Science.gov

Sample records for 2a receptor gene

  1. Positive association between a DNA sequence variant in the serotonin 2A receptor gene and schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Inayama, Y.; Yoneda, H.; Sakai, T.

    1996-02-16

    Sixty-two patients with schizophrenia and 96 normal controls were investigated for genetic association with restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) in the serotonin receptor genes. A positive association between the serotonin 2A receptor gene (HTR2A) and schizophrenia was found, but not between schizophrenia and the serotonin 1A receptor gene. The positive association we report here would suggest that the DNA region with susceptibility to schizophrenia lies in the HTR2A on the long arm of chromosome 13. 15 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. Increased hypothalamic 5-HT2A receptor gene expression and effects of pharmacologic 5-HT2A receptor inactivation in obese A{sup y} mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nonogaki, Katsunori . E-mail: knonogaki-tky@umin.ac.jp; Nozue, Kana; Oka, Yoshitomo

    2006-12-29

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) 2A receptors contribute to the effects of 5-HT on platelet aggregation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, and are reportedly involved in decreases in plasma levels of adiponectin, an adipokine, in diabetic subjects. Here, we report that systemic administration of sarpogrelate, a 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, suppressed appetite and increased hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript, corticotropin releasing hormone, 5-HT2C, and 5-HT1B receptor gene expression. A{sup y} mice, which have ectopic expression of the agouti protein, significantly increased hypothalamic 5-HT2A receptor gene expression in association with obesity compared with wild-type mice matched for age. Systemic administration of sarpogrelate suppressed overfeeding, body weight gain, and hyperglycemia in obese A{sup y} mice, whereas it did not increase plasma adiponectin levels. These results suggest that obesity increases hypothalamic 5-HT2A receptor gene expression, and pharmacologic inactivation of 5-HT2A receptors inhibits overfeeding and obesity in A{sup y} mice, but did not increase plasma adiponectin levels.

  3. Serotonin receptor 2A (HTR2A) gene polymorphism predicts treatment response to venlafaxine XR in generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Lohoff, F W; Aquino, T D; Narasimhan, S; Multani, P K; Etemad, B; Rickels, K

    2013-02-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a chronic psychiatric disorder with significant morbidity and mortality. Antidepressant drugs are the preferred choice for treatment; however, treatment response is often variable. Several studies in major depression have implicated a role of the serotonin receptor gene (HTR2A) in treatment response to antidepressants. We tested the hypothesis that the genetic polymorphism rs7997012 in the HTR2A gene predicts treatment outcome in GAD patients treated with venlafaxine XR. Treatment response was assessed in 156 patients that participated in a 6-month open-label clinical trial of venlafaxine XR for GAD. Primary analysis included Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A) reduction at 6 months. Secondary outcome measure was the Clinical Global Impression of Improvement (CGI-I) score at 6 months. Genotype and allele frequencies were compared between groups using χ(2) contingency analysis. The frequency of the G-allele differed significantly between responders (70%) and nonresponders (56%) at 6 months (P=0.05) using the HAM-A scale as outcome measure. Similarly, using the CGI-I as outcome, the G-allele was significantly associated with improvement (P=0.01). Assuming a dominant effect of the G-allele, improvement differed significantly between groups (P=0.001, odds ratio=4.72). Similar trends were observed for remission although not statistically significant. We show for the first time a pharmacogenetic effect of the HTR2A rs7997012 variant in anxiety disorders, suggesting that pharmacogenetic effects cross diagnostic categories. Our data document that individuals with the HTR2A rs7997012 single nucleotide polymorphism G-allele have better treatment outcome over time. Future studies with larger sample sizes are necessary to further characterize this effect in treatment response to antidepressants in GAD. PMID:22006095

  4. Polymorphism in the Serotonin Receptor 2a (HTR2A) Gene as Possible Predisposal Factor for Aggressive Traits

    PubMed Central

    Banlaki, Zsofia; Elek, Zsuzsanna; Nanasi, Tibor; Szekely, Anna; Nemoda, Zsofia; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria; Ronai, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive manifestations and their consequences are a major issue of mankind, highlighting the need for understanding the contributory factors. Still, aggression-related genetic analyses have so far mainly been conducted on small population subsets such as individuals suffering from a certain psychiatric disorder or a narrow-range age cohort, but no data on the general population is yet available. In the present study, our aim was to identify polymorphisms in genes affecting neurobiological processes that might explain some of the inter-individual variation between aggression levels in the non-clinical Caucasian adult population. 55 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were simultaneously determined in 887 subjects who also filled out the self-report Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQ). Single marker association analyses between genotypes and aggression scores indicated a significant role of rs7322347 located in the HTR2A gene encoding serotonin receptor 2a following Bonferroni correction for multiple testing (p = 0.0007) both for males and females. Taking the four BPAQ subscales individually, scores for Hostility, Anger and Physical Aggression showed significant association with rs7322347 T allele in themselves, while no association was found with Verbal Aggression. Of the subscales, relationship with rs7322347 was strongest in the case of Hostility, where statistical significance virtually equaled that observed with the whole BPAQ. In conclusion, this is the first study to our knowledge analyzing SNPs in a wide variety of genes in terms of aggression in a large sample-size non-clinical adult population, also describing a novel candidate polymorphism as predisposal to aggressive traits. PMID:25658328

  5. Gene expression and function of adenosine A(2A) receptor in the rat carotid body.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Conforti, L; Millhorn, D E

    2000-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether rat carotid bodies express adenosine (Ado) A(2A) receptors and whether this receptor is involved in the cellular response to hypoxia. Our results demonstrate that rat carotid bodies express the A(2A) and A(2B) Ado receptor mRNAs but not the A(1) or A(3) receptor mRNAs as determined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. In situ hybridization confirmed the expression of the A(2A) receptor mRNA. Immunohistochemical studies further showed that the A(2A) receptor is expressed in the carotid body and that it is colocalized with tyrosine hydroxylase in type I cells. Whole cell voltage-clamp studies using isolated type I cells showed that Ado inhibited the voltage-dependent Ca(2+) currents and that this inhibition was abolished by the selective A(2A) receptor antagonist ZM-241385. Ca(2+) imaging studies using fura 2 revealed that exposure to severe hypoxia induced elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in type I cells and that extracellularly applied Ado significantly attenuated the hypoxia-induced elevation of [Ca(2+)](i). Taken together, our findings indicate that A(2A) receptors are present in type I cells and that activation of A(2A) receptors modulates Ca(2+) accumulation during hypoxia. This mechanism may play a role in regulating intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis and cellular excitability during hypoxia. PMID:10926550

  6. Caffeine interaction with glutamate receptor gene GRIN2A: Parkinson's disease in Swedish population.

    PubMed

    Yamada-Fowler, Naomi; Fredrikson, Mats; Söderkvist, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors is thought to be involved in the etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). A recent genome-wide association and interaction study (GWAIS) identified GRIN2A, which encodes an NMDA-glutamate-receptor subunit involved in brain's excitatory neurotransmission, as a PD genetic modifier in inverse association with caffeine intake. Here in, we attempted to replicate the reported association of a single nucleotide polymorphism, GRIN2A_rs4998386, and its interaction with caffeine intake with PD in patient-control study in an ethnically homogenous population in southeastern Sweden, as consistent and independent genetic association studies are the gold standard for the validation of genome-wide association studies. All the subjects (193 sporadic PD patients and 377 controls) were genotyped, and the caffeine intake data was obtained by questionnaire. We observed an association between rs4998386 and PD with odds ratio (OR) of 0.61, 95% confidence intervals (CI) of 0.39-0.96, p = 0.03, under a model excluding rare TT allele. There was also a strong significance in joint effects of gene and caffeine on PD risk (TC heavy caffeine vs. CC light caffeine: OR = 0.38, 95%CI = [0.20-0.70], p = 0.002) and gene-caffeine interaction (OR = 0.998, 95%CI = [0.991-0.999], p<0.001). Overall, our results are in support of the findings of the GWAIS and provided additional evidence indicating PD protective effects of coffee drinking/caffeine intake as well as the interaction with glutamate receptor genotypes.

  7. Adenosine A2A receptor gene disruption provokes marked changes in melanocortin content and pro-opiomelanocortin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jégou, S; El Yacoubi, M; Mounien, L; Ledent, C; Parmentier, M; Costentin, J; Vaugeois, J-M; Vaudry, H

    2003-12-01

    A2A receptor knockout (A2AR-/-) mice are more anxious and aggressive, and exhibit reduced exploratory activity than their wild-type littermates (A2AR+/+). Because alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) influences anxiety, aggressiveness and motor activity, we investigated the effect of A2AR gene disruption on alpha-MSH content in discrete brain regions and pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) expression in the hypothalamus and pituitary. No modification in alpha-MSH content was observed in the hypothalamus and medulla oblongata where POMC-expressing perikarya are located. In the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, POMC mRNA levels were not affected by A2AR disruption. Conversely, in A2AR-/- mice, a significant increase in alpha-MSH content was observed in the amygdala and cerebral cortex, two regions that are innervated by POMC terminals. In the pars intermedia of the pituitary, A2AR disruption provoked a significant reduction of POMC mRNA expression associated with a decrease in alpha-MSH content. By contrast, in the anterior lobe of the pituitary, a substantial increase in POMC mRNA and adrenocorticotropin hormone concentrations was observed, and plasma corticosterone concentration was significantly higher in A2AR-/- mice, revealing hyperactivity of their pituitary-adrenocortical axis. Together, these results suggest that adenosine, acting through A2A receptors, may modulate the release of alpha-MSH in the cerebral cortex and amygdala. The data also indicate that A2A receptors are involved in the control of POMC gene expression and biosynthesis of POMC-derived peptides in pituitary melanotrophs and corticotrophs.

  8. Serotonin 5-HT2A receptor gene variants influence antidepressant response to repeated total sleep deprivation in bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Francesco; Barbini, Barbara; Bernasconi, Alessandro; Fulgosi, Mara Cigala; Colombo, Cristina; Dallaspezia, Sara; Gavinelli, Chiara; Marino, Elena; Pirovano, Adele; Radaelli, Daniele; Smeraldi, Enrico

    2008-12-12

    5-HT2A receptor density in prefrontal cortex was associated with depression and suicide. 5-HT2A receptor gene polymorphism rs6313 was associated with 5-HT2A receptor binding potential, with the ability of individuals to use environmental support in order to prevent depression, and with sleep improvement after antidepressant treatment with mirtazapine. Studies on response to antidepressant drugs gave inconsistent results. Here we studied the effect of rs6313 on response to repeated total sleep deprivation (TSD) in 80 bipolar depressed inpatients treated with three consecutive TSD cycles (each one made of 36 h awake followed by a night of undisturbed sleep). All genotype groups showed comparable acute effects of the first TSD, but patients homozygotes for the T variant had better perceived and observed benefits from treatment than carriers of the C allele. These effects became significant after the first recovery night and during the following days, leading to a 36% higher final response rate (Hamilton depression rating<8). The higher density of postsynaptic excitatory 5-HT2A receptors in T/T homozygotes could have led to higher behavioural effects of increased 5-HT neurotransmission due to repeated TSD. Other possible mechanisms involve allostatic/homeostatic adaptation to sleep loss, and a different effect of the allele variants on epigenetic influences. Results confirm the interest for individual gene variants of the serotonin pathway in shaping clinical characteristics of depression and antidepressant response.

  9. Variants at serotonin transporter and 2A receptor genes predict cooperative behavior differentially according to presence of punishment.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Kari B; McElreath, Richard; Nettle, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Punishment of free-riding has been implicated in the evolution of cooperation in humans, and yet mechanisms for punishment avoidance remain largely uninvestigated. Individual variation in these mechanisms may stem from variation in the serotonergic system, which modulates processing of aversive stimuli. Functional serotonin gene variants have been associated with variation in the processing of aversive stimuli and widely studied as risk factors for psychiatric disorders. We show that variants at the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) and serotonin 2A receptor gene (HTR2A) predict contributions to the public good in economic games, dependent upon whether contribution behavior can be punished. Participants with a variant at the serotonin transporter gene contribute more, leading to group-level differences in cooperation, but this effect dissipates in the presence of punishment. When contribution behavior can be punished, those with a variant at the serotonin 2A receptor gene contribute more than those without it. This variant also predicts a more stressful experience of the games. The diversity of institutions (including norms) that govern cooperation and punishment may create selective pressures for punishment avoidance that change rapidly across time and space. Variant-specific epigenetic regulation of these genes, as well as population-level variation in the frequencies of these variants, may facilitate adaptation to local norms of cooperation and punishment. PMID:23431136

  10. Variants at serotonin transporter and 2A receptor genes predict cooperative behavior differentially according to presence of punishment.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Kari B; McElreath, Richard; Nettle, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Punishment of free-riding has been implicated in the evolution of cooperation in humans, and yet mechanisms for punishment avoidance remain largely uninvestigated. Individual variation in these mechanisms may stem from variation in the serotonergic system, which modulates processing of aversive stimuli. Functional serotonin gene variants have been associated with variation in the processing of aversive stimuli and widely studied as risk factors for psychiatric disorders. We show that variants at the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) and serotonin 2A receptor gene (HTR2A) predict contributions to the public good in economic games, dependent upon whether contribution behavior can be punished. Participants with a variant at the serotonin transporter gene contribute more, leading to group-level differences in cooperation, but this effect dissipates in the presence of punishment. When contribution behavior can be punished, those with a variant at the serotonin 2A receptor gene contribute more than those without it. This variant also predicts a more stressful experience of the games. The diversity of institutions (including norms) that govern cooperation and punishment may create selective pressures for punishment avoidance that change rapidly across time and space. Variant-specific epigenetic regulation of these genes, as well as population-level variation in the frequencies of these variants, may facilitate adaptation to local norms of cooperation and punishment.

  11. Targeted mutagenesis of aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2a and 2b genes in Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus)

    PubMed Central

    Aluru, Neelakanteswar; Karchner, Sibel I.; Franks, Diana G.; Nacci, Diane; Champlin, Denise; Hahn, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding molecular mechanisms of toxicity is facilitated by experimental manipulations, such as disruption of function by gene targeting, that are especially challenging in non-standard model species with limited genomic resources. While loss-of-function approaches have included gene knock-down using morpholino-modified oligonucleotides and random mutagenesis using mutagens or retroviruses, more recent approaches include targeted mutagenesis using zinc finger nuclease (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 technology. These latter methods provide more accessible opportunities to explore gene function in non-traditional model species. To facilitate evaluations of toxic mechanisms for important categories of aryl hydrocarbon pollutants, whose actions are known to be receptor mediated, we used ZFN and CRISPR-Cas9 approaches to generate aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2a (AHR2a) and AHR2b gene mutations in Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) embryos. This killifish is a particularly valuble non-traditional model for this study, with multiple paralogs of AHR whose functions are not well characterized. In addition, some populations of this species have evolved resistance to toxicants such as halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons. AHR-null killifish will be valuable for characterizing the role of the individual AHR paralogs in evolved resistance, as well as in normal development. We first used five-finger ZFNs targeting exons 1 and 3 of AHR2a. Subsequently, CRISPR-Cas9 guide RNAs were designed to target regions in exon 2 and 3 of AHR2a and AHR2b. We successfully induced frameshift mutations in AHR2a exon 3 with ZFN and CRISPR-Cas9 guide RNAs, with mutation frequencies of 10% and 16%, respectively. In AHR2b, mutations were induced using CRISPR-Cas9 guide RNAs targeting sites in both exon 2 (17%) and exon 3 (63%). We screened AHR2b exon 2 CRISPR-Cas9-injected embryos for

  12. Serotonin receptor gene (HTR2A) T102C polymorphism modulates individuals’ perspective taking ability and autistic-like traits

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Pingyuan; Liu, Jinting; Blue, Philip R.; Li, She; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that empathic traits, such as perspective taking, are associated with the levels of serotonin in the brain and with autism spectrum conditions. Inspired by the finding that the serotonin receptor 2A gene (HTR2A) modulates the availability of serotonin, this study investigated to what extent HTR2A modulates individuals’ perspective taking ability and autistic-like traits. To examine the associations of the functional HTR2A polymorphism T102C (rs6313) with individuals’ perspective taking abilities and autistic-like traits, we differentiated individuals according to this polymorphism and measured empathic and autistic-like traits with Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI) and Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ) scale in 523 Chinese people. The results indicated that this polymorphism was significantly associated with the scores on Perspective Taking and Personal Distress subscales of IRI, and Communication subscale of AQ. Individuals with a greater number of the C alleles were less likely to spontaneously adopt the point of view of others, more likely to be anxious when observing the pain endured by others, and more likely to have communication problems. Moreover, the genotype effect on communication problems was mediated by individuals’ perspective taking ability. These findings provide evidence that the HTR2A T102C polymorphism is a predictor of individual differences in empathic and autistic-like traits and highlight the role of the gene in the connection between perspective taking and autistic-like traits. PMID:26557070

  13. Hyperactivity in Childhood as a Predictor of School Performance in Elementary School: Modifying Effect of a Serotonin Receptor Gene (5-HTR2A)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulkki-Raback, Laura; Pullmann, Helle; Hintsanen, Mirka; Alatupa, Saija; Ravaja, Niklas; Lehtimaki, Terho; Keltikangas-jarvinen, Liisa

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Genes have been suggested to interact with predictors of school performance, but evidence is scarce. The purpose was to examine whether a hyperactive temperament leads to different school performance, depending on variability in a serotonin receptor gene (5-HTR2A). Method: The participants were a population-based sample of 909 girls…

  14. Expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide, adenosine A2a receptor and adenosine A1 receptor in experiment rat migraine models

    PubMed Central

    LU, WENXIAN; LI, BIN; CHEN, JINBO; SU, YIPENG; DONG, XIAOMENG; SU, XINYANG; GAO, LIXIANG

    2016-01-01

    A migraine is a disabling neurovascular disorder characterized by a unilateral throbbing headache that lasts from 4 to 72 h. The headache is often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, phonophobia and photophobia, and may be worsened by physical exercise. The trigeminovascular system (TVS) is speculated to have an important role in migraines, although the pathophysiology of this disorder remains to be elucidated. Trigeminal ganglion (TG) and spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC) are important components of the TVS. Several clinical cases have provided evidence for the involvement of the brainstem in migraine initiation. Electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion (ESTG) in rats can activate TVS during a migraine attack. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is an important vasoactive compound produced following TVS activation. Numerous studies have revealed that adenosine and its receptors have an important role in pain transmission and regulation process. However, only a few studies have examined whether adenosine A2a receptor (A2aR) and adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) are involved in migraine and nociceptive pathways. In the present study, CGRP, A2aR and A1R expression levels were detected in the TG and TNC of ESTG models through reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. Tianshu capsule (TSC), a type of Chinese medicine, was also used in the ESTG rat models to examine its influence on the three proteins. Results demonstrated that CGRP, A2aR and A1R mediated pain transmission and the regulation process during migraine and the expression of the three proteins was regulated by TSC. PMID:26998280

  15. USP10 deubiquitylates the histone variant H2A.Z and both are required for androgen receptor-mediated gene activation.

    PubMed

    Draker, Ryan; Sarcinella, Elizabeth; Cheung, Peter

    2011-05-01

    H2A.Z, a variant of H2A, is found at the promoters of inducible genes in both yeast and higher eukaryotes. However, its role in transcriptional regulation is complex since it has been reported to function both as a repressor and activator. We have previously found that mono-ubiquitylation of H2A.Z is linked to transcriptional silencing. Here, we provide new evidence linking H2A.Z deubiquitylation to transcription activation. We found that H2A.Z and ubiquitin-specific protease 10 (USP10) are each required for transcriptional activation of the androgen receptor (AR)-regulated PSA and KLK3 genes. USP10 directly deubiquitylates H2A.Z in vitro and in vivo, and reducing USP10 expression in prostate cancer cells results in elevated steady-state levels of mono-ubiquitylated H2A.Z (H2A.Zub1). Moreover, knockdown of USP10 ablates hormone-induced deubiquitylation of chromatin proteins at the AR-regulated genes. Finally, by sequential ChIP assays, we found that H2A.Zub1 is enriched at the PSA and KLK3 regulatory regions, and loss of H2A.Zub1 is associated with transcriptional activation of these genes. Together, these data provide novel insights into how H2A.Z ubiquitylation/deubiquitylation and USP10 function in AR-regulated gene expression.

  16. Alpha-2A adrenergic receptor subtype gene expression in the intestines of cocaine-exposed rat embryos.

    PubMed

    Ward, Laura P; Hill, Joanna M; McCune, Susan K

    2002-10-01

    Cocaine has become a popular illicit drug in our society, and pregnant women are not immune from this epidemic. Recently, there have been several references in the literature describing an association between prenatal cocaine exposure and the subsequent development of necrotizing enterocolitis in the neonate, but the mechanism underlying this relationship remains speculative. Because alpha-2 adrenergic receptors are thought to play a role in the autoregulatory mechanism in the newborn intestine that responds to hypoxia and ischemia, we examined the expression of this receptor in the intestine of embryonic rats exposed to low- and high-dose cocaine in utero. Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were injected daily with either saline, low-dose cocaine, or high-dose cocaine beginning on embryonic d 5 (E 5) and continuing to E 20. Mothers were killed on E 16, E 17, E 18, E 19, and E 20. Embryos were frozen and stored at -80 degrees C. In situ hybridization was performed on 20- micro m sections with 35S-labeled oligonucleotide probes specific for the alpha-2A adrenergic receptor subtype. Densitometric analysis revealed a significant decrease in the alpha-2A receptor expression in the intestine of both the low-dose and high-dose cocaine-exposed animals compared with controls. This down-regulation was demonstrated by E 17, and continued through the remainder of gestation. These changes may limit the normal adaptation to vasoconstriction, thus exacerbating the already insufficient compensatory mechanisms for responding to ischemic injury, and thus may be one of the important factors predisposing cocaine-exposed infants to necrotizing enterocolitis.

  17. Lack of Association between the Serotonin Transporter (5-HTT) and Serotonin Receptor (5-HT2A) Gene Polymorphisms with Smoking Behavior among Malaysian Malays

    PubMed Central

    Rozak, Nur Iwani A; Ahmad, Imran; Gan, Siew Hua; Abu Bakar, Ruzilawati

    2014-01-01

    Abstract An insertion/deletion polymorphism in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) and a polymorphism (rs6313) in the serotonin 2A receptor gene (5-HT2A) have previously been linked to smoking behavior. The objective of this study was to determine the possible association of the 5-HTTLPR and 5-HT2A gene polymorphisms with smoking behavior within a population of Malaysian male smokers (n=248) and non-smokers (n=248). The 5-HTTLPR genotypes were determined using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and were classified as short (S) alleles or long (L) alleles. The 5HT2A genotypes were determined using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR-RFLP). No significant differences in the distribution frequencies of the alleles were found between the smokers and the non-smokers for the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism (x2 = 0.72, P>0.05) or the 5HT2A polymorphism (x2 = 0.73, P>0.05). This is the first study conducted on Malaysian Malay males regarding the association of 5-HTTLPR and 5HT2A polymorphisms and smoking behavior. However, the genes were not found to be associated with smoking behavior in our population. PMID:25853073

  18. Synergistic activation of the human orphan nuclear receptor SHP gene promoter by basic helix–loop–helix protein E2A and orphan nuclear receptor SF-1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Han-Jong; Kim, Joon-Young; Park, Yun-Yong; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2003-01-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP; NR0B2) is an unusual orphan nuclear receptor that lacks a conventional DNA-binding domain and acts as a modulator of transcriptional activities of a number of nuclear receptors. We have previously reported that the orphan nuclear receptor ERRγ activates the SHP promoter. In this study, we have found that basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) transcription factors, the E2A proteins (E47, E12 and E2/5), activated the human but not the mouse SHP promoter. In contrast, the tissue-specific E47 heterodimer partner BETA2 repressed the E47- mediated transactivation of the human SHP (hSHP) promoter. Using serial deletions and E-box mutant constructs of the hSHP promoter, we identified two E-boxes (E6 and E7) as E47-responsive E-boxes, which are not conserved in the mouse SHP promoter. Moreover, gel shift, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and northern blot assays demonstrated that E47 directly binds to the hSHP promoter in vivo and in vitro and that Id proteins inhibited E47 binding to the hSHP promoter. Finally, we found that E47 and steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1), a regulator of the SHP promoter, synergistically activate the human but not the mouse SHP promoter. Our findings suggest that the E2A proteins differentially regulate the human and mouse SHP promoters and cooperate with orphan nuclear receptor SF-1 for transcriptional activation of the hSHP promoter. PMID:14627819

  19. Enriched Expression of Serotonin 1B and 2A Receptor Genes in Macaque Visual Cortex and their Bidirectional Modulatory Effects on Neuronal Responses

    PubMed Central

    Watakabe, Akiya; Komatsu, Yusuke; Sadakane, Osamu; Shimegi, Satoshi; Takahata, Toru; Higo, Noriyuki; Tochitani, Shiro; Hashikawa, Tsutomu; Naito, Tomoyuki; Osaki, Hironobu; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Ayako; Hara, Shin-ichiro; Akasaki, Takafumi; Sato, Hiromichi

    2009-01-01

    To study the molecular mechanism how cortical areas are specialized in adult primates, we searched for area-specific genes in macaque monkeys and found striking enrichment of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) 1B receptor mRNA, and to a lesser extent, of 5-HT2A receptor mRNA, in the primary visual area (V1). In situ hybridization analyses revealed that both mRNA species were highly concentrated in the geniculorecipient layers IVA and IVC, where they were coexpressed in the same neurons. Monocular inactivation by tetrodotoxin injection resulted in a strong and rapid (<3 h) downregulation of these mRNAs, suggesting the retinal activity dependency of their expression. Consistent with the high expression level in V1, clear modulatory effects of 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A receptor agonists on the responses of V1 neurons were observed in in vivo electrophysiological experiments. The modulatory effect of the 5-HT1B agonist was dependent on the firing rate of the recorded neurons: The effect tended to be facilitative for neurons with a high firing rate, and suppressive for those with a low firing rate. The 5-HT2A agonist showed opposite effects. These results suggest that this serotonergic system controls the visual response in V1 for optimization of information processing toward the incoming visual inputs. PMID:19056862

  20. Polymorphisms of Serotonin Receptor 2A and 2C Genes and COMT in Relation to Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kring, Sofia I. I.; Werge, Thomas; Holst, Claus; Toubro, Søren; Astrup, Arne; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Candidate genes of psychological importance include 5HT2A, 5HT2C, and COMT, implicated in the serotonin, noradrenaline and dopamine pathways, which also may be involved in regulation of energy balance. We investigated the associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of these genes with obesity and metabolic traits. Methodology/Principal Findings In a population of 166 200 young men examined at the draft boards, obese men (n = 726, BMI≥31.0 kg/m2) and a randomly selected group (n = 831) were re-examined at two surveys at mean ages 46 and 49 years (S-46, S-49). Anthropometric, physiological and biochemical measures were available. Logistic regression analyses were used to assess age-adjusted odds ratios. No significant associations were observed of 5HT2A rs6311, 5HT2C rs3813929 and COMT rs4680 with obesity, except that COMT rs4680 GG-genotype was associated with fat-BMI (OR = 1.08, CI = 1.01–1.16). The SNPs were associated with a number of physiological variables; most importantly 5HT2C rs3813929 T-allele was associated with glucose (OR = 4.56, CI = 1.13–18.4) and acute insulin response (OR = 0.65, CI = 0.44–0.94) in S-49. COMT rs4680 GG-genotype was associated with glucose (OR = 1.04, CI = 1.00–1.09). Except for an association between 5HT2A rs6311 and total-cholesterol at both surveys, significant in S-46 (OR = 2.66, CI = 1.11–6.40), no significant associations were observed for the other phenotypes. Significant associations were obtained when combined genotype of 5HT2C rs3813929 and COMT rs4680 were examined in relation to BMI (OR = 1.12, CI = 1.03–1.21), fat-BMI (OR = 1.22, CI = 1.08–1.38), waist (OR = 1.13, CI = 1.04–1.22), and cholesterol (OR = 5.60, CI = 0.99–31.4). Analyses of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) revealed, a 12.3% increased frequency of 5HT2C rs3813929 T-allele and an 11.6% increased frequency of COMT

  1. Culture as a mediator of gene-environment interaction: Cultural consonance, childhood adversity, a 2A serotonin receptor polymorphism, and depression in urban Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dressler, William W; Balieiro, Mauro C; Ferreira de Araújo, Luiza; Silva, Wilson A; Ernesto Dos Santos, José

    2016-07-01

    Research on gene-environment interaction was facilitated by breakthroughs in molecular biology in the late 20th century, especially in the study of mental health. There is a reliable interaction between candidate genes for depression and childhood adversity in relation to mental health outcomes. The aim of this paper is to explore the role of culture in this process in an urban community in Brazil. The specific cultural factor examined is cultural consonance, or the degree to which individuals are able to successfully incorporate salient cultural models into their own beliefs and behaviors. It was hypothesized that cultural consonance in family life would mediate the interaction of genotype and childhood adversity. In a study of 402 adult Brazilians from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds, conducted from 2011 to 2014, the interaction of reported childhood adversity and a polymorphism in the 2A serotonin receptor was associated with higher depressive symptoms. Further analysis showed that the gene-environment interaction was mediated by cultural consonance in family life, and that these effects were more pronounced in lower social class neighborhoods. The findings reinforce the role of the serotonergic system in the regulation of stress response and learning and memory, and how these processes in turn interact with environmental events and circumstances. Furthermore, these results suggest that gene-environment interaction models should incorporate a wider range of environmental experience and more complex pathways to better understand how genes and the environment combine to influence mental health outcomes.

  2. Culture as a mediator of gene-environment interaction: Cultural consonance, childhood adversity, a 2A serotonin receptor polymorphism, and depression in urban Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dressler, William W; Balieiro, Mauro C; Ferreira de Araújo, Luiza; Silva, Wilson A; Ernesto Dos Santos, José

    2016-07-01

    Research on gene-environment interaction was facilitated by breakthroughs in molecular biology in the late 20th century, especially in the study of mental health. There is a reliable interaction between candidate genes for depression and childhood adversity in relation to mental health outcomes. The aim of this paper is to explore the role of culture in this process in an urban community in Brazil. The specific cultural factor examined is cultural consonance, or the degree to which individuals are able to successfully incorporate salient cultural models into their own beliefs and behaviors. It was hypothesized that cultural consonance in family life would mediate the interaction of genotype and childhood adversity. In a study of 402 adult Brazilians from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds, conducted from 2011 to 2014, the interaction of reported childhood adversity and a polymorphism in the 2A serotonin receptor was associated with higher depressive symptoms. Further analysis showed that the gene-environment interaction was mediated by cultural consonance in family life, and that these effects were more pronounced in lower social class neighborhoods. The findings reinforce the role of the serotonergic system in the regulation of stress response and learning and memory, and how these processes in turn interact with environmental events and circumstances. Furthermore, these results suggest that gene-environment interaction models should incorporate a wider range of environmental experience and more complex pathways to better understand how genes and the environment combine to influence mental health outcomes. PMID:27270123

  3. Taste Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Beauchamp, Gary K.

    2009-01-01

    In the past several years, tremendous progress has been achieved with the discovery and characterization of vertebrate taste receptors from the T1R and T2R families, which are involved in recognition of bitter, sweet, and umami taste stimuli. Individual differences in taste, at least in some cases, can be attributed to allelic variants of the T1R and T2R genes. Progress with understanding how T1R and T2R receptors interact with taste stimuli and with identifying their patterns of expression in taste cells sheds light on coding of taste information by the nervous system. Candidate mechanisms for detection of salts, acids, fat, complex carbohydrates, and water have also been proposed, but further studies are needed to prove their identity. PMID:17444812

  4. Stimulation of expression for the adenosine A2A receptor gene by hypoxia in PC12 cells. A potential role in cell protection.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Millhorn, D E

    1999-07-16

    The purpose of this study was to examine the regulation of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) gene expression during hypoxia in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Northern blot analysis revealed that the A2AR mRNA level was substantially increased after a 3-h exposure to hypoxia (5% O2), which reached a peak at 12 h. Immunoblot analysis showed that the A2AR protein level was also increased during hypoxia. Inhibition of de novo protein synthesis blocked A2AR induction by hypoxia. In addition, removal of extracellular free Ca2+, chelation of intracellular free Ca2+, and pretreatment with protein kinase C inhibitors prevented A2AR induction by hypoxia. Moreover, depletion of protein kinase C activity by prolonged treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate significantly inhibited the hypoxic induction of A2AR. A2AR antagonists led to a significant enhancement of A2AR mRNA levels during hypoxia, whereas A2AR agonists caused down-regulation of A2AR expression during hypoxia. This suggests that A2AR regulates its own expression during hypoxia by feedback mechanisms. We further found that activation of A2AR enhances cell viability during hypoxia and also inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor expression in PC12 cells. Thus, increased expression of A2AR during hypoxia might protect cells against hypoxia and may act to inhibit hypoxia-induced angiogenic activity mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor. PMID:10400659

  5. Increased brain monoaminergic tone after the NMDA receptor GluN2A subunit gene knockout is responsible for resistance to the hypnotic effect of nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Andrey B; Yamakura, Tomohiro; Kohno, Tatsuro; Sakimura, Kenji; Baba, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors can be inhibited by inhalational anesthetics in vitro at clinically relevant concentrations. Here, to clarify the role of NMDA receptors in anesthetic-induced unconsciousness, we examined the hypnotic properties of isoflurane, sevoflurane and nitrous oxide in NMDA receptor GluN2A subunit knockout mice. The hypnotic properties of inhalational anesthetics were evaluated in mice in the loss of righting reflex (LORR) assay by measuring the 50% concentration for LORR (LORR ED(50)). Knockout mice displayed isoflurane and sevoflurane LORR ED(50) values similar to wild-type controls, indicating no significant contribution of these receptors to the hypnotic action of halogenated anesthetics. However, compared with wild-type controls, mutant mice displayed larger isoflurane LORR ED(50) values in the presence of nitrous oxide, indicating a resistance to this gaseous anesthetic. Knockout mice have enhanced brain monoaminergic activity which occurs secondary to NMDA receptor dysfunction, and the observed resistance to the isoflurane LORR ED(50)-sparing effect of nitrous oxide could be abolished by pretreatment with the dopamine D(2) receptor antagonist droperidol or with the serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist ketanserin. Thus, resistance to nitrous oxide in knockout mice appears to be a secondary phenomenon of monoaminergic origin and not a direct result of impaired NMDA receptor function. Our results indicate that NMDA receptors are not critically involved in the hypnotic action of conventionally-used inhalational anesthetics. Also, they suggest that increased brain monoaminergic tone can diminish the effects of general anesthesia. Finally, they provide further evidence that changes secondary to genetic manipulation can explain the results obtained in global knockouts. PMID:23123346

  6. DNA Hypermethylation of the Serotonin Receptor Type-2A Gene Is Associated with a Worse Response to a Weight Loss Intervention in Subjects with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Cornago, Aurora; Mansego, Maria L.; Zulet, María Angeles; Martinez, José Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the regulation of gene activities depending on DNA methylation has been the subject of much recent study. However, although polymorphisms of the HTR2A gene have been associated with both obesity and psychiatric disorders, the role of HTR2A gene methylation in these illnesses remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of HTR2A gene promoter methylation levels in white blood cells (WBC) with obesity traits and depressive symptoms in individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS) enrolled in a behavioural weight loss programme. Analyses were based on 41 volunteers (mean age 49 ± 1 year) recruited within the RESMENA study. Depressive symptoms (as determined using the Beck Depression Inventory), anthropometric and biochemical measurements were analysed at the beginning and after six months of weight loss treatment. At baseline, DNA from WBC was isolated and cytosine methylation in the HTR2A gene promoter was quantified by a microarray approach. In the whole-study sample, a positive association of HTR2A gene methylation with waist circumference and insulin levels was detected at baseline. Obesity measures significantly improved after six months of dietary treatment, where a lower mean HTR2A gene methylation at baseline was associated with major reductions in body weight, BMI and fat mass after the treatment. Moreover, mean HTR2A gene methylation at baseline significantly predicted the decrease in depressive symptoms after the weight loss treatment. In conclusion, this study provides newer evidence that hypermethylation of the HTR2A gene in WBC at baseline is significantly associated with a worse response to a weight-loss intervention and with a lower decrease in depressive symptoms after the dietary treatment in subjects with MetS. PMID:24959950

  7. Melatonin Receptor Genes in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Di Yan; Smith, David Glenn; Hardeland, Rüdiger; Yang, Ming Yao; Xu, Huai Liang; Zhang, Long; Yin, Hua Dong; Zhu, Qing

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Three genes for melatonin receptors have been cloned. The MT1 (or Mel1a or MTNR1A) and MT2 (or Mel1b or MTNR1B) receptor subtypes are present in humans and other mammals, while an additional melatonin receptor subtype, Mel1c (or MTNR1C), has been identified in fish, amphibians and birds. Another melatonin related orphan receptor, GPR50, which does not bind melatonin, is found exclusively in mammals. The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily by the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone acts systemically in numerous organs. In the brain, it is involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes, and it readjusts the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This article reviews recent studies of gene organization, expression, evolution and mutations of melatonin receptor genes of vertebrates. Gene polymorphisms reveal that numerous mutations are associated with diseases and disorders. The phylogenetic analysis of receptor genes indicates that GPR50 is an outgroup to all other melatonin receptor sequences. GPR50 may have separated from a melatonin receptor ancestor before the split between MTNR1C and the MTNR1A/B ancestor. PMID:23712359

  8. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor and glucocorticoid receptor interact to activate human metallothionein 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Shoko; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Tomita, Shuhei; Tohkin, Masahiro; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Komai, Michio

    2013-11-15

    Although the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) play essential roles in mammalian development, stress responses, and other physiological events, crosstalk between these receptors has been the subject of much debate. Metallothioneins are classic glucocorticoid-inducible genes that were reported to increase upon treatment with AHR agonists in rodent tissues and cultured human cells. In this study, the mechanism of human metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene transcription activation by AHR was investigated. Cotreatment with 3-methylcholanthrene and dexamethasone, agonists of AHR and GR respectively, synergistically increased MT2A mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. MT2A induction was suppressed by RNA interference against AHR or GR. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical interaction between AHR and GR proteins. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that AHR was recruited to the glucocorticoid response element in the MT2A promoter. Thus, we provide a novel mechanism whereby AHR modulates expression of human MT2A via the glucocorticoid response element and protein–protein interactions with GR. - Highlights: • Aryl hydrocarbon receptor forms a complex with glucocorticoid receptor in cells. • Human metallothionein gene is regulated by the AHR and GR interaction. • AHR–GR complex binds to glucocorticoid response element in metallothionein gene. • We demonstrated a novel transcriptional mechanism via AHR and GR interaction.

  9. Effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment on catalepsy and the immune response in mice with a genetic predisposition to freezing reactions: the roles of types 1A and 2A serotonin receptors and the tph2 and SERT genes.

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, M A; Alperina, E L; Tolstikova, T G; Bazovkina, D V; Di, V Y; Idova, G V; Kulikov, A V; Popova, N K

    2010-06-01

    ASC (Antidepressant-Sensitive Catalepsy) mice, bred for a high predisposition to catalepsy, are characterized by depression-like behavior and decreased immune responses. Chronic administration of fluoxetine, which is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant widely used in clinical practice, to mice of this strain weakened catalepsy and normalized the number of rosette-forming cells in the spleen. In mice of the parental cataleptic strain CBA/Lac, fluoxetine had no effect on the level of catalepsy or the immune response. Analysis of the effects of fluoxetine on the functional activity of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptors, and the expression of 5-HT(1A) receptor genes in the frontal cortex and midbrain and 5-HT(2A) receptors in the frontal cortex, as well as the tryptophan hydroxylase-2 and the serotonin transporter genes in the midbrain showed that the antidepressant had no effect on these parameters in ASC mice, but decreased the functional activity of 5-HT(2A) receptors in CBA/Lac mice. The possibility that the actions of fluoxetine on catalepsy and the immune response in mice with depression-like states are mediated via other serotoninergic mechanisms is discussed.

  10. Assessment of exonic single nucleotide polymorphisms in the adenosine A2A receptor gene to high myopia susceptibility in Chinese subjects

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Xue, Anquan; Chen, Wei; Ding, Yang; Yan, Dongsheng; Peng, Jiqing; Zeng, Changqing; Qu, Jia

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) modulates collagen synthesis and extracellular matrix production in ocular tissues that contribute to eye growth and the development of myopia. We aimed to determine if single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in A2AR exons associates with high myopia found in Chinese subjects. Methods DNA samples were prepared from venous lymphocytes of 175 Chinese subjects with high myopia of less than –8.00 diopters (D) correction and 101 ethnically similar controls with between –1.00 D and +1.00 D correction. The coding region sequences of A2AR were amplified by PCR and analyzed by Sanger sequencing. The detected variations were confirmed by reverse sequencing. Allelic frequencies of all detected common SNPs were assessed for Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium. Results Five variations in A2AR exons, 5675 A>G, 5765 C>T, 13325 G>A, 13448 C>T, and 14000 T>A, were detected in controls at a low frequency (<1%). However, one SNP, 13772 T>C (rs5751876), showed its polymorphism in 53.3% of the total study population. The rs5751876 is a synonymous substitution located in a tyrosine codon of exon 2. Despite no significant difference in genotype distribution between cases and controls, the frequency of heterozygotes with the rs5751876 genotype was significantly lower in subjects with high myopia. Conclusions The reduced frequency of the heterozygote rs5751876 genotype in subjects suggests a possible association of A2AR with high myopia in a Chinese population. PMID:22740769

  11. Association of Polymorphisms within the Serotonin Receptor Genes 5-HTR1A, 5-HTR1B, 5-HTR2A and 5-HTR2C and Migraine Susceptibility in a Turkish Population

    PubMed Central

    Yücel, Yavuz; Coşkun, Salih; Cengiz, Beyhan; Özdemir, Hasan H.; Uzar, Ertuğrul; Çim, Abdullah; Camkurt, M. Akif; Aluclu, M. Ufuk

    2016-01-01

    Objective Migraine, a highly prevelant headache disorder, is regarded as a polygenic multifactorial disease. Serotonin (5-HT) and their respective receptors have been implicated in the patogenesis. Methods We investigated the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT2C receptor gene polymorphisms and their association with migraine in Turkish patients. The rs6295, rs1300060, rs1228814, rs6311, rs6313, rs6314, rs6318, rs3813929 (−759C/T) and rs518147 polymorphisms were analyzed in 135 patients with migraine and 139 healthy subjects, using a BioMark 96.96 dynamic array system. Results We found no difference in the frequency of the analyzed eight out of nine polymorpisms between migraine and control groups. However, a significant association was found between the rs3813929 polymorphism in the promoter region of 5-HTR2C gene and migraine. Also, the allele of rs3813929 was more common in the migraine group. Conclusion This result suggests that the 5-HTR2C rs3813929 polymorphism can be a genetic risk factor for migraine in a Turkish population. PMID:27489378

  12. Evolution of the nuclear receptor gene superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Laudet, V; Hänni, C; Coll, J; Catzeflis, F; Stéhelin, D

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear receptor genes represent a large family of genes encoding receptors for various hydrophobic ligands such as steroids, vitamin D, retinoic acid and thyroid hormones. This family also contains genes encoding putative receptors for unknown ligands. Nuclear receptor gene products are composed of several domains important for transcriptional activation, DNA binding (C domain), hormone binding and dimerization (E domain). It is not known whether these genes have evolved through gene duplication from a common ancestor or if their different domains came from different independent sources. To test these possibilities we have constructed and compared the phylogenetic trees derived from two different domains of 30 nuclear receptor genes. The tree built from the DNA binding C domain clearly shows a common progeny of all nuclear receptors, which can be grouped into three subfamilies: (i) thyroid hormone and retinoic acid receptors, (ii) orphan receptors and (iii) steroid hormone receptors. The tree constructed from the central part of the E domain which is implicated in transcriptional regulation and dimerization shows the same distribution in three subfamilies but two groups of receptors are in a different position from that in the C domain tree: (i) the Drosophila knirps family genes have acquired very different E domains during evolution, and (ii) the vitamin D and ecdysone receptors, as well as the FTZ-F1 and the NGF1B genes, seem to have DNA binding and hormone binding domains belonging to different classes. These data suggest a complex evolutionary history for nuclear receptor genes in which gene duplication events and swapping between domains of different origins took place. PMID:1312460

  13. Conserved structure and adjacent location of the thrombin receptor and protease-activated receptor 2 genes define a protease-activated receptor gene cluster.

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, M.; Ishii, K.; Kuo, W. L.; Piper, M.; Connolly, A.; Shi, Y. P.; Wu, R.; Lin, C. C.; Coughlin, S. R.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thrombin is a serine protease that elicits a variety of cellular responses. Molecular cloning of a thrombin receptor revealed a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by a novel proteolytic mechanism. Recently, a second protease-activated receptor was discovered and dubbed PAR2. PAR2 is highly related to the thrombin receptor by sequence and, like the thrombin receptor, is activated by cleavage of its amino terminal exodomain. Also like the thrombin receptor, PAR2 can be activated by the hexapeptide corresponding to its tethered ligand sequence independent of receptor cleavage. Thus, functionally, the thrombin receptor and PAR2 constitute a fledgling receptor family that shares a novel proteolytic activation mechanism. To further explore the relatedness of the two known protease-activated receptors and to examine the possibility that a protease-activated gene cluster might exist, we have compared the structure and chromosomal locations of the thrombin receptor and PAR2 genes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The genomic structures of the two protease-activated receptor genes were determined by analysis of lambda phage, P1 bacteriophage, and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) genomic clones. Chromosomal location was determined with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) on metaphase chromosomes, and the relative distance separating the two genes was evaluated both by means of two-color FISH and analysis of YACs and BACs containing both genes. RESULTS: Analysis of genomic clones revealed that the two protease-activated receptor genes share a two-exon genomic structure in which the first exon encodes 5'-untranslated sequence and signal peptide, and the second exon encodes the mature receptor protein and 3'-untranslated sequence. The two receptor genes also share a common locus with the two human genes located at 5q13 and the two mouse genes at 13D2, a syntenic region of the mouse genome. These techniques also suggest that the physical distance separating

  14. 5-Hydroxytryptamine 2A receptor signaling cascade modulates adiponectin and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 expression in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Uchida-Kitajima, Shoko; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Takashina, Youko; Okada-Iwabu, Miki; Iwabu, Masato; Ueki, Kohjiro; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2008-09-01

    Knowledge of the regulatory factors associated with down-regulation of adiponectin gene expression and up-regulation of PAI-1 gene expression is crucial to understand the pathophysiological basis of obesity and metabolic diseases, and could establish new treatment strategies for these conditions. We showed that expression of 5-HT(2A) receptors was up-regulated in hypertrophic 3T3-L1 adipocytes, which exhibited decreased expression of adiponectin and increased expression of PAI-1. 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonists and suppression of 5-HT(2A) receptor gene expression enhanced adiponectin expression. Activation of Gq negatively regulated adiponectin expression, and inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase reversed the Gq-induced effect. Moreover, the 5-HT(2A) receptor blockade reduced PAI-1 expression. These findings indicate that antagonism of 5-HT(2A) receptors in adipocytes could improve the obesity-linked decreases in adiponectin expression and increases in PAI-1 expression.

  15. Gene silencing by nuclear orphan receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Dufau, Maria L

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear orphan receptors represent a large and diverse subgroup in the nuclear receptor superfamily. Although putative ligands for these orphan members remain to be identified, some of these receptors possess intrinsic activating, inhibitory, or dual regulatory functions in development, differentiation, homeostasis, and reproduction. In particular, gene-silencing events elicited by chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factors (COUP-TFs); dosage-sensitive sex reversal-adrenal hypoplasia congenita critical region on the X chromosome, gene 1 (DAX-1); germ cell nuclear factor (GCNF); short heterodimer partner (SHP); and testicular receptors 2 and 4 (TR2 and TR4) are among the best characterized. These orphan receptors are critical in controlling basal activities or hormonal responsiveness of numerous target genes. They employ multiple and distinct mechanisms to mediate target gene repression. Complex cross-talk exists between these orphan receptors at their cognate DNA binding elements and an array of steroid?nonsteroid hormone receptors, other transcriptional activators, coactivators and corepressors, histone modification enzyme complexes, and components of basal transcriptional components. Therefore, perturbation induced by these orphan receptors at multiple levels, including DNA binding activities, receptor homo- or heterodimerization, recruitment of cofactor proteins, communication with general transcriptional machinery, and changes at histone acetylation status and chromatin structures, may contribute to silencing of target gene expression in a specific promoter or cell-type context. Moreover, the findings derived from gene-targeting studies have demonstrated the significance of these orphan receptors' function in physiologic settings. Thus, COUP-TFs, DAX-1, GCNF, SHP, and TR2 and 4 are known to be required for multiple physiologic and biologic functions, including neurogenesis and development of the heart and vascular system steroidogenesis and sex

  16. Astrocytic adenosine receptor A2A and Gs-coupled signaling regulate memory

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Anna G.; Hsiao, Edward C.; Wang, Max M.; Ho, Kaitlyn; Kim, Daniel H.; Wang, Xin; Guo, Weikun; Kang, Jing; Yu, Gui-Qiu; Adame, Anthony; Devidze, Nino; Dubal, Dena B.; Masliah, Eliezer; Conklin, Bruce R.; Mucke, Lennart

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes express a variety of G protein-coupled receptors and might influence cognitive functions, such as learning and memory. However, the roles of astrocytic Gs-coupled receptors in cognitive function are not known. We found that humans with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) had increased levels of the Gs-coupled adenosine receptor A2A in astrocytes. Conditional genetic removal of these receptors enhanced long-term memory in young and aging mice, and increased the levels of Arc/Arg3.1, an immediate-early gene required for long-term memory. Chemogenetic activation of astrocytic Gs-coupled signaling reduced long-term memory in mice without affecting learning. Similar to humans with AD, aging mice expressing human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) showed increased levels of astrocytic A2A receptors. Conditional genetic removal of these receptors enhanced memory in aging hAPP mice. Together, these findings establish a regulatory role for astrocytic Gs-coupled receptors in memory and suggest that AD-linked increases in astrocytic A2A receptor levels contribute to memory loss. PMID:25622143

  17. Astrocytic adenosine receptor A2A and Gs-coupled signaling regulate memory.

    PubMed

    Orr, Anna G; Hsiao, Edward C; Wang, Max M; Ho, Kaitlyn; Kim, Daniel H; Wang, Xin; Guo, Weikun; Kang, Jing; Yu, Gui-Qiu; Adame, Anthony; Devidze, Nino; Dubal, Dena B; Masliah, Eliezer; Conklin, Bruce R; Mucke, Lennart

    2015-03-01

    Astrocytes express a variety of G protein-coupled receptors and might influence cognitive functions, such as learning and memory. However, the roles of astrocytic Gs-coupled receptors in cognitive function are not known. We found that humans with Alzheimer's disease (AD) had increased levels of the Gs-coupled adenosine receptor A2A in astrocytes. Conditional genetic removal of these receptors enhanced long-term memory in young and aging mice and increased the levels of Arc (also known as Arg3.1), an immediate-early gene that is required for long-term memory. Chemogenetic activation of astrocytic Gs-coupled signaling reduced long-term memory in mice without affecting learning. Like humans with AD, aging mice expressing human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) showed increased levels of astrocytic A2A receptors. Conditional genetic removal of these receptors enhanced memory in aging hAPP mice. Together, these findings establish a regulatory role for astrocytic Gs-coupled receptors in memory and suggest that AD-linked increases in astrocytic A2A receptor levels contribute to memory loss. PMID:25622143

  18. Agonist Derived Molecular Probes for A2A Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Pannell, Lewis K.; Ji, Xiao-duo; Jarvis, Michael F.; Williams, Michael; Hutchison, Alan J.; Barrington, William W.; Stiles, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    The adenosine agonist 2-(4-(2-carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino)-5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS21680) was recently reported to be selective for the A2A adenosine receptor subtype, which mediates its hypotensive action. To investigate structurelactivity relationships at a distal site, CGS21680 was derivatized using a functionalized congener approach. The carboxylic group of CGS21680 has been esterified to form a methyl ester, which was then treated with ethylenediamine to produce an amine congener. The amine congener was an intermediate for acylation reactions, in which the reactive acyl species contained a reported group, or the precursor for such. For radioiodination, derivatives of p-hydroxyphenylpropionic, 2-thiophenylacetic, and p-aminophenylacetic acids were prepared. The latter derivative (PAPA-APEC) was iodinated electrophilically using [125I]iodide resulting in a radioligand which was used for studies of competition of binding to striatal A, adenosine receptors in bovine brain. A biotin conjugate and an aryl sulfonate were at least 350-fold selective for A, receptors. For spectroscopic detection, a derivative of the stable free radical tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) was prepared. For irreversible inhibition of receptors, meta- and para-phenylenediisothiocyanate groups were incorporated in the analogs. We have demonstrated that binding at A2A receptors is relatively insensitive to distal structural changes at the 2-position, and we report high affinity molecular probes for receptor characterization by radioactive, spectroscopic and affinity labelling methodology. PMID:2561548

  19. Allelic association of the D2 dopamine receptor gene with receptor-binding characteristics in alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, E.P.; Blum, K.; Ritchie, T.; Montgomery, A.; Sheridan, P.J. )

    1991-07-01

    The allelic association of the human D2 dopamine receptor gene with the binding characteristics of the D2 dopamine receptor was determined in 66 brains of alcoholic and non-alcoholic subjects. In a blinded experiment, DNA from the cerebral cortex was treated with the restriction endonuclease Taql and probed with a 1.5-kilobase (kb) digest of a clone (lambda hD2G1) of the human D2 dopamine receptor gene. The binding characteristics (Kd (binding affinity) and Bmax (number of binding sites)) of the D2 dopamine receptor were determined in the caudate nuclei of these brains using tritiated spiperone as the ligand. The adjusted Kd was significantly lower in alcoholic than in nonalcoholic subjects. In subjects with the A1 allele, in whom a high association with alcoholism was found, the Bmax was significantly reduced compared with the Bmax of subjects with the A2 allele. Moreover, a progressively reduced Bmax was found in subjects with A2/A2, A1/A2, and A1/A1 alleles, with subjects with A2/A2 having the highest mean values, and subjects with A1/A1, the lowest. The polymorphic pattern of the D2 dopamine receptor gene and its differential expression of receptors suggests the involvement of the dopaminergic system in conferring susceptibility to at least one subtype of severe alcoholism.

  20. Desensitization of human CRF2(a) receptor signaling governed by agonist potency and βarrestin2 recruitment.

    PubMed

    Hauger, Richard L; Olivares-Reyes, J Alberto; Braun, Sandra; Hernandez-Aranda, Judith; Hudson, Christine C; Gutknecht, Eric; Dautzenberg, Frank M; Oakley, Robert H

    2013-09-10

    The primary goal was to determine agonist-specific regulation of CRF2(a) receptor function. Exposure of human retinoblastoma Y79 cells to selective (UCN2, UCN3 or stresscopins) and non-selective (UCN1 or sauvagine) agonists prominently desensitized CRF2(a) receptors in a rapid, concentration-dependent manner. A considerably slower rate and smaller magnitude of desensitization developed in response to the weak agonist CRF. CRF1 receptor desensitization stimulated by CRF, cortagine or stressin1-A had no effect on CRF2(a) receptor cyclic AMP signaling. Conversely, desensitization of CRF2(a) receptors by UCN2 or UCN3 did not cross-desensitize Gs-coupled CRF1 receptor signaling. In transfected HEK293 cells, activation of CRF2(a) receptors by UCN2, UCN3 or CRF resulted in receptor phosphorylation and internalization proportional to agonist potency. Neither protein kinase A nor casein kinases mediated CRF2(a) receptor phosphorylation or desensitization. Exposure of HEK293 or U2OS cells to UCN2 or UCN3 (100nM) produced strong βarrestin2 translocation and colocalization with membrane CRF2(a) receptors while CRF (1μM) generated only weak βarrestin2 recruitment. βarrestin2 did not internalize with the receptor, however, indicating that transient CRF2(a) receptor-arrestin complexes dissociate at or near the cell membrane. Since deletion of the βarrestin2 gene upregulated Gs-coupled CRF2(a) receptor signaling in MEF cells, a βarrestin2 mechanism restrains Gs-coupled CRF2(a) receptor signaling activated by urocortins. We further conclude that the rate and extent of homologous CRF2(a) receptor desensitization are governed by agonist-specific mechanisms affecting GRK phosphorylation, βarrestin2 recruitment, and internalization thereby producing unique signal transduction profiles that differentially affect the stress response. PMID:23820308

  1. Presynaptic serotonin 2A receptors modulate thalamocortical plasticity and associative learning

    PubMed Central

    Barre, Alexander; Berthoux, Coralie; De Bundel, Dimitri; Valjent, Emmanuel; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe; Bécamel, Carine

    2016-01-01

    Higher-level cognitive processes strongly depend on a complex interplay between mediodorsal thalamus nuclei and the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Alteration of thalamofrontal connectivity has been involved in cognitive deficits of schizophrenia. Prefrontal serotonin (5-HT)2A receptors play an essential role in cortical network activity, but the mechanism underlying their modulation of glutamatergic transmission and plasticity at thalamocortical synapses remains largely unexplored. Here, we show that 5-HT2A receptor activation enhances NMDA transmission and gates the induction of temporal-dependent plasticity mediated by NMDA receptors at thalamocortical synapses in acute PFC slices. Expressing 5-HT2A receptors in the mediodorsal thalamus (presynaptic site) of 5-HT2A receptor-deficient mice, but not in the PFC (postsynaptic site), using a viral gene-delivery approach, rescued the otherwise absent potentiation of NMDA transmission, induction of temporal plasticity, and deficit in associative memory. These results provide, to our knowledge, the first physiological evidence of a role of presynaptic 5-HT2A receptors located at thalamocortical synapses in the control of thalamofrontal connectivity and the associated cognitive functions. PMID:26903620

  2. Structure of the human progesterone receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Misrahi, M; Venencie, P Y; Saugier-Veber, P; Sar, S; Dessen, P; Milgrom, E

    1993-11-16

    The complete organization of the human progesterone receptor (hPR) gene has been determined. It spans over 90 kbp and contains eight exons. The first exon encodes the N-terminal part of the receptor. The DNA binding domain is encoded by two exons, each exon corresponding to one zinc finger. The steroid binding domain is encoded by five exons. The nucleotide sequence of 1144 bp of the 5' flanking region has been determined. PMID:8241270

  3. The impact of serotonin receptor 1A and 2A gene polymorphisms and interactions on suicide attempt and suicide risk in depressed patients with insufficient response to treatment--a European multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Höfer, Peter; Schosser, Alexandra; Calati, Raffaella; Serretti, Alessandro; Massat, Isabelle; Kocabas, Neslihan A; Konstantinidis, Anastasios; Mendlewicz, Julien; Souery, Daniel; Zohar, Joseph; Juven-Wetzler, Alzbeta; Montgomery, Stuart; Kasper, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    So far, associations between serotonergic neurotransmission pathways and suicidality have been reported. The aim of our study was to investigate the role of genetic polymorphisms and gene-gene interactions of the 5-HTR1A and the 5-HTR2A gene on suicide risk and/or a personal history of suicide attempts. A total of 374 major depressive disorder patients, adequately treated with antidepressants for at least 4 weeks, were collected in the context of a European multicentre study on treatment-resistant depression. We assessed suicidality using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D). Treatment response was defined as HAM-D ≤ 17 and remission as HAM-D ≤ 7 after 4 weeks of adequate antidepressant treatment. The 5-HTR1A rs6295 (C-1019G) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and the 5-HTR2A rs7997012, rs6313, rs643627 and rs17288723 SNPs were selected for genotyping. Using logistic regression analyses, no association (P<0.05) could be found between any SNP and neither suicide risk nor personal history of suicide attempts. Interactions between 5HTR1A rs6295 and 5HTR2A rs6313 in suicide risk, and 5HTR1A rs6295 and 5HTR2A rs643627 in a personal history of suicide attempts have been reported (P=0.027 and 0.036, respectively); however, the results did not survive multiple testing correction. In conclusion, our study shows no association between 5HTR1A or 5HTR2A gene polymorphisms and both current suicide risk and personal history of suicide attempts. In addition, epistatic effects of 5HTR1A and 5HTR2A genes on suicidal behaviour were not significant, although sample size limitations do not allow definitive conclusions.

  4. An Update on Adenosine A2A-Dopamine D2 receptor interactions. Implications for the Function of G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ferré, S.; Quiroz, C.; Woods, A. S.; Cunha, R.; Popoli, P.; Ciruela, F.; Lluis, C.; Franco, R.; Azdad, K.; Schiffmann, S. N.

    2008-01-01

    Adenosine A2A-dopamine D2 receptor interactions play a very important role in striatal function. A2A-D2 receptor interactions provide an example of the capabilities of information processing by just two different G protein-coupled receptors. Thus, there is evidence for the coexistence of two reciprocal antagonistic interactions between A2A and D2 receptors in the same neurons, the GABAergic enkephalinergic nens. An antagonistic A2A-D2 intramembrane receptor interaction, which depends on A2A-D2 receptor heteromerization and Gq/11-PLC signaling, modulates neuronal excitability and neurotransmitter release. On the other hand, an antagonistic A2A-D2 receptor interaction at the adenylyl-cyclase level, which depends on Gs/olf- and Gi/o- type V adenylyl-cyclase signaling, modulates protein phosphorylation and gene expression. Finally, under conditions of upregulation of an activator of G protein signaling (AGS3), such as during chronic treatment with addictive drugs, a synergistic A2A-D2 receptor interaction can also be demonstrated. AGS3 facilitates a synergistic interaction between Gs/olf- and Gi/o- coupled receptors on the activation of types II/IV adenylyl cyclase, leading to a paradoxical increase in protein phosphorylation and gene expression upon co-activation of A2A and D2 receptors. The analysis of A2-D2 receptor interactions will have implications for the pathophysiology and treatment of basal ganglia disorders and drug addiction. PMID:18537670

  5. Biophysical Mapping of the Adenosine A2A Receptor

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A new approach to generating information on ligand receptor interactions within the binding pocket of G protein-coupled receptors has been developed, called Biophysical Mapping (BPM). Starting from a stabilized receptor (StaR), minimally engineered for thermostability, additional single mutations are then added at positions that could be involved in small molecule interactions. The StaR and a panel of binding site mutants are captured onto Biacore chips to enable characterization of the binding of small molecule ligands using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurement. A matrix of binding data for a set of ligands versus each active site mutation is then generated, providing specific affinity and kinetic information (KD, kon, and koff) of receptor–ligand interactions. This data set, in combination with molecular modeling and docking, is used to map the small molecule binding site for each class of compounds. Taken together, the many constraints provided by these data identify key protein–ligand interactions and allow the shape of the site to be refined to produce a high quality three-dimensional picture of ligand binding, thereby facilitating structure based drug design. Results of biophysical mapping of the adenosine A2A receptor are presented. PMID:21661720

  6. G-protein Receptor Kinase 5 Regulates the Cannabinoid Receptor 2-induced Up-regulation of Serotonin 2A Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Jade M.; Carrasco, Gonzalo A.

    2013-01-01

    We have recently reported that cannabinoid agonists can up-regulate and enhance the activity of serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptors in the prefrontal cortex (PFCx). Increased expression and activity of cortical 5-HT2A receptors has been associated with neuropsychiatric disorders, such as anxiety and schizophrenia. Here we report that repeated CP55940 exposure selectively up-regulates GRK5 proteins in rat PFCx and in a neuronal cell culture model. We sought to examine the mechanism underlying the regulation of GRK5 and to identify the role of GRK5 in the cannabinoid agonist-induced up-regulation and enhanced activity of 5-HT2A receptors. Interestingly, we found that cannabinoid agonist-induced up-regulation of GRK5 involves CB2 receptors, β-arrestin 2, and ERK1/2 signaling because treatment with CB2 shRNA lentiviral particles, β-arrestin 2 shRNA lentiviral particles, or ERK1/2 inhibitor prevented the cannabinoid agonist-induced up-regulation of GRK5. Most importantly, we found that GRK5 shRNA lentiviral particle treatment prevented the cannabinoid agonist-induced up-regulation and enhanced 5-HT2A receptor-mediated calcium release. Repeated cannabinoid exposure was also associated with enhanced phosphorylation of CB2 receptors and increased interaction between β-arrestin 2 and ERK1/2. These latter phenomena were also significantly inhibited by GRK5 shRNA lentiviral treatment. Our results suggest that sustained activation of CB2 receptors, which up-regulates 5-HT2A receptor signaling, enhances GRK5 expression; the phosphorylation of CB2 receptors; and the β-arrestin 2/ERK interactions. These data could provide a rationale for some of the adverse effects associated with repeated cannabinoid agonist exposure. PMID:23592773

  7. Genetic dysfunction of serotonin 2A receptor hampers response to antidepressant drugs: A translational approach.

    PubMed

    Qesseveur, Gaël; Petit, Anne Cécile; Nguyen, Hai Thanh; Dahan, Lionel; Colle, Romain; Rotenberg, Samuel; Seif, Isabelle; Robert, Pauline; David, Denis; Guilloux, Jean-Philippe; Gardier, Alain M; Verstuyft, Céline; Becquemont, Laurent; Corruble, Emmanuelle; Guiard, Bruno P

    2016-06-01

    Pharmacological studies have yielded valuable insights into the role of the serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor in major depressive disorder (MDD) and antidepressant drugs (ADs) response. However, it is still unknown whether genetic variants in the HTR2A gene affect the therapeutic outcome of ADs and the mechanism underlying the regulation of such response remains poorly described. In this context, a translational human-mouse study offers a unique opportunity to address the possibility that variations in the HTR2A gene may represent a relevant marker to predict the efficacy of ADs. In a first part of this study, we investigated in depressed patients the effect of three HTR2A single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), selected for their potential functional consequences on 5-HT2A receptor (rs6313, rs6314 and rs7333412), on response and remission rates after 3 months of antidepressant treatments. We also explored the consequences of the constitutive genetic inactivation of the 5-HT2A receptor (i.e. in 5-HT2A(-/-) mice) on the activity of acute and prolonged administration of SSRIs. Our clinical data indicate that GG patients for the rs7333412 SNP were less prone to respond to ADs than AA/AG patients. In the preclinical study, we demonstrated that the 5-HT2A receptor exerts an inhibitory influence on the neuronal activity of the serotonergic system after acute administration of SSRIs. However, while the chronic administration of the SSRIs escitalopram or fluoxetine elicited a progressive increased in the firing rate of 5-HT neurons in 5-HT2A(+/+) mice, it failed to do so in 5-HT2A(-/-) mutants. These electrophysiological impairments were associated with a decreased ability of the chronic administration of fluoxetine to stimulate hippocampal plasticity and to produce antidepressant-like activities. Genetic loss of the 5-HT2A receptor compromised the activity of chronic treatment with SSRIs, making this receptor a putative marker to predict ADs response. PMID:26764241

  8. cDNA cloning, molecular characterization, and chromosomal localization of NET(EPHT2), a human EPH-related receptor protein-tyrosine kinase gene preferentially expressed in brain

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, X.X.; Yoshioka, A.; Pleasure, D.E.

    1995-09-20

    By screening a human fetal brain cDNA expression library using a monoclonal anti-phosphotyrosine antibody , we have isolated a cDNA clone encoding a receptor type protein-tyrosine kinase belonging to the EPH family, NET (neuronally expressed EPH-related tyrosine kinase). NET shows 87% homology in nucleotide sequence and 99% homology in the deduced amino acid sequence to rat elk, suggesting that NET is the human homologue of elk. The NET gene is mapped to human chromosome 3q21-q23 by PCR screening of a human rodent somatic cell hybrid panel and by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Examination of NET mRNA expression in several human tissues has shown that the NET gene is expressed preferentially in brain as a 5-kb transcript. Steady-state levels of NET mRNA in human brain are greater in the midterm fetus than in the adult. Lower levels of NET mRNA are found in fetal kidney and adult skeletal muscle. The expression pattern of NET mRNA thus differs from that of elk, suggesting that these two gene products may preform distinct roles in human and rat. NET transcripts are detected in human acid-induced neuronal differentiation. Several human tumor cell lines derived from neuroectoderm including primitive neuroblastoma also express NET transcripts. Since the NET mRNA expression in human brain is developmentally regulated and is induced during neuronal differentiation, NET potentially plays important roles in human neurogenesis. 89 refs., 7 figs.

  9. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Patterson, M N; Hughes, I A; Gottlieb, B; Pinsky, L

    1994-09-01

    The androgen receptor gene mutations database is a comprehensive listing of mutations published in journals and meetings proceedings. The majority of mutations are point mutations identified in patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Information is included regarding the phenotype, the nature and location of the mutations, as well as the effects of the mutations on the androgen binding activity of the receptor. The current version of the database contains 149 entries, of which 114 are unique mutations. The database is available from EMBL (NetServ@EMBL-Heidelberg.DE) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (mc33001@musica.mcgill.ca).

  10. Social regulation of cortisol receptor gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Korzan, Wayne J.; Grone, Brian P.; Fernald, Russell D.

    2014-01-01

    In many social species, individuals influence the reproductive capacity of conspecifics. In a well-studied African cichlid fish species, Astatotilapia burtoni, males are either dominant (D) and reproductively competent or non-dominant (ND) and reproductively suppressed as evidenced by reduced gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH1) release, regressed gonads, lower levels of androgens and elevated levels of cortisol. Here, we asked whether androgen and cortisol levels might regulate this reproductive suppression. Astatotilapia burtoni has four glucocorticoid receptors (GR1a, GR1b, GR2 and MR), encoded by three genes, and two androgen receptors (ARα and ARβ), encoded by two genes. We previously showed that ARα and ARβ are expressed in GnRH1 neurons in the preoptic area (POA), which regulates reproduction, and that the mRNA levels of these receptors are regulated by social status. Here, we show that GR1, GR2 and MR mRNAs are also expressed in GnRH1 neurons in the POA, revealing potential mechanisms for both androgens and cortisol to influence reproductive capacity. We measured AR, MR and GR mRNA expression levels in a microdissected region of the POA containing GnRH1 neurons, comparing D and ND males. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR), we found D males had higher mRNA levels of ARα, MR, total GR1a and GR2 in the POA compared with ND males. In contrast, ND males had significantly higher levels of GR1b mRNA, a receptor subtype with a reduced transcriptional response to cortisol. Through this novel regulation of receptor type, neurons in the POA of an ND male will be less affected by the higher levels of cortisol typical of low status, suggesting GR receptor type change as a potential adaptive mechanism to mediate high cortisol levels during social suppression. PMID:25013108

  11. CRISPLD2: a novel NSCLP candidate gene

    PubMed Central

    Chiquet, Brett T.; Lidral, Andrew C.; Stal, Samuel; Mulliken, John B.; Moreno, Lina M.; Arco-Burgos, Mauricio; Valencia-Ramirez, Consuelo; Blanton, Susan H.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.

    2013-01-01

    Non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCLP) results from the complex interaction between genes and environmental factors. Candidate gene analysis and genome scans have been employed to identify the genes contributing to NSCLP. In this study, we evaluated the 16q24.1 chromosomal region, which has been identified by multiple genome scans as an NSCLP region of interest. Two candidate genes were found in the region: interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) and cysteine-rich secretory protein LCCL domain containing 2 (CRISPLD2). Initially, Caucasian and Hispanic NSCLP multiplex families and simplex parent–child trios were genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in both IRF8 and CRISPLD2. CRISPLD2 was subsequently genotyped in a data set comprised of NSCLP families from Colombia, South America. Linkage disequilibrium analysis identified a significant association between CRISPLD2 and NSCLP in both our Caucasian and Hispanic NSCLP cohorts. SNP rs1546124 and haplotypes between rs1546124 and either rs4783099 or rs16974880 were significant in the Caucasian multiplex population (P = 0.01, P = 0.002 and P = 0.001, respectively). An altered transmission of CRISPLD2 SNPs rs8061351 (P = 0.02) and rs2326398 (P = 0.06) was detected in the Hispanic population. No association was found between CRISPLD2 and our Colombian population or IRF8 and NSCLP. In situ hybridization showed that CRISPLD2 is expressed in the mandible, palate and nasopharynx regions during craniofacial development at E13.5–E17.5, respectively. Altogether, these data suggest that genetic variation in CRISPLD2 has a role in the etiology of NSCLP. PMID:17616516

  12. Blockade of adenosine A2A receptors prevents protein phosphorylation in the striatum induced by cortical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, César; Gomes, Catarina; Pak, Arlene C; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Goldberg, Steven R; Hope, Bruce T; Ferré, Sergi

    2006-10-18

    Previous studies have shown that cortical stimulation selectively activates extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation and immediate early gene expression in striatal GABAergic enkephalinergic neurons. In the present study, we demonstrate that blockade of adenosine A2A receptors with caffeine or a selective A2A receptor antagonist counteracts the striatal activation of cAMP-protein kinase A cascade (phosphorylation of the Ser845 residue of the glutamate receptor 1 subunit of the AMPA receptor) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2 phosphorylation) induced by the in vivo stimulation of corticostriatal afferents. The results indicate that A2A receptors strongly modulate the efficacy of glutamatergic synapses on striatal enkephalinergic neurons.

  13. Phosphaturic mesenchymal tumors show positive staining for somatostatin receptor 2A (SSTR2A).

    PubMed

    Houang, Michelle; Clarkson, Adele; Sioson, Loretta; Elston, Marianne S; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick J; Dray, Michael; Ranchere-Vince, Dominique; Decouvelaere, Anne-Valerie; de la Fouchardiere, Arnaud; Gill, Anthony J

    2013-12-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a paraneoplastic syndrome associated with tumors that secrete phosphaturic hormones, most notably fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). The majority of tumors associated with this syndrome show stereotypical histological features and are now known as phosphaturic mesenchymal tumors (PMTs). We postulated that immunohistochemistry for somatostatin receptor 2A (SSTR2A) could be used to definitively identify PMTs or other tumors that cause TIO. Immunohistochemistry for FGF23 and SSTR2A was performed on 15 tumors from 14 patients with a definite diagnosis of TIO. All showed positive staining for both markers. While FGF23 staining was quite focal in some tumors, SSTR2A showed diffuse strong expression. In 40 control tumors not known to be associated with the clinical or biochemical features of TIO, FGF23 expression was found in 2 cases (one aneurysmal bone cyst and one osteosarcoma). SSTR2A expression was found in 9 control tumors (4 synovial sarcomas, 2 hemangiomas, 2 aneurysmal bone cysts and one osteosarcoma). Only one tumor (an aneurysmal bone cyst) showed positive staining for both FGF23 and SSTR2A. SSTR2A also commonly stained neoplastic and non-neoplastic endothelial cells. We conclude that neither FGF23 nor SSTR2A expression are specific for the diagnosis of PMT. However both stains are highly sensitive. Because of its diffuse strong expression and widespread availability, immunohistochemistry for SSTR2A is useful to confirm the diagnosis of PMT in an appropriate setting particularly if material is limited. Negative staining can serve as an excellent rule out test for this diagnosis. PMID:24060005

  14. Expression of serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptors in the human cerebellum and alterations in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, S L; Burnet, P W; Gittins, R; Baker, K; Harrison, P J

    2001-11-01

    The occurrence of human cerebellar serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptors (5-HT(2A)R) is equivocal and their status in schizophrenia unknown. Using a range of techniques, we investigated cerebellar 5-HT(2A)R expression in 16 healthy subjects and 16 subjects with schizophrenia. Immunocytochemistry with a monoclonal antibody showed labelling of Purkinje cell bodies and dendrites, as well as putative astrocytes. Western blots showed a major band at approximately 45 kDa. Receptor autoradiography and homogenate binding with [(3)H]ketanserin revealed cerebellar 5-HT(2A)R binding sites present at levels approximately a third of that in prefrontal cortex. 5-HT(2A)R mRNA was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, with higher relative levels in men than women. Several aspects of 5-HT(2A)R expression were altered in schizophrenia. 5-HT(2A)R immunoreactivity in Purkinje cells was partially redistributed from soma to dendrites and was increased in white matter. 5-HT(2A)R mRNA was decreased in the male patients. 5-HT(2A)R measured by dot blots and [(3)H]ketanserin binding (B(max) and K(d)) were not significantly altered in schizophrenia. These data show that 5-HT(2A)R gene products (mRNA, protein, binding sites) are expressed in the human cerebellum at nonnegligible levels; this bears upon 5-HT(2A)R imaging studies which use the cerebellum as a reference region. 5-HT(2A)R expression is altered in schizophrenia; the shift of 5-HT(2A)R from soma to dendrites is noteworthy since atypical antipsychotics have the opposite effect. Finally, the results emphasise that expression of a receptor gene is a mutifaceted process. Measurement of multiple parameters is necessary to give a clear picture of the normal situation and to show the profile of alterations in a disease. PMID:11574947

  15. The Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Lehvaslaiho, H; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1998-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 272 to 309 in the past year. We have expanded the database: (i) by giving each entry an accession number; (ii) by adding information on the length of polymorphic polyglutamine (polyGln) and polyglycine (polyGly) tracts in exon 1; (iii) by adding information on large gene deletions; (iv) by providing a direct link with a completely searchable database (courtesy EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute). The addition of the exon 1 polymorphisms is discussed in light of their possible relevance as markers for predisposition to prostate or breast cancer. The database is also available on the internet (http://www.mcgill. ca/androgendb/ ), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp. ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen ), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  16. The NMDA receptor NR2A subunit regulates proliferation of MKN45 human gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Kanako; Kanno, Takeshi; Oshima, Tadayuki; Miwa, Hiroto; Tashiro, Chikara; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2008-03-07

    The present study investigated proliferation of MKN28 and MKN45 human gastric cancer cells regulated by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit. The NMDA receptor antagonist DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (AP5) inhibited proliferation of MKN45 cells, but not MKN28 cells. Of the NMDA subunits such as NR1, NR2 (2A, 2B, 2C, and 2D), and NR3 (3A and 3B), all the NMDA subunit mRNAs except for the NR2B subunit mRNA were expressed in both MKN28 and MKN45 cells. MKN45 cells were characterized by higher expression of the NR2A subunit mRNA and lower expression of the NR1 subunit mRNA, but MKN28 otherwise by higher expression of the NR1 subunit mRNA and lower expression of the NR2A subunit mRNA. MKN45 cell proliferation was also inhibited by silencing the NR2A subunit-targeted gene. For MKN45 cells, AP5 or knocking-down the NR2A subunit increased the proportion of cells in the G{sub 1} phase of cell cycling and decreased the proportion in the S/G{sub 2} phase. The results of the present study, thus, suggest that blockage of NMDA receptors including the NR2A subunit suppresses MKN45 cell proliferation due to cell cycle arrest at the G{sub 1} phase; in other words, the NR2A subunit promotes MKN45 cell proliferation by accelerating cell cycling.

  17. T Cell Receptor Gene Therapy for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Thomas M.; Ragnarsson, Gunnar B.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract T cell-based adoptive immunotherapy has been shown to be a promising treatment for various types of cancer. However, adoptive T cell therapy currently requires the custom isolation and characterization of tumor-specific T cells from each patient—a process that can be not only difficult and time-consuming but also often fails to yield high-avidity T cells, which together have limited the broad application of this approach as a clinical treatment. Employing T cell receptor (TCR) gene therapy as a component of adoptive T cell therapy strategies can overcome many of these obstacles, allowing autologous T cells with a defined specificity to be generated in a much shorter time period. Initial studies using this approach have been hampered by a number of technical difficulties resulting in low TCR expression and acquisition of potentially problematic specificities due to mispairing of introduced TCR chains with endogenous TCR chains. The last several years have seen substantial progress in our understanding of the multiple facets of TCR gene therapy that will have to be properly orchestrated for this strategy to succeed. Here we outline the challenges of TCR gene therapy and the advances that have been made toward realizing the promise of this approach. PMID:19702439

  18. Androgen receptor gene polymorphism in zebra species.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hideyuki; Langenhorst, Tanya; Ogden, Rob; Inoue-Murayama, Miho

    2015-09-01

    Androgen receptor genes (AR) have been found to have associations with reproductive development, behavioral traits, and disorders in humans. However, the influence of similar genetic effects on the behavior of other animals is scarce. We examined the loci AR glutamine repeat (ARQ) in 44 Grevy's zebras, 23 plains zebras, and three mountain zebras, and compared them with those of domesticated horses. We observed polymorphism among zebra species and between zebra and horse. As androgens such as testosterone influence aggressiveness, AR polymorphism among equid species may be associated with differences in levels of aggression and tameness. Our findings indicate that it would be useful to conduct further studies focusing on the potential association between AR and personality traits, and to understand domestication of equid species. PMID:26236645

  19. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Trifiro, M; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L

    1997-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 212 to 272. We have expanded the database: (i) by adding a large amount of new data on somatic mutations in prostatic cancer tissue; (ii) by defining a new constitutional phenotype, mild androgen insensitivity (MAI); (iii) by placing additional relevant information on an internet site (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/ ). The database has allowed us to examine the contribution of CpG sites to the multiplicity of reports of the same mutation in different families. The database is also available from EMBL (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen) or as a Macintosh Filemaker Pro or Word file (MC33@musica,mcgill.ca)

  20. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Trifiro, M; Lumbroso, R; Vasiliou, D M; Pinsky, L

    1996-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. We have added (if available) data on the androgen binding phenotype of the mutant AR, the clinical phenotype of the affected persons, the family history and whether the pathogenicity of a mutation has been proven. Exonic mutations are now listed in 5'-->3' sequence regardless of type and single base pair changes are presented in codon context. Splice site and intronic mutations are listed separately. The database has allowed us to substantiate and amplify the observation of mutational hot spots within exons encoding the AR androgen binding domain. The database is available from EML (ftp://www.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  1. INSIGHTS INTO THE REGULATION OF 5-HT2A RECEPTORS BY SCAFFOLDING PROTEINS AND KINASES

    PubMed Central

    Allen, John A.; Yadav, Prem N.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY 5-HT2A serotonin receptors are essential molecular targets for the actions of LSD-like hallucinogens and atypical antipsychotic drugs. 5-HT2A serotonin receptors also mediate a variety of physiological processes in peripheral and central nervous systems including platelet aggregation, smooth muscle contraction, and the modulation of mood and perception. Scaffolding proteins have emerged as important regulators of 5-HT2A receptors and our recent studies suggest multiple scaffolds exist for 5-HT2A receptors including PSD95, arrestin, and caveolin. In addition, a novel interaction has emerged between p90 ribosomal S6 kinase and 5-HT2A receptors which attenuates receptor signaling. This article reviews our recent studies and emphasizes the role of scaffolding proteins and kinases in the regulation of 5-HT2A trafficking, targeting and signaling. PMID:18640136

  2. Glycine Potentiates AMPA Receptor Function through Metabotropic Activation of GluN2A-Containing NMDA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-Jun; Hu, Rong; Lujan, Brendan; Chen, Juan; Zhang, Jian-Jian; Nakano, Yasuko; Cui, Tian-Yuan; Liao, Ming-Xia; Chen, Jin-Cao; Man, Heng-Ye; Feng, Hua; Wan, Qi

    2016-01-01

    NMDA receptors are Ca2+-permeable ion channels. The activation of NMDA receptors requires agonist glutamate and co-agonist glycine. Recent evidence indicates that NMDA receptor also has metabotropic function. Here we report that in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons, glycine increases AMPA receptor-mediated currents independent of the channel activity of NMDA receptors and the activation of glycine receptors. The potentiation of AMPA receptor function by glycine is antagonized by the inhibition of ERK1/2. In the hippocampal neurons and in the HEK293 cells transfected with different combinations of NMDA receptors, glycine preferentially acts on GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors (GluN2ARs), but not GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors (GluN2BRs), to enhance ERK1/2 phosphorylation independent of the channel activity of GluN2ARs. Without requiring the channel activity of GluN2ARs, glycine increases AMPA receptor-mediated currents through GluN2ARs. Thus, these results reveal a metabotropic function of GluN2ARs in mediating glycine-induced potentiation of AMPA receptor function via ERK1/2 activation. PMID:27807405

  3. Gene Transfer and Molecular Cloning of the Human NGF Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Moses V.; Bothwell, Mark A.; Ross, Alonzo H.; Koprowski, Hilary; Lanahan, Anthony A.; Buck, C. Randall; Sehgal, Amita

    1986-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptor are important in the development of cells derived from the neural crest. Mouse L cell transformants have been generated that stably express the human NGF receptor gene transfer with total human DNA. Affinity cross-linking, metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, and equilibrium binding with 125I-labeled NGF revealed that this NGF receptor had the same size and binding characteristics as the receptor from human melanoma cells and rat PC12 cells. The sequences encoding the NGF receptor were molecularly cloned using the human Alu repetitive sequence as a probe. A cosmid clone that contained the human NGF receptor gene allowed efficient transfection and expression of the receptor.

  4. Recruitment of a Cytoplasmic Chaperone Relay by the A2A Adenosine Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Bergmayr, Christian; Thurner, Patrick; Keuerleber, Simon; Kudlacek, Oliver; Nanoff, Christian; Freissmuth, Michael; Gruber, Christian W.

    2013-01-01

    The adenosine A2A receptor is a prototypical rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptor but has several unique structural features, in particular a long C terminus (of >120 residues) devoid of a palmitoylation site. It is known to interact with several accessory proteins other than those canonically involved in signaling. However, it is evident that many more proteins must interact with the A2A receptor, if the trafficking trajectory of the receptor is taken into account from its site of synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to its disposal by the lysosome. Affinity-tagged versions of the A2A receptor were expressed in HEK293 cells to identify interacting partners residing in the ER by a proteomics approach based on tandem affinity purification. The receptor-protein complexes were purified in quantities sufficient for analysis by mass spectrometry. We identified molecular chaperones (heat-shock proteins HSP90α and HSP70-1A) that interact with and retain partially folded A2A receptor prior to ER exit. Complex formation between the A2A receptor and HSP90α (but not HSP90β) and HSP70-1A was confirmed by co-affinity precipitation. HSP90 inhibitors also enhanced surface expression of the receptor in PC12 cells, which endogenously express the A2A receptor. Finally, proteins of the HSP relay machinery (e.g. HOP/HSC70-HSP90 organizing protein and P23/HSP90 co-chaperone) were recovered in complexes with the A2A receptor. These observations are consistent with the proposed chaperone/coat protein complex II exchange model. This posits that cytosolic HSP proteins are sequentially recruited to folding intermediates of the A2A receptor. Release of HSP90 is required prior to recruitment of coat protein complex II components. This prevents premature ER export of partially folded receptors. PMID:23965991

  5. 5-HT2 Receptor Regulation of Mitochondrial Genes: Unexpected Pharmacological Effects of Agonists and Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Jennifer L; Wills, Lauren P; McOmish, Caitlin E; Demireva, Elena Y; Gingrich, Jay A; Beeson, Craig C; Schnellmann, Rick G

    2016-04-01

    In acute organ injuries, mitochondria are often dysfunctional, and recent research has revealed that recovery of mitochondrial and renal functions is accelerated by induction of mitochondrial biogenesis (MB). We previously reported that the nonselective 5-HT2 receptor agonist DOI [1-(4-iodo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)propan-2-amine] induced MB in renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs). The goal of this study was to determine the role of 5-HT2 receptors in the regulation of mitochondrial genes and oxidative metabolism in the kidney. The 5-HT2C receptor agonist CP-809,101 [2-[(3-chlorophenyl)methoxy]-6-(1-piperazinyl)pyrazine] and antagonist SB-242,084 [6-chloro-2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-N-[6-[(2-methyl-3-pyridinyl)oxy]-3-pyridinyl]-1H-indole-1-carboxyamide dihydrochloride] were used to examine the induction of renal mitochondrial genes and oxidative metabolism in RPTCs and in mouse kidneys in the presence and absence of the 5-HT2C receptor. Unexpectedly, both CP-809,101 and SB-242,084 increased RPTC respiration and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) mRNA expression in RPTCs at 1-10 nM. In addition, CP-809,101 and SB-242,084 increased mRNA expression of PGC-1α and the mitochondrial proteins NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 and NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) β subcomplex 8 in mice. These compounds increased mitochondrial genes in RPTCs in which the 5-HT2C receptor was downregulated with small interfering RNA and in the renal cortex of mice lacking the 5-HT2C receptor. By contrast, the ability of these compounds to increase PGC-1α mRNA and respiration was blocked in RPTCs treated with 5-HT2A receptor small interfering RNA or the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist eplivanserin. In addition, the 5-HT2A receptor agonist NBOH-2C-CN [4-[2-[[(2-hydroxyphenyl)methyl]amino]ethyl]-2,5-dimethoxybenzonitrile] increased RPTC respiration at 1-100 nM. These results suggest that agonism of the 5-HT2A receptor induces MB and that the classic 5-HT2C receptor agonist CP

  6. Dopamine receptor genes: new tools for molecular psychiatry.

    PubMed Central

    Niznik, H B; Van Tol, H H

    1992-01-01

    For over a decade it has been generally assumed that all the pharmacological and biochemical actions of dopamine within the central nervous system and periphery were mediated by two distinct dopamine receptors. These receptors, termed D1 and D2, were defined as those coupled to the stimulation or inhibition of adenylate cyclase, respectively, and by their selectivity and avidity for various drugs and compounds. The concept that two dopamine receptors were sufficient to account for all the effects mediated by dopamine was an oversimplification. Recent molecular biological studies have identified five distinct genes which encode at least eight functional dopamine receptors. The members of the expanded dopamine receptor family, however, can still be codifed by way of the original D1 and D2 receptor dichotomy. These include two genes encoding dopamine D1-like receptors (D1 [D1A]/D5 [D1B]) and three genes encoding D2-like receptors (D2/D3/D4). We review here our recent work on the cloning and characterization of some of the members of the dopamine receptor gene family (D1, D2, D4, D5), their relationship to neuropsychiatric disorders and their potential role in antipsychotic drug action. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1450188

  7. Nucleus tractus solitarii A(2a) adenosine receptors inhibit cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of sympathetic outputs.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2014-02-01

    Previously we have shown that stimulation of inhibitory A1 adenosine receptors located in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) attenuates cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) evoked inhibition of renal, adrenal and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Activation of facilitatory A2a adenosine receptors, which dominate over A1 receptors in the NTS, contrastingly alters baseline activity of regional sympathetic outputs: it decreases renal, increases adrenal and does not change lumbar nerve activity. Considering that NTS A2a receptors may facilitate release of inhibitory transmitters we hypothesized that A2a receptors will act in concert with A1 receptors differentially inhibiting regional sympathetic CCR responses (adrenal>lumbar>renal). In urethane/chloralose anesthetized rats (n=38) we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of serotonin 5HT3 receptor agonist, phenylbiguanide, (1-8μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation, blockade or combined blockade and stimulation of NTS A2a adenosine receptors (microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 0.2-20pmol/50nl, ZM-241385 40pmol/100nl or ZM-241385+CGS-21680, respectively). We found that stimulation of A2a adenosine receptors uniformly inhibited the regional sympathetic and hemodynamic reflex responses and this effect was abolished by the selective blockade of NTS A2a receptors. This indicates that A2a receptor triggered inhibition of CCR responses and the contrasting shifts in baseline sympathetic activity are mediated via different mechanisms. These data implicate that stimulation of NTS A2a receptors triggers unknown inhibitory mechanism(s) which in turn inhibit transmission in the CCR pathway when adenosine is released into the NTS during severe hypotension. PMID:24216055

  8. Gene expression of NMDA receptor subunits in the cerebellum of elderly patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Andrea; Koschel, Jiri; Zink, Mathias; Bauer, Manfred; Sommer, Clemens; Frank, Josef; Treutlein, Jens; Schulze, Thomas; Schneider-Axmann, Thomas; Parlapani, Eleni; Rietschel, Marcella; Falkai, Peter; Henn, Fritz A

    2010-03-01

    To determine if NMDA receptor alterations are present in the cerebellum in schizophrenia, we measured NMDA receptor binding and gene expression of the NMDA receptor subunits in a post-mortem study of elderly patients with schizophrenia and non-affected subjects. Furthermore, we assessed influence of genetic variation in the candidate gene neuregulin-1 (NRG1) on the expression of the NMDA receptor in an exploratory study. Post-mortem samples from the cerebellar cortex of ten schizophrenic patients were compared with nine normal subjects. We investigated NMDA receptor binding by receptor autoradiography and gene expression of the NMDA receptor subunits NR1, NR2A, NR2B, NR2C and NR2D by in situ hybridization. For the genetic study, we genotyped the NRG1 polymorphism rs35753505 (SNP8NRG221533). Additionally, we treated rats with the antipsychotics haloperidol or clozapine and assessed cerebellar NMDA receptor binding and gene expression of subunits to examine the effects of antipsychotic treatment. Gene expression of the NR2D subunit was increased in the right cerebellum of schizophrenic patients compared to controls. Individuals carrying at least one C allele of rs35753505 (SNP8NRG221533) showed decreased expression of the NR2C subunit in the right cerebellum, compared to individuals homozygous for the T allele. Correlation with medication parameters and the animal model revealed no treatment effects. In conclusion, increased NR2D expression results in a hyperexcitable NMDA receptor suggesting an adaptive effect due to receptor hypofunction. The decreased NR2C expression in NRG1 risk variant may cause a deficit in NMDA receptor function. This supports the hypothesis of an abnormal glutamatergic neurotransmission in the right cerebellum in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  9. Functional Characterization of Soybean Glyma04g39610 as a Brassinosteroid Receptor Gene and Evolutionary Analysis of Soybean Brassinosteroid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Suna; Tao, Ping; Xu, Feng; Wu, Aiping; Huo, Weige; Wang, Jinxiang

    2016-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BR) play important roles in plant growth and development. Although BR receptors have been intensively studied in Arabidopsis, the BR receptors in soybean remain largely unknown. Here, in addition to the known receptor gene Glyma06g15270 (GmBRI1a), we identified five putative BR receptor genes in the soybean genome: GmBRI1b, GmBRL1a, GmBRL1b, GmBRL2a, and GmBRL2b. Analysis of their expression patterns by quantitative real-time PCR showed that they are ubiquitously expressed in primary roots, lateral roots, stems, leaves, and hypocotyls. We used rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) to clone GmBRI1b (Glyma04g39160), and found that the predicted amino acid sequence of GmBRI1b showed high similarity to those of AtBRI1 and pea PsBRI1. Structural modeling of the ectodomain also demonstrated similarities between the BR receptors of soybean and Arabidopsis. GFP-fusion experiments verified that GmBRI1b localizes to the cell membrane. We also explored GmBRI1b function in Arabidopsis through complementation experiments. Ectopic over-expression of GmBRI1b in Arabidopsis BR receptor loss-of-function mutant (bri1-5 bak1-1D) restored hypocotyl growth in etiolated seedlings; increased the growth of stems, leaves, and siliques in light; and rescued the developmental defects in leaves of the bri1-6 mutant, and complemented the responses of BR biosynthesis-related genes in the bri1-5 bak1-D mutant grown in light. Bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that the six BR receptor genes in soybean resulted from three gene duplication events during evolution. Phylogenetic analysis classified the BR receptors in dicots and monocots into three subclades. Estimation of the synonymous (Ks) and the nonsynonymous substitution rate (Ka) and selection pressure (Ka/Ks) revealed that the Ka/Ks of BR receptor genes from dicots and monocots were less than 1.0, indicating that BR receptor genes in plants experienced purifying selection during evolution. PMID:27338344

  10. Functional Characterization of Soybean Glyma04g39610 as a Brassinosteroid Receptor Gene and Evolutionary Analysis of Soybean Brassinosteroid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Peng, Suna; Tao, Ping; Xu, Feng; Wu, Aiping; Huo, Weige; Wang, Jinxiang

    2016-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BR) play important roles in plant growth and development. Although BR receptors have been intensively studied in Arabidopsis, the BR receptors in soybean remain largely unknown. Here, in addition to the known receptor gene Glyma06g15270 (GmBRI1a), we identified five putative BR receptor genes in the soybean genome: GmBRI1b, GmBRL1a, GmBRL1b, GmBRL2a, and GmBRL2b. Analysis of their expression patterns by quantitative real-time PCR showed that they are ubiquitously expressed in primary roots, lateral roots, stems, leaves, and hypocotyls. We used rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) to clone GmBRI1b (Glyma04g39160), and found that the predicted amino acid sequence of GmBRI1b showed high similarity to those of AtBRI1 and pea PsBRI1. Structural modeling of the ectodomain also demonstrated similarities between the BR receptors of soybean and Arabidopsis. GFP-fusion experiments verified that GmBRI1b localizes to the cell membrane. We also explored GmBRI1b function in Arabidopsis through complementation experiments. Ectopic over-expression of GmBRI1b in Arabidopsis BR receptor loss-of-function mutant (bri1-5 bak1-1D) restored hypocotyl growth in etiolated seedlings; increased the growth of stems, leaves, and siliques in light; and rescued the developmental defects in leaves of the bri1-6 mutant, and complemented the responses of BR biosynthesis-related genes in the bri1-5 bak1-D mutant grown in light. Bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that the six BR receptor genes in soybean resulted from three gene duplication events during evolution. Phylogenetic analysis classified the BR receptors in dicots and monocots into three subclades. Estimation of the synonymous (Ks) and the nonsynonymous substitution rate (Ka) and selection pressure (Ka/Ks) revealed that the Ka/Ks of BR receptor genes from dicots and monocots were less than 1.0, indicating that BR receptor genes in plants experienced purifying selection during evolution. PMID:27338344

  11. Adenovirus receptors and their implications in gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anurag; Li, Xiaoxin; Bangari, Dinesh S.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2010-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) have gained popularity as gene delivery vectors for therapeutic and prophylactic applications. Ad entry into host cells involves specific interactions between cell surface receptors and viral capsid proteins. Several cell surface molecules have been identified as receptors for Ad attachment and entry. Tissue tropism of Ad vectors is greatly influenced by their receptor usage. A variety of strategies have been investigated to modify Ad vector tropism by manipulating the receptor-interacting moieties. Many such strategies are aimed at targeting and/or detargeting of Ad vectors. In this review, we discuss the various cell surface molecules that are implicated as receptors for virus attachment and internalization. Special emphasis is given to Ad types that are utilized as gene delivery vectors. Various strategies to modify Ad tropism using the knowledge of Ad receptors are also discussed. PMID:19647886

  12. Adenosine A2a receptors and O2 sensing in development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Reduced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, via activation of adenylate kinase and the resulting exponential rise in the cellular AMP/ATP ratio, appears to be a critical factor underlying O2 sensing in many chemoreceptive tissues in mammals. The elevated AMP/ATP ratio, in turn, activates key enzymes that are involved in physiologic adjustments that tend to balance ATP supply and demand. An example is the conversion of AMP to adenosine via 5′-nucleotidase and the resulting activation of adenosine A2A receptors, which are involved in acute oxygen sensing by both carotid bodies and the brain. In fetal sheep, A2A receptors associated with carotid bodies trigger hypoxic cardiovascular chemoreflexes, while central A2A receptors mediate hypoxic inhibition of breathing and rapid eye movements. A2A receptors are also involved in hypoxic regulation of fetal endocrine systems, metabolism, and vascular tone. In developing lambs, A2A receptors play virtually no role in O2 sensing by the carotid bodies, but brain A2A receptors remain critically involved in the roll-off ventilatory response to hypoxia. In adult mammals, A2A receptors have been implicated in O2 sensing by carotid glomus cells, while central A2A receptors likely blunt hypoxic hyperventilation. In conclusion, A2A receptors are crucially involved in the transduction mechanisms of O2 sensing in fetal carotid bodies and brains. Postnatally, central A2A receptors remain key mediators of hypoxic respiratory depression, but they are less critical for O2 sensing in carotid chemoreceptors, particularly in developing lambs. PMID:21677265

  13. Expression of plasma membrane receptor genes during megakaryocyte development

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Sijie; Wang, Wenjing; Latchman, Yvette; Gao, Dayong; Aronow, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Megakaryocyte (MK) development is critically informed by plasma membrane-localized receptors that integrate a multiplicity of environmental cues. Given that the current understanding about receptors and ligands involved in megakaryocytopoiesis is based on single targets, we performed a genome-wide search to identify a plasma membrane receptome for developing MKs. We identified 40 transmembrane receptor genes as being upregulated during MK development. Seven of the 40 receptor-associated genes were selected to validate the dataset. These genes included: interleukin-9 receptor (IL9R), transforming growth factor, β receptor II (TGFBR2), interleukin-4 receptor (IL4R), colony stimulating factor-2 receptor-beta (CSFR2B), adiponectin receptor (ADIPOR2), thrombin receptor (F2R), and interleukin-21 receptor (IL21R). RNA and protein analyses confirmed their expression in primary human MKs. Matched ligands to IL9R, TGFBR2, IL4R, CSFR2B, and ADIPOR2 affected megakaryocytopoiesis. IL9 was unique in its ability to increase the number of MKs formed. In contrast, MK colony formation was inhibited by adiponectin, TGF-β, IL4, and GM-CSF. The thrombin-F2R axis affected platelet function, but not MK development, while IL21 had no apparent detectable effects. ADP-induced platelet aggregation was suppressed by IL9, TGF-β, IL4, and adiponectin. Overall, six of seven of the plasma membrane receptors were confirmed to have functional roles in MK and platelet biology. Also, results show for the first time that adiponectin plays a regulatory role in MK development. Together these data support a strong likelihood that the 40 transmembrane genes identified as being upregulated during MK development will be an important resource to the research community for deciphering the complex repertoire of environmental cues regulating megakaryocytopoiesis and/or platelet function. PMID:23321270

  14. Comparative Genomics of Natural Killer Cell Receptor Gene Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, James; Walter, Lutz; Trowsdale, John

    2005-01-01

    Many receptors on natural killer (NK) cells recognize major histocompatibility complex class I molecules in order to monitor unhealthy tissues, such as cells infected with viruses, and some tumors. Genes encoding families of NK receptors and related sequences are organized into two main clusters in humans: the natural killer complex on Chromosome 12p13.1, which encodes C-type lectin molecules, and the leukocyte receptor complex on Chromosome 19q13.4, which encodes immunoglobulin superfamily molecules. The composition of these gene clusters differs markedly between closely related species, providing evidence for rapid, lineage-specific expansions or contractions of sets of loci. The choice of NK receptor genes is polarized in the two species most studied, mouse and human. In mouse, the C-type lectin-related Ly49 gene family predominates. Conversely, the single Ly49 sequence is a pseudogene in humans, and the immunoglobulin superfamily KIR gene family is extensive. These different gene sets encode proteins that are comparable in function and genetic diversity, even though they have undergone species-specific expansions. Understanding the biological significance of this curious situation may be aided by studying which NK receptor genes are used in other vertebrates, especially in relation to species-specific differences in genes for major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. PMID:16132082

  15. 5-HT2A Serotonin Receptor Density in Adult Male Rats’ Hippocampus after Morphine-based Conditioned Place Preference

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Rabie; Jahanshahi, Mehrdad; Jameie, Seyed Behnamedin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A close interaction exists between the brain opioid and serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmitter systems. Brain neurotransmitter 5-HT plays an important role in the regulation of reward-related processing. However, a few studies have investigated the potential role of 5-HT2A receptors in this behavior. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess the influence of morphine and Conditioned Place Preference (CPP) on the density of 5-HT2A receptor in neurons of rat hippocampal formation. Methods: Morphine (10 mg/kg, IP) was injected in male Wistar rats for 7 consecutive days (intervention group), but control rats received just normal saline (1 mL/kg, IP). We used a hotplate test of analgesia to assess induction of tolerance to analgesic effects of morphine on days 1 and 8 of injections. Later, two groups of rats were sacrificed one day after 7 days of injections, their whole brains removed, and the striatum and PFC immediately dissected. Then, the NR1 gene expression was examined with a semi-quantitative RT-PCR method. Results: Our data showed that the maximum response was obtained with 2.5 mg/kg of morphine. The density of 5-HT2A receptor in different areas of the hippocampus increased significantly at sham-morphine and CPP groups (P<0.05). On the other hand, the CPP groups had more 5-HT2A receptors than sham-morphine groups and also the sham-morphine groups had more 5-HT2A receptors than the control groups. Conclusion: We concluded that the phenomenon of conditioned place preference induced by morphine can cause a significant increase in the number of serotonin 5-HT2A receptors in neurons of all areas of hippocampus. PMID:27563418

  16. Differential effects of ADORA2A gene variations in pre-attentive visual sensory memory subprocesses.

    PubMed

    Beste, Christian; Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Ness, Vanessa; Epplen, Jörg T; Arning, Larissa

    2012-08-01

    The ADORA2A gene encodes the adenosine A(2A) receptor that is highly expressed in the striatum where it plays a role in modulating glutamatergic and dopaminergic transmission. Glutamatergic signaling has been suggested to play a pivotal role in cognitive functions related to the pre-attentive processing of external stimuli. Yet, the precise molecular mechanism of these processes is poorly understood. Therefore, we aimed to investigate whether ADORA2A gene variation has modulating effects on visual pre-attentive sensory memory processing. Studying two polymorphisms, rs5751876 and rs2298383, in 199 healthy control subjects who performed a partial-report paradigm, we find that ADORA2A variation is associated with differences in the efficiency of pre-attentive sensory memory sub-processes. We show that especially the initial visual availability of stimulus information is rendered more efficiently in the homozygous rare genotype groups. Processes related to the transfer of information into working memory and the duration of visual sensory (iconic) memory are compromised in the homozygous rare genotype groups. Our results show a differential genotype-dependent modulation of pre-attentive sensory memory sub-processes. Hence, we assume that this modulation may be due to differential effects of increased adenosine A(2A) receptor signaling on glutamatergic transmission and striatal medium spiny neuron (MSN) interaction.

  17. 2A self-cleaving peptide-based multi-gene expression system in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuancheng; Wang, Feng; Wang, Riyuan; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental and applied studies of silkworms have entered the functional genomics era. Here, we report a multi-gene expression system (MGES) based on 2A self-cleaving peptide (2A), which regulates the simultaneous expression and cleavage of multiple gene targets in the silk gland of transgenic silkworms. First, a glycine-serine-glycine spacer (GSG) was found to significantly improve the cleavage efficiency of 2A. Then, the cleavage efficiency of six types of 2As with GSG was analyzed. The shortest porcine teschovirus-1 2A (P2A-GSG) exhibited the highest cleavage efficiency in all insect cell lines that we tested. Next, P2A-GSG successfully cleaved the artificial human serum albumin (66 kDa) linked with human acidic fibroblast growth factor (20.2 kDa) fusion genes and vitellogenin receptor fragment (196 kD) of silkworm linked with EGFP fusion genes, importantly, vitellogenin receptor protein was secreted to the outside of cells. Furthermore, P2A-GSG successfully mediated the simultaneous expression and cleavage of a DsRed and EGFP fusion gene in silk glands and caused secretion into the cocoon of transgenic silkworms using our sericin1 expression system. We predicted that the MGES would be an efficient tool for gene function research and innovative research on various functional silk materials in medicine, cosmetics, and other biomedical areas.

  18. 2A self-cleaving peptide-based multi-gene expression system in the silkworm Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuancheng; Wang, Feng; Wang, Riyuan; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental and applied studies of silkworms have entered the functional genomics era. Here, we report a multi-gene expression system (MGES) based on 2A self-cleaving peptide (2A), which regulates the simultaneous expression and cleavage of multiple gene targets in the silk gland of transgenic silkworms. First, a glycine-serine-glycine spacer (GSG) was found to significantly improve the cleavage efficiency of 2A. Then, the cleavage efficiency of six types of 2As with GSG was analyzed. The shortest porcine teschovirus-1 2A (P2A-GSG) exhibited the highest cleavage efficiency in all insect cell lines that we tested. Next, P2A-GSG successfully cleaved the artificial human serum albumin (66 kDa) linked with human acidic fibroblast growth factor (20.2 kDa) fusion genes and vitellogenin receptor fragment (196 kD) of silkworm linked with EGFP fusion genes, importantly, vitellogenin receptor protein was secreted to the outside of cells. Furthermore, P2A-GSG successfully mediated the simultaneous expression and cleavage of a DsRed and EGFP fusion gene in silk glands and caused secretion into the cocoon of transgenic silkworms using our sericin1 expression system. We predicted that the MGES would be an efficient tool for gene function research and innovative research on various functional silk materials in medicine, cosmetics, and other biomedical areas. PMID:26537835

  19. Neuropeptide Y receptor gene y6: multiple deaths or resurrections?

    PubMed

    Starbäck, P; Wraith, A; Eriksson, H; Larhammar, D

    2000-10-14

    The neuropeptide Y family of G-protein-coupled receptors consists of five cloned members in mammals. Four genes give rise to functional receptors in all mammals investigated. The y6 gene is a pseudogene in human and pig and is absent in rat, but generates a functional receptor in rabbit and mouse and probably in the collared peccary (Pecari tajacu), a distant relative of the pig family. We report here that the guinea pig y6 gene has a highly distorted nucleotide sequence with multiple frame-shift mutations. One evolutionary scenario may suggest that y6 was inactivated before the divergence of the mammalian orders and subsequently resurrected in some lineages. However, the pseudogene mutations seem to be distinct in human, pig, and guinea pig, arguing for separate inactivation events. In either case, the y6 gene has a quite unusual evolutionary history with multiple independent deaths or resurrections.

  20. Karyopherin alpha2: a control step of glucose-sensitive gene expression in hepatic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Guillemain, Ghislaine; Muñoz-Alonso, Maria J; Cassany, Aurélia; Loizeau, Martine; Faussat, Anne-Marie; Burnol, Anne-Françoise; Leturque, Armelle

    2002-01-01

    Glucose is required for an efficient expression of the glucose transporter GLUT2 and other genes. We have shown previously that the intracytoplasmic loop of GLUT2 can divert a signal, resulting in the stimulation of glucose-sensitive gene transcription. In the present study, by interaction with the GLUT2 loop, we have cloned the rat karyopherin alpha2, a receptor involved in nuclear import. The specificity of the binding was restricted to GLUT2, and not GLUT1 or GLUT4, and to karyopherin alpha2, not alpha1. When rendered irreversible by a cross-linking agent, this transitory interaction was detected in vivo in hepatocytes. A role for karyopherin alpha2 in the transcription of two glucose-sensitive genes was investigated by transfection of native and inactive green fluorescent protein-karyopherin alpha2 in GLUT2-expressing hepatoma cells. The amount of inactive karyopherin alpha2 receptor reduced, in a dose-dependent manner, the GLUT2 and liver pyruvate kinase mRNA levels by competition with endogenous active receptor. In contrast, the overexpression of karyopherin alpha2 did not significantly stimulate GLUT2 and liver pyruvate kinase mRNA accumulation in green fluorescent protein-sorted cells. The present study suggests that, in concert with glucose metabolism, karyopherin alpha2 transmits a signal to the nucleus to regulate glucose-sensitive gene expression. The transitory tethering of karyopherin alpha2 to GLUT2 at the plasma membrane might indicate that the receptor can load the cargo to be imported locally. PMID:11988093

  1. NMDA receptor gene variations as modifiers in Huntington disease: a replication study.

    PubMed

    Saft, Carsten; Epplen, Jörg T; Wieczorek, Stefan; Landwehrmeyer, G Bernhard; Roos, Raymund A C; de Yebenes, Justo Garcia; Dose, Matthias; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Craufurd, David; Arning, Larissa

    2011-10-04

    Several candidate modifier genes which, in addition to the pathogenic CAG repeat expansion, influence the age at onset (AO) in Huntington disease (HD) have already been described. The aim of this study was to replicate association of variations in the N-methyl D-aspartate receptor subtype genes GRIN2A and GRIN2B in the "REGISTRY" cohort from the European Huntington Disease Network (EHDN). The analyses did replicate the association reported between the GRIN2A rs2650427 variation and AO in the entire cohort. Yet, when subjects were stratified by AO subtypes, we found nominally significant evidence for an association of the GRIN2A rs1969060 variation and the GRIN2B rs1806201 variation. These findings further implicate the N-methyl D-aspartate receptor subtype genes as loci containing variation associated with AO in HD.

  2. Btn2a2, a T cell immunomodulatory molecule coregulated with MHC class II genes

    PubMed Central

    Sarter, Kerstin; Leimgruber, Elisa; Gobet, Florian; Agrawal, Vishal; Dunand-Sauthier, Isabelle; Barras, Emmanuèle; Mastelic-Gavillet, Béatris; Kamath, Arun; Fontannaz, Paola; Guéry, Leslie; Duraes, Fernanda do Valle; Lippens, Carla; Ravn, Ulla; Santiago-Raber, Marie-Laure; Magistrelli, Giovanni; Fischer, Nicolas; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Hugues, Stéphanie

    2016-01-01

    Evidence has recently emerged that butyrophilins, which are members of the extended B7 family of co-stimulatory molecules, have diverse functions in the immune system. We found that the human and mouse genes encoding butyrophilin-2A2 (BTN2A2) are regulated by the class II trans-activator and regulatory factor X, two transcription factors dedicated to major histocompatibility complex class II expression, suggesting a role in T cell immunity. To address this, we generated Btn2a2-deficient mice. Btn2a2−/− mice exhibited enhanced effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, impaired CD4+ regulatory T cell induction, potentiated antitumor responses, and exacerbated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Altered immune responses were attributed to Btn2a2 deficiency in antigen-presenting cells rather than T cells or nonhematopoietic cells. These results provide the first genetic evidence that BTN2A2 is a co-inhibitory molecule that modulates T cell–mediated immunity. PMID:26809444

  3. Dopamine receptor gene expression by enkephalin neurons in rat forebrain

    SciTech Connect

    Le Moine, C.; Normand, E.; Guitteny, A.F.; Fouque, B.; Teoule, R.; Bloch, B. )

    1990-01-01

    In situ hybridization experiments were performed with brain sections from normal, control and haloperidol-treated rats to identify and map the cells expressing the D2 dopamine receptor gene. D2 receptor mRNA was detected with radioactive or biotinylated oligonucleotide probes. D2 receptor mRNA was present in glandular cells of the pituitary intermediate lobe and in neurons of the substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, and forebrain, especially in caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, and piriform cortex. Hybridization with D2 and preproenkephalin A probes in adjacent sections, as well as combined hybridization with the two probes in the same sections, demonstrated that all detectable enkephalin neurons in the striatum contained the D2 receptor mRNA. Large neurons in caudate putamen, which were unlabeled with the preproenkephalin A probe and which may have been cholinergic, also expressed the D2 receptor gene. Haloperidol treatment (14 or 21 days) provoked an increase in mRNA content for D2 receptor and preproenkephalin A in the striatum. This suggests that the increase in D2 receptor number observed after haloperidol treatment is due to increased activity of the D2 gene. These results indicate that in the striatum, the enkephalin neurons are direct targets for dopamine liberated from mesostriatal neurons.

  4. Lysergic acid diethylamide-induced Fos expression in rat brain: role of serotonin-2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Gresch, P J; Strickland, L V; Sanders-Bush, E

    2002-01-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) produces altered mood and hallucinations in humans and binds with high affinity to serotonin-2A (5-HT(2A)) receptors. Although LSD interacts with other receptors, the activation of 5-HT(2A) receptors is thought to mediate the hallucinogenic properties of LSD. The goal of this study was to identify the brain sites activated by LSD and to determine the influence of 5-HT(2A) receptors in this activation. Rats were pretreated with the 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist MDL 100907 (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle 30 min prior to LSD (500 microg/kg, i.p.) administration and killed 3 h later. Brain tissue was examined for Fos protein expression by immunohistochemistry. LSD administration produced a five- to eight-fold increase in Fos-like immunoreactivity in medial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and central nucleus of amygdala. However, in dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens no increase in Fos-like immunoreactivity was observed. Pretreatment with MDL 100907 completely blocked LSD-induced Fos-like immunoreactivity in medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex, but only partially blocked LSD-induced Fos-like immunoreactivity in amygdala. Double-labeled immunohistochemistry revealed that LSD did not induce Fos-like immunoreactivity in cortical cells expressing 5-HT(2A) receptors, suggesting an indirect activation of cortical neurons. These results indicate that the LSD activation of medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex is mediated by 5-HT(2A) receptors, whereas in amygdala 5-HT(2A) receptor activation is a component of the response. These findings support the hypothesis that the medial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and perhaps the amygdala, are important regions involved in the production of hallucinations.

  5. Lack of tolerance to motor stimulant effects of a selective adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Halldner, L; Lozza, G; Lindström, K; Fredholm, B B

    2000-10-20

    It is well known that tolerance develops to the actions of caffeine, which acts as an antagonist on adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors. Since selective adenosine A(2A) antagonists have been proposed as adjuncts to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) therapy in Parkinson's disease we wanted to examine if tolerance also develops to the selective A(2A) receptor antagonist 5-amino-7-(2-phenylethyl)-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2, 4-triazolo [1,5-c]pyrimidine (SCH 58261). SCH 58261 (0.1 and 7.5 mg/kg) increased basal locomotion and the motor stimulation afforded by apomorphine. Neither effect was subject to tolerance following long-term treatment with the same doses given intraperitoneally twice daily. There were no adaptive changes in A(1) and A(2A) adenosine receptors or their corresponding messenger RNA or in dopamine D(1) or D(2) receptors. These results demonstrate that the tolerance that develops to caffeine is not secondary to its inhibition of adenosine A(2A) receptors. The results also offer hope that long-term treatment with an adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist may be possible in man.

  6. Reduced 5-HT2A receptor signaling following selective bilateral amygdala damage

    PubMed Central

    Schlaepfer, Thomas E.; Matusch, Andreas; Reich, Harald; Shah, Nadim J.; Zilles, Karl; Maier, Wolfgang; Bauer, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Neurobiological evidence implicates the amygdala as well as serotonergic (serotonin, 5-HT) signaling via postsynaptic 5-HT2A receptors as essential substrates of anxiety behaviors. Assuming a functional interdependence of these substrates, we hypothesized that a low-fear behavioral phenotype due to bilateral lesion of the amygdala would be associated with significant 5-HT2A receptor changes. Thus, we used [18F]altanserin positron emission tomography (PET) referenced to radioligand plasma levels and corrected for partial volume effects to quantify the spatial distribution of 5-HT2A receptor binding potential (BPP) in a rare patient with Urbach–Wiethe disease and selective bilateral amygdala calcification damage relative to 10 healthy control subjects. Consistent with our a priori hypothesis, we observed a 70% global decrease in 5-HT2A receptor BPP in the Urbach–Wiethe patient relative to controls. Thus, brain abnormalities in this patient are not restricted to the amygdala, but extend to overall 5-HT neurotransmission via 5-HT2A receptors. Our findings provide important insights into the molecular architecture of human anxiety behaviors and suggest the 5-HT2A receptor as a promising pharmacological target to control pathological anxiety. PMID:19015089

  7. Adenosine A2A Receptors Modulate Acute Injury and Neuroinflammation in Brain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Pedata, Felicita; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Coppi, Elisabetta; Dettori, Ilaria; Maraula, Giovanna; Cellai, Lucrezia; Melani, Alessia

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular concentration of adenosine in the brain increases dramatically during ischemia. Adenosine A2A receptor is expressed in neurons and glial cells and in inflammatory cells (lymphocytes and granulocytes). Recently, adenosine A2A receptor emerged as a potential therapeutic attractive target in ischemia. Ischemia is a multifactorial pathology characterized by different events evolving in the time. After ischemia the early massive increase of extracellular glutamate is followed by activation of resident immune cells, that is, microglia, and production or activation of inflammation mediators. Proinflammatory cytokines, which upregulate cell adhesion molecules, exert an important role in promoting recruitment of leukocytes that in turn promote expansion of the inflammatory response in ischemic tissue. Protracted neuroinflammation is now recognized as the predominant mechanism of secondary brain injury progression. A2A receptors present on central cells and on blood cells account for important effects depending on the time-related evolution of the pathological condition. Evidence suggests that A2A receptor antagonists provide early protection via centrally mediated control of excessive excitotoxicity, while A2A receptor agonists provide protracted protection by controlling massive blood cell infiltration in the hours and days after ischemia. Focus on inflammatory responses provides for adenosine A2A receptor agonists a wide therapeutic time-window of hours and even days after stroke. PMID:25165414

  8. 5-HT2A receptor activation is necessary for CO2-induced arousal

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Haleigh R.; MacAskill, Amanda; Richerson, George B.

    2015-01-01

    Hypercapnia-induced arousal from sleep is an important protective mechanism pertinent to a number of diseases. Most notably among these are the sudden infant death syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. Serotonin (5-HT) plays a significant role in hypercapnia-induced arousal. The mechanism of 5-HT's role in this protective response is unknown. Here we sought to identify the specific 5-HT receptor subtype(s) involved in this response. Wild-type mice were pretreated with antagonists against 5-HT receptor subtypes, as well as antagonists against adrenergic, cholinergic, histaminergic, dopaminergic, and orexinergic receptors before challenge with inspired CO2 or hypoxia. Antagonists of 5-HT2A receptors dose-dependently blocked CO2-induced arousal. The 5-HT2C receptor antagonist, RS-102221, and the 5-HT1A receptor agonist, 8-OH-DPAT, attenuated but did not completely block CO2-induced arousal. Blockade of non-5-HT receptors did not affect CO2-induced arousal. None of these drugs had any effect on hypoxia-induced arousal. 5-HT2 receptor agonists were given to mice in which 5-HT neurons had been genetically eliminated during embryonic life (Lmx1bf/f/p) and which are known to lack CO2-induced arousal. Application of agonists to 5-HT2A, but not 5-HT2C, receptors, dose-dependently restored CO2-induced arousal in these mice. These data identify the 5-HT2A receptor as an important mediator of CO2-induced arousal and suggest that, while 5-HT neurons can be independently activated to drive CO2-induced arousal, in the absence of 5-HT neurons and endogenous 5-HT, 5-HT receptor activation can act in a permissive fashion to facilitate CO2-induced arousal via another as yet unidentified chemosensor system. PMID:25925320

  9. The Mouse Solitary Odorant Receptor Gene Promoters as Models for the Study of Odorant Receptor Gene Choice

    PubMed Central

    Degl'Innocenti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background In vertebrates, several anatomical regions located within the nasal cavity mediate olfaction. Among these, the main olfactory epithelium detects most conventional odorants. Olfactory sensory neurons, provided with cilia exposed to the air, detect volatile chemicals via an extremely large family of seven-transmembrane chemoreceptors named odorant receptors. Their genes are expressed in a monogenic and monoallelic fashion: a single allele of a single odorant receptor gene is transcribed in a given mature neuron, through a still uncharacterized molecular mechanism known as odorant receptor gene choice. Aim Odorant receptor genes are typically arranged in genomic clusters, but a few are isolated (we call them solitary) from the others within a region broader than 1 Mb upstream and downstream with respect to their transcript's coordinates. The study of clustered genes is problematic, because of redundancy and ambiguities in their regulatory elements: we propose to use the solitary genes as simplified models to understand odorant receptor gene choice. Procedures Here we define number and identity of the solitary genes in the mouse genome (C57BL/6J), and assess the conservation of the solitary status in some mammalian orthologs. Furthermore, we locate their putative promoters, predict their homeodomain binding sites (commonly present in the promoters of odorant receptor genes) and compare candidate promoter sequences with those of wild-caught mice. We also provide expression data from histological sections. Results In the mouse genome there are eight intact solitary genes: Olfr19 (M12), Olfr49, Olfr266, Olfr267, Olfr370, Olfr371, Olfr466, Olfr1402; five are conserved as solitary in rat. These genes are all expressed in the main olfactory epithelium of three-day-old mice. The C57BL/6J candidate promoter of Olfr370 has considerably varied compared to its wild-type counterpart. Within the putative promoter for Olfr266 a homeodomain binding site is predicted. As a

  10. On the role of 5-HT(1A) receptor gene in behavioral effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Vladimir S; Kondaurova, Elena M; Bazovkina, Daria V; Tsybko, Anton S; Il'chibaeva, Tatyana V; Popova, Nina K

    2014-08-01

    Experiments were made on a congenic AKR.CBA-D13Mit76C (76C) mouse strain created by transferring a chromosome 13 fragment containing the 5-HT1A receptor gene from a CBA strain to an AKR background. It was shown that 76C mice differed from AKR mice by decreased 5-HT1A receptor and tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (tph-2) genes expression in the midbrain. Functional activity of 5-HT2A receptors and 5-HT(2A) receptor mRNA levels in the midbrain and hippocampus of 76C mice were decreased compared with AKR mice. Central brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) administration (300 ng i.c.v.) reduced 5-HT1A and 5-HT(2A) receptor mRNA levels in the frontal cortex and tph-2 mRNA level in the midbrain of AKR mice. However, BDNF failed to produce any effect on the expression of 5-HT(1A) , 5-HT(2A) , and tph-2 genes in 76C mice but decreased functional activity of 5-HT(2A) receptors in 76C mice and increased it in AKR mice. BDNF restored social deficiency in 76C mice but produced asocial behavior (aggressive attacks towards young mice) in AKR mice. The data indicate that a small genetic variation altered the response to BDNF and show an important role of 5-HT(1A) receptor gene in the 5-HT system response to BDNF treatment and in behavioral effects of BDNF.

  11. Genes involved in Drosophila glutamate receptor expression and localization

    PubMed Central

    Liebl, Faith LW; Featherstone, David E

    2005-01-01

    Background A clear picture of the mechanisms controlling glutamate receptor expression, localization, and stability remains elusive, possibly due to an incomplete understanding of the proteins involved. We screened transposon mutants generated by the ongoing Drosophila Gene Disruption Project in an effort to identify the different types of genes required for glutamate receptor cluster development. Results To enrich for non-silent insertions with severe disruptions in glutamate receptor clustering, we identified and focused on homozygous lethal mutants in a collection of 2185 BG and KG transposon mutants generated by the BDGP Gene Disruption Project. 202 lethal mutant lines were individually dissected to expose glutamatergic neuromuscular junctions, stained using antibodies that recognize neuronal membrane and the glutamate receptor subunit GluRIIA, and viewed using laser-scanning confocal microscopy. We identified 57 mutants with qualitative differences in GluRIIA expression and/or localization. 84% of mutants showed loss of receptors and/or clusters; 16% of mutants showed an increase in receptors. Insertion loci encode a variety of protein types, including cytoskeleton proteins and regulators, kinases, phosphatases, ubiquitin ligases, mucins, cell adhesion proteins, transporters, proteins controlling gene expression and protein translation, and proteins of unknown/novel function. Expression pattern analyses and complementation tests, however, suggest that any single mutant – even if a mutant gene is uniquely tagged – must be interpreted with caution until the mutation is validated genetically and phenotypically. Conclusion Our study identified 57 transposon mutants with qualitative differences in glutamate receptor expression and localization. Despite transposon tagging of every insertion locus, extensive validation is needed before one can have confidence in the role of any individual gene. Alternatively, one can focus on the types of genes identified, rather

  12. α(2A) adrenergic receptor promotes amyloidogenesis through disrupting APP-SorLA interaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunjia; Peng, Yin; Che, Pulin; Gannon, Mary; Liu, Yin; Li, Ling; Bu, Guojun; van Groen, Thomas; Jiao, Kai; Wang, Qin

    2014-12-01

    Accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides in the brain is the key pathogenic factor driving Alzheimer's disease (AD). Endocytic sorting of amyloid precursor protein (APP) mediated by the vacuolar protein sorting (Vps10) family of receptors plays a decisive role in controlling the outcome of APP proteolytic processing and Aβ generation. Here we report for the first time to our knowledge that this process is regulated by a G protein-coupled receptor, the α(2A) adrenergic receptor (α(2A)AR). Genetic deficiency of the α(2A)AR significantly reduces, whereas stimulation of this receptor enhances, Aβ generation and AD-related pathology. Activation of α(2A)AR signaling disrupts APP interaction with a Vps10 family receptor, sorting-related receptor with A repeat (SorLA), in cells and in the mouse brain. As a consequence, activation of α(2A)AR reduces Golgi localization of APP and concurrently promotes APP distribution in endosomes and cleavage by β secretase. The α(2A)AR is a key component of the brain noradrenergic system. Profound noradrenergic dysfunction occurs consistently in patients at the early stages of AD. α(2A)AR-promoted Aβ generation provides a novel mechanism underlying the connection between noradrenergic dysfunction and AD. Our study also suggests α(2A)AR as a previously unappreciated therapeutic target for AD. Significantly, pharmacological blockade of the α(2A)AR by a clinically used antagonist reduces AD-related pathology and ameliorates cognitive deficits in an AD transgenic model, suggesting that repurposing clinical α(2A)R antagonists would be an effective therapeutic strategy for AD.

  13. Androgen receptor gene mutation, rearrangement, polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Eisermann, Kurtis; Wang, Dan; Jing, Yifeng; Pascal, Laura E; Wang, Zhou

    2013-09-01

    Genetic aberrations of the androgen receptor (AR) caused by mutations, rearrangements, and polymorphisms result in a mutant receptor that has varied functions compared to wild type AR. To date, over 1,000 mutations have been reported in the AR with most of these being associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). While mutations of AR associated with prostate cancer occur less often in early stage localized disease, mutations in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients treated with anti-androgens occur more frequently with 10-30% of these patients having some form of mutation in the AR. Resistance to anti-androgen therapy usually results from gain-of-function mutations in the LBD such as is seen with bicalutamide and more recently with enzalutamide (MDV3100). Thus, it is crucial to investigate these new AR mutations arising from drug resistance to anti-androgens and other small molecule pharmacological agents.

  14. Adenosine A2A receptor deficiency up-regulates cystatin F expression in white matter lesions induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wei; Ran, Hong; Zhou, Zhujuan; He, Qifen; Zheng, Jian

    2012-01-01

    In previous studies, we have shown that the inactivation of the adenosine A2A receptor exacerbates chronic cerebral hypoperfusion-induced white matter lesions (WMLs) by enhancing neuroinflammatory responses. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the effect of the adenosine A2A receptor remains unknown. Recent studies have demonstrated that cystatin F, a potent endogenous cysteine protease inhibitor, is selectively expressed in immune cells in association with inflammatory demyelination in central nervous system diseases. To understand the expression of cystatin F and its potential role in the effect of A2A receptor on WMLs induced through chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, we investigated cystatin F expression in the WMLs of A2A receptor gene knockout mice, the littermate wild-type mice and wild-type mice treated daily with the A2A receptor agonist CGS21680 or both CGS21680 and A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. The results of quantitative-PCR and western blot analysis revealed that cystatin F mRNA and protein expression were significantly up-regulated in the WMLs after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. In addition, cystatin F expression in the corpus callosum was significantly increased in A2A receptor gene knockout mice and markedly decreased in mice treated with CGS21680 on both the mRNA and protein levels. Additionally, SCH58261 counteracted the attenuation of cystatin F expression produced by CGS21680 after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Moreover, double immunofluorescence staining revealed that cystatin F was co-localized with the activated microglia marker CD11b. In conclusion, the cystatin F expression in the activated microglia is closely associated with the effect of the A2A receptors, which may be related to the neuroinflammatory responses occurring during the pathological process.

  15. Mouse T-cell receptor variable gene segment families

    SciTech Connect

    Arden, B.; Kabelitz, D.; Clark, S.P.; Mak, T.W.

    1995-10-01

    All mouse T-cell receptor {alpha}/{delta}, {beta}, and {gamma} variable (Tcra/d-, b-, and g-V) gene segments were aligned to compare the sequences with one another, to group them into subfamilies, and to derive a name which complies with the standard nomenclature. it was necessary to change the names of some V gene segments because they conflicted with those of other segments. The traditional classification into subfamilies was re-evaluated using a much larger pool of sequences. In the mouse, most V gene segments can be grouped into subfamilies of closely related genes with significantly less similarity between different subfamilies. 118 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine(2A) receptor activation suppresses tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced inflammation with extraordinary potency.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bangning; Becnel, Jaime; Zerfaoui, Mourad; Rohatgi, Rasika; Boulares, A Hamid; Nichols, Charles D

    2008-11-01

    The G protein-coupled serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)(2A) receptor is primarily recognized for its role in brain neurotransmission, where it mediates a wide variety of functions, including certain aspects of cognition. However, there is significant expression of this receptor in peripheral tissues, where its importance is largely unknown. We have now discovered that activation of 5-HT(2A) receptors in primary aortic smooth muscle cells provides a previously unknown and extremely potent inhibition of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-mediated inflammation. 5-HT(2A) receptor stimulation with the agonist (R)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane [(R)-DOI] rapidly inhibits a variety of TNF-alpha-mediated proinflammatory markers, including intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), and interleukin (IL)-6 gene expression, nitric-oxide synthase activity, and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappaB, with IC(50) values of only 10 to 20 pM. It is significant that proinflammatory markers can also be inhibited by (R)-DOI hours after treatment with TNF-alpha. With the exception of a few natural toxins, no current drugs or small molecule therapeutics demonstrate a comparable potency for any physiological effect. TNF-alpha-mediated inflammatory pathways have been strongly implicated in a number of diseases, including atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, type II diabetes, depression, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease. Our results indicate that activation of 5-HT(2A) receptors represents a novel, and extraordinarily potent, potential therapeutic avenue for the treatment of disorders involving TNF-alpha-mediated inflammation. Note that because (R)-DOI can significantly inhibit the effects of TNF-alpha many hours after the administration of TNF-alpha, potential therapies could be aimed not only at preventing inflammation but also treating inflammatory injury that has already occurred or is ongoing. PMID

  17. Activated astrocytes display increased 5-HT2a receptor expression in pathological states.

    PubMed

    Wu, C; Singh, S K; Dias, P; Kumar, S; Mann, D M

    1999-08-01

    In human brain tissues from patients dying with cerebral infarction, hypertensive encephalopathy, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, frontotemporal dementia, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease there is an activation of astrocytes. Such activated astrocytes display GFAP and strong 5-HT(2A), but not 5-HT(2B) or 5-HT(2C), receptor immunoreactivity; this 5-HT(2A) reaction has not been observed in normal, nonactivated astrocytes. It is suggested that an up-regulation of 5-HT(2A) receptors may be part of an early response reaction in astrocytes, possibly designed to maintain homeostasis or to induce secondary message pathways involving trophic factors or glycogenolysis. PMID:10415157

  18. Impaired Discrimination Learning in Mice Lacking the NMDA Receptor NR2A Subunit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brigman, Jonathan L.; Feyder, Michael; Saksida, Lisa M.; Bussey, Timothy J.; Mishina, Masayoshi; Holmes, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) mediate certain forms of synaptic plasticity and learning. We used a touchscreen system to assess NR2A subunit knockout mice (KO) for (1) pairwise visual discrimination and reversal learning and (2) acquisition and extinction of an instrumental response requiring no pairwise discrimination. NR2A KO mice…

  19. Serotonin 2a Receptor and Serotonin 1a Receptor Interact Within the Medial Prefrontal Cortex During Recognition Memory in Mice.

    PubMed

    Morici, Juan F; Ciccia, Lucia; Malleret, Gaël; Gingrich, Jay A; Bekinschtein, Pedro; Weisstaub, Noelia V

    2015-01-01

    Episodic memory, can be defined as the memory for unique events. The serotonergic system one of the main neuromodulatory systems in the brain appears to play a role in it. The serotonin 2a receptor (5-HT2aR) one of the principal post-synaptic receptors for 5-HT in the brain, is involved in neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders associated with memory deficits. Recognition memory can be defined as the ability to recognize if a particular event or item was previously encountered and is thus considered, under certain conditions, a form of episodic memory. As human data suggest that a constitutively decrease of 5-HT2A signaling might affect episodic memory performance we decided to compare the performance of mice with disrupted 5-HT2aR signaling (htr2a (-/-)) with wild type (htr2a (+/+)) littermates in different recognition memory and working memory tasks that differed in the level of proactive interference. We found that ablation of 5-HT2aR signaling throughout development produces a deficit in tasks that cannot be solved by single item strategy suggesting that 5-HT2aR signaling is involved in interference resolution. We also found that in the absence of 5-HT2aR signaling serotonin has a deleterious effect on recognition memory retrieval through the activation of 5-HT1aR in the medial prefrontal cortex. PMID:26779016

  20. Adenosine A2A receptors are necessary and sufficient to trigger memory impairment in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Pagnussat, N; Almeida, A S; Marques, D M; Nunes, F; Chenet, G C; Botton, P H S; Mioranzza, S; Loss, C M; Cunha, R A; Porciúncula, L O

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Caffeine (a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist) prevents memory deficits in aging and Alzheimer’s disease, an effect mimicked by adenosine A2A receptor, but not A1 receptor, antagonists. Hence, we investigated the effects of adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists on memory performance and scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice. Experimental Approach We determined whether A2A receptors are necessary for the emergence of memory impairments induced by scopolamine and whether A2A receptor activation triggers memory deficits in naïve mice, using three tests to assess short-term memory, namely the object recognition task, inhibitory avoidance and modified Y-maze. Key Results Scopolamine (1.0 mg·kg−1, i.p.) impaired short-term memory performance in all three tests and this scopolamine-induced amnesia was prevented by the A2A receptor antagonist (SCH 58261, 0.1–1.0 mg·kg−1, i.p.) and by the A1 receptor antagonist (DPCPX, 0.2–5.0 mg·kg−1, i.p.), except in the modified Y-maze where only SCH58261 was effective. Both antagonists were devoid of effects on memory or locomotion in naïve rats. Notably, the activation of A2A receptors with CGS 21680 (0.1–0.5 mg·kg−1, i.p.) before the training session was sufficient to trigger memory impairment in the three tests in naïve mice, and this effect was prevented by SCH 58261 (1.0 mg·kg−1, i.p.). Furthermore, i.c.v. administration of CGS 21680 (50 nmol) also impaired recognition memory in the object recognition task. Conclusions and Implications These results show that A2A receptors are necessary and sufficient to trigger memory impairment and further suggest that A1 receptors might also be selectively engaged to control the cholinergic-driven memory impairment. PMID:25939452

  1. Receptor editing and marginal zone B cell development are regulated by the helix-loop-helix protein, E2A.

    PubMed

    Quong, Melanie W; Martensson, Annica; Langerak, Anton W; Rivera, Richard R; Nemazee, David; Murre, Cornelis

    2004-04-19

    Previous studies have indicated that the E2A gene products are required to initiate B lineage development. Here, we demonstrate that E2A(+/-) B cells that express an autoreactive B cell receptor fail to mature due in part to an inability to activate secondary immunoglobulin (Ig) light chain gene rearrangement. Both RAG1/2 gene expression and RS deletion are severely defective in E2A(+/-) mice. Additionally, we demonstrate that E2A(+/-) mice show an increase in the proportion of marginal zone B cells with a concomitant decrease in the proportion of follicular B cells. In contrast, Id3-deficient splenocytes show a decline in the proportion of marginal zone B cells. Based on these observations, we propose that E-protein activity regulates secondary Ig gene rearrangement at the immature B cell stage and contributes to cell fate determination of marginal zone B cells. Additionally, we propose a model in which E-proteins enforce the developmental checkpoint at the immature B cell stage.

  2. Serotonin 2a Receptor and Serotonin 1a Receptor Interact Within the Medial Prefrontal Cortex During Recognition Memory in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Morici, Juan F.; Ciccia, Lucia; Malleret, Gaël; Gingrich, Jay A.; Bekinschtein, Pedro; Weisstaub, Noelia V.

    2015-01-01

    Episodic memory, can be defined as the memory for unique events. The serotonergic system one of the main neuromodulatory systems in the brain appears to play a role in it. The serotonin 2a receptor (5-HT2aR) one of the principal post-synaptic receptors for 5-HT in the brain, is involved in neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders associated with memory deficits. Recognition memory can be defined as the ability to recognize if a particular event or item was previously encountered and is thus considered, under certain conditions, a form of episodic memory. As human data suggest that a constitutively decrease of 5-HT2A signaling might affect episodic memory performance we decided to compare the performance of mice with disrupted 5-HT2aR signaling (htr2a−/−) with wild type (htr2a+/+) littermates in different recognition memory and working memory tasks that differed in the level of proactive interference. We found that ablation of 5-HT2aR signaling throughout development produces a deficit in tasks that cannot be solved by single item strategy suggesting that 5-HT2aR signaling is involved in interference resolution. We also found that in the absence of 5-HT2aR signaling serotonin has a deleterious effect on recognition memory retrieval through the activation of 5-HT1aR in the medial prefrontal cortex. PMID:26779016

  3. Gene Expression Switching of Receptor Subunits in Human Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Shira, Ossnat; Maor, Ronnie; Chechik, Gal

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic receptors in the human brain consist of multiple protein subunits, many of which have multiple variants, coded by different genes, and are differentially expressed across brain regions and developmental stages. The brain can tune the electrophysiological properties of synapses to regulate plasticity and information processing by switching from one protein variant to another. Such condition-dependent variant switch during development has been demonstrated in several neurotransmitter systems including NMDA and GABA. Here we systematically detect pairs of receptor-subunit variants that switch during the lifetime of the human brain by analyzing postmortem expression data collected in a population of donors at various ages and brain regions measured using microarray and RNA-seq. To further detect variant pairs that co-vary across subjects, we present a method to quantify age-corrected expression correlation in face of strong temporal trends. This is achieved by computing the correlations in the residual expression beyond a cubic-spline model of the population temporal trend, and can be seen as a nonlinear version of partial correlations. Using these methods, we detect multiple new pairs of context dependent variants. For instance, we find a switch from GLRA2 to GLRA3 that differs from the known switch in the rat. We also detect an early switch from HTR1A to HTR5A whose trends are negatively correlated and find that their age-corrected expression is strongly positively correlated. Finally, we observe that GRIN2B switch to GRIN2A occurs mostly during embryonic development, presumably earlier than observed in rodents. These results provide a systematic map of developmental switching in the neurotransmitter systems of the human brain. PMID:26636753

  4. Gene Expression Switching of Receptor Subunits in Human Brain Development.

    PubMed

    Bar-Shira, Ossnat; Maor, Ronnie; Chechik, Gal

    2015-12-01

    Synaptic receptors in the human brain consist of multiple protein subunits, many of which have multiple variants, coded by different genes, and are differentially expressed across brain regions and developmental stages. The brain can tune the electrophysiological properties of synapses to regulate plasticity and information processing by switching from one protein variant to another. Such condition-dependent variant switch during development has been demonstrated in several neurotransmitter systems including NMDA and GABA. Here we systematically detect pairs of receptor-subunit variants that switch during the lifetime of the human brain by analyzing postmortem expression data collected in a population of donors at various ages and brain regions measured using microarray and RNA-seq. To further detect variant pairs that co-vary across subjects, we present a method to quantify age-corrected expression correlation in face of strong temporal trends. This is achieved by computing the correlations in the residual expression beyond a cubic-spline model of the population temporal trend, and can be seen as a nonlinear version of partial correlations. Using these methods, we detect multiple new pairs of context dependent variants. For instance, we find a switch from GLRA2 to GLRA3 that differs from the known switch in the rat. We also detect an early switch from HTR1A to HTR5A whose trends are negatively correlated and find that their age-corrected expression is strongly positively correlated. Finally, we observe that GRIN2B switch to GRIN2A occurs mostly during embryonic development, presumably earlier than observed in rodents. These results provide a systematic map of developmental switching in the neurotransmitter systems of the human brain.

  5. Expression of serotonin receptor genes in cranial ganglia.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Naohiro; Ohmoto, Makoto; Yamamoto, Kurumi; Kurokawa, Azusa; Narukawa, Masataka; Ishimaru, Yoshiro; Misaka, Takumi; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Abe, Keiko

    2016-03-23

    Taste cells release neurotransmitters to gustatory neurons to transmit chemical information they received. Sweet, umami, and bitter taste cells use ATP as a neurotransmitter. However, ATP release from sour taste cells has not been observed so far. Instead, they release serotonin when they are activated by sour/acid stimuli. Thus it is still controversial whether sour taste cells use ATP, serotonin, or both. By reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and subsequent in situ hybridization (ISH) analyses, we revealed that of 14 serotonin receptor genes only 5-HT3A and 5-HT3B showed significant/clear signals in a subset of neurons of cranial sensory ganglia in which gustatory neurons reside. Double-fluorescent labeling analyses of ISH for serotonin receptor genes with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) in cranial sensory ganglia of pkd1l3-WGA mice whose sour neural pathway is visualized by the distribution of WGA originating from sour taste cells in the posterior region of the tongue revealed that WGA-positive cranial sensory neurons rarely express either of serotonin receptor gene. These results suggest that serotonin receptors expressed in cranial sensory neurons do not play any role as neurotransmitter receptor from sour taste cells. PMID:26854841

  6. Chemosensory receptor genes in the Oriental tobacco budworm Helicoverpa assulta.

    PubMed

    Xu, W; Papanicolaou, A; Liu, N-Y; Dong, S-L; Anderson, A

    2015-04-01

    The Oriental tobacco budworm (Helicoverpa assulta) is a specialist herbivore moth and its larvae feed on Solanaceous plants. (Z)-9-hexadecenal (Z9-16: Ald) is the major sex pheromone component in H. assulta but the specific pheromone receptor (PR) against Z9-16: Ald has not yet been identified. In the present study, we integrated transcriptomic, bioinformatic and functional characterization approaches to investigate the chemosensory receptor genes of H. assulta. We identified seven potential PRs with 44 olfactory receptors, 18 gustatory receptors and 24 ionotropic receptors, which were further studied by in silico gene expression profile, phylogenetic analysis, reverse transcription PCR and calcium imaging assays. The candidate PR, HassOR13, showed a strong response to the minor sex pheromone component, (Z)-11-hexadecenal, but not the major component, Z9-16: Ald, in calcium imaging assays. This study provides the molecular basis for comparative studies of chemosensory receptors between H. assulta and other Helicoverpa species and will advance our understanding of the evolution and function of Lepidoptera insect chemosensation. PMID:25430896

  7. Cartography of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A Receptor Subtypes in Prefrontal Cortex and Its Projections.

    PubMed

    Mengod, Guadalupe; Palacios, José M; Cortés, Roser

    2015-07-15

    Since the development of chemical neuroanatomical tools in the 1960s, a tremendous wealth of information has been generated on the anatomical components of the serotonergic system, at the microscopic level in the brain including the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The PFC receives a widespread distribution of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) terminals from the median and dorsal raphe nuclei. 5-HT receptors were first visualized using radioligand autoradiography in the late 1980s and early 1990s and showed, in contrast to 5-HT innervation, a differential distribution of binding sites associated with different 5-HT receptor subtypes. Due to the cloning of the different 5-HT receptor subtype genes in the late 1980s and early 1990s, it was possible, using in situ hybridization histochemistry, to localize cells expressing mRNA for these receptors. Double in situ hybridization histochemistry and immunohistochemistry allowed for the chemical characterization of the phenotype of cells expressing 5-HT receptors. Tract tracing technology allowed a detailed cartography of the neuronal connections of PFC and other brain areas. Based on these data, maps have been constructed that reflect our current understanding of the different circuits where 5-HT receptors can modulate the electrophysiological, pharmacological, and behavioral functions of the PFC. We will review current knowledge regarding the cellular localization of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors in mammalian PFC and their possible functions in the neuronal circuits of the PFC. We will discuss data generated in our laboratory as well as in others, focusing on localization in the pyramidal and GABAergic neuronal cell populations in different mammalian species using molecular neuroanatomy and on the connections with other brain regions. PMID:25739427

  8. Cartography of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A Receptor Subtypes in Prefrontal Cortex and Its Projections.

    PubMed

    Mengod, Guadalupe; Palacios, José M; Cortés, Roser

    2015-07-15

    Since the development of chemical neuroanatomical tools in the 1960s, a tremendous wealth of information has been generated on the anatomical components of the serotonergic system, at the microscopic level in the brain including the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The PFC receives a widespread distribution of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) terminals from the median and dorsal raphe nuclei. 5-HT receptors were first visualized using radioligand autoradiography in the late 1980s and early 1990s and showed, in contrast to 5-HT innervation, a differential distribution of binding sites associated with different 5-HT receptor subtypes. Due to the cloning of the different 5-HT receptor subtype genes in the late 1980s and early 1990s, it was possible, using in situ hybridization histochemistry, to localize cells expressing mRNA for these receptors. Double in situ hybridization histochemistry and immunohistochemistry allowed for the chemical characterization of the phenotype of cells expressing 5-HT receptors. Tract tracing technology allowed a detailed cartography of the neuronal connections of PFC and other brain areas. Based on these data, maps have been constructed that reflect our current understanding of the different circuits where 5-HT receptors can modulate the electrophysiological, pharmacological, and behavioral functions of the PFC. We will review current knowledge regarding the cellular localization of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors in mammalian PFC and their possible functions in the neuronal circuits of the PFC. We will discuss data generated in our laboratory as well as in others, focusing on localization in the pyramidal and GABAergic neuronal cell populations in different mammalian species using molecular neuroanatomy and on the connections with other brain regions.

  9. Serotonin 2A receptor agonist binding in the human brain with [11C]Cimbi-36

    PubMed Central

    Ettrup, Anders; da Cunha-Bang, Sophie; McMahon, Brenda; Lehel, Szabolcs; Dyssegaard, Agnete; Skibsted, Anine W; Jørgensen, Louise M; Hansen, Martin; Baandrup, Anders O; Bache, Søren; Svarer, Claus; Kristensen, Jesper L; Gillings, Nic; Madsen, Jacob; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2014-01-01

    [11C]Cimbi-36 was recently developed as a selective serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor agonist radioligand for positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging. Such an agonist PET radioligand may provide a novel, and more functional, measure of the serotonergic system and agonist binding is more likely than antagonist binding to reflect 5-HT levels in vivo. Here, we show data from a first-in-human clinical trial with [11C]Cimbi-36. In 29 healthy volunteers, we found high brain uptake and distribution according to 5-HT2A receptors with [11C]Cimbi-36 PET. The two-tissue compartment model using arterial input measurements provided the most optimal quantification of cerebral [11C]Cimbi-36 binding. Reference tissue modeling was feasible as it induced a negative but predictable bias in [11C]Cimbi-36 PET outcome measures. In five subjects, pretreatment with the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin before a second PET scan significantly decreased [11C]Cimbi-36 binding in all cortical regions with no effects in cerebellum. These results confirm that [11C]Cimbi-36 binding is selective for 5-HT2A receptors in the cerebral cortex and that cerebellum is an appropriate reference tissue for quantification of 5-HT2A receptors in the human brain. Thus, we here describe [11C]Cimbi-36 as the first agonist PET radioligand to successfully image and quantify 5-HT2A receptors in the human brain. PMID:24780897

  10. Increased desensitization of dopamine D₂ receptor-mediated response in the ventral tegmental area in the absence of adenosine A(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Al-Hasani, R; Foster, J D; Metaxas, A; Ledent, C; Hourani, S M O; Kitchen, I; Chen, Y

    2011-09-01

    G-protein coupled receptors interact to provide additional regulatory mechanisms for neurotransmitter signaling. Adenosine A(2A) receptors are expressed at a high density in striatal neurons, where they closely interact with dopamine D₂ receptors and modulate effects of dopamine and responses to psychostimulants. A(2A) receptors are expressed at much lower densities in other forebrain neurons but play a more prominent yet opposing role to striatal receptors in response to psychostimulants in mice. It is, therefore, possible that A(2A) receptors expressed at low levels elsewhere in the brain may also regulate neurotransmitter systems and modulate neuronal functions. Dopamine D₂ receptors play an important role in autoinhibition of neuronal firing in dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and dopamine release in other brain areas. Here, we examined the effect of A(2A) receptor deletion on D₂ receptor-mediated inhibition of neuronal firing in dopamine neurons in the VTA. Spontaneous activity of dopamine neurons was recorded in midbrain slices, and concentration-dependent effects of the dopamine D₂ receptor agonist, quinpirole, was compared between wild-type and A(2A) knockout mice. The potency of quinpirole applied in single concentrations and the expression of D₂ receptors were not altered in the VTA of the knockout mice. However, quinpirole applied in stepwise escalating concentrations caused significantly reduced maximal inhibition in A(2A) knockout mice, indicating an enhanced agonist-induced desensitization of D₂ receptors in the absence of A(2A) receptors. The A(2A) receptor agonist, CGS21680, did not exert any effect on dopamine neuron firing or response to quinpirole, revealing a novel non-pharmacological interaction between adenosine A(2A) receptors and dopaminergic neurotransmission in midbrain dopamine neurons. Altered D₂ receptor desensitization may result in changes in dopamine neuron firing rate and pattern and dopamine

  11. Evolution of an Expanded Mannose Receptor Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Staines, Karen; Hunt, Lawrence G.; Young, John R.; Butter, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Sequences of peptides from a protein specifically immunoprecipitated by an antibody, KUL01, that recognises chicken macrophages, identified a homologue of the mammalian mannose receptor, MRC1, which we called MRC1L-B. Inspection of the genomic environment of the chicken gene revealed an array of five paralogous genes, MRC1L-A to MRC1L-E, located between conserved flanking genes found either side of the single MRC1 gene in mammals. Transcripts of all five genes were detected in RNA from a macrophage cell line and other RNAs, whose sequences allowed the precise definition of spliced exons, confirming or correcting existing bioinformatic annotation. The confirmed gene structures were used to locate orthologues of all five genes in the genomes of two other avian species and of the painted turtle, all with intact coding sequences. The lizard genome had only three genes, one orthologue of MRC1L-A and two orthologues of the MRC1L-B antigen gene resulting from a recent duplication. The Xenopus genome, like that of most mammals, had only a single MRC1-like gene at the corresponding locus. MRC1L-A and MRC1L-B genes had similar cytoplasmic regions that may be indicative of similar subcellular migration and functions. Cytoplasmic regions of the other three genes were very divergent, possibly indicating the evolution of a new functional repertoire for this family of molecules, which might include novel interactions with pathogens. PMID:25390371

  12. Selection for Genes Encoding Secreted Proteins and Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Robert D.; Gu, Qimin; Goddard, Audrey; Rosenthal, Arnon

    1996-07-01

    Extracellular proteins play an essential role in the formation, differentiation, and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Despite that, the systematic identification of genes encoding these proteins has not been possible. We describe here a highly efficient method to isolate genes encoding secreted and membrane-bound proteins by using a single-step selection in yeast. Application of this method, termed signal peptide selection, to various tissues yielded 559 clones that appear to encode known or novel extracellular proteins. These include members of the transforming growth factor and epidermal growth factor protein families, endocrine hormones, tyrosine kinase receptors, serine/threonine kinase receptors, seven transmembrane receptors, cell adhesion molecules, extracellular matrix proteins, plasma proteins, and ion channels. The eventual identification of most, or all, extracellular signaling molecules will advance our understanding of fundamental biological processes and our ability to intervene in disease states.

  13. Functional expression of 5-HT{sub 2A} receptor in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Takao; Kaneshige, Kota; Kurosaki, Teruko; Nishio, Hiroaki

    2010-05-28

    In the previous study, we reported the gene expression for proteins related to the function of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) and elucidated the expression patterns of 5-HT{sub 2} receptor subtypes in mouse osteoblasts. In the present study, we evaluated the possible involvement of 5-HT receptor subtypes and its inactivation system in MC3T3-E1 cells, an osteoblast cell line. DOI, a 5-HT{sub 2A} and 5-HT{sub 2C} receptor selective agonist, as well as 5-HT concentration-dependently increased proliferative activities of MC3T3-E1 cells in their premature period. This effect of 5-HT on cell proliferation were inhibited by ketanserin, a 5-HT{sub 2A} receptor specific antagonist. Moreover, both DOI-induced cell proliferation and phosphorylation of ERK1 and 2 proteins were inhibited by PD98059 and U0126, selective inhibitors of MEK in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, treatment with fluoxetine, a 5-HT specific re-uptake inhibitor which inactivate the function of extracellular 5-HT, significantly increased the proliferative activities of MC3T3-E1 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Our data indicate that 5-HT fill the role for proliferation of osteoblast cells in their premature period. Notably, 5-HT{sub 2A} receptor may be functionally expressed to regulate mechanisms underlying osteoblast cell proliferation, at least in part, through activation of ERK/MAPK pathways in MC3T3-E1 cells.

  14. Protein phosphatase 2A mediates resensitization of the neurokinin 1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Jane E.; Roosterman, Dirk; Cottrell, Graeme S.; Padilla, Benjamin E.; Feld, Micha; Brand, Eva; Cedron, Wendy J.; Steinhoff, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are phosphorylated and interact with β-arrestins, which mediate desensitization and endocytosis. Endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) degrades neuropeptides in endosomes and can promote recycling. Although endocytosis, dephosphorylation, and recycling are accepted mechanisms of receptor resensitization, a large proportion of desensitized receptors can remain at the cell surface. We investigated whether reactivation of noninternalized, desensitized (phosphorylated) receptors mediates resensitization of the substance P (SP) neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R). Herein, we report a novel mechanism of resensitization by which protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is recruited to dephosphorylate noninternalized NK1R. A desensitizing concentration of SP reduced cell-surface SP binding sites by only 25%, and SP-induced Ca2+ signals were fully resensitized before cell-surface binding sites started to recover, suggesting resensitization of cell-surface-retained NK1R. SP induced association of β-arrestin1 and PP2A with noninternalized NK1R. β-Arrestin1 small interfering RNA knockdown prevented SP-induced association of cell-surface NK1R with PP2A, indicating that β-arrestin1 mediates this interaction. ECE-1 inhibition, by trapping β-arrestin1 in endosomes, also impeded SP-induced association of cell-surface NK1R with PP2A. Resensitization of NK1R signaling required both PP2A and ECE-1 activity. Thus, after stimulation with SP, PP2A interacts with noninternalized NK1R and mediates resensitization. PP2A interaction with NK1R requires β-arrestin1. ECE-1 promotes this process by releasing β-arrestin1 from NK1R in endosomes. These findings represent a novel mechanism of PP2A- and ECE-1-dependent resensitization of GPCRs. PMID:21795521

  15. Protein phosphatase 2A mediates resensitization of the neurokinin 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jane E; Roosterman, Dirk; Cottrell, Graeme S; Padilla, Benjamin E; Feld, Micha; Brand, Eva; Cedron, Wendy J; Bunnett, Nigel W; Steinhoff, Martin

    2011-10-01

    Activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are phosphorylated and interact with β-arrestins, which mediate desensitization and endocytosis. Endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) degrades neuropeptides in endosomes and can promote recycling. Although endocytosis, dephosphorylation, and recycling are accepted mechanisms of receptor resensitization, a large proportion of desensitized receptors can remain at the cell surface. We investigated whether reactivation of noninternalized, desensitized (phosphorylated) receptors mediates resensitization of the substance P (SP) neurokinin 1 receptor (NK(1)R). Herein, we report a novel mechanism of resensitization by which protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is recruited to dephosphorylate noninternalized NK(1)R. A desensitizing concentration of SP reduced cell-surface SP binding sites by only 25%, and SP-induced Ca(2+) signals were fully resensitized before cell-surface binding sites started to recover, suggesting resensitization of cell-surface-retained NK(1)R. SP induced association of β-arrestin1 and PP2A with noninternalized NK(1)R. β-Arrestin1 small interfering RNA knockdown prevented SP-induced association of cell-surface NK(1)R with PP2A, indicating that β-arrestin1 mediates this interaction. ECE-1 inhibition, by trapping β-arrestin1 in endosomes, also impeded SP-induced association of cell-surface NK(1)R with PP2A. Resensitization of NK(1)R signaling required both PP2A and ECE-1 activity. Thus, after stimulation with SP, PP2A interacts with noninternalized NK(1)R and mediates resensitization. PP2A interaction with NK(1)R requires β-arrestin1. ECE-1 promotes this process by releasing β-arrestin1 from NK(1)R in endosomes. These findings represent a novel mechanism of PP2A- and ECE-1-dependent resensitization of GPCRs.

  16. Characterization of the "CCR5" Chemokine Receptor Gene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, John C.

    2004-01-01

    The life cycle of retroviruses is an essential topic of modern cell biology instruction. Furthermore, the process of HIV viral entry into the cell is a question of great interest in basic and clinical biology. This paper describes how students can easily recover their own DNA, amplify a portion of the "CCR5" chemokine receptor gene, characterize…

  17. Ethanol upregulates NMDA receptor subunit gene expression in human embryonic stem cell-derived cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yangfei; Kim, Kun-Yong; Gelernter, Joel; Park, In-Hyun; Zhang, Huiping

    2015-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption may result in sustained gene expression alterations in the brain, leading to alcohol abuse or dependence. Because of ethical concerns of using live human brain cells in research, this hypothesis cannot be tested directly in live human brains. In the present study, we used human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived cortical neurons as in vitro cellular models to investigate alcohol-induced expression changes of genes involved in alcohol metabolism (ALDH2), anti-apoptosis (BCL2 and CCND2), neurotransmission (NMDA receptor subunit genes: GRIN1, GRIN2A, GRIN2B, and GRIN2D), calcium channel activity (ITPR2), or transcriptional repression (JARID2). hESCs were differentiated into cortical neurons, which were characterized by immunostaining using antibodies against cortical neuron-specific biomarkers. Ethanol-induced gene expression changes were determined by reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). After a 7-day ethanol (50 mM) exposure followed by a 24-hour ethanol withdrawal treatment, five of the above nine genes (including all four NMDA receptor subunit genes) were highly upregulated (GRIN1: 1.93-fold, P = 0.003; GRIN2A: 1.40-fold, P = 0.003; GRIN2B: 1.75-fold, P = 0.002; GRIN2D: 1.86-fold, P = 0.048; BCL2: 1.34-fold, P = 0.031), and the results of GRIN1, GRIN2A, and GRIN2B survived multiple comparison correction. Our findings suggest that alcohol responsive genes, particularly NMDA receptor genes, play an important role in regulating neuronal function and mediating chronic alcohol consumption-induced neuroadaptations.

  18. Adenosine A2a receptors form distinct oligomers in protein detergent complexes.

    PubMed

    Schonenbach, Nicole S; Rieth, Monica D; Han, Songi; O'Malley, Michelle A

    2016-09-01

    The human adenosine A2a receptor (A2aR) tunes its function by forming homo-oligomers and hetero-oligomers with other G protein-coupled receptors, but the biophysical characterization of these oligomeric species is limited. Here, we show that upon reconstitution into an optimized mixed micelle system, and purification via an antagonist affinity column, full-length A2aR exists as a distribution of oligomers. We isolated the dimer population from the other oligomers via size exclusion chromatography and showed that it is stable upon dilution, thus supporting the hypotheses that the A2aR dimer has a defined structure and function. This study presents a crucial enabling step to a detailed biophysical characterization of A2aR homodimers. PMID:27543907

  19. Estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor genes are expressed differentially in mouse embryos during preimplantation development.

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Q; Gorski, J

    1993-01-01

    Estrogen and progesterone play an important role in the development and implantation of preimplantation embryos. However, it is controversial whether these hormones act directly on the embryos. The effects of these hormones depend on the existence of their specific receptors. To determine whether estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor genes are expressed in mouse preimplantation embryos, we examined RNA from embryos at different stages of preimplantation development by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction techniques. ER mRNA was found in oocytes and fertilized eggs. The message level began to decline at the two-cell stage and reached its lowest level at the five- to eight-cell stage. ER mRNA was not detectable at the morula stage but reappeared at the blastocyst stage. Progesterone receptor mRNA was not detectable until the blastocyst stage. The embryonic expression of ER and progesterone receptor genes in the blastocyst suggests a possible functional requirement for ER and progesterone receptor at this stage of development. These results provide a basis for determining the direct role of estrogen and progesterone in preimplantation embryos. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8415723

  20. Interspecies variations in Bordetella catecholamine receptor gene regulation and function.

    PubMed

    Brickman, Timothy J; Suhadolc, Ryan J; Armstrong, Sandra K

    2015-12-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica can use catecholamines to obtain iron from transferrin and lactoferrin via uptake pathways involving the BfrA, BfrD, and BfrE outer membrane receptor proteins, and although Bordetella pertussis has the bfrD and bfrE genes, the role of these genes in iron uptake has not been demonstrated. In this study, the bfrD and bfrE genes of B. pertussis were shown to be functional in B. bronchiseptica, but neither B. bronchiseptica bfrD nor bfrE imparted catecholamine utilization to B. pertussis. Gene fusion analyses found that expression of B. bronchiseptica bfrA was increased during iron starvation, as is common for iron receptor genes, but that expression of the bfrD and bfrE genes of both species was decreased during iron limitation. As shown previously for B. pertussis, bfrD expression in B. bronchiseptica was also dependent on the BvgAS virulence regulatory system; however, in contrast to the case in B. pertussis, the known modulators nicotinic acid and sulfate, which silence Bvg-activated genes, did not silence expression of bfrD in B. bronchiseptica. Further studies using a B. bronchiseptica bvgAS mutant expressing the B. pertussis bvgAS genes revealed that the interspecies differences in bfrD modulation are partly due to BvgAS differences. Mouse respiratory infection experiments determined that catecholamine utilization contributes to the in vivo fitness of B. bronchiseptica and B. pertussis. Additional evidence of the in vivo importance of the B. pertussis receptors was obtained from serologic studies demonstrating pertussis patient serum reactivity with the B. pertussis BfrD and BfrE proteins. PMID:26371128

  1. Interspecies Variations in Bordetella Catecholamine Receptor Gene Regulation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Brickman, Timothy J.; Suhadolc, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica can use catecholamines to obtain iron from transferrin and lactoferrin via uptake pathways involving the BfrA, BfrD, and BfrE outer membrane receptor proteins, and although Bordetella pertussis has the bfrD and bfrE genes, the role of these genes in iron uptake has not been demonstrated. In this study, the bfrD and bfrE genes of B. pertussis were shown to be functional in B. bronchiseptica, but neither B. bronchiseptica bfrD nor bfrE imparted catecholamine utilization to B. pertussis. Gene fusion analyses found that expression of B. bronchiseptica bfrA was increased during iron starvation, as is common for iron receptor genes, but that expression of the bfrD and bfrE genes of both species was decreased during iron limitation. As shown previously for B. pertussis, bfrD expression in B. bronchiseptica was also dependent on the BvgAS virulence regulatory system; however, in contrast to the case in B. pertussis, the known modulators nicotinic acid and sulfate, which silence Bvg-activated genes, did not silence expression of bfrD in B. bronchiseptica. Further studies using a B. bronchiseptica bvgAS mutant expressing the B. pertussis bvgAS genes revealed that the interspecies differences in bfrD modulation are partly due to BvgAS differences. Mouse respiratory infection experiments determined that catecholamine utilization contributes to the in vivo fitness of B. bronchiseptica and B. pertussis. Additional evidence of the in vivo importance of the B. pertussis receptors was obtained from serologic studies demonstrating pertussis patient serum reactivity with the B. pertussis BfrD and BfrE proteins. PMID:26371128

  2. Interspecies variations in Bordetella catecholamine receptor gene regulation and function.

    PubMed

    Brickman, Timothy J; Suhadolc, Ryan J; Armstrong, Sandra K

    2015-12-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica can use catecholamines to obtain iron from transferrin and lactoferrin via uptake pathways involving the BfrA, BfrD, and BfrE outer membrane receptor proteins, and although Bordetella pertussis has the bfrD and bfrE genes, the role of these genes in iron uptake has not been demonstrated. In this study, the bfrD and bfrE genes of B. pertussis were shown to be functional in B. bronchiseptica, but neither B. bronchiseptica bfrD nor bfrE imparted catecholamine utilization to B. pertussis. Gene fusion analyses found that expression of B. bronchiseptica bfrA was increased during iron starvation, as is common for iron receptor genes, but that expression of the bfrD and bfrE genes of both species was decreased during iron limitation. As shown previously for B. pertussis, bfrD expression in B. bronchiseptica was also dependent on the BvgAS virulence regulatory system; however, in contrast to the case in B. pertussis, the known modulators nicotinic acid and sulfate, which silence Bvg-activated genes, did not silence expression of bfrD in B. bronchiseptica. Further studies using a B. bronchiseptica bvgAS mutant expressing the B. pertussis bvgAS genes revealed that the interspecies differences in bfrD modulation are partly due to BvgAS differences. Mouse respiratory infection experiments determined that catecholamine utilization contributes to the in vivo fitness of B. bronchiseptica and B. pertussis. Additional evidence of the in vivo importance of the B. pertussis receptors was obtained from serologic studies demonstrating pertussis patient serum reactivity with the B. pertussis BfrD and BfrE proteins.

  3. Folate receptor gene variants and neural tube defect occurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Finnell, R.; Greer, K.; Lammer, E.

    1994-09-01

    Recent epidemiological evidence shows that periconceptional use of folic acid supplements may prevent 40-50% of neural tube defects (NTDs). The FDA has subsequently recommended folic acid supplementation of all women of childbearing potential, even though the mechanism by which folic acid prevents NTDs is unknown. We investigated genetic variation of a candidate gene, the 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MeTHF) receptor, that may mediate this preventive effect. The receptor concentrates folate within cells and we have localized its mRNA to neuroepithelial cells during neurulation. Our hypothesis is that dysfunctional 5-MeTHF receptors inadequately concentrate folate intracellularly, predisposing infants to NTDs. We have completed SSCP analysis on 3 of the 4 coding exons of the 5-MeTHF receptor gene of 474 infants participating in a large population-based epidemiological case-control study of NTDs in California; genotyping of another 500 infants is ongoing. Genomic DNA was extracted from residual blood spots from newborn screening samples of cases and controls. Genotyping was done blinded to case status. Polymorphisms have been detected for exons 4 and 5; fourteen percent of the infants have exon 5 polymorphisms. Data will be presented on the prevalence of 5-MeTHF receptor polymorphisms among cases and controls. Relationships among the polymorphisms and NTD occurrence may shed light on how folic acid supplementation prevents NTDs.

  4. Activation of 5-HT2A/2C receptors reduces the excitability of cultured cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lingli; Liu, Chunhua; Dang, Minyan; Luo, Bin; Guo, Yiping; Wang, Haitao

    2016-10-01

    The abundant forebrain serotonergic projections are believed to modulate the activities of cortical neurons. 5-HT2 receptor among multiple subtypes of serotonin receptors contributes to the modulation of excitability, synaptic transmissions and plasticity. In the present study, whole-cell patch-clamp recording was adopted to examine whether activation of 5-HT2A/2C receptors would have any impact on the excitability of cultured cortical neurons. We found that 2,5-Dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI), a selective 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist, rapidly and reversibly depressed spontaneous action potentials mimicking the effect of serotonin. The decreased excitability was also observed for current-evoked firing. Additionally DOI increased neuronal input resistance. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cationic channels (HCN) did not account for the inhibition of spontaneous firing. The synaptic contribution was ruled out in that DOI augmented excitation and attenuated inhibition to actually favor an increase in the excitability. Our findings revealed that activation of 5-HT2A/2C receptors reduces neuronal excitability, which would deepen our understanding of serotonergic modulation of cortical activities. PMID:27585751

  5. Structural Basis for Negative Allosteric Modulation of GluN2A-Containing NMDA Receptors.

    PubMed

    Yi, Feng; Mou, Tung-Chung; Dorsett, Katherine N; Volkmann, Robert A; Menniti, Frank S; Sprang, Stephen R; Hansen, Kasper B

    2016-09-21

    NMDA receptors mediate excitatory synaptic transmission and regulate synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system, but their dysregulation is also implicated in numerous brain disorders. Here, we describe GluN2A-selective negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) that inhibit NMDA receptors by stabilizing the apo state of the GluN1 ligand-binding domain (LBD), which is incapable of triggering channel gating. We describe structural determinants of NAM binding in crystal structures of the GluN1/2A LBD heterodimer, and analyses of NAM-bound LBD structures corresponding to active and inhibited receptor states reveal a molecular switch in the modulatory binding site that mediate the allosteric inhibition. NAM binding causes displacement of a valine in GluN2A and the resulting steric effects can be mitigated by the transition from glycine bound to apo state of the GluN1 LBD. This work provides mechanistic insight to allosteric NMDA receptor inhibition, thereby facilitating the development of novel classes NMDA receptor modulators as therapeutic agents. PMID:27618671

  6. Gene Expression Control by Glucocorticoid Receptors during Innate Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Andre Machado; Anunciato, Aparecida Kataryna Olimpio; Rosenstock, Tatiana Rosado; Glezer, Isaias

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are potent anti-inflammatory compounds that have been extensively used in clinical practice for several decades. GC’s effects on inflammation are generally mediated through GC receptors (GRs). Signal transduction through these nuclear receptors leads to dramatic changes in gene expression programs in different cell types, typically due to GR binding to DNA or to transcription modulators. During the last decade, the view of GCs as exclusive anti-inflammatory molecules has been challenged. GR negative interference in pro-inflammatory gene expression was a landmark in terms of molecular mechanisms that suppress immune activity. In fact, GR can induce varied inhibitory molecules, including a negative regulator of Toll-like receptors pathway, or subject key transcription factors, such as NF-κB and AP-1, to a repressor mechanism. In contrast, the expression of some acute-phase proteins and other players of innate immunity generally requires GR signaling. Consequently, GRs must operate context-dependent inhibitory, permissive, or stimulatory effects on host defense signaling triggered by pathogens or tissue damage. This review aims to disclose how contradictory or comparable effects on inflammatory gene expression can depend on pharmacological approach (including selective GC receptor modulators; SEGRMs), cell culture, animal treatment, or transgenic strategies used as models. Although the current view of GR-signaling integrated many advances in the field, some answers to important questions remain elusive. PMID:27148162

  7. The farnesoid X receptor induces very low density lipoprotein receptor gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sirvent, Audrey; Claudel, Thierry; Martin, Geneviève; Brozek, John; Kosykh, Vladimir; Darteil, Raphaël; Hum, Dean W; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Staels, Bart

    2004-05-21

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear receptor activated by bile acids (BAs). In response to ligand-binding, FXR regulates many genes involved in BA, lipid, and lipoprotein metabolism. To identify new FXR target genes, microarray technology was used to profile total RNA extracted from HepG2 cells treated with the natural FXR agonist chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). Interestingly, a significant increase of transcript level of the very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) was observed. Our data, resulting from selective FXR activation, FXR RNA silencing and FXR-deficient mice, clearly demonstrate that BAs up-regulate VLDLR transcript levels via a FXR-dependent mechanism in vitro in human and in vivo in mouse liver cells.

  8. CRDB: database of chemosensory receptor gene families in vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Dong, Dong; Jin, Ke; Wu, Xiaoli; Zhong, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Chemosensory receptors (CR) are crucial for animals to sense the environmental changes and survive on earth. The emergence of whole-genome sequences provides us an opportunity to identify the entire CR gene repertoires. To completely gain more insight into the evolution of CR genes in vertebrates, we identified the nearly all CR genes in 25 vertebrates using homology-based approaches. Among these CR gene repertoires, nearly half of them were identified for the first time in those previously uncharacterized species, such as the guinea pig, giant panda and elephant, etc. Consistent with previous findings, we found that the numbers of CR genes vary extensively among different species, suggesting an extreme form of 'birth-and-death' evolution. For the purpose of facilitating CR gene analysis, we constructed a database with the goals to provide a resource for CR genes annotation and a web tool for exploring their evolutionary patterns. Besides a search engine for the gene extraction from a specific chromosome region, an easy-to-use phylogenetic analysis tool was also provided to facilitate online phylogeny study of CR genes. Our work can provide a rigorous platform for further study on the evolution of CR genes in vertebrates.

  9. Mu Opioid Receptor Gene: New Point Mutations in Opioid Addicts

    PubMed Central

    Dinarvand, Amin; Goodarzi, Ali; Vousooghi, Nasim; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Dinarvand, Rasoul; Ostadzadeh, Fahimeh; Khoshzaban, Ahad; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in mu opioid receptor gene and drug addiction has been shown in various studies. Here, we have evaluated the existence of polymorphisms in exon 3 of this gene in Iranian population and investigated the possible association between these mutations and opioid addiction. Methods 79 opioid-dependent subjects (55 males, 24 females) and 134 non-addict or control individuals (74 males, 60 females) participated in the study. Genomic DNA was extracted from volunteers’ peripheral blood and exon 3 of the mu opioid receptor gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) whose products were then sequenced. Results Three different heterozygote polymorphisms were observed in 3 male individuals: 759T > C and 877G > A mutations were found in 2 control volunteers and 1043G > C substitution was observed in an opioid-addicted subject. Association between genotype and opioid addiction for each mutation was not statistically significant. Discussion It seems that the sample size used in our study is not enough to confirm or reject any association between 759T > C, 877G > A and 1043G > C substitutions in exon 3 of the mu opioid receptor gene and opioid addiction susceptibility in Iranian population. PMID:25436079

  10. NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via a GABAergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine is a powerful central neuromodulator acting via opposing A1 (inhibitor) and A2a (activator) receptors. However, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), both adenosine receptor subtypes attenuate cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) sympathoinhibition of renal, adrenal, and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and attenuate reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Adenosine A1 receptors inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the CCR pathway, whereas adenosine A2a receptors most likely facilitate release of an unknown inhibitory neurotransmitter, which, in turn, inhibits the CCR. We hypothesized that adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the CCR via facilitation of GABA release in the NTS. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 51), we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (1-8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors [microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 (20 pmol/50 nl)] preceded by blockade of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the NTS [bicuculline (10 pmol/100 nl) or SCH-50911 (1 nmol/100 nl)]. Blockade of GABAA receptors virtually abolished adenosine A2a receptor-mediated inhibition of the CCR. GABAB receptors had much weaker but significant effects. These effects were similar for the different sympathetic outputs. We conclude that stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibits CCR-evoked hemodynamic and regional sympathetic reflex responses via a GABA-ergic mechanism.

  11. NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via a GABAergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine is a powerful central neuromodulator acting via opposing A1 (inhibitor) and A2a (activator) receptors. However, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), both adenosine receptor subtypes attenuate cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) sympathoinhibition of renal, adrenal, and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and attenuate reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Adenosine A1 receptors inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the CCR pathway, whereas adenosine A2a receptors most likely facilitate release of an unknown inhibitory neurotransmitter, which, in turn, inhibits the CCR. We hypothesized that adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the CCR via facilitation of GABA release in the NTS. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 51), we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (1-8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors [microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 (20 pmol/50 nl)] preceded by blockade of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the NTS [bicuculline (10 pmol/100 nl) or SCH-50911 (1 nmol/100 nl)]. Blockade of GABAA receptors virtually abolished adenosine A2a receptor-mediated inhibition of the CCR. GABAB receptors had much weaker but significant effects. These effects were similar for the different sympathetic outputs. We conclude that stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibits CCR-evoked hemodynamic and regional sympathetic reflex responses via a GABA-ergic mechanism. PMID:25910812

  12. Expression of α(1)-adrenergic receptors in rat prefrontal cortex: cellular co-localization with 5-HT(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Santana, Noemí; Mengod, Guadalupe; Artigas, Francesc

    2013-06-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is involved in behavioural control and cognitive processes that are altered in schizophrenia. The brainstem monoaminergic systems control PFC function, yet the cells/networks involved are not fully known. Serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) increase PFC neuronal activity through the activation of α(1)-adrenergic receptors (α(1)ARs) and 5-HT(2A) receptors (5-HT(2A)Rs), respectively. Neurochemical and behavioural interactions between these receptors have been reported. Further, classical and atypical antipsychotic drugs share nm in vitro affinity for α(1)ARs while having preferential affinity for D(2) and 5-HT(2A)Rs, respectively. Using double in situ hybridization we examined the cellular expression of α(1)ARs in pyramidal (vGluT1-positive) and GABAergic (GAD(65/67)-positive) neurons in rat PFC and their co-localization with 5-HT(2A)Rs. α(1)ARs are expressed by a high proportion of pyramidal (59-85%) and GABAergic (52-79%) neurons. The expression in pyramidal neurons exhibited a dorsoventral gradient, with a lower percentage of α(1)AR-positive neurons in infralimbic cortex compared to anterior cingulate and prelimbic cortex. The expression of α(1A), α(1B) and α(1D) adrenergic receptors was segregated in different layers and subdivisions. In all them there is a high co-expression with 5-HT(2A)Rs (∼80%). These observations indicate that NE controls the activity of most PFC pyramidal neurons via α(1)ARs, either directly or indirectly, via GABAergic interneurons. Antipsychotic drugs can thus modulate the activity of PFC via α(1)AR blockade. The high co-expression with 5-HT(2A)Rs indicates a convergence of excitatory serotonergic and noradrenergic inputs onto the same neuronal populations. Moreover, atypical antipsychotics may exert a more powerful control of PFC function through the simultaneous blockade of α(1)ARs and 5-HT(2A)Rs.

  13. 5-HT2A Receptor Binding in the Frontal Cortex of Parkinson's Disease Patients and Alpha-Synuclein Overexpressing Mice: A Postmortem Study.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Nadja Bredo; Olesen, Mikkel Vestergaard; Brudek, Tomasz; Plenge, Per; Klein, Anders Bue; Westin, Jenny E; Fog, Karina; Wörtwein, Gitta; Aznar, Susana

    2016-01-01

    The 5-HT2A receptor is highly involved in aspects of cognition and executive function and seen to be affected in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and related to the disease pathology. Even though Parkinson's disease (PD) is primarily a motor disorder, reports of impaired executive function are also steadily being associated with this disease. Not much is known about the pathophysiology behind this. The aim of this study was thereby twofold: (1) to investigate 5-HT2A receptor binding levels in Parkinson's brains and (2) to investigate whether PD associated pathology, alpha-synuclein (AS) overexpression, could be associated with 5-HT2A alterations. Binding density for the 5-HT2A-specific radioligand [(3)H]-MDL 100.907 was measured in membrane suspensions of frontal cortex tissue from PD patients. Protein levels of AS were further measured using western blotting. Results showed higher AS levels accompanied by increased 5-HT2A receptor binding in PD brains. In a separate study, we looked for changes in 5-HT2A receptors in the prefrontal cortex in 52-week-old transgenic mice overexpressing human AS. We performed region-specific 5-HT2A receptor binding measurements followed by gene expression analysis. The transgenic mice showed lower 5-HT2A binding in the frontal association cortex that was not accompanied by changes in gene expression levels. This study is one of the first to look at differences in serotonin receptor levels in PD and in relation to AS overexpression. PMID:27579212

  14. 5-HT2A Receptor Binding in the Frontal Cortex of Parkinson's Disease Patients and Alpha-Synuclein Overexpressing Mice: A Postmortem Study.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Nadja Bredo; Olesen, Mikkel Vestergaard; Brudek, Tomasz; Plenge, Per; Klein, Anders Bue; Westin, Jenny E; Fog, Karina; Wörtwein, Gitta; Aznar, Susana

    2016-01-01

    The 5-HT2A receptor is highly involved in aspects of cognition and executive function and seen to be affected in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and related to the disease pathology. Even though Parkinson's disease (PD) is primarily a motor disorder, reports of impaired executive function are also steadily being associated with this disease. Not much is known about the pathophysiology behind this. The aim of this study was thereby twofold: (1) to investigate 5-HT2A receptor binding levels in Parkinson's brains and (2) to investigate whether PD associated pathology, alpha-synuclein (AS) overexpression, could be associated with 5-HT2A alterations. Binding density for the 5-HT2A-specific radioligand [(3)H]-MDL 100.907 was measured in membrane suspensions of frontal cortex tissue from PD patients. Protein levels of AS were further measured using western blotting. Results showed higher AS levels accompanied by increased 5-HT2A receptor binding in PD brains. In a separate study, we looked for changes in 5-HT2A receptors in the prefrontal cortex in 52-week-old transgenic mice overexpressing human AS. We performed region-specific 5-HT2A receptor binding measurements followed by gene expression analysis. The transgenic mice showed lower 5-HT2A binding in the frontal association cortex that was not accompanied by changes in gene expression levels. This study is one of the first to look at differences in serotonin receptor levels in PD and in relation to AS overexpression.

  15. 5-HT2A Receptor Binding in the Frontal Cortex of Parkinson's Disease Patients and Alpha-Synuclein Overexpressing Mice: A Postmortem Study

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Nadja Bredo; Olesen, Mikkel Vestergaard; Plenge, Per; Klein, Anders Bue; Westin, Jenny E.; Fog, Karina

    2016-01-01

    The 5-HT2A receptor is highly involved in aspects of cognition and executive function and seen to be affected in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and related to the disease pathology. Even though Parkinson's disease (PD) is primarily a motor disorder, reports of impaired executive function are also steadily being associated with this disease. Not much is known about the pathophysiology behind this. The aim of this study was thereby twofold: (1) to investigate 5-HT2A receptor binding levels in Parkinson's brains and (2) to investigate whether PD associated pathology, alpha-synuclein (AS) overexpression, could be associated with 5-HT2A alterations. Binding density for the 5-HT2A-specific radioligand [3H]-MDL 100.907 was measured in membrane suspensions of frontal cortex tissue from PD patients. Protein levels of AS were further measured using western blotting. Results showed higher AS levels accompanied by increased 5-HT2A receptor binding in PD brains. In a separate study, we looked for changes in 5-HT2A receptors in the prefrontal cortex in 52-week-old transgenic mice overexpressing human AS. We performed region-specific 5-HT2A receptor binding measurements followed by gene expression analysis. The transgenic mice showed lower 5-HT2A binding in the frontal association cortex that was not accompanied by changes in gene expression levels. This study is one of the first to look at differences in serotonin receptor levels in PD and in relation to AS overexpression. PMID:27579212

  16. The serotonin 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors interact with specific sets of PDZ proteins.

    PubMed

    Bécamel, Carine; Gavarini, Sophie; Chanrion, Benjamin; Alonso, Gérard; Galéotti, Nathalie; Dumuis, Aline; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe

    2004-05-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine type 2A (5-HT(2A)) receptor and the 5-HT(2C) receptor are closely related members of the G-protein-coupled receptors activated by serotonin that share very similar pharmacological profiles and cellular signaling pathways. These receptors express a canonical class I PDZ ligand (SXV) at their C-terminal extremity. Here, we have identified proteins that interact with the PDZ ligand of the 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2C) receptors by a proteomic approach associating affinity chromatography using immobilized synthetic peptides encompassing the PDZ ligand and mass spectrometry. We report that both receptor C termini interact with specific sets of PDZ proteins in vitro. The 5-HT(2C) receptor but not the 5-HT(2A) receptor binds to the Veli-3.CASK.Mint1 ternary complex and to SAP102. In addition, the 5-HT(2C) receptor binds more strongly to PSD-95 and MPP-3 than the 5-HT(2A) receptor. In contrast, a robust interaction between the 5-HT(2A) receptor and the channel-interacting PDZ protein CIPP was found, whereas CIPP did not significantly associate with the 5-HT(2C) receptor. We also show that residues located at the -1 position and upstream the PDZ ligand in the C terminus of the 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2C) receptors are major determinants in their interaction with specific PDZ proteins. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy studies strongly suggested that these specific interactions also take place in living cells and that the 5-HT(2) receptor-PDZ protein complexes occur in intracellular compartments. The interaction of the 5-HT(2A) and the 5-HT(2C) receptor with specific sets of PDZ proteins may contribute to their different signal transduction properties.

  17. The Role of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Genes in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Maj, Carlo; Minelli, Alessandra; Giacopuzzi, Edoardo; Sacchetti, Emilio; Gennarelli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Genomic studies revealed two main components in the genetic architecture of schizophrenia, one constituted by common variants determining a distributed polygenic effect and one represented by a large number of heterogeneous rare and highly disruptive mutations. These gene modifications often affect neural transmission and different studies proved an involvement of metabotropic glutamate receptors in schizophrenia phenotype. Through the combination of literature information with genomic data from public repositories, we analyzed the current knowledge on the involvement of genetic variations of the human metabotropic glutamate receptors in schizophrenia and related endophenotypes. Despite the analysis did not reveal a definitive connection, different suggestive associations have been identified and in particular a relevant role has emerged for GRM3 in affecting specific schizophrenia endophenotypes. This supports the hypothesis that these receptors are directly involved in schizophrenia disorder. PMID:27296644

  18. The Role of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Genes in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Maj, Carlo; Minelli, Alessandra; Giacopuzzi, Edoardo; Sacchetti, Emilio; Gennarelli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Genomic studies revealed two main components in the genetic architecture of schizophrenia, one constituted by common variants determining a distributed polygenic effect and one represented by a large number of heterogeneous rare and highly disruptive mutations. These gene modifications often affect neural transmission and different studies proved an involvement of metabotropic glutamate receptors in schizophrenia phenotype. Through the combination of literature information with genomic data from public repositories, we analyzed the current knowledge on the involvement of genetic variations of the human metabotropic glutamate receptors in schizophrenia and related endophenotypes. Despite the analysis did not reveal a definitive connection, different suggestive associations have been identified and in particular a relevant role has emerged for GRM3 in affecting specific schizophrenia endophenotypes. This supports the hypothesis that these receptors are directly involved in schizophrenia disorder.

  19. Ligand Binding and Subtype Selectivity of the Human A2A Adenosine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jaakola, Veli-Pekka; Lane, J. Robert; Lin, Judy Y.; Katritch, Vsevolod; IJzerman, Adriaan P.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of the human A2A adenosine receptor bound to the A2A receptor-specific antagonist, ZM241385, was recently determined at 2.6-Å resolution. Surprisingly, the antagonist binds in an extended conformation, perpendicular to the plane of the membrane, and indicates a number of interactions unidentified before in ZM241385 recognition. To further understand the selectivity of ZM241385 for the human A2A adenosine receptor, we examined the effect of mutating amino acid residues within the binding cavity likely to have key interactions and that have not been previously examined. Mutation of Phe-168 to Ala abolishes both agonist and antagonist binding as well as receptor activity, whereas mutation of this residue to Trp or Tyr had only moderate effects. The Met-177 → Ala mutation impeded antagonist but not agonist binding. Finally, the Leu-249 → Ala mutant showed neither agonist nor antagonist binding affinity. From our results and previously published mutagenesis data, we conclude that conserved residues Phe-168(5.29), Glu-169(5.30), Asn-253(6.55), and Leu-249(6.51) play a central role in coordinating the bicyclic core present in both agonists and antagonists. By combining the analysis of the mutagenesis data with a comparison of the sequences of different adenosine receptor subtypes from different species, we predict that the interactions that determine subtype selectivity reside in the more divergent “upper” region of the binding cavity while the “lower” part of the binding cavity is conserved across adenosine receptor subtypes. PMID:20147292

  20. Control of transcriptional repression of the vitellogenin receptor gene in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) by select estrogen receptors isotypes.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Gustavo A; Bisesi, Joseph H; Kroll, Kevin J; Denslow, Nancy D; Sabo-Attwood, Tara

    2014-10-01

    The vitellogenin receptor (Vtgr) plays an important role in fish reproduction. This receptor functions to incorporate vitellogenin (Vtg), a macromolecule synthesized and released from the liver in the bloodstream, into oocytes where it is processed into yolk. Although studies have focused on the functional role of Vtgr in fish, the mechanistic control of this gene is still unexplored. Here we report the identification and analysis of the first piscine 5' regulatory region of the vtgr gene which was cloned from largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Using this putative promoter sequence, we investigated a role for hormones, including insulin and 17β-estradiol (E2), in transcriptional regulation through cell-based reporter assays. No effect of insulin was observed, however, E2 was able to repress transcriptional activity of the vtgr promoter through select estrogen receptor subtypes, Esr1 and Esr2a but not Esr2b. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that Esr1 likely interacts with the vtgr promoter region through half ERE and/or SP1 sites, in part. Finally we also show that ethinylestradiol (EE2), but not bisphenol-A (BPA), represses promoter activity similarly to E2. These results reveal for the first time that the Esr1 isoform may play an inhibitory role in the expression of LMB vtgr mRNA under the influence of E2, and potent estrogens such as EE2. In addition, this new evidence suggests that vtgr may be a target of select endocrine disrupting compounds through environmental exposures. PMID:25061109

  1. Control of transcriptional repression of the vitellogenin receptor gene in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) by select estrogen receptors isotypes.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Gustavo A; Bisesi, Joseph H; Kroll, Kevin J; Denslow, Nancy D; Sabo-Attwood, Tara

    2014-10-01

    The vitellogenin receptor (Vtgr) plays an important role in fish reproduction. This receptor functions to incorporate vitellogenin (Vtg), a macromolecule synthesized and released from the liver in the bloodstream, into oocytes where it is processed into yolk. Although studies have focused on the functional role of Vtgr in fish, the mechanistic control of this gene is still unexplored. Here we report the identification and analysis of the first piscine 5' regulatory region of the vtgr gene which was cloned from largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Using this putative promoter sequence, we investigated a role for hormones, including insulin and 17β-estradiol (E2), in transcriptional regulation through cell-based reporter assays. No effect of insulin was observed, however, E2 was able to repress transcriptional activity of the vtgr promoter through select estrogen receptor subtypes, Esr1 and Esr2a but not Esr2b. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that Esr1 likely interacts with the vtgr promoter region through half ERE and/or SP1 sites, in part. Finally we also show that ethinylestradiol (EE2), but not bisphenol-A (BPA), represses promoter activity similarly to E2. These results reveal for the first time that the Esr1 isoform may play an inhibitory role in the expression of LMB vtgr mRNA under the influence of E2, and potent estrogens such as EE2. In addition, this new evidence suggests that vtgr may be a target of select endocrine disrupting compounds through environmental exposures.

  2. Antagonists of the human A(2A) receptor. Part 6: Further optimization of pyrimidine-4-carboxamides.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Roger J; Bamford, Samantha J; Clay, Alex; Gaur, Suneel; Haymes, Tim; Jackson, Philip S; Jordan, Allan M; Klenke, Burkhard; Leonardi, Stefania; Liu, Jeanette; Mansell, Howard L; Ng, Sean; Saadi, Mona; Simmonite, Heather; Stratton, Gemma C; Todd, Richard S; Williamson, Douglas S; Yule, Ian A

    2009-09-15

    Antagonists of the human A(2A) receptor have been reported to have potential therapeutic benefit in the alleviation of the symptoms associated with neurodegenerative movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. As part of our efforts to discover potent and selective antagonists of this receptor, we herein describe the detailed optimization and structure-activity relationships of a series of pyrimidine-4-carboxamides. These optimized derivatives display desirable physiochemical and pharmacokinetic profiles, which have led to promising oral activity in clinically relevant models of Parkinson's disease.

  3. Mechanisms of oestrogen receptor (ER) gene regulation in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Most breast cancers are driven by a transcription factor called oestrogen receptor (ER). Understanding the mechanisms of ER activity in breast cancer has been a major research interest and recent genomic advances have revealed extraordinary insights into how ER mediates gene transcription and what occurs during endocrine resistance. This review discusses our current understanding on ER activity, with an emphasis on several evolving, but important areas of ER biology. PMID:26884552

  4. Farnesoid X receptor represses hepatic lipase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sirvent, Audrey; Verhoeven, Adrie J M; Jansen, Hans; Kosykh, Vladimir; Darteil, Raphaël J; Hum, Dean W; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Staels, Bart

    2004-11-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear receptor that regulates gene expression in response to bile acids (BAs). FXR plays a central role in BA, cholesterol, and lipoprotein metabolism. Here, we identify HL, an enzyme involved in the metabolism of remnant and high density lipoproteins, as a novel FXR-regulated gene. The natural FXR ligand, chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), downregulates HL gene expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. The nonsteroidal synthetic FXR agonist GW4064 also decreases HL mRNA levels in HepG2 cells and in primary human hepatocytes. Moreover, the decrease of HL mRNA levels after treatment with FXR agonists was associated with a significant decrease in secreted enzymatic activity. In addition, FXR-specific gene silencing using small interfering RNAs demonstrated that CDCA- and GW4064-mediated downregulation of HL transcript levels occurs via an FXR-dependent mechanism. Finally, using transient transfection experiments, it is shown that FXR represses transcriptional activity of a reporter driven by the -698/+13 bp human HL promoter. Taken together, these results identify HL as a new FXR-regulated gene in human liver cells. In view of the role of HL in plasma lipoprotein metabolism, our results further emphasize the central role of FXR in lipid homeostasis.

  5. Liver X receptor alpha mediated genistein induction of human dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) in Hep G2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yue; Zhang, Shunfen; Zhou, Tianyan; Huang, Chaoqun; McLaughlin, Alicia; Chen, Guangping

    2013-04-15

    Cytosolic sulfotransferases are one of the major families of phase II drug metabolizing enzymes. Sulfotransferase-catalyzed sulfonation regulates hormone activities, metabolizes drugs, detoxifies xenobiotics, and bioactivates carcinogens. Human dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) plays important biological roles by sulfating endogenous hydroxysteroids and exogenous xenobiotics. Genistein, mainly existing in soy food products, is a naturally occurring phytoestrogen with both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential. Our previous studies have shown that genistein significantly induces hSULT2A1 in Hep G2 and Caco-2 cells. In this study, we investigated the roles of liver X receptor (LXRα) in the genistein induction of hSULT2A1. LXRs have been shown to induce expression of mouse Sult2a9 and hSULT2A1 gene. Our results demonstrate that LXRα mediates the genistein induction of hSULT2A1, supported by Western blot analysis results, hSULT2A1 promoter driven luciferase reporter gene assay results, and mRNA interference results. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay results demonstrate that genistein increase the recruitment of hLXRα binding to the hSULT2A1 promoter. These results suggest that hLXRα plays an important role in the hSULT2A1 gene regulation. The biological functions of phytoestrogens may partially relate to their induction activity toward hydroxysteroid SULT. - Highlights: ► Liver X receptor α mediated genistein induction of hSULT2A1 in Hep G2 cells. ► LXRα and RXRα dimerization further activated this induction. ► Western blot results agreed well with luciferase reporter gene assay results. ► LXRs gene silencing significantly decreased hSULT2A1 expression. ► ChIP analysis suggested that genistein enhances hLXRα binding to the hSULT2A1 promoter.

  6. Therapeutic Opportunities for Caffeine and A2A Receptor Antagonists in Retinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Boia, Raquel; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Santiago, Ana Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine, the major component of coffee, is the most consumed psychostimulant in the world. Caffeine is an adenosine analog and acts as a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist. The majority of the effects of caffeine are mainly mediated by the blockade of adenosine receptors, and the proved neuroprotective effects of caffeine in brain disorders have been mimicked by the blockade of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR). A growing body of evidence demonstrates that microglia-mediated neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of brain and retinal diseases. Moreover, the control of microglia reactivity by blocking A2AR has been proposed to be the mechanism underlying the observed protective effects of caffeine. Hence, it is conceivable that caffeine and A2AR antagonists offer therapeutic value for the treatment of retinal diseases, mainly those involving microglia-mediated neuroinflammation.

  7. Therapeutic Opportunities for Caffeine and A2A Receptor Antagonists in Retinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Boia, Raquel; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Santiago, Ana Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine, the major component of coffee, is the most consumed psychostimulant in the world. Caffeine is an adenosine analog and acts as a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist. The majority of the effects of caffeine are mainly mediated by the blockade of adenosine receptors, and the proved neuroprotective effects of caffeine in brain disorders have been mimicked by the blockade of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR). A growing body of evidence demonstrates that microglia-mediated neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of brain and retinal diseases. Moreover, the control of microglia reactivity by blocking A2AR has been proposed to be the mechanism underlying the observed protective effects of caffeine. Hence, it is conceivable that caffeine and A2AR antagonists offer therapeutic value for the treatment of retinal diseases, mainly those involving microglia-mediated neuroinflammation. PMID:26959995

  8. Linkage of schizophrenia with TPH2 and 5-HTR2A gene polymorphisms in the Malay population.

    PubMed

    Tee, S F; Chow, T J; Tang, P Y; Loh, H C

    2010-07-06

    The serotoninergic system has been implicated in the etiology of schizophrenia and other behavioral disorders. Association studies have focused on the tryptophan hydroxylase 2 gene (TPH2) and the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 2A gene (5-HTR2A). We genotyped two single-nucleotide polymorphisms, A1438G of 5-HTR2A and intronic rs1386494 of TPH2 in the Malay population, using a sample size of 289 schizophrenic patients and 130 healthy controls. We found a significant association of A1438G of 5-HTR2A with schizophrenia in Malays. On the other hand, TPH2 polymorphism was not associated with schizophrenia. This is the first genetic association study concerning schizophrenia in the Malay population.

  9. Neuroprotection by caffeine in the MPTP model of parkinson's disease and its dependence on adenosine A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Xu, K; Di Luca, D G; Orrú, M; Xu, Y; Chen, J-F; Schwarzschild, M A

    2016-05-13

    Considerable epidemiological and laboratory data have suggested that caffeine, a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist, may protect against the underlying neurodegeneration of parkinson's disease (PD). Although both caffeine and more specific antagonists of the A2A subtype of adenosine receptor (A2AR) have been found to confer protection in animal models of PD, the dependence of caffeine's neuroprotective effects on the A2AR is not known. To definitively determine its A2AR dependence, the effect of caffeine on 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6 tetra-hydropyridine (MPTP) neurotoxicity was compared in wild-type (WT) and A2AR gene global knockout (A2A KO) mice, as well as in central nervous system (CNS) cell type-specific (conditional) A2AR knockout (cKO) mice that lack the receptor either in postnatal forebrain neurons or in astrocytes. In WT and in heterozygous A2AR KO mice caffeine pretreatment (25mg/kgip) significantly attenuated MPTP-induced depletion of striatal dopamine. By contrast in homozygous A2AR global KO mice caffeine had no effect on MPTP toxicity. In forebrain neuron A2AR cKO mice, caffeine lost its locomotor stimulant effect, whereas its neuroprotective effect was mostly preserved. In astrocytic A2AR cKO mice, both caffeine's locomotor stimulant and protective properties were undiminished. Taken together, these results indicate that neuroprotection by caffeine in the MPTP model of PD relies on the A2AR, although the specific cellular localization of these receptors remains to be determined. PMID:26905951

  10. NMDA receptor surface mobility depends on NR2A-2B subunits

    PubMed Central

    Groc, Laurent; Heine, Martin; Cousins, Sarah L.; Stephenson, F. Anne; Lounis, Brahim; Cognet, Laurent; Choquet, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    The NR2 subunit composition of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) varies during development, and this change is important in NMDAR-dependent signaling. In particular, synaptic NMDAR switch from containing mostly NR2B subunit to a mixture of NR2B and NR2A subunits. The pathways by which neurons differentially traffic NR2A- and NR2B-containing NMDARs are poorly understood. Using single-particle and -molecule approaches and specific antibodies directed against NR2A and NR2B extracellular epitopes, we investigated the surface mobility of native NR2A and NR2B subunits at the surface of cultured neurons. The surface mobility of NMDARs depends on the NR2 subunit subtype, with NR2A-containing NMDARs being more stable than NR2B-containing ones, and NR2A subunit overexpression stabilizes surface NR2B-containing NMDARs. The developmental change in the synaptic surface content of NR2A and NR2B subunits was correlated with a developmental change in the time spent by the subunits within synapses. This suggests that the switch in synaptic NMDAR subtypes depends on the regulation of the receptor surface trafficking. PMID:17124177

  11. Communication over the Network of Binary Switches Regulates the Activation of A2A Adenosine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoonji; Choi, Sun; Hyeon, Changbong

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics and functions of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are accurately regulated by the type of ligands that bind to the orthosteric or allosteric binding sites. To glean the structural and dynamical origin of ligand-dependent modulation of GPCR activity, we performed total ~ 5 μsec molecular dynamics simulations of A2A adenosine receptor (A2AAR) in its apo, antagonist-bound, and agonist-bound forms in an explicit water and membrane environment, and examined the corresponding dynamics and correlation between the 10 key structural motifs that serve as the allosteric hotspots in intramolecular signaling network. We dubbed these 10 structural motifs “binary switches” as they display molecular interactions that switch between two distinct states. By projecting the receptor dynamics on these binary switches that yield 210 microstates, we show that (i) the receptors in apo, antagonist-bound, and agonist-bound states explore vastly different conformational space; (ii) among the three receptor states the apo state explores the broadest range of microstates; (iii) in the presence of the agonist, the active conformation is maintained through coherent couplings among the binary switches; and (iv) to be most specific, our analysis shows that W246, located deep inside the binding cleft, can serve as both an agonist sensor and actuator of ensuing intramolecular signaling for the receptor activation. Finally, our analysis of multiple trajectories generated by inserting an agonist to the apo state underscores that the transition of the receptor from inactive to active form requires the disruption of ionic-lock in the DRY motif. PMID:25664580

  12. Toll-Like Receptor Gene Expression during Trichinella spiralis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sin; Park, Mi Kyung; Yu, Hak Sun

    2015-01-01

    In Trichinella spiralis infection, type 2 helper T (Th2) cell-related and regulatory T (Treg) cell-related immune responses are the most important immune events. In order to clarify which Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are closely associated with these responses, we analyzed the expression of mouse TLR genes in the small intestine and muscle tissue during T. spiralis infection. In addition, the expression of several chemokine- and cytokine-encoding genes, which are related to Th2 and Treg cell mediated immune responses, were analyzed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/TIR-associated proteins (TIRAP) and Toll receptor-associated activator of interferons (TRIF) adapter protein deficient and wild type (WT) mice. The results showed significantly increased TLR4 and TLR9 gene expression in the small intestine after 2 weeks of T. spiralis infection. In the muscle, TLR1, TLR2, TLR5, and TLR9 gene expression significantly increased after 4 weeks of infection. Only the expression of the TLR4 and TLR9 genes was significantly elevated in WT MEF cells after treatment with excretory-secretory (ES) proteins. Gene expression for Th2 chemokine genes were highly enhanced by ES proteins in WT MEF cells, while this elevation was slightly reduced in MyD88/TIRAP-/- MEF cells, and quite substantially decreased in TRIF-/- MEF cells. In contrast, IL-10 and TGF-β expression levels were not elevated in MyD88/TIRAP-/- MEF cells. In conclusion, we suggest that TLR4 and TLR9 might be closely linked to Th2 cell and Treg cell mediated immune responses, although additional data are needed to convincingly prove this observation. PMID:26323841

  13. Association of a coding polymorphism in Fc gamma receptor 2A and graft survival in re-transplant candidates.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Marie-Luise; Fuernrohr, Barbara G; Weiß, Katrin M; Harre, Ulrike; Wiesener, Michael S; Spriewald, Bernd M

    2015-10-01

    The family of Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs) is involved in mediating immunological effector functions. FcγRs are differentially expressed on immune cells and can act either activating or inhibitory, with FcγR2A belonging to the first group. The polymorphism H131R (rs1801274) in FCGR2A has been associated with acute rejection and can shift the overall balance between activating and inhibitory FcγRs. Anti-HLA allo-antibodies in transplant recipients have been identified as risk factor for organ survival after transplantation. In this study we genotyped FCGR2A H131R in 200 patients who had undergone kidney transplantation and experienced loss of graft function. FCGR2A polymorphism was related to graft survival and anti-HLA antibodies. Graft survival was calculated as the time interval between transplantation and return to chronic dialysis after transplantation. The gene frequency of FCGR2A R/R131 was found significantly more often in patients with earlier (⩽60months) compared to patients with later (>60months) graft failure. Overall patients homozygous for R/R131 had a significantly shorter graft survival, compared to H/H131 or H/R131 which is even more pronounced, when anti-HLA antibodies were present. These data suggest, that FCGR2A polymorphisms constitute a risk factor for graft loss following kidney transplantation and that this effect is related to anti-HLA antibodies. PMID:26429312

  14. Molecular mechanisms of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Norwitz, E R; Jeong, K H; Chin, W W

    1999-01-01

    GnRH plays a critical role in regulating mammalian reproductive development and function. At the level of the anterior pituitary, GnRH binds to the GnRH receptor (GnRHR) on the cell surface of pituitary gonadotropes. Here, it activates intracellular signal transduction pathways to effect both the synthesis and intermittent release of the gonadotropins LH and FSH. These hormones then enter the systemic circulation to regulate gonadal function, including steroid hormone synthesis and gametogenesis. The response of pituitary gonadotropes to GnRH correlates directly with the concentration of GnRHR on the cell surface, which is mediated, at least in part, at the level of gene expression. A number of endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine factors are known to regulate GnRHR gene expression. This article reviews in detail the role of the GnRHR in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and the factors mediating expression of this gene. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate transcription of the GnRHR gene will further our knowledge about the role of this receptor in mammalian reproductive physiology in health and disease.

  15. Carbon dioxide receptor genes in cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Anderson, Alisha

    2015-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is important in insect ecology, eliciting a range of behaviours across different species. Interestingly, the numbers of CO2 gustatory receptors (GRs) vary among insect species. In the model organism Drosophila melanogaster, two GRs (DmelGR21a and DmelGR63a) have been shown to detect CO2. In the butterfly, moth, beetle and mosquito species studied so far, three CO2 GR genes have been identified, while in tsetse flies, four CO2 GR genes have been identified. In other species including honeybees, pea aphids, ants, locusts and wasps, no CO2 GR genes have been identified from the genome. These genomic differences may suggest different mechanisms for CO2 detection exist in different insects but, with the exception of Drosophila and mosquitoes, limited attention has been paid to the CO2 GRs in insects. Here, we cloned three putative CO2 GR genes from the cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera and performed phylogenetic and expression analysis. All three H. armigera CO2 GRs (HarmGR1, HarmGR2 and HarmGR3) are specifically expressed in labial palps, the CO2-sensing tissue of this moth. HarmGR3 is significantly activated by NaHCO3 when expressed in insect Sf9 cells but HarmGR1 and HarmGR2 are not. This is the first report characterizing the function of lepidopteran CO2 receptors, which contributes to our general understanding of the molecular mechanisms of insect CO2 gustatory receptors.

  16. Effects of serotonin 2A/1A receptor stimulation on social exclusion processing.

    PubMed

    Preller, Katrin H; Pokorny, Thomas; Hock, Andreas; Kraehenmann, Rainer; Stämpfli, Philipp; Seifritz, Erich; Scheidegger, Milan; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2016-05-01

    Social ties are crucial for physical and mental health. However, psychiatric patients frequently encounter social rejection. Moreover, an increased reactivity to social exclusion influences the development, progression, and treatment of various psychiatric disorders. Nevertheless, the neuromodulatory substrates of rejection experiences are largely unknown. The preferential serotonin (5-HT) 2A/1A receptor agonist, psilocybin (Psi), reduces the processing of negative stimuli, but whether 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation modulates the processing of negative social interactions remains unclear. Therefore, this double-blind, randomized, counterbalanced, cross-over study assessed the neural response to social exclusion after the acute administration of Psi (0.215 mg/kg) or placebo (Pla) in 21 healthy volunteers by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and resting-state magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Participants reported a reduced feeling of social exclusion after Psi vs. Pla administration, and the neural response to social exclusion was decreased in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the middle frontal gyrus, key regions for social pain processing. The reduced neural response in the dACC was significantly correlated with Psi-induced changes in self-processing and decreased aspartate (Asp) content. In conclusion, 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation with psilocybin seems to reduce social pain processing in association with changes in self-experience. These findings may be relevant to the normalization of negative social interaction processing in psychiatric disorders characterized by increased rejection sensitivity. The current results also emphasize the importance of 5-HT2A/1A receptor subtypes and the Asp system in the control of social functioning, and as prospective targets in the treatment of sociocognitive impairments in psychiatric illnesses.

  17. An efficient route to xanthine based A(2A) adenosine receptor antagonists and functional derivatives.

    PubMed

    Labeaume, Paul; Dong, Ma; Sitkovsky, Michail; Jones, Elizabeth V; Thomas, Rhiannon; Sadler, Sara; Kallmerten, Amy E; Jones, Graham B

    2010-09-21

    A one-pot route to 8-substituted xanthines has been developed from 5,6-diaminouracils and carboxaldehydes. Yields are good and the process applicable to a range of substrates including a family of A(2A) adenosine receptor antagonists. A new route to the KW-6002 family of antagonists is presented including a pro-drug variant, and application to related image contrast agents developed.

  18. Effects of serotonin 2A/1A receptor stimulation on social exclusion processing.

    PubMed

    Preller, Katrin H; Pokorny, Thomas; Hock, Andreas; Kraehenmann, Rainer; Stämpfli, Philipp; Seifritz, Erich; Scheidegger, Milan; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2016-05-01

    Social ties are crucial for physical and mental health. However, psychiatric patients frequently encounter social rejection. Moreover, an increased reactivity to social exclusion influences the development, progression, and treatment of various psychiatric disorders. Nevertheless, the neuromodulatory substrates of rejection experiences are largely unknown. The preferential serotonin (5-HT) 2A/1A receptor agonist, psilocybin (Psi), reduces the processing of negative stimuli, but whether 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation modulates the processing of negative social interactions remains unclear. Therefore, this double-blind, randomized, counterbalanced, cross-over study assessed the neural response to social exclusion after the acute administration of Psi (0.215 mg/kg) or placebo (Pla) in 21 healthy volunteers by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and resting-state magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Participants reported a reduced feeling of social exclusion after Psi vs. Pla administration, and the neural response to social exclusion was decreased in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the middle frontal gyrus, key regions for social pain processing. The reduced neural response in the dACC was significantly correlated with Psi-induced changes in self-processing and decreased aspartate (Asp) content. In conclusion, 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation with psilocybin seems to reduce social pain processing in association with changes in self-experience. These findings may be relevant to the normalization of negative social interaction processing in psychiatric disorders characterized by increased rejection sensitivity. The current results also emphasize the importance of 5-HT2A/1A receptor subtypes and the Asp system in the control of social functioning, and as prospective targets in the treatment of sociocognitive impairments in psychiatric illnesses. PMID:27091970

  19. Effects of serotonin 2A/1A receptor stimulation on social exclusion processing

    PubMed Central

    Preller, Katrin H.; Pokorny, Thomas; Hock, Andreas; Kraehenmann, Rainer; Stämpfli, Philipp; Seifritz, Erich; Scheidegger, Milan; Vollenweider, Franz X.

    2016-01-01

    Social ties are crucial for physical and mental health. However, psychiatric patients frequently encounter social rejection. Moreover, an increased reactivity to social exclusion influences the development, progression, and treatment of various psychiatric disorders. Nevertheless, the neuromodulatory substrates of rejection experiences are largely unknown. The preferential serotonin (5-HT) 2A/1A receptor agonist, psilocybin (Psi), reduces the processing of negative stimuli, but whether 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation modulates the processing of negative social interactions remains unclear. Therefore, this double-blind, randomized, counterbalanced, cross-over study assessed the neural response to social exclusion after the acute administration of Psi (0.215 mg/kg) or placebo (Pla) in 21 healthy volunteers by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and resting-state magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Participants reported a reduced feeling of social exclusion after Psi vs. Pla administration, and the neural response to social exclusion was decreased in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the middle frontal gyrus, key regions for social pain processing. The reduced neural response in the dACC was significantly correlated with Psi-induced changes in self-processing and decreased aspartate (Asp) content. In conclusion, 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation with psilocybin seems to reduce social pain processing in association with changes in self-experience. These findings may be relevant to the normalization of negative social interaction processing in psychiatric disorders characterized by increased rejection sensitivity. The current results also emphasize the importance of 5-HT2A/1A receptor subtypes and the Asp system in the control of social functioning, and as prospective targets in the treatment of sociocognitive impairments in psychiatric illnesses. PMID:27091970

  20. Key modulatory role of presynaptic adenosine A2A receptors in cortical neurotransmission to the striatal direct pathway.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, César; Luján, Rafael; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Simoes, Ana Patrícia; Lerner, Talia N; Borycz, Janusz; Kachroo, Anil; Canas, Paula M; Orru, Marco; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Rosin, Diane L; Kreitzer, Anatol C; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ferré, Sergi

    2009-11-18

    Basal ganglia processing results from a balanced activation of direct and indirect striatal efferent pathways, which are controlled by dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, respectively. Adenosine A2A receptors are considered novel antiparkinsonian targets, based on their selective postsynaptic localization in the indirect pathway, where they modulate D2 receptor function. The present study provides evidence for the existence of an additional, functionally significant, segregation of A2A receptors at the presynaptic level. Using integrated anatomical, electrophysiological, and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that presynaptic A2A receptors are preferentially localized in cortical glutamatergic terminals that contact striatal neurons of the direct pathway, where they exert a selective modulation of corticostriatal neurotransmission. Presynaptic striatal A2A receptors could provide a new target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  1. Evidence of selection at insulin receptor substrate-1 gene loci.

    PubMed

    Yoshiuchi, Issei

    2013-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a complex disease characterized by insulin resistance and defect of insulin secretion. The worldwide prevalence of T2DM is steadily increasing. T2DM is also significantly associated with obesity, coronary artery disease (CAD), and metabolic syndrome. There is a clear difference in the prevalence of T2DM among populations, and T2DM is highly heritable. Human adaptations to environmental changes in food supply, lifestyle, and geography may have pressured the selection of genes associated with the metabolism of glucose, lipids, carbohydrates, and energy. The insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) gene is considered a major T2DM gene, and common genetic variations near the IRS1 gene were found to be associated with T2DM, insulin resistance, adiposity, and CAD. Here, we aimed to find evidence of selection at the IRS1 gene loci using the HapMap population data. We investigated a 3-step test procedure-Wright's F statistics (Fst), the long-range haplotype (LRH) test, and the integrated haplotype score (iHS) test-to detect selection at the IRS1 gene loci using the HapMap population data. We observed that 1 CAD-associated SNP (rs2943634) and 1 adiposity- and insulin resistance-associated SNP (rs2943650) exhibited high Fst values. We also found selection at the IRS1 gene loci by the LRH test and the iHS test. These findings suggest evidence of selection at the IRS1 gene loci and that further studies should examine the adaptive evolution of T2DM genes. PMID:22797928

  2. 3-iodothyronamine differentially modulates α-2A-adrenergic receptor-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Dinter, Juliane; Mühlhaus, Jessica; Jacobi, Simon Friedrich; Wienchol, Carolin Leonie; Cöster, Maxi; Meister, Jaroslawna; Hoefig, Carolin Stephanie; Müller, Anne; Köhrle, Josef; Grüters, Annette; Krude, Heiko; Mittag, Jens; Schöneberg, Torsten; Kleinau, Gunnar; Biebermann, Heike

    2015-06-01

    Most in vivo effects of 3-iodothyronamine (3-T1AM) have been thus far thought to be mediated by binding at the trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1). Inconsistently, the 3-T1AM-induced hypothermic effect still persists in Taar1 knockout mice, which suggests additional receptor targets. In support of this general assumption, it has previously been reported that 3-T1AM also binds to the α-2A-adrenergic receptor (ADRA2A), which modulates insulin secretion. However, the mechanism of this effect remains unclear. We tested two different scenarios that may explain the effect: the sole action of 3-T1AM at ADRA2A and a combined action of 3-T1AM at ADRA2A and TAAR1, which is also expressed in pancreatic islets. We first investigated a potential general signaling modification using the label-free EPIC technology and then specified changes in signaling by cAMP inhibition and MAPKs (ERK1/2) determination. We found that 3-T1AM induced Gi/o activation at ADRA2A and reduced the norepinephrine (NorEpi)-induced MAPK activation. Interestingly, in ADRA2A/TAAR1 hetero-oligomers, application of NorEpi resulted in uncoupling of the Gi/o signaling pathway, but it did not affect MAPK activation. However, 3-T1AM application in mice over a period of 6 days at a daily dose of 5 mg/kg had no significant effects on glucose homeostasis. In summary, we report an agonistic effect of 3-T1AM on the ADRA2A-mediated Gi/o pathway but an antagonistic effect on MAPK induced by NorEpi. Moreover, in ADRA2A/TAAR1 hetero-oligomers, the capacity of NorEpi to stimulate Gi/o signaling is reduced by co-stimulation with 3-T1AM. The present study therefore points to a complex spectrum of signaling modification mediated by 3-T1AM at different G protein-coupled receptors.

  3. Early and transient alteration of adenosine A2A receptor signaling in a mouse model of Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Tarditi, Alessia; Camurri, Alessandra; Varani, Katia; Borea, Pier Andrea; Woodman, Ben; Bates, Gillian; Cattaneo, Elena; Abbracchio, Maria P

    2006-07-01

    Huntington Disease (HD) is characterized by choreic involuntary movements and striatal vulnerability. A2A receptors expressed on GABAergic striatal neurons have been suggested to play a pathogenetic role. Previous data demonstrated the presence of an aberrant alteration of A2A receptor-dependent adenylyl cyclase in an in vitro model of the disease (striatal cells expressing mutant huntingtin) and in peripheral circulating cells of HD patients. Here, we investigated whether this dysfunction is present in the R6/2 HD transgenic mouse model, by analyzing striatal A2A receptor-binding and adenylyl cyclase activity at different developmental stages in comparison with age-matched wild type animals. A transient increase in A2A receptor density (Bmax) and A2A receptor-dependent cAMP production at early presymptomatic ages (7-14 postnatal days) was found. Both alterations normalized to control values starting from postnatal day 21. In contrast, A2A receptor mRNA, as detected by real time PCR, dramatically decreased starting from PND21 until late symptomatic stages (12 weeks of age). The discrepancy between A2A receptor expression and density suggests compensatory mechanisms. These data, reproducing ex vivo the previous observations in vitro, support the hypothesis that an alteration of A2A receptor signaling is present in HD and might represent an interesting target for neuroprotective therapies.

  4. Perilipin, a critical regulator of fat storage and breakdown, is a target gene of estrogen receptor-related receptor {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Akter, Mst. Hasina; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Hirose, Fumiko; Osumi, Takashi

    2008-04-11

    Perilipin is a protein localized on lipid droplet surfaces in adipocytes and steroidogenic cells, playing a central role in regulated lipolysis. Expression of the perilipin gene is markedly induced during adipogenesis. We found that transcription from the perilipin gene promoter is activated by an orphan nuclear receptor, estrogen receptor-related receptor (ERR){alpha}. A response element to this receptor was identified in the promoter region by a gene reporter assay, the electrophoretic-gel mobility-shift assay and the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} coactivator (PGC)-1{alpha} enhanced, whereas small heterodimer partner (SHP) repressed, the transactivating function of ERR{alpha} on the promoter. Thus, the perilipin gene expression is regulated by a transcriptional network controlling energy metabolism, substantiating the functional importance of perilipin in the maintenance of body energy balance.

  5. Striatal pre- and postsynaptic profile of adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Orru, Marco; Bakešová, Jana; Brugarolas, Marc; Quiroz, César; Beaumont, Vahri; Goldberg, Steven R; Lluís, Carme; Cortés, Antoni; Franco, Rafael; Casadó, Vicent; Canela, Enric I; Ferré, Sergi

    2011-01-11

    Striatal adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs) are highly expressed in medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the indirect efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with dopamine D(2) receptors (D(2)Rs). A(2A)Rs are also localized presynaptically in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals contacting MSNs of the direct efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with adenosine A(1) receptors (A(1)Rs). It has been hypothesized that postsynaptic A(2A)R antagonists should be useful in Parkinson's disease, while presynaptic A(2A)R antagonists could be beneficial in dyskinetic disorders, such as Huntington's disease, obsessive-compulsive disorders and drug addiction. The aim or this work was to determine whether selective A(2A)R antagonists may be subdivided according to a preferential pre- versus postsynaptic mechanism of action. The potency at blocking the motor output and striatal glutamate release induced by cortical electrical stimulation and the potency at inducing locomotor activation were used as in vivo measures of pre- and postsynaptic activities, respectively. SCH-442416 and KW-6002 showed a significant preferential pre- and postsynaptic profile, respectively, while the other tested compounds (MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261) showed no clear preference. Radioligand-binding experiments were performed in cells expressing A(2A)R-D(2)R and A(1)R-A(2A)R heteromers to determine possible differences in the affinity of these compounds for different A(2A)R heteromers. Heteromerization played a key role in the presynaptic profile of SCH-442416, since it bound with much less affinity to A(2A)R when co-expressed with D(2)R than with A(1)R. KW-6002 showed the best relative affinity for A(2A)R co-expressed with D(2)R than co-expressed with A(1)R, which can at least partially explain the postsynaptic profile of this compound. Also, the in vitro pharmacological profile of MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261 was is in accordance with their mixed pre- and postsynaptic

  6. Mouse histone H2A and H2B genes: four functional genes and a pseudogene undergoing gene conversion with a closely linked functional gene.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, T J; Liu, L; Marzluff, W F

    1987-01-01

    The sequence of five mouse histone genes, two H2a and three H2b genes on chromosome 13 has been determined. The three H2b genes all code for different proteins, each differing in two amino acids from the others. The H2b specific elements present 5' to H2b genes from other species are present in all three mouse H2b genes. All three H2b genes are expressed in the same relative amounts in three different mouse cell lines and fetal mice. The H2b gene with the H2b specific sequence closest to the TATAA sequence is expressed in the highest amount. One of the H2a genes lacks the first 9 amino acids, the promoter region, the last 3 amino acids and contains an altered 3' end sequence. Despite these multiple defects, there is only one nucleotide change between the two H2a genes from codon 9 to 126. This indicates that a recent gene conversion has occurred between these two genes. The similarity of the nucleotide sequences in the coding regions of mouse histone genes is probably due to gene conversion events targeted precisely at the coding region. Images PMID:3562244

  7. Induction of murine adenosine A(2A) receptor expression by LPS: analysis of the 5' upstream promoter.

    PubMed

    Elson, G; Eisenberg, M; Garg, C; Outram, S; Ferrante, C J; Hasko, G; Leibovich, S J

    2013-04-01

    Non-activated macrophages express low levels of A(2A)Rs and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) upregulates A(2A)R expression in an NF-κB-dependent manner. The murine A(2A)R gene is encoded by three exons, m1, m2 and m3. Exons m2 and m3 are conserved, while m1 encodes the 5' untranslated UTR. Three m1 variants have been defined, m1A, m1B and m1C, with m1C being farthest from the transcriptional start site. LPS upregulates A(2A)Rs in primary murine peritoneal and bone-marrow-derived macrophages and RAW264.7 cells by selectively splicing m1C to m2, through a promoter located upstream of m1C. We have cloned ∼1.6 kb upstream of m1C into pGL4.16(luc2CP/Hygro) promoterless vector. This construct in RAW 264.7 cells responds to LPS, and adenosine receptor agonists augmented LPS responsiveness. The NF-κB inhibitors BAY-11 and triptolide inhibited LPS-dependent induction. Deletion of a key proximal NF-κB site (402-417) abrogated LPS responsiveness, while deletion of distal NF-κB and C/EBPβ sites did not. Site-directed mutagenesis of CREB (309-320), STAT1 (526-531) and AP2 (566-569) sites had little effect on LPS and adenosine receptor agonist responsiveness; however, mutation of a second STAT1 site (582-588) abrogated this responsiveness. Further analysis of this promoter should provide valuable insights into regulation of A(2A)R expression in macrophages in response to inflammatory stimuli.

  8. The two yeast histone H2A genes encode similar protein subtypes.

    PubMed Central

    Choe, J; Kolodrubetz, D; Grunstein, M

    1982-01-01

    The sequences of the two histones H2A genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been determined. These genes encode two histone H2A subtypes which are 131 amino acids in length but differ at 2 amino acid positions: an Ala leads to Thr and a Thr leads to Ala change at positions 124 and 125. Thus, the two histone H2A subtypes have identical amino acid compositions. The coding regions of the two H2A genes are homologous at 369 of 393 bases (94%), with all but 2 of the 24 changes being silent. There is only 30% homology in the 5' flanking sequences of the two H2A genes. Like other eukaryotic histone genes, the yeast H2A genes are not interrupted by intervening sequences. When the yeast H2A histones are compared to those from other eukaryotes, there is at least 80% homology in amino acid sequence. PMID:7041122

  9. The role of serotonin 5-HT2A receptors in memory and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gongliang; Stackman, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2ARs) are widely distributed in the central nervous system, especially in brain region essential for learning and cognition. In addition to endogenous 5-HT, several hallucinogens, antipsychotics, and antidepressants function by targeting 5-HT2ARs. Preclinical studies show that 5-HT2AR antagonists have antipsychotic and antidepressant properties, whereas agonist ligands possess cognition-enhancing and hallucinogenic properties. Abnormal 5-HT2AR activity is associated with a number of psychiatric disorders and conditions, including depression, schizophrenia, and drug addiction. In addition to its traditional activity as a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), recent studies have defined novel operations of 5-HT2ARs. Here we review progress in the (1) receptor anatomy and biology: distribution, signaling, polymerization and allosteric modulation; and (2) receptor functions: learning and memory, hallucination and spatial cognition, and mental disorders. Based on the recent progress in basic research on the 5-HT2AR, it appears that post-training 5-HT2AR activation enhances non-spatial memory consolidation, while pre-training 5-HT2AR activation facilitates fear extinction. Further, the potential influence that 5-HT2AR-elicited visual hallucinations may have on visual cue (i.e., landmark) guided spatial cognition is discussed. We conclude that the development of selective 5-HT2AR modulators to target distinct signaling pathways and neural circuits represents a new possibility for treating emotional, neuropsychiatric, and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26500553

  10. Ultraslow Water-Mediated Transmembrane Interactions Regulate the Activation of A2A Adenosine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoonji; Kim, Songmi; Choi, Sun; Hyeon, Changbong

    2016-09-20

    Water molecules inside a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) have recently been spotlighted in a series of crystal structures. To decipher the dynamics and functional roles of internal water molecules in GPCR activity, we studied the A2A adenosine receptor using microsecond molecular-dynamics simulations. Our study finds that the amount of water flux across the transmembrane (TM) domain varies depending on the receptor state, and that the water molecules of the TM channel in the active state flow three times more slowly than those in the inactive state. Depending on the location in solvent-protein interface as well as the receptor state, the average residence time of water in each residue varies from ∼O(10(2)) ps to ∼O(10(2)) ns. Especially, water molecules, exhibiting ultraslow relaxation (∼O(10(2)) ns) in the active state, are found around the microswitch residues that are considered activity hotspots for GPCR function. A continuous allosteric network spanning the TM domain, arising from water-mediated contacts, is unique in the active state, underscoring the importance of slow water molecules in the activation of GPCRs. PMID:27653477

  11. Serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor activation induces 2-arachidonoylglycerol release through a phospholipase c-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Jason C; Nichols, David E

    2006-11-01

    To date, several studies have demonstrated that phospholipase C-coupled receptors stimulate the production of endocannabinoids, particularly 2-arachidonoylglycerol. There is now evidence that endocannabinoids are involved in phospholipase C-coupled serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor-mediated behavioral effects in both rats and mice. The main objective of this study was to determine whether activation of the 5-HT(2A) receptor leads to the production and release of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol. NIH3T3 cells stably expressing the rat 5-HT(2A) receptor were first incubated with [(3)H]-arachidonic acid for 24 h. Following stimulation with 10 mum serotonin, lipids were extracted from the assay medium, separated by thin layer chromatography, and analyzed by liquid scintillation counting. Our results indicate that 5-HT(2A) receptor activation stimulates the formation and release of 2-arachidonoylglycerol. The 5-HT(2A) receptor-dependent release of 2-arachidonoylglycerol was partially dependent on phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C activation. Diacylglycerol produced downstream of 5-HT(2A) receptor-mediated phospholipase D or phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C activation did not appear to contribute to 2-arachidonoylglycerol formation in NIH3T3-5HT(2A) cells. In conclusion, our results support a functional model where neuromodulatory neurotransmitters such as serotonin may act as regulators of endocannabinoid tone at excitatory synapses through the activation of phospholipase C-coupled G-protein coupled receptors. PMID:17010161

  12. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor gene association with cryptorchidism.

    PubMed

    Niepiekło-Miniewska, Wanda; Kuśnierczyk, Piotr; Havrylyuk, Anna; Kamieniczna, Marzena; Nakonechnyy, Andrij; Chopyak, Valentyna; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    Cryptorchidism is a condition where a testis persists in the abdominal cavity. Thus, due to elevated temperature we may expect induction of aberrant immune reactions depending on genetic constitution of individual. This may be reflected by development of anti-sperm antibodies (ASA) in cryptorchid males. Also, natural killer (NK) cells which belong to innate immunity may control adaptive immunity. Therefore, the gene system encoding polymorphic NK cell immunoglobulin receptors (KIRs) has been studied. 109 prepubertal boys with cryptorchidism and 136 ethnically matched young male donors were selected to study NK cell KIRs. DNA was isolated using automatic Maxwell(®) system from the peripheral venous blood drawn onto anticoagulant. Olerup SSP KIR Genotyping kit including Taq polymerase was used for detection of KIR genes. Human leukocyte antigen-C (HLA-C) groups, C1 and C2 were established using a Olerup SSP KIR HLA Ligand kit. KIR2DL2 (killer immunoglobulin-like receptor two-domain long 2) and KIR2DS2 (killer immunoglobulin-like receptor two-domain short 2) genes were less frequent in patients than in control individuals (corrected p values: 0.0110 and 0.0383, respectively). However, no significant differences were observed between ASA-positive and ASA-negative patients, or between bilateral or unilateral cryptorchidism. No association between KIR ligands C1 and C2, alone or together with KIR2DL2, was found. However, the results suggest that KIR2DL2+/KIR2DS2+ genotype may be, to some extent, protective against cryptorchidism.

  13. Activation of NTS A2a adenosine receptors differentially resets baroreflex control of renal vs. adrenal sympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Tomoko K; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2009-04-01

    The role of nucleus of solitary tract (NTS) A(2a) adenosine receptors in baroreflex mechanisms is controversial. Stimulation of these receptors releases glutamate within the NTS and elicits baroreflex-like decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), whereas inhibition of these receptors attenuates HR baroreflex responses. In contrast, stimulation of NTS A(2a) adenosine receptors increases preganglionic adrenal sympathetic nerve activity (pre-ASNA), and the depressor and sympathoinhibitory responses are not markedly affected by sinoaortic denervation and blockade of NTS glutamatergic transmission. To elucidate the role of NTS A(2a) adenosine receptors in baroreflex function, we compared full baroreflex stimulus-response curves for HR, RSNA, and pre-ASNA (intravenous nitroprusside/phenylephrine) before and after bilateral NTS microinjections of selective adenosine A(2a) receptor agonist (CGS-21680; 2.0, 20 pmol/50 nl), selective A(2a) receptor antagonist (ZM-241385; 40 pmol/100 nl), and nonselective A(1) + A(2a) receptor antagonist (8-SPT; 1 nmol/100 nl) in urethane/alpha-chloralose anesthetized rats. Activation of A(2a) receptors decreased the range, upper plateau, and gain of baroreflex-response curves for RSNA, whereas these parameters all increased for pre-ASNA, consistent with direct effects of the agonist on regional sympathetic activity. However, no resetting of baroreflex-response curves along the MAP axis occurred despite the marked decreases in baseline MAP. The antagonists had no marked effects on baseline variables or baroreflex-response functions. We conclude that the activation of NTS A(2a) adenosine receptors differentially alters baroreflex control of HR, RSNA, and pre-ASNA mostly via non-baroreflex mechanism(s), and these receptors have virtually no tonic action on baroreflex control of these sympathetic outputs.

  14. Constraint and Adaptation in newt Toll-Like Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Babik, Wiesław; Dudek, Katarzyna; Fijarczyk, Anna; Pabijan, Maciej; Stuglik, Michał; Szkotak, Rafał; Zieliński, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Acute die-offs of amphibian populations worldwide have been linked to the emergence of viral and fungal diseases. Inter and intraspecific immunogenetic differences may influence the outcome of infection. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are an essential component of innate immunity and also prime acquired defenses. We report the first comprehensive assessment of TLR gene variation for urodele amphibians. The Lissotriton newt TLR repertoire includes representatives of 13 families and is compositionally most similar to that of the anuran Xenopus. Both ancient and recent gene duplications have occurred in urodeles, bringing the total number of TLR genes to at least 21. Purifying selection has predominated the evolution of newt TLRs in both long (∼70 Ma) and medium (∼18 Ma) timescales. However, we find evidence for both purifying and positive selection acting on TLRs in two recently diverged (2–5 Ma) allopatric evolutionary lineages (Lissotriton montandoni and L. vulgaris graecus). Overall, both forms of selection have been stronger in L. v. graecus, while constraint on most TLR genes in L. montandoni appears relaxed. The differences in selection regimes are unlikely to be biased by demographic effects because these were controlled by means of a historical demographic model derived from an independent data set of 62 loci. We infer that TLR genes undergo distinct trajectories of adaptive evolution in closely related amphibian lineages, highlight the potential of TLRs to capture the signatures of different assemblages of pathogenic microorganisms, and suggest differences between lineages in the relative roles of innate and acquired immunity. PMID:25480684

  15. Human T-cell receptor variable gene segment families

    SciTech Connect

    Arden, B.; Kabelitz, D.; Clark, S.P.; Mak, T.W.

    1995-10-01

    Multiple DNA and protein sequence alignments have been constructed for the human T-cell receptor {alpha}/{delta}, {beta}, and {gamma} (TCRA/D, B, and G) variable (V) gene segments. The traditional classification into subfamilies was confirmed using a much larger pool of sequences. For each sequence, a name was derived which complies with the standard nomenclature. The traditional numbering of V gene segments in the order of their discovery was continued and changed when in conflict with names of other segments. By discriminating between alleles at the same locus versus genes from different loci, we were able to reduce the number of more than 150 different TCRBV sequences in the database to a repertoire of only 47 functional TCRBV gene segments. An extension of this analysis to the over 100 TCRAV sequences results in a predicted repertoire of 42 functional TCRAV gene segments. Our alignment revealed two residues that distinguish between the highly homologous V{delta} and V{alpha}, one at a site that in V{sub H} contacts the constant region, the other at the interface between immunoglobulin V{sub H} and V{sub L}. This site may be responsible for restricted pairing between certain V{delta} and V{gamma} chains. On the other hand, V{beta} and V{gamma} appear to be related by the fact that their CDR2 length is increased by four residues as compared with that of V{alpha}/{delta} peptides. 150 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Comprehensive gene expression analysis of rice aleurone cells: probing the existence of an alternative gibberellin receptor.

    PubMed

    Yano, Kenji; Aya, Koichiro; Hirano, Ko; Ordonio, Reynante Lacsamana; Ueguchi-Tanaka, Miyako; Matsuoka, Makoto

    2015-02-01

    Current gibberellin (GA) research indicates that GA must be perceived in plant nuclei by its cognate receptor, GIBBERELLIN INSENSITIVE DWARF1 (GID1). Recognition of GA by GID1 relieves the repression mediated by the DELLA protein, a model known as the GID1-DELLA GA perception system. There have been reports of potential GA-binding proteins in the plasma membrane that perceive GA and induce α-amylase expression in cereal aleurone cells, which is mechanistically different from the GID1-DELLA system. Therefore, we examined the expression of the rice (Oryza sativa) α-amylase genes in rice mutants impaired in the GA receptor (gid1) and the DELLA repressor (slender rice1; slr1) and confirmed their lack of response to GA in gid1 mutants and constitutive expression in slr1 mutants. We also examined the expression of GA-regulated genes by genome-wide microarray and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses and confirmed that all GA-regulated genes are modulated by the GID1-DELLA system. Furthermore, we studied the regulatory network involved in GA signaling by using a set of mutants defective in genes involved in GA perception and gene expression, namely gid1, slr1, gid2 (a GA-related F-box protein mutant), and gamyb (a GA-related trans-acting factor mutant). Almost all GA up-regulated genes were regulated by the four named GA-signaling components. On the other hand, GA down-regulated genes showed different expression patterns with respect to GID2 and GAMYB (e.g. a considerable number of genes are not controlled by GAMYB or GID2 and GAMYB). Based on these observations, we present a comprehensive discussion of the intricate network of GA-regulated genes in rice aleurone cells.

  17. The human gene for neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 2 (NTRK2) is located on chromosome 9 but is not the familial dysautonomia gene

    SciTech Connect

    Slaugenhaupt, S.A. |; Liebert, C.B.; Lucente, D.E.

    1995-02-10

    The neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 2 (NTRK2) gene is a member of the trk family of tyrosine protein kinases, which encode receptors for the nerve growth factor-related proteins known as neurotrophins. The neurotrophins and their receptors have long been considered candidate genes for familial dysautonomia (FD), a hereditary sensory neuropathy resulting from the congenital loss of both sensory and autonomic neurons. The DYS gene has recently been mapped to human chromosome 9q31-q33, and therefore we set out to determine the chromosomal localization of the candidate gene NTRK2. A mouse trkB probe was hybridized to both somatic cell hybrids containing human chromosome 9 and a human chromosome 9 flow-sorted cosmid library. The human homologue of trkB, NTRK2, was assigned to chromosome 9. To localize the NTRK2 gene further, a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism was identified within a cosmid that contains NTRK2 exon sequences. This marker was genotyped in the CEPH reference pedigrees and places the NTRK2 gene near D9S1 on the proximal long arm of human chromosome 9. The NTRK2 gene is located approximately 22 cm proximal to DYS and shows several recombinants in disease families. Therefore, the NTRK2 gene can now be excluded as a candidate gene for familial dysautonomia. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  18. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor ERRγ Regulates Hepatic CB1 Receptor-Mediated Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yoon Seok; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kim, Ki-Sun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Jina; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, In-Kyu; Kim, Seong Heon; Cho, Sung Jin; Jeong, Won-Il; Lee, Chul-Ho; Harris, Robert A.; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), a stress inducible hepatokine, is synthesized in the liver and plays important roles in glucose and lipid metabolism. However, the mechanism of hepatic cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression is largely unknown. Results Activation of the hepatic CB1 receptor by arachidonyl-2’-chloroethylamide (ACEA), a CB1 receptor selective agonist, significantly increased FGF21 gene expression. Overexpression of estrogen-related receptor (ERR) γ increased FGF21 gene expression and secretion both in hepatocytes and mice, whereas knockdown of ERRγ decreased ACEA-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Moreover, ERRγ, but not ERRα and ERRβ, induced FGF21 gene promoter activity. In addition, deletion and mutation analysis of the FGF21 promoter identified a putative ERRγ-binding motif (AGGTGC, a near-consensus response element). A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed direct binding of ERRγ to the FGF21 gene promoter. Finally, GSK5182, an ERRγ inverse agonist, significantly inhibited hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Conclusion Based on our data, we conclude that ERRγ plays a key role in hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression and secretion. PMID:27455076

  19. Chicken interferons, their receptors and interferon-stimulated genes.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Kate E; Ward, Alister C; Lowenthal, John W; Bean, Andrew G D

    2013-11-01

    The prevalence of pathogenic viruses is a serious issue as they pose a constant threat to both the poultry industry and to human health. To prevent these viral infections an understanding of the host-virus response is critical, especially for the development of novel therapeutics. One approach in the control of viral infections would be to boost the immune response through administration of cytokines, such as interferons. However, the innate immune response in chickens is poorly characterised, particularly concerning the interferon pathway. This review will provide an overview of our current understanding of the interferon system of chickens, including their cognate receptors and known interferon-stimulated gene products.

  20. Adenosine A2A receptors modulate glutamate uptake in cultured astrocytes and gliosomes.

    PubMed

    Matos, Marco; Augusto, Elisabete; Santos-Rodrigues, Alexandre Dos; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Agostinho, Paula

    2012-05-01

    Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, where its toxic build-up leads to synaptic dysfunction and excitotoxic cell death that underlies many neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, efforts have been made to understand the regulation of glutamate transporters, which are responsible for the clearance of extracellular glutamate. We now report that adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A) R) control the uptake of D-aspartate in primary cultured astrocytes as well as in an ex vivo preparation enriched in glial plasmalemmal vesicles (gliosomes) from adult rats, whereas A(1) R and A(3) R were devoid of effects. Thus, the acute exposure to the A(2A) R agonist, CGS 21680, inhibited glutamate uptake, an effect prevented by the A(2A) R antagonist, SCH 58261, and abbrogated in cultured astrocytes from A(2A) R knockout mice. Furthermore, the prolonged activation of A(2A) R lead to a cAMP/protein kinase A-dependent reduction of GLT-I and GLAST mRNA and protein levels, which leads to a sustained decrease of glutamate uptake. This dual mechanism of inhibition of glutamate transporters by astrocytic A(2A) R provides a novel candidate mechanism to understand the ability of A(2) (A) R to control synaptic plasticity and neurodegeneration, two conditions tightly associated with the control of extracellular glutamate levels by glutamate transporters.

  1. Cardiac gene expression data and in silico analysis provide novel insights into human and mouse taste receptor gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Foster, Simon R; Porrello, Enzo R; Stefani, Maurizio; Smith, Nicola J; Molenaar, Peter; dos Remedios, Cristobal G; Thomas, Walter G; Ramialison, Mirana

    2015-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are the principal mediators of the sweet, umami, bitter, and fat taste qualities in mammals. Intriguingly, the taste receptors are also expressed outside of the oral cavity, including in the gut, airways, brain, and heart, where they have additional functions and contribute to disease. However, there is little known about the mechanisms governing the transcriptional regulation of taste receptor genes. Following our recent delineation of taste receptors in the heart, we investigated the genomic loci encoding for taste receptors to gain insight into the regulatory mechanisms that drive their expression in the heart. Gene expression analyses of healthy and diseased human and mouse hearts showed coordinated expression for a subset of chromosomally clustered taste receptors. This chromosomal clustering mirrored the cardiac expression profile, suggesting that a common gene regulatory block may control the taste receptor locus. We identified unique domains with strong regulatory potential in the vicinity of taste receptor genes. We also performed de novo motif enrichment in the proximal promoter regions and found several overrepresented DNA motifs in cardiac taste receptor gene promoters corresponding to ubiquitous and cardiac-specific transcription factor binding sites. Thus, combining cardiac gene expression data with bioinformatic analyses, this study has provided insights into the noncoding regulatory landscape for taste GPCRs. These findings also have broader relevance for the study of taste GPCRs outside of the classical gustatory system, where understanding the mechanisms controlling the expression of these receptors may have implications for future therapeutic development.

  2. Cardiac gene expression data and in silico analysis provide novel insights into human and mouse taste receptor gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Foster, Simon R; Porrello, Enzo R; Stefani, Maurizio; Smith, Nicola J; Molenaar, Peter; dos Remedios, Cristobal G; Thomas, Walter G; Ramialison, Mirana

    2015-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are the principal mediators of the sweet, umami, bitter, and fat taste qualities in mammals. Intriguingly, the taste receptors are also expressed outside of the oral cavity, including in the gut, airways, brain, and heart, where they have additional functions and contribute to disease. However, there is little known about the mechanisms governing the transcriptional regulation of taste receptor genes. Following our recent delineation of taste receptors in the heart, we investigated the genomic loci encoding for taste receptors to gain insight into the regulatory mechanisms that drive their expression in the heart. Gene expression analyses of healthy and diseased human and mouse hearts showed coordinated expression for a subset of chromosomally clustered taste receptors. This chromosomal clustering mirrored the cardiac expression profile, suggesting that a common gene regulatory block may control the taste receptor locus. We identified unique domains with strong regulatory potential in the vicinity of taste receptor genes. We also performed de novo motif enrichment in the proximal promoter regions and found several overrepresented DNA motifs in cardiac taste receptor gene promoters corresponding to ubiquitous and cardiac-specific transcription factor binding sites. Thus, combining cardiac gene expression data with bioinformatic analyses, this study has provided insights into the noncoding regulatory landscape for taste GPCRs. These findings also have broader relevance for the study of taste GPCRs outside of the classical gustatory system, where understanding the mechanisms controlling the expression of these receptors may have implications for future therapeutic development. PMID:25986534

  3. Allosteric interactions between agonists and antagonists within the adenosine A2A receptor-dopamine D2 receptor heterotetramer

    PubMed Central

    Bonaventura, Jordi; Navarro, Gemma; Casadó-Anguera, Verònica; Azdad, Karima; Rea, William; Moreno, Estefanía; Brugarolas, Marc; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I.; Lluís, Carme; Cortés, Antoni; Volkow, Nora D.; Schiffmann, Serge N.; Ferré, Sergi; Casadó, Vicent

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR)-dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) heteromers are key modulators of striatal neuronal function. It has been suggested that the psychostimulant effects of caffeine depend on its ability to block an allosteric modulation within the A2AR-D2R heteromer, by which adenosine decreases the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of dopamine at the D2R. We describe novel unsuspected allosteric mechanisms within the heteromer by which not only A2AR agonists, but also A2AR antagonists, decrease the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of D2R agonists and the affinity of D2R antagonists. Strikingly, these allosteric modulations disappear on agonist and antagonist coadministration. This can be explained by a model that considers A2AR-D2R heteromers as heterotetramers, constituted by A2AR and D2R homodimers, as demonstrated by experiments with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and bimolecular fluorescence and bioluminescence complementation. As predicted by the model, high concentrations of A2AR antagonists behaved as A2AR agonists and decreased D2R function in the brain. PMID:26100888

  4. Androgen Receptor-Target Genes in African American Prostate Cancer Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bi-Dar; Yang, Qi; Ceniccola, Kristin; Bianco, Fernando; Andrawis, Ramez; Jarrett, Thomas; Frazier, Harold; Patierno, Steven R.; Lee, Norman H.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence and mortality rates of prostate cancer (PCa) are higher in African American (AA) compared to Caucasian American (CA) men. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying PCa disparities, we employed an integrative approach combining gene expression profiling and pathway and promoter analyses to investigate differential transcriptomes and deregulated signaling pathways in AA versus CA cancers. A comparison of AA and CA PCa specimens identified 1,188 differentially expressed genes. Interestingly, these transcriptional differences were overrepresented in signaling pathways that converged on the androgen receptor (AR), suggesting that the AR may be a unifying oncogenic theme in AA PCa. Gene promoter analysis revealed that 382 out of 1,188 genes contained cis-acting AR-binding sequences. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed STAT1, RHOA, ITGB5, MAPKAPK2, CSNK2A,1 and PIK3CB genes as novel AR targets in PCa disparities. Moreover, functional screens revealed that androgen-stimulated AR binding and upregulation of RHOA, ITGB5, and PIK3CB genes were associated with increased invasive activity of AA PCa cells, as siRNA-mediated knockdown of each gene caused a loss of androgen-stimulated invasion. In summation, our findings demonstrate that transcriptional changes have preferentially occurred in multiple signaling pathways converging (“transcriptional convergence”) on AR signaling, thereby contributing to AR-target gene activation and PCa aggressiveness in AAs. PMID:23365759

  5. Genotype-Dependent Difference in 5-HT2C Receptor-Induced Hypolocomotion: Comparison with 5-HT2A Receptor Functional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bazovkina, Darya V.; Kondaurova, Elena M.; Naumenko, Vladimir S.; Ponimaskin, Evgeni

    2015-01-01

    In the present study behavioral effects of the 5-HT2C serotonin receptor were investigated in different mouse strains. The 5-HT2C receptor agonist MK-212 applied intraperitoneally induced significant dose-dependent reduction of distance traveled in the open field test in CBA/Lac mice. This effect was receptor-specific because it was inhibited by the 5-HT2C receptor antagonist RS102221. To study the role of genotype in 5-HT2C receptor-induced hypolocomotion, locomotor activity of seven inbred mouse strains was measured after MK-212 acute treatment. We found that the 5-HT2C receptor stimulation by MK-212 decreased distance traveled in the open field test in CBA/Lac, C57Bl/6, C3H/He, and ICR mice, whereas it failed to affect locomotor activity in DBA/2J, Asn, and Balb/c mice. We also compared the interstrain differences in functional response to 5-HT2C and 5-HT2A receptors activation measured by the quantification of receptor-mediated head-twitches. These experiments revealed significant positive correlation between 5-HT2C and 5-HT2A receptors functional responses for all investigated mouse strains. Moreover, we found that 5-HT2A receptor activation with DOI did not change locomotor activity in CBA/Lac mice. Taken together, our data indicate the implication of 5-HT2C receptors in regulation of locomotor activity and suggest the shared mechanism for functional responses mediated by 5-HT2C and 5-HT2A receptors. PMID:26380122

  6. Genotype-Dependent Difference in 5-HT2C Receptor-Induced Hypolocomotion: Comparison with 5-HT2A Receptor Functional Activity.

    PubMed

    Bazovkina, Darya V; Kondaurova, Elena M; Naumenko, Vladimir S; Ponimaskin, Evgeni

    2015-01-01

    In the present study behavioral effects of the 5-HT2C serotonin receptor were investigated in different mouse strains. The 5-HT2C receptor agonist MK-212 applied intraperitoneally induced significant dose-dependent reduction of distance traveled in the open field test in CBA/Lac mice. This effect was receptor-specific because it was inhibited by the 5-HT2C receptor antagonist RS102221. To study the role of genotype in 5-HT2C receptor-induced hypolocomotion, locomotor activity of seven inbred mouse strains was measured after MK-212 acute treatment. We found that the 5-HT2C receptor stimulation by MK-212 decreased distance traveled in the open field test in CBA/Lac, C57Bl/6, C3H/He, and ICR mice, whereas it failed to affect locomotor activity in DBA/2J, Asn, and Balb/c mice. We also compared the interstrain differences in functional response to 5-HT2C and 5-HT2A receptors activation measured by the quantification of receptor-mediated head-twitches. These experiments revealed significant positive correlation between 5-HT2C and 5-HT2A receptors functional responses for all investigated mouse strains. Moreover, we found that 5-HT2A receptor activation with DOI did not change locomotor activity in CBA/Lac mice. Taken together, our data indicate the implication of 5-HT2C receptors in regulation of locomotor activity and suggest the shared mechanism for functional responses mediated by 5-HT2C and 5-HT2A receptors. PMID:26380122

  7. Genotype-Dependent Difference in 5-HT2C Receptor-Induced Hypolocomotion: Comparison with 5-HT2A Receptor Functional Activity.

    PubMed

    Bazovkina, Darya V; Kondaurova, Elena M; Naumenko, Vladimir S; Ponimaskin, Evgeni

    2015-01-01

    In the present study behavioral effects of the 5-HT2C serotonin receptor were investigated in different mouse strains. The 5-HT2C receptor agonist MK-212 applied intraperitoneally induced significant dose-dependent reduction of distance traveled in the open field test in CBA/Lac mice. This effect was receptor-specific because it was inhibited by the 5-HT2C receptor antagonist RS102221. To study the role of genotype in 5-HT2C receptor-induced hypolocomotion, locomotor activity of seven inbred mouse strains was measured after MK-212 acute treatment. We found that the 5-HT2C receptor stimulation by MK-212 decreased distance traveled in the open field test in CBA/Lac, C57Bl/6, C3H/He, and ICR mice, whereas it failed to affect locomotor activity in DBA/2J, Asn, and Balb/c mice. We also compared the interstrain differences in functional response to 5-HT2C and 5-HT2A receptors activation measured by the quantification of receptor-mediated head-twitches. These experiments revealed significant positive correlation between 5-HT2C and 5-HT2A receptors functional responses for all investigated mouse strains. Moreover, we found that 5-HT2A receptor activation with DOI did not change locomotor activity in CBA/Lac mice. Taken together, our data indicate the implication of 5-HT2C receptors in regulation of locomotor activity and suggest the shared mechanism for functional responses mediated by 5-HT2C and 5-HT2A receptors.

  8. Tricyclic antidepressants exhibit variable pharmacological profiles at the α(2A) adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Cottingham, Christopher; Percival, Stefanie; Birky, Tana; Wang, Qin

    2014-08-29

    Antidepressant mechanisms of action remain shrouded in mystery, greatly hindering our ability to develop therapeutics which can fully treat patients suffering from depressive disorders. In an attempt to shed new light on this topic, we have undertaken a series of studies investigating actions of tricyclic antidepressant drugs (TCAs) at the α2A adrenergic receptor (AR), a centrally important receptor, dysregulation of which has been linked to depression. Our previous work established a particular TCA, desipramine, as an arrestin-biased α2AAR ligand driving receptor endocytosis and downregulation but not canonical heterotrimeric G protein-mediated signaling. The present work is aimed at broadening our understanding of how members of the TCA drug class act at the α2AAR, as we have selected the closely related but subtly different TCAs imipramine and amitriptyline for evaluation. Our data demonstrate that these drugs do also function as direct arrestin-biased α2AAR ligands. However, these data reveal differences in receptor affinity and in the extent/nature of arrestin recruitment to and endocytosis of α2AARs. Specifically, amitriptyline exhibits an approximately 14-fold stronger interaction with the receptor, is a weaker driver of arrestin recruitment, and preferentially recruits a different arrestin subtype. Extent of endocytosis is similar for all TCAs studied so far, and occurs in an arrestin-dependent manner, although imipramine uniquely retains a slight ability to drive α2AAR endocytosis in arrestin-null cells. These findings signify an important expansion of our mechanistic understanding of antidepressant pharmacology, and provide useful insights for future medicinal chemistry efforts.

  9. C5L2: a controversial receptor of complement anaphylatoxin, C5a.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Coulthard, Liam G; Wu, M C L; Taylor, Stephen M; Woodruff, Trent M

    2013-03-01

    C5a is the paramount proinflammatory mediator of the complement cascade, and has been previously thought to act only through a single, G-protein-coupled, C5a receptor (C5aR; also termed CD88). In 2000, a second C5a receptor, C5L2 (previously known as GPR77), was discovered; yet, despite 12 yr of intensive research, its biological, or pathophysiological, function is both enigmatic and controversial. Unlike C5aR, this receptor does not couple to G proteins, and early studies promoted the hypothesis that C5L2 functions as a decoy receptor. However, recent data have provided other evidence for more complicated and conflicting interactions between C5L2 and other inflammatory mediators. C5L2 has been recently demonstrated to physically interact with both C5aR and β-arrestin to negatively regulate C5aR signaling toward an anti-inflammatory manner, and to reduce pathology, in several disease models in vivo. In direct contrast, other groups have demonstrated that C5L2 stimulation caused release of HMGB1 both in vitro and in vivo, and enhanced pathology in sepsis models, suggesting a clear proinflammatory signaling role. These astoundingly contradictory data challenge our precepts and complicate the foundational bases for the possible targeting of C5L2 as a therapeutic option in inflammatory disease. C5L2 may be the great masquerader in complement biology; its function dependent on the cell type, species, and disease context. Because of these unusual and unforeseen complexities, we present the current state of knowledge on C5L2 structure, expression and, most controversially, its putative functions.-Li, R., Coulthard, L.G., Wu, M. C. L., Taylor, S. M., Woodruff, T. M. C5L2: a controversial receptor of complement anaphylatoxin, C5a. PMID:23239822

  10. Evolution of the chicken Toll-like receptor gene family: A story of gene gain and gene loss

    PubMed Central

    Temperley, Nicholas D; Berlin, Sofia; Paton, Ian R; Griffin, Darren K; Burt, David W

    2008-01-01

    Background Toll-like receptors (TLRs) perform a vital role in disease resistance through their recognition of pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Recent advances in genomics allow comparison of TLR genes within and between many species. This study takes advantage of the recently sequenced chicken genome to determine the complete chicken TLR repertoire and place it in context of vertebrate genomic evolution. Results The chicken TLR repertoire consists of ten genes. Phylogenetic analyses show that six of these genes have orthologs in mammals and fish, while one is only shared by fish and three appear to be unique to birds. Furthermore the phylogeny shows that TLR1-like genes arose independently in fish, birds and mammals from an ancestral gene also shared by TLR6 and TLR10. All other TLRs were already present prior to the divergence of major vertebrate lineages 550 Mya (million years ago) and have since been lost in certain lineages. Phylogenetic analysis shows the absence of TLRs 8 and 9 in chicken to be the result of gene loss. The notable exception to the tendency of gene loss in TLR evolution is found in chicken TLRs 1 and 2, each of which underwent gene duplication about 147 and 65 Mya, respectively. Conclusion Comparative phylogenetic analysis of vertebrate TLR genes provides insight into their patterns and processes of gene evolution, with examples of both gene gain and gene loss. In addition, these comparisons clarify the nomenclature of TLR genes in vertebrates. PMID:18241342

  11. Update of the androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1999-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 309 to 374 during the past year. We have expanded the database by adding information on AR-interacting proteins; and we have improved the database by identifying those mutation entries that have been updated. Mutations of unknown significance have now been reported in both the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of the AR gene, and in individuals who are somatic mosaics constitutionally. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms, including silent mutations, have been discovered in normal individuals and in individuals with male infertility. A mutation hotspot associated with prostatic cancer has been identified in exon 5. The database is available on the internet (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  12. Insulin receptor gene expression in normal and diseased bovine liver.

    PubMed

    Liu, G W; Zhang, Z G; Wang, J G; Wang, Z; Xu, C; Zhu, X L

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare insulin receptor (IR) gene expression in normal bovine liver (n=7) with samples of liver from cows in the perinatal period with ketosis (n=7) and cows with fatty liver (n=7). Gene expression was determined by internally controlled reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The expression of IR mRNA in the liver of ketotic dairy cows was higher than in cows with fatty liver, but in both disease groups the expression was substantially lower than that in normal liver. Reduced expression of IR mRNA in fatty liver indicates that responses to insulin are markedly decreased, which might be due to insulin resistance. The relatively lower IR mRNA expression in the liver tissue of dairy cows with ketosis might enhance gluconeogenesis and lipid mobilization to relieve energy negative balance.

  13. Quantitative phosphoproteomics unravels biased phosphorylation of serotonin 2A receptor at Ser280 by hallucinogenic versus nonhallucinogenic agonists.

    PubMed

    Karaki, Samah; Becamel, Carine; Murat, Samy; Mannoury la Cour, Clotilde; Millan, Mark J; Prézeau, Laurent; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe; Vandermoere, Franck

    2014-05-01

    The serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor is a primary target of psychedelic hallucinogens such as lysergic acid diethylamine, mescaline, and psilocybin, which reproduce some of the core symptoms of schizophrenia. An incompletely resolved paradox is that only some 5-HT(2A) receptor agonists exhibit hallucinogenic activity, whereas structurally related agonists with comparable affinity and activity lack such a psychoactive activity. Using a strategy combining stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with enrichment in phosphorylated peptides by means of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography followed by immobilized metal affinity chromatography, we compared the phosphoproteome in HEK-293 cells transiently expressing the 5-HT(2A) receptor and exposed to either vehicle or the synthetic hallucinogen 1-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl]-2-aminopropane (DOI) or the nonhallucinogenic 5-HT(2A) agonist lisuride. Among the 5995 identified phosphorylated peptides, 16 sites were differentially phosphorylated upon exposure of cells to DOI versus lisuride. These include a serine (Ser(280)) located in the third intracellular loop of the 5-HT(2A) receptor, a region important for its desensitization. The specific phosphorylation of Ser(280) by hallucinogens was further validated by quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of immunopurified receptor digests and by Western blotting using a phosphosite specific antibody. The administration of DOI, but not of lisuride, to mice, enhanced the phosphorylation of 5-HT(2A) receptors at Ser(280) in the prefrontal cortex. Moreover, hallucinogens induced a less pronounced desensitization of receptor-operated signaling in HEK-293 cells and neurons than did nonhallucinogenic agonists. The mutation of Ser(280) to aspartic acid (to mimic phosphorylation) reduced receptor desensitization by nonhallucinogenic agonists, whereas its mutation to alanine increased the ability of hallucinogens to desensitize the receptor. This study reveals a biased

  14. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Unravels Biased Phosphorylation of Serotonin 2A Receptor at Ser280 by Hallucinogenic versus Nonhallucinogenic Agonists*

    PubMed Central

    Karaki, Samah; Becamel, Carine; Murat, Samy; Mannoury la Cour, Clotilde; Millan, Mark J.; Prézeau, Laurent; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe; Vandermoere, Franck

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT2A receptor is a primary target of psychedelic hallucinogens such as lysergic acid diethylamine, mescaline, and psilocybin, which reproduce some of the core symptoms of schizophrenia. An incompletely resolved paradox is that only some 5-HT2A receptor agonists exhibit hallucinogenic activity, whereas structurally related agonists with comparable affinity and activity lack such a psychoactive activity. Using a strategy combining stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with enrichment in phosphorylated peptides by means of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography followed by immobilized metal affinity chromatography, we compared the phosphoproteome in HEK-293 cells transiently expressing the 5-HT2A receptor and exposed to either vehicle or the synthetic hallucinogen 1-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl]-2-aminopropane (DOI) or the nonhallucinogenic 5-HT2A agonist lisuride. Among the 5995 identified phosphorylated peptides, 16 sites were differentially phosphorylated upon exposure of cells to DOI versus lisuride. These include a serine (Ser280) located in the third intracellular loop of the 5-HT2A receptor, a region important for its desensitization. The specific phosphorylation of Ser280 by hallucinogens was further validated by quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of immunopurified receptor digests and by Western blotting using a phosphosite specific antibody. The administration of DOI, but not of lisuride, to mice, enhanced the phosphorylation of 5-HT2A receptors at Ser280 in the prefrontal cortex. Moreover, hallucinogens induced a less pronounced desensitization of receptor-operated signaling in HEK-293 cells and neurons than did nonhallucinogenic agonists. The mutation of Ser280 to aspartic acid (to mimic phosphorylation) reduced receptor desensitization by nonhallucinogenic agonists, whereas its mutation to alanine increased the ability of hallucinogens to desensitize the receptor. This study reveals a biased phosphorylation of

  15. A reference gene set for chemosensory receptor genes of Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Christopher; Hirsh, Ariana; Bucks, Sascha; Klinner, Christian; Vogel, Heiko; Shukla, Aditi; Mansfield, Jennifer H; Morton, Brian; Hansson, Bill S; Grosse-Wilde, Ewald

    2015-11-01

    The order of Lepidoptera has historically been crucial for chemosensory research, with many important advances coming from the analysis of species like Bombyx mori or the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. Specifically M. sexta has long been a major model species in the field, especially regarding the importance of olfaction in an ecological context, mainly the interaction with its host plants. In recent years transcriptomic data has led to the discovery of members of all major chemosensory receptor families in the species, but the data was fragmentary and incomplete. Here we present the analysis of the newly available high-quality genome data for the species, supplemented by additional transcriptome data to generate a high quality reference gene set for the three major chemosensory receptor gene families, the gustatory (GR), olfactory (OR) and antennal ionotropic receptors (IR). Coupled with gene expression analysis our approach allows association of specific receptor types and behaviors, like pheromone and host detection. The dataset will provide valuable support for future analysis of these essential chemosensory modalities in this species and in Lepidoptera in general. PMID:26365739

  16. MicroRNA signatures predict dysregulated vitamin D receptor and calcium pathways status in limb girdle muscle dystrophies (LGMD) 2A/2B.

    PubMed

    Aguennouz, M; Lo Giudice, C; Licata, N; Rodolico, C; Musumeci, O; Fanin, M; Migliorato, A; Ragusa, M; Macaione, V; Di Giorgio, R M; Angelini, C; Toscano, A

    2016-08-01

    miRNA expression profile and predicted pathways involved in selected limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD)2A/2B patients were investigated. A total of 187 miRNAs were dysregulated in all patients, with six miRNAs showing opposite regulation in LGMD2A versus LGMD2B patients. Silico analysis evidence: (1) a cluster of the dysregulated miRNAs resulted primarily involved in inflammation and calcium metabolism, and (2) two genes predicted as controlled by calcium-assigned miRNAs (Vitamin D Receptor gene and Guanine Nucleotide Binding protein beta polypeptide 1gene) showed an evident upregulation in LGMD2B patients, in accordance with miRNA levels. Our data support alterations in calcium pathway status in LGMD 2A/B, suggesting myofibre calcium imbalance as a potential therapeutic target. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27558075

  17. Variations in Opioid Receptor Genes in Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Wachman, Elisha M; Hayes, Marie J; Sherva, Richard; Brown, Mark S; Davis, Jonathan M; Farrer, Lindsay A; Nielsen, David A

    2015-01-01

    Background There is significant variability in the severity of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) due to in-utero opioid exposure. We wanted to determine if single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in key candidate genes contribute to this variability. Methods Full-term opioid-exposed newborns and their mothers (n=86 pairs) were studied. DNA was genotyped for 80 SNPs from 14 genes utilizing a custom designed microarray. The association of each SNP with NAS outcomes was evaluated. Results SNPs in two opioid receptor genes in the infants were associated with worse NAS severity: 1) The PNOC rs732636 A allele (OR=3.8, p=0.004) for treatment with 2 medications and a longer hospital stay (LOS) of 5.8 days (p=0.01), and 2) The OPRK1 rs702764 C allele (OR=4.1, p=0.003) for treatment with 2 medications. The OPRM1 rs1799971 G allele (β= −6.9 days, p=0.02) and COMT rs740603 A allele (β= −5.3 days, p=0.01) were associated with shorter LOS. The OPRD1 rs204076 A allele in the mothers was associated with a longer LOS by 6.6 days (p=0.008). Results were significant point-wise but did not meet the experiment-wide significance level. Conclusions These findings suggest that SNPs in opioid receptor and the PNOC genes are associated with NAS severity. However, further testing in a large sample is warranted. This has important implications for prenatal prediction and personalized treatment regimens for infants at highest risk for severe NAS. PMID:26233486

  18. Adenosine A2A Receptor Antagonists and Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This Review summarizes and updates the work on adenosine A2A receptor antagonists for Parkinson’s disease from 2006 to the present. There have been numerous publications, patent applications, and press releases within this time frame that highlight new medicinal chemistry approaches to this attractive and promising target to treat Parkinson’s disease. The Review is broken down by scaffold type and will discuss the efforts to optimize particular scaffolds for activity, pharmacokinetics, and other drug discovery parameters. The majority of approaches focus on preparing selective A2A antagonists, but a few approaches to dual A2A/A1 antagonists will also be highlighted. The in vivo profiles of compounds will be highlighted and discussed to compare activities across different chemical series. A clinical report and update will be given on compounds that have entered clinical trials. PMID:22860156

  19. Oxytocin receptor and vasopressin receptor 1a genes are respectively associated with emotional and cognitive empathy.

    PubMed

    Uzefovsky, F; Shalev, I; Israel, S; Edelman, S; Raz, Y; Mankuta, D; Knafo-Noam, A; Ebstein, R P

    2015-01-01

    Empathy is the ability to recognize and share in the emotions of others. It can be considered a multifaceted concept with cognitive and emotional aspects. Little is known regarding the underlying neurochemistry of empathy and in the current study we used a neurogenetic approach to explore possible brain neurotransmitter pathways contributing to cognitive and emotional empathy. Both the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) and the arginine vasopressin receptor 1a (AVPR1a) genes contribute to social cognition in both animals and humans and hence are prominent candidates for contributing to empathy. The following research examined the associations between polymorphisms in these two genes and individual differences in emotional and cognitive empathy in a sample of 367 young adults. Intriguingly, we found that emotional empathy was associated solely with OXTR, whereas cognitive empathy was associated solely with AVPR1a. Moreover, no interaction was observed between the two genes and measures of empathy. The current findings contribute to our understanding of the distinct neurogenetic pathways involved in cognitive and emotional empathy and underscore the pervasive role of both oxytocin and vasopressin in modulating human emotions.

  20. The dopamine D3 receptor gene and posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Erika J; Mitchell, Karen S; Logue, Mark W; Baldwin, Clinton T; Reardon, Annemarie F; Aiello, Alison; Galea, Sandro; Koenen, Karestan C; Uddin, Monica; Wildman, Derek; Miller, Mark W

    2014-08-01

    The dopamine D3 receptor (DRD3) gene has been implicated in schizophrenia, autism, and substance use-disorders and is related to emotion reactivity, executive functioning, and stress-responding, processes impaired in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The aim of this candidate gene study was to evaluate DRD3 polymorphisms for association with PTSD. The discovery sample was trauma-exposed White, non-Hispanic U.S. veterans and their trauma-exposed intimate partners (N = 491); 60.3% met criteria for lifetime PTSD. The replication sample was 601 trauma-exposed African American participants living in Detroit, Michigan; 23.6% met criteria for lifetime PTSD. Genotyping was based on high-density bead chips. In the discovery sample, 4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs2134655, rs201252087, rs4646996, and rs9868039, showed evidence of association with PTSD and withstood correction for multiple testing. The minor alleles were associated with reduced risk for PTSD (OR range = 0.59 to 0.69). In the replication sample, rs2251177, located 149 base pairs away from the most significant SNP in the discovery sample, was nominally associated with PTSD in men (OR = 0.32). Although the precise role of the D3 receptor in PTSD is not yet known, its role in executive functioning and emotional reactivity, and the sensitivity of the dopamine system to environmental stressors could potentially explain this association. PMID:25158632

  1. The Dopamine D3 Receptor Gene and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Erika J.; Mitchell, Karen S.; Logue, Mark W.; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Reardon, Annemarie F.; Aiello, Alison; Galea, Sandro; Koenen, Karestan C.; Uddin, Monica; Wildman, Derek; Miller, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine D3 receptor (DRD3) gene has been implicated in schizophrenia, autism, and substance use-disorders and is related to emotion reactivity, executive functioning, and stress-responding, processes impaired in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This aim of this candidate gene study was to evaluate DRD3 polymorphisms for association with PTSD. The discovery sample was trauma-exposed white, non-Hispanic veterans and their trauma-exposed intimate partners (N = 491); 60% met criteria for lifetime PTSD. The replication sample was 601 trauma-exposed African American participants; 24% met criteria for lifetime PTSD. Genotyping was based on high-density bead chips. In the discovery sample, four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs2134655, rs201252087, rs4646996, and rs9868039, showed evidence of association with PTSD and withstood correction for multiple testing. The minor alleles were associated with reduced risk for PTSD (odds ratio range: 0.59 – 0.69). In the replication sample, rs2251177, located 149 base pairs away from the most significant SNP in the discovery sample, was nominally associated with PTSD in men (odds ratio: 0.32). Although the precise role of the D3 receptor in PTSD is not yet known, its role in executive functioning and emotional reactivity, and the sensitivity of the dopamine system to environmental stressors, could potentially explain this association. PMID:25158632

  2. Serotonin 2A and 2B receptor-induced phrenic motor facilitation: differential requirement for spinal NADPH oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    MacFarlane, P.M.; Vinit, S.; Mitchell, G.S.

    2011-01-01

    Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) facilitates phrenic motor output by a mechanism that requires spinal serotonin (type 2) receptor activation, NADPH oxidase activity and formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Episodic spinal serotonin (5-HT) receptor activation alone, without changes in oxygenation, is sufficient to elicit NADPH oxidase-dependent phrenic motor facilitation (pMF). Here we investigated: 1) whether serotonin 2A and/or 2B (5-HT2a/b) receptors are expressed in identified phrenic motor neurons, and 2) which receptor subtype is capable of eliciting NADPH-oxidase-dependent pMF. In anesthetized, artificially ventilated adult rats, episodic C4 intrathecal injections (3 × 6µl injections, 5 min intervals) of a 5-HT2a (DOI) or 5-HT2b (BW723C86) receptor agonist elicited progressive and sustained increases in integrated phrenic nerve burst amplitude (i.e. pMF), an effect lasting at least 90 minutes post-injection for both receptor subtypes. 5-HT2a and 5-HT2b receptor agonist-induced pMF were both blocked by selective antagonists (ketanserin and SB206553, respectively), but not by antagonists to the other receptor subtype. Single injections of either agonist failed to elicit pMF, demonstrating a need for episodic receptor activation. Phrenic motor neurons retrogradely labeled with cholera toxin B fragment expressed both 5-HT2a and 5-HT2b receptors. Pre-treatment with NADPH oxidase inhibitors (apocynin and DPI) blocked 5-HT2b, but not 5-HT2a-induced pMF. Thus, multiple spinal type 2 serotonin receptors elicit pMF, but they act via distinct mechanisms that differ in their requirement for NADPH oxidase activity. PMID:21223996

  3. Lipocalin 2: a new mechanoresponding gene regulating bone homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Rucci, Nadia; Capulli, Mattia; Piperni, Sara Gemini; Cappariello, Alfredo; Lau, Patrick; Frings-Meuthen, Petra; Heer, Martina; Teti, Anna

    2015-02-01

    Mechanical loading represents a crucial factor in the regulation of skeletal homeostasis. Its reduction causes loss of bone mass, eventually leading to osteoporosis. In a previous global transcriptome analysis performed in mouse calvarial osteoblasts subjected to simulated microgravity, the most upregulated gene compared to unit gravity condition was Lcn2, encoding the adipokine Lipocalin 2 (LCN2), whose function in bone metabolism is poorly known. To investigate the mechanoresponding properties of LCN2, we evaluated LCN2 levels in sera of healthy volunteers subjected to bed rest, and found a significant time-dependent increase of this adipokine compared to time 0. We then evaluated the in vivo LCN2 regulation in mice subjected to experimentally-induced mechanical unloading by (1) tail suspension, (2) muscle paralysis by botulin toxin A (Botox), or (3) genetically-induced muscular dystrophy (MDX mice), and observed that Lcn2 expression was upregulated in the long bones of all of them, whereas physical exercise counteracted this increase. Mechanistically, in primary osteoblasts transfected with LCN2-expression-vector (OBs-Lcn2) we observed that Runx2 and its downstream genes, Osterix and Alp, were transcriptionally downregulated, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was less prominent versus empty-vector transduced osteoblasts (OBs-empty). OBs-Lcn2 also exhibited an increase of the Rankl/Opg ratio and IL-6 mRNA, suggesting that LCN2 could link poor differentiation of osteoblasts to enhanced osteoclast stimulation. In fact, incubation of purified mouse bone marrow mononuclear cells with conditioned media from OBs-Lcn2 cultures, or their coculture with OBs-Lcn2, improved osteoclastogenesis compared to OBs-empty, whereas treatment with recombinant LCN2 had no effect. In conclusion, our data indicate that LCN2 is a novel osteoblast mechanoresponding gene and that its regulation could be central to the pathological response of the bone tissue to low mechanical forces.

  4. Control of Transcriptional Repression of the Vitellogenin Receptor Gene in Largemouth Bass (Micropterus Salmoides) by Select Estrogen Receptors Isotypes

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Gustavo A.; Bisesi, Joseph H.; Kroll, Kevin J.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Sabo-Attwood, Tara

    2014-01-01

    The vitellogenin receptor (Vtgr) plays an important role in fish reproduction. This receptor functions to incorporate vitellogenin (Vtg), a macromolecule synthesized and released from the liver in the bloodstream, into oocytes where it is processed into yolk. Although studies have focused on the functional role of Vtgr in fish, the mechanistic control of this gene is still unexplored. Here we report the identification and analysis of the first piscine 5′ regulatory region of the vtgr gene which was cloned from largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Using this putative promoter sequence, we investigated a role for hormones, including insulin and 17β-estradiol (E2), in transcriptional regulation through cell-based reporter assays. No effect of insulin was observed, however, E2 was able to repress transcriptional activity of the vtgr promoter through select estrogen receptor subtypes, Esr1 and Esr2a but not Esr2b. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that Esr1 likely interacts with the vtgr promoter region through half ERE and/or SP1 sites, in part. Finally we also show that ethinylestradiol (EE2), but not bisphenol-A (BPA), represses promoter activity similarly to E2. These results reveal for the first time that the Esr1 isoform may play an inhibitory role in the expression of LMB vtgr mRNA under the influence of E2, and potent estrogens such as EE2. In addition, this new evidence suggests that vtgr may be a target of select endocrine disrupting compounds through environmental exposures. PMID:25061109

  5. Thyroid hormone receptors bind to defined regions of the growth hormone and placental lactogen genes.

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, J W; Voz, M L; Eliard, P H; Mathy-Harter, M; De Nayer, P; Economidis, I V; Belayew, A; Martial, J A; Rousseau, G G

    1986-01-01

    The intracellular receptor for thyroid hormone is a protein found in chromatin. Since thyroid hormone stimulates transcription of the growth hormone gene through an unknown mechanism, the hypothesis that the thyroid hormone-receptor complex interacts with defined regions of this gene has been investigated in a cell-free system. Nuclear extracts from human lymphoblastoid IM-9 cells containing thyroid hormone receptors were incubated with L-3,5,3'-tri[125I]iodothyronine and calf thymus DNA-cellulose. Restriction fragments of the human growth hormone gene were added to determine their ability to inhibit labeled receptor binding to DNA-cellulose. These fragments encompassed nucleotide sequences from about three kilobase pairs upstream to about four kilobase pairs downstream from the transcription initiation site. The thyroid hormone-receptor complex bound preferentially to the 5'-flanking sequences of the growth hormone gene in a region between nucleotide coordinates -290 and -129. The receptor also bound to an analogous promoter region in the human placental lactogen gene, which has 92% nucleotide sequence homology with the growth hormone gene. These binding regions appear to be distinct from those that are recognized by the receptor for glucocorticoids, which stimulate growth hormone gene expression synergistically with thyroid hormone. The presence of thyroid hormone was required for binding of its receptor to the growth hormone gene promoter, suggesting that thyroid hormone renders the receptor capable of recognizing specific gene regions. PMID:3466175

  6. Physical origins of remarkable thermostabilization by an octuple mutation for the adenosine A2a receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiwara, Yuta; Ogino, Takahiro; Yasuda, Satoshi; Takamuku, Yuuki; Murata, Takeshi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2016-07-01

    It was experimentally showed that the thermal stability of a membrane protein, the adenosine A2a receptor, was remarkably enhanced by an octuple mutation. Here we theoretically prove that the energy decrease arising from the formation of protein intramolecular hydrogen bonds and the solvent-entropy gain upon protein folding are made substantially larger by the mutation, leading to the remarkable enhancement. The solvent is formed by hydrocarbon groups constituting nonpolar chains of the lipid bilayer within a membrane. The mutation modifies geometric characteristics of the structure so that the solvent crowding can be reduced to a larger extent when the protein folds.

  7. Mass spectrometry-based ligand binding assays on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Massink, A; Holzheimer, M; Hölscher, A; Louvel, J; Guo, D; Spijksma, G; Hankemeier, T; IJzerman, A P

    2015-12-01

    Conventional methods to measure ligand-receptor binding parameters typically require radiolabeled ligands as probes. Despite the robustness of radioligand binding assays, they carry inherent disadvantages in terms of safety precautions, expensive synthesis, special lab requirements, and waste disposal. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a method that can selectively detect ligands without the need of a label. The sensitivity of MS equipment increases progressively, and currently, it is possible to detect low ligand quantities that are usually found in ligand binding assays. We developed a label-free MS ligand binding (MS binding) assay on the adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors (A(1)AR and A(2A)AR), which are well-characterized members of the class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Radioligand binding assays for both receptors are well established, and ample data is available to compare and evaluate the performance of an MS binding assay. 1,3-Dipropyl-8-cyclopentyl-xanthine (DPCPX) and 4-(2-((7-amino-2-(furan-2-yl)-[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]-[1,3,5]triazin-5-yl)amino)ethyl)phenol (ZM-241,385) are high-affinity ligands selective for the A(1)AR and A(2A)AR, respectively. To proof the feasibility of MS binding on the A(1)AR and A(2A)AR, we first developed an MS detection method for unlabeled DPCPX and ZM-241,385. To serve as internal standards, both compounds were also deuterium-labeled. Subsequently, we investigated whether the two unlabeled compounds could substitute for their radiolabeled counterparts as marker ligands in binding experiments, including saturation, displacement, dissociation, and competition association assays. Furthermore, we investigated the accuracy of these assays if the use of internal standards was excluded. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the MS binding assay, even in the absence of a deuterium-labeled internal standard, and provide great promise for the further development of label-free assays based on MS for other GPCRs. PMID

  8. CRTH2, a prostaglandin D2 receptor, mediates depression-related behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Onaka, Yusuke; Shintani, Norihito; Nakazawa, Takanobu; Haba, Ryota; Ago, Yukio; Wang, Hyper; Kanoh, Takuya; Hayata-Takano, Atsuko; Hirai, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Kin-Ya; Nakamura, Masataka; Hashimoto, Ryota; Matsuda, Toshio; Waschek, James A; Kasai, Atsushi; Nagayasu, Kazuki; Baba, Akemichi; Hashimoto, Hitoshi

    2015-05-01

    Depression is a complex neuropsychiatric disorder with an unclear molecular etiology. Inflammatory cytokines and molecular intermediates (including prostaglandins) are suggested to be involved in depression; however, the roles of prostaglandins and their respective receptors are largely unknown in depression. Using genetic and pharmacological approaches, we show here that chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on T helper type 2 cells (CRTH2), a second receptor for prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), mediates depression-related behavior in mice. CRTH2-deficient (CRTH2(-/-)) mice showed antidepressant-like activity in a chronic corticosterone treatment-induced depression. Consistent with this observation, the pharmacological inhibition of CRTH2 via the clinically available drug ramatroban also rescued abnormal social interaction and depression-related behavior in well-established models, including chronic corticosterone-, lipopolysaccharide-, and tumor-induced pathologically relevant depression models. Importantly, chronic stress via corticosterone treatment increased mRNA levels in PGD2-producing enzymes, such as cyclooxygenase-2 and lipocalin-type PGD2 synthase, in the brain. Furthermore, the activity of the hippocampal noradrenergic system but not the dopaminergic or serotonergic systems was increased in CRTH2(-/-) mice. Together with the observation that untreated CRTH2(-/-) mice showed antidepressant-like activity in the forced swim test, these results provide evidence that central CRTH2-mediated signaling is critically involved in depression-related behavior. PMID:25698598

  9. Expression, binding, and signaling properties of CRF2(a) receptors endogenously expressed in human retinoblastoma Y79 cells: passage-dependent regulation of functional receptors.

    PubMed

    Gutknecht, Eric; Hauger, Richard L; Van der Linden, Ilse; Vauquelin, Georges; Dautzenberg, Frank M

    2008-02-01

    Endogenous expression of the corticotropin-releasing factor type 2a receptor [CRF2(a)] but not CRF2(b) and CRF2(c) was observed in higher passage cultures of human Y79 retinoblastoma cells. Functional studies further demonstrated an increase in CRF2(a) mRNA and protein levels with higher passage numbers (> 20 passages). Although the CRF1 receptor was expressed at higher levels than the CRF2(a) receptor, both receptors were easily distinguishable from one another by selective receptor ligands. CRF(1)-preferring or non-selective agonists such as CRF, urocortin 1 (UCN1), and sauvagine stimulated cAMP production in Y79 to maximal responses of approximately 100 pmoles/10(5) cells, whereas the exclusive CRF2 receptor-selective agonists UCN2 and 3 stimulated cAMP production to maximal responses of approximately 25-30 pmoles/10(5) cells. UCN2 and 3-mediated cAMP stimulation was potently blocked by the approximately 300-fold selective CRF2 antagonist antisauvagine (IC50 = 6.5 +/- 1.6 nmol/L), whereas the CRF(1)-selective antagonist NBI27914 only blocked cAMP responses at concentrations > 10 microL. When the CRF(1)-preferring agonist ovine CRF was used to activate cAMP signaling, NBI27914 (IC50 = 38.4 +/- 3.6 nmol/L) was a more potent inhibitor than antisauvagine (IC50 = 2.04 +/- 0.2 microL). Finally, UCN2 and 3 treatment potently and rapidly desensitized the CRF2 receptor responses in Y79 cells. These data demonstrate that Y79 cells express functional CRF1 and CRF2a receptors and that the CRF2(a) receptor protein is up-regulated during prolonged culture. PMID:17976162

  10. Postsynaptic Adenosine A2A Receptors Modulate Intrinsic Excitability of Pyramidal Cells in the Rat Basolateral Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Andrew R.; Ariwodola, Olusegun J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The basolateral amygdala plays a critical role in the etiology of anxiety disorders and addiction. Pyramidal neurons, the primary output cells of this region, display increased firing following exposure to stressors, and it is thought that this increase in excitability contributes to stress responsivity and the expression of anxiety-like behaviors. However, much remains unknown about the underlying mechanisms that regulate the intrinsic excitability of basolateral amygdala pyramidal neurons. Methods: Ex vivo gramicidin perforated patch recordings were conducted in current clamp mode where hyper- and depolarizing current steps were applied to basolateral amygdala pyramidal neurons to assess the effects of adenosine A2A receptor modulation on intrinsic excitability. Results: Activation of adenosine A2A receptors with the selective A2A receptor agonist CGS-21680 significantly increased the firing rate of basolateral amygdala pyramidal neurons in rat amygdala brain slices, likely via inhibition of the slow afterhyperpolarization potential. Both of these A2A receptor-mediated effects were blocked by preapplication of a selective A2A receptor antagonist (ZM-241385) or by intra-pipette infusion of a protein kinase A inhibitor, suggesting a postsynaptic locus of A2A receptors on basolateral amygdala pyramidal neurons. Interestingly, bath application of the A2A receptor antagonist alone significantly attenuated basolateral amygdala pyramidal cell firing, consistent with a role for tonic adenosine in the regulation of the intrinsic excitability of these neurons. Conclusions: Collectively, these data suggest that adenosine, via activation of A2A receptors, may directly facilitate basolateral amygdala pyramidal cell output, providing a possible balance for the recently described inhibitory effects of adenosine A1 receptor activation on glutamatergic excitation of basolateral amygdala pyramidal cells. PMID:25716780

  11. Expression of somatostatin receptor genes and acetylcholine receptor development in rat skeletal muscle during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Peng, M; Conforti, L; Millhorn, D E

    1998-05-01

    Our laboratory reported previously that somatostatin (SST) is transiently expressed in rat motoneurons during the first 14 days after birth. We investigated the possibility that the SST receptor (SSTR) is expressed in skeletal muscle. We found that two of the five subtypes of SSTR (SSTR3 and SSTR4) are expressed in skeletal muscle with a time course that correlates with the transient expression of SST in motoneurons. In addition, SSTR2A is expressed from birth to adulthood in skeletal muscle. Both SSTR2A and SSTR4 are also expressed in L6 cells, a skeletal muscle cell line. Somatostatin acting through its receptors has been shown to stimulate tyrosine phosphatase activity in a number of different tissues. We found that several proteins (50, 65, 90, 140, 180 and 200 kDa) exhibited a reduced degree of tyrosine phosphorylation following SST treatment. Inhibition of tyrosine phosphatase activity with sodium orthovanadate increased expression of the nicotinic acetyl-choline receptor (nAChR) epsilon subunit mRNA by three fold. Somatostatin reversed the elevated epsilon mRNA following orthovanadate treatment. These findings show that SSTR is expressed in skeletal muscle and that SST acting via the SSTR regulates tyrosine phosphorylation and expression of the epsilon subunit of the AChR in the rat skeletal muscle. PMID:9852305

  12. Altered Expression of Genes Encoding Neurotransmitter Receptors in GnRH Neurons of Proestrous Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vastagh, Csaba; Rodolosse, Annie; Solymosi, Norbert; Liposits, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons play a key role in the central regulation of reproduction. In proestrous female mice, estradiol triggers the pre-ovulatory GnRH surge, however, its impact on the expression of neurotransmitter receptor genes in GnRH neurons has not been explored yet. We hypothesized that proestrus is accompanied by substantial changes in the expression profile of genes coding for neurotransmitter receptors in GnRH neurons. We compared the transcriptome of GnRH neurons obtained from intact, proestrous, and metestrous female GnRH-GFP transgenic mice, respectively. About 1500 individual GnRH neurons were sampled from both groups and their transcriptome was analyzed using microarray hybridization and real-time PCR. In this study, changes in mRNA expression of genes involved in neurotransmitter signaling were investigated. Differential gene expression was most apparent in GABA-ergic (Gabbr1, Gabra3, Gabrb3, Gabrb2, Gabrg2), glutamatergic (Gria1, Gria2, Grin1, Grin3a, Grm1, Slc17a6), cholinergic (Chrnb2, Chrm4) and dopaminergic (Drd3, Drd4), adrenergic (Adra1b, Adra2a, Adra2c), adenosinergic (Adora2a, Adora2b), glycinergic (Glra), purinergic (P2rx7), and serotonergic (Htr1b) receptors. In concert with these events, expression of genes in the signaling pathways downstream to the receptors, i.e., G-proteins (Gnai1, Gnai2, Gnas), adenylate-cyclases (Adcy3, Adcy5), protein kinase A (Prkaca, Prkacb) protein kinase C (Prkca) and certain transporters (Slc1a4, Slc17a6, Slc6a17) were also changed. The marked differences found in the expression of genes involved in neurotransmitter signaling of GnRH neurons at pro- and metestrous stages of the ovarian cycle indicate the differential contribution of these neurotransmitter systems to the induction of the pre-ovulatory GnRH surge, the known prerequisite of the subsequent hormonal cascade inducing ovulation. PMID:27774052

  13. Receptor protein kinase gene encoded at the self-incompatibility locus

    DOEpatents

    Nasrallah, June B.; Nasrallah, Mikhail E.; Stein, Joshua

    1996-01-01

    Described herein is a S receptor kinase gene (SRK), derived from the S locus in Brassica oleracea, having a extracellular domain highly similar to the secreted product of the S-locus glycoprotein gene.

  14. Transcriptional Characterization of Porcine Leptin and Leptin Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Montarelo, Dafne; Fernández, Almudena; Barragán, Carmen; Noguera, Jose L.; Folch, Josep M.; Rodríguez, M. Carmen; Óvilo, Cristina; Silió, Luis; Fernández, Ana I.

    2013-01-01

    The leptin (LEP) and its receptor (LEPR) regulate food intake and energy balance through hypothalamic signaling. However, the LEP-LEPR axis seems to be more complex and its expression regulation has not been well described. In pigs, LEP and LEPR genes have been widely studied due to their relevance. Previous studies reported significant effects of SNPs located in both genes on growth and fatness traits. The aim of this study was to determine the expression profiles of LEP and LEPR across hypothalamic, adipose, hepatic and muscle tissues in Iberian x Landrace backcrossed pigs and to analyze the effects of gene variants on transcript abundance. To our knowledge, non porcine LEPR isoforms have been described rather than LEPRb. A short porcine LEPR isoform (LEPRa), that encodes a protein lacking the intracellular residues responsible of signal transduction, has been identified for the first time. The LEPRb isoform was only quantifiable in hypothalamus while LEPRa appeared widely expressed across tissues, but at higher levels in liver, suggesting that both isoforms would develop different roles. The unique LEP transcript showed expression in backfat and muscle. The effects of gene variants on transcript expression revealed interesting results. The LEPRc.1987C>T polymorphism showed opposite effects on LEPRb and LEPRa hypothalamic expression. In addition, one out of the 16 polymorphisms identified in the LEPR promoter region revealed high differential expression in hepatic LEPRa. These results suggest a LEPR isoform-specific regulation at tissue level. Conversely, non-differential expression of LEP conditional on the analyzed polymorphisms could be detected, indicating that its regulation is likely affected by other mechanisms rather than gene sequence variants. The present study has allowed a transcriptional characterization of LEP and LEPR isoforms on a range of tissues. Their expression patterns seem to indicate that both molecules develop peripheral roles apart from

  15. Calcium-Sensing Receptor Gene: Regulation of Expression.

    PubMed

    Hendy, Geoffrey N; Canaff, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    The human calcium-sensing receptor gene (CASR) has 8 exons, and localizes to chromosome 3q. Exons 1A and 1B encode alternative 5'-untranslated regions (UTRs) that splice to exon 2 encoding the AUG initiation codon. Exons 2-7 encode the CaSR protein of 1078 amino acids. Promoter P1 has TATA and CCAAT boxes upstream of exon 1A, and promoter P2 has Sp1/3 motifs at the start site of exon 1B. Exon 1A transcripts from the P1 promoter are reduced in parathyroid tumors and colon carcinomas. Studies of colon carcinomas and neuroblastomas have emphasized the importance of epigenetic changes-promoter methylation of the GC-rich P2 promoter, histone acetylation-as well as involvement of microRNAs in bringing about CASR gene silencing and reduced CaSR expression. Functional cis-elements in the CASR promoters responsive to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], proinflammatory cytokines, and the transcription factor glial cells missing-2 (GCM2) have been characterized. Reduced levels of CaSR and reduced responsiveness to active vitamin D in parathyroid neoplasia and colon carcinoma may blunt the "tumor suppressor" activity of the CaSR. The hypocalcemia of critically ill patients with burn injury or sepsis is associated with CASR gene upregulation by TNF-alpha and IL-1beta via kappaB elements, and by IL-6 via Stat1/3 and Sp1/3 elements in the CASR gene promoters, respectively. The CASR is transactivated by GCM2-the expression of which is essential for parathyroid gland development. Hyperactive forms of GCM2 may contribute to later parathyroid hyperactivity or tumorigenesis. The expression of the CaSR-the calciostat-is regulated physiologically and pathophysiologically at the gene level. PMID:27679579

  16. Calcium-Sensing Receptor Gene: Regulation of Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hendy, Geoffrey N.; Canaff, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    The human calcium-sensing receptor gene (CASR) has 8 exons, and localizes to chromosome 3q. Exons 1A and 1B encode alternative 5′-untranslated regions (UTRs) that splice to exon 2 encoding the AUG initiation codon. Exons 2–7 encode the CaSR protein of 1078 amino acids. Promoter P1 has TATA and CCAAT boxes upstream of exon 1A, and promoter P2 has Sp1/3 motifs at the start site of exon 1B. Exon 1A transcripts from the P1 promoter are reduced in parathyroid tumors and colon carcinomas. Studies of colon carcinomas and neuroblastomas have emphasized the importance of epigenetic changes—promoter methylation of the GC-rich P2 promoter, histone acetylation—as well as involvement of microRNAs in bringing about CASR gene silencing and reduced CaSR expression. Functional cis-elements in the CASR promoters responsive to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], proinflammatory cytokines, and the transcription factor glial cells missing-2 (GCM2) have been characterized. Reduced levels of CaSR and reduced responsiveness to active vitamin D in parathyroid neoplasia and colon carcinoma may blunt the “tumor suppressor” activity of the CaSR. The hypocalcemia of critically ill patients with burn injury or sepsis is associated with CASR gene upregulation by TNF-alpha and IL-1beta via kappaB elements, and by IL-6 via Stat1/3 and Sp1/3 elements in the CASR gene promoters, respectively. The CASR is transactivated by GCM2—the expression of which is essential for parathyroid gland development. Hyperactive forms of GCM2 may contribute to later parathyroid hyperactivity or tumorigenesis. The expression of the CaSR—the calciostat—is regulated physiologically and pathophysiologically at the gene level. PMID:27679579

  17. Calcium-Sensing Receptor Gene: Regulation of Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hendy, Geoffrey N.; Canaff, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    The human calcium-sensing receptor gene (CASR) has 8 exons, and localizes to chromosome 3q. Exons 1A and 1B encode alternative 5′-untranslated regions (UTRs) that splice to exon 2 encoding the AUG initiation codon. Exons 2–7 encode the CaSR protein of 1078 amino acids. Promoter P1 has TATA and CCAAT boxes upstream of exon 1A, and promoter P2 has Sp1/3 motifs at the start site of exon 1B. Exon 1A transcripts from the P1 promoter are reduced in parathyroid tumors and colon carcinomas. Studies of colon carcinomas and neuroblastomas have emphasized the importance of epigenetic changes—promoter methylation of the GC-rich P2 promoter, histone acetylation—as well as involvement of microRNAs in bringing about CASR gene silencing and reduced CaSR expression. Functional cis-elements in the CASR promoters responsive to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], proinflammatory cytokines, and the transcription factor glial cells missing-2 (GCM2) have been characterized. Reduced levels of CaSR and reduced responsiveness to active vitamin D in parathyroid neoplasia and colon carcinoma may blunt the “tumor suppressor” activity of the CaSR. The hypocalcemia of critically ill patients with burn injury or sepsis is associated with CASR gene upregulation by TNF-alpha and IL-1beta via kappaB elements, and by IL-6 via Stat1/3 and Sp1/3 elements in the CASR gene promoters, respectively. The CASR is transactivated by GCM2—the expression of which is essential for parathyroid gland development. Hyperactive forms of GCM2 may contribute to later parathyroid hyperactivity or tumorigenesis. The expression of the CaSR—the calciostat—is regulated physiologically and pathophysiologically at the gene level.

  18. Transcriptional Characterization of Porcine Leptin and Leptin Receptor Genes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Montarelo, Dafne; Fernández, Almudena; Barragán, Carmen; Noguera, Jose L; Folch, Josep M; Rodríguez, M Carmen; Ovilo, Cristina; Silió, Luis; Fernández, Ana I

    2013-01-01

    The leptin (LEP) and its receptor (LEPR) regulate food intake and energy balance through hypothalamic signaling. However, the LEP-LEPR axis seems to be more complex and its expression regulation has not been well described. In pigs, LEP and LEPR genes have been widely studied due to their relevance. Previous studies reported significant effects of SNPs located in both genes on growth and fatness traits. The aim of this study was to determine the expression profiles of LEP and LEPR across hypothalamic, adipose, hepatic and muscle tissues in Iberian x Landrace backcrossed pigs and to analyze the effects of gene variants on transcript abundance. To our knowledge, non porcine LEPR isoforms have been described rather than LEPRb. A short porcine LEPR isoform (LEPRa), that encodes a protein lacking the intracellular residues responsible of signal transduction, has been identified for the first time. The LEPRb isoform was only quantifiable in hypothalamus while LEPRa appeared widely expressed across tissues, but at higher levels in liver, suggesting that both isoforms would develop different roles. The unique LEP transcript showed expression in backfat and muscle. The effects of gene variants on transcript expression revealed interesting results. The LEPRc.1987C>T polymorphism showed opposite effects on LEPRb and LEPRa hypothalamic expression. In addition, one out of the 16 polymorphisms identified in the LEPR promoter region revealed high differential expression in hepatic LEPRa. These results suggest a LEPR isoform-specific regulation at tissue level. Conversely, non-differential expression of LEP conditional on the analyzed polymorphisms could be detected, indicating that its regulation is likely affected by other mechanisms rather than gene sequence variants. The present study has allowed a transcriptional characterization of LEP and LEPR isoforms on a range of tissues. Their expression patterns seem to indicate that both molecules develop peripheral roles apart from

  19. Reduced striatal adenosine A2A receptor levels define a molecular subgroup in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Villar-Menéndez, Izaskun; Díaz-Sánchez, Sara; Blanch, Marta; Albasanz, José Luis; Pereira-Veiga, Thais; Monje, Alfonso; Planchat, Luis Maria; Ferrer, Isidre; Martín, Mairena; Barrachina, Marta

    2014-04-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is a mental disorder of unknown origin. Some scientific evidence seems to indicate that SZ is not a single disease entity, since there are patient groups with clear symptomatic, course and biomarker differences. SZ is characterized by a hyperdopaminergic state related to high dopamine D2 receptor activity. It has also been proposed that there is a hypoadenosynergic state. Adenosine is a nucleoside widely distributed in the organism with neuromodulative and neuroprotective activity in the central nervous system. In the brain, the most abundant adenosine receptors are A1R and A2AR. In the present report, we characterize the presence of both receptors in human postmortem putamens of patients suffering SZ with real time TaqMan PCR, western blotting and radioligand binding assay. We show that A1R levels remain unchanged with respect to age-matched controls, whereas nearly fifty percent of patients have reduced A2AR, at the transcriptional and translational levels. Moreover, we describe how DNA methylation plays a role in the pathological A2AR levels with the bisulfite-sequencing technique. In fact, an increase in 5-methylcytosine percentage in the 5' UTR region of ADORA2A was found in those SZ patients with reduced A2AR levels. Interestingly, there was a relationship between the A2A/β-actin ratio and motor disturbances as assessed with some items of the PANSS, AIMS and SAS scales. Therefore, there may be a subgroup of SZ patients with reduced striatal A2AR levels accompanied by an altered motor phenotype. PMID:24433848

  20. Evaluation of structural effects on 5-HT2A receptor antagonism by aporphines: identification of a new aporphine with 5-HT2A antagonist activity

    PubMed Central

    Ponnala, Shashikanth; Gonzales, Junior; Kapadia, Nirav; Navarro, Hernan A.; Harding, Wayne W.

    2014-01-01

    A set of aporphine analogs related to nantenine was evaluated for antagonist activity at 5-HT2A and α1A adrenergic receptors. With regards to 5-HT2A receptor antagonism, a C2 allyl group is detrimental to activity. The chiral center of nantenine is not important for 5-HT2A antagonist activity, however the N6 nitrogen atom is a critical feature for 5-HT2A antagonism. Compound 12b was the most potent 5-HT2A aporphine antagonist identified in this study and has similar potency to previously identified aporphine antagonists 2 and 3. The ring A and N6 modifications examined were detrimental to α1A antagonism. A slight eutomeric preference for the R enantiomer of nantenine was observed in relation to α1A antagonism. PMID:24630561

  1. Effects of α-2A adrenergic receptor agonist on time and risk preference in primates

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soyoun; Bobeica, Irina; Gamo, Nao J.; Arnsten, Amy F. T.; Lee, Daeyeol

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Subjective values of actions are influenced by the uncertainty and immediacy of expected rewards. Multiple brain areas, including the prefrontal cortex and basal ganglia, are implicated in selecting actions according to their subjective values. Alterations in these neural circuits therefore might contribute to symptoms of impulsive choice behaviors in disorders such as substance abuse and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In particular, the α-2A noradrenergic system is known to have a key influence on prefrontal cortical circuits, and medications that stimulate this receptor are currently in use for the treatment of ADHD. Objective We tested whether the preference of rhesus monkeys for delayed and uncertain reward is influenced by the α-2A adrenergic receptor agonist, guanfacine. Methods In each trial, the animal chose between a small, certain and immediate reward and another larger, more delayed reward. In half of the trials, the larger reward was certain, whereas in the remaining trials, the larger reward was uncertain. Results Guanfacine increased the tendency for the animal to choose the larger and more delayed reward only when it was certain. By applying an econometric model to the animal’s choice behavior, we found that guanfacine selectively reduced the animal’s time preference, increasing their choice of delayed, larger rewards, without significantly affecting their risk preference. Conclusions In combination with previous findings that guanfacine improves the efficiency of working memory and other prefrontal functions, these results suggest that impulsive choice behaviors may also be ameliorated by strengthening prefrontal functions. PMID:21979441

  2. A constitutive promoter directs expression of the nerve growth factor receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Sehgal, A.; Patil, N.; Chao, M.

    1988-08-01

    Expression of nerve growth factor receptor is normally restricted to cells derived from the neural crest in a developmentally regulated manner. The authors analyzed promoter sequences for the human nerve growth factor receptor gene and found that the receptor promoter resembles others which are associated with constitutively expressed genes that have housekeeping and growth-related functions. Unlike these other genes, the initiation of transcription occurred at one major site rather than at multiple sites. The constitutive nature of the nerve growth factor receptor promoter may account for the ability of this gene to be transcribed in a diverse number of heterologous cells after gene transfer. The intron-exon structure of the receptor gene indicated that structural features are precisely divided into discrete domains.

  3. Vasopressin V1 receptors contribute to hemodynamic and sympathoinhibitory responses evoked by stimulation of adenosine A2a receptors in NTS.

    PubMed

    Scislo, Tadeusz J; O'Leary, Donal S

    2006-05-01

    Activation of adenosine A2a receptors in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) decreases mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), whereas increases in preganglionic adrenal sympathetic nerve activity (pre-ASNA) occur, a pattern similar to that observed during hypotensive hemorrhage. Central vasopressin V1 receptors may contribute to posthemorrhagic hypotension and bradycardia. Both V1 and A2a receptors are densely expressed in the NTS, and both of these receptors are involved in cardiovascular control; thus they may interact. The responses elicited by NTS A2a receptors are mediated mostly via nonglutamatergic mechanisms, possibly via release of vasopressin. Therefore, we investigated whether blockade of NTS V1 receptors alters the autonomic response patterns evoked by stimulation of NTS A2a receptors (CGS-21680, 20 pmol/50 nl) in alpha-chloralose-urethane anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats. In addition, we compared the regional sympathetic responses to microinjections of vasopressin (0.1-100 ng/50 nl) into the NTS. Blockade of V1 receptors reversed the normal decreases in MAP into increases (-95.6 +/- 28.3 vs. 51.4 +/- 15.7 integralDelta%), virtually abolished the decreases in HR (-258.3 +/- 54.0 vs. 18.9 +/- 57.8 integralDeltabeats/min) and RSNA (-239.3 +/- 47.4 vs. 15.9 +/- 36.1 integralDelta%), and did not affect the increases in pre-ASNA (279.7 +/- 48.3 vs. 233.1 +/- 54.1 integralDelta%) evoked by A2a receptor stimulation. The responses partially returned toward normal values approximately 90 min after the blockade. Microinjections of vasopressin into the NTS evoked dose-dependent decreases in HR and RSNA and variable MAP and pre-ASNA responses with a tendency toward increases. We conclude that the decreases in MAP, HR, and RSNA in response to NTS A2a receptor stimulation may be mediated via release of vasopressin from neural terminals in the NTS. The differential effects of NTS V1 and A2a receptors on

  4. Differential modulation of expression of nuclear receptor mediated genes by tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) on early life stages of zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiyuan; Yu, Yijun; Tang, Song; Liu, Hongling; Su, Guanyong; Xie, Yuwei; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus; Yu, Hongxia

    2015-12-01

    As one substitute for phased-out brominated flame retardants (BFRs), tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) is frequently detected in aquatic organisms. However, knowledge about endocrine disrupting mechanisms associated with nuclear receptors caused by TBOEP remained restricted to results from in vitro studies with mammalian cells. In the study, results of which are presented here, embryos/larvae of zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to 0.02, 0.1 or 0.5μM TBOEP to investigate expression of genes under control of several nuclear hormone receptors (estrogen receptors (ERs), androgen receptor (AR), thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TRα), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), aryl hydrocarbon (AhR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and pregnane×receptor (P×R)) pathways at 120hpf. Exposure to 0.5μM TBOEP significantly (p<0.05, one-way analysis of variance) up-regulated expression of estrogen receptors (ERs, er1, er2a, and er2b) genes and ER-associated genes (vtg4, vtg5, pgr, ncor, and ncoa3), indicating TBOEP modulates the ER pathway. In contrast, expression of most genes (mr, 11βhsd, ube2i,and adrb2b) associated with the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) pathway were significantly down-regulated. Furthermore, in vitro mammalian cell-based (MDA-kb2 and H4IIE-luc) receptor transactivation assays, were also conducted to investigate possible agonistic or antagonistic effects on AR- and AhR-mediated pathways. In mammalian cells, none of these pathways were affected by TBOEP at the concentrations studied. Receptor-mediated responses (in vivo) and mammalian cell lines receptor binding assay (in vitro) combined with published information suggest that TBOEP can modulate receptor-mediated, endocrine process (in vivo/in vitro), particularly ER and MR. PMID:26562049

  5. Characterization of the NR1, NR2A, and NR2C receptor proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Köpke, A. K.; Bonk, I.; Sydow, S.; Menke, H.; Spiess, J.

    1993-01-01

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits were characterized with seven polyclonal antibodies. The antibodies were directed against NR1-A, NR2A-N1, and NR2C-N1, representing N-terminal sequences of the NR1, NR2A, and NR2C subunits, and against NR1-E, NR2A-C1, and NR2C-C1, derived from C-terminal sequences of these subunits. The anti-NR1-D antibody was raised against the putative internal loop of NR1. A size of 118 kDa was found in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for NR1 (from rat brain) detected by anti-NR1-D and -NR1-E, but not anti-NR1-A. With the anti-NR1-A antibody, a 125-kDa protein was discovered that may represent a glutamate receptor not yet characterized. NR2A and NR2C were identified as proteins with sizes of 175 and 140 kDa, respectively. Enzymatic N-deglycosylation generated a 97-kDa protein from NR1, a 105-kDa protein from the 125-kDa protein, a 162-kDa protein from NR2A, and a 127-kDa protein from NR2C. In contrast to the deglycosylation product of the NR2A, the 97- and 127-kDa proteins derived from NR1 and NR2C, respectively, were found significantly smaller than the molecular masses of 103 and 141 kDa, respectively, predicted on the basis of DNA data. These products may represent truncated proteins. The tissue content of the NR1 and NR2A was high in bovine hippocampus and cortex but lower in the cerebellum. In contrast, NR2C was solely found in the cerebellum. The 125-kDa protein was highest in the cerebellum and cortex. PMID:8298456

  6. A1 and A2a receptors mediate inhibitory effects of adenosine on the motor activity of human colon.

    PubMed

    Fornai, M; Antonioli, L; Colucci, R; Ghisu, N; Buccianti, P; Marioni, A; Chiarugi, M; Tuccori, M; Blandizzi, C; Del Tacca, M

    2009-04-01

    Experimental evidence in animal models suggests that adenosine is involved in the regulation of digestive functions. This study examines the influence of adenosine on the contractile activity of human colon. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed A(1) and A(2a) receptor expression in colonic neuromuscular layers. Circular muscle preparations were connected to isotonic transducers to determine the effects of 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX; A(1) receptor antagonist), ZM 241385 (A(2a) receptor antagonist), CCPA (A(1) receptor agonist) and 2-[(p-2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino]-5'-N-ethyl-carboxamide-adenosine (CGS 21680; A(2a) receptor agonist) on motor responses evoked by electrical stimulation or carbachol. Electrically evoked contractions were enhanced by DPCPX and ZM 241385, and reduced by CCPA and CGS 21680. Similar effects were observed when colonic preparations were incubated with guanethidine (noradrenergic blocker), L-732,138, GR-159897 and SB-218795 (NK receptor antagonists). However, in the presence of guanethidine, NK receptor antagonists and N(omega)-propyl-L-arginine (NPA; neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), the effects of DPCPX and CCPA were still evident, while those of ZM 241385 and CGS 21680 no longer occurred. Carbachol-induced contractions were unaffected by A(2a) receptor ligands, but they were enhanced or reduced by DPCPX and CCPA, respectively. When colonic preparations were incubated with guanethidine, NK antagonists and atropine, electrically induced relaxations were partly reduced by ZM 241385 or NPA, but unaffected by DPCPX. Dipyridamole or application of exogenous adenosine reduced electrically and carbachol-evoked contractions, whereas adenosine deaminase enhanced such motor responses. In conclusion, adenosine exerts an inhibitory control on human colonic motility. A(1) receptors mediate direct modulating actions on smooth muscle, whereas A(2a) receptors operate through inhibitory nitrergic nerve pathways.

  7. Corticosteroid receptor gene expression is related to sex and social behaviour in a social fish.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Constance M; Rodela, Tammy M; Mileva, Viktoria R; Balshine, Sigal; Gilmour, Kathleen M

    2013-03-01

    Circulating corticosteroids have been related to social status in a variety of species. However, our understanding of corticosteroid receptor expression and its relationship with sociality is still in its infancy. Knowledge of variation in receptor expression is critical to understand the physiological relevance of differences in circulating corticosteroid concentrations. In this study, we examined corticosteroid receptor gene expression in relation to dominance rank, sex, and social behaviour in the highly social cichlid fish, Neolamprologus pulcher. We examined the relative gene expression of the three known teleost corticosteroid receptors: glucocorticoid receptor 1 (GR1), glucocorticoid receptor 2 (GR2), and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in liver and brain tissue of dominant and subordinate N. pulcher males and females. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the N. pulcher gene originally described as GR2, clustered with other teleost GR1 genes, while the originally-described N. pulcher GR1 gene clustered with the GR2 genes of other teleosts. Therefore we propose a change in the original nomenclature of the N. pulcher GRs: GR1 (formerly GR2) and GR2 (formerly GR1) and adopt this new nomenclature throughout this manuscript. Liver MR transcript levels were higher in males than females, and positively related to submissive behaviour. Liver GR2 (formerly GR1) transcript levels were also higher in males than females. Collectively, the results demonstrate sex differences in corticosteroid receptor abundance, and suggest tissue- and receptor-specific roles for corticosteroid receptors in mediating aspects of social behaviour.

  8. Variants in the vitamin D receptor gene and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wjst, Matthias

    2005-01-01

    Background Early lifetime exposure to dietary or supplementary vitamin D has been predicted to be a risk factor for later allergy. Twin studies suggest that response to vitamin D exposure might be influenced by genetic factors. As these effects are primarily mediated through the vitamin D receptor (VDR), single base variants in this gene may be risk factors for asthma or allergy. Results 951 individuals from 224 pedigrees with at least 2 asthmatic children were analyzed for 13 SNPs in the VDR. There was no preferential transmission to children with asthma. In their unaffected sibs, however, one allele in the 5' region was 0.5-fold undertransmitted (p = 0.049), while two other alleles in the 3' terminal region were 2-fold over-transmitted (p = 0.013 and 0.018). An association was also seen with bronchial hyperreactivity against methacholine and with specific immunoglobulin E serum levels. Conclusion The transmission disequilibrium in unaffected sibs of otherwise multiple-affected families seem to be a powerful statistical test. A preferential transmission of vitamin D receptor variants to children with asthma could not be confirmed but raises the possibility of a protective effect for unaffected children. PMID:15651992

  9. Critical role of hypoxia and A2A adenosine receptors in liver tissue-protecting physiological anti-inflammatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Choukèr, Alexander; Thiel, Manfred; Lukashev, Dmitriy; Ward, Jerrold M; Kaufmann, Ines; Apasov, Sergey; Sitkovsky, Michail V; Ohta, Akio

    2008-01-01

    Whole body exposure of wild type control littermates and A2A adenosine receptor (A2AR) gene deleted mice to low oxygen containing inspired gas mixture allowed the investigation of the mechanism that controls inflammatory liver damage and protects the liver using a mouse model of T cell-mediated viral and autoimmune hepatitis. We tested the hypothesis that the inflammatory tissue damage-associated hypoxia and extracellular adenosine --> A2AR signaling plays an important role in the physiological anti-inflammatory mechanism that limits liver damage during fulminant hepatitis. After induction of T cell-mediated hepatitis, mice were kept in modular chambers either under normoxic (21% oxygen) or hypoxic (10% oxygen) conditions for 8 h. It was shown that the whole body exposure to hypoxic atmosphere caused tissue hypoxia in healthy animals as evidenced by a decrease in the arterial blood oxygen tension and increase of the plasma adenosine concentration (P < 0.05). This "hypoxic" treatment resulted in significantly reduced hepatocellular damage and attenuated levels of serum cytokines in mice with acute liver inflammation. The anti-inflammatory effects of hypoxia were not observed in the absence of A2AR in studies of A2AR gene-deficient mice or when A2AR have been pharmacologically antagonized with synthetic antagonist. The presented data demonstrate that total body hypoxia-triggered pathway provides protection in acute hepatitis and that hypoxia (upstream) and A2AR (downstream) function in the same immunosuppressive and liver tissue-protecting pathway.

  10. α2A-Adrenergic Receptors Filter Parabrachial Inputs to the Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis

    PubMed Central

    Flavin, Stephanie A.; Matthews, Robert T.; Wang, Qin; Muly, E. Chris

    2014-01-01

    α2-adrenergic receptors (AR) within the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) reduce stress–reward interactions in rodent models. In addition to their roles as autoreceptors, BNST α2A-ARs suppress glutamatergic transmission. One prominent glutamatergic input to the BNST originates from the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) and consists of asymmetric axosomatic synapses containing calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and vGluT2. Here we provide immunoelectron microscopic data showing that many asymmetric axosomatic synapses in the BNST contain α2A-ARs. Further, we examined optically evoked glutamate release ex vivo in BNST from mice with virally delivered channelrhodopsin2 (ChR2) expression in PBN. In BNST from these animals, ChR2 partially colocalized with CGRP, and activation generated EPSCs in dorsal anterolateral BNST neurons that elicited two cell-type-specific outcomes: (1) feedforward inhibition or (2) an EPSP that elicited firing. We found that the α2A-AR agonist guanfacine selectively inhibited this PBN input to the BNST, preferentially reducing the excitatory response in ex vivo mouse brain slices. To begin to assess the overall impact of α2A-AR control of this PBN input on BNST excitatory transmission, we used a Thy1-COP4 mouse line with little postsynaptic ChR2 expression nor colocalization of ChR2 with CGRP in the BNST. In slices from these mice, we found that guanfacine enhanced, rather than suppressed, optogenetically initiated excitatory drive in BNST. Thus, our study reveals distinct actions of PBN afferents within the BNST and suggests that α2A-AR agonists may filter excitatory transmission in the BNST by inhibiting a component of the PBN input while enhancing the actions of other inputs. PMID:25009265

  11. α(2A)-adrenergic receptors filter parabrachial inputs to the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.

    PubMed

    Flavin, Stephanie A; Matthews, Robert T; Wang, Qin; Muly, E Chris; Winder, Danny G

    2014-07-01

    α2-adrenergic receptors (AR) within the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) reduce stress-reward interactions in rodent models. In addition to their roles as autoreceptors, BNST α(2A)-ARs suppress glutamatergic transmission. One prominent glutamatergic input to the BNST originates from the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) and consists of asymmetric axosomatic synapses containing calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and vGluT2. Here we provide immunoelectron microscopic data showing that many asymmetric axosomatic synapses in the BNST contain α(2A)-ARs. Further, we examined optically evoked glutamate release ex vivo in BNST from mice with virally delivered channelrhodopsin2 (ChR2) expression in PBN. In BNST from these animals, ChR2 partially colocalized with CGRP, and activation generated EPSCs in dorsal anterolateral BNST neurons that elicited two cell-type-specific outcomes: (1) feedforward inhibition or (2) an EPSP that elicited firing. We found that the α(2A)-AR agonist guanfacine selectively inhibited this PBN input to the BNST, preferentially reducing the excitatory response in ex vivo mouse brain slices. To begin to assess the overall impact of α(2A)-AR control of this PBN input on BNST excitatory transmission, we used a Thy1-COP4 mouse line with little postsynaptic ChR2 expression nor colocalization of ChR2 with CGRP in the BNST. In slices from these mice, we found that guanfacine enhanced, rather than suppressed, optogenetically initiated excitatory drive in BNST. Thus, our study reveals distinct actions of PBN afferents within the BNST and suggests that α(2A)-AR agonists may filter excitatory transmission in the BNST by inhibiting a component of the PBN input while enhancing the actions of other inputs.

  12. α(2A)-adrenergic receptors filter parabrachial inputs to the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.

    PubMed

    Flavin, Stephanie A; Matthews, Robert T; Wang, Qin; Muly, E Chris; Winder, Danny G

    2014-07-01

    α2-adrenergic receptors (AR) within the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) reduce stress-reward interactions in rodent models. In addition to their roles as autoreceptors, BNST α(2A)-ARs suppress glutamatergic transmission. One prominent glutamatergic input to the BNST originates from the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) and consists of asymmetric axosomatic synapses containing calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and vGluT2. Here we provide immunoelectron microscopic data showing that many asymmetric axosomatic synapses in the BNST contain α(2A)-ARs. Further, we examined optically evoked glutamate release ex vivo in BNST from mice with virally delivered channelrhodopsin2 (ChR2) expression in PBN. In BNST from these animals, ChR2 partially colocalized with CGRP, and activation generated EPSCs in dorsal anterolateral BNST neurons that elicited two cell-type-specific outcomes: (1) feedforward inhibition or (2) an EPSP that elicited firing. We found that the α(2A)-AR agonist guanfacine selectively inhibited this PBN input to the BNST, preferentially reducing the excitatory response in ex vivo mouse brain slices. To begin to assess the overall impact of α(2A)-AR control of this PBN input on BNST excitatory transmission, we used a Thy1-COP4 mouse line with little postsynaptic ChR2 expression nor colocalization of ChR2 with CGRP in the BNST. In slices from these mice, we found that guanfacine enhanced, rather than suppressed, optogenetically initiated excitatory drive in BNST. Thus, our study reveals distinct actions of PBN afferents within the BNST and suggests that α(2A)-AR agonists may filter excitatory transmission in the BNST by inhibiting a component of the PBN input while enhancing the actions of other inputs. PMID:25009265

  13. Progesterone receptor gene variants and risk of endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    O'Mara, Tracy A.; Fahey, Paul; Ferguson, Kaltin; Marquart, Louise; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Vergote, Ignace; Amant, Frederic; Hall, Per; Liu, Jianjun; Czene, Kamila; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Ahmed, Shahana; Dunning, Alison M.; Gregory, Catherine S.; Shah, Mitul; Webb, Penelope M.; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2011-01-01

    Prolonged excessive estrogen exposure unopposed by progesterone is widely accepted to be a risk factor for endometrial cancer development. The physiological function of progesterone is dependent upon the presence of its receptor [progesterone receptor (PGR)] and several studies have reported single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the PGR gene to be associated with endometrial cancer risk. We sought to confirm the associations with endometrial cancer risk previously reported for four different PGR polymorphisms. A maximum of 2888 endometrial cancer cases and 4483 female control subjects from up to three studies were genotyped for four PGR polymorphisms (rs1042838, rs10895068, rs11224561 and rs471767). Logistic regression with adjustment for age, study, ethnicity and body mass index was performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and P-values. Of the four SNPs investigated, only rs11224561 in the 3′ region of the PGR gene was found to be significantly associated with endometrial cancer risk. The A allele of the rs11224561 SNP was associated with increased risk of endometrial cancer (OR per allele 1.31; 95% CI 1.12–1.53, P = 0.001, adjusted for age and study), an effect of the same magnitude and direction as reported previously. We have validated the endometrial cancer risk association with a tagSNP in the 3′ untranslated region of PGR previously reported in an Asian population. Replication studies will be required to refine the risk estimate and to establish if this, or a correlated SNP, is the underlying causative variant. PMID:21148628

  14. An Expression Refinement Process Ensures Singular Odorant Receptor Gene Choice.

    PubMed

    Abdus-Saboor, Ishmail; Al Nufal, Mohammed J; Agha, Maha V; Ruinart de Brimont, Marion; Fleischmann, Alexander; Shykind, Benjamin M

    2016-04-25

    Odorant receptor (OR) gene choice in mammals is a paradigmatic example of monogenic and monoallelic transcriptional selection, in which each olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) chooses to express one OR allele from over 1,000 encoded in the genome [1-3]. This process, critical for generation of the circuit from nose to brain [4-6], is thought to occur in two steps: a slow initial phase that randomly activates a single OR allele, followed by a rapid feedback that halts subsequent expression [7-14]. Inherent in this model is a finite failure rate wherein multiple OR alleles may be activated prior to feedback suppression [15, 16]. Confronted with more than one receptor, the neuron would need to activate a refinement mechanism to eliminate multigenic OR expression and resolve unique neuronal identity [16], critical to the generation of the circuit from nose to olfactory bulb. Here we used a genetic approach in mice to reveal a new facet of OR regulation that corrects adventitious activation of multiple OR alleles, restoring monogenic OR expression and unique neuronal identity. Using the tetM71tg model system, in which the M71 OR is expressed in >95% of mature OSNs and potently suppresses the expression of the endogenous OR repertoire [10], we provide clear evidence of a post-selection refinement (PSR) process that winnows down the number of ORs. We further demonstrate that PSR efficiency is linked to OR expression level, suggesting an underlying competitive process and shedding light on OR gene switching and the fundamental mechanism of singular OR choice. PMID:27040780

  15. Association between the vitamin D receptor gene polymorphism and osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ju; Shang, De-Peng; Yang, Sheng; Fu, Da-Peng; Ling, Hao-Yi; Hou, Shuang-Shuang; Lu, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene for the risk of osteoporosis remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to understand the distribution of various single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the VDR gene and its association with the risk of osteoporosis. In total, 378 subjects without a genetic relationship were recruited to the study between January 2013 and July 2015. The subjects were divided into three groups, which were the normal (n=234), osteoporosis (n=65) and osteoporosis with osteoporotic fracture (n=79) groups. Three pertinent SNPs of the VDR gene rs17879735 (ApaI, Allele A/a, SNP C>A) were examined with polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine (L2-L4), femoral neck, Ward's and Tro was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The distributions of genotype frequencies aa, AA and Aa were 48.68, 42.86 and 8.46%, separately. Following analysis of each site, BMD, body mass index (BMI) and age, BMD for each site was negatively correlated with age (P<0.01) and positively correlated with BMI (P<0.01). Correction analysis revealed that there were significant differences in the Ward's triangle BMD among each genotype (P<0.05), in which the aa genotype exhibited the lower BMD (P<0.05). No significant difference was identified among the different genotypes in the occurrence of osteoporosis with osteoporotic fracture (P>0.05). In conclusion, these indicated that the VDR gene ApaI polymorphisms had an important role in the osteoporosis risk. PMID:27446548

  16. Olfactory receptor genes cooperate with protocadherin genes in human extreme obesity.

    PubMed

    Mariman, Edwin C M; Szklarczyk, Radek; Bouwman, Freek G; Aller, Erik E J G; van Baak, Marleen A; Wang, Ping

    2015-07-01

    Worldwide, the incidence of obesity has increased dramatically over the past decades. More knowledge about the complex etiology of obesity is needed in order to find additional approaches for treatment and prevention. Investigating the exome sequencing data of 30 extremely obese subjects (BMI 45-65 kg/m(2)) shows that predicted damaging missense variants in olfactory receptor genes on chromosome 1q and rare predicted damaging variants in the protocadherin (PCDH) beta-cluster genes on chromosome 5q31, reported in our previous work, co-localize in subjects with extreme obesity. This implies a synergistic effect between genetic variation in these gene clusters in the predisposition to extreme obesity. Evidence for a general involvement of the olfactory transduction pathway on itself could not be found. Bioinformatic analysis indicates a specific involvement of the PCDH beta-cluster genes in controlling tissue development. Further mechanistic insight needs to await the identification of the ligands of the 1q olfactory receptors. Eventually, this may provide the possibility to manipulate food flavor in a way to reduce the risk of overeating and of extreme obesity in genetically predisposed subjects.

  17. The Dopamine D2 Receptor Gene, Perceived Parental Support, and Adolescent Loneliness: Longitudinal Evidence for Gene-Environment Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Roekel, Eeske; Goossens, Luc; Scholte, Ron H. J.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Verhagen, Maaike

    2011-01-01

    Background: Loneliness is a common problem in adolescence. Earlier research focused on genes within the serotonin and oxytocin systems, but no studies have examined the role of dopamine-related genes in loneliness. In the present study, we focused on the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2). Methods: Associations among the DRD2, sex, parental support,…

  18. Past, present and future of A2A adenosine receptor antagonists in the therapy of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Armentero, Marie Therese; Pinna, Annalisa; Ferré, Sergi; Lanciego, José Luis; Müller, Christa E.; Franco, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Several selective antagonists for adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) are currently under evaluation in clinical trials (phases I to III) to treat Parkinson’s disease, and they will probably soon reach the market. The usefulness of these antagonists has been deduced from studies demonstrating functional interactions between dopamine D2 and adenosine A2A receptors in the basal ganglia. At present it is believed that A2AR antagonists can be used in combination with the dopamine precursor L-DOPA to minimize the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s patients. However, a considerable body of data indicates that in addition to ameliorating motor symptoms, adenosine A2AR antagonists may also prevent neurodegeneration. Despite these promising indications, one further issue must be considered in order to develop fully optimized anti-parkinsonian drug therapy, namely the existence of receptor (hetero)dimers/oligomers of G protein-coupled receptors, a topic currently the focus of intense debate within the scientific community. Dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) expressed in the striatum are known to form heteromers with A2A adenosine receptors. Thus, the development of heteromer-specific A2A receptor antagonists represents a promising strategy for the identification of more selective and safer drugs. PMID:21810444

  19. Localization of the A{sub 3} adenosine receptor gene (ADORA3) to human chromosome 1p

    SciTech Connect

    Monitto, C.L.; Levitt, R.C.; Holroyd, K.J.

    1995-04-10

    Adenosine modulates important physiologic functions involving the cardiovascular system, brain, kidneys, lungs, GI tract, and immune system. To date four adenosine receptors have been identified: A{sub 1}, A{sub 2a}, A{sub 2b}, and A{sub 3}. Activation of these receptors results in inhibition (A{sub 1} and A{sub 3}) or stimulation (A{sub 2a} and A{sub 2b}) of intracellular adenyl cyclase activity, stimulation of K{sup +} flux, inhibition of Ca{sup 2+} flux, and modulation of inositol phospholipid turnover. A{sub 3} receptors have been identified and sequenced in the testes, brain, lung, liver, kidney, and heart of various species, including the rat, mouse, and human. A{sub 3} receptor activation is responsible for release of inflammatory mediators from mast cells, which can cause allergic bronchoconstriction. In addition, they can produce systemic vasodilation and locomotor depression via activation of A{sub 3} receptors in the brain. Given the potential importance of A{sub 3} receptor activity in the pathogenesis of pulmonary, cardiovascular, and central nervous system disease states, we set out to localize the human A{sub 3} adenosine receptor gene (ADORA3). 9 refs., 1 fig.

  20. The Sigma-2 Receptor and Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 are Different Binding Sites Derived From Independent Genes

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Uyen B.; Mavlyutov, Timur A.; Chu, Ming-Liang; Yang, Huan; Schulman, Amanda; Mesangeau, Christophe; McCurdy, Christopher R.; Guo, Lian-Wang; Ruoho, Arnold E.

    2015-01-01

    The sigma-2 receptor (S2R) is a potential therapeutic target for cancer and neuronal diseases. However, the identity of the S2R has remained a matter of debate. Historically, the S2R has been defined as (1) a binding site with high affinity to 1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG) and haloperidol but not to the selective sigma-1 receptor ligand (+)-pentazocine, and (2) a protein of 18–21 kDa, as shown by specific photolabeling with [3H]-Azido-DTG and [125I]-iodoazido-fenpropimorph ([125I]-IAF). Recently, the progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1), a 25 kDa protein, was reported to be the S2R (Nature Communications, 2011, 2:380). To confirm this identification, we created PGRMC1 knockout NSC34 cell lines using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology. We found that in NSC34 cells devoid of or overexpressing PGRMC1, the maximum [3H]-DTG binding to the S2R (Bmax) as well as the DTG-protectable [125I]-IAF photolabeling of the S2R were similar to those of wild-type control cells. Furthermore, the affinities of DTG and haloperidol for PGRMC1 (KI = 472 μM and 350 μM, respectively), as determined in competition with [3H]-progesterone, were more than 3 orders of magnitude lower than those reported for the S2R (20–80 nM). These results clarify that PGRMC1 and the S2R are distinct binding sites expressed by different genes. PMID:26870805

  1. Evaluation of neuronal phosphoproteins as effectors of caffeine and mediators of striatal adenosine A2A receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Bogachan; Galdi, Stacey; Hendrick, Joseph; Greene, Robert W.; Snyder, Gretchen L.; Bibb, James A.

    2007-01-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors are predominantly expressed in the dendrites of enkephalin-positive γ-aminobutyric acidergic medium spiny neurons in the striatum. Evidence indicates that these receptors modulate striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission and regulate motor control, vigilance, alertness, and arousal. Although the physiological and behavioral correlates of adenosine A2A receptor signaling have been extensively studied using a combination of pharmacological and genetic tools, relatively little is known about the signal transduction pathways that mediate the diverse biological functions attributed to this adenosine receptor subtype. Using a candidate approach based on the coupling of these receptors to adenylate cyclase-activating G proteins, a number of membranal, cytosolic, and nuclear phosphoproteins regulated by PKA were evaluated as potential mediators of adenosine A2A receptor signaling in the striatum. Specifically, the adenosine A2A receptor agonist, CGS 21680, was used to determine whether the phosphorylation state of each of the following PKA targets is responsive to adenosine A2A receptor stimulation in this tissue: Ser40 of tyrosine hydroxylase, Ser9 of synapsin, Ser897 of the NR1 subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate-type glutamate receptor, Ser845 of the GluR1 subunit of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid-type glutamate receptor, Ser94 of spinophilin, Thr34 of the dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein, Mr32,000, Ser133 of the cAMP-response element-binding protein, Thr286 of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and Thr202/Tyr204 and Thr183/Tyr185 of the p44 and p42 isoforms, respectively, of mitogen-activated protein kinase. Although the substrates studied differed considerably in their responsiveness to selective adenosine A2A receptor activation, the phosphorylation state of all postsynaptic PKA targets was up-regulated in a time- and dose-dependent manner by treatment with CGS 21680, whereas presynaptic PKA

  2. Evaluation of neuronal phosphoproteins as effectors of caffeine and mediators of striatal adenosine A2A receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Bogachan; Galdi, Stacey; Hendrick, Joseph; Greene, Robert W; Snyder, Gretchen L; Bibb, James A

    2007-01-19

    Adenosine A(2A) receptors are predominantly expressed in the dendrites of enkephalin-positive gamma-aminobutyric acidergic medium spiny neurons in the striatum. Evidence indicates that these receptors modulate striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission and regulate motor control, vigilance, alertness, and arousal. Although the physiological and behavioral correlates of adenosine A(2A) receptor signaling have been extensively studied using a combination of pharmacological and genetic tools, relatively little is known about the signal transduction pathways that mediate the diverse biological functions attributed to this adenosine receptor subtype. Using a candidate approach based on the coupling of these receptors to adenylate cyclase-activating G proteins, a number of membranal, cytosolic, and nuclear phosphoproteins regulated by PKA were evaluated as potential mediators of adenosine A(2A) receptor signaling in the striatum. Specifically, the adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist, CGS 21680, was used to determine whether the phosphorylation state of each of the following PKA targets is responsive to adenosine A(2A) receptor stimulation in this tissue: Ser40 of tyrosine hydroxylase, Ser9 of synapsin, Ser897 of the NR1 subunit of the N-methyl-d-aspartate-type glutamate receptor, Ser845 of the GluR1 subunit of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid-type glutamate receptor, Ser94 of spinophilin, Thr34 of the dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein, M(r) 32,000, Ser133 of the cAMP-response element-binding protein, Thr286 of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and Thr202/Tyr204 and Thr183/Tyr185 of the p44 and p42 isoforms, respectively, of mitogen-activated protein kinase. Although the substrates studied differed considerably in their responsiveness to selective adenosine A(2A) receptor activation, the phosphorylation state of all postsynaptic PKA targets was up-regulated in a time- and dose-dependent manner by treatment with CGS 21680

  3. Pharmacogenetics of the β2-Adrenergic Receptor Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Victor E.; Hawkins, Gregory A.; Peters, Stephen P.; Bleecker, Eugene R.

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is a complex genetic disease with multiple genetic and environmental determinants contributing to the observed variability in response to common anti-asthma therapies. Asthma pharmacogenetic research has focused on multiple candidate genes including the β2-adrenergic receptor gene (ADRβ2) and its effect on individual responses to beta agonist therapy. At present, knowledge about the effects of ADRβ2 variation on therapeutic responses is evolving and should not alter current Asthma Guideline approaches consisting of the use of short acting beta agonists for as-needed symptom based therapy and the use of a regular long-acting beta agonist in combination with inhaled corticosteroid therapy for optimal control of asthma symptoms in those asthmatics who are not controlled on inhaled corticosteroid alone. This approach is based upon studies showing a consistent pharmacogenetic response to regular use of short acting beta agonists (SABA) and less consistent findings in studies evaluating long acting beta agonist (LABA). While emerging pharmacogenetic studies are provocative and should lead to functional approaches, conflicting data with responses to LABA therapy may be caused by factors that include small sample sizes of study populations and differences in experimental design that may limit the conclusions that may be drawn from these clinical trials at the present time. PMID:17996583

  4. Anti-Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Gene Therapy for Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Martin J.; Chiuchiolo, Maria J.; Ballon, Douglas; Dyke, Jonathan P.; Aronowitz, Eric; Funato, Kosuke; Tabar, Viviane; Havlicek, David; Fan, Fan; Sondhi, Dolan; Kaminsky, Stephen M.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary intracranial brain tumor in adults with a mean survival of 14 to 15 months. Aberrant activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays a significant role in GBM progression, with amplification or overexpression of EGFR in 60% of GBM tumors. To target EGFR expressed by GBM, we have developed a strategy to deliver the coding sequence for cetuximab, an anti-EGFR antibody, directly to the CNS using an adeno-associated virus serotype rh.10 gene transfer vector. The data demonstrates that single, local delivery of an anti-EGFR antibody by an AAVrh.10 vector coding for cetuximab (AAVrh.10Cetmab) reduces GBM tumor growth and increases survival in xenograft mouse models of a human GBM EGFR-expressing cell line and patient-derived GBM. AAVrh10.CetMab-treated mice displayed a reduction in cachexia, a significant decrease in tumor volume and a prolonged survival following therapy. Adeno-associated-directed delivery of a gene encoding a therapeutic anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody may be an effective strategy to treat GBM. PMID:27711187

  5. Pharmacological Preconditioning by Adenosine A2a Receptor Stimulation: Features of the Protected Liver Cell Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Alchera, Elisa; Imarisio, Chiara; Mandili, Giorgia; Merlin, Simone; Chandrashekar, Bangalore R.; Novelli, Francesco; Follenzi, Antonia; Carini, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IP) of the liver by a brief interruption of the blood flow protects the damage induced by a subsequent ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) preventing parenchymal and nonparenchymal liver cell damage. The discovery of IP has shown the existence of intrinsic systems of cytoprotection whose activation can stave off the progression of irreversible tissue damage. Deciphering the molecular mediators that underlie the cytoprotective effects of preconditioning can pave the way to important therapeutic possibilities. Pharmacological activation of critical mediators of IP would be expected to emulate or even to intensify its salubrious effects. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the role of the adenosine A2a receptor (A2aR) as a trigger of liver IP. This review will provide insight into the phenotypic changes that underline the resistance to death of liver cells preconditioned by pharmacological activation of A2aR and their implications to develop innovative strategies against liver IR damage. PMID:26539478

  6. Molecular Determinants of CGS21680 Binding to the Human Adenosine A2A Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Patricia C.; Leslie, Andrew G. W.

    2015-01-01

    The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) plays a key role in transmembrane signaling mediated by the endogenous agonist adenosine. Here, we describe the crystal structure of human A2AR thermostabilized in an active-like conformation bound to the selective agonist 2-[p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenylethyl-amino]-5′-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine (CGS21680) at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Comparison of A2AR structures bound to either CGS21680, 5′-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine (NECA), UK432097 [6-(2,2-diphenylethylamino)-9-[(2R,3R,4S,5S)-5-(ethylcarbamoyl)-3,4-dihydroxy-tetrahydrofuran-2-yl]-N-[2-[[1-(2-pyridyl)-4-piperidyl]carbamoylamino]ethyl]purine-2-carboxamide], or adenosine shows that the adenosine moiety of the ligands binds to the receptor in an identical fashion. However, an extension in CGS21680 compared with adenosine, the (2-carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino group, binds in an extended vestibule formed from transmembrane regions 2 and 7 (TM2 and TM7) and extracellular loops 2 and 3 (EL2 and EL3). The (2-carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino group makes van der Waals contacts with side chains of amino acid residues Glu169EL2, His264EL3, Leu2677.32, and Ile2747.39, and the amine group forms a hydrogen bond with the side chain of Ser672.65. Of these residues, only Ile2747.39 is absolutely conserved across the human adenosine receptor subfamily. The major difference between the structures of A2AR bound to either adenosine or CGS21680 is that the binding pocket narrows at the extracellular surface when CGS21680 is bound, due to an inward tilt of TM2 in that region. This conformation is stabilized by hydrogen bonds formed by the side chain of Ser672.65 to CGS21680, either directly or via an ordered water molecule. Mutation of amino acid residues Ser672.65, Glu169EL2, and His264EL3, and analysis of receptor activation either in the presence or absence of ligands implicates this region in modulating the level of basal activity of A2AR. PMID:25762024

  7. Food Cravings, Food Addiction, and a Dopamine-Resistant (DRD2 A1) Receptor Polymorphism in Asian American College Students

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Joanna; Trang, Amy; Henning, Susanne M; Wilhalme, Holly; Carpenter, Catherine; Heber, David; Li, Zhaoping

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives In an era where obesity remains an important public health concern, food addiction has emerged as a possible contributor to obesity. The DRD2 gene is the most studied polymorphism. The aim of this study was to investigate a relationship between food craving and food addiction questionnaires, body composition measurements, and a dopamine-resistant receptor polymorphism (DRD2 A1) among healthy Asian Americans. Subjects/Methods A total of 84 Asian American college students were recruited. Participants underwent body composition measurement via bioelectrical impedance, answered subjective questionnaires, and had blood drawn for genotyping. Results Among Asian American college students, there was no difference in body composition (BMI, percent body fat) between the A1 (A1A1 or A1A2) and A2 (A2A2) groups. There were statistically significant differences in food cravings of carbohydrates and fast food on the Food Craving Inventory between the A1 and A2 groups (p=0.03), but not for sugar or fat. Among female Asian college students, there was also a difference on the Power of Food questionnaire (p=0.04), which was not seen among males. 13 out of 55 females also had > 30% body fat at a BMI of 21.4 to 28.5 kg/m2. Conclusion Greater carbohydrate and fast food craving was associated with the DRD2 A1 versus A2 allele among Asian Americans. Further studies examining the ability of dopamine agonists to affect food craving and to reduce body fat in Asian American are warranted. More studies in food addiction among obese Asian Americans are needed with careful definition of obesity, specifically for Asian women. PMID:27222427

  8. Adenosine A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) receptors in hematopoiesis. 1. Expression of receptor mRNA in four mouse hematopoietic precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Streitová, D; Sefc, L; Savvulidi, F; Pospísil, M; Holá, J; Hofer, M

    2010-01-01

    Four mouse bone marrow or thymus cell populations, namely granulopoietic/monocytopoietic, erythropoietic, B-lymphopoietic, and T-lymphopoietic precursor cells have been assayed by RT-PCR technique for the presence and relative amounts of adenosine A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) receptor mRNA. It has been found that (i) all four populations studied express all four adenosine receptor subtypes, (ii) the A(1), receptor is the least expressed in all populations studied, (iii) the A(3) receptor is markedly expressed in the populations of granulopoietic/monocytopoietic and erythropoietic cells, (iv) the A(2a) receptor is markedly expressed in the populations of B-lymphopoietic and T-lymphopoietic cells, and v) the A(2b) receptor does not predominate in any of the precursor cells studied. Our data offer a new possibility for the assessment of the readiness of these cells to respond, by receptor-mediated mechanisms, to adenosine or its analogs present in the tissues as a result of endogenous processes and/or following their administration.

  9. 5-HT2A Gene Variants Moderate the Association between PTSD and Reduced Default Mode Network Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mark W; Sperbeck, Emily; Robinson, Meghan E; Sadeh, Naomi; Wolf, Erika J; Hayes, Jasmeet P; Logue, Mark; Schichman, Steven A; Stone, Angie; Milberg, William; McGlinchey, Regina

    2016-01-01

    The default mode network (DMN) has been used to study disruptions of functional connectivity in a wide variety of psychiatric and neurological conditions, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Studies indicate that the serotonin system exerts a modulatory influence on DMN connectivity; however, no prior study has examined associations between serotonin receptor gene variants and DMN connectivity in either clinical or healthy samples. We examined serotonin receptor single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), PTSD, and their interactions for association with DMN connectivity in 134 White non-Hispanic veterans. We began by analyzing candidate SNPs identified in prior meta-analyses of relevant psychiatric traits and found that rs7997012 (an HTR2A SNP), implicated previously in anti-depressant medication response in the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives for Depression study (STAR(*)D; McMahon et al., 2006), interacted with PTSD to predict reduced connectivity between the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and the right medial prefrontal cortex and right middle temporal gyrus (MTG). rs130058 (HTR1B) was associated with connectivity between the PCC and right angular gyrus. We then expanded our analysis to 99 HTR1B and HTR2A SNPs and found two HTR2A SNPs (rs977003 and rs7322347) that significantly moderated the association between PTSD severity and the PCC-right MTG component of the DMN after correcting for multiple testing. Finally, to obtain a more precise localization of the most significant SNP × PTSD interaction, we performed a whole cortex vertex-wise analysis of the rs977003 effect. This analysis revealed the locus of the pre-frontal effect to be in portions of the superior frontal gyrus, while the temporal lobe effect was centered in the middle and inferior temporal gyri. These findings point to the influence of HTR2A variants on DMN connectivity and advance knowledge of the role of 5-HT2A receptors in the neurobiology of PTSD. PMID:27445670

  10. 5-HT2A Gene Variants Moderate the Association between PTSD and Reduced Default Mode Network Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark W.; Sperbeck, Emily; Robinson, Meghan E.; Sadeh, Naomi; Wolf, Erika J.; Hayes, Jasmeet P.; Logue, Mark; Schichman, Steven A.; Stone, Angie; Milberg, William; McGlinchey, Regina

    2016-01-01

    The default mode network (DMN) has been used to study disruptions of functional connectivity in a wide variety of psychiatric and neurological conditions, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Studies indicate that the serotonin system exerts a modulatory influence on DMN connectivity; however, no prior study has examined associations between serotonin receptor gene variants and DMN connectivity in either clinical or healthy samples. We examined serotonin receptor single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), PTSD, and their interactions for association with DMN connectivity in 134 White non-Hispanic veterans. We began by analyzing candidate SNPs identified in prior meta-analyses of relevant psychiatric traits and found that rs7997012 (an HTR2A SNP), implicated previously in anti-depressant medication response in the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives for Depression study (STAR*D; McMahon et al., 2006), interacted with PTSD to predict reduced connectivity between the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and the right medial prefrontal cortex and right middle temporal gyrus (MTG). rs130058 (HTR1B) was associated with connectivity between the PCC and right angular gyrus. We then expanded our analysis to 99 HTR1B and HTR2A SNPs and found two HTR2A SNPs (rs977003 and rs7322347) that significantly moderated the association between PTSD severity and the PCC-right MTG component of the DMN after correcting for multiple testing. Finally, to obtain a more precise localization of the most significant SNP × PTSD interaction, we performed a whole cortex vertex-wise analysis of the rs977003 effect. This analysis revealed the locus of the pre-frontal effect to be in portions of the superior frontal gyrus, while the temporal lobe effect was centered in the middle and inferior temporal gyri. These findings point to the influence of HTR2A variants on DMN connectivity and advance knowledge of the role of 5-HT2A receptors in the neurobiology of PTSD. PMID:27445670

  11. Expression of the human ABCC6 gene is induced by retinoids through the retinoid X receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ratajewski, Marcin; Bartosz, Grzegorz; Pulaski, Lukasz . E-mail: lpulaski@cbm.pan.pl

    2006-12-01

    Mutations in the human ABCC6 gene are responsible for the disease pseudoxanthoma elasticum, although Physiological function or substrate of the gene product (an ABC transporter known also as MRP6) is not known. We found that the expression of this gene in cells of hepatic origin (where this gene is predominantly expressed in the body) is significantly upregulated by retinoids, acting as agonists of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) rather than the retinoid A receptor (RAR). The direct involvement of this nuclear receptor in the transcriptional regulation of ABCC6 gene expression was confirmed by transient transfection and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. This constitutes the first direct proof of previously suggested involvement of nuclear hormone receptors in ABCC6 gene expression and the first identification of a transcription factor which may be relevant to regulation of ABCC6 level in tissues and in some PXE patients.

  12. [3H]-SCH 58261 labelling of functional A2A adenosine receptors in human neutrophil membranes

    PubMed Central

    Varani, Katia; Gessi, Stefania; Dionisotti, Silvio; Ongini, Ennio; Andrea Borea, Pier

    1998-01-01

    The present study describes the direct labelling of A2A adenosine receptors in human neutrophil membranes with the potent and selective antagonist radioligand, [3H]-5-amino-7-(2-phenylethyl)-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo[4,3-e]-1,2,4 triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine, ([3H]-SCH 58261). In addition, both receptor affinity and potency of a number of adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists were determined in binding, adenylyl cyclase and superoxide anion production assays.Saturation experiments revealed a single class of binding sites with Kd and Bmax values of 1.34 nM and 75 fmol mg−1 protein, respectively. Adenosine receptor ligands competed for the binding of 1 nM [3H]-SCH 58261 to human neutrophil membranes, with a rank order of potency consistent with that typically found for interactions with the A2A adenosine receptors. In the adenylyl cyclase and in the superoxide anion production assays the same compounds exhibited a rank order of potency identical to that observed in binding experiments.Thermodynamic data indicated that [3H]-SCH 58261 binding to human neutrophils is entropy and enthalpy-driven. This finding is in agreement with the thermodynamic behaviour of antagonists binding to rat striatal A2A adenosine receptors.It was concluded that in human neutrophil membranes, [3H]-SCH 58261 directly labels binding sites with pharmacological properties similar to those of A2A adenosine receptors of other tissues. The receptors labelled by [3H]-SCH 58261 mediated the effects of adenosine and adenosine receptor agonists to stimulate cyclic AMP accumulation and inhibition of superoxide anion production in human neutrophils. PMID:9605581

  13. Phosphorylated and sumoylation-deficient progesterone receptors drive proliferative gene signatures during breast cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Progesterone receptors (PR) are emerging as important breast cancer drivers. Phosphorylation events common to breast cancer cells impact PR transcriptional activity, in part by direct phosphorylation. PR-B but not PR-A isoforms are phosphorylated on Ser294 by mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). Phospho-Ser294 PRs are resistant to ligand-dependent Lys388 SUMOylation (that is, a repressive modification). Antagonism of PR small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)ylation by mitogenic protein kinases suggests a mechanism for derepression (that is, transcriptional activation) of target genes. As a broad range of PR protein expression is observed clinically, a PR gene signature would provide a valuable marker of PR contribution to early breast cancer progression. Methods Global gene expression patterns were measured in T47D and MCF-7 breast cancer cells expressing either wild-type (SUMOylation-capable) or K388R (SUMOylation-deficient) PRs and subjected to pathway analysis. Gene sets were validated by RT-qPCR. Recruitment of coregulators and histone methylation levels were determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Changes in cell proliferation and survival were determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays and western blotting. Finally, human breast tumor cohort datasets were probed to identify PR-associated gene signatures; metagene analysis was employed to define survival rates in patients whose tumors express a PR gene signature. Results 'SUMO-sensitive' PR target genes primarily include genes required for proliferative and pro-survival signaling. DeSUMOylated K388R receptors are preferentially recruited to enhancer regions of derepressed genes (that is, MSX2, RGS2, MAP1A, and PDK4) with the steroid receptor coactivator, CREB-(cAMP-response element-binding protein)-binding protein (CBP), and mixed lineage leukemia 2 (MLL2), a histone methyltransferase mediator of nucleosome

  14. Correlation of functional GRIN2A gene promoter polymorphisms with schizophrenia and serum D-serine levels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Dang, Wei; Du, Ying; Zhou, Qiong; Liu, Zhaohui; Jiao, Kai

    2015-08-15

    Schizophrenia is a severe, complex mental disorder. Abnormal glutamate neurotransmission mediated by decreased expression of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptors (NMDArs) and its endogenous co-agonist d-serine (d-Ser) has been proposed as one of the hypotheses of the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. GRIN2A gene promoter polymorphism causes changes in the regulation of the expression of NMDAr subunit genes. Our study is aimed at evaluating a possible association between GRIN2A promoter GT polymorphisms and schizophrenia in the Han Chinese population in Shaanxi and the relationship between serum d-Ser levels and GRIN2A (GT)n in schizophrenia. Four hundred and twenty patients with schizophrenia and 410 healthy individuals were recruited in this study and GRIN2A (GT)n repeats as well as serum d-Ser levels were measured in all of the subjects. Nineteen alleles were found in (GT)n locus. The allele frequency of (GT)21, (GT)22 and (GT)23 in schizophrenic subjects was significantly lower compared with the mentally healthy controls, while the allele (GT)26 was significantly more frequent than in normal persons. Transcriptional activity of GRIN2A promoter was gradually suppressed with the increase in the length of the (GT)n repeats. d-Ser levels in the serum of the GRIN2A (GT)21 schizophrenic patients were significantly lower than those of the GRIN2A (GT)21 healthy control. A significant correlation between serum d-Ser levels and GRIN2A (GT)21 in schizophrenia was detected. GRIN2A (GT)21 may play a significant role in the etiology of schizophrenia among the Chinese Han population of Shaanxi.

  15. Characterization of A2A adenosine receptors in human lymphocyte membranes by [3H]-SCH 58261 binding

    PubMed Central

    Varani, Katia; Gessi, Stefania; Dalpiaz, Alessandro; Ongini, Ennio; Andrea Borea, Pier

    1997-01-01

    The present study describes for the first time the characterization of the adenosine A2A receptor in human lymphocyte membranes with the new potent and selective antagonist radioligand, [3H]-5-amino-7-(2-phenylethyl)-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo [4,3-e]-1,2,4 triazolo [1,5-c] pyrimidine, ([3H]-SCH 58261). In addition, both receptor affinity and potency of reference adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists were determined in binding and adenylyl cyclase studies. Saturation experiments revealed a single class of binding sites with Kd and Bmax values of 0.85 nM and 35 fmol mg−1 protein, respectively. A series of adenosine receptor ligands were found to compete for the binding of 0.8 nM [3H]-SCH 58261 to human lymphocyte membranes with a rank order of potency consistent with that typically found for interactions with the A2A-adenosine receptor. In the adenylyl cyclase assay the same compounds exhibited a rank order of potency similar to that observed in binding experiments. Thermodynamic data indicate that [3H]-SCH 58261 binding to human lymphocytes is entropy and enthalpy-driven, a finding in agreement with the thermodynamic behaviour of antagonists for rat striatal A2A-adenosine receptors. It is concluded that in human lymphocyte membranes [3H]-SCH 58261 directly labels binding sites showing the characteristic properties of the adenosine A2A-receptor. The presence of A2A-receptors in peripheral tissue such as human lymphocytes strongly suggests an important role for adenosine in modulating immune and inflammatory responses. PMID:9313951

  16. Perinatal exposure to PTU delays switching from NR2B to NR2A subunits of the NMDA receptor in the rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kumiko; Tsuji, Ryozo; Yoshioka, Takafumi; Mino, Terumasa; Seki, Takaki

    2006-03-01

    Certain kinds of developmental neurotoxicants are considered to act by affecting the levels of thyroid hormones, which are essential for the brain development of both humans and experimental animals. Hypothyroidism experimentally induced in rats with propylthiouracil (PTU) offers a useful animal model for developmental neurotoxicity. The purpose of the present study was to clarify developmental alterations in gene expression caused by PTU in this model, with the focus on eight genes implicated in neural network formation or synaptic functions, such as the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and NMDA receptors 2A/2B. First, we measured the developmental profile of gene expression in vehicle-dosed rat cerebellum by quantitative RT-PCR and then examined the effects of PTU on mRNA levels on postnatal day (PND) 22, when most of the cerebellar structures in mature animals are already formed. PTU induced up-regulation of NR2B mRNA and down-regulation of NR2A and BDNF mRNAs in the cerebellum on PND 22, but there were no changes in the other genes (growth associated protein-43, L1, neuronal cell adhesion molecule, synaptophysin, post synaptic density-95). Examination of the effects of PTU on maturation of NMDAR subunits (NR2A/NR2B) demonstrated changes in relative expression on PND 14, but not on PND 4, with recovery after maturation. The profile of NMDAR subunits in vehicle-dosed rats showed a shift from NR2B to NR2A during development. These results suggest PTU can delay this switching from NR2B to NR2A subunits in the maturation of NMDA receptors.

  17. Human kininogen gene is transactivated by the farnesoid X receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Annie; Lew, Jane-L; Huang, Li; Yu, Jinghua; Zhang, Theresa; Hrywna, Yaroslav; Thompson, John R; de Pedro, Nuria; Blevins, Richard A; Peláez, Fernando; Wright, Samuel D; Cui, Jisong

    2003-08-01

    Human kininogen belongs to the plasma kallikreinkinin system. High molecular weight kininogen is the precursor for two-chain kinin-free kininogen and bradykinin. It has been shown that the two-chain kinin-free kininogen has the properties of anti-adhesion, anti-platelet aggregation, and anti-thrombosis, whereas bradykinin is a potent vasodilator and mediator of inflammation. In this study we show that the human kininogen gene is strongly up-regulated by agonists of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor for bile acids. In primary human hepatocytes, both the endogenous FXR agonist chenodeoxycholate and synthetic FXR agonist GW4064 increased kininogen mRNA with a maximum induction of 8-10-fold. A more robust induction of kininogen expression was observed in HepG2 cells, where kininogen mRNA was increased by chenodeoxycholate or GW4064 up to 130-140-fold as shown by real time PCR. Northern blot analysis confirmed the up-regulation of kininogen expression by FXR agonists. To determine whether kininogen is a direct target of FXR, we examined the sequence of the kininogen promoter and identified a highly conserved FXR response element (inverted repeat, IR-1) in the proximity of the kininogen promoter (-66/-54). FXR/RXRalpha heterodimers specifically bind to this IR-1. A construct of a minimal promoter with the luciferase reporter containing this IR-1 was transactivated by FXR. Deletion or mutation of this IR-1 abolished FXR-mediated promoter activation, indicating that this IR-1 element is responsible for the promoter transactivation by FXR. We conclude that kininogen is a novel and direct target of FXR, and bile acids may play a role in the vasodilation and anti-coagulation processes.

  18. Identification of Putative Chemosensory Receptor Genes from the Athetis dissimilis Antennal Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Junfeng; Song, Yueqin; Li, Wenliang; Shi, Jie; Wang, Zhenying

    2016-01-01

    Olfaction plays a crucial role in insect population survival and reproduction. Identification of the genes associated with the olfactory system, without the doubt will promote studying the insect chemical communication system. In this study, RNA-seq technology was used to sequence the antennae transcriptome of Athetis dissimilis, an emerging crop pest in China with limited genomic information, with the purpose of identifying the gene set involved in olfactory recognition. Analysis of the transcriptome of female and male antennae generated 13.74 Gb clean reads in total from which 98,001 unigenes were assembled, and 25,930 unigenes were annotated. Total of 60 olfactory receptors (ORs), 18 gustatory receptors (GRs), and 12 ionotropic receptors (IRs) were identified by Blast and sequence similarity analyzes. One obligated olfactory receptor co-receptor (Orco) and four conserved sex pheromone receptors (PRs) were annotated in 60 ORs. Among the putative GRs, five genes (AdisGR1, 6, 7, 8 and 94) clustered in the sugar receptor family, and two genes (AdisGR3 and 93) involved in CO2 detection were identified. Finally, AdisIR8a.1 and AdisIR8a.2 co-receptors were identified in the group of candidate IRs. Furthermore, expression levels of these chemosensory receptor genes in female and male antennae were analyzed by mapping the Illumina reads. PMID:26812239

  19. Structural organization and chromosomal assignment of the human prostacyclin receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Issei; Inoue, Miho

    1995-05-01

    Prostacyclin receptor is a member of the prostanoid receptor family in the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily with seven transmembrane domains. The authors report here the isolation and structural organization of the human prostacyclin receptor gene. Southern blot analysis demonstrated a single copy of the human prostacyclin receptor gene in the human genome. The human prostacyclin receptor gene spanned approximately 7.0 kb and was composed of three exons separated by two introns. The first intron occurred in the 5`-untranslated region, 13 bp upstream to the ATG start codon. The second intron was located at the end of the sixth transmembrane domain, thereby separating it from the downstream coding region and the 3`-untranslated region. By primer extension analysis, the transcription initiation sites were mapped 870-872 bp upstream to the ATG start codon. The 1.2-kb human prostacyclin receptor 5`-flanking region lacked conventional TATA and CCAAT boxes, but it contained several cis-acting regulatory elements including an inverted CCAAT box (Y box) and two copies of SP-1 binding sites. Using human-rodent somatic hybrid cell DNA, the human prostacyclin receptor gene was assigned to human chromosome 19. The present study helps establish the genetic basis for prostacyclin receptor research and provides further insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the prostanoid receptor family. 38 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Antidepressant, Antipsychotic, and Hallucinogen Drugs for the Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders: A Convergence at the Serotonin-2A Receptor.

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2016-07-01

    Antidepressant, atypical antipsychotic, and hallucinogen drugs mediate their actions in part by interactions with the serotonin-2A (5HT2A) receptor. Serotonergic hallucinogen drugs, such as psilocybin, bind most potently as agonists at the 5HT2A receptor, producing profound changes in perception, mood, and cognition. Some of these drugs have been or are currently being investigated in small Phase 2 studies for depression, alcoholism, smoking cessation, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder. However, unlike the synergistic effects of combining antidepressant and atypical antipsychotic drugs, the potential therapeutic effects of hallucinogen drugs may be attenuated by the concurrent use of these medications because antidepressant and atypical antipsychotic drugs desensitize and/or down-regulate 5HT2A receptors. This finding has important implications for optimizing the potential therapeutic use of hallucinogen drugs in psychiatry. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54(7), 21-24.]. PMID:27362381

  1. Lipopolysaccharide rapidly modifies adenosine receptor transcripts in murine and human macrophages: role of NF-kappaB in A(2A) adenosine receptor induction.

    PubMed

    Murphree, Lauren J; Sullivan, Gail W; Marshall, Melissa A; Linden, Joel

    2005-11-01

    The A(2A) adenosine receptor (A(2A)AR) mediates anti-inflammatory actions of adenosine in a variety of cell types. LPS (lipopolysaccharide) was reported to induce a small (<2-fold) increase in the expression of A(2A)AR mRNA in human monocytes and monocytic cell lines. We investigated the effects of LPS on the expression of adenosine receptor mRNAs in primary mouse IPMPhi (intraperitoneal macrophages), human macrophages and Wehi-3 cells. Treatment with 10 ng/ml LPS for 4 h produced a >100-fold increase in A(2A)AR mRNA. LPS-induced increases in mRNA for A(2A)AR and TNFalpha (tumour necrosis factor alpha) are reduced by 90% in IPMPhi pretreated with the NF-kappaB (nuclear factor kappaB) inhibitor, BAY 11-7082 {(E)3-[(4-methylphenyl)sulphonyl]-2-propenenitrile; 10 microM}. In Wehi-3 cells exposed to LPS, A(2A)AR and A(2B)AR transcripts are elevated by 290- and 10-fold respectively, the A(1)AR transcript is unchanged and the A(3)AR transcript is decreased by 67%. The induction of A(2A)AR mRNA by LPS is detectable after 1 h, reaches a peak at 6 h at 600 times control and remains elevated beyond 24 h. The ED50 (effective dose) of LPS is 2.3 ng/ml. A(2A)AR receptor number, measured by 125I-ZM241385 binding to whole cells, is undetectable in naïve cells and increases linearly at a rate of 23 receptors x cell(-1) x min(-1) to a B(max) of 348 fmol/mg (28000 receptors/cell) in 20 h. The increase in receptor number is correlated with an increase in the potency of an A(2A) agonist (4-{3-[6-amino-9-(5-ethylcarbamoyl-3,4-dihydroxy-tetrahydro-furan-2-yl)-9H-purin-2-yl]-prop-2-ynyl}-cyclohexanecarboxylic acid methyl ester; referred to as ATL146e) to stimulate cAMP in these cells. After LPS pretreatment, the potency of the A(2A) agonist, ATL146e, to reduce TNFalpha release from IPMPhi was increased by 200-fold. The results support the hypothesis that regulation of adenosine receptor expression, especially up-regulation of the A(2A)AR, is part of a delayed feedback mechanism

  2. The antidepressant desipramine is an arrestin-biased ligand at the α(2A)-adrenergic receptor driving receptor down-regulation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cottingham, Christopher; Chen, Yunjia; Jiao, Kai; Wang, Qin

    2011-10-14

    The neurobiological mechanisms of action underlying antidepressant drugs remain poorly understood. Desipramine (DMI) is an antidepressant classically characterized as an inhibitor of norepinephrine reuptake. Available evidence, however, suggests a mechanism more complex than simple reuptake inhibition. In the present study, we have characterized the direct interaction between DMI and the α(2A)-adrenergic receptor (α(2A)AR), a key regulator of noradrenergic neurotransmission with altered expression and function in depression. DMI alone was found to be sufficient to drive receptor internalization acutely and a robust down-regulation of α(2A)AR expression and signaling following prolonged stimulation in vitro. These effects are achieved through arrestin-biased regulation of the receptor, as DMI selectively induces recruitment of arrestin but not activation of heterotrimeric G proteins. Meanwhile, a physiologically relevant concentration of endogenous agonist (norepinephrine) was unable to sustain a down-regulation response. Prolonged in vivo administration of DMI resulted in significant down-regulation of synaptic α(2A)AR expression, a response that was lost in arrestin3-null animals. We contend that direct DMI-driven arrestin-mediated α(2A)AR down-regulation accounts for the therapeutically desirable but mechanistically unexplained adaptive alterations in receptor expression associated with this antidepressant. Our results provide novel insight into both the pharmacology of this antidepressant drug and the targeting of the α(2A)AR in depression.

  3. Ghrelin axis genes, peptides and receptors: recent findings and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Seim, Inge; Josh, Peter; Cunningham, Peter; Herington, Adrian; Chopin, Lisa

    2011-06-20

    The ghrelin axis consists of the gene products of the ghrelin gene (GHRL), and their receptors, including the classical ghrelin receptor GHSR. While it is well-known that the ghrelin gene encodes the 28 amino acid ghrelin peptide hormone, it is now also clear that the locus encodes a range of other bioactive molecules, including novel peptides and non-coding RNAs. For many of these molecules, the physiological functions and cognate receptor(s) remain to be determined. Emerging research techniques, including proteogenomics, are likely to reveal further ghrelin axis-derived molecules. Studies of the role of ghrelin axis genes, peptides and receptors, therefore, promises to be a fruitful area of basic and clinical research in years to come.

  4. Mutagenesis Reveals Structure–Activity Parallels between Human A2A Adenosine Receptors and Biogenic Amine G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qiaoling; Lee, Brian X.; Glashofer, Marc; van Rhee, A. Michiel; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Structure–affinity relationships for ligand binding at the human A2A adenosine receptor have been probed using site-directed mutagenesis in the transmembrane helical domains (TMs). The mutant receptors were expressed in COS-7 cells and characterized by binding of the radioligands [3H]CGS21680, [3H]NECA, and [3H]XAC. Three residues, at positions essential for ligand binding in other G protein-coupled receptors, were individually mutated. The residue V(3.32) in the A2A receptor that is homologous to the essential aspartate residue of TM3 in the biogenic amine receptors, i.e., V84(3.32), may be substituted with L (present in the A3 receptor) but not with D (in biogenic amine receptors) or A. H250(6.52), homologous to the critical N507 of rat m3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, may be substituted with other aromatic residues or with N but not with A (Kim et al. J. Biol. Chem. 1995, 270, 13987–13997). H278(7.43), homologous to the covalent ligand anchor site in rhodopsin, may not be substituted with either A, K, or N. Both V84L(3.32) and H250N(6.52) mutant receptors were highly variable in their effect on ligand competition depending on the structural class of the ligand. Adenosine-5′-uronamide derivatives were more potent at the H250N(6.52) mutant receptor than at wild type receptors. Xanthines tended to be close in potency (H250N(6.52)) or less potent (V84L-(3.32)) than at wild type receptors. The affinity of CGS21680 increased as the pH was lowered to 5.5 in both the wild type and H250N(6.52) mutant receptors. Thus, protonation of H250-(6.52) is not involved in this pH dependence. These data are consistent with a molecular model predicting the proximity of bound agonist ligands to TM3, TM5, TM6, and TM7. PMID:9258366

  5. A2A adenosine receptor regulates the human blood brain barrier permeability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do-Geun; Bynoe, Margaret S.

    2015-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) symbolically represents the gateway to the central nervous system. It is a single layer of specialized endothelial cells that coats the central nervous system (CNS) vasculature and physically separates the brain environment from the blood constituents, to maintain the homeostasis of the CNS. However, this protective measure is a hindrance to the delivery of therapeutics to treat neurological diseases. Here, we show that activation of A2A adenosine receptor (AR) with an FDA-approved agonist potently permeabilizes an in vitro primary human brain endothelial barrier (hBBB) to the passage of chemotherapeutic drugs and T cells. T cell migration under AR signaling occurs primarily by paracellular transendothelial route. Permeabilization of the hBBB is rapid, time-dependent and reversible and is mediated by morphological changes in actin-cytoskeletal reorganization induced by RhoA signaling and a potent down-regulation of Claudin-5 and VE-Cadherin. Moreover, the kinetics of BBB permeability in mice closely overlaps with the permeability kinetics of the hBBB. These data suggest that activation of A2A AR is an endogenous mechanism that may be used for CNS drug delivery in human. PMID:25262373

  6. Differential effects of neonatal handling on anxiety, corticosterone response to stress, and hippocampal glucocorticoid and serotonin (5-HT)2A receptors in Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Durand, M; Sarrieau, A; Aguerre, S; Mormède, P; Chaouloff, F

    1998-05-01

    Neonatal handling (during the first 3 weeks of age) has been reported by others to diminish the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) responsivity to stress in adult Long Evans rats, an effect involving a serotonin (5-HT)2A receptor-mediated increase in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene expression in the frontal cortex and the hippocampus. In addition, handled animals may also display enduring reductions in anxiety-related behaviours, including in the elevated plus-maze. We have thus analysed the aforementioned neuroendocrine and behavioural consequences of neonatal stress in male and female adult Lewis rats, a strain characterised by its high anxiety and its hyporesponsive HPA axis. Plasma corticosterone, but not behavioural, responses to an elevated plus-maze test were decreased in handled rats. Besides, hippocampal mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and GR binding capacities were not different between handled and non-handled Lewis rats, an observation which could be extended to our adult Long Evans rats. Lastly, neither hippocampal nor cortical 5-HT2A receptor binding capacities in adult Lewis rats were affected by prior handling. In keeping with the failure to detect early handling-induced increases in hippocampal GR binding in 3-week old Lewis and Long Evans rats, the present study reinforces past findings indicating that environmental and genetic factors are crucial variables in the neonatal handling paradigm.

  7. Age-dependent effects on social interaction of NMDA GluN2A receptor subtype-selective antagonism.

    PubMed

    Green, Torrian L; Burket, Jessica A; Deutsch, Stephen I

    2016-07-01

    NMDA receptor-mediated neurotransmission is implicated in the regulation of normal sociability in mice. The heterotetrameric NMDA receptor is composed of two obligatory GluN1 and either two "modulatory" GluN2A or GluN2B receptor subunits. GluN2A and GluN2B-containing receptors differ in terms of their developmental expression, distribution between synaptic and extrasynaptic locations, and channel kinetic properties, among other differences. Because age-dependent differences in disruptive effects of GluN2A and GluN2B subtype-selective antagonists on sociability and locomotor activity have been reported in rats, the current investigation explored age-dependent effects of PEAQX, a GluN2A subtype-selective antagonist, on sociability, stereotypic behaviors emerging during social interaction, and spatial working memory in 4- and 8-week old male Swiss Webster mice. The data implicate an age-dependent contribution of GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors to the regulation of normal social interaction in mice. Specifically, at a dose of PEAQX devoid of any effect on locomotor activity and mouse rotarod performance, the social interaction of 8-week old mice was disrupted without any effect on the social salience of a stimulus mouse. Moreover, PEAQX attenuated stereotypic behavior emerging during social interaction in 4- and 8-week old mice. However, PEAQX had no effect on spontaneous alternations, a measure of spatial working memory, suggesting that neural circuits mediating sociability and spatial working memory may be discrete and dissociable from each other. Also, the data suggest that the regulation of stereotypic behaviors and sociability may occur independently of each other. Because expression of GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors occurs at a later developmental stage, they may be more involved in mediating the pathogenesis of ASDs in patients with histories of "regression" after a period of normal development than GluN2B receptors.

  8. 5-HT2A receptors control body temperature in mice during LPS-induced inflammation via regulation of NO production.

    PubMed

    Voronova, Irina P; Khramova, Galina M; Kulikova, Elizabeth A; Petrovskii, Dmitrii V; Bazovkina, Daria V; Kulikov, Alexander V

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled 5-HT2A receptors are involved in the regulation of numerous normal and pathological physiological functions. At the same time, its involvement in the regulation of body temperature (Tb) in normal conditions is obscure. Here we study the effect of the 5-HT2A receptor activation or blockade on Tb in sick animals. The experiments were carried out on adult C57BL/6 mouse males. Systemic inflammation and sickness were produced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.1mg/kg, ip), while the 5-HT2A receptor was stimulated or blocked through the administration of the receptor agonist DOI or antagonist ketanserin (1mg/kg), respectively. LPS, DOI or ketanserin alone produced no effect on Tb. However, administration of LPS together with a peripheral or central ketanserin injection reduced Tb (32.2°C). Ketanserin reversed the LPS-induced expression of inducible NO synthase in the brain. Consequently, an involvement of NO in the mechanism of the hypothermic effect of ketanserin in sick mice was hypothesized. Administration of LPS together with NO synthase inhibitor, l-nitro-arginine methyl ester (60mg/kg, ip) resulted in deep (28.5°C) and prolonged (8h) hypothermia, while administration of l-nitro-arginine methyl ester alone produced no effect on Tb. Thus, 5-HT2A receptors play a key role in Tb control in sick mice. Blockade of this GPCR produces hypothermia in mice with systemic inflammation via attenuation of LPS-induced NO production. These results indicate an unexpected role of 5-HT2A receptors in inflammation and NO production and have a considerable biological impact on understanding the mechanism of animal adaptation to pathogens and parasites. Moreover, adverse side effects of 5-HT2A receptor antagonists in patients with inflammation may be expected. PMID:26621247

  9. 5-HT2A receptors control body temperature in mice during LPS-induced inflammation via regulation of NO production.

    PubMed

    Voronova, Irina P; Khramova, Galina M; Kulikova, Elizabeth A; Petrovskii, Dmitrii V; Bazovkina, Daria V; Kulikov, Alexander V

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled 5-HT2A receptors are involved in the regulation of numerous normal and pathological physiological functions. At the same time, its involvement in the regulation of body temperature (Tb) in normal conditions is obscure. Here we study the effect of the 5-HT2A receptor activation or blockade on Tb in sick animals. The experiments were carried out on adult C57BL/6 mouse males. Systemic inflammation and sickness were produced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.1mg/kg, ip), while the 5-HT2A receptor was stimulated or blocked through the administration of the receptor agonist DOI or antagonist ketanserin (1mg/kg), respectively. LPS, DOI or ketanserin alone produced no effect on Tb. However, administration of LPS together with a peripheral or central ketanserin injection reduced Tb (32.2°C). Ketanserin reversed the LPS-induced expression of inducible NO synthase in the brain. Consequently, an involvement of NO in the mechanism of the hypothermic effect of ketanserin in sick mice was hypothesized. Administration of LPS together with NO synthase inhibitor, l-nitro-arginine methyl ester (60mg/kg, ip) resulted in deep (28.5°C) and prolonged (8h) hypothermia, while administration of l-nitro-arginine methyl ester alone produced no effect on Tb. Thus, 5-HT2A receptors play a key role in Tb control in sick mice. Blockade of this GPCR produces hypothermia in mice with systemic inflammation via attenuation of LPS-induced NO production. These results indicate an unexpected role of 5-HT2A receptors in inflammation and NO production and have a considerable biological impact on understanding the mechanism of animal adaptation to pathogens and parasites. Moreover, adverse side effects of 5-HT2A receptor antagonists in patients with inflammation may be expected.

  10. Perikaryal and synaptic localization of alpha 2A-adrenergic receptor-like immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Aoki, C; Go, C G; Venkatesan, C; Kurose, H

    1994-07-11

    Through molecular cloning, the existence of three distinct subtypes of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors (alpha 2AR)--A, B and C--has been established and are referred to as alpha 2A AR, alpha 2B AR and alpha 2CAR. Due to limitations in pharmacological tools, it has been difficult to ascribe the role of each subtype to the central functions of alpha 2AR. In situ hybridization studies have provided valuable information regarding their distribution within brain. However, little is known about their subcellular distribution, and in particular, their pre- versus postsynaptic localization or their relation to noradrenergic neurons in the CNS. We used an antiserum that selectively recognizes the A-subtype of alpha 2AR to determine: (1) the regional distribution of the receptor within brains of rat and monkey; (2) the subcellular distribution of the receptor in locus coeruleus (LC) of rats and prefrontal cortex of monkeys; and (3) the ultrastructural relation of the receptor to noradrenergic processes in LC. Light microscopic immunocytochemistry revealed prominent immunoreactivity in LC, the brainstem regions modulating the baroreflex, the granule cell layer of the cerebellar cortex, the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei of the hypothalamus (PVN, SON), the basal ganglia, all thalamic nuclei, the hippocampal formation and throughout cerebral cortical areas. Comparison of results obtained from rat and monkey brains revealed no apparent interspecies-differences in the regional distribution of immunoreactivity. Immunoreactivity occurred as small puncta, less than 1 micron in diameter, that cluster over neuronal perikarya. Besides these puncta, cell bodies, proximal dendrites and fine varicose processes--most likely to be axonal--of the PVN and SON and the hippocampal granule cells also exhibited homogeneously intense distribution of immunoreactivity. Subcellularly, alpha 2AAR-ir in LC and prefrontal cortex were associated with synaptic and non-synaptic plasma membrane of

  11. Differential expression of adenosine A3 receptors controls adenosine A2A receptor-mediated inhibition of TLR responses in microglia.

    PubMed

    van der Putten, Céline; Zuiderwijk-Sick, Ella A; van Straalen, Linda; de Geus, Eveline D; Boven, Leonie A; Kondova, Ivanela; IJzerman, Ad P; Bajramovic, Jeffrey J

    2009-06-15

    Microglia activation is a prominent feature in many neuroinflammatory disorders. Unrestrained activation can generate a chronic inflammatory environment that might lead to neurodegeneration and autoimmunity. Extracellular adenosine modulates cellular activation through adenosine receptor (ADORA)-mediated signaling. There are four ADORA subtypes that can either increase (A(2A) and A(2B) receptors) or decrease (A(1) and A(3) receptors) intracellular cyclic AMP levels. The expression pattern of the subtypes thus orchestrates the cellular response to extracellular adenosine. We have investigated the expression of ADORA subtypes in unstimulated and TLR-activated primary rhesus monkey microglia. Activation induced an up-regulation of A(2A) and a down-regulation of A(3) receptor (A(3)R) levels. The altered ADORA-expression pattern sensitized microglia to A(2A) receptor (A(2A)R)-mediated inhibition of subsequent TLR-induced cytokine responses. By using combinations of subtype-specific agonists and antagonists, we revealed that in unstimulated microglia, A(2A)R-mediated inhibitory signaling was effectively counteracted by A(3)R-mediated signaling. In activated microglia, the decrease in A(3)R-mediated signaling sensitized them to A(2A)R-mediated inhibitory signaling. We report a differential, activation state-specific expression of ADORA in microglia and uncover a role for A(3)R as dynamically regulated suppressors of A(2A)R-mediated inhibition of TLR-induced responses. This would suggest exploration of combinations of A(2A)R agonists and A(3)R antagonists to dampen microglial activation during chronic neuroinflammatory conditions.

  12. Novel mutations in the COL2A1 gene in Japanese patients with Stickler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Itsuka; Nagata, Tatsuo; Hayashi, Takaaki; Kakinoki, Masashi; Uchio, Eiichi; Kondo, Mineo; Ohji, Masahito; Kusaka, Shunji

    2016-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is an inherited connective tissue disorder that affects the eyes, cartilage and articular tissues. The phenotypes of Stickler syndrome include congenital high myopia, retinal detachment, premature joint degeneration, hearing impairment and craniofacial anomalies, such as cleft palate and midline facial hypoplasia. The disease is genetically heterogeneous, and the majority of the cases are caused by mutations in the COL2A1 gene. We examined 40 Japanese patients with Stickler syndrome from 23 families to determine whether they had mutations in the COL2A1 gene. This analysis was conducted by examining each patient's genomic DNA by Sanger sequencing. Five nonsense, 4 splicing and 8 deletion mutations in the COL2A1 gene were identified, accounting for 21 of the 23 families. Different mutations of the COL2A1 gene were associated with similar phenotypes but with different degrees of expressivity. PMID:27408751

  13. Novel mutations in the COL2A1 gene in Japanese patients with Stickler syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Itsuka; Nagata, Tatsuo; Hayashi, Takaaki; Kakinoki, Masashi; Uchio, Eiichi; Kondo, Mineo; Ohji, Masahito; Kusaka, Shunji

    2016-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is an inherited connective tissue disorder that affects the eyes, cartilage and articular tissues. The phenotypes of Stickler syndrome include congenital high myopia, retinal detachment, premature joint degeneration, hearing impairment and craniofacial anomalies, such as cleft palate and midline facial hypoplasia. The disease is genetically heterogeneous, and the majority of the cases are caused by mutations in the COL2A1 gene. We examined 40 Japanese patients with Stickler syndrome from 23 families to determine whether they had mutations in the COL2A1 gene. This analysis was conducted by examining each patient’s genomic DNA by Sanger sequencing. Five nonsense, 4 splicing and 8 deletion mutations in the COL2A1 gene were identified, accounting for 21 of the 23 families. Different mutations of the COL2A1 gene were associated with similar phenotypes but with different degrees of expressivity. PMID:27408751

  14. Classification of Dopamine Receptor Genes in Vertebrates: Nine Subtypes in Osteichthyes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kei; Fontaine, Romain; Pasqualini, Catherine; Vernier, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine neurotransmission regulates various brain functions, and its regulatory roles are mediated by two families of G protein-coupled receptors: the D1 and D2 receptor families. In mammals, the D1 family comprises two receptor subtypes (D1 and D5), while the D2 family comprises three receptor subtypes (D2, D3 and D4). Phylogenetic analyses of dopamine receptor genes strongly suggest that the common ancestor of Osteichthyes (bony jawed vertebrates) possessed four subtypes in the D1 family and five subtypes in the D2 family. Mammals have secondarily lost almost half of the ancestral dopamine receptor genes, whereas nonmammalian species kept many of them. Although the mammalian situation is an exception among Osteichthyes, the current classification and characterization of dopamine receptors are based on mammalian features, which have led to confusion in the identification of dopamine receptor subtypes in nonmammalian species. Here we begin by reviewing the history of the discovery of dopamine receptors in vertebrates. The recent genome sequencing of coelacanth, gar and elephant shark led to the proposal of a refined scenario of evolution of dopamine receptor genes. We also discuss a current problem of nomenclature of dopamine receptors. Following the official nomenclature of mammalian dopamine receptors from D1 to D5, we propose to name newly identified receptor subtypes from D6 to D9 in order to facilitate the use of an identical name for orthologous genes among different species. To promote a nomenclature change which allows distinguishing the two dopamine receptor families, a nomenclature consortium is needed. This comparative perspective is crucial to correctly interpret data obtained in animal studies on dopamine-related brain disorders, and more fundamentally, to understand the characteristics of dopamine neurotransmission in vertebrates. PMID:26613258

  15. Parathyroid receptor gene expression by epiphyseal growth plates in rickets and tibial dyschondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Ben-Bassat, S; Genina, O; Lavelin, I; Leach, R M; Pines, M

    1999-03-25

    PTH/PTHrP receptor gene expression was evaluated in situ in avian epiphyseal growth plates taken from normal, rachitic and tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) afflicted chicks induced by thiram or by genetic selection. In the normal growth plates, PTH/PTHrP receptor gene expression was localized to the maturation zone as demonstrated by the expression of collagen type II (col II), osteopontin (OPN) genes and alkaline phosphatase activity (AP). In TD, either induced by thiram or by genetic selection, normal levels of PTH/PTHrP receptor gene expression were observed up to 21 days post-hatch. In rickets, on the other hand, no PTH/PTHrP receptor gene expression was observed in the growth plate from day 8 of a vitamin D-deficient diet. In cultured chondrocytes, PTH caused time-dependent down-regulation of its own receptor. These results suggest that alterations in the PTH/PTHrP receptor gene expression are associated with rickets but not with TD. The reduction in the PTH/PTHrP receptor gene expression in rickets may be due to the high plasma levels of PTH.

  16. Hyperactivation of D1 and A2A receptors contributes to cognitive dysfunction in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Tyebji, Shiraz; Saavedra, Ana; Canas, Paula M; Pliassova, Anna; Delgado-García, José M; Alberch, Jordi; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Gruart, Agnès; Pérez-Navarro, Esther

    2015-02-01

    Stimulation of dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) and adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) increases cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity in the brain. In Huntington's disease, by essentially unknown mechanisms, PKA activity is increased in the hippocampus of mouse models and patients and contributes to hippocampal-dependent cognitive impairment in R6 mice. Here, we show for the first time that D1R and A2AR density and functional efficiency are increased in hippocampal nerve terminals from R6/1 mice, which accounts for increased cAMP levels and PKA signaling. In contrast, PKA signaling was not altered in the hippocampus of Hdh(Q7/Q111) mice, a full-length HD model. In line with these findings, chronic (but not acute) combined treatment with D1R plus A2AR antagonists (SCH23390 and SCH58261, respectively) normalizes PKA activity in the hippocampus, facilitates long-term potentiation in behaving R6/1 mice, and ameliorates cognitive dysfunction. By contrast, chronic treatment with either D1R or A2AR antagonist alone does not modify PKA activity or improve cognitive dysfunction in R6/1 mice. Hyperactivation of both D1R and A2AR occurs in HD striatum and chronic treatment with D1R plus A2AR antagonists normalizes striatal PKA activity but it does not affect motor dysfunction in R6/1 mice. In conclusion, we show that parallel alterations in dopaminergic and adenosinergic signaling in the hippocampus contribute to increase PKA activity, which in turn selectively participates in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory deficits in HD. In addition, our results point to the chronic inhibition of both D1R and A2AR as a novel therapeutic strategy to manage early cognitive impairment in this neurodegenerative disease. PMID:25449908

  17. Striatal Pre- and Postsynaptic Profile of Adenosine A2A Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz, César; Beaumont, Vahri; Goldberg, Steven R.; Lluís, Carme; Cortés, Antoni; Franco, Rafael; Casadó, Vicent; Canela, Enric I.; Ferré, Sergi

    2011-01-01

    Striatal adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) are highly expressed in medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the indirect efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs). A2ARs are also localized presynaptically in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals contacting MSNs of the direct efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs). It has been hypothesized that postsynaptic A2AR antagonists should be useful in Parkinson's disease, while presynaptic A2AR antagonists could be beneficial in dyskinetic disorders, such as Huntington's disease, obsessive-compulsive disorders and drug addiction. The aim or this work was to determine whether selective A2AR antagonists may be subdivided according to a preferential pre- versus postsynaptic mechanism of action. The potency at blocking the motor output and striatal glutamate release induced by cortical electrical stimulation and the potency at inducing locomotor activation were used as in vivo measures of pre- and postsynaptic activities, respectively. SCH-442416 and KW-6002 showed a significant preferential pre- and postsynaptic profile, respectively, while the other tested compounds (MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261) showed no clear preference. Radioligand-binding experiments were performed in cells expressing A2AR-D2R and A1R-A2AR heteromers to determine possible differences in the affinity of these compounds for different A2AR heteromers. Heteromerization played a key role in the presynaptic profile of SCH-442416, since it bound with much less affinity to A2AR when co-expressed with D2R than with A1R. KW-6002 showed the best relative affinity for A2AR co-expressed with D2R than co-expressed with A1R, which can at least partially explain the postsynaptic profile of this compound. Also, the in vitro pharmacological profile of MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261 was is in accordance with their mixed pre- and postsynaptic profile. On the basis of their preferential

  18. Functional characterization of bursicon receptor and genome-wide analysis for identification of genes affected by bursicon receptor RNAi.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hua; Palli, Subba R

    2010-08-01

    Bursicon is an insect neuropeptide hormone that is secreted from the central nervous system into the hemolymph and initiates cuticle tanning. The receptor for bursicon is encoded by the rickets (rk) gene and belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily. The bursicon and its receptor regulate cuticle tanning as well as wing expansion after adult eclosion. However, the molecular action of bursicon signaling remains unclear. We utilized RNA interference (RNAi) and microarray to study the function of the bursicon receptor (Tcrk) in the model insect, Tribolium castaneum. The data included here showed that in addition to cuticle tanning and wing expansion reported previously, Tcrk is also required for development and expansion of integumentary structures and adult eclosion. Using custom microarrays, we identified 24 genes that are differentially expressed between Tcrk RNAi and control insects. Knockdown in the expression of one of these genes, TC004091, resulted in the arrest of adult eclosion. Identification of genes that are involved in bursicon receptor mediated biological processes will provide tools for future studies on mechanisms of bursicon action.

  19. GRID2 a novel gene possibly associated with mevalonate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Moura, Ronald; Tricarico, Paola Maura; Campos Coelho, Antonio Victor; Crovella, Sergio

    2015-04-01

    Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is a rare autosomal disease caused by mutations in the mevalonate kinase gene (MVK). The genotype-phenotype correlation is sometimes problematic due to the great genetic and clinical heterogeneity; so we hypothesize that genes other than MVK are able to modulate MKD clinical phenotypes. This hypothesis was tested by analyzing the exome of 22 patients with MKD all carrying MVK gene mutations, and 20 patients with recurrent fevers (RF) not carrying MVK mutations. Our preliminary findings suggest a possible role of GRID2 in the susceptibility to develop MKD. GRID2 gene (4q22.2), encoding for human glutamate receptor delta-2, associated with MKD: The rs1450500 SNP was differently distributed in patients with MKD with respect to those with RF. Being aware of the small number of patients analyzed, we hypothesized a possible role for GRID2 as possible phenotype modifier in MKD patients, especially in those with severe phenotypes.

  20. Photoperiod regulates genes encoding melanocortin 3 and serotonin receptors and secretogranins in the dorsomedial posterior arcuate of the Siberian hamster.

    PubMed

    Nilaweera, K N; Archer, Z A; Campbell, G; Mayer, C-D; Balik, A; Ross, A W; Mercer, J G; Ebling, F J P; Morgan, P J; Barrett, P

    2009-02-01

    The mechanism(s) involved in the regulation of the seasonal-appropriate body weight of the Siberian hamster are currently unknown. We have identified photoperiodically regulated genes including VGF in a sub-region of the arcuate nucleus termed the dorsomedial posterior arcuate (dmpARC). Gene expression changes in this nucleus so far account for a significant number of those reported as photoperiodically regulated and are therefore likely to contribute to seasonal physiological responses of the hamsters. The present study aimed to identify additional genes expressed in the dmpARC regulated by photoperiod that could be involved in regulating the activity of this nucleus with respect to seasonal physiology of the Siberian hamster. Using laser capture microdissection coupled with a microarray analysis and a candidate gene approach, we have identified several photoperiodically regulated genes in the dmpARC that are known to have roles in secretory and intracellular signalling pathways. These include secretogranin (sg) III and SgVI (secretory pathway), melanocortin 3 receptor (MC3-R) and serotonin (5-HT) receptors 2A and 7 (signalling pathway), all of which increase in expression under a short photoperiod. The spatial relationship between receptor signalling and potential secretory pathways was investigated by dual in situ hybridisation, which revealed that 5-HT2A and 5-HT7 receptors are expressed in neurones expressing VGF mRNA and that a sub-population (approximately 40%) of these neurones express MC3-R. These gene expression changes in dmpARC neurones may reflect the functional requirement of these neurones for seasonal physiological responses of the hamster.

  1. Effect of metallothionein 2A gene polymorphism on allele-specific gene expression and metal content in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Krześlak, Anna; Forma, Ewa; Jóźwiak, Paweł; Szymczyk, Agnieszka; Bryś, Magdalena

    2013-05-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are highly conserved, small molecular weight, cysteine rich proteins. The major physiological functions of metallothioneins include homeostasis of essential metals Zn and Cu and protection against cytotoxicity of heavy metals. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is an association between the − 5 A/G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs28366003) in core promoter region and expression of metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene and metal concentration in prostate cancer tissues. MT2A polymorphism was determined by the polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism technique (PCR–RFLP) using 412 prostate cancer tissue samples. MT2A gene expression analysis was performed by real-time RT-PCR method. A significant association between rs28366003 genotype and MT2A expression level was found. The average mRNA level was found to be lower among minor allele carriers (the risk allele) than average expression among homozygotes for the major allele. Metal levels were analyzed by flamed atomic absorption spectrometer system. Highly statistically significant associations were detected between the SNP and Cd, Zn, Cu and Pb levels. The results of Spearman's rank correlation showed that the expressions of MT2A and Cu, Pb and Ni concentrations were negatively correlated. On the basis of the results obtained in this study, we suggest that SNP polymorphism may affect the MT2A gene expression in prostate and this is associated with some metal accumulation. - Highlights: • MT2A gene expression and metal content in prostate cancer tissues • Association between SNP (rs28366003) and expression of MT2A • Significant associations between the SNP and Cd, Zn, Cu and Pb levels • Negative correlation between MT2A gene expression and Cu, Pb and Ni levels.

  2. Differential expression of hoxa2a and hoxa2b genes during striped bass embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Scemama, Jean-Luc; Vernon, Jamie L; Stellwag, Edmund J

    2006-10-01

    Here, we report the cloning and expression analysis of two previously uncharacterized paralogs group 2 Hox genes, striped bass hoxa2a and hoxa2b, and the developmental regulatory gene egr2. We demonstrate that both Hox genes are expressed in the rhombomeres of the developing hindbrain and the pharyngeal arches albeit with different spatio-temporal distributions relative to one another. While both hoxa2a and hoxa2b share the r1/r2 anterior boundary of expression characteristic of the hoxa2 paralog genes of other species, hoxa2a gene expression extends throughout the hindbrain, whereas hoxa2b gene expression is restricted to the r2-r5 region. Egr2, which is used in this study as an early developmental marker of rhombomeres 3 and 5, is expressed in two distinct bands with a location and spacing typical for these two rhombomeres in other species. Within the pharyngeal arches, hoxa2a is expressed at higher levels in the second pharyngeal arch, while hoxa2b is more strongly expressed in the posterior arches. Further, hoxa2b expression within the arches becomes undetectable at 60hpf, while hoxa2a expression is maintained at least up until the beginning of chondrogenesis. Comparison of the striped bass HoxA cluster paralog group 2 (PG2) genes to their orthologs and trans-orthologs shows that the striped bass hoxa2a gene expression pattern is similar to the overall expression pattern described for the hoxa2 genes in the lobe-finned fish lineage and for the hoxa2b gene from zebrafish. It is notable that the pharyngeal arch expression pattern of the striped bass hoxa2a gene is more divergent from its sister paralog, hoxa2b, than from the zebrafish hoxa2b gene. Overall, our results suggest that differences in the Hox PG2 gene complement of striped bass and zebrafish affects both their rhombomeric and pharyngeal arch expression patterns and may account for the similarities in pharyngeal arch expression between striped bass hoxa2a and zebrafish hoxa2b.

  3. Identification of Modulators of the Nuclear Receptor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α (PPARα) in a Mouse Liver Gene Expression Compendium

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nuclear receptor family member peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is activated by therapeutic hypolipidemic drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals to regulate genes involved in lipid transport and catabolism. Chronic activation of PPARα in rodents inc...

  4. The human glutamate receptor delta 2 gene (GRID2) maps to chromosome 4q22.

    PubMed

    Hu, W; Zuo, J; De Jager, P L; Heintz, N

    1998-01-01

    We isolated the human glutamate receptor delta 2 (GRID2) gene, which has 97.0% identity in amino acid sequence to the mouse glutamate receptor delta 2 (Grid2) gene. We subsequently mapped this gene to human chromosome 4q22 by radiation hybrid mapping and by hybridization to two overlapping human yeast artificial chromosomes that are located in 4q22. The Grid2 gene, which is mutated in lurcher (Lc) mice, maps to mouse chromosome 6. Thus, the mapping of the GRID2 gene to human chromosome 4q22 confirms and refines a region of synteny between mouse and human genomes.

  5. Allelic association of human dopamine D sub 2 receptor gene in alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, K.; Sheridan, P.J.; Montgomery, A.; Jagadeeswaran, P.; Nogami, H.; Briggs, A.H. ); Noble, E.P.; Ritchie, T.; Cohn, J.B. )

    1990-04-18

    In a blinded experiment, the authors report the first allelic association of the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene in alcoholism. From 70 brain samples of alcoholics and nonalcoholics, DNA was digested with restriction endonucleases and probed with a clone that contained the entire 3{prime} coding exon, the polyadenylation signal, and approximately 16.4 kilobases of noncoding 3{prime} sequence of the human dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene ({lambda}hD2G1). In the present samples, the presence of A1 allele of the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene correctly classified 77% of alcoholics, and its absence classified 72% of nonalcoholics. The polymorphic pattern of this receptor gene suggests that a gene that confers susceptibility to at least one form of alcoholism is located on the q22-q23 region of chromosome 11.

  6. Membrane omega-3 fatty acids modulate the oligomerisation kinetics of adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Guixà-González, Ramon; Javanainen, Matti; Gómez-Soler, Maricel; Cordobilla, Begoña; Domingo, Joan Carles; Sanz, Ferran; Pastor, Manuel; Ciruela, Francisco; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Selent, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Membrane levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an essential omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω-3 PUFA), are decreased in common neuropsychiatric disorders. DHA modulates key cell membrane properties like fluidity, thereby affecting the behaviour of transmembrane proteins like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These receptors, which have special relevance for major neuropsychiatric disorders have recently been shown to form dimers or higher order oligomers, and evidence suggests that DHA levels affect GPCR function by modulating oligomerisation. In this study, we assessed the effect of membrane DHA content on the formation of a class of protein complexes with particular relevance for brain disease: adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptor oligomers. Using extensive multiscale computer modelling, we find a marked propensity of DHA for interaction with both A2A and D2 receptors, which leads to an increased rate of receptor oligomerisation. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) experiments performed on living cells suggest that this DHA effect on the oligomerisation of A2A and D2 receptors is purely kinetic. This work reveals for the first time that membrane ω-3 PUFAs play a key role in GPCR oligomerisation kinetics, which may have important implications for neuropsychiatric conditions like schizophrenia or Parkinson’s disease. PMID:26796668

  7. Membrane omega-3 fatty acids modulate the oligomerisation kinetics of adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guixà-González, Ramon; Javanainen, Matti; Gómez-Soler, Maricel; Cordobilla, Begoña; Domingo, Joan Carles; Sanz, Ferran; Pastor, Manuel; Ciruela, Francisco; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Selent, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Membrane levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an essential omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω-3 PUFA), are decreased in common neuropsychiatric disorders. DHA modulates key cell membrane properties like fluidity, thereby affecting the behaviour of transmembrane proteins like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These receptors, which have special relevance for major neuropsychiatric disorders have recently been shown to form dimers or higher order oligomers, and evidence suggests that DHA levels affect GPCR function by modulating oligomerisation. In this study, we assessed the effect of membrane DHA content on the formation of a class of protein complexes with particular relevance for brain disease: adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptor oligomers. Using extensive multiscale computer modelling, we find a marked propensity of DHA for interaction with both A2A and D2 receptors, which leads to an increased rate of receptor oligomerisation. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) experiments performed on living cells suggest that this DHA effect on the oligomerisation of A2A and D2 receptors is purely kinetic. This work reveals for the first time that membrane ω-3 PUFAs play a key role in GPCR oligomerisation kinetics, which may have important implications for neuropsychiatric conditions like schizophrenia or Parkinson’s disease.

  8. A chimeric Plasmodium falciparum Pfnbp2b/Pfnbp2a gene originated during asexual growth.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Alfred

    2005-02-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum line 3D7-A has an unusual invasion phenotype, such that it can invade enzyme-treated and mutant red blood cells that are resistant to invasion by other parasite lines. 3D7-A has a chimeric Pfnbp2b gene that contains part of the repeat region of the paralogous gene Pfnbp2a. This chimeric gene originated by spontaneous gene conversion during normal maintenance in culture, indicating that ectopic recombination and gene conversion during asexual growth are potentially important mechanisms participating in the evolution of paralogous genes in Plasmodium. However, the presence of the chimeric Pfnbp2b gene in 3D7-A was not associated with its peculiar invasion phenotype.

  9. Association study of dopamine D3 receptor gene and schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, J.L.; Billett, E.A.; Macciardi, F.M.

    1995-12-18

    Several groups have reported an association between schizophrenia and the MscI polymorphism in the first exon of the dopamine D3 receptor gene (DRD3). We studied this polymorphism using a North American sample (117 patients plus 188 controls) and an Italian sample (97 patients plus 64 controls). In the first part of the study, we compared allele frequencies of schizophrenia patients and unmatched controls and observed a significant difference in the total sample (P = 0.01). The second part of the study involved a case control approach in which each schizophrenia patient was matched to a control of the same sex, and of similar age and ethnic background. The DRD3 allele frequencies of patients and controls revealed no significant difference between the two groups in the Italian (N = 53) or the North American (N = 54) matched populations; however, when these two matched samples were combined, a significant difference was observed (P = 0.026). Our results suggest that the MscI polymorphism may be associated with schizophrenia in the populations studied. 32 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. Penguins reduced olfactory receptor genes common to other waterbirds

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qin; Wang, Kai; Lei, Fumin; Yu, Dan; Zhao, Huabin

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell, or olfaction, is fundamental in the life of animals. However, penguins (Aves: Sphenisciformes) possess relatively small olfactory bulbs compared with most other waterbirds such as Procellariiformes and Gaviiformes. To test whether penguins have a reduced reliance on olfaction, we analyzed the draft genome sequences of the two penguins, which diverged at the origin of the order Sphenisciformes; we also examined six closely related species with available genomes, and identified 29 one-to-one orthologous olfactory receptor genes (i.e. ORs) that are putatively functionally conserved and important across the eight birds. To survey the 29 one-to-one orthologous ORs in penguins and their relatives, we newly generated 34 sequences that are missing from the draft genomes. Through the analysis of totaling 378 OR sequences, we found that, of these functionally important ORs common to other waterbirds, penguins have a significantly greater percentage of OR pseudogenes than other waterbirds, suggesting a reduction of olfactory capability. The penguin-specific reduction of olfactory capability arose in the common ancestor of penguins between 23 and 60 Ma, which may have resulted from the aquatic specializations for underwater vision. Our study provides genetic evidence for a possible reduction of reliance on olfaction in penguins. PMID:27527385

  11. Penguins reduced olfactory receptor genes common to other waterbirds.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qin; Wang, Kai; Lei, Fumin; Yu, Dan; Zhao, Huabin

    2016-08-16

    The sense of smell, or olfaction, is fundamental in the life of animals. However, penguins (Aves: Sphenisciformes) possess relatively small olfactory bulbs compared with most other waterbirds such as Procellariiformes and Gaviiformes. To test whether penguins have a reduced reliance on olfaction, we analyzed the draft genome sequences of the two penguins, which diverged at the origin of the order Sphenisciformes; we also examined six closely related species with available genomes, and identified 29 one-to-one orthologous olfactory receptor genes (i.e. ORs) that are putatively functionally conserved and important across the eight birds. To survey the 29 one-to-one orthologous ORs in penguins and their relatives, we newly generated 34 sequences that are missing from the draft genomes. Through the analysis of totaling 378 OR sequences, we found that, of these functionally important ORs common to other waterbirds, penguins have a significantly greater percentage of OR pseudogenes than other waterbirds, suggesting a reduction of olfactory capability. The penguin-specific reduction of olfactory capability arose in the common ancestor of penguins between 23 and 60 Ma, which may have resulted from the aquatic specializations for underwater vision. Our study provides genetic evidence for a possible reduction of reliance on olfaction in penguins.

  12. Penguins reduced olfactory receptor genes common to other waterbirds.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qin; Wang, Kai; Lei, Fumin; Yu, Dan; Zhao, Huabin

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell, or olfaction, is fundamental in the life of animals. However, penguins (Aves: Sphenisciformes) possess relatively small olfactory bulbs compared with most other waterbirds such as Procellariiformes and Gaviiformes. To test whether penguins have a reduced reliance on olfaction, we analyzed the draft genome sequences of the two penguins, which diverged at the origin of the order Sphenisciformes; we also examined six closely related species with available genomes, and identified 29 one-to-one orthologous olfactory receptor genes (i.e. ORs) that are putatively functionally conserved and important across the eight birds. To survey the 29 one-to-one orthologous ORs in penguins and their relatives, we newly generated 34 sequences that are missing from the draft genomes. Through the analysis of totaling 378 OR sequences, we found that, of these functionally important ORs common to other waterbirds, penguins have a significantly greater percentage of OR pseudogenes than other waterbirds, suggesting a reduction of olfactory capability. The penguin-specific reduction of olfactory capability arose in the common ancestor of penguins between 23 and 60 Ma, which may have resulted from the aquatic specializations for underwater vision. Our study provides genetic evidence for a possible reduction of reliance on olfaction in penguins. PMID:27527385

  13. Blockage of A2A and A3 adenosine receptors decreases the desensitization of human GABAA receptors microtransplanted to Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Roseti, Cristina; Palma, Eleonora; Martinello, Katiuscia; Fucile, Sergio; Morace, Roberta; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Gianpaolo; Arcella, Antonietta; Giangaspero, Felice; Aronica, Eleonora; Mascia, Addolorata; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Manfredi, Mario; Cristalli, Gloria; Lambertucci, Catia; Marucci, Gabriella; Volpini, Rosaria; Limatola, Cristina; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    We previously found that the endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine, acting through A2A and A3 adenosine receptors (ARs), alters the stability of currents (IGABA) generated by GABAA receptors expressed in the epileptic human mesial temporal lobe (MTLE). Here we examined whether ARs alter the stability (desensitization) of IGABA expressed in focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) and in periglioma epileptic tissues. The experiments were performed with tissues from 23 patients, using voltage-clamp recordings in Xenopus oocytes microinjected with membranes isolated from human MTLE and FCD tissues or using patch-clamp recordings of pyramidal neurons in epileptic tissue slices. On repetitive activation, the epileptic GABAA receptors revealed instability, manifested by a large IGABA rundown, which in most of the oocytes (≈70%) was obviously impaired by the new A2A antagonists ANR82, ANR94, and ANR152. In most MTLE tissue-microtransplanted oocytes, a new A3 receptor antagonist (ANR235) significantly improved IGABA stability. Moreover, patch-clamped pyramidal neurons from human neocortical slices of periglioma epileptic tissues exhibited altered IGABA rundown on ANR94 treatment. Our findings indicate that antagonizing A2A and A3 receptors increases the IGABA stability in different epileptic tissues and suggest that adenosine derivatives may offer therapeutic opportunities in various forms of human epilepsy. PMID:19721003

  14. Serotonin 2A Receptor SNP rs7330461 Association with Treatment Response to Pomaglumetad Methionil in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Nisenbaum, Laura K.; Downing, AnnCatherine M.; Zhao, Fangyi; Millen, Brian A.; Munsie, Leanne; Kinon, Bruce J.; Adams, David H.; Gomez, Juan Carlos; Penny, Michelle Ann

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to confirm the initial pharmacogenetic finding observed within the clinical proof-of-concept trial of an enhanced response to treatment with pomaglumetad methionil (LY2140023 monohydrate) in Caucasian schizophrenia patients homozygous for T/T at single nucleotide polymorphism rs7330461 in the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) 2A receptor gene compared to A/A homozygous patients. The effect of the rs7330461 genotype on the response to pomaglumetad methionil treatment was assessed in three additional clinical trials and in an integrated analysis. Overall, this study includes data from 1115 Caucasian patients for whom genotyping information for rs7330461 was available, consisting of 513 A/A homozygous, 466 A/T heterozygous and 136 T/T homozygous patients. Caucasian T/T homozygous patients showed significantly (p ≤ 0.05) greater improvement in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total scores during treatment with pomaglumetad methionil 40 mg twice daily compared to A/A homozygous patients. Additionally, T/T homozygous patients receiving pomaglumetad methionil had significantly (p ≤ 0.05) greater improvements in PANSS total scores compared to placebo and similar improvements as T/T homozygous patients receiving standard-of-care (SOC) treatment. The findings reported here in conjunction with prior reports show that in Caucasian patients with schizophrenia, the T/T genotype at rs7330461 is consistently associated with an increased treatment response to pomaglumetad methionil compared to the A/A genotype. PMID:26861400

  15. Epigenetic regulation of olfactory receptor gene expression by the Myb-MuvB/dREAM complex.

    PubMed

    Sim, Choon Kiat; Perry, Sarah; Tharadra, Sana Khalid; Lipsick, Joseph S; Ray, Anandasankar

    2012-11-15

    In both mammals and insects, an olfactory neuron will usually select a single olfactory receptor and repress remaining members of large receptor families. Here we show that a conserved multiprotein complex, Myb-MuvB (MMB)/dREAM, plays an important role in mediating neuron-specific expression of the carbon dioxide (CO(2)) receptor genes (Gr63a/Gr21a) in Drosophila. Activity of Myb in the complex is required for expression of Gr63a/Gr21a and acts in opposition to the histone methyltransferase Su(var)3-9. Consistent with this, we observed repressive dimethylated H3K9 modifications at the receptor gene loci, suggesting a mechanism for silencing receptor gene expression. Conversely, other complex members, Mip120 (Myb-interacting protein 120) and E2F2, are required for repression of Gr63a in inappropriate neurons. Misexpression in mutants is accompanied by an increase in the H3K4me3 mark of active chromatin at the receptor gene locus. Nuclei of CO(2) receptor-expressing neurons contain reduced levels of the repressive subunit Mip120 compared with surrounding neurons and increased levels of Myb, suggesting that activity of the complex can be regulated in a cell-specific manner. Our evidence suggests a model in which olfactory receptors are regulated epigenetically and the MMB/dREAM complex plays a critical role in specifying, maintaining, and modulating the receptor-to-neuron map.

  16. From "junk" to gene: curriculum vitae of a primate receptor isoform gene.

    PubMed

    Singer, Silke S; Männel, Daniela N; Hehlgans, Thomas; Brosius, Jürgen; Schmitz, Jürgen

    2004-08-20

    Exonization of Alu retroposons awakens public opinion, particularly when causing genetic diseases. However, often neglected, alternative "Alu-exons" also carry the potential to greatly enhance genetic diversity by increasing the transcriptome of primates chiefly via alternative splicing.Here, we report a 5' exon generated from one of the two alternative transcripts in human tumor necrosis factor receptor gene type 2 (p75TNFR) that contains an ancient Alu-SINE, which provides an alternative N-terminal protein-coding domain. We follow the primate evolution over the past 63 million years to reconstruct the key events that gave rise to a novel receptor isoform. The Alu integration and start codon formation occurred between 58 and 40 million years ago (MYA) in the common ancestor of anthropoid primates. Yet a functional gene product could not be generated until a novel splice site and an open reading frame were introduced between 40 and 25 MYA on the catarrhine lineage (Old World monkeys including apes).

  17. Identification and Expression Analysis of Putative Chemosensory Receptor Genes in Microplitis mediator by Antennal Transcriptome Screening

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan-Ning; Peng, Yong; Lu, Zi-Yun; Dhiloo, Khalid Hussain; Gu, Shao-Hua; Li, Rui-Jun; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Zhang, Yong-Jun; Guo, Yu-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Host-seeking, ovipositional behavior and mating of insects are controlled mainly by odor perception through sensory organs such as antennae. Antennal chemoreception is extremely important for insect survival. Several antennal chemosensory receptors are involved in mediating the odor detection in insects, especially the odorant receptors (ORs) and ionotropic receptors (IRs), to ensure the specificity of the olfactory sensory neuron responses. In the present study, we identified the chemosensory receptor gene repertoire of the parasitoid wasp Microplitis mediator, a generalist endoparasitoid that infests more than 40 types of Lepidopterous larvae and is widely distributed in the Palaearctic region. By transcriptome sequencing of male and female antennae we identified 60 candidate odorant receptors, six candidate ionotropic receptors and two gustatory receptors in M. mediator. The full-length sequences of these putative chemosensory receptor genes were obtained by using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR (RACE-PCR) method. We also conducted reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) combined with real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) for investigating the expression profiles of these chemosensory receptor genes in olfactory and non-olfactory tissues. The tissue- and sex-biased expression patterns may provide insights into the roles of the chemosensory receptor in M. mediator. Our findings support possible future study of the chemosensory behavior of M. mediator at the molecular level. PMID:26078716

  18. Reelin influences the expression and function of dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT2A receptors: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Varela, M J; Lage, S; Caruncho, H J; Cadavid, M I; Loza, M I; Brea, J

    2015-04-01

    Reelin is an extracellular matrix protein that plays a critical role in neuronal guidance during brain neurodevelopment and in synaptic plasticity in adults and has been associated with schizophrenia. Reelin mRNA and protein levels are reduced in various structures of post-mortem schizophrenic brains, in a similar way to those found in heterozygous reeler mice (HRM). Reelin is involved in protein expression in dendritic spines that are the major location where synaptic connections are established. Thus, we hypothesized that a genetic deficit in reelin would affect the expression and function of dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT2A receptors that are associated with the action of current antipsychotic drugs. In this study, D2 and 5-HT2A receptor expression and function were quantitated by using radioligand binding studies in the frontal cortex and striatum of HRM and wild-type mice (WTM). We observed increased expression (p<0.05) in striatum membranes and decreased expression (p<0.05) in frontal cortex membranes for both dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT2A receptors from HRM compared to WTM. Our results show parallel alterations of D2 and 5-HT2A receptors that are compatible with a possible hetero-oligomeric nature of these receptors. These changes are similar to changes described in schizophrenic patients and provide further support for the suitability of using HRM as a model for studying this disease and the effects of antipsychotic drugs. PMID:25637489

  19. Modulation of GluK2a subunit-containing kainate receptors by 14-3-3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Changcheng; Qiao, Haifa; Zhou, Qin; Wang, Yan; Wu, Yuying; Zhou, Yi; Li, Yong

    2013-08-23

    Kainate receptors (KARs) are one of the ionotropic glutamate receptors that mediate excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) with characteristically slow kinetics. Although mechanisms for the slow kinetics of KAR-EPSCs are not totally understood, recent evidence has implicated a regulatory role of KAR-associated proteins. Here, we report that decay kinetics of GluK2a-containing receptors is modulated by closely associated 14-3-3 proteins. 14-3-3 binding requires PKC-dependent phosphorylation of serine residues localized in the carboxyl tail of the GluK2a subunit. In transfected cells, 14-3-3 binding to GluK2a slows desensitization kinetics of both homomeric GluK2a and heteromeric GluK2a/GluK5 receptors. Moreover, KAR-EPSCs at mossy fiber-CA3 synapses decay significantly faster in the 14-3-3 functional knock-out mice. Collectively, these results demonstrate that 14-3-3 proteins are an important regulator of GluK2a-containing KARs and may contribute to the slow decay kinetics of native KAR-EPSCs. PMID:23861400

  20. Adenosine A(2A) receptor stimulation reduces inflammation and neointimal growth in a murine carotid ligation model.

    PubMed

    McPherson, J A; Barringhaus, K G; Bishop, G G; Sanders, J M; Rieger, J M; Hesselbacher, S E; Gimple, L W; Powers, E R; Macdonald, T; Sullivan, G; Linden, J; Sarembock, I J

    2001-05-01

    Endothelial activation and leukocyte recruitment are early events in atherosclerosis and the vascular response to injury. Adenosine has anti-inflammatory effects on leukocytes and endothelial cells mediated through its A(2A) receptor. We tested the hypothesis that A(2A) activation would reduce inflammation and neointimal formation in a murine carotid ligation model. Before injury, mice were randomized to a 7-day subcutaneous infusion of a specific A(2A) receptor agonist (ATL-146e, 0.004 microg/kg per minute), vehicle control, ATL-146e plus ZM241385 (a selective A(2A) antagonist), or ZM241385 alone. Leukocyte recruitment and adhesion molecule expression were assessed at early time points, and the neointimal area was measured at 14 and 28 days after injury. Compared with control mice, ATL-146e-treated mice had significantly less neutrophil and macrophage recruitment and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and P-selectin expression in the first 7 days after injury. Neointimal area was markedly and persistently reduced by 80% at 14 and 28 days, despite termination of ATL infusion at 7 days. ATL-146e+ZM241385-treated and ZM241385-treated animals had neointimal areas similar to those of control animals, confirming that the observed effects of ATL-146e were mediated specifically by the A(2A) receptor. These data demonstrate that novel stimulation of adenosine A(2A) receptors can inhibit early inflammatory processes that are important in neointimal formation after vascular injury.

  1. Oleocanthal Modulates Estradiol-Induced Gene Expression Involving Estrogen Receptor α.

    PubMed

    Keiler, Annekathrin Martina; Djiogue, Sefirin; Ehrhardt, Tino; Zierau, Oliver; Skaltsounis, Leandros; Halabalaki, Maria; Vollmer, Günter

    2015-09-01

    Oleocanthal is a bioactive compound from olive oil. It has attracted considerable attention as it is anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, and has been shown to possess neuroprotective properties in vitro and in vivo. Delineated from its polyphenolic structure, the aim of this study was to characterize oleocanthal towards estrogenic properties. This might contribute to partly explain the beneficial effects described for the Mediterranean diet. Estrogenic properties of oleocanthal were assessed by different methods: a) stimulation of reporter gene activity in MVLN or RNDA cells either expressing estrogen receptor α or β, b) stimulation of luciferase reporter gene activity in U2OS osteosarcoma cells expressing estrogen receptor α or β, and c) elucidation of the impact on estradiol-induced gene expression in U2OS cells transduced with both estrogen receptors. Depending on the cell line origin, oleocanthal inhibited luciferase activity (MVLN, U2OS-estrogen receptor β) or weakly induced reporter gene activity at 10 µM in U2OS-estrogen receptor α cells. However, oleocanthal inhibited stimulation of luciferase activity by estradiol from both estrogen receptors. Oleocanthal, if given alone, did not stimulate gene expression in U2OS cells, but it significantly modulated the response of estradiol. Oleocanthal enhanced the effect of estradiol on the regulation of those genes, which are believed to be regulated through heterodimeric estrogen receptors. As the estrogenic response pattern of oleocanthal is rather unique, we compared the results obtained with oleacein. Oleocanthal binds to both estrogen receptors inducing estradiol-agonistic or antiagonistic effects depending on the cell line. Regarding regulation of gene expression in U2OS-estrogen receptor α/β cells, oleocanthal and oleacein enhanced estradiol-mediated regulation of heterodimer-regulated genes. PMID:26166135

  2. A novel human gene encoding a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR15) is located on chromosome 3

    SciTech Connect

    Heiber, M.; Marchese, A.; O`Dowd, B.F.

    1996-03-05

    We used sequence similarities among G-protein-coupled receptor genes to discover a novel receptor gene. Using primers based on conserved regions of the opioid-related receptors, we isolated a PCR product that was used to locate the full-length coding region of a novel human receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor encoded by GPR15 with other receptors revealed that it shared sequence identity with the angiotensin II AT1 and AT2 receptors, the interleukin 8b receptor, and the orphan receptors GPR1 and AGTL1. GPR15 was mapped to human chromosome 3q11.2-q13.1. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Homology modelling of the human adenosine A2B receptor based on X-ray structures of bovine rhodopsin, the beta2-adrenergic receptor and the human adenosine A2A receptor.

    PubMed

    Sherbiny, Farag F; Schiedel, Anke C; Maass, Astrid; Müller, Christa E

    2009-11-01

    A three-dimensional model of the human adenosine A2B receptor was generated by means of homology modelling, using the crystal structures of bovine rhodopsin, the beta2-adrenergic receptor, and the human adenosine A2A receptor as templates. In order to compare the three resulting models, the binding modes of the adenosine A2B receptor antagonists theophylline, ZM241385, MRS1706, and PSB601 were investigated. The A2A-based model was much better able to stabilize the ligands in the binding site than the other models reflecting the high degree of similarity between A2A and A2B receptors: while the A2B receptor shares about 21% of the residues with rhodopsin, and 31% with the beta2-adrenergic receptor, it is 56% identical to the adenosine A2A receptor. The A2A-based model was used for further studies. The model included the transmembrane domains, the extracellular and the intracellular hydrophilic loops as well as the terminal domains. In order to validate the usefulness of this model, a docking analysis of several selective and nonselective agonists and antagonists was carried out including a study of binding affinities and selectivities of these ligands with respect to the adenosine A2A and A2B receptors. A common binding site is proposed for antagonists and agonists based on homology modelling combined with site-directed mutagenesis and a comparison between experimental and calculated affinity data. The new, validated A2B receptor model may serve as a basis for developing more potent and selective drugs.

  4. Evolutionary Analysis of the B56 Gene Family of PP2A Regulatory Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Lauren M.; Cho, Hyuk; Choudhary, Madhusudan; Seeling, Joni M.

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is an abundant serine/threonine phosphatase that functions as a tumor suppressor in numerous cell-cell signaling pathways, including Wnt, myc, and ras. The B56 subunit of PP2A regulates its activity, and is encoded by five genes in humans. B56 proteins share a central core domain, but have divergent amino- and carboxy-termini, which are thought to provide isoform specificity. We performed phylogenetic analyses to better understand the evolution of the B56 gene family. We found that B56 was present as a single gene in eukaryotes prior to the divergence of animals, fungi, protists, and plants, and that B56 gene duplication prior to the divergence of protostomes and deuterostomes led to the origin of two B56 subfamilies, B56αβε and B56γδ. Further duplications led to three B56αβε genes and two B56γδ in vertebrates. Several nonvertebrate B56 gene names are based on distinct vertebrate isoform names, and would best be renamed. B56 subfamily genes lack significant divergence within primitive chordates, but each became distinct in complex vertebrates. Two vertebrate lineages have undergone B56 gene loss, Xenopus and Aves. In Xenopus, B56δ function may be compensated for by an alternatively spliced transcript, B56δ/γ, encoding a B56δ-like amino-terminal region and a B56γ core. PMID:25950761

  5. Evolutionary Analysis of the B56 Gene Family of PP2A Regulatory Subunits.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Lauren M; Cho, Hyuk; Choudhary, Madhusudan; Seeling, Joni M

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is an abundant serine/threonine phosphatase that functions as a tumor suppressor in numerous cell-cell signaling pathways, including Wnt, myc, and ras. The B56 subunit of PP2A regulates its activity, and is encoded by five genes in humans. B56 proteins share a central core domain, but have divergent amino- and carboxy-termini, which are thought to provide isoform specificity. We performed phylogenetic analyses to better understand the evolution of the B56 gene family. We found that B56 was present as a single gene in eukaryotes prior to the divergence of animals, fungi, protists, and plants, and that B56 gene duplication prior to the divergence of protostomes and deuterostomes led to the origin of two B56 subfamilies, B56αβε and B56γδ. Further duplications led to three B56αβε genes and two B56γδ in vertebrates. Several nonvertebrate B56 gene names are based on distinct vertebrate isoform names, and would best be renamed. B56 subfamily genes lack significant divergence within primitive chordates, but each became distinct in complex vertebrates. Two vertebrate lineages have undergone B56 gene loss, Xenopus and Aves. In Xenopus, B56δ function may be compensated for by an alternatively spliced transcript, B56δ/γ, encoding a B56δ-like amino-terminal region and a B56γ core.

  6. Phenotypical characterization of the rat striatal neurons expressing the D1 dopamine receptor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Le Moine, C; Normand, E; Bloch, B

    1991-01-01

    In situ hybridization experiments were performed in rat brain sections from normal and 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rats in order to map and identify the neurons expressing the D1 receptor gene in the striatum and the substantia nigra. Procedures of combined in situ hybridization, allowing the simultaneous detection of two mRNAs in the same section or in adjacent sections, were used to characterize the phenotypes of the neurons expressing the D1 receptor gene. D1 receptor mRNA was found in neurons all over the caudate-putamen, the accumbens nucleus, and the olfactory tubercle but not in the substantia nigra. In the caudate-putamen and accumbens nucleus, most of the neurons containing D1 receptor mRNA were characterized as medium-sized substance P neurons and distinct from those containing D2 receptor mRNA. Nevertheless, 15-20% of the substance P neurons did not contain D1 receptor mRNA. The neurons containing preproenkephalin A mRNA did not contain D1 receptor mRNA but contained D2 receptor mRNA. A small number of cholinergic and somatostatinergic neurons exhibited a weak reaction for D1 receptor mRNA. These results demonstrate that dopamine acts on efferent striatal neurons through expression of distinct receptors--namely, D1 and D2 in separate cell populations (substance P and preproenkephalin A neurons, respectively)--and can also act on nonprojecting neurons through D1 receptor expression. Images PMID:1827915

  7. Adenosine A2A receptor antagonists: blockade of adenosinergic effects and T regulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Sitkovsky, M; Lukashev, D; Deaglio, S; Dwyer, K; Robson, S C; Ohta, A

    2008-01-01

    The intensity and duration of host responses are determined by protective mechanisms that control tissue injury by dampening down inflammation. Adenosine generation and consequent effects, mediated via A2A adenosine receptors (A2AR) on effector cells, play a critical role in the pathophysiological modulation of these responses in vivo. Adenosine is both released by hypoxic cells/tissues and is also generated from extracellular nucleotides by ecto-enzymes e.g. CD39 (ENTPD1) and CD73 that are expressed by the vasculature and immune cells, in particular by T regulatory cell. In general, these adenosinergic mechanisms minimize the extent of collateral damage to host tissues during the course of inflammatory reactions. However, induction of suppressive pathways might also cause escape of pathogens and permit dissemination. In addition, adenosinergic responses may inhibit immune responses while enhancing vascular angiogenic responses to malignant cells that promote tumor growth. Novel drugs that block A2AR-adenosinergic effects and/or adenosine generation have the potential to boost pathogen destruction and to selectively destroy malignant tissues. In the latter instance, future treatment modalities might include novel ‘anti-adenosinergic' approaches that augment immune clearance of malignant cells and block permissive angiogenesis. This review addresses several possible pharmacological modalities to block adenosinergic pathways and speculates on their future application together with impacts on human disease. PMID:18311159

  8. Macrophage A2A Adenosine Receptors Are Essential to Protect from Progressive Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Truong, Luan D; Trostel, Jessica; McMahan, Rachel; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Garcia, Gabriela E

    2016-10-01

    A2A adenosine receptors (A2ARs) are endogenous inhibitor of inflammation. Macrophages that are key effectors of kidney disease progression express A2ARs. We investigated the role of A2ARs in kidney inflammation in a macrophage-mediated anti-glomerular basement membrane reactive serum-induced immune nephritis in A2AR-deficient mice. Sub-threshold doses of glomerular basement membrane-reactive serum induced more severe and prolonged kidney damage with higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines and greater accumulation of inflammatory cells in A2AR(-/-) mice than wild-type (WT) mice. To investigate the role of macrophage A2AR in progressive kidney injury, glomerulonephritis was induced in CD11b-DTR transgenic mice. Macrophages were selectively depleted in the established phase of the disease and reconstituted with macrophages from WT or A2AR-deficient mice and then treated with an A2AR agonist. In mice receiving WT macrophages and treated with an A2AR agonist, the glomerular cellularity, crescent formation, sclerotic glomeruli, and tubulointerstitial injury were significantly reduced compared with the control group. In contrast, in mice reconstituted with A2AR-deficient macrophages and treated with an A2AR agonist, the kidney injury was more severe with increased deposition of collagen I, III, and IV. These findings suggest that disruption of the protective A2AR amplifies inflammation to accelerate glomerular damage and endogenous macrophage A2ARs are essential to protect from progressive kidney fibrosis.

  9. Continuous adenosine A2A receptor antagonism after focal cerebral ischemia in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Fronz, Ulrike; Deten, Alexander; Baumann, Frank; Kranz, Alexander; Weidlich, Sarah; Härtig, Wolfgang; Nieber, Karen; Boltze, Johannes; Wagner, Daniel-Christoph

    2014-02-01

    Antagonism of the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) has been shown to elicit substantial neuroprotective properties when given immediately after cerebral ischemia. We asked whether the continuous application of a selective A2AR antagonist within a clinically relevant time window will be a feasible and effective approach to treat focal cerebral ischemia. To answer this question, we subjected 20 male spontaneously hypertensive rats to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion and randomized them equally to a verum and a control group. Two hours after stroke onset, the animals received a subcutaneous implantation of an osmotic minipump filled with 5 mg kg(-1) day(-1) 8-(3-chlorostyryl) caffeine (CSC) or vehicle solution. The serum level of CSC was measured twice a day for three consecutive days. The infarct volume was determined at days 1 and 3 using magnetic resonance imaging. We found the serum level of CSC showing a bell-shaped curve with its maximum at 36 h. The infarct volume was not affected by continuous CSC treatment. These results suggest that delayed and continuous CSC application was not sufficient to treat acute ischemic stroke, potentially due to unfavorable hepatic elimination and metabolization of the pharmaceutical. PMID:24170241

  10. The 5-HT2A serotonin receptor in executive function: Implications for neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Aznar, Susana; Hervig, Mona El-Sayed

    2016-05-01

    Executive function entails the interplay of a group of cognitive processes enabling the individual to anticipate consequences, attain self-control, and undertake appropriate goal-directed behaviour. Serotonin signalling at serotonin 2A receptors (5-HT2AR) has important effects on these behavioural and cognitive pathways, with the prefrontal cortex (PFC) as the central actor. Indeed, the 5-HT2ARs are highly expressed in PFC, where they modulate cortical activity and local network oscillations (brain waves). Numerous psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases result in disrupted executive function. Animal and human studies have linked these disorders with alterations in the 5-HT2AR system, making this an important pharmacological target for the treatment of disorders with impaired cognitive function. This review aims to describe the current state of knowledge on the role of 5-HT2AR signalling in components of executive function, and how 5-HT2AR systems may relate to executive dysfunctions occurring in psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. We hope thereby to provide insight into how pharmacotherapy targeting the 5-HT2AR may ameliorate (or exacerbate) aspects of these disorders. PMID:26891819

  11. [Beta]-Adrenergic Receptor Activation Rescues Theta Frequency Stimulation-Induced LTP Deficits in Mice Expressing C-Terminally Truncated NMDA Receptor GluN2A Subunits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Teena D.; Watabe, Ayako M.; Indersmitten, Tim; Komiyama, Noboru H.; Grant, Seth G. N.; O'Dell, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Through protein interactions mediated by their cytoplasmic C termini the GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) have a key role in the formation of NMDAR signaling complexes at excitatory synapses. Although these signaling complexes are thought to have a crucial role in NMDAR-dependent forms of synaptic plasticity such as long-term…

  12. A nonsense mutation in the LDL receptor gene leads to familial hypercholesterolemia in the Druze sect

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberger, D.; Meiner, V.; Reshef, A.; Leitersdorf, E. ); Levy, Yishai ); Westhytzen, D.R. van der; Coetzee, G.A. )

    1992-02-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the LDL receptor gene. Here the authors characterize and LDL receptor mutation that is associated with a distinct haplotype and causes FH in the Druze, a small Middle Eastern Islamic sect with a high degree of inbreeding. The mutation was found in FH families from two distinct Druze villages from the Golan Heights (northern Israel). It was not found either in another Druze FH family residing in a different geographical area nor in eight Arab and four Jewish FH heterozygote index cases whose hypercholesterolemia cosegregates with an identical LDL receptor gene haplotype. The mutation, a single-base substitution, results in a termination codon in exon 4 of the LDL receptor gene that encodes for the fourth repeat of the binding domain of the mature receptor. It can be diagnosed by allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization of PCR-amplified DNA from FH patients.

  13. Differential regulation of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in neuroblastoma: Estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα) regulates HIF2A transcription and correlates to poor outcome.

    PubMed

    Hamidian, Arash; von Stedingk, Kristoffer; Munksgaard Thorén, Matilda; Mohlin, Sofie; Påhlman, Sven

    2015-06-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are differentially regulated in tumor cells. While the current paradigm supports post-translational regulation of the HIF-α subunits, we recently showed that hypoxic HIF-2α is also transcriptionally regulated via insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II in the childhood tumor neuroblastoma. Here, we demonstrate that transcriptional regulation of HIF-2α seems to be restricted to neural cell-derived tumors, while HIF-1α is canonically regulated at the post-translational level uniformly across different tumor forms. Enhanced expression of HIF2A mRNA at hypoxia is due to de novo transcription rather than increased mRNA stability, and chemical stabilization of the HIF-α proteins at oxygen-rich conditions unexpectedly leads to increased HIF2A transcription. The enhanced HIF2A levels do not seem to be dependent on active HIF-1. Using a transcriptome array approach, we identified members of the Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC)/Estrogen-related receptor (ERR) complex families as potential regulators of HIF2A. Knockdown or inhibition of one of the members, ERRα, leads to decreased expression of HIF2A, and high expression of the ERRα gene ESRRA correlates with poor overall and progression-free survival in a clinical neuroblastoma material consisting of 88 tumors. Thus, targeting of ERRα and pathways regulating transcriptional HIF-2α are promising therapeutic avenues in neuroblastoma.

  14. Sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium transport ATPase 2a: a potential gene therapy target in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Papolos, Alexander; Frishman, William H

    2013-01-01

    The development of cardiac-specific adeno-associated viral vectors capable of long-term transgenic expression has opened new avenues in the therapeutic approach to heart failure. Failing cardiomyocytes demonstrate altered calcium-handling secondary to depressed expression and activity of myocardial sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2a (SERCA2a). This observation has led to a large body of research investigating the therapeutic utility of SERCA2a gene therapy in heart failure.

  15. The antidepressant 5-HT2A receptor antagonists pizotifen and cyproheptadine inhibit serotonin-enhanced platelet function.

    PubMed

    Lin, Olivia A; Karim, Zubair A; Vemana, Hari Priya; Espinosa, Enma V P; Khasawneh, Fadi T

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable interest in defining new agents or targets for antithrombotic purposes. The 5-HT2A receptor is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) expressed on many cell types, and a known therapeutic target for many disease states. This serotonin receptor is also known to regulate platelet function. Thus, in our FDA-approved drug repurposing efforts, we investigated the antiplatelet activity of cyproheptadine and pizotifen, two antidepressant 5-HT2A Receptor antagonists. Our results revealed that cyproheptadine and pizotifen reversed serotonin-enhanced ADP-induced platelet aggregation in vitro and ex vivo. And the inhibitory effects of these two agents were found to be similar to that of EMD 281014, a 5-HT2A Receptor antagonist under development. In separate experiments, our studies revealed that these 5-HT2A receptor antagonists have the capacity to reduce serotonin-enhanced ADP-induced elevation in intracellular calcium levels and tyrosine phosphorylation. Using flow cytometry, we also observed that cyproheptadine, pizotifen, and EMD 281014 inhibited serotonin-enhanced ADP-induced phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, P-selectin expression, and glycoprotein IIb-IIIa activation. Furthermore, using a carotid artery thrombosis model, these agents prolonged the time for thrombotic occlusion in mice in vivo. Finally, the tail-bleeding time was investigated to assess the effect of cyproheptadine and pizotifen on hemostasis. Our findings indicated prolonged bleeding time in both cyproheptadine- and pizotifen-treated mice. Notably, the increases in occlusion and bleeding times associated with these two agents were comparable to that of EMD 281014, and to clopidogrel, a commonly used antiplatelet drug, again, in a fashion comparable to clopidogrel and EMD 281014. Collectively, our data indicate that the antidepressant 5-HT2A antagonists, cyproheptadine and pizotifen do exert antiplatelet and thromboprotective effects, but similar to clopidogrel and EMD 281014, their

  16. Adenosine A2(A) receptor modulates the oxidative stress response of primed polymorphonuclear leukocytes after parabolic flight.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Ines; Feuerecker, Matthias; Salam, Alex; Schelling, Gustav; Thiel, Manfred; Choukèr, Alexander

    2011-07-01

    Space flight and gravitational stress can alter innate immune function. Parabolic flights (PFs) as a model for short-term gravitational changes prime the cytotoxic capability of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). In view of the emerging role of adenosine in the regulation of innate immune responses, we examined the potency of adenosine to control the release of cytotoxic H(2)O(2) by primed PMNs via the adenosine receptor system. During PFs, microgravity conditions (<10(-2) G) are generated for approximately 22 seconds, followed by a hypergravity (1.8 G) phase resulting in gravitational stress. We studied the ex vivo effects of adenosine on the production of H(2)O(2) by stimulated PMNs and determined adenosine plasma levels and adenosine A2(A) receptor transcripts of leukocytes of PF participants (n = 15). Increasing concentrations of adenosine dose dependently reduced tissue-toxic H(2)O(2) production by PMNs with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 19.5 nM before takeoff and 7.6 nM at 48 hours after PF. This increase in the adenosine-mediated inhibition of PMNs' H(2)O(2) production was completely reversed by addition of the A2(A) receptor antagonist ZM241385. PF induced a nonsignificant elevation in adenosine plasma levels; A2(A) receptor mRNA from leukocytes remained almost unchanged. Adenosine limits the oxidative stress response of PMNs after PFs through an upregulation of the adenosine A2(A) receptor function. This stop signal on inflammation is stronger than that under normal physiologic states and may limit further cytotoxic damage. Pharmacologic manipulation of the adenosine A2(A) receptor pathway could be a potential target for control of unwanted exacerbations of cytotoxic PMN functions.

  17. Identification of microsatellite markers linked to the human leptin receptor gene on chromosome 1

    SciTech Connect

    Winick, J.D.; Friedman, J.M.; Stoffel, M.

    1996-08-15

    This report describes the localization of the human leptin receptor gene to human chromosome 1 using polymerase chain reaction of somatic cell hybrids. Leptin is a secreted protein important in the regulation of body weight. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Chronic treatment with LY341495 decreases 5-HT(2A) receptor binding and hallucinogenic effects of LSD in mice.

    PubMed

    Moreno, José L; Holloway, Terrell; Rayannavar, Vinayak; Sealfon, Stuart C; González-Maeso, Javier

    2013-03-01

    Hallucinogenic drugs, such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), mescaline and psilocybin, alter perception and cognitive processes. All hallucinogenic drugs have in common a high affinity for the serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor. Metabotropic glutamate 2/3 (mGlu2/3) receptor ligands show efficacy in modulating the cellular and behavioral responses induced by hallucinogenic drugs. Here, we explored the effect of chronic treatment with the mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist 2S-2-amino-2-(1S,2S-2-carboxycyclopropan-1-yl)-3-(xanth-9-yl)-propionic acid (LY341495) on the hallucinogenic-like effects induced by LSD (0.24mg/kg). Mice were chronically (21 days) treated with LY341495 (1.5mg/kg), or vehicle, and experiments were carried out one day after the last injection. Chronic treatment with LY341495 down-regulated [(3)H]ketanserin binding in somatosensory cortex of wild-type, but not mGlu2 knockout (KO), mice. Head-twitch behavior, and expression of c-fos, egr-1 and egr-2, which are responses induced by hallucinogenic 5-HT(2A) agonists, were found to be significantly decreased by chronic treatment with LY341495. These findings suggest that repeated blockade of the mGlu2 receptor by LY341495 results in reduced 5-HT(2A) receptor-dependent hallucinogenic effects of LSD.

  19. Alpha2A adrenergic receptor activation inhibits epileptiform activity in the rat hippocampal CA3 region.

    PubMed

    Jurgens, Chris W D; Hammad, Hana M; Lichter, Jessica A; Boese, Sarah J; Nelson, Brian W; Goldenstein, Brianna L; Davis, Kylie L; Xu, Ke; Hillman, Kristin L; Porter, James E; Doze, Van A

    2007-06-01

    Norepinephrine has potent antiepileptic properties, the pharmacology of which is unclear. Under conditions in which GABAergic inhibition is blocked, norepinephrine reduces hippocampal cornu ammonis 3 (CA3) epileptiform activity through alpha(2) adrenergic receptor (AR) activation on pyramidal cells. In this study, we investigated which alpha(2)AR subtype(s) mediates this effect. First, alpha(2)AR genomic expression patterns of 25 rat CA3 pyramidal cells were determined using real-time single-cell reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, demonstrating that 12 cells expressed alpha(2A)AR transcript; 3 of the 12 cells additionally expressed mRNA for alpha(2C)AR subtype and no cells possessing alpha(2B)AR mRNA. Hippocampal CA3 epileptiform activity was then examined using field potential recordings in brain slices. The selective alphaAR agonist 6-fluoronorepinephrine caused a reduction of CA3 epileptiform activity, as measured by decreased frequency of spontaneous epileptiform bursts. In the presence of betaAR blockade, concentration-response curves for AR agonists suggest that an alpha(2)AR mediates this response, as the rank order of potency was 5-bromo-N-(4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-6-quinoxalinamine (UK-14304) >or= epinephrine >6-fluoronorepinephrine > norepinephrine > phenylephrine. Finally, equilibrium dissociation constants (K(b)) of selective alphaAR antagonists were functionally determined to confirm the specific alpha(2)AR subtype inhibiting CA3 epileptiform activity. Apparent K(b) values calculated for atipamezole (1.7 nM), MK-912 (4.8 nM), BRL-44408 (15 nM), yohimbine (63 nM), ARC-239 (540 nM), prazosin (4900 nM), and terazosin (5000 nM) correlated best with affinities previously determined for the alpha(2A)AR subtype (r = 0.99, slope = 1.0). These results suggest that, under conditions of impaired GABAergic inhibition, activation of alpha(2A)ARs is primarily responsible for the antiepileptic actions of norepinephrine in the rat hippocampal CA3

  20. Specific repertoire of olfactory receptor genes in the male germ cells of several mammalian species

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderhaeghen, P.; Schurmans, S.; Vassart, G.; Parmentier, M.

    1997-02-01

    Olfactory receptors constitute the largest family among G protein-coupled receptors, with up to 1000 members expected. We have previously shown that genes belonging to this family were expressed in the male germ line from both dog and human. We have subsequently demonstrated the presence of one of the corresponding olfactory receptor proteins during dog spermatogenesis and in mature sperm cells. In this study, we investigated whether the unexpected pattern of expression of olfactory receptors in the male germ line was conserved in other mammalian species. Using reverse transcription-PCR with primers specific for the olfactory receptor gene family, about 20 olfactory receptor cDNA fragments were cloned from the testis of each mammalian species tested. As a whole, they displayed no sequence specificity compared to other olfactory receptors, but highly homologous, possibly orthologous, genes were amplified from different species. Finally, their pattern of expression, as determined by RNase protection assay, revealed that many but not all of these receptors were expressed predominantly in testis. The male germ line from each mammalian species tested is thus characterized by a specific repertoire of olfactory receptors, which display a pattern of expression suggestive of their potential implication in the control of sperm maturation, migration, or fertilization. 34 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Organization, structure, and expression of the gene encoding the rat substance P receptor.

    PubMed

    Hershey, A D; Dykema, P E; Krause, J E

    1991-03-01

    The gene for the rat substance P receptor has been cloned, its genomic structure determined, and the patterns of mRNA expression extensively analyzed. Unlike many genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors, the protein-coding region of this gene is divided into five exons consisting of 965, 195, 151, 197, and 2,010 base pairs. The substance P receptor gene extends more than 45 kilobases in length, and the splice sites for the exons occur at the borders of the sequences encoding putative membrane-spanning domains. The transcription initiation site has been defined by solution hybridization-nuclease protection and nucleotide sequence analyses, and lies downstream of a conventional TATA sequence. Substance P receptor mRNA levels in various tissues have been quantitated using solution hybridization-nuclease protection assays and were found to comprise from 0.00008 to 0.0016% of total RNA levels. Relatively high levels of substance P receptor mRNA are seen in the urinary bladder and the sublingual salivary gland, whereas moderate levels are observed for the submandibular salivary gland, striatum, hippocampus, midbrain, and olfactory bulb with lower levels in the remainder of the central nervous system and alimentary canal. These results are discussed in relation to the evolutionary role of multiple exons for a G protein-coupled receptor and with regard to the locations and mechanisms of substance P receptor gene expression.

  2. Concomitant Duplications of Opioid Peptide and Receptor Genes before the Origin of Jawed Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Sundström, Görel; Dreborg, Susanne; Larhammar, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Background The opioid system is involved in reward and pain mechanisms and consists in mammals of four receptors and several peptides. The peptides are derived from four prepropeptide genes, PENK, PDYN, PNOC and POMC, encoding enkephalins, dynorphins, orphanin/nociceptin and beta-endorphin, respectively. Previously we have described how two rounds of genome doubling (2R) before the origin of jawed vertebrates formed the receptor family. Methodology/Principal Findings Opioid peptide gene family members were investigated using a combination of sequence-based phylogeny and chromosomal locations of the peptide genes in various vertebrates. Several adjacent gene families were investigated similarly. The results show that the ancestral peptide gene gave rise to two additional copies in the genome doublings. The fourth member was generated by a local gene duplication, as the genes encoding POMC and PNOC are located on the same chromosome in the chicken genome and all three teleost genomes that we have studied. A translocation has disrupted this synteny in mammals. The PDYN gene seems to have been lost in chicken, but not in zebra finch. Duplicates of some peptide genes have arisen in the teleost fishes. Within the prepropeptide precursors, peptides have been lost or gained in different lineages. Conclusions/Significance The ancestral peptide and receptor genes were located on the same chromosome and were thus duplicated concomitantly. However, subsequently genetic linkage has been lost. In conclusion, the system of opioid peptides and receptors was largely formed by the genome doublings that took place early in vertebrate evolution. PMID:20463905

  3. Sustained Suppression of Hyperalgesia during Latent Sensitization by μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors and α2A Adrenergic Receptors: Role of Constitutive Activity

    PubMed Central

    Walwyn, Wendy M.; Chen, Wenling; Kim, Hyeyoung; Minasyan, Ani; Ennes, Helena S.; McRoberts, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Many chronic pain disorders alternate between bouts of pain and periods of remission. The latent sensitization model reproduces this in rodents by showing that the apparent recovery (“remission”) from inflammatory or neuropathic pain can be reversed by opioid antagonists. Therefore, this remission represents an opioid receptor-mediated suppression of a sustained hyperalgesic state. To identify the receptors involved, we induced latent sensitization in mice and rats by injecting complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the hindpaw. In WT mice, responses to mechanical stimulation returned to baseline 3 weeks after CFA. In μ-opioid receptor (MOR) knock-out (KO) mice, responses did not return to baseline but partially recovered from peak hyperalgesia. Antagonists of α2A-adrenergic and δ-opioid receptors reinstated hyperalgesia in WT mice and abolished the partial recovery from hyperalgesia in MOR KO mice. In rats, antagonists of α2A adrenergic and μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors reinstated hyperalgesia during remission from CFA-induced hyperalgesia. Therefore, these four receptors suppress hyperalgesia in latent sensitization. We further demonstrated that suppression of hyperalgesia by MORs was due to their constitutive activity because of the following: (1) CFA-induced hyperalgesia was reinstated by the MOR inverse agonist naltrexone (NTX), but not by its neutral antagonist 6β-naltrexol; (2) pro-enkephalin, pro-opiomelanocortin, and pro-dynorphin KO mice showed recovery from hyperalgesia and reinstatement by NTX; (3) there was no MOR internalization during remission; (4) MORs immunoprecipitated from the spinal cord during remission had increased Ser375 phosphorylation; and (5) electrophysiology recordings from dorsal root ganglion neurons collected during remission showed constitutive MOR inhibition of calcium channels. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Chronic pain causes extreme suffering to millions of people, but its mechanisms remain to be unraveled. Latent

  4. P2Y2 receptor activation regulates the expression of acetylcholinesterase and acetylcholine receptor genes at vertebrate neuromuscular junctions.

    PubMed

    Tung, Edmund K K; Choi, Roy C Y; Siow, Nina L; Jiang, Joy X S; Ling, Karen K Y; Simon, Joseph; Barnard, Eric A; Tsim, Karl W K

    2004-10-01

    At the vertebrate neuromuscular junction (nmj), ATP is known to be coreleased with acetylcholine from the synaptic vesicles. We have previously shown that the P2Y1 receptor is localized at the nmj. Here, we extend the findings to show that another nucleotide receptor, P2Y2, is also localized there and with P2Y1 jointly mediates trophic responses to ATP. The P2Y2 receptor mRNA in rat muscle increased during development and peaked in adulthood. The P2Y2 receptor protein was shown to become restricted to the nmjs during embryonic development, in chick and in rat. In both rat and chick myotubes, P2Y1 and P2Y2 are expressed, increasing with differentiation, but P2Y4 is absent. The P2Y2 agonist UTP stimulated there inositol trisphosphate production and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases, in a dose-dependent manner. These UTP-induced responses were insensitive to the P2Y1-specific antagonist MRS 2179 (2'-deoxy-N6-methyl adenosine 3',5'-diphosphate diammonium salt). In differentiated myotubes, P2Y2 activation induced expression of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) protein (but not control alpha-tubulin). This was shown to arise from AChE promoter activation, mediated by activation of the transcription factor Elk-1. Two Elk-1-responsive elements, located in intron-1 of the AChE promoter, were found by mutation to act in this gene activation initiated at the P2Y2 receptor and also in that initiated at the P2Y1 receptor. Furthermore, the promoters of different acetylcholine receptor subunits were also stimulated by application of UTP to myotubes. These results indicate that ATP regulates postsynaptic gene expressions via a common pathway triggered by the activation of P2Y1 and P2Y2 receptors at the nmjs. PMID:15258260

  5. Effect of Caffeine Chronically Consumed During Pregnancy on Adenosine A1 and A2A Receptors Signaling in Both Maternal and Fetal Heart from Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, Inmaculada; Albasanz, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Background: Caffeine is the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, even during pregnancy. Its stimulatory effects are mainly due to antagonism of adenosine actions by blocking adenosine A1 and A2A receptors. Previous studies have shown that caffeine can cross the placenta and therefore modulate these receptors not only in the fetal brain but also in the heart. Methods: In the present work, the effect of caffeine chronically consumed during pregnancy on A1 and A2A receptors in Wistar rat heart, from both mothers and their fetuses, were studied using radioligand binding, Western-blotting, and adenylyl cyclase activity assays, as well as reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results: Caffeine did not significantly alter A1R neither at protein nor at gene expression level in both the maternal and fetal heart. On the contrary, A2AR significantly decreased in the maternal heart, although mRNA was not affected. Gi and Gs proteins were also preserved. Finally, A1R-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity did not change in the maternal heart, but A2AR mediated stimulation of this enzymatic activity significantly decreased according to the detected loss of this receptor. Conclusions: Opposite to the downregulation and desensitization of the A1R/AC pathway previously reported in the brain, these results show that this pathway is not affected in rat heart after caffeine exposure during pregnancy. In addition, A2AR is downregulated and desensitized in the maternal heart, suggesting a differential modulation of these receptor-mediated pathways by caffeine. PMID:25538864

  6. APORPHINOID ANTAGONISTS OF 5-HT2A RECEPTORS: FURTHER EVALUATION OF RING A SUBSTITUENTS AND THE SIZE OF RING C

    PubMed Central

    Ponnala, Shashikanth; Kapadia, Nirav; Navarro, Hernán A.; Harding, Wayne W.

    2014-01-01

    A series of ring A modified analogs of nantenine as well as structural variants in ring C were synthesized and evaluated for antagonist activity at 5-HT2A and α1A receptors. Halogenation improves 5-HT2A antagonist potency in molecules containing a C1 methoxyl/C2 methoxyl or C1 methoxyl/C2 hydroxyl moiety. Bromination or iodination (but not chlorination) with the latter moiety also significantly increased α1A antagonist potency. Homologation or contraction of ring C adversely affected antagonist activity at both receptors, implying that a six-membered ring C motif is beneficial for high antagonist potency at both receptors. Molecular docking studies suggest that the improved antagonist activity (by virtue of improved affinity) of C3 halogenated aporphines in this study, is attributable to favorable interactions with the C3 halogen and F339 and/or F340. PMID:24766771

  7. Differential role of nitric oxide in regional sympathetic responses to stimulation of NTS A2a adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Scislo, Tadeusz J; Tan, Nobusuke; O'Leary, Donal S

    2005-02-01

    Our previous studies showed that preganglionic adrenal (pre-ASNA), renal (RSNA), lumbar, and postganglionic adrenal sympathetic nerve activities (post-ASNA) are inhibited after stimulation of arterial baroreceptors, nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), and glutamatergic and P2x receptors and are activated after stimulation of adenosine A1 receptors. However, stimulation of adenosine A2a receptors inhibited RSNA and post-ASNA, whereas it activated pre-ASNA. Because the effects evoked by NTS A2a receptors may be mediated via activation of nitric oxide (NO) mechanisms in NTS neurons, we tested the hypothesis that NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors would attenuate regional sympathetic responses to NTS A2a receptor stimulation, whereas NO donors would evoke contrasting responses from pre-ASNA versus RSNA and post-ASNA. Therefore, in chloralose/urethane-anesthetized rats, we compared hemodynamic and regional sympathetic responses to microinjections of selective A2a receptor agonist (CGS-21680, 20 pmol/50 nl) after pretreatment with NOS inhibitors Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (10 nmol/100 nl) and 1-[2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]imidazole (100 pmol/100 nl) versus pretreatment with vehicle (100 nl). In addition, responses to microinjections into the NTS of different NO donors [40 and 400 pmol/50 nl sodium nitroprusside (SNP); 0.5 and 5 nmol/50 nl 3,3-bis(aminoethyl)-1-hydroxy-2-oxo-1-triazene (DETA NONOate, also known as NOC-18), and 2 nmol/50 nl 3-(2-hydroxy-2-nitroso-1-propylhydrazino)-1-propanamine (PAPA NONOate, also known as NOC-15)], the NO precursor L-arginine (10-50 nmol/50 nl), and sodium glutamate (500 pmol/50 nl) were evaluated. SNP, DETA NONOate, and PAPA NONOate activated pre-ASNA and inhibited RSNA and post-ASNA, whereas l-arginine and glutamate microinjected into the same site of the NTS inhibited all these sympathetic outputs. Decreases in heart rate and depressor or biphasic responses accompanied the neural responses. Pretreatment with NOS inhibitors

  8. Cloning of human genes encoding novel G protein-coupled receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Marchese, A.; Docherty, J.M.; Heiber, M.

    1994-10-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of several novel human genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors. Each of the receptors contained the familiar seven transmembrane topography and most closely resembled peptide binding receptors. Gene GPR1 encoded a receptor protein that is intronless in the coding region and that shared identity (43% in the transmembrane regions) with the opioid receptors. Northern blot analysis revealed that GPR1 transcripts were expressed in the human hippocampus, and the gene was localized to chromosome 15q21.6. Gene GPR2 encoded a protein that most closely resembled an interleukin-8 receptor (51% in the transmembrane regions), and this gene, not expressed in the six brain regions examined, was localized to chromosome 17q2.1-q21.3. A third gene, GPR3, showed identity (56% in the transmembrane regions) with a previously characterized cDNA clone from rat and was localized to chromosome 1p35-p36.1. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Anti-thrombotic and vascular effects of AR246686, a novel 5-HT2A receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Adams, John W; Ramirez, Juan; Ortuno, Danny; Shi, Yunqing; Thomsen, William; Richman, Jeremy G; Morgan, Michael; Dosa, Peter; Teegarden, Bradley R; Al-Shamma, Hussien; Behan, Dominic P; Connolly, Daniel T

    2008-05-31

    We have evaluated the anti-platelet and vascular pharmacology of AR246686, a novel 5-hydroxytryptamine2A (5-HT2A) receptor antagonist. AR246686 displayed high affinity binding to membranes of HEK cells stably expressing recombinant human and rat 5-HT2A receptors (Ki=0.2 nM and 0.4 nM, respectively). Functional antagonism (IC50=1.9 nM) with AR246686 was determined by inhibition of ligand-independent inositol phosphate accumulation in the 5-HT2A stable cell line. We observed 8.7-fold and 1360-fold higher affinity of AR246686 for the 5-HT2A receptor vs. 5-HT2C and 5-HT2B receptors, respectively. AR246686 inhibited 5-HT-induced amplification of ADP-stimulated human platelet aggregation (IC50=21 nM). Similar potency was observed for inhibition of 5-HT stimulated DNA synthesis in rat aortic smooth muscle cells (IC(50)=10 nM) and 5-HT-mediated contraction in rat aortic rings. Effects of AR246686 on arterial thrombosis and bleeding time were studied in a rat model of femoral artery occlusion. Oral dosing of AR246686 to rats resulted in prolongation of time to occlusion at 1 mg/kg, whereas increased bleeding time was observed at a dose of 20 mg/kg. In contrast, both bleeding time and time to occlusion were increased at the same dose (10 mg/kg) of clopidogrel. These results demonstrate that AR246686 is a high affinity 5-HT2A receptor antagonist with potent activity on platelets and vascular smooth muscle. Further, oral administration results in anti-thrombotic effects at doses that are free of significant effects on traumatic bleeding time.

  10. The Circadian Rhythm Gene Arntl2 Is a Metastasis Susceptibility Gene for Estrogen Receptor-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Ngoc-Han; Long, Jirong; Cai, Qiuyin; Shu, Xiao Ou

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer mortality is primarily due to metastasis rather than primary tumors, yet relatively little is understood regarding the etiology of metastatic breast cancer. Previously, using a mouse genetics approach, we demonstrated that inherited germline polymorphisms contribute to metastatic disease, and that these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could be used to predict outcome in breast cancer patients. In this study, a backcross between a highly metastatic (FVB/NJ) and low metastatic (MOLF/EiJ) mouse strain identified Arntl2, a gene encoding a circadian rhythm transcription factor, as a metastasis susceptibility gene associated with progression, specifically in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients. Integrated whole genome sequence analysis with DNase hypersensitivity sites reveals SNPs in the predicted promoter of Arntl2. Using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated substitution of the MOLF promoter, we demonstrate that the SNPs regulate Arntl2 transcription and affect metastatic burden. Finally, analysis of SNPs associated with ARNTL2 expression in human breast cancer patients revealed reproducible associations of ARNTL2 expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) SNPs with disease-free survival, consistent with the mouse studies. PMID:27656887

  11. Dorsal prefrontal cortical serotonin 2A receptor binding indices are differentially related to individual scores on harm avoidance.

    PubMed

    Baeken, Chris; Bossuyt, Axel; De Raedt, Rudi

    2014-02-28

    Although the serotonergic system has been implicated in healthy as well as in pathological emotional states, knowledge about its involvement in personality is limited. Earlier research on this topic suggests that post-synaptic 5-HT2A receptors could be involved in particular in frontal cortical areas. In drug-naïve healthy individuals, we examined the relationship between these 5-HT2A receptors and the temperament dimension harm avoidance (HA) using 123I-5-I-R91150 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). HA is a personality feature closely related to stress, anxiety and depression proneness, and it is thought to be mediated by the serotonergic system. We focused on the prefrontal cortices as these regions are frequently implicated in cognitive processes related to a variety of affective disorders. We found a positive relationship between dorsal prefrontal cortical (DPFC) 5-HT2A receptor binding indices (BI) and individual HA scores. Further, our results suggest that those individuals with a tendency to worry or to ruminate are particularly prone to display significantly higher 5-HT2A receptor BI in the left DPFC. Although we only examined psychologically healthy individuals, this relationship suggests a possible vulnerability for affective disorders. PMID:24412555

  12. Time-course of protection by the selective A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 after transient focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Melani, Alessia; Dettori, Ilaria; Corti, Francesca; Cellai, Lucrezia; Pedata, Felicita

    2015-08-01

    Evidence indicates that the adenosine A2A receptor subtype is of critical importance in stroke. In previous studies, in the model of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAo), the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, SCH58261, administered soon after ischemia, proved protective against excessive glutamate outflow in the first 4 h after ischemia and against neurological deficit and tissue damage evaluated 24 h after pMCAo. In the present work, we investigated if neuroprotective effect of SCH58261 was maintained 7 days after transient MCAo (tMCAo). SCH58261 (0.01 mg/kg, i.p.), administered twice/day for 7 days, protected from neurological deficit 1 day after tMCAo, but no more after 5 and 7 days. Two days after tMCAo, SCH58261 did not reduce blood cell infiltration, evaluated as HIS-48 positive cells, into ischemic striatal and cortical tissue. Moreover, 7 days after tMCAo, SCH58261 has not protected ischemic areas from damage and has not ameliorated myelin organization into the ischemic striatum. Protection by the A2A receptor antagonist 24 h after ischemia is attributable to reduced excitotoxicity. Seven days after ischemia the early protective effect of the A2A receptor antagonist likely has been overwhelmed by a secondary damage due to blood cell infiltration and neuroinflammation.

  13. Genetic deletion of the adenosine A(2A) receptor prevents nicotine-induced upregulation of α7, but not α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor binding in the brain.

    PubMed

    Metaxas, Athanasios; Al-Hasani, Ream; Farshim, Pamela; Tubby, Kristina; Berwick, Amy; Ledent, Catherine; Hourani, Susanna; Kitchen, Ian; Bailey, Alexis

    2013-08-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs) modulate cholinergic neurotransmission, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) function, and nicotine-induced behavioural effects. To explore the interaction between A(2A) and nAChRs, we examined if the complete genetic deletion of adenosine A(2A)Rs in mice induces compensatory alterations in the binding of different nAChR subtypes, and whether the long-term effects of nicotine on nAChR regulation are altered in the absence of the A(2A)R gene. Quantitative autoradiography was used to measure cytisine-sensitive [¹²⁵I]epibatidine and [¹²⁵I]α-bungarotoxin binding to α4β2* and α7 nAChRs, respectively, in brain sections of drug-naïve (n = 6) or nicotine treated (n = 5-7), wild-type and adenosine A(2A)R knockout mice. Saline or nicotine (7.8 mg/kg/day; free-base weight) were administered to male CD1 mice via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps for a period of 14 days. Blood plasma levels of nicotine and cotinine were measured at the end of treatment. There were no compensatory developmental alterations in nAChR subtype distribution or density in drug-naïve A(2A)R knockout mice. In nicotine treated wild-type mice, both α4β2* and α7 nAChR binding sites were increased compared with saline treated controls. The genetic ablation of adenosine A(2A)Rs prevented nicotine-induced upregulation of α7 nAChRs, without affecting α4β2* receptor upregulation. This selective effect was observed at plasma levels of nicotine that were within the range reported for smokers (10-50 ng ml⁻¹). Our data highlight the involvement of adenosine A(2A)Rs in the mechanisms of nicotine-induced α7 nAChR upregulation, and identify A(2A)Rs as novel pharmacological targets for modulating the long-term effects of nicotine on α7 receptors.

  14. Genetic deletion of the adenosine A(2A) receptor prevents nicotine-induced upregulation of α7, but not α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor binding in the brain.

    PubMed

    Metaxas, Athanasios; Al-Hasani, Ream; Farshim, Pamela; Tubby, Kristina; Berwick, Amy; Ledent, Catherine; Hourani, Susanna; Kitchen, Ian; Bailey, Alexis

    2013-08-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs) modulate cholinergic neurotransmission, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) function, and nicotine-induced behavioural effects. To explore the interaction between A(2A) and nAChRs, we examined if the complete genetic deletion of adenosine A(2A)Rs in mice induces compensatory alterations in the binding of different nAChR subtypes, and whether the long-term effects of nicotine on nAChR regulation are altered in the absence of the A(2A)R gene. Quantitative autoradiography was used to measure cytisine-sensitive [¹²⁵I]epibatidine and [¹²⁵I]α-bungarotoxin binding to α4β2* and α7 nAChRs, respectively, in brain sections of drug-naïve (n = 6) or nicotine treated (n = 5-7), wild-type and adenosine A(2A)R knockout mice. Saline or nicotine (7.8 mg/kg/day; free-base weight) were administered to male CD1 mice via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps for a period of 14 days. Blood plasma levels of nicotine and cotinine were measured at the end of treatment. There were no compensatory developmental alterations in nAChR subtype distribution or density in drug-naïve A(2A)R knockout mice. In nicotine treated wild-type mice, both α4β2* and α7 nAChR binding sites were increased compared with saline treated controls. The genetic ablation of adenosine A(2A)Rs prevented nicotine-induced upregulation of α7 nAChRs, without affecting α4β2* receptor upregulation. This selective effect was observed at plasma levels of nicotine that were within the range reported for smokers (10-50 ng ml⁻¹). Our data highlight the involvement of adenosine A(2A)Rs in the mechanisms of nicotine-induced α7 nAChR upregulation, and identify A(2A)Rs as novel pharmacological targets for modulating the long-term effects of nicotine on α7 receptors. PMID:23583933

  15. Potential role of A2A adenosine receptor in traumatic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saif; Fatteh, Nadeem; El-Sherbiny, Nehal M; Naime, Mohammad; Ibrahim, Ahmed S; El-Sherbini, Ahmed M; El-Shafey, Sally A; Khan, Sohail; Fulzele, Sadanand; Gonzales, Joyce; Liou, Gregory I

    2013-11-15

    In traumatic optic neuropathy (TON), apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells is closely related to the local production of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory mediators from activated microglial cells. Adenosine receptor A2A (A2AAR) has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory properties that have not been studied in TON. In the present study, we examined the role of A2AAR in retinal complications associated with TON. Initial studies in wild-type mice revealed that treatment with the A2AAR agonist resulted in marked decreases in the TON-induced microglial activation, retinal cell death and releases of reactive oxygen species and pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6. To further assess the role of A2AAR in TON, we studied the effects of A2AAR ablation on the TON-induced retinal abnormalities. A2AAR-/- mice with TON showed a significantly higher mRNA level of TNF-α, Iba1-1 in retinal tissue, and ICAM-1 expression in retinal sections compared with wild-type mice with TON. To explore a potential mechanism by which A2AAR-signaling regulates inflammation in TON, we performed additional studies using hypoxia- or LPS-treated microglial cells as an in vitro model for TON. Activation of A2AAR attenuates hypoxia or LPS-induced TNF-α release and significantly repressed the inflammatory signaling, ERK in the activated microglia. Collectively, this work provides pharmacological and genetic evidence for A2AAR signaling as a control point of cell death in TON and suggests that the retinal protective effect of A2AAR is mediated by attenuating the inflammatory response that occurs in microglia via interaction with MAPKinase pathway.

  16. Myocardial blood flow and adenosine A2A receptor density in endurance athletes and untrained men

    PubMed Central

    Heinonen, Ilkka; Nesterov, Sergey V; Liukko, Kaisa; Kemppainen, Jukka; Någren, Kjell; Luotolahti, Matti; Virsu, Pauliina; Oikonen, Vesa; Nuutila, Pirjo; Kujala, Urho M; Kainulainen, Heikki; Boushel, Robert; Knuuti, Juhani; Kalliokoski, Kari K

    2008-01-01

    Previous human studies have shown divergent results concerning the effects of exercise training on myocardial blood flow (MBF) at rest or during adenosine-induced hyperaemia in humans. We studied whether these responses are related to alterations in adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) density in the left-ventricular (LV) myocardium, size and work output of the athlete's heart, or to fitness level. MBF at baseline and during intravenous adenosine infusion, and A2AR density at baseline were measured using positron emission tomography, and by a novel A2AR tracer in 10 healthy male endurance athletes (ET) and 10 healthy untrained (UT) men. Structural LV parameters were measured with echocardiography. LV mass index was 71% higher in ET than UT (193 ± 18 g m−2versus 114 ± 13 g m−2, respectively). MBF per gram of tissue was significantly lower in the ET than UT at baseline, but this was only partly explained by reduced LV work load since MBF corrected for LV work was higher in ET than UT, as well as total MBF. The MBF during adenosine-induced hyperaemia was reduced in ET compared to UT, and the fitter the athlete was, the lower was adenosine-induced MBF. A2AR density was not different between the groups and was not coupled to resting or adenosine-mediated MBF. The novel findings of the present study show that the adaptations in the heart of highly trained endurance athletes lead to relative myocardial ‘overperfusion’ at rest. On the other hand hyperaemic perfusion is reduced, but is not explained by A2AR density. PMID:18772204

  17. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human antidiuretic hormone receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Seibold, A.; Brabet, P.; Rosenthal, W.; Birnbaumer, M. )

    1992-11-01

    Applying a genomic DNA-expression approach, the authors cloned the gene and cDNA coding for the human antidiuretic hormone receptor, also called vasopressin V2 receptor' (V2R). The nucleotide sequence of both cloned DNAs provided the information to elucidate the structure of the isolated transcriptional unit. The structure of this gene is unusual in that it is the first G protein-coupled receptor gene that contains two very small intervening sequences, the second of which separates the region encoding the seventh transmembrane region from the rest of the open reading frame. The sequence information was used to synthesize appropriate oligonucleotides to be used as primers in the PCR. The V2R gene was localized by PCR using DNA from hybrid cells as template. The gene was found to reside in the q28-qter portion of the human X chromosome, a region identified as the locus for congential nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. 27 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Crystal structures of the A2A adenosine receptor and their use in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2013-12-20

    New insights into drug design are derived from the X-ray crystallographic structures of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), and the adenosine receptors (ARs) are at the forefront of this effort. The 3D knowledge of receptor binding and activation promises to enable drug discovery for GPCRs in general, and specifically for the ARs. The predictability of modeling based on the X-ray structures of the A2AAR has been well demonstrated in the identification, design and modification of both known and novel AR agonists and antagonists. It is expected that structure-based design of drugs acting through ARs will provide new avenues to clinically useful agents.

  19. A cosmid and yeast artificial chromosome contig containing the complete ryanodine receptor (RYR1) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Rouquier, S.; Giorgi, D.; Trask, B.; Bergmann, A.; De Jong, P. ); Phillips, M.S.; MacLennan, D.H. )

    1993-08-01

    The ryanodine receptor (RYR1) gene is responsible for some forms of malignant hyperthermia and has been localized to 19q13.1. Central core disease is a genetic myopathy that is genetically linked to RYR1. The authors have identified an overlapping set of cosmid and YAC clones that spans more than 800 kb and includes the RYR1 gene ([approximately]205 kb). Cosmids from this region were identified by screening three chromosome 19 cosmid libraries (11-fold coverage) with six subclones representing the entire RYR1 cDNA. Genomic sequences from positive cosmids were then used as probes to identify additional cosmids. A minimally overlapping set of 23 cosmids was assembled into two contigs on the basis of restriction fragment analysis and hybridization data. Three YAC clones were isolated by screening a human YAC library with selected cosmid inserts. Overlaps among these YACs and the cosmid contigs were determined by hybridizing YAC Alu-PCR products to cosmid DNAs. The YACs bridged the gap between the cosmid contigs and extended the contig on both sides. Fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments positioned the RYR1 contig between GPI, MAG, and D19S191 on the proximal side and D19S190, CYP2A, CYP2F, SNRPA, BCKDHA, and other markers on the distal side. The 800-kb contig of cloned reagents will facilitate the detailed characterization of the RYR1 gene and other loci that may be closely related to central core disease. 62 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Gene Expression Profiling in Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2A

    PubMed Central

    Sáenz, Amets; Azpitarte, Margarita; Armañanzas, Rubén; Leturcq, France; Alzualde, Ainhoa; Inza, Iñaki; García-Bragado, Federico; De la Herran, Gaspar; Corcuera, Julián; Cabello, Ana; Navarro, Carmen; De la Torre, Carolina; Gallardo, Eduard; Illa, Isabel; de Munain, Adolfo López

    2008-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) is a recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations in calpain 3 (CAPN3). Calpain 3 plays different roles in muscular cells, but little is known about its functions or in vivo substrates. The aim of this study was to identify the genes showing an altered expression in LGMD2A patients and the possible pathways they are implicated in. Ten muscle samples from LGMD2A patients with in which molecular diagnosis was ascertained were investigated using array technology to analyze gene expression profiling as compared to ten normal muscle samples. Upregulated genes were mostly those related to extracellular matrix (different collagens), cell adhesion (fibronectin), muscle development (myosins and melusin) and signal transduction. It is therefore suggested that different proteins located or participating in the costameric region are implicated in processes regulated by calpain 3 during skeletal muscle development. Genes participating in the ubiquitin proteasome degradation pathway were found to be deregulated in LGMD2A patients, suggesting that regulation of this pathway may be under the control of calpain 3 activity. As frizzled-related protein (FRZB) is upregulated in LGMD2A muscle samples, it could be hypothesized that β-catenin regulation is also altered at the Wnt signaling pathway, leading to an incorrect myogenesis. Conversely, expression of most transcription factor genes was downregulated (MYC, FOS and EGR1). Finally, the upregulation of IL-32 and immunoglobulin genes may induce the eosinophil chemoattraction explaining the inflammatory findings observed in presymptomatic stages. The obtained results try to shed some light on identification of novel therapeutic targets for limb-girdle muscular dystrophies. PMID:19015733

  1. Widely distributed mutations in the COL2A1 gene produce achondrogenesis type II/hypochondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Körkkö, J; Cohn, D H; Ala-Kokko, L; Krakow, D; Prockop, D J

    2000-05-15

    The COL2A1 gene was assayed for mutations in genomic DNA from 12 patients with achondrogenesis type II/hypochondrogenesis. The exons and flanking sequences of the 54 exons in the COL2A1 gene were amplified by a series of specific primers using PCR. The PCR products were scanned for mutations by conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis, and PCR products that generated heteroduplex bands were then sequenced. Mutations in the COL2A1 gene were found in all 12 patients. Ten of the mutations were single base substitutions that converted a codon for an obligate glycine to a codon for an amino acid with a bulkier side chain. One of the mutations was a change in a consensus RNA splice site. Another was an 18-base pair deletion of coding sequences. The results confirmed previous indications that conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis is highly sensitive for detection of mutations in large and complex genes. They also demonstrate that most, if not all, patients with achondrogenesis type II/hypochondrogenesis have mutations in the COL2A1 gene. PMID:10797431

  2. Differential regulation of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in neuroblastoma: Estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα) regulates HIF2A transcription and correlates to poor outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Hamidian, Arash; Stedingk, Kristoffer von; Munksgaard Thorén, Matilda; Mohlin, Sofie; Påhlman, Sven

    2015-06-05

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are differentially regulated in tumor cells. While the current paradigm supports post-translational regulation of the HIF-α subunits, we recently showed that hypoxic HIF-2α is also transcriptionally regulated via insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II in the childhood tumor neuroblastoma. Here, we demonstrate that transcriptional regulation of HIF-2α seems to be restricted to neural cell-derived tumors, while HIF-1α is canonically regulated at the post-translational level uniformly across different tumor forms. Enhanced expression of HIF2A mRNA at hypoxia is due to de novo transcription rather than increased mRNA stability, and chemical stabilization of the HIF-α proteins at oxygen-rich conditions unexpectedly leads to increased HIF2A transcription. The enhanced HIF2A levels do not seem to be dependent on active HIF-1. Using a transcriptome array approach, we identified members of the Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC)/Estrogen-related receptor (ERR) complex families as potential regulators of HIF2A. Knockdown or inhibition of one of the members, ERRα, leads to decreased expression of HIF2A, and high expression of the ERRα gene ESRRA correlates with poor overall and progression-free survival in a clinical neuroblastoma material consisting of 88 tumors. Thus, targeting of ERRα and pathways regulating transcriptional HIF-2α are promising therapeutic avenues in neuroblastoma. - Highlights: • Transcriptional control of HIF-2α is restricted to neural cell-derived tumors. • Enhanced transcription of HIF2A is not due to increased mRNA stability. • Chemical stabilization of the HIF-α subunits leads to increased HIF2A transcription. • ERRα regulates HIF2A mRNA expression in neuroblastoma. • High expression of ESRRA correlates to poor outcome in neuroblastoma.

  3. Regulation of bradykinin receptor gene expression in human lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Phagoo, S B; Yaqoob, M; Herrera-Martinez, E; McIntyre, P; Jones, C; Burgess, G M

    2000-06-01

    In WI-38 human fibroblasts, interleukin-1 beta and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) increased bradykinin B(1) receptor mRNA, which peaked between 2 and 4 h, remaining elevated for 20 h. Binding of the bradykinin B(1) receptor selective ligand [3H]des-Arg(10)-kallidin, also increased, peaking at 4 h and remaining elevated for 20 h. The B(max) value for [3H]des-Arg(10)-kallidin rose from 280+/-102 fmol/mg (n=3) to 701+/-147 fmol/mg (n=3), but the K(D) value remained unaltered (control, 1.04+/-0.33 nM (n=3); interleukin-1 beta, 0.88+/-0.41 nM (n=3)). The interleukin-1 beta-induced [3H]des-Arg(10)-kallidin binding sites were functional receptors, as bradykinin B(1) receptor agonist-induced responses increased in treated cells. Bradykinin B(2) receptor mRNA and [3H]bradykinin binding were upregulated by interleukin-1 beta, but not TNF-alpha. The effect of interleukin-1 beta on bradykinin B(2) receptors was smaller than for bradykinin B(1) receptors. Cycloheximide prevented interleukin-1 beta-mediated increases in B(1) and B(2) binding, but not mRNA suggesting that de novo synthesis of a transcriptional activator was unnecessary.

  4. Molecular Basis of Ligand Dissociation from the Adenosine A2A Receptor.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Pan, Albert C; Dror, Ron O; Mocking, Tamara; Liu, Rongfang; Heitman, Laura H; Shaw, David E; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-05-01

    How drugs dissociate from their targets is largely unknown. We investigated the molecular basis of this process in the adenosine A2Areceptor (A2AR), a prototypical G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Through kinetic radioligand binding experiments, we characterized mutant receptors selected based on molecular dynamic simulations of the antagonist ZM241385 dissociating from the A2AR. We discovered mutations that dramatically altered the ligand's dissociation rate despite only marginally influencing its binding affinity, demonstrating that even receptor features with little contribution to affinity may prove critical to the dissociation process. Our results also suggest that ZM241385 follows a multistep dissociation pathway, consecutively interacting with distinct receptor regions, a mechanism that may also be common to many other GPCRs.

  5. Co-regulation of a large and rapidly evolving repertoire of odorant receptor genes

    PubMed Central

    Kambere, Marijo B; Lane, Robert P

    2007-01-01

    The olfactory system meets niche- and species-specific demands by an accelerated evolution of its odorant receptor repertoires. In this review, we describe evolutionary processes that have shaped olfactory and vomeronasal receptor gene families in vertebrate genomes. We emphasize three important periods in the evolution of the olfactory system evident by comparative genomics: the adaptation to land in amphibian ancestors, the decline of olfaction in primates, and the delineation of putative pheromone receptors concurrent with rodent speciation. The rapid evolution of odorant receptor genes, the sheer size of the repertoire, as well as their wide distribution in the genome, presents a developmental challenge: how are these ever-changing odorant receptor repertoires coordinated within the olfactory system? A central organizing principle in olfaction is the specialization of sensory neurons resulting from each sensory neuron expressing only ~one odorant receptor allele. In this review, we also discuss this mutually exclusive expression of odorant receptor genes. We have considered several models to account for co-regulation of odorant receptor repertoires, as well as discussed a new hypothesis that invokes important epigenetic properties of the system. PMID:17903278

  6. Gene Interaction Network Suggests Dioxin Induces a Significant Linkage between Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor and Retinoic Acid Receptor Beta

    PubMed Central

    Toyoshiba, Hiroyoshi; Yamanaka, Takeharu; Sone, Hideko; Parham, Frederick M.; Walker, Nigel J.; Martinez, Jeanelle; Portier, Christopher J.

    2004-01-01

    Gene expression arrays (gene chips) have enabled researchers to roughly quantify the level of mRNA expression for a large number of genes in a single sample. Several methods have been developed for the analysis of gene array data including clustering, outlier detection, and correlation studies. Most of these analyses are aimed at a qualitative identification of what is different between two samples and/or the relationship between two genes. We propose a quantitative, statistically sound methodology for the analysis of gene regulatory networks using gene expression data sets. The method is based on Bayesian networks for direct quantification of gene expression networks. Using the gene expression changes in HPL1A lung airway epithelial cells after exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin at levels of 0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 nM for 24 hr, a gene expression network was hypothesized and analyzed. The method clearly demonstrates support for the assumed network and the hypothesis linking the usual dioxin expression changes to the retinoic acid receptor system. Simulation studies demonstrated the method works well, even for small samples. PMID:15345368

  7. Adenosine A2A Receptor Up-Regulates Retinal Wave Frequency via Starburst Amacrine Cells in the Developing Rat Retina

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pin-Chien; Hsiao, Yu-Tien; Kao, Shao-Yen; Chen, Ching-Feng; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Chiang, Chung-Wei; Lee, Chien-fei; Lu, Juu-Chin; Chern, Yijuang; Wang, Chih-Tien

    2014-01-01

    Background Developing retinas display retinal waves, the patterned spontaneous activity essential for circuit refinement. During the first postnatal week in rodents, retinal waves are mediated by synaptic transmission between starburst amacrine cells (SACs) and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The neuromodulator adenosine is essential for the generation of retinal waves. However, the cellular basis underlying adenosine's regulation of retinal waves remains elusive. Here, we investigated whether and how the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) regulates retinal waves and whether A2AR regulation of retinal waves acts via presynaptic SACs. Methodology/Principal Findings We showed that A2AR was expressed in the inner plexiform layer and ganglion cell layer of the developing rat retina. Knockdown of A2AR decreased the frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ transients, suggesting that endogenous A2AR may up-regulate wave frequency. To investigate whether A2AR acts via presynaptic SACs, we targeted gene expression to SACs by the metabotropic glutamate receptor type II promoter. Ca2+ transient frequency was increased by expressing wild-type A2AR (A2AR-WT) in SACs, suggesting that A2AR may up-regulate retinal waves via presynaptic SACs. Subsequent patch-clamp recordings on RGCs revealed that presynaptic A2AR-WT increased the frequency of wave-associated postsynaptic currents (PSCs) or depolarizations compared to the control, without changing the RGC's excitability, membrane potentials, or PSC charge. These findings suggest that presynaptic A2AR may not affect the membrane properties of postsynaptic RGCs. In contrast, by expressing the C-terminal truncated A2AR mutant (A2AR-ΔC) in SACs, the wave frequency was reduced compared to the A2AR-WT, but was similar to the control, suggesting that the full-length A2AR in SACs is required for A2AR up-regulation of retinal waves. Conclusions/Significance A2AR up-regulates the frequency of retinal waves via presynaptic SACs, requiring its full

  8. Two different forms of lethal chondrodysplasias caused by COL2A1 gene mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Winterpacht, A.; Hilbert, K.; Schwarze, U.

    1994-09-01

    Two bone dysplasia families seem to be due to mutations in the type II procollagen gene (COL2A1): the so-called spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC) group with achondrogenesis II, hypochondrogenesis, SEDC, osteoarthrosis and the Stickler-Kniest pattern that include different forms of Kniest and Stickler dysplasia. Both groups comprise a clinical spectrum ranging from lethal to mild. COL2A1-mutations have been identified in lethal forms of the SEDC family but not in lethal forms of the Stickler/Kniest group. We now report a COL2A-1 mutation in an additional case of hypochondrogenesis (patient S) and in a lethal case of Kniest dysplasia (patient B). We amplified all 54 exons of the COL2A1 gene in both patients and screened the PCR products for mutations by SSCP analysis and sequencing. In patient B, we identified an 18 bp deletion in exon 34 which removes 6 amino acids from the mature protein. In patient S, we were able to identify a two base pair exchange (GG to AT) in exon 31, which leads to the very unusual conversion of Gly to Ile. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a Gly to Ile conversion in the COL2A1 gene, and the first report of a COL2A1 gene mutation in a lethal form of Kniest dysplasia. On the basis of the known COL2A1 gene mutations and the genotype-phenotype correlations established so far, we provide molecular data (an in frame deletion in patient B and a Gly conversion in patient S) that support their clinical classification as Kniest dysplasia and hypochondrogenesis, respectively.

  9. Alcohol misuse in emerging adulthood: Association of dopamine and serotonin receptor genes with impulsivity-related cognition.

    PubMed

    Leamy, Talia E; Connor, Jason P; Voisey, Joanne; Young, Ross McD; Gullo, Matthew J

    2016-12-01

    Impulsivity predicts alcohol misuse and risk for alcohol use disorder. Cognition mediates much of this association. Genes also account for a large amount of variance in alcohol misuse, with dopamine and serotonin receptor genes of particular interest, because of their role in motivated behavior. The precise psychological mechanisms through which such genes confer risk is unclear. Trait impulsivity conveys risk for alcohol misuse by influencing two distinct domains of cognition: beliefs about the reinforcing effects of alcohol consumption (positive alcohol expectancy) and the perceived ability to resist it (drinking refusal self-efficacy). This study investigated the effect of the dopamine-related polymorphism in the DRD2/ANKK1 gene (rs1800497) and a serotonin-related polymorphism in the HTR2A gene (rs6313) on associations between impulsivity, cognition, and alcohol misuse in 120 emerging adults (18-21years). HTR2A predicted lower positive alcohol expectancy, higher refusal self-efficacy, and lower alcohol misuse. However, neither polymorphism moderated the linkages between impulsivity, cognition, and alcohol misuse. This is the first report of an association between HTR2A and alcohol-related cognition. Theoretically-driven biopsychosocial models have potential to elucidate the specific cognitive mechanisms through which distal risk factors like genes and temperament affect alcohol misuse in emerging adulthood. PMID:27399274

  10. [Severe type A insulin resistance syndrome due to a mutation in the insulin receptor gene].

    PubMed

    Ros, P; Colino-Alcol, E; Grasso, V; Barbetti, F; Argente, J

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance syndromes without lipodystrophy are an infrequent and heterogeneous group of disorders with variable clinical phenotypes, associated with hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. The three conditions related to mutations in the insulin receptor gene are leprechaunism or Donohue syndrome, Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome, and Type A syndrome. A case is presented on a patient diagnosed with type A insulin resistance, defined by the triad of extreme insulin resistance, acanthosis nigricans, and hyperandrogenism, carrying a heterozygous mutation in exon 19 of the insulin receptor gene coding for its tyrosine kinase domain that is crucial for the catalytic activity of the receptor. The molecular basis of the syndrome is reviewed, focusing on the structure-function relationships of the insulin receptor, knowing that the criteria for survival are linked to residual insulin receptor function. It is also pointed out that, although type A insulin resistance appears to represent a somewhat less severe condition, these patients have a high morbidity and their treatment is still unsatisfactory.

  11. Arabidopsis RPT2a, 19S proteasome subunit, regulates gene silencing via DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Sako, Kaori; Maki, Yuko; Kanai, Tomoyuki; Kato, Eriko; Maekawa, Shugo; Yasuda, Shigetaka; Sato, Takeo; Watahiki, Masaaki K; Yamaguchi, Junji

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin/proteasome pathway plays a crucial role in many biological processes. Here we report a novel role for the Arabidopsis 19S proteasome subunit RPT2a in regulating gene activity at the transcriptional level via DNA methylation. Knockout mutation of the RPT2a gene did not alter global protein levels; however, the transcriptional activities of reporter transgenes were severely reduced compared to those in the wild type. This transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) was observed for transgenes under control of either the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter or the cold-inducible RD29A promoter. Bisulfite sequencing analysis revealed that both the transgene and endogenous RD29A promoter regions were hypermethylated at CG and non-CG contexts in the rpt2a mutant. Moreover, the TGS of transgenes driven by the CaMV 35S promoters was released by treatment with the DNA methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, but not by application of the inhibitor of histone deacetylase Trichostatin A. Genetic crosses with the DNA methyltransferase met1 single or drm1drm2cmt3 triple mutants also resulted in a release of CaMV 35S transgene TGS in the rpt2a mutant background. Increased methylation was also found at transposon sequences, suggesting that the 19S proteasome containing AtRPT2a negatively regulates TGS at transgenes and at specific endogenous genes through DNA methylation. PMID:22615900

  12. MicroRNA-16 is putatively involved in the NF-κB pathway regulation in ulcerative colitis through adenosine A2a receptor (A2aAR) mRNA targeting

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ting; Zhou, Yu; Feng, Xiao; Ye, Shicai; Wang, Hao; Wu, Weiyun; Tan, Wenkai; Yu, Caiyuan; Hu, Juxiang; Zheng, Rong; Chen, Zonghao; Pei, Xinyu; Luo, Hesheng

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) act as important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression by targeting the 3′-untranslated region of their target genes. Altered expression of miR-16 is reported in human ulcerative colitis (UC), but its role in the development of the disease remains unclear. Adenosine through adenosine A2a receptor (A2aAR) could inhibit nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) signaling pathway in inflammation. Here we identified overexpression of miR-16 and down-regulation of A2aAR in the colonic mucosa of active UC patients. We demonstrated that miR-16 negatively regulated the expression of the A2aAR at the post-transcriptional level. Furthermore, transfection of miR-16 mimics promoted nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 protein and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IFN-γ and IL-8 in colonic epithelial cells. Treatment with miR-16 inhibitor could reverse these effects in cells. The A2aAR-mediated effects of miR-16 on the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway were confirmed by the A2aAR knockdown assay. Our results suggest that miR-16 regulated the immune and inflammatory responses, at least in part, by suppressing the expression of the A2aAR to control the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:27476546

  13. Estrogen Receptor beta binds Sp1 and recruits a Corepressor Complex to the Estrogen Receptor alpha Gene Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Bartella, V; Rizza, P; Barone, I; Zito, D; Giordano, F; Giordano, C; Catalano, S; Mauro, L; Sisci, D; Panno, ML; Fuqua, SA; Andò, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    Human estrogen receptors (ERs) alpha and beta are crucially involved in the regulation of mammary growth and development. Normal breast tissues display a prevalently expression of ER beta than ER alpha, which drastically increases during breast tumorogenesis. So, it is reasonable to assume how a dysregulation of the two estrogen receptor subtypes may induce breast cancer development. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the opposite role played by the two estrogen receptors on tumor cell growth remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we have demonstrated that ER beta overexpression in breast cancer cells decreases cell proliferation and down-regulates ER alpha mRNA and protein content along with a concomitant repression of estrogen-regulated genes. Transient transfection experiments, using a vector containing the human ER alpha promoter region, showed that elevated levels of the ER beta down-regulated basal ER alpha promoter activity. Furthermore, side-directed mutagenesis and deletion analysis have revealed that the proximal GC-rich motifs at −223 and −214 is crucial for the ER beta-induced ER alpha down-regulation in breast cancer cells. This occurred through ER beta-Sp1 protein-protein interaction within the ER alpha promoter region and the recruitment of a corepressor complex containing NCoR/SMRT (nuclear receptor corepressor/silencing mediator of retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptor), accompanied by hypoacetylation of histone H4 and displacement of RNA polymerase II. Silencing of NCoR gene expression by RNA interference reversed the down-regulatory effect of ER beta on ER alpha gene expression and cell proliferation. Our results provide evidence for a novel mechanism by which overexpression of ER beta through NCoR is able to down regulate ER alpha gene expression, thus inhibiting ER alpha’s driving role on breast cancer cell growth. PMID:22622808

  14. Presynaptic facilitatory adenosine A2A receptors mediate fade induced by neuromuscular relaxants that exhibit anticholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Bornia, Elaine Cs; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo; Alves-Do-Prado, Wilson

    2011-03-01

    1. Pancuronium, cisatracurium and vecuronium are antinicotinic agents that, in contrast with d-tubocurarine and hexamethonium, exhibit anticholinesterase activity. Pancuronium-, cisatracurium- and vecuronium-induced fade results from blockade of facilitatory nicotinic receptors on motor nerves, but fade produced by such agents also depends on the presynaptic activation of inhibitory muscarinic M2 receptors by acetylcholine released from motor nerve terminals and activation of inhibitory adenosine A1 receptors by adenosine released from motor nerves and muscles. The participation of presynaptic facilitatory A2A receptors in fade caused by pancuronium, cisatracurium and vecuronium has not yet been investigated. In the present study, we determined the effects of ZM241385, an antagonist of presynaptic facilitatory A2A receptors, on fade produced by these neuromuscular relaxants in the rat phrenic nerve-diaphragm (PND) preparation. 2. The muscles were stimulated indirectly at 75±3Hz to induce a sustained tetanizing muscular contraction. The lowest concentration at which each antinicotinic agent produced fade without modifying initial tetanic tension (presynaptic action) was determined. 3. d-Tubocurarine-induced fade occurred only at 55 nmol/L, a concentration that also reduced maximal tetanic tension (post-synaptic action). At 10 nmol/L, ZM 241385 alone did not produce fade, but it did attenuate pancuronium (0.32 μmol/L)-, cisatracurium (0.32 μmol/L)- and vecuronium (0.36 μmol/L)-induced fade. 4. The fade induced by the 'pure' antinicotinic agents d-tubocurarine (55 nmol/L) and hexamethonium (413 μmol/L) was not altered by 10 nmol/L ZM 241385, indicating that presynaptic adenosine A2A receptors play a significant role in the fade produced by antinicotinic agents when such agents have anticholinesterase activity.

  15. [3H]SCH 58261, a selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, is a useful ligand in autoradiographic studies.

    PubMed

    Fredholm, B B; Lindström, K; Dionisotti, S; Ongini, E

    1998-03-01

    We have characterized the new potent and selective nonxanthine adenosine A2A receptor antagonist SCH 58261 as a new radioligand for receptor autoradiography. In autoradiographic studies using agonist radioligands for A2A receptors ([3H]CGS 21680) or A1 receptors (N6-[3H]cyclohexyladenosine), it was found that SCH 58261 is close to 800-fold selective for rat brain A2A versus A1 receptors (Ki values of 1.2 nM versus 0.8 microM). Moreover, receptor autoradiography showed that [3H]SCH 58261, in concentrations below 2 nM, binds only to the dopamine-rich regions of the rat brain, with a K(D) value of 1.4 (0.8-1.8) nM. The maximal number of binding sites was 310 fmol/mg of protein in the striatum. Below concentrations of 3 nM, the nonspecific binding was <15%. Three adenosine analogues displaced all specific binding of [3H] SCH 58261 with the following estimated Ki values (nM): 2-hex-1-ynyl-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine, 3.9 (1.8-8.4); CGS 21680, 130 (42-405); N6-cyclohexyladenosine, 9,985 (3,169-31,462). The binding of low concentrations of SCH 58261 was not influenced by either GTP (100 microM) or Mg2+ (10 mM). The present results show that in its tritium-labeled form, SCH 58261 appears to be a good radioligand for autoradiographic studies, because it does not suffer from some of the problems encountered with the currently used agonist radioligand [3H]CGS 21680.

  16. A common polymorphism in the LDL receptor gene has multiple effects on LDL receptor function.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Ihn, Hansel E; Medina, Marisa W; Krauss, Ronald M

    2013-04-01

    A common synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism in exon 12 of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene, rs688, has been associated with increased plasma total and LDL cholesterol in several populations. Using immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines from a healthy study population, we confirmed an earlier report that the minor allele of rs688 is associated with increased exon 12 alternative splicing (P < 0.05) and showed that this triggered nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) of the alternatively spliced LDLR mRNA. However, since synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms may influence structure and function of the encoded proteins by co-translational effects, we sought to test whether rs688 was also functional in the full-length mRNA. In HepG2 cells expressing LDLR cDNA constructs engineered to contain the major or minor allele of rs688, the latter was associated with a smaller amount of LDLR protein at the cell surface (-21.8 ± 0.6%, P = 0.012), a higher amount in the lysosome fraction (+25.7 ± 0.3%, P = 0.037) and reduced uptake of fluorescently labeled LDL (-24.3 ± 0.7%, P < 0.01). Moreover, in the presence of exogenous proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), a protein that reduces cellular LDL uptake by promoting lysosomal degradation of LDLR, the minor allele resulted in reduced capacity of a PCSK9 monoclonal antibody to increase LDL uptake. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that rs688, which is located in the β-propeller region of LDLR, has effects on LDLR activity beyond its role in alternative splicing due to impairment of LDLR endosomal recycling and/or PCSK9 binding, processes in which the β-propeller is critically involved.

  17. Scavenger receptor A gene regulatory elements target gene expression to macrophages and to foam cells of atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Horvai, A; Palinski, W; Wu, H; Moulton, K S; Kalla, K; Glass, C K

    1995-01-01

    Transcription of the macrophage scavenger receptor A gene is markedly upregulated during monocyte to macrophage differentiation. In these studies, we demonstrate that 291 bp of the proximal scavenger receptor promoter, in concert with a 400-bp upstream enhancer element, is sufficient to direct macrophage-specific expression of a human growth hormone reporter in transgenic mice. These regulatory elements, which contain binding sites for PU.1, AP-1, and cooperating ets-domain transcription factors, are also sufficient to mediate regulation of transgene expression during the in vitro differentiation of bone marrow progenitor cells in response to macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Mutation of the PU.1 binding site within the scavenger receptor promoter severely impairs transgene expression, consistent with a crucial role of PU.1 in regulating the expression of the scavenger receptor gene. The ability of the scavenger receptor promoter and enhancer to target gene expression to macrophages in vivo, including foam cells of atherosclerotic lesions, suggests that these regulatory elements will be of general utility in the study of macrophage differentiation and function by permitting specific modifications of macrophage gene expression. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7777517

  18. Thyroid hormones regulate phosphate homoeostasis through transcriptional control of the renal type IIa sodium-dependent phosphate co-transporter (Npt2a) gene.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Mariko; Yamamoto, Hironori; Masuda, Masashi; Kozai, Mina; Takei, Yuichiro; Tanaka, Sarasa; Sato, Tadatoshi; Segawa, Hiroko; Taketani, Yutaka; Arai, Hidekazu; Miyamoto, Ken-Ichi; Takeda, Eiji

    2010-03-15

    The type IIa renal sodium-dependent phosphate (Na/Pi) co-transporter Npt2a is implicated in the control of serum phosphate levels. It has been demonstrated previously that renal Npt2a protein and its mRNA expression are both up-regulated by the thyroid hormone T3 (3,3',5-tri-iodothyronine) in rats. However, it has never been established whether the induction was mediated by a direct effect of thyroid hormones on the Npt2a promoter. To address the role of Npt2a in T3-dependent regulation of phosphate homoeostasis and to identify the molecular mechanisms by which thyroid hormones modulate Npt2a gene expression, mice were rendered pharmacologically hypo- and hyper-thyroid. Hypothyroid mice showed low levels of serum phosphate and a marked decrease in renal Npt2a protein abundance. Importantly, we also showed that Npt2a-deficient mice had impaired serum phosphate responsiveness to T3 compared with wild-type mice. Promoter analysis with a luciferase assay revealed that the transcriptional activity of a reporter gene containing the Npt2a promoter and intron 1 was dependent upon TRs (thyroid hormone receptors) and specifically increased by T3 in renal cells. Deletion analysis and EMSAs (electrophoretic mobility-shift assays) determined that there were unique TREs (thyroid-hormone-responsive elements) within intron 1 of the Npt2a gene. These results suggest that Npt2a plays a critical role as a T3-target gene, to control phosphate homoeostasis, and that T3 transcriptionally activates the Npt2a gene via TRs in a renal cell-specific manner.

  19. Extraordinary diversity of chemosensory receptor gene repertoires among vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Shi, P; Zhang, J

    2009-01-01

    Chemosensation (smell and taste) is important to the survival and reproduction of vertebrates and is mediated by specific bindings of odorants, pheromones, and tastants by chemoreceptors that are encoded by several large gene families. This review summarizes recent comparative genomic and evolutionary studies of vertebrate chemoreceptor genes. It focuses on the remarkable diversity of chemoreceptor gene repertoires in terms of gene number and gene sequence across vertebrates and the evolutionary mechanisms that are responsible for generating this diversity. We argue that the great among-species variation of chemoreceptor gene repertoires is a result of adaptations of individual species to their environments and diets. PMID:19145414

  20. Ubiquitin specific protease 19 involved in transcriptional repression of retinoic acid receptor by stabilizing CORO2A

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Key-Hwan; Choi, Jong-Ho; Park, Jung-Hyun; Cho, Hyeon-Ju; Park, Jang-Joon; Lee, Eung-Ji; Li, Lan; Choi, Young-Kil; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Deubiquitination via deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) has been emerged as one of the important post-translational modifications, resulting in the regulation of numerous target proteins. In this study, we screened new protein biomarkers for adipogenesis, and related studies showed that ubiquitin specific protease 19 (USP19) as a DUB is gradually decreased during adipogenesis and it regulates coronin 2A (CORO2A) as one of the components for the nuclear receptor co-repressor (NCoR) complex in some studies. The regulation of CORO2A through the deubiquitinating activity of USP19 affected the transcriptional repression activity of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR), suggesting that USP19 may be involved in the regulation of RAR-mediated adipogenesis. PMID:27129179

  1. Identification of a null mutation in the human dopamine D4 receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Noethen, M.M.; Cichon, S.; Hebebrand, J.

    1994-09-01

    Dopamine receptors belong to the family of G protein-coupled receptors. Five different dopamine receptor genes have thus far been identified. These receptors are classified into two main subfamilies: D1, which includes the D1 and D5 receptors, and D2, which includes the D2, D3, and D4 receptors. The dopamine D4 receptor is of great interest for research into neuropsychiatric disorders and psychopharmacology in light of the fact that it binds the antipsychotic medication clozapine with higher affinity than does any other dopamine receptor. In addition, among the dopamine receptors, the D4 receptor shows a uniquely high degree of genetic variation in the human population. We identified a new 13 bp deletion in exon 1 of the D4 gene. This frameshift creates a terminator codon at amino acid position 98. mRNA isolated from brain tissue of two heterozygous persons showed both alleles to be expressed. The deletion occurs with a frequency of 2% in the German population. One person was identified to be homozygous for the deletion. Interestingly, he has a normal intelligence and did not exhibit a major psychiatric disorder as defined by DSM III-R. The 13 bp deletion is the first mutation resulting in premature translation termination reported for a dopamine receptor gene so far. This mutation is a good candidate to test for potential effects on disease and/or individual response to pharmacotherapy. Association studies in patients with various psychiatric illnesses and differences in response to clozapine are underway.

  2. Association of COL2A1 Gene Polymorphism with Degenerative Lumbar Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Dae Woo; Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Jung Youn; Kim, Dong Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Background Degenerative lumbar scoliosis (DLS) progresses with aging after 50-60 years, and the genetic association of DLS remains largely unclear. In this study, the genetic association between collagen type II alpha 1 (COL2A1) gene and DLS was investigated. Methods COL2A1 gene polymorphism was investigated in DLS subjects compared to healthy controls to investigate the possibility of its association with COL2A1 gene. Based on a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) database, SNP (rs2276454) in COL2A1 were selected and genotyped using direct sequencing in 51 patients with DLS and 235 healthy controls. The SNP effects were analyzed using three models of codominant, dominant, and recessive. Logistic regression models were calculated for odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and corresponding p-values, controlling age and gender as co-variables. Results SNP (rs2276454) in COL2A1 was significantly associated with the degenerative lumbar scoliosis in the codominant (OR, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.17 to 3.10; p = 0.008) and dominant models (OR, 3.58; 95% CI, 1.59 to 9.29; p = 0.001). Conclusions The results suggest that COL2A1 is associated with the risk of DLS in Korean population. PMID:25436060

  3. The Association of Polymorphisms in Leptin/Leptin Receptor Genes and Ghrelin/Ghrelin Receptor Genes With Overweight/Obesity and the Related Metabolic Disturbances: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ghalandari, Hamid; Hosseini-Esfahani, Firoozeh; Mirmiran, Parvin

    2015-01-01

    Context: Leptin and ghrelin are two important appetite and energy balance-regulating peptides. Common polymorphisms in the genes coding these peptides and their related receptors are shown to be associated with body weight, different markers of obesity and metabolic abnormalities. This review article aims to investigate the association of common polymorphisms of these genes with overweight/obesity and the metabolic disturbances related to it. Evidence Acquisition: The keywords leptin, ghrelin, polymorphism, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), obesity, overweight, Body Mass Index, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) (MeSH headings) were used to search in the following databases: Pubmed, Sciencedirect (Elsevier), and Google scholar. Overall, 24 case-control studies, relevant to our topic, met the criteria and were included in the review. Results: The most prevalent leptin/leptin receptor genes (LEP/LEPR) and ghrelin/ghrelin receptor genes (GHRL/GHSR) single nucleotide polymorphisms studied were LEP G-2548A, LEPR Q223R, and Leu72Met, respectively. Nine studies of the 17 studies on LEP/LEPR, and three studies of the seven studies on GHRL/GHSR showed significant relationships. Conclusions: In general, our study suggests that the association between LEP/LEPR and GHRL/GHSR with overweight/obesity and the related metabolic disturbances is inconclusive. These results may be due to unidentified gene-environment interactions. More investigations are needed to further clarify this association. PMID:26425125

  4. Identification of Gene Markers for Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Pregnane X Receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many environmentally-relevant chemicals and drugs activate the nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR). Activation of PXR in the mouse liver can lead to increases in liver weight in part through increased hepatocyte replication similar to chemicals that activate other nuclear ...

  5. Nuclear receptors for retinoic acid and thyroid hormone regulate transcription of keratin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Tomic, M; Jiang, C K; Epstein, H S; Freedberg, I M; Samuels, H H; Blumenberg, M

    1990-01-01

    In the epidermis, retinoids regulate the expression of keratins, the intermediate filament proteins of epithelial cells. We have cloned the 5' regulatory regions of four human epidermal keratin genes, K#5, K#6, K#10, and K#14, and engineered constructs in which these regions drive the expression of the CAT reporter gene. By co-transfecting the constructs into epithelial cells along with the vectors expressing nuclear receptors for retinoic acid (RA) and thyroid hormone, we have demonstrated that the receptors can suppress the promoters of keratin genes. The suppression is ligand dependent; it is evident both in established cell lines and in primary cultures of epithelial cells. The three RA receptors have similar effects on keratin gene transcription. Our data indicate that the nuclear receptors for RA and thyroid hormone regulate keratin synthesis by binding to negative recognition elements in the upstream DNA sequences of the keratin genes. RA thus has a twofold effect on epidermal keratin expression: qualitatively, it regulates the regulators that effect the switch from basal cell-specific keratins to differentiation-specific ones; and quantitatively, it determines the level of keratin synthesis within the cell by direct interaction of its receptors with the keratin gene promoters. Images PMID:1712634

  6. Alternative splicing, a new target to block cellular gene expression by poliovirus 2A protease

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Enrique; Castello, Alfredo; Carrasco, Luis; Izquierdo, Jose M.

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} Novel role for poliovirus 2A protease as splicing modulator. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease inhibits the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease blocks the second catalytic step of splicing. -- Abstract: Viruses have developed multiple strategies to interfere with the gene expression of host cells at different stages to ensure their own survival. Here we report a new role for poliovirus 2A{sup pro} modulating the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. Expression of 2A{sup pro} potently inhibits splicing of reporter genes in HeLa cells. Low amounts of 2A{sup pro} abrogate Fas exon 6 skipping, whereas higher levels of protease fully abolish Fas and FGFR2 splicing. In vitro splicing of MINX mRNA using nuclear extracts is also strongly inhibited by 2A{sup pro}, leading to accumulation of the first exon and the lariat product containing the unspliced second exon. These findings reveal that the mechanism of action of 2A{sup pro} on splicing is to selectively block the second catalytic step.

  7. Elevated Resistin Gene Expression in African American Estrogen and Progesterone Receptor Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vallega, Karin A.; Liu, NingNing; Myers, Jennifer S.; Yu, Kaixian; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction African American (AA) women diagnosed with breast cancer are more likely to have aggressive subtypes. Investigating differentially expressed genes between patient populations may help explain racial health disparities. Resistin, one such gene, is linked to inflammation, obesity, and breast cancer risk. Previous studies indicated that resistin expression is higher in serum and tissue of AA breast cancer patients compared to Caucasian American (CA) patients. However, resistin expression levels have not been compared between AA and CA patients in a stage- and subtype-specific context. Breast cancer prognosis and treatments vary by subtype. This work investigates differential resistin gene expression in human breast cancer tissues of specific stages, receptor subtypes, and menopause statuses in AA and CA women. Methods Differential gene expression analysis was performed using human breast cancer gene expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. We performed inter-race resistin gene expression level comparisons looking at receptor status and stage-specific data between AA and CA samples. DESeq was run to test for differentially expressed resistin values. Results Resistin RNA was higher in AA women overall, with highest values in receptor negative subtypes. Estrogen-, progesterone-, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2- negative groups showed statistically significant elevated resistin levels in Stage I and II AA women compared to CA women. In inter-racial comparisons, AA women had significantly higher levels of resistin regardless of menopause status. In whole population comparisons, resistin expression was higher among Stage I and III estrogen receptor negative cases. In comparisons of molecular subtypes, resistin levels were significant higher in triple negative than in luminal A breast cancer. Conclusion Resistin gene expression levels were significantly higher in receptor negative subtypes, especially estrogen receptor negative cases in AA

  8. Cytochrome P450 2A5 and bilirubin: Mechanisms of gene regulation and cytoprotection

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sangsoo Daniel; Antenos, Monica; Squires, E. James; Kirby, Gordon M.

    2013-07-15

    Bilirubin (BR) has recently been identified as the first endogenous substrate for cytochrome P450 2A5 (CYP2A5) and it has been suggested that CYP2A5 plays a major role in BR clearance as an alternative mechanism to BR conjugation by uridine-diphosphate glucuronyltransferase 1A1. This study investigated the mechanisms of Cyp2a5 gene regulation by BR and the cytoprotective role of CYP2A5 in BR hepatotoxicity. BR induced CYP2A5 expression at the mRNA and protein levels in a dose-dependent manner in primary mouse hepatocytes. BR treatment also caused nuclear translocation of Nuclear factor-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in hepatocytes. In reporter assays, BR treatment of primary hepatocytes transfected with a Cyp2a5 promoter-luciferase reporter construct resulted in a 2-fold induction of Cyp2a5 reporter activity. Furthermore, cotransfection of the hepatocytes with a Nrf2 expression vector without BR treatment resulted in an increase in Cyp2a5 reporter activity of approximately 2-fold and BR treatment of Nrf2 cotransfectants further increased reporter activity by 4-fold. In addition, site-directed mutation of the ARE in the reporter construct completely abolished both the BR- and Nrf2-mediated increases in reporter activity. The cytoprotective role of CYP2A5 against BR-mediated apoptosis was also examined in Hepa 1–6 cells that lack endogenous CYP2A5. Transient overexpression of CYP2A5 partially blocked BR-induced caspase-3 cleavage in Hepa 1–6 cells. Furthermore, in vitro degradation of BR was increased by microsomes from Hepa 1–6 cells overexpressing CYP2A5 compared to control cells transfected with an empty vector. Collectively, these results suggest that Nrf2-mediated CYP2A5 transactivation in response to BR may provide an additional mechanism for adaptive cytoprotection against BR hepatotoxicity. - Highlights: • The mechanism of Cyp2a5 gene regulation by BR was investigated. • The cytoprotective role of CYP2A5 in BR hepatotoxicity was determined. • BR

  9. Comprehensive Gene Expression Analysis of Rice Aleurone Cells: Probing the Existence of an Alternative Gibberellin Receptor1

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Kenji; Aya, Koichiro; Hirano, Ko; Ordonio, Reynante Lacsamana; Ueguchi-Tanaka, Miyako; Matsuoka, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Current gibberellin (GA) research indicates that GA must be perceived in plant nuclei by its cognate receptor, GIBBERELLIN INSENSITIVE DWARF1 (GID1). Recognition of GA by GID1 relieves the repression mediated by the DELLA protein, a model known as the GID1-DELLA GA perception system. There have been reports of potential GA-binding proteins in the plasma membrane that perceive GA and induce α-amylase expression in cereal aleurone cells, which is mechanistically different from the GID1-DELLA system. Therefore, we examined the expression of the rice (Oryza sativa) α-amylase genes in rice mutants impaired in the GA receptor (gid1) and the DELLA repressor (slender rice1; slr1) and confirmed their lack of response to GA in gid1 mutants and constitutive expression in slr1 mutants. We also examined the expression of GA-regulated genes by genome-wide microarray and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses and confirmed that all GA-regulated genes are modulated by the GID1-DELLA system. Furthermore, we studied the regulatory network involved in GA signaling by using a set of mutants defective in genes involved in GA perception and gene expression, namely gid1, slr1, gid2 (a GA-related F-box protein mutant), and gamyb (a GA-related trans-acting factor mutant). Almost all GA up-regulated genes were regulated by the four named GA-signaling components. On the other hand, GA down-regulated genes showed different expression patterns with respect to GID2 and GAMYB (e.g. a considerable number of genes are not controlled by GAMYB or GID2 and GAMYB). Based on these observations, we present a comprehensive discussion of the intricate network of GA-regulated genes in rice aleurone cells. PMID:25511432

  10. Arginine vasotocin, isotocin and nonapeptide receptor gene expression link to social status and aggression in sex-dependent patterns.

    PubMed

    Lema, S C; Sanders, K E; Walti, K A

    2015-02-01

    Nonapeptide hormones of the vasopressin/oxytocin family regulate social behaviours. In mammals and birds, variation in behaviour also is linked to expression patterns of the V1a-type receptor and the oxytocin/mesotocin receptor in the brain. Genome duplications, however, expand the diversity of nonapeptide receptors in actinopterygian fishes, and two distinct V1a-type receptors (v1a1 and v1a2) for vasotocin, as well as at least two V2-type receptors (v2a and v2b), have been identified in these taxa. The present study investigates how aggression connected to social status relates to the abundance patterns of gene transcripts encoding four vasotocin receptors, an isotocin receptor (itr), pro-vasotocin (proVT) and pro-isotocin (proIT) in the brain of the pupfish Cyprinodon nevadensis amargosae. Sexually-mature pupfish were maintained in mixed-sex social groups and assessed for individual variation in aggressive behaviours. Males in these groups behaved more aggressively than females, and larger fish exhibited higher aggression relative to smaller fish of the same sex. Hypothalamic proVT transcript abundance was elevated in dominant males compared to subordinate males, and correlated positively with individual variation in aggression in both social classes. Transcripts encoding vasotocin receptor v1a1 were at higher levels in the telencephalon and hypothalamus of socially subordinate males than dominant males. Dominant males exhibited elevated hypothalamic v1a2 receptor transcript abundance relative to subordinate males and females, and telencephalic v1a2 mRNA abundance in dominant males was also associated positively with individual aggressiveness. Transcripts in the telencephalon encoding itr were elevated in females relative to males, and both telencephalic proIT and hypothalamic itr transcript abundance varied with female social status. Taken together, these data link hypothalamic proVT expression to aggression and implicate forebrain expression of the V1a

  11. Multimodality Imaging of Gene Transfer with a Receptor-Based Reporter Gene

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ron; Parry, Jesse J.; Akers, Walter J.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.; El Naqa, Issam M.; Achilefu, Samuel; Edwards, W. Barry; Rogers, Buck E.

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy trials have traditionally used tumor and tissue biopsies for assessing the efficacy of gene transfer. Non-invasive imaging techniques offer a distinct advantage over tissue biopsies in that the magnitude and duration of gene transfer can be monitored repeatedly. Human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) has been used for the nuclear imaging of gene transfer. To extend this concept, we have developed a somatostatin receptor–enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion construct (SSTR2-EGFP) for nuclear and fluorescent multimodality imaging. Methods An adenovirus containing SSTR2-EGFP (AdSSTR2-EGFP) was constructed and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. SCC-9 human squamous cell carcinoma cells were infected with AdEGFP, AdSSTR2, or AdSSTR2-EGFP for in vitro evaluation by saturation binding, internalization, and fluorescence spectroscopy assays. In vivo biodistribution and nano-SPECT imaging studies were conducted with mice bearing SCC-9 tumor xenografts directly injected with AdSSTR2-EGFP or AdSSTR2 to determine the tumor localization of 111In-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-Tyr3-octreotate. Fluorescence imaging was conducted in vivo with mice receiving intratumoral injections of AdSSTR2, AdSSTR2-EGFP, or AdEGFP as well as ex vivo with tissues extracted from mice. Results The similarity between AdSSTR2-EGFP and wild-type AdSSTR2 was demonstrated in vitro by the saturation binding and internalization assays, and the fluorescence emission spectra of cells infected with AdSSTR2-EGFP was almost identical to the spectra of cells infected with wild-type AdEGFP. Biodistribution studies demonstrated that the tumor uptake of 111In-DTPA-Tyr3-octreotate was not significantly different (P > 0.05) when tumors (n = 5) were injected with AdSSTR2 or AdSSTR2-EGFP but was significantly greater than the uptake in control tumors. Fluorescence was observed in tumors injected with AdSSTR2-EGFP and AdEGFP in vivo and ex vivo but not in tumors injected with AdSSTR2

  12. Functional expression of adenosine A2A and A3 receptors in the mouse dendritic cell line XS-106.

    PubMed

    Dickenson, John M; Reeder, Steve; Rees, Bob; Alexander, Steve; Kendall, Dave

    2003-08-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that adenosine receptors can modulate the function of cells involved in the immune system. For example, human dendritic cells derived from blood monocytes have recently been described to express functional adenosine A1, A2A and A3 receptors. Therefore, in the present study, we have investigated whether the recently established murine dendritic cell line XS-106 expresses functional adenosine receptors. The selective adenosine A3 receptor agonist 1-[2-chloro-6[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-1-deoxy-N-methyl-beta-D-ribofuranuronamide (2-Cl-IB-MECA) inhibited forskolin-mediated [3H]cyclic AMP accumulation and stimulated concentration-dependent increases in p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation. The selective adenosine A2A receptor agonist 4-[2-[[-6-amino-9-(N-ethyl-beta-D-ribofuranuronamidosyl)-9H-purin-2-yl]amino]ethyl]benzene-propanoic acid (CGS 21680) stimulated a robust increase in [3H]cyclic AMP accumulation and p42/p44 MAPK phosphorylation. In contrast, the selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist CPA (N6-cyclopentyladenosine) did not inhibit forskolin-mediated [3H]cyclic AMP accumulation or stimulate increases in p42/p44 MAPK phosphorylation. These observations suggest that XS-106 cells express functional adenosine A2A and A3 receptors. The non-selective adenosine receptor agonist 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) release from XS-106 cells in a concentration-dependent fashion. Furthermore, treatment with Cl-IB-MECA (1 microM) or CGS 21680 (1 microM) alone produced a partial inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-alpha release (when compared to NECA), whereas a combination of both agonists resulted in the inhibition of TNF-alpha release comparable to that observed with NECA alone. Treatment of cells with the adenosine A2A receptor selective antagonists 4-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a

  13. SERCA2a gene therapy can improve symptomatic heart failure in δ-sarcoglycan-deficient animals.

    PubMed

    Bouyon, Sophie; Roussel, Véronique; Fromes, Yves

    2014-08-01

    The loss of dystrophin or its associated proteins results in the development of muscle wasting frequently associated with cardiomyopathy. Contractile cardiac tissue is injured and replaced by fibrous tissue or fatty infiltrates, leading to a progressive decrease of the contractile force and finally to end-stage heart failure. At the time symptoms appear, restoration of a functional allele of the causative gene might not be sufficient to prevent disease progression. Alterations in Ca(2+) transport and intracellular calcium levels have been implicated in many types of pathological processes, especially in heart disease. On the basis of a gene transfer strategy, we analyzed the therapeutic efficacy of primary gene correction in a δ-sarcoglycan (δ-SG)-deficient animal model versus gene transfer of the Ca(2+) pump hSERCA2a (human sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2a), at a symptomatic stage of heart disease. Our results strongly suggest that restoration of δ-SG at this stage of disease will not lead to improved clinical outcome. However, restoration of proper Ca(2+) handling by means of amplifying SERCA2a expression in the myocardium can lead to functional improvement. Abnormalities in Ca(2+) handling play an important role in disease progression toward heart failure, and increased SERCA2a levels appear to significantly improve cardiac contraction and relaxation. Beneficial effects persist at least over a period of 6 months, and the evolution of cardiac functional parameters paralleled those of normal controls. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a plasmid formulation based on amphiphilic block copolymers can provide a safe and efficient platform for myocardial gene therapies. The use of synthetic formulations for myocardial gene transfer might thus overcome one of the major hurdles linked to viral vectors, that is, repeat administrations.

  14. Adenosine A2A-receptor blockade abolishes the roll-off respiratory response to hypoxia in awake lambs.

    PubMed

    Koos, Brian J; Kawasaki, Yoshikazu; Kim, Young-Han; Bohorquez, Fanor

    2005-05-01

    Adenosine (ADO) receptor antagonists (aminophylline, caffeine) blunt the respiratory roll-off response to hypoxia in the newborn. This study was designed to determine the ADO receptor subtype involved in the respiratory depression. Chronically catheterized lambs of 7-16 days of age breathed via face mask a gas mixture with a fraction of inspired O2 of 0.21 (normoxia) or 0.07 (hypoxia), while being infused intravascularly with 9-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX; ADO A1-receptor antagonist, n=8), ZM-241385 (ADO A2A-receptor antagonist, n=7), or vehicle. Ventilation was measured at 20 degrees C by a turbine transducer flowmeter. In normoxia [arterial Po2 (PaO2) of approximately 83 Torr], infusion of vehicle did not alter cardiorespiratory measurements, whereas hypoxia (PaO2 of approximately 31 Torr, 15 min) elicited biphasic effects on mean arterial pressure (transient increase), heart rate (HR; diminishing tachycardia), and minute ventilation. In the latter, hypoxia increased ventilation to a peak value of approximately 2.5 times control within the first 3 min, which was followed by a significant (P<0.05) decline to approximately 50% of the maximum increment over the subsequent 7 min. ZM-241385 abolished the hypoxic ventilatory roll-off and blunted the rate of rise in HR without affecting mean arterial pressure or rectal temperature responses. In normoxia, DPCPX increased ventilation and mean arterial pressure but did not change HR. Compared with vehicle, DPCPX did not significantly affect cardiorespiratory responses to hypoxemia (PaO2 of approximately 31 Torr, 10 min). It is concluded that 1) ADO A2A receptors are critically involved in the ventilatory roll-off and HR responses to hypoxia, and 2) ADO A1 receptors, which are tonically active in cardiorespiratory control in normoxia, appear to have little impact on hypoxic ventilatory depression.

  15. PET/CT imaging of human somatostatin receptor 2 (hsstr2) as reporter gene for gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, M.; Gazdhar, A.; Weitzel, T.; Schmid, R.; Krause, T.

    2006-12-01

    Localized information on region-selective gene expression in small animals is widely obtained by use of reporter genes inducing light emission. Using these reporter genes for imaging deep inside the human body fluorescent probes are hindered by attenuation, scattering and possible fluorescence quenching. This can be overcome by use of radio-peptide receptors as reporter genes. Therefore, the feasibility of the somatostatin receptor 2 expression vector system for expression imaging was checked against a control vector containing luciferase gene. For in vivo transduction of vector DNA into the rat forelimb muscles the in vivo electroporation technique was chosen because of its high regio-selectivity. The gene expression was imaged by high-sensitive CCD camera (luciferase activity) and by PET/CT using a Ga-68-DOTATOC as radio peptide probe. The relative sstr2 expression was enhanced by gene transduction at maximum to a factor of 15. The PET/CT images could be fully quantified. The above demonstrated feasibility of radio-peptide PET/CT reporter gene imaging may serve in the future as a tool for full quantitative understanding of regional gene expression, especially in large animals and humans.

  16. Behavioral tolerance to lysergic acid diethylamide is associated with reduced serotonin-2A receptor signaling in rat cortex.

    PubMed

    Gresch, Paul J; Smith, Randy L; Barrett, Robert J; Sanders-Bush, Elaine

    2005-09-01

    Tolerance is defined as a decrease in responsiveness to a drug after repeated administration. Tolerance to the behavioral effects of hallucinogens occurs in humans and animals. In this study, we used drug discrimination to establish a behavioral model of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) tolerance and examined whether tolerance to the stimulus properties of LSD is related to altered serotonin receptor signaling. Rats were trained to discriminate 60 microg/kg LSD from saline in a two-lever drug discrimination paradigm. Two groups of animals were assigned to either chronic saline treatment or chronic LSD treatment. For chronic treatment, rats from each group were injected once per day with either 130 microg/kg LSD or saline for 5 days. Rats were tested for their ability to discriminate either saline or 60 microg/kg LSD, 24 h after the last chronic injection. Rats receiving chronic LSD showed a 44% reduction in LSD lever selection, while rats receiving chronic vehicle showed no change in percent choice on the LSD lever. In another group of rats receiving the identical chronic LSD treatment, LSD-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding, an index of G-protein coupling, was measured in the rat brain by autoradiography. After chronic LSD, a significant reduction in LSD-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding was observed in the medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex. Furthermore, chronic LSD produced a significant reduction in 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding in medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex, which was blocked by MDL 100907, a selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, but not SB206553, a 5-HT2C receptor antagonist, indicating a reduction in 5-HT2A receptor signaling. 125I-LSD binding to 5-HT2A receptors was reduced in cortical regions, demonstrating a reduction in 5-HT2A receptor density. Taken together, these results indicate that adaptive changes in LSD-stimulated serotonin receptor signaling may mediate tolerance

  17. The transcription factor Spi-B regulates human plasmacytoid dendritic cell survival through direct induction of the antiapoptotic gene BCL2-A1.

    PubMed

    Karrich, Julien J; Balzarolo, Melania; Schmidlin, Heike; Libouban, Marion; Nagasawa, Maho; Gentek, Rebecca; Kamihira, Shimeru; Maeda, Takahiro; Amsen, Derk; Wolkers, Monika C; Blom, Bianca

    2012-05-31

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) selectively express Toll-like receptor (TLR)-7 and TLR-9, which allow them to rapidly secrete massive amounts of type I interferons after sensing nucleic acids derived from viruses or bacteria. It is not completely understood how development and function of pDCs are controlled at the transcriptional level. One of the main factors driving pDC development is the ETS factor Spi-B, but little is known about its target genes. Here we demonstrate that Spi-B is crucial for the differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells into pDCs by controlling survival of pDCs and its progenitors. In search for Spi-B target genes, we identified the antiapoptotic gene Bcl2-A1 as a specific and direct target gene, thereby consolidating the critical role of Spi-B in cell survival.

  18. Presynaptic NR2A-containing NMDA receptors implement a high-pass filter synaptic plasticity rule.

    PubMed

    Bidoret, Céline; Ayon, Annick; Barbour, Boris; Casado, Mariano

    2009-08-18

    The detailed characterization of synaptic plasticity has led to the replacement of simple Hebbian rules by more complex rules depending on the order of presynaptic and postsynaptic action potentials. Here, we describe a mechanism endowing a plasticity rule with additional computational complexity--a dependence on the pattern of presynaptic action potentials. The classical Hebbian rule is based on detection of conjunctive presynaptic and postsynaptic activity by postsynaptic NMDA receptors, but there is also accumulating evidence for the existence of presynaptic NMDA receptors in several brain structures. Here, we examine the role of presynaptic NMDA receptors in defining the temporal structure of the plasticity rule governing induction of long-term depression (LTD) at the cerebellar parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse. We show that multiple presynaptic action potentials at frequencies between 40 Hz and 1 kHz are necessary for LTD induction. We characterize the subtype, kinetics, and role of presynaptic NMDA receptors involved in the induction of LTD, showing how the kinetics of the NR2A subunits expressed by parallel fibers implement a high-pass filter plasticity rule that will selectively attenuate synapses undergoing high-frequency bursts of activity. Depending on the type of NMDA receptor subunit expressed, high-pass filters of different corner frequencies could be implemented at other synapses expressing NMDA autoreceptors.

  19. Molecular Characterization of the Aphis gossypii Olfactory Receptor Gene Families

    PubMed Central

    Walker, William B.; Li, Jianhong; Wang, Guirong

    2014-01-01

    The cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover, is a polyphagous pest that inflicts great damage to cotton yields worldwide. Antennal olfaction, which is extremely important for insect survival, mediates key behaviors such as host preference, mate choice, and oviposition site selection. In insects, odor detection is mediated by odorant receptors (ORs) and ionotropic receptors (IRs), which ensure the specificity of the olfactory sensory neuron responses. In this study, our aim is to identify chemosensory receptors in the cotton aphid genome, as a means to uncover olfactory encoding of the polyphagous feeding habits as well as to aid the discovery of new targets for behavioral interference. We identified a total of 45 candidate ORs and 14 IRs in the cotton aphid genome. Among the candidate AgoORs, 9 are apparent pseudogenes, while 19 can be clustered with ORs from the pea aphid, forming 16 AgoOR/ApOR orthologous subgroups. Among the candidate IRs, we identified homologs of the two highly conserved co-receptors IR8a and IR25a; no AgoIR retain the complete glutamic acid binding domain, suggesting that putative AgoIRs bind different ligands. Our results provide the necessary information for functional characterization of the chemosensory receptors of A. gossypii, with potential for new or refined applications of semiochemicals-based control of this pest insect. PMID:24971460

  20. Molecular characterization of the Aphis gossypii olfactory receptor gene families.

    PubMed

    Cao, Depan; Liu, Yang; Walker, William B; Li, Jianhong; Wang, Guirong

    2014-01-01

    The cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover, is a polyphagous pest that inflicts great damage to cotton yields worldwide. Antennal olfaction, which is extremely important for insect survival, mediates key behaviors such as host preference, mate choice, and oviposition site selection. In insects, odor detection is mediated by odorant receptors (ORs) and ionotropic receptors (IRs), which ensure the specificity of the olfactory sensory neuron responses. In this study, our aim is to identify chemosensory receptors in the cotton aphid genome, as a means to uncover olfactory encoding of the polyphagous feeding habits as well as to aid the discovery of new targets for behavioral interference. We identified a total of 45 candidate ORs and 14 IRs in the cotton aphid genome. Among the candidate AgoORs, 9 are apparent pseudogenes, while 19 can be clustered with ORs from the pea aphid, forming 16 AgoOR/ApOR orthologous subgroups. Among the candidate IRs, we identified homologs of the two highly conserved co-receptors IR8a and IR25a; no AgoIR retain the complete glutamic acid binding domain, suggesting that putative AgoIRs bind different ligands. Our results provide the necessary information for functional characterization of the chemosensory receptors of A. gossypii, with potential for new or refined applications of semiochemicals-based control of this pest insect. PMID:24971460

  1. Chx10 Consolidates V2a Interneuron Identity through Two Distinct Gene Repression Modes.

    PubMed

    Clovis, Yoanne M; Seo, So Yeon; Kwon, Ji-Sun; Rhee, Jennifer C; Yeo, Sujeong; Lee, Jae W; Lee, Seunghee; Lee, Soo-Kyung

    2016-08-01

    During development, two cell types born from closely related progenitor pools often express identical transcriptional regulators despite their completely distinct characteristics. This phenomenon implies the need for a mechanism that operates to segregate the identities of the two cell types throughout differentiation after initial fate commitment. To understand this mechanism, we investigated the fate specification of spinal V2a interneurons, which share important developmental genes with motor neurons (MNs). We demonstrate that the paired homeodomain factor Chx10 functions as a critical determinant for V2a fate and is required to consolidate V2a identity in postmitotic neurons. Chx10 actively promotes V2a fate, downstream of the LIM-homeodomain factor Lhx3, while concomitantly suppressing the MN developmental program by preventing the MN-specific transcription complex from binding and activating MN genes. This dual activity enables Chx10 to effectively separate the V2a and MN pathways. Our study uncovers a widely applicable gene regulatory principle for segregating related cell fates. PMID:27477290

  2. Arabidopsis meiotic crossover hotspots overlap with H2A.Z nucleosomes at gene promoters

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyuha; Zhao, Xiaohui; Kelly, Krystyna A.; Venn, Oliver; Higgins, James D.; Yelina, Nataliya E.; Hardcastle, Thomas J.; Ziolkowski, Piotr A.; Copenhaver, Gregory P.; Franklin, F. Chris H.; McVean, Gil; Henderson, Ian R.

    2013-01-01

    PRDM9 directs human meiotic crossover hotspots to intergenic sequence motifs, whereas budding yeast hotspots overlap low nucleosome density regions in gene promoters. To investigate hotspots in plants, which lack PRDM9, we used coalescent analysis of Arabidopsis genetic variation. Crossovers increase towards gene promoters and terminators, and hotspots are associated with active chromatin modifications, including H2A.Z, histone H3K4me3, low nucleosome density and low DNA methylation. Hotspot-enriched A-rich and CTT-repeat DNA motifs occur upstream and downstream of transcriptional start respectively. Crossovers are asymmetric around promoters and highest over CTT-motifs and H2A.Z-nucleosomes. Pollen-typing, segregation and cytogenetic analysis show decreased crossovers in the arp6 H2A.Z deposition mutant, at multiple scales. During meiosis H2A.Z and DMC1/RAD51 recombinases form overlapping chromosomal foci. As arp6 reduces DMC1/RAD51 foci, H2A.Z may promote formation or processing of meiotic DNA double-strand breaks. We propose that gene chromatin ancestrally designates hotspots within eukaryotes and PRDM9 is a derived state within vertebrates. PMID:24056716

  3. Discovering the mechanisms underlying serotonin (5-HT)2A and 5-HT2C receptor regulation following nicotine withdrawal in rats.

    PubMed

    Zaniewska, Magdalena; Alenina, Natalia; Wydra, Karolina; Fröhler, Sebastian; Kuśmider, Maciej; McCreary, Andrew C; Chen, Wei; Bader, Michael; Filip, Małgorzata

    2015-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that nicotine withdrawal produces depression-like behavior and that serotonin (5-HT)2A/2C receptor ligands modulate that mood-like state. In the present study we aimed to identify the mechanisms (changes in radioligand binding, transcription or RNA-editing) related to such a behavioral outcome. Rats received vehicle or nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, s.c.) for 5 days in home cages. Brain 5-HT2A/2C receptors were analyzed on day 3 of nicotine withdrawal. Nicotine withdrawal increased [(3)H]ketanserin binding to 5-HT2A receptors in the ventral tegmental area and ventral dentate gyrus, yet decreased binding in the nucleus accumbens shell. Reduction in [(3)H]mesulergine binding to 5-HT2C receptors was seen in the ventral dentate gyrus. Profound decrease in the 5-HT2A receptor transcript level was noted in the hippocampus and ventral tegmental area. Out of five 5-HT2C receptor mRNA editing sites, deep sequencing data showed a reduction in editing at the E site and a trend toward reduction at the C site in the hippocampus. In the ventral tegmental area, a reduction for the frequency of CD 5-HT2C receptor transcript was seen. These results show that the reduction in the 5-HT2A receptor transcript level may be an auto-regulatory response to the increased receptor density in the hippocampus and ventral tegmental area during nicotine withdrawal, while decreased 5-HT2C receptor mRNA editing may explain the reduction in receptor labeling in the hippocampus. Serotonin (5-HT)2A/2C receptor ligands alleviate depression-like state in nicotine-withdrawn rats. Here, we show that the reduction in 5-HT2A receptor transcript level may be an auto-regulatory response to the increased receptor number in the hippocampus and ventral tegmental area during nicotine withdrawal, while attenuated 5-HT2C receptor mRNA editing in the hippocampus might explain reduced inverse agonist binding to 5-HT2C receptor and suggest a shift toward a population of more active receptors. 5

  4. A novel mutation of the luteinizing hormone receptor gene causing male gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty.

    PubMed

    Latronico, A C; Anasti, J; Arnhold, I J; Mendonça, B B; Domenice, S; Albano, M C; Zachman, K; Wajchenberg, B L; Tsigos, C

    1995-08-01

    Familial male-limited precocious puberty (FMPP) is an autosomal dominant gonadotropin-independent disorder. Affected males generally develop signs of precocious puberty in early childhood. They typically show Leydig cell hyperplasia and increased testosterone production typical for their age, whereas circulating LH concentrations remain prepubertal. Several dominant point mutations of the LH receptor gene were identified in pedigrees with familial male-limited precocious puberty and were shown to cosegregate with the disease. Here we report a novel heterozygote point mutation in the LH receptor gene of a Brazilian boy with gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty. This mutation substitutes alanine 568 with valine at the carboxyterminus of the third cytosolic loop of the LH receptor. The unoccupied mutant receptors confer constitutive activation of adenyl cyclase activity when expressed in COS-7 cells, resulting in 4-fold higher cAMP concentrations over baseline compared with cells expressing an equivalent number of wild-type receptors. The affinity of the mutant receptors to 125I-labeled human LH was not altered compared with the wild type. Mutations of the homologue alanine residue in the alpha 1-adrenergic (in vitro), FSH (in vitro), and TSH (naturally occurring) receptors also result in constitutive adenyl cyclase activation, suggesting that this alanine residue is crucial for signal transduction and a potential site for upregulatory/oncogenic mutations in G-protein coupled receptors. PMID:7629248

  5. [60]Fullerene derivative modulates adenosine and metabotropic glutamate receptors gene expression: a possible protective effect against hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Glutamate, the main excitatory neurotransmitter, is involved in learning and memory processes but at higher concentration results excitotoxic causing degeneration and neuronal death. Adenosine is a nucleoside that exhibit neuroprotective effects by modulating of glutamate release. Hypoxic and related oxidative conditions, in which adenosine and metabotropic glutamate receptors are involved, have been demonstrated to contribute to neurodegenerative processes occurring in certain human pathologies. Results Human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) were used to evaluate the long time (24, 48 and 72 hours) effects of a [60]fullerene hydrosoluble derivative (t3ss) as potential inhibitor of hypoxic insult. Low oxygen concentration (5% O2) caused cell death, which was avoided by t3ss exposure in a concentration dependent manner. In addition, gene expression analysis by real time PCR of adenosine A1, A2A and A2B and metabotropic glutamate 1 and 5 receptors revealed that t3ss significantly increased A1 and mGlu1 expression in hypoxic conditions. Moreover, t3ss prevented the hypoxia-induced increase in A2A mRNA expression. Conclusions As t3ss causes overexpression of adenosine A1 and metabotropic glutamate receptors which have been shown to be neuroprotective, our results point to a radical scavenger protective effect of t3ss through the enhancement of these neuroprotective receptors expression. Therefore, the utility of these nanoparticles as therapeutic target to avoid degeneration and cell death of neurodegenerative diseases is suggested. PMID:25123848

  6. Delineation of gastric cancer subtypes by co-regulated expression of receptor tyrosine kinases and chemosensitivity genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu-Chun; Ma, Rong; Wu, Jian-Zhong; Xiao, Xia; Wu, Wei; Li, Gang; Chen, Bo; Sharma, Ashok; Bai, Shan; Dun, Bo-Ying; She, Jin-Xiong; Tang, Jin-Hai

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy plays a key role in improving disease-free survival and overall survival of gastric cancer (GC); however, response rates are variable and a non-negligible proportion of patients undergo toxic and costly chemotherapeutic regimens without a survival benefit. Several studies have shown the existence of GC subtypes which may predict survival and respond differently to chemotherapy. It is also known that the expression level of chemotherapy-related and target therapy-related genes correlates with response to specific antitumor drugs. Nevertheless, these genes have not been considered jointly to define GC subtypes. In this study, we evaluated seven genes known to influence chemotherapeutic response (ERCC1, BRCA1, RRM1, TUBB3, STMN1, TYMS and TOP2A) and five receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) (EGFR, ERBB2, PDGFRB, VEGFR1 and VEGFR2). We demonstrate significant heterogeneity of gene expression among GC patients and identified four GC subtypes using the expression profiles of eight genes in two co-regulation groups: chemosensitivity (BRCA1, STMN1, TYMS and TOP2A) and RTKs (EGFR, PDGFRB, VEGFR1 and VEGFR2). The results are of immediate translational value regarding GC diagnostics and therapeutics, as many of these genes are curently widely used in relevant clinical testing. PMID:26396673

  7. Massive losses of taste receptor genes in toothed and baleen whales.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ping; Zheng, Jinsong; Rossiter, Stephen J; Wang, Ding; Zhao, Huabin

    2014-05-06

    Taste receptor genes are functionally important in animals, with a surprising exception in the bottlenose dolphin, which shows extensive losses of sweet, umami, and bitter taste receptor genes. To examine the generality of taste gene loss, we examined seven toothed whales and five baleen whales and sequenced the complete repertoire of three sweet/umami (T1Rs) and ten bitter (T2Rs) taste receptor genes. We found all amplified T1Rs and T2Rs to be pseudogenes in all 12 whales, with a shared premature stop codon in 10 of the 13 genes, which demonstrated massive losses of taste receptor genes in the common ancestor of whales. Furthermore, we analyzed three genome sequences from two toothed whales and one baleen whale and found that the sour taste marker gene Pkd2l1 is a pseudogene, whereas the candidate salty taste receptor genes are intact and putatively functional. Additionally, we examined three genes that are responsible for taste signal transduction and found the relaxation of functional constraints on taste signaling pathways along the ancestral branch leading to whales. Together, our results strongly suggest extensive losses of sweet, umami, bitter, and sour tastes in whales, and the relaxation of taste function most likely arose in the common ancestor of whales between 36 and 53 Ma. Therefore, whales represent the first animal group to lack four of five primary tastes, probably driven by the marine environment with high concentration of sodium, the feeding behavior of swallowing prey whole, and the dietary switch from plants to meat in the whale ancestor.

  8. Adenosine is required for sustained inflammasome activation via the A2A receptor and the HIF-1α pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Xinshou; Ghani, Ayaz; Malik, Ahsan; Wilder, Tuere; Colegio, Oscar Rene; Flavell, Richard Anthony; Cronstein, Bruce Neil; Mehal, Wajahat Zafar

    2013-12-01

    Inflammasome pathways are important in chronic diseases; however, it is not known how the signalling is sustained after initiation. Inflammasome activation is dependent on stimuli such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and ATP that provide two distinct signals resulting in rapid production of interleukin (IL)-1β, with the lack of response to repeat stimulation. Here we report that adenosine is a key regulator of inflammasome activity, increasing the duration of the inflammatory response via the A2A receptor. Adenosine does not replace signals provided by stimuli such as LPS or ATP but sustains inflammasome activity via a cAMP/PKA/CREB/HIF-1α pathway. In the setting of the lack of IL-1β responses after previous exposure to LPS, adenosine can supersede this tolerogenic state and drive IL-1β production. These data reveal that inflammasome activity is sustained, after initial activation, by A2A receptor-mediated signalling.

  9. Natural killer cell receptor genes in the family Equidae: not only Ly49.

    PubMed

    Futas, Jan; Horin, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have important functions in immunity. NK recognition in mammals can be mediated through killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and/or killer cell lectin-like Ly49 receptors. Genes encoding highly variable NK cell receptors (NKR) represent rapidly evolving genomic regions. No single conservative model of NKR genes was observed in mammals. Single-copy low polymorphic NKR genes present in one mammalian species may expand into highly polymorphic multigene families in other species. In contrast to other non-rodent mammals, multiple Ly49-like genes appear to exist in the horse, while no functional KIR genes were observed in this species. In this study, Ly49 and KIR were sought and their evolution was characterized in the entire family Equidae. Genomic sequences retrieved showed the presence of at least five highly conserved polymorphic Ly49 genes in horses, asses and zebras. These findings confirmed that the expansion of Ly49 occurred in the entire family. Several KIR-like sequences were also identified in the genome of Equids. Besides a previously identified non-functional KIR-Immunoglobulin-like transcript fusion gene (KIR-ILTA) and two putative pseudogenes, a KIR3DL-like sequence was analyzed. In contrast to previous observations made in the horse, the KIR3DL sequence, genomic organization and mRNA expression suggest that all Equids might produce a functional KIR receptor protein molecule with a single non-mutated immune tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM) domain. No evidence for positive selection in the KIR3DL gene was found. Phylogenetic analysis including rhinoceros and tapir genomic DNA and deduced amino acid KIR-related sequences showed differences between families and even between species within the order Perissodactyla. The results suggest that the order Perissodactyla and its family Equidae with expanded Ly49 genes and with a potentially functional KIR gene may represent an interesting model for evolutionary biology of

  10. Natural Killer Cell Receptor Genes in the Family Equidae: Not only Ly49

    PubMed Central

    Futas, Jan; Horin, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have important functions in immunity. NK recognition in mammals can be mediated through killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and/or killer cell lectin-like Ly49 receptors. Genes encoding highly variable NK cell receptors (NKR) represent rapidly evolving genomic regions. No single conservative model of NKR genes was observed in mammals. Single-copy low polymorphic NKR genes present in one mammalian species may expand into highly polymorphic multigene families in other species. In contrast to other non-rodent mammals, multiple Ly49-like genes appear to exist in the horse, while no functional KIR genes were observed in this species. In this study, Ly49 and KIR were sought and their evolution was characterized in the entire family Equidae. Genomic sequences retrieved showed the presence of at least five highly conserved polymorphic Ly49 genes in horses, asses and zebras. These findings confirmed that the expansion of Ly49 occurred in the entire family. Several KIR-like sequences were also identified in the genome of Equids. Besides a previously identified non-functional KIR-Immunoglobulin-like transcript fusion gene (KIR-ILTA) and two putative pseudogenes, a KIR3DL-like sequence was analyzed. In contrast to previous observations made in the horse, the KIR3DL sequence, genomic organization and mRNA expression suggest that all Equids might produce a functional KIR receptor protein molecule with a single non-mutated immune tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM) domain. No evidence for positive selection in the KIR3DL gene was found. Phylogenetic analysis including rhinoceros and tapir genomic DNA and deduced amino acid KIR-related sequences showed differences between families and even between species within the order Perissodactyla. The results suggest that the order Perissodactyla and its family Equidae with expanded Ly49 genes and with a potentially functional KIR gene may represent an interesting model for evolutionary biology of

  11. Natural killer cell receptor genes in the family Equidae: not only Ly49.

    PubMed

    Futas, Jan; Horin, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have important functions in immunity. NK recognition in mammals can be mediated through killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and/or killer cell lectin-like Ly49 receptors. Genes encoding highly variable NK cell receptors (NKR) represent rapidly evolving genomic regions. No single conservative model of NKR genes was observed in mammals. Single-copy low polymorphic NKR genes present in one mammalian species may expand into highly polymorphic multigene families in other species. In contrast to other non-rodent mammals, multiple Ly49-like genes appear to exist in the horse, while no functional KIR genes were observed in this species. In this study, Ly49 and KIR were sought and their evolution was characterized in the entire family Equidae. Genomic sequences retrieved showed the presence of at least five highly conserved polymorphic Ly49 genes in horses, asses and zebras. These findings confirmed that the expansion of Ly49 occurred in the entire family. Several KIR-like sequences were also identified in the genome of Equids. Besides a previously identified non-functional KIR-Immunoglobulin-like transcript fusion gene (KIR-ILTA) and two putative pseudogenes, a KIR3DL-like sequence was analyzed. In contrast to previous observations made in the horse, the KIR3DL sequence, genomic organization and mRNA expression suggest that all Equids might produce a functional KIR receptor protein molecule with a single non-mutated immune tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM) domain. No evidence for positive selection in the KIR3DL gene was found. Phylogenetic analysis including rhinoceros and tapir genomic DNA and deduced amino acid KIR-related sequences showed differences between families and even between species within the order Perissodactyla. The results suggest that the order Perissodactyla and its family Equidae with expanded Ly49 genes and with a potentially functional KIR gene may represent an interesting model for evolutionary biology of

  12. Promotion of Wound Healing by an Agonist of Adenosine A2A Receptor Is Dependent on Tissue Plasminogen Activator.

    PubMed

    Montesinos, M Carmen; Desai-Merchant, Avani; Cronstein, Bruce N

    2015-12-01

    Impaired wound healing, as it occurs in diabetes mellitus or long-term corticoid treatment, is commonly associated with disability, diminished quality of life, and high economic costs. Selective agonists of the A2A receptor subtype of adenosine, an endogenous regulator of inflammation, promote tissue repair in animal models, both healthy and with impaired healing. Plasmin-mediated proteolysis of fibrin and other matrix proteins is essential for cell migration at sites of injury. Since adenosine A2A receptor activation increases plasminogen activator release from macrophages and mast cells, we studied the effect of a selective agonist, CGS-21680, on full-thickness excisional wound closure in wild-type, urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA)-deficient, and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-deficient mice. Wound closure was impaired in tPA- and uPA-deficient mice as compared with wild-type mice, and topical application of CGS-21680 significantly increased the rate at which wounds closed in wild-type mice and uPA-deficient mice, but not in tPA-deficient mice. Immunostaining of tissue sections showed that tPA was present in endothelial cells and histiocytes by day 3 post-wound and also by day 6. In contrast, uPA was more prominent in these cell types only by day 6 post-wound. Our results confirm that plasminogen activation contributes to wound repair and are consistent with the hypothesis that adenosine A2A receptor activation promotes wound closure by a mechanism that depends upon tPA, but not uPA. Moreover, our results suggest that topical adenosine A2A receptor agonists may be useful in promotion of wound closure in patients with impaired wound healing.

  13. N-acetylcysteine modulates hallucinogenic 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist-mediated responses: behavioral, molecular, and electrophysiological studies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei-Yi; Chiang, Chun-Cheng; Chiu, Hong-Yi; Chan, Ming-Huan; Chen, Hwei-Hsien

    2014-06-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC) has been reported to reverse the psychotomimetic effects in the rodent phencyclidine model of psychosis and shown beneficial effects in treating patients with schizophrenia. The effect of NAC has been associated with facilitating the activity of cystine-glutamate antiporters on glial cells concomitant with the release of non-vesicular glutamate, which mainly stimulates the presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 2 receptors (mGluR2). Recent evidence demonstrated that functional interactions between serotonin 5-HT2A receptor (5-HT(2A)R) and mGluR2 are responsible to unique cellular responses when targeted by hallucinogenic drugs. The present study determined the effects of NAC on hallucinogenic 5-HT(2A)R agonist (±)1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI)-elicited behavioral and molecular responses in mice and DOI-evoked field potentials in the mouse cortical slices. NAC significantly attenuated DOI-induced head twitch response and expression of c-Fos and Egr-2 in the infralimbic and motor cortex and suppressed the increase in the frequency of excitatory field potentials elicited by DOI in the medial prefrontal cortex. In addition, the cystine-glutamate antiporter inhibitor (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine (CPG) and the mGluR2 antagonist LY341495 reversed the suppressing effects of NAC on DOI-induced head twitch and molecular responses and increased frequency of excitatory field potentials, supporting that NAC attenuates the 5-HT(2A)R-mediated hallucinogenic effects via increased activity of cystine-glutamate antiporter followed by activation of mGluR2 receptors. These findings implicate NAC as a potential therapeutic agent for hallucinations and psychosis associated with hallucinogen use and schizophrenia.

  14. Blockade of 5-HT2A receptors suppresses hyperthermic but not cardiovascular responses to psychosocial stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Beig, M I; Baumert, M; Walker, F R; Day, T A; Nalivaiko, E

    2009-03-31

    The aim of this study was to determine whether 5-HT2A receptors mediate cardiovascular and thermogenic responses to acute psychological stresses. For this purpose, adult male Wistar hooded rats instrumented for telemetric recordings of either electrocardiogram (ECG) (n=12) or arterial pressure (n=12) were subjected, on different days, to four 15-min episodes of social defeat. Prior to stress, animals received s.c. injection of the selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist SR-46349B (trans-4-((3Z)3-[(2-dimethylaminoethyl)oxyimino]-3-(2-fluorophenyl)propen-1-yl)-phenol, hemifumarate) (at doses of 0.3, 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg) or vehicle. The drug had no effect on basal heart rate or heart rate variability indexes, arterial pressure, and core body temperature. Social defeat elicited significant and substantial tachycardic (347+/-7 to 500+/-7 bpm), pressor (77+/-4 to 97+/-4 mm Hg) and hyperthermic (37.0+/-0.3 to 38.5+/-0.1 degrees C) responses. Blockade of 5-HT2A receptors, at all doses of the antagonist, completely prevented stress-induced hyperthermia. In contrast, stress-induced cardiovascular responses were not affected by the blockade (except small reduction of tachycardia by the highest dose of the drug). We conclude that in rats, 5-HT2A receptors mediate stress-induced hyperthermic responses, but are not involved in the genesis of stress-induced rises in heart rate or arterial pressure, and do not participate in cardiovascular control at rest. PMID:19356699

  15. Identification and characterization of a ubiquitinconjugating enzyme UBE2A gene from lamprey.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liyong; Wu, Fenfang; Feng, Bo

    2016-02-01

    Ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (E2s) play an important role in the mechanism of ubiquitin transfer. Although in most species many of these enzymes share high sequence and structural conservation, their existence and functions in the lamprey remain unknown. In this study, we identified and characterized a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (UBE2A)-like gene in lamprey. The gene, designated as LaUBE2A, contained a 456-bp open reading frame encoding a 152-amino acid protein with a typical UBC domain. Real-time PCR assay showed that LaUBE2A was expressed in various tissues of the adult lamprey, with higher levels in the leukocytes and muscle and lower levels in the skin and liver. The high conservation in amino acid sequence between LaUBE2A and UBE2As from Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Cavia porcellus, and Alligator sinensi implied that the function of LaUBE2A may be similar to that of UBE2A. PMID:26463350

  16. Potential Modes of Interaction of 9-Aminomethyl-9,10-dihydroanthracene (AMDA) Derivatives with the 5-HT2A Receptor: A Ligand Structure-Affinity Relationship, Receptor Mutagenesis and Receptor Modeling Investigation⊕

    PubMed Central

    Runyon, Scott P.; Mosier, Philip D.; Roth, Bryan L.; Glennon, Richard A.; Westkaemper, Richard B.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of 3-position substitution of 9-aminomethyl-9,10-dihydroanthracene (AMDA) on 5-HT2A receptor affinity were determined and compared to a parallel series of DOB-like 1-(2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-aminopropanes substituted at the 4-position. The results were interpreted within the context of 5-HT2A receptor models that suggest that members of the DOB-like series can bind to the receptor in two distinct modes that correlate with the compounds’ functional activity. Automated ligand docking and molecular dynamics suggest that all of the AMDA derivatives, the parent of which is a 5-HT2A antagonist, bind in a fashion analogous to that for the sterically demanding antagonist DOB-like compounds. The failure of the F3406.52L mutation to adversely affect the affinity of AMDA and the 3-bromo derivative is consistent with the proposed modes of orientation. Evaluation of ligand-receptor complex models suggest that a valine/threonine exchange between the 5-HT2A and D2 receptors may be the origin of selectivity for AMDA and two substituted derivatives. PMID:18847250

  17. An Indian girl with Fanconi-Bickel syndrome without SLC2A2 gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Dayal, Devi; Dekate, Parag; Sharda, Sheetal; Das, Ashim; Attri, Savita

    2013-06-01

    Fanconi-Bickel syndrome is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder caused by defects in the facilitative glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) gene. It is characterized by hepatorenal glycogen accumulation, tubular nephropathy and impaired utilization of glucose and galactose. In this communication, we present the case of a 5-year-old girl who presented with deforming rickets and massive hepatomegaly. Liver biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of glycogen storage disorder. However, the mutation of the SLC2A2 (GLUT2) gene was not found. Mutation negative patients with characteristic Fanconi-Bickel syndrome phenotype suggest additional underlying mechanisms that need exploration. PMID:27625848

  18. An Indian girl with Fanconi-Bickel syndrome without SLC2A2 gene mutation

    PubMed Central

    Dayal, Devi; Dekate, Parag; Sharda, Sheetal; Das, Ashim; Attri, Savita

    2013-01-01

    Fanconi-Bickel syndrome is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder caused by defects in the facilitative glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) gene. It is characterized by hepatorenal glycogen accumulation, tubular nephropathy and impaired utilization of glucose and galactose. In this communication, we present the case of a 5-year-old girl who presented with deforming rickets and massive hepatomegaly. Liver biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of glycogen storage disorder. However, the mutation of the SLC2A2 (GLUT2) gene was not found. Mutation negative patients with characteristic Fanconi-Bickel syndrome phenotype suggest additional underlying mechanisms that need exploration. PMID:27625848

  19. A network of autism linked genes stabilizes two pools of synaptic GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xia-Jing; Hu, Zhitao; Liu, Yu; Anderson, Dorian; Kaplan, Joshua M

    2015-01-01

    Changing receptor abundance at synapses is an important mechanism for regulating synaptic strength. Synapses contain two pools of receptors, immobilized and diffusing receptors, both of which are confined to post-synaptic elements. Here we show that immobile and diffusing GABAA receptors are stabilized by distinct synaptic scaffolds at C. elegans neuromuscular junctions. Immobilized GABAA receptors are stabilized by binding to FRM-3/EPB4.1 and LIN-2A/CASK. Diffusing GABAA receptors are stabilized by the synaptic adhesion molecules Neurexin and Neuroligin. Inhibitory post-synaptic currents are eliminated in double mutants lacking both scaffolds. Neurexin, Neuroligin, and CASK mutations are all linked to Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Our results suggest that these mutations may directly alter inhibitory transmission, which could contribute to the developmental and cognitive deficits observed in ASD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09648.001 PMID:26575289

  20. Expression and functional analysis of genes encoding cytokinin receptor-like histidine kinase in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Yanhong; Guo, Baojian; Kabir, Muhammad Rezaul; Yao, Yingyin; Peng, Huiru; Xie, Chaojie; Zhang, Yirong; Sun, Qixin; Ni, Zhongfu

    2014-08-01

    Cytokinin signaling is vital for plant growth and development which function via the two-component system (TCS). As one of the key component of TCS, transmembrane histidine kinases (HK) are encoded by a small gene family in plants. In this study, we focused on expression and functional analysis of cytokinin receptor-like HK genes (ZmHK) in maize. Firstly, bioinformatics analysis revealed that seven cloned ZmHK genes have different expression patterns during maize development. Secondly, ectopic expression by CaMV35S promoter in Arabidopsis further revealed that functional differentiation exists among these seven members. Among them, the ZmHK1a2-OX transgenic line has the lowest germination rate in the dark, ZmHK1-OX and ZmHK2a2-OX can delay leaf senescence, and seed size of ZmHK1-OX, ZmHK1a2-OX, ZmHK2-OX, ZmHK3b-OX and ZmHK2a2-OX was obviously reduced as compared to wild type. Additionally, ZmHK genes play opposite roles in shoot and root development; all ZmHK-OX transgenic lines display obvious shorter root length and reduced number of lateral roots, but enhanced shoot development compared with the wild type. Most notably, Arabidopsis response regulator ARR5 gene was up-regulated in ZmHK1-OX, ZmHK1a2-OX, ZmHK2-OX, ZmHK3b-OX and ZmHK2a2-OX as compared to wild type. Although the causal link between ZmHK genes and cytokinin signaling pathway is still an area to be further elucidated, these findings reflected that the diversification of ZmHK genes expression patterns and functions occurred in the course of maize evolution, indicating that some ZmHK genes might play different roles during maize development.

  1. Expression and functional analysis of genes encoding cytokinin receptor-like histidine kinase in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Yanhong; Guo, Baojian; Kabir, Muhammad Rezaul; Yao, Yingyin; Peng, Huiru; Xie, Chaojie; Zhang, Yirong; Sun, Qixin; Ni, Zhongfu

    2014-08-01

    Cytokinin signaling is vital for plant growth and development which function via the two-component system (TCS). As one of the key component of TCS, transmembrane histidine kinases (HK) are encoded by a small gene family in plants. In this study, we focused on expression and functional analysis of cytokinin receptor-like HK genes (ZmHK) in maize. Firstly, bioinformatics analysis revealed that seven cloned ZmHK genes have different expression patterns during maize development. Secondly, ectopic expression by CaMV35S promoter in Arabidopsis further revealed that functional differentiation exists among these seven members. Among them, the ZmHK1a2-OX transgenic line has the lowest germination rate in the dark, ZmHK1-OX and ZmHK2a2-OX can delay leaf senescence, and seed size of ZmHK1-OX, ZmHK1a2-OX, ZmHK2-OX, ZmHK3b-OX and ZmHK2a2-OX was obviously reduced as compared to wild type. Additionally, ZmHK genes play opposite roles in shoot and root development; all ZmHK-OX transgenic lines display obvious shorter root length and reduced number of lateral roots, but enhanced shoot development compared with the wild type. Most notably, Arabidopsis response regulator ARR5 gene was up-regulated in ZmHK1-OX, ZmHK1a2-OX, ZmHK2-OX, ZmHK3b-OX and ZmHK2a2-OX as compared to wild type. Although the causal link between ZmHK genes and cytokinin signaling pathway is still an area to be further elucidated, these findings reflected that the diversification of ZmHK genes expression patterns and functions occurred in the course of maize evolution, indicating that some ZmHK genes might play different roles during maize development. PMID:24585212

  2. Organization, structure, chromosomal assignment, and expression of the gene encoding the human endothelin-A receptor.

    PubMed

    Hosoda, K; Nakao, K; Tamura, N; Arai, H; Ogawa, Y; Suga, S; Nakanishi, S; Imura, H

    1992-09-15

    We have isolated and characterized the gene for the human endothelin-A receptor. Southern blot analyses demonstrated a single copy gene for the receptor. The gene spans more than 40 kilobases and contains eight exons and seven introns. Intron 1 exists in the 5'-noncoding region, and introns 2-7 occur in the coding region. The locations of introns 2-7 exist before or after the regions encoding the membrane-spanning domains. The transcription start site, determined by primer extension experiments, is 502 base pairs upstream of the methionine initiation codon. The 5'-flanking region lacks a typical TATA box but contains a potential SP-1-binding site 27 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site. Using human-rodent somatic hybrid cell DNA, the gene was assigned to human chromosome 4. Northern blot analyses revealed a 4.3-kilobase mRNA in a wide variety of human tissues, at the highest level in the aorta and at a substantial level in the cultured human mesangial cells. This is the first report of cloning of a gene for a member of the endothelin receptor family. The present study should give a clue to the discovery of possible disorders of the endothelin-A receptor, as well as facilitate the elucidation of the mechanisms by which the gene expression is regulated.

  3. Ecdysone Receptor-Based Gene Switches for Applications in Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are a number of circumstances in which it is advantageous to use an inducible gene regulation system, the most obvious being when introducing transgenes whose constitutive expression is detrimental or even lethal to the host plants. The selective induction of gene expression is typically accom...

  4. A hot spot for hotfoot mutations in the gene encoding the delta2 glutamate receptor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Matsuda, Shinji; Drews, Valerie; Torashima, Takashi; Meisler, Miriam H; Yuzaki, Michisuke

    2003-04-01

    The orphan glutamate receptor delta2 is selectively expressed in Purkinje cells and plays a crucial role in cerebellar functions. Recently, ataxia in the hotfoot mouse ho4J was demonstrated to be caused by a deletion in the delta2 receptor gene (Grid2) removing the N-terminal 170 amino acids of the delta2 receptor. To understand how delta2 receptors function, we characterized mutations in eight additional spontaneously occurring hotfoot alleles of Grid2. The mouse Grid2 gene consists of 16 exons, spanning approximately 1.4 Mb. Genomic DNA analysis showed that seven hotfoot mutants had a deletion of one or more exons encoding the N-terminal domain of delta2 receptors. The exception is ho5J, which has a point mutation in exon 12. Deletions in ho7J, ho9J, ho11J and ho12J mice result in the in-frame deletion of between 40 and 95 amino acids. Expression of constructs containing these deletions in HEK293 cells resulted in protein retention in the endoplasmic reticulum or cis-Golgi without transport to the cell surface. Coimmunoprecipitation assays indicated that these deletions also reduce the intermolecular interaction between individual delta2 receptors. These results indicate that the deleted N-terminal regions are crucial for oligomerization of delta2 receptors and their subsequent transport to the cell surface of Purkinje cells. The relatively large size of the Grid2 gene may be one of the reasons why many spontaneous mutations occur in this gene. In addition, the frequent occurrence of in-frame deletions within the N-terminal domain in hotfoot mutants suggests the importance of this domain in the function of delta2 receptors.

  5. A cluster of novel serotonin receptor 3-like genes on human chromosome 3.

    PubMed

    Karnovsky, Alla M; Gotow, Lisa F; McKinley, Denise D; Piechan, Julie L; Ruble, Cara L; Mills, Cynthia J; Schellin, Kathleen A B; Slightom, Jerry L; Fitzgerald, Laura R; Benjamin, Christopher W; Roberds, Steven L

    2003-11-13

    The ligand-gated ion channel family includes receptors for serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), acetylcholine, GABA, and glutamate. Drugs targeting subtypes of these receptors have proven useful for the treatment of various neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders. To identify new ligand-gated ion channels as potential therapeutic targets, drafts of human genome sequence were interrogated. Portions of four novel genes homologous to 5-HT(3A) and 5-HT(3B) receptors were identified within human sequence databases. We named the genes 5-HT(3C1)-5-HT(3C4). Radiation hybrid (RH) mapping localized these genes to chromosome 3q27-28. All four genes shared similar intron-exon organizations and predicted protein secondary structure with 5-HT(3A) and 5-HT(3B). Orthologous genes were detected by Southern blotting in several species including dog, cow, and chicken, but not in rodents, suggesting that these novel genes are not present in rodents or are very poorly conserved. Two of the novel genes are predicted to be pseudogenes, but two other genes are transcribed and spliced to form appropriate open reading frames. The 5-HT(3C1) transcript is expressed almost exclusively in small intestine and colon, suggesting a possible role in the serotonin-responsiveness of the gut.

  6. Data on Arc and Zif268 expression in the brain of the α-2A adrenergic receptor knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Jeff

    2016-06-01

    The α2-adrenergic receptor (α2-AR) is widely distributed in the brain with distinct roles for α2-AR subtypes (A, B and C). In this article, data are provided on Activity Regulated Cytoskeleton Associated Protein (Arc) and Zif268 expression in the brain of the α2A-AR knockout (α2A-AR KO) mouse. These data are supplemental to an original research article examining Arc and Zif268 expression in rats injected with the α2-AR antagonist, RX821002 (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neulet.2015.12.002. [1]). PMID:26952134

  7. SSRI augmentation of antipsychotic alters expression of GABA(A) receptor and related genes in PMC of schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Silver, Henry; Susser, Ehud; Danovich, Lena; Bilker, Warren; Youdim, Moussa; Goldin, Vladimir; Weinreb, Orly

    2011-06-01

    Clinical studies have shown that negative symptoms of schizophrenia unresponsive to antipsychotic given alone can improve after augmentation with SSRI antidepressant. Laboratory investigations into the mechanism of this synergism showed that co-administration of SSRI and antipsychotic produces changes in GABA(A) receptor and related systems, which differ from the effects of each drug alone. To examine the clinical relevance of these findings, the current study examined the effects of SSRI augmentation treatment on GABA(A) receptor and related systems in schizophrenia patients. Schizophrenia patients with high levels of negative symptoms unresponsive to antipsychotic treatment received add-on fluvoxamine (100 mg/d). Blood was taken before and 1, 3 and 6 wk after adding fluvoxamine and peripheral mononuclear cells (PMC) isolated. RNA encoding for GABA(A)β3, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT7 receptors, PKCβ2, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was assayed with real-time RT-PCR. Plasma BDNF protein was assayed using ELISA. Clinical symptoms were assessed with validated rating scales. We found significant increase in mRNA encoding for GABA(A)β3 and 5-HT2A, 5-HT7 receptors and BDNF and a reduction in PKCβ2 mRNA. Plasma BDNF protein concentrations were increased. There were significant correlations among the genes. Clinical symptoms improved significantly. mRNA expression of PKCβ2, 5-HT2A and 5-HT7 showed significant associations with clinical symptoms. Combined SSRI+antipsychotic treatment is associated with changes in GABA(A) receptor and in related signalling systems in patients. These changes may be part of the mechanism of clinically effective drug action and may prove to be biomarkers of pharmacological response.

  8. Mineralocorticoid receptor interaction with SP1 generates a new response element for pathophysiologically relevant gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Meinel, Sandra; Ruhs, Stefanie; Schumann, Katja; Strätz, Nicole; Trenkmann, Kay; Schreier, Barbara; Grosse, Ivo; Keilwagen, Jens; Gekle, Michael; Grossmann, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a ligand-induced transcription factor belonging to the steroid receptor family and involved in water-electrolyte homeostasis, blood pressure regulation, inflammation and fibrosis in the renocardiovascular system. The MR shares a common hormone-response-element with the glucocorticoid receptor but nevertheless elicits MR-specific effects including enhanced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression via unknown mechanisms. The EGFR is a receptor tyrosine kinase that leads to activation of MAP kinases, but that can also function as a signal transducer for other signaling pathways. In the present study, we mechanistically investigate the interaction between a newly discovered MR- but not glucocorticoid receptor- responsive-element (=MRE1) of the EGFR promoter, specificity protein 1 (SP1) and MR to gain general insights into MR-specificity. Biological relevance of the interaction for EGFR expression and consequently for different signaling pathways in general is demonstrated in human, rat and murine vascular smooth muscle cells and cells of EGFR knockout mice. A genome-wide promoter search for identical binding regions followed by quantitative PCR validation suggests that the identified MR-SP1–MRE1 interaction might be applicable to other genes. Overall, a novel principle of MR-specific gene expression is explored that applies to the pathophysiologically relevant expression of the EGFR and potentially also to other genes. PMID:23821666

  9. Oxytocin, vasopressin and estrogen receptor gene expression in relation to social recognition in female mice

    PubMed Central

    Clipperton-Allen, Amy E.; Lee, Anna W.; Reyes, Anny; Devidze, Nino; Phan, Anna; Pfaff, Donald W.; Choleris, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Inter- and intra-species differences in social behavior and recognition-related hormones and receptors suggest that different distribution and/or expression patterns may relate to social recognition. We used qRT-PCR to investigate naturally occurring differences in expression of estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα), ER-beta (ERβ), progesterone receptor (PR), oxytocin (OT) and receptor, and vasopressin (AVP) and receptors in proestrous female mice. Following four 5 min exposures to the same two conspecifics, one was replaced with a novel mouse in the final trial (T5). Gene expression was examined in mice showing high (85–100%) and low (40–60%) social recognition scores (i.e., preferential novel mouse investigation in T5) in eight socially-relevant brain regions. Results supported OT and AVP involvement in social recognition, and suggest that in the medial preoptic area, increased OT and AVP mRNA, together with ERα and ERβ gene activation, relate to improved social recognition. Initial social investigation correlated with ERs, PR and OTR in the dorsolateral septum, suggesting that these receptors may modulate social interest without affecting social recognition. Finally, increased lateral amygdala gene activation in the LR mice may be associated with general learning impairments, while decreased lateral amygdala activity may indicate more efficient cognitive mechanisms in the HR mice. PMID:22079582

  10. Identification of hemostatic genes expressed in human and rat leg muscles and a novel gene (LPP1/PAP2A) suppressed during prolonged physical inactivity (sitting)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Partly because of functional genomics, there has been a major paradigm shift from solely thinking of skeletal muscle as contractile machinery to an understanding that it can have roles in paracrine and endocrine functions. Physical inactivity is an established risk factor for some blood clotting disorders. The effects of inactivity during sitting are most alarming when a person develops the enigmatic condition in the legs called deep venous thrombosis (DVT) or “coach syndrome,” caused in part by muscular inactivity. The goal of this study was to determine if skeletal muscle expresses genes with roles in hemostasis and if their expression level was responsive to muscular inactivity such as occurs in prolonged sitting. Methods Microarray analyses were performed on skeletal muscle samples from rats and humans to identify genes associated with hemostatic function that were significantly expressed above background based on multiple probe sets with perfect and mismatch sequences. Furthermore, we determined if any of these genes were responsive to models of physical inactivity. Multiple criteria were used to determine differential expression including significant expression above background, fold change, and non-parametric statistical tests. Results These studies demonstrate skeletal muscle tissue expresses at least 17 genes involved in hemostasis. These include the fibrinolytic factors tetranectin, annexin A2, and tPA; the anti-coagulant factors TFPI, protein C receptor, PAF acetylhydrolase; coagulation factors, and genes necessary for the posttranslational modification of these coagulation factors such as vitamin K epoxide reductase. Of special interest, lipid phosphate phosphatase-1 (LPP1/PAP2A), a key gene for degrading prothrombotic and proinflammatory lysophospholipids, was suppressed locally in muscle tissue within hours after sitting in humans; this was also observed after acute and chronic physical inactivity conditions in rats, and exercise was

  11. Adenosine A{sub 2A} receptor-dependent proliferation of pulmonary endothelial cells is mediated through calcium mobilization, PI3-kinase and ERK1/2 pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Aftab; Schaack, Jerome B.; White, Carl W.; Ahmad, Shama

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •A{sub 2A} receptor-induced pulmonary endothelial growth is mediated by PI3K and ERK1/2. •Cytosolic calcium mobilization is also critical for pulmonary endothelial growth. •Effectors of A{sub 2A} receptor, like tyrosine kinases and cAMP increase PI3K/Akt signaling. •Activation of A{sub 2A} receptor can contribute to vascular remodeling. -- Abstract: Hypoxia and HIF-2α-dependent A{sub 2A} receptor expression and activation increase proliferation of human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs). This study was undertaken to investigate the signaling mechanisms that mediate the proliferative effects of A{sub 2A} receptor. A{sub 2A} receptor-mediated proliferation of HLMVECs was inhibited by intracellular calcium chelation, and by specific inhibitors of ERK1/2 and PI3-kinase (PI3K). The adenosine A{sub 2A} receptor agonist CGS21680 caused intracellular calcium mobilization in controls and, to a greater extent, in A{sub 2A} receptor-overexpressing HLMVECs. Adenoviral-mediated A{sub 2A} receptor overexpression as well as receptor activation by CGS21680 caused increased PI3K activity and Akt phosphorylation. Cells overexpressing A{sub 2A} receptor also manifested enhanced ERK1/2 phosphorylation upon CGS21680 treatment. A{sub 2A} receptor activation also caused enhanced cAMP production. Likewise, treatment with 8Br-cAMP increased PI3K activity. Hence A{sub 2A} receptor-mediated cAMP production and PI3K and Akt phosphorylation are potential mediators of the A{sub 2A}-mediated proliferative response of HLMVECs. Cytosolic calcium mobilization and ERK1/2 phosphorylation are other critical effectors of HLMVEC proliferation and growth. These studies underscore the importance of adenosine A{sub 2A} receptor in activation of survival and proliferative pathways in pulmonary endothelial cells that are mediated through PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 pathways.

  12. Gene set of chemosensory receptors in the polyembryonic endoparasitoid Macrocentrus cingulum

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tofael; Zhang, Tiantao; Wang, Zhenying; He, Kanglai; Bai, Shuxiong

    2016-01-01

    Insects are extremely successful animals whose odor perception is very prominent due to their sophisticated olfactory system. The main chemosensory organ, antennae play a critical role in detecting odor in ambient environment before initiating appropriate behavioral responses. The antennal chemosensory receptor genes families have been suggested to be involved in olfactory signal transduction pathway as a sensory neuron response. The Macrocentrus cingulum is deployed successfully as a biological control agent for corn pest insects from the Lepidopteran genus Ostrinia. In this research, we assembled antennal transcriptomes of M. cingulum by using next generation sequencing to identify the major chemosensory receptors gene families. In total, 112 olfactory receptors candidates (79 odorant receptors, 20 gustatory receptors, and 13 ionotropic receptors) have been identified from the male and female antennal transcriptome. The sequences of all of these transcripts were confirmed by RT-PCR, and direct DNA sequencing. Expression profiles of gustatory receptors in olfactory and non-olfactory tissues were measured by RT-qPCR. The sex-specific and sex-biased chemoreceptors expression patterns suggested that they may have important functions in sense detection which behaviorally relevant to odor molecules. This reported result provides a comprehensive resource of the foundation in semiochemicals driven behaviors at molecular level in polyembryonic endoparasitoid. PMID:27090020

  13. Sequence variation in the androgen receptor gene is not a common determinant of male sexual orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Macke, J.P.; Nathans, J.; King, V.L. ); Hu, N.; Hu, S.; Hamer, D.; Bailey, M. ); Brown, T. )

    1993-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that DNA sequence variation in the androgen receptor gene plays a causal role in the development of male sexual orientation, the authors have (1) measured the degree of concordance of androgen receptor alleles in 36 pairs of homosexual brothers, (2) compared the lengths of polyglutamine and polyglycine tracts in the amino-terminal domain of the androgen receptor in a sample of 197 homosexual males and 213 unselected subjects, and (3) screened the entire androgen receptor coding region for sequence variation by PCR and denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and/or single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis in 20 homosexual males with homosexual or bisexual brothers and one homosexual male with no homosexual brothers, and screened the amino-terminal domain of the receptor for sequence variation in an additional 44 homosexual males, 37 of whom had one or more first- or second-degree male relatives who were either homosexual or bisexual. These analyses show that (1) homosexual brothers are as likely to be discordant as concordant for androgen receptor alleles; (2) there are no large-scale differences between the distributions of polyglycine or polyglutamine tract lengths in the homosexual and control groups; and (3) coding region sequence variation is not commonly found within the androgen receptor gene of homosexual men. The DGGE screen identified two rare amino acid substitutions, ser[sup 205] -to-arg and glu[sup 793]-to-asp, the biological significance of which is unknown. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Gene set of chemosensory receptors in the polyembryonic endoparasitoid Macrocentrus cingulum.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Tofael; Zhang, Tiantao; Wang, Zhenying; He, Kanglai; Bai, Shuxiong

    2016-01-01

    Insects are extremely successful animals whose odor perception is very prominent due to their sophisticated olfactory system. The main chemosensory organ, antennae play a critical role in detecting odor in ambient environment before initiating appropriate behavioral responses. The antennal chemosensory receptor genes families have been suggested to be involved in olfactory signal transduction pathway as a sensory neuron response. The Macrocentrus cingulum is deployed successfully as a biological control agent for corn pest insects from the Lepidopteran genus Ostrinia. In this research, we assembled antennal transcriptomes of M. cingulum by using next generation sequencing to identify the major chemosensory receptors gene families. In total, 112 olfactory receptors candidates (79 odorant receptors, 20 gustatory receptors, and 13 ionotropic receptors) have been identified from the male and female antennal transcriptome. The sequences of all of these transcripts were confirmed by RT-PCR, and direct DNA sequencing. Expression profiles of gustatory receptors in olfactory and non-olfactory tissues were measured by RT-qPCR. The sex-specific and sex-biased chemoreceptors expression patterns suggested that they may have important functions in sense detection which behaviorally relevant to odor molecules. This reported result provides a comprehensive resource of the foundation in semiochemicals driven behaviors at molecular level in polyembryonic endoparasitoid. PMID:27090020

  15. [Receptor tyrosine kinase KIT may regulate expression of genes involved in spontaneous regression of neuroblastoma].

    PubMed

    Lebedev, T D; Spirin, P V; Suntsova, M V; Ivanova, A V; Buzdin, A A; Prokofjeva, M M; Rubtsov, P M; Prassolov, V S

    2015-01-01

    Hallmark of neuroblastoma is an ability of this malignant tumor to undergo spontaneous regression or differentiation into benign tumor during any stage of the disease, but it is little known about mechanisms of these phenomena. We studied effect of receptor tyrosine kinase receptor KIT on expression of genes, which may be involved in tumor spontaneous regression. Downregulation of KIT expression by RNA interference in SH-SY5Y cells causes suppression of neurotrophin receptor NGFR expression that may promote the loss of sensibility of cells to nerve growth factors, also it causes upregulation of TrkA receptor expression which can stimulate cell differentiation or apoptosis in NGF dependent manner. Furthermore there is an upregulation of genes which stimulate malignant cell detection by immune system, such as genes of major histocompatibility complex HLA class I HLA-B and HLA-C, and interferon-γ receptors IFNGR1 and IFNGR2 genes. Thus KIT can mediate neuroblastoma cell sensibility to neurotrophins and immune system components--two factors directly contributing to spontaneous regression of neuroblastoma.

  16. Safety assessment of lepidopteran insect-protected transgenic rice with cry2A* gene.

    PubMed

    Zou, Shiying; Huang, Kunlun; Xu, Wentao; Luo, Yunbo; He, Xiaoyun

    2016-04-01

    Numerous genetically modified (GM) crops expressing proteins for insect resistance have been commercialized following extensive testing demonstrating that the foods obtained from them are as safe as that obtained from their corresponding non-GM varieties. In this paper, we report the outcome of safety studies conducted on a newly developed insect-resistant GM rice expressing the cry2A* gene by a subchronic oral toxicity study on rats. GM rice and non-GM rice were incorporated into the diet at levels of 30, 50, and 70% (w/w), No treatment-related adverse or toxic effects were observed based on an examination of the daily clinical signs, body weight, food consumption, hematology, serum biochemistry, and organ weight or based on gross and histopathological examination. These results demonstrate that the GM rice with cry2A* gene is as safe for food as conventional non-GM rice. PMID:26581349