, Louis M.; Green, Peter H.; Bhagat, Govind; Reizis, Boris

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are primary producers of type I interferon (IFN) in response to viruses. The IFN-producing capacity of pDCs is regulated by specific inhibitory receptors, yet none of the known receptors are conserved in evolution. We report that within the human immune system, receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase sigma (PTPRS) is expressed specifically on pDCs. Surface PTPRS was rapidly downregulated after pDC activation, and only PTPRS– pDCs produced IFN-α. Antibody-mediated PTPRS crosslinking inhibited pDC activation, whereas PTPRS knockdown enhanced IFN response in a pDC cell line. Similarly, murine Ptprs and the homologous receptor phosphatase Ptprf were specifically co-expressed in murine pDCs. Haplodeficiency or DC-specific deletion of Ptprs on Ptprf-deficient background were associated with enhanced IFN response of pDCs, leukocyte infiltration in the intestine and mild colitis. Thus, PTPRS represents an evolutionarily conserved pDC-specific inhibitory receptor, and is required to prevent spontaneous IFN production and immune-mediated intestinal inflammation. PMID:26231120

  3. An Affinity-Based Fluorescence Polarization Assay for Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Chen, Lan; Kumar, Sanjai; Wu, Li; Lawrence, David S.; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2007-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are important signaling enzymes that control such fundamental processes as proliferation, differentiation, survival/apoptosis, as well as adhesion and motility. Potent and selective PTP inhibitors serve not only as powerful research tools, but also as potential therapeutics against a variety illness including cancer and diabetes. PTP activity-based assays are widely used in high throughput screening (HTS) campaigns for PTP inhibitor discovery. These assays suffer from a major weakness, in that the reactivity of the active site Cys can cause serious problems as highly reactive oxidizing and alkylating agents may surface as hits. We describe the development of a fluorescence polarization (FP)-based displacement assay that makes the use of an active site Cys to Ser mutant PTP (e.g., PTP1B/C215S) that retains the wild type binding affinity. The potency of library compounds is assessed by their ability to compete with the fluorescently labeled active site ligand for binding to the Cys to Ser PTP mutant. Finally, the substitution of the active site Cys by a Ser renders the mutant PTP insensitive to oxidation and alkylation and thus will likely eliminate “false” positives due to modification of the active site Cys that destroy the phosphatase activity. PMID:17532513

  4. Protein-Protein Interactions in Crystals of the Human Receptor-Type Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase ICA512 Ectodomain

    SciTech Connect

    Primo M. E.; Jakoncic J.; Noguera M.E.; Risso V.A.; Sosa L.; Sica M.P.; Solimena M.; Poskus E. and Ermacora M.

    2011-09-15

    ICA512 (or IA-2) is a transmembrane protein-tyrosine phosphatase located in secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells. Initially, it was identified as one of the main antigens of autoimmune diabetes. Later, it was found that during insulin secretion, the cytoplasmic domain of ICA512 is cleaved and relocated to the nucleus, where it stimulates the transcription of the insulin gene. The role of the other parts of the receptor in insulin secretion is yet to be unveiled. The structures of the intracellular pseudocatalytic and mature extracellular domains are known, but the transmembrane domain and several intracellular and extracellular parts of the receptor are poorly characterized. Moreover the overall structure of the receptor remains to be established. We started to address this issue studying by X-ray crystallography the structure of the mature ectodomain of ICA512 (ME ICA512) and variants thereof. The variants and crystallization conditions were chosen with the purpose of exploring putative association interfaces, metal binding sites and all other structural details that might help, in subsequent works, to build a model of the entire receptor. Several structural features were clarified and three main different association modes of ME ICA512 were identified. The results provide essential pieces of information for the design of new experiments aimed to assess the structure in vivo.

  5. Type 2C protein phosphatase ABI1 is a negative regulator of strawberry fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hai-Feng; Lu, Dong; Sun, Jing-Hua; Li, Chun-Li; Xing, Yu; Qin, Ling; Shen, Yuan-Yue

    2013-04-01

    Although a great deal of progress has been made toward understanding the role of abscisic acid (ABA) in fruit ripening, many components in the ABA signalling pathway remain to be elucidated. Here, a strawberry gene homologous to the Arabidopsis gene ABI1, named FaABI1, was isolated and characterized. The 1641bp cDNA includes an intact open reading frame that encodes a deduced protein of 546 amino acids, in which putative conserved domains were determined by homology analysis. Transcriptional analysis showed that the levels of FaABI1 mRNA expression declined rapidly during strawberry fruit development as evidenced by real-time PCR, semi-quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, and northern blotting analyses, suggesting that the Ser/Thr protein phosphatase PP2C1 encoded by FaABI1 may be involved in fruit ripening as a negative regulator. The results of Tobacco rattle virus-induced gene silencing and PBI121 vector-mediated overexpression suggested that the down- and up-regulation of FaABI1 mRNA expression levels in degreening strawberry fruit could promote and inhibit ripening, respectively. Furthermore, alteration of FaABI1 expression could differentially regulate the transcripts of a set of both ABA-responsive and ripening-related genes, including ABI3, ABI4, ABI5, SnRK2, ABRE1, CHS, PG1, PL, CHI, F3H, DFR, ANS, and UFGT. Taken together, the data provide new evidence for an important role for ABA in regulating strawberry fruit ripening in the processes of which the type 2C protein phosphatase ABI1 serves as a negative regulator. Finally, a possible core mechanism underlying ABA perception and signalling transduction in strawberry fruit ripening is discussed.

  6. Protein phosphatase 5 is necessary for ATR-mediated DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yoonsung; Cheong, Hyang-Min; Lee, Jung-Hee; Song, Peter I.; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Sang-Yong; Jun, Jae Yeoul; You, Ho Jin

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Serine/threonine protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) has been shown to participate in ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)- and ATR (ATM- and Rad3-related)-mediated checkpoint pathways, which plays an important role in the DNA damage response and maintenance of genomic stability. {yields} However, it is not clear exactly how PP5 participates in this process. {yields} Our results indicate that PP5 is more closely related with ATR-mediated pathway than ATM-mediated pathway in DNA damage repair. -- Abstract: Several recent studies have shown that protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) participates in cell cycle arrest after DNA damage, but its roles in DNA repair have not yet been fully characterized. We investigated the roles of PP5 in the repair of ultraviolet (UV)- and neocarzinostatin (NCS)-induced DNA damage. The results of comet assays revealed different repair patterns in UV- and NCS-exposed U2OS-PS cells. PP5 is only essential for Rad3-related (ATR)-mediated DNA repair. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of 53BP1 and BRCA1, important mediators of DNA damage repair, and substrates of ATR and ATM decreased in U2OS-PS cells exposed to UV radiation. In contrast, the cell cycle arrest proteins p53, CHK1, and CHK2 were normally phosphorylated in U2OS and U2OS-PS cells exposed to UV radiation or treated with NCS. In view of these results, we suggest that PP5 plays a crucial role in ATR-mediated repair of UV-induced DNA damage.

  7. Timely Degradation of Wip1 Phosphatase by APC/C Activator Protein Cdh1 is Necessary for Normal Mitotic Progression.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ho-Chang; Gil, Na-Yeon; Lee, Ho-Soo; Cho, Seung-Ju; Kim, Kyungtae; Chun, Kwang-Hoon; Cho, Hyeseong; Cha, Hyuk-Jin

    2015-08-01

    Wip1 belongs to the protein phosphatase C (PP2C) family, of which expression is up-regulated by a number of external stresses, and serves as a stress modulator in normal physiological conditions. When overexpressed, premature dephosphorylation of stress-mediators by Wip1 results in abrogation of tumor surveillance, thus Wip1 acts as an oncogene. Previously, the functional regulation of Wip1 in cell-cycle progression by counteracting cellular G1 and G2/M checkpoint activity in response to DNA damage was reported. However, other than in stress conditions, the function and regulatory mechanism of Wip1 has not been fully determined. Herein, we demonstrated that protein regulation of Wip1 occurs in a cell cycle-dependent manner, which is directly governed by APC/C(Cdh1) at the end of mitosis. In particular, we also showed evidence that Wip1 phosphatase activity is closely associated with its own protein stability, suggesting that reduced phosphatase activity of Wip1 during mitosis could trigger its degradation. Furthermore, to verify the physiological role of its phosphatase activity during mitosis, we established doxycycline-inducible cell models, including a Wip1 wild type (WT) and phosphatase dead mutant (Wip1 DA). When ectopically expressing Wip1 WT, we observed a delay in the transition from metaphase to anaphase. In conclusion, these studies show that mitotic degradation of Wip1 by APC/C(Cdh1) is important for normal mitotic progression.

  8. Small Molecule Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase γ (RPTPγ) Ligands That Inhibit Phosphatase Activity via Perturbation of the Tryptophan-Proline-Aspartate (WPD) Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Sheriff, Steven; Beno, Brett R; Zhai, Weixu; Kostich, Walter A; McDonnell, Patricia A; Kish, Kevin; Goldfarb, Valentina; Gao, Mian; Kiefer, Susan E; Yanchunas, Joseph; Huang, Yanling; Shi, Shuhao; Zhu, Shirong; Dzierba, Carolyn; Bronson, Joanne; Macor, John E; Appiah, Kingsley K; Westphal, Ryan S; O’Connell, Jonathan; Gerritz, Samuel W

    2012-11-09

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) catalyze the dephosphorylation of tyrosine residues, a process that involves a conserved tryptophan-proline-aspartate (WPD) loop in catalysis. In previously determined structures of PTPs, the WPD-loop has been observed in either an 'open' conformation or a 'closed' conformation. In the current work, X-ray structures of the catalytic domain of receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase γ (RPTPγ) revealed a ligand-induced 'superopen' conformation not previously reported for PTPs. In the superopen conformation, the ligand acts as an apparent competitive inhibitor and binds in a small hydrophobic pocket adjacent to, but distinct from, the active site. In the open and closed WPD-loop conformations of RPTPγ, the side chain of Trp1026 partially occupies this pocket. In the superopen conformation, Trp1026 is displaced allowing a 3,4-dichlorobenzyl substituent to occupy this site. The bound ligand prevents closure of the WPD-loop over the active site and disrupts the catalytic cycle of the enzyme.

  9. INHIBITORY POTENTIAL OF POLYHYDROXYLATED FULLERENES AGAINST PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE 1B.

    PubMed

    Kobzar, O L; Trush, V V; Tanchuk, V Yu; Vovk, A I

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of PTP1B by polyhydroxylated fullerenes was studied in silico and in vitro. The enzyme kinetics in the presence of polyhydroxy small gap fullerenes showed that reciprocal value of maximum velocity non-linearly increases with increasing the inhibitor concentration. Analysis of the dose-dependent curve of PTP1B inhibition suggests an apparent positive cooperativity with involvement of at least two binding sites for the hydroxylated fullerene cages. Molecular docking calculations indicated that highly hydroxylated fullerene C60 may occupy the active site and additional allosteric binding site with similar affinity. In silico analysis of a number of fullerenols with 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, and 36 hydroxyl groups showed that the inhibitory activity may depend on the degree of hydroxylation of the nanoparticles surface. These data provide some understanding of the mechanisms of inhibitory action of fullerenols on activity of protein tyrosine phosphatases. PMID:26547960

  10. Purification and characterization of protein phosphatase-1 from two cold-hardy goldenrod gall insects.

    PubMed

    Pfister, Thomas D; Storey, Kenneth B

    2002-01-01

    The catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1) was purified to homogeneity from final instar larvae (the overwintering stage) of freeze avoiding (Epiblema scudderiana) and freeze tolerant (Eurosta solidaginis) cold-hardy insects. Arrhenius plots showed that activity of PP-1 from both species was strongly suppressed at low temperature. Acidic shifts in pH optima and increased inhibition by okadaic acid were also observed when the enzymes were assayed at 4 degrees C compared with 24 degrees C. The data identify multiple ways by which PP-1 can be inhibited at low temperature and this inhibition appears to be key to sustaining high glycogen phosphorylase activity in support of polyol synthesis at low temperatures.

  11. Cell Death Inducing Microbial Protein Phosphatase Inhibitors--Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Kleppe, Rune; Herfindal, Lars; Døskeland, Stein Ove

    2015-10-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and microcystin (MC) as well as several other microbial toxins like nodularin and calyculinA are known as tumor promoters as well as inducers of apoptotic cell death. Their intracellular targets are the major serine/threonine protein phosphatases. This review summarizes mechanisms believed to be responsible for the death induction and tumor promotion with focus on the interdependent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase II (CaM-KII). New data are presented using inhibitors of specific ROS producing enzymes to curb nodularin/MC-induced liver cell (hepatocyte) death. They indicate that enzymes of the arachidonic acid pathway, notably phospholipase A2, 5-lipoxygenase, and cyclooxygenases, may be required for nodularin/MC-induced (and presumably OA-induced) cell death, suggesting new ways to overcome at least some aspects of OA and MC toxicity. PMID:26506362

  12. INHIBITORY POTENTIAL OF POLYHYDROXYLATED FULLERENES AGAINST PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE 1B.

    PubMed

    Kobzar, O L; Trush, V V; Tanchuk, V Yu; Vovk, A I

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of PTP1B by polyhydroxylated fullerenes was studied in silico and in vitro. The enzyme kinetics in the presence of polyhydroxy small gap fullerenes showed that reciprocal value of maximum velocity non-linearly increases with increasing the inhibitor concentration. Analysis of the dose-dependent curve of PTP1B inhibition suggests an apparent positive cooperativity with involvement of at least two binding sites for the hydroxylated fullerene cages. Molecular docking calculations indicated that highly hydroxylated fullerene C60 may occupy the active site and additional allosteric binding site with similar affinity. In silico analysis of a number of fullerenols with 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, and 36 hydroxyl groups showed that the inhibitory activity may depend on the degree of hydroxylation of the nanoparticles surface. These data provide some understanding of the mechanisms of inhibitory action of fullerenols on activity of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

  13. Pterocarpans with inhibitory effects on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B from Erythrina lysistemon Hutch.

    PubMed

    Dao, Trong Tuan; Nguyen, Phi Hung; Thuong, Phuong Thien; Kang, Keon Wook; Na, MinKyun; Ndinteh, Derek Tantoh; Mbafor, Joseph Tanyi; Oh, Won Keun

    2009-12-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the MeOH extract of the stem bark of Erythrina lysistemon Hutch. resulted in isolation of pterocarpans (1-3), named erylysins A-C, along with nine known pterocarpans (4-12). Their structures were determined to be 3''-hydroxy-2',2'-dimethylpyrano[6',5':3,4]-2'',2''-dimethyldihydropyrano[6'',5'':9,10]pterocarpan (1), furano[5',4':3,4]-9-hydroxy-10-prenylpterocarpan (2), and 8-formyl-3,9-dihydroxy-4,10-diprenylpterocarpan (3), based on spectroscopic analyses. All the isolates, with the exception of 3, 6, and 11, strongly inhibited protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) activity in an in vitro assay, with IC(50) values ranging from 1.01+/-0.3 to 18.1+/-0.9 microg/mL. This is the first report showing the potential of prenylated pterocarpans as a class of natural PTP1B inhibitors. PMID:19833362

  14. Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B by lignans from Myristica fragrans.

    PubMed

    Yang, Senugmi; Na, Min Kyun; Jang, Jun Pil; Kim, Kyung Ah; Kim, Bo Yeon; Sung, Nak Ju; Oh, Won Keun; Ahn, Jong Seog

    2006-08-01

    Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been proposed as one of the drug targets for treating type 2 diabetes and obesity. Bioassay-guided fractionation of a MeOH extract of the semen of Myristica fragrans Houtt. (Myristicaceae) afforded PTP1B inhibitory compounds, meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid (1) and otobaphenol (2). Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited PTP1B with IC(50) values of 19.6 +/- 0.3 and 48.9 +/- 0.5 microM, respectively, in the manner of non-competitive inhibitors. Treatment with compound 1 on 32D cells overexpressing the insulin receptor (IR) resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the tyrosine phosphorylation of IR. These results indicate that compound 1 can act as an enhancing agent in intracellular insulin signaling, possibly through the inhibition of PTP1B activity.

  15. Protein phosphatase PP1-NIPP1 activates mesenchymal genes in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Van Dessel, Nele; Boens, Shannah; Lesage, Bart; Winkler, Claudia; Görnemann, Janina; Van Eynde, Aleyde; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-05-22

    The deletion of the protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) regulator known as Nuclear Inhibitor of PP1 (NIPP1) is embryonic lethal during gastrulation, hinting at a key role of PP1-NIPP1 in lineage specification. Consistent with this notion we show here that a mild, stable overexpression of NIPP1 in HeLa cells caused a massive induction of genes of the mesenchymal lineage, in particular smooth/cardiac-muscle and matrix markers. This reprogramming was associated with the formation of actin-based stress fibers and retracting filopodia, and a reduced proliferation potential. The NIPP1-induced mesenchymal transition required functional substrate and PP1-binding domains, suggesting that it involves the selective dephosphorylation of substrates of PP1-NIPP1. PMID:25907536

  16. Protein phosphatase PHLPP1 controls the light-induced resetting of the circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Masubuchi, Satoru; Gao, Tianyan; O'Neill, Audrey; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Newton, Alexandra C.; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1) differentially attenuates Akt, PKC, and ERK1/2 signaling, thereby controlling the duration and amplitude of responses evoked by these kinases. PHLPP1 is expressed in the mammalian central clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus, where it oscillates in a circadian fashion. To explore the role of PHLPP1 in vivo, we have generated mice with a targeted deletion of the PHLPP1 gene. Here we show that PHLPP1-null mice, although displaying normal circadian rhythmicity, have a drastically impaired capacity to stabilize the circadian period after light-induced resetting, producing a large phase shift after light resetting. Our findings reveal that PHLPP1 exerts a previously unappreciated role in circadian control, governing the consolidation of circadian periodicity after resetting. PMID:20080691

  17. The Trypanosoma brucei protein phosphatase gene: polycistronic transcription with the RNA polymerase II largest subunit gene.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, R; Cornelissen, A W

    1990-01-01

    We have previously described the trypanosomal gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) and found that two almost identical genes are encoded within the Trypanosoma brucei genome. Here we show by Southern analyses that the 5' breakpoint between both loci is located approximately 7.5 kb upstream of the RNAP II genes. Northern analyses revealed that the 5' duplicated segment contains at least four other genes, which are transcribed in both bloodstream and procyclic trypanosomes. The gene located immediately upstream of the RNAP II gene in both loci was characterized by sequence analyses. The deduced amino acid sequences show a high degree of similarity to the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase class 1 (PP1) genes. S1 mapping provided strong evidence in support of the fact that the PP1 and RNAP II genes belong to a single transcription unit. Images PMID:2169604

  18. The protein tyrosine phosphatase Pez regulates TGFbeta, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and organ development.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Leila; Wadham, Carol; Crocker, Lesley A; Lardelli, Michael; Khew-Goodall, Yeesim

    2007-09-24

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), crucial during embryogenesis for new tissue and organ formation, is also considered to be a prerequisite to cancer metastasis. We report here that the protein tyrosine phosphatase Pez is expressed transiently in discrete locations in developing brain, heart, pharyngeal arches, and somites in zebrafish embryos. We also find that Pez knock-down results in defects in these organs, indicating a crucial role in organogenesis. Overexpression of Pez in epithelial MDCK cells causes EMT, with a drastic change in cell morphology and function that is accompanied by changes in gene expression typical of EMT. Transfection of Pez induced TGFbeta signaling, critical in developmental EMT with a likely role also in oncogenic EMT. In zebrafish, TGFbeta3 is co- expressed with Pez in a number of tissues and its expression was lost from these tissues when Pez expression was knocked down. Together, our data suggest Pez plays a crucial role in organogenesis by inducing TGFbeta and EMT. PMID:17893246

  19. The Potent Inhibitors of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B from the Fruits of Melaleuca leucadendron

    PubMed Central

    Saifudin, Azis; Lallo, Subehan Ab; Tezuka, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Melaleuca leucadendron (Myrtaceae) is a kind of fruit used as Indonesian medicinal component and recorded in Jamu (tonic made of medical herbs) prescription records for the diabetes treatment. Its methanol extract exhibited a strong inhibitory activity with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 2.05 μg/mL, while it is the same value with positive control RK-682. Objective: To isolate the chemical constituents of M. leucadendron and to evaluate their activity against protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). Further, determine their toxicity potential against T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP). Materials and Methods: Methanol extract was fractionated using silica column chromatography, and the obtained fraction was purified using Sephadex 20-LH. The structure of isolated compounds was identified based on 1H and 13Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry. Furthermore, the compounds were examined against PTP1B and TCPTP. Results: Methanol extract of M. leucadendron (Myrtaceae) afforded two triterpenes: Betulinic acid and ursolic acid in high quantities. Both compounds exhibited a strong inhibitory activity against PTP1B inhibition with IC50 value of 1.5 and 2.3 μg/mL, respectively (positive control RK-682, IC50 = 2.05 μg/mL). Their activity toward TCPTP, on the other hand, were at 2.4 and 3.1 μg/mL, respectively. Based on this purification work, betulinic acid and ursolic acid presented 7.6% and 2.4%, respectively, as markedly M. leucadendron most potential for betulinic acid source among Indonesian plants. The result should have demonstrated that the antidiabetes of M. dendron could be through the inhibition of PTP1B. SUMMARY Melaleuca leucadendron is a good source for ursolic acid.Confirming traditional use for type II diabetes via PTP1B inhibition. PMID:27114690

  20. Specific inhibition of sensitized protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) with a biarsenical probe

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Oliver B.; Bishop, Anthony C.

    2012-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a key regulator of the insulin-receptor and leptin-receptor signaling pathways, and it has therefore emerged as a critical anti-type-II-diabetes and anti-obesity drug target. Toward the goal of generating a covalent modulator of PTP1B activity that can be used for investigating its roles in cell signaling and disease progression, we report that the biarsenical probe FlAsH-EDT2 can be used to inhibit PTP1B variants that contain cysteine point mutations in a key catalytic loop of the enzyme. The site-specific cysteine mutations have little effect on the catalytic activity of the enzyme in the absence of FlAsH-EDT2. Upon addition of FlAsH-EDT2, however, the activity of the engineered PTP1B is strongly inhibited, as assayed with either small-molecule or phosphorylated-peptide PTP substrates. We show that the cysteine-rich PTP1B variants can be targeted with the biarsenical probe in either whole-cell lysates or intact cells. Together, our data provide an example of a biarsenical probe controlling the activity of a protein that does not contain the canonical tetra-cysteine biarsenical-labeling sequence CCXXCC. The targeting of “incomplete” cysteine-rich motifs could provide a general means for controlling protein activity by targeting biarsenical compounds to catalytically important loops in conserved protein domains. PMID:22263876

  1. The period of the circadian oscillator is primarily determined by the balance between casein kinase 1 and protein phosphatase 1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong-min; Chen, Rongmin; Kim, Hyukmin; Etchegaray, Jean-Pierre; Weaver, David R; Lee, Choogon

    2011-09-27

    Mounting evidence suggests that PERIOD (PER) proteins play a central role in setting the speed (period) and phase of the circadian clock. Pharmacological and genetic studies have shown that changes in PER phosphorylation kinetics are associated with changes in circadian rhythm period and phase, which can lead to sleep disorders such as Familial Advanced Sleep Phase Syndrome in humans. We and others have shown that casein kinase 1δ and ε (CK1δ/ε) are essential PER kinases, but it is clear that additional, unknown mechanisms are also crucial for regulating the kinetics of PER phosphorylation. Here we report that circadian periodicity is determined primarily through PER phosphorylation kinetics set by the balance between CK1δ/ε and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). In CK1δ/ε-deficient cells, PER phosphorylation is severely compromised and nonrhythmic, and the PER proteins are constitutively cytoplasmic. However, when PP1 is disrupted, PER phosphorylation is dramatically accelerated; the same effect is not seen when PP2A is disrupted. Our work demonstrates that the speed and rhythmicity of PER phosphorylation are controlled by the balance between CK1δ/ε and PP1, which in turn determines the period of the circadian oscillator. Thus, our findings provide clear insights into the molecular basis of how the period and phase of our daily rhythms are determined. PMID:21930935

  2. The role of Saccharomyces cerevisiae type 2A phosphatase in the actin cytoskeleton and in entry into mitosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, F C; Arndt, K T

    1995-01-01

    We have prepared a temperature-sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae type 2A phosphatase (PP2A) mutant, pph21-102. At the restrictive temperature, the pph21-102 cells arrested predominantly with small or aberrant buds, and their actin cytoskeleton and chitin deposition were abnormal. The involvement of PP2A in bud growth may be due to the role of PP2A in actin distribution during the cell cycle. Moreover, after a shift to the non-permissive temperature, the pph21-102 cells were blocked in G2 and had low activity of Clb2-Cdc28 kinase. Expression of Clb2 from the S.cerevisiae ADH promoter in pph21-102 cells was able to partially bypass the G2 arrest in the first cell cycle, but was not able to stimulate passage through a second mitosis. These cells had higher total amounts of Clb2-Cdc28 kinase activity, but the Clb2-normalized specific activity was lower in the pph21-102 cells compared with wild-type cells. Unlike wild-type strains, a PP2A-deficient strain was sensitive to the loss of MIH1, which is a homolog of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe mitotic inducer cdc25+. Furthermore, the cdc28F19 mutation cured the synthetic defects of a PP2A-deficient strain containing a deletion of MIH1. These results suggest that PP2A is required during G2 for the activation of Clb-Cdc28 kinase complexes for progression into mitosis. Images PMID:7796803

  3. UBC9-dependent Association between Calnexin and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) at the Endoplasmic Reticulum*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dukgyu; Kraus, Allison; Prins, Daniel; Groenendyk, Jody; Aubry, Isabelle; Liu, Wen-Xin; Li, Hao-Dong; Julien, Olivier; Touret, Nicolas; Sykes, Brian D.; Tremblay, Michel L.; Michalak, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Calnexin is a type I integral endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein, molecular chaperone, and a component of the translocon. We discovered a novel interaction between the calnexin cytoplasmic domain and UBC9, a SUMOylation E2 ligase, which modified the calnexin cytoplasmic domain by the addition of SUMO. We demonstrated that calnexin interaction with the SUMOylation machinery modulates an interaction with protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), an ER-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in the negative regulation of insulin and leptin signaling. We showed that calnexin and PTP1B form UBC9-dependent complexes, revealing a previously unrecognized contribution of calnexin to the retention of PTP1B at the ER membrane. This work shows that the SUMOylation machinery links two ER proteins from divergent pathways to potentially affect cellular protein quality control and energy metabolism. PMID:25586181

  4. Protein phosphatase complex PP5/PPP2R3C dephosphorylates P-glycoprotein/ABCB1 and down-regulates the expression and function.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Kazuhiro; Yamaguchi, Miho; Noguchi, Kohji; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu

    2014-04-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp)/ABCB1 is a key molecule of multidrug resistance in cancer. Protein phosphatase (PP) 2A, regulatory subunit B, gamma (PPP2R3C), which is a regulatory subunit of PP2A and PP5, was identified as a binding candidate to P-gp. Immunoprecipitation-western blotting revealed that PP5 and PPP2R3C were coprecipitated with P-gp, while PP2A was not. PP5/PPP2R3C dephosphorylated protein kinase A/protein kinase C-phosphorylation of P-gp. Knockdown of PP5 and/or PPP2R3C increased P-gp expression and lowered the sensitivity to vincristine and doxorubicin. Consequently, our results indicate that PP5/PPP2R3C negatively regulates P-gp expression and function.

  5. Highly sensitive detection and discrimination of LR and YR microcystins based on protein phosphatases and an artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Covaci, O I; Sassolas, A; Alonso, G A; Muñoz, R; Radu, G L; Bucur, B; Marty, J-L

    2012-08-01

    The inhibition characteristics of three different protein phosphatases by three microcystin (MC) variants--LR, YR, and RR--were studied. The corresponding K (I) for each enzyme-MC couple was calculated. The toxicity of MC varies in the following order: MC-LR > MC-YR > MC-RR. The sensitivity of the enzymes increased in the following order: mutant PP2A < mutant PP1 < natural PP2A. The best limit of detection obtained was 21.2 pM MC-LR using the most sensible enzyme. Methanol, ethanol, and acetonitrile up to 2 % (v/v) may be used in inhibition measurements. An artificial neural network (ANN) was used to discriminate two MC variants--LR and YR--using the differences in inhibition percentages measured with mutant PP1 and natural PP2A. The ANN is able to analyze mixtures with concentrations ranging from 8 to 98 pM MC-LR and 31 to 373 pM MC-YR.

  6. Role of Protein Phosphorylation and Tyrosine Phosphatases in the Adrenal Regulation of Steroid Synthesis and Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Gorostizaga, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana F.; Mori Sequeiros García, M. Mercedes; Maloberti, Paula M.; Orlando, Ulises D.; Mele, Pablo G.; Poderoso, Cecilia; Podesta, Ernesto J.

    2016-01-01

    In adrenocortical cells, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) promotes the activation of several protein kinases. The action of these kinases is linked to steroid production, mainly through steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), whose expression and activity are dependent on protein phosphorylation events at genomic and non-genomic levels. Hormone-dependent mitochondrial dynamics and cell proliferation are functions also associated with protein kinases. On the other hand, protein tyrosine dephosphorylation is an additional component of the ACTH signaling pathway, which involves the “classical” protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), such as Src homology domain (SH) 2-containing PTP (SHP2c), and members of the MAP kinase phosphatase (MKP) family, such as MKP-1. PTPs are rapidly activated by posttranslational mechanisms and participate in hormone-stimulated steroid production. In this process, the SHP2 tyrosine phosphatase plays a crucial role in a mechanism that includes an acyl-CoA synthetase-4 (Acsl4), arachidonic acid (AA) release and StAR induction. In contrast, MKPs in steroidogenic cells have a role in the turn-off of the hormonal signal in ERK-dependent processes such as steroid synthesis and, perhaps, cell proliferation. This review analyzes the participation of these tyrosine phosphates in the ACTH signaling pathway and the action of kinases and phosphatases in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and steroid production. In addition, the participation of kinases and phosphatases in the signal cascade triggered by different stimuli in other steroidogenic tissues is also compared to adrenocortical cell/ACTH and discussed. PMID:27375556

  7. Structure and Configuration of Phosphoeleganin, a Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitor from the Mediterranean Ascidian Sidnyum elegans.

    PubMed

    Imperatore, Concetta; Luciano, Paolo; Aiello, Anna; Vitalone, Rocco; Irace, Carlo; Santamaria, Rita; Li, Jia; Guo, Yue-W; Menna, Marialuisa

    2016-04-22

    A new phosphorylated polyketide, phosphoeleganin (1), has been isolated from the Mediterranean ascidian Sidnyum elegans. Its structure and configuration have been determined by extensive use of 2D NMR and microscale chemical degradation and/or derivatization. Phosphoeleganin (1) inhibited the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) activity. PMID:27064611

  8. Implication of a protein-tyrosine-phosphatase in human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Gaits, F; Li, R Y; Ragab, A; Selves, J; Ragab-Thomas, J M; Chap, H

    1994-07-01

    Protein tyrosyl phosphorylation plays an essential role in regulating cellular events such as proliferation, differentiation and oncogenesis. The recent characterization of the family of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) suggests that dephosphorylation might be a crucial event in these phenomena. One of the functions of PTPases is to reverse the effect of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKases), many of which are oncogenes, suggesting that they may act as tumor suppressors as described for HPTP gamma. In order to investigate the implication in lung cancer of HPTP beta, a receptor PTPase, we have developed a semi-quantitative method derived from primer-directed reverse transcription (RT) and subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with 32P-labelled nucleotide. We have demonstrated that the expression of HPTP beta mRNA was dramatically decreased in lung adenocarcinomas and lung malpighian carcinomas as compared to normal lung tissue. In addition, HPTP beta was not expressed in the pulmonar adenocarcinoma cell line A427, which proliferates in a deregulated way. These results suggest that the loss of expression of HPTP beta might play a role in neoplasic transformation and thus this molecule could act as a tumor suppressor factor. PMID:7981622

  9. Implication of a protein-tyrosine-phosphatase in human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Gaits, F; Li, R Y; Ragab, A; Selves, J; Ragab-Thomas, J M; Chap, H

    1994-07-01

    Protein tyrosyl phosphorylation plays an essential role in regulating cellular events such as proliferation, differentiation and oncogenesis. The recent characterization of the family of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) suggests that dephosphorylation might be a crucial event in these phenomena. One of the functions of PTPases is to reverse the effect of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKases), many of which are oncogenes, suggesting that they may act as tumor suppressors as described for HPTP gamma. In order to investigate the implication in lung cancer of HPTP beta, a receptor PTPase, we have developed a semi-quantitative method derived from primer-directed reverse transcription (RT) and subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with 32P-labelled nucleotide. We have demonstrated that the expression of HPTP beta mRNA was dramatically decreased in lung adenocarcinomas and lung malpighian carcinomas as compared to normal lung tissue. In addition, HPTP beta was not expressed in the pulmonar adenocarcinoma cell line A427, which proliferates in a deregulated way. These results suggest that the loss of expression of HPTP beta might play a role in neoplasic transformation and thus this molecule could act as a tumor suppressor factor.

  10. Conformational diversity in the TPR domain-mediated interaction of protein phosphatase 5 with Hsp90.

    PubMed

    Cliff, Matthew J; Harris, Richard; Barford, David; Ladbury, John E; Williams, Mark A

    2006-03-01

    Protein phosphatase 5 (Ppp5) is one of several proteins that bind to the Hsp90 chaperone via a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. We report the solution structure of a complex of the TPR domain of Ppp5 with the C-terminal pentapeptide of Hsp90. This structure has the "two-carboxylate clamp" mechanism of peptide binding first seen in the Hop-TPR domain complexes with Hsp90 and Hsp70 peptides. However, NMR data reveal that the Ppp5 clamp is highly dynamic, and that there are multiple modes of peptide binding and mobility throughout the complex. Although this interaction is of very high affinity, relatively few persistent contacts are found between the peptide and the Ppp5-TPR domain, thus explaining its promiscuity in binding both Hsp70 and Hsp90 in vivo. We consider the possible implications of this dynamic structure for the mechanism of relief of autoinhibition in Ppp5 and for the mechanisms of TPR-mediated recognition of Hsp90 by other proteins.

  11. Leishmania donovani engages in regulatory interference by targeting macrophage protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1.

    PubMed

    Nandan, Devki; Reiner, Neil E

    2005-03-01

    Protozoan parasites of the genus leishmania are obligate intracellular parasites of monocytes and macrophages. These pathogens have evolved to invade the mammalian immune system and typically survive for long periods of time. Leishmania have developed a variety of remarkable strategies to prevent their elimination by both innate and acquired immune effector mechanisms. One particular strategy of interest involves manipulation of host cell regulatory pathways so as to prevent macrophage activation required for efficient microbicidal activity. These interference mechanisms are the main focus of this review. Several lines of evidence have been developed to show that the Src homology-2 domain containing tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) becomes activated in leishmania-infected cells and that this contributes to disease pathogenesis. Recent studies aimed at understanding the mechanism responsible for the change in activation state of SHP-1 led to the identification of leishmania EF-1alpha as an SHP-1 binding protein and SHP-1 activator. This was a surprising finding given that this ubiquitous and highly conserved protein plays an essential role in protein translation in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The role of leishmania EF-1alpha as an SHP-1 activator and its contribution to pathogenesis are reviewed with particular attention to the properties that distinguish it from host EF-1alpha. PMID:15721837

  12. Protein-tyrosine-phosphatase SHPTP2 is a required positive effector for insulin downstream signaling.

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, K; Milarski, K L; Saltiel, A R; Pessin, J E

    1995-01-01

    SHPTP2 is a ubiquitously expressed tyrosine-specific protein phosphatase that contains two amino-terminal Src homology 2 (SH2) domains responsible for its association with tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. In this study, expression of dominant interfering mutants of SHPTP2 was found to inhibit insulin stimulation of c-fos reporter gene expression and activation of the 42-kDa (Erk2) and 44-kDa (Erk1) mitogen-activated protein kinases. Cotransfection of dominant interfering SHPTP2 mutants with v-Ras or Grb2 indicated that SHPTP2 regulated insulin signaling either upstream of or in parallel to Ras function. Furthermore, phosphotyrosine blotting and immunoprecipitation identified the 125-kDa focal adhesion kinase (pp125FAK) as a substrate for insulin-dependent tyrosine dephosphorylation. These data demonstrate that SHPTP2 functions as a positive regulator of insulin action and that insulin signaling results in the dephosphorylation of tyrosine-phosphorylated pp125FAK. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7531337

  13. Dynamic targeting of protein phosphatase 1 within the nuclei of living mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Trinkle-Mulcahy, L; Sleeman, J E; Lamond, A I

    2001-12-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is expressed in mammalian cells as three closely related isoforms, alpha, beta/delta and gamma1, which are encoded by separate genes. It has yet to be determined whether the separate isoforms behave in a similar fashion or play distinct roles in vivo. We report here on analyses by fluorescence microscopy of functional and fluorescently tagged PP1 isoforms in live cells. PP1alpha and PP1gamma fluorescent protein fusions show largely complimentary localization patterns, particularly within the nucleus where tagged PP1gamma accumulates in the nucleolus, whereas tagged PP1alpha is primarily found in the nucleoplasm. Overexpression of NIPP1 (nuclear inhibitor of PP1), a PP1 targeting subunit that accumulates at interchromatin granule clusters in the nucleoplasm, results in a retargeting of both isoforms to these structures, indicating that steady-state localization is based, at least in part, on relative affinities for various targeting subunits. Photobleaching analyses show that PP1gamma is rapidly exchanging between the nucleolar, nucleoplasmic and cytoplasmic compartments. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analyses indicate that the direct interaction of the two proteins predominantly occurs at or near interchromatin granule clusters. These data indicate that PP1 isoforms are highly mobile in cells and can be dynamically (re)localized through direct interaction with targeting subunits. PMID:11739654

  14. Striatal-Enriched Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Controls Responses to Aversive Stimuli: Implication for Ethanol Drinking

    PubMed Central

    Legastelois, Rémi; Darcq, Emmanuel; Wegner, Scott A.; Lombroso, Paul J.; Ron, Dorit

    2015-01-01

    The STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific phosphatase whose dysregulation in expression and/or activity is associated with several neuropsychiatric disorders. We recently showed that long-term excessive consumption of ethanol induces a sustained inhibition of STEP activity in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) of mice. We further showed that down-regulation of STEP expression in the DMS, and not in the adjacent dorsolateral striatum, increases ethanol intake, suggesting that the inactivation of STEP in the DMS contributes to the development of ethanol drinking behaviors. Here, we compared the consequence of global deletion of the STEP gene on voluntary ethanol intake to the consumption of an appetitive rewarding substance (saccharin) or an aversive solution (quinine or denatonium). Whereas saccharin intake was similar in STEP knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) littermate mice, the consumption of ethanol as well as quinine and denatonium was increased in STEP KO mice. These results suggested that the aversive taste of these substances was masked upon deletion of the STEP gene. We therefore hypothesized that STEP contributes to the physiological avoidance towards aversive stimuli. To further test this hypothesis, we measured the responses of STEP KO and WT mice to lithium-induced conditioned place aversion (CPA) and found that whereas WT mice developed lithium place aversion, STEP KO mice did not. In contrast, conditioned place preference (CPP) to ethanol was similar in both genotypes. Together, our results indicate that STEP contributes, at least in part, to the protection against the ingestion of aversive agents. PMID:25992601

  15. Unbiased identification of substrates of protein tyrosine phosphatase ptp-3 in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Christopher J; Kim, Min-Sik; Zhong, Jun; Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Bose, Anjun K; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2016-06-01

    The leukocyte antigen related (LAR) family of receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatases has three members in humans - PTPRF, PTPRD and PTPRS - that have been implicated in diverse processes including embryonic development, inhibition of cell growth and axonal guidance. Mutations in the LAR family are associated with developmental defects such as cleft palate as well as various cancers including breast, neck, lung, colon and brain. Although this family of tyrosine phosphatases is important for many developmental processes, little is known of their substrates. This is partially due to functional redundancy within the LAR family, as deletion of a single gene in the LAR family does not have an appreciable phenotype, but a dual knockout is embryonically lethal in mouse models. To circumvent the inability to knockout multiple members of the LAR family in mouse models, we used a knockout of ptp-3, which is the only known ortholog of the LAR family in Caenorhabditis elegans and allows for the study of the LAR family at the organismal level. Using SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomics, we identified 255 putative substrates of ptp-3, which included four of the nine known annotated substrates of the LAR family. A motif analysis of the identified phosphopeptides allowed for the determination of sequences that appear to be preferentially dephosphorylated. Finally, we discovered that kinases were overrepresented in the list of identified putative substrates and tyrosine residues whose phosphorylation is known to increase kinase activity were dephosphorylated by ptp-3. These data are suggestive of ptp-3 as a potential negative regulator of several kinase families, such as the mitogen activated kinases (MAPKs), and multiple tyrosine kinases including FER, MET, and NTRK2.

  16. Phosphatidic acid inhibits blue light-induced stomatal opening via inhibition of protein phosphatase 1 [corrected].

    PubMed

    Takemiya, Atsushi; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2010-08-01

    Stomata open in response to blue light under a background of red light. The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) inhibits blue light-dependent stomatal opening, an effect essential for promoting stomatal closure in the daytime to prevent water loss. However, the mechanisms and molecular targets of this inhibition in the blue light signaling pathway remain unknown. Here, we report that phosphatidic acid (PA), a phospholipid second messenger produced by ABA in guard cells, inhibits protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), a positive regulator of blue light signaling, and PA plays a role in stimulating stomatal closure in Vicia faba. Biochemical analysis revealed that PA directly inhibited the phosphatase activity of the catalytic subunit of V. faba PP1 (PP1c) in vitro. PA inhibited blue light-dependent stomatal opening but did not affect red light- or fusicoccin-induced stomatal opening. PA also inhibited blue light-dependent H(+) pumping and phosphorylation of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. However, PA did not inhibit the autophosphorylation of phototropins, blue light receptors for stomatal opening. Furthermore, 1-butanol, a selective inhibitor of phospholipase D, which produces PA via hydrolysis of phospholipids, diminished the ABA-induced inhibition of blue light-dependent stomatal opening and H(+) pumping. We also show that hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, which are intermediates in ABA signaling, inhibited the blue light responses of stomata and that 1-butanol diminished these inhibitions. From these results, we conclude that PA inhibits blue light signaling in guard cells by PP1c inhibition, accelerating stomatal closure, and that PP1 is a cross talk point between blue light and ABA signaling pathways in guard cells.

  17. Chimeric proteins combining phosphatase and cellulose-binding activities: proof-of-concept and application in the hydrolysis of paraoxon.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Larissa M; Chaimovich, Hernan; Cuccovia, Iolanda M; Marana, Sandro R

    2014-05-01

    Phosphatases for organophosphate degradation and carbohydrate-binding domains (CBMs) have potential biotechnological applications. As a proof-of-concept, a soluble chimeric protein that combines acid phosphatase (AppA) from Escherichia coli and a CBM from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (AppA-CBM) was produced in E.coli. AppACBM adsorbed in microcrystalline cellulose Avicel PH101 catalyzed the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate (PNPP). The binding to microcrystalline cellulose displayed saturation behavior with an apparent binding constant (Kb) of 22 ± 5 mg and a maximum binding (Bmax) of 1.500 ± 0.001 enzyme units. Binding was highest at pH 2.5 and decreased above pH 6.5, as previously observed for family 2 CBMs. The Km values for PNPP of AppA-CBM and native AppA were identical (2.7 mM). To demonstrate that this strategy for protein engineering has practical applications and is largely functional, even for phosphatases exhibiting diverse folds, a chimeric protein combining human paraoxonase 1 (hPON1) and the CBM was produced. Both PON1-CBM and hPON1 had identical Km values for paraoxon (1.3 mM). Additionally, hPON1 bound to microcrystalline cellulose with a Kb of 27 ± 3 mg, the same as that observed for AppA-CBM. These data show that the phosphatase domains are as functional in both of the chimeric proteins as they are in the native enzymes and that the CBM domain maintains the same cellulose affinity. Therefore, the engineering of chimeric proteins combining domains of phosphatases and CBMs is fully feasible, resulting in chimeric enzymes that exhibit potential for OP detoxification. PMID:24555432

  18. Attenuation of ribosomal protein S6 phosphatase activity in chicken embryo fibroblasts transformed by Rous sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Belandia, B; Brautigan, D; Martín-Pérez, J

    1994-01-01

    In chicken embryo fibroblasts, phosphorylation of the 40S ribosomal protein S6 increases during G1 but returns to basal level by mitosis. In contrast, in Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-transformed fibroblasts, S6 remains highly phosphorylated throughout mitosis. This study investigated the mechanism by which RSV alters the pattern of S6 phosphorylation. Pulse-chase experiments demonstrate that phosphate turnover in S6 is rapid in normal cells and in cells infected with an RSV transformation-defective virus. In contrast, phosphate turnover in S6 is severely reduced in cells infected with temperature-sensitive RSV at a temperature permissive for transformation, indicating a diminished S6 phosphatase activity. Fractionation of cell lysates by DEAE chromatography showed an almost threefold lower S6 phosphatase activity in RSV-transformed versus normal cells. The S6 phosphatase was sensitive to inhibitor 2 and specifically recognized by an antibody to type 1 phosphatase (PP1). The S6 phosphatase activity recovered by immunoprecipitation of PP1 was threefold lower in transformed cells, but the steady-state level of expression and the rate of synthesis of PP1 were not altered by oncogenic transformation. Together, the results show that transformation by RSV reduced the S6-PP1 activity. Images PMID:8264587

  19. Activation of protein phosphatase 1 by a small molecule designed to bind to the enzyme's regulatory site.

    PubMed

    Tappan, Erin; Chamberlin, A Richard

    2008-02-01

    The activity of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), a serine-threonine phosphatase that participates ubiquitously in cellular signaling, is controlled by a wide variety of regulatory proteins that interact with PP1 at an allosteric regulatory site that recognizes a "loose" consensus sequence (usually designated as RVXF) found in all such regulatory proteins. Peptides containing the regulatory consensus sequence have been found to recapitulate the binding and PP1 activity modulation of the regulatory proteins, suggesting that it might be possible to design small-molecule surrogates that activate PP1 rather than inhibiting it. This prospect constitutes a largely unexplored way of controlling signaling pathways that could be functionally complementary to the much more extensively explored stratagem of kinase inhibition. Based on these principles, we have designed a microcystin analog that activates PP1. PMID:18291321

  20. Identification of New Substrates of the Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase PTP1B by Bayesian Integration of Proteome Evidence*

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Emanuela; Tinti, Michele; Costa, Stefano; Corallino, Salvatore; Nardozza, Aurelio Pio; Chatraryamontri, Andrew; Ceol, Arnaud; Cesareni, Gianni; Castagnoli, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    There is growing evidence that tyrosine phosphatases display an intrinsic enzymatic preference for the sequence context flanking the target phosphotyrosines. On the other hand, substrate selection in vivo is decisively guided by the enzyme-substrate connectivity in the protein interaction network. We describe here a system wide strategy to infer physiological substrates of protein-tyrosine phosphatases. Here we integrate, by a Bayesian model, proteome wide evidence about in vitro substrate preference, as determined by a novel high-density peptide chip technology, and “closeness” in the protein interaction network. This allows to rank candidate substrates of the human PTP1B phosphatase. Ultimately a variety of in vitro and in vivo approaches were used to verify the prediction that the tyrosine phosphorylation levels of five high-ranking substrates, PLC-γ1, Gab1, SHP2, EGFR, and SHP1, are indeed specifically modulated by PTP1B. In addition, we demonstrate that the PTP1B-mediated dephosphorylation of Gab1 negatively affects its EGF-induced association with the phosphatase SHP2. The dissociation of this signaling complex is accompanied by a decrease of ERK MAP kinase phosphorylation and activation. PMID:21123182

  1. Mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of arsenic compounds on protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)

    SciTech Connect

    Rehman, Kanwal; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Wen Wen; Wang, Yan Wei; Sakamoto, Akira; Zhang, Yan Fang; Naranmandura, Hua; Suzuki, Noriyuki

    2012-09-15

    Arsenic binding to biomolecules is considered one of the major toxic mechanisms, which may also be related to the carcinogenic risks of arsenic in humans. At the same time, arsenic is also known to activate the phosphorylation-dependent signaling pathways including the epidermal growth factor receptor, the mitogen-activated protein kinase and insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 pathways. These signaling pathways originate at the level of receptor tyrosine kinases whose phosphorylation status is regulated by opposing protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity. Reversible tyrosine phosphorylation, which is governed by the balanced action of protein tyrosine kinases and phosphatases, regulates important signaling pathways that are involved in the control of cell proliferation, adhesion and migration. In the present study, we have focused on the interaction of cellular PTPs with toxic trivalent arsenite (iAs{sup III}) and its intermediate metabolites such as monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) in vitro, and then determined the arsenic binding site in PTP by the use of recombinant PTPs (e.g., PTP1B and CD45). Interestingly, the activities of PTP1B (cytoplasm-form) or CD45 (receptor-linked form) were observed to be strongly inhibited by both methylated metabolites (i.e., MMA{sup III} and DMA{sup III}) but not by iAs{sup III}. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has clearly confirmed that the organic intermediate, DMA{sup III} directly bound to the active site cysteine residue of PTP1B (e.g., Cys215), resulting in inhibition of enzyme activity. These results suggest that arsenic exposure may disturb the cellular signaling pathways through PTP inactivation. Highlights: ► This study focused on the interaction of PTPs with trivalent arsenicals in vitro. ► We for the first time confirmed that DMA{sup III} strongly inhibited activity of PTP1B. ► DMA{sup III} directly

  2. Behavioral characterization of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Sukoff Rizzo, S J; Lotarski, S M; Stolyar, P; McNally, T; Arturi, C; Roos, M; Finley, J E; Reinhart, V; Lanz, T A

    2014-09-01

    Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) has been described as a regulator of multiple kinases and glutamate receptor subunits critical for synaptic plasticity. Published behavioral and biochemical characterization from the founder line of STEP knockout (KO) mice revealed superior cognitive performance, with enhanced phosphorylation of substrates such as ERK, Fyn and GluN2B; suggesting that inhibitors of STEP may have potential as therapeutic agents for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. The objectives of this work aimed to replicate and extend the previously reported behavioral consequences of STEP knockout. Consistent with previous reported data, STEP KO mice demonstrated exploratory activity levels and similar motor coordination relative to WT littermate controls as well as intact memory in a Y-maze spatial novelty test. Interestingly, KO mice demonstrated deficits in pre-pulse inhibition as well as reduced seizure threshold relative to WT controls. Immunohistochemical staining of brains revealed the expected gene-dependent reduction in STEP protein confirming knockout in the mice. The present data confirm expression and localization of STEP and the absence in KO mice, and describe functional downstream implications of reducing STEP levels in vivo.

  3. Status Epilepticus-Induced Somatostatinergic Hilar Interneuron Degeneration Is Regulated by Striatal Enriched Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Sik; Lin, Stanley L.; Lee, Boyoung; Kurup, Pradeep; Cho, Hee-Yeon; Naegele, Janice R.; Lombroso, Paul J.; Obrietan, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Excitotoxic cell death is one of the precipitating events in the development of temporal lobe epilepsy. Of particular prominence is the loss of GABAergic hilar neurons. Although the molecular mechanisms responsible for the selective vulnerability of these cells are not well understood, activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) pathway has been implicated in neuroprotective responses to excitotoxicity in other neuronal populations. Here, we report that high levels of the striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP), a key regulator of ERK/MAPK signaling, are found in vulnerable somatostatin-immunoreactive hilar interneurons. Under both control conditions and after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE), ERK/MAPK activation was repressed in STEP-immunoreactive hilar neurons. This contrasts with robust SE-induced ERK/MAPK activation in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus, a cell region that does not express STEP. During pilocarpine-induced SE, in vivo disruption of STEP activity allowed activation of the MAPK pathway, leading to immediate-early gene expression and significant rescue from cell death. Thus, STEP increases the sensitivity of neurons to SE-induced excitotoxicity by specifically blocking a latent neuroprotective response initiated by the MAPK pathway. These findings identify a key set of signaling events that render somatostatinergic hilar interneurons vulnerable to SE-induced cell death. PMID:17360923

  4. Activation of HIV-1 with Nanoparticle-Packaged Small-Molecule Protein Phosphatase-1-Targeting Compound

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kahli A.; Lin, Xionghao; Bolshakov, Oleg; Griffin, James; Niu, Xiaomei; Kovalskyy, Dmytro; Ivanov, Andrey; Jerebtsova, Marina; Taylor, Robert E.; Akala, Emmanuel; Nekhai, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Complete eradication of HIV-1 infection is impeded by the existence of latent HIV-1 reservoirs in which the integrated HIV-1 provirus is transcriptionally inactive. Activation of HIV-1 transcription requires the viral Tat protein and host cell factors, including protein phosphatase-1 (PP1). We previously developed a library of small compounds that targeted PP1 and identified a compound, SMAPP1, which induced HIV-1 transcription. However, this compound has a limited bioavailability in vivo and may not be able to reach HIV-1-infected cells and induce HIV-1 transcription in patients. We packaged SMAPP1 in polymeric polyethylene glycol polymethyl methacrylate nanoparticles and analyzed its release and the effect on HIV-1 transcription in a cell culture. SMAPP1 was efficiently packaged in the nanoparticles and released during a 120-hr period. Treatment of the HIV-1-infected cells with the SMAPP1-loaded nanoparticles induced HIV-1 transcription. Thus, nanoparticles loaded with HIV-1-targeting compounds might be useful for future anti-HIV-1 therapeutics. PMID:26839837

  5. Genome-wide promoter binding profiling of protein phosphatase-1 and its major nuclear targeting subunits.

    PubMed

    Verheyen, Toon; Görnemann, Janina; Verbinnen, Iris; Boens, Shannah; Beullens, Monique; Van Eynde, Aleyde; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-07-13

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) is a key regulator of transcription and is targeted to promoter regions via associated proteins. However, the chromatin binding sites of PP1 have never been studied in a systematic and genome-wide manner. Methylation-based DamID profiling in HeLa cells has enabled us to map hundreds of promoter binding sites of PP1 and three of its major nuclear interactors, i.e. RepoMan, NIPP1 and PNUTS. Our data reveal that the α, β and γ isoforms of PP1 largely bind to distinct subsets of promoters and can also be differentiated by their promoter binding pattern. PP1β emerged as the major promoter-associated isoform and shows an overlapping binding profile with PNUTS at dozens of active promoters. Surprisingly, most promoter binding sites of PP1 are not shared with RepoMan, NIPP1 or PNUTS, hinting at the existence of additional, largely unidentified chromatin-targeting subunits. We also found that PP1 is not required for the global chromatin targeting of RepoMan, NIPP1 and PNUTS, but alters the promoter binding specificity of NIPP1. Our data disclose an unexpected specificity and complexity in the promoter binding of PP1 isoforms and their chromatin-targeting subunits. PMID:25990731

  6. Activation of the Low Molecular Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase in Keratinocytes Exposed to Hyperosmotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cavalheiro, Renan P.; Machado, Daisy; Cruz, Bread L. G.; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J.; Gomes-Marcondes, Maria C. C.; Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Vasques, Luciana; Nader, Helena B.; Souza, Ana Carolina S.; Justo, Giselle Z.

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we provide new contribution to the mechanisms involved in keratinocytes response to hyperosmotic shock showing, for the first time, the participation of Low Molecular Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (LMWPTP) activity in this event. We reported that sorbitol-induced osmotic stress mediates alterations in the phosphorylation of pivotal cytoskeletal proteins, particularly Src and cofilin. Furthermore, an increase in the expression of the phosphorylated form of LMWPTP, which was followed by an augment in its catalytic activity, was observed. Of particular importance, these responses occurred in an intracellular milieu characterized by elevated levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and increased expression of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase. Altogether, our results suggest that hyperosmostic stress provides a favorable cellular environment to the activation of LMWPTP, which is associated with increased expression of antioxidant enzymes, high levels of GSH and inhibition of Src kinase. Finally, the real contribution of LMWPTP in the hyperosmotic stress response of keratinocytes was demonstrated through analysis of the effects of ACP1 gene knockdown in stressed and non-stressed cells. LMWPTP knockdown attenuates the effects of sorbitol induced-stress in HaCaT cells, mainly in the status of Src kinase, Rac and STAT5 phosphorylation and activity. These results describe for the first time the participation of LMWPTP in the dynamics of cytoskeleton rearrangement during exposure of human keratinocytes to hyperosmotic shock, which may contribute to cell death. PMID:25781955

  7. Activation of the low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase in keratinocytes exposed to hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rodrigo A; Palladino, Marcelly V; Cavalheiro, Renan P; Machado, Daisy; Cruz, Bread L G; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; Gomes-Marcondes, Maria C C; Zambuzzi, Willian F; Vasques, Luciana; Nader, Helena B; Souza, Ana Carolina S; Justo, Giselle Z

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we provide new contribution to the mechanisms involved in keratinocytes response to hyperosmotic shock showing, for the first time, the participation of Low Molecular Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (LMWPTP) activity in this event. We reported that sorbitol-induced osmotic stress mediates alterations in the phosphorylation of pivotal cytoskeletal proteins, particularly Src and cofilin. Furthermore, an increase in the expression of the phosphorylated form of LMWPTP, which was followed by an augment in its catalytic activity, was observed. Of particular importance, these responses occurred in an intracellular milieu characterized by elevated levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and increased expression of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase. Altogether, our results suggest that hyperosmostic stress provides a favorable cellular environment to the activation of LMWPTP, which is associated with increased expression of antioxidant enzymes, high levels of GSH and inhibition of Src kinase. Finally, the real contribution of LMWPTP in the hyperosmotic stress response of keratinocytes was demonstrated through analysis of the effects of ACP1 gene knockdown in stressed and non-stressed cells. LMWPTP knockdown attenuates the effects of sorbitol induced-stress in HaCaT cells, mainly in the status of Src kinase, Rac and STAT5 phosphorylation and activity. These results describe for the first time the participation of LMWPTP in the dynamics of cytoskeleton rearrangement during exposure of human keratinocytes to hyperosmotic shock, which may contribute to cell death. PMID:25781955

  8. The polymorphism of protein phosphatase Z1 gene in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Kovács, László; Farkas, Ilona; Majoros, László; Miskei, Márton; Pócsi, István; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2010-12-01

    The gene of protein phosphatase Z1 (CaPPZ1) that codes a fungus specific regulatory enzyme was investigated in Candida albicans. After cloning and sequencing CaPPZ1 we revealed the heterozygous nature of the ATCC 10231 reference strain, and identified two new alleles termed CaPPZ1-2 and CaPPZ1-3. The genetic polymorphism in CaPPZ1 was extended by finding a fourth allele CaPPZ1-4 in a clinical isolate. Single nucleotide replacements and short in/del mutations were identified in the gene, some of which resulted in amino acid changes in the protein. The analysis of the hypervariable 3'-noncoding gene region in 27 DNA sequences obtained from reference strains and clinical samples confirmed the presence of four distinct DNA sequence-groups that correspond to the four main alleles of CaPPZ1. In addition to the allelic combinations, we detected individual mutations elevating genetic variability of the opportunistic pathogen. We utilized the hypervariable gene region for genotyping C. albicans in clinical isolates by sequencing the cloned amplified region, by direct sequencing of the PCR products, or by RFLP analysis. The comparison of the genotypes of the strains originating from different body parts of the same patient proved to be useful in delineating the origin of the infection. PMID:20473966

  9. Activation of HIV-1 with Nanoparticle-Packaged Small-Molecule Protein Phosphatase-1-Targeting Compound.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kahli A; Lin, Xionghao; Bolshakov, Oleg; Griffin, James; Niu, Xiaomei; Kovalskyy, Dmytro; Ivanov, Andrey; Jerebtsova, Marina; Taylor, Robert E; Akala, Emmanuel; Nekhai, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Complete eradication of HIV-1 infection is impeded by the existence of latent HIV-1 reservoirs in which the integrated HIV-1 provirus is transcriptionally inactive. Activation of HIV-1 transcription requires the viral Tat protein and host cell factors, including protein phosphatase-1 (PP1). We previously developed a library of small compounds that targeted PP1 and identified a compound, SMAPP1, which induced HIV-1 transcription. However, this compound has a limited bioavailability in vivo and may not be able to reach HIV-1-infected cells and induce HIV-1 transcription in patients. We packaged SMAPP1 in polymeric polyethylene glycol polymethyl methacrylate nanoparticles and analyzed its release and the effect on HIV-1 transcription in a cell culture. SMAPP1 was efficiently packaged in the nanoparticles and released during a 120-hr period. Treatment of the HIV-1-infected cells with the SMAPP1-loaded nanoparticles induced HIV-1 transcription. Thus, nanoparticles loaded with HIV-1-targeting compounds might be useful for future anti-HIV-1 therapeutics. PMID:26839837

  10. Regulation of collagenase gene expression by okadaic acid, an inhibitor of protein phosphatases.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S J; Lafyatis, R; Kim, K Y; Angel, P; Fujiki, H; Karin, M; Sporn, M B; Roberts, A B

    1990-01-01

    Human collagenase gene expression is regulated transcriptionally and is inducible by various mitogens in many cell types. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of this response, we examined the effects on collagenase gene expression of okadaic acid, a non-12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-type tumor promoter, which induces apparent "activation" of protein kinases by inhibition of protein phosphatases. Steady state levels of collagenase mRNA were markedly increased by okadaic acid treatment. We show that the AP-1 consensus sequence in the collagenase promoter is required for the induction of collagenase gene expression by okadaic acid, even though sequences upstream of the AP-1 consensus site have an additive effect. We also examined the regulation by okadaic acid of expression of the components of the AP-1 complex, c-fos and c-jun. c-fos expression is dramatically stimulated by okadaic acid, whereas c-jun expression is stimulated to a lesser extent. Induction of c-fos gene mRNA occurs through a region known to contain multiple regulatory elements. These results suggest that phosphorylation regulates collagenase gene expression mediated by an AP-1 binding site. Images PMID:1966042

  11. The growth factor-inducible immediate-early gene 3CH134 encodes a protein-tyrosine-phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Charles, C H; Sun, H; Lau, L F; Tonks, N K

    1993-01-01

    Stimulation of fibroblasts with serum growth factors results in the rapid activation of a set of immediate-early genes, among them 3CH134. We have purified a bacterially expressed form of the 3CH134-encoded polypeptide and demonstrated that it has intrinsic protein-tyrosine-phosphatase (PTPase; protein-tyrosine-phosphate phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.48) activity in vitro. This activity is optimal at pH 7.5, is sensitive to vanadate and cysteinyl modifying agents, and is insensitive to a panel of serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitors. Purified 3CH134 protein displays a high degree of selectivity among the tyrosine-phosphorylated polypeptide substrates tested. Under our assay conditions, the rates of dephosphorylation are in the order EDNDYINASL peptide < myelin basic protein < reduced, carboxyamidomethylated, and maleylated lysozyme (RCML) < p42mapk. There is a 200-fold range in rates for these substrates, with p42mapk dephosphorylated 15-fold more rapidly than RCML. Although 3CH134 is most closely related to the tyrosine/serine dual-specificity phosphatase VH1, we failed to detect any 3CH134-directed activity on casein or RCML phosphorylated on serine/threonine residues by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Since 3CH134 expression is controlled transcriptionally and posttranscriptionally, it may represent a class of PTPases whose activity is regulated at the level of protein synthesis and degradation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8389479

  12. A novel antimicrobial protein isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum) shares homology with an acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Yuan, Fenghua; Gao, Yin; Liang, Chenggang; Xu, Jin; Zhang, Changling; He, Liyuan

    2003-12-01

    The nucleotide and amino acids sequences for AP(1) will appear in the GenBank(R) and NCBI databases under accession number AY297449. A novel antimicrobial protein (AP(1)) was purified from leaves of the potato ( Solanum tuberosum, variety MS-42.3) with a procedure involving ammonium sulphate fractionation, molecular sieve chromatography with Sephacryl S-200 and hydrophobic chromatography with Butyl-Sepharose using a FPLC system. The inhibition spectrum investigation showed that AP(1) had good inhibition activity against five different strains of Ralstonia solanacearum from potato or other crops, and two fungal pathogens, Rhizoctonia solani and Alternaria solani from potato. The full-length cDNA encoding AP(1) has been successfully cloned by screening a cDNA expression library of potato with an anti-AP(1) antibody and RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) PCR. Determination of the nucleotide sequences revealed the presence of an open reading frame encoding 343 amino acids. At the C-terminus of AP(1) there is an ATP-binding domain, and the N-terminus exhibits 58% identity with an/the acid phosphatase from Mesorhizobium loti. SDS/PAGE and Western blotting analysis suggested that the AP(1) gene can be successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and recognized by an antibody against AP(1). Also the expressed protein showed an inhibition activity the same as original AP(1) protein isolated from potato. We suggest that AP(1) most likely belongs to a new group of proteins with antimicrobial characteristics in vitro and functions in relation to phosphorylation and energy metabolism of plants.

  13. The energetic network of hotspot residues between Cdc25B phosphatase and its protein substrate

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Jungsan; Rudolph, Johannes

    2006-01-01

    Summary We have investigated the functional network of hotspot residues at the remote docking site of two cell cycle regulators, namely Cdc25B phosphatase and its native protein substrate Cdk2-pTpY/CycA. Specifically, we have studied the roles of energetically important residues (Arg488, Arg492, Tyr497 on Cdc25B and Asp206 and Asp210 on Cdk2-pTpY/CycA) by generating a diverse set of substitutions and performing double- and triple mutant cycle analyses. This transient protein-protein interaction is particularly well-suited for this mutagenic approach because various control experiments ensure that the effect of each mutation is limited to the interaction of interest. We find binary coupling energies for ion pairs and hydrogen bonds ranging from 0.7 to 3.9 kcal/mol and ternary coupling energies of 1.9 and 2.8 kcal/mol. Overall our biochemical analyses are in good agreement with the docked structure of the complex and suggest the following roles for the individual hotspot residues on Cdc25B. The most important contributor, Arg492, forms a specific and tight bidentate interaction with Asp206 and a weaker interaction with Asp210 that cannot be replaced by a Lys. Although Tyr497 does not directly participate in this ionic network, it is important for buttressing Arg492 using both its hydrophobic (aromatic ring) and hydrophilic characteristics (hydrogen bonding). Arg488 participates less specifically in the electrostatic network with Asp206 and Asp210 of the protein substrate as it can partially be replaced by Lys. Our data provide insight how a cluster of residues in a docking site remote from the site of the chemical reaction can bring about efficient and specific substrate recognition. PMID:16950393

  14. Differential Expression of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Synthase Genes during Orchid Flower Senescence Induced by the Protein Phosphatase Inhibitor Okadaic Acid1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning Ning; Yang, Shang Fa; Charng, Yee-yung

    2001-01-01

    Applying 10 pmol of okadaic acid (OA), a specific inhibitor of type 1 or type 2A serine/threonine protein phosphatases, to the orchid (Phalaenopsis species) stigma induced a dramatic increase in ethylene production and an accelerated senescence of the whole flower. Aminoethoxyvinylglycine or silver thiosulfate, inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis or action, respectively, effectively inhibited the OA-induced ethylene production and retarded flower senescence, suggesting that the protein phosphatase inhibitor induced orchid flower senescence through an ethylene-mediated signaling pathway. OA treatment induced a differential expression pattern for the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase multigene family. Accumulation of Phal-ACS1 transcript in the stigma, labelum, and ovary induced by OA were higher than those induced by pollination as determined by “semiquantitative” reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. In contrast, the transcript levels of Phal-ACS2 and Phal-ACS3 induced by OA were much lower than those induced by pollination. Staurosporine, a protein kinase inhibitor, on the other hand, inhibited the OA-induced Phal-ACS1 expression in the stigma and delayed flower senescence. Our results suggest that a hyper-phosphorylation status of an unidentified protein(s) is involved in up-regulating the expression of Phal-ACS1 gene resulting in increased ethylene production and accelerated the senescence process of orchid flower. PMID:11351088

  15. Design, Synthesis, Biological Activity and Molecular Dynamics Studies of Specific Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitors over SHP-2

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Su-Xia; Li, Xiao-Bo; Liu, Wen-Bo; Ma, Ying; Wang, Run-Ling; Cheng, Xian-Chao; Wang, Shu-Qing; Liu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Over expressing in PTPN1 (encoding Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, PTP1B), a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) that plays an overall positive role in insulin signaling, is linked to the pathogenesis of diabetes and obesity. The relationship between PTP1B and human diseases exhibits PTP1B as the target to treat these diseases. In this article, small weight molecules of the imidazolidine series were screened from databases and optimized on silicon as the inhibitors of PTP1B based on the steric conformation and electronic configuration of thiazolidinedione (TZD) compounds. The top three candidates were tested using an in vitro biological assay after synthesis. Finally, we report a novel inhibitor, Compound 13, that specifically inhibits PTP1B over the closely related phosphatase Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) at 80 μM. Its IC50 values are reported in this paper as well. This compound was further verified by computer analysis for its ability to combine the catalytic domains of PTP1B and SHP-2 by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. PMID:23774838

  16. The molecular chaperone Hsp70 activates protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) by binding the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain.

    PubMed

    Connarn, Jamie N; Assimon, Victoria A; Reed, Rebecca A; Tse, Eric; Southworth, Daniel R; Zuiderweg, Erik R P; Gestwicki, Jason E; Sun, Duxin

    2014-01-31

    Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is auto-inhibited by intramolecular interactions with its tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. Hsp90 has been shown to bind PP5 to activate its phosphatase activity. However, the functional implications of binding Hsp70 to PP5 are not yet clear. In this study, we find that both Hsp90 and Hsp70 bind to PP5 using a luciferase fragment complementation assay. A fluorescence polarization assay shows that Hsp90 (MEEVD motif) binds to the TPR domain of PP5 almost 3-fold higher affinity than Hsp70 (IEEVD motif). However, Hsp70 binding to PP5 stimulates higher phosphatase activity of PP5 than the binding of Hsp90. We find that PP5 forms a stable 1:1 complex with Hsp70, but the interaction appears asymmetric with Hsp90, with one PP5 binding the dimer. Solution NMR studies reveal that Hsc70 and PP5 proteins are dynamically independent in complex, tethered by a disordered region that connects the Hsc70 core and the IEEVD-TPR contact area. This tethered binding is expected to allow PP5 to carry out multi-site dephosphorylation of Hsp70-bound clients with a range of sizes and shapes. Together, these results demonstrate that Hsp70 recruits PP5 and activates its phosphatase activity which suggests dual roles for PP5 that might link chaperone systems with signaling pathways in cancer and development.

  17. Significance of the photosystem II core phosphatase PBCP for plant viability and protein repair in thylakoid membranes.

    PubMed

    Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Woodiwiss, Timothy; Knoerdel, Ryan; Zia, Ahmad; Wood, Magnus; Hoehner, Ricarda; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2014-07-01

    PSII undergoes photodamage, which results in photoinhibition-the light-induced loss of photosynthetic activity. The main target of damage in PSII is the reaction center protein D1, which is buried in the massive 1.4 MDa PSII holocomplex. Plants have evolved a PSII repair cycle that degrades the damaged D1 subunit and replaces it with a newly synthesized copy. PSII core proteins, including D1, are phosphorylated in high light. This phosphorylation is important for the mobilization of photoinhibited PSII from stacked grana thylakoids to the repair machinery in distant unstacked stroma lamellae. It has been recognized that the degradation of the damaged D1 is more efficient after its dephosphorylation by a protein phosphatase. Recently a protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C)-type PSII core phosphatase (PBCP) has been discovered, which is involved in the dephosphorylation of PSII core proteins. Its role in PSII repair, however, is unknown. Using a range of spectroscopic and biochemical techniques, we report that the inactivation of the PBCP gene affects the growth characteristic of plants, with a decreased biomass and altered PSII functionality. PBCP mutants show increased phosphorylation of core subunits in dark and photoinhibitory conditions and a diminished degradation of the D1 subunit. Our results on D1 turnover in PBCP mutants suggest that dephosphorylation of PSII subunits is required for efficient D1 degradation. PMID:24793754

  18. Pancreatic Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Deficiency Exacerbates Acute Pancreatitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bettaieb, Ahmed; Koike, Shinichiro; Chahed, Samah; Bachaalany, Santana; Griffey, Stephen; Sastre, Juan; Haj, Fawaz G

    2016-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common and devastating gastrointestinal disorder that causes significant morbidity. The disease starts as local inflammation in the pancreas that may progress to systemic inflammation and complications. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is implicated in inflammatory signaling, but its significance in AP remains unclear. To investigate whether PTP1B may have a role in AP, we used pancreas PTP1B knockout (panc-PTP1B KO) mice and determined the effects of pancreatic PTP1B deficiency on cerulein- and arginine-induced acute pancreatitis. We report that PTP1B protein expression was increased in the early phase of AP in mice and rats. In addition, histological analyses of pancreas samples revealed enhanced features of AP in cerulein-treated panc-PTP1B KO mice compared with controls. Moreover, cerulein- and arginine-induced serum amylase and lipase were significantly higher in panc-PTP1B KO mice compared with controls. Similarly, pancreatic mRNA and serum concentrations of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1B, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α were increased in panc-PTP1B KO mice compared with controls. Furthermore, panc-PTP1B KO mice exhibited enhanced cerulein- and arginine-induced NF-κB inflammatory response accompanied with increased mitogen-activated protein kinases activation and elevated endoplasmic reticulum stress. Notably, these effects were recapitulated in acinar cells treated with a pharmacological inhibitor of PTP1B. These findings reveal a novel role for pancreatic PTP1B in cerulein- and arginine-induced acute pancreatitis. PMID:27461362

  19. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B expression is induced by inflammation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zabolotny, Janice M; Kim, Young-Bum; Welsh, Laura A; Kershaw, Erin E; Neel, Benjamin G; Kahn, Barbara B

    2008-05-23

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a major negative regulator of insulin and leptin sensitivity. PTP1B overexpression in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle of humans and rodents may contribute to insulin resistance and obesity. The mechanisms mediating PTP1B overexpression in obese and diabetic states have been unclear. We find that adipose tissue inflammation and the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) regulate PTP1B expression in vivo. High fat feeding of mice increased PTP1B expression 1.5- to 7-fold in adipose tissue, liver, skeletal muscle, and arcuate nucleus of hypothalamus. PTP1B overexpression in high fat-fed mice coincided with increased adipose tissue expression of the macrophage marker CD68 and TNFalpha, which is implicated in causing obesity-induced insulin resistance. TNFalpha increased PTP1B mRNA and protein levels by 2- to 5-fold in a dose- and time-dependent manner in adipocyte and hepatocyte cell lines. TNFalpha administration in mice increased PTP1B mRNA 1.4- to 4-fold in adipose tissue, liver, skeletal muscle, and hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and PTP1B protein 2-fold in liver. Actinomycin D treatment blocked, and high dose salicylate treatment inhibited by 80%, TNFalpha-induced PTP1B expression in adipocyte cell lines, suggesting TNFalpha may induce PTP1B transcription via nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation from adipocyte cell lines and liver of mice demonstrated TNFalpha-induced recruitment of NFkappaB subunit p65 to the PTP1B promoter in vitro and in vivo. In mice with diet-induced obesity, TNFalpha deficiency also partly blocked PTP1B overexpression in adipose tissue. Our data suggest that PTP1B overexpression in multiple tissues in obesity is regulated by inflammation and that PTP1B may be a target of anti-inflammatory therapies. PMID:18281274

  20. Rational design of allosteric-inhibition sites in classical protein tyrosine phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Chio, Cynthia M.; Yu, Xiaoling; Bishop, Anthony C.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which catalyze the dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine in protein substrates, are critical regulators of metazoan cell signaling and have emerged as potential drug targets for a range of human diseases. Strategies for chemically targeting the function of individual PTPs selectively could serve to elucidate the signaling roles of these enzymes and would potentially expedite validation of the therapeutic promise of PTP inhibitors. Here we report a novel strategy for the design of non-natural allosteric-inhibition sites in PTPs; these sites, which can be introduced into target PTPs through protein engineering, serve to sensitize target PTPs to potent and selective inhibition by a biarsenical small molecule. Building on the recent discovery of a naturally occurring cryptic allosteric site in wild-type Src-homology-2 domain containing PTP (Shp2) that can be targeted by biarsenical compounds, we hypothesized that Shp2’s unusual sensitivity to biarsenicals could be strengthened through rational design and that the Shp2-specific site could serve as a blueprint for the introduction of non-natural inhibitor sensitivity in other PTPs. Indeed, we show here that the strategic introduction of a cysteine residue at a position removed from the Shp2 active site can serve to increase the potency and selectivity of the interaction between Shp2’s allosteric site and the biarsenical inhibitor. Moreover, we find that “Shp2-like” allosteric sites can be installed de novo in PTP enzymes that do not possess naturally occurring sensitivity to biarsenical compounds. Using primary-sequence alignments to guide our enzyme engineering, we have successfully introduced allosteric-inhibition sites in four classical PTPs—PTP1B, PTPH-1, FAP-1, and HePTP—from four different PTP subfamilies, suggesting that our sensitization approach can likely be applied widely across the classical PTP family to generate biarsenical-responsive PTPs. PMID:25828055

  1. The tyrosine phosphatase PTPN14 (Pez) inhibits metastasis by altering protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Belle, Leila; Ali, Naveid; Lonic, Ana; Li, Xiaochun; Paltridge, James L; Roslan, Suraya; Herrmann, David; Conway, James R W; Gehling, Freya K; Bert, Andrew G; Crocker, Lesley A; Tsykin, Anna; Farshid, Gelareh; Goodall, Gregory J; Timpson, Paul; Daly, Roger J; Khew-Goodall, Yeesim

    2015-02-17

    Factors secreted by tumor cells shape the local microenvironment to promote invasion and metastasis, as well as condition the premetastatic niche to enable secondary-site colonization and growth. In addition to this secretome, tumor cells have increased abundance of growth-promoting receptors at the cell surface. We found that the tyrosine phosphatase PTPN14 (also called Pez, which is mutated in various cancers) suppressed metastasis by reducing intracellular protein trafficking through the secretory pathway. Knocking down PTPN14 in tumor cells or injecting the peritoneum of mice with conditioned medium from PTPN14-deficient cell cultures promoted the growth and metastasis of breast cancer xenografts. Loss of catalytically functional PTPN14 increased the secretion of growth factors and cytokines, such as IL-8 (interleukin-8), and increased the abundance of EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) at the cell surface of breast cancer cells and of FLT4 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3) at the cell surface of primary lymphatic endothelial cells. We identified RIN1 (Ras and Rab interactor 1) and PRKCD (protein kinase C-δ) as binding partners and substrates of PTPN14. Similar to cells overexpressing PTPN14, receptor trafficking to the cell surface was inhibited in cells that lacked PRKCD or RIN1 or expressed a nonphosphorylatable RIN1 mutant, and cytokine secretion was decreased in cells treated with PRKCD inhibitors. Invasive breast cancer tissue had decreased expression of PTPN14, and patient survival was worse when tumors had increased expression of the genes encoding RIN1 or PRKCD. Thus, PTPN14 prevents metastasis by restricting the trafficking of both soluble and membrane-bound proteins. PMID:25690013

  2. Reactive Nitrogen Species and Hydrogen Sulfide as Regulators of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Redox modifications of thiols serve as a molecular code enabling precise and complex regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and other proteins. Particular gasotransmitters and even the redox modifications themselves affect each other, of which a typical example is S-nitrosylation-mediated protection against the further oxidation of protein thiols. Recent Advances: For a long time, PTPs were considered constitutively active housekeeping enzymes. This view has changed substantially over the last two decades, and the PTP family is now recognized as a group of tightly and flexibly regulated fundamental enzymes. In addition to the conventional ways in which they are regulated, including noncovalent interactions, phosphorylation, and oxidation, the evidence that has accumulated during the past two decades suggests that many of these enzymes are also modulated by gasotransmitters, namely by nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Critical Issues: The specificity and selectivity of the methods used to detect nitrosylation and sulfhydration remains to be corroborated, because several researchers raised the issue of false-positive results, particularly when using the most widespread biotin switch method. Further development of robust and straightforward proteomic methods is needed to further improve our knowledge of the full extent of the gasotransmitters-mediated changes in PTP activity, selectivity, and specificity. Further Directions: Results of the hitherto performed studies on gasotransmitter-mediated PTP signaling await translation into clinical medicine and pharmacotherapeutics. In addition to directly affecting the activity of particular PTPs, the use of reversible S-nitrosylation as a protective mechanism against oxidative stress should be of high interest. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2191–2209. PMID:24328688

  3. Probing the origins of catalytic discrimination between phosphate and sulfate monoester hydrolysis: comparative analysis of alkaline phosphatase and protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Logan D; Zalatan, Jesse G; Herschlag, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Catalytic promiscuity, the ability of enzymes to catalyze multiple reactions, provides an opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the origins of catalysis and substrate specificity. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) catalyzes both phosphate and sulfate monoester hydrolysis reactions with a ∼10(10)-fold preference for phosphate monoester hydrolysis, despite the similarity between these reactions. The preponderance of formal positive charge in the AP active site, particularly from three divalent metal ions, was proposed to be responsible for this preference by providing stronger electrostatic interactions with the more negatively charged phosphoryl group versus the sulfuryl group. To test whether positively charged metal ions are required to achieve a high preference for the phosphate monoester hydrolysis reaction, the catalytic preference of three protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which do not contain metal ions, were measured. Their preferences ranged from 5 × 10(6) to 7 × 10(7), lower than that for AP but still substantial, indicating that metal ions and a high preponderance of formal positive charge within the active site are not required to achieve a strong catalytic preference for phosphate monoester over sulfate monoester hydrolysis. The observed ionic strength dependences of kcat/KM values for phosphate and sulfate monoester hydrolysis are steeper for the more highly charged phosphate ester with both AP and the PTP Stp1, following the dependence expected based on the charge difference of these two substrates. However, the dependences for AP were not greater than those of Stp1 and were rather shallow for both enzymes. These results suggest that overall electrostatics from formal positive charge within the active site is not the major driving force in distinguishing between these reactions and that substantial discrimination can be attained without metal ions. Thus, local properties of the active site, presumably including multiple positioned dipolar

  4. [Difluro(phosphono)methyl]phenylalanine-containing peptide inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed Central

    Desmarais, S; Friesen, R W; Zamboni, R; Ramachandran, C

    1999-01-01

    Peptides containing the non-hydrolysable phosphotyrosine analogue 4-[difluro(phosphono)methyl]phenylalanine [Phe(CF2P)] were synthesized and tested as inhibitors of the protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) PTP1B, CD45, PTPbeta, LAR and SHP-1. We have identified peptides containing two adjacent Phe(CF2P) residues as potent inhibitors of PTPs. The tripeptide having the sequence Glu-Phe(CF2P)-Phe(CF2P) is a potent and selective inhibitor of PTP1B. This peptide inhibits PTP1B with an IC50 of 40 nM, which is at least 100-fold lower than with other PTPs. A second tripeptide, Pro-Phe(CF2P)-Phe(CF2P), is most potent against PTPbeta, with an IC50 of 200 nM, and inhibits PTP1B with an IC50 of 300 nM. These data suggest that it is possible to develop selective, active-site-directed, reversible, potent inhibitors of PTPs. PMID:9882618

  5. NLRP3 tyrosine phosphorylation is controlled by protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN22

    PubMed Central

    Spalinger, Marianne R.; Kasper, Stephanie; Gottier, Claudia; Lang, Silvia; Atrott, Kirstin; Vavricka, Stephan R.; Scharl, Sylvie; Gutte, Petrus M.; Grütter, Markus G.; Beer, Hans-Dietmar; Contassot, Emmanuel; Chan, Andrew C.; Dai, Xuezhi; Rawlings, David J.; Mair, Florian; Becher, Burkhard; Falk, Werner; Fried, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes form as the result of the intracellular presence of danger-associated molecular patterns and mediate the release of active IL-1β, which influences a variety of inflammatory responses. Excessive inflammasome activation results in severe inflammatory conditions, but physiological IL-1β secretion is necessary for intestinal homeostasis. Here, we have described a mechanism of NLRP3 inflammasome regulation by tyrosine phosphorylation of NLRP3 at Tyr861. We demonstrated that protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 22 (PTPN22), variants in which are associated with chronic inflammatory disorders, dephosphorylates NLRP3 upon inflammasome induction, allowing efficient NLRP3 activation and subsequent IL-1β release. In murine models, PTPN22 deficiency resulted in pronounced colitis, increased NLRP3 phosphorylation, but reduced levels of mature IL-1β. Conversely, patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that carried an autoimmunity-associated PTPN22 variant had increased IL-1β levels. Together, our results identify tyrosine phosphorylation as an important regulatory mechanism for NLRP3 that prevents aberrant inflammasome activation. PMID:27043286

  6. 4-Quinolone-3-carboxylic acids as cell-permeable inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Ying; Gao, Li-Xin; Jin, Yi; Tang, Chun-Lan; Li, Jing-Ya; Li, Jia; Long, Ya-Qiu

    2014-07-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B is a negative regulator in the insulin and leptin signaling pathways, and has emerged as an attractive target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. However, the essential pharmacophore of charged phosphotyrosine or its mimetic confer low selectivity and poor cell permeability. Starting from our previously reported aryl diketoacid-based PTP1B inhibitors, a drug-like scaffold of 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid was introduced for the first time as a novel surrogate of phosphotyrosine. An optimal combination of hydrophobic groups installed at C-6, N-1 and C-3 positions of the quinolone motif afforded potent PTP1B inhibitors with low micromolar IC50 values. These 4-quinolone-3-carboxylate based PTP1B inhibitors displayed a 2-10 fold selectivity over a panel of PTP's. Furthermore, the bidentate inhibitors of 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acids conjugated with aryl diketoacid or salicylic acid were cell permeable and enhanced insulin signaling in CHO/hIR cells. The kinetic studies and molecular modeling suggest that the 4-quinolone-3-carboxylates act as competitive inhibitors by binding to the PTP1B active site in the WPD loop closed conformation. Taken together, our study shows that the 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid derivatives exhibit improved pharmacological properties over previously described PTB1B inhibitors and warrant further preclinical studies.

  7. Role of Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase γ in Sensing Extracellular CO2 and HCO3.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuehan; Skelton, Lara A; Xu, Lumei; Chandler, Margaret P; Berthiaume, Jessica M; Boron, Walter F

    2016-09-01

    Regulation of blood pH-critical for virtually every facet of life-requires that the renal proximal tubule (PT) adjust its rate of H(+) secretion (nearly the same as the rate of HCO3 (-) reabsorption, JHCO3 ) in response to changes in blood [CO2] and [HCO3 (-)]. Yet CO2/HCO3 (-) sensing mechanisms remain poorly characterized. Because receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors render JHCO3 in the PT insensitive to changes in CO2 concentration, we hypothesized that the structural features of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase-γ (RPTPγ) that are consistent with binding of extracellular CO2 or HCO3 (-) facilitate monitoring of blood CO2/HCO3 (-) concentrations. We now report that PTs express RPTPγ on blood-facing membranes. Moreover, RPTPγ deletion in mice eliminated the CO2 and HCO3 (-) sensitivities of JHCO3 as well as the normal defense of blood pH during whole-body acidosis. Thus, RPTPγ appears to be a novel extracellular CO2/HCO3 (-) sensor critical for pH homeostasis. PMID:26839367

  8. Protein tyrosine phosphatase σ regulates the synapse number of zebrafish olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xigui; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Sagara, Hiroshi; Mikami, Yoshinori; Mishina, Masayoshi

    2011-11-01

    The formation and refinement of synaptic connections are key steps of neural development to establish elaborate brain networks. To investigate the functional role of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) σ, we employed an olfactory sensory neuron (OSN)-specific gene manipulation system in combination with in vivo imaging of transparent zebrafish embryos. Knockdown of PTPσ enhanced the accumulation of synaptic vesicles in the axon terminals of OSNs. The exaggerated accumulation of synaptic vesicles was restored to the normal level by the OSN-specific expression of PTPσ, indicating that presynaptic PTPσ is responsible for the regulation of synaptic vesicle accumulation. Consistently, transient expression of a dominant-negative form of PTPσ in OSNs enhanced the accumulation of synaptic vesicles. The exaggerated accumulation of synaptic vesicles was reproduced in transgenic zebrafish lines carrying an OSN-specific expression vector of the dominant-negative PTPσ. By electron microscopic analysis of the transgenic line, we found the significant increase of the number of OSN-mitral cell synapses in the central zone of the olfactory bulb. The density of docked vesicles at the active zone was also increased significantly. Our results suggest that presynaptic PTPσ controls the number of OSN-mitral cell synapses by suppressing their excessive increase.

  9. In vitro effects of cinnamic acid derivatives on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Adisakwattana, Sirichai; Pongsuwan, Jirawan; Wungcharoen, Chompunut; Yibchok-anun, Sirintorn

    2013-10-01

    Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a major negative regulator of insulin signaling pathways. Finding selective PTP1B inhibitors from natural sources has been widely recognized as a potential drug target for the treatment of diabetes mellitus and obesity. In the present study, we evaluated the inhibitory activity of cinnamic acid derivatives against PTP1B in vitro. Among 14 cinnamic acid derivatives and related compounds, the most potent inhibitor PTP1Bs were o-hydroxycinnamic acid and p-hydroxycinnamic acid, which had IC50 values of 137.67 ± 13.37 and 181.60 ± 9.34 µM, respectively. The kinetics analysis revealed that PTP1B was inhibited by o-hydroxycinnamic acid and p-hydroxycinnamic acid in a non-competitive manner. o-Hydroxycinnamic acid (25 μM) and p-hydroxycinnamic acid (25 μM), in combination with sodium orthovanadate (0.0125 μM), demonstrated a synergistic effect to inhibit PTP1B activity. In conclusion, the findings provide a new insight into naturally occurring PTP1B inhibitors that could be useful for treatment of diabetes and obesity.

  10. [Polymorphism of placental alkaline phosphatase on the level of DNA and protein in the Mordovian population].

    PubMed

    Bekman, G; Vennberg, K; Bekman, L; Spitsyn, V A; Novoradovskiĭ, A G

    1996-03-01

    Data on DNA and enzyme polymorphisms of human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) in Mordvinian populations are presented. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was detected after the digestion of DNA samples with Rsa I and Pst I endounucleases. The frequencies of the second (2) allele for PLAP Pst I and Rsa I were 0.53 and 0.192, respectively. Comparative data suggest that there are no population differences between Mordvinians and Scandinavian ethnic groups. In Mordvinians gene frequencies measured at the level of gene products were PLAP*1(S) = 0.681, PLAP*2(F) = 0.244, PLAP*3(I) = 0.069, and PLAP*18(D) = 0.006, indicating the similarity of the corresponding values in Scandinavians. The observed RFLP and "protein" genotype frequencies were in good agreement with that expected according to the Hardy-Weinberg equation. In the Mordvinian population, as in those, surveyed previously, a strong linkage disequilibrium between Pst I and Rsa I PLAP alleles was observed. PMID:8723634

  11. The selective inhibition of protein phosphatase-1 results in mitotic catastrophe and impaired tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Claudia; De Munter, Sofie; Van Dessel, Nele; Lesage, Bart; Heroes, Ewald; Boens, Shannah; Beullens, Monique; Van Eynde, Aleyde; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-12-15

    The serine/threonine protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) complex is a key regulator of the cell cycle. However, the redundancy of PP1 isoforms and the lack of specific inhibitors have hampered studies on the global role of PP1 in cell cycle progression in vertebrates. Here, we show that the overexpression of nuclear inhibitor of PP1 (NIPP1; also known as PPP1R8) in HeLa cells culminated in a prometaphase arrest, associated with severe spindle-formation and chromosome-congression defects. In addition, the spindle assembly checkpoint was activated and checkpoint silencing was hampered. Eventually, most cells either died by apoptosis or formed binucleated cells. The NIPP1-induced mitotic arrest could be explained by the inhibition of PP1 that was titrated away from other mitotic PP1 interactors. Consistent with this notion, the mitotic-arrest phenotype could be rescued by the overexpression of PP1 or the inhibition of the Aurora B kinase, which acts antagonistically to PP1. Finally, we demonstrate that the overexpression of NIPP1 also hampered colony formation and tumor growth in xenograft assays in a PP1-dependent manner. Our data show that the selective inhibition of PP1 can be used to induce cancer cell death through mitotic catastrophe. PMID:26542020

  12. Nitropropenyl Benzodioxole, An Anti-Infective Agent with Action as a Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    White, Kylie S; Nicoletti, Gina; Borland, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We report on the activities of a broad spectrum antimicrobial compound,nitropropenyl benzodioxole (NPBD) which are of relevance to its potential as an anti-infective drug. These investigations support the proposal that a major mechanism of NPBD is action as a tyrosine mimetic, competitively inhibiting bacterial and fungal protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP). NPBD did not affect major anti-bacterial drug targets, namely, ATP production, cell wall or cell membrane integrity, or transcription and translation of RNA. NPBD inhibited bacterial YopH and human PTP1B and not human CD45 in enzyme assays. NPBD inhibited PTP-associated bacterial virulence factors, namely, endospore formation in Bacillus cereus, prodigiosin secretion in Serratia marcescens, motility in Proteus spp., and adherence and invasion of mammalian cells by Yersinia enterocolitica. NPBD acts intracellularly to inhibit the early development stages of the Chlamydia trachomatis infection cycle in mammalian cells known to involve sequestration of host cell PTPs. NPBD thus both kills pathogens and inhibits virulence factors relevant to early infection, making it a suitable candidate for development as an anti-infective agent, particularly for pathogens that enter through, or cause infections at, mucosal surfaces. Though much is yet to be understood about bacterial PTPs, they are proposed as suitable anti-infective targets and have been linked to agents similar to NPBD. The structural and functional diversity and heterogeneous distribution of PTPs across microbial species make them suitably selective targets for the development of both broadly active and pathogen-specific drugs. PMID:24976873

  13. The Arabidopsis Protein Phosphatase PP2C38 Negatively Regulates the Central Immune Kinase BIK1.

    PubMed

    Couto, Daniel; Niebergall, Roda; Liang, Xiangxiu; Bücherl, Christoph A; Sklenar, Jan; Macho, Alberto P; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Derbyshire, Paul; Altenbach, Denise; Maclean, Dan; Robatzek, Silke; Uhrig, Joachim; Menke, Frank; Zhou, Jian-Min; Zipfel, Cyril

    2016-08-01

    Plants recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) via cell surface-localized pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), leading to PRR-triggered immunity (PTI). The Arabidopsis cytoplasmic kinase BIK1 is a downstream substrate of several PRR complexes. How plant PTI is negatively regulated is not fully understood. Here, we identify the protein phosphatase PP2C38 as a negative regulator of BIK1 activity and BIK1-mediated immunity. PP2C38 dynamically associates with BIK1, as well as with the PRRs FLS2 and EFR, but not with the co-receptor BAK1. PP2C38 regulates PAMP-induced BIK1 phosphorylation and impairs the phosphorylation of the NADPH oxidase RBOHD by BIK1, leading to reduced oxidative burst and stomatal immunity. Upon PAMP perception, PP2C38 is phosphorylated on serine 77 and dissociates from the FLS2/EFR-BIK1 complexes, enabling full BIK1 activation. Together with our recent work on the control of BIK1 turnover, this study reveals another important regulatory mechanism of this central immune component. PMID:27494702

  14. The selective inhibition of protein phosphatase-1 results in mitotic catastrophe and impaired tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Claudia; De Munter, Sofie; Van Dessel, Nele; Lesage, Bart; Heroes, Ewald; Boens, Shannah; Beullens, Monique; Van Eynde, Aleyde; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-12-15

    The serine/threonine protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) complex is a key regulator of the cell cycle. However, the redundancy of PP1 isoforms and the lack of specific inhibitors have hampered studies on the global role of PP1 in cell cycle progression in vertebrates. Here, we show that the overexpression of nuclear inhibitor of PP1 (NIPP1; also known as PPP1R8) in HeLa cells culminated in a prometaphase arrest, associated with severe spindle-formation and chromosome-congression defects. In addition, the spindle assembly checkpoint was activated and checkpoint silencing was hampered. Eventually, most cells either died by apoptosis or formed binucleated cells. The NIPP1-induced mitotic arrest could be explained by the inhibition of PP1 that was titrated away from other mitotic PP1 interactors. Consistent with this notion, the mitotic-arrest phenotype could be rescued by the overexpression of PP1 or the inhibition of the Aurora B kinase, which acts antagonistically to PP1. Finally, we demonstrate that the overexpression of NIPP1 also hampered colony formation and tumor growth in xenograft assays in a PP1-dependent manner. Our data show that the selective inhibition of PP1 can be used to induce cancer cell death through mitotic catastrophe.

  15. Protein tyrosine phosphatase controls breast cancer invasion through the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Bo-Mi; Chae, Hee Suk; Jeong, Young-Ju; Lee, Young-Rae; Noh, Eun-Mi; Youn, Hyun Zo; Jung, Sung Hoo; Yu, Hong-Nu; Chung, Eun Yong; Kim, Jong-Suk

    2013-01-01

    The expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) produced by cancer cells has been associated with the high potential of metastasis in several human carcinomas, including breast cancer. Several pieces of evidence demonstrate that protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) have functions that promote cell migration and metastasis in breast cancer. We analyzed whether PTP inhibitor might control breast cancer invasion through MMP expression. Herein, we investigate the effect of 4-hydroxy-3,3-dimethyl-2H benzo[g]indole-2,5(3H)-dione (BVT948), a novel PTP inhibitor, on 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced MMP-9 expression and cell invasion in MCF-7 cells. The expression of MMP-9 and cell invasion increased after TPA treatment, whereas TPA-induced MMP-9 expression and cell invasion were decreased by BVT948 pretreatment. Also, BVT948 suppressed NF-κB activation in TPA-treated MCF-7 cells. However, BVT948 didn’t block TPA-induced AP-1 activation in MCF-7 cells. Our results suggest that the PTP inhibitor blocks breast cancer invasion via suppression of the expression of MMP-9. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(11): 533-538] PMID:24152909

  16. Aurora kinases and protein phosphatase 1 mediate chromosome congression through regulation of CENP-E.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yumi; Holland, Andrew J; Lan, Weijie; Cleveland, Don W

    2010-08-01

    Opposing roles of Aurora kinases and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) during mitosis have long been suggested. Here, we demonstrate that Aurora kinases A and B phosphorylate a conserved residue on the kinetochore motor CENP-E. PP1 binds CENP-E via a motif overlapping this phosphorylation site and binding is disrupted by Aurora phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of CENP-E by the Auroras is enriched at spindle poles, disrupting binding of PP1 and reducing CENP-E's affinity for individual microtubules. This phosphorylation is required for CENP-E-mediated towing of initially polar chromosomes toward the cell center. Kinetochores on such chromosomes cannot make subsequent stable attachment to spindle microtubules when dephosphorylation of CENP-E or rebinding of PP1 to CENP-E is blocked. Thus, an Aurora/PP1 phosphorylation switch modulates CENP-E motor activity as an essential feature of chromosome congression from poles and localized PP1 delivery by CENP-E to the outer kinetochore is necessary for stable microtubule capture by those chromosomes. PMID:20691903

  17. Role of Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase γ in Sensing Extracellular CO2 and HCO3.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuehan; Skelton, Lara A; Xu, Lumei; Chandler, Margaret P; Berthiaume, Jessica M; Boron, Walter F

    2016-09-01

    Regulation of blood pH-critical for virtually every facet of life-requires that the renal proximal tubule (PT) adjust its rate of H(+) secretion (nearly the same as the rate of HCO3 (-) reabsorption, JHCO3 ) in response to changes in blood [CO2] and [HCO3 (-)]. Yet CO2/HCO3 (-) sensing mechanisms remain poorly characterized. Because receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors render JHCO3 in the PT insensitive to changes in CO2 concentration, we hypothesized that the structural features of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase-γ (RPTPγ) that are consistent with binding of extracellular CO2 or HCO3 (-) facilitate monitoring of blood CO2/HCO3 (-) concentrations. We now report that PTs express RPTPγ on blood-facing membranes. Moreover, RPTPγ deletion in mice eliminated the CO2 and HCO3 (-) sensitivities of JHCO3 as well as the normal defense of blood pH during whole-body acidosis. Thus, RPTPγ appears to be a novel extracellular CO2/HCO3 (-) sensor critical for pH homeostasis.

  18. Comprehensive protein tyrosine phosphatase mRNA profiling identifies new regulators in the progression of glioma.

    PubMed

    Bourgonje, Annika M; Verrijp, Kiek; Schepens, Jan T G; Navis, Anna C; Piepers, Jolanda A F; Palmen, Chantal B C; van den Eijnden, Monique; Hooft van Huijsduijnen, Rob; Wesseling, Pieter; Leenders, William P J; Hendriks, Wiljan J A J

    2016-01-01

    The infiltrative behavior of diffuse gliomas severely reduces therapeutic potential of surgical resection and radiotherapy, and urges for the identification of new drug-targets affecting glioma growth and migration. To address the potential role of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), we performed mRNA expression profiling for 91 of the 109 known human PTP genes on a series of clinical diffuse glioma samples of different grades and compared our findings with in silico knowledge from REMBRANDT and TCGA databases. Overall PTP family expression levels appeared independent of characteristic genetic aberrations associated with lower grade or high grade gliomas. Notably, seven PTP genes (DUSP26, MTMR4, PTEN, PTPRM, PTPRN2, PTPRT and PTPRZ1) were differentially expressed between grade II-III gliomas and (grade IV) glioblastomas. For DUSP26, PTEN, PTPRM and PTPRT, lower expression levels correlated with poor prognosis, and overexpression of DUSP26 or PTPRT in E98 glioblastoma cells reduced tumorigenicity. Our study represents the first in-depth analysis of PTP family expression in diffuse glioma subtypes and warrants further investigations into PTP-dependent signaling events as new entry points for improved therapy. PMID:27586084

  19. Effect of chlorination on the protein phosphatase inhibition activity for several microcystins.

    PubMed

    Mash, H; Wittkorn, A

    2016-05-15

    Microcystins are of particular concern due to their toxicity to both humans and animals and may be the most prominent cyanotoxin observed in freshwater. Although a number of studies have investigated the fate of microcystins and other algal toxins through drinking water treatment facilities, measurement of their potential for toxic activity after chlorination, a popular form of treatment in the United States, has not been investigated. In this study, six microcystin variants are subjected to chlorine oxidation. The degradation of each microcystin variant is measured by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry simultaneously with protein phosphatase inhibition (PPI) response over reaction time with chlorine. Results show that inhibition is dependent on the incorporated amino acid residues, their placement within the microcystin structure, as well as pH. This pH dependence may have practical implications to such activities such as drinking water treatment when the pH is usually adjusted to around 8. Namely, at this pH, even with chlorine addition for disinfection, PPI activity may not be totally eliminated even when the initial MYCs are eliminated. PMID:26999255

  20. The Ablation of Mitochondrial Protein Phosphatase Pgam5 Confers Resistance Against Metabolic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Shiori; Yao, Akari; Hattori, Kazuki; Sugawara, Sho; Naguro, Isao; Koike, Masato; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Takeda, Kohsuke; Ichijo, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutase family member 5 (PGAM5) is a mitochondrial protein phosphatase that has been reported to be involved in various stress responses from mitochondrial quality control to cell death. However, its roles in vivo are largely unknown. Here, we show that Pgam5-deficient mice are resistant to several metabolic insults. Under cold stress combined with fasting, Pgam5-deficient mice better maintained body temperature than wild-type mice and showed an extended survival rate. Serum triglycerides and lipid content in brown adipose tissue (BAT), a center of adaptive thermogenesis, were severely reduced in Pgam5-deficient mice. Moreover, although Pgam5 deficiency failed to maintain proper mitochondrial integrity in BAT, it reciprocally resulted in the dramatic induction of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) that activates various functions of BAT including thermogenesis. Thus, the enhancement of lipid metabolism and FGF21 may contribute to the cold resistance of Pgam5-deficient mice under fasting condition. Finally, we also found that Pgam5-deficient mice are resistant to high-fat-diet-induced obesity. Our study uncovered that PGAM5 is involved in the whole-body metabolism in response to stresses that impose metabolic challenges on mitochondria. PMID:27077115

  1. The Ablation of Mitochondrial Protein Phosphatase Pgam5 Confers Resistance Against Metabolic Stress.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Shiori; Yao, Akari; Hattori, Kazuki; Sugawara, Sho; Naguro, Isao; Koike, Masato; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Takeda, Kohsuke; Ichijo, Hidenori

    2016-03-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutase family member 5 (PGAM5) is a mitochondrial protein phosphatase that has been reported to be involved in various stress responses from mitochondrial quality control to cell death. However, its roles in vivo are largely unknown. Here, we show that Pgam5-deficient mice are resistant to several metabolic insults. Under cold stress combined with fasting, Pgam5-deficient mice better maintained body temperature than wild-type mice and showed an extended survival rate. Serum triglycerides and lipid content in brown adipose tissue (BAT), a center of adaptive thermogenesis, were severely reduced in Pgam5-deficient mice. Moreover, although Pgam5 deficiency failed to maintain proper mitochondrial integrity in BAT, it reciprocally resulted in the dramatic induction of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) that activates various functions of BAT including thermogenesis. Thus, the enhancement of lipid metabolism and FGF21 may contribute to the cold resistance of Pgam5-deficient mice under fasting condition. Finally, we also found that Pgam5-deficient mice are resistant to high-fat-diet-induced obesity. Our study uncovered that PGAM5 is involved in the whole-body metabolism in response to stresses that impose metabolic challenges on mitochondria. PMID:27077115

  2. H2O2 inhibits ABA-signaling protein phosphatase HAB1.

    PubMed

    Sridharamurthy, Madhuri; Kovach, Amanda; Zhao, Yang; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Xu, H Eric; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Melcher, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Due to its ability to be rapidly generated and propagated over long distances, H2O2 is an important second messenger for biotic and abiotic stress signaling in plants. In response to low water potential and high salt concentrations sensed in the roots of plants, the stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA) activates NADPH oxidase to generate H2O2, which is propagated in guard cells in leaves to induce stomatal closure and prevent water loss from transpiration. Using a reconstituted system, we demonstrate that H2O2 reversibly prevents the protein phosphatase HAB1, a key component of the core ABA-signaling pathway, from inhibiting its main target in guard cells, SnRK2.6/OST1 kinase. We have identified HAB1 C186 and C274 as H2O2-sensitive thiols and demonstrate that their oxidation inhibits both HAB1 catalytic activity and its ability to physically associate with SnRK2.6 by formation of intermolecular dimers.

  3. The Arabidopsis Protein Phosphatase PP2C38 Negatively Regulates the Central Immune Kinase BIK1

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiangxiu; Bücherl, Christoph A.; Sklenar, Jan; Macho, Alberto P.; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Derbyshire, Paul; Altenbach, Denise; Robatzek, Silke; Uhrig, Joachim; Menke, Frank; Zhou, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    Plants recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) via cell surface-localized pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), leading to PRR-triggered immunity (PTI). The Arabidopsis cytoplasmic kinase BIK1 is a downstream substrate of several PRR complexes. How plant PTI is negatively regulated is not fully understood. Here, we identify the protein phosphatase PP2C38 as a negative regulator of BIK1 activity and BIK1-mediated immunity. PP2C38 dynamically associates with BIK1, as well as with the PRRs FLS2 and EFR, but not with the co-receptor BAK1. PP2C38 regulates PAMP-induced BIK1 phosphorylation and impairs the phosphorylation of the NADPH oxidase RBOHD by BIK1, leading to reduced oxidative burst and stomatal immunity. Upon PAMP perception, PP2C38 is phosphorylated on serine 77 and dissociates from the FLS2/EFR-BIK1 complexes, enabling full BIK1 activation. Together with our recent work on the control of BIK1 turnover, this study reveals another important regulatory mechanism of this central immune component. PMID:27494702

  4. Liposomal C6 Ceramide Activates Protein Phosphatase 1 to Inhibit Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fangzhen; Jin, Kai; Huang, Shenyu; Bao, Qi; Shao, Zheren; Hu, Xueqing; Ye, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one common skin cancer. In the present study, the potential anti-melanoma activity by a liposomal C6 ceramide was tested in vitro. We showed that the liposomal C6 (ceramide) was cytotoxic and anti-proliferative against a panel of human melanoma cell lines (SK-Mel2, WM-266.4 and A-375 and WM-115). In addition, liposomal C6 induced caspase-dependent apoptotic death in the melanoma cells. Reversely, its cytotoxicity was attenuated by several caspase inhibitors. Intriguingly, liposomal C6 was non-cytotoxic to B10BR mouse melanocytes and primary human melanocytes. Molecularly, liposomal C6 activated protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) to inactivate Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling in melanoma cells. On the other hand, PP1 shRNA knockdown or exogenous expression of constitutively activate Akt1 (CA-Akt1) restored Akt-mTOR activation and significantly attenuated liposomal C6-mediated cytotoxicity and apoptosis in melanoma cells. Our results suggest that liposomal C6 activates PP1 to inhibit melanoma cells. PMID:27631768

  5. Nitropropenyl benzodioxole, an anti-infective agent with action as a protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    White, Kylie S; Nicoletti, Gina; Borland, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We report on the activities of a broad spectrum antimicrobial compound,nitropropenyl benzodioxole (NPBD) which are of relevance to its potential as an anti-infective drug. These investigations support the proposal that a major mechanism of NPBD is action as a tyrosine mimetic, competitively inhibiting bacterial and fungal protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP). NPBD did not affect major anti-bacterial drug targets, namely, ATP production, cell wall or cell membrane integrity, or transcription and translation of RNA. NPBD inhibited bacterial YopH and human PTP1B and not human CD45 in enzyme assays. NPBD inhibited PTP-associated bacterial virulence factors, namely, endospore formation in Bacillus cereus, prodigiosin secretion in Serratia marcescens , motility in Proteus spp., and adherence and invasion of mammalian cells by Yersinia enterocolitica . NPBD acts intracellularly to inhibit the early development stages of the Chlamydia trachomatis infection cycle in mammalian cells known to involve sequestration of host cell PTPs. NPBD thus both kills pathogens and inhibits virulence factors relevant to early infection, making it a suitable candidate for development as an anti-infective agent, particularly for pathogens that enter through, or cause infections at, mucosal surfaces. Though much is yet to be understood about bacterial PTPs, they are proposed as suitable anti-infective targets and have been linked to agents similar to NPBD. The structural and functional diversity and heterogeneous distribution of PTPs across microbial species make them suitably selective targets for the development of both broadly active and pathogen-specific drugs.

  6. Transient expression of protein tyrosine phosphatases encoded in Cotesia plutellae bracovirus inhibits insect cellular immune responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed M. A.; Kim, Yonggyun

    2008-01-01

    Several immunosuppressive factors are associated with parasitism of an endoparasitoid wasp, Cotesia plutellae, on the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella. C. plutellae bracovirus (CpBV) encodes a large number of putative protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which may play a role in inhibiting host cellular immunity. To address this inhibitory hypothesis of CpBV-PTPs, we performed transient expression of individual CpBV-PTPs in hemocytes of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, and analyzed their cellular immune responses. Two different forms of CpBV-PTPs were chosen and cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector under the control of the p10 promoter of baculovirus: one with the normal cysteine active site (CpBV-PTP1) and the other with a mutated active site (CpBV-PTP5). The hemocytes transfected with CpBV-PTP1 significantly increased in PTP activity compared to control hemocytes, but those with CpBV-PTP5 exhibited a significant decrease in the PTP activity. All transfected hemocytes exhibited a significant reduction in both cell spreading and encapsulation activities compared to control hemocytes. Co-transfection of CpBV-PTP1 together with its double-stranded RNA reduced the messenger RNA (mRNA) level of CpBV-PTP1 and resulted in recovery of both hemocyte behaviors. This is the first report demonstrating that the polydnaviral PTPs can manipulate PTP activity of the hemocytes to interrupt cellular immune responses.

  7. Liposomal C6 Ceramide Activates Protein Phosphatase 1 to Inhibit Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fangzhen; Jin, Kai; Huang, Shenyu; Bao, Qi; Shao, Zheren; Hu, Xueqing; Ye, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one common skin cancer. In the present study, the potential anti-melanoma activity by a liposomal C6 ceramide was tested in vitro. We showed that the liposomal C6 (ceramide) was cytotoxic and anti-proliferative against a panel of human melanoma cell lines (SK-Mel2, WM-266.4 and A-375 and WM-115). In addition, liposomal C6 induced caspase-dependent apoptotic death in the melanoma cells. Reversely, its cytotoxicity was attenuated by several caspase inhibitors. Intriguingly, liposomal C6 was non-cytotoxic to B10BR mouse melanocytes and primary human melanocytes. Molecularly, liposomal C6 activated protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) to inactivate Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling in melanoma cells. On the other hand, PP1 shRNA knockdown or exogenous expression of constitutively activate Akt1 (CA-Akt1) restored Akt-mTOR activation and significantly attenuated liposomal C6-mediated cytotoxicity and apoptosis in melanoma cells. Our results suggest that liposomal C6 activates PP1 to inhibit melanoma cells. PMID:27631768

  8. Aurora kinases and protein phosphatase 1 mediate chromosome congression through regulation of CENP-E.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yumi; Holland, Andrew J; Lan, Weijie; Cleveland, Don W

    2010-08-01

    Opposing roles of Aurora kinases and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) during mitosis have long been suggested. Here, we demonstrate that Aurora kinases A and B phosphorylate a conserved residue on the kinetochore motor CENP-E. PP1 binds CENP-E via a motif overlapping this phosphorylation site and binding is disrupted by Aurora phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of CENP-E by the Auroras is enriched at spindle poles, disrupting binding of PP1 and reducing CENP-E's affinity for individual microtubules. This phosphorylation is required for CENP-E-mediated towing of initially polar chromosomes toward the cell center. Kinetochores on such chromosomes cannot make subsequent stable attachment to spindle microtubules when dephosphorylation of CENP-E or rebinding of PP1 to CENP-E is blocked. Thus, an Aurora/PP1 phosphorylation switch modulates CENP-E motor activity as an essential feature of chromosome congression from poles and localized PP1 delivery by CENP-E to the outer kinetochore is necessary for stable microtubule capture by those chromosomes.

  9. Dehydroepiandrosterone-enhanced dual specificity protein phosphatase (DDSP) prevents diet-induced and genetic obesity.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tetsuhiro; Ashida, Kenji; Goto, Kiminobu; Nawata, Hajime; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Yanase, Toshihiko; Nomura, Masatoshi

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) exerts a wide variety of therapeutic effects against medical disorders, such as diabetes and obesity. However, the molecular basis of DHEA action remains to be clarified. Previously, we reported that DHEA-enhanced dual specificity protein phosphatase, designated DDSP, is one of the target molecules of DHEA. To examine the role of DDSP in DHEA signaling, we generated mice that carry a DDSP transgene in which expression is driven by the CAG promoter (DDSP-Tg). DDSP-Tg mice weighed significantly less than wild-type (WT) control mice when a high fat diet was supplied (p < 0.01). No difference in food-intake or locomotor activity was found between DDSP-Tg and WT mice. Oxygen consumption of DDSP-Tg mice was higher than that of WT mice (p < 0.01), which suggested an increase in basal metabolism in DDSP-Tg mice. To further investigate the role of DDSP in genetic obese mice, DDSP-Tg mice with a db/db background were generated (DDSP-Tg db/db). We observed cancellation of obesity by the db/db mutation and development of a cachexic phenotype in DDSP-Tg db/db mice. In conclusion, our study shows that expression of DDSP leads to prevention of diet-induced and genetic (db/db) obesity. Anti-obese effects of DHEA might be mediated through DDSP, which might be a therapeutic target for intervention of obesity.

  10. H2O2 Inhibits ABA-Signaling Protein Phosphatase HAB1

    PubMed Central

    Sridharamurthy, Madhuri; Kovach, Amanda; Zhao, Yang; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Xu, H. Eric; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Melcher, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Due to its ability to be rapidly generated and propagated over long distances, H2O2 is an important second messenger for biotic and abiotic stress signaling in plants. In response to low water potential and high salt concentrations sensed in the roots of plants, the stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA) activates NADPH oxidase to generate H2O2, which is propagated in guard cells in leaves to induce stomatal closure and prevent water loss from transpiration. Using a reconstituted system, we demonstrate that H2O2 reversibly prevents the protein phosphatase HAB1, a key component of the core ABA-signaling pathway, from inhibiting its main target in guard cells, SnRK2.6/OST1 kinase. We have identified HAB1 C186 and C274 as H2O2-sensitive thiols and demonstrate that their oxidation inhibits both HAB1 catalytic activity and its ability to physically associate with SnRK2.6 by formation of intermolecular dimers. PMID:25460914

  11. Protein-tyrosine-phosphatase 2C is phosphorylated and inhibited by 44-kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase.