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Sample records for 2b miyoshi myopathy

  1. Calf heads on a trophy sign: Miyoshi myopathy.

    PubMed

    Shyma, M Mundayadan; Roopchand, P Sreedharan; Ram, K Mohan; Shaji, C Velayudhan

    2015-01-01

    Miyoshi myopathy is an autosomal recessive distal myopathy with predominant involvement of the posterior calf muscles attributed to mutations in the dysferlin gene. We report a 26-year-old male, born of nonconsanginous parentage. He noticed weakness and atrophy of leg muscles with inability to walk on his heels. The creatine kinase concentration was high. The electromyography showed myopathic pattern and the muscle biopsy disclosed dystrophic changes with absence of dysferlin. Miyoshi myopathy may be distinct among the hereditary distal myopathies. There are only few reported cases of Miyoshi myopathy in the world literature. In India only 12 cases were reported who had classical features of Miyoshi myopathy. Our's is a typical case of Miyoshi myopathy, with an affected twin sister as well. He also had "calf heads on a trophy sign" on physical examination, which is considered to be pathognomonic of this disease. PMID:26167036

  2. Calf heads on a trophy sign: Miyoshi myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shyma, M. Mundayadan; Roopchand, P. Sreedharan; Ram, K. Mohan; Shaji, C. Velayudhan

    2015-01-01

    Miyoshi myopathy is an autosomal recessive distal myopathy with predominant involvement of the posterior calf muscles attributed to mutations in the dysferlin gene. We report a 26-year-old male, born of nonconsanginous parentage. He noticed weakness and atrophy of leg muscles with inability to walk on his heels. The creatine kinase concentration was high. The electromyography showed myopathic pattern and the muscle biopsy disclosed dystrophic changes with absence of dysferlin. Miyoshi myopathy may be distinct among the hereditary distal myopathies. There are only few reported cases of Miyoshi myopathy in the world literature. In India only 12 cases were reported who had classical features of Miyoshi myopathy. Our's is a typical case of Miyoshi myopathy, with an affected twin sister as well. He also had “calf heads on a trophy sign” on physical examination, which is considered to be pathognomonic of this disease. PMID:26167036

  3. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy and Miyoshi myopathy in an aboriginal Canadian kindred map to LGMD2B and segregate with the same haplotype

    SciTech Connect

    Weiler, T.; Nylen, E.; Wrogemann, K.

    1996-10-01

    We report the results of our investigations of a large, inbred, aboriginal Canadian kindred with nine muscular dystrophy patients. The ancestry of all but two of the carrier parents could be traced to a founder couple, seven generations back. Seven patients presented with proximal myopathy consistent with limb girdle-type muscular dystrophy (LGMD), whereas two patients manifested predominantly distal wasting and weakness consistent with Miyoshi myopathy (distal autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy) (MM). Age at onset of symptoms, degree of creatine kinase elevation, and muscle histology were similar in both phenotypes. Segregation of LGMD/MM is consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance, and the putative locus is significantly linked (LOD scores >3.0) to six marker loci that span the region of the LGMD2B locus on chromosome 2p. Our initial hypothesis that the affected patients would all be homozygous by descent for microsatellite markers surrounding the disease locus was rejected. Rather, two different core haplotypes, encompassing a 4-cM region spanned by D2S291-D2S145-D2S286, segregated with the disease, indicating that there are two mutant alleles of independent origin in this kindred. There was no association, however, between the two different haplotypes and clinical variability; they do not distinguish between the LGMD and MM phenotypes. Thus, we conclude that LGMD and MM in our population are caused by the same mutation in LGMD2B and that additional factors, both genetic and nongenetic, must contribute to the clinical phenotype. 37 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Late-onset myopathy of the posterior calf muscles mimicking Miyoshi myopathy unrelated to dysferlin mutation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Miyoshi myopathy, a type of distal myopathy with predominant involvement of the posterior calf muscles, has been assigned to mutations in the dysferlin gene. However, many of the late-onset limb-girdle and distal myopathies that resemble dysferlinopathy or Miyoshi myopathy remain unclassified, even after extensive immunohistological and genetic analysis. Case presentation We report the case of a 59-year-old Caucasian man with distal myopathy and exercise-induced myalgia, preferentially of the leg muscles, closely resembling the Miyoshi phenotype. Magnetic resonance imaging of his calf muscles showed typical fatty replacement of the medial heads of the gastrocnemius muscles and soleus muscles, with progression to the adductor longus muscles over a time course of two years. However, genetic analysis revealed that the phenotype of our patient was not related to a mutation in the dysferlin gene but to a novel homozygous splice mutation in the anoctamin 5 gene. Mutations in the anoctamin 5 gene have so far been identified only in some cases of limb-girdle and distal myopathy. Mutations in the anoctamin 5 gene have been assigned to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2L, while distal Miyoshi-like phenotypes have been classified as Miyoshi myopathy type 3. Conclusion The case presented in this report further strengthens the underlying genetic heterogeneity in Miyoshi myopathy-like phenotypes and adds another family to non-dysferlin, Miyoshi myopathy type 3 of late-onset. Furthermore, our case supports the recent observation that anoctamin 5 mutations are a primary cause of distal non-dysferlin myopathies. Therefore, given the increasing number of anoctamin 5 mutations in Miyoshi-like phenotypes, genetic analysis should include an anoctamin 5 screen in late-onset limb-girdle and distal myopathies. PMID:23050857

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Miyoshi myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... called the endoplasmic reticulum , which is involved in protein production, processing, and transport. Anoctamin-5 is thought to act as a channel , allowing charged chlorine atoms (chloride ... or elimination of the corresponding protein. A lack of dysferlin leads to a reduced ...

  6. Myopathies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Different types of ion channels allow specific ions — sodium, calcium, potassium or chloride — to pass into and out of the muscle ... become more negative (“repolarized”). 4 13 sodium ... channel Myopathies • ©2011 MDA Inheritable myopathies ...

  7. Myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find People About NINDS NINDS Myopathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What ... characterized by bone growing in muscle tissue familial periodic paralysis : characterized by episodes of weakness in the ...

  8. Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B masquerading as inflammatory myopathy: case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B is a rare subtype of muscular dystrophy, the predominant feature of which is muscle weakness. The disease is caused by an autosomal recessively inherited reduction/absence of muscle dysferlin due to a mutation in dysferlin gene at 2p12-14. We report a 10 year old boy who presented with severe non-transient right knee pain and swelling, which later became bilateral. His pain was worst in the morning and during rest. Blood tests revealed markedly raised creatine kinase values (highest 22, 297 U/l), raising the possibility of an inflammatory myositis. MRI showed bilateral asymmetrical muscle involvement of thighs and calves with oedematous changes mimicking the imaging appearances of inflammatory myositis. CRP and ESR levels were consistently within normal limits. Over several months his knee pain worsened and limited walking. Muscle biopsy revealed a severe reduction of dysferlin immunostaining, indicating the diagnosis, which was confirmed by 2 compound heterozygous pathogenic mutations in the dysferlin gene. It is not unusual for this subtype of the disease to mimic myositis: however, significant pain is a rare presenting symptom. Given the significant overlap between this form of muscular dystrophy and inflammatory myopathies, a high index of suspicion is needed to ensure an accurate and timely diagnosis. Furthermore, characteristic inflammatory-related morning pain should not rule out consideration of non-inflammatory causes. PMID:23641709

  9. DISTAL MYOPATHIES

    PubMed Central

    Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Over a century ago, Gowers described two young patients in whom distal muscles weakness involved the hand, foot, sternocleidomastoid, and facial muscles in the other case the shoulder and distal leg musculature. Soon after, , similar distal myopathy cases were reported whereby the absence of sensory symptoms and of pathologic changes in the peripheral nerves and spinal cord at postmortem examination allowed differentiation from Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. In 1951, Welander described autosomal dominant (AD) distal arm myopathy in a large Scandanavian cohort. Since then the number of well-characterized distal myopathies has continued to grow such that the distal myopathies have formed a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. Affected kindred commonly manifest weakness that is limited to foot and toe muscles even in advanced stages of the disease, with variable mild proximal leg, distal arm, neck and laryngeal muscle involvement in selected individuals. An interesting consequence of the molecular characterization of the distal myopathies has been the recognition that mutation in a single gene can lead to more than one clinical disorder. For example, Myoshi myopathy (MM) and limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) type 2B are allelic disorders due to defects in the gene that encodes dysferlin. The six well described distal myopathy syndromes are shown in Table 1. Table 2 lists advances in our understanding of the myofibrillar myopathy group and Table 3 includes more recently delineated and less common distal myopathies. In the same manner, the first section of this review pertains to the more traditional six distal myopathies followed by discussion of the myofibrillar myopathies. In the third section, we review other clinically and genetically distinctive distal myopathy syndromes usually based upon single or smaller family cohorts. The fourth section considers other neuromuscular disorders that are important to recognize as they display prominent

  10. Genetic and physical mapping at the limb-girdle muscular dystrophy locus (LGMD2B) on chromosome 2p

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, R.; Keers, S.; Strachan, T.

    1996-04-01

    The limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, different forms of which have been mapped to at least six distinct genetic loci. We have mapped to at least six distinct genetic loci. We have mapped an autosomal recessive form of LGMD (LGMD2B) to chromosome 2p13. Two other conditions have been shown to map to this region or to the homologous region in mouse: a gene for a form of autosomal recessive distal muscular dystrophy, Miyoshi myopathy, shows linkage to the same markers on chromosome 2p as LGMD2B, and an autosomal recessive mouse mutation mnd2, in which there is rapidly progressive paralysis and muscle atrophy, has been mapped to mouse chromosome 6 to a region showing conserved synteny with human chromosome 2p12-p13. We have assembled a 6-cM YAC contig spanning the LGMD2B locus and have mapped seven genes and 13 anonymous polymorphic microsatellites to it. Using haplotype analysis in the linked families, we have narrowed our region of interest to a 0-cM interval between D2S2113 and D2S145, which does not overlap with the critical region for mnd2 in mouse. Use of these most closely linked markers will help to determine the relationship between LGMD2B and Miyoshi myopathy. YACs selected from our contig will be the starting point for the cloning of the LGMD2B gene and thereby establish the biological basis for this form of muscular dystrophy and its relationship with the other limb-girdle muscular dystrophies. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Thyrotoxic Myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... NINDS Thyrotoxic Myopathy Information Page Synonym(s): Myopathy - Thyrotoxic Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What ... associated with low blood potassium levels (known as periodic paralysis). Is there any treatment? Treatment involves restoring ...

  12. Maze Busters: Carrie Miyoshi Macfarlane & Kathleen Sheehan--Harvard University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Even if one is equipped with an MLS, the 11 libraries that comprise the Harvard College Library can be pretty daunting. That is why Carrie Miyoshi Macfarlane and Kathleen Sheehan created Threading the Maze. The online publication is presented to students in expository writing, the one course all undergraduates must take. "This highly effective…

  13. Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2L presenting as necrotizing myopathy.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ilka; Stoltenburg, Gisela; Deschauer, Marcus; Winterholler, Martin; Hanisch, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Recessive mutations in the ANO5 gene, encoding anoctamin 5, cause proximal limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2L), Miyoshi-type distal myopathy (MM3) and asymptomatic hyper- CKemia. We report a woman with exertion-induced myalgia and weakness in the hip girdle manifesting at the age of 40. Creatine kinase (CK) was increased 20-fold. Histologically the dominating feature was necrotizing myopathy, but long-term immunosuppressive therapy did not change CK level or myopathic symptoms. Molecular genetic investigation led to the finding of the homozygous ANO5 c.191dupA mutation. This is a report of a muscular dystrophy due to ANO5 mutation presenting histologically as necrotizing myopathy. For this reason our finding extends the histological spectrum of myopathies due to ANO5 mutations as well as the possible differential diagnoses for necrotizing myopathy. PMID:24843231

  14. Congenital Myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... arms and legs, droopy eyelids, and problems with eye movements. Weakness often gets worse with time. Central core ... difficulties occur as well. Some children have weakened eye movements. Congenital fiber-type disproportion myopathy is a rare ...

  15. Statin myopathy.

    PubMed

    Radcliffe, Kristofer A; Campbell, William W

    2008-01-01

    Many different classes of medications can cause toxic myopathy. One of the most frequently implicated classes is the statins. Statin myotoxicity ranges from asymptomatic creatine kinase elevations or myalgias to muscle necrosis and fatal rhabdomyolysis. Statins may also cause an autoimmune myopathy requiring immunosuppressive treatment. The mechanisms of statin myotoxicity are unclear. If unrecognized in its early manifestations, complications from continued statin therapy may lead to rhabdomyolysis and death. Risk factors for myotoxicity include concomitant medication use and medical conditions, and the patient's underlying genetic constitution. We review these considerations along with the recommended evaluation and treatment for patients presenting with statin myotoxicity. PMID:18367041

  16. Toxic Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Barohn, Richard J.; Dimachkie, Mazen M.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle tissue is highly sensitive to many substances. Early recognition of toxic myopathies is important, as they potentially are reversible on removal of the offending drug or toxin, with greater likelihood of complete resolution the sooner this is achieved. Clinical features range from mild muscle pain and cramps to severe weakness with rhabdomyolysis, renal failure, and even death. The pathogenic bases can be multifactorial. This article reviews some of the common toxic myopathies and their clinical presentation, histopathologic features and possible underlying cellular mechanisms. PMID:25037083

  17. Metabolic myopathies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, A.; Haller, R. G.; Barohn, R.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Metabolic myopathies are disorders of muscle energy production that result in skeletal muscle dysfunction. Cardiac and systemic metabolic dysfunction may coexist. Symptoms are often intermittent and provoked by exercise or changes in supply of lipid and carbohydrate fuels. Specific disorders of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in muscle are reviewed. Evaluation often requires provocative exercise testing. These tests may include ischemic forearm exercise, aerobic cycle exercise, and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy with exercise.

  18. Molecular and Genetic Studies of Congenital Myopathies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-26

    Central Core Disease; Centronuclear Myopathy; Congenital Fiber Type Disproportion; Multiminicore Disease; Myotubular Myopathy; Nemaline Myopathy; Rigid Spine Muscular Dystrophy; Undefined Congenital Myopathy

  19. Congenital myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Irene; Scoto, Mariacristina; Manzur, Adnan Y.; Robb, Stephanie A.; Maggi, Lorenzo; Gowda, Vasantha; Cullup, Thomas; Yau, Michael; Phadke, Rahul; Sewry, Caroline; Jungbluth, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the natural history of congenital myopathies (CMs) due to different genotypes. Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study based on case-note review of 125 patients affected by CM, followed at a single pediatric neuromuscular center, between 1984 and 2012. Results: Genetic characterization was achieved in 99 of 125 cases (79.2%), with RYR1 most frequently implicated (44/125). Neonatal/infantile onset was observed in 76%. At birth, 30.4% required respiratory support, and 25.2% nasogastric feeding. Twelve percent died, mainly within the first year, associated with mutations in ACTA1, MTM1, or KLHL40. All RYR1-mutated cases survived and did not require long-term ventilator support including those with severe neonatal onset; however, recessive cases were more likely to require gastrostomy insertion (p = 0.0028) compared with dominant cases. Independent ambulation was achieved in 74.1% of all patients; 62.9% were late walkers. Among ambulant patients, 9% eventually became wheelchair-dependent. Scoliosis of variable severity was reported in 40%, with 1/3 of (both ambulant and nonambulant) patients requiring surgery. Bulbar involvement was present in 46.4% and required gastrostomy placement in 28.8% (at a mean age of 2.7 years). Respiratory impairment of variable severity was a feature in 64.1%; approximately half of these patients required nocturnal noninvasive ventilation due to respiratory failure (at a mean age of 8.5 years). Conclusions: We describe the long-term outcome of a large cohort of patients with CMs. While overall course is stable, we demonstrate a wide clinical spectrum with motor deterioration in a subset of cases. Severity in the neonatal/infantile period is critical for survival, with clear genotype-phenotype correlations that may inform future counseling. PMID:25428687

  20. Update on toxic myopathies.

    PubMed

    Mastaglia, F L; Needham, M

    2012-02-01

    The toxic myopathies are a clinically and pathologically diverse group of disorders that can be caused by a variety of therapeutic agents used in clinical practice, as well as various venoms and other biological toxins. The most important iatrogenic causes are the statin and fibrate cholesterol-lowering agents that can cause a severe necrotizing myopathy and acute rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuria. The current update focuses on the mechanisms of statin myotoxicity and the importance of genetic predisposing factors for statin myopathy, as well as the recently described form of necrotizing autoimmune myopathy, which is associated with antibodies to the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase enzyme and is responsive to aggressive immunotherapy. Mitochondrial myopathies associated with antiretroviral agents and the pyrimidine nucleoside analogue clevudine, and recent reports of myopathies caused by ingestion of red yeast rice and toxic species of mushrooms are also discussed. PMID:21968786

  1. [Inflammatory myopathies. New concepts].

    PubMed

    López Longo, Francisco Javier

    2008-03-01

    Myopathies are diseases characterized by the primary affection of skeletal muscle. In general they present with muscle weakness, pain, contracture, paresthesias, rigidity, or fatigue. They can be hereditary, such as muscle dystrophies, congenital, myotonic, metabolic, and myasthenic, or acquired. Among the latter ones we include idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM), toxic, endocrine, or infectious myopathies and myasthenia gravis. There is a current acceptance of considerable clinical and histopathological overlap among some muscle dystrophies and some IIM. However, the molecular profile is different and characteristic in each myopathy and the study into the patterns of expression of genes in the muscle can be useful in their differential diagnosis, including that of IIM. PMID:21794553

  2. Distal Myopathies: Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Shaibani, Aziz

    2016-08-01

    About 15% of myopathies present with distal weakness. Lack of sensory deficit, and preservation of sensory responses and deep tendon reflexes, favors a myopathic cause for distal weakness. Electromyogram confirms this diagnosis. Profuse spontaneous discharges are common in inflammatory, metabolic, and myofibrillar myopathy (MFM). If the clinical picture indicates a specific disease such as facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), genetic testing provides the quickest diagnosis. Otherwise, muscle biopsy can distinguish specific features. The common causes of myopathic distal weakness are FSHD, myotonic dystrophy, and inclusion body myositis. Other causes include MFM, distal muscular dystrophies, metabolic myopathies, and congenital myopathies. PMID:27445241

  3. Testosterone deficiency myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Orrell, R W; Woodrow, D F; Barrett, M C; Press, M; Dick, D J; Rowe, R C; Lane, R J

    1995-01-01

    Testosterone is recognized to have a positive effect on nitrogen balance and muscle development in hypogonadal men, but significantly myopathy secondary to testosterone deficiency has been reported only rarely. We describe a patient who presented with a myopathy associated with testosterone deficiency, and who demonstrated a significant functional and myometric response to treatment. PMID:7562829

  4. AIDS-related myopathy.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Rafiq A.; Yasmeen, Shagufta; Munn, Robert; Ruebner, Boris H.; Ellis, William G.

    1999-09-01

    Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is often associated with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and wasting is one of the defining clinical features of AIDS. Muscular weakness due to myopathy may develop at any stage of HIV infection. We report two illustrative cases of HIV-associated myopathies. One was due to inflammatory myosits most likely directly related to the HIV infection, and the other was most likely the result of mitochondrial damage due to zidovudine, a nucleoside analogue commonly used in treating HIV infection. Biopsies from both patients showed alterations of myofiber structures, of varying severity, culminating in necrosis, lipid droplets, and lymphoplasmocytic inflammatory response. The zidovudine-treated patient also showed distinctive mitochondrial changes, predominantly enlargement, variation in shape and size, and disorganization of the cristae. These two types of HIV-associated inflammatory myopathies are reviewed, along with other HIV-associated myopathies, including HIV wasting syndrome, nemaline rod myopathy, pyomyositis, rhabdomyolysis, cardiomyopathy, and other miscellaneous myopathies associated with HIV infection. PMID:11810429

  5. Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are a group of rare disorders including polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), and autoimmune necrotizing myopathies (NMs). The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies share many similarities. They present acutely, subacutely, or chronically with marked proximal and symmetric muscle weakness, except for associated distal and asymmetric weakness in inclusion body myositis. The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies also share a variable degree of creatine kinase (CK) elevation and a nonspecifically abnormal electromyogram demonstrating an irritative myopathy. The muscle pathology demonstrates inflammatory exudates of variable distribution within the muscle fascicle. Despite these similarities, the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are a heterogeneous group. The overlap syndrome (OS) refers to the association of PM, DM, or NM with connective tissue disease, such as scleroderma or systemic lupus erythematosus. In addition to elevated antinuclear antibodies (ANA), patients with OS may be weaker in the proximal arms than the legs mimicking the pattern seen in some muscular dystrophies. In this review, we focus on DM, PM, and NM and examine current and promising therapies. PMID:23117947

  6. Eosinophils in hereditary and inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Thomas; Fuchss, Johann; Schneider, Ilka; Stoltenburg-Didinger, Gisela; Hanisch, Frank

    2013-12-01

    It is not known whether eosinophilic myositis is a specific histopathological feature of limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2A (LGMD2A). Number and location of eosinophils in skeletal muscle biopsies (n=100) was analysed by Giemsa and modified hematoxylin/eosin staining in patients with genetically confirmed myopathies (LGMD2A, LGMD2B, LGMD2L, facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, dystrophinopathy), histologically confirmed idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM), dermatomyositis (DM), polymyositis), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (neurogenic control), and normal controls. The number of eosinophils/mm² was significantly higher in LGMD2A, PM, DM, and sIBM compared to controls but not significantly higher than other myopathies. A large overlap in the number of eosinophils/mm2 between all groups was seen. In all disease groups eosinophils were mainly found endomysially (46- 88%) and intra- and perivascularly (4-37%). There was no correlation between the numbers of eosinophils/mm² and (i) age at biopsy and (ii) the duration of the disease. The extent of myopathic, fibrotic, and inflammatory changes did not differ in samples with high and low eosinophil count. Eosinophils seem to represent an unspecific histological finding in hereditary and inflammatory myopathies, but also amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:24803842

  7. Statin-induced myopathies.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Michał; Stępień, Karolina M; Tomaszewska, Joanna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2011-01-01

    Statins are considered to be safe, well tolerated and the most efficient drugs for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, one of the main risk factor for atherosclerosis, and therefore they are frequently prescribed medications. The most severe adverse effect of statins is myotoxicity, in the form of myopathy, myalgia, myositis or rhabdomyolysis. Clinical trials commonly define statin toxicity as myalgia or muscle weakness with creatine kinase (CK) levels greater than 10 times the normal upper limit. Rhabdomyolysis is the most severe adverse effect of statins, which may result in acute renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation and death. The exact pathophysiology of statin-induced myopathy is not fully known. Multiple pathophysiological mechanisms may contribute to statin myotoxicity. This review focuses on a number of them. The prevention of statin-related myopathy involves using the lowest statin dose required to achieve therapeutic goals and avoiding polytherapy with drugs known to increase systemic exposure and myopathy risk. Currently, the only effective treatment of statin-induced myopathy is the discontinuation of statin use in patients affected by muscle aches, pains and elevated CK levels. PMID:22001973

  8. Evaluation of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-06

    Becker Muscular Dystrophy; Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2A (Calpain-3 Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2B (Miyoshi Myopathy, Dysferlin Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2I (FKRP-deficiency)

  9. [Myopathy caused by hypothyroidism].

    PubMed

    Paiva, C; Mouro, A M; Luís, M L; Fonseca, F; Quina, M

    1991-01-01

    The authors report a case of primary hypothyroidism where the main symptoms were caused by muscular lesions and disappeared after treatment with L-thyroxine. Based on this case study the authors then review both the clinical aspects and the diagnostical methods of hypothyroidism myopathy, noting its frequency, be it in terms of isolated laboratory changes or in terms of functional changes. PMID:1807095

  10. Genetics Home Reference: inclusion body myopathy 2

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions inclusion body myopathy 2 inclusion body myopathy 2 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Inclusion body myopathy 2 is a condition that primarily affects skeletal muscles , ...

  11. Collagen type VI myopathies.

    PubMed

    Bushby, Kate M D; Collins, James; Hicks, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in each of the three collagen VI genes COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3 cause two main types of muscle disorders: Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, a severe phenotype, and a mild to moderate phenotype Bethlem myopathy. Recently, two additional phenotypes, including a limb-girdle muscular dystrophy phenotype and an autosomal recessive myosclerosis reported in one family with mutations in COL6A2 have been reported. Collagen VI is an important component of the extracellular matrix which forms a microfibrillar network that is found in close association with the cell and surrounding basement membrane. Collagen VI is also found in the interstitial space of many tissues including muscle, tendon, skin, cartilage, and intervertebral discs. Thus, collagen VI mutations result in disorders with combined muscle and connective tissue involvement, including weakness, joint laxity and contractures, and abnormal skin findings.In this review we highlight the four recognized clinical phenotypes of collagen VI related - myopathies; Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), Bethlem myopathy (BM), autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy phenotype and autosomal recessive myosclerosis. We discuss the diagnostic criteria of these disorders, the molecular pathogenesis, genetics, treatment, and related disorders. PMID:24443028

  12. Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Barohn, Richard J.; Amato, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) consist of rare heterogenous autoimmune disorders that present with marked proximal and symmetric muscle weakness, except for distal and asymmetric weakness in inclusion body myositis (IBM). Besides frequent creatine kinase (CK) elevation, the electromyogram confirms the presence of an irritative myopathy. Extramuscular involvement affects a significant number of cases with interstitial lung disease (ILD), cutaneous in dermatomyositis (DM), systemic or joint manifestations and increased risk of malignancy especially in DM. Myositis specific autoantibodies influence phenotype of the IIM. Jo-1 antibodies are frequently associated with ILD and the newly described HMG-CoA reductase antibodies are characteristic of autoimmune necrotizing myopathy (NM). Muscle pathology ranges from inflammatory exudates of variable distribution, to intact muscle fiber invasion, necrosis, phagocytosis and in the case of IBM rimmed vacuoles and protein deposits. Despite many similarities, the IIM are a quite heterogeneous from the histopathological and pathogenetic standpoints in addition to some clinical and treatment-response difference. The field has witnessed significant advances in our understanding of pathophysiology and treatment of these rare disorders. In this review, we focus on DM, polymyositis (PM) and NM and examine current and promising therapies. The reader interested in more details on IBM is referred to the corresponding chapter in this issue. PMID:25037081

  13. Myalgias and Myopathies: Drug-Induced Myalgias and Myopathies.

    PubMed

    Holder, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Drugs can cause myalgias and myopathies through a variety of mechanisms. Most drug-induced myopathies are potentially reversible if recognized early. Prescribers should be familiar with common drug-induced myopathies and drug-drug interactions. Clinical presentations can be subacute or acute, ranging from benign muscle pain with mild elevations of serum creatine kinase to fulminant rhabdomyolysis with high creatine kinase levels and potentially life-threatening acute kidney injury. Myalgias and proximal muscle weakness are typical symptoms; onset can be weeks to months after drug exposure. Endocrine disorders and inflammatory etiologies should be excluded because their management may differ from that of drug-induced myopathies. Statin drugs are prescribed widely, and statin-induced myopathy is one of the most commonly recognized and studied myopathies. Risk factors include dose and type of statin prescribed, older age, female sex, genetic predisposition, and concomitant use of other drugs metabolized by the cytochrome P450 system. Glucocorticoids, immunologic drugs, and antimicrobials, as well as other drugs and alcohol, can cause myopathies. Management typically involves discontinuing the drug and switching to an alternative drug or considering an alternative dosing schedule. Referral to a neuromuscular subspecialist is warranted if symptoms persist. PMID:26734833

  14. Metabolic neuropathies and myopathies.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism may impact on muscle and peripheral nerve. Abnormalities involve mitochondria and other subcellular organelles such as peroxisomes and lysosomes related to the turnover and recycling of cellular compartments. Treatable causes are β-oxidation defects producing progressive neuropathy; pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency, porphyria, or vitamin B12 deficiency causing recurrent episodes of neuropathy or acute motor deficit mimicking Guillain-Barré syndrome. On the other hand, lysosomal (mucopolysaccharidosis, Gaucher and Fabry diseases), mitochondriopathic (mitochondrial or nuclear mutations or mDNA depletion), peroxisomal (adrenomyeloneuropathy, Refsum disease, sterol carrier protein-2 deficiency, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, α-methylacyl racemase deficiency) diseases are multisystemic disorders involving also the heart, liver, brain, retina, and kidney. Pathophysiology of most metabolic myopathies is related to the impairment of energy production or to abnormal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Main symptoms are exercise intolerance with myalgias, cramps and recurrent myoglobinuria or limb weakness associated with elevation of serum creatine kinase. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase deficiency, followed by acid maltase deficiency, and lipin deficiency, are the most common cause of isolated rhabdomyolysis. Metabolic myopathies are frequently associated to extra-neuromuscular disorders particularly involving the heart, liver, brain, retina, skin, and kidney. PMID:23622366

  15. Genetics Home Reference: nemaline myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bushby K, Van den Bergh P, Iannaccone S, Laing NG, Wallgren-Pettersson C. Identification of 45 novel mutations ... Clement S, Barois A, Muntoni F, Romero NB, Laing NG. Nemaline myopathy caused by absence of alpha-skeletal ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Salih myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... myopathy with fatal cardiomyopathy Salih CMD Salih congenital muscular dystrophy Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes ... Children's Cardiomyopathy Foundation Congenital Muscle Disease International Registry Muscular Dystrophy ... Dystrophy Canada Muscular Dystrophy UK Resource ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: centronuclear myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... abnormal side-to-side curvature of the spine ( scoliosis ). Rarely, individuals with centronuclear myopathy have a weakened ... health conditions: Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Surgery and Rehabilitation Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Related Information How are ...

  18. Anaesthesia in myotubular (centronuclear) myopathy.

    PubMed

    Breslin, D; Reid, J; Hayes, A; Mirakhur, R K

    2000-05-01

    A patient with a known history of myotubular myopathy presented for surgery for insertion of a tibial nail. Anasthesia was induced and maintained using an intravenous anasthetic technique. Neuromuscular function was assessed using mechanomyography, which showed a profound reduction in muscle contractility. In view of this, the use of muscle relaxants was avoided altogether. Nerve conduction was normal but electromyography showed small motor units, with generalised distribution, suggesting mild to moderately severe myopathy. The patient made a slow but uneventful recovery. PMID:10792141

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Laing distal myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... for This Page GeneReview: Laing Distal Myopathy Laing NG, Laing BA, Meredith C, Wilton SD, Robbins P, ... T, Bridges LR, Fabian V, Rozemuller A, Laing NG. Laing early onset distal myopathy: slow myosin defect ...

  20. Resveratrol and Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Bastin, Jean; Djouadi, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a natural polyphenolic compound produced by plants under various stress conditions. Resveratrol has been reported to exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-proliferative properties in mammalian cells and animal models, and might therefore exert pleiotropic beneficial effects in different pathophysiological states. More recently, resveratrol has also been shown to potentially target many mitochondrial metabolic pathways, including fatty acid β-oxidation or oxidative phosphorylation, leading to the up-regulation of the energy metabolism via signaling pathways involving PGC-1α, SIRT1, and/or AMP-kinase, which are not yet fully delineated. Some of resveratrol beneficial effects likely arise from its cellular effects in the skeletal muscle, which, surprisingly, has been given relatively little attention, compared to other target tissues. Here, we review the potential for resveratrol to ameliorate or correct mitochondrial metabolic deficiencies responsible for myopathies, due to inherited fatty acid β-oxidation or to respiratory chain defects, for which no treatment exists to date. We also review recent data supporting therapeutic effects of resveratrol in the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, a fatal genetic disease affecting the production of muscle dystrophin, associated to a variety of mitochondrial dysfunctions, which likely contribute to disease pathogenesis. PMID:27136581

  1. Resveratrol and Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bastin, Jean; Djouadi, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a natural polyphenolic compound produced by plants under various stress conditions. Resveratrol has been reported to exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-proliferative properties in mammalian cells and animal models, and might therefore exert pleiotropic beneficial effects in different pathophysiological states. More recently, resveratrol has also been shown to potentially target many mitochondrial metabolic pathways, including fatty acid β-oxidation or oxidative phosphorylation, leading to the up-regulation of the energy metabolism via signaling pathways involving PGC-1α, SIRT1, and/or AMP-kinase, which are not yet fully delineated. Some of resveratrol beneficial effects likely arise from its cellular effects in the skeletal muscle, which, surprisingly, has been given relatively little attention, compared to other target tissues. Here, we review the potential for resveratrol to ameliorate or correct mitochondrial metabolic deficiencies responsible for myopathies, due to inherited fatty acid β-oxidation or to respiratory chain defects, for which no treatment exists to date. We also review recent data supporting therapeutic effects of resveratrol in the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, a fatal genetic disease affecting the production of muscle dystrophin, associated to a variety of mitochondrial dysfunctions, which likely contribute to disease pathogenesis. PMID:27136581

  2. Nemaline myopathy caused by mutations in the nebulin gene may present as a distal myopathy.

    PubMed

    Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Pelin, Katarina; Herczegfalvi, Agnes; Karcagi, Veronika; Pouget, Jean; Franques, Jerôme; Pellissier, Jean François; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; von der Hagen, Maja; Huebner, Angela; Schoser, Benedikt; Lochmüller, Hanns; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2011-08-01

    Mutations in the nebulin gene are the main cause of autosomal recessive nemaline myopathy, with clinical presentations ranging from mild to severe disease. We have previously reported a nonspecific distal myopathy caused by homozygous missense mutations in the nebulin gene in six Finnish patients from four different families. Here we describe three non-Finnish patients in two unrelated families with distal nemaline myopathy caused by four different compound heterozygous nebulin mutations, only one of which is a missense mutation. One of the mutations has previously been identified in one family with the severe form of nemaline myopathy. We conclude that nemaline myopathy and distal myopathy caused by nebulin mutations form a clinical and histological continuum. Nemaline myopathy should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with an early-onset predominantly distal myopathy. PMID:21724397

  3. Genetics Home Reference: collagen VI-related myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions collagen VI-related myopathy collagen VI-related myopathy Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Collagen VI-related myopathy is a group of disorders ...

  4. Resistin in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the serum levels and local expression of resistin in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies to controls, and to determine the relationship between resistin levels, inflammation and disease activity. Methods Serum resistin levels were determined in 42 patients with inflammatory myopathies and 27 healthy controls. The association among resistin levels, inflammation, global disease activity and muscle strength was examined. The expression of resistin in muscle tissues from patients with inflammatory myopathies and healthy controls was evaluated. Gene expression and protein release from resistin-stimulated muscle and mononuclear cells were assessed. Results In patients with inflammatory myopathies, the serum levels of resistin were significantly higher than those observed in controls (8.53 ± 6.84 vs. 4.54 ± 1.08 ng/ml, P < 0.0001) and correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (r = 0.328, P = 0.044) and myositis disease activity assessment visual analogue scales (MYOACT) (r = 0.382, P = 0.026). Stronger association was observed between the levels of serum resistin and CRP levels (r = 0.717, P = 0.037) as well as MYOACT (r = 0.798, P = 0.007), and there was a trend towards correlation between serum resistin and myoglobin levels (r = 0.650, P = 0.067) in anti-Jo-1 positive patients. Furthermore, in patients with dermatomyositis, serum resistin levels significantly correlated with MYOACT (r = 0.667, P = 0.001), creatine kinase (r = 0.739, P = 0.001) and myoglobin levels (r = 0.791, P = 0.0003) and showed a trend towards correlation with CRP levels (r = 0.447, P = 0.067). Resistin expression in muscle tissue was significantly higher in patients with inflammatory myopathies compared to controls, and resistin induced the expression of interleukins (IL)-1β and IL-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 in mononuclear cells but not in myocytes. Conclusions The results of this study

  5. A Diagnostic Algorithm for Metabolic Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Berardo, Andres; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic myopathies comprise a clinically and etiologically diverse group of disorders caused by defects in cellular energy metabolism, including the breakdown of carbohydrates and fatty acids to generate adenosine triphosphate, predominantly through mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Accordingly, the three main categories of metabolic myopathies are glycogen storage diseases, fatty acid oxidation defects, and mitochondrial disorders due to respiratory chain impairment. The wide clinical spectrum of metabolic myopathies ranges from severe infantile-onset multisystemic diseases to adult-onset isolated myopathies with exertional cramps. Diagnosing these diverse disorders often is challenging because clinical features such as recurrent myoglobinuria and exercise intolerance are common to all three types of metabolic myopathy. Nevertheless, distinct clinical manifestations are important to recognize as they can guide diagnostic testing and lead to the correct diagnosis. This article briefly reviews general clinical aspects of metabolic myopathies and highlights approaches to diagnosing the relatively more frequent subtypes (Fig. 1). PMID:20425236

  6. Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism in a Boy with Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Haq, T; Pathan, M F; Ikhtaire, S

    2016-01-01

    Hypogonadism is seldom seen together with myopathy, although testosterone contributes to muscle strength. We present here a rare case of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with myopathy in a 20 year old male. He had flaccid quadriparesis with raised creatinine phosphokinase. Hormone assays revealed low testosterone as well as low luteinising hormone and follicle stimulating hormone levels. Tests to exclude androgen deficiency should be carried out in male patients with myopathy. PMID:26931274

  7. Dermal ultrastructure in collagen VI myopathy.

    PubMed

    Hermanns-Lê, Trinh; Piérard, Gérald E; Piérard-Franchimont, Claudine; Delvenne, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    The COL VI mutations are responsible for a spectrum of myopathies. The authors report cutaneous ultrastructural alterations in a patient with COL6A2 myopathy. The changes include variations in size of collagen fibrils, flower-like sections of collagen fibrils, as well as thickening of vessel and nerve basement membranes. Electron microscopy of a skin biopsy contributes to the diagnosis of COL VI myopathies. PMID:24134684

  8. Stepwise Approach to Myopathy in Systemic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Jasvinder

    2011-01-01

    Muscle diseases can constitute a large variety of both acquired and hereditary disorders. Myopathies in systemic disease results from several different disease processes including endocrine, inflammatory, paraneoplastic, infectious, drug- and toxin-induced, critical illness myopathy, metabolic, and myopathies with other systemic disorders. Patients with systemic myopathies often present acutely or sub acutely. On the other hand, familial myopathies or dystrophies generally present in a chronic fashion with exceptions of metabolic myopathies where symptoms on occasion can be precipitated acutely. Most of the inflammatory myopathies can have a chance association with malignant lesions; the incidence appears to be specifically increased only in patients with dermatomyositis. In dealing with myopathies associated with systemic illnesses, the focus will be on the acquired causes. Management is beyond the scope of this chapter. Prognosis is based upon the underlying cause and, most of the time, carries a good prognosis. In order to approach a patient with suspected myopathy from systemic disease, a stepwise approach is utilized. PMID:21886637

  9. Metabolic myopathies: clinical features and diagnostic approach.

    PubMed

    Smith, Edward C; El-Gharbawy, Areeg; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2011-05-01

    The rheumatologist is frequently called on to evaluate patients with complaints of myalgia, muscle cramps, and fatigue. The evaluation of these patients presents a diagnostic challenge given the nonspecific and intermittent nature of their complaints, often leading to inappropriate diagnostic testing. When these symptoms are associated with physical exertion, a metabolic myopathy should be suspected Although inflammatory myopathies may present with similar features, such a pattern should prompt a thorough evaluation for an underlying metabolic myopathy. This review discusses the most common causes of metabolic myopathies and reviews the current diagnostic options available to the clinician. PMID:21444020

  10. Respiratory assessment in centronuclear myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Barbara K; Goddard, Melissa; Childers, Martin K.

    2014-01-01

    The centronuclear myopathies (CNMs) are a group of inherited neuromuscular disorders classified as congenital myopathies. While several causative genes have been identified, some patients do not harbor any of the currently known mutations. These diverse disorders have common histological features, which include a high proportion of centrally-nucleated muscle fibers, and clinical attributes of muscle weakness and respiratory insufficiency. Respiratory problems in CNMs may manifest initially during sleep, but daytime symptoms, ineffective airway clearance, and hypoventilation predominate as more severe respiratory muscle dysfunction evolves. Respiratory muscle capacity can be evaluated using a variety of clinical tests selected with consideration for the age and baseline motor function of the patient. Similar clinical tests of respiratory function can also be incorporated into preclinical CNM canine models to offer insight for clinical trials. Since respiratory problems account for significant morbidity in patients, routine assessments of respiratory muscle function are discussed. PMID:24668768

  11. Congenital myopathies: clinical and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Thaha, Fazil; Gayathri, N; Nalini, A

    2011-01-01

    Congenital myopathies (CMs), a group of relatively non-progressive disorders presents with weakness and hypotonia of varying severity, morphologically recognized by specific structural abnormalities within the myofiber. This report presents the clinical and Histopathological features of 40 patients with CMs. Centronuclear myopathy was the commonest (40%) followed by congenital fiber type disproportion (37.5%). Other less common CMs included: myotubular myopathy (5%), nemaline myopathy (5%), central core disease (5%), multicore disease (2.5%) and congenital myopathy with tubular aggregate (5%). Immunolabeling to desmin corresponded to morphological changes within the myofibers while vimentin was negative in all the patients. There is no combined role of these proteins in the disease process. PMID:22234203

  12. A diagnostic algorithm for metabolic myopathies.

    PubMed

    Berardo, Andres; DiMauro, Salvatore; Hirano, Michio

    2010-03-01

    Metabolic myopathies comprise a clinically and etiologically diverse group of disorders caused by defects in cellular energy metabolism, including the breakdown of carbohydrates and fatty acids to generate adenosine triphosphate, predominantly through mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Accordingly, the three main categories of metabolic myopathies are glycogen storage diseases, fatty acid oxidation defects, and mitochondrial disorders due to respiratory chain impairment. The wide clinical spectrum of metabolic myopathies ranges from severe infantile-onset multisystemic diseases to adult-onset isolated myopathies with exertional cramps. Diagnosing these diverse disorders often is challenging because clinical features such as recurrent myoglobinuria and exercise intolerance are common to all three types of metabolic myopathy. Nevertheless, distinct clinical manifestations are important to recognize as they can guide diagnostic testing and lead to the correct diagnosis. This article briefly reviews general clinical aspects of metabolic myopathies and highlights approaches to diagnosing the relatively more frequent subtypes (Fig. 1). Fig. 1 Clinical algorithm for patients with exercise intolerance in whom a metabolic myopathy is suspected. CK-creatine kinase; COX-cytochrome c oxidase; CPT-carnitine palmitoyl transferase; cyt b-cytochrome b; mtDNA-mitochondrial DNA; nDNA-nuclear DNA; PFK-phosphofructokinase; PGAM-phosphoglycerate mutase; PGK-phosphoglycerate kinase; PPL-myophosphorylase; RRF-ragged red fibers; TFP-trifunctional protein deficiency; VLCAD-very long-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase. PMID:20425236

  13. Myopathy with anti-HMGCR antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Alshehri, Ali; Choksi, Rati; Bucelli, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze clinical features and myopathology changes in muscle fibers, connective tissue, and vessels in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) antibody–associated myopathies. Methods: Retrospective review of records and myopathologic features of 49 consecutive patients with myopathies and serum HMGCR antibodies. Results: Clinical features included onset age from 12 to 83 years, female predominance (67%), proximal, symmetric weakness (84%), muscle discomfort (78%), dysphagia (35%), systemic features, including skin rash and interstitial lung disease (37%), statin use (38%), and a high serum creatine kinase (83%). Myopathology included muscle fiber necrosis or regeneration (66%), myonuclear pathology (43%), perimysial connective tissue damage (61%), and lymphocytic foci (27%). Conclusions: Patients with HMGCR antibody–associated myopathies present with weakness and muscle discomfort and often have damage to both perimysial connective tissue and muscle fibers, with necrosis and myonuclear pathology. Only a minority of patients with HMGCR antibody–associated myopathies have a history of statin exposure. PMID:26090508

  14. Fit 2-B FATHERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiorano, Joseph J.

    2001-01-01

    Fit 2-B FATHERS is a parenting-skills education program for incarcerated adult males. The goals of this program are for participants to have reduced recidivism rates and a reduced risk of their children acquiring criminal records. These goals are accomplished by helping participants become physically, practically, and socially fit for the demands…

  15. Severe reversible myopathy due to typhoid.

    PubMed

    Mody, G M; Gathiram, V; Abdulla, E A

    1989-04-01

    An 18-year-old Black male presented to hospital with a fever and inability to walk due to severe proximal myopathy. He was found to have typhoid, and marked elevation of the creatine phosphokinase with myoglobinuria was recorded. After appropriate antibiotic therapy the creatine phosphokinase level returned to normal and the patient made a complete recovery. Although neuropsychiatric manifestations have been commonly recorded in typhoid, the complication of a myopathy has not been frequently noted. PMID:2709478

  16. Gene therapy in monogenic congenital myopathies.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xuan; Goddard, Melissa A; Mack, David L; Childers, Martin K

    2016-04-15

    Current treatment options for patients with monogenetic congenital myopathies (MCM) ameliorate the symptoms of the disorder without resolving the underlying cause. However, gene therapies are being developed where the mutated or deficient gene target is replaced. Preclinical findings in animal models appear promising, as illustrated by gene replacement for X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) in canine and murine models. Prospective applications and approaches to gene replacement therapy, using these disorders as examples, are discussed in this review. PMID:26454198

  17. Approach to the diagnosis of congenital myopathies.

    PubMed

    North, Kathryn N; Wang, Ching H; Clarke, Nigel; Jungbluth, Heinz; Vainzof, Mariz; Dowling, James J; Amburgey, Kimberly; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Beggs, Alan H; Sewry, Caroline; Laing, Nigel G; Bönnemann, Carsten G

    2014-02-01

    Over the past decade there have been major advances in defining the genetic basis of the majority of congenital myopathy subtypes. However the relationship between each congenital myopathy, defined on histological grounds, and the genetic cause is complex. Many of the congenital myopathies are due to mutations in more than one gene, and mutations in the same gene can cause different muscle pathologies. The International Standard of Care Committee for Congenital Myopathies performed a literature review and consulted a group of experts in the field to develop a summary of (1) the key features common to all forms of congenital myopathy and (2) the specific features that help to discriminate between the different genetic subtypes. The consensus statement was refined by two rounds of on-line survey, and a three-day workshop. This consensus statement provides guidelines to the physician assessing the infant or child with hypotonia and weakness. We summarise the clinical features that are most suggestive of a congenital myopathy, the major differential diagnoses and the features on clinical examination, investigations, muscle pathology and muscle imaging that are suggestive of a specific genetic diagnosis to assist in prioritisation of genetic testing of known genes. As next generation sequencing becomes increasingly used as a diagnostic tool in clinical practise, these guidelines will assist in determining which sequence variations are likely to be pathogenic. PMID:24456932

  18. Statin-induced myopathy in the rat: relationship between systemic exposure, muscle exposure and myopathy.

    PubMed

    Sidaway, J; Wang, Y; Marsden, A M; Orton, T C; Westwood, F R; Azuma, C T; Scott, R C

    2009-01-01

    Rare instances of myopathy are associated with all statins, but cerivastatin was withdrawn from clinical use due to a greater incidence of myopathy. The mechanism of statin-induced myopathy with respect to tissue disposition was investigated by measuring the systemic, hepatic, and skeletal muscle exposure of cerivastatin, rosuvastatin, and simvastatin in rats before and after muscle damage. The development of myopathy was not associated with the accumulation of statins in skeletal muscle. For each statin exposure was equivalent in muscles irrespective of their fibre-type sensitivity to myopathy. The low amount of each statin in skeletal muscle relative to the liver does not support a significant role for transporters in the disposition of statins in skeletal muscle. Finally, the concentration of cerivastatin necessary to cause necrosis in skeletal muscle was considerably lower than rosuvastatin or simvastatin, supporting the concept cerivastatin is intrinsically more myotoxic than other statins. PMID:19219751

  19. Boeing XF2B-1 (F2B-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Boeing XF2B-1 (F2B-1): Serving as the prototype for the F2B-1 shipboard fighter, the XF2B-1 differed visually in having a pointed spinner and an unbalanced rudder. Like many aircraft of its day, the Boeing model 69 was powered by a Pratt & Whitney Wasp radial engine.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions MEMSA myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia Enable Javascript to view the ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia , commonly called MEMSA , is part ...

  1. Familial myopathy with tubular aggregates associated with abnormal pupils.

    PubMed

    Shahrizaila, Nortina; Lowe, James; Wills, Adrian

    2004-09-28

    The authors describe familial tubular aggregate myopathy associated with abnormal pupils. Four family members from two generations had myopathy and pupillary abnormalities. The myopathologic findings consisted of tubular aggregates in many fibers but predominantly type I fibers. PMID:15452313

  2. Myopathy associated with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    He, Dian; Li, Ya; Dai, Qingqing; Zhang, Yifan; Xu, Zhu; Li, Yuan; Cai, Gang; Chu, Lan

    2016-10-01

    Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) were generally thought to affect only central nervous system and spare peripheral aquaporin-4 (AQP4)-expressing organs. In recent years, however, increasing evidence has shown that skeletal muscle is involved in NMOSD. We provided a comprehensive review of the relevant literature and summarized the clinical and pathological characteristics of myopathy associated with NMOSD. NMOSD-associated myopathy seems to be characterized by mild muscle symptoms with prominent hyperCKemia and minimal changes on conventional pathological staining. Loss of AQP4 and deposition of IgG and activated complement products on sarcolemma of type II fibers are diagnostic features on immunohistochemical examinations. Creatine kinase leakage as a result of AQP4-IgG-induced, complement-mediated sarcolemmal injury may be a potential mechanism for hyperCKemia. Myopathy should be considered a component of NMOSD unified by AQP4-IgG seropositivity. PMID:26514543

  3. SACALC2B

    2007-02-08

    SACALC2B calculates the average solid angle subtended by a rectangular or circular detector window to a coaxial or non-coaxial rectangular, circular or point source, including where the source and detector planes are not parallel. SACALC_CYL calculates the average solid angle subtended by a cylinder to a rectangular or circular source, plane or thick, at any location and orientation. This is needed, for example, in calculating the intrinsic gamma efficiency of a detector such as amore » GM tube. The program also calculates the number of hits on the cylinder side and on each end, and the average path length through the detector volume (assuming no scattering or absorption). Point sources can be modelled by using a circular source of zero radius.« less

  4. Diagnosis and treatment of mitochondrial myopathies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting from primary dysfunction of the respiratory chain. Muscle tissue is highly metabolically active, and therefore myopathy is a common element of the clinical presentation of these disorders, although this may be overshadowed by central neurological features. This review is aimed at a general medical and neurologist readership and provides a clinical approach to the recognition, investigation, and treatment of mitochondrial myopathies. Emphasis is placed on practical management considerations while including some recent updates in the field. PMID:21867371

  5. Muscle fibre type changes in hypothyroid myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    McKeran, R O; Slavin, G; Andrews, T M; Ward, P; Mair, W G

    1975-01-01

    Changes in muscle fibre type in hypothyroid myopathy were studied by serial percutaneous needle biopsy of vastus lateralis before and during treatment with L-thyroxine. A type II fibre atrophy and loss was found, which correlated with the clinical and biochemical evidence of a myopathy. The type II fibre atrophy was corrected by L-thyroxine but type II fibre loss was still apparent in severely myopathic patients up to two years after starting treatment. The pathogenesis and significance of type II fibre atrophy and loss are discussed in relation to prognosis. PMID:1184764

  6. Myopathies of endocrine disorders: A prospective clinical and biochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vikas; Borah, Papori; Basumatary, Lakshya J.; Das, Marami; Goswami, Munindra; Kayal, Ashok K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Major categories of endocrine myopathy include those associated with: Adrenal dysfunction (as in Cushing's disease or steroid myopathy); thyroid dysfunction (as in myxedema coma or thyrotoxic myopathy); vitamin D deficiency; parathyroid dysfunction; and pituitary dysfunction. Steroid myopathy is the most common endocrine myopathy. Objective: To study the etiology, varied presentations, and outcome after therapy of patients with endocrine myopathies. Materials and Methods: Myopathy was evaluated by the standard clinical procedures: Detailed clinical history, manual muscle strength testing, and creatine phosphokinase (CPK). Endocrine disorders were diagnosed as per clinical features and biochemical parameters. The treatment was given to patients as per underlying endocrine disease. Myopathy was assessed before and after treatment. Results: Out of the 37 patients who were diagnosed with endocrine myopathies, thyroid dysfunction was the most common cause (17 cases), followed by vitamin D deficiency in nine, adrenal dysfunction in six, parathyroid dysfunction in three, and pituitary dysfunction in two. Some patients had atypical presentation (repeated falls in one, tongue fasciculations in one, neck weakness in five, one with ptosis and facial weakness, asymmetrical onset in one, and calf hypertrophy in one. The serum creatine kinase (CK) concentration did not correlate with muscle weakness. Following the treatment regimen which was specific for a given myopathy, 26 patients recovered fully. Conclusion: We found varied clinical presentations of endocrine myopathies. All the patients with neuromuscular complaints should be investigated for endocrine causes because significant number of them recovers fully with specific treatment. PMID:25221399

  7. Clinicopathological Features of Telbivudine-Associated Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Ambang, Tomica; Tan, Joo-San; Ong, Sheila; Wong, Kum-Thong; Goh, Khean-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Telbivudine, a thymidine nucleoside analog, is a common therapeutic option for chronic hepatitis B infection. While raised serum creatine kinase is common, myopathy associated with telbivudine is rare. Reports on its myopathological features are few and immunohistochemical analyses of inflammatory cell infiltrates have not been previously described. We describe the clinical, myopathological and immunohistochemical features of four patients who developed myopathy after telbivudine therapy for chronic hepatitis B infection. All four patients presented with progressive proximal muscle weakness, elevation of serum creatine kinase and myopathic changes on electromyography. Muscle biopsies showed myofiber degeneration/necrosis, regeneration, and fibers with cytoplasmic bodies and cytochrome c oxidase deficiency. There was minimal inflammation associated with strong sarcolemmal overexpression of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I). Upon withdrawal of telbivudine, muscle weakness improved in all patients and eventually completely resolved in three. In our series, telbivudine-associated myopathy is characterized by necrotizing myopathy which improved on drug withdrawal. Although the occasional loss of cytochrome c oxidase is consistent with mitochondrial toxicity, the overexpression of MHC class I in all patients could suggest an underlying immune-mediated mechanism which may warrant further investigation. PMID:27611456

  8. Multidisciplinary Approach to the Management of Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    M. King, Wendy; Kissel, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review Aside from some inflammatory myopathies and very few genetic disorders, there are no therapies that make most patients with myopathies stronger. Consequently, the management of these patients can be frustrating for patients and their families as well as the clinicians taking care of them. Treatment of these patients must involve a comprehensive approach focused on limiting the secondary effects of skeletal muscle weakness, managing comorbidities associated with specific diseases, and, most importantly, optimizing patients’ functional abilities and quality of life in terms of their ability to accomplish activities of daily living. While the approach to each patient differs depending on their disease, certain common themes can be addressed in each patient. This review highlights an approach centered on four conceptual themes (“the Four S’s”): Strength therapies, Supportive care, Symptomatic therapies, and pSychological support. Recent Findings Although relatively few well-designed studies have been done that highlight conservative management of patients with various myopathies, an emerging literature helps guide the clinician in certain key areas, especially in relation to cardiac and pulmonary management of these patients. Summary While disease-altering therapies have proven elusive for many muscle diseases, a multimodal approach to the conservative and supportive care of these patients can markedly improve their quality of life. Pharmacologic treatment options for specific myopathies will not be addressed in this article but are covered elsewhere in this issue of CONTINUUM. PMID:24305452

  9. Genetic interaction of hnRNPA2B1 and DNAJB6 in a Drosophila model of multisystem proteinopathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Songqing; Zhang, Peipei; Freibaum, Brian D; Kim, Nam Chul; Kolaitis, Regina-Maria; Molliex, Amandine; Kanagaraj, Anderson P; Yabe, Ichiro; Tanino, Mishie; Tanaka, Shinya; Sasaki, Hidenao; Ross, Eric D; Taylor, J Paul; Kim, Hong Joo

    2016-03-01

    Adult-onset inherited myopathies with similar pathological features, including hereditary inclusion body myopathy (hIBM) and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD), are a genetically heterogeneous group of muscle diseases. It is unclear whether these inherited myopathies initiated by mutations in distinct classes of genes are etiologically related. Here, we exploit a genetic model system to establish a mechanistic link between diseases caused by mutations in two distinct genes, hnRNPA2B1 and DNAJB6. Hrb98DE and mrj are the Drosophila melanogaster homologs of human hnRNPA2B1 and DNAJB6, respectively. We introduced disease-homologous mutations to Hrb98DE, thus capturing mutation-dependent phenotypes in a genetically tractable model system. Ectopic expression of the disease-associated mutant form of hnRNPA2B1 or Hrb98DE in fly muscle resulted in progressive, age-dependent cytoplasmic inclusion pathology, as observed in humans with hnRNPA2B1-related myopathy. Cytoplasmic inclusions consisted of hnRNPA2B1 or Hrb98DE protein in association with the stress granule marker ROX8 and additional endogenous RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), suggesting that these pathological inclusions are related to stress granules. Notably, TDP-43 was also recruited to these cytoplasmic inclusions. Remarkably, overexpression of MRJ rescued this phenotype and suppressed the formation of cytoplasmic inclusions, whereas reduction of endogenous MRJ by a classical loss of function allele enhanced it. Moreover, wild-type, but not disease-associated, mutant forms of MRJ interacted with RBPs after heat shock and prevented their accumulation in aggregates. These results indicate both genetic and physical interactions between disease-linked RBPs and DNAJB6/mrj, suggesting etiologic overlap between the pathogenesis of hIBM and LGMD initiated by mutations in hnRNPA2B1 and DNAJB6. PMID:26744327

  10. Centronuclear myopathy in a Border collie dog.

    PubMed

    Eminaga, S; Cherubini, G B; Shelton, G D

    2012-10-01

    A two-year old, male entire Border collie was presented with a one-year history of exercise-induced collapsing on the pelvic limbs. Physical examination revealed generalised muscle atrophy. Neurological examination supported a generalised neuromuscular disorder. Electromyography revealed spontaneous electrical activity in almost all muscles. Unfixed and formaldehyde-fixed biopsy samples were collected from the triceps brachii, longissimus and vastus lateralis muscles. Histopathological, histochemical and ultrastructural examinations of biopsy specimens were consistent with either centronuclear or myotubular myopathy. The dog clinically improved with supportive treatment with L-carnitine, co-enzyme Q10 and vitamin B compound. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of centronuclear/myotubular myopathy in a Border collie. PMID:23013377

  11. Autoimmune Myopathies: Where Do We Stand?

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Jean-Philippe; Marie, Isabelle; Jouen, Fabienne; Boyer, Olivier; Martinet, Jérémie

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs) as a whole represent a major health concern and remain a medical and scientific challenge. Some of them, such as multiple sclerosis or type 1 diabetes, have been actively investigated for many decades. Autoimmune myopathies (AIMs), also referred to as idiopathic inflammatory myopathies or myositis, represent a group of very severe AID for which we have a more limited pathophysiological knowledge. AIM encompass a group of, individually rare but collectively not so uncommon, diseases characterized by symmetrical proximal muscle weakness, increased serum muscle enzymes such as creatine kinase, myopathic changes on electromyography, and several typical histological patterns on muscle biopsy, including the presence of inflammatory cell infiltrates in muscle tissue. Importantly, some AIMs are strongly related to cancer. Here, we review the current knowledge on the most prevalent forms of AIM and, notably, the diagnostic contribution of autoantibodies. PMID:27379096

  12. Bethlem myopathy: An autosomal dominant myopathy with flexion contractures, keloids, and follicular hyperkeratosis.

    PubMed

    Saroja, Aralikatte Onkarappa; Naik, Karkal Ravishankar; Nalini, Atcharayam; Gayathri, Narayanappa

    2013-10-01

    Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy form a spectrum of collagenopathies caused by genetic mutations encoding for any of the three subunits of collagen VI. Bethlem phenotype is relatively benign and is characterized by proximal dominant myopathy, keloids, contractures, distal hyperextensibility, and follicular hyperkeratosis. Three patients from a single family were diagnosed to have Bethlem myopathy based on European Neuromuscular Centre Bethlem Consortium criteria. Affected father and his both sons had slowly progressive proximal dominant weakness and recurrent falls from the first decade. Both children aged 18 and 20 years were ambulant at presentation. All had flexion contractures, keloids, and follicular hyperkeratosis without muscle hypertrophy. Creatinine kinase was mildly elevated and electromyography revealed myopathic features. Muscle imaging revealed severe involvement of glutei and vasti with "central shadow" in rectus femoris. Muscle biopsy in the father showed dystrophic changes with normal immmunostaining for collagen VI, sarcoglycans, and dysferlin. PMID:24339618

  13. Bethlem myopathy: An autosomal dominant myopathy with flexion contractures, keloids, and follicular hyperkeratosis

    PubMed Central

    Saroja, Aralikatte Onkarappa; Naik, Karkal Ravishankar; Nalini, Atcharayam; Gayathri, Narayanappa

    2013-01-01

    Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy form a spectrum of collagenopathies caused by genetic mutations encoding for any of the three subunits of collagen VI. Bethlem phenotype is relatively benign and is characterized by proximal dominant myopathy, keloids, contractures, distal hyperextensibility, and follicular hyperkeratosis. Three patients from a single family were diagnosed to have Bethlem myopathy based on European Neuromuscular Centre Bethlem Consortium criteria. Affected father and his both sons had slowly progressive proximal dominant weakness and recurrent falls from the first decade. Both children aged 18 and 20 years were ambulant at presentation. All had flexion contractures, keloids, and follicular hyperkeratosis without muscle hypertrophy. Creatinine kinase was mildly elevated and electromyography revealed myopathic features. Muscle imaging revealed severe involvement of glutei and vasti with “central shadow” in rectus femoris. Muscle biopsy in the father showed dystrophic changes with normal immmunostaining for collagen VI, sarcoglycans, and dysferlin. PMID:24339618

  14. Diagnosis and classification of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, I E; Miller, F W; Tjärnlund, A; Bottai, M

    2016-07-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) are a heterogeneous group of diseases, collectively termed myositis, sharing symptoms of muscle weakness, fatigue and inflammation. Other organs are frequently involved, supporting the notion that these are systemic inflammatory diseases. The IIMs can be subgrouped into dermatomyositis, polymyositis and inclusion body myositis. The myositis-specific autoantibodies (MSAs) identify other and often more distinct clinical phenotypes, such as the antisynthetase syndrome with antisynthetase autoantibodies and frequent interstitial lung disease and anti-SRP and anti-HMGCR autoantibodies that identify necrotizing myopathy. The MSAs are important both to support myositis diagnosis and to identify subgroups with different patterns of extramuscular organ involvement such as interstitial lung disease. Another cornerstone in the diagnostic procedure is muscle biopsy to identify inflammation and to exclude noninflammatory myopathies. Treatment effect and prognosis vary by subgroup. To develop new and better therapies, validated classification criteria that identify distinct subgroups of myositis are critical. The lack of such criteria was the main rationale for the development of new classification criteria for IIMs, which are summarized in this review; the historical background regarding previous diagnostic and classification criteria is also reviewed. As the IIMs are rare diseases with a prevalence of 10 in 100 000 individuals, an international collaboration was essential, as was the interdisciplinary effort including experts in adult and paediatric rheumatology, neurology, dermatology and epidemiology. The new criteria have been developed based on data from more than 1500 patients from 47 centres worldwide and are based on clinically easily available variables. PMID:27320359

  15. Extraocular mitochondrial myopathies and their differential diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Schoser, Benedikt G H; Pongratz, Dieter

    2006-06-01

    The diagnosis of mitochondrial myopathy depends upon a constellation of findings, family history, type of muscle involvement, specific laboratory abnormalities, and the results of histological, pathobiochemical and genetic analysis. In the present paper, the authors describe the diagnostic approach to mitochondrial myopathies manifesting as extraocular muscle disease. The most common ocular manifestation of mitochondrial myopathy is progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO). To exclude myasthenia gravis, ocular myositis, thyroid associated orbitopathy, oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy, and congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles in patients with an early onset or long-lasting very slowly progressive ptosis and external ophthalmoplegia, almost without any diplopia, and normal to mildly elevated serum creatine kinase and lactate, electromyography, nerve conduction studies and MRI of the orbits should be performed. A PEO phenotype forces one to look comprehensively for other multisystemic mitochondrial features (e.g., exercise induced weakness, encephalopathy, polyneuropathy, diabetes, heart disease). Thereafter, and presently even in familiar PEO, a diagnostic muscle biopsy should be taken. Histological and ultrastructural hallmarks are mitochondrial proliferations and structural abnormalities, lipid storage, ragged-red fibers, or cytochrome-C negative myofibers. In addition, Southern blotting may reveal the common deletion, or molecular analysis may verify specific mutations of distinct mitochondrial or nuclear genes. PMID:16760117

  16. GNE Myopathy: current update and future therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nishino, Ichizo; Carrillo-Carrasco, Nuria; Argov, Zohar

    2015-01-01

    GNE myopathy is an autosomal recessive muscle disease due to biallelic mutations in GNE, a gene encoding for a single protein with key enzymatic activities in sialic acid biosynthetic pathway. The diagnosis should be considered primarily in patients presenting with distal weakness (foot drop) in early adulthood (other onset symptoms are possible too). The disease slowly progresses to involve other lower and upper extremities’ muscles, with marked sparing of the quadriceps. Characteristic findings found in biopsies of affected muscles include “rimmed” (autophagic) vacuoles, aggregation of various proteins, and fiber size variation. The diagnosis is confirmed by sequencing of the GNE gene. Note that we use a new mutation nomenclature based upon the longest transcript (GenBank: NM_001128227), which encodes a 31-amino-acid longer protein than the originally described one (GenBank: NM_005476), which has been used previously in most papers. Given the pathophysiology of the disease, recent clinical trials have evaluated the use of sialic acid or ManNAc (a precursor of sialic acid) in patients with GNE myopathy as well as early gene therapy trials. Now that therapies are under investigation, it is critical that a timely and accurate diagnosis is made in patients with GNE myopathy. PMID:25002140

  17. [Iatrogeny. The importance of clinical diagnosis. Myopathies induced by clofibrate].

    PubMed

    Godoy, J M; Nicaretta, D H; Balassiano, S L; Skacel, M

    1992-03-01

    The authors describe the neurological manifestations of a female patient with hypercholesterolemia who developed myopathy in the course of her treatment with clofibrate. After the drug was tapered off, the neurological signs and symptoms disappeared. Therefore, attention is called for the importance of the differential diagnosis of iatrogenic myopathies with polymyositis. PMID:1307471

  18. An Unusual Case of Statin-Induced Myopathy: Anti-HMGCoA Necrotizing Autoimmune Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Laura; Pfeifer, Kurt; Mammen, Andrew L; Shahnoor, Nazima; Konersman, Chamindra G

    2015-12-01

    Statins are some of the most widely prescribed medications, and though generally well tolerated, can lead to a self-limited myopathy in a minority of patients. Recently, these medications have been associated with a necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (NAM). Statin-associated NAM is characterized by irritable myopathy on electromyography (EMG) and muscle necrosis with minimal inflammation on muscle biopsy. The case presented is a 63-year-old woman who has continued elevation of creatine kinase (CK) after discontinuation of statin therapy. She has irritable myopathy on EMG and NAM is confirmed by muscle biopsy. She subsequently tests positive for an experimental anti-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (anti-HMGCoA) antibody that is found to be present in patients with statin-associated NAM. Though statin-associated NAM is a relatively rare entity, it is an important consideration for the general internist in patients who continue to have CK elevation and weakness after discontinuation of statin therapy. Continued research is necessary to better define statin-specific and dose-dependent risk, as well as optimal treatment for this condition. PMID:25855481

  19. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and in nearby lymph nodes. Also shown are the bile duct, pancreatic duct, and duodenum. Stage IIB pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes and ...

  20. Exertional myopathy in whooping cranes (Grus americana) with prognostic guidlelines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanley, C.S.; Thomas, N.J.; Paul-Murphy, P.; Hartup, B.K.

    2005-01-01

    Exertional myopathy developed in three whooping cranes (Grus americana) secondary to routine capture, handling, and trauma. Presumptive diagnosis of exertional myopathy was based on history of recent capture or trauma, clinical signs, and elevation of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and serum potassium. Treatments were attempted in each case, but ultimately were not successful. Gross and microscopic lesions at necropsy confirmed the diagnosis in each case, with the leg musculature most severely affected. Guidelines for determining prognosis of exertional myopathy in cranes have been included based on the analysis of these cases and others in the literature. As treatment is largely unrewarding, prevention remains the key in controlling exertional myopathy. Identification of predisposing factors and proper handling, immobilization, and transportation techniques can help prevent development of exertional myopathy in cranes.

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory myopathy: issues and management

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Christine

    2012-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies include polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM) and inclusion body myositis (IBM). The specific etiologies of these muscle diseases are not well known and are thought to involve components of the humoral and cellular immune system as well as other nonimmune factors. Diagnosing these myopathies involves a laboratory evaluation, imaging studies, multidisciplinary consultations, histologic examination and potentially genetic studies. Despite all that we currently know about inflammatory muscle disease with these studies, we find that our current concept of muscle disease is changing. In the cases of immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy and inclusion body myositis, the concept of inflammation needs to be rethought. Moreover, the classification schemes for these idiopathic myopathies may need updating to include current research findings that relate to pathogenesis. With ongoing discoveries, classification and appropriate treatment is becoming increasingly challenging. This paper discusses the inflammatory myopathies, the challenges to diagnosis, classification controversies and potential treatment options. PMID:22870499

  2. Antisynthetase syndrome: not just an inflammatory myopathy.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Soumya; Prayson, Richard; Farver, Carol

    2013-10-01

    In recent years, antisynthetase syndrome has been recognized as an important cause of autoimmune inflammatory myopathy in a subset of patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis. It is associated with serum antibodies to aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetases and is characterized by a constellation of manifestations, including fever, myositis, interstitial lung disease, "mechanic's hands," Raynaud phenomenon, and polyarthritis. Physicians should be familiar with its variety of clinical presentations and should include it in the differential diagnosis in patients presenting with unexplained interstitial lung disease. PMID:24085811

  3. Myopathy and parkinsonism in phosphoglycerate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sotiriou, Evangelia; Greene, Paul; Krishna, Sindu; Hirano, Michio; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2010-05-01

    A 25-year-old man with exertional myoglobinuria had no evidence of hemolytic anemia, but he had severe parkinsonism that was responsive to levodopa. Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) activity was markedly decreased in muscle, and molecular analysis of the PGK1 gene identified the p.T378P mutation that was recently reported in a patient with isolated myopathy. This case reinforces the concept that PGK deficiency is a clinically heterogeneous disorder and raises the question of a relationship between PGK deficiency and idiopathic juvenile Parkinson disease. PMID:20151463

  4. Bethlem myopathy is not allelic to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1A

    SciTech Connect

    Speer, M.C.; Yamaoka, L.H.; Stajich, J.; Lewis, K.

    1995-08-28

    The Bethlem myopathy, an autosomal-dominant myopathy, shows a distribution of proximal muscle weakness similar to that observed in dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). Yet the Bethlem myopathy differs from most limb-girdle dystrophies in two important regards. First, the Bethlem myopathy presents with joint contractures most commonly observed at the elbows, ankles, and neck. Secondly, disease onset in the Bethlem myopathy is in early childhood, while most dominant LGMDs present with adult onset. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia with inflammatory myopathy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Pu, Chuanqiang; Shi, Qiang; Wang, Qian; Cong, Lu; Liu, Jiexiao; Luo, Hongyu; Fei, Lingna; Tang, Wei; Yu, Shanshan

    2014-01-01

    Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia is one of mitochondrial disorders, characterized by ptosis, limitation of eye movement, variably severe bulbar muscle weakness and proximal limb weakness. Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia complicated with acquired disease is extremely rare. We report a 44 years old male patient with more than 20 years of chronic progressive bilateral ptosis and limitation of eye movements manifested dysarthria, dysphagia and neck muscle weakness for 3 years. The first muscle biopsy showed red-ragged fibers and cytochrome c oxidase negative fibers as well as inflammatory cells infiltration. Electron microscopy revealed paracrystalline inclusions. Mitochondrial genetic analysis demonstrated a large-scale mtDNA deletion of m.8470_13446del4977. The patient was treated with prednisone. In a three-year follow-up study, the second biopsy was performed. Before the treatment, except bilateral ptosis and external ophthalmopelgia, this patient presented bulbar muscle weakness and neck muscle weakness. After treated with prednisone, the symptoms of dysphagia, dysarthria and neck muscle weakness were significantly improved, and the second biopsy showed only mitochondrial myopathy pathology but the inflammations disappeared. Here, we report a patient with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia complicated with inflammatory myopathy and after treated with prednisone as myositis, he had a significant therapeutic effect. PMID:25674260

  6. Diaphragmatic dysfunction in Collagen VI myopathies.

    PubMed

    Quijano-Roy, S; Khirani, S; Colella, M; Ramirez, A; Aloui, S; Wehbi, S; de Becdelievre, A; Carlier, R Y; Allamand, V; Richard, P; Azzi, V; Estournet, B; Fauroux, B

    2014-02-01

    Collagen VI-related myopathies are hereditary disorders causing progressive restrictive respiratory insufficiency. Specific diaphragm involvement has been suggested by a drop in supine volumes. This pilot study aimed at characterizing the respiratory muscle phenotype in patients with COL6A1-3 genes mutations. Lung function, blood gases, muscle strength and respiratory mechanics were measured in 7 patients between 2002 and 2012. Patients were classified as Early-Severe (n = 3), Moderate-Progressive (n = 2) and Mild (n = 2) according to clinical disease presentation. Seven patients (aged 6-28) were evaluated. Forced vital capacity distinguished the Mild group (>60% predicted) from the two other groups (<50% predicted). This distinction was also possible using the motor function measure scale. Diaphragmatic dysfunction at rest was observed in all the Early-Severe and Moderate-Progressive patients. During a voluntary sniff maneuver diaphragmatic dysfunction was observed in all patients, as assessed by a negative gastric pressure. All patients had diaphragmatic fatigue assessed by a tension-time index over the threshold of 0.15. Diaphragmatic dysfunction during a maximal voluntary maneuver and diaphragmatic fatigue are constant features in Collagen VI myopathies. These observations can assist the diagnosis and should be taken in account for the clinical management, with the early detection of sleep-disordered breathing. PMID:24314752

  7. Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies: Clinical Approach and Management

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Asma; Hayat, Ghazala; Kalia, Junaid S.; Guzman, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) are a group of chronic, autoimmune conditions affecting primarily the proximal muscles. The most common types are dermatomyositis (DM), polymyositis (PM), necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (NAM), and sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM). Patients typically present with sub-acute to chronic onset of proximal weakness manifested by difficulty with rising from a chair, climbing stairs, lifting objects, and combing hair. They are uniquely identified by their clinical presentation consisting of muscular and extramuscular manifestations. Laboratory investigations, including increased serum creatine kinase (CK) and myositis specific antibodies (MSA) may help in differentiating clinical phenotype and to confirm the diagnosis. However, muscle biopsy remains the gold standard for diagnosis. These disorders are potentially treatable with proper diagnosis and initiation of therapy. Goals of treatment are to eliminate inflammation, restore muscle performance, reduce morbidity, and improve quality of life. This review aims to provide a basic diagnostic approach to patients with suspected IIM, summarize current therapeutic strategies, and provide an insight into future prospective therapies. PMID:27242652

  8. Atypical presentation of GNE myopathy with asymmetric hand weakness.

    PubMed

    de Dios, John Karl L; Shrader, Joseph A; Joe, Galen O; McClean, Jeffrey C; Williams, Kayla; Evers, Robert; Malicdan, May Christine V; Ciccone, Carla; Mankodi, Ami; Huizing, Marjan; McKew, John C; Bluemke, David A; Gahl, William A; Carrillo-Carrasco, Nuria

    2014-12-01

    GNE myopathy is a rare autosomal recessive muscle disease caused by mutations in GNE, the gene encoding the rate-limiting enzyme in sialic acid biosynthesis. GNE myopathy usually manifests in early adulthood with distal myopathy that progresses slowly and symmetrically, first involving distal muscles of the lower extremities, followed by proximal muscles with relative sparing of the quadriceps. Upper extremities are typically affected later in the disease. We report a patient with GNE myopathy who presented with asymmetric hand weakness. He had considerably decreased left grip strength, atrophy of the left anterior forearm and fibro-fatty tissue replacement of left forearm flexor muscles on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The patient was an endoscopist and thus the asymmetric hand involvement may be associated with left hand overuse in daily repetitive pinching and gripping movements, highlighting the possible impact of environmental factors on the progression of genetic muscle conditions. PMID:25182749

  9. Atypical presentation of GNE myopathy with asymmetric hand weakness

    PubMed Central

    de Dios, John Karl L.; Shrader, Joseph A.; Joe, Galen O.; McClean, Jeffrey C.; Williams, Kayla; Evers, Robert; Malicdan, May Christine V.; Ciccone, Carla; Mankodi, Ami; Huizing, Marjan; McKew, John C.; Bluemke, David A.; Gahl, William A.; Carrillo-Carrasco, Nuria

    2014-01-01

    GNE myopathy is a rare autosomal recessive muscle disease caused by mutations in GNE, the gene encoding the rate-limiting enzyme in sialic acid biosynthesis. GNE myopathy usually manifests in early adulthood with distal myopathy that progresses slowly and symmetrically, first involving distal muscles of the lower extremities, followed by proximal muscles with relative sparing of the quadriceps. Upper extremities are typically affected later in the disease. We report a patient with GNE myopathy who presented with asymmetric hand weakness. He had considerably decreased left grip strength, atrophy of the left anterior forearm and fibro-fatty tissue replacement of left forearm flexor muscles on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The patient was an endoscopist and thus the asymmetric hand involvement may be associated with left hand overuse in daily repetitive pinching and gripping movements, highlighting the possible impact of environmental factors on the progression of genetic muscle conditions. PMID:25182749

  10. Genetics Home Reference: neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), reduced thyroid activity (hypothyroidism), and type 2 diabetes mellitus (the most common ... Neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Hypothyroidism MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Type 2 Diabetes These resources from ...

  11. [Sarcopenia or uremic myopathy in CKD patients].

    PubMed

    Chauveau, Philippe; Moreau, Karine; Lasseur, Catherine; Fouque, Denis; Combe, Christian; Aparicio, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Often underestimated or misunderstood in chronic renal failure (CRF), muscle wasting is nevertheless common and concerns about 50% of dialysis patients. The consequences of this myopathy on quality of life and outcomes of patients are unfavorable, identical to those observed in sarcopenia in elderly subjects with sarcopenia. The similarities between the two situations also concern the symptoms, the underlying muscle damages and the pathogenic mechanisms and may be partly explained by the frequently high age of ESRD patients. Skeletal muscle involvement should be systematically investigated in the IRC patient as in the elderly with sarcopenia to propose as early as possible a treatment of which physical activity and nutritional interventions are the mainstay. PMID:26598033

  12. Aerobic Training in Patients with Congenital Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hedermann, Gitte; Vissing, Christoffer Rasmus; Heje, Karen; Preisler, Nicolai; Witting, Nanna; Vissing, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Congenital myopathies (CM) often affect contractile proteins of the sarcomere, which could render patients susceptible to exercise-induced muscle damage. We investigated if exercise is safe and beneficial in patients with CM. Methods Patients exercised on a stationary bike for 30 minutes, three times weekly, for 10 weeks at 70% of their maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). Creatine kinase (CK) was monitored as a marker of muscle damage. VO2max, functional tests, and questionnaires evaluated efficacy. Results Sixteen patients with CM were included in a controlled study. VO2max increased by 14% (range, 6–25%; 95% CI 7–20; p < 0.001) in the seven patients who completed training, and tended to decrease in a non-intervention group (n = 7; change -3.5%; range, -11–3%, p = 0.083). CK levels were normal and remained stable during training. Baseline Fatigue Severity Scale scores were high, 4.9 (SE 1.9), and tended to decrease (to 4.4 (SE 1.7); p = 0.08) with training. Nine patients dropped out of the training program. Fatigue was the major single reason. Conclusions Ten weeks of endurance training is safe and improves fitness in patients with congenital myopathies. The training did not cause sarcomeric injury, even though sarcomeric function is affected by the genetic abnormalities in most patients with CM. Severe fatigue, which characterizes patients with CM, is a limiting factor for initiating training in CM, but tends to improve in those who train. Trial Registration The Regional Committee on Health Research Ethics of the Capital Region of Denmark H-2-2013-066 and ClinicalTrials.gov H2-2013-066 PMID:26751952

  13. Mitochondrial myopathy presenting as fibromyalgia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction To the best of our knowledge, we describe for the first time the case of a woman who met the diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia, did not respond to therapy for that disorder, and was subsequently diagnosed by biochemical and genetic studies with a mitochondrial myopathy. Treatment of the mitochondrial myopathy resulted in resolution of symptoms. This case demonstrates that mitochondrial myopathy may present in an adult with a symptom complex consistent with fibromyalgia. Case presentation Our patient was a 41-year-old Caucasian woman with symptoms of fatigue, exercise intolerance, headache, and multiple trigger points. Treatment for fibromyalgia with a wide spectrum of medications including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antidepressants, gabapentin and pregabalin had no impact on her symptoms. A six-minute walk study demonstrated an elevated lactic acid level (5 mmol/L; normal < 2 mmol/L). Biochemical and genetic studies from a muscle biopsy revealed a mitochondrial myopathy. Our patient was started on a compound of coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone) 200 mg, creatine 1000 mg, carnitine 200 mg and folic acid 1 mg to be taken four times a day. She gradually showed significant improvement in her symptoms over a course of several months. Conclusions This case demonstrates that adults diagnosed with fibromyalgia may have their symptom complex related to an adult onset mitochondrial myopathy. This is an important finding since treatment of mitochondrial myopathy resulted in resolution of symptoms. PMID:22325469

  14. Native American myopathy: congenital myopathy with cleft palate, skeletal anomalies, and susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Stamm, Demetra S; Aylsworth, Arthur S; Stajich, Jeffrey M; Kahler, Stephen G; Thorne, Leigh B; Speer, Marcy C; Powell, Cynthia M

    2008-07-15

    Native American myopathy (NAM) [OMIM 255995], a putative autosomal recessive disorder, was first reported in the Lumbee Indians of North Carolina. NAM features include congenital weakness and arthrogryposis, cleft palate, ptosis, short stature, kyphoscoliosis, talipes deformities, and susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia (MH) provoked by anesthesia. This report documents the phenotypic complexity and natural history of this rare congenital disorder in fourteen individuals with NAM. Findings include a previously unreported 36% mortality by age 18. Based on this study, our conservative estimate for prevalence of NAM within the Lumbee population is approximately 2:10,000; however, birth incidence remains unknown. PMID:18553514

  15. Genetics Home Reference: myopathy with deficiency of iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    ... sulfur cluster assembly enzyme myopathy with deficiency of iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme Enable Javascript to view ... All Close All Description Myopathy with deficiency of iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme is an inherited disorder ...

  16. Mutation Update: The Spectra of Nebulin Variants and Associated Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Kiiski, Kirsi; Sandaradura, Sarah A.; Laporte, Jocelyn; Repo, Pauliina; Frey, Jennifer A.; Donner, Kati; Marttila, Minttu; Saunders, Carol; Barth, Peter G.; den Dunnen, Johan T.; Beggs, Alan H.; Clarke, Nigel F.; North, Kathryn N.; Laing, Nigel G.; Romero, Norma B.; Winder, Thomas L.; Pelin, Katarina; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2015-01-01

    A mutation update on the nebulin gene (NEB) is necessary because of recent developments in analysis methodology, the identification of increasing numbers and novel types of variants, and a widening in the spectrum of clinical and histological phenotypes associated with this gigantic, 183 exons containing gene. Recessive pathogenic variants in NEB are the major cause of nemaline myopathy (NM), one of the most common congenital myopathies. Moreover, pathogenic NEB variants have been identified in core-rod myopathy and in distal myopathies. In this update, we present the disease-causing variants in NEB in 159 families, 143 families with NM, and 16 families with NM-related myopathies. Eighty-eight families are presented here for the first time. We summarize 86 previously published and 126 unpublished variants identified in NEB. Furthermore, we have analyzed the NEB variants deposited in the Exome Variant Server (http://evs.gs.washington.edu/EVS/), identifying that pathogenic variants are a minor fraction of all coding variants (~7%). This indicates that nebulin tolerates substantial changes in its amino acid sequence, providing an explanation as to why variants in such a large gene result in relatively rare disorders. Lastly, we discuss the difficulties of drawing reliable genotype–phenotype correlations in NEB-associated disease. PMID:25205138

  17. Mutation update: the spectra of nebulin variants and associated myopathies.

    PubMed

    Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Kiiski, Kirsi; Sandaradura, Sarah A; Laporte, Jocelyn; Repo, Pauliina; Frey, Jennifer A; Donner, Kati; Marttila, Minttu; Saunders, Carol; Barth, Peter G; den Dunnen, Johan T; Beggs, Alan H; Clarke, Nigel F; North, Kathryn N; Laing, Nigel G; Romero, Norma B; Winder, Thomas L; Pelin, Katarina; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2014-12-01

    A mutation update on the nebulin gene (NEB) is necessary because of recent developments in analysis methodology, the identification of increasing numbers and novel types of variants, and a widening in the spectrum of clinical and histological phenotypes associated with this gigantic, 183 exons containing gene. Recessive pathogenic variants in NEB are the major cause of nemaline myopathy (NM), one of the most common congenital myopathies. Moreover, pathogenic NEB variants have been identified in core-rod myopathy and in distal myopathies. In this update, we present the disease-causing variants in NEB in 159 families, 143 families with NM, and 16 families with NM-related myopathies. Eighty-eight families are presented here for the first time. We summarize 86 previously published and 126 unpublished variants identified in NEB. Furthermore, we have analyzed the NEB variants deposited in the Exome Variant Server (http://evs.gs.washington.edu/EVS/), identifying that pathogenic variants are a minor fraction of all coding variants (∼7%). This indicates that nebulin tolerates substantial changes in its amino acid sequence, providing an explanation as to why variants in such a large gene result in relatively rare disorders. Lastly, we discuss the difficulties of drawing reliable genotype-phenotype correlations in NEB-associated disease. PMID:25205138

  18. Myofibrillar myopathies: State of the art, present and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Béhin, A; Salort-Campana, E; Wahbi, K; Richard, P; Carlier, R-Y; Carlier, P; Laforêt, P; Stojkovic, T; Maisonobe, T; Verschueren, A; Franques, J; Attarian, S; Maues de Paula, A; Figarella-Branger, D; Bécane, H-M; Nelson, I; Duboc, D; Bonne, G; Vicart, P; Udd, B; Romero, N; Pouget, J; Eymard, B

    2015-10-01

    Myofibrillar myopathies (MFM) have been described in the mid-1990s as a group of diseases sharing common histological features, including an abnormal accumulation of intrasarcoplasmic proteins, the presence of vacuoles and a disorganization of the intermyofibrillar network beginning at the Z-disk. The boundaries of this concept are still uncertain, and whereas six genes (DES, CRYAB, LDB3/ZASP, MYOT, FLNC and BAG3) are now classically considered as responsible for MFM, other entities such as FHL1 myopathy or Hereditary Myopathy with Early Respiratory Failure linked to mutations of titin can now as well be included in this group. The diagnosis of MFM is not always easy; as histological lesions can be focal, and muscle biopsy may be disappointing; this has led to a growing importance of muscle imaging, and the selectivity of muscle involvement has now been described in several disorders. Due to the rarity of these myopathies, if some clinical patterns (such as distal myopathy associated with cardiomyopathy due to desmin mutations) are now well known, surprises remain possible and should lead to systematic testing of the known genes in case of a typical histological presentation. In this paper, we aim at reviewing the data acquired on the six main genes listed above as well as presenting the experience from two French reference centres, Paris and Marseilles. PMID:26342832

  19. Mendelian bases of myopathies, cardiomyopathies, and neuromyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Piluso, G; Aurino, S; Cacciottolo, M; Del Vecchio Blanco, F; Lancioni, A; Rotundo, IL; Torella, A; Nigro, V

    2010-01-01

    Summary A second genetic revolution is approaching thanks to next-generation DNA sequencing technologies. In the next few years, the 1,000$-genome sequencing promises to reveal every individual variation of DNA. There is, however, a major problem: the identification of thousands of nucleotide changes per individual with uncertain pathological meaning. This is also an ethical issue. In the middle, there is today the possibility to address the sequencing analysis of genetically heterogeneous disorders to selected groups of genes with defined mutation types. This will be cost-effective and safer. We assembled an easy-to manage overview of most Mendelian genes involved in myopathies, cardiomyopathies, and neuromyopathies. This was entirely put together using a number of open access web resources that are listed below. During this effort we realized that there are unexpected countless sources of data, but the confusion is huge. In some cases, we got lost in the validation of disease genes and in the difficulty to discriminate between polymorphisms and disease-causing alleles. In the table are the annotated genes, their associated disorders, genomic, mRNA and coding sizes. We also counted the number of pathological alleles so far reported and the percentage of single nucleotide mutations. PMID:22029103

  20. Myopathy in patients with Hashimoto's disease.

    PubMed

    Villar, Jaqueline; Finol, Héctor J; Torres, Sonia H; Roschman-González, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland. Patients may present or not a hypothyroid state, and frequently have manifestations of myopathy. The present work was aimed to assess the clinical symptoms and signs of skeletal muscle alterations in HT, describe the muscular pathological changes and relate them to the functional thyroid status and to the autoimmune condition of the patient. Clinical and laboratory studies were performed in ten HT patients and three control subjects (hormonal levels and electromyography). Biopsies from their vastus lateralis of quadriceps femoris muscle were analyzed under light (histochemistry and immunofluorescense) and electron microscopy. All patients showed muscle focal alterations, ranging from moderate to severe atrophy, necrosis, activation of satellite cells, presence of autophagosomes, capillary alterations and macrophage and mast cell infiltration, common to autoimmune diseases. The intensity of clinical signs and symptoms was not related to the morphological muscle findings, the electromyography results, or to the state of the thyroid function. Reactions for immunoglobulin in muscle fibers were positive in 80% of the patients. Fiber type II proportion was increased in all patients, with the exception of those treated with L-thyroxine. In conclusion, autoimmune processes in several of the patients may be associated to the skeletal muscle alterations, independently of the functional state of the thyroid gland; however, fiber II type proportion could have been normalized by L-thyroxine treatment. PMID:25920184

  1. Antiangiogenic VEGF Isoform in Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Volpi, Nila; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Lorenzoni, Paola; Di Lazzaro, Francesco; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Aglianò, Margherita; Giannini, Fabio; Grasso, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To investigate expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antiangiogenic isoform A-165b on human muscle in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) and to compare distribution of angiogenic/antiangiogenic VEGFs, as isoforms shifts are described in other autoimmune disorders. Subjects and Methods. We analyzed VEGF-A165b and VEGF-A by western blot and immunohistochemistry on skeletal muscle biopsies from 21 patients affected with IIM (polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and inclusion body myositis) and 6 control muscle samples. TGF-β, a prominent VEGF inductor, was analogously evaluated. Intergroup differences of western blot bands density were statistically examined. Endomysial vascularization, inflammatory score, and muscle regeneration, as pathological parameters of IIM, were quantitatively determined and their levels were confronted with VEGF expression. Results. VEGF-A165b was significantly upregulated in IIM, as well as TGF-β. VEGF-A was diffusely expressed on unaffected myofibers, whereas regenerating/atrophic myofibres strongly reacted for both VEGF-A isoforms. Most inflammatory cells and endomysial vessels expressed both isoforms. VEGF-A165b levels were in positive correlation to inflammatory score, endomysial vascularization, and TGF-β. Conclusions. Our findings indicate skeletal muscle expression of antiangiogenic VEGF-A165b and preferential upregulation in IIM, suggesting that modulation of VEGF-A isoforms may occur in myositides. PMID:23840094

  2. Capture myopathy in live-stranded cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Herráez, P; Espinosa de los Monteros, A; Fernández, A; Edwards, J F; Sacchini, S; Sierra, E

    2013-05-01

    A group of 51 cetaceans that had been stranded alive on the coasts of the Canary Islands, experienced human capture/rescue interactions and then died, were necropsied over a 12-year period. Of these cetaceans, 25 had haemodynamic lesions indicative of multiorganic vascular shock, degenerative muscle lesions affecting both skeletal and cardiac muscles and myoglobinuric nephrosis typical of capture myopathy (CM). Because macroscopic lesions in muscles and kidneys were not always obvious, a standard protocol was developed where the longissimus dorsi muscle was examined histologically for segmental hypercontraction, contraction band necrosis and segmental muscular degeneration and cardiomyocytes studied for hypereosinophilic wavy fibres, sarcolemmal and perinuclear vacuolation and contraction band necrosis. Light microscopic skeletal and cardiac muscle lesions in all CM animals were confirmed as ante mortem by immunohistochemical assay for myoglobin loss from and fibrinogen entry into affected myofibres. All animals had tubular nephrosis with casts and tubular myoglobin. The oxidative stress-related marker HSP70 was demonstrated immunohistochemically in tubular epithelium. Although the syndrome related to death of live-stranded cetaceans is multifactorial, this study documents that a clinicopathological syndrome comparable to CM of terrestrial wildlife has a role in stranding outcomes. PMID:23146174

  3. An unusual case of glipizide-induced proximal myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Das, Saibal; Ramasamy, Anand; De, Soumyadip; Mondal, Somnath

    2016-01-01

    This case report outlines a very rare case of glipizide-induced severe proximal myopathy in a 61-year-old diabetic man. After taking 10 mg glipizide for 5 months, diabetes was well controlled but the patient presented with progressive proximal muscle weakness in all the four limbs. Clinical examination and relevant investigations suggested it to be a case of proximal myopathy and might be drug induced. De-challenge was done and was treated resulting in reversal of the diseased state. After 3 more months, controlled re-challenge was done and there was recurrence of proximal muscle weakness. There were no evidences of any other possible metabolic, infective, organic or other pathologic causes giving rise to that condition and Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale suggested that it was “probable” that glipizide was responsible for the development of myopathy in this patient. PMID:27440956

  4. An unusual case of glipizide-induced proximal myopathy.

    PubMed

    Das, Saibal; Ramasamy, Anand; De, Soumyadip; Mondal, Somnath

    2016-01-01

    This case report outlines a very rare case of glipizide-induced severe proximal myopathy in a 61-year-old diabetic man. After taking 10 mg glipizide for 5 months, diabetes was well controlled but the patient presented with progressive proximal muscle weakness in all the four limbs. Clinical examination and relevant investigations suggested it to be a case of proximal myopathy and might be drug induced. De-challenge was done and was treated resulting in reversal of the diseased state. After 3 more months, controlled re-challenge was done and there was recurrence of proximal muscle weakness. There were no evidences of any other possible metabolic, infective, organic or other pathologic causes giving rise to that condition and Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale suggested that it was "probable" that glipizide was responsible for the development of myopathy in this patient. PMID:27440956

  5. Sialyllactose ameliorates myopathic phenotypes in symptomatic GNE myopathy model mice.

    PubMed

    Yonekawa, Takahiro; Malicdan, May Christine V; Cho, Anna; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Nonaka, Ikuya; Mine, Toshiki; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Nishino, Ichizo; Noguchi, Satoru

    2014-10-01

    Patients with GNE myopathy, a progressive and debilitating disease caused by a genetic defect in sialic acid biosynthesis, rely on supportive care and eventually become wheelchair-bound. To elucidate whether GNE myopathy is treatable at a progressive stage of the disease, we examined the efficacy of sialic acid supplementation on symptomatic old GNE myopathy mice that have ongoing, active muscle degeneration. We examined the therapeutic effect of a less metabolized sialic acid compound (6'-sialyllactose) or free sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid) by oral, continuous administration to 50-week-old GNE myopathy mice for 30 weeks. To evaluate effects on their motor performance in living mice, spontaneous locomotion activity on a running wheel was measured chronologically at 50, 65, 72 and 80 weeks of age. The size, force production, and pathology of isolated gastrocnemius muscle were analysed at the end point. Sialic acid level in skeletal muscle was also measured. Spontaneous locomotion activity was recovered in 6'-sialyllactose-treated mice, while NeuAc-treated mice slowed the disease progression. Treatment with 6'-sialyllactose led to marked restoration of hyposialylation in muscle and consequently to robust improvement in the muscle size, contractile parameters, and pathology as compared to NeuAc. This is due to the fact that 6'-sialyllactose is longer working as it is further metabolized to free sialic acid after initial absorption. 6'-sialyllactose ameliorated muscle atrophy and degeneration in symptomatic GNE myopathy mice. Our results provide evidence that GNE myopathy can be treated even at a progressive stage and 6'-sialyllactose has more remarkable advantage than free sialic acid, providing a conceptual proof for clinical use in patients. PMID:25062695

  6. Peginterferon Alfa-2b Injection (Sylatron)

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called interferons. It works by stopping the growth of cancer ... allergic to peginterferon alfa-2b injection (PegIntron, Sylatron), interferon alfa-2b (Intron), any other medications, or any ...

  7. Rosuvastatin: characterization of induced myopathy in the rat.

    PubMed

    Westwood, F Russell; Scott, Robert C; Marsden, Alan M; Bigley, Alison; Randall, Kevin

    2008-02-01

    Rosuvastatin is a relatively new member of the statin family (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors), with superior lipid-lowering effects and a pattern of clinical side effects, including a low incidence of myopathy, similar to other widely prescribed statins. This article describes investigations of myopathy in the rat following administration of very high doses of rosuvastatin. The nature of the changes were found to be entirely consistent with those seen with other statins, including a differential sensitivity of muscle fibers (with glycolytic fibers [type IIB] the most sensitive and oxidative fibers [type I] the least), a delay of approximately 10 days after the start of oral dosing before necrosis was apparent, and ultrastructural alterations appearing first in mitochondria. In addition, the development of myopathy was prevented by coadministration of mevalonate, the product of HMG-CoA reductase. The findings illustrate a pattern of induced myopathy in the rat directly attributable to inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase that is entirely consistent between the various statins, with the oral dose required to produce the changes being a differentiating feature (based on these new data and a previously reported study from the same laboratory): cerivastatin dose less than simvastatin, and simvastatin dose less than rosuvastatin. PMID:18362199

  8. Genetics Home Reference: CAV3-related distal myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... gene causes a peculiar form of distal myopathy. Neurology. 2002 Jan 22;58(2):323-5. Erratum in: Neurology 2002 Mar 12;58(5):839. Itoyoma Y [ ... 3 cause four distinct autosomal dominant muscle diseases. Neurology. 2004 Feb 24;62(4):538-43. Review. ...

  9. Anesthesia for sickle cell disease and congenital myopathy in combination.

    PubMed

    Fanning, Rebecca; O'Donnell, Brian; Lynch, Brian; Stephens, Michael; O'Donovan, Frances

    2006-08-01

    We report on the perioperative management of anesthesia and analgesia in a child with sickle cell disease and a congenital myopathy, presenting for corrective orthopedic surgery. The case illustrates two valuable points of interest: the many benefits of regional anesthesia in complex medical cases and the successful use of tourniquets in children with sickle cell disease. PMID:16884472

  10. GNE Myopathy in Turkish Sisters with a Novel Homozygous Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Diniz, Gulden; Secil, Yaprak; Ceylaner, Serdar; Tokucoglu, Figen; Türe, Sabiha; Celebisoy, Mehmet; İncesu, Tülay Kurt; Akhan, Galip

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hereditary inclusion body myopathy is caused by biallelic defects in the GNE gene located on chromosome 9p13. It generally affects adults older than 20 years of age. Methods and Results. In this study, we present two Turkish sisters with progressive myopathy and describe a novel mutation in the GNE gene. Both sisters had slightly higher levels of creatine kinase (CK) and muscle weakness. The older sister presented at 38 years of age with an inability to climb steps, weakness, and a steppage gait. Her younger sister was 36 years old and had similar symptoms. The first symptoms of the disorder were seen when the sisters were 30 and 34 years old, respectively. The muscle biopsy showed primary myopathic features and presence of rimmed vacuoles. DNA analysis demonstrated the presence of previously unknown homozygous mutations [c.2152 G>A (p.A718T)] in the GNE genes. Conclusion. Based on our literature survey, we believe that ours is the first confirmed case of primary GNE myopathy with a novel missense mutation in Turkey. These patients illustrate that the muscle biopsy is still an important method for the differential diagnosis of vacuolar myopathies in that the detection of inclusions is required for the definitive diagnosis. PMID:27298745

  11. GNE Myopathy in Turkish Sisters with a Novel Homozygous Mutation.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Gulden; Secil, Yaprak; Ceylaner, Serdar; Tokucoglu, Figen; Türe, Sabiha; Celebisoy, Mehmet; İncesu, Tülay Kurt; Akhan, Galip

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hereditary inclusion body myopathy is caused by biallelic defects in the GNE gene located on chromosome 9p13. It generally affects adults older than 20 years of age. Methods and Results. In this study, we present two Turkish sisters with progressive myopathy and describe a novel mutation in the GNE gene. Both sisters had slightly higher levels of creatine kinase (CK) and muscle weakness. The older sister presented at 38 years of age with an inability to climb steps, weakness, and a steppage gait. Her younger sister was 36 years old and had similar symptoms. The first symptoms of the disorder were seen when the sisters were 30 and 34 years old, respectively. The muscle biopsy showed primary myopathic features and presence of rimmed vacuoles. DNA analysis demonstrated the presence of previously unknown homozygous mutations [c.2152 G>A (p.A718T)] in the GNE genes. Conclusion. Based on our literature survey, we believe that ours is the first confirmed case of primary GNE myopathy with a novel missense mutation in Turkey. These patients illustrate that the muscle biopsy is still an important method for the differential diagnosis of vacuolar myopathies in that the detection of inclusions is required for the definitive diagnosis. PMID:27298745

  12. Nutritional Status and Body Composition in Korean Myopathy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seong-Woong; Choi, Won Ah; Lee, Jang Woo; Suh, Mi Ri; Lee, Song Mi

    2016-01-01

    In myopathy patients, fat mass increases as the disease progresses, while lean body mass decreases. The present study aimed to investigate the overall nutritional status of Korean myopathy patients through surveys of diet and dietary habits, bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), and biochemistry tests, as well as the examination of related factors, for the purpose of using such findings as a basis for improving the nutritional status in myopathy patients. The energy intake of all participants was found to be insufficient at only 44.5% of Dietary Reference Intakes for Koreans 2010 (KDRIs 2010), whereas protein intake was sufficient at 89.8% of KDRIs 2010. Dietary fiber intake was found to be 58.4% of sufficient dietary fiber intake for adults according to KDRIs 2010. Calcium intake was found to be 55.0% and magnesium was 14.9% of the recommended calcium and magnesium intake for adults according to KDRIs 2010. With respect to quality of life (QOL), overall increase in QOL domain score showed significant positive correlations with vegetable fat intake (p < 0.05), vegetable protein intake (p < 0.05), and dietary fiber intake (p < 0.05). With respect to BIA, the mean phage angle of all participants was found to be 2.49 ± 0.93°, which was below the cutoff value. As a study that examined nutrient analysis and dietary habits of myopathy patients in Korea, the present study is meaningful in providing the basic data for future studies that aim to present dietary guidelines for patients suffering from myopathy. PMID:26839876

  13. DNM2 mutations in Chinese Han patients with centronuclear myopathy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pengfei; Liu, Xinhong; Zhao, Dandan; Dai, Tingjun; Wu, Huamin; Gong, Yaoqin; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2016-06-01

    Centronuclear myopathy (CNM) is a congenital myopathy characterized by an abnormally high number of muscle fibers with centrally located nuclei. Autosomal-dominant centronuclear myopathy-1 (CNM1) results from mutations in the dynamin 2 gene (DNM2) and accounts for approximately 50 % of all CNM cases. Up to now, around 35 mutations of DNM2 gene have been identified in CNM; however, the underlying molecular mechanism of DNM2 mutation in the pathology of CNM remains elusive, and the standard clinical characteristics and the genotype-phenotype correlation of DNM2 gene mutation with CNM have not yet been defined. Here, we report the clinical characteristics, molecular diagnosis strategy, and DNM2 gene mutations of four Chinese Han patients with CNM. Congenital myopathy-targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) was applied to sequence the regions of the genome that contain all the coding regions of all known CNM genes and other congenital myopathy genes. We found potential DNM2 mutations in all four of the patients. Further targeted Sanger DNA sequencing of DNM2 found the 1106G>A (p.R369Q) mutation in patients 1 and 2, the c.1393C>T (p.R465W) mutation in patient 3, and the c.1565G>A (p.R522H) mutation in patient 4, all of which were reported previously to be causative mutations of DNM2-related CNM. Our results suggest that the combination of targeted NGS and Sanger sequencing is an effective, rapid, and reliable strategy for the molecular diagnosis of CNM and other genetically heterogeneous disorders. PMID:26908122

  14. Hypokalemic vacuolar myopathy of chronic alcoholism. A histological and histochemical study.

    PubMed

    Khurana, R; Kalyanaraman, K

    1977-04-01

    Recent reports have emphasized the occurrence of a myopathy in chronic alcoholism associated with hypokalemia. This report of hypokalemic myopathy in a chronic alcoholic, emphasizes the primary myopathic nature of the condition and attributes it to a possible non-specific effect of the hypokalemia on skeletal muscle. It is pointed out, that histological and histochemical changes of muscle in this type of myopathy are indistinguishable from other types of hypokalemic myopathies like periodic paralysis. It is conjectured that in alcoholic myopathy, the underlying disorder might be related to a primary disturbance of potassium metabolism, though in most cases, serum potassium is normal. It is likely that studies aimed at studying total body potassium content and turnover in alcoholic myopathy would help in understanding its pathogenesis and possible relationship to disturbed potassium metabolism. PMID:849704

  15. Adults with RRM2B-related mitochondrial disease have distinct clinical and molecular characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Pitceathly, Robert D. S.; Smith, Conrad; Fratter, Carl; Alston, Charlotte L.; He, Langping; Craig, Kate; Blakely, Emma L.; Evans, Julie C.; Taylor, John; Shabbir, Zarfishan; Deschauer, Marcus; Pohl, Ute; Roberts, Mark E.; Jackson, Matthew C.; Halfpenny, Christopher A.; Turnpenny, Peter D.; Lunt, Peter W.; Hanna, Michael G.; Schaefer, Andrew M.; McFarland, Robert; Horvath, Rita; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Turnbull, Douglass M.; Poulton, Joanna; Taylor, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial maintenance gene RRM2B are an important cause of familial mitochondrial disease in both adults and children and represent the third most common cause of multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in adults, following POLG [polymerase (DNA directed), gamma] and PEO1 (now called C10ORF2, encoding the Twinkle helicase) mutations. However, the clinico-pathological and molecular features of adults with RRM2B-related disease have not been clearly defined. In this multicentre study of 26 adult patients from 22 independent families, including five additional cases published in the literature, we show that extra-ocular neurological complications are common in adults with genetically confirmed RRM2B mutations. We also demonstrate a clear correlation between the clinical phenotype and the underlying genetic defect. Myopathy was a prominent manifestation, followed by bulbar dysfunction and fatigue. Sensorineural hearing loss and gastrointestinal disturbance were also important findings. Severe multisystem neurological disease was associated with recessively inherited compound heterozygous mutations with a mean age of disease onset at 7 years. Dominantly inherited heterozygous mutations were associated with a milder predominantly myopathic phenotype with a later mean age of disease onset at 46 years. Skeletal muscle biopsies revealed subsarcolemmal accumulation of mitochondria and/or cytochrome c oxidase-deficient fibres. Multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions were universally present in patients who underwent a muscle biopsy. We identified 18 different heterozygous RRM2B mutations within our cohort of patients, including five novel mutations that have not previously been reported. Despite marked clinical overlap between the mitochondrial maintenance genes, key clinical features such as bulbar dysfunction, hearing loss and gastrointestinal disturbance should help prioritize genetic testing towards RRM2B analysis, and sequencing of the gene

  16. Sialylation of Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen is a noninvasive blood-based biomarker for GNE myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Leoyklang, Petcharat; Malicdan, May Christine; Yardeni, Tal; Celeste, Frank; Ciccone, Carla; Li, Xueli; Jiang, Rong; Gahl, William A.; Carrillo-Carrasco, Nuria; He, Miao; Huizing, Marjan

    2014-01-01

    GNE myopathy is an adult-onset progressive myopathy, resulting from mutations in GNE, the key enzyme of sialic acid synthesis. The pathomechanism of GNE myopathy likely involves aberrant sialylation, since administration of sialic acid itself, or its precursor, N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc), rescued hyposialylation of GNE myopathy mice. Recently, clinical trials for GNE myopathy patients were initiated. A robust, noninvasive biomarker is highly desirable for diagnosis of GNE myopathy and for evaluating response to therapy. Since muscle biopsies of patients with GNE myopathy demonstrated hyposialylation of predominantly O-linked glycans, we analyzed the O-linked glycome of patients’ plasma proteins using mass spectrometry. Most patients showed increased plasma levels of the core 1 O-linked glycan, Thomsen-Friedenreich (T)-antigen and/or decreased amounts of its sialylated form, ST-antigen. In addition, compared to unaffected individuals, all analyzed patients had a consistently increased ratio of T-antigen to ST-antigen. Importantly, the T/ST ratios were in the normal range in a GNE myopathy patient treated with intravenous immunoglobulins as a source of sialic acid, indicating response to therapy. Natural history and clinical trial data will reveal whether T/ST ratios can be correlated to muscle function. These findings not only highlight plasma T/ST ratios as a robust blood-based biomarker for GNE myopathy, but may also help explain the pathology and course of the disease. PMID:25123033

  17. [Novel autoantibodies in inflammatory myopathies and systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Ribi, Camillo

    2015-01-14

    Acquired inflammatory myopathies and systemic sclerosis are chronic autoimmune conditions. These diseases arise from sustained activation of the innate and adaptive immune system, resulting in damage to blood vessels, muscles, connective tissues and internal organs. Auto-antibodies are found in a majority of cases, which makes the immune serology an important diagnostic tool. The immuno dot assays detect a variety of disease-specific-or-associated antibodies. A positive result should be correlated with the indirect immunofluorescence pattern of the antinuclear antibody screen. Some antibodies are associated with specific organ involvement, other may indicated an underlying neoplastic condition. The scope of this article is to review the diagnostic and prognostic value of antibodies in inflammatory myopathies and systemic sclerosis. PMID:25799647

  18. Statin therapy, myopathy and exercise--a case report.

    PubMed

    Semple, Stuart J

    2012-01-01

    In a bid to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with coronary artery disease, statin therapy has become a cornerstone treatment for patients with dyslipideamia. Statins, or HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, are effective in blocking hepatic synthesis of cholesterol and are generally regarded as safe. Although rare, severe adverse side effects such as rhabdomyolysis have been reported, however, the more common complaint from patients is that related to myopathy. There is also mounting evidence that exercise may exacerbate these side effects, however the mechanisms are yet to be fully defined and there is controversy regarding the role that inflammation may play in the myopathy. This paper reports a patients experience during 6 months of simvastatin therapy and provides some insight into the white cell count (inflammation) following two bouts of moderate intensity exercise before and during statin therapy. It also highlights the need for rehabilitation practitioners to be aware of the adverse effects of statins in exercising patients. PMID:22420409

  19. Restriction enzyme analysis of the mitochondrial genome in mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Poulton, J; Turnbull, D M; Mehta, A B; Wilson, J; Gardiner, R M

    1988-01-01

    The mitochondrial myopathies are a heterogeneous group of disorders some of which may be caused by mutations in the mitochondrial genome. Mitochondrial DNA from 10 patients with mitochondrial myopathy and their mothers was analysed using five restriction enzymes and 11 mitochondrial probes in bacteriophage M13. No abnormalities were found in seven out of the 10 patients. Polymorphisms which have not previously been reported were detected in three patients and two of their mothers. These results exclude the presence of deletions or insertions of greater than 60 bp in the region of the mitochondrial genome examined. Any causative mitochondrial DNA mutations in these disorders are therefore likely to be point mutations or small structural rearrangements. Images PMID:2903249

  20. Chronic myopathy due to immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Manoli, Irini; Kwan, Justin Y.; Wang, Qian; Rushing, Elisabeth J.; Tsokos, Maria; Arai, Andrew E.; Burch, Warner M.; Dispenzieri, Angela; McPherron, Alexandra C.; Gahl, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid myopathy associated with a plasma cell dyscrasia is a rare cause of muscle hypertrophy. It can be a challenging diagnosis, since pathological findings are often elusive. In addition, the mechanism by which immunoglobulin light-chain deposition stimulates muscle overgrowth remains poorly understood. We present a 53–year old female with a 10-year history of progressive generalized muscle overgrowth. Congo-red staining and immunohistochemistry revealed perivascular lambda light chain amyloid deposits, apparent only in a second muscle biopsy. The numbers of central nuclei and satellite cells were increased, suggesting enhanced muscle progenitor cell formation. Despite the chronicity of the light chain disease, the patient showed complete resolution of hematologic findings and significant improvement of her muscle symptoms following autologous bone marrow transplantation. This case highlights the importance of early diagnosis and therapy for this treatable cause of a chronic myopathy with muscle hypertrophy. PMID:23465863

  1. Cysteine mutations cause defective tyrosine phosphorylation in MEGF10 myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Mitsuhashi, Hiroaki; Alexander, Matthew S; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Kang, Peter B

    2013-01-01

    Recessive mutations in MEGF10 are known to cause a congenital myopathy in humans. Two mutations in the extracellular EGF-like domains of MEGF10, C326R and C774R, were associated with decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of MEGF10 in vitro. Y1030 was identified to be the major tyrosine phosphorylation site in MEGF10 and is phosphorylated at least in part by c-Src. Overexpression of wild-type MEGF10 enhanced C2C12 myoblast proliferation, while overexpression of Y1030F mutated MEGF10 did not. We conclude that MEGF10-mediated signaling via tyrosine phosphorylation helps to regulate myoblast proliferation. Defects in this signaling pathway may contribute to the disease mechanism of MEGF10 myopathy. PMID:23954233

  2. Laing distal myopathy pathologically resembling inclusion body myositis

    PubMed Central

    Roda, Ricardo H; Schindler, Alice B; Blackstone, Craig; Mammen, Andrew L; Corse, Andrea M; Lloyd, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in MYH7 cause autosomal dominant Laing distal myopathy. We present a family with a previously reported deletion (c.5186_5188delAGA, p.K1729del). Muscle pathology in one family member was characterized by an inflammatory myopathy with rimmed vacuoles, increased MHC Class I expression, and perivascular and endomysial muscle inflammation comprising CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, and CD68+ inflammatory cells. Interestingly, this biopsy specimen contained TDP-43, p62, and SMI-31-positive protein aggregates typical of inclusion body myositis. These findings should alert physicians to the possibility that patients with MYH7 mutations may have muscle biopsies showing pathologic findings similar to inclusion body myositis. PMID:25574480

  3. Immune-Mediated Necrotizing Myopathy: Update on Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Basharat, Pari; Christopher-Stine, Lisa

    2015-12-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) comprise a group of autoimmune disorders that target skeletal muscle. They are characterized by typical laboratory and clinical features including muscle weakness, elevated muscle enzymes, characteristic histopathology of muscle biopsies, as well as electromyography abnormalities. The IIMs are divided into polymyositis, dermatomyositis, inclusion body myositis, nonspecific myositis, and immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM). IMNM is distinguished by the absence of primary inflammation on muscle biopsy. IMNM may be associated with myositis-specific autoantibodies (i.e., anti-SRP and anti-HMGCR) and malignancy, in association with viral infections (HIV or hepatitis C), or in relation to other connective tissue diseases (i.e., scleroderma). Typical clinical findings such as severe muscle weakness, highly elevated creatine kinase (CK) levels, as well as resistance to conventional immunosuppressive therapy are associated with this subtype of IIM. This review provides an overview of this disease entity and focuses on its diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26515574

  4. Lipid storage myopathy in von Gierke's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Santa, T; Inoue, K; Omae, T

    1978-09-01

    An 18-year-old girl with von Gierke's disease associated with a lipid storage myopathy is reported. The diagnosis of von Gierke's disease was made from decreased activity in glucose-6-phosphatase in the jejunal biopsy specimen. Neurologically she showed generalized hypotonia of the muscles, atrophy of bilateral proximal muscles of the lower extremities, weakness in neck flexors, deltoid and lumbar girdle muscles, and a positive Gower's sign. Muscle biopsy from flexor femoris muscle revealed fatty deposition in type 1 fibers and atrophy of type 2 fibers and the diagnosis of an accompanying lipid storage myopathy was made. This case also had a ventricular septal defect confirmed by right cardiac catheterization. PMID:213538

  5. Case Report: Elevated CPK, an indicator of idiopathic inflammatory myopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Hina N.; Jilani, Usman; Arora, Shitij

    2016-01-01

    Polymyositis is a rare disease with incidence rates at about 1 per 100,000 people annually. In this case report we will review a case of proximal muscle weakness with an elevated creatine phosphokinase that was initially misdiagnosed twice as rhabdomyolysis. Therefore, emphasizing that idiopathic inflammatory myopathy is a potential cause of myasthenia that must be considered in the differential. The case will also describe the current treatment and treatment response in polymyositis.

  6. Sleep-disordered breathing in a patient with congenital myopathy.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Y; Shimizu, T; Takahashi, K; Saito, Y; Ogawa, Y; Kanbayashi, T; Hishikawa, Y

    1998-04-01

    A case of adult onset myopathy who showed a peculiar sleep-related respiratory disorder (SRRD) is reported. She recovered from respiratory failure after tracheostomy and/or with the aid of the respirator used only during the night. Sleep study without the use of respirator revealed that her sleep was highly fragmented by frequent arousal responses due to inspiratory effort but not by apnea or hypopnea. To our knowledge this type of SRRD has not been described. PMID:9628169

  7. Analysis of lipid profile in lipid storage myopathy.

    PubMed

    Aguennouz, M'hammed; Beccaria, Marco; Purcaro, Giorgia; Oteri, Marianna; Micalizzi, Giuseppe; Musumesci, Olimpia; Ciranni, Annmaria; Di Giorgio, Rosa Maria; Toscano, Antonio; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2016-09-01

    Lipid dysmetabolism disease is a condition in which lipids are stored abnormally in organs and tissues throughout the body, causing muscle weakness (myopathy). Usually, the diagnosis of this disease and its characterization goes through dosage of Acyl CoA in plasma accompanied with evidence of droplets of intra-fibrils lipids in the patient muscle biopsy. However, to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of lipid storage diseases, it is useful to identify the nature of lipids deposited in muscle fiber. In this work fatty acids and triglycerides profile of lipid accumulated in the muscle of people suffering from myopathies syndromes was characterized. In particular, the analyses were carried out on the muscle biopsy of people afflicted by lipid storage myopathy, such as multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency, and neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy, and by the intramitochondrial lipid storage dysfunctions, such as deficiencies of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II enzyme. A single step extraction and derivatization procedure was applied to analyze fatty acids from muscle tissues by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector and with an electronic impact mass spectrometer. Triglycerides, extracted by using n-hexane, were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometer equipped with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface. The most representative fatty acids in all samples were: C16:0 in the 13-24% range, C18:1n9 in the 20-52% range, and C18:2n6 in the 10-25% range. These fatty acids were part of the most representative triglycerides in all samples. The data obtained was statistically elaborated performing a principal component analysis. A satisfactory discrimination was obtained among the different diseases. Using component 1 vs component 3 a 43.3% of total variance was explained. Such results suggest the important role that lipid profile characterization can have in supporting a correct

  8. Case Report: Elevated CPK, an indicator of idiopathic inflammatory myopathy?

    PubMed

    Khan, Hina N; Jilani, Usman; Arora, Shitij

    2016-01-01

    Polymyositis is a rare disease with incidence rates at about 1 per 100,000 people annually. In this case report we will review a case of proximal muscle weakness with an elevated creatine phosphokinase that was initially misdiagnosed twice as rhabdomyolysis. Therefore, emphasizing that idiopathic inflammatory myopathy is a potential cause of myasthenia that must be considered in the differential. The case will also describe the current treatment and treatment response in polymyositis. PMID:27540467

  9. Integrative Data Mining Highlights Candidate Genes for Monogenic Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Osorio Abath; Tassy, Olivier; Biancalana, Valérie; Zanoteli, Edmar; Pourquié, Olivier; Laporte, Jocelyn

    2014-01-01

    Inherited myopathies are a heterogeneous group of disabling disorders with still barely understood pathological mechanisms. Around 40% of afflicted patients remain without a molecular diagnosis after exclusion of known genes. The advent of high-throughput sequencing has opened avenues to the discovery of new implicated genes, but a working list of prioritized candidate genes is necessary to deal with the complexity of analyzing large-scale sequencing data. Here we used an integrative data mining strategy to analyze the genetic network linked to myopathies, derive specific signatures for inherited myopathy and related disorders, and identify and rank candidate genes for these groups. Training sets of genes were selected after literature review and used in Manteia, a public web-based data mining system, to extract disease group signatures in the form of enriched descriptor terms, which include functional annotation, human and mouse phenotypes, as well as biological pathways and protein interactions. These specific signatures were then used as an input to mine and rank candidate genes, followed by filtration against skeletal muscle expression and association with known diseases. Signatures and identified candidate genes highlight both potential common pathological mechanisms and allelic disease groups. Recent discoveries of gene associations to diseases, like B3GALNT2, GMPPB and B3GNT1 to congenital muscular dystrophies, were prioritized in the ranked lists, suggesting a posteriori validation of our approach and predictions. We show an example of how the ranked lists can be used to help analyze high-throughput sequencing data to identify candidate genes, and highlight the best candidate genes matching genomic regions linked to myopathies without known causative genes. This strategy can be automatized to generate fresh candidate gene lists, which help cope with database annotation updates as new knowledge is incorporated. PMID:25353622

  10. Filamin C-related myopathies: pathology and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fürst, Dieter O; Goldfarb, Lev G; Kley, Rudolf A; Vorgerd, Matthias; Olivé, Montse; van der Ven, Peter F M

    2013-01-01

    The term filaminopathy was introduced after a truncating mutation in the dimerization domain of filamin C (FLNc) was shown to be responsible for a devastating muscle disease. Subsequently, the same mutation was found in patients from diverse ethnical origins, indicating that this specific alteration is a mutational hot spot. Patients initially present with proximal muscle weakness, while distal and respiratory muscles become affected with disease progression. Muscle biopsies of these patients show typical signs of myofibrillar myopathy, including disintegration of myofibrils and aggregation of several proteins into distinct intracellular deposits. Highly similar phenotypes were observed in patients with other mutations in Ig-like domains of FLNc that result in expression of a noxious protein. Biochemical and biophysical studies showed that the mutated domains acquire an abnormal structure causing decreased stability and eventually becoming a seed for abnormal aggregation with other proteins. The disease usually presents only after the fourth decade of life possibly as a result of ageing-related impairments in the machinery that is responsible for disposal of damaged proteins. This is confirmed by mutations in components of this machinery that cause a highly similar phenotype. Transfection studies of cultured muscle cells reflect the events observed in patient muscles and, therefore, may provide a helpful model for testing future dedicated therapeutic strategies. More recently, FLNC mutations were also found in families with a distal myopathy phenotype, caused either by mutations in the actin-binding domain of FLNc that result in increased actin-binding and non-specific myopathic abnormalities without myofibrillar myopathy pathology, or a nonsense mutation in the rod domain that leads to RNA instability, haploinsufficiency with decreased expression levels of FLNc in the muscle fibers and myofibrillar abnormalities, but not to the formation of desmin-positive protein

  11. Full-length dysferlin expression driven by engineered human dystrophic blood derived CD133+ stem cells.

    PubMed

    Meregalli, Mirella; Navarro, Claire; Sitzia, Clementina; Farini, Andrea; Montani, Erica; Wein, Nicolas; Razini, Paola; Beley, Cyriaque; Cassinelli, Letizia; Parolini, Daniele; Belicchi, Marzia; Parazzoli, Dario; Garcia, Luis; Torrente, Yvan

    2013-12-01

    The protein dysferlin is abundantly expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscles, where its main function is membrane repair. Mutations in the dysferlin gene are involved in two autosomal recessive muscular dystrophies: Miyoshi myopathy and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B. Development of effective therapies remains a great challenge. Strategies to repair the dysferlin gene by skipping mutated exons, using antisense oligonucleotides (AONs), may be suitable only for a subset of mutations, while cell and gene therapy can be extended to all mutations. AON-treated blood-derived CD133+ stem cells isolated from patients with Miyoshi myopathy led to partial dysferlin reconstitution in vitro but failed to express dysferlin after intramuscular transplantation into scid/blAJ dysferlin null mice. We thus extended these experiments producing the full-length dysferlin mediated by a lentiviral vector in blood-derived CD133+ stem cells isolated from the same patients. Transplantation of engineered blood-derived CD133+ stem cells into scid/blAJ mice resulted in sufficient dysferlin expression to correct functional deficits in skeletal muscle membrane repair. Our data suggest for the first time that lentivirus-mediated delivery of full-length dysferlin in stem cells isolated from Miyoshi myopathy patients could represent an alternative therapeutic approach for treatment of dysferlinopathies. PMID:24028392

  12. Novel recessive myotilin mutation causes severe myofibrillar myopathy.

    PubMed

    Schessl, Joachim; Bach, Elisa; Rost, Simone; Feldkirchner, Sarah; Kubny, Christiana; Müller, Stefan; Hanisch, Franz-Georg; Kress, Wolfram; Schoser, Benedikt

    2014-08-01

    We identified the first homozygous and hence recessive mutation in the myotilin gene (MYOT) in a family affected by a severe myofibrillar myopathy (MFM). MFM is a rare, progressive and devastating disease of human skeletal muscle with distinct histopathological pattern of protein aggregates and myofibrillar degeneration. So far, only heterozygous missense mutations in MYOT have been associated with autosomal dominant myofibrillar myopathy, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1A and distal myopathy. Myotilin itself is highly expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscle and is localized at the Z-disc and therefore interacts in sarcomere assembly. We performed whole-exome sequencing in a German family clinically diagnosed with MFM and identified a homozygous mutation in exon 2, c.16C > G (p.Arg6Gly). Using laser microdissection followed by quantitative mass spectrometry, we identified the myotilin protein as one component showing the highest increased abundance in the aggregates in the index patient. We suggest that the combined approach has a high potential as a new tool for the confirmation of unclassified variants which are found in whole-exome sequencing approaches. PMID:24928145

  13. Capture myopathy in an endangered sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, J.W.; Thomas, N.J.; Reeves, S.

    1991-01-01

    Despite precautions to protect cranes, a 3-year-old endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla) was found caught in a leghold trap in Gautier, Mississippi, on 11 November 1987. The bird could have been in the trap for up to 16 hr and was standing and struggling to escape when it was discovered. Serum chemistries of the crane on 12 November revealed elevated lactic dehydrogenase (2,880 IU/L), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (152 IU/L), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (>1,000 IU/L) values. Following surgical amputation of a fractured toe, the bird never attempted to stand and was unable to stand even when manually supported. Radiographic and physical examination of both legs did not reveal any anatomical abnormalities. Despite medical care, including supportive therapy, no improvement was observed in the bird's ability to stand and to support itself, and the bird died on 19 November. Serum chemistries and the postmortem and histopathologic findings were compatible with capture myopathy described in other species. Because of the possible susceptibility of long-legged birds such as the Mississippi sandhill crane to capture myopathy, special care must be taken when trapping, handling, chemically immobilizing, and transporting these species. In addition, precautions must be taken when conducting a predator-control program to ensure that nontarget wildlife are unlikely to encounter traps. Capture myopathy has only rarely been observed in wild birds, and this case represents the first report in a Mississippi sandhill crane.

  14. [A case of X-linked myotubular myopathy with chylothorax].

    PubMed

    Oishi, Taku; Sato, Tetsuya; Matsushita, Kenshi; Takechi, Tomoki; Murakami, Nobuyuki; Fujieda, Mikiya

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of X-linked myotubular myopathy with chylothorax. A male infant weighing 2,114 g was born to a mother whose pregnancy was complicated with polyhydramnios from gestational week 32. At gestational week 37, emergent caesarian section was performed due to membrane rupture followed by fetal bradycardia. Ventilatory support was necessary because the neonate showed severe birth asphyxia accompanied by hypotonia and dyspnea. He also showed a respiratory complication of chylothorax at 10 days old; therefore, thoracic drainage was performed. Congenital chylothorax associated with congenital myotonic dystrophy (CMD) has been described in a number of past reports. Specific findings of congenital myotubular myopathy and partial CMD, such as peripheral halo of muscle fibers, were demonstrated in biopsied muscle, and mutation of the myotubularin (MTM1) gene was identified. Tracheostomy was performed at 5 months old because of prolonged ventilatory support and severe dysphagia. The infant was able to be discharged at 17 months old. Congenital chylothorax might be associated with congenital myotubular myopathies such as CMD. PMID:27012108

  15. Classification, diagnosis, and management of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Lazarou, Ilias N; Guerne, Pierre-André

    2013-05-01

    The detection and characterization of a large array of autoantibodies, including at least 8 different antisynthetase, anti-SRP, -200/100 (HMGCR), -Mi-2, -CADM-140 (MDA5), -SAE, -p155, -MJ (NXP-2), and -PMS1, frequently associated with distinct and well-defined clinicopathological features, allowed for significant improvement in the definition and diagnosis of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM). Classification remains difficult, with lingering divergence between the different specialties involved in IIM care, but several categories clearly stand out, including dermatomyositis (DM), overlap myositis (OM), polymyositis, necrotizing myositis, and sporadic inclusion body myositis (s-IBM). Biopsy and histological analysis remain crucial, particularly in the absence of autoantibodies, to accurately specify the diagnosis and rule out mimics such as muscular dystrophies and metabolic myopathies. Numerous infectious agents (in particular human immunodeficiency virus and human T cell lymphotrophic virus-1) and drugs (statins, tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, and proton pump inhibitors) can cause mimic IIM that must also be excluded. Pharmacological treatment, in addition to glucocorticoids and immunoglobulins, now includes mycophenolate mofetil and rituximab, which proved helpful in resistant cases, particularly rituximab in DM and OM. Exercise, initially seen as potentially deleterious, recently was shown to be efficacious and safe. IIM can thus be reasonably well controlled in most cases, although aggressive disease remains refractory to treatment, including some cases of necrotizing myopathy. Sporadic IBM still seems resistant to all medications tested to date. PMID:23504386

  16. Insights into Muscle Degeneration from Heritable Inclusion Body Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Muscle mass and function are gradually lost in age-related, degenerative neuromuscular disorders, which also reflect the clinical hallmarks of sarcopenia. The consensus definition of sarcopenia includes a condition of age-related loss of muscle mass, quality, and strength. The most common acquired muscle disease affecting adults aged over 50 years is sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM). Besides inflammatory effects and immune-mediated muscle injury, degenerative myofiber changes are characteristic features of the disease. Although the earliest triggering events in sIBM remain elusive, a plethora of downstream mechanisms are implicated in the pathophysiology of muscle wasting. Although it remains controversial whether hereditary forms of inclusion body myopathy (IBM) may be considered as degenerative sIBM disease models, partial pathophysiological aspects can mimic the much more frequent sporadic condition, in particular the occurrence of inclusion bodies in skeletal muscle. Various clinical aspects in genetically determined skeletal muscle disorders reflect age-related alterations observed in sarcopenia. Several intriguing clues from monogenic defects in heritable IBMs contributing to the molecular basis of muscle loss will be discussed with special emphasis on inclusion body myopathy with Paget’s disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD) and GNE myopathy. Finally, also the recently identified dominant multisystem proteinopathy will be considered, which may rarely present as IBM. PMID:25729363

  17. Investigation of Class 2b Trucks

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.C.

    2002-04-03

    The popularity of trucks in the class 2 category--that is, those with a 6,000 to 10,000 pounds (lbs) gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR)--has increased since the late 1970s/early 1980s. The purpose of this research is to identify and examine vehicles in the upper portion of the class 2 weight range (designated as vehicle class 2b) and to assess their impact. Vehicles in class 2b (8,500-10,000 lbs GVWR) include pickup trucks, sport utility vehicles (SUVs), and large vans (i.e., not minivans). Oak Ridge National Laboratory researched each individual truck model to determine which models were class 2b trucks and arrived at four methodologies to derive sales volumes. Two methods--one for calendar year and one for model year sales--were recommended for producing believable and reliable results. The study indicates that 521,000 class 2b trucks were sold in calendar year 1999--6.4% of sales of all trucks under 10,000 lbs. Eighty-two percent of class 2b trucks sold in 1999 were pickups; one third of class 2b trucks sold in 1999 were diesel. There were 5.8 million class 2b trucks on the road in 2000, which amounts to 7.8% of all trucks under 10,000 lbs. Twenty-four percent of the class 2b truck population is diesel. Estimates show that class 2b trucks account for 8% of annual miles traveled by trucks under 10,000 lbs and 9% of fuel use. Data on class 2b trucks are scarce. As the Tier 2 standards, which apply to passenger vehicles in the 8,500-10,000 lb GVWR category, become effective, additional data on class 2b trucks may become available--not only emissions data, but data in all areas. At the moment, distinguishing class 2b trucks from class 2 trucks in general is a substantial task requiring data on an individual model level.

  18. Peginterferon Alfa-2b Injection (Sylatron)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2b injection is used in people with malignant melanoma (a life-threatening cancer that begins in certain ... is used to reduce the chance that malignant melanoma will come back and must be started within ...

  19. Peginterferon Alfa-2b (PEG-Intron)

    MedlinePlus

    ... inject into your stomach if you are very thin. Use a different spot for each injection. Do not inject peginterferon alfa-2b into an area where the skin is sore, red, bruised, scarred, irritated, or infected; has stretch marks ...

  20. Cell stress molecules in the skeletal muscle of GNE myopathy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mutations of the UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine-kinase (GNE)-gene are causally related to GNE myopathy. Yet, underlying pathomechanisms of muscle fibre damage have remained elusive. In sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM), the pro-inflammatory cell-stress mediators αB-crystallin and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) are crucial markers of the disease pathology. Methods 10 muscle biopsies from GNE myopathy patients were analyzed for mRNA-expression of markers of cell-stress, inflammation and β-amyloid and compared to non-myopathic controls. Using double-labeling immunohistochemistry, serial sections of skeletal muscle biopsies were stained for amyloid precursor protein (APP), major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I, αB-crystallin, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), interleukin (IL)-1β, β-amyloid, iNOS, and phosphorylated neurofilament (P-neurofilament) as well as hematoxylin/eosin histochemistry. Corresponding areas of all biopsies with a total of 2,817 muscle fibres were quantitatively assessed for all markers. Results mRNA-expression of APP, NCAM, iNOS, TNF-α and TGF-β was higher in GNE myopathy compared to controls, yet this was not statistically significant. The mRNA-expression of APP and αB-crystallin significantly correlated with the expression of several pro-inflammatory and cell-stress-associated markers as NCAM, IL-1β, TGF-β, CCL-3, and CCL4. By immunohistochemistry, αB-crystallin and iNOS were co-upregulated and the number of fibres positive for αB-crystallin, NCAM, MHC-I and iNOS significantly correlated with each other. A large fraction of fibres positive for αB-crystallin were double positive for iNOS and vice-versa. Moreover, several fibres with structural abnormalities were positive for αB-crystallin and iNOS. Notably, particularly normal appearing fibres displayed an overexpression of these molecules. Conclusions The cell-stress molecules αB-crystallin and iNOS are overexpressed in GNE

  1. Nutritional degenerative myopathy in a population of captive bred Uroplatus phantasticus (satanic leaf-tailed geckoes).

    PubMed

    Les Gabor, J

    2005-01-01

    Severe generalized degenerative myopathy was diagnosed in a population of captive bred satanic leaf-tailed geckoes (Uroplatus phantasticus). The diagnosis was based on characteristic histological changes and response to dietary therapy. This is the first reported case of nutritional myopathy in the satanic leaf-tailed gecko. PMID:15690956

  2. Myopathy induced by statin-ezetimibe combination: Evaluation of potential risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Brahmachari, Ballari; Chatterjee, Suparna

    2015-01-01

    Although both atorvastatin and ezetimibe may cause myopathy, statin-induced myopathy is less likely at low doses, and ezetimibe is only rarely reported to induce myopathy. Also, ezetimibe is not usually known to potentiate statin-induced myopathy. We report a case of myalgia with elevated serum creatinine phosphokinase in a patient after 2 months of therapy with fixed dose combination of atorvastatin and ezetimibe (10 mg each). At the time of the event, patient was undertaking moderate physical exertion in the form of brisk walking for 30–40 min a day and was detected to have low serum Vitamin D levels. The adverse event resolved after stopping atorvastatin-ezetimibe combination therapy. Potential risk factors, such as physical exertion and Vitamin D deficiency, co-existent in dyslipidemic patients, may exacerbate myopathy potential of these drugs, and precipitate muscular symptoms even at a low-dose. PMID:26600650

  3. Myopathy induced by statin-ezetimibe combination: Evaluation of potential risk factors.

    PubMed

    Brahmachari, Ballari; Chatterjee, Suparna

    2015-01-01

    Although both atorvastatin and ezetimibe may cause myopathy, statin-induced myopathy is less likely at low doses, and ezetimibe is only rarely reported to induce myopathy. Also, ezetimibe is not usually known to potentiate statin-induced myopathy. We report a case of myalgia with elevated serum creatinine phosphokinase in a patient after 2 months of therapy with fixed dose combination of atorvastatin and ezetimibe (10 mg each). At the time of the event, patient was undertaking moderate physical exertion in the form of brisk walking for 30-40 min a day and was detected to have low serum Vitamin D levels. The adverse event resolved after stopping atorvastatin-ezetimibe combination therapy. Potential risk factors, such as physical exertion and Vitamin D deficiency, co-existent in dyslipidemic patients, may exacerbate myopathy potential of these drugs, and precipitate muscular symptoms even at a low-dose. PMID:26600650

  4. Genetic Risk for Malignant Hyperthermia in Non-Anesthesia-Induced Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Vladutiu, Georgirene D.; Isackson, Paul J.; Kaufman, Kenneth; Harley, John B.; Cobb, Beth; Christopher-Stine, Lisa; Wortmann, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a pharmacogenetic, autosomal dominantly inherited disorder of skeletal muscle triggered by volatile anesthetics and infrequently by extreme exertion and heat exposure. MH has variable penetrance with an incidence ranging from 1 in 5,000 to 1 in 50,000–100,000 anesthesias. Mutations in the ryanodine receptor gene, RYR1, are found in 50–70% of cases. We hypothesized that a portion of patients with drug-induced muscle diseases, unrelated to anesthesia, such as severe statin myopathy, have underlying genetic liability that may include RYR1 gene mutations. DNA samples were collected from 885 patients in 4 groups: severe statin myopathy (n=197), mild statin myopathy (n=163), statin-tolerant controls (n=133), and non-drug-induced myopathies of unknown etiology characterized by exercise-induced muscle pain and weakness (n=392). Samples were screened for 105 mutations and variants in 26 genes associated with 7 categories of muscle disease including 34 mutations and variants in the RYR1 gene. Disease-causing mutations or variants in RYR1 were present in 3 severe statin myopathy cases, 1 mild statin myopathy case, 8 patients with non-drug-induced myopathy, and none in controls. These results suggest that disease-causing mutations and certain variants in the RYR1 gene may contribute to underlying genetic risk for non-anesthesia-induced myopathies and should be included in genetic susceptibility screening in patients with severe statin myopathy and in patients with non-statin-induced myopathies of unknown etiology. PMID:21795085

  5. GNE Myopathy and Cell Apoptosis: A Comparative Mutation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Reema; Arya, Ranjana

    2016-07-01

    In a number of genetic disorders such as GNE myopathy, it is not clear how mutations in target genes result in disease phenotype. GNE myopathy is a progressive neuro-degenerative disorder associated with homozygous or compound heterozygous missense mutations in either epimerase or kinase domain of UDP-GlcNAc 2-epimerase/ManNAc kinase (GNE). This bifunctional enzyme catalyses the rate limiting step in sialic acid biosynthesis. Many mechanisms have been suggested as possible cause of muscle degeneration. These include hyposialylation of critical proteins, defects in cytoskeletal network, sarcomere organization and apoptosis. In order to elucidate the role of GNE in cell apoptosis, we have used HEK cell-based model system overexpressing pathologically relevant GNE mutations. These cells display a reduction in the levels of sialic acid-bound glycoconjugates. These mutants GNE overexpressing cells have defect in cell proliferation as compared to vector or wild-type GNE (wtGNE) controls. Moreover, effect of different GNE mutations on cell apoptosis was also observed using staining with annexin V-FITC and TUNEL assay. The downstream apoptosis signalling pathway involving activation of caspases and increased PARP cleavage were observed in all GNE mutant cell lines. In addition, morpho-structural changes in mitochondria in cells overexpressing different GNE mutants were noticed by transmission electron microscopy, and mitochondrial transmembrane potential was found to be altered in absence of functional GNE. Our results clearly indicate role of GNE in mitochondria-dependent cell apoptosis and provide insights into the pathomechanism of GNE myopathy. PMID:25976366

  6. Extensive morphological and immunohistochemical characterization in myotubular myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shichiji, Minobu; Biancalana, Valérie; Fardeau, Michel; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Osawa, Makiko; Laporte, Jocelyn; Romero, Norma Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    The X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) also called X-linked centronuclear myopathy is a rare congenital myopathy due to mutations in the MTM1 gene encoding myotubularin. The disease gives rise to a severe muscle weakness in males at birth. The main muscle morphological characteristics (significant number of small muscle fibers with centralized nuclei and type 1 fiber predominance) are usually documented, but the sequence of formation and maintenance of this particular morphological pattern has not been extensively characterized in humans. In this study, we perform a reevaluation of morphological changes in skeletal muscle biopsies in severe XLMTM. We correlate the pathologic features observed in the muscle biopsies of 15 newborns with MTM1-mutations according to the “adjusted-age” at the time of muscle biopsy, focusing on sequential analysis in the early period of the life (from 34 weeks of gestation to 3 months of age). We found a similar morphological pattern throughout the period analyzed; the proportion of myofibers with central nuclei was high in all muscle biopsies, independently of the muscle type, the age of the newborns at time of biopsy and the specific MTM1 mutation. We did not observe a period free of morphological abnormalities in human skeletal muscle as observed in myotubularin-deficient mouse models. In addition, this study demonstrated some features of delayed maturation of the muscle fibers without any increase in the number of satellite cells, associated with a marked disorganization of the muscle T-tubules and cytoskeletal network in the skeletal muscle fibers. PMID:24381816

  7. Treatment of inflammatory myopathy: emerging therapies and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Moghadam-Kia, Siamak; Aggarwal, Rohit; Oddis, Chester V

    2016-01-01

    Despite the lack of placebo-controlled trials, glucocorticoids are considered the mainstay of initial treatment for idiopathic inflammatory myopathy and myositis-associated interstitial lung disease. Glucocorticoid-sparing agents are often given concomitantly with other immunosuppressive agents, particularly in patients with moderate or severe disease. First-line conventional immunosuppressive drugs include either methotrexate or azathioprine, and when they fail, more aggressive therapy includes mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus or cyclosporine, intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab, or cyclophosphamide, used alone or in various combinations. Further investigations are required to assess the role of more novel therapies in the treatment of myositis and myositis-associated interstitial lung disease. PMID:26313852

  8. Distal myopathy caused by homozygous missense mutations in the nebulin gene.

    PubMed

    Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Kalimo, Hannu; Paetau, Anders; Nuutinen, Elina; Hackman, Peter; Sewry, Caroline; Pelin, Katarina; Udd, Bjarne

    2007-06-01

    We describe a novel, recessively inherited distal myopathy caused by homozygous missense mutations in the nebulin gene (NEB), in which other combinations of mutations are known to cause nemaline (rod) myopathy (NM). Two different missense mutations were identified in homozygous form in seven Finnish patients from four unrelated families with childhood or adult-onset foot drop. Both mutations, when combined in compound heterozygous form with more disruptive mutations in NEB, are known to cause NM. Hitherto, no patients with NM have been found to have two missense mutations in NEB. Muscle weakness predominantly affected ankle dorsiflexors, finger extensors and neck flexors, a distribution different both from the patterns of weakness seen in NM caused by NEB mutations, and those of the known recessively inherited distal myopathies. Singleton cases need to be distinguished from the Laing type of distal myopathy. Histologically, this myopathy differs from NM in that nemaline bodies were not detectable with routine light microscopy, and they were inconspicuous or absent even with electron microscopy. Rimmed vacuoles, commonly seen in other distal myopathies, were not a feature. We conclude that homozygous missense mutations in NEB cause a novel distal myopathy, predominantly involving lower leg extensor muscles, finger extensors and neck flexors. PMID:17525139

  9. High risk of cancer in autoimmune necrotizing myopathies: usefulness of myositis specific antibody.

    PubMed

    Allenbach, Yves; Keraen, Jeremy; Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Jooste, Valérie; Champtiaux, Nicolas; Hervier, Baptiste; Schoindre, Yoland; Rigolet, Aude; Gilardin, Laurent; Musset, Lucile; Charuel, Jean-Luc; Boyer, Olivier; Jouen, Fabienne; Drouot, Laurent; Martinet, Jeremie; Stojkovic, Tanya; Eymard, Bruno; Laforêt, Pascal; Behin, Antony; Salort-Campana, Emmanuelle; Fain, Olivier; Meyer, Alain; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Mariampillai, Kuberaka; Grados, Aurelie; Benveniste, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    Cancer can occur in patients with inflammatory myopathies. This association is mainly observed in dermatomyositis, and myositis-specific antibodies have allowed us to delineate patients at an increased risk. Malignancy is also reported in patients with necrotizing autoimmune myopathies, but the risk remains elusive. Anti-signal recognition particle or anti-HMGCR antibodies have been specifically associated with necrotizing autoimmune myopathies. We aimed at screening the incidence of cancer in necrotizing autoimmune myopathies. A group of patients (n = 115) with necrotizing autoimmune myopathies with or without myositis-specific antibodies was analysed. Malignancy occurred more frequently in seronegative necrotizing autoimmune myopathies patients and in HMGCR-positive patients compared to anti-signal recognition particle positive patients. Synchronous malignancy was diagnosed in 21.4% and 11.5% of cases, respectively, and incidence of cancer was higher compared to the general population in both groups. No specific type of cancer was predominant. Patients suffering from a synchronous cancer had a decreased median survival time. Cancer screening is necessary in seronegative necrotizing autoimmune myopathies and in HMGCR-positive patients but not in anti-signal recognition particle-positive patients. PMID:27086869

  10. Statin-associated myopathy: from genetic predisposition to clinical management.

    PubMed

    Vrablik, M; Zlatohlavek, L; Stulc, T; Adamkova, V; Prusikova, M; Schwarzova, L; Hubacek, J A; Ceska, R

    2014-01-01

    Statin-associated myopathy (SAM) represents a broad spectrum of disorders from insignificant myalgia to fatal rhabdomyolysis. Its frequency ranges from 1-5 % in clinical trials to 15-20 % in everyday clinical practice. To a large extent, these variations can be explained by the definition used. Thus, we propose a scoring system to classify statin-induced myopathy according to clinical and biochemical criteria as 1) possible, 2) probable or 3) definite. The etiology of this disorder remains poorly understood. Most probably, an underlying genetic cause is necessary for overt SAM to develop. Variants in a few gene groups that encode proteins involved in: i) statin metabolism and distribution (e.g. membrane transporters and enzymes; OATP1B1, ABCA1, MRP, CYP3A4), ii) coenzyme Q10 production (e.g. COQ10A and B), iii) energy metabolism of muscle tissue (e.g. PYGM, GAA, CPT2) and several others have been proposed as candidates which can predispose to SAM. Pharmacological properties of individual statin molecules (e.g. lipophilicity, excretion pathways) and patients´ characteristics influence the likelihood of SAM development. This review summarizes current data as well as our own results. PMID:25428737

  11. [Myopathy in the course of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency].

    PubMed

    Durka-Kęsy, Marta; Stępień, Adam; Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Fidziańska, Anna; Niebrój-Dobosz, Irena; Pastuszak, Zanna

    2012-01-01

    Congenital deficiency of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II is a disease with an autosomal recessive inheritance of phenotypic variability which depends on age at the onset of symptoms. Three entities associated with deficiency of CPT II are known: the perinatal, the infantile and the adult form. The perinatal disease is the most severe form and is invariably fatal. On the other hand, the adult CPT II clinical phenotype is benign and requires additional external triggers such as high-intensity exercise to provoke myopathic symptoms. We report a case of adult CPT II deficiency presenting with the subtle symptoms of myopathy. A 32-year-old man was admitted to the hospital complaining of muscle pain after exercise. Athletic appearance drew attention, because the patient denied practicing sport. Neurological examination revealed marked tiredness during the single-leg hop test without other abnormalities. Electromyography (EMG) and serum biochemistry were not typical for myopathy. Routine histopathological examination did not reveal any abnormalities of structure of muscle fibers. Diagnosis was established after ultrastructural and biochemical analysis which revealed changes typical for CPT II deficiency. PMID:23319229

  12. Mitochondrial myopathies: diagnosis, exercise intolerance, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Raha, Sandeep

    2005-12-01

    Mitochondrial myopathies are caused by genetic mutations that directly influence the functioning of the electron transport chain (ETC). It is estimated that 1 of 8,000 people have pathology inducing mutations affecting mitochondrial function. Diagnosis often requires a multifaceted approach with measurements of serum lactate and pyruvate, urine organic acids, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), muscle histology and ultrastructure, enzymology, genetic analysis, and exercise testing. The ubiquitous distribution of the mitochondria in the human body explains the multiple organ involvement. Exercise intolerance is a common but often an overlooked hallmark of mitochondrial myopathies. The muscle consequences of ETC dysfunction include increased reliance on anaerobic metabolism (lactate generation, phosphocreatine degradation), enhanced free radical production, reduced oxygen extraction and electron flux through ETC, and mitochondrial proliferation or biogenesis (see article by Hood in current issue). Treatments have included antioxidants (vitamin E, alpha lipoic acid), electron donors and acceptors (coenzyme Q10, riboflavin), alternative energy sources (creatine monohydrate), lactate reduction strategies (dichloroacetate) and exercise training. Exercise is a particularly important modality in diagnosis as well as therapy (see article by Taivassalo in current issue). Increased awareness of these disorders by exercise physiologists and sports medicine practitioners should lead to more accurate and more rapid diagnosis and the opportunity for therapy and genetic counseling. PMID:16331134

  13. Progressive myopathy with circulating autoantibody against giantin in the Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Sahashi, K; Ibi, T; Ohno, K; Sahashi, K; Nakao, N; Kondo, H

    2004-05-25

    A woman aged 59 years with adult-onset progressive myopathy had anti-Golgi (giantin) autoantibody in the serum. Limb-muscle biopsy revealed chronic myopathy with paucity of cellular reactions and reduced immunostaining for alpha-dystroglycan. The similarity of the current patient with cases of hereditary alpha-dystroglycanopathies (Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy, Walker-Warburg syndrome, muscle-eye-brain disease, congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C, and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I) suggests that the Golgi apparatus is the target organelle in a subset of myopathies. PMID:15159505

  14. Vitamin D deficiency: a forgotten treatable cause of motor delay and proximal myopathy.

    PubMed

    Fluss, Joel; Kern, Ilse; de Coulon, Geraldo; Gonzalez, Elsa; Chehade, Hassib

    2014-01-01

    We report a four-year-old African boy referred for proximal muscle weakness, fatigability and episodic limb pain. Classical causes of structural and metabolic myopathy were initially considered before clinical and biological features of vitamin D deficiency rickets were identified. Prompt treatment with vitamin D and calcium supplementation led to a complete reversal of the muscle symptoms. Rickets-associated myopathy should be included in the differential diagnosis of proximal myopathy, especially in at-risk individuals. Vitamin D deficiency and its prevention remain important health issues in industrialized countries. PMID:23273989

  15. Fibrous myopathy as a complication of repeated intramuscular injections for chronic headache

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, R; McNeil, S; Hegedus, C; Gray, DS

    2006-01-01

    Two cases of fibrous myopathy associated with repeated, long-term intramuscular injections for treatment of chronic temporomandibular joint pain and chronic headache, respectively, are described. Both patients developed severe, function-limiting contractures in upper and lower extremity muscles used as injection sites. In one of the cases, the contractures were painful. Electrophysiological testing, magnetic resonance imaging and muscle biopsy results were all consistent with myopathy and replacement of skeletal muscle with noncontractile fibrous tissue. These cases are presented to increase awareness of fibrous myopathy and to promote surveillance for this serious potential complication of long-term intramuscular injections in chronic headache and other pain patients. PMID:17149458

  16. Hereditary inclusion body myopathy: A myopathy with unique topography of weakness, yet frequently misdiagnosed: Case series and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Das, Biplab; Goyal, Manoj Kumar; Bhatkar, Sanat Ramchandra; Vinny, Pulikottil Wilson; Modi, Manish; Lal, Vivek; Gayathri, N.; Mahadevan, Anitha; Radotra, Bishan Dass

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM) continues to be underrecognized clinically despite a characteristic topography of weakness with total sparing of quadriceps muscles and patient being wheelchair bound. We report seven patients of HIBM from four families in North India. Methods and Results: Seven patients from four different families were diagnosed to have HIBM. There was no consanguinity in any of the families. While one patient had two affected siblings, another had one affected siblings and the family history was noncontributory in two patients. Two of the siblings were available for examination and confirmed clinically to be suffering from HIBM. Among the seven patients, only one was still ambulatory at the time of diagnosis. Discussion: This is the first case report of occurrence of HIBM in North Indian population. Despite its unique clinical presentation, HIBM is frequently misdiagnosed resulting in unnecessary diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. A high index of suspicion of this rare myopathy along with proper clinical examination may go a long way in accurate prognostication and management of these patients. PMID:27011643

  17. Isolated inclusion body myopathy caused by a multisystem proteinopathy–linked hnRNPA1 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Rumiko; Warita, Hitoshi; Niihori, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Tateyama, Maki; Suzuki, Naoki; Nishiyama, Ayumi; Shirota, Matsuyuki; Funayama, Ryo; Nakayama, Keiko; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Nishino, Ichizo; Aoki, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic cause of isolated inclusion body myopathy (IBM) with autosomal dominant inheritance in 2 families. Methods: Genetic investigations were performed using whole-exome and Sanger sequencing of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 gene (hnRNPA1). The clinical and pathologic features of patients in the 2 families were evaluated with neurologic examinations, muscle imaging, and muscle biopsy. Results: We identified a missense p.D314N mutation in hnRNPA1, which is also known to cause familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, in 2 families with IBM. The affected individuals developed muscle weakness in their 40s, which slowly progressed toward a limb-girdle pattern. Further evaluation of the affected individuals revealed no apparent motor neuron dysfunction, cognitive impairment, or bone abnormality. The muscle pathology was compatible with IBM, lacking apparent neurogenic change and inflammation. Multiple immunohistochemical analyses revealed the cytoplasmic aggregation of hnRNPA1 in close association with autophagosomes and myonuclei. Furthermore, the aberrant accumulation was characterized by coaggregation with ubiquitin, sequestome-1/p62, valosin-containing protein/p97, and a variety of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Conclusions: The present study expands the clinical phenotype of hnRNPA1-linked multisystem proteinopathy. Mutations in hnRNPA1, and possibly hnRNPA2B1, will be responsible for isolated IBM with a pure muscular phenotype. Although the mechanisms underlying the selective skeletal muscle involvement remain to be elucidated, the immunohistochemical results suggest a broad sequestration of RBPs by the mutated hnRNPA1. PMID:27066560

  18. Genetics Home Reference: inclusion body myopathy with early-onset Paget disease and frontotemporal dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... progressively damages parts of the brain that control reasoning, personality, social skills, speech, and language. People with ... K, Mumm S, Whyte MP, Smith CD, Watts GD. Clinical studies in familial VCP myopathy associated with Paget ...

  19. MRI in DNM2-related centronuclear myopathy: evidence for highly selective muscle involvement.

    PubMed

    Schessl, Joachim; Medne, Livija; Hu, Ying; Zou, Yaqun; Brown, Mark J; Huse, Jason T; Torigian, Drew A; Jungbluth, Heinz; Goebel, Hans-Hilmar; Bönnemann, Carsten G

    2007-01-01

    Dynamin 2 has recently been recognized as a causative gene for the autosomal dominant form of centronuclear myopathy (dominant centronuclear myopathy). Here we report an affected father and daughter with dynamin 2 related AD CNM with predominantly distal onset of weakness. In addition to the diagnostic central location of myonuclei the muscle biopsy also showed core-like structures. Muscle MRI in the lower leg revealed prominent involvement of the soleus, but also of the gastrocnemius and the tibialis anterior whereas in the thigh there was a consistent pattern of selective involvement of adductor longus, semimembranosus, biceps femoris, rectus femoris, and vastus intermedius with relative sparing of vastus lateralis and medialis, sartorius, gracilis, and partly of the semitendinosus. These characteristic findings on muscle MRI confirm similar findings reported for CT imaging in dynamin 2 related dominant centronuclear myopathy and may help to differentiate this disorder from central core disease and other myopathies. PMID:17134899

  20. Natural history of pulmonary function in collagen VI-related myopathies.

    PubMed

    Foley, A Reghan; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Collins, James; Straub, Volker; McCallum, Michelle; Deconinck, Nicolas; Mercuri, Eugenio; Pane, Marika; D'Amico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico; North, Kathryn; Ryan, Monique M; Richard, Pascale; Allamand, Valérie; Hicks, Debbie; Lamandé, Shireen; Hu, Ying; Gualandi, Francesca; Auh, Sungyoung; Muntoni, Francesco; Bönnemann, Carsten G

    2013-12-01

    The spectrum of clinical phenotypes associated with a deficiency or dysfunction of collagen VI in the extracellular matrix of muscle are collectively termed 'collagen VI-related myopathies' and include Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, Bethlem myopathy and intermediate phenotypes. To further define the clinical course of these variants, we studied the natural history of pulmonary function in correlation to motor abilities in the collagen VI-related myopathies by analysing longitudinal forced vital capacity data in a large international cohort. Retrospective chart reviews of genetically and/or pathologically confirmed collagen VI-related myopathy patients were performed at 10 neuromuscular centres: USA (n = 2), UK (n = 2), Australia (n = 2), Italy (n = 2), France (n = 1) and Belgium (n = 1). A total of 486 forced vital capacity measurements obtained in 145 patients were available for analysis. Patients at the severe end of the clinical spectrum, conforming to the original description of Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy were easily identified by severe muscle weakness either preventing ambulation or resulting in an early loss of ambulation, and demonstrated a cumulative decline in forced vital capacity of 2.6% per year (P < 0.0001). Patients with better functional abilities, in whom walking with/without assistance was achieved, were initially combined, containing both intermediate and Bethlem myopathy phenotypes in one group. However, one subset of patients demonstrated a continuous decline in pulmonary function whereas the other had stable pulmonary function. None of the patients with declining pulmonary function attained the ability to hop or run; these patients were categorized as intermediate collagen VI-related myopathy and the remaining patients as Bethlem myopathy. Intermediate patients had a cumulative decline in forced vital capacity of 2.3% per year (P < 0.0001) whereas the relationship between age and forced vital capacity in patients with

  1. hnRNPA2B1 and hnRNPA1 mutations are rare in patients with "multisystem proteinopathy" and frontotemporal lobar degeneration phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Le Ber, Isabelle; Van Bortel, Inge; Nicolas, Gael; Bouya-Ahmed, Kawtar; Camuzat, Agnès; Wallon, David; De Septenville, Anne; Latouche, Morwena; Lattante, Serena; Kabashi, Edor; Jornea, Ludmila; Hannequin, Didier; Brice, Alexis

    2014-04-01

    hnRNPA2B1 and hnRNPA1 mutations have been recently identified by exome sequencing in three families presenting with multisystem proteinopathy (MSP), a rare complex phenotype associating frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), Paget disease of bone (PDB), inclusion body myopathy (IBM), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). No study has evaluated the exact frequency of these genes in cohorts of MSP or FTD patients so far. We sequenced both genes in 17 patients with MSP phenotypes, and in 60 patients with FTLD and FTLD-ALS to test whether mutations could be implicated in the pathogenesis of these disorders. No disease-causing mutation was identified. We conclude that hnRNPA2B1 and hnRNPA1 mutations are rare in MSP and FTLD spectrum of diseases, although further investigations in larger populations are needed. PMID:24119545

  2. The Spectrum of Mitochondrial Ultrastructural Defects in Mitochondrial Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Amy E.; Ng, Yi Shiau; White, Kathryn; Davey, Tracey; Mannella, Carmen; Falkous, Gavin; Feeney, Catherine; Schaefer, Andrew M.; McFarland, Robert; Gorman, Grainne S.; Taylor, Robert W.; Turnbull, Doug M.; Picard, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial functions are intrinsically linked to their morphology and membrane ultrastructure. Characterizing abnormal mitochondrial structural features may thus provide insight into the underlying pathogenesis of inherited and acquired mitochondrial diseases. Following a systematic literature review on ultrastructural defects in mitochondrial myopathy, we investigated skeletal muscle biopsies from seven subjects with genetically defined mtDNA mutations. Mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology were characterized using two complimentary approaches: transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and serial block face scanning EM (SBF-SEM) with 3D reconstruction. Six ultrastructural abnormalities were identified including i) paracrystalline inclusions, ii) linearization of cristae and abnormal angular features, iii) concentric layering of cristae membranes, iv) matrix compartmentalization, v) nanotunelling, and vi) donut-shaped mitochondria. In light of recent molecular advances in mitochondrial biology, these findings reveal novel aspects of mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology in human tissues with implications for understanding the mechanisms linking mitochondrial dysfunction to disease. PMID:27506553

  3. Inborn Errors of Energy Metabolism Associated with Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anibh M.; Steuerwald, Ulrike; Illsinger, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Inherited neuromuscular disorders affect approximately one in 3,500 children. Structural muscular defects are most common; however functional impairment of skeletal and cardiac muscle in both children and adults may be caused by inborn errors of energy metabolism as well. Patients suffering from metabolic myopathies due to compromised energy metabolism may present with exercise intolerance, muscle pain, reversible or progressive muscle weakness, and myoglobinuria. In this review, the physiology of energy metabolism in muscle is described, followed by the presentation of distinct disorders affecting skeletal and cardiac muscle: glycogen storage diseases types III, V, VII, fatty acid oxidation defects, and respiratory chain defects (i.e., mitochondriopathies). The diagnostic work-up and therapeutic options in these disorders are discussed. PMID:20589068

  4. Molecular basis of infantile reversible cytochrome c oxidase deficiency myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, John P.; Tuppen, Helen A. L.; Hudson, Gavin; Oldfors, Anders; Marie, Suely K. N.; Moslemi, Ali-Reza; Servidei, Serenella; Holme, Elisabeth; Shanske, Sara; Kollberg, Gittan; Jayakar, Parul; Pyle, Angela; Marks, Harold M.; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Scavina, Mena; Walter, Maggie C.; Çoku, Jorida; Günther-Scholz, Andrea; Smith, Paul M.; McFarland, Robert; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M. A.; Lightowlers, Robert N.; Hirano, Michio; Lochmüller, Hanns; Taylor, Robert W.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Tulinius, Mar; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2009-01-01

    Childhood-onset mitochondrial encephalomyopathies are usually severe, relentlessly progressive conditions that have a fatal outcome. However, a puzzling infantile disorder, long known as ‘benign cytochrome c oxidase deficiency myopathy’ is an exception because it shows spontaneous recovery if infants survive the first months of life. Current investigations cannot distinguish those with a good prognosis from those with terminal disease, making it very difficult to decide when to continue intensive supportive care. Here we define the principal molecular basis of the disorder by identifying a maternally inherited, homoplasmic m.14674T>C mt-tRNAGlu mutation in 17 patients from 12 families. Our results provide functional evidence for the pathogenicity of the mutation and show that tissue-specific mechanisms downstream of tRNAGlu may explain the spontaneous recovery. This study provides the rationale for a simple genetic test to identify infants with mitochondrial myopathy and good prognosis. PMID:19720722

  5. [Sporadic Late-Onset Nemaline Myopathy Associated with MGUS].

    PubMed

    Nagai, Taiji; Sunada, Yoshihide

    2015-12-01

    Sporadic late-onset nemaline myopathy is an uncommon disease. Clinically, it is characterized by progressive muscle weakness that can develop in limbs or axial muscles. Asymmetrical distal weakness, facial weakness, dropped head, and dysphagia can also occur. Since the serum creatine kinase level usually remains within the normal range, patients can be misdiagnosed with motor neuron disease. Recognition of nemaline rods on muscle biopsy is crucial for accurate diagnosis. If it is associated with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, the outcome is known to be unfavorable. In spite of various immunotherapies such as corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, and plasmapheresis, most patients die of respiratory failure within 5 years. Since the efficacy of autologous stem cell transplantation following high-dose melphalan was first reported in 2008, there have been accumulating reports that showed the positive effect of this therapy for the disease. PMID:26618766

  6. The Spectrum of Mitochondrial Ultrastructural Defects in Mitochondrial Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Amy E; Ng, Yi Shiau; White, Kathryn; Davey, Tracey; Mannella, Carmen; Falkous, Gavin; Feeney, Catherine; Schaefer, Andrew M; McFarland, Robert; Gorman, Grainne S; Taylor, Robert W; Turnbull, Doug M; Picard, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial functions are intrinsically linked to their morphology and membrane ultrastructure. Characterizing abnormal mitochondrial structural features may thus provide insight into the underlying pathogenesis of inherited and acquired mitochondrial diseases. Following a systematic literature review on ultrastructural defects in mitochondrial myopathy, we investigated skeletal muscle biopsies from seven subjects with genetically defined mtDNA mutations. Mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology were characterized using two complimentary approaches: transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and serial block face scanning EM (SBF-SEM) with 3D reconstruction. Six ultrastructural abnormalities were identified including i) paracrystalline inclusions, ii) linearization of cristae and abnormal angular features, iii) concentric layering of cristae membranes, iv) matrix compartmentalization, v) nanotunelling, and vi) donut-shaped mitochondria. In light of recent molecular advances in mitochondrial biology, these findings reveal novel aspects of mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology in human tissues with implications for understanding the mechanisms linking mitochondrial dysfunction to disease. PMID:27506553

  7. Toxic myopathy induced by industrial minerals oils: clinical and histopathological features.

    PubMed

    Rossi, B; Siciliano, G; Giraldi, C; Angelini, C; Marchetti, A; Paggiaro, P L

    1986-12-01

    We report a case of subacute myopathy in a 47 years old man engaged on boiler maintenance at an oil-fired thermoelectric power station. The occupational history highlighted heavy exposure to inhalation of ash derived from mineral oil combustion and containing several elements, metals and metalloids, including vanadium and nickel. The presenting symptoms, clinical course and muscle histopathology suggest that exposure to toxic agents probably played an important part in the causation of the myopathy. PMID:3804712

  8. Motor unit reorganization in progressive muscular dystrophies and congenital myopathies.

    PubMed

    Szmidt-Sałkowska, Elżbieta; Gaweł, Małgorzata; Lipowska, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze motor unit reorganization in different types of progressive muscular dystrophies and congenital myopathies. The study population consisted of patients with genetically verified progressive muscular dystrophies: Duchenne (DMD) (n=54), Becker (BMD) (n=30), facio-scapulo-humeral (FSHD) (n=37), and Emery-Dreifuss (E-DD) (n=26). Patients with probable limb-girdle dystrophy (L-GD) (n=58) and congenital myopathies (n=35) were also included in the study. Quantitative EMG recordings were obtained from 469 muscles. Muscle activity at rest and during slight voluntary and maximal muscle contraction was analyzed. The motor unit activity potential (MUAP) duration, amplitude, area, size index (SI), polyphasicity, and the presence of "outliers" were evaluated. Diminished values of MUAP parameters and decreased maximal amplitude of maximal muscle contraction were recorded most frequently in DMD and mainly in the biceps brachii muscles. SI was the most frequently changed EMG parameter. "Outliers" with amplitude below the normal range were recorded more frequently then a decreased mean MUAP amplitude (what could indicate a very high sensitivity of this EMG parameter). Pathological interference pattern was recorded in 34.7% of biceps brachii and in 21.2% of rectus femoris muscles. In FSHD, decreased MUAP duration and SI and pathological interference pattern with low amplitude were recorded most frequently in the tibial anterior and deltoid muscles. The presence of potentials with reduced parameters is a result of decreasing motor unit area (reduced number and size of muscle fibers), while high amplitude potentials recorded in BMD and E-DD could indicate a slow and mild course of disease and muscle regeneration. PMID:26188938

  9. Statin-induced Myopathy in Skeletal Muscle: the Role of Exercise.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hyo-Bum

    2014-09-01

    Statins are widely used drugs to lower cholesterol levels and to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. However, it has been reported that statins are associated with adverse side effects of skeletal myopathy. Statin treatment can impair mitochondrial function and induce apoptosis in skeletal muscle in both human and animal models. Ubiquinone plays an essential role in transferring electrons in the mitochondrial electron transfer chain for oxidative phosphorylation. However, statin treatment reduces ubiquinone levels in the cholesterol synthesis pathway, which may be associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and apoptosis induced by statins may provide cellular and molecular mechanisms in skeletal myopathy. Exercise is the most effective therapy to prevent metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. However, whether exercise provides a benefit to or exacerbation of statin-induced myopathy in skeletal muscle remains poorly investigated. This review will briefly provide a comprehensive summary regarding the effects of statins on skeletal myopathy, and discuss the potential mechanisms of statin-induced myopathy and the role of exercise in statin-induced myopathy in skeletal muscle. PMID:26064857

  10. Statin-induced Myopathy in Skeletal Muscle: the Role of Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hyo-Bum

    2014-01-01

    Statins are widely used drugs to lower cholesterol levels and to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. However, it has been reported that statins are associated with adverse side effects of skeletal myopathy. Statin treatment can impair mitochondrial function and induce apoptosis in skeletal muscle in both human and animal models. Ubiquinone plays an essential role in transferring electrons in the mitochondrial electron transfer chain for oxidative phosphorylation. However, statin treatment reduces ubiquinone levels in the cholesterol synthesis pathway, which may be associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and apoptosis induced by statins may provide cellular and molecular mechanisms in skeletal myopathy. Exercise is the most effective therapy to prevent metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. However, whether exercise provides a benefit to or exacerbation of statin-induced myopathy in skeletal muscle remains poorly investigated. This review will briefly provide a comprehensive summary regarding the effects of statins on skeletal myopathy, and discuss the potential mechanisms of statin-induced myopathy and the role of exercise in statin-induced myopathy in skeletal muscle. PMID:26064857

  11. Scapuloperoneal muscular dystrophy phenotype due to TRIM32-sarcotubular myopathy in South Dakota Hutterite.

    PubMed

    Liewluck, Teerin; Tracy, Jennifer A; Sorenson, Eric J; Engel, Andrew G

    2013-02-01

    Scapuloperoneal muscular dystrophy is a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders that share the phenotype of progressive weakness of scapular and anterior distal leg muscles. Recessive mutations in C-terminal domains of TRIM32 result in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2H and sarcotubular myopathy, a rare congenital myopathy commonly seen in Hutterites. A scapuloperoneal phenotype has never been reported in sarcotubular myopathy. We here report a 23-year-old Hutterite man with a one-year history of progressive weakness predominantly involving the anterior tibial and left scapular muscles, and hyperCKemia. Biopsy of the anterior tibial muscle showed an active myopathy with non-rimmed vacuoles and mild denervation atrophy associated with reinnervation. The vacuoles are similar to those described in sarcotubular myopathy. TRIM32 sequencing revealed the common c.1459G>A mutation at homozygosity. A search for mutations in TRIM32 should be considered in patients with scapuloperoneal muscular dystrophy, and especially in patients of Hutterite origin or with an atypical vacuolar myopathy. PMID:23142638

  12. KLHL40-related nemaline myopathy with a sustained, positive response to treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Natera-de Benito, D; Nascimento, A; Abicht, A; Ortez, C; Jou, C; Müller, J S; Evangelista, T; Töpf, A; Thompson, R; Jimenez-Mallebrera, C; Colomer, J; Lochmüller, H

    2016-03-01

    Congenital myopathies are a group of inherited muscle disorders characterized by hypotonia, weakness and a non-dystrophic muscle biopsy with the presence of one or more characteristic histological features. Neuromuscular transmission defects have recently been reported in several patients with congenital myopathies (CM). Mutations in KLHL40 are among the most common causes of severe forms of nemaline myopathy. Clinical features of affected individuals include fetal akinesia or hypokinesia, respiratory failure, and swallowing difficulties at birth. Muscle weakness is usually severe and nearly half of the individuals have no spontaneous antigravity movement. The average age of death has been reported to be 5 months in a recent case series. Herein we present a case of a patient with a nemaline myopathy due to KLHL40 mutations (c.604delG, p.Ala202Argfs*56 and c.1513G>C, p.Ala505Pro) with an impressive and prolonged beneficial response to treatment with high-dose pyridostigmine. Myasthenic features or response to ACEI have not previously been reported as a characteristic of nemaline myopathy or KLHL40-related myopathy. PMID:26754003

  13. Deep RNA profiling identified CLOCK and molecular clock genes as pathophysiological signatures in collagen VI myopathy.

    PubMed

    Scotton, Chiara; Bovolenta, Matteo; Schwartz, Elena; Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Martoni, Elena; Passarelli, Chiara; Armaroli, Annarita; Osman, Hana; Rodolico, Carmelo; Messina, Sonia; Pegoraro, Elena; D'Amico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico; Gualandi, Francesca; Neri, Marcella; Selvatici, Rita; Boffi, Patrizia; Maioli, Maria Antonietta; Lochmüller, Hanns; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Katherine; Castrignanò, Tiziana; Pesole, Graziano; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Merlini, Luciano; Braghetta, Paola; Bonaldo, Paolo; Bernardi, Paolo; Foley, Reghan; Cirak, Sebahattin; Zaharieva, Irina; Muntoni, Francesco; Capitanio, Daniele; Gelfi, Cecilia; Kotelnikova, Ekaterina; Yuryev, Anton; Lebowitz, Michael; Zhang, Xiping; Hodge, Brian A; Esser, Karyn A; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2016-04-15

    Collagen VI myopathies are genetic disorders caused by mutations in collagen 6 A1, A2 and A3 genes, ranging from the severe Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy to the milder Bethlem myopathy, which is recapitulated by collagen-VI-null (Col6a1(-/-)) mice. Abnormalities in mitochondria and autophagic pathway have been proposed as pathogenic causes of collagen VI myopathies, but the link between collagen VI defects and these metabolic circuits remains unknown. To unravel the expression profiling perturbation in muscles with collagen VI myopathies, we performed a deep RNA profiling in both Col6a1(-/-)mice and patients with collagen VI pathology. The interactome map identified common pathways suggesting a previously undetected connection between circadian genes and collagen VI pathology. Intriguingly, Bmal1(-/-)(also known as Arntl) mice, a well-characterized model displaying arrhythmic circadian rhythms, showed profound deregulation of the collagen VI pathway and of autophagy-related genes. The involvement of circadian rhythms in collagen VI myopathies is new and links autophagy and mitochondrial abnormalities. It also opens new avenues for therapies of hereditary myopathies to modulate the molecular clock or potential gene-environment interactions that might modify muscle damage pathogenesis. PMID:26945058

  14. What Happened with Spectrometer Magnet 2B

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A

    2010-05-27

    The spectrometer solenoid is supposed to be the first magnets installed in MICE [1]-[4]. This report described what happened during the test of the MICE spectrometer solenoid 2B. First, the report describes the temperatures in the magnet, the cooler top plate and the shield during the run where the magnet quenched at 258 A. During this quench, a lead between the bottom of the HTS leads and the diode bank burned out causing the magnet to quench. Second, three methods for measuring the net heat flow into the cold mass are described. Third, there is a discussion of possible resistive heating in the HTS leads between liquid helium temperature and the copper plate, which is at about 50 K. Fourth, there is a discussion of the measured first stage heat loads in the magnet, when there is no current in the magnet. The first stage heat load calculations are based on knowing the first stage temperatures of the three two-stage pulse tube coolers and the single stage GM cooler. Fifth, the estimated heat load to the first stage when the magnet has current in it is discussed. Sixth, there is a comparison of the stage 1 heat loads in magnet 1A [5], magnet 2A [6], and magnet 2B [7]. Finally there is a discussion of recommended changes for improving the spectrometer solenoids so that the coolers can keep them cold.

  15. Dysferlin stabilizes stress-induced Ca2+ signaling in the transverse tubule membrane

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Jaclyn P.; Ziman, Andrew P.; Mueller, Amber L.; Muriel, Joaquin M.; Kleinhans-Welte, Emily; Gumerson, Jessica D.; Vogel, Steven S.; Ward, Christopher W.; Roche, Joseph A.; Bloch, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Dysferlinopathies, most commonly limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B and Miyoshi myopathy, are degenerative myopathies caused by mutations in the DYSF gene encoding the protein dysferlin. Studies of dysferlin have focused on its role in the repair of the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle, but dysferlin’s association with calcium (Ca2+) signaling proteins in the transverse (t-) tubules suggests additional roles. Here, we reveal that dysferlin is enriched in the t-tubule membrane of mature skeletal muscle fibers. Following experimental membrane stress in vitro, dysferlin-deficient muscle fibers undergo extensive functional and structural disruption of the t-tubules that is ameliorated by reducing external [Ca2+] or blocking L-type Ca2+ channels with diltiazem. Furthermore, we demonstrate that diltiazem treatment of dysferlin-deficient mice significantly reduces eccentric contraction-induced t-tubule damage, inflammation, and necrosis, which resulted in a concomitant increase in postinjury functional recovery. Our discovery of dysferlin as a t-tubule protein that stabilizes stress-induced Ca2+ signaling offers a therapeutic avenue for limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B and Miyoshi myopathy patients. PMID:24302765

  16. Telecom 2-B and 2-C (TC2B and TC2C)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulac, J.; Alvarez, H.

    1991-01-01

    The DSN (Deep Space Network) mission support requirements for Telecom 2-B and 2-C (TC2B and TC2C) are summarized. These Telecom missions will provide high-speed data link applications, telephone, and television service between France and overseas territories as a follow-on to TC2A. Mission objectives are outlined and the DSN support requirements are defined through the presentation of tables and narratives describing the spacecraft flight profile; DSN support coverage; frequency assignments; support parameters for telemetry, command and support systems; and tracking support responsibility.

  17. Other limb-girdle muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Amato, Anthony A

    2011-01-01

    The secondary α-dystroglycanopathies usually present in infancy as congenital muscular dystrophies but may manifest later in childhood or adult life (limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) 2I, LGMD2K, LGMD2M, LGMD2N, and LGMD2O). Patients with telethoninopathy (LGMD2B) may present with mainly proximal or distal lower extremity weakness, and notably the muscle biopsies may demonstrate rimmed vacuoles. LGMD2L is caused by newly described mutations in ANO5 and can sometimes present with distal weakness resembling Miyoshi myopathy. PMID:21496628

  18. Critical illness myopathy: sepsis-mediated failure of the peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, O

    2008-01-01

    With better survival of critically ill patients, 'de novo' arising neuromuscular complications like critical illness myopathy or polyneuropathy have been increasingly observed. Prolonged hospitalization not only imposes risks like pneumonia or thrombosis on patients but also represents a real budget threat to modern intensive-care medicine. Clinical symptoms like muscle weakness and weaning failure are common to critical illness myopathy and critical illness polyneuropathy and do not allow for distinction. Specific therapies are not yet available, and the quest for the pathomechanisms has proved more complicated than anticipated. Especially for critical illness myopathy, multiple sites of disturbances to the excitation-contraction coupling cascade are possible causes of muscle weakness. The present review summarizes the epidemiological, clinical and diagnostic features of critical illness myopathy and then focuses on current concepts of the presumed pathomechanisms of critical illness myopathy. Sepsis was shown to be a major cause of critical illness myopathy and special emphasis will be placed on how sepsis and inflammatory mediators influence (i) the membrane excitability at the level of voltage-gated ion channels and (ii) the intracellular protein signalling that results in selective loss of myosin protein content and muscle wasting. For (i), critical illness myopathy represents a new type of acquired channelopathy affecting the inactivation properties of Na+ channels. For (ii), both protein proteolysis and protein build up at the transcriptional level seem to be involved. Findings from different studies are put into a common context to propose a model for cytokine-mediated failure of muscle in severe sepsis. This can open a series of new possible trials to test specific therapeutic strategies in the future. PMID:18289421

  19. Hypokalemic myopathy associated with primary aldosteronism and glycyrrhizine-induced pseudoaldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, S; Saito, T; Okada, K; Atsumi, T; Kuzuya, T

    1985-12-01

    Enzymatic and histological features of muscular disorders associated with primary aldosteronism and glycyrrhizine-induced pseudoaldosteronism were studied. Among 10 patients with primary aldosteronism and 3 patients with pseudoaldosteronism, 5 patients were admitted to our hospital because of muscular weakness. The serum potassium (K) level was 1.86 +/- 0.21 mEq/l in a myopathy group on admission, a value significantly less than that of the 2.74 +/- 0.10 mEq/l in a non-myopathy group (p less than 0.01). Serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK), glutamate-oxyloacetate transaminase (GOT), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were increased in the myopathy group compared to the non-myopathy group; serum CPK was 1412.6 +/- 902.6 vs. 22.8 +/- 5.0 mU/ml, serum GOT was 186.4 +/- 75.3 vs. 24.2 +/- 5.4 mU/ml (p less than 0.05), and serum LDH was 1133.4 +/- 377.3 vs. 387.6 +/- 42.5 mU/ml (p less than 0.05) in the groups with and without myopathy. Analysis of CPK isozymes revealed that the MM type exceeded 95%. The elevated serum CPK, GOT and LDH rapidly decreased to the normal range and muscular strength completely improved within 6 to 13 days after hospitalization, when the serum K level remained below than normal. Light microscopic finding of damaged muscle showed the diffuse necrosis and vacuolization of muscle fibers. Electron microscopic study clearly demonstrated complete dissolution of myofilaments with disappearance of sarcoplasmic reticulum and T-tubules in the necrotic muscle fibers. These results indicate that muscular lesions may occur in primary aldosteronism and pseudoaldosteronism when the serum K level is decreased to below 2.0 mEq/l. This myopathy is not periodic paralysis but hypokalemic myopathy. The mechanism by which K deficiency causes muscular damage remains unknown. PMID:3914413

  20. Axial Magnetic Anisotropy from Two Systems Fe2B and Co2B with Planar Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taufour, Valentin; Lamichhane, Tej; Bud'Ko, Sergey L.; Jesche, Anton; Goldman, Alan I.; Dennis, Kevin W.; McCallum, R. William; Antropov, Vladimir; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-03-01

    Growth of single crystals of (Fe1-xCox)2B (0 <= x <= 1) and detailed characterization of their magnetic properties will be presented. Despite the fact that both Fe2B and Co2B show a planar anisotropy at room temperature, we observe a uniaxial anisotropy at intermediate doping which makes (Fe,Co)2B a promising system for permanent magnet applications in a system without rare-earth element. Comparison with recent band structure calculations will be presented. The temperature dependence of the anisotropy measured on single crystals from 2 K to 1000 K shows some unusual variations with an increase of the magnetic anisotropy with increasing temperature at some specific substitution. This work is supported by the Critical Materials Institute, an Energy Innovation Hub funded by the US DOE and by the Office of Basic Energy Science, Division of Materials Science and Engineering. Ames Laboratory is operated for the US DOE by Iowa State University under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358.

  1. The diagnostic value of biexponential apparent diffusion coefficients in myopathy.

    PubMed

    Ran, Jun; Liu, Yao; Sun, Dong; Morelli, John; Zhang, Ping; Wu, Gang; Sheng, Yuda; Xie, Ruyi; Zhang, Xiaoli; Li, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the performance of a biexponential signal decay model using DWI in myopathies and to differentiate Polymyositis (PM)/Dermatomyositis (DM), Glycogen Storage Diseases (GSDs) and Muscular Dystrophies (MDs) utilizing diffusion-weighted imaging. 11 healthy volunteers (control group) and 46 patients with myopathy were enrolled in the retrospective study. 27 of 46 patients had PM/DM, 7 patients GSDs and 12 patients MDs. After conventional MR sequences, diffusion weighted imaging with a b-factor ranging from 0 to 1200 s/mm(2) was performed on both thighs. The intra-muscular signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) on multiple-b DWI images were measured for 7 different muscles and compared among the different groups. The median T2 signal intensity and biexponential apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC), including standard ADC, fast ADC, and slow ADC values, were compared among the different groups. The intra-muscular SNRs were statistically significantly different depending on the b value, and also found among the 4 groups (p < 0.05). The median T2 signal intensity of the normal muscles in control group was statistically significantly lower than that of edematous muscles in the PM/DM, GSDs and MDs groups (p = 0.000), while there were no statistically significant differences among the PM/DM, GSDs, and MDs groups (p > 0.05). The median standard ADC value of the edematous muscles in GSDs was statistically significantly lower than that of normal muscles in the control group (p = 0.000) and the median ADC value of the edematous muscles in PM/DM patients was statistically significantly greater than that of the GSDs (p = 0.000) and MDs groups (p = 0.005). The median slow ADC value of the edematous muscles in MDs patients and PM/DM patients was statistically significantly greater than that of GSDs patients (p < 0.05). Intra-muscular SNR decay curves and biexponential ADC parameters are useful in distinguishing among PM/DM, GSDs, and MDs. PMID:27142711

  2. Titin mutation segregates with hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Pfeffer, Gerald; Elliott, Hannah R.; Griffin, Helen; Barresi, Rita; Miller, James; Marsh, Julie; Evilä, Anni; Vihola, Anna; Hackman, Peter; Straub, Volker; Dick, David J.; Horvath, Rita; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Udd, Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    In 2001, we described an autosomal dominant myopathy characterized by neuromuscular ventilatory failure in ambulant patients. Here we describe the underlying genetic basis for the disorder, and we define the neuromuscular, respiratory and radiological phenotype in a study of 31 mutation carriers followed for up to 31 years. A combination of genome-wide linkage and whole exome sequencing revealed the likely causal genetic variant in the titin (TTN) gene (g.274375T>C; p.Cys30071Arg) within a shared haplotype of 2.93 Mbp on chromosome 2. This segregated with the phenotype in 21 individuals from the original family, nine subjects in a second family with the same highly selective pattern of muscle involvement on magnetic resonance imaging and a third familial case with a similar phenotype. Comparing the mutation carriers revealed novel features not apparent in our original report. The clinical presentation included predominant distal, proximal or respiratory muscle weakness. The age of onset was highly variable, from early adulthood, and including a mild phenotype in advanced age. Muscle weakness was earlier onset and more severe in the lower extremities in nearly all patients. Seven patients also had axial muscle weakness. Respiratory function studies demonstrated a gradual deterioration over time, reflecting the progressive nature of this condition. Cardiomyopathy was not present in any of our patients despite up to 31 years of follow-up. Magnetic resonance muscle imaging was performed in 21 affected patients and revealed characteristic abnormalities with semitendinosus involvement in 20 of 21 patients studied, including 3 patients who were presymptomatic. Diagnostic muscle histopathology most frequently revealed eosinophilic inclusions (inclusion bodies) and rimmed vacuoles, but was non-specific in a minority of patients. These findings have important clinical implications. This disease should be considered in patients with adult-onset proximal or distal myopathy and

  3. Altered sodium channel-protein associations in critical illness myopathy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background During the acute phase of critical illness myopathy (CIM) there is inexcitability of skeletal muscle. In a rat model of CIM, muscle inexcitability is due to inactivation of sodium channels. A major contributor to this sodium channel inactivation is a hyperpolarized shift in the voltage dependence of sodium channel inactivation. The goal of the current study was to find a biochemical correlate of the hyperpolarized shift in sodium channel inactivation. Methods The rat model of CIM was generated by cutting the sciatic nerve and subsequent injections of dexamethasone for 7 days. Skeletal muscle membranes were prepared from gastrocnemius muscles, and purification and biochemical analyses carried out. Immunoprecipitations were performed with a pan-sodium channel antibody, and the resulting complexes probed in Western blots with various antibodies. Results We carried out analyses of sodium channel glycosylation, phosphorylation, and association with other proteins. Although there was some loss of channel glycosylation in the disease, as assessed by size analysis of glycosylated and de-glycosylated protein in control and CIM samples, previous work by other investigators suggest that such loss would most likely shift channel inactivation gating in a depolarizing direction; thus such loss was viewed as compensatory rather than causative of the disease. A phosphorylation site at serine 487 was identified on the NaV 1.4 sodium channel α subunit, but there was no clear evidence of altered phosphorylation in the disease. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments carried out with a pan-sodium channel antibody confirmed that the sodium channel was associated with proteins of the dystrophin associated protein complex (DAPC). This complex differed between control and CIM samples. Syntrophin, dystrophin, and plectin associated strongly with sodium channels in both control and disease conditions, while β-dystroglycan and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) associated

  4. Synthesis and Electrochemical Properties of Nano-VO2 (B).

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun; Lu, Yong; Wang, Wei; Feng, Chuanqi; Yang, Shuijin

    2016-03-01

    The nano-VO2 (B) has been self-assembly synthesized by hydrothermal method using different templates, which may give them some interesting properties. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The electrochemical properties of the samples were investigated. The results show that the hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) (soft template) was used to obtain the VO2 (B1) nanobelts. The flake graphite (hard template) was taken to get the VO2 (B2) nanosheets. The VO2 (B1) nanobelts have higher initial capacity to compare with VO2 (B2). But the VO2 (B2) nanosheets showed better cycling performance than that of VO2 (B1) nanobelts. The nano VO2 (B2) is a promising anode material for lithium ion battery application. PMID:27455666

  5. X-linked myopathy with excessive autophagy: a failure of self-eating.

    PubMed

    Dowling, James J; Moore, Steven A; Kalimo, Hannu; Minassian, Berge A

    2015-03-01

    Autophagic vacuolar myopathies (AVMs) are a group of disorders united by shared histopathological features on muscle biopsy that include the aberrant accumulation of autophagic vacuoles. The classic conditions that compose the AVMs include Pompe Disease, Danon Disease and X-linked myopathy with excessive autophagy (XMEA). Other disorders, including acquired myopathies like chloroquine toxicity, also have features of an autophagic myopathy. This review is focused on XMEA, a myopathy with onset of slowly progressive proximal weakness and elevated serum creatine kinase (2× to 20× normal) typically in the first decade of life. However, both late-adult onset and severe, sometimes lethal, neonatal cases also occur. Skeletal muscle pathology is characterized by numerous cytoplasmic autophagic vacuoles, complex muscle fiber splitting with internalization of capillaries, and complement C5b-9 deposition within vacuoles and along the sarcolemma. The autophagic vacuoles have sarcolemmal features. Mutations in the VMA21 gene at Xq28 cause XMEA by reducing the activity of lysosomal hydrolases. The VMA21 protein regulates the assembly of the V-ATPase required to acidify the lysosome. Increased lysosomal pH and poor degradation of cellular debris may secondarily induce autophagy, the net effect being accumulation of autophagolysosomes. The relationship of XMEA to other lysosomal disorders of muscle and potential therapeutic interventions for XMEA are discussed. PMID:25644398

  6. Potassium dependent rescue of a myopathy with core-like structures in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, M Gartz; Wilde, Jonathan J; Moreno, Rosa L; Minic, Angela D; Niswander, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Myopathies decrease muscle functionality. Mutations in ryanodine receptor 1 (RyR1) are often associated with myopathies with microscopic core-like structures in the muscle fiber. In this study, we identify a mouse RyR1 model in which heterozygous animals display clinical and pathological hallmarks of myopathy with core-like structures. The RyR1 mutation decreases sensitivity to activated calcium release and myoplasmic calcium levels, subsequently affecting mitochondrial calcium and ATP production. Mutant muscle shows a persistent potassium leak and disrupted expression of regulators of potassium homeostasis. Inhibition of KATP channels or increasing interstitial potassium by diet or FDA-approved drugs can reverse the muscle weakness, fatigue-like physiology and pathology. We identify regulators of potassium homeostasis as biomarkers of disease that may reveal therapeutic targets in human patients with myopathy of central core disease (CCD). Altogether, our results suggest that amelioration of potassium leaks through potassium homeostasis mechanisms may minimize muscle damage of myopathies due to certain RyR1 mutations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02923.001 PMID:25564733

  7. Distal myopathy with coexisting heterozygous TIA1 and MYH7 Variants.

    PubMed

    Brand, Patricio; Dyck, P James B; Liu, Jie; Berini, Sarah; Selcen, Duygu; Milone, Margherita

    2016-08-01

    TIA1 mutations cause Welander distal myopathy. MYH7 mutations result in various clinical phenotypes, including Laing distal myopathy and cardiomyopathy. We describe a family with coexisting TIA1 and MYH7 variants. The proband is a 67-year-old woman with easy tripping since childhood and progressive asymmetric distal limb weakness, but no cardiac involvement. Muscle biopsy showed rare rimmed vacuoles, minicore-like structures and congophilic inclusions. Her 66-year-old sister has a mild distal myopathy, supraventricular tachycardia and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Both sisters carry the only known pathogenic TIA1 mutation and a heterozygous MYH7 variant (c.5459G > A; p.Arg1820Gln). Another sibling with isolated distal myopathy carries only the TIA1 mutation. MYH7 p.Arg1820Gln involves a highly conserved residue and is predicted to be deleterious. Furthermore, the proband's childhood-onset distal leg weakness and sister's cardiomyopathy suggest that MYH7 p.Arg1820Gln likely affects function, favoring a digenic etiology of the myopathy. PMID:27282841

  8. Decreased oxidative phosphorylation and PGAM deficiency in horses suffering from atypical myopathy associated with acquired MADD.

    PubMed

    Westermann, C M; Dorland, L; van Diggelen, O P; Schoonderwoerd, K; Bierau, J; Waterham, H R; van der Kolk, J H

    2011-11-01

    Earlier research on ten horses suffering from the frequently fatal disorder atypical myopathy showed that MADD (multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency) is the biochemical derangement behind atypical myopathy. From five horses that died as a result of this disease and seven healthy control horses, urine and plasma were collected ante mortem and muscle biopsies were obtained immediately post-mortem (2 patients and 7 control horses), to analyse creatine, purine and carbohydrate metabolism as well as oxidative phosphorylation. In patients, the mean creatine concentration in urine was increased 17-fold and the concentration of uric acid approximately 4-fold, compared to controls. The highest degree of depletion of glycogen was observed in the patient with the most severe myopathy clinically. In this patient, glycolysis was more active than in the other patients and controls, which may explain this depletion. One patient demonstrated very low phosphoglycerate mutase (PGAM) activity, less than 10% of reference values. Most respiratory chain complex activity in patients was 20-30% lower than in control horses, complex II activity was 42% lower than normal, and one patient had severely decrease ATP-synthase activity, more than 60% lower than in control horses. General markers for myopathic damage are creatine kinase (CK) and lactic acid in plasma, and creatine and uric acid in urine. To obtain more information about the cause of the myopathy analysis of carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism as well as oxidative phosphorylation is advised. This study expands the diagnostic possibilities of equine myopathies. PMID:21843962

  9. Significant response to immune therapies in a case of subacute necrotizing myopathy and FKRP mutations.

    PubMed

    Svahn, J; Streichenberger, N; Benveniste, O; Menassa, R; Michel, L; Fayolle, H; Petiot, P

    2015-11-01

    Necrotizing myopathies can be encountered in various conditions as acquired myopathies (toxic or autoimmune) or muscular dystrophies. We report a twenty-year-old Caucasian woman who presented with clinical findings suggestive of an inflammatory myopathy: subacute onset of lower limb muscle weakness, myalgia, weight loss and absence of family history. The serum creatine kinase level was elevated at 4738 IU/L (normal range, 25-175 IU/L). Muscle biopsy was consistent with necrotizing myopathy. The patient showed significant clinical improvement following corticosteroid, azathioprine and intravenous immunoglobulin treatments. Biological tests revealed no specific autoantibodies associated with necrotizing autoimmune myopathies. Immunohistochemical staining for sarcolemmal proteins in muscle biopsy samples finally led to a diagnosis of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I (fukutin-related protein gene mutations). The response to immune therapies suggested a possible inflammatory component associated with the muscular dystrophy and highlighted the potential benefit of corticosteroid treatment in patients with LGMD2I and subacute onset. PMID:26363967

  10. Elucidation of the mechanism of atorvastatin-induced myopathy in a rat model.

    PubMed

    El-Ganainy, Samar O; El-Mallah, Ahmed; Abdallah, Dina; Khattab, Mahmoud M; Mohy El-Din, Mahmoud M; El-Khatib, Aiman S

    2016-06-01

    Myopathy is among the well documented and the most disturbing adverse effects of statins. The underlying mechanism is still unknown. Mitochondrial dysfunction related to coenzyme Q10 decline is one of the proposed theories. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanism of atorvastatin-induced myopathy in rats. In addition, the mechanism of the coenzyme Q10 protection was investigated with special focus of mitochondrial alterations. Sprague-Dawely rats were treated orally either with atorvastatin (100mg/kg) or atorvastatin and coenzyme Q10 (100mg/kg). Myopathy was assessed by measuring serum creatine kinase (CK) and myoglobin levels together with examination of necrosis in type IIB fiber muscles. Mitochondrial dysfunction was evaluated by measuring muscle lactate/pyruvate ratio, ATP level, pAkt as well as mitochondrial ultrastructure examination. Atorvastatin treatment resulted in a rise in both CK (2X) and myoglobin (6X) level with graded degrees of muscle necrosis. Biochemical determinations showed prominent increase in lactate/pyruvate ratio and a decline in both ATP (>80%) and pAkt (>50%) levels. Ultrastructure examination showed mitochondrial swelling with disrupted organelle membrane. Co-treatment with coenzyme Q10 induced reduction in muscle necrosis as well as in CK and myoglobin levels. In addition, coenzyme Q10 improved all mitochondrial dysfunction parameters including mitochondrial swelling and disruption. These results presented a model for atorvastatin-induced myopathy in rats and proved that mitochondrial dysfunction is the main contributor in statin-myopathy pathophysiology. PMID:27345130

  11. Antisense Therapy in Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joshua J.A.; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    Antisense therapy is an approach to fighting diseases using short DNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides. Recently, antisense therapy has emerged as an exciting and promising strategy for the treatment of various neurodegenerative and neuromuscular disorders. Previous and ongoing pre-clinical and clinical trials have provided encouraging early results. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), Huntington’s disease (HD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), dysferlinopathy (including limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2B; LGMD2B, Miyoshi myopathy; MM, and distal myopathy with anterior tibial onset; DMAT), and myotonic dystrophy (DM) are all reported to be promising targets for antisense therapy. This paper focuses on the current progress of antisense therapies in neurology. PMID:25562650

  12. Mechanical Signaling in the Pathophysiology of Critical Illness Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kalamgi, Rebeca C.; Larsson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The complete loss of mechanical stimuli of skeletal muscles, i.e., the loss of external strain, related to weight bearing, and internal strain, related to the contraction of muscle cells, is uniquely observed in pharmacologically paralyzed or deeply sedated mechanically ventilated intensive care unit (ICU) patients. The preferential loss of myosin and myosin associated proteins in limb and trunk muscles is a significant characteristic of critical illness myopathy (CIM) which separates CIM from other types of acquired muscle weaknesses in ICU patients. Mechanical silencing is an important factor triggering CIM. Microgravity or ground based microgravity models form the basis of research on the effect of muscle unloading-reloading, but the mechanisms and effects may differ from the ICU conditions. In order to understand how mechanical tension regulates muscle mass, it is critical to know how muscles sense mechanical information and convert stimulus to intracellular biochemical actions and changes in gene expression, a process called cellular mechanotransduction. In adult skeletal muscles and muscle fibers, this process may differ, the same stimulus can cause divergent response and the same fiber type may undergo opposite changes in different muscles. Skeletal muscle contains multiple types of mechano-sensors and numerous structures that can be affected differently and hence respond differently in distinct muscles. PMID:26869939

  13. Episodic weakness and vacuolar myopathy in hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Basali, Diana; Prayson, Richard A

    2015-11-01

    We report a 50-year-old woman who presented with a 20 year history of gradually progressive lower extremity weakness, characterized by knee buckling with occasional falls and foot dragging. She also experienced difficulty in lifting her arms above her shoulders. The primary periodic paralyses are rare disorders caused by dysfunctional ion channels in skeletal muscle. The hypokalemic type is generally an autosomal dominant condition, due to missense mutations in the alpha subunits of the skeletal muscle L-type calcium channel genes, CACN1AS, or the skeletal muscle sodium channel gene, SCN4A. The affected patients typically present with episodic weakness. For our patient, the consumption of foods high in carbohydrates seemed to precipitate the episodes of weakness. Her family history was significant for six blood relatives, including three sons and three relatives on the paternal side, who had experienced similar symptoms. A biopsy of the left rectus femoralis muscle showed vacuolar myopathic changes in the scattered muscle fibers, accompanied by occasional degenerating and regenerating muscle fibers. There was no evidence of inflammation on the biopsy. The vacuoles were often associated with increased acid phosphatase staining. An electron microscopic examination showed that the vacuolar changes were due to T-tubule dilation, a characteristic of hypokalemic periodic paralysis. Other metabolic etiologies of vacuolar myopathy, such as acid phosphatase (lysosomal) associated acid maltase deficiency (a glycogen storage disease), need to be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:26190219

  14. Dysferlin overexpression in skeletal muscle produces a progressive myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Glover, Louise E.; Newton, Kimberly; Krishnan, Gomathi; Bronson, Roderick; Boyle, Alexandra; Krivickas, Lisa S.; Brown, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The dose-response effects of dysferlin transgenesis were analyzed to determine if the dysferlin-deficient myopathies are good candidates for gene replacement therapy. Methods We have generated three lines of transgenic mice, expressing low, mid and high levels of full-length human dysferlin from a muscle-specific promoter. Transgenic skeletal muscle was analyzed and scored for morphological and functional deficits. Results Overexpression of dysferlin in mice resulted in a striking phenotype of kyphosis, irregular gait and reduced muscle mass and strength. Moreover, protein dosage correlated with phenotype severity. In contrast to dysferlin-null skeletal muscle, no evidence of sarcolemmal impairment was revealed. Rather, increased levels of Ca2+-regulated, dysferlin-binding proteins and ER stress chaperone proteins were observed in muscle lysates from transgenic mice as compared to controls. Interpretation Expression levels of dysferlin are important for appropriate function without deleterious or cytotoxic effects. As a corollary, we propose that future endeavors in gene replacement for correction of dysferlinopathy should be tailored to take account of this. PMID:20373350

  15. 7 CFR 301.85-2b - Exempted articles. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exempted articles. 1 301.85-2b Section 301.85-2b... § 301.85-2b Exempted articles. 1 1 The articles hereby exempted remain subject to applicable restrictions under other quarantines and other provisions of this subpart. (a) The following articles...

  16. 7 CFR 301.80-2b - Exempted articles. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exempted articles. 1 301.80-2b Section 301.80-2b....80-2b Exempted articles. 1 1 The articles hereby exempted remain subject to applicable restrictions under other quarantines. (a) The following articles are exempt from the certification and permit...

  17. 7 CFR 301.85-2b - Exempted articles. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exempted articles. 1 301.85-2b Section 301.85-2b... § 301.85-2b Exempted articles. 1 1 The articles hereby exempted remain subject to applicable restrictions under other quarantines and other provisions of this subpart. (a) The following articles...

  18. 7 CFR 301.85-2b - Exempted articles. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exempted articles. 1 301.85-2b Section 301.85-2b... § 301.85-2b Exempted articles. 1 1 The articles hereby exempted remain subject to applicable restrictions under other quarantines and other provisions of this subpart. (a) The following articles...

  19. 7 CFR 301.80-2b - Exempted articles. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exempted articles. 1 301.80-2b Section 301.80-2b....80-2b Exempted articles. 1 1 The articles hereby exempted remain subject to applicable restrictions under other quarantines. (a) The following articles are exempt from the certification and permit...

  20. Commonality of TRIM32 mutation in causing sarcotubular myopathy and LGMD2H.

    PubMed

    Schoser, Benedikt G H; Frosk, Patrick; Engel, Andrew G; Klutzny, Ursula; Lochmüller, Hanns; Wrogemann, Klaus

    2005-04-01

    Sarcotubular myopathy (OMIM 268950) is a rare autosomal recessive myopathy first described in two Hutterite brothers from South Dakota and in two non-Hutterite brothers from Germany. We report that sarcotubular myopathy (STM) is caused by mutation in TRIM32, the gene encoding the tripartite motif-containing protein 32. TRIM32 was found to be the gene mutated in limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2H (LGMD2H [OMIM 254110]), a disorder that has been confined to the Hutterite population. The TRIM32 mutation found in the STM patients is identical to the causative mutation for LGMD2H (D487N), Haplotype analysis shows that the disease chromosomes share common ancestry. PMID:15786463

  1. Endplate structure and parameters of neuromuscular transmission in sporadic centronuclear myopathy associated with myasthenia.

    PubMed

    Liewluck, Teerin; Shen, Xin-Ming; Milone, Margherita; Engel, Andrew G

    2011-06-01

    Centronuclear myopathy is a pathologically diagnosed congenital myopathy. The disease genes encode proteins with membrane modulating properties (MTM1, DNM2, and BIN1) or alter excitation-contraction coupling (RYR1). Some patients also have myasthenic symptoms but electrodiagnostic and endplate studies in these are limited. A sporadic patient had fatigable weakness and a decremental EMG response. Analysis of centronuclear myopathy disease- and candidate-genes identified no mutations. Quantitative endplate electron microscopy studies revealed simplified postsynaptic regions, endplate remodeling with normal nerve terminal size, normal synaptic vesicle density, and mild acetylcholine receptor deficiency. The amplitude of the miniature endplate potential was decreased to 60% of normal. Quantal release by nerve impulse was reduced to 40% of normal due to a decreased number of releasable quanta. The safety margin of neuromuscular transmission is compromised by decreased quantal release by nerve impulse and by a reduced postsynaptic response to the released quanta. PMID:21482111

  2. Autosomal recessive sudden unexpected death in children probably caused by a cardiomyopathy associated with myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Fried, K; Beer, S; Vure, E; Algom, M; Shapira, Y

    1979-01-01

    The propositus, who died suddenly at the age of 22 months, was investigated because of an unusual myopathy. Family history revealed two sisters and four cousins who had also died suddenly and unexpectedly. The finding of asymmetric septal hypertrophy by echocardiography in the propositus suggested that the cause of the sudden death in the relatives was an undetected cardiomyopathy accompanying a mild and often subclinical myopathy. The affected children were in two sibships and both sets of parents were first cousins. The mother of one sibship was the sister of the father of the other. It is suggested that a gene causes a mild autosomal recessive myopathy with cardiomyopathy that is often undiagnosed and usually ends in sudden unexpected death in the second year of life. The same gene may manifest on echocardiogram in some heterozygotes as asymmetric septal hypertrophy. Images PMID:513079

  3. Ultrastructural changes in muscle cells of patients with collagen VI-related myopathies.

    PubMed

    Tagliavini, Francesca; Sardone, Francesca; Squarzoni, Stefano; Maraldi, Nadir Mario; Merlini, Luciano; Faldini, Cesare; Sabatelli, Patrizia

    2013-10-01

    Collagen VI is an extracellular matrix protein expressed in several tissues including skeletal muscle. Mutations in COL6A genes cause Bethlem Myopathy (BM), Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (UCMD) and Myosclerosis Myopathy (MM). Collagen VI deficiency causes increased opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), leading to ultrastructural and functional alterations of mitochondria, amplified by impairment of autophagy. Here we report for the first time ultrastructural studies on muscle biopsies from BM and UCMD patients, showing swollen mitochondria with hypodense matrix, disorganized cristae and paracrystalline inclusions, associated with dilated sarcoplasmic reticulum and apoptotic changes. These data were supported by scanning electron microscopy analysis on BM and UCMD cultured cells, showing alterations of the mitochondrial network. Morphometric analysis also revealed a reduced short axis and depicted swelling in about 3% of mitochondria. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial defects underlie the pathogenetic mechanism in muscle tissue of patients affected by collagen VI myopathies. PMID:24596691

  4. A Novel Mutation in PNPLA2 Leading to Neutral Lipid Storage Disease With Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Daniel B.; Papadimitriou, Dimitra; Hays, Arthur P.; DiMauro, Salvatore; Hirano, Michio

    2016-01-01

    Background Mutations in PNPLA2, a gene encoding adipose triglyceride lipase, lead to neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy. Objective To report the clinical and molecular features of a case of neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy resulting from a novel mutation in PNPLA2. Design Case report. Setting University hospital. Patient A 65-year-old man with progressive muscle weakness and high serum creatine kinase levels. Intervention Direct sequencing of the PNPLA2 gene. Results Identification of a novel homozygous mutation in the patient’s PNPLA2 gene confirmed the suspected diagnosis of neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy. Conclusion Screening of the PNPLA2 gene should be considered for patients presenting with high levels of creatine kinase, progressive muscle weakness, and systemic lipid accumulation. The presence of Jordans anomaly can be a strong diagnostic clue. PMID:22964912

  5. Pathophysiological concepts in the congenital myopathies: blurring the boundaries, sharpening the focus.

    PubMed

    Ravenscroft, Gianina; Laing, Nigel G; Bönnemann, Carsten G

    2015-02-01

    The congenital myopathies are a diverse group of genetic skeletal muscle diseases, which typically present at birth or in early infancy. There are multiple modes of inheritance and degrees of severity (ranging from foetal akinesia, through lethality in the newborn period to milder early and later onset cases). Classically, the congenital myopathies are defined by skeletal muscle dysfunction and a non-dystrophic muscle biopsy with the presence of one or more characteristic histological features. However, mutations in multiple different genes can cause the same pathology and mutations in the same gene can cause multiple different pathologies. This is becoming ever more apparent now that, with the increasing use of next generation sequencing, a genetic diagnosis is achieved for a greater number of patients. Thus, considerable genetic and pathological overlap is emerging, blurring the classically established boundaries. At the same time, some of the pathophysiological concepts underlying the congenital myopathies are moving into sharper focus. Here we explore whether our emerging understanding of disease pathogenesis and underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, rather than a strictly gene-centric approach, will provide grounds for a different and perhaps complementary grouping of the congenital myopathies, that at the same time could help instil the development of shared potential therapeutic approaches. Stemming from recent advances in the congenital myopathy field, five key pathophysiology themes have emerged: defects in (i) sarcolemmal and intracellular membrane remodelling and excitation-contraction coupling; (ii) mitochondrial distribution and function; (iii) myofibrillar force generation; (iv) atrophy; and (v) autophagy. Based on numerous emerging lines of evidence from recent studies in cell lines and patient tissues, mouse models and zebrafish highlighting these unifying pathophysiological themes, here we review the congenital myopathies in relation to these

  6. Pathophysiological concepts in the congenital myopathies: blurring the boundaries, sharpening the focus

    PubMed Central

    Ravenscroft, Gianina; Laing, Nigel G.

    2015-01-01

    The congenital myopathies are a diverse group of genetic skeletal muscle diseases, which typically present at birth or in early infancy. There are multiple modes of inheritance and degrees of severity (ranging from foetal akinesia, through lethality in the newborn period to milder early and later onset cases). Classically, the congenital myopathies are defined by skeletal muscle dysfunction and a non-dystrophic muscle biopsy with the presence of one or more characteristic histological features. However, mutations in multiple different genes can cause the same pathology and mutations in the same gene can cause multiple different pathologies. This is becoming ever more apparent now that, with the increasing use of next generation sequencing, a genetic diagnosis is achieved for a greater number of patients. Thus, considerable genetic and pathological overlap is emerging, blurring the classically established boundaries. At the same time, some of the pathophysiological concepts underlying the congenital myopathies are moving into sharper focus. Here we explore whether our emerging understanding of disease pathogenesis and underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, rather than a strictly gene-centric approach, will provide grounds for a different and perhaps complementary grouping of the congenital myopathies, that at the same time could help instil the development of shared potential therapeutic approaches. Stemming from recent advances in the congenital myopathy field, five key pathophysiology themes have emerged: defects in (i) sarcolemmal and intracellular membrane remodelling and excitation-contraction coupling; (ii) mitochondrial distribution and function; (iii) myofibrillar force generation; (iv) atrophy; and (v) autophagy. Based on numerous emerging lines of evidence from recent studies in cell lines and patient tissues, mouse models and zebrafish highlighting these unifying pathophysiological themes, here we review the congenital myopathies in relation to these

  7. PHOX2B is a suppressor of neuroblastoma metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Naftali, Osnat; Maman, Shelly; Meshel, Tsipi; Sagi-Assif, Orit; Ginat, Ravit; Witz, Isaac P.

    2016-01-01

    Paired like homeobox 2B (PHOX2B) is a minimal residual disease (MRD) marker of neuroblastoma. The presence of MRD, also referred to as micro-metastases, is a powerful marker of poor prognosis in neuroblastoma. Lung metastasis is considered a terminal event in neuroblastoma. Lung micro-metastatic neuroblastoma (MicroNB) cells show high expression levels of PHOX2B and possess a less malignant and metastatic phenotype than lung macro metastatic neuroblastoma (MacroNB) cells, which hardly express PHOX2B. In vitro assays showed that PHOX2B knockdown in MicroNB cells did not affect cell viability; however it decreased the migratory capacity of the MicroNB-shPHOX2B cells. An orthotopic inoculation of MicroNB-shPHOX2B cells into the adrenal gland of nude mice resulted in significantly larger primary tumors and a heavier micro-metastatic load in the lungs and bone-marrow, than when control cells were inoculated. PHOX2B expression was found to be regulated by methylation. The PHOX2B promoter in MacroNB cells is significantly more methylated than in MicroNB cells. Demethylation assays using 5-azacytidine demonstrated that methylation can indeed inhibit PHOX2B transcription in MacroNB cells. These pre-clinical data strongly suggest that PHOX2B functions as a suppressor of neuroblastoma progression. PMID:26840262

  8. Licorice-induced hypokalemic myopathy and hypokalemic renal tubular damage in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, S; Kato, M; Tokuda, T; Momoi, H; Sekijima, Y; Higuchi, M; Yanagisawa, N

    1999-07-01

    A patient with a history of anorexia nervosa developed licorice-induced hypokalemic myopathy. With potassium replacement, high CPK blood level and myopathic signs returned to normal. However, the patient manifested persistent hypokalemia and impaired renal function to concentrate and acidify the urine. Renal biopsy demonstrated intense degeneration and vacuolation of tubules with a normal glomerus which was consistent with hypokalemic nephropathy. Prolonged hypokalemia in anorexia nervosa is sometimes attributed to surreptitious purging or taking diuretics, but it is necessary to check the urine pH, the urine-specific gravity, and the urine potassium level in order to find underlying renal damage even after hypokalemic myopathy is treated successfully. PMID:10349593

  9. Familial visceral myopathy diagnosed by exome sequencing of a patient with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    Holla, Oystein L; Bock, Gunter; Busk, Oyvind L; Isfoss, Björn Logi

    2014-06-01

    A 55-year-old woman with a history of bowel dysmotility presented with abdominal distension and peritonitis. Family history included premature deaths with intestinal symptomatology, suggesting autosomal dominant inheritance. Computed tomography showed a distended small bowel. Symptoms were alleviated by enterocutaneous stomas. Initial ileal biopsy suggested neuropathy; however, exome sequencing revealed an Arg148Ser mutation in the enteric smooth muscle actin gamma 2 (ACTG2) gene. Histological reassessment showed abnormal muscularis propria and smooth muscle actin, with the same findings in sibling, confirming familial visceral myopathy. Thus, noninvasive genomic analysis can provide early and specific diagnosis of familial visceral myopathy, which may help to avoid inappropriate surgery. PMID:24777424

  10. Capture myopathy in a free-flying greater sandhill crane (Grus canadensis tabida) from Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Windingstad, R.M.; Hurley, S.S.; Sileo, L.

    1983-01-01

    Capture myopathy has been reported Frequently in wild mammals (Bartsch et al., 1977, Vet. Pathol. 14: 314-324). There are, however, fewer reports of this disease in wild birds (Young, 1967, mt. Zoo Yearb. 7: 226-227; Bartsch et al., 1977, op. cit. ; Henschel and Low, 1978, S. Afr. J. Sci. 74: 305-306; Wobeser, 1981, Diseases of Wild Waterfowl, Plenum Press, New York, 300 pp.). We are reporting a case of skeletal muscle necrosis in a greater sandhill crane found dead 5 days after its capture, radio-tagging, and release. We believe this is the first case of capture myopathy to be reported for this species.

  11. Long-term management of atrial myopathy in two dogs with single chamber permanent transvenous pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, K E; Lefbom, B K

    2016-06-01

    Two young Labrador retriever dogs with bradycardia-induced syncope resulting from atrial myopathy underwent permanent transvenous pacemaker implantation. Both dogs developed heart failure 3-5 years after pacemaker implantation. Both were managed medically for approximately 7 years after pacemaker implantation and, ultimately, were humanely euthanized due to refractory heart failure signs and quality of life concerns. Long-term management of dogs with atrial myopathy and secondary atrial standstill with pacemaker implantation and medical therapy for heart failure is feasible and prognosis may be better than previously reported or speculated. PMID:26923757

  12. The Spectrum of Renal Involvement in Patients With Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Couvrat-Desvergnes, Grégoire; Masseau, Agathe; Benveniste, Olivier; Bruel, Alexandra; Hervier, Baptiste; Mussini, Jean-Marie; Buob, David; Hachulla, Eric; Rémy, Philippe; Azar, Raymond; Namara, Evelyne Mac; MacGregor, Brigitte; Daniel, Laurent; Lacraz, Adeline; Broucker, Thomas De; Rouvier, Philippe; Carli, Philippe; Laville, Maurice; Dantan, Etienne; Hamidou, Mohamed; Moreau, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Data regarding the incidence and outcome of renal involvement in patients with inflammatory myopathies (IM) remain scarce. We assessed the incidence and causes of acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in 150 patients with dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and antisynthetase syndrome followed in 3 French referral centers. Renal involvement occurred in 35 (23.3%) patients: AKI in 16 (10.7%), and CKD in 31 (20.7%) patients. The main cause of AKI was drug or myoglobinuria-induced acute tubular necrosis. Male sex, cardiovascular risk factors, cardiac involvement, and initial proteinuria >0.3 g/d were associated with the occurrence of AKI. The outcome of patients with AKI was poor: 13 (81%) progressed to CKD and 2 (12.5%) reached end-stage renal disease. In multivariate survival analysis, age at IM onset, male sex, a history of cardiovascular events, and a previous episode of AKI were associated with the risk of CKD. We also identified 14 IM patients who underwent a kidney biopsy in 10 nephrology centers. Renal pathology disclosed a wide range of renal disorders, mainly immune-complex glomerulonephritis. We identified in 5 patients a peculiar pattern of severe acute renal vascular damage consisting mainly of edematous thickening of the intima of arterioles. We found that AKI and CKD are frequent in patients with IM. Prevention of AKI is crucial in these patients, as AKI is a major contributor to their relatively high risk of CKD. A peculiar pattern of acute vascular damage is part of the spectrum of renal diseases associated with IM. PMID:24378741

  13. MEF2B mutations in non-Hodgkin lymphoma dysregulate cell migration by decreasing MEF2B target gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Pon, Julia R.; Wong, Jackson; Saberi, Saeed; Alder, Olivia; Moksa, Michelle; Grace Cheng, S. -W.; Morin, Gregg B.; Hoodless, Pamela A.; Hirst, Martin; Marra, Marco A.

    2015-01-01

    Myocyte enhancer factor 2B (MEF2B) is a transcription factor with mutation hotspots at K4, Y69 and D83 in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). To provide insight into the regulatory network of MEF2B, in this study, we analyse global gene expression and DNA-binding patterns. We find that candidate MEF2B direct target genes include RHOB, RHOD, CDH13, ITGA5 and CAV1, and that indirect target genes of MEF2B include MYC, TGFB1, CARD11, MEF2C, NDRG1 and FN1. MEF2B overexpression increases HEK293A cell migration and epithelial–mesenchymal transition, and decreases DLBCL cell chemotaxis. K4E, Y69H and D83V MEF2B mutations decrease the capacity of MEF2B to activate transcription and decrease its' effects on cell migration. The K4E and D83V mutations decrease MEF2B DNA binding. In conclusion, our map of the MEF2B regulome connects MEF2B to drivers of oncogenesis. PMID:26245647

  14. MEF2B mutations in non-Hodgkin lymphoma dysregulate cell migration by decreasing MEF2B target gene activation.

    PubMed

    Pon, Julia R; Wong, Jackson; Saberi, Saeed; Alder, Olivia; Moksa, Michelle; Grace Cheng, S-W; Morin, Gregg B; Hoodless, Pamela A; Hirst, Martin; Marra, Marco A

    2015-01-01

    Myocyte enhancer factor 2B (MEF2B) is a transcription factor with mutation hotspots at K4, Y69 and D83 in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). To provide insight into the regulatory network of MEF2B, in this study, we analyse global gene expression and DNA-binding patterns. We find that candidate MEF2B direct target genes include RHOB, RHOD, CDH13, ITGA5 and CAV1, and that indirect target genes of MEF2B include MYC, TGFB1, CARD11, MEF2C, NDRG1 and FN1. MEF2B overexpression increases HEK293A cell migration and epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and decreases DLBCL cell chemotaxis. K4E, Y69H and D83V MEF2B mutations decrease the capacity of MEF2B to activate transcription and decrease its' effects on cell migration. The K4E and D83V mutations decrease MEF2B DNA binding. In conclusion, our map of the MEF2B regulome connects MEF2B to drivers of oncogenesis. PMID:26245647

  15. PTK2b function during fertilization of the mouse oocyte

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Jinping; McGinnis, Lynda K.; Carlton, Carol; Beggs, Hilary E.; Kinsey, William H.

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • PTK2b is expressed in oocytes and is activated following fertilization. • PTK2b suppression in oocytes prevents fertilization, but not parthenogenetic activation. • PTK2b suppression prevents the oocyte from fusing with or incorporating bound sperm. • PTK2b suppressed oocytes that fail to fertilize do not exhibit calcium oscillations. - Abstract: Fertilization triggers rapid changes in intracellular free calcium that serve to activate multiple signaling events critical to the initiation of successful development. Among the pathways downstream of the fertilization-induced calcium transient is the calcium-calmodulin dependent protein tyrosine kinase PTK2b or PYK2 kinase. PTK2b plays an important role in fertilization of the zebrafish oocyte and the objective of the present study was to establish whether PTK2b also functions in mammalian fertilization. PTK2b was activated during the first few hours after fertilization of the mouse oocyte during the period when anaphase resumption was underway and prior to the pronuclear stage. Suppression of PTK2b kinase activity in oocytes blocked sperm incorporation and egg activation although sperm-oocyte binding was not affected. Oocytes that failed to incorporate sperm after inhibitor treatment showed no evidence of a calcium transient and no evidence of anaphase resumption suggesting that egg activation did not occur. The results indicate that PTK2b functions during the sperm-egg fusion process or during the physical incorporation of sperm into the egg cytoplasm and is therefore critical for successful development.

  16. Knockdown of the sodium-dependent phosphate co-transporter 2b (NPT2b) suppresses lung tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seong-Ho; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Chang, Seung-Hee; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Lee, Somin; Lee, Ah-Young; Seo, Hwi Won; Chae, Chanhee; Beck, George R; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2013-01-01

    The sodium-dependent phosphate co-transporter 2b (NPT2b) plays an important role in maintaining phosphate homeostasis. In previous studies, we have shown that high dietary inorganic phosphate (Pi) consumption in mice stimulated lung tumorigenesis and increased NPT2b expression. NPT2b has also been found to be highly expressed in human lung cancer tissues. The association of high expression of NPT2b in the lung with poor prognosis in oncogenic lung diseases prompted us to test whether knockdown of NPT2b may regulate lung cancer growth. To address this issue, aerosols that contained small interfering RNA (siRNA) directed against NPT2b (siNPT2b) were delivered into the lungs of K-ras (LA1) mice, which constitute a murine model reflecting human lung cancer. Our results clearly showed that repeated aerosol delivery of siNPT2b successfully suppressed lung cancer growth and decreased cancer cell proliferation and angiogenesis, while facilitating apoptosis. These results strongly suggest that NPT2b plays a role lung tumorigenesis and represents a novel target for lung cancer therapy. PMID:24194864

  17. Cyclophilin D, a target for counteracting skeletal muscle dysfunction in mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed

    Gineste, Charlotte; Hernandez, Andres; Ivarsson, Niklas; Cheng, Arthur J; Naess, Karin; Wibom, Rolf; Lesko, Nicole; Bruhn, Helene; Wedell, Anna; Freyer, Christoph; Zhang, Shi-Jin; Carlström, Mattias; Lanner, Johanna T; Andersson, Daniel C; Bruton, Joseph D; Wredenberg, Anna; Westerblad, Håkan

    2015-12-01

    Muscle weakness and exercise intolerance are hallmark symptoms in mitochondrial disorders. Little is known about the mechanisms leading to impaired skeletal muscle function and ultimately muscle weakness in these patients. In a mouse model of lethal mitochondrial myopathy, the muscle-specific Tfam knock-out (KO) mouse, we previously demonstrated an excessive mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in isolated muscle fibers that could be inhibited by the cyclophilin D (CypD) inhibitor, cyclosporine A (CsA). Here we show that the Tfam KO mice have increased CypD levels, and we demonstrate that this increase is a common feature in patients with mitochondrial myopathy. We tested the effect of CsA treatment on Tfam KO mice during the transition from a mild to terminal myopathy. CsA treatment counteracted the development of muscle weakness and improved muscle fiber Ca(2+) handling. Importantly, CsA treatment prolonged the lifespan of these muscle-specific Tfam KO mice. These results demonstrate that CsA treatment is an efficient therapeutic strategy to slow the development of severe mitochondrial myopathy. PMID:26374844

  18. Muscle imaging in patients with tubular aggregate myopathy caused by mutations in STIM1

    PubMed Central

    Tasca, Giorgio; D'Amico, Adele; Monforte, Mauro; Nadaj-Pakleza, Aleksandra; Vialle, Marc; Fattori, Fabiana; Vissing, John; Ricci, Enzo; Bertini, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Tubular aggregate myopathy is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by tubular aggregates as the hallmark on muscle biopsy. Mutations in STIM1 have recently been identified as one genetic cause in a number of tubular aggregate myopathy cases. To characterize the pattern of muscle involvement in this disease, upper and lower girdles and lower limbs were imaged in five patients with mutations in STIM1, and the scans were compared with two patients with tubular aggregate myopathy not caused by mutations in STIM1. A common pattern of involvement was found in STIM1-mutated patients, although with variable extent and severity of lesions. In the upper girdle, the subscapularis muscle was invariably affected. In the lower limbs, all the patients showed a consistent involvement of the flexor hallucis longus, which is very rarely affected in other muscle diseases, and a diffuse involvement of thigh and posterior leg with sparing of gracilis, tibialis anterior and, to a lesser extent, short head of biceps femoris. Mutations in STIM1 are associated with a homogeneous involvement on imaging despite variable clinical features. Muscle imaging can be useful in identifying STIM1-mutated patients especially among other forms of tubular aggregate myopathy. PMID:26255678

  19. Aberrant O-GlcNAcylation disrupts GNE enzyme activity in GNE myopathy.

    PubMed

    Bennmann, Dorit; Weidemann, Wenke; Thate, Annett; Kreuzmann, Denise; Horstkorte, Rüdiger

    2016-06-01

    UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase (GNE) is the key enzyme for the biosynthesis of sialic acids. Sialic acids are terminal monosaccharides of glycoconjugates and gangliosides, which have an essential influence on various cell interactions. The sialylation of proteins varies during development, aging, and pathogenesis of degenerative diseases such as Morbus Alzheimer, diabetes mellitus type II, or myopathies. Mutation of methionine 743 in the GNE leads to a 30% reduction of the enzyme activity and is responsible for an aggressive form of GNE myopathy. GNE myopathy or hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM) is an age-dependent muscular dystrophy. Here, we analyzed the impact of the exchange of methionine to threonine at position 743 which introduces an additional potential phosphorylation/O-GlcNAcylation site. We found increased O-GlcNAcylation of the M743T variant compared to the wild-type GNE. In addition, removal of the O-GlcNAc of the M743T variant resulted in an increased activity comparable to activity of the wild-type GNE. Furthermore, the half-life of the M743T variant is two times longer than for the wild-type GNE protein. This study provides that the balance of phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation is decisive involved in efficiency and regulation of GNE. PMID:27037841

  20. Expression of anti-SRP19 antibody in muscle tissues from patients with autoimmune necrotizing myopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Duan, F; Liu, P; Wang, P F; Wang, M X

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of anti-SRP19 antibody in muscle tissues of patients with autoimmune necrotizing myopathy. Immunohistochemistry staining was used to determine the expression of anti-SRP19 antibodies in muscle tissues of autoimmune necrotizing myopathy patients. Results demonstrated that anti-SRP19 antibody was expressed in 71.4% (20/28) of muscle tissue specimens from patients with autoimmune necrotizing myopathy. Anti-SRP19 antibody expression was mainly localized in cytoplasm of necrotic muscle fibers surrounding the small blood vessels and interstitial cells. There were no significant differences in the age, course of disease, muscle, and creatine kinase levels between patients with positive or negative expression of anti-SRP19 antibodies. The expression levels of anti-SRP19, serum anti-nuclear antibodies, as well as anti-Ro-52, anti- SSA, anti-Sm, and anti-Jo-1 antibodies were not significantly different among groups. This study demonstrates that anti-SRP19 antibody is highly expressed in muscle tissues of patients with autoimmune necrotizing myopathy, and suggests that this protein may be involved in the origin and progression of the disease. PMID:27525944

  1. Muscle imaging in patients with tubular aggregate myopathy caused by mutations in STIM1.

    PubMed

    Tasca, Giorgio; D'Amico, Adele; Monforte, Mauro; Nadaj-Pakleza, Aleksandra; Vialle, Marc; Fattori, Fabiana; Vissing, John; Ricci, Enzo; Bertini, Enrico

    2015-11-01

    Tubular aggregate myopathy is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by tubular aggregates as the hallmark on muscle biopsy. Mutations in STIM1 have recently been identified as one genetic cause in a number of tubular aggregate myopathy cases. To characterize the pattern of muscle involvement in this disease, upper and lower girdles and lower limbs were imaged in five patients with mutations in STIM1, and the scans were compared with two patients with tubular aggregate myopathy not caused by mutations in STIM1. A common pattern of involvement was found in STIM1-mutated patients, although with variable extent and severity of lesions. In the upper girdle, the subscapularis muscle was invariably affected. In the lower limbs, all the patients showed a consistent involvement of the flexor hallucis longus, which is very rarely affected in other muscle diseases, and a diffuse involvement of thigh and posterior leg with sparing of gracilis, tibialis anterior and, to a lesser extent, short head of biceps femoris. Mutations in STIM1 are associated with a homogeneous involvement on imaging despite variable clinical features. Muscle imaging can be useful in identifying STIM1-mutated patients especially among other forms of tubular aggregate myopathy. PMID:26255678

  2. A case of anti-nuclear matrix protein 2 antibody positive myopathy associated with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Shin; Unoda, Ki-Ichi; Nakajima, Hideto; Ikeda, Soichiro; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Kimura, Fumiharu

    2016-08-31

    Myositis-specific autoantibodies (MSAs) are associated with myositis. Anti-nuclear matrix protein 2 (NXP-2) antibody was recently identified as a major MSA and was observed mostly in juvenile dermatomyositis. We report the case of a 44-year-old man who presented with myopathy with anti-NXP-2 antibody and large cell carcinoma of the lung. He was hospitalized because of myalgia and edema of limbs. Neurological examination revealed mild proximal-dominant weakness in all four extremities, and laboratory studies showed elevated creatine kinase level (6,432 IU/l). Needle electromyography showed myogenic patterns. MRI of the lower limbs demonstrated inflammatory lesions in the thighs. Biopsied specimen from the left quadriceps femoris muscle showed mild mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate surrounding muscle fibres but no fiber necrosis. He was diagnosed with myopathy based on neurological examinations and clinical symptoms. His chest X-ray and CT showed tumor shadow on the right upper lung field, but CT didn't indicate the findings of interstitial lung disease. This was surgically removed, and a histological diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer was suspected. He was also treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy before and after operation. His symptoms of myopathy promptly remitted with the preoperative chemotherapy. His serum analysis was positive for the anti-NXP-2. Further investigation and experience of MSAs are necessary to evaluate the therapeutic strategy against cancer-associated myopathy/myositis. PMID:27477574

  3. Quadriceps myopathy: a variant of the limb-girdle dystrophy syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Swash, M; Heathfield, Kwg

    1983-01-01

    The clinical and pathological features in a patient with quadriceps myopathy are presented. The pattern of progression of the disorder, during a period of 18 years observation, suggests that it represents an unusual and perhaps specific syndrome within the clinical spectrum of the limb-girdle muscular dystophies. Images PMID:6842250

  4. PNA HyBeacons for analysis of human mutations related to statin-induced myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Nittaya; Kocalka, Petr; Mardle, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Aminoalkyl and alkyne-tagged PNA HyBeacons have been synthesized, labeled with fluorescein via conventional amide bond or triazole formation (click chemistry) and used to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) implicated in statin-induced myopathy. The PNA HyBeacons gave much better mismatch/mutant discrimination than conventional DNA HyBeacons but smaller fluorescence changes on melting. PMID:22567191

  5. Ileocolonic transfer of solid chyme in small intestinal neuropathies and myopathies

    SciTech Connect

    Greydanus, M.P.; Camilleri, M.; Colemont, L.J.; Phillips, S.F.; Brown, M.L.; Thomforde, G.M. )

    1990-07-01

    The aims of this study were to assess gastric emptying, small bowel transit and colonic filling in patients with motility disorders, with particular attention to the patterns of colonic filling. Gastrointestinal transit was assessed using a previously validated radiolabeled mixed meal. Fourteen patients with clinical and manometric features of chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction classified as intestinal neuropathy and 6 as intestinal myopathy, were studied. The results were compared with those from 10 healthy controls studied similarly. Gastric emptying and small bowel transit of solids were significantly slower in both groups of patients than in healthy controls (P less than 0.05). In health, the ileocolonic transit of solid chyme was characterized by intermittent bolus transfers. The mean size of boluses transferred to the colon (expressed as a percentage of ingested radiolabel) was significantly less (P less than 0.05) in patients with intestinal myopathy (10% +/- 4% (SEM)) than in healthy controls (25% +/- 4%) or in patients with intestinal neuropathy (25% +/- 4%). The intervals between bolus transfer of solids (plateaus in the colonic filling curve) were longer (P less than 0.05) in myopathies (212 +/- 89 minutes) than in health (45 +/- 7 minutes) or neuropathies (53 +/- 11 minutes). Thus, gastric emptying and small bowel transit were delayed in small bowel neuropathies and myopathies. Bolus filling of the colon was less frequent and less effective in patients with myopathic intestinal pseudoobstruction, whereas bolus transfer was preserved in patients with neuropathic intestinal pseudoobstruction.

  6. Lack of β2-adrenoceptors aggravates heart failure-induced skeletal muscle myopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Voltarelli, Vanessa A; Bechara, Luiz RG; Bacurau, Aline VN; Mattos, Katt C; Dourado, Paulo MM; Bueno, Carlos R; Casarini, Dulce E; Negrao, Carlos E; Brum, Patricia C

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal myopathy is a hallmark of heart failure (HF) and has been associated with a poor prognosis. HF and other chronic degenerative diseases share a common feature of a stressed system: sympathetic hyperactivity. Although beneficial acutely, chronic sympathetic hyperactivity is one of the main triggers of skeletal myopathy in HF. Considering that β2-adrenoceptors mediate the activity of sympathetic nervous system in skeletal muscle, we presently evaluated the contribution of β2-adrenoceptors for the morphofunctional alterations in skeletal muscle and also for exercise intolerance induced by HF. Male WT and β2-adrenoceptor knockout mice on a FVB genetic background (β2KO) were submitted to myocardial infarction (MI) or SHAM surgery. Ninety days after MI both WT and β2KO mice presented to cardiac dysfunction and remodelling accompanied by significantly increased norepinephrine and epinephrine plasma levels, exercise intolerance, changes towards more glycolytic fibres and vascular rarefaction in plantaris muscle. However, β2KO MI mice displayed more pronounced exercise intolerance and skeletal myopathy when compared to WT MI mice. Skeletal muscle atrophy of infarcted β2KO mice was paralleled by reduced levels of phosphorylated Akt at Ser 473 while increased levels of proteins related with the ubiquitin-–proteasome system, and increased 26S proteasome activity. Taken together, our results suggest that lack of β2-adrenoceptors worsen and/or anticipate the skeletal myopathy observed in HF. PMID:24629015

  7. Trichinella pseudospiralis infection is characterized by more continuous and diffuse myopathy than T. spiralis infection.

    PubMed

    Boonmars, T; Wu, Z; Nagano, I; Takahashi, Y

    2005-08-01

    A time course study was performed to reveal the sequence of histopathology after Trichinella spiralis or T. pseudospiralis infection in mice. A cyst was formed in the former case by about 18 days post infection and prominent myopathy was restricted within the cyst. In the latter case, however, no typical cyst was formed, and myopathy spread diffusely over the infected muscle tissues occupying half the area of muscle sections. An electron microscope observation revealed that the disintegration of muscle cells was delayed in T. pseudospiralis infection than in T. spiralis infection. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed that apoptosis-related genes were expressed for a longer term in muscles infected with T. pseudospiralis than in those with T. spiralis, although the same spectrum of genes are mobilized. Examined apoptosis-related genes included tumor suppressor genes p53, p53; mouse double minute 2, MDM2; cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 (WAF1), p21(waf) ; Bcl-2 associated protein X, BAX; apoptotic protease activating factor 1, Apaf-1; Caspase 9 and serine/ threonine protein kinase, PKB. Micro-dissection of the infected muscle tissue and subsequent RT-PCR confirmed that the expressions of these genes are restricted to tissue with myopathy. Thus, the expression of the apoptosis-related genes correlated with continuous and diffuse myopathy caused by T. pseudospiralis infection. PMID:15948011

  8. Mutation-Specific Effects on Thin Filament Length in Thin Filament Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    de Winter, Josine M.; Joureau, Barbara; Lee, Eun-Jeong; Kiss, Balázs; Yuen, Michaela; Gupta, Vandana A.; Pappas, Christopher T.; Gregorio, Carol C.; Stienen, Ger J. M.; Edvardson, Simon; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Pelin, Katarina; Malfatti, Edoardo; Romero, Norma B.; van Engelen, Baziel G.; Voermans, Nicol C.; Donkervoort, Sandra; Bönnemann, C. G.; Clarke, Nigel F.; Beggs, Alan H.; Granzier, Henk; Ottenheijm, Coen A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Thin filament myopathies are among the most common nondystrophic congenital muscular disorders, and are caused by mutations in genes encoding proteins that are associated with the skeletal muscle thin filament. Mechanisms underlying muscle weakness are poorly understood, but might involve the length of the thin filament, an important determinant of force generation. Methods We investigated the sarcomere length-dependence of force, a functional assay that provides insights into the contractile strength of muscle fibers as well as the length of the thin filaments, in muscle fibers from 51 patients with thin filament myopathy caused by mutations in NEB, ACTA1, TPM2, TPM3, TNNT1, KBTBD13, KLHL40, and KLHL41. Results Lower force generation was observed in muscle fibers from patients of all genotypes. In a subset of patients who harbor mutations in NEB and ACTA1, the lower force was associated with downward shifted force–sarcomere length relations, indicative of shorter thin filaments. Confocal microscopy confirmed shorter thin filaments in muscle fibers of these patients. A conditional Neb knockout mouse model, which recapitulates thin filament myopathy, revealed a compensatory mechanism; the lower force generation that was associated with shorter thin filaments was compensated for by increasing the number of sarcomeres in series. This allowed muscle fibers to operate at a shorter sarcomere length and maintain optimal thin–thick filament overlap. Interpretation These findings might provide a novel direction for the development of therapeutic strategies for thin filament myopathy patients with shortened thin filament lengths. PMID:27074222

  9. Aerobic Exercise and Pharmacological Therapies for Skeletal Myopathy in Heart Failure: Similarities and Differences

    PubMed Central

    Bacurau, Aline V.; Cunha, Telma F.; Souza, Rodrigo W.; Voltarelli, Vanessa A.; Gabriel-Costa, Daniele; Brum, Patricia C.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal myopathy has been identified as a major comorbidity of heart failure (HF) affecting up to 20% of ambulatory patients leading to shortness of breath, early fatigue, and exercise intolerance. Neurohumoral blockade, through the inhibition of renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAS) and β-adrenergic receptor blockade (β-blockers), is a mandatory pharmacological therapy of HF since it reduces symptoms, mortality, and sudden death. However, the effect of these drugs on skeletal myopathy needs to be clarified, since exercise intolerance remains in HF patients optimized with β-blockers and inhibitors of RAS. Aerobic exercise training (AET) is efficient in counteracting skeletal myopathy and in improving functional capacity and quality of life. Indeed, AET has beneficial effects on failing heart itself despite being of less magnitude compared with neurohumoral blockade. In this way, AET should be implemented in the care standards, together with pharmacological therapies. Since both neurohumoral inhibition and AET have a direct and/or indirect impact on skeletal muscle, this review aims to provide an overview of the isolated effects of these therapeutic approaches in counteracting skeletal myopathy in HF. The similarities and dissimilarities of neurohumoral inhibition and AET therapies are also discussed to identify potential advantageous effects of these combined therapies for treating HF. PMID:26904163

  10. Rod distribution and muscle fiber type modification in the progression of nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Gurgel-Giannetti, Juliana; Reed, Umbertina C; Marie, Sueli K; Zanoteli, Edmar; Fireman, Moacir A T; Oliveira, Acary S B; Werneck, Lineu C; Beggs, Alan H; Zatz, Mayana; Vainzof, Mariz

    2003-03-01

    Nemaline myopathy is a structural congenital myopathy associated with the presence of rodlike structures inside the muscle fibers and type I predominance. It may be caused by mutations in at least five genes: slow alpha-tropomyosin 3 (chromosome 1q22-23), nebulin (chromosome 2q21.1-q22), actin (chromosome 1q42), tropomyosin 2 (chromosome 9p13), and troponin T1 (chromosome 19q13.4). The effect of these mutations in the expression of the protein and the mechanism of rod formation is still under investigation. We analyzed the possibility of progressive alterations with time and/or disease evolution, such as transformation of type I to type II fiber and rod pattern and distribution in muscle fibers from patients with nemaline myopathy, through a morphometric and immunohistochemical analysis of different muscle protein isoforms. A tendency of diffuse rods to be organized in the subsarcolemmal region was observed in two patients who were submitted to subsequent biopsies after 10 and 13 years. Additionally, we observed the expression of type II protein isoforms in type I fibers and a higher proportion of type II fibers in the younger patient of a pair of affected sibs, giving further support to the hypothesis of progressive conversion of type II to type I fibers in nemaline myopathy. PMID:12731651

  11. Clinical Manifestation and a New "ISCU" Mutation in Iron-Sulphur Cluster Deficiency Myopathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kollberg, Gittan; Tulinius, Mar; Melberg, Atle; Darin, Niklas; Andersen, Oluf; Holmgren, Daniel; Oldfors, Anders; Holme, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Myopathy with deficiency of succinate dehydrogenase and aconitase is a recessively inherited disorder characterized by childhood-onset early fatigue, dyspnoea and palpitations on trivial exercise. The disease is non-progressive, but life-threatening episodes of widespread weakness, severe metabolic acidosis and rhabdomyolysis may occur. The…

  12. Metabolic Myopathies and Physical Activity: When Fatigue Is More Than Simple Exertion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarnopolsky, Mark A.

    2002-01-01

    When patients experience fatigue and muscle cramps beyond exercise adaptation, physicians should consider metabolic myopathies. The most common conditions seen in active patients are myoadenylate deaminase deficiency and disorders such as McArdle's disease. Targeted family histories and basic laboratory studies help rule out conditions mimicking…

  13. Rehabilitation of Critical Illness Polyneuropathy and Myopathy Patients: An Observational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Primoz; Vidmar, Gaj; Kuret, Zala; Bizovicar, Natasa

    2011-01-01

    Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy (CIPNM) frequently develops in patients hospitalized in intensive care units. The number of patients with CIPNM admitted to inpatient rehabilitation is increasing. The aim of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the outcome of their rehabilitation. Twenty-seven patients with CIPNM were included in…

  14. Evaluation of ubiquinone concentration and mitochondrial function relative to cerivastatin-induced skeletal myopathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, William H; Lawrence, Jeffery W; Loughlin, Amy F; Stoffregen, Dana A; Mixson, Lori A; Dean, Dennis C; Raab, Conrad E; Yu, Nathan X; Lankas, George R; Frederick, Clay B

    2004-01-01

    As a class, hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors can potentially cause skeletal myopathy. One statin, cerivastatin, has recently been withdrawn from the market due to an unacceptably high incidence of rhabdomyolysis. The mechanism underlying statin-induced myopathy is unknown. This paper sought to investigate the relationship among statin-induced myopathy, mitochondrial function, and muscle ubiquinone levels. Rats were administered cerivastatin at 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 (mg/kg)/day or dose vehicle (controls) by oral gavage for 15 days. Samples of type I-predominant skeletal muscle (soleus) and type II-predominant skeletal muscle [quadriceps and extensor digitorum longus (EDL)], and blood were collected on study days 5, 10, and 15 for morphological evaluation, clinical chemistry, mitochondrial function tests, and analysis of ubiquinone levels. No histological changes were observed in any of the animals on study days 5 or 10, but on study day 15, mid- and high-dose animals had necrosis and inflammation in type II skeletal muscle. Elevated creatine kinase (CK) levels in blood (a clinical marker of myopathy) correlated with the histopathological diagnosis of myopathy. Ultrastructural characterization of skeletal muscle revealed disruption of the sarcomere and altered mitochondria only in myofibers with degeneration, while adjacent myofibers were unaffected and had normal mitochondria. Thus, mitochondrial effects appeared not to precede myofiber degeneration. Mean coenzyme Q9 (CoQ9) levels in all dose groups were slightly decreased relative to controls in type II skeletal muscle, although the difference was not significantly different in most cases. Mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle was not affected by the changes in ubiquinone levels. The ubiquinone levels in high-dose-treated animals exhibiting myopathy were not significantly different from low-dose animals with no observable toxic effects. Furthermore, ubiquinone levels did not correlate

  15. Scientific core hole Valles caldera No. 2b (VC-2b), New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, J.N.; Hulen, J.B.; Lysne, P.; Jacobson, R.; Goff, F.; Nielson, D.L.; Pisto, L.; Criswell, C.W.; Gribble, R.; Utah Univ. Research Inst., Salt Lake City, UT; Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM; Los Alamos National Lab., NM; Utah Univ. Research Inst., Salt Lake City, UT; Tonto Drilling Services, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT; Los Alamo

    1989-01-01

    Research core hole was continuously cored to 1.762 km on the western flank of the caldera's resurgent dome in 1988. Bottom hole temperature is about 295{degree}C within Precambrian (1.5 Ga) quartz monzonite, deep within the liquid-dominated portions of the Sulphur Springs hydrothermal system. VC-2b may be the deepest, hottest, continuously cored hole in North America. Core recovery was 99.2%. The only major drilling problems encountered were when temperatures at the bit exceeded 225{degree}C below depths of about 1000 m. The result of these conditions was loss of viscosity and/or lubricity in the mud, apparently caused by breakdown of the high temperature polymers. Lithologies in caldera-fill indicate the drill site may be proximal to ignimbrite vents and that an intracaldera lake with temperatures approaching boiling formed soon after the caldera itself. Structural correlations between VC-2b and the 528-m-deep companion hole VC-2a indicate the earlier Toledo caldera (1.45 Ma; Otowi Member tuffs) and even older Lower Tuffs caldera experienced no structural resurgence similar to the 1.12 million year old Valles caldera. The hydrothermal system penetrated by these bores, consists of a shallow vapor-rich cap, which has evolved from an earlier 200{degree}C liquid-dominated system, overlying stacked, liquid-dominated zones up to about 300{degree}C. Geochemistry of mud returns collected during drilling suggests chloride-rich geothermal fluids were entering the bore and mixing with the drilling fluids in the fractured lower Paleozoic and Precambrian sections. 23 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Laing early onset distal myopathy: slow myosin defect with variable abnormalities on muscle biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, P J; Udd, B; Mastaglia, F L; de Visser, M; Hedera, P; Voit, T; Bridges, L R; Fabian, V; Rozemuller, A; Laing, N G

    2006-01-01

    Background Laing early onset distal myopathy (MPD1) is an autosomal dominant myopathy caused by mutations within the slow skeletal muscle fibre myosin heavy chain gene, MYH7. It is allelic with myosin storage myopathy, with the commonest form of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and with one form of dilated cardiomyopathy. However, the clinical picture of MPD1 is distinct from these three conditions. Objective To collate and discuss the histological features reported in the muscle biopsies of MPD1 patients and to outline the clinical features. Results The phenotype of MPD1 was consistent, with initial weakness of great toe/ankle dorsiflexion, and later development of weakness of finger extension and neck flexion. Age of onset was the only variable, being from birth up to the 20s, but progression was always very slow. The pathological features were variable. In this retrospective series, there were no pathognomonic diagnostic features, although atrophic type I fibres were found in half the families. Rimmed vacuoles are consistently seen in all other distal myopathies with the exception of Myoshi distal myopathy. However, they were found in a minority of patients with MPD1, and were not prominent when present. Immunohistochemical staining for slow and fast myosin showed co‐expression of slow and fast myosin in some type I fibres, possibly indicating a switch to type II status. This may be a useful aid to diagnosis. Conclusions The pathological findings in MPD1 are variable and appear to be affected by factors such as the specific muscle biopsied, the age of the patient at biopsy, and the duration of disease manifestations. PMID:16103042

  17. In silico analysis of Brucella abortus Omp2b and in vitro expression of SOmp2b

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose At present, there is no vaccine available for the prevention of human brucellosis. Brucella outer membrane protein 2b (Omp2b) is a 36 kD porin existed in common Brucella pathogens and it is considered as priority antigen for designing a new subunit vaccine. Materials and Methods In the current study, we aimed to predict and analyze the secondary and tertiary structures of the Brucella abortus Omp2b protein, and to predict T-cell and B-cell epitopes with the help of bioinformatics tools. Subsequently, cloning and expression of the short form of Omp2b (SOmp2b) was performed using pET28a expression vector and Escherichia coli BL21 host, respectively. The recombinant SOmp2b (rSOmp2b) was purified with Ni-NTA column. Results The recombinant protein was successfully expressed in E. coli host and purified under denaturation conditions. The yield of the purified rSOmp2b was estimated by Bradford method and found to be 220 µg/mL of the culture. Conclusion Our results indicate that Omp2b protein has a potential to induce both B-cell– and T-cell–mediated immune responses and it can be evaluated as a new subunit vaccine candidate against brucellosis. PMID:26866027

  18. Building Customized University-to-Business (U2B) Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvine, George; Verma, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Continuing education (CE) units throughout the United States have successfully built University-to-Business (U2B) partnerships to provide greater value to their community partners and to increase revenue for the university. Our experience in building U2B partnerships and feedback from our partners--businesses, corporations, state agencies, and…

  19. Role of adenosine A2B receptors in inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Feoktistov, Igor; Biaggioni, Italo

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress in our understanding of the unique role of A2B receptors in the regulation of inflammation, immunity and tissue repair was considerably facilitated with the introduction of new pharmacological and genetic tools. However, it also led to seemingly conflicting conclusions on the role of A2B adenosine receptors in inflammation with some publications indicating pro-inflammatory effects and others suggesting the opposite. This chapter reviews the functions of A2B receptors in various cell types related to inflammation and integrated effects of A2B receptor modulation in several animal models of inflammation. It is argued that translation of current findings into novel therapies would require a better understanding of A2B receptors functions in diverse types of inflammatory responses in various tissues and at different points of their progression. PMID:21586358

  20. Chromatin-to-nucleoprotamine transition is controlled by the histone H2B variant TH2B

    PubMed Central

    Montellier, Emilie; Boussouar, Fayçal; Rousseaux, Sophie; Zhang, Kai; Buchou, Thierry; Fenaille, François; Shiota, Hitoshi; Debernardi, Alexandra; Héry, Patrick; Curtet, Sandrine; Jamshidikia, Mahya; Barral, Sophie; Holota, Hélène; Bergon, Aurélie; Lopez, Fabrice; Guardiola, Philippe; Pernet, Karin; Imbert, Jean; Petosa, Carlo; Tan, Minjia; Zhao, Yingming; Gérard, Matthieu; Khochbin, Saadi

    2013-01-01

    The conversion of male germ cell chromatin to a nucleoprotamine structure is fundamental to the life cycle, yet the underlying molecular details remain obscure. Here we show that an essential step is the genome-wide incorporation of TH2B, a histone H2B variant of hitherto unknown function. Using mouse models in which TH2B is depleted or C-terminally modified, we show that TH2B directs the final transformation of dissociating nucleosomes into protamine-packed structures. Depletion of TH2B induces compensatory mechanisms that permit histone removal by up-regulating H2B and programming nucleosome instability through targeted histone modifications, including lysine crotonylation and arginine methylation. Furthermore, after fertilization, TH2B reassembles onto the male genome during protamine-to-histone exchange. Thus, TH2B is a unique histone variant that plays a key role in the histone-to-protamine packing of the male genome and guides genome-wide chromatin transitions that both precede and follow transmission of the male genome to the egg. PMID:23884607

  1. [Anesthesia and intensive therapy for a patient with mitochondrial myopathy].

    PubMed

    Breucking, E; Mortier, W; Lampert, R; Brandt, L

    1993-10-01

    Since 1983 we have been involved in the diagnostic work-up and emergency treatment of a female patient now 48 years old who has a mitochondrial myopathy resembling Luft's disease. The syndrome was first described in 1959, and in more detail in 1962, by Luft and et al., who reported a picture of hypermetabolism with high temperature, extreme sweating, tachycardia, dyspnoea at rest, polydipsia, polyphagia and irritability but normal thyroid function. In 1971 and 1976 Haydar and Di Mauro presented a second case and proposed treatment with chloramphenicol. Our patient has the third case of the syndrome reported so far: her case was initially published in 1987. CASE REPORT. Since her 17th year of life the patient had suffered from episodes of fever, tachycardia and sweating. At the age of 32 these attacks worsened, leading to unconsciousness and apnoea. The patient then had to be intubated, ventilated and sometimes resuscitated. The diagnosis of MH susceptibility and Luft's disease was made on biochemical grounds after the first muscle biopsy in 1983. Therapy with chloramphenicol failed. Therapy with beta blockers, vitamin C and K or E, coenzyme Q10 and a high-caloric diet was started in 1985. The patient was registered with an emergency service, which flew her to our ICU whenever she had a severe crisis. For milder episodes she was supplied with an oxygen breathing mask at home. Myalgia increased with the episodes starting in 1988, and the patient needed dantrolene infusions and analgesics at home. To facilitate venepuncture a Port-A-Cath system was implanted in 1987, which had to be removed four times due to infection and sepsis. A muscle biopsy was taken in Rotterdam, which revealed differences in mitochondrial function from the biochemical findings recorded in 1983 and not in keeping with Luft's disease. Unfortunately, the patient was not able to undergo further metabolic investigations or therapeutic trials. ANAESTHESIA. The patient received three local and six

  2. Recent developments in A2B adenosine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Kalla, Rao V; Zablocki, Jeff; Tabrizi, Mojgan Aghazadeh; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    A selective, high-affinity A(2B) adenosine receptor (AR) antagonist will be useful as a pharmacological tool to help determine the role of the A(2B)AR in inflammatory diseases and angiogenic diseases. Based on early A(2B)AR-selective ligands with nonoptimal pharmaceutical properties, such as 15 (MRS 1754: K(i)(hA(2B)) = 2 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) = 403 nM; K(i)(hA(2A)) = 503 NM, and K(i)(hA(3)) = 570 nM), several groups have discovered second-generation A(2B)AR ligands that are suitable for development. Scientists at CV Therapeutics have discovered the selective, high-affinity A(2B)AR antagonist 22, a 8-(4-pyrazolyl)-xanthine derivative, (CVT-6883, K(i)(hA(2B)) = 22 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) = 1,940 nM; K(i)(hA(2A)) = 3,280; and K(i)(hA(3)) = 1,070 nM). Compound 22 has demonstrated favorable pharmacokinetic (PK) properties (T(1/2) = 4 h and F > 35% rat), and it is a functional antagonist at the A(2B)AR(K (B) = 6 nM). In a mouse model of asthma, compound 22 demonstrated a dose-dependent efficacy supporting the role of the A(2B)AR in asthma. In two Phase I clinical trails, 22 (CVT-6883) was found to be safe, well tolerated, and suitable for once-daily dosing. Baraldi et al. have independently discovered a selective, high-affinity A(2B)AR antagonist, 30 (MRE2029F20), 8-(5-pyrazolyl)-xanthine (K(i)(hA(2B)) = 5.5 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) = 200 nM; K(i)(hA(2A), A(3)) > 1,000, that has been selected for development in conjunction with King Pharmaceuticals. Compound 30 has been demonstrated to be a functional antagonist of the A(2B)AR, and it has been radiolabeled for use in pharmacological studies. A third compound, 58 (LAS-38096), is a 2-aminopyrimidine derivative (discovered by the Almirall group) that has high A(2B)AR affinity and selectivity (K(i)(hA(2B)) = 17 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) > 1,000 nM; K(i)(hA(2A)) > 2,500; and K(i)(hA(3)) > 1,000 nM), and 58 has been moved into preclinical safety testing. A fourth selective, high-affinity A(2B)AR antagonist, 54 (OSIP339391 K(i))(hA(2B)) = 0.5 nM; K(i))(hA(1

  3. Clinical, histological and genetic characterization of reducing body myopathy caused by mutations in FHL1

    PubMed Central

    Schessl, Joachim; Taratuto, Ana L.; Sewry, Caroline; Battini, Roberta; Chin, Steven S.; Maiti, Baijayanta; Dubrovsky, Alberto L.; Erro, Marcela G.; Espada, Graciela; Robertella, Monica; Saccoliti, Maria; Olmos, Patricia; Bridges, Leslie R.; Standring, Peter; Hu, Ying; Zou, Yaqun; Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Scavina, Mena; Goebel, Hans-Hilmar; Mitchell, Christina A.; Flanigan, Kevin M.; Muntoni, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    We recently identified the X-chromosomal four and a half LIM domain gene FHL1 as the causative gene for reducing body myopathy, a disorder characterized by progressive weakness and intracytoplasmic aggregates in muscle that exert reducing activity on menadione nitro-blue-tetrazolium (NBT). The mutations detected in FHL1 affected highly conserved zinc coordinating residues within the second LIM domain and lead to the formation of aggregates when transfected into cells. Our aim was to define the clinical and morphological phenotype of this myopathy and to assess the mutational spectrum of FHL1 mutations in reducing body myopathy in a larger cohort of patients. Patients were ascertained via the detection of reducing bodies in muscle biopsy sections stained with menadione-NBT followed by clinical, histological, ultrastructural and molecular genetic analysis. A total of 11 patients from nine families were included in this study, including seven sporadic patients with early childhood onset disease and four familial cases with later onset. Weakness in all patients was progressive, sometimes rapidly so. Respiratory failure was common and scoliosis and spinal rigidity were significant in some of the patients. Analysis of muscle biopsies confirmed the presence of aggregates of FHL1 positive material in all biopsies. In two patients in whom sequential biopsies were available the aggregate load in muscle sections appeared to increase over time. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that cytoplasmic bodies were regularly seen in conjunction with the reducing bodies. The mutations detected were exclusive to the second LIM domain of FHL1 and were found in both sporadic as well as familial cases of reducing body myopathy. Six of the nine mutations affected the crucial zinc coordinating residue histidine 123. All mutations in this residue were de novo and were associated with a severe clinical course, in particular in one male patient (H123Q). Mutations in the zinc coordinating residue

  4. Rf2a and rf2b transcription factors

    DOEpatents

    Beachy, Roger N.; Petruccelli, Silvana; Dai, Shunhong

    2007-10-02

    A method of activating the rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV) promoter in vivo is disclosed. The RTBV promoter is activated by exposure to at least one protein selected from the group consisting of Rf2a and Rf2b.

  5. Crystal structure of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2B.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Mari; Nishimoto, Madoka; Hiyama, Takuya B; Higo, Toshiaki; Umehara, Takashi; Sakamoto, Kensaku; Ito, Takuhiro; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2016-03-01

    Eukaryotic cells restrict protein synthesis under various stress conditions, by inhibiting the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2B (eIF2B). eIF2B is the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for eIF2, a heterotrimeric G protein consisting of α-, β- and γ-subunits. eIF2B exchanges GDP for GTP on the γ-subunit of eIF2 (eIF2γ), and is inhibited by stress-induced phosphorylation of eIF2α. eIF2B is a heterodecameric complex of two copies each of the α-, β-, γ-, δ- and ε-subunits; its α-, β- and δ-subunits constitute the regulatory subcomplex, while the γ- and ε-subunits form the catalytic subcomplex. The three-dimensional structure of the entire eIF2B complex has not been determined. Here we present the crystal structure of Schizosaccharomyces pombe eIF2B with an unprecedented subunit arrangement, in which the α2β2δ2 hexameric regulatory subcomplex binds two γε dimeric catalytic subcomplexes on its opposite sides. A structure-based in vitro analysis by a surface-scanning site-directed photo-cross-linking method identified the eIF2α-binding and eIF2γ-binding interfaces, located far apart on the regulatory and catalytic subcomplexes, respectively. The eIF2γ-binding interface is located close to the conserved 'NF motif', which is important for nucleotide exchange. A structural model was constructed for the complex of eIF2B with phosphorylated eIF2α, which binds to eIF2B more strongly than the unphosphorylated form. These results indicate that the eIF2α phosphorylation generates the 'nonproductive' eIF2-eIF2B complex, which prevents nucleotide exchange on eIF2γ, and thus provide a structural framework for the eIF2B-mediated mechanism of stress-induced translational control. PMID:26901872

  6. 27 CFR 21.33 - Formula No. 2-B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Formula No. 2-B. 21.33 Section 21.33 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specially Denatured Spirits Formulas and Authorized Uses § 21.33 Formula No. 2-B....

  7. 27 CFR 21.33 - Formula No. 2-B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Formula No. 2-B. 21.33 Section 21.33 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specially Denatured Spirits Formulas and Authorized Uses § 21.33 Formula No. 2-B....

  8. 27 CFR 21.33 - Formula No. 2-B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Formula No. 2-B. 21.33 Section 21.33 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specially Denatured Spirits Formulas and Authorized Uses § 21.33 Formula No. 2-B....

  9. Myopathy-inducing mutation H40Y in ACTA1 hampers actin filament structure and function.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chun; Fan, Jun; Messer, Andrew E; Marston, Steve B; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Ochala, Julien

    2016-08-01

    In humans, more than 200 missense mutations have been identified in the ACTA1 gene. The exact molecular mechanisms by which, these particular mutations become toxic and lead to muscle weakness and myopathies remain obscure. To address this, here, we performed a molecular dynamics simulation, and we used a broad range of biophysical assays to determine how the lethal and myopathy-related H40Y amino acid substitution in actin affects the structure, stability, and function of this protein. Interestingly, our results showed that H40Y severely disrupts the DNase I-binding-loop structure and actin filaments. In addition, we observed that normal and mutant actin monomers are likely to form distinctive homopolymers, with mutant filaments being very stiff, and not supporting proper myosin binding. These phenomena underlie the toxicity of H40Y and may be considered as important triggering factors for the contractile dysfunction, muscle weakness and disease phenotype seen in patients. PMID:27112274

  10. Respiratory muscle and pulmonary function in polymyositis and other proximal myopathies.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, N M; Arora, N S; Rochester, D F

    1983-01-01

    We studied 53 patients with proximal myopathy to determine at what level of muscle weakness hypercapnic respiratory failure is likely, and which tests of pulmonary function or respiratory muscle strength would best suggest this development. Respiratory muscle strength was determined from maximal static efforts and in half the patients, both inspiratory and expiratory muscle strengths were less than 50% of normal. In the 37 patients without lung disease respiratory muscle weakness was accompanied by significant decreases in vital capacity, total lung capacity, and maximum voluntary ventilation; by significant increases in residual volume and arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2); and greater likelihood of dependence on ventilators, atelectasis, and pneumonia. Hypercapnia was particularly likely when respiratory muscle strength was less than 30% of normal in uncomplicated myopathy, and when vital capacity was less than 55% of the predicted value in any patient. PMID:6412385

  11. Relationship of Skeletal Muscle Development and Growth to Breast Muscle Myopathies: A Review.

    PubMed

    Velleman, Sandra G

    2015-12-01

    Selection in meat-type birds has focused on growth rate, muscling, and feed conversion. These strategies have made substantial improvements but have affected muscle structure, repair mechanisms, and meat quality, especially in the breast muscle. The increase in muscle fiber diameters has reduced available connective tissue spacing, reduced blood supply, and altered muscle metabolism in the breast muscle. These changes have increased muscle fiber degeneration and necrosis but have limited muscle repair mechanisms mediated by the adult myoblast (satellite cell) population of cells, likely resulting in the onset of myopathies. This review focuses on muscle growth mechanisms and how changes in the cellular development of the breast muscle may be associated with breast muscle myopathies occurring in meat-type birds. PMID:26629627

  12. Inheritance patterns and phenotypic features of myofibrillar myopathy associated with a BAG3 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Odgerel, Zagaa; Sarkozy, Anna; Lee, Hee-Suk; McKenna, Caoimhe; Rankin, Julia; Straub, Volker; Lochmüller, Hanns; Paola, Francalanci; D’Amico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico; Bushby, Kate; Goldfarb, Lev G

    2010-01-01

    Myofibrillar myopathies (MFMs) are a heterogeneous group of neuromuscular disorders characterized by disintegration of myofibrils. The inheritance pattern in MFMs is commonly autosomal dominant, but there has been a striking absence of secondary cases noted in a BAG3-associated subtype. We studied three families with BAG3 p.Pro209Leu mutation showing a severe phenotype of myofibrillar myopathy and axonal neuropathy with giant axons. In one family, transmission to a pair of siblings has occurred from their asymptomatic father who showed somatic mosaicism. In two other families, neither of the parents was affected or showed detectable level of somatic mosaicism. These observations suggest that the BAG3 variant of MFM may result from a spontaneous mutation at an early point of embryonic development and that transmission from a mosaic parent may occur more than once. The study underlines the importance of parental evaluation as it may have implications for genetic counseling. PMID:20605452

  13. Outcomes and disease activity measures for assessing treatments in the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Oddis, Chester V

    2005-04-01

    The assessment and treatment of patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathy has taken a major step forward over the past few years. Through the efforts of multi-disciplinary international groups of experts interested in the management of patients with myositis, initiatives have led to the development of a core set of outcome measures critical to their assessment. Similarly, the lack of consensus on several issues of clinical trial design has been addressed resulting in the development of a definition of clinical improvement for adult and juvenile patients with inflammatory myopathy using the core set outcomes. The final step in the puzzle of well-designed therapeutic trials in myositis is the determination of consensus guidelines to conduct such trials in adult and pediatric populations of myositis patients. PMID:15760586

  14. Therapeutic advances in the management of Pompe disease and other metabolic myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Nascimbeni, Anna Chiara; Semplicini, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    The world of metabolic myopathies has been dramatically modified by the advent of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), the first causative treatment for glycogenosis type II (GSDII) or Pompe disease, which has given new impetus to research into that disease and also other pathologies. This article reviews new advances in the treatment of GSDII, the consensus about ERT, and its limitations. In addition, the most recent knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, phenotype, and genotype of the disease is discussed. Pharmacological, immunotherapy, nutritional, and physical/rehabilitative treatments for late-onset Pompe disease and other metabolic myopathies are covered, including treatments for defects in glycogen metabolism, such as glycogenosis type V (McArdle disease), and glycogenosis type III (debrancher enzyme deficiency), and defects in lipid metabolism, such as carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency and electron transferring flavoprotein dehydrogenase deficiency, or riboflavin-responsive multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. PMID:23997816

  15. A PATTERN RECOGNITION APPROACH TO THE PATIENT WITH A SUSPECTED MYOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Barohn, Richard J.; Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Jackson, Carlayne E.

    2014-01-01

    Myopathies are a heterogeneous group of disorders that can be challenging to diagnose. The purpose of this review is to provide a diagnostic approach based predominantly upon the clinical history and neurologic examination. Laboratory testing that can be subsequently used to confirm the suspected diagnosis based upon this pattern recognition approach will also be discussed. Over the past decade, there have been numerous discoveries allowing clinicians to diagnose myopathies with genetic testing. Unfortunately, some of the testing, particularly molecular genetics, is extremely expensive and frequently not covered by insurance. Careful consideration of the distribution of muscle weakness and attention to common patterns of involvement in the context of other aspects of the neurologic examination and laboratory evaluation should assist the clinician in making a timely and accurate diagnosis, and sometimes can minimize the expense of further testing PMID:25037080

  16. Npt2b Deletion Attenuates Hyperphosphatemia Associated with CKD

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wen; Bracken, Christina; O’Brien, Stephen P.; Song, Wenping; Boulanger, Joseph; Ryan, Susan; Phillips, Lucy; Liu, Shiguang; Arbeeny, Cynthia; Ledbetter, Steven; Sabbagh, Yves

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular events and mortality strongly correlates with serum phosphate in individuals with CKD. The Npt2b transporter contributes to maintaining phosphate homeostasis in the setting of normal renal function, but its role in CKD-associated hyperphosphatemia is not well understood. Here, we used adenine to induce uremia in both Npt2b-deficient and wild-type mice. Compared with wild-type uremic mice, Npt2b-deficient uremic mice had significantly lower levels of serum phosphate and attenuation of FGF23. Treating Npt2b-deficient mice with the phosphate binder sevelamer carbonate further reduced serum phosphate levels. Uremic mice exhibited high turnover renal osteodystrophy; treatment with sevelamer significantly decreased the number of osteoclasts and the rate of mineral apposition in Npt2b-deficient mice, but sevelamer did not affect bone formation and rate of mineral apposition in wild-type mice. Taken together, these data suggest that targeting Npt2b in addition to using dietary phosphorus binders may be a therapeutic approach to modulate serum phosphate in CKD. PMID:22859851

  17. Development of autoantibodies against muscle-specific FHL1 in severe inflammatory myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Inka; Wick, Cecilia; Hallgren, Åsa; Tjärnlund, Anna; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Andrade, Felipe; Thompson, Kathryn; Coley, William; Phadke, Aditi; Diaz-Gallo, Lina-Marcela; Bottai, Matteo; Nennesmo, Inger; Chemin, Karine; Herrath, Jessica; Johansson, Karin; Wikberg, Anders; Ytterberg, A. Jimmy; Zubarev, Roman A.; Danielsson, Olof; Krystufkova, Olga; Vencovsky, Jiri; Landegren, Nils; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Padyukov, Leonid; Kämpe, Olle; Lundberg, Ingrid E.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of the gene encoding four-and-a-half LIM domain 1 (FHL1) are the causative factor of several X-linked hereditary myopathies that are collectively termed FHL1-related myopathies. These disorders are characterized by severe muscle dysfunction and damage. Here, we have shown that patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) develop autoimmunity to FHL1, which is a muscle-specific protein. Anti-FHL1 autoantibodies were detected in 25% of IIM patients, while patients with other autoimmune diseases or muscular dystrophies were largely anti-FHL1 negative. Anti-FHL1 reactivity was predictive for muscle atrophy, dysphagia, pronounced muscle fiber damage, and vasculitis. FHL1 showed an altered expression pattern, with focal accumulation in the muscle fibers of autoantibody-positive patients compared with a homogeneous expression in anti-FHL1–negative patients and healthy controls. We determined that FHL1 is a target of the cytotoxic protease granzyme B, indicating that the generation of FHL1 fragments may initiate FHL1 autoimmunity. Moreover, immunization of myositis-prone mice with FHL1 aggravated muscle weakness and increased mortality, suggesting a direct link between anti-FHL1 responses and muscle damage. Together, our findings provide evidence that FHL1 may be involved in the pathogenesis not only of genetic FHL1-related myopathies but also of autoimmune IIM. Importantly, these results indicate that anti-FHL1 autoantibodies in peripheral blood have promising potential as a biomarker to identify a subset of severe IIM. PMID:26551678

  18. Salvaging hope: Is increasing NAD(+) a key to treating mitochondrial myopathy?

    PubMed

    Lightowlers, Robert N; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M A

    2014-06-01

    Mitochondrial diseases can arise from mutations either in mitochondrial DNA or in nuclear DNA encoding mitochondrially destined proteins. Currently, there is no cure for these diseases although treatments to ameliorate a subset of the symptoms are being developed. In this issue of EMBO Molecular Medicine, Khan et al (2014) use a mouse model to test the efficacy of a simple dietary supplement of nicotinamide riboside to treat and prevent mitochondrial myopathies. PMID:24838280

  19. Unfolded Protein Response and Activated Degradative Pathways Regulation in GNE Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Honghao; Chen, Qi; Liu, Fuchen; Zhang, Xuemei; Li, Wei; Liu, Shuping; Zhao, Yuying; Gong, Yaoqin; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2013-01-01

    Although intracellular beta amyloid (Aβ) accumulation is known as an early upstream event in the degenerative course of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase (GNE) myopathy, the process by which Aβdeposits initiate various degradative pathways, and their relationship have not been fully clarified. We studied the possible secondary responses after amyloid beta precursor protein (AβPP) deposition including unfolded protein response (UPR), ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) activation and its correlation with autophagy system. Eight GNE myopathy patients and five individuals with normal muscle morphology were included in this study. We performed immunofluorescence and immunoblotting to investigate the expression of AβPP, phosphorylated tau (p-tau) and endoplasmic reticulum molecular chaperones. Proteasome activities were measured by cleavage of fluorogenic substrates. The expression of proteasome subunits and linkers between proteasomal and autophagy systems were also evaluated by immunoblotting and relative quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Four molecular chaperones, glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94), glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), calreticulin and calnexin and valosin containing protein (VCP) were highly expressed in GNE myopathy. 20S proteasome subunits, three main proteasome proteolytic activities, and the factors linking UPS and autophagy system were also increased. Our study suggests that AβPP deposition results in endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) and highly expressed VCP deliver unfolded proteins from endoplasmic reticulum to proteosomal system which is activated in endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation (ERAD) in GNE myopathy. Excessive ubiquitinated unfolded proteins are exported by proteins that connect UPS and autophagy to autophagy system, which is activated as an alternative pathway for degradation. PMID:23472144

  20. Congenital adrenal hypoplasia, myopathy, and glycerol kinase deficiency: Molecular genetic evidence for deletions

    PubMed Central

    Francke, Uta; Harper, John F.; Darras, Basil T.; Cowan, Janet M.; McCabe, Edward R. B.; Kohlschütter, Alfried; Seltzer, William K.; Saito, Fumiko; Goto, Jun; Harpey, Jean-Paul; Wise, Joyce E.

    1987-01-01

    Glycerol kinase deficiency (GKD) is an X-linked recessive trait that occurs in association with congenital adrenal hypoplasia (AH) and developmental delay with or without congenital dystrophic myopathy. Several such patients have recently been reported to have cytological deletions of chromosome region Xp21 and/or of DNA markers that map near the locus for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in band Xp21. We have examined the initial family reported in the literature and, using prometaphase chromosome studies and Southern blot analysis with 13 different DNA probes derived from band Xp21, have found no deletions within this region of the X chromosome. When DNA samples from six other unrelated affected males were analyzed, four of them were found to have different-size deletions within Xp21. Thus, the form of GKD associated with AH and dystrophic myopathy exhibits significant genetic heterogeneity at the DNA level. No deletions were detected in two patients with isolated GK deficiency. Comparison of our molecular studies of unrelated patients with deletions of DNA segments allows us to define the region of Xp21 (between probes J-Bir and L1.4) that most likely contains the genes for GKD and AH. This location is distal to the DMD locus. The patients with progressive muscular dystrophy tended to have larger deletions that include markers known to derive from the DMD locus, while GKD/AH/dystrophic-myopathy patients without current evidence of deletion seemed to have a milder, nonprogressive form of congenital myopathy. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:2883886

  1. GNE myopathy associated with congenital thrombocytopenia: a report of two siblings.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Rumiko; Niihori, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Naoki; Sasahara, Yoji; Rikiishi, Takeshi; Nishiyama, Ayumi; Nishiyama, Shuhei; Endo, Kaoru; Kato, Masaaki; Warita, Hitoshi; Konno, Hidehiko; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Tateyama, Maki; Nagashima, Takeshi; Funayama, Ryo; Nakayama, Keiko; Kure, Shigeo; Matsubara, Yoichi; Aoki, Yoko; Aoki, Masashi

    2014-12-01

    GNE myopathy is an autosomal recessive muscular disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the key enzyme in sialic acid biosynthesis, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase (GNE/MNK). Here, we report two siblings with myopathy with rimmed vacuoles and congenital thrombocytopenia who harbored two compound heterozygous GNE mutations, p.V603L and p.G739S. Thrombocytopenia, which is characterized by shortened platelet lifetime rather than ineffective thrombopoiesis, has been observed since infancy. We performed exome sequencing and array CGH to identify the underlying genetic etiology of thrombocytopenia. No pathogenic variants were detected among the known causative genes of recessively inherited thrombocytopenia; yet, candidate variants in two genes that followed an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance, including previously identified GNE mutations, were detected. Alternatively, it is possible that the decreased activity of GNE/MNK itself, which would lead to decreased sialic content in platelets, is associated with thrombocytopenia in these patients. Further investigations are required to clarify the association between GNE myopathy and the pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia. PMID:25257349

  2. Oculopharyngeal Weakness, Hypophrenia, Deafness, and Impaired Vision: A Novel Autosomal Dominant Myopathy with Rimmed Vacuoles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ting; Lu, Xiang-Hui; Wang, Hui-Fang; Ban, Rui; Liu, Hua-Xu; Shi, Qiang; Wang, Qian; Yin, Xi; Pu, Chuan-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Myopathies with rimmed vacuoles are a heterogeneous group of muscle disorders with progressive muscle weakness and varied clinical manifestations but similar features in muscle biopsies. Here, we describe a novel autosomal dominant myopathy with rimmed vacuoles in a large family with 11 patients of three generations affected. Methods: A clinical study including family history, obstetric, pediatric, and development history was recorded. Clinical examinations including physical examination, electromyography (EMG), serum creatine kinase (CK), bone X-rays, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed in this family. Open muscle biopsies were performed on the proband and his mother. To find the causative gene, the whole-exome sequencing was carried out. Results: Disease onset was from adolescence to adulthood, but the affected patients of the third generation presented an earlier onset and more severe clinical manifestations than the older generations. Clinical features were characterized as dysarthria, dysphagia, external ophthalmoplegia, limb weakness, hypophrenia, deafness, and impaired vision. However, not every patient manifested all symptoms. Serum CK was mildly elevated and EMG indicated a myopathic pattern. Brain MRI showed cerebellum and brain stem mildly atrophy. Rimmed vacuoles and inclusion bodies were observed in muscle biopsy. The whole-exome sequencing was performed, but the causative gene has not been found. Conclusions: We reported a novel autosomal dominant myopathy with rimmed vacuoles characterized by dysarthria, dysphagia, external ophthalmoplegia, limb weakness, hypophrenia, deafness, and impaired vision, but the causative gene has not been found and needs further study. PMID:27453229

  3. Subcellular Localization of Matrin 3 Containing Mutations Associated with ALS and Distal Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gallego-Iradi, M. Carolina; Clare, Alexis M.; Brown, Hilda H.; Janus, Christopher; Lewis, Jada; Borchelt, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mutations in Matrin 3 [MATR3], an RNA- and DNA-binding protein normally localized to the nucleus, have been linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and distal myopathies. In the present study, we have used transient transfection of cultured cell lines to examine the impact of different disease-causing mutations on the localization of Matrin 3 within cells. Results Using CHO and human H4 neuroglioma cell models, we find that ALS/myopathy mutations do not produce profound changes in the localization of the protein. Although we did observe variable levels of Matrin 3 in the cytoplasm either by immunostaining or visualization of fluorescently-tagged protein, the majority of cells expressing either wild-type (WT) or mutant Matrin 3 showed nuclear localization of the protein. When cytoplasmic immunostaining, or fusion protein fluorescence, was seen in the cytoplasm, the stronger intensity of staining or fluorescence was usually evident in the nucleus. In ~80% of cells treated with sodium arsenite (Ars) to induce cytoplasmic stress granules, the nuclear localization of WT and F115C mutant Matrin 3 was not disturbed. Notably, over-expression of mutant Matrin 3 did not induce the formation of obvious large inclusion-like structures in either the cytoplasm or nucleus. Conclusions Our findings indicate that mutations in Matrin 3 that are associated with ALS and myopathy do not dramatically alter the normal localization of the protein or readily induce inclusion formation. PMID:26528920

  4. Novel pathogenic variants and genes for myopathies identified by whole exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Jesse M; Ahearn, Mary Ellen; Balak, Christopher D; Liang, Winnie S; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Corneveaux, Jason J; Russell, Megan; Huentelman, Matthew J; Craig, David W; Carpten, John; Coons, Stephen W; DeMello, Daphne E; Hall, Judith G; Bernes, Saunder M; Baumbach-Reardon, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular diseases (NMD) account for a significant proportion of infant and childhood mortality and devastating chronic disease. Determining the specific diagnosis of NMD is challenging due to thousands of unique or rare genetic variants that result in overlapping phenotypes. We present four unique childhood myopathy cases characterized by relatively mild muscle weakness, slowly progressing course, mildly elevated creatine phosphokinase (CPK), and contractures. We also present two additional cases characterized by severe prenatal/neonatal myopathy. Prior extensive genetic testing and histology of these cases did not reveal the genetic etiology of disease. Here, we applied whole exome sequencing (WES) and bioinformatics to identify likely causal pathogenic variants in each pedigree. In two cases, we identified novel pathogenic variants in COL6A3. In a third case, we identified novel likely pathogenic variants in COL6A6 and COL6A3. We identified a novel splice variant in EMD in a fourth case. Finally, we classify two cases as calcium channelopathies with identification of novel pathogenic variants in RYR1 and CACNA1S. These are the first cases of myopathies reported to be caused by variants in COL6A6 and CACNA1S. Our results demonstrate the utility and genetic diagnostic value of WES in the broad class of NMD phenotypes. PMID:26247046

  5. A novel perspective for burn-induced myopathy: Membrane repair defect

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Wang, Hongyu; Wu, Dan; Hu, Jianhong; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Yong; Peng, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Myopathy is a common complication of severe burn patients. One potential cause of this myopathy could be failure of the plasma membrane to undergo repair following injuries generated from toxin or exercise. The aim of this study is to assess systemic effect on muscle membrane repair deficiency in burn injury. Skeletal muscle fibers isolated from burn-injured mice were damaged with a UV laser and dye influx imaged confocally to evaluate membrane repair capacity. Membrane repair failure was also tested in burn-injured mice subjected to myotoxin or treadmill exercise. We further used C2C12 myotubules and animal models to investigate the role of MG53 in development of burn-induced membrane repair defect. We demonstrated that skeletal muscle myofibers in burn-injured mice showed significantly more dye uptake after laser damage than controls, indicating a membrane repair deficiency. Myotoxin or treadmill exercise also resulted in a higher-grade repair defect in burn-injured mice. Furthermore, we observed that burn injury induced a significant decrease in MG53 levels and its dimerization in skeletal muscles. Our findings highlight a new mechanism that implicates membrane repair failure as an underlying cause of burn-induced myopathy. And, the disorders in MG53 expression and MG53 dimerization are involved in this cellular pathology. PMID:27545095

  6. Novel pathogenic variants and genes for myopathies identified by whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Jesse M; Ahearn, Mary Ellen; Balak, Christopher D; Liang, Winnie S; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Corneveaux, Jason J; Russell, Megan; Huentelman, Matthew J; Craig, David W; Carpten, John; Coons, Stephen W; DeMello, Daphne E; Hall, Judith G; Bernes, Saunder M; Baumbach-Reardon, Lisa

    2015-07-01

    Neuromuscular diseases (NMD) account for a significant proportion of infant and childhood mortality and devastating chronic disease. Determining the specific diagnosis of NMD is challenging due to thousands of unique or rare genetic variants that result in overlapping phenotypes. We present four unique childhood myopathy cases characterized by relatively mild muscle weakness, slowly progressing course, mildly elevated creatine phosphokinase (CPK), and contractures. We also present two additional cases characterized by severe prenatal/neonatal myopathy. Prior extensive genetic testing and histology of these cases did not reveal the genetic etiology of disease. Here, we applied whole exome sequencing (WES) and bioinformatics to identify likely causal pathogenic variants in each pedigree. In two cases, we identified novel pathogenic variants in COL6A3. In a third case, we identified novel likely pathogenic variants in COL6A6 and COL6A3. We identified a novel splice variant in EMD in a fourth case. Finally, we classify two cases as calcium channelopathies with identification of novel pathogenic variants in RYR1 and CACNA1S. These are the first cases of myopathies reported to be caused by variants in COL6A6 and CACNA1S. Our results demonstrate the utility and genetic diagnostic value of WES in the broad class of NMD phenotypes. PMID:26247046

  7. Pharmacogenetics of cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6): advances on polymorphisms, mechanisms, and clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Zanger, Ulrich M.; Klein, Kathrin

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6) belongs to the minor drug metabolizing P450s in human liver. Expression is highly variable both between individuals and within individuals, owing to non-genetic factors, genetic polymorphisms, inducibility, and irreversible inhibition by many compounds. Drugs metabolized mainly by CYP2B6 include artemisinin, bupropion, cyclophosphamide, efavirenz, ketamine, and methadone. CYP2B6 is one of the most polymorphic CYP genes in humans and variants have been shown to affect transcriptional regulation, splicing, mRNA and protein expression, and catalytic activity. Some variants appear to affect several functional levels simultaneously, thus, combined in haplotypes, leading to complex interactions between substrate-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The most common functionally deficient allele is CYP2B6*6 [Q172H, K262R], which occurs at frequencies of 15 to over 60% in different populations. The allele leads to lower expression in liver due to erroneous splicing. Recent investigations suggest that the amino acid changes contribute complex substrate-dependent effects at the activity level, although data from recombinant systems used by different researchers are not well in agreement with each other. Another important variant, CYP2B6*18 [I328T], occurs predominantly in Africans (4–12%) and does not express functional protein. A large number of uncharacterized variants are currently emerging from different ethnicities in the course of the 1000 Genomes Project. The CYP2B6 polymorphism is clinically relevant for HIV-infected patients treated with the reverse transcriptase inhibitor efavirenz, but it is increasingly being recognized for other drug substrates. This review summarizes recent advances on the functional and clinical significance of CYP2B6 and its genetic polymorphism, with particular emphasis on the comparison of kinetic data obtained with different substrates for variants expressed in different recombinant expression systems. PMID

  8. Antagonistic effects of extracts from Artemisia rupetris L. and Leontopodium leontopodioides to CC chemokine receptor 2b (CCR2b).

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin-Wei; Hu, Jie; Wang, Hao; Chen, Xin; Zhao, Fang; Gao, Peng; Yang, Qiu-Bin; Sun, Dan-Dan; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Yan, Ming

    2016-05-01

    The present study was designed to establish a suitable assay to explore CCR2b receptor antagonists from the natural products of Artemisia rupetris and Leontopodium leontopodioides. An aequorin assay was developed as a cell-based assay suitable for 384-well microplate and used for screening CCR2b receptor antagonists from natural products. Through establishing suitable conditions, the assay was shown to be suitable for screening of CCR2b receptor antagonists. Seven compounds were identified in preliminary screening. Five of them showed evident dose-response relationship in secondary screening. The structure-activity relationship study suggested that 7-position hydroxyl group of flavonoids was necessary, a polar group should be introduced on the 3-position, and the substituents on 2-position benzene ring of flavonoids have little influence on the potentency of the inhibition activity on CCR2b receptor. The ortho-position dihydroxyl structure in quinic acid compounds may be important. In conclusion, Compounds HR-1, 5, 7, and AR-20, 35 showed activity as antagonist of CCR2b receptor, which shed lights on the development of novel drugs as CCR2b receptor antagonists for preventing inflammation related diseases. PMID:27478099

  9. Fibrillin-2b regulates endocardial morphogenesis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Mellman, Katharine; Huisken, Jan; Dinsmore, Colin; Hoppe, Cornelia; Stainier, Didier Y

    2012-12-01

    scotch tape (sco) is a zebrafish cardiac mutant initially proposed to exhibit a reduced amount of cardiac jelly, the extracellular matrix between the myocardial and endocardial layers. We analyzed sco(te382) mutant hearts in detail using both selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and observed a fascinating endocardial defect. Time-lapse SPIM imaging of wild-type and mutant embryos revealed significant and dynamic gaps between endocardial cells during development. Although these gaps close in wild-type animals, they fail to close in the mutants, ultimately leading to a near complete absence of endocardial cells in the atrial chamber by the heart looping stage. TEM analyses confirm the presence of gaps between endocardial cells in sco mutants, allowing the apparent leakage of cardiac jelly into the lumen. High-resolution mapping places the sco(te382) mutation within the fbn2b locus, which encodes the extracellular matrix protein Fibrillin 2b (OMIM ID: 121050). Complementation and further phenotypic analyses confirm that sco is allelic to puff daddy(gw1) (pfd(gw1)), a null mutant in fbn2b, and that sco(te382) is a hypomorphic allele of fbn2b. fbn2b belongs to a family of genes responsible for the assembly of microfibrils throughout development, and is essential for microfibril structural integrity. In sco(te382) mutants, Fbn2b is disabled by a missense mutation in a highly conserved cbEGF domain, which likely interferes with protein folding. Integrating data obtained from microscopy and molecular biology, we posit that this mutation impacts the rigidity of Fbn2b, imparting a structural defect that weakens endocardial adhesion thereby resulting in perforated endocardium. PMID:22841646

  10. Serotonin 2B Receptor Antagonism Prevents Heritable Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Schroer, Alison K.; Chen, Peter; Ryzhova, Larisa M.; Gladson, Santhi; Shay, Sheila; Hutcheson, Joshua D.; Merryman, W. David

    2016-01-01

    Serotonergic anorexigens are the primary pharmacologic risk factor associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), and the resulting PAH is clinically indistinguishable from the heritable form of disease, associated with BMPR2 mutations. Both BMPR2 mutation and agonists to the serotonin receptor HTR2B have been shown to cause activation of SRC tyrosine kinase; conversely, antagonists to HTR2B inhibit SRC trafficking and downstream function. To test the hypothesis that a HTR2B antagonist can prevent BMRP2 mutation induced PAH by restricting aberrant SRC trafficking and downstream activity, we exposed BMPR2 mutant mice, which spontaneously develop PAH, to a HTR2B antagonist, SB204741, to block the SRC activation caused by BMPR2 mutation. SB204741 prevented the development of PAH in BMPR2 mutant mice, reduced recruitment of inflammatory cells to their lungs, and reduced muscularization of their blood vessels. By atomic force microscopy, we determined that BMPR2 mutant mice normally had a doubling of vessel stiffness, which was substantially normalized by HTR2B inhibition. SB204741 reduced SRC phosphorylation and downstream activity in BMPR2 mutant mice. Gene expression arrays indicate that the primary changes were in cytoskeletal and muscle contractility genes. These results were confirmed by gel contraction assays showing that HTR2B inhibition nearly normalizes the 400% increase in gel contraction normally seen in BMPR2 mutant smooth muscle cells. Heritable PAH results from increased SRC activation, cellular contraction, and vascular resistance, but antagonism of HTR2B prevents SRC phosphorylation, downstream activity, and PAH in BMPR2 mutant mice. PMID:26863209

  11. Paraneoplastic necrotizing myopathy associated with adenocarcinoma of the lung – a rare entity with atypical onset: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Inflammatory myopathies (such as dermatomyositis and polymyositis) are well-recognized paraneoplastic syndromes. However, paraneoplastic necrotizing myopathy is a more recently defined clinical entity, characterized by rapidly progressive, symmetrical, predominantly proximal muscle weakness with severe disability, and associated with a marked increase in serum muscle enzyme levels. Paraneoplastic necrotizing myopathy requires muscle biopsy for diagnosis, which typically shows massive necrosis of muscle fibers with limited or absent inflammatory infiltrates. Case presentation We report the case of an 82-year-old Italian-born Caucasian man who was admitted to hospital because of heart failure and two drop attacks. Over the following days, he developed progressive severe weakness, dysphagia, and dysphonia. Testing showed increasing serum muscle enzyme levels. Electromyography showed irritative myopathy of the proximal muscles and sensorimotor polyneuropathy. Muscle biopsy (left vastus lateralis) showed massive necrosis of muscle fibers with negligible inflammatory infiltrates, complement membrane attack complex deposition on endomysial capillaries, and moderate upregulation of major histocompatibility complex-I. Computed tomography of the thorax showed a nodular mass in the apex of the right lung. The patient was diagnosed with paraneoplastic necrotizing myopathy. In spite of high-dose corticoid therapy, he died 1 month later because of his aggressive cancer. Subsequent electron microscopic examination of a muscle biopsy specimen showed thickened walls and typical pipestem changes of the endomysial capillaries, with swollen endothelial cells. Poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the lung was confirmed on post-mortem histological examination. Conclusions Paraneoplastic necrotizing myopathy is a rare syndrome with outcomes ranging from fast progression to complete recovery. Treatment with corticosteroids is often ineffective, and prognosis depends mainly

  12. Lithium insertion in nanostructured TiO(2)(B) architectures.

    PubMed

    Dylla, Anthony G; Henkelman, Graeme; Stevenson, Keith J

    2013-05-21

    Electric vehicles and grid storage devices have potentialto become feasible alternatives to current technology, but only if scientists can develop energy storage materials that offer high capacity and high rate capabilities. Chemists have studied anatase, rutile, brookite and TiO2(B) (bronze) in both bulk and nanostructured forms as potential Li-ion battery anodes. In most cases, the specific capacity and rate of lithiation and delithiation increases as the materials are nanostructured. Scientists have explained these enhancements in terms of higher surface areas, shorter Li(+) diffusion paths and different surface energies for nanostructured materials allowing for more facile lithiation and delithiation. Of the most studied polymorphs, nanostructured TiO2(B) has the highest capacity with promising high rate capabilities. TiO2(B) is able to accommodate 1 Li(+) per Ti, giving a capacity of 335 mAh/g for nanotubular and nanoparticulate TiO2(B). The TiO2(B) polymorph, discovered in 1980 by Marchand and co-workers, has been the focus of many recent studies regarding high power and high capacity anode materials with potential applications for electric vehicles and grid storage. This is due to the material's stability over multiple cycles, safer lithiation potential relative to graphite, reasonable capacity, high rate capability, nontoxicity, and low cost (Bruce, P. G.; Scrosati, B.; Tarascon, J.-M. Nanomaterials for Rechargeable Lithium Batteries. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed.2008, 47, 2930-2946). One of the most interesting properties of TiO2(B) is that both bulk and nanostructured forms lithiate and delithiate through a surface redox or pseudocapacitive charging mechanism, giving rise to stable high rate charge/discharge capabilities in the case of nanostructured TiO2(B). When other polymorphs of TiO2 are nanostructured, they still mainly intercalate lithium through a bulk diffusion-controlled mechanism. TiO2(B) has a unique open crystal structure and low energy Li

  13. Rap2B GTPase: structure, functions, and regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhesi; Di, Jiehui; Lu, Zheng; Gao, Keyu; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-06-01

    Rap2B GTPase, a member of Ras-related protein superfamily, was first discovered from a platelet cDNA library in the early 1990s. Since then, it has been reported to play an important role in regulating cellular processes including cytoskeletal organization, cell growth, and proliferation. It can be stimulated and suppressed by a wide range of external and internal inducers, circulating between GTP-bound active state and GDP-bound inactive state. Increasing focus on Ras signaling pathway reveals critical effects of Rap2B on tumorigenesis. In particular, Rap2B behaves in a p53-dependent manner in regulation of apoptosis and migration. Apart from being an oncogenic activator, Rap2B has been found to participate in many other physiological events via diverse downstream effectors. In this review, we present recent studies on the structure, regulation, and multiple biological functions of Rap2B, shedding light on its potential status in treatment of cancer as well as other diseases. PMID:27012552

  14. Substrate Recognition of Histone H2B by DUBm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Elizabeth; Berndsen, Christopher; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2011-03-01

    The SAGA complex is a transcriptional coactivator that regulates gene expression in eukaryotes via histone acetylation and deubiquitination, which are crucial for transcription. Our lab is investigating the SAGA-dependent deubiquitination of histone H2B. The deubiquitinating module (DUBm) of SAGA is comprised of a ubiquitin-specific protease, Ubp8, and three other proteins. It is known that Ubp8 cleaves ubiquitin from histone H2B, however, the specific way in which the enzyme binds to the substrate remains elusive. In order to unravel this mechanism, we attempted to determine the crystal structure of the substrate binding complex. We obtained this substrate by exploiting the techniques of intein chemistry to artificially ubiquitinate a histone H2B peptide, which we then co-crystallized with DUBm. Additionally, we synthesized Ub-K63R-linked chains and Ub-K48-linked chains and co-crystallized them with DUBm.

  15. Expanding Interprofessional EHR Data in i2b2.

    PubMed

    Westra, Bonnie L; Christie, Beverly; Johnson, Steven G; Pruinelli, Lisiane; LaFlamme, Anne; Park, Jung In; Sherman, Suzan G; Byrne, Matthew D; Ranallo, Piper; Speedie, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Emerging issues of team-based care, precision medicine, and big data science underscore the need for health information technology (HIT) tools for integrating complex data in consistent ways to achieve the triple aims of improving patient outcomes, patient experience, and cost reductions. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of creating a hierarchical flowsheet ontology in i2b2 using data-derived information models and determine the underlying informatics and technical issues. This study is the first of its kind to use information models that aggregate team-based care across time, disciplines, and settings into 14 information models that were integrated into i2b2 in a hierarchical model. In the process of successfully creating a hierarchical ontology for flowsheet data in i2b2, we uncovered a variety of informatics and technical issues described in this paper. PMID:27570680

  16. Expanding Interprofessional EHR Data in i2b2

    PubMed Central

    Westra, Bonnie L.; Christie, Beverly; Johnson, Steven G.; Pruinelli, Lisiane; LaFlamme, Anne; Park, Jung In; Sherman, Suzan G.; Byrne, Matthew D.; Ranallo, Piper; Speedie, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Emerging issues of team-based care, precision medicine, and big data science underscore the need for health information technology (HIT) tools for integrating complex data in consistent ways to achieve the triple aims of improving patient outcomes, patient experience, and cost reductions. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of creating a hierarchical flowsheet ontology in i2b2 using data-derived information models and determine the underlying informatics and technical issues. This study is the first of its kind to use information models that aggregate team-based care across time, disciplines, and settings into 14 information models that were integrated into i2b2 in a hierarchical model. In the process of successfully creating a hierarchical ontology for flowsheet data in i2b2, we uncovered a variety of informatics and technical issues described in this paper. PMID:27570680

  17. caB2B hosting update —

    Cancer.gov

    cancer Bench-to-Beside - caB2B - is an open-source query tool that permits translational research scientists to search and combine data from virtually any caGrid data service. The caB2B suite is composed of three core components: the Web application, the Client Application and the Administrative Module. The caB2B Web Application provides query templates that allow easy search and retrieval of microarray data (from caArray), imaging data (from the National Biomedical Imaging Archive (NBIA)), specimen data (from caTissue) and nanoparticle data (from caNanoLab) across the grid. Searches can be performed on selected locations using either form-based or keyword searches and data can be exported in the CSV format.

  18. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2b associated with lichen nitidus.

    PubMed

    Altaykan, Asli; Ersoy-Evans, Sibel; Emre, Serap; Orhan, Diclehan; Güçer, Safak; Erkin, Gül

    2007-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 2B syndrome is an autosomal dominantly inherited endocrine disorder with rare skin manifestations. We report the case of a 19-year-old Turkish girl who presented with skin-colored flat papules scattered all over the trunk and extremities. Additionally, she had marfanoid habitus, thick lips, and multiple flesh-colored papules over the inner eyelids and oral mucosa. Histopathological examination of one of the trunk lesions was consistent with lichen nitidus. Her past medical history was significant for medullary thyroid carcinoma. Genetic testing showed a point mutation in exon 16 at codon 918 (M918T) in the RET proto-oncogene. Based on all these findings, MEN type 2B was diagnosed. To the best of our knowledge we report the first case of MEN type 2B associated with lichen nitidus. PMID:17540634

  19. ORM-Based Semantics of B2B Transactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsters, H.; van Blommestein, F.

    After widespread implementation of Enterprise Resource Planning and Personal Information Management, the next wave in the application of ICT is headed towards business to business (B2B) communication. B2B has a number of specific aspects, one of them being negotiation. This aspect has been largely neglected by present implementations of standard EDI- or XML-messaging and by B2B webservice implementations. In this paper a precise model is given of the negotiation process. The requirements of a potential Buyer and the offer of a potential Seller are matched and, if the negotiation is successful, a contract is concluded. The negotiation process model is represented in ORM, extended with dynamic constraints. Our model may be implemented in the databases of the trading partners and in message- or service definitions.

  20. Flow Simulation of N2B Hybrid Wing Body Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyoungjin; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2012-01-01

    The N2B hybrid wing body aircraft was conceptually designed to meet environmental and performance goals for the N+2 generation transport set by the subsonic fixed wing project. In this study, flow fields around the N2B configuration is simulated using a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver using unstructured meshes. Boundary conditions at engine fan face and nozzle exhaust planes are provided by response surfaces of the NPSS thermodynamic engine cycle model. The present flow simulations reveal challenging design issues arising from boundary layer ingestion offset inlet and nacelle-airframe interference. The N2B configuration can be a good test bed for application of multidisciplinary design optimization technology.

  1. Diagnosis of myocardial involvement in patients with systemic myopathies with 15-(p-(I-123)iodophenyl) pentadecanoic acid (IPPA) SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Kropp, J.; Briele, B.; Smekal, A.V.; Hotze, A.L.; Biersack, H.J.; Koehler, U.; Zierz, St. ); Knapp, F.F. )

    1992-01-01

    Involvement of the myocardium in non-infectious myopathies presents in most cases as systolic dysfunction or a disturbed cardiac rhythm. We are interested in exploring how often cardiac involvement can be evaluated with various diagnostic techniques in patients with proven myopathy. We investigated 41 patients with myopathies of various etiology, including mitochondrial and congenital myopathies, Curshmann-Steinert disease, muscular dystrophy, and others. Myopathy was proven by muscular biopsy usually from the bicep. Fatty acid imaging was performed with 15-(p-(I-123)iodophenyl)pentadecanoic acid (IP-PA) and sequential SPECT-scintigraphy with a 180 deg. rotation starting at the 45 deg. RAO position. 190 MBq were injected at the maximal stage of a submaximal exercise. Filtered backprojection and reorientation of the slices were achieved by standard techniques. The quantitative comparison of the oblique slices (bulls-eye technique) of the SPECT-studies revealed turnover-rates as a qualitative measure of {beta}-oxidation. Serum levels of lactate (L), pyruvate (P), glucose (G) and triglycerides (TG) were measured at rest and stress. Ventricular function was investigated by radionuclide ventriculography (MUGA) at rest and under stress with Tc-99m labeled red blood cells. In addition, ECG, 24 hour-ECG, and echocardiography were also performed with standard techniques.

  2. Diagnosis of myocardial involvement in patients with systemic myopathies with 15-(p-[I-123]iodophenyl) pentadecanoic acid (IPPA) SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Kropp, J.; Briele, B.; Smekal, A.V.; Hotze, A.L.; Biersack, H.J.; Koehler, U.; Zierz, St.; Knapp, F.F.

    1992-03-01

    Involvement of the myocardium in non-infectious myopathies presents in most cases as systolic dysfunction or a disturbed cardiac rhythm. We are interested in exploring how often cardiac involvement can be evaluated with various diagnostic techniques in patients with proven myopathy. We investigated 41 patients with myopathies of various etiology, including mitochondrial and congenital myopathies, Curshmann-Steinert disease, muscular dystrophy, and others. Myopathy was proven by muscular biopsy usually from the bicep. Fatty acid imaging was performed with 15-(p-[I-123]iodophenyl)pentadecanoic acid (IP-PA) and sequential SPECT-scintigraphy with a 180 deg. rotation starting at the 45 deg. RAO position. 190 MBq were injected at the maximal stage of a submaximal exercise. Filtered backprojection and reorientation of the slices were achieved by standard techniques. The quantitative comparison of the oblique slices (bulls-eye technique) of the SPECT-studies revealed turnover-rates as a qualitative measure of {beta}-oxidation. Serum levels of lactate (L), pyruvate (P), glucose (G) and triglycerides (TG) were measured at rest and stress. Ventricular function was investigated by radionuclide ventriculography (MUGA) at rest and under stress with Tc-99m labeled red blood cells. In addition, ECG, 24 hour-ECG, and echocardiography were also performed with standard techniques.

  3. A novel dynamin-2 gene mutation associated with a late-onset centronuclear myopathy with necklace fibres.

    PubMed

    Casar-Borota, Olivera; Jacobsson, Johan; Libelius, Rolf; Oldfors, Carola Hedberg; Malfatti, Edoardo; Romero, Norma Beatriz; Oldfors, Anders

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear centralisation and internalisation, sarcoplasmic radiating strands and type 1 muscle fibre predominance and hypotrophy characterise dynamin-2 (DNM2) associated centronuclear myopathy, whereas necklace fibres are typically seen in late onset myotubularin-1 (MTM1)-related myopathy. We report a woman with unilateral symptoms probably related to brachial plexus neuritis. Electromyography revealed localised neuropathic and generalised myopathic abnormalities. The typical features of DNM2 centronuclear myopathy with additional necklace fibres were found in the muscle biopsy. Sequencing of the DNM2 and MTM1 genes revealed a novel heterozygous missense mutation in exon 18 of the DNM2, leading to replacement of highly conserved proline at position 647 by arginine. The muscle symptoms have not progressed during the 3-year follow-up. However, the patient has developed bilateral subtle lens opacities. Our findings support the concept that necklace fibres may occasionally be found in DNM2-related myopathy, possibly indicating a common pathogenic mechanism in DNM2 and MTM1 associated centronuclear myopathy. PMID:25633151

  4. 27 CFR 21.33 - Formula No. 2-B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Formula No. 2-B. 21.33 Section 21.33 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specially Denatured Spirits...

  5. INSAT-2A and 2B development mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayan, M. N.; Rao, M. Nageswara; Nataraju, B. S.; Viswanatha, N.; Chary, M. Laxmana; Balan, K. S.; Murthy, V. Sridhara; Aller, Raju; Kumar, H. N. Suresha

    1994-01-01

    The Indian National Satellite (INSAT) 2A and 2B have deployment mechanisms for deploying the solar array, two C/S band antenna reflectors and a coilable lattice boom with sail. The mechanisms have worked flawlessly on both satellites. The configuration details, precautions taken during the design phase, the test philosophy, and some of the critical analysis activities are discussed.

  6. Strategies for maintaining patient privacy in i2b2

    PubMed Central

    Gainer, Vivian; Mendis, Michael; Churchill, Susanne; Kohane, Isaac

    2011-01-01

    Background The re-use of patient data from electronic healthcare record systems can provide tremendous benefits for clinical research, but measures to protect patient privacy while utilizing these records have many challenges. Some of these challenges arise from a misperception that the problem should be solved technically when actually the problem needs a holistic solution. Objective The authors' experience with informatics for integrating biology and the bedside (i2b2) use cases indicates that the privacy of the patient should be considered on three fronts: technical de-identification of the data, trust in the researcher and the research, and the security of the underlying technical platforms. Methods The security structure of i2b2 is implemented based on consideration of all three fronts. It has been supported with several use cases across the USA, resulting in five privacy categories of users that serve to protect the data while supporting the use cases. Results The i2b2 architecture is designed to provide consistency and faithfully implement these user privacy categories. These privacy categories help reflect the policy of both the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act and the provisions of the National Research Act of 1974, as embodied by current institutional review boards. Conclusion By implementing a holistic approach to patient privacy solutions, i2b2 is able to help close the gap between principle and practice. PMID:21984588

  7. Unilateral symptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis and myopathy in an adolescent with Graves disease: a case report of an high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jia; Zhu, Jiajia; Huang, Dongling; Shi, Changzheng; Guan, Yuqing; Zhou, Liang; Pan, Suyue

    2015-01-01

    Vascular and muscular involvements in Graves disease (GD) are rare. Here, we report a case of a 17-year-old patient with unilateral symptomatic middle cerebral artery stenosis concurrent with GD and myopathy. He presented with a 1-day history of acute severe right-sided hemiparesis and aphasia and a 3-week history of high metabolic syndrome. The pathogenesis of the stenosis is most likely vasculitis rather than atherosclerosis, based on contrast-enhanced high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging showing concentric wall enhancement. We suggest that lipid storage myopathy is secondary to GD, and it is likely mitochondrial dysfunction or immune dysfunction induced by GD responsible for the myopathy and that magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is capable of establishing the diagnosis of myopathy. Thus, MRS can be used for follow-up evaluations of the myopathy along with the pathology biopsy. PMID:25444029

  8. GRIN2B predicts attention problems among disadvantaged children.

    PubMed

    Riva, Valentina; Battaglia, Marco; Nobile, Maria; Cattaneo, Francesca; Lazazzera, Claudio; Mascheretti, Sara; Giorda, Roberto; Mérette, Chantal; Émond, Claudia; Maziade, Michel; Marino, Cecilia

    2015-07-01

    It is well established that adversities and GRIN2B (coding an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit) are independently associated with behavioral and cognitive impairments in childhood. However, a high proportion of children exposed to adversities have good, long-term outcomes. We hypothesized that among children exposed to adversities, GRIN2B variants would predict the worst cognitive and behavioral outcomes. 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms of GRIN2B were genotyped in 625 children aged 6-11 years from an Italian community-based sample. The interacting effect of GRIN2B variants with 4 measures of adversities [low socioeconomic status (SES), preterm delivery, maternal smoking during pregnancy, and absence of breastfeeding] was investigated upon blindly assessed cognitive abilities (vocabulary, block design, digit spans of Wechsler's Intelligence Scale, and Rey complex figure) and parents-rated behavioral problems (Child Behavior Checklist/6-18). Rs2268119 × SES interaction (Hotelling's Trace = 0.07; F(12,1154) = 3.53; p = 0.00004) influenced behavior, with more attention problems among children in the 'either A/T or T/T genotype and low SES' group, compared to all other groups. This interaction effect was not significant in an independent, replication sample of 475 subjects from an Italian community-based sample. GRIN2B variants predict children with the worst outcome in attention functioning among children exposed to low SES. Our findings, if replicated, could help in the identification of children with the highest risk and may prompt cost-effective preventive/treatment strategies. PMID:25316095

  9. Skeletal muscle-specific HMG-CoA reductase knockout mice exhibit rhabdomyolysis: A model for statin-induced myopathy.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Yoshinori; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Miyahara, Shoko; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Ishii, Akiko; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yatoh, Shigeru; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Yahagi, Naoya; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Sone, Hirohito; Ohashi, Ken; Ishibashi, Shun; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2015-10-23

    HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR) catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonic acid (MVA); this is the rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that synthesizes cholesterol. Statins, HMGCR inhibitors, are widely used as cholesterol-reducing drugs. However, statin-induced myopathy is the most adverse side effect of statins. To eludicate the mechanisms underlying statin the myotoxicity and HMGCR function in the skeletal muscle, we developed the skeletal muscle-specific HMGCR knockout mice. Knockout mice exhibited postnatal myopathy with elevated serum creatine kinase levels and necrosis. Myopathy in knockout mice was completely rescued by the oral administration of MVA. These results suggest that skeletal muscle toxicity caused by statins is dependent on the deficiencies of HMGCR enzyme activity and downstream metabolites of the mevalonate pathway in skeletal muscles rather than the liver or other organs. PMID:26381177

  10. Mutation of the mitochondrial carrier SLC25A42 causes a novel form of mitochondrial myopathy in humans

    PubMed Central

    Kentab, Amal; Alkhalidi, Hisham; Summers, Brady; Alsedairy, Haifa; Xiong, Yong; Gupta, Vandana A.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2016-01-01

    Myopathies are heterogeneous disorders characterized clinically by weakness and hypotonia, usually in the absence of gross dystrophic changes. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a frequent cause of myopathy. We report a simplex case born to consanguineous parents who presented with muscle weakness, lactic acidosis, and muscle changes suggestive of mitochondrial dysfunction. Combined autozygome and exome analysis revealed a missense variant in the SLC25A42 gene, which encodes an inner mitochondrial membrane protein that imports co-enzyme A into the mitochondrial matrix. Zebrafish slc25a42 knockdown morphants display severe muscle disorganization and weakness. Importantly, these features are rescued by normal human SLC25A42 RNA, but not by RNA harboring the patient’s variant. Our data support a potentially causal link between SLC25A42 mutation and mitochondrial myopathy in humans. PMID:26541337

  11. Autism in the Son of a Woman with Mitochondrial Myopathy and Dysautonomia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rais, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between autism spectrum disorders and mitochondrial dysfunction, including mitochondrial myopathies and other mitochondrial diseases, is an area of ongoing research. All autism spectrum disorders are known to be heritable, via genetic and/or epigenetic mechanisms, but specific modes of inheritance are not well characterized. Nevertheless, autism spectrum disorders have been linked to many specific genes associated with mitochondrial function, especially to genes involved in mitochondrial tRNA and the electron transport chain, both particularly vulnerable to point mutations, and clinical research also supports a relationship between the two pathologies. Although only a small minority of patients with autism have a mitochondrial disease, many patients with mitochondrial myopathies have autism spectrum disorder symptoms, and these symptoms may be the presenting symptoms, which presents a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The authors report the case of a 15-year-old boy with a history of autism spectrum disorder and neurocardiogenic syncope, admitted to the inpatient unit for self-injury, whose young mother, age 35, was discovered to suffer from mitochondrial myopathy, dysautonomia, neurocardiogenic syncope, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and other uncommon multisystem pathologies likely related to mitochondrial dysfunction. This case illustrates the need for a high index of suspicion for mitochondrial disease in patients with autism, as they have two orders of magnitude greater risk for such diseases than the general population. The literature shows that mitochondrial disease is underdiagnosed in autism spectrum disorder patients and should not be viewed as a “zebra” (i.e., an obscure diagnosis that is made when a more common explanation is more likely). PMID:26634179

  12. Bethlem myopathy and engineered collagen VI triple helical deletions prevent intracellular multimer assembly and protein secretion.

    PubMed

    Lamandé, S R; Shields, K A; Kornberg, A J; Shield, L K; Bateman, J F

    1999-07-30

    Mutations in the genes that code for collagen VI subunits, COL6A1, COL6A2, and COL6A3, are the cause of the autosomal dominant disorder, Bethlem myopathy. Although three different collagen VI structural mutations have previously been reported, the effect of these mutations on collagen VI assembly, structure, and function is currently unknown. We have characterized a new Bethlem myopathy mutation that results in skipping of COL6A1 exon 14 during pre-mRNA splicing and the deletion of 18 amino acids from the triple helical domain of the alpha1(VI) chain. Sequencing of genomic DNA identified a G to A transition in the +1 position of the splice donor site of intron 14 in one allele. The mutant alpha1(VI) chains associated intracellularly with alpha2(VI) and alpha3(VI) to form disulfide-bonded monomers, but further assembly into dimers and tetramers was prevented, and molecules containing the mutant chain were not secreted. This triple helical deletion thus resulted in production of half the normal amount of collagen VI. To further explore the biosynthetic consequences of collagen VI triple helical deletions, an alpha3(VI) cDNA expression construct containing a 202-amino acid deletion within the triple helix was produced and stably expressed in SaOS-2 cells. The transfected mutant alpha3(VI) chains associated with endogenous alpha1(VI) and alpha2(VI) to form collagen VI monomers, but dimers and tetramers did not form and the mutant-containing molecules were not secreted. Thus, deletions within the triple helical region of both the alpha1(VI) and alpha3(VI) chains can prevent intracellular dimer and tetramer assembly and secretion. These results provide the first evidence of the biosynthetic consequences of structural collagen VI mutations and suggest that functional protein haploinsufficiency may be a common pathogenic mechanism in Bethlem myopathy. PMID:10419498

  13. Complex sarcolemmal invaginations mimicking myotendinous junctions in a case of Laing early-onset distal myopathy.

    PubMed

    Reis, Gerald F; de la Motte, Grant; Gooding, Rebecca; Laing, Nigel G; Margeta, Marta

    2015-12-01

    Distal myopathies are a group of clinically and pathologically overlapping muscle diseases that are genetically complex and can represent a diagnostic challenge. Laing early-onset distal myopathy (MPD1) is a form of distal myopathy caused by mutations in the MYH7 gene, which encodes the beta myosin heavy chain protein expressed in type 1 skeletal muscle fibers and cardiac myocytes. Here, we present a case of genetically confirmed MPD1 with a typical clinical presentation but distinctive light microscopic and ultrastructural findings on muscle biopsy. A 39-year-old professional male cellist presented with a bilateral foot drop that developed by age 8; analysis of the family pedigree showed an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. The physical exam demonstrated bilateral weakness of ankle dorsiflexors, toe extensors and finger extensors; creatine kinase level was normal. Biopsy of the quadriceps femoris muscle showed predominance and hypotrophy of type 1 fibers, hybrid fibers with co-expression of slow and fast myosin proteins (both in highly atrophic and normal size range), moth-eaten fibers and mini-cores, lack of rimmed vacuoles and rare desmin-positive eosinophilic sarcoplasmic inclusions. In addition to these abnormalities often observed in MPD1, the biopsy demonstrated frequent clefted fibers with complex sarcolemmal invaginations; on ultrastructural examination, these structures closely mimicked myotendinous junctions but were present away from the tendon and were almost exclusively found in type 1 fibers. Sequencing analysis of the MYH7 gene in the index patient and other affected family members demonstrated a previously described heterozygous c.4522_4524delGAG (p.Glu1508del) mutation. This case widens the pathologic spectrum of MPD1 and highlights the pathologic and clinical variability that can accompany the same genetic mutation, suggesting a significant role for modifier genes in MPD1 pathogenesis. PMID:26094647

  14. Modulating myosin restores muscle function in a mouse model of nemaline myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, Johan; Levy, Yotam; Pati‐Alam, Alisha; Hardeman, Edna C.; Gregorevic, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objective Nemaline myopathy, one of the most common congenital myopathies, is associated with mutations in various genes including ACTA1. This disease is also characterized by various forms/degrees of muscle weakness, with most cases being severe and resulting in death in infancy. Recent findings have provided valuable insight into the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. Mutations in ACTA1 directly disrupt binding interactions between actin and myosin, and consequently the intrinsic force‐generating capacity of muscle fibers. ACTA1 mutations are also associated with variations in myofiber size, the mechanisms of which have been unclear. In the present study, we sought to test the hypotheses that the compromised functional and morphological attributes of skeletal muscles bearing ACTA1 mutations (1) would be directly due to the inefficient actomyosin complex and (2) could be restored by manipulating myosin expression. Methods We used a knockin mouse model expressing the ACTA1 His40Tyr actin mutation found in human patients. We then performed in vivo intramuscular injections of recombinant adeno‐associated viral vectors harboring a myosin transgene known to facilitate muscle contraction. Results We observed that in the presence of the transgene, the intrinsic force‐generating capacity was restored and myofiber size was normal. Interpretation This demonstrates a direct link between disrupted attachment of myosin molecules to actin monomers and muscle fiber atrophy. These data also suggest that further therapeutic interventions should primarily target myosin dysfunction to alleviate the pathology of ACTA1‐related nemaline myopathy. Ann Neurol 2016;79:717–725 PMID:26891371

  15. Autism in the Son of a Woman with Mitochondrial Myopathy and Dysautonomia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Brown, Bradley D; Rais, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between autism spectrum disorders and mitochondrial dysfunction, including mitochondrial myopathies and other mitochondrial diseases, is an area of ongoing research. All autism spectrum disorders are known to be heritable, via genetic and/or epigenetic mechanisms, but specific modes of inheritance are not well characterized. Nevertheless, autism spectrum disorders have been linked to many specific genes associated with mitochondrial function, especially to genes involved in mitochondrial tRNA and the electron transport chain, both particularly vulnerable to point mutations, and clinical research also supports a relationship between the two pathologies. Although only a small minority of patients with autism have a mitochondrial disease, many patients with mitochondrial myopathies have autism spectrum disorder symptoms, and these symptoms may be the presenting symptoms, which presents a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The authors report the case of a 15-year-old boy with a history of autism spectrum disorder and neurocardiogenic syncope, admitted to the inpatient unit for self-injury, whose young mother, age 35, was discovered to suffer from mitochondrial myopathy, dysautonomia, neurocardiogenic syncope, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and other uncommon multisystem pathologies likely related to mitochondrial dysfunction. This case illustrates the need for a high index of suspicion for mitochondrial disease in patients with autism, as they have two orders of magnitude greater risk for such diseases than the general population. The literature shows that mitochondrial disease is underdiagnosed in autism spectrum disorder patients and should not be viewed as a "zebra" (i.e., an obscure diagnosis that is made when a more common explanation is more likely). PMID:26634179

  16. Clinical and Muscle Imaging Findings in 14 Mainland Chinese Patients with Oculopharyngodistal Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Juan; Liu, Jing; Xiao, Jiangxi; Du, Jing; Que, Chengli; Shi, Xin; Liang, Wei; Sun, Weiping; Zhang, Wei; Lv, He; Yuan, Yun; Wang, Zhaoxia

    2015-01-01

    Oculopharyngodistal myopathy (OPDM) is an extremely rare, adult-onset hereditary muscular disease characterized by progressive external ocular, pharyngeal, and distal muscle weakness and myopathological rimmed vacuole changes. The causative gene is currently unknown; therefore, diagnosis of OPDM is based on clinical and histopathological features and genetic exclusion of similar conditions. Moreover, variable manifestations of this disorder are reported in terms of muscle involvement and severity. We present the clinical profile and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes of lower limb muscles in 14 mainland Chinese patients with OPDM, emphasizing the role of muscle MRI in disease identification and differential diagnosis. The patients came from 10 unrelated families and presented with progressive external ocular, laryngopharyngeal, facial, distal limb muscle weakness that had been present since early adulthood. Serum creatine kinase was mildly to moderately elevated. Electromyography revealed myogenic changes with inconsistent myotonic discharge. The respiratory function test revealed subclinical respiratory muscle involvement. Myopathological findings showed rimmed vacuoles with varying degrees of muscular dystrophic changes. All known genes responsible for distal and myofibrillar myopathies, vacuolar myopathies, and muscular dystrophies were excluded by PCR or targeted next-generation sequencing. Muscle MRI revealed that the distal lower legs had more severe fatty replacement than the thigh muscles. Serious involvement of the soleus and long head of the biceps femoris was observed in all patients, whereas the popliteus, gracilis and short head of biceps femoris were almost completely spared, even in advanced stages. Not only does our study widen the spectrum of OPDM in China, but it also demonstrates that OPDM has a specific pattern of muscle involvement that may provide valuable information for its differential diagnosis and show further evidence supporting

  17. The genetic basis of pectoralis major myopathies in modern broiler chicken lines

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Richard A.; Watson, Kellie A.; Bilgili, S. F.; Avendano, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    This is the first report providing estimates of the genetic basis of breast muscle myopathies (BMM) and their relationship with growth and yield in broiler chickens. In addition, this paper addresses the hypothesis that genetic selection for increase breast yield has contributed to the onset of BMM. Data were analyzed from ongoing recording of BMM within the Aviagen breeding program. This study focused on three BMM: deep pectoral myopathy (DPM; binary trait), white striping (WS; 4 categories) and wooden breast (WB; 3 categories). Data from two purebred commercial broiler lines (A and B) were utilized providing greater than 40,000 meat quality records per line. The difference in selection history between these two lines has resulted in contrasting breast yield (BY): 29% for Line A and 21% for Line B. Data were analyzed to estimate genetic parameters using a multivariate animal model including six traits: body weight (BW), processing body weight (PW), BY, DPM, WB, and WS, in addition to the appropriate fixed effects and permanent environmental effect of the dam. Results indicate similar patterns of heritability and genetic correlations for the two lines. Heritabilities (h2) of BW, PW and BY ranged from 0.271–0.418; for DPM and WB h2 <0.1; and for WS h2 ≤0.338. Genetic correlations between the BMM and BW, PW, or BY were ≤0.132 in Line A and ≤0.248 in Line B. This paper demonstrates the polygenic nature of these traits and the low genetic relationships with BW, PW, and BY, which facilitates genetic improvement across all traits in a balanced breeding program. It also highlights the importance of understanding the environmental and/or management factors that contribute greater than 65% of the variance in the incidence of white striping of breast muscle and more than 90% of the variance of the incidence of wooden breast and deep pectoral myopathy in broiler chickens. PMID:26476091

  18. Phospholamban overexpression in mice causes a centronuclear myopathy-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Fajardo, Val A.; Bombardier, Eric; McMillan, Elliott; Tran, Khanh; Wadsworth, Brennan J.; Gamu, Daniel; Hopf, Andrew; Vigna, Chris; Smith, Ian C.; Bellissimo, Catherine; Michel, Robin N.; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.; Quadrilatero, Joe; Tupling, A. Russell

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Centronuclear myopathy (CNM) is a congenital myopathy that is histopathologically characterized by centrally located nuclei, central aggregation of oxidative activity, and type I fiber predominance and hypotrophy. Here, we obtained commercially available mice overexpressing phospholamban (PlnOE), a well-known inhibitor of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCAs), in their slow-twitch type I skeletal muscle fibers to determine the effects on SERCA function. As expected with a 6- to 7-fold overexpression of phospholamban, SERCA dysfunction was evident in PlnOE muscles, with marked reductions in rates of Ca2+ uptake, maximal ATPase activity and the apparent affinity of SERCA for Ca2+. However, our most significant discovery was that the soleus and gluteus minimus muscles from the PlnOE mice displayed overt signs of myopathy: they histopathologically resembled human CNM, with centrally located nuclei, central aggregation of oxidative activity, type I fiber predominance and hypotrophy, progressive fibrosis and muscle weakness. This phenotype is associated with significant upregulation of muscle sarcolipin and dynamin 2, increased Ca2+-activated proteolysis, oxidative stress and protein nitrosylation. Moreover, in our assessment of muscle biopsies from three human CNM patients, we found a significant 53% reduction in SERCA activity and increases in both total and monomeric PLN content compared with five healthy subjects, thereby justifying future studies with more CNM patients. Altogether, our results suggest that the commercially available PlnOE mouse phenotypically resembles human CNM and could be used as a model to test potential mechanisms and therapeutic strategies. To date, there is no cure for CNM and our results suggest that targeting SERCA function, which has already been shown to be an effective therapeutic target for murine muscular dystrophy and human cardiomyopathy, might represent a novel therapeutic strategy to combat CNM. PMID:26035394

  19. Exome sequencing reveals DNAJB6 mutations in dominantly-inherited myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Matthew B.; Sommerville, R. Brian; Allred, Peggy; Bell, Shaughn; Ma, Duanduan; Cooper, Paul; Lopate, Glenn; Pestronk, Alan; Weihl, Conrad C.; Baloh, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To identify the causative gene in an autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) with skeletal muscle vacuoles. Methods Exome sequencing was used to identify candidate mutations in the studied pedigree. Genome-wide linkage was then used to narrow the list of candidates to a single disease-associated mutation. Additional pedigrees with dominant or sporadic myopathy were screened for mutations in the same gene (DNAJB6) using exome sequencing. Skeletal muscle from affected patients was evaluated with histochemistry and immunohistochemical stains for dystrophy-related proteins, SMI-31, TDP43, and DNAJB6. Results Exome analysis in three affected individuals from a family with dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy and vacuolar pathology identified novel candidate mutations in 22 genes. Linkage analysis excluded all variants except a Phe93Leu mutation in the G/F domain of the DNAJB6 gene, which resides within the LGMD 1E locus at 7q36. Analysis of exome sequencing data from other pedigrees with dominant myopathy identified a second G/F domain mutation (Pro96Arg) in DNAJB6. Affected muscle showed mild dystrophic changes, vacuoles, and abnormal aggregation of proteins, including TDP-43 and DNAJB6 itself. Interpretation Mutations within the G/F domain of DNAJB6 are a novel cause of dominantly-inherited myopathy. DNAJB6 is a member of the HSP40/DNAJ family of molecular co-chaperones tasked with protecting client proteins from irreversible aggregation during protein synthesis or during times of cellular stress. The abnormal accumulation of several proteins in patient muscle, including DNAJB6 itself, suggest that DNAJB6 function is compromised by the identified G/F domain mutations. PMID:22334415

  20. The Sick and the Weak: Neuropathies/Myopathies in the Critically Ill

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, O.; Reid, M. B.; Van den Berghe, G.; Vanhorebeek, I.; Hermans, G.; Rich, M. M.; Larsson, L.

    2015-01-01

    Critical illness polyneuropathies (CIP) and myopathies (CIM) are common complications of critical illness. Several weakness syndromes are summarized under the term intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW). We propose a classification of different ICUAW forms (CIM, CIP, sepsis-induced, steroid-denervation myopathy) and pathophysiological mechanisms from clinical and animal model data. Triggers include sepsis, mechanical ventilation, muscle unloading, steroid treatment, or denervation. Some ICUAW forms require stringent diagnostic features; CIM is marked by membrane hypoexcitability, severe atrophy, preferential myosin loss, ultrastructural alterations, and inadequate autophagy activation while myopathies in pure sepsis do not reproduce marked myosin loss. Reduced membrane excitability results from depolarization and ion channel dysfunction. Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to energy-dependent processes. Ubiquitin proteasome and calpain activation trigger muscle proteolysis and atrophy while protein synthesis is impaired. Myosin loss is more pronounced than actin loss in CIM. Protein quality control is altered by inadequate autophagy. Ca2+ dysregulation is present through altered Ca2+ homeostasis. We highlight clinical hallmarks, trigger factors, and potential mechanisms from human studies and animal models that allow separation of risk factors that may trigger distinct mechanisms contributing to weakness. During critical illness, altered inflammatory (cytokines) and metabolic pathways deteriorate muscle function. ICUAW prevention/treatment is limited, e.g., tight glycemic control, delaying nutrition, and early mobilization. Future challenges include identification of primary/secondary events during the time course of critical illness, the interplay between membrane excitability, bioenergetic failure and differential proteolysis, and finding new therapeutic targets by help of tailored animal models. PMID:26133937

  1. Congenital Generalized Lipodystrophy, Type 4 (CGL4) Associated with Myopathy due to Novel PTRF Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Shastry, Savitha; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Dirik, Eray; Turkmen, Mehmet; Agarwal, Anil K.; Garg, Abhimanyu

    2010-01-01

    Congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by near total absence of body fat since birth with predisposition to insulin resistance, diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis. Three CGL loci, AGPAT2, BSCL2 and CAV1 have been identified previously. Recently, mutations in polymerase I and transcript release factor (PTRF) were reported in five Japanese patients presenting with myopathy and CGL (CGL4). We report on novel PTRF mutations and detailed phenotype of two male and three female patients with CGL4 belonging to two pedigrees of Mexican origin (CGL7100 and CGL178) and one pedigree of Turkish origin (CGL180). All patients had near total loss of body fat and congenital myopathy manifesting as weakness, percussion-induced muscle mounding and high serum creatine kinase levels. Four of them had hypertriglyceridemia. Three of them had atlantoaxial instability. Two patients belonging to CGL178 pedigree required surgery for pyloric stenosis in the first month of life. None of them had prolonged QT interval on electrocardiography but both siblings belonging to CGL7100 had exercise-induced arrhythmias. Three of them had mild acanthosis nigricans but had normal glucose tolerance. Two of them had hepatic steatosis. All patients had novel null mutations in PTRF gene. In conclusion, mutations in PTRF result in a novel phenotype that includes generalized lipodystrophy with mild metabolic derangements, myopathy, cardiac arrhythmias, atlantoaxial instability and pyloric stenosis. It is unclear how mutations in PTRF, which plays an essential role in formation of caveolae, affect a wide variety of tissues resulting in a variable phenotype. PMID:20684003

  2. Rapid diagnosis of hypoglycin A intoxication in atypical myopathy of horses.

    PubMed

    Sander, Johannes; Cavalleri, Jessika-M V; Terhardt, Michael; Bochnia, Mandy; Zeyner, Annette; Zuraw, Aleksandra; Sander, Stefanie; Peter, Michael; Janzen, Nils

    2016-03-01

    Hypoglycin A (2-amino-3-(2-methylidenecyclopropyl)propanoic acid) is the plant toxin shown to cause atypical myopathy in horses. It is converted in vivo to methylenecyclopropyl acetic acid, which is transformed to a coenzyme A ester that subsequently blocks beta oxidation of fatty acids. Methylenecyclopropyl acetic acid is also conjugated with carnitine and glycine. Acute atypical myopathy may be diagnosed by quantifying the conjugates of methylenecyclopropyl acetic acid plus a selection of acyl conjugates in urine and serum. We describe a new mass spectrometric method for sample volumes of <0.5 mL. Samples were extracted with methanol containing 5 different internal standards. Extracts were analyzed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry focusing on 11 metabolites. The total preparation time for a series of 20 samples was 100 min. Instrument run time was 14 min per sample. For the quantification of carnitine and glycine conjugates of methylenecyclopropyl acetic acid in urine, the coefficients of variation for intraday quantification were 2.9% and 3.0%, respectively. The respective values for interday were 9.3% and 8.0%. Methylenecyclopropyl acetyl carnitine was detected as high as 1.18 µmol/L in serum (median: 0.46 µmol/L) and 1.98 mmol/mol creatinine in urine (median: 0.79 mmol/mol creatinine) of diseased horses, while the glycine derivative accumulated up to 1.97 mmol/mol creatinine in urine but was undetectable in most serum samples. In serum samples from horses with atypical myopathy, the intraday coefficients of variation for C4-C8 carnitines and glycines were ≤4.5%. Measured concentrations exceeded those in healthy horses by ~10 to 1,400 times. PMID:26965229

  3. Mutations of the human interferon alpha-2b (hIFNα-2b) gene in cancer patients receiving radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Saman; Chaudhry, Muhammad Nawaz; Mahmood, Nasir

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to find out the impact of ionizing radiations on the hIFNα-2b gene of radiotherapy treated cancer patients. The gene hIFNα-2b synthesizes a protein which is an important anticancerous and antiviral protein. The cancer patients (breast, lung, thyroid, oral and prostate) who were undergoing a radiotherapy treatment were selected. A molecular analysis was performed for DNA isolation and gene amplification through PCR, to identify gene mutations. Further, by bioinformatics tools we concluded that how mutations identified in gene sequences have led to the alterations in the hINFα-2b protein in radiotherapy receiving cancer patients. The 32% mutations in the hINFα-2b gene were identified and all were frameshift mutations. Radiotherapy can impact the immune system and cancer patients may modulate their immunity. Understaning the mechanisms of radiotherapy-elicited immune response may be helpful in the development of those therapeutic interventions that can enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy. PMID:26396921

  4. Juvenile Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathy in a Patient With Dyskeratosis Congenita Due to C16orf57 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Sara S; Cekic, Sukru

    2016-03-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is a rare inherited disorder characterized by reticular skin pigmentation, oral cavity leukoplakia, and nail dystrophy. A variety of noncutaneous (dental, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, neurological, genitourinary, ophthalmic, and skeletal) abnormalities also have been reported. An 8-year-old boy with DC developed juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy. C16orf57 mutation was identified as a genetic cause of DC. Treatment with methylprednisolone was initiated, followed with methotrexate, prednisolone, and high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin treatment. This is the first report on a patient with juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy and DC. PMID:26535771

  5. Myasthenic decrement and myasthenic myopathy. A study on the effects of thymectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Pinelli, P; Arrigo, A; Moglia, A

    1975-01-01

    Motor unit action potentials, M responses to repetitive nerve stimulation, and anticholinesterase tests were investigated in 12 myasthenic patients before and after thymectomy. In six of them the endarterial acetylcholine test was also carried out. Responsiveness to ACTH or to prednisone treatment was evaluated before and after thymectomy. The typical myasthenic presynaptic disorders were improved by thymectomy, while signs of myasthenic myopathy (according to Rowland's definition) were apparently increased. This process of 'functional myopathophanerosis' is discussed and explained in terms of a previous presynaptic disorder blocking the voluntary recruitment threshold of those motor units which are most affected at both presynaptic and postsynaptic level. Images PMID:168321

  6. Myasthenic decrement and myasthenic myopathy. A study on the effects of thymectomy.

    PubMed

    Pinelli, P; Arrigo, A; Moglia, A

    1975-06-01

    Motor unit action potentials, M responses to repetitive nerve stimulation, and anticholinesterase tests were investigated in 12 myasthenic patients before and after thymectomy. In six of them the endarterial acetylcholine test was also carried out. Responsiveness to ACTH or to prednisone treatment was evaluated before and after thymectomy. The typical myasthenic presynaptic disorders were improved by thymectomy, while signs of myasthenic myopathy (according to Rowland's definition) were apparently increased. This process of 'functional myopathophanerosis' is discussed and explained in terms of a previous presynaptic disorder blocking the voluntary recruitment threshold of those motor units which are most affected at both presynaptic and postsynaptic level. PMID:168321

  7. Suspected myofibrillar myopathy in Arabian horses with a history of exertional rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    VALBERG, S. J.; McKENZIE, E. C.; EYRICH, L. V.; SHIVERS, J.; BARNES, N. E.; FINNO, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Reasons for performing study Although exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER) is common in Arabian horses, there are no dedicated studies describing histopathological characteristics of muscle from Arabian horses with ER. Objectives To prospectively identify distinctive histopathological features of muscle from Arabian endurance horses with a history of ER (pro-ER) and to retrospectively determine their prevalence in archived samples from Arabian horses with exertional myopathies (retro-ER). Study design Prospective and retrospective histopathological description. Methods Middle gluteal muscle biopsies obtained from Arabian controls (n = 14), pro-ER (n = 13) as well as archived retro-ER (n = 25) muscle samples previously classified with type 2 polysaccharide storage myopathy (15/25), recurrent exertional rhabdomyolysis (7/25) and no pathology (3/25) were scored for histopathology and immunohistochemical staining of cytoskeletal proteins. Glutaraldehyde-fixed samples (2 pro-ER, one control) were processed for electron microscopy. Pro-ER and retro-ER groups were compared with controls using Mann–Whitney U and Fisher's exact tests. Results Centrally located myonuclei in mature myofibres were found in significantly more (P<0.05) pro-ER (12/13) and retro-ER (21/25) horses than controls (4/14). Degenerating myofibres were not evident in any biopsies. Retro-ER horses had amylase-resistant polysaccharide (6/25, P<0.05) and higher scores for cytoplasmic glycogen, rimmed vacuoles and rod-like bodies. A few control horses (3/14) and significantly (P<0.05) more pro-ER (12/13) and retro-ER (18/25) horses had disrupted myofibrillar alignment and large desmin and αβ-crystallin positive cytoplasmic aggregates. Prominent Z-disc degeneration and focal myofibrillar disruption with regional accumulation of β-glycogen particles were identified on electron microscopy of the 2 pro-ER samples. Conclusions In a subset of Arabian horses with intermittent episodes of exertional

  8. Mitochondrial myopathy, cardiomyopathy, and pontine signal changes in an adult patient with isolated complex II deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sonam, Kothari; Bindu, Parayil Sankaran; Taly, Arun B; Nalini, Atchayaram; Govindaraju, Chikkanna; Aravinda, Hanumanthapura R; Khan, Nahid Akthar; Thangaraj, Kumaraswamy; Gayathri, Narayanappa

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial disorders resulting from an isolated deficiency of complex II of the respiratory chain is rarely reported. The phenotypic spectrum associated with these disorders is heterogeneous and still expanding. This report describes a patient who presented with myopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, and pontine signal changes on magnetic resonance imaging. Muscle biopsy showed total absence of succinate dehydrogenase on enzyme histochemistry, negative succinate dehydrogenase subunit A (SDHA) activity on immunohistochemistry, and ultrastructural evidence of mitochondrial aggregates of varying sizes confirming the diagnosis of complex II deficiency. A unique phenotype with complex II deficiency is reported. PMID:25415517

  9. Extensive germinal mosaicism in a family with X linked myotubular myopathy simulates genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, M C; Guiraud-Chaumeil, C; Laporte, J; Manouvrier-Hanu, S; Mandel, J L

    1998-01-01

    A family with two male cousins affected with myotubular myopathy (MTM) was referred to us for genetic counselling. Linkage analysis appeared to exclude the Xq28 region. As a gene for X linked MTM was recently identified in Xq28, we screened the obligatory carrier mothers for mutation. We found a 4 bp deletion in exon 4 of the MTM1 gene, which originated from the grandfather of the affected children and which was transmitted to three daughters. This illustrates the importance of mutation detection to avoid pitfalls in linkage analysis that may be caused by such cases of germinal mosaicism. Images PMID:9541111

  10. Hyperpigmentation and atrophy in folds as cutaneous manifestation in a case of mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed

    Campuzano-García, Andrés Eduardo; Rodríguez-Arámbula, Adriana; Torres-Alvarez, Bertha; Castanedo-Cázares, Juan Pablo

    2015-05-01

    Mitochondrial myopathies are inborn metabolism defect diseases manifested by symptoms reflecting failure of the final step in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Clinical expression of these conditions can vary widely, but typically includes organ systems with a high energy demand, such as striated muscle, myocardium, and nervous and liver tissues. In contrast, cutaneous manifestations are rare and are non-specific, most commonly presenting as pigmentation disorders. In this case report, we present a case of Alpers syndrome accompanied by hyperpigmentation and atrophy in skin folds. PMID:26295861

  11. Structural stability of W2B5 under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, N. R. Sanjay; Shekar, N. V. Chandra; Sahu, P. Ch.

    2015-05-01

    High-pressure structural stability studies have been carried out on tungsten boride W2B5 up to maximum pressure of 36 GPa using a Mao-Bell diamond-anvil cell at beamline BR-12 of the ELETTRA synchrotron facility (λ = 0.68881 Å). The hexagonal phase (S.G:P63/mmc) of W2B5 is stable up to the maximum pressure studied. The bulk modulus is estimated to be ~347 GPa using the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state. The variation of lattice parameters and bond lengths B-B and W-B have been studied and the c-axis is seen to be marginally more compressible than the a-axis.

  12. 40 CFR Table 2b to Subpart E of... - Reactivity Factors for Aliphatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures 2B Table 2B to Subpart E of Part 59 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures Bin Averageboiling point * (degrees F) Criteria Reactivityfactor 1 80-205 Alkanes... + Dry Point) / 2 (b) Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvents...

  13. 40 CFR Table 2b to Subpart E of... - Reactivity Factors for Aliphatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures 2B Table 2B to Subpart E of Part 59 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures Bin Averageboiling point * (degrees F) Criteria Reactivityfactor 1 80-205 Alkanes... + Dry Point) / 2 (b) Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvents...

  14. Flux Line Lattice Structure in YNi2B2C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano-Furukawa, Hazuki; Ohira-Kawamura, Seiko; Tsukagoshi, Hitomi; Kobayashi, Chiyako; Nagata, Takashi; Sakiyama, Naoki; Yoshizawa, Hideki; Yethiraj, Mohana; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Takeya, Hiroyuki

    2008-10-01

    Recently Nakai et al. reported a theoretical H-T phase diagram of flux line lattice (FLL) structure in which successive transitions from a triangular, a square (\\squarev), a triangular and another square (\\squareg) occur with increasing a magnetic field. Here \\squarev and \\squareg indicate the FLL structures reflecting anisotropies in the Fermi velocity and the superconducting gap, respectively. In the case of YNi2B2C, \\squarev and \\squareg should rotate by 45°. The low field transition from triangular to \\squarev is observed in RENi2B2C (\\textit{RE}=Er, Tm, Lu, and Y). However, there is no experimental evidence for the appearance of \\squareg phase so far. We studied the FLL structure of YNi2B2C in the higher field region by small-angle neutron scattering. Our results show that a large area of the H-T phase diagram is occupied by \\squarev phase and there is no evidence for the appearance of \\squareg lattice.

  15. Agent-based services for B2B electronic commerce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Elizabeth; Ivezic, Nenad; Rhodes, Tom; Peng, Yun

    2000-12-01

    The potential of agent-based systems has not been realized yet, in part, because of the lack of understanding of how the agent technology supports industrial needs and emerging standards. The area of business-to-business electronic commerce (b2b e-commerce) is one of the most rapidly developing sectors of industry with huge impact on manufacturing practices. In this paper, we investigate the current state of agent technology and the feasibility of applying agent-based computing to b2b e-commerce in the circuit board manufacturing sector. We identify critical tasks and opportunities in the b2b e-commerce area where agent-based services can best be deployed. We describe an implemented agent-based prototype system to facilitate the bidding process for printed circuit board manufacturing and assembly. These activities are taking place within the Internet Commerce for Manufacturing (ICM) project, the NIST- sponsored project working with industry to create an environment where small manufacturers of mechanical and electronic components may participate competitively in virtual enterprises that manufacture printed circuit assemblies.

  16. Association of genetic variants of GRIN2B with autism.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yongcheng; Chen, Jingjing; Guo, Hui; Ou, Jianjun; Peng, Yu; Liu, Qiong; Shen, Yidong; Shi, Lijuan; Liu, Yalan; Xiong, Zhimin; Zhu, Tengfei; Luo, Sanchuan; Hu, Zhengmao; Zhao, Jingping; Xia, Kun

    2015-01-01

    Autism (MIM 209850) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by social communication impairments and restricted repetitive behaviors. It has a high heritability, although much remains unclear. To evaluate genetic variants of GRIN2B in autism etiology, we performed a system association study of common and rare variants of GRIN2B and autism in cohorts from a Chinese population, involving a total sample of 1,945 subjects. Meta-analysis of a triad family cohort and a case-control cohort identified significant associations of multiple common variants and autism risk (Pmin = 1.73 × 10(-4)). Significantly, the haplotype involved with the top common variants also showed significant association (P = 1.78 × 10(-6)). Sanger sequencing of 275 probands from a triad cohort identified several variants in coding regions, including four common variants and seven rare variants. Two of the common coding variants were located in the autism-related linkage disequilibrium (LD) block, and both were significantly associated with autism (P < 9 × 10(-3)) using an independent control cohort. Burden analysis and case-only analysis of rare coding variants identified by Sanger sequencing did not find this association. Our study for the first time reveals that common variants and related haplotypes of GRIN2B are associated with autism risk. PMID:25656819

  17. Regulation of Human UGT2B15 and UGT2B17 by miR-376c in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Wijayakumara, Dhilushi D; Hu, Dong Gui; Meech, Robyn; McKinnon, Ross A; Mackenzie, Peter I

    2015-09-01

    Given the prime importance of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 2B15 and UGT2B17 in inactivating testosterone and dihydrotestosterone, control of their expression and activity in the prostate is essential for androgen signaling homeostasis in this organ. Although several studies provide evidence of transcriptional control of UGT2B15 and UGT2B17 by various endogenous and exogenous compounds, potential post-transcriptional regulation of UGT2B15 and UGT2B17 by microRNAs (miRs) in prostate cancer cells has not been examined. The present study identified a putative miR-376c target site in the 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs) of both UGT2B15 and UGT2B17 mRNAs. In accordance with the possibility that this miRNA negatively regulates UGT2B15 and UGT2B17 expression, there is an inverse correlation in the levels of miR-376c and UGT2B15/UGT2B17 mRNAs in prostate cancer cell lines versus normal prostate tissue. In LNCaP cells, transfection of miR-376c mimics inhibited the glucuronidations of testosterone, 4-methylumbelliferone (a substrate of UGT2B15), and androsterone (a substrate of UGT2B17). miR-376c reduced both UGT2B15 and UGT2B17 mRNA and protein levels and the activity of luciferase reporters containing UGT2B15 or UGT2B17 3'-UTRs. This microRNA-mediated repression was significantly abrogated by mutating the miR-376c binding site in the 3'-UTRs of both UGTs. Collectively, these data indicate that the expression of UGT2B15 and UGT2B17 is negatively regulated by the binding of miR-376c to the 3'-UTRs of UGT2B15 and UGT2B17 in prostate cancer cells. This represents the first evidence for post-transcriptional regulation of UGT2B15 and UGT2B17 by miRNAs in prostate cancer cells and may have importance in regulating androgen receptor signaling. PMID:26163549

  18. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF CYP2B6 SUBSTRATES

    PubMed Central

    Ekins, Sean; Iyer, Manisha; Krasowski, Matthew D.; Kharasch, Evan D.

    2008-01-01

    CYP2B6 has not been as fully characterized at the molecular level as other members of the human cytochrome P450 family. As more widely used in vitro probes for characterizing the involvement of this enzyme in the metabolism of xenobiotics have become available, the number of molecules identified as CYP2B6 substrates has increased. In this study we have analyzed the available kinetic data generated by multiple laboratories with human recombinant expressed CYP2B6 and along with calculated molecular properties derived from the ChemSpider database, we have determined the molecular features that appear to be important for CYP2B6 substrates. In addition we have applied 2D and 3D QSAR methods to generate predictive pharmacophore and 2D models. For 28 molecules with Km data, the molecular weight (mean ± SD) is 253.78±74.03, ACD/logP is 2.68±1.51, LogDpH 5.5 is 1.51±1.43, LogDpH 7.4 is 2.02±1.25, hydrogen bond donor (HBD) count is 0.57 ±0.57, hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA) count is 2.57±1.37, rotatable bonds is 3.50±2.71 and total polar surface area (TPSA) is 27.63±19.42. A second set of 15 molecules without Km data possessed similar mean molecular property values. These properties are comparable to those of a set of 21 molecules used in a previous pharmacophore modeling study (Ekins et al., J Pharmacol Exp Ther 288 (1), 21–29, 1999). Only the LogD and HBD values were statistically significantly different between these different datasets. We have shown that CYP2B6 substrates are generally small hydrophobic molecules that are frequently central nervous system active, which may be important for drug discovery research. PMID:18537573

  19. The ISS 2B PVTCS Ammonia Leak: An Operational History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vareha, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, the Photovoltaic Thermal Control System (PVTCS) for the International Space Station's 2B power channel began leaking ammonia at a rate of approximately 1.5lbm/year (out of a starting approximately 53lbm system ammonia mass). Initially, the operations strategy was "feed the leak," a strategy successfully put into action via Extra Vehicular Activity during the STS-134 mission. During this mission the system was topped off with ammonia piped over from a separate thermal control system. This recharge was to have allowed for continued power channel operation into 2014 or 2015, at which point another EVA would have been required. Without these periodic EVAs to refill the 2B coolant system, the channel would eventually leak enough fluid as to risk pump cavitation and system failure, resulting in the loss of the 2B power channel - the most critical of the Space Station's 8 power channels. In mid-2012, the leak rate increased to approximately 5lbm/year. Once discovered, an EVA was planned and executed within a 5 week timeframe to drastically alter the architecture of the PVTCS via connection to a dormant thermal control system not intended to be utilized as anything other than spare components. The purpose of this rerouting of the TCS was to increase system volume and to isolate the photovoltaic radiator, thought to be the likely leak source. This EVA was successfully executed on November 1st, 2012 and left the 2B PVTCS in a configuration where the system was now being adequately cooled via a totally different radiator than what the system was designed to utilize. Unfortunately, data monitoring over the next several months showed that the isolated radiator was not leaking, and the system itself continued to leak steadily until May 9th, 2013. It was on this day that the ISS crew noticed the visible presence of ammonia crystals escaping from the 2B channel's truss segment, signifying a rapid acceleration of the leak from 5lbm/year to 5lbm/day. Within 48 hours of the

  20. Muscle spindles exhibit core lesions and extensive degeneration of intrafusal fibers in the Ryr1{sup I4895T/wt} mouse model of core myopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Zvaritch, Elena; MacLennan, David H.

    2015-04-24

    Muscle spindles from the hind limb muscles of adult Ryr1{sup I4895T/wt} (IT/+) mice exhibit severe structural abnormalities. Up to 85% of the spindles are separated from skeletal muscle fascicles by a thick layer of connective tissue. Many intrafusal fibers exhibit degeneration, with Z-line streaming, compaction and collapse of myofibrillar bundles, mitochondrial clumping, nuclear shrinkage and pyknosis. The lesions resemble cores observed in the extrafusal myofibers of this animal model and of core myopathy patients. Spindle abnormalities precede those in extrafusal fibers, indicating that they are a primary pathological feature in this murine Ryr1-related core myopathy. Muscle spindle involvement, if confirmed for human core myopathy patients, would provide an explanation for an array of devastating clinical features characteristic of these diseases and provide novel insights into the pathology of RYR1-related myopathies. - Highlights: • Muscle spindles exhibit structural abnormalities in a mouse model of core myopathy. • Myofibrillar collapse and mitochondrial clumping is observed in intrafusal fibers. • Myofibrillar degeneration follows a pattern similar to core formation in extrafusal myofibers. • Muscle spindle abnormalities are a part of the pathological phenotype in the mouse model of core myopathy. • Direct involvement of muscle spindles in the pathology of human RYR1-related myopathies is proposed.

  1. Intensive care unit acquired weakness in children: Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kukreti, Vinay; Shamim, Mosharraf; Khilnani, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Intensive care unit acquired weakness (ICUAW) is a common occurrence in patients who are critically ill. It is most often due to critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP) or to critical illness myopathy (CIM). ICUAW is increasingly being recognized partly as a consequence of improved survival in patients with severe sepsis and multi-organ failure, partly related to commonly used agents such as steroids and muscle relaxants. There have been occasional reports of CIP and CIM in children, but little is known about their prevalence or clinical impact in the pediatric population. This review summarizes the current understanding of pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of CIP and CIM in general with special reference to published literature in the pediatric age group. Subjects and Methods: Studies were identified through MedLine and Embase using relevant MeSH and Key words. Both adult and pediatric studies were included. Results: ICUAW in children is a poorly described entity with unknown incidence, etiology and unclear long-term prognosis. Conclusions: Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy is relatively rare, but clinically significant sequelae of multifactorial origin affecting morbidity, length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay and possibly mortality in critically ill children admitted to pediatric ICU. PMID:24678152

  2. Exome sequencing reveals a nebulin nonsense mutation in a dog model of nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jacquelyn M; Cox, Melissa L; Huska, Jonathan; Li, Frank; Gaitero, Luis; Guo, Ling T; Casal, Margaret L; Granzier, Henk L; Shelton, G Diane; Clark, Leigh Anne

    2016-10-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a congenital muscle disorder associated with muscle weakness, hypotonia, and rod bodies in the skeletal muscle fibers. Mutations in 10 genes have been implicated in human NM, but spontaneous cases in dogs have not been genetically characterized. We identified a novel recessive myopathy in a family of line-bred American bulldogs (ABDs); rod bodies in muscle biopsies established this as NM. Using SNP profiles from the nuclear family, we evaluated inheritance patterns at candidate loci and prioritized TNNT1 and NEB for further investigation. Whole exome sequencing of the dam, two affected littermates, and an unaffected littermate revealed a nonsense mutation in NEB (g.52734272 C>A, S8042X). Whole tissue gel electrophoresis and western blots confirmed a lack of full-length NEB in affected tissues, suggesting nonsense-mediated decay. The pathogenic variant was absent from 120 dogs of 24 other breeds and 100 unrelated ABDs, suggesting that it occurred recently and may be private to the family. This study presents the first molecularly characterized large animal model of NM, which could provide new opportunities for therapeutic approaches. PMID:27215641

  3. Identification and Mechanistic Investigation of Drug-Drug Interactions Associated with Myopathy – A Translational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xu; Quinney, Sara K.; Wang, Zhiping; Zhang, Pengyue; Duke, Jon; Desta, Zeruesenay; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S.; Flockhart, David A.; Li, L

    2015-01-01

    Myopathy is a group of muscle diseases that can be induced or exacerbated by drug-drug interactions (DDIs). We sought to identify clinically important myopathic DDIs and elucidate their underlying mechanisms. Five DDIs were found to increase the risk of myopathy based on analysis of observational data from the Indiana Network of Patient Care. Loratadine interacted with simvastatin (relative risk 95% CI = [1.39, 2.06]), alprazolam (1.50, 2.31), ropinirole (2.06, 5.00) and omeprazole (1.15, 1.38). Promethazine interacted with tegaserod (1.94, 4.64). In vitro investigation showed that these DDIs were unlikely to result from inhibition of drug metabolism by CYP450 enzymes or from inhibition of hepatic uptake via the membrane transporter OATP1B1/1B3. However, we did observe in vitro synergistic myotoxicity of simvastatin and desloratadine, suggesting a role in loratadine-simvastatin interaction. This interaction was epidemiologically confirmed (odds ratio 95% CI = [2.02, 3.65]) using the data from the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System. PMID:25975815

  4. A statin-dependent QTL for GATM expression is associated with statin-induced myopathy.

    PubMed

    Mangravite, Lara M; Engelhardt, Barbara E; Medina, Marisa W; Smith, Joshua D; Brown, Christopher D; Chasman, Daniel I; Mecham, Brigham H; Howie, Bryan; Shim, Heejung; Naidoo, Devesh; Feng, QiPing; Rieder, Mark J; Chen, Yii-Der I; Rotter, Jerome I; Ridker, Paul M; Hopewell, Jemma C; Parish, Sarah; Armitage, Jane; Collins, Rory; Wilke, Russell A; Nickerson, Deborah A; Stephens, Matthew; Krauss, Ronald M

    2013-10-17

    Statins are prescribed widely to lower plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) concentrations and cardiovascular disease risk and have been shown to have beneficial effects in a broad range of patients. However, statins are associated with an increased risk, albeit small, of clinical myopathy and type 2 diabetes. Despite evidence for substantial genetic influence on LDL concentrations, pharmacogenomic trials have failed to identify genetic variations with large effects on either statin efficacy or toxicity, and have produced little information regarding mechanisms that modulate statin response. Here we identify a downstream target of statin treatment by screening for the effects of in vitro statin exposure on genetic associations with gene expression levels in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from 480 participants of a clinical trial of simvastatin treatment. This analysis identified six expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) that interacted with simvastatin exposure, including rs9806699, a cis-eQTL for the gene glycine amidinotransferase (GATM) that encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in creatine synthesis. We found this locus to be associated with incidence of statin-induced myotoxicity in two separate populations (meta-analysis odds ratio = 0.60). Furthermore, we found that GATM knockdown in hepatocyte-derived cell lines attenuated transcriptional response to sterol depletion, demonstrating that GATM may act as a functional link between statin-mediated lowering of cholesterol and susceptibility to statin-induced myopathy. PMID:23995691

  5. Identification and Mechanistic Investigation of Drug-Drug Interactions Associated With Myopathy: A Translational Approach.

    PubMed

    Han, X; Quinney, S K; Wang, Z; Zhang, P; Duke, J; Desta, Z; Elmendorf, J S; Flockhart, D A; Li, L

    2015-09-01

    Myopathy is a group of muscle diseases that can be induced or exacerbated by drug-drug interactions (DDIs). We sought to identify clinically important myopathic DDIs and elucidate their underlying mechanisms. Five DDIs were found to increase the risk of myopathy based on analysis of observational data from the Indiana Network of Patient Care. Loratadine interacted with simvastatin (relative risk 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.39, 2.06]), alprazolam (1.50, 2.31), ropinirole (2.06, 5.00), and omeprazole (1.15, 1.38). Promethazine interacted with tegaserod (1.94, 4.64). In vitro investigation showed that these DDIs were unlikely to result from inhibition of drug metabolism by CYP450 enzymes or from inhibition of hepatic uptake via the membrane transporter OATP1B1/1B3. However, we did observe in vitro synergistic myotoxicity of simvastatin and desloratadine, suggesting a role in loratadine-simvastatin interaction. This interaction was epidemiologically confirmed (odds ratio 95% CI = [2.02, 3.65]) using the data from the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System. PMID:25975815

  6. Intragenic deletion of TRIM32 in compound heterozygotes with sarcotubular myopathy/LGMD2H.

    PubMed

    Borg, Kristian; Stucka, Rolf; Locke, Matthew; Melin, Eva; Ahlberg, Gabrielle; Klutzny, Ursula; Hagen, Maja von der; Huebner, Angela; Lochmüller, Hanns; Wrogemann, Klaus; Thornell, Lars-Eric; Blake, Derek J; Schoser, Benedikt

    2009-09-01

    In 2005 the commonality of sarcotubular myopathy (STM) and limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2H (LGMD2H) was demonstrated, as both are caused by the p D487N missense mutation in TRIM32 originally found in the Manitoba Hutterite population. Recently, three novel homozygous TRIM32 mutations have been described in LGMD patients. Here we describe a three generation Swedish family clinically presenting with limb girdle muscular weakness and histological features of a microvacuolar myopathy. The two index patients were compound heterozygotes for a frameshift mutation in TRIM32 (c.1560delC ) and a 30 kb intragenic deletion, encompassing parts of intron 1 and the entire exon 2 of TRIM32. In these patients, no full-length or truncated TRIM32 could be detected. Interestingly, heterozygous family members carrying only one mutation showed mild clinical symptoms and vacuolar changes in muscle. In our family, the phenotype encompasses additionally a mild demyelinating polyneuropathic syndrome. Thus STM and LGMD2H are the result of loss of function mutations that can be either deletions or missense mutations. PMID:19492423

  7. Validity of a Neurological Scoring System for Canine X-Linked Myotubular Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Meisner, Allison; Mack, David; Goddard, Melissa; Coulter, Ian T.; Grange, Robert; Childers, Martin K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A simple clinical neurological test was developed to evaluate response to gene therapy in a preclinical canine model of X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM). This devastating congenital myopathy is caused by mutation in the myotubularin (MTM1) gene. Clinical signs include muscle weakness, early respiratory failure, and ventilator dependence. A spontaneously occurring canine model has a similar clinical picture and histological abnormalities on muscle biopsy compared with patients. We developed a neuromuscular assessment score, graded on a scale from 10 (normal) to 1 (unable to maintain sternal recumbency). We hypothesize that this neurological assessment score correlates with genotype and established measures of disease severity and is reliable when performed by an independent observer. At 17 weeks of age, there was strong correlation between neurological assessment scores and established methods of severity testing. The neurological severity score correctly differentiated between XLMTM and wild-type dogs with good interobserver reliability, on the basis of strong agreement between neurological scores assigned by independent observers. Together, these data indicate that the neurological scoring system developed for this canine congenital neuromuscular disorder is reliable and valid. This scoring system may be helpful in evaluating response to therapy in preclinical testing in this disease model, such as response to gene therapy. PMID:26086764

  8. Scanning for Therapeutic Targets within the Cytokine Network of Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    De Paepe, Boel; Zschüntzsch, Jana

    2015-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) constitute a heterogeneous group of chronic disorders that include dermatomyositis (DM), polymyositis (PM), sporadic inclusion body myositis (IBM) and necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (NAM). They represent distinct pathological entities that, most often, share predominant inflammation in muscle tissue. Many of the immunopathogenic processes behind the IIM remain poorly understood, but the crucial role of cytokines as essential regulators of the intramuscular build-up of inflammation is undisputed. This review describes the extensive cytokine network within IIM muscle, characterized by strong expression of Tumor Necrosis Factors (TNFα, LTβ, BAFF), Interferons (IFNα/β/γ), Interleukins (IL-1/6/12/15/18/23) and Chemokines (CXCL9/10/11/13, CCL2/3/4/8/19/21). Current therapeutic strategies and the exploration of potential disease modifying agents based on manipulation of the cytokine network are provided. Reported responses to anti-TNFα treatment in IIM are conflicting and new onset DM/PM has been described after administration of anti-TNFα agents to treat other diseases, pointing to the complex effects of TNFα neutralization. Treatment with anti-IFNα has been shown to suppress the IFN type 1 gene signature in DM/PM patients and improve muscle strength. Beneficial effects of anti-IL-1 and anti-IL-6 therapy have also been reported. Cytokine profiling in IIM aids the development of therapeutic strategies and provides approaches to subtype patients for treatment outcome prediction. PMID:26270565

  9. Leiomodin-3 dysfunction results in thin filament disorganization and nemaline myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Michaela; Sandaradura, Sarah A.; Dowling, James J.; Kostyukova, Alla S.; Moroz, Natalia; Quinlan, Kate G.; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Todd, Emily J.; Ceyhan-Birsoy, Ozge; Gokhin, David S.; Maluenda, Jérome; Lek, Monkol; Nolent, Flora; Pappas, Christopher T.; Novak, Stefanie M.; D’Amico, Adele; Malfatti, Edoardo; Thomas, Brett P.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gupta, Namrata; Daly, Mark J.; Ilkovski, Biljana; Houweling, Peter J.; Davidson, Ann E.; Swanson, Lindsay C.; Brownstein, Catherine A.; Gupta, Vandana A.; Medne, Livija; Shannon, Patrick; Martin, Nicole; Bick, David P.; Flisberg, Anders; Holmberg, Eva; Van den Bergh, Peter; Lapunzina, Pablo; Waddell, Leigh B.; Sloboda, Darcée D.; Bertini, Enrico; Chitayat, David; Telfer, William R.; Laquerrière, Annie; Gregorio, Carol C.; Ottenheijm, Coen A.C.; Bönnemann, Carsten G.; Pelin, Katarina; Beggs, Alan H.; Hayashi, Yukiko K.; Romero, Norma B.; Laing, Nigel G.; Nishino, Ichizo; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Melki, Judith; Fowler, Velia M.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; North, Kathryn N.; Clarke, Nigel F.

    2014-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a genetic muscle disorder characterized by muscle dysfunction and electron-dense protein accumulations (nemaline bodies) in myofibers. Pathogenic mutations have been described in 9 genes to date, but the genetic basis remains unknown in many cases. Here, using an approach that combined whole-exome sequencing (WES) and Sanger sequencing, we identified homozygous or compound heterozygous variants in LMOD3 in 21 patients from 14 families with severe, usually lethal, NM. LMOD3 encodes leiomodin-3 (LMOD3), a 65-kDa protein expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscle. LMOD3 was expressed from early stages of muscle differentiation; localized to actin thin filaments, with enrichment near the pointed ends; and had strong actin filament-nucleating activity. Loss of LMOD3 in patient muscle resulted in shortening and disorganization of thin filaments. Knockdown of lmod3 in zebrafish replicated NM-associated functional and pathological phenotypes. Together, these findings indicate that mutations in the gene encoding LMOD3 underlie congenital myopathy and demonstrate that LMOD3 is essential for the organization of sarcomeric thin filaments in skeletal muscle. PMID:25250574

  10. Validity of a Neurological Scoring System for Canine X-Linked Myotubular Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Jessica M; Meisner, Allison; Mack, David; Goddard, Melissa; Coulter, Ian T; Grange, Robert; Childers, Martin K

    2015-06-01

    A simple clinical neurological test was developed to evaluate response to gene therapy in a preclinical canine model of X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM). This devastating congenital myopathy is caused by mutation in the myotubularin (MTM1) gene. Clinical signs include muscle weakness, early respiratory failure, and ventilator dependence. A spontaneously occurring canine model has a similar clinical picture and histological abnormalities on muscle biopsy compared with patients. We developed a neuromuscular assessment score, graded on a scale from 10 (normal) to 1 (unable to maintain sternal recumbency). We hypothesize that this neurological assessment score correlates with genotype and established measures of disease severity and is reliable when performed by an independent observer. At 17 weeks of age, there was strong correlation between neurological assessment scores and established methods of severity testing. The neurological severity score correctly differentiated between XLMTM and wild-type dogs with good interobserver reliability, on the basis of strong agreement between neurological scores assigned by independent observers. Together, these data indicate that the neurological scoring system developed for this canine congenital neuromuscular disorder is reliable and valid. This scoring system may be helpful in evaluating response to therapy in preclinical testing in this disease model, such as response to gene therapy. PMID:26086764

  11. A distinct mitochondrial myopathy, lactic acidosis and sideroblastic anemia (MLASA) phenotype associates with YARS2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Shahni, Rojeen; Wedatilake, Yehani; Cleary, Maureen A; Lindley, Keith J; Sibson, Keith R; Rahman, Shamima

    2013-09-01

    Nuclear-encoded disorders of mitochondrial translation are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Genetic causes include defects of mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and factors required for initiation, elongation and termination of protein synthesis as well as ribosome recycling. We report on a new case of myopathy, lactic acidosis and sideroblastic anemia (MLASA) syndrome caused by defective mitochondrial tyrosyl aminoacylation. The patient presented at 1 year with anemia initially attributed to iron deficiency. Bone marrow aspirate at 5 years revealed ringed sideroblasts but transfusion dependency did not occur until 11 years. Other clinical features included lactic acidosis, poor weight gain, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and severe myopathy leading to respiratory failure necessitating ventilatory support. Long-range PCR excluded mitochondrial DNA rearrangements. Clinical diagnosis of MLASA prompted direct sequence analysis of the YARS2 gene encoding the mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, which revealed homozygosity for a known pathogenic mutation, c.156C>G;p.F52L. Comparison with four previously reported cases demonstrated remarkable clinical homogeneity. First line investigation of MLASA should include direct sequence analysis of YARS2 and PUS1 (encoding a tRNA modification factor) rather than muscle biopsy. Early genetic diagnosis is essential for counseling and to facilitate appropriate supportive therapy. Reasons for segregation of specific clinical phenotypes with particular mitochondrial aminoacyl tRNA-synthetase defects remain unknown. PMID:23918765

  12. A distinct mitochondrial myopathy, lactic acidosis and sideroblastic anemia (MLASA) phenotype associates with YARS2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Shahni, Rojeen; Wedatilake, Yehani; Cleary, Maureen A; Lindley, Keith J; Sibson, Keith R; Rahman, Shamima

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear-encoded disorders of mitochondrial translation are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Genetic causes include defects of mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and factors required for initiation, elongation and termination of protein synthesis as well as ribosome recycling. We report on a new case of myopathy, lactic acidosis and sideroblastic anemia (MLASA) syndrome caused by defective mitochondrial tyrosyl aminoacylation. The patient presented at 1 year with anemia initially attributed to iron deficiency. Bone marrow aspirate at 5 years revealed ringed sideroblasts but transfusion dependency did not occur until 11 years. Other clinical features included lactic acidosis, poor weight gain, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and severe myopathy leading to respiratory failure necessitating ventilatory support. Long-range PCR excluded mitochondrial DNA rearrangements. Clinical diagnosis of MLASA prompted direct sequence analysis of the YARS2 gene encoding the mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, which revealed homozygosity for a known pathogenic mutation, c.156C>G;p.F52L. Comparison with four previously reported cases demonstrated remarkable clinical homogeneity. First line investigation of MLASA should include direct sequence analysis of YARS2 and PUS1 (encoding a tRNA modification factor) rather than muscle biopsy. Early genetic diagnosis is essential for counseling and to facilitate appropriate supportive therapy. Reasons for segregation of specific clinical phenotypes with particular mitochondrial aminoacyl tRNA-synthetase defects remain unknown. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23918765

  13. HSPB7 interacts with dimerized FLNC and its absence results in progressive myopathy in skeletal muscles

    PubMed Central

    Juo, Liang-Yi; Liao, Wern-Chir; Shih, Yen-Ling; Yang, Bih-Ying; Liu, An-Bang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HSPB7 belongs to the small heat-shock protein (sHSP) family, and its expression is restricted to cardiac and skeletal muscles from embryonic stages to adulthood. Here, we found that skeletal-muscle-specific ablation of the HspB7 does not affect myogenesis during embryonic stages to postnatal day 1 (P1), but causes subsequent postnatal death owing to a respiration defect, with progressive myopathy phenotypes in the diaphragm. Deficiency of HSPB7 in the diaphragm muscle resulted in muscle fibrosis, sarcomere disarray and sarcolemma integrity loss. We identified dimerized filamin C (FLNC) as an interacting partner of HSPB7. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that the aggregation and mislocalization of FLNC occurred in the muscle of HspB7 mutant adult mice. Furthermore, the components of dystrophin glycoprotein complex, γ- and δ-sarcoglycan, but not dystrophin, were abnormally upregulated and mislocalized in HSPB7 mutant muscle. Collectively, our findings suggest that HSPB7 is essential for maintaining muscle integrity, which is achieved through its interaction with FLNC, in order to prevent the occurrence and progression of myopathy. PMID:26929074

  14. Leiomodin-3 dysfunction results in thin filament disorganization and nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Michaela; Sandaradura, Sarah A; Dowling, James J; Kostyukova, Alla S; Moroz, Natalia; Quinlan, Kate G; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Todd, Emily J; Ceyhan-Birsoy, Ozge; Gokhin, David S; Maluenda, Jérome; Lek, Monkol; Nolent, Flora; Pappas, Christopher T; Novak, Stefanie M; D'Amico, Adele; Malfatti, Edoardo; Thomas, Brett P; Gabriel, Stacey B; Gupta, Namrata; Daly, Mark J; Ilkovski, Biljana; Houweling, Peter J; Davidson, Ann E; Swanson, Lindsay C; Brownstein, Catherine A; Gupta, Vandana A; Medne, Livija; Shannon, Patrick; Martin, Nicole; Bick, David P; Flisberg, Anders; Holmberg, Eva; Van den Bergh, Peter; Lapunzina, Pablo; Waddell, Leigh B; Sloboda, Darcée D; Bertini, Enrico; Chitayat, David; Telfer, William R; Laquerrière, Annie; Gregorio, Carol C; Ottenheijm, Coen A C; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Pelin, Katarina; Beggs, Alan H; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Romero, Norma B; Laing, Nigel G; Nishino, Ichizo; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Melki, Judith; Fowler, Velia M; MacArthur, Daniel G; North, Kathryn N; Clarke, Nigel F

    2014-11-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a genetic muscle disorder characterized by muscle dysfunction and electron-dense protein accumulations (nemaline bodies) in myofibers. Pathogenic mutations have been described in 9 genes to date, but the genetic basis remains unknown in many cases. Here, using an approach that combined whole-exome sequencing (WES) and Sanger sequencing, we identified homozygous or compound heterozygous variants in LMOD3 in 21 patients from 14 families with severe, usually lethal, NM. LMOD3 encodes leiomodin-3 (LMOD3), a 65-kDa protein expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscle. LMOD3 was expressed from early stages of muscle differentiation; localized to actin thin filaments, with enrichment near the pointed ends; and had strong actin filament-nucleating activity. Loss of LMOD3 in patient muscle resulted in shortening and disorganization of thin filaments. Knockdown of lmod3 in zebrafish replicated NM-associated functional and pathological phenotypes. Together, these findings indicate that mutations in the gene encoding LMOD3 underlie congenital myopathy and demonstrate that LMOD3 is essential for the organization of sarcomeric thin filaments in skeletal muscle. PMID:25250574

  15. Effective treatment of mitochondrial myopathy by nicotinamide riboside, a vitamin B3.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nahid A; Auranen, Mari; Paetau, Ilse; Pirinen, Eija; Euro, Liliya; Forsström, Saara; Pasila, Lotta; Velagapudi, Vidya; Carroll, Christopher J; Auwerx, Johan; Suomalainen, Anu

    2014-06-01

    Nutrient availability is the major regulator of life and reproduction, and a complex cellular signaling network has evolved to adapt organisms to fasting. These sensor pathways monitor cellular energy metabolism, especially mitochondrial ATP production and NAD(+)/NADH ratio, as major signals for nutritional state. We hypothesized that these signals would be modified by mitochondrial respiratory chain disease, because of inefficient NADH utilization and ATP production. Oral administration of nicotinamide riboside (NR), a vitamin B3 and NAD(+) precursor, was previously shown to boost NAD(+) levels in mice and to induce mitochondrial biogenesis. Here, we treated mitochondrial myopathy mice with NR. This vitamin effectively delayed early- and late-stage disease progression, by robustly inducing mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue, preventing mitochondrial ultrastructure abnormalities and mtDNA deletion formation. NR further stimulated mitochondrial unfolded protein response, suggesting its protective role in mitochondrial disease. These results indicate that NR and strategies boosting NAD(+) levels are a promising treatment strategy for mitochondrial myopathy. PMID:24711540

  16. A statin-dependent QTL for GATM expression is associated with statin-induced myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mangravite, Lara M.; Engelhardt, Barbara E.; Medina, Marisa W.; Smith, Joshua D.; Brown, Christopher D.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Mecham, Brigham H.; Howie, Bryan; Shim, Heejung; Naidoo, Devesh; Feng, QiPing; Rieder, Mark J.; Chen, Y-D I.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Ridker, Paul M.; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Parish, Sarah; Armitage, Jane; Collins, Rory; Wilke, Russell A.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Stephens, Matthew; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2013-01-01

    Statins are widely prescribed for lowering plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) concentrations and cardiovascular disease risk1, but there is considerable interindividual variation in treatment response2,3 and increasing concern regarding the potential for adverse effects, including myopathy4 and type 2 diabetes5. Despite evidence for substantial genetic influence on LDL concentrations6, pharmacogenomic trials have failed to identify genetic variations with large effects on either statin efficacy7-9 or toxicity10, and have yielded little information regarding mechanisms that modulate statin response. Here we identify a downstream target of statin treatment by screening for the effects of in vitro statin exposure on genetic associations with gene expression levels in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from 480 participants of a clinical trial of simvastatin treatment7. This analysis identified six expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) that interacted with simvastatin exposure including rs9806699, a cis-eQTL for the gene GATM that encodes glycine amidinotransferase, a rate-limiting enzyme in creatine synthesis. We found this locus to be associated with incidence of statin-induced myotoxicity in two separate populations (meta-analysis odds ratio = 0.60, 95% confidence interval = 0.45-0.81, P=6.0×10-4). Furthermore, we found that GATM knockdown in hepatocyte-derived cell lines attenuated transcriptional response to sterol depletion, demonstrating that GATM may act as a functional link between statin-mediated cholesterol lowering and susceptibility to statin-induced myopathy. PMID:23995691

  17. Monoamine oxidase inhibition prevents mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in myoblasts from patients with collagen VI myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Sorato, E.; Menazza, S.; Zulian, A.; Sabatelli, P.; Gualandi, F.; Merlini, L.; Bonaldo, P.; Canton, M.; Bernardi, P.; Di Lisa, F.

    2014-01-01

    Although mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress have been proposed to play a crucial role in several types of muscular dystrophy (MD), whether a causal link between these two alterations exists remains an open question. We have documented that mitochondrial dysfunction through opening of the permeability transition pore plays a key role in myoblasts from patients as well as in mouse models of MD, and that oxidative stress caused by monoamine oxidases (MAO) is involved in myofiber damage. In the present study we have tested whether MAO-dependent oxidative stress is a causal determinant of mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in myoblasts from patients affected by collagen VI myopathies. We find that upon incubation with hydrogen peroxide or the MAO substrate tyramine myoblasts from patients upregulate MAO-B expression and display a significant rise in reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, with concomitant mitochondrial depolarization. MAO inhibition by pargyline significantly reduced both ROS accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunction, and normalized the increased incidence of apoptosis in myoblasts from patients. Thus, MAO-dependent oxidative stress is causally related to mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in myoblasts from patients affected by collagen VI myopathies, and inhibition of MAO should be explored as a potential treatment for these diseases. PMID:25017965

  18. Next generation sequencing on patients with LGMD and nonspecific myopathies: Findings associated with ANO5 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Savarese, Marco; Di Fruscio, Giuseppina; Tasca, Giorgio; Ruggiero, Lucia; Janssens, Sandra; De Bleecker, Jan; Delpech, Marc; Musumeci, Olimpia; Toscano, Antonio; Angelini, Corrado; Sacconi, Sabrina; Santoro, Lucio; Ricci, Enzo; Claes, Kathleen; Politano, Luisa; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    We studied 786 undiagnosed patients with LGMD or nonspecific myopathic features to investigate the role of ANO5 mutations in limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) and in nonspecific myopathies using the next generation sequencing (NGS) approach. In 160 LGMD patients, we first sequenced hotspot exons 5 and 20 and then sequenced the remaining part of the coding region. Another 626 patients, recruited using broader inclusion criteria, were directly analyzed by targeted NGS. By combining NGS and Sanger sequencing, we identified 33/786 (4%) patients carrying putative pathogenic changes in both alleles and 23 ANO5 heterozygotes (3%). The phenotypic spectrum is broader than expected, from hyperCKemia to myopathies, with lack of genotype/phenotype correlations. In particular, this is currently the largest screening of the ANO5 gene. The large number of heterozygotes for damaging mutations suggests that anoctaminopathies should be frequent and often nonpenetrant. We propose the multiple genetic testing by targeted NGS as a first step to analyze patients with nonspecific myopathic presentations. This represents a straightforward approach to overcome the difficulties of clinical heterogeneity of ANO5 patients, and to test, at the same time, many other genes involved in neuromuscular disorders. PMID:25891276

  19. Next generation sequencing on patients with LGMD and nonspecific myopathies: Findings associated with ANO5 mutations.

    PubMed

    Savarese, Marco; Di Fruscio, Giuseppina; Tasca, Giorgio; Ruggiero, Lucia; Janssens, Sandra; De Bleecker, Jan; Delpech, Marc; Musumeci, Olimpia; Toscano, Antonio; Angelini, Corrado; Sacconi, Sabrina; Santoro, Lucio; Ricci, Enzo; Claes, Kathleen; Politano, Luisa; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2015-07-01

    We studied 786 undiagnosed patients with LGMD or nonspecific myopathic features to investigate the role of ANO5 mutations in limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) and in nonspecific myopathies using the next generation sequencing (NGS) approach. In 160 LGMD patients, we first sequenced hotspot exons 5 and 20 and then sequenced the remaining part of the coding region. Another 626 patients, recruited using broader inclusion criteria, were directly analyzed by targeted NGS. By combining NGS and Sanger sequencing, we identified 33/786 (4%) patients carrying putative pathogenic changes in both alleles and 23 ANO5 heterozygotes (3%). The phenotypic spectrum is broader than expected, from hyperCKemia to myopathies, with lack of genotype/phenotype correlations. In particular, this is currently the largest screening of the ANO5 gene. The large number of heterozygotes for damaging mutations suggests that anoctaminopathies should be frequent and often nonpenetrant. We propose the multiple genetic testing by targeted NGS as a first step to analyze patients with nonspecific myopathic presentations. This represents a straightforward approach to overcome the difficulties of clinical heterogeneity of ANO5 patients, and to test, at the same time, many other genes involved in neuromuscular disorders. PMID:25891276

  20. Phenotypes of Myopathy-Related Beta-Tropomyosin Mutants in Human and Mouse Tissue Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Hussein, Saba; Rahl, Karin; Moslemi, Ali-Reza; Tajsharghi, Homa

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in TPM2 result in a variety of myopathies characterised by variable clinical and morphological features. We used human and mouse cultured cells to study the effects of β-TM mutants. The mutants induced a range of phenotypes in human myoblasts, which generally changed upon differentiation to myotubes. Human myotubes transfected with the E41K-β-TMEGFP mutant showed perinuclear aggregates. The G53ins-β-TMEGFP mutant tended to accumulate in myoblasts but was incorporated into filamentous structures of myotubes. The K49del-β-TMEGFP and E122K-β-TMEGFP mutants induced the formation of rod-like structures in human cells. The N202K-β-TMEGFP mutant failed to integrate into thin filaments and formed accumulations in myotubes. The accumulation of mutant β-TMEGFP in the perinuclear and peripheral areas of the cells was the striking feature in C2C12. We demonstrated that human tissue culture is a suitable system for studying the early stages of altered myofibrilogenesis and morphological changes linked to myopathy-related β-TM mutants. In addition, the histopathological phenotype associated with expression of the various mutant proteins depends on the cell type and varies with the maturation of the muscle cell. Further, the phenotype is a combinatorial effect of the specific amino acid change and the temporal expression of the mutant protein. PMID:24039757

  1. Transthyretin V122I amyloidosis with clinical and histological evidence of amyloid neuropathy and myopathy.

    PubMed

    Carr, A S; Pelayo-Negro, A L; Jaunmuktane, Z; Scalco, R S; Hutt, D; Evans, M R B; Heally, E; Brandner, S; Holton, J; Blake, J; Whelan, C J; Wechalekar, A D; Gillmore, J D; Hawkins, P N; Reilly, M M

    2015-06-01

    Hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR) is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disease manifesting with predominant peripheral and autonomic neuropathy; cardiomyopathy, or both. ATTR V122I is the most common variant associated with non-neuropathic familial amyloid cardiomyopathy. We present an unusual case of V122I amyloidosis with features of amyloid neuropathy and myopathy, supported by histological confirmation in both sites and diffuse tracer uptake on (99m)Tc-3,3-Diphosphono-1,2-Propanodicarboxylic acid (DPD) scintigraphy throughout skeletal and cardiac muscle. A 64 year old Jamaican man presented with cardiac failure. Cardiac MR revealed infiltrative cardiomyopathy; abdominal fat aspirate confirmed the presence of amyloid, and he was homozygous for the V122I variant of transthyretin. He also described general weakness and EMG demonstrated myopathic features. Sural nerve and vastus lateralis biopsy showed TTR amyloid. The patient is being treated with diflunisal, an oral TTR stabilising agent. Symptomatic myopathy and neuropathy with confirmation of tissue amyloid deposition has not previously been described. Extracardiac amyloidosis has implications for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25819286

  2. Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in a case of intranuclear rod myopathy without any prenatal sentinel event.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Koya; Nishino, Ichizo; Sugimoto, Mari; Kouwaki, Masanori; Koyama, Norihisa; Yokochi, Kenji

    2015-02-01

    Intranuclear rod myopathy (IRM), a variant of nemaline myopathy, is characterized by the presence of nemaline bodies in myonuclei. We report a case of IRM presenting with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). There were no prenatal complications caused by fetal brain injury. Although no nemaline bodies were observed in the cytoplasm, intranuclear rods were observed in some fibers under light and electron microscopy. Molecular analysis identified a heterozygous variant, c.449C>T (p.Thr150Ile), in ACTA1. On magnetic resonance imaging at 9days of age, injuries to the basal ganglia, thalamus, and brainstem consistent with perinatal HIE were seen. Respiratory insufficiency at birth was strongly suspected to be the cause of HIE. Our case highlights that a patient with a congenital neuromuscular disorder who presents with severe respiratory dysfunction requiring substantial resuscitative efforts at birth can be complicated by HIE without any prenatal sentinel event. Prenatal detection of neuromuscular disorders, careful management of delivery, and neonatal resuscitation and adequate respiratory management are important in preventing irreversible brain injury in these patients. PMID:24787270

  3. Microneedle Electrode Array for Electrical Impedance Myography to Characterize Neurogenic Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Li, Yi; Liu, Mingsheng; Cui, Liying; Yu, Yude

    2016-05-01

    Electrical impedance myography (EIM) is a noninvasive technique for neuromuscular assessment, wherein a low-intensity alternating current is applied to a muscle, and the consequent surface voltage patterns are evaluated. Commercial wet electrodes are most commonly used for EIM. However, these electrodes are not suitable for use on small muscles, as they do not effectively solve the problem of high electrode-skin contact impedance (ESCI) that negatively influences the quality of recorded biopotentials. To address this problem, we fabricated a novel microneedle electrode array (MEA) that consists of 124-µm-long microneedles. Compared to wet electrodes, the MEA could pierce through the outer skin surface in a painless and micro-invasive manner, and could thus effectively reduce ESCI. The MEA has excellent test-retest reproducibility, with intraclass correlation coefficients exceeding 0.920. When used in combination with EIM, the MEA differentiated the affected muscles from the unaffected muscles in patients with neurogenic myopathy, by using EIM parameters of reactance and phase (p = 0.023 and 0.008, respectively). Thus, the novel MEA is a practical and reusable device for EIM assessment in cases of neurogenic myopathy. However, further refinement of the electrode is needed to enhance the clinical application of the system. PMID:26407702

  4. Elevated risk of venous thromboembolic events in patients with inflammatory myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Michał; Królak-Nowak, Katarzyna; Sobolewska-Włodarczyk, Aleksandra; Fichna, Jakub; Włodarczyk, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a multifactorial disease manifesting as either deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. Its prevalence makes VTE a significant issue for both the individual – as a negative factor influencing the quality of life and prognosis – and the society due to economic burden. VTE is the third most common vascular disorder in Western countries, after myocardial infarction and stroke, making it a major cause of in-hospital mortality, responsible for 5%–10% of hospital deaths. Despite many studies conducted, only 50%–60% provoking factors have been identified, while the remaining 40%–50% have been classified as idiopathic or unprovoked. Chronic inflammatory disorders, with their underlying prothrombotic state, reveal an increased risk of VTE (six to eight times) compared with the general population. Among the inflammatory disorders, we can identify inflammatory myopathies – a group of rare, chronic diseases featuring weakness and inflammation of muscles with periods of exacerbation and remission; their main classes are polymyositis and dermatomyositis. The objective of this review is to emphasize the need of VTE prophylaxis in individuals with inflammatory myopathies in order to reduce morbidity and mortality rates among those patients and improve their quality of life and prognosis. PMID:27350751

  5. Skeletal Muscle Pathology in X-Linked Myotubular Myopathy: Review With Cross-Species Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Michael W.; Beggs, Alan H.; Buj-Bello, Ana; Childers, Martin K.; Dowling, James J.; James, Emma S.; Meng, Hui; Moore, Steven A.; Prasad, Suyash; Schoser, Benedikt; Sewry, Caroline A.

    2016-01-01

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) is a devastating, rare, congenital myopathy caused by mutations in the MTM1 gene, resulting in a lack of or dysfunction of the enzyme myotubularin. This leads to severe perinatal weakness and distinctive muscle pathology. It was originally thought that XLMTM was related to developmental arrest in myotube maturation; however, the generation and characterization of several animal models have significantly improved our understanding of clinical and pathological aspects of this disorder. Myotubularin is now known to participate in numerous cellular processes including endosomal trafficking, excitation-contraction coupling, cytoskeletal organization, neuromuscular junction structure, autophagy, and satellite cell proliferation and survival. The available vertebrate models of XLMTM, which vary in severity from complete absence to reduced functional levels of myotubularin, recapitulate features of the human disease to a variable extent. Understanding how pathological endpoints in animals with XLMTM translate to human patients will be essential to interpret preclinical treatment trials and translate therapies into human clinical studies. This review summarizes the published animal models of XLMTM, including those of zebrafish, mice, and dogs, with a focus on their pathological features as compared to those seen in human XLMTM patients. PMID:26823526

  6. Fever, Myositis, and Paralysis: Is This Inflammatory Myopathy or Neuroinvasive Disease?

    PubMed

    Kiran, Aneeta R; Lau, Richard A; Wu, Kim M; Wong, Andrew L; Clements, Philip J; Heinze, Emil R

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne RNA Flavivirus which emerged in North America in 1999. Most patients present with a febrile illness but a few develop WNV neuroinvasive disease. Myopathy is an uncommon manifestation. We describe a case of a 42-year-old male from Los Angeles who presented with 8 days of fever and muscle pain. Initial physical exam was normal except for 4/5 muscle strength testing in his extremity proximal muscles. Laboratory revealed a creatine kinase of 45,000 and a urinalysis with large blood but no red blood cells, suggesting rhabdomyolysis. The patient's condition declined despite aggressive supportive care and hydration, and on hospital day #6 he developed severe altered mental status and progressed to complete right arm paralysis and 2/5 muscle strength in bilateral legs. EMG/NCS showed sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy and the cerebrospinal fluid was positive for IgM and IgG WNV antibodies. The patient was diagnosed with WNV neuroinvasive disease, poliomyelitis (and encephalitis) type with myopathy/muscle involvement. He was treated supportively and his muscle and neurologic disease gradually improved. At 12-month follow-up his muscle enzymes had normalized and his weakness had improved to 5/5 strength in bilateral legs and 3/5 strength in the right arm. PMID:27119037

  7. Effective treatment of mitochondrial myopathy by nicotinamide riboside, a vitamin B3

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nahid A; Auranen, Mari; Paetau, Ilse; Pirinen, Eija; Euro, Liliya; Forsström, Saara; Pasila, Lotta; Velagapudi, Vidya; Carroll, Christopher J; Auwerx, Johan; Suomalainen, Anu

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient availability is the major regulator of life and reproduction, and a complex cellular signaling network has evolved to adapt organisms to fasting. These sensor pathways monitor cellular energy metabolism, especially mitochondrial ATP production and NAD+/NADH ratio, as major signals for nutritional state. We hypothesized that these signals would be modified by mitochondrial respiratory chain disease, because of inefficient NADH utilization and ATP production. Oral administration of nicotinamide riboside (NR), a vitamin B3 and NAD+ precursor, was previously shown to boost NAD+ levels in mice and to induce mitochondrial biogenesis. Here, we treated mitochondrial myopathy mice with NR. This vitamin effectively delayed early- and late-stage disease progression, by robustly inducing mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue, preventing mitochondrial ultrastructure abnormalities and mtDNA deletion formation. NR further stimulated mitochondrial unfolded protein response, suggesting its protective role in mitochondrial disease. These results indicate that NR and strategies boosting NAD+ levels are a promising treatment strategy for mitochondrial myopathy. PMID:24711540

  8. The Story of Equine Atypical Myopathy: A Review from the Beginning to a Possible End

    PubMed Central

    Votion, Dominique-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Atypical myopathy (AM) is a frequently fatal seasonal pasture myopathy that emerges in Europe. Outbreaks are of an acute and unexpected nature and practitioners should be prepared to handle these critically ill patients. This review retraces the history of AM and describes results of epidemiological investigations that were conducted to raise hypotheses concerning the etiology of this devastating disease as well as to be able to suggest potential preventive measures. Also, clinical studies have contributed to a better definition and recognition of the syndrome, whereas elucidation of the pathological process, identified as a multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD), was a great step forward improving medical management of AM and guiding the search for the etiological agent towards toxins that reproduce the identified defect. Treatment plans can be extrapolated from the described clinical signs and metabolic problems, but they remain limited to supportive care until the causative agent has been identified with certainty. Since treatment is still unsuccessful in the majority of cases, the main emphasis is currently still on prevention. This paper aims at being a practical support for equine clinicians dealing with AM and is based on discussion and comparison of the currently available scientific data. PMID:23762581

  9. Effects of exercise training on neurovascular control and skeletal myopathy in systolic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Middlekauff, Holly R.; Gomes-Santos, Igor L.; Antunes-Correa, Ligia M.

    2015-01-01

    Neurohormonal excitation and dyspnea are the hallmarks of heart failure (HF) and have long been associated with poor prognosis in HF patients. Sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and ventilatory equivalent of carbon dioxide (VE/VO2) are elevated in moderate HF patients and increased even further in severe HF patients. The increase in SNA in HF patients is present regardless of age, sex, and etiology of systolic dysfunction. Neurohormonal activation is the major mediator of the peripheral vasoconstriction characteristic of HF patients. In addition, reduction in peripheral blood flow increases muscle inflammation, oxidative stress, and protein degradation, which is the essence of the skeletal myopathy and exercise intolerance in HF. Here we discuss the beneficial effects of exercise training on resting SNA in patients with systolic HF and its central and peripheral mechanisms of control. Furthermore, we discuss the exercise-mediated improvement in peripheral vasoconstriction in patients with HF. We will also focus on the effects of exercise training on ventilatory responses. Finally, we review the effects of exercise training on features of the skeletal myopathy in HF. In summary, exercise training plays an important role in HF, working synergistically with pharmacological therapies to ameliorate these abnormalities in clinical practice. PMID:25681428

  10. Epigenetic changes as a common trigger of muscle weakness in congenital myopathies.

    PubMed

    Rokach, Ori; Sekulic-Jablanovic, Marijana; Voermans, Nicol; Wilmshurst, Jo; Pillay, Komala; Heytens, Luc; Zhou, Haiyan; Muntoni, Francesco; Gautel, Mathias; Nevo, Yoram; Mitrani-Rosenbaum, Stella; Attali, Ruben; Finotti, Alessia; Gambari, Roberto; Mosca, Barbara; Jungbluth, Heinz; Zorzato, Francesco; Treves, Susan

    2015-08-15

    Congenital myopathies are genetically and clinically heterogeneous conditions causing severe muscle weakness, and mutations in the ryanodine receptor gene (RYR1) represent the most frequent cause of these conditions. A common feature of diseases caused by recessive RYR1 mutations is a decrease of ryanodine receptor 1 protein content in muscle. The aim of the present investigation was to gain mechanistic insight into the causes of this reduced ryanodine receptor 1. We found that muscle biopsies of patients with recessive RYR1 mutations exhibit decreased expression of muscle-specific microRNAs, increased DNA methylation and increased expression of class II histone deacetylases. Transgenic mouse muscle fibres over-expressing HDAC-4/HDAC-5 exhibited decreased expression of RYR1 and of muscle-specific miRNAs, whereas acute knock-down of RYR1 in mouse muscle fibres by siRNA caused up-regulation of HDAC-4/HDAC-5. Intriguingly, increased class II HDAC expression and decreased ryanodine receptor protein and miRNAs expression were also observed in muscles of patients with nemaline myopathy, another congenital neuromuscular disorder. Our results indicate that a common pathophysiological pathway caused by epigenetic changes is activated in some forms of congenital neuromuscular disorders. PMID:26019235

  11. [A female infant of mitochondrial myopathy with findings of active necrosis and regeneration of muscle fibers].

    PubMed

    Nagaura, T; Sumi, K; Nonaka, I

    1990-04-01

    An 8 year-old female infant with the clinical and pathological characteristics of both progressive muscular dystrophy and mitochondrial myopathy was described. Her maternal cousin had clinical and pathological findings of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Since the patient had markedly elevated serum CK and calf muscle hypertrophy, her muscle was biopsied and she was diagnosed as having female DMD at the age of 5 years. She had generalized tonic-clonic convulsions and alternate hemiconvulsions for recent 4 years which brought her our hospital. On admission, she had mild generalized muscle atrophy and weakness predominantly in the proximal limbs. The lactate and pyruvate levels in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid were elevated, but with no metabolic acidosis. Serum CK was elevated to 4464 IU/L. Brain CT and MRI showed the expanding arachnoid cyst in the left middle fossa of cranium. In the biopsied left biceps crachii muscle, in addition to numerous ragged-red fibers, there were active muscular fiber necrosis and regeneration and interstitial fibrosis similar to those seen in progressive muscular dystrophy. Biochemically, no decrease or defect in the respiratory chain enzymes was detected. On electron microscopy, a large number of fibers contained aggregates of giant mitochondria with proliferated complicated cristae. Scattered throughout were necrotic muscle fibers filled with phagocytes and regenerating fibers. This patient had the diagnostic features of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy and progressive muscular dystrophy. We supposed that the patient provided very interesting evidences to study the relationship between mitochondrial myopathy and progressive muscular dystrophy. PMID:2387114

  12. Anisotropic elastic and vibrational properties of Ru2B3 and Os2B3: a first-principles investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozisik, Haci; Deligoz, Engin; Surucu, Gokhan; Bogaz Ozisik, Havva

    2016-07-01

    The structural, mechanical and lattice dynamical properties of Ru2B3 and Os2B3 have been investigated by using a first-principles method based on the density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation. The single crystal elastic constants are numerically estimated using strain–stress approach. The polycrystalline aggregate elastic parameters are calculated from the single elastic constants via the Voigt–Reuss–Hill approximations. Subsequently, the ductility and brittleness are characterized with the estimation from Pugh’s rule (B/G) and Cauchy pressure. Additionally, the Debye temperature is calculated from the average elastic wave velocity obtained from bulk and shear moduli. The calculated parameters are consistent with the previous experimental and theoretical data. These borides are both mechanically and dynamically stable in the considered structure.

  13. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis in primary hyperaldosteronism. Subclinical myopathy with atrophy of the type 2A muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Bautista, J; Gil-Neciga, E; Gil-Peralta, A

    1979-01-01

    A case of a patient suffering from primary hyperaldosteronism is reported. In this case the disease is manifested clinically by periodic paralysis and hypopotasemia without permanent myopathy. The morphological study of the muscle demonstrates selective atrophy of the type 2A fibers as the most pronounced alteration. These findings suggest a chronic myopathic process. PMID:546663

  14. Defective collagen VI α6 chain expression in the skeletal muscle of patients with collagen VI-related myopathies.

    PubMed

    Tagliavini, F; Pellegrini, C; Sardone, F; Squarzoni, S; Paulsson, M; Wagener, R; Gualandi, F; Trabanelli, C; Ferlini, A; Merlini, L; Santi, S; Maraldi, N M; Faldini, C; Sabatelli, P

    2014-09-01

    Collagen VI is a non-fibrillar collagen present in the extracellular matrix (ECM) as a complex polymer; the mainly expressed form is composed of α1, α2 and α3 chains; mutations in genes encoding these chains cause myopathies known as Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), Bethlem myopathy (BM) and myosclerosis myopathy (MM). The collagen VI α6 chain is a recently identified component of the ECM of the human skeletal muscle. Here we report that the α6 chain was dramatically reduced in skeletal muscle and muscle cell cultures of genetically characterized UCMD, BM and MM patients, independently of the clinical phenotype, the gene involved and the effect of the mutation on the expression of the "classical" α1α2α3 heterotrimer. By contrast, the collagen VI α6 chain was normally expressed or increased in the muscle of patients affected by other forms of muscular dystrophy, the overexpression matching with areas of increased fibrosis. In vitro treatment with TGF-β1, a potent collagen inducer, promoted the collagen VI α6 chain deposition in the ECM of normal muscle cells, whereas, in cultures derived from collagen VI-related myopathy patients, the collagen VI α6 chain failed to develop a network outside the cells and accumulated in the endoplasmic reticulum. The defect of the α6 chain points to a contribution to the pathogenesis of collagen VI-related disorders. PMID:24907562

  15. Defective collagen VI α6 chain expression in the skeletal muscle of patients with collagen VI-related myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Tagliavini, F.; Pellegrini, C.; Sardone, F.; Squarzoni, S.; Paulsson, M.; Wagener, R.; Gualandi, F.; Trabanelli, C.; Ferlini, A.; Merlini, L.; Santi, S.; Maraldi, N.M.; Faldini, C.; Sabatelli, P.

    2014-01-01

    Collagen VI is a non-fibrillar collagen present in the extracellular matrix (ECM) as a complex polymer; the mainly expressed form is composed of α1, α2 and α3 chains; mutations in genes encoding these chains cause myopathies known as Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), Bethlem myopathy (BM) and myosclerosis myopathy (MM). The collagen VI α6 chain is a recently identified component of the ECM of the human skeletal muscle. Here we report that the α6 chain was dramatically reduced in skeletal muscle and muscle cell cultures of genetically characterized UCMD, BM and MM patients, independently of the clinical phenotype, the gene involved and the effect of the mutation on the expression of the “classical” α1α2α3 heterotrimer. By contrast, the collagen VI α6 chain was normally expressed or increased in the muscle of patients affected by other forms of muscular dystrophy, the overexpression matching with areas of increased fibrosis. In vitro treatment with TGF-β1, a potent collagen inducer, promoted the collagen VI α6 chain deposition in the ECM of normal muscle cells, whereas, in cultures derived from collagen VI-related myopathy patients, the collagen VI α6 chain failed to develop a network outside the cells and accumulated in the endoplasmic reticulum. The defect of the α6 chain points to a contribution to the pathogenesis of collagen VI-related disorders. PMID:24907562

  16. Loss of FHL1 induces an age-dependent skeletal muscle myopathy associated with myofibrillar and intermyofibrillar disorganization in mice

    PubMed Central

    Domenighetti, Andrea A.; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Wu, Tongbin; Sheikh, Farah; Gokhin, David S.; Guo, Ling T.; Cui, Ziyou; Peter, Angela K.; Christodoulou, Danos C.; Parfenov, Michael G.; Gorham, Joshua M.; Li, Daniel Y.; Banerjee, Indroneal; Lai, Xianyin; Witzmann, Frank A.; Seidman, Christine E.; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Gomes, Aldrin V.; Shelton, G. Diane; Lieber, Richard L.; Chen, Ju

    2014-01-01

    Recent human genetic studies have provided evidences that sporadic or inherited missense mutations in four-and-a-half LIM domain protein 1 (FHL1), resulting in alterations in FHL1 protein expression, are associated with rare congenital myopathies, including reducing body myopathy and Emery–Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. However, it remains to be clarified whether mutations in FHL1 cause skeletal muscle remodeling owing to gain- or loss of FHL1 function. In this study, we used FHL1-null mice lacking global FHL1 expression to evaluate loss-of-function effects on skeletal muscle homeostasis. Histological and functional analyses of soleus, tibialis anterior and sternohyoideus muscles demonstrated that FHL1-null mice develop an age-dependent myopathy associated with myofibrillar and intermyofibrillar (mitochondrial and sarcoplasmic reticulum) disorganization, impaired muscle oxidative capacity and increased autophagic activity. A longitudinal study established decreased survival rates in FHL1-null mice, associated with age-dependent impairment of muscle contractile function and a significantly lower exercise capacity. Analysis of primary myoblasts isolated from FHL1-null muscles demonstrated early muscle fiber differentiation and maturation defects, which could be rescued by re-expression of the FHL1A isoform, highlighting that FHL1A is necessary for proper muscle fiber differentiation and maturation in vitro. Overall, our data show that loss of FHL1 function leads to myopathy in vivo and suggest that loss of function of FHL1 may be one of the mechanisms underlying muscle dystrophy in patients with FHL1 mutations. PMID:23975679

  17. MED23: a new Mediator of H2B monoubiquitylation.

    PubMed

    Streubel, Gundula; Bracken, Adrian P

    2015-12-01

    The Mediator multiprotein complex physically links transcription factors to RNA polymerase II and the basal transcription machinery. While the Mediator complex has been shown to be required for transcriptional initiation and elongation, the understanding of its interplay with histone modifying enzymes and post‐translational modifications remains elusive. In this issue of The EMBO Journal, Yao et al (2015) report that the MED23 subunit of the Mediator complex physically associates with the heterodimeric RNF20/40 E3‐ligase complex to facilitate the monoubiquitylation of histone H2B on gene bodies of actively transcribed genes. PMID:26438725

  18. Mutations in the N-terminal actin-binding domain of filamin C cause a distal myopathy.

    PubMed

    Duff, Rachael M; Tay, Valerie; Hackman, Peter; Ravenscroft, Gianina; McLean, Catriona; Kennedy, Paul; Steinbach, Alina; Schöffler, Wiebke; van der Ven, Peter F M; Fürst, Dieter O; Song, Jaeguen; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Penttilä, Sini; Raheem, Olayinka; Reardon, Katrina; Malandrini, Alessandro; Gambelli, Simona; Villanova, Marcello; Nowak, Kristen J; Williams, David R; Landers, John E; Brown, Robert H; Udd, Bjarne; Laing, Nigel G

    2011-06-10

    Linkage analysis of the dominant distal myopathy we previously identified in a large Australian family demonstrated one significant linkage region located on chromosome 7 and encompassing 18.6 Mbp and 151 genes. The strongest candidate gene was FLNC because filamin C, the encoded protein, is muscle-specific and associated with myofibrillar myopathy. Sequencing of FLNC cDNA identified a c.752T>C (p.Met251Thr) mutation in the N-terminal actin-binding domain (ABD); this mutation segregated with the disease and was absent in 200 controls. We identified an Italian family with the same phenotype and found a c.577G>A (p.Ala193Thr) filamin C ABD mutation that segregated with the disease. Filamin C ABD mutations have not been described, although filamin A and filamin B ABD mutations cause multiple musculoskeletal disorders. The distal myopathy phenotype and muscle pathology in the two families differ from myofibrillar myopathies caused by filamin C rod and dimerization domain mutations because of the distinct involvement of hand muscles and lack of pathological protein aggregation. Thus, like the position of FLNA and B mutations, the position of the FLNC mutation determines disease phenotype. The two filamin C ABD mutations increase actin-binding affinity in a manner similar to filamin A and filamin B ABD mutations. Cell-culture expression of the c.752T>C (p.Met251)Thr mutant filamin C ABD demonstrated reduced nuclear localization as did mutant filamin A and filamin B ABDs. Expression of both filamin C ABD mutants as full-length proteins induced increased aggregation of filamin. We conclude filamin C ABD mutations cause a recognizable distal myopathy, most likely through increased actin affinity, similar to the pathological mechanism of filamin A and filamin B ABD mutations. PMID:21620354

  19. Mutations in the N-terminal Actin-Binding Domain of Filamin C Cause a Distal Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Duff, Rachael M.; Tay, Valerie; Hackman, Peter; Ravenscroft, Gianina; McLean, Catriona; Kennedy, Paul; Steinbach, Alina; Schöffler, Wiebke; van der Ven, Peter F.M.; Fürst, Dieter O.; Song, Jaeguen; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Penttilä, Sini; Raheem, Olayinka; Reardon, Katrina; Malandrini, Alessandro; Gambelli, Simona; Villanova, Marcello; Nowak, Kristen J.; Williams, David R.; Landers, John E.; Brown, Robert H.; Udd, Bjarne; Laing, Nigel G.

    2011-01-01

    Linkage analysis of the dominant distal myopathy we previously identified in a large Australian family demonstrated one significant linkage region located on chromosome 7 and encompassing 18.6 Mbp and 151 genes. The strongest candidate gene was FLNC because filamin C, the encoded protein, is muscle-specific and associated with myofibrillar myopathy. Sequencing of FLNC cDNA identified a c.752T>C (p.Met251Thr) mutation in the N-terminal actin-binding domain (ABD); this mutation segregated with the disease and was absent in 200 controls. We identified an Italian family with the same phenotype and found a c.577G>A (p.Ala193Thr) filamin C ABD mutation that segregated with the disease. Filamin C ABD mutations have not been described, although filamin A and filamin B ABD mutations cause multiple musculoskeletal disorders. The distal myopathy phenotype and muscle pathology in the two families differ from myofibrillar myopathies caused by filamin C rod and dimerization domain mutations because of the distinct involvement of hand muscles and lack of pathological protein aggregation. Thus, like the position of FLNA and B mutations, the position of the FLNC mutation determines disease phenotype. The two filamin C ABD mutations increase actin-binding affinity in a manner similar to filamin A and filamin B ABD mutations. Cell-culture expression of the c.752T>C (p.Met251)Thr mutant filamin C ABD demonstrated reduced nuclear localization as did mutant filamin A and filamin B ABDs. Expression of both filamin C ABD mutants as full-length proteins induced increased aggregation of filamin. We conclude filamin C ABD mutations cause a recognizable distal myopathy, most likely through increased actin affinity, similar to the pathological mechanism of filamin A and filamin B ABD mutations. PMID:21620354

  20. Muscular myopathies other than myotonic dystrophy also associated with (CTG)n expansion at the DMPK locus

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Vasavi; Ahuja, Y. R.; Hasan, Qurratulain

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Assess triplet repeat expansion (CTG)n at the ‘dystrophia-myotonica protein kinase’ (DMPK) locus in muscular myopathies to elucidate its role in myopathic symptoms and enable genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis in families. Methods and Results: Individuals with symptoms of myopathy, hypotonia and controls selected randomly from the population were evaluated for triplet repeat expansion of (CTG)n repeats in the 3’untranslated region (UTR) of DMPK gene, the causative mutation in myotonic dystrophy (DM). DNA was isolated from peripheral blood of 40 individuals; they presented symptoms of muscle myopathy (n = 11), muscle hypotonia (n = 4), members of their families (n = 5) and control individuals from random population (n = 20). Molecular analysis of genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific for the DMPK gene encompassing the triplet repeat expansion, showed that all controls (n = 20) gave a 2.1 kb band indicating normal triplet repeat number. Three out of 11 cases (two clinically diagnosed DM and one muscular dystrophy) had an expansion of the (CTG)n repeat in the range of 1000-2100 repeats corresponding to the repeat number in cases of severe DM. Other two of these 11 cases, showed a mild expansion of ~ 66 repeats. Three samples, which included two cases of hypotonia and the father of a subject with muscular dystrophy, also gave a similar repeat expansion (~66 repeats). Conclusion: Results suggest a role of (CTG)n expansion at the DMPK locus in unexplained hypotonias and muscular myopathies other than DM. This calls for screening of the triplet repeat expansion at the DMPK locus in cases of idiopathic myopathies and hypotonia. PMID:23560000

  1. Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) Phase 2B Navigation Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scaperoth, Paige Thomas; Long, Anne; Carpenter, Russell

    2009-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) formation flying mission, which consists of four spacecraft flying in a tetrahedral formation, has challenging navigation requirements associated with determining and maintaining the relative separations required to meet the science requirements. The baseline navigation concept for MMS is for each spacecraft to independently estimate its position, velocity and clock states using GPS pseudorange data provided by the Goddard Space Flight Center-developed Navigator receiver and maneuver acceleration measurements provided by the spacecraft's attitude control subsystem. State estimation is performed onboard in real-time using the Goddard Enhanced Onboard Navigation System flight software, which is embedded in the Navigator receiver. The current concept of operations for formation maintenance consists of a sequence of two maintenance maneuvers that is performed every 2 weeks. Phase 2b of the MMS mission, in which the spacecraft are in 1.2 x 25 Earth radii orbits with nominal separations at apogee ranging from 30 km to 400 km, has the most challenging navigation requirements because, during this phase, GPS signal acquisition is restricted to less than one day of the 2.8-day orbit. This paper summarizes the results from high-fidelity simulations to determine if the MMS navigation requirements can be met between and immediately following the maintenance maneuver sequence in Phase 2b.

  2. CD4+ cells, macrophages, MHC-I and C5b-9 involve the pathogenesis of dysferlinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xi; Wang, Qian; Chen, Ting; Niu, Junwei; Ban, Rui; Liu, Jiexiao; Mao, Yanling; Pu, Chuanqiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Dysferlin is a sarcolemmal protein that plays an important role in membrane repair by regulating vesicle fusion with the sarcolemma. Mutations in the dysferlin gene (DYSF) lead to multiple clinical phenotypes, including Miyoshi myopathy (MM), limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD 2B), and distal myopathy with anterior tibial onset (DMAT). Patients with dysferlinopathy also show muscle inflammation, which often leads to a misdiagnosis as inflammatory myopathy. In this study, we examined and analyzed the dyferlinopathy-associated immunological features. Methods: Comparative immunohistochemical analysis of inflammatory cell infiltration, and muscle expression of MHC-I and C5b-9 was performed using muscle biopsy samples from 14 patients with dysferlinopathy, 7 patients with polymyositis, and 8 patients with either Duchenne muscular dystrophy or Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD). Results: Immunohistochemical analysis revealed positive staining for immune response-related CD4+ cells, macrophages, MHC-I and C5b-9 in dysferlinopathy, which is in a different mode of polymyositis and DMD/BMD. Conclusion: These results demonstrated the involvement of immune factors in the pathogenesis of dysferlinopathy. PMID:26045819

  3. Structure of human nucleosome containing the testis-specific histone variant TSH2B

    SciTech Connect

    Urahama, Takashi; Horikoshi, Naoki; Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2014-03-25

    The crystal structure of human nucleosome containing the testis-specific TSH2B variant has been determined. The TSH2B Ser85 residue does not interact with H4 in the nucleosome, and induces a local structural difference between TSH2B and H2B in nucleosomes. The human histone H2B variant TSH2B is highly expressed in testis and may function in the chromatin transition during spermatogenesis. In the present study, the crystal structure of the human testis-specific nucleosome containing TSH2B was determined at 2.8 Å resolution. A local structural difference between TSH2B and canonical H2B in nucleosomes was detected around the TSH2B-specific amino-acid residue Ser85. The TSH2B Ser85 residue does not interact with H4 in the nucleosome, but in the canonical nucleosome the H2B Asn84 residue (corresponding to the TSH2B Ser85 residue) forms water-mediated hydrogen bonds with the H4 Arg78 residue. In contrast, the other TSH2B-specific amino-acid residues did not induce any significant local structural changes in the TSH2B nucleosome. These findings may provide important information for understanding how testis-specific histone variants form nucleosomes during spermatogenesis.

  4. Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: a distinct regional myopathy with a novel molecular pathogenesis. FSH Consortium.

    PubMed

    Tawil, R; Figlewicz, D A; Griggs, R C; Weiffenbach, B

    1998-03-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most common inherited diseases of muscle. Until recently, FSHD had received little attention because of its relatively benign course and the perception that it represented a syndrome rather than a distinct myopathy. Research interest into this disease was reignited with the demonstration of linkage of FSHD to chromosome 4q35 in 1990. Clinical and molecular genetic research in FSHD has since helped define it as a distinct clinical entity, outlined its natural history, and defined the primary molecular defect associated with the condition. FSHD is now known to be associated with large deletions of variable size on chromosome 4q35. These deletions, however, do not appear to disrupt a transcribed gene but are thought to interfere with the expression of a gene or genes located proximal to the deletions. These observations complicate the search for the FSHD gene but also imply the presence of a potentially novel molecular pathogenesis. PMID:9506542

  5. Late Na+ current and protracted electrical recovery are critical determinants of the aging myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Signore, Sergio; Sorrentino, Andrea; Borghetti, Giulia; Cannata, Antonio; Meo, Marianna; Zhou, Yu; Kannappan, Ramaswamy; Pasqualini, Francesco; O'Malley, Heather; Sundman, Mark; Tsigkas, Nikolaos; Zhang, Eric; Arranto, Christian; Mangiaracina, Chiara; Isobe, Kazuya; Sena, Brena F.; Kim, Junghyun; Goichberg, Polina; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Isom, Lori L.; Leri, Annarosa; Anversa, Piero; Rota, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    The aging myopathy manifests itself with diastolic dysfunction and preserved ejection fraction. We raised the possibility that, in a mouse model of physiological aging, defects in electromechanical properties of cardiomyocytes are important determinants of the diastolic characteristics of the myocardium, independently from changes in structural composition of the muscle and collagen framework. Here we show that an increase in the late Na+ current (INaL) in aging cardiomyocytes prolongs the action potential (AP) and influences temporal kinetics of Ca2+ cycling and contractility. These alterations increase force development and passive tension. Inhibition of INaL shortens the AP and corrects dynamics of Ca2+ transient, cell contraction and relaxation. Similarly, repolarization and diastolic tension of the senescent myocardium are partly restored. Thus, INaL offers inotropic support, but negatively interferes with cellular and ventricular compliance, providing a new perspective of the biology of myocardial aging and the aetiology of the defective cardiac performance in the elderly. PMID:26541940

  6. Exertional myopathy in a grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) captured by leghold snare.

    PubMed

    Cattet, Marc; Stenhouse, Gordon; Bollinger, Trent

    2008-10-01

    We diagnosed exertional myopathy (EM) in a grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) that died approximately 10 days after capture by leghold snare in west-central Alberta, Canada, in June 2003. The diagnosis was based on history, post-capture movement data, gross necropsy, histopathology, and serum enzyme levels. We were unable to determine whether EM was the primary cause of death because autolysis precluded accurate evaluation of all tissues. Nevertheless, comparison of serum aspartate aminotransferase and creatine kinase concentrations and survival between the affected bear and other grizzly bears captured by leghold snare in the same research project suggests EM also occurred in other bears, but that it is not generally a cause of mortality. We propose, however, occurrence of nonfatal EM in grizzly bears after capture by leghold snare has potential implications for use of this capture method, including negative effects on wildlife welfare and research data. PMID:18957653

  7. Progressive chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in a child with central nervous system involvement and myopathy.

    PubMed

    Barisić, Nina; Horvath, Rita; Grković, Lana; Mihelcić, Dina; Luetić, Tomislav

    2006-12-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is a chronic disorder, manifesting with monophasic or relapsing course. Progressive course is rare in children. The article presents a boy with progressive generalized muscle weakness and areflexia since the age of two, developed after viral infection. Electromyoneurography showed severe neurogenic lesion, with myopathic pattern in proximal muscles. Increased serum ganglioside antibody titers (anti-GM1 and anti-GD1b) were registered. Sural nerve biopsy revealed demyelination and onion bulbs. Inflammatory perivascular CD3 positive infiltrates were present in muscle and nerve biopsies. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed cortical atrophy, hyperintensities of the white matter and gray matter hypointensities. Improvement occurred on intravenous immune globulins and methylprednisolone treatment. Demyelination might develop in central and peripheral nervous system associated with inflammatory myopathy in patients with progressive course of CIDP. PMID:17243577

  8. Aborted Sudden Cardiac Death and a Mother with Suspected Metabolic Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia; Keller, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Aborted sudden cardiac death (SCD) has not been reported as initial manifestation of cardiac involvement in metabolic myopathy (MM). A 20-year-old female with a previous history of three syncopes, hyperhidrosis, and recurrent tick bites experienced aborted SCD. Her mother presented with MM, and a history of pituitary adenoma, nephroptosis, arterial hypertension, depression, migraine, goiter, pancreatitis, osteoporosis, hyperhidrosis, multiple muscle ruptures, and hyperlipidemia. After a few days of disorientation and amnesia, the young female recovered completely. Clinical neurological examination was noticeable for partial ophthalmoparesis and mild hyperprolactinemia. She received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator, which did not discharge so far. Recurrent syncopes and aborted SCD may be the initial manifestation of MM with multiple organ involvement. The family history is important in cases with aborted SCD to guide the diagnostic work-up. Phenotypic heterogeneity between the family members may be an indicator of MM. PMID:25187745

  9. Autosomal dominant nemaline myopathy caused by a novel alpha-tropomyosin 3 mutation.

    PubMed

    Kiphuth, I C; Krause, S; Huttner, H B; Dekomien, G; Struffert, T; Schröder, R

    2010-04-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a genetically and clinically heterogenous muscle disorder, which is myopathologically characterized by nemaline bodies. Mutations in six genes have been reported to cause NM: Nebulin (NEB Pelin 1999), alpha-skeletal muscle actin (ACTA1 Nowak 1999), alpha-slow tropomyosin (TPM3 Laing 1995), beta-tropomyosin (TPM2 Donner 2002), slow troponin T (TNNT1 Johnston 2000) and cofilin 2 (CFL2 Agrawal 2007). The majority of cases are due to mutation in NEB and ACTA1. We report on the clinical, myopathological and muscle MRI findings in a German family with autosomal dominant NM due to a novel pathogenic TPM3 mutation (p.Ala156Thr). PMID:20012312

  10. Biomarkers and Autoantibodies of Interstitial Lung Disease with Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Yoshifuji, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Various autoantibodies are seen in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. Among myositis-specific antibodies, anti-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and anti-melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (MDA5) antibodies are associated with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Anti-MDA5 antibodies are associated with dermatomyositis (DM) or clinically amyopathic DM complicated with rapidly progressive ILD. In anti-MDA5-positive patients, a random ground-glass attenuation pattern is a characteristic finding of ILD in chest high-resolution computed tomography. Conversely, anti-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase antibodies are not associated with rapidly progressive ILD but with chronic ILD. DM or clinically amyopathic DM patients with anti-MDA5, and characteristic high-resolution computed tomography findings are highly likely to have devastating ILD and need aggressive treatment. PMID:27081322

  11. Guillain-Barré syndrome mimics primary biliary cirrhosis-related myopathy.

    PubMed

    Munday, William R; DiCapua, Daniel; Vortmeyer, Alexander; Gomez, Jose Luis

    2015-04-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an immune-mediated disorder characterized by acute polyneuropathy, ascending paralysis and post infectious polyneuritis. Two-thirds of patients present with a history of recent upper respiratory tract or gastrointestinal infection. The clinical history, neurologic examination and laboratory assessment allow for a straightforward diagnosis in the majority of cases. However, primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is known to cause clinically detectable muscular weakness. It is therefore critical to differentiate between PBC-associated muscular weakness and GBS-induced paralysis. Here, we report a patient with a longstanding history of PBC who developed progressive weakness and respiratory failure due to GBS, which clinically mimicked PBC myopathy. This is the first reported association between GBS and PBC. PMID:26634144

  12. Mitochondrial Myopathy in Follow-up of a Patient With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Galán, Fernando; de Lavera, Isabel; Cotán, David; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Symptoms of mitochondrial diseases and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) frequently overlap and can easily be mistaken. Methods. We report the case of a patient diagnosed with CFS and during follow-up was finally diagnosed with mitochondrial myopathy by histochemical study of muscle biopsy, spectrophotometric analysis of the complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and genetic studies. Results. The results revealed 3% fiber-ragged blue and a severe deficiency of complexes I and IV and several mtDNA variants. Mother, sisters, and nephews showed similar symptoms, which strongly suggests a possible maternal inheritance. The patient and his family responded to treatment with high doses of riboflavin and thiamine with a remarkable and sustained fatigue and muscle symptoms improvement. Conclusions. This case illustrates that initial symptoms of mitochondrial disease in adults can easily be mistaken with CFS, and in these patients a regular reassessment and monitoring of symptoms is recommended to reconfirm or change the diagnosis. PMID:26904705

  13. Ascending paresis as presentation of an unusual association between necrotizing autoimmune myopathy and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    García-Reynoso, Marco Julio; Veramendi-Espinoza, Liz Eliana; Ruiz-Garcia, Henry Jeison

    2014-01-01

    A 45 year-old man went to the emergency room due to disease duration of 15 days of insidious onset and progressive course. It began with symmetrical weakness and pain in feet and ankles that extends upward to the knees. Later, this progressed to paraparesis with Creatine phosphokinase levels of 44,270 U/L and respiratory failure that required mechanical ventilation. Electromyography and muscle biopsy of quadriceps were made. The patient responded to corticotherapy in pulses and supporting management. The presentation of ascending paresis suggested the diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome. However, the degree of muscle involvement with rhabdomyolysis explains the neurological damage by itself. The biopsy revealed pathological criteria for necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (NAM), as well as other clinical and laboratory evidence. Patient disease continued and reached criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To our best knowledge, this is the first report of the NAM and SLE association. PMID:23906548

  14. Mitochondrial Myopathy in Follow-up of a Patient With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Galán, Fernando; de Lavera, Isabel; Cotán, David; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Symptoms of mitochondrial diseases and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) frequently overlap and can easily be mistaken. Methods. We report the case of a patient diagnosed with CFS and during follow-up was finally diagnosed with mitochondrial myopathy by histochemical study of muscle biopsy, spectrophotometric analysis of the complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and genetic studies. Results. The results revealed 3% fiber-ragged blue and a severe deficiency of complexes I and IV and several mtDNA variants. Mother, sisters, and nephews showed similar symptoms, which strongly suggests a possible maternal inheritance. The patient and his family responded to treatment with high doses of riboflavin and thiamine with a remarkable and sustained fatigue and muscle symptoms improvement. Conclusions. This case illustrates that initial symptoms of mitochondrial disease in adults can easily be mistaken with CFS, and in these patients a regular reassessment and monitoring of symptoms is recommended to reconfirm or change the diagnosis. PMID:26904705

  15. VMA21 deficiency prevents vacuolar ATPase assembly and causes autophagic vacuolar myopathy.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Nivetha; Munteanu, Iulia; Wang, Peixiang; Ruggieri, Alessandra; Rilstone, Jennifer J; Israelian, Nyrie; Naranian, Taline; Paroutis, Paul; Guo, Ray; Ren, Zhi-Ping; Nishino, Ichizo; Chabrol, Brigitte; Pellissier, Jean-Francois; Minetti, Carlo; Udd, Bjarne; Fardeau, Michel; Tailor, Chetankumar S; Mahuran, Don J; Kissel, John T; Kalimo, Hannu; Levy, Nicolas; Manolson, Morris F; Ackerley, Cameron A; Minassian, Berge A

    2013-03-01

    X-linked Myopathy with Excessive Autophagy (XMEA) is a childhood onset disease characterized by progressive vacuolation and atrophy of skeletal muscle. We show that XMEA is caused by hypomorphic alleles of the VMA21 gene, that VMA21 is the diverged human ortholog of the yeast Vma21p protein, and that like Vma21p, VMA21 is an essential assembly chaperone of the vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase), the principal mammalian proton pump complex. Decreased VMA21 raises lysosomal pH which reduces lysosomal degradative ability and blocks autophagy. This reduces cellular free amino acids which leads to downregulation of the mTORC1 pathway, and consequent increased macroautophagy resulting in proliferation of large and ineffective autolysosomes that engulf sections of cytoplasm, merge, and vacuolate the cell. Our results uncover a novel mechanism of disease, namely macroautophagic overcompensation leading to cell vacuolation and tissue atrophy. PMID:23315026

  16. [Retracted] Clinical, pathological and genetic characteristics of autosomal dominant inherited dynamin 2 centronuclear myopathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhong; Wu, Huamin; Gong, Jian; Wang, Tao; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2016-07-01

    We wish to retract our article entitled 'Clinical, pathological and genetic characteristics of autosomal dominant inherited dynamin 2 centronuclear myopathy' published in Molecular Medicine Reports 13: 4273-4278, 2016. The article was submitted by the first author, Xinhong Liu, without the prior knowledge of the corresponding author, Chuanzhu Yan, or the other authors included on the paper. Furthermore, the details of the paper were not discussed by the authors prior to the submission, and all are in agreement that the paper contains data therein (and interpretations thereof) which are either inaccurate or inappropriate. All the authors agree to this retraction, and we apologize for the inconvenience caused in this regard.[the original article was published in the Molecular Medicine Reports 13: 4273-4278, 2016; DOI: 10.3892/mmr.2016.5047]. PMID:27176730

  17. Study of Subsonic Flow Over a TOW 2B Missile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudarzi, Koorosh; Jamali, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to study the subsonic flow over a missile. In this paper, a model of TOW 2B missile is studied. Two computational approaches are being explored, namely solutions based on the Reynolds-averaged compressible Navier-Stokes equations and solutions based on the inviscid flow (small disturbance theory). The simulations are performed at the Mach number of 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9 and 1.0 at four angles of attack of 2, 4, 6 and 8 degree. Results obtained from analytical simulation are compared with numerical data. It is found that lift and drag coefficients would go up by increasing of the angle of attack and the Mach number. Trend of changes of the results that obtained from the small disturbance theory is roughly as same as the numeric solution.

  18. Integrated Product and Process Data for B2B Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Kulvatunyou, Boonserm; Ivezic, Nenad; Jones, Albert; Wysk, Richard A.

    2003-09-01

    Collaborative development of engineered products in a business-to-business (B2B) environment will require more than just the selection of components from an on-line catalogue. It will involve the electronic exchange of product, process, and production engineering information during both design and manufacturing. While the state-of-the-practice does include a variety of ways to exchange product data electronically, it does not extend to the exchange of manufacturing process data. The reason is simple; process data is usually tied to specific manufacturing resources. These resources are not known typically at product development time. This paper proposes an approach, called an Integrated Product and Process Data (IPPD), where manufacturing process data is considered during product development. This approach replaces traditional process plans, which are resource specific, with a resource-independent process representation. Such a representation will allow a much wider collaboration among business partners and provide the necessary base for collaborative product development.

  19. The cyclotron energization through auroral wave experiments (CENTAUR 2B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winningham, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    The CENTAUR 2B mission, a dual payload program, is in many aspects the same as the previous missions from Cape Perry and Norway in 1985. It was planned that these payloads would be launched from Andoya, Norway, Nov. 1989 from the Universal II launcher. The payloads are identical, but would have been launched at different azimuths as far north and as far west as possible. Particle experiments include the angular resolving energy analyzer (AREA), the fast ion mass spectrometer (FIMS), the spectrographic particle images (SPI), and finally, the differential ion flux probe (DIFP). SwRI was responsible for the scientific payload, which includes the power supplies, the power supply interfacing, the manipulating of the data from the instruments to format it for the telemetry system, all mechanical structure and restraint mechanisms, and the payload subskin. The status of the various components of this program is given.

  20. Semantic ETL into i2b2 with Eureka!

    PubMed

    Post, Andrew R; Krc, Tahsin; Rathod, Himanshu; Agravat, Sanjay; Mansour, Michel; Torian, William; Saltz, Joel H

    2013-01-01

    Clinical phenotyping is an emerging research information systems capability. Research uses of electronic health record (EHR) data may require the ability to identify clinical co-morbidities and complications. Such phenotypes may not be represented directly as discrete data elements, but rather as frequency, sequential and temporal patterns in billing and clinical data. These patterns' complexity suggests the need for a robust yet flexible extract, transform and load (ETL) process that can compute them. This capability should be accessible to investigators with limited ability to engage an IT department in data management. We have developed such a system, Eureka! Clinical Analytics. It extracts data from an Excel spreadsheet, computes a broad set of phenotypes of common interest, and loads both raw and computed data into an i2b2 project. A web-based user interface allows executing and monitoring ETL processes. Eureka! is deployed at our institution and is available for deployment in the cloud. PMID:24303265

  1. Semantic ETL into i2b2 with Eureka!

    PubMed Central

    Post, Andrew R.; Krc, Tahsin; Rathod, Himanshu; Agravat, Sanjay; Mansour, Michel; Torian, William; Saltz, Joel H.

    Clinical phenotyping is an emerging research information systems capability. Research uses of electronic health record (EHR) data may require the ability to identify clinical co-morbidities and complications. Such phenotypes may not be represented directly as discrete data elements, but rather as frequency, sequential and temporal patterns in billing and clinical data. These patterns’ complexity suggests the need for a robust yet flexible extract, transform and load (ETL) process that can compute them. This capability should be accessible to investigators with limited ability to engage an IT department in data management. We have developed such a system, Eureka! Clinical Analytics. It extracts data from an Excel spreadsheet, computes a broad set of phenotypes of common interest, and loads both raw and computed data into an i2b2 project. A web-based user interface allows executing and monitoring ETL processes. Eureka! is deployed at our institution and is available for deployment in the cloud. PMID:24303265

  2. Role of Myofibrillar Protein Catabolism in Development of Glucocorticoid Myopathy: Aging and Functional Activity Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Seene, Teet; Kaasik, Priit

    2016-01-01

    Muscle weakness in corticosteroid myopathy is mainly the result of the destruction and atrophy of the myofibrillar compartment of fast-twitch muscle fibers. Decrease of titin and myosin, and the ratio of nebulin and MyHC in myopathic muscle, shows that these changes of contractile and elastic proteins are the result of increased catabolism of the abovementioned proteins in skeletal muscle. Slow regeneration of skeletal muscle is in good correlation with a decreased number of satellite cells under the basal lamina of muscle fibers. Aging causes a reduction of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity as the result of the reduced function of the mitochondrial compartment. AMPK activity increases as a result of increased functional activity. Resistance exercise causes anabolic and anticatabolic effects in skeletal muscle: muscle fibers experience hypertrophy while higher myofibrillar proteins turn over. These changes are leading to the qualitative remodeling of muscle fibers. As a result of these changes, possible maximal muscle strength is increasing. Endurance exercise improves capillary blood supply, increases mitochondrial biogenesis and muscle oxidative capacity, and causes a faster turnover rate of sarcoplasmic proteins as well as qualitative remodeling of type I and IIA muscle fibers. The combination of resistance and endurance exercise may be the fastest way to prevent or decelerate muscle atrophy due to the anabolic and anticatabolic effects of exercise combined with an increase in oxidative capacity. The aim of the present short review is to assess the role of myofibrillar protein catabolism in the development of glucocorticoid-caused myopathy from aging and physical activity aspects. PMID:27187487

  3. The Effect of Nutritional Status in the Pathogenesis of Critical Illness Myopathy (CIM)

    PubMed Central

    Ogilvie, Hannah; Larsson, Lars

    2014-01-01

    The muscle wasting and loss of specific force associated with Critical Illness Myopathy (CIM) is, at least in part, due to a preferential loss of the molecular motor protein myosin. This acquired myopathy is common in critically ill immobilized and mechanically ventilated intensive care patients (ICU). There is a growing understanding of the mechanisms underlying CIM, but the role of nutritional factors triggering this serious complication of modern intensive care remains unknown. This study aims at establishing the effect of nutritional status in the pathogenesis of CIM. An experimental ICU model was used where animals are mechanically ventilated, pharmacologically paralysed post-synaptically and extensively monitored for up to 14 days. Due to the complexity of the experimental model, the number of animals included is small. After exposure to this ICU condition, animals develop a phenotype similar to patients with CIM. The results from this study show that the preferential myosin loss, decline in specific force and muscle fiber atrophy did not differ between low vs. eucaloric animals. In both experimental groups, passive mechanical loading had a sparing effect of muscle weight independent on nutritional status. Thus, this study confirms the strong impact of the mechanical silencing associated with the ICU condition in triggering CIM, overriding any potential effects of caloric intake in triggering CIM. In addition, the positive effects of passive mechanical loading on muscle fiber size and force generating capacity was not affected by the nutritional status in this study. However, due to the small sample size these pilot results need to be validated in a larger cohort. PMID:24887774

  4. Role of multi-drug resistance-associated protein-1 transporter in statin-induced myopathy.

    PubMed

    Dorajoo, Rajkumar s o; Pereira, Barry P; Yu, Zou; Gopalakrishnakone, P; Leong, Cheng Chee; Wee, Aileen; Lee, Edmund

    2008-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of probenecid to inhibit the multi-drug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP-1) in mediating the efflux and myotoxicity in rat skeletal muscles, with administration of rosuvastatin. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered daily, for 15 days, with either rosuvastatin (50, 100 or 200 mg/kg) or probenecid (100 mg/kg) alone, or with a combination of rosuvastatin (50, 100 or 200 mg/kg) and probenecid (100 mg/kg). Skeletal muscle toxicity was elevated with probenecid administered with 200 mg/kg/day of rosuvastatin, with the elevation of creatine kinase by 12-fold, alanine aminotrasferase by 10-fold and creatinine by 9-fold at day 15, with no adverse effects observed when probenecid was given alone. Mitochondria ultrastructural damage with enlargement, disruption, cristolysis and vaculation was seen in the soleus and plantaris of animals administered with probenecid and high dosages of statin. These muscles were also expressing more succinic dehydrogenase (SDH)-positive and cytochrome oxidase (CyOX)-positive fibers. Although generally well-tolerated, statins produce a variety of adverse skeletal muscle events. Hydrophilic statins, with reduced levels of non-specific passive diffusion rates into extra-hepatic tissues, are still seen to produce myopathy. This highlights the important roles of transport mechanisms in statin transport at the skeletal muscles. Excessive influx, reduced efflux or the combination of the two could result in elevated cellular levels of statins at the skeletal muscles, resulting in toxicity. This study provides preliminary evidence that the MRP-1 transporter and efflux at skeletal muscles possibly play significant roles in statin-induced myopathy. PMID:18509883

  5. Recessive TTN truncating mutations define novel forms of core myopathy with heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Chauveau, Claire; Bonnemann, Carsten G.; Julien, Cedric; Kho, Ay Lin; Marks, Harold; Talim, Beril; Maury, Philippe; Arne-Bes, Marie Christine; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Alexandrovich, Alexander; Vihola, Anna; Schafer, Sebastian; Kaufmann, Beth; Medne, Livija; Hübner, Norbert; Foley, A. Reghan; Santi, Mariarita; Udd, Bjarne; Topaloglu, Haluk; Moore, Steven A.; Gotthardt, Michael; Samuels, Mark E.; Gautel, Mathias; Ferreiro, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Core myopathies (CM), the main non-dystrophic myopathies in childhood, remain genetically unexplained in many cases. Heart disease is not considered part of the typical CM spectrum. No congenital heart defect has been reported, and childhood-onset cardiomyopathy has been documented in only two CM families with homozygous mutations of the TTN gene. TTN encodes titin, a giant protein of striated muscles. Recently, heterozygous TTN truncating mutations have also been reported as a major cause of dominant dilated cardiomyopathy. However, relatively few TTN mutations and phenotypes are known, and titin pathophysiological role in cardiac and skeletal muscle conditions is incompletely understood. We analyzed a series of 23 families with congenital CM and primary heart disease using TTN M-line-targeted sequencing followed in selected patients by whole-exome sequencing and functional studies. We identified seven novel homozygous or compound heterozygous TTN mutations (five in the M-line, five truncating) in 17% patients. Heterozygous parents were healthy. Phenotype analysis identified four novel titinopathies, including cardiac septal defects, left ventricular non-compaction, Emery–Dreifuss muscular dystrophy or arthrogryposis. Additionally, in vitro studies documented the first-reported absence of a functional titin kinase domain in humans, leading to a severe antenatal phenotype. We establish that CM are associated with a large range of heart conditions of which TTN mutations are a major cause, thereby expanding the TTN mutational and phenotypic spectrum. Additionally, our results suggest titin kinase implication in cardiac morphogenesis and demonstrate that heterozygous TTN truncating mutations may not manifest unless associated with a second mutation, reassessing the paradigm of their dominant expression. PMID:24105469

  6. Recessive TTN truncating mutations define novel forms of core myopathy with heart disease.

    PubMed

    Chauveau, Claire; Bonnemann, Carsten G; Julien, Cedric; Kho, Ay Lin; Marks, Harold; Talim, Beril; Maury, Philippe; Arne-Bes, Marie Christine; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Alexandrovich, Alexander; Vihola, Anna; Schafer, Sebastian; Kaufmann, Beth; Medne, Livija; Hübner, Norbert; Foley, A Reghan; Santi, Mariarita; Udd, Bjarne; Topaloglu, Haluk; Moore, Steven A; Gotthardt, Michael; Samuels, Mark E; Gautel, Mathias; Ferreiro, Ana

    2014-02-15

    Core myopathies (CM), the main non-dystrophic myopathies in childhood, remain genetically unexplained in many cases. Heart disease is not considered part of the typical CM spectrum. No congenital heart defect has been reported, and childhood-onset cardiomyopathy has been documented in only two CM families with homozygous mutations of the TTN gene. TTN encodes titin, a giant protein of striated muscles. Recently, heterozygous TTN truncating mutations have also been reported as a major cause of dominant dilated cardiomyopathy. However, relatively few TTN mutations and phenotypes are known, and titin pathophysiological role in cardiac and skeletal muscle conditions is incompletely understood. We analyzed a series of 23 families with congenital CM and primary heart disease using TTN M-line-targeted sequencing followed in selected patients by whole-exome sequencing and functional studies. We identified seven novel homozygous or compound heterozygous TTN mutations (five in the M-line, five truncating) in 17% patients. Heterozygous parents were healthy. Phenotype analysis identified four novel titinopathies, including cardiac septal defects, left ventricular non-compaction, Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy or arthrogryposis. Additionally, in vitro studies documented the first-reported absence of a functional titin kinase domain in humans, leading to a severe antenatal phenotype. We establish that CM are associated with a large range of heart conditions of which TTN mutations are a major cause, thereby expanding the TTN mutational and phenotypic spectrum. Additionally, our results suggest titin kinase implication in cardiac morphogenesis and demonstrate that heterozygous TTN truncating mutations may not manifest unless associated with a second mutation, reassessing the paradigm of their dominant expression. PMID:24105469

  7. Nemaline myopathy caused by mutations in the muscle alpha-skeletal-actin gene.

    PubMed

    Ilkovski, B; Cooper, S T; Nowak, K; Ryan, M M; Yang, N; Schnell, C; Durling, H J; Roddick, L G; Wilkinson, I; Kornberg, A J; Collins, K J; Wallace, G; Gunning, P; Hardeman, E C; Laing, N G; North, K N

    2001-06-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by muscle weakness and the presence of nemaline bodies (rods) in skeletal muscle. Disease-causing mutations have been reported in five genes, each encoding a protein component of the sarcomeric thin filament. Recently, we identified mutations in the muscle alpha-skeletal-actin gene (ACTA1) in a subset of patients with NM. In the present study, we evaluated a new series of 35 patients with NM. We identified five novel missense mutations in ACTA1, which suggested that mutations in muscle alpha-skeletal actin account for the disease in approximately 15% of patients with NM. The mutations appeared de novo and represent new dominant mutations. One proband subsequently had two affected children, a result consistent with autosomal dominant transmission. The seven patients exhibited marked clinical variability, ranging from severe congenital-onset weakness, with death from respiratory failure during the 1st year of life, to a mild childhood-onset myopathy, with survival into adulthood. There was marked variation in both age at onset and clinical severity in the three affected members of one family. Common pathological features included abnormal fiber type differentiation, glycogen accumulation, myofibrillar disruption, and "whorling" of actin thin filaments. The percentage of fibers with rods did not correlate with clinical severity; however, the severe, lethal phenotype was associated with both severe, generalized disorganization of sarcomeric structure and abnormal localization of sarcomeric actin. The marked variability, in clinical phenotype, among patients with different mutations in ACTA1 suggests that both the site of the mutation and the nature of the amino acid change have differential effects on thin-filament formation and protein-protein interactions. The intrafamilial variability suggests that alpha-actin genotype is not the sole determinant of phenotype. PMID:11333380

  8. Role of Myofibrillar Protein Catabolism in Development of Glucocorticoid Myopathy: Aging and Functional Activity Aspects.

    PubMed

    Seene, Teet; Kaasik, Priit

    2016-01-01

    Muscle weakness in corticosteroid myopathy is mainly the result of the destruction and atrophy of the myofibrillar compartment of fast-twitch muscle fibers. Decrease of titin and myosin, and the ratio of nebulin and MyHC in myopathic muscle, shows that these changes of contractile and elastic proteins are the result of increased catabolism of the abovementioned proteins in skeletal muscle. Slow regeneration of skeletal muscle is in good correlation with a decreased number of satellite cells under the basal lamina of muscle fibers. Aging causes a reduction of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity as the result of the reduced function of the mitochondrial compartment. AMPK activity increases as a result of increased functional activity. Resistance exercise causes anabolic and anticatabolic effects in skeletal muscle: muscle fibers experience hypertrophy while higher myofibrillar proteins turn over. These changes are leading to the qualitative remodeling of muscle fibers. As a result of these changes, possible maximal muscle strength is increasing. Endurance exercise improves capillary blood supply, increases mitochondrial biogenesis and muscle oxidative capacity, and causes a faster turnover rate of sarcoplasmic proteins as well as qualitative remodeling of type I and IIA muscle fibers. The combination of resistance and endurance exercise may be the fastest way to prevent or decelerate muscle atrophy due to the anabolic and anticatabolic effects of exercise combined with an increase in oxidative capacity. The aim of the present short review is to assess the role of myofibrillar protein catabolism in the development of glucocorticoid-caused myopathy from aging and physical activity aspects. PMID:27187487

  9. Mutations in the collagen XII gene define a new form of extracellular matrix-related myopathy.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Debbie; Farsani, Golara Torabi; Laval, Steven; Collins, James; Sarkozy, Anna; Martoni, Elena; Shah, Ashoke; Zou, Yaqun; Koch, Manuel; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Roberts, Mark; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker

    2014-05-01

    Bethlem myopathy (BM) [MIM 158810] is a slowly progressive muscle disease characterized by contractures and proximal weakness, which can be caused by mutations in one of the collagen VI genes (COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3). However, there may be additional causal genes to identify as in ∼50% of BM cases no mutations in the COL6 genes are identified. In a cohort of -24 patients with a BM-like phenotype, we first sequenced 12 candidate genes based on their function, including genes for known binding partners of collagen VI, and those enzymes involved in its correct post-translational modification, assembly and secretion. Proceeding to whole-exome sequencing (WES), we identified mutations in the COL12A1 gene, a member of the FACIT collagens (fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices) in five individuals from two families. Both families showed dominant inheritance with a clinical phenotype resembling classical BM. Family 1 had a single-base substitution that led to the replacement of one glycine residue in the triple-helical domain, breaking the Gly-X-Y repeating pattern, and Family 2 had a missense mutation, which created a mutant protein with an unpaired cysteine residue. Abnormality at the protein level was confirmed in both families by the intracellular retention of collagen XII in patient dermal fibroblasts. The mutation in Family 2 leads to the up-regulation of genes associated with the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway and swollen, dysmorphic rough-ER. We conclude that the spectrum of causative genes in extracellular matrix (ECM)-related myopathies be extended to include COL12A1. PMID:24334769

  10. Nutritional status evaluation in patients affected by bethlem myopathy and ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Toni, Silvia; Morandi, Riccardo; Busacchi, Marcello; Tardini, Lucia; Merlini, Luciano; Battistini, Nino Carlo; Pellegrini, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Collagen VI mutations lead to disabling myopathies like Bethlem myopathy (BM) and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). We have investigated the nutritional and metabolic status of one UCMD and seven BM patients (five female, three male, mean age 31 ± 9 years) in order to find a potential metabolic target for nutritional intervention. For this study, we used standard anthropometric tools, such as BMI evaluation and body circumference measurements. All results were compared to dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), considered the "gold standard" method. Energy intake of each patient was evaluated through longitudinal methods (7-day food diary) while resting energy expenditure (REE) was predicted using specific equations and measured by indirect calorimetry. Clinical evaluation included general and nutritional blood and urine laboratory analyses and quantitative muscle strength measurement by hand-held dynamometry. BM and UCMD patients showed an altered body composition, characterized by low free fat mass (FFM) and high fat mass (FM), allowing us to classify them as sarcopenic, and all but one as sarcopenic-obese. Another main result was the negative correlation between REE/FFM ratio (basal energy expenditure per kilograms of fat-free mass) and the severity of the disease, as defined by the muscle megascore (correlation coefficient -0.955, P-value <0.001). We postulate that the increase of the REE/FFM ratio in relation to the severity of the disease may be due to an altered and pathophysiological loss of energetic efficiency at the expense of skeletal muscle. We show that a specific metabolic disequilibrium is related to the severity of the disease, which may represent a target for a nutritional intervention in these patients. PMID:25477818

  11. Nutritional Status Evaluation in Patients Affected by Bethlem Myopathy and Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Toni, Silvia; Morandi, Riccardo; Busacchi, Marcello; Tardini, Lucia; Merlini, Luciano; Battistini, Nino Carlo; Pellegrini, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Collagen VI mutations lead to disabling myopathies like Bethlem myopathy (BM) and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). We have investigated the nutritional and metabolic status of one UCMD and seven BM patients (five female, three male, mean age 31 ± 9 years) in order to find a potential metabolic target for nutritional intervention. For this study, we used standard anthropometric tools, such as BMI evaluation and body circumference measurements. All results were compared to dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), considered the “gold standard” method. Energy intake of each patient was evaluated through longitudinal methods (7-day food diary) while resting energy expenditure (REE) was predicted using specific equations and measured by indirect calorimetry. Clinical evaluation included general and nutritional blood and urine laboratory analyses and quantitative muscle strength measurement by hand-held dynamometry. BM and UCMD patients showed an altered body composition, characterized by low free fat mass (FFM) and high fat mass (FM), allowing us to classify them as sarcopenic, and all but one as sarcopenic-obese. Another main result was the negative correlation between REE/FFM ratio (basal energy expenditure per kilograms of fat-free mass) and the severity of the disease, as defined by the muscle megascore (correlation coefficient −0.955, P-value <0.001). We postulate that the increase of the REE/FFM ratio in relation to the severity of the disease may be due to an altered and pathophysiological loss of energetic efficiency at the expense of skeletal muscle. We show that a specific metabolic disequilibrium is related to the severity of the disease, which may represent a target for a nutritional intervention in these patients. PMID:25477818

  12. Expression of myotubularins in blood platelets: Characterization and potential diagnostic of X-linked myotubular myopathy.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Rana; Severin, Sonia; Xuereb, Jean-Marie; Gratacap, Marie-Pierre; Laporte, Jocelyn; Buj-Bello, Ana; Tronchère, Hélène; Payrastre, Bernard

    2016-07-29

    Phosphoinositides play a key role in the spatiotemporal control of central intracellular processes and several specific kinases and phosphatases regulating the level of these lipids are implicated in human diseases. Myotubularins are a family of 3-phosphatases acting specifically on phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate and phosphatidylinositol 3,5 bisphosphate. Members of this family are mutated in genetic diseases including myotubularin 1 (MTM1) and myotubularin-related protein 2 (MTMR2) which mutations are responsible of X-linked centronuclear myopathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy, respectively. Here we show that MTM1 is expressed in blood platelets and that hundred microliters of blood is sufficient to detect the protein by western blotting. Since the most severe cases of pathogenic mutations of MTM1 lead to loss of expression of the protein, we propose that a minimal amount of blood can allow a rapid diagnostic test of X-linked myotubular myopathy, which is currently based on histopathology of muscle biopsy and molecular genetic testing. In platelets, MTM1 is a highly active 3-phosphatase mainly associated to membranes and found on the dense granules and to a lesser extent on alpha-granules. However, deletion of MTM1 in mouse had no significant effect on platelet count and on platelet secretion and aggregation induced by thrombin or collagen stimulation. Potential compensation by other members of the myotubularin family is conceivable since MTMR2 was easily detectable by western blotting and the mRNA of several members of the family increased during in vitro differentiation of human megakaryocytes and MEG-01 cells. In conclusion, we show the presence of several myotubularins in platelets and propose that minimal amounts of blood can be used to develop a rapid diagnostic test for genetic pathologies linked to loss of expression of these phosphatases. PMID:27155155

  13. Mitochondrial Myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... ATP. This highly efficient part of the ATP manufacturing process requires oxygen, and is called the respiratory ... based on three natural substances involved in ATP production in our cells. One substance, creatine , normally acts ...

  14. Inflammatory Myopathies

    MedlinePlus

    ... the symptoms can be treated. Options include medication, physical therapy, exercise, heat therapy (including microwave and ultrasound), orthotics ... and polymyositis include cyclosporine A, cyclophosphamide, and tacrolimus. Physical therapy is usually recommended to prevent muscle atrophy and ...

  15. Metabolic Myopathies

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscles. Metabolic refers to chemical reactions that provide energy, nutrients and substances necessary for health and growth. ... occur when muscle cells don’t get enough energy. Without enough energy, the muscle lacks enough fuel ...

  16. Mitochondrial Myopathies

    MedlinePlus

    ... line and are therefore called the electron transport chain, and complex V actually churns out ATP, so ... coQ10 , is a component of the electron transport chain, which uses oxygen to manufacture ATP. Some mitochondrial ...

  17. Mitochondrial Myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... with ragged-red fibers, and mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes. The symptoms of ... riboflavin, coenzyme Q, and carnitine (a specialized amino acid) may provide subjective improvement in fatigue and energy ...

  18. Increased binding of circulating systemic lupus erythematosus autoantibodies to recombinant interferon alpha 2b.

    PubMed

    Khan, Wahid Ali; Qureshi, Javed Anwer

    2015-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by various types of immunological abnormalities including circulating and tissue-fixed autoantibodies reactive with autoantigens. The mechanism that can explain the production of these antibodies is unclear. Here we address the binding specificity of SLE autoantibodies with recombinant alpha interferon 2b (hrIFN α-2b), commercially available interferon (IFN α-2b), and the gene (cIFN α-2b) encoding this interferon. hrIFN α-2b showed higher binding with naturally occurring SLE autoantibodies as compared to IFN α-2b (p < 0.05) or cIFN α-2b gene (p < 0.001) as assessed by direct binding, inhibition ELISA, and quantitative precipitin titration. The relative affinity of SLE autoantibodies for hrIFN α-2b, IFN α-2b, and cIFN α-2b gene was in the order of 1.13 × 10(-7) , 1.38 × 10(-6) , and 1.22 × 10(-6) , respectively. hrIFN α-2b is shown to have unique epitopes that would explain the possible antigenic role of hrIFN α-2b in the generation of SLE autoantibodies. Anti-hrIFN α-2b antibodies have been shown to represent an alternative immunological probe for the estimation of interferon alpha 2b in the serum of SLE patients. PMID:26547367

  19. Stac3 is a component of the excitation-contraction coupling machinery and mutated in Native American myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Horstick, Eric J.; Linsley, Jeremy W.; Dowling, James J.; Hauser, Michael A.; McDonald, Kristin K.; Ashley-Koch, Allison; Saint-Amant, Louis; Satish, Akhila; Cui, Wilson W.; Zhou, Weibin; Sprague, Shawn M.; Stamm, Demetra S.; Powell, Cynthia M.; Speer, Marcy C.; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Hirata, Hiromi; Kuwada, John Y.

    2013-01-01

    Excitation-contraction coupling, the process that regulates contractions by skeletal muscles, transduces changes in membrane voltage by activating release of Ca2+ from internal stores to initiate muscle contraction. Defects in EC coupling are associated with muscle diseases. Here we identify Stac3 as a novel component of the EC coupling machinery. Using a zebrafish genetic screen, we generate a locomotor mutation that is mapped to stac3. We provide electrophysiological, Ca2+ imaging, immunocytochemical and biochemical evidence that Stac3 participates in excitation-contraction coupling in muscles. Furthermore, we reveal that a mutation in human STAC3 as the genetic basis of the debilitating Native American myopathy (NAM). Analysis of NAM stac3 in zebrafish shows that the NAM mutation decreases excitation-contraction coupling. These findings enhance our understanding of both excitation-contraction coupling and the pathology of myopathies. PMID:23736855

  20. Mapping of the locus for X-linked cardioskeletal myopathy with neutropenia and abnormal mitochondria (Barth syndrome) to Xq28.

    PubMed Central

    Bolhuis, P A; Hensels, G W; Hulsebos, T J; Baas, F; Barth, P G

    1991-01-01

    X-linked cardioskeletal myopathy with neutropenia and abnormal mitochondria is clinically characterized by congenital dilated cardiomyopathy, skeletal myopathy, recurrent bacterial infections, and growth retardation. We analyzed linkage between the disease locus and X-chromosomal markers in a family with seven carriers, four patients, and eight unaffected sons of carriers. Highest lod scores obtained by two-point linkage analysis were 2.70 for St14.1 (DXS52, TaqI) at a recombination fraction of zero and 2.53 for cpX67 (DXS134) at a recombination fraction of zero. Multipoint linkage analysis resulted in a maximum lod score of 5.24 at the position of St35.691 (DXS305). The most distal recombination detected in this family was located between the markers II-10 (DXS466) and DX13 (DXS15). These data indicate the location of the mutated gene at Xq28. PMID:1998334

  1. Specific binding of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I lectin to sarcolemma of distal myopathy with rimmed vacuole formation.

    PubMed

    Yatabe, K; Kawai, M

    1997-08-01

    Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA I) binding was studied in 83 patients with various neuromuscular disorders. UEA I labelled endomysial capillaries and endothelial cells of perimysial blood vessels in all the examined muscles. There was no UEA I binding to muscle fibres except for all (9) cases of distal myopathy with rimmed vacuole formation (DMRV), 1 of 5 cases of inclusion body myositis and 1 of 36 cases of inflammatory myopathies. The UEA I binding was completely eliminated by preincubation of UEA I solution with L-fucose. Using electron microscopy, the UEA I binding was localized to sarcolemma and intrasarco-plasmic membranous organelles other than mitochondria. Myosatellite cells were not labelled. These findings revealed the existence of fucosylated proteins or lipids in a subset of skeletal muscles suffering from DMRV. Biochemical identification of the fucosylated substance and further detailed study on subcellular localization of UEA I binding may yield important clues to the unknown pathogenesis of DMRV. PMID:9309554

  2. “Target” and “Sandwich” Signs in Thigh Muscles have High Diagnostic Values for Collagen VI-related Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jun; Zheng, Yi-Ming; Jin, Su-Qin; Yi, Jun-Fei; Liu, Xiu-Juan; Lyn, He; Wang, Zhao-Xia; Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Jiang-Xi; Yuan, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Collagen VI-related myopathies are autosomal dominant and recessive hereditary myopathies, mainly including Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) and Bethlem myopathy (BM). Muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been widely used to diagnosis muscular disorders. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of thigh muscles MRI for collagen VI-related myopathies. Methods: Eleven patients with collagen VI gene mutation-related myopathies were enrolled in this study. MRI of the thigh muscles was performed in all patients with collagen VI gene mutation-related myopathies and in 361 patients with other neuromuscular disorders (disease controls). T1-weighted images were used to assess fatty infiltration of the muscles using a modified Mercuri's scale. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of the MRI features of collagen VI-related myopathies. The relationship between fatty infiltration of muscles and specific collagen VI gene mutations was also investigated. Results: Eleven patients with collagen VI gene mutation-related myopathies included six UCMD patients and five BM patients. There was no significant difference between UCMD and BM patients in the fatty infiltration of each thigh muscle except sartorius (P = 0.033); therefore, we combined the UCMD and BM data. Mean fatty infiltration scores were 3.1 and 3.0 in adductor magnus and gluteus maximus, while the scores were 1.3, 1.3, and 1.5 in gracilis, adductor longus, and sartorius, respectively. A “target” sign in rectus femoris (RF) was present in seven cases, and a “sandwich” sign in vastus lateralis (VL) was present in ten cases. The “target” and “sandwich” signs had sensitivities of 63.6% and 90.9% and specificities of 97.3% and 96.9% for the diagnosis of collagen VI-related myopathies, respectively. Fatty infiltration scores were 2.0–3.0 in seven patients with mutations in the triple-helical domain, and 1.0–1.5 in three of four patients with

  3. Molecular characterization of an. alpha. sub 2B -adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.K.; Dewan Zeng; D'Angelo, D.D.; Tucker, A.L.; Zhihong Lu; Barber, C.M.; Lynch, K.R. )

    1990-02-26

    {alpha}{sub 2}-Adrenergic receptors comprise a heterogeneous population based on pharmacologic and molecular evidence. The authors have isolated a cDNA clone (pRNG{alpha}2) encoding a previously undescribed third subtype of an {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor from a rat kidney cDNA library. The library was screened with an oligonucleotide encoding a highly conserved region found in all biogenic amine receptors described to date. The deduced amino acid sequence displays many features of G-protein coupled receptors with exception of the absence of the consensus N-linked glycosylation site at the amino terminus. Membranes prepared from COS-1 cells transfected with pRNG{alpha}2 display high affinity and saturable binding to {sup 3}H-rauwolscine (K{sub d}=2 nM).Competition curve data analysis shows that pRNG{alpha}2 protein binds to a variety of adrenergic drugs with the following rank order of potency: yohimbine {ge} cholorpromazine > prazosin {ge} clonidine > norepinephrine {ge} oxymetazoline. pRNG{alpha}2 RNA accumulates in both adult rat kidney and rat neonatal lung (predominant species is 4.0 kb). They conclude that pRNG{alpha}2 likely represents a cDNA for the {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor.

  4. BRI2 (ITM2b) Inhibits Aβ Deposition in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungsu; Miller, Victor M.; Levites, Yona; West, Karen Jansen; Zwizinski, Craig W.; Moore, Brenda D.; Troendle, Fredrick J.; Bann, Maralyssa; Verbeeck, Christophe; Price, Robert W.; Smithson, Lisa; Sonoda, Leilani; Wagg, Kayleigh; Rangachari, Vijayaraghavan; Zou, Fanggeng; Younkin, Steven G.; Graff-Radford, Neill; Dickson, Dennis; Rosenberry, Terrone; Golde, Todd E.

    2008-01-01

    Analyses of the biologic effects of mutations in the BRI2 (ITM2b) and the amyloid β precursor protein (APP) genes support the hypothesis that cerebral accumulation of amyloidogenic peptides in familial British and familial Danish dementias and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is associated with neurodegeneration. We have used somatic brain transgenic technology to express the BRI2 and BRI2-Aβ1-40 transgenes in amyloid β protein precursor (APP) mouse models. Expression of BRI2-Aβ1-40 mimics the suppressive effect previously observed using conventional transgenic methods, further validating the somatic brain transgenic methodology. Unexpectedly, we also find that expression of wild type human BRI2 reduces cerebral Aβ deposition in an AD mouse model. Additional data indicate that the 23 amino acid peptide, Bri23, released from BRI2 by normal processing is present in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), inhibits Aβ aggregation in vitro, and mediates its anti-amyloidogenic effect in vivo. These studies demonstrate that BRI2 is a novel mediator of Aβ deposition in vivo. PMID:18524908

  5. Remission of liver fibrosis by interferon-alpha 2b.

    PubMed

    Moreno, M G; Muriel, P

    1995-08-01

    Fibrosis is a dynamic process associated with the continuous deposition and resorption of connective tissue, mainly collagen. Therapeutic strategies are emerging by which this dynamic process can be modulated. Since interferons are known to inhibit collagen production, the aim of this study was to investigate if the administration of interferon-alpha 2b (IFN-alpha) can restore the normal hepatic content of collagen in rats with established fibrosis. Fibrosis was induced by prolonged bile duct ligation. IFN-alpha (100,000 IU/rat/day; s.c.) was administered to fibrotic rats for 15 days. Bile duct ligation increased liver collagen content 6-fold. In addition, serum and liver markers of hepatic injury increased significantly; liver histology showed an increase in collagen deposition, and the normal architecture was lost, with large zones of necrosis being observed frequently. IFN-alpha administration reversed to normal the values of all the biochemical markers measured and restored the normal architecture of the liver. Our results demonstrated that IFN-alpha is useful in reversing fibrosis and liver damage induced by biliary obstruction in the rat. However, further investigations are required to evaluate the therapeutic relevance of interferons on non-viral fibrosis and cholestasis. PMID:7646558

  6. Deleting exon 55 from the nebulin gene induces severe muscle weakness in a mouse model for nemaline myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ottenheijm, Coen A. C.; Buck, Danielle; de Winter, Josine M.; Ferrara, Claudia; Piroddi, Nicoletta; Tesi, Chiara; Jasper, Jeffrey R.; Malik, Fady I.; Meng, Hui; Stienen, Ger J. M.; Beggs, Alan H.; Labeit, Siegfried; Poggesi, Corrado; Lawlor, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Nebulin—a giant sarcomeric protein—plays a pivotal role in skeletal muscle contractility by specifying thin filament length and function. Although mutations in the gene encoding nebulin (NEB) are a frequent cause of nemaline myopathy, the most common non-dystrophic congenital myopathy, the mechanisms by which mutations in NEB cause muscle weakness remain largely unknown. To better understand these mechanisms, we have generated a mouse model in which Neb exon 55 is deleted (NebΔExon55) to replicate a founder mutation seen frequently in patients with nemaline myopathy with Ashkenazi Jewish heritage. NebΔExon55 mice are born close to Mendelian ratios, but show growth retardation after birth. Electron microscopy studies show nemaline bodies—a hallmark feature of nemaline myopathy—in muscle fibres from NebΔExon55 mice. Western blotting studies with nebulin-specific antibodies reveal reduced nebulin levels in muscle from NebΔExon55 mice, and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy studies with tropomodulin antibodies and phalloidin reveal that thin filament length is significantly reduced. In line with reduced thin filament length, the maximal force generating capacity of permeabilized muscle fibres and single myofibrils is reduced in NebΔExon55 mice with a more pronounced reduction at longer sarcomere lengths. Finally, in NebΔExon55 mice the regulation of contraction is impaired, as evidenced by marked changes in crossbridge cycling kinetics and by a reduction of the calcium sensitivity of force generation. A novel drug that facilitates calcium binding to the thin filament significantly augmented the calcium sensitivity of submaximal force to levels that exceed those observed in untreated control muscle. In conclusion, we have characterized the first nebulin-based nemaline myopathy model, which recapitulates important features of the phenotype observed in patients harbouring this particular mutation, and which has severe muscle weakness caused by thin

  7. Mutation in the Novel Nuclear-Encoded Mitochondrial Protein CHCHD10 in a Family with Autosomal Dominant Mitochondrial Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ajroud-Driss, Senda; Fecto, Faisal; Ajroud, Kaouther; Lalani, Irfan; Calvo, Sarah E.; Mootha, Vamsi K.; Deng, Han-Xiang; Siddique, Nailah; Tahmoush, Albert J.; Heiman-Patterson, Terry D.; Siddique, Teepu

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial myopathies belong to a larger group of systemic diseases caused by morphological or biochemical abnormalities of mitochondria. Mitochondrial disorders can be caused by mutations in either the mitochondrial or the nuclear genome. Only 5% of all mitochondrial disorders are autosomal dominant. We analyzed DNA from members of a previously reported Puerto Rican kindred with an autosomal dominant mitochondrial myopathy (Heimann-Patterson et al. 1997). Linkage analysis suggested a putative locus on the pericentric region of the long arm of chromosome 22 (22q11). Using the tools of integrative genomics, we established C22orf16 (later designated as CHCHD10) as the only high scoring mitochondrial candidate gene in our minimal candidate region. Sequence analysis revealed a double missense mutation (R15S; G58R) in cis in CHCHD10 which encodes a coiled-coil helix coiled-coil helix protein of unknown function. These two mutations completely co-segregated with the disease phenotype and were absent in 1481 Caucasian and 80 Hispanic (including 32 Puerto Rican) controls. Expression profiling showed that CHCHD10 is enriched in skeletal muscle. Mitochondrial localization of the CHCHD10 protein was confirmed using immunofluorescence in cells expressing either wild-type or mutant CHCHD10. We found that expression of the G58R, but not the R15S, mutation induced mitochondrial fragmentation. Our findings identify a novel gene causing mitochondrial myopathy, thereby expanding the spectrum of mitochondrial myopathies caused by nuclear genes. Our findings also suggest a role for CHCHD10 in the morphologic remodeling of the mitochondria. PMID:25193783

  8. Dysferlin Binds SNAREs (Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide-sensitive Factor (NSF) Attachment Protein Receptors) and Stimulates Membrane Fusion in a Calcium-sensitive Manner.

    PubMed

    Codding, Sara J; Marty, Naomi; Abdullah, Nazish; Johnson, Colin P

    2016-07-01

    Resealing of tears in the sarcolemma of myofibers is a necessary step in the repair of muscle tissue. Recent work suggests a critical role for dysferlin in the membrane repair process and that mutations in dysferlin are responsible for limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B and Miyoshi myopathy. Beyond membrane repair, dysferlin has been linked to SNARE-mediated exocytotic events including cytokine release and acid sphingomyelinase secretion. However, it is unclear whether dysferlin regulates SNARE-mediated membrane fusion. In this study we demonstrate a direct interaction between dysferlin and the SNARE proteins syntaxin 4 and SNAP-23. In addition, analysis of FRET and in vitro reconstituted lipid mixing assays indicate that dysferlin accelerates syntaxin 4/SNAP-23 heterodimer formation and SNARE-mediated lipid mixing in a calcium-sensitive manner. These results support a function for dysferlin as a calcium-sensing SNARE effector for membrane fusion events. PMID:27226605

  9. Critical evaluation of the use of cell cultures for inclusion in clinical trials of patients affected by collagen VI myopathies.

    PubMed

    Sabatelli, P; Palma, E; Angelin, A; Squarzoni, S; Urciuolo, A; Pellegrini, C; Tiepolo, T; Bonaldo, P; Gualandi, F; Merlini, L; Bernardi, P; Maraldi, N M

    2012-07-01

    Collagen VI myopathies (Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), Bethlem myopathy (BM), and myosclerosis myopathy) share a common pathogenesis, that is, mitochondrial dysfunction due to deregulation of the permeability transition pore (PTP). This effect was first identified in the Col6a1(-/-) mouse model and then in muscle cell cultures from UCMD and BM patients; the normalizing effect of cyclosporin A (CsA) confirmed the pathogenic role of PTP opening. In order to determine whether mitochondrial performance can be used as a criterion for inclusion in clinical trials and as an outcome measure of the patient response to therapy, it is mandatory to establish whether mitochondrial dysfunction is conserved in primary cell cultures from UCMD and BM patients. In this study we report evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction and the consequent increase of apoptotic rate can be detected not only, as previously reported, in muscle, but also in fibroblast cell cultures established from muscle biopsies of collagen VI-related myopathic patients. However, the mitochondrial phenotype is no longer maintained after nine passages in culture. These data demonstrate that the dire consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction are not limited to myogenic cells, and that this parameter can be used as a suitable diagnostic criterion, provided that the cell culture conditions are carefully established. PMID:21953374

  10. Whole-Body muscle MRI in a series of patients with congenital myopathy related to TPM2 gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Jarraya, Mohamed; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Monnier, Nicole; Béhin, Anthony; Avila-Smirnov, Daniela; Romero, Norma Beatriz; Allamand, Valérie; Richard, Pascale; Barois, Annie; May, Adrien; Estournet, Brigitte; Mercuri, Eugenio; Carlier, Pierre G; Carlier, Robert-Yves

    2012-10-01

    Beta-tropomyosin 2 (TPM2) gene mutations are a rare cause of congenital myopathy with variable clinical and histological features. We describe muscle involvement using Whole-Body muscle Magnetic Resonance Imaging (WBMRI) in 8 individuals with genetically proven TPM2 mutations and different clinical and histological features (nemaline myopathy, 'cap disease', Bethlem-like phenotype, arthrogryposis). Most patients shared a recognizable MRI pattern with the involvement of masticatory and distal lower leg muscles. The lower leg showed constant soleus muscle involvement, and often also involvement of peroneus, tibialis anterior, and toe flexor muscles. Pelvic and shoulder girdles, and upper limbs muscles were quite spared. Two adult subjects (a patient and a paucisymptomatic parent) had a more diffuse involvement with striking fat infiltration of the rectus femoris muscle. Two children showed variant findings: one presented with masseter involvement associated with severe axial fat infiltration, the second had masticatory and distal leg muscle involvement (soleus and gastrocnemius muscles). Our study suggests that, independently of the clinical and histological presentation, most patients with TPM2 mutations show a predominant involvement of masticatory and distal leg muscles with the other regions relatively spared. More spread involvement may be observed. This cephalic-distal MRI pattern is not frequent in other known myopathies. PMID:22980765

  11. [Diagnosis of inflammatory myopathy; usefulness of 99mTc MDP scintigraphy and muscle MRI for determination of affected sites].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, T; Saitoh, Y; Yatabe, K; Sueishi, M; Kawai, M

    1999-11-01

    We studied the effectiveness of 99mTc-MDP (methylendiphosphate) scintigraphy in imaging inflammatory myopathy. The three subjects including 1 male and 2 female patients had high creatine kinase (CK) levels and proximal dominant muscle weakness. In whole body muscle surveillance by 99mTc-MDP scintigraphy, abnormal 99mTc-MDP accumulation was found in the extremities of all patients. The sites with high 99mTc-MDP accumulation showed high intensity on T2 weighted MR imaging, suggesting an inflammatory process. Muscle biopsy was performed on two patients from the muscles with the abnormal MRI findings, which showed the diagnostic finding of inflammatory changes. Because muscle involvement in inflammatory myopathy differs from muscle to muscle, it is sometimes difficult to choose appropriate muscle biopsy sites for diagnostic purposes. Affected muscles are more easily identified by using 99mTc-MDP muscle scintigraphy and muscle MRI, therefore, a correct diagnosis and choice of biopsy site can be made. 99mTc-PYP scintigraphy is permitted for use in myocardial infarction alone and 111In-antimyosin scintigraphy is not available in Japan. Therefore, we recommend 99mTc-MDP scintigraphy for diagnosis of inflammatory myopathy and for determination of muscle biopsy sites. PMID:10689932

  12. A de novo mutation of the MYH7 gene in a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Tetsuya; Xiong, Hui; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Wang, Shuo; Satake, Wataru; Jiao, Hui; Yang, Yanling; Cha, Pei-Chieng; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Nishino, Ichizo; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Wu, Xiru; Toda, Tatsushi

    2015-01-01

    Laing distal myopathy (LDM) is an autosomal dominant myopathy that is caused by mutations in the slow/beta cardiac myosin heavy-chain (MYH7) gene. It has been recently reported that LDM presents with a wide range of clinical manifestations. We herein report a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant myopathy. The affected individuals in the family presented with foot drop in early childhood, along with progressive distal and proximal limb weakness. Their characteristic symptoms include scapular winging and scoliosis in the early disease phase and impairment of ambulation in the advanced phase. Although limb-girdle muscle dystrophy (LGMD) was suspected initially, a definite diagnosis could not be reached. As such, we performed linkage analysis and detected four linkage regions, namely 1q23.2-24.1, 14q11.2-12, 15q26.2-26.3 and 17q24.3. Through subsequent whole exome sequencing, we found a de novo p.K1617del causative mutation in the MYH7 gene and diagnosed the disease as LDM. This is the first LDM case in China. Our patients have severe clinical manifestations that mimic LGMD in comparison with the patients with the same mutation reported elsewhere. PMID:27081534

  13. A de novo mutation of the MYH7 gene in a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant myopathy.

    PubMed

    Oda, Tetsuya; Xiong, Hui; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Wang, Shuo; Satake, Wataru; Jiao, Hui; Yang, Yanling; Cha, Pei-Chieng; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Nishino, Ichizo; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Wu, Xiru; Toda, Tatsushi

    2015-01-01

    Laing distal myopathy (LDM) is an autosomal dominant myopathy that is caused by mutations in the slow/beta cardiac myosin heavy-chain (MYH7) gene. It has been recently reported that LDM presents with a wide range of clinical manifestations. We herein report a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant myopathy. The affected individuals in the family presented with foot drop in early childhood, along with progressive distal and proximal limb weakness. Their characteristic symptoms include scapular winging and scoliosis in the early disease phase and impairment of ambulation in the advanced phase. Although limb-girdle muscle dystrophy (LGMD) was suspected initially, a definite diagnosis could not be reached. As such, we performed linkage analysis and detected four linkage regions, namely 1q23.2-24.1, 14q11.2-12, 15q26.2-26.3 and 17q24.3. Through subsequent whole exome sequencing, we found a de novo p.K1617del causative mutation in the MYH7 gene and diagnosed the disease as LDM. This is the first LDM case in China. Our patients have severe clinical manifestations that mimic LGMD in comparison with the patients with the same mutation reported elsewhere. PMID:27081534

  14. A Brazilian family with hereditary inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Fanganiello, R D; Kimonis, V E; Côrte, C C; Nitrini, R; Passos-Bueno, M R

    2011-04-01

    Inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD) is a progressive and usually misdiagnosed autosomal dominant disorder. It is clinically characterized by a triad of features: proximal and distal myopathy, early onset Paget disease of bone (PDB), and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). It is caused by missense mutations in the valosin-containing protein (VCP) gene. We describe here the clinical and molecular findings of the first Brazilian family identified with IBMPFD. Progressive myopathy affecting the limb girdles was detected by clinical examination followed by muscle biopsy and creatine kinase measurement. PDB was suggested after anatomopathological bone examination and FTD was diagnosed by clinical, neuropsychological and language evaluations. Brain magnetic resonance revealed severe atrophy of the anterior temporal lobes, including the hippocampi. A R93C mutation in VCP was detected by direct sequencing screening in subject W (age 62) and in his mother. Four more individuals diagnosed with "dementia" were reported in this family. We also present a comprehensive genotype-phenotype correlation analysis of mutations in VCP in 182 patients from 29 families described in the literature and show that while IBM is a conspicuously penetrant symptom, PDB has a lower penetrance when associated with mutations in the AAAD1 domain and FTD has a lower penetrance when associated with mutations in the Junction (L1-D1) domain. Furthermore, the R93C mutation is likely to be associated with the penetrance of all the clinical symptoms of the triad. PMID:21412659

  15. [Obtaining and characteristics of domestic preparation interferon alpha-2b with prolonged effect].

    PubMed

    Pokholenko, Ia A; Porubleva, L V; Dubeĭ, I Ia; Rebriev, A V; Sutugina, L P; Gromovoĭ, T Iu; Pokrovskiĭ, V A; Obolenskaia, M Iu; Chernykh, S I

    2008-01-01

    Pegylated interferon alpha-2b (PEG-IFN alpha-2b) is a domestic preparation of a modified recombinant interferon alpha-2b with prolonged effect. The preparation was obtained by N-terminal pegylation of IFN alpha-2b with polyethylene glycol (PEG). This paper presents the method of PEG-IFN alpha-2b synthesis and characteristics of the obtained product. PAAG electrophoresis, Western blot analysis and MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry confirm that the preparation is an N-terminal pegylated IFN alpha-2b that contains no more than 10% of dipegylated IFN alpha-2b. The comparison of PEG-IFN alpha-2b with its foreign analogue has revealed the similarity of their biological activity and pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:19351063

  16. Functional characterization of cytochromes P450 2B from the desert woodrat Neotoma lepida

    PubMed Central

    Wilderman, P. Ross; Jang, Hyun-Hee; Malenke, Jael R.; Salib, Mariam; Angermeier, Elizabeth; Lamime, Sonia; Dearing, M. Denise; Halpert, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian detoxification processes have been the focus of intense research, but little is known about how wild herbivores process plant secondary compounds, many of which have medicinal value or are drugs. cDNA sequences that code for three enzymes of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2B subfamily, here termed 2B35, 2B36, and 2B37 have been recently identified from a wild rodent, the desert woodrat (Malenke et al., 2012). Two variant clones of each enzyme were engineered to increase protein solubility and to facilitate purification, as reported for CYP2B enzymes from multiple species. When expressed in E. coli each of the woodrat proteins gave the characteristic maximum at 450 nm in a reduced carbon monoxide difference spectrum but generally expressed at lower levels than rat CYP2B1. Two enzymes, 2B36 and 2B37, showed dealkylation activity with the model substrates 7-ethoxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin and 7-benzyloxyresorufin, whereas 2B35 was inactive. Binding of the monoterpene (+)-α-pinene produced a Type I shift in the absorbance spectrum of each enzyme. Mutation of 2B37 at residues 114, 262, or 480, key residues governing ligand interactions with other CYP2B enzymes, did not significantly change expression levels or produce the expected functional changes. In summary, two catalytic and one ligand-binding assay are sufficient to distinguish among CYP2B35, 2B36, and 2B37. Differences in functional profiles between 2B36 and 2B37 are partially explained by changes in substrate recognition site residue 114, but not 480. The results advance our understanding of the mechanisms of detoxification in wild mammalian herbivores and highlight the complexity of this system. PMID:24361551

  17. Beyond the exchange--the future of B2B.

    PubMed

    Wise, R; Morrison, D

    2000-01-01

    Using the Internet to facilitate business-to-business commerce promises many benefits, such as dramatic cost reductions and greater access to buyers and sellers. Yet little is known about how B2B e-commerce will evolve. The authors argue that changes in the financial services industry over the past two decades provide important clues. Exchanges, they say, are not the primary source of value in information-intensive markets; value tends to accumulate among a diverse group of specialists that focus on such tasks as packaging, standard setting, arbitrage, and information management. Because scale and liquidity are vitally important to efficient trading, today's exchanges will consolidate into a relatively small set of mega-exchanges. Originators will handle the origination and aggregation of complex transactions before sending them on to mega-exchanges for execution. E-speculators, seeking to capitalize on an abundance of market information, will tend to concentrate where relatively standardized products can be transferred easily among a large group of buyers. In many markets, a handful of independent solution providers with well-known brand names and solid reputations will thrive alongside mega-exchanges. Sell-side asset exchanges will create the networks and provide the tools to allow suppliers to trade orders among themselves, sometimes after initial transactions with customers are made on the mega-exchanges. For many companies, traditional skills in such areas as product development, manufacturing, and marketing may become relatively less important, while the ability to understand and capitalize on market dynamics may become considerably more important. PMID:11184979

  18. Maintenance therapy with interferon alfa 2b in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Avilés, A; Díaz-Maqueo, J C; Talavera, A; Nambo, M J; García, E L

    1998-08-01

    We performed a randomized clinical trial to assess the efficacy and toxicity of interferon alfa 2b (IFN) as maintenance therapy in patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease in complete remission (CR) after conventional chemotherapy. One hundred and thirty-five patients (stage IIIB-IV B) were initially treated with EBVD (epirubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine). IF CR was achieved they were randomly assigned to receive either maintenance therapy with IFN 5.0 MU three times a week for one year or no further treatment (control group). Clinical and laboratory characteristics at diagnosis were quite similar in both groups. After a median follow-up of 74.3 months (range 49 to 108), 61 out of 68 patients (91%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 76% to 97%) remain in first complete remission in the IFN-treated group compared to 38 out of 67 (58%; 95% CI: 49% to 71%) in the control group (p<.01). Overall survival was also better in the IFN treated group: 62 patients (92%; 95% CI: 82% to 97%) are alive free of disease at 7-years compared to 40 patients (67%, 95%: 55% to 76%) in the control group (p<.01). Toxicity secondary to IFN administration was mild and no dose modification was necessary during treatment. All patients received the planned dose of IFN. This was not an intent-to treat analysis. IFN administration as maintenance therapy was appears to be the only cause of improvement in outcome in these patients. We feel that IFN should be considered as maintenance therapy in patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease because this treatment improves the final outcome without the excessive toxicities of more aggressive therapeutic approaches such as bone marrow transplantation during first CR. We hope that IFN will be considered in future randomized clinical trials in order to define it's role in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease. PMID:9711927

  19. 40 CFR Table 2b to Subpart E of... - Reactivity Factors for Aliphatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures 2B Table 2B to Subpart E of Part 59 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures Bin Averageboiling point* (degrees F) Criteria Reactivityfactor (g O3/g VOC) 1 80... Point + Dry Point)/2(b) Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvents...

  20. 40 CFR Table 2b to Subpart E of... - Reactivity Factors for Aliphatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures 2B Table 2B to Subpart E of Part 59 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures Bin Averageboiling point* (degrees F) Criteria Reactivityfactor (g O3/g VOC) 1 80... Point + Dry Point)/2(b) Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvents...

  1. 40 CFR Table 2b to Subpart E of... - Reactivity Factors for Aliphatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures 2B Table 2B to Subpart E of Part 59 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures Bin Averageboiling point* (degrees F) Criteria Reactivityfactor (g O3/g VOC) 1 80... Point + Dry Point)/2(b) Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvents...

  2. 14 CFR 250.2b - Carriers to request volunteers for denied boarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Carriers to request volunteers for denied boarding. 250.2b Section 250.2b Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS OVERSALES § 250.2b Carriers to request volunteers for...

  3. Statin Intolerance Because of Myalgia, Myositis, Myopathy, or Myonecrosis Can in Most Cases be Safely Resolved by Vitamin D Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Khayznikov, Maksim; Hemachrandra, Kallish; Pandit, Ramesh; Kumar, Ashwin; Wang, Ping; Glueck, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Low serum vitamin D can cause myalgia, myositis, myopathy, and myonecrosis. Statin-induced myalgia is a major and common cause of statin intolerance. Low serum vitamin D and statins, additively or synergistically, cause myalgia, myositis, myopathy, and/or myonecrosis. Statin-induced myalgia in vitamin D deficient patients can often be resolved by vitamin D supplementation, normalizing serum vitamin D levels. Aims: In 74 men and 72 women (age 59 ± 14 years) intolerant to ≥2 statins because of myalgia, myositis, myopathy, or myonecrosis and found to have low (<32 ng/mL) serum vitamin D, we prospectively assessed whether vitamin D supplementation (vitamin D2: 50,000-100,000 units/week) to normalize serum vitamin D would allow successful rechallenge therapy with statins. Materials and Methods: Follow-up evaluation on vitamin D supplementation was done on 134 patients at 6 months (median 5.3), 103 patients at 12 months (median 12.2), and 82 patients at 24 months (median 24). Results: Median entry serum vitamin D (22 ng/mL, 23 ng/mL, and 23 ng/mL) rose at 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months follow-up to 53 ng/mL, 53 ng/mL, and 55 ng/mL, respectively, (P < .0001 for all) on vitamin D therapy (50,000-100,000 units/week). On vitamin D supplementation, serum vitamin D normalized at 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months follow-up in 90%, 86%, and 91% of the patients, respectively. On rechallenge with statins while on vitamin D supplementation, median low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC) fell from the study entry (167 mg/dL, 164 mg/dL, and 158 mg/dL) to 90 mg/dL, 91 mg/dL, and 84 mg/dL, respectively, (P < .0001 for all). On follow-up at median 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months on statins and vitamin D, 88%, 91%, and 95% of the previously statin-intolerant patients, respectively, were free of myalgia, myositis, myopathy, and/or myonecrosis. Conclusions: Statin intolerance because of myalgia, myositis, myopathy, or myonecrosis associated with low serum vitamin

  4. Muscle histopathology in nebulin-related nemaline myopathy: ultrastrastructural findings correlated to disease severity and genotype.

    PubMed

    Malfatti, Edoardo; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Böhm, Johann; De Winter, Josine M; Schäffer, Ursula; Estournet, Brigitte; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Monges, Soledad; Lubieniecki, Fabiana; Bellance, Remi; Viou, Mai Thao; Madelaine, Angéline; Wu, Bin; Taratuto, Ana Lía; Eymard, Bruno; Pelin, Katarina; Fardeau, Michel; Ottenheijm, Coen A C; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Laporte, Jocelyn; Romero, Norma B

    2014-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a rare congenital myopathy characterised by hypotonia, muscle weakness, and often skeletal muscle deformities with the presence of nemaline bodies (rods) in the muscle biopsy. The nebulin (NEB) gene is the most commonly mutated and is thought to account for approximately 50% of genetically diagnosed cases of NM. We undertook a detailed muscle morphological analysis of 14 NEB-mutated NM patients with different clinical forms to define muscle pathological patterns and correlate them with clinical course and genotype. Three groups were identified according to clinical severity. Group 1 (n = 5) comprises severe/lethal NM and biopsy in the first days of life. Group 2 (n = 4) includes intermediate NM and biopsy in infancy. Group 3 (n = 5) comprises typical/mild NM and biopsy in childhood or early adult life. Biopsies underwent histoenzymological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural analysis. Fibre type distribution patterns, rod characteristics, distribution and localization were investigated. Contractile performance was studied in muscle fibre preparations isolated from seven muscle biopsies from each of the three groups. G1 showed significant myofibrillar dissociation and smallness with scattered globular rods in one third of fibres; there was no type 1 predominance. G2 presented milder sarcomeric dissociation, dispersed or clustered nemaline bodies, and type 1 predominance/uniformity. In contrast, G3 had well-delimited clusters of subsarcolemmal elongated rods and type 1 uniformity without sarcomeric alterations. In accordance with the clinical and morphological data, functional studies revealed markedly low forces in muscle bundles from G1 and a better contractile performance in muscle bundles from biopsies of patients from G2, and G3.In conclusion NEB-mutated NM patients present a wide spectrum of morphological features. It is difficult to establish firm genotype phenotype correlation. Interestingly, there was a correlation

  5. Anti-HMGCR autoantibodies in European patients with autoimmune necrotizing myopathies: inconstant exposure to statin.

    PubMed

    Allenbach, Yves; Drouot, Laurent; Rigolet, Aude; Charuel, Jean Luc; Jouen, Fabienne; Romero, Norma B; Maisonobe, Thierry; Dubourg, Odile; Behin, Anthony; Laforet, Pascal; Stojkovic, Tania; Eymard, Bruno; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Campana-Salort, Emmanuelle; Tournadre, Anne; Musset, Lucile; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Kone-Paut, Isabelle; Sibilia, Jean; Servais, Laurent; Fain, Olivier; Larroche, Claire; Diot, Elisabeth; Terrier, Benjamin; De Paz, Raphael; Dossier, Antoine; Menard, Dominique; Morati, Chafika; Roux, Marielle; Ferrer, Xavier; Martinet, Jeremie; Besnard, Sophie; Bellance, Remi; Cacoub, Patrice; Arnaud, Laurent; Grosbois, Bernard; Herson, Serge; Boyer, Olivier; Benveniste, Olivier

    2014-05-01

    Necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (NAM) is a group of acquired myopathies characterized by prominent myofiber necrosis with little or no muscle inflammation. Recently, researchers identified autoantibodies (aAb) against 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) in patients with NAM, especially in statin-exposed patients. Here we report what is to our knowledge the first European cohort of patients with NAM.The serum of 206 patients with suspicion of NAM was tested for detection of anti-HMGCR aAb using an addressable laser bead immunoassay. Forty-five patients were found to be anti-HMGCR positive. Their mean age was 48.9 ± 21.9 years and the group was predominantly female (73.3%). Statin exposure was recorded in 44.4% of patients. Almost all patients had a muscular deficit (97.7%), frequently severe (Medical Research Council [MRC] 5 ≤3 in 75.5%). Subacute onset (<6 mo) was noted for most of them (64.4%). Nevertheless, 3 patients (6.6%) had a slowly progressive course over more than 10 years. Except for weight loss (20%), no extramuscular sign was observed. The mean CK level was high (6941 ± 8802 IU/L) and correlated with muscle strength evaluated by manual muscle testing (r = -0.37, p = 0.03). Similarly, anti-HMGCR aAb titers were correlated with muscular strength (r = -0.31; p = 0.03) and CK level (r = 0.45; p = 0.01). Mean duration of treatment was 34.1 ± 40.8 months, and by the end of the study no patient had been able to stop treatment.This study confirms the observation and description of anti-HMGCR aAb associated with NAM. The majority of patients were statin naive and needed prolonged treatments. Some patients had a dystrophic-like presentation. Anti-HMGR aAb titers correlated with CK levels and muscle strength, suggesting their pathogenic role. PMID:24797170

  6. New aspects on patients affected by dysferlin deficient muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Klinge, Lars; Aboumousa, Ahmed; Eagle, Michelle; Hudson, Judith; Sarkozy, Anna; Vita, Gianluca; Charlton, Richard; Roberts, Mark; Straub, Volker; Barresi, Rita; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the dysferlin gene lead to limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B, Miyoshi myopathy and distal anterior compartment myopathy. A cohort of 36 patients affected by dysferlinopathy is described, in the first UK study of clinical, genetic, pathological and biochemical data. The diagnosis was established by reduction of dysferlin in the muscle biopsy and subsequent mutational analysis of the dysferlin gene. Seventeen mutations were novel; the majority of mutations were small deletions/insertions, and no mutational hotspots were identified. Sixty-one per cent of patients (22 patients) initially presented with limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B, 31% (11 patients) with a Miyoshi phenotype, one patient with proximodistal mode of onset, one patient with muscle stiffness after exercise and one patient as a symptomatic carrier. A wider range of age of onset was noted than previously reported, with 25% of patients having first symptoms before the age of 13 years. Independent of the initial mode of presentation, in our cohort of patients the gastrocnemius muscle was the most severely affected muscle leading to an inability to stand on tiptoes, and lower limbs were affected more severely than upper limbs. As previous anecdotal evidence on patients affected by dysferlinopathy suggests good muscle prowess before onset of symptoms, we also investigated pre-symptomatic fitness levels of the patients. Fifty-three per cent of the patients were very active and sporty before the onset of symptoms which makes the clinical course of dysferlinopathy unusual within the different forms of muscular dystrophy and provides a challenge to understanding the underlying pathomechanisms in this disease. PMID:19528035

  7. Distinct roles of NR2A and NR2B cytoplasmic tails in long term potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Kelly A.; McLaughlin, Nathan; Edbauer, Dieter; Phillips, Marnie; Bolton, Andrew; Constantine-Paton, Martha; Sheng, Morgan

    2010-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) are critical mediators of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity, but the differential roles of NR2A- versus NR2B-containing NMDARs have been controversial. Here, we investigate the roles of NR2A and NR2B in LTP in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures using RNAi and overexpression, to complement pharmacological approaches. In young slices, when NR2B is the predominant subunit expressed, LTP is blocked by the NR2B-selective antagonist Ro25-6981. As slices mature, and NR2A expression rises, activation of NR2B receptors became no longer necessary for LTP induction. LTP was blocked, however, by RNAi knockdown of NR2B, and this was rescued by coexpression of an RNAi-resistant NR2B (NR2B*) cDNA. Interestingly, a chimeric NR2B subunit in which the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail was replaced by that of NR2A failed to rescue LTP while the reverse chimera, NR2A channel with NR2B tail, was able to restore LTP. Thus expression of NR2B with its intact cytoplasmic tail is required for LTP induction, at an age when channel activity of NR2B-NMDARs is not required for LTP. Overexpression of wildtype NR2A failed to rescue LTP in neurons transfected with NR2B-RNAi construct, despite restoring NMDA-EPSC amplitude to a similar level as NR2B*. Surprisingly, an NR2A construct lacking its entire C-terminal cytoplasmic tail regained its ability to restore LTP. Together these data suggest that the NR2B subunit plays a critical role for LTP, presumably by recruiting relevant molecules important for LTP via its cytoplasmic tail. By contrast, NR2A is not essential for LTP and its cytoplasmic tail seems to carry inhibitory factors for LTP. PMID:20164351

  8. Postsynaptic density protein 95-regulated NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation and interactions of Fyn with NR2B in levodopa-induced dyskinesia rat models

    PubMed Central

    Ba, Maowen; Kong, Min; Ma, Guozhao

    2015-01-01

    Context Abnormality in interactions between N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor and its signaling molecules occurs in the lesioned striatum in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID). It was reported that Fyn-mediated NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation, can enhance NMDA receptor function. Postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), one of the synapse-associated proteins, regulates interactions between receptor and downstream-signaling molecules. In light of the relationship between PSD-95, NR2B, and Fyn kinases, does PSD-95 contribute to the overactivity of NMDA receptor function induced by dopaminergic treatment? To further prove the possibility, the effects of regulating the PSD-95 expression on the augmented NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation and on the interactions of Fyn and NR2B in LID rat models were evaluated. Methods In the present study, parkinsonian rat models were established by injecting 6-hydroxydopamine. Subsequently, valid PD rats were treated with levodopa (50 mg/kg/day with benserazide 12.5 mg/kg/day, twice daily) intraperitoneally for 22 days to create LID rat models. Then, the effect of pretreatment with an intrastriatal injection of the PSD-95mRNA antisense oligonucleotides (PSD-95 ASO) on the rotational response to levodopa challenge was assessed. The effects of pretreatment with an intrastriatal injection of PSD-95 ASO on the augmented NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation and interactions of Fyn with NR2B in the LID rat models were detected by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation. Results Levodopa administration twice daily for 22 days to parkinsonian rats shortened the rotational duration and increased the peak turning responses. The altered rotational responses were attenuated by PSD-95 ASO pretreatment. Meanwhile, PSD-95 ASO pretreatment decreased the level of PSD-95 protein expression and reduced both the augmented NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation and interactions of Fyn with NR2B triggered during the levodopa administration in the

  9. Copy Number Variation of UGT 2B Genes in Indian Families Using Whole Genome Scans

    PubMed Central

    Veerappa, Avinash M.; Padakannaya, Prakash; Ramachandra, Nallur B.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Uridine diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase 2B (UGT2B) is a family of genes involved in metabolizing steroid hormones and several other xenobiotics. These UGT2B genes are highly polymorphic in nature and have distinct polymorphisms associated with specific regions around the globe. Copy number variations (CNVs) status of UGT2B17 in Indian population is not known and their disease associations have been inconclusive. It was therefore of interest to investigate the CNV profile of UGT2B genes. Methods. We investigated the presence of CNVs in UGT2B genes in 31 members from eight Indian families using Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 chip. Results. Our data revealed >50% of the study members carried CNVs in UGT2B genes, of which 76% showed deletion polymorphism. CNVs were observed more in UGT2B17 (76.4%) than in UGT2B15 (17.6%). Molecular network and pathway analysis found enrichment related to steroid metabolic process, carboxylesterase activity, and sequence specific DNA binding. Interpretation and Conclusion. We report the presence of UGT2B gene deletion and duplication polymorphisms in Indian families. Network analysis indicates the substitutive role of other possible genes in the UGT activity. The CNVs of UGT2B genes are very common in individuals indicating that the effect is neutral in causing any suspected diseases. PMID:27092269

  10. Membrane repair of human skeletal muscle cells requires Annexin-A5.

    PubMed

    Carmeille, Romain; Bouvet, Flora; Tan, Sisareuth; Croissant, Coralie; Gounou, Céline; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Mouly, Vincent; Brisson, Alain R; Bouter, Anthony

    2016-09-01

    Defect in membrane repair contributes to the development of limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B) and Miyoshi myopathy. In healthy skeletal muscle, unraveling membrane repair mechanisms requires to establish an exhaustive list of the components of the resealing machinery. Here we show that human myotubes rendered deficient for Annexin-A5 (AnxA5) suffer from a severe defect in membrane resealing. This defect is rescued by the addition of recombinant AnxA5 while an AnxA5 mutant, which is unable to form 2D protein arrays, has no effect. Using correlative light and electron microscopy, we show that AnxA5 binds to the edges of the torn membrane, as early as a few seconds after sarcolemma injury, where it probably self-assembles into 2D arrays. In addition, we observed that membrane resealing is associated with the presence of a cluster of lipid vesicles at the wounded site. AnxA5 is present at the surface of these vesicles and may thus participate in plugging the cell membrane disruption. Finally, we show that AnxA5 behaves similarly in myotubes from a muscle cell line established from a patient suffering from LGMD2B, a myopathy due to dysferlin mutations, which indicates that trafficking of AnxA5 during sarcolemma damage is independent of the presence of dysferlin. PMID:27286750

  11. Increased mitochondrial emission of reactive oxygen species and calpain activation are required for doxorubicin-induced cardiac and skeletal muscle myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kisuk; Kwon, Oh-Sung; Smuder, Ashley J; Wiggs, Michael P; Sollanek, Kurt J; Christou, Demetra D; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Szeto, Hazel H; Kavazis, Andreas N; Powers, Scott K

    2015-01-01

    Although doxorubicin (DOX) is a highly effective anti-tumour agent used to treat a variety of cancers, DOX administration is associated with significant side effects, including myopathy of both cardiac and skeletal muscles. The mechanisms responsible for DOX-mediated myopathy remain a topic of debate. We tested the hypothesis that both increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) emission and activation of the cysteine protease calpain are required for DOX-induced myopathy in rat cardiac and skeletal muscle. Cause and effect was determined by administering a novel mitochondrial-targeted anti-oxidant to prevent DOX-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS emission, whereas a highly-selective pharmacological inhibitor was exploited to inhibit calpain activity. Our findings reveal that mitochondria are a major site of DOX-mediated ROS production in both cardiac and skeletal muscle fibres and the prevention of DOX-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS emission protects against fibre atrophy and contractile dysfunction in both cardiac and skeletal muscles. Furthermore, our results indicate that DOX-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS emission are required to activate calpain in heart and skeletal muscles and, importantly, calpain activation is a major contributor to DOX-induced myopathy. Taken together, these findings show that increased mitochondrial ROS production and calpain activation are significant contributors to the development of DOX-induced myopathy in both cardiac and skeletal muscle fibres. PMID:25643692

  12. Molecular Genetic Diagnosis of a Bethlem Myopathy Family with an Autosomal-Dominant COL6A1 Mutation, as Evidenced by Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyung Jun; Choi, Young-Chul; Kim, Seung Min; Kim, Se Hoon; Hong, Young Bin; Yoon, Bo Ram

    2015-01-01

    Background We describe herein the application of whole exome sequencing (WES) for the molecular genetic diagnosis of a large Korean family with dominantly inherited myopathy. Case Report The affected individuals presented with slowly progressive proximal weakness and ankle contracture. They were initially diagnosed with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) based on clinical and pathologic features. However, WES and subsequent capillary sequencing identified a pathogenic splicing-site mutation (c.1056+1G>A) in COL6A1, which was previously reported to be an underlying cause of Bethlem myopathy. After identification of the genetic cause of the disease, careful neurologic examination revealed subtle contracture of the interphalangeal joint in the affected members, which is a characteristic sign of Bethlem myopathy. Therefore, we revised the original diagnosis from LGMD to Bethlem myopathy. Conclusions This is the first report of identification of COL6A1-mediated Bethlem myopathy in Korea, and indicates the utility of WES for the diagnosis of muscular dystrophy. PMID:25749816

  13. Melanocytes from Patients Affected by Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy and Bethlem Myopathy have Dysfunctional Mitochondria That Can be Rescued with Cyclophilin Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zulian, Alessandra; Tagliavini, Francesca; Rizzo, Erika; Pellegrini, Camilla; Sardone, Francesca; Zini, Nicoletta; Maraldi, Nadir Mario; Santi, Spartaco; Faldini, Cesare; Merlini, Luciano; Petronilli, Valeria; Bernardi, Paolo; Sabatelli, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myopathy are caused by mutations in collagen VI (ColVI) genes, which encode an extracellular matrix protein; yet, mitochondria play a major role in disease pathogenesis through a short circuit caused by inappropriate opening of the permeability transition pore, a high-conductance channel, which causes a shortage in ATP production. We find that melanocytes do not produce ColVI yet they bind it at the cell surface, suggesting that this protein may play a trophic role and that its absence may cause lesions similar to those seen in skeletal muscle. We show that mitochondria in melanocytes of Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myopathy patients display increased size, reduced matrix density, and disrupted cristae, findings that suggest a functional impairment. In keeping with this hypothesis, mitochondria (i) underwent anomalous depolarization after inhibition of the F-ATP synthase with oligomycin, and (ii) displayed decreased respiratory reserve capacity. The non-immunosuppressive cyclophilin inhibitor NIM811 prevented mitochondrial depolarization in response to oligomycin in melanocytes from both Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myopathy patients, and partially restored the respiratory reserve of melanocytes from one Bethlem myopathy patient. These results match our recent findings on melanocytes from patients affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy (Pellegrini et al., 2013), and suggest that skin biopsies may represent a minimally invasive tool to investigate mitochondrial dysfunction and to evaluate drug efficacy in ColVI-related myopathies and possibly in other muscle wasting conditions like aging sarcopenia. PMID:25477819

  14. Melanocytes from Patients Affected by Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy and Bethlem Myopathy have Dysfunctional Mitochondria That Can be Rescued with Cyclophilin Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zulian, Alessandra; Tagliavini, Francesca; Rizzo, Erika; Pellegrini, Camilla; Sardone, Francesca; Zini, Nicoletta; Maraldi, Nadir Mario; Santi, Spartaco; Faldini, Cesare; Merlini, Luciano; Petronilli, Valeria; Bernardi, Paolo; Sabatelli, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myopathy are caused by mutations in collagen VI (ColVI) genes, which encode an extracellular matrix protein; yet, mitochondria play a major role in disease pathogenesis through a short circuit caused by inappropriate opening of the permeability transition pore, a high-conductance channel, which causes a shortage in ATP production. We find that melanocytes do not produce ColVI yet they bind it at the cell surface, suggesting that this protein may play a trophic role and that its absence may cause lesions similar to those seen in skeletal muscle. We show that mitochondria in melanocytes of Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myopathy patients display increased size, reduced matrix density, and disrupted cristae, findings that suggest a functional impairment. In keeping with this hypothesis, mitochondria (i) underwent anomalous depolarization after inhibition of the F-ATP synthase with oligomycin, and (ii) displayed decreased respiratory reserve capacity. The non-immunosuppressive cyclophilin inhibitor NIM811 prevented mitochondrial depolarization in response to oligomycin in melanocytes from both Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myopathy patients, and partially restored the respiratory reserve of melanocytes from one Bethlem myopathy patient. These results match our recent findings on melanocytes from patients affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy (Pellegrini et al., 2013), and suggest that skin biopsies may represent a minimally invasive tool to investigate mitochondrial dysfunction and to evaluate drug efficacy in ColVI-related myopathies and possibly in other muscle wasting conditions like aging sarcopenia. PMID:25477819

  15. Association between risk of myopathy and cholesterol-lowering effect: a comparison of all statins.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Chisaki, Ikumi; Narumi, Katsuya; Hidaka, Kazuhiro; Kagawa, Toshiki; Itagaki, Shirou; Hirano, Takeshi; Iseki, Ken

    2008-04-23

    In the present study, we examined the mechanisms underlying the cytotoxicity of pitavastatin, a new statin, and we compared the in vitro potencies of muscle cytotoxicity using a prototypic embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma cell line (RD cells), a typical side effect of statins and compared the cholesterol-lowering effects of statins using Hep G2 hepatoma cells. Pitavastatin reduced the number of viable cells and caused caspase-9 and -3/7 activation in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The comparison of cytotoxities of statins showed that statins significantly reduced cell viability and markedly enhanced activity of caspase-3/7 in concentration-dependent manner. On the other hand, the effects of hydrophilic statins, pravastatin, rosuvastatin were very weak. The rank order of cytotoxicity was cerivastatin > simvastatin acid> fluvastatin > atorvastatin > lovastatin acid > pitavastatin > rosuvastatin, pravastatin. Statin-induced cytotoxicity is associated with these partition coefficients. On the other hand, the cholesterol-lowering effect of statins did not correlate with these partition coefficients and cytotoxicity. Thus, it is necessary to consider the association between risk of myopathy and cholesterol-lowering effect of a statin for precise use of statins. PMID:18402982

  16. Blockade of ActRIIB signaling triggers muscle fatigability and metabolic myopathy.

    PubMed

    Relizani, Karima; Mouisel, Etienne; Giannesini, Benoit; Hourdé, Christophe; Patel, Ketan; Morales Gonzalez, Susanne; Jülich, Kristina; Vignaud, Alban; Piétri-Rouxel, France; Fortin, Dominique; Garcia, Luis; Blot, Stéphane; Ritvos, Olli; Bendahan, David; Ferry, Arnaud; Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Schuelke, Markus; Amthor, Helge

    2014-08-01

    Myostatin regulates skeletal muscle size via the activin receptor IIB (ActRIIB). However, its effect on muscle energy metabolism and energy-dependent muscle function remains largely unexplored. This question needs to be solved urgently since various therapies for neuromuscular diseases based on blockade of ActRIIB signaling are being developed. Here, we show in mice, that 4-month pharmacological abrogation of ActRIIB signaling by treatment with soluble ActRIIB-Fc triggers extreme muscle fatigability. This is associated with elevated serum lactate levels and a severe metabolic myopathy in the mdx mouse, an animal model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Blockade of ActRIIB signaling downregulates porin, a crucial ADP/ATP shuttle between cytosol and mitochondrial matrix leading to a consecutive deficiency of oxidative phosphorylation as measured by in vivo Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ((31)P-MRS). Further, ActRIIB blockade reduces muscle capillarization, which further compounds the metabolic stress. We show that ActRIIB regulates key determinants of muscle metabolism, such as Pparβ, Pgc1α, and Pdk4 thereby optimizing different components of muscle energy metabolism. In conclusion, ActRIIB signaling endows skeletal muscle with high oxidative capacity and low fatigability. The severe metabolic side effects following ActRIIB blockade caution against deploying this strategy, at least in isolation, for treatment of neuromuscular disorders. PMID:24861054

  17. Role of TGF-β signaling in inherited and acquired myopathies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily consists of a variety of cytokines expressed in many different cell types including skeletal muscle. Members of this superfamily that are of particular importance in skeletal muscle are TGF-β1, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and myostatin. These signaling molecules play important roles in skeletal muscle homeostasis and in a variety of inherited and acquired neuromuscular disorders. Expression of these molecules is linked to normal processes in skeletal muscle such as growth, differentiation, regeneration, and stress response. However, chronic elevation of TGF-β1, MAPKs, and myostatin is linked to various features of muscle pathology, including impaired regeneration and atrophy. In this review, we focus on the aberrant signaling of TGF-β in various disorders such as Marfan syndrome, muscular dystrophies, sarcopenia, and critical illness myopathy. We also discuss how the inhibition of several members of the TGF-β signaling pathway has been implicated in ameliorating disease phenotypes, opening up novel therapeutic avenues for a large group of neuromuscular disorders. PMID:21798096

  18. The evolution of capture myopathy in hooved mammals: a model for human stress cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Blumstein, Daniel T.; Buckner, Janet; Shah, Sajan; Patel, Shane; Alfaro, Michael E.; Natterson-Horowitz, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives: Capture myopathy (CM) syndromes in wildlife may be a model for human stress cardiomyopathy, including Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Emotional stress or grief may trigger heart attack-like symptoms, and occasionally, sudden death in some humans. Similarly, wildlife exposed to predatory stresses, chase, or capture occasionally results in sudden death. To better understand the nature of vulnerability to stress-induced sudden death, we studied cases of CM in hooved mammals—ungulates—and hypothesized that CM would be associated with a syndrome of longevity-related traits. Methodology: We reconstructed the evolution of CM in ungulates then determined how a set of life history traits explained variation in the likelihood that CM was reported. Results: CM is broadly reported, but not in all genera, and phylogenetic analyses suggest that it is an evolutionarily labile trait. We found that the following traits were significantly associated with reports of CM: greater brain mass, faster maximum running speed, greater minimum group size and greater maximum longevity. Conclusions and implications: CM may be an unavoidable consequence of adaptations to reduce predation risk that include increased running speed, sociality and having larger brains. Moreover, longer-lived species seem to be more likely to be susceptible to CM. Exploring variable susceptibility to CM highlights the evolutionary origins of the disorder, potential basic mechanisms that underlie vulnerability to the phenomenon, and the potential for reduction of risk through modification of life history trajectory. PMID:26198189

  19. Inflammatory myopathy with severe tongue atrophy in Pembroke Welsh Corgi dogs.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Kaoru; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Matsuki, Naoaki; Sakai, Hideo; Kitagawa, Masato; Saito, Miyoko; Sasaki, Jun; Nakayama, Hiroyuki

    2010-11-01

    A disease characterized by tongue and facial muscle atrophy has been recognized sporadically among Pembroke Welsh Corgi (PWC) dogs in Japan. The present study describes the pathologic findings of this canine syndrome. Histopathologic examinations were performed in 2 dogs, including a case of muscular biopsy. Identification and characterization of autoantibodies were attempted by fluorescent antibody test (FAT) and Western blot (WB) by using sera from 7 PWC dogs with typical clinical features, 6 PWC dogs with other clinical signs, and 2 from other breeds with polymyositis. Clinically, the 7 affected PWC dogs exhibited dysphagia with severe tongue atrophy, facial muscular atrophy, and occasional walking difficulty. Histopathologic examinations of the 2 dogs with clinical symptoms revealed moderate to severe inflammatory lesions characterized by lymphohistiocytic infiltration and muscular atrophy in the tongue and/or femoral muscles. The tongue lesions were very severe and accompanied by diffuse fatty infiltration. There were no major lesions in the nervous tissues examined. By FAT, an autoantibody against the cross striation of skeletal muscle was detected in sera from 5 affected PWC dogs. By using WB analysis, the autoantibodies recognized a 42-kDa molecule in striated muscle but not in the nervous tissues. All of the findings indicated that the unique disease of PWC dogs might be generalized inflammatory myopathy, whereas the detailed etiology concerning the dominant involvement of tongue muscles and the role of the autoantibody in the canine disease remain to be clarified. PMID:21088170

  20. Diabetes in the young - a case of Alström syndrome with myopathy.

    PubMed

    Bronson, S C; Anand Moses, C R; Periyandavar, I; Dharmarajan, P; Suresh, E; Shanmugam, A; Vasuki, R; Venkatesh, D; Amudha, J

    2015-03-01

    Alström syndrome is a rare ciliopathy affecting about 1 in 1,000,000 individuals. It is characterised by cone-rod dystrophy, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, cardiomyopathy, renal failure and hypogonadism. Progressive multi-organ dysfunction eventually leads to death. Only about 800 patients with this disorder have been identified so far. The diagnosis of Alström syndrome is critical as it can easily be overlooked because of the many features it shares with metabolic syndrome. The gene affected in this autosomal recessive disease is ALMS1, the protein product of which is involved in intracellular trafficking and ciliary function. Alström syndrome is being studied as a model which would potentially shed light on the pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus. In this report, we describe a patient with features of Alström syndrome and a clinical picture suggestive of a recurrent, severe, steroid responsive myopathy which, to the best of our knowledge, has not been reported so far. PMID:25874828

  1. Exercise myopathy: changes in myofibrils of fast-twitch muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Kaasik, P; Umnova, M; Seene, T

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the relationships between the changes of myofibrils in fast-twitch oxidative-glycolytic (type IIA) fibres and fast-twitch glycolytic (type IIB) muscle fibres, protein synthesis and degradation rate in exercise-induced myopathic skeletal muscle. Exhaustive exercise was used to induce myopathy in Wistar rats. Intensity of glycogenolysis in muscle fibres during exercise, protein synthesis rate, degradation rate and structural changes of myofibrils were measured using morphological and biochemical methods. Myofibril cross sectional area (CSA) in type IIA fibres decreased 33% and type IIB fibres 44%. Protein degradation rate increased in both type IIA and IIB fibres, 63% and 69% respectively in comparison with the control group. According to the intensity of glycogenolysis, fast oxidative-glycolytic fibres are recruited more frequently during overtraining. Myofibrils in both types of fast-twitch myopathic muscle fibres are significantly thinner as the result of more intensive protein degradation. Regeneration capacity according to the presence of satellite cells is higher in type IIA fibres than in type IIB fibres in myopathic muscle. PMID:25177093

  2. [Pulmonary thromboembolism as a late complication of mitochondrial myopathy (Kearns-Sayer syndrome ].

    PubMed

    Fijołek, Justyna; Wiatr, Elzbieta; Wiechecka, Anna; Torbicki, Adam; Biederman, Andrzej; Mickielewicz, Anatol; Roszkowski-Sliz, Kazimierz

    2003-01-01

    A case of pulmonary thromboembolism with transient pulmonary hypertension of a rare cause is presented. In 24-year-old woman myasthenia was recognised on the ground of ptosis and fixation of eyes muscles from the 14th year of age. The treatment with mestinon was ineffective. Before planned thymectomy serious disturbances of heart rhythm and conduction were confirmed. Stimulator was implanted and thymectomy was done. No improvement of neurological state was observed despite the treatment with mestinone and prednisone. When she was 30 years old disease of lung appeared with fever, cough and parenchymal and pleural lesions of right lung. Antibiotic therapy was ineffective. CT scan and US examination revealed large thrombus inside the right auricle connected with stimulator electrodes. Embolisation of right pulmonary arteria was confirmed also. Treatment with heparin was ineffective and thrombectomy was performed. Exact neurological examination stated that the patient had no typical symptoms of myasthenia and that symptoms related with eyes and heart could be result of mitochondrial myopathy. Diagnosis was confirmed by EMG examination and muscle biopsy. PMID:15052981

  3. Two Desmin Gene Mutations Associated with Myofibrillar Myopathies in Polish Families

    PubMed Central

    Berdynski, Mariusz; Sikorska, Agata; Filipek, Slawomir; Redowicz, Maria Jolanta; Kaminska, Anna; Zekanowski, Cezary

    2014-01-01

    Desmin is a muscle-specific intermediate filament protein which forms a network connecting the sarcomere, T tubules, sarcolemma, nuclear membrane, mitochondria and other organelles. Mutations in the gene coding for desmin (DES) cause skeletal myopathies often combined with cardiomyopathy, or isolated cardiomyopathies. The molecular pathomechanisms of the disease remain ambiguous. Here, we describe and comprehensively characterize two DES mutations found in Polish patients with a clinical diagnosis of desminopathy. The study group comprised 16 individuals representing three families. Two mutations were identified: a novel missense mutation (Q348P) and a small deletion of nine nucleotides (A357_E359del), previously described by us in the Polish population. A common ancestry of all the families bearing the A357_E359del mutation was confirmed. Both mutations were predicted to be pathogenic using a bioinformatics approach, including molecular dynamics simulations which helped to rationalize abnormal behavior at molecular level. To test the impact of the mutations on DES expression and the intracellular distribution of desmin muscle biopsies were investigated. Elevated desmin levels as well as its atypical localization in muscle fibers were observed. Additional staining for M-cadherin, α-actinin, and myosin heavy chains confirmed severe disruption of myofibrill organization. The abnormalities were more prominent in the Q348P muscle, where both small atrophic fibers as well large fibers with centrally localized nuclei were observed. We propose that the mutations affect desmin structure and cause its aberrant folding and subsequent aggregation, triggering disruption of myofibrils organization. PMID:25541946

  4. Phenotypic expansion of visceral myopathy associated with ACTG2 tandem base substitution.

    PubMed

    Klar, Joakim; Raykova, Doroteya; Gustafson, Elisabet; Tóthová, Iveta; Ameur, Adam; Wanders, Alkwin; Dahl, Niklas

    2015-12-01

    Familial visceral myopathy (FVM) is a rare heritable and heterogeneous condition due to impaired smooth muscle function. We identified a family segregating 11 individuals with a spectrum of visceral symptoms involving the small intestine, colon, biliary tract, urinary tract and uterus. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a novel heterozygous tandem base substitution c.806_807delinsAA (p.(Gly269Glu)) in ACTG2, encoding smooth muscle actin γ-2, in affected family members. Variants in ACTG2 were recently identified in FVM with intestinal pseudo-obstruction as well as with the congenital megacystics-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome. In our family, eight affected members presented with severe complications from the biliary and/or the urinary tracts in addition to gastrointestinal pseudo-obstructions. Furthermore, all affected mothers had a history of assisted deliveries owing to poor progress during labor and weak uterine contractions. The variable involvement of multiple smooth muscle-dependent organs in our family, including the biliary tract and the uterus, add to the phenotypic spectrum associated with ACTG2 missense variants. PMID:25782675

  5. Critical illness myopathy and polyneuropathy - A challenge for physiotherapists in the intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Pattanshetty, Renu B; Gaude, Gajanan S

    2011-04-01

    The development of critical patient related generalized neuromuscular weakness, referred to as critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP) and critical illness myopathy (CIM), is a major complication in patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU). Both CIP and CIM cause muscle weakness and paresis in critically ill patients during their ICU stay. Early mobilization or kinesiotherapy have shown muscle weakness reversion in critically ill patients providing faster return to function, reducing weaning time, and length of hospitalization. Exercises in the form of passive, active, and resisted forms have proved to improve strength and psychological well being. Clinical trials using neuromuscular electrical stimulation to increase muscle mass, muscle strength and improve blood circulation to the surrounding tissue have proved beneficial. The role of electrical stimulation is unproven as yet. Recent evidence indicates no difference between treated and untreated muscles. Future research is recommended to conduct clinical trials using neuromuscular electrical stimulation, exercises, and early mobilization as a treatment protocol in larger populations of patients in ICU. PMID:21814370

  6. [Higher Brain Dysfunction in Mitochondrial Myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-Like Episodes (MELAS)].

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Hiroo

    2016-02-01

    Stroke-like episodes are one of the cardinal features of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), and occur in 84-99% of the patients. The affected areas detected on neuroimaging do not have classical vascular distribution, and involve predominantly the temporal, parietal and occipital lobes. Thus, the neurological symptoms including higher brain dysfunction correlate with this topographical distribution. In association with the occipital lobe involvement, the most frequent symptom is cortical blindness. Other symptoms have been occasionally reported in case reports: visual agnosia, prosopagnosia, cortical deafness, auditory agnosia, topographical disorientation, various types of aphasia, hemispatial neglect, and so on. On the other hand, cognitive decline associated with more diffuse brain impairment rather than with focal stroke-like lesions has been postulated. This condition is also known as mitochondrial dementia. Domains of cognitive dysfunction include abstract reasoning, verbal memory, visual memory, language (naming and fluency), executive or constructive functions, attention, and visuospatial function. Cognitive functions and intellectual abilities may decline from initially minimal cognitive impairment to dementia. To date, the neuropsychological and neurologic impairment has been reported to be associated with cerebral lactic acidosis as estimated by ventricular spectroscopic lactate levels. PMID:26873235

  7. Mutations in FAM111B Cause Hereditary Fibrosing Poikiloderma with Tendon Contracture, Myopathy, and Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, Sandra; Küry, Sébastien; Shaboodien, Gasnat; Houniet, Darren T.; Khumalo, Nonhlanhla P.; Bou-Hanna, Chantal; Bodak, Nathalie; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; David, Albert; Faivre, Laurence; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Gherardi, Romain K.; Glen, Elise; Hamel, Antoine; Laboisse, Christian; Le Caignec, Cédric; Lindenbaum, Pierre; Magot, Armelle; Munnich, Arnold; Mussini, Jean-Marie; Pillay, Komala; Rahman, Thahira; Redon, Richard; Salort-Campana, Emmanuelle; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Thauvin, Christel; Barbarot, Sébastien; Keavney, Bernard; Bézieau, Stéphane; Mayosi, Bongani M.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital poikiloderma is characterized by a combination of mottled pigmentation, telangiectasia, and epidermal atrophy in the first few months of life. We have previously described a South African European-descent family affected by a rare autosomal-dominant form of hereditary fibrosing poikiloderma accompanied by tendon contracture, myopathy, and pulmonary fibrosis. Here, we report the identification of causative mutations in FAM111B by whole-exome sequencing. In total, three FAM111B missense mutations were identified in five kindreds of different ethnic backgrounds. The mutation segregated with the disease in one large pedigree, and mutations were de novo in two other pedigrees. All three mutations were absent from public databases and were not observed on Sanger sequencing of 388 ethnically matched control subjects. The three single-nucleotide mutations code for amino acid changes that are clustered within a putative trypsin-like cysteine/serine peptidase domain of FAM111B. These findings provide evidence of the involvement of FAM111B in congenital poikiloderma and multisystem fibrosis. PMID:24268661

  8. A Tropomyosin-2 Mutation Suppresses a Troponin I Myopathy in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Naimi, Benyoussef; Harrison, Andrew; Cummins, Mark; Nongthomba, Upendra; Clark, Samantha; Canal, Inmaculada; Ferrus, Alberto; Sparrow, John C.

    2001-01-01

    A suppressor mutation, D53, of the held-up2 allele of the Drosophila melanogaster Troponin I (wupA) gene is described. D53, a missense mutation, S185F, of the tropomyosin-2, Tm2, gene fully suppresses all the phenotypic effects of held-up2, including the destructive hypercontraction of the indirect flight muscles (IFMs), a lack of jumping, the progressive myopathy of the walking muscles, and reductions in larval crawling and feeding behavior. The suppressor restores normal function of the IFMs, but flight ability decreases with age and correlates with an unusual, progressive structural collapse of the myofibrillar lattice starting at the center. The S185F substitution in Tm2 is close to a troponin T binding site on tropomyosin. Models to explain suppression by D53, derived from current knowledge of the vertebrate troponin-tropomyosin complex structure and functions, are discussed. The effects of S185F are compared with those of two mutations in residues 175 and 180 of human α-tropomyosin 1 which cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). PMID:11359941

  9. Differential involvement of sarcomeric proteins in myofibrillar myopathies: a morphological and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Claeys, Kristl G; van der Ven, Peter F M; Behin, Anthony; Stojkovic, Tanya; Eymard, Bruno; Dubourg, Odile; Laforêt, Pascal; Faulkner, Georgine; Richard, Pascale; Vicart, Patrick; Romero, Norma B; Stoltenburg, Gisela; Udd, Bjarne; Fardeau, Michel; Voit, Thomas; Fürst, Dieter O

    2009-03-01

    Myofibrillar myopathies (MFMs) are rare inherited or sporadic progressive neuromuscular disorders with considerable clinical and genetic heterogeneity. In the current study, we have analyzed histopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics in genetically identified MFMs. We performed a morphological and morphometrical study in a cohort of 24 genetically identified MFM patients (12 desmin, 6 alphaB-crystallin, 4 ZASP, 2 myotilin), and an extensive immunohistochemical study in 15 of these patients, using both well-known and novel antibodies directed against distinct compartments of the muscle fibers, including Z-disc and M-band proteins. Our morphological data revealed some significant differences between the distinct MFM subgroups: the consistent presence of 'rubbed-out' fibers in desminopathies and alphaB-crystallinopathies, an elevated frequency of vacuoles in ZASPopathies and myotilinopathies, and the presence of a few necrotic fibers in the two myotilinopathy patients. Immunohistochemistry showed that in MFM only a subset of Z-disc proteins, such as filamin C and its ligands myotilin and Xin, exhibited significant alterations in their localization, whereas other Z-disc proteins like alpha-actinin, myopodin and tritopodin, did not. In contrast, M-band proteins revealed no abnormalities in MFM. We conclude that the presence of 'rubbed-out' fibers are a suggestive feature for desminopathy or alphaB-crystallinopathy, and that MFM is not a general disease of the myofibril, but primarily affects a subgroup of stress-responsive Z-disc proteins. PMID:19151983

  10. Vitamin D Receptor Gene Polymorphisms and Haplotypes in Hungarian Patients with Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Griger, Zoltán; Dankó, Katalin

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are autoimmune diseases characterized by symmetrical proximal muscle weakness. Our aim was to identify a correlation between VDR polymorphisms or haplotypes and myositis. We studied VDR-BsmI, VDR-ApaI, VDR-TaqI, and VDR-FokI polymorphisms and haplotypes in 89 Hungarian poly-/dermatomyositis patients (69 females) and 93 controls (52 females). We did not obtain any significant differences for VDR-FokI, BsmI, ApaI, and TaqI genotypes and allele frequencies between patients with myositis and healthy individuals. There was no association of VDR polymorphisms with clinical manifestations and laboratory profiles in myositis patients. Men with myositis had a significantly different distribution of BB, Bb, and bb genotypes than female patients, control male individuals, and the entire control group. Distribution of TT, Tt, and tt genotypes was significantly different in males than in females in patient group. According to four-marker haplotype prevalence, frequencies of sixteen possible haplotypes showed significant differences between patient and control groups. The three most frequent haplotypes in patients were the fbAt, FBaT, and fbAT. Our findings may reveal that there is a significant association: Bb and Tt genotypes can be associated with myositis in the Hungarian population we studied. We underline the importance of our result in the estimated prevalence of four-marker haplotypes. PMID:25649962

  11. Dynamin GTPase Regulation is Altered by PH Domain Mutations Found in Centronuclear Myopathy Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kenniston, J.; Lemmon, M

    2010-01-01

    The large GTPase dynamin has an important membrane scission function in receptor-mediated endocytosis and other cellular processes. Self-assembly on phosphoinositide-containing membranes stimulates dynamin GTPase activity, which is crucial for its function. Although the pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain is known to mediate phosphoinositide binding by dynamin, it remains unclear how this promotes activation. Here, we describe studies of dynamin PH domain mutations found in centronuclear myopathy (CNM) that increase dynamin's GTPase activity without altering phosphoinositide binding. CNM mutations in the PH domain C-terminal {alpha}-helix appear to cause conformational changes in dynamin that alter control of the GTP hydrolysis cycle. These mutations either 'sensitize' dynamin to lipid stimulation or elevate basal GTPase rates by promoting self-assembly and thus rendering dynamin no longer lipid responsive. We also describe a low-resolution structure of dimeric dynamin from small-angle X-ray scattering that reveals conformational changes induced by CNM mutations, and defines requirements for domain rearrangement upon dynamin self-assembly at membrane surfaces. Our data suggest that changes in the PH domain may couple lipid binding to dynamin GTPase activation at sites of vesicle invagination.

  12. Muscle proteomics reveals novel insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms of collagen VI myopathies.

    PubMed

    De Palma, Sara; Capitanio, Daniele; Vasso, Michele; Braghetta, Paola; Scotton, Chiara; Bonaldo, Paolo; Lochmüller, Hanns; Muntoni, Francesco; Ferlini, Alessandra; Gelfi, Cecilia

    2014-11-01

    Mutations in the collagen VI genes cause the Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), with severe phenotype, and Bethlem myopathy (BM) with mild to moderate phenotype. Both, UCMD and BM patients show dystrophic features with degeneration/regeneration and replacement of muscle with fat and fibrous connective tissue. At molecular level, UCMD patients show autophagic impairment and increased PTP opening; these features are less severe in BM. To elucidate the biochemical mechanisms adopted by the muscle to adapt to collagen VI deficiency in BM and UCMD patients, a proteome analysis was carried out on human muscle biopsies. Qualitative and quantitative differences were assessed by 2D-DIGE coupled to MALDI-ToF/ToF MS. Proteomics results, coupled with immunoblotting, indicate changes in UPR, hexosamine pathway, and amino acid and fatty acid metabolism, suggesting an association of ER stress, metabolic dysregulation, autophagic impairment, and alteration in mechanotransduction signaling. Overall, these results indicate that despite the common downregulation of hexosamine pathway in UCMD and BM, in BM the protein quality control system is sustained by a metabolic adaptation supporting energy requirements for the maintenance of autophagy, counteracting ER misfolded protein overload. In UCMD, this multilayered system may be disrupted and worsened by the metabolic rewiring, which leads to lipotoxicity. PMID:25211533

  13. DNM2 mutations in a cohort of sporadic patients with centronuclear myopathy.

    PubMed

    Abath, Osorio; Martins, Cristiane de Araújo; Carvalho, Mary; Chadi, Gerson; Seitz, Katia Werneck; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle; Reed, Umbertina Conti; Laporte, Jocelyn; Zanoteli, Edmar

    2015-05-01

    Centronuclear myopathy (CNM) is a rare congenital muscle disease characterized by fibers with prominent centralized nuclei in muscle biopsies. The disease is clinically heterogeneous, ranging from severe neonatal hypotonic phenotypes to adult-onset mild muscle weakness, and can have multiple modes of inheritance in association with various genes, including MTM1, DNM2, BIN1 and RYR1. Here we analyzed 18 sporadic patients with clinical and histological diagnosis of CNM and sequenced the DNM2 gene, which codes for the dynamin 2 protein. We found DNM2 missense mutations in two patients, both in exon 8, one known (p.E368K) and one novel (p.F372C), which is found in a position of presumed pathogenicity and appeared de novo. The patients had similar phenotypes characterized by neonatal signs followed by improvement and late childhood reemergence of slowly progressive generalized muscle weakness, elongated face with ptosis and ophthalmoparesis, and histology showing fibers with radiating sarcoplasmic strands (RSS). These patients were the only ones in the series to present this histological marker, which together with previous reports in the literature suggest that, when RSS are present, direct sequencing of DNM2 mutation hot spot regions should be the first step in the molecular diagnosis of CNM, even in sporadic cases. PMID:26273216

  14. Vitamin D Receptor Agonists: Suitable Candidates as Novel Therapeutic Options in Autoimmune Inflammatory Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Crescioli, Clara

    2014-01-01

    The primary aim in the treatment of autoimmune inflammatory myopathies (IMs) is to recover muscle function. The presence of immune/inflammatory cell infiltrates within muscle tissues represents the common feature of different IM subtypes, albeit a correlation between muscular damage extent and inflammation degree is often lacking. Treatments for IMs are based on life-long immunosuppressive therapy, with the well known adverse effects; recovery is incomplete for many patients. More effective therapies, with reduced side-effects, are highly desirable. Vitamin D receptor (VDR) agonists emerge to retain pleiotropic anti-inflammatory properties, since they regulate innate and adaptive immunity by switching the immune response from proinflammatory T helper 1 (Th1) type to tolerogenic T helper 2 (Th2) type dominance. In skeletal muscle cells less hypercalcemic VDR ligands target powerful mediators of inflammation, such as TNFα and TNFα driven paths, without affecting immune or muscle cells viability, retaining the potentiality to counteract Th1 driven overreactivity established by the self-enhancing inflammatory loop between immune and skeletal muscle cells. This review summarizes those features of VDR agonists as candidates in future treatment of IM. PMID:24895631

  15. Cardiac and skeletal myopathy in Fabry disease: a clinicopathologic correlative study.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, Cristina; Padua, Luca; Pazzaglia, Costanza; Morgante, Emanuela; Centurion, Carlos; Antuzzi, Daniela; Russo, Matteo A; Frustaci, Andrea

    2012-09-01

    Skeletal muscle disturbances are commonly reported in patients with Fabry disease. Whether they derive from cardiac dysfunction or direct muscle involvement is still unclear. Clinical, noninvasive, and invasive cardiac and muscle studies, including an endomyocardial and muscle biopsy, were obtained in 12 patients (mean age, 42.1 ± 12.6 years; range, 24-58 years) with Fabry disease. In the youngest patients (group A, 4 men aged <35 years), results of cardiac and skeletal noninvasive studies were normal, except for reduced velocities in tissue Doppler imaging. Histologic examination indicated that muscle myocytes were unaffected, whereas muscle vessels showed the presence of mild glycosphingolipid accumulation in endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In the heart, cardiomyocytes and endothelial and smooth muscle cells of intramural cardiac vessels were involved by the disease. The oldest patients (group B, 6 men and 2 women aged >35 years) showed ultrasound muscle disarray and electromyography signs of myopathy, increased left ventricular mass, and normal cardiac function. Histologic examination showed that muscle myocytes contained mild glycosphingolipid accumulation compared with severe engulfment of cardiomyocytes. Moreover, similar infiltration of myocardial and muscle intramural vessels, causing lumen narrowing and fibrofatty tissue replacement, was observed. Direct muscle involvement occurs in patients with Fabry disease. It is milder and delayed compared with that in the heart. The difference in organ function and the need of residual α-galactosidase A activity are the likely causes. PMID:22406371

  16. Muscle inactivation of mTOR causes metabolic and dystrophin defects leading to severe myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Risson, Valérie; Mazelin, Laetitia; Roceri, Mila; Sanchez, Hervé; Moncollin, Vincent; Corneloup, Claudine; Richard-Bulteau, Hélène; Vignaud, Alban; Baas, Dominique; Defour, Aurélia; Freyssenet, Damien; Tanti, Jean-François; Le-Marchand-Brustel, Yannick; Ferrier, Bernard; Conjard-Duplany, Agnès; Romanino, Klaas; Bauché, Stéphanie; Hantaï, Daniel; Mueller, Matthias; Kozma, Sara C.; Thomas, George; Rüegg, Markus A.; Ferry, Arnaud; Pende, Mario; Bigard, Xavier; Koulmann, Nathalie

    2009-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of cell growth that associates with raptor and rictor to form the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2, respectively. Raptor is required for oxidative muscle integrity, whereas rictor is dispensable. In this study, we show that muscle-specific inactivation of mTOR leads to severe myopathy, resulting in premature death. mTOR-deficient muscles display metabolic changes similar to those observed in muscles lacking raptor, including impaired oxidative metabolism, altered mitochondrial regulation, and glycogen accumulation associated with protein kinase B/Akt hyperactivation. In addition, mTOR-deficient muscles exhibit increased basal glucose uptake, whereas whole body glucose homeostasis is essentially maintained. Importantly, loss of mTOR exacerbates the myopathic features in both slow oxidative and fast glycolytic muscles. Moreover, mTOR but not raptor and rictor deficiency leads to reduced muscle dystrophin content. We provide evidence that mTOR controls dystrophin transcription in a cell-autonomous, rapamycin-resistant, and kinase-independent manner. Collectively, our results demonstrate that mTOR acts mainly via mTORC1, whereas regulation of dystrophin is raptor and rictor independent. PMID:20008564

  17. Immunocytochemical study of CD45 T cell isoforms in inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed Central

    De Bleecker, J. L.; Engel, A. G.

    1995-01-01

    The CD45RO and CD45RA antigens subdivide the CD8+ and the CD4+ T cells into primed memory cells and unprimed virgin T cells, respectively. To assess the relative abundance of the CD8+ and the CD4+ T cells expressing the two CD45 isoforms in the major inflammatory myopathies, we immunophenotyped T cells in muscle specimens from patients with inclusion body myositis, polymyositis (PM), and dermatomyositis. The analysis was according to diagnosis and sites of cell accumulation: endomysial inflammatory cells focally surrounding and invading nonnecrotic fibers were analyzed in inclusion body myositis and PM and perivascular infiltrates in PM and dermatomyositis. In all diseases and at all sites of accumulation, the CD45RO+ memory T cells were predominant and the CD45RO/CD45RA ratio exceeded that in normal blood. In PM and inclusion body myositis, the marked enrichment of endomysial T cells in memory cells implicates these cells in the pathogenesis. The enrichment of perivascular T cells in dermatomyositis and PM in memory cells may be a result of enhanced transendothelial migratory capacity of these cells; alternatively, the virgin-to-memory cell conversion may occur after diapedesis. Images Figure 11 Figure 2 PMID:7747812

  18. Developments in the Classification and Treatment of the Juvenile Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Lisa G.; Katz, James D.; Jones, Olcay Y.

    2013-01-01

    The juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM) are rare, heterogeneous autoimmune diseases that share chronic muscle inflammation and weakness. JIIM broadly includes three major clinicopathologic groups: juvenile dermatomyositis, juvenile polymyositis, and overlap myositis. A growing spectrum of clinicopathologic groups and serologic phenotypes defined by the presence of myositis-specific or myositis-associated autoantibodies are now recognized, each with differing demographics, clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, and prognoses. With the first multi-center collaborative studies and controlled trials using standardized preliminarily validated outcome measures, the therapy of juvenile myositis has advanced. Although daily oral corticosteroids remain the backbone of treatment, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are almost always used as adjunctive therapy. Methotrexate is the conventional DMARD for the initial therapy, either alone or combined with intravenous pulse methylprednisolone, and/or intravenous immunoglobulin for patients with moderate to severe disease. Cyclosporine may be added to these or serve as an alternative to methotrexate. Other drugs and biologic therapies, including mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus, cyclophosphamide, rituximab, and infliximab, might benefit selected patients with recalcitrant disease, unacceptable steroid toxicity, or patients with risk factors for poor prognosis. The treatment of cutaneous disease, calcinosis, and the role for rehabilitation are also discussed. PMID:24182859

  19. Blockade of ActRIIB Signaling Triggers Muscle Fatigability and Metabolic Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Relizani, Karima; Mouisel, Etienne; Giannesini, Benoit; Hourdé, Christophe; Patel, Ketan; Morales Gonzalez, Susanne; Jülich, Kristina; Vignaud, Alban; Piétri-Rouxel, France; Fortin, Dominique; Garcia, Luis; Blot, Stéphane; Ritvos, Olli; Bendahan, David; Ferry, Arnaud; Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Schuelke, Markus; Amthor, Helge

    2014-01-01

    Myostatin regulates skeletal muscle size via the activin receptor IIB (ActRIIB). However, its effect on muscle energy metabolism and energy-dependent muscle function remains largely unexplored. This question needs to be solved urgently since various therapies for neuromuscular diseases based on blockade of ActRIIB signaling are being developed. Here, we show in mice, that 4-month pharmacological abrogation of ActRIIB signaling by treatment with soluble ActRIIB-Fc triggers extreme muscle fatigability. This is associated with elevated serum lactate levels and a severe metabolic myopathy in the mdx mouse, an animal model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Blockade of ActRIIB signaling downregulates porin, a crucial ADP/ATP shuttle between cytosol and mitochondrial matrix leading to a consecutive deficiency of oxidative phosphorylation as measured by in vivo Phophorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (31P-MRS). Further, ActRIIB blockade reduces muscle capillarization, which further compounds the metabolic stress. We show that ActRIIB regulates key determinants of muscle metabolism, such as Pparβ, Pgc1α, and Pdk4 thereby optimizing different components of muscle energy metabolism. In conclusion, ActRIIB signaling endows skeletal muscle with high oxidative capacity and low fatigability. The severe metabolic side effects following ActRIIB blockade caution against deploying this strategy, at least in isolation, for treatment of neuromuscular disorders. PMID:24861054

  20. X-linked myotubular myopathy: clinical observations in ten additional cases.

    PubMed

    Joseph, M; Pai, G S; Holden, K R; Herman, G

    1995-11-01

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) is a recessively inherited disorder, lethal to males in the first months of life. Since the first report in 1969, at least 90 cases have been described in the literature. Diagnosis is confirmed by muscle biopsy. Linkage studies have localized the disorder to the Xq28 region, close to the loci for X-linked hydrocephalus and MASA syndrome. We report on 10 additional cases of XLMTM from six different families. In addition to classic clinical features of XLMTM, our patients showed interesting associated findings which included birth length > 90th centile and large head circumference with or without hydrocephalus in 70%, narrow, elongated face in 80%, and slender, long digits in 60% of cases. There was concordance in the occurrence and severity of hydrocephalus in most sib pairs. These features in a "floppy" male infant serve as clues for early clinical diagnosis of XLMTM, which can then be confirmed by muscle biopsy. Development of polyhydramnios was observed in the third trimester of an at-risk dizygotic twin gestation monitored by serial sonography with confirmation of XLMTM at birth. PMID:8588581

  1. Clinical, pathological and genetic characteristics of autosomal dominant inherited dynamin 2 centronuclear myopathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhong; Wu, Huamin; Gong, Jian; Wang, Tao; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to report on a family with pathologically and genetically diagnosed autosomal dominant inherited centronuclear myopathy (CNM). In addition, this study aimed to investigate the clinical, pathological and molecular genetic characteristics of the disease. This pedigree was traced back three generations, four patients underwent neurological examination, two patients underwent muscle biopsy, and eight family members were subjected to dynamin 2 (DNM2) gene mutation analysis. DNM2 mutations were detected in seven family members, of which four patients exhibited DNM2 mutation‑specific clinical and pathological features. Lower extremity weakness was the predominant symptom of these patients, however, proximal and distal lower extremity involvement was inconsistent. All patients exhibited marked systematic muscle atrophy and various degrees of facial muscle involvement. The patients presented the typical pathological changes of CNM, and their muscle tissues were heavily replaced by adipose tissue, with clustered distribution of muscle fibers as another notable feature. DNM2‑CNM patients of this pedigree exhibited heterogeneous clinical and pathological features, providing a basis for further molecular genetic analysis. PMID:27035234

  2. Hemolysis, myopathy, and cardiac disease associated with hereditary phosphofructokinase deficiency in two Whippets

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Karen; Harvey, John W.; D'Agorne, Sara; Wood, Jonathan; Giger, Urs

    2009-01-01

    Two male castrated Whippet littermates were presented at 1 year of age for pallor, tachycardia, systolic heart murmur, dark yellow to orange feces, intermittent lethargy, pigmenturia, and muscle shivering or cramping after exercise. Persistent macrocytic hypochromic anemia with marked reticulocytosis and metarubricytosis was found when CBC results were compared with reference values for Whippets. Increased serum creatine kinase activity and hyperkalemia also were sometimes present over the 4-year period of evaluation. Progressively increasing serum concentrations of N-terminal prohormone brain natriuretic peptide suggested cardiac disease. Erythrocytes from the whippets were less osmotically fragile but more alkaline fragile than those from control dogs. Erythrocyte phosphofructokinase (PFK) activities and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate concentrations were decreased. Restriction enzyme-based DNA test screening and DNA sequencing revealed the same mutation in the muscle-PFK gene of the Whippets as seen in English Springer Spaniel dogs with PFK deficiency. This is the first report of PFK deficiency in Whippet dogs. In addition to causing hemolysis and exertional myopathy, heart disease may be a prominent clinical component of PFK deficiency in this breed and has not been previously recognized in PFK-deficient English Springer Spaniels. PMID:19228357

  3. Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) in Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Regardt, Malin; Wojcik, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is a research priority in chronic diseases. We undertook a systematic review (registration #CRD42015024939) to identify, appraise and synthesize the evidence relating to HRQoL in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM). A comprehensive search was conducted in August 2015 using CINAHL, EMBase and Pubmed to identify studies reporting original data on HRQoL in IIM using generic HRQoL instruments. Characteristics of samples and results from selected studies were extracted and appraised using a standardized approach. Qualitative synthesis of the results was performed. Ten studies including a total of 654 IIM subjects were included in this systematic review. HRQoL was significantly impaired in all subsets of IIM compared with the general population. Disease activity, disease damage and chronic disease course were associated with poorer HRQoL. Insufficient or conflicting results were found in associations between clinical features, treatment, disease duration and mood or illness perception, and HRQoL in IIM. This study suggests that HRQoL is impaired in IIM. However, due to the paucity and heterogeneity of the evidence to date, robust estimates are lacking and significant knowledge gaps persist. There is a need for studies that systematically investigate the correlates and trajectory of HRQoL in IIM. PMID:27504827

  4. Orai1 deficiency leads to heart failure and skeletal myopathy in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Völkers, Mirko; Dolatabadi, Nima; Gude, Natalie; Most, Patrick; Sussman, Mark A; Hassel, David

    2012-01-15

    Mutations in the store-operated Ca²⁺ entry pore protein ORAI1 have been reported to cause myopathies in human patients but the mechanism involved is not known. Cardiomyocytes express ORAI1 but its role in heart function is also unknown. Using reverse genetics in zebrafish, we demonstrated that inactivation of the highly conserved zebrafish orthologue of ORAI1 resulted in severe heart failure, reduced ventricular systolic function, bradycardia and skeletal muscle weakness. Electron microscopy of Orai1-deficient myocytes revealed progressive skeletal muscle instability with loss of myofiber integrity and ultrastructural abnormalities of the z-disc in both skeletal and cardiac muscle. Isolated Orai1-deficient cardiomyocytes showed loss of the calcineurin-associated protein calsarcin from the z-discs. Furthermore, we found mechanosignal transduction was affected in Orai1-depleted hearts, indicating an essential role for ORAI1 in establishing the cardiac signaling transduction machinery at the z-disc. Our findings identify ORAI1 as an important regulator of cardiac and skeletal muscle function and provide evidence linking ORAI1-mediated calcium signaling to sarcomere integrity and cardiomyocyte function. PMID:22302996

  5. Cloning and chromosomal localization of the human A{sub 2b} adenosine receptor gene (ADORA2B) and its pseudogene

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, M.A.; Johnson, R.G.; Luneau, C.J.

    1995-05-20

    To determine the chromosomal localization of the human A{sub 2b} adenosine receptor, the corresponding genomic clone was isolated and used as a probe for fluorescence in situ hybridization to metaphase chromosomes. Partial sequence analysis of the A{sub 2b} gene (ADORA2B) revealed an intron that interrupted the coding region corresponding to the second intracellular loop similar to that reported for A{sub 1} and A{sub 2a} adenosine receptor genes. A pseudogene for the A{sub 2b} receptor was also identified; it exhibited 79% identity to the A{sub 2b} adenosine receptor cDNA coding sequence and contained multiple deletions, point mutations, and frame shifts and two in-frame stops. These changes would result in the inability to encode a functional receptor. The genomic clones were utilized to localize the A{sub 2b} receptor to chromosome 17p12 and the A{sub 2b} pseudogene to chromosome 1q32. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Functional characterization of cytochromes P450 2B from the desert woodrat Neotoma lepida

    SciTech Connect

    Wilderman, P. Ross; Jang, Hyun-Hee; Malenke, Jael R.; Salib, Mariam; Angermeier, Elisabeth; Lamime, Sonia; Dearing, M. Denise; Halpert, James R.

    2014-02-01

    Mammalian detoxification processes have been the focus of intense research, but little is known about how wild herbivores process plant secondary compounds, many of which have medicinal value or are drugs. cDNA sequences that code for three enzymes of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2B subfamily, here termed 2B35, 2B36, and 2B37 have been recently identified from a wild rodent, the desert woodrat (Malenke et al., 2012). Two variant clones of each enzyme were engineered to increase protein solubility and to facilitate purification, as reported for CYP2B enzymes from multiple species. When expressed in Escherichia coli each of the woodrat proteins gave the characteristic maximum at 450 nm in a reduced carbon monoxide difference spectrum but generally expressed at lower levels than rat CYP2B1. Two enzymes, 2B36 and 2B37, showed dealkylation activity with the model substrates 7-ethoxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin and 7-benzyloxyresorufin, whereas 2B35 was inactive. Binding of the monoterpene (+)-α-pinene produced a Type I shift in the absorbance spectrum of each enzyme. Mutation of 2B37 at residues 114, 262, or 480, key residues governing ligand interactions with other CYP2B enzymes, did not significantly change expression levels or produce the expected functional changes. In summary, two catalytic and one ligand-binding assay are sufficient to distinguish among CYP2B35, 2B36, and 2B37. Differences in functional profiles between 2B36 and 2B37 are partially explained by changes in substrate recognition site residue 114, but not 480. The results advance our understanding of the mechanisms of detoxification in wild mammalian herbivores and highlight the complexity of this system. - Highlights: • Three CYP2B enzymes from Neotoma lepida were cloned, engineered, and expressed. • A mix of catalytic and binding assays yields unique results for each enzyme. • Mutational analysis indicates CYP{sub 2}B substrate recognition remains to be clarified. • Reported N. lepida gene

  7. Nrk2b-mediated NAD+ production regulates cell adhesion and is required for muscle morphogenesis in vivo: Nrk2b and NAD+ in muscle morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Goody, Michelle F; Kelly, Meghan W; Lessard, Kevin N; Khalil, Andre; Henry, Clarissa A

    2010-08-15

    Cell-matrix adhesion complexes (CMACs) play fundamental roles during morphogenesis. Given the ubiquitous nature of CMACs and their roles in many cellular processes, one question is how specificity of CMAC function is modulated. The clearly defined cell behaviors that generate segmentally reiterated axial skeletal muscle during zebrafish development comprise an ideal system with which to investigate CMAC function during morphogenesis. We found that Nicotinamide riboside kinase 2b (Nrk2b) cell autonomously modulates the molecular composition of CMACs in vivo. Nrk2b is required for normal Laminin polymerization at the myotendinous junction (MTJ). In Nrk2b-deficient embryos, at MTJ loci where Laminin is not properly polymerized, muscle fibers elongate into adjacent myotomes and are abnormally long. In yeast and human cells, Nrk2 phosphorylates Nicotinamide Riboside and generates NAD+ through an alternative salvage pathway. Exogenous NAD+ treatment rescues MTJ development in Nrk2b-deficient embryos, but not in laminin mutant embryos. Both Nrk2b and Laminin are required for localization of Paxillin, but not beta-Dystroglycan, to CMACs at the MTJ. Overexpression of Paxillin in Nrk2b-deficient embryos is sufficient to rescue MTJ integrity. Taken together, these data show that Nrk2b plays a specific role in modulating subcellular localization of discrete CMAC components that in turn plays roles in musculoskeletal development. Furthermore, these data suggest that Nrk2b-mediated synthesis of NAD+ is functionally upstream of Laminin adhesion and Paxillin subcellular localization during MTJ development. These results indicate a previously unrecognized complexity to CMAC assembly in vivo and also elucidate a novel role for NAD+ during morphogenesis. PMID:20566368

  8. Protein 2B of Coxsackievirus B3 Induces Autophagy Relying on Its Transmembrane Hydrophobic Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Heng; Zhai, Xia; Chen, Yang; Wang, Ruixue; Lin, Lexun; Chen, Sijia; Wang, Tianying; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Wu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Fengmin; Zhao, Wenran; Zhong, Zhaohua

    2016-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B (CVB) belongs to Enterovirus genus within the Picornaviridae family, and it is one of the most common causative pathogens of viral myocarditis in young adults. The pathogenesis of myocarditis caused by CVB has not been completely elucidated. In CVB infection, autophagy is manipulated to facilitate viral replication. Here we report that protein 2B, one of the non-structural proteins of CVB3, possesses autophagy-inducing capability. The autophagy-inducing motif of protein 2B was identified by the generation of truncated 2B and site-directed mutagenesis. The expression of 2B alone was sufficient to induce the formation of autophagosomes in HeLa cells, while truncated 2B containing the two hydrophobic regions of the protein also induced autophagy. In addition, we demonstrated that a single amino acid substitution (56V→A) in the stem loop in between the two hydrophobic regions of protein 2B abolished the formation of autophagosomes. Moreover, we found that 2B and truncated 2B with autophagy-inducting capability were co-localized with LC3-II. This study indicates that protein 2B relies on its transmembrane hydrophobic regions to induce the formation of autophagosomes, while 56 valine residue in the stem loop of protein 2B might exert critical structural influence on its two hydrophobic regions. These results may provide new insight for understanding the molecular mechanism of autophagy triggered by CVB infection. PMID:27187444

  9. Protein 2B of Coxsackievirus B3 Induces Autophagy Relying on Its Transmembrane Hydrophobic Sequences.

    PubMed

    Wu, Heng; Zhai, Xia; Chen, Yang; Wang, Ruixue; Lin, Lexun; Chen, Sijia; Wang, Tianying; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Wu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Fengmin; Zhao, Wenran; Zhong, Zhaohua

    2016-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B (CVB) belongs to Enterovirus genus within the Picornaviridae family, and it is one of the most common causative pathogens of viral myocarditis in young adults. The pathogenesis of myocarditis caused by CVB has not been completely elucidated. In CVB infection, autophagy is manipulated to facilitate viral replication. Here we report that protein 2B, one of the non-structural proteins of CVB3, possesses autophagy-inducing capability. The autophagy-inducing motif of protein 2B was identified by the generation of truncated 2B and site-directed mutagenesis. The expression of 2B alone was sufficient to induce the formation of autophagosomes in HeLa cells, while truncated 2B containing the two hydrophobic regions of the protein also induced autophagy. In addition, we demonstrated that a single amino acid substitution (56V→A) in the stem loop in between the two hydrophobic regions of protein 2B abolished the formation of autophagosomes. Moreover, we found that 2B and truncated 2B with autophagy-inducting capability were co-localized with LC3-II. This study indicates that protein 2B relies on its transmembrane hydrophobic regions to induce the formation of autophagosomes, while 56 valine residue in the stem loop of protein 2B might exert critical structural influence on its two hydrophobic regions. These results may provide new insight for understanding the molecular mechanism of autophagy triggered by CVB infection. PMID:27187444

  10. CULTURE CONDITIONS PROFOUNDLY IMPACT PHENOTYPE IN BEAS-2B, A HUMAN PULMONARY EPITHELIAL MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fei; Klimecki, Walter T.

    2015-01-01

    BEAS-2B, an immortalized, human lung epithelial cell line, has been used to model pulmonary epithelial function for over 30 years. The BEAS-2B phenotype can be modulated by culture conditions that include the presence or absence of fetal bovine serum (FBS). The popularity of BEAS-2B as a model of arsenic toxicology, and the common use of BEAS-2B cultured both with and without FBS, led us to investigate the impact of FBS on BEAS-2B in the context of arsenic toxicology. Comparison of genome-wide gene expression in BEAS-2B cultured with or without FBS revealed altered expression in several biological pathways, including those related to carcinogenesis and energy metabolism. Real-time measurements of oxygen consumption and glycolysis in BEAS-2B demonstrated that FBS culture conditions were associated with a 1.4-fold increase in total glycolytic capacity, a 1.9-fold increase in basal respiration, a 2.0-fold increase in oxygen consumed for ATP production, and a 2.8-fold increase in maximal respiration, compared to BEAS-2B cultured without FBS. Comparisons of the transcriptome changes in BEAS-2B resulting from FBS exposure to the transcriptome changes resulting from exposure to 1 μM sodium arsenite revealed that mRNA levels of 43% of the arsenite-modulated genes were also modulated by FBS. Cytotoxicity studies revealed that BEAS-2B cells exposed to 5% FBS for 8 weeks were almost 5 times more sensitive to arsenite cytotoxicity than non-FBS-exposed BEAS-2B cells. Phenotype changes induced in BEAS-2B by FBS suggest that culture conditions should be carefully considered when using BEAS-2B as an experimental model of arsenic toxicity. PMID:25524072

  11. Impacts of the Glucuronidase Genotypes UGT1A4, UGT2B7, UGT2B15 and UGT2B17 on Tamoxifen Metabolism in Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Romero-Lorca, Alicia; Novillo, Apolonia; Gaibar, María; Bandrés, Fernando; Fernández-Santander, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen is used to prevent and treat estrogen-dependent breast cancer. It is described as a prodrug since most of its antiestrogen effects are exerted through its hydroxylated metabolites 4-OH-tamoxifen and endoxifen. In prior work, we correlated optimal plasma levels of these metabolites with certain genotypes of CYP2D6 and SULT1A2. This descriptive study examines correlations between concentrations of tamoxifen's glucuronide metabolites and genotypes UGT1A4 Pro24Thr, UGT1A4 Leu48Val, UGT2B7 His268Tyr, UGT2B15 Asp85YTyr UGT2B15 Lys523Thr and UGT2B17del in 132 patients with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer under treatment with tamoxifen. Patients were genotyped by real-time and conventional PCR-RFLP. The glucuronides 4-OH-tamoxifen-N-glucuronide, 4-OH-tamoxifen-O-glucuronide and endoxifen-O-glucuronide were isolated from blood plasma and quantified using a high-pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry system. Individuals who were homozygous for UGT1A448VAL showed significantly lower mean concentrations of both glucuronide metabolites compared to subjects genotyped as wt/wt plus wt/48Val (p=0.037 and p=0.031, respectively). Women homozygous for UGT2B7268Tyr also showed mean substrate/product ratios of 4-OH-tamoxifen/4-OH-tamoxifen-O-glucuronide and 4-OH-tamoxifen/4-OH-tamoxifen-N-glucuronide indicative of reduced glucuronidase activity compared to wt homozygotes or to heterozygotes for the polymorphism (p=0.005 and p=0.003, respectively). In contrast, UGT2B15 Lys523Thr and UGT2B17del were associated with possibly increased enzyme activity. Patients with at least one variant allele UGT2B15523Thr showed significantly higher 4-OH-tamoxifen-O-glucuronide and endoxifen-glucuronide levels (p=0.023 and p=0.025, respectively) indicating a variant gene-dose effect. Higher 4-OH-tamoxifen-N-glucuronide levels observed in UGT2B17del genotypes (p=0.042) could be attributed to a mechanism that compensates for the greater expression of other genes in UGT2B

  12. Impacts of the Glucuronidase Genotypes UGT1A4, UGT2B7, UGT2B15 and UGT2B17 on Tamoxifen Metabolism in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Lorca, Alicia; Novillo, Apolonia; Gaibar, María; Bandrés, Fernando; Fernández-Santander, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen is used to prevent and treat estrogen-dependent breast cancer. It is described as a prodrug since most of its antiestrogen effects are exerted through its hydroxylated metabolites 4-OH-tamoxifen and endoxifen. In prior work, we correlated optimal plasma levels of these metabolites with certain genotypes of CYP2D6 and SULT1A2. This descriptive study examines correlations between concentrations of tamoxifen's glucuronide metabolites and genotypes UGT1A4 Pro24Thr, UGT1A4 Leu48Val, UGT2B7 His268Tyr, UGT2B15 Asp85YTyr UGT2B15 Lys523Thr and UGT2B17del in 132 patients with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer under treatment with tamoxifen. Patients were genotyped by real-time and conventional PCR-RFLP. The glucuronides 4-OH-tamoxifen-N-glucuronide, 4-OH-tamoxifen-O-glucuronide and endoxifen-O-glucuronide were isolated from blood plasma and quantified using a high-pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry system. Individuals who were homozygous for UGT1A448VAL showed significantly lower mean concentrations of both glucuronide metabolites compared to subjects genotyped as wt/wt plus wt/48Val (p=0.037 and p=0.031, respectively). Women homozygous for UGT2B7268Tyr also showed mean substrate/product ratios of 4-OH-tamoxifen/4-OH-tamoxifen-O-glucuronide and 4-OH-tamoxifen/4-OH-tamoxifen-N-glucuronide indicative of reduced glucuronidase activity compared to wt homozygotes or to heterozygotes for the polymorphism (p=0.005 and p=0.003, respectively). In contrast, UGT2B15 Lys523Thr and UGT2B17del were associated with possibly increased enzyme activity. Patients with at least one variant allele UGT2B15523Thr showed significantly higher 4-OH-tamoxifen-O-glucuronide and endoxifen-glucuronide levels (p=0.023 and p=0.025, respectively) indicating a variant gene-dose effect. Higher 4-OH-tamoxifen-N-glucuronide levels observed in UGT2B17del genotypes (p=0.042) could be attributed to a mechanism that compensates for the greater expression of other genes in UGT2B

  13. Association Between SLCO1B1 Gene T521C Polymorphism and Statin-Related Myopathy Risk

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Qingtao; Li, Sheyu; Li, Ling; Li, Yun; Sun, Xin; Tian, Haoming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Statin-related myopathy is an important adverse effect of statin which is classically unpredictable. The evidence of association between solute carrier organic anion transporter 1B1 (SLCO1B1) gene T521C polymorphism and statin-related myopathy risk remained controversial. This study aimed to investigate this genetic association. Databases of PubMed, EMBASE, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chinese Scientific Journals Database, and Wanfang Data were searched till June 17, 2015. Case-control studies investigating the association between SLCO1B1 gene T521C polymorphism and statin-related myopathy risk were included. The Newcastle–Ottawa Scale (NOS) was used for assessing the quality of included studies. Data were pooled by odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Nine studies with 1360 cases and 3082 controls were included. Cases of statin-related myopathy were found to be significantly associated with the variant C allele (TC + CC vs TT: OR = 2.09, 95% CI = 1.27–3.43, P = 0.003; C vs T: OR = 2.10, 95% CI = 1.43–3.09, P < 0.001), especially when statin-related myopathy was defined as an elevation of creatine kinase (CK) >10 times the upper limit of normal (ULN) or rhabdomyolysis (TC + CC vs TT: OR = 3.83, 95% CI = 1.41–10.39, P = 0.008; C vs T: OR = 2.94, 95% CI = 1.47–5.89, P = 0.002). When stratified by statin type, the association was significant in individuals receiving simvastatin (TC + CC vs TT: OR = 3.09, 95% CI = 1.64–5.85, P = 0.001; C vs T: OR = 3.00, 95% CI = 1.38–6.49, P = 0.005), but not in those receiving atorvastatin (TC + CC vs TT: OR = 1.31, 95% CI = 0.74–2.30, P = 0.35; C vs T: OR = 1.33, 95% CI = 0.57–3.12, P = 0.52). The available evidence suggests that SLCO1B1 gene T521C polymorphism is associated with an increased risk of

  14. Multiple roles for UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)2B15 and UGT2B17 enzymes in androgen metabolism and prostate cancer evolution.

    PubMed

    Gauthier-Landry, Louis; Bélanger, Alain; Barbier, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    In the prostate, approximately 50% of androgens are from adrenal steroids, mainly dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), its sulfate and androstenedione. These compounds are converted first into testosterone, and then into the active hormone dihydrotestosterone (DHT). After having activated the androgen receptor (AR), DHT is reduced into androstane-3α-DIOL (3α-DIOL) and androsterone (ADT), which are subsequently converted into 2 inactive and easily excretable metabolites: 3α-DIOL-17glucuronide (3α-DIOL-17G) and ADT-3glucuronide (ADT-3G). The formation of these last derivatives through the glucuronidation reaction involves 2 UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes, namely UGT2B15 and UGT2B17. The present review article aims at providing a comprehensive view of the physiological and pharmacological importance of these 2 enzymes for the control of androgen homeostasis. We will resume: (i) how UGT2B15 and UGT2B17 contribute to androgen elimination; (ii) how their glucuronidation capacity influences the androgen signaling pathway in prostate cells; (iii) how they contribute to the anti-proliferative properties of AR antagonists in prostate cancer cells; and (iv) how AR and its spliced variants regulate the UGT2B15 and/or UGT2B17 genes expression. Finally, whether the unexploited AR-UGT axis could serve as a prognostic maker or a pharmacological target for novel therapeutics in the treatment of prostate cancer is also discussed. This article is part of a special issue entitled 'Essential role of DHEA'. PMID:24861263

  15. Structure and expression of the gene (HNRPA2B1) encoding the human hnRNP protein A2/B1

    SciTech Connect

    Kozu, Tomoko; Henrich, B.; Schaefer, K.P.

    1995-01-20

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A2 is a major nuclear protein and one of the major components of the hnRNP core complex in mammalian cells. We first determined the complete sequence of the human gene for hnRNP protein A2 (HNRPA2B1). The human HNRPA2B1 gene exists in a single copy over 9 kb in length. The gene was split into 12 exons, including a 36-nucleotide mini-exon, which was specific to the hnRNP protein B1, providing genetic evidence that the B1 mRNA was generated from the primary HNRPA2B1 transcript by alternative splicing. The 5{prime} region of HNRPA2B1 was GC-rich and contained several DNA motifs for the binding of several transcription factors, which included 2 CCAAT boxes and no TATA sequences. The 5{prime} ends of the mRNA were mapped to multiple positions. These structural features are characteristic of promoter regions of housekeeping genes. Northern blot and RT-PCR analyses of the HNRPA2B1 transcripts revealed levels of B1 mRNA from 2 to 5% of total A2/B1 transcripts and showed that both A2 and B1 mRNAs were transcribed in all human cell lines and mouse tissues studied. The structural and evolutionary characteristics of the A2 and A1 proteins as they relate to each other are discussed. 38 refs., 5 figs.

  16. An X-Linked Myopathy with Postural Muscle Atrophy and Generalized Hypertrophy, Termed XMPMA, Is Caused by Mutations in FHL1

    PubMed Central

    Windpassinger, Christian; Schoser, Benedikt; Straub, Volker; Hochmeister, Sonja; Noor, Abdul; Lohberger, Birgit; Farra, Natalie; Petek, Erwin; Schwarzbraun, Thomas; Ofner, Lisa; Löscher, Wolfgang N.; Wagner, Klaus; Lochmüller, Hanns; Vincent, John B.; Quasthoff, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Summary We have identified a large multigenerational Austrian family displaying a novel form of X-linked recessive myopathy. Affected individuals develop an adult-onset scapulo-axio-peroneal myopathy with bent-spine syndrome characterized by specific atrophy of postural muscles along with pseudoathleticism or hypertrophy and cardiac involvement. Known X-linked myopathies were excluded by simple-tandem-repeat polymorphism (STRP) and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis, direct gene sequencing, and immunohistochemical analysis. STRP analysis revealed significant linkage at Xq25–q27.1. Haplotype analysis based on SNP microarray data from selected family members confirmed this linkage region on the distal arm of the X chromosome, thereby narrowing down the critical interval to 12 Mb. Sequencing of functional candidate genes led to the identification of a missense mutation within the four and a half LIM domain 1 gene (FHL1), which putatively disrupts the fourth LIM domain of the protein. Mutation screening of FHL1 in a myopathy family from the UK exhibiting an almost identical phenotype revealed a 3 bp insertion mutation within the second LIM domain. FHL1 on Xq26.3 is highly expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Western-blot analysis of muscle biopsies showed a marked decrease in protein expression of FHL1 in patients, in concordance with the genetic data. In summary, we have to our knowledge characterized a new disorder, X-linked myopathy with postural muscle atrophy (XMPMA), and identified FHL1 as the causative gene. This is the first FHL protein to be identified in conjunction with a human genetic disorder and further supports the role of FHL proteins in the development and maintenance of muscle tissue. Mutation screening of FHL1 should be considered for patients with uncharacterized myopathies and cardiomyopathies. PMID:18179888

  17. Rap2b promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion of lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yi-Gen; Zhang, Zheng-Qun; Chen, Yan-Bin; Huang, Jian-An

    2016-10-01

    Rap2b, a member of the guanosine triphosphate-binding proteins, is widely up-regulated in many types of tumors. However, the functional role of Rap2b in tumorigenesis of lung cancer remains to be fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the effect of Rap2b on the lung cancer malignant phenotype, such as cell proliferation and metastasis. We found that Rap2b could promote the abilities of lung cancer cell wound healing, migration, and invasion via increasing matrix metalloproteinase-2 enzyme activity. Furthermore, Rap2b overexpression could increase the phosphorylation level of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1/2. In conclusion, our results suggested that Rap2b may be a potential therapeutic target for lung cancer. PMID:26671640

  18. Genetic loss of SH2B3 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Garcia, Arianne; Ambesi-Impiombato, Alberto; Hadler, Michael; Rigo, Isaura; LeDuc, Charles A.; Kelly, Kara; Jalas, Chaim; Paietta, Elisabeth; Racevskis, Janis; Rowe, Jacob M.; Tallman, Martin S.; Paganin, Maddalena; Basso, Giuseppe; Tong, Wei; Chung, Wendy K.

    2013-01-01

    The SH2B adaptor protein 3 (SH2B3) gene encodes a negative regulator of cytokine signaling with a critical role in the homeostasis of hematopoietic stem cells and lymphoid progenitors. Here, we report the identification of germline homozygous SH2B3 mutations in 2 siblings affected with developmental delay and autoimmunity, one in whom B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) developed. Mechanistically, loss of SH2B3 increases Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling, promotes lymphoid cell proliferation, and accelerates leukemia development in a mouse model of NOTCH1-induced ALL. Moreover, extended mutation analysis showed homozygous somatic mutations in SH2B3 in 2 of 167 ALLs analyzed. Overall, these results demonstrate a Knudson tumor suppressor role for SH2B3 in the pathogenesis of ALL and highlight a possible link between genetic predisposition factors in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and leukemogenesis. PMID:23908464

  19. Literature Based Drug Interaction Prediction with Clinical Assessment Using Electronic Medical Records: Novel Myopathy Associated Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Subhadarshini, Abhinita; Karnik, Shreyas D.; Li, Xiaochun; Hall, Stephen D.; Jin, Yan; Callaghan, J. Thomas; Overhage, Marcus J.; Flockhart, David A.; Strother, R. Matthew; Quinney, Sara K.; Li, Lang

    2012-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are a common cause of adverse drug events. In this paper, we combined a literature discovery approach with analysis of a large electronic medical record database method to predict and evaluate novel DDIs. We predicted an initial set of 13197 potential DDIs based on substrates and inhibitors of cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolism enzymes identified from published in vitro pharmacology experiments. Using a clinical repository of over 800,000 patients, we narrowed this theoretical set of DDIs to 3670 drug pairs actually taken by patients. Finally, we sought to identify novel combinations that synergistically increased the risk of myopathy. Five pairs were identified with their p-values less than 1E-06: loratadine and simvastatin (relative risk or RR = 1.69); loratadine and alprazolam (RR = 1.86); loratadine and duloxetine (RR = 1.94); loratadine and ropinirole (RR = 3.21); and promethazine and tegaserod (RR = 3.00). When taken together, each drug pair showed a significantly increased risk of myopathy when compared to the expected additive myopathy risk from taking either of the drugs alone. Based on additional literature data on in vitro drug metabolism and inhibition potency, loratadine and simvastatin and tegaserod and promethazine were predicted to have a strong DDI through the CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 enzymes, respectively. This new translational biomedical informatics approach supports not only detection of new clinically significant DDI signals, but also evaluation of their potential molecular mechanisms. PMID:22912565

  20. Pharmacogenetics of Statin-Induced Myopathy: A Focused Review of the Clinical Translation of Pharmacokinetic Genetic Variants

    PubMed Central

    Talameh, Jasmine A; Kitzmiller, Joseph P

    2014-01-01

    Statins are the most commonly prescribed drugs in the United States and are extremely effective in reducing major cardiovascular events in the millions of Americans with hyperlipidemia. However, many patients (up to 25%) cannot tolerate or discontinue statin therapy due to statin-induced myopathy (SIM). Patients will continue to experience SIM at unacceptably high rates or experience unnecessary cardiovascular events (as a result of discontinuing or decreasing their statin therapy) until strategies for predicting or mitigating SIM are identified. A promising strategy for predicting or mitigating SIM is pharmacogenetic testing, particularly of pharmacokinetic genetic variants as SIM is related to statin exposure. Data is emerging on the association between pharmacokinetic genetic variants and SIM. A current, critical evaluation of the literature on pharmacokinetic genetic variants and SIM for potential translation to clinical practice is lacking. This review focuses specifically on pharmacokinetic genetic variants and their association with SIM clinical outcomes. We also discuss future directions, specific to the research on pharmacokinetic genetic variants, which could speed the translation into clinical practice. For simvastatin, we did not find sufficient evidence to support the clinical translation of pharmacokinetic genetic variants other than SLCO1B1. However, SLCO1B1 may also be clinically relevant for pravastatin- and pitavastatin-induced myopathy, but additional studies assessing SIM clinical outcome are needed. CYP2D6*4 may be clinically relevant for atorvastatin-induced myopathy, but mechanistic studies are needed. Future research efforts need to incorporate statin-specific analyses, multi-variant analyses, and a standard definition of SIM. As the use of statins is extremely common and SIM continues to occur in a significant number of patients, future research investments in pharmacokinetic genetic variants have the potential to make a profound impact on

  1. Deficiency of the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM32 in mice leads to a myopathy with a neurogenic component.

    PubMed

    Kudryashova, Elena; Wu, Jun; Havton, Leif A; Spencer, Melissa J

    2009-04-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2H (LGMD2H) and sarcotubular myopathy are hereditary skeletal muscle disorders caused by mutations in TRIM32. We previously identified TRIM32 as an E3 ubiquitin ligase that binds to myosin and ubiquitinates actin. To date four TRIM32 mutations have been linked to LGMD2H, all of which occur in the C-terminal NHL domains. Unexpectedly, a fifth mutation in the B-box of TRIM32 causes a completely different, multisystemic disorder, Bardet-Biedl syndrome type 11. It is not understood how allelic mutations in TRIM32 can create such diverse phenotypic outcomes. To generate a tool for elucidating the complex in vivo functions of TRIM32, we created the first murine Trim32 knock-out model (T32KO). Histological analysis of T32KO skeletal muscles revealed mild myopathic changes. Electron microscopy showed areas with Z-line streaming and a dilated sarcotubular system with vacuoles -- the latter being a prominent feature of sarcotubular myopathy. Therefore, our model replicates phenotypes of LGMD2H and sarcotubular myopathy. The level of Trim32 expression in normal mouse brain exceeds that observed in skeletal muscle by more than 100 times, as we demonstrated by real-time PCR. Intriguingly, analysis of T32KO neural tissue revealed a decreased concentration of neurofilaments and a reduction in myelinated motoraxon diameters. The axonal changes suggest a shift toward a slower motor unit type. Not surprisingly, T32KO soleus muscle expressed an elevated type I slow myosin isotype with a concomitant reduction in the type II fast myosin. These data suggest that muscular dystrophy due to TRIM32 mutations involves both neurogenic and myogenic characteristics. PMID:19155210

  2. Loss of Catalytically Inactive Lipid Phosphatase Myotubularin-related Protein 12 Impairs Myotubularin Stability and Promotes Centronuclear Myopathy in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vandana A.; Hnia, Karim; Smith, Laura L.; Gundry, Stacey R.; McIntire, Jessica E.; Shimazu, Junko; Bass, Jessica R.; Talbot, Ethan A.; Amoasii, Leonela; Goldman, Nathaniel E.; Laporte, Jocelyn; Beggs, Alan H.

    2013-01-01

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) is a congenital disorder caused by mutations of the myotubularin gene, MTM1. Myotubularin belongs to a large family of conserved lipid phosphatases that include both catalytically active and inactive myotubularin-related proteins (i.e., “MTMRs”). Biochemically, catalytically inactive MTMRs have been shown to form heteroligomers with active members within the myotubularin family through protein-protein interactions. However, the pathophysiological significance of catalytically inactive MTMRs remains unknown in muscle. By in vitro as well as in vivo studies, we have identified that catalytically inactive myotubularin-related protein 12 (MTMR12) binds to myotubularin in skeletal muscle. Knockdown of the mtmr12 gene in zebrafish resulted in skeletal muscle defects and impaired motor function. Analysis of mtmr12 morphant fish showed pathological changes with central nucleation, disorganized Triads, myofiber hypotrophy and whorled membrane structures similar to those seen in X-linked myotubular myopathy. Biochemical studies showed that deficiency of MTMR12 results in reduced levels of myotubularin protein in zebrafish and mammalian C2C12 cells. Loss of myotubularin also resulted in reduction of MTMR12 protein in C2C12 cells, mice and humans. Moreover, XLMTM mutations within the myotubularin interaction domain disrupted binding to MTMR12 in cell culture. Analysis of human XLMTM patient myotubes showed that mutations that disrupt the interaction between myotubularin and MTMR12 proteins result in reduction of both myotubularin and MTMR12. These studies strongly support the concept that interactions between myotubularin and MTMR12 are required for the stability of their functional protein complex in normal skeletal muscles. This work highlights an important physiological function of catalytically inactive phosphatases in the pathophysiology of myotubular myopathy and suggests a novel therapeutic approach through identification of

  3. Solution structure of the isolated histone H2A-H2B heterodimer

    PubMed Central

    Moriwaki, Yoshihito; Yamane, Tsutomu; Ohtomo, Hideaki; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Kurita, Jun-ichi; Sato, Masahiko; Nagadoi, Aritaka; Shimojo, Hideaki; Nishimura, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    During chromatin-regulated processes, the histone H2A-H2B heterodimer functions dynamically in and out of the nucleosome. Although detailed crystal structures of nucleosomes have been established, that of the isolated full-length H2A-H2B heterodimer has remained elusive. Here, we have determined the solution structure of human H2A-H2B by NMR coupled with CS-Rosetta. H2A and H2B each contain a histone fold, comprising four α-helices and two β-strands (α1–β1–α2–β2–α3–αC), together with the long disordered N- and C-terminal H2A tails and the long N-terminal H2B tail. The N-terminal αN helix, C-terminal β3 strand, and 310 helix of H2A observed in the H2A-H2B nucleosome structure are disordered in isolated H2A-H2B. In addition, the H2A α1 and H2B αC helices are not well fixed in the heterodimer, and the H2A and H2B tails are not completely random coils. Comparison of hydrogen-deuterium exchange, fast hydrogen exchange, and {1H}-15N hetero-nuclear NOE data with the CS-Rosetta structure indicates that there is some conformation in the H2A 310 helical and H2B Lys11 regions, while the repression domain of H2B (residues 27–34) exhibits an extended string-like structure. This first structure of the isolated H2A-H2B heterodimer provides insight into its dynamic functions in chromatin. PMID:27181506

  4. HUMAN CYTOSOLIC SULFOTRANSFERASE 2B1: ISOFORM EXPRESSION, TISSUE SPECIFICITY AND SUBCELLULAR LOCALIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Falany, C.N.; He, D.; Dumas, N.; Frost, A.R.; Falany, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Sulfation is an important Phase II conjugation reaction involved in the synthesis and metabolism of steroids in humans. Two different isoforms (2B1a and 2B1b) are encoded by the sulfotransferase (SULT) 2B1 gene utilizing different start sites of transcription resulting in the incorporation of different first exons. SULT2B1a and SULT2B1b are 350 and 365 amino acids in length, respectively, and the last 342 aa are identical. Message for both SULT2B1 isoforms is present in human tissues although SULT2B1b message is generally more abundant. However, to date only SULT2B1b protein has been detected in human tissues or cell lines. SULT2B1b is localized in the cytosol and/or nuclei of human cells. A unique 3′-extension of SULT2B1b is required for nuclear localization in human BeWo placental choriocarcinoma cells. Nuclear localization is stimulated by forskolin treatment in BeWo cells and serine phosphorylation has been identified in the 3′-extension. SULT2B1b is selective for the sulfation of 3β-hydroxysteroids such as dehydroepiandrosterone and pregnenolone, and may also have a role in cholesterol sulfation in human skin. The substrate specificity, nuclear localization, and tissue localization of SULT2B1b suggest a role in regulating the responsiveness of cells to adrenal androgens via their direct inactivation or by preventing their conversion to more potent androgens and estrogens. PMID:17055258

  5. Reduction and alkaline hydrolysis of 5-oxoindeno(1,2-b)pyridinium salts

    SciTech Connect

    Mutsenietse, D.Kh.; Zandersons, A.Z.; Lusis, V.K.; Dubur, G.Ya.

    1987-07-01

    5,9b-dihydro derivatives of indeno(1,2-b)pyridine were obtained by the reduction of the corresponding 1,2-dimethyl-4-acryl-5-oxoindeno(1,2-b)pyridinium perchlorates. 1,2-dimethyl-3-ethoxycarbonyl-4-phenyl-5-oxoindeno(1,2-b)pyridinium perchlorate forms in alkaline medium with splitting, recyclization and deamination products.

  6. Solution structure of the isolated histone H2A-H2B heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Yoshihito; Yamane, Tsutomu; Ohtomo, Hideaki; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Kurita, Jun-Ichi; Sato, Masahiko; Nagadoi, Aritaka; Shimojo, Hideaki; Nishimura, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    During chromatin-regulated processes, the histone H2A-H2B heterodimer functions dynamically in and out of the nucleosome. Although detailed crystal structures of nucleosomes have been established, that of the isolated full-length H2A-H2B heterodimer has remained elusive. Here, we have determined the solution structure of human H2A-H2B by NMR coupled with CS-Rosetta. H2A and H2B each contain a histone fold, comprising four α-helices and two β-strands (α1-β1-α2-β2-α3-αC), together with the long disordered N- and C-terminal H2A tails and the long N-terminal H2B tail. The N-terminal αN helix, C-terminal β3 strand, and 310 helix of H2A observed in the H2A-H2B nucleosome structure are disordered in isolated H2A-H2B. In addition, the H2A α1 and H2B αC helices are not well fixed in the heterodimer, and the H2A and H2B tails are not completely random coils. Comparison of hydrogen-deuterium exchange, fast hydrogen exchange, and {(1)H}-(15)N hetero-nuclear NOE data with the CS-Rosetta structure indicates that there is some conformation in the H2A 310 helical and H2B Lys11 regions, while the repression domain of H2B (residues 27-34) exhibits an extended string-like structure. This first structure of the isolated H2A-H2B heterodimer provides insight into its dynamic functions in chromatin. PMID:27181506

  7. Loss-of-function mutations in SCN4A cause severe foetal hypokinesia or 'classical' congenital myopathy.

    PubMed

    Zaharieva, Irina T; Thor, Michael G; Oates, Emily C; van Karnebeek, Clara; Hendson, Glenda; Blom, Eveline; Witting, Nanna; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Gabbett, Michael T; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Sframeli, Maria; Suetterlin, Karen; Sarkozy, Anna; D'Argenzio, Luigi; Hartley, Louise; Matthews, Emma; Pitt, Matthew; Vissing, John; Ballegaard, Martin; Krarup, Christian; Slørdahl, Andreas; Halvorsen, Hanne; Ye, Xin Cynthia; Zhang, Lin-Hua; Løkken, Nicoline; Werlauff, Ulla; Abdelsayed, Mena; Davis, Mark R; Feng, Lucy; Phadke, Rahul; Sewry, Caroline A; Morgan, Jennifer E; Laing, Nigel G; Vallance, Hilary; Ruben, Peter; Hanna, Michael G; Lewis, Suzanne; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Männikkö, Roope; Muntoni, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Congenital myopathies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of muscle disorders characterized by congenital or early-onset hypotonia and muscle weakness, and specific pathological features on muscle biopsy. The phenotype ranges from foetal akinesia resulting in in utero or neonatal mortality, to milder disorders that are not life-limiting. Over the past decade, more than 20 new congenital myopathy genes have been identified. Most encode proteins involved in muscle contraction; however, mutations in ion channel-encoding genes are increasingly being recognized as a cause of this group of disorders. SCN4A encodes the α-subunit of the skeletal muscle voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav1.4). This channel is essential for the generation and propagation of the muscle action potential crucial to muscle contraction. Dominant SCN4A gain-of-function mutations are a well-established cause of myotonia and periodic paralysis. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified homozygous or compound heterozygous SCN4A mutations in a cohort of 11 individuals from six unrelated kindreds with congenital myopathy. Affected members developed in utero- or neonatal-onset muscle weakness of variable severity. In seven cases, severe muscle weakness resulted in death during the third trimester or shortly after birth. The remaining four cases had marked congenital or neonatal-onset hypotonia and weakness associated with mild-to-moderate facial and neck weakness, significant neonatal-onset respiratory and swallowing difficulties and childhood-onset spinal deformities. All four surviving cohort members experienced clinical improvement in the first decade of life. Muscle biopsies showed myopathic features including fibre size variability, presence of fibrofatty tissue of varying severity, without specific structural abnormalities. Electrophysiology suggested a myopathic process, without myotonia. In vitro functional assessment in HEK293 cells of the impact of the identified SCN4A

  8. The clinical pharmacogenetics implementation consortium guideline for SLCO1B1 and simvastatin-induced myopathy: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, L B; Johnson, S G; Caudle, K E; Haidar, C E; Voora, D; Wilke, R A; Maxwell, W D; McLeod, H L; Krauss, R M; Roden, D M; Feng, Q; Cooper-DeHoff, R M; Gong, L; Klein, T E; Wadelius, M; Niemi, M

    2014-10-01

    Simvastatin is among the most commonly used prescription medications for cholesterol reduction. A single coding single-nucleotide polymorphism, rs4149056T>C, in SLCO1B1 increases systemic exposure to simvastatin and the risk of muscle toxicity. We summarize evidence from the literature supporting this association and provide therapeutic recommendations for simvastatin based on SLCO1B1 genotype. This article is an update to the 2012 Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium guideline for SLCO1B1 and simvastatin-induced myopathy. PMID:24918167

  9. Characterization of acetylation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae H2B by mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kangling

    2008-11-01

    Following the identification of histone H3 modifications in Saccharomyces cerevisiae [K. Zhang, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 269 (2008) 101-111], here, we report a detailed characterization of post-translational modifications by LC/MS/MS analysis of tryptic and Glu-C digests of H2B proteins isolated from S. cerevisiae. We show that both H2B.1 and H2B.2 are acetylated at K6, K11, K16, K21 and K22 while H2B.2 has an additional acetylation site at K3. All the acetylation sites of yeast H2B except K3 of H2B.2 are located at the same positions on aligned protein sequences of Arabidopsis H2B variants that were reported previously to be acetylated at K6, K11, K27, K32, K38 and K39. A unique acetylation motif AEK is observed in the H2B variants of these two species, indicating a plant/yeast H2B specific acetyltransferase may exist.

  10. Mechanism-Based Inactivation of Human Cytochrome P450 2B6 by Chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, Jaime; Zhang, Haoming; Kenaan, Cesar; Hollenberg, Paul F

    2015-07-20

    Chlorpyrifos (CPS) is a commonly used pesticide which is metabolized by P450s into the toxic metabolite chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPO). Metabolism also results in the release of sulfur, which has been suggested to be involved in mechanism-based inactivation (MBI) of P450s. CYP2B6 was previously determined to have the greatest catalytic efficiency for CPO formation in vitro. Therefore, we characterized the MBI of CYP2B6 by CPS. CPS inactivated CYP2B6 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner with a kinact of 1.97 min(-1), a KI of 0.47 μM, and a partition ratio of 17.7. We further evaluated the ability of other organophosphate pesticides including chorpyrifos-methyl, diazinon, parathion-methyl, and azinophos-methyl to inactivate CYP2B6. These organophosphate pesticides were also potent MBIs of CYP2B6 characterized by similar kinact and KI values. The inactivation of CYP2B6 by CPS was accompanied by the loss of P450 detectable in the CO reduced spectrum and loss of detectable heme. High molecular weight aggregates were observed when inactivated CYP2B6 was run on SDS-PAGE gels indicating protein aggregation. Interestingly, we found that the rat homologue of CYP2B6, CYP2B1, was not inactivated by CPS despite forming CPO to a similar extent. On the basis of the locations of the Cys residues in the two proteins which could react with released sulfur during the metabolism of CPS, we investigated whether the C475 in CYP2B6, which is not conserved in CYP2B1, was the critical residue for inactivation by mutating it to a Ser. CYP2B6 C475S was inactivated to a similar extent as wild type CYP2B6 indicating that C475 is not likely the key difference between CYP2B1 and CYP2B6 with respect to inactivation. These results indicate that CPS and other organophosphate pesticides are potent MBIs of CYP2B6 which may have implications for the toxicity of these pesticides as well as the potential for pesticide-drug interactions. PMID:26075493

  11. Progress in Diagnosing Mitochondrial Myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like Episodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Xin; Le, Wei-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) is a progressive, multisystem affected mitochondrial disease associated with a number of disease-related defective genes. MELAS has unpredictable presentations and clinical course, and it can be commonly misdiagnosed as encephalitis, cerebral infarction, or brain neoplasms. This review aimed to update the diagnosis progress in MELAS, which may provide better understanding of the disease nature and help make the right diagnosis as well. Data Sources: The data used in this review came from published peer review articles from October 1984 to October 2014, which were obtained from PubMed. The search term is “MELAS”. Study Selection: Information selected from those reported studies is mainly based on the progress on clinical features, blood biochemistry, neuroimaging, muscle biopsy, and genetics in diagnosing MELAS. Results: MELAS has a wide heterogeneity in genetics and clinical manifestations. The relationship between mutations and phenotypes remains unclear. Advanced serial functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide directional information on this disease. Muscle biopsy has meaningful value in diagnosing MELAS, which shows the presence of ragged red fibers and mosaic appearance of cytochrome oxidase negative fibers. Genetic studies have reported that approximately 80% of MELAS cases are caused by the mutation m.3243A>G of the mitochondrial transfer RNA (Leu (UUR)) gene (MT-TL1). Conclusions: MELAS involves multiple systems with variable clinical symptoms and recurrent episodes. The prognosis of MELAS patients depends on timely diagnosis. Therefore, overall diagnosis of MELAS should be based on the maternal inheritance family history, clinical manifestation, and findings from serial MRI, muscle biopsy, and genetics. PMID:26112726

  12. The phenotypic spectrum of neutral lipid storage myopathy due to mutations in the PNPLA2 gene.

    PubMed

    Reilich, Peter; Horvath, Rita; Krause, Sabine; Schramm, Nicolai; Turnbull, Doug M; Trenell, Michael; Hollingsworth, Kieren G; Gorman, Grainne S; Hans, Volkmar H; Reimann, Jens; MacMillan, Andrée; Turner, Lesley; Schollen, Annette; Witte, Gregor; Czermin, Birgit; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Walter, Maggie C; Schoser, Benedikt; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2011-11-01

    Neutral lipid storage disease is caused by mutations in the CGI-58 or the PNPLA2 genes. Lipid storage can be detected in various cell types including blood granulocytes. While CGI-58 mutations are associated with Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome, a condition characterized by lipid storage and skin involvement (ichthyosis), mutations in the patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 2 gene (PNPLA2) were reported with skeletal and cardiac muscle disease only. We describe clinical, myopathological, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and genetic findings of six patients carrying different recessive PNPLA2 mutations. Pulse-chase labeling of control and patient cells with supplementation of clenbuterol, salmeterol, and dexamethasone was performed in vitro. The patients share a recognizable phenotype with prominent shoulder girdle weakness and mild pelvic girdle and distal muscle weakness, with highly elevated creatine kinase (CK) and cardiomyopathy developing at later stages. Muscle histology invariably reveals massive accumulation of lipid droplets. New muscle or whole-body MRI techniques may assist diagnosis and may become a useful tool to quantify intramuscular lipid storage. Four novel and two previously reported mutations were detected, affecting different parts of the PNPLA2 gene. Activation of hormone-sensitive lipase by beta-adrenergic substances such as clenbuterol appears to bypass the enzymatic block in PNPLA2-deficient patient cells in vitro. PNPLA2 deficiency is a slowly progressive myopathy with onset around the third decade. Cardiac involvement is relatively common at a later stage. Muscle MRI may detect increased lipid in a characteristic distribution, which could be used for monitoring disease progression. Beta-adrenergic agents may be beneficial in improving triacylglycerol breakdown in patients with PNPLA2 mutations. PMID:21544567

  13. Effect of L-carnitine on exercise performance in patients with mitochondrial myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gimenes, A.C.; Bravo, D.M.; Nápolis, L.M.; Mello, M.T.; Oliveira, A.S.B.; Neder, J.A.; Nery, L.E.

    2015-01-01

    Exercise intolerance due to impaired oxidative metabolism is a prominent symptom in patients with mitochondrial myopathy (MM), but it is still uncertain whether L-carnitine supplementation is beneficial for patients with MM. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of L-carnitine on exercise performance in MM. Twelve MM subjects (mean age±SD=35.4±10.8 years) with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) were first compared to 10 healthy controls (mean age±SD=29±7.8 years) before they were randomly assigned to receive L-carnitine supplementation (3 g/daily) or placebo in a double-blind crossover design. Clinical status, body composition, respiratory function tests, peripheral muscle strength (isokinetic and isometric torque) and cardiopulmonary exercise tests (incremental to peak exercise and at 70% of maximal), constant work rate (CWR) exercise test, to the limit of tolerance [Tlim]) were assessed after 2 months of L-carnitine/placebo administration. Patients with MM presented with lower mean height, total body weight, fat-free mass, and peripheral muscle strength compared to controls in the pre-test evaluation. After L-carnitine supplementation, the patients with MM significantly improved their Tlim (14±1.9 vs 11±1.4 min) and oxygen consumption (V˙O2) at CWR exercise, both at isotime (1151±115 vs 1049±104 mL/min) and at Tlim (1223±114 vs 1060±108 mL/min). These results indicate that L-carnitine supplementation may improve aerobic capacity and exercise tolerance during high-intensity CWRs in MM patients with CPEO. PMID:25714882

  14. Reliability of the Adult Myopathy Assessment Tool in Individuals with Myositis

    PubMed Central

    Harris-Love, Michael O.; Joe, Galen; Davenport, Todd E.; Koziol, Deloris; Rose, Kristen Abbett; Shrader, Joseph A.; Vasconcelos, Olavo M.; McElroy, Beverly; Dalakas, Marinos C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The Adult Myopathy Assessment Tool (AMAT) is a 13-item performance-based battery developed to assess functional status and muscle endurance. The purpose of this study was to determine the intrarater and interrater reliability of the AMAT in adults with myosits. Methods Nineteen raters (13 physical therapists and 6 physicians) scored videotaped recordings of patients with myositis performing the AMAT for a total of 114 tests and 1,482 item observations per session. Raters rescored the AMAT test and item observations during a follow up session (19 ±6 days between scoring sessions). All raters completed a single, self-directed, electronic training module prior to the initial scoring session. Results Intrarater and interrater reliability correlation coefficients were .94 or greater for the AMAT Functional Subscale, Endurance Subscale, and Total score (all p < 0.02 for Ho:ρ ≤ 0.75). All AMAT items had satisfactory intrarater agreement (Kappa statistics with Fleiss-Cohen weights, Kw = .57-1.00). Interrater agreement was acceptable for each AMAT item (K = .56-.89) except the sit up (K = .16). The standard error of measurement and 95% confidence interval range for the AMAT Total scores did not exceed 2 points across all observations (AMAT Total score range = 0-45). Conclusions The AMAT is a reliable, domain-specific assessment of functional status and muscle endurance for adult subjects with myositis. Results of this study suggest that physicians and physical therapists may reliably score the AMAT following a single training session. The AMAT Functional Subscale, Endurance Subscale, and Total score exhibit interrater and intrarater reliability suitable for clinical and research use. PMID:25201624

  15. Novel myopathy in a newborn with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome and review of neonatal presentation.

    PubMed

    Topa, Alexandra; Tulinius, Mar; Oldfors, Anders; Hedberg-Oldfors, Carola

    2016-05-01

    Shwachman-Diamond-Bodian syndrome (SDS) is a pleiotropic disorder in which the main features are bone marrow dysfunction and pancreatic insufficiency. Skeletal changes can occur, and in rare cases manifest as severe congenital thoracic dystrophy. We report a newborn boy with asphyxia, narrow thorax, and severe hypotonia initially suggesting a neuromuscular disease. The muscle biopsy showed myopathic changes with prominent variability in muscle fiber size and abnormal expression of developmental isoforms of myosin. The myofibrils showed focal loss and disorganization of myofilaments, and thickening of the Z-discs including some abortive nemaline rods. The boy became permanently dependent on assisted ventilation. Pancreatic insufficiency was subsequently diagnosed, explaining the malabsorption and failure to thrive. Except transitory thrombocytopenia and leukopenia, no major hematological abnormalities were noted. He had bilateral nephrocalcinosis with preserved renal function. Transitory liver dysfunction with elevated transaminase levels and parenchymal changes on ultrasound were registered. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed by detection of compound heterozygous mutations in SBDS using whole-exome sequencing: a recurrent intronic mutation causing aberrant splicing (c.258+2T>C) and a novel missense variant in a highly conserved codon (c.41A>G, p.Asn14Ser), considered to be damaging for the protein structure by in silico prediction programs. The carrier status of the parents has been confirmed. This case illustrates the challenges in differential diagnosis of pronounced neonatal hypotonia with asphyxia and highlights the muscular involvement in SDS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of myopathy evidenced in a patient with clinically and molecularly confirmed SDS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26866830

  16. Identification of 45 novel mutations in the nebulin gene associated with autosomal recessive nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Pelin, Katarina; Sandbacka, Maria; Ranta, Salla; Donner, Kati; Muntoni, Francesco; Sewry, Caroline; Angelini, Corrado; Bushby, Kate; Van den Bergh, Peter; Iannaccone, Susan; Laing, Nigel G; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2006-09-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder of skeletal muscle caused by mutations in at least five different genes encoding thin filament proteins of the striated muscle sarcomere. We have previously described 18 different mutations in the last 42 exons of the nebulin gene (NEB) in 18 families with NM. Here we report 45 novel NEB mutations detected by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC) and sequence analysis of all 183 NEB exons in NM patients from 44 families. Altogether we have identified, including the deletion of exon 55 identified in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, 64 different mutations in NEB segregating with autosomal recessive NM in 55 families. The majority (55%) of the mutations in NEB are frameshift or nonsense mutations predicted to cause premature truncation of nebulin. Point mutations (25%) or deletions (3%) affecting conserved splice signals are predicted in the majority of cases to cause in-frame exon skipping, possibly leading to impaired nebulin-tropomyosin interaction along the thin filament. Patients in 18 families had one of nine missense mutations (14%) affecting conserved amino acids at or in the vicinity of actin or tropomyosin binding sites. In addition, we found the exon 55 deletion in four families. The majority of the patients (in 49/55 families) were shown to be compound heterozygous for two different mutations. The mutations were found in both constitutively and alternatively expressed exons throughout the NEB gene, and there were no obvious mutational hotspots. Patients with more severe clinical pictures tended to have mutations predicted to be more disruptive than patients with milder forms. PMID:16917880

  17. Identification of a founder mutation in TPM3 in nemaline myopathy patients of Turkish origin.

    PubMed

    Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Pelin, Katarina; Donner, Kati; Voit, Thomas; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Stoetter, Mechthild; Talim, Beril; Topaloglu, Haluk; Laing, Nigel G; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2008-09-01

    To date, six genes are known to cause nemaline (rod) myopathy (NM), a rare congenital neuromuscular disorder. In an attempt to find a seventh gene, we performed linkage and subsequent sequence analyses in 12 Turkish families with recessive NM. We found homozygosity in two of the families at 1q12-21.2, a region encompassing the gamma-tropomyosin gene (TPM3) encoding slow skeletal muscle alpha-tropomyosin, a known NM gene. Sequencing revealed homozygous deletion of the first nucleotide of the last exon, c.913delA of TPM3 in both families. The mutation removes the last nucleotide before the stop codon, causing a frameshift and readthrough across the termination signal. The encoded alphaTm(slow) protein is predicted to be 73 amino acids longer than normal, and the extension to the protein is hypothesised to be unable to form a coiled coil. The resulting tropomyosin protein may therefore be non-functional. The affected children in both families were homozygous for the mutation, while the healthy parents were mutation carriers. Both of the patients in Family 1 had the severe form of NM, and also an unusual chest deformity. The affected children in Family 2 had the intermediate form of NM. Muscle biopsies showed type 1 (slow) fibres to be markedly smaller than type 2 (fast) fibres. Previously, there had been five reports, only, of NM caused by mutations in TPM3. The mutation reported here is the first deletion to be identified in TPM3, and it is likely to be a founder mutation in the Turkish population. PMID:18382475

  18. COLQ variant associated with Devon Rex and Sphynx feline hereditary myopathy.

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, Barbara; Grahn, Robert A; Creighton, Erica K; Williams, D Colette; Dickinson, Peter J; Sturges, Beverly K; Guo, Ling T; Shelton, G Diane; Leegwater, Peter A J; Longeri, Maria; Malik, Richard; Lyons, Leslie A

    2015-12-01

    Some Devon Rex and Sphynx cats have a variably progressive myopathy characterized by appendicular and axial muscle weakness, megaesophagus, pharyngeal weakness and fatigability with exercise. Muscle biopsies from affected cats demonstrated variable pathological changes ranging from dystrophic features to minimal abnormalities. Affected cats have exacerbation of weakness following anticholinesterase dosing, a clue that there is an underlying congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS). A genome-wide association study and whole-genome sequencing suggested a causal variant for this entity was a c.1190G>A variant causing a cysteine to tyrosine substitution (p.Cys397Tyr) within the C-terminal domain of collagen-like tail subunit (single strand of homotrimer) of asymmetric acetylcholinesterase (COLQ). Alpha-dystroglycan expression, which is associated with COLQ anchorage at the motor end-plate, has been shown to be deficient in affected cats. Eighteen affected cats were identified by genotyping, including cats from the original clinical descriptions in 1993 and subsequent publications. Eight Devon Rex and one Sphynx not associated with the study were identified as carriers, suggesting an allele frequency of ~2.0% in Devon Rex. Over 350 tested cats from other breeds did not have the variant. Characteristic clinical features and variant presence in all affected cats suggest a model for COLQ CMS. The association between the COLQ variant and this CMS affords clinicians the opportunity to confirm diagnosis via genetic testing and permits owners and breeders to identify carriers in the population. Moreover, accurate diagnosis increases available therapeutic options for affected cats based on an understanding of the pathophysiology and experience from human CMS associated with COLQ variants. PMID:26374066

  19. A TALEN-Exon Skipping Design for a Bethlem Myopathy Model in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Radev, Zlatko; Hermel, Jean-Michel; Elipot, Yannick; Bretaud, Sandrine; Arnould, Sylvain; Duchateau, Philippe; Ruggiero, Florence; Joly, Jean-Stéphane; Sohm, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Presently, human collagen VI-related diseases such as Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) and Bethlem myopathy (BM) remain incurable, emphasizing the need to unravel their etiology and improve their treatments. In UCMD, symptom onset occurs early, and both diseases aggravate with ageing. In zebrafish fry, morpholinos reproduced early UCMD and BM symptoms but did not allow to study the late phenotype. Here, we produced the first zebrafish line with the human mutation frequently found in collagen VI-related disorders such as UCMD and BM. We used a transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) to design the col6a1ama605003-line with a mutation within an essential splice donor site, in intron 14 of the col6a1 gene, which provoke an in-frame skipping of exon 14 in the processed mRNA. This mutation at a splice donor site is the first example of a template-independent modification of splicing induced in zebrafish using a targetable nuclease. This technique is readily expandable to other organisms and can be instrumental in other disease studies. Histological and ultrastructural analyzes of homozygous and heterozygous mutant fry and 3 months post-fertilization (mpf) fish revealed co-dominantly inherited abnormal myofibers with disorganized myofibrils, enlarged sarcoplasmic reticulum, altered mitochondria and misaligned sarcomeres. Locomotion analyzes showed hypoxia-response behavior in 9 mpf col6a1 mutant unseen in 3 mpf fish. These symptoms worsened with ageing as described in patients with collagen VI deficiency. Thus, the col6a1ama605003-line is the first adult zebrafish model of collagen VI-related diseases; it will be instrumental both for basic research and drug discovery assays focusing on this type of disorders. PMID:26221953

  20. A TALEN-Exon Skipping Design for a Bethlem Myopathy Model in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Elipot, Yannick; Bretaud, Sandrine; Arnould, Sylvain; Duchateau, Philippe; Ruggiero, Florence; Joly, Jean-Stéphane; Sohm, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Presently, human collagen VI-related diseases such as Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) and Bethlem myopathy (BM) remain incurable, emphasizing the need to unravel their etiology and improve their treatments. In UCMD, symptom onset occurs early, and both diseases aggravate with ageing. In zebrafish fry, morpholinos reproduced early UCMD and BM symptoms but did not allow to study the late phenotype. Here, we produced the first zebrafish line with the human mutation frequently found in collagen VI-related disorders such as UCMD and BM. We used a transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) to design the col6a1ama605003-line with a mutation within an essential splice donor site, in intron 14 of the col6a1 gene, which provoke an in-frame skipping of exon 14 in the processed mRNA. This mutation at a splice donor site is the first example of a template-independent modification of splicing induced in zebrafish using a targetable nuclease. This technique is readily expandable to other organisms and can be instrumental in other disease studies. Histological and ultrastructural analyzes of homozygous and heterozygous mutant fry and 3 months post-fertilization (mpf) fish revealed co-dominantly inherited abnormal myofibers with disorganized myofibrils, enlarged sarcoplasmic reticulum, altered mitochondria and misaligned sarcomeres. Locomotion analyzes showed hypoxia-response behavior in 9 mpf col6a1 mutant unseen in 3 mpf fish. These symptoms worsened with ageing as described in patients with collagen VI deficiency. Thus, the col6a1ama605003-line is the first adult zebrafish model of collagen VI-related diseases; it will be instrumental both for basic research and drug discovery assays focusing on this type of disorders. PMID:26221953